WorldWideScience

Sample records for handed material optical

  1. Controllable optical black hole in left-handed materials.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bai, Qiang; Chen, Jing; Shen, Nian-Hai; Cheng, Chen; Wang, Hui-Tian

    2010-02-01

    Halting and storing light by infinitely decelerating its speed, in the absence of any form of external control, is extremely di+/-cult to imagine. Here we present a theoretical prediction of a controllable optical black hole composed of a planar left-handed material slab. We reveal a criterion that the effective round-trip propagation length in one zigzag path is zero, which brings light to a complete standstill. Both theory and ab initio simulation demonstrate that this optical black hole has degrees flexible controllability for the speed of light. Surprisingly, the ab initio simulations reveal that our scheme has degrees flexible controllability for swallowing, holding, and releasing light.

  2. Left handed composite materials in the optical range

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Voskoboynikova, O.; Dyankov, G.; Wijers, Christianus M.J.

    2005-01-01

    The purpose of this paper is to show that semiconductor nano-structures built from non-magnetic InAs/GaAs nano-rings can exhibit simultaneously negative effective permittivity and permeability over a certain optical frequency range. The structures are resonant and have this property near the edge of

  3. Organic nonlinear optical materials

    Science.gov (United States)

    Umegaki, S.

    1987-01-01

    Recently, it became clear that organic compounds with delocalized pi electrons show a great nonlinear optical response. Especially, secondary nonlinear optical constants of more than 2 digits were often seen in the molecular level compared to the existing inorganic crystals such as LiNbO3. The crystallization was continuously tried. Organic nonlinear optical crystals have a new future as materials for use in the applied physics such as photomodulation, optical frequency transformation, opto-bistabilization, and phase conjugation optics. Organic nonlinear optical materials, e.g., urea, O2NC6H4NH2, I, II, are reviewed with 50 references.

  4. Infrared fiber optic materials

    Science.gov (United States)

    Feigelson, Robert S.

    1987-01-01

    The development of IR fiber optics for use in astronomical and other space applications is summarized. Candidate materials were sought for use in the 1 to 200 micron and the 200 to 1000 micron wavelength range. Synthesis and optical characterization were carried out on several of these materials in bulk form. And the fabrication of a few materials in single crystal fiber optic form were studied.

  5. Hands-on Optics training courses for school teachers

    Science.gov (United States)

    M. Costa, Manuel F.; Vazquez-Dorrio, José B.

    2009-06-01

    For long time optics' scientists all around the world realised the importance to the development of optics of providing our school students a good effective education in optics. A large range of quality educational support materials was developed and is readily available. Fortunately this is also true in what concerns materials to be used in hands-on experiments based learning covering virtually all fields of optics and also intended or adapted for use at all school levels. Recent trends in educational policies are given science education an increasing importance within school' curricula. Furthers efforts must be developed in order to increase the importance of optics in school syllabus and generalize it throughout all school levels, while guaranteeing a quality effective education. This demands a strong focus on an active investigative hands-on experiments based study of the different subjects of light and optics by the students at the classroom in formal context but also in different informal activities. In this process the role of the teacher is of crucial importance. Quite often, however, teachers are not adequately trained in this type of pedagogic approach and frequently feel the need of further training in these issues but also on the recent advances of optics and photonics. In other to tackle this need a number of different training courses for school teachers, from pre-school to highschool and vocational training schools, were designed and will be presented and discussed in this communication.

  6. Hands-on optics: an informal science education initiative

    Science.gov (United States)

    Johnson, Anthony M.; Pompea, Stephen M.; Arthurs, Eugene G.; Walker, Constance E.; Sparks, Robert T.

    2007-09-01

    The project is collaboration between two scientific societies, the Optical Society of America (OSA) and SPIE - The International Society for Optical Engineering and the National Optical Astronomy Observatory (NOAO). The program is designed to bring science education enrichment to thousands of underrepresented middle school students in more than ten states, including female and minority students, who typically have not been the beneficiaries of science and engineering resources and investments. HOO provides each teacher with up to six activity modules, each containing enough materials for up to 30 students to participate in 6-8 hours of hands-on optics-related activities. Sample activities, developed by education specialists at NOAO, include building kaleidoscopes and telescopes, communicating with a beam of light, and a hit-the-target laser beam challenge. Teachers engage in two days of training and, where possible, are partnered with a local optics professional (drawn from the local rosters of SPIE and OSA members) who volunteers to spend time with the teacher and students as they explore the module activities. Through these activities, students gain experience and understanding of optics principles, as well as learning the basics of inquiry, critical thinking, and problem solving skills involving optics, and how optics interfaces with other disciplines. While the modules were designed for use in informal after- school or weekend sessions, the number of venues has expanded to large and small science centers, Boys and Girls Clubs, Girl Scouts, summer camps, family workshops, and use in the classroom.

  7. Optical properties of advanced materials

    CERN Document Server

    Kajikawa, Kotaro

    2013-01-01

    In the last decade, optically functionalized materials have developed rapidly, from bulk matters to structured forms. Now we have a rich variety of attractive advanced materials. They are applied to optical and electrical devices that support the information communication technology in the mid 21-th century. Accordingly, it is quite important to have a broad knowledge of the optical properties of advanced materials for students, scientists and engineers working in optics and related fields. This book is designed to teach fundamental optical properties of such advanced materials effectively. These materials have their own peculiarities which are very interesting in modern optical physics and also for applications because the concepts of optical properties are quite different from those in conventional optical materials. Hence each chapter starts to review the basic concepts of the materials briefly and proceeds to the practical use. The important topics covered in this book include:  quantum structures of sem...

  8. Nonlinear Optical Properties of Materials

    CERN Document Server

    Ganeev, Rashid A

    2013-01-01

    This book is mostly concerned on the experimental research of the nonlinear optical characteristics of various media, low- and high-order harmonic generation in different materials, and formation, and nonlinear optical characterization of clusters. We also demonstrate the inter-connection between these areas of nonlinear optics.   Nonlinear optical properties of media such as optical limiting can be applied in various areas of science and technology. To define suitable materials for these applications, one has to carefully analyse the nonlinear optical characteristics of various media, such as the nonlinear refractive indices, coefficients of nonlinear absorption, saturation absorption intensities, etc. Knowing the nonlinear optical parameters of materials is also important for describing the propagation effects, self-interaction of intense laser pulses, and optimisation of various nonlinear optical processes. Among those processes one can admit the importance of the studies of the frequency conversion of c...

  9. Satellite material contaminant optical properties

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wood, B. E.; Bertrand, W. T.; Seiber, B. L.; Kiech, E. L.; Falco, P. M.; Holt, J. D.

    1990-01-01

    The Air Force Wright Research and Development Center and the Arnold Engineering Development Center are continuing a program for measuring optical effects of satellite material outgassing products on cryo-optic surfaces. Presented here are infrared (4000 to 700 cm(-1)) transmittance data for contaminant films condensed on a 77 K geranium window. From the transmittance data, the contaminant film refractive and absorptive indices (n, k) were derived using an analytical thin-film interference model with a nonlinear least-squares algorithm. To date 19 materials have been studied with the optical contents determined for 13 of those. The materials include adhesives, paints, composites, films, and lubricants. This program is continuing and properties for other materials will be available in the future.

  10. HANDS-ON MATERIALS AS INVITATION TO A FANTASY WORLD

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ejersbo, Lisser Rye

    In this article I wish to introduce an innovative use of hands-on-materials, developed by Peter Müller, a Danish elementary school teacher. The hands-on material itself consists of a collection of small plastic bears in different colors and sizes, which can be used for many different purposes among...

  11. Materials Discovery: Informatic Strategies for Optical Materials

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ferris, Kim F.; Webb-Robertson, Bobbie-Jo M.; Jones, Dumont M.

    2007-01-15

    Information-based materials discovery offers a structured method to evolve materials signatures based upon their physical properties, and to direct searches using performance-based criteria. In this current paper, we focus on the crystal structure aspects of an optical material and construct an information-based model to determine the proclivity of a particular AB composition to exhibit multiple crystal system behavior. Exploratory data methods used both supervised (support-vector machines) and unsupervised (disorder-reduction and principal-component) classification methods for structural signature development; revealing complementary valid signatures. Examination of the relative contributions of the materials chemistry descriptors within these signatures indicates a strong role for Mendeleev number chemistry which must be balanced against the cationic/anionic radius ratio and electronegativity differences of constituents within the unit cell.

  12. Optical Spectroscopy of New Materials

    Science.gov (United States)

    White, Susan M.; Arnold, James O. (Technical Monitor)

    1993-01-01

    Composites are currently used for a rapidly expanding number of applications including aircraft structures, rocket nozzles, thermal protection of spacecraft, high performance ablative surfaces, sports equipment including skis, tennis rackets and bicycles, lightweight automobile components, cutting tools, and optical-grade mirrors. Composites are formed from two or more insoluble materials to produce a material with superior properties to either component. Composites range from dispersion-hardened alloys to advanced fiber-reinforced composites. UV/VIS and FTIR spectroscopy currently is used to evaluate the bonding between the matrix and the fibers, monitor the curing process of a polymer, measure surface contamination, characterize the interphase material, monitor anion transport in polymer phases, characterize the void formation (voids must be minimized because, like cracks in a bulk material, they lead to failure), characterize the surface of the fiber component, and measure the overall optical properties for energy balances.

  13. How better availability of materials improved hand-hygiene compliance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Azlz, Ann-Marie

    Hand hygiene is one of the most effective measures for preventing infections. The annual NHS staff survey in England provides national and local data on how staff feel about working in the NHS. It also provides staff with the opportunity to give their views on the availability of hand-washing materials. The infection prevention and control team at an NHS trust decided a review was required on this issue. This review assessed the availability of hand-washing materials and alcohol handrub on wards and at ward entrances. Three community buildings and 31 wards were reviewed. The audit results showed the availability of hand-washing materials was good in 30 out of 34 areas. Staff on both wards and in the community buildings highlighted what other materials were required for hand hygiene, and steps were made to provide these. The audit allowed hand-hygiene practices to be benchmarked across the trust and increased staff awareness of improving hand hygiene. As a result of this audit, the hand-hygiene compliance score increased from 80% to 95%.

  14. Hands-on optics and photonics outreach in Riga

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lesina, Natalija; Spigulis, Janis

    2014-07-01

    A long-term exposition focused on optics and photonics was created in Institute of Atomic Physics and Spectroscopy at University of Latvia in 2010. Considering unpopularity of science in Latvia and lack of broadly accessible hands-on outreach activities for school children, as well as rapid development of advanced photonic technologies, this exposition was meant to involve more students to the natural sciences and modern technologies. Exposition covers 10 topics of optics - colors, diffraction, interference, polarization, reflection, liquid crystals, gas discharge, lasers, fluorescence, infrared and ultraviolet radiation. Students' visits are organized as an exciting adventure, which differs from ordinary school lessons. The visit mainly includes own actions with hands-on exhibits, lecturer's explanations about the most difficult topics and some demonstrations shown by the lecturer. The main accent is made on hands-on experiments due to the fact that students, who had performed hands-on experiments, will be emboldened to choose their career in the field of science and technologies. The exposition now is running and is part of Riga Photonics Center. Nearly 300 students from the 8th till 12th grades visited it during academic years 2011/2012 and 2012/2013 and their generally positive feedback has been analyzed.

  15. Nonlinear optical properties of composite materials

    Science.gov (United States)

    Haus, Joseph W.; Inguva, Ramarao

    1991-01-01

    The optical properties of a new class of composite nonlinear materials composed of coated grains, such as cadmium sulfide with a silver coating, are examined. These materials exhibit intrinsic optical bistability and resonantly enhanced conjugate reflectivity. The threshold for intrinsic optical bistability is low enough for practical applications in optical communications and optical computing. Some problems associated with the fabrication of these materials are addressed. Based on preliminary results, switching times are expected to be in the subpicosecond range.

  16. New Electromagnetic Absorbers Composed of Left-handed and Right-handed Materials

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fang, Weihai; Xu, Shanjia

    2008-08-01

    New double-layered electromagnetic absorbers are presented in this paper. The new absorbers composed of one lossy left-handed material absorbing layer and one impedance matching layer consisted of lossless right-handed material. It is indicated that the reflection loss of below -20dB can be obtained in the frequency range 7GHz 13GHz. Power attenuation achieving -50dB of narrow frequency band electromagnetic absorbers can also be obtained by modulate permittivity of right-handed material. Furthermore, the thickness of the whole absorbing structure is only 2mm, which is particularly helpful in some practical applications. The presented results are of reference significance for accurate design of the new electromagnetic absorbers and of practical prospects for stealth technology.

  17. Optimization of skewed omega for left-handed material characteristics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Panda, Asit K.; Sahu, Sudhakar; Mishra, Rabindra K.

    2015-01-01

    Artificial neural network and simulated annealing are applied to obtain optimized design parameters of skewed omega-shaped metamaterial unit cells for providing left-handed material (LHM) with a negative refractive index. The implemented numerical and experimental methods provide evidence for the validity and practicality of the technique. Simulation, with optimized parameters, using CST Microwave Studio, shows that skewed LHMs are low-loss materials.

  18. Perspective and potential of smart optical materials

    Science.gov (United States)

    Choi, Sang H.; Duzik, Adam J.; Kim, Hyun-Jung; Park, Yeonjoon; Kim, Jaehwan; Ko, Hyun-U.; Kim, Hyun-Chan; Yun, Sungryul; Kyung, Ki-Uk

    2017-09-01

    The increasing requirements of hyperspectral imaging optics, electro/photo-chromic materials, negative refractive index metamaterial optics, and miniaturized optical components from micro-scale to quantum-scale optics have all contributed to new features and advancements in optics technology. Development of multifunctional capable optics has pushed the boundaries of optics into new fields that require new disciplines and materials to maximize the potential benefits. The purpose of this study is to understand and show the fundamental materials and fabrication technology for field-controlled spectrally active optics (referred to as smart optics) that are essential for future industrial, scientific, military, and space applications, such as membrane optics, filters, windows for sensors and probes, telescopes, spectroscopes, cameras, light valves, light switches, and flat-panel displays. The proposed smart optics are based on the Stark and Zeeman effects in materials tailored with quantum dot arrays and thin films made from readily polarizable materials via ferroelectricity or ferromagnetism. Bound excitonic states of organic crystals are also capable of optical adaptability, tunability, and reconfigurability. To show the benefits of smart optics, this paper reviews spectral characteristics of smart optical materials and device technology. Experiments testing the quantum-confined Stark effect, arising from rare earth element doping effects in semiconductors, and applied electric field effects on spectral and refractive index are discussed. Other bulk and dopant materials were also discovered to have the same aspect of shifts in spectrum and refractive index. Other efforts focus on materials for creating field-controlled spectrally smart active optics on a selected spectral range. Surface plasmon polariton transmission of light through apertures is also discussed, along with potential applications. New breakthroughs in micro scale multiple zone plate optics as a micro

  19. The inhalation of radioactive materials as related to hand contamination

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bailey, J.C.; Rohr, R.C.

    1953-09-15

    Tests performed to determine the hazard associated with the inhalation of radioactive materials as the result of smoking with contaminated hands indicate that for dry uranium compounds adhering to the palmar surfaces of the hands, approximately 1.0% of the material may be transferred to a cigarette, and that of this approximately 0.2% may appear in the smoke which is inhaled. Most of the contamination originally placed in a cigarette was found in the ash, and only 11% of the material was not recovered following burning; approximately half of this loss may be attributed to normal losses inherent in the analytical process, the recovery efficiency for which was found by supplementary experiments to be 95%.

  20. Rotational Doppler effect in left-handed materials

    OpenAIRE

    Luo, Hailu; Wen, Shuangchun; Shu, Weixing; Tang, Zhixiang; Zou, Yanhong; Fan, Dianyuan

    2008-01-01

    We explain the rotational Doppler effect associated with light beams carrying with orbital angular momentum in left-handed materials (LHMs). We demonstrate that the rotational Doppler effect in LHMs is unreversed, which is significantly different from the linear Doppler effect. The physics underlying this intriguing effect is the combined contributions of negative phase velocity and inverse screw of wave-front. In the normal dispersion region, the rotational Doppler effect induces a upstream ...

  1. Photorefractive optics materials, properties, and applications

    CERN Document Server

    Yu, Francis T S

    1999-01-01

    The advances of photorefractive optics have demonstrated many useful and practical applications, which include the development of photorefractive optic devices for computer communication needs. To name a couple significant applications: the large capacity optical memory, which can greatly improve the accessible high-speed CD-ROM and the dynamic photorefractive gratings, which can be used for all-optic switches for high-speed fiber optic networks. This book is an important reference both for technical and non-technical staffs who are interested in this field. * Covers the recent development in materials, phenomena, and applications * Includes growth, characterization, dynamic gratings, and liquid crystal PR effect * Includes applications to photonic devices such as large capacity optical memory, 3-D interconnections, and dynamic holograms * Provides the recent overall picture of current trends in photorefractive optics * Includes optical and electronic properties of the materials as applied to dynamic photoref...

  2. Bio-Optics and Bio-Inspired Optical Materials.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tadepalli, Sirimuvva; Slocik, Joseph M; Gupta, Maneesh K; Naik, Rajesh R; Singamaneni, Srikanth

    2017-10-25

    Through the use of the limited materials palette, optimally designed micro- and nanostructures, and tightly regulated processes, nature demonstrates exquisite control of light-matter interactions at various length scales. In fact, control of light-matter interactions is an important element in the evolutionary arms race and has led to highly engineered optical materials and systems. In this review, we present a detailed summary of various optical effects found in nature with a particular emphasis on the materials and optical design aspects responsible for their optical functionality. Using several representative examples, we discuss various optical phenomena, including absorption and transparency, diffraction, interference, reflection and antireflection, scattering, light harvesting, wave guiding and lensing, camouflage, and bioluminescence, that are responsible for the unique optical properties of materials and structures found in nature and biology. Great strides in understanding the design principles adapted by nature have led to a tremendous progress in realizing biomimetic and bioinspired optical materials and photonic devices. We discuss the various micro- and nanofabrication techniques that have been employed for realizing advanced biomimetic optical structures.

  3. Laser and nonlinear optical materials: SPIE volume 681

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    De Shazer, L.G.

    1987-01-01

    This book contains papers arranged under the following session headings: Nonlinear optical crystals; Laser host crystals; Electro-optic and magneto-optic materials; and Characterization of optical materials.

  4. Optical waveguides in hard crystalline materials

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Pollnau, Markus

    2005-01-01

    The recent results of our research group and collaborators in the field of fabrication, characterization, and applications of optical waveguides in hard crystalline materials, specifically in sapphire and Ti:sapphire, are reviewed.

  5. Laser-induced damage in optical materials

    CERN Document Server

    Ristau, Detlev

    2014-01-01

    Dedicated to users and developers of high-powered systems, Laser-Induced Damage in Optical Materials focuses on the research field of laser-induced damage and explores the significant and steady growth of applications for high-power lasers in the academic, industrial, and military arenas. Written by renowned experts in the field, this book concentrates on the major topics of laser-induced damage in optical materials and most specifically addresses research in laser damage that occurs in the bulk and on the surface or the coating of optical components. It considers key issues in the field of hi

  6. Laser and nonlinear optical materials

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    De Shazer, L.G.

    1986-01-01

    This book contains 21 papers. Some of the titles are: Frequency conversion materials from a device perspective; Recent developments in area; Recent developments in barium borate; Growth of laser crystals at Airtron; Crystal growth and the future of solid state lasers; Faraday rotator materials for laser systems; and Mechanical properties of single crystal ceramics.

  7. Gamma Radiation Studies on Optical Materials

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Spencer, J

    2004-02-05

    Results for the effects of gamma s on materials for a new laser-driven accelerator are presented. Various optical and laser materials are compared. While Si and fused c-SiO{sub 2} appear ideal for sub-bandgap laser wavelengths, other interesting candidates include certain fluorides and compound semiconductors.

  8. Optical properties of low-dimensional materials

    CERN Document Server

    Ogawa, T

    1998-01-01

    This book surveys recent theoretical and experimental studies of optical properties of low-dimensional materials. As an extended version of Optical Properties of Low-Dimensional Materials (Volume 1, published in 1995 by World Scientific), Volume 2 covers a wide range of interesting low-dimensional materials including both inorganic and organic systems, such as disordered polymers, deformable molecular crystals, dilute magnetic semiconductors, SiGe/Si short-period superlattices, GaAs quantum wires, semiconductor microcavities, and photonic crystals. There are excellent review articles by promis

  9. Materials Development for Next Generation Optical Fiber

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ballato, John; Dragic, Peter

    2014-01-01

    Optical fibers, the enablers of the Internet, are being used in an ever more diverse array of applications. Many of the rapidly growing deployments of fibers are in high-power and, particularly, high power-per-unit-bandwidth systems where well-known optical nonlinearities have historically not been especially consequential in limiting overall performance. Today, however, nominally weak effects, most notably stimulated Brillouin scattering (SBS) and stimulated Raman scattering (SRS) are among the principal phenomena restricting continued scaling to higher optical power levels. In order to address these limitations, the optical fiber community has focused dominantly on geometry-related solutions such as large mode area (LMA) designs. Since such scattering, and all other linear and nonlinear optical phenomena including higher order mode instability (HOMI), are fundamentally materials-based in origin, this paper unapologetically advocates material solutions to present and future performance limitations. As such, this paper represents a ‘call to arms’ for material scientists and engineers to engage in this opportunity to drive the future development of optical fibers that address many of the grand engineering challenges of our day. PMID:28788683

  10. Experimental Characterization of Nonlinear Optical Materials

    Science.gov (United States)

    Knox, Katie; Yang, Chuan; Liu, Zhiwen

    2009-10-01

    An optical system based on a half-wave plate-polarizer attenuator was designed to determine the transmitted light through materials that behave nonlinearly in the presence of high-energy picosecond laser pulses. The sample's nonlinear absorbance of a frequency-doubled Nd:YAG laser was measured as the energy of the incident light was regulated by the rotation of a half-wave plate. The optical system was used to measure the absorption of two linear samples as well as a nonlinear liquid crystal. Experimental results revealed that the optical material, which was composed of gold nanospheres in the nonlinear liquid L34, behaved as expected in the presence of lower input energies, but the attenuated beam did not reach a high enough energy to observe the full limiting effects of the nonlinear material.

  11. Tunable optical sensitivity of composite energetic materials

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rashkeev, Sergey; Wang, Fenggong; Tsyshevskiy, Roman; Kuklja, Maija; University of Maryland College Park Team

    Optical initiation to detonation of energetic materials is compelling because it opens up new ways for safe handling, storage, and use of high explosives. Despite this, laser irradiation has been mainly perceived as a source of heat for vibrational excitation rather than viable means of photo-stimulated initiation of energy release. Limitations of our knowledge on photo-stimulated energy release from high energy density materials hampers progress in design and manufacturing of efficient optical devices for energy storage and conversion. Here we show how electronic and optical properties of interfaces formed between nitro energetic materials and various metal oxides can be effectively tuned to achieve highly controllable surface chemistry. We discuss mechanisms of photo stimulated reactions triggered by defects on these interfaces. We demonstrate that the key in achieving tunable sensitivity is the proper alignment of the filled and vacant electronic states of oxide defects and energetic materials and provide guidelines for design composite energetic materials suitable for optical initiation. Research is supported by the US ONR (Grants N00014-16-1-2069 and N00014-16-1-2346) and NSF. We used NERSC, XSEDE and MARCC computational resources.

  12. Optical substrate materials for synchrotron radiation beamlines

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Howells, M.R. [Lawrence Berkeley National Lab., CA (United States). Advanced Light Source; Paquin, R.A. [Univ. of Arizona, Tucson, AZ (United States). Optical Sciences Center

    1997-06-01

    The authors consider the materials choices available for making optical substrates for synchrotron radiation beam lines. They find that currently the optical surfaces can only be polished to the required finish in fused silica and other glasses, silicon, CVD silicon carbide, electroless nickel and 17-4 PH stainless steel. Substrates must therefore be made of one of these materials or of a metal that can be coated with electroless nickel. In the context of material choices for mirrors they explore the issues of dimensional stability, polishing, bending, cooling, and manufacturing strategy. They conclude that metals are best from an engineering and cost standpoint while the ceramics are best from a polishing standpoint. They then give discussions of specific materials as follows: silicon carbide, silicon, electroless nickel, Glidcop{trademark}, aluminum, precipitation-hardening stainless steel, mild steel, invar and superinvar. Finally they summarize conclusions and propose ideas for further research.

  13. Advanced materials for integrated optical waveguides

    CERN Document Server

    Tong Ph D, Xingcun Colin

    2014-01-01

    This book provides a comprehensive introduction to integrated optical waveguides for information technology and data communications. Integrated coverage ranges from advanced materials, fabrication, and characterization techniques to guidelines for design and simulation. A concluding chapter offers perspectives on likely future trends and challenges. The dramatic scaling down of feature sizes has driven exponential improvements in semiconductor productivity and performance in the past several decades. However, with the potential of gigascale integration, size reduction is approaching a physical limitation due to the negative impact on resistance and inductance of metal interconnects with current copper-trace based technology. Integrated optics provides a potentially lower-cost, higher performance alternative to electronics in optical communication systems. Optical interconnects, in which light can be generated, guided, modulated, amplified, and detected, can provide greater bandwidth, lower power consumption, ...

  14. Optical Limiting Materials Based on Gold Nanoparticles

    Science.gov (United States)

    2014-04-30

    F. A Review of Optical Limiting Mechanisms and Devices Using Organics, Fullerenes , Semiconductors and Other Materials. Prog. Quant. Electr. 1993...information is estimated to average 1 hour per response, including the time for reviewing instructions, searching existing data sources, gathering...and maintaining the data needed, and completing and reviewing this collection of information. Send comments regarding this burden estimate or any

  15. Optical analysis for few TMDC materials

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Home; Journals; Bulletin of Materials Science; Volume 38; Issue 7. Optical analysis for few ... The direct and indirect energy gaps and phonon energies for all crystals have been estimated. The results obtained are ... Mehul Dave1. Natubhai V. Patel College of Pure and Applied Sciences, Vallabh Vidyanagar 388 120, India ...

  16. Exhibition: Fibre optics, the future is at hand

    CERN Multimedia

    Anaïs Schaeffer

    2012-01-01

    Until 20 June, the Pont de la Machine in Geneva will host an exhibition on fibre optics, sponsored by SIG. CERN, a major user of this technology, was invited to take part with a presentation of some of its scintillating fibre detectors.   The CERN module, designed for the SIG's fibre optics exhibition. Visitors can discover a cosmic ray detector (on the right) and its oscilloscope (on the left), as well as one of the ALFA detector modules (at the back). The Services industriels genevois (SIG), who are in the process of deploying an optical fibre network in Geneva, have decided to showcase this technology with an exhibition entitled “Fibre optique – Le futur à portée de main.” The exhibition, which will be open to the public from 26 April to 20 June, is being held at the Espace ExpoSIG, at the Pont de la Machine in the centre of Geneva. “CERN’s Physics Department was approached by SIG at the start of this year to ...

  17. Optical Material Characterization Using Microdisk Cavities

    Science.gov (United States)

    Michael, Christopher P.

    Since Jack Kilby recorded his "Monolithic Idea" for integrated circuits in 1958, microelectronics companies have invested billions of dollars in developing the silicon material system to increase performance and reduce cost. For decades, the industry has made Moore's Law, concerning cost and transistor density, a self-fulfilling prophecy by integrating technical and material requirements vertically down their supply chains and horizontally across competitors in the market. At recent technology nodes, the unacceptable scaling behavior of copper interconnects has become a major design constraint by increasing latency and power consumption---more than 50% of the power consumed by high speed processors is dissipated by intrachip communications. Optical networks at the chip scale are a potential low-power high-bandwidth replacement for conventional global interconnects, but the lack of efficient on-chip optical sources has remained an outstanding problem despite significant advances in silicon optoelectronics. Many material systems are being researched, but there is no ideal candidate even though the established infrastructure strongly favors a CMOS-compatible solution. This thesis focuses on assessing the optical properties of materials using microdisk cavities with the intention to advance processing techniques and materials relevant to silicon photonics. Low-loss microdisk resonators are chosen because of their simplicity and long optical path lengths. A localized photonic probe is developed and characterized that employs a tapered optical-fiber waveguide, and it is utilized in practical demonstrations to test tightly arranged devices and to help prototype new fabrication methods. A case study in AlxGa1-xAs illustrates how the optical scattering and absorption losses can be obtained from the cavity-waveguide transmission. Finally, single-crystal Er2O3 epitaxially grown on silicon is analyzed in detail as a potential CMOS-compatable gain medium due to its high Er3

  18. Optical integration of CAD/CAM materials.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Güth, Jan-Frederik; Magne, Pascal

    The optical integration (OI) of monolithic CAD/CAM materials under 4 illuminations was evaluated using a standardized and clinically relevant method. Eighteen inlays were manufactured and placed (glycerin gel). Standardized photos were taken under 4 illuminations (neutral white light direct and indirect illumination, cross-polarized light, fluorescent light). Six evaluators defined the optical integration score (OIS) as the "visibility" of the restoration (0 = worst OI, 4 = optimal OI). The intact tooth served as control. The null hypothesis was that different illuminations did not influence the OI of CAD/CAM inlays. One-way ANOVA, followed by Scheffe's post hoc, was applied (P = 0.05). Neutral light direct illumination: OIS between 2.67 (IPS e.max CAD LT A1, ENAMIC A1) and 3.83 (IPS e.max CAD HT A1) with a mean of 3.28 (± 0.339). Indirect illumination: OIS from 1.00 (Paradigm MZ100 A1) to 2.41 (ENAMIC A1) with a mean of 1.88 (± 0.598). Fluorescent light: OIS between 0.75 and 3.25 with a mean of 1.67 (± 1.025). ENAMIC and VITA BLOCS Mark II showed the best optical integration in fluorescence. IPS e.max CAD, Paradigm MZ 100 demonstrated low fluorescence; Lava Ultimate high fluorescence. OI was influenced by different illumination. A simple method accessible to clinicians for additional evaluation of CAD/CAM materials in daily practice is presented. All materials showed excellent OI under direct illumination with neutral white light. The most pronounced differences in optical integration between tooth and evaluated materials were observed under fluorescent light.

  19. Support for hands-on optics immersions (Conference Presentation)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Spalding, Gabriel C.; McCann, Lowell I.

    2016-09-01

    The Advanced Laboratory Physics Association (ALPhA) is an official affiliate organization of the AAPT, supporting upper-level undergraduate instructional lab education in physics. The ALPhA Immersions program is intended to be an efficient use of an instructor's time: with expert colleague-mentors on hand they spend 2.5 days learning a key new instructional experiment (of their choice) well enough to confidently teach it to the students at their home institutions. At an ALPhA Immersion, participants work in groups of no more than three per experimental setup. Our follow-up surveys support the notion that this individualized, concentrated focus directly results in significant updating and improvement of undergraduate laboratory instruction in physics across the country. Such programs have the effect of encouraging investment, on the part of individual institutions. For example, we have disseminated ideas, training, and equipment for contemporary single-photon-based instructional labs dealing with core, contemporary issues in Quantum Mechanics. By the time this paper is presented, ALPhA will have delivered at least 420 single-photon detectors to a wide variety of educational institutions. We have also partnered with the non-profit Jonathan F. Reichert Foundation to support equipment acquisition by institutions participating in our wide variety of training programs.

  20. Materials for refractive x-ray optics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lund, M W

    1997-01-01

    An X-ray lens using refraction has been proposed by Tomie, and demonstrated for 14 keV X-rays by Snigirev et al. This type of lens is made from a series of very weak lens elements. I calculate the properties of such lenses constructed of various chemical elements and compounds over the range of 1 to 30 keV. In general, I find that X-ray optics made from low density, low Z materials have the widest useful apertures, but require more lens elements than denser and higher Z materials.

  1. Wave Propagation Solution for Transverse Electric Mode in a Graded Interface between Left-Handed and Right-Handed Material

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    B. N. Pratiwi

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available Wave propagation for transverse electric (TE mode in a graded interface between left-handed and right-handed material has been investigated by using asymptotic iteration method. By using hyperbolic functions for negative permittivity and negative permeability, we obtained the graded graphs of permittivity and permeability as a function of material thickness. Maxwell equation for the dielectric with the hyperbolic function in permittivity and permeability has been reduced to second orde differential equation. The second orde differential equation has been solved by using asymptotic iteration method with the eigen functions in complementary error functions. The eigen functions explained about the wave propagation in a graded interface of material. The distribution of the electric field and the wave vector were given in approximate solution.

  2. Optical thin films and coatings from materials to applications

    CERN Document Server

    Flory, Francois

    2013-01-01

    Optical coatings, including mirrors, anti-reflection coatings, beam splitters, and filters, are an integral part of most modern optical systems. This book provides an overview of thin film materials, the properties, design and manufacture of optical coatings and their use across a variety of application areas.$bOptical coatings, including mirrors, anti-reflection coatings, beam splitters, and filters, are an integral part of most modern optical systems. Optical thin films and coatings provides an overview of thin film materials, the properties, design and manufacture of optical coatings and their use across a variety of application areas. Part one explores the design and manufacture of optical coatings. Part two highlights unconventional features of optical thin films including scattering properties of random structures in thin films, optical properties of thin film materials at short wavelengths, thermal properties and colour effects. Part three focusses on novel materials for optical thin films and coatings...

  3. Relevant optical properties for direct restorative materials.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pecho, Oscar E; Ghinea, Razvan; do Amaral, Erika A Navarro; Cardona, Juan C; Della Bona, Alvaro; Pérez, María M

    2016-05-01

    To evaluate relevant optical properties of esthetic direct restorative materials focusing on whitened and translucent shades. Enamel (E), body (B), dentin (D), translucent (T) and whitened (Wh) shades for E (WhE) and B (WhB) from a restorative system (Filtek Supreme XTE, 3M ESPE) were evaluated. Samples (1 mm thick) were prepared. Spectral reflectance (R%) and color coordinates (L*, a*, b*, C* and h°) were measured against black and white backgrounds, using a spectroradiometer, in a viewing booth, with CIE D65 illuminant and d/0° geometry. Scattering (S) and absorption (K) coefficients and transmittance (T%) were calculated using Kubelka-Munk's equations. Translucency (TP) and opalescence (OP) parameters and whiteness index (W*) were obtained from differences of CIELAB color coordinates. R%, S, K and T% curves from all shades were compared using VAF (Variance Accounting For) coefficient with Cauchy-Schwarz inequality. Color coordinates and optical parameters were statistically analyzed using one-way ANOVA, Tukey's test with Bonferroni correction (α=0.0007). Spectral behavior of R% and S were different for T shades. In addition, T shades showed the lowest R%, S and K values, as well as the highest T%, TP an OP values. In most cases, WhB shades showed different color and optical properties (including TP and W*) than their corresponding B shades. WhE shades showed similar mean W* values and higher mean T% and TP values than E shades. When using whitened or translucent composites, the final color is influenced not only by the intraoral background but also by the color and optical properties of multilayers used in the esthetic restoration. Copyright © 2016 Academy of Dental Materials. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  4. Slip detection and grip adjustment using optical tracking in prosthetic hands.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roberts, Luke; Singhal, Girish; Kaliki, Rahul

    2011-01-01

    We have designed a closed loop control system that adjusts the grasping force of a prosthetic hand based on the amount of object slip detected by an optical tracking sensor. The system was designed for the i-Limb (a multi-fingered prosthetic hand from Touch Bionics Inc.) and is comprised of an optical sensor embedded inside a silicone prosthetic glove and a control algorithm. In a proof of concept study to demonstrate the effectiveness of optical tracking in slip sensing, we record slip rate while increasing the weight held in the grasp of the hand and compare two cases: grip adjustment on and grip adjustment off. The average slip rate was found to be 0.314 slips/(s · oz) without grip adjustment and 0.0411 slips/(s · oz) with grip adjustment. This paper discusses the advantages of the optical approach in slip detection and presents the experiment and results utilizing the optical sensor and grip control algorithm.

  5. Templated Chemically Deposited Semiconductor Optical Fiber Materials

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sparks, Justin R.; Sazio, Pier J. A.; Gopalan, Venkatraman; Badding, John V.

    2013-07-01

    Chemical deposition is a powerful technology for fabrication of planar microelectronics. Optical fibers are the dominant platform for telecommunications, and devices such as fiber lasers are forming the basis for new industries. High-pressure chemical vapor deposition (HPCVD) allows for conformal layers and void-free wires of precisely doped crystalline unary and compound semiconductors inside the micro-to-nanoscale-diameter pores of microstructured optical fibers (MOFs). Drawing the fibers to serve as templates into which these semiconductor structures can be fabricated allows for geometric design flexibility that is difficult to achieve with planar fabrication. Seamless coupling of semiconductor optoelectronic and photonic devices with existing fiber infrastructure thus becomes possible, facilitating all-fiber technological approaches. The deposition techniques also allow for a wider range of semiconductor materials compositions to be exploited than is possible by means of preform drawing. Gigahertz bandwidth junction-based fiber devices can be fabricated from doped crystalline semiconductors, for example. Deposition of amorphous hydrogenated silicon, which cannot be drawn, allows for the exploitation of strong nonlinear optical function in fibers. Finally, crystalline compound semiconductor fiber cores hold promise for high-power infrared light-guiding fiber devices and subwavelength-resolution, large-area infrared imaging.

  6. Smart Optical Material Characterization System and Method

    Science.gov (United States)

    Choi, Sang Hyouk (Inventor); Park, Yeonjoon (Inventor)

    2015-01-01

    Disclosed is a system and method for characterizing optical materials, using steps and equipment for generating a coherent laser light, filtering the light to remove high order spatial components, collecting the filtered light and forming a parallel light beam, splitting the parallel beam into a first direction and a second direction wherein the parallel beam travelling in the second direction travels toward the material sample so that the parallel beam passes through the sample, applying various physical quantities to the sample, reflecting the beam travelling in the first direction to produce a first reflected beam, reflecting the beam that passes through the sample to produce a second reflected beam that travels back through the sample, combining the second reflected beam after it travels back though the sample with the first reflected beam, sensing the light beam produced by combining the first and second reflected beams, and processing the sensed beam to determine sample characteristics and properties.

  7. Evaluation of Optical Propagation in Photorefractive Materials

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Jaw-Jueh

    Photorefractive materials, such as BSO, BaTiO _3, LiNbO_3, etc. are known to exhibit high nonlinearity at low optical intensities. The laser beam illumination changes the optical characteristics of the crystals and gives rise to a nonuniform distribution of the refractive index, thereby leading to distortion of the beam. In this thesis, we analyze the nature of the photorefractive effect using the nonlinearly coupled Kukhtarev equations. Starting from the photorefractive holographic write-in and read-out process, we study the diffraction efficiency as a function of the applied electric field, the grating period and the light intensity, and also investigate the signal-to-noise ratio for a diffracted Gaussian reading beam under the influence of noise. In this connection, the propagation of a Gaussian beam through a thick sample of a previously dark photorefractive material is first investigated. Two different materials, BaTiO _3, LiNbO_3, have been considered. Because the light intensity creates a strong internal electric field and hence an induced refractive index, the incident light is deflected in phase and amplitude resulting to a distorted far field pattern, often termed beam fanning. These results are then used to analyze beam fanning in the case when a Gaussian reading beam is incident on a photorefractive material in which a sinusoidal phase grating has previously been stored. Finally, we examine multiple beam interaction in a photorefractive crystal. We analyze subharmonic amplification during the interaction between two pump beams and a seed beam, incident along the bisector of the pumps, in BSO. We then evaluate the fractional change in the intensity of the seed team at the output in the presence of the suhharmonic grating as a function of the angle between the pump teams. Experimental results agree well with the theory.

  8. "Optics 4 every1", the hands-on optics outreach program of the Universidad Autonoma de Nuevo Leon

    Science.gov (United States)

    Viera-González, Perla M.; Sánchez-Guerrero, Guillermo E.

    2016-09-01

    The Fisica Pato2 (Physics 4 every1) outreach group started as a need of hands-on activities and active Science demonstrations in the education for kids, teenagers and basic education teachers in Nuevo Leffon maintaining a main objective of spread the word about the importance of Optics and Photonics; for accomplish this objective, since November 2013 several outreach events are organized every year by the group. The program Optics 4 every1 is supported by the Facultad de Ciencias Fisico Matematicas of the Universidad Autonoma de Nuevo Leon and the International Society for Optics and Photonics and consist in quick hands-on activities and Optics demonstrations designed for teach basic optical phenomena related with light and its application in everyday life. During 2015, with the purpose of celebrate the International Year of Light 2015, the outreach group was involved in 13 different events and reached more than 8,000 people. The present work explains the activities done and the outcome obtained with this program.

  9. Enhanced localization of Dyakonov-like surface waves in left-handed materials

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Crasovan, L. C.; Takayama, O.; Artigas, D.

    2006-01-01

    We address the existence and properties of hybrid surface waves forming at interfaces between left-handed materials and dielectric birefringent media. The existence conditions of such waves are found to be highly relaxed in comparison to Dyakonov waves existing in right-handed media. We show...

  10. Shape Memory Polymers: A Joint Chemical and Materials Engineering Hands-On Experience

    Science.gov (United States)

    Seif, Mujan; Beck, Matthew

    2018-01-01

    Hands-on experiences are excellent tools for increasing retention of first year engineering students. They also encourage interdisciplinary collaboration, a critical skill for modern engineers. In this paper, we describe and evaluate a joint Chemical and Materials Engineering hands-on lab that explores cross-linking and glass transition in…

  11. Impairment of online control of hand and eye movements in a monkey model of optic ataxia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Battaglia-Mayer, Alexandra; Ferrari-Toniolo, Simone; Visco-Comandini, Federica; Archambault, Philippe S; Saberi-Moghadam, Sohrab; Caminiti, Roberto

    2013-11-01

    The parietal mechanisms for online control of hand trajectory were studied by combining single-cell recording and reversible inactivation of superior parietal area 5 (PE/PEc; SPL) of monkeys while these made reaches and saccades to visual targets, when the target position changed unexpectedly. Neural activity was modulated by hand position, speed, and movement direction, and by pre- and/or postsaccadic signals. After bilateral muscimol injection, an increase in the hand reaction- and movement-time toward both the first and second targets was observed. This caused an increase in the time necessary for the trajectory correction, and therefore an elongation of the hand-path toward the first target location. Furthermore, hand trajectories were different in shape than control ones. An elongation of the eye reaction time to both first and second targets was also observed, which could partially explain the deficit of planning and correction of hand movement. These results identify the superior parietal lobule as a crucial node in the online control of hand and eye movement and highlight the role of the eye impairment in the emergence of the reaching disorder so far regarded as the hallmark of optic ataxia.

  12. Plaster of Paris: the forgotten hand splinting material.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Colditz, Judy C

    2002-01-01

    This article examines the concept of tissue adaptation in response to the application of plaster of Paris splints and casts. A review of the history of plaster of Paris and its composition, its working properties, and precautions for its use introduces the reader to this oft-forgotten material. Four designs are described for plaster of Paris application-circumferential padded casts, digital unpadded casts, plaster slabs, and contour molds. The discussion of clinical application of plaster of Paris covers joint tightness, arthritis, contracted joints due to spasticity, muscle-tendon tightness, skin tightness, skin and joint tightness, and edema reduction. In addition, a new application called casting motion to mobilize stiffness (CMMS), developed by the author, is discussed. The use of plaster of Paris to improve postoperative flexor tendon glide is also discussed. This review article intends to stimulate the reader to use plaster of Paris splinting or casting more frequently to solve clinical problems.

  13. Plasmonic Biofoam: A Versatile Optically Active Material.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tian, Limei; Luan, Jingyi; Liu, Keng-Ku; Jiang, Qisheng; Tadepalli, Sirimuvva; Gupta, Maneesh K; Naik, Rajesh R; Singamaneni, Srikanth

    2016-01-13

    Owing to their ability to confine and manipulate light at the nanoscale, plasmonic nanostructures are highly attractive for a broad range of applications. While tremendous progress has been made in the synthesis of size- and shape-controlled plasmonic nanostructures, their integration with other materials and application in solid-state is primarily through their assembly on rigid two-dimensional (2D) substrates, which limits the plasmonically active space to a few nanometers above the substrate. In this work, we demonstrate a simple method to create plasmonically active three-dimensional biofoams by integrating plasmonic nanostructures with highly porous biomaterial aerogels. We demonstrate that plasmonic biofoam is a versatile optically active platform that can be harnessed for numerous applications including (i) ultrasensitive chemical detection using surface-enhanced Raman scattering; (ii) highly efficient energy harvesting and steam generation through plasmonic photothermal heating; and (iii) optical control of enzymatic activity by triggered release of biomolecules encapsulated within the aerogel. Our results demonstrate that 3D plasmonic biofoam exhibits significantly higher sensing, photothermal, and loading efficiency compared to conventional 2D counterparts. The design principles and processing methodology of plasmonic aerogels demonstrated here can be broadly applied in the fabrication of other functional foams.

  14. Optical Material Researches for Frontier Optical Ceramics and Visible Fiber Laser Technologies

    Science.gov (United States)

    2016-07-07

    AFRL-AFOSR-JP-TR-2016-0059 Optical material researches for frontier optical ceramics and visible fiber laser technologies Yasushi Fujimoto Osaka...07-2016 2. REPORT TYPE Final 3. DATES COVERED (From - To) 18 Apr 2013 to 17 Apr 2016 4. TITLE AND SUBTITLE Optical material researches for frontier...are very useful for scientific and industrial applications. 15. SUBJECT TERMS Fibre Lasers, Laser Dynamics, Nonlinear Optical Materials 16. SECURITY

  15. Engineering materials for mid-infrared optical sensor applications

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Richardson, K. A; Musgraves, J. D; Wachtel, P; Novak, S; Danto, S; Agarwal, A; Singh, V; Lin, P-T; Kimerling, L.C; Hu, J; Yi, Z; Lin, H; Giammarco, J; Soliani, A.P; Luzinov, I; Hensley, J

    2013-01-01

    .... Chalcogenide glasses have demonstrated promise as materials for infrared sensing as they exhibit transparency over a large range of infrared wavelengths and tunable optical properties through doping...

  16. Neurosurgical hand-held optical coherence tomography (OCT) forward-viewing probe

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sun, Cuiru; Lee, Kenneth K. C.; Vuong, Barry; Cusimano, Michael; Brukson, Alexander; Mariampillai, Adrian; Standish, Beau A.; Yang, Victor X. D.

    2012-02-01

    A prototype neurosurgical hand-held optical coherence tomography (OCT) imaging probe has been developed to provide micron resolution cross-sectional images of subsurface tissue during open surgery. This new ergonomic hand-held probe has been designed based on our group's previous work on electrostatically driven optical fibers. It has been packaged into a catheter probe in the familiar form factor of the clinically accepted Bayonet shaped neurosurgical non-imaging Doppler ultrasound probes. The optical design was optimized using ZEMAX simulation. Optical properties of the probe were tested to yield an ~20 um spot size, 5 mm working distance and a 3.5 mm field of view. The scan frequency can be increased or decreased by changing the applied voltage. Typically a scan frequency of less than 60Hz is chosen to keep the applied voltage to less than 2000V. The axial resolution of the probe was ~15 um (in air) as determined by the OCT system. A custom-triggering methodology has been developed to provide continuous stable imaging, which is crucial for clinical utility. Feasibility of this probe, in combination with a 1310 nm swept source OCT system was tested and images are presented to highlight the usefulness of such a forward viewing handheld OCT imaging probe. Knowledge gained from this research will lay the foundation for developing new OCT technologies for endovascular management of cerebral aneurysms and transsphenoidal neuroendoscopic treatment of pituitary tumors.

  17. Silicon Oxynitride: A Versatile Material for Integrated Optics Applications

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Worhoff, Kerstin; Hilderink, L.T.H.; Driessen, A.; Lambeck, Paul

    Silicon oxynitride is a very attractive material for integrated optics application, because of its excellent optical properties (~e.g. optical loss below 0.2 dB/cm!, the large refractive index range ~between 1.45 for silicon oxide and 2.0 for silicon nitride), and last but not least, the

  18. Silicon oxynitride: a versatile material for integrated optics application

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Worhoff, Kerstin; Hilderink, L.T.H.; Driessen, A.; Lambeck, Paul

    2002-01-01

    Silicon oxynitride is a very attractive material for integrated optics application, because of its excellent optical properties (e.g., optical loss below 0.2 dB/cm), the large refractive index range (between 1.45 for silicon oxide and 2.0 for silicon nitride), and last but not least, the

  19. Optical coatings material aspects in theory and practice

    CERN Document Server

    Stenzel, Olaf

    2014-01-01

    Optical coatings, i.e. multilayer stacks composed from a certain number of thin individual layers, are an essential part of any optical system necessary to tailor the properties of the optical surfaces. Hereby, the performance of any optical coating is defined by a well-balanced interplay between the properties of the individual coating materials and the geometrical parameters (such as film thickness) which define their arrangement. In all scientific books dealing with the performance of optical coatings, the main focus is on optimizing the geometrical coating parameters, particularly the number of individual layers and their thickness. At the same time, much less attention is paid to another degree of freedom in coating design, namely the possibility to tailor optical material properties to an optimum relevant for the required specification. This book, on the contrary, concentrates on the material aside of the problem. After a comprehensive review of the basics of thin film theory, traditional optical coatin...

  20. Non-linear optics for transducers: Principles and materials

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Hoekstra, Hugo; Krijnen, Gijsbertus J.M.; Driessen, A.; Lambeck, Paul; Popma, T.J.A.

    This paper concentrates on intensity-dependent refractive-index changes due to the third-order optical non-linearity. Materials exhibiting such effects are good candidates for applications in all-optical devices. The discussion will be on these materials, and characterization techniques and an

  1. Optical and Terahertz Measurements of Spintronic Materials

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bas, Derek A.

    Terahertz time-domain spectroscopy (THz-TDS) is a versatile method to determine lattice, electronic charge and spin dynamics. This dissertation employs THz-TDS to study the spin and charge dynamics in topological insulator and antiferromagnetic systems. Observing time-domain effects on the scale of picoseconds gives unprecedented control over optoelectronic properties. Methods and challenges of THz generation, detection, and transmission are outlined. The wealth of light-matter interactions present in all nonlinear optical experiments are discussed, including primarily optical rectification, shift currents, and injection currents. Each of these gives valuable insight into the carrier dynamics of a material type. Conventional electronics can be improved in their speed and efficiency by taking advantage of an additional degree of freedom- electron spin. Therefore, we consider material types which exhibit great potential to replace common electronic materials while simultaneously employing electron spin for information storage or transport. Antiferromagnets show a type of spin-order that has the ability to store bits without unwanted interactions between neighboring particles. In antiferromagnetic MnF2 which has a Neel temperature of TN = 67 K, THz-TDS is performed on one-magnon and two-magnon resonances in the 0.1-2.3 THz range while varying the temperature from 6 to 295 K. The behavior of the one-magnon resonance is modeled by modified molecular field theory with an additional coupling term j set as a free parameter to fit the data. The resulting best fit value j = 1.1 provides the first experimental evidence indicating that neighboring spins in MnF 2 are only weakly coupled, closely approximating mean-field theory. Time-of-flight analysis was performed on the transmitted THz pulses to measure the temperature-dependent THz refractive index, which was modeled by phonon energy in the T > TN regime and magnetic energy in the T < TN regime. In the range T < 10 K

  2. Overlapping illusions by transformation optics without any negative refraction material

    OpenAIRE

    Fei Sun; Sailing He

    2016-01-01

    A novel method to achieve an overlapping illusion without any negative refraction index material is introduced with the help of the optic-null medium (ONM) designed by an extremely stretching spatial transformation. Unlike the previous methods to achieve such an optical illusion by transformation optics (TO), our method can achieve a power combination and reshape the radiation pattern at the same time. Unlike the overlapping illusion with some negative refraction index material, our method is...

  3. Optical Spectroscopy of Nano Materials and Structures

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guo, Wenhao

    In this thesis, nanostructures and nanomaterials ranging from 3D to OD will be studied compresively, by using optical methods. Firstly, for 3D and 2D nanomaterials, nanoporous zeolite crystals, such as AFI and AEL are introduced as host materials to accommodate diatomic iodine molecules. Polarized Raman spectroscopy is utilized to identify the two configurations of iodine molecules to stay in the channels of AEL: the lying mode (the bond of the two atoms is parallel to the direction of the channels) and the standing mode (the bond is perpendicular to the direction of the channels). The lying mode and standing mode are switchable and can be well controlled by the amount of water molecules inside the crystal, revealed by both molecule dynamics simulation and experiment observation. With more water molecules inside, iodine molecules choose to stay in the standing mode, while with less water molecules, iodine molecules prefer to lie along the channel. Therefore, the configurations of molecules could be precisely controlled, globally by the surrounding pressure and temperature, and locally by the laser light. Ii is believed that this easy and reversible control of single molecule will be valuable in nanostructured devices, such as molecular sieving or molecular detection. Secondly, for 1D case, the PL spectrum of ZnO nanowire under uniaxial strain is studied. When a ZnO nanowire is bent, besides the lattice constant induced bandgap change on the tensile and compressive sides, there is a piezoelectric field generated along the cross section. This piezoelectric potential, together with the bandgap changes induced by the deformation, will redistribute the electrons excited by incident photons from valence band to conduction band. As a result, the electrons occupying the states at the tensile side will largely outnumbered the ones at the compressive side. Therefore, the PL spectrum we collected at the whole cross section will manifest a redshift, other than the peak

  4. Advanced magneto-optical materials and devices

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kang, Shaoying

    The magneto-optical materials with both high Faraday rotation and high transmittance capabilities are greatly desired in high speed switches, isolators, and visible imaging systems. In this thesis work, new magneto-optical materials that possess both high Faraday effect and high transmittance in the visible range of the spectrum were studied and synthesized. New Bismuth iron gallium garnet thin-films (Bi3Fe4Ga 1O12, BIGG) have been successfully deposited on gadolinium gallium garnet substrates with a pulsed laser deposition technique in our lab. X-ray diffraction analyses have proven that the BIGG films are of good epitaxial quality with a lattice constant close to 12.61+/-0.01Á. The bandwidth of BIGG's transmittance spectrum has been extended and its left edge has been shifted about 50nm towards the shorter wavelengths relative to those of Bi3Fe5O12 (BIG) films. The BIGG film is more transparent than a BIG film although BIGG's Faraday rotation angle is slightly less than that of a BIG film. The figure of merit of the BIGG garnet film has reached 16.5°, which is about 1.8 times that of a typical BIG film. Currently, the switches using BIGG films were tested and a 2.4 ns response time had been reached with a phi1 mm circular aperture at the wavelength of 532 nm. Iron Borate (FeBO3) is another material that is far superior in terms of the transmittance in the visible spectrum at room temperature to most garnet materials. The FeBO3 is one of the orthoferrites with a large natural birefringence for the light propagated along the magnetization direction. The effect of birefringence on Faraday rotation reduced the maximum obtainable rotation. In order to eliminate the birefringence and further improve the transmittance, a high energy ball-milling technique was used to synthesize FeBO3 nanoparticles. Our numerical simulation shows the nanoparticles could eliminate the birefringence, and concurrently keep the intrinsic Faraday rotation. After milling and centrifuging

  5. Laser And Nonlinear Optical Materials For Laser Remote Sensing

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barnes, Norman P.

    2005-01-01

    NASA remote sensing missions involving laser systems and their economic impact are outlined. Potential remote sensing missions include: green house gasses, tropospheric winds, ozone, water vapor, and ice cap thickness. Systems to perform these measurements use lanthanide series lasers and nonlinear devices including second harmonic generators and parametric oscillators. Demands these missions place on the laser and nonlinear optical materials are discussed from a materials point of view. Methods of designing new laser and nonlinear optical materials to meet these demands are presented.

  6. Properties of Optical and Laser-Related Materials: A Handbook

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nikogosyan, David N.

    2003-05-01

    Properties of Optical and Laser-Related Materials-A Handbook offers the reader a self-contained, concise and up-to-date collection of the key properties of 125 of the most common and important optical materials used in modern optics, laser physics and technology, spectroscopy and laser spectroscopy, nonlinear optics, quantum electronics and laser applications. This comprehensive volume presents not only the classical properties but also those that have appeared in the three decades since the invention of the laser. The presentation of the material is given in a clear tabular form with more than 1000 references. A wide variety of readers, ranging from workers in both industry and academia, to lecturers and students at postgraduate and undergraduate levels, will find Properties of Optical and Laser-Related Materials-A Handbook an invaluable resource.

  7. The Hands-On Optics Project: a demonstration of module 3-magnificent magnifications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pompea, Stephen M.; Sparks, Robert T.; Walker, Constance E.

    2014-07-01

    The Hands-On Optics project offers an example of a set of instructional modules that foster active prolonged engagement. Developed by SPIE, OSA, and NOAO through funding from the U.S. National Science Foundation, the modules were originally designed for afterschool settings and museums. However, because they were based on national standards in mathematics, science, and technology, they were easily adapted for use in classrooms. The philosophy and implementation strategies of the six modules will be described as well as lessons learned in training educators. The modules were implementing with the help of optics industry professionals who served as expert volunteers to assist educators. A key element of the modules was that they were developed around an understanding of optics misconceptions and used culminating activities in each module as a form of authentic assessment. Thus student achievement could be measured by evaluating the actual product created by each student in applying key concepts, tools, and applications together at the end of each module. The program used a progression of disciplinary core concepts to build an integrated sequence and crosscutting ideas and practices to infuse the principles of the modern electro-optical field into the modules. Whenever possible, students were encouraged to experiment and to create, and to pursue inquiry-based approaches. The result was a program that had high appeal to regular as well as gifted students.

  8. Inconsistent-handed advantage in episodic memory extends to paragraph-level materials.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Prichard, Eric C; Christman, Stephen D

    2017-09-01

    Past research using handedness as a proxy for functional access to the right hemisphere demonstrates that individuals who are mixed/inconsistently handed outperform strong/consistently handed individuals when performing episodic recall tasks. However, research has generally been restricted to stimuli presented in a list format. In the present paper, we present two studies in which participants were presented with paragraph-level material and then asked to recall material from the passages. The first study was based on a classic study looking at retroactive interference with prose materials. The second was modelled on a classic experiment looking at perspective taking and the content of memory. In both studies, the classic effects were replicated and the general finding that mixed/inconsistent-handers outperform strong/consistent-handers was replicated. This suggests that considering degree of handedness may be an empirically useful means of reducing error variance in paradigms looking at memory for prose level material.

  9. Overlapping illusions by transformation optics without any negative refraction material

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sun, Fei; He, Sailing

    2016-01-01

    A novel method to achieve an overlapping illusion without any negative refraction index material is introduced with the help of the optic-null medium (ONM) designed by an extremely stretching spatial transformation. Unlike the previous methods to achieve such an optical illusion by transformation optics (TO), our method can achieve a power combination and reshape the radiation pattern at the same time. Unlike the overlapping illusion with some negative refraction index material, our method is not sensitive to the loss of the materials. Other advantages over existing methods are discussed. Numerical simulations are given to verify the performance of the proposed devices.

  10. 2D Materials for Optical Modulation: Challenges and Opportunities.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yu, Shaoliang; Wu, Xiaoqin; Wang, Yipei; Guo, Xin; Tong, Limin

    2017-04-01

    Owing to their atomic layer thickness, strong light-material interaction, high nonlinearity, broadband optical response, fast relaxation, controllable optoelectronic properties, and high compatibility with other photonic structures, 2D materials, including graphene, transition metal dichalcogenides and black phosphorus, have been attracting increasing attention for photonic applications. By tuning the carrier density via electrical or optical means that modifies their physical properties (e.g., Fermi level or nonlinear absorption), optical response of the 2D materials can be instantly changed, making them versatile nanostructures for optical modulation. Here, up-to-date 2D material-based optical modulation in three categories is reviewed: free-space, fiber-based, and on-chip configurations. By analysing cons and pros of different modulation approaches from material and mechanism aspects, the challenges faced by using these materials for device applications are presented. In addition, thermal effects (e.g., laser induced damage) in 2D materials, which are critical to practical applications, are also discussed. Finally, the outlook for future opportunities of these 2D materials for optical modulation is given. © 2017 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  11. Study on an SRR-shaped left-handed material patch antenna

    Science.gov (United States)

    Song, X. H.; Chen, L. L.; Wu, C. H.; Yuan, Y. N.

    2011-03-01

    Left-handed material (LHM) is an artificial material. It has negative permittivity and negative permeability simultaneously and has attracted a great deal of attention in recent years. This paper investigates a patch antenna based on SRR-shaped left-handed material by using the method of finite difference time domain (FDTD). A patch antenna based on SRR and notches is designed by employing the traditional construction method; the results show that there exists a wave resonance state at 7.67 GHz, where its refraction index is close to - 1. The effect has greatly enhanced the electromagnetic wave's resonance intensity, and has improved the localized extent of the electromagnetic energy noticeably in such an LHM structure; besides, it can also enhance the radiation gain, broaden the frequency band, improve the impedance matching condition, and restrain the high harmonics.

  12. Wave Propagation From Electrons to Photonic Crystals and Left-Handed Materials

    CERN Document Server

    Markos, Peter

    2010-01-01

    This textbook offers the first unified treatment of wave propagation in electronic and electromagnetic systems and introduces readers to the essentials of the transfer matrix method, a powerful analytical tool that can be used to model and study an array of problems pertaining to wave propagation in electrons and photons. It is aimed at graduate and advanced undergraduate students in physics, materials science, electrical and computer engineering, and mathematics, and is ideal for researchers in photonic crystals, negative index materials, left-handed materials, plasmonics, nonlinear effects,

  13. Phosphorus-based compounds for EUV multilayer optics materials

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Medvedev, Viacheslav; Yakshin, Andrey; van de Kruijs, Robbert Wilhelmus Elisabeth; Bijkerk, Frederik

    2015-01-01

    We have evaluated the prospects of phosphorus-based compounds in extreme ultraviolet multilayer optics. Boron phosphide (BP) is suggested to be used as a spacer material in reflective multilayer optics operating just above the L-photoabsorption edge of P (λ ≈9.2 nm). Mo, Ag, Ru, Rh, and Pd were

  14. Nonlinear Optical Properties of Traditional and Novel Materials

    Science.gov (United States)

    Krupa, Sean J.

    Nonlinear optical processes are an excellent candidate to provide the heralded, indistinguishable, or entangled photons necessary for development of quantum mechanics based technology which currently lack bright sources of these photons. In order to support these technologies, and others, two classes of materials: traditional and novel, were investigated via optical characterization methods with goal of gaining insight into which materials and experimental conditions yield the greatest nonlinear optical effects. Optical characterization of periodically poled lithium niobate (PPLN) helped support the development of a simple, efficient photon pair source that could be easily integrated into optical networks. Additionally, an in-situ measurement of the 2nd order nonlinear optical coefficient was developed to aid in the characterization of PPLN pair sources. Lastly, an undergraduate demonstration of quantum key distribution was constructed such that students could see the primary application for PPLN photon pair sources in an affordable, approachable demonstration. A class of novel optical materials known as 2D materials has been identified as potential replacements to the traditional nonlinear optical materials discussed in Part I. Through optical characterization of second harmonic generation (SHG) the ideal conditions for spontaneous parametric downconversion were established as well as signal thresholds for successful detection. Attempts to observe SPDC produces hints that weak generate SPDC may be present in WS2 samples however this is incredibly difficult to confirm. As growth techniques of 2D materials improve, a photonic device constructed from these materials may be possible, however it will need some mechanism e.g. stacking, a cavity, etc. to help enhance the SPDC signal.

  15. New directions for ion beam processing of optical materials

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    White, C.W.; Budai, J.D.; Zhu, J.G.; Withrow, S.P. [Oak Ridge National Lab., TN (United States)

    1997-03-01

    Recent developments in the use of ion implantation to modify the properties of optical materials are summarized. The use of ion implantation to form nanocrystal and quantum dots is emphasized. (author)

  16. Spectroscopic properties of rare earths in optical materials

    CERN Document Server

    Parisi, Jürgen; Osgood, R; Warlimont, Hans; Liu, Guokui; Jacquier, Bernard

    2005-01-01

    Aimed at researchers and graduate students, this book provides up-to-date information for understanding electronic interactions that impact the optical properties of rare earth ions in solids. Its goal is to establish a connection between fundamental principles and the materials properties of rare-earth activated luminescent and laser optical materials. The theoretical survey and introduction to spectroscopic properties include electronic energy level structure, intensities of optical transitions, ion-phonon interactions, line broadening, and energy transfer and up-conversion. An important aspect of the book lies in its deep and detailed discussions on materials properties and the potential of new applications such as optical storage, information processing, nanophotonics, and molecular probes that have been identified in recent experimental studies. This volume will be a valuable reference book on advanced topics of rare earth spectroscopy and materials science.

  17. Innovative materials tailored for advanced micro-optic applications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Himmelhuber, Roland; Fink, Marion; Pfeiffer, Karl; Ostrzinski, Ute; Klukowska, Anna; Gruetzner, Gabi; Houbertz, Ruth; Wolter, Herbert

    2007-02-01

    The handling of a continuously increasing amount of data leads to a strong need for high-speed short-range connections. Conventional Cu technology between chips on a board is limited. Optical interconnects will dominate the market, since they can overcome the limitations. One of the issues for materials used, e.g., for waveguides embedded in printed circuit boards (PCBs) is the compatibility with standard epoxies used for PCBs during the entire board fabrication process. Materials applied for optical interconnects should be mechanically and optically reliable, and also allow low-cost production. From the material production side, the process should be easy to up-scale. Therefore, anticipatory research strategy and suitable tailoring is asked for. The handling of light in the UV and visible range often requires the use of specially designed materials. Most polymer materials show an increased yellowing effect upon being exposed to shorter wavelength light. The major influence on the absorption in the UV and visible range of a UV curable material is related to the UV initiator, beside any other chromophores formed mainly during the exposure. Different material approaches will be presented which fulfil the requirements for highly sophisticated applications in optics / optical packaging technology. Firstly, an epoxy-based material system for optical chip-to-chip interconnection will be introduced. Secondly, the adaptation of a UV patternable inorganic-organic hybrid material (ORMOCER ®) originally developed for waveguide applications in the data and telecom regime, will be discussed with respect to applications in the visible regime. Spectroscopy and UV-DSC measurements were carried out to investigate the influence of standard photoinitiators on the optical properties for an ORMOCER ® system suitable for microoptic applications. The results show that the resulting material properties were significantly improved by exchange of the initiators compared to the originally

  18. Optical Coherence Tomography for Material Characterization

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Liu, P.

    2014-01-01

    Optical coherence tomography (OCT) is a non-invasive, contactless and high resolution imaging method, which allows the reconstruction of two or three dimensional depth-resolved images in turbid media. In the past 20 years, OCT has been extensively developed in the field of biomedical diagnostics,

  19. Influence of optical material properties on the perception of liquids.

    Science.gov (United States)

    van Assen, Jan Jaap R; Fleming, Roland W

    2016-12-01

    In everyday life we encounter a wide range of liquids (e.g., water, custard, toothpaste) with distinctive optical appearances and viscosities. Optical properties (e.g., color, translucency) are physically independent of viscosity, but, based on experience with real liquids, we may associate specific appearances (e.g., water, caramel) with certain viscosities. Conversely, the visual system may discount optical properties, enabling "viscosity constancy" based primarily on the liquid's shape and motion. We investigated whether optical characteristics affect the perception of viscosity and other properties of liquids. We simulated pouring liquids with viscosities ranging from water to molten glass and rendered them with nine different optical characteristics. In Experiment 1, observers (a) adjusted a match stimulus until it had the same perceived viscosity as a test stimulus with different optical properties, and (b) rated six physical properties of the test stimuli (runniness, shininess, sliminess, stickiness, warmth, wetness). We tested moving and static stimuli. In Experiment 2, observers had to associate names with every liquid in the stimulus set. We find that observers' viscosity matches correlated strongly with the true viscosities and that optical properties had almost no effect. However, some ratings of liquid properties did show substantial interactions between viscosity and optical properties. Observers associate liquid names primarily with optical cues, although some materials are associated with a specific viscosity or combination of viscosity and optics. These results suggest viscosity is inferred primarily from shape and motion cues but that optical characteristics influence recognition of specific liquids and inference of other physical properties.

  20. In Situ Identification of Mineral Resources with an X-Ray-Optical "Hands-Lens" Instrument

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marshall, J.; Koppel, L.; Bratton, C.; Metzger, E.; Hecht, M.

    1999-01-01

    The recognition of material resources on a planetary surface requires exploration strategies not dissimilar to those employed by early field geologists who searched for ore deposits primarily from surface clues. In order to determine the location of mineral ores or other materials, it will be necessary to characterize host terranes at regional or subregional scales. This requires geographically broad surveys in which statistically significant numbers of samples are rapidly scanned from a roving platform. To enable broad-scale, yet power-conservative planetary-surface exploration, we are developing an instrument that combines x-ray diffractometry (XRD), x-ray fluorescence spectrometry (XRF), and optical capabilities; the instrument can be deployed at the end of a rover's robotic arm, without the need for sample capture or preparation. The instrument provides XRD data for identification of mineral species and lithological types; diffractometry of minerals is conducted by ascertaining the characteristic lattice parameters or "d-spacings" of mineral compounds. D-spacings of 1.4 to 25 angstroms can be determined to include the large molecular structures of hydrated minerals such as clays. The XRF data will identify elements ranging from carbon (Atomic Number = 6) to elements as heavy as barium (Atomic Number = 56). While a sample is being x-rayed, the instrument simultaneously acquires an optical image of the sample surface at magnifications from lx to at least 50x (200x being feasible, depending on the sample surface). We believe that imaging the sample is extremely important as corroborative sample-identification data (the need for this capability having been illustrated by the experience of the Pathfinder rover). Very few geologists would rely on instrument data for sample identification without having seen the sample. Visual inspection provides critical recognition data such as texture, crystallinity, granularity, porosity, vesicularity, color, lustre, opacity, and

  1. Broadband optical characterization of material properties

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nielsen, Otto Højager Attermann

    the applicability of optical techniques for this purpose, the fermentation of milk into yogurt has been used as a model system. Studies have been conducted on commercially available products, but also of on-line measurement of the fermentation process. The second process is from the aquaculture industry...... to develop and investigate the applicability of optical broadband characterization techniques in industrially relevant production process. Both combined broad and high resolution techniques have the potential to provide important information on scattering properties related to particle size distributions......, as well as details of the absorption spectrum which relate to chemical composition. The thesis focuses on two production process from the food industry. The first process is from the dairy industry where discrimination between chemical and structural properties is of importance. To explore...

  2. Materials for Nonlinear Optics Chemical Perspectives

    Science.gov (United States)

    1991-01-01

    devices. Typical crystal growth techniques include Czochralski melt - crystal growth for substrates and liquid phase epitaxy ( LPE ), vapor phase epitaxy...useful laser for surgery is single crystal yttrium aluminum garnet doped with neodymium. Neodymium lasers efficiently emit high intensity near infrared...Michael McFarland, Ajay Nahata, Chengjiu Wu, and James T. Yardley ORGANIC AND INORGANIC CRYSTALS 21. Functional Waveguides with Optically Nonlinear Organic

  3. Optical identification using imperfections in 2D materials

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cao, Yameng; Robson, Alexander J.; Alharbi, Abdullah; Roberts, Jonathan; Woodhead, Christopher S.; Noori, Yasir J.; Bernardo-Gavito, Ramón; Shahrjerdi, Davood; Roedig, Utz; Fal'ko, Vladimir I.; Young, Robert J.

    2017-12-01

    The ability to uniquely identify an object or device is important for authentication. Imperfections, locked into structures during fabrication, can be used to provide a fingerprint that is challenging to reproduce. In this paper, we propose a simple optical technique to read unique information from nanometer-scale defects in 2D materials. Imperfections created during crystal growth or fabrication lead to spatial variations in the bandgap of 2D materials that can be characterized through photoluminescence measurements. We show a simple setup involving an angle-adjustable transmission filter, simple optics and a CCD camera can capture spatially-dependent photoluminescence to produce complex maps of unique information from 2D monolayers. Atomic force microscopy is used to verify the origin of the optical signature measured, demonstrating that it results from nanometer-scale imperfections. This solution to optical identification with 2D materials could be employed as a robust security measure to prevent counterfeiting.

  4. Optical Fibre Sensors Using Graphene-Based Materials: A Review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hernaez, Miguel; Zamarreño, Carlos R; Melendi-Espina, Sonia; Bird, Liam R; Mayes, Andrew G; Arregui, Francisco J

    2017-01-14

    Graphene and its derivatives have become the most explored materials since Novoselov and Geim (Nobel Prize winners for Physics in 2010) achieved its isolation in 2004. The exceptional properties of graphene have attracted the attention of the scientific community from different research fields, generating high impact not only in scientific journals, but also in general-interest newspapers. Optical fibre sensing is one of the many fields that can benefit from the use of these new materials, combining the amazing morphological, chemical, optical and electrical features of graphene with the advantages that optical fibre offers over other sensing strategies. In this document, a review of the current state of the art for optical fibre sensors based on graphene materials is presented.

  5. Traditional and emerging materials for optical metasurfaces

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhu, Alexander Y.; Kuznetsov, Arseniy I.; Luk'yanchuk, Boris; Engheta, Nader; Genevet, Patrice

    2017-03-01

    One of the most promising and vibrant research areas in nanotechnology has been the field of metasurfaces. These are two dimensional representations of metaatoms, or artificial interfaces designed to possess specialized electromagnetic properties which do not occur in nature, for specific applications. In this article, we present a brief review of metasurfaces from a materials perspective, and examine how the choice of different materials impact functionalities ranging from operating bandwidth to efficiencies. We place particular emphasis on emerging and non-traditional materials for metasurfaces such as high index dielectrics, topological insulators and digital metamaterials, and the potentially transformative role they could play in shaping further advances in the field.

  6. Traditional and emerging materials for optical metasurfaces

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zhu Alexander Y.

    2017-03-01

    Full Text Available One of the most promising and vibrant research areas in nanotechnology has been the field of metasurfaces. These are two dimensional representations of metaatoms, or artificial interfaces designed to possess specialized electromagnetic properties which do not occur in nature, for specific applications. In this article, we present a brief review of metasurfaces from a materials perspective, and examine how the choice of different materials impact functionalities ranging from operating bandwidth to efficiencies. We place particular emphasis on emerging and non-traditional materials for metasurfaces such as high index dielectrics, topological insulators and digital metamaterials, and the potentially transformative role they could play in shaping further advances in the field.

  7. Advances in nonlinear optical materials and devices

    Science.gov (United States)

    Byer, Robert L.

    1991-01-01

    The recent progress in the application of nonlinear techniques to extend the frequency of laser sources has come from the joint progress in laser sources and in nonlinear materials. A brief summary of the progress in diode pumped solid state lasers is followed by an overview of progress in nonlinear frequency extension by harmonic generation and parametric processes. Improved nonlinear materials including bulk crystals, quasiphasematched interactions, guided wave devices, and quantum well intersubband studies are discussed with the idea of identifying areas of future progress in nonlinear materials and devices.

  8. The Optical Janus Effect: Asymmetric Structural Color Reflection Materials.

    Science.gov (United States)

    England, Grant T; Russell, Calvin; Shirman, Elijah; Kay, Theresa; Vogel, Nicolas; Aizenberg, Joanna

    2017-08-01

    Structurally colored materials are often used for their resistance to photobleaching and their complex viewing-direction-dependent optical properties. Frequently, absorption has been added to these types of materials in order to improve the color saturation by mitigating the effects of nonspecific scattering that is present in most samples due to imperfect manufacturing procedures. The combination of absorbing elements and structural coloration often yields emergent optical properties. Here, a new hybrid architecture is introduced that leads to an interesting, highly directional optical effect. By localizing absorption in a thin layer within a transparent, structurally colored multilayer material, an optical Janus effect is created, wherein the observed reflected color is different on one side of the sample than on the other. A systematic characterization of the optical properties of these structures as a function of their geometry and composition is performed. The experimental studies are coupled with a theoretical analysis that enables a precise, rational design of various optical Janus structures with highly controlled color, pattern, and fabrication approaches. These asymmetrically colored materials will open applications in art, architecture, semitransparent solar cells, and security features in anticounterfeiting materials. © 2017 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  9. Organic materials for the use in optical layer systems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Neubert, T.; Gaida, A.; Huwer, W.; Vergöhl, M.

    2011-09-01

    Ceramic materials such as SiO2 or Ta2O5 are widely used for optical interference coatings. These materials have a high hardness and mostly offer excellent optical properties. However, there is a growing demand not only for good optical properties and a high stability, but also for coatings with a high elasticity. Especially coatings on polymer substrates need layers with improved elasticity since cracks in the layers occur easily when the coated substrates were mechanically deformed. For such applications flexible layer materials using organics or even polymers are very promising. These may be used as pure organic layers of with organic-inorganic composites. Unfortunately the chemical reactions to form polymers layers are more complex than the reactions to form oxides. Thus the deposition techniques for polymer layers are much more varying. Other important issues are the deposition rate stability and the optical properties of the polymer layers like haze, refractive and absorption index. In this paper we compare different ways for the deposition of organic and polymer layers in the gas phase at low pressures. The methods used were: evaporation, sputtering, PECVD and thermal CVD techniques. The optical parameters (refractive index, absorption and haze) and some mechanical parameters (adhesion, crack onset strain) of the different polymer layers were characterized. It will be shown that excellent organic film properties can be obtained by the use of a suitable organic material and deposition process. Also shown will be results on composite materials to modify the optical properties.

  10. Planar waveguide with left-handed material guiding film for refractometry applications

    OpenAIRE

    Taher M. El-Agez; Sofyan A. Taya; SHABAT, Mohamed M.; KULLAB, Hani M.

    2014-01-01

    A symmetric 3-layer slab waveguide with a left-handed material as a guiding layer is examined analytically for cover refractive index detection. The TM mode dispersion relation of the proposed waveguide is investigated. The sensitivity of the proposed sensor to changes in the cover refractive index and the power flowing within each layer are presented. Some unusual features are found; for example, the sensitivity of the proposed sensor is negative. Moreover, the sensitivity improvem...

  11. Rational design of organic electro-optic materials

    CERN Document Server

    Dalton, L R

    2003-01-01

    Quantum mechanical calculations are used to optimize the molecular first hyperpolarizability of organic chromophores and statistical mechanical calculations are used to optimize the translation of molecular hyperpolarizability to macroscopic electro-optic activity (to values of greater than 100 pm V sup - sup 1 at telecommunications wavelengths). Macroscopic material architectures are implemented exploiting new concepts in nanoscale architectural engineering. Multi-chromophore-containing dendrimers and dendronized polymers not only permit optimization of electro-optic activity but also of auxiliary properties including optical loss (both absorption and scattering), thermal and photochemical stability and processability. New reactive ion etching and photolithographic techniques permit the fabrication of three-dimensional optical circuitry and the integration of that circuitry with semiconductor very-large-scale integration electronics and silica fibre optics. Electro-optic devices have been fabricated exploiti...

  12. Hand-Held Sunphotometers for High School Student Construction and Measuring Aerosol Optical Thickness

    Science.gov (United States)

    Almonor, Linda; Baldwin, C.; Craig, R.; Johnson, L. P.

    2000-01-01

    Science education is taking the teaching of science from a traditional (lecture) approach to a multidimensional sense-making approach which allows teachers to support students by providing exploratory experiences. Using projects is one way of providing students with opportunities to observe and participate in sense-making activity. We created a learning environment that fostered inquiry-based learning. Students were engaged in a variety of Inquiry activities that enabled them to work in cooperative planning teams where respect for each other was encouraged and their ability to grasp, transform and transfer information was enhanced. Summer, 1998: An air pollution workshop was conducted for high school students in the Medgar Evers College/Middle College High School Liberty Partnership Summer Program. Students learned the basics of meteorology: structure and composition of the atmosphere and the processes that cause weather. The highlight of this workshop was the building of hand-held sunphotometers, which measure the intensity of the sunlight striking the Earth. Summer, 1999: high school students conducted a research project which measured the mass and size of ambient particulates and enhanced our ability to observe through land based measurements changes in the optical depth of ambient aerosols over Brooklyn. Students used hand held Sunphotometers to collect data over a two week period and entered it into the NASA GISS database by way of the internet.

  13. The Weather-Beaten Dorsal Hand Clinical Rating, Shadow Casting Optical Profilometry, and Skin Capacitance Mapping

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marie Delvenne

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Laypeople commonly perceive some skin xerosis and withering (roughness changes during winter on some parts of the body, particularly on the dorsal hands. The aim of the study was to assess the withered skin surface changes occurring during the four seasons. A total of 47 menopausal women completed the study. A group of 31 volunteers were on hormone replacement therapy (HRT and 16 were out of HRT. Skin xerosis and scaliness were rated clinically. In addition, skin whitening was assessed by computerized shadow casting optical profilometry and by skin capacitance mapping. The volunteers were not using topical creams and over-the-counter products on their hands. Marked changes, recorded over the successive seasons, corresponded to patchy heterogeneous stratum corneum hydration and heterogeneous skin surface roughness changing over seasons; they likely resulted from changes in the environmental temperature and atmosphere moisture. The severity of the changes revealed by clinical inspection was not supported by similar directions of fluctuations in the instrumental assessments. This seemingly contradiction was in fact due to different levels of scale observation. The clinical centimetric scale and the instrumental inframillimetric scale possibly provide distinct aspects of a given biological impact.

  14. Materials and integration schemes for above-IC integrated optics

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Schmitz, Jurriaan; Rangarajan, B.; Kovalgin, Alexeij Y.

    2014-01-01

    A study is presented on silicon oxynitride material for waveguides and germanium-silicon alloys for p-i-n diodes. The materials are manufactured at low, CMOS-backend compatible temperatures, targeting the integration of optical functions on top of CMOS chips. Low-temperature germanium-silicon

  15. Gallium Phosphide as a material for visible and infrared optics

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Václavík J.

    2013-05-01

    Full Text Available Gallium phosphide is interesting material for optical system working in both visible and MWIR or LWIR spectral ranges. Number of a material available for these applications is limited. They are typically salts, fluorides or sulphides and usually exhibit unfavorable properties like brittleness; softness; solubility in water and small chemical resistance. Although GaP has do not offer best optical parameters excels over most other material in mechanical and chemical resistance. The article describes its most important characteristics and outlines some applications where GaP should prove useful.

  16. Development of a low-cost hand-held system for optical coherence tomography imaging (Conference Presentation)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pande, Paritosh; Shelton, Ryan L.; Monroy, Guillermo L.; Nolan, Ryan M.; Boppart, Stephen A.

    2016-03-01

    We report the development of a low-cost hand-held optical coherence imaging system. The proposed system is based on the principle of linear optical coherence tomography (Linear OCT), a technique which was proposed in the early 2000s as a simpler alternative to the conventional time-domain and Fourier-domain OCT. In our design, as in the traditional Michaelson interferometer, light from a broadband source is split into sample and reference beams. Unlike in a Michaelson interferometer though, upon return, a tilt is introduced to the reference beam before it is combined with the sample beam to illuminate a detector array. The resulting fringe pattern encodes information about the relative time-of-flight of photons between the sample and reference arms, which can be decoded by standard signal processing techniques to obtain depth resolved reflectivity profiles of the sample. The axial resolution and the SNR of our system was measured to be approximately 5.2 μm and 80 dB, respectively. The performance of the proposed system was compared with a standard state-of-the-art Fourier-domain low coherence interferometry (LCI) system by imaging several biological and non-biological samples. The results of this study indicate that the proposed low-cost system might be a suitable choice for applications where the imaging depth and SNR can be traded for lower cost and simpler optical design. Two potentially useful applications of the proposed imaging system could be for imaging the human tympanic membrane (TM) for diagnosing middle ear pathologies, and to visualize the sub-surface features of materials for non-destructive evaluation and quality inspection.

  17. Organic materials with nonlinear optical properties

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stupp, Samuel I.; Son, Sehwan; Lin, Hong-Cheu

    1995-01-01

    The present invention is directed to organic materials that have the ability to double or triple the frequency of light that is directed through the materials. Particularly, the present invention is directed to the compound 4-[4-(2R)-2-cyano-7-(4'-pentyloxy-4-biphenylcarbonyloxy)phenylheptylidene) phenylcarbonyloxy]benzaldehyde, which can double the frequency of light that is directed through the compound. The invention is also directed to the compound (12-hydroxy-5,7-dodecadiynyl) 4'-[(4'-pentyloxy-4-biphenyl)carbonyloxy]-4-biphenylcarboxylate, and its polymeric form. The polymeric form can triple the frequency of light directed through it.

  18. Development of on-fiber optical sensors utilizing chromogenic materials

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yuan, Jianming; El-Sherif, Mahmoud A.

    1999-01-01

    On-fiber optical sensors, designed with chromogenic materials used as the fiber modified cladding, were developed for sensing environmental conditions. The design was based on the previously developed on-fiber devices. It is known that the light propagation characteristics in optical fibers are strongly influenced by the refractive index of the cladding materials. Thus, the idea of the on- fiber devices is based on replacing the passive optical fiber cladding with active or sensitive materials. For example, temperature sensors can be developed by replacing the fiber clad material with thermochromic materials. In this paper, segmented polyurethane-diacetylene copolymer (SPU), was selected as the thermochromic material for temperature sensors applications. This material has unique chromogenic properties as well as the required mechanical behaviors. During UV exposure and heat treatment, the color of the SPU copolymer varies with its refractive index. The boundary condition between core and cladding changes due to the change of the refractive index of the modified cladding material. The method used for the sensor development presented involves three steps: (a) removing the fiber jacket and cladding from a small region, (b) coating the chromogenic materials onto the modified region, and (c) integrating the optical fiber sensor components. The experimental set-up was established to detect the changes of the output signal based on the temperature variations. For the sensor evaluation, real-time measurements were performed under different heating-cooling cycles. Abrupt irreversible changes of the sensor output power were detected during the first heating-cooling cycle. At the same time, color changes of the SPU copolymer were observed in the modified region of the optical fiber. For the next heating-cooling cycles, however, the observed changes were almost completely reversible. This result demonstrates that a low-temperature sensor can be built by utilizing the

  19. Optical analysis for few TMDC materials

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Natubhai V. Patel College of Pure and Applied Sciences, Vallabh Vidyanagar 388 120, India. MS received 9 September 2014; accepted 5 .... chemical vapour transport (CVT) technique using iodine as a transporting agent. ..... Subba Rao G V and Shafer M V 1979 Physics and chemistry of materials with layered structures ...

  20. Integration of Magneto-Optical Materials for Novel Optical Devices & Magnetophotonic Crystals Project

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — This work proposes to capitalize on our Phase I success in monolithically integrating magneto-optic and magnetic materials with semiconductor platforms in order to...

  1. Optical characteristics of contemporary dental composite resin materials.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mikhail, Sarah S; Schricker, Scott R; Azer, Shereen S; Brantley, William A; Johnston, William M

    2013-09-01

    Optical and physical properties of dental restorative composite materials are affected by composition. Basic optical absorption and scattering properties have been derived through the use of a corrected reflectance model, but practical and important optical properties are not easily derived from these basic spectral characteristics. The purposes of this study are to derive and compare colour and translucency characteristics of two cured contemporary nanohybrid composites being marketed as universal composites, and to evaluate colour difference between each composite material and published shade guide data. Previously derived optical scattering and absorption coefficients for five diverse shades of these composite materials were used to calculate the CIE colour parameters of L*, a* and b* at infinite thickness under various illuminants and to derive ideal translucency parameters at various thicknesses using two colour difference formulae. Differences were found in the inherent colour parameters and in the translucency parameters between the brands for some of the shades studied. The colour differences of the inherent colours from published shade guide data were always higher than the perceptibility limit, and often higher than the acceptability limit. Inherent colours and ideal translucency parameters may be calculated from optical coefficients for a variety of illuminants. Different inherent colour parameters of composite materials marked for the same shade indicate the influence of compositional differences between these materials. Since patients are seen under various illuminations, the ability to assess appearance matching characteristics under diverse illuminants will help assure an optimum match for the patient. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  2. [Influence of promotional material on hand hygiene in the safety culture of a tertiary hospital].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Molina-Cabrillana, J; Dorta-Hung, M E; Otero Sanz, L; Henández Vera, J R; Martín-Rodríguez, M M; García de Carlos, P

    2016-06-01

    In order to increase safety culture about hand hygiene by means of messages and reminders about its importance in preventing nosocomial infections, we developed a new set of materials in the Complejo Hospitalario Universitario Insular Materno-Infantil of Las Palmas, Gran Canaria, constitued by two centres with 450 beds each and acredited for medical internal residents training. We hired a well-known caricaturist, who adapted the messages to the local way of speaking, by using characters that used to appear in his artwork in the local newspaper. Also, we continued to work with other graphic design professionals. We monitored adherence and consumption of products for hand rubbing. We noted an increase in both indicators in the following months after the implementation of this strategy. Moreover, we revised the infrastructures for hand hygiene, and were able to demonstrate improvements in most of the patient care areas. The material was well accepted by professionals, patients and visitors. No other interventions were made, so we think improvements can be attributable to this strategy in our setting. Copyright © 2016 SECA. Published by Elsevier Espana. All rights reserved.

  3. Ultralight Weight Optical Systems Using Nano-Layered Synthesized Materials

    Science.gov (United States)

    Clark, Natalie; Breckinridge, James

    2014-01-01

    Optical imaging is important for many NASA science missions. Even though complex optical systems have advanced, the optics, based on conventional glass and mirrors, require components that are thick, heavy and expensive. As the need for higher performance expands, glass and mirrors are fast approaching the point where they will be too large, heavy and costly for spacecraft, especially small satellite systems. NASA Langley Research Center is developing a wide range of novel nano-layered synthesized materials that enable the development and fabrication of ultralight weight optical device systems that enable many NASA missions to collect science data imagery using small satellites. In addition to significantly reducing weight, the nano-layered synthesized materials offer advantages in performance, size, and cost.

  4. Laser Induced Damage in Optical Materials: 1979.

    Science.gov (United States)

    1980-07-01

    and 100 gm loads using a Knoop diamond indentor. Coefficient of Thermal Expansion A quartz tube dilatometer was employed for thermal expansion...which in turn results in an explosive heating with plasma formation and cracking, melting and vaporizing of the material. 2. Experimental Procedure 2.1... explosive eruption upward and outward from the substrate interface. At the edge of the irradiated area, where the beam fluence is low, the damaged site

  5. Strained silicon as a new electro-optic material

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jacobsen, Rune Shim; Andersen, Karin Nordström; Borel, Peter Ingo

    2006-01-01

    functionalities can be integrated into monolithic components based on the versatile silicon platform, is due to the limited active optical properties of silicon3. Recently, however, a continuous-wave Raman silicon laser was demonstrated4; if an effective modulator could also be realized in silicon, data......For decades, silicon has been the material of choice for mass fabrication of electronics. This is in contrast to photonics, where passive optical components in silicon have only recently been realized1, 2. The slow progress within silicon optoelectronics, where electronic and optical...... processing and transmission could potentially be performed by all-silicon electronic and optical components. Here we have discovered that a significant linear electro-optic effect is induced in silicon by breaking the crystal symmetry. The symmetry is broken by depositing a straining layer on top...

  6. Silicon waveguide optical switch with embedded phase change material.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miller, Kevin J; Hallman, Kent A; Haglund, Richard F; Weiss, Sharon M

    2017-10-30

    Phase-change materials (PCMs) have emerged as promising active elements in silicon (Si) photonic systems. In this work, we design, fabricate, and characterize a hybrid Si-PCM optical switch. By integrating vanadium dioxide (a PCM) within a Si photonic waveguide, in a non-resonant geometry, we achieve ~10 dB broadband optical contrast with a PCM length of 500 nm using thermal actuation.

  7. Engineering materials for mid-infrared optical sensor applications

    OpenAIRE

    Richardson K. A; Musgraves J. D.; Wachtel P.; Novak S; Danto S.; Agarwal A; Singh V; Lin P-T; Kimerling L.C.; Hu J; Yi Z; Lin H; Giammarco J.; Soliani A.P; Luzinov I.

    2013-01-01

    Planar optical structures based on functionalized chalcogenide glasses provide a superb device platform for chemical and biological sensing applications. Chalcogenide glasses have demonstrated promise as materials for infrared sensing as they exhibit transparency over a large range of infrared wavelengths and tunable optical properties through doping and/or compositional tailoring. Waveguides, resonators and other components processed on-chip (silicon, Si) can be realized such that the strong...

  8. Fabrication and optical properties of pyrene-Eu hybrid materials.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhao, Yan-Xia; Xu, Bo; Ding, Xun-Lei; He, Sheng-Gui

    2013-02-01

    Lanthanide-containing organic-inorganic hybrid materials have drawn much attention in the research of materials with multifunctional and modulated optical properties. Here, large area pyrene-Eu hybrid nanostructures constructed of a large amount of nanowires are successfully fabricated through physical vapor codeposition method at low temperature (77 K). Further optical property characterizations indicate that the pyrene-Eu hybrid nanostructures exhibit enhanced green light emission under blue light excitation compared with other fabricated samples (pyrene nanostructures, Eu nanoparticles, and pyrene/Cu hybrid nanostructures). The results indicate the occurrence of an energy transfer process from the sensitizing pyrene nanostructures to Eu. Pyrene-Eu hybrid nanostructures with unique photoluminescence properties may have promising applications in phosphors, light-emitting device, and UV-vis photo sensor. The results also prove that the physical vapor codeposition method is an effective way for design of organic-inorganic hybrid materials with controllable and tunable optical properties.

  9. Active polymer materials for optical fiber CO2 sensors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wysokiński, Karol; Filipowicz, Marta; Stańczyk, Tomasz; Lipiński, Stanisław; Napierała, Marek; Murawski, Michał; Nasiłowski, Tomasz

    2017-04-01

    CO2 optical fiber sensors based on polymer active materials are presented in this paper. Ethyl cellulose was proven to be a good candidate for a matrix material of the sensor, since it gives porous, thick and very sensitive layers. Low-cost sensors based on polymer optical fibers have been elaborated. Sensors have been examined for their sensitivity to CO2, temperature and humidity. Response time during cyclic exposures to CO2 have been also determined. Special layers exhibiting irreversible change of color during exposure to carbon dioxide have been developed. They have been verified for a possible use in smart food packaging.

  10. Laser Induced Damage in Optical Materials: 6th ASTM Symposium.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Glass, A J; Guenther, A H

    1975-03-01

    The Sixth ASTM-ONR-NBS Symposium on Laser Induced Damage in Optical Materials was held at the National Bureau of Standards in Boulder, Colorado on 22-23 May 1974. Over 150 attendees at the Symposium heard thirty-one papers on topics relating to laser induced damage in crystalline and nonlinear optical materials, at dielectric surfaces, and in thin film coatings as well as discussions of damage problems in the ir region due both to cw and pulsed irradiation. In addition, several reports on the theoretical analysis of laser-materials interaction relative to the damage progress were given, along with tabulations of fundamental materials properties of importance in evaluation of optical material response to high-power laser radiation. Attention was given to high-power laser system design considerations that relate to improved system performance and reliability when various damage mechanisms are operable in such systems. A workshop on the machining of optics was held, and nine papers on various facets of the topic were presented dealing with machining procedures, surface characterization of machined elements, coating of machined components, and the polishing and damage resistance of polished, coated, and bare metal reflectors.

  11. Stable phantom materials for ultrasound and optical imaging

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cabrelli, Luciana C.; Pelissari, Pedro I. B. G. B.; Deana, Alessandro M.; Carneiro, Antonio A. O.; Pavan, Theo Z.

    2017-01-01

    Phantoms mimicking the specific properties of biological tissues are essential to fully characterize medical devices. Water-based materials are commonly used to manufacture phantoms for ultrasound and optical imaging techniques. However, these materials have disadvantages, such as easy degradation and low temporal stability. In this study, we propose an oil-based new tissue-mimicking material for ultrasound and optical imaging, with the advantage of presenting low temporal degradation. A styrene-ethylene/butylene-styrene (SEBS) copolymer in mineral oil samples was made varying the SEBS concentration between 5%-15%, and low-density polyethylene (LDPE) between 0%-9%. Acoustic properties, such as the speed of sound and the attenuation coefficient, were obtained using frequencies ranging from 1-10 MHz, and were consistent with that of soft tissues. These properties were controlled varying SEBS and LDPE concentration. To characterize the optical properties of the samples, the diffuse reflectance and transmittance were measured. Scattering and absorption coefficients ranging from 400 nm-1200 nm were calculated for each compound. SEBS gels are a translucent material presenting low optical absorption and scattering coefficients in the visible region of the spectrum, but the presence of LDPE increased the turbidity. Adding LDPE increased the absorption and scattering of the phantom materials. Ultrasound and photoacoustic images of a heterogeneous phantom made of LDPE/SEBS containing a spherical inclusion were obtained. Annatto dye was added to the inclusion to enhance the optical absorbance. The results suggest that copolymer gels are promising for ultrasound and optical imaging, making them also potentially useful for photoacoustic imaging.

  12. Stable phantom materials for ultrasound and optical imaging.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cabrelli, Luciana C; Pelissari, Pedro I B G B; Deana, Alessandro M; Carneiro, Antonio A O; Pavan, Theo Z

    2017-01-21

    Phantoms mimicking the specific properties of biological tissues are essential to fully characterize medical devices. Water-based materials are commonly used to manufacture phantoms for ultrasound and optical imaging techniques. However, these materials have disadvantages, such as easy degradation and low temporal stability. In this study, we propose an oil-based new tissue-mimicking material for ultrasound and optical imaging, with the advantage of presenting low temporal degradation. A styrene-ethylene/butylene-styrene (SEBS) copolymer in mineral oil samples was made varying the SEBS concentration between 5%-15%, and low-density polyethylene (LDPE) between 0%-9%. Acoustic properties, such as the speed of sound and the attenuation coefficient, were obtained using frequencies ranging from 1-10 MHz, and were consistent with that of soft tissues. These properties were controlled varying SEBS and LDPE concentration. To characterize the optical properties of the samples, the diffuse reflectance and transmittance were measured. Scattering and absorption coefficients ranging from 400 nm-1200 nm were calculated for each compound. SEBS gels are a translucent material presenting low optical absorption and scattering coefficients in the visible region of the spectrum, but the presence of LDPE increased the turbidity. Adding LDPE increased the absorption and scattering of the phantom materials. Ultrasound and photoacoustic images of a heterogeneous phantom made of LDPE/SEBS containing a spherical inclusion were obtained. Annatto dye was added to the inclusion to enhance the optical absorbance. The results suggest that copolymer gels are promising for ultrasound and optical imaging, making them also potentially useful for photoacoustic imaging.

  13. Methods for integrating optical fibers with advanced aerospace materials

    Science.gov (United States)

    Poland, Stephen H.; May, Russell G.; Murphy, Kent A.; Claus, Richard O.; Tran, Tuan A.; Miller, Mark S.

    1993-07-01

    Optical fibers are attractive candidates for sensing applications in near-term smart materials and structures, due to their inherent immunity to electromagnetic interference and ground loops, their capability for distributed and multiplexed operation, and their high sensitivity and dynamic range. These same attributes also render optical fibers attractive for avionics busses for fly-by-light systems in advanced aircraft. The integration of such optical fibers with metal and composite aircraft and aerospace materials, however, remains a limiting factor in their successful use in such applications. This paper first details methods for the practical integration of optical fiber waveguides and cable assemblies onto and into materials and structures. Physical properties of the optical fiber and coatings which affect the survivability of the fiber are then considered. Mechanisms for the transfer of the strain from matrix to fiber for sensor and data bus fibers integrated with composite structural elements are evaluated for their influence on fiber survivability, in applications where strain or impact is imparted to the assembly.

  14. Optical Fibre Sensors Using Graphene-Based Materials: A Review

    OpenAIRE

    Miguel Hernaez; Zamarreño, Carlos R.; Sonia Melendi-Espina; Bird, Liam R.; Mayes, Andrew G.; Francisco J. Arregui

    2017-01-01

    Graphene and its derivatives have become the most explored materials since Novoselov and Geim (Nobel Prize winners for Physics in 2010) achieved its isolation in 2004. The exceptional properties of graphene have attracted the attention of the scientific community from different research fields, generating high impact not only in scientific journals, but also in general-interest newspapers. Optical fibre sensing is one of the many fields that can benefit from the use of these new materials, co...

  15. Norland Optical Adhesive 72® as phase holographic material

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mauricio Ortiz-Gutiérrez

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available Characterization of the holographic material composed by adhesive polymer Norland Optical Adhesive 72® (NOA 72® was studied. With a wavelength of 457 nm from an Ar laser, real time phase holographic gratings under different parameters such as energy, frequency and thickness were recorded. The diffraction efficiency of the recorded holographic gratings was measured and some experimental results are shown. Furthermore, the material was used to record Fourier holograms.

  16. Materials and Structures Enabling Vanishing Optically Triggered Sensors

    Science.gov (United States)

    2017-03-01

    Materials and Structures Enabling Vanishing Optically Triggered Sensors Paul A. Kohl School of Chemical and Biomolecular Engineering Georgia...polymers in the fabrication of vaporizing devices, such as sensors . However, they have been troublesome to synthesize and keep stable during storage...phthalaldehyde; vaporizing sensors Introduction Thermodynamically unstable polymers have emerged in applications where a catalytic response to a

  17. Breakdown of Optical Phonons' Splitting in Two-Dimensional Materials.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sohier, Thibault; Gibertini, Marco; Calandra, Matteo; Mauri, Francesco; Marzari, Nicola

    2017-06-14

    We investigate the long-wavelength dispersion of longitudinal and transverse optical phonon modes in polar two-dimensional materials, multilayers, and their heterostructures. Using analytical models and density-functional perturbation theory in a two-dimensional framework, we show that at variance with the three-dimensional case these modes are degenerate at the zone center but the macroscopic electric field associated with the longitudinal-optical modes gives rise to a finite slope at the zone center in their corresponding phonon dispersions. This slope increases linearly with the number of layers and it is determined solely by the Born effective charges of the material and the dielectric properties of the surrounding media. Screening from the environment can greatly reduce the slope splitting between the longitudinal and transverse optical modes and can be seen in the experimentally relevant case of boron nitride-graphene heterostructures. As the phonon momentum increases, the intrinsic screening properties of the two-dimensional material dictate the transition to a momentum-independent splitting similar to that of three-dimensional materials. These considerations are essential to understand electrical transport and optical coupling in two-dimensional systems.

  18. 3D Printing Optical Engine for Controlling Material Microstructure

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huang, Wei-Chin; Chang, Kuang-Po; Wu, Ping-Han; Wu, Chih-Hsien; Lin, Ching-Chih; Chuang, Chuan-Sheng; Lin, De-Yau; Liu, Sung-Ho; Horng, Ji-Bin; Tsau, Fang-Hei

    Controlling the cooling rate of alloy during melting and resolidification is the most commonly used method for varying the material microstructure and consequently the resuling property. However, the cooling rate of a selective laser melting (SLM) production is restricted by a preset optimal parameter of a good dense product. The head room for locally manipulating material property in a process is marginal. In this study, we invent an Optical Engine for locally controlling material microstructure in a SLM process. It develops an invovative method to control and adjust thermal history of the solidification process to gain desired material microstucture and consequently drastically improving the quality. Process parameters selected locally for specific materials requirement according to designed characteristics by using thermal dynamic principles of solidification process. It utilize a technique of complex laser beam shape of adaptive irradiation profile to permit local control of material characteristics as desired. This technology could be useful for industrial application of medical implant, aerospace and automobile industries.

  19. Oxidation processes in magneto-optic and related materials

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Paul A.; Armstrong, Neal R.; Danzinger, James L.; England, Craig D.

    1992-01-01

    The surface oxidation processes of thin films of magneto-optic materials, such as the rare-earth transition metal alloys have been studied, starting in ultrahigh vacuum environments, using surface analysis techniques, as a way of modeling the oxidation processes which occur at the base of a defect in an overcoated material, at the instant of exposure to ambient environments. Materials examined have included FeTbCo alloys, as well as those same materials with low percentages of added elements, such a Ta, and their reactivities to both O2 and H2O compared with materials such as thin Fe films coated with ultrathin adlayers of Ti. The surface oxidation pathways for these materials is reviewed, and XPS data presented which indicates the type of oxides formed, and a critical region of Ta concentration which provides optimum protection.

  20. Causality relations for materials with strong artificial optical chirality

    CERN Document Server

    Gorkunov, M V; Ezhov, A A; Artemov, V V; Rogov, O Y

    2014-01-01

    We demonstrate that the fundamental causality principle being applied to strongly chiral artificial materials yields the generalized Kramers-Kronig relations for the observables -- circular dichroism and optical activity. The relations include the Blaschke terms determined by material-specific features - the zeros of transmission amplitude on the complex frequency plane. By the example of subwavelength arrays of chiral holes in silver films we show that the causality relations can be used not only for a precise verification of experimental data but also for resolving the positions of material anomalies and resonances and quantifying the degree of their chiral splitting.

  1. Optical Properties of Selective Emitter Materials for Thermophotovoltaic Applications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hambourger, Paul D.

    1996-01-01

    We investigate the optical properties of new "selective emitter" materials for possible use in high-efficiency thermophotovoltaic power systems. These are systems which directly convert heat to radiation at a wavelength closely matched to the bandgap energy of the solar cell. Candidate materials which have strong absorption lines fairly close to the bandgap of good solar-cell materials were chosen for study. Their emittance was measured as a function of wavelength to evaluate their promise as selective TPV emitters. Useful and informative results were obtained. Some of these results were presented at a January 1996 solar energy conference of the American Institute of Aeronautics and Astronautics.

  2. In Situ identification of mineral resources with an X-ray-optical "Hand-Lens" instrument

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marshall, J.; Koppel, L.; Bratton, C.; Metzger, E.; Hecht, M.

    1997-01-01

    The recognition of material resources on a planetary surface requires exploration strategies not dissimilar to those employed by early field geologists who searched for ore deposits primarily from surface clues. In order to determine the location of mineral ores or other materials, it will be necessary to characterize host terranes at regional or subregional scales. This requires geographically broad surveys in which statistically significant numbers of samples are rapidly scanned from a roving platform. To enable broad-scale, yet power-conservative planetary-surface exploration, we are developing an instrument that combines x-ray diffractometry (XRD), x-ray fluorescence spectrometry (XRF), and optical capabilities; the instrument can be deployed at the end of a rover's robotic arm, without the need for sample capture or preparation. The instrument provides XRD data for identification of mineral species and lithological types; diffractometry of minerals is conducted by ascertaining the characteristic lattice parameters or "d-spacings" of mineral compounds. D-spacings of 1.4 to 25 angstroms can be determined to include the large molecular structures of hydrated minerals such as clays. The XRF data will identify elements ranging from carbon (Atomic Number = 6) to elements as heavy as barium (Atomic Number = 56).

  3. The clinical utility of a hand-held computerized optical imaging system at assessing skin discoloration.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fisk, Nathan A; Jensen, Kurt; Knaggs, Helen; Ferguson, Scott

    2010-06-01

    A hand-held computerized optical device (HCOD) that can be used by a layperson has been developed which is capable of imaging facial skin and assessing multiple skin attributes, including discoloration. The aim of this study was to assess the HCOD's ability to measure changes in discoloration induced over an 8-week course of treatment by comparing data obtained from the HCOD with the assessments of a trained research dermatologist. Ten female Caucasian subjects, aged between 41 and 79 years, exhibiting moderate facial dyspigmentation used a combination 0.01% fluocinolone acetonide, 4% hydroquinone, and 0.05% tretinoin cream twice daily for 8 weeks. Subjects were evaluated at weeks 0, 4, and 8 by a dermatologist. Images were also taken with high resolution digital photography and with the HCOD. Human testing was directed by a dermatologist, used approved consent forms, and products approved by the FDA. Facial dyspigmentation as scored by a clinician significantly decreased from 4.10 to 2.70 by week 8. HCOD discoloration area scores also significantly decreased from 100,989 to 87,276 by week 8. Assessment of pigmented area by the HCOD proved to be the most reliable in terms of correlating to a clinician's score. Limitations The study had a small sample size and was not placebo controlled because the effectiveness of the HCOD was being evaluated, not the skin lightening product. The HCOD's discoloration area count statistically correlated with the clinician dyspigmentation scores when evaluating the effect of a prescription skin lightening cream on subjects with moderate facial discolorations.

  4. Continuous ambulatory hand force monitoring during manual materials handling using instrumented force shoes and an inertial motion capture suit.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Faber, G S; Koopman, A S; Kingma, I; Chang, C C; Dennerlein, J T; van Dieën, J H

    2017-10-25

    Hand forces (HFs) are commonly measured during biomechanical assessment of manual materials handling; however, it is often a challenge to directly measure HFs in field studies. Therefore, in a previous study we proposed a HF estimation method based on ground reaction forces (GRFs) and body segment accelerations and tested it with laboratory equipment: GFRs were measured with force plates (FPs) and segment accelerations were measured using optical motion capture (OMC). In the current study, we evaluated the HF estimation method based on an ambulatory measurement system, consisting of inertial motion capture (IMC) and instrumented force shoes (FSs). Sixteen participants lifted and carried a 10-kg crate from ground level while 3D full-body kinematics were measured using OMC and IMC, and 3D GRFs were measured using FPs and FSs. We estimated 3D hand force vectors based on: (1) FP+OMC, (2) FP+IMC and (3) FS+IMC. We calculated the root-mean-square differences (RMSDs) between the estimated HFs to reference HFs calculated based on crate kinematics and the GRFs of a FP that the crate was lifted from. Averaged over subjects and across 3D force directions, the HF RMSD ranged between 10-15N when using the laboratory equipment (FP + OMC), 11-18N when using the IMC instead of OMC data (FP+IMC), and 17-21N when using the FSs in combination with IMC (FS + IMC). This error is regarded acceptable for the assessment of spinal loading during manual lifting, as it would results in less than 5% error in peak moment estimates. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  5. Inkjet Printing of Functional Materials for Optical and Photonic Applications

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jorge Alamán

    2016-11-01

    Full Text Available Inkjet printing, traditionally used in graphics, has been widely investigated as a valuable tool in the preparation of functional surfaces and devices. This review focuses on the use of inkjet printing technology for the manufacturing of different optical elements and photonic devices. The presented overview mainly surveys work done in the fabrication of micro-optical components such as microlenses, waveguides and integrated lasers; the manufacturing of large area light emitting diodes displays, liquid crystal displays and solar cells; as well as the preparation of liquid crystal and colloidal crystal based photonic devices working as lasers or optical sensors. Special emphasis is placed on reviewing the materials employed as well as in the relevance of inkjet in the manufacturing of the different devices showing in each of the revised technologies, main achievements, applications and challenges.

  6. Reconfigurable optical manipulation by phase change material waveguides.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Tianhang; Mei, Shengtao; Wang, Qian; Liu, Hong; Lim, Chwee Teck; Teng, Jinghua

    2017-05-25

    Optical manipulation by dielectric waveguides enables the transportation of particles and biomolecules beyond diffraction limits. However, traditional dielectric waveguides could only transport objects in the forward direction which does not fulfill the requirements of the next generation lab-on-chip system where the integrated manipulation system should be much more flexible and multifunctional. In this work, bidirectional transportation of objects on the nanoscale is demonstrated on a rectangular waveguide made of the phase change material Ge2Sb2Te5 (GST) by numerical simulations. Either continuous pushing forces or pulling forces are generated on the trapped particles when the GST is in the amorphous or crystalline phase. With the technique of a femtosecond laser induced phase transition on the GST, we further proposed a reconfigurable optical trap array on the same waveguide. This work demonstrates GST waveguide's potential of achieving multifunctional manipulation of multiple objects on the nanoscale with plausible optical setups.

  7. Inkjet Printing of Functional Materials for Optical and Photonic Applications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alamán, Jorge; Alicante, Raquel; Peña, Jose Ignacio; Sánchez-Somolinos, Carlos

    2016-01-01

    Inkjet printing, traditionally used in graphics, has been widely investigated as a valuable tool in the preparation of functional surfaces and devices. This review focuses on the use of inkjet printing technology for the manufacturing of different optical elements and photonic devices. The presented overview mainly surveys work done in the fabrication of micro-optical components such as microlenses, waveguides and integrated lasers; the manufacturing of large area light emitting diodes displays, liquid crystal displays and solar cells; as well as the preparation of liquid crystal and colloidal crystal based photonic devices working as lasers or optical sensors. Special emphasis is placed on reviewing the materials employed as well as in the relevance of inkjet in the manufacturing of the different devices showing in each of the revised technologies, main achievements, applications and challenges. PMID:28774032

  8. Optical Microresonators for Sensing and Transduction: A Materials Perspective.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Heylman, Kevin D; Knapper, Kassandra A; Horak, Erik H; Rea, Morgan T; Vanga, Sudheer K; Goldsmith, Randall H

    2017-08-01

    Optical microresonators confine light to a particular microscale trajectory, are exquisitely sensitive to their microenvironment, and offer convenient readout of their optical properties. Taken together, this is an immensely attractive combination that makes optical microresonators highly effective as sensors and transducers. Meanwhile, advances in material science, fabrication techniques, and photonic sensing strategies endow optical microresonators with new functionalities, unique transduction mechanisms, and in some cases, unparalleled sensitivities. In this progress report, the operating principles of these sensors are reviewed, and different methods of signal transduction are evaluated. Examples are shown of how choice of materials must be suited to the analyte, and how innovations in fabrication and sensing are coupled together in a mutually reinforcing cycle. A tremendously broad range of capabilities of microresonator sensors is described, from electric and magnetic field sensing to mechanical sensing, from single-molecule detection to imaging and spectroscopy, from operation at high vacuum to in live cells. Emerging sensing capabilities are highlighted and put into context in the field. Future directions are imagined, where the diverse capabilities laid out are combined and advances in scalability and integration are implemented, leading to the creation of a sensor unparalleled in sensitivity and information content. © 2017 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  9. Nonreciprocal optical properties of thermal radiation with SiC grating magneto-optical materials.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Han; Wu, Hao; Shen, Zhiyuan

    2017-08-07

    We demonstrate the nonreciprocal optical phenomenon of SiC gratings on substrate in infrared band, in which the Lorentz-Drude equations of dielectric constant tensor are proposed to describe the nonreciprocal optical properties as magnetic field applied on the magneto-optical materials, under variable intensity and wavelength. Moreover, the properly designed geometrical factors are proposed, and the good nonreciprocal absorption properties of SiC in thermal radiation wavelength band are presented. The dependence of the absorptivity as a function of different structure parameters, such as thickness of different layers, filling ratios, is studied in details. Furthermore, the electric field intensity is also presented for understanding light coupling, propagation. Numerical evidence shows that the nonreciprocal absorption performance is sensitive to the incidence angle, as well as the magnetic field strength. The relative study is useful to the thermal radiative design in photovoltaic and optical instrument.

  10. Magneto optical properties of silver doped magnetic nanocomposite material

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    N. Abirami

    2017-11-01

    Full Text Available Magnetic composite materials challenge traditional materials in broad applications such as transformer, sensors and electrical motors. In this work by studying the permittivity and permeability spectra of silver doped magnetic nanocomposite system, the variation of the effective refractive index with frequency is investigated for different filling factor. It is found that the value of resonance frequency decrease with filling factor. The polariton dispersion of the system is also studied. This study of the nanocomposite system can be exploited in designing modern optical devices.PACS: 75.50-y, 71.36.+c, 78.67.Sc, 78.20.Ci. Keywords: Permittivity, Permeability, Nanocomposite system, Polariton

  11. Phase-matched nonlinear optics via patterning layered materials.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fryett, Taylor K; Zhan, Alan; Majumdar, Arka

    2017-09-15

    The ease of integration and a large second-order nonlinear coefficient of atomically thin layered two-dimensional (2D) materials presents a unique opportunity to realize second-order nonlinearity in a silicon compatible integrated photonic system. However, the phase-matching requirement for second-order nonlinear optical processes makes the nanophotonic design difficult. We show that by nano-patterning the 2D material, quasi-phase-matching can be achieved. Such patterning-based quasi-phase-matching could potentially compensate for inevitable fabrication errors and significantly simplify the design process of the nonlinear nanophotonic devices.

  12. Optical/Dielectric Properties of Inhomogeneous Optical Material: A New Method of Evaluation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nagendra, C. L.; Lamb, J. L.

    1993-01-01

    A new method, based on Effective mean Field Theory, is proposed for the evaluation of the optical/dielectric properties of inhomogeneous materials, in which the real and imaginary parts of the dielectric function are determined by solving a simultaneous non-linear equation.

  13. THz - ToF Optical Layer Analysis (OLA) to determine optical properties of dielectric materials

    Science.gov (United States)

    Spranger, Holger; Beckmann, Jörg

    2017-02-01

    Electromagnetic waves with frequencies between 0.1 and 10 THz are described as THz-radiation (T-ray). The ability to penetrate dielectric materials makes T-rays attractive to reveal discontinuities in polymer and ceramic materials. THz-Time Domain Spectroscopy Systems (THz-TDS) are available on the market today which operates with THz-pulses transmitted and received by optically pumped semiconductor antennas. In THz-TDS the travelling time (ToF) and shape of the pulse is changed if it interacts with the dielectric material and its inherent discontinuities. A tomogram of the object under the test can be reconstructed from time of flight diffraction (ToFD) scans if a synthetic focusing aperture (SAFT) algorithm is applied. The knowledge of the base materials shape and optical properties is essential for a proper reconstruction result. To obtain these properties a model is assumed which describes the device under the test as multilayer structure composed of thin layers with different dielectric characteristics. The Optical Layer Analysis (OLA) is able to fulfill these requirements. A short description why the optical properties are crucial for meaningful SAFT reconstruction results will be given first. Afterwards the OLA will be derived and applied on representative samples to discuss and evaluate its benefits and limits.

  14. Engineering materials for mid-infrared optical sensor applications

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Richardson K. A

    2013-11-01

    Full Text Available Planar optical structures based on functionalized chalcogenide glasses provide a superb device platform for chemical and biological sensing applications. Chalcogenide glasses have demonstrated promise as materials for infrared sensing as they exhibit transparency over a large range of infrared wavelengths and tunable optical properties through doping and/or compositional tailoring. Waveguides, resonators and other components processed on-chip (silicon, Si can be realized such that the strong enhancement in the electromagnetic field confined within a high index contrast resonator, leads to highly sensitive photon-matter interactions in a small footprint. In this paper we discuss the development of highly sensitive chalcogenide glass based microdisk resonator sensors that measure resonant peak shifts caused by refractive index change upon exposure to a chemical analyte. The specificity of the microdisk resonator sensors is enhanced by applying specialized polymer films and nanofoams that respond in a predictable fashion when exposed to a chemical analyte of interest. Discussed are key material science challenges needed to enable highly sensitive and specific sensors based on such complex multi-material assemblies and the fabrication issues that ultimately define resulting optical performance.

  15. Development and Optical Testing of the Camera, Hand Lens, and Microscope Probe with Scannable Laser Spectroscopy (CHAMP-SLS)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mungas, Greg S.; Gursel, Yekta; Sepulveda, Cesar A.; Anderson, Mark; La Baw, Clayton; Johnson, Kenneth R.; Deans, Matthew; Beegle, Luther; Boynton, John

    2008-01-01

    Conducting high resolution field microscopy with coupled laser spectroscopy that can be used to selectively analyze the surface chemistry of individual pixels in a scene is an enabling capability for next generation robotic and manned spaceflight missions, civil, and military applications. In the laboratory, we use a range of imaging and surface preparation tools that provide us with in-focus images, context imaging for identifying features that we want to investigate at high magnification, and surface-optical coupling that allows us to apply optical spectroscopic analysis techniques for analyzing surface chemistry particularly at high magnifications. The camera, hand lens, and microscope probe with scannable laser spectroscopy (CHAMP-SLS) is an imaging/spectroscopy instrument capable of imaging continuously from infinity down to high resolution microscopy (resolution of approx. 1 micron/pixel in a final camera format), the closer CHAMP-SLS is placed to a feature, the higher the resultant magnification. At hand lens to microscopic magnifications, the imaged scene can be selectively interrogated with point spectroscopic techniques such as Raman spectroscopy, microscopic Laser Induced Breakdown Spectroscopy (micro-LIBS), laser ablation mass-spectrometry, Fluorescence spectroscopy, and/or Reflectance spectroscopy. This paper summarizes the optical design, development, and testing of the CHAMP-SLS optics.

  16. Examination of an optical transmittance test for photovoltaic encapsulation materials

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Miller, David C.; Bengoechea, Jaione; Bokria, Jayesh G.; Köhl, Michael; Powell, Nick E.; Smith, Michael E.; White, Michael D.; Wilson, Helen Rose; Wohlgemuth, John H.; Dhere, Neelkanth G.; Wohlgemuth, John H.; Lynn, Kevin W.

    2013-09-24

    The optical transmittance of encapsulation materials is a key characteristic for their use in photovoltaic (PV) modules. Changes in transmittance with time in the field affect module performance, which may impact product warranties. Transmittance is important in product development, module manufacturing, and field power production (both immediate and long-term). Therefore, an international standard (IEC 62788-1-4) has recently been proposed by the Encapsulation Task-Group within the Working Group 2 (WG2) of the International Electrotechnical Commission (IEC) Technical Committee 82 (TC82) for the quantification of the optical performance of PV encapsulation materials. Existing standards, such as ASTM E903, are general and more appropriately applied to concentrated solar power than to PV. Starting from the optical transmittance measurement, the solar-weighted transmittance of photon irradiance, yellowness index (which may be used in aging studies to assess durability), and ultraviolet (UV) cut-off wavelength may all be determined using the proposed standard. The details of the proposed test are described. The results of a round-robin experiment (for five materials) conducted at seven laboratories to validate the test procedure using representative materials are also presented. For example, the Encapsulation Group actively explored the measurement requirements (wavelength range and resolution), the requirements for the spectrophotometer (including the integrating sphere and instrument accessories, such as a depolarizer), specimen requirements (choice of glass-superstrate and -substrate), and data analysis (relative to the light that may be used in the PV application). The round-robin experiment identified both intra- and inter-laboratory instrument precision and bias for five encapsulation materials (encompassing a range of transmittance and haze-formation characteristics).

  17. The use of polyurethane foam as an antimicrobial dressing material in hand surgery

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nebil Yesiloglu

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available Polyurethane foam is generally used in negative pressure-assisted wound closure therapy. It provides an antimicrobial environment around the wound, while reducing the rate of skin maceration. The authors used polyurethane foam in routine hand dressings after hand surgery operations that were performed for both congenital and acquired purposes. [Hand Microsurg 2015; 4(3.000: 91-92

  18. Inverse Algorithm Optimization for Determining Optical Properties of Biological Materials from Spatially-Resolved Diffuse Reflectance

    Science.gov (United States)

    Optical characterization of biological materials is useful in many scientific and industrial applications like biomedical diagnosis and nondestructive quality evaluation of food and agricultural products. However, accurate determination of the optical properties from intact biological materials base...

  19. New Organic Semiconductor Materials Applied in Organic Photovoltaic and Optical Devices

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Andre F. S. Guedes; Vilmar P. Guedes; Simone Tartari; Mônica L. Souza; Idaulo J. Cunha

    2015-01-01

    The development of flexible organic photovoltaic solar cells, using an optically transparent substrate material and organic semiconductor materials, has been widely utilized by the electronic industry...

  20. Optical Studies on Antimonide Superlattice Infrared Detector Material

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hoglund, Linda; Soibel, Alexander; Hill, Cory J.; Ting, David Z.; Khoshakhlagh, Arezou; Liao, Anna; Keo, Sam; Lee, Michael C.; Nguyen, Jean; Mumolo, Jason M.; hide

    2010-01-01

    In this study the material quality and optical properties of type II InAs/GaSb superlattices are investigated using transmission and photoluminescence (PL) spectroscopy. The influence of the material quality on the intensity of the luminescence and on the electrical properties of the detectors is studied and a good correlation between the photodetector current-voltage (IV) characteristics and the PL intensity is observed. Studies of the temperature dependence of the PL reveal that Shockley-Read-Hall processes are limiting the minority carrier lifetime in both the mid-IR wavelength and the long-IR wavelength detector material studied. These results demonstrate that PL spectroscopy is a valuable tool for optimization of infrared detectors.

  1. New Class of Wide Energy Gap Benzotriimidazole Optical Materials

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jianmin Shi

    2017-10-01

    Full Text Available A new class of wide energy gap benzotriimidazole materials have been synthesized by a two-step condensation reaction. All of the benzotriimidazole compounds have π-π* absorption bands in the range of 250–400 nm. The photoluminescence (PL quantum efficiency of each benzotriimidazole depends strongly on the presence of electron withdrawing groups. PL quantum efficiencies of benzotriimidazoles without electron withdrawing groups were less than desirable (40–43%, while molecules with electron withdrawing groups displayed much stronger PL with efficiencies in the range of 73–75%. The electron withdrawing groups shift the emission to a longer wavelength, towards a more “true blue” color. This new class of benzotriimidazole optical materials could be used as electron-injecting and electron-transporting blue luminescence materials for potential organic light-emitting diode (OLED applications.

  2. From usability requirement to technical specifications for hand-held tools and materials: an applied research in the construction field.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Duca, Gabriella; Attaianese, Erminia

    2012-01-01

    Literature shows incidence of musculoskeletal disorders in bricklaying workers as well as the relevance of good designed hand-held tools in musculoskeletal disorders prevention. In this framework, it can be supposed that providing usable hand-held tools and material in construction worksites will help to improve bricklayers' working conditions. Here a study is presented aimed at framing a methodology for usability assessment of bricklayers handled objects, in order to provide employers with practical indicators for choosing tools and materials best fitting workers needs, under the effectiveness, efficiency and satisfaction perspective. On the basis of a task analysis, usability requirements for bricklaying hand-held tools and materials have been detailed and related, quantitative and qualitative, technical specifications have been elicited. Theoretical framework and usability assessment methodology are presented and, finally, findings from a field application are discussed.

  3. Nonlinear optical properties of organic materials: A theoretical study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cardelino, Beatriz H.

    1991-01-01

    Replacement of electronic switching circuits in computing and telecommunication systems with purely optical devices offers the potential for extremely high throughput and compact information processing systems. The potential application of organic materials containing molecules with large nonresonant nonlinear effects in this area have triggered intensive research during the last decade. Interest on this area was due to two facts: (1) that many organic materials show nonlinearities that are orders of magnitude larger than those of conventional inorganic materials such as lithium niobate and potassium dihydrogen phosphate; and (2) that organic materials show much flexibility in terms of molecular designs. Some of the desirable characteristics that these materials should have are that they be transparent to the frequency of the incident laser and its second or third harmonic, that they have a high damage threshold, and, in the case of second-order effects, that their crystal structure or molecular orientation be accentric. Since polymeric assemblages can enhance the nonlinear response of organic molecules severalfold, efforts have been directed toward the synthesis of thin films with interpenetrating lattices of electroactive molecules. The goal of this theoretical investigation is to predict the magnitude of the molecular polarizabilities of organic molecules that could be incorporated into films. These calculations are intended to become a powerful tool to assist material scientists in screening for the best candidates for optical applications. The procedure that was developed for the present calculations is based on the static-field approach, and is a modification to the method developed by Dewar and Stewart, 1984 for calculating molecular linear polarizabilities.

  4. Cryogenic Q-factor measurement of optical substrate materials

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nietzsche, S; Nawrodt, R; Zimmer, A; Thuerk, M; Vodel, W; Seidel, P [Institut fuer Festkoerperphysik, Friedrich-Schiller-Universitaet Jena, Helmholtzweg 5, 07743 Jena (Germany)

    2006-03-02

    Upcoming generations of interferometric gravitational wave detectors are likely to be operated at cryogenic temperatures because one of the sensitivity limiting factors of the present generation is the thermal noise of optical components (e.g. end mirrors, cavity couplers, beam splitters). The main contributions to this noise are due to the substrate, the optical coating, and the suspension. The thermal noise can be reduced by cooling to cryogenic temperatures. In addition the overall mechanical quality factor should preferable increase at low temperatures. The experimental details of a new cryogenic apparatus for investigations of the temperature dependency of the Q-factor of several substrate materials in the range of 5 to 300 K are presented. To perform a ring down recording an electrostatic mode excitation of the samples and an interferometric read-out of the amplitude of the vibrations was used.

  5. Research on lunar materials. [optical, chemical, and electrical properties

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gold, T.

    1978-01-01

    Abstracts of 14 research reports relating to investigations of lunar samples are presented. The principal topics covered include: (1) optical properties of surface and core samples; (2) chemical composition of the surface layers of lunar grains: Auger electron spectroscopy of lunar soil and ground rock samples; (3) high frequency electrical properties of lunar soil and rock samples and their relevance for the interpretation of lunar radar observations; (4) the electrostatic dust transport process; (5) secondary electron emission characteristics of lunar soil samples and their relevance to the dust transportation process; (6) grain size distribution in surface soil and core samples; and (7) the optical and chemical effects of simulated solar wind (2keV proton and a particle radiation) on lunar material.

  6. Advances in optical materials for large aperture lasers

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Stokowski, S.E.; Lowdermilk, W.H.; Marchi, F.T.; Swain, J.E.; Wallerstein, E.P.; Wirtenson, G.R.

    1981-12-15

    Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL) is using large aperture Nd: glass lasers to investigate the feasibility of inertial confinement fusion. In our experiments high power laser light is focussed onto a small (100 to 500 micron) target containing a deuterium-tritium fuel mixture. During the short (1 to 5 ns) laser pulse the fuel is compressed and heated, resulting in fusion reactions. The generation and control of the powerful laser pulses for these experiments is a challenging scientific and engineering task, which requires the development of new optical materials, fabrication techniques, and coatings. LLNL with the considerable cooperation and support from the optical industry, where most of the research and development and almost all the manufacturing is done, has successfully applied several new developments in these areas.

  7. Triboluminescent Materials for Smart Optical Damage Sensors for Space Applications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aggarwal, M. D.; Penn, B. G.; Miller, J.; Sadate, S.; Batra, A. K.

    2008-01-01

    There is a need to develop a new technique of damage detection for composites, which could detect cracking or delamination from any desired location within a material structure in real time. Recently, triboluminescent materials have been proposed as smart sensors of structural damage. To sense the damage, these materials can be epoxy bonded, coated in a polymer matrix, or embedded in a composite host structure. When the damage or fracture takes place in the host structure, the resultant fracture of triboluminescent crystals creates a light emission. This will warn in real time that structural damage has occurred. The triboluminescent emission of the candidate phosphor has to be bright enough that the light reaching from the point of fracture to the detector through a fiber optic cable is detectable. There are a large number of triboluminescent materials, but few satisfy the above criterion. The authors have synthesized an organic material known as Europium tetrakis (dibenzoylmethide) triethylammonium (EuD4TEA), which is a potential candidate for application as a damage sensor and could be made into a wireless sensor with the addition of microchip, antenna, and electronics. Preliminary results on the synthesis and characterization of this material are presented.

  8. Comparison of a digital and an optical analogue hand-held refractometer for the measurement of canine urine specific gravity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Paris, J K; Bennett, A D; Dodkin, S J; Gunn-Moore, D A

    2012-05-05

    Urine specific gravity (USG) is used clinically as a measure of urine concentration, and is routinely assessed by refractometry. A comparison between optical analogue and digital refractometers for evaluation of canine urine has not been reported. The aim of this study was to compare a digital and an optical analogue hand-held refractometer for the measurement of canine USG, and to assess correlation with urine osmolality. Prospective study. Free-catch urine samples were collected from 285 hospitalised adult dogs, and paired USG readings were obtained with a digital and an optical analogue refractometer. In 50 dogs, urine osmolality was also measured using a freezing point depression osmometer. There was a small but statistically significant difference between the two refractometers (P<0.001), with the optical analogue refractometer reading higher than the digital refractometer (mean difference 0.0006, sd 0.0012). Paired refractometer measurements varied by <0.002 in 91.5 per cent of cases. The optical analogue and digital refractometer readings showed excellent correlation with osmolality (r=0.980 and r=0.977, respectively, P<0.001 in both cases). Despite statistical significance, the difference between the two refractometers is unlikely to be clinically significant. Both instruments provide an accurate assessment of USG in dogs.

  9. Extravasation of radiographic contrast material and compartment syndrome in the hand: a case report

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Torrededia Laura

    2011-02-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Radiocontrast agents are a type of medical contrast material used to improve the visibility of internal bodily structures in X-ray based imaging techniques such as computed tomography (CT or radiography. Radiocontrast agents are typically iodine or barium compounds. Extravasation of contrast is a possible complication of imaging studies performed with contrasts. Most extravasations cause minimal swelling or erythema, however, skin necrosis, ulceration and compartment syndrome may occur with extravasation of large volumes of contrast. A case report is presented in which significant extravasation of contrast was caused while injecting the contrast intravenously into the back of the hand of a 50 year old patient during computed tomography. The patient was undergoing chemotherapy. The patient developed a compartment syndrome and a fasciotomy was required. Treatment options are outlined and emphasis is made on prevention of this iatrogenic complication. Some of the preventive measures to avoid these complications include use of non-ionic contrast (low osmolarity, careful choice of the site of intravenous administration, and close monitoring of the patient during injection of contrast to minimize or prevent extravasation injuries. Clear information to patients and prompt recognition of the complication can allow for other non-surgical treatment options than the one required in this case.

  10. Structure/property relationships in non-linear optical materials

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cole, J.M. [Institut Max von Laue - Paul Langevin (ILL), 38 - Grenoble (France)]|[Durham Univ. (United Kingdom); Howard, J.A.K. [Durham Univ. (United Kingdom); McIntyre, G.J. [Institut Max von Laue - Paul Langevin (ILL), 38 - Grenoble (France)

    1997-04-01

    The application of neutrons to the study of structure/property relationships in organic non-linear optical materials (NLOs) is described. In particular, charge-transfer effects and intermolecular interactions are investigated. Charge-transfer effects are studied by charge-density analysis and an example of one such investigation is given. The study of intermolecular interactions concentrates on the effects of hydrogen-bonding and an example is given of two structurally similar molecules with very disparate NLO properties, as a result of different types of hydrogen-bonding. (author). 3 refs.

  11. Micro-optical elements and optical materials of certain spider webs

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kane, D. M.; Naidoo, N.; Little, D. J.

    2012-06-01

    Certain spider webs are composed of several types of micro-optical elements made from transparent optical materials. The silks (radial and capture) are almost exclusively protein. The nearly cylindrical silks have diameters in the range 0.1 to several microns and cross-sectional morphology that is cylindrical-multi-layered,.as studied by transmission electron microscopy, The capture threads are coated with aqueous adhesive that also forms into nearly elliptical micro-lenses (adhesive droplets) mounted on the near cylindrical silks. The remaining elements of the web are the cement junctions tying the radial and the capture threads of the web together. These are irregularly shaped platelets. Progress to date on our research characterizing the optical properties and function of these transparent orb webs has been to interpret the reflection and transmission properties of the elements of the web, and the web as a whole, in natural lighting; to evaluate the optical finish of the surface of the silks and capture droplets; and to measure the principal refractive indices of radial silks using new immersion based methods developed for application to micron-sized, curved optical elements. Here we report the principal refractive indices, birefringence, dispersion and morphology of transparent spider silk subject to various chemical treatments. The morphology is measured using TEM. Insight into the physical origin of the refractive index properties will be discussed.

  12. Optical fiber sensors for damage analysis in aerospace materials

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schindler, Paul; May, Russell; Claus, Richard

    1995-01-01

    Under this grant, fiber optic sensors were investigated for use in the nondestructive evaluation of aging aircraft. Specifically, optical fiber sensors for detection and location of impacts on a surface, and for detection of corrosion in metals were developed. The use of neural networks was investigated for determining impact location by processing the output of a network of fiberoptic strain sensors distributed on a surface. This approach employs triangulation to determine location by comparing the arrival times at several sensors, of the acoustic signal generated by the impact. For this study, a neural network simulator running on a personal computer was used to train a network using a back-propagation algorithm. Fiber optic extrinsic Fabry-Perot interferometer (EFPI) strain sensors are attached to or embedded in the surface, so that stress waves emanating from an impact can be detected. The ability of the network to determine impact location by time-or-arrival of acoustic signals was assessed by comparing network outputs with actual experimental results using impacts on a panel instrumented with optical fiber sensors. Using the neural network to process the sensor outputs, the impact location can be inferred to centimeter range accuracy directly from the arrival time data. In addition, the network can be trained to determine impact location, regardless of material anisotropy. Results demonstrate that a back-propagation network identifies impact location for an anisotropic graphite/bismaleimide plate with the same accuracy as that for an isotropic aluminum plate. Two different approaches were investigated for the development of fiber optic sensors for corrosion detection in metals, both utilizing optical fiber sensors with metal coatings. In the first approach, an extrinsic Fabry-Perot interferometric fiber optic strain sensor was placed under tensile stress, and while in the resulting strained position, a thick coating of metal was applied. Due to an increase in

  13. DNA-based materials for electro-optic applications: current status

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grote, James G.; Heckman, Emily M.; Diggs, Darnell E.; Hagen, Joshua A.; Yaney, Perry P.; Steckl, Andrew J.; Clarson, Stephen J.; He, Guang S.; Zheng, Qingdong; Prasad, Paras N.; Zetts, John S.; Hopkins, F. Kenneth

    2005-08-01

    Purified deoxyribonucleic acid (DNA), derived from salmon milt and roe sacs, waste products of the Japanese fishing industry in Hokkaido, has been processed into a promising, optical waveguide quality, biopolymer material suitable for both passive and active optical and electro-optic applications. Intercalation of aromatic compounds into stacked layers within the double helix of DNA molecules has rendered active optical waveguide materials with excellent nonlinear optical properties.

  14. Electromagnetic wave propagation in left-handed materials and metallic photonic crystals

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pokrovski, Alexandre

    Theoretical study of the light propagation in the materials of a new type, which have simultaneously negative electric permittivity epsilon and magnetic permeability mu in the same frequency range and are known as Left-Handed Materials (LHM), is presented. It is shown that in spite of widespread opinion, the refractive index n of the LHM is not necessarily negative. The first and the second thermodynamic laws for electromagnetic field are shown to give two inequalities that are different in the LHM and in the regular materials (RM). Namely, the product Re[n]Im[n] is positive in the RM and negative in the LHM. The second inequality reads that the group velocity is positive in RM and negative in the LHM. Both conditions are quadratic in n, so that the sign of n can be chosen in either way. Moreover, it is shown that if the negative sign is chosen one should change some general electrodynamics definitions. The most important property of the LHM is negative refraction of light at the interface of the RM and the LHM. Russian scientist Victor Veselago has proposed a unique lens for the three-dimensional (3D) imaging based upon this property. The theory of diffraction in the LHM is presented to show that the image of this lens has a usual wavelength smearing though many recent authors claim that this lens is a perfect one. A new lens based upon the LHM is proposed, which is a modification of the Veselago lens. The new lens should be easier to manufacture, it has multiple foci and can image an object located at any large distance from the lens. The new lens might be useful for the 3D imaging. The first LHM has been recently created by the San Diego group. It is based upon the low-frequency (GHz) mode in metallic photonic crystal (MPC). This mode has been interpreted by this group as a plasmon that creates a negative epsilon at low frequencies. An analytical theory of the low frequency modes in the MPC has been presented. It has been shown that the mode under study is not a

  15. Development of Device Quality Nonlinear Optical Materials and Definition of Mechanisms of Optical Nonlinearity

    Science.gov (United States)

    1994-09-01

    polymer main chain. Indeed, some of the references cited in the preceding section also explore lattice hardening protocols . In the following discussion...chromophore. It is worthwhile to briefly discuss the importance of poling protocol when preparing thermosetting or thermally- hardened materials. Care...Adams, M. J. An Introduction to Optical Waveguides, John Wiley and Sons: New York, 1981. 294. Buckman , A. B. Guided Photonic Waves, Saunders Publishing

  16. Optical method for determining the mechanical properties of a material

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maris, H.J.; Stoner, R.J.

    1998-12-01

    Disclosed is a method for characterizing a sample, comprising the steps of: (a) acquiring data from the sample using at least one probe beam wavelength to measure, for times less than a few nanoseconds, a change in the reflectivity of the sample induced by a pump beam; (b) analyzing the data to determine at least one material property by comparing a background signal component of the data with data obtained for a similar delay time range from one or more samples prepared under conditions known to give rise to certain physical and chemical material properties; and (c) analyzing a component of the measured time dependent reflectivity caused by ultrasonic waves generated by the pump beam using the at least one determined material property. The first step of analyzing may include a step of interpolating between reference samples to obtain an intermediate set of material properties. The material properties may include sound velocity, density, and optical constants. In one embodiment, only a correlation is made with the background signal, and at least one of the structural phase, grain orientation, and stoichiometry is determined. 14 figs.

  17. Optical and electrical phenomena in dielectric materials under irradiation

    CERN Document Server

    Plaksin, O A; Stepanov, P A; Demenkov, P V; Chernov, V M; Krutskikh, A O

    2002-01-01

    Optical and acoustic properties of the materials based on Al sub 2 O sub 3 , SiO sub 2 and BN under 8 MeV proton irradiation (<10 sup 4 Gy/s) have been measured. Electric charge partitioning has been shown to result in charging the microscopic regions in the bulk of the dielectrics under irradiation, which is due to different mobility of free electrons and holes (sapphire), concentration inhomogeneity in the system of charge carrier traps (alumina), or thermodynamic instability of the homogeneous distribution of the filled traps (silica glasses). Prevalent charge carrier recombination in the grain boundaries causes re-crystallization of pyrolytic boron nitride under irradiation, which shows up as simultaneous decrease of the intensity of radiation-induced luminescence (RIL) of the centres in the grain boundaries and the BN. The local charging results in optical inhomogeneity of the silica glasses which is sustained by the optical loss spectra of the irradiated glasses, features of kinetics of bleaching, RI...

  18. Materials and Reliability Handbook for Semiconductor Optical and Electron Devices

    CERN Document Server

    Pearton, Stephen

    2013-01-01

    Materials and Reliability Handbook for Semiconductor Optical and Electron Devices provides comprehensive coverage of reliability procedures and approaches for electron and photonic devices. These include lasers and high speed electronics used in cell phones, satellites, data transmission systems and displays. Lifetime predictions for compound semiconductor devices are notoriously inaccurate due to the absence of standard protocols. Manufacturers have relied on extrapolation back to room temperature of accelerated testing at elevated temperature. This technique fails for scaled, high current density devices. Device failure is driven by electric field or current mechanisms or low activation energy processes that are masked by other mechanisms at high temperature. The Handbook addresses reliability engineering for III-V devices, including materials and electrical characterization, reliability testing, and electronic characterization. These are used to develop new simulation technologies for device operation and ...

  19. Optics and optronics in university courses for officers of the Federal Armed Forces - special curricula and hands-on lessons vs. academic requirements

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hahlweg, Cornelius; Rothe, Hendrik

    2016-09-01

    For more than two decades lessons in optics, digital image processing and optronics are compulsory optional subjects and as such integral parts of the courses in mechanical engineering at the University of the Federal Armed Forces in Hamburg. They are provided by the Chair for Measurement and Information Technology. Historically, the curricula started as typical basic lessons in optics and digital image processing and related sensors. Practical sessions originally concentrated on image processing procedures in Pascal, C and later Matlab. They evolved into a broad portfolio of practical hands-on lessons in lab and field, including high-tech and especially military equipment, but also homemaker style primitive experiments, of which the paper will give a methodical overview. A special topic - as always with optics in education - is the introduction to the various levels of abstraction in conjunction with the highly complex and wide-ranging matter squeezed into only two trimesters - instead of semesters at civil universities - for an audience being subject to strains from both study and duty. The talk will be accompanied by striking multi-media material, which will be also part of the multi-media attachment of the paper.

  20. Comparison of digital and optical hand-held refractometers for the measurement of feline urine specific gravity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bennett, Alexander D; McKnight, Grace E; Dodkin, Steve J; Simpson, Kerry E; Schwartz, Anita M; Gunn-Moore, Danièlle A

    2011-02-01

    Measuring urine specific gravity (USG) is an important component of urine analysis as it evaluates renal concentrating capability. The objective of this study was to quantify the difference in USG values between a hand-held optical analogue refractometer and a cat-specific digital instrument. Urine samples from 55 cats were assessed. There was a statistically significant difference between these two refractometers (Purine osmolality and both the optical and digital instruments demonstrated excellent correlation. While an accurate USG reading is important, it is unlikely that the statistical significance between the two instruments is clinically significant and, therefore, unlikely to result in a change in patient evaluation or treatment plans. While both the digital and optimal refractometers are highly correlated to the urine osmolality, making both devices valid for assessment of USG in clinical practice, this digital device is easier to read and eliminates the variability of subjective interpretation. Copyright © 2010 ISFM and AAFP. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  1. New Optical Sensing Materials for Application in Marine Research

    Science.gov (United States)

    Borisov, S.; Klimant, I.

    2012-04-01

    Optical chemosensors are versatile analytical tools which find application in numerous fields of science and technology. They proved to be a promising alternative to electrochemical methods and are applied increasingly often in marine research. However, not all state-of-the- art optical chemosensors are suitable for these demanding applications since they do not fully fulfil the requirements of high luminescence brightness, high chemical- and photochemical stability or their spectral properties are not adequate. Therefore, development of new advanced sensing materials is still of utmost importance. Here we present a set of novel optical sensing materials recently developed in the Institute of Analytical Chemistry and Food Chemistry which are optimized for marine applications. Particularly, we present new NIR indicators and sensors for oxygen and pH which feature high brightness and low level of autofluorescence. The oxygen sensors rely on highly photostable metal complexes of benzoporphyrins and azabenzoporphyrins and enable several important applications such as simultaneous monitoring of oxygen and chlorophyll or ultra-fast oxygen monitoring (Eddy correlation). We also developed ulta-sensitive oxygen optodes which enable monitoring in nM range and are primary designed for investigation of oxygen minimum zones. The dynamic range of our new NIR pH indicators based on aza-BODIPY dyes is optimized for the marine environment. A highly sensitive NIR luminescent phosphor (chromium(III) doped yttrium aluminium borate) can be used for non-invasive temperature measurements. Notably, the oxygen, pH sensors and temperature sensors are fully compatible with the commercially available fiber-optic readers (Firesting from PyroScience). An optical CO2 sensor for marine applications employs novel diketopyrrolopyrrol indicators and enables ratiometric imaging using a CCD camera. Oxygen, pH and temperature sensors suitable for lifetime and ratiometric imaging of analytes

  2. Synthesis and Characterization of Novel Nonlinear Optical Materials

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liang, Cheryl Shuang

    1992-01-01

    Nonlinear optic materials are becoming increasingly important because of their many technological applications, such as second harmonic generation (SHG), optical switching, and waveguides for optical transmission. Currently, there is a demand for crystals transparent in the UV region, which would make the third and higher harmonic generations feasible. Compounds with the general stoichiometry ABCO _4 structural systems have shown to be promising candidates for frequency doubling into the UV region. The stuffed tridymite structure in which these ABCO_4 compounds crystallize is very tolerant to substitution, and over two hundred compounds have been synthesized up to date. While the presently available theories of optical nonlinearity have been applied to many inorganic solids, the threatened structure theory applied for ferroelectric properties can also be used to describe the structure/property relationship in the ABCO_4 structural family. Compounds synthesized for this study, ALiPO_4 (A = Sr, Ba, Pb) have shown that the SHG of these materials can be maximized by bringing each system close to its structural phase transition or by inducing stress in the pure phase structure. Studies have shown that the dielectric coefficients of KNbO_3 increase by more than tenfold with tantalum doping. This prompted the investigation of a mixed niobium/tantalum containing channelled tetrahedra/octahedra open framework, K_{2/3}Li _{1/3}Nb_ {rm 2-x}Ta_{ rm x}PO_8. These compounds are capable of ion exchange, where other cations are used to replace potassium. The cation-framework interaction mimics the guest-host relationship characteristic of many traditional zeolitic materials. This interaction also enables us to determine the role of the cation in framework polarizability, which can be measured by SHG intensities. Through ion exchange, many isostructural compounds can be made at low temperatures. A family of layered rubidium niobium/tantalum oxide compounds have been synthesized in

  3. Optical studies of dynamical processes in disordered materials

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yen, W.M.

    1991-07-01

    In general terms, our research activities under the present Agency sponsorship continue to focus on processes and interactions which affect the dynamical behavior of excitations/excited states of optically activated amorphous or disordered solids. The framework of our understanding of these processes has been established with work performed over the past two decades. The advent of more refined spectroscopies, most of them laser based, has allowed a re-examination of these properties in a much more detailed and basic way. A deeper understanding of the interactions which lead to relaxation, energy diffusion and nonlinearities in the disordered phases is important to the development of more efficient and better materials to service all of the technologies which employ optically activated materials. In this document, we will present an abbreviated synopsis of the research we have conducted under the auspices of the present grant. We will then outline directions we wish to maintain and will render descriptions of new opportunities which have ensued from our current efforts and which we wish to exploit under renewed sponsorship. 52 refs., 12 figs.

  4. Continuous ambulatory hand force monitoring during manual materials handling using instrumented force shoes and an inertial motion capture suit

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Faber, G. S.; Koopman, A. S.; Kingma, I.; Chang, C. C.; Dennerlein, J. T.; van Dieën, J. H.

    2017-01-01

    Hand forces (HFs) are commonly measured during biomechanical assessment of manual materials handling; however, it is often a challenge to directly measure HFs in field studies. Therefore, in a previous study we proposed a HF estimation method based on ground reaction forces (GRFs) and body segment

  5. Growth of bulk single crystals of organic materials for nonlinear optical devices - An overview

    Science.gov (United States)

    Penn, Benjamin G.; Cardelino, Beatriz H.; Moore, Craig E.; Shields, Angela W.; Frazier, D. O.

    1991-01-01

    Highly perfect single crystals of nonlinear optical organic materials are required for use in optical devices. An overview of the bulk crystal growth of these materials by melt, vapor, and solution processes is presented. Additionally, methods that may be used to purify starting materials, detect impurities at low levels, screen materials for crystal growth, and process grown crystals are discussed.

  6. Designing Plasmonic Materials and Optical Metasurfaces for Light Manipulation and Optical Sensing

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Wenxiang

    Metamaterials are artificial materials designed to create optical properties that do not exist in nature. They are assemblies of subwavelength structures that are tailored in size, shape, composition, and orientation to realize the desired property. Metamaterials are promising for applications in diverse areas: optical filters, lenses, holography, sensors, photodetectors, photovoltaics, photocatalysts, medical devices, and many more, because of their excellent abilities in bending, absorbing, enhancing and blocking light. However, the practical use of metamaterials is challenged by the lack of plasmonic materials with proper permittivity for different applications and the slow and expensive fabrication methods available to pattern sub-wavelength structures. We have also only touched the surface in exploring the innovative uses of metamaterials to solve world problems. In this thesis, we study the fundamental optical properties of metamaterial building blocks by designing material permittivity. We continuously tune the interparticle distance in colloidal Au nanocrystal (NC) solids via the partial ligand exchange process. Then we combine top-down nanoimprint lithography with bottom-up assembly of colloidal NCs to develop a large-area, low-cost fabrication method for subwavelength nanostructures. Via this method, we fabricate and characterize nano-antenna arrays of different sizes and demonstrate metasurface quarter wave-plates of different bandwidth, and compare their performances with simulation results. We also integrate the metasurfaces with chemically- and mechanically-responsive polymers for strong-signal sensing. In the first design, we combine ultrathin plasmonic nanorods with hydrogel to fabricate optical moisture sensors for agricultural use. In the second application, we design mechanically tunable Au grating resonances on a polydimethylsiloxane (PDMS) substrate. The dimensions of Au grating are carefully engineered to achieve a hybridized, ultrasharp, and

  7. Laser-matter structuration of optical and biological materials

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hallo, L., E-mail: hallo@celia.u-bordeaux1.fr [CELIA, Universite Bordeaux 1 (France); Mezel, C., E-mail: candice.mezel@cea.fr [CELIA, Universite Bordeaux 1 (France); CEA Le Ripault, 37260 Monts (France); Guillemot, F., E-mail: fabien.guillemot@inserm.fr [UMR 577 INSERM, Universite Bordeaux 2 (France); Chimier, B., E-mail: chimier@celia.u-bordeaux1.fr [CELIA, Universite Bordeaux 1 (France); Bourgeade, A., E-mail: antoine.bourgeade@cea.fr [CEA-CESTA, Le Barp (France); Regan, C., E-mail: regan@celia.u-bordeaux1.fr [CELIA, Universite Bordeaux 1 (France); Duchateau, G., E-mail: duchateau@celia.u-bordeaux1.fr [CELIA, Universite Bordeaux 1 (France); Souquet, A., E-mail: agnes.souquet@inserm.fr [UMR 577 INSERM, Universite Bordeaux 2 (France); Hebert, D., E-mail: david.hebert@cea.fr [CEA-CESTA, Le Barp (France)

    2012-09-15

    Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer In this study we model nanomaterial structuring. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer The laser energy deposition is discussed first. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Full and approximate models are discussed. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Dynamic material response is addressed via hydrodynamics. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Sild effects are accounted for - Abstract: Interaction of ultrafast laser, i.e. from the femtosecond (fs) to the nanosecond (ns) regime, with initially transparent matter may produce very high energy density hot spots in the bulk as well as at the material surface, depending on focusing conditions. In the fs regime, absorption is due to ionisation of the dielectric, which enables absorption process to begin, and then hydrodynamic to take place. In the ns regime both absorption and hydrodynamic are coupled to each other, which complexifies considerably the comprehension but matter structuration looks similar. A numerical tool including solution of 3D Maxwell equations and a rate equation for free electrons is first compared to some available simple models of laser energy absorption. Then, subsequent material deformation, i.e. structuration, is determined by solving hydrodynamic equations, including or not solid behaviour. We show that nature of the final structures strongly depends on the amount of deposited energy and on the shape of the absorption zone. Then we address some problems related to laser-matter structuration of optical and biological materials in the fs, ps and ns regimes.

  8. Optical characteristics and visual appearance for artwork materials

    Science.gov (United States)

    Radis, M.; Iacomussi, P.; Aghemo, C.

    2015-06-01

    The aim of this study is to evaluate experimentally how well available metrics are able to evaluate how lighting sources affect the perception of visual attributes of artworks exhibited, providing useful indications for works of art exhibition designers. The study considers objective investigations on optical material properties (i.e. spectral reflection factor) compared to subjective tests on colour attributes evaluation of artworks lighted by common lamps (incandescent and fluorescent lamps) and LED lighting sources. Commission International Eclairage (CIE) developed several mathematical methods to predict colour rendering of lighting source, as well visual attributes of materials, but are only an approximation of the material appearance: too many parameters of influence, subjects expectancy included, influence the appearance. In artwork exhibition visual appearance is of fundamental importance and currently no reliable and robust appearance model is available. Comparing objective evaluations and subjective results for lighting set up comparable to works of art exhibition, will provide useful indications on the applicability of colorimetric calculation to artwork exhibition when LED are involved. Visual attributes (hue, saturation, brightness…) of six different colours under LED and not-LED sources at the same Correlate Colour Temperature were compared to the associate objective characteristics calculated from the spectral reflectance. The results show that the perception of visual attributes differs from objective data when SSL sources are involved and when colours are perceived in complex samples: in some cases the visual system is not coherent with the suggestions arising from the calculations.

  9. Time scales of radiation damage decay in four optical materials

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grupp, Frank; Geis, Norbert; Katterloher, Reinhard; Bender, Ralf

    2017-09-01

    In the framework of the qualification campaigns for the near infrared spectrometer and photometer instrument (NISP) on board the ESA/EUCLID satellite six optical materials where characterized with respect to their transmission losses after a radiation dose representing the mission exposure to high energy particles in the outer Lagrange point L2. Data was taken between 500 and 2000nm on six 25mm thick coated probes. Thickness and coating being representative for the NISP flight configuration. With this paper we present results owing up the radiation damage shown in [1]. We where able to follow up the decay of the radiation damage over almost one year under ambient conditions. This allows us to distinguish between curing effects that happen on different time-scales. As for some of the materials no radiation damage and thus no curing was detected, all materials that showed significant radiation damage in the measured passband showed two clearly distinguished time scales of curing. Up to 70% of the transmission losses cured on half decay time scales of several tens of days, while the rest of the damage cures on time scales of years.

  10. Thin film detection of High Energy Materials: Optical Pumping Approach

    CERN Document Server

    Barthwal, Sachin

    2014-01-01

    We present our work on High Energy Material detection based on thin film of Lithium using the phenomenon of Optical Pumping. The Li atoms present in the thin film are optically pumped to one of the ground hyperfine energy levels so that they can no more absorb light from the resonant light source. Now in presence of a RF signal, which quantifies the ambient magnetic field, this polarized atomic system is again randomized thus making it reabsorb the resonant light. This gives a quantified measurement of the magnetic field surrounding the thin film detector. This is then mapped to the presence of magnetic HEM and hence the HEM are detected. Our approach in this regard starts with verifying the stability of Lithium atoms in various solvents so as to get a suitable liquid medium to form a thin film. In this regard, various UV-visible characterization spectra are presented to finally approach a stable system for the detection. We have worked on around 10 polar and non- polar solvents to see the stability criteria....

  11. Degradation study on optical materials for concentrator photovoltaics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eltermann, Fabian; Roeder, Kerstin; Wiesenfarth, Maike; Wilde, Juergen; Bett, Andreas W.

    2012-10-01

    In this work the impact of accelerated aging on the spectral transmission and the mechanical robustness of silicone elastomers for concentrator photovoltaic applications was investigated. Therefore, specific test samples were manufactured. The samples were annealed at 150 °C to assure a complete cross-linking. These samples were exposed to humidity freeze, to a pressure cooker test, and to UV light. To investigate optical materials under UVA intensity up to 10 W/cm2 a test setup was developed. Thus, a UV dosage of 10000 kWh/m2 was applied to the silicone samples after thermal treatment. The mean transmission was used as a measure to identify changes in the spectral behavior and was, therefore, compared after the stress tests with the initial value. No total failures but rather degradation was observed, mainly in the range of ultraviolet and visible light. In addition, the shear strengths for the silicone elastomers were compared before and after stress.

  12. Fiber Optic Thermal Health Monitoring of Aerospace Structures and Materials

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, Meng-Chou; Winfree, William P.; Allison, Sidney G.

    2009-01-01

    A new technique is presented for thermographic detection of flaws in materials and structures by performing temperature measurements with fiber Bragg gratings. Individual optical fibers with multiple Bragg gratings employed as surface temperature sensors were bonded to the surfaces of structures with subsurface defects or thickness variations. Both during and following the application of a thermal heat flux to the surface, the individual Bragg grating sensors measured the temporal and spatial temperature variations. The investigated structures included a 10-ply composite specimen with subsurface delaminations of various sizes and depths. The data obtained from grating sensors were further analyzed with thermal modeling to reveal particular characteristics of the interested areas. These results were found to be consistent with those from conventional thermography techniques. Limitations of the technique were investigated using both experimental and numerical simulation techniques. Methods for performing in-situ structural health monitoring are discussed.

  13. Increasing Student Understanding of Microscope Optics by Building and Testing the Limits of Simple, Hand-Made Model Microscopes†

    Science.gov (United States)

    Drace, Kevin; Couch, Brett; Keeling, Patrick J.

    2012-01-01

    The ability to effectively use a microscope to observe microorganisms is a crucial skill required for many disciplines within biology, especially general microbiology and cell biology. A basic understanding of the optical properties of light microscopes is required for students to use microscopes effectively, but this subject can also be a challenge to make personally interesting to students. To explore basic optical principles of magnification and resolving power in a more engaging and hands-on fashion, students constructed handmade lenses and microscopes based on Antony van Leeuwenhoek’s design using simple materials—paper, staples, glass, and adhesive putty. Students determined the power of their lenses using a green laser pointer to magnify a copper grid of known size, which also allowed students to examine variables affecting the power and resolution of a lens such as diameter, working distance, and wavelength of light. To assess the effectiveness of the laboratory’s learning objectives, four sections of a general microbiology course were given a brief pre-activity assessment quiz to determine their background knowledge on the subject. One week after the laboratory activity, students were given the same quiz (unannounced) under similar conditions. Students showed significant gains in their understanding of microscope optics. PMID:23653781

  14. Increasing Student Understanding of Microscope Optics by Building and Testing the Limits of Simple, Hand-Made Model Microscopes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kevin Drace

    2012-02-01

    Full Text Available The ability to effectively use a microscope to observe microorganisms is a crucial skill required for many disciplines within biology, especially general microbiology and cell biology. A basic understanding of the optical properties of light microscopes is required for students to use microscopes effectively, but this subject can also be a challenge to make personally interesting to students. To explore basic optical principles of magnification and resolving power in a more engaging and hands-on fashion, students constructed handmade lenses and microscopes based on Antony van Leeuwenhoek’s design using simple materials—paper, staples, glass, and adhesive putty. Students determined the power of their lenses using a green laser pointer to magnify a copper grid of known size, which also allowed students to examine variables affecting the power and resolution of a lens such as diameter, working distance, and wavelength of light. To assess the effectiveness of the laboratory’s learning objectives, four sections of a general microbiology course were given a brief pre-activity assessment quiz to determine their background knowledge on the subject. One week after the laboratory activity, students were given the same quiz (unannounced under similar conditions. Students showed significant gains in their understanding of microscope optics.

  15. Silver nanoprisms/silicone hybrid rubber materials and their optical limiting property to femtosecond laser

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Chunfang; Liu, Miao; Jiang, Nengkai; Wang, Chunlei; Lin, Weihong; Li, Dongxiang

    2017-08-01

    Optical limiters against femtosecond laser are essential for eye and sensor protection in optical processing system with femtosecond laser as light source. Anisotropic Ag nanoparticles are expected to develop into optical limiting materials for femtosecond laser pulses. Herein, silver nanoprisms are prepared and coated by silica layer, which are then doped into silicone rubber to obtain hybrid rubber sheets. The silver nanoprisms/silicone hybrid rubber sheets exhibit good optical limiting property to femtosecond laser mainly due to nonlinear optical absorption.

  16. Nonlinear Optical Properties of Organic and Polymeric Thin Film Materials of Potential for Microgravity Processing Studies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abdeldayem, Hossin; Frazier, Donald O.; Paley, Mark S.; Penn, Benjamin; Witherow, William K.; Bank, Curtis; Shields, Angela; Hicks, Rosline; Ashley, Paul R.

    1996-01-01

    In this paper, we will take a closer look at the state of the art of polydiacetylene, and metal-free phthalocyanine films, in view of the microgravity impact on their optical properties, their nonlinear optical properties and their potential advantages for integrated optics. These materials have many attractive features with regard to their use in integrated optical circuits and optical switching. Thin films of these materials processed in microgravity environment show enhanced optical quality and better molecular alignment than those processed in unit gravity. Our studies of these materials indicate that microgravity can play a major role in integrated optics technology. Polydiacetylene films are produced by UV irradiation of monomer solution through an optical window. This novel technique of forming polydiacetylene thin films has been modified for constructing sophisticated micro-structure integrated optical patterns using a pre-programmed UV-Laser beam. Wave guiding through these thin films by the prism coupler technique has been demonstrated. The third order nonlinear parameters of these films have been evaluated. Metal-free phthalocyanine films of good optical quality are processed in our laboratories by vapor deposition technique. Initial studies on these films indicate that they have excellent chemical, laser, and environmental stability. They have large nonlinear optical parameters and show intrinsic optical bistability. This bistability is essential for optical logic gates and optical switching applications. Waveguiding and device making investigations of these materials are underway.

  17. Fiber Optic Sensors for Smart Materials and Structures

    Science.gov (United States)

    Singh, H.; Chang, C. C.; Boyer, T.; Sirkis, J. S.

    1996-01-01

    In this paper we describe recently developed fiber sensors which are capable of monitoring the health of smart-structures. The unobstrusive geometry of these sensors make them an excellent choice for embedding the sensor in composite materials to measure internal states of strain in structures and materials. Some of these sensors have gage lengths that can be tailored from tens of microns to many meters. We will describe various demodulation schemes (Pseudo-Heterodyne, Synthetic-Heterodyne, Homodyne, Differential-Cross Multiplier, and Single Channel Phase-Tracker) to obtain high bandwidth measurements, enabling measurement of static to high frequency impact generated strains with a dynamic response exceeding tens of thousands of microstrains. In addition, we will show that we can tailor the fiber sensor to either measure only strain and reject temperature response or measure only the temperature, or measure both temperature and strain simultaneously. We will also demonstrate the ability to measure multiple strain components inside a host simultaneously using a single fiber sensor embedded in the host using a certain sensor type and transverse strain immunity using another sensor type. Additionally we will show the ability to measure temperature up to 100 C using fiber optic sensors.

  18. Surface imaging of metallic material fractures using optical coherence tomography.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hutiu, Gheorghe; Duma, Virgil-Florin; Demian, Dorin; Bradu, Adrian; Podoleanu, Adrian Gh

    2014-09-10

    We demonstrate the capability of optical coherence tomography (OCT) to perform topography of metallic surfaces after being subjected to ductile or brittle fracturing. Two steel samples, OL 37 and OL 52, and an antifriction Sn-Sb-Cu alloy were analyzed. Using an in-house-built swept source OCT system, height profiles were generated for the surfaces of the two samples. Based on such profiles, it can be concluded that the first two samples were subjected to ductile fracture, while the third one was subjected to brittle fracture. The OCT potential for assessing the surface state of materials after fracture was evaluated by comparing OCT images with images generated using an established method for such investigations, scanning electron microscopy (SEM). Analysis of cause of fracture is essential in response to damage of machinery parts during various accidents. Currently the analysis is performed using SEM, on samples removed from the metallic parts, while OCT would allow in situ imaging using mobile units. To the best of our knowledge, this is the first time that the OCT capability to replace SEM has been demonstrated. SEM is a more costly and time-consuming method to use in the investigation of surfaces of microstructures of metallic materials.

  19. Semi-automated sorting using holographic optical tweezers remotely controlled by eye/hand tracking camera

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tomori, Zoltan; Keša, Peter; Nikorovič, Matej; Kaůka, Jan; Zemánek, Pavel

    2016-12-01

    We proposed the improved control software for the holographic optical tweezers (HOT) proper for simple semi-automated sorting. The controller receives data from both the human interface sensors and the HOT microscope camera and processes them. As a result, the new positions of active laser traps are calculated, packed into the network format and sent to the remote HOT. Using the photo-polymerization technique, we created a sorting container consisting of two parallel horizontal walls where one wall contains "gates" representing a place where the trapped particle enters into the container. The positions of particles and gates are obtained by image analysis technique which can be exploited to achieve the higher level of automation. Sorting is documented on computer game simulation and the real experiment.

  20. Calculated efficiencies of three-material low stress coatings for diffractive x-ray transmission optics

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kubec, Adam, E-mail: adam.kubec@iws.fraunhofer.de; Braun, Stefan; Gawlitza, Peter; Menzel, Maik; Leson, Andreas [Fraunhofer IWS Dresden, Winterbergstr. 28, 01277 Dresden (Germany)

    2016-07-27

    Diffractive X-ray optical elements made by thin film coating techniques such as multilayer Laue lenses (MLL) and multilayer zone plates (MZP) are promising approaches to achieve resolutions in hard X-ray microscopy applications of less than 10 nm. The challenge is to make a lens with a large numerical aperture on the one hand and a decent working distance on the other hand. One of the limiting factors with the coated structures is the internal stress in the films, which can lead to significant bending of the substrate and various types of unwanted diffraction effects. Several approaches have been discussed to overcome this challenge. One of these is a three-material combination such as Mo/MoSi{sub 2}/Si, where four single layers per period are deposited. Mo and Si represent the absorber and spacer in this case while MoSi{sub 2} forms a diffusion barrier; in addition the thicknesses of absorber and spacer are chosen to minimize residual stress of the overall coating. Here the diffraction efficiency as well as the profile of the beam in the focal plane are discussed in order to find a tradeoff between lowest residual stress and best diffraction properties.

  1. Smart Optical Composite Materials: Dispersions of Metal-Organic Framework@Superparamagnetic Microrods for Switchable Isotropic-Anisotropic Optical Properties.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mandel, Karl; Granath, Tim; Wehner, Tobias; Rey, Marcel; Stracke, Werner; Vogel, Nicolas; Sextl, Gerhard; Müller-Buschbaum, Klaus

    2017-01-24

    A smart optical composite material with dynamic isotropic and anisotropic optical properties by combination of luminescence and high reflectivity was developed. This combination enables switching between luminescence and angle-dependent reflectivity by changing the applied wavelength of light. The composite is formed as anisotropic core/shell particles by coating superparamagnetic iron oxide-silica microrods with a layer of the luminescent metal-organic framework (MOF) 3 ∞ [Eu 2 (BDC) 3 ]·2DMF·2H 2 O (BDC 2- = 1,4-benzenedicarboxylate). The composite particles can be rotated by an external magnet. Their anisotropic shape causes changes in the reflectivity and diffraction of light depending on the orientation of the composite particle. These rotation-dependent optical properties are complemented by an isotropic luminescence resulting from the MOF shell. If illuminated by UV light, the particles exhibit isotropic luminescence while the same sample shows anisotropic optical properties when illuminated with visible light. In addition to direct switching, the optical properties can be tailored continuously between isotropic red emission and anisotropic reflection of light if the illuminating light is tuned through fractions of both UV and visible light. The integration and control of light emission modes within a homogeneous particle dispersion marks a smart optical material, addressing fundamental directions for research on switchable multifunctional materials. The material can function as an optic compass or could be used as an optic shutter that can be switched by a magnetic field, e.g., for an intensity control for waveguides in the visible range.

  2. Four dimensional hybrid ultrasound and optoacoustic imaging via passive element optical excitation in a hand-held probe

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fehm, Thomas Felix; Razansky, Daniel, E-mail: dr@tum.de [Institute for Biological and Medical Imaging (IBMI), Helmholtz Zentrum München, Neuherberg (Germany); Faculty of Medicine, Technische Universität München, Munich (Germany); Deán-Ben, Xosé Luís [Institute for Biological and Medical Imaging (IBMI), Helmholtz Zentrum München, Neuherberg (Germany)

    2014-10-27

    Ultrasonography and optoacoustic imaging share powerful advantages related to the natural aptitude for real-time image rendering with high resolution, the hand-held operation, and lack of ionizing radiation. The two methods also possess very different yet highly complementary advantages of the mechanical and optical contrast in living tissues. Nonetheless, efficient integration of these modalities remains challenging owing to the fundamental differences in the underlying physical contrast, optimal signal acquisition, and image reconstruction approaches. We report on a method for hybrid acquisition and reconstruction of three-dimensional pulse-echo ultrasound and optoacoustic images in real time based on passive ultrasound generation with an optical absorber, thus avoiding the hardware complexity of active ultrasound generation. In this way, complete hybrid datasets are generated with a single laser interrogation pulse, resulting in simultaneous rendering of ultrasound and optoacoustic images at an unprecedented rate of 10 volumetric frames per second. Performance is subsequently showcased in phantom experiments and in-vivo measurements from a healthy human volunteer, confirming general clinical applicability of the method.

  3. Optical and physical properties of ceramic crystal laser materials

    Science.gov (United States)

    Simmons, Jed A.

    Historically ceramic crystal laser material has had disadvantages compared to single crystal laser material. However, progress has been made in the last decade and a half to overcome the disadvantages associated with ceramic crystal. Today, because of the promise of ceramic crystal as a high power laser material, investigation into its properties, both physical and optical, is warranted and important. Thermal expansion was measured in this thesis for Nd:YAG (yttrium aluminum garnet) ceramic crystal using an interferometric method. The interferometer employed a spatially filtered HeNe at 633 nm wavelength. Thermal expansion coefficients measured for the ceramic crystal samples were near the reported values for single crystal Nd:YAG. With a similar experimental setup as that for the thermal expansion measurements, dn/dT for ceramic crystal Nd:YAG was measured and found to be slightly higher than the reported value for single crystal. Depolarization loss due to thermal gradient induced stresses can limit laser performance. As a result this phenomenon was modeled for ceramic crystal materials and compared to single crystals for slab and rod shaped gain media. This was accomplished using COMSOL Multiphysics, and MATLAB. Results indicate a dependence of the depolarization loss on the grain size where the loss decreases with decreased grain size even to the point where lower loss may be expected in ceramic crystals than in single crystal samples when the grain sizes in the ceramic crystal are sufficiently small. Deformation-induced thermal lensing was modeled for a single crystal slab and its relevance to ceramic crystal is discussed. Data indicates the most notable cause of deformation-induced thermal lensing is a consequence of the deformation of the top and bottom surfaces. Also, the strength of the lensing along the thickness is greater than the width and greater than that due to other causes of lensing along the thickness of the slab. Emission spectra, absorption

  4. An Innovative Context-Based Module to Introduce Students to the Optical Properties of Materials

    Science.gov (United States)

    Testa, I.; Lombardi, S.; Monroy, G.; Sassi, E.

    2011-01-01

    A context-based module to introduce secondary school students to the study of the optical properties of materials and geometric optics is presented. The module implements an innovative teaching approach in which the behaviour of the chosen application, in this article, the optical fibre, is iteratively explored and modelled by means of a…

  5. Analysis of nonlinear optical properties in donor-acceptor materials.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Day, Paul N; Pachter, Ruth; Nguyen, Kiet A

    2014-05-14

    Time-dependent density functional theory has been used to calculate nonlinear optical (NLO) properties, including the first and second hyperpolarizabilities as well as the two-photon absorption cross-section, for the donor-acceptor molecules p-nitroaniline and dimethylamino nitrostilbene, and for respective materials attached to a gold dimer. The CAMB3LYP, B3LYP, PBE0, and PBE exchange-correlation functionals all had fair but variable performance when compared to higher-level theory and to experiment. The CAMB3LYP functional had the best performance on these compounds of the functionals tested. However, our comprehensive analysis has shown that quantitative prediction of hyperpolarizabilities is still a challenge, hampered by inadequate functionals, basis sets, and solvation models, requiring further experimental characterization. Attachment of the Au2S group to molecules already known for their relatively large NLO properties was found to further enhance the response. While our calculations show a modest enhancement for the first hyperpolarizability, the enhancement of the second hyperpolarizability is predicted to be more than an order of magnitude.

  6. A review of materials engineering in silicon-based optical fibres

    Science.gov (United States)

    Healy, Noel; Gibson, Ursula; Peacock, Anna C.

    2018-02-01

    Semiconductor optical fibre technologies have grown rapidly in the last decade and there are now a range of production and post-processing techniques that allow for a vast degree of control over the core material's optoelectronic properties. These methodologies and the unique optical fibre geometry provide an exciting platform for materials engineering and fibres can now be produced with single crystal cores, low optical losses, tunable strain, and inscribable phase composition. This review discusses the state-of-the-art regarding the production of silicon optical fibres in amorphous and crystalline form and then looks at the post-processing techniques and the improved material quality and new functionality that they afford.

  7. All-optical signal processing in quadratic nonlinear materials

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Johansen, Steffen Kjær

    2002-01-01

    The focal point of the research presented here is all-optical signal processing via nonlinearities. The objective has been to investigate the interaction between optical signals via nonlinearities and how these nonlinearities can be engineered to serve specific purposes. The nonlinear response...

  8. Engineered Multifunctional Nanophotonic Materials for Ultrafast Optical Switching

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-11-02

    Optics, ( 2008): . doi: 08/20/2009 37.00 Gero Nootz, Lazaro A. Padilha, Scott Webster, David J. Hagan, Eric W. Van Stryland, Larissa Levina , Vlad... Levina , Vlad Sukhovatkin, Lukasz Brzozowski, Edward H. Sargent. Role of Symmetry Breaking on the Optical Transitions in Lead-Salt Quantum Dots, Nano

  9. Hand eczema

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ibler, K.S.; Jemec, G.B.E.; Flyvholm, M.-A.

    2012-01-01

    Background. Healthcare workers are at increased risk of developing hand eczema. Objectives. To investigate the prevalence and severity of self-reported hand eczema, and to relate the findings to demographic data, occupation, medical speciality, wards, shifts, and working hours. Patients....../materials/methods. A survey of 3181 healthcare workers was performed. Data were analysed with logistic regression. Data on sick leave and notification to the authorities were obtained. Results. The response rate was 71% (2274 of 3181). The 1-year prevalence of hand eczema was 21%, and was positively associated with atopic....... The 21% prevalence of hand eczema in healthcare workers is double the prevalence in the background population. Eleven per cent of hand eczema patients reported severe/very severe eczema. No significant differences were found between professions or medical specialities with respect to prevalence...

  10. Unusual fault detection and loss analysis in optical fiber connections with refractive index matching material

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kihara, Mitsuru; Nagano, Ryuichiro; Izumita, Hisashi; Toyonaga, Masanobu

    2012-05-01

    We investigated and analyzed an unusual fault that occurs in optical access fiber networks, which is caused by a defective fiber connection. We developed a fault-detection system to locate such a fault by using both optical power level and optical pulse measurement methods. We investigated a defective mechanical splice in three laboratory tests: outward appearance, non-destructive, and dismantled. As a result, we confirmed that the defective mechanical splice had large gaps of more than 10 μm. We also analyzed the unusual fault that occurs from such a defective mechanical splice in mechanically transferrable (MT) connector experiments. The experimental results revealed that the optical performance of fiber connections with a mixture of refractive index matching material and air-filled gaps was extremely unstable and varied widely. In the worst case, the insertion loss worsened to more than 30 dB. The case of the fault caused by a mixture of refractive index matching material and air-filled gaps between the ends of optical fibers is thought to occur independently of the sorts or structures of optical fiber connectors and could be a characteristic peculiar to optical fiber connections using refractive index matching material. These findings can be applied to optical fiber connections that use refractive index matching material, such as MT connectors in outside underground facilities, mechanical splices, or field assembly connectors at aerial and home sites in optical access networks. These findings also support the practical construction and operation of optical network systems.

  11. Optical and structural properties of Mo-doped NiTiO3 materials synthesized via modified Pechini methods

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pham, Thanh-Truc; Kang, Sung Gu; Shin, Eun Woo

    2017-07-01

    In this study, molybdenum (Mo)-doped nickel titanate (NiTiO3) materials were successfully synthesized as a function of Mo content through a modified Pechini method followed by a solvothermal treatment process. Various characterization methods were employed to investigate the optical and structural properties of the materials. XRD patterns clearly showed that the NiTiO3 structure maintained a single phase with no observed crystalline structure transformations, even after the addition of 10 wt.% Mo. In the Raman spectra and XRD patterns, peak positions shifted with a change in Mo content, confirming that the NiTiO3 lattice was doped with Mo. On the other hand, Mo doping of NiTiO3 materials changed their optical properties. DRS-UV demonstrated that the addition of Mo increased photon absorption within the UV region. Relaxation processes were inhibited by Mo doping, which was evident in the PL spectra. Structural properties of the prepared materials were studied via FE-SEM and HR-TEM. The measured surface area increased proportionally with Mo content due to a reduction in grain size of the materials.

  12. Robotic Hand

    Science.gov (United States)

    1993-01-01

    The Omni-Hand was developed by Ross-Hime Designs, Inc. for Marshall Space Flight Center (MSFC) under a Small Business Innovation Research (SBIR) contract. The multiple digit hand has an opposable thumb and a flexible wrist. Electric muscles called Minnacs power wrist joints and the interchangeable digits. Two hands have been delivered to NASA for evaluation for potential use on space missions and the unit is commercially available for applications like hazardous materials handling and manufacturing automation. Previous SBIR contracts resulted in the Omni-Wrist and Omni-Wrist II robotic systems, which are commercially available for spray painting, sealing, ultrasonic testing, as well as other uses.

  13. [Design and Preparation of Plant Bionic Materials Based on Optical and Infrared Features Simulation].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jiang, Xiao-jun; Lu, Xu-liang; Pan, Jia-liang; Zhang, Shuan-qin

    2015-07-01

    Due to the life characteristics such as physiological structure and transpiration, plants have unique optical and infrared features. In the optical band, because of the common effects of chlorophyll and water, plant leafs show spectral reflectance characteristics change in 550, 680, 1400 and 1900 nm significantly. In the infrared wave band, driven by transpiration, plants could regulate temperature on their own initiative, which make the infrared characteristics of plants different from artificial materials. So palnt bionic materials were proposed to simulate optical and infrared characteristics of plants. By analyzing formation mechanism of optical and infrared features about green plants, the component design and heat-transfer process of plants bionic materials were studied, above these the heat-transfer control formulation was established. Based on water adsorption/release compound, optical pigments and other man-made materials, plant bionic materials preparation methods were designed which could simulate the optical and infrared features of green plants. By chemical casting methods plant bionic material films were prepared, which use polyvinyl alcohol as film forming and water adsorption/release compound, and use optical pigments like chrome green and macromolecule yellow as colouring materials. The research conclusions achieved by testings figured out: water adsorption/release testing showed that the plant bionic materials with a certain thickness could absorb 1.3 kg water per square meter, which could satisfy the water usage of transpiration simulation one day; the optical and infrared simulated effect tests indicated that the plant bionic materials could preferably simulate the spectral reflective performance of green plants in optical wave band (380-2500 nm, expecially in 1400 and 1900 nm which were water absorption wave band of plants), and also it had similar daily infrared radiation variations with green plants, daily average radiation temperature

  14. Characterization of electrical and optical properties of silicon based materials

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jia, Guobin

    2009-12-04

    characteristic DRL lines D1 to D4 has been detected, indicating the dislocations in the Alile sample are relatively clean. Test p-n junction diodes with dislocation networks (DNs) produced by silicon wafer direct bonding have been investigated by EBIC technique. Charge carriers collection and electrical conduction phenomena by the DNs were observed. Inhomogeneities in the charge collection were detected in n- and p-type samples under appropriate beam energy. The diffusion lengths in the thin top layer of silicon-on-insulator (SOI) have been measured by EBIC with full suppression of the surface recombination at the buried oxide (BOX) layer and at surface of the top layer by biasing method. The measured diffusion length is several times larger than the layer thickness. Silicon nanostructures are another important subject of this work. Electrical and optical properties of various silicon based materials like silicon nanowires, silicon nano rods, porous silicon, and Si/SiO{sub 2} multi quantum wells (MQWs) samples were investigated in this work. Silicon sub-bandgap infrared (IR) luminescence around 1570 nm was found in silicon nanowires, nano rods and porous silicon. PL measurements with samples immersed in different liquid media, for example, in aqueous HF (50%), concentrated H{sub 2}SO{sub 4} (98%) and H{sub 2}O{sub 2} established that the subbandgap IR luminescence originated from the Si/SiO{sub x} interface. EL in the sub-bandgap IR range has been observed in simple devices prepared on porous silicon and MQWs at room temperature. (orig.)

  15. Characterization of temperature-dependent optical material properties of polymer powders

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Laumer, Tobias [Bayerisches Laserzentrum GmbH, 91052 Erlangen (Germany); SAOT Erlangen Graduate School in Advanced Optical Technologies, 91052 Erlangen (Germany); CRC Collaborative Research Center 814 - Additive Manufacturing, 91052 Erlangen (Germany); Stichel, Thomas; Bock, Thomas; Amend, Philipp [Bayerisches Laserzentrum GmbH, 91052 Erlangen (Germany); CRC Collaborative Research Center 814 - Additive Manufacturing, 91052 Erlangen (Germany); Schmidt, Michael [Bayerisches Laserzentrum GmbH, 91052 Erlangen (Germany); University of Erlangen-Nürnberg, Institute of Photonic Technologies, 91052 Erlangen (Germany); SAOT Erlangen Graduate School in Advanced Optical Technologies, 91052 Erlangen (Germany); CRC Collaborative Research Center 814 - Additive Manufacturing, 91052 Erlangen (Germany)

    2015-05-22

    In former works, the optical material properties of different polymer powders used for Laser Beam Melting (LBM) at room temperature have been analyzed. With a measurement setup using two integration spheres, it was shown that the optical material properties of polymer powders differ significantly due to multiple reflections within the powder compared to solid bodies of the same material. Additionally, the absorption behavior of the single particles shows an important influence on the overall optical material properties, especially the reflectance of the powder bed. Now the setup is modified to allow measurements at higher temperatures. Because crystalline areas of semi-crystalline thermoplastics are mainly responsible for the absorption of the laser radiation, the influence of the temperature increase on the overall optical material properties is analyzed. As material, conventional polyamide 12 and polypropylene as new polymer powder material, is used. By comparing results at room temperature and at higher temperatures towards the melting point, the temperature-dependent optical material properties and their influence on the beam-matter interaction during the process are discussed. It is shown that the phase transition during melting leads to significant changes of the optical material properties of the analyzed powders.

  16. Optical and structural properties of Mo-doped NiTiO{sub 3} materials synthesized via modified Pechini methods

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pham, Thanh-Truc; Kang, Sung Gu; Shin, Eun Woo, E-mail: ewshin@ulsan.ac.kr

    2017-07-31

    Highlights: • Mo-doped NiTiO{sub 3} materials were well prepared by a modified Pechini method. • Recombination rates of the materials were significantly inhibited by Mo doping. • Defect sites were generated by the substitution of Mo for Ni or Ti positions. • The generation of defect sites gradually decreased the grain sizes of the materials. • The surface areas of the materials were increased with decreasing the grain sizes. - Abstract: In this study, molybdenum (Mo)-doped nickel titanate (NiTiO{sub 3}) materials were successfully synthesized as a function of Mo content through a modified Pechini method followed by a solvothermal treatment process. Various characterization methods were employed to investigate the optical and structural properties of the materials. XRD patterns clearly showed that the NiTiO{sub 3} structure maintained a single phase with no observed crystalline structure transformations, even after the addition of 10 wt.% Mo. In the Raman spectra and XRD patterns, peak positions shifted with a change in Mo content, confirming that the NiTiO{sub 3} lattice was doped with Mo. On the other hand, Mo doping of NiTiO{sub 3} materials changed their optical properties. DRS-UV demonstrated that the addition of Mo increased photon absorption within the UV region. Relaxation processes were inhibited by Mo doping, which was evident in the PL spectra. Structural properties of the prepared materials were studied via FE-SEM and HR-TEM. The measured surface area increased proportionally with Mo content due to a reduction in grain size of the materials.

  17. Self-Assembled Soft Optical Negative Index Materials

    Science.gov (United States)

    2008-08-05

    dividing the results of the closed aperture Z-scan by those from the open aperture Z-scan. The source of the Z-scan can be directly from a laser or...orientation and relative position with respect to precision scribe lines. This type of mapping enabled us to examine regions .of interest in optical...chirality of cysteine stabilizers has the distinct effect on both the growth kinetics and the optical properties of CdTe nanocrystals synthesized in

  18. Global Systems Science and Hands-On Universe Course Materials for High School

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gould, A.

    2011-09-01

    The University of California Berkeley's Lawrence Hall of Science has a project called Global Systems Science (GSS). GSS produced a set of course materials for high school science education that includes reading materials, investigations, and software for analyzing satellite images of Earth focusing on Earth systems as well as societal issues that require interdisciplinary science for full understanding. The software has general application in analysis of any digital images for a variety of purposes. NSF and NASA funding have contributed to the development of GSS. The current NASA-funded project of GSS is Lifelines for High School Climate Change Education (LHSCCE), which aims to establish professional learning communities (PLCs) to share curriculum resources and best practices for teaching about climate change in grades 9-12. The project explores ideal ways for teachers to meet either in-person or using simple yet effective distance-communication techniques (tele-meetings), depending on local preferences. Skills promoted include: how to set up a website to share resources; initiating tele-meetings with any available mechanism (webinars, Skype, telecons, moodles, social network tools, etc.); and easy ways of documenting and archiving presentations made at meetings. Twenty teacher leaders are forming the PLCs in their regions or districts. This is a national effort in which teachers share ideas, strategies, and resources aimed at making science education relevant to societal issues, improve students' understanding of climate change issues, and contribute to possible solutions. Although the binding theme is climate change, the application is to a wide variety of courses: Earth science, environmental science, biology, physics, and chemistry. Moreover, the PLCs formed can last as long as the members find it useful and can deal with any topics of interest, even if they are only distantly related to climate change.

  19. Optimization of spatial frequency domain imaging technique for estimating optical properties of food and biological materials

    Science.gov (United States)

    Spatial frequency domain imaging technique has recently been developed for determination of the optical properties of food and biological materials. However, accurate estimation of the optical property parameters by the technique is challenging due to measurement errors associated with signal acquis...

  20. Self-Assembly of Nanocomposite Nonlinear Optical Materials for Photonic Devices Project

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — This program targets the development of new highly anisotropic nonlinear optical nanocomposite materials for NASA and non-NASA applications in advanced photonic and...

  1. Process Optimization of Pontianak Aloe vera Powder (Aloe chinensis Beakker as Raw Material for Hand body lotion

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nana Supriyatna

    2010-12-01

    Full Text Available Process optimization of Pontianak aloe vera powder (Aloe chinensis Beaker  as raw material for hand body lotion have been conducted on laboratory scale with the aim of obtaining the optimum conditions of processing technologies through the addition of maltodextrin and Carboxy Methyl Cellulase. The optimum results achieved at the ratio of maltodextrin to the CMC by 90%: 10%. Characteristics of aloe vera powder produced showing yellowish white color, water content of 8:56%, 5:50 pH, total solid Aloe 25.5%, weight flour ratio and fresh aloe vera leaves 1.5: 100, aloin content of 164.40 ppm, 257.08 ppm malic acid content, 10.32 ppm vitamin E and 1.4 x 105 colonies/g total bacteria. Making hand body lotion of aloe vera powder optimization results show the characteristic white color with a fragrant aroma, acidity (pH 7:07, 10.34 ppm of malic acid, 1.1 x 104 colony/g total bacteria, and quite stable while storage.

  2. Evaluation of a novel simulation method of teaching B-lines: hand ultrasound with a wet foam dressing material.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Kyoo-Hyun; Ahn, Jung-Hwan; Jung, Ru Bi; Hong, Chong Kun; Shin, Tae Yong; Kim, Young Sik; Ha, Young Rock

    2015-06-01

    The aim of this study was to evaluate the effectiveness of teaching A- and B-lines, and lung sliding with a novel simulation methods using hand ultrasound. All subjects enrolled were medical school students who were novices in lung ultrasound. All subjects attended a 20-minute lecture about lung ultrasound using simulated video clips of A-lines, B-lines, and lung sliding; and then a 20-minute post-test was administered. The post-test included questions on the presence or absence of A-lines, B-lines, and lung sliding using a random mixture of 20 real video clips and 20 simulated video clips created by using hand ultrasound with or without foam dressing materials. A Wilcoxon signed rank test was used to compare the scores of A-lines, B-lines, and lung sliding between the real images (RG) and simulated models (SG). There was a statistically significant difference in the median score of the correct answers for A-lines (RG, 18; SG, 17; P=0.037). Correct answers for B-line were significantly different between RG and SG group (RG, 18; SG, 17; P=0.008). There was a statistically significant difference in the median score of the correct answers for lung sliding (RG, 16; SG, 18; Psyndrome.

  3. Signal processing in optical coherence tomography for aerospace material characterization

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Liu, P.; Groves, R.M.; Benedictus, R.

    2013-01-01

    Based on a customized time-domain optical coherence tomography (OCT) system, a series of signal processing approaches have been designed and reviewed. To improve demodulation accuracy and image quality, demodulation approaches such as median filter, Hilbert transform, and envelope detector were

  4. Optically stimulated luminescence dosimetry using natural and synthetic materials

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bøtter-Jensen, L.; McKeever, S.W.S.

    1996-01-01

    The application of optically stimulated luminescence (OSL) for use in radiation dosimetry is reviewed. A broad description is given of OSL techniques developed at Riso National Laboratory and at Oklahoma State University, and recent collaborative investigations on the properties of a variety...

  5. Novel Plasmonic and Hyberbolic Optical Materials for Control of Quantum Nanoemitters

    Science.gov (United States)

    2017-01-13

    AFRL-AFOSR-CL-TR-2017-0001 Novel Plasmonic and Hyberbolic Optical Materials for control of Quantum Nanoemitters Paras Prasad RESEARCH FOUNDATION OF...Hyberbolic Optical Materials for control of Quantum Nanoemitters 5a.  CONTRACT NUMBER 5b.  GRANT NUMBER FA9550-15-1-0314 5c.  PROGRAM ELEMENT NUMBER...properties, metal ion implantation techniques, and multi-physics modeling to produce hyperbolic quantum nanoemitters. 15. SUBJECT TERMS nanotechnology 16

  6. Sol-Gel Material-Enabled Electro-Optic Polymer Modulators

    OpenAIRE

    Roland Himmelhuber; Norwood, Robert A.; Yasufumi Enami; Nasser Peyghambarian

    2015-01-01

    Sol-gels are an important material class, as they provide easy modification of material properties, good processability and are easy to synthesize. In general, an electro-optic (EO) modulator transforms an electrical signal into an optical signal. The incoming electrical signal is most commonly information encoded in a voltage change. This voltage change is then transformed into either a phase change or an intensity change in the light signal. The less voltage needed to drive the modulator an...

  7. Performance analysis and material dependence of micro holographic optical elements as couplers for fiber optic communication

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ambadiyil, Sajan; Prasannan, G.; Sathyan, Jithesh; Ajith Kumar, P. T.

    2005-01-01

    Holographic Optical Elements (HOEs) are gaining much importance and finding newer and better applications in areas of optical fiber communication and optical information processing systems. In contrast to conventional HOEs, optical communication and information systems require smaller and efficient elements of desired characteristics and transfer functions. Such Micro Holographic Optical Elements (MHOEs) can either be an HOE, recorded with two narrow beams of laser light or a segment cut from a larger HOE (SHOEs), and recorded in the conventional manner. In this study, micro holographic couplers, having specific focusing and diffraction characteristics were recorded in different holographic recording media such as silver halide and dichromated gelatin. Wavelength response of the elements was tested at 633 nm and 442 nm. Variation in diffraction efficiency/coupling factor, and insertion loss of the elements were studied. The paper reports in detail about the above results and related design considerations.

  8. Synergistically Enhanced Optical Limiting Property of Graphene Oxide Hybrid Materials Functionalized with Pt Complexes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Rui; Hu, Jinyang; Zhu, Senqiang; Lu, Jiapeng; Zhu, Hongjun

    2017-09-27

    Recently, graphene-based materials have become well-known nonlinear optical materials for the potential application of laser protection. Two new graphene oxide-platinum  complex (GO-Pt) hybrid materials (GO-Pt-1, GO-Pt-2) have been fabricated through covalent modification and electrostatic adsorption of different Pt complexes with GO. The structural and photophysical properties of the resultant hybrid materials were studied. The nonlinear optical properties and optical power limiting (OPL) performance of Pt complexes, GO, and GO-Pt hybrid materials were investigated by using Z-scan measurements at 532 nm. At the same transmittance, the results illustrate that functionalization of GO makes GO-Pt hybrid materials possess better nonlinear optical properties and OPL performance than individual Pt complexes and GO due to a combination of nonlinear scattering, nonlinear absorption, and photoinduced electron and energy transfer between GO and Pt complex moieties. Furthermore, the nonlinear optics and OPL performance of GO-Pt-2 are better than those of GO-Pt-1, due to not only the excellent optical limiting of Pt-2 and more molecules per area of GO but also the way of combination of Pt-2 and GO.

  9. Biological inspiration in optics and photonics: harnessing nature's light manipulation strategies for multifunctional optical materials (Conference Presentation)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kolle, Mathias; Sandt, Joseph D.; Nagelberg, Sara N.; Zarzar, Lauren D.; Kreysing, Moritz; Vukusic, Peter

    2016-03-01

    The precise control of light-matter interactions is crucial for the majority of known biological organisms in their struggle to survive. Many species have evolved unique methods to manipulate light in their environment using a variety of physical effects including pigment-induced, spectrally selective absorption or light interference in photonic structures that consist of micro- and nano-periodic material morphologies. In their optical performance, many of the known biological photonic systems are subject to selection criteria not unlike the requirements faced in the development of novel optical technology. For this reason, biological light manipulation strategies provide inspiration for the creation of tunable, stimuli-responsive, adaptive material platforms that will contribute to the development of multifunctional surfaces and innovative optical technology. Biomimetic and bio-inspired approaches for the manufacture of photonic systems rely on self-assembly and bottom-up growth techniques often combined with conventional top-down manufacturing. In this regard, we can benefit in several ways from highly sophisticated material solutions that have convergently evolved in various organisms. We explore design concepts found in biological photonic architectures, seek to understand the mechanisms underlying morphogenesis of bio-optical systems, aim to devise viable manufacturing strategies that can benefit from insight in biological formation processes and the use of established synthetic routines alike, and ultimately strive to realize new photonic materials with tailor-made optical properties. This talk is focused on the identification of biological role model photonic architectures, a brief discussion of recently developed bio-inspired photonic structures, including mechano-sensitive color-tunable photonic fibers and reconfigurable fluid micro-lenses. Potentially, early-stage results in studying and harnessing the structure-forming capabilities of living cells that

  10. Phase change material based tunable reflectarray for free-space optical inter/intra chip interconnects.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zou, Longfang; Cryan, Martin; Klemm, Maciej

    2014-10-06

    The concept of phase change material (PCM) based optical antennas and antenna arrays is proposed for dynamic beam shaping and steering utilized in free-space optical inter/intra chip interconnects. The essence of this concept lies in the fact that the behaviour of PCM based optical antennas will change due to the different optical properties of the amorphous and crystalline state of the PCM. By engineering optical antennas or antenna arrays, it is feasible to design dynamic optical links in a desired manner. In order to illustrate this concept, a PCM based tunable reflectarray is proposed for a scenario of a dynamic optical link between a source and two receivers. The designed reflectarray is able to switch the optical link between two receivers by switching the two states of the PCM. Two types of antennas are employed in the proposed tunable reflectarray to achieve full control of the wavefront of the reflected beam. Numerical studies show the expected binary beam steering at the optical communication wavelength of 1.55 μm. This study suggests a new research area of PCM based optical antennas and antenna arrays for dynamic optical switching and routing.

  11. Design considerations for multi component molecular-polymeric nonlinear optical materials

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Singer, K.D. (Case Western Reserve Univ., Cleveland, OH (USA). Dept. of Physics); Kuzyk, M.G. (Washington State Univ., Pullman, WA (USA). Dept. of Physics); Fang, T.; Holland, W.R. (AT and T Bell Labs., Princeton, NJ (USA)); Cahill, P.A. (Sandia National Labs., Albuquerque, NM (USA))

    1990-01-01

    We review our work on multi component polymeric nonlinear optical materials. These materials consist of nonlinear optical molecules incorporated in a polymeric host. A cross-linked triazine polymer incorporating a dicyanovinyl terminated azo dye was found to be relatively stable at 85{degree} and posses an electro-optic coefficient of 11pm/V. We have also observed the zero dispersion condition in a new anomalous dispersion dye for phase matched second harmonic generation, and expect efficient conversion to the blue. A squarylium dye, ISQ, has been found to posses a large third order nonlinearity, and may display two-level behavior. 24 refs., 11 figs.

  12. Optical characterization of photopolymer and photoresist materials for storage, sensing, and security applications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Feid, Timo; Frohmann, Sven; Rass, Jens; Müller, Christian; Orlic, Susanna

    2008-08-01

    Diffractive optical elements with application specific tailored properties can be fabricated by light induced alternation of the material's refractive index. Holographic polymers or photoresists are typically used for permanent optical structurization. Today, photostructurable media become core elements of photonic systems with innovative capabilities. We investigate different classes of organic photosensitive materials in order to optimize the interaction between the material and an optoelectronic system around. Some exemplary applications are microholographic data storage, 3D nano/micro structurization, optical patterning for advanced security features. Key issues include dynamic material response, spectral and temporal grating development, influence of the light intensity distribution, effects of pre-exposure and post-curing, etc. Materials under investigation are cationic and free radical polymerization systems, liquid crystalline polymer nanocomposites, and photoresist systems.

  13. Optical properties of hybrid polymers as barrier materials

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Georgiou, D. [Aristotle University of Thessaloniki, Department of Physics, Laboratory for Thin Films - Nanosystems and Nanometrology, GR-54124 Thessaloniki (Greece); Laskarakis, A., E-mail: alask@physics.auth.gr [Aristotle University of Thessaloniki, Department of Physics, Laboratory for Thin Films - Nanosystems and Nanometrology, GR-54124 Thessaloniki (Greece); Logothetidis, S. [Aristotle University of Thessaloniki, Department of Physics, Laboratory for Thin Films - Nanosystems and Nanometrology, GR-54124 Thessaloniki (Greece); Amberg-Scwhab, S.; Weber, U. [Fraunhofer-Institut fuer Silicatforschung, 97082 Wuerzburg (Germany); Schmidt, M.; Noller, K. [Fraunhofer-Institut fuer Verfahrenstechnik und Verpackung IVV, Freising (Germany)

    2009-06-30

    The development of high barrier films for the encapsulation of organic electronics devices onto flexible polymeric substrates is attracting a considerable scientific interest, since it is important to protect the organic semiconductor layers of these devices from corrosion due to atmospheric gas molecule permeation. The barrier layers for encapsulation consist of a sequence of inorganic and hybrid polymer thin films that are deposited onto flexible polymeric substrates, such as polyethylene terephthalate (PET). In addition to their barrier response, these multilayer systems should also exhibit high transparency and good adhesion between the hybrid polymer and inorganic layers. The knowledge of their optical properties and the correlation of the optical response with their structure and the final barrier response are of major importance since it will contribute towards the optimization of their functionality. In this work, the optical properties of hybrid polymers deposited onto silicon oxide inorganic thin films that were grown onto flexible polymeric substrates, have been investigated by the use of spectroscopic ellipsometry in a wide spectral region from the infrared to the visible-ultra violet. As it has been found, the increase of the solid content in the hybrid polymers is associated with a reduction in the refractive index values. This behavior can be correlated to a lower density of the hybrid polymer, and furthermore to a poor barrier response, due to the less cohesive inorganic-organic bonding network. Finally, from the investigation of the optical response of the hybrid polymers in the IR spectral region has revealed information on their bonding structure that has been discussed together with their barrier response.

  14. Optical realization of bioinspired spiking neurons in the electron trapping material thin film.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pashaie, Ramin; Farhat, Nabil H

    2007-12-10

    A thin film of electron-trapping material (ETM), when combined with suitable optical bistability, is considered as a medium for optical implementation of bioinspired neural nets. The optical mechanism of ETM under blue light and near-infrared exposure has the inherent ability at the material level to mimic the crucial components of the stylized Hodgkin-Huxley model of biological neurons. Combining this unique property with the high-resolution capability of ETM, a dense network of bioinspired neurons can be realized in a thin film of this infrared stimulable storage phosphor. When combined with suitable optical bistability and optical interconnectivity, it has the potential of producing an artificial nonlinear excitable medium analog to cortical tissue.

  15. Sol-Gel Material-Enabled Electro-Optic Polymer Modulators

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Roland Himmelhuber

    2015-07-01

    Full Text Available Sol-gels are an important material class, as they provide easy modification of material properties, good processability and are easy to synthesize. In general, an electro-optic (EO modulator transforms an electrical signal into an optical signal. The incoming electrical signal is most commonly information encoded in a voltage change. This voltage change is then transformed into either a phase change or an intensity change in the light signal. The less voltage needed to drive the modulator and the lower the optical loss, the higher the link gain and, therefore, the better the performance of the modulator. In this review, we will show how sol-gels can be used to enhance the performance of electro-optic modulators by allowing for designs with low optical loss, increased poling efficiency and manipulation of the electric field used for driving the modulator. The optical loss is influenced by the propagation loss in the device, as well as the losses occurring during fiber coupling in and out of the device. In both cases, the use of sol-gel materials can be beneficial due to the wide range of available refractive indices and low optical attenuation. The influence of material properties and synthesis conditions on the device performance will be discussed.

  16. Sol-Gel Material-Enabled Electro-Optic Polymer Modulators.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Himmelhuber, Roland; Norwood, Robert A; Enami, Yasufumi; Peyghambarian, Nasser

    2015-07-27

    Sol-gels are an important material class, as they provide easy modification of material properties, good processability and are easy to synthesize. In general, an electro-optic (EO) modulator transforms an electrical signal into an optical signal. The incoming electrical signal is most commonly information encoded in a voltage change. This voltage change is then transformed into either a phase change or an intensity change in the light signal. The less voltage needed to drive the modulator and the lower the optical loss, the higher the link gain and, therefore, the better the performance of the modulator. In this review, we will show how sol-gels can be used to enhance the performance of electro-optic modulators by allowing for designs with low optical loss, increased poling efficiency and manipulation of the electric field used for driving the modulator. The optical loss is influenced by the propagation loss in the device, as well as the losses occurring during fiber coupling in and out of the device. In both cases, the use of sol-gel materials can be beneficial due to the wide range of available refractive indices and low optical attenuation. The influence of material properties and synthesis conditions on the device performance will be discussed.

  17. INNOVATIONS IN THE SYNTHESIS AND CHARACTERIZATION OF ELECTRO-OPTICAL MATERIALS BASED ON POLYMERS WITH CARBAZOLIC SEQUENCES

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ionica Ionita

    2011-05-01

    Full Text Available We live in a complex world where revolutionary progress has been and continues to be made in communications, computer memory, and data processing. There is a growing need for new technologies that rapidly detect and treat diseases at an early stage or even pre-stage. As we are accustomed to these advances, our expectations will demand more compact, energy-efficient, rapidly responding, and environmentally safe technologies. Since the discovery of the photorefractive effect in organic polymers, carbazole-containing polymers have also attracted much attention because of their photoconductivity. In this context, multicomponent polymers with structural units containing both photoconductive and electro-optic functionalities in the side chain can be regarded as potentially suitable materials for photorefractive applications. Azobenzene photochemistry is a fascinating area of investigation, on one hand, because it is fairly well known, and on the other hand, because it has produced and continues to reveal completely unexpected phenomena, some of them still unexplained. When the azobenzene group is incorporated into a polymer, its photoisomerization can have a wide range of unexpected possible consequences. Connecting the carbazole sequence with azo sequence, using en spacer with  electrons, can enhance the electro-optical properties of the polymer materials based on carbazole. That can be realized first by (copolymerization of the monomers with the azo-carbazole sequences. Secondly, the chemical transformations of the polymers contented by (copolymerization of the known monomers with the carbazole monomers will be used. In these ideas the goal of this paper is an investigation of the scientifically literature regarding the new electro-active materials, peculiarly photorefractive alongside of our results in this field.

  18. Behavior of optical thin-film materials and coatings under proton and gamma irradiation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Di Sarcina, Ilaria; Grilli, Maria Luisa; Menchini, Francesca; Piegari, Angela; Scaglione, Salvatore; Sytchkova, Anna; Zola, Danilo

    2014-02-01

    Optical materials and coatings are exposed to the flux of energetic particles when used in either space applications or nuclear energy plants. The study of their behavior in such an environment is important to avoid failure of the optical components during their operation. The optical performance of several thin-film materials ((HfO2, Ta2O5, Nb2O5, TiO2, SiO2) and coatings, under irradiation with high-dose gamma rays (5.8 MGy) and exposure to low-energy (60 keV) protons, has been investigated. Some variations of optical properties have been detected in silicon oxide after irradiation, while the other materials are stable in such conditions.

  19. Overview of magneto-optic isolator materials and devices (invited) (abstract)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tsushima, K.

    1988-04-01

    Recent research and developments on magneto-optic materials and devices using nonreciprocal properties are described. Investigations on the growth of Bi-substituted iron garnet bulk crystals and LPE-grown thin films are extensively carried out, and high quality and compact isolators for near-infrared wavelengths are realized. Temperature coefficient of the angle of Faraday rotation is decreased enough by using a combination of Bi and rare-earth ions substituted in these host garnets. These materials are also used as magneto-optic switches and magnetic field (current) sensors. Basic research on waveguide-type of magneto-optic devices is another subject. It is shown that growth-induced birefringence found in LPE-grown Bi-rare-earth iron garnet films is effective to achieve phase matching between TE and TM modes in a planar waveguide. The author would like to summarize some other subjects on magneto-optic recording materials being done at many research laboratories.

  20. Tuneable dielectric and optical characteristics of tailor-made inorganic electro-chromic materials.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bulja, S; Kopf, R; Nolan, K; Lundy, R; Tate, A; Hu, T C; Norooziarab, M; Cahill, R; Templ, W

    2017-10-18

    Electro-chromic materials (EC) are a new class of electronically reconfigurable thin films that have the ability to reversibly change optical properties by electric charge insertion/extraction. Since their discovery by Deb, they have been employed in applications related to display technology, such as smart windows and mirrors and active optical filters. In this sense, a variety of studies related to the tuneable optical characteristics of EC materials have recently been reported, however, their microwave tuneable dielectric characteristics have been left somewhat unexplored. In 2016 Bulja showed that dc bias voltage induced modulation of the optical characteristics of an inorganic Conductor/WO3/LiNbO3/NiO/Conductor EC cell isaccompanied by the modulation of its high frequency (1-20 GHz) dielectric characteristics. In general, according to the state of the art, cells of different material compositions are needed to produce devices of tailor made characteristics. Here, we report the discovery that the microwave dielectric and the optical characteristics of an EC cell can be engineered to suit a variety of applications without changing their material composition. The obtained results indicate the potential for producing novel, tuneable and tailor-engineered materials that can be used to create next generation agile microwave-optical devices.

  1. Poling and characterization of a novel organic/polymer electro-optic material

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liao, Jinkun; Tang, Xianzhong; Lu, Rongguo; Tang, Xionggui; Li, Heping; Zhang, Xiaoxia; Liu, Yongzhi

    2010-10-01

    Electro-optic organic/polymer material is important for the fabrication of polymer integrated optic-electronic devices and organic sensors. Recently, a novel organic high μβ value chromophore FFC have been synthesized by molecular design. The absorption spectrum in 400-4000 cm-1 is measured for the material, and the measurement result shows that the absorption loss is negligibly small. An organic/polymer high electro-optic activity material FFC/PSU is obtained by dissolving guest FFC (wt. 20%) and a host polysulfone (PSU) in a solvent. The resolvability of cyclohexanone for the material is satisfactory by comparison with other solvents experimentally, and the preparation of FFC/PSU thin film is ease relatively. The materiel is poled by electric field-assisted contact poling, and the near optimum poling condition is determined by adjusting poling parameters as pre-curing duration, poling temperature and poling voltage etc. The electro-optic coefficient of the material is measured as high as 130pm/V by using the widely accepted simple reflection technique. The investigation indicates that the FFC/PSU has excellent characteristics, such as high electro-optic coefficient, low absorption loss, good thermal stability and capability for withstanding the subsequent process techniques, suitable for the fabrication of high-performance integrated optic-electronic devices and sensors.

  2. Fiber-Optic Hydrogen Sensors Based upon Chromogenic Materials

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pitts, Roland

    2002-03-01

    The development of lightweight, low cost, inherently safe, reliable hydrogen sensors is crucial to the development of an infrastructure for a hydrogen-based economy. Since the involvement of hydrogen in the Hindenburg disaster (May 7, 1937), the public perception is that hydrogen is dangerous to use, store, and handle. It will require extraordinary safety measures to ensure the public that hydrogen leaks can be detected and controlled early. Detection requires sensors to be arrayed in locations where explosive concentrations of hydrogen can accumulate, and mitigation of risk requires a control function associated with detection that can trigger alarms or actuate devices to prevent hydrogen concentrations from reaching the explosive limit. The approach at NREL to meet the needs for hydrogen detection that are anticipated in the transportation sector uses thin films to indicate the presence of hydrogen. The thin films react with hydrogen to produce a change in optical properties that can be sensed with a light beam propagating along a fiber-optic element. Sensitivity of the device is 200 ppm hydrogen in air, with response times less than one second. The sensor response is unique to hydrogen. It is inherently safe, in that no wires are used that could provide an ignition source in a monitored space. Sensor films can be deposited inexpensively on the end of commercial fiber optic cables, either glass or polymer. They are lightweight and resistant to interference from electric and magnetic fields. Arrays of sensors can be operated from a single detection and control point. Primary challenges involve stabilizing the response in real environments, where pollutants and contamination of the thin film surface interfere with response, and extending the lifetime of the sensor to periods of interest in the transportation sector.

  3. Mueller based scatterometry and optical characterization of semiconductor materials

    Science.gov (United States)

    Muthinti, Gangadhara Raja

    Scatterometry is one of the most useful metrology methods for the characterization and control of critical dimensions (CD) and the detailed topography of periodic structures found in microelectronics fabrication processes. Spectroscopic ellipsometry (SE) and normal incidence reflectometry (NI) based scatterometry are the most widely used optical methodologies for metrology of these structures. Evolution of better optical hardware and faster computing capabilities led to the development of Mueller Matrix (MM) based Scatterometry (MMS). Dimensional metrology using full Mueller Matrix (16 element) scatterometry in the wavelength range of 245nm-1000nm was discussed in this work. Unlike SE and NI, MM data provides complete information about the optical reflection and transmission of polarized light reflected from a sample. MM is a 4x4 transformation matrix (16 elements) describing the change in the intensities of incident polarized light expressed by means of a Stokes Vector. The symmetry properties associated with MM provide an excellent means of measuring and understanding the topography of the periodic nanostructures. Topography here refers to uniformity of the periodic order of arrayed structure. The advantage of MMS over traditional SE Scatterometry is the ability of MMS to measure samples that have anisotropic optical properties and depolarize light. The present work focuses on understanding the Mueller based Scatterometry with respect to other methodologies by a systematic approach. Several laterally complex nano-scale structures with dimensions in the order of nanometers were designed and fabricated using e-beam lithography. Also Mueller based analysis was used to extract profile information and anisotropy coefficients of complex 3D FinFET, SOI fin grating structures. Later, Spectroscopic Mueller matrix (all 16 elements) and SE data were collected in planar diffraction mode for the samples using a J.A. Woollam RC2(TM) Spectroscopic Ellipsometer. Nano

  4. Periodically-poled lithium niobate - a 'designer' material for nonlinear optics

    OpenAIRE

    Hanna, D.C.

    1999-01-01

    Many of the previous limitations of nonlinear optical materials have now been swept aside with the recent advent of quasi-matched materials such as periodically-poled lithium niobate (PPLN). This talk, starting with an introduction to the basic principles of quasi-phase-matching will review the progress made in developing devices based on PPLN, and survey future prospects.

  5. 9th International Congress on Advanced Electromagnetic Materials in Microwaves and Optics

    CERN Document Server

    2015-01-01

    The Congress will provide a unique topical forum to share the latest results of the metamaterials research in Europe and worldwide and bring together the engineering, physics, and material science communities working on artificial materials and their applications from microwaves to optical frequencies, as well as in acoustics, mechanics, and thermodynamics.

  6. Design and evaluation of carbon nanotube based optical power limiting materials.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rahman, Salma; Mirza, Shamim; Sarkar, Abhijit; Rayfield, George W

    2010-08-01

    Optical power limiters (OPLs) are "smart materials" that follow passive approaches to provide laser protection. They have the potential for protecting optical sensors and possibly even human eyes from laser-pulse damage. Optical power limiting has been a subject of increasing interest for more than two decades now. The interest is due to the increasingly large number of applications based on lasers that are currently available. Several research groups have been attempting to develop novel OPL materials based on nonlinear optical (NLO) chromophores. As a result, there are a large number of publications and patents on this subject. To date, however, there is not a single OPL material available which, taken individually, can provide ideal and smooth attenuation of an output beam. Therefore, the design and development of radically new types of materials for OPL is urgently required. During the last few years, materials containing carbon nanotubes (CNTs) have established themselves as some of the best-performing optical limiters; however, such materials are difficult to prepare and have issues with stability. In this review, the origin of OPL as well as the mechanisms of OPL are discussed. Ways to modify CNTs to make them suitable for OPL applications is also discussed.

  7. Optical contrast for identifying the thickness of two-dimensional materials

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bing, Dan; Wang, Yingying; Bai, Jing; Du, Ruxia; Wu, Guoqing; Liu, Liyan

    2018-01-01

    One of the most intriguing properties of two-dimensional (2D) materials is their thickness dependent properties. A quick and precise technique to identify the layer number of 2D materials is therefore highly desirable. In this review, we will introduce the basic principle of using optical contrast to determine the thickness of 2D material and also its advantage as compared to other modern techniques. Different 2D materials, including graphene, graphene oxide, transitional metal dichalcogenides, black phosphorus, boron nitride, have been used as examples to demonstrate the capability of optical contrast methods. A simple and more efficient optical contrast image technique is also emphasized, which is suitable for quick and large-scale thickness identification. We have also discussed the factors that could affect the experimental results of optical contrast, including incident light angle, anisotropic nature of materials, and also the twisted angle between 2D layers. Finally, we give perspectives on future development of optical contrast methods for the study and application of 2D materials.

  8. Optical investigations of various polymeric materials used in dental technology

    Science.gov (United States)

    Negrutiu, Meda Lavinia; Sinescu, Cosmin; Topala, Florin Ionel; Ionita, Ciprian; Goguta, Luciana; Marcauteanu, Corina; Rominu, Mihai; Podoleanu, Adrian Gh.

    2011-10-01

    Dental prosthetic restorations have to satisfy high stress as well as aesthetic requirements. In order to avoid deficiencies of dental prostheses, several alternative systems and procedures were imagined, directly related to the material used and also to the manufacturing technology. Increasing the biomechanical comportment of polymeric materials implies fiber reinforcing. The different fibers reinforcing products made very difficult the evaluation of their performances and biomechanical properties analysis. There are several known methods which are used to assess the quality of dental prostheses, but most are invasive. These lead to the destruction of the samples and often no conclusion could be drawn in the investigated areas of interest. Using a time domain en-face OCT system, we have recently demonstrated real time thorough evaluation of quality of various dental treatments. The aim of this study was to assess the quality of various polymeric materials used in dental technology and to validate the en face OCT imagistic evaluation of polymeric dental prostheses by using scanning electron microscopy (SEM) and microcomputer tomography (μCT). SEM investigations evidenced the nonlinear aspect of the interface between the polymeric material and the fiber reinforcement and materials defects in some samples. The results obtained by microCT revealed also some defects inside the polymeric materials and at the interfaces with the fiber reinforcement. The advantages of the OCT method consist in non-invasiveness and high resolution. In addition, en face OCT investigations permit visualization of the more complex stratified structure at the interface between the polymeric material and the fiber reinforcement.

  9. Brillouin Optical Correlation Domain Analysis in Composite Material Beams

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yonatan Stern

    2017-10-01

    Full Text Available Structural health monitoring is a critical requirement in many composites. Numerous monitoring strategies rely on measurements of temperature or strain (or both, however these are often restricted to point-sensing or to the coverage of small areas. Spatially-continuous data can be obtained with optical fiber sensors. In this work, we report high-resolution distributed Brillouin sensing over standard fibers that are embedded in composite structures. A phase-coded, Brillouin optical correlation domain analysis (B-OCDA protocol was employed, with spatial resolution of 2 cm and sensitivity of 1 °K or 20 micro-strain. A portable measurement setup was designed and assembled on the premises of a composite structures manufacturer. The setup was successfully utilized in several structural health monitoring scenarios: (a monitoring the production and curing of a composite beam over 60 h; (b estimating the stiffness and Young’s modulus of a composite beam; and (c distributed strain measurements across the surfaces of a model wing of an unmanned aerial vehicle. The measurements are supported by the predictions of structural analysis calculations. The results illustrate the potential added values of high-resolution, distributed Brillouin sensing in the structural health monitoring of composites.

  10. Brillouin Optical Correlation Domain Analysis in Composite Material Beams.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stern, Yonatan; London, Yosef; Preter, Eyal; Antman, Yair; Diamandi, Hilel Hagai; Silbiger, Maayan; Adler, Gadi; Levenberg, Eyal; Shalev, Doron; Zadok, Avi

    2017-10-02

    Structural health monitoring is a critical requirement in many composites. Numerous monitoring strategies rely on measurements of temperature or strain (or both), however these are often restricted to point-sensing or to the coverage of small areas. Spatially-continuous data can be obtained with optical fiber sensors. In this work, we report high-resolution distributed Brillouin sensing over standard fibers that are embedded in composite structures. A phase-coded, Brillouin optical correlation domain analysis (B-OCDA) protocol was employed, with spatial resolution of 2 cm and sensitivity of 1 °K or 20 micro-strain. A portable measurement setup was designed and assembled on the premises of a composite structures manufacturer. The setup was successfully utilized in several structural health monitoring scenarios: (a) monitoring the production and curing of a composite beam over 60 h; (b) estimating the stiffness and Young's modulus of a composite beam; and (c) distributed strain measurements across the surfaces of a model wing of an unmanned aerial vehicle. The measurements are supported by the predictions of structural analysis calculations. The results illustrate the potential added values of high-resolution, distributed Brillouin sensing in the structural health monitoring of composites.

  11. High-resolution measurement of internal interface of optically transparent materials

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chang, Chun-Wei; Hsu, I.-Jen

    2009-08-01

    The measurement of surface morphology of a material with high resolution is important in both the industrial and biomedical applications. Furthermore, a precise measurement of the morphology of the internal interface is usually needed for materials with multilayered structures. Although some optical techniques can provide subsurface imaging of materials, their resolutions are difficult to achieve nanometer scale. In our research, an optical system based on a composite interferometer which can image the internal interface of a material with nanometer resolution is proposed and demonstrated. The system consists of a Michelson interferometer and a Mach-Zehnder interferometer. The Michelson interferometer with a broadband light source is used for three-dimensional imaging of the sample. In the Mach-Zehnder interferometer, a prism and a retro-reflector are arranged for an optical delay line with adjustable length. The two interferometers share common light source and a rapid scanning optical delay system used for axial scanning. In the experiment, the adjustable optical delay line in the second interferometer is adjusted for the optical path lengths to match that relative to the interface under investigation. With a phase compensation mechanism, the interface can be imaged with an axial accuracy at nanometer scale.

  12. Selection of Polymer Materials for Manufacturing Optical Parts,

    Science.gov (United States)

    1987-10-06

    instruments. Coefficients of refraction were measured by goniometric method and corresponded to those given in the literature. Dispersion of light/world...was determined also by goniometric method (see table). Results of measurements showed that of five investigated materials lowest dispersion have

  13. Light Scatter in Optical Materials: Advanced Haze Modeling

    Science.gov (United States)

    2017-03-31

    glare. Haze can be inherent in the material, a result of the molding process, or a result of surface texture. Haze can also be a result of...detector (10 mm diameter silicon photodiode) located 1000 mm from the sample. A partially-collimated probe beam of 532 nm laser light was used to

  14. Materials for monolithic integration of optical functions on CMOS

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Rangarajan, B.

    2013-01-01

    This thesis, under the program called MEMPHIS (Merging Electronics and Micro & Nano Photonics in Integrated Systems - http://www.smartmix-memphis.nl/), focuses on the selection and optimization of materials and low temperature processes to realize waveguides and photodetectors on top of

  15. Porous gallium phosphide: Challenging material for nonlinear-optical applications

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Melnikov, V.A.; Golovan, L.A.; Konorov, S.O.; Fedotov, A.B.; Zheltikov, A.M.; Timoshenko, V. Yu.; Kashkarov, P.K. [Physics Department, M.V. Lomonosov Moscow State University, 119992 Moscow (Russian Federation); Petrov, G.I.; Li, L.; Yakovlev, V.V. [Physics Department, University of Wisconsin-Milwaukee, 53211 Milwaukee, WI (United States); Gavrilov, S.A.

    2005-06-01

    Electrochemically produced porous GaP layers demonstrate strong non-Rayleigh light scattering in visible range. Moreover, (110) porous GaP layers exhibit in-plane birefringence. Both properties offer much promises for enhanced nonlinear-optical processes. We report experimental studies of spectral and orientation dependences of the second-harmonic generation in (110) and (111) porous GaP layers. An order of magnitude increase of the second-harmonic intensity was found in the strongly scattering porous GaP layers in comparison with monocrystalline GaP. The spectral dependence of the second-harmonic intensity was discussed in terms of the phase matching and light localization phenomena. (copyright 2005 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH and Co. KGaA, Weinheim) (orig.)

  16. Emerging Low-Dimensional Materials for Nonlinear Optics and Ultrafast Photonics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Xiaofeng; Guo, Qiangbing; Qiu, Jianrong

    2017-04-01

    Low-dimensional (LD) materials demonstrate intriguing optical properties, which lead to applications in diverse fields, such as photonics, biomedicine and energy. Due to modulation of electronic structure by the reduced structural dimensionality, LD versions of metal, semiconductor and topological insulators (TIs) at the same time bear distinct nonlinear optical (NLO) properties as compared with their bulk counterparts. Their interaction with short pulse laser excitation exhibits a strong nonlinear character manifested by NLO absorption, giving rise to optical limiting or saturated absorption associated with excited state absorption and Pauli blocking in different materials. In particular, the saturable absorption of these emerging LD materials including two-dimensional semiconductors as well as colloidal TI nanoparticles has recently been utilized for Q-switching and mode-locking ultra-short pulse generation across the visible, near infrared and middle infrared wavelength regions. Beside the large operation bandwidth, these ultrafast photonics applications are especially benefit from the high recovery rate as well as the facile processibility of these LD materials. The prominent NLO response of these LD materials have also provided new avenues for the development of novel NLO and photonics devices for all-optical control as well as optical circuits beyond ultrafast lasers. © 2017 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  17. Synthesis and characterization of rare earth doped novel optical materials and their potential applications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pokhrel, Madhab

    There are many application of photonic materials but selection of photonic materials are always constrained by number of factors such as cost, availability of materials, thermal and chemical stability, toxicity, size and more importantly ease of synthesis and processing along with the efficient emission. For example, quantum dots are efficient emitter but they are significantly toxic, whereas dyes are also efficient emitters but they are chemically unstable. On the other hand, display and LED requires the micron size particles but bio application requires the nano-sized particles. On the other hand, laser gain media requires the ceramics glass or single crystal not the nanoparticles. So, realization of practical optical systems critically depends on suitable materials that offer specific combinations of properties. Solid-state powders such as rare-earth ions doped nano and micron size phosphors are one of the most promising candidates for several photonic applications discussed above. In this dissertation, we investigate the upconversion (UC) fluorescence characteristics of rare earth (RE) doped M2O2S (M = Y, Gd, La) oxysulphide phosphors, for near-infrared to visible UC. Both nano and micron size phosphors were investigated depending on their applications of interest. This oxysulphide phosphor possesses several excellent properties such as chemical stability, low toxicity and can be easily mass produced at low cost. Mainly, Yb3+, Er3+, and Ho3+ were doped in the host lattice, resulting in bright red, green, blue and NIR emissions under 980 nm and 1550 nm excitation at various excitation power densities. Maximum UC quantum yields (QY) up to 6.2 %, 5.8%, and 4.6% were respectively achieved in Yb3+/Er3+ :La2O2S, Y2O2S, and Gd2O 2S. Comparisons have been made with respect to reported most efficient upconverting phosphors beta-NaYF4:20 % Yb/ 2% Er. We believe that present phosphors are the most efficient and lower excitation threshold upconverting phosphors at 980 and

  18. Unified treatment of coupled optical and acoustic phonons in piezoelectric cubic materials

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Willatzen, Morten; Wang, Zhong Lin

    2015-01-01

    A unified treatment of coupled optical and acoustic phonons in piezoelectric cubic materials is presented whereby the lattice displacement vector and the internal ionic displacement vector are found simultaneously. It is shown that phonon couplings exist in pairs only; either between the electric...... potential and the lattice displacement coordinate perpendicular to the phonon wave vector or between the two other lattice displacement components. The former leads to coupled acousto-optical phonons by virtue of the piezoelectric effect. We then establish three new conjectures that entirely stem from...... piezoelectricity in a cubic structured material slab. First, it is shown that isolated optical phonon modes generally cannot exist in piezoelectric cubic slabs. Second, we prove that confined acousto-optical phonon modes only exist for a discrete set of in-plane wave numbers in piezoelectric cubic slabs. Third...

  19. Overview of Fiber Optic Sensor Technologies for Strain/Temperature Sensing Applications in Composite Materials.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ramakrishnan, Manjusha; Rajan, Ginu; Semenova, Yuliya; Farrell, Gerald

    2016-01-15

    This paper provides an overview of the different types of fiber optic sensors (FOS) that can be used with composite materials and also their compatibility with and suitability for embedding inside a composite material. An overview of the different types of FOS used for strain/temperature sensing in composite materials is presented. Recent trends, and future challenges for FOS technology for condition monitoring in smart composite materials are also discussed. This comprehensive review provides essential information for the smart materials industry in selecting of appropriate types of FOS in accordance with end-user requirements.

  20. Overview of Fiber Optic Sensor Technologies for Strain/Temperature Sensing Applications in Composite Materials

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ramakrishnan, Manjusha; Rajan, Ginu; Semenova, Yuliya; Farrell, Gerald

    2016-01-01

    This paper provides an overview of the different types of fiber optic sensors (FOS) that can be used with composite materials and also their compatibility with and suitability for embedding inside a composite material. An overview of the different types of FOS used for strain/temperature sensing in composite materials is presented. Recent trends, and future challenges for FOS technology for condition monitoring in smart composite materials are also discussed. This comprehensive review provides essential information for the smart materials industry in selecting of appropriate types of FOS in accordance with end-user requirements. PMID:26784192

  1. Overview of Fiber Optic Sensor Technologies for Strain/Temperature Sensing Applications in Composite Materials

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Manjusha Ramakrishnan

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available This paper provides an overview of the different types of fiber optic sensors (FOS that can be used with composite materials and also their compatibility with and suitability for embedding inside a composite material. An overview of the different types of FOS used for strain/temperature sensing in composite materials is presented. Recent trends, and future challenges for FOS technology for condition monitoring in smart composite materials are also discussed. This comprehensive review provides essential information for the smart materials industry in selecting of appropriate types of FOS in accordance with end-user requirements.

  2. Infrared optical properties of Mars soil analog materials: Palagonites

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roush, Ted L.

    1992-01-01

    The globally distributed bright soils on Mars represent products of chemical alteration of primary igneous materials. As such, understanding the chemistry and mineralogy of these soils provides clues about the nature of the parent materials and the type, duration, and extent of the chemical weathering environments on Mars. Such clues are key in developing an understanding of the interior and surficial processes that have operated throughout Mars' history to yield the surface as it is currently observed. The generally homogeneous nature of these soils is illustrated by a variety of observational data. These data include (1) direct determination of elemental abundances by the X-ray fluorescence instruments on both Viking Landers, (2) Earth-based telescopic observations, and (3) space-based observations. Based on their spectral properties in the visible and near-infrared, terrestrial palagonitic soils have been suggested as analogs for the bright regions on Mars. Palagonites represent the weathering products of basaltic glass and as such are composed of a variety of minerals/materials. In order to gain an understanding regarding the chemical, mineralogical, and spectral properties of a broad suite of palagonites, several samples were collected from the eastern and central regions of the island of Hawaii.

  3. Extremely high rate deposition of polymer multilayer optical thin film materials

    Science.gov (United States)

    Affinito, J. D.

    A new technique for extremely high rate deposition of optical dielectric films (vacuum deposition of polymer multilayer thin films) is highlighted. This is a way to produce multilayer optical filters comprised of thousands of layers of either linear or nonlinear optical materials. The technique involves the flash evaporation of an acrylic monomer onto a moving substrate; the monomer is then cured. Acrylic polymers deposited to date are very clear for wavelengths between 0.35 and 2.5 microns; they have extinction coefficients of k is approximately 10(exp -7). Application of electric field during crosslinking can polarize ('pole') the film to greatly enhance the nonlinear optical properties. 'Poling' films with the polymer multilayer technique offers advantages over conventional approaches, in that the polarization should not decay over time. Battelle's Pacific Northwest Laboratory is well suited for bringing linear and nonlinear polymer multilayer optical filter technology to manufacturing production status for batch and wide area web applications.

  4. Manipulating the Interfacial Electrical and Optical Properties of Dissimilar Materials with Metallic Nanostructures

    Science.gov (United States)

    2016-07-30

    AFRL-AFOSR-VA-TR-2016-0281 MANIPULATING THE INTERFACIAL ELECTRIAL & OPTICAL PROPERTIES OF DISSIMILA Seth Bank UNIVERSITY OF TEXAS AT AUSTIN 101 EAST...From - To) 1 May 2010 - 30 Apr 2016 4. TITLE AND SUBTITLE Manipulating the Interfacial Electrical & Optical Properties of Dissimilar Materials with...NUMBER 5e. TASK NUMBER 5f. WORK UNIT NUMBER 7. PERFORMING ORGANIZATION NAME(S) AND ADDRESS(ES) The University of Texas at Austin 101 E. 27th, Ste

  5. Microstructured optical fiber sensors embedded in a laminate composite for smart material applications.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sonnenfeld, Camille; Sulejmani, Sanne; Geernaert, Thomas; Eve, Sophie; Lammens, Nicolas; Luyckx, Geert; Voet, Eli; Degrieck, Joris; Urbanczyk, Waclaw; Mergo, Pawel; Becker, Martin; Bartelt, Hartmut; Berghmans, Francis; Thienpont, Hugo

    2011-01-01

    Fiber Bragg gratings written in highly birefringent microstructured optical fiber with a dedicated design are embedded in a composite fiber-reinforced polymer. The Bragg peak wavelength shifts are measured under controlled axial and transversal strain and during thermal cycling of the composite sample. We obtain a sensitivity to transversal strain that exceeds values reported earlier in literature by one order of magnitude. Our results evidence the relevance of using microstructured optical fibers for structural integrity monitoring of composite material structures.

  6. Femtosecond laser excitation of dielectric materials: experiments and modeling of optical properties and ablation depths

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Wædegaard, Kristian Juncher; Frislev, Martin Thomas; Balling, Peter

    2013-01-01

    Modeling of the interaction between a dielec- tric material and ultrashort laser pulses provides the tem- poral evolution of the electronic excitation and the optical properties of the dielectric. Experimentally determined re- flectances and ablation depths for sapphire are compared...... to the calculations. A decrease in reflectance at high fluences is observed experimentally, which demonstrates the neces- sity of a temperature-dependent electron scattering rate in the model. The comparison thus provides new constraints on the optical parameters of the model....

  7. Hand collection - hand harvest

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — This is a summary of activities related to the collection and harvest of seeds on Neal Smith National Wildlife Refuge between 1992 and 2009. Information about hand...

  8. Time-domain separation of optical properties from structural transitions in resonantly bonded materials.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Waldecker, Lutz; Miller, Timothy A; Rudé, Miquel; Bertoni, Roman; Osmond, Johann; Pruneri, Valerio; Simpson, Robert E; Ernstorfer, Ralph; Wall, Simon

    2015-10-01

    The extreme electro-optical contrast between crystalline and amorphous states in phase-change materials is routinely exploited in optical data storage and future applications include universal memories, flexible displays, reconfigurable optical circuits, and logic devices. Optical contrast is believed to arise owing to a change in crystallinity. Here we show that the connection between optical properties and structure can be broken. Using a combination of single-shot femtosecond electron diffraction and optical spectroscopy, we simultaneously follow the lattice dynamics and dielectric function in the phase-change material Ge2Sb2Te5 during an irreversible state transformation. The dielectric function changes by 30% within 100 fs owing to a rapid depletion of electrons from resonantly bonded states. This occurs without perturbing the crystallinity of the lattice, which heats with a 2-ps time constant. The optical changes are an order of magnitude larger than those achievable with silicon and present new routes to manipulate light on an ultrafast timescale without structural changes.

  9. Optical lead flint glasses: key material in optics since centuries and in future

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hartmann, Peter

    2015-09-01

    About 350 years ago a new kind of glass types was invented for decorative purposes such as drinking glasses, bowls and vases. It needed more than 70 years until the capability of these lead flint glasses was discovered to improve the performance of optical systems markedly. Color correction enabled images with resolution more than ten times better than earlier systems opening the view of researchers for new fields in the micro and macro world. Within the next 150 years the progress in optical glass production concentrated on improving quality especially homogeneity, characterization of its properties and achieving larger lenses. The introduction of glass types with considerably different compositions in the 1880s led to complementation of the glass program but not to a replacement of the lead flint glasses. Their outstanding optical properties together with their favorable melting behavior kept them being workhorses in optical systems design. One of the outstanding properties of lead flint glasses is their capability of being cast in large volumes. The size development reached a summit by the end of the 19th century with the lenses of the largest refracting telescopes. Their use as radiation shielding glasses since the second half of the 20th century led to even bigger castings of up to two tons of weight. In the 1990s the other outstanding property made lead flint glass types playing an important role in microlithography. Transmissive optics working with the mercury i-line needs crown and flint glass for dispersion correction of the comparatively broad i-line. The flint glasses had to have utmost transmission in the near UV to reduce thermal lensing as far as possible. This combination of requirements on dispersion and transmission could be fulfilled only by using lead flint glasses. It remains valid in fluorescence microscopy. Here the trend goes to an ever broader spectral range extending from the IR into the UV allowing diffraction limited resolution for many

  10. Self-assembly of colloid-cholesteric composites provides a possible route to switchable optical materials

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stratford, K.; Henrich, O.; Lintuvuori, J. S.; Cates, M. E.; Marenduzzo, D.

    2014-06-01

    Colloidal particles dispersed in liquid crystals can form new materials with tunable elastic and electro-optic properties. In a periodic ‘blue phase’ host, particles should template into colloidal crystals with potential uses in photonics, metamaterials and transformational optics. Here we show by computer simulation that colloid/cholesteric mixtures can give rise to regular crystals, glasses, percolating gels, isolated clusters, twisted rings and undulating colloidal ropes. This structure can be tuned via particle concentration, and by varying the surface interactions of the cholesteric host with both the particles and confining walls. Many of these new materials are metastable: two or more structures can arise under identical thermodynamic conditions. The observed structure depends not only on the formulation protocol but also on the history of an applied electric field. This new class of soft materials should thus be relevant to design of switchable, multistable devices for optical technologies such as smart glass and e-paper.

  11. Optical determination of material abundances by using neural networks for the derivation of spectral filters

    Science.gov (United States)

    Krippner, Wolfgang; Wagner, Felix; Bauer, Sebastian; Puente León, Fernando

    2017-06-01

    Using appropriately designed spectral filters allows to optically determine material abundances. While an infinite number of possibilities exist for determining spectral filters, we take advantage of using neural networks to derive spectral filters leading to precise estimations. To overcome some drawbacks that regularly influence the determination of material abundances using hyperspectral data, we incorporate the spectral variability of the raw materials into the training of the considered neural networks. As a main result, we successfully classify quantized material abundances optically. Thus, the main part of the high computational load, which belongs to the use of neural networks, is avoided. In addition, the derived material abundances become invariant against spatially varying illumination intensity as a remarkable benefit in comparison with spectral filters based on the Moore-Penrose pseudoinverse, for instance.

  12. Probing the mechanism of material specific peptides for optical biosensors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ramakrishnan, Sathish K.; Estephan, Elias; Martin, Marta; Cloitre, Thierry; Gergely, Csilla

    2013-05-01

    The possibility to engineer bio-nanomaterials with programmed synthesis and controlled immobilization of biomolecules through biomimetic molecular evolution approach has been demonstrated. Material specific peptides with exquisite molecular recognition function were used as a linker for the attachment of biomolecules. Exploring the origin of peptide material specificity not only opens up rational design approach with precise control over biomimetic bio-sensor design, but more importantly provides a new route of functionalizing for various material surfaces with enhanced sensitivity over classical grafting chemistry. To study the fine prints of experimentally obtained peptides, theoretical understanding of surface interactions may serve as important clues for further refinement. By taking advantage of classical molecular dynamics (MD) simulations and density functional theory (DFT), we investigated the origin of this smart recognition function through the strength of interaction of experimentally selected 12mer peptides revealing high binding affinity towards n+-Si(100). Here, we attempt for the very first time to model the interaction of the peptides (in buffer solution) with semiconductors and we calculate their binding energies at the atomic level, enabling thereby linking direct evidence to our experimental evidence. Several peptide conformations have been taken into account simultaneously upon the surface. Our studies demonstrate that the peptides possess certain recognition function and their high interaction energy with the surface makes them unique among the populations. Our work is a step towards the understanding of the interactions between peptides and semiconductor surfaces that is a highly relevant challenge in the development of novel devices with a high degree of biocompatibility as well.

  13. Material Evaluation of Optical Fibers and Payout Bobbins: An Overview

    Science.gov (United States)

    1990-03-01

    polymer coatings. 1,2 CORE AND CLADDING MATERAIS Doped silica (i.e., GeO 2, P 20 5, or B20 3) or pure silica cores are usually the materials of choice... strategic planning include increased maneuverability and more rapid response in the guidance. ISSUES NEEDING ATTENTION FIBER DRAWING As the FOG-M missile...Command, Attention: AMSMI-RD-AS-OG, Redstone Arsenal, Alabama 35898 19. Deputy Commander, U.S. Army Strategic Defense Command, Attention: CSSD-H-L, P.O

  14. Electromagnetism, Optics and Lasers: Handbook of Coherent Domain Optical Methods, Biomedical Diagnostics, Environment and Material Science

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tuchin, Valery V.

    For the first time in one set of books, coherent-domain optical methods are discussed in the framework of various applications, which are characterized by a strong light scattering. A few chapters describe basic research c ontaining the updated results on coherent and polarized light non-destructive interactions with a scattering medium, in particular, diffraction, interference, and speckle formation at multiple scattering. These chapters allow for understanding coherent-domain diagnostic techniques presented in later chapters.

  15. [Review on Application of Optical Scattering Spectroscopy for Elastic Wave Velocity Study on Materials in Earth's Interior].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jiang, Jian-jun; Li, He-ping; Dai, Li-dong; Hu, Hai-ying; Wang, Yan; Zhao, Chao-shuai

    2015-09-01

    In-situ experimental results on the elastic wave velocity of Earth materials at high pressure and high temperature in combination with data from seismic observation can help to inverse the chemical composition, state and migration of materials in Earth's interior, providing an important approach to explore information of deep earth. Applying the Brillouin scattering into the Diamond Anvil Cell (DAC) to obtain the in situ elastic wave velocities of minerals, is the important approach to investigate elastic properties of Earth's Interior. With the development of DAC technology, on the one hand, the high temperature and high pressure experimental environment to simulate different layers of the earth can be achieved; on the other hand, the optical properties of DAC made many kinds of optical analysis and test methods have been widely applied in this research field. In order to gain the elastic wave velocity under high temperature and high pressure, the accurate experimental pressure and heating temperature of the sample in the cavity should be measured and calibrated first, then the scattering signal needs to dealt with, using the Brillouin frequency shift to calculate the velocity in the sample. Combined with the lattice constants obtained from X ray technique, by a solid elastic theory, all the elastic parameters of minerals can be solved. In this paper, firstly, application of methods based on optical spectrum such as Brillouin and Raman scattering in elasticity study on materials in Earth's interior, and the basic principle and research progress of them in the velocity measurement, pressure and temperature calibration are described in detail. Secondly, principle and scope of application of two common methods of spectral pressure calibration (fluorescence and Raman spectral pressure standard) are analyzed, in addition with introduce of the application of two conventional means of temperature calibration (blackbody radiation and Raman temperature scale) in

  16. Diverse electron-induced optical emissions from space observatory materials at low temperatures

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dennison, J. R.; Evans Jensen, Amberly; Wilson, Gregory; Dekany, Justin; Bowers, Charles W.; Meloy, Robert

    2013-09-01

    Electron irradiation experiments have investigated the diverse electron-induced optical and electrical signatures observed in ground-based tests of various space observatory materials at low temperature. Three types of light emission were observed: (i); long-duration cathodoluminescence which persisted as long as the electron beam was on (ii) short-duration (fiberglass-epoxy composites, and macroscopically-conductive carbon-loaded polyimides). We conclude that electron-induced optical emissions resulting from interactions between observatory materials and the space environment electron flux can, in specific circumstances, make significant contributions to the stray light background that could possibly adversely affect the performance of space-based observatories.

  17. Multi-Purpose Anthropomorphic Robotic Hand Design for Extra-Vehicular Activity Manipulation Tasks using Embedded Fiber Optic Sensors Project

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — IFOS proposes to design and build fiber-optically sensorized robotic fingers that can sense force and, objects using only tactile feedback, similar to the skin on a...

  18. A Student's Hands-on Introduction to Radio Astronomy With the Simple Construction, Operation and Testing, Utilizing Commonly Available Materials, of a Functioning Solar Radio Telescope

    Science.gov (United States)

    Knight, D.

    2016-12-01

    Our study of the Sun, an object that provides life to this planet but also is a serious threat to the existence we now enjoy, is frequently limited in hands-on activities by the unavailability of the necessary observational tools. While small optical telescopes are more easily obtained, telescopes that work the other regions of the electromagnetic spectrum, such as the radio frequencies, are unusual. Radio emissions from solar storms, however, can be "viewed" by a student constructing a simple, tunable and inexpensive radio telescope designed to receive the most common radio frequencies broadcast from the Sun during such a storm. The apparatus employs normally available materials and technology in new purposes. Utilizing this telescope, students have the ability to test and modify its design for changes in frequency and signal amplitude, and therefore examine a wide spectrum of radio emission emanating from our star. This engaging introduction to radio electronics not only involves the study of the electrical circuit involved, but also sets the student up for detailed study in the form of specific research projects focusing on solar activity in the radio wavelengths. So far, my students have been actively involved in varying the electrical properties of a simple one-transistor circuit that selects the observational frequencies of the solar radio telescope they have constructed. Student research projects also have examined antenna design in terms of directionality and signal strength gain. In the future, collaboration is possible to link student observers in different locations on this planet, allowing for significant peer evaluation and cooperation. NASA's "Project Jove", a program that Sonoma Valley High School and Robert Ferguson Observatory have been connected with since about the year 2000, already has a worldwide collaboration network in place for similar student-operated radio telescopes for primarily studying Jupiter. Because of the higher frequencies with

  19. Pump and probe damage testing for investigation of transient material modifications associated with laser damage in optical materials

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Negres, R A; Feit, M D; DeMange, P; Bude, J D; Demos, S G

    2007-10-18

    Laser-induced breakdown in the bulk of transparent dielectric materials is associated with the generation of extreme localized conditions of temperatures and pressures. In this work, we perform pump and probe damage testing experiments to investigate the evolution of transient absorption by the host material arising from modifications following confined laser energy deposition in fused silica and DKDP materials. Specifically, we measure the size of the damage sites observed in the region of spatial overlap between the pump and probe pulses versus probe time delay and energy. Results of this proof-of-principle experimental work confirm that material modifications under extreme conditions created during a damage event include transient optical absorption. In addition, we found that the relaxation times of the induced absorption are very distinct for DKDP and SiO{sub 2} even under identical excitation conditions, on the order of 100 ns and 100 {micro}s, respectively.

  20. Broadband nonlinear optical response in multi-layer black phosphorus: an emerging infrared and mid-infrared optical material.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lu, S B; Miao, L L; Guo, Z N; Qi, X; Zhao, C J; Zhang, H; Wen, S C; Tang, D Y; Fan, D Y

    2015-05-04

    Black phosphorous (BP), the most thermodynamically stable allotrope of phosphorus, is a high-mobility layered semiconductor with direct band-gap determined by the number of layers from 0.3 eV (bulk) to 2.0 eV (single layer). Therefore, BP is considered as a natural candidate for broadband optical applications, particularly in the infrared (IR) and mid-IR part of the spectrum. The strong light-matter interaction, narrow direct band-gap, and wide range of tunable optical response make BP as a promising nonlinear optical material, particularly with great potentials for infrared and mid-infrared opto-electronics. Herein, we experimentally verified its broadband and enhanced saturable absorption of multi-layer BP (with a thickness of ~10 nm) by wide-band Z-scan measurement technique, and anticipated that multi-layer BPs could be developed as another new type of two-dimensional saturable absorber with operation bandwidth ranging from the visible (400 nm) towards mid-IR (at least 1930 nm). Our results might suggest that ultra-thin multi-layer BP films could be potentially developed as broadband ultra-fast photonics devices, such as passive Q-switcher, mode-locker, optical switcher etc.

  1. Athermal silicon optical add-drop multiplexers based on thermo-optic coefficient tuning of sol-gel material.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Namnabat, Soha; Kim, Kyung-Jo; Jones, Adam; Himmelhuber, Roland; DeRose, Christopher T; Trotter, Douglas C; Starbuck, Andrew L; Pomerene, Andrew; Lentine, Anthony L; Norwood, Robert A

    2017-09-04

    Silicon photonics has gained interest for its potential to provide higher efficiency, bandwidth and reduced power consumption compared to electrical interconnects in datacenters and high performance computing environments. However, it is well known that silicon photonic devices suffer from temperature fluctuations due to silicon's high thermo-optic coefficient and therefore, temperature control in many applications is required. Here we present an athermal optical add-drop multiplexer fabricated from ring resonators. We used a sol-gel inorganic-organic hybrid material as an alternative to previously used materials such as polymers and titanium dioxide. In this work we studied the thermal curing parameters of the sol-gel and their effect on thermal wavelength shift of the rings. With this method, we were able to demonstrate a thermal shift down to -6.8 pm/°C for transverse electric (TE) polarization in ring resonators with waveguide widths of 325 nm when the sol-gel was cured at 130°C for 10.5 hours. We also achieved thermal shifts below 1 pm/°C for transverse magnetic (TM) polarization in the C band under different curing conditions. Curing time compared to curing temperature shows to be the most important factor to control sol-gel's thermo-optic value in order to obtain an athermal device in a wide temperature range.

  2. Optical topographic technique to material characterization of photorefractive crystals

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bugaychuk, S.; Mandula, G.; Koávcs, L.; Rupp, R. A.

    2005-11-01

    Nonlinear transmission wave-mixing problem in a photorefractive medium that include both local and non-local responses is solved not traditionally but with using a new variable namely the dynamic grating amplitude. The dynamics of the wave-mixing is described by a modified sine-Gordon equation that have soliton-like solutions for the dynamic grating amplitude. For the first time the solution for the grating amplitude distribution in a medium with complex response is obtained. The shape of the grating amplitude profile is determined only by the value of the non-local response in the steady state, and both by local and by non-local components of the response in a transient process. Complete analytical solutions with taking into consideration the complex medium response as well as the absorption in two-wave mixing are obtained. The described theoretical predictions can be a base for a novel topographical method to material characterization of photorefractive crystals that allows one to study contributions local and non-local components of the medium response more precisely.

  3. Liquid polymeric materials for optical nano-bio sensing

    Science.gov (United States)

    Garan, Jacob; Melzer, Jeffrey E.; McLeod, Euan

    2017-02-01

    Detecting, counting, and sizing nanoparticles is a key problem in biomedical, environmental, and materials synthesis fields. Here we demonstrate a cost-effective and high-performance approach that uses wide-field microscopy enabled by the combination of inline lensfree holography, pixel super-resolution, and vapor-condensed nano-scale lenses (nanolenses). These nanolenses are composed of liquid polyethylene glycol (PEG) that self-assembles in situ around particles of interest. A nanolens around each particle generates a more substantial phase shift than the native object alone, making it more easily detectible in the imaging system. This latest generation of lensfree holographic microscope incorporates more precise temperature control and utilizes a hermetically sealed chamber allowing for a controlled, repeatable environment for simultaneous hologram measurements and nanolens formation. To further enhance the sensitivity of our system, we have compared the performance of two different pixel super-resolution algorithms: shiftand- add and gradient descent. It was found that the gradient descent approach provides the highest resolution. Detection and localization results for 1 μm, 400 nm, and 100 nm particles are presented.

  4. Optical and thermal characterization of membrane reflector materials for solar orbit transfer vehicles

    Science.gov (United States)

    Farmer, Gregory D.; McGee, Jennie K.; Partch, Russell; Lester, Dean M.

    2002-01-01

    The Air Force Research Laboratory (AFRL), is advancing technologies to enable greater mobility for future AF spacecraft. The Solar Orbit Transfer Vehicle (SOTV) program is developing components for a concept based on a solar thermal rocket and solar thermal power generation. The program is performing ground testing of a thin film membrane concentrator concept. To better understand system performance, a series of optical characterization tests of the membrane material were performed. The objective was to quantify the relationship between membrane optical properties and the concentrator on-orbit transmission performance and thermal profile. During testing we collected reflectivity, absorptivity, transmissivity, and emissivity data for un-coated and coated membrane material. The membrane material tested was fabricated using a flight-qualified polyimide material and proven manufacturing processes. The test results, and system thermal analysis are presented in this paper. The results of this research will be used to refine hardware performance predictions and improve sizing for flight demonstration. .

  5. Damage detection of hybrid aramid/metal–PVB composite materials using optical fiber sensors

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. Kojović

    2009-09-01

    Full Text Available Embedding optical fiber sensors within laminar thermoplastic composite material results in forming a system known as «smart structure». These sensors present the information about the inner structure health during the material exploitation and especially in the case of exterior impacts when a geometric configuration or the property changes of the material should be expected. This paper evaluates the feasibility of the real-time monitoring of indentation and low energy impact damage in composite laminates from indentation loading and Charpy pendulum impact, using the embedded intensity-based optical fiber sensors. An optical fiber sensing system, which relies solely on monitoring light intensity for providing the indication of the composite structural health, offers simplicity in design and cost-effectiveness. For this, aramid/polyvinylbutyral (PVB and aramid/metal/PVB laminates with embedded optical fibers were fabricated. Four configurations of woven composites were tested, namely, aramid/PVB, and aramid/metal/PVB in three stacking sequences of aramid and metallic woven layers. The initiation of damage and fracture during testing was detected by observation of the intensity drop of light signal transmitted through an optical fiber.

  6. Simple optical method for recognizing physical parameters of graphene nanoplatelets materials

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lorenc, Zofia; Tomczewski, Slawomir; Pakula, Anna; Sloma, Marcin; Wroblewski, Grzegorz; Salbut, Leszek; Jakubowska, Malgorzata

    2015-09-01

    Graphene nanoplatelets exhibit high potential for current engineering applications, particularly in context of conductive inks for organic and flexible electronic. Electrodes for organic displays are expected to be transparent in the visible part of electromagnetic spectrum. Thus this study aimed at full-field transmission measurements in the visible wavelength range. The paper presents transmission characteristics of different graphene samples. Samples, prepared using spray coating methods contained 3 types of deposited inks. Each of them was based on different concentration and size of graphene nanoplatelets. Moreover, they had various numbers of layers. Such materials were characterized by different parameters, like distribution of deposited carbon nanoparticles which is influencing layers homogeneity, resulting in different optical properties. Further, this research tries to establish a robust indicators characterizing examined samples. Authors built in Institute novel scanning optical system with fiber-based, compact spectrometer instead of other expensive techniques used for material characteristic in nanosciences i.e. high-resolution scanning electron microscopy. An optical scheme, design of system and technical parameters are described. Performed examinations show, that number of parameters derived from our measurements, strongly correlate with physical properties of deposited inks. Authors estimated surface roughness, homogeneity and distribution of nanoparticles agglomerates within the deposited layers. Presented results suggest, that this novel cost-effective, simple optical method of materials characterization especially in production of graphene nanoplates coatings can be promising in concern of repeatability assessment and optical properties.

  7. Hand Therapy

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Therapist? Media Find a Hand Surgeon Home Anatomy Hand Therapy Email to a friend * required fields From * ... ensure a healthy style of work. Find a Hand Therapist Search for a hand therapist in your ...

  8. The mechanical and optical properties of ordered and disordered materials

    Science.gov (United States)

    Holliday, Kito S.

    crystals. In Chapter 3 we study several novel photonic devices and fabrication techniques. We accurately model a lithographic fabrication technique and characterize a three-dimensional polymer-based photonic crystal. We study the interplay be tween order and disorder in an efficient Gratzel like solar cell assembly. We also model a new design for a liquid-crystal-based anisotropic photonic switch. In Chapter 4 we examine disorder and its ability to promote stability in solid state crystals under stress. We show how disorder in the bond lengths and bond stiffnesses can shrink and soften a material making the disordered state favorable under stress. We quantify the relationship between lattice coordination, the variance of the local bond stiffnesses and the macroscopic rigidity. We relate these results to order-disorder solid state phase transitions and the search for ultra-hard materials. We also demonstrate that long range order in three dimensions can survive perturbative disorder in the nominal bond length.

  9. Damage detection in laminar thermoplastic composite materials by means of embedded optical fibers

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kojović Aleksandar M.

    2006-01-01

    Full Text Available This paper investigates the possibility of applying optical fibers as sensors for investigating low energy impact damage in laminar thermoplastic composite materials, in real time. Impact toughness testing by a Charpy impact pendulum with different loads was conducted in order to determine the method for comparative measurement of the resulting damage in the material. For that purpose intensity-based optical fibers were built in to specimens of composite materials with Kevlar 129 (the DuPont registered trade-mark for poly(p-phenylene terephthalamide woven fabric as reinforcement and thermoplastic PVB (poly(vinyl butyral as the matrix. In some specimens part of the layers of Kevlar was replaced with metal mesh (50% or 33% of the layers. Experimental testing was conducted in order to observe and analyze the response of the material under multiple low-energy impacts. Light from the light-emitting diode (LED was launched to the embedded optical fiber and was propagated to the phototransistor-based photo detector. During each impact, the signal level, which is proportional to the light intensity in the optical fiber, drops and then slowly recovers. The obtained signals were analyzed to determine the appropriate method for real time damage monitoring. The major part of the damage occurs during impact. The damage reflects as a local, temporary release of strain in the optical fiber and an increase of the signal level. The obtained results show that intensity-based optical fibers could be used for measuring the damage in laminar thermoplastic composite materials. The acquired optical fiber signals depend on the type of material, but the same set of rules (relatively different, depending on the type of material could be specified. Using real time measurement of the signal during impact and appropriate analysis enables quantitative evaluation of the impact damage in the material. Existing methods in most cases use just the intensity of the signal before

  10. Handbook of the optical, thermal and mechanical properties of six polycrystalline dielectric materials

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dewitt, D. P.

    1972-01-01

    The design data for six polycrystalline dielectric materials are presented to describe the optical, thermal, and mechanical properties. The materials are aluminum oxide, calcium fluoride, magnesium fluoride, magnesium oxide, silicon dioxide, and titanium dioxide. The primary interest is in the polycrystalline state, although single crystal data are included when appropriate. The temperature range is room temperature to melting point. The wavelength range is from near ultraviolet to near infrared.

  11. Macroscopic order and electro-optic response of dipolar chromophore-polymer materials.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pereverzev, Yuriy V; Prezhdo, Oleg V; Dalton, Larry R

    2004-12-10

    This Minireview considers the key factors that govern the organization of macroscopic polarization in nonlinear optical systems obtained by electric poling of organic dipolar chromophores dissolved in polymer matrices. The macroscopic electric polarization depends on the thermodynamic state of the dipole system. The dependence of the paraelectric and antiferroelectric states of dipolar chromophores on the chromophore concentration and the strength of the poling field is discussed. Phase transitions between the para- and antiferroelectric states are investigated within the limits of the Ising and isotropic models for the chromophore dipoles and are considered for varying chromophore concentration, poling field strength, and macroscopic shape of the sample used for poling. The macroscopic polarization and electro-optic coefficient of the material change drastically upon phase transition. The theories are compared with the experimental data on the electro-optic coefficient dependence on the chromophore concentration. The isotropic dipole model shows excellent agreement with experiment for the chromophore systems most commonly used in nonlinear optics.

  12. Determination and interpretation of the optical constants for solar cell materials

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fujiwara, Hiroyuki; Fujimoto, Shohei; Tamakoshi, Masato; Kato, Masato; Kadowaki, Hideyuki; Miyadera, Tetsuhiko; Tampo, Hitoshi; Chikamatsu, Masayuki; Shibata, Hajime

    2017-11-01

    Solar cell materials in thin film form often exhibit quite rough surface, which makes the accurate determination of the optical constants using spectroscopic ellipsometry (SE) quite difficult. In this study, we investigate the effect of the rough surface on the SE analysis and establish an analysis procedure, which is quite helpful for the correction of the underestimated roughness contribution. As examples, the roughness analyses for CuInSe2 and CH3NH3PbI3 hybrid-perovskite thin films are presented. Moreover, to interpret the dielectric functions of emerging solar cell materials, such as CH3NH3PbI3 and Cu2ZnSnSe4, the optical transition analyses are performed based on density functional theory (DFT). The excellent agreement observed between the experimental and DFT results allows the detailed assignment of the transition peaks, confirming the importance of DFT for revealing fundamental optical characteristics.

  13. Computational chemistry modeling and design of photoswitchable alignment materials for optically addressable liquid crystal devices

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marshall, K. L.; Sekera, E. R.; Xiao, K.

    2015-09-01

    Photoalignment technology based on optically switchable "command surfaces" has been receiving increasing interest for liquid crystal optics and photonics device applications. Azobenzene compounds in the form of low-molar-mass, watersoluble salts deposited either directly on the substrate surface or after dispersion in a polymer binder have been almost exclusively employed for these applications, and ongoing research in the area follows a largely empirical materials design and development approach. Recent computational chemistry advances now afford unprecedented opportunities to develop predictive capabilities that will lead to new photoswitchable alignment layer materials with low switching energies, enhanced bistability, write/erase fatigue resistance, and high laser-damage thresholds. In the work described here, computational methods based on the density functional theory and time-dependent density functional theory were employed to study the impact of molecular structure on optical switching properties in photoswitchable methacrylate and acrylamide polymers functionalized with azobenzene and spiropyran pendants.

  14. Growth and characterization of an organic nonlinear optical material: L-Histidine malonate

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ramya, K.; Saraswathi, N. T.; Raja, C. Ramachandra

    2016-10-01

    L-Histidine malonate is one of the potential organic material for nonlinear optical applications. Single crystals of L-Histidine malonate were grown by the liquid diffusion method. The lattice parameter values were evaluated from single crystal X-ray diffraction technique. The Fourier Transform Infra Red and Raman spectral studies were employed to identify the different modes of vibrations of molecular groups in the crystal. Optical characterization and the percentage of optical transmission were recorded using UV-vis-NIR spectroscopy. The molecular structure was established by proton and carbon Nuclear magnetic resonance spectral studies. The thermal behavior of the material has been studied by Thermo gravimetric and Differential thermal plots. The second harmonic generation conversion efficiency was found out from the powder technique of Kurtz and Perry.

  15. Optical power diodes based on phase-transition materials (Conference Presentation)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wan, Chenghao; Horak, Erik H.; Zhou, You; Zhang, Zhen; Salman, Jad; Roney, Patrick; Rensberg, Jura; Gundlach, Bradley; Ramanathan, Shriram; Goldsmith, Randall H.; Ronning, Carsten; Kats, Mikhail A.

    2017-03-01

    We present several designs and experimental implementations of optical power diodes - devices that are designed to be transparent from one direction, but opaque from the other, when illuminated by a beam with sufficient intensity. Optical power diodes can be used to protect optical devices that both detect and transmit light. Our designs are based on phase-change material vanadium dioxide (VO2), which undergoes an insulator-to-metal transition (IMT) that can be triggered thermally or optically. Here, VO2 films serve as nonlinear elements that can be transformed from transparent to opaque by intense illumination. We build thin-film metallic structures on top of the VO2 films such that the optical absorption becomes asymmetric - light impinging from one direction is absorbed at a higher rate than from the other direction, triggering the transition, and turning the device opaque. This results in asymmetric transmission. The designs are optimized with finite-difference time-domain (FDTD) simulations, using optical constants of VO2 extracted using ellipsometry, and are shown to be scalable across the near- and mid-infrared. Our initial experimental results using a simple design comprised of metal and VO2 films on sapphire, designed for an operating wavelength of 1.35µm, show a transmission asymmetry ratio of 2, and experiments with superior designs are ongoing. Future work will include the use of defect-engineered VO2 to engineer the intensity threshold of optical power diodes.

  16. TRUE COLORS: LEDS AND THE RELATIONSHIP BETWEEN CCT, CRI, OPTICAL SAFETY, MATERIAL DEGRADATION, AND PHOTOBIOLOGICAL STIMULATION

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Royer, Michael P.

    2014-08-30

    This document analyzes the optical, material, and photobiological hazards of LED light sources compared to conventional light sources. It documents that LEDs generally produce the same amount of blue light, which is the primary contributor to the risks, as other sources at the same CCT. Duv may have some effect on the amount of blue light, but CRI does not.

  17. Extreme ultraviolet optical properties of two SiO2 based low-expansion materials

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rife, J.; Osantowski, J.

    1980-01-01

    The reflectances of two low-expansion materials, a recrystallized glass ceramic and a high silica glass, have been measured at five angles of incidence from 15 to 85 deg in the wavelength region from 80 to 310 A and in some cases up to 1050 A. Optical constants are derived and silicon core-level transitions analyzed.

  18. Orientational dynamics in dye-doped organic electro-optic materials

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Apitz, D.; Svanberg, C.; Jespersen, K.G.

    2003-01-01

    The time dependent birefringence of polymer-based electro-optic materials is investigated using ellipsometry. We show that the birefringence after switching off the poling field does not depend only on the induced refractive index, but also on how that level was reached. The role of the poling...

  19. Kinetic Roughening and Material Optical Properties Influence on Van der Waals/Casimir Forces

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van Zwol, P. J.; Palasantzas, G.

    Atomic force microscopy measurements and force theory calculations using the Lifshitz theory show that van der Waals/Casimir dispersive forces have a strong dependence on surface roughness and material optical properties. It is found that at separations below 100 nm the roughness effect is

  20. Optical materials technology for energy efficiency and solar energy conversion. Vol. 653

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1986-01-01

    This book presents papers on optical materials technology for energy efficiency and solar energy conversion V. Topics covered include: electrochromic devices for transmissive and reflective light control; high contrast electrochromic tungsten oxide layers; transparent thermal insulation with infrared-absorbing gases; and a modified luminescent solar concentrator.

  1. Optical Properties of Materials for Optical Amplifiers at 1.3 µm

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Hessen, B.; Sunshine, S.A.; Schneemeyer, L.F.; Neeves, A.E.; Reed, W.A.

    1992-01-01

    We describe the preparation and near Infra-Red fluorescence characteristics of a series of transition metal (V2+, Ni2+, Cr4+) doped crystalline inorganic materials. Within isostructural series, the effect of changes in the host lattice on the transition metal fluorescence has been investigated. This

  2. Comparison of optical localization techniques for optical coherence tomography of the hand for multi-fraction orthovoltage radiotherapy or photodynamic therapy: white light vs. optical surface imaging (Conference Presentation)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jakubovic, Raphael; Bains, Amitpal; Ramjist, Joel; Babic, Steve; Chin, Lee; Barnes, Elizabeth; Yang, Victor X. D.

    2017-02-01

    Non-melanoma skin cancer (NMSC) is considered the most commonly diagnosed cancer in the United States and Canada. Treatment options include radiotherapy, surgical excision, radiotherapy, topical therapies, electrocautery, and cryotherapy. For patients undergoing fractionated orthovoltage radiation therapy or photodynamic therapy (PDT), the lesions are typically delineated by clinical markup prior to treatment without providing any information about the underlying tissue thus increasing the risk of geographic miss. The development of biomarkers for response in NMSC is imperative considering the current treatment paradigm is based on clinical examination and biopsy confirmation. Therefore, a non-invasive image-based evaluation of skin structure would allow for faster and potentially more comprehensive microscopic evaluation of the treated region at the point of care. To address this, our group is investigating the use of optical coherence tomography (OCT) for pre- and post- treatment evaluation of NMSC lesions during radiation therapy and PDT. Localization of the OCT probe for follow-up is complex, especially in the context of treatment response where the lesion is not present, precluding accurate delineation of the planning treatment area. Further, comparison to standard white light pre-treatment images is limited by the scale of the OCT probe (6 mm X 6 mm) relative to target region. In this study we compare the set-up accuracy of a typical OCT probe to detect a theoretical lesion on a patient's hand. White light images, optical surface imaging (OSI) and OCT will be obtained at baseline and used for probe set up on subsequent scans. Set-up error will be quantified using advanced image processing techniques.

  3. A deterministic guide for material and mode dependence of on-chip electro-optic modulator performance

    Science.gov (United States)

    Amin, Rubab; Suer, Can; Ma, Zhizhen; Sarpkaya, Ibrahim; Khurgin, Jacob B.; Agarwal, Ritesh; Sorger, Volker J.

    2017-10-01

    Electro-optic modulation is a key function in optical data communication and possible future optical computing engines. The performance of modulators intricately depends on the interaction between the actively modulated material and the propagating waveguide mode. While high-performing modulators were demonstrated before, the approaches were taken as ad-hoc. Here we show the first systematic investigation to incorporate a holistic analysis for high-performance and ultra-compact electro-optic modulators on-chip. We show that intricate interplay between active modulation material and optical mode plays a key role in the device operation. Based on physical tradeoffs such as index modulation, loss, optical confinement factors and slow-light effects, we find that bias-material-mode regions exist where high phase modulation and high loss (absorption) modulation is found. This work paves the way for a holistic design rule of electro-optic modulators for on-chip integration.

  4. Thermophysical and Optical Properties of Materials Considered for Use on the LDSD Test Vehicle

    Science.gov (United States)

    Redmond, Matthew; Mastropietro, A.J.

    2015-01-01

    In June 2014, the first of multiple flights in the Low Density Supersonic Decelerator (LDSD) technology development program took place and successfully demonstrated a Supersonic Inflatable Aerodynamic Decelerator (SIAD) in Mars-like conditions. Although the primary goal of the technology program was the development of new decelerators for landing heavier payloads on Mars, the low-cost thermal design of the test vehicle was only possible through the innovative use of a combination of both commercial off the shelf (COTS) and aerospace grade materials. As a result, numerous thermophysical and optical property measurements were undertaken to characterize material candidates before the final material selection was made. This paper presents thermophysical and optical property measurements performed over the course of the LDSD test vehicle development, including those not ultimately selected for use on the vehicle. These properties are compared and contrasted with the existing measurements available in previous literature.

  5. Changes in the Optical Properties of Materials Are Observed After 18 Months in Low Earth Orbit

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jaworske, Donald A.

    1999-01-01

    Materials located on the exterior of spacecraft in low Earth orbit are subjected to a number of environmental threats, including atomic oxygen, ultraviolet radiation, thermal cycling, and micrometeroid and debris impact. Atomic oxygen attacks materials vulnerable to oxidation. Ultraviolet radiation can break chemical bonds and cause undesirable changes in optical properties. Thermal cycling can cause cracking, and micrometeroid and debris impacts can damage protective coatings. Another threat is contamination. The outgassing of volatile chemicals can contaminate nearby surfaces, changing their thermal control properties. Contaminated surfaces may undergo further change as a result of atomic oxygen and ultraviolet radiation exposure. The Passive Optical Sample Assembly (POSA) experiment was designed as a risk mitigation experiment for the International Space Station. Samples were characterized before launch, exposed for 18 months on the exterior of Mir, and characterized upon their return. Lessons learned from POSA about the durability of material properties can be applied to the space station and other long-duration missions.

  6. Development of New Electro-Optic and Acousto-Optic Materials.

    Science.gov (United States)

    1983-11-01

    IntotaI 1/2 Intotal Zntotal t 2 VACANT METAL SITES "DEFECT CHALCOPYRITE " E-O COEFFICIENT, roI 32 x 10-12 m/V ? 50 x 10-12m/V Figure 5. New EO/AO...Differential. theraal analysis (DTA) was used to determine melting characteristics as well- as the existence of other phase transitions for selected...the chalcopyrite structure) from which AgGaS2 was selected for the HALO program. Subsequently, a materials program aimed at increasing the scope of IR

  7. New Materials Directions for the Realization of Ultra-High Performance 3rd Order Non-Linear Optical Organics

    Science.gov (United States)

    2015-03-13

    hour per response, Including the lime for reviewing instructions, sean::hing existing data sources, gathei1ng and maintaining the data naeded, and...optical communications . Such materials would open up new capabilities in all-optical switching. Our approach to achieving this objective is to...the presence of the gold. This provides a new means of tuning plasmon resonance to wavelengths relevant for optical communications . Linear optical

  8. Visualization of unidirectional optical waveguide using topological photonic crystals made of dielectric material

    CERN Document Server

    Yang, Yuting; Xu, Tao; Wang, Hai-Xiao; Jiang, Jian-Hua; Hu, Xiao; Hang, Zhi Hong

    2016-01-01

    The introduction of topology unravels a new chapter of physics. Topological systems provide unique edge/interfacial quantum states which are expected to contribute to the development of novel spintronics and open the door to robust quantum computation. Optical systems can also benefit from topology. Engineering locally in real space a honeycomb photonic crystal with double Dirac cone in its photonic dispersion, topology transition in photonic band structure is induced and a pseudospin unidirectional optical channel is created and demonstrated by the backscattering immune electromagnetic transportation. The topological photonic crystal made of dielectric material can pave the road towards steering light propagations and contribute to novel communication technology.

  9. PC-Based systems for experiments in optical characterization of materials

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lopez-Mora, C C; Trejo-Duran, M; Alvarado-Mendez, E; Rojas-Laguna, R; Vargas-Rodriguez, E; Estudillo-Ayala, J M; Mata-Chavez, R; Sukhoivanov, I; Garcia-Perez, A; Ibarra-Manzano, O G; Andrade-Lucio, J A, E-mail: andrade@salamanca.ugto.mx [Universidad de Guanajuato. Division de Ingenierias, Campus Irapuato-Salamanca. Carr. Salamanca-Valle Km 3.5-1.8, Palo Blanco, 36700. Salamanca, Gto. (Mexico)

    2011-01-01

    An automatic control for applications of optical characterization of materials using the optical Z-Scan technique is presented in this work. The emphasis is placed in the design of the graphical user interface (GUI) and the automation process. For this purpose, we use a USB data acquisition module with programmable I/O ports for control and signals acquisition for the complete system. The control software was developed using the graphical programming language LabVIEW (registered) and compiled in order to obtain a portable system with the hardware used in this work.

  10. Synthesis, crystal structure, growth, optical and third order nonlinear optical studies of 8HQ2C5N single crystal - An efficient third-order nonlinear optical material

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Divya Bharathi, M.; Ahila, G.; Mohana, J. [Department of Physics, Presidency College, Chennai 600005 (India); Chakkaravarthi, G. [Department of Physics, CPCL Polytechnic College, Chennai 600068 (India); Anbalagan, G., E-mail: anbu24663@yahoo.co.in [Department of Nuclear Physics, University of Madras, Chennai 600025 (India)

    2017-05-01

    A neoteric organic third order nonlinear optical material 8-hydroxyquinolinium 2-chloro-5-nitrobenzoate dihydrate (8HQ2C5N) was grown by slow cooling technique using ethanol: water (1:1) mixed solvent. The calculated low value of average etch pit solidity (4.12 × 10{sup 3} cm{sup −2}) indicated that the title crystal contain less defects. From the single crystal X-ray diffraction data, it was endowed that 8HQ2C5N crystal belongs to the monoclinic system with centrosymmetric space group P2{sub 1}/c and the cell parameters values, a = 9.6546 (4) Ǻ, b = 7.1637(3) Ǻ, c = 24.3606 (12) Ǻ, α = γ = 90°, β = 92.458(2)° and volume = 1683.29(13) Ǻ{sup 3}. The FT-IR and FT-Raman spectrum were used to affirm the functional group of the title compound. The chemical structure of 8HQ2C5N was scrutinized by {sup 13}C and {sup 1}H NMR spectral analysis and thermal stability through the differential scanning calorimetry study. Using optical studies the lower cut-off wavelength and optical band gap of 8HQ2C5N were found to be 364 nm and 3.17 eV respectively. Using the single oscillator model suggested by Wemple – Didomenico, the oscillator energy (E{sub o}), the dispersion energy (E{sub d}) and static dielectric constant (ε{sub o}) were estimated. The third-order susceptibility were determined as Im χ{sup (3)} = 2.51 × 10{sup −5} esu and Re χ{sup (3)} = 4.46 × 10{sup −7} esu. The theoretical third-order nonlinear optical susceptibility χ{sup (3)} was calculated and the results were compared with experimental value. Photoluminescence spectrum of 8HQ2C5N crystal showed the yellow emission. The crystal had the single shot laser damage threshold of 5.562 GW/cm{sup 2}. Microhardness measurement showed that 8HQ2C5N belongs to a soft material category. - Highlights: • A new organic single crystals were grown and the crystal structure was reported. • Crystal possess, good transmittance, thermal and mechanical stability. • Single shot LDT value is found to be

  11. Mechanical properties and production quality of hand-layup and vacuum infusion processed hybrid composite materials for GFRP marine structures

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kim Sang-Young

    2014-09-01

    Full Text Available Glass Fiber Reinforced Plastic (GFRP structures are primarily manufactured using hand lay-up or vacuum infusion techniques, which are cost-effective for the construction of marine vessels. This paper aims to investigate the mechanical properties and failure mechanisms of the hybrid GFRP composites, formed by applying the hand lay-up processed exterior and the vacuum infusion processed interior layups, providing benefits for structural performance and ease of manufacturing. The hybrid GFRP composites contain one, two, and three vacuum infusion processed layer sets with consistent sets of hand lay-up processed layers. Mechanical properties assessed in this study include tensile, compressive and in-plane shear properties. Hybrid composites with three sets of vacuum infusion layers showed the highest tensile mechanical properties while those with two sets had the highest mechanical properties in compression. The batch homogeneity, for the GFRP fabrication processes, is evaluated using the experimentally obtained mechanical properties

  12. Mechanical properties and production quality of hand-layup and vacuum infusion processed hybrid composite materials for GFRP marine structures

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sang-Young Kim

    2014-09-01

    Full Text Available Glass Fiber Reinforced Plastic (GFRP structures are primarily manufactured using hand lay-up or vacuum infusion techniques, which are cost-effective for the construction of marine vessels. This paper aims to investigate the mechanical properties and failure mechanisms of the hybrid GFRP composites, formed by applying the hand lay-up processed exterior and the vacuum infusion processed interior layups, providing benefits for structural performance and ease of manufacturing. The hybrid GFRP composites contain one, two, and three vacuum infusion processed layer sets with consistent sets of hand lay-up processed layers. Mechanical properties assessed in this study include tensile, compressive and in-plane shear properties. Hybrid composites with three sets of vacuum infusion layers showed the highest tensile mechanical properties while those with two sets had the highest mechanical properties in compression. The batch homogeneity, for the GFRP fabrication processes, is evaluated using the experimentally obtained mechanical properties.

  13. Limits to the Optical Response of Graphene and Two-Dimensional Materials.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miller, Owen D; Ilic, Ognjen; Christensen, Thomas; Reid, M T Homer; Atwater, Harry A; Joannopoulos, John D; Soljačić, Marin; Johnson, Steven G

    2017-09-13

    Two-dimensional (2D) materials provide a platform for strong light-matter interactions, creating wide-ranging design opportunities via new-material discoveries and new methods for geometrical structuring. We derive general upper bounds to the strength of such light-matter interactions, given only the optical conductivity of the material, including spatial nonlocality, and otherwise independent of shape and configuration. Our material figure-of-merit shows that highly doped graphene is an optimal material at infrared frequencies, whereas single-atomic-layer silver is optimal in the visible. For quantities ranging from absorption and scattering to near-field spontaneous-emission enhancements and radiative heat transfer, we consider canonical geometrical structures and show that in certain cases the bounds can be approached, while in others there may be significant opportunity for design improvement. The bounds can encourage systematic improvements in the design of ultrathin broadband absorbers, 2D antennas, and near-field energy harvesters.

  14. Revealing Optical Properties of Reduced-Dimensionality Materials at Relevant Length Scales.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ogletree, D Frank; Schuck, P James; Weber-Bargioni, Alexander F; Borys, Nicholas J; Aloni, Shaul; Bao, Wei; Barja, Sara; Lee, Jiye; Melli, Mauro; Munechika, Keiko; Whitelam, Stephan; Wickenburg, Sebastian

    2015-10-14

    Reduced-dimensionality materials for photonic and optoelectronic applications including energy conversion, solid-state lighting, sensing, and information technology are undergoing rapid development. The search for novel materials based on reduced-dimensionality is driven by new physics. Understanding and optimizing material properties requires characterization at the relevant length scale, which is often below the diffraction limit. Three important material systems are chosen for review here, all of which are under investigation at the Molecular Foundry, to illustrate the current state of the art in nanoscale optical characterization: 2D semiconducting transition metal dichalcogenides; 1D semiconducting nanowires; and energy-transfer in assemblies of 0D semiconducting nanocrystals. For each system, the key optical properties, the principal experimental techniques, and important recent results are discussed. Applications and new developments in near-field optical microscopy and spectroscopy, scanning probe microscopy, and cathodoluminescence in the electron microscope are given detailed attention. Work done at the Molecular Foundry is placed in context within the fields under review. A discussion of emerging opportunities and directions for the future closes the review. © 2015 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  15. Substrate material selection method for multilayer diffractive optics in a wide environmental temperature range.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Piao, Mingxu; Cui, Qingfeng; Zhao, Chunzhu; Zhang, Bo; Mao, Shan; Zhao, Yuanming; Zhao, Lidong

    2017-04-01

    We present a substrate material selection method for multilayer diffractive optical elements (MLDOEs) to obtain high polychromatic integral diffraction efficiency (PIDE) in a wide environmental temperature range. The extended expressions of the surface relief heights for the MLDOEs are deduced with consideration of the influence of the environmental temperature. The PIDE difference Δη¯(λ) and PIDE change factor F are introduced to select a reasonable substrate material combination. A smaller value of Δη¯(λ) or F indicates a smaller decrease of the PIDE in a wide temperature range, and the corresponding substrate material combination is better. According to the deduced relation, double-layer and three-layer DOEs with different combinations are discussed. The results show that IRG26 and zinc sulfide is the best substrate material combination in the infrared waveband for double-layer DOEs, and polycarbonate is more reasonable than polymethyl methacrylate as the middle filling optical material for three-layer DOEs when the two substrate materials are the same.

  16. Influence of material removal programming on ion beam figuring of high-precision optical surfaces

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liao, Wenlin; Dai, Yifan; Xie, Xuhui

    2014-09-01

    Ion beam figuring (IBF) provides a nanometer/subnanometer precision fabrication technology for optical components, where the surface materials on highlands are gradually removed by the physical sputtering effect. In this deterministic method, the figuring process is usually divided into several iterations and the sum of the removed material in each iteration is expected to approach the ideally removed material as nearly as possible. However, we find that the material removal programming in each iteration would influence the surface error convergence of the figuring process. The influence of material removal programming on the surface error evolution is investigated through the comparative study of the contour removal method (CRM) and the geometric proportion removal method (PRM). The research results indicate that the PRM can maintenance the smoothness of the surface topography during the whole figuring process, which would benefit the stable operation of the machine tool and avoid the production of mid-to-high spatial frequency surface errors. Additionally, the CRM only has the corrective effect on the area above the contour line in each iteration, which would result in the nonuniform convergence of the surface errors in various areas. All these advantages distinguish PRM as an appropriate material removal method for ultraprecision optical surfaces.

  17. Three-dimensional chiral microstructures fabricated by structured optical vortices in isotropic material

    CERN Document Server

    Ni, Jincheng; Zhang, Chenchu; Hu, Yanlei; Yang, Liang; Lao, Zhaoxin; Xu, Bing; Li, Jiawen; Wu, Dong; Chu, Jiaru

    2016-01-01

    Optical vortices, as a kind of structured beam with helical phase wavefronts and doughnut shape intensity distribution, have been used for fabricating chiral structures in metal and spiral patterns in anisotropic polarization-dependent azobenzene polymer. However, in isotropic polymer, the fabricated microstructures are typically confined to non-chiral cylindrical geometry due to two-dimensional doughnut intensity profile of optical vortices. Here we develop a powerful strategy for realizing chiral microstructures in isotropic material by coaxial interference of a vortex beam and a plane wave, which produces three-dimensional (3D) spiral optical fields. This coaxial interference beams are creatively produced by designing the contrivable holograms consisting of azimuthal phase and equiphase loaded on liquid-crystal spatial light modulator. Then, in isotropic polymer, 3D chiral microstructures are achieved under illumination of the coaxial interference femtosecond laser beams with their chirality controlled by ...

  18. Simulation tool for optical design of PET detector modules including scintillator material and sensor array

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jatekos, B.; Erdei, G.; Lorincz, E. [Budapest Univ. of Technology and Economics, Dept. of Atomic Physics, Budafoki ut 8, H-1111 Budapest (Hungary)

    2011-07-01

    The appearance of single photon avalanche diodes (SPADs) in the field of PET detector modules made it necessary to apply more complex optical design methods to refine the performance of such assemblies. We developed a combined simulation tool that is capable to model complex detector structures including scintillation material, light guide, light collection optics and sensor, correctly taking into account the statistical behavior of emission of scintillation light and its absorbance in SPADs. As a validation we compared simulation results obtained by our software and another optical design program. Calculations were performed for a simple PET detector arrangement used for testing purposes. According to the results, deviation of center of gravity coordinates between the two simulations is 0.0195 mm, the average ratio of total counts 1.0052. We investigated the error resulting from finite sampling in wavelength space and we found that 20 nm pitch is sufficient for the simulation in case of the given spectral dependencies. (authors)

  19. Femtosecond laser ablation of dielectric materials in the optical breakdown regime: Expansion of a transparent shell

    Science.gov (United States)

    Garcia-Lechuga, M.; Siegel, J.; Hernandez-Rueda, J.; Solis, J.

    2014-09-01

    Phase transition pathways of matter upon ablation with ultrashort laser pulses have been considered to be understood long-since for metals and semiconductors. We provide evidence that also certain dielectrics follow the same pathway, even at high pulse energies triggering optical breakdown. Employing femtosecond microscopy, we observe a characteristic ring pattern within the ablating region that dynamically changes for increasing time delays between pump and probe pulse. These transient Newton rings are related to optical interference of the probe beam reflected at the front surface of the ablating layer with the reflection at the interface of the non-ablating substrate. Analysis of the ring structure shows that the ablation mechanism is initiated by a rarefaction wave leading within a few tens of picoseconds to the formation of a transparent thin shell of reduced density and refractive index, featuring optically sharp interfaces. The shell expands and eventually detaches from the solid material at delays of the order of 100 ps.

  20. New radiological material detection technologies for nuclear forensics: Remote optical imaging and graphene-based sensors.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Harrison, Richard Karl [Sandia National Lab. (SNL-NM), Albuquerque, NM (United States); Martin, Jeffrey B. [Sandia National Lab. (SNL-NM), Albuquerque, NM (United States); Wiemann, Dora K. [Sandia National Lab. (SNL-NM), Albuquerque, NM (United States); Choi, Junoh [Sandia National Lab. (SNL-NM), Albuquerque, NM (United States); Howell, Stephen W. [Sandia National Lab. (SNL-NM), Albuquerque, NM (United States)

    2015-09-01

    We developed new detector technologies to identify the presence of radioactive materials for nuclear forensics applications. First, we investigated an optical radiation detection technique based on imaging nitrogen fluorescence excited by ionizing radiation. We demonstrated optical detection in air under indoor and outdoor conditions for alpha particles and gamma radiation at distances up to 75 meters. We also contributed to the development of next generation systems and concepts that could enable remote detection at distances greater than 1 km, and originated a concept that could enable daytime operation of the technique. A second area of research was the development of room-temperature graphene-based sensors for radiation detection and measurement. In this project, we observed tunable optical and charged particle detection, and developed improved devices. With further development, the advancements described in this report could enable new capabilities for nuclear forensics applications.

  1. Hand Anatomy

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Arthritis Thumb Sprains Trigger Finger Tumors Wrist Fracture Hand Safety Fireworks Safety Lawnmower Safety Snowblower safety Pumpkin ... A-Z Videos Infographics Symptom Picker Anatomy About Hand Surgery What is a Hand Surgeon? What is ...

  2. Claw hand

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ulnar nerve palsy - claw hand; Ulnar nerve dysfunction - claw hand; Ulnar claw ... Someone can be born with claw hand (congenital), or they can develop it because of certain disorders, such as nerve injury.

  3. The influence of metallic brazing materials on the strain formation of internally water-cooled X-ray optics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oberta, P; Kittler, M; Áč, V; Hrdý, J; Iragashi, N; Scheinost, A C; Uchida, Y

    2015-03-01

    A study of metallic brazing material for internally cooled optics is presented. The study shows the influence of the different material properties on the final quality of the bond in terms of diffracted wavefront distortion, i.e. enlargement of the rocking curve. By choosing the proper brazing material and applying the proper brazing conditions, the influence of the brazing material can be fully eliminated. Furthermore the degradation of some brazing material due to the extreme working conditions of the optics is presented. Measurement results from ESRF and KEK confirm the importance of the proper brazing material choice.

  4. Metal-organic frameworks as competitive materials for non-linear optics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mingabudinova, L R; Vinogradov, V V; Milichko, V A; Hey-Hawkins, E; Vinogradov, A V

    2016-09-26

    The last five years have witnessed a huge breakthrough in the creation and the study of the properties of a new class of compounds - metamaterials. The next stage of this technological revolution will be the development of active, controllable, and non-linear metamaterials, surpassing natural media as platforms for optical data processing and quantum information applications. However, scientists are constantly faced with the need to find new methods that can ensure the formation of quantum and non-linear metamaterials with higher resolution. One such method of producing metamaterials in the future, which will provide scalability and availability, is chemical synthesis. Meanwhile, the chemical synthesis of organized 3D structures with a period of a few nanometers and a size of up to a few millimeters is not an easy task and is yet to be resolved. The most promising avenue seems to be the use of highly porous structures based on metal-organic frameworks that have demonstrated their unique properties in the field of non-linear optics (NLO) over the past three years. Thus, the aim of this review is to examine current progress and the possibilities of using metal-organic frameworks in the field of non-linear optics as chemically obtained metamaterials of the future. The review begins by presenting the theoretical principles of physical phenomena represented by mathematical descriptions for clarity. Major attention is paid to the second harmonic generation (SHG) effect. In this section we compare inorganic single crystals, which are most commonly used to study the effect in question, to organic materials, which also possess the required properties. Based on these data, we present a rationale for the possibility of studying the non-linear optical properties of metal-organic structures as well as describing the use of synthetic approaches and the difficulties associated with them. The second part of the review explicitly acquaints the reader with a new class of materials

  5. Ink-jet printed fluorescent materials as light sources for planar optical waveguides on polymer foils

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bollgruen, Patrick; Gleissner, Uwe; Wolfer, Tim; Megnin, Christof; Mager, Dario; Overmeyer, Ludger; Korvink, Jan G.; Hanemann, Thomas

    2016-10-01

    Polymer-based optical sensor networks on foils (planar optronic systems) are a promising research field, but it can be challenging to supply them with light. We present a solvent-free, ink-jet printable material system with optically active substances to create planar light sources for these networks. The ink is based on a UV-curable monomer, the fluorescent agents are EuDBMPhen or 9,10-diphenylantracene, which fluoresce at 612 or 430 nm, respectively. We demonstrate the application as light source by printing a small area of fluorescent material on an optical waveguide fabricated by flexographic printing on PMMA foil, resulting in a simple polymer-optical device fabricated entirely by additive deposition techniques. When excited by a 405-nm laser of 10 mW, the emitted light couples into the waveguide and appears at the end of the waveguide. In comparison to conventional light sources, the intensity is weak but could be detected with a photodiode power sensor. In return, the concept has the advantage of being completely independent of any electrical elements or external cable connections.

  6. Graphene and graphene-like 2D materials for optical biosensing and bioimaging: a review

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhu, Chengzhou; Du, Dan; Lin, Yuehe

    2015-09-01

    The increasing demands of bioassay and biomedical applications have significantly promoted the rational design and fabrication of a wide range of functional nanomaterials. Coupling these advanced nanomaterials with biomolecule recognition events leads to novel sensing and diagnostic platforms. Because of their unique structures and multifunctionalities, two-dimensional nanomaterials, such as graphene and graphene-like materials (e.g., graphitic carbon nitride, transition metal dichalcogenides, boron nitride, and transition metal oxides), have stimulated great interest in the field of optical biosensors and imaging because of their innovative mechanical, physicochemical and optical properties. Depending on the different applications, the graphene and graphene-like nanomaterials can be tailored to form either fluorescent emitters or efficient fluorescence quenchers, making them powerful platforms for fabricating a series of optical biosensors to sensitively detect various targets including ions, small biomolecules, DNA/RNA and proteins. This review highlights the recent progress in optical biosensors based on graphene and graphene-like 2D materials and their imaging applications. Finally, the opportunities and some critical challenges in this field are also addressed.

  7. Vibration measurement on composite material with embedded optical fiber based on phase-OTDR

    Science.gov (United States)

    Franciscangelis, C.; Margulis, W.; Floridia, C.; Rosolem, J. B.; Salgado, F. C.; Nyman, T.; Petersson, M.; Hallander, P.; Hällstrom, S.; Söderquist, I.; Fruett, F.

    2017-04-01

    Distributed sensors based on phase-optical time-domain reflectometry (phase-OTDR) are suitable for aircraft health monitoring due to electromagnetic interference immunity, small dimensions, low weight and flexibility. These features allow the fiber embedment into aircraft structures in a nearly non-intrusive way to measure vibrations along its length. The capability of measuring vibrations on avionics structures is of interest for what concerns the study of material fatigue or the occurrence of undesirable phenomena like flutter. In this work, we employed the phase-OTDR technique to measure vibrations ranging from some dozens of Hz to kHz in two layers of composite material board with embedded polyimide coating 0.24 numerical aperture single-mode optical fiber.

  8. Understanding of Prospective Physics Teachers Students Toward Pedagogical Content Knowledge on Optical Geometry Materials

    Science.gov (United States)

    Erwin, E.; Rustaman, N. Y.

    2017-09-01

    This article discusses about Pedagogical content knowledge (PCK) profile of prospective physics teachers on optical geometry materials. Data collected using interview and questionnaire, and the data were analyzed descriptively. The results showed that PCK is an unfamiliar term to students. The extreme findings in this study is the lack of understanding of PCK by prospective physics teachers relating to the importance of recognizing the characteristics of students and how to manage questions from students, which teacher has to directly answer questions from students, and how to respond to the students’ incorrect answer, mostly prospective physics teachers assume that in case of the students answer incorrectly, the students should be directly blamed. Prospective physics teachers have not yet integrated the pedagogical knowledge with the content knowledge in their possess learning it he optical geometry material.

  9. Novel silica surface charge density mediated control of the optical properties of embedded optically active materials and its application for fiber optic pH sensing at elevated temperatures

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Congjun; Ohodnicki, Paul R.; Su, Xin; Keller, Murphy; Brown, Thomas D.; Baltrus, John P.

    2015-01-01

    Silica and silica incorporated nanocomposite materials have been extensively studied for a wide range of applications. Here we demonstrate an intriguing optical effect of silica that, depending on the solution pH, amplifies or attenuates the optical absorption of a variety of embedded optically active materials with very distinct properties, such as plasmonic Au nanoparticles, non-plasmonic Pt nanoparticles, and the organic dye rhodamine B (not a pH indicator), coated on an optical fiber. Interestingly, the observed optical response to varying pH appears to follow the surface charge density of the silica matrix for all the three different optically active materials. To the best of our knowledge, this optical effect has not been previously reported and it appears universal in that it is likely that any optically active material can be incorporated into the silica matrix to respond to solution pH or surface charge density variations. A direct application of this effect is for optical pH sensing which has very attractive features that can enable minimally invasive, remote, real time and continuous distributed pH monitoring. Particularly, as demonstrated here, using highly stable metal nanoparticles embedded in an inorganic silica matrix can significantly improve the capability of pH sensing in extremely harsh environments which is of increasing importance for applications in unconventional oil and gas resource recovery, carbon sequestration, water quality monitoring, etc. Our approach opens a pathway towards possible future development of robust optical pH sensors for the most demanding environmental conditions. The newly discovered optical effect of silica also offers the potential for control of the optical properties of optically active materials for a range of other potential applications such as electrochromic devices.Silica and silica incorporated nanocomposite materials have been extensively studied for a wide range of applications. Here we demonstrate an

  10. Intermediate strain rate testing methodologies and full-field optical strain measurement techniques for composite materials characterisation

    OpenAIRE

    Longana, M.L.

    2014-01-01

    Two optical full-field strain measurement techniques, Digital Image Correlation and the Grid Method, are applied to characterise the strain-rate dependent constitutive behaviour of composite materials. Optical strain measurement techniques based on full-field images are well established for material characterisation in the quasi-static strain rate region, however in this work they are developed to study the material behaviour at intermediate strain rates, which is relatively unexplored. For t...

  11. A versatile low-cost Czochralski crystal growth system for nonlinear optical organic materials

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aggarwal, M. D.; Wang, W. S.; Shields, Angela W.; Penn, Benjamin G.; Frazier, Donald O.

    1992-01-01

    A versatile low-cost Czochralski system for pulling crystals from melt has been described. It is designed for low melting, transparent, and nonlinear optical materials. One of the most important novel feature of this crystal growth system is that the entire growth process including the solid-liquid interface can be viewed from any direction. Another is the use of an after-heater to reduce excess heat loss from the surface of the melt.

  12. Temperature Dependence Characterization of Layered Materials via the Magneto-Optical Kerr Effect

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Haoxiang; Stevens, Christopher; Paul, Jagannath; Karaiskaj, Denis; Miller, Casey

    The Curie temperature of PyCu alloy films can be controlled by Cu content. The additional thickness in layered materials changes the Cure temperature and hence the magnetic coupling between permalloy and Cu layers. The decoupling is investigated by the Magneto-Optical Kerr Effect (MOKE) as a function of temperature around the Curie temperature. The measurements reveal the coupling dynamics between permalloy and Co in novel magnetic heterostructures. This research at USF is supported by the National Science Foundation.

  13. Control of optical properties of hybrid materials with chirped femtosecond laser pulses under strong coupling conditions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sukharev, Maxim

    2014-08-28

    The interaction of chirped femtosecond laser pulses with hybrid materials--materials comprised of plasmon sustaining structures and resonant molecules--is scrutinized using a self-consistent model of coupled Maxwell-Bloch equations. The optical properties of such systems are examined with the example of periodic sinusoidal gratings. It is shown that under strong coupling conditions one can control light transmission using chirped pulses in a spatiotemporal manner. The temporal origin of control relies on chirps non-symmetric in time while the space control is achieved via spatial localization of electromagnetic energy due to plasmon resonances.

  14. Electronic and optical properties of strained graphene and other strained 2D materials: a review

    Science.gov (United States)

    Naumis, Gerardo G.; Barraza-Lopez, Salvador; Oliva-Leyva, Maurice; Terrones, Humberto

    2017-09-01

    This review presents the state of the art in strain and ripple-induced effects on the electronic and optical properties of graphene. It starts by providing the crystallographic description of mechanical deformations, as well as the diffraction pattern for different kinds of representative deformation fields. Then, the focus turns to the unique elastic properties of graphene, and to how strain is produced. Thereafter, various theoretical approaches used to study the electronic properties of strained graphene are examined, discussing the advantages of each. These approaches provide a platform to describe exotic properties, such as a fractal spectrum related with quasicrystals, a mixed Dirac-Schrödinger behavior, emergent gravity, topological insulator states, in molecular graphene and other 2D discrete lattices. The physical consequences of strain on the optical properties are reviewed next, with a focus on the Raman spectrum. At the same time, recent advances to tune the optical conductivity of graphene by strain engineering are given, which open new paths in device applications. Finally, a brief review of strain effects in multilayered graphene and other promising 2D materials like silicene and materials based on other group-IV elements, phosphorene, dichalcogenide- and monochalcogenide-monolayers is presented, with a brief discussion of interplays among strain, thermal effects, and illumination in the latter material family.

  15. Electronic and optical properties of strained graphene and other strained 2D materials: a review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Naumis, Gerardo G; Barraza-Lopez, Salvador; Oliva-Leyva, Maurice; Terrones, Humberto

    2017-09-01

    This review presents the state of the art in strain and ripple-induced effects on the electronic and optical properties of graphene. It starts by providing the crystallographic description of mechanical deformations, as well as the diffraction pattern for different kinds of representative deformation fields. Then, the focus turns to the unique elastic properties of graphene, and to how strain is produced. Thereafter, various theoretical approaches used to study the electronic properties of strained graphene are examined, discussing the advantages of each. These approaches provide a platform to describe exotic properties, such as a fractal spectrum related with quasicrystals, a mixed Dirac-Schrödinger behavior, emergent gravity, topological insulator states, in molecular graphene and other 2D discrete lattices. The physical consequences of strain on the optical properties are reviewed next, with a focus on the Raman spectrum. At the same time, recent advances to tune the optical conductivity of graphene by strain engineering are given, which open new paths in device applications. Finally, a brief review of strain effects in multilayered graphene and other promising 2D materials like silicene and materials based on other group-IV elements, phosphorene, dichalcogenide- and monochalcogenide-monolayers is presented, with a brief discussion of interplays among strain, thermal effects, and illumination in the latter material family.

  16. FOREX-A Fiber Optics Diagnostic System For Study Of Materials At High Temperatures And Pressures

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smith, D. E.; Roeske, F.

    1983-03-01

    We have successfully fielded a Fiber Optics Radiation EXperiment system (FOREX) designed for measuring material properties at high temperatures and pressures on an underground nuclear test. The system collects light from radiating materials and transmits it through several hundred meters of optical fibers to a recording station consisting of a streak camera with film readout. The use of fiber optics provides a faster time response than can presently be obtained with equalized coaxial cables over comparable distances. Fibers also have significant cost and physical size advantages over coax cables. The streak camera achieves a much higher information density than an equivalent oscilloscope system, and it also serves as the light detector. The result is a wide bandwidth high capacity system that can be fielded at a relatively low cost in manpower, space, and materials. For this experiment, the streak camera had a 120 ns time window with a 1.2 ns time resolution. Dynamic range for the system was about 1000. Beam current statistical limitations were approximately 8% for a 0.3 ns wide data point at one decade above the threshold recording intensity.

  17. Design, synthesis and polymerization of novel second-order nonlinear optical materials

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ghosn, Rima Kamal

    1997-10-01

    This dissertation focuses on the design, synthesis and nonlinear optical properties of large second-order nonlinearity chromophores. A review of the fundamentals of nonlinear optics and polymeric materials is provided in the first chapter. The second chapter focuses on the optimization of reaction conditions of asymmetric diphenyl diacetylene liquid crystals. The third chapter deals with the design and synthesis of chromophores derived from thiobarbituric acids. Conventional nonlinear optical organic materials employ chromophores possessing a large transition dipole moment between the ground and first excited states. This requirement is fulfilled using conjugated molecules containing optimally balanced electron donor and acceptor moieties. Barbituric acid is a strong electron acceptor that yields molecules with a large first hyperpolarizabilities. There are two classes of chromophores investigated, both capable of covalent polymer incorporation, which include the main chain and double-end crosslinkable chromophores. These chromophores, high in both nonlinearity and thermal stability, are regarded as ideal candidates for electrooptical devices. The fourth chapter investigates polyimides as stable NLO polymeric materials.

  18. Metal-organic frameworks for electronics: emerging second order nonlinear optical and dielectric materials.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mendiratta, Shruti; Lee, Cheng-Hua; Usman, Muhammad; Lu, Kuang-Lieh

    2015-10-01

    Metal-organic frameworks (MOFs) have been intensively studied over the past decade because they represent a new category of hybrid inorganic-organic materials with extensive surface areas, ultrahigh porosity, along with the extraordinary tailorability of structure, shape and dimensions. In this highlight, we summarize the current state of MOF research and report on structure-property relationships for nonlinear optical (NLO) and dielectric applications. We focus on the design principles and structural elements needed to develop potential NLO and low dielectric (low-κ) MOFs with an emphasis on enhancing material performance. In addition, we highlight experimental evidence for the design of devices for low-dielectric applications. These results motivate us to develop better low-dielectric and NLO materials and to perform in-depth studies related to deposition techniques, patterning and the mechanical performance of these materials in the future.

  19. Optically pumped lasing in solution-processed perovskite semiconducting materials: Self-assembled Fabry-Pérot microcavity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sasaki, Fumio; Zhou, Ying; Sonoda, Yoriko; Azumi, Reiko; Mochizuki, Hiroyuki; Nguyen, Van-Cao; Yanagi, Hisao

    2017-04-01

    Optically pumped lasing has been observed in solution-processed perovskite semiconducting materials, CH3NH3PbX3 (X = Cl, Br, I). Self-assembled Fabry-Pérot (FP) cavities have been easily obtained by using a simple “cast-capping method”, where we can obtain single-crystal-like optical cavities. The observed spectra show clear multimode lasing of the FP cavities under pulsed optical excitation. The mode intervals are well explained by the optical constants with large dispersions of the materials. The obtained refractive index around the lasing area coincides with the results in the previous reports.

  20. Android Hands

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Vlachos, Evgenios; Schärfe, Henrik

    2014-01-01

    . On such occasions, android and humanoid hand models should have similar structure, functions, and performance as the human hand. In this paper we present the anatomy, and the key functionalities of the human hand followed by a literature review on android/humanoid hands for grasping and manipulating objects...

  1. Examination of an Optical Transmittance Test for Photovoltaic Encapsulation Materials (Presentation)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Miller, D.; Bengoechea, J.; Bokria, J.; Kohl, M.; Powell, N. E.; Smith, M. E.; White, M. D.; Wilson, H. R.; Wohlgemuth, J. H.

    2013-09-01

    The optical transmittance of encapsulation materials is a key characteristic for their use in photovoltaic (PV) modules. Changes in transmittance with time in the field affect module performance, which may impact product warranties. Transmittance is important in product development, module manufacturing, and field power production (both immediate and long-term). Therefore, an international standard (IEC 62788-1-4) has recently been proposed by the Encapsulation Task-Group within the Working Group 2 (WG2) of the International Electrotechnical Commission (IEC) Technical Committee 82 (TC82) for the quantification of the optical performance of PV encapsulation materials. Existing standards, such as ASTM E903, are general and more appropriately applied to concentrated solar power than to PV. Starting from the optical transmittance measurement, the solar-weighted transmittance of photon irradiance, yellowness index (which may be used in aging studies to assess durability), and ultraviolet (UV) cut-off wavelength may all be determined using the proposed standard. The details of the proposed test are described. The results of a round-robin experiment (for five materials) conducted at seven laboratories to validate the test procedure using representative materials are also presented. For example, the Encapsulation Group actively explored the measurement requirements (wavelength range and resolution), the requirements for the spectrophotometer (including the integrating sphere and instrument accessories, such as a depolarizer), specimen requirements (choice of glass-superstrate and -substrate), and data analysis (relative to the light that may be used in the PV application). The round-robin experiment identified both intra- and inter-laboratory instrument precision and bias for five encapsulation materials (encompassing a range of transmittance and haze-formation characteristics).

  2. First Example of Nonlinear Optical Materials Based on Nanoconjugates of Sandwich Phthalocyanines with Quantum Dots.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oluwole, David O; Yagodin, Alexey V; Mkhize, Nhlakanipho C; Sekhosana, Kutloano E; Martynov, Alexander G; Gorbunova, Yulia G; Tsivadze, Aslan Yu; Nyokong, Tebello

    2017-02-24

    We report original, selective, and efficient approaches to novel nonlinear optical (NLO) materials, namely homoleptic double- and triple-decker europium(III) complexes 2 and 3 with the A3 B-type phthalocyanine ligand (2,3-bis[2'-(2''-hydroxyethoxy)ethoxy]-9,10,16,17,23,24-hexa-n-butoxyphthalocyanine 1) bearing two anchoring diethyleneglycol chains terminated with OH groups. Their covalently linked nanoconjugates with mercaptosuccinic acid-capped ternary CdSeTe/CdTeS/ZnSeS quantum dots are prepared in the presence of an ethyl(dimethylaminopropyl)carbodiimide activating agent. Optical limiting (OL) properties of the obtained low-symmetry complexes and their conjugates with quantum dots (QDs) are measured for the first time by the open-aperture Z-scan technique (532 nm laser and pulse rate of 10 ns). For comparison, symmetrical double- and triple-decker EuIII octa-n-butoxyphthalocyaninates 5 and 6 and their mixtures with trioctylphosphine oxide-capped QDs are also synthesized and studied. It is revealed that both lowering of molecular symmetry and expansion of the π-electron system upon moving from double- to triple-decker complexes significantly improves the OL characteristics, making the low-symmetry triple-decker complex 3 the most efficient optical limiter in the studied family of sandwich complexes, affording 50 % lowering of light transmittance below 0.5 J cm-2 input fluence. Conjugation (both covalent and noncovalent) with QDs affords further enhancement of the OL properties of both double- and triple-decker complexes. Altogether, the obtained results contribute to the development of novel nonlinear optical materials for future nanoelectronic and optical device applications. © 2017 Wiley-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  3. Nonlinear optics and carrier dynamics in nanostructured and two-dimensional materials

    Science.gov (United States)

    Suess, Ryan J.

    Understanding and measuring the interaction of light with sub-wavelength structures and atomically thin materials is of critical importance for the development of next generation photonic devices. One approach to achieve the desired optical properties in a material is to manipulate its mesoscopic structure or its composition in order to affect the properties of the light-matter interaction. There has been tremendous recent interest in so called two-dimensional materials, consisting of only a single to a few layers of atoms arranged in a planar sheet. These materials have demonstrated great promise as a platform for studying unique phenomena arising from the low-dimensionality of the material and for developing new types of devices based on these effects. A thorough investigation of the optical and electronic properties of these new materials is essential to realizing their potential. In this work we present studies that explore the nonlinear optical properties and carrier dynamics in nanoporous silicon waveguides, two-dimensional graphite (graphene), and atomically thin black phosphorus. We first present an investigation of the nonlinear response of nanoporous silicon optical waveguides using a novel pump-probe method. A two-frequency heterodyne technique is developed in order to measure the pump-induced transient change in phase and intensity in a single measurement. The experimental data reveal a characteristic material response time and temporally resolved intensity and phase behavior matching a physical model dominated by free-carrier effects that are significantly stronger and faster than those observed in traditional silicon-based waveguides. These results shed light on the large optical nonlinearity observed in nanoporous silicon and demonstrate a new measurement technique for heterodyne pump-probe spectroscopy. Next we explore the optical properties of low-doped graphene in the terahertz spectral regime, where both intraband and interband effects play a

  4. Novel silica surface charge density mediated control of the optical properties of embedded optically active materials and its application for fiber optic pH sensing at elevated temperatures.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Congjun; Ohodnicki, Paul R; Su, Xin; Keller, Murphy; Brown, Thomas D; Baltrus, John P

    2015-02-14

    Silica and silica incorporated nanocomposite materials have been extensively studied for a wide range of applications. Here we demonstrate an intriguing optical effect of silica that, depending on the solution pH, amplifies or attenuates the optical absorption of a variety of embedded optically active materials with very distinct properties, such as plasmonic Au nanoparticles, non-plasmonic Pt nanoparticles, and the organic dye rhodamine B (not a pH indicator), coated on an optical fiber. Interestingly, the observed optical response to varying pH appears to follow the surface charge density of the silica matrix for all the three different optically active materials. To the best of our knowledge, this optical effect has not been previously reported and it appears universal in that it is likely that any optically active material can be incorporated into the silica matrix to respond to solution pH or surface charge density variations. A direct application of this effect is for optical pH sensing which has very attractive features that can enable minimally invasive, remote, real time and continuous distributed pH monitoring. Particularly, as demonstrated here, using highly stable metal nanoparticles embedded in an inorganic silica matrix can significantly improve the capability of pH sensing in extremely harsh environments which is of increasing importance for applications in unconventional oil and gas resource recovery, carbon sequestration, water quality monitoring, etc. Our approach opens a pathway towards possible future development of robust optical pH sensors for the most demanding environmental conditions. The newly discovered optical effect of silica also offers the potential for control of the optical properties of optically active materials for a range of other potential applications such as electrochromic devices.

  5. Prediction of nonlinear optical properties of organic materials. General theoretical considerations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cardelino, B.; Moore, C.; Zutaut, S.

    1993-01-01

    The prediction of nonlinear optical properties of organic materials is geared to assist materials scientists in the selection of good candidate molecules. A brief summary of the quantum mechanical methods used for estimating hyperpolarizabilities will be presented. The advantages and limitations of each technique will be discussed. Particular attention will be given to the finite-field method for calculating first and second order hyperpolarizabilities, since this method is better suited for large molecules. Corrections for dynamic fields and bulk effects will be discussed in detail, focusing on solvent effects, conformational isomerization, core effects, dispersion, and hydrogen bonding. Several results will be compared with data obtained from third-harmonic-generation (THG) and dc-induced second harmonic generation (EFISH) measurements. These comparisons will demonstrate the qualitative ability of the method to predict the relative strengths of hyperpolarizabilities of a class of compounds. The future application of molecular mechanics, as well as other techniques, in the study of bulk properties and solid state defects will be addressed. The relationship between large values for nonlinear optical properties and large conjugation lengths is well known, and is particularly important for third-order processes. For this reason, the materials with the largest observed nonresonant third-order properties are conjugated polymers. An example of this type of polymer is polydiacetylene. One of the problems in dealing with polydiacetylene is that substituents which may enhance its nonlinear properties may ultimately prevent it from polymerizing. A model which attempts to predict the likelihood of solid-state polymerization is considered, along with the implications of the assumptions that are used. Calculations of the third-order optical properties and their relationship to first-order properties and energy gaps will be discussed. The relationship between monomeric and

  6. An ultra-fast optical shutter exploiting total light absorption in a phase change material

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jafari, Mohsen; Guo, L. Jay; Rais-Zadeh, Mina

    2017-02-01

    In this paper, we present an ultra-fast and high-contrast optical shutter with applications in atomic clock assemblies, integrated photonic systems, communication hardware, etc. The shutter design exploits the total light absorption phenomenon in a thin phase change (PC) material placed over a metal layer. The shutter switches between ON and OFF states by changing PC material phase and thus its refractive index. The PC material used in this work is Germanium Telluride (GeTe), a group IV-VI chalcogenide compound, which exhibits good optical contrast when switching from amorphous to crystalline state and vice versa. The stable phase changing behavior and reliability of GeTe and GeSbTe (GST) have been verified in optical memories and RF switches. Here, GeTe is used as it has a lower extinction coefficient in near-IR regions compared to GST. GeTe can be thermally transitioned between two phases by applying electrical pulses to an integrated heater. The memory behavior of GeTe results in zero static power consumption which is useful in applications requiring long time periods between switching activities. We previously demonstrated a meta-surface employing GeTe in sub-wavelength slits with >14 dB isolation at 1.5 μm by exciting the surface plasmon polariton and localized slit resonances. In this work, strong interference effects in a thin layer of GeTe over a gold mirror result in near total light absorption of up to 40 dB (21 dB measured) in the amorphous phase of the shutter at 780 nm with much less fabrication complexity. The optical loss at the shutter ON state is less than 1.5 dB. A nickel chrome (NiCr) heater provides the Joule heating energy required to achieve the crystallographic phase change. The measured switching speed is 2 μs.

  7. Selection of the intrinsic polarization properties of animal optical materials creates enhanced structural reflectivity and camouflage.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Feller, Kathryn D; Jordan, Thomas M; Wilby, David; Roberts, Nicholas W

    2017-07-05

    Many animals use structural coloration to create bright and conspicuous visual signals. Selection of the size and shape of the optical structures animals use defines both the colour and intensity of the light reflected. The material used to create these reflectors is also important; however, animals are restricted to a limited number of materials: commonly chitin, guanine and the protein, reflectin. In this work we highlight that a particular set of material properties can also be under selection in order to increase the optical functionality of structural reflectors. Specifically, polarization properties, such as birefringence (the difference between the refractive indices of a material) and chirality (which relates to molecular asymmetry) are both under selection to create enhanced structural reflectivity. We demonstrate that the structural coloration of the gold beetle Chrysina resplendens and silvery reflective sides of the Atlantic herring, Clupea harengus are two examples of this phenomenon. Importantly, these polarization properties are not selected to control the polarization of the reflected light as a source of visual information per se. Instead, by creating higher levels of reflectivity than are otherwise possible, such internal polarization properties improve intensity-matching camouflage.This article is part of the themed issue 'Animal coloration: production, perception, function and application'. © 2017 The Authors.

  8. Design of a gonio-spectro-photometer for optical characterization of gonio-apparent materials

    Science.gov (United States)

    Matsapey, N.; Faucheu, J.; Flury, M.; Delafosse, D.

    2013-06-01

    Gonio-apparent surfaces, characterized by large variations in optical properties with small variations in detection or illuminating directions, have a huge appeal for industrial product for aesthetic reasons. This work is dedicated to the design of a gonio-spectrophotometer (OptiMines goniometer) adequate for analyzing the light reflecting behavior of these challenging surface aspects. Such optical characterizations are useful data for realistic rendering of such surfaces in computer graphics but also for new product development and quality control in industrial manufacturing. To reach the four degrees of freedom necessary to cover the entire reflecting hemisphere, the designed geometrical setup favors movements of the sample so that illuminating and detection arms only carry one degree of freedom each. Having only one degree of freedom on each optical arm enables an easy installation of precise optical systems that leads to a very high directional accuracy for small arm dimensions. High directional accuracy is essential for fine analysis of gonio-apparent surfaces in order to prevent signal averaging with out-of-direction beam, in particular when the property change is abrupt. The analysis of both diffuse and gonio-apparent materials demonstrates the performance in surface metrology provided by this new device.

  9. Smart synthetic material arresting cable based on embedded distributed fiber optic sensors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mendoza, Edgar; Prohaska, John; Kempen, Cornelia; Bentley, Douglas; Murdock, Chad; Piatkowski, David; White, Lonnie

    2007-07-01

    Redondo Optics Inc. in collaboration with the Cortland Cable Company and the US. Navy under a Navy sponsored SBIR program is in the process of developing an embedded distributed fiber optic sensor (EDIFOS TM) system for the real-time, structural health monitoring, damage assessment, and lifetime prediction of full scale synthetic material arresting gear cables. The EDIFOS TM system uses a distributed array of fiber Bragg grating sensors, sensitive to stress/strain, impact damage, kinking and bending, and temperature, embedded within the strands of a synthetic material arresting cable structure. Fiber Bragg grating sensors are a mature technology typically used for the in-situ structural health monitoring of advanced structures. The periodic grating produces an optical, wavelength-encoded signal whose properties are dependent on the structural, and mechanical environment of the sensor fiber. The FBG sensor interrogation system monitors the status of each of the individual FBG sensors distributed along the embedded sensor fibers and transforms this information in real-time in to a graphical display of the stress/strain and temperature state of the entire arresting gear cable. An alarm system triggers to pinpoint those locations of potential damage.

  10. Distributed Brillouin fiber optic strain monitoring applications in advanced composite materials

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bastianini, Filippo; Cargnelutti, Mario; Di Tommaso, Angelo; Toffanin, Massimo

    2003-08-01

    Composite materials based on glass, carbon and aramid fibers have many advantages such as fast application, lightweight and corrosion resistance, and are widely diffused for manufacturing of tanks, pipings and for restoration, upgrade and seismic retrofit of structures and historical heritage. As several questions regarding long term durability of composite strengthenings remains still unsolved, monitoring of strain and temperature is strongly recommended, respectively to assess proper load transfer and no glass phase transition of the polymeric matrix. In this research work strain and temperature distributed sensing trough Brillouin scattering in single-mode optical fibers was used in different tests in order to understand the influence of different fiber coatings and embedding techniques. Pressure tests were performed on a GFRP piping with inhomogeneous strengthening layout and Brillouin strain data were compared with conventional strain gages. A smart CFRP material has been also developed and evaluated in a seismic retrofit application on an historical building dated 1500 that was seriously damaged in the earthquake of 1997. The developed embedding technique has been demonstrated successful to obtain fiber-optic smart composites with low optical losses, and the data comparison between Brillouin and resistive strain gauges confirms Brillouin technique is very effective for composite monitoring.

  11. Polymer single-arm optical waveguide interferometer for detection of toxic industrial materials

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sarkisov, Sergey S.; Curley, Michael J.; Adamovsky, Grigory

    2001-12-01

    We report a novel single-arm double-mode double-order waveguide interferometer being used as a chemical sensor for detection f toxic industrial materials such as ammonia in air. The sensor is based on thin films of polymers poly(methyl methacrylate) and polyimide doped with indicator dyes bromocresol purple and bromothymol blue. These dye- doped polymer materials exhibit a reversible optical absorption in a band near 600 nm being exposed to ammonia in wet air. The rise of absorption is accompanied by the change of the refractive index in near IR region out of the absorption band. The distinguished feature of the sensor is that is uses for reading the change of the refractive index of the dye-doped polymer film the interference of two propagation waveguide modes of different orders. The modes TM0 and TM1 are simultaneously excited in the light- guiding polymer film with a focusing optics and a prism coupler. The modes are decoupled from the film and recombined producing an interference pattern in the face of an output optical fiber. The sensitivity of the sensor to ammonia is 200 ppm per one full oscillation of the signal. We analyze effects of various factors such as polymer composition, light wavelength, ambient humidity and atmospheric pressure on the performance of the sensor. Various design and fabrication issues are also discussed. The problems of particular interest are reduction of losses and sensitivity improvement.

  12. Sensitivity on materials optical properties of single beam torsional Casimir actuation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tajik, Fatemeh; Sedighi, Mehdi; Palasantzas, George

    2017-05-01

    Here, we investigate the dynamical sensitivity of electrostatic torsional type microelectromechanical systems (MEMS) on the optical properties of interacting materials. This is accomplished by considering the combined effect of mechanical Casimir and electrostatic torques to drive the device actuation. The bifurcation curves and the phase portraits of the actuation dynamics have been analyzed to compare the sensitivity of a single beam torsional device operating between materials with conductivities that differ by several orders of magnitude. It is shown that the range of stable operation of torsional MEMS against stiction instabilities can increase by decreasing the conductivity of interacting materials. Moreover, the introduction of controlled dissipation, corresponding to a finite quality factor, in an otherwise unstable torsional system, could alter an unstable motion towards stiction to dissipative stable motion.

  13. Investigation of nonlinear optical properties of various organic materials by the Z-scan method

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ganeev, R. A.; Boltaev, G. S.; Tugushev, R. I.; Usmanov, T.

    2012-06-01

    We have studied the nonlinear optical properties of various organic materials (vegetable oil, juice, wine, cognac, Coca-Cola and Fanta drinks, Nescafé coffee, tea, gasoline, clock oil, glycerol, and polyphenyl ether) that are used in everyday life. Their nonlinearities have been studied by the Z-scan method in the near-IR and visible spectral ranges. We have shown that the majority of samples possess a nonlinear absorption; however, some of the studied materials show a strong saturated absorption and nonlinear refraction. Red wine and glycerol proved to be the most interesting materials. For these samples, we have observed a change in the sign of the nonlinear absorption with increasing laser intensity, which was attributed to the competition between two-photon absorption and saturated absorption.

  14. An optical coherence tomography investigation of materials defects in ceramic fixed partial dental prostheses

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sinescu, Cosmin; Negrutiu, Meda; Hughes, Michael; Bradu, Adrian; Todea, Carmen; Rominu, Mihai; Laissue, Philippe L.; Podoleanu, Adrian Gh.

    2008-04-01

    Metal ceramic and integral ceramic fixed partial prostheses are mainly used in the frontal part of the dental arch because for esthetics reasons. The masticatory stress may induce fractures of the bridges. There are several factors that are associated with the stress state created in ceramic restorations, including: thickness of ceramic layers, mechanical properties of the materials, elastic modulus of the supporting substrate material, direction, magnitude and frequency of applied load, size and location of occlusal contact areas, residual stresses induced by processing or pores, restoration-cement interfacial defects and environmental defects. The fractures of these bridges lead to functional, esthetic and phonetic disturbances which finally render the prosthetic treatment inefficient. The purpose of this study is to evaluate the capability of optical coherence tomography (OCT) in detection and analysis of possible material defects in metal-ceramic and integral ceramic fixed partial dentures.

  15. Erbium-doped silicon-oxycarbide materials for advanced optical waveguide amplifiers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gallis, Spyros

    As a novel silicon based material, amorphous silicon oxycarbide (a-SiC xOyHz) has found many important applications (e.g. as a low-k material for interconnects) in Si microelectronics. This Ph.D. thesis work has explored another potential application of amorphous silicon oxycarbide: as a silicon-based host material for planar erbium-doped waveguide amplifiers (EDWAs) that operate at the telecommunications wavelength of 1540 nm. Such EDWAs are an important component of planar photonic integrated circuits being developed for implementation of the fiber-to-the-home (FTTH) technology. Furthermore, these Si-based EDWAs could be combined with other Si photonic devices (e.g. light sources, detectors, modulators) for achieving opto-electronic integration on Si chips, or silicon micro/nanophotonics. This thesis will start with basics about Er-doped systems and material challenges in the design of EDWAs. A detailed study of the structural and optical properties of a-SiCxOyHz materials under various deposition and processing conditions, concerning several aspects, such as thin film composition, chemical bonding, refractive index and optical gap, will be presented and discussed. Lastly, this work will focus on the photoluminescence (PL) properties of erbium-doped amorphous silicon oxycarbides (a-SiCxOyHz:Er). Results of both Er-related (near infrared ˜1540 nm) and matrix-related (visible) luminescence properties will be presented, and mechanisms leading to efficient excitation of Er ions in the materials will be discussed. This work indicates that a-SiC xOyHz:Er can be a promising matrix for realizing high-performance EDWAs using inexpensive broadband light sources.

  16. Thermal stability of the solid DNA as a novel optical material

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nizioł, Jacek; Makyła-Juzak, Katarzyna; Marzec, Mateusz M.; Ekiert, Robert; Marzec, Monika; Gondek, Ewa

    2017-04-01

    Deoxyribonucleic acid (DNA) has been extensively exploited for the past decade as the matrix material in organic electronics and nonlinear optics. In this work thermal stability of DNA in solid form was thoroughly studied, mainly by optical methods. Solid samples of low molecular mass DNA were subjected to heating according to different protocols and dissolved. The temperature effect was observed in the evolution of UV absorption and circular dichroism spectra. Thin films of DNA were deposited on polished silicon wafers. They were conditioned at consecutively raised temperature and simultaneously measured by spectroscopic ellipsometry. Changes in chemical composition of thermally treated films were studied by XPS. Below 100 °C all thermal effects were reversible. Melting occurred at c.a.140 °C. Irreversible chemical changes probably occurred at 170-180 °C.

  17. Optical diffraction and spatial filtering of electron micrographs of biological materials

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wever, G.H.; Dunn, P.; Wiberg, J.S.; Thompson, B.J.

    1980-01-01

    Optical diffraction and spatial filtering methods have been used to determine the characteristics of periodic structures in many biological materials. The head shell of bacteriophage T4 was chosen for this study, since aberrations in the assembly of the shell due to mutation or changes in growth conditions lead to the formation of a variety of elongated tubular head forms. The lattice parameters of structures assembled at elevated growth temperatures by normal, wild-type T4 and by a mutant (regA) were analyzed using optical diffraction patterns obtained from electron micrographs. Spatial filtering procedures were used for the reconstruction of one-sided images to determine the characteristics of the head structures assembled under different growth conditions.

  18. New approaches for the fabrication of photonic structures of nonlinear optical materials

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Carvajal, J.J., E-mail: joanjosep.carvajal@urv.ca [Fisica i Cristal lografia de Materials i Nanomaterials (FiCMA-FiCNA), Univ. Rovira i Virgili (URV), Campus Sescelades, Marcel li Domingo, s/n, E-43007 Tarragona (Spain); Pena, A.; Kumar, R.; Pujol, M.C.; Mateos, X.; Aguilo, M. [Fisica i Cristal lografia de Materials i Nanomaterials (FiCMA-FiCNA), Univ. Rovira i Virgili (URV), Campus Sescelades, Marcel li Domingo, s/n, E-43007 Tarragona (Spain); Diaz, F., E-mail: f.diaz@urv.ca [Fisica i Cristal lografia de Materials i Nanomaterials (FiCMA-FiCNA), Univ. Rovira i Virgili (URV), Campus Sescelades, Marcel li Domingo, s/n, E-43007 Tarragona (Spain); Vazquez de Aldana, J.R.; Mendez, C.; Moreno, P.; Roso, L. [Servicio Laser, Univ. Salamanca, E-37008 Salamanca (Spain); Trifonov, T.; Rodriguez, A.; Alcubilla, R. [Dept. Enginyeria Electronica, Univ. Politecnica de Catalunya, E-08034 Barcelona (Spain); Kral, Z.; Ferre-Borrull, J.; Pallares, J.; Marsal, L.F. [Dept. d' Enginyeria Electronica, Univ. Rovira i Virgili (URV), E-43007 Tarragona (Spain); Di Finizio, S.; Macovez, R. [ICFO-Institut de Ciencies Fotoniques, E-08860 Castelldefels (Spain)

    2009-12-15

    We revisited two different strategies to fabricate 1D photonic crystals of nonlinear optical dielectric materials based on ultrafast laser ablation of the surface of an RbTiOPO{sub 4} crystal, and selective etching of ferroelectric domains of the surface of a periodically poled LiNbO{sub 4} crystal. We evaluated their behaviour as Bragg diffraction gratings. We also presented the recent advances we developed in a new procedure of fabrication of 2D and 3D photonic crystals of KTiOPO{sub 4} (KTP) grown on the surface of a KTP substrate by liquid phase epitaxial means within the pores of a silicon macroporous template. Optical, structural, morphological, and compositional characterization for the photonic crystals produced through this technique are presented.

  19. Optimization of the Inverse Algorithm for Estimating the Optical Properties of Biological Materials Using Spatially-resolved Diffuse Reflectance Technique

    Science.gov (United States)

    Determination of the optical properties from intact biological materials based on diffusion approximation theory is a complicated inverse problem, and it requires proper implementation of inverse algorithm, instrumentation, and experiment. This work was aimed at optimizing the procedure of estimatin...

  20. Optically stimulated luminescence of common plastic materials for accident dose reconstruction

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chang, I.; Lee, J. I.; Kim, J. L. [Korea Atomic Energy Research Institute, Daejeon (Korea, Republic of); Chung, K. S. [Gyeongsang National Univ., Jinju (Korea, Republic of)

    2014-05-15

    Optically stimulate luminescence(OSL) has many applications in a variety of radiation dosimetry fields, including personal dosimetry, environmental radiation level monitor, retrospective dosimetry for dating, and reconstruction of radiation doses from radiation accident. In the reconstruction of radiation doses from radiation accident, OSL technique has been used to estimate the doses exposed to public area through analysis of housewares or house construing materials. Recently, many efforts have been carried out for dose reconstruction using personal electronic devices such as mobile phones and USB memory chips. Some of natural minerals such as quartz and feldspar have OSL properties. Quartz is the second most abundant mineral in continental crust of the Earth. In some of common plastics, inorganic fillers (quartz, alumina etc.) are added to make strengthen of their properties depends on applications areas. The aim of this research is to explore a possibility of use of the common plastic materials for dose reconstruction in radiation accident case. In this research the OSL dose response-curve and fading characteristics of the common plastics were tested and evaluated. Finally, we expect this work contribute to elevate the possibility of the dose reconstruction. The general conclusion of this work is that the possibility of dose reconstruction using common plastic materials is showed using the OSL characteristics of the materials. However, the tested common plastic materials have relatively low sensitivities. Further work is required to establish a database of OSL properties of common plastic materials for emergency dose reconstruction by using housewares.

  1. Stable dopant for liquid crystals as materials for optically addressed spatial light modulators

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ruzak, Oksana; Collings, Neil; Crossland, William A.; Davey, Anthony B.; Wilkinson, Timothy D.

    2004-10-01

    It is shown that 2,6 azo-substituted anthraquinone dye-doped systems are interesting alternative to Methyl Red (MR) doped NLCs as materials for Optically Addressed Spatial Light Modulators (OASLMs) without amorphous silicon layer. Nonlinearity in liquid crystals doped with new dye is studied. Dynamic holographic grating formation is observed under conditions of low power laser light and no external fields. The samples are planar and normal incidence of light is used. The results for dynamic holographic studies are compared with azo dye MR crystals and C60. It is shown that this dopant competes with the best known materials in terms of performance in 10 ms speed regime. The system under investigation possesses very good time stability and outstanding light fastness (even a power exceeding working light intensity 100 times is not destructive to the material). It does not form permanent component at any conditions, which is vital for applications where constant change of written information is required (OASLMs, dynamic holography, all-optical switching). Possible mechanisms and the nature of effects that lead to the photorefractive effect in the anthraquinone system are discussed. Resolution of the devices, their efficiency and optimal working conditions are investigated.

  2. Crystal growth of an organic non-linear optical material from the vapour phase

    CERN Document Server

    Hou, W

    1999-01-01

    Due to the potential applications of organic non-linear optical materials in the areas of optical processing and communication, the investigation of the crystal growth of new organic NLO materials has been an active field for the last 20 years. For such uses it is necessary to produce single crystals of high quality and perfection, free of strain and defects. When crystals are grown from the solution and the melt, solvent and the decomposition component in the melt can introduce impurities and imperfection to the as-grown crystals. For crystals grown from vapour phase, in the absence of the solvent, this cannot occur and the method promises to yield single crystals of higher quality. Despite this attraction, little attention has been paid to the vapour phase growth of organic NLO crystals. It was with this in mind that the following investigation was carried out. Using Methyl p-hydroxybenzoate (p-MHB), a potential organic NLO material, a comparison investigation was made of its crystal growth from both the va...

  3. Uncovering the Intramolecular Emission and Tuning the Nonlinear Optical Properties of Organic Materials by Cocrystallization.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhu, Weigang; Zhu, Lingyun; Sun, Lingjie; Zhen, Yonggang; Dong, Huanli; Wei, Zhixiang; Hu, Wenping

    2016-11-02

    The spectroscopic and photophysical properties of organic materials in the solid-state are widely accepted as a result of their molecular packing structure and intermolecular interactions, such as J- and H-aggregation, charge-transfer (CT), excimer and exciplex. However, in this work, we show that Spe-F4 DIB cocrystals (SFCs) surprisingly retain the energy levels of photoluminescence (PL) states of Spe crystals, despite a significantly altered molecular packing structure after cocrystallization. In comparison, Npe-F4 DIB cocrystals (NFCs) with new spectroscopic states display different spectra and photophysical behaviors as compared with those of individual component crystals. These may be related to the molecular configuration in crystals, and we propose Spe as an "intramolecular emissive" material, thus providing a new viewpoint on light-emitting species of organic chromophores. Moreover, the nonlinear optical (NLO) properties of Npe and Spe are firstly demonstrated and modulated by cocrystallization. The established "molecule-packing-property" relationship helps to rationally control the optical properties of organic materials through cocrystallization. © 2016 Wiley-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  4. Analysis of interferograms of refractive index inhomogeneities produced in optical materials

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tarjányi, N.

    2014-12-01

    Optical homogeneity of materials intended for optical applications is one of the criterions which decide on an appropriate application method for the material. The existence of a refractive index inhomogeneity inside a material may disqualify it from utilization or by contrary, provide an advantage. For observation of a refractive index inhomogeneity, even a weak one, it is convenient to use any of interferometric methods. They are very sensitive and provide information on spatial distribution of the refractive index, immediately. One can use them also in case when the inhomogeneity evolves in time, usually due to action of some external fields. Then, the stream of interferograms provides a dynamic evolution of a spatial distribution of the inhomogeneity. In the contribution, there are presented results of the analysis of interferograms obtained by observing the creation of a refractive index inhomogeneity due to illumination of thin layers of a polyvinyl-alcohol/acrylamide photopolymer and a plate of photorefractive crystal, lithium niobate, by light and a refractive index inhomogeneity originated at the boundary of two layers of polydimethylsiloxane. The obtained dependences can be used for studying of the mechanisms responsible for the inhomogeneity creation, designing various technical applications or for diagnostics of fabricated components.

  5. Optical properties of graphene-based materials in transparent polymer matrices

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bayrak, Osman; Demirci, Emrah, E-mail: E.Demirci@lboro.ac.uk; Silberschmidt, Vadim V. [Wolfson School of Mechanical, Electrical and Manufacturing Engineering, Loughborough University, Loughborough, LE11 3TU (United Kingdom); Ionita, Mariana [Advanced Polymer Materials Group, University Politehnica of Bucharest, 132 Calea Grivitei, 010737 Bucharest (Romania)

    2016-08-22

    Different aspects of graphene-based materials (GBMs) and GBM-nanocomposites have been investigated due to their intriguing features; one of these features is their transparency. Transparency of GBMs has been of an interest to scientists and engineers mainly with regard to electronic devices. In this study, optical transmittance of structural, purpose-made nanocomposites reinforced with GBMs was analyzed to lay a foundation for optical microstructural characterization of nanocomposites in future studies. Two main types of GBM reinforcements were studied, graphene oxide (GO) and graphite nanoplates (GNPs). The nanocomposites investigated are GO/poly(vinyl alcohol), GO/sodium alginate, and GNP/epoxy with different volume fractions of GBMs. Together with UV-visible spectrophotometry, image-processing-assisted micro and macro photography were used to assess the transparency of GBMs embedded in the matrices. The micro and macro photography methods developed were proven to be an alternative way of measuring light transmittance of semi-transparent materials. It was found that there existed a linear relationship between light absorbance and a volume fraction of GBMs embedded in the same type of polymer matrices, provided that the nanocomposites of interest had the same thicknesses. This suggests that the GBM dispersion characteristics in the same type of polymer are similar and any possible change in crystal structure of polymer due to different volumetric contents of GBM does not have an effect on light transmittance of the matrices. The study also showed that the same types of GBMs could display different optical properties in different matrix materials. The results of this study will help to develop practical microstructural characterization techniques for GBM-based nanocomposites.

  6. Soft X-ray excited optical luminescence from functional organic materials

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sham, T.K., E-mail: tsham@uwo.ca

    2015-10-01

    Highlights: • Many functional organic materials convert X-ray energy into visible light. • The X-ray induced luminescence (XEOL) across an absorption edge can be site and excitation channel specific. • XEOL is composition, morphology, size and crystallinity dependent. • XEOL using the time structure of a synchrotron can reveal the decay and energy transfer dynamics of the sample. • The combined use of XEOL and XAS in the analysis of functional organic materials is illustrated. - Abstract: This brief report reviews some of the recent findings in the study of synchrotron based X-ray excited optical luminescence (XEOL) from representative organic light emitting device (OLED) and related functional organic materials. The systems of interest include Alq{sub 3}, aluminium tris(8-hydroxylquinoline); Ru(bipy){sub 3}{sup 2+}, tris-(2,2-bipyridine) ruthenium(II); Ir(bpy){sub 3}, tris(2-phenyl-bipyridine)iridium; PVK (poly(N-vinylcarbazole)) and [Au{sub 2}(dppe)(bipy)]{sup 2+}, a Au(I) polymer containing 1,2-bis(diphenylphosphino)ethane and the 4,40-bipyridyl ligands, as well as TBPe (2,5,8,11-tetra-tert-butylperylene) polyhedral crystals and fluorescein isothiocyanate (FITC) and FITC-labelled proteins. It is shown that tunable and pulsed X-rays from synchrotron light sources enable the detailed tracking of the optical properties of organic functional materials by monitoring the luminescence in both the energy and time domain as the excitation energy is scanned across an element-specific absorption edge. The use of XEOL and X-ray absorption spectroscopy (XAS) in materials analysis is illustrated.

  7. Optically active sum-frequency generation as an advanced tool for chiral metallopolymer material

    Science.gov (United States)

    Taupier, Grégory; Torres-Werlé, Maria; Boeglin, Alex; Maisse-François, Aline; Achard, Thierry; Bellemin-Laponnaz, Stéphane; Dorkenoo, Kokou Dodzi Honorat

    2017-01-01

    Metallopolymers incorporating metal ions and polytopic ligands offer the advantage to be easily obtained through a self-assembly process in solution but offer great prospects in the development of multifunctional, smart, even self-healing, materials. We have found that chiral enantiopure ligands containing bis(oxazoline) units in combination with Ni(II) salts generate well-defined thin films either by drop casting or by spin-coating and we demonstrate that the condensation process of these chiral metallosupramolecular assemblies can be characterized through optically active sum-frequency generation.

  8. YAG:Yb3+ crystal as a potential material for optical temperature sensors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Demirkhanyan, H. G.; Demirkhanyan, G. G.; Kostanyan, R. B.

    2018-02-01

    The possibilities are discussed of Y3Al5O12:Yb3+ crystal as a material for an optical temperature sensor (OTS) based on the temperature dependences of the more intense spectral emission lines and on the ratio of the absorption coefficients from the ground and first excited Stark sublevels. The operating temperature and average sensitivity for OTSs are determined. It is shown that the former is an effective method for an OTS in a cryogenic temperature range (40–130 K) and the latter in a high temperature range (500–1000 K).

  9. Design of conformal lens by drilling holes materials using quasi-conformal transformation optics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Shouliang; Zhang, Zhan; Wang, Junhong; He, Xianshi

    2014-10-20

    In this paper, based on quasi-conformal transformation optics, a 3D conformal lens made of isotropic and non-resonant metamaterial is designed, which can make a cylindrical conformal array behave similarly to a uniform linear array. After discussion and simplification in the two-dimensional model, we realize the proposed lens by utilizing drilling-hole material in the three-dimensional structure. The ring-like shape and forward-only radiation make it possible to equip the lens on a cylindrical device.

  10. Structure modulations in nonlinear optical (NLO) materials Cs(2)TB4O9 (T = Ge, Si).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhou, Zhengyang; Xu, Xiang; Fei, Rao; Mao, Jianggao; Sun, Junliang

    2016-04-01

    Incommensurately modulated borate structures of a new type were studied in detail in the nonlinear optical (NLO) materials Cs(2)TB4O9 (T = Ge, Si) using single-crystal X-ray diffraction techniques. The structures were solved by the charge-flipping algorithm in the superspace group I2(αβ0)0. The refinement results strongly suggest that the main structure modulation feature of Cs(2)TB4O9 is the ordering of the O atoms. With these modulated structure models, the unreasonable B-O distances in the average structures were explained as the ordering of BO4 and BO3.

  11. Detection of Light Dark Matter With Optical Phonons in Polar Materials

    OpenAIRE

    Knapen, Simon; Lin, Tongyan; Pyle, Matt; Zurek, Kathryn M.

    2017-01-01

    We show that polar materials are ideal targets for direct detection of sub-GeV dark matter due to the presence of gapped optical phonons as well as acoustic phonons with high sound speed. We take the example of Gallium Arsenide (GaAs), which has the properties needed for experimental realization, and where many results can be estimated analytically. We find GaAs has excellent reach to dark photon absorption, can completely cover the freeze-in benchmark for scattering via an ultralight dark ph...

  12. Integrity assessment under various conditions of embedded fiber optics based multi-sensing materials

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mekid, Samir; Butt, Asad Muhammad; Qureshi, Khurram

    2017-07-01

    The paper discusses new self-measurement and reacting materials with embedded sensors and actuators. New mechanical structures are made with a new integrated material that can almost inherently sense external effects e.g. temperature and deformation and react to them. Hence, the need to embed fiber Bragg grating (FBG) sensors that are inscribed in fiber optics inside materials for various applications e.g. structural health monitoring. The embedding technique can be part of the manufacturing process that can affect these delicate sensors. During this process, the sensors are subject to pressure, heat and deformation. The integrity of the sensors and the host material prior and after to embedding becomes very important. The paper discusses various characterization tests including strains, temperature, pressure and geometry effect on sensors placement while embedding within the host material subsurface. The results have shown that specific conditions are to be considered during the process of embedding to secure the integrity and good level of sensitivity of the sensors to deliver true measurements. The practice of these conditions has led to successful products.

  13. Axially substituted phthalocyanine/naphthalocyanine doped in glass matrix: an approach to the practical use for optical limiting material.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yuan, Hua; Chen, Jun; Zhang, Tao; Wang, Shuangqing; Hu, Rui; Li, Shayu; Yang, Guoqiang

    2016-05-02

    A novel glass matrix doped with phthalocyanine or naphthalocyanine is prepared by a modified sol-gel technique. The photophysical and optical limiting properties of the phthalocyanine compounds both in glass matrix and in THF solution were investigated. The obtained glass matrix is homogeneous and transparent, as well as mechanically and thermodynamically stable enough to withstand very high laser fluence; the optical limiting performances of these compound samples are better than that of benchmark materials like C60 in toluene, carbon black in water, and graphene oxide in water or ethanol under nanosecond pulsed laser at 532 nm. Two prototypes of optical limiters doped in the glass matrix have very good optical limiting performances, which may provide potential practical use for optical limiting materials in a near future.

  14. Optically reconfigurable metasurfaces and photonic devices based on phase change materials

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Qian; Rogers, Edward T. F.; Gholipour, Behrad; Wang, Chih-Ming; Yuan, Guanghui; Teng, Jinghua; Zheludev, Nikolay I.

    2016-01-01

    Photonic components with adjustable parameters, such as variable-focal-length lenses or spectral filters, which can change functionality upon optical stimulation, could offer numerous useful applications. Tuning of such components is conventionally achieved by either micro- or nanomechanical actuation of their constituent parts, by stretching or by heating. Here, we report a novel approach for making reconfigurable optical components that are created with light in a non-volatile and reversible fashion. Such components are written, erased and rewritten as two-dimensional binary or greyscale patterns into a nanoscale film of phase-change material by inducing a refractive-index-changing phase transition with tailored trains of femtosecond pulses. We combine germanium-antimony-tellurium-based films with a diffraction-limited resolution optical writing process to demonstrate a variety of devices: visible-range reconfigurable bichromatic and multi-focus Fresnel zone plates, a super-oscillatory lens with subwavelength focus, a greyscale hologram, and a dielectric metamaterial with on-demand reflection and transmission resonances.

  15. Using complementary tools to characterize the effects of radiation in electro-optic polymeric materials

    Science.gov (United States)

    Perez-Moreno, Javier

    2015-09-01

    Understanding the fundamental mechanisms behind the radiation resistance of polymers and molecules would allow us to tailor new materials with enhanced performance in space and adverse environments. Previous studies of the radiation effects on polymer-based photonic materials indicate that they are very dependent on the choice of polymer-host and guest-chromophores. The best results have been reported from the combination of CLD1 as a guest-chromophore doped in APC as host polymer, where improvement of the performance was observed upon gamma-irradiation at moderate doses. In this paper, we report on the different complementary tools that have been tried to characterize the origin of such enhancement: characterization of the linear and nonlinear response, characterization of chemical properties, and application of an all-optical protocol. We derive some general conclusions by contrasting the results of each characterization, and propose complementary experiments based on microscopy techniques.

  16. [Hand osteoarthritis].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Šenolt, Ladislav

    Hand osteoarthritis (OA) is a common chronic disorder causing pain and limitation of mobility of affected joints. The prevalence of hand OA increases with age and more often affects females. Clinical signs obviously do not correlate with radiographic findings - symptomatic hand OA affects approximately 26 % of adult subjects, but radiographic changes can be found in up to two thirds of females and half of males older than 55 years.Disease course differ among individual patients. Hand OA is a heterogeneous disease. Nodal hand OA is the most common subtype affecting interphalangeal joints, thumb base OA affects first carpometacarpal joint. Erosive OA represents a specific subtype of hand OA, which is associated with joint inflammation, more pain, functional limitation and erosive findings on radiographs.Treatment of OA is limited. Analgesics and nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs are the only agents reducing symptoms. New insights into the pathogenesis of disease should contribute to the development of novel effective treatment of hand OA.

  17. Acousto-Optic Tunable Filter Spectroscopic Instrumentation for Quantitative Near-Ir Analysis of Organic Materials.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eilert, Arnold James

    1995-01-01

    The utility of near-IR spectroscopy for routine quantitative analyses of a wide variety of compositional, chemical, or physical parameters of organic materials is well understood. It can be used for relatively fast and inexpensive non-destructive bulk material analysis before, during, and after processing. It has been demonstrated as being a particularly useful technique for numerous analytical applications in cereal (food and feed) science and industry. Further fulfillment of the potential of near-IR spectroscopic analysis, both in the process and laboratory environment, is reliant upon the development of instrumentation that is capable of meeting the challenges of increasingly difficult applications. One approach to the development of near-IR spectroscopic instrumentation that holds a great deal of promise is acousto-optic tunable filter (AOTF) technology. A combination of attributes offered by AOTF spectrometry, including speed, optical throughput, wavelength reproducibility, ruggedness (no -moving-parts operation) and flexibility, make it particularly desirable for numerous applications. A series of prototype (research model) acousto -optic tunable filter instruments were developed and tested in order to investigate the feasibility of the technology for quantitative near-IR spectrometry. Development included design, component procurement, assembly and/or configuration of the optical and electronic subsystems of which each functional spectrometer arrangement was comprised, as well as computer interfacing and acquisition/control software development. Investigation of this technology involved an evolution of several operational spectrometer systems, each of which offered improvements over its predecessor. Appropriate testing was conducted at various stages of development. Demonstrations of the potential applicability of our AOTF spectrometer to quantitative process monitoring or laboratory analysis of numerous organic substances, including food materials, were

  18. Aerosol deposition process for synthesizing optically active nano-scale materials

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chivas, Robert Douglas

    2007-12-01

    The field of optically active polycrystalline materials has two major thrusts: high-power solid-state laser hosts and scintillators. Until recently, the primary focus has been on creating high-power solid-state laser hosts for active ions. An example is Nd:Y2O3, which has the potential to outperform the Nd:YAG solid state laser. More recently, efforts have been directed to scintillating materials. Scintillators emit a visible light photon when excited by x-ray radiation. Applications of this technology range from medical imaging to bomb detection in port security. Lu2O3, YAP, and YAG are oxide scintillators. Criteria for synthesizing optimized particles for use as polycrystalline precursors exist from previous work in the field. These particles should be whole, spherical, solid, unagglomerated and sub-micrometer in size. Prior investigation into transparent oxides has established that such particles must possess cubic crystallinity, or other isometric rotational symmetry (i.e. garnet). In this work we produce particles ideal for use as precursors in polycrystalline transparent oxides. We have synthesized nano-particles for both laser hosts and scintillators, and demonstrate photoluminescence of Nd:Y 2O3. Scintillation of Eu:Lu2O 3 and Ce:YAP has been demonstrated. The primary focus of our work has been to establish and optimize an aerosol synthesis process capable of synthesizing such particles. We believe the process is transferable to any oxide material where liquid precursors exist. Extensions of this method to other materials have also been demonstrated. As an example, we have synthesized nano-scale pure germanium that possesses interesting and possibly unique optical properties. We have demonstrated photoluminescence in two energy bands with distinct lifetimes, indicating they are a result of two separate processes. Investigation of this material is in progress. Over the course of this work, we realized one of our methods preferentially created shell

  19. Autogenic synthesis of SnO2 materials and their structural, electrochemical, and optical properties

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pol, V. G.; Calderon-Moreno, J. M.; Thackeray, M. M.

    2012-12-01

    During autogenic reactions, organometallic precursors are decomposed above their critical temperature within an enclosed chamber at high temperatures and pressures. It has recently been established that such reactions can be used to synthesize carbon-coated metal oxide and metal phosphate nanoparticles. These materials are of interest as electrodes for lithium-ion batteries. In this paper, we report the autogenic fabrication of a carbon-coated SnO2 product and a carbon-free SnO2 product after removal of the carbon coating by combustion. The major objectives of the study were to monitor any beneficial effects that carbon-coated electrodes containing a lithium alloying element such as Sn might have in improving the electrical connectivity between electrode particles, which expand and contract significantly on lithiation and delithiation, and their utility in lithium cells. Specifically, we report the compositional, structural and morphological properties, and electrochemical behavior of carbon-coated SnO2 electrodes. Given the importance of the optical properties of SnO2, we also describe the effects of the carbon coating on the optical absorbance and photoluminescence of autogenically-prepared SnO2 materials.

  20. 3D optical printing of piezoelectric nanoparticle-polymer composite materials.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Kanguk; Zhu, Wei; Qu, Xin; Aaronson, Chase; McCall, William R; Chen, Shaochen; Sirbuly, Donald J

    2014-10-28

    Here we demonstrate that efficient piezoelectric nanoparticle-polymer composite materials can be optically printed into three-dimensional (3D) microstructures using digital projection printing. Piezoelectric polymers were fabricated by incorporating barium titanate (BaTiO3, BTO) nanoparticles into photoliable polymer solutions such as polyethylene glycol diacrylate and exposing to digital optical masks that could be dynamically altered to generate user-defined 3D microstructures. To enhance the mechanical-to-electrical conversion efficiency of the composites, the BTO nanoparticles were chemically modified with acrylate surface groups, which formed direct covalent linkages with the polymer matrix under light exposure. The composites with a 10% mass loading of the chemically modified BTO nanoparticles showed piezoelectric coefficients (d(33)) of ∼ 40 pC/N, which were over 10 times larger than composites synthesized with unmodified BTO nanoparticles and over 2 times larger than composites containing unmodified BTO nanoparticles and carbon nanotubes to boost mechanical stress transfer efficiencies. These results not only provide a tool for fabricating 3D piezoelectric polymers but lay the groundwork for creating highly efficient piezoelectric polymer materials via nanointerfacial tuning.

  1. Investigation of UV laser induced depositions on optics under space conditions in presence of outgassing materials

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schröder, Helmut; Riede, Wolfgang; Kheyrandish, Hamid; Wernham, Denny; Lien, Yngve

    2017-11-01

    We have investigated the formation of UV laser induced deposits on uncoated fused silica optics under simulated space conditions in presence of outgassing materials at 30°C and 100°C. We used a frequency tripled Nd:YAG laser with 355 nm wavelength, 3 ns pulse length and 100 Hz repetition rate. Optics were exposed to fluence values in the range of 0.5 - 1.0 J/cm2. As contamination samples epoxy, silicone and polyurethane containing materials were used. The depositions were monitored online and in-situ by measuring the fluorescence intensity distribution with CCD cameras, where the UV laser beam itself served as excitation source for fluorescence emission. This method allows for a very sensitive detection of the onset of deposit formation. Contaminant layers with a thickness down to 20 nm can be consistently detected. The influence of water on the formation of deposits was investigated. Time-of-flight secondary ion mass spectroscopy (ToFSIMS) was used for chemical characterization of the deposits.

  2. The effect of extended aging on the optical properties of different zirconia materials.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alghazzawi, Tariq F

    2017-07-01

    The purpose of this study was to determine if the optical properties of zirconia and glass-ceramic (e.max) were affected by low-temperature degradation (aging). Experiment samples were fabricated with seven zirconia brands (n=10): Zenostar, Zirlux, Katana, Bruxzir, DD-BioZX2, DD-cubeX2, NexxZr; and e.max were used as a control. This resulted in a total of 80 samples in the experiment. The L*, a* and b* were measured for each sample, and then the optical properties including translucency parameter (TP), contrast ratio (CR), and opalescence parameter (OP) were calculated. The samples were aged (20, 40, 60, 80, 100h), and the optical properties were calculated after each interval. Most zirconia brands had lower L*, higher a*, higher b* with increased aging, which visually corresponds to darker, redder, and more yellow. Aging also increased CR, lowered TP, and lowered OP. e.max was also affected by aging but still had the highest TP (23.9±2.8), L* (81.7±3.4), and lowest CR (0.41±0.05) compared to any zirconia. The Zenostar had the closest TP (24.1±0.4), and L* (90.2±0.5) values to e.max before aging. However, after 100h of aging, the DD-cubeX2 was least effected and had the highest TP (22.2±0.6) and lowest CR (0.43±0.01) compared with other zirconia samples and highest OP (11.3±0.2) of all ceramic samples. The optical properties of zirconia and e.max materials were affected by aging with the effects increasing with time. The magnitude of change was affected by seven brands of dental zirconia. Copyright © 2016 Japan Prosthodontic Society. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  3. Optics

    CERN Document Server

    Mathieu, Jean Paul

    1975-01-01

    Optics, Parts 1 and 2 covers electromagnetic optics and quantum optics. The first part of the book examines the various of the important properties common to all electromagnetic radiation. This part also studies electromagnetic waves; electromagnetic optics of transparent isotropic and anisotropic media; diffraction; and two-wave and multi-wave interference. The polarization states of light, the velocity of light, and the special theory of relativity are also examined in this part. The second part is devoted to quantum optics, specifically discussing the classical molecular theory of optical p

  4. Performance of a write-once multilayer optical disk that uses transparent recording material with an optical switching layer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, Fung-Hsu; Shieh, Han-Ping D; Huang, Der-Ray; Milster, Tom D

    2004-10-10

    A volumetric optical disk that has multiple transparent films with optical switching layers is used as a recording medium to increase the number of recording layers. In the disk the optical switching layer is adapted to reduce decay of laser energy and increase reading and recording sensitivity. Well-defined marks of approximately 100-nm depth can be placed precisely on the transparent films by a focused laser beam. Writing and reading of a four-layer recordable disk, fabricated by molding and spin bonding, have been demonstrated experimentally. The volumetric disk can achieve a high recording capacity with conventional optical pickups.

  5. Optical and Electrical Properties of III-Nitrides and Related Materials

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jiang, Hongxing [Texas Tech Univ., Lubbock, TX (United States); Lin, Jingyu [Texas Tech Univ., Lubbock, TX (United States)

    2016-01-22

    Among the members of the III-nitride material system, boron-nitride (BN) is the least studied and understood. Its extraordinary physical properties, such as ultra-high chemical stability, thermal conductivity, electrical resistivity, band gap (Eg ~ 6 eV), and optical absorption near the band gap make hexagonal BN (h-BN) the material of choice for emerging applications such as deep ultraviolet (DUV) optoelectronic devices. Moreover, h-BN has a close lattice match to graphene and is the most suitable substrate and dielectric/separation layer for graphene electronics and optoelectronics. Similar to graphene, low dimensional h-BN is expected to possess rich new physics. Other potential applications include super-capacitors and electron emitters. However, our knowledge concerning the semiconducting properties of h-BN is very scarce. The project aims to extend our studies to the “newest” family member of the III-nitride material system, h-BN, and to address issues that have not yet been explored but are expected to profoundly influence our understanding on its fundamental properties and device applications. During the supporting period, we have improved the growth processes of h-BN epilayers by metal organic chemical vapor deposition (MOCVD), investigated the fundamental material properties, and identified several unique features of h-BN as well as critical issues that remain to be addressed.

  6. Omnidirectional Photonic Band Gap Using Low Refractive Index Contrast Materials and its Application in Optical Waveguides

    KAUST Repository

    Vidal Faez, Angelo

    2012-07-01

    Researchers have argued for many years that one of the conditions for omnidirectional reflection in a one-dimensional photonic crystal is a strong refractive index contrast between the two constituent dielectric materials. Using numerical simulations and the theory of Anderson localization of light, in this work we demonstrate that an omnidirectional band gap can indeed be created utilizing low refractive index contrast materials when they are arranged in a disordered manner. Moreover, the size of the omnidirectional band gap becomes a controllable parameter, which now depends on the number of layers and not only on the refractive index contrast of the system, as it is widely accepted. This achievement constitutes a major breakthrough in the field since it allows for the development of cheaper and more efficient technologies. Of particular interest is the case of high index contrast one-dimensional photonic crystal fibers, where the propagation losses are mainly due to increased optical scattering from sidewall roughness at the interfaces of high index contrast materials. By using low index contrast materials these losses can be reduced dramatically, while maintaining the confinement capability of the waveguide. This is just one of many applications that could be proven useful for this discovery.

  7. Surface Texture and Optical Properties of Self-Adhering Composite Materials after Toothbrush Abrasion.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Malavasi, Caroline Veiga; Macedo, Elisa Maria; Souza, Karoline da Costa; Rego, Guilherme Ferreira; Schneider, Luis Felipe Jochims; Cavalcante, Larissa Maria

    2015-10-01

    This study evaluated the surface texture and optical properties of two self-adhering composites and a nanofilled composite before and after toothbrush abrasion. Vertise Flow (Kerr), Fusio Liquid (Pentron Clinical) and Filtek Z350 XT (3M ESPE) composites were divided into 3 groups (n = 6). Disks of 12 mm diameter and 2 mm thick were made. All materials were light-cured with a LED light source for 40 seconds. Analyses of surface roughness, gloss retention and color stability were performed 24 hours after light curing and after 20,000 brushing cycles. Data were analyzed with analysis of variance (ANOVA) and Tukey's test (α = 5%). Tukey's test ascertained that toothbrush abrasion resulted in rougher and matte surfaces for all composites tested. Filtek Z350 presented better gloss retention after abrasion. On surface roughness evaluation, there was no statistical difference between Fusio Liquid Dentin and Filtek Z350 resins (p > 0.05). Vertise Flow resin showed better color stability (ΔE), than the other two materials. Nanofilled material presented better gloss retention but it did not produce the best results in aspects related to surface roughness and color stability compared to self-adhering composites. A simulation of degradation process by using toothbrush abrasion produced a rougher and matte surface in all composites tested. The surface texture was not only related to filler's amount present in materials, but also with the organic matrix composition of them. The results suggested that the constant development of new materials, seeking for a technical simplification, seems an innovative attraction for dentist's clinical routine, even though larger studies are necessary to promote to everyone a better understanding and improvement of action and effectiveness of this new class of materials.

  8. Laser-induced optical breakdown spectroscopy of polymer materials based on evaluation of molecular emission bands

    Science.gov (United States)

    Trautner, Stefan; Jasik, Juraj; Parigger, Christian G.; Pedarnig, Johannes D.; Spendelhofer, Wolfgang; Lackner, Johannes; Veis, Pavel; Heitz, Johannes

    2017-03-01

    Laser-induced breakdown spectroscopy (LIBS) for composition analysis of polymer materials results in optical spectra containing atomic and ionic emission lines as well as molecular emission bands. In the present work, the molecular bands are analyzed to obtain spectroscopic information about the plasma state in an effort to quantify the content of different elements in the polymers. Polyethylene (PE) and a rubber material from tire production are investigated employing 157 nm F2 laser and 532 nm Nd:YAG laser ablation in nitrogen and argon gas background or in air. The optical detection reaches from ultraviolet (UV) over the visible (VIS) to the near infrared (NIR) spectral range. In the UV/VIS range, intense molecular emissions, C2 Swan and CN violet bands, are measured with an Echelle spectrometer equipped with an intensified CCD camera. The measured molecular emission spectra can be fitted by vibrational-rotational transitions by open access programs and data sets with good agreement between measured and fitted spectra. The fits allow determining vibrational-rotational temperatures. A comparison to electronic temperatures Te derived earlier from atomic carbon vacuum-UV (VUV) emission lines show differences, which can be related to different locations of the atomic and molecular species in the expanding plasma plume. In the NIR spectral region, we also observe the CN red bands with a conventional CDD Czerny Turner spectrometer. The emission of the three strong atomic sulfur lines between 920 and 925 nm is overlapped by these bands. Fitting of the CN red bands allows a separation of both spectral contributions. This makes a quantitative evaluation of sulfur contents in the start material in the order of 1 wt% feasible.

  9. Optics

    CERN Document Server

    Fincham, W H A

    2013-01-01

    Optics: Ninth Edition Optics: Ninth Edition covers the work necessary for the specialization in such subjects as ophthalmic optics, optical instruments and lens design. The text includes topics such as the propagation and behavior of light; reflection and refraction - their laws and how different media affect them; lenses - thick and thin, cylindrical and subcylindrical; photometry; dispersion and color; interference; and polarization. Also included are topics such as diffraction and holography; the limitation of beams in optical systems and its effects; and lens systems. The book is recommen

  10. Computational Code to Determinate the Optical Constants of Materials with Atrophysical Importance

    Science.gov (United States)

    Robson Rocha, Will; Pilling, Sergio

    Several environments in the interstellar medium (ISM) are composed by dust grains (e.g. silicates), that in somewhere can be covered by astrophysical ices (frozen molecular species). The presence of this materials inside dense and cold regions in space such as molecular clouds and circumstellar disks around young stars is proven by space telescopes (e. g. Herschel, Spitzer, ISO) using infrared spectroscopy. In such environments, molecules such as H _{2}O, CO, CO _{2}, NH _{3}, CH _{3}OH among others, may exist in the solid phase and constitute what we call as the interstellar ices. In this work we present a code called NKABS (acronym for “N and K determination from ABSorbance data”) to calculate the optical constants of materials with astrophysical importance directly from absorbance data in the infrared. It is a free code, developed in Python Programing Language, available for Windows (®) operating system. The parameters obtained using the NKABS code are essentials to perform studies involving computational modeling of star forming regions in the infrared. The experimental data have been obtained using a high vacuum portable chamber from the Laboratorio de Astroquímica e Astrobiologia (LASA/UNIVAP). The samples used to calculate the optical constants presented here, were obtained from the condensation of pure gases (e.g. CO, CO _{2} , NH _{3} , SO _{2}), from the sublimation in vacuum of pure liquids (e.g. water, acetone, acetonitrile, acetic acid, formic acid, ethanol and methanol) and from mixtures of different species (e.g. H _{2}O:CO _{2}, H _{2}O:CO:NH _{3}, H _{2}O:CO _{2}:NH _{3}:CH _{4}). Additionally films of solid biomolecules samples of astrochemistry/astrobiology interest (e.g. glycine, adenine) were probed. The NKABS code may also calculate the optical constants of materials processed by the radiation, a scenario very common in star forming regions. Authors would like to thanks the agencies FAPESP (JP#2009/18304-0 and PHD#2013/07657-5), FVE

  11. Optically stimulated luminescence techniques in retrospective dosimetry using single grains of quartz extracted from unheated materials

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Joerkov Thomsen, Kristina

    2004-02-01

    This work investigates the possibility of applying optically stimulated luminescence (OSL) in retrospective dose determinations using unheated materials. It focuses on identifying materials suitable for use in assessment of doses absorbed as a consequence of radiation accidents (i.e. accident dosimetry). Special attention has been paid to quartz extracted from unheated building materials such as concrete and mortar. The single-aliquot regeneration-dose (SAR) protocol has been used to determine absorbed doses in small aliquots as well as single grains of quartz. It is shown that OSL measurements of single grains of quartz extracted from poorly-bleached building materials can provide useful information on radiation accident doses, even when the luminescence sensitivity is low. Sources of variance in well-bleached single grain dose distributions have been investigated in detail and it is concluded that the observed variability in the data is consistent with the sum (in quadrature) of a component, which depends on the number of photons detected from each grain, and a fixed component independent of light level. Dose depth profiles through laboratory irradiated concrete bricks have successfully been measured and minimum detection limits of less than 100 mGy are derived. Measurements of thermal transfer in single grains of poorly-bleached quartz show that thermal transfer is variable on a grain-to-grain basis and that it can be a source of variance in single-grain dose distributions. Furthermore, the potential of using common household and workplace chemicals, such as table salt, washing powder and water softener, in retrospective dosimetry has been investigated. It is concluded that such materials should be considered as retrospective dosimeters in the event of a radiation accident. (au)

  12. First principles crystal engineering of nonlinear optical materials. I. Prototypical case of urea

    Science.gov (United States)

    Masunov, Artëm E.; Tannu, Arman; Dyakov, Alexander A.; Matveeva, Anastasia D.; Freidzon, Alexandra Ya.; Odinokov, Alexey V.; Bagaturyants, Alexander A.

    2017-06-01

    The crystalline materials with nonlinear optical (NLO) properties are critically important for several technological applications, including nanophotonic and second harmonic generation devices. Urea is often considered to be a standard NLO material, due to the combination of non-centrosymmetric crystal packing and capacity for intramolecular charge transfer. Various approaches to crystal engineering of non-centrosymmetric molecular materials were reported in the literature. Here we propose using global lattice energy minimization to predict the crystal packing from the first principles. We developed a methodology that includes the following: (1) parameter derivation for polarizable force field AMOEBA; (2) local minimizations of crystal structures with these parameters, combined with the evolutionary algorithm for a global minimum search, implemented in program USPEX; (3) filtering out duplicate polymorphs produced; (4) reoptimization and final ranking based on density functional theory (DFT) with many-body dispersion (MBD) correction; and (5) prediction of the second-order susceptibility tensor by finite field approach. This methodology was applied to predict virtual urea polymorphs. After filtering based on packing similarity, only two distinct packing modes were predicted: one experimental and one hypothetical. DFT + MBD ranking established non-centrosymmetric crystal packing as the global minimum, in agreement with the experiment. Finite field approach was used to predict nonlinear susceptibility, and H-bonding was found to account for a 2.5-fold increase in molecular hyperpolarizability to the bulk value.

  13. New computational solution to quantify synthetic material porosity from optical microscopic images.

    Science.gov (United States)

    De Albuquerque, V H C; Filho, P P Rebouças; Cavalcante, T S; Tavares, J M R S

    2010-10-01

    This paper presents a new computational solution to quantify the porosity of synthetic materials from optical microscopic images. The solution is based on an artificial neuronal network of the multilayer perceptron type and a backpropagation algorithm is used for training. To evaluate this new solution, 40 sample images of a synthetic material were analysed and the quality of the results was confirmed by human visual analysis. In addition, these results were compared with ones obtained with a commonly used commercial system confirming their superior quality and the shorter time needed. The effect of images with noise was also studied and the new solution showed itself to be more reliable. The training phase of the new solution was analysed confirming that it can be performed in a very easy and straightforward manner. Thus, the new solution demonstrated that it is a valid and adequate option for researchers, engineers, specialists and other professionals to quantify the porosity of materials from microscopic images in an automatic, fast, efficient and reliable manner. © 2010 The Authors Journal compilation © 2010 The Royal Microscopical Society.

  14. Dispersion-model-free determination of optical constants: application to materials for organic thin film devices.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Flämmich, Michael; Danz, Norbert; Michaelis, Dirk; Bräuer, Andreas; Gather, Malte C; Kremer, Jonas H-W M; Meerholz, Klaus

    2009-03-10

    We describe a method to determine the refractive index and extinction coefficient of thin film materials without prior knowledge of the film thickness and without the assumption of a dispersion model. A straightforward back calculation to the optical parameters can be performed starting from simple measurements of reflection and transmission spectra of a 100-250 nm thick supported film. The exact film thickness is found simultaneously by fulfilling the intrinsic demand of continuity of the refractive index as a function of wavelength. If both the layer and the substrate are homogeneous and isotropic media with plane and parallel interfaces, effects like surface roughness, scattering, or thickness inhomogeneities can be neglected. Then, the accuracy of the measurement is approximately 10(-2) and 10(-3) for the refractive index and the extinction coefficient, respectively. The error of the thin film thickness determination is well below 1 nm. Thus this technique is well suited to determine the input parameters for optical simulations of organic thin film devices, such as organic light-emitting diodes (OLEDs) or organic photovoltaic (OPV) cells. We apply the method to the electroluminescent polymer poly(2,5-dioctyl-p-phenylene vinylene) (PDO-PPV) and show its applicability by comparing the measured and calculated reflection and transmission spectra of OLED stacks with up to five layers.

  15. Fiber Optic Sensors for Cure/Health Monitoring of Composite Materials

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wood, K. H.; Brown, T. L.; Wu, M. C.; Gause, C. B.

    2004-01-01

    The objective of the current program is to develop techniques for using optical fibers to monitor the cure of composite materials in real time during manufacture and to monitor the in-service structural health of composite structures. Single and multimode optical fibers containing Bragg gratings have been used to perform Near Infrared (NIR) spectroscopy on high refractive index resins and show promise as embedded sensors. In order for chemical spectroscopy to be possible, intimate contact must be achieved between the fiber core and the composite resin. This contact is often achieved by stripping the cladding off of a portion of the fiber, thus making it brittle and easily broken in the composite processing environment. To avoid weakening the fiber to this extent, high refractive index fibers have been fabricated that use a low refractive index acrylate coating which serves as the cladding. This is ideal, as the coating is easily solvent stripped and intimate contact with the glass core can be achieved. Real time resin and composite chemical spectra have been obtained, with possible multifunctional capability using Bragg gratings to assess physical properties such as strain, modulus and other parameters of interest.

  16. Handbook of Coherent-Domain Optical Methods Biomedical Diagnostics, Environmental Monitoring, and Materials Science

    CERN Document Server

    2013-01-01

    This Handbook provides comprehensive coverage of laser and coherent-domain methods as applied to biomedicine, environmental monitoring, and materials science. Worldwide leaders in these fields describe the fundamentals of light interaction with random media and present an overview of basic research. The latest results on coherent and polarization properties of light scattered by random media, including tissues and blood, speckles formation in multiple scattering media, and other non-destructive interactions of coherent light with rough surfaces and tissues, allow the reader to understand the principles and applications of coherent diagnostic techniques. The expanded second edition has been thoroughly updated with particular emphasis on novel coherent-domain techniques and their applications in medicine and environmental science. Volume 1 describes state-of-the-art methods of coherent and polarization optical imaging, tomography and spectroscopy; diffusion wave spectroscopy; elastic, quasi-elastic and inelasti...

  17. Ultrafast optical manipulation of atomic motion in multilayer Ge-Sb-Te phase change materials

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fons P.

    2013-03-01

    Full Text Available Phase change random access memory devices have evolved dramatically with the recent development of superlattice structure of Ge-Sb-Te material (GST-SL in terms of its low power consumption. The phase change in GST-SL is mainly characterized by the displacement of Ge atoms. Here we examine a new phase change method, that is the manipulation of Ge-Te bonds using linearly-polarized femtosecond near-infrared optical pulses. As a result, we found that the p-polarized pump pulse is more effective in inducing the reversible and irreversible displacement of Ge atoms along [111] direction in the local structure. This structural change would be induced by the anisotropic carrier-phonon interaction along the [111] direction created by the p-polarized pulse.

  18. Optical resonances of bowtie slot antennas and their geometry and material dependence.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guo, Hongcang; Meyrath, Todd P; Zentgraf, Thomas; Liu, Na; Fu, Liwei; Schweizer, Heinz; Giessen, Harald

    2008-05-26

    In order to provide a guide for the design and optimization of bowtie slot antennas in the visible and near infrared spectral regime, their optical properties have been investigated with emphasis on geometry and materials. Although primarily theoretical, experimental investigations for reduced thickness cases are also included. As characterized by their field patterns, two types of resonances are discussed: plasmonic and Fabry-Pérot-like resonances. These resonance types show a linear dependence on aperture perimeter and film thickness, respectively, while showing a complementary behavior with near independence of the other respective parameter. Metal properties, as in the Drude model, are also considered. Various metals with respectively different skin depths are studied, showing a nearly linear dependence of the resonance wavelength on skin depth.

  19. Autogenic synthesis of SnO{sub 2} materials and their structural, electrochemical, and optical properties

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pol, V.G., E-mail: pol@anl.gov [Electrochemical Energy Storage Department, Chemical Sciences and Engineering Division, Argonne National Laboratory, 9700 S. Cass Avenue, Argonne, IL 60439 (United States); Calderon-Moreno, J.M. [Institute of Physical Chemistry Ilie Murgulescu, Romanian Academy, 202 Splaiul Independentei St., Bucharest 060021 (Romania); Thackeray, M.M. [Electrochemical Energy Storage Department, Chemical Sciences and Engineering Division, Argonne National Laboratory, 9700 S. Cass Avenue, Argonne, IL 60439 (United States)

    2012-12-15

    During autogenic reactions, organometallic precursors are decomposed above their critical temperature within an enclosed chamber at high temperatures and pressures. It has recently been established that such reactions can be used to synthesize carbon-coated metal oxide and metal phosphate nanoparticles. These materials are of interest as electrodes for lithium-ion batteries. In this paper, we report the autogenic fabrication of a carbon-coated SnO{sub 2} product and a carbon-free SnO{sub 2} product after removal of the carbon coating by combustion. The major objectives of the study were to monitor any beneficial effects that carbon-coated electrodes containing a lithium alloying element such as Sn might have in improving the electrical connectivity between electrode particles, which expand and contract significantly on lithiation and delithiation, and their utility in lithium cells. Specifically, we report the compositional, structural and morphological properties, and electrochemical behavior of carbon-coated SnO{sub 2} electrodes. Given the importance of the optical properties of SnO{sub 2}, we also describe the effects of the carbon coating on the optical absorbance and photoluminescence of autogenically-prepared SnO{sub 2} materials. - Graphical abstract: One-step, solvent-free autogenic reactions yield nanosized SnO{sub 2} nanoparticles, uniformly coated and interconnected by 2-4 nm carbon layers, with improved electrochemical performance. Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Distinctive autogenic process synthesized SnO{sub 2} nanoparticles coated with 2-4 nm carbon layers. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Carbon coating improved capacity retention and cycling stability of SnO{sub 2} nanoparticles. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Carbon coating quenched photoluminescence of SnO{sub 2} component in SnO{sub 2}-C composite. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Autogenic approach is extremely versatile, holds promise for designing new nanoarchitectures.

  20. Temperature dependent optical characterization of Ni-TiO2 thin films as potential photocatalytic material

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rajnarayan De

    2017-09-01

    Full Text Available Along with other transition metal doped titanium dioxide materials, Ni-TiO2 is considered to be one of the most efficient materials for catalytic applications due to its suitable energy band positions in the electronic structure. The present manuscript explores the possibility of improving the photocatalytic activity of RF magnetron sputtered Ni-TiO2 films upon heat treatment. Optical, structural and morphological and photocatalytic properties of the films have been investigated in detail for as deposited and heat treated samples. Evolution of refractive index (RI and total film thickness as estimated from spectroscopic ellipsometry characterization are found to be in agreement with the trend in density and total film thickness estimated from grazing incidence X-ray reflectivity measurement. Interestingly, the evolution of these macroscopic properties were found to be correlated with the corresponding microstructural modifications realized in terms of anatase to rutile phase transformation and appearance of a secondary phase namely NiTiO3 at high temperature. Corresponding morphological properties of the films were also found to be temperature dependent which leads to modifications in the grain structure. An appreciable reduction of optical band gap from 2.9 to 2.5 eV of Ni-TiO2 thin films was also observed as a result of post deposition heat treatment. Testing of photocatalytic activity of the films performed under UV illumination demonstrates heat treatment under atmospheric ambience to be an effective means to enhance the photocatalytic efficiency of transition metal doped titania samples.

  1. Far Ultraviolet Refractive Index of Optical Materials for Solar Blind Channel (SBC) Filters for HST Advanced Camera for Surveys

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leviton, Douglas B.; Madison, Timothy J.; Petrone, Peter

    1998-01-01

    Refractive index measurements using the minimum deviation method have been carried out for prisms of a variety of far ultraviolet optical materials used in the manufacture of Solar Blind Channel (SBC) filters for the HST Advanced Camera for Surveys (ACS). Some of the materials measured are gaining popularity in a variety of high technology applications including high power excimer lasers and advanced microlithography optics operating in a wavelength region where high quality knowledge of optical material properties is sparse. Our measurements are of unusually high accuracy and precision for this wavelength region owing to advanced instrumentation in the large vacuum chamber of the Diffraction Grating Evaluation Facility (DGEF) at Goddard Space Flight Center (GSFC). Index values for CaF2, BaF2, LiF, and far ultraviolet grades of synthetic sapphire and synthetic fused silica are reported and compared with values from the literature.

  2. Optics

    CERN Document Server

    Fincham, W H A

    2013-01-01

    Optics: Eighth Edition covers the work necessary for the specialization in such subjects as ophthalmic optics, optical instruments and lens design. The text includes topics such as the propagation and behavior of light; reflection and refraction - their laws and how different media affect them; lenses - thick and thin, cylindrical and subcylindrical; photometry; dispersion and color; interference; and polarization. Also included are topics such as diffraction and holography; the limitation of beams in optical systems and its effects; and lens systems. The book is recommended for engineering st

  3. Study of novel nonlinear optical material based on Poly(aryl ether ketone) and its application in SHG imaging

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Yi; Liu, Hui; Qin, Guangjiong; Gui, Zhiguo; Yang, Zhimao; Liu, Jialei

    2017-10-01

    Novel nonlinear optical polymer based on poly(aryl ether ketone) was designed and prepared. Such kind of materials showed excellent water solubility and thermal properties, its onset decomposition temperature can reach 314 °C; glass transition temperature can reach 170 °C. Though the nonlinear optical coefficients (d33) is not very large at 1310 nm, just about 13.9 pm/V; such kind of materials show us a low absorption spectral window at red and infrared light area (wavelength longer than 650 nm). Under the laser of 1310 nm, the morphology of the poled films can be detected by second harmonic generation (SHG) scanning microscopy.

  4. Group IV all-semiconductor spintronics. Materials aspects and optical spin selection rules

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sircar, Narayan

    2012-04-03

    In the scope of the present thesis various aspects for the realization of spintronic applications based on group IV semiconductors are discussed. This work comprises a refined material characterization of the magnetic semiconductor GeMn. We furthermore present efforts to utilize this material as spin injector for a Si-based optical spintronic device. Applying transmission electron microscopy and atom probe tomography, we are able to resolve a vertical anisotropy in the self-assembly, leading to the stacking of well-defined clusters in the growth direction. Three-dimensional atom distribution maps confirm that clusters are built from a nonstoichiometric GeMn alloy and exhibit a high-Mn-concentration core with a decreasing Mn concentration toward a shell. An amorphous nature of the cluster cores as well as the crystallinity of the shells, coherent with the surrounding Ge lattice, are revealed in scanning transmission electron microscopy. We localize a strain field surrounding each GeMn cluster by scanning transmission electron microscopy. The importance of strain to the stacking phenomenon of the clusters becomes clear in studies of Ge/GeMn superlattice structures, where a vertical spatial correlation of clusters over 30 nm-thick Ge spacer layers is observed. We present evidence that electrical transport properties of the p-type GeMn thin films fabricated on high-resistivity Ge substrates are severely influenced by parallel conduction through the substrate. It is shown that substrate conduction persists also for wellconducting degenerate p-type reference thin films, giving rise to an effective two-layer conduction scheme. GeMn thin films fabricated on these substrates exhibit only a negligible magnetoresistance effect. Before integrating GeMn in an optical spintronic device, some key aspects important for an understanding of the optical injection and detection of carrier spins in Si and Si-based heterostructures are clarified in the second part of this thesis. In

  5. Mechanical and optical properties of monolithic CAD-CAM restorative materials.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sen, Nazmiye; Us, Yesim Olcer

    2017-08-04

    Achieving natural tooth appearance with sufficient mechanical strength is one of the most challenging issues of computer-assisted design and computer-assisted manufacturing (CAD-CAM) materials. However, limited evidence is available regarding their optical and mechanical properties for proper and evidence-based material selection in clinical practice. The purpose of this in vitro study was to assess and compare the translucency and biaxial flexural strength of 5 monolithic CAD-CAM restorative materials. Disk-shaped specimens (n=30) of each material (Lava Ultimate [LU], Vita Enamic [VE], Vitablocs Mark II [VMII], Vita Suprinity [VS], and IPS e.max CAD [IPS]) with a diameter of 12 mm and a thickness of 1.2 ±0.05 mm were prepared. A spectrophotometer was used to measure the translucency parameter. The specimens were then subjected to a biaxial flexure test using 3 balls and loaded with a piston in a universal testing machine at a cross-head speed of 0.5 mm/min until failure occurred (International Organization for Standardization standard 6872). Weibull statistics were used to evaluate the characteristic strength and reliability of each material. Chemical compositions were analyzed using an energy dispersive spectrometer, and microstructural analysis was conducted using scanning electron microscopy. Data were analyzed using 1-way ANOVA and the Tukey honest significant difference test (α=.05). Significant differences were found among the materials concerning translucency and biaxial flexural strength (P<.05). The highest mean transparency value was obtained in the VS group, whereas the lowest mean value was obtained in the VE group. The VS group produced the highest mean biaxial flexural strength, followed by the IPS, LU, VE, and VMII groups. Based on the results of the present study, zirconia-reinforced glass-ceramic revealed higher mean translucency and biaxial flexural strength than resin nanoceramic, feldspathic ceramic, lithium disilicate ceramic, and dual

  6. Hand Eczema

    Science.gov (United States)

    Agarwal, Uma Shankar; Besarwal, Raj Kumar; Gupta, Rahul; Agarwal, Puneet; Napalia, Sheetal

    2014-01-01

    Hand eczema is often a chronic, multifactorial disease. It is usually related to occupational or routine household activities. Exact etiology of the disease is difficult to determine. It may become severe enough and disabling to many of patients in course of time. An estimated 2-10% of population is likely to develop hand eczema at some point of time during life. It appears to be the most common occupational skin disease, comprising 9-35% of all occupational diseases and up to 80% or more of all occupational contact dermatitis. So, it becomes important to find the exact etiology and classification of the disease and to use the appropriate preventive and treatment measures. Despite its importance in the dermatological practice, very few Indian studies have been done till date to investigate the epidemiological trends, etiology, and treatment options for hand eczema. In this review, we tried to find the etiology, epidemiology, and available treatment modalities for chronic hand eczema patients. PMID:24891648

  7. Micro and Nanostructured Materials for the Development of Optical Fibre Sensors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arregui, Francisco Javier; Ruiz-Zamarreño, Carlos; Corres, Jesus M.; Bariain, Candido; Goicoechea, Javier; Hernaez, Miguel; Rivero, Pedro J.; Urrutia, Aitor; Sanchez, Pedro; Zubiate, Pablo; Lopez-Torres, Diego; Acha, Nerea De; Ascorbe, Joaquin; Ozcariz, Aritz; Matias, Ignacio R.

    2017-01-01

    The measurement of chemical and biomedical parameters can take advantage of the features exclusively offered by optical fibre: passive nature, electromagnetic immunity and chemical stability are some of the most relevant ones. The small dimensions of the fibre generally require that the sensing material be loaded into a supporting matrix whose morphology is adjusted at a nanometric scale. Thanks to the advances in nanotechnology new deposition methods have been developed: they allow reagents from different chemical nature to be embedded into films with a thickness always below a few microns that also show a relevant aspect ratio to ensure a high transduction interface. This review reveals some of the main techniques that are currently been employed to develop this kind of sensors, describing in detail both the resulting supporting matrices as well as the sensing materials used. The main objective is to offer a general view of the state of the art to expose the main challenges and chances that this technology is facing currently. PMID:29019945

  8. Embedded optical probes for simultaneous pressure and temperature measurement of materials in extreme conditions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sandberg, R. L.; Rodriguez, G.; Gibson, L. L.; Dattelbaum, D. M.; Stevens, G. D.; Grover, M.; Lalone, B. M.; Udd, E.

    2014-05-01

    We present recent efforts at Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL) to develop sensors for simultaneous, in situ pressure and temperature measurements under dynamic conditions by using an all-optical fiber-based approach. While similar tests have been done previously in deflagration-to-detonation tests (DDT), where pressure and temperature were measured to 82 kbar and 400°C simultaneously, here we demonstrate the use of embedded fiber grating sensors to obtain high temporal resolution, in situ pressure measurements in inert materials. We present two experimental demonstrations of pressure measurements: (1) under precise shock loading from a gas-gun driven plate impact and (2) under high explosive driven shock in a water filled vessel. The system capitalizes on existing telecom components and fast transient digitizing recording technology. It operates as a relatively inexpensive embedded probe (single-mode 1550 nm fiber-based Bragg grating) that provides a continuous fast pressure record during shock and/or detonation. By applying well-controlled shock wave pressure profiles to these inert materials, we study the dynamic pressure response of embedded fiber Bragg gratings to extract pressure amplitude of the shock wave and compare our results with particle velocity wave profiles measured simultaneously.

  9. New Organic Semiconductor Materials Applied in Organic Photovoltaic and Optical Devices

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Andre F. S. Guedes

    2015-04-01

    Full Text Available The development of flexible organic photovoltaic solar cells, using an optically transparent substrate material and organic semiconductor materials, has been widely utilized by the electronic industry when producing new technological products. The flexible organic photovoltaic solar cells are the base Poly (3,4-ethylenedioxythiophene, PEDOT, Poly(3-hexyl thiophene, P3HT, Phenyl-C61-butyric acid methyl ester, PCBM and Polyaniline, PANI, were deposited in Indium Tin Oxide, ITO, and characterized by Electrical Measurements and Scanning Electron Microscopy (SEM. In addition, the thin film obtained by the deposition of PANI, prepared in perchloric acid solution, was identified through PANI-X1. The result obtained by electrical Measurements has demonstrated that the PET/ITO/PEDOT/P3HT:PCBM Blend/PANI-X1 layer presents the characteristic curve of standard solar cell after spin-coating and electrodeposition. The Thin film obtained by electrodeposition of PANI-X1 on P3HT/PCBM Blend was prepared in perchloric acid solution. These flexible organic photovoltaic solar cells presented power conversion efficiency of 12%. The inclusion of the PANI-X1 layer reduced the effects of degradation these organic photovoltaic panels induced for solar irradiation. In Scanning Electron Microscopy (SEM these studies reveal that the surface of PANI-X1 layers is strongly conditioned by the surface morphology of the dielectric.

  10. Optical second-harmonic generation measurements of porous low-k dielectric materials

    Science.gov (United States)

    Atkin, Joanna; Shaw, Thomas; Laibowitz, Robert; Heinz, Tony

    2009-03-01

    Low-k dielectric materials based on porous carbon-doped oxides, with relative dielectric constants as low as 2.1, are widely used as thin insulating films in the microelectronics industry. Knowledge of these materials' basic electronic properties, such as energy gaps, barrier heights, and trap states, is essential for modeling their electrical leakage and stability characteristics. We use femtosecond laser pulses to probe the dynamics of charge-carrier transfer processes across Si/LKD interfacial barriers by optical second harmonic generation (SHG). Larger electric fields from multiphoton injection can be developed in Si/LKD systems compared to Si/SiO2, indicating a significantly higher density of traps in the LKD. This is consistent with previously reported measurements of trap density by photoinjection techniques^*. We will also discuss results on the dynamics of discharging and on the dependence of charging phenomena on layer thickness. ^*J. M. Atkin, D. Song, T. M. Shaw, E. Cartier, R. B. Laibowitz, and T. F. Heinz, J. Appl. Phys. 103, 094104 (2008).

  11. Optical spectroscopic characterization of amorphous germanium carbide materials obtained by X-Ray Chemical Vapor Deposition

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Paola Antoniotti

    2015-05-01

    Full Text Available Amorphous germanium carbides have been prepared by X-ray activated Chemical Vapor Deposition from germane/allene systems. The allene percentage and irradiation time (total dose were correlated to the composition, the structural features, and the optical coefficients of the films, as studied by IR and UV-VIS spectroscopic techniques. The materials composition is found to change depending on both the allene percentage in the mixture and the irradiation time. IR spectroscopy results indicate that the solids consist of randomly bound networks of carbon and germanium atoms with hydrogen atoms terminating all the dangling bonds. Moreover, the elemental analysis results, the absence of both unsaturated bonds and CH3 groups into the solids and the absence of allene autocondensation reactions products, indicate that polymerization reactions leading to mixed species, containing Ge-C bonds, are favored. Eopt values around 3.5 eV have been found in most of the cases, and are correlated with C sp3-bonding configuration. The B1/2 value, related to the order degree, has been found to be dependent on solid composition, atoms distribution in the material and hydrogenation degree of carbon atoms.

  12. Experimental estimation of dij coefficients of piezoelectric materials by means of optical microscopy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Stamopoulos D.

    2014-07-01

    Full Text Available The properties of multiferroic and specifically piezoelectric (PE materials are, nowadays, intensively investigated by means of well established, however relatively complicate methods. In this work we present a method for the direct visual demonstration of the underlying electro-mechanical processes occurring in PE materials and the estimation of the respective coefficients dij. The method is based on the utilization of optical microscopy for the local observation of the deformation of a PE specimen upon application of an electric field. The direct comparison of the snapshots obtained before and after application of the electric field and simple algebraic calculations enables the estimation of the dij coefficients. The method was evaluated in unpoled single crystals of 0.71Pb(Mg1/3Nb2/3O3–0.29PbTiO3, at room temperature. Various locations of each crystal surface were surveyed. Non-homogeneous electro-mechanical response was observed. Accordingly, the estimated dij coefficients depended on the specific location of the crystal surface. Specifically, the dzx coefficient ranged within 500-1000 pm/V over the investigated locations (for electric fields E<1kV/mm. The present method directly unveils non-homogeneous electro-mechanical processes occurring at the surface of PE crystals and clarifies how these observations can be quantified through the respective dij coefficients.

  13. Sub-250nm room temperature optical gain from AlGaN materials with strong compositional fluctuations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pecora, Emanuele; Zhang, Wei; Sun, Haiding; Nikiforov, A.; Yin, Jian; Paiella, Roberto; Moustakas, Theodore; Dal Negro, Luca

    2013-03-01

    Compact and portable deep-UV LEDs and laser sources are needed for a number of engineering applications including optical communications, gas sensing, biochemical agent detection, disinfection, biotechnology and medical diagnostics. We investigate the deep-UV optical emission and gain properties of AlxGa1-xN/AlyGa1-yN multiple quantum wells structure. These structures were grown by molecular-beam epitaxy on 6H-SiC substrates resulting in either homogeneous wells or various degrees of band-structure compositional fluctuations in the form of cluster-like features within the wells. We measured the TE-polarized amplified spontaneous emission in the sample with cluster-like features and quantified the optical absorption/gain coefficients and gain spectra by the Variable Stripe Length (VSL) technique under ultrafast optical pumping. We report blue-shift and narrowing of the emission, VSL traces, gain spectra, polarization studies, and the validity of the Schalow-Townes relation to demonstrate a maximum net modal gain of 120 cm-1 at 250 nm in the sample with strong compositional fluctuations. Moreover, we measure a very low gain threshold (15 μJ/cm2) . On the other hand, we found that samples with homogeneous quantum wells lead to absorption only. In addition, we report gain measurements in graded-index-separate-confined heterostructure (GRINSCH) designed to increase the device optical confinement factor.

  14. Laser ablation inductively coupled plasma optical emission spectrometry for analysis of pellets of plant materials

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gomes, Marcos S.; Schenk, Emily R.; Santos, Dário; Krug, Francisco José; Almirall, José R.

    An evaluation of laser ablation inductively coupled plasma optical emission spectroscopy (LAICP OES) for the direct analysis of pelleted plant material is reported. Ground leaves of orange citrus, soy and sugarcane were comminuted using a high-speed ball mill, pressed into pellets and sampled directly with laser ablation and analyzed by ICP OES. The limits of detection (LODs) for the method ranged from as low as 0.1 mg kg- 1 for Zn to as high as 94 mg kg- 1 for K but were generally below 6 mg kg- 1 for most of the elements of interest. A certified reference material consisting of a similar matrix (NIST SRM 1547 peach leaves) was used to check the accuracy of the calibration and the reported method resulted in an average bias of ~ 5% for all the elements of interest. The precision for the reported method ranged from as low as 4% relative standard deviation (RSD) for Mn to as high as 17% RSD for Zn but averaged ~ 6.5% RSD for all the elements (n = 10). The proposed method was tested for the determination of Ca, Mg, P, K, Fe, Mn, Zn and B, and the results were in good agreement with those obtained for the corresponding acid digests by ICP-OES, no differences being observed by applying a paired t-test at the 95% confidence level. The reported direct solid sampling method provides a fast alternative to acid digestion that results in similar and appropriate analytical figures of merit with regard to sensitivity, accuracy and precision for plant material analysis.

  15. Optical properties of dental restorative materials in the wavelength range 400 to 700 nm for the simulation of color perception.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Friebel, Moritz; Povel, Kirsten; Cappius, Hans-Joachim; Helfmann, Jürgen; Meinke, Martina

    2009-01-01

    Aesthetic restorations require dental restorative materials to have optical properties very similar to those of the teeth. A method is developed to this end to determine the optical parameters absorption coefficient mu(a), scattering coefficient mu(s), anisotropy factor g, and effective scattering coefficient mu(s) (') of dental restorative materials. The method includes sample preparation and measurements of transmittance and reflectance in an integrating sphere spectrometer followed by inverse Monte Carlo simulations. Using this method the intrinsic optical parameters are determined for shade B2 of the light-activated composites TPH((R)) Spectrum, Esthet-X, and the Ormocer Definite in the wavelength range 400 to 700 nm. By using the determined parameters mu(a), mu(s), and g together with an appropriate phase function, the reflectance of samples with 1-mm layer thickness and shade B2 could be predicted with a very high degree of accuracy using a forward Monte Carlo simulation. The color perception was calculated from the simulated reflectance according to the CIELAB system. We initiate the compilation of a data pool of optical parameters that in the future will enable calculation models to be used as a basis for optimization of the optical approximation of the natural tooth, and the composition of new materials and their production process.

  16. Optical properties of dental restorative materials in the wavelength range 400 to 700 nm for the simulation of color perception

    Science.gov (United States)

    Friebel, Moritz; Povel, Kirsten; Cappius, Hans-Joachim; Helfmann, Jürgen; Meinke, Martina

    2009-09-01

    Aesthetic restorations require dental restorative materials to have optical properties very similar to those of the teeth. A method is developed to this end to determine the optical parameters absorption coefficient μa, scattering coefficient μs, anisotropy factor g, and effective scattering coefficient μs' of dental restorative materials. The method includes sample preparation and measurements of transmittance and reflectance in an integrating sphere spectrometer followed by inverse Monte Carlo simulations. Using this method the intrinsic optical parameters are determined for shade B2 of the light-activated composites TPH® Spectrum®, Esthet-X®, and the Ormocer® Definite® in the wavelength range 400 to 700 nm. By using the determined parameters μa, μs, and g together with an appropriate phase function, the reflectance of samples with 1-mm layer thickness and shade B2 could be predicted with a very high degree of accuracy using a forward Monte Carlo simulation. The color perception was calculated from the simulated reflectance according to the CIELAB system. We initiate the compilation of a data pool of optical parameters that in the future will enable calculation models to be used as a basis for optimization of the optical approximation of the natural tooth, and the composition of new materials and their production process.

  17. Laser Induced Damage in Optical Materials: 1983. Symposium on Optical Materials for High Power Lasers (15th). Held in Boulder, Colorado on 14-16 November 1983

    Science.gov (United States)

    1985-11-01

    OPTIQUE which is considered as the best optic polisher in FRANCE j with damage threshold around 8.5 J/cm 2 (figure 2). 22· samples were tested with an...J/cm2 • MATRA’s laboratory "couches minces optiques " (thin optical layers) production commercial mirrors was around 3.5 J/cm2 in 1982. In order to...cleaning or dried-on cleaning agent residues. This list is by no means complete and can be extended to include dust grains, fibres etc. We know from

  18. Use of a Novel Infrared Wavelength-Tunable Mueller-Matrix Polarimeteric Scatterometer to Measure Nanostructured Optical Materials (Preprint)

    Science.gov (United States)

    2017-06-09

    NANOSTRUCTURED OPTICAL MATERIALS (PREPRINT) Michael R. Benson AFRL/RX Jason C. Vap, Stephen E. Nauyoks, and Michael A. Marciniak Air Force Institute...COPY) AIR FORCE RESEARCH LABORATORY MATERIALS AND MANUFACTURING DIRECTORATE WRIGHT-PATTERSON AIR FORCE BASE, OH 45433-7750 AIR FORCE MATERIEL...Directorate for Information Operations and Reports (0704-0188), 1215 Jefferson Davis Highway , Suite 1204, Arlington, VA 22202-4302. Respondents should be

  19. Hand protection from ultraviolet exposure

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Khazova, M.; O' Hagan, J.B. [Health Protection Agency, Radiation Protection Division, Chilton, Did cot (United Kingdom)

    2006-07-01

    Full text of publication follows: A number of industrial applications and public services involve exposure to ultraviolet radiation (U.V.R.) from a variety of lamps and lasers, for example, in forensic examination, biological trans-illuminators, dentistry, laser material processing, microelectronics, etc. The proposed European Union Directive on Optical Radiation would place specific requirements on employers to provide adequate safety measures to reduce exposure to U.V.R., including gloves for hand protection. The selection of gloves should be based on a risk assessment and on the performance characteristics of the gloves for the task. However, current International and national standards do not describe evaluation procedures of disposable gloves for hand protection against non-ionising radiation. A methodology for assessment of the UV protection level for disposable gloves and a simple measurement protocol are proposed, based on a common approach with UV protection by clothing and sunscreens. Glove Ultraviolet Protection Factor is defined as a time-scale increase in exposure permitted for the hand protected by a glove with respect to an unprotected hand. However, the wide variety of U.V.R. sources and the real-life conditions of glove use (stretching and wetting the surface by liquids) bring substantial challenges to the assessment method. Our study of {approx} 50 samples of widely used disposable gloves made of different materials (nitrile, vinyl, latex and chloroprene) showed that for all tested gloves a change in U.V.R. attenuation with stretching is characteristic for the type of glove material and can be included as a scaling factor in the definition of U.V.R. protection. Glove material has a bigger effect on U.V.R. protection level than variations in the glove thickness or its colour. The following approaches are suggested to overcome the problem of variable U.V.R. sources: - Worst case scenario minimal protection level, most restrictive case - Application

  20. Optimization of the Hyperspectral Imaging-based Spatially-resolved System for Measuring the Optical Properties of Biological Materials

    Science.gov (United States)

    This paper reports on the optimization and assessment of a hyperspectral imaging-based spatially-resolved system for determination of the optical properties of biological materials over the wavelengths of 500-1,000 nm. Twelve model samples covering a wide range of absorption and reduced scattering c...

  1. Surface Roughness and Material Optical Properties Influence on Casimir/van der Waals and Capillary Surface Forces

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Zwol, P.J. van; Palasantzas, G.

    2010-01-01

    Theory calculations using the Lifshitz theory and atomic force microscopy force measurements show that Casimir/van der Weals dispersive forces have a strong dependence on material optical properties and surface roughness. At separations below 100 nm the roughness effect is manifested through a

  2. Third-order nonlinear optical properties of metal dithiolene- and phthalocyanine-doped sol-gel materials

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gall, Gavin J.; King, Terence A.; Oliver, Stephen N.; Capozzi, Carol A.; Seddon, Angela B.; Hill, Callum A. S.; Underhill, Allan E.

    1994-10-01

    Recent studies on metal dithiolene complexes in solution and PMMA have shown this range of materials to exhibit high third-order nonlinear optical coefficients, (Chi) 3, and excellent figures of merit. Phthalocyanine dyes have been shown to exhibit optical limiting due to the nonlinear effect of reverse saturable absorption. We report here on the third-order nonlinear optical characterization of several metal dithiolene and phthalocyanine compounds doped in sol-gel derived materials. These hosts provide a physically and chemically stable environment for the nonlinear compounds, and offer the potential of high levels of doping. The dithiolene and phthalocyanine compounds were incorporated into partially densified sol-gel silica glass (xerogels) by the post-doping technique, and into the hybrid organic-inorganic materials at the sol-stage. To obtain optical quality surfaces on the porous xerogel, a unique polishing technique has been developed. Picosecond and nanosecond pulsed laser studies of nonlinear refraction and absorption are presented, together with laser damage and micro-hardness measurements. For the dithiolenes, concentrations of the order of 1018 molecules/cm3 for both the hybrid material and the xerogel were studied using the degenerate four wave mixing (DFWM) technique. (Chi) 3 values up to 1.4 X 10-19 m2/V2 (equivalent to 1.0 X 10-11 esu) were observed in the sol-gel host.

  3. Improved algorithm for estimating optical properties of food and biological materials using spatially-resolved diffuse reflectance

    Science.gov (United States)

    In this research, the inverse algorithm for estimating optical properties of food and biological materials from spatially-resolved diffuse reflectance was optimized in terms of data smoothing, normalization and spatial region of reflectance profile for curve fitting. Monte Carlo simulation was used ...

  4. PREFACE: Proceedings of the International Conference on Optical, Optoelectronic and Photonic Materials and Applications (ICOOPMA) 2014

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sweeney, Stephen J.; Jha, Animesh

    2015-06-01

    Developments in the connected fields of optics, optoelectronics and photonics have had a profound effect on the emergence of modern technologies and their influence on our lives. In all of these fields, understanding and improving the basic underlying materials is of crucial importance for the development of systems and applications. The International Conference on Optical, Optoelectronic and Photonic Materials and Applications (ICOOPMA) has successfully married these fields and become a regular feature in the conference calendar. The 6th conference in the series, held at the University of Leeds from 27th July - 1st August, 2014, continued the ICOOPMA tradition and attracted 220 international delegates with a diverse range of disciplines and interests. The 59 papers in this Proceedings provide an excellent overview of the topics presented. The conference consisted of four thematic areas in the fields of inorganic semiconductors, carbon and polymeric materials, inorganic glasses and crystalline materials, and metamaterials and plasmonics where each theme area included research on basic materials through to device applications. The conference began with a Workshop organised by Professor Dan Hewak (University of Southampton) with speakers covering Organic Optoelectronic Complexes (Dr Richard Curry, University of Surrey), Metamaterials (Dr Vassili Fedotov, University of Southampton), Graphene (Dr Monica Craciun, University of Exeter) and Amorphous Semiconductors (Dr Jiri Orava, University of Cambridge and Tohoku University). This provided an excellent overview of a representative range of the important topics that were discussed further at the conference. The conference included a banquet which successfully combined excellent food with a relaxing opportunity for the conference delegates to socialise and network. The pinnacle of the evening was the after dinner speech given by our distinguished guest, Professor Sir David Payne (University of Southampton), who gave a

  5. Laser ablation inductively coupled plasma optical emission spectrometry for analysis of pellets of plant materials

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gomes, Marcos S. [Departamento de Química, Universidade Federal de São Carlos, Rod. Washington Luís, km 235, 13565-905 São Carlos, SP (Brazil); Centro de Energia Nuclear na Agricultura, Universidade de São Paulo, Av. Centenário 303, 13416-000 Piracicaba, SP (Brazil); Schenk, Emily R. [Department of Chemistry and Biochemistry, Florida International University, Miami, FL (United States); International Forensic Research Institute, Florida International University, Miami, FL (United States); Santos, Dário [Departamento de Ciências Exatas e da Terra, Universidade Federal de São Paulo, Rua Professor Arthur Riedel 275, Diadema, SP (Brazil); Krug, Francisco José [Centro de Energia Nuclear na Agricultura, Universidade de São Paulo, Av. Centenário 303, 13416-000 Piracicaba, SP (Brazil); Almirall, José R., E-mail: almirall@fiu.edu [Department of Chemistry and Biochemistry, Florida International University, Miami, FL (United States); International Forensic Research Institute, Florida International University, Miami, FL (United States)

    2014-04-01

    An evaluation of laser ablation inductively coupled plasma optical emission spectroscopy (LAICP OES) for the direct analysis of pelleted plant material is reported. Ground leaves of orange citrus, soy and sugarcane were comminuted using a high-speed ball mill, pressed into pellets and sampled directly with laser ablation and analyzed by ICP OES. The limits of detection (LODs) for the method ranged from as low as 0.1 mg kg{sup −1} for Zn to as high as 94 mg kg{sup −1} for K but were generally below 6 mg kg{sup −1} for most of the elements of interest. A certified reference material consisting of a similar matrix (NIST SRM 1547 peach leaves) was used to check the accuracy of the calibration and the reported method resulted in an average bias of ∼ 5% for all the elements of interest. The precision for the reported method ranged from as low as 4% relative standard deviation (RSD) for Mn to as high as 17% RSD for Zn but averaged ∼ 6.5% RSD for all the elements (n = 10). The proposed method was tested for the determination of Ca, Mg, P, K, Fe, Mn, Zn and B, and the results were in good agreement with those obtained for the corresponding acid digests by ICP-OES, no differences being observed by applying a paired t-test at the 95% confidence level. The reported direct solid sampling method provides a fast alternative to acid digestion that results in similar and appropriate analytical figures of merit with regard to sensitivity, accuracy and precision for plant material analysis. - Highlights: • An evaluation of LA-ICP-OES for the direct analysis of pelleted plant material is reported. • Orange citrus, soy and sugarcane plants were pressed into pellets and sampled directly. • The element menu consisted of Ca, Mg, P, K, Fe, Mn, Zn and B. • LODs for the method ranged from 0.1 mg kg{sup −1} for Zn to 94 mg kg{sup −1} for K. • The precision ranged from 4% RSD for Mn to 17% RSD for Zn (∼ 6.5% RSD average)

  6. Analysis of the fractures of metallic materials using optical coherence tomography

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hutiu, Gh.; Duma, V.-F.; Demian, D.; Bradu, A.; Podoleanu, A. Gh.

    2017-06-01

    Forensic in situ investigations, for example for aviation, maritime, road, or rail accidents would benefit from a method that may allow to distinguish ductile from brittle fractures of metals - as material defects are one of the potential causes of such accidents. Currently, the gold standard in material studies is represented by scanning electron microscopy (SEM). However, SEM are large, lab-based systems, therefore in situ measurements are excluded. In addition, they are expensive and time-consuming. We have approached this problem and propose the use of Optical Coherence Tomography (OCT) in such investigations in order to overcome these disadvantages of SEM. In this respect, we demonstrate the capability to perform such fracture analysis by obtaining the topography of metallic surfaces using OCT. Different materials have been analyzed; in this presentation a sample of low soft carbon steel with the chemical composition of C 0.2%, Mn 1.15%, S 0.04%, P 0.05 % and Fe for the rest has been considered. An in-house developed Swept Source (SS) OCT system has been used, and height profiles have been generated for the sample surface. This profile allowed for concluding that the carbon steel sample was subjected to a ductile fracture. A validation of the OCT images obtained with a 10 microns resolution has been made with SEM images obtained with a 4 nm resolution. Although the OCT resolution is much lower than the one of SEM, we thus demonstrate that it is sufficient in order to obtain clear images of the grains of the metallic materials and thus to distinguish between ductile and brittle fractures. This study analysis opens avenues for a range of applications, including: (i) to determine the causes that have generated pipe ruptures, or structural failures of metallic bridges and buildings, as well as damages of machinery parts; (ii) to optimize the design of various machinery; (iii) to obtain data regarding the structure of metallic alloys); (iv) to improve the

  7. Method and apparatus for measuring the intensity and phase of one or more ultrashort light pulses and for measuring optical properties of materials

    Science.gov (United States)

    Trebino, Rick P.; DeLong, Kenneth W.

    1996-01-01

    The intensity and phase of one or more ultrashort light pulses are obtained using a non-linear optical medium. Information derived from the light pulses is also used to measure optical properties of materials. Various retrieval techniques are employed. Both "instantaneously" and "non-instantaneously" responding optical mediums may be used.

  8. Hand Eczema

    OpenAIRE

    Uma Shankar Agarwal; Raj Kumar Besarwal; Rahul Gupta; Puneet Agarwal; Sheetal Napalia

    2014-01-01

    Hand eczema is often a chronic, multifactorial disease. It is usually related to occupational or routine household activities. Exact etiology of the disease is difficult to determine. It may become severe enough and disabling to many of patients in course of time. An estimated 2-10% of population is likely to develop hand eczema at some point of time during life. It appears to be the most common occupational skin disease, comprising 9-35% of all occupational diseases and up to 80% or more of ...

  9. Are Extracted Materials Truly Representative of Original Samples? Impact of C18 Extraction on CDOM Optical and Chemical Properties.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Andrew, Andrea A; Del Vecchio, Rossana; Zhang, Yi; Subramaniam, Ajit; Blough, Neil V

    2016-01-01

    Some properties of dissolved organic matter (DOM) and chromophoric dissolved organic matter (CDOM) can be easily measured directly on whole waters, while others require sample concentration and removal of natural salts. To increase CDOM content and eliminate salts, solid phase extraction (SPE) is often employed. Biases following extraction and elution are inevitable, thus raising the question of how truly representative the extracted material is of the original. In this context, we investigated the wavelength dependence of extraction efficiency for C18 cartridges with respect to CDOM optical properties using samples obtained from the Middle Atlantic Bight (MAB) and the Equatorial Atlantic Ocean (EAO). Further, we compared the optical changes of C18 extracts and the corresponding whole water following chemical reduction with sodium borohydride (NaBH4). C18 cartridges preferentially extracted long-wavelength absorbing/emitting material for samples impacted by riverine input. Extraction efficiency overall decreased with offshore distance away from riverine input. Spectral slopes of C18-OM samples were also almost always lower than those of their corresponding CDOM samples supporting the preferential extraction of higher molecular weight absorbing material. The wavelength dependence of the optical properties (absorption, fluorescence emission, and quantum yield) of the original water samples and their corresponding extracted material were very similar. C18 extracts and corresponding water samples further exhibited comparable optical changes following NaBH4 reduction, thus suggesting a similarity in nature (structure) of the optically active extracted material, independent of geographical locale. Altogether, these data suggested a strong similarity between C18 extracts and corresponding whole waters, thus indicating that extracts are representative of the CDOM content of original waters.

  10. Are extracted materials truly representative of original samples? Impact of C18 extraction on CDOM optical and chemical properties

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Andrea A Andrew

    2016-02-01

    Full Text Available Some properties of dissolved organic matter (DOM and chromophoric dissolved organic matter (CDOM can be easily measured directly on whole waters, while others require sample concentration and removal of natural salts. To increase CDOM content and eliminate salts, solid phase extraction is often employed. Biases following extraction and elution are inevitable, thus raising the question of how truly representative the extracted material is of the original. In this context, we investigated the wavelength dependence of extraction efficiency for C18 cartridges with respect to CDOM optical properties using samples obtained from the Middle Atlantic Bight (MAB and the Equatorial Atlantic Ocean (EAO. Further, we compared the optical changes of C18 extracts and the corresponding whole water following chemical reduction with sodium borohydride (NaBH4.C18 cartridges preferentially extracted long-wavelength absorbing/emitting material for samples impacted by riverine input. Extraction efficiency overall decreased with offshore distance away from riverine input. Spectral slopes of C18-OM samples were also almost always lower than those of their corresponding CDOM samples supporting the preferential extraction of higher molecular weight absorbing material. The wavelength dependence of the optical properties (absorption, fluorescence emission and quantum yield of the original water samples and their corresponding extracted material were very similar. C18 extracts and corresponding water samples further exhibited comparable optical changes following NaBH4 reduction, thus suggesting a similarity in nature (structure of the optically active extracted material, independent of geographical locale. Altogether, these data suggested a strong similarity between C18 extracts and corresponding whole waters, thus indicating that extracts are representative of the CDOM content of original waters.

  11. Investigation on Growth, Structural, Spectral, Optical, and Mechanical Properties of an Organic Nonlinear Optical Material: Morpholinium Hydrogen Tartrate

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    R. Renugadevi

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Organic nonlinear optical crystal morpholinium hydrogen tartrate (MHT, with molecular formula [C8H15NO7], has been grown by slow evaporation solution technique. Single crystal X-ray diffraction study confirms that MHT crystallizes in orthorhombic system with noncentrosymmetric space group P212121. FTIR spectrum was recorded to identify the various functional groups of MHT. The various kinds of protons and carbons of MHT have been identified using 1H and 13C NMR spectral analyses. The range of optical absorption was ascertained by recording UV-Vis-NIR spectral studies. The TG/DTA studies revealed that the grown crystal is thermally stable up to 159.26°C. The mechanical property of the grown crystal was studied using Vickers microhardness studies. The relative second harmonic generation efficiency of MHT was determined using Kurtz and Perry powder technique; it was observed to be greater than that of KDP crystal.

  12. Share-shaped durable and isometric diamond powders for superquality treatment of optics materials

    Science.gov (United States)

    Samoylova, Liliya M.; Krinskaya, Elena L.

    2002-10-01

    For the first time, developed are sphere-shaped precision diamond micropowders ASMV-RM having a number of unique properties - advanced, ordered crystal structure, improved surface morphology, maximal hardening of crystals with increase wear-resistant, with high uniformity of grains and in physico-mechanical properties, with absence of needle, sharp-angled crystals. These exclusive properties enable to provide the considerable increase of productivity of processes at essential improvement of surface quality during thin grinding and polishing of products by these micropowders. They are outside of a competition to the standard marks of diamonds of general purpose as were created for new highly perspective areas of applications focused on high technologies in electronics, optics and other branches of modern engineering. In precision micropowders ASMV-RM enormous potential of diamonds is realized. The technology of precision diamond micropowders preparation is based on results of the scientific school by Academician of the National Academy of Sciences of Ukraine V.I. Trefilov and complex approach directed on deepened influence on a material with application of modern effective technologies and the optimum technical solutions. The technology of their manufacture is referred to high technologies, and precision micropowders have created a new direction in diamond branch. Real conditions for realization of technical revolution in creation and use of a new class precision diamond micropowders are now created.

  13. Imaging of dental material by polarization-sensitive optical coherence tomography

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dichtl, Sabine; Baumgartner, Angela; Hitzenberger, Christoph K.; Moritz, Andreas; Wernisch, Johann; Robl, Barbara; Sattmann, Harald; Leitgeb, Rainer; Sperr, Wolfgang; Fercher, Adolf F.

    1999-05-01

    Partial coherence interferometry (PCI) and optical coherence tomography (OCT) are noninvasive and noncontact techniques for high precision biometry and for obtaining cross- sectional images of biologic structures. OCT was initially introduced to depict the transparent tissue of the eye. It is based on interferometry employing the partial coherence properties of a light source with high spatial coherence ut short coherence length to image structures with a resolution of the order of a few microns. Recently this technique has been modified for cross section al imaging of dental and periodontal tissues. In vitro and in vivo OCT images have been recorded, which distinguish enamel, cemento and dentin structures and provide detailed structural information on clinical abnormalities. In contrast to convention OCT, where the magnitude of backscattered light as a function of depth is imaged, polarization sensitive OCT uses backscattered light to image the magnitude of the birefringence in the sample as a function of depth. First polarization sensitive OCT recordings show, that changes in the mineralization status of enamel or dentin caused by caries or non-caries lesions can result in changes of the polarization state of the light backscattered by dental material. Therefore polarization sensitive OCT might provide a new diagnostic imaging modality in clinical and research dentistry.

  14. Sol-gel derived solid chiral materials and their optical activity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xia, Haiping; Tao, Weidong; Wang, Jinhao; Zhang, Jianli; Nie, Qiuhua

    2004-11-01

    The chiral organic molecules glucose (C 6H 12O 6) and griseofulvin (C 17H 17ClO 6) were first uniformly incorporated in sol-gel derived materials. The polarity response, absorption spectra and thermal stability were measured and discussed. The DTA results indicated that the C 6H 12O 6 and C 17H 17ClO 6 in gels were stable in air at the temperature lower than 210 and 350 °C, respectively. An absorption band at about 1.4 μm due to OH - existed in the infrared absorption spectra of the gels. The similar behaviors of optical activity for the organic chiral molecules in solutions were hold in solid gels. The specific rotations for C 6H 12O 6 and C 17H 17ClO 6 in gels were -0.95 and -1.45°/cm, corresponding to the chiral parameter 1.55 × 10 -7 and 2.37 × 10 -7, respectively.

  15. Preparation of Organic Zn-Phthalocyanine-Based Semiconducting Materials and Their Optical and Electrochemical Characterization

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Amira Hajri

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available In order to increase the species of organic semiconductors, new Zn-phthalocyanines-based organic materials were synthesized and characterized. The new compounds have been characterized by 1H and 13C using NMR, FTIR, and UV-Vis. The absorption, fluorescence, and electrochemical properties were also studied. Green photoluminescence was observed in dilute solutions. In solid thin films, π-π* interactions influenced the optical properties, and redshifted photoluminescence spectra were obtained; red emissions for ZnPAL (647 nm and ZnPTr (655 nm were found. By cyclic voltammetry, the electrochemical band gap was estimated to be 1.94 and 1.17 eV for ZnPAl and ZnPTr, respectively. Single-layer diode devices of an indium tin oxide/Zn-phthalocyanine/aluminum configuration were fabricated and showed relatively low turn-on voltages (3.3 V for ZnPAl and 3 V for ZnPTr.

  16. Mid-infrared materials and devices on a Si platform for optical sensing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Singh, Vivek; Lin, Pao Tai; Patel, Neil; Lin, Hongtao; Li, Lan; Zou, Yi; Deng, Fei; Ni, Chaoying; Hu, Juejun; Giammarco, James; Soliani, Anna Paola; Zdyrko, Bogdan; Luzinov, Igor; Novak, Spencer; Novak, Jackie; Wachtel, Peter; Danto, Sylvain; Musgraves, J David; Richardson, Kathleen; Kimerling, Lionel C; Agarwal, Anuradha M

    2014-02-01

    In this article, we review our recent work on mid-infrared (mid-IR) photonic materials and devices fabricated on silicon for on-chip sensing applications. Pedestal waveguides based on silicon are demonstrated as broadband mid-IR sensors. Our low-loss mid-IR directional couplers demonstrated in SiN x waveguides are useful in differential sensing applications. Photonic crystal cavities and microdisk resonators based on chalcogenide glasses for high sensitivity are also demonstrated as effective mid-IR sensors. Polymer-based functionalization layers, to enhance the sensitivity and selectivity of our sensor devices, are also presented. We discuss the design of mid-IR chalcogenide waveguides integrated with polycrystalline PbTe detectors on a monolithic silicon platform for optical sensing, wherein the use of a low-index spacer layer enables the evanescent coupling of mid-IR light from the waveguides to the detector. Finally, we show the successful fabrication processing of our first prototype mid-IR waveguide-integrated detectors.

  17. A combinatorial chemistry approach to new materials for non-linear optics. I. Five schiff bases

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nesterov; Timofeeva; Borbulevych; Antipin; Clark

    2000-08-01

    A combinatorial chemistry approach has been used to synthesize an array of Schiff bases, five of which, namely N-[(E, 2E)-3-(4-methoxyphenyl)-2-propenylidene]-3-nitroaniline, C(16)H(14)N(2)O(3), (1a), N-[(E, 2E)-3-(4-methoxyphenyl)-2-propenylidene]-4-nitroaniline, C(16)H(14)N(2)O(3), (2a), N-(E, 2E)-3-[4-(dimethylamino)phenyl]-2-propenylidene-3-nitroaniline, C(17)H(17)N(3)O(2), (1b), N-(E, 2E)-3-[4-(dimethylamino)phenyl]-2-propenylidene-4-nitroaniline, C(17)H(17)N(3)O(2), (2b), and N-(E, 2E)-3-[4-(dimethylamino)phenyl]-2-propenylidene-2-methyl-4-nitroanil ine, C(18)H(19)N(3)O(2), (3b), have been structurally characterized. A stack structure is observed for (1a) and (1b) in the crystal phase. Experimental and calculated molecular structures are discussed for these compounds which belong to a chemical class having potential applications as non-linear optical materials.

  18. Ferrule material dependence of axial force sensitivity of a tunable optical frequency filter made of fiber fabry-perot etalon

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tateda, Mitsuhiro; Dong, Mohan

    2011-01-01

    Fiber Fabry-Perot etalon (FFPE) is a device designed as an optical frequency filter, and its transmission characteristics change depending on force and temperature. In this paper, axial force sensitivity of three types of FFPE is investigated, whose ferrule materials have different Young's modulus. Force sensitivity of an FFPE whose ferrule material is borosilicate glass was found to be 2.7 GHz/N, while those of FFPEs with glass ceramics and zirconium oxide ferrules were 1.7 and 0.8 GHz/N, respectively. Thus, the theoretical expectation is confirmed experimentally that the axial force sensitivity of FFPE is inversely proportional to Young's modulus of the ferrule material.

  19. Super-resolution nanofabrication with metal-ion doped hybrid material through an optical dual-beam approach

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cao, Yaoyu; Li, Xiangping; Gu, Min, E-mail: mgu@swin.edu.au [Centre for Micro-Photonics, Faculty of Science, Engineering and Technology, Swinburne University of Technology, P.O. Box 218, Hawthorn, Victoria 3122 (Australia)

    2014-12-29

    We apply an optical dual-beam approach to a metal-ion doped hybrid material to achieve nanofeatures beyond the optical diffraction limit. By spatially inhibiting the photoreduction and the photopolymerization, we realize a nano-line, consisting of polymer matrix and in-situ generated gold nanoparticles, with a lateral size of sub 100 nm, corresponding to a factor of 7 improvement compared to the diffraction limit. With the existence of gold nanoparticles, a plasmon enhanced super-resolution fabrication mechanism in the hybrid material is observed, which benefits in a further reduction in size of the fabricated feature. The demonstrated nanofeature in hybrid materials paves the way for realizing functional nanostructures.

  20. Hand eczema

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Uma Shankar Agarwal

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Hand eczema is often a chronic, multifactorial disease. It is usually related to occupational or routine household activities. Exact etiology of the disease is difficult to determine. It may become severe enough and disabling to many of patients in course of time. An estimated 2-10% of population is likely to develop hand eczema at some point of time during life. It appears to be the most common occupational skin disease, comprising 9-35% of all occupational diseases and up to 80% or more of all occupational contact dermatitis. So, it becomes important to find the exact etiology and classification of the disease and to use the appropriate preventive and treatment measures. Despite its importance in the dermatological practice, very few Indian studies have been done till date to investigate the epidemiological trends, etiology, and treatment options for hand eczema. In this review, we tried to find the etiology, epidemiology, and available treatment modalities for chronic hand eczema patients.

  1. Hand Washing

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... that mystery object in the park or your cat rub against you after using the litter pan. Fido and Fluffy are dirtier than you might think. Even if you're a good hand-washer, your friends may be harboring some ...

  2. Rare-earth-doped materials with application to optical signal processing, quantum information science, and medical imaging technology

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cone, R. L.; Thiel, C. W.; Sun, Y.; Böttger, Thomas; Macfarlane, R. M.

    2012-02-01

    Unique spectroscopic properties of isolated rare earth ions in solids offer optical linewidths rivaling those of trapped single atoms and enable a variety of recent applications. We design rare-earth-doped crystals, ceramics, and fibers with persistent or transient "spectral hole" recording properties for applications including high-bandwidth optical signal processing where light and our solids replace the high-bandwidth portion of the electronics; quantum cryptography and information science including the goal of storage and recall of single photons; and medical imaging technology for the 700-900 nm therapeutic window. Ease of optically manipulating rare-earth ions in solids enables capturing complex spectral information in 105 to 108 frequency bins. Combining spatial holography and spectral hole burning provides a capability for processing high-bandwidth RF and optical signals with sub-MHz spectral resolution and bandwidths of tens to hundreds of GHz for applications including range-Doppler radar and high bandwidth RF spectral analysis. Simply stated, one can think of these crystals as holographic recording media capable of distinguishing up to 108 different colors. Ultra-narrow spectral holes also serve as a vibration-insensitive sub-kHz frequency reference for laser frequency stabilization to a part in 1013 over tens of milliseconds. The unusual properties and applications of spectral hole burning of rare earth ions in optical materials are reviewed. Experimental results on the promising Tm3+:LiNbO3 material system are presented and discussed for medical imaging applications. Finally, a new application of these materials as dynamic optical filters for laser noise suppression is discussed along with experimental demonstrations and theoretical modeling of the process.

  3. Modified Powder-in-Tube Technique Based on the Consolidation Processing of Powder Materials for Fabricating Specialty Optical Fibers

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jean-Louis Auguste

    2014-08-01

    Full Text Available The objective of this paper is to demonstrate the interest of a consolidation process associated with the powder-in-tube technique in order to fabricate a long length of specialty optical fibers. This so-called Modified Powder-in-Tube (MPIT process is very flexible and paves the way to multimaterial optical fiber fabrications with different core and cladding glassy materials. Another feature of this technique lies in the sintering of the preform under reducing or oxidizing atmosphere. The fabrication of such optical fibers implies different constraints that we have to deal with, namely chemical species diffusion or mechanical stress due to the mismatches between thermal expansion coefficients and working temperatures of the fiber materials. This paper focuses on preliminary results obtained with a lanthano-aluminosilicate glass used as the core material for the fabrication of all-glass fibers or specialty Photonic Crystal Fibers (PCFs. To complete the panel of original microstructures now available by the MPIT technique, we also present several optical fibers in which metallic particles or microwires are included into a silica-based matrix.

  4. Phantom materials mimicking the optical properties in the near infrared range for non-invasive fetal pulse oximetry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ley, Sebastian; Stadthalter, Miriam; Link, Dietmar; Laqua, Daniel; Husar, Peter

    2014-01-01

    An optical phantom of the maternal abdomen during pregnancy is an appropriate test environment to evaluate a non-invasive system for fetal pulse oximetry. To recreate the optical properties of maternal tissue, fetal tissue and blood suitable substitutes are required. For this purpose, phantom materials are used, which consist of transparent silicone or water as host material. Cosmetic powder and India ink are investigated as absorbing materials, whereas titanium dioxide particles are examined as scattering medium. Transmittance and reflectance measurements of the samples were performed in the spectral range from 600 nm to 900 nm using integrating sphere technique. The scattering and absorption coefficients and the anisotropy factor were determined using Kubelka-Munk theory. The results were used to compute the required mixture ratios of the respective components to replicate the optical properties of maternal tissue, fetal tissue and blood, and corresponding samples were produced. Their optical properties were investigated in the same manner as mentioned above. The results conform to the values of various types of tissues and blood given in the scientific literature.

  5. Modified Powder-in-Tube Technique Based on the Consolidation Processing of Powder Materials for Fabricating Specialty Optical Fibers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Auguste, Jean-Louis; Humbert, Georges; Leparmentier, Stéphanie; Kudinova, Maryna; Martin, Pierre-Olivier; Delaizir, Gaëlle; Schuster, Kay; Litzkendorf, Doris

    2014-08-22

    The objective of this paper is to demonstrate the interest of a consolidation process associated with the powder-in-tube technique in order to fabricate a long length of specialty optical fibers. This so-called Modified Powder-in-Tube (MPIT) process is very flexible and paves the way to multimaterial optical fiber fabrications with different core and cladding glassy materials. Another feature of this technique lies in the sintering of the preform under reducing or oxidizing atmosphere. The fabrication of such optical fibers implies different constraints that we have to deal with, namely chemical species diffusion or mechanical stress due to the mismatches between thermal expansion coefficients and working temperatures of the fiber materials. This paper focuses on preliminary results obtained with a lanthano-aluminosilicate glass used as the core material for the fabrication of all-glass fibers or specialty Photonic Crystal Fibers (PCFs). To complete the panel of original microstructures now available by the MPIT technique, we also present several optical fibers in which metallic particles or microwires are included into a silica-based matrix.

  6. Recent developments of optically stimulated luminescence materials and techniques for radiation dosimetry and clinical applications

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pradhan A

    2008-01-01

    Full Text Available During the last 10 years, optically stimulated luminescence (OSL has emerged as a formidable competitor not only to thermoluminescence dosimetry (TLD but also to several other dosimetry systems. Though a large number of materials have been synthesized and studied for OSL, Al 2 O 3 :C continues to dominate the dosimetric applications. Re-investigations of OSL in BeOindicate that this material might provide an alternative to Al 2 O 3 :C. Study of OSL of electronic components of mobile phones and ID cards appears to have opened up a feasibility of dosimetry and dose reconstruction using the electronic components of gadgets of everyday use in the events of unforeseen situations of radiological accidents, including the event of a dirty bomb by terrorist groups. Among the newly reported materials, a very recent development of NaMgF 3 :Eu 2+ appears fascinating because of its high OSL sensitivity and tolerable tissue equivalence. In clinical dosimetry, an OSL as a passive dosimeter could do all that TLD can do, much faster with a better or at least the same efficiency; and in addition, it provides a possibility of repeated readout unlike TLD, in which all the dose information is lost in a single readout. Of late, OSL has also emerged as a practical real-time dosimeter for in vivo measurements in radiation therapy (for both external beams and brachytherapy and in various diagnostic radiological examinations including mammography and CT dosimetry. For in vivo measurements, a probe of Al 2 O 3 :C of size of a fraction of a millimeter provides the information on both the dose rate and the total dose from the readout of radioluminescence and OSL signals respectively, from the same probe. The availability of OSL dosimeters in various sizes and shapes and their performance characteristics as compared to established dosimeters such as plastic scintillation dosimeters, diode detectors, MOSFET detectors, radiochromic films, etc., shows that OSL may soon become

  7. Interaction of short x-ray pulses with low-Z x-ray optics materials at the LCLS free-electron laser

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Hau-Riege, S. P.; London, R. A.; Graf, A.; Baker, S. L.; Soufli, R.; Sobierajski, R.; Burian, T.; Chalupsky, J.; Juha, L.; Gaudin, J.; Krzywinski, J.; Moeller, S.; Messerschmidt, M.; Bozek, J.; Bostedt, C.

    2010-01-01

    Materials used for hard x-ray-free-electron laser (XFEL) optics must withstand high-intensity x-ray pulses. The advent of the Linac Coherent Light Source has enabled us to expose candidate optical materials, such as bulk B4C and SiC films, to 0.83 keV XFEL pulses with pulse energies between 1 mu J

  8. Fabrication of a material assembly of silver nanoparticles using the phase gradients of optical tweezers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yan, Zijie; Sajjan, Manas; Scherer, Norbert F

    2015-04-10

    Optical matter can be created using the intensity gradient and electrodynamic (e.g., optical binding) forces that nano- and microparticles experience in focused optical beams. Here we show that the force associated with phase gradient is also important. In fact, in optical line traps the phase gradient force is crucial in determining the structure and stability of optical matter arrays consisting of Ag nanoparticles (NPs). NP lattices can be repeatedly assembled and disassembled simply by changing the sign of the phase gradient. The phase gradient creates a compressive force (and thus a stress) in the optically bound Ag NP lattices, causing structural transitions (a stress response) from 1D "chains" to 2D lattices, and even to amorphous structures. The structural transitions and dynamics of driven transport are well described by electrodynamics simulations and modeling using a drift-diffusion Langevin equation.

  9. Method and system for processing optical materials for high power laser systems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Demos, Stavros G; Raman, Rajesh; Negres, Raluca A

    2015-02-03

    A method of determining conditioning pulse parameters for an optical element includes directing a pump pulse to impinge on the optical element and directing a probe pulse to impinge on the optical element. The method also includes determining a first time associated with an onset of electronic excitation leading to formation of an absorbing region of the optical element and determining a second time associated with expansion of the absorbing region of the optical element. The method further includes defining a turn-off time for a conditioning pulse between the first time and the second time. According to embodiments of the present invention, pulse shaping of the conditioning pulse enables laser conditioning of optical elements to achieve improvements in their laser induced damage threshold.

  10. Research of developing and processing technology of new visual and optical materials

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kim, Sun Jae; Kim, K. H.; Rhee, C. K.; Lee, H. G.; Kim, W. W.; Jeon, C. J.; Park, S.; Kim, H. S

    2000-08-01

    Crystalline TiO{sub 2} powder with rutile phase for the plastic lens material was prepared by the homogeneous precipitation process at ambient or low temperatures (HPPLT) using simply heating aqueous TiOCl{sub 2} solution. The transparent TiO{sub 2} thin films and CR39/TiO{sub 2} composite lens were fabricated using dispersed TiO{sub 2} particle in the aqueous or organic solution. The monodisperse TiO{sub 2} ultrafine particles with the diameters of 40 {approx} 400 nm were obtained from aqueous TiOCl{sub 2} solution with an appropriate Ti{sup 4+} concentration by the HPPLT. The process was carried out under the conditions in the ranges of 17 {approx} 230 deg C to prevent H{sub 2}O evaporation completely and to make it freely or to prevent it thoroughly. The existence of SO{sub 4}{sup 2-} ion in aqueous TiOCl{sub 2} solution make the preferential growth of the acicular primary particles suppressed, resulting in the spherical or round primary particles with the anatase phase. The ultrafine TiO{sub 2} powder by the HPPLT was well dispersed with sizes of 20 {approx} 50 nm in n-butyl alcohol solution. The mixture of TiO{sub 2} particles with silica sol, corresponding to 1.0 wt.% SiO{sub 2} in 99 wt.% (TiO{sub 2} + H{sub 2}O) aqueous solution was coated with 40 {approx} 50 nm thickness on the substrate. The optical transmittance of CR39/TiO{sub 2} composite lens with increase in the addition of the ultrafine TiO{sub 2} powder decreases gradually although TiO{sub 2} particles were well dispersed in n-butyl alcohol solution. Thus, it can be thought that it is appropriate to add 0.3 mL of 1.0 g TiO{sub 2}/1000 mL n-butyl alcohol solution to the CR39 solution for the CR39/TiO2 composite lens with optical transmittances more than 90 %. It was also confirmed that PMMA/TiO{sub 2} composite thin films showed a similar transmittance like the CR39/TiO{sub 2} composite lens.

  11. Every photon counts: improving low, mid, and high-spatial frequency errors on astronomical optics and materials with MRF

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maloney, Chris; Lormeau, Jean Pierre; Dumas, Paul

    2016-07-01

    Many astronomical sensing applications operate in low-light conditions; for these applications every photon counts. Controlling mid-spatial frequencies and surface roughness on astronomical optics are critical for mitigating scattering effects such as flare and energy loss. By improving these two frequency regimes higher contrast images can be collected with improved efficiency. Classically, Magnetorheological Finishing (MRF) has offered an optical fabrication technique to correct low order errors as well has quilting/print-through errors left over in light-weighted optics from conventional polishing techniques. MRF is a deterministic, sub-aperture polishing process that has been used to improve figure on an ever expanding assortment of optical geometries, such as planos, spheres, on and off axis aspheres, primary mirrors and freeform optics. Precision optics are routinely manufactured by this technology with sizes ranging from 5-2,000mm in diameter. MRF can be used for form corrections; turning a sphere into an asphere or free form, but more commonly for figure corrections achieving figure errors as low as 1nm RMS while using careful metrology setups. Recent advancements in MRF technology have improved the polishing performance expected for astronomical optics in low, mid and high spatial frequency regimes. Deterministic figure correction with MRF is compatible with most materials, including some recent examples on Silicon Carbide and RSA905 Aluminum. MRF also has the ability to produce `perfectly-bad' compensating surfaces, which may be used to compensate for measured or modeled optical deformation from sources such as gravity or mounting. In addition, recent advances in MRF technology allow for corrections of mid-spatial wavelengths as small as 1mm simultaneously with form error correction. Efficient midspatial frequency corrections make use of optimized process conditions including raster polishing in combination with a small tool size. Furthermore, a novel MRF

  12. Novel Optical Fiber Materials With Engineered Brillouin Gain Coefficients SSL 1: Novel Fiber Lasers

    Science.gov (United States)

    2015-12-29

    Hawkins, C. Ryan, A. D. Yablon, R. Stolen, J. Ballato. Single- and few-moded lithium aluminosilicate optical fiber for athermal Brillouin strain...invited presentations 5 invited journal papers 1 journal cover 1 paper awarded "Spotlight on Optics" by the Optical Society of America 1 paper...Derived Fiber 25 G. Strontium Aluminosilicate Fiber 28 H. Lithium Aluminosilicate Fiber 30 V. Investigations Into Other Compatible

  13. Optical fiber interferometer for the study of ultrasonic waves in composite materials

    Science.gov (United States)

    Claus, R. O.; Zewekh, P. S.; Turner, T. M.; Wade, J. C.; Rogers, R. T.; Garg, A. O.

    1981-01-01

    The possibility of acoustic emission detection in composites using embedded optical fibers as sensing elements was investigated. Optical fiber interferometry, fiber acoustic sensitivity, fiber interferometer calibration, and acoustic emission detection are reported. Adhesive bond layer dynamical properties using ultrasonic interface waves, the design and construction of an ultrasonic transducer with a two dimensional Gaussian pressure profile, and the development of an optical differential technique for the measurement of surface acoustic wave particle displacements and propagation direction are also examined.

  14. Ethanol catalytic optical driven deposition for 1D and 2D materials with ultra-low power threshold of 0 dBm

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Hao; Chen, Bohua; Xiao, Xu; Guo, Chaoshi; Zhang, Xiaoyan; Wang, Jun; Jiang, Meng; Wu, Kan; Chen, Jianping

    2018-01-01

    We have demonstrated a generalized optical driven deposition method, ethanol catalytic deposition (ECD) method, which is widely applicable to the deposition of a broad range of one-dimensional (1D) and two-dimensional (2D) materials with common deposition parameters. Using ECD method, deposition of 1D material carbon nanotubes and 2D materials MoS2, MoSe2, WS2 and WSe2 on tapered fiber has been demonstrated with the threshold power as low as 0 dBm. To our knowledge, this is the lowest threshold power ever reported in optical driven deposition, noting that the conventional optical driven deposition has a threshold typically near 15 dBm. It means ECD method can significantly reduce the power requirement and simplify the setup of the optical driven deposition as well as its wide applicability to different materials, which benefits the research on optical nonlinearity and ultrafast photonics of 1D and 2D materials.

  15. Biomimetic replicas: Transfer of complex architectures with different optical properties from plant surfaces onto technical materials.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schulte, Anna Julia; Koch, Kerstin; Spaeth, Manuel; Barthlott, Wilhelm

    2009-07-01

    Plant surfaces are characterized by a high diversity of structures which determine their optical properties, such as shiny, gleaming, silky, matt or iridescent. Replicas with different optical properties have been generated by using plant surfaces as templates and an improved replica technique. The technique allows the replication of complex surface structures with overhangs, cavities, and fragile or soft structures in a fast and cost-efficient way. Structures from some millimetres to some nanometres can be replicated. The transfer of complex architectures with different optical properties from plant surfaces onto technical surfaces implies a great potential for the development of new biomimetic surfaces with new optical properties.

  16. Crystal growth, vibrational, optical, thermal and theoretical studies of a nonlinear optical material: 2-Methyl 3,5-dinitrobenzoic acid

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sangeetha, K. [Department of Physics, Sri Sarada College for Women, Salem-16 (India); Guru Prasad, L. [Department of Science & Humanities, M. Kumarasamy College of Engineering, Karur (India); Mathammal, R. [Department of Physics, Sri Sarada College for Women, Salem-16 (India)

    2016-11-15

    Single crystals of 2-methyl 3,5-dinitro benzoic acid with reasonable size have been grown by slow evaporation solution growth method using ethanol as solvent. Quantum chemical calculation of 2-methyl 3,5-Dinitro benzoic acid was carried out by using DFT/B3LYP/6-31+G(d,p) method. The powder X-ray diffraction pattern was recorded and indexed. Both the experimental and theoretical vibrational spectrum validates the presence of functional groups. Polarizability, first order hyperpolarizability and the electric dipole moment values have been computed theoretically. The {sup 1}H and {sup 13}C NMR chemical shift of the molecule was calculated and compared with experimental results. TG/DSC analysis has been employed to understand the thermal and physio-chemical stability of the title compound. Frequency conversion property of the crystal was tested by Kurtz and Perry method. Optical absorption behavior of the grown crystal was examined by recording the optical spectrum and band gap energy was also estimated. The calculated HOMO and LUMO energy shows the charge transfer nature of the molecule.

  17. Conversion of 4-N,N-dimethylamino-4'-N'-methyl-stilbazolium tosylate (DAST) from a Simple Optical Material to a Versatile Optoelectronic Material.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xu, Xiangdong; Sun, Ziqiang; Fan, Kai; Jiang, Yadong; Huang, Rui; Wen, Yuejiang; He, Qiong; Ao, Tianhong

    2015-07-20

    4-N,N-dimethylamino-4'-N'-methyl-stilbazolium tosylate (DAST) is an important optical material, but its poor conductivity limits applications in devices. To tackle this problem, we designed, prepared, and systematically investigated novel binary composite films that are composed of two-dimensional (2D) DAST and 2D graphene. Results indicate that both electrical and optical properties of DAST can be significantly improved by graphene addition. The negative steric effects of big DAST molecules that greatly trouble ex-situ synthesis can be efficiently overcome by in-situ synthesis, thus leading to better film quality and higher physical properties. Consequently, the in-situ composite film exhibits a low sheet resistance of 7.5 × 10(6) ohm and high temperature coefficient of resistance of -2.79% K(-1), close to the levels of the most important bolometric materials for uncooled infrared detectors. Particularly, a new low temperature reduction of graphene oxide induced by DAST, which is further enhanced by in-situ process, was discovered. This work presents valuable information about the DAST-graphene composite films, their chemical structures, mechanisms, physical properties, and comparison on in-situ and ex-situ syntheses of graphene-based composites, all of which will be helpful for not only theoretically studying the DAST and graphene materials and expanding their applications, but also for seeking new optoelectronic sensitive materials.

  18. 3D Printed Robotic Hand

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pizarro, Yaritzmar Rosario; Schuler, Jason M.; Lippitt, Thomas C.

    2013-01-01

    Dexterous robotic hands are changing the way robots and humans interact and use common tools. Unfortunately, the complexity of the joints and actuations drive up the manufacturing cost. Some cutting edge and commercially available rapid prototyping machines now have the ability to print multiple materials and even combine these materials in the same job. A 3D model of a robotic hand was designed using Creo Parametric 2.0. Combining "hard" and "soft" materials, the model was printed on the Object Connex350 3D printer with the purpose of resembling as much as possible the human appearance and mobility of a real hand while needing no assembly. After printing the prototype, strings where installed as actuators to test mobility. Based on printing materials, the manufacturing cost of the hand was $167, significantly lower than other robotic hands without the actuators since they have more complex assembly processes.

  19. Silicon as a virtual plasmonic material: Acquisition of its transient optical constants and the ultrafast surface plasmon-polariton excitation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Danilov, P. A.; Ionin, A. A.; Kudryashov, S. I., E-mail: sikudr@sci.lebedev.ru; Makarov, S. V.; Rudenko, A. A. [Lebedev Physical Institute (Russian Federation); Saltuganov, P. N. [Moscow Institute of Physics and Technology (State University) (Russian Federation); Seleznev, L. V.; Yurovskikh, V. I.; Zayarny, D. A. [Lebedev Physical Institute (Russian Federation); Apostolova, T. [Bulgarian Academy of Sciences, Institute for Nuclear Research and Nuclear Energetics (Bulgaria)

    2015-06-15

    Ultrafast intense photoexcitation of a silicon surface is complementarily studied experimentally and theoretically, with its prompt optical dielectric function obtained by means of time-resolved optical reflection microscopy and the underlying electron-hole plasma dynamics modeled numerically, using a quantum kinetic approach. The corresponding transient surface plasmon-polariton (SPP) dispersion curves of the photo-excited material were simulated as a function of the electron-hole plasma density, using the derived optical dielectric function model, and directly mapped at several laser photon energies, measuring spatial periods of the corresponding SPP-mediated surface relief nanogratings. The unusual spectral dynamics of the surface plasmon resonance, initially increasing with the increase in the electron-hole plasma density but damped at high interband absorption losses induced by the high-density electron-hole plasma through instantaneous bandgap renormalization, was envisioned through the multi-color mapping.

  20. Structural, optical and electrical properties of europium picrate tetraethylene glycol complex as emissive material for OLED

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kusrini, Eny, E-mail: ekusrini@che.ui.ac.id [Department of Chemical Engineering, Faculty of Engineering, Universitas Indonesia, 16424 Depok (Indonesia); Saleh, Muhammad I.; Adnan, Rohana [School of Chemical Sciences, Universiti Sains Malaysia, 11800 Penang (Malaysia); Yulizar, Yoki [Department of Chemistry, Faculty of Mathematics and Natural Sciences, Universitas Indonesia, 16424 Depok (Indonesia); Sha Shiong, Ng; Fun, H.K. [School of Physics, Universiti Sains Malaysia, 11800 Penang (Malaysia); Adhha Abdullah, M.A.; Mamat, Mazidah [Department of Chemical Sciences, Faculty of Science and Technology, Universiti Malaysia Terengganu, 21030 Kuala Terengganu, Terengganu Darul Iman (Malaysia); Za' aba, N.K.; Abd. Majid, W.H. [Solid State Research Laboratory, Department of Physics, Universiti Malaya, 50603 Kuala Lumpur (Malaysia)

    2012-01-15

    A new europium complex [Eu(Pic){sub 2}(H{sub 2}O)(EO4)](Pic).0.75H{sub 2}O was synthesized and used as the emission material for the single layer device structure of ITO/EO4-Eu-Pic/Al, using a spin-coating technique. Study on the optical properties of the [Eu(Pic){sub 2}(H{sub 2}O)(EO4)](Pic).0.75H{sub 2}O complex where EO4=tetraethylene glycol and Pic=picrate anion, had to be undertaken before being applicable to the study of an organic light emitting diode (OLED). The electrical property of an OLED using current-voltage (I-V) measurement was also studied. In complex, the Eu(III) ion was coordinated with the EO4 ligand as a pentadentate mode, one water molecule, and with two Pic anions as bidentate and monodentate modes, forming a nine-coordination number. The photoluminescence (PL) spectra of the crystalline complex in the solid state and its thin film showed a hypersensitive peak at 613.5-614.9 nm that assigned to the {sup 5}D{sub 0}{yields}{sup 7}F{sub 2} transition. A narrow band emission from the thin film EO4-Eu-Pic was obtained. The typical semiconductor I-V curve of device ITO/EO4-Eu-Pic/Al showed the threshold and turn on voltages at 1.08 and 4.6 V, respectively. The energy transfer process from the ligand to the Eu(III) ion was discussed by investigating the excitation and PL characteristics. Effect of the picrate anion on the device performance was also studied. - Highlights: > The [Eu(Pic){sub 2}(H{sub 2}O)(EO4)](Pic).0.75(H{sub 2}O) is crystallized in triclinic with space group P-1. > The complex is applied as a emissive center in single layer device structure of ITO/EO4-Eu-Pic/Al. > The complex displays a red luminescence in both the crystalline complex and its thin film state. > The low turn on voltage of the device (4.6 V), indicating that this material is suitable for OLED. > The roughness and morphology of the thin film affects luminance and electrical properties of OLED.

  1. View from... JSAP Spring Meeting: A marriage of materials and optics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Horiuchi, Noriaki

    2017-04-01

    A laser-annealing technique for increasing the dopant concentration in semiconductors, the creation of a glass with second-order optical nonlinearity and the realization of optical topological insulators were highlights at the Japan Society of Applied Physics Spring Meeting.

  2. Embedded optical fiber sensors for continuous health monitoring of civil engineering structures in composite materials

    OpenAIRE

    Chapeleau, Xavier; Drissi Habti, Monssef; TOMIYAMA, Tomonori

    2010-01-01

    Embedding optical fibre-based sensors into composite structures in civil engineering is a promising alternative for structural health monitoring (SHM). This article is a review of the main sensing techniques based on optical fibres. Localized and multiplexed measurements as well as distributed measurements techniques are presented.

  3. Special optical fiber design to reduce reflection peak distortion of a FBG embedded in inhomogeneous material

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Cheng, L.K.; Toet, P.M.; Vreugd, J. de; Nieuwland, R.A.; Tseb, M.-L.V.; Tamb, H.

    2014-01-01

    During the last decades, the use of optical fiber for sensing applications has gained increasing acceptance because of its unique properties of being intrinsically safe, unsusceptible to EMI, potentially lightweight and having a large operational temperature range. Among the different Fiber Optic

  4. Analyses of significant features of L-Prolinium Picrate single crystal: An excellent material for non linear optical applications

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Thukral, Kanika [Academy of Scientific and Innovative Research, CSIR- National Physical Laboratory, New Delhi, 110012 (India); CSIR-National Physical Laboratory, Dr. K.S. Krishnan Road, New Delhi, 110 012 (India); Vijayan, N., E-mail: nvijayan@nplindia.org [CSIR-National Physical Laboratory, Dr. K.S. Krishnan Road, New Delhi, 110 012 (India); Vij, Mahak [CSIR-National Physical Laboratory, Dr. K.S. Krishnan Road, New Delhi, 110 012 (India); Nagaraja, C.M. [Department of Chemistry, Indian Institute of Technology Ropar, Rupnagar, 140001, Punjab (India); Jayaramakrishnan, V. [Centro De Investigations En Optica, Loma del Bosque 115, Colonia Lomas del Campestre, León, Guanajuato, Código Postal, 37150 (Mexico); Jayalakshmy, M.S. [International and Inter University Centre for Nanoscience and Nanotechnology, Mahatma Gandhi University, Kottayam, Kerala, 686560 (India); Kant, Rajni [Department of Physics and Electronics, University of Jammu, Jammu Tawi, 180006 (India)

    2017-06-15

    Today the fundamental aspect of the researchers is to explore maximum physical properties of the material for device fabrication. In the present article, single crystal X-ray diffraction has been carried out to verify the formation of the synthesized compound. In addition to that, powder X-ray diffraction has been performed to obtain diffraction pattern of L-Prolinium Picrate single crystal. The strain present inside the single crystal was measured using Hall-Williamson equation from PXRD measurements. The dark current and photon current was obtained from photoconductivity technique whose plot depicted that the sample was negative photoconducting material. Optical homogeneity of the single crystal was analyzed using birefringence technique. Its resistance towards Nd: YAG laser was scrutinized for L-Prolinium Picrate single crystal by applying 1 pulse per second. Different thermal parameters like thermal conductivity, thermal diffusivity, thermal effusivity and specific heat were computed using photo-pyroelectric technique. Solid state parameters were calculated from Clausius Mossotti relation by taking structural information of the title compound. Also, optical parameters like refractive index, reflectance etc were calculated through UV–Vis–NIR analysis. - Highlights: • An optically transparent L-Prolinium Picrate single crystal was harvested from slow evaporation solution growth technique. • The compound shows negative photoconducting nature. • Its optical homogeneity was analyzed using birefringence. • Single shot of laser was applied to sample to measure laser damage threshold value. • The thermal parameters were computed from Photopyroelectric technique.

  5. Non-Linear Optical Phenomena in Detecting Materials as a Possibility for Fast Timing in Detectors of Ionizing Radiation

    CERN Document Server

    Korjik, M. V.; Buganov, O.; Fedorov, A. A.; Emelianchik, I.; Griesmayer, E.; Mechinsky, V.; Nargelas, S.; Sidletskiy, O.; Tamulaitis, G.; Tikhomirov, S. N.; Vaitkevicius, A.

    2016-01-01

    The time resolution of the detectors currently in use is limited by 50-70 ps due to the spontaneous processes involved in the development of the response signal, which forms after the relaxation of carriers generated during the interaction. In this study, we investigate the feasibility of exploiting sub-picosecond phenomena occurring after the interaction of scintillator material with ionizing radiation by probing the material with ultra-short laser pulses. One of the phenomena is the elastic polarization due to the local lattice distortion caused by the displacement of electrons and holes generated by ionization. The key feature of the elastic polarization is its short response time, which makes it prospective for using as an optically detectable time mark. The nonlinear optical absorption of femtosecond light pulses of appropriate wavelength is demonstrated to be a prospective tool to form the mark. This study was aimed at searching for inorganic crystalline media combining scintillation properties and non-...

  6. Quantum and Classical Optics of Plasmonic Systems: 3D/2D Materials and Photonic Topological Insulators

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hassani Gangaraj, Seyyed Ali

    waveguide edges can lead to a significant increase in entanglement compared to the case of the emitter coupled to an infinite plasmonic waveguide. Moreover, even for the infinite-length case, discontinuities in the waveguides do not always play a detrimental role, to be more specific, an increase in entanglement compared to the unperturbed waveguides can be achieved by introducing coupling slots (engineered perturbations) into the structure. In addition to 3D environments, two dimensional (2D) materials are of intense interest due to their extraordinary capabilities to manipulate reflection and transmission characteristics, and beam-forming. Some notable examples of 2D layered crystals include graphene, black phosphorus (BP) and boron nitride. Graphene in particular has received considerable attention as a promising 2D surface for many applications relating to its integrability and electronic tune-ability. Black phosphorus is also a layered material that has recently been exfoliated into its multilayers, showing good electrical transport properties and promising optical charactristics. Most of the previous studies of the electromagnetic response of 2D surfaces and metallic surface plasmons have considered isotropic structures with omnidirectional plasmonic surface wave propagation on the plane of these materials. Such an omnidirectional surface wave propagation does not allow for launching energy from electromagnetic source to a specific target on the surface, which is a desirable characteristic. However, an appropriate structured anisotropic surface can provide such a capability, such as an array of graphene strips. In addition, by tuning of the graphene doping it is possible to have a hyperbolic surface response. Working in this regime of surface conductivity, it is possible to launch SPPs along a specific direction, which is tunable via doping of the graphene. In this work, the electromagnetic response of anisotropic 2D surfaces has been investigated based on the

  7. Implants in the hand; Implantate der Hand

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wanivenhaus, A. [Medizinische Universitaet, Universitaetsklinik fuer Orthopaedie, Wien (Austria)

    2006-09-15

    Increasingly, implants in the region of hand joints and the wrist represent an alternative for the treatment of post-traumatic, inflamed, or degenerative joint damage. The diversity of hand functions also results in varied solutions, which are effective in their stability, mobility, and distraction. Different materials are necessary for this, and they require subtile radiological control. The native X-ray represents the substantial method to observe migration of the implants. Each interface between titanium, ceramic, zirconium, pyrocarbon, and silicon to the bone has to be assessed differently in order to obtain a relevant statement. The finger joints and to a limited extent the wrist represent the artificial joints with limited alternative therapy. Other implants in the hand should only be applied after strict indication and patient compliance, as arthrodesis and resection arthroplasty have shown very good long-term results. (orig.) [German] Implantate im Bereich der Gelenke der Hand und des Handgelenks stellen zunehmend Alternativen bei der Versorgung posttraumatischer, entzuendlicher oder degenerativer Gelenkschaeden dar. Die Vielfalt der Handfunktionen fuehrt auch zu unterschiedlichen Loesungen, die durch Stabilitaet, Mobilitaet und Distraktion wirksam werden. Dafuer sind unterschiedliche Materialien erforderlich, die eine subtile radiologische Kontrolle erfordern. Das Nativroentgen stellt das wesentlichste Verfahren zur Verlaufsbeobachtung von Implantaten dar. Das Interface zwischen Titan, Keramik, Zirkonium, Pyrokarbon und Silikon zum Knochen muss unterschiedlich bewertet werden, um relevante Aussagen treffen zu koennen. Die Fingergelenke und in begrenztem Ausmass auch das Handgelenk stellen Kunstgelenke mit geringen Alternativtherapiemoeglichkeiten dar. Die uebrigen Implantate der Hand sollten nur bei strenger Indikationsstellung und hoher Patientencompliance Anwendung finden, da Arthrodese oder Resektionsarthroplastik gute Langzeitresultate aufweisen. (orig.)

  8. Nonlinear optics in germanium mid-infrared fiber material: Detuning oscillations in femtosecond mid-infrared spectroscopy

    OpenAIRE

    Ordu, M.; Guo, J.; G. Ng Pack; Shah, P.; S. Ramachandran; Hong, M K; Ziegler, L. D.; S. N. Basu; Erramilli, S

    2017-01-01

    Germanium optical fibers hold great promise in extending semiconductor photonics into the fundamentally important mid-infrared region of the electromagnetic spectrum. The demonstration of nonlinear response in fabricated Ge fiber samples is a key step in the development of mid-infrared fiber materials. Here we report the observation of detuning oscillations in a germanium fiber in the mid-infrared region using femtosecond dispersed pump-probe spectroscopy. Detuning oscillations are observed i...

  9. Temperature-dependent optical properties of Cd(1-x),Zn(x),Te substitute material

    Science.gov (United States)

    Quijada, Manuel A.; Russell, Anne Marie; Hill, Robert J.

    2005-01-01

    In this study, we report cryogenic optical properties of Cd(l-x), Zn(x), Te wafers that are used as substrate seed layers in the manufacturing of HgCdTe focal-plane array detectors. These studies are motivated by the fact that the substrate optical properties influence the overall detector performance. The studies consist of measuring the substrate frequency dependent transmittance T(W) and reflectance R(W) above and below the optical band-gap in the UV/Visible and infrared frequency ranges, and with temperature variation of the sample from 5 to 300 K. Determination of the optical absorption from these measurements show that the optical absorption energy gap near 1.6 eV shows a substantial increase as the temperature is reduced from 300 to 5 K. Furthermore, we observe the presence of infrared-active optical phonons whose peak frequency shifts as the temperature of the sample is varied over the measured temperature range. The theoretical frequency dependent optical conductivity, with allowance for redistribution of spectral weight among the interband transition charge carriers, will be discussed.

  10. From the surface to volume: concepts for the next generation of optical-holographic data-storage materials.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bruder, Friedrich-Karl; Hagen, Rainer; Rölle, Thomas; Weiser, Marc-Stephan; Fäcke, Thomas

    2011-05-09

    Optical data storage has had a major impact on daily life since its introduction to the market in 1982. Compact discs (CDs), digital versatile discs (DVDs), and Blu-ray discs (BDs) are universal data-storage formats with the advantage that the reading and writing of the digital data does not require contact and is therefore wear-free. These formats allow convenient and fast data access, high transfer rates, and electricity-free data storage with low overall archiving costs. The driving force for development in this area is the constant need for increased data-storage capacity and transfer rate. The use of holographic principles for optical data storage is an elegant way to increase the storage capacity and the transfer rate, because by this technique the data can be stored in the volume of the storage material and, moreover, it can be optically processed in parallel. This Review describes the fundamental requirements for holographic data-storage materials and compares the general concepts for the materials used. An overview of the performance of current read-write devices shows how far holographic data storage has already been developed. Copyright © 2011 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  11. Robotically enhanced rubber hand illusion.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arata, Jumpei; Hattori, Masashi; Ichikawa, Shohei; Sakaguchi, Masamichi

    2014-01-01

    The rubber hand illusion is a well-known multisensory illusion. In brief, watching a rubber hand being stroked by a paintbrush while one's own unseen hand is synchronously stroked causes the rubber hand to be attributed to one's own body and to "feel like it's my hand." The rubber hand illusion is thought to be triggered by the synchronized tactile stimulation of both the subject's hand and the fake hand. To extend the conventional rubber hand illusion, we introduce robotic technology in the form of a master-slave telemanipulator. The developed one degree-of-freedom master-slave system consists of an exoskeleton master equipped with an optical encoder that is worn on the subject's index finger and a motor-actuated index finger on the rubber hand, which allows the subject to perform unilateral telemanipulation. The moving rubber hand illusion has been studied by several researchers in the past with mechanically connected rigs between the subject's body and the fake limb. The robotic instruments let us investigate the moving rubber hand illusion with less constraints, thus behaving closer to the classic rubber hand illusion. In addition, the temporal delay between the body and the fake limb can be precisely manipulated. The experimental results revealed that the robotic instruments significantly enhance the rubber hand illusion. The time delay is significantly correlated with the effect of the multisensory illusion, and the effect significantly decreased at time delays over 100 ms. These findings can potentially contribute to the investigations of neural mechanisms in the field of neuroscience and of master-slave systems in the field of robotics.

  12. Laser Induced Damage in Optical Materials: 1981. Symposium on Optical Materials for High Power Lasers (13th). Held in Boulder, Colorado on 17-18 November 1981

    Science.gov (United States)

    1983-09-01

    investigate laser-damage resistance of polymer materials, which can have great peculiarities due to their specific structure and thermoelastic ...of the dye solutlon and coolant. Three heat exchangers - two which involve either the dye solution or coolant with the refrigerant and one which...solution/coolant tempera­ ture differential. Regulation of the temperatures and flows of the dye solution, coolant, and refrigerant allows maintenance

  13. Handbook of coherent domain optical methods biomedical diagnostics, environmental and material science

    CERN Document Server

    2004-01-01

    For the first time in one set of books, coherent-domain optical methods are discussed in the framework of various applications, which are characterized by a strong light scattering. A few chapters describe basic research containing the updated results on coherent and polarized light non-destructive interactions with a scattering medium, in particular, diffraction, interference, and speckle formation at multiple scattering. These chapters allow for understanding coherent-domain diagnostic techniques presented in later chapters. A large portion of Volume I is dedicated to analysis of various aspects of optical coherence tomography (OCT) - a very new and growing field of coherent optics. Two chapters on laser scanning confocal microscopy give insight to recent extraordinary results on in vivo imaging and compare the possibilities and achievements of confocol, excitation multiphoton, and OCT microscopy. This two volume reference contains descriptions of holography, interferometry and optical heterodyning techniqu...

  14. Formalism of optical coherence and polarization based on material media states

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kuntman, Ertan; Kuntman, M. Ali; Sancho-Parramon, Jordi; Arteaga, Oriol

    2017-06-01

    The fluctuations or disordered motion of the electromagnetic fields are described by statistical properties rather than instantaneous values. This statistical description of the optical fields is underlying in the Stokes-Mueller formalism that applies to measurable intensities. However, the fundamental concept of optical coherence, which is assessed by the ability of waves to interfere, is not treatable by this formalism because it omits the global phase. In this work we show that using an analogy between deterministic matrix states associated with optical media and quantum mechanical wave functions, it is possible to construct a general formalism that accounts for the additional terms resulting from the coherency effects that average out for incoherent treatments. This method generalizes further the concept of coherent superposition to describe how deterministic states of optical media can superpose to generate another deterministic media state. Our formalism is used to study the combined polarimetric response of interfering plasmonic nanoantennas.

  15. Fabrication of PMMA doped with griseofulvin material and its optical rotatory dispersion

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pan, Xue-Feng; Tao, Wei-Dong; Yan, Fei-Biao; Bai, Gui-Ru

    2006-01-01

    Chiral molecule C17H17CIO6 was incorporated in MMA by sol-gel process and its optical polarization response was measured. The optical rotatory dispersion was measured with self-manufactured apparatus. The results show that the maximum and minimum rotation angles of the chiral PMMA are 69° at the wavelength of 450 nm and 17° at the wavelength of 700 nm, respectively. The experimental results accord with the simulation results by the Boltzmann formula.

  16. Optical constants of materials in the EUV/soft x-ray region for multilayer mirror applications

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Soufli, Regina [Univ. of California, Berkeley, CA (United States)

    1997-12-01

    The response of a given material to an incident electromagnetic wave is described by the energy dependent complex index of refraction n = 1 - δ + iβ. In the extreme ultraviolet (EUV)/soft x-ray spectral region, the need for accurate determination of n is driven by activity in areas such as synchrotron based research, EUV/x-ray lithography, x-ray astronomy and plasma applications. Knowledge of the refractive index is essential for the design of the optical components of instruments used in experiments and applications. Moreover, measured values of n may be used to evaluate solid state models for the optical behavior of materials. The refractive index n of Si, Mo and Be is investigated in the EUV/soft x-ray region. In the case of Si, angle dependent reflectance measurements are performed in the energy range 50-180 eV. The optical constants δ, β are both determined by fitting to the Fresnel equations. The results of this method are compared to the values in the 1993 atomic tables. Photoabsorption measurements for the optical constants of Mo are performed on C/Mo/C foils, in the energy range 60-930 eV. Photoabsorption measurements on Be thin films supported on silicon nitride membranes are performed, and the results are applied in the determination of the absorption coefficient of Be in the energy region 111.5-250 eV. The new results for Si and Mo are applied to the calculation of normal incidence reflectivities of Mo/Si and Mo/Be multilayer mirrors. These calculations show the importance of accurate knowledge of δ and β in the prediction and modeling of the performance of multilayer optics.

  17. Technical Readiness and Gaps Analysis of Commercial Optical Materials and Measurement Systems for Advanced Small Modular Reactors

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Anheier, Norman C.; Suter, Jonathan D.; Qiao, Hong (Amy); Andersen, Eric S.; Berglin, Eric J.; Bliss, Mary; Cannon, Bret D.; Devanathan, Ramaswami; Mendoza, Albert; Sheen, David M.

    2013-08-06

    This report intends to support Department of Energy’s Office of Nuclear Energy (DOE-NE) Nuclear Energy Research and Development Roadmap and industry stakeholders by evaluating optical-based instrumentation and control (I&C) concepts for advanced small modular reactor (AdvSMR) applications. These advanced designs will require innovative thinking in terms of engineering approaches, materials integration, and I&C concepts to realize their eventual viability and deployability. The primary goals of this report include: 1. Establish preliminary I&C needs, performance requirements, and possible gaps for AdvSMR designs based on best available published design data. 2. Document commercial off-the-shelf (COTS) optical sensors, components, and materials in terms of their technical readiness to support essential AdvSMR in-vessel I&C systems. 3. Identify technology gaps by comparing the in-vessel monitoring requirements and environmental constraints to COTS optical sensor and materials performance specifications. 4. Outline a future research, development, and demonstration (RD&D) program plan that addresses these gaps and develops optical-based I&C systems that enhance the viability of future AdvSMR designs. The development of clean, affordable, safe, and proliferation-resistant nuclear power is a key goal that is documented in the Nuclear Energy Research and Development Roadmap. This roadmap outlines RD&D activities intended to overcome technical, economic, and other barriers, which currently limit advances in nuclear energy. These activities will ensure that nuclear energy remains a viable component to this nation’s energy security.

  18. Simulation on photoacoustic conversion efficiency of optical fiber-based ultrasound generator using different absorbing film materials

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sun, Kai; Wu, Nan; Tian, Ye; Wang, Xingwei

    2011-04-01

    The low energy-conversion efficiency in photoacoustic generation is the most critical hurdle preventing its wide applications. In recent studies, it was found that the selection of the energy-absorbing layer material and design of the acoustic generator structure both determine the photoacoustic conversion efficiency. The selection of the absorbing material is based on its optical, thermal, and mechanical properties. In this research, we calculated and compared the conversion efficiencies of six different absorbing film materials: bulk aluminum, bulk gold, graphite foil, graphite powder-resin mixture, gold nanospheres, and gold nanorods. The calculations were carried out by a finite element modeling (FEM) software, COMSOL Multiphysics. A 2D-axisymmetric model in COMSOL was built up to simulate a 3-layer structure: optical fiber tip, light absorbing film, and surrounding water. Three equations governed the thermo-elastic generation of ultrasonic waves: the heat conduction, thermal expansion and acoustic wave equations. In "thick-film" generation regime, majority of the laser energy is absorbed by the film and converted to high-frequency film vibration, and the vibration excites the ultrasound wave in the adjacent water, while the water would not be heated directly by the laser. From the results of this FEM simulation, the acoustic signal generated by gold nanosphere (or nanorod) film is over two times stronger than that generated by graphite powder-resin film of the same thickness. This simulation provides a strong support to the absorbing material selection for our proposed fiber ultrasound generator.

  19. Conformal Coating of a Phase Change Material on Ordered Plasmonic Nanorod Arrays for Broadband All-Optical Switching.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guo, Peijun; Weimer, Matthew S; Emery, Jonathan D; Diroll, Benjamin T; Chen, Xinqi; Hock, Adam S; Chang, Robert P H; Martinson, Alex B F; Schaller, Richard D

    2017-01-24

    Actively tunable optical transmission through artificial metamaterials holds great promise for next-generation nanophotonic devices and metasurfaces. Plasmonic nanostructures and phase change materials have been extensively studied to this end due to their respective strong interactions with light and tunable dielectric constants under external stimuli. Seamlessly integrating plasmonic components with phase change materials, as demonstrated in the present work, can facilitate phase change by plasmonically enabled light confinement and meanwhile make use of the high sensitivity of plasmon resonances to the variation of dielectric constant associated with the phase change. The hybrid platform here is composed of plasmonic indium-tin-oxide nanorod arrays (ITO-NRAs) conformally coated with an ultrathin layer of a prototypical phase change material, vanadium dioxide (VO2), which enables all-optical modulation of the infrared as well as the visible spectral ranges. The interplay between the intrinsic plasmonic nonlinearity of ITO-NRAs and the phase transition induced permittivity change of VO2 gives rise to spectral and temporal responses that cannot be achieved with individual material components alone.

  20. Cell-to-module optical loss/gain analysis for various photovoltaic module materials through systematic characterization

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hsian Saw, Min; Khoo, Yong Sheng; Singh, Jai Prakash; Wang, Yan

    2017-08-01

    Reducing levelized cost of electricity (LCOE) is important for solar photovoltaics to compete against other energy sources. Thus, the focus should not only be on improving the solar cell efficiency, but also on continuously reducing the losses (or achieving gain) in the cell-to-module process. This can be achieved by choosing the appropriate module material and design. This paper presents a detailed and systematic characterization of various photovoltaic (PV) module materials (encapsulants, tabbing ribbons, and backsheets) and an evaluation of their impact on the output power of silicon wafer-based PV modules. Various characterization tools/techniques, such as UV-vis (reflectance) measurement, external quantum efficiency (EQE) measurement and EQE line-scan are used. Based on the characterization results, we use module materials with the best-evaluated optical performance to build “optimized modules”. Compared to the standard mini-module, an optical gain of more than 5% is achievable for the “optimized module” with selected module materials.

  1. Conformal Coating of a Phase Change Material on Ordered Plasmonic Nanorod Arrays for Broadband All-Optical Switching

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Guo, Peijun; Weimer, Matthew S. [Department; Emery, Jonathan D.; Diroll, Benjamin T.; Chen, Xinqi; Hock, Adam S. [Department; Chang, Robert P. H.; Martinson, Alex B. F.; Schaller, Richard D.

    2016-12-19

    Actively tunable optical transmission through artificial metamaterials holds great promise for next-generation nanophotonic devices and metasurfaces. Plasmonic nanostructures and phase change materials have been extensively studied to this end due to their respective strong interactions with light and tunable dielectric constants under external stimuli. Seamlessly integrating plasmonic components with phase change materials, as demonstrated in the present work, can facilitate phase change by plasmonically enabled light confinement and meanwhile make use of the high sensitivity of plasmon resonances to the variation of dielectric constant associated with the phase change. The hybrid platform here is composed of plasmonic indium tin-oxide nanorod arrays (ITO-NRAs) conformally coated with an ultrathin layer of a prototypical phase change material, vanadium dioxide (VO2), which enables all-optical modulation of the infrared as well as the visible spectral ranges. The interplay between the intrinsic plasmonic nonlinearity of ITO-NRAs and the phase transition induced permittivity change of VO2 gives rise to spectral and temporal responses that cannot be achieved with individual material components alone.

  2. Optical Fiber Chemical Sensor with Sol-Gel Derived Refractive Material as Transducer for High Temperature Gas Sensing in Clean Coal Technology

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Shiquan Tao

    2006-12-31

    The chemistry of sol-gel derived silica and refractive metal oxide has been systematically studied. Sol-gel processes have been developed for preparing porous silica and semiconductor metal oxide materials. Micelle/reversed micelle techniques have been developed for preparing nanometer sized semiconductor metal oxides and noble metal particles. Techniques for doping metal ions, metal oxides and nanosized metal particles into porous sol-gel material have also been developed. Optical properties of sol-gel derived materials in ambient and high temperature gases have been studied by using fiber optic spectroscopic techniques, such as fiber optic ultraviolet/visible absorption spectrometry, fiber optic near infrared absorption spectrometry and fiber optic fluorescence spectrometry. Fiber optic spectrometric techniques have been developed for investigating the optical properties of these sol-gel derived materials prepared as porous optical fibers or as coatings on the surface of silica optical fibers. Optical and electron microscopic techniques have been used to observe the microstructure, such as pore size, pore shape, sensing agent distribution, of sol-gel derived material, as well as the size and morphology of nanometer metal particle doped in sol-gel derived porous silica, the nature of coating of sol-gel derived materials on silica optical fiber surface. In addition, the chemical reactions of metal ion, nanostructured semiconductor metal oxides and nanometer sized metal particles with gas components at room temperature and high temperatures have also been investigated with fiber optic spectrometric methods. Three classes of fiber optic sensors have been developed based on the thorough investigation of sol-gel chemistry and sol-gel derived materials. The first group of fiber optic sensors uses porous silica optical fibers doped with metal ions or metal oxide as transducers for sensing trace NH{sub 3} and H{sub 2}S in high temperature gas samples. The second group of

  3. Optical cell for combinatorial in situ Raman spectroscopic measurements of hydrogen storage materials at high pressures and temperatures.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hattrick-Simpers, Jason R; Hurst, Wilbur S; Srinivasan, Sesha S; Maslar, James E

    2011-03-01

    An optical cell is described for high-throughput backscattering Raman spectroscopic measurements of hydrogen storage materials at pressures up to 10 MPa and temperatures up to 823 K. High throughput is obtained by employing a 60 mm diameter × 9 mm thick sapphire window, with a corresponding 50 mm diameter unobstructed optical aperture. To reproducibly seal this relatively large window to the cell body at elevated temperatures and pressures, a gold o-ring is employed. The sample holder-to-window distance is adjustable, making this cell design compatible with optical measurement systems incorporating lenses of significantly different focal lengths, e.g., microscope objectives and single element lenses. For combinatorial investigations, up to 19 individual powder samples can be loaded into the optical cell at one time. This cell design is also compatible with thin-film samples. To demonstrate the capabilities of the cell, in situ measurements of the Ca(BH(4))(2) and nano-LiBH(4)-LiNH(2)-MgH(2) hydrogen storage systems at elevated temperatures and pressures are reported.

  4. Mechanically stacked 1-nm-thick carbon nanosheets: ultrathin layered materials with tunable optical, chemical, and electrical properties.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nottbohm, Christoph T; Turchanin, Andrey; Beyer, André; Stosch, Rainer; Gölzhäuser, Armin

    2011-04-04

    Carbon nanosheets are mechanically stable, free-standing two-dimensional materials with a thickness of ≈1 nm and well defined physical and chemical properties. They are made by radiation-induced cross-linking of aromatic self-assembled monolayers. Herein, a route is presented to the scalable fabrication of multilayer nanosheets with tunable electrical, optical, and chemical properties on insulating substrates. Stacks of up to five nanosheets with sizes of ≈1 cm(2) on oxidized silicon are studied. Their optical characteristics are investigated by visual inspection, optical microscopy, UV-vis reflection spectroscopy, and model calculations. Their chemical composition is studied by X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy. The multilayer samples are then annealed in an ultrahigh vacuum at various temperatures up to 1100 K. A subsequent investigation by Raman, X-ray photoelectron, and UV-vis reflection spectroscopy, as well as by electrical four-point probe measurements, demonstrates that the layered nanosheets transform into nanocrystalline graphene. This structural and chemical transformation is accompanied by changes in the optical properties and electrical conductivity and opens up a new path for the fabrication of ultrathin functional conductive coatings. Copyright © 2011 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  5. Optical cell for combinatorial in situ Raman spectroscopic measurements of hydrogen storage materials at high pressures and temperatures

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hattrick-Simpers, Jason R.; Hurst, Wilbur S.; Srinivasan, Sesha S.; Maslar, James E.

    2011-03-01

    An optical cell is described for high-throughput backscattering Raman spectroscopic measurements of hydrogen storage materials at pressures up to 10 MPa and temperatures up to 823 K. High throughput is obtained by employing a 60 mm diameter × 9 mm thick sapphire window, with a corresponding 50 mm diameter unobstructed optical aperture. To reproducibly seal this relatively large window to the cell body at elevated temperatures and pressures, a gold o-ring is employed. The sample holder-to-window distance is adjustable, making this cell design compatible with optical measurement systems incorporating lenses of significantly different focal lengths, e.g., microscope objectives and single element lenses. For combinatorial investigations, up to 19 individual powder samples can be loaded into the optical cell at one time. This cell design is also compatible with thin-film samples. To demonstrate the capabilities of the cell, in situ measurements of the Ca(BH4)2 and nano-LiBH4-LiNH2-MgH2 hydrogen storage systems at elevated temperatures and pressures are reported.

  6. Technical Progress Report for "Optical and Electrical Properties of III-Nitrides and Related Materials"

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jiang, Hongxing

    2008-10-31

    Investigations have been conducted focused on the fundamental material properties of AIN and high AI-content AIGaN alloys and further developed MOCVD growth technologies for obtaining these materials with improved crystalline quality and conductivities.

  7. Reversible optical switching of highly confined phonon-polaritons with an ultrathin phase-change material.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Peining; Yang, Xiaosheng; Maß, Tobias W W; Hanss, Julian; Lewin, Martin; Michel, Ann-Katrin U; Wuttig, Matthias; Taubner, Thomas

    2016-08-01

    Surface phonon-polaritons (SPhPs), collective excitations of photons coupled with phonons in polar crystals, enable strong light-matter interaction and numerous infrared nanophotonic applications. However, as the lattice vibrations are determined by the crystal structure, the dynamical control of SPhPs remains challenging. Here, we realize the all-optical, non-volatile, and reversible switching of SPhPs by controlling the structural phase of a phase-change material (PCM) employed as a switchable dielectric environment. We experimentally demonstrate optical switching of an ultrathin PCM film (down to 7 nm, 70k0, k0 = 2π/λ) in quartz. Our proof of concept allows the preparation of all-dielectric, rewritable SPhP resonators without the need for complex fabrication methods. With optimized materials and parallelized optical addressing we foresee application potential for switchable infrared nanophotonic elements, for example, imaging elements such as superlenses and hyperlenses, as well as reconfigurable metasurfaces and sensors.

  8. Evaluation of the potential of optical switching materials for overheating protection of thermal solar collectors - Final report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Huot, G.; Roecker, Ch.; Schueler, A.

    2008-01-15

    Providing renewable energy for domestic hot water production and space heating, thermal solar collectors are more and more widespread, and users' expectations with respect to performance and service lifetime are rising continuously. The durability of solar collector materials is a critical point as the collector lifetime should be at least 25 years. Overheating and the resulting stagnation of the collector is a common problem with solar thermal systems. During stagnation high temperatures lead to water evaporation, glycol degradation, and stresses in the collector with increasing pressure. Special precautions are necessary to release this pressure; only mechanical solutions exist nowadays. Additionally, the occurring elevated temperatures lead to degradation of the materials that compose collectors: seals, insulation materials, and also the selective coating which is the most important part of the collector. A promising way to achieve active cooling of collectors without any mechanical device for pressure release or collector emptying is to produce a selective coating which is able to switch its optical properties at a critical temperature Tc. An optical switch allows changing the selective coating efficiency; the goal is to obtain a coating with a poor selectivity above Tc (decreasing of absorptance, increasing of emittance). Obtaining self-cooling collectors will allow increasing collector surfaces on facades and roofs in order to get high efficiency and hot water production during winter without inconvenient overheating during summer. Optical switching of materials can be obtained by many ways. Inorganic and organic thermochromic compounds, and organic thermotropic coatings are the main types of switching coatings that have been studied at EPFL-LESO-PB. Aging studies of organic thermochromic paints fabricated at EPFL suggest that the durability of organic compounds might not be sufficient for glazed metallic collectors. First samples of inorganic coatings

  9. The effects of doping on the structural, optical and electric properties of Zn4Sb3 material

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vaida Mirela

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available This paper presents results of the investigations regarding the obtaining and the characterization of the thermoelectric material Zn4Sb3 and (Zn1-xMx4Sb3 where M = Ag and / or Sn. Obtaining of the materials was realized by melting high purity precursors into an oven where were kept isothermally for 12 hours at 1173 K. X-ray diffraction and scanning electron microscopy were used for structural and morphologic characterization. Optical band gap for each sample was determined from absorbance spectra recorded in the visible range 240-400 nm at room temperature. Electrical resistivity as function of temperature was measured and the electrical band gap was estimated for each of the obtained samples. The semiconducting behavior of the materials was reflected by these.

  10. Multi-Spectral Materials: Hybridisation of Optical Plasmonic Filters and a Terahertz Metamaterial Absorber

    OpenAIRE

    Mccrindle, Iain J.H.; Grant, James; Drysdale, Timothy D.; Cumming, David R. S.

    2014-01-01

    Multi-spectral materials, using hybridised plasmonic and metamaterial structures, can simultaneously exhibit unique resonant phenomena over several decades of wavelengths. A multi-spectral material that combines a plasmonic colour filter array and a terahertz metamaterial absorber into a single material is a promising prospect for a coaxial multi-spectral imager operating in the visible, near IR, and terahertz wavebands.

  11. Coherent control of optical activity and optical anisotropy of thin metamaterials

    CERN Document Server

    Mousavi, Seyedmohammad A; Shi, Jinhui; Zheludev, Nikolay I

    2013-01-01

    The future fibre optic communications network will rely on photons as carriers of information, which may be stored in intensity, polarization or phase of light. However, processing of such optical information usually relies on electronics. Aiming to avoid the conversion between optical and electronic signals, modulation of light with light based on optical nonlinearity has become a major research field, but real integrated all-optical systems face thermal management and energy challenges. On the other hand, it has recently been demonstrated that the interaction of two coherent light beams on a thin, lossy, linear material can lead to large and ultrafast intensity modulation at arbitrarily low power resulting from coherent absorption. Here we demonstrate that birefringence and optical activity (linear and circular birefringence and dichroism) of functional materials can be coherently controlled by placing a thin material slab into a standing wave formed by the signal and control waves. Efficient control of the...

  12. High sensitivity optical biosensor based on polymer materials and using the Vernier effect.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Azuelos, Paul; Girault, Pauline; Lorrain, Nathalie; Poffo, Luiz; Guendouz, Mohammed; Thual, Monique; Lemaître, Jonathan; Pirasteh, Parastesh; Hardy, Isabelle; Charrier, Joël

    2017-11-27

    We demonstrate the fabrication of a Vernier effect SU8/PMATRIFE polymer optical biosensor with high homogeneous sensitivity using a standard photolithography process. The sensor is based on one micro-resonator embedded on each arm of a Mach-Zehnder interferometer. Measurements are based on the refractive index variation of the optical waveguide superstrate with different concentrations of glucose solutions. The sensitivity of the sensor has been measured as 17558 nm/RIU and the limit of detection has been estimated to 1.1.10-6 RIU.

  13. Growth of thin films of organic nonlinear optical materials by vapor growth processes - An overview and examination of shortfalls

    Science.gov (United States)

    Frazier, D. O.; Penn, B. G.; Witherow, W. K.; Paley, M. S.

    1991-01-01

    Research on the growth of second- and third-order nonlinear optical (NLO) organic thin film by vapor deposition is reviewed. Particular attention is given to the experimental methods for growing thin films of p-chlorophenylurea, diacetylenes, and phthalocyanines; characteristics of the resulting films; and approaches for advancing thin film technology. It is concluded that the growth of NLO thin films by vapor processes is a promising method for the fabrication of planar waveguides for nonlinear optical devices. Two innovative approaches are proposed including a method of controlling the input beam frequency to maximize nonlinear effects in thin films and single crystals, and the alternate approach to the molecular design of organic NLO materials by increasing the transition dipole moment between ground and excited states of the molecule.

  14. Nonlinear optics in germanium mid-infrared fiber material: Detuning oscillations in femtosecond mid-infrared spectroscopy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ordu, M.; Guo, J.; Ng Pack, G.; Shah, P.; Ramachandran, S.; Hong, M. K.; Ziegler, L. D.; Basu, S. N.; Erramilli, S.

    2017-09-01

    Germanium optical fibers hold great promise in extending semiconductor photonics into the fundamentally important mid-infrared region of the electromagnetic spectrum. The demonstration of nonlinear response in fabricated Ge fiber samples is a key step in the development of mid-infrared fiber materials. Here we report the observation of detuning oscillations in a germanium fiber in the mid-infrared region using femtosecond dispersed pump-probe spectroscopy. Detuning oscillations are observed in the frequency-resolved response when mid-infrared pump and probe pulses are overlapped in a fiber segment. The oscillations arise from the nonlinear frequency resolved nonlinear (χ(3)) response in the germanium semiconductor. Our work represents the first observation of coherent oscillations in the emerging field of germanium mid-infrared fiber optics.

  15. Nonlinear optics in germanium mid-infrared fiber material: Detuning oscillations in femtosecond mid-infrared spectroscopy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. Ordu

    2017-09-01

    Full Text Available Germanium optical fibers hold great promise in extending semiconductor photonics into the fundamentally important mid-infrared region of the electromagnetic spectrum. The demonstration of nonlinear response in fabricated Ge fiber samples is a key step in the development of mid-infrared fiber materials. Here we report the observation of detuning oscillations in a germanium fiber in the mid-infrared region using femtosecond dispersed pump-probe spectroscopy. Detuning oscillations are observed in the frequency-resolved response when mid-infrared pump and probe pulses are overlapped in a fiber segment. The oscillations arise from the nonlinear frequency resolved nonlinear (χ(3 response in the germanium semiconductor. Our work represents the first observation of coherent oscillations in the emerging field of germanium mid-infrared fiber optics.

  16. Correction: Conceptual design of tetraazaporphyrin- and subtetraazaporphyrin-based functional nanocarbon materials: electronic structures, topologies, optical properties, and methane storage capacities.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Belosludov, Rodion V; Rhoda, Hannah M; Zhdanov, Ravil K; Belosludov, Vladimir R; Kawazoe, Yoshiyuki; Nemykin, Victor N

    2017-08-02

    Correction for 'Conceptual design of tetraazaporphyrin- and subtetraazaporphyrin-based functional nanocarbon materials: electronic structures, topologies, optical properties, and methane storage capacities' by Rodion V. Belosludov et al., Phys. Chem. Chem. Phys., 2016, 18, 13503-13518.

  17. Optically-controlled long-term storage and release of thermal energy in phase-change materials.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Han, Grace G D; Li, Huashan; Grossman, Jeffrey C

    2017-11-13

    Thermal energy storage offers enormous potential for a wide range of energy technologies. Phase-change materials offer state-of-the-art thermal storage due to high latent heat. However, spontaneous heat loss from thermally charged phase-change materials to cooler surroundings occurs due to the absence of a significant energy barrier for the liquid-solid transition. This prevents control over the thermal storage, and developing effective methods to address this problem has remained an elusive goal. Herein, we report a combination of photo-switching dopants and organic phase-change materials as a way to introduce an activation energy barrier for phase-change materials solidification and to conserve thermal energy in the materials, allowing them to be triggered optically to release their stored latent heat. This approach enables the retention of thermal energy (about 200 J g(-1)) in the materials for at least 10 h at temperatures lower than the original crystallization point, unlocking opportunities for portable thermal energy storage systems.

  18. Dispersion-modulation by high material loss in microstructured polymer optical fibers

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Frosz, Michael Henoch

    2009-01-01

    The influence of strong loss peaks on the dispersion (through the Kramers-Kronig relations) of a nonlinear waveguide is investigated theore­ti­cally. It is found specifically for degenerate four-wave mixing in a poly(methyl methacrylate) microstructured polymer optical fiber that the loss...

  19. Determining the Optical Properties of Two-Layer Turbid Materials Based on Spatially Resolved Diffuse Reflectance

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hyperspectral imaging-based spatially resolved technique is useful for determining the optical properties of fruits and food products that are homogeneous. To better characterize fruit properties and quality attributes, it is necessary to consider fruit to be composed of two homogeneous layers, i.e....

  20. Characterization of optical properties and surface roughness profiles: The casimir force between real materials

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van Zwol, P.J.; Svetovoy, Vitaly; Palasantzas, G.

    2011-01-01

    The Lifshitz theory provides a method to calculate the Casimir force between two flat plates if the frequency dependent dielectric function of the plates is known. In reality any plate is rough and its optical properties are known only to some degree. For high precision experiments the plates must

  1. Using iridium films to compensate for piezo-electric materials processing stresses in adjustable x-ray optics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ames, A.; Bruni, R.; Cotroneo, V.; Johnson-Wilke, R.; Kester, T.; Reid, P.; Romaine, S.; Tolier-McKinstry, S.; Wilke, R. H. T.

    2015-09-01

    Adjustable X-ray optics represent a potential enabling technology for simultaneously achieving large effective area and high angular resolution for future X-ray Astronomy missions. The adjustable optics employ a bimorph mirror composed of a thin (1.5 μm) film of piezoelectric material deposited on the back of a 0.4 mm thick conical mirror segment. The application of localized electric fields in the piezoelectric material, normal to the mirror surface, result in localized deformations in mirror shape. Thus, mirror fabrication and mounting induced figure errors can be corrected, without the need for a massive reaction structure. With this approach, though, film stresses in the piezoelectric layer, resulting from deposition, crystallization, and differences in coefficient of thermal expansion, can distort the mirror. The large relative thickness of the piezoelectric material compared to the glass means that even 100MPa stresses can result in significant distortions. We have examined compensating for the piezoelectric processing related distortions by the deposition of controlled stress chromium/iridium films on the front surface of the mirror. We describe our experiments with tuning the product of the chromium/iridium film stress and film thickness to balance that resulting from the piezoelectric layer. We also evaluated the repeatability of this deposition process, and the robustness of the iridium coating.

  2. Improved Hand Hygiene Compliance is Associated with the Change of Perception toward Hand Hygiene among Medical Personnel

    OpenAIRE

    Lee, Seung Soon; Park, Se Jeong; Chung, Moon Joo; Lee, Ju Hee; Kang, Hyun Joo; Lee, Jeong-a; Kim, Yong Kyun

    2014-01-01

    Background Hand hygiene compliance has improved significantly through hand hygiene promotion programs that have included poster campaign, monitoring and performance feedback, and education with special attentions to perceived subjective norms. We investigated factors associated with improved hand hygiene compliance, focusing on whether the improvement of hand hygiene compliance is associated with changed perception toward hand hygiene among medical personnel. Materials and Methods Hand hygien...

  3. ICOM2012: 3rd International Conference on the Physics of Optical Materials and Devices (Belgrade, Serbia, 2-6 September 2012)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dramićanin, Miroslav D.; Antić, Željka; Viana, Bruno

    2013-11-01

    The 3rd International Conference on the Physics of Optical Materials and Devices (ICOM2012) was held in Belgrade (Serbia) from 2 to 6 September 2012 (figure 1). The conference was organized by the Vinča Institute of Nuclear Sciences, University of Belgrade (Serbia) and the Laboratoire de Chimie de la Matière Condensée de Paris (France), and supported by the Ministry of Education, Science and Technological Development of the Republic of Serbia and Optical Society of America. ICOM2012 was a follow-up to the two previous, successful ICOM conferences held in Herceg Novi in 2006 and 2009. The conference aimed at providing a forum for scientists in optical materials to debate on: • Luminescent materials and nanomaterials • Hybrid optical materials (organic/inorganic) • Characterization techniques of optical materials • Luminescence mechanisms and energy transfers • Theory and modeling of optical processes • Ultrafast-laser processing of materialsOptical sensors • Medical imaging • Advanced optical materials in photovoltaics and biophotonics • Photothermal and photoacoustic spectroscopy and phenomena The conference stressed the value of a fundamental scientific understanding of optical materials. A particular accent was put on wide band-gap materials in crystalline, glass and nanocrystalline forms. The applications mainly involved lasers, scintillators and phosphors. Rare earth and transition metal ions introduced as dopants in various hosts were considered, and their impact on the optical properties were detailed in several presentations. This volume contains selected contributions of speakers and participants of the ICOM2012 conference. The conference provided a unique opportunity for about 200 scientists from 32 countries to discuss recent progress in the field of optical materials. During the three and half days, 21 invited talks and 52 contributed lectures were given, with a special event in memory of our dear colleague Professor Dr Tsoltan

  4. Acridizinium-Substituted Dendrimers As a New Potential Rewritable Optical Data Storage Material for Blu-ray

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lohse, Brian; Vestberg, Robert; Ivanov, Mario T.

    2008-01-01

    . This provides an alternative chromophore for rewritable optical data storage media to the existing dye materials such as azo, cyanine, and phthalocyanine dyes for Blu-ray recording. The compound was initially tested in ethanol, showing good reversible properties and photoinduced degree of dimerization....... The (acridizinium) 12-bis-MPA deIldrimer was cast on a quartz plate, using poly(vinylpyrrolidone) as a matrix, in order to simulate conditions found in DVD discs for existing dyes. The film showed good transmission, stability, and mechanical properties. Through gray scale recording it may be possible to store more...

  5. Magneto-optic material selectivity in self-assembled BiFeO3-CoFe2O4 biferroic nanostructures

    Science.gov (United States)

    Postava, K.; Hrabovský, D.; Životský, O.; Pištora, J.; Dix, N.; Muralidharan, R.; Caicedo, J. M.; Sánchez, F.; Fontcuberta, J.

    2009-04-01

    Material selective sensitivity of a magneto-optical polar Kerr effect to magnetic contributions from different inclusions in self-organized magnetic nanostructures is presented. The method is supported by modeling of the magneto-optic response based on the effective medium approximation and by hysteresis loop measurement of the multiferroic BiFeO3-CoFe2O4 self-assembled nanostructure. Magneto-optic selective sensitivity is demonstrated and explained as an effect of different complex diagonal and off-diagonal permittivity tensor elements of two materials.

  6. Synthesis and spectral characterization of acetophenone thiosemicarbazone—A nonlinear optical material

    Science.gov (United States)

    Santhakumari, R.; Ramamurthi, K.; Vasuki, G.; Yamin, Bohari M.; Bhagavannarayana, G.

    2010-08-01

    Acetophenone thiosemicarbazone (APTSC) was synthesized. Solubility of APTSC was determined in ethanol and methanol at different temperatures. Single crystals were grown from ethanol by slow evaporation at room temperature. The grown crystal was subjected to FTIR, Laser-Raman and 1H NMR spectral analyses to confirm the synthesized compound. Thermal properties were investigated by thermogravimetric and differential thermal analyses. High-resolution X-ray diffractometry (HRXRD) was employed to evaluate the perfection of the grown crystal. The range and percentage of optical transmission was ascertained by recording UV-vis-NIR spectrum. The third order nonlinear optical parameters (nonlinear refractive index and nonlinear absorption coefficient) were derived by the Z-scan technique.

  7. Growth and characterization of an organometallic nonlinear optical material tri-allylthiourea cadmium chloride (ATCC)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Perumal, R. [Crystal Growth Centre, Anna University, Chennai 25 (India); Babu, S. Moorthy [Crystal Growth Centre, Anna University, Chennai 25 (India)], E-mail: smbabu_cgcau@yahoo.co.in

    2008-01-15

    ATCC was synthesized in deionized water by solvent evaporation method. Its (powder) SHG efficiency is higher than that of urea. Single crystals of the co-ordination complex nonlinear optical crystal tri-allylthiourea cadmium chloride (ATCC) with dimensions of 8 mm x 8 mm x 4 mm were grown from aqueous solution by slow evaporation as well as by slow cooling methods. The grown crystals were characterized with single crystal X-ray diffraction, Fourier transform infrared and Raman spectroscopy, UV-vis transmittance and absorbance studies, microhardness, thermal and etching studies to understand the physico-chemical properties of the as grown single crystal. Nonlinear optical study was also carried out to test the SHG property.

  8. Polar self-assembled thin films for non-linear optical materials

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, XiaoGuang; Swanson, Basil I.; Li, DeQuan

    2000-01-01

    The design and synthesis of a family of calix[4]arene-based nonlinear optical (NLO) chromophores are discussed. The calixarene chromophores are macrocyclic compounds consisting of four simple D-.pi.-A units bridged by methylene groups. These molecules were synthesized such that four D-.pi.-A units of the calix[4]arene were aligned along the same direction with the calixarene in a cone conformation. These nonlinear optical super-chromophores were subsequently fabricated into covalently bound self-assembled monolayers on the surfaces of fused silica and silicon. Spectroscopic second harmonic generation (SHG) measurements were carried out to determine the absolute value of the dominant element of the second-order nonlinear susceptibility, d.sub.33, and the average molecular alignment, .PSI.. A value of d.sub.33 =60 pm/V at a fundamental wavelength of 890 nm, and .PSI..about.36.degree. was found with respect to the surface normal.

  9. Multilayer Black Phosphorus as a Versatile Mid-Infrared Electro-optic Material.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lin, Charles; Grassi, Roberto; Low, Tony; Helmy, Amr S

    2016-03-09

    We investigate the electro-optic properties of black phosphorus (BP) thin films for optical modulation in the mid-infrared frequencies. Our calculation indicates that an applied out-of-plane electric field may lead to red-, blue-, or bidirectional shift in BP's absorption edge. This is due to the interplay between the field-induced quantum-confined Franz-Keldysh effect and the Pauli-blocked Burstein-Moss shift. The relative contribution of the two electro-absorption mechanisms depends on doping range, operating wavelength, and BP film thickness. For proof-of concept, simple modulator configuration with BP overlaid over a silicon nanowire is studied. Simulation results show that operating BP in the quantum-confined Franz-Keldysh regime can improve the maximal attainable absorption as well as power efficiency compared to its graphene counterpart.

  10. Relativistic plasma optics enabled by near-critical density nanostructured material

    CERN Document Server

    Bin, J H; Wang, H Y; Streeter, M J V; Kreuzer, C; Kiefer, D; Yeung, M; Cousens, S; Foster, P S; Dromey, B; Yan, X Q; Meyer-ter-Vehn, J; Zepf, M; Schreiber, J

    2014-01-01

    The nonlinear optical properties of a plasma due to the relativistic electron motion in an intense laser field are of fundamental importance for current research and the generation of brilliant laser-driven sources of particles and photons1-15. Yet, one of the most interesting regimes, where the frequency of the laser becomes resonant with the plasma, has remained experimentally hard to access. We overcome this limitation by utilizing ultrathin carbon nanotube foam16 (CNF) targets allowing the strong relativistic nonlinearities at near- critical density (NCD) to be exploited for the first time. We report on the experimental realization of relativistic plasma optics to spatio-temporally compress the laser pulse within a few micrometers of propagation, while maintaining about half its energy. We also apply the enhanced laser pulses to substantially improve the properties of an ion bunch accelerated from a secondary target. Our results provide first insights into the rich physics of NCD plasmas and the opportuni...

  11. Optical, photonic and optoelectronic properties of graphene, h-NB and their hybrid materials

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wang Jingang

    2017-06-01

    Full Text Available Because of the linear dispersion relation and the unique structure of graphene’s Dirac electrons, which can be tuned the ultra-wide band, this enables more applications in photonics, electronics and plasma optics. As a substrate, hexagonal boron nitride (h-BN has an atomic level flat surface without dangling bonds, a weak doping effect and a response in the far ultraviolet area. So the graphene/h-BN heterostructure is very attractive due to its unique optical electronics characteristics. Graphene and h-BN which are stacked in different ways could open the band gap of graphene, and form a moiré pattern for graphene on h-BN and the superlattice in the Brillouin zone, which makes it possible to build photoelectric devices.

  12. Optical, photonic and optoelectronic properties of graphene, h-NB and their hybrid materials

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Jingang; Ma, Fengcai; Liang, Wenjie; Wang, Rongming; Sun, Mengtao

    2017-06-01

    Because of the linear dispersion relation and the unique structure of graphene's Dirac electrons, which can be tuned the ultra-wide band, this enables more applications in photonics, electronics and plasma optics. As a substrate, hexagonal boron nitride (h-BN) has an atomic level flat surface without dangling bonds, a weak doping effect and a response in the far ultraviolet area. So the graphene/h-BN heterostructure is very attractive due to its unique optical electronics characteristics. Graphene and h-BN which are stacked in different ways could open the band gap of graphene, and form a moiré pattern for graphene on h-BN and the superlattice in the Brillouin zone, which makes it possible to build photoelectric devices.

  13. Electronic and optical properties of new multifunctional materials via half-substituted hematite: First principles calculations

    KAUST Repository

    Yang, Hua

    2012-01-01

    Electronic structure and optical properties of α-FeMO 3 systems (M = Sc, Ti, V, Cr, Cu, Cd or In) have been investigated using first principles calculations. All of the FeMO 3 systems have a large net magnetic moment. The ground state of pure α-Fe 2O 3 is an antiferromagnetic insulator. For M = Cu or Cd, the systems are half-metallic. Strong absorption in the visible region can be observed in the Cu and Cd-doped systems. Systems with M = Sc, Ti, V, Cr or In are not half-metallic and are insulators. The strongest peaks shift toward shorter wavelengths in the absorption spectra. It is concluded that transition metal doping can modify the electronic structure and optical properties of α-FeMO 3 systems. This journal is © 2012 The Royal Society of Chemistry.

  14. Influence of the substituent on azobenzene side-chain polyester optical storage materials

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Pedersen, M; Hvilsted, Søren; Holme, NCR

    1999-01-01

    , chloro, and bromo. C-13 NMR spectroscopic and molecular mass investigations substantiate good film forming characteristics. The optical storage performance of thin polyester films are investigated through polarization holography. The resulting diffraction efficiency is mapped and discussed as a function...... of irradiation power and exposure time. Polytetradecanedioates with cyano-, nitro-, methyl-, fluoro-, or trinuoromethyl-azobenzene reach more than 50% diffraction efficiency. Investigations of anisotropy induced at different temperatures reveal that the polyesters are only photosensitive in a narrow temperature...

  15. Determination of optical properties of tissue and other bio-materials

    CSIR Research Space (South Africa)

    Singh, A

    2008-11-01

    Full Text Available in improving medicine is identifying different, effective and efficient methods for diagnosis and treatment which also promote patient comfort. This has led to current trends in healthcare such as non-invasive medical techniques and devices that often... have substantiated that light of specific wavelengths can cause healing effects.1,2,3 Areas where these non-invasive modalities are applied include photodynamic therapy (PDT) and wound healing. For optimised effects in tissue optical studies...

  16. Structural and Optical Properties of Spray Coated Carbon Hybrid Materials Applied to Transparent and Flexible Electrodes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Grzegorz Wroblewski

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Transparent and flexible electrodes were fabricated with cost-effective spray coating technique on polyethylene terephthalate foil substrates. Particularly designed paint compositions contained mixtures of multiwalled carbon nanotubes and graphene platelets to achieve their desired rheology and electrooptical layers parameters. Electrodes were prepared in standard technological conditions without the need of clean rooms or high temperature processing. The sheet resistance and optical transmittance of fabricated layers were tuned with the number of coatings; then the most suitable relation of these parameters was designated through the figure of merit. Optical measurements were performed in the range of wavelengths from 250 to 2500 nm with a spectrophotometer with the integration sphere. Spectral dependence of total and diffusive optical transmission for thin films with graphene platelet covered by multiwalled carbon nanotubes was designated which allowed determining the relative absorbance. Layer parameters such as thickness, refractive index, energy gap, and effective reflectance coefficient show the correlation of electrooptical properties with the technological conditions. Moreover the structural properties of fabricated layers were examined by means of the X-ray diffraction.

  17. Tunable optical switching in the near-infrared spectral regime by employing plasmonic nanoantennas containing phase change materials.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Savaliya, Priten B; Thomas, Arun; Dua, Rishi; Dhawan, Anuj

    2017-10-02

    We propose the design of switchable plasmonic nanoantennas (SPNs) that can be employed for optical switching in the near-infrared regime. The proposed SPNs consist of nanoantenna structures made up of a plasmonic metal (gold) such that these nanoantennas are filled with a switchable material (vanadium dioxide). We compare the results of these SPNs with inverted SPN structures that consist of gold nanoantenna structures surrounded by a layer of vanadium dioxide (VO2) on their outer surface. These nanoantennas demonstrate switching of electric-field intensity enhancement (EFIE) between two states (On and Off states), which can be induced thermally, optically or electrically. The On and Off states of the nanoantennas correspond to the metallic and semiconductor states, respectively of the VO2 film inside or around the nanoantennas, as the VO2 film exhibits phase transition from its semiconductor state to the metallic state upon application of thermal, optical, or electrical energy. We employ finite-difference time-domain (FDTD) simulations to demonstrate switching in the EFIE for four different SPN geometries - nanorod-dipole, bowtie, planar trapezoidal toothed log-periodic, and rod-disk - and compare their near-field distributions for the On and Off states of the SPNs. We also demonstrate that the resonance wavelength of the EFIE spectra gets substantially modified when these SPNs switch between the two states.

  18. Investigating the relationship between material properties and laser-induced damage threshold of dielectric optical coatings at 1064 nm

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bassiri, Riccardo; Clark, Caspar; Martin, Iain W.; Markosyan, Ashot; Murray, Peter G.; Tessmer, Joseph; Rowan, Sheila; Fejer, Martin M.

    2015-11-01

    The Laser Induced Damage Threshold (LIDT) and material properties of various multi-layer amorphous dielectric optical coatings, including Nb2O5, Ta2O5, SiO2, TiO2, ZrO2, AlN, SiN, LiF and ZnSe, have been studied. The coatings were produced by ion assisted electron beam and thermal evaporation; and RF and DC magnetron sputtering at Helia Photonics Ltd, Livingston, UK. The coatings were characterized by optical absorption measurements at 1064 nm by Photothermal Common-path Interferometry (PCI). Surface roughness and damage pits were analyzed using atomic force microscopy. LIDT measurements were carried out at 1064 nm, with a pulse duration of 9.6 ns and repetition rate of 100 Hz, in both 1000-on-1 and 1-on-1 regimes. The relationship between optical absorption, LIDT and post-deposition heat-treatment is discussed, along with analysis of the surface morphology of the LIDT damage sites showing both coating and substrate failure.

  19. Miniature laser mass spectrometer and optical microscopy: current capabilities for the quantitative analysis of micro-sized solid materials

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tulej, M.; Wiesendanger, R.; Neuland, M., B.; Meyer, S.; Wurz, P.; Neubeck, A.; Ivarsson, M.; Riedo, V.; Moreno-Garcia, P.; Riedo, A.

    2017-09-01

    The current progress in the development of the instrumentation for the context analysis of planetary surfaces is described. By combining a miniature laser time-of-flight mass analyser with a microscope-camera system, one can conduct detailed optical and mass spectrometric analyses of the solid material down to micrometre-sized samples. Improvements of the instrument performance made by installation of a pulser, high-resolution microscope and modification of laser ion source are discussed. It is shown that with the current instrument capabilities quantitative elemental and isotope analyses even of small micrometer-sized grains or fossilized materials are possible. The performance capabilities are demonstrated by measurements conducted on standard and natural samples of rocks and meteorites.

  20. Optics history as effective instrument for education in optics and photonics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stafeef, S. K.; Tomilin, M. G.

    2009-06-01

    The education problem in optics and photonics is to draw young generation on the side of light, optical science and technology. The main goal is to prove the slogan that "physics is a small part of optics": during the thousand years optics formulated the clear worldview for humanity. In fact optics is itself presents multidisciplinary collection of independent scientific arias from one hand and was a generator of new fields of knowledge from the other hand. Optics and photonics are the regions where the fundamental problems of our reality have to be solved. The mentioned functions belonged to optics during the period of civilizations development. This is a basic idea of books serial by S. Stafeev and M. Tomilin "Five Millennium of Optics" including 3 volumes. The first volume devoted to optics prehistory was edit in 2006 in Russian. Its main chapters devoted to relations between Sun and Life, the beginnings of human intelligence, megalithic viewfinders, gnomons and ancient temples orientation, archaic optical materials and elements. It also consist the optical riddles of that period. The volume II is devoted to Greek and Roman antiquity and is in the process of publishing. It consist the chapters on the beginning of optics, mathematical fundaments and applied optics evolution. Volume III would be devoted to Medieval and Renaissance optics history. The materials are used at our university in a course "The Modern Natural Science Conceptions" for students and graduate students. In our paper the possibilities of optics history as effective instrument for education in optics and photonics are discussed.