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Sample records for hand grip strength

  1. Hand grip strength

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Frederiksen, Henrik; Gaist, David; Petersen, Hans Christian

    2002-01-01

    in life is a major problem in terms of prevalence, morbidity, functional limitations, and quality of life. It is therefore of interest to find a phenotype reflecting physical functioning which has a relatively high heritability and which can be measured in large samples. Hand grip strength is known......-55%). A powerful design to detect genes associated with a phenotype is obtained using the extreme discordant and concordant sib pairs, of whom 28 and 77 dizygotic twin pairs, respectively, were found in this study. Hence grip strength is a suitable phenotype for identifying genetic variants of importance to mid...

  2. Hand-grip isometric strength in judo

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    Juan G Bonitch-Góngora

    2014-02-01

    Full Text Available The grip is an important technical and tactical aspect through which the judokas dominate the adversary, hindering the application of appropriate techniques and favoring their own attack. The judokas must have high levels of isometric force and endurance to this type of force on the gripping muscles of the forearms, as one of the key aspects for success. This article reviews the grip muscular strength and endurance profiles of judokas of different groups (gender, age and competitive level. In general, the peak isometric strength of elite judokas has not changed in the last 40 years and is similar to that reached by non-elite judokas or even registered in large populations. This indicate that the evaluation of the isometric hand grip endurance may be a more relevant parameter than the peak isometric force in judokas, as during the bouts the grip must be maintained for relatively long periods of time and the maximum force cannot be maintained for long. However there are few studies on the ability to resist successive isometric handgrip stress in judokas.

  3. Hand Grip Strength Vs. Sprint Effectiveness in Amputee Soccer Players

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    Wieczorek Marta

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available Amputee soccer is one of the types of soccer designed for the disabled, especially those who have undergone amputations, as well as those with extremity dysfunction. The objective of the study was to find the relationship between hand grip strength and sprint time in amputee soccer players. Thirteen field amputee soccer players participated in the study. A SAEHAN hydraulic hand dynamometer manufactured by Jamar was used for hand grip strength measurements. The sprint running test was conducted over a distance of 30 m. The Fusion Smart Speed System was employed for running time measurements. No statistically significant relationships were found between hand grip strength of the left or right hand, and sprint times over 1, 5, 10, 15, 20, 25 and 30 m. Analysis of the running velocity curve of the subjects showed an interesting profile characterized by a 15 meter-long acceleration phase and a significant velocity increase over a distance of 20 – 25 m. The study suggests that there is no relationship between hand grip strength and sprint effectiveness in amputee soccer players. The specificity of locomotion with the use of elbow crutches among elite Polish amputee soccer players probably accounts for the profile of the sprint velocity curve. Extension of the acceleration phase in the sprint run and a velocity increase in the subsequent part of the run were observed.

  4. Effects of hyperthyroidism on hand grip strength and function.

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    Erkol İnal, Esra; Çarlı, Alparslan Bayram; Çanak, Sultan; Aksu, Oğuzhan; Köroğlu, Banu Kale; Savaş, Serpil

    2015-01-01

    Hyperthyroidism is a pathologic condition in which the body is exposed to excessive amounts of circulating thyroid hormones. Skeletal muscle is one of the major target organs of thyroid hormones. We evaluated hand grip strength and function in patients with overt hyperthyroidism. Fifty-one patients newly diagnosed with hyperthyroidism and 44 healthy controls participated in this study. Age, height, weight, and dominant hand of all participants were recorded. The diagnosis of hyperthyroidism was confirmed by clinical examination and laboratory tests. Hand grip strength was tested at the dominant hand with a Jamar hand dynamometer. The grooved pegboard test (PGT) was used to evaluate hand dexterity. The Duruöz Hand Index (DHI) was used to assess hand function. No significant differences were found in terms of clinical and demographic findings between the patients with hyperthyroidism and healthy controls (p > 0.05). Significant differences were found between the patients with hyperthyroidism and healthy controls regarding PGT and DHI scores (p Hyperthyroidism seemed to affect hand dexterity and function more than hand grip strength and seemed to be associated with reduced physical function more than muscle strength. This may also indicate that patients with hyperthyroidism should be evaluated by multidisplinary modalities.

  5. Hand grip strength in patients with chronic obstructive pulmonary disease

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    Jeong M

    2017-08-01

    Full Text Available Moa Jeong,1 Hyung Koo Kang,1 Pamela Song,2 Hye Kyeong Park,1 Hoon Jung,1 Sung-Soon Lee,1 Hyeon-Kyoung Koo1 1Division of Pulmonary and Critical Care Medicine, Department of Internal Medicine, 2Department of Neurology, Ilsan Paik Hospital, Inje University College of Medicine, Goyang, Republic of Korea Purpose: Hand grip strength (HGS is a simple way of predicting the risk of cardiovascular disease and all-cause mortality in the general population. However, the practical significance of grip strength in patients with COPD is uncertain. The aim of this study was to compare HGS between subjects with and without COPD and to evaluate its clinical relevance in patients with COPD by using a national survey.Methods: Data were collected from the Korean National Health and Nutrition Examination Survey. The study included 421 adults with COPD and 2,542 controls who completed questionnaires, spirometry, and a HGS test. HGS was compared between subjects with and without COPD, and the association between grip strength, lung function, and quality of life (QoL was evaluated.Results: The mean HGS was 33.3±9.1 kg in the COPD group and 29.9±9.5 kg in the non-COPD group; adjusted HGS was 30.9±0.33 kg and 30.9±0.11 kg, respectively (P=0.99. HGS was not related to forced vital capacity (β=0.04, P=0.70 or forced expiratory volume in 1 second (β=0.11, P=0.24 in multivariable analysis. HGS was independently associated with the EQ-5D index, but the relationship was stronger in the COPD group (β=0.30, P<0.001 than in the non-COPD group (β=0.21, P<0.001. The results were similar for each component of the EQ-5D, including mobility (β=-0.25, P<0.001, daily activity (β=-0.19, P=0.01, pain/discomfort (β=-0.32, P<0.001, and anxiety/depression (β=-0.16, P=0.01.Conclusion: HGS was not different between subjects with and without COPD, but was associated with QoL – including mobility, daily activity, pain/discomfort, and anxiety/depression – in patients with COPD. The

  6. G×E Interaction Influences Trajectories of Hand Grip Strength

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Petersen, Inge; Pedersen, Nancy L; Rantanen, Taina;

    2016-01-01

    and Environment across Multiple Studies consortium. Growth curve parameters were estimated for same-sex pairs, aged 34-99 (N = 10,681). Fisher's test for mixture distribution of within-monozygotic twin-pair differences (N = 1724) was performed on growth curve parameters. We observed significant gene......-environment interaction on grip strength trajectories. Finally, we compared the variability of within-pair differences of growth curve parameters by APOE haplotypes. Though not statistically significant, the results suggested that APOE ɛ2ɛ2/ɛ2ɛ3 haplotypes might buffer environmental influences on grip strength...

  7. Hand-grip strength cut points to screen older persons at risk for mobility limitation.

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    Sallinen, Janne; Stenholm, Sari; Rantanen, Taina; Heliövaara, Markku; Sainio, Päivi; Koskinen, Seppo

    2010-09-01

    To determine optimal hand-grip strength cut points for likelihood of mobility limitation in older people and to study whether these cut points differ according to body mass index (BMI). Cross-sectional analysis of data. Data collected in the Finnish population-based Health 2000 Survey. One thousand eighty-four men and 1,562 women aged 55 and older with complete data on anthropometry, hand-grip strength and self-reported mobility. Mobility limitation was defined as difficulty walking 0.5 km or climbing stairs. Receiver operating characteristic analysis was used to estimate hand-grip strength cut points for likelihood of mobility limitation. The overall hand-grip strength cut points for likelihood of mobility limitation were 37 kg (sensitivity 62%; specificity 76%) for men and 21 kg (sensitivity 67%; specificity 73%) for women. The effect of the interaction between hand-grip strength and BMI on mobility limitation was significant in men (P=.02), but no such interaction was observed in women (P=.16). In men, the most-optimal cutoff points were 33 kg (sensitivity 73%; specificity 79%) for normal-weight men, 39 kg (sensitivity 67%; specificity 71%) for overweight men, and 40 kg (sensitivity 57%; specificity 68%) for obese men. In women, BMI-specific hand-grip strength cutoff values was not markedly more accurate than the overall cutoff value. The hand-grip strength test is a useful tool to identify persons at risk of mobility limitation. In men, hand-grip strength cut points for mobility increased with BMI, whereas in women, only one hand-grip strength threshold was identified. © 2010, Copyright the Authors. Journal compilation © 2010, The American Geriatrics Society.

  8. Relation between hand grip strength, respiratory muscle strength and spirometric measures in male nursing home residents.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bahat, Gulistan; Tufan, Asli; Ozkaya, Hilal; Tufan, Fatih; Akpinar, Timur Selçuk; Akin, Sibel; Bahat, Zumrut; Kaya, Zuleyha; Kiyan, Esen; Erten, Nilgün; Karan, Mehmet Akif

    2014-09-01

    Adverse-outcomes related to sarcopenia are mostly mentioned as physical disability. As the other skeletal muscles, respiratory muscles may also be affected by sarcopenia. Respiratory muscle strength is known to affect pulmonary functions. Therefore, we aimed to investigate the relations between extremity muscle strength, respiratory muscle strengths and spirometric measures in a group of male nursing home residents. Among a total of 104 male residents, residents with obstructive measures were excluded and final study population was composed of 62 residents. Mean age was 70.5 ± 6.7 years, body mass index: 27.7 ± 5.3 kg/m2 and dominant hand grip strength: 29.7 ± 6.5 kg. Hand grip strength was positively correlated with maximal inspiratory pressure (MIP) and maximal expiratory pressure (MEP) (r = 0.35, p strength; among spirometric measures only parameter significantly related to grip strength was peak cough flow (PCF). The association of PCF with grip strength disappeared when MIP alone or "MIP and MEP" were included in the regression analysis. In the latter case, PCF was significantly associated only with MIP. We found peripheric muscle strength be associated with MIP and PCF but not with MEP or any other spirometric parameters. The relation between peripheral muscle strength and PCF was mediated by MIP. Our findings suggest that sarcopenia may affect inspiratory muscle strength earlier or more than the expiratory muscle strength. Sarcopenia may cause decrease in PCF in the elderly, which may stand for some common adverse respiratory complications.

  9. Effects of kinesio tape compared with non-elastic tape on hand grip strength.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Ji Young; Kim, Seong Yeol

    2016-05-01

    [Purpose] Many assumptions have been made about taping and several studies have considered tape application methods; however, the true effect of taping on muscle strength remains unclear. Most previous studies compared application techniques using Kinesio tape (KT), but studies that compared muscle strength using non-elastic tape (NT) are limited. Moreover, no studies have applied KT and NT in the same way to assess grip strength in normal subjects. The purpose of this study was to evaluate the immediate effect of application of two tapes with different elastic properties on maximal grip strength in healthy adults. [Subjects and Methods] Twenty healthy adults were divided into two groups (KT and NT). Maximal grip strength was measured with a dynamometer. Forearm extensor muscles of the dominant hand were then taped and subjects were immediately asked to perform hand grip movement with maximum strength in the same standardized manner. [Results] In the KT group, maximal grip strength was significantly increased compared to the initial value; however, in the NT group, there was no significant difference in maximal grip strength. [Conclusion] This study suggests that only Kinesio tape can increase maximal grip strength immediately after application on the extensor region of the forearm.

  10. Effects of kinesio tape compared with non-elastic tape on hand grip strength

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Ji Young; Kim, Seong Yeol

    2016-01-01

    [Purpose] Many assumptions have been made about taping and several studies have considered tape application methods; however, the true effect of taping on muscle strength remains unclear. Most previous studies compared application techniques using Kinesio tape (KT), but studies that compared muscle strength using non-elastic tape (NT) are limited. Moreover, no studies have applied KT and NT in the same way to assess grip strength in normal subjects. The purpose of this study was to evaluate the immediate effect of application of two tapes with different elastic properties on maximal grip strength in healthy adults. [Subjects and Methods] Twenty healthy adults were divided into two groups (KT and NT). Maximal grip strength was measured with a dynamometer. Forearm extensor muscles of the dominant hand were then taped and subjects were immediately asked to perform hand grip movement with maximum strength in the same standardized manner. [Results] In the KT group, maximal grip strength was significantly increased compared to the initial value; however, in the NT group, there was no significant difference in maximal grip strength. [Conclusion] This study suggests that only Kinesio tape can increase maximal grip strength immediately after application on the extensor region of the forearm. PMID:27313372

  11. Adductor pollicis muscle and hand grip strength: potential methods of nutritional assessment in outpatients with stroke

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    Débora Rocha Oliveira

    2010-12-01

    Full Text Available Objective: To evaluate and compare the effectiveness of different methods used for nutritional assessment of outpatients who had hemiplegic stroke. Methods: A cross-section study with adult and elderly patients of both genders enrolled in a rehabilitation center. The analyzed variables were anthropometric measurements, bioelectrical impedance, hand grip strength and thickness of the adductor pollicis muscle. The Pearson χ2 test was used to check the association between variables with a significance level of α = 5%. Results: When evaluating the association between indicators of muscle mass, it was observed that the hand grip strength in both genders was positively correlated with arm muscle circumference (p = 0.0196 and lean mass (p = 0.0002. Fat mass measured by the bioelectrical impedance method already showed a significant inverse relationship with the grip (r = -0.3879. The thickness of the adductor pollicis muscle showed significant association with lean mass (p = 0.0052 and hand grip (p = 0.0024. Conclusion: In this study, the hand grip strength and thickness of the adductor pollicis muscle were well correlated with measurements determined by anthropometry and bioimpedance. The results show the applicability of grip strength and thickness of the adductor pollicis muscle in clinical practice as nutritional assessment methods for this population, especially elderly patients, since they detect functional changes not captured by other parameters in the short term and are important for early identification of risk nutrition.

  12. Large-scale GWAS identifies multiple loci for hand grip strength providing biological insights into muscular fitness

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Willems, Sara M; Wright, Daniel J.; Day, Felix R

    2017-01-01

    Hand grip strength is a widely used proxy of muscular fitness, a marker of frailty, and predictor of a range of morbidities and all-cause mortality. To investigate the genetic determinants of variation in grip strength, we perform a large-scale genetic discovery analysis in a combined sample of 1...

  13. Large-scale GWAS identifies multiple loci for hand grip strength providing biological insights into muscular fitness

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Willems, Sara M.; Wright, D.J.; Day, Felix R.; Trajanoska, Katerina; Joshi, P.K.; Morris, John A.; Matteini, Amy M.; Garton, Fleur C.; Grarup, Niels; Oskolkov, Nikolay; Thalamuthu, Anbupalam; Mangino, Massimo; Liu, Jun; Demirkan, Ayse; Lek, Monkol; Xu, Liwen; Wang, Guan; Oldmeadow, Christopher; Gaulton, Kyle J.; Lotta, Luca A.; Miyamoto-Mikami, Eri; Rivas, Manuel A.; White, Tom; Loh, Po Ru; Aadahl, Mette; Amin, Najaf; Attia, John R.; Austin, Krista; Benyamin, Beben; Brage, Søren; Cheng, Yu Ching; Ciȩszczyk, Paweł; Derave, Wim; Eriksson, Karl Fredrik; Eynon, Nir; Linneberg, Allan; Lucia, Alejandro; Massidda, Myosotis; Mitchell, Braxton D.; Miyachi, Motohiko; Murakami, Haruka; Padmanabhan, Sandosh; Pandey, Ashutosh; Papadimitriou, Ioannis; Rajpal, Deepak K.; Sale, Craig; Schnurr, Theresia M.; Sessa, Francesco; Shrine, Nick; Tobin, Martin D.; Varley, Ian; Wain, Louise V.; Wray, Naomi R.; Lindgren, Cecilia M.; MacArthur, Daniel G.; Waterworth, Dawn M.; McCarthy, Mark I.; Pedersen, Oluf; Khaw, Kay Tee; Kiel, Douglas P.; Pitsiladis, Yannis; Fuku, Noriyuki; Franks, Paul W.; North, Kathryn N.; Duijn, Van C.M.; Mather, Karen A.; Hansen, Torben; Hansson, Ola; Spector, Tim D.; Murabito, Joanne M.; Richards, J.B.; Rivadeneira, Fernando; Langenberg, Claudia; Perry, John R.B.; Wareham, Nick J.; Scott, Robert A.; Oei, Ling; Zheng, Hou Feng; Forgetta, Vincenzo; Leong, Aaron; Ahmad, Omar S.; Laurin, Charles; Mokry, Lauren E.; Ross, Stephanie; Elks, Cathy E.; Bowden, Jack; Warrington, Nicole M.; Murray, Anna; Ruth, Katherine S.; Tsilidis, Konstantinos K.; Medina-Gómez, Carolina; Estrada, Karol; Bis, Joshua C.; Chasman, Daniel I.; Demissie, Serkalem; Enneman, Anke W.; Hsu, Yi Hsiang; Ingvarsson, Thorvaldur; Kähönen, Mika; Kammerer, Candace; Lacroix, Andrea Z.; Li, Guo; Liu, Ching Ti; Liu, Yongmei; Lorentzon, Mattias; Mägi, Reedik; Mihailov, Evelin; Milani, Lili; Moayyeri, Alireza; Nielson, Carrie M.; Sham, Pack Chung; Siggeirsdotir, Kristin; Sigurdsson, Gunnar; Stefansson, Kari; Trompet, Stella; Thorleifsson, Gudmar; Vandenput, Liesbeth; Velde, Van Der Nathalie; Viikari, Jorma; Xiao, Su Mei; Zhao, Jing Hua; Evans, Daniel S.; Cummings, Steven R.; Cauley, Jane; Duncan, Emma L.; Groot, De Lisette C.P.G.M.; Esko, Tonu; Gudnason, Vilmundar; Harris, Tamara B.; Jackson, Rebecca D.; Jukema, J.W.; Ikram, Arfan M.A.; Karasik, David; Kaptoge, Stephen; Kung, Annie Wai Chee; Lehtimäki, Terho; Lyytikäinen, Leo Pekka; Lips, Paul; Luben, Robert; Metspalu, Andres; Meurs, van Joyce B.; Minster, Ryan L.; Orwoll, Erick; Oei, Edwin; Psaty, Bruce M.; Raitakari, Olli T.; Ralston, Stuart W.; Ridker, Paul M.; Robbins, John A.; Smith, Albert V.; Styrkarsdottir, Unnur; Tranah, Gregory J.; Thorstensdottir, Unnur; Uitterlinden, Andre G.; Zmuda, Joseph; Zillikens, M.C.; Ntzani, Evangelia E.; Evangelou, Evangelos; Ioannidis, John P.A.; Evans, David M.; Ohlsson, Claes

    2017-01-01

    Hand grip strength is a widely used proxy of muscular fitness, a marker of frailty, and predictor of a range of morbidities and all-cause mortality. To investigate the genetic determinants of variation in grip strength, we perform a large-scale genetic discovery analysis in a combined sample of 195,

  14. Hand Grip Strength and Myocardial Oxygen Consumption Index among Coronary Artery Bypass Grafting Patients

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    Siti Nur Baait Biniti Mohd Sokran

    2015-07-01

    Full Text Available Background: Hand grip strength (HGS is a reliable indicator of peripheral muscle strength. Although, numerous studies have investigated the strength of hand grip; little attention has been given to coronary artery disease (CAD patients, exploring the relationship between HGS and myocardial oxygen consumption (MVO2 index. The current study aimed to evaluate the interaction between HGS and MVO2 index findings before and after cardiac surgery. Methods: Twenty-seven patients with CAD had HGS were assessed using handheld dynamometer. HGS for each hand were documented. MVO2 index was assessed using rate pressure product (RPP, which is the product of the heart rate (HR and systolic blood pressure (SBP. Repeated measures MANOVA were carried out to estimate the interaction between both hands HGS and MVO2 index before and after surgery. Results: There was significant interactions (P<0.001 for both HGS dominant and non-dominant with large effect sizes (HGS dominant×MVO2 index: hp2=0.44; HGS dominant×RPP: hp2=0.49. This signifies that peripheral muscle strength of the upper limb (HGS dominant and non-dominant had different effects on MVO2 index before and after surgery. The interaction graph shows that the increase in MVO2 index after surgery was significantly greater for peripheral muscle strength of the dominant hand when compared to non-dominant. Conclusion: Patients with CAD had interactions between HGS and oxygen consumption before and after surgery. Hence, HGS might be used as a predictor to assess oxygen consumption among cardiac patients.

  15. REDUCED HAND GRIP STRENGTH IN OVERWEIGHT AND OBESE CHRONIC HEPATITIS C PATIENTS.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bruch, Juliana Paula; Álvares-DA-Silva, Mário Reis; Alves, Bruna Cherubini; Dall'alba, Valesca

    2016-01-01

    Hepatitis C is a liver disease that causes significant changes in metabolism, and also has an impact on nutritional status. To evaluate the nutritional status and cardiovascular risk in patients with chronic hepatitis C. This cross-sectional study investigated 58 patients with chronic hepatitis C, non-cirrhotic and were not under active pharmacological treatment. Patients with significant alcohol consumption (greater than 10 g ethanol/day) were excluded. Patients underwent nutritional assessment through anthropometric measurements and functional assessment using hand grip strength by dynamometry. The physical activity was assessed using the International Physical Activity Questionnaire. Patients also underwent clinical and laboratory evaluation. Cardiovascular risk was calculated by the Framingham score. The mean age of patients was 51.6±9.7 years, 55.2% were female, and 79.3% had genotype 1. The most prevalent degree of fibrosis was F1 (37.9%) followed by F2 (27.6%) and F3 (1.7%). The prevalence of overweight/obesity considering the body mass index was 70.7%. However, 57.7% of men and 68.8% of women were considered malnourished according to hand grip strength. These patients also had waist circumference (93.5±10.7 cm) and neck circumference (37.0±3.6 cm) high. Almost 60% of patients were considered sedentary or irregularly active. In relation to cardiovascular risk, 50% of patients had high risk of suffering a cardiovascular event within 10 years. Although most patients with hepatitis C presented overweight, associated with high cardiovascular risk, they also have reduced functional capacity, indicative of protein-caloric commitment. Therefore, body mass index can not be considered the only method of assessment for nutritional diagnosis of patients with liver disease. Adopting methods such as hand grip strength can be important for a better understanding of nutritional status of these patients.

  16. IMPACT OF COMBINING MIRROR THERAPY AND HABIT ON HAND GRIP STRENGTH IN CHILDREN WITH HEMIPARESIS

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    Asmaa A. Abo Nour

    2016-08-01

    Full Text Available Background: hemiparetic children usually tend to avoid the use of their impaired arm and are remarkably tend to perform inherently bimanual tasks of daily living with the less impaired arm only rather than with both arms. In fact, these children actually may have never learned to use their impaired arm for certain motor tasks or may only use it in the simplest manner, so the purpose of the study was to determine the impact of combining HABIT and mirror therapy on hand grip in hemiparetic children. Methods: A total of 30 hemiparetic children divided randomly into two groups (A and B of equal number, (N of each =15. Eligibility criteria to our study were age ranged from 4-8 years, ability to score more than 50 % of grasps and associated domains of quality of upper extremity skills test (QUEST and grade 2 in manual ability classification system (MACS, assessment done by baseline hand held dynamometer for hand palmar & pinch grasp strength (in pounds at start (0 week, reassessed at 4 & 8 weeks. The treatment protocol for two groups include: 2 months total time, 3 sessions\\ week, 1.5 hour\\session. Children in study group (A received selected occupational therapy program with modified mirror apparatus while children in control group (B Children received the same occupational therapy program as in study group but without modified mirror apparatus. Results: there is significant improvement in both groups when comparing the pre and post I & II treatment mean values. However comparing the post treatment results of both groups were statistically non-significant. Conclusion: This study confirmed that combining mirror therapy and HABIT is effective in improving hand function.

  17. Hand grip strength and chronic obstructive pulmonary disease in Korea: an analysis in KNHANES VI

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    Lee SH

    2017-08-01

    Full Text Available Su Hwan Lee, Soo Jung Kim, Yeji Han, Yon Ju Ryu, Jin Hwa Lee, Jung Hyun Chang Division of Pulmonary and Critical Care Medicine, Department of Internal Medicine, Ewha Medical Research Institute, Ewha Womans University School of Medicine, Seoul, Korea Background: Muscle mass is known to be associated with mortality in elderly adults. Because hand grip strength (HGS is known as a simple assessment tool for muscular strength, many researchers have studied the association between HGS and disease. However, empirical evidence for the relationship between chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD and HGS is still controversial. The aim of this study was to evaluate the association between COPD and HGS, using Korean population data. Methods: This was a population-based cross-sectional study. Data were obtained from the sixth Korean National Health and Nutrition Examination Survey, which was conducted from 2013 to 2015. To reduce the effects of HGS-related factors and potential confounding factors, propensity score matching was used to match subjects with and without COPD. Results: Among 14,930 subjects, 832 were enrolled in each group (non-COPD and COPD after propensity score matching. COPD subjects did not have lower HGS than non-COPD subjects (non-COPD vs COPD, male, 38.0±7.0 vs 38.9±7.0 kg, P=0.044, female, 23.8±4.6 vs 24.2±4.9 kg, P=0.342. Lung function was classified by Global Initiative for Chronic Obstructive Lung Disease stages and was not significantly associated with HGS. For male COPD subjects, there was a significant correlation between HGS and the EuroQol Five-Dimension Questionnaire (EQ5D utility score index, which is an indicator of quality of life that adjusts for age and body mass index (r=0.201, P<0.001. The correlation was absent for female subjects (r=0.098, P=0.170. Conclusion: COPD subjects did not have lower HGS than non-COPD subjects. HGS did not associate with lung function. However, the HGS of male COPD subjects was

  18. Effect of range of motion and isometric strengthening exercises on grip strength and hand function in rheumatoid arthritis patients

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    Yefta Daniel Bastiana

    2016-04-01

    Full Text Available In previous studies, duration of hand exercises in patients with rheumatoid arthritis (RA had widely varying ranges, from 3 weeks to 4 months. An experimental study was conducted to evaluate the effect of range of motion (ROM and muscle strengthening exercises for 6 weeks on grip strength and hand function in RA patients. Seventeen patients with chronic RA were randomly assigned to a treatment group and a control group. The treatment group (n=8 was given muscle strengthening exercises and heat therapy using paraffin baths 3 times a week at the hospital and ROM exercises once a day at home for 6 weeks. The control group (n=9 was given only paraffin baths 3 times a week. After 6 weeks, there were significant differences in hand function (p=0.003, right and left grip strength (p=0.000 and p=0.001 and ROM in the interventional group only. ROM and isometric strengthening exercises significantly improved grip strength and hand function in patients with RA, while no impact was found when the patients were given paraffin baths only. In view of the small size of the study population, there is a need for further studies with larger populations.

  19. IMPACT OF COMBINING MIRROR THERAPY AND HABIT ON HAND GRIP STRENGTH IN CHILDREN WITH HEMIPARESIS

    OpenAIRE

    Asmaa A. Abo Nour; Saleh, Muhammad G.; Emam H. Elnagmy

    2016-01-01

    Background: hemiparetic children usually tend to avoid the use of their impaired arm and are remarkably tend to perform inherently bimanual tasks of daily living with the less impaired arm only rather than with both arms. In fact, these children actually may have never learned to use their impaired arm for certain motor tasks or may only use it in the simplest manner, so the purpose of the study was to determine the impact of combining HABIT and mirror therapy on hand grip in hemiparetic chil...

  20. Effect of anaemia on hand grip strength, walking speed, functionality and 1 year mortality in older hospitalized patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Joosten, Etienne; Detroyer, Elke; Milisen, Koen

    2016-08-19

    Anaemia is a common problem in hospitalized older patients and is recognized as a risk factor for a significant number of adverse outcomes. Data of the effect of anaemia on functional status during hospitalization and mortality after discharge are limited. Aim of the study is to examine whether there is an association between anaemia, hand grip strength, gait speed and basic activities of daily living (ADL) during hospitalization and mortality 1 year after discharge in geriatric patients. In a prospective study, data on age, sex, body mass index, Mini-Mental State Examination (MMSE), main clinical diagnosis, number of comorbidities, hand grip strength, gait speed, ADL, haemoglobin, C-reactive protein and estimated Glomerular filtration ratio (eGFR) were recorded in 220 older patients, admitted to the acute geriatric ward of a university hospital. Anaemia was defined as a haemoglobin level anaemia (haemoglobin between 10 and 12 g/dL for women and 10 and 13 g/dL for men). Gait speed (in meters per second) was calculated after a 4.5 m walk and hand grip strength (in kilogram) was assessed with a hydraulic hand dynamometer. Functionality was assessed in the six basic activities of daily living. Information about the vital status was obtained 1 year after discharge with a telephone call. Analysis of covariance (ANCOVA) was used to examine the effect of the anaemia status on the walking speed, hand grip strength and premorbid ADL index and logistic regression analysis was used to examine whether anaemia could be identified as risk factors for mortality 12 months after discharge. Overall, 106 (48 %) patients had anaemia. Hand-grip strength, gait speed and ADL score were not significantly different between anaemic and non-anaemic hospitalized geriatric patients. After adjustment for age, sex, body mass index, eGFR, MMSE, number of comorbidities and main clinical diagnosis, the means for hand-grip strength were 17.3, 19.9 and 19.1 kg (p = 0.38); for gait speed 0

  1. Laterality and grip strength influence hand bone micro-architecture in modern humans, an HRpQCT study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reina, Nicolas; Cavaignac, Etienne; Trousdale, William H; Laffosse, Jean-Michel; Braga, José

    2017-06-01

    It is widely hypothesized that mechanical loading, specifically repetitive low-intensity tasks, influences the inner structure of cancellous bone. As such, there is likely a relationship between handedness and bone morphology. The aim of this study is to determine patterns in trabecular bone between dominant and non-dominant hands in modern humans. Seventeen healthy patients between 22 and 32 years old were included in the study. Radial carpal bones (lunate, capitate, scaphoid, trapezium, trapezoid, 1st, 2nd and 3rd metacarpals) were analyzed with high-resolution micro-computed tomography. Additionally, crush and pinch grip were recorded. Factorial analysis indicated that bone volume ratio, trabeculae number (Tb.N), bone surface to volume ratio (BS.BV), body weight, stature and crush grip were all positively correlated with principal components 1 and 2 explaining 78.7% of the variance. Volumetric and trabecular endostructural parameters (BV/TV, BS/BV or Tb.Th, Tb.N) explain the observed inter-individual variability better than anthropometric or clinical parameters. Factors analysis regressions showed correlations between these parameters and the dominant side for crush strength for the lunate (r(2) = 0.640, P modern human wrist. © 2017 Anatomical Society.

  2. Comparison of pressure pain threshold, grip strength,dexterity and touch pressure of dominant and non-dominant hands within and between right-and left-handed subjects.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ozcan, Ayse; Tulum, Zeliha; Pinar, Lamia; Başkurt, Ferdi

    2004-12-01

    This study was done to evaluate differences in pressure pain threshold, grip strength, manual dexterity and touch pressure threshold in the dominant and non-dominant hands of right- and left-handed subjects, and to compare findings within and between these groups. Thirty-nine right-handed and twenty-one left-handed subjects participated in the study. Pressure pain threshold was assessed using a dolorimeter, grip strength was assessed with a hand-grip dynamometer, manual dexterity was evaluated using the VALPAR Component Work Sample-4 system, and touch pressure threshold was determined using Semmes Weinstein monofilaments. Results for the dominant and non-dominant hands were compared within and between the groups. In the right-handed subjects, the dominant hand was significantly faster with the VALPAR Component Work Sample-4, showed significantly greater grip strength, and had a significantly higher pressure pain threshold than the non-dominant hand. The corresponding results for the two hands were similar in the left-handed subjects. The study revealed asymmetrical manual performance in grip strength, manual dexterity and pressure pain threshold in right-handed subjects, but no such asymmetries in left-handed subjects.

  3. [Grip strength changes in familial amyloidotic polyneuropathy].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tomás, Maria Teresa; Santa-Clara, Helena; Monteiro, Estela; Carolino, Elizabete; Freire, António; Barroso, Eduardo

    2010-01-01

    Familial amiloidotic polyneuropathy (FAP) is an autossomical and dominant neurodegenerative disease related with systemic deposition of amyloid fibre mainly on peripheral nervous system. Clinically, is translated by an autonomous sensitive-motor polyneuropathy with beginning nearly always in foot, involving subsequently the hands. Until now, the unique available treatment for FAP disease is liver transplantation requiring medication that negatively affect muscle metabolism and force production mechanism. To our knowledge there are no quantitative characterizations of peak force in FAP patients or any comparison with healthy people. This knowledge will be extremely important to verify clinical and functional evolution of this disease and eventually prescribe an effective rehabilitation program. The purpose of this study was to analyse and compare levels of hand grip strength (peak force and endurance) in FAP patients with (FAPTx) or without (FAPNTx) a liver transplant with a group of healthy people (GC). The total sample of individuals where two hundred and six, assigned in 3 groups: 59 patients PAFNTx (23 males, 36 female; age 35 ± 8 years); 90 patients PAFTx (53 males, 37 females; age 34 ± 8 years) e 62 healthy persons (GC) (30 males, 32 females; age 33 ± 9 years). Grip strength was assessed by a portable grip dynamometer E-link (Biometrics Ltd, UK). All measurements were taken on standardized positions with standardized orders. The value noted to peak force was classified according to American College of Sports Medicine norms for grip strength. The 3 groups are differents (p < 0,05) for weigth, body mass index (BMI) and grip strength in both hands and endurance for left hand. Negative correlations between age and grip strength were found for PAFNTx and PAFTx but not for GC. According to our results FAP patients have lower values for grip strength in both hands than healthy subjects and consequently a worse classification in ACSM norms. Most patients present

  4. Sustained effect of resistance training on blood pressure and hand grip strength following a detraining period in elderly hypertensive women: a pilot study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nascimento, Dahan da Cunha; Tibana, Ramires Alsamir; Benik, Franklin M; Fontana, Keila Elizabeth; Neto, Frederico Ribeiro; de Santana, Frederico Santos; Santos-Neto, Leopoldo; Silva, Renato André Sousa; Silva, Alessandro Oliveira; Farias, Darlan Lopes; Balsamo, Sandor; Prestes, Jonato

    2014-01-01

    Introduction Hypertension is the most prevalent modifiable risk factor with a high prevalence among older adults. Exercise is a nonpharmacological treatment shown to benefit all patients with hypertension. Objective This study examined the effects of a 14-week moderate intensity resistance training program (RT) on the maintenance of blood pressure and hand grip strength during an extended detraining period in elderly hypertensive women. Methods Twelve hypertensive sedentary elderly women completed 14 weeks of whole body RT at a moderate perceived exertion following a detraining period of 14 weeks. Results Following the training period, participants demonstrated an increase in absolute hand grip strength (P=0.001), relative hand grip strength (P=0.032) and a decrease of systolic (P=0.001), diastolic (P=0.008), and mean blood pressure (P=0.002) when compared to pre-exercise values. In addition, these effects were sustained after 14 weeks of detraining. Conclusion Resistance training may be a valuable method to improve muscular strength and blood pressure in elderly people with benefits being maintained up to 14 weeks following training cessation. PMID:24477221

  5. Normative data on functional grip strength of elderly in Singapore.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mat Jais, Ita Suzana; Chan, Kai Li; Loke, Mun Kitt Austin; Abdul Rahim, Saleem; Tay, Shian Chao

    2017-02-21

    Cross-sectional study for clinical measurement. Most daily tasks require individuals to exert grip strength with torque, which can be challenging for elderly as their strength diminishes with age. We postulate that to assess the functional capacity of an individual, it is important to evaluate the functional grip strength instead of the maximal static grip strength. The objective of this cross-sectional study is to establish normative data for the functional grip strength of elderly aged 60 years and older in the Singapore population. In this study, 233 healthy subjects aged 60 years and older were recruited. Using a custom-made hand strength measurement device, the following measurements were recorded: grip strength at neutral position, grip strength with resistive pronation torque, and grip strength with resistive supination torque. Grip strengths measured for both genders decreased by 13% and 16% for males and females respectively, when pronation torque was exerted, and with supination torque, the strength decreased by 18% and 17% for males and females respectively. Normative data for the elderly population in Singapore had been established. The findings from this study can complement the existing ergonomic hand data in designing better assistive tools to improve the independent living of elderly. NA. Copyright © 2016 Hanley & Belfus. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  6. Examinations of factors influencing toe grip strength.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Soma, Masayuki; Murata, Shin; Kai, Yoshihiro; Nakae, Hideyuki; Satou, Yousuke; Murata, Jun; Miyazaki, Junya

    2016-11-01

    [Purpose] This study examined the relationship between toe grip strength and its associated factors by focusing on factors that were suggested to have a relationship with toe grip strength in previous studies, aiming to clarify the factors influencing the toe grip strength of healthy women. [Subjects and Methods] Twelve healthy young women were selected for this study. Their toe grip strength, angular changes in their ankle joint during toe grip, maximum voluntary contraction activities of the rectus femoris, biceps femoris, and tibialis anterior muscles, and the medial head of the gastrocnemius muscles were measured using electromyography. Their toe curl ability, foot-arch height ratio, and weight were also measured. [Results] Multiple regression analysis demonstrated that the predictors of toe grip strength in the resulting model were foot-arch height ratio and the percentage of integrated electromyography (%IEMG) of the tibialis anterior muscle, as the dependent variables. This reveals that women whose tibialis anterior muscle %IEMG values and foot-arch height ratio are high have greater %IEMG values have greater toe grip strength. [Conclusion] These findings suggest a significant relationship between foot-arch height ratio and toe grip strength, with a reciprocal interaction. These findings further indicate that the risk of falls by the elderly could be decreased if toe grip strength were enhanced, by increasing the height of a low foot-arch with the help of an inserted insole.

  7. lateral asymmetry ш grip strength: utility of the ten per cent rule

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    2001-11-01

    Nov 1, 2001 ... between strengths of dominant and non-dominant hands. Such discrepancy in ... methodological approaches in evaluation of grip strength, different .... Relations between stronger hand and hand preference. Stronger hand.

  8. Sustained effect of resistance training on blood pressure and hand grip strength following a detraining period in elderly hypertensive women: a pilot study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nascimento D da C

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Dahan da Cunha Nascimento,1,5,8 Ramires Alsamir Tibana,1,8 Franklin M Benik,2 Keila Elizabeth Fontana,3 Frederico Ribeiro Neto,8 Frederico Santos de Santana,5,8 Leopoldo Santos-Neto,4 Renato André Sousa Silva,1,5,6 Alessandro Oliveira Silva,1,7 Darlan Lopes Farias,1,7 Sandor Balsamo,4,5,8 Jonato Prestes1 1Postgraduate Program in Physical Education, Catholic University of Brasilia, Brasilia, Brazil; 2Department of Kinesiology and Sports Studies Graduate Program, Eastern Illinois University, Charleston, IL, USA; 3Faculty of Physical Education, University of Brasilia, Brasilia, Brazil; 4Graduate Program in Medical Sciences of the University of Brasilia, School of Medicine and Rheumatology Service, University Hospital of Brasilia (HUB, Brasilia, Brazil; 5Department of Physical Education, University Center Euro American University Center, Brasilia, Brazil; 6Center of Excellence in Medicine of Exercise (CEMEx, Brasilia, Brazil; 7Center University of Brasilia (UNICEUB, Brasilia, Brazil; 8Strength Training and Health Research Group (GEPEEFS, Brasilia, Brazil Introduction: Hypertension is the most prevalent modifiable risk factor with a high prevalence among older adults. Exercise is a nonpharmacological treatment shown to benefit all patients with hypertension. Objective: This study examined the effects of a 14-week moderate intensity resistance training program (RT on the maintenance of blood pressure and hand grip strength during an extended detraining period in elderly hypertensive women. Methods: Twelve hypertensive sedentary elderly women completed 14 weeks of whole body RT at a moderate perceived exertion following a detraining period of 14 weeks. Results: Following the training period, participants demonstrated an increase in absolute hand grip strength (P=0.001, relative hand grip strength (P=0.032 and a decrease of systolic (P=0.001, diastolic (P=0.008, and mean blood pressure (P=0.002 when compared to pre-exercise values. In addition, these

  9. Association of grip strength with cardiovascular risk markers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gubelmann, Cédric; Vollenweider, Peter; Marques-Vidal, Pedro

    2017-03-01

    Background Mechanisms underlying the association between grip strength and cardiovascular mortality are poorly understood. We aimed to assess the association of grip strength with a panel of cardiovascular risk markers. Design The study was based on a cross-sectional analysis of 3468 adults aged 50-75 years (1891 women) from a population-based sample in Lausanne, Switzerland. Methods Grip strength was measured using a hydraulic hand dynamometer. Cardiovascular risk markers included anthropometry, blood pressure, lipids, glucose, adiposity, inflammatory and other metabolic markers. Results In both genders, grip strength was negatively associated with fat mass (Pearson correlation coefficient: women: -0.170, men: -0.198), systolic blood pressure (women: -0.096, men: -0.074), fasting glucose (women: -0.048, men: -0.071), log-transformed leptin (women: -0.074, men: -0.065), log-transformed high-sensitivity C-reactive protein (women: -0.101, men: -0.079) and log-transformed homocysteine (women: -0.109, men: -0.060). In men, grip strength was also positively associated with diastolic blood pressure (0.068), total (0.106) and low density lipoprotein-cholesterol (0.082), and negatively associated with interleukin-6 (-0.071); in women, grip strength was negatively associated with triglycerides (-0.064) and uric acid (-0.059). After multivariate adjustment, grip strength was negatively associated with waist circumference (change per 5 kg increase in grip strength: -0.82 cm in women and -0.77 cm in men), fat mass (-0.56% in women; -0.27% in men) and high-sensitivity C-reactive protein (-6.8% in women; -3.2% in men) in both genders, and with body mass index (0.22 kg/m(2)) and leptin (-2.7%) in men. Conclusion Grip strength shows only moderate associations with cardiovascular risk markers. The effect of muscle strength as measured by grip strength on cardiovascular disease does not seem to be mediated by cardiovascular risk markers.

  10. Registration of hand-grip pattern in smart gun

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Shang, X.; Veldhuis, R.N.J.

    2006-01-01

    Secure Grip1 focuses on the development of a hand-grip pattern recognition system, as part of a smart gun. It is intended for use by the police. We collected the hand-grip data from police officers in three sessions in a row with time intervals in between. If data for training and testing come from

  11. Comparison of hand grip strength and upper limb pressure pain threshold between older adults with or without non-specific shoulder pain

    Science.gov (United States)

    2017-01-01

    Background There is a high prevalence of non-specific shoulder pain associated with upper limb functional limitations in older adults. The purpose of this study was to determine the minimal clinically important differences (MCID) of grip strength and pressure pain threshold (PPT) in the upper limb between older adults with or without non-specific shoulder pain. Methods A case-control study was carried out following the Strengthening the Reporting of Observational Studies in Epidemiology (STROBE) criteria. A sample of 132 shoulders (mean ± SD years) with (n = 66; 76.04 ± 7.58) and without (n = 66; 75.05 ± 6.26) non-specific pain were recruited. The grip strength and PPT of the anterior deltoid and extensor carpi radialis brevis (ECRB) muscles were assessed. Results There were statistically significant differences (mean ± SD; P-value) for anterior deltoid PPT (2.51 ± 0.69 vs 3.68 ± 0.65, kg/cm2; P PPT (2.20 ± 0.60 vs 3.35 ± 0.38 kg/cm2; P PPT, ECRB PPT and grip strength, respectively, to assess the upper limb of older adults with non-specific shoulder pain after treatment. In addition, univariate and multivariate (linear regression and regression trees) analyses may be used to consider age distribution, sex, pain intensity, grip strength and PPT in older adults including clinical and epidemiological studies with non-specific shoulder pain. PMID:28289561

  12. Comparison of hand grip strength and upper limb pressure pain threshold between older adults with or without non-specific shoulder pain

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cesar Calvo Lobo

    2017-02-01

    Full Text Available Background There is a high prevalence of non-specific shoulder pain associated with upper limb functional limitations in older adults. The purpose of this study was to determine the minimal clinically important differences (MCID of grip strength and pressure pain threshold (PPT in the upper limb between older adults with or without non-specific shoulder pain. Methods A case-control study was carried out following the Strengthening the Reporting of Observational Studies in Epidemiology (STROBE criteria. A sample of 132 shoulders (mean ± SD years with (n = 66; 76.04 ± 7.58 and without (n = 66; 75.05 ± 6.26 non-specific pain were recruited. The grip strength and PPT of the anterior deltoid and extensor carpi radialis brevis (ECRB muscles were assessed. Results There were statistically significant differences (mean ± SD; P-value for anterior deltoid PPT (2.51 ± 0.69 vs 3.68 ± 0.65, kg/cm2; P < .001, ECRB PPT (2.20 ± 0.60 vs 3.35 ± 0.38 kg/cm2; P < .001 and grip strength (20.78 ± 10.94 vs 24.63 ± 9.38 kg; P = .032 between shoulders with and without non-specific pain, respectively. Discussion The MCID of 1.17 kg/cm2, 1.15 kg/cm2 and 3.84 kg were proposed for anterior deltoid PPT, ECRB PPT and grip strength, respectively, to assess the upper limb of older adults with non-specific shoulder pain after treatment. In addition, univariate and multivariate (linear regression and regression trees analyses may be used to consider age distribution, sex, pain intensity, grip strength and PPT in older adults including clinical and epidemiological studies with non-specific shoulder pain.

  13. Grip strength in healthy caucasian adults: reference values.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Günther, Christian M; Bürger, Alexander; Rickert, Markus; Crispin, Alexander; Schulz, Christoph U

    2008-04-01

    The aim of this study was to update reference data of handgrip strength for healthy adults of both genders spanning a wide age range and to analyze possible factors of influence. Intraindividual and interindividual variations of grip strength and their relation to several anthropometric factors were analyzed in a standardized manner for 769 healthy adults (women, n = 403; men, n = 366) aged between 20 years and 95 years. Measurements were done in neutral position of arm, forearm, and wrist on setting II of a Baseline digital hydraulic dynamometer (NexGen Ergonomics Inc. Quebec, Canada). Mean strength was about 41% less in women (right 29 kg; left 27 kg) than in men (right 49 kg; left 47 kg) resulting in a ratio of left to right hand slightly above .95 in both genders. During the course of life, hand strength develops comparably in both genders peaking at 35 years of age and decreasing continuously further on. Anthropometric variables such as forearm circumference and length, hand size, or body mass showed a positive correlation with grip strength. Body mass index, type of work, and hand dominance showed only a partial positive correlation or no correlation with grip strength. Gender and age, followed by parameters representing body length and obesity, were observed to have the highest predictive value for handgrip strength and were therefore entered into the generation of prediction equations. We recommend side adjustment of measured values for intraindividual comparison and inclusion of information regarding anthropometric characteristics, as well as using gender- and age-adjusted reference values, whereas hand dominance can be neglected. The regression equations we generated might prove to be useful for clinicians or for those who use normative values within software to provide more accurate predictions of strength scores for specific applications.

  14. Grip and Pinch Strength Norms for Michigan Workers

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Joel M. Phillips M.S., OTRL

    2013-06-01

    Full Text Available The purpose of this study was to create a norm reference of current grip and pinch strength norms for working-age Michigan adults. This normative study included a convenience sample of 179 volunteers who were employees at car plants in South East Michigan or hospital sites in West Michigan. Participants’ ages ranged from between 20 and 62 years of age with a mean age of 49.15 years. There were 78 females (44% and 101 males (56%. Subjects were classified by gender and in the age categories of ages 20 to 49 years and ages 50-62 years. Grip and pinch strength norms were collected following the American Society of Hand Therapy protocol. The norms from these working adults were calculated with descriptive statistics for males and females in two age classifications: ages 20 to 49 and ages 50 to 62 years. Standard Errors (SE are better than the 1985 norms for both males and females ages 20 to 49 years. SEs are higher than the ages 20 to 49 years’ norms for the ages 50 to 62 years age categories in both males and females. These norms offer a point of comparison for clinicians to use for clients in Michigan who are ages 20 to 62 years and who have a goal to improve their grip strength. Clients’ grip and pinch strength could be compared to their age level or gender norms using the comparison for one standard deviation above, below, or at the means.

  15. Comparative study of maximum isometric grip strength in different sports

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Noé Gomes Borges Junior

    2009-06-01

    Full Text Available The objective of this study was to compare maximum isometric grip strength (Fmaxbetween different sports and between the dominant (FmaxD and non-dominant (FmaxND hand. Twenty-nine male aikido (AI, jiujitsu (JJ, judo (JU and rowing (RO athletes and 21non-athletes (NA participated in the study. The hand strength test consisted of maintainingmaximum isometric grip strength for 10 seconds using a hand dynamometer. The position of the subjects was that suggested by the American Society of Hand Therapy. Factorial 2X5 ANOVA with Bonferroni correction, followed by a paired t test and Tukey test, was used for statistical analysis. The highest Fmax values were observed for the JJ group when using the dominant hand,followed by the JU, RO, AI and NA groups. Variation in Fmax could be attributed to handdominance (30.9%, sports modality (39.9% and the interaction between hand dominance andsport (21.3%. The present results demonstrated significant differences in Fmax between the JJ and AI groups and between the JJ and NA groups for both the dominant and non-dominant hand. Significant differences in Fmax between the dominant and non-dominant hand were only observed in the AI and NA groups. The results indicate that Fmax can be used for comparisonbetween different sports modalities, and to identify differences between the dominant and nondominanthand. Studies involving a larger number of subjects will permit the identification of differences between other modalities.

  16. Normative Measurements of Grip and Pinch Strengths of 21st Century Korean Population

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jin Hee Shim

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available BackgroundMeasuring grip and pinch strength is an important part of hand injury evaluation. Currently, there are no standardized values of normal grip and pinch strength among the Korean population, and lack of such data prevents objective evaluation of post-surgical recovery in strength. This study was designed to establish the normal values of grip and pinch strength among the healthy Korean population and to identify any dependent variables affecting grip and pinch strength.MethodsA cross-sectional study was carried out. The inclusion criterion was being a healthy Korean person without a previous history of hand trauma. The grip strength was measured using a Jamar dynamometer. Pulp and key pinch strength were measured with a hydraulic pinch gauge. Intra-individual and inter-individual variations in these variables were analyzed in a standardized statistical manner.ResultsThere were a total of 336 healthy participants between 13 and 77 years of age. As would be expected in any given population, the mean grip and pinch strength was greater in the right hand than the left. Male participants (137 showed mean strengths greater than female participants (199 when adjusted for age. Among the male participants, anthropometric variables correlated positively with grip strength, but no such correlations were identifiable in female participants in a statistically significant way.ConclusionsObjective measurements of hand strength are an important component of hand injury evaluation, and population-specific normative data are essential for clinical and research purposes. This study reports updated normative hand strengths of the South Korean population in the 21st century.

  17. Grip strength and lower limb extension power in 19-72-year-old Danish men and women

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Aadahl, Mette; Beyer, Nina; Linneberg, Allan

    2011-01-01

    To assess muscular fitness by hand grip strength (HGS) and lower limb extension power (LEP) and to explore associations with age, leisure time physical activity (LTPA) and body composition.......To assess muscular fitness by hand grip strength (HGS) and lower limb extension power (LEP) and to explore associations with age, leisure time physical activity (LTPA) and body composition....

  18. The effectiveness of low-level laser therapy on pain, self-reported hand function, and grip strength compared to placebo or "sham" treatment for adults with carpal tunnel syndrome: A systematic review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Burger, Marlette; Kriel, Réna; Damon, Andrea; Abel, Amy; Bansda, Anisha; Wakens, Marinique; Ernstzen, Dawn

    2017-03-01

    Carpal tunnel syndrome (CTS) is one of the most common peripheral neuropathies in the upper extremity. The aim of this review was to systematically and critically appraise the available literature for the effectiveness of Low-Level Laser Therapy (LLLT) on pain, self-reported hand function, and grip strength compared to placebo treatment in adults with CTS. Seven databases were searched from 2000 to March 2015 namely: Cinahl, Cochrane Library, EBSCOhost, PEDro, PubMed, Science Direct, and Scopus. Key search terms were: CTS, LLLT, and physiotherapy. Specific inclusion and exclusion criteria were applied. The methodological quality was appraised with the PEDro scale. Data were extracted and captured on an Excel spreadsheet. The nine included randomized control trials (RCTs) had an average score of 8.2/11 according to the PEDro scale. The heterogeneity of the LLLT regimes used made statistical pooling inappropriate for this review and results were described narratively. No strong evidence exists concerning the effects of LLLT on CTS in adults. Studies that used 780-860 nm Lasers and energy dosages of 9-11 J/cm(2) or 10.8 J reported a more favorable outcome for pain, symptom severity, and functional ability as well as grip strength at the end of treatment and short-term follow up.

  19. Long-term outcome of muscle strength in ulnar and median nerve injury: Comparing manual muscle strength testing, grip and pinch strength dynamometers and a new intrinsic muscle strength dynamometer

    OpenAIRE

    Schreuders, Ton; Roebroeck, Marij; Jaquet, Jean; Hovius, Steven; Stam, Henk

    2004-01-01

    textabstractObjective: To compare the outcome of muscle strength with manual muscle strength testing grip and pinch strength measurements and a dynamometer which allows for measurements of the intrinsic muscles of the hand in isolation (the Rotterdam Intrinsic Hand Myometer, RIHM). Methods: Thirty-four patients more than 2 years after ulnar and/or median nerve injury. Muscle strength was evaluated using manual muscle strength testing (MMST), grip, pinch and intrinsic muscle strength measureme...

  20. Analysis of the statistical methods used to detect submaximal effort with the five-rung grip strength test.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shechtman, Orit; Gutierrez, Zeida; Kokendofer, Emily

    2005-01-01

    Controversy exists in the literature concerning the ability of the five-rung grip test to identify submaximal effort. The purpose of this study was to analyze four methods commonly used to evaluate the shape of the curve generated by maximal versus submaximal efforts. Thirty hand therapy patients performed the five-rung grip test maximally and submaximally with both their injured and uninjured hands. Grip strength scores were recorded at each of the five-rung positions. Next, four methods were used to analyze the data 1) visual analysis, 2) analysis of variance, 3) normalization, and 4) calculation of the standard deviation across the five strength scores. Analysis by all methods demonstrated that there were no differences between the injured hand exerting maximal effort and the uninjured hand exerting submaximal effort. In all four methods, the five-rung grip strength test was unable to distinguish between the injured hand exerting maximal effort and the uninjured hand exerting submaximal effort. The results suggest that the five-rung grip strength test should not be used to determine sincerity of effort in people with hand injuries, and that the shape of the curve generated by the five-rung grip strength test may not be related to level of effort but rather to the amount of force generated by the gripping hand.

  1. Relationship between grip, pinch strengths and anthropometric variables, types of pitch throwing among Japanese high school baseball pitchers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tajika, Tsuyoshi; Kobayashi, Tsutomu; Yamamoto, Atsushi; Shitara, Hitoshi; Ichinose, Tsuyoshi; Shimoyama, Daisuke; Okura, Chisa; Kanazawa, Saeko; Nagai, Ayako; Takagishi, Kenji

    2015-03-01

    Grip and pinch strength are crucially important attributes and standard parameters related to the functional integrity of the hand. It seems significant to investigate normative data for grip and pinch strength of baseball players to evaluate their performance and condition. Nevertheless, few reports have explained the association between grip and pinch strength and anthropometric variables and types of pitch throwing for baseball pitchers. The aim of this study was to measure and evaluate clinical normative data for grip and tip, key, palmar pinch strength and to assess the relationship between these data and anthropometric variables and types of pitch throwing among Japanese high-school baseball pitchers. One hundred-thirty three healthy high school baseball pitchers were examined and had completed a self-administered questionnaire including items related to age, hand dominance, throwing ratio of type of pitch. A digital dynamometer was used to measure grip strength and a pinch gauge to measure tip, key and palmer pinch in both dominant and nondominant side. Body composition was measured by the multi frequency segmental body composition analyzer. Grip strength and tip and palmer pinch strength in dominant side were statistically greater than them in nondominant side (P types of pitches thrown and grip strength and tip, key, palmar pinch strength. Our result provides normative values and evidences for grip and pinch strengths in high school baseball pitchers.

  2. [Isometric grip strength and social gerontological research: results and analytic potentials of SHARE and SOEP].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hank, K; Jürges, H; Schupp, J; Wagner, G G

    2009-04-01

    This paper shows that the measurement of hand grip strength provides a non-invasive and reliable objective health indicator for social science research and is easy to collect in general population surveys. Grip strength is not only a useful complement of self-reported indicators of health, but it also exhibits a considerable predictive power with regard to a number of further relevant variables for social gerontological research, such as mortality risks. New data from the 2004 Survey of Health, Ageing and Retirement in Europe (SHARE) and the 2006 wave of the German Socio-Economic Panel Study (SOEP) allow insightful methodological and very first substantive cross-sectional analyses of grip strength in Germany. The focus of the present study is on the analysis of individuals aged 50 or older. The experience of both surveys when measuring grip strength is consistently positive, particularly with regard to the respondents' feedback. Major determinants of isometric grip strength are - beyond the individual's gender - age, body size and weight. A multivariate analysis also provides evidence for a clear positive association between various health indicators and grip strength.

  3. Prosthetic Hand With Two Gripping Fingers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Norton, William E.; Belcher, Jewell B.; Vest, Thomas W.; Carden, James R.

    1993-01-01

    Prosthetic hand developed for amputee who retains significant portion of forearm. Outer end of device is end effector including two fingers, one moved by rotating remaining part of forearm about its longitudinal axis. Main body of end effector is end member supporting fingers, roller bearing assembly, and rack-and-pinion mechanism. Advantage of rack-and-pinion mechanism enables user to open or close gap between fingers with precision and force.

  4. Genetic influences on the development of grip strength in adolescence.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Isen, Joshua; McGue, Matt; Iacono, William

    2014-06-01

    Enhanced physical strength is a secondary sex characteristic in males. Sexual dimorphism in physical strength far exceeds sex differences in stature or total body mass, suggesting a legacy of intense sexual selection. Upper-body strength is a particularly promising marker of intrasexual competitiveness in young men. Consequently, it is assumed that sex-influenced gene expression contributes to the development of physical strength. It is unclear, however, whether the underlying sources of individual differences in strength development are comparable across sex. We obtained three measurements of hand-grip strength (HGS) over a six-year period spanning adolescence in male and female same-sex twins (N = 2,513). Biometrical latent growth models were used to partition the HGS variance at age 11 (intercept) and its growth over time (slope) into genetic and environmental components. Results demonstrated that variance around the intercept was highly heritable in both males and females (88% and 79%, respectively). In males, variance around the slope exceeded that of the intercept, while the reverse held for females. Additive genetic effects accounted for most (80%) of the variance around the slope in males, but were of less importance in females (heritability = 28%). Absolute genetic variance around the slope was nearly nine-fold higher in males. This striking disparity suggests that the developmental processes shaping HGS growth are different between the sexes. We propose that this might account for the sex-specific pattern of associations between HGS and external measures (e.g., digit ratio and physical aggression) typically reported in the literature. Our results underscore the role of endogenous androgenic influences in the development of physical strength.

  5. Evaluation of total grip strength and individual finger forces on opposing (A-type) handles among Koreans.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kong, Yong-Ku; Seo, Min-Tae; Kang, Hyun-Sung

    2014-01-01

    The present study evaluated the effect of grip span on finger forces and defined the best grip span for maximising total grip strength based on the finger forces and subjective discomfort in a static exertion. Five grip spans (45, 50, 55, 60 and 65 mm) of the opposing (A-type) handle shape were tested in this study to measure total grip strength and individual finger force among Korean population. A total of 30 males who participated in this study were asked to exert a maximum grip force with two repetitions, and to report the subjective discomfort experienced between exertions using the Borg's CR-10 scale. The highest grip strength was obtained at 45 mm and 50 mm grip spans. Results also showed that forces of all fingers, except for the middle finger force, significantly differed over the grip spans. The lowest subjective discomfort was observed in the 50 mm grip span. The results might be used as development guidelines for ergonomic opposing (A-type) hand tools for Korean population.

  6. Effects of Taping on Pain, Grip Strength and Wrist Extension Force in Patients with Tennis Elbow

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shamsoddini, Alireza; Hollisaz, Mohammad Taghi

    2013-01-01

    Background Tennis elbow (TE) is a common musculotendinous degenerative disorder of the extensor origin at the lateral humeral epicondyle. Different modes of treatment are used for management of tennis elbow. Objectives This study investigated the effect of the taping technique (TT) on pain, grip strength and wrist extension force in treatment of tennis elbow. Patients and Methods Thirty patients (16 men /14 women with a mean age of 32.2 years) with tennis elbow of their dominant arm participated in this study. Outcome measures were assessment of pain at the lateral aspect of the elbow, grip strength and wrist extension force before and five to ten minutes after application of elbow tape on the affected and unaffected arms. A Visual Analog Scale was used to assess pain. A dynamometer and a hand-held dynamometer were used for evaluation of grip strength and wrist extension force, respectively. Results Among the variables, significant differences were found in wrist extension forces between effected and unaffected arms (P = 0.02). Changes in grip strength showed statically significant improvements in the affected arm compared to the unaffected arm (P = 0.03). Also, in assessment of pain at the lateral epicondyle, the mean change between affected and unaffected arms was significant, with P = 0.001. Conclusions The taping technique, as applied in this study demonstrates an impressive effect on wrist extension force and grip strength of patients with TE. Elbow taping also reduces pain at the lateral aspect of the elbow in these patients. PMID:24350156

  7. Medida da força de preensão manual- validade e confiabilidade do dinamômetro saehan Assessment of hand grip strength- validity and reliability of the saehan dynamometer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Maurício Moreira Reis

    2011-06-01

    Full Text Available Existe uma grande variedade de instrumentos utilizados para a avaliação da força de preensão manual. Porém, não existem estudos demonstrando a validade e a confiabilidade da maioria destes instrumentos. O objetivo deste estudo foi avaliar a validade concorrente e a confiabilidade intraexaminador do dinamômetro Saehan hidráulico comparado-o com o dinamômetro Jamar hidráulico. Cem indivíduos sadios (50 homens e 50 mulheres, entre 20 e 50 anos de idade, sem alterações cognitivas, deficiências físicas, disfunções neuromusculares e ortopédicas e história de lesões nos membros superiores, foram testados com os dinamômetros Jamar e Saehan. A validade concorrente entre o dinamômetro Jamar e o dinamômetro Saehan foi excelente para os testes de força de preensão realizados com as mãos direita (r=0,976 e esquerda (r=0,986. A confiabilidade intra-examinador foi excelente tanto para o dinamômetro Jamar (r=0,985 mãos direita e esquerda quanto para o dinamômetro Saehan (r=0,981 mão direita e r=0,985 mão esquerda. O dinamômetro Saehan é válido, confiável e comparável com o dinamômetro Jamar. Portanto, dados coletados com o dinamômetro Jamar são equivalentes aos dados coletados com o dinamômetro Saehan. Consequentemente, valores de força obtidos por testes com dinamômetro Saehan podem ser comparados com valores de referência de força de preensão que foram obtidos com o dinamômetro Jamar.There is a great variety of instruments available for evaluating hand grip strength. There is, however, a lack of studies showing the validity and reliability of most of these instruments. The purpose of this study was to examine the concurrent validity and test-retest reliability of the hydraulic Saehan dynamometer using the hydraulic Jamar dynamometer. One hundred healthy subjects (50 men and 50 women, between the ages of 20 and 50 years old, without cognitive impairment, physical disability, neuromuscular or orthopedic dysfunction

  8. Long-term outcome of muscle strength in ulnar and median nerve injury: Comparing manual muscle strength testing, grip and pinch strength dynamometers and a new intrinsic muscle strength dynamometer

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    A.R. Schreuders (Ton); M.E. Roebroeck (Marij); J.B. Jaquet (Jean); S.E.R. Hovius (Steven); H.J. Stam (Henk)

    2004-01-01

    textabstractObjective: To compare the outcome of muscle strength with manual muscle strength testing grip and pinch strength measurements and a dynamometer which allows for measurements of the intrinsic muscles of the hand in isolation (the Rotterdam Intrinsic Hand Myometer, RIHM). Methods:

  9. Long-term outcome of muscle strength in ulnar and median nerve injury: Comparing manual muscle strength testing, grip and pinch strength dynamometers and a new intrinsic muscle strength dynamometer

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    A.R. Schreuders (Ton); M.E. Roebroeck (Marij); J.B. Jaquet (Jean); S.E.R. Hovius (Steven); H.J. Stam (Henk)

    2004-01-01

    textabstractObjective: To compare the outcome of muscle strength with manual muscle strength testing grip and pinch strength measurements and a dynamometer which allows for measurements of the intrinsic muscles of the hand in isolation (the Rotterdam Intrinsic Hand Myometer, RIHM). Methods: Thirty-f

  10. Grip Strength as a Marker of Hypertension and Diabetes in Healthy Weight Adults.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mainous, Arch G; Tanner, Rebecca J; Anton, Stephen D; Jo, Ara

    2015-12-01

    Muscle strength may play a role in cardiometabolic disease. We examined the relationship between hand grip strength and diabetes and hypertension in a sample of healthy weight adults. In 2015, we analyzed the National Health and Nutrition Examination Survey 2011-2012 for adults aged ≥20 years with healthy BMIs (between 18.5 and Hypertension was based on measured blood pressure and reported hypertension diagnosis. Individuals with undiagnosed diabetes compared with individuals without diabetes had lower grip strength (51.9 vs 69.8, p=0.0001), as did individuals with diagnosed diabetes compared with individuals without diabetes (61.7 vs 69.8, p=0.008). Mean grip strength was lower among individuals with undiagnosed hypertension compared with individuals without hypertension (63.5 vs 71.5, p=0.008) as well as among individuals with diagnosed hypertension compared with those without hypertension (60.8 vs 71.5, phypertension (β=-6.6, p=0.004) and diagnosed hypertension (β=-4.27, p=0.04) compared with individuals without hypertension. Among healthy weight adults, combined grip strength is lower in individuals with diagnosed and undiagnosed diabetes and hypertension. Copyright © 2015 American Journal of Preventive Medicine. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  11. Posture, Flexibility and Grip Strength in Horse Riders

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hobbs Sarah Jane

    2014-10-01

    Full Text Available Since the ability to train the horse to be ambidextrous is considered highly desirable, rider asymmetry is recognized as a negative trait. Acquired postural and functional asymmetry can originate from numerous anatomical regions, so it is difficult to suggest if any is developed due to riding. The aim of this study was therefore to assess symmetry of posture, strength and flexibility in a large population of riders and to determine whether typical traits exist due to riding. 127 right handed riders from the UK and USA were categorized according to years riding (in 20 year increments and their competition level (using affiliated test levels. Leg length, grip strength and spinal posture were measured and recorded by a physiotherapist. Standing and sitting posture and trunk flexibility were measured with 3-D motion capture technology. Right-left differences were explored in relation to years riding and rider competitive experience. Significant anatomical asymmetry was found for the difference in standing acromion process height for a competition level (-0.07±1.50 cm Intro/Prelim; 0.02±1.31 cm Novice; 0.43±1.27 cm Elementary+; p=0.048 and for sitting iliac crest height for years riding (-0.23±1.36 cm Intro/Prelim; 0.01±1.50 cm Novice; 0.86±0.41 cm Elementary+; p=0.021. For functional asymmetry, a significant interaction was found for lateral bending ROM for years riding x competition level (p=0.047. The demands on dressage riders competing at higher levels may predispose these riders to a higher risk of developing asymmetry and potentially chronic back pain rather than improving their symmetry

  12. Posture, flexibility and grip strength in horse riders.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hobbs, Sarah Jane; Baxter, Joanna; Broom, Louise; Rossell, Laura-Ann; Sinclair, Jonathan; Clayton, Hilary M

    2014-09-29

    Since the ability to train the horse to be ambidextrous is considered highly desirable, rider asymmetry is recognized as a negative trait. Acquired postural and functional asymmetry can originate from numerous anatomical regions, so it is difficult to suggest if any is developed due to riding. The aim of this study was therefore to assess symmetry of posture, strength and flexibility in a large population of riders and to determine whether typical traits exist due to riding. 127 right handed riders from the UK and USA were categorized according to years riding (in 20 year increments) and their competition level (using affiliated test levels). Leg length, grip strength and spinal posture were measured and recorded by a physiotherapist. Standing and sitting posture and trunk flexibility were measured with 3-D motion capture technology. Right-left differences were explored in relation to years riding and rider competitive experience. Significant anatomical asymmetry was found for the difference in standing acromion process height for a competition level (-0.07±1.50 cm Intro/Prelim; 0.02±1.31 cm Novice; 0.43±1.27 cm Elementary+; p=0.048) and for sitting iliac crest height for years riding (-0.23±1.36 cm Intro/Prelim; 0.01±1.50 cm Novice; 0.86±0.41 cm Elementary+; p=0.021). For functional asymmetry, a significant interaction was found for lateral bending ROM for years riding x competition level (p=0.047). The demands on dressage riders competing at higher levels may predispose these riders to a higher risk of developing asymmetry and potentially chronic back pain rather than improving their symmetry.

  13. [Reliability and validity of the analysis of hand grip and pinch force in isometric and isokinetic conditions].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Benaglia, P G; Franchignoni, F; Ferriero, G; Zebellin, G; Sartorio, F

    1999-01-01

    Strength measurement of the hand grip is at the core of most protocols of functional assessment of the upper limb and in rehabilitation plays a major role in the analysis of treatment efficacy and patients' occupational ability. The aims of this study were to: a) verify the repeatability of strength measurements made during performance of the hand grip and three types of pinch, carried out under isometric and isokinetic conditions; b) compare maximal isometric strength with the corresponding isokinetic value for each of the manoeuvres studied; c) investigate the correlations between the strength expressed in the different manoeuvres, under both isometric and isokinetic conditions. We studied 14 voluntary subjects over three sessions conducted at 48-hr intervals, employing a computerized isokinetic dynamometer Lido WorkSet equipped with device N(o) 21 for the study of pinch (lateral pinch, pulp pinch, chuck pinch) and device N(o) 52 for the grip study. Isometric contractions resulted stronger than isokinetic ones, and the hand grip was found to be the manoeuvre able to produce most strength. The repeatability of each strength measurement test over the three days was high (Intraclass Correlation Coefficients: 0.89-0.93). Correlations between the isometric and isokinetic performance for each of the manoeuvres examined were always high (Pearson's r coefficients: 0.89-0.95) as were those between the different manoeuvres, whether performed in isometric or isokinetic modality (r: 0.60-0.94).

  14. Effects of Taping on Pain, Grip Strength and Wrist Extension Force in Patients with Tennis Elbow

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alireza Shamsoddini

    2013-09-01

    Full Text Available Background: Tennis elbow (TE is a common musculotendinous degenerative disorder of the extensor origin at the lateral humeral epicondyle. Different modes of treatment are used for management of tennis elbow.Objectives: This study investigated the effect of the taping technique (TT on pain, grip strength and wrist extension force in treatment of tennis elbow.Patients and Methods: Thirty patients (16 men /14 women with a mean age of 32.2 years with tennis elbow of their dominant arm participated in this study. Outcome measures were assessment of pain at the lateral aspect of the elbow, grip strength and wrist extension force before and five to ten minutes after application of elbow tape on the affected and unaffected arms. A Visual Analog Scale was used to assess pain. A dynamometer and a hand-held dynamometer were used for evaluation of grip strength and wrist extension force, respectively.Results: Among the variables, significant differences were found in wrist extension forces between effected and unaffected arms (P = 0.02. Changes in grip strength showed statically significant improvements in the affected arm compared to the unaffected arm (P = 0.03. Also, in assessment of pain at the lateral epicondyle, the mean change between affected and unaffected arms was significant, with P = 0.001.Conclusions: The taping technique, as applied in this study demonstrates an impressive effect on wrist extension force and grip strength of patients with TE. Elbow taping also reduces pain at the lateral aspect of the elbow in these patients.

  15. Does grip strength on the unaffected side of patients with hemiparetic stroke reflect the strength of other ipsilateral muscles?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Takahashi, Jumpei; Nishiyama, Toru; Matsushima, Yoshimasa

    2017-01-01

    [Purpose] Grip strength is used as an indicator of overall body muscular strength. However, most studies on grip strength have been performed in healthy people, and no study has evaluated it in the unaffected side of patients with hemiparetic stroke. The purpose of this study was to determine if grip strength on the unaffected side of patients with hemiparetic stroke correlates with the strength of other ipsilateral musculature. [Subjects and Methods] The maximal strengths of the muscles on the unaffected side of 31 patients with hemiparetic stroke were measured, and correlation coefficients were calculated. [Results] The results revealed significant positive correlations between grip strength on the unaffected side and the strength of the other ipsilateral muscle groups, with relatively high correlations being observed for the upper extremity muscle groups. [Conclusion] This suggests that grip strength on the unaffected side of patients with hemiparetic stroke can be used as a simple way to estimate overall strength on that side.

  16. The Effect of Handedness on Grip Strength in Older Adults with Intellectual Disabilities

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oppewal, Alyt; Hilgenkamp, Thessa I. M.; van Wijck, Ruud; Evenhuis, Heleen M.

    2013-01-01

    Grip strength is an important predictor of several health outcomes in the general older population. Grip strength assessment is feasible and reliable in older adults with intellectual disabilities (ID), which makes it a valuable measurement for application in this population. The purpose of this study was to investigate the effect of handedness on…

  17. Children with flat feet have weaker toe grip strength than those having a normal arch

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tashiro, Yuto; Fukumoto, Takahiko; Uritani, Daisuke; Matsumoto, Daisuke; Nishiguchi, Shu; Fukutani, Naoto; Adachi, Daiki; Hotta, Takayuki; Morino, Saori; Shirooka, Hidehiko; Nozaki, Yuma; Hirata, Hinako; Yamaguchi, Moe; Aoyama, Tomoki

    2015-01-01

    [Purpose] This study investigated the relationship between toe grip strength and foot posture in children. [Subjects and Methods] A total of 619 children participated in this study. The foot posture of the participants was measured using a foot printer and toe grip strength was measured using a toe grip dynamometer. Children were classified into 3 groups; flatfoot, normal, and high arch, according to Staheli’s arch index. The differences in demographic data and toe grip strength among each foot posture group were analyzed by analysis of variance. Additionally, toe grip strength differences were analyzed by analysis of covariance, adjusted to body mass index, age, and gender. [Results] The number of participants classified as flatfoot, normal, and high arch were 110 (17.8%), 468 (75.6%), and 41 (6.6%), respectively. The toe grip strength of flatfoot children was significantly lower than in normal children, as shown by both analysis of variance and analysis of covariance. [Conclusion] A significant difference was detected in toe grip strength between the low arch and normal foot groups. Therefore, it is suggested that training to increase toe grip strength during childhood may prevent the formation of flat feet or help in the development of arch. PMID:26696732

  18. The effect of vibration exposure during haul truck operation on grip strength, touch sensation, and balance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pollard, Jonisha; Porter, William; Mayton, Alan; Xu, Xueyan; Weston, Eric

    2017-01-01

    Falls from mobile equipment are reported at surface mine quarry operations each year in considerable numbers. Research shows that a preponderance of falls occur while getting on/off mobile equipment. Contributing factors to the risk of falls include the usage of ladders, exiting onto a slippery surface, and foot or hand slippage. Balance issues may also contribute to fall risks for mobile equipment operators who are exposed to whole-body vibration (WBV). For this reason, the National Institute for Occupational Safety and Health, Office of Mine Safety and Health Research conducted a study at four participating mine sites with seven haul truck operators. The purpose was to ascertain whether WBV and hand-arm vibration (HAV) exposures for quarry haul truck operators were linked to short-term decreases in performance in relation to postural stability, touch sensation threshold, and grip strength that are of crucial importance when getting on/off the trucks. WBV measures of frequency-weighted RMS accelerations (wRMS) and vibration dose value (VDV), when compared to the ISO/ANSI standards, were mostly below levels identified for the Health Guidance Caution Zone (HGCZ), although there were instances where the levels were within and above the specified Exposure Action Value. Comparably, all mean HAV levels, when compared to the ISO/ANSI standards, were below the HGCZ. For the existing conditions and equipment, no significant correlation could be identified between the WBV, HAV, postural stability, touch sensation threshold, and grip strength measures taken during this study.

  19. Analysis of the effects of hospitalization on fine hand functions compared to gross grip in patients with rheumatoid arthritis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zeynep Tuna

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available Objective: Hospitalization process causes a variety of physical problems. The decrease of hand use in daily life during hospitalization brings hand dysfunction to mind in inpatients. The aim of this study is to compare the hand functions of hospitalized patients with Rheumatoid Arthritis (RA to outpatients in detail. Methods: Grip and pinch strengths of both hospitalized patients in rheumatology service and outpatients on the routine control day were measured. In addition, 9-Hole Peg Test was performed and the disability level was determined by the Turkish version of Michigan Hand Outcomes Questionnaire (MHOQ. Results: While grip strength and MHOQ scores were similar (p>0.05 in both groups, all three pinch strengths (lateral, bipod, tripod and 9HPT scores were lower (p<0.05 in hospitalized patients. Conclusion: Consequently, besides disease activity, hospitalization process also impairs fine hand functions in rheumatological patients. Evaluation of fine hand functions and appropriate rehabilitative interventions may prevent further disability in hospitalized patients. J Clin Exp Invest 2015; 6 (3: 228-232

  20. Is the coefficient of variation a valid measure for detecting sincerity of effort of grip strength?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shechtman, Orit

    1999-01-01

    The wide use of the coefficient of variation in detecting sincerity of effort is puzzling since existing research findings regarding its effectiveness are contradictory. The lack of empirical support in the literature raises the question of whether or not the coefficient of variation is a valid measure for detecting sincerity of effort. Many clinicians, especially those who use a computer software to calculate the coefficient of variation, may not understand how the coefficient of variation is derived and what it is based on. The coefficient of variation is a measure of relative variability and would be used correctly only if the average and the standard deviation of grip strength trials increased proportionally. This case study, however, demonstrated that the average and standard deviation of grip strength are independent. Thus, the coefficient of variation is not a valid measure of sincerity of effort. In addition, this study indicated that the coefficient of variation may be inflated in individuals after carpal tunnel release surgery. The author, therefore, cautions clinicians against the use of the coefficient of variation as a measure of sincerity of effort especially in injured individuals with compromised hand strength.

  1. Kinetic measurements of hand motor impairments after mild to moderate stroke using grip control tasks.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ye, Yu; Ma, Le; Yan, Tiebin; Liu, Huihua; Wei, Xijun; Song, Rong

    2014-05-11

    The aim of this study is to investigate quantitative outcome measurements of hand motor performance for subjects after mild to moderate stroke using grip control tasks and characterize abnormal flexion synergy of upper extremities after stroke. A customized dynamometer with force sensors was used to measure grip force and calculate rotation torque during the sub-maximal grip control tasks. The paretic and nonpartic sides of eleven subjects after stroke and the dominant sides of ten healthy persons were tested. Their maximal voluntary grip force was measured and used to set sub-maximal grip control tasks at three different target force levels. Force control ability was characterized by the maximal grip force, mean force percentage, coefficient of variation (CV), target deviation ratio (TDR), and rotation torque ratio (RTR). The motor impairments of subjects after stroke were also evaluated using the Fugl-Meyer assessment for upper extremity (FMA-UE) and Wolf Motor Function Test (WMFT). Maximal grip force of the paretic side was significantly reduced as compared to the nonparetic side and the healthy group, while the difference of maximal grip force between the nonparetic side and the healthy group was not significant. TDR and RTR increased for all three groups with increasing target force level. There were significant differences of CV, TDR and RTR between the paretic side and the healthy group at all the force levels. CV, TDR and RTR showed significant negative correlations with FMA-UE and WMFT at 50% of maximum grip force. This study designed a customized dynamometer together with an innovative measurement, RTR, to investigate the hand motor performance of subjects after mild to moderate stroke during force control tasks. And stroke-induced abnormal flexion synergy of wrist and finger muscles could be characterized by RTR. This study also identified a set of kinetic parameters which can be applied to quantitatively assess the hand motor function of subjects after

  2. Using the coefficient of variation to detect sincerity of effort of grip strength: a literature review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shechtman, O

    2000-01-01

    Many clinicians use the coefficient of variation (CV) to assess sincerity of effort, without understanding the premise on which it is based or its physiological and mathematical bases. Clinicians who use computerized evaluation systems that calculate the CV may not even be aware of the formula used to derive it. The wide use of the CV in detecting sincerity of effort of grip strength is puzzling, since it lacks empirical support in the literature. This paper examines the physiological rationale for using measures of variability to detect sincerity of effort, the mathematical basis on which the CV is founded, and the reliability and validity of the CV. The conclusions based on this literature review are that the CV is not an appropriate method for determining whether an effort is sincere and that CV values may be inflated in injured patients with compromised hand strength.

  3. Immediate and Delayed Effects of Forearm Kinesio Taping on Grip Strength

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kouhzad Mohammadi, Hosein; Khademi Kalantari, Khosro; Naeimi, Sedighe Sadat; Pouretezad, Mohammad; Shokri, Esmaeil; Tafazoli, Mojdeh; Dastjerdi, Mahboobeh; Kardooni, Leila

    2014-01-01

    Background: Due to the fundamental role of gripping in most upper limb activities, grip strength promotion is a chief goal in the treatment of patients with upper limb musculoskeletal disorders. Kinesio taping is a novel and effective therapeutic technique believed to facilitate muscle contraction through stimulating mechanoreceptors and increasing the sensory feedback around the taped region. Objectives: The present study aimed to identify the best region (flexor, extensor and flexor/extensor regions) and time (immediate, 0.5, 1, 1.5, and 2 hours) of forearm Kinesio taping to obtain the maximum improvement in grip strength. Materials and Methods: In this longitudinal study, 40 healthy men and women (the mean age of 22.3 ± 2.19 years) were selected among students of Shahid Beheshti University of Medical Sciences, Tehran, Iran by simple, nonrandom sampling method. A dynamometer was used to measure grip strength immediately and every 30 minutes during the two hours after I-shaped application of tape (with 50% stretch) to the flexor, extensor, and flexor/extensor forearm muscles. Results: Grip strength was significantly increased in various muscle groups for males (P = 0.002) and females (P = 0.000) of the forearm and at different intervals for males (P = 0.000) and females (P = 0.000). Moreover, in both men and women, tape application to the extensor region provided greater grip strength compared to taping of the flexor and flexor/extensor regions (P = 0.000 for both). Furthermore, the maximum increase in grip strength were 0.5 (10.8% increase, P = 0.001) and 1.5 h (23.9% increase, P = 0.000) after taping in males and females, respectively. Conclusions: Taping the extensor region of forearm is recommended to achieve higher grip strength. Although grip strength increased at a slower pace in females than males, the final values were higher in women. PMID:25389492

  4. Corticomuscular coherence during hand gripping with DBS and medication in PD patients

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sridharan, Kousik Sarathy; Højlund, Andreas; Johnsen, Erik Lisbjerg

    (MEG) from six PD patients performing hand gripping during DBS ON and medicated (levodopa, MED ON) conditions and from ten age-matched healthy controls. Participants performed isotonic contractions (hand gripping) with their right hand, and electromyography (EMG) was recorded from the extensor...... digitorum communis muscle with a belly-tendon montage. We calculated the mean-squared coherence between MEG and the rectified EMG signals. For each group and condition, we selected the maximum CMC value in the beta range (13-30 Hz) within the average of an a priori selection of nine left sensorimotor...

  5. Correlações entre força de preensão manual e variáveis antropométricas da mão de jovens adultos Correlations between grip strength and anthropometric variables of young adults'hand

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Luciane Fernanda Rodrigues Martinho Fernandes

    2011-06-01

    Full Text Available O objetivo do estudo foi correlacionar a força de preensão palmar em diferentes posições de abertura, com variáveis antropométricas da mão. Participaram 73 voluntários de ambos os sexos (40 homens e 33 mulheres, com idade média de 23±4,61 anos. As medidas antropométricas largura da palma, comprimento do dedo indicador, espessura da palma, largura da mão, circunferência da palma e da mão foram realizadas bilateralmente. Para as medidas lineares, utilizou-se um paquímetro digital e, para as medidas de circunferência, a fita métrica. As medidas de força de preensão foram realizadas por meio de um dinamômetro hidráulico (UFTM Jamar®. Os valores antropométricos foram correlacionados com as medidas de força nas cinco posições de abertura. Os homens e as mulheres tiveram maior força na mão direita e, entre as posições, a maior força dos homens foi na de número 3 (45,5±15,53 kgf e das mulheres, na de posição 2 (25,5±6,28 kgf. Verificaram-se correlações significativas entre a força e os valores antropométricos nas medidas da largura da mão e circunferência da palma - que representam a maior medida transversal e o maior trofismo da mão, respectivamente, no grupo dos homens e a medida de comprimento do dedo, que representa a maior medida longitudinal no grupo das mulheres. Com isso, pode-se concluir que, para os homens, a maior força está relacionada à maior medida transversal e ao maior trofismo da mão e, para as mulheres, ao maior comprimento longitudinal da mão.The aim of this study was to correlate the grip strength of hand, in different opening positions, with hand anthropometric measures. The study included 73 volunteers (40 male and 33 female with mean age of 23±4.61 years old. Anthropometric measures, such as palm width, forefinger length, palm thickness, hand width, palm and hand circumferences, were performed bilaterally. For linear measures, a digital caliper rule was used as well as a tape

  6. Reliability of the grip strength coefficient of variation for detecting sincerity in normal and blocked median nerve in healthy adults.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wachter, N J; Mentzel, M; Hütz, R; Gülke, J

    2017-04-01

    In the assessment of hand and upper limb function, detecting sincerity of effort (SOE) for grip strength is of major importance to identifying feigned loss of strength. Measuring maximal grip strength with a dynamometer is very common, often combined with calculating the coefficient of variation (CV), a measure of the variation over the three grip strength trials. Little data is available about the relevance of these measurements in patients with median nerve impairment due to the heterogeneity of patient groups. This study examined the reliability of grip strength tests as well as the CV to detect SOE in healthy subjects. The power distribution of the individual fingers and the thenar was taken into account. To assess reliability, the measurements were performed in subjects with a median nerve block to simulate a nerve injury. The ability of 21 healthy volunteers to exert maximal grip force and to deliberately exert half-maximal force to simulate reduced SOE in a power grip was examined using the Jamar(®) dynamometer. The experiment was performed in a combined setting with and without median nerve block of the same subject. The force at the fingertips of digits 2-5 and at the thenar eminence was measured with a sensor glove with integrated pressure receptors. For each measurement, three trials were recorded subsequently and the mean and CV were calculated. When exerting submaximal force, the subjects reached 50-62% of maximal force, regardless of the median nerve block. The sensor glove revealed a significant reduction of force when exerting submaximal force (P1 sensor) with (P<0.032) and without median nerve block (P<0.017). An increase in CV at submaximal force was found, although it was not significant. SOE can be detected with the CV at the little finger at using a 10% cut-off (sensitivity 0.84 and 0.92 without and with median nerve block, respectively). These findings suggest low reliability of the power grip measurement with the Jamar(®) dynamometer, as

  7. Using Hand Grip Force as a Correlate of Longitudinal Acceleration Comfort for Rapid Transit Trains.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guo, Beiyuan; Gan, Weide; Fang, Weining

    2015-07-02

    Longitudinal acceleration comfort is one of the essential metrics used to evaluate the ride comfort of train. The aim of this study was to investigate the effectiveness of using hand grip force as a correlate of longitudinal acceleration comfort of rapid transit trains. In the paper, a motion simulation system was set up and a two-stage experiment was designed to investigate the role of the grip force on the longitudinal comfort of rapid transit trains. The results of the experiment show that the incremental grip force was linearly correlated with the longitudinal acceleration value, while the incremental grip force had no correlation with the direction of the longitudinal acceleration vector. The results also show that the effects of incremental grip force and acceleration duration on the longitudinal comfort of rapid transit trains were significant. Based on multiple regression analysis, a step function model was established to predict the longitudinal comfort of rapid transit trains using the incremental grip force and the acceleration duration. The feasibility and practicably of the model was verified by a field test. Furthermore, a comparative analysis shows that the motion simulation system and the grip force based model were valid to support the laboratory studies on the longitudinal comfort of rapid transit trains.

  8. Optimal Scoring Methods of Hand-Strength Tests in Patients with Stroke

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huang, Sheau-Ling; Hsieh, Ching-Lin; Lin, Jau-Hong; Chen, Hui-Mei

    2011-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to determine the optimal scoring methods for measuring strength of the more-affected hand in patients with stroke by examining the effect of reducing measurement errors. Three hand-strength tests of grip, palmar pinch, and lateral pinch were administered at two sessions in 56 patients with stroke. Five scoring methods…

  9. Slip detection and grip adjustment using optical tracking in prosthetic hands.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roberts, Luke; Singhal, Girish; Kaliki, Rahul

    2011-01-01

    We have designed a closed loop control system that adjusts the grasping force of a prosthetic hand based on the amount of object slip detected by an optical tracking sensor. The system was designed for the i-Limb (a multi-fingered prosthetic hand from Touch Bionics Inc.) and is comprised of an optical sensor embedded inside a silicone prosthetic glove and a control algorithm. In a proof of concept study to demonstrate the effectiveness of optical tracking in slip sensing, we record slip rate while increasing the weight held in the grasp of the hand and compare two cases: grip adjustment on and grip adjustment off. The average slip rate was found to be 0.314 slips/(s · oz) without grip adjustment and 0.0411 slips/(s · oz) with grip adjustment. This paper discusses the advantages of the optical approach in slip detection and presents the experiment and results utilizing the optical sensor and grip control algorithm.

  10. A COMPARATIVE STUDY TO FIND OUT IMMEDIATE EFFECTIVENESS OF MOVEMENT WITH MOBILIZATION VERSUS ELBOW ORTHOSIS ON PAIN AND GRIP STRENGTH IN LATERAL EPICONDYLITIS IN HOUSEWIVES

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Trishna Kakati

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available Background: There are various studies using Mulligan’s MWM with or without combining with electrotherapy modalities and proved the efficacy of the technique in immediately decreasing pain and improving grip strength in patients with lateral epicondylitis. Orthotic as a treatment is also proved to be beneficial in decreasing pain and improving grip strength. There is evidence that housewives are prone to develop lateral epicondylitis due to their routine household work. But there is lack of evidence which compare initial effects of MWM and orthosis in housewives bringing up better outcome measures. The purpose of this study is to compare the initial effectiveness of Mulligan’s MWM and elbow orthosis on pain and grip strength in housewives with lateral epicondylitis. The aim of the study is to evaluate the effectiveness of Mulligan’s MWM technique versus counterforce elbow orthosis in immediately reducing pain and improving grip strength in lateral epicondylitis in housewives. Methodos: All subjects underwent a pre-treatment examination to assess pain and pain free hand grip strength with the help of outcome measures. Subjects were randomly assigned into two groups, A and B respectively; having 25 subjects in each group. Group A was treated with one session of Mulligan’s MWM technique. Group B was treated with Counterforce elbow strap orthosis. Data was assessed pre-treatment and immediately after treatment. Visual Analogue Scale (VAS and hand grip on Hand Grip Dynamometer (HGD were used as outcome measures. Results: Independent t-test was performed to see the effectiveness between Mulligan’s MWM and elbow orthosis. For VAS, t = - 2.243 which is significant at 5% level of significance. It has been inferred that VAS decreases more when Mulligan’s MWM was applied. For HGD, t = 0.878 which is not significant implying that increase in HGD do not differ remarkably for the two treatments. Conclusion: It has been recorded from the study that

  11. Measurement error in grip and pinch force measurements in patients with hand injuries.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schreuders, Ton A R; Roebroeck, Marij E; Goumans, Janine; van Nieuwenhuijzen, Johan F; Stijnen, Theo H; Stam, Henk J

    2003-09-01

    There is limited documentation of measurement error of grip and pinch force evaluation methods. The purposes of this study were (1) to determine indexes of measurement error for intraexaminer and interexaminer measurements of grip and pinch force in patients with hand injuries and (2) to investigate whether the measurement error differs between measurements of the injured and noninjured hands and between experienced and inexperienced examiners. The subjects were a consecutive sample of 33 patients with hand injuries who were seen in the Department of Rehabilitation Medicine of Erasmus MC-University Medical Center Rotterdam in the Netherlands. Repeated measurements were taken of grip and pinch force, with a short break of 2 to 3 minutes between sessions. For the grip force in 2 handle positions (distance between handles of 4.6 and 7.2 cm, respectively), tip pinch (with the index finger on top and the thumb below, with the other fingers flexed) and key pinch force (with the thumb on top and the radial side of the index finger below) data were obtained on both hands of the subjects by an experienced examiner and an inexperienced examiner. Intraclass correlation coefficients (ICCs), standard errors of measurement (SEMs), and associated smallest detectable differences (SDDs) were calculated and compared with data from previous studies. The reliability of the measurements was expressed by ICCs between .82 and .97. For grip force measurements (in the second handle position) by the experienced examiner, an SDD of 61 N was found. For tip pinch and key pinch, these values were 12 N and 11 N, respectively. For measurements by the inexperienced examiner, SDDs of 56 N for grip force and 13 N and 18 N for tip pinch and key pinch were found. Based on the SEMs and SDDs, in individual patients only relatively large differences in grip and pinch force measurements can be adequately detected between consecutive measurements. Measurement error did not differ between injured and

  12. An investigation of the association between grip strength and hip and knee joint moments in older adults.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Samuel, Dinesh; Rowe, Philip

    2012-01-01

    Grip strength is a predictor of health outcomes but with differing rates of age-related decline in muscle strength, it is unclear whether handgrip is a reliable indicator of lower limb moments. This study investigated the relationship between grip strength and lower extremity moments in community-dwelling older adults. Eighty-two healthy volunteers aged 60-82 years (mean age 73.2 years) performed maximal voluntary contractions of knee and hip extensors and flexors at three positions and at neutral position for hip abductors and adductors using a custom-built dynamometer. Grip strength was measured using an electronic Jamar dynamometer. The relative reduction in muscle strength of 80s age category compared to 60-year-olds ranged from 14% for grip strength to 27% for hip abductors. Peak torque of flexors and extensors of the knee and hip joints were significantly correlated with grip strength and Pearson's correlation coefficients ranged from 0.56 to 0.78 with the highest correlations observed between knee moments and grip strength. "Good" correlation was found but only 31-60% of the variation in grip strength could be related to changes in joint torques. Hence the assumption that grip strength is an indicator of strength in the lower limb would seem unjustified in the healthy older adult.

  13. MusicGlove: motivating and quantifying hand movement rehabilitation by using functional grips to play music.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Friedman, Nizan; Chan, Vicky; Zondervan, Danny; Bachman, Mark; Reinkensmeyer, David J

    2011-01-01

    People with stroke typically must perform much of their hand exercise at home without professional assistance as soon as two weeks after the stroke. Without feedback and encouragement, individuals often lose motivation to practice using the affected hand, and this disuse contributes to further declines in hand function. We developed the MusicGlove as a way to facilitate and motivate at home practice of hand movement. This low-cost device uses music as an interactive and motivating medium to guide hand exercise and to quantitatively assess hand movement recovery. It requires the user to practice functional movements, including pincer grip, key-pinch grip, and finger-thumb opposition, by using those movements to play different musical notes, played along to songs displayed by an interactive computer game. We report here the design of the glove and the results of a single-session experiment with 10 participants with chronic stroke. We found that the glove is well suited for use by people with an impairment level quantified by a Box and Blocks score of at least around 7; that the glove can be used to obtain a measure of hand dexterity (% of notes hit) that correlates strongly with the Box and Blocks score; and that the incorporation of music into training significantly improved both objective measures of hand motor performance and self-ratings of motivation for training in the single session.

  14. Quantification of hand and forearm muscle forces during a maximal power grip task.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goislard de Monsabert, Benjamin; Rossi, Jérémy; Berton, Eric; Vigouroux, Laurent

    2012-10-01

    The aim of this study was to estimate muscle and joint forces during a power grip task. Considering the actual lack of quantification of such internal variables, this information would be essential for sports sciences, medicine, and ergonomics. This study also contributed to the advancement of scientific knowledge concerning hand control during power grip. A specially designed apparatus combining both an instrumented handle and a pressure map was used to record the forces at the hand/handle interface during maximal exertions. Data were processed such that the forces exerted on 25 hand anatomical areas were determined. Joint angles of the five fingers and the wrist were also computed from synchronized kinematic measurements. These processed data were used as input of a hand/wrist biomechanical model, which includes 23 degrees of freedom and 42 muscles to estimate muscle and joint forces. Greater forces were applied on the distal phalanges of the long fingers compared with the middle and the proximal ones. Concomitantly, high solicitations were observed for FDP muscles. A large cocontraction level of extensor muscles was also estimated by the model and confirmed previously reported activities and injuries of extensor muscles related to the power grip. Quantifying hand internal loadings also resulted in new insights into the thumb and the wrist biomechanics. Output muscle tension ratios were all in smaller ranges than the ones reported in the literature. Including wrist and finger interactions in this hand model provided new quantification of muscle load sharing, cocontraction level, and biomechanics of the hand. Such information could complete future investigations concerning handle ergonomics or pathomechanisms of hand musculoskeletal disorders.

  15. Age trajectories of grip strength: cross-sectional and longitudinal data among 8,342 Danes aged 46 to 102

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Frederiksen, Henrik; Hjelmborg, Jacob; Mortensen, Jakob

    2006-01-01

    with increasing age. Estimates were obtained by using full-information methods from large population-representative studies. Equations of expected grip strength, as well as tables with sex-, age-, and height-stratified reference data, provide an opportunity to include grip-strength measurement in clinical care...

  16. EFFECT OF ECCENTRIC EXERCISE PROGRAMME ON PAIN AND GRIP STRENGTH FOR SUBJECTS WITH MEDIAL EPICONDYLITIS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mishra Prashant Akhilesh

    2014-04-01

    Full Text Available Background and Objective: Therapeutic eccentric exercise may provide both a structural and functional benefit during tendinopathy rehabilitation. The objective is to find the effect of eccentric exercises on improvement of pain and grip strength for subjects with Medial Epicondylitis. Method: Pre to post test experimental study design randomized thirty subjects with medial epicondylitis, 15 each into Group A and Group B. Group B subjects were treated with conventional therapy and Eccentric exercises. Group A subjects were treated with conventional therapy. Results: When means of post intervention were compared using Independent ‘t’ between groups there was no statistically significant difference in improvements obtained in VAS scores and grip strength. There was a statistically significant change in means of VAS score and Grip strength when means were analyzed by using Paired‘t’ test and Wilcoxon signed rank test within the groups with positive percentage of change. Conclusion: It is concluded that four weeks of Eccentric Exercise Programme combined with conventional therapy shown significant effect on improving pain and Grip strength, however the improvement obtained has no difference when compared with control conventional treatment for Subjects with Medial Epicondylitis.

  17. Development of normative data for hand strength and anthropometric dimensions in a population of automotive workers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kunelius, Amanda; Darzins, Susan; Cromie, Jean; Oakman, Jodi

    2007-01-01

    (1) To develop a normative data set for hand strength and anthropometric dimensions in automotive trim line workers. (2) To examine the relationship between trim line worker demographics and hand strength. Work tasks inherent in the automobile manufacturing industry such as forceful gripping and pinching, place physical demands upon the hands and fingers. This places workers at risk of developing a musculoskeletal injury. To reduce the risk of injury it is necessary to apply user strength data in the design phase of hand intensive tasks in order to create a fit between the person and the task. Demographic variables, anthropometry and maximal grip and pinch strength were measured for one hundred and sixty-one trim line automotive workers. Their data were analyzed to examine the associations between the variables. Significant hand strength differences were found in relation to age, gender, hand dominance and anthropometry. The workers in this study had significantly lower strength values than previously used reference data. The disparity between the present study's strength data and that of Mathiowetz et al. [22] may be due to the different demographic pools from which the populations were drawn. A training effect appeared to exist in trim line workers which may have reduced the disparity in hand strength between the hands as the number of years worked on the line increased. Caution should be taken when applying international normative data sets to the design of hand tools/workstations, as global differences in hand strength are likely to exist.

  18. Computer vision-based classification of hand grip variations in neurorehabilitation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zariffa, José; Steeves, John D

    2011-01-01

    The complexity of hand function is such that most existing upper limb rehabilitation robotic devices use only simplified hand interfaces. This is in contrast to the importance of the hand in regaining function after neurological injury. Computer vision technology has been used to identify hand posture in the field of Human Computer Interaction, but this approach has not been translated to the rehabilitation context. We describe a computer vision-based classifier that can be used to discriminate rehabilitation-relevant hand postures, and could be integrated into a virtual reality-based upper limb rehabilitation system. The proposed system was tested on a set of video recordings from able-bodied individuals performing cylindrical grasps, lateral key grips, and tip-to-tip pinches. The overall classification success rate was 91.2%, and was above 98% for 6 out of the 10 subjects. © 2011 IEEE

  19. Avaliação da função manual e da força de preensão palmar máxima em indivíduos com diabetes mellitus Hand function and power grip strength assessment in individuals with diabetes mellitus

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kauê Carvalho de Almeida Lima

    2012-12-01

    involving object manipulation. The aim of the study was to compare the performance of diabetic individual without diagnosis of neuropathy with non-diabetic healthy individuals in manipulation task and their maximum power grip strength. Thirteen diabetic individuals without peripheral neuropathy diagnosis (48.6±11.51 years-old; 79.9±10.88 kg; 1.68±0.09 m and 13 healthy age- and gender-matched controls (48.5±10.09 years-old; 76.44±11.79 kg; 1.69±0.1 m participated in the study. Hand cutaneous sensitivity was assessed by the Semmes-Weinstein monofilaments examination (SWME followed by the application of three tests commonly used to assess hand function: Jebsen-Taylor hand function test (JTHFT, nine hole peg test (9HPT and maximum power grip strength test (GSmax. The results of SWME revealed that eight diabetic individuals presented normal cutaneous sensitivity and five showed mild sensory losses, but that was not enough to characterize them as neuropathic diabetics. Regarding the hand function tests, the results revealed no difference between diabetic individuals and healthy controls in any of the tests performed (diabetic individuals and controls - JHHFT: 26.15±3.06 and 25.78±1.29 s; 9HPT: 15.33±1.35 and 15.48±2.39 s; GSmax: 41.15±10.59 and 43.69±12.59 kgf. Therefore, we conclude that diabetic individuals without neuropathy show no hand function impairment, as well as no reduction in the maximum power grip strength.

  20. Synaptic and functional linkages between spinal premotor interneurons and hand-muscle activity during precision grip

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tomohiko eTakei

    2013-04-01

    Full Text Available Grasping is a highly complex movement that requires the coordination of a number of hand joints and muscles. Previous studies showed that spinal premotor interneurons (PreM-INs in the primate cervical spinal cord have divergent synaptic effects on hand motoneurons and that they might contribute to hand-muscle synergies. However, the extent to which these PreM-IN synaptic connections functionally contribute to modulating hand-muscle activity is not clear. In this paper, we explored the contribution of spinal PreM-INs to hand-muscle activation by quantifying the synaptic linkage (SL and functional linkage (FL of the PreM-INs with hand-muscle activities. The activity of 23 PreM-INs was recorded from the cervical spinal cord (C6–T1, with EMG signals measured simultaneously from hand and arm muscles in two macaque monkeys performing a precision grip task. Spike-triggered averages (STAs of rectified EMGs were compiled for 456 neuron–muscle pairs; 63 pairs showed significant post-spike effects (i.e., SL. Conversely, 231 of 456 pairs showed significant cross-correlations between the IN firing rate and rectified EMG (i.e., FL. Importantly, a greater proportion of the neuron–muscle pairs with SL showed FL (43/63 pairs, 68% compared with the pairs without SL (203/393, 52%, and the presence of SL was significantly associated with that of FL. However, a significant number of pairs had SL without FL (SL∩!FL, n = 20 or FL without SL (!SL∩FL, n = 203, and the proportions of these incongruities exceeded the number expected by chance. These results suggested that spinal PreM-INs function to significantly modulate hand-muscle activity during precision grip, but the contribution of other neural structures is also needed to recruit an adequate combination of hand-muscle motoneurons.

  1. Adherence to a standardized protocol for measuring grip strength and appropriate cut-off values in adults over 65 years with sarcopenia: a systematic review protocol.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fox, Benjamin; Henwood, Tim; Schaap, Laura; Bruyère, Olivier; Reginster, Jean-Yves; Beaudart, Charlotte; Buckinx, Fanny; Roberts, Helen; Cooper, Cyrus; Cherubini, Antonio; dellʼAquilla, Giuseppina; Maggio, Marcello; Volpato, Stefano

    2015-10-01

    studies. On the other hand, within this definition there still is wide variability in measurement tools and use of cut-off values, which could actually hamper comparability between studies.To assess muscle strength, the EWGSOP has recommended grip strength measurement which is easy and inexpensive. A recent systematic review on the measurement properties of tools to assess sarcopenia concluded that grip strength measurement is a valid and reliable method. In a comprehensive review of the measurement of grip strength in clinical and epidemiological studies by Roberts et al., it was shown that there is wide variability in the choice of equipment and protocols for measuring grip strength. To enable comparison between studies, a standardized approach, incorporating more consistent measurement of grip strength is warranted. Based on the results of the review, a standardized approach was described including the utilization of the widely used Jamar hydraulic hand dynamometer, as was a clear assessment protocol. So far, it is unknown whether this approach has been adopted in studies investigating grip strength for sarcopenia. The primary aim of this current review is to identify whether studies are adhering to the suggested protocol, or whether a more common method is prevalent. The EWGSOP has suggested multiple cut-off values to define sarcopenia regarding muscle strength: an absolute cut-off score of 20 kilograms (kg) for women and 30 kg for men, and Body Mass Index (BMI) specific cut-off values for men and women. Alternatively, the Foundation for the National Institutes of Health (FNIH) Sarcopenia Study suggested cut-off points of 26kg for males and 16kg for females, based on the likelihood of mobility impairment. Similar values have also been suggested by Dodds et al., who generated grip strength reference values and calculated cut-off points 2.5 standard deviations below the mean from 12 United Kingdom (U.K)based epidemiology studies.Recently, Beaudart et al. showed that

  2. Muscular forearm activation in hand-grip tasks with superimposition of mechanical vibrations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fattorini, L; Tirabasso, A; Lunghi, A; Di Giovanni, R; Sacco, F; Marchetti, E

    2016-02-01

    The purpose of this paper is to evaluate the muscular activation of the forearm, with or without vibration stimuli at different frequencies while performing a grip tasks of 45s at various level of exerted force. In 16 individuals, 9 females and 7 males, the surface electromyogram (EMG) of extensor carpi radialis longus and the flexor carpi ulnari muscles were assessed. At a short latency from onset EMG, RMS and the level of MU synchronization were assessed to evaluate the muscular adaptations. Whilst a trend of decay of EMG Median frequency (MDFd) was employed as an index of muscular fatigue. Muscular tasks consists of the grip of an instrumented handle at a force level of 20%, 30%, 40%, 60% of the maximum voluntary force. Vibration was supplied by a shaker to the hand in mono-frequential waves at 20, 30, 33 and 40Hz. In relation to EMG, RMS and MU synchronization, the muscular activation does not seem to change with the superimposition of the mechanical vibrations, on the contrary a lower MDFd was observed at 33Hz than in absence of vibration. This suggests an early muscular fatigue induced by vibration due to the fact that 33Hz is a resonance frequency for the hand-arm system.

  3. Grip Strength Decline and Its Determinants in the Very Old: Longitudinal Findings from the Newcastle 85+ Study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Davies, Karen; Jagger, Carol; Kirkwood, Thomas B. L.; Syddall, Holly E.; Sayer, Avan A.

    2016-01-01

    Background Weak grip strength (GS) is a key component of sarcopenia and frailty and a powerful predictor of mortality, morbidity and disability. Despite increasing interest in understanding GS across the lifespan, little is known about GS decline in the very old (aged ≥85). We examined trajectories of GS in very old adults and identified the determinants. Methods GS (kg) was measured four times over 5 years in 319 men and 526 women participating in the Newcastle 85+ Study. A weak GS sub-cohort was identified as having strength of ≤27 kg (men), and ≤16 kg (women) at baseline and follow-up. Mixed models were used to establish trajectories of GS and associated factors in all participants, men and women, and in those with weak GS. Results Men’s mean grip strength was 24.42 (SD = 6.77) kg, and women’s 13.23 (4.42) kg (p<0.001) at baseline, with mean absolute change of -5.27 (4.90) kg and -3.14 (3.41), respectively (p<0.001) by 5-year follow-up. In the time-only mixed model, men experienced linear annual decline in GS of -1.13 (0.8) kg (β (SE), p<0.001), whilst women’s decline although slower, accelerated by -0.06 (0.02) kg (p = 0.01) over time. In the saturated model, higher baseline physical activity, height, fat-free mass, better self-rated health, and not having arthritis in hand(s) were associated with stronger GS initially in both sexes. Annual GS decline in men and participants with weak GS who were highly physically active was slower by 0.95 and 0.52 kg, respectively compared with inactive counterparts. Conclusion Grip strength decline in the very old followed linear (men) and curvilinear (women) trends. High levels of physical activity were protective of GS loss in men (but not in women) and in those with weak GS. Thus maintaining muscle strength in later life is important to reduce the morbidity and mortality in the very old. PMID:27637107

  4. Effect of isometric hand grip on heart rate in normotensive and hypertensive individuals during head up tilt (300 and 600)

    OpenAIRE

    Badwe, A. N.; Latti, Ramchandra Girimalappa

    2017-01-01

    Objective: To study the effect of isometric hand grip exercise at 20% on normotensive, treated hypertensive, and non treated hypertensive in supine position, and at 300 and 600 head up tilt.Material and Methods: After recording heart rate in supine position, isometric hand grip exercise at 20% was conducted for 2 minutes with dominant hand and heart rate was recorded for 1 minute in all subjects after end of the exercise. The same maneuver was repeated before head up tilt in supine position a...

  5. Interobserver reproducibility of the assessment of severity of complaints, grip strength, and pressure pain threshold in patients with lateral epicondylitis.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Smidt, N.; Windt, A. van der; Assendelft, W.J.; Mourits, A.J.; Devillé, W.L.; Winter, F. de; Bouter, L.M.

    2002-01-01

    Objective: To evaluate the interobserver reproducibility of the assessment of severity of complaints, grip strength, and pressure pain threshold in patients with lateral epicondylitis in primary care. Design: Two physiotherapists assessed independently, and in randomized order, the severity of

  6. Interobserver reproducibility of the assessment of severity of complaints, grip strength, and pressure pain threshold in patients with lateral epicondylitis

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Smidt, N; van der Windt, DA; Assendelft, WJ; Mourits, AJ; Deville, WL; de Winter, AF; Bouter, LM

    2002-01-01

    Objective: To evaluate the interobserver reproducibility of the assessment of severity of complaints, grip strength, and pressure pain threshold in patients with lateral epicondylitis in primary care. Design: Two physiotherapists assessed independently, and in randomized order, the severity of compl

  7. Interobserver reproducibility of the assessment of severity of complaints, grip strength, and pressure pain threshold in patients with lateral epicondylitis.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Smidt, N.; Windt, A. van der; Assendelft, W.J.; Mourits, A.J.; Devillé, W.L.; Winter, F. de; Bouter, L.M.

    2002-01-01

    Objective: To evaluate the interobserver reproducibility of the assessment of severity of complaints, grip strength, and pressure pain threshold in patients with lateral epicondylitis in primary care. Design: Two physiotherapists assessed independently, and in randomized order, the severity of compl

  8. Nutritional status is the major factor affecting grip strength of African HIV patients before and during antiretroviral treatment

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Filteau, Suzanne; PrayGod, G; Woodd, Susannah L

    2017-01-01

    involved HIV-infected Zambian and Tanzanian participants recruited to the NUSTART trial when malnourished (body mass index requiring ART. The relationship of grip strength to nutritional, infectious and demographic factors was assessed by multivariable linear regression at referral...

  9. Validade preditiva de equações de referência para força de preensão manual em homens brasileiros de meia idade e idosos Predictive validity of reference equations to hand grip strength in Brazilian men of middle age and elderly

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alex de Andrade Fernandes

    2012-12-01

    Full Text Available O objetivo deste estudo foi verificar a validade preditiva das equações de referência para predição da força de preensão manual (FPM em homens brasileiros de meia idade e idosos. Foram avaliados 60 homens com idade de 58,7±8,6 anos (50-84 anos, estatura 168,7±8,0 cm, massa corporal 67,9±13,0 kg e índice de massa corporal 23,7±4,0 kg/m², utilizando equipamento 'padrão-ouro' na avaliação da FPM e seguindo todas as recomendações metodológicas preconizadas pela American Society of Hand Therapists (ASHT. Os resultados do diagrama de Bland-Altman para mão dominante (MD apresentam um erro médio (viés de -8,4% (IC95% -51,6-34,7. Já o diagrama de Bland-Altman para mão não dominante (MND apresenta um erro médio (viés de 1,4% (IC95% -47,1-49,8. O cálculo de Cronbach's alpha para a MD foi de 0,69 e 0,59 para MND. O coeficiente de correlação intraclasse para MD foi 0,52 (IC95% 31-68 e de 0,42 (IC95% 20-60 para a MND. Concluímos que as equações para predição analisadas neste estudo, para uma população de homens brasileiros de meia idade e idosos, apresentou baixa validade preditiva, o que pode gerar erros de interpretação dos resultados.The objective of this study was to verify the predictive validity of reference equations for hand grip strength (HGS in middle-aged and elderly Brazilian men. We evaluated 60 men with age of 58.7±8.6 years, height 168.7±8.0 cm, body mass 67.9±13.0 kg, and body mass index 23.7±4.0 kg/m², utilizing the gold standard equipment for evaluation of HGS and following all methodological recommendations of the American Society of Hand Therapists (ASTH. The results of the Bland-Altman diagram for the dominant hand (DH had a mean error (bias of -8.4% (95%CI -51.6-34.7. The Bland-Altman diagram for the non-dominant hand (NDH had a mean error (bias of 1.4% (95%CI -47.1-49.8. The calculation of Cronbach's alpha was 0.69 for the DH and 0.59 for the NDH. The intraclass correlation coefficient was 0

  10. Nutritional status is the major factor affecting grip strength of African HIV patients before and during antiretroviral treatment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Filteau, S; PrayGod, G; Woodd, S L; Friis, H; Heimburger, D C; Koethe, J R; Kelly, P; Kasonka, L; Rehman, A M

    2017-10-01

    Low grip strength is a marker of frailty and a risk factor for mortality among HIV patients and other populations. We investigated factors associated with grip strength in malnourished HIV patients at referral to ART, and at 12 weeks and 2-3 years after starting ART. The study involved HIV-infected Zambian and Tanzanian participants recruited to the NUSTART trial when malnourished (body mass index <18.5 kg/m(2) ) and requiring ART. The relationship of grip strength to nutritional, infectious and demographic factors was assessed by multivariable linear regression at referral for ART (n = 1742) and after 12 weeks (n = 778) and 2-3 years of ART (n = 273). In analyses controlled only for sex, age and height, most nutrition and infection-related variables were associated with grip strength. However, in multivariable analyses, consistent associations were seen for fat-free mass index, mid-upper arm circumference, haemoglobin and systolic blood pressure, and a variable association with fat mass index in men. C-reactive protein and CD4 count had limited independent effects on grip strength, while receiving tuberculosis treatment was associated with weaker grip strength. In this population of originally malnourished HIV patients, poor grip strength was more strongly and independently associated with nutritional than with infection and inflammation variables. Programmes to improve health and survival of HIV patients should incorporate nutritional assessment and management and could use grip strength as a functional indicator of improving nutrition. © 2017 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  11. Spinal interneurons facilitate coactivation of hand muscles during a precision grip task in monkeys.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Takei, Tomohiko; Seki, Kazuhiko

    2010-12-15

    Grasping is a highly complex movement requiring coordination of a number of hand joints and muscles. In contrast to cortical descending systems, the contribution of the subcortical system for coordinating this higher degree of freedom is largely unknown. Here we explore how spinal interneurons (INs) contribute to the coordination of hand muscles by recording their activity from the cervical spinal cord (C5-T1) simultaneously with electromyographic (EMG) activity from hand and arm muscles in three monkeys performing a precision grip task. Spike-triggered averages of the rectified EMGs were compiled for 255 neurons (4821 neuron-muscle pairs). Twenty-six neurons produced 68 significant postspike effects in hand and arm muscles and were identified as premotor interneurons (PreM-INs), which presumably have relatively direct synaptic effects on spinal motoneurons. The majority of the PreM-INs (22/26 neurons) produced postspike effects in finger muscles (intrinsic and extrinsic hand muscles) compared with wrist (9/26 neurons) and elbow muscles (1/26 neurons). The effects in finger muscles were mostly facilitative [postspike facilitations (PSFs), 19/22 neurons], and few had suppressive effects (postspike suppressions, 3/22 neurons). Moreover, PreM-INs produced more divergent PSFs in intrinsic hand muscles (2.5 ± 1.9 muscles/neuron) than in wrist muscles (1.2 ± 0.4 muscles/neurons). We conclude that spinal PreM-INs produce divergent facilitations preferentially in intrinsic hand muscles. These results suggest that spinal interneurons contribute to the control of hand grasping in primates by combining and coordinating multiple finger muscles.

  12. Tongue Strength is Associated with Grip Strength and Nutritional Status in Older Adult Inpatients of a Rehabilitation Hospital.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sakai, Kotomi; Nakayama, Enri; Tohara, Haruka; Maeda, Tomomi; Sugimoto, Motonobu; Takehisa, Takahiro; Takehisa, Yozo; Ueda, Koichiro

    2017-04-01

    The aim of this cross-sectional study was to investigate whether tongue strength observed in older adult inpatients of a rehabilitation hospital is associated with muscle function, nutritional status, and dysphagia. A total of 174 older adult inpatients aged 65 years and older in rehabilitation (64 men, 110 women; median age, 84 years; interquartile range, 80-89 years) who were suspected of having reduced tongue strength due to sarcopenia were included in this study. Isometric tongue strength was measured using a device fitted with a disposable oral balloon probe. We evaluated age, muscle function as assessed by the Barthel index and grip strength, nutritional status as measured by the Mini Nutritional Assessment-short form (MNA-SF), body mass index, serum albumin, controlling nutritional status, and calf circumference and arm muscle area to assess muscle mass. In addition, the functional oral intake scale (FOIS) was used as an index of dysphagia. Multivariate linear regression analysis revealed that isometric tongue strength was independently associated with grip strength (coefficient = 0.33, 95 % confidence interval (CI) 0.12-0.54, p = 0.002), MNA-SF (coefficient = 0.74, 95 % CI 0.12-1.35, p = 0.019), and FOIS (coefficient = 0.02, 95 % CI 0.00-0.15, p = 0.047). To maintain and improve tongue strength in association with sarcopenic dysphagia, exercise therapy and nutritional therapy interventions, as well as direct interventions to address tongue strength, may be effective in dysphagia rehabilitation in older adult inpatients.

  13. Short-Term Effects of Whole-Body Vibration Combined with Task-Related Training on Upper Extremity Function, Spasticity, and Grip Strength in Subjects with Poststroke Hemiplegia: A Pilot Randomized Controlled Trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Jung-Sun; Kim, Chang-Yong; Kim, Hyeong-Dong

    2016-08-01

    The aim of this study was to determine the effect of whole-body vibration training combined with task-related training on arm function, spasticity, and grip strength in subjects with poststroke hemiplegia. Forty-five subjects with poststroke were randomly allocated to 3 groups, each with 15 subjects as follows: control group, whole-body vibration group, and whole-body vibration plus task-related training group. Outcome was evaluated by clinical evaluation and measurements of the grip strength before and 4 weeks after intervention. Our results show that there was a significantly greater increase in the Fugl-Meyer scale, maximal grip strength of the affected hand, and grip strength normalized to the less affected hand in subjects undergoing the whole-body vibration training compared with the control group after the test. Furthermore, there was a significantly greater increase in the Wolf motor function test and a decrease in the modified Ashworth spasticity total scores in subjects who underwent whole-body vibration plus task-related training compared with those in the other 2 groups after the test. The findings indicate that the use of whole-body vibration training combined with task-related training has more benefits on the improvement of arm function, spasticity, and maximal grip strength than conventional upper limb training alone or with whole-body vibration in people with poststroke hemiplegia.

  14. Intra-session and inter-day reliability of forearm surface EMG during varying hand grip forces.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hashemi Oskouei, Alireza; Paulin, Michael G; Carman, Allan B

    2013-02-01

    Surface electromyography (EMG) is widely used to evaluate forearm muscle function and predict hand grip forces; however, there is a lack of literature on its intra-session and inter-day reliability. The aim of this study was to determine reliability of surface EMG of finger and wrist flexor muscles across varying grip forces. Surface EMG was measured from six forearm flexor muscles of 23 healthy adults. Eleven of these subjects undertook inter-day test-retest. Six repetitions of five randomized isometric grip forces between 0% and 80% of maximum force (MVC) were recorded and normalized to MVC. Intra- and inter-day reliability were calculated through the intraclass correlation coefficient (ICC) and standard error of measurement (SEM). Normalized EMG produced excellent intra-session ICC of 0.90 when repeated measurements were averaged. Intra-session SEM was low at low grip forces, however, corresponding normalized SEM was high (23-45%) due to the small magnitude of EMG signals. This may limit the ability to evaluate finer forearm muscle function and hand grip forces in daily tasks. Combining EMG of functionally related muscles improved intra-session SEM, improving within-subject reliability without taking multiple measurements. Removing and replacing electrodes inter-day produced poor ICC (ICC < 0.50) but did not substantially affect SEM.

  15. The coefficient of variation as a measure of sincerity of effort of grip strength, Part I: the statistical principle.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shechtman, O

    2001-01-01

    The coefficient of variation (CV) is a widely used measure of sincerity of effort of grip strength despite contradictory research findings and lack of empirical support in the literature. The purpose of this study was to investigate whether the CV is an appropriate measure of sincerity of effort. One hundred forty-six uninjured volunteers underwent a series of grip strength tests. The mean, standard deviation (SD), and CV of repeated strength trials were calculated, and paired comparisons were conducted between maximal and submaximal efforts. While the mean of maximal trials was significantly greater, there were no differences in SD between maximal and submaximal trials. Therefore, the increased CV associated with submaximal effort was an artifact of reduced torque rather than an indicator of a true increase in variability. Consequently, the CV is not an appropriate measure of sincerity of effort of grip strength.

  16. Efeito da preensão manual sobre o equilíbrio de judocas Effect of hand grip on the balance of judokas

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jonathan Ache Dias

    2011-06-01

    Full Text Available O objetivo deste estudo foi verificar se existe efeito da preensão manual máxima (o ato de realizar ou não a preensão sobre o controle do equilíbrio de judocas em postura restrita, além de verificar se existe correlação entre a força de preensão manual (FPM e o controle do equilíbrio. Foram avaliados sete judocas com um dinamômetro e uma plataforma estabilométrica sendo mensuradas, concomitantemente, a FPM e o centro de pressão (CP. Foi verificado que até 80% da variabilidade do CP pode ser atrelada a preensão manual indicando que a mesma gera perturbações no controle do equilíbrio. Entretanto, foram encontradas correlações (r = 0,348 até 0,816 entre a FPM e o deslocamento do CP. Com isso pode-se concluir que, apesar da preensão manual gerar perturbações no equilíbrio, seu comportamento parece estar relacionado com os movimentos do corpo realizados para manter o equilíbrio, indicando uma possível correlação entre esses fenômenos.The purpose of this study was to verify if there is an effect of maximum hand grip (the act of performing or not the hand grip on the balance control of judokas in a restrict posture, and also to verify if there is a correlation between the hand grip strength (HGS and the balance control. Seven judokas were evaluated with a dynamometer and a stabilometric force platform, being measured, at the same time, the HGS and the center of pressure (COP. It was found that up to 80% of the COP variability was related to the hand grip demonstrating that it generates perturbations to the balance control. However, It was found correlations (r = 0,348 to 0,816 between de HGS and de COP displacement. With that, it can be concluded that, despite the hand grip generating perturbation on the balance, its behavior appears to be related to the body movements performed to sustain balance, indicating a possible correlation between this phenomenons.

  17. Low serum selenium concentrations are associated with poor grip strength among older women living in the community

    OpenAIRE

    2007-01-01

    Aging is associated with a loss of muscle strength, and, in turn, loss of muscle strength has been associated with increased risk of frailty, disability and mortality. The factors that contribute to loss of muscle strength with aging have not been well characterized. Selenium is important in normal muscle function because of its role in selenoenzymes that protect muscle against oxidative damage. We hypothesized that low serum selenium concentrations were associated with poor grip strength. We...

  18. [Evaluation of grip strength in normal and obese Wistar rats submitted to swimming with overload after median nerve compression].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Coradinia, Josinéia Gresele; Kakihata, Camila Mayumi Martin; Kunz, Regina Inês; Errero, Tatiane Kamada; Bonfleur, Maria Lúcia; Bertolini, Gladson Ricardo Flor

    2015-01-01

    To verify the functionality through muscle grip strength in animals with obesity induced by monosodium glutamate (MSG) and in control animals, which suffered compression of the right median nerve, and treated with swimming with overload. During the first five days of life, neonatal Wistar rats received subcutaneous injections of MSG. The control group received a hypertonic saline solution. Forty-eight rats were divided into six groups: G1 (control); G2 (control + injury); G3 (control + injury + swimming); G4 (obese); G5 (obese + injury); G6 (obese + injury + swimming). The animals in groups G2, G3, G5 and G6 were submitted to compression of the median nerve and G3 and G6 groups were treated, after injury, with swimming exercise with load for three weeks. The swimming exercise had a progressive duration, according to the week, of 20, 30 and 40minutes. Muscle strength was assessed using a grip strength meter preoperatively and on the 3rd, 7th, 14th and 21st days after surgery. The results were expressed and analyzed using descriptive and inferential statistics. When the grip strength was compared among assessments regardless of group, in the second assessment the animals exhibited lower grip strength. G1 and G4 groups had greater grip strength, compared to G2, G3, G4 and G6. The swimming exercise with overload has not been effective in promoting improvement in muscle grip strength after compression injury of the right median nerve in control and in obese-MSG rats. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Editora Ltda. All rights reserved.

  19. Effects of smartphone overuse on hand function, pinch strength, and the median nerve.

    Science.gov (United States)

    İnal, Esra Erkol; Demİrcİ, kadİr; Çetİntürk, Azİze; Akgönül, Mehmet; Savaş, Serpİl

    2015-08-01

    In this study we investigated the flexor pollicis longus (FPL) tendon and median nerve in smartphone users by ultrasonography to assess the effects of smartphone addiction on the clinical and functional status of the hands. One hundred two students were divided into 3 groups: non-users, and high or low smartphone users. Smartphone Addiction Scale (SAS) scores and grip and pinch strengths were recorded. Pain in thumb movement and rest and hand function were evaluated on the visual analog scale (VAS) and the Duruöz Hand Index (DHI), respectively. The cross-sectional areas (CSAs) of the median nerve and the FPL tendon were calculated bilaterally using ultrasonography. Significantly higher median nerve CSAs were observed in the dominant hands of the high smartphone users than in the non-dominant hands (PSmartphone overuse enlarges the median nerve, causes pain in the thumb, and decreases pinch strength and hand functions. © 2015 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  20. Physical function, grip strength and frailty in people living with HIV in sub-Saharan Africa: systematic review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bernard, Charlotte; Dabis, François; de Rekeneire, Nathalie

    2017-05-01

    To present the current knowledge on physical function, grip strength and frailty in HIV-infected patients living in sub-Saharan Africa, where the phenomenon is largely underestimated. A systematic search was conducted on MEDLINE, Scopus and African Index Medicus. We reviewed articles on sub-Saharan African people living with HIV (PLHIV) >18 years old, published until November 2016. Of 537 articles, 12 were conducted in six African countries and included in this review. Five articles reported information on functional limitation and one on disability. Two of these five articles reported functional limitation (low gait speed) in PLHIV. Disability was observed in 27% and 3% of PLHIV living in rural and urban places, respectively. Two of three studies reporting grip strength reported lower grip strength (nearly 4 kg) in PLHIV in comparison with uninfected patients. One study reported that PLHIV were more likely to be frail than HIV-uninfected individuals (19.4% vs. 13.3%), whereas another reported no statistical difference. Decline in physical function, grip strength and frailty are now part of the burden of PLHIV living in SSA countries, but current data are insufficient to characterise the real public health dimension of these impairments. Further studies are needed to depict this major public health challenge. As this is likely to contribute to a significant burden on the African healthcare systems and human resources in the near future, a holistic care approach should be developed to inform guidelines. © 2017 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  1. Key Insights into Hand Biomechanics: Human Grip Stiffness Can Be Decoupled from Force by Cocontraction and Predicted from Electromyography

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hannes Höppner

    2017-05-01

    Full Text Available We investigate the relation between grip force and grip stiffness for the human hand with and without voluntary cocontraction. Apart from gaining biomechanical insight, this issue is particularly relevant for variable-stiffness robotic systems, which can independently control the two parameters, but for which no clear methods exist to design or efficiently exploit them. Subjects were asked in one task to produce different levels of force, and stiffness was measured. As expected, this task reveals a linear coupling between force and stiffness. In a second task, subjects were then asked to additionally decouple stiffness from force at these force levels by using cocontraction. We measured the electromyogram from relevant groups of muscles and analyzed the possibility to predict stiffness and force. Optical tracking was used for avoiding wrist movements. We found that subjects were able to decouple grip stiffness from force when using cocontraction on average by about 20% of the maximum measured stiffness over all force levels, while this ability increased with the applied force. This result contradicts the force–stiffness behavior of most variable-stiffness actuators. Moreover, we found the thumb to be on average twice as stiff as the index finger and discovered that intrinsic hand muscles predominate our prediction of stiffness, but not of force. EMG activity and grip force allowed to explain 72 ± 12% of the measured variance in stiffness by simple linear regression, while only 33 ± 18% variance in force. Conclusively the high signal-to-noise ratio and the high correlation to stiffness of these muscles allow for a robust and reliable regression of stiffness, which can be used to continuously teleoperate compliance of modern robotic hands.

  2. Key Insights into Hand Biomechanics: Human Grip Stiffness Can Be Decoupled from Force by Cocontraction and Predicted from Electromyography

    Science.gov (United States)

    Höppner, Hannes; Große-Dunker, Maximilian; Stillfried, Georg; Bayer, Justin; van der Smagt, Patrick

    2017-01-01

    We investigate the relation between grip force and grip stiffness for the human hand with and without voluntary cocontraction. Apart from gaining biomechanical insight, this issue is particularly relevant for variable-stiffness robotic systems, which can independently control the two parameters, but for which no clear methods exist to design or efficiently exploit them. Subjects were asked in one task to produce different levels of force, and stiffness was measured. As expected, this task reveals a linear coupling between force and stiffness. In a second task, subjects were then asked to additionally decouple stiffness from force at these force levels by using cocontraction. We measured the electromyogram from relevant groups of muscles and analyzed the possibility to predict stiffness and force. Optical tracking was used for avoiding wrist movements. We found that subjects were able to decouple grip stiffness from force when using cocontraction on average by about 20% of the maximum measured stiffness over all force levels, while this ability increased with the applied force. This result contradicts the force–stiffness behavior of most variable-stiffness actuators. Moreover, we found the thumb to be on average twice as stiff as the index finger and discovered that intrinsic hand muscles predominate our prediction of stiffness, but not of force. EMG activity and grip force allowed to explain 72 ± 12% of the measured variance in stiffness by simple linear regression, while only 33 ± 18% variance in force. Conclusively the high signal-to-noise ratio and the high correlation to stiffness of these muscles allow for a robust and reliable regression of stiffness, which can be used to continuously teleoperate compliance of modern robotic hands. PMID:28588472

  3. The coefficient of variation as a measure of sincerity of effort of grip strength, Part II: sensitivity and specificity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shechtman, O

    2001-01-01

    The coefficient of variation (CV) is commonly used to detect sincerity of effort. The purpose of this study was to examine whether the CV possessed adequate sensitivity and specificity to effectively detect sincerity of effort of grip strength. One hundred forty-six uninjured volunteers underwent a series of grip strength tests. Sensitivity and specificity values were calculated for various CV cut-off values (between 2.5% and 22%) of the static grip test. The receiver operating characteristic (ROC) curves based on these values demonstrated the trade-offs between specificity and sensitivity. For example, the "traditional" 15% cut-off value yielded poor sensitivity (0.55), whereas the 11% cut-off value yielded poor specificity (0.74). Selecting any cut-off value along the continuum did not provide adequate sensitivity or specificity for labeling an effort sincere or insincere. Although the CV differentiated between maximal and submaximal effort, it was not sensitive or specific enough to do so effectively. Thus, the CV should not be used to assess sincerity of effort of grip strength.

  4. Degree, but not direction of grip strength asymmetries, is related to depression and anxiety in an elderly population.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yu, Junhong; Rawtaer, Iris; Mahendran, Rathi; Kua, Ee-Heok; Feng, Lei

    2017-05-01

    Despite the abundance of studies on asymmetries in manual laterality, a marker for atypical brain lateralization in depression and anxiety, findings in this area are mixed. Traditionally, research have looked at individual differences in depression and anxiety as a function of the direction of asymmetry. However, recent research has emphasized on studying the degree of asymmetry in addition to its direction. To these ends, the present study aims to unravel the associations between the degree and direction of manual lateralization, and depression/anxiety. Cognitively healthy elderlies (N = 326, 91 males, Mage = 68) were administered grip strength assessments on both hands and self-report measures of depression and anxiety. Partial correlation analyses controlling for age, education and sex revealed significant positive associations between degree of lateralization and anxiety in the overall sample and among right-dominant participants, as well as a significant positive relationship between degree of lateralization and depression among right-dominant participants. None of the correlations involving the direction of lateralization yielded significance, neither was there significant differences between left- and right-dominant participants on depression and anxiety scores. These findings suggest that the degree of manual lateralization, but not direction, is related to depression and anxiety at least among right-dominant individuals.

  5. ANALYSIS OF POWER GRIP AND PINCH GRIP AMONG HEALTH CARE PROFESSIONALS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zakariya M P

    2016-02-01

    Full Text Available Background: Grip and pinch strength are commonly employed indices of strength used in hand evaluations. Pinch grip and power grip strengths are used as indices of strength in hand therapy assessments. For all professions grip strength is an important criterion to be successful in their profession. Such phenomena may be explained by differences in nature of work, working environment, and objects workers handle. Method: 200 healthy subjects, satisfying the selection criteria were included and assessed with standardized procedure for power grip and pinch grip (lateral pinch, pad-pad, and tip-tip strength. They were divided in four groups, 50 group each according to profession i.e. medical surgeons, dentist, physiotherapists and nurses. Results: The mean power grip strength shows highly significant difference between medical vs. dental (p>0.01 and medical vs. physiotherapy group (p> 0.05 .The mean lateral pinch strength shows there is highly significant difference (p< 0.001 between dental vs. nursing profession and dental vs. physiotherapy group. No significant difference among other groups. The mean pad-pad pinch strength shows there is significant difference between dental vs. nursing (p< 0.05 and dental vs physiotherapy group (p< 0.05. The mean Tip-Tip pinch strength shows there is significant difference between dental vs nursing profession(p< 0.05 and dental vs. physiotherapy(p< 0.05. No significant different among other groups. Conclusion: Surgeons have highest power grip strength followed by Nursing, Physiotherapy and Dental professionals. Dentists have the maximum pinch strength in all three positions, followed by Surgeons, Nurses and Physiotherapists. Surgeons have maximum pinch strength next to Dentists.

  6. Test-retest reliability of handgrip strength measurement using a hydraulic hand dynamometer in patients with cervical radiculopathy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Savva, Christos; Giakas, Giannis; Efstathiou, Michalis; Karagiannis, Christos

    2014-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to evaluate the test-retest reliability of handgrip strength measurement using a hydraulic hand dynamometer in patients with cervical radiculopathy (CR). A convenience sample of 19 participants (14 men and 5 women; mean ± SD age, 50.5 ± 12 years) with CR was measured using a Jamar hydraulic hand dynamometer by the same rater on 2 different testing sessions with an interval of 7 days between sessions. Data collection procedures followed standardized grip strength testing guidelines established by the American Society of Hand Therapists. During the repeated measures, patients were advised to rest their upper limb in the standardized arm position and encouraged to exert 3 maximum gripping efforts. The mean value of the 3 efforts (measured in kilogram force [Kgf]) was used for data analysis. The intraclass correlation coefficient, SEM, and the Bland-Altman plot were used to estimate test-retest reliability and measurement precision. Grip strength measurement in CR demonstrated an intraclass correlation coefficient of 0.976, suggesting excellent test-retest reliability. The small SEM in both testing sessions (SEM1, 2.41 Kgf; SEM2, 2.51 Kgf) as well as the narrow width of the 95% limits of agreements (95% limits of agreement, -4.9 to 4.4 Kgf) in the Bland-Altman plot reflected precise measurements of grip strength in both occasions. Excellent test-retest reliability for grip strength measurement was measured in patients with CR, demonstrating that a hydraulic hand dynamometer could be used as an outcome measure for these patients. Copyright © 2014 National University of Health Sciences. Published by Mosby, Inc. All rights reserved.

  7. Grip strength measurements at two different wrist extension positions in chronic lateral epicondylitis-comparison of involved vs. uninvolved side in athletes and non athletes: a case-control study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bhargava Arti S

    2010-09-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Lateral epicondylitis is a common sports injury of the elbow caused due to altered muscle activation during repetitive wrist extension in many athletic and non-athletic endeavours. The amount of muscle activity and timing of contraction eventually is directly dependent upon joint position during the activity. The purpose of our study was to compare the grip strength in athletes with lateral epicondylalgia in two different wrist extension positions and compare them between involved and uninvolved sides of athletes and non-athletes. Methods An assessor-blinded case-control study of eight athletes and twenty-two non-athletes was done. The grip strength was measured using JAMAR® hand dynamometer in kilograms-force at 15 degrees (slightly extended and 35 degrees (moderately extended wrist extension positions (maintained by wrist splints on both involved and uninvolved sides of athletes and non-athletes with unilateral lateral epicondylitis of atleast 3 months duration. Their pain was to be elicited with local tenderness and two of three tests being positive- Cozen's, Mill's manoeuvre, resisted middle finger extension tests. For comparisons of grip strength, Wilcoxon signed rank test was used for within-group comparison (between 15 and 35 degrees wrist extension positions and Mann-Whitney U test was used for between-group (athletes vs. non-athletes comparisons at 95% confidence interval and were done using SPSS 11.5 for Windows. Results Statistically significant greater grip strength was found in 15 degrees (27.75 ± 4.2 kgms in athletes; 16.45 ± 4.2 kgms in non-athletes wrist extension than at 35 degrees (25.25 ± 3.53 kgm in athletes and 14.18 ± 3.53 kgm in non-athletes. The athletes had greater grip strength than non-athletes in each of test positions (11.3 kgm at 15 degrees and 11.07 kgm at 35 degrees measured. There was also a significant difference between involved and uninvolved sides' grip strength at both wrist

  8. Detecting submaximal efforts in grip strength testing with the coefficient of variation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Robinson, M E; Geisser, M E; Hanson, C S; O'Connor, P D

    1993-03-01

    The use of the coefficient of variation (CV) to determine level of effort in grip strength testing was examined empirically. Twenty-nine asymptomatic subjects participated in two conditions of testing: 100% effort and 50% effort. Order of conditions was counterbalanced and each subject was run in both conditions twice in the same order in order to assess the stability of the method. The number of trials (grasps) per condition was three for a total of 12 grasps for the study. The submaximal (50%) effort condition showed significantly more variability than the maximal effort condition in both sets of conditions (p<.01). Intra-class correlation coefficients were very low for both maximal effort and submaximal efforts (.036 and .025) indicating very low stability for the coefficient of variation. Classification rates were also found to have unacceptably large errors with 69% of the submaximal efforts being classified as maximal with the traditional 15% CV cutoff and 55% misclassification of submaximal efforts with an optimized 11% CV cutoff. It was concluded that the currently practiced method of using a low number of repetitions to calculate the CV may result in very unstable measures. Furthermore the "false negative" rate in using this method is unacceptably high for practical application. The implications of using the method and suggestions for improvement are discussed.

  9. Priming for Improved Hand Strength in Persons with Chronic Tetraplegia: A Comparison of Priming-Augmented Functional Task Practice, Priming Alone, and Conventional Exercise Training

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gomes-Osman, Joyce; Tibbett, Jacqueline A.; Poe, Brandon P.; Field-Fote, Edelle C.

    2017-01-01

    Many everyday tasks cannot be accomplished without adequate grip strength, and corticomotor drive to the spinal motoneurons is a key determinant of grip strength. In persons with tetraplegia, damage to spinal pathways limits transmission of signals from motor cortex to spinal motoneurons. Corticomotor priming, which increases descending drive, should increase corticospinal transmission through the remaining spinal pathways resulting in increased grip strength. Since the motor and somatosensory cortices share reciprocal connections, corticomotor priming may also have potential to influence somatosensory function. The purpose of this study was to assess changes in grip (precision, power) force and tactile sensation associated with two different corticomotor priming approaches and a conventional training approach and to determine whether baseline values can predict responsiveness to training. Participants with chronic (≥1 year) tetraplegia (n = 49) were randomized to one of two corticomotor priming approaches: functional task practice plus peripheral nerve somatosensory stimulation (FTP + PNSS) or PNSS alone, or to conventional exercise training (CET). To assess whether baseline corticospinal excitability (CSE) is predictive of responsiveness to training, in a subset of participants, we assessed pre-intervention CSE of the thenar muscles. Participants were trained 2 h daily, 5 days/week for 4 weeks. Thirty-seven participants completed the study. Following intervention, significant improvements in precision grip force were observed in both the stronger and weaker hand in the FTP + PNSS group (effect size: 0.51, p = 0.04 and 0.54, p = 0.03, respectively), and significant improvements in weak hand precision grip force were associated with both PNSS and CET (effect size: 0.54, p = 0.03 and 0.75, p = 0.02, respectively). No significant changes were observed in power grip force or somatosensory scores in any group. Across all groups

  10. Priming for Improved Hand Strength in Persons with Chronic Tetraplegia: A Comparison of Priming-Augmented Functional Task Practice, Priming Alone, and Conventional Exercise Training.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gomes-Osman, Joyce; Tibbett, Jacqueline A; Poe, Brandon P; Field-Fote, Edelle C

    2016-01-01

    Many everyday tasks cannot be accomplished without adequate grip strength, and corticomotor drive to the spinal motoneurons is a key determinant of grip strength. In persons with tetraplegia, damage to spinal pathways limits transmission of signals from motor cortex to spinal motoneurons. Corticomotor priming, which increases descending drive, should increase corticospinal transmission through the remaining spinal pathways resulting in increased grip strength. Since the motor and somatosensory cortices share reciprocal connections, corticomotor priming may also have potential to influence somatosensory function. The purpose of this study was to assess changes in grip (precision, power) force and tactile sensation associated with two different corticomotor priming approaches and a conventional training approach and to determine whether baseline values can predict responsiveness to training. Participants with chronic (≥1 year) tetraplegia (n = 49) were randomized to one of two corticomotor priming approaches: functional task practice plus peripheral nerve somatosensory stimulation (FTP + PNSS) or PNSS alone, or to conventional exercise training (CET). To assess whether baseline corticospinal excitability (CSE) is predictive of responsiveness to training, in a subset of participants, we assessed pre-intervention CSE of the thenar muscles. Participants were trained 2 h daily, 5 days/week for 4 weeks. Thirty-seven participants completed the study. Following intervention, significant improvements in precision grip force were observed in both the stronger and weaker hand in the FTP + PNSS group (effect size: 0.51, p = 0.04 and 0.54, p = 0.03, respectively), and significant improvements in weak hand precision grip force were associated with both PNSS and CET (effect size: 0.54, p = 0.03 and 0.75, p = 0.02, respectively). No significant changes were observed in power grip force or somatosensory scores in any group. Across all groups

  11. Lipodystrophy and inflammation predict later grip strength in HIV-infected men: the MACS Body Composition substudy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Crawford, Keith W; Li, Xiuhong; Xu, Xiaoqiang; Abraham, Alison G; Dobs, Adrian S; Margolick, Joseph B; Palella, Frank J; Kingsley, Lawrence A; Witt, Mallory D; Brown, Todd T

    2013-08-01

    Body fat changes in HIV-infected persons are associated with increased systemic inflammation and increased mortality. It is unknown whether lipodystrophy is also associated with declines in physical function. Between 2001 and 2003, 33 HIV-infected men with evidence of lipodystrophy (LIPO⁺), 23 HIV-infected men without lipodystrophy (LIPO⁻), and 33 seronegative men were recruited from the Multicenter AIDS Cohort Study (MACS) for the Body Composition substudy. Visceral adipose tissue (VAT) was assessed by quantitative computed tomography. Lean body mass (LBM) and extremity fat were measured by dual-energy x-ray absorptiometry. Insulin resistance was estimated by Homeostatic Model Assessment (HOMA). Serum interleukin (IL)-6, soluble tumor necrosis factor (TNF)-α receptors I and II (sTNFRI and sTNFRII), and highly sensitive C-reactive protein (hs-CRP) concentrations were quantified from archived serum samples. These measurements were correlated with grip strength measured in 2007 using linear regression. At the substudy visit, the LIPO⁺ group had higher HOMA, sTNFRI, sTNFRII, and IL-6 levels than the LIPO⁻ group. In 2007, the LIPO⁺ group had lower median grip strength than the LIPO⁻ group (34.4 vs. 42.7 kg, p=0.002). Multivariable analysis of HIV⁺ men showed older age, lower LBM, higher sTNFRII concentrations, and LIPO⁺ status [adjusted mean difference -4.9 kg (p=0.045)] at the substudy visit were independently associated with lower subsequent grip strength. Inflammation, lower LBM, and lipodystrophy in HIV-infected men were associated with lower subsequent grip strength. These findings suggest that inflammation may contribute to declines in functional performance, independent of age.

  12. Rapamycin increases grip strength and attenuates age-related decline in maximal running distance in old low capacity runner rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xue, Qian-Li; Yang, Huanle; Li, Hui-Fen; Abadir, Peter M; Burks, Tyesha N; Koch, Lauren G; Britton, Steven L; Carlson, Joshua; Chen, Laura; Walston, Jeremy D; Leng, Sean X

    2016-04-01

    Rapamycin is known to extend lifespan. We conducted a randomized placebo-controlled study of enteric rapamycin-treatment to evaluate its effect on physical function in old low capacity runner (LCR) rats, a rat model selected from diverse genetic background for low intrinsic aerobic exercise capacity without genomic manipulation and characterized by increased complex disease risks and aging phenotypes. The study was performed in 12 male and 16 female LCR rats aged 16-22 months at baseline. The treatment group was fed with rapamycin-containing diet pellets at approximately 2.24mg/kg body weight per day and the placebo group with the same diet without rapamycin for six months. Observation was extended for additional 2 months. Physical function measurements include grip strength measured as maximum tensile force using a rat grip strength meter and maximum running distance (MRD) using rat physical treadmill test. The results showed that rapamycin improved grip strength by 13% (p=.036) and 60% (p=.001) from its baseline in female and male rats, respectively. Rapamycin attenuated MRD decline by 66% (p=.001) and 46% (p=.319) in females and males, respectively. These findings provide initial evidence for beneficial effect of rapamycin on physical functioning in an aging rat model of high disease risks with significant implication in humans.

  13. Modified forelimb grip strength test detects aging-associated physiological decline in skeletal muscle function in male mice

    Science.gov (United States)

    Takeshita, Hikari; Yamamoto, Koichi; Nozato, Satoko; Inagaki, Tadakatsu; Tsuchimochi, Hirotsugu; Shirai, Mikiyasu; Yamamoto, Ryohei; Imaizumi, Yuki; Hongyo, Kazuhiro; Yokoyama, Serina; Takeda, Masao; Oguro, Ryosuke; Takami, Yoichi; Itoh, Norihisa; Takeya, Yasushi; Sugimoto, Ken; Fukada, So-ichiro; Rakugi, Hiromi

    2017-01-01

    The conventional forelimb grip strength test is a widely used method to assess skeletal muscle function in rodents; in this study, we modified this method to improve its variability and consistency. The modified test had lower variability among trials and days than the conventional test in young C57BL6 mice, especially by improving the variabilities in male. The modified test was more sensitive than the conventional test to detect a difference in motor function between female and male mice, or between young and old male mice. When the modified test was performed on male mice during the aging process, reduction of grip strength manifested between 18 and 24 months of age at the group level and at the individual level. The modified test was similar to the conventional test in detecting skeletal muscle dysfunction in young male dystrophic mice. Thus, the modified forelimb grip strength test, with its improved validity and reliability may be an ideal substitute for the conventional method. PMID:28176863

  14. Functional connectivity associated with hand shape generation: Imitating novel hand postures and pantomiming tool grips challenge different nodes of a shared neural network.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vingerhoets, Guy; Clauwaert, Amanda

    2015-09-01

    Clinical research suggests that imitating meaningless hand postures and pantomiming tool-related hand shapes rely on different neuroanatomical substrates. We investigated the BOLD responses to different tasks of hand posture generation in 14 right handed volunteers. Conjunction and contrast analyses were applied to select regions that were either common or sensitive to imitation and/or pantomime tasks. The selection included bilateral areas of medial and lateral extrastriate cortex, superior and inferior regions of the lateral and medial parietal lobe, primary motor and somatosensory cortex, and left dorsolateral prefrontal, and ventral and dorsal premotor cortices. Functional connectivity analysis revealed that during hand shape generation the BOLD-response of every region correlated significantly with every other area regardless of the hand posture task performed, although some regions were more involved in some hand postures tasks than others. Based on between-task differences in functional connectivity we predict that imitation of novel hand postures would suffer most from left superior parietal disruption and that pantomiming hand postures for tools would be impaired following left frontal damage, whereas both tasks would be sensitive to inferior parietal dysfunction. We also unveiled that posterior temporal cortex is committed to pantomiming tool grips, but that the involvement of this region to the execution of hand postures in general appears limited. We conclude that the generation of hand postures is subserved by a highly interconnected task-general neural network. Depending on task requirements some nodes/connections will be more engaged than others and these task-sensitive findings are in general agreement with recent lesion studies.

  15. Getting a grip on memory: unilateral hand clenching alters episodic recall.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ruth E Propper

    Full Text Available Unilateral hand clenching increases neuronal activity in the frontal lobe of the contralateral hemisphere. Such hand clenching is also associated with increased experiencing of a given hemisphere's "mode of processing." Together, these findings suggest that unilateral hand clenching can be used to test hypotheses concerning the specializations of the cerebral hemispheres during memory encoding and retrieval. We investigated this possibility by testing effects of unilateral hand clenching on episodic memory. The hemispheric Encoding/Retrieval Asymmetry (HERA model proposes left prefrontal regions are associated with encoding, and right prefrontal regions with retrieval, of episodic memories. It was hypothesized that right hand clenching (left hemisphere activation pre-encoding, and left hand clenching (right hemisphere activation pre-recall, would result in superior memory. Results supported the HERA model. Also supported was that simple unilateral hand clenching can be used as a means by which the functional specializations of the cerebral hemispheres can be investigated in intact humans.

  16. [Gait speed, grip strength and self-rated health among the elderly: data from the FIBRA Campinas network, São Paulo, Brazil].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bez, Joelita Pessoa de Oliveira; Neri, Anita Liberalesso

    2014-08-01

    The article seeks to investigate patterns of performance and relationships between grip strength, gait speed and self-rated health, and investigate the relationships between them, considering the variables of gender, age and family income. This was conducted in a probabilistic sample of community-dwelling elderly aged 65 and over, members of a population study on frailty. A total of 689 elderly people without cognitive deficit suggestive of dementia underwent tests of gait speed and grip strength. Comparisons between groups were based on low, medium and high speed and strength. Self-related health was assessed using a 5-point scale. The males and the younger elderly individuals scored significantly higher on grip strength and gait speed than the female and oldest did; the richest scored higher than the poorest on grip strength and gait speed; females and men aged over 80 had weaker grip strength and lower gait speed; slow gait speed and low income arose as risk factors for a worse health evaluation. Lower muscular strength affects the self-rated assessment of health because it results in a reduction in functional capacity, especially in the presence of poverty and a lack of compensatory factors.

  17. Sex Differences in the Level and Rate of Change of Physical Function and Grip Strength in the Danish 1905-Cohort Study

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Oksuzyan, Anna; Maier, Heiner; McGue, Matt;

    2010-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: The study was conducted to examine sex differences in the initial level and rate of change in physical function and grip strength. METHOD: The baseline survey included 2,262 Danes born in 1905 and alive in 1998 and followed-up in 2000, 2003, and 2005. Hence, the authors fully used...... with intercepts and slopes. DISCUSSION: The Danish data suggested that the longest-living individuals have higher initial levels of strength score and grip strength and smaller rate of change. The data further suggested that the initial level of strength score and grip strength was more predictive of mortality...... than the rate of change was, and the predictive effects were similar in men and women....

  18. Performance of repetitive tasks induces decreased grip strength and increased fibrogenic proteins in skeletal muscle: role of force and inflammation.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Samir M Abdelmagid

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: This study elucidates exposure-response relationships between performance of repetitive tasks, grip strength declines, and fibrogenic-related protein changes in muscles, and their link to inflammation. Specifically, we examined forearm flexor digitorum muscles for changes in connective tissue growth factor (CTGF; a matrix protein associated with fibrosis, collagen type I (Col1; a matrix component, and transforming growth factor beta 1 (TGFB1; an upstream modulator of CTGF and collagen, in rats performing one of two repetitive tasks, with or without anti-inflammatory drugs. METHODOLOGY/RESULTS: To examine the roles of force versus repetition, rats performed either a high repetition negligible force food retrieval task (HRNF, or a high repetition high force handle-pulling task (HRHF, for up to 9 weeks, with results compared to trained only (TR-NF or TR-HF and normal control rats. Grip strength declined with both tasks, with the greatest declines in 9-week HRHF rats. Quantitative PCR (qPCR analyses of HRNF muscles showed increased expression of Col1 in weeks 3-9, and CTGF in weeks 6 and 9. Immunohistochemistry confirmed PCR results, and also showed greater increases of CTGF and collagen matrix in 9-week HRHF rats than 9-week HRNF rats. ELISA, and immunohistochemistry revealed greater increases of TGFB1 in TR-HF and 6-week HRHF, compared to 6-week HRNF rats. To examine the role of inflammation, results from 6-week HRHF rats were compared to rats receiving ibuprofen or anti-TNF-α treatment in HRHF weeks 4-6. Both treatments attenuated HRHF-induced increases in CTGF and fibrosis by 6 weeks of task performance. Ibuprofen attenuated TGFB1 increases and grip strength declines, matching our prior results with anti-TNFα. CONCLUSIONS/SIGNIFICANCE: Performance of highly repetitive tasks was associated with force-dependent declines in grip strength and increased fibrogenic-related proteins in flexor digitorum muscles. These changes were

  19. Foreign Researches of the Relationship Among Grip Strength, Health and Fitness for Older Adults%老年人握力与健康及体适能关系的国外研究现状

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    张春华; 叶长林

    2013-01-01

    The measurement of hand grip strength has gained attention as a simple, non-invasive marker of muscle strength of upper extremities, and more and more researches show that it well suitable for clinical use. This review outlines the prognostic relevance of grip strength in various clinical and epidemiologic settings and describes the relationship between grip strength and fitness for older adults.%握力作为一项简单、无创的上肢肌肉力量测试指标而为人们所关注,越来越多的研究显示握力测试应用于临床也是适合的。这篇文献综述概述了在临床医学和流行病学领域里老年人握力的关联与预测,同时也描述了握力与体适能之间的关系。

  20. Effect of muscle strength and pain on hand function in patients with trapeziometacarpal osteoarthritis. A cross-sectional study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cantero-Téllez, Raquel; Martín-Valero, Rocío; Cuesta-Vargas, Antonio

    2015-01-01

    To assess the relationship between muscle strength (Jama), and pain (VAS) levels with hand function (DASH) in patients with trapeziometarcapal osteoarthritis. Cross-sectional study. Sample of 72 patients with osteoarthritis stage 2-3 (Eaton) and trapeziometacarpal osteoarthritis. Patients were recruited when they came to the Hand Surgery Unit. Grip strength, pinch, pain and hand function were measured, and correlation and regression coefficients between them were obtained. For function, the most significant model (R(2)=0.83) included pain and strength. But it is tip to tip pinch force which has a stronger relationship with DASH (Standardized B: -57) questionnaire. Pain also influenced strength measured with the dynamometer but it was tip to tip pinch force that was the most affected. Findings confirm that there is a significant correlation between function referred by the patient and variables that can be measured in the clinic such as grip strength and pinch. The correlation between pain intensity and function was also significant, but tip to tip pinch strength had the greatest impact on the function. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier España, S.L.U. y Sociedad Española de Reumatología y Colegio Mexicano de Reumatología. All rights reserved.

  1. Diabetic hands: a study on strength and function.

    Science.gov (United States)

    de Carvalho e Silva, Fernanda; Jakimiu, Fernanda O; Skare, Thelma L

    2014-01-01

    To study hand strength and function in type 2 DM patients. We collected data on hand strength and function, disease duration, glycemic, creatinine and HbA1C levels, degree of pain and stiffness and physical examination in 100 DM patients comparing than with 100 hand osteoarthritis patients and 100 controls. DM patients had hand strength and function better than osteoarthritis patients and worse than controls. De Quervain tendonitis associated with hand strength (p=0.005); hand function associated with carpal tunnel syndrome (pQuervain tendinitis (p=0.006), HbA1C level (p=0.005), insulin use (p=0.030), disease duration (p=0.0006), pain (pQuervain tendinitis. Copyright © 2014 Diabetes India. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  2. Effects of Isometric Hand-Grip Muscle Contraction on Young Adults' Free Recall and Recognition Memory

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tomporowski, Phillip D.; Albrecht, Chelesa; Pendleton, Daniel M.

    2017-01-01

    Purpose: The purpose of this study was to determine if physical arousal produced by isometric hand-dynamometer contraction performed during word-list learning affects young adults' free recall or recognition memory. Method: Twenty-four young adults (12 female; M[subscript age] = 22 years) were presented with 4 20-item word lists. Moderate arousal…

  3. Getting a Grip on Memory: Unilateral Hand Clenching Alters Episodic Recall

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-04-24

    This is an open-access article distributed under the terms of the Creative Commons Attribution License, which permits unrestricted use, distribution...Electroencephalographic ( EEG ) measures demonstrate that a mere 90 seconds of left hand clenching increases right hemisphere activity, and similar right

  4. Relationship between blood lactate and cortical excitability between taekwondo athletes and non-athletes after hand-grip exercise.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moscatelli, Fiorenzo; Valenzano, Anna; Petito, Annamaria; Triggiani, Antonio Ivano; Ciliberti, Michela Anna Pia; Luongo, Livio; Carotenuto, Marco; Esposito, Maria; Messina, Antonietta; Monda, Vincenzo; Monda, Marcellino; Capranica, Laura; Messina, Giovanni; Cibelli, Giuseppe

    2016-06-01

    In taekwondo competitions, fatigue has a large influence on performance. Recent studies have reported that the excitability in the primary hand motor cortex, investigated with transcranial magnetic stimulation (TMS), is enhanced at the end of a maximal exercise and that this improvement correlates with blood lactate. The aim of the present study was to investigate the relationship between blood lactate and cortical excitability in taekwondo athletes and non-athletes. The excitability of the primary motor cortex was measured before and after fatiguing hand-grip exercise by TMS. Capillary blood lactate was measured at rest (pre-test), at the end (0 min), and at 3 and 10 min after the exercise by using a "Lactate Pro" portable lactate analyzer. Significant differences in cortical excitability between the two groups were found after the exercise (p taekwondo athletes, lactate may delay the onset of fatigue not only by maintaining the excitability of muscle, but also by increasing the excitability of the primary motor cortex more than in non-athletes.

  5. Sweating responses to isometric hand-grip exercise and forearm muscle metaboreflex in prepubertal children and elderly.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Amano, Tatsuro; Kai, Seiko; Nakajima, Michi; Ichinose-Kuwahara, Tomoko; Gerrett, Nicola; Kondo, Narihiko; Inoue, Yoshimitsu

    2017-02-01

    What is the central question of this study? Non-thermal factors (e.g. muscle metaboreflex) contribute to the sweating response during exercise. Although it is well recognized that the sweating responses caused by core temperature elevation in prepubertal children and the elderly are attenuated compared with young adults, it is unknown whether non-thermal sweating is also attenuated in these populations. What is the main finding and its importance? The non-thermal sweating response during isometric hand-grip exercise and isolated muscle metaboreflex were attenuated in prepubertal children compared with young adults in a non-uniform manner over the body, but only during the muscle metaboreflex in the elderly. This may explain the maturation- and ageing-related decline of sweating during exercise. The purpose of the present study was to investigate sweating responses to isometric hand-grip (IH) exercise and muscle metaboreflex in prepubertal children and the elderly. In hot conditions (ambient temperature, 35°C; relative humidity, 45%), 13 healthy young adults, 10 prepubertal children and 10 elderly subjects (aged 20.4 ± 1.2, 11.4 ± 0.5 and 63.5 ± 3.1 years, respectively) repeated a three hand-grip exercise protocol that consisted of 1 min IH exercise at 15, 30 or 45% of maximal voluntary contraction (MVC) followed by 2 min postexercise forearm occlusion. Local sweat rates (SRs) on the forehead, chest, forearm, thigh and palm were continuously measured (ventilated capsule method). The forehead SR in prepubertal children during IH exercise at 45% MVC was significantly lower than that of young adults (0.26 ± 0.22 and 0.08 ± 0.15 mg cm(-2)  min(-1) for young adults and children, respectively; P elderly at any exercise intensities. The SR on the chest (0.22 ± 0.22 and -0.01 ± 0.05 mg cm(-2)  min(-1) for young adults and children, respectively), forearm (0.14 ± 0.12 and 0.03 ± 0.04 mg cm(-2)  min(-1) ) and thigh (0.13 ± 0.10 and 0

  6. Relation of grip strength, bone mineral density and body mass index in postmenopausal women%绝经后女性握力和体重指数与骨密度的相关研究

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    吕波

    2014-01-01

    Objective To study the positive association between hand grip strength and bone mineral density in postmenopausal women.We conducted a screening program for osteoporosis in a large cohort of postmenopausal women to investigate the relation among hand grip strength,other nutritional parameters and bone density.Methods This investigation involved 973 volunteers from March 2012 to March 2013 at Tianjin Hongqiao Hospital.Bone mineral density,hand grip strength measurement,body mass index and T score were analyzed.Results Univariate analysis showed that hand grip strength measurement,body mass index and T score were correlated (Pearson correlation coefficient were 0.201,0.115,P =0.001,0.009) ; age and T score were negatively correlated(Pearson correlation coefficient were-0.358,P =0.001).Incidence of osteoporosis was 19.7% (192/973).Conclusion Both body mass index and handgrip strength are strongly correlated to bone mineral density.%目的 探讨绝经后女性握力和体重指数与骨密度之间的相关性.方法 收集2012年3月至2013年3月在天津市红桥医院检查治疗973名女性志愿者,所有志愿者均接受足跟部骨密度测量(T指数)、握力测试和体重指数测量并进行相关性分析.结果 在单变量分析中,握力和体重指数与T指数相关(Pearson相关系数分别为0.201、0.115,P=0.001、0.009),年龄与T指数呈负相关(Pearson相关系数为-0.358,P=0.001).骨质疏松发病率18.7%(182/973).有骨质疏松和无骨质疏松绝经年龄、握力比较[绝经年龄(48±6)岁比(49±5)岁,P=0.020;握力(23±6)kg比(24±6) kg,P=0.001].结论 体重指数和握力二者均与骨密度密切相关,二者可作为预示骨疾病的关键因子.

  7. Description of Primary Education 1st Grade Students' Forms of Holding a Pencil as well as Their Grip and Compression Strengths

    Science.gov (United States)

    Temur, Turan

    2011-01-01

    This study aimed to examine how first grade students in primary education held and gripped a pencil and their compressive strength using a descriptive research method. The participants of the research comprises first grade students attending a private school in the city center of Ankara (n=79). All of the four different sections in this private…

  8. Short Term Microgravity Effect on Isometric Hand Grip and Precision Pinch Force with Visual and Propioceptive Feedback

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pastacaldi, P.; Bracciaferri, F.; Neri, G.; Porciani, M.; Zolesi, V.

    Experiments executed on the upper limb are assuming increasing significance in the frame of the Human Physiology in space, for at least two reasons: -the upper limb is the principal means of locomotion for the subject living in aspace station -fatigue can have a significant effect the hand, for the ordinary work on board,and in particular for the extra-vehicular activities. The degradation of the performances affecting the muscular-skeletal apparatus can be easily recognized on the upper limb, by exerting specific scientific protocols, to be repeated through the permanence of the subject in weightlessness conditions. Also, the effectiveness of adequate counter-measures aimed to the reduction of calcium and muscular mass need to be verified, by means of specific assessments on the upper limb. Another aspect relevant to the effect of microgravity on the upper limb is associated with the alteration of the motor control programs due to the different gravity factor, affecting not only the bio-mechanics of the subject, but in general all his/her psycho- physical conditions, induced by the totally different environment. Specific protocols on the upper limb can facilitate the studies on learning mechanisms for the motor control. The results of such experiments can be transferred to the Earth, useful for treatment of subjects with local traumas or diseases of the Central Nervous System.In the frame of the mission of the Italian astronaut Roberto Vittori on board the International Space Station (ISS), the Italian Space Agency (ASI) has promoted the program "Marco Polo", with a number of experiments devoted to the study of the effect of microgravity on the human body. The experiment CHIRO ("Crew's Health: Investigation on Reduced Operability) is a part of the program. Its purpose is the determination of the influence of the altered gravity on the control of the grip force exerted by the hand or by a group of fingers and the adaptive behavior of this control through the

  9. COMPARISON OF ACTIVE RELEASE TECHNIQUE AND MYOFASCIAL RELEASE TECHNIQUE ON PAIN, GRIP STRENGTH & FUNCTIONAL PERFORMANCE IN PATIENTS WITH CHRONIC LATERAL EPICONDYLITIS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Parth Trivedi

    2014-06-01

    Full Text Available Background & Purpose: Lateral epicondylitis is the most common lesion of the elbow. Tennis elbow or lateral epicondylitis is defined as a syndrome of pain in the wrist extensor muscles at or near their lateral epicondyle origin or pain directly over the lateral epicondyle. So, the aim of this study was to compare the effectiveness of Active Release Technique (ART and Myofascial Release Technique (MFR in the treatment of Chronic Lateral Epicondylitis (CLE. Methodology: The study included thirty-six patients with Chronic Lateral Epicondylitis of age group range between 30 to 45 years. Patients were randomly divided into three groups: Control Group (A, Active Release Technique Group (B and Myofascial Release Technique Group (C. The patients were treated for 4 weeks and three outcome measures: 0-10 NPRS, Hand Dynamometer and PRTEE were taken for assessment and analysis at baseline and after 4th weeks was done. Result: In this study the result showed that Active Release Technique and Myofascial Release Technique were effective in all three outcome measures when compared to Control Group. Myofascial Release Technique was more effective in improving grip strength & reducing pain & disability when compared to Active Release Technique.(p<0.05 Conclusion: Active Release Technique and Myofascial Release Technique are effective in patients with Chronic Lateral Epicondylitis. Myofascial Release Technique demonstrated better outcomes than Active Release Technique in the management of Chronic Lateral Epicondylitis.

  10. Comparative study of millennials' (age 20-34 years) grip and lateral pinch with the norms.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fain, Elizabeth; Weatherford, Cara

    Cross-sectional research design. Clinical practice continues to use normative data for grip and pinch measurements that were established in 1985. There is no updated norms despite different hand usage patterns in today's society. Measuring and comparing grip and pinch strengths with normative data is a valid method to determine hand function. This research was implemented to compare the grip and pinch measurements obtained from healthy millennials to the established norms and to describe hand usage patterns for millennials. Grip and lateral pinch measurements were obtained from a sample of 237 healthy millennials (ages 20-34 years). Strength scores were statistically lower that older normative data in all millennial grip strengths, with the exception of the women in the age group of 30-34 years. Specifically, this statistically significant trend was observed in all male grip strengths, as well as in women in the age group of 20-24 years (bilateral grip) and 25-29 years (right grip). However, the lateral pinch data reflected was similar to the older norms with variances of 0.5-1 kg. Current data reflect statistically significant differences from the norms for all male grip measurements, as well as for women in the age group of 20-24 years (bilateral grip) and 25-29 years (right grip). No statistical significance was observed in the independent-sample t tests for the lateral pinch in men of all age groups. Statistical significance was noted for lateral pinch for female age groups for the left hand (20-24 years) and for bilateral lateral pinches (30-34 years). IV. Copyright © 2016 Hanley & Belfus. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  11. Effects of Sensory Deficit on Phalanx Force Deviation During Power Grip Post Stroke.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Enders, Leah R; Seo, Na Jin

    2017-01-01

    The effect of sensory deficits on power grip force from individual phalanges was examined. The authors found that stroke survivors with sensory deficits (determined by the Semmes-Weinstein monofilament test) gripped with phalanx force directed more tangential to the object surface, than those without, although both groups had similar motor deficits (Chedoke-McMaster and Fugl-Meyer), grip strength, and skin friction. Altered grip force direction elevates risk of finger slippage against the object thus grip loss/object dropping, hindering activities of daily living. Altered grip force direction was associated with altered muscle activation patterns. In summary, the motor impairment level alone may not describe hand motor control in detail. Information about sensory deficits helps elucidate patients' hand motor control with functional relevance.

  12. Effect of wrist position on young adults pinch grip control

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vanessa Luzia Barros de Andrade

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available Pinch grip is used in a large number of handling activities that require precision and control of an object. The position of the upper arm joints affects the fingers force production in order to handle the object. This study aimed to verify the influence of the wrist position in the production of maximum strength and in the control fingers grip pinch submaximum strength control. Participants were 21 right handed adults (10 male, 18-26 years old. They made two attempts of maximum force production and eight attempts of submaximal force production (four at 20% and four at 40% of maximum strength for pinch grip in three wrist positions: neutral, flexion and extension. The results showed that the production of maximum strength is higher in neutral position compared to wrist flexion and extension and higher for men compared to women. In addition, there was a positive correlation between the length of the hand and the production of maximum strength. The results also indicated that the wrist position did not interfere in the submaximum force control during this task. However, participants showed more difficulty controlling 20% than 40% of maximum strength. The present study showed evidence that the motor units used to produce grip pinch maximum strength cross the wrist joint but those used for the 20% and 40% of maximum strength are present only in the fingers and hand.

  13. Serotonin and Histamine Therapy Increases Tetanic Forces of Myoblasts, Reduces Muscle Injury, and Improves Grip Strength Performance of Dmdmdx Mice

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Volkan Gurel

    2015-11-01

    Full Text Available Duchenne muscular dystrophy (DMD is a recessive X-linked fatal disorder caused by a mutation in the dystrophin gene. Although several therapeutic approaches have been studied, none has led to substantial long-term effects in patients. The aim of this study was to test a serotonin and histamine (S&H combination on human skeletal myoblasts and Dmdmdx mice for its effects on muscle strength and injury. Normal human bioartificial muscles (BAMs were treated, and muscle tetanic forces and muscle injury tests were performed using the MyoForce Analysis System. Dmdmdx mice, the murine model of DMD, were administered serotonin, histamine, or S&H combination twice daily for 6 weeks, and functional performance tests were conducted once a week. The S&H combination treatment caused significant increases in tetanic forces at all time points and concentrations tested as compared to the saline controls. Dose response of the BAMs to the treatment demonstrated a significant increase in force generation at all concentrations compared to the controls after 3 to 4 days of drug treatment. The highest 3 concentrations had a significant effect on lowering contractile-induced injury as measured by a reduction in the release of adenylate kinase. Histamine-only and S&H treatments improved grip strength of Dmdmdx mice, whereas serotonin-only treatment resulted in no significant improvement in muscle strength. The results of this study indicate that S&H therapy might be a promising new strategy for muscular dystrophies and that the mechanism should be further investigated.

  14. Short Physical Performance Battery, usual gait speed, grip strength and Vulnerable Elders Survey each predict functional decline among older women with breast cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Owusu, Cynthia; Margevicius, Seunghee; Schluchter, Mark; Koroukian, Siran M; Berger, Nathan A

    2017-09-01

    To determine the ability of three performance-based measures [Short Physical Performance Battery (SPPB), gait speed, and Grip Strength] and a self-report measure [Vulnerable Elders Survey (VES-13)] to predict functional decline among older women with breast cancer. Longitudinal data from a study of women ≥65years, with newly diagnosed stages I-III breast cancer, recruited from ambulatory oncology clinics between July 2010 and April 2014, was used. The primary outcome was functional decline, Yes or No, defined as a decrease in ≥1-point from baseline to 12months, on Activities of Daily Living Scales. Multivariable logistic regression and receiver operator curve analyses were conducted. Among 123 participants 18 (15%) developed functional decline. The predictive abilities for measures were: SPPB [Adjusted odds ratio (AOR)=1.65 per unit decrease in scores, 95% confidence interval (CI)=1.33-2.05; area under the receiver operator curve (AUC)=0.93; sensitivity=94%, specificity=80%]; gait speed (AOR=1.76 per unit increase in usual walking time, CI=1.29-2.41; AUC=0.93; sensitivity=87%, specificity=79%); VES-13 (AOR=1.64 per unit increase in scores, CI=1.31-2.05; AUC=0.87; sensitivity=83%, specificity=84%); and grip strength: (AOR=1.18 per unit decrease in grip strength, CI=1.06-1.30; AUC=0.80; sensitivity=67%, specificity=77%). SPPB, gait speed, grip strength and VES-13 all demonstrated excellent predictive abilities for functional decline. Larger studies are warranted to confirm the utility of these measures for identifying older adults with cancer at increased risk for functional decline, who may then be targeted for studies to explore the effects of interventions to improve function. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  15. Changes in pain, dysfunction, and grip strength of patients with acute lateral epicondylitis caused by frequency of physical therapy: a randomized controlled trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Soyoung; Ko, Youngjun; Lee, Wanhee

    2014-07-01

    [Purpose] The purpose of this study was to investigate the changes in pain, dysfunction, and grip strength of patients with acute lateral epicondylitis and to suggest the appropriate treatment frequency and period. [Subjects] The subjects were divided into three: 2 days per week group (n=12), 3 days per week group (n=15), and 6 days per week group (n=13). [Methods] All groups received conventional physical therapy for 40 minutes and therapeutic exercises for 20 minutes per session during 6 weeks. The outcome measurements were the visual analogue scale (VAS), Patient-Rated Tennis Elbow Evaluation (PRTEE), and grip strength. [Results] The results of this study were as follows: at 3 weeks, there were no significant differences in VAS and PRTEE in the 3 groups, but at 6 weeks, 6 days per week group significantly decreased these two outcomes. Grip strength was significantly increased in 3 and 6 days per week groups at 6 weeks. [Conclusion] In conclusion, physical therapy is needed 3 days per week for 3 weeks in patients with acute lateral epicondylitis. After 3 weeks, 6 days per week is the most effective treatment frequency.

  16. Associations of work activities requiring pinch or hand grip or exposure to hand-arm vibration with finger and wrist osteoarthritis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hammer, Paula E C; Shiri, Rahman; Kryger, Ann I;

    2014-01-01

    -analyses. RESULTS: Of the 19 studies included, 17 were cross-sectional, 1 was a prospective cohort, and 1 a case-control study. The meta-analyses of studies that controlled their estimates for at least age and gender showed the associations of pinch grip work with proximal interphalangeal joint [OR 1.56, 95...

  17. 基于人手抓握复现的欠驱动假手结构设计%Underactuated Prosthetic Hand Design Based on Manpower Grip Reproduction

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    何其佳; 赵京东; 刘源

    2016-01-01

    假手的运动拟人性主要体现在抓取过程中手指各个关节间的协同性上。根据神经学原理,人手完成一个抓握动作需要几十个肌肉协同作用。人手是假手设计的范本,将这个原理推广到假手中,通过2个电机的协同输入,实现四指12个关节的协同输出。协同的具体参数通过人手抓握数据采集的降维处理计算得出。在拟人假手的设计中,首次提出通过集成在手掌内部的微型行星齿轮来合成2路输入,实现协同控制。经过ADAMS仿真,本假手能够完成多种日常抓握姿势。%The anthropomorphic movement of a prosthetic hand is mainly reflected on the synergy a‐mong various joints of the fingers during the grabbing process .According to the principle in neurology ,a gripping action requires manpower to complete dozens of muscle synergies .Manpower is the template for prosthetic hand design .This principle will be extended to the prosthetic hand .Collaborative output of twelve joints of the four fingers is achieved by collaborative input of two motors .Specific parameters of the synergy are calculated by collection of hand gripping data and dimension reduction .The anthropomorphic prosthetic hand design first proposes that the integrated inside the palm of the minor planet gear can be used to synthesize two inputs to achieve cooperative control .According to the simulation of ADAMS ,the prosthetic hand can complete a variety of daily grip positions .

  18. GRIPS Plan

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1978-07-31

    The GRIPS (Geothermal Resources Impact Projection Study) Commission was established by a Joint Powers Agreement between the California Counties of Lake, Mendocino, Napa, and Sonoma. The objectives of GRIPS are primarily to develop and use a cooperative environmental data collection and use system including natural, social, and economic considerations to facilitate their independent decisions and those of State and Federal agencies related to the environmental effects of geothermal development. This GRIPS Plan was prepared from a wide range of studies, workshops, and staff analyses. The plan is presented in four parts: summary and introduction; environmental data status report; planned programs; and budget. (MHR)

  19. GRIPS bibliography

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1978-07-31

    This GRIPS (Geothermal Resources Impact Project Study) contains over 1700 references on a wide variety of subjects dealing directly or indirectly with geothermal development at the Geysers/Calistoga KGRA. (MHR)

  20. Evaluation of pliers' grip spans in the maximum gripping task and sub-maximum cutting task.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Dae-Min; Kong, Yong-Ku

    2016-12-01

    A total of 25 males participated to investigate the effects of the grip spans of pliers on the total grip force, individual finger forces and muscle activities in the maximum gripping task and wire-cutting tasks. In the maximum gripping task, results showed that the 50-mm grip span had significantly higher total grip strength than the other grip spans. In the cutting task, the 50-mm grip span also showed significantly higher grip strength than the 65-mm and 80-mm grip spans, whereas the muscle activities showed a higher value at 80-mm grip span. The ratios of cutting force to maximum grip strength were also investigated. Ratios of 30.3%, 31.3% and 41.3% were obtained by grip spans of 50-mm, 65-mm, and 80-mm, respectively. Thus, the 50-mm grip span for pliers might be recommended to provide maximum exertion in gripping tasks, as well as lower maximum-cutting force ratios in the cutting tasks.

  1. Autism Severity and Muscle Strength: A Correlation Analysis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kern, Janet K.; Geier, David A.; Adams, James B.; Troutman, Melissa R.; Davis, Georgia; King, Paul G.; Young, John L.; Geier, Mark R.

    2011-01-01

    The current study examined the relationship between muscle strength, as measured by hand grip strength, and autism severity, as measured by the Childhood Autism Rating Scale (CARS). Thirty-seven (37) children with a diagnosis of autism spectrum disorder (ASD) were evaluated using the CARS and then tested for hand muscle strength using a hand grip…

  2. Vitamin D Receptor Ablation and Vitamin D Deficiency Result in Reduced Grip Strength, Altered Muscle Fibers, and Increased Myostatin in Mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Girgis, Christian M; Cha, Kuan Minn; Houweling, Peter J; Rao, Renuka; Mokbel, Nancy; Lin, Mike; Clifton-Bligh, Roderick J; Gunton, Jenny E

    2015-12-01

    Vitamin D deficiency is associated with muscle weakness, pain, and atrophy. Serum vitamin D predicts muscle strength and age-related muscle changes. However, precise mechanisms by which vitamin D affects skeletal muscle are unclear. To address this question, this study characterizes the muscle phenotype and gene expression of mice with deletion of vitamin D receptor (VDRKO) or diet-induced vitamin D deficiency. VDRKO and vitamin D-deficient mice had significantly weaker grip strength than their controls. Weakness progressed with age and duration of vitamin D deficiency, respectively. Histological assessment showed that VDRKO mice had muscle fibers that were significantly smaller in size and displayed hyper-nuclearity. Real-time PCR also indicated muscle developmental changes in VDRKO mice with dysregulation of myogenic regulatory factors (MRFs) and increased myostatin in quadriceps muscle (>2-fold). Vitamin D-deficient mice also showed increases in myostatin and the atrophy marker E3-ubiqutin ligase MuRF1. As a potential explanation for grip strength weakness, both groups of mice had down-regulation of genes encoding calcium-handling and sarco-endoplasmic reticulum calcium transport ATPase (Serca) channels. This is the first report of reduced strength, morphological, and gene expression changes in VDRKO and vitamin D-deficient mice where confounding by calcium, magnesium, and phosphate have been excluded by direct testing. Although suggested in earlier in vitro work, this study is the first to report an in vivo association between vitamin D, myostatin, and the regulation of muscle mass. These findings support a direct role for vitamin D in muscle function and corroborate earlier work on the presence of VDR in this tissue.

  3. UCP3 polymorphisms, hand grip performance and survival at old age: association analysis in two Danish middle aged and elderly cohorts.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dato, Serena; Soerensen, Mette; Montesanto, Alberto; Lagani, Vincenzo; Passarino, Giuseppe; Christensen, Kaare; Christiansen, Lene

    2012-08-01

    An efficient uncoupling process is generally considered to have a protective effect on the aging muscle by slowing down its age-related decay. Genetic polymorphisms in the Uncoupling Protein 3 (UCP3) gene, whose product is mainly expressed in skeletal muscle, were suggested to be associated with hand grip (HG) performances in elderly populations. Considering the population specificity of the quality of aging, we aimed to add further support to this evidence by analyzing the association between four SNPs in the UCP3 gene and relative haplotypes in two large cohorts of middle aged (N=708) and oldest old Danes (N=908). We found that the variability at rs1685354 and rs11235972 was associated with HG levels both at single and haplotypic level in both cohorts. Furthermore, taking advantage of large cohort and period survival data of the oldest cohort, we tested the association of each SNP with survival at 10years from the baseline visit. Interestingly, we found that allele A at rs11235972, associated in this cohort with lowest HG scores, influences also the survival patterns, with people carrying this allele showing higher mortality rates. On the whole, our work supports the role of UCP3 gene in functional status and survival at old age.

  4. The influence of respiratory acid-base changes on muscle performance and excitability of the sarcolemma during strenuous intermittent hand grip exercise.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hilbert, M; Shushakov, V; Maassen, N

    2012-02-01

    Acidification has been reported to provide protective effects on force production in vitro. Thus, in this study, we tested if respiratory acid-base changes influence muscle function and excitability in vivo. Nine subjects performed strenuous, intermittent hand grip exercises (10 cycles of 15 s of work/45 s of rest) under respiratory acidosis by CO(2) rebreathing, alkalosis by hyperventilation, or control. The Pco(2), pH, K(+) concentration ([K(+)]), and Na(+) concentration were measured in venous and arterialized blood. Compound action potentials (M-wave) were elicited to examine the excitability of the sarcolemma. The surface electromyogram (EMG) was recorded to estimate the central drive to the muscle. The lowest venous pH during the exercise period was 7.24 ± 0.03 in controls, 7.31 ± 0.05 with alkalosis, and 7.17 ± 0.04 with acidosis (P acidosis than with alkalosis, and, after the second cycle, it was smaller with acidosis than with the control condition (P Respiratory alkalosis stabilized the M-wave area without influencing performance. Thus, we did not find a direct link between performance and alteration of excitability of the sarcolemma due to changes in pH in vivo.

  5. [Is there any correlation between the strength of pronation and supination of the dominant hand and that of the non-dominant one in right-handed healthy adults: preliminary results].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rey, P-B; Jardin, E; Uhring, J; Obert, L

    2014-02-01

    We searched the existence of a link between the strength of pronation and supination of the dominant forearm and those of the non-dominant one. Ninety-seven volunteers were tested in pronation and supination with an analog dynamometer. Gender, age, dominance, height and weight were recorded. The measurement position was: 90° of elbow flexion, 0° of shoulder abduction, wrist slightly extended and neutral pronation-supination. We took four measurements per patient: strength in pronation and supination, in both the dominant and non-dominant sides. Fifteen subjects were evaluated twice. The left-handed (4) were removed from the statistical analysis. There were 38 men (37 years, 18-66) and 55 women (45 years, 21-71). Torques were higher (P0.6). Relating to the 15 subjects evaluated twice, the value of the forces varied during the day, but the ratio "non-dominant/dominant" was constant. The left-handed people were excluded, their values may be different from those of right-handers, as has been shown for grip strength. There was a strength variation during the day, but the ratio "non-dominant/dominant" was constant, making it more relevant intra-individual comparison (non-dominant side versus dominant side) rather inter-individual (based on charts of gender, age, weight and height). In the right-handed, the ratio "strength non-dominant side/dominant" is constant, defining easily in consultation the expected value of recovery of an injured forearm.

  6. Short term microgravity effect on isometric hand grip and precision pinch force with visual and proprioceptive feedback

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pastacaldi, P.; Orsini, P.; Bracciaferri, F.; Neri, G.; Porciani, M.; Liuni, L.; Zolesi, V.

    2004-01-01

    Experiments executed on the upper limb are assuming increasing significance in the frame of the Human Physiology in space, for at least two reasons: the upper limb is the principal means of locomotion for the subject living in a space station; furthermore, fatigue can have a significant effect on the hand, for the ordinary work on board, and in particular for the extra-vehicular activities. The degradation of the performances affecting the muscular-skeletal apparatus can be easily recognized on the upper limb, by exerting specific scientific protocols, to be repeated through the permanence of the subject in weightlessness conditions. Another aspect relevant to the effect of microgravity on the upper limb is associated with the alteration of the motor control programs due to the different gravity factor, affecting not only the bio-mechanics of the subject, but in general all his/her psycho-physical conditions, induced by the totally different environment. Specific protocols on the upper limb can facilitate the studies on learning mechanisms for the motor control. The results of such experiments can be transferred to the Earth, useful for treatment of subjects with local traumas or diseases of the Central Nervous System.

  7. Early reduction in toe flexor strength is associated with physical activity in elderly men

    Science.gov (United States)

    Suwa, Masataka; Imoto, Takayuki; Kida, Akira; Yokochi, Takashi

    2016-01-01

    [Purpose] To compare the toe flexor, hand grip and knee extensor strengths of young and elderly men, and to examine the association between toe flexor strength and physical activity or inactivity levels. [Subjects and Methods] Young (n=155, 18–23 years) and elderly (n=60, 65–88 years) men participated in this study. Toe flexor, hand grip, and knee extensor strength were measured. Physical activity (time spent standing/walking per day) and inactivity (time spent sitting per day) were assessed using a self-administered questionnaire. [Results] Toe flexor, hand grip, and knee extensor strength of the elderly men were significantly lower than those of the young men. Standing/walking and sitting times of the elderly men were lower than those of the young men. Toe flexor strength correlated with hand grip and knee extensor strength in both groups. In elderly men, toe flexor strength correlated with standing/walking time. In comparison to the young men’s mean values, toe flexor strength was significantly lower than knee extensor and hand grip strength in the elderly group. [Conclusion] The results suggest that age-related reduction in toe flexor strength is greater than those of hand grip and knee extensor strengths. An early loss of toe flexor strength is likely associated with reduced physical activity in elderly men. PMID:27313353

  8. Tablet Keyboard Configuration Affects Performance, Discomfort and Task Difficulty for Thumb Typing in a Two-Handed Grip.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Matthieu B Trudeau

    Full Text Available When holding a tablet computer with two hands, the touch keyboard configuration imposes postural constraints on the user because of the need to simultaneously hold the device and type with the thumbs. Designers have provided users with several possible keyboard configurations (device orientation, keyboard layout and location. However, potential differences in performance, usability and postures among these configurations have not been explored. We hypothesize that (1 the narrower standard keyboard layout in the portrait orientation leads to lower self-reported discomfort and less reach than the landscape orientation; (2 a split keyboard layout results in better overall outcomes compared to the standard layout; and (3 the conventional bottom keyboard location leads to the best outcomes overall compared to other locations. A repeated measures laboratory experiment of 12 tablet owners measured typing speed, discomfort, task difficulty, and thumb/wrist joint postures using an active marker system during typing tasks for different combinations of device orientation (portrait and landscape, keyboard layout (standard and split, and keyboard location (bottom, middle, top. The narrower standard keyboard with the device in the portrait orientation was associated with less discomfort (least squares mean (and S.E. 2.9±0.6 than the landscape orientation (4.5±0.7. Additionally, the split keyboard decreased the amount of reaching required by the thumb in the landscape orientation as defined by a reduced range of motion and less MCP extension, which may have led to reduced discomfort (2.7±0.6 compared to the standard layout (4.5±0.7. However, typing speed was greater for the standard layout (127±5 char./min. compared to the split layout (113±4 char./min. regardless of device orientation and keyboard location. Usage guidelines and designers can incorporate these findings to optimize keyboard design parameters and form factors that promote user performance

  9. Tablet Keyboard Configuration Affects Performance, Discomfort and Task Difficulty for Thumb Typing in a Two-Handed Grip.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Trudeau, Matthieu B; Catalano, Paul J; Jindrich, Devin L; Dennerlein, Jack T

    2013-01-01

    When holding a tablet computer with two hands, the touch keyboard configuration imposes postural constraints on the user because of the need to simultaneously hold the device and type with the thumbs. Designers have provided users with several possible keyboard configurations (device orientation, keyboard layout and location). However, potential differences in performance, usability and postures among these configurations have not been explored. We hypothesize that (1) the narrower standard keyboard layout in the portrait orientation leads to lower self-reported discomfort and less reach than the landscape orientation; (2) a split keyboard layout results in better overall outcomes compared to the standard layout; and (3) the conventional bottom keyboard location leads to the best outcomes overall compared to other locations. A repeated measures laboratory experiment of 12 tablet owners measured typing speed, discomfort, task difficulty, and thumb/wrist joint postures using an active marker system during typing tasks for different combinations of device orientation (portrait and landscape), keyboard layout (standard and split), and keyboard location (bottom, middle, top). The narrower standard keyboard with the device in the portrait orientation was associated with less discomfort (least squares mean (and S.E.) 2.9±0.6) than the landscape orientation (4.5±0.7). Additionally, the split keyboard decreased the amount of reaching required by the thumb in the landscape orientation as defined by a reduced range of motion and less MCP extension, which may have led to reduced discomfort (2.7±0.6) compared to the standard layout (4.5±0.7). However, typing speed was greater for the standard layout (127±5 char./min.) compared to the split layout (113±4 char./min.) regardless of device orientation and keyboard location. Usage guidelines and designers can incorporate these findings to optimize keyboard design parameters and form factors that promote user performance and

  10. Acute effect of different stretching methods on isometric muscle strength

    OpenAIRE

    Gabriel Vasconcellos de Lima Costa e Silva; Anderson Luiz Bezerra da Silveira; Fabrízio Di Masi; Cláudio Melibeu Bentes; Maria do Socorro Cirilo de Sousa; Jefferson da Silva Novaes

    2014-01-01

    http://dx.doi.org/10.4025/actascihealthsci.v36i1.15581 This study investigated the acute effect of static stretching methods (SS) and proprioceptive neuromuscular facilitation (PNF) on the static muscle strength (SMS). Eleven young male subjects with strength training experience, performed 3 tests with a 48h interval between them, randomly selected, where each one subject carried out all procedures: a) hand grip without stretching; b) hand grip preceded by static stretching of wrist flexor...

  11. Motor cortical function and the precision grip.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Geevasinga, Nimeshan; Menon, Parvathi; Kiernan, Matthew C; Vucic, Steve

    2014-12-01

    While task-dependent changes in motor cortical outputs have been previously reported, the issue of whether such changes are specific for complex hand tasks remains unresolved. The aim of the present study was to determine whether cortical inhibitory tone and cortical output were greater during precision grip and power grip. Motor cortex excitability was undertaken by using the transcranial magnetic stimulation threshold tracking technique in 15 healthy subjects. The motor-evoked potential (MEP) responses were recorded over the abductor pollicis brevis (APB), with the hand in the following positions: (1) rest, (2) precision grip and (3) power grip. The MEP amplitude (MEP amplitude REST 23.6 ± 3.3%; MEP amplitude PRECISION GRIP 35.2 ± 5.6%; MEP amplitude POWER GRIP 19.6 ± 3.4%, F = 2.4, P < 0.001) and stimulus-response gradient (SLOPEREST 0.06 ± 0.01; SLOPEPRCISION GRIP 0.15 ± 0.04; SLOPE POWER GRIP 0.07 ± 0.01, P < 0.05) were significantly increased during precision grip. Short interval intracortical inhibition (SICI) was significantly reduced during the precision grip (SICI REST 15.0 ± 2.3%; SICI PRECISION GRIP 9.7 ± 1.5%, SICI POWER GRIP 15.9 ± 2.7%, F = 2.6, P < 0.05). The present study suggests that changes in motor cortex excitability are specific for precision grip, with functional coupling of descending corticospinal pathways controlling thumb and finger movements potentially forming the basis of these cortical changes.

  12. Outcome measures for hand function naturally reveal three distinct domains in older adults: strength, coordinated upper extremity function, and sensorimotor processing

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Emily L Lawrence

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available Understanding the mapping between individual outcome measures and the latent functional domains of interest is critical to a quantitative evaluation and rehabilitation of hand function. We examined whether and how the associations among six hand-specific outcome measures reveal latent functional domains in elderly individuals. We asked 66 healthy older adult participants (38F, 28M, 66.1±11.6yrs, range: 45-88yrs and 33 older adults (65.8±9.7yrs, 44-81yrs, 51 hands diagnosed with osteoarthritis (OA of the carpometacarpal (CMC joint, to complete six functional assessments: hand strength (Grip, Key and Precision Pinch, Box and Block, Nine Hole Pegboard, and Strength-Dexterity tests. The first three principal components suffice to explain 86% of variance among the six outcome measures in healthy older adults, and 84% of variance in older adults with CMC OA. The composition of these dominant associations revealed three distinct latent functional domains: strength, coordinated upper extremity function, and sensorimotor processing. Furthermore, in participants with thumb CMC OA we found a blurring of the associations between the latent functional domains of strength and coordinated upper extremity function. This motivates future work to understand how the physiological effects of thumb CMC OA lead upper extremity coordination to become strongly associated with strength, while dynamic sensorimotor ability remains an independent functional domain.Thus, when assessing the level of hand function in our growing older adult populations, it is particularly important to acknowledge its multidimensional nature—and explicitly consider how each outcome measure maps to these three latent and fundamental domains of function. Moreover, this ability to distinguish among latent functional domains may facilitate the design of treatment modalities to target the rehabilitation of each of them.

  13. Effect of elbow flexion, forearm rotation and upper arm abduction on MVC grip and grip endurance time.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Farooq, Mohd; Khan, Abid Ali

    2012-01-01

    This experiment was designed to know the effect of upper limb postural deviations on grip strength and grip endurance time. A full factorial design of experiment, i.e., 3 (0°, 45°, 90° abduction angles of upper arm) × 3 (45°, 90°, 135° angles of elbow flexion) × 3 (0°, -60° prone, +60° supine angles of forearm rotation) was used to find the effect of 27 combinations of postures on maximum voluntary contraction (MVC) grip strength and grip endurance time. The results showed that none of the main factors were significant on MVC grip, although there was a change in MVC grip. Grip endurance time significantly decreased with an increase in upper arm abduction. Also, grip endurance significantly increased with the elbow flexion angle and decreased with forearm rotation from neutral. These data will help designers and engineers to improve the workplace and tools to reduce the risk of injuries.

  14. Soft shape-adaptive gripping device made from artificial muscle

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hamburg, E.; Vunder, V.; Johanson, U.; Kaasik, F.; Aabloo, A.

    2016-04-01

    We report on a multifunctional four-finger gripper for soft robotics, suitable for performing delicate manipulation tasks. The gripping device is comprised of separately driven gripping and lifting mechanisms, both made from a separate single piece of smart material - ionic capacitive laminate (ICL) also known as artificial muscle. Compared to other similar devices the relatively high force output of the ICL material allows one to construct a device able to grab and lift objects exceeding multiple times its own weight. Due to flexible design of ICL grips, the device is able to adapt the complex shapes of different objects and allows grasping single or multiple objects simultaneously without damage. The performance of the gripper is evaluated in two different configurations: a) the ultimate grasping strength of the gripping hand; and b) the maximum lifting force of the lifting actuator. The ICL is composed of three main layers: a porous membrane consisting of non-ionic polymer poly(vinylidene fluoride-co-hexafluoropropene) (PVdF-HFP), ionic liquid 1-ethyl-3-methylimidazolium trifluoromethane-sulfonate (EMITFS), and a reinforcing layer of woven fiberglass cloth. Both sides of the membrane are coated with a carbonaceous electrode. The electrodes are additionally covered with thin gold layers, serving as current collectors. Device made of this material operates silently, requires low driving voltage (<3 V), and is suitable for performing tasks in open air environment.

  15. Effects of breast cancer related lymphedema on hand muscle strength, hand functions and sensory loss of hand

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gul Mete Civelek

    2016-06-01

    Conclusion: In patients with BCRL, having axillary dissection, receiving chemotherapy and radiotherapy in post-operative period, obesity and shoulder pain are common. Evaluation of patients with BCRL should be made in details, should be versatile and should include questioning shoulder pain and hand evaluation. [Cukurova Med J 2016; 41(2.000: 208-216

  16. Hold, grasp, clutch or grab: consumer grip choices during food container opening.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rowson, J; Yoxall, A

    2011-07-01

    Society is ageing and sadly that ageing leads to a host of issues, not least a society in which the majority are likely to have some loss of strength and dexterity. This can lead to complications in undertaking everyday tasks such as using transport, bathing or even handling and opening food. Packaging has to provide a multitude of services; to protect and preserve the product, to provide information to the consumer and not least to allow access to the contents. This access to packaging--or 'openability'--has become a significant issue for designers and manufacturers with the change in demographics as described above. Understanding the choices consumers make in how they manipulate packaging can help designers produce packaging that is more able to meet the requirements of modern society. Studies previously undertaken by the authors showed that consumers did use different grips when opening packaging and that certain grips were theoretically more comfortable and stronger than others. This paper outlines a further study whereby consumers were asked to apply the most common grips to a specially designed torque measuring device. Details were taken about the consumers: age, gender, occupation, hand size, plus their preferred grip choice for packaging of this type. The study showed that typically women chose a grip that maximised their opportunity of opening the closure and that this grip choice was more limited than that available for men. This has implications for inclusive design of many everyday products.

  17. Looking at eye dominance from a different angle: is sighting strength related to hand preference?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carey, David P; Hutchinson, Claire V

    2013-10-01

    Sighting dominance (the behavioural preference for one eye over the other under monocular viewing conditions) has traditionally been thought of as a robust individual trait. However, Khan and Crawford (2001) have shown that, under certain viewing conditions, eye preference reverses as a function of horizontal gaze angle. Remarkably, the reversal of sighting from one eye to the other depends on which hand is used to reach out and grasp the target. Their procedure provides an ideal way to measure the strength of monocular preference for sighting, which may be related to other indicators of hemispheric specialisation for speech, language and motor function. Therefore, we hypothesised that individuals with consistent side preferences (e.g., right hand, right eye) should have more robust sighting dominance than those with crossed lateral preferences. To test this idea, we compared strength of eye dominance in individuals who are consistently right or left sided for hand and foot preference with those who are not. We also modified their procedure in order to minimise a potential image size confound, suggested by Banks et al. (2004) as an explanation of Khan and Crawford's results. We found that the sighting dominance switch occurred at similar eccentricities when we controlled for effects of hand occlusion and target size differences. We also found that sighting dominance thresholds change predictably with the hand used. However, we found no evidence for relationships between strength of hand preference as assessed by questionnaire or by pegboard performance and strength of sighting dominance. Similarly, participants with consistent hand and foot preferences did not show stronger eye preference as assessed using the Khan and Crawford procedure. These data are discussed in terms of indirect relationships between sighting dominance, hand preference and cerebral specialisation for language and motor control. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  18. ASSESSMENT OF GRIP FORCE CONTROL IN PATIENTS WITH MUSCULAR DYSTROPHY

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gregorij Kurillo

    2004-12-01

    Full Text Available Background. The majority of hand functionality tests are based on qualitative assessment which largely depends on the experience of the therapist. Computer-assisted methods can provide more objective and accurate measurements of the grip force and other parameters related to grasping.Methods. We analysed the grip force control in 12 patients with muscular dystrophy using the tracking system developed. The system consists of a grip-measuring device with endobjects assessing the force applied in different grips. The device was used as input to a tracking task where the patient applied the grip force according to the visual feedback from the computer screen. Each patient performed two tasks which consisted of tracking a ramp and sinus target.Results. We analysed the maximal grip force as assessed in the ramp task and the tracking accuracy of the sinus task. The results are compared among five different grips (cylindrical, lateral, palmar, pinch and spherical grip, applied with dominant and non-dominant hand. The results show no significant difference in tracking accuracy between the dominant and non-dominant hand.Conclusions. The results obtained in tracking the ramp target showed that the method could be used for the assessment of the muscle fatigue, providing quantitative information on muscle capacity. The results of the sinus-tracking task showed that the method can evaluate the grip force control in different types of grips, providing information on hand dexterity, muscle activation patterns or tremor.

  19. Muscle strength in athletes-hand kettlebell sport for different meteorological situations

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kulthickiy Z.I.

    2011-12-01

    Full Text Available Considered indicators of the strength of muscles of hands of students of general physical training and weightlifting athletes. The study involved 16 students of general physical training, 16 weightlifting athletes (III level and 16 athletes (II level. Age 18-23 years of study (men. Investigations were carried out at meteorological situations I and type III. It is established that muscle strength depends on the athletes and sports category varies for different types of weather. When the type III weather in all surveyed groups of athletes, a decrease of muscle strength.

  20. Clinical assessment of hip strength using a hand-held dynamometer is reliable

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Thorborg, K; Petersen, J; Magnusson, S P;

    2010-01-01

    rotation (ER), internal rotation (IR), flexion (FLEX) and extension (EXT) using a hand-held dynamometer. Nine subjects (five males, four females), physically active for at least 2.5 h a week, were included. Twelve standardized isometric strength tests were performed twice with a 1-week interval in between...

  1. Domo-Grip: functional evaluation and rehabilitation using grip force.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hewson, David J; Li, Ke; Frerejean, Alexis; Hogrel, Jean-Yves; Duchene, Jacques

    2010-01-01

    Grip force measurement is routinely used to identify pathologies, evaluate muscular function, and as part of rehabilitation. Grip force has also been shown to be a good indicator of the capacity of elderly to live independently owing to its strong relationship with clinical tests such as the Index of Activities of Daily Living. An autonomous, communicant grip-force measurement device is presented in this paper in order to perform grip-force evaluation at home. The Domo-Grip system consists of the Grip-Ball, the Grip-Box, and Grip-Soft. The Grip-Ball measures the pressure resulting from grip force, the Grip-Box serves as the communication hub, while Grip-Soft is an interactive software suite. The Domo-Grip system can be used as part of a home-based rehabilitation, and also for functional evaluation as part of an assessment of the capacity of elderly to live autonomously.

  2. Força de preensão palmar e pinça digital em diferentes grupos de pilotos da Academia da Força Aérea brasileira Grip and pinch strength among different groups of Brazilian Air Force pilots

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gláucia Helena Gonçalves

    2010-06-01

    Full Text Available Pilotos da Academia de Força Aérea (AFA brasileira, durante vôos, realizam movimentos com grande solicitação da musculatura da mão que comanda o manche, o que pode modificar a força muscular. Este estudo teve por objetivo analisar as forças musculares isométricas de preensão palmar e pinças polpa-a-polpa, trípode e lateral de três grupos de pilotos da AFA. Foram avaliados 15 pilotos da Esquadrilha da Fumaça (EDA, 16 instrutores de vôo (PI e 6 pilotos em treinamento (PT, todos do sexo masculino. Para a avaliação, o posicionamento corporal dos pilotos seguiu a padronização da Sociedade Americana de Terapeutas da Mão e a ordem dos movimentos analisados foi predefinida, evitando fadiga muscular. A força muscular isométrica máxima foi coletada em uma contração sustentada por 6 segundos. Os resultados mostram diferenças significativas na preensão, com superioridade das mãos dominantes em relação às não-dominantes em todos os grupos, tendo ainda o grupo EDA obtido valores significativamente superiores em relação aos demais. Nas medidas da pinça trípode, o grupo EDA apresentou significativos valores superiores aos do grupo PT, sendo encontrados valores das mãos dominantes superiores aos das não-dominantes nos grupos EDA e PI. Conclui-se que o treino específico da musculatura da mão durante o vôo, a especificidade e o período de treinamento interferem na força muscular isométrica da mão.Pilots from Brazilian Air Force Academy (AFA perform strentgth- and accuracy-demanding hand movements, which may modify muscle strength. The aim of this study was to analyse hand isometric strength of grip and pulp-to-pulp, tripode and lateral pinch in three groups of male AFA pilots: ADS (Air Demonstration Squadron, n=15; IP (instructor pilots, n=16; and TP (training pilots, n=6. Pilots body positioning during tests followed the standards of the American Society of Hand Therapists; the sequence of assessed movements was

  3. Optimal work-rest cycles for an isometric intermittent gripping task as a function of force, posture and grip span.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eksioglu, Mahmut

    2006-02-10

    The aim of this study was to investigate the maximum acceptable contraction frequencies (i.e. work-rest cycles) for an isometric-intermittent handgrip task as a function of grip span, applied force and shoulder posture using psychophysical and physiological approaches. Twelve healthy males served as subjects. The three grip spans investigated were the optimal, 2 cm narrower than the optimal, and 2 cm wider than the optimal. The grip force levels studied were 15% and 30% of maximum voluntary grip force and the two shoulder postures were 25 degrees flexion and 30 degrees abduction. The psychophysical results indicate that subjects work faster with the narrower grip span at 15% of maximum voluntary grip force level in comparison to working with the optimal and the wider spans. However, when the task required 30% of maximum grip force level, the subjects worked faster with the optimal grip span. These findings were supported by the results of electromyography, heart rate, blood pressure and perceived discomfort. The study suggests that grip span of a tool is an important factor to be considered in predicting optimal work-rest cycles for hand grip tasks, and the optimum setting of grip span of the hand-tool depends on the required task force level. That is, the optimality is relative rather than absolute. In addition, it appears that weaker subjects can work at a higher rate than stronger ones at the same relative force level.

  4. Forearm posture and grip effects during push and pull tasks.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Di Domizio, Jennifer; Keir, Peter J

    2010-03-01

    Direction of loading and performance of multiple tasks have been shown to elevate muscle activity in the upper extremity. The purpose of this study was to evaluate the effects of gripping on muscle activity and applied force during pushing and pulling tasks with three forearm postures. Twelve volunteers performed five hand-based tasks in supinated, neutral and pronated forearm postures with the elbow at 90 degrees and upper arm vertical. All tasks were performed with the right (dominant) hand and included hand grip alone, push and pull with and without hand grip. Surface EMG from eight upper extremity muscles, hand grip force, tri-axial push and pull forces and wrist angles were recorded during the 10 s trials. The addition of a pull force to hand grip elevated activity in all forearm muscles (all p push with grip tasks, forearm extensor muscle activity tended to increase when compared with grip only while flexor activity tended to decrease. Forearm extensor muscle activity was higher with the forearm pronated compared with neutral and supinated postures during most isolated grip tasks and push or pull with grip tasks (all p push and pull forces could act to assist in creating grip force, forearm muscle activity generally decreased. These results provide strategies for reducing forearm muscle loading in the workplace. STATEMENT OF RELEVANCE: Tools and tasks designed to take advantage of coupling grip with push or pull actions may be beneficial in reducing stress and injury in the muscles of the forearm. These factors should be considered in assessing the workplace in terms of acute and cumulative loading.

  5. Proximal arm kinematics affect grip force-load force coordination

    OpenAIRE

    Vermillion, Billy C.; Lum, Peter S; Lee, Sang Wook

    2015-01-01

    During object manipulation, grip force is coordinated with load force, which is primarily determined by object kinematics. Proximal arm kinematics may affect grip force control, as proximal segment motion could affect control of distal hand muscles via biomechanical and/or neural pathways. The aim of this study was to investigate the impact of proximal kinematics on grip force modulation during object manipulation. Fifteen subjects performed three vertical lifting tasks that involved distinct...

  6. Influence On Physical Work While Working With Segmental Vibration Inducing Hand Operated Power Tools

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sudhir Vinayakrao. Deshmukh

    2012-10-01

    Full Text Available Study evaluates and assesses the work done by vibrating equipments. It includes the assessment of influence of various independent variables associated with hand tools, operators, work & environmental factors on various dependent variables. Three tools selected for study include Rock drill (Dry type (Tool-1, Concrete breaker (Tool-2, Hand grinder (Tool-3. The impact of vibration exposure on health of operators is assessed by the help of survey. It is found that the human energy expenditure is more in the subjects having low grip strength whereas it is less in the subjects of more grip strength. The subjects having more grip strength show less change in touch sensation. The human energy expenditure of subjects of hand grinder is significantly less than the subjects of rock drill and concrete breaker. The presence of hand arm vibration Syndrome (HAVS in the subjects under heavy work, like rock drill and concrete breaker found very high.

  7. Acute effect of different stretching methods on isometric muscle strength

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gabriel Vasconcellos de Lima Costa e Silva

    2014-03-01

    This study investigated the acute effect of static stretching methods (SS and proprioceptive neuromuscular facilitation (PNF on the static muscle strength (SMS. Eleven young male subjects with strength training experience, performed 3 tests with a 48h interval between them, randomly selected, where each one subject carried out all procedures: a hand grip without stretching; b hand grip preceded by static stretching of wrist flexors muscles; c hand grip preceded by PNF stretching of wrist flexors muscles. The Shapiro-Wilk test verified the normality of data, and a one-way ANOVA with repeated measures, followed by Tukey’s post hoc test, evaluated the differences between the groups. The significance was set at p 0.05. In conclusion, both stretching methods had caused negative effects on isometric strength, reducing its levels.

  8. Growth Diagrams for Individual Finger Strength in Children Measured with the RIHM

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    H.M. Molenaar (Ties); R.W. Selles (Ruud); S.P. Willemsen (Sten); S.E.R. Hovius (Steven); H.J. Stam (Henk)

    2011-01-01

    textabstractBackground: Although grip and pinch strength provide a more global measure of a large number of digits and muscles, measuring strength of individual fingers or the thumb can provide additional and more detailed information regarding hand strength. Questions/purposes: We developed growth

  9. Algorithm design for grip-pattern verification in smart gun

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Shang, X.; Veldhuis, R.N.J.; Bazen, A.M.; Ganzevoort, W.P.T.

    2005-01-01

    The Secure Grip project1 focuses on the development of a hand-grip pattern recognition system, as part of the smart gun. Its target customer is the police. To explore the authentication performance of this system, we collected data from a group of police officers, and made authentication simulations

  10. Algorithm Design for Grip-Pattern Verification in Smart Gun

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Shang, X.; Veldhuis, Raymond N.J.; Bazen, A.M.; Ganzevoort, W.P.T.

    2005-01-01

    The Secure Grip project1 focuses on the development of a hand-grip pattern recognition system, as part of the smart gun. Its target customer is the police. To explore the authentication performance of this system, we collected data from a group of police officers, and made authentication simulations

  11. Grip-pattern recognition: Applied to a smart gun

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Shang, X.

    2008-01-01

    In our work the verification performance of a biometric recognition system based on grip patterns, as part of a smart gun for use by the police ocers, has been investigated. The biometric features are extracted from a two-dimensional pattern of the pressure, exerted on the grip of a gun by the hand

  12. Research of hands' strength and endurance indications of arm sport athletes having different levels of skills

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Podrigalo L.V.

    2014-03-01

    Full Text Available Purpose : comparative study of indicators of hands’ strength and endurance at athletes of arm sport of different skill levels. Material : the study involved 50 athletes. Athletes were divided into two groups: 1 - 15 athletes with high skill levels (age 25,25 ± 0,62 years and 2 - 35 athletes and fans of mass categories (age 22,21 ± 0,35 years. Results : it is shown that the results of carpal dynamometry right and left hands were significantly higher in group 1 (respectively: 60,50 ± 0,91 kg and 53,75 ± 0,83 kg against 52,35 ± 0,51 kg and 48 53 ± 0,46 kg. Strength endurance was significantly higher in group 2 (respectively: 32,97 ± 0,61 sec 33,09 ± 0,62 sec against 23,78 ± 0,85 sec and 24,66 ± 0,78 sec. Found that carpal dynamometry has a maximum contribution to the system (in group 1 for the right hand - 18.17, for the left - 23.50, in group 2 - 7.44 and 7.10. Correlation coefficients dynamometry in group 1 were significantly higher. Strength endurance had almost no connection with the study of reliable performance. Conclusions : it is proved that the level of carpal dynamometry is an important informative and adequate criterion. This indicator is characterized by a maximum contribution backbone.

  13. Application of least square method for muscular strength estimation in hand motion recognition using surface EMG.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nakano, Takemi; Nagata, Kentaro; Yamada, Masafumi; Magatani, Kazushige

    2009-01-01

    In this study, we describe the application of least square method for muscular strength estimation in hand motion recognition based on surface electromyogram (SEMG). Although the muscular strength can consider the various evaluation methods, a grasp force is applied as an index to evaluate the muscular strength. Today, SEMG, which is measured from skin surface, is widely used as a control signal for many devices. Because, SEMG is one of the most important biological signal in which the human motion intention is directly reflected. And various devices using SEMG are reported by lots of researchers. Those devices which use SEMG as a control signal, we call them SEMG system. In SEMG system, to achieve high accuracy recognition is an important requirement. Conventionally SEMG system mainly focused on how to achieve this objective. Although it is also important to estimate muscular strength of motions, most of them cannot detect power of muscle. The ability to estimate muscular strength is a very important factor to control the SEMG systems. Thus, our objective of this study is to develop the estimation method for muscular strength by application of least square method, and reflecting the result of measured power to the controlled object. Since it was known that SEMG is formed by physiological variations in the state of muscle fiber membranes, it is thought that it can be related with grasp force. We applied to the least-squares method to construct a relationship between SEMG and grasp force. In order to construct an effective evaluation model, four SEMG measurement locations in consideration of individual difference were decided by the Monte Carlo method.

  14. The Reliability and Validity of Toe Grip Strength as an Index of Physical Development in 4- to 5-Year-Old Children

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Takahiro Ikeda[1; Osamu Aoyagi[2

    2015-01-01

    Studies on TGS (toe-grip strength) are currently proliferating as a result of the development of the dynamometer. The purpose of the present study was to investigate the reliability and validity of TGS as a physical function in preschool aged children. The participants were 153 preschoolers. Each participant was measured in terms of his or her TGS and completed a MAT (motor ability test). The reliability of the measurements was investigated via Pearson's r and Cronbach's a through a test-retest method, as well as a Bland-Altman plot. The validity of the TGS value was investigated by measuring the correlation between TGS and each component of the MAT, the principal component analysis, and a two-way layout ANOVA with general linear model (gender and age). All reliability coefficients were more than 0.70. Though all components of the MAT relating to TGS were found to be significant (P 〈 0.05), these correlations were weak. However, TGS was found to be a physical function that relating to the lower limbs and develops with aging. Therefore, TGS was found to be a highly reliable measure of physical function performance in preschoolers.

  15. The efficacy of peloid therapy in management of hand osteoarthritis: a pilot study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kasapoğlu Aksoy, Meliha; Altan, Lale; Eröksüz, Rıza; Metin Ökmen, Burcu

    2017-08-01

    Hand osteoarthritis (OA) is associated with pain, reduced grip strength, loss of range of motion (ROM), and joint stiffness, leading to impaired hand function and difficulty in performance of daily living activities. Mud bath therapy has been reported to play a primary role in the prevention and management of OA. Thus, we planned to conduct a study aimed at investigating the effects of peloid therapy on pain, functional state, grip strength, and the quality of life and performing a comparative analysis of the outcomes of peloid therapy. In this randomized, controlled, single-blind, pilot study, patients (n = 33) underwent peloid therapy over 2 weeks, 5 sessions a week, for a total of 10 sessions and home exercise program in group 1. Patients in group 2 (control, n = 30) received only the same home exercise program as in group 1. Patients were evaluated just before, and 2 and 6 weeks after the start of the study with Visual Analogue Scale (VAS), Australian/Canadian Hand Osteoarthritis Index (AUSCAN), Health Assessment Questionnaire (HAQ), hand grip strength (HGS), and pinch strength (PS). Statistically significant improvements were observed in all parameters assessed at week 2 and week 6 in the group 1 (p management of symptomatic osteoarthritis of the hand and may provide effective pain control and improvements in the hand functions, quality of life, and grip strength.

  16. Gripping tool for the ITER upper port plug RH extraction/insertion

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rosa, Elena V., E-mail: elena.rosa@ciemat.es; Ríos, Luis, E-mail: luis.rios@ciemat.es

    2014-10-15

    Highlights: •The gripping tool is based on only one gripping point centred at the plug bottom. •The gripping tool should allow the relative displacement in the gripping point to absorb the misalignment between plug and tractor. •The gripping tool needs to withstand around 100/30 kN during the plug extraction/insertion. •The gripping tool should rely on visual control and it has to avoid force feed-back. •The comparison between the features of several gripping tool concepts is assessed. -- Abstract: The conceptual design of several gripping tools and their mechanical interfaces is being carried out for the ITER ECH UPP within the WP10-GOTRH programme. EFDA finances the GOT RH (Goal Oriented Training Programme for Remote Handling). The purpose of this paper is to introduce new concepts of gripping tools for the plug extraction/insertion in the upper port of ITER. All these gripping tools are designed according to IO input data and geometrical constraints. The gripping tools have to be able to extract/insert the plug in the scenario of maximum misalignment between the plug and the tractor. The paper also defines the functional requirements the gripping tools need to comply with. The requirements and input data are verified and validated through 3D simulation with Catia mock-ups of the gripping tools. The strengths and weaknesses of each gripping tool model are compared.

  17. Development of a prototype over-actuated biomimetic prosthetic hand.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Matthew R Williams

    Full Text Available The loss of a hand can greatly affect quality of life. A prosthetic device that can mimic normal hand function is very important to physical and mental recuperation after hand amputation, but the currently available prosthetics do not fully meet the needs of the amputee community. Most prosthetic hands are not dexterous enough to grasp a variety of shaped objects, and those that are tend to be heavy, leading to discomfort while wearing the device. In order to attempt to better simulate human hand function, a dexterous hand was developed that uses an over-actuated mechanism to form grasp shape using intrinsic joint mounted motors in addition to a finger tendon to produce large flexion force for a tight grip. This novel actuation method allows the hand to use small actuators for grip shape formation, and the tendon to produce high grip strength. The hand was capable of producing fingertip flexion force suitable for most activities of daily living. In addition, it was able to produce a range of grasp shapes with natural, independent finger motion, and appearance similar to that of a human hand. The hand also had a mass distribution more similar to a natural forearm and hand compared to contemporary prosthetics due to the more proximal location of the heavier components of the system. This paper describes the design of the hand and controller, as well as the test results.

  18. Development of a prototype over-actuated biomimetic prosthetic hand.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Williams, Matthew R; Walter, Wayne

    2015-01-01

    The loss of a hand can greatly affect quality of life. A prosthetic device that can mimic normal hand function is very important to physical and mental recuperation after hand amputation, but the currently available prosthetics do not fully meet the needs of the amputee community. Most prosthetic hands are not dexterous enough to grasp a variety of shaped objects, and those that are tend to be heavy, leading to discomfort while wearing the device. In order to attempt to better simulate human hand function, a dexterous hand was developed that uses an over-actuated mechanism to form grasp shape using intrinsic joint mounted motors in addition to a finger tendon to produce large flexion force for a tight grip. This novel actuation method allows the hand to use small actuators for grip shape formation, and the tendon to produce high grip strength. The hand was capable of producing fingertip flexion force suitable for most activities of daily living. In addition, it was able to produce a range of grasp shapes with natural, independent finger motion, and appearance similar to that of a human hand. The hand also had a mass distribution more similar to a natural forearm and hand compared to contemporary prosthetics due to the more proximal location of the heavier components of the system. This paper describes the design of the hand and controller, as well as the test results.

  19. A cross-sectional analysis of age and sex patterns in grip strength, tooth loss, near vision and hearing levels in Chinese aged 50-74 years

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Wu, Yili; Pang, Zengchang; Zhang, Dongfeng

    2012-01-01

    By focusing on four health variables, handgrip strength, near visual acuity, tooth loss and hearing level, this study examined the different patterns of age-related changes in these variables in Chinese aged from 50 to 74 years, as well as explored the relationship among the variables in a cross-...

  20. The composition of a graph on the decline of total body strength with age based on pushing, pulling, twisting and gripping force

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Voorbij, A.I.M.; Steenbekkers, L.P.A.

    2001-01-01

    This study, part of a large project on design-relevant characteristics of ageing users, aims to provide more insight in the possibilities and limitations of the procedure of extrapolation and calculation of human strength for transgenerational designThis study is part of a large project on design-re

  1. Proximal arm kinematics affect grip force-load force coordination.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vermillion, Billy C; Lum, Peter S; Lee, Sang Wook

    2015-10-01

    During object manipulation, grip force is coordinated with load force, which is primarily determined by object kinematics. Proximal arm kinematics may affect grip force control, as proximal segment motion could affect control of distal hand muscles via biomechanical and/or neural pathways. The aim of this study was to investigate the impact of proximal kinematics on grip force modulation during object manipulation. Fifteen subjects performed three vertical lifting tasks that involved distinct proximal kinematics (elbow/shoulder), but resulted in similar end-point (hand) trajectories. While temporal coordination of grip and load forces remained similar across the tasks, proximal kinematics significantly affected the grip force-to-load force ratio (P = 0.042), intrinsic finger muscle activation (P = 0.045), and flexor-extensor ratio (P muscles and the elbow joint cannot fully explain the observed changes, as task-related changes in intrinsic hand muscle activation were greater than in extrinsic hand muscles. Rather, between-task variation in grip force (highest during task 3) appears to contrast to that in shoulder joint velocity/acceleration (lowest during task 3). These results suggest that complex neural coupling between the distal and proximal upper extremity musculature may affect grip force control during movements, also indicated by task-related changes in intermuscular coherence of muscle pairs, including intrinsic finger muscles. Furthermore, examination of the fingertip force showed that the human motor system may attempt to reduce variability in task-relevant motor output (grip force-to-load force ratio), while allowing larger fluctuations in output less relevant to task goal (shear force-to-grip force ratio).

  2. Effect of Sevoflurane on the Grip Strength of Mice by Intrathecal and Intracerebroventricular Injection%鞘内注射和侧脑室注射七氟烷对小鼠抓力的影响研究

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    周美艳; 张明阳; 刘亚君; 戴体俊

    2011-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: To study the main site of muscle-relaxation induced by sevoflurane (Sev). METHODS: 64 mice were randomly divided into intrathecal injection (it) group and intracerebroventricular injection (icv) group. Then it group and icv group were redivided into aCSF group (0.25 μL·g-1), Sev1 group (0.25 mg·g-1), Sev2 group (0.31 mg·g-1), Sev3 group (0.39 mg·g-1) with each group of 8 mice. The duration of injection was 10 s and acupuncture manipulation time lasted for 15 s. The grip strength of mice were recorded before administration and 5, 10, 15, 20, 25, 30 min after administration. RESULTS: Compared with aCSF group, the grip strength of mice in each group had reduced as the concentration of Sev increased, there was significant difference between Sev2 group and Sev3 group (P<0.05 or P<0.01 ). Compared with icv groups, the grip strength of mice in Sev2 group and Sev3 group of it group had reduced (P<0.01). CONCLUSION: Intratheeal and intracerebroventricular injection of sevoflurane produce muscle relaxation effect in dose-dependent manner, especially in it group. It can be concluded that spinal cord is the main site of muscle-relaxation induced by sevoflurane.%目的:研究七氟烷(Sev)产生肌松作用的主要部位.方法:将64只小鼠按基础抓力、体重,用分层随机区组设计均分为鞘内(it)注射组和侧脑室(icv)注射组,每组再各分为人工脑脊液(aCSF)组(0.25 uJL·g)、Sev1组(0.25 mg·g)、Sev2组(0.31 mg·g)、Scv3组(0.39mg·g),每小组8只,给予相应药物,注射时间为10 S,留针时间为15 S,考察各组小鼠给药前和给药后5、10、15、20、25、30min的抓力变化.结果:与aCSF组比较,it和icy注射Sev各组小鼠抓力均减小,且注射Sev浓度越高小鼠抓力越小,其中Sev2组和Sev3具有显著性差异(JD<0.05或P<0.01);与icv组比较,it组中的Sev2组、Sev3组小鼠抓力均显著减小(P<0.01).结论:it和icv注射Sev后均可产生剂量依赖性的肌松作用,但相同剂量

  3. Effects of Different Environment Temperatures on Some Motor Characteristics and Muscle Strength

    Science.gov (United States)

    Çakir, Ergün; Yüksek, Selami; Asma, Bülent; Arslanoglu, Erkal

    2016-01-01

    The aim of this study was determine the effects of different environment temperatures on motor characteristics and muscle strength. 15 athletes participated to study. Flexibility, vertical jump, hand grip-leg strength, 30m sprint, 20-meter shuttle run and coordination-agility tests were measured in five different environment temperatures. (22°C,…

  4. Daily multi-micronutrient supplementation during tuberculosis treatment increases weight and grip strength among HIV-uninfected but not HIV-infected patients in Mwanza, Tanzania

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    PrayGod, George; Range, Nyagosya; Faurholt-Jepsen, Daniel

    2011-01-01

    Undernutrition is common among tuberculosis (TB) patients. The objective of this study was to assess the effect of multi-micronutrient supplementation during TB treatment on weight, body composition, and handgrip strength. A total of 865 patients with smear-positive (PTB+) or -negative (PTB......-) pulmonary TB were randomly allocated to receive a daily biscuit with or without multi-micronutrients for 60 d during the intensive phase of TB treatment. Weight, arm fat area, arm muscle area, and handgrip strength were assessed at baseline and after 2 and 5 mo. At 2 mo, the multi-micronutrient...... supplementation led to a higher handgrip gain (1.22 kg; 95% CI = 0.50, 1.94; P = 0.001) but had no effects on other outcomes. The effects of multi-micronutrient supplementation were modified by HIV infection (P-interaction = 0.002). Among HIV- patients, multi-micronutrient supplementation increased weight gain...

  5. Comparative assessment of knee extensor and flexor muscle strength measured using a hand-held vs. isokinetic dynamometer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Muff, Guillaume; Dufour, Stéphane; Meyer, Alain; Severac, François; Favret, Fabrice; Geny, Bernard; Lecocq, Jehan; Isner-Horobeti, Marie-Eve

    2016-09-01

    [Purpose] To compare measurements of knee extensor and flexor muscle strength performed using a hand-held dynamometer and an isokinetic dynamometer in apparently healthy subjects. [Subjects and Methods] Thirty adult volunteers underwent knee muscle strength evaluation using an isokinetic or a hand-held dynamometer. [Results] Strong positive correlations were found between the 2 methods, with correlation coefficients r ranging from 0.72 (95% confidence interval [CI], 0.48-0.86) to 0.87 (95% CI, 0.75-0.94), depending on the muscle group and the isokinetic evaluation mode. The reproducibility of the hand-held dynamometer findings was good, judged by a coefficient of variation of 3.2-4.2%. However, the correlation between the 2 methods for the assessment of flexor/extensor ratios ranged from -0.04 to 0.46. [Conclusion] Knee extensor and flexor muscle strength recorded with a hand-held dynamometer is reproducible and significantly correlated with the isokinetic values, indicating that this method may in some cases be a useful replacement for isokinetic strength measurement. However, for strength ratio assessment, and when judged against the isokinetic standard, a hand-held dynamometer is not a valid option.

  6. A systematic review into the effectiveness of hand exercise therapy in the treatment of rheumatoid arthritis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bergstra, S A; Murgia, A; Te Velde, A F; Caljouw, S R

    2014-11-01

    Hand exercises are often part of the treatment of hand rheumatoid arthritis; however, it is still unclear whether and what type of exercises is effective in the treatment of this condition. Therefore, a systematic review into the effectiveness of hand exercises in the treatment of hand rheumatoid arthritis has been performed. Studies were identified in the literature databases by predefined search criteria. The eight included studies are peer-reviewed studies published between 2000 and 2014. Hand exercises differed between studies, but always included resistance and/or active range of motion exercises. Grip strength in various grip types (power grip, key pinch, precision pinch and tripod pinch) was found to improve by hand exercise therapy without having adverse effects on pain or disease activity. Adaptations in the range of motion in response to hand exercise therapy were less pronounced. There appears to be some transfer from the improvements on the body functioning level to the level of daily functioning, with the largest improvements found on grip ability. With regard to the intervention content, there was some evidence in favour of a longer therapy duration and a higher therapy intensity. No conclusions could be drawn on the effectiveness of the different types of exercises. Collectively, the studies indicate that hand exercises may have positive effects on strength and some aspects of daily functioning without aggravating disease activity or pain, although caution should be taken for subjects in the exacerbation period.

  7. Association of BODE index to daily living activities and upper limb strength in chronic obstructive pulmonary disease

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Renukadevi Mahadevan

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Context: Chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD is a progressive disease that reduces the functional capacity and the ability to perform activities of daily living (ADL. Aims: To determine the correlation between the BODE index (B - body mass index; O - airflow obstruction; D - dyspnea; and E - exercise capacity with ADL and grip strength in COPD patients. Settings and Design: The study was conducted at JSS Hospital, Mysore. It was a correlational study. Subjects and Methods: Sixty-six COPD subjects were recruited by convenience sampling. Forced expiratory volume, body mass index, Six-Minute Walk Test, and Medical Research Council scale were assessed. The BODE index was calculated. The total score of London Chest Activities of Daily Living (LCADL and grip strength were compared between the patients of the four quartiles of the BODE index. The association between LCADL and grip Strength with BODE index was analyzed. Statistical Analysis: Eta coefficient, Spearman's rank correlation coefficient and the analysis of variance were used. Results: The Eta coefficients showed the strength or the measure of associations of BODE index with age, grip strength, and LCADL. Spearman's correlation coefficient shows that there is an inverse association with grip strength and LCADL, and it was statistically significant as theP<0.05. Conclusions: ADL limitation and hand grip strength test have a strong association with the BODE index in patients with moderate to severe COPD.

  8. Associations between Handgrip Strength and Ultrasound-Measured Muscle Thickness of the Hand and Forearm in Young Men and Women.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abe, Takashi; Counts, Brittany R; Barnett, Brian E; Dankel, Scott J; Lee, Kofan; Loenneke, Jeremy P

    2015-08-01

    It is unknown whether muscle size of intrinsic hand muscles is associated with handgrip strength. To investigate the relationships between handgrip strength and flexor muscle size of the hand and forearm, muscle thickness (MT) of 86 young adults (43 men and 43 women) between the ages of 18 and 34 y was measured by ultrasound. Two MTs (forearm radius and forearm ulna MT) in the anterior forearm, two MTs (lumbrical and dorsal interosseous MT) in the anterior hand and handgrip strength were measured on the right side. Linear regression with part (also referred to as semipartial) correlation coefficients revealed that forearm ulna MT positively correlated with handgrip strength in both men (part = 0.379, p = 0.001) and women (part = 0.268, p = 0.002). Dorsal interosseous MT correlated with handgrip strength in women only (part = 0.289, p = 0.001). Our results suggest that the forearm ulna and dorsal interosseous MTs for women and forearm ulna MTs for men are factors contributing to prediction of handgrip strength in young adults. Copyright © 2015 World Federation for Ultrasound in Medicine & Biology. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  9. Ultrasonographic quantification of intrinsic hand muscle cross-sectional area; Reliability and validity for predicting muscle strength

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Mohseny, Behnam; Nijhuis, Tim H.; Hundepool, Caroline A.; Janssen, Wim G.; Selles, Ruud W.; Coert, J. Henk

    2015-01-01

    Objective To investigate whether ultrasonographic measurement of the cross-sectional area (CSA) of the intrinsic hand muscles can be used to predict muscle strength in a valid and reliable manner, and to determine if this method can be used for follow-up of patients with peripheral nerve injury betw

  10. Alteration in Peripheral Muscle Strength among Overweight and Obese Individuals: A Systematic Review

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vikram Mohan

    2017-04-01

    Full Text Available Peripheral muscle dysfunction in Overweight (OW and Obesity (OB leads to fatigue and activity limitations. However, there are contradictory views regarding the exact level with regard to hand grip and quadriceps muscle strength in OW and OB. The main objective of the present systematic review was to synthesize the literature for the strength part of the hand grip and quadriceps muscle strength among OW and OB. Literature search of Scopus, EBSCO and PubMed databases from 01.01.2004 to 30.06.2016, was performed. We set our search strategy using the terms “overweight OR obesity” AND “muscle strength” AND “grip OR quadriceps”. Two reviewers administered established eligible criteria and extracted the data. Strengthening the Reporting of Observational studies in Epidemiology (STROBE was used to assess the risk of bias. Sixteen articles which were included identified Handgrip Strength (HGS, shoulder flexor, elbow flexor and knee extensor were found to be altered. There were consistent results with an increase in quadriceps muscle strength, whereas differed results were found in hand grip to increase and decrease in muscle strength in the presence of OW and OB. It is concluded that HGS appeared to be diversified with findings of increased and decrease strength, whereas regarding the quadriceps muscles, the findings were homogeneous.

  11. Enter the Gripping Beast

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sindbæk, Søren Michael

    2012-01-01

    of communities and their life world. Transcending technology, cultural dispositions and social relations, the study of innovations invites an actor-networks approach, which considers the heterogeneous nature of human-material relations. The archaeological record is potentially a rich source of evidence...... on innovations. Mostly, however, the time-resolution of archaeological data is too coarse-grained to allow us to grasp this potential to the full. In the period c. AD 790-850 a distinctly new artistic motif, the Gripping Beast, emerged in Scandinavia. A series of narrowly dated contexts provide anchor points...

  12. Ultrasonographic quantification of intrinsic hand muscle cross-sectional area; reliability and validity for predicting muscle strength.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mohseny, Behnam; Nijhuis, Tim H; Hundepool, Caroline A; Janssen, Wim G; Selles, Ruud W; Coert, J Henk

    2015-05-01

    To investigate whether ultrasonographic measurement of the cross-sectional area (CSA) of the intrinsic hand muscles can be used to predict muscle strength in a valid and reliable manner, and to determine if this method can be used for follow-up of patients with peripheral nerve injury between the wrist and elbow. Repeated-measures cross-sectional study. Clinical and academic hospital. Healthy adults (n=31) and patients with ulnar and median nerve injuries (n=16) between the wrist and elbow who were visiting the Erasmus Medical Center or Maasstad Hospital were included in the study (N=47). Not applicable. Correlation between measured muscle CSA and strength and assessment of inter- and intrarater reliability. Ultrasound and strength measurements of the intrinsic hand muscles were conducted bilaterally. To establish validity, the CSA of 4 muscles (abductor digiti minimi, first dorsal interosseus, abductor pollicis brevis, opponens pollicis) was compared with strength measurements of the same muscles conducted with the Rotterdam Intrinsic Hand Myometer. Repeated measures were conducted to assess inter- and intrarater reliability. The assessed CSA strongly correlated with strength measurements, with correlations ranging from 0.82 to 0.93 in healthy volunteers and from 0.63 to 0.94 in patients. Test-retest reliability showed excellent intrarater reliability (intraclass correlation coefficient range, 0.99-1.00) in patients and volunteers and good interrater reliability (intraclass correlation coefficient range, 0.88-0.95) in healthy volunteers. We found that ultrasound is a valid and reliable method to assess the CSA of specific muscles in the hand. Therefore, this technique could be useful to monitor muscle reinnervation in patients suffering from peripheral nerve injury as a valuable addition to strength dynamometers. Copyright © 2015 American Congress of Rehabilitation Medicine. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  13. Direct, quantitative clinical assessment of hand function: usefulness and reproducibility.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goodson, Alexander; McGregor, Alison H; Douglas, Jane; Taylor, Peter

    2007-05-01

    Methods of assessing functional impairment in arthritic hands include pain assessments and disability scoring scales which are subjective, variable over time and fail to take account of the patients' need to adapt to deformities. The aim of this study was to evaluate measures of functional strength and joint motion in the assessment of the rheumatoid (RA) and osteoarthritic (OA) hand. Ten control subjects, ten RA and ten OA patients were recruited for the study. All underwent pain and disability scoring and functional assessment of the hand using measures of pinch/grip strength and range of joint motion (ROM). Functional assessments including ROM analyses at interphalangeal (IP), metacarpophalangeal (MCP) and wrist joints along with pinch/grip strength clearly discriminated between patient groups (RA vs. OA MCP ROM P<0.0001), pain and disability scales were unable to. In the RA there were demonstrable relationships between ROM measurements and disability (R2=0.31) as well as disease duration (R2=0.37). Intra-patient measures of strength were robust whereas inter-patient comparisons showed variability. In conclusion, pinch/grip strength and ROM are clinically reproducible assessments that may more accurately reflect functional impairment associated with arthritis.

  14. Hand Spring Operated Movement Enhancer (HandSOME): a portable, passive hand exoskeleton for stroke rehabilitation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brokaw, Elizabeth B; Black, Iian; Holley, Rahsaan J; Lum, Peter S

    2011-08-01

    Stroke patients often have flexor hypertonia and finger extensor weakness, which makes it difficult to open their affected hand for functional grasp. Because of this impairment, hand rehabilitation after stroke is essential for restoring functional independent lifestyles. The goal of this study is to develop a passive, lightweight, wearable device to assist with hand function during performance of activities of daily living. The device, Hand Spring Operated Movement Enhancer (HandSOME), assists with opening the patient's hand using a series of elastic cords that apply extension torques to the finger joints and compensates for the flexor hypertonia. Device design and calibration are described as well as functional and usability testing with stroke subjects with a wide range of hand impairments. In initial testing with eight stroke subjects with finger flexor hypertonia, use of the HandSOME significantly increased range of motion and functional ability (p=0.002) . There was some decrease in grip strength with the HandSOME device at the subject's ideal setting, however this was not statistically significant (p=0.167) and did not seem to have a significant effect on function. Overall HandSOME shows promise as a training tool to facilitate repetitive task practice for improving hand function in stroke patients. HandSOME can be used as part of a home-based therapy program, or as an orthotic for replacing lost function.

  15. A força de preensão manual é boa preditora do desempenho funcional de idosos frágeis: um estudo correlacional múltiplo The hand-grip forecasts the functional performance of fragile elder subjects: a multiple-correlation study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Amandio A.R. Geraldes

    2008-02-01

    Full Text Available A força de preensão manual (FPM associa-se com a funcionalidade de idosos, mas há dúvidas sobre o valor dessa relação em todas as situações. O estudo observou a correlação entre FPM de idosos residentes em instituições de cuidados permanentes (asilos e o desempenho funcional (DF em tarefas específicas e inespecíficas para as mãos. Participaram 12 homens (70±6 anos; 64±9 kg; 160±10 cm e sete mulheres (77±11 anos; 49±10 kg; 147±10 cm. A FPM foi medida com dinamômetro hidráulico. As tarefas motoras propostas foram: caminhar 10 m na velocidade máxima (C10, timed up & go test (TUGT, colocar e retirar chave de fechadura (TCCF e tirar e recolocar lâmpada em um bocal (TCLB. O teste de Wilcoxon revelou que os homens apresentaram melhores desempenhos que as mulheres em todos as medidas, exceto IMC, TCCF e TCLB (pHand-grip strength (HGS has been used to predict functional limitation in the elderly. However, this relationship in all situations is doubtful. The purpose of the study was to observe the association between HGS and functional performance (FP, in specific and not specific tasks among 19 long-term home elderly residents, 12 men (70±6 yrs; 64±9 kg; 160±10 cm and 7 women (77±11 yrs; 49±10 kg; 147±10 cm. HGS was measured by a hydraulic hand dynamometer. The FP was measured by the time to perform the following tasks: 1 habitual gait speed (HGS; 2 timed up & go test (TUGT; 3 opening a lock with a key (OLK; 4 to take off and put in a light bulb (TPB. The Wilcoxon test revealed that men were better than women in all measurements except for the IMC, OLK and TPL (p<0.05. The Spearman coefficients showed significant correlation between HGS and three FP tests: TPL (r=-.54; p=.018; TUGT (r=-.67; p=.002 and HGS (r=-.69; p=.001. The multiple correlation showed good correlation between the HGS and all FP tests (R=.66; R²=.44; p<.04. These results suggest that HGS may be a good predictor for FP, especially for fragile and

  16. Muscle strength, power and cardiorespiratory fitness are associated with bone mineral density in men aged 31-60 years

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Schwarz, Peter; Jørgensen, Niklas; Nielsen, Barbara

    2014-01-01

    -respiratory fitness with BMD at the spine and hip in men. RESULTS: The association between independent variables maximal aerobic capacity (VO(2max)), leg power and hand grip strength, and dependent variables BMD at the spine and total hip was explored in a series of linear regression models successively adjusted.......011) with BMD at total hip. CONCLUSIONS: We found that cardiorespiratory fitness was associated with BMD in men. Furthermore, hand grip strength and leg power were associated with increasing BMD at the lumbar spine and total hip in men, respectively. Further prospective studies are needed to further investigate...

  17. Muscle Strength, Physical Activity, and Functional Limitations in Older Adults with Central Obesity

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cassandra M. Germain

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Background. Obesity and muscle weakness are independently associated with increased risk of physical and functional impairment in older adults. It is unknown whether physical activity (PA and muscle strength combined provide added protection against functional impairment. This study examines the association between muscle strength, PA, and functional outcomes in older adults with central obesity. Methods. Prevalence and odds of physical (PL, ADL, and IADL limitation were calculated for 6,388 community dwelling adults aged ≥ 60 with central obesity. Individuals were stratified by sex-specific hand grip tertiles and PA. Logistic models were adjusted for age, education, comorbidities, and body-mass index and weighted. Results. Overall prevalence of PL and ADL and IADL limitations were progressively lower by grip category. Within grip categories, prevalence was lower for individuals who were active than those who were inactive. Adjusted models showed significantly lower odds of PL OR 0.42 [0.31, 0.56]; ADL OR 0.60 [0.43, 0.84], and IADL OR 0.46 [0.35, 0.61] for those in the highest grip strength category as compared to those in the lowest grip category. Conclusion. Improving grip strength in obese elders who are not able to engage in traditional exercise is important for reducing odds of physical and functional impairment.

  18. Sex, race and age differences in muscle strength and limitations in community dwelling older adults: Data from the Health and Retirement Survey (HRS).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Germain, Cassandra M; Vasquez, Elizabeth; Batsis, John A; McQuoid, Douglas R

    2016-01-01

    Aging-related muscle weakness is associated with increased risk of functional limitations and disability. This study examined the association between varying degrees of hand grip strength on functional ability in community-dwelling older adults. Cross-sectional analysis of 4289 men and 5860 women ≥60 from 2006 and 2008 waves of the population-based Health and Retirement Study (HRS) were stratified by sex-specific grip strength tertiles (low, mid, high). Prevalence and adjusted odds of physical limitations (PL), and ADL/IADL limitation were calculated by sex, race/ethnicity and age group (60-69, 70-79, 80+). Models were weighted, adjusted for age, sex, race/ethnicity, education, smoking status, BMI, comorbidities and participation in physical activity. Prevalence of PL, ADL and IADL limitations were significantly lower among adults in the highest grip category as compared to those in the lowest grip category. Adjusted odds for PL OR 0.41[0.33,0.52]; ADL OR.51 [0.39,0.67], and IADL OR 0.47 [0.38-0.59] limitations were significantly lower among adults in the highest grip compared to the lowest grip category. However, notable differences were observed in the strength of these associations by gender, race and age group. Demographic characteristics are important factors to consider for risk stratification and the development of effective grip strength training interventions for older adults. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  19. Assessment of coarse and fine hand motor performance in asymptomatic subjects exposed to hand-arm vibration.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Popević, Martin B; Janković, Srđan M; Borjanović, Srđan S; Jovičić, Slavica R; Tenjović, Lazar R; Milovanović, Aleksandar P S; Bulat, Petar

    2014-03-01

    A frequently encountered exposure profile for hand-arm vibration in contemporary occupational setting comprises workers with a long history of intermittent exposure but without detectable signs of hand-arm vibration syndrome (HAVS). Yet, most of the published studies deal with developed HAVS cases, rarely discussing the biological processes that may be involved in degradation of manual dexterity and grip strength when it can be most beneficial - during the asymptomatic stage. In the present paper, a group of 31 male asymptomatic vibration-exposed workers (according to the Stockholm Workshop Scale) were compared against 30 male controls. They were tested using dynamometry and dexterimetry (modelling coarse and fine manual performance respectively) and cold provocation was done to detect possible differences in manual performance drop on these tests. The results showed reduced manual dexterity but no significant degradation in hand grip strength in the exposed subjects. This suggests that intermittent exposure profile and small cumulative vibration dose could only lead to a measurable deficit in manual dexterity but not hand grip strength even at non-negligible A(8) levels and long term exposures.

  20. The administration and interpretation of the rapid exchange grip test: a national survey.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shechtman, Orit; Goodall, Sara K

    2008-01-01

    The purpose of the present study was to determine if the administration and interpretation of the rapid exchange grip (REG) test vary among hand therapists nationally. The REG is used to determine sincerity of effort of grip strength. There are inconsistencies in the literature regarding the administration and interpretation of the REG, as various studies use different testing protocols and diverse interpretation criteria for what constitutes a sincere effort. As a result, we expected to find a lack of standardization in the administration and interpretation of the REG in clinical practice. We conducted a random nationwide survey of 200 hand therapists. The questionnaire items regarding the administration of the REG included patient position, test instructions, handle settings, handling of the dynamometer, hand switch rate, number of repetitions, and techniques used to record the score. The items for the interpretation of the REG involved questions regarding comparative tests. We found that the REG test lacks standardized administration protocols and interpretation criteria among therapists nationwide. The lack of standardization is likely to affect the reliability and validity of the REG and to hinder the therapist's ability to accurately report its outcomes. The implications of lack of standardization in assessment techniques to the profession are discussed.

  1. The design and development of a gloveless endoskeletal prosthetic hand.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Doshi, R; Yeh, C; LeBlanc, M

    1998-10-01

    Current prosthetic hands, although functional, have the potential of being improved significantly. We report here the design and development of a novel prosthetic hand that is lighter in weight, less expensive, and more functional than current hands. The new prosthesis features an endoskeleton embedded in self-skinning foam that provides a realistic look and feel and obviates the need for a separate cosmetic glove. The voluntary-closing mechanism offers variable grip strength. Placement of joints at three locations (metacarpophalangeal and proximal and distal interphalangeal) within each of four fingers affords realistic finger movement. High-strength synthetic cable attached to the distal phalanx of each finger is used to effect flexion. A multiposition passive thumb provides both precision and power grips. The new prosthesis can securely grasp objects with various shapes and sizes. Compared to current hands, weight has been reduced by approximately 50%, and cable excursion required for full finger flexion by more than 50%. The new endoskeletal prosthesis requires approximately 12-24% less force input to grasp a variety of everyday objects, largely due to its adaptive grip. Production cost estimates reveal the new prosthesis to be significantly less expensive than current prosthetic hands.

  2. Test-retest reliabilities of hand-held dynamometer for lower-limb muscle strength in intellectual disabilities.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wuang, Yee-Pay; Chang, Jyh-Jong; Wang, Min-Hung; Lin, Hsiu-Ching

    2013-08-01

    The primary purpose of this study was to investigate the test-retest reliabilities of hand-held dynamometer (HDD) for measuring lower-limb muscle strength in intellectual disabilities (ID). The other purposes were to: (1) compare the lower-limb muscle strength between children with and without ID; (2) probe the relationship between the muscle forces and agility performance in ID; and (3) explore the factors associated with muscle strength in ID. Sixty-one participants (30 boys and 31 girls; mean age=14.1 ± 3.3 year) were assessed by the HDD using a "make" test. The comparative group consisted of 63 typically developing children (33 boys and 30 girls; mean age=14.9 ± 2.1 year). The ID group demonstrated lower muscle groups than in typically developing group. Except for the ankle plantarflexors (ICC=0.69, SEM=0.72), test-retest analysis showed good intrarater reliability with ICC ranging from 0.81 to 0.96, and intrarater SEM values ranged from 0.40 to 0.57. The HDD has the potential to be a reliable tool for strength measurement in ID. Muscle strength was positively related to agility performance. Regression analysis indicated that height, weight, BMI, and activity level were significant predictors of muscle strength in ID.

  3. Effect of syllable articulation on precision and power grip performance.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lari Vainio

    Full Text Available The present study was motivated by a theory, which proposes that speech includes articulatory gestures that are connected to particular hand actions. We hypothesized that certain articulatory gestures would be more associated with the precision grip than with the power grip, and vice versa. In the study, the participants pronounced a syllable and performed simultaneously a precision or power grip that was theorized to be either congruent or incongruent with the syllable. Relatively fast precision grip responses were associated with articulatory gestures in which the tip of the tongue contacted the alveolar ridge ([te] or the aperture of the vocal tract remained small ([hi], as well as gestures that required lip protrusion ([pu]. In contrast, relatively fast power grip responses were associated with gestures that were produced by moving the back of the tongue against the velum ([ke] or in which the aperture of the vocal tract remained large ([hα]. In addition to demonstrating that certain articulatory gestures are systematically connected to different grip types, the study may shed some light on discussion concerning sound symbolism and evolution of speech.

  4. THE ROLE OF MORPHOLOGICAL VARIABLES IN DETERMINING STRENGTH AND FLEXIBILITY IN DIFFERENT SPORTS BRANCHES IN SCHOOL OF PHYSICAL EDUCATION AND SPORTS STUDENTS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ali ÖZKAN

    2014-07-01

    Full Text Available The purpose of the present study was to determination of the morphological variables in determining role of strength and flexibility in dıfferent sports branches in School of Physical Education and Sports sudents . A total of 71 different sports branches players ( 푋 age: 21.16±3.65 year participated in this study voluntarily. Subjects’ height, body weight, body mass index, body fat percentage and total of seven skinfold thicknesses were determined. Body fat percentage was determined by Yuhasz formula. Sit and reach test was used to determinate. Isometric dynamometer was used for the determination of knee (KS, back (BS, grip (GS and total strength (TS. Results of Pearson Product Moment correlation analysis, height was significantly correlated with right hand grip strength (r=.267, p<.01 and total strength (r= .354, p<.05. Similarly body weight was significantly positive correlated with right hand grip strength (r=.250, p<.01 and total strength (r=.542, p<.05. On the other hand, total of seven skinfol d thicknesses was significantly positive correlated with left hand grip strength (r=.286, p<.01. As a conclusion, the findings of the present study indicated that morphological variables plays important role in different sports branches in School of Physi cal Education and Sports sudents.

  5. Gait Speed and Grip Strength Reflect Cognitive Impairment and Are Modestly Related to Incident Cognitive Decline in Memory Clinic Patients With Subjective Cognitive Decline and Mild Cognitive Impairment: Findings From the 4C Study

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Hooghiemstra, A.M.; Ramakers, I.; Sistermans, N.; Pijnenburg, Y.A.; Aalten, P.; Hamel, R.E.; Melis, R.J.F.; Verhey, F.R.J.; Olde Rikkert, M.G.M.; Scheltens, P.; Flier, W.M. van der

    2017-01-01

    Background: Prospective studies in the general population show that slow gait speed is associated with cognitive decline and clinical progression to dementia. However, longitudinal studies in memory clinic populations are mostly lacking. We aimed to study the association between gait speed and grip

  6. Comparison of three hand dynamometers in relation to the accuracy and precision of the measurements

    OpenAIRE

    2012-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Given the variety of available hand-held dynamometers and their different handle shapes, reliability studies are needed. Objectives: To compare the accuracy and reliability between three different hand-held dynamometers and analyze the influence of their handles on grip strength. Methods: The tests were performed with the Jamar® dynamometer, the Takei® dynamometer and the EMG System Manual Transducer with modified handle. Eighteen healthy volunteers aged 20.0±1.3 years without his...

  7. Finding Relief from Allergy's Grip

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Navigation Bar Home Current Issue Past Issues Finding Relief from Allergy's Grip Past Issues / Summer 2006 Table ... action for patients who have had inadequate symptom relief with antihistamines and topical nasal steroids. Through injection ...

  8. Proprioceptive neuromuscular facilitation and strength training to gain muscle strength in elderly women

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Cesário, Denise Ferreira; Mendes, Geovânia Barbosa da Silva; Uchôa, Érica Patrícia Borba Lira; Veiga, Paulo Henrique Altran

    2014-01-01

    ...: To perform comparative analyze of results of proprioceptive neuromuscular facilitation (PNF) techniques and strength training to gain muscle strength of biceps and quadriceps and grip in the elderly...

  9. Individual finger contribution in submaximal voluntary contraction of gripping.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kong, Yong-Ku; Lee, Kyung-Sun; Kim, Dae-Min; Jung, Myung-Chul

    2011-11-01

    The objective of this study was to evaluate individual finger force and contribution to a gripping force, the difference between actual and expected finger forces and subjective discomfort rating at 10 different submaximal voluntary contraction (%MVC) levels (10-100% in 10 increments). Seventy-two participants randomly exerted gripping force with a multi-finger force measurement system. The individual finger force, gripping force and discomfort increased as %MVC levels increased. The middle and ring fingers exerted more force and contributed to a gripping force more than the index and little fingers due to their larger mass fractions of the digit flexor muscles. It was apparent at MVC; however, the index finger increased its contribution and exerted even more force than expected at more than 50% MVC. Subjective discomfort supported the results of the objective measures. This could explain the conflicting findings between index and ring fingers in previous finger contribution studies. STATEMENT OF RELEVANCE: Hand tool design is of special interest in ergonomics due to its association with musculoskeletal disorders in the hand. This study reveals a different contribution pattern of the fingers in submaximal voluntary contraction of gripping exertion.

  10. Control of Precision Grip Force in Lifting and Holding of Low-Mass Objects.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yuichi Hiramatsu

    Full Text Available Few studies have investigated the control of grip force when manipulating an object with an extremely small mass using a precision grip, although some related information has been provided by studies conducted in an unusual microgravity environment. Grip-load force coordination was examined while healthy adults (N = 17 held a moveable instrumented apparatus with its mass changed between 6 g and 200 g in 14 steps, with its grip surface set as either sandpaper or rayon. Additional measurements of grip-force-dependent finger-surface contact area and finger skin indentation, as well as a test of weight discrimination, were also performed. For each surface condition, the static grip force was modulated in parallel with load force while holding the object of a mass above 30 g. For objects with mass smaller than 30 g, on the other hand, the parallel relationship was changed, resulting in a progressive increase in grip-to-load force (GF/LF ratio. The rayon had a higher GF/LF force ratio across all mass levels. The proportion of safety margin in the static grip force and normalized moment-to-moment variability of the static grip force were also elevated towards the lower end of the object mass for both surfaces. These findings indicate that the strategy of grip force control for holding objects with an extremely small mass differs from that with a mass above 30 g. The data for the contact area, skin indentation, and weight discrimination suggest that a decreased level of cutaneous feedback signals from the finger pads could have played some role in a cost function in efficient grip force control with low-mass objects. The elevated grip force variability associated with signal-dependent and internal noises, and anticipated inertial force on the held object due to acceleration of the arm and hand, could also have contributed to the cost function.

  11. Effect of Putting Grip on Eye and Head Movements During the Golf Putting Stroke

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    George K. Hung

    2003-01-01

    Full Text Available The objective of this article is to determine the effect of three different putting grips (conventional, cross-hand, and one-handed on variations in eye and head movements during the putting stroke. Seven volunteer novice players, ranging in age from 21 to 22 years, participated in the study. During each experimental session, the subject stood on a specially designed platform covered with artificial turf and putted golf balls towards a standard golf hole. The three different types of grips were tested at two distances: 3 and 9 ft. For each condition, 20 putts were attempted. For each putt, data were recorded over a 3-s interval at a sampling rate of 100 Hz. Eye movements were recorded using a helmet-mounted eye movement monitor. Head rotation about an imaginary axis through the top of the head and its center-of-rotation was measured by means of a potentiometer mounted on a fixed frame and coupled to the helmet. Putter-head motion was measured using a linear array of infrared phototransistors embedded in the platform. The standard deviation (STD, relative to the initial level was calculated for eye and head movements over the duration of the putt (i.e., from the beginning of the backstroke, through the forward stroke, to impact. The averaged STD for the attempted putts was calculated for each subject. Then, the averaged STDs and other data for the seven subjects were statistically compared across the three grip conditions. The STD of eye movements were greater (p < 0.1 for conventional than cross-hand (9 ft and one-handed (3 and 9 ft grips. Also, the STD of head movements were greater (p < 0.1; 3 ft for conventional than cross-hand and one-handed grips. Vestibulo-ocular responses associated with head rotations could be observed in many 9 ft and some 3 ft putts. The duration of the putt was significantly longer (p < 0.05; 3 and 9 ft for the one-handed than conventional and cross-hand grips. Finally, performance, or percentage putts made, was

  12. Hand functioning in children with cerebral palsy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Carlyne eArnould

    2014-04-01

    Full Text Available Brain lesions may disturb hand functioning in children with cerebral palsy (CP, making it difficult or even impossible for them to perform several manual activities. Most conventional treatments for hand dysfunction in CP assume that reducing the hand dysfunctions will improve the capacity to manage activities (i.e., manual ability, MA. The aim of this study was to investigate the directional relationships (direct and indirect pathways through which hand skills influence MA in children with CP. A total of 136 children with CP (mean age: 10 years; range: 6–16 years; 35 quadriplegics, 24 diplegics, 77 hemiplegics were assessed. Six hand skills were measured on both hands: touch-pressure detection (Semmes-Weinstein aesthesiometer, stereognosis (Manual Form Perception Test, proprioception (passive mobilization of the metacarpophalangeal joints, grip strength (Jamar dynamometer, gross manual dexterity (Box and Block Test, and fine finger dexterity (Purdue Pegboard Test. MA was measured with the ABILHAND-Kids questionnaire. Correlation coefficients were used to determine the linear associations between observed variables. A path analysis of structural equation modeling was applied to test different models of causal relationships among the observed variables. Purely sensory impairments did seem not to play a significant role in the capacity to perform manual activities. According to path analysis, gross manual dexterity in both hands and stereognosis in the dominant hand were directly related to MA, whereas grip strength was indirectly related to MA through its relationship with gross manual dexterity. However, one-third of the variance in MA measures could not be explained by hand skills. It can be concluded that MA is not simply the integration of hand skills in daily activities and should be treated per se, supporting activity-based interventions.

  13. Hip- and knee-strength assessments using a hand-held dynamometer with external belt-fixation are inter-tester reliable

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Thorborg, Kristian; Bandholm, Thomas; Hölmich, Per

    2013-01-01

    PURPOSE: In football, ice-hockey, and track and field, injuries have been predicted, and hip- and knee-strength deficits quantified using hand-held dynamometry (HHD). However, systematic bias exists when testers of different sex and strength perform the measurements. Belt-fixation of the dynamome......PURPOSE: In football, ice-hockey, and track and field, injuries have been predicted, and hip- and knee-strength deficits quantified using hand-held dynamometry (HHD). However, systematic bias exists when testers of different sex and strength perform the measurements. Belt...

  14. Power grip, pinch grip, manual muscle testing or thenar atrophy – which should be assessed as a motor outcome after carpal tunnel decompression? A systematic review

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    Kale Swati

    2007-11-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Objective assessment of motor function is frequently used to evaluate outcome after surgical treatment of carpal tunnel syndrome (CTS. However a range of outcome measures are used and there appears to be no consensus on which measure of motor function effectively captures change. The purpose of this systematic review was to identify the methods used to assess motor function in randomized controlled trials of surgical interventions for CTS. A secondary aim was to evaluate which instruments reflect clinical change and are psychometrically robust. Methods The bibliographic databases Medline, AMED and CINAHL were searched for randomized controlled trials of surgical interventions for CTS. Data on instruments used, methods of assessment and results of tests of motor function was extracted by two independent reviewers. Results Twenty-two studies were retrieved which included performance based assessments of motor function. Nineteen studies assessed power grip dynamometry, fourteen studies used both power and pinch grip dynamometry, eight used manual muscle testing and five assessed the presence or absence of thenar atrophy. Several studies used multiple tests of motor function. Two studies included both power and pinch strength and reported descriptive statistics enabling calculation of effect sizes to compare the relative responsiveness of grip and pinch strength within study samples. The study findings suggest that tip pinch is more responsive than lateral pinch or power grip up to 12 weeks following surgery for CTS. Conclusion Although used most frequently and known to be reliable, power and key pinch dynamometry are not the most valid or responsive tools for assessing motor outcome up to 12 weeks following surgery for CTS. Tip pinch dynamometry more specifically targets the thenar musculature and appears to be more responsive. Manual muscle testing, which in theory is most specific to the thenar musculature, may be more

  15. Hand-held dynamometry in patients with haematological malignancies: Measurement error in the clinical assessment of knee extension strength

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    Uebelhart Daniel

    2009-03-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Hand-held dynamometry is a portable and inexpensive method to quantify muscle strength. To determine if muscle strength has changed, an examiner must know what part of the difference between a patient's pre-treatment and post-treatment measurements is attributable to real change, and what part is due to measurement error. This study aimed to determine the relative and absolute reliability of intra and inter-observer strength measurements with a hand-held dynamometer (HHD. Methods Two observers performed maximum voluntary peak torque measurements (MVPT for isometric knee extension in 24 patients with haematological malignancies. For each patient, the measurements were carried out on the same day. The main outcome measures were the intraclass correlation coefficient (ICC ± 95%CI, the standard error of measurement (SEM, the smallest detectable difference (SDD, the relative values as % of the grand mean of the SEM and SDD, and the limits of agreement for the intra- and inter-observer '3 repetition average' and the 'highest value of 3 MVPT' knee extension strength measures. Results The intra-observer ICCs were 0.94 for the average of 3 MVPT (95%CI: 0.86–0.97 and 0.86 for the highest value of 3 MVPT (95%CI: 0.71–0.94. The ICCs for the inter-observer measurements were 0.89 for the average of 3 MVPT (95%CI: 0.75–0.95 and 0.77 for the highest value of 3 MVPT (95%CI: 0.54–0.90. The SEMs for the intra-observer measurements were 6.22 Nm (3.98% of the grand mean (GM and 9.83 Nm (5.88% of GM. For the inter-observer measurements, the SEMs were 9.65 Nm (6.65% of GM and 11.41 Nm (6.73% of GM. The SDDs for the generated parameters varied from 17.23 Nm (11.04% of GM to 27.26 Nm (17.09% of GM for intra-observer measurements, and 26.76 Nm (16.77% of GM to 31.62 Nm (18.66% of GM for inter-observer measurements, with similar results for the limits of agreement. Conclusion The results indicate that there is acceptable relative reliability

  16. The effect of isometric exercise of the hand on the synovial blood flow in patients with rheumatoid arthritis measured by color Doppler ultrasound

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ellegaard, Karen; Torp-Pedersen, Søren; Lund, Hans

    2013-01-01

    In 90% of patients with rheumatoid arthritis (RA), the joints of the hand are affected. Studies of grip strength training have not indicated a negative effect on disease activity after training. Introduction of ultrasound Doppler (USD) to measure increased blood flow induced by inflammation has...

  17. Assessment of Lower Limb Muscle Strength and Power Using Hand-Held and Fixed Dynamometry: A Reliability and Validity Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mentiplay, Benjamin F; Perraton, Luke G; Bower, Kelly J; Adair, Brooke; Pua, Yong-Hao; Williams, Gavin P; McGaw, Rebekah; Clark, Ross A

    2015-01-01

    Hand-held dynamometry (HHD) has never previously been used to examine isometric muscle power. Rate of force development (RFD) is often used for muscle power assessment, however no consensus currently exists on the most appropriate method of calculation. The aim of this study was to examine the reliability of different algorithms for RFD calculation and to examine the intra-rater, inter-rater, and inter-device reliability of HHD as well as the concurrent validity of HHD for the assessment of isometric lower limb muscle strength and power. 30 healthy young adults (age: 23±5 yrs, male: 15) were assessed on two sessions. Isometric muscle strength and power were measured using peak force and RFD respectively using two HHDs (Lafayette Model-01165 and Hoggan microFET2) and a criterion-reference KinCom dynamometer. Statistical analysis of reliability and validity comprised intraclass correlation coefficients (ICC), Pearson correlations, concordance correlations, standard error of measurement, and minimal detectable change. Comparison of RFD methods revealed that a peak 200 ms moving window algorithm provided optimal reliability results. Intra-rater, inter-rater, and inter-device reliability analysis of peak force and RFD revealed mostly good to excellent reliability (coefficients ≥ 0.70) for all muscle groups. Concurrent validity analysis showed moderate to excellent relationships between HHD and fixed dynamometry for the hip and knee (ICCs ≥ 0.70) for both peak force and RFD, with mostly poor to good results shown for the ankle muscles (ICCs = 0.31-0.79). Hand-held dynamometry has good to excellent reliability and validity for most measures of isometric lower limb strength and power in a healthy population, particularly for proximal muscle groups. To aid implementation we have created freely available software to extract these variables from data stored on the Lafayette device. Future research should examine the reliability and validity of these variables in clinical

  18. Assessment of Lower Limb Muscle Strength and Power Using Hand-Held and Fixed Dynamometry: A Reliability and Validity Study.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Benjamin F Mentiplay

    Full Text Available Hand-held dynamometry (HHD has never previously been used to examine isometric muscle power. Rate of force development (RFD is often used for muscle power assessment, however no consensus currently exists on the most appropriate method of calculation. The aim of this study was to examine the reliability of different algorithms for RFD calculation and to examine the intra-rater, inter-rater, and inter-device reliability of HHD as well as the concurrent validity of HHD for the assessment of isometric lower limb muscle strength and power.30 healthy young adults (age: 23±5 yrs, male: 15 were assessed on two sessions. Isometric muscle strength and power were measured using peak force and RFD respectively using two HHDs (Lafayette Model-01165 and Hoggan microFET2 and a criterion-reference KinCom dynamometer. Statistical analysis of reliability and validity comprised intraclass correlation coefficients (ICC, Pearson correlations, concordance correlations, standard error of measurement, and minimal detectable change.Comparison of RFD methods revealed that a peak 200 ms moving window algorithm provided optimal reliability results. Intra-rater, inter-rater, and inter-device reliability analysis of peak force and RFD revealed mostly good to excellent reliability (coefficients ≥ 0.70 for all muscle groups. Concurrent validity analysis showed moderate to excellent relationships between HHD and fixed dynamometry for the hip and knee (ICCs ≥ 0.70 for both peak force and RFD, with mostly poor to good results shown for the ankle muscles (ICCs = 0.31-0.79.Hand-held dynamometry has good to excellent reliability and validity for most measures of isometric lower limb strength and power in a healthy population, particularly for proximal muscle groups. To aid implementation we have created freely available software to extract these variables from data stored on the Lafayette device. Future research should examine the reliability and validity of these variables in

  19. Relationship between patient-reported and objective measurements of hand function in patients with rheumatoid arthritis

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    S.M. Günay

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available Rheumatoid arthritis (RA often results in impairments in upper extremities, especially in the small joints of hand. Involvement of hand brings limitations in activities of daily living. However, it is commonly observed that patient-reported functional status of hand does not always corresponds to their actual physical performance in the clinical setting. The aim of this pilot study is to investigate the relationship between patient self-reported and objectively measured hand functions in patients with RA. Twenty-six patients (51±13 years with RA diagnosis participated in the study. Hand grip and pinch (lateral, bipod, tripod strengths were measured and Jebsen Hand Function Test (JHFT was performed for objective functional performance. Duruöz Hand Index and Beck Depression Inventory - Turkish version were completed by patients. Grip and all three-pinch strength results significantly correlated with Duruöz Hand Index scores (p<0.05. JHFT results except the sentence writing also correlated with the Duruöz scores (p<0.05. Our results showed that self-reported outcome scales might be used for determining functional level of hand in patients with RA in rheumatology practice. Objective quantitative functional tests are the best methods in evaluating functional level of hand, but require valid and reliable equipment with accurate calibration. Therefore, in case of unavailability of objective assessment tools, patient-reported scales may also reflect the real status of hand functions.

  20. Improvement of handle grip using reverse engineering, CAE and Rapid Prototyping

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    Stoklasek Pavel

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available The overwhelming majority of manual operations is even nowadays performed by using manual hand tools. These tools can be divided into 2 groups – hand tools designed for general use or a single-purpose hand tools for special operations. Tool described in this paper is used in assembling operation in the completion of electric motor. During the design of the existing tools the requirements for a functional part of the tool (lifespan, inability to damage the engine installation were fully considered, demands for ergonomic grip area, however, were not taken into account. Long-term use of incorrectly designed tool causes carpal tunnel syndrome, hand-arm vibration syndrome, diminished sensitivity or tingling in the fingers of workers. These difficulties can be reduced or entirely eliminated due to proper design of the grip of hand tool. Most authors focus on adjusting the grip for optimum ergonomics at individual types of grips (cylindrical, palmar, lateral, etc.. However, as already mentioned, there are tools for specific operations when the working area is limited by space or a specific type of load on the grip is needed. In some cases, it is often necessary to change the type of grip or combine different types of grips. This paper describes the design of an optimal grip of hand tool used for specific operation when assembling motors. Design of prototype mold and production of functional prototypes for ergonomics assessment directly in the workplace were realized. New design of handle should reduce the risk primarily of developing carpal tunnel in long-term use.

  1. Gripping System For Mechanical Testing Of Composites

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mackay, Rebecca A.; Nathal, Michael V.

    1994-01-01

    Specimens held without slippage, even at high temperatures. Improved gripping system designed to securely hold ends of specimen of composite material during creep or tensile test. Each grip includes pair of wedges having sharply corrugated gripping surfaces. Wedges held between two plates containing cavities sloped to accommodate wedges. Two such grips (one for each end) holds specimen in furnace connected to tensile test machine for creep measurements.

  2. Evaluating Hand Function in Clients with Trigger Finger

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    Danit Langer

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Background. Trigger finger (TF is a common hand pathology frequently encountered in hand clinics. Occupational therapists predominantly assess TF symptoms as opposed to using standardized hand functioning assessments. The purpose of this study was to assess the construct validity of dexterity and grip strength assessments for clients with TF. Method. Sixty-three participants with TF and 66 healthy controls were administered the Functional Dexterity Test (FDT, Purdue Pegboard Test (PPT, and Jamar® Hydraulic Hand Dynamometer (JD and completed the Disabilities of Arm Shoulder and Hand questionnaire (DASH. TF symptoms were graded using the Quinnell classification. Results. Statistically significant differences were found between the groups in dexterity and grip strength. A statistically significant difference between the three TF grades was found on the PPT. All three test scores were moderately correlated with the DASH scores. Conclusion. This study provides innovative evidence for the validity of common hand function assessments for individuals with TF and recommends incorporating these tools in clinical practice. Further research is needed with larger samples and better representation of each TF clinical grade.

  3. Effects of Anodal Transcranial Direct Current Stimulation on Visually Guided Learning of Grip Force Control

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    Tamas Minarik

    2015-03-01

    Full Text Available Anodal transcranial Direct Current Stimulation (tDCS has been shown to be an effective non-invasive brain stimulation method for improving cognitive and motor functioning in patients with neurological deficits. tDCS over motor cortex (M1, for instance, facilitates motor learning in stroke patients. However, the literature on anodal tDCS effects on motor learning in healthy participants is inconclusive, and the effects of tDCS on visuo-motor integration are not well understood. In the present study we examined whether tDCS over the contralateral motor cortex enhances learning of grip-force output in a visually guided feedback task in young and neurologically healthy volunteers. Twenty minutes of 1 mA anodal tDCS were applied over the primary motor cortex (M1 contralateral to the dominant (right hand, during the first half of a 40 min power-grip task. This task required the control of a visual signal by modulating the strength of the power-grip for six seconds per trial. Each participant completed a two-session sham-controlled crossover protocol. The stimulation conditions were counterbalanced across participants and the sessions were one week apart. Performance measures comprised time-on-target and target-deviation, and were calculated for the periods of stimulation (or sham and during the afterphase respectively. Statistical analyses revealed significant performance improvements over the stimulation and the afterphase, but this learning effect was not modulated by tDCS condition. This suggests that the form of visuomotor learning taking place in the present task was not sensitive to neurostimulation. These null effects, together with similar reports for other types of motor tasks, lead to the proposition that tDCS facilitation of motor learning might be restricted to cases or situations where the motor system is challenged, such as motor deficits, advanced age, or very high task demand.

  4. The use of the rapid exchange grip test in detecting sincerity of effort, Part II: validity of the test.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shechtman, O; Taylor, C

    2000-01-01

    The rapid exchange grip (REG) test was developed to identify patients exerting insincere effort. The premise of the REG test is that a maximal, sincere effort yields a "negative REG," in which peak static grip (SG) scores are greater than peak REG scores, and that a submaximal, insincere effort yields a "positive REG," in which REG scores are greater than SG scores. There is disagreement in the literature concerning what constitutes a positive REG test, suggesting that the REG may not be a valid measure of sincerity of effort. The purpose of the present study was to investigate the validity of the REG test by examining its premise as well as its sensitivity and specificity values. The 146 uninjured subjects performed a series of randomized grip strength tests, exerting both maximal and submaximal efforts. The tests included the REG at hand switch rates of 45 rpm (REG-45) and 60 rpm (REG-60), the maximal static grip test (MSGT), and the five-rung test (5R). Our findings supported the concept of a "negative REG" for both REG maneuvers and both comparative SG tests. The concept of a "positive REG," however, was supported only when peak REG scores were compared with peak 5R scores. The authors found relatively low sensitivity and specificity values, suggesting that the REG test may not be sensitive or specific enough to effectively detect sincerity of effort. The authors discuss the likelihood that mistakes will be made when the REG test is used to diagnose sincerity of effort and the possible consequences of making such mistakes.

  5. Hydraulically Driven Grips For Hot Tensile Specimens

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bird, R. Keith; Johnson, George W.

    1994-01-01

    Pair of grips for tensile and compressive test specimens operate at temperatures up to 1,500 degrees F. Grips include wedges holding specimen inside furnace, where heated to uniform temperature. Hydraulic pistons drive wedges, causing them to exert clamping force. Hydraulic pistons and hydraulic fluid remain outside furnace, at room temperature. Cooling water flows through parts of grips to reduce heat transferred to external components. Advantages over older devices for gripping specimens in high-temperature tests; no need to drill holes in specimens, maintains constant gripping force on specimens, and heated to same temperature as that of specimen without risk of heating hydraulic fluid and acuator components.

  6. An Unpowered Exoskeleton to Reduce Astronaut Hand Fatigue during Microgravity EVA

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carey, Alan John

    Astronaut hand fatigue during Extravehicular Activity (EVA) and EVA training is a critical risk in human space exploration. Improved glove designs over the past forty years have reduced hand fatigue, but limitations of the technology prevent major improvements to reduce hand fatigue. Therefore, a mechanism to assist astronauts by reducing hand fatigue was explored. Many organizations have already developed exoskeletons to assist astronauts, but all mechanisms developed required electrically powered actuators and control systems to enhance grip strength. However, astronauts already possess the strength required to actuate the glove; what is needed is a method to reduce fatigue without introducing electromechanical complexity. A passive mechanical system was developed as a proof-of-concept to test the feasibility of an unpowered exoskeleton to maintain static grip around an object. The semi- rigid nature of an inflated pressure glove provided an ideal substrate to mount a mechanism and associated components to allow an astronaut to release his/her grip inside the glove while maintaining attitude, as the mechanism will keep the glove closed around an object. Three prototypes were fabricated and tested to evaluate the architecture. The final two prototypes were tested on a real pressure suit glove at Final Frontier Design (FFD), and the third mechanism demonstrated attachment and basic operating principles. At University of California (UC) Davis, pressure glove analogs were fabricated from a baseball batting glove and polystyrene to simulate a real pressure glove without the risk of testing in a reduced pressure environment (i.e. a glove box). Testing of the third prototype showed a reduction in fatigue as measured by Maximum Voluntary Contraction (MVC) grip force over a 30 second period when the mechanism assisted gripping an object.

  7. Effects of carpal tunnel syndrome on dexterous manipulation are grip type-dependent.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Wei; Johnston, Jamie A; Ross, Mark A; Sanniec, Kyle; Gleason, Elizabeth A; Dueck, Amylou C; Santello, Marco

    2013-01-01

    Carpal tunnel syndrome (CTS) impairs sensation of a subset of digits. Although the effects of CTS on manipulation performed with CTS-affected digits have been studied using precision grip tasks, the extent to which CTS affects multi-digit force coordination has only recently been studied. Whole-hand manipulation studies have shown that CTS patients retain the ability to modulate multi-digit forces to object mass, mass distribution, and texture. However, CTS results in sensorimotor deficits relative to healthy controls, including significantly larger grip force and lower ability to balance the torques generated by the digits. Here we investigated the effects of CTS on multi-digit force modulation to object weight when manipulating an object with a variable number of fingers. We hypothesized that CTS patients would be able to modulate digit forces to object weight. However, as different grip types involve the exclusive use of CTS-affected digits ('uniform' grips) or a combination of CTS-affected and non-affected digits ('mixed' grips), we addressed the question of whether 'mixed' grips would reduce or worsen CTS-induced force coordination deficits. The former scenario would be due to adding digits with intact tactile feedback, whereas the latter scenario might occur due to a potentially greater challenge for the central nervous system of integrating 'noisy' and intact tactile feedback. CTS patients learned multi-digit force modulation to object weight regardless of grip type. Although controls exerted the same total grip force across all grip types, patients exerted significantly larger grip force than controls but only for manipulations with four and five digits. Importantly, this effect was due to CTS patients' inability to change the finger force distribution when adding the ring and little fingers. These findings suggest that CTS primarily challenges sensorimotor integration processes for dexterous manipulation underlying the coordination of CTS-affected and non

  8. Effects of carpal tunnel syndrome on dexterous manipulation are grip type-dependent.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wei Zhang

    Full Text Available Carpal tunnel syndrome (CTS impairs sensation of a subset of digits. Although the effects of CTS on manipulation performed with CTS-affected digits have been studied using precision grip tasks, the extent to which CTS affects multi-digit force coordination has only recently been studied. Whole-hand manipulation studies have shown that CTS patients retain the ability to modulate multi-digit forces to object mass, mass distribution, and texture. However, CTS results in sensorimotor deficits relative to healthy controls, including significantly larger grip force and lower ability to balance the torques generated by the digits. Here we investigated the effects of CTS on multi-digit force modulation to object weight when manipulating an object with a variable number of fingers. We hypothesized that CTS patients would be able to modulate digit forces to object weight. However, as different grip types involve the exclusive use of CTS-affected digits ('uniform' grips or a combination of CTS-affected and non-affected digits ('mixed' grips, we addressed the question of whether 'mixed' grips would reduce or worsen CTS-induced force coordination deficits. The former scenario would be due to adding digits with intact tactile feedback, whereas the latter scenario might occur due to a potentially greater challenge for the central nervous system of integrating 'noisy' and intact tactile feedback. CTS patients learned multi-digit force modulation to object weight regardless of grip type. Although controls exerted the same total grip force across all grip types, patients exerted significantly larger grip force than controls but only for manipulations with four and five digits. Importantly, this effect was due to CTS patients' inability to change the finger force distribution when adding the ring and little fingers. These findings suggest that CTS primarily challenges sensorimotor integration processes for dexterous manipulation underlying the coordination of CTS

  9. The Effect of Comprehensive Hand Repetitive Intensive Strength Training (CHRIST) Using Motion Analysis in Children with Cerebral Palsy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Dong-A; Lee, Jung-Ah; Hwang, Pil-Woo; Lee, Min-Jin; Kim, Hyun-Kyung; Park, Jeong-Joon; You, Joshua H; Lee, Dong-Ryul; Lee, Nam-Gi

    2012-02-01

    To investigate the effect of Comprehensive Hand Repetitive Intensive Strength Training (CHRIST) on upper limb function in children with cerebral palsy using motion analysis. The subjects in this study included 19 children (10 males, 9 females, mean age=8.8 years) with cerebral palsy. The experimental group (n=10) received CHRIST and general rehabilitation therapy. The control group (n=9) received a home program as well as general rehabilitation therapy. Both groups received 30 sessions of CHRIST or home program training for 60 minutes per session 3 times a week during the 10-week period. The reaching movements were captured by a motion analysis system. Kinematic variables including movement time (MT), mean velocity (MV), normalized jerk score (NJS), mean angular velocity (MAV) and normalized jerk score of the shoulder, elbow and wrist joint with comfortable and fast speed were analyzed between groups and the pre-post training group. After pre- and post-training experimental group, MT, MV, NJS, MAV of shoulder, elbow, wrist and NJS of elbow and wrist improved significantlyin reaching movement of both comfortable and fast speed (ptraining control group, MV improved significantlyin reaching movement of only comfortable speed (pchildren with cerebral palsy.

  10. Functional benefit of an adaptive myoelectric prosthetic hand compared to a conventional myoelectric hand.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bergman, K; Ornholmer, L; Zackrisson, K; Thyberg, M

    1992-04-01

    Eight patients with a traumatic unilateral upper limb amputation, who used conventional myoelectric prostheses, were also fitted with a commercially available myoelectric prosthetic hand with an adaptive grip, in order to compare the functional benefit of the two types of prostheses. Comparisons were made regarding width of grip, force of grip, scores in a standardised grip function test and prosthesis preference. The conventional prosthesis showed significantly better results regarding these parameters. The adaptive hand does not appear to be fully developed for practical use in prosthetic rehabilitation.

  11. Evaluating the Relation between Dominant and Non-Dominant Hand Perimeters and Handgrip Strength of Basketball, Volleyball, Badminton and Handball Athletes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kaplan, Defne Öcal

    2016-01-01

    In this study, it's aimed to evaluate the relation between dominant and non-dominant hand perimeters and handgrip strength of basketball, volleyball, badminton and handball athletes. Totally 101 active athletes (49 females, 52 male), of the average age in female 20±1.42 years, in male 21±1.99 years, joined to this study. Height, body weight, BMI…

  12. Investigation of sport rock climbers’ handgrip strength

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    Burak Gürer

    2015-10-01

    Full Text Available This study aims to investigate handgrip strengths of elite sportsmen who are involved in sport rock climbing. Study group was composed of 144 sportsmen from 22 countries who participated in Petzl Roc Trip sport rock climbing festival held in Turkey between 14 and 19 October 2014. Data were collected by using Takei Grip-D brand hand dynamometer. The data collected were analyzed and interpreted by statistical package programme (SPSS 16.0. Results show meaningful differences between sportsmen’s right handgrip strength and left handgrip strength. Sportsmen’s right handgrip strength was found to be higher. Results differed based on gender as well. Left and right handgrip strength of males was found to be higher to those of females. No significant relationships were detected based on nationality, age, history of climbing and period of experience in climbing. Relationships were observed between Turkish male and female climbers’ right and left handgrip strengths. As a result, it can be claimed that right hand is used more often in sport rock climbing compared to the left hand. It is also believed that fingers and technique are crucial in sport rock climbing. Practices to develop finger strength and techniques are suggested.

  13. Motor unit number index examination in dominant and non-dominant hand muscles.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Xiaoyan; He, Wensheng; Li, Charles; Wang, Ying-Chih; Slavens, Brooke A; Zhou, Ping

    2015-01-01

    This study investigated the effect of handedness on motor unit number index (MUNIX). Maximal hand strength, compound muscle action potential (CMAP) and voluntary surface electromyography (EMG) signals were measured bilaterally for the first dorsal interosseous (FDI) and thenar muscles in 24 right-handed and 2 left-handed healthy subjects. Mean (±standard error) grip and pinch forces in the dominant hand were 43.99 ± 2.36 kg and 9.36 ± 0.52 kg respectively, significantly larger than those in the non-dominant hand (grip: 41.37 ± 2.29 kg, p muscles. In addition, there was a lack of correlation between the strength and myoelectric parameters in regression analysis. However, strong correlations were observed between dominant and non-dominant hand muscles in both strength and myoelectric measures. Our results indicate that the population of motor units or spinal motor neurons as estimated from MUNIX may not be associated with handedness. Such findings help understand and interpret the MUNIX during its application for clinical or laboratory investigations.

  14. The beneficial effects of rehabilitation on hand function in patients with rheumatoid arthritis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Księżopolska-Orłowska, Krystyna; Kasprzak, Katarzyna; Gaszewska, Ewa; Rodkiewicz-Bogusławska, Agnieszka; Sokołowska, Beata

    2016-01-01

    Objectives The hand is one of the main elements of the rehabilitation of patients with rheumatoid arthritis (RA) due to deformities, which occur in approximately 90% of patients. It is a serious problem, both in the psychological and functional aspect, connected with muscle strength reduction, a limited range of motion and non-acceptance of the changes in the shape of the limb. The study aimed to assess the effect of rehabilitation on the function of the hand in rheumatoid arthritis. Material and methods The study group consisted of 40 women with RA. The patients had been previously treated at the Rehabilitation Department of the National Institute of Geriatrics, Rheumatology and Rehabilitation in Warsaw. The study group underwent 3 weeks of rehabilitation involving individual therapy, exercises with equipment, patient education and physical therapy. The control group included women without a diagnosis of RA, hands pain-free and fully mobile. In both groups the hand was assessed for grip value, grip quality and manipulative ability. In the study group the basis of pain intensity was noted. The measurements were performed twice – prior to the rehabilitation and after 3 weeks of rehabilitation in women with RA and once in women without hand problems. Results The results obtained revealed marked limitation of hand function in patients with rheumatoid arthritis. The treatment resulted in an improvement of all assessed parameters except cylindrical grip, in which only a part of the findings was statistically significant. Conclusions The analysis of the study material showed that appropriately adjusted and conducted hand physiotherapy in women with rheumatoid arthritis contributed to the improvement of its function by pain reduction, improved value and quality of grip, and also increased manipulative ability. PMID:28115778

  15. The beneficial effects of rehabilitation on hand function in patients with rheumatoid arthritis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Krystyna Księżopolska-Orłowska

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available Objectives: The hand is one of the main elements of the rehabilitation of patients with rheumatoid arthritis (RA due to deformities, which occur in approximately 90% of patients. It is a serious problem, both in the psychological and functional aspect, connected with muscle strength reduction, a limited range of motion and non-acceptance of the changes in the shape of the limb. The study aimed to assess the effect of rehabilitation on the function of the hand in rheumatoid arthritis. Material and methods: The study group consisted of 40 women with RA. The patients had been previously treated at the Rehabilitation Department of the National Institute of Geriatrics, Rheumatology and Rehabilitation in Warsaw. The study group underwent 3 weeks of rehabilitation involving individual therapy, exercises with equipment, patient education and physical therapy. The control group included women without a diagnosis of RA, hands pain-free and fully mobile. In both groups the hand was assessed for grip value, grip quality and manipulative ability. In the study group the basis of pain intensity was noted. The measurements were performed twice – prior to the rehabilitation and after 3 weeks of rehabilitation in women with RA and once in women without hand problems. Results : The results obtained revealed marked limitation of hand function in patients with rheumatoid arthritis. The treatment resulted in an improvement of all assessed parameters except cylindrical grip, in which only a part of the findings was statistically significant. Conclusions : The analysis of the study material showed that appropriately adjusted and conducted hand physiotherapy in women with rheumatoid arthritis contributed to the improvement of its function by pain reduction, improved value and quality of grip, and also increased manipulative ability.

  16. Grip pressure distributions and associated variability in golf: a two-club comparison.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Langlais, Sean M; Broker, Jeffrey P

    2014-06-01

    Teaching and playing professionals offer multiple theories concerning the manner in which forces should be applied to the handle of the club during the golf swing. This study extends recent research concerning grip pressures and forces in golf, with the purpose of exploring the similarities and differences between force profiles for a 7-iron and driver swung by proficient golfers. A secondary purpose was to further analyze the way that golfers use grip forces to manipulate the club. Grip forces were measured on eight low handicap golfers (USGA indexes 0 to 7) swinging their own 7-irons and drivers. In total, lead-hand and trail-hand grip forces were isolated as well as anatomically specific forces within the hands. Force profile variability across multiple swings for each golfer and between golfers characterized consistencies and important differences. Correlations between 7-iron and driver force profiles characterized force 'signatures.' The data highlight large fluctuations in grip forces during the swing. Marked differences between participants were observed, involving force magnitudes and phasing. Dominant forces arose primarily from the lead hand, specifically the last three fingers. Force profiles were highly repeatable across swings for a golfer (standard deviations high (r2 = 0.86). Notably, within swing force variability was greatest during club acceleration, but dramatically decreased at impact.

  17. Estimating thumb-index finger precision grip and manipulation potential in extant and fossil primates.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Feix, Thomas; Kivell, Tracy L; Pouydebat, Emmanuelle; Dollar, Aaron M

    2015-05-06

    Primates, and particularly humans, are characterized by superior manual dexterity compared with other mammals. However, drawing the biomechanical link between hand morphology/behaviour and functional capabilities in non-human primates and fossil taxa has been challenging. We present a kinematic model of thumb-index precision grip and manipulative movement based on bony hand morphology in a broad sample of extant primates and fossil hominins. The model reveals that both joint mobility and digit proportions (scaled to hand size) are critical for determining precision grip and manipulation potential, but that having either a long thumb or great joint mobility alone does not necessarily yield high precision manipulation. The results suggest even the oldest available fossil hominins may have shared comparable precision grip manipulation with modern humans. In particular, the predicted human-like precision manipulation of Australopithecus afarensis, approximately one million years before the first stone tools, supports controversial archaeological evidence of tool-use in this taxon.

  18. Functional corticospinal projections from human supplementary motor area revealed by corticomuscular coherence during precise grip force control.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sophie Chen

    Full Text Available The purpose of the present study was to investigate whether corticospinal projections from human supplementary motor area (SMA are functional during precise force control with the precision grip (thumb-index opposition. Since beta band corticomuscular coherence (CMC is well-accepted to reflect efferent corticospinal transmission, we analyzed the beta band CMC obtained with simultaneous recording of electroencephalographic (EEG and electromyographic (EMG signals. Subjects performed a bimanual precise visuomotor force tracking task by applying isometric low grip forces with their right hand precision grip on a custom device with strain gauges. Concurrently, they held the device with their left hand precision grip, producing similar grip forces but without any precision constraints, to relieve the right hand. Some subjects also participated in a unimanual control condition in which they performed the task with only the right hand precision grip while the device was held by a mechanical grip. We analyzed whole scalp topographies of beta band CMC between 64 EEG channels and 4 EMG intrinsic hand muscles, 2 for each hand. To compare the different topographies, we performed non-parametric statistical tests based on spatio-spectral clustering. For the right hand, we obtained significant beta band CMC over the contralateral M1 region as well as over the SMA region during static force contraction periods. For the left hand, however, beta band CMC was only found over the contralateral M1. By comparing unimanual and bimanual conditions for right hand muscles, no significant difference was found on beta band CMC over M1 and SMA. We conclude that the beta band CMC found over SMA for right hand muscles results from the precision constraints and not from the bimanual aspect of the task. The result of the present study strongly suggests that the corticospinal projections from human SMA become functional when high precision force control is required.

  19. Temporary threshold shift of vibratory sensation induced by a vibrating handle and its gripping force.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nishiyama, K; Taoda, K; Yamashita, H; Watanabe, S

    1996-01-01

    This study examines the effect of the force with which a vibrating handle is gripped on the temporary threshold shift of vibratory sensation (TTSv) induced by hand-arm vibration. Six healthy subjects gripped a handle vibrating with a 1.3 octave-band vibration, with a central frequency of 200 Hz and an intensity of 39.2 m/s2. Exposure was for 1 min and 10 min, respectively. Gripping forces for the 1-min exposure were 5 N, 10 N, 40 N and 80 N, respectively, with 0 N push-pull force. Gripping forces for the 10-min exposure were the same as for the 1-min exposure but omitting 80 N. The vibratory sensation threshold at 125 Hz was measured before and after exposure of an exposed fingertip to vibration. The differences measured determine TTSv.t at time t. TTSv.t determines TTSv.0, that is, the temporary threshold shift of vibratory sensation immediately after exposure to vibration according to the estimate made on the basis of the preceding study. The same experimental conditions were repeated 3 times on different days in a soundproof and thermoregulated room. Our findings show that TTSv increases significantly with increasing gripping force. We also determined the quantitative relationships between TTSv.0 and gripping force as described by the equation TTSv.0 = exp(kf x F + Cf). where kt and Cf are constants and F is gripping force. This study revealed the importance of ergonomic design in reducing the force with which a vibrating handle is gripped to prevent an adverse effect of local vibration. The equation devised may help in the quantitative assessment of the effect of reduced gripping force.

  20. Laterality of handgrip strength: age- and physical training-related changes in Lithuanian schoolchildren and conscripts.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tutkuviene, Janina; Schiefenhövel, Wulf

    2013-06-01

    Laterality in handgrip strength was assessed by analyzing dynamometric data of the right and left hand in three samples of Lithuanian boys and girls aged 7-20 years. In addition, the influence of general physical training on the laterality of handgrip strength was explored in a sample of conscripts. A negative secular trend in handgrip strength of schoolchildren has been detected since 1965, and with increasing age, right-handedness has become more pronounced. Children that were ambidextrous (by grip strength) showed negative deviations in physical status more often than their right- or left-handed peers. During one year of physical training, the conscripts had a larger increase in grip strength of the left than in the right hand, and a marked shift in handgrip laterality toward left-handed and ambidextrous individuals was observed. The different impact of schooling and physical training on handgrip strength laterality might partly explain variations in the prevalence of handedness in different societies with divergent cultures and lifestyles (e.g., more or less sedentary). © 2013 New York Academy of Sciences.

  1. Evaluation of hand function after early excision and skin grafting of burns versus delayed skin grafting: a randomized clinical trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Omar, Mohammed T Ahmed; Hassan, Ahmed A

    2011-06-01

    Thermal injury of the hand is characterized by disfigurement and deformity with marked problems because the patient is no longer able to perform the daily living activities and function at school or work. Early excision and grafting (E&G) were introduced to decrease hospital stay, hospital cost, and septic complications and to eliminate burn toxins. In this study, E&G was compared with delayed skin grafting in deep hand burns. 40 patients with deep second- and third- degree hand burns with average burn size less than 30% total body surface area (TBSA) were randomly divided into E&G group and delayed grafting group. All hands in both groups were subjected to pre and post operative program of physiotherapy. Measurement of total active motion (TAM) of each digit and grip strength was recorded pre and post operative. Hand function using Jebsen-Taylor hand function test (JTHFT) was recorded three months after operation in both groups. There were statistically significant differences in both groups regarding to TAM, hand grip strength and Jebsen-Taylor hand function test favoring the E&G group. The study concluded that early excision and skin grafting with physiotherapy gave better results than delayed grafting in terms of preservation of hand function and shortened hospital stay. Copyright © 2010 Elsevier Ltd and ISBI. All rights reserved.

  2. A soft robotic exomusculature glove with integrated sEMG sensing for hand rehabilitation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Delph, Michael A; Fischer, Sarah A; Gauthier, Phillip W; Luna, Carlos H Martinez; Clancy, Edward A; Fischer, Gregory S

    2013-06-01

    Stroke affects 750,000 people annually, and 80% of stroke survivors are left with weakened limbs and hands. Repetitive hand movement is often used as a rehabilitation technique in order to regain hand movement and strength. In order to facilitate this rehabilitation, a robotic glove was designed to aid in the movement and coordination of gripping exercises. This glove utilizes a cable system to open and close a patients hand. The cables are actuated by servomotors, mounted in a backpack weighing 13.2 lbs including battery power sources. The glove can be controlled in terms of finger position and grip force through switch interface, software program, or surface myoelectric (sEMG) signal. The primary control modes of the system provide: active assistance, active resistance and a preprogrammed mode. This project developed a working prototype of the rehabilitative robotic glove which actuates the fingers over a full range of motion across one degree-of-freedom, and is capable of generating a maximum 15N grip force.

  3. Intra- and inter-rater reliability of isometric shoulder extensor and internal rotator strength measurements performed using a hand-held dynamometer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Awatani, Takenori; Morikita, Ikuhiro; Shinohara, Junji; Mori, Seigo; Nariai, Miki; Tatsumi, Yasutaka; Nagata, Akinori; Koshiba, Hiroya

    2016-11-01

    [Purpose] The purpose of the present study was to establish the intra- and inter-rater reliability of measurement of extensor strength in the maximum shoulder abducted position and internal rotator strength in the 90° abducted and the 90° external rotated position using a hand-held dynamometer. [Subjects and Methods] Twelve healthy volunteers (12 male; mean ± SD: age 19.0 ± 1.1 years) participated in the study. The examiners were two students who had nonclinical experience with a hand-held dynamometer measurement. The examiners and participants were blinded to measurement results by the recorder. Participants in the prone position were instructed to hold the contraction against the ground reaction force, and peak isometric force was recorded using the hand-held dynamometer on the floor. Reliability was determined using intraclass correlation coefficients. [Results] The intra- and inter-rater reliability data were found to be "almost perfect". [Conclusion] This study investigated intra- and inter-rater reliability and reveald high reliability. Thus, the measurement method used in the present study can evaluate muscle strength by a simple measurement technique.

  4. Mu rhythm desynchronization reveals motoric influences of hand action on object recognition

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sanjay eKumar

    2013-03-01

    Full Text Available We examined the effect of hand grip on object recognition by studying the modulation of the mu rhythm when participants made object decisions to objects and non-objects shown with congruent or incongruent hand-grip actions. Despite the grip responses being irrelevant to the task, mu rhythm activity on the scalp over motor and pre-motor cortex was sensitive to the congruency of the hand grip – in particular the event related desynchronization of the mu rhythm was more pronounced for familiar objects grasped with an appropriate grip than for objects given an inappropriate grasp. Also the power of mu activity correlated with RTs to congruently gripped objects. The results suggest that familiar motor responses evoked by the appropriateness of a hand grip facilitate recognition responses to objects.

  5. Control of grip force and vertical posture while holding an object and being perturbed.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Bing; Lee, Yun-Ju; Aruin, Alexander S

    2016-11-01

    We investigated motor control perspectives of coordinating maintenance of posture and application of grip force when holding an object and being perturbed. Ten subjects stood on the force platform holding an instrumented object in their dominant hand and were exposed to an external perturbation applied to their shoulders. Task demands were manipulated by positioning a slippery cap on top of the instrumented object. Grip force applied to the object, the object acceleration and the center of pressure (COP) were recorded and analyzed during the time intervals typical for the anticipatory (APA) and compensatory (CPA) components of postural control. Onsets of grip force were seen before the onsets of the COP displacement and initiation of movements of the handheld object during the APA phase of postural control, while the onsets of maximum grip force preceded the maximum COP displacement during the CPA phase. When the task demands increased by holding a handheld object with the slippery cap, subjects tended to generate grip force earlier and of a smaller magnitude; also, the COP displacement in the APA phase was smaller as compared to holding a handheld object only. The outcome provides a foundation for future studies of maintenance of vertical posture in people with impairments of balance and grip force control when holding an object and being perturbed.

  6. Kinesio Taping® of the metacarpophalangeal joints and its effect on pain and hand function in individuals with rheumatoid arthritis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sarah Roberts

    2016-02-01

    Full Text Available Background: In persons suffering from rheumatoid arthritis (RA, the metacarpophalangeal (MCP joints are commonly affected, resulting in inflammation, pain, joint instability, diminished grip strength and difficulties with function. However, the effectiveness of Kinesio Taping® of the MCP joints in alleviating the symptoms has not been established.Aim: To determine the effectiveness of bilateral Kinesio Taping® of the MCP joints on pain, range of motion, grip strength and hand function in elderly individuals previously diagnosed with RA.Methods: A repeated measure, experimental design was used over a 7-week period with the Kinesio Taping group (n = 30 receiving bilateral space correction Kinesio Taping® of the MCP joints with a joint protection (JP group (n = 31 participating in JP workshops. The Kinesio Tape® was worn for 3 days a week with four applications during the data collection process. For the control group, 2-hour JP educational–behavioural workshops were run weekly for 4 weeks. Weekly assessments were completed for grip strength, ulnar deviation and pain (VAS, and two pre-intervention assessments and one post-intervention assessment was completed for the Michigan Hands Outcomes Questionnaire (MHQ.Results: Kinesio Taping® of the MCP joints showed a significant decrease in pain (p = 0.001 and improved range of motion (p = 0.001 bilaterally. JP was found to have a significant improvement in grip strength (p = 0.001 bilaterally and in the work (p = 0.01 and activities of daily living (ADL (p = 0.01 sections of the MHQ. No significant difference was found between groups after intervention in the majority of outcomes (p = 0.24 except for grip strength where a significant difference was found.Conclusion: Kinesio Taping® of the MCP joints is an effective conservative intervention to improve pain and MCP ulnar deviation in individuals with RA.Significance of the work: Kinesio Taping® of the MCP joints of individuals with RA showed a

  7. Grip pressure measurements during activities of daily life

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sanford, Joe; Young, Carolyn; Popa, Dan; Bugnariu, Nicoleta; Patterson, Rita

    2014-06-01

    Research has expanded human-machine communication methods past direct programming and standard hand- held joystick control. Individual force sensors have been used as a simple means of providing environmental information to a robot and research has shown that more advanced sensitive skins can be viable input devices. These touch sensitive surfaces allow for additional modes of interaction between machines in open, undefined environments. These interactions include object detection for navigation and safety but can also be used for recognition of users command gestures by their machine partner. Key to successful implementation of these gestures is the understanding of varied strategies used for communication and interaction and the development of performance limits. Data of dominant hand grip forces was collected using a Tekscan Grip VersaTek Pressure Measurement System during opening of a door. Analysis of data from 10 male and female subjects is presented. The results of qualitative and quantitative analysis of these data show variability in hand configurations between users. Average data over the cohort is reported. These data will be used in future work to provide human metrology constraints and limits for use in simulation and design of new, physical human-robot interaction systems.

  8. Hand functions in systemic sclerosis and rheumatoid arthritis and influence on clinical variables.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Erol, Kemal; Gok, Kevser; Cengiz, Gizem; Ozgocmen, Salih

    2017-03-21

    Hand joints are the main target in rheumatoid arthritis (RA) and hand involvement in terms of thickening of the skin and contractures are also well known in systemic sclerosis (SSc). Assessment of hand function in SSc is generally an overlooked entity with respect to RA. Therefore the aim of this study was to compare hand functions and potential influence of functional loss on patients' overall physical functions, health-related quality of life (HRQoL) and psychological status in RA and SSc. Age- and gender-matched adult patients with SSc and RA were consecutively recruited. Patients' hand functions were evaluated by using the Duruöz Hand Index (DHI), and hand span and hand grip strength were measured. Patients were evaluated for disease-specific and generic outcome measures including disease activity parameters and HRQoL measures. Fifty patients (44 female, six male) with SSc and 51 (45 female, six male) with RA were included. Despite similar functioning and HRQoL, patients with RA had higher visual analog scale-pain and body mass index. In both groups DHI revealed similar functional loss and correlated with various measurements related to HRQoL. In SSc, hand span, grip strength and modified Rodnan skin score had major influences on hand functions. Assessment of hand function is an important component in the clinical evaluation of patients with RA and SSc. Loss of hand functions is an important feature contributing negatively to the overall physical status and HRQoL in patients with SSc and may be more frequent and important than expected. © 2017 Asia Pacific League of Associations for Rheumatology and John Wiley & Sons Australia, Ltd.

  9. Mind your hand during the energy crunch: Functional Outcome of Circular Saw Hand Injuries.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Frank, Matthias; Hecht, Juliane; Napp, Matthias; Lange, Joern; Grossjohann, Rico; Stengel, Dirk; Schmucker, Uli; Ekkernkamp, Axel; Hinz, Peter

    2010-09-06

    Although injuries due to circular saws are very common all over the world, there is surprisingly little information available about their functional outcomes. As the socioeconomic impact of these injuries is immense and determined by the casualties' disability and impairment, it is the objective of this study to present data on the functional outcome, disability, and impairment of hand injuries due to electric circular saws. Patients treated from 1999 through 2007 for circular saw-related hand injuries were contacted and asked for clinical follow-up assessment. The clinical follow-up protocol consisted of a physical examination and an assessment of static muscle power (grip and pinch strength). For assessment of the subjective experience of the patients regarding their injury-related disability and impairment, the DASH follow-up questionnaire was used. The occupational impact of these injuries was measured by number of lost working days. Finally, safety-related behaviour of the patients was investigated. 114 Patients were followed-up on average 52 months after the injury. Average in-house treatment was 8.8 days. Average time lost from work was 14.8 weeks. A significant reduction of static muscle testing parameters compared with the uninjured hand was revealed for grip strength, tip pinch, key pinch, and palmar pinch. Average DASH score was 17.4 (DASH work 15.8, DASH sports/music 17.7). Most patients had more than ten years experience in using these power tools. The everyday occurrence of circular saw-related hand injuries followed by relatively short periods of in-house treatment might distort the real dimension of the patients' remaining disability and impairment. While the trauma surgeon's view is generally confined to the patients' clinical course, the outcome parameters in this follow-up investigation, with loss of working time as the key factor, confirm that the whole socioeconomic burden is much greater than the direct cost of treatment.

  10. Muscle-Pair Specific Distribution and Grip-Type Modulation of Neural Common Input to Extrinsic Digit Flexors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Winges, Sara A.; Johnston, Jamie A.; Santello, Marco

    2007-01-01

    To gain insight into the synergistic control of hand muscles, we have recently quantified the strength of correlated neural activity across motor units from extrinsic digit flexors during a five-digit object-hold task. We found stronger synchrony and coherence across motor units from thumb and index finger flexor muscle compartment than between the thumb flexor and other finger flexor muscle compartments. The present study of two-digit object hold was designed to determine the extent to which such distribution of common input among thumb-finger flexor muscle compartments, revealed by holding an object with five digits, is preserved when varying the functional role of a given digit pair. We recorded normal force exerted by the digits and electrical activity of single motor units from muscle flexor pollicis longus (FPL) and two compartments of the m. flexor digitorum profundus (FDP2 and FDP3; index and middle finger, respectively). Consistent with our previous results from five-digit grasping, synchrony and coherence across motor units from FPL-FDP2 was significantly stronger than in FPL-FDP3 during object hold with two digits [common input strength: 0.49 ± 0.02 and 0.35 ± 0.02 (means ± SE), respectively; peak coherence: 0.0054 and 0.0038, respectively]. This suggests that the distribution of common neural input is muscle-pair specific regardless of grip type. However, the strength of coherence, but not synchrony, was significantly stronger in two- versus five-digit object hold for both muscle combinations, suggesting the periodicity of common input is sensitive to grip type. PMID:16723414

  11. Hand Functioning in Children with Cerebral Palsy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arnould, Carlyne; Bleyenheuft, Yannick; Thonnard, Jean-Louis

    2014-01-01

    Brain lesions may disturb hand functioning in children with cerebral palsy (CP), making it difficult or even impossible for them to perform several manual activities. Most conventional treatments for hand dysfunction in CP assume that reducing the hand dysfunctions will improve the capacity to manage activities (i.e., manual ability, MA). The aim of this study was to investigate the directional relationships (direct and indirect pathways) through which hand skills influence MA in children with CP. A total of 136 children with CP (mean age: 10 years; range: 6–16 years; 35 quadriplegics, 24 diplegics, 77 hemiplegics) were assessed. Six hand skills were measured on both hands: touch-pressure detection (Semmes–Weinstein esthesiometer), stereognosis (Manual Form Perception Test), proprioception (passive mobilization of the metacarpophalangeal joints), grip strength (GS) (Jamar dynamometer), gross manual dexterity (GMD) (Box and Block Test), and fine finger dexterity (Purdue Pegboard Test). MA was measured with the ABILHAND-Kids questionnaire. Correlation coefficients were used to determine the linear associations between observed variables. A path analysis of structural equation modeling was applied to test different models of causal relationships among the observed variables. Purely sensory impairments did seem not to play a significant role in the capacity to perform manual activities. According to path analysis, GMD in both hands and stereognosis in the dominant hand were directly related to MA, whereas GS was indirectly related to MA through its relationship with GMD. However, one-third of the variance in MA measures could not be explained by hand skills. It can be concluded that MA is not simply the integration of hand skills in daily activities and should be treated per se, supporting activity-based interventions. PMID:24782821

  12. Angiotensin-converting enzyme genotype affects skeletal muscle strength in elite athletes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Costa, Aldo Matos; Silva, António José; Garrido, Nuno; Louro, Hugo; Marinho, Daniel Almeida; Cardoso Marques, Mário; Breitenfeld, Luiza

    2009-01-01

    Previous studies have associated angiotensin-converting enzyme (ACE) D allele with variability in the skeletal muscle baseline strength, though conclusions have been inconsistent across investigations. The purpose of this study was to examine the possible association between ACE genotype and skeletal muscle baseline strength in elite male and female athletes involved in different event expertise. A group of 58 elite athletes, designated as Olympic candidates, were studied: 35 swimmers (19 males and 16 females, 18.8 ± 3.2 years) and 23 triathletes (15 males and 8 females, 18.7 ± 3.0 years). The athletes were classified as: short (≤ 200m) and middle (400m to 1500m) distance athletes, respectively. For each subject the grip strength in both hands was measure using an adjustable mechanical hand dynamometer. The maximum height in both squat jump (SJ) and counter movement jump (CMJ) were also assessed, using a trigonometric carpet (Ergojump Digitime 1000; Digitest, Jyvaskyla, Finland). DNA extraction was obtained with Chelex 100(®) and genotype determination by PCR-RFLP methods. Both males and females showed significantly higher right grip strength in D allele carriers compared to II homozygote's. We found that allelic frequency differs significantly by event distance specialization in both genders (p sprinter D allele carriers showed the superior scores in nearly all strength measurements (p < 0.05), in both genders. Among endurance athletes, the results also demonstrated that female D allele carriers exhibited the higher performance right grip and CMJ scores (p < 0.05). In conclusion, the ACE D allele seems associated with skeletal muscle baseline strength in elite athletes, being easily identified in females. Key pointsDD homozygote's and D allele carriers from both genders shows significantly higher right grip strength.Right grip strength remains significantly higher in the D allele carrier's female endurance group.Female's D allele carriers exhibited the higher

  13. Motor unit synchronization measured by cross-correlation is not influenced by short-term strength training of a hand muscle.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kidgell, Dawson J; Sale, Martin V; Semmler, John G

    2006-11-01

    The purpose of the study was to quantify the strength of motor unit synchronization and coherence from pairs of concurrently active motor units before and after short-term (4-8 weeks) strength training of the left first dorsal interosseous (FDI) muscle. Five subjects (age 24.8 +/- 4.3 years) performed a training protocol three times/week that consisted of six sets of ten maximal isometric index finger abductions, whereas three subjects (age 27.3 +/- 6.7 years) acted as controls. Motor unit activity was recorded from pairs of intramuscular electrodes in the FDI muscle with two separate motor unit recording sessions obtained before and after strength training (trained group) or after 4 weeks of normal daily activities that did not involve training (control group). The training intervention resulted in a 54% (45.2 +/- 8.3 to 69.5 +/- 13.8 N, P = 0.001) increase in maximal index finger abduction force, whereas there was no change in strength in the control group. A total of 163 motor unit pairs (198 single motor units) were examined in both subject groups, with 52 motor unit pairs obtained from 10 recording sessions before training and 51 motor unit pairs from 10 recording sessions after training. Using the cross-correlation procedure, there was no change in the strength of motor unit synchronization following strength training (common input strength index; 0.71 +/- 0.41 to 0.67 +/- 0.43 pulses/s). Furthermore, motor unit coherence z scores at low (0-10 Hz; 3.9 +/- 0.3 before to 4.4 +/- 0.4 after) or high (10-30 Hz; 1.7 +/- 0.1 before to 1.9 +/- 0.1 after) frequencies were not influenced by strength training. These motor unit data indicate that increases in strength following several weeks of training a hand muscle are not accompanied by changes in motor unit synchronization or coherence, suggesting that these features of correlated motor unit activity are not important in the expression of muscle strength.

  14. Physical capacity and psychological mood in association with self-reported work ability in vibration-exposed patients with hand symptoms

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Edlund Maria

    2012-11-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The aim of this study was to investigate whether self-reports of work ability correlated to the results of quantitative tests measuring physical capacity and a questionnaire assessing psychological mood in vibration-exposed patients with hand symptoms. Methods The participants comprised 47 patients (36 men and eleven women with exposure to hand vibration and vascular and/or neurological symptoms in the hands. They performed several quantitative tests (manual dexterity, hand grip strength, finger strength and completed the Work Ability Index (WAI and Hospital Anxiety and Depression Scale (HADS questionnaires. Results Correlation analysis revealed statistically significant associations between the WAI results, the HADS indices, hand grip and finger strength, and manual dexterity measured using the Purdue Pegboard®. Multiple regression analysis revealed age and HADS indices as the strongest predictors of work ability. Conclusions The patient’s age and psychological mood may be stronger predictors of work ability compared with results from tests measuring physical capacity of the hands in vibration-exposed patients with hand symptoms. When using the WAI as an instrument for assessing work ability in these patients, health care providers need to be more aware of the impact of the psychological mood.

  15. Medida da força de preensão manual- validade e confiabilidade do dinamômetro saehan Assessment of hand grip strength- validity and reliability of the saehan dynamometer

    OpenAIRE

    Maurício Moreira Reis; Paula Maria Machado Arantes

    2011-01-01

    Existe uma grande variedade de instrumentos utilizados para a avaliação da força de preensão manual. Porém, não existem estudos demonstrando a validade e a confiabilidade da maioria destes instrumentos. O objetivo deste estudo foi avaliar a validade concorrente e a confiabilidade intraexaminador do dinamômetro Saehan hidráulico comparado-o com o dinamômetro Jamar hidráulico. Cem indivíduos sadios (50 homens e 50 mulheres), entre 20 e 50 anos de idade, sem alterações cognitivas, deficiências f...

  16. The determination of the operating range of a twin-grip control yoke through biomechanical means

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gaertner, K. P.

    1978-01-01

    A twin-grip control yoke was designed as an ergonomic case study that allows dual axis control inputs, both axes being rotational. Inputs are effected by rotating the grips. How the handles were designed with respect to their shape and size and how the angular range of the control yoke in both rotational axes was evaluated. The control yoke which requires two-hand operation was tested to determine its operating range. The intention of this investigation was to find out the optimal form of the control yoke and the maximum permissible range in both rotating axes. In these experiments controls had no spring resistance.

  17. The application of an external wrist extension force reduces electromyographic activity of wrist extensor muscles during gripping.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Elk, N. van; Faes, M.C.; Degens, H.; Kooloos, J.G.M.; Lint, J.A. de; Hopman, M.T.E.

    2004-01-01

    STUDY DESIGN: Experimental repeated-measures study. OBJECTIVE: To investigate the effect of different extension forces applied to the palm of the hand on electromyographic (EMG) activity of the wrist extensor muscles during hand gripping. BACKGROUND: Lateral epicondylitis is usually caused by repeti

  18. The effect of isometric exercise of the hand on the synovial blood flow in patients with rheumatoid arthritis measured by color Doppler ultrasound.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ellegaard, Karen; Torp-Pedersen, Søren; Lund, Hans; Pedersen, Kirsten; Henriksen, Marius; Danneskiold-Samsøe, Bente; Bliddal, Henning

    2013-01-01

    In 90% of patients with rheumatoid arthritis (RA), the joints of the hand are affected. Studies of grip strength training have not indicated a negative effect on disease activity after training. Introduction of ultrasound Doppler (USD) to measure increased blood flow induced by inflammation has made it possible to investigate the direct effect on blood supply in the synovium after training. In this case-control study, 24 patients with RA with USD activity in the wrist joint participated. The USD activity was measured by the color fraction (CF) (CF = colored pixels/total number of pixels in ROI). Twenty-four patients were assigned to an 8-week grip strength training program. At baseline and after 8 weeks of training, an USD examination of the wrist joint was performed. In the training group, we measured grip strength and pain in the wrist joint. Six patients withdrew from the training because of pain or change in medication. Eighteen patients served as control group. There was a modest, not significant, decrease in the CF in response to training (1.86%; P = 0.08). Grip strength increased 8.8% after training (P = 0.055). Pain in motion deceased after training (P = 0.04). No difference in the CF was seen between the training and control groups, neither at baseline nor at follow-up (P = 0.82 and P = 0.48). Patients withdrawing from training had a significantly higher CF than the other patients (P > 0.001). The results in this study might indicate that the flow in the synovium assessed by USD is not affected by grip strength training.

  19. Connectivity-based predictions of hand motor outcome for patients at the subacute stage after stroke

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    Julia eLindow

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available Background. Connectivity-based predictions of hand motor outcome have been proposed to be useful in stroke patients. We intended to assess the prognostic value of different imaging methods on short-term (3 months and long-term (6 months motor outcome after stroke. Methods. We measured resting state functional connectivity (rsFC, diffusion weighted imaging (DWI and grip strength in 19 stroke patients within the first days (5-9 days after stroke. Outcome measurements for short-term (3 months and long-term (6 months motor function was assessed by the Motricity Index (MI of the upper limb and the Box and Block test (BB. Patients were predominantly mildly affected since signed consent was necessary at inclusion. We performed a multiple stepwise regression analysis to compare the predictive value of rsFC, DWI and clinical measurements. Results. Patients showed relevant improvement in both motor outcome tests. As expected grip strength at inclusion was a predictor for short- and long-term motor outcome as assessed by MI. Diffusion-based tract volume (DTV of the tracts between ipsilesional primary motor cortex and contralesional anterior cerebellar hemisphere showed a strong trend (p=0.05 for a predictive power for long-term motor outcome as measured by MI. DTV of the interhemispheric tracts between both primary motor cortices was predictive for both short - and long-term motor outcome in BB. rsFC was not associated with motor outcome. Conclusions. Grip strength is a good predictor of hand motor outcome concerning strength-related measurements (MI for mildly affected subacute patients. Therefore additional connectivity measurements seem to be redundant in this group. Using more complex movement recruiting bilateral motor areas as an outcome parameter, DTV and in particular interhemispheric pathways might enhance predictive value of hand motor outcome.

  20. Precision grip in congenital and acquired hemiparesis: similarities in impairments and implications for neurorehabilitation - review

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    Yannick eBleyenheuft

    2014-06-01

    Full Text Available Background: Patients with congenital and acquired hemiparesis incur long-term functional deficits, among which the loss of prehension that may impact their functional independence. Identifying, understanding and comparing the underlying mechanisms of prehension impairments represent an opportunity to better adapt neurorehabilitationObjective: The present review aims to provide a better understanding of precision grip deficits in congenital and acquired hemiparesis and to determine whether the severity and type of fine motor control impairments depend on whether or not the lesions are congenital or acquired in adulthood. Methods: Using combinations of the following key words: fingertip force, grip force, precision grip, cerebral palsy, stroke, pubmed and Scopus databases were used to search studies from 1984 to 2013. Results: Individuals with both congenital and acquired hemiparesis were able to some extent to use anticipatory motor control in precision grip tasks, even if this control was impaired in the paretic hand. In both congenital or acquired hemiparesis, the ability to plan efficient anticipatory motor control when the less-affected hand is used provides a possibility to remediate impairments in anticipatory motor control of the paretic hand. Conclusion: Surprisingly we observed very few differences between the results of studies in children with congenital hemiplegia and stroke patients. We suggest that the underlying specific strategies of neurorehabilitation developed for each one could benefit the other.

  1. 司坦唑醇对高营养风险危重患者氮平衡、握力及临床预后影响的研究%Effect of stanozolol on the nitrogen balance,grip strength and clinical outcomes of critical patients with high nutrition risk

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    王宇辉; 龙大利; 叶八宁; 施贤清

    2015-01-01

    Objective To investigate the effect of stanozolol on nitrogen balance ,grip strength and clinical outcomes of criti‐cal patients with high nutrition risk .Methods We enrolled patients who were admitted to the ICU of Guizhou provincial Hospital during the time period from January 2014 to June 2014 and ,as patients with high nutrition risk .Patients ,who received same base nutritional support program ,were divided into two groups .Treatment group who were treated with stanozolol administrated with gastric or jejunal tube for 7 days by 4 mg Tid .The control group whose members underwent placebo simultaneously with the treat‐ment group .The nitrogen balance ,grip strength of both groups was measured when at admitted and 4th as well as 7th day .Prealbu‐min ,total bilirubin ,alanine aminotransferase ,and aspartate aminotransferase were measured when at the same time and before leave hospital .The duration of the mechanical ventilation ,ICU stays ,hospital stays and mortality within 28 days were recorded .Results There was no statistical significance in the differences between all the indicators of the two groups at admission(P>0 .05) .The du‐ration of mechanical ventilation ,ICU stays ,hospital stays were decreased significantly in the treatment group (P0 .05) .Nitrogen bal‐ance ,prealbumin ,grip strength and liver function parameters in the treatment group were significantly higher than they were been at admitted and control group at 4th and 7th day (all P<0 .05) .Liver function parameters of treatment group gradually decreased to the normal range before discharge .Conclusion In critically ill patients treated with anabolic steroid stanozolol ,can promote protein synthesis ,reduce muscle and other lean tissue decomposition ,improve clinical symptoms ,short the length of hospital stay and ICU stay .But we should pay more attention on liver function in critically ill patients who treated with stanozolol .%目的:探讨司坦唑醇对高营养风险危重患

  2. Reliability of hand-held dynamometry for measurement of lower limb muscle strength in children with Duchenne and Becker muscular dystrophy

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    Wei SHI

    2015-05-01

    Full Text Available Objective To determine the reliability of hand-held dynamometry (HHD for lower limb isometric muscle strength measurement in children with Duchenne and Becker muscular dystrophy (DMD/BMD.  Methods A total of 21 children [20 males and one female; mean age was (7.88 ± 2.87 years, ranging between 3.96-14.09 years; mean age at diagnosis was (5.88 ± 2.88 years, ranging between 1.35-12.89 years; mean height was (120.64 ± 16.30 cm, ranging between 97-153 cm; mean body weight was (24.62 ± 9.05 kg, ranging between 14-50 kg] with DMD (19/21 and BMD (2/21 were involved from Rehabilitation Center of Children's Hospital of Fudan University. The muscle strength of hip, knee and ankle was measured by HHD under standardized test methods. The test-retest results were compared to determine the inter-test reliability, and the results among testers were compared to determine the inter-tester reliability.  Results HHD showed fine inter-tester reliability (ICC = 0.762-0.978 and inter-test reliability (ICC = 0.690-0.938 in measuring lower limb muscle strength of children with DMD/BMD. Results also showed relatively poor reliability in distal muscle groups (foot plantar flexion and dorsiflexion.  Conclusions HHD, showing fine inter-tester and inter-test reliability in measuring the lower limb muscle strength of children with DMD/BMD, can be used in monitoring muscle strength changing and assessing effects of clinical interventions. DOI: 10.3969/j.issn.1672-6731.2015.05.009

  3. Enhanced independence: experiences after regaining grip function in people with tetraplegia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wangdell, Johanna; Carlsson, Gunnel; Fridén, Jan

    2013-01-01

    To explore how surgical reconstruction of grip affects everyday life for patients with tetraplegia, with special emphasis on patients perspective of their perceived changes. Qualitative method. Eleven people (aged 22-73) with tetraplegia who had undergone surgical reconstruction to restore grip function. Qualitative interviews were conducted 7-17 months after surgery and analysed using Grounded theory. The core concept describing the participants experienced gains after grip reconstructive surgery was "enhanced independence". It was associated with changes in both practical and psychological aspects of independence. Practical aspects identified were: "perform more activities", "smoother everyday life", "renewed ability to participate in social activities", "less dependence on assistance" and "less restricted by physical environment". Psychological aspects of independence included "regained privacy", "increased manageability", "regained identity", "recapture a part of the body" and "share positive experiences with relatives and friends". Encompassing all categories was the concept "self-efficacy in hand control". It was seen as a result included in the enhanced independency core but also as an important factor for the development of all the other categories. Participants in this study experienced enhanced independence after grip reconstructive surgery and rehabilitation. The enhanced independence included both practical and physical aspects and it influenced all domains using the International Classification of Function, Disability and Health model; body function and structure, activities, participation, personal factors and environmental factors. Implications for Rehabilitation Patients with tetraplegia experience grip reconstruction as a useful intervention, an enhanced independence, related to their improved hand control. The increased hand control impacted not only physical aspects but also practical and psychological aspects. It also influenced social and

  4. Prosthetic Hand For Holding Rods, Tools, And Handles

    Science.gov (United States)

    Belcher, Jewell G., Jr.; Vest, Thomas W.

    1995-01-01

    Prosthetic hand with quick-grip/quick-release lever broadens range of specialized functions available to lower-arm amputee by providing improved capabilities for gripping rods, tools, handles, and like. Includes two stationary lower fingers opposed by one pivoting upper finger. Lever operates in conjunction with attached bracket.

  5. Nuevas tablas de fuerza de la mano para población adulta de Teruel New tables on hand strength in the adult population from Teruel

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. L. Mateo Lázaro

    2008-02-01

    Full Text Available Objetivo: Construir tablas de valores teóricos de fuerza de la mano para la población adulta del Área Sanitaria de Teruel. Material y Método: Población residente en el Área Sanitaria de Teruel con edad ≥ 20 años, sin incapacidad física para realizar las pruebas y que voluntariamente desean participar. Se tallan y pesan descalzos, con tórax desnudo y se calcula el índice de masa corporal. La fuerza de la mano se mide con dinamómetro con el brazo en extensión, paralelo al cuerpo y sin apoyo. Se hacen dos determinaciones para cada mano dejando descansar unos segundos entre ellas y anotando el valor máximo para cada mano. Se construyen tablas para ambos sexos, por décadas de edad, con los percentiles correspondientes para valores de mano derecha, mano izquierda y valor medio de ambas manos. Resultados: Un total de 2.270 casos fueron válidos; 1.113 hombres, 1.157 mujeres con edades medias de 62 y 55 años respectivamente. La fuerza es mayor en la mano derecha que en la izquierda, en ambos sexos con una media de 27,5 kg (3-57 para hombres y de 16,7 (1-44 para mujeres. Los valores máximos se encuentra en los 20 a los 40 años comenzado a descender más de un 8% por década. Encontramos relación entre la fuerza media y el índice de masa corporal (r = 0,179, p = 0,0003 para hombres y r = -0,095. p = 0,001 en mujeres. Conclusiones: Se construyen tablas teóricas que van a posibilitar evaluar el estado nutricional de nuestra población desde un punto de vista funcional y detectar su desviación. La fuerza se pierde de forma progresiva a partir de los 50 años. Hay relación entre la fuerza de la mano y el estado nutricional valorado por el índice de masa corporal.Objective: To elaborate the predicted values of hand strength in the adult population from the health care area of Teruel. Material and Methods: The population residing in the health care area of Teruel, aged ≥ 20 years, with no physical disability precluding the performance

  6. The effect of Kinesio Taping on handgrip strength.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lemos, Thiago Vilela; Pereira, Kelice Cristina; Protássio, Carina Celedonio; Lucas, Lorrane Barbosa; Matheus, Joao Paulo C

    2015-03-01

    [Purpose] The purpose of this research was to evaluate the change in muscle function induced by a Kinesio Tape application with no or moderate tension, to the dominant and non-dominant arms. [Subjects and Methods] This research was a quantitative study, in which 75 women participated. The subjects, aged 18-30 years, were divided into 3 groups, Kinesio, Kinesio without Tension, and Control, and they were assessed before the taping intervention and after 30 minutes, 24 hours, and 48 hours of taping. [Results] The Kinesio group subjects demonstrated an increase in handgrip strength after 30 minutes, 24 hours, and 48 hours of tape application compared to control. A statistically significant increase in strength was observed in the Kinesio group comparison to the Control after 24 hours and 48 hours for the right hand, and after 48 hours for the left hand. Improvement in the Kinesio group compared to the Kinesio without Tension was observed only after 24 hours of taping application, and only in the right hand. [Conclusion] The Kinesio Taping method augmented the handgrip strength of healthy women, and the increase in grip strength was maintained for 48 hours after its application; the dominant hand demonstrated the greatest strength values.

  7. The effect of Kinesio Taping on handgrip strength

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lemos, Thiago Vilela; Pereira, Kelice Cristina; Protássio, Carina Celedonio; Lucas, Lorrane Barbosa; Matheus, Joao Paulo C.

    2015-01-01

    [Purpose] The purpose of this research was to evaluate the change in muscle function induced by a Kinesio Tape application with no or moderate tension, to the dominant and non-dominant arms. [Subjects and Methods] This research was a quantitative study, in which 75 women participated. The subjects, aged 18–30 years, were divided into 3 groups, Kinesio, Kinesio without Tension, and Control, and they were assessed before the taping intervention and after 30 minutes, 24 hours, and 48 hours of taping. [Results] The Kinesio group subjects demonstrated an increase in handgrip strength after 30 minutes, 24 hours, and 48 hours of tape application compared to control. A statistically significant increase in strength was observed in the Kinesio group comparison to the Control after 24 hours and 48 hours for the right hand, and after 48 hours for the left hand. Improvement in the Kinesio group compared to the Kinesio without Tension was observed only after 24 hours of taping application, and only in the right hand. [Conclusion] The Kinesio Taping method augmented the handgrip strength of healthy women, and the increase in grip strength was maintained for 48 hours after its application; the dominant hand demonstrated the greatest strength values. PMID:25931682

  8. Determinants and magnitudes of manual force strengths and joint moments during two-handed standing maximal horizontal pushing and pulling.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chow, Amy Y; Dickerson, Clark R

    2016-04-01

    Pushing and pulling are common occupational exertions that are increasingly associated with musculoskeletal complaints. This study focuses on the sensitivity of shoulder capacity to gender, handle height, exertion type (push or pull) and handle orientation for these tasks. All factors except for handle orientation influenced unilateral and total manual force strength (p < 0.01), with exertion type being the most influential. Interaction effects also existed between handle height and exertion type. Additionally, joint moments at the shoulders and low back were influenced by all factors studied (p < 0.01), with exertion type again being most influential. Knowledge of the relative influence of multiple factors on shoulder capacity can provide guidance regarding these factors when designing or evaluating occupational pushing and pulling tasks for a diverse population. Practitioner Summary: pushing and pulling comprise nearly half of all manual materials handling tasks. Practitioners often assess, design or modify these tasks while incorporating constraints, including manual force direction and handle interface. This study provides guidance to aid design of pushing and pulling tasks in the context of shoulder physical capacity.

  9. Prognostic factors for the recovery of hand function following trapeziectomy with ligamentoplasty stabilisation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moineau, G; Richou, J; Liot, M; Le Nen, D

    2009-09-01

    Numerous procedures are in use to treat trapeziometacarpal osteoarthritis. Most of these techniques impair hand function. In a series of trapeziectomies stabilized by ligament reconstruction with tendon suspension, we investigated whether eventual parameters influenced hand function and dexterity. Some parameters influence hand function recovery following trapeziectomy combined to ligamento-tendinous stabilization. This is a continuous, retrospective, single surgeon series; 60 cases of thumb trapeziometacarpal osteoarthritis were treated with trapeziectomy and ligament reconstruction (40 palmaris longus, and 20 half flexor carpi radialis) with no additional metacarpophalangeal (MCP) joint surgery. Besides assessing classical clinical outcome criteria (pain, mobility, force), we analyzed hand function: this was obtained with a questionnaire about different everyday movements. Five types of grip were included in this analysis: spherical, pinch grasp, key pinch, power grip, and precision pinch. Fifty-one trapeziectomies (85%) were evaluated at an average follow-up of 7.5 years (5-11.5). Ninety-four percent of patients had good results for pain. The average Kapandji score for mobility was 9.6 (6-10) with a mean web angle at 36.5 degrees. Hyperextension of the MCP joint occurred in 36 cases and measured an average of 26 degrees (5 degrees-50 degrees). Compared to the contralateral side average strength was 97% with the Jamar dynamometer and 88% for the key pinch. The rate of satisfaction was 96%. Collapse of trapezial height was constant, and at last follow-up, the trapezial index was 50% of its preoperative initial value. The results relative to hand function assessment were good in 58% of patients. The spherical grip was the most difficult to restore. The analysis of the 42% of patients with average or poor hand function showed five prognostic factors for a poor outcome: young age at surgery, persisting postoperative pain, postoperative hyperextension of the MCP joint

  10. ANGIOTENSIN-CONVERTING ENZYME GENOTYPE AFFECTS SKELETAL MUSCLE STRENGTH IN ELITE ATHLETES

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    Aldo Matos Costa

    2009-09-01

    Full Text Available Previous studies have associated angiotensin-converting enzyme (ACE D allele with variability in the skeletal muscle baseline strength, though conclusions have been inconsistent across investigations. The purpose of this study was to examine the possible association between ACE genotype and skeletal muscle baseline strength in elite male and female athletes involved in different event expertise. A group of 58 elite athletes, designated as Olympic candidates, were studied: 35 swimmers (19 males and 16 females, 18.8 ± 3.2 years and 23 triathletes (15 males and 8 females, 18.7 ± 3.0 years. The athletes were classified as: short (< 200m and middle (400m to 1500m distance athletes, respectively. For each subject the grip strength in both hands was measure using an adjustable mechanical hand dynamometer. The maximum height in both squat jump (SJ and counter movement jump (CMJ were also assessed, using a trigonometric carpet (Ergojump Digitime 1000; Digitest, Jyvaskyla, Finland. DNA extraction was obtained with Chelex 100® and genotype determination by PCR-RFLP methods. Both males and females showed significantly higher right grip strength in D allele carriers compared to II homozygote's. We found that allelic frequency differs significantly by event distance specialization in both genders (p < 0.05. In fact, sprinter D allele carriers showed the superior scores in nearly all strength measurements (p < 0.05, in both genders. Among endurance athletes, the results also demonstrated that female D allele carriers exhibited the higher performance right grip and CMJ scores (p < 0.05. In conclusion, the ACE D allele seems associated with skeletal muscle baseline strength in elite athletes, being easily identified in females

  11. Temperature limit values for gripping cold surfaces

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Malchaire, J.; Geng, Q.; Den Hartog, E.; Havenith, G.; Holmer, I.; Piette, A.; Powell, S.L.; Rintamäki, H.; Rissanen, S.

    2002-01-01

    Objectives. At the request of the European Commission and in the framework of the European Machinery Directive, research was conducted jointly in five different laboratories to develop specifications for surface temperature limit values for the gripping and handling of cold items. Methods. Four

  12. Temperature limit values for gripping cold surfaces

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Malchaire, J.; Geng, Q.; Den Hartog, E.; Havenith, G.; Holmer, I.; Piette, A.; Powell, S.L.; Rintamäki, H.; Rissanen, S.

    2002-01-01

    Objectives. At the request of the European Commission and in the framework of the European Machinery Directive, research was conducted jointly in five different laboratories to develop specifications for surface temperature limit values for the gripping and handling of cold items. Methods. Four hund

  13. Grip-Pattern Recognition for Smart Guns

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kauffman, J.A.; Bazen, A.M.; Gerez, S.H.; Veldhuis, R.N.J.

    2003-01-01

    This paper describes the design, implementation and evaluation of a user-verification system for a smart gun, which is based on grip-pattern recognition. An existing pressure sensor consisting of an array of 44 x 44 piezoresistive elements has been used. An interface has been developed to acquire pr

  14. The GRIP method for collaborative roadmapping workshops

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Piirainen, Kalle

    2015-01-01

    Technology roadmapping is a well-known tool for technology management, but practical advice for facilitating collaborative roadmapping workshops is relatively scarce. To cater for this need, we have designed a method for collaborative roadmapping, dubbed the GRIP method, for facilitating group work...

  15. Changes in arm-hand function and arm-hand skill performance in patients after stroke during and after rehabilitation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Franck, Johan Anton; Smeets, Rob Johannes Elise Marie; Seelen, Henk Alexander Maria

    2017-01-01

    Arm-hand rehabilitation programs applied in stroke rehabilitation frequently target specific populations and thus are less applicable in heterogeneous patient populations. Besides, changes in arm-hand function (AHF) and arm-hand skill performance (AHSP) during and after a specific and well-described rehabilitation treatment are often not well evaluated. This single-armed prospective cohort study featured three subgroups of stroke patients with either a severely, moderately or mildly impaired AHF. Rehabilitation treatment consisted of a Concise_Arm_and_hand_ Rehabilitation_Approach_in_Stroke (CARAS). Measurements at function and activity level were performed at admission, clinical discharge, 3, 6, 9 and 12 months after clinical discharge. Eighty-nine stroke patients (M/F:63/23; mean age:57.6yr (+/-10.6); post-stroke time:29.8 days (+/-20.1)) participated. All patients improved on AHF and arm-hand capacity during and after rehabilitation, except on grip strength in the severely affected subgroup. Largest gains occurred in patients with a moderately affected AHF. As to self-perceived AHSP, on average, all subgroups improved over time. A small percentage of patients declined regarding self-perceived AHSP post-rehabilitation. A majority of stroke patients across the whole arm-hand impairment severity spectrum significantly improved on AHF, arm-hand capacity and self-perceived AHSP. These were maintained up to one year post-rehabilitation. Results may serve as a control condition in future studies.

  16. Toe-to-finger transfer for post-traumatic reconstruction of the fingerless hand

    Science.gov (United States)

    Williamson, J. Scott; Manktelow, Ralph T.; Kelly, Louise; Marcuzzi, A.; Mahabir, Raman C.

    2001-01-01

    Objective To assess the utility of toe-to-finger transfers (TFTs) for post-traumatic reconstruction of the fingerless hand. Design A case series. Setting A regional trauma centre. Patients Eight men, mean age was 36 years (range from 25–59 yr), who had lost all the fingers from a hand due to a crush–degloving injury (6 patients), frostbite (1 patient) or a burn injury (1 patient). Intervention TFT. Twelve TFTs were cone and the mean time from injury to reconstruction was 17.2 months. Main outcome measures Objective (range of motion, moving 2-point discrimination, grip strength, key pinch, Jebsen–Taylor hand assessment, return to work) and subjective (activities of daily living and a questionnaire) measures. Results Eleven of the 12 transfers survived. Six of the 7 in whom the transfer was successful were available for follow-up (mean 45 mo). Range of motion was 10° at the distal interphalangeal joint, 18° at the proximal interphalangeal joint and 59° at the metacarpophalangeal joint. Sensation was protective in all. Grip strength and key pinch were 26.1% and 70.2% of the contralateral hand respectively. Jebsen–Taylor assessment indicated that basic activities were possible but slowed. All 6 patients returned to work and could perform 92.6% of the activities of daily living unassisted. Hand and foot symptoms were mild. Two-thirds were appearance conscious, 5 of the 6 went on to altered vocations and all reported overall satisfaction as high. Conclusion This study supports TFT for reconstruction of the fingerless hand in that, although transferred toe function may be poorer than a normal finger, the hand is restored to a useful, sensate and versatile functional unit, such that global hand and patient function, as well as patient satisfaction, are very good. PMID:11504261

  17. Effects of early versus delayed excision and grafting on the return of the burned hand function.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Salehi, Seyed Hamid; Fatemi, Mohammad Javad; Sedghi, Maryam; Niazi, Mitra

    2016-01-01

    Despite a general consensus regarding the impacts of early excision and grafting (EE and G) of burned hand on the reducing of treatment cost and hospital stay, there are some controversial issues about its effect on the outcome of hand function. This study conducted to compare the results of the EE and G and delayed skin grafting in deep hand burns regarding the hand functional outcome. This study was conducted from April 2012 to November 2013 in sixty patients with deep thermal burns of the dorsal hand with total body surface area (TBSA) <20% who were admitted to special burn hospital. After standard primary burn care and resuscitation, necessary procedures (EE and G or more conservative treatment) were performed based on the patients' conditions. The patients were placed into early excision (No. =30) and delayed excision group (No. =30). Total active motion (TAM) of fingers, grip strength of the hand and the assessment of disabilities of the arm, shoulder and hand questionnaire, were measured in all patients 6 months after grafting. The average percentage of TBSA in the EE and G group was more than the delayed excision group (17.34% ±5.12% vs. 15.64% ±5.83%), this difference was not significant (P = 0.23). After 6 months, the average of the TAM and grip strength in the EE and G group was significantly more than that of the delayed group (P < 0.0001 and P = 0.019). The present study showed that EE and G with proper physical therapy and rehabilitation management provides a higher functional outcome in dorsal deep burned hand.

  18. Effects of early versus delayed excision and grafting on the return of the burned hand function

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Seyed Hamid Salehi

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: Despite a general consensus regarding the impacts of early excision and grafting (EE and G of burned hand on the reducing of treatment cost and hospital stay, there are some controversial issues about its effect on the outcome of hand function. This study conducted to compare the results of the EE and G and delayed skin grafting in deep hand burns regarding the hand functional outcome. Materials and Methods: This study was conducted from April 2012 to November 2013 in sixty patients with deep thermal burns of the dorsal hand with total body surface area (TBSA <20% who were admitted to special burn hospital. After standard primary burn care and resuscitation, necessary procedures (EE and G or more conservative treatment were performed based on the patients' conditions. The patients were placed into early excision (No. =30 and delayed excision group (No. =30. Total active motion (TAM of fingers, grip strength of the hand and the assessment of disabilities of the arm, shoulder and hand questionnaire, were measured in all patients 6 months after grafting. Results: The average percentage of TBSA in the EE and G group was more than the delayed excision group (17.34% ±5.12% vs. 15.64% ±5.83%, this difference was not significant (P = 0.23. After 6 months, the average of the TAM and grip strength in the EE and G group was significantly more than that of the delayed group (P < 0.0001 and P = 0.019. Conclusion: The present study showed that EE and G with proper physical therapy and rehabilitation management provides a higher functional outcome in dorsal deep burned hand.

  19. Muscle strength in patients with acromegaly at diagnosis and during long-term follow-up.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Füchtbauer, Laila; Olsson, Daniel S; Bengtsson, Bengt-Åke; Norrman, Lise-Lott; Sunnerhagen, Katharina S; Johannsson, Gudmundur

    2017-08-01

    Patients with acromegaly have decreased body fat (BF) and increased extracellular water (ECW) and muscle mass. Although there is a lack of systematic studies on muscle function, it is believed that patients with acromegaly may suffer from proximal muscle weakness despite their increased muscle mass. We studied body composition and muscle function in untreated acromegaly and after biochemical remission. Prospective observational study. Patients with acromegaly underwent measurements of muscle strength (dynamometers) and body composition (four-compartment model) at diagnosis (n = 48), 1 year after surgery (n = 29) and after long-term follow-up (median 11 years) (n = 24). Results were compared to healthy subjects. Untreated patients had increased body cell mass (113 ± 9% of predicted) and ECW (110 ± 20%) and decreased BF (67 ± 7.6%). At one-year follow-up, serum concentration of IGF-I was reduced and body composition had normalized. At baseline, isometric muscle strength in knee flexors and extensors was normal and concentric strength was modestly increased whereas grip strength and endurance was reduced. After one year, muscle strength was normal in both patients with still active disease and patients in remission. At long-term follow-up, all patients were in remission. Most muscle function tests remained normal, but isometric flexion and the fatigue index were increased to 153 ± 42% and 139 ± 28% of predicted values, respectively. Patients with untreated acromegaly had increased body cell mass and normal or modestly increased proximal muscle strength, whereas their grip strength was reduced. After biochemical improvement and remission, body composition was normalized, hand grip strength was increased, whereas proximal muscle fatigue increased. © 2017 European Society of Endocrinology.

  20. Using pliers in assembly work: short and long task duration effects of gloves on hand performance capabilities and subjective assessments of discomfort and ease of tool manipulation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dianat, Iman; Haslegrave, Christine M; Stedmon, Alex W

    2012-03-01

    The present study investigated the effects of wearing typical industrial gloves on hand performance capabilities (muscle activity, wrist posture, touch sensitivity, hand grip and forearm torque strength) and subjective assessments for an extended duration of performing a common assembly task, wire tying with pliers, which requires a combination of manipulation and force exertion. Three commercially available gloves (cotton, nylon and nitrile gloves) were tested and compared with a bare hand condition while participants performed the simulated assembly task for 2 h. The results showed that wearing gloves significantly increased the muscle activity, wrist deviation, and discomfort whilst reducing hand grip strength, forearm torque strength and touch sensitivity. The combined results showed that the length of time for which gloves are worn does affect hand performance capability and that gloves need to be evaluated in a realistic working context. The results are discussed in terms of selection of gloves for industrial assembly tasks involving pliers. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier Ltd and The Ergonomics Society. All rights reserved.

  1. Effect of paddle grip on segmental fluid distribution in elite slalom paddlers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bílý, Milan; Baláš, Jiří; Martin, Andrew John; Cochrane, Darryl; Coufalová, Klára; Süss, Vladimír

    2013-01-01

    Issues of high levels of muscular asymmetry have been associated with injury risk, and therefore have potential implications for decremental performance at the elite sport level. The aim of this current study was to assess the relationship between the segmental fluid distribution and the paddle grip in elite male and female slalom kayakers and canoeists. Eighty-four world-cup competitors (61 males and 23 females) took part in the study. Impedance analysis was used to assess segmental fluid asymmetry. The effect of paddle grip (loose/fixed hand in kayakers, lower/upper hand in canoeists), morphological dominance (dominant/non-dominant) and discipline (canoe/kayak) were evaluated by repeated measures ANOVA. The findings indicated a significant effect of paddle grip in canoeists on morphological asymmetry in upper limbs (arm of lower paddle hand mean fluid distribution 3.28, s=0.43 litres; arm of upper paddle hand mean fluid distribution 3.19, s=0.41 litres; P=0.000, [Formula: see text]=0.33). The sternmen demonstrated higher asymmetry between the arms of upper and lower paddle hand (mean 0.11, s=0.04 litres, P=0.000, [Formula: see text]=0.80) than the bowmen (mean 0.04, s=0.06 litres, P=0.015, [Formula: see text]=0.44) in double-canoes. Significant morphological asymmetry was found also in kayakers but the effect of paddle grip was not substantial. The use of segmental impedance analysis may be a suitable diagnostic tool for assessing morphological changes, which can be related to paddling training. Likewise muscular asymmetry is associated with injury risk; the evaluation of morphological changes during the training process may be considered by sport trainers and physical therapists.

  2. Variability of grip kinetics during adult signature writing.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bassma Ghali

    Full Text Available Grip kinetics and their variation are emerging as important considerations in the clinical assessment of handwriting pathologies, fine motor rehabilitation, biometrics, forensics and ergonomic pen design. This study evaluated the intra- and inter-participant variability of grip shape kinetics in adults during signature writing. Twenty (20 adult participants wrote on a digitizing tablet using an instrumented pen that measured the forces exerted on its barrel. Signature samples were collected over 10 days, 3 times a day, to capture temporal variations in grip shape kinetics. A kinetic topography (i.e., grip shape image was derived per signature by time-averaging the measured force at each of 32 locations around the pen barrel. The normalized cross correlations (NCC of grip shape images were calculated within- and between-participants. Several classification algorithms were implemented to gauge the error rate of participant discrimination based on grip shape kinetics. Four different grip shapes emerged and several participants made grip adjustments (change in grip shape or grip height or rotated the pen during writing. Nonetheless, intra-participant variation in grip kinetics was generally much smaller than inter-participant force variations. Using the entire grip shape images as a 32-dimensional input feature vector, a K-nearest neighbor classifier achieved an error rate of 1.2±0.4% in discriminating among participants. These results indicate that writers had unique grip shape kinetics that were repeatable over time but distinct from those of other participants. The topographic analysis of grip kinetics may inform the development of personalized interventions or customizable grips in clinical and industrial applications, respectively.

  3. Variability of grip kinetics during adult signature writing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ghali, Bassma; Thalanki Anantha, Nayanashri; Chan, Jennifer; Chau, Tom

    2013-01-01

    Grip kinetics and their variation are emerging as important considerations in the clinical assessment of handwriting pathologies, fine motor rehabilitation, biometrics, forensics and ergonomic pen design. This study evaluated the intra- and inter-participant variability of grip shape kinetics in adults during signature writing. Twenty (20) adult participants wrote on a digitizing tablet using an instrumented pen that measured the forces exerted on its barrel. Signature samples were collected over 10 days, 3 times a day, to capture temporal variations in grip shape kinetics. A kinetic topography (i.e., grip shape image) was derived per signature by time-averaging the measured force at each of 32 locations around the pen barrel. The normalized cross correlations (NCC) of grip shape images were calculated within- and between-participants. Several classification algorithms were implemented to gauge the error rate of participant discrimination based on grip shape kinetics. Four different grip shapes emerged and several participants made grip adjustments (change in grip shape or grip height) or rotated the pen during writing. Nonetheless, intra-participant variation in grip kinetics was generally much smaller than inter-participant force variations. Using the entire grip shape images as a 32-dimensional input feature vector, a K-nearest neighbor classifier achieved an error rate of 1.2±0.4% in discriminating among participants. These results indicate that writers had unique grip shape kinetics that were repeatable over time but distinct from those of other participants. The topographic analysis of grip kinetics may inform the development of personalized interventions or customizable grips in clinical and industrial applications, respectively.

  4. Effects of intermanual transfer induced by repetitive precision grip on input-output properties of untrained contralateral limb muscles.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liang, Nan; Takahashi, Makoto; Ni, Zhen; Yahagi, Susumu; Funase, Kozo; Kato, Takashi; Kasai, Tatsuya

    2007-10-01

    Although there were many reports relating to intermanual transfer of behavioral motor tasks in humans, it is still not well-known whether the transfer phenomenon between the trained and untrained hand is accompanied by corresponding changes in motor system. In the present study we applied transcranial magnetic stimulation to investigate the practice effects of unilateral fingertip precision grip on corticospinal excitability, regarding both the trained and untrained hand muscles. The results showed that after practice fingertip grip force became steady and safety margin dramatically decreased not only in the trained hand, but also in the untrained hand. Regarding MEP and background EMG (B.EMG) activities, the regression slope of MEP/B.EMG ratio in the first dorsal interosseous (FDI) muscle became significantly steeper after practice in both hands, but in the thenar (TH) muscle there were no clear modulations. These results indicated that through practice qualitative or functional changes of corticospinal systems related to the reorganization for a fingertip precision grip prominently reflect only on FDI muscle which plays a dominant role in the task. More importantly, such effects were simultaneously seen in the untrained hand correspondent to the trained hand, i.e., changes of input-output property in M1 occur not only in the trained hand, but also in the untrained hand. Based on the present results, we suggest that training-induced neural adaptations of the central nervous system may include improvement of its predicting fingertip grip force for self-lifting of the object in the untrained hand.

  5. Predictive force programming in the grip-lift task: the role of memory links between arbitrary cues and object weight.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ameli, Mitra; Dafotakis, Manuel; Fink, Gereon R; Nowak, Dennis A

    2008-01-01

    We tested the ability of healthy participants to learn an association between arbitrary sensory cues and the weight of an object to be lifted using a precision grip between the index finger and thumb. Right-handed participants performed a series of grip-lift tasks with each hand. In a first experiment, participants lifted two objects of equal visual appearance which unexpectedly and randomly changed their weight. In two subsequent experiments, the change in object weight was indicated by cues, which were presented (i) visually or (ii) auditorily. When no cue about the weight of the object to be lifted was presented, participants programmed grip force according to the most recent lift, regardless of the hand used. In contrast, participants were able to rapidly establish an association between a particular sensory cue with a given weight and scaled grip force precisely to the actual weight thereafter, regardless of the hand used or the sensory modality of the cue. We discuss our data within the theoretical concept of internal models.

  6. The Effect of Repetitive Rhythmic Precision Grip Task-Oriented Rehabilitation in Chronic Stroke Patients: A Pilot Study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dispa, Delphine; Lejeune, Thierry; Thonnard, Jean-Louis

    2013-01-01

    Most chronic stroke patients present with difficulty in the manipulation of objects. The aim of this study was to test whether an intensive program of precision grip training could improve hand functioning of patients at more than 6 months after a stroke. This was a cross-over study; hence, at inclusion, the patients were randomly divided into two…

  7. Differential roles for NSF and GRIP/ABP in AMPA receptor cycling.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Braithwaite, Steven P; Xia, Houhui; Malenka, Robert C

    2002-05-14

    alpha-Amino-3-hydroxy-5-methylisoxazole-4-propionic acid receptor (AMPAR) stability and movement at synapses are important factors controlling synaptic strength. Here, we study the roles of proteins [N-ethylmaleimide-sensitive fusion protein (NSF), glutamate receptor AMPAR binding protein (ABP)-interacting protein (GRIP)/(ABP), and protein interacting with C-kinase-1 (PICK1) that interact with the GluR2 subunit in the control of the surface expression and cycling of AMPARs. Epitope-tagged GluR2 formed functional receptors that exhibited targeting to synaptic sites. Constructs in which binding to NSF, PDZ proteins (GRIP/ABP and PICK1), or GRIP/ABP alone was eliminated each exhibited normal surface targeting and constitutive cycling. The lack of NSF binding, however, resulted in receptors that were endocytosed to a greater extent than wild-type receptors in response to application of AMPA or N-methyl-d-aspartate (NMDA). Conversely, the behavior of the GluR2 mutants incapable of binding to GRIP/ABP suggests that these PDZ proteins play a role in the stabilization of an intracellular pool of AMPARs that have been internalized on stimulation, thus inhibiting their recycling to the synaptic membrane. These results provide further evidence for distinct functional roles of GluR2-interacting proteins in AMPAR trafficking.

  8. Carryover effects of cyclical stretching of the digits on hand function in stroke survivors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Triandafilou, Kristen M; Kamper, Derek G

    2014-08-01

    To investigate the longevity and cumulative impact of multiple sessions of passive, cyclical stretching of the digits on hand function in subacute stroke survivors. Before-after trial with intervention repeated on 3 consecutive days. Research laboratory. Individuals (N=27) with moderate to severe hand impairment, 2 to 6 months (subacute, n=12) and >7 months (chronic, n=15) poststroke. Subjects wore an actuated glove orthosis that cyclically moved their fingers and thumb from a relaxed/flexed posture into neutral extension for 30 minutes on 3 consecutive days. Three hand-specific tasks from the Graded Wolf Motor Function Test, Box and Block Test (BBT), grip strength, and lateral pinch strength. Recordings were taken before stretching and at 3 time points, each separated by 30 minutes after completion of stretching on each day. Significant improvement was observed immediately after the stretching for both groups. Improvements in the subacute group were largely maintained up to 1 hour poststretching, with significant carryover from day to day for some outcomes measures such as the BBT (P=.006) and grip strength (P=.012). In contrast, improvements after stretching for the chronic group were transient, with the changes largely dissipating over time and no significant cumulative effect across days. Cyclical stretching of the digits had a lasting and reinforcing effect on improving hand motor control for subacute stroke survivors. Incorporation of cyclical stretching before active hand therapy may prove to be a beneficial treatment for stroke survivors, especially during the subacute phase of recovery. Copyright © 2014 American Congress of Rehabilitation Medicine. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  9. Reliability of Isometric Knee Extension Muscle Strength Measurements of Healthy Elderly Subjects Made with a Hand-held Dynamometer and a Belt.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Katoh, Munenori; Isozaki, Koji

    2014-12-01

    [Purpose] The purpose of this study was to examine the reliability of three isometric knee extension strength measurements (IKE) made with a hand-held dynamometer (HHD) and a belt of healthy elderly living in the community as subjects. [Subjects] The subject cohort consisted of 186 healthy elderly people, aged 65 to 79 years, living in local communities. [Methods] IKE of the leg subjects used to kick a ball was measured. IKE of each subject was measured three times using an HHD-belt at intervals of 30 seconds. The reliability of the larger of the first two measurements (LV2) as well as the third measurement (3V) was investigated. [Results] The intraclass correlation coefficients [ICC (1, 1)] for LV2 and 3V were 0.955. Bland-Altman analysis showed a fixed bias, and the limits of agreement ranged from -5.6 to 4.6. [Conclusion] The ICC results show that the test-retest reproducibility of IKE measurements of healthy elderly subjects using an HHD-belt is high. However, Bland-Altman analysis showed a fixed bias, suggesting the need for three measurements.

  10. Hand stiffness following distal radius fractures: who gets it and is it a functional problem?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Egol, Kenneth A; Karia, Raj; Zingman, Allissa; Lee, Steve; Paksima, Nader

    2014-01-01

    In order to identify predictors for hand stiffness following distal radius fractures and understand the consequences of this common clinical finding, we studied 260 patients. Our null hypothesis was that we would find no predictors of post injury hand stiffness. Baseline demographics and injury characteristics were obtained at distal radius fracture presentation. Treatment and healing was documented. Stiffness was defined as tip to palm distance greater than 1 cm for any one finger. Outcome parameters obtained at regular intervals included wrist and hand range of motion, radiographs, visual analog pain scales, and Disability of the Arm Shoulder and Hand (DASH) questionnaires. Forty-nine of 260 patients (19%) patients were considered to be "stiff" by our criteria. Grip strength was weaker for stiff patients as well. Patient demographics were similar in both groups with the "stiff" cohort having a greater mean age, p = 0.05. There was no significant difference in stiffness seen in operative cases versus nonoperative cases. Injury ulnar variance was 3.1mm (SD = 3.5) in the "stiff" cohort and 1.8 (SD = 2.9) in the "non-stiff" cohort (p= 0.02). Functional disability as measured by the DASH differed (p = 0.001) between stiff and non-stiff patients for both 6 month and 1 year follow-up time points. Stiff patients were more likely than non-stiff patients to have lower grip strength at 12-month post fracture (p = 0.001). Older patients who present with significant ulnar variance at injury are more likely to experience hand stiffness at some time during their recovery. The development of hand stiffness is associated with poorer functional outcome than those who do not develop stiffness.

  11. Functional magnetic resonance imaging reveals the neural substrates of arm transport and grip formation in reach-to-grasp actions in humans.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cavina-Pratesi, Cristiana; Monaco, Simona; Fattori, Patrizia; Galletti, Claudio; McAdam, Teresa D; Quinlan, Derek J; Goodale, Melvyn A; Culham, Jody C

    2010-08-01

    Picking up a cup requires transporting the arm to the cup (transport component) and preshaping the hand appropriately to grasp the handle (grip component). Here, we used functional magnetic resonance imaging to examine the human neural substrates of the transport component and its relationship with the grip component. Participants were shown three-dimensional objects placed either at a near location, adjacent to the hand, or at a far location, within reach but not adjacent to the hand. Participants performed three tasks at each location as follows: (1) touching the object with the knuckles of the right hand; (2) grasping the object with the right hand; or (3) passively viewing the object. The transport component was manipulated by positioning the object in the far versus the near location. The grip component was manipulated by asking participants to grasp the object versus touching it. For the first time, we have identified the neural substrates of the transport component, which include the superior parieto-occipital cortex and the rostral superior parietal lobule. Consistent with past studies, we found specialization for the grip component in bilateral anterior intraparietal sulcus and left ventral premotor cortex; now, however, we also find activity for the grasp even when no transport is involved. In addition to finding areas specialized for the transport and grip components in parietal cortex, we found an integration of the two components in dorsal premotor cortex and supplementary motor areas, two regions that may be important for the coordination of reach and grasp.

  12. Golf Injuries to the Hand, Wrist, or Elbow

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Z Videos Infographics Symptom Picker Anatomy Bones Joints Muscles Nerves Vessels Tendons About Hand Surgery What is a Hand Surgeon? What is ... by exercises designed to stretch and strengthen the muscles and tendons, which can be recommended by a hand therapist. Changing grips on the golf club may ...

  13. Acute effect of whole body vibration on isometric strength, squat jump, and flexibility in well-trained combat athletes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cem Kurt

    2015-02-01

    Full Text Available The purpose of this study was to investigate the effect of whole body vibration (WBV training on maximal strength, squat jump, and flexibility of well-trained combat athletes. Twelve female and 8 male combat athletes (age: 22.8 ± 3.1 years, mass: 65.4 ± 10.7 kg, height: 168.8 ± 8.8 cm, training experience: 11.6 ± 4.7 years, training volume: 9.3 ± 2.8 hours/week participated in this study. The study consisted of three sessions separated by 48 hours. The first session was conducted for familiarization. In the subsequent two sessions, participants performed WBV or sham intervention in a randomized, balanced order. During WBV intervention, four isometric exercises were performed (26 Hz, 4 mm. During the sham intervention, participants performed the same WBV intervention without vibration treatment (0 Hz, 0 mm. Hand grip, squat jump, trunk flexion, and isometric leg strength tests were performed after each intervention. The results of a two-factor (pre-post[2] × intervention[2] repeated measures ANOVA revealed a significant interaction (p = 0.018 of pre-post × intervention only for the hand grip test, indicating a significant performance increase of moderate effect (net increase of 2.48%, d = 0.61 after WBV intervention. Squat jump, trunk flexion, and isometric leg strength performances were not affected by WBV. In conclusion, the WBV protocol used in this study potentiated hand grip performance, but did not enhance squat jump, trunk flexion, or isometric leg strength in well-trained combat athletes.

  14. Follow-up of volar plate interposition arthroplasty (Tupper) of the metacarpophalangeal joints in rheumatoid hands: preliminary findings

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Gøtze, J P; Jensen, Claus Hjorth

    2000-01-01

    We present the results of a three-year follow-up study of 59 interposition volar plate arthroplasties (Tupper) on metacarpophalangeal joints in 13 patients with erosive rheumatoid arthritis. The median age at the time of operation was 60 years (range 45-77). All patients reported lasting pain...... relief at rest. Improvement of hand function was, however, less satisfactory as both grip and pinch strength were compromised in all patients. Seven patients were satisfied with the outcome whereas six complained of stiffness in the operated joints. All but one patient concluded that they would have...

  15. Mind your hand during the energy crunch: Functional Outcome of Circular Saw Hand Injuries

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Frank Matthias

    2010-09-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Although injuries due to circular saws are very common all over the world, there is surprisingly little information available about their functional outcomes. As the socioeconomic impact of these injuries is immense and determined by the casualties' disability and impairment, it is the objective of this study to present data on the functional outcome, disability, and impairment of hand injuries due to electric circular saws. Methods Patients treated from 1999 through 2007 for circular saw-related hand injuries were contacted and asked for clinical follow-up assessment. The clinical follow-up protocol consisted of a physical examination and an assessment of static muscle power (grip and pinch strength. For assessment of the subjective experience of the patients regarding their injury-related disability and impairment, the DASH follow-up questionnaire was used. The occupational impact of these injuries was measured by number of lost working days. Finally, safety-related behaviour of the patients was investigated. Results 114 Patients were followed-up on average 52 months after the injury. Average in-house treatment was 8.8 days. Average time lost from work was 14.8 weeks. A significant reduction of static muscle testing parameters compared with the uninjured hand was revealed for grip strength, tip pinch, key pinch, and palmar pinch. Average DASH score was 17.4 (DASH work 15.8, DASH sports/music 17.7. Most patients had more than ten years experience in using these power tools. Conclusion The everyday occurrence of circular saw-related hand injuries followed by relatively short periods of in-house treatment might distort the real dimension of the patients' remaining disability and impairment. While the trauma surgeon's view is generally confined to the patients' clinical course, the outcome parameters in this follow-up investigation, with loss of working time as the key factor, confirm that the whole socioeconomic burden is much

  16. Evaluation of the Relationship Between Hand Osteoarthritis and Osteoporosis in Postmenauposal Women

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Oya Özdemir

    2013-04-01

    Full Text Available Aim: Osteoarthritis (OA and osteoporosis (OP are the two leading causes of disability in elderly. The aim of this study was to compare the values of bone mineral density (BMD in postmenopausal women with and without hand OA. Meterial and Methods: 26 patient with hand OA and 22 age and sex-matched individuals without hand OA were included in the study. The patients with secondary OP and under the treatment of OP were excluded. In physical examination, the number of tender and swollen joints, Heberden and Bouchard nodules were recorded. The participants’ grip and lateral pinch strength were measured using Jamar dynamometer and pinchmeter. The Australian Canadian Osteoarthritis Hand Index (AUSCAN was used to evaluate pain and function. Additionally, the pain during rest and activity were evaluated on a 10-cm visual analog scale (VAS. BMD was measured from 3 different regions (femur neck, lumbar vertebra, and radius using dual energy X-ray absorptiometry. Results: The mean age of the patients’ was 59.0±6.1 years and 84.6% were right-handed. No signi cant difference was found in BMD values of the femur neck, lumbar vertebra between the two groups. However, the patients with hand OA had signi cantly lower t-scores of distal radius (p=0.045. There was no statistically signi cant correlation between distal radius t-score and age, body mass index, postmenopausal duration, right hand pinch strength, number of nodules in the right hand, pain duration, VAS rest and activity scores, AUSCAN pain, stiffness and function scores whereas we found a positive correlation between distal radius t-score and right hand grip strength in the patient group (r=0.478, p=0.016. Conclusion: Several studies investigating the relationship between hand OA and OP found positive correlation whereas some found negative correlation. We found an inverse relationship between hand OA and distal radius t-score. Further studies are needed to enlighten the pathogenesis of

  17. Microspine Gripping Mechanism for Asteroid Capture

    Science.gov (United States)

    Merriam, Ezekiel G.; Berg, Andrew B.; Willig, Andrew; Parness, Aaron; Frey, Tim; Howell, Larry L.

    2016-01-01

    This paper details the development and early testing of a compliant suspension for a microspine gripper device for asteroid capture or micro-gravity percussive drilling. The microspine gripper architecture is reviewed, and a proposed microspine suspension design is presented and discussed. Prototyping methods are discussed, as well as testing methods and results. A path forward is identified from the results of the testing completed thus far. Key findings include: the microspine concept has been established as a valid architecture and the compliant suspension exhibits the desired stiffness characteristics for good gripping behavior. These developments will aid in developing the capability to grasp irregularly shaped boulders in micro-gravity.

  18. Analysis list: Grip1 [Chip-atlas[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available Grip1 Blood + mm9 http://dbarchive.biosciencedbc.jp/kyushu-u/mm9/target/Grip1.1.tsv... http://dbarchive.biosciencedbc.jp/kyushu-u/mm9/target/Grip1.5.tsv http://dbarchive.biosciencedbc.jp/kyushu-u/mm9/target/Gri...p1.10.tsv http://dbarchive.biosciencedbc.jp/kyushu-u/mm9/colo/Grip1.Blood.tsv http://dbarchive.biosciencedbc.jp/kyushu-u/mm9/colo/Blood.gml ...

  19. Cortical activation during power grip task with pneumatic pressure gauge: an fMRI study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mohamad, M.; Mardan, N. H.; Ismail, S. S.

    2017-05-01

    Aging is associated with a decline in cognitive and motor function. But, the relationships with motor performance are less well understood. In this study, functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI) was used to assess cortical activation in older adults. This study employed power grip task that utilised block paradigm consisted of alternate 30s rest and active. A visual cue was used to pace the hand grip movement that clenched a cylindrical rubber bulb connected with pressure pneumatic gauge that measure the pressure (Psi). The objective of this study is determined the brain areas activated during motor task and the correlation between percentage signal change of each motor area (BA 4 and 6) and hand grip pressure. Result showed there was a significant difference in mean percentage signal change in BA 4 and BA 6 in both hemispheres and negative correlation obtained in BA 4 and BA 6. These results indicate that a reduced ability in the motor networks contribute to age-related decline in motor performance.

  20. Heuristic control of the Utah/MIT dextrous robot hand

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bass, Andrew H., Jr.

    1987-01-01

    Basic hand grips and sensor interactions that a dextrous robot hand will need as part of the operation of an EVA Retriever are analyzed. What is to be done with a dextrous robot hand is examined along with how such a complex machine might be controlled. It was assumed throughout that an anthropomorphic robot hand should perform tasks just as a human would; i.e., the most efficient approach to developing control strategies for the hand would be to model actual hand actions and do the same tasks in the same ways. Therefore, basic hand grips that human hands perform, as well as hand grip action were analyzed. It was also important to examine what is termed sensor fusion. This is the integration of various disparate sensor feedback paths. These feedback paths can be spatially and temporally separated, as well as, of different sensor types. Neural networks are seen as a means of integrating these varied sensor inputs and types. Basic heuristics of hand actions and grips were developed. These heuristics offer promise of control dextrous robot hands in a more natural and efficient way.

  1. Adaptive Human Control Gains During Precision Grip

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Erik D. Engeberg

    2013-03-01

    Full Text Available Eight human test subjects attempted to track a desired position trajectory with an instrumented manipulandum (MN. The test subjects used the MN with three different levels of stiffness. A transfer function was developed to represent the human application of a precision grip from the data when the test subjects initially displaced the MN so as to learn the position mapping from the MN onto the display. Another transfer function was formed from the data of the remainder of the experiments, after significant displacement of the MN occurred. Both of these transfer functions accurately modelled the system dynamics for a portion of the experiments, but neither was accurate for the duration of the experiments because the human grip dynamics changed while learning the position mapping. Thus, an adaptive system model was developed to describe the learning process of the human test subjects as they displaced the MN in order to gain knowledge of the position mapping. The adaptive system model was subsequently validated following comparison with the human test subject data. An examination of the average absolute error between the position predicted by the adaptive model and the actual experimental data yielded an overall average error of 0.34mm for all three levels of stiffness.

  2. Hand to hand.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bedell, Susanna E; Graboys, Thomas B

    2002-08-01

    Examination of the hands has the potential to transform the encounter between physician and patient. Taking the hands conveys a sense of warmth and connectedness and is a means to communicate the physician's mindfulness. The hands can focus the examination on the individual patient as a complete human being, and not merely a disease or a collection of symptoms. The hands provide readily accessible information that may not be available through other evaluations, and they offer clues to a patient's physical and mental health. Commonplace observations, such as those revealed in the hands, can unravel medical mysteries and provide profound clinical insights.

  3. Biometric verification based on grip-pattern recognition

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Veldhuis, Raymond; Bazen, Asker; Kauffman, Joost; Hartel, Pieter

    2004-01-01

    This paper describes the design, implementation and evaluation of a user-verification system for a smart gun, which is based on grip-pattern recognition. An existing pressure sensor consisting of an array of 44 £ 44 piezoresistive elements is used to measure the grip pattern. An interface has been d

  4. Biometric verification based on grip-pattern recognition

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Veldhuis, Raymond N.J.; Bazen, A.M.; Kauffman, J.A.; Hartel, Pieter H.; Delp, Edward J.; Wong, Ping W.

    This paper describes the design, implementation and evaluation of a user-verification system for a smart gun, which is based on grip-pattern recognition. An existing pressure sensor consisting of an array of 44 x 44 piezoresistive elements is used to measure the grip pattern. An interface has been

  5. Grip-pattern verification for a smart gun

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Shang, X.; Groenland, J.P.J.; Groenland, J.P.J.; Veldhuis, Raymond N.J.

    In the biometric verification system of a smart gun, the rightful user of the gun is recognized based on grip-pattern recognition. It was found that the verification performance of grip-pattern recognition degrades strongly when the data for training and testing the classifier, respectively, have

  6. Efficacy of paraffin bath therapy in hand osteoarthritis: a single-blinded randomized controlled trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dilek, Banu; Gözüm, Mehtap; Şahin, Ebru; Baydar, Meltem; Ergör, Gül; El, Ozlem; Bircan, Çigdem; Gülbahar, Selmin

    2013-04-01

    To evaluate the efficacy of paraffin bath therapy on pain, function, and muscle strength in patients with hand osteoarthritis. Prospective single-blinded randomized controlled trial. Department of physical medicine and rehabilitation in a university hospital. Patients with bilateral hand osteoarthritis (N=56). Patients were randomized into 2 groups with a random number table by using block randomization with 4 patients in a block. Group 1 (n=29) had paraffin bath therapy (5 times per week, for 3-week duration) for both hands. Group 2 (n=27) was the control group. All patients were informed about joint-protection techniques, and paracetamol intake was recorded. The primary outcome measures were pain (at last 48h) at rest and during activities of daily living (ADL), assessed with a visual analog scale (0-10cm) at 12 weeks. The secondary outcome measures were the Australian Canadian Osteoarthritis Hand Index (AUSCAN) and the Dreiser Functional Index (DFI), used for subjective functional evaluation, loss of range of motion (ROM), grip and pinch strength, painful and tender joint counts, and paracetamol intake. A researcher blind to group allocation recorded the measures for both hands at baseline, 3 weeks, and 12 weeks at the hospital setting. At baseline, there were no significant differences between groups in any of the parameters (P>.05). After treatment, the paraffin group exhibited significant improvement in pain at rest and during ADL, ROM of the right hand, and pain and stiffness dimensions of the AUSCAN (P.05). The control group showed a significant deterioration in right hand grip and bilateral lateral pinch and right chuck pinch strength (Pparaffin group (Pparaffin group were significantly higher than the control group at 12 weeks (PParaffin bath therapy seemed to be effective both in reducing pain and tenderness and maintaining muscle strength in hand osteoarthritis. It may be regarded as a beneficial short-term therapy option, which is effective for a 12

  7. Study on the collision-mechanical properties of tomatoes gripped by ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    STORAGESEVER

    2009-12-15

    Dec 15, 2009 ... The data of collision-mechanical property of tomatoes gripped by robot fingers are important for the gripping control of .... Figure 2a shows the process of robot fingers gripping tomato. ..... Drop test simulation of a sample.

  8. Rehabilitation of the hand in tetraplegics.

    OpenAIRE

    Mukherjee, D. J.

    1981-01-01

    Fifty cases of tetraplegia have been treated in the Spinal Cord Injury Centre, Military Hospital, Kirkee, during the past 4 years. Twelve patients have been treated by tendon transfer of the hand to give a pinch grip. They have been made more independent and can be rehabilitated better socially. This has been found better than using any splint continuously.

  9. Multiple intramedullary nailing of proximal phalangeal fractures of hand

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Patankar Hemant

    2008-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: Proximal phalangeal fractures are commonly encountered fractures in the hand. Majority of them are stable and can be treated by non-operative means. However, unstable fractures i.e. those with shortening, displacement, angulation, rotational deformity or segmental fractures need surgical intervention. This prospective study was undertaken to evaluate the functional outcome after surgical stabilization of these fractures with joint-sparing multiple intramedullary nailing technique. Materials and Methods: Thirty-five patients with 35 isolated unstable proximal phalangeal shaft fractures of hand were managed by surgical stabilization with multiple intramedullary nailing technique. Fractures of the thumb were excluded. All the patients were followed up for a minimum of six months. They were assessed radiologically and clinically. The clinical evaluation was based on two criteria. 1. total active range of motion for digital functional assessment as suggested by the American Society for Surgery of Hand and 2. grip strength. Results: All the patients showed radiological union at six weeks. The overall results were excellent in all the patients. Adventitious bursitis was observed at the point of insertion of nails in one patient. Conclusion: Joint-sparing multiple intramedullary nailing of unstable proximal phalangeal fractures of hand provides satisfactory results with good functional outcome and fewer complications.

  10. Improved Friction Joint With Self-Locking Grips

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Costache, Andrei; Glejbøl, Kristian; Sivebæk, Ion Marius

    2016-01-01

    Flexible risers are used in the oil industry to transport liquids and gas from the seafloorto extraction and production equipment at the sea surface. Ongoing research aims at using composite materials instead of steel, in order to reduce weight and increase stiffness. Ensuring an optimal load...... transfer between the composite and metal components is very important. This paper presents an improved method for anchoring a flat fiber reinforced tendon using a double grip system with self-locking grips. The novelty is the combination of new experimental results and finite element (FE) analysis...... to develop asuperior dry friction grip. Experimental results are carried using a dedicated test setup, through which the test parameters can be accurately controlled. The efficiency of the grip system during pullout is superior to results obtained with flat grips. Numerical results offer an in...

  11. Influência de um programa de atividade física de longa duração sobre a força muscular manual e a flexibilidade corporal de mulheres idosas Influence of a long-term physical activity program on hand muscle strength and body flexibility among elderly women

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    JR Rebelatto

    2006-01-01

    period, three times a week, lasting 50-55 minutes each. During this period, four measurements of hand muscle strength were made, using a pressure manometer, and also of body flexibility, using the sit and reach test. The data were analyzed using ANOVA with repeated measurements. Results: There were no significant differences in relation to either muscle strength or flexibility (p=0.005. Conclusions: The program contributed towards maintaining hand grip strength over the two-year period. For body flexibility, the data indicate the need to reprogram the exercises aimed at developing this capacity.

  12. High level swimming performance and its relation to non-specific parameters: a cross-sectional study on maximum handgrip isometric strength.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Garrido, Nuno D; Silva, António J; Fernandes, Ricardo J; Barbosa, Tiago M; Costa, Aldo M; Marinho, Daniel A; Marques, Mário C

    2012-06-01

    The relationship between handgrip isometric strength and swimming performance was assessed in the four competitive swimming strokes in swimmers of different age groups and of both sexes. 78 national-level Portuguese swimmers (39 males, 39 females) were selected for this study. Grip strength, previously used as a marker of overall strength to predict future swimming performance, was measured using a hand dynamometer. The best competitive time at 100 and 200 m in all four swimming strokes were converted into 2010 FINA points. Non-parametric tests were used to evaluate differences between groups. Pearson product-moment correlations were computed to verify the association between variables. Handgrip maximum isometric strength was significantly correlated with swimming performance, particularly among female swimmers. Among female age group swimmers, the relationship between handgrip and 100-m freestyle was significant. Handgrip isometric strength seems to be related to swimming performance, especially to 100-m freestyle and in female swimmers. For all other distances and strokes, technique and training probably are more influential than semi-hereditary strength markers such as grip strength.

  13. Stature is an essential predictor of muscle strength in children

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    Hogrel Jean-Yves

    2012-09-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Children with growth retardation or short stature generally present with lower strength than children of the same chronological age. The aim of the study was to establish if strength was dependent on variables related to stature in a population of healthy children and to propose practical predictive models for the muscle functions tested. A secondary aim was to test for any learning effects concerning strength measured at two successive visits by children. Methods Hand grip, elbow flexion and extension, and knee flexion and extension were measured by fixed dynamometry in 96 healthy subjects (47 girls and 49 boys, aged from 5 to 17 years. Results For the present paediatric population, muscle strength was highly dependent on height. Predictive models are proposed for the muscle functions tested. No learning effect between the first and the second visit was detected for any of the muscle functions tested. Conclusions This work shows that strength measurements using fixed dynamometry are reliable in children when using appropriate standardization of operating procedures. It underlines the particular relationship between body stature and muscle strength. Predictive equations may help with assessing the neuromuscular involvement in children suffering from various disorders, particularly those affecting their stature.

  14. Creative mechanism design for a prosthetic hand.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chang, Wen-Tung; Tseng, Ching-Huan; Wu, Long-Long

    2004-01-01

    In this paper, an auxiliary methodology called the creative mechanism design is introduced into the innovation of gripping devices for prosthetic hands. This methodology is a systematic approach based on modification of existing devices for the generation of all possible topological structures of mechanisms and mechanical devices. An existing gripping device (Teh Lin ATG-5F prosthetic hand) constructed by a planar six-bar linkage with one degree of freedom is dealt with by using this methodology. Through the processes of generalization, number synthesis, specialization and particularization for the existing design, five new mechanisms are created in this study to apply to anthropomorphic prosthetic hands. The results show that the methodology for creative mechanism design is a powerful tool for creating new categories of mechanisms to avoid existing designs that have patent protection and can help designers in the conceptual phase. Also, this methodology is validated as a useful way to improve prosthetic hands for amputees.

  15. Modeling the Maturation of Grip Selection Planning and Action Representation: Insights from Typical and Atypical Motor Development.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ian eFuelscher

    2016-02-01

    Full Text Available We investigated the purported association between developmental changes in grip selection planning and improvements in an individual’s capacity to represent action at an internal level (i.e., motor imagery. Participants were groups of healthy children aged 6-7 years and 8-12 years respectively, while a group of adolescents (13-17 years and adults (18-34 years allowed for consideration of childhood development in the broader context of motor maturation. A group of children aged 8-12 years with probable DCD (pDCD was included as a reference group for atypical motor development. Participants’ proficiency to generate and/or engage internal action representations was inferred from performance on the hand rotation task, a well-validated measure of motor imagery. A grip selection task designed to elicit the end-state comfort (ESC effect provided a window into the integrity of grip selection planning. Consistent with earlier accounts, the efficiency of grip selection planning followed a non-linear developmental progression in neurotypical individuals. As expected, analysis confirmed that these developmental improvements were predicted by an increased capacity to generate and/or engage internal action representations. The profile of this association remained stable throughout the (typical developmental spectrum. These findings are consistent with computational accounts of action planning that argue that internal action representations are associated with the expression and development of grip selection planning across typical development. However, no such association was found for our sample of children with pDCD, suggesting that individuals with atypical motor skill may adopt an alternative, sub-optimal strategy to plan their grip selection compared to their same-age control peers.

  16. Modeling the Maturation of Grip Selection Planning and Action Representation: Insights from Typical and Atypical Motor Development

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fuelscher, Ian; Williams, Jacqueline; Wilmut, Kate; Enticott, Peter G.; Hyde, Christian

    2016-01-01

    We investigated the purported association between developmental changes in grip selection planning and improvements in an individual’s capacity to represent action at an internal level [i.e., motor imagery (MI)]. Participants were groups of healthy children aged 6–7 years and 8–12 years respectively, while a group of adolescents (13–17 years) and adults (18–34 years) allowed for consideration of childhood development in the broader context of motor maturation. A group of children aged 8–12 years with probable DCD (pDCD) was included as a reference group for atypical motor development. Participants’ proficiency to generate and/or engage internal action representations was inferred from performance on the hand rotation task, a well-validated measure of MI. A grip selection task designed to elicit the end-state comfort (ESC) effect provided a window into the integrity of grip selection planning. Consistent with earlier accounts, the efficiency of grip selection planning followed a non-linear developmental progression in neurotypical individuals. As expected, analysis confirmed that these developmental improvements were predicted by an increased capacity to generate and/or engage internal action representations. The profile of this association remained stable throughout the (typical) developmental spectrum. These findings are consistent with computational accounts of action planning that argue that internal action representations are associated with the expression and development of grip selection planning across typical development. However, no such association was found for our sample of children with pDCD, suggesting that individuals with atypical motor skill may adopt an alternative, sub-optimal strategy to plan their grip selection compared to their same-age control peers. PMID:26903915

  17. Effects of Ving Tsun Chinese Martial Art Training on Upper Extremity Muscle Strength and Eye-Hand Coordination in Community-Dwelling Middle-Aged and Older Adults: A Pilot Study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ng, Shamay S. M.; Cheng, Yoyo T. Y.; Yu, Esther Y. T.; Chow, Gary C. C.; Chak, Yvonne T. C.; Chan, Ivy K. Y.; Zhang, Joni; Macfarlane, Duncan

    2016-01-01

    Objectives. To evaluate the effects of Ving Tsun (VT) martial art training on the upper extremity muscle strength and eye-hand coordination of middle-aged and older adults. Methods. This study used a nonequivalent pretest-posttest control group design. Forty-two community-dwelling healthy adults participated in the study; 24 (mean age ± SD = 68.5 ± 6.7 years) underwent VT training for 4 weeks (a supervised VT session twice a week, plus daily home practice), and 18 (mean age ± SD = 72.0 ± 6.7 years) received no VT training and acted as controls. Shoulder and elbow isometric muscle strength and eye-hand coordination were evaluated using the Lafayette Manual Muscle Test System and a computerized finger-pointing test, respectively. Results. Elbow extensor peak force increased by 13.9% (P = 0.007) in the VT group and the time to reach peak force decreased (9.9%) differentially in the VT group compared to the control group (P = 0.033). For the eye-hand coordination assessment outcomes, reaction time increased by 2.9% in the VT group and decreased by 5.3% in the control group (P = 0.002). Conclusions. Four weeks of VT training could improve elbow extensor isometric peak force and the time to reach peak force but not eye-hand coordination in community-dwelling middle-aged and older adults. PMID:27525020

  18. Effects of Ving Tsun Chinese Martial Art Training on Upper Extremity Muscle Strength and Eye-Hand Coordination in Community-Dwelling Middle-Aged and Older Adults: A Pilot Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fong, Shirley S M; Ng, Shamay S M; Cheng, Yoyo T Y; Wong, Janet Y H; Yu, Esther Y T; Chow, Gary C C; Chak, Yvonne T C; Chan, Ivy K Y; Zhang, Joni; Macfarlane, Duncan; Chung, Louisa M Y

    2016-01-01

    Objectives. To evaluate the effects of Ving Tsun (VT) martial art training on the upper extremity muscle strength and eye-hand coordination of middle-aged and older adults. Methods. This study used a nonequivalent pretest-posttest control group design. Forty-two community-dwelling healthy adults participated in the study; 24 (mean age ± SD = 68.5 ± 6.7 years) underwent VT training for 4 weeks (a supervised VT session twice a week, plus daily home practice), and 18 (mean age ± SD = 72.0 ± 6.7 years) received no VT training and acted as controls. Shoulder and elbow isometric muscle strength and eye-hand coordination were evaluated using the Lafayette Manual Muscle Test System and a computerized finger-pointing test, respectively. Results. Elbow extensor peak force increased by 13.9% (P = 0.007) in the VT group and the time to reach peak force decreased (9.9%) differentially in the VT group compared to the control group (P = 0.033). For the eye-hand coordination assessment outcomes, reaction time increased by 2.9% in the VT group and decreased by 5.3% in the control group (P = 0.002). Conclusions. Four weeks of VT training could improve elbow extensor isometric peak force and the time to reach peak force but not eye-hand coordination in community-dwelling middle-aged and older adults.

  19. Effects of Ving Tsun Chinese Martial Art Training on Upper Extremity Muscle Strength and Eye-Hand Coordination in Community-Dwelling Middle-Aged and Older Adults: A Pilot Study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shirley S. M. Fong

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Objectives. To evaluate the effects of Ving Tsun (VT martial art training on the upper extremity muscle strength and eye-hand coordination of middle-aged and older adults. Methods. This study used a nonequivalent pretest-posttest control group design. Forty-two community-dwelling healthy adults participated in the study; 24 (mean age ± SD = 68.5±6.7 years underwent VT training for 4 weeks (a supervised VT session twice a week, plus daily home practice, and 18 (mean age ± SD = 72.0±6.7 years received no VT training and acted as controls. Shoulder and elbow isometric muscle strength and eye-hand coordination were evaluated using the Lafayette Manual Muscle Test System and a computerized finger-pointing test, respectively. Results. Elbow extensor peak force increased by 13.9% (P=0.007 in the VT group and the time to reach peak force decreased (9.9% differentially in the VT group compared to the control group (P=0.033. For the eye-hand coordination assessment outcomes, reaction time increased by 2.9% in the VT group and decreased by 5.3% in the control group (P=0.002. Conclusions. Four weeks of VT training could improve elbow extensor isometric peak force and the time to reach peak force but not eye-hand coordination in community-dwelling middle-aged and older adults.

  20. Robot-Assisted Training of Arm and Hand Movement Shows Functional Improvements for Incomplete Cervical Spinal Cord Injury.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Francisco, Gerard E; Yozbatiran, Nuray; Berliner, Jeffrey; OʼMalley, Marcia K; Pehlivan, Ali Utku; Kadivar, Zahra; Fitle, Kyle; Boake, Corwin

    2017-10-01

    The aim of the study was to demonstrate the feasibility, tolerability, and effectiveness of robotic-assisted arm training in incomplete chronic tetraplegia. Pretest/posttest/follow-up was conducted. Ten individuals with chronic cervical spinal cord injury were enrolled. Participants performed single degree-of-freedom exercise of upper limbs at an intensity of 3-hr per session for 3 times a week for 4 wks with MAHI Exo-II. Arm and hand function tests (Jebsen-Taylor Hand Function Test, Action Research Arm Test), strength of upper limb (upper limb motor score, grip, and pinch strength), and independence in daily living activities (Spinal Cord Independence Measure II) were performed at baseline, end of training, and 6 mos later. After 12 sessions of training, improvements in arm and hand functions were observed. Jebsen-Taylor Hand Function Test (0.14[0.04]-0.21[0.07] items/sec, P = 0.04), Action Research Arm Test (30.7[3.8]-34.3[4], P = 0.02), American Spinal Injury Association upper limb motor score (31.5[2.3]-34[2.3], P = 0.04) grip (9.7[3.8]-12[4.3] lb, P = 0.02), and pinch strength (4.5[1.1]-5.7[1.2] lb, P = 0.01) resulted in significant increases. Some gains were maintained at 6 mos. No change in Spinal Cord Independence Measure II scores and no adverse events were observed. Results from this pilot study suggest that repetitive training of arm movements with MAHI Exo-II exoskeleton is safe and has potential to be an adjunct treatment modality in rehabilitation of persons with spinal cord injury with mild to moderate impaired arm functions.

  1. 便携式电子测力计在肌力评定中的应用进展%Application Progress of Hand-held Dynamometry in Muscle Strength Assessment

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    关润泽; 赵鹏

    2016-01-01

    Objective and accurate evaluation of muscle strength is the core foundation of developing rehabil⁃itation programs, determining the rehabilitation goals, evaluating the treatment effects. Understand the lat⁃est research results of muscle strength testing, comparative study of manual muscle testing and isokinetic testing, hand-held dynamometer testing of a variety of muscle strength method. Results showed that hand-held dynamometer testing compared to traditional manual muscle strength testing more quantitative, and hand-held dynamometer muscle strength measurement value associated with isokinetic testing of strong(r=0.91),and the easy to operate, strong applicability, can effectively discharge effect on muscle strength assess⁃ment of muscular tension. View of hand-held dynamometer with merits of quantitative, accurate and easy to carry, can be widely used in rehabilitation assessment, screening function and monitoring training effect, so as to improve the effectiveness of rehabilitation.%客观准确地肌力评定,是制定康复治疗计划、确定康复目标、评价治疗效果的核心基石。了解现阶段肌力检测的最新研究成果,对比研究徒手肌力检测、等速仪器测试、便携式电子测力计测试等多种肌力检测方法。结果显示,便携式电子测力计相对于传统徒手肌力检测更为量化;同时便携式电子测力计肌力测量值与等速仪器测试相关性较强(r=0.91),且易于操作,应用性较强,能有效排出肌张力对肌力评定的影响。因而鉴于便携式电子测力计有定量、精确和便于携带的优点,能广泛应用于康复评定、功能筛查和训练效果监控过程中。

  2. The contribution of the palmaris longus muscle to the strength of thumb abduction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gangata, Hope; Ndou, Robert; Louw, Graham

    2010-05-01

    The palmaris longus muscle (PLM) is described as a weak flexor of the wrist and a tensor of the palmar aponeurosis, but not a thumb abductor. The PLM is believed to aid thumb abduction through its insertion onto the thenar eminence. Two groups, both right hand dominant, were selected from 1,200 sampled participants. The first group comprised of 38 subjects with unilateral presence of the PLM and was used to determine the strength of thumb abduction. The second group comprised of 30 subjects, with bilateral presence of the PLM, and it was used to calculate the effects of hand dominance. A significant number of subjects with bilateral absence of the PLM were observed and undocumented. Using a dynamometer in subjects with unilateral presence of the PLM, the force of thumb abduction was significantly greater on the hand with a PLM than the one without it (P = 0.014), irrespective of hand dominance. In the second sample with bilateral PLM, thumb abduction on the dominant hand was 10% stronger than on the nondominant hand and was similar to the universally accepted average of 10% increase in grip strength of the dominant hand. Thus, 10% was deducted from all the dominant hands, and the force of thumb abduction remained greater on the hand with PLM than the hand without it (P = 0.049). The results of this study demonstrated the PLM to be involved in thumb abduction, and the authors therefore recommend that this action of the muscle be universally accepted by anatomists and hand surgeons.

  3. Using goal- and grip-related information for understanding the correctness of other's actions: an ERP study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    van Elk, Michiel; Bousardt, Roel; Bekkering, Harold; van Schie, Hein T

    2012-01-01

    Detecting errors in other's actions is of pivotal importance for joint action, competitive behavior and observational learning. Although many studies have focused on the neural mechanisms involved in detecting low-level errors, relatively little is known about error-detection in everyday situations. The present study aimed to identify the functional and neural mechanisms whereby we understand the correctness of other's actions involving well-known objects (e.g. pouring coffee in a cup). Participants observed action sequences in which the correctness of the object grasped and the grip applied to a pair of objects were independently manipulated. Observation of object violations (e.g. grasping the empty cup instead of the coffee pot) resulted in a stronger P3-effect than observation of grip errors (e.g. grasping the coffee pot at the upper part instead of the handle), likely reflecting a reorienting response, directing attention to the relevant location. Following the P3-effect, a parietal slow wave positivity was observed that persisted for grip-errors, likely reflecting the detection of an incorrect hand-object interaction. These findings provide new insight in the functional significance of the neurophysiological markers associated with the observation of incorrect actions and suggest that the P3-effect and the subsequent parietal slow wave positivity may reflect the detection of errors at different levels in the action hierarchy. Thereby this study elucidates the cognitive processes that support the detection of action violations in the selection of objects and grips.

  4. Grip op werkstress. Mindfulness ontstresst maatschappelijk werkers

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jen van Horen

    2014-03-01

    Full Text Available Taking control over work related stress. Mindfulness destresses social workersStress is a major social problem. Due to the increasing workload and the content of the work, social workers are at risk to develop stress (symptoms. The physical and psychological consequences of prolonged stress are serious. By living healthy, optimize working conditions and applying mindfulness, stress can be reduced. Mindfulness is an effective and useful way to reduce stress. It increases the resistance of workers against stress, improves brainfunctions and therefore has a positive effect on the performance. These effects are great, but they are still weakly methodologically substantiated. A pilot project within the youthcare though, was enthusiastically received and proves to be effective against stress symptoms. The exercises that are part of this pilot fit well with the needs of employees. For organizations mindfulnesstrainings are a time-and cost-effective way of structural stress prevention.Grip op werkstress. Mindfulness ontstresst maatschappelijk werkersStress is een omvangrijk maatschappelijk probleem. Door de toenemende werkdruk en de inhoud van het werk zijn maatschappelijk werkers een risicogroep om stress en stressklachten te ontwikkelen. De fysieke en psychische gevolgen die langdurige stress met zich meebrengt zijn ernstig. Door gezond te leven, de arbeidsomstandigheden te optimaliseren en mindfulness toe te passen kan stress terug worden gedrongen. Mindfulness is een effectieve en bruikbare manier om stress te verminderen. Het vergroot de weerbaarheid van werknemers tegen stress, het verbetert de hersenwerking en heeft daardoor een positief effect op het functioneren. Grote effecten dus, maar wel nog methodologisch zwak onderbouwd. Een pilot binnen de jeugdzorg op het gebied van mindfulness is enthousiast ontvangen en blijkt effectief tegen stressklachten. De oefeningen die onderdeel uitmaken van deze pilot sluiten goed aan bij de behoeften van

  5. Screen-based sedentary behavior, physical activity, and muscle strength in the English longitudinal study of ageing.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mark Hamer

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Sarcopenia is associated with loss of independence and ill-health in the elderly although the causes remain poorly understood. We examined the association between two screen-based leisure time sedentary activities (daily TV viewing time and internet use and muscle strength. METHODS AND RESULTS: We studied 6228 men and women (aged 64.9 ± 9.1 yrs from wave 4 (2008-09 of the English Longitudinal Study of Ageing, a prospective study of community dwelling older adults. Muscle strength was assessed by a hand grip test and the time required to complete five chair rises. TV viewing and internet usage were inversely associated with one another. Participants viewing TV ≥ 6 hrs/d had lower grip strength (Men, B = -1.20 kg, 95% CI, -2.26, -0.14; Women, -0.75 kg, 95% CI, -1.48, -0.03 in comparison to <2 hrs/d TV, after adjustment for age, physical activity, smoking, alcohol, chronic disease, disability, depressive symptoms, social status, and body mass index. In contrast, internet use was associated with higher grip strength (Men, B = 2.43 kg, 95% CI, 1.74, 3.12; Women, 0.76 kg, 95% CI, 0.32, 1.20. These associations persisted after mutual adjustment for both types of sedentary behaviour. CONCLUSIONS: In older adults, the association between sedentary activities and physical function is context specific (TV viewing vs. computer use. Adverse effects of TV viewing might reflect the prolonged sedentary nature of this behavior.

  6. Comparing the Impact of Specific Strength Training vs General Fitness Training on Professional Symphony Orchestra Musicians

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nygaard Andersen, Lotte; Mann, Stephanie; Juul-Kristensen, Birgit

    2017-01-01

    Musculoskeletal symptoms, especially in the upper body, are frequent among professional symphony orchestra musicians. Physical exercise may relieve pain but might also interfere with playing performance. OBJECTIVE: To evaluate the feasibility and effect of "specific strength training" (SST) versus...... "general fitness training" (GFT). METHODS: A feasibility study using randomized controlled methods. Primarily, evaluations involved self-reported impact on instrument playing and satisfaction with the interventions. Secondary evaluations included pain intensity, hand-grip strength, aerobic capacity, body...... mass index, and self-assessed physical fitness. A total of 23 professional symphony orchestra musicians were randomly allocated to either the SST (n=12) or GFT (n=11) groups. Participants conducted three 20-minutes exercise periods/wk at the workplace for 9 weeks. RESULTS: Evaluations of both...

  7. Bilateral deficits in fine motor control and pinch grip force are not associated with electrodiagnostic findings in women with carpal tunnel syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    de la Llave-Rincón, Ana Isabel; Fernández-de-Las-Peñas, César; Pérez-de-Heredia-Torres, Marta; Martínez-Perez, Almudena; Valenza, Marie Carmen; Pareja, Juan A

    2011-06-01

    : The aim of this study was to analyze the differences in deficits in fine motor control and pinch grip force between patients with minimal, moderate/mild, or severe carpal tunnel syndrome (CTS) and healthy age- and hand dominance-matched controls. : A case-control study was conducted. The subtests of the Purdue Pegboard Test (one-hand and bilateral pin placements and assemblies) and pinch grip force between the thumb and the remaining four fingers of the hand were bilaterally evaluated in 66 women with minimal (n = 16), moderate (n = 16), or severe (n = 34) CTS and in 20 age- and hand-matched healthy women. The differences among the groups were analyzed using different mixed models of analysis of variance. : A two-way mixed analysis of variance revealed significant differences between groups, not depending on the presence of unilateral or bilateral symptoms (side), for the one-hand pin placement subtest: patients showed bilateral lower scores compared with controls (P < 0.001), without differences among those with minimal, moderate, or severe CTS (P = 0.946). The patients also exhibited lower scores in bilateral pin placement (P < 0.001) and assembly (P < 0.001) subtests, without differences among them. The three-way analysis of variance revealed significant differences among groups (P < 0.001) and fingers (P < 0.001), not depending on the presence of unilateral/bilateral symptoms (P = 0.684), for pinch grip force: patients showed bilateral lower pinch grip force in all fingers compared with healthy controls, without differences among those with minimal, moderate, or severe CTS. : The current study revealed similar bilateral deficits in fine motor control and pinch grip force in patients with minimal, moderate, or severe CTS, supporting that fine motor control deficits are a common feature of CTS not associated with electrodiagnostic findings.

  8. Enhanced muscle strength with carbohydrate supplement two hours before open cholecystectomy: a randomized, double-blind study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gava, Marcella Giovana; Castro-Barcellos, Heloísa Michelon; Caporossi, Cervantes; Aguilar-Nascimento, José Eduardo de

    2016-02-01

    to investigate the effects of preoperative fasting abbreviation with oral supplementation with carbohydrate in the evolution of grip strength in patients undergoing cholecystectomy by laparotomy. we conducted a clinical, randomizeddouble blind study with adult female patients, aged 18-60 years. Patients were divided into two groups: Control Group, with fasting prescription 6-8h until the time of operation; and Intervention Group, which received prescription of fasting for solids 6-8h before surgery, but ingested an oral supplement containing 12.5% carbohydrate, six (400ml) and two (200ml) hours before theprocedure. The handgrip strength was measured in both hands in both groups, at patient's admission (6h before surgery), the immediate pre-operative time (1h before surgery) and 12-18h postoperatively. we analyzed 27 patients, 14 in the intervention group and 13 in the control group. There was no mortality. The handgrip strength (mean [standard deviation]) was significantly higher in the intervention group in the three periods studied, in at least one hand: preoperatively in the dominant hand (27.8 [2.6] vs 24.1 [3.7] kg; p=0.04), in the immediate preoperative in both hands, and postoperatively in the non-dominant hand (28.5 [3.0] vs 21.3 [5.9] kg; p=0.01). the abbreviation of preoperative fasting to two hours with drink containing carbohydrate improves muscle function in the perioperative period.

  9. Enhanced muscle strength with carbohydrate supplement two hours before open cholecystectomy: a randomized, double-blind study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marcella Giovana Gava

    Full Text Available Objective: to investigate the effects of preoperative fasting abbreviation with oral supplementation with carbohydrate in the evolution of grip strength in patients undergoing cholecystectomy by laparotomy. Methods : we conducted a clinical, randomizeddouble blind study with adult female patients, aged 18-60 years. Patients were divided into two groups: Control Group, with fasting prescription 6-8h until the time of operation; and Intervention Group, which received prescription of fasting for solids 6-8h before surgery, but ingested an oral supplement containing 12.5% carbohydrate, six (400ml and two (200ml hours before theprocedure. The handgrip strength was measured in both hands in both groups, at patient's admission (6h before surgery, the immediate pre-operative time (1h before surgery and 12-18h postoperatively. Results : we analyzed 27 patients, 14 in the intervention group and 13 in the control group. There was no mortality. The handgrip strength (mean [standard deviation] was significantly higher in the intervention group in the three periods studied, in at least one hand: preoperatively in the dominant hand (27.8 [2.6] vs 24.1 [3.7] kg; p=0.04, in the immediate preoperative in both hands, and postoperatively in the non-dominant hand (28.5 [3.0] vs 21.3 [5.9] kg; p=0.01. Conclusion : the abbreviation of preoperative fasting to two hours with drink containing carbohydrate improves muscle function in the perioperative period.

  10. Functionality of i-LIMB and i-LIMB Pulse hands : Case report

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van der Niet, Olga; Bongers, Raoul M.; van der Sluis, Corry K.

    2013-01-01

    The availability of various multiarticulated prosthetic hands makes determining differences in functionality between these hands relevant. The current study asked whether the functionality of these hands increased with time of use and whether grip force and robustness improved. A 45-year-old man wit

  11. Associations among facial masculinity, physical strength, fluctuating asymmetry and attractiveness in young men and women.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Van Dongen, Stefan

    2014-01-01

    Studies of the process of human mate selection and attractiveness have assumed that selection favours morphological features that correlate with (genetic) quality. Degree of masculinity/femininity and fluctuating asymmetry (FA) may signal (genetic) quality, but what information they harboured and how they relate to fitness is still debated. To study strength of associations between facial masculinity/femininity, facial FA, attractiveness and physical strength in humans. Two-hundred young males and females were studied by measuring facial asymmetry and masculinity on the basis of frontal photographs. Attractiveness was determined on the basis of scores given by an anonymous panel, and physical strength using hand grip strength. Patterns differed markedly between males and females and analysis method used (univariate vs multivariate). Overall, no associations between FA and attractiveness, masculinity and physical strength were found. In females, but not males, masculinity and attractiveness correlated negatively and masculinity and physical strength correlated positively. Further research into the differences between males and females in associations between facial morphology, attractiveness and physical strength is clearly needed. The use of a multivariate approach can increase our understanding of which regions of the face harbour specific information of hormone levels and perhaps behavioural traits.

  12. EMG discharge patterns during human grip movement are task-dependent and not modulated by muscle contraction modes: a transcranial magnetic stimulation (TMS) study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Anson, J G; Hasegawa, Y; Kasai, T; Latash, M L; Yahagi, S

    2002-05-03

    Our previous study revealed that, during tonic muscle contraction, remarkable functional differences among intrinsic and extrinsic muscles were observed during two different grip movements, i.e., precision and power grips. To verify whether this evidence is true even under the phasic muscle contraction, magnetic stimulation was delivered over the left scalp while a normal human subject performed phasic precision or power grip responses of the right-hand fingers in a simple reaction time (SRT) paradigm. Magnetic stimulation delivered during the latent period revealed different cortico-motoneuronal excitations between the two grip responses. In particular, the contributions of extensor carpi radialis (ECR) muscle were definitely different between the two grip responses, although motor-evoked potentials (MEPs) of first dorsal interosseous (FDI) prior to, and after EMG onset of movement initiation, were not different. These results were similar to previous results obtained during tonic muscle contraction. Thus, we have concluded that the task-dependent EMG discharge pattern in finger manipulation could not be modulated by muscle contraction modes.

  13. [Surgical treatment of stiff metacarpophalangeal joint after hand injury].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rui, Yongjun; Shi, Haifeng; Mi, Jingyi; Chen, Guang; Wang, Jun; Qian, Jun

    2011-05-01

    To discuss the surgical procedures and curative effect of stiff 2-5 metacarpophalangeal (MP) joints after crash injury in hand. Between January 2006 and June 2009, 7 cases of stiff 2-5 MP joints were treated by releasing the stiff MP joints and reconstructing the function of lumbrical muscle in one stage. There were 6 males and 1 female with an average age of 32 years (range, 18-56 years). All injuries were caused by crash. Six cases suffered from multiple metacarpal fracture or complex dislocation of MP joint and 1 case suffered from complete amputation at level of middle palm of hand. The interval from initial wound healing to hospitalization was 3 to 15 months. Before operation, the X-ray films showed fracture healed and the results of nipping paper test were positive. All hands were treated with physical therapy for 1 month. After the plaster external fixation for 6 weeks, the physical therapy and function training were given. All wounds healed by first intention. The patients had no joint instability and extensor tendon side-slipping with normal finger function. Six patients were followed up from 6 months to 3 years. The extension and flexion of MP joint were 0 degree and 67-90 degrees, respectively. The average grip strength of injured dominant hand reached 86.70% of normal side and non-dominant hand reached 66.70% of normal side. The average injured dominant tip pinch strength reached 83.52% of normal side and non-dominant tip pinch strength reached 61.30% of normal side. Based on total active motion (TAM) system of Chinese Medical Association for Hand Surgery, the results were excellent in 4 cases, good in 1 case, and fair in 1 case; the excellent and good rate was 83.33%. In patients with stiff MP joint and lumbrical muscle defect, releasing stiff MP joint and reconstructing lumbrical function in one stage can recover the function of MP joint and achieve good outcome. Physical therapy plays an important role before operation.

  14. Laterality in hand use across four tool-use behaviors among the wild chimpanzees of Bossou, Guinea, West Africa.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Humle, Tatyana; Matsuzawa, Tetsuro

    2009-01-01

    Population-level right handedness is a human universal, whose evolutionary origins are the source of considerable empirical and theoretical debate. Although our closest neighbor, the chimpanzee, shows some evidence for population-level handedness in captivity, there is little evidence from the wild. Tool-use measures of hand use in chimpanzees have yielded a great deal of variation in directionality and strength in hand preference, which still remains largely unexplored and unexplained. Data on five measures of hand use across four tool-use skills--ant-dipping, algae-scooping, pestle-pounding and nut-cracking--among the wild chimpanzees of Bossou, Guinea, West Africa, are presented here. This study aims to explore age- and sex-class effects, as well as the influence of task motor, cognitive and haptic demands, on the strength and directionality of hand preference within and across all five measures of hand use. Although there was no age- or sex-class effect on the directionality of hand preference, immature pestle-pounding, which required bimanual coordination, but also imposed constraints owing to fatigue. It emerged that only the most hazardous tool use, i.e. ant-dipping, and the sole haptic task, i.e. the extraction by hand of crushed oil-palm heart, were laterally biased and both to the right. Shared motor or grip patterns in tool-use skills failed to reveal any specialization in hand use at the individual level. Finally, Bossou chimpanzees demonstrated a tendency for a population-level right-hand use. (c) 2008 Wiley-Liss, Inc.

  15. Study of Silicon Photomultipliers for the GRIPS Calorimeter Module

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alexei Ulyanov

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available GRIPS is a proposed gamma-ray (200 keV to 80 MeV astronomy mission, which incorporates a pair-creation and Compton scattering telescope, along with X-ray and infrared telescopes. It will carry out a sensitive all-sky scanning survey, investigating phenomena such as gamma-ray bursts, blazars and core collapse supernovae. The main telescope is composed of a Si strip detector surroundedby a calorimeter with a fast scintillator material. We present the initial results of a study which considers the potential use of silicon photomultipliers in conjunction with the scintillator in the GRIPS calorimeter module.

  16. Closed-loop afferent electrical stimulation for recovery of hand function in individuals with motor incomplete spinal injury: early clinical results.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schildt, Christopher J; Thomas, Sarah H; Powell, Elizabeth S; Sawaki, Lumy; Sunderam, Sridhar

    2016-08-01

    Afferent electrical stimulation is known to augment the effect of rehabilitative therapy through use-dependent cortical plasticity. Experiments pairing transcranial magnetic stimulation (TMS) with peripheral nerve stimulation (PNS) have shown a timing-dependent effect on motor evoked potential (MEP) amplitude suggesting that PNS applied in closed-loop (CL) mode could augment this effect through positive reinforcement. We present early results from a clinical trial in which an EEG brain-machine interface (BMI) was used to apply PNS to two subjects in response to motor intent detected from sensorimotor cortex in a cue-driven hand grip task. Both subjects had stable incomplete cervical spinal cord injury (SCI) with impaired upper limb function commensurate with the injury level. Twelve sessions of CL-PNS applied over a 4-6 week period yielded results suggesting improved hand grip strength and increased task-related modulation of the EEG in one hand of both subjects, and increased TMS-measured motor map area in one. These observations suggest that rehabilitation using such interactive therapies could benefit affected individuals.

  17. Quantification of finger joint loadings using musculoskeletal modelling clarifies mechanical risk factors of hand osteoarthritis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goislard de Monsabert, Benjamin; Vigouroux, Laurent; Bendahan, David; Berton, Eric

    2014-02-01

    Owing to limited quantitative data related to the loadings (forces and pressures) acting upon finger joints, several clinical observations regarding mechanical risk factors of hand osteoarthritis remain misunderstood. To improve the knowledge of this pathology, the present study used musculoskeletal modelling to quantify the forces and pressures acting upon hand joints during two grasping tasks. Kinematic and grip force data were recorded during both a pinch and a power grip tasks. Three-dimensional magnetic resonance imaging measurements were conducted to quantify joint contact areas. Using these datasets as input, a musculoskeletal model of the hand and wrist, including twenty-three degrees of freedom and forty-two muscles, has been developed to estimate joint forces and joint pressures. When compared with the power grip task, the pinch grip task resulted in two to eight times higher joint loadings whereas the grip forces exerted on each finger were twice lower. For both tasks, joint forces and pressures increased along a disto-proximal direction for each finger. The quantitative dataset provided by the present hand model clarified two clinical observations about osteoarthritis development which were not fully understood, i.e., the strong risk associated to pinch grip tasks and the high frequency of thumb-base osteoarthritis.

  18. Hand Anatomy

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Z Videos Infographics Symptom Picker Anatomy Bones Joints Muscles Nerves Vessels Tendons About Hand Surgery What is a Hand Surgeon? What is a Hand Therapist? Media Find a Hand Surgeon Home Anatomy Bones Joints Muscles Nerves Vessels Tendons Anatomy The upper extremity is ...

  19. Android Hands

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Vlachos, Evgenios; Schärfe, Henrik

    2014-01-01

    . On such occasions, android and humanoid hand models should have similar structure, functions, and performance as the human hand. In this paper we present the anatomy, and the key functionalities of the human hand followed by a literature review on android/humanoid hands for grasping and manipulating objects...

  20. Hand Robotic Therapy in Children with Hemiparesis: A Pilot Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bishop, Lauri; Gordon, Andrew M; Kim, Heakyung

    2017-01-01

    The aim of this study was to understand the impact of training with a hand robotic device on hand paresis and function in a population of children with hemiparesis. Twelve children with hemiparesis (mean age, 9 [SD, 3.64] years) completed participation in this prospective, experimental, pilot study. Participants underwent clinical assessments at baseline and again 6 weeks later with instructions to not initiate new therapies. After these assessments, participants received 6 weeks of training with a hand robotic device, consisting of 1-hour sessions, 3 times weekly. Assessments were repeated on completion of training. Results showed significant improvements after training on the Assisting Hand Assessment (mean difference, 2.0 Assisting Hand Assessment units; P = 0.011) and on the upper-extremity component of the Fugl-Meyer scale (raw score mean difference, 4.334; P = 0.001). No significant improvements between pretest and posttest were noted on the Jebsen-Taylor Test of Hand Function, the Quality of Upper Extremity Skills Test, or the Pediatric Evaluation of Disability Inventory after intervention. Total active mobility of digits and grip strength also failed to demonstrate significant changes after training. Participants tolerated training with the hand robotic device, and significant improvements in bimanual hand use, as well as impairment-based scales, were noted. Improvements were carried over into bimanual skills during play. Complete the self-assessment activity and evaluation online at http://www.physiatry.org/JournalCME CME OBJECTIVES: Upon completion of this article, the reader should be able to: (1) Understand key components of neuroplasticity; (2) Discuss the benefits of robotic therapy in the recovery of hand function in pediatric patients with hemiplegia; and (3) Appropriately incorporate robotic therapy into the treatment plan of pediatric patients with hemiplegia. Advanced ACCREDITATION: The Association of Academic Physiatrists is accredited by the

  1. Grip selection for sequential movements in children and adults with and without Developmental Coordination Disorder.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wilmut, Kate; Byrne, Maia

    2014-08-01

    When generating a movement adults favor grasps which start the body in an uncomfortable position if they end in a comfortable position (the end-state-comfort effect). In contrast, children with Developmental Coordination Disorder (DCD) select grasps which require little initial hand rotation even though they result in an uncomfortable end position. The current study considered grip selection of individuals with DCD when asked to make simple one step movements and when making more complex multi-staged movements. Adults with DCD (N=17, mean age 24:09, SD age=52months) and children with DCD (N=20, mean age 9:00, SD age=20months) and age and gender matched controls rotated a disc so an arrow pointed toward a specific target(s). Task complexity was increased by increasing the number of targets from 1 to 3. Planning for end-state-comfort was seen in all groups albeit to a lesser extent in children versus adults. The children with DCD showed fewer grips for end-state-comfort compared to their peers and this was explained by a propensity to select minimal initial rotation grasps. This result was mirrored in adults with DCD but only for the longest movement sequence. These results suggest some changes in ability from childhood to adulthood in individuals with DCD.

  2. The impact of unilateral brain damage on anticipatory grip force scaling when lifting everyday objects.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eidenmüller, S; Randerath, J; Goldenberg, G; Li, Y; Hermsdörfer, J

    2014-08-01

    The scaling of our finger forces according to the properties of manipulated objects is an elementary prerequisite of skilled motor behavior. Lesions of the motor-dominant left brain may impair several aspects of motor planning. For example, limb-apraxia, a tool-use disorder after left brain damage is thought to be caused by deficient recall or integration of tool-use knowledge into an action plan. The aim of the present study was to investigate whether left brain damage affects anticipatory force scaling when lifting everyday objects. We examined 26 stroke patients with unilateral brain damage (16 with left brain damage, ten with right brain damage) and 21 healthy control subjects. Limb apraxia was assessed by testing pantomime of familiar tool-use and imitation of meaningless hand postures. Participants grasped and lifted twelve randomly presented everyday objects. Grip force was measured with help of sensors fixed on thumb, index and middle-finger. The maximum rate of grip force was determined to quantify the precision of anticipation of object properties. Regression analysis yielded clear deficits of anticipation in the group of patients with left brain damage, while the comparison of patient with right brain damage with their respective control group did not reveal comparable deficits. Lesion-analyses indicate that brain structures typically associated with a tool-use network in the left hemisphere play an essential role for anticipatory grip force scaling, especially the left inferior frontal gyrus (IFG) and the premotor cortex (PMC). Furthermore, significant correlations of impaired anticipation with limb apraxia scores suggest shared representations. However, the presence of dissociations, implicates also independent processes. Overall, our findings suggest that the left hemisphere is engaged in anticipatory grip force scaling for lifting everyday objects. The underlying neural substrate is not restricted to a single region or stream; instead it may rely on

  3. Effect of Acute Effort on Isometric Strength and Body Balance: Trained vs. Untrained Paradigm.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Stanisław Sterkowicz

    Full Text Available Years of training in competitive sports leads to human body adaptation to a specific type of exercise. In judo bouts, maintaining hand grip on an opponent's clothes and postural balance is essential for the effective technical and tactical actions. This study compares changes after maximal anaerobic exercise among judo athletes and untrained subjects regarding 1 maximum isometric handgrip strength (HGSmax and accuracy at the perceived 50% maximum handgrip force (1/2HGSmax and 2 the balance of 13 judo athletes at national (n = 8 and international (n = 5 competitive levels and 19 untrained university students. The groups did not differ in age, body height, and weight. Body mass index (BMI and body composition (JAWON were evaluated. The Wingate Anaerobic Test (WAnT, Monark 875E measured recommended anaerobic capacity indices. Hand grip strength (Takei dynamometer and balance (biplate balance platform were measured before warm-up (T1, before the WAnT test (T2, and after (T3. Parametric or non-parametric tests were performed after verifying the variable distribution assumption. Judoists had higher BMI and fat-free mass index (FFMI than the students. The athletes also showed higher relative total work and relative peak power and lower levels of lactic acid. The difference in judoists between HGSmax at T1 and HGSmax at T3 was statistically significant. Before warm-up (T1, athletes showed higher strength (more divergent from the calculated ½HGSmax value compared to students. Substantial fatigue after the WAnT test significantly deteriorated the body stability indices, which were significantly better in judo athletes at all time points. The findings suggest specific body adaptations in judoists, especially for body composition, anaerobic energy system efficiency, and postural balance. These characteristics could be trained for specifically by judo athletes to meet the time-motion and anaerobic demands of contemporary bouts.

  4. The effects of power and strength training on bone mineral density in premenopausal women.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gray, M; Di Brezzo, R; Fort, I L

    2013-08-01

    The purpose of this 48-week exercise intervention was designed to examine the effects of power and resistance training on bone mineral density (BMD). Premenopausal women were recruited and randomly assigned to either a power (N.=8) or resistance (N.=11) training group. The power exercises included jumping rope, skipping, hopping, and other power-type exercises. The resistance training group performed 8-10 whole-body strengthening exercises at 70% one-repetition maximum (1RM). Before and after the exercise intervention, BMD was measured via dual energy x-ray absorptiometry (DXA) for the total-body, lumbar spine, left femoral neck, and left greater trochanter. Muscular strength was measured by hand grip dynamometer and 1RM of chest press and leg press. Muscular power was assessed by the Margaria-Kalamen stair climb test. Data were analyzed using repeated measures ANOVA. There were no statistical differences between the two training groups for any of the BMD measurements. Chest press strength was different between the two groups, increasing 6.41 and 1.1kg for the resistance and power groups, respectively over the course of the training period (F[1.15]=9.44, P<0.01). There was a significant time effect for leg press 1RM (F[1.15]=6.04, P=0.03). The participants increased by 12.37kg after the 48-week intervention. Hand grip strength also increased after the study intervention (F[1.16]=46.32, P<0.01). The results of this study suggest that power and resistance training are comparable techniques for maintaining bone density.

  5. Traumatic hand injuries: the emergency clinician's evidence-based approach.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Andrade, Aaron; Hern, H Gene

    2011-06-01

    At the start of your Saturday afternoon shift, you are not surprised to see that several patients are waiting to be seen for physical injuries. The first patient is a 34-year-old woman who sustained injury to her hand while skiing, 2 hours prior to her arrival. She reports falling with her hand still tethered to the pole's grip, landing on her outstretched right hand. She felt a painful snap in her right thumb, which still hurts, but otherwise she did not sustain any other trauma. Her only complaint currently is pain at the base of the right thumb. The patient is otherwise completely healthy, has no past medical or surgical history, and takes no medications. Upon examination, the affected hand appears to be surprisingly normal except for mild tenderness and swelling over the ulnar aspect of her first metacarpophalangeal joint and mildly decreased strength in her pincher grasp. X-ray reveals no fracture. You wonder if there is additional testing that should be done to evaluate this injury. You move on to a second patient, a 24-year-old man who cut his ring finger knuckle when he punched a wall 2 days ago. Physical examination reveals a small puncture wound over the IV metacarpophalangeal joint with mild swelling, erythema, warmth, and decreased range of motion secondary to pain. X-ray reveals no fracture, but there's something suspicious about this case. A third patient is a 37-year-old industrial worker whose finger contacted the stream of a high-powered grease injector. Physical examination reveals a small puncture wound over the volar proximal interphalangeal joint of his left long finger, mild tenderness to palpation over the area, and slight decreased range of motion secondary to pain. You wonder if the injury is as benign as it looks.

  6. Closed-loop control of grasping with a myoelectric hand prosthesis: which are the relevant feedback variables for force control?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ninu, Andrei; Dosen, Strahinja; Muceli, Silvia; Rattay, Frank; Dietl, Hans; Farina, Dario

    2014-09-01

    In closed-loop control of grasping by hand prostheses, the feedback information sent to the user is usually the actual controlled variable, i.e., the grasp force. Although this choice is intuitive and logical, the force production is only the last step in the process of grasping. Therefore, this study evaluated the performance in controlling grasp strength using a hand prosthesis operated through a complete grasping sequence while varying the feedback variables (e.g., closing velocity, grasping force), which were provided to the user visually or through vibrotactile stimulation. The experiments were conducted on 13 volunteers who controlled the Otto Bock Sensor Hand Speed prosthesis. Results showed that vibrotactile patterns were able to replace the visual feedback. Interestingly, the experiments demonstrated that direct force feedback was not essential for the control of grasping force. The subjects were indeed able to control the grip strength, predictively, by estimating the grasping force from the prosthesis velocity of closing. Therefore, grasping without explicit force feedback is not completely blind, contrary to what is usually assumed. In our study we analyzed grasping with a specific prosthetic device, but the outcomes are also applicable for other devices, with one or more degrees-of-freedom. The necessary condition is that the electromyography (EMG) signal directly and proportionally controls the velocity/grasp force of the hand, which is a common approach among EMG controlled prosthetic devices. The results provide important indications on the design of closed-loop EMG controlled prosthetic systems.

  7. Is one trial enough for repeated testing? Same-day assessments of walking, mobility and fine hand use in people with myotonic dystrophy type 1.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kierkegaard, Marie; Petitclerc, Emilie; Hébert, Luc J; Gagnon, Cynthia

    2017-02-01

    Performance-based assessments of physical function are essential in people with myotonic dystrophy type 1 (DM1) to monitor disease progression and evaluate interventions. Commonly used are the six-minute walk test, the 10 m-walk test, the timed up-and-go test, the timed-stands test, grip strength tests and the nine-hole peg test. The number of trials needed on a same-day test occasion and whether the first, best or average of trials should be reported as result is unknown. Thus, the aim was to describe and explore differences between trials in these measures of walking, mobility and fine hand use in 70 adults with DM1. Three trials were performed for each test except for the six-minute walk test where two trials were allowed. There were statistical significant differences over trials in all tests except for the 10 m-walk test and grip strength tests. Pair-wise comparisons showed that the second and third trials were in general better than the first, although effect sizes were small. At which trial the individuals performed their best differed between individuals and tests. People with severe muscular impairment had difficulties to perform repeated trials. Intraclass correlation coefficients were all high in analyses exploring how to report results. The conclusion and clinical implication is that, for a same-day test occasion, one trial is sufficient for the 10 m-walk test and grip strength tests, and that repeated trials should be allowed in the timed up-and-go test, timed-stands test and nine-hole peg tests. We recommend that two trials are performed for these latter tests as such a protocol could accommodate people with various levels of impairments and physical limitations.

  8. The interosseous muscles: the foundation of hand function.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liss, Frederic E

    2012-02-01

    The interosseous muscles of the hand can be thought of as the cornerstone of hand function, as they provide a "foundation" for all intrinsic and extrinsic hand movements. Innervated by the ulnar nerve and organized in dorsal and palmar layers, these pivotal muscles have small excursion yet great impact on finger balance, grip, and pinch function, particularly when impaired by denervation and/or contracture. This article gives an overview of the functional anatomy and pathologic dysfunction of the interosseous muscles within the context of this Hand Clinics issue on the intrinsic muscular function of the hand. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  9. Force-directed design of a voluntary closing hand prosthesis

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    De Visser, H.; Herder, J.L.

    2000-01-01

    This paper presents the design of a body-powered voluntary closing prosthetic hand. It is argued that the movement of the fingers before establishing a grip is much less relevant for good control of the object held than the distribution of forces once the object has been contacted. Based on this not

  10. Gripped by movies: From story-world to artifact absorption

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Doicaru, M.M.

    2016-01-01

    That movies are a great source of entertainment seems to be common sense. But how exactly movies manage to get large audiences absorbed, or what is their gripping tool is still a mystery. Research makes use of different concepts pointing to narrative absorption, but it is not clear how they differ f

  11. Hand tactile discrimination, social touch and frailty criteria in elderly people: A cross sectional observational study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vieira, Ana Isabel; Nogueira, Dália; de Azevedo Reis, Elisabeth; da Lapa Rosado, Maria; Vânia Nunes, Maria; Castro-Caldas, Alexandre

    2016-01-01

    Frailty is a common syndrome among elderly and sensory decline may exacerbate functional decline. The hand function, the manual dexterity, the performance of the daily living skills and the social interactions are determined, in a large degree, by sensory integrity. However, hand tactile sensory deterioration has been little explored in frailty. We performed a cross sectional observational study with 181 of institutionalized elders. From the initial sample we selected 50 subjects (68-99 years) who met the inclusion/exclusion criteria. Our goals were (1) to analyse the relationship between tactile discrimination (TD) of the hand, avoidance behaviours and attitudes towards social touch (BATST) and phenotype frailty criteria (unintentional weight loss, self-perception of exhaustion, decrease grip strength - GS, slow walking speed, low level of physical activity), (2) to explore whether other variables can contribute to explain the differences between pre-frail and frail elders. The results showed that increasing age is related to decline of TD of the hand (p=0.021) and to decrease in GS (p=0.025); women have significantly lower level of GS (p=0.001); TD decrease is correlated with higher avoidance BATST (p=0.000) and with lower GS (p=0.000); Lower GS corresponds to more avoidance BATST (p=0.003). Hand TD also can differentiate frail and pre-frail elderly subjects in this sample (p=0.037). Decreased TD of the hand may have implications on the functionality and on interpersonal relationships. TD of the hand also explains frailty levels in this sample. Hand TD should be used in assessment and intervention protocols in pre-frail and frail elders.

  12. Massage therapy plus topical analgesic is more effective than massage alone for hand arthritis pain.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Field, Tiffany; Diego, Miguel; Solien-Wolfe, Lynda

    2014-07-01

    20 adults were randomly assigned to a massage therapy or a massage therapy plus a topical analgesic application group. Both groups received a weekly massage from a therapist and were taught self-massage (same procedure) to be done by each participant once daily over a four-week period. The massage plus topical analgesic group as compared to the massage group had greater improvement in hand function as measured by a digital hand exerciser following the first session and across the four-week period. That group also had a greater increase in perceived grip strength and a greater decrease in hand pain, depressed mood and sleep disturbances over the four-week period. Massage therapy has been effective for several pain syndromes including migraine headaches (Lawle and Cameron, 2006)), lower back pain (Hsieh et al., 2004), fibromyalgia (Kalichman, 2010), neck and shoulder pain (Kong et al., 2013), carpal tunnel syndrome (Elliott and Burkett, 2013), and pain related to upper limb arthritis (Field et al., 2013). The purpose of the current study was to determine whether applying a topical analgesic following massage might be more effective than massage alone in treating pain associated with hand arthritis. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  13. Analysis of fatigue and tremor during sustained maximal grip contractions using Hilbert-Huang Transformation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Ke; Hogrel, Jean-Yves; Duchêne, Jacques; Hewson, David J

    2012-09-01

    The objective of this study was to evaluate muscle fatigue and tremor during a Sustained Maximal Grip Contraction (SMGC) using the Hilbert-Huang Transformation (HHT). Thirty-nine healthy subjects volunteered for the study and performed a 25-s SMGC. Fatigue parameters such as the relative force output (RFO) were calculated from the residual of SMGC after applying Empirical Mode Decomposition (EMD). Using the energy spectrum of the Intrinsic Mode Functions (IMF) obtained using HHT, isometric force tremor was identified from the 4 to 12 Hz region in IMF3 and IMF4. Data were analysed for five consecutive 5-s epochs to identify changes in fatigue and tremor over time. The HHT method was able to identify a greater resistance to fatigue in women compared to men (p≤0.05) and in non-dominant hands compared to dominant hands (p≤0.05). Consistent with the results for fatigue, women had less tremor than men (p≤0.05), while non-dominant hands trembled less than did dominant hands (p≤0.05). Higher levels of tremor were observed for non-fatigue-resistant subjects for both 10-15 s and 15-20 s epochs (p≤0.05). The HHT is an appropriate method to identify both fatigue and tremor during SMGC. It would be of interest to apply this method to the study the elderly or patients with neuromuscular disorders.

  14. Hand Fractures

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Z Videos Infographics Symptom Picker Anatomy Bones Joints Muscles Nerves Vessels Tendons About Hand Surgery What is a Hand Surgeon? What is ... serve as a framework. This framework supports the muscles that make the wrist ... When one of these hand bones is broken (fractured), it can prevent you ...

  15. Characteristics of Body Composition and Muscle Strength of North Korean Refugees during South Korean Stay

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sun Wook Cho

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available BackgroundThe aim of this study was to investigate the changes of body composition and muscle strength of North Korean refugees (NKRs according to their duration of stay in South Korea.MethodsNKRs who volunteered and were living in South Korea, aged 20 to 75 years were recruited. Body compositions were analyzed by bioelectrical impedance analysis. Muscle strength was measured with the hand grip test. Demographic and migration information was obtained with a questionnaire.ResultsA total of 158 volunteers were recruited at a mean age of 48.3±11.4 years. The mean time from when they escaped from North Korea and arrived in South Korea was 5.8±4.3 years. Height, weight, and body surface area were significantly smaller in all NKRs compared to South Korean controls, except for women aged over 50 years. In females of younger ages (<50 years, NKRs with more than a 4-year stay in South Korea had a higher weight and fat mass than that of those who had a shorter stay (less than 4 years in South Korea. All NKRs had a weaker grip strength than that of the age-matched controls from South Korea.ConclusionThe NKRs showed relatively smaller physiques and weaker muscle strength than that of the South Korean controls. In younger female NKRs, shorter South Korean stay group showed small body weight and fat mass than that of longer South Korean stay group. Specific health support programs might be needed.

  16. In the grip of betrayed expectations

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jarić Isidora

    2005-01-01

    Full Text Available The paper discusses the position of young people in Serbia today, as can be inferred from the evidence collected in the study "Politics and everyday life - three years later". Starting from the typology she developed in her 2002 analysis of young people’s interviews (when four basic ways of self-positioning within the social context were identified: "B92 generation", "provincials", "fundamentalists", and "guests", the author traces the changes that have intervened over the past three years in the attitudes of these same respondents concerning politics, personal engagement, views of the future and of their own selves. The fact that the expectations, awakened by the events of 5 October 2000, have been betrayed, has brought strong disappointment, and it is the context in which young people in Serbia once again are losing faith that they will ever find their place in their own society. Against the background of a basic tension in relation to politics - between excessive interest and disgust - there basic strategies of young people in 2005 are formed. "Withdrawal", as the most common strategy, indicates a return of the young to their narrow personal, private, imaginary world, after a short exit into reality and active participation in creating the conditions of their own social existence. The increasingly frequent strategy of "aggression and imposition of one’s own worldview" points to the rising radicalization of the young generation. Finally, it is only the "planning strategy", espoused by just a handful of respondents, that retains traces of faith in future improvement of social conditions.

  17. From Single Motor Unit Activity to Multiple Grip Forces: Mini‐review of Multi‐digit Grasping1

    Science.gov (United States)

    Winges, Sara A.; Santello, Marco

    2007-01-01

    SYNOPSIS This paper is a mini review of kinetic and kinematic evidence on the control of the hand with emphasis on grasping. It is not meant to be an exhaustive review, rather it summarizes current research examining the mechanisms through which specific patterns of coordination are elicited and observed during reach to grasp movements and static grasping. These coordination patterns include the spatial and temporal covariation of the rotation at multiple joints during reach to grasp movements. A basic coordination between grip forces produced by multiple digits also occurs during whole hand grasping such that normal forces tend to be produced in a synchronous fashion across pairs of digits. Finally, we address current research that suggests that motor unit synchrony across hand muscles and muscle compartments might be one of the neural mechanisms underlying the control of grasping. PMID:18414593

  18. GRIPS - Gamma-Ray Imaging, Polarimetry and Spectroscopy

    CERN Document Server

    Greiner, J; Aharonian, F; Ajello, M; Balasz, L G; Barbiellini, G; Bellazzini, R; Bishop, S; Bisnovatij-Kogan, G S; Boggs, S; Bykov, A; DiCocco, G; Diehl, R; Elsässer, D; Foley, S; Fransson, C; Gehrels, N; Hanlon, L; Hartmann, D; Hermsen, W; Hillebrandt, W; Hudec, R; Iyudin, A; Jose, J; Kadler, M; Kanbach, G; Klamra, W; Kiener, J; Klose, S; Kreykenbohm, I; Kuiper, L M; Kylafis, N; Labanti, C; Langanke, K; Langer, N; Larsson, S; Leibundgut, B; Laux, U; Longo, F; Maeda, K; Marcinkowski, R; Marisaldi, M; McBreen, B; McBreen, S; Meszaros, A; Nomoto, K; Pearce, M; Peer, A; Pian, E; Prantzos, N; Raffelt, G; Reimer, O; Rhode, W; Ryde, F; Schmidt, C; Silk, J; Shustov, B M; Strong, A; Tanvir, N; Thielemann, F -K; Tibolla, O; Tierney, D; Trümper, J; Varshalovich, D A; Wilms, J; Wrochna, G; Zdziarski, A; Zoglauer, A

    2011-01-01

    We propose to perform a continuously scanning all-sky survey from 200 keV to 80 MeV achieving a sensitivity which is better by a factor of 40 or more compared to the previous missions in this energy range. The Gamma-Ray Imaging, Polarimetry and Spectroscopy (GRIPS) mission addresses fundamental questions in ESA's Cosmic Vision plan. Among the major themes of the strategic plan, GRIPS has its focus on the evolving, violent Universe, exploring a unique energy window. We propose to investigate $\\gamma$-ray bursts and blazars, the mechanisms behind supernova explosions, nucleosynthesis and spallation, the enigmatic origin of positrons in our Galaxy, and the nature of radiation processes and particle acceleration in extreme cosmic sources including pulsars and magnetars. The natural energy scale for these non-thermal processes is of the order of MeV. Although they can be partially and indirectly studied using other methods, only the proposed GRIPS measurements will provide direct access to their primary photons. G...

  19. Upper limb strength and function changes during a one-year follow-up in non-ambulant patients with Duchenne Muscular Dystrophy: an observational multicenter trial.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Andreea Mihaela Seferian

    Full Text Available INTRODUCTION: Upper limb evaluation of patients with Duchenne Muscular Dystrophy is crucially important to evaluations of efficacy of new treatments in non-ambulant patients. In patients who have lost ambulation, there are few validated and informative outcome measures. In addition, longitudinal data demonstrating sensitivity to clinical evolution of outcome measures over short-term periods are lacking. PATIENTS AND METHODS: We report here the results of a one-year multicenter study using specifically designed tools to assess grip, pinch strength, and hand function in wheelchair-bound patients. Our study assessed 53 non-ambulant patients with Duchenne muscular dystrophy aged 17.1 ± 4.8 years (range: 9 - 28.1 years. The average Brooke functional score of these patients was 4.6 ± 1.1. The average forced vital capacity was 44.5% predicted and 19 patients used non-invasive ventilation. Patients were assessed at baseline, 6 months, and one year using the Motor Function Measure and innovative devices (namely the MyoSet composed of MyoGrip, MyoPinch, and MoviPlate. RESULTS: Our study confirmed preliminary data previously reported regarding feasibility of use and of reliability of the MyoSet and the correlation at baseline between distal strength and clinical outcomes such as FVC, Brooke score, age, and duration since loss of ambulation. A significant correlation was observed between the distal upper limb strength and clinical variables. The sensitive dynamometers (MyoGrip and MyoPinch and MoviPlate captured a 12-month change in non-ambulant Duchenne muscular dystrophy patients of all ages. TRIAL REGISTRATION: ClinicalTrials.gov NCT00993161 NCT00993161.

  20. Developing hands-on ergonomics lessons for youth

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bennett, C; Alexandre, M; Jacobs, K

    2006-02-22

    By the time students are ready to enter the workforce they have been exposed to up to 20 years of ergonomics risk factors. As technology evolves, it provides more opportunities for intensive repetitive motion and with computers, cell phones, personal digital assistants (PDAs), and electronic games. The average student engages in fewer active physical activities, sit stationary in mismatched furniture in schools for hours and carry heavy backpacks. While long-term effects remain to be identified, increasingly ergonomists and others concerned with musculoskeletal health and wellness, see a need for early ergonomics education. This interactive session provides a hands-on approach to introducing ergonomics to students. Although different approaches may effectively introduce ergonomics at even early stages of development, this program was designed for youth at the middle to high school age. Attendees will participate in four activities designed to introduce ergonomics at an experiential level. The modules focus on grip strength, effective breathing, optimizing your chair, and backpack safety. The workshop will include presentation and worksheets designed for use by teachers with minimal ergonomics training. Feedback from the participants will be sought for further refining the usability and safety of the training package.

  1. Repair of Minor Tissue Defect in Hand by Transfer of Free Tissue Flap from the Toe

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Haitao Tan

    2014-03-01

    Full Text Available Background:   To introduce our experience of using the free neurovascular flap from great and second toe. Methods:   Thirteen patients (fifteen fingers sought surgical treatment for soft tissue defects of the hand at our medical institutin between March 2006 and September 2009. In two patients, fibular side skin-nail flaps of great toe were applied to cover the dorsal defect of distal thumb. In twelve, in the treatment of pulp defect of finger with fibular side flap of great toe or tibial side flap of second toe. In one, in the treatment of defect of distal middle with composite flap with distal digital bone of second toe. Results:   All flaps were survived. The average subjective satisfaction score was 8.08 (range 4-10. Nine patients (69% experienced cold intolerance, and 2 patients (15% dysesthesia. The Semmes-Weinstein sensitivity score was between 3.47and 4.72 on the flap, and 0-4.18 on the donor site. The mean two-point discrimination was 6.8 mm (range 4-12. Grip strength was 10% less than in the unaffected hand. The proximal interphalangeal mobility loss was less than 15 degrees. Conclusions:   Our results indicated that these free flaps from toe are useful for patients with a small soft-tissue defect in hand.

  2. Handgrip Strength and Factors Associated in Poor Elderly Assisted at a Primary Care Unit in Rio de Janeiro, Brazil

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lino, Valéria Teresa Saraiva; Rodrigues, Nádia Cristina Pinheiro; O’Dwyer, Gisele; Andrade, Mônica Kramer de Noronha; Mattos, Inês Echenique; Portela, Margareth Crisóstomo

    2016-01-01

    Introduction Sarcopenia is a condition diagnosed when the patient presents low muscle mass, plus low muscle strength or low physical performance. Muscle weakness in the oldest (dynapenia) is a major public health concern because it predicts future all-cause mortality and is associated with falls, disability, cardiovascular mortality and morbidity. Grip strength is a simple method for assessment of muscle function in clinical practice. Objective To estimate the grip strength and identify factors associated with handgrip strength variation in elderly people with low socioeconomic status. Methods Cross-sectional study based on a multidimensional assessment of primary care users that were 60 years or older. The sample size was calculated using an estimated prevalence of depression in older adults of 20%. A kappa coefficient of 0.6 with a 95% confidence interval was used to generate a conservative sample size of 180 individuals. Procedures: tests and scales to assess humor, cognition (MMSE), basic (ADL) and instrumental activities (IADL) of daily living, mobility (Timed Up and Go), strength, height, Body Mass Index (BMI) and social support were applied. Questions about falls, chronic diseases and self-rated health (SRH) were also included. Statistical Analysis: Mean, standard deviation and statistical tests were used to compare grip strength means by demographic and health factors. A multivariate linear model was used to explain the relationship of the predictors with grip strength. Results The group was composed predominantly by women (73%) with a very low level of education (mean 3 years of schooling), mean age of 73.09 (± 7.05) years old, good mobility and without IADL impairment. Mean grip strength of male and female were 31.86Kg (SD 5.55) and 21.69Kg (SD 4.48) [p- 0.0001], respectively. Low grip strength was present in 27.7% of women and 39.6% of men. As expected, men and younger participants had higher grip strength than women and older individuals. In the

  3. Hand Eczema

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Coenraads, Pieter-Jan

    2012-01-01

    A 33-year-old woman presents with redness of the hands and reports the intermittent occurrence of tiny vesicles, scaling, and fissuring, accompanied by itching on the palms, fingers, and dorsal sides of the hands. She has two young children and works as a nurse in a nearby hospital. She has a histor

  4. Biomimetic hand exotendon device (BiomHED) for functional hand rehabilitation in stroke.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Sang Wook; Landers, Katlin A; Park, Hyung-Soon

    2013-06-01

    Significant functional impairment of the hand is commonly observed among stroke survivors. In order to restore the functional use of the affected hand, we developed a biomimetic device that assists in generating functional movements of the hand. The device is actuated by exotendons that replicate the kinetic functional of the hand muscle-tendons, therefore it can reproduce the spatial finger joint coordination patterns of the functional manual tasks (e.g., power grip and pinch) with a reduced number of actuators. The system includes a thumb actuation mechanism, whose action is coordinated with finger exotendons to perform various manual tasks, thereby restoring the functional use of the hand. This paper presents the design of the device and the preliminary data of the functional movement generation by the system.

  5. Contribution of corticospinal tract and functional connectivity in hand motor impairment after stroke.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Charlotte Rosso

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Motor outcome after stroke is associated with reorganisation of cortical networks and corticospinal tract (CST integrity. However, the relationships between motor severity, CST damage, and functional brain connectivity are not well understood. Here, the main objective was to study the effect of CST damage on the relationship between functional motor network connectivity and hand motor function in two groups of stroke patients: the severely (n=8 and the mildly impaired (n=14. METHODS: Twenty-two carotid stroke patients with motor deficits were studied with magnetic resonance imaging (MRI at 3 weeks, at 3 and 6 months. Healthy subjects (n=28 were scanned once. The CST injury was assessed by fractional anisotropy values. Functional connectivity was studied from a whole-hand grip task fMRI in a cortical and cerebellar motor network. Functional connectivity indexes were computed between these regions at each time point. The relationship between hand motor strength, ipsilesional CST damage and functional connectivity from the primary motor cortex (M1 was investigated using global and partial correlations. FINDINGS: In mildly impaired patients, cortico-cortical connectivity was disturbed at three weeks but returned to a normal pattern after 3 months. Cortico-cerebellar connectivity was still decreased at 6 months. In severely impaired patients, the cortico-cortical connectivity tended to return to a normal pattern, but the cortico-cerebellar connectivity was totally abolished during the follow-up. In the entire group of patients, the hand motor strength was correlated to the ipsilesional functional connectivity from M1. Partial correlations revealed that these associations were not anymore significant when the impact of CST damage was removed, except for the ipsilesional M1-contralateral cerebellum connectivity. CONCLUSION: Functional brain connectivity changes can be observed, even in severely impaired patients with no recovery. Upper limb

  6. 25(OHD3 Levels Relative to Muscle Strength and Maximum Oxygen Uptake in Athletes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Książek Anna

    2016-04-01

    Full Text Available Vitamin D is mainly known for its effects on the bone and calcium metabolism. The discovery of Vitamin D receptors in many extraskeletal cells suggests that it may also play a significant role in other organs and systems. The aim of our study was to assess the relationship between 25(OHD3 levels, lower limb isokinetic strength and maximum oxygen uptake in well-trained professional football players. We enrolled 43 Polish premier league soccer players. The mean age was 22.7±5.3 years. Our study showed decreased serum 25(OHD3 levels in 74.4% of the professional players. The results also demonstrated a lack of statistically significant correlation between 25(OHD3 levels and lower limb muscle strength with the exception of peak torque of the left knee extensors at an angular velocity of 150°/s (r=0.41. No significant correlations were found between hand grip strength and maximum oxygen uptake. Based on our study we concluded that in well-trained professional soccer players, there was no correlation between serum levels of 25(OHD3 and muscle strength or maximum oxygen uptake.

  7. Effects of rehabilitative interventions on pain, function and physical impairments in people with hand osteoarthritis: a systematic review

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-01-01

    Introduction Hand osteoarthritis (OA) is associated with pain, reduced grip strength, loss of range of motion and joint stiffness leading to impaired hand function and difficulty with daily activities. The effectiveness of different rehabilitation interventions on specific treatment goals has not yet been fully explored. The objective of this systematic review is to provide evidence based knowledge on the treatment effects of different rehabilitation interventions for specific treatment goals for hand OA. Methods A computerized literature search of Medline, the Cumulative Index to Nursing and Allied Health Literature (CINAHL), ISI Web of Science, the Physiotherapy Evidence Database (PEDro) and SCOPUS was performed. Studies that had an evidence level of 2b or higher and that compared a rehabilitation intervention with a control group and assessed at least one of the following outcome measures - pain, physical hand function or other measures of hand impairment - were included. The eligibility and methodological quality of trials were systematically assessed by two independent reviewers using the PEDro scale. Treatment effects were calculated using standardized mean difference and 95% confidence intervals. Results Ten studies, of which six were of higher quality (PEDro score >6), were included. The rehabilitation techniques reviewed included three studies on exercise, two studies each on laser and heat, and one study each on splints, massage and acupuncture. One higher quality trial showed a large positive effect of 12-month use of a night splint on hand pain, function, strength and range of motion. Exercise had no effect on hand pain or function although it may be able to improve hand strength. Low level laser therapy may be useful for improving range of motion. No rehabilitation interventions were found to improve stiffness. Conclusions There is emerging high quality evidence to support that rehabilitation interventions can offer significant benefits to individuals

  8. Effect of object width on precision grip force and finger posture.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Domalain, M; Vigouroux, L; Danion, F; Sevrez, V; Berton, E

    2008-09-01

    This study aimed to define the effect of object width on spontaneous grasp. Participants held objects of various masses (0.75 to 2.25 kg) and widths (3.5 to 9.5 cm) between thumb and index finger. Grip force, maximal grip force and corresponding finger postures were recorded using an embedded force sensor and an optoelectronic system, respectively. Results showed that index finger joints varied to accommodate the object width, whereas thumb posture remained constant across conditions. For a given object mass, grip force increased as a function of object width, although this result is not dictated by the laws of mechanics. Because maximal grip force also increased with object width, we hypothesise that participants maintain a constant ratio between grip force and their maximal grip force at each given width. Altogether we conclude that when the task consists in manipulating objects/tools, the optimal width is different than when maximal force exertions are required.

  9. Discrimination of handlebar grip samples by fourier transform infrared microspectroscopy analysis and statistics

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zeyu Lin

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available In this paper, the authors presented a study on the discrimination of handlebar grip samples, to provide effective forensic science service for hit and run traffic cases. 50 bicycle handlebar grip samples, 49 electric bike handlebar grip samples, and 96 motorcycle handlebar grip samples have been randomly collected by the local police in Beijing (China. Fourier transform infrared microspectroscopy (FTIR was utilized as analytical technology. Then, target absorption selection, data pretreatment, and discrimination of linked samples and unlinked samples were chosen as three steps to improve the discrimination of FTIR spectrums collected from different handlebar grip samples. Principal component analysis and receiver operating characteristic curve were utilized to evaluate different data selection methods and different data pretreatment methods, respectively. It is possible to explore the evidential value of handlebar grip residue evidence through instrumental analysis and statistical treatments. It will provide a universal discrimination method for other forensic science samples as well.

  10. Hand eczema.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Agarwal, Uma Shankar; Besarwal, Raj Kumar; Gupta, Rahul; Agarwal, Puneet; Napalia, Sheetal

    2014-05-01

    Hand eczema is often a chronic, multifactorial disease. It is usually related to occupational or routine household activities. Exact etiology of the disease is difficult to determine. It may become severe enough and disabling to many of patients in course of time. An estimated 2-10% of population is likely to develop hand eczema at some point of time during life. It appears to be the most common occupational skin disease, comprising 9-35% of all occupational diseases and up to 80% or more of all occupational contact dermatitis. So, it becomes important to find the exact etiology and classification of the disease and to use the appropriate preventive and treatment measures. Despite its importance in the dermatological practice, very few Indian studies have been done till date to investigate the epidemiological trends, etiology, and treatment options for hand eczema. In this review, we tried to find the etiology, epidemiology, and available treatment modalities for chronic hand eczema patients.

  11. ANALYTICAL RESEARCH ON THE GRIP VARIATION OF TWO-AXLE CAR

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rosen IVANOV

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available This paper presents a theoretical investigation on the decrease in grip coefficient of a car due to the car mass changes for three different running conditions- straightforward, motion in curve and braking. The grip of two types of cars - with forward and rear traction, equipped with three models of tires are studied. The results show a significant decrease of the grip coefficient in longitudinal and lateral directions.

  12. A comparison of respiratory and peripheral muscle strength, functional exercise capacity, activities of daily living and physical fitness in patients with cystic fibrosis and healthy subjects.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arikan, Hulya; Yatar, İlker; Calik-Kutukcu, Ebru; Aribas, Zeynep; Saglam, Melda; Vardar-Yagli, Naciye; Savci, Sema; Inal-Ince, Deniz; Ozcelik, Ugur; Kiper, Nural

    2015-01-01

    There are limited reports that compare muscle strength, functional exercise capacity, activities of daily living (ADL) and parameters of physical fitness of cystic fibrosis (CF) patients with healthy peers in the literature. The purpose of this study was to assess and compare respiratory and peripheral muscle strength, functional exercise capacity, ADL and physical fitness in patients with CF and healthy subjects. Nineteen patients with CF (mean forced expiratory volume in one second-FEV1: 86.56±18.36%) and 20 healthy subjects were included in this study. Respiratory (maximal inspiratory pressure-MIP and maximal expiratory pressure-MEP) and peripheral muscle strength (quadriceps, shoulder abductors and hand grip strength) were evaluated. Functional exercise capacity was determined with 6min walk test (6MWT). ADL was assessed with Glittre ADL test and physical fitness was assessed with Munich fitness test (MFT). There were not any statistically significant difference in MIP, %MIP, MEP and %MEP values between two groups (p>0.05). %Peripheral muscle strength (% quadriceps and shoulder abductors strength), 6MWT distance and %6MWT distance were significantly lower in patients with CF than those of healthy subjects (pmuscle strength, functional exercise capacity, ADL performance and speed, coordination, endurance and power components of physical fitness are adversely affected in mild-severe patients with CF compared to healthy peers. Evaluations must be done in comprehensive manner in patients with CF with all stages.

  13. Design for a three-fingered hand. [robotic and prosthetic applications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Crossley, F. R. E.

    1977-01-01

    This paper describes the construction of a prototype mechanical hand or 'end effector' for use on a remotely controlled robot, but with possible application as a prosthetic device. An analysis of hand motions is reported, from which it is concluded that the two most important manipulations (apart from grasps) are to be able to pick up a tool and draw it into a nested grip against the palm, and to be able to hold a pistol-grip tool such as an electric drill and pull the trigger. One of our models was tested and found capable of both these operations.

  14. Finger pad friction and its role in grip and touch

    Science.gov (United States)

    Adams, Michael J.; Johnson, Simon A.; Lefèvre, Philippe; Lévesque, Vincent; Hayward, Vincent; André, Thibaut; Thonnard, Jean-Louis

    2013-01-01

    Many aspects of both grip function and tactile perception depend on complex frictional interactions occurring in the contact zone of the finger pad, which is the subject of the current review. While it is well established that friction plays a crucial role in grip function, its exact contribution for discriminatory touch involving the sliding of a finger pad is more elusive. For texture discrimination, it is clear that vibrotaction plays an important role in the discriminatory mechanisms. Among other factors, friction impacts the nature of the vibrations generated by the relative movement of the fingertip skin against a probed object. Friction also has a major influence on the perceived tactile pleasantness of a surface. The contact mechanics of a finger pad is governed by the fingerprint ridges and the sweat that is exuded from pores located on these ridges. Counterintuitively, the coefficient of friction can increase by an order of magnitude in a period of tens of seconds when in contact with an impermeably smooth surface, such as glass. In contrast, the value will decrease for a porous surface, such as paper. The increase in friction is attributed to an occlusion mechanism and can be described by first-order kinetics. Surprisingly, the sensitivity of the coefficient of friction to the normal load and sliding velocity is comparatively of second order, yet these dependencies provide the main basis of theoretical models which, to-date, largely ignore the time evolution of the frictional dynamics. One well-known effect on taction is the possibility of inducing stick–slip if the friction decreases with increasing sliding velocity. Moreover, the initial slip of a finger pad occurs by the propagation of an annulus of failure from the perimeter of the contact zone and this phenomenon could be important in tactile perception and grip function. PMID:23256185

  15. GRIPS - Gamma-Ray Burst Investigation via Polarimetry and Spectroscopy

    CERN Document Server

    Greiner, J

    2008-01-01

    The primary scientific goal of the GRIPS mission is to revolutionize our understanding of the early universe using gamma-ray bursts. We propose a new generation gamma-ray observatory capable of unprecedented spectroscopy over a wide range of gamma-ray energies (200 keV--50 MeV) and of polarimetry (200--1000 keV). Secondary goals achievable by this mission include direct measurements of supernova interiors through gamma-rays from radioactive decays, nuclear astrophysics with massive stars and novae, and studies of particle acceleration near compact stars, interstellar shocks, and clusters of galaxies.

  16. GRIP Database original data - GRIPDB | LSDB Archive [Life Science Database Archive metadata

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available List Contact us GRIPDB GRIP Database original data Data detail Data name GRIP Database original data DOI 10....18908/lsdba.nbdc01665-006 Description of data contents GRIP Database original data It consists of data table...s and sequences. Data file File name: gripdb_original_data.zip File URL: ftp://ftp.biosciencedbc.jp/archive/gripdb/LATEST/gripdb_orig...e Database Description Download License Update History of This Database Site Policy | Contact Us GRIP Database original data - GRIPDB | LSDB Archive ... ...inal_data.zip File size: 779 KB Simple search URL - Data

  17. Pencil grips, legibility, and speed of fourth-graders' writing in cursive.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Koziatek, Susan M; Powell, Nancy J

    2003-01-01

    The purpose of this research was to study how the speed and legibility of fourth-graders handwriting was affected by type of pencil grip on the Evaluation Tool of Children's Handwriting-Cursive. Ninety-five typically developing students and 6 students receiving special education services completed the Evaluation Tool of Children's Handwriting-Cursive (ETCH-C). Photographs were taken of their pencil grips while they wrote the alphabet. One-way ANOVAs were calculated to compare legibility rates and writing speeds by type of pencil grip. Ninety-nine of the students used one of four pencil grips including the dynamic tripod (38 students), the dynamic quadrupod (18), the lateral tripod (22), and the lateral quadrupod (21). One student used the four-finger pencil grip and one used the interdigital pencil grip. Mean cursive writing speeds were similar for all pencil grips except for the interdigital grasp. Speeds obtained were slower than recently published fourth-grade speeds ranging from a mean of 29.45 to 34.75 letters per minute. CONCLUSION. This study found the lateral quadrupod and four-finger pencil grips to be as functional as the dynamic tripod, lateral tripod, and dynamic quadrupod pencil grips. This study provides average handwriting speeds for fourth-grade students on the ETCH-C.

  18. Delayed grip relaxation and altered modulation of intracortical inhibition with aging

    Science.gov (United States)

    Motawar, Binal; Stinear, James W.; Lauer, Abigail W.; Ramakrishnan, V. Viswanathan; Seo, Na Jin

    2015-01-01

    Grip relaxation is a voluntary action that requires an increase in short-interval intracortical inhibition (SICI) in healthy young adults, rather than a simple termination of excitatory drive. The way aging affects this voluntary inhibitory action and timing of grip relaxation is currently unknown. The objective of this study was to examine aging-related delays in grip relaxation and SICI modulation for the flexor digitorum superficialis (FDS) muscle during grip relaxation. The main finding was that young adults increased SICI to relax their grips, whereas older adults did not increase SICI with a prolonged grip relaxation time (prelaxation time). A secondary experiment showed that both young and older adults did not change H reflex excitability during grip relaxation. Our data suggest that grip relaxation is mediated by increased cortical inhibitory output in young adults, and aging-related impairment in increasing cortical inhibitory output may hamper timely cessation of muscle activity. Our data also suggest a lesser role of the spinal circuits in grip muscle relaxation. This knowledge may contribute to understanding of aging-related movement deterioration and development of interventions for improving modulation of SICI to improve muscle relaxation and movement coordination. PMID:26686531

  19. Effects of 16-week functional movement screen training program on strength and flexibility of elite high school baseball players.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Song, Hong-Sun; Woo, Seung-Seok; So, Wi-Young; Kim, Kwang-Jun; Lee, Joohyung; Kim, Joo-Young

    2014-04-01

    Functional Movement Screen (FMS) is a way to pretest functional movement. This study examined the effects of the FMS training program on the strength and flexibility of 62 elite male high school baseball players (31 in the training group, 31 in the control group). All players who received less than two points on each FMS test item had to join the 16-week, three times weekly FMS training program. To analyze results among the FMS participants, measures including intraclass correlation coefficient (ICC) and repeated measure ANOVA were utilized. The Kappa coefficient was 0.805 when the intraclass correlation coefficient of the three participants was inspected. Strength showed a significant interaction depending on time and group (hand grip strength: P=0.011, bench press and squat both for one-repetition maximum (1RM): P=0.001 and P=0.008, respectively). Back muscle strength did not show a significant difference (P=0.660). Trunk forward flexion showed no interaction depending on time and groups (P=0.983) but trunk extension backward showed significant differences depending on groups (P=0.004) and time (P=0.001). Splits showed a significant difference depending on time and groups (P=0.004). The FMS training program improved the strength and flexibility of elite high school baseball players.

  20. The Effectiveness of Manual Therapy Versus Surgery on Self-reported Function, Cervical Range of Motion, and Pinch Grip Force in Carpal Tunnel Syndrome: A Randomized Clinical Trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fernández-de-Las-Peñas, César; Cleland, Joshua; Palacios-Ceña, María; Fuensalida-Novo, Stella; Pareja, Juan A; Alonso-Blanco, Cristina

    2017-03-01

    Study Design Randomized parallel-group trial. Background Carpal tunnel syndrome (CTS) is a common pain condition that can be managed surgically or conservatively. Objective To compare the effectiveness of manual therapy versus surgery for improving self-reported function, cervical range of motion, and pinch-tip grip force in women with CTS. Methods In this randomized clinical trial, 100 women with CTS were randomly allocated to either a manual therapy (n = 50) or a surgery (n = 50) group. The primary outcome was self-rated hand function, assessed with the Boston Carpal Tunnel Questionnaire. Secondary outcomes included active cervical range of motion, pinch-tip grip force, and the symptom severity subscale of the Boston Carpal Tunnel Questionnaire. Patients were assessed at baseline and 1, 3, 6, and 12 months after the last treatment by an assessor unaware of group assignment. Analysis was by intention to treat, with mixed analyses of covariance adjusted for baseline scores. Results At 12 months, 94 women completed the follow-up. Analyses showed statistically significant differences in favor of manual therapy at 1 month for self-reported function (mean change, -0.8; 95% confidence interval [CI]: -1.1, -0.5) and pinch-tip grip force on the symptomatic side (thumb-index finger: mean change, 2.0; 95% CI: 1.1, 2.9 and thumb-little finger: mean change, 1.0; 95% CI: 0.5, 1.5). Improvements in self-reported function and pinch grip force were similar between the groups at 3, 6, and 12 months. Both groups reported improvements in symptom severity that were not significantly different at all follow-up periods. No significant changes were observed in pinch-tip grip force on the less symptomatic side and in cervical range of motion in either group. Conclusion Manual therapy and surgery had similar effectiveness for improving self-reported function, symptom severity, and pinch-tip grip force on the symptomatic hand in women with CTS. Neither manual therapy nor surgery resulted

  1. Deficient grip force control in schizophrenia: behavioral and modeling evidence for altered motor inhibition and motor noise.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Teremetz, Maxime; Amado, Isabelle; Bendjemaa, Narjes; Krebs, Marie-Odile; Lindberg, Pavel G; Maier, Marc A

    2014-01-01

    Whether upper limb sensorimotor control is affected in schizophrenia and how underlying pathological mechanisms may potentially intervene in these deficits is still being debated. We tested voluntary force control in schizophrenia patients and used a computational model in order to elucidate potential cerebral mechanisms underlying sensorimotor deficits in schizophrenia. A visuomotor grip force-tracking task was performed by 17 medicated and 6 non-medicated patients with schizophrenia (DSM-IV) and by 15 healthy controls. Target forces in the ramp-hold-and-release paradigm were set to 5 N and to 10% maximal voluntary grip force. Force trajectory was analyzed by performance measures and Principal Component Analysis (PCA). A computational model incorporating neural control signals was used to replicate the empirically observed motor behavior and to explore underlying neural mechanisms. Grip task performance was significantly lower in medicated and non-medicated schizophrenia patients compared to controls. Three behavioral variables were significantly higher in both patient groups: tracking error (by 50%), coefficient of variation of force (by 57%) and duration of force release (up by 37%). Behavioral performance did not differ between patient groups. Computational simulation successfully replicated these findings and predicted that decreased motor inhibition, together with an increased signal-dependent motor noise, are sufficient to explain the observed motor deficits in patients. PCA also suggested altered motor inhibition as a key factor differentiating patients from control subjects: the principal component representing inhibition correlated with clinical severity. These findings show that schizophrenia affects voluntary sensorimotor control of the hand independent of medication, and suggest that reduced motor inhibition and increased signal-dependent motor noise likely reflect key pathological mechanisms of the sensorimotor deficit.

  2. The Southampton Hand Assessment Procedure revisited : A transparent linear scoring system, applied to data of experienced prosthetic users

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Burgerhof, Johannes G M; Vasluian, Ecaterina; Dijkstra, Pieter U; Bongers, Raoul M; van der Sluis, Corry K

    2016-01-01

    STUDY DESIGN: Cross-sectional. INTRODUCTION: Southampton Hand Assessment Procedure (SHAP) provides function scores for hand grips (prehensile patterns) and an overall score, the index of function (IOF). The underlying equations of SHAP are not publicly available, which induces opacity. Furthermore,

  3. [Hand infections].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schiele, Philippe; Le Nen, Dominique

    2013-11-01

    Superficial and deep hand infections are frequent in general medical practice. Clinical examination is a crucial step for an adapted provided care. Most of the time, surgery is the only way to heal infections. However, in some cases (like bites), empiric antibiotherapy is first indicated to limit infection. Staphyloccocus aureus as well as Group Beta Streptococcus are the most frequently pathogenes associated with hand infections. Methicillin resistant S. Aureus must always be considered in the diagnoses. Whatever treatment is provided, clinical assessement must be repeated within two days. An early adaquated treatment prevent functional complications and in some cases death of the patients.

  4. The Relationship of Isometric Grip Strength, Optimal Dynamometer Settings, and Certain Anthropometric Factors

    Science.gov (United States)

    1990-05-01

    of the long flexors of the digits ( Kapandji , 1982). This may be the result of losing the fulcrum that is normally provided as the tendons pass over an...univariate and multivariate examination of measurement error in anthropometry. American Journal of Physical Anthropology, 40, 197-203. Kapandji , I. A. (1982

  5. Infants' Grip Strength Predicts Mu Rhythm Attenuation during Observation of Lifting Actions with Weighted Blocks

    Science.gov (United States)

    Upshaw, Michaela B.; Bernier, Raphael A.; Sommerville, Jessica A.

    2016-01-01

    Research has established that the body is fundamentally involved in perception: bodily experience influences activation of the shared neural system underlying action perception and production during action observation, and bodily characteristics influence perception of the spatial environment. However, whether bodily characteristics influence…

  6. Cross-national differences in grip strength among 50+ year old Europeans

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Andersen-Ranberg, Karen; Petersen, Inge; Frederiksen, Henrik;

    2009-01-01

    , education, health and socioeconomic status. The relative excess was found to be 11% and the absolute difference 5.0 kg for 50- to 54-year-old men, increasing to 28% and 6.9 kg among 80+ year-old men. The corresponding figures for women were 16% and 4.3 kg, and 21% and 3.5 kg, respectively. Southern European...... with higher rates of functional decline and mortality, and thus may be used as a health indicator, it is of interest to examine whether the results on extremely old can be reproduced in a large-scale European survey. GS was measured in a cross-sectional population-based sample of 27,456 individuals aged 50...

  7. Grip strength of severely malnourished children during nutritional rehabilitation in the Jimma hospital of Ethiopia

    OpenAIRE

    Fonguh, Sylvanus

    2011-01-01

    The frequent occurence of missing data in scientific studies is not uncommon. In longitudinal clinical studies for instance, one would expect, in a 'dream land' scenario, a complete profile for each study subject. Unfortunately, this is rarely the case. Plagued therefore with the issue of missingness, it becomes vital to understand the mechanism that led to the missing data to be able to perform analyses that will lead to valid inference. Under the missing at random (MAR) assumption, likeli...

  8. Mechanisms of strength gain in a handgrip exercise programme in rheumatoid arthritis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Speed, C A; Campbell, R

    2012-01-01

    In a progressive resistive strengthening programme, healthy individuals gain strength initially through neural adaptation followed by increases in muscle mass. Programmes are designed to maximise these responses. The physiological mechanisms of strength gain in RA are unknown, but their identification will help to develop more effective exercise programmes. The aim of this study was to investigate the responses to a 12-week isometric handgrip strengthening programme in female subjects with RA. Fourteen right-handed female subjects with RA and 14 age-matched female controls participated in a 12-week right handgrip strengthening programme. Maximum grip strength (MGS) and disease activity were measured serially over 12 weeks. Forearm muscle volume was measured using MRI at baseline and 12 weeks. Significant gains in right handgrip strength were noted in both groups, the gains being most marked in those with RA: mean (SD; range) MGS (mmHg) in RA group at baseline 105.1 (48.1; 34-108) and 174.8 (76.4; 50-340) at 12 weeks. Mean (SD; range) MGS in control group at baseline 311.7 (49.6; 220-370) and 357.0 (67.1; 250-540) at 12 weeks. Significant increases in forearm muscle volume occurred in the controls, correlating with gains in strength. No such changes were noted in the RA group, indicating that improvements were solely related to neural adaptation. Response to strength training in RA differs from those of healthy individuals. Significant gains in strength in individuals with RA can occur due to neural adaptation without gains in muscle mass during a strengthening programme. This has implications for the design of rehabilitation programmes for such subjects.

  9. Hand eczema

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Uma Shankar Agarwal

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Hand eczema is often a chronic, multifactorial disease. It is usually related to occupational or routine household activities. Exact etiology of the disease is difficult to determine. It may become severe enough and disabling to many of patients in course of time. An estimated 2-10% of population is likely to develop hand eczema at some point of time during life. It appears to be the most common occupational skin disease, comprising 9-35% of all occupational diseases and up to 80% or more of all occupational contact dermatitis. So, it becomes important to find the exact etiology and classification of the disease and to use the appropriate preventive and treatment measures. Despite its importance in the dermatological practice, very few Indian studies have been done till date to investigate the epidemiological trends, etiology, and treatment options for hand eczema. In this review, we tried to find the etiology, epidemiology, and available treatment modalities for chronic hand eczema patients.

  10. Hand Osteoblastoma

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. Farzan

    2006-06-01

    Full Text Available Background and Aim: Osteoblastoma is one of the rarest primary bone tumors. Although, small bones of the hands and feet are the third most common location for this tumor, the hand involvement is very rare and few case observations were published in the English-language literature. Materials and Methods: In this study, we report five cases of benign osteoblastoma of the hand, 3 in metacarpals and two in phalanxes. The clinical feature is not specific. The severe nocturnal, salicylate-responsive pain is not present in patients with osteoblastoma. The pain is dull, persistent and less localized. The clinical course is usually long and there is often symptoms for months before medical attention are sought. Swelling is a more persistent finding in osteoblastoma of the hand that we found in all of our patients. The radiologic findings are indistinctive, so preoperative diagnosis based on X-ray appearance is difficult. In all of our 5 cases, we fail to consider osteoblastoma as primary diagnosis. Pathologically, osteoblastoma consisting of a well-vascularized connective tissue stroma in which there is active production of osteoid and primitive woven bone. Treatment depends on the stage and localization of the tumor. Curettage and bone grafting is sufficient in stage 1 or stage 2, but in stage 3 wide resection is necessary for prevention of recurrence. Osteosarcoma is the most important differential diagnosis that may lead to inappropriate operation.

  11. Hand eczema

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ibler, K.S.; Jemec, G.B.E.; Flyvholm, M.-A.

    2012-01-01

    /materials/methods. A survey of 3181 healthcare workers was performed. Data were analysed with logistic regression. Data on sick leave and notification to the authorities were obtained. Results. The response rate was 71% (2274 of 3181). The 1-year prevalence of hand eczema was 21%, and was positively associated with atopic...

  12. Magic Hands

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    1998-01-01

    THE two most amazing things on the planet may well be the human brain and human hands. When they work together, the results can be enchanting. At an international folk art fair held recently in Beijing, artisans and masters from Japan, India, Switzerland, Peru, South

  13. Use of a Portable Assistive Glove to Facilitate Rehabilitation in Stroke Survivors With Severe Hand Impairment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fischer, Heidi C; Triandafilou, Kristen M; Thielbar, Kelly O; Ochoa, José M; Lazzaro, Emily D C; Pacholski, Kathleen A; Kamper, Derek G

    2016-03-01

    Treatment options for stroke survivors with severe hand impairment are limited. Active task practice can be restricted by difficulty in voluntarily activating finger muscles and interference from involuntary muscle excitation. We developed a portable, actuated glove-orthosis, which could be employed to address both issues. We hypothesized that combining passive cyclical stretching (reducing motoneuronal hyperexcitability) imposed by the device with active-assisted, task-oriented training (rehabilitating muscle activation) would improve upper extremity motor control and task performance post-stroke. Thirteen participants who experienced a stroke 2-6 months prior to enrollment completed 15 treatment sessions over five weeks. Each session involved cyclically stretching the long finger flexors (30 min) followed by active-assisted task-oriented movement practice (60 min). Outcome measures were completed at six intervals: three before and three after treatment initiation. Overall improvement in post-training scores was observed across all outcome measures, including the Graded Wolf Motor Function Test, Action Research Arm Test, and grip and pinch strength (p ≤ 0.02), except finger extension force. No significant change in spasticity was observed. Improvement in upper extremity capabilities is achievable for stroke survivors even with severe hand impairment through a novel intervention combining passive cyclical stretching and active-assisted task practice, a paradigm which could be readily incorporated into the clinic.

  14. Biomimetics approach for methods to release microobjects from the gripping tool

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Gegeckaite, Asta; Moon, Jack; Hansen, Hans Nørgaard

    2005-01-01

    In the micro scale, gripping devices are working in the different way. New forces, working in the micro scale, like van der Waals, surface tension and electrostatics are influencing the gripping process. Handling of micro or even nano sized objects can be easily in the nature. Different types of ...

  15. Getting a Grip on Numbers: Numerical Magnitude Priming in Object Grasping

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lindemann, Oliver; Abolafia, Juan M.; Girardi, Giovanna; Bekkering, Harold

    2007-01-01

    To investigate the functional connection between numerical cognition and action planning, the authors required participants to perform different grasping responses depending on the parity status of Arabic digits. The results show that precision grip actions were initiated faster in response to small numbers, whereas power grips were initiated…

  16. 16 CFR Figure 5 to Part 1512 - Typical Handbrake Actuator Showing Grip Dimension

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    ... 16 Commercial Practices 2 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Typical Handbrake Actuator Showing Grip Dimension 5 Figure 5 to Part 1512 Commercial Practices CONSUMER PRODUCT SAFETY COMMISSION FEDERAL HAZARDOUS... Actuator Showing Grip Dimension EC03OC91.072 ...

  17. Biomimetics approach for methods to release microobjects from the gripping tool

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Gegeckaite, Asta; Moon, Jack; Hansen, Hans Nørgaard

    2005-01-01

    In the micro scale, gripping devices are working in the different way. New forces, working in the micro scale, like van der Waals, surface tension and electrostatics are influencing the gripping process. Handling of micro or even nano sized objects can be easily in the nature. Different types of ...

  18. Evaluation of strength training protocols with the use of the Powerball® and Shakeweight® in moderate trained women

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    THEOPHILOS PILIANIDIS

    2016-04-01

    Full Text Available The aim of this study was to evaluate and compare the effect of two training protocols on the women’s arms strength by using the patented equipment of PowerBall® and Shake Weight®. 39 females, aged 21.6±1.1yrs with body mass 60.3±7.4kg and stature 164±0.6cm were randomly divided into three groups: the PowerBall® (PGr, the Shake Weight® (SGr and the Control (CGr. The participants of the PGr & SGr trained for 18 days by using specific arms exercises while the women of the CGr did not perform any training program. In all studied women the hand-grip test as well as the forearm and arm girths of the dominant hand was evaluated before and after the completion of the testing protocol. The interaction among the variables in each group was assessed with the use of the factorial Analysis of Variance (ANOVA. The results showed that the women in PGr had a marginal improvement in the final hand- grip measurement (18.78±3.1kg in relation to the participants of the SGr (18.65±3.1kg. In addition, the forearm and arm girths of the women of the PGr were slightly larger than those reported in the participants of the SGr. In conclusion, the present study justifies the effectiveness of the training with the use of the innovative PowerBall® and Shake Weight® which are the proper equipment for the upper limbs muscular strength in moderate trained women.

  19. Handgrip and general muscular strength and endurance during prolonged bedrest with isometric and isotonic leg exercise training

    Science.gov (United States)

    Greenleaf, J. E.; Starr, J. C.; Van Beaumont, W.; Convertino, V. A.

    1983-01-01

    Measurements of maximal grip strength and endurance at 40 percent max strength were obtained for 7 men 19-21 years of age, 1-2 days before and on the first recovery day during three 2-week bedrest (BR) periods, each separated by a 3-week ambulatory recovery period. The subjects performed isometric exercise (IME) for 1 hr/day, isotonic exercise (ITE) for 1 hr/day, and no exercise (NOE) in the three BR periods. It was found that the mean maximal grip strength was unchanged after all three BR periods. Mean grip endurance was found to be unchanged after IME and ITE training, but was significantly reduced after NOE. These results indicate that IME and ITE training during BR do not increase or decrease maximal grip strength, alghough they prevent loss of grip endurance, while the maximal strength of all other major muscle groups decreases in proportion to the length of BR to 70 days. The maximal strength reduction of the large muscle groups was found to be about twice that of the small muscle groups during BR. In addition, it is shown that changes in maximal strength after spaceflight, BR, or water immersion deconditioning cannot be predicted from changes in submaximal or maximal oxygen uptake values.

  20. Applying a soft-robotic glove as assistive device and training tool with games to support hand function after stroke: Preliminary results on feasibility and potential clinical impact.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Prange-Lasonder, Gerdienke B; Radder, Bob; Kottink, Anke I R; Melendez-Calderon, Alejandro; Buurke, Jaap H; Rietman, Johan S

    2017-07-01

    Recent technological developments regarding wearable soft-robotic devices extend beyond the current application of rehabilitation robotics and enable unobtrusive support of the arms and hands during daily activities. In this light, the HandinMind (HiM) system was developed, comprising a soft-robotic, grip supporting glove with an added computer gaming environment. The present study aims to gain first insight into the feasibility of clinical application of the HiM system and its potential impact. In order to do so, both the direct influence of the HiM system on hand function as assistive device and its therapeutic potential, of either assistive or therapeutic use, were explored. A pilot randomized clinical trial was combined with a cross-sectional measurement (comparing performance with and without glove) at baseline in 5 chronic stroke patients, to investigate both the direct assistive and potential therapeutic effects of the HiM system. Extended use of the soft-robotic glove as assistive device at home or with dedicated gaming exercises in a clinical setting was applicable and feasible. A positive assistive effect of the soft-robotic glove was proposed for pinch strength and functional task performance 'lifting full cans' in most of the five participants. A potential therapeutic impact was suggested with predominantly improved hand strength in both participants with assistive use, and faster functional task performance in both participants with therapeutic application.

  1. A Triple-Masked, Randomized Controlled Trial Comparing Ultrasound-Guided Brachial Plexus and Distal Peripheral Nerve Block Anesthesia for Outpatient Hand Surgery

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nicholas C. K. Lam

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Background. For hand surgery, brachial plexus blocks provide effective anesthesia but produce undesirable numbness. We hypothesized that distal peripheral nerve blocks will better preserve motor function while providing effective anesthesia. Methods. Adult subjects who were scheduled for elective ambulatory hand surgery under regional anesthesia and sedation were recruited and randomly assigned to receive ultrasound-guided supraclavicular brachial plexus block or distal block of the ulnar and median nerves. Each subject received 15 mL of 1.5% mepivacaine at the assigned location with 15 mL of normal saline injected in the alternate block location. The primary outcome (change in baseline grip strength measured by a hydraulic dynamometer was tested before the block and prior to discharge. Subject satisfaction data were collected the day after surgery. Results. Fourteen subjects were enrolled. Median (interquartile range [IQR] strength loss in the distal group was 21.4% (14.3, 47.8%, while all subjects in the supraclavicular group lost 100% of their preoperative strength, P = 0.001. Subjects in the distal group reported greater satisfaction with their block procedures on the day after surgery, P = 0.012. Conclusion. Distal nerve blocks better preserve motor function without negatively affecting quality of anesthesia, leading to increased patient satisfaction, when compared to brachial plexus block.

  2. The Vacuum-Compacted Regolith Gripping Mechanism and Unmanned Flights via Quad-Rotors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Scott, Rollin L.

    2014-01-01

    During the course of the Kennedy Space Center Summer Internship, two main experiments were performed: The Vacuum-Compacted Regolith Gripping Mechanism and Unmanned Flights via Quad-copters. The objectives of the Vacuum-Compacted Regolith Gripping Mechanism, often abbreviated as the Granular Gripper, are to exhibit Space Technology, such as a soft robotic hand, lift different apparatuses used to excavate regolith, and conserve energy while executing its intended task. The project is being conducted to test how much weight the Granular Gripper can hold. With the use of an Animatronic Robotic Hand, Arduino Uno, and other components, the system was calibrated before actually conducting the intended weight test. The maximum weight each finger could hold with the servos running, in the order of pinky, ring, middle, and index fingers, are as follows: 1.340N, 1.456 N, 0.9579 N, and 1.358 N. Using the small vacuum pump system, the maximum weight each finger could hold, in the same order, was: 4.076 N, 6.159 N, 5.454 N, and 4.052 N. The maximum torques on each of the fingers when the servos were running, in the same respective order, was: 0.0777 Nm, 0.0533 Nm, 0.0648 Nm, and 0.0532 Nm. The maximum torques on the individual fingers, when the small vacuum pump was in effect, in the same order as above, was: 0.2318 Nm, 0.3032 Nm, 0.2741 Nm, and 0.1618 Nm. In testing all the fingers with the servos running, the total weight was 5.112 N and the maximum torque on the all the fingers was 0.2515 Nm. However, when the small vacuum pump system was used, the total weight was 19.741 N and the maximum torque on the all the fingers was 0.9713 Nm. The conclusion that was drawn stated that using the small vacuum pump system proved nearly 4 times more effective when testing how much weigh the hand could hold. The resistance provided by the compacted sand in the glove allowed more weight to be held by the hand and glove. Also, when the servos turned off and the hand still retaining its

  3. Force analysis of the rowing stroke employing two differing oar grips.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bompa, T O; Hebbelinck, M; Van Gheluwe, B

    1985-06-01

    The velocity of the rowing boat appears to depend on the force which the athlete applies at the handle of the oar. Although force is generated by legs, upper body, and arms, the latter are the only limbs which actually transmit and apply the force against the oar. The force output of the arms seem to be a function of the forearm position used by the athlete while gripping the oar. The traditional gripping technique is with the forearms in pronation. This technique was never challenged or scientifically researched to see whatever a modified one might lead to better efficiency. Consequently, the purpose of this investigation was to analyze whether athletes' force output differed if the gripping technique was changed from pronation to a semiprone grip (one arm prone, the other semiprone). Under the specific conditions of this investigation it was demonstrated that the semiprone position was generating greater force output, thus being superior to the classical prone grip.

  4. Immediate effects of somatosensory stimulation on hand function in patients with poststroke hemiparesis: a randomized cross-over trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sim, Sun-Mi; Oh, Duck-Won; Chon, Seung-chul

    2015-12-01

    This study aimed to determine the immediate effects of somatosensory stimulation on hand function in patients with poststroke hemiparesis. Eleven patients with poststroke hemiparesis participated in this study. Four types (no stimulation, vibration, and light and rough touches) of somatosensory stimulation were performed randomly for 4 days applying only one type of somatosensory stimulation each day. The box and block test (BBT), the Jebsen-Taylor hand function test (JTHFT), hand grip strength (HGS), and movement distance and peak velocity of the wrist joint during a forward-reaching task were measured. The BBT and JTHFT scores for no stimulation [BBT: median (interquartile range), 0.00 (-1.00 to 1.00) and JTHFT: 2.57 (-0.47 to 4.92)] were significantly different from those for vibration [BBT: 3.00 (2.00-5.00) and JTHFT: -16.02 (-23.06 to -4.31)], light touch [BBT: 3.00 (1.00-4.00) and JTHFT: -5.00 (-21.20 to -0.94)], and rough touch [BBT: 2.00 (1.00-4.00) and JTHFT: -6.19 (-18.22 to -3.70)]. The JTHFT score was significantly higher for vibration than that for rough touch (Phemiparesis, with more favorable effects observed in vibration stimulation.

  5. Reliability, validity, and responsiveness of the modified Kapandji index for assessment of functional mobility of the rheumatoid hand.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lefevre-Colau, Marie Martine; Poiraudeau, Serge; Oberlin, Christophe; Demaille, Samantha; Fermanian, Jacques; Rannou, François; Revel, Michel

    2003-07-01

    To determine the reliability, validity, and responsiveness of the modified Kapandji index (MKI). Prospective study. A cohort of patients planned for surgery of the wrist and/or fingers was evaluated within 48 hours before surgery and at least 6 months after surgery. Patients were in hospitalized or private care in France. Patients with rheumatoid arthritis according to criteria of the American College of Rheumatology. Forty-two patients (36 women; mean age, 57.5y; range, 22-80y) were included in the reliability study. Fifty patients (42 women; mean age, 54.18y; range, 19-77y) were included in the validity study. Not applicable. Clinical outcome measures included the MKI, the overall mobility score of the wrist and fingers, the finger mobility score, a visual analog scale (VAS) of pain in the hands and wrists, morning stiffness duration, total score of tenderness, total score of swelling, grip and pinch strength, the Hand Functional Index (HFI), and the Cochin rheumatoid hand disability scale. Reliability was studied with the intraclass correlation coefficient (ICC) and the Bland and Altman method. Convergent and divergent validity were assessed with the Spearman correlation coefficient. Responsiveness was assessed by the paired t test, the effect size, and the standardized response mean (SRM). Interobserver reliability was good with an ICC of.90, and the Bland and Altman analysis showed homogeneous distribution of the differences, with no systematic trend. The MKI correlated well with the other mobility measures (HFI, the finger mobility score measured with the finger goniometer), indicating a good convergent validity, and the expected divergent validity with the other outcome measures (grip and pinch strength, total score of swelling, total score of Ritchie Articular Index, Cochin scale, VAS of pain) was observed. The 50 patients in the validity study were evaluated twice, before and after surgery, at a mean interval +/- standard deviation of 7.16+/-2.10 months

  6. The Effects of Surgical Treatment on Elbow and Hand Functions in Gartland Type 3 Children s Humerus

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Firat Seyfettinoglu

    2014-03-01

    Full Text Available Aim: The aim of this study was to evaluate the effects of treatment with open surgery methods on elbow and hand functions in paediatric patients with a Gartland Type 3 humerus supracondylar fracture. Material and Method: The study comprised 25 patients (7 female, 18 male; mean age 6.7 years, range, 3-13 years who were treated and regularly followed up at our clinic between 2005 and 2009. All the fractures were extension Type 3 according to the Gartland classification. All the patients were treated with posterior approach open reduction and internal fixation. 20 patients underwent surgery within the first 8 hours and 5 patients between 8-72 hours (mean 57.6 hours. In the postoperative follow-up, carrying angle, elbow range of movement, grip strength and pinch strength were measured with hand evaluation tests. Upper extremity functions were scored with the Q-DASH scoring system. The functional and cosmetic results were evaluated according to the Flynn criteria. Results: According to the Flynn criteria, 20 of the 25 patients had excellent results, 1 good, 3 fair and 1 poor. At the final follow-up examination, 6 patients (24% had limited flexion of mean 3.9° (min 5°, max 25°. No restriction of extension was seen in any patient. While there was a loss of grip strength of mean 0.9kg (4% compared with the healthy side, the loss of pinch strength was mean 0.05 kg (0.8%. Compared with the healthy side, 16 patients had a loss of carrying angle of mean 2.1° (min -10°, max 5°. Of these, the loss was valgus in 3 patients (mean 3.6°,min 3°%u2013max 5° , and varus in 12 (mean 5.7°, min -10° %u2013 max -3°. In 10 patients no loss of carrying angle was determined. Discussion: Limited extension and triceps insufficiency which are the most significant disadvantages of the posterior approach were seen to have completely recovered at the final follow-up. Loss of carrying angle which develops following treatment of paediatric humerus supracondylar

  7. Comparison of Infant Car Seat grip orientations and lift strategies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Clamann, Michael; Zhu, Biwen; Beaver, Leah; Taylor, Kinley; Kaber, David

    2012-07-01

    The rear-facing Infant Car Seat (ICS) is designed to meet federal requirements for transporting children less than 1 year old. Typical use includes transfer in and out of a vehicle, which is shown to be a difficult lift. Despite the frequency of this lift, manufacturers provide little guidance for users. Review of relevant literature suggested an ICS featuring an angled handle, promoting a neutral wrist posture, would increase grip stability and decrease lifting effort. Popular press suggested a foot-in-car stance for the ICS lift would do the same. An experiment was conducted in which wrist deviations from neutral posture were recorded along with lifting muscle activation levels (multiple flexor muscles and biceps brachii) and overall perceived exertion for straight versus a new bent handle design and conventional stance versus foot-in-car. Foot position was examined to test the recommendations in the popular press. Surprisingly, wrist deviation was not significantly affected by the new bent handle design (due to compensatory behavior with the straight handle) but was related to foot placement (p=0.04). Results revealed the bent handle to significantly reduce flexor activation compared with the straight handle (p=0.0003); however, the level of biceps activation increased. Biceps activation also significantly increased for foot-in-car stance (p=0.035) but not flexor activation. In general, the bent handle enabled the user to lift the ICS with a steadier grip and less effort. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier Ltd and The Ergonomics Society. All rights reserved.

  8. Local cold acclimation during exercise and its effect on neuromuscular function of the hand.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Geurts, Carla L M; Sleivert, Gordon G; Cheung, Stephen S

    2006-12-01

    Most acclimation research is performed on resting individuals, whereas in real life, cold exposure is often accompanied by physical activity. We examined the effects of 2 weeks of repeated cold exposure of the hand with or without an elevated core temperature from exercise on neuromuscular function of the first dorsal interosseus (FDI) muscle and manual performance of the hand. The experimental group (4 female, 6 male; age, 25.1 +/- 6.9 y) cooled their hands in 8 degrees C water for 30 min daily while cycling (50% of heart rate reserve); the control group (4 female, 4 male; age, 25.1 +/- 5.7 y) remained still. Manual function testing consisted of tactile sensitivity, grip strength, manual dexterity, and evoked twitch force in a custom-made myograph. Thermal sensation, skin temperature of index finger (Tif) and hand (Tfdi), as well as rectal temperature (Tre), were recorded daily. Tre increased significantly during bicycling, by 0.6 +/- 0.2 degrees C. Minimal Tif and Tfdi of the groups combined increased significantly during exposure days from 8.7 +/- 0.7 degrees C and 12.4 +/- 2.8 degrees C to 10.1 +/- 1.3 degrees C and 15.0 +/- 3.0 degrees C, respectively (p=0.04), with no significant difference between groups. Thermal ratings improved significantly on exposure days. Manual function was impaired with cooling, but with no significant difference between groups or across time. Deterioration of twitch characteristics with cooling did not change with repeated cold exposure. Although the increasing core temperature during cold water immersion changed the acute temperature response and thermal ratings, it had no effect on local cold acclimation or manual function.

  9. Associations of Midlife to Late Life Fatigue With Physical Performance and Strength in Early Old Age

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Mänty, Minna Regina; Kuh, Diana; Cooper, Rachel

    2015-01-01

    objective measures: grip strength, standing balance, chair rising, and timed get-up-and-go (TUG) tests. RESULTS: There were associations between reports of frequent fatigue at both ages and poorer grip strength, chair rise, and TUG performance at 60 to 64 years. Furthermore, individuals reporting frequent...... fatigue at both ages had weaker grip strength (β = -4.09 kg, 95% confidence interval [CI] = -6.71 to -1.48) and slower chair rise (β = -4.65 repetitions/min, 95% CI = -6.65 to -2.64) and TUG (β = -4.22 cm/s, 95% CI = -12.16 to -2.28) speeds when compared with those who reported no fatigue at both time...

  10. Kinematic assessment of manual skill following functional hand surgery in tetraplegia

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van der Linde, H; Snoek, GJ; Knoop, HA; Mulder, T

    2000-01-01

    To determine whether surgical key grip reinforcement actually leads to a better movement ability we developed a procedure for the kinematic analysis of manual skill following hand surgery in tetraplegia. The functional results of surgery in 5 cases were examined by the kinematic analysis of drawing

  11. Injury Risk Assessment of Extravehicular Mobility Unit (EMU) Phase VI and Series 4000 Gloves During Extravehicular Activity (EVA) Hand Manipulation Tasks

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kilby, Melissa

    2015-01-01

    Functional Extravehicular Mobility Units (EMUs) with high precision gloves are essential for the success of Extravehicular Activity (EVA). Previous research done at NASA has shown that total strength capabilities and performance are reduced when wearing a pressurized EMU. The goal of this project was to characterize the human-space suit glove interaction and assess the risk of injury during common EVA hand manipulation tasks, including pushing, pinching and gripping objects. A custom third generation sensor garment was designed to incorporate a combination of sensors, including force sensitive resistors, strain gauge sensors, and shear force sensors. The combination of sensors was used to measure the forces acting on the finger nails, finger pads, finger tips, as well as the knuckle joints. In addition to measuring the forces, data was collected on the temperature, humidity, skin conductance, and blood perfusion of the hands. Testing compared both the Phase VI and Series 4000 glove against an ungloved condition. The ungloved test was performed wearing the sensor garment only. The project outcomes identified critical landmarks that experienced higher workloads and are more likely to suffer injuries. These critical landmarks varied as a function of space suit glove and task performed. The results showed that less forces were acting on the hands while wearing the Phase VI glove as compared to wearing the Series 4000 glove. Based on our findings, the engineering division can utilize these methods for optimizing the current space suit glove and designing next generation gloves to prevent injuries and optimize hand mobility and comfort.

  12. Evidence for right-hand feeding biases in a left-handed population.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Flindall, Jason W; Stone, Kayla D; Gonzalez, Claudia L R

    2015-05-01

    We have recently shown that actions with similar kinematic requirements, but different end-state goals may be supported by distinct neural networks. Specifically, we demonstrated that when right-handed individuals reach-to-grasp food items with intent to eat, they produce smaller maximum grip apertures (MGAs) than when they grasp the same item with intent to place it in a location near the mouth. This effect was restricted to right-handed movements; left-handed movements showed no difference between tasks. The current study investigates whether (and to which side) the effect may be lateralized in left-handed individuals. Twenty-one self-identified left-handed participants grasped food items of three different sizes while grasp kinematics were captured via an Optotrak Certus motion capture array. A main effect of task was identified wherein the grasp-to-eat action generated significantly smaller MGAs than did the grasp-to-place action. Further analysis revealed that similar to the findings in right-handed individuals, this effect was significant only during right-handed movements. Upon further inspection however, we found individual differences in the magnitude and direction of the observed lateralization. These results underscore the evolutionary significance of the grasp-to-eat movement in producing population-level right-handedness in humans as well as highlighting the heterogeneity of the left-handed population.

  13. Lifting strength in two-person teamwork.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Tzu-Hsien

    2016-01-01

    This study examined the effects of lifting range, hand-to-toe distance, and lifting direction on single-person lifting strengths and two-person teamwork lifting strengths. Six healthy males and seven healthy females participated in this study. Two-person teamwork lifting strengths were examined in both strength-matched and strength-unmatched groups. Our results showed that lifting strength significantly decreased with increasing lifting range or hand-to-toe distance. However, lifting strengths were not affected by lifting direction. Teamwork lifting strength did not conform to the law of additivity for both strength-matched and strength-unmatched groups. In general, teamwork lifting strength was dictated by the weaker of the two members, implying that weaker members might be exposed to a higher potential danger in teamwork exertions. To avoid such overexertion in teamwork, members with significantly different strength ability should not be assigned to the same team.

  14. Effect of hand-arm bimanual intensive therapy on fine-motor ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Manal Abd El Wahab

    2014-09-04

    Sep 4, 2014 ... not static during development [15,16], as the rate of develop- ment of the involved ..... the two groups. Variable. Pre. Post. P value. Grip strength. Control. 1.65 ± 1.2 ... [11] Charles JR, Wolf SL, Schneider JA, Gordon AM. Efficacy of a ... with cerebral palsy: growth curve analysis for ages 16 to · 70 months.

  15. Anticipatory grip force between 1 and 3g

    Science.gov (United States)

    White, Olivier; Van Loon, ing.. Jack J. W. A.; Thonnard, Jean-Louis; Hermsdorfer, Joachim; Lefevre, Philippe

    One remarkable capacity of utilizing common tools appropriately as soon as we grasp them relies on the ability to determine in advance the grip force (GF) required to handle them in relation to their mechanical properties and the surrounding environment. This anticipatory strategy avoids the uncompressible delays in the feedback system. The predictive control of GF is made possible because the nervous system can learn, store and then select the internal representations of the dynamics of innumerable objects, known as internal models. Beside this flexibility, the nervous system's ability to learn different task dynamics is often limited in classical robotic experiments The environment itself can be profoundly modified in altered gravity or centrifugation. The few studies that investigated motor adaptation in such contexts did not consider the interaction between gravitational phases and even less the transitions across environments. Here, we tested subject's abilities to adapt to levels of gravitational fields generated by a human centrifuge. In Experiment 1, seven subjects performed 4 lifting trials in each gravitational phase (1 to 2.5g and then 2.5 to 1g by steps of 0.5g) with a 0.12 kg instrumented object. In Experiment 2, six subjects performed vertical oscillations of the object during transitions between 1 and 3g (0.5g steps, ascending and descending phases, profile repeated twice). We continuously measured GF, load force (LF) and ambient gravity. We hypothesized that participants were able to predictively adjust GF to the new environment. In Experiment 1, participants adjusted their GF proportionally to gravity and decreased GF across trials within a given gravitational environment. Preload phases decreased over time from 300ms to 50ms irrespective of gravity. We quantified the abilities of participants to switch across environments by subtracting GF recorded in the last trial in the current gravity level from GF during the first trial in the new environment

  16. JPL Genesis and Rapid Intensification Processes (GRIP) Portal

    Science.gov (United States)

    Knosp, Brian W.; Li, P. Peggy; Vu, Quoc A.; Turk, Francis J.; Shen, Tsae-Pyng J.; Hristova-Veleva, Svetla M.; Licata, Stephen J.; Poulsen, William L.

    2012-01-01

    Satellite observations can play a very important role in airborne field campaigns, since they provide a comprehensive description of the environment that is essential for the experiment design, flight planning, and post-experiment scientific data analysis. In the past, it has been difficult to fully utilize data from multiple NASA satellites due to the large data volume, the complexity of accessing NASA s data in near-real-time (NRT), as well as the lack of software tools to interact with multi-sensor information. The JPL GRIP Portal is a Web portal that serves a comprehensive set of NRT observation data sets from NASA and NOAA satellites describing the atmospheric and oceanic environments related to the genesis and intensification of the tropical storms in the North Atlantic Ocean. Together with the model forecast data from four major global atmospheric models, this portal provides a useful tool for the scientists and forecasters in planning and monitoring the NASA GRIP field campaign during the 2010 Atlantic Ocean hurricane season. This portal uses the Google Earth plug-in to visualize various types of data sets, such as 2D maps, wind vectors, streamlines, 3D data sets presented at series of vertical cross-sections or pointwise vertical profiles, and hurricane best tracks and forecast tracks. Additionally, it allows users to overlap multiple data sets, change the opacity of each image layer, generate animations on the fly with selected data sets, and compare the observation data with the model forecast using two independent calendars. The portal also provides the capability to identify the geographic location of any point of interest. In addition to supporting the airborne mission planning, the NRT data and portal will serve as a very rich source of information during the post-field campaign analysis stage of the airborne experiment. By including a diverse set of satellite observations and model forecasts, it provides a good spatial and temporal context for the

  17. Learned manipulation at unconstrained contacts does not transfer across hands.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Qiushi Fu

    Full Text Available Recent studies about sensorimotor control of the human hand have focused on how dexterous manipulation is learned and generalized. Here we address this question by testing the extent to which learned manipulation can be transferred when the contralateral hand is used and/or object orientation is reversed. We asked subjects to use a precision grip to lift a grip device with an asymmetrical mass distribution while minimizing object roll during lifting by generating a compensatory torque. Subjects were allowed to grasp anywhere on the object's vertical surfaces, and were therefore able to modulate both digit positions and forces. After every block of eight trials performed in one manipulation context (i.e., using the right hand and at a given object orientation, subjects had to lift the same object in the second context for one trial (transfer trial. Context changes were made by asking subjects to switch the hand used to lift the object and/or rotate the object 180° about a vertical axis. Therefore, three transfer conditions, hand switch (HS, object rotation (OR, and both hand switch and object rotation (HS+OR, were tested and compared with hand matched control groups who did not experience context changes. We found that subjects in all transfer conditions adapted digit positions across multiple transfer trials similar to the learning of control groups, regardless of different changes of contexts. Moreover, subjects in both HS and HS+OR group also adapted digit forces similar to the control group, suggesting independent learning of the left hand. In contrast, the OR group showed significant negative transfer of the compensatory torque due to an inability to adapt digit forces. Our results indicate that internal representations of dexterous manipulation tasks may be primarily built through the hand used for learning and cannot be transferred across hands.

  18. Learned manipulation at unconstrained contacts does not transfer across hands.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fu, Qiushi; Choi, Jason Y; Gordon, Andrew M; Jesunathadas, Mark; Santello, Marco

    2014-01-01

    Recent studies about sensorimotor control of the human hand have focused on how dexterous manipulation is learned and generalized. Here we address this question by testing the extent to which learned manipulation can be transferred when the contralateral hand is used and/or object orientation is reversed. We asked subjects to use a precision grip to lift a grip device with an asymmetrical mass distribution while minimizing object roll during lifting by generating a compensatory torque. Subjects were allowed to grasp anywhere on the object's vertical surfaces, and were therefore able to modulate both digit positions and forces. After every block of eight trials performed in one manipulation context (i.e., using the right hand and at a given object orientation), subjects had to lift the same object in the second context for one trial (transfer trial). Context changes were made by asking subjects to switch the hand used to lift the object and/or rotate the object 180° about a vertical axis. Therefore, three transfer conditions, hand switch (HS), object rotation (OR), and both hand switch and object rotation (HS+OR), were tested and compared with hand matched control groups who did not experience context changes. We found that subjects in all transfer conditions adapted digit positions across multiple transfer trials similar to the learning of control groups, regardless of different changes of contexts. Moreover, subjects in both HS and HS+OR group also adapted digit forces similar to the control group, suggesting independent learning of the left hand. In contrast, the OR group showed significant negative transfer of the compensatory torque due to an inability to adapt digit forces. Our results indicate that internal representations of dexterous manipulation tasks may be primarily built through the hand used for learning and cannot be transferred across hands.

  19. Influence of Fatigue on Hand Muscle Coordination and EMG-EMG Coherence During Three-Digit Grasping

    OpenAIRE

    Danna-Dos Santos, Alessander; Poston, Brach; Jesunathadas, Mark; Bobich, Lisa R.; Hamm, Thomas M.; Santello, Marco

    2010-01-01

    Fingertip force control requires fine coordination of multiple hand muscles within and across the digits. While the modulation of neural drive to hand muscles as a function of force has been extensively studied, much less is known about the effects of fatigue on the coordination of simultaneously active hand muscles. We asked eight subjects to perform a fatiguing contraction by gripping a manipulandum with thumb, index, and middle fingers while matching an isometric target force (40% maximal ...

  20. Association between muscular strength and inflammatory markers among elderly persons with cardiac disease: results from the KORA-Age study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Volaklis, K A; Halle, M; Koenig, W; Oberhoffer, R; Grill, E; Peters, A; Strasser, B; Heier, M; Emeny, R; Schulz, H; Ladwig, K H; Meisinger, C; Thorand, B

    2015-11-01

    Little is known about the association between muscle strength and inflammation in diseased individuals and particularly in cardiac patients. Thus, our purpose was to examine the association of muscular strength with the inflammatory status in older adults with and without cardiac disease. The cross-sectional analysis was based on 1079 adults aged 65-94 years, who participated in the KORA-Age study. Participants underwent an interview and extensive physical examinations including anthropometric measurements, registration of diseases and drug intake, determination of health-related behaviors, collection of blood samples for measurements of interleukin-6 and hs-CRP and muscle strength measurement using hand-grip dynamometry. Cardiac patients (n = 323) had higher levels of IL-6 and poorer muscle strength compared with older adults without cardiac disease. Among persons with cardiac diseases, muscle strength in the lower tertile compared to the upper tertile was significantly associated with increased odds of having elevated IL-6 levels (OR 3.53, 95 % CI 1.18-10.50, p = 0.024) after controlling for age, gender, body fat, alcohol intake, smoking status, diseases, medications and physical activity, whereas the association between muscle strength and hs-CRP remained borderline significant (OR 2.80, 95 % CI 0.85-9.24, p = 0.092). The same trends, with slightly lower odds ratios, were also observed in older adults without cardiac disease. Lower levels of muscular strength are associated with higher concentrations of IL-6 and hs-CRP in elderly individuals with and without cardiac disease suggesting a significant contribution of the muscular system in reducing low-grade inflammation that accompanies cardiac disease and aging.

  1. Development of an evaluation function for eye-hand coordination robotic therapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pernalete, N; Tang, F; Chang, S M; Cheng, F Y; Vetter, P; Stegemann, M; Grantner, J

    2011-01-01

    This paper is the continuation of a work presented at ICORR 07, in which we discussed the possibility of improving eye-hand coordination in children diagnosed with this problem, using a robotic mapping from a haptic user interface to a virtual environment. Our goal is to develop, implement and refine a system that will assess and improve the eye-hand coordination and grip strength in children diagnosed with poor graphomotor skills. A detailed analysis of patters (e.g., labyrinths, letters and angles) was conducted in order to select three very distinguishable levels of difficulty that could be included in the system, and which would yield the greatest benefit in terms of assessment of coordination and strength issues as well as in training. Support algorithms (position, force, velocity, inertia and viscosity) were also developed and incorporated into the tasks in order to introduce general computer assistance to the mapping of the user's movements to the computer screen without overriding the user's commands to the robotic device. In order to evaluate performance (given by %accuracy and time) of the executed tasks, a sophisticated evaluation function was designed based on image analysis and edge detection algorithms. This paper presents the development of the haptic tasks, the various assistance algorithms, the description of the evaluation function and the results of a study implemented at the Motor Development Clinic at Cal Poly Pomona. The results (Accuracy and Time) of this function are currently being used as inputs to an Intelligent Decision Support System (described in), which in turn, suggests the next task to be executed by the subject based on his/her performance. © 2011 IEEE

  2. What are the important components of the clinical assessment of hand problems in older adults in primary care? Results of a Delphi study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dziedzic Krysia

    2010-08-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background To identify clinical questions and assessments regarded by health care practitioners as important when assessing undifferentiated hand pain or problems in adults aged 50 years and over presenting to primary care. Methods A purposively selected panel of 26 UK-based Health Care Practitioners comprising occupational therapists, physiotherapists, rheumatologists and general practitioners, were invited to take part in a consensus study involving three postal rounds of a Delphi questionnaire with accompanying case scenarios. Participants were asked to generate questions and assessments (round 1, rate their importance (round 2, and vote on which items were most important (round 3. Results Sixteen Health Care Practitioners agreed to participate with 11 completing all three rounds. The first round of the Delphi study generated 156 questions and 143 assessments. After three rounds agreement was reached on the importance of 25 questions and 19 assessments. Questions were weighted towards current symptoms, but also included the history of previous hand problems, self-reported hand function, co-morbidity and general health. Observation and palpation of features predominated in the choice of assessment, but specific tests, grip strength, evaluation of sensation and hand function were also included. Conclusions A pool of clinical questions and assessments were generated by Health Care Practitioners, and those considered most important for assessing older adults presenting with undifferentiated hand pain and hand problems in primary care were identified. Further evaluation is required to establish the reliability and feasibility of using these questions and assessments in primary care. In particular, the relative contribution of these questions and assessments in evaluating the nature and severity of hand problems, assisting diagnosis, indicating appropriate management, and predicting future course requires further investigation.

  3. Body mass index, muscle strength and physical performance in older adults from eight cohort studies: the HALCyon programme.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rebecca Hardy

    Full Text Available To investigate the associations of body mass index (BMI and grip strength with objective measures of physical performance (chair rise time, walking speed and balance including an assessment of sex differences and non-linearity.Cross-sectional data from eight UK cohort studies (total N = 16,444 participating in the Healthy Ageing across the Life Course (HALCyon research programme, ranging in age from 50 to 90+ years at the time of physical capability assessment, were used. Regression models were fitted within each study and meta-analysis methods used to pool regression coefficients across studies and to assess the extent of heterogeneity between studies.Higher BMI was associated with poorer performance on chair rise (N = 10,773, walking speed (N = 9,761 and standing balance (N = 13,921 tests. Higher BMI was associated with stronger grip strength in men only. Stronger grip strength was associated with better performance on all tests with a tendency for the associations to be stronger in women than men; for example, walking speed was higher by 0.43 cm/s (0.14, 0.71 more per kg in women than men. Both BMI and grip strength remained independently related with performance after mutual adjustment, but there was no evidence of effect modification. Both BMI and grip strength exhibited non-linear relations with performance; those in the lowest fifth of grip strength and highest fifth of BMI having particularly poor performance. Findings were similar when waist circumference was examined in place of BMI.Older men and women with weak muscle strength and high BMI have considerably poorer performance than others and associations were observed even in the youngest cohort (age 53. Although causality cannot be inferred from observational cross-sectional studies, our findings suggest the likely benefit of early assessment and interventions to reduce fat mass and improve muscle strength in the prevention of future functional limitations.

  4. The Effect of a 12-Week Omega-3 Supplementation on Body Composition, Muscle Strength and Physical Performance in Elderly Individuals with Decreased Muscle Mass

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Roma Krzymińska-Siemaszko

    2015-08-01

    Full Text Available The aim of the study was to assess the effect of a polyunsaturated omega-3 fatty acids (PUFA supplementation on the parameters of body composition, muscle strength and physical performance in elderly people with decreased muscle mass (DMM. Fifty three elderly people with an ALM index (the ratio of appendicular lean mass to squared height either below (−2SD: low muscle mass-LMM or between (−1SD and −2SD: the risk of LMM-rLMM the ALM index for the young Polish reference population were randomly assigned to PUFA-treated groups (LMM-PUFA, rLMM-PUFA or control groups (LMM-control, rLMM-control. PUFA-treated groups received capsules containing 1.3 g of PUFA and 10 mg of vitamin E, while the control groups received 11 mg of vitamin E daily for 12 weeks. Body composition (BIA analysis, muscle strength (hand grip measured with dynamometer and physical performance (Timed Up and Go test-TUG were assessed before and after supplementation. No statistically significant differences were observed either in muscle mass or in the hand grip and TUG in any group. The post-pre difference (mean ± SD in ALM index was as follows (kg/m2: LMM-PUFA: 0.00 ± 0.30, rLMM-PUFA: 0.00 ± 0.22, LMM-control: 0.03 ± 0.36, rLMM-control: –0.03 ± 0.20. In our study, a 12 week supplementation of PUFA did not affect the evaluated parameters in elderly individuals with DMM.

  5. Gripping during climbing of arboreal snakes may be safe but not economical

    Science.gov (United States)

    Byrnes, Greg; Jayne, Bruce C.

    2014-01-01

    On the steep surfaces that are common in arboreal environments, many types of animals without claws or adhesive structures must use muscular force to generate sufficient normal force to prevent slipping and climb successfully. Unlike many limbed arboreal animals that have discrete gripping regions on the feet, the elongate bodies of snakes allow for considerable modulation of both the size and orientation of the gripping region. We quantified the gripping forces of snakes climbing a vertical cylinder to determine the extent to which their force production favoured economy or safety. Our sample included four boid species and one colubrid. Nearly all of the gripping forces that we observed for each snake exceeded our estimate of the minimum required, and snakes commonly produced more than three times the normal force required to support their body weight. This suggests that a large safety factor to avoid slipping and falling is more important than locomotor economy. PMID:25142200

  6. Adaptive grip force is modulated by subthalamic beta activity in Parkinson's disease patients

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lukas L. Imbach

    2015-01-01

    Conclusion: The time-locked suppression of beta oscillatory activity in the STN is in line with previous reports of beta ERD prior to voluntary movements. Our results show that the STN is involved in anticipatory grip force control in PD patients. The difference in the phasic beta ERD between the two tasks and the reduction of cortico-subthalamic synchronization suggests that qualitatively different neuronal network states are involved in different grip force control tasks.

  7. Hand-held Dynamo-metry

    OpenAIRE

    Ploeg, Rutger Jan Otto van der

    1992-01-01

    This study describes the application of a hand-held dynamometer that was designed to measure muscle strength in normal individuals and neurological patients in a simple way, comparable to manual muscle testing. Zie: Summary

  8. PICK1 interacts with ABP/GRIP to regulate AMPA receptor trafficking.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lu, Wei; Ziff, Edward B

    2005-08-04

    PICK1 and ABP/GRIP bind to the AMPA receptor (AMPAR) GluR2 subunit C terminus. Transfer of the receptor from ABP/GRIP to PICK1, facilitated by GluR2 S880 phosphorylation, may initiate receptor trafficking. Here we report protein interactions that regulate these steps. The PICK1 BAR domain interacts intermolecularly with the ABP/GRIP linker II region and intramolecularly with the PICK1 PDZ domain. Binding of PKCalpha or GluR2 to the PICK1 PDZ domain disrupts the intramolecular interaction and facilitates the PICK1 BAR domain association with ABP/GRIP. Interference with the PICK1-ABP/GRIP interaction impairs S880 phosphorylation of GluR2 by PKC and decreases the constitutive surface expression of GluR2, the NMDA-induced endocytosis of GluR2, and recycling of internalized GluR2. We suggest that the PICK1 interaction with ABP/GRIP is a critical step in controlling GluR2 trafficking.

  9. Moving a hand-held object: Reconstruction of referent coordinate and apparent stiffness trajectories.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ambike, S; Zhou, T; Zatsiorsky, V M; Latash, M L

    2015-07-01

    This study used the framework of the referent configuration hypothesis and slow changes in the external conditions during vertical oscillation of a hand-held object to infer the characteristics of hypothetical control variables. The study had two main objectives: (1) to show that hypothetical control variables, namely, referent coordinates and apparent stiffness of vertical hand position and grip force can be measured in an experiment; and (2) to establish relation(s) between these control variables that yield the classic grip-force-load-force coupling. Healthy subjects gripped a handle and performed vertical oscillations between visual targets at one of five metronome-prescribed frequencies. A HapticMaster robot was used to induce slow changes in the vertical force applied to the handle, while the size of the handle was changed slowly leading to changes in the grip aperture. The subjects were instructed not to react to possible changes in the external forces. A linear, second-order model was used to reconstruct the referent coordinate and apparent stiffness values for each phase of the vertical oscillation cycle using across-cycle regressions. The reconstructed time profiles of the referent coordinates and apparent stiffness showed consistent trends across subjects and movement frequencies. To validate the method, these values were used to predict the vertical force and the grip force applied to the handle for movement cycles that were not utilized in the reconstruction process. Analysis of the coupling between the four variables, two referent coordinates and two apparent stiffness values, revealed a single strong constraint reflecting the coupling between the grip force and vertical force. We view these data as providing experimental support for the idea of controlling natural, multi-muscle actions with shifts in a low-dimensional set of referent coordinates.

  10. Cross-talk in mechanomyographic signals from the forearm muscles during sub-maximal to maximal isometric grip force.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Md Anamul Islam

    Full Text Available PURPOSE: This study aimed: i to examine the relationship between the magnitude of cross-talk in mechanomyographic (MMG signals generated by the extensor digitorum (ED, extensor carpi ulnaris (ECU, and flexor carpi ulnaris (FCU muscles with the sub-maximal to maximal isometric grip force, and with the anthropometric parameters of the forearm, and ii to quantify the distribution of the cross-talk in the MMG signal to determine if it appears due to the signal component of intramuscular pressure waves produced by the muscle fibers geometrical changes or due to the limb tremor. METHODS: Twenty, right-handed healthy men (mean ± SD: age  = 26.7±3.83 y; height  = 174.47±6.3 cm; mass  = 72.79±14.36 kg performed isometric muscle actions in 20% increment from 20% to 100% of the maximum voluntary isometric contraction (MVIC. During each muscle action, MMG signals generated by each muscle were detected using three separate accelerometers. The peak cross-correlations were used to quantify the cross-talk between two muscles. RESULTS: The magnitude of cross-talk in the MMG signals among the muscle groups ranged from, R2(x, y = 2.45-62.28%. Linear regression analysis showed that the magnitude of cross-talk increased linearly (r2 = 0.857-0.90 with the levels of grip force for all the muscle groups. The amount of cross-talk showed weak positive and negative correlations (r2 = 0.016-0.216 with the circumference and length of the forearm respectively, between the muscles at 100% MVIC. The cross-talk values significantly differed among the MMG signals due to: limb tremor (MMGTF, slow firing motor unit fibers (MMGSF and fast firing motor unit fibers (MMGFF between the muscles at 100% MVIC (p<0.05, η2 = 0.47-0.80. SIGNIFICANCE: The results of this study may be used to improve our understanding of the mechanics of the forearm muscles during different levels of the grip force.

  11. [Early functional passive mobilization of flexor tendon injuries of the hand (zone 2) : Exercise with an exoskeleton compared to physical therapy].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gülke, Joachim; Mentzel, Martin; Krischak, Gert; Gulkin, David; Dornacher, Daniel; Wachter, Nikolaus

    2017-07-20

    These days there are different types of aftercare following flexor tendon injury. Patients in this study received a dynamic Kleinert protocol and additionally two different postoperative treatments. Both treatment groups were compared to each other and results were put into perspective when compared to other treatment options. Sixty-two patients presenting with clean lesions of the two flexor tendons in zone 2 received postoperative treatment with a dynamic Kleinert protocol. Patients were randomly divided into either Group I (physical therapy) or Group II (exoskeleton). Range of motion was assessed after 6, 12 and 18 weeks. In addition, we measured the Strickland score and grip strength at the 18-week follow-up. DASH scores were obtained at weeks 12 and 18. Regardless of the received postoperative treatment, range of motion was predominantly limited in the proximal interphalangeal and distal interphalangeal joints after 6 weeks. This deficit decreased with time and almost full range of motion was achieved after 18 weeks. Grip strength measured 75% (Group I) and 78% (Group II) of the healthy hand's level. Good functional outcome was observed in the DASH scores after 12 weeks, which improved further, measuring 7.5 (Group I) and 6.8 (Group II) at the 18-week follow-up. We did not see any clinically relevant differences between the two patient groups. Regarding possible reruptures, the Kleinert protocol delivers a safe treatment regime. The possible disadvantage of flexion contractures with the Kleinert protocol was not seen in our measurements. Additional motion exercises using an exoskeleton delivered comparable results to classic physical therapy.

  12. Representing tools as hand movements: early and somatotopic visuomotor transformations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bartoli, Eleonora; Maffongelli, Laura; Jacono, Marco; D'Ausilio, Alessandro

    2014-08-01

    The term affordance defines a property of objects, which relates to the possible interactions that an agent can carry out on that object. In monkeys, canonical neurons encode both the visual and the motor properties of objects with high specificity. However, it is not clear if in humans exists a similarly fine-grained description of these visuomotor transformations. In particular, it has not yet been proven that the processing of visual features related to specific affordances induces both specific and early visuomotor transformations, given that complete specificity has been reported to emerge quite late (300-450ms). In this study, we applied an adaptation-stimulation paradigm to investigate early cortico-spinal facilitation and hand movements׳ synergies evoked by the observation of tools. We adapted, through passive observation of finger movements, neuronal populations coding either for precision or power grip actions. We then presented the picture of one tool affording one of the two grasps types and applied single-pulse Transcranial Magnetic Stimulation (TMS) to the hand primary motor cortex, 150ms after image onset. Cortico-spinal excitability of the Abductor Digiti Minimi and Abductor Pollicis Brevis showed a detailed pattern of modulations, matching tools׳ affordances. Similarly, TMS-induced hand movements showed a pattern of grip-specific whole hand synergies. These results offer a direct proof of the emergence of an early visuomotor transformation when tools are observed, that maintains the same amount of synergistic motor details as the actions we can perform on them.

  13. fMRI-compatible rehabilitation hand device

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tzika Aria

    2006-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI has been widely used in studying human brain functions and neurorehabilitation. In order to develop complex and well-controlled fMRI paradigms, interfaces that can precisely control and measure output force and kinematics of the movements in human subjects are needed. Optimized state-of-the-art fMRI methods, combined with magnetic resonance (MR compatible robotic devices for rehabilitation, can assist therapists to quantify, monitor, and improve physical rehabilitation. To achieve this goal, robotic or mechatronic devices with actuators and sensors need to be introduced into an MR environment. The common standard mechanical parts can not be used in MR environment and MR compatibility has been a tough hurdle for device developers. Methods This paper presents the design, fabrication and preliminary testing of a novel, one degree of freedom, MR compatible, computer controlled, variable resistance hand device that may be used in brain MR imaging during hand grip rehabilitation. We named the device MR_CHIROD (Magnetic Resonance Compatible Smart Hand Interfaced Rehabilitation Device. A novel feature of the device is the use of Electro-Rheological Fluids (ERFs to achieve tunable and controllable resistive force generation. ERFs are fluids that experience dramatic changes in rheological properties, such as viscosity or yield stress, in the presence of an electric field. The device consists of four major subsystems: a an ERF based resistive element; b a gearbox; c two handles and d two sensors, one optical encoder and one force sensor, to measure the patient induced motion and force. The smart hand device is designed to resist up to 50% of the maximum level of gripping force of a human hand and be controlled in real time. Results Laboratory tests of the device indicate that it was able to meet its design objective to resist up to approximately 50% of the maximum handgrip force. The detailed

  14. Analysis of the Static Strength and Relative Endurance of Women Athletes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Heyward, Vivian; McCreary, Leslie

    1977-01-01

    Investigations of static strength and relative endurance of the grip muscles of women athletes revealed that mean endurance time was significantly greater than for men. Results were discussed in light of evidence suggesting possible sex differences in muscle hypertrophy, capillarization of muscle tissue, critical occluding tension level, and…

  15. Decoding a wide range of hand configurations from macaque motor, premotor, and parietal cortices.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schaffelhofer, Stefan; Agudelo-Toro, Andres; Scherberger, Hansjörg

    2015-01-21

    Despite recent advances in decoding cortical activity for motor control, the development of hand prosthetics remains a major challenge. To reduce the complexity of such applications, higher cortical areas that also represent motor plans rather than just the individual movements might be advantageous. We investigated the decoding of many grip types using spiking activity from the anterior intraparietal (AIP), ventral premotor (F5), and primary motor (M1) cortices. Two rhesus monkeys were trained to grasp 50 objects in a delayed task while hand kinematics and spiking activity from six implanted electrode arrays (total of 192 electrodes) were recorded. Offline, we determined 20 grip types from the kinematic data and decoded these hand configurations and the grasped objects with a simple Bayesian classifier. When decoding from AIP, F5, and M1 combined, the mean accuracy was 50% (using planning activity) and 62% (during motor execution) for predicting the 50 objects (chance level, 2%) and substantially larger when predicting the 20 grip types (planning, 74%; execution, 86%; chance level, 5%). When decoding from individual arrays, objects and grip types could be predicted well during movement planning from AIP (medial array) and F5 (lateral array), whereas M1 predictions were poor. In contrast, predictions during movement execution were best from M1, whereas F5 performed only slightly worse. These results demonstrate for the first time that a large number of grip types can be decoded from higher cortical areas during movement preparation and execution, which could be relevant for future neuroprosthetic devices that decode motor plans.

  16. AtGRIP protein locates to the secretory vesicles of trans Golgi-network in Arabidopsis root cap cells

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    CHEN Ying; ZHANG Wei; ZHAO Lei; LI Yan

    2008-01-01

    GRIP domain proteins, locating to the trans-Golgi network, are thought to play an essential role in Golgi apparatus trafficking in yeast and animal cells. In the present study, AtGRIP cDNA was amplified by reverse transcriptase PCR from RNA isolated from Arabidopsis seedling. The GST fusion protein of AtGRIP was affinity-purified and its rabbit polyclonal antibody was obtained. Immuno-blotting with the purified anti-AtGRIP polyclonal antibody demonstrated that the molecular mass of AtGRIP protein is about 92 kD, and its expression is not tissue-specific in Arabidopsis. Immunoflourescent labeling and confocal microscopy revealed that the AtGRIP protein was co-localized with Golgi stacks in Arabidop-sis root cells. Immuno-gold labeling and electron microscopy observation showed that AtGRIP protein was mainly located to the membrane of the secretory vesicles of trans-Golgi network in Arabidopsis root cap cells. Taken together, these results indicate that the localization of GRIP domain proteins be-tween plants and animal cells are conserved. These results also suggest that the AtGRIP may be in-volved in regulating the formation or sorting of Golgi-associated vesicles in plant cells.

  17. Grip type and task goal modify reach-to-grasp performance in post-stroke hemiparesis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schaefer, Sydney Y.; DeJong, Stacey L.; Cherry, Kendra M.; Lang, Catherine E.

    2011-01-01

    This study investigated whether grip type and/or task goal influenced reaching and grasping performance in post-stroke hemiparesis. Sixteen adults with post-stroke hemiparesis and twelve healthy adults reached to and grasped a cylindrical object using one of two grip types (3-finger or palmar) to achieve one of two task goals (hold or lift). Performance of the stroke group was characteristic of hemiparetic limb movement during reach-to-grasp, with more curved handpaths and slower velocities compared to the control group. These effects were present regardless of grip type or task goal. Other measures of reaching (reach time and reach velocity at object contact) and grasping (peak thumb-index finger aperture during the reach and peak grip force during the grasp) were differentially affected by grip type, task goal, or both, despite the presence of hemiparesis, providing new evidence that changes in motor patterns after stroke may occur to compensate for stroke-related motor impairment. PMID:22357103

  18. Proposed technique for inguinal hernia repair with self-gripping mesh: avoiding fixation to undesired structures.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Porrero, J L; Cano-Valderrama, O; Castillo, M J; Alonso, M T

    2015-10-01

    Self-gripping meshes have been developed to avoid fixing sutures during inguinal hernia repair. Operative time is shorter when using a self-gripping mesh than with conventional Lichtenstein repair. However, these meshes can be difficult to handle because they fix to undesired structures. The aim of this report is to describe a new technique to avoid this problem. Inguinal hernia dissection is made as usual. Once dissection is finished, a Parietex ProGrip(®) (Covidien, Dublin, Ireland) flat sheet mesh is cut depending on the size needed. A small split is made between the lower and medium third of the mesh to mark where the split for the spermatic cord will be. Using this mark, the upper third of the mesh is folded over the medium third, hiding the microgrips that make this a self-gripping mesh. In this way, only the lower third of the mesh has the microgrips exposed and the mesh can be fixed to the pubic bone and inguinal ligament without fixation to undesired structures. Once the lower third of the mesh is fixed, the split for the spermatic cord is completed and the upper part of the mesh is passed below the spermatic cord. Then, the mesh is unfolded to expose the microgrips again and the medium and upper third of the mesh are descended to its final position. This proposed technique for inguinal hernia repair with self-gripping mesh makes the surgery easier, avoiding mesh fixation to undesired structures.

  19. Comparison of Jamar and Bodygrip Dynamometers for Handgrip Strength Measurement.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guerra, Rita S; Amaral, Teresa F; Sousa, Ana S; Fonseca, Isabel; Pichel, Fernando; Restivo, Maria T

    2017-07-01

    Guerra, RS, Amaral, TF, Sousa, AS, Fonseca, I, Pichel, F, and Restivo, MT. Comparison of Jamar and Bodygrip dynamometers for handgrip strength measurement. J Strength Cond Res 31(7): 1931-1940, 2017-Studies that compared the agreement between Jamar and other models of dynamometers for handgrip strength (HGS) measurement have exhibited variability in the provided results. The lack of comparability between dynamometers led to the development of the Bodygrip dynamometer. This study aims to examine the reliability of the Bodygrip for HGS measurement, to compare it with the Jamar, and to explore the HGS differences between instruments considering the ergonomic effect of using the Bodygrip with 2 different handles. A cross-sectional study was conducted in free-living (n = 114, 18-89 years) and inpatient (n = 50, 65-93 years) volunteers. Nondominant HGS was tested randomly with the Jamar and Bodygrip, the latter using 2 different handles-curved and straight types. Handgrip strength was obtained for each participant under the same conditions. Each individual performed 2 HGS measurements with each dynamometer, and the maximum HGS value was considered for dynamometers comparison. Differences in the maximum HGS value between the 2 devices (Jamar-Bodygrip), intraclass correlation coefficients (ICCs), Bland and Altman plots, and limits of agreement were obtained. Correlation between the highest HGS measurement obtained for the nondominant hand with the Jamar and with the Bodygrip using each handle was excellent (ICCs: 0.93-0.95). Mean differences of -0.5 (limits of agreement: -4.6; 3.5) kgf with the curved handle and of 1.0 (-7.7; 9.7) kgf with the straight handle for the free-living participants were obtained, whereas for inpatients these values were -1.0 (-3.8; 1.9) kgf and 2.1 (-3.3; 7.5) kgf, respectively, for the curved and straight handles. The Bodygrip is comparable to the Jamar in free-living adults and in hospitalized older adults, exhibiting excellent interinstrument

  20. Muscle strength in patients with chronic pain

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van Wilgen, C.P.; Akkerman, L.; Wieringa, J.; Dijkstra, P.U.

    2003-01-01

    Objective: To analyse the influence of chronic pain on muscle strength. Design: Muscle strength of patients with unilateral nonspecific chronic pain, in an upper or lower limb, were measured according to a standardized protocol using a hand-held dynamometer. Before and after muscle strength

  1. Muscle strength in patients with chronic pain

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van Wilgen, C.P.; Akkerman, L.; Wieringa, J.; Dijkstra, P.U.

    2003-01-01

    Objective: To analyse the influence of chronic pain on muscle strength. Design: Muscle strength of patients with unilateral nonspecific chronic pain, in an upper or lower limb, were measured according to a standardized protocol using a hand-held dynamometer. Before and after muscle strength measurem

  2. Intentional switches between bimanual coordination patterns are primarily effectuated by the nondominant hand

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    de Poel, HJ; Peper, CE; Beek, PJ

    2006-01-01

    Based on indications that hand dominance is characterized by asymmetrical interlimb coupling strength (with the dominant hand exerting stronger influences on the nondominant hand than vice versa), intentional switches between rhythmic bimanual coordination patterns were predicted to be mediated prim

  3. The effects of joint torque, pace and work:rest ratio on powered hand tool operations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lin, Jia-Hua; McGorry, Raymond W; Maikala, Rammohan V

    2012-01-01

    Repetitive use of hand-held power tools is associated with work-related upper extremity musculoskeletal disorders. Using a pneumatic nutrunner, 21 men completed twelve 360 repetitive fastener-driving sessions on three joints (hard, soft and control) at slow and fast pace, and two different work:rest patterns. Handgrip force and perceived exertions were collected throughout each session. For the control joint, the mean grip force exerted was 39.6% of maximum voluntary exertion (MVE) whereas during hard and soft joint sessions it was 48.9% MVE and 56.9% MVE, respectively. Throughout each session, the grip force decreased, more while operating soft and hard joints as compared with the control joint (regression slope: -0.022 and -0.023, compared with -0.007 N/drive, respectively), suggesting considerable upper extremity muscular effort by participants during torque buildup. Fast work pace resulted in higher average grip forces by participants but a greater decrease in the force as the session progressed. Providing rest breaks reduced perceived exertions. The findings gain additional knowledge for assembly task design to possibly reduce the hand/arm injury risks for the operator. Practitioner Summary: Powered hand tools are widely used in assembly and manufacturing industries. However, the nature of their repetitive use on human operator biomechanical and perceptual responses is not fully understood. This study examined work-related risk factors such as joint torque, pace and work:rest ratios on powered hand tool performance.

  4. Extraction of time and frequency features from grip force rates during dexterous manipulation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mojtahedi, Keivan; Fu, Qiushi; Santello, Marco

    2015-05-01

    The time course of grip force from object contact to onset of manipulation has been extensively studied to gain insight into the underlying control mechanisms. Of particular interest to the motor neuroscience and clinical communities is the phenomenon of bell-shaped grip force rate (GFR) that has been interpreted as indicative of feedforward force control. However, this feature has not been assessed quantitatively. Furthermore, the time course of grip force may contain additional features that could provide insight into sensorimotor control processes. In this study, we addressed these questions by validating and applying two computational approaches to extract features from GFR in humans: 1) fitting a Gaussian function to GFR and quantifying the goodness of the fit [root-mean-square error, (RMSE)]; and 2) continuous wavelet transform (CWT), where we assessed the correlation of the GFR signal with a Mexican Hat function. Experiment 1 consisted of a classic pseudorandomized presentation of object mass (light or heavy), where grip forces developed to lift a mass heavier than expected are known to exhibit corrective responses. For Experiment 2, we applied our two techniques to analyze grip force exerted for manipulating an inverted T-shaped object whose center of mass was changed across blocks of consecutive trials. For both experiments, subjects were asked to grasp the object at either predetermined or self-selected grasp locations ("constrained" and "unconstrained" task, respectively). Experiment 1 successfully validated the use of RMSE and CWT as they correctly distinguished trials with versus without force corrective responses. RMSE and CWT also revealed that grip force is characterized by more feedback-driven corrections when grasping at self-selected contact points. Future work will examine the application of our analytical approaches to a broader range of tasks, e.g., assessment of recovery of sensorimotor function following clinical intervention, interlimb

  5. Maximal intermittent handgrip strategy: design and evaluation of an exercise protocol and a grip tool.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bentley, Danielle Christine; Thomas, Scott Gordon

    2016-01-01

    Handgrip (HG) exercise has been prescribed as a lifestyle intervention to successfully reduce resting blood pressure (BP) among heterogeneous groups of participants. Current HG protocols have limited accessibility due to complicated exercise prescriptions and sophisticated required equipment. Therefore, this research describes the design and evaluation of the maximal intermittent (MINT) HG exercise strategy, consisting of both a novel exercise protocol (32×5 seconds maximal grip squeezes separated by 5 seconds of rest between sets) and an original grip tool. This research was a multistep progressive design that included 51 postmenopausal women as participants in three separate research studies. Part 1 of this research focuses on the MINT exercise protocol. A literature-informed rationale for the design of the protocol is described. This includes exercise intensity, work-to-rest ratio, and total exercise duration with reference to the unique physiology (mechanoreflex and metaboreflex) of postmenopausal women. Subsequent experimental analyses of acute responses to the MINT protocol revealed that women produced 50% of their maximum grip force with moderate cardiovascular responses (increases of systolic BP: 41.6 mmHg, diastolic BP: 20.1 mmHg, heart rate: 35.1 bpm) that remained far below the thresholds of concern identified by the American College of Sports Medicine. Part 2 of this research describes the creation of a novel grip tool, beginning with a mixed-methods assessment of participant opinions regarding two distinct in-laboratory grip tools, leading to the creation of four prototype MINT tools. Structured focus groups revealed a strong preference for MINT prototype 1 for all tool design features, including color, shape, size, and foam grip. Collectively, the result of this multistep research is a novel HG exercise strategy with enhanced accessibility by being easy to understand and simple to execute. The long-term training effectiveness of MINT as an exercise

  6. EFFICACY OF UNDERWATER INTERFERENTIAL CURRENT ON HAND FUNCTION IN PSORIATIC ARTHRITIS PATIENTS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ahmed Fathy Samhan. PhD PT

    2014-04-01

    Full Text Available Background: Psoriatic arthritis is an entity of inflammatory joint disease associated with psoriasis. Purpose: The purpose of this study was to evaluate the efficacy of underwater interferential current therapy on hand function in psoriatic arthritis of both hands. Method: Thirty patients (18 females and 12 males had psoriatic arthritis of hands, aged 42 to 50 years with 45.77 ± 3.52 mean, were assigned randomly into two groups of equal number: study group received 20 minutes underwater interferential current for one month, 3 times per week (12 sessions and control group received placebo interferential current. Visual analogue scale for patient-reported pain, the Disability of Arm, Shoulder and Hand questionnaire score, and hand function (grip force in Pound of dominant hand were assessed pretreatment and post-treatment. Results: showed significant improvement in the 3 outcomes in study group (p 0.005. Visual analogue scale had a strong positive correlation (p < 0.001 with the disability score and a strong negative correlation (p < 0.001 with the grip force. Conclusion: Using underwater interferential current therapy in patient with psoriatic arthritis of hands was effective in improvement of hand function and quality of life.

  7. Robot hand with soft tactile sensors and underactuated control.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tsutsui, H; Murashima, Y; Honma, N; Akazawa, K

    2013-01-01

    We developed a robot hand with three fingers and controlled them using underactuated control to obtain a more flexible grip. With underactuated control, we can flexibly operate an artificial robot hand and reduce the number of actuators. The robot fingers had three joints to imitate human fingers. One finger was driven by one wire and one servo motor for bending and by three torsion springs for extension. We also developed a soft tactile sensor having three pneumatic sensors and mounted it on front of each robot fingers. We obtained the following information from our experimental examinations of the robot hand. It adaptively grasped an object by underactuated control. The soft tactile sensor deftly touched an object, and the data showed the contact position with. By analyzing the data from tactile sensors, we obtained the rough information of the object's shape.

  8. Hand Dominance and Common Hand Conditions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lutsky, Kevin; Kim, Nayoung; Medina, Juana; Maltenfort, Mitchell; Beredjiklian, Pedro K

    2016-05-01

    The goals of this study were to (1) assess how frequently patients present for evaluation of common hand disorders in relation to hand dominance and (2) evaluate the effect of hand dominance on function in patients with these conditions. The authors hypothesized that (1) the majority of patients who seek evaluation would have a condition that affects the dominant hand, and (2) disability scores would be worse if the dominant hand is involved. They retrospectively reviewed the records of consecutive patients who presented for treatment to their institution with unilateral symptoms of 5 common disorders of the hand: carpal tunnel syndrome (CTS), de Quervain's tenosynovitis (DEQ), lateral epicondylitis (LE), hand osteoarthritis (OA), and trigger finger (TF). The authors assessed the effect of diagnosis and hand dominance on Disabilities of the Arm, Shoulder and Hand (DASH) scores. The study group comprised 1029 patients (379 men and 650 women) with a mean age of 59.5 years. Ninety percent were right-hand dominant. The dominant and nondominant hands were affected with relatively equal frequency for CTS, DEQ, OA, and TF (range, 45%-53%). Patients with LE had a significantly higher incidence of dominant hand involvement. Men had lower DASH scores than women by an average of 7.9 points, and DASH scores were significantly but slightly higher for the overall group (3.2 points) when the dominant side was affected. Men with LE and women with TF and OA had significantly higher DASH scores when their dominant extremity was affected. Common hand disorders such as CTS, DEQ, OA, and TF affect the dominant and nondominant hands in roughly equivalent proportions, whereas LE is more common on the dominant side. Dominant hand involvement results in significantly worse DASH scores, although the magnitude of this is relatively small. Women have significantly higher DASH scores than men for the conditions evaluated. [Orthopedics. 2016; 39(3):e444-e448.].

  9. Your hands are precious, look after them!

    CERN Multimedia

    2003-01-01

    With their 27 bones, 33 muscles and 22 joints, hands are the most complicated and at the same time the most useful parts of the body. Without them, we would not be able to grip things between our fingers, pick them up, turn them, lift them, hold them or handle them. Due to this very usefulness, however, they are more prone to injury than any other part of the body. This year, over 30% of CERN's industrial accidents involved hand injuries. Many of these accidents could have been avoided if the people concerned had worn suitable gloves or, quite simply, made proper use of tools adapted to the work they were doing. 1. Mechanically sustained injuries Most hand injuries are mechanically sustained. - Cuts and pricks often occur during the use or handling of sharp objects and tools. The Medical Service has treated many patients with cuts received when handling iron plates or when using cutters without taking adequate precautions. Such injuries range from superficial cuts to deep wounds with severed tendons or bl...

  10. Hand Rehabilitation Learning System With an Exoskeleton Robotic Glove.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ma, Zhou; Ben-Tzvi, Pinhas; Danoff, Jerome

    2016-12-01

    This paper presents a hand rehabilitation learning system, the SAFE Glove, a device that can be utilized to enhance the rehabilitation of subjects with disabilities. This system is able to learn fingertip motion and force for grasping different objects and then record and analyze the common movements of hand function including grip and release patterns. The glove is then able to reproduce these movement patterns in playback fashion to assist a weakened hand to accomplish these movements, or to modulate the assistive level based on the user's or therapist's intent for the purpose of hand rehabilitation therapy. Preliminary data have been collected from healthy hands. To demonstrate the glove's ability to manipulate the hand, the glove has been fitted on a wooden hand and the grasping of various objects was performed. To further prove that hands can be safely driven by this haptic mechanism, force sensor readings placed between each finger and the mechanism are plotted. These experimental results demonstrate the potential of the proposed system in rehabilitation therapy.

  11. The split hand syndrome in amyotrophic lateral sclerosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eisen, Andrew; Kuwabara, Satoshi

    2012-04-01

    In amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS), hand muscle wasting preferentially affects the 'thenar (lateral) hand', including the abductor pollicis brevis (APB) and first dorsal interosseous (FDI) muscles, with relative sparing of the hypothenar muscles (the abductor digiti minimi (ADM)). This peculiar pattern of dissociated atrophy of the intrinsic hand muscles is termed the 'split hand' and is rarely seen in diseases other than ALS. The muscles involved in the split hand are innervated through the same spinal segments (C8 and T1), and FDI and ADM, which are differentially affected, are both ulnar nerve innervated. The physiological mechanisms underlying the split hand in ALS are incompletely understood but both cortical and spinal/peripheral mechanisms are probably involved. Motor potentials evoked by magnetic stimulation are significantly smaller when recorded from the thenar complex, compared with the hypothenar muscles, supporting a cortical mechanism. But peripheral axonal excitability studies have suggested that APB/FDI motor axons have more prominent persistent sodium currents than ADM axons, leading to higher axonal excitability and thereby more ready degeneration. Pincer or precision grip is vital to human hand function, and frequent use of thenar complex muscles may lead to greater oxidative stress and metabolic demands at both upper and lower motoneurons innervating the APB and FDI. The split hand is a useful diagnostic sign in early ALS, and recent objective studies indicate that the sign has a high degree of specificity.

  12. Wear and Grip Loss Evaluation of High Chromium Welding Deposits Applied on Sugar Cane Rolls1

    OpenAIRE

    Diaz Millan, Sebastian; Rugbeño S.A.S; Aguilar Castro, Yesid; Escuela de Ingeniería de Materiales, Universidad del Valle, Cali, Colombia; Casanova García, Gonzalo Fernando; Escuela de Ingeniería Mecánica,Universidad del Valle, Cali, Colombia

    2015-01-01

    Wear on sugar cane rolls is an expensive maintenance problem for the sugar cane industry. Wear produces loss of sucrose extraction and loss of grip of the roll on the bagasse. This paper presents the evaluation of wear and loss of grip of hypoeutectic and hypereutectic high chromium welding deposits applied on ASTM A-36 steel and gray cast iron. A modified ASTM G-65 standard test was used. Wear was produced by the abrasive action of wet bagasse with three levels of mineral extraneous matter. ...

  13. Assessment of the effectiveness of low-level laser therapy on the hands of patients with rheumatoid arthritis: a randomized double-blind controlled trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Meireles, Sandra Mara; Jones, Anamaria; Jennings, Fabio; Suda, Alina Lica; Parizotto, Nivaldo Antônio; Natour, Jamil

    2010-05-01

    Assess the effectiveness of low-level laser therapy on pain reduction and improvement in function in the hands of patients with rheumatoid arthritis. A randomized double-blind controlled trial was carried out on 82 patients with rheumatoid arthritis. The experimental group was submitted to the application of laser therapy, whereas the control group received a placebo laser. Aluminum gallium arsenide laser was used, at a wavelength of 785 nm, dose of 3 J/cm(2) and mean power of 70 mW. The groups were homogenous at the beginning of the study with regard to the main variables (p > 0.05). There were no statistically significant differences between groups in most of the measurements taken at the end of the intervention including the primary variables; the following variables were the exceptions: favoring the experimental group-inflammation of the interphalangeal joint of the right thumb (p = 0.012) and perimetry of the interphalangeal joint of the left thumb (p = 0.013); and favoring the control group-flexion of the proximal interphalangeal joint of the right fifth finger (p = 0.021), perimetry of the third proximal interphalangeal joint of the right hand (p = 0.044), grip strength in the left hand (p = 0.010), and the work domain of the Disabilities of the Arm, Shoulder and Hand (DASH) questionnaire (p = 0.010). We conclude that low-level aluminum gallium arsenide laser therapy is not effective at the wavelength, dosage, and power studied for the treatment of hands among patients with rheumatoid arthritis.

  14. Hand Hygiene Saves Lives

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... children, parents, and public health professionals. More > Hand Hygiene Saves Lives (5:10) Recommend on Facebook Tweet Share Compartir Hand Hygiene Saves Lives Hand Hygiene Saves Lives Transcript [28 KB, 2 pages] High ...

  15. Hand Hygiene Saves Lives

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... including, children, parents, and public health professionals. More > Hand Hygiene Saves Lives (5:10) Recommend on Facebook Tweet Share Compartir Hand Hygiene Saves Lives Hand Hygiene Saves Lives Transcript [28 KB, 2 pages] High ...

  16. Hand Hygiene Saves Lives

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... including, children, parents, and public health professionals. More > Hand Hygiene Saves Lives (5:10) Recommend on Facebook Tweet Share Compartir Hand Hygiene Saves Lives Hand Hygiene Saves Lives Transcript [28 KB, 2 pages] High ...

  17. Guideline Implementation: Hand Hygiene.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goldberg, Judith L

    2017-02-01

    Performing proper hand hygiene and surgical hand antisepsis is essential to reducing the rates of health care-associated infections, including surgical site infections. The updated AORN "Guideline for hand hygiene" provides guidance on hand hygiene and surgical hand antisepsis, the wearing of fingernail polish and artificial nails, proper skin care to prevent dermatitis, the wearing of jewelry, hand hygiene product selection, and quality assurance and performance improvement considerations. This article focuses on key points of the guideline to help perioperative personnel make informed decisions about hand hygiene and surgical hand antisepsis. The key points address the necessity of keeping fingernails and skin healthy, not wearing jewelry on the hands or wrists in the perioperative area, properly performing hand hygiene and surgical hand antisepsis, and involving patients and visitors in hand hygiene initiatives. Perioperative RNs should review the complete guideline for additional information and for guidance when writing and updating policies and procedures.

  18. The cost-effectiveness of grip on challenging behaviour: an economic evaluation of a care programme for managing challenging behaviour

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Zwijsen, S.A.; Bosmans, J.E.; Gerritsen, D.L.; Pot, A.M.; Hertogh, C.M.; Smalbrugge, M.

    2016-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: The objective of the study was to evaluate the cost-effectiveness of implementing the Grip on Challenging Behaviour care programme (GRIP) on dementia special care units in comparison with usual care. METHODS: A stepped wedge design was used. Challenging behaviour and quality of life were

  19. Strength Training

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... strengthens your heart and lungs. When you strength train with weights, you're using your muscles to ... see there are lots of different ways to train with weights. Try a few good basic routines ...

  20. Strength Training

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... en español Entrenamiento de la fuerza muscular Strength training is a vital part of a balanced exercise routine that includes aerobic activity and flexibility exercises. Regular aerobic exercise, such as running or ...

  1. Analysis of the pen pressure and grip force signal during basic drawing tasks: The timing and speed changes impact drawing characteristics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gatouillat, Arthur; Dumortier, Antoine; Perera, Subashan; Badr, Youakim; Gehin, Claudine; Sejdić, Ervin

    2017-08-01

    Writing is a complex fine and trained motor skill, involving complex biomechanical and cognitive processes. In this paper, we propose the study of writing kinetics using three angles: the pen-tip normal force, the total grip force signal and eventually writing quality assessment. In order to collect writing kinetics data, we designed a sensor collecting these characteristics simultaneously. Ten healthy right-handed adults were recruited and were asked to perform four tasks: first, they were instructed to draw circles at a speed they considered comfortable; they then were instructed to draw circles at a speed they regarded as fast; afterwards, they repeated the comfortable task compelled to follow the rhythm of a metronome; and eventually they performed the fast task under the same timing constraints. Statistical differences between the tasks were computed, and while pen-tip normal force and total grip force signal were not impacted by the changes introduced in each task, writing quality features were affected by both the speed changes and timing constraint changes. This verifies the already-studied speed-accuracy trade-off and suggest the existence of a timing constraints-accuracy trade-off. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  2. Subcutaneous immunoglobulin preserves muscle strength in chronic inflammatory demyelinating polyneuropathy

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Markvardsen, Lars Høj; Harbo, Thomas; Sindrup, Søren Hein

    2014-01-01

    BACKGROUND AND PURPOSE: Subcutaneous immunoglobulin (SCIG) is superior to placebo treatment for maintenance of muscle strength during 12 weeks in patients with chronic inflammatory demyelinating polyneuropathy (CIDP). The present study evaluated whether SCIG preserves muscle strength for 1 year...... evaluated after 3, 6 and 12 months. Primary end-points were changes in muscle strength evaluated by isokinetic dynamometry in four affected muscle groups and a composite score of muscle performance and function tests, including Medical Research Council (MRC) score, grip strength, 40-m walking test (40-MWT...... remained unchanged. CONCLUSION: SCIG preserves muscle strength and functional ability in patients with CIDP who previously responded to IVIG. SCIG should be considered as an alternative in long-term treatment of CIDP patients....

  3. Weight-specific anticipatory coding of grip force in human dorsal premotor cortex

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    van Nuenen, Bart F L; Kuhtz-Buschbeck, Johann; Schulz, Christian

    2012-01-01

    ). An additional pre-cue (S1) correctly predicted the weight in 75% of the trials. Participants were asked to use this prior information to prepare for the lift. In the sham condition, grip force showed a consistent undershoot, if the S1 incorrectly prompted the preparation of a light lift. Likewise, an S1...

  4. Eyes, Grip and Gesture as Objective Indicators of Intentions and Attention

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Mortensen, Ditte Hvas

    This poster abstract presents the first part of a study concerning the use of information about gaze, grip and gesture to create non-command interaction. The experiment reported here seeks to establish the occurrence of patterns in nonverbal communication,  which may be used in an activity aware...

  5. Facilitation of corticospinal tract excitability by transcranial direct current stimulation combined with voluntary grip exercise.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Gi-Wook; Ko, Myoung-Hwan

    2013-08-26

    Previous studies have established that transcranial direct current stimulation (tDCS) is a powerful technique for the deliberate manipulation of the activity of human cerebral cortex. Moreover, it has also been shown that the non-exhausted voluntary motor exercise increases the excitability of corticospinal tract. We conducted this study to define the facilitation effect following anodal tDCS combined with the voluntary grip exercise as compared with single use of tDCS or voluntary grip exercise. Our result showed that the combination of anodal tDCS with voluntary grip exercise produced a 2-fold increase in the amplitude of MEP as compared with single use of anodal tDCS or voluntary grip exercise. In conclusion, our result could indicate that the treatment outcomes of brain and neurorehabilitation using tDCS would be better when tDCS is combined with the appropriate method of voluntary exercise as compared with single use of tDCS. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  6. Grip Force Control Is Dependent on Task Constraints in Children with and without Developmental Coordination Disorder

    Science.gov (United States)

    Law, Sui-Heung; Lo, Sing Kai; Chow, Susanna; Cheing, Gladys L.Y.

    2011-01-01

    Excessive grip force (GF) is often found in children with developmental coordination disorder (DCD). However, their GF control may vary when task constraints are imposed upon their motor performance. This study aimed to investigate how their GF control changes in response to task demands, and to examine their tactile sensitivity. Twenty-one…

  7. The effect of precision and power grips on activations in human auditory cortex

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Patrik Alexander Wikman

    2015-10-01

    Full Text Available The neuroanatomical pathways interconnecting auditory and motor cortices play a key role in