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Sample records for hamster v79 spheroids

  1. DNA conformation of Chinese hamster V79 cells and sensitivity to ionizing radiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Olive, P.L.; Hilton, J.; Durand, R.E.

    1986-01-01

    Chinese hamster V79 cells grown for 20 h in suspension culture form small clusters of cells (spheroids) which are more resistant to killing by ionizing radiation than V79 cells grown as monolayers. This resistance appears to be due to the greater capacity of cells grown in contact to repair radiation damage. Attempts to relate this ''contact effect'' to differences in DNA susceptibility or DNA repair capacity have provided conflicting results. Two techniques, alkaline sucrose gradient sedimentation and alkaline elution, show no difference in the amounts of radiation-induced DNA single-strand breakage or its repair between suspension or monolayer cells. However, using the alkali-unwinding assay, the rate of DNA unwinding is much slower for suspension cells than for monolayer cells. Interestingly, a decrease in salt concentration or in pH of the unwinding solution eliminates these differences in DNA unwinding kinetics. A fourth assay, sedimentation of nucleoids on neutral sucrose gradients, also shows a significant decrease in radiation damage produced in suspension compared to monolayer cultures. It is believed that this assay measures differences in DNA conformation (supercoiling) as well as differences in DNA strand breakage. We conclude from these four assays that the same number of DNA strand breaks/Gy is produced in monolayer and spheroid cells. However, changes in DNA conformation or packaging occur when cells are grown as spheroids, and these changes are responsible for reducing DNA damage by ionizing radiation

  2. Recovery from DNA synthesis in V 79 chinese hamster cells irradiated with UV light

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ventura, A.M.

    1987-01-01

    Mammalian cells recover from DNA synthesis inhibition by UV light before most of the pyrimidine dimers have been removed from the genome. Most of the rodent cells show a deficient dimer excision repair compared with normal human fibroblasts. Despite this fact they recover efficiently from DNA synthesis inhibition after UV. In Chinese hamster V 79 cells was found that this recovery takes place in the absence of a significant excision repair, and it seems to be directly coupled to a recovery in the rate of movement of the replication fork. 120 refs, 31 figs. (author)

  3. Transgenic Chinese hamster V79 cell lines which exhibit variable levels of gpt mutagenesis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Klein, C.B.; Rossman, T.G.

    1990-01-01

    The Escherichia coli gpt gene coding for xanthine-guanine phosphoribosyl transferase has been stably transfected into HPRT - Chinese hamster V79 cells. Several gpt - cell lines have been established, which retain the sequence(s) even after long-term culture without selection for gpt. While spontaneous mutagenesis to gpt - occurs rather frequently for most cell lines, it cannot be correlated with either the number of plasmid integration sites or deletion of the plasmid sequence(s). One transgenic cell line (g12), which continuously maintains a low spontaneous mutation frequency was used in comparative mutagenesis studies with wild-type V79 cells (gpt vs. hprt). Alkylating agents such as N-methyl-N'-nitro-N-nitrosoguanidine (MNNG) and β-propiolactone (BPL) are shown to be equally toxic and mutagenic in both g12 and V79 cells. UV and X-rays are also equally toxic to both cell lines. The data presented here suggests that g12 cells may be useful to study mammalian mutagenesis by agents which yield limited response at the hprt locus

  4. Effects of ultrasound, cysteamine, and x-rays on V79 Chinese hamster cells

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fu, Y.K.

    1978-01-01

    Chinese hamster V79 cells were exposed to different intensities and durations of 1 MHz ultrasound and were studied for cell lysis and colony-forming ability. The threshold for cell lysis and loss of viability (reduction in colony-forming ability) were found to be ultrasonic intensity, sonication duration, and energy dependent. Above the threshold there was an initial correlation between ultrasound intensity and biological effect: the higher the intensity, the greater the amount of cell lysis and reduction in colony-forming ability. These effects were maximal at an intensity of 10-20 W/cm 2 , and were less at 30 W/cm 2 . Cells were also exposed to ultrasound in the presence of cysteamine and results are compared with the effects of x radiation on cells exposed in the presence of cysteamine or methionine

  5. Diethyldithiocarbamate concentration effects and interactions with other cytotoxic agents on Chinese hamster cells (V79)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lin, P.S.; Quamo, S.; Ho, K.C.; Baur, K.

    1985-01-01

    A metal chelator, diethyldithiocarbamate (DDC) perturbs the chromosome condensation processes in dividing cells. The length of the metaphase chromosomes in Chinese hamster cells (V79) treated with 17.2 μg/ml of DDC for 2 hr is about half of that in untreated cells. However, concentrations of 1.7 μg or 172 μg/ml DDC apparently do not produce this effect. DDC at 17.2 μg/ml also disrupts spindle fibers. Bleomycin, but not mitomycin and cisplatin, added simultaneously with DDC can prevent the DDC effect on chromosomes. The cytotoxic effect of increasing concentrations of DDC can prevent the DDC effect on chromosomes. The cytotoxic effect of increasing concentrations of DDC to V79 cells incubated at 37 0 C exhibits a similar biphasic response. This concentration biphasic toxic effect is not altered when the cells are treated with DDC in combination with radiation, heat, or other cytotoxic drugs. These observations suggest that the different effects of DDC concentrations on chromosome condensation should be considered as one important modification factor for DDC related toxicity

  6. Modification of potentially lethal damage in irradiated Chinese hamster V79 cells after incorporation of halogenated pyrimidines

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Franken, N. A.; van Bree, C. V.; Kipp, J. B.; Barendsen, G. W.

    1997-01-01

    Radiosensitization of exponentially growing and plateau phase Chinese hamster V79 cells by incorporation of halogenated pyrimidines (HP) was investigated for different culture conditions that influenced repair. For this purpose cells were grown for 72 h with 0, 1, 2 and 4 microM of chloro-(CldUrd),

  7. Recovery of subchromosomal DNA synthesis in synchronous V-79 Chinese hamster cells after ultraviolet light exposure

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Meechan, P.J.; Carpenter, J.G.

    1986-01-01

    Previous work obtained from Chinese hamster V-79 cells indicated that, immediately following exposure, UV-induced lesions acted as blocks to elongation of nascent strands, but gradually lost that ability over a 10 h period after exposure to 10 J/m 2 . The work reported herein attempted to examine possible cell cycle mediated alterations in the recovery of DNA synthesis. Kinetic incorporation of radiolabeled thymidine studies indicated that there may have been a more rapid recover of DNA synthesis in cells irradiated in G 1 or G 2 vs cells irradiated in S phase. DNA fiber autoradiograms prepared from synchronous cells indicated that after irradiation in any phase of the cell cycle, the length of newly synthesized DNA was equal to control lengths 1 h after exposure to 5.0Jm 2 (or 1 h after entering S phase for cells irradiated in G 1 or G 2 ). This observed recovery was not solely due to an excision process. No cell cycle mediated difference in the number of dimers induced or removed as a function of cell cycle position was observed. These results appear to be consistent with a continuum of effects, with initiation effects dominating the response at low fluences, gapped synthesis at intermediate fluences and elongation inhibition at high fluences. The fluences at which each event dominates may be cell-line specific. (author)

  8. Interactive cytotoxicity of etoposide and radiation on cultured Chinese hamster V-79 cells

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Saito, Tsutomu; Shimada, Yuji; Kamata, Rikisaburo

    1989-01-01

    Etoposide is a semisynthetic derivative of podophyllotoxin and is an active antitumor agent. The interactive cytotoxic effect of Etoposide and radiation was investigated using cultured Chinese hamster V-79 cells. The surviving fraction of the cells was reduced by only 20%, when the cells were exposed to 5μg/ml of Etoposide for 30 min. Etoposide at this concentration reduced the width of the shoulder of the radiation survival curve. The change became more significant with increase in the concentration of Etoposide. The Dqs (quasithreshold doses) of the radiation survival curves were 5.39, 3.28, 2.13 and 0.54Gy, although the Dos (37% dose slopes) of the radiation survival curves were 2.55, 2.49, 2.39 and 2.18 Gy, when combination treatment with radiaiton and 0, 5, 10 and 20 μg/ml of Etoposide, respectively, was carried out. The cytotoxic effect became increased when fractional treatments with Etoposide and radiation were performed. The results obtained suggest that the mechanism of the interactive cytotoxic effect of this combination treatment involves a reciprocal action of Etoposide and sublethal damage by the radiation to the cells. (author)

  9. Effect of pepleomycin combined with irradiation on cultured Chinese hamster V79 cells

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Saito, Tsutomu

    1983-01-01

    The combined effect of pepleomycin (PEP), a bleomycin derivative, with irradiation was investigated on cultured Chinese hamster V79 cells. An additive effect was observed when PEP and irradiation were given simultaneously. A time interval between PEP (50μg/ml for one hour) and subsequent irradiation (10 Gy) increased the survival, and it became maximum when the time interval exceeded 2 hours. PEP-induced potentially lethal damage (PLD) was recovered when trysinization was delayed, and this recovery increased the survival. When PEP was given at a time interval after initial irradiation, the survival was decreased to below that following simultaneous treatment of the two modalities, and it became minimum when the time interval was 5 to 6 hours. Cells in ''G 2 -block'' induced by 10 Gy irradiation were partially synchronized, and cells in G 2 -M phase were more sensitive to PEP than those in S phase. It was considered that cells became more sensitive to PEP when they were irradiated 5 to 6 hours previously. However, cells recovery at any cell age when trypsinization was delayed. The benefit of a time interval between the two modalities was decreased by this recovery. (author)

  10. Resistance to DNA denaturation in irradiated Chinese hamster V79 fibroblasts is linked to cell shape

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Olive, P.L.; Vanderbyl, S.; MacPhail, S.H.

    1991-01-01

    Exponentially growing Chinese hamster V79-171b lung fibroblasts seeded at high density on plastic (approximately 7 x 10(3) cells/cm2) flatten, elongate, and produce significant amounts of extracellular fibronectin. When lysed in weak alkali/high salt, the rate of DNA denaturation following exposure to ionizing radiation is exponential. Conversely, cells plated at low density (approximately 7 x 10(2) cells/cm2) on plastic are more rounded 24 h later, produce little extracellular fibronectin, and display unusual DNA denaturation kinetics after X-irradiation. DNA in these cells resists denaturation, as though constraints to DNA unwinding have developed. Cell doubling time and distribution of cells in the growth cycle are identical for both high and low density cultures as is cell survival in response to radiation damage. The connection between DNA conformation and cell shape was examined further in low density cultures grown in conditioned medium. Under these conditions, cells at low density were able to elongate, and DNA denaturation of low density cultures was identical to that of high density cultures. Conversely, cytochalasin D, which interferes with actin polymerization causing cells to round up and release fibronectin, allowed development of constraints in high density cultures. These results suggest that DNA conformation is sensitive to changes in cell shape which result when cells are grown in different environments. However, these changes in DNA conformation detected by the DNA unwinding assay do not appear to play a direct role in radiation-induced cell killing

  11. Inhibition of DNA replication by ozone in Chinese Hamster V79 cells

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rasmussen, R.E.

    1986-01-01

    DNA replication in Chinese hamster lung fibroblasts, line V79, was depressed in a dose-dependent manner over an ozone concentration range of 1-10 ppm. When the cells were exposed for 1 h at concentrations up to 6 ppm, the rate of DNA replication, as measured by [ 3 H]thymidine incorporation, declined further during a 3-h period immediately following exposure. At higher ozone concentrations, at which more than 99.9% of the cells were killed, no further decline in DNA replication was seen beyond that immediately following exposure. Cultures exposed for 1 h to 10 mM ethyl methanesulfonate or to 10 J/m 2 of ultraviolet (UV) light showed a similar progressive decline in the rate of DNA replication. The inhibition of DNA replication by ozone resembled that seen after exposure of cells to chemical mutagens or radiation and did not resemble the inhibition produced by metabolic poisons. The results may indicate that ozone or its reaction products interact directly with DNA in a way that inhibits replication

  12. Mutagenicity of 8-methoxypsoralen and long-wave ultraviolet irradiation in V-79 Chinese hamster cells

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Burger, P.M.; Simons, J.W.I.M.

    1979-01-01

    The effect of 8-methoxypsoralen (8-MOP) and long-wave ultraviolet irradiation (UVA) on cell killing and mutation induction was studied in V-79 Chinese hamster cells. No effect was observed after treatment with 8-MOP alone (50 μg/ml, 4 h), UVA alone (9000 J/m 2 ), or 8-MOP metobolized by rat-liver microsomes. Combined treatment with 8-MOP and UVA induced both cell killing and mutation. This was also observed under conditins approaching patient treatment with PUVA photochemotherapy with respect to the concentration of 8-MOP in the skin and the amount of UVA received by the epidermal cells. A simple relation proved to apply for mutation induction under different treatment conditions: 5.5 X 10 -8 per J/m 2 per μg 8-MOP/ml. On this basis the mutation induction in dividing cells per session of PUVA-photochemotherapy amounts to 12.4 X 10 -5 , which is probably an over-estimation. (Auth.)

  13. Repair, redistribution and repopulation in V79 spheroids during multifraction irradiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Brown, R.C.; Durand, R.E.

    1994-01-01

    We used cells growing as multicell spheroids to determine whether the initial radiation response would be predictive for multifraction exposures, or whether other factors including repopulation rate should be considered. Potential problems of hypoxia and reoxygenation were avoided by using small spheroids which had not yet developed radiobiologically hypoxic regions. Repair and redistribution dominated the responses in the first two or three exposures, with repopulation playing a minor role. As the fractionation schedule was extended, however, repopulation between fractions largely determined the number of viable cells per spheroid. We conclude that the radiation response of cells from untreated spheroids provides a general indication of net sensitivity, but that repair and redistribution produces considerable variation in radiosensitivity throughout a fractionation protocol. Ultimately, repopulation effects may dominate the multifraction response. (Author)

  14. Anomalous dose-response characteristics induced by caffeine in ultraviolet-irradiated V79-79 Chinese hamster cells

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Schroy, C.B.; Todd, P.

    1979-01-01

    Cultured Chinese hamster cell line V79-79 exhibited an increase in survival with increasing UV fluence after a sharp decrease when exposed to 2.5 mM caffeine for 44 h after far-UV irradiation resulting in an anomalous maximum in the survival curve. No survival maximum was evident when either 0 or 1 mM caffeine is administered under the same conditions. The UV survival curve for 2.5 mM caffeine crossed the corresponding 1 mM curve and apparently became asymptotic to the 0 mM curve as UV fluence was increased. Chinese hamster cell lines V79-753B (related to V79-79 by derivation from the same parental line) and M3-1F3 (unrelated) exhibited only potentiation of post-UV lethality by the same concentration of caffeine and had no caffeine-induced anomalies in their survival curves. Xanthine, used alone or in combination with caffeine, only potentiated a slight amount of lethality and appeared not to be a major causative factor of the anomaly. (author)

  15. Structural changes in plasma membranes prepared from irradiated Chinese hamster V79 cells as revealed by Raman spectroscopy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Verma, S.P.; Sonwalkar, N.

    1991-01-01

    The effect of gamma irradiation on the integrity of plasma membranes isolated from Chinese hamster V79 cells was investigated by Raman spectroscopy. Plasma membranes of control V79 cells show transitions between -10 and 5 degree C (low-temperature transition), 10 and 22 degree C (middle-temperature transition), and 32 and 40 degree C (high-temperature transition). Irradiation (5 Gy) alters these transitions markedly. First, the low-temperature transition shifts to higher temperature (onset and completion temperatures 4 and 14 degree C). Second, the middle-temperature transition shifts up to the range of about 20-32 degree C, but the width remains unchanged. Third, the higher temperature transition broadens markedly and shifts to the range of about 15-40 degree C. Protein secondary structure as determined by least-squares analysis of the amide I bands shows 36% total helix, 55% total beta-strand, and 9% turn plus undefined for control plasma membrane proteins. Plasma membrane proteins of irradiated V79 cells show an increase in total helix (40 and 45% at 5 and 10 Gy, respectively) and a decrease in the total beta-strand (48 and 44% at 5 and 10 Gy, respectively) structures. The qualitative analysis of the Raman features of plasma membranes and model compounds in the 1600 cm-1 region, assigned to tyrosine groups, revealed that irradiation alters the microenvironment of these groups. We conclude that the radiation dose used in the survival range of Chinese hamster V79 cells can cause damage to plasma membrane proteins without detectable lipid peroxidation, and that the altered proteins react differently with lipids, yielding a shift in the thermal transition properties

  16. Effects of 1 MHz ultrasound on Chinese hamster V-79 cells: cavitational mechanisms and effects on proliferation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ciaravino, V.

    1982-01-01

    An assessment of acoustic cavitation as a primary physical mechanism in producing chemical and biological effects has been made. Chemical effects have been demonstrated through experimental protocols involving the release of iodine from sodium iodide. Biological effects have been shown by procedures assessing cell lysis and growth of in vitro Chinese hamsters V-79 cells. An important conclusion reached through these assessments is that the threshold level at which acoustic cavitation can exert an effect is dependent on the sensitivity of the experimental system being exposed. The proliferation of mitotically synchronous in vitro Chinese hamster V-79 cells exposed to 1 MHz ultrasound was investigated. Cell growth was assessed in the first three hours after sonication (3 W/cm 2 for 1 min) and was found to decrease to approx. 60 percent of control values. At an intensity of 3 W/cm 2 and exposure durations of 0.1, 1, 2, 5, and 10 min., mitotic cells underwent respectively increasing amounts of lysis. The remaining intact cells were observed for growth rate as indicated by the timed formation of colonies from single cells. The results indicated an immediate decrease in colony size (p 0.05)

  17. Isolation of hypoxanthine phosphoribosyltransferase-defective mutants in Chinese hamster V79 cells by tritium suicide

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bryant, R.E.; Schauer, I.E.; Hatcher, D.G.

    1981-01-01

    Tritium suicide was shown to be a highly efficient method for isolating mutants defective in hypoxanthine incorporation in the Chinese hamster lung of one kill cycle were used for the next kill cycle. The kill cycles involved incorporation of ( 3 H) hypoxanthine for 5 or 10 min, followed by storage of 3 H-labelled cells at -70 0 C for 4-10 days. 12 clones that survived the 3rd kill cycle were tested for incorporation of ( 3 H)hypoxanthine and all were found to be defective. At least 6 of the clones have defective hypoxanthine phosphoribosyltransferase (HPRT) activity. One mutant, H19, chosen for further characterization, had HPRT with a 13-fold elevation in apparent Ksub(m) for phosphoribosylpyrophosphate (PRPP). Thin-layer chromatography of cell extracts showed that this mutant was incapable of converting intracellular hypoxanthine to IMP or to other purine metabolites. In addition, H19 was resistant to 6-thioguanine. (orig.)

  18. The suppressive effect of etoposide on recovery from sublethal radiation damage in Chinese hamster V 79 cells

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Saito, Tsutomu; Shimada, Yuji; Kawamori, Jiro; Kamata, Rikisaburo

    1992-01-01

    The combined effect of radiation and etoposide on the survival of cultured Chinese hamster V 79 cells was investigated. Cells in exponential growth phase were treated with various combinations of radiation and etoposide. The surviving fraction was assessed by colony formation. Etoposide significantly reduced so-called shoulder width, as expressed in Dq (quasithreshold dose), of radiation survival curves. The reduction depended on the increase of etoposide concentrations, although steepening of slopes of exponentially regressing portions of the radiation survival curves was slight. Split dose experiments showed that cells did not recover from sublethal radiation damage in the presence of low concentration of etoposide, although they did recover from sublethal radiation damage under a drug free condition. The results show the suppressive effect of etoposide on recovery from sublethal radiation damage. The effect of a sequential combination of radiation and etoposide was also investigated. The effect was more marked when the interval between radiation and etoposide was shorter regardless of the sequence. (author)

  19. Enhancement of excision-repair efficiency by conditioned medium from density-inhibited cultures in V79 Chinese hamster cells

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nakano, S.

    1979-01-01

    Conditioned medium from density-inhibited V79 Chinese hamster cell cultures, given as a post-treatment to UV-irradiated homologous cells, was demonstrated to reduce the lethal action of ultraviolet light by temporarily blocking DNA replication. Since the increased survival was not affected by various nontoxic concentrations of caffeine, such protective effect would be attributable to the prolonged intervention of excision repair before DNA replication during the post-treatment period. The influence of conditioned medium on the UV-induced mutation at the ouabain-resistance locus was also examined and a significant decrease in mutation frequecy was noted. The observed reduction in killing and mutation as a result of post-incubation in conditioned medium, which delays DNA replication, would be interpreted as evidence that conditioned medium provides a longer period of time for an error-free excision-repair process, leaving lesion in DNA available for error-prone post-replication repair. (Auth.)

  20. Influence of DMSO on Carbon K ultrasoft X-rays induced chromosome aberrations in V79 Chinese hamster cells

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Natarajan, Adayapalam T., E-mail: natarajan@live.nl [University of Tuscia, Viterbo (Italy); Palitti, Fabrizio [University of Tuscia, Viterbo (Italy); Hill, Mark A. [CRUK/MRC Gray Institute for Radiation Oncology and Biology, University of Oxford, Old Road Campus Research Building, Oxford OX3 7DQ (United Kingdom); MRC Radiation and Genome Stability Unit, Harwell, Oxfordshire OX11 0RD (United Kingdom); Stevens, David L. [MRC Radiation and Genome Stability Unit, Harwell, Oxfordshire OX11 0RD (United Kingdom); Ahnstroem, Gunnar [Department of Microbiology and Genetic Toxicology, Stockholm University, Stockholm (Sweden)

    2010-09-10

    Ultrasoft X-rays have been shown to be very efficient in inducing chromosomal aberrations in mammalian cells. The present study was aimed to evaluate the modifying effects of DMSO (a potent scavenger of free radicals) on the frequencies of chromosome aberrations induced by soft X-rays. Confluent held G1 Chinese hamster cells (V79) were irradiated with Carbon K ultrasoft X-rays in the presence and absence of 1 M DMSO and frequencies of chromosome aberrations in the first division cells were determined. DMSO reduced the frequencies of exchange types of aberrations (dicentrics and centric rings) by a factor of 2.1-3.5. The results indicate that free radicals induced by ultrasoft X-rays contribute to a great extent to the induction of chromosome aberrations. The possible implications of these results in interpreting the mechanisms involved in the high efficiency of ultrasoft X-rays in the induction of chromosome aberrations are discussed.

  1. Isolation and cross-sensitivity of X-ray-sensitive mutants of V79-4 hamster cells

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jones, N.J.; Cox, R.; Thacker, J.

    1987-01-01

    The V79-4 Chinese hamster line was mutagenized and surviving clones screened for X-ray sensitivity using a replica microwell technique. One slightly sensitive clone and 3 clearly sensitive clones were isolated from approximately 5000 screened, and designated irs 1 to irs 4. The 3 more sensitive clones showed different responses to the genotoxic agents mitomycin C (MMC), ethyl methanesulphonate (EMS) and ultraviolet light (UV). irs 1 showed considerable sensitivity to all the agents tested, in the order MMC >> EMS > UV. irs 2 and irs 3 had similar sensitivities to EMS and to UV (EMS > UV) but irs 3 was more sensitive than irs 2 to MMC. None of these mutants is identical in phenotype to previously published mutants. (Auth.)

  2. X-ray induced changes in immunostaining of proliferating cell nuclear antigen (PCNA) in V79 hamster fibroplasts

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lohr, F.; Hof, H.; Weber, K.-J.; Latz, D.; Wenz, F.

    1998-01-01

    To better understand the role of PCNA after photon irradiation in vivo, using flow cytometry, we studied the immunochemical PCNA-staining in V79 cells after irradiation with 6-MeV photons with and without serum depletion and with and without low-dose pre-irradiation under different growth conditions. Material and methods: Using V79 hamster cells, BrdUrd incorporation, total and DNA-bound PCNA were measured for exponential cells and for confluent cells at different times (up to 14 days) after reaching confluence. Cells were either grown with medium containing 10% fetal calf serum (FCS) or 0.5% FCS. Six days after reaching confluence, cells were irradiated with 1 Gy (and 8 Gy for non-serum-depleted cells) (6-MV photons, 2 Gy/min). Then, immunochemical PCNA-staining was measured by flow cytometry at 0, 30, 60 and 120 min after irradiation. For studying the adaptive response, exponentially growing cells and cells that were 6 days in confluence were pretreated with 0.01 Gy, reincubated for 5 h and then definitively treated with 1 Gy and harvested and processed as described above. Results: Four days after reaching confluence, DNA-bound PCNA and BrdUrd content were reduced to a minimum of [de

  3. Inhibition and recovery of the rate of DNA synthesis in V79 Chinese hamster cells following ultraviolet light irradiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ventura, A.M.; Meneghini, R.

    1984-01-01

    Chinese hamster fibroblasts (V79 cell line) exhibit the phenomenon of recovery of DNA synthesis from the initial inhibition observed after ultraviolet light irradiation, in the absence of significant excision of pyrimidine dimers. In an attempt to determine whether the initial inhibition and subsequent recovery can be accounted for by parallel variations in the rate of movement of the replication fork, the cells were pulse-labeled with radioactive bromodeoxyuridine at different times following irradiation and their DNA centrifuged in neutral CsCl density gradients. When DNA synthesis inhibition was at a maximum, an accumulation of DNA, of density intermediate between hybrid and nonsubstituted DNA, was noticed in the density-distribution profiles. The density distribution of DNA along the gradient can provide an estimate of the rate of movement of the replication fork, and the results indicate that most of the variation in the overall rate of DNA synthesis can be accounted for by a parallel variation in the rate of fork movement. (Auth.)

  4. Sensitization by wortmannin of heat- or X-ray induced cell death in cultured Chinese hamster V79 cells

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tomita, Masanori; Suzuki, Norio; Matsumoto, Yoshihisa; Hirano, Kazuya; Umeda, Noriko; Sakai, Kazuo

    2000-01-01

    Here we found that wortmannin sensitized Chinese hamster V79 cells to hyperthermic treatment at 44.0 deg C as determined either by colony formation assay or by dye exclusion assay. Wortmannin enhanced heat-induced cell death accompanying cleavage of poly (ADP-ribose) polymerases (PARP). Additionally, the induction of heat shock protein HSP70 was suppressed and delayed in wortmannin-treated cells. Heat sensitizing effect of wortmannin was obvious at more than 5 or 10 μM of final concentrations, while radiosensitization was apparent at 5 μM. Requirement for high concentration of wortmannin, i.e., order of μM, suggests a possible role of certain protein kinases, such as DNA-PK and/or ATM among PI3-kinase family. The sensitization was minimal when wortmannin was added at the end of heat treatment. This was similar to the case of X-ray. Since heat-induced cell death and PARP cleavage preceded HSP70 induction phenomenon, the sensitization to the hyperthermic treatment was considered mainly caused by enhanced apoptotic cell death rather than secondary to suppression or delay by wortmannin of HSP70 induction. Further, in the present system radiosensitization by wortmannin was also at least partly mediated through enhancement of apoptotic cell death. (author)

  5. Interaction between the effects of pepleomycin with lidocaine and radiation on cultured Chinese hamster V79 cells

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Shimada, Yuji

    1989-01-01

    The interaction of the cytotoxicities in combination use of lidocaine (LID), pepleomycin (PEP) and radiation in combined treatment was studied using Chinese hamster V79 cells by colony forming assay. LID showed no cytotoxic effect up to 12 mM when it was employed alone. However selective enhancement of the PEP cytotoxic effect appeared when the drugs were used simultaneously. The mechanism of this enhancing effect was thought to involve inhibition by LID of the repair of the cells from PEP potentially lethal damage. LID showed no enhancing effect on the radiation cytotoxicity when the agents were used simultaneously. Only an additive effect appeared when PEP and radiation were employed simultaneously. An interactive effect appeared when LID, PEP and radiation were used simultaneously, although this effect was not so significant. The enhancement ratio of PEP with LID on radiation was 1.58. The fundamental mechanism of enhancement of cytotoxic effect of LID on PEP and the interactive relationship among LID, PEP and radiation are analyzed and discussed. (author)

  6. A uv-sensitive Chinese hamster lung fibroblast cell line (V79/UC) with a possible defect in DNA polymerase activity is deficient in DNA repair

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Creissen, D.M.; Hill, C.K.

    1991-01-01

    Studies of repair enzyme activities in a uv-sensitive cell line (V79/UC) derived from Chinese hamster V79 cells have revealed levels of total DNA polymerase that are about 50% of the levels in the parental cell line. There are a number of DNA polymerase inhibitors available which allow us to distinguish between the major forms of DNA polymerase (alpha, beta, gamma, and delta) identified in mammalian cells. Enzyme assays with these inhibitors indicate that the aphidicolin-sensitive DNA polymerase is defective in the V79/UC cell line. This could be either polymerase alpha or delta, or both. The V79/UC cells do not express resistance to aphidicolin in standard toxicity studies. However, when aphidicolin is added postirradiation in survival assays designed to measure the extent of inhibitable repair, V79/UC cells do not respond with the further decrease in survival seen in the parental line. Further evidence of a polymerase-dependent repair defect is evident from alkaline elution data. In this case the V79/UC cells show the appearance of single-strand breaks following uv irradiation in the absence of any added inhibitor. Cells of the V79/M12G parental line, on the other hand, show the appearance of single-strand breaks only when aphidicolin is present

  7. The increase in radioresistance of Chinese hamster cells cultured as spheroids is correlated to changes in nuclear morphology

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gordon, D.J.; Milner, A.E.; Beaney, R.P.; Grdina, D.J.; Vaughan, A.T.

    1990-01-01

    Chinese hamster V79 cells grown as spheroids in roller culture are more radioresistant than those grown as monolayers. The supercoiled structure of chromatin, as salt-extracted nucleoids, has been examined using flow cytometry. Irradiated viable cells from spheroid culture contain restraints to supercoil relaxation that are absent in monolayer cells. Further analysis of the chromatin organization from each growth form shows that the radioresistant spheroid cells contain a DNA-protein matrix that is more resistant to detergent-induced degradation. The increase in structural integrity may be due to the retention of a 55-60 kDa protein that is apparent in the nucleoids of spheroid, but not monolayer cells. The increase in structural integrity of the spheroid cells may explain their greater radioresistance by providing a more stable platform for high-fidelity DNA damage repair

  8. Nicotinamide starvation and inhibition of poly(ADP-Ribose) synthesis enhance the induced mutation in Chinese hamster V79 cells

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Okada, Gensaku; Kaneko, Ichiro; Mitsui, Hideki.

    1987-01-01

    The effects of nicotinamide (NA) deficiency and added NA and 3-aminobenzamide (3AB) on the cytotoxicity and the induction of mutations in Chinese hamster V79-14 cells were investigated. In NA deficiency the addition of NA (up to 4 mM) and 3AB (up to 7.5 mM) was not cytotoxic. The presence of NA prior to exposure to mitomycin C (MMC) or γ-rays produced a dose-dependent increase in the relative cloning ability of DNA-damaged cells. The lethality of N-methyl-N'-nitro-N-nitrosoguanidine (MNNG) was significantly potentiated by pre-treatment with 5 mM 3AB, but no potentiation by 3AB was observed for MMC, ultraviolet (UV)-B light, or γ-rays. Among cells pre-cultured in NA-free medium there were increased frequencies of mutations at both the hypoxanthineguanine phosphoribosyltransferase (HGPRT) and the adenine phosphoribosyltransferase (APRT) loci following DNA damage. The enhancing effect by NA deficiency was time-dependent. Incubation with NA prior to DNA damage produced a significant reduction in the frequency of mutations. The addition of 3AB to the nicotinamide adenine dinucleotide (NAD + )-depleted cell cultures before or after the DNA damage also strongly increased the frequency of induced mutations, with increasing concentrations of 3AB up to 5 mM, but the frequency was reduced at higher concentrations. The interaction between NA deficiency and the addition of 3AB appears to act synergistically on mutation induction. A correlation was observed between the potential of inhibiting poly (ADP-ribose) polymerase and the enhancement of mutation frequency. (author)

  9. Effects of D,L-buthionine-S,R-sulfoximine on cellular thiol levels and the oxygen effect in Chinese hamster V79 cells

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Astor, M.B.; Hall, E.J.; Biaglow, J.E.; Hartog, B.

    1984-01-01

    The role of glutathione (GSH) and total non-protein thiols (NPSH) in repairing radiation-induced free radical damage incurred under aerated and hypoxic conditions was investigated using Chinese hamster V79 cells cultured in vitro. GSH and NPSH levels were depleted in V79 cells of varying cell densities using the gamma-glutamyl-cysteine-synthetase inhibitor, D,L-Buthionine-S,R-sulfoximine (BSO). A small change in hypoxic cell radiosensitivity could be attributed to the loss of GSH while depletion of thiols to lower levels affected both aerated and hypoxic cell radiosensitivity, resulting in no change in the OER

  10. The effect of dexamethasone on the radiation survival response and misonidazole-induced hypoxic-cell cytotoxicity in Chinese hamster cells V-79-753B in vitro

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Millar, B.C.; Jinks, S.

    1981-01-01

    Overnight exposure of Chinese hamster cells, V-79-753B, to microgram quantities of the synthetic corticosteroid, dexamethasone, resulted in a decrease in sensitivity towards radiation, both in air and in hypoxia. The effect was dose-modifying and the oxygen enhancement ratio did not change appreciably. Similarly, when dexamethasone-treated hypoxic cells were irradiated in the presence of misonidazole, a hypoxic cell radiosensitizer, there was a decrease in radiation sensitivity compared with untreated hypoxic cells irradiated with misonidazole. (author)

  11. Amount of sister chromatid exchanges and survival of Chinese hamster V79-4 cells after irradiation with 0,7 MeV neutrons

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lapidus, I.L.; Nasonova, E.A.

    1987-01-01

    The dependence of the survival and induction of sister chromatid exchanges (SCEs) in Chinese hamster V79-4 cells on the dose of γ-rays and neutrons with average energy 0.7 MeV has been analysed. The value of RBE for neutrons was 5.5. It has been shown that the number of SCE increased with the dose of γ-irradiation and no induction could be detected after neutron irradiation

  12. Effects of 3-Deoxyadenosine (Cordycepin) on the repair of X-ray-induced DNA single- and double-strand breaks in chinese hamster V79 cells

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hiraoka, Wakako; Kuwabara, Mikinori; Sato, Fumiaki

    1990-01-01

    The ability of cordycepin to inhibit the repair of DNA strand breaks was examined with X-irradiated Chinese hamster V79 cells in log-phase culture. A filter elution technique revealed that 70 μM cordycepin did not inhibit the repair of single-strand breaks but inhibited the repair of double-strand breaks. These findings confirmed the fact that the increase in the lethality of cordycepin in X-irradiated cultured mammalian cells was attributable to unrepaired DNA double-strand breaks. (author)

  13. Sodium butyrate affects the cytotoxic and mutagenic response of V79 Chinese hamster cells to the genotoxic agents, daunorubicin and U.V. radiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pani, B.; Babudri, N.; Giancotti, V.; Russo, E.

    1984-01-01

    It has been suggested that conditions which lead to modifications in the chromatin structure could be responsible for an increased accessibility of DNA to genotoxic agents in eukaryotic cells. With this in mind, the cytotoxic and mutagenic activity of the anthracycline antibiotic, daunorubicin, and of UV radiation was assayed on V79 Chinese hamster cells pretreated or not with 5 mM sodium butyrate, an agent known to induce modifications in the chromatin structure: this treatment in fact proved to induce the hyperacetylation of the core histones, and moreover to enhance the cytotoxic response of the cells to both daunorubicin and UV radiation and the mutagenic response to daunorubicin. (orig.)

  14. Induction and removal of DNA interstrand cross-links in V-79 Chinese hamster cells measured by hydroxylapatite chromatography after treatments with bifunctional furocoumarins

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dardalhon, M.; Averbeck, D.

    1988-01-01

    DNA interstrand crosslinks (CL) photoinduced by bifunctional furocoumarins in V-79 Chinese hamster cells were measured by alkaline denaturation and hydroxylapatite chromatography. Treatments with 5-methoxypsoralen (5-MOP), 8-methoxypsoralen (8-MOP) and 4,5',8-trimethylpsoralen (4,5',8-TMP) and 365 nm irradiation (UVA) confer a dose-dependent linear increase in the amount of double-stranded DNA indicating the induction of CL. Determination in alkaline sucrose gradients of the molecular weight of the DNA and estimation of drug-induced strand breakage allowed quantification of the CL induced. 5-MOP was found to be slightly more effective than 8-MOP whereas 4,5',8-TMP was 9 times more effective for the induction of CL. The fate of CL during post-treatment incubation was also followed. Cells in exponential growth phase were found to be efficient in the removal of CL. (Author)

  15. Comparative ecotoxicity of potential biofuels to water flea (Daphnia magna), zebrafish (Danio rerio) and Chinese hamster (Cricetulus griseus) V79 cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Heger, Sebastian; Du, Miaomiao; Bauer, Kevin; Schäffer, Andreas; Hollert, Henner

    2018-08-01

    The ecotoxicity of two biofuel candidates (1‑octanol and 2‑butanone) was investigated by an integrative test strategy using three bioassays: the acute immobilisation test with water flea (D. magna), the fish embryo acute toxicity test with zebrafish (Danio rerio) and the in vitro micronucleus assay with Chinese hamster (Cricetulus griseus) V79 cells. The median effective concentration (EC 50 ) values were 14.9±0.66mgL -1 for 1‑octanol, and 2152.1±44.6mgL -1 for 2‑butanone in the D. magna test. Both 1‑octanol and 2‑butanone caused teratogenic and lethal effects on zebrafish embryos, while exposure to 1‑octanol significantly induced these effects at concentrations ≥2.0mgL -1 . These results indicate that 1‑octanol exert much higher ecotoxicity than 2‑butanone to D. magna and zebrafish embryos. Moreover, both 1‑octanol and 2‑butanone did not cause significant genotoxic effects, while their metabolites significantly induced micronuclei in V79 cells. The present study proposed an integrative test approach to evaluate the potential ecotoxicity of biofuels using simple, quick and inexpensive bioassays. Copyright © 2018 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  16. Chromosomal aberrations of the Chinese hamster cell line V79 after irradiation with X-rays and heavy ions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mueller, W.

    1985-02-01

    The study on hand examines chromosomal aberrations in Chinese hamster 79 cells. Irradiation involved a number of heavy ions ranging from neon to uranium with an energy variation between 0.3 and 20 MeV/u. Linear energy transfer ranged from 270 to 16,300 keV/μm. X-ray tests were run for reasons of comparison. Experiments showed the following results: 1) Aberration rate increases in dependence of nuclear charge number or LET resp. 2) The distribution of the chromosome-damage instances found differed markedly from corresponding measurements following irradiation with thinly ionizing radiation. In contrast to x-irradiation, it is possible, therefore, to obtain high aberration yields in preparations made immediately after irradiation. 3) The maximum of aberration yield after heavy-ion irradiation could be shown to occur as early as 4h after irradiation. This is true in x-irradiation for but small doses. 4) The radiation-sensitizing effect of caffeine and its action on the repair system of the cell could be confirmed for x-irradiation and could be described for heavy ions for the first time. 5) The radiation-protection effect of cysteamine could be re-affirmed for thinly ionizing radiation, however, it could not be verified for heavy ions. 6) Irradiation of cells by means of particles of a defined range supports the hypothesis that the particularly radiation-sensitive regions of the nucleus membrane constitute the cell's crucial target. (orig./MG) [de

  17. Comparison of 6-thioguanine-resistant mutation and sister chromatid exchanges in Chinese hamster V79 cells with forty chemical and physical agents

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nishi, Y.; Hasegawa, M.M.; Taketomi, M.; Ohkawa, Y.; Inui, N.

    1984-01-01

    The induction of sister chromatid exchanges (SCE) and mutation at the hypoxanthine-guanine phosphoribosyl transferase locus and toxicities of 40 different chemical and physical agents were examined on Chinese hamster V79 cells. These agents included mono-, di-, tri-, and polyfunctional alkylating agents, intercalators, gamma-rays, and UV light irradiation. Mutation was measured as resistance to 6-thioguanine and toxicity as loss of cell-plating efficiency. SCE were examined 29 hr after treatment. With the agents examined, a highly positive correlation existed between SCE-inducing and mutagenic potencies, when expressed as increase in the number per a unit dose over the control values. But the great difference of the ratios of mutagenic potencies versus SCE-inducing potencies among agents was observed, the maximal difference in the ratios being about 200-fold. The agents that showed the higher values of the ratio (agents producing more mutations than SCE) were bleomycin, cobalt-60 gamma-rays, all ethylating agents (N-ethyl-N-nitrosourea, N-ethyl-N'-nitro-N-nitrosoguanidine, ethyl methanesulfonate, and diethylsulfate), N-propyl-N-nitrosourea, N-butyl-N-nitrosourea, isopropyl methanesulfonate, intercalating acridine compounds (2-methoxy-6-chloro-9-[3-(ethyl-2-chloroethyl)aminopropylamino]-acridine X 2HCl and 2-methoxy-6-chloro-9-[3-(chloroethyl)-aminopropylamino]acridine 2HCl) and UV light at 254 nm

  18. Effect of vitamin E on cytotoxicity, DNA single strand breaks, chromosomal aberrations, and mutation in Chinese hamster V-79 cells exposed to ultraviolet-B light

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sugiyama, M.; Tsuzuki, K.; Matsumoto, K.; Ogura, R.

    1992-01-01

    The effect of pretreatment with vitamin E on cytotoxicity, DNA single strand breaks, and chromosomal aberrations as well as on mutation induced by ultraviolet-B light (UV-B) was investigated in Chinese hamster V-79 cells. Cellular pretreatment with non-toxic levels of 25 μM α-tocopherol succinate (vitamin E) for 24h prior to exposure resulted in a 10-fold increase in cellular levels of α-tocopherol. Using a colony-forming assay, this pretreatment decreased the cytotoxicity of UV-B light. However, alkaline elution assays demonstrated that pretreatment with vitamin E did not affect the number of DNA single strand breaks caused by UV-B light. UV-B exposure produced a dose-dependent induction of chromosomal aberrations and mutations at the HGPRT locus, and neither of these actions of UV-B was influenced by pretreatment with the vitamin. These results suggest that vitamin E protects cells from UV-B-induced cytotoxicity, possibly through its ability to scavenge free radicals. The genotoxicity induced by UV-B light may not correlate directly with the cytotoxic action of this wavelength region in sunlight. (author)

  19. Survival and mutation in clones derived from V79 Chinese hamster cells irradiated with multiple small exposures to far-UV and mid-UV

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ikebuchi, M.; Osmak, M.; Hill, C.

    1987-01-01

    Clones were isolated from U81 and N80 cells that were established by irradiation of Chinese hamster V79-M12G cells on a once a day schedule with 81 and 80 fractions of 6 J m/sup -2/ far-UV and 150 Jm/sup -2/ mid-UV (UV-B), respectively. These clones were examined for UV sensitivity to cell lethality and induction of mutations at 6TG/sup r/ (resistance to 6-thioguanine) and Oua/sup R/ (resistance to ouabain) loci. Survival curves for these clones indicate that their UV sensitivities to lethality vary from that of M12G cells to that of U81 and N80 parental cells. Clones also show heterogeneity for mutability to mid-UV: For induction of 6TG/sup r/, for example, non-mutable (U814), hypomutable (U815) and hypermutable (U811) were isolated from U81 cells. The authors are investigating by chromosome analysis and repair experiments why resistance to far-UV and mid-UV cell killing in these cells appears to be induced but the resulting survivors have a heterogeneous response to mutation induction by further doses of UV light

  20. An inhibitor of potentially lethal damage (PLD) repair reduces the frequency of γ-ray mutations in cultured Chinese hamster V79 cells

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yokoiyama, A.; Kada, T.; Kuroda, Y.

    1992-01-01

    Cordycepin (3'-deoxyadenosine, 3 - dA) is an RNA antimetabolite and a radiosensitizer in cultured mammalian cells. In the present paper, the effects of 3'-dA on γ-ray-induced lethality and 6-thioguanine (6TG)-resistant mutations in cultured Chinese hamster V79 cells were examined. 3'-dA had the effect of sensitizing the lethality induced by γ-rays. The potentially lethal damage (PLD) repair produced by post-incubation cells in Hanks' solution after γ-irradiation was almost completely suppressed by 5x10 -5 M 3'-dA. When cells were irradiated with 10 Gy γ-rays and incubated with 3'-dA for 5 h, the frequency of 6TG-resistant mutations induced by γ-rays decreased to 1/6 of that of the irradiated cells incubated without 3'-dA. The decrease in the frequency of γ-ray-induced mutations was dependent on the length of incubation time with 3'-dA. It is suggested that the inhibition of PLD repair by 3'-dA may be that of error-prone repair. (author). 26 refs.; 5 figs

  1. Evidence for the induction of two types of potentially lethal damage after exposure of plateau phase Chinese hamster V79 cells to γ-rays

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Iliakis, G.

    1985-01-01

    The fixation of γ-rays induced potentially damage (PLD) caused after treatment either with β-araA or in medium made hypertonic by the addition of sodium chloride was studied in plateauphase chinese hamster V79 cells. Treatment with β-araA was found to affect a sector of PLD, the fixation of which specifically reduced the shoulder width of the survival curve. The effect was maximized when cell survival reached levels corresponding to an exponential line, with a slope similar to the final slope of the survival curve of untreated cells. This effect was achieved by a four hour treatment with β-araA at concentrations above 150 μM. Longer treatment times or incubation at higher β-araA concentrations did not significantly enhance the effect. Treatment in hypertonic medium, on the other hand, enhanced cell killing in a concentration dependent (NaCl-concentration) way and the survival reached values much lower than those corresponding to an exponential line. No indication for a plateau in the effect, indicating complete fixation of the sector of PLD that reacts sensitively to this treatment, was obtained. Boht the slope and the shoulder width of the survival curve were affected, the slope first being increaseed after short treatment times (up to 10 min), followed by a decrease in the shoulder width after longer treatment times (longer than 10 min). (orig./WL)

  2. Detection of a deuterium isotope effect in di- and trisubstituted alkylphenylnitrosoureas. An SCE study in Chinese hamster V79-E cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thust, R; Mendel, J; Bach, B; Schwarz, H

    1985-06-01

    The genotoxicity of 1-methyl-3-phenyl-1-nitrosourea (MPNU), 1-methyl-3-(p-chlorophenyl)-1-nitrosourea (C1-MPNU), 1-ethyl-3-phenyl-1-nitrosourea (EPNU), 1,3-dimethyl-3-phenyl-1-nitrosourea (DMPNU) and their derivatives substituted by deuterium in different positions was studied using sister chromatid exchange (SCE) induction in Chinese hamster V79-E cells. Deuterium substitution in the 1-methyl group of MPNU (MPNU-d3) and C1-MPNU (C1-MPNU-d3) diminished the SCE-inducing capacity by 20-30% and by 30-40% in DMPNU (DMPNU-d3B). There was no altered SCE activity detected when the phenyl group of MPNU (MPNU-d5) or the 3-methyl group of DMPNU (DMPNU-d3A) was deuterium labeled. No isotope effect was detected in deuterated EPNU derivatives, presumably due to the instability of these compounds. It is surmised that the easier delocalization of the positive charge in the deuterated alkyl diazonium ion causes a diminished reactivity and therefore influences the type and amount of DNA alkylation. Furthermore, the experiments with DMPNU and its derivatives revealed that, in contrast to mono- and disubstituted nitrosoureas, the biological activities of these very stable trisubstituted nitrosoureas are strongly influenced by a serum factor in the culture fluid.

  3. Alkylarylnitrosoureas--stability in aqueous solution, partition coefficient, alkylating activity and its relationship to SCE induction in Chinese hamster V 79-E cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mendel, J; Thust, R; Schwarz, H

    1982-01-01

    The alkylating activity, chemical stability in aqueous solution (pH 7.0; 37 degrees C), and partition coefficient (octanol/water) of the following compounds were determined: 1-methyl-3-phenyl-1-nitrosourea (MPNU), 1-ethyl-3-phenyl-1-nitrosourea (EPNU), 1-isopropyl-3-phenyl-1-nitrosourea (i-PrPNU), 1-methyl-3-(p-fluorophenyl)-1-nitrosourea (F-MPNU), 1-methyl-3-(p-chlorophenyl)-1-nitrosourea (Cl-MPNU), 1-methyl-3-(p-bromophenyl)-1-nitrosourea (Br-MPNU), 1,3-dimethyl-3-phenyl-1-nitrosourea (DMPNU), and 1-methyl-3-naphthyl-1-nitrosocarbamate (NCA). 1-Methyl-1-nitrosourea (MNU) and 1-ethyl-1-nitrosourea (ENU) were used for the comparison. THe rate of decomposition in aqueous solution is discussed concerning the influences of the substituents at the 1- and 3-N-atom. The mono- and disubstituted N-nitrosoureas showed a coarse correlation between alkylating activity and SCE induction in Chinese hamster V 79-E cells. On the other hand, this correlation is missing in the case of NCA, which is a potent SCE inducer despite relatively low alkylating activity. DMPNU is the strongest SCE inducer, but this compound shows a high stability in aqueous solution and, consequently, we were not able to detect an alkylating activity.

  4. Detection of a deuterium isotope effect in di- and trisubstituted alkylphenylnitrosoureas. An SCE study in Chinese hamster V79-E cells

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Thust, R.; Mendel, J.; Bach, B.; Schwarz, H.

    1985-01-01

    The genotoxicity of 1-methyl-3-phenyl-1-nitrosourea (MPNU), 1-methyl-3-(p-chlorophenyl)-1-nitrosourea (C1-MPNU), 1-ethyl-3-phenyl-1-nitrosourea (EPNU), 1,3-dimethyl-3-phenyl-1-nitrosourea (DMPNU) and their derivatives substituted by deuterium in different positions was studied using sister chromatid exchange (SCE) induction in Chinese hamster V79-E cells. Deuterium substitution in the 1-methyl group of MPNU (MPNU-d3) and C1-MPNU (C1-MPNU-d3) diminished the SCE-inducing capacity by 20-30% and by 30-40% in DMPNU (DMPNU-d3B). There was no altered SCE activity detected when the phenyl group of MPNU (MPNU-d5) or the 3-methyl group of DMPNU (DMPNU-d3A) was deuterium labeled. No isotope effect was detected in deuterated EPNU derivatives, presumably due to the instability of these compounds. It is surmised that the easier delocalization of the positive charge in the deuterated alkyl diazonium ion causes a diminished reactivity and therefore influences the type and amount of DNA alkylation. Furthermore, the experiments with DMPNU and its derivatives revealed that, in contrast to mono- and disubstituted nitrosoureas, the biological activities of these very stable trisubstituted nitrosoureas are strongly influenced by a serum factor in the culture fluid

  5. Anthracyclines as radiosensitizers. A Cu(II) complex of a simpler analogue modifies DNA in Chinese Hamster V79 cells under low-dose γ radiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Saurabh Das; Mandal, P.C.

    2014-01-01

    Hydroxy-9,10-anthraquinones are structural analogues of anthracycline anticancer drugs showing similarity in physicochemical attributes, electrochemical behavior and biophysical interactions. 1,2-dihydroxy-9,10-anthraquinone (Q) and its complexes with Cu(II)/Ni(II) were studied for γ radiation induced modification of DNA in Chinese Hamster V79 cells. The amount of double stranded DNA remaining was ascertained by fluorometric analysis of DNA unwinding using ethidium bromide. Modification of double stranded DNA increased in the presence of Q and Cu(II)-Q when cells were irradiated (0-4.2 Gray). Ni(II)-Q was not that effective. Changing incubation time before recovery of DNA from cells there was evidence for DNA repair that was least for Cu(II)-Q treated cells. Minimum repair in case of Cu(II)-Q treated cells suggest the compound either assists radiation induced damage of agents responsible for repair or interacts with species like H 2 O 2 that assist in repair. Since a hydroxy-9,10-anthraquinone and its Cu(II) complex show radiosensitizing property, anthracyclines that contain a hydroxy-9,10-anthraquinone as the core moiety could also be tried as radiosensitizers in treating cancer. (author)

  6. The effect of γ-irradiation on the toxicity of malathion in V79 hamster cells and Molt-4 human lymphocytes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Szekely, J.G.; Goodwin, M.; Delaney, S.

    1992-01-01

    There is a growing interest in irradiation of food and agricultural products for insect disinfestation, sprout inhibition, delayed ripening and the reduction of microbiological loads. Irradiation to a maximum dose of 10 kGy is recognized as safe by national and international regulatory agencies. To address the question, whether irradiation of pesticide residues might produce radiation products that were less or more toxic than the original pesticide, effects were observed of 10 kGy of γ-radiation on malathion as measured by sister-chromatid exchange (SCE), micronuclei formation, cell survival, growth rate and polyploid formation. No significant differences were found between effects of irradiated and unirradiated malathion on any of these end- points. Polyploid formation was the most dramatic effect of both irradiated and control malathion on V79 Chinese hamster cells. Cell survival, polyploid formation and growth rate were slightly better in cells treated with irradiated malathion. In Molt-4 human lymphocyte cell, micronuclei formation was not affected by unirradiated or irradiated malathion. Compared to malathion alone, the lack of such biological effects indicates that none of the presumed radiation-induced breakdown products increased or decreased the endpoints studied. The number of SCE was consistently, but not significantly, higher in cells treated with irradiated malathion. There were no significant differences in cell survival or micronucleus formation in the human lymphocyte cell line Molt-4 treated with irradiated or control malathion. Thus, the irradiation of the pesticide malathion to 10 kGy, a recommended upper dose for most food irradiations, does not significantly alter its toxicity in these in vitro systems. (author). 23 refs.; 4 figs.; 3 tabs

  7. Inverse dose-rate effect for the induction of 6-thioguanine-resistant mutants in Chinese hamster V79-S cells by 60Co gamma rays

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Crompton, N.E.; Barth, B.; Kiefer, J.

    1990-01-01

    Chinese hamster V79-S cells capable of growing in suspension culture were exposed to 60Co gamma rays at a high dose rate (84 Gy/h), low dose rates (200, 50, and 39 mGy/h), and a spectrum of very low dose rates (between 29 and 4.5 mGy/h). Following time for appropriate expression the cultures were assayed for the induction of 6-thioguanine-resistant mutants. For a given dose, a decrease in mutation induction occurred as the dose rate was reduced from high dose rates to low dose rates. However, further reduction in dose rate resulted in a reverse dose-rate effect, and an increase in the frequency of mutants was observed. The contribution of background mutation frequency to this reverse dose-rate effect was studied, both by examining fluctuations of mutation frequency in nonirradiated culture and by its impact upon the dose-rate-independent nature of the reversed effect, and it was found to be negligible. The physiological state of the suspension culture under periods of protracted exposure to very low dose rates was also investigated. The effect of doubling time, plating efficiency, cell cycle distribution, and sensitivity on survival and mutation were examined. In no case was a change apparent during the very low-dose-rate exposures. The results are discussed in terms of the possible expression of cryptic radiation damage after prolonged culture times and/or the involvement of an error-free repair system which requires a certain amount of radiation damage to become active

  8. Changes in the Number of Double-Strand DNA Breaks in Chinese Hamster V79 Cells Exposed to γ-Radiation with Different Dose Rates

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Andreyan N. Osipov

    2013-07-01

    Full Text Available A comparative investigation of the induction of double-strand DNA breaks (DSBs in the Chinese hamster V79 cells by γ-radiation at dose rates of 1, 10 and 400 mGy/min (doses ranged from 0.36 to 4.32 Gy was performed. The acute radiation exposure at a dose rate of 400 mGy/min resulted in the linear dose-dependent increase of the γ-H2AX foci formation. The dose-response curve for the acute exposure was well described by a linear function y = 1.22 + 19.7x, where “y” is an average number of γ-H2AX foci per a cell and “x” is the absorbed dose (Gy. The dose rate reduction down to 10 mGy/min lead to a decreased number of γ-H2AX foci, as well as to a change of the dose-response relationship. Thus, the foci number up to 1.44 Gy increased and reached the “plateau” area between 1.44 and 4.32 Gy. There was only a slight increase of the γ-H2AX foci number (up to 7 in cells after the protracted exposure (up to 72 h to ionizing radiation at a dose rate of 1 mGy/min. Similar effects of the varying dose rates were obtained when DNA damage was assessed using the comet assay. In general, our results show that the reduction of the radiation dose rate resulted in a significant decrease of DSBs per cell per an absorbed dose.

  9. Influence of different chemical agents (H2O2, t-BHP and MMS) on the activity of antioxidant enzymes in human HepG2 and hamster V79 cells; relationship to cytotoxicity and genotoxicity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Slamenova, D; Kozics, K; Melusova, M; Horvathova, E

    2015-01-01

    We investigated activities of antioxidant enzymes (AEs), superoxide dismutase (SOD), glutathione peroxidase (GPx) and catalase (CAT) in human HepG2 and hamster V79 cells treated with a scale of concentrations of hydrogen peroxide (H2O2), tert-butyl hydroperoxide (t-BHP) and methyl methanesulfonate (MMS). Cytotoxicity and genotoxicity of these substances were evaluated simultaneously. We have found out that H2O2, t-BHP and MMS predictably induce significant concentration-dependent increase of DNA lesions in both cell lines. Cytotoxicity detected in V79 cells with help of PE test was in a good conformity with the level of DNA damage. MTT test has proved unsuitable, except for MMS-treated V79 cells. Compared with human cells HepG2, hamster cells V79 manifested approximately similar levels of SOD and CAT but ten times higher activity of GPx. Across all concentrations tested the most significant increase of activity of the enzyme CAT was found in H2O2- and t-BHP-treated HepG2 cells, of the enzyme SOD in t-BHP- and MMS-treated V79 cells, and of the enzyme GPx in H2O2-treated V79 cells. We suggest that stimulation of enzyme activity by the relevant chemical compounds may result from transcriptional or post-transcriptional regulation of the expression of the genes CAT, SOD and GPx. Several authors suggest that moderate levels of toxic reactants can induce increase of AEs activities, while very high levels of reactants can induce their decrease, as a consequence of damage of the molecular machinery required to induce AEs. Based on a great amount of experiments, which were done and described within this paper, we can say that the above mentioned principle does not apply in general. Only the reactions of t-BHP affected HepG2 cells were consistent with this idea.

  10. Response to high LET radiation 12C (LET, 295 keV/microm) in M5 cells, a radio resistant cell strain derived from Chinese hamster V79 cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pathak, R; Sarma, A; Sengupta, B; Dey, S K; Khuda-Bukhsh, A R

    2007-01-01

    To study the effects of 12C-beam of 295 keV/microm (57.24 MeV) on M5 and Chinese hamster V79 cells by using cytogenetic assays like micronuclei (MN) induction, chromosomal aberrations (CA) and apoptosis. Additionally, the relative survival of these two cell lines was tested by the colony forming ability of the cells, with a view to understanding the mechanism of cellular damages that lead to difference in cell survival. Confluent cells were irradiated with 12C-beam at various doses using 15UD Pelletron accelerator. Cell survival was studied by the colony forming ability of cells. MN assay was done by fluorescent staining. Different types of chromosomal aberrations in metaphase cells were scored at 12 h after irradiation. Apoptosis was measured at different post irradiation times as detected by nuclear fragmentation and DNA ladder was prepared after 48 h of incubation. Dose-dependent decrease in surviving fractions was found in both the cell lines. However, the surviving fractions were higher in M5 cells in comparison to V79 cells when exposed to the same radiation doses. On the other hand, induced MN frequencies, CA frequencies and apoptosis percentages were less in M5 cells than V79 cells. Very good correlations between surviving fractions and induced MN frequencies or induced total CA or induced apoptosis percentages were obtained in this study. The cell strain M5 showed relatively more radio-resistance to 12C-beam compared to Chinese hamster V79 cells in this study. As the MN formation, CA and apoptosis induction were less in M5 cells as compared to parental V79 cells, the higher cell survival in the former could possibly be attributed to their better repairing ability leading to higher cell survival.

  11. Assessment of anti-mutagenic effects of stobadine dihydro-chloride on MNNG-induced mutations in Chinese hamster cells V79

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Horvathova, E.; Slamenova, D.; Chorvatovicova, D.; Wsolova, L.

    1995-01-01

    Mutagenicity of N-methyl-n'-nitro-N-nitrosoguanidine (MNNG) and anti-mutagenic effect of antioxidant stobadine (STB) were investigated by so called HGPRT/V79 system. Cells were treated by STB before, during and after MNNG-treatment. Our results showed that the highest anti-mutagenic effect of STB was observed if the drug was given as a pretreatment before exposure of cells to MNNG. This effect was not concentration dependent within the framework of 1.5 - 9 mmol. All other combinations of MNNG- and STB-treatment led to the weaker but statistically significant decrease of 6-TG r mutations. Inhibition of proteosynthesis induced by methylxanthine pentoxifylline in the time of pre-MNNG-treatment removed completely anti-mutagenic effects of STB. In addition of mutagenicity assays, cytotoxicity of STB and combined effects of MNNG and STB were studied. Trypan blue exclusion and growth activity of influenced cells showed that application of STB (1.5 mmol) before or after MNNG (0.5 μg/cm 3 ) treatment had a similar toxic effects as MNNG alone. Application of STB during MNNG-treatment or pretreatment of cells with STB followed by combined treatment of cells by STB + MNNG statistically significantly decreased viability of cells. There are probably no relationship between the anti-mutagenic and the toxic effects of combined influence of STB and MNNG on V79 cells. (author)

  12. Different effects of inorganic and dimethylated arsenic compounds on cell morphology, cytoskeletal organization, and DNA synthesis in cultured Chinese hamster V79 cells

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ochi, Takafumi; Nakajima, Fumie [Department of Environmental Toxicology, Faculty of Pharmaceutical Sciences, Teikyo University, Sagamiko, Kanagawa (Japan); Fukumori, Nobutaka [Department of Toxicology, Tokyo Metropolitan Research Laboratory of Public Health, Hyakuninchou, Shinjyuku (Japan)

    1998-09-01

    Changes in cytoskeletal organization of cultured V79 cells exposed to arsenite and dimethylarsinic acid (DMAA), a methylated derivative of inorganic arsenics, and related changes, such as mitotic arrest and induction of multinucleated cells, were investigated in comparison with their effects on DNA synthesis. DMAA caused mitotic arrest and induction of multinucleated cells with a delay of 12 h relative to the mitotic arrest. By contrast, arsenite at equitoxic concentrations to DMAA was less effective than DMAA in causing mitotic arrest and in inducing multinucleated cells. Post-mitotic incubation of cells arrested in metaphase by 6 h incubation with 10 mM DMAA showed that the incidence of multinucleated cells increased conversely with a rapid decrease in metaphase cells. This suggests that metaphase-arrested cells can escape from metaphase, resulting in the appearance of multinucleated cells. The mitotic arrest caused by DMAA was accompanied by disruption of the microtubule network. By contrast, both arsenite and DMAA did not cause disorganization of actin stress fibers even when incubated at concentrations that caused a marked retardation of cell growth. Cells exposed to arsenite for 6 h showed marked inhibition of DNA synthesis, whereas inhibition by DMAA was not observed. When incubation was prolonged by 18 h, the arsenite-induced inhibition of DNA synthesis was mitigated. By contrast, inhibition of DNA synthesis by DMAA occurred in parallel with an increase in the population of mitotic cells. These results suggest that DMAA caused growth retardation and morphological changes via disruption of the microtubule network, and that arsenite-induced retardation of cell growth and inhibition of DNA synthesis were not attributable to the cytoskeletal changes. (orig.) (orig.) With 7 figs., 31 refs.

  13. Effects of a tumor promoter and an anti-promoter on spontaneous and UV-induced 6-thioguanine-resistant mutations and sister-chromatid exchanges in V79 Chinese hamster cells

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fujiwara, Y.; Kano, Y.; Tatsumi, M.; Paul, P.

    1980-01-01

    The effects of a tumor promoter 12-O-tetradecanoylphorbol-13-acetate (TPA) and/or an anti-promoter antipain (protease inhibitor) on spontaneous and ultraviolet-induced sister-chromatid exchanges (SCEs) and 6-thioguanine-resistant (6TGsup(r)) recessive mutations were examined in V79 Chinese hamster cells in culture. TPA and/or antipain neither significantly altered base-line and UV-induced immediate SCE frequencies, nor decreased the level of delayed SCEs which persisted 6-7 days after irradiation. TPA and/or antipain appeared to enhance the recovery of UV-induced 6TGsup(r) colonies at the plateau expression phase despite non-mutagenicity by themselves and unaltered metabolic cooperation. Thus, the results conceivably imply that the 6TGsup(r)-recessive mutation expression, but not fixation, can be modulated at the cell level by TPA and/or antipain. Our results, together with the recent results of Loveday and Latt, may argue against the notion that TPA enhances the antipain-suppressible SCEs as an index of mitotic recombination in relevance with a tumor-promotion mechanism. (orig.)

  14. The role of non-protein sulphydryls in determining the chemical repair rates of free radical precursors of DNA damage and cell killing in Chinese hamster V79 cells

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Prise, K.M.; Davies, S.; Stratford, M.R.L.; Michael, B.D.

    1992-01-01

    Chinese hamster V79 fibroblasts were irradiated in the gas explosion apparatus and the chemical repair rates of the oxygen-dependent free radical precursors of DNA double-strand breaks (dsb) and lethal lesions measured using filter elution (pH 9.6) and a clonogenic assay. Depletion of cellular GSH levels, from 4.16 fmol/cell to 0.05 fmol/cell, by treatment with buthionine sulphoximine (50 μmol dm -3 ; 18 h), led to sensitization as regards DNA dsb induction and cell killing. This was evident at all time settings but was particularly pronounced when the oxygen shot was given 1 ms after the irradiation pulse. A detailed analysis of the chemical repair kinetics showed that depletion of GSH led to a reduction in the first-order rate constant for dsb precursors from 385 s -1 to 144 s -1 , and for lethal lesion precursors from 533 s -1 to 165 s -1 . (Author)

  15. 5-Fluorouracil, colchicine, benzo[a]pyrene and cytosine arabinoside tested in the in vitro mammalian cell micronucleus test (MNvit) in Chinese hamster V79 cells at Covance Laboratories, Harrogate, UK in support of OECD draft Test Guideline 487.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Whitwell, James; Fowler, Paul; Allars, Sarah; Jenner, Karen; Lloyd, Melvyn; Wood, Debbie; Smith, Katie; Young, Jamie; Jeffrey, Laura; Kirkland, David

    2010-10-29

    The reference genotoxic agents 5-fluorouracil (a nucleoside analogue, characterised by a steep dose response profile), colchicine (an aneugen that inhibits tubulin polymerisation), benzo[a]pyrene (a polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbon requiring metabolic activation) and cytosine arabinoside (a nucleoside analogue that inhibits the gap-filling step of excision repair) were tested in the in vitro micronucleus assay using the Chinese hamster V79 cell line at Covance Laboratories, Harrogate, UK. All chemicals were treated in the absence and presence of cytokinesis block (via addition of cytochalasin B) with this work forming part of a collaborative evaluation of the toxicity measures recommended in the draft OECD Test Guideline 487 on the In Vitro Mammalian Cell Micronucleus Test (MNvit). The toxicity measures used, detecting a possible combination of both cytostasis and cell death (though not cell death directly), were relative population doubling, relative increase in cell counts and relative cell counts for treatments in the absence of cytokinesis block, and replication index in the presence of cytokinesis block. All of the chemicals tested either gave marked increases in the percentage of micronucleated cells with and without cytokinesis block, or did not induce micronuclei at concentrations giving approximately 50-60% toxicity (cytostasis and cell death) or less by all of the toxicity measures used. The outcome from this series of tests supports the use of relative increase in cell counts and relative population doubling, as well as relative cell counts, as appropriate measures of cytotoxicity for the non-cytokinesis blocked in vitro micronucleus assay. Copyright © 2010 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  16. Arsenic compound-induced increases in glutathione levels in cultured Chinese hamster V79 cells and mechanisms associated with changes in {gamma}-glutamylcysteine synthetase activity, cystine uptake and utilization of cysteine

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ochi, Takafumi [Department of Environmental Toxicology, Faculty of Pharmaceutical Sciences, Teikyo University, Sagamiko, Kanagawa 199-01 (Japan)

    1997-11-01

    Increases in the glutathione (GSH) level in cultured Chinese hamster V79 cells incubated with arsenic compounds were investigated in terms of changes in the activity of {gamma}-glutamylcysteine synthetase ({gamma}-GCS), rate of cystine uptake, and utilization of cysteine. Arsenite at subtoxic concentrations caused a marked increase of the GSH level at 8 h after addition and then declined. Increase in the GSH level caused by arsenite was associated with an increase in the rate of cystine uptake, but not in {gamma}-GCS activity. Increase in the rate of uptake of cystine was attributed mainly to an increase in the utilization of cysteine in the synthesis of GSH. Dimethylarsinic acid (DMAA) also caused an increase in the GSH level in a time- and concentration-dependent manner. Increase in the GSH level was accompanied by increases in {gamma}-GCS activity and in the uptake of cystine. DMAA caused a reduction in the rate of utilization of cysteine for protein synthesis while enhancing the rate of cysteine utilization for GSH synthesis. Cycloheximide inhibited increases in {gamma}-GCS activity caused by DMAA and in the rate of cystine uptake caused by arsenite and DMAA. The cystine transport system is suggested to be induced by arsenite and DMAA with {gamma}-GCS induced in cells incubated with DMAA. Among the arsenic compounds, methylarsonic acid (MAA) was not effective in causing an increase in the GSH level. Accordingly, increases in the GSH level caused by arsenite and DMAA may be specific phenomena in which the cells responded to the arsenicals by increasing the GSH level. (orig.) With 13 figs., 1 tab., 47 refs.

  17. Differential response of nascent DNA synthesis and chain elongation in V79 and V79/79 cells exposed to u.v. light and chemical mutagens

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fox, M.; Bloomfield, M.E.; Hopkins, J.; Boyle, J.M.

    1983-01-01

    DNA repair after u.v., N-methyl-N-nitrosourea (MNU) and ethylmethane sulphonate (EMS) in Chinese hamster V79 cells and the mutagen sensitive derivative V79/79 was investigated. Equal template strand breakage was evident in both cell lines immediately after MNU and EMS exposure and by 4-5 h after MNU the extent of fragmentation was greater in V79/79 cells. After u.v. irradiation template fragmentation was evident in V79/79 but not in V79 cells, even though V79/79 cells failed to excise cyclobutane dimers and repair synthesis was demonstrable in V79 cells but not in V79/79 cells after exposure to all three mutagens. The rate of incorporation of [ 3 H]TdR during semi-conservative DNA synthesis was inhibited equally in a dose dependent manner after u.v. and MNU exposure; incorporation by V79/79 cells was inhibited to a greater extent than by V79 cells after EMS exposure. Nascent DNA synthesis was suppressed more in V79/79 cells than in V79 cells after u.v. but to similar extents in both cell lines after MNU and EMS treatment. Pulse chase experiments indicated a lower rate of elongation of nascent DNA in V79/79 cells after MNU and u.v. exposure but little difference was detectable after EMS. (author)

  18. Differential responses of nascent DNA synthesis and chain elongation in V79 and V79/79 cells exposed to U.V. light and chemical mutagens

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fox, M.; Bloomfield, M.E.; Hopkins, J.; Boyle, J.M.

    1983-01-01

    DNA repair after u.v., N-methyl-N-nitrosourea (MNU) and ethylmethane sulphonate (EMS) in Chinese hamster V79 cells and the mutagen sensitive derivative V79/79 was investigated by measurement of five parameters: production of strand breaks in template DNA, incorporation of [ 3 H]TdR, semi-conservative and repair synthesis, molecular weights of pulse labelled DNA after mutagen exposure (nascent synthesis) and molecular weights of DNA pulse labelled and chased after mutagen exposure (elongation and ligation). Equal template strand breakage was evident in both cell lines immediately after MNU and EMS exposure and by 4-5 h after MNU the extent of fragmentation was greater in V79/79 cells. After u.v. irradiation template fragmentation was evident in V79/79 but not in V79 cells, even though V79/79 cells failed to excise cyclobutane dimers and repair synthesis was demonstrable in V79 cells but not in V79/79 cells after exposure to all three mutagens. The rate of incorporation of [ 3 H]TdR during semi-conservative DNA synthesis was inhibited equally in a dose dependent manner after u.v. and MNU exposure; incorporation by V79/79 cells was inhibited to a greater extent than by V79 cells after EMS exposure. Nascent DNA synthesis was suppressed more in V79/79 cells than in V79 cells after u.v. but to similar extents in both cell lines after MNU and EMS treatment. Pulse chase experiments indicated a lower rate of elongation of nascent DNA in V79/79 cells after MNU and u.v. exposure but little difference was detectable after EMS

  19. Heavy-ion radiobiology of multicellular tumor spheroids

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rodriguez, A.; Alpen, E.L.

    1980-01-01

    Experiments reported here were conducted with carbon ions, neon ions, and argon ions using rat brain gliosarcoma (9L) and Chinese hamster lung V79 cells grown as multicellular spheroids. Our studies were designed to evaluate high-LET radiation survival characteristics of cells grown in this relatively organized tissue-like environment. Our primary objectives were to determine the RBE values in plateau and spread Bragg peak regions of the carbon, neon, and argon beams, and evaluate with high and low LET radiation, the role of spheroid architecture in postirradiation survival of cells grown in this format

  20. Relationship of clonogenic cells and 'tumour-rescuing cells', modelled in irradiated spheroids in vitro

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Moore, J.V.; Hendry, J.H.

    1984-01-01

    Using the method of double negative logs (Gilbert, 1974), in which the probability of death (Pm) of a structure (e.g. spheroid, tumour or organism) after a given dose D, is related to the survival characteristics after irradiation of target cells (TRC) within the structure, the authors have reexamined the data of Durand (1975) for spheroids of V79-171 Chinese hamster cells grown in spinner culture, and of Pourreau-Schneider and Malaise (1981) for Na II human melanoma grown on agar. (U.K.)

  1. Radiobiological studies of cells in multicellular spheroids using a sequential trypsinization technique

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Giesbrecht, J.L.; Wilson, W.R.; Hill, R.P.

    1981-01-01

    The radiation response of V79 Chinese hamster cells grown as multicellular spheroids has been investigated by determining survival curves for treatment under a variety of different oxygen concentrations. Spheroids were irradiated under fully oxygenated conditions in air-equilibrated medium at 37 0 C, in medium exposed to lower oxygen tension (5% O 2 ) for times varying from 1 hr to 3 days, or under anoxic conditions. For comparison with the spheroids, using identical treatment conditions, V79 cells were grown in suspension as a subconfluent monolayer attached to Sephadex (microcarrier) beads and irradiated under fully oxygenated or anoxic conditions. The radiation response of cells at different depths within the spheroid was investigated by using a sequential trypsinization technique developed to remove eight or nine shells of cells successively from the spheroid surface. When irradiation was given under fully oxygenated conditions the outer few cell layers were more sensitive than the inner cells, a finding which is not understood. As expected the inner cells in spheroids irradiated in air (at 37 0 C) or in 5% O 2 are more resistant than the outer cells. For an acute exposure to 5% O 2 (1 hr) in the inner cells displayed full radiobiological hypoxia; however, for chronic exposures to low oxygen this was not the case. These results with the sequential trypsinization procedure suggest that the radiation response of cells in spheroids is more complex than anticipted

  2. Relations between pH, oxygen partial pressure and growth in cultured cell spheroids.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carlsson, J; Acker, H

    1988-11-15

    The pH gradients, oxygen partial-pressure gradients and growth curves were measured for 7 different types of spheroids. Growth curves were measured in liquid overlay culture and thereafter the spheroids were attached to cover glasses and transferred to a chamber for micro-electrode measurements. The spheroids were randomly divided for pH or pO2 measurements which then were made under conditions as identical as possible. The decreases in pO2 and pH, delta pO2 and delta pH were calculated as the difference between the values in the culture medium and the values 200 micron inside the spheroids. Each type of spheroid had a certain relation between delta pO2 and delta pH. The human colon carcinoma HT29, the mouse mammary carcinoma EMT6 and the hamster lung V79-379A spheroids had high values of the quotient delta pO2/delta pH. The human thyroid carcinoma HTh7 spheroids and the 3 types of human glioma spheroids had lower quotients. There was a tendency for fast-growing spheroids to have high quotients. Two extreme types of spheroids, HT29 (high quotient) and U-118 MG (low quotient) were analyzed for lactate production and oxygen consumption. The U-118 MG spheroids produced about 3 times more lactate and consumed about 3 times less oxygen than the HT29 spheroids. The differences in lactate production could not be explained by differences in the pyruvate Km values of lactate dehydrogenase. The results indicate that there are significant metabolic differences between the spheroid systems studied.

  3. Influence of caffeine on X-ray-induced killing and mutation in V79 cells

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bhattacharjee, S.B.; Bhattacharyya, N.; Chatterjee, S.

    1987-01-01

    Effects produced by caffeine on X-irradiated Chinese hamster V79 cells depended on the growth conditions of the cells. For exponentially growing cells, nontoxic concentrations of caffeine decreased the shoulder width from the survival curve, but the slope remained unchanged. The yield of mutants under the same conditions also remained unaffected. In case of density-inhibited cells, delaying trypsinization for 24 h after X irradiation increased the survival and decreased the yield of mutants. The presence of caffeine during this incubation period inhibited such recovery and significantly increased the yield of X-ray-induced mutants

  4. Influence of caffeine on X-ray-induced killing and mutation in V79 cells

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bhattacharjee, S.B.; Bhattacharyya, N.; Chatterjee, S.

    1987-02-01

    Effects produced by caffeine on X-irradiated Chinese hamster V79 cells depended on the growth conditions of the cells. For exponentially growing cells, nontoxic concentrations of caffeine decreased the shoulder width from the survival curve, but the slope remained unchanged. The yield of mutants under the same conditions also remained unaffected. In case of density-inhibited cells, delaying trypsinization for 24 h after X irradiation increased the survival and decreased the yield of mutants. The presence of caffeine during this incubation period inhibited such recovery and significantly increased the yield of X-ray-induced mutants.

  5. Paracetamol-induced spindle disturbances in V79 cells with and without expression of human CYP1A2

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jensen, K G; Poulsen, H E; Doehmer, J

    1996-01-01

    Spindle disturbing effects in terms of c-mitosis and cytotoxicity of paracetamol were investigated in two Chinese hamster V79 cell lines, one of which (V79MZh1A2) was transfected with human CYP1A2. This enzyme catalyses the oxidative formation of the reactive paracetamol metabolite, NAPQI, believed...... to initiate hepatoxicity by covalent binding to proteins after overdose. In the native V79 cell line paracetamol increased c-mitosis frequency in a concentration dependent manner from 8.7 + or - 3.5% (control) to 66 + or - 18% at 20 mM. A significant increase to 13.3 + or - 3.5% was first seen at 2.5 m......M in the native cell line (Pparacetamol. At 5 mM paracetamol the c-mitosis frequency was 14.4 + or - 5.0% and 19.0 + or - 3...

  6. Induction of HPRT- mutants in Chinese hamster V79 cells after heavy ion exposure

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Stoll, U.; Schneider, E.; Kranert, T.; Kiefer, J.

    1995-01-01

    The induction of resistance to 6-thioguanine by heavy ion exposure was investigated with various accelerated ions (oxygen-uranium) up to linear energy transfer (LET) values of about 15 000 keV/μm. Survival curves are exponential with fluence; mutation induction shows a linear dependence. Cross-sections (σ i : inactivation, σ m : mutation) were derived from the respective slopes. Generally, σ i rises over the whole LET range, but separates into different declining curves for single ions with LET values above 200 keV/μm. Similar behaviour is seen for σ m . The new SIS facility at GSI, Darmstadt, makes it possible to study the effects of ions with the same LET but very different energies and track structures. Experiments using nickel and oxygen ions (up to 400 MeV/u) showed that inactivation cross-sections do not depend very much on track structure, i.e. similar values are found with different ions at the same LET. This is not the case for mutation induction, where very energetic ions display considerably smaller induction cross-sections compared with low-energy ions of identical LET. Preliminary analyses using the polymerase chain reaction (PCR) demonstrate that even heavy ions cause ''small alterations'' (small deletions or base changes). The proportion of the total deletions seems to increase with LET. (orig.)

  7. Acceptors for poly(ADP-ribose) in irradiated Chinese hamster V79 cells

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Xue, L.Y.; Sokany, N.M.; Friedman, L.R.; Oleinick, N.L.

    1985-01-01

    Strand breaks in DNA, as produced by ionizing radiation, stimulate the synthesis of poly(ADP-ribose) (pADPR) by the nuclear enzyme pADPR transferase (ADPRT). The polymer is covalently bound to chromatin-associated proteins and may function in repair of DNA lesions. When total /sup 32/P-pADPR-protein is analyzed by electrophoresis on SDS-polyacrylamide gels, the major radioactive bands correspond to the 116 kD ADPRT and the low molecular weight (histone) region. On two-dimensional gels (isoelectric focusing followed by SDS-PAGE) several ADP-ribosylated species can be detected in each molecular weight range. The intensity of label in each species is greater for proteins isolated from irradiated (10 or 100 Cy) rather than control cells. For detailed analysis of histones, the authors incubated isolated nuclei with /sup 32/P-NAD, extracted histones in acid, and subjected them to electrophoresis in acid-urea gels. Specific radiation-induced increases in pADPR were seen on some nucleosomal core histone bands but not on histone H1. The results suggest that radiation-induced strand breaks stimulate ADPRT to modify core histones; the resultant increase in negative charge could loosen nucleosomal structure, permitting access of repair enzymes to the DNA lesions

  8. LET dependency of heavy-ion induced apoptosis in V79 cells

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Aoki, Mizuho; Furusawa, Yoshiya; Yamada, Takeshi

    2000-01-01

    We investigated the relationship between the LET values and cell death, defined as either apoptosis or loss of reproductive integrity (reproductive death), using Chinese hamster V79 cells. The cells were irradiated with X-rays or carbon-ion beams from the Heavy Ion Medical Accelerator in Chiba (HIMAC) at the National Institute of Radiological Sciences (NIRS). Apoptosis was defined based on the morphological change upon treating of cells with caffeine. The apoptotic index, the ratio of apoptotic cells to the total, after exposure to 2 Gy of X-rays was 0.043. Upon irradiation with carbon-ion beams, the index was gradually increased with increasing LET values, reaching a maximum of 0.076 at 110 keV/μm, and then decreased to 0.054 at 237 keV/μm. An analogous pattern of the LET dependence was observed between reproductive death and apoptotic death. The cell-survival values obtained after 2 Gy exposure (SF 2 ) were 0.64, 0.13, and 0.24, respectively. A similar trend was found for the RBE values calculated from the initial slope for both apoptosis and reproductive death. These results strongly suggest that the target for both types of cell death is the same. (author)

  9. Changes in radiosensitivity of V-79 cells accompanying growth and cell division

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lehnert, S.

    1975-01-01

    The X-ray survival curve for asynchronous Chinese hamster V-79 cells at 17 to 20 hr after plating when cells are irradiated as microclones of two to four cells differs from the survival curve seen at short times after plating, when single cells are irradiated, in having higher D 0 (300 rad vs 160 rad) and negligible extrapolation number. As a consequence of the difference in D 0 the difference in survival between single cells and clones increases with increasing dose. Transient cyclic changes in survival occur at early times after plating and are probably related to partial synchronization induced by trypsinization. In addition there is a progressive increase in survival which develops with increasing time after plating, as the number of cells in the clones increases. Decrease in radiosensitivity with increasing number of cells irradiated is also observed for synchronous cells when cells at corresponding points in the cell cycle are irradiated. Accumulation and repair of sublethal damage is demonstrable in cells irradiated at short times after plating, but cannot be shown at 20 hr after plating when cells are irradiated as microclones. (U.S.)

  10. The survival effects of V79 cells irradiated with carbon ions in different let

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wang Jufang; Zhou Guangming; He Jing; Li Wenjian; Li Qiang; Dang Bingrong; Li Xinglin; Weng Xiaoqiong; Xie Hongmei; Wei Zengquan; Gao Qingxiang

    2001-01-01

    The survival of cultured Chinese V79 hamster cells irradiated with carbon ions with different LETs were investigated. Irradiation was performed at the heavy Ion Research Facility in Lanzhou (HIRFL). Results were compared with those obtained from the experiments with γ rats and could be concluded as follows: The survival curves for carbon ions showed as straight lines and were fitted to the one-target one-hit model, but for γ rays the curves with shoulders were fitted to the multi-target one-hit model. As the LETs were 125, 200 and 700 keV/μm for carbon ions, the inactivation cross section 35, 12 and 8 μm 2 , respectively, which suggested that under the experimental conditions, the lower the LET of carbon ions, the more seriously the irradiation killed cells. In the case of 125 keV/μm, the RBEs of carbon ions at the 0.1 and 0.37 survival levels were 1.47 and 2.19 respectively

  11. V79 survival following simultaneous or sequential irradiation by 15-MeV neutrons and 60Co photons

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Higgins, P.D.; DeLuca, P.M. Jr.; Pearson, D.W.; Gould, M.N.

    1983-01-01

    A unique tandem source irradiation facility, composed of an intense d-T neutron source and a 60 Co teletherapy unit, was used to investigate biological responses for different neutron/photon configurations. V79 Chinese hamster cells, attached as monolayers in log-phase growth, were irradiated at 37 degrees C by either 14.8-MeV neutrons, 60 Co, or a mixture of 40% neutrons and 60% photons in simultaneous or sequential application. Measurements of cell survival indicate an increased effectiveness in cell killing for simultaneously administered neutrons and photons compared to that measured or predicted for sequentially applied beam modalities. An understanding of the magnitude of these interactive effects is important both for calculating accurate effective doses for neutron radiotherapy of deep-seated tumors, for which the photon component is appreciable, and for determination of environmental hazards to people occupationally exposed to mixtures of photons and neutrons

  12. V79 survival following simultaneous or sequential irradiation by 15-MeV neutrons and 60Co photons

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Higgins, P.D.; DeLuca, P.M. Jr.; Pearson, D.W.; Gould, M.N.

    1983-01-01

    A unique tandem source irradiation facility, composed of an intense d-T neutron source and a 60 Co teletherapy unit, was used to investigate biological responses for different neutron/photon configurations. V79 Chinese hamster cells, attached as monolayers in log-phase growth, were irradiated at 37 0 C by either 14.8-MeV neutrons, 60 Co, or a mixture of 40% neutrons and 60% photons in simultaneous or sequential application. Measurements of cell survival indicate an increased effectiveness in cell killing for simultaneously administered neutrons and photons compared to that measured or predicted for sequentially applied beam modalities. An understanding of the magnitude of these interactive effects is important both for calculating accurate effective doses for neutron radiotherapy of deep-seated tumors, for which the photon component is appreciable, and for determination of environmental hazards to people occupationally exposed to mixtures of photons and neutrons

  13. V79 survival following simultaneous or sequential irradiation by 14.8-MeV neutrons and 60Co photons

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Higgins, P.D.; DeLuca, P.M. Jr.; Pearson, D.W.; Gould, M.N.

    1981-01-01

    A unique tandem source irradiation facility, comprised of an intense d-T neutron source and a 60 Co teletherapy unit, has been used to investigate biological response for different neutron/photon configurations. V79 Chinese hamster cells, attached as monolayers in log phase growth, were irradiated at 37 0 C by either 14.8 MeV neutrons, 60 Co or by a mixture of 40% neutrons - 60% photons in simultaneous or sequential application. Measurements of cell survival indicate an increased effectiveness in cell killing for simultaneously administered neutrons and photons than was measured or predicted for sequentially applied beam modalities. An understanding of the magnitude of these interactive effects is important both for calculating accurate effective doses for neutron radiotherapy of deep-seated tumors, for which the photon component is appreciable and for determination of environmental hazards to people occupationally exposed to low levels of photons and neutrons

  14. Studies on the utility and mechanism of the V-79 cell metabolic cooperation assay for tumor promoters

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hartman, T.G.

    1985-01-01

    Cigarette smoke condensate and its fractions were tested for activity in the V-79 Metabolic Cooperation Assay to determine the usefulness of the assay for analysis of a complex mixture and to compare the results obtained with previously conducted in vivo promoter assays. The whole condensate and several of its fractions were positive in the assay. In general, the Metabolic Cooperation Assay results were comparable to previously published results obtained on mouse skin. The effect of cell density, phorbol 12-myrystate-13-acetate (PMA) exposure time, concentration, pre-exposure and binding activity on the recovery of mutant V-79 Chinese hamster lung fibroblasts in the Metabolic Cooperation Assay was determined. A PMA exposure interval of only 1 minute resulted in maximum recovery of mutant cells. PMA began to inhibit metabolic cooperation at an exposure concentration of 0.1 ng/ml. Pre-exposure of cells to PMA increased the recovery of both post-PMA-treated and non-treated mutant cells in a dose-dependent manner. 3 H-PMA was rapidly bound to or taken up by the V-79 cells under assay conditions. The effect of calcium antagonists and representative compounds from several classes of anti-promoters including anti-inflammatory sterols, protease inhibitors, retinoids and cyclic nucleotides on metabolic determined. Each compound was tested for its effect on metabolic cooperation and also for its ability to reverse or modify the inhibitory properties of PMA on inter-cellular communication. Of all the compounds tested only cyclic adenosine monophosphate (cAMP) was able to antagonize the inhibitory effect of PMA

  15. Biochemical and biological responses in V79 cells grown in different background radiation environment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Amicarelli, F.; Colafarina, S.; Ara, C.; Antonelli, F.; Balata, M.; Belli, M.; Simone, G.; Satta, L.

    2003-01-01

    Full text: In order to investigate the influence of a low background radiation environment on the biochemical and biological responses of mammalian cells cultured in vitro, a cell culture laboratory has been set up at the Gran Sasso National Laboratory (LNGS) of the Istituto Nazionale di Fisica Nucleare (INFN), located under the Gran Sasso d'Italia mountain, where cosmic rays are reduced by a factor of 10 6 and neutrons by a factor of 10 3 respect to the outside environment. Chinese hamster V79 cells were grown in parallel for up to nine months at LNGS and at the Istituto Superiore di Sanita (ISS). At the LNGS the exposure due to radon was reduced by a factor of about 25 with respect to the ISS. The biological end points addressed concerned cells proliferation, the expression of enzymes specific for the reduction of superoxydes, mutation induction by gamma-rays at the hprt locus and apoptotic sensitivity. After 9 months of culture, the cells grown at the LNGS, compared to the cells grown at the ISS, exhibit: i) a significant increase of the cell density at confluence; ii) a significantly higher capacity to scavenge organic and inorganic hydroperoxydes but a reduced scavenging capacity towards superoxide anions; iii) an increase in both the basal hprt mutation frequency and the sensitivity to the mutagenic effect of gamma-rays. The cells grown at the LNGS also show greater apoptotic sensitivity at the third month of culture that is no longer detected after nine months. Overall, these data suggest that cell response to ionizing radiation may be more complex than that predicted by a linear relationship with the dose and are consistent with the occurrence of an adaptive response related to the background radiation. However, other possibilities cannot be excluded such as the selection, in the two cultures, of clones having different characteristics, independently of the different radiation background. Work is in progress to better elucidate this point

  16. Effect of pulsed dose in simultaneous and sequential irradiation of V-79 cells by 14.8 MeV neutrons and 60Co photons

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Higgins, P.D.; DeLuca, P.M. Jr.; Gould, M.N.; Schell, M.C.; Pearson, D.W.

    1983-01-01

    The effect of irradiating V-79 Chinese hamster ovary cells with a mixture of 40% 14.8-MeV neutrons and 60% 60 Co photons with simultaneous or sequential exposures is investigated. Target doses are obtained by irradiating cell samples with 3-minute-long pulses of alternating neutrons and photons (in the sequential case) or with mixed neutrons and photons followed by equal beam-off periods to insure equal total-exposure times for sequenced and simultaneous irradiations. We observe qualitative differences between the survival results under each beam configuration that confirms earlier observations

  17. Effect of pulsed dose in simultaneous and sequential irradiation of V-79 cells by 14.8-MeV neutrons and 60Co photons

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Higgins, P.D.; DeLuca, P.M. Jr.; Gould, M.N.

    1984-01-01

    The effect of irradiating V-79 Chinese hamster cells with a mixture of 40% 14.8-MeV neutrons and 60% 69 Co photons with simultaneous or sequential exposures is investigated. Sample doses are obtained by irradiating cells with alternating 3-min pulses of neutrons and photons (in the sequential case) or with mixed neutrons and photons followed by equal beam-off periods to ensure equal total exposure times for sequential and simultaneous irradiations. Differences between the survival results under each beam configuration that are consistent with previous observations with nonpulsed irradiations are observed

  18. Protective effect of N-acetyl-L-cysteine against disulfiram-induced oxidative stress and apoptosis in V79 cells

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Grosicka-Maciag, Emilia; Kurpios-Piec, Dagmara; Grzela, Tomasz; Czeczot, Hanna; Skrzycki, Michal; Szumilo, Maria; Rahden-Staron, Iwonna

    2010-01-01

    This work investigated the effect of N-acetyl-L-cysteine (NAC) on disulfiram (DSF) induced oxidative stress in Chinese hamster fibroblast cells (V79). An increase in oxidative stress induced by DSF was observed up to a 200 μM concentration. It was evidenced by a statistically significant increase of both GSH t and GSSG levels, as well as elevated protein carbonyl (PC) content. There was no increase in lipid peroxidation (measured as TBARS). DSF increased CAT activity, but did not change SOD1 and SOD2 activities. Analysis of GSH related enzymes showed that DSF significantly increased GR activity, did not change Se-dependent GPx, but statistically significantly decreased non-Se-dependent GPx activity. DSF showed also pro-apoptotic activity. NAC alone did not produce any significant changes, besides an increase of GSH t level, in any of the variables measured. However, pre-treatment of cells with NAC ameliorated DSF-induced changes. NAC pre-treatment restored the viability of DSF-treated cells evaluated by Trypan blue exclusion assay and MTT test, GSSG level, and protein carbonyl content to the control values as well as it reduced pro-apoptotic activity of DSF. The increase of CAT and GR activity was not reversed. Activity of both GPx was significantly increased compared to their values after DSF treatment. In conclusion, oxidative properties are at least partially attributable to the cellular effects of disulfiram and mechanisms induced by NAC pre-treatment may lower or even abolish the observed effects. These observations illustrate the importance of the initial cellular redox state in terms of cell response to disulfiram exposure. -- Research Highlights: →This report explores biological properties of disulfiram under a condition of modulated intra-cellular GSH level. It shows a protective role of N-acetyl-L-cysteine in V79 cells exposed to disulfiram (in GSH metabolism as well as in changes of antioxidant enzyme activity).

  19. The pretective effects of heat shock protein 70 on radiation injury of V79 cells

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Qin Yongchun; Zhang Baoguo; Hong Chengjiao

    2008-01-01

    Westem blot was used to detect the expression of heat shock protein 70 in V79 cells after heat shock pretreatment; V79 cells were irradiated using γ-ray after heat shock pretreatment, survival rate was observed using Colony formation assay. Our study shows that 1) the overexpression of heat shock protein 70 was observed in cells recovering for 1 hour after heat shock pretreatment, with peak expression in cells recovering for 4 hours, and could last for 24 hours; 2) heat shock pretreatment was able to elevate survival rate of V79 cells after irradiation by 60 Co γ ray (when the irradiation dose was less than 6 Gy). The results indicate that heat shock protein 70 has protective effect on radiation induced cell death of V79 cells (when the irradiation dose was less than 6 Gy). (authors)

  20. Effect of 17-AAG on radio-sensitivity of HeLa and V79 cells

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pan Yanling; Hong Chengjiao; Zhang Baoguo

    2010-01-01

    In order to investigate the radio-sensitizing effect of 17-AAG, an inhibitor of Heat Shock Protein 90, on human Uterine Cervix Cancer HeLa and V79 cells, Clonogenic assay was used to observe the cell survival rate. The results show that 17-AAG can decrease obviously (p 0.05). This indicates that 17-AAG may enhance the radio-sensitivity of the HeLa cell line and has no effect on the V79 cell line. (authors)

  1. Evaluation of the genotoxic and antigenotoxic potential of Baccharis dracunculifolia extract on V79 cells by the comet assay.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Munari, Carla Carolina; Alves, Jacqueline Morais; Bastos, Jairo Kenupp; Tavares, Denise Crispim

    2010-01-01

    Baccharis dracunculifolia (Asteraceae), the main botanical source of green propolis, is a shrub of the Brazilian 'cerrado'. In folk medicine it is used as an anti-inflammatory agent, mainly for the treatment of gastrointestinal diseases. The aim of the present study was to evaluate the genotoxic and antigenotoxic effects of B. dracunculifolia ethyl acetate extract (Bd-EAE) on Chinese hamster lung fibroblasts (V79 cells) by the comet assay. Methyl methanesulfonate (MMS; 200 microM) was used as an inducer of DNA damage. Genotoxicity was evaluated using four different concentrations of Bd-EAE: 12.5, 25.0, 50.0 and 100.0 microg ml(-1). Antigenotoxicity was assessed before, simultaneously, and after treatment with the mutagen. The results showed a significant increase in the frequency of DNA damage in cultures treated with 50.0 and 100.0 microg ml(-1) Bd-EAE. Regarding its antigenotoxic potential, Bd-EAE reduced the frequency of DNA damage induced by MMS. However, this chemopreventive activity depended on the concentrations and treatment regimens used. The antioxidant activity of phenolic components present in Bd-EAE may contribute to reduce the alkylation damage induced by MMS. In conclusion, our findings confirmed the chemopreventive activity of Bd-EAE and showed that this effect occurs under different mechanism.

  2. An action spectrum for UV-induced attachment of V79 Chinese hamster cells to a substratum

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Baanrud, H; Berg, K; Platou, T; Moan, J [Inst. for Cancer Research, Oslo (Norway). Dept. of Biophysics

    1993-10-01

    When cells growing in monolayers are exposed to ultraviolet radiation (UV), their binding to the substratum is increased in strength. An action spectrum for such UV-induced binding was determined, using the time needed for trypsin-EDTA to detach the cells as a measure of binding strength. This action spectrum was significantly different from that for cell inactivation, also determined. At the shortest wavelengths (297/302, 313 nm) lethal fluences were needed to induce measurable binding while at the longest wavelengths (365, 405 nm) completely nonlethal fluences induced strong and persistent binding. (author).

  3. Association of mutator activity with UV sensitivity in an aphidicolin-resistant mutant of Chinese hamster V79 cells

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Liu, P.K.; Chang, C.; Trosko, J.E.

    1982-01-01

    The spontaneous mutation rates of an ultraviolet light (UV)-sensitive aphidicolin-resistant mutant (aphsup(r)-4-2) and its revertants have been determined by 2 techniques. By using the fluctuation analysis, the mutant and its thymidine (TdR)-prototrophic 'revertant' were found to exhibit elevated spontaneous mutation rates at the 6-thioguanine- and diphtheria-toxin-resistant loci. In contrast, the TdR-auxotrophic 'revertant' did not show this property. Similar results were obtained by the multiple replating technique. From these comparative studies and other previous characterizations, it appears that a single gene mutation is responsible for the following pleiotropic phenotype: slow growth, UV sensitivity, high UV-induced mutability, high frequency of site-specific bromodeoxyuridine (BrdU)-dependent chromosome breaks and enhanced spontaneous mutation rate. Recent studies indicate that the mutation may be on the gene for DNA polymerase α. The results further indicate that thymidine auxotrophy or imbalance in nucleotide pools is not necessarily associated with the mutator activity in mammalian cells. (orig.)

  4. Repair during multifraction exposures: spheroids versus monolayers

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Durand, R.E.

    1984-01-01

    Many type of mammalian cells, when grown in culture as multicell spheroids, display an increased ability to accumulate and repair sublethal radiation damage which has been called the ''contact effect''. Since this effect has the potential to markedly modify the multifraction radiation response of cells in V79 spheroids relative to cells in monolayer cultures, an investigation was made of regimens ranging from 1 to 100 fractions. Effective dose rates were chosen near 1 Gy h -1 to inhibit cell progression and thus simplify analysis of the results. As expected, larger doses per fraction produced more net cell killing in both systems than lower doses per fraction. Additionally, less killing of spheroid cells was observed in all regimens, in accord with their greater potential for repair. However, when the data were expressed as isoeffect curves, the spheroid and monolayer curves converged as the number of fractions increased. Thus, quite similar inherent sensitivity and repair capabilities would be predicted for ultra-low doses per fraction. High precision techniques for defining survival after doses of radiation from 0.2 to 1 Gy were, however, still able to demonstrate a survival advantage for cells grown as spheroids. (author)

  5. Characterization and radiation response of a heat-resistant variant of V79 cells

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Campbell, S.D.; Kruuv, J.; Lepock, J.R.

    1983-01-01

    A thermoresistant variant of the established cell line V79-S171-W1 was isolated after treatment with nitrosoguanidine and repeated heat treatments at 42.6 to 43 degrees C, and showed an enhanced ability to survive at 42.6, 43.5, and 44.5 degrees C. The rates of inactivation of the normal and heat-resistant lines differed by approximately a factor of 2 over this temperature range. This level of thermoresistance was stable for the first 80 doublings, but was lost by 120 doublings. This may have been due to a reversion to the normal V79 line since there was no continuous selection pressure and the thermoresistant variant, which was designated at HR7, had a longer average doubling time. Transient thermotolerance was induced in both the V79 and HR7 cells by a 10-min exposure to 44.5 degrees C. After 3 hr incubation at 37 degrees C, both cell lines had an identical sensitivity to further exposure to 44.5 degrees C. Thus the long-term thermoresistance of the HR7 cells may be due to a permanent induction of a low level of thermotolerance. The (ionizing) radiation survival curves and the ability to repair sublethal radiation damage were identical for the thermoresistant variant and the parent cell line

  6. The attachment of V79 and human periodontal ligament fibroblasts on periodontally involved root surfaces following treatment with EDTA, citric acid, or tetracycline HCL: an SEM in vitro study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chandra, R Viswa; Jagetia, Ganesh Chandra; Bhat, K Mahalinga

    2006-02-15

    The present in vitro study has been designed to establish and compare the effects of citric acid, EDTA, and tetracycline HCl on human periodontally diseased roots on the structure, attachment, and orientation of V79 (primary Chinese hamster lung fibroblasts) cells and human periodontal ligament fibroblasts (HPDL). Commercially available V79 cells and HPDL derived from healthy human third molars were used in this study. These fibroblasts were left in solution for seven days in order to attain confluence. Forty single-rooted teeth were obtained from patients diagnosed with periodontitis. The crown part was removed under constant irrigation and the root was split vertically into two equal halves, thus, yielding 80 specimens. Following scaling and root planing, the specimens were washed with phosphate buffered saline (PBS) and kept in 50 microg/ml gentamycin sulphate solution for 24 hours. The root pieces were then treated as follows: citric acid at pH 1, 24% EDTA, or with a 10% solution of tetracycline HCl and were then placed in V79 fibroblast cultures and HPDL cultures. The specimens were harvested after four weeks and were fixed in 2.5% glutaraldehyde in PBS before preparation for scanning electron microscopy (SEM). The behavior of V79 cells was similar to that of human periodontal ligament cells on root conditioned surfaces. V79 and HPDL showed a healthy morphology on root surfaces treated with citric acid and EDTA and a relatively unhealthy appearance on root surfaces treated with tetracycline HCl and distilled water (control group). The results suggest the use of citric acid and EDTA as root conditioning agents favorably affects the migration, attachment, and morphology of fibroblasts on human root surfaces, which may play a significant role in periodontal healing and regeneration.

  7. Kale Extract Increases Glutathione Levels in V79 Cells, but Does not Protect Them against Acute Toxicity Induced by Hydrogen Peroxide

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Paula B. Andrade

    2012-05-01

    Full Text Available This study aims to evaluate the antioxidant potential of extracts of Brassica oleracea L. var. acephala DC. (kale and several materials of Pieris brassicae L., a common pest of Brassica cultures using a cellular model with hamster lung fibroblast (V79 cells under quiescent conditions and subjected to H2O2-induced oxidative stress. Cytotoxicity was evaluated by 3-(4,5-dimethylthiazol-2-yl-2,5-diphenyl tetrazolium bromide (MTT assay and glutathione was determined by the 5,5'-dithiobis(2-nitrobenzoic acid (DTNB-oxidized glutathione (GSSG reductase recycling assay. The phenolic composition of the extracts was also established by HPLC-DAD. They presented acylated and non acylated flavonoid glycosides, some of them sulfated, and hydroxycinnamic acyl gentiobiosides. All extracts were cytotoxic by themselves at high concentrations and failed to protect V79 cells against H2O2 acute toxicity. No relationship between phenolic composition and cytotoxicity of the extracts was found. Rather, a significant increase in glutathione was observed in cells exposed to kale extract, which contained the highest amount and variety of flavonoids. It can be concluded that although flavonoids-rich extracts have the ability to increase cellular antioxidant defenses, the use of extracts of kale and P. brassicae materials by pharmaceutical or food industries, may constitute an insult to health, especially to debilitated individuals, if high doses are consumed.

  8. Radiosensitizing efficiency of sodium glycididazole on V79 cells in vitro

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zheng Xiulong; Gao Jianguo; Zhang Hong; Zhu Qin; Meng Xiangshun; Zhao Fang

    1995-01-01

    Radiosensitizing effect of sodium glycididazole (SGDD) on the hypoxic V 79 cells by standard in vitro colon formation method has been further studied. The results showed its toxicity was low. Its ID 50 in cells under hypoxic and aerobic condition were 23.5 and 35.7 mmol/L respectively. These indicated that SGDD showed more toxicity under hypoxic than under aerobic condition (p 1.6 was 0.48 mmol/L. Its maximum SER was 2.3 at 1.38 mmol/L. Comparisons of radiosensitizing effect of SGDD versus MISO and its mother compound (metronidazole) under the same experimental condition, SER for SGDD, MISO and metronidazole were 1.75, 1.53 and 1.07 at 0.3 mmol/L respectively. SGDD showed more radiosensitizing efficiency than MISO and much greater than metronidazole. This study further confirms our previous results i.e. SGDD is a hypoxic radiosensitizer with low toxic, high efficiency and selectively enhances the radiosensitivity of hypoxic cells for tumor radiotherapy

  9. Induction of micronuclei in V79 cells after combined treatments with heterocyclic aromatic amines.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Perez, C; Lopez de Cerain, A; Bello, J

    2002-10-01

    Heterocyclic aromatic amines (HAs) appear in foods rich in proteins when subjected to different cooking processes. These amines have been demonstrated to be mutagenic in bacteria; in eucaryotic cells, controversial results have been referred. The objective of this study is to evaluate the clastogenic and/or aneugenic capacity of three HAs--2-amino-3-methylimidazo[4,5-f]quinoline (IQ), 2-amino-3-methylimidazo[4,5-f]quinoxaline (IQx), and 2-amino-3-methyl-6-phenylimidazo[4,5-b]pyridine (PhIP)--in isolated as well as in combined treatments. The micronucleus test in vitro was used on V79 cells in the presence and absence of metabolic activation. The duration of the treatment was 2 h, and cytochalasin B was added for 21 h to stop cytokinesis; then, micronuclei (MN) were counted in binucleated cells. In the presence of metabolic activation, the three amines showed a significant increase in the number of MN with respect to the negative control. The PhIP amine presented the highest values and it also resulted slightly active in the absence of metabolic activation, although these differences have not been considered to be significant. The combined treatments of these amines have shown that the effects attributed to them when administered together are those that are expected for a possible additive effect; the effect attributed to each HA separately is not potentiated nor inhibited.

  10. Dose-rate effects on the cell cycle and survival of S3 HeLa and V79 cells

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mitchell, J.B.; Bedford, J.S.; Bailey, S.M.

    1979-01-01

    The effects of continuous irradiation at different dose rates on the cell cycle and on cell survival were studied using synchronized S3 HeLa and V79 cells. The minimum dose rate necessary to stop cell division was found to be approximately 23 rad/hr for HeLa cells and 270 rad/hr for V79 cells. For dose rates that stop cell division, cells progress through G 1 and S, with a small delay in the S phase, and are blocked in G 2 . Appreciable mitotic accumulation was observed for HeLa cells at dose rates which stopped cell division. By comparison, much less mitotic accumulation was observed for V79 cells over a range of dose rates from 37 to 270 rad/hr. Minimum mitotic delays for a variety of dose rates were determined for both cell lines. S3 HeLa cells are much more sensitive in this respect than V79 cells; however, it appeared that for higher dose rates the minimum mitotic delay in HeLa cells asymptotically approached a value of about 35 hr. In addition to the qualitative differences observed for the two cell lines in regard to mitotic accumulation, HeLa cells accumulated for prolonged periods in the presence of colcemid while V79 cells were blocked for only a few hours, HeLa cells show a dramatic effect of redistribution of cells into sensitive phases of the cell cycle during exposure, which was reflected in the survival curves at low dose rate. More cell killing per unit dose was observed at 37 than at 74 rad/hr

  11. Survival of V79 cells after low doses of X-rays

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Watts, M.E.; Fowler, J.F.; Hodgkiss, R.J.; Jones, N.R.

    1984-01-01

    Doses of X-rays of the order 1-3 Gy are used in clinical multifraction regimes. Reduction in oxygen enhancement ratios (OER) and sensitizer enhancement ratios have been reported for CHO cells. The errors in determining low levels of cell kill are largely influenced by sampling and dilution errors. The authors have aimed to reduce these errors by increasing the sample size and reducing dilutions. To further assess the uncertainties involved in these experiments the data were pooled from three independent series of experiments. Asynchronous log phase Chinese hamster lung fibroblast cells have been irradiated attached to glass Petri dishes in Eagle's MEM + 10% fcs at a dose rate of 0.61 Gy min/sup -1/ under air + 5% CO/sub 2/ or nitrogen + 5% CO/sub 2/ at 18 0 C. Survival in the range 10/sup -1/ to 5 x 10/sup -3/ surviving fraction (SF) was identical at 0.61 Gy min/sup -1/ and 3.93 Gy min/sup -1/. Many previous experiments have given an OER = 3.1 at 10/sup -2/-10/sup -3/ survival. Least squares fit to the linear quadratic function log S = -(αD + βD/sup 2/) gave an OER≅3.2 at SF = 10/sup -2/. Below 6 Gy air dose (>0.2 SF) OER was reduced, but was still ≅ 2.4 at 2 Gy. The linear quadratic function gave an OER for a ≅ 1.5 (the limiting low-dose OER) and √β≅3.2

  12. Encapsulation by Janus spheroids

    OpenAIRE

    Li, Wei; Liu, Ya; Brett, Genevieve; Gunton, James D.

    2011-01-01

    The micro/nano encapsulation technology has acquired considerable attention in the fields of drug delivery, biomaterial engineering, and materials science. Based on recent advances in chemical particle synthesis, we propose a primitive model of an encapsulation system produced by the self-assembly of Janus oblate spheroids, particles with oblate spheroidal bodies and two hemi-surfaces coded with dissimilar chemical properties. Using Monte Carlo simulation, we investigate the encapsulation sys...

  13. Trypsinization and the radiosensitivity of mitotic and log phase Chinese hamster V79 cells exposed to 250 kVp X-rays

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Reddy, N.M.S.; Stevenson, A.F.G.; Lange, C.S.

    1989-01-01

    The authors studied the influence of trypsin-induced morphological changes on the x-radiosensitivity of cells plated at either low (4-600/cm 2 ) or high (2 x 10 4 /cm 2 ) density and grown overnight before treatments. Trypsin treatment induced contraction and rounding of spread cells. The results suggest that: (1) trypsin-induced cell contraction affects the ability of cells to repair radiation damage, (2) spread cells are better able to repair potential lethal damage (PLD) than rounded cells, (3) immediate plating survival of cells in high-density cultures may not represent their intrinsic radiosensitivity and (4) cell-to-cell contact is not necessary for log phase cells to repair PLD. (author)

  14. The elimination of low-dose hypersensitivity in Chinese hamster V79-379A cells by pretreatment with X rays or hydrogen peroxide

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Marples, B.; Joiner, M.C.

    1995-01-01

    To explain increased radioresistance over the X-ray dose range ∼ 0.5-1 Gy an inducible radioprotective mechanism triggered by DNA damage was proposed; hypersensitivity to doses much-lt Gy reflected the response prior to the activation of this system. To test this hypothesis, cells were pre-exposed to DNA-damaging agents in an attempt to induce the process prematurely. An increase in survival was evident at X-ray doses below 0.3 Gy after a priming treatment of X rays (0.05, 0.2, 1 Gy) given 6 h earlier. The protective effect was found to be transitory, requiring time for development and diminishing after two to three cell cycle times. Cycloheximide administered in the interval between the priming and challenge doses of X rays abolished the protection conferred by pretreatment, indicating the involvement of de novo protein synthesis. Oxidative damage by nontoxic doses of hydrogen peroxide (10 -4 M, but not 10 -6 M) also produced a protective effect against subsequent X irradiation. These experiments indicate survival in the hyper-radiosensitive region (much-lt 0.5 Gy) can be modified by pretreatment with agents known to affect DNA repair. In addition, the development of increased radioresistance after single doses of X rays was inhibited by cycloheximide treatment. These studies provide evidence to support the explanations proposed previously for the phenomena of increased radioresistance and hyper-radiosensitivity observed at very low X-ray doses. 57 refs., 6 figs., 3 tabs

  15. V-79 Chinese Hamster Cells irradiated with antiprotons, a study of peripheral damage due to medium and long range components of the annihilation radiation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kovacevic, Sandra; Bassler, Niels; Hartley, Oliver

    2009-01-01

    beam with fluence ranging from 4.5e8 to 4.5e9 particles, and evaluated the biological effect on cells located distal to the Bragg peak using clonogenic survival and the COMET assay. Results: Both methods show a substantial biological effect on the cells in the entrance channel and the Bragg Peak area...

  16. Caffeine-enhanced survival of radiation-sensitive, repair-deficient Chinese hamster cells

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Utsumi, H.; Elkind, M.M.

    1983-01-01

    A clone of V79 Chinese hamster cells (V79-AL162/S-10) with unique properties has been isolated after a challenge of parental cells (V79-AL162) with 1 mM ouabain. Compared with parental cells, or with other clones isolated after the ouabain challenge, these cells form smaller colonies, are more sensitive to both x rays and fission-spectrum neutrons, and respond atypically to a postirradiation treatment with caffeine. Their enhanced response to x rays results mainly from a large reduction in the shoulder of their survival curve, probably because in late S phase, the most resistant phase in the cell cycle, the survival curve of these cells has a reduced shoulder width. Caffeine, and to a lesser extent theophylline, added to the colony-forming medium immediately after exposure appreciably increases the width of the shoulder of these sensitive cells, whereas caffeine has the opposite effect on the response of normal V79 cells. Thus the unique response of the V79-AL162/S-10 cells to a radiation posttreatment with caffeine (increased survival) results from a net increase in their ability to repair damage that is otherwise lethal; caffeine treatment ordinarly prevents normal V79 cells from repairing damage that is only potentially lethal

  17. Dose-rate effects in plateau-phase cultures of S3 HeLa and V79 cells

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mitchell, J.B.; Bedford, J.S.; Bailey, S.M.

    1979-01-01

    Dose-rate effects on cell survival were studied for log-, fed plateau-, and unfed plateau-phase cultures of V79 and S3 HeLa cells. For log-phase cultures, repair, cell-cycle redistribution, and cell division during exposure can contribute to the overall dose-rate effect, but their relative contributions are difficult to determine. With plateau-phase cultures, the cell-cycle times are greatly lengthened, for those cells that are in cycle. Hence, the contribution to the overall dose-rate effect of cell-cycle redistribution and cell division during the exposure could be minimized using plateau-phase cultures. With respect to the acute dose-survival curves, there was a clear loss in effectiveness when the dose rate was lowered to 154 rad/hr for both fed and unfed plateau-phase HeLa and V79 cells. There was no further reduction in effectiveness per unit dose, however, when the dose rate was reduced to 55 rad/hr. Since there was virtually no cell division or cell-cycle redistribution, it may be that a limit to the repair-dependent dose-rate effect at 37 0 C has been reached at a dose rate of 154 rad/hr

  18. Study of the effect of vitamins C and E on the radiation response of multicell spheroids treated with Adriamycin

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sridhar, R.; Stroude, E.; Inch, W.R.

    1979-01-01

    Treatment with Adriamycin (0.6 μg/ml for 60 min) was not cytotoxic to multicell spheroids. At this concentration, the drug was not a sensitizer of hypoxic cells in V79 multicell spheroids, which were irradiated at 37 0 C in medium equilibrated with a mixture of 5% O 2 :3% CO 2 :92% N 2 . The addition of vitamins C and E did not increase the radiation sensitivity of Adriamycin-treated spheroids. In some experiments, catalase was included in the growth medium to overcome the toxic effect of hydrogen peroxide, which is known to be formed in solutions containing vitamin C and also in Adriamycin solutions treated with vitamin C or microsomal preparations. As a result of these experiments, it was found that catalase increased the radiation killing in multicell spheroids

  19. Biophysical interpretation of the response of Chinese hamster cells to 24 keV neutrons

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Holt, P.D.

    1988-01-01

    The response of V79 Chinese hamster cells to a 24 keV neutron spectrum has been compared with data for the response of V79 cells to a range of higher neutron energies (up to 15 MeV). The linear energy transfer (LET) distributions of the neutron spectra were calculated and the expected responses of the cells to the different spectra were calculated using published track-segment data on the response of V79 cells to charged particles with various LET values. The response of the cells to 24 keV neutrons was predicted satisfactorily by the LET distribution, in spite of the fact that the maximum range of the recoil protons is only 0.5 μm. The response was not correctly predicted by the microdosimetric parameter y-bar D * evaluated in a 1 μm diameter sphere. (author)

  20. A study of V79 cell survival after for proton and carbon ion beams as represented by the parameters of Katz' track structure model

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Grzanka, Leszek; Waligórski, M. P. R.; Bassler, Niels

    different sets of data obtained for the same cell line and different ions, measured at different laboratories, we have fitted model parameters to a set of carbon-irradiated V79 cells, published by Furusawa et al. (2), and to a set of proton-irradiated V79 cells, published by Wouters et al. (3), separately....... We found that values of model parameters best fitted to the carbon data of Furusawa et al. yielded predictions of V79 survival after proton irradiation which did not match the V79 proton data of Wouters et al. Fitting parameters to both sets combined did not improve the accuracy of model predictions...... carbon irradiation. 1. Katz, R., Track structure in radiobiology and in radiation detection. Nuclear Track Detection 2: 1-28 (1978). 2. Furusawa Y. et al. Inactivation of aerobic and hypoxic cells from three different cell lines by accelerated 3He-, 12C- and 20Ne beams. Radiat Res. 2012 Jan; 177...

  1. Comments on ''V79 survival following simultaneous or sequential irradiation by 15-MeV neutrons and 60Co photons'' by Higgins et al. [Radiat. Res. 95, 45-56(1983)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zaider, M.; Brenner, D.J.

    1984-01-01

    In a recent paper Higgins et al. reported survival data for V79 Chinese hamster cells exposed simultaneously or sequentially to 15-MeV neutrons and 60 Co photons. In each case the results showed the combined modality to be more effective at cell killing than would be expected from the simple multiplication of the effects due to each radiation alone. Thus the effects of the two radiations are synergistic. In addition, simultaneous exposures yielded lower surviving fractions than sequential ones. Both these results are easy to understand, at least qualitatively, if the concepts of sublethal damage and sublethal damage repair are used. The proposition that simultaneous exposure is more effective than sequential ones thus proposition that simultaneous exposure is more effective than sequential ones thus becomes evident. Theoretical expressions have been derived also to quantify these phenomena. Higgins et al. rederive several of the equations previously obtained, however, the interpretation that they give to these equations is not appropriate. It is the purpose of this note to comment on some of these problems and offer a simple analysis and interpretation of the results based on sublethal damage repair

  2. Beschermingsplan hamster 2005-2010

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Haye, la M.J.J.; Jansman, H.A.H.

    2005-01-01

    Alterra-Concept van het beschermingsplan hamster 2005-2010. De hamster is in het meest westelijke deel van het Europese verspreidingsgebied bedreigd. De kennis die in de afgelopen periode is opgedaan van de hamster en de maatregelen die in het veld zijn uitgevoerd vormen de basis voor dit tweede

  3. Isotropic oscillator: spheroidal wave functions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mardoyan, L.G.; Pogosyan, G.S.; Ter-Antonyan, V.M.; Sisakyan, A.N.

    1985-01-01

    Solutions of the Schroedinger equation are found for an isotropic oscillator (10) in prolate and oblate spheroidal coordinates. It is shown that the obtained solutions turn into spherical and cylindrical bases of the isotropic oscillator at R→0 and R→ infinity (R is the dimensional parameter entering into the definition of prolate and oblate spheroidal coordinates). The explicit form is given for both prolate and oblate basis of the isotropic oscillator for the lowest quantum states

  4. The Andromeda Dwarf Spheroidal Galaxies

    OpenAIRE

    Armandroff, Taft E.; Da Costa, Gary S.

    1998-01-01

    Our current knowledge of M31's dwarf spheroidal companions is reviewed. Two topics of recent interest constitute the bulk of this review. First, color-magnitude diagrams reaching below the horizontal branch have been constructed for two M31 dwarf spheroidals based on images from HST/WFPC2. The horizontal branches are predominantly red in both galaxies, redder than expected for their metallicity based on Galactic globular clusters. Thus, the second parameter effect is seen in the M31 halo. Sec...

  5. Variations in sensitivity of synchronized Chinese hamster cells to oxic and anoxic X-ray exposures

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Siracka, E.; Littbrand, B.; Clifton, K.H.; Revesz, L.

    1975-01-01

    V-79 Chinese hamster cells in monolayer cultures on glass surfaces were synchronized by treatment with hydroxyurea and then exposed at different times to X-rays in air or in oxygen-free argon. Survival determinations indicated that the oxygen enhancement ratio (OER) as expressed by the ratio of the respective D 0 values varied over a narrow range in the different phases of the cell cycle. These changes resulted from cyclic alterations in both aerobic and anaerobic D 0 values, possibly in n values. (author)

  6. RF induction plasma spheroidization of tungsten powders

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gu Zhogntao; Ye Gaoying; Liu Chuandong; Tong Honghui

    2009-01-01

    Irregularly-shaped tungsten powders (average granular sizes of 512 μm) have been spheroidized by radio frequency (RF)induction plasma. The effects of feed rate, mode of material dispersion, particle size on spheroidization efficiency are investigated. Experimental results show that the spheroidization efficiency decreases rapidly when the feed rate increases to more than 95 g/min. Only 30% spheroidization efficiency is gained at the feed rate of 135.75 g/min. The spheroidization efficiency is also affected by the flow rate of carrier gas. When the flow rate of carrier gas is 0.12 m 3 /h, the dispersion effect is the best, and the spheroidization efficiency is almost 100%. The apparent density of tungsten powders increases a bit with the increase of spheroidization efficiency. And the particle size uniformity of spheroidized tungsten powders is in accordance with that of original powders. (authors)

  7. SIZE AND SHAPE FACTOR EXTREMES OF SPHEROIDS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Daniel Hlubinka

    2011-05-01

    Full Text Available In the paper we consider random prolate (oblate spheroids and their random profiles. The limiting distribution of the extremal characteristics of the spheroids is related to the limiting distribution of the corresponding extremal characteristics of the profiles. The difference between the analysis of the prolate and oblate spheroids is discussed. We propose the possible application of the theoretical results.

  8. Dicholesteroyl diselenide: cytotoxicity, genotoxicity and mutagenicity in the yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae and in Chinese hamster lung fibroblasts.

    Science.gov (United States)

    de Oliveira, Iuri Marques; Degrandi, Tiago Hoerbe; Jorge, Patrícia Mendes; Saffi, Jenifer; Rosa, Renato Moreira; Guecheva, Temenouga Nikolova; Henriques, João Antonio Pêgas

    2014-03-15

    The organoselenium compound, dicholesteroyl diselenide (DCDS) is a structural analogue of diphenyl diselenide (DPDS) and may be considered as a promising antioxidant drug in vivo. Nevertheless, little is known about the toxicological properties of DCDS. In the present study we evaluated the cytotoxic, genotoxic and mutagenic properties of DCDS in Chinese hamster lung fibroblasts (V79) and in strains of the yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae, proficient and deficient in several DNA-repair pathways. The results with V79 cells show that DCDS induced cytotoxicity, GSH depletion and elevation of lipid peroxidation at lower concentrations than did DPDS. DCDS also generated single- and double-strand DNA breaks in V79 cells, both in the presence and in the absence of metabolic activation, as revealed by alkaline and neutral comet assays. Moreover, the induction of oxidative DNA base-damage was demonstrated by means of a modified comet assay with formamidopyrimidine-DNA glycosylase and endonuclease III. Treatment with DCDS also induced micronucleus formation in V79 cells as well as point and frame-shift mutations in a haploid wild-type strain of S. cerevisiae. Yeast mutants defective in base excision-repair proteins were the most sensitive to DCDS. Pre-incubation with N-acetylcysteine reduced DCDS's oxidative, genotoxic and mutagenic effects in yeast and in V79 cells. Our findings indicate that the presence of cholesteroyl substituents in DCDS results in elevation of its cytotoxic and genotoxic potential compared with that of DPDS in yeast and in V79 cells. However, due to dose-dependent contrasting behaviour of organoselenium compounds and differences in their toxicity in in vitro and in vivo systems, further studies are needed in order to establish the non-toxic concentration range for treatment in mammals. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  9. Acoustic scattering on spheroidal shapes near boundaries

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miloh, Touvia

    2016-11-01

    A new expression for the Lamé product of prolate spheroidal wave functions is presented in terms of a distribution of multipoles along the axis of the spheroid between its foci (generalizing a corresponding theorem for spheroidal harmonics). Such an "ultimate" singularity system can be effectively used for solving various linear boundary-value problems governed by the Helmholtz equation involving prolate spheroidal bodies near planar or other boundaries. The general methodology is formally demonstrated for the axisymmetric acoustic scattering problem of a rigid (hard) spheroid placed near a hard/soft wall or inside a cylindrical duct under an axial incidence of a plane acoustic wave.

  10. Theory and computation of spheroidal wavefunctions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Falloon, P E; Abbott, P C; Wang, J B

    2003-01-01

    In this paper we report on a package, written in the Mathematica computer algebra system, which has been developed to compute the spheroidal wavefunctions of Meixner and Schaefke (1954 Mathieusche Funktionen und Sphaeroidfunktionen) and is available online (physics.uwa.edu.au/~falloon/spheroidal/spheroidal.html). This package represents a substantial contribution to the existing software, since it computes the spheroidal wavefunctions to arbitrary precision for general complex parameters μ, ν, γ and argument z; existing software can only handle integer μ, ν and does not give arbitrary precision. The package also incorporates various special cases and computes analytic power series and asymptotic expansions in the parameter γ. The spheroidal wavefunctions of Flammer (1957 Spheroidal Wave functions) are included as a special case of Meixner's more general functions. This paper presents a concise review of the general theory of spheroidal wavefunctions and a description of the formulae and algorithms used in their computation, and gives high precision numerical examples

  11. Effect of hepatocyte growth factor on radiation response of HeLa, V79, CHO and primary cultured parenchymal hepatocyte in vitro

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yamazaki, Hideya; Inoue, Takehiro; Nose, Takayuki; Murayama, Shigeyuki; Teshima, Teruki; Ozeki, Syuji; Koizumi, Masahiko; Inoue, Toshihiko.

    1996-01-01

    Hepatocyte growth factor (HGF) is a multipotent cytokine enhancing regeneration of injured organs as liver, kidney and lung after injury. HGF enhances proliferation of various type of cells, inhibits proliferation of carcinoma cells, enhances motility of epithelial cells. We examined three cell lines (CHO, HeLa, V79) and primary cultured normal rat parenchymal hepatocytes to determine the effect of HGF on radiation response. HGF diminished survival of CHO and V79 cells determined by colony formation assay, whereas no significant change of survival was found in HeLa cells. No synergistic changes of survival were found when these three cell lines were irradiated with the addition of HGF. Thus, HGF did not enhance the radiation effect. We also analyzed the impact of irradiation with HGF on primary cultured normal rat parenchymal hepatocytes. At first, the release of glutamic-oxaloacetic amino-transaminase (GOT) in the supernatant was estimated. Irradiation (40 Gy) with or without HGF did not change GOT release in acute phase by 4 days after irradiation compared with the unirradiated control. Second, the DNA synthesis of rat parenchymal hepatocytes was analyzed using radioactive iodine-labeled deoxyuridine incorporation. HGF counteracted the suppression of DNA synthesis induced by irradiation. Thus, HGF may act as a mitogen even for irradiation-damaged normal cells. (author)

  12. 12-O-Tetradecanoyl-phorbol-13-acetate and its relationship to SCE induction in Syrian and Chinese hamster cells

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Popescu, N.C.; Amsbaugh, S.C.; Larramendy, M.L.; DiPaolo

    1982-01-01

    12-O-Tetradecanoyl-phorbol-13-acetate (TPA) in conditions that produce enhancement of ultraviolet light (UV) and x-irradiation Syrian hamster embryo cell (HEC) transformation did not cause further increase in the sister chromatid exchange (SCE) frequency induced by UV and x-irradiation, two physical carcinogens that differ in their mode of DNA interaction and efficiency of SCE induction. Several factors which might influence SCE induction by TPA were studied on HEC and Chinese hamster V79-4 cells. Heat-inactivated serum was used because of the possibility that a serum component may interfere with TPA ability to cause SCE. TPA effect on SCE was determined at the first and second division post treatment on cells exposed to different 5-bromodeoxyuridine (BrdUrd) concentrations. Independent of BrdUrd concentration (1-10μg/ml medium) and the number of cells divisions post treatment, TPA (0.01-2μg/ml medium) was ineffective in inducing SCE in exponentially and stationary HEC cultures cultivated in medium supplemented with heat-inactivated serum. Also, TPA did not increase the SCE frequency in V79-4 Chinese hamster cells cultured in heat-activated or noninactivated serum. Although SCE induction, a cellular response to carcinogen-induced DNA damage, may be important for the induction of transformation by environmental agents, the enhancement of transformation frequency caused by TPA occurs without further DNA alterations involved in SCE formation

  13. Lack of specificity of chromosome breaks resulting from radiation-induced genomic instability in Chinese hamster cells

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Trott, K.-R.; Teibe, A.

    1998-01-01

    In V79 Chinese hamster cells, radiation-induced genomic instability results in a persistently increased frequency of micronuclei, dicentric chromosomes and apoptosis and in decreased colony-forming ability. These manifestations of radiation-induced genomic instability may be attributed to an increased rate of chromosome breakage events many generations after irradiation. This chromosomal instability does not seem to be a property which has been inflicted on individual chromosomes at the time of irradiation. Rather, it appears to be secondary to an increased level of non-specific clastogenic factors in the progeny of most if not all irradiated cells. This conclusion is drawn from the observations presented here, that all the chromosomes in surviving V79 cells are involved in the formation of dicentric chromosome aberrations 1 or 2 weeks after irradiation with about equal probability if corrections are made for chromosome length. (orig.)

  14. Scalable robotic biofabrication of tissue spheroids

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mehesz, A Nagy; Hajdu, Z; Visconti, R P; Markwald, R R; Mironov, V; Brown, J; Beaver, W; Da Silva, J V L

    2011-01-01

    Development of methods for scalable biofabrication of uniformly sized tissue spheroids is essential for tissue spheroid-based bioprinting of large size tissue and organ constructs. The most recent scalable technique for tissue spheroid fabrication employs a micromolded recessed template prepared in a non-adhesive hydrogel, wherein the cells loaded into the template self-assemble into tissue spheroids due to gravitational force. In this study, we present an improved version of this technique. A new mold was designed to enable generation of 61 microrecessions in each well of a 96-well plate. The microrecessions were seeded with cells using an EpMotion 5070 automated pipetting machine. After 48 h of incubation, tissue spheroids formed at the bottom of each microrecession. To assess the quality of constructs generated using this technology, 600 tissue spheroids made by this method were compared with 600 spheroids generated by the conventional hanging drop method. These analyses showed that tissue spheroids fabricated by the micromolded method are more uniform in diameter. Thus, use of micromolded recessions in a non-adhesive hydrogel, combined with automated cell seeding, is a reliable method for scalable robotic fabrication of uniform-sized tissue spheroids.

  15. Scalable robotic biofabrication of tissue spheroids

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mehesz, A Nagy; Hajdu, Z; Visconti, R P; Markwald, R R; Mironov, V [Advanced Tissue Biofabrication Center, Department of Regenerative Medicine and Cell Biology, Medical University of South Carolina, Charleston, SC (United States); Brown, J [Department of Mechanical Engineering, Clemson University, Clemson, SC (United States); Beaver, W [York Technical College, Rock Hill, SC (United States); Da Silva, J V L, E-mail: mironovv@musc.edu [Renato Archer Information Technology Center-CTI, Campinas (Brazil)

    2011-06-15

    Development of methods for scalable biofabrication of uniformly sized tissue spheroids is essential for tissue spheroid-based bioprinting of large size tissue and organ constructs. The most recent scalable technique for tissue spheroid fabrication employs a micromolded recessed template prepared in a non-adhesive hydrogel, wherein the cells loaded into the template self-assemble into tissue spheroids due to gravitational force. In this study, we present an improved version of this technique. A new mold was designed to enable generation of 61 microrecessions in each well of a 96-well plate. The microrecessions were seeded with cells using an EpMotion 5070 automated pipetting machine. After 48 h of incubation, tissue spheroids formed at the bottom of each microrecession. To assess the quality of constructs generated using this technology, 600 tissue spheroids made by this method were compared with 600 spheroids generated by the conventional hanging drop method. These analyses showed that tissue spheroids fabricated by the micromolded method are more uniform in diameter. Thus, use of micromolded recessions in a non-adhesive hydrogel, combined with automated cell seeding, is a reliable method for scalable robotic fabrication of uniform-sized tissue spheroids.

  16. Permeabilization of ultraviolet-irradiated chinese hamster cells with polyethylene glycol and introduction of ultraviolet endonuclease from Micrococcus luteus

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yarosh, D.B.; Setlow, R.B.

    1981-01-01

    Chinese hamster V-79 cells were made permeable by treatment with polyethylene glycol and then incubated with a Micrococcus luteus extract containing ultraviolet-specific endonuclease activity. This treatment introduced nicks in irradiated, but not in unirradiated, deoxyribonucleic acid. The nicks remained open for at least 3 h; there was no loss of endonuclease-sensitive sites, and no excision of dimers as measured by chromatography was detected. In addition, there was no increase in ultraviolet resistance in treated cells. This suggests that the absence of a significant amount of excision repair in rodent cells is due to the lack of both incision and excision capacity

  17. The effect of 2-[(aminopropyl)amino] ethanethiol (WR 1065) on radiation-induced DNA damage and repair and cell progression in V79 cells

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Grdina, D.J.; Nagy, B.

    1986-01-01

    The radioprotector 2-[(aminopropyl)amino] ethanethiol (WR 1065) was investigated with respect to its ability to affect radiation-induced DNA damage and repair in V79 cells. At a concentration of 4mM, WR 1065 protected against the formation of single strand breaks (SSB), when present during irradiation. The protector appeared, however, to inhibit the subsequent postirradiation repair or rejoining of SSB. While repair was complete within 24h, the protector reduced the rate of repair by a factor of 3. This inhibitory effect on the rate of repair did not correlate with either measured differences in cell survival or mutagenesis. WR 1065 present in the growth medium inhibited the progression of cells through S-phase, and cell-doubling time following a 3h exposure to the protector was increased from 11 to 18h. These data are consistent with the property of thiols to inhibit DNA polymerase activity. It was concluded that, while the presence of WR 1065 during irradiation reduced SSB-DNA damage, its effect on the subsequent rejoining of these breaks could not be correlated with its observed effect on protecting against radiation-induced mutagenesis. (author)

  18. Translation and rotation of a porous spheroid in a spheroidal container

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Saad, E.I.

    2010-01-01

    The flow problem of an incompressible axisymmetrical quasisteady translation and steady rotation of a porous spheroid in a concentric spheroidal container are studied analytically. The same small departure from a sphere is considered for each spheroidal surface. In the limit of small Reynolds number, the Brinkman equation for the flow inside the porous region and the Stokes equation for the outside region in their stream functions formulations and velocity components, which are proportional to the translational and angular velocities, respectively, are used. Explicit expressions are obtained for both inside and outside flow fields to the first order in a small parameter characterizing the deformation of the spheroidal surface from the spherical shape. The hydrodynamic drag force and couple exerted on the porous spheroid are obtained for the special cases of prolate and oblate spheroids in closed forms. The dependence of the normalized wall-corrected translational and rotational mobilities on permeability for a porous spheroid in an unbounded medium and for a solid spheroid in a cell on the particle volume fraction is discussed numerically and graphically for various values of the deformation parameter. In the limiting cases, the analytical solutions describing the drag force and torque or mobilities for a porous spheroid in the spheroidal vessel reduce to those for a solid sphere and for a porous sphere in a spherical cell. (author)

  19. Solution of diffusion equation in deformable spheroids

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ayyoubzadeh, Seyed Mohsen [Department of Energy Engineering, Sharif University of Technology, Tehran (Iran, Islamic Republic of); Safari, Mohammad Javad, E-mail: iFluka@gmail.com [Department of Energy Engineering, Sharif University of Technology, Tehran (Iran, Islamic Republic of); Vosoughi, Naser [Department of Energy Engineering, Sharif University of Technology, Tehran (Iran, Islamic Republic of)

    2011-05-15

    Research highlights: > Developing an explicit solution for the diffusion equation in spheroidal geometry. > Proving an orthogonality relation for spheroidal eigenfunctions. > Developing a relation for the extrapolation distance in spheroidal geometry. > Considering the sphere and slab as limiting cases for a spheroid. > Cross-validation of the analytical solution with Monte Carlo simulations. - Abstract: The time-dependent diffusion of neutrons in a spheroid as a function of the focal distance has been studied. The solution is based on an orthogonal basis and an extrapolation distanced related boundary condition for the spheroidal geometry. It has been shown that spheres and disks are two limiting cases for the spheroids, for which there is a smooth transition for the systems properties between these two limits. Furthermore, it is demonstrated that a slight deformation from a sphere does not affect the fundamental mode properties, to the first order. The calculations for both multiplying and non-multiplying media have been undertaken, showing good agreement with direct Monte Carlo simulations.

  20. Charged fluid distribution in higher dimensional spheroidal space-time

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    associated 3-spaces obtained as hypersurfaces t = constant, 3-spheroids, are suit- ... pressure. Considering the Vaidya–Tikekar [12] spheroidal geometry, ... a relativistic star in hydrostatic equilibrium having the spheroidal geometry of the .... K = 1, the spheroidal 3-space degenerates into a flat 3-space and when K = 0 it.

  1. Bar-spheroid interaction in galaxies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hernquist, Lars; Weinberg, Martin D.

    1992-01-01

    N-body simulation and linear analysis is employed to investigate the secular evolution of barred galaxies, with emphasis on the interaction between bars and spheroidal components of galaxies. This interaction is argued to drive secular transfer of angular momentum from bars to spheroids, primarily through resonant coupling. A moderately strong bar, having mass within corotation about 0.3 times the enclosed spheroid mass, is predicted to shed all its angular momentum typically in less than about 10 exp 9 yr. Even shorter depletion time scales are found for relatively more massive bars. It is suggested either that spheroids around barred galaxies are structured so as to inhibit strong coupling with bars, or that bars can form by unknown processes long after disks are established. The present models reinforce the notion that bars can drive secular evolution in galaxies.

  2. Plasma spheroidization and cladding of powders

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Petrunichev, V.A.; Averin, V.V.; Sorokin, L.M.; Koroleva, E.B.

    1987-02-01

    With reference to experimental results for nickel and chromium alloys, it is shown that complex alloy powders can be spheroidized in plasma discharges using an argon plasma with hydrogen. The spheroidizing process is accompanied by the reduction of surface oxides, with uniform element distribution within the particles; the granulometric composition of the particles is preserved. It is also shown that plasma technology can be used for producing metal-clad oxide and carbide powders, which improve the performance of cermets and coatings.

  3. Unsuccessful mitosis in multicellular tumour spheroids.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Molla, Annie; Couvet, Morgane; Coll, Jean-Luc

    2017-04-25

    Multicellular spheroids are very attractive models in oncology because they mimic the 3D organization of the tumour cells with their microenvironment. We show here using 3 different cell types (mammary TSA/pc, embryonic kidney Hek293 and cervical cancer HeLa), that when the cells are growing as spheroids the frequency of binucleated cells is augmented as occurs in some human tumours.We therefore describe mitosis in multicellular spheroids by following mitotic markers and by time-lapse experiments. Chromosomes alignment appears to be correct on the metaphasic plate and the passenger complex is well localized on centromere. Moreover aurora kinases are fully active and histone H3 is phosphorylated on Ser 10. Consequently, the mitotic spindle checkpoint is satisfied and, anaphase proceeds as illustrated by the transfer of survivin on the spindle and by the segregation of the two lots of chromosomes. However, the segregation plane is not well defined and oscillations of the dividing cells are observed. Finally, cytokinesis fails and the absence of separation of the two daughter cells gives rise to binucleated cells.Division orientation is specified during interphase and persists throughout mitosis. Our data indicate that the cancer cells, in multicellular spheroids, lose their ability to regulate their orientation, a feature commonly encountered in tumours.Moreover, multicellular spheroid expansion is still sensitive to mitotic drugs as pactlitaxel and aurora kinase inhibitors. The spheroids thus represent a highly relevant model for studying drug efficiency in tumours.

  4. Activation of mitochondrial promoter PH-binding protein in a radio-resistant Chinese hamster cell strain associated with Bcl-2

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Roychoudhury, Paromita; Ghosh, Utpal; Bhattacharyya, Nitai P.; Chaudhuri, Keya

    2006-01-01

    The cellular response to ionizing radiation is mediated by a complex interaction of number of proteins involving different pathways. Previously, we have shown that up regulation of mitochondrial genes ND1, ND4, and COX1 transcribed from the heavy strand promoter (P H ) has been increased in a radio-resistant cell strain designated as M5 in comparison with the parental Chinese hamster V79 cells. These genes are also up regulated in Chinese hamster V79 cells VB13 that express exogenous human Bcl2. In the present study, the expression of the gene ND6 that is expressed from the light strand promoter (P L ) was found to be similar in both the cell lines, as determined by RT-PCR. To test the possibility that this differential expression of mitochondrial genes under these two promoters was mediated by differences in proteins' affinity to interact with these promoters, we have carried out electrophoretic mobility shift assay (EMSA) using mitochondrial cell extracts from these two cell lines. Our result of these experiments revealed that two different proteins formed complex with the synthetic promoters and higher amount of protein from M5 cell extracts interacted with the P H promoter in comparison to that observed with cell extracts from Chinese hamster V79 cells. The promoter-specific differential binding of proteins was also observed in VB13. These results showed that differential mitochondrial gene expression observed earlier in the radio-resistant M5 cells was due to enhanced interaction proteins with the promoters P H and mediated by the expression of Bcl2

  5. Effects of 2'-chlorothymidine on Chinese hamster cells irradiated with x-rays and ultraviolet light

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Murai, T; Kuwabara, M; Sato, F; Kubo, K; Itoh, T; Yoshii, G

    1985-06-01

    Effects of 2'-chlorothymidine (2'-Cl-TdR) and its mother compound, thymidine (TdR), on cell killing induced by X- and UV-irradiation have been investigated. Chinse hamster V-79 (TK/sup +/) cells as well as thymidine kinase deficient (TK/sup -/) variant cells, which were isolated from parental V-79 cells following stepwise treatment with BUdR, were incubated in a medium containing 2'-Cl-TdR and TdR after X- and UV-irradiation. In the TK/sup +/ cells, both 2'-Cl-TdR and TdR enhanced the killing efficiency of X-rays and ultraviolet light. On the other hand, in the TK/sup -/ cells, only 2'-Cl-TdR enhanced the killing efficiency of X- and UV-irradiation, and no effect of TdR was observed. These results suggest that phosphorylation of TdR by the enzyme is essential for its ability to modify radiation response, while the enhancement of cell killing by 2'-Cl-TdR must be explained by a mechanism at least partly independent of phosphorylation. (author).

  6. Hypermutability of a UV-sensitive aphidicolin-resistant mutant of Chinese hamster fibroblasts

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Liu, P.K.; Chang, C.; Trosko, J.E.

    1982-01-01

    An ultraviolet light (UV)-sensitive thymidine auxotroph of Chinese hamster V79 cells that exhibits pleiotropic effects such as a high level of deoxycytidine triphosphate, slow growth, sensitivity to cytidine, and high frequencies of site-specific bromodeoxyuridine-dependent chromosomal aberrations was selected by its resistance to aphidicolin. The UV-induced mutability of this mutant and one of its revertants, which retains some of the phenotypes listed above, was studied in 3 mutation assay systems. The results showed that the mutant was hypermutable for ouabain and diphtheria-toxin-resistant mutations compared to wild-type V79 cells at the same UV dose or the same survival level. The mutant exhibits a delayed expression of maximal frequency of induced 6-thioguanine-resistant mutants. When maximal frequencies are compared at the same UV dose, the mutant also has higher mutation frequencies at the hypoxanthine-guanine phosphoribosyl transferase locus. The revertant was similar to the wild-type in UV sensitivity and mutability. (orig./AJ)

  7. Differing sensitivity to fluorescent light in Chinese hamster cells containing equally incorporated quantities of BUdR versus IUdR

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mitchell, J.B.; Morstyn, G.; Russo, A.; Kinsella, T.J.; Fornace, A. Jr.; McPherson, S.; Glatstein, E.

    1984-01-01

    Chinese hamster V79 cells that had incorporated approximately equal levels of either BUdR or IUdR into their DNA were found to be equal sensitizers to x rays. However, BUdR-substituted cells were much more sensitive to fluorescent light than IUdR-substituted cells, both on a cell survival basis and by the initial number of single strand DNA breaks induced. Since a major toxicity to the use of BUdR clinically has been light-induced skin rash, these data indicate that the use of IUdR clinically might cause less untoward toxicity but yet provide the same radiosensitization as BUdR

  8. Bistable flows in precessing spheroids

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cébron, D, E-mail: david.cebron@ujf-grenoble.fr [Université Grenoble Alpes, CNRS, ISTerre, Grenoble (France)

    2015-04-15

    Precession driven flows are found in any rotating container filled with liquid, when the rotation axis itself rotates about a secondary axis that is fixed in an inertial frame of reference. Because of its relevance for planetary fluid layers, many works consider spheroidal containers, where the uniform vorticity component of the bulk flow is reliably given by the well-known equations obtained by Busse (1968 J. Fluid Mech. 33 739–51). So far however, no analytical result for the solutions is available. Moreover, the cases where multiple flows can coexist have not been investigated in detail since their discovery by Noir et al (2003 Geophys. J. Int. 154 407–16). In this work we aim at deriving analytical results for the solutions, aiming in particular at first estimating the ranges of parameters where multiple solutions exist, and second studying quantitatively their stability. Using the models recently proposed by Noir and Cébron (2013 J. Fluid Mech. 737 412–39), which are more generic in the inviscid limit than the equations of Busse, we analytically describe these solutions, their conditions of existence, and their stability in a systematic manner. We then successfully compare these analytical results with the theory of Busse (1968). Dynamical model equations are finally proposed to investigate the stability of the solutions, which describe the bifurcation of the unstable flow solution. We also report for the first time the possibility that time-dependent multiple flows can coexist in precessing triaxial ellipsoids. Numerical integrations of the algebraic and differential equations have been efficiently performed with the dedicated script FLIPPER (supplementary material). (paper)

  9. Misorientations in spheroidal graphite: some new insights about spheroidal graphite growth in cast irons

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lacaze, J; Theuwissen, K; Laffont, L; Véron, M

    2016-01-01

    Local diffraction patterning, orientation mapping and high resolution transmission electron microscopy imaging have been used to characterize misorientations in graphite spheroids of cast irons. Emphasis is put here on bulk graphite, away from the nucleus as well as from the outer surface of the spheroids in order to get information on their growth during solidification. The results show that spheroidal graphite consists in conical sectors made of elementary blocks piled up on each other. These blocks are elongated along the prismatic a direction of graphite with the c axes roughly parallel to the radius of the spheroids. This implies that the orientation of the blocks rotates around the spheroid centre giving low angle tilting misorientations along tangential direction within each sector. Misorientations between neighbouring sectors are of higher values and their interfaces show rippled layers which are characteristic of defects in graphene. Along a radius of the spheroid, clockwise and anticlockwise twisting between blocks is observed. These observations help challenging some of the models proposed to explain spheroidal growth in cast ions. (paper)

  10. Charged fluid distribution in higher dimensional spheroidal space-time

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    A general solution of Einstein field equations corresponding to a charged fluid distribution on the background of higher dimensional spheroidal space-time is obtained. The solution generates several known solutions for superdense star having spheroidal space-time geometry.

  11. Analytical study of spheroidal dust grains in plasma

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zahed, H.; Mahmoodi, J.; Sobhanian, S.

    2006-01-01

    Using the modified spheroidal equations, the potential of a spheroidal conducting grain, floated in a plasma, is calculated. The electric field and capacitance for both prolate and oblate spheroidal grains are investigated. The solutions, obtained up to the second-order approximation, show that the plasma screening causes the equipotential surfaces around the grain to be more elongated or flattened than the potential spheroids of the Laplace equation. This leads to the variation of the plasma concentration around the grain

  12. Dwarf spheroidal galaxies: Keystones of galaxy evolution

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gallagher, John S., III; Wyse, Rosemary F. G.

    1994-01-01

    Dwarf spheroidal galaxies are the most insignificant extragalactic stellar systems in terms of their visibility, but potentially very significant in terms of their role in the formation and evolution of much more luminous galaxies. We discuss the present observational data and their implications for theories of the formation and evolution of both dwarf and giant galaxies. The putative dark-matter content of these low-surface-brightness systems is of particular interest, as is their chemical evolution. Surveys for new dwarf spheroidals hidden behind the stars of our Galaxy and those which are not bound to giant galaxies may give new clues as to the origins of this unique class of galaxy.

  13. Differential thermo-resistance of multicellular tumor spheroids

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Khoei, S.; Goliaei, B.; Neshasteh-Rize, A.

    2004-01-01

    Many cell lines, when cultured under proper conditions, can form three dimensional structures called multicellular spheroids. These spheroids resemble in vivo tumor models in several aspects. Therefore, studying growth characteristics and behavior of spheroids is beneficial in understanding the behavior of tumors under various experimental conditions. In this work, we have studied the growth properties, along with the thermal characteristics of spheroids of Du 145 human prostate carcinoma cell lines and compared the results to monolayer cultures of these cells. For this purpose, The Du 145 cells were cultured either as monolayer or spheroids. At various times after initiation of cultures, the growth properties of spheroids as a function of seeding cell number was determined. To evaluate the thermal characteristics of spheroids, they were heated at various stages of growth at 43 d ig c for various periods. The thermal response was judged by the survival fraction of colony forming cells in spheroids or monolayer culture following heat treatment. The results showed spheroids were more resistant to heat than monolayer cultures at all stages of development. However, the extent of this thermal resistant was dependent on the age, and consequently, the size of the spheroid. The result suggests that the differential thermal resistance of the spheroid cultures develop gradually during the growth of spheroid cultures of Du 145 cell line

  14. Acquisition of resistance to 1-(4-amino-2-methyl-5-pyrimidinyl) methyl-3-(2-chloroethyl)-3-nitrosourea hydrochloride in V79 cells through increased removal of O6-alkylguanine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Satoh, M S; Huh, N H; Horie, Y; Thomale, J; Rajewsky, M F; Kuroki, T

    1987-10-01

    The molecular mechanism of acquisition of resistance to 1-(4-amino-2-methyl-5-pyrimidinyl)-methyl-3-(2-chloroethyl)-3-nitroso ure a hydrochloride (ACNU) was investigated using ACNU-resistant clones (ACNUr-1-4) isolated from the V79 cell line. The binding level of alkyl cyanate, a decomposition product of ACNU, to protein in ACNUr-1 cells was not less than that in the parental V79 cells, indicating that the acquired resistance was not due to a reduced intracellular concentration of ACNU. Because O6-chloroethylguanine, an intermediate in cytotoxic interstrand cross-link formation by ACNU, is known to be repaired by the same mechanism as O6-ethyldeoxyguanosine (O6-EtdGuo), we quantitated O6-EtdGuo by radioimmunoassay at various times after exposure of cells to 100 micrograms/ml N-ethyl-N-nitrosourea for 20 min. In V79 cells, elimination of O6-EtdGuo was negligible, but in all four resistant clones, 30 to 59% of the O6-EtdGuo was removed within 24 hr after exposure. This increased removal of O6-EtdGuo among the resistant clones was associated with the activity of O6-alkylguanine DNA alkyltransferase (O6-AGT) determined using cell extracts. The present results indicate that increased removal of O6-chloroethylguanine in ACNU-resistant clones by O6-AGT is mechanistically linked to the acquisition of resistance to ACNU.

  15. Negative pion irradiation of mammalian cells

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dertinger, H.; Luecke-Huhle, C.; Schlag, H.; Weibezahn, K.F.

    1976-01-01

    Monolayers and spheroids of Chinese hamster cells (V79) were subjected to negative pion irradiation under aerobic conditions. R.b.e. values in the pion peak of 1.8 and 1.5 were obtained for monolayers and spheroids, respectively, whereas the r.b.e. for the plateau was found to be slightly higher than 1. In addition, it was observed that the higher resistance of the V79 spheroid cells than the monolayers to γ-irradiation is not diminished in the pion peak, suggesting that the underlying phenomenon of intercellular communication influences cell survival even after high-LET irradiation. (author)

  16. Partial discharges in spheroidal voids: Void orientation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    McAllister, Iain Wilson

    1997-01-01

    Partial discharge transients can be described in terms of the charge induced on the detecting electrode. The influence of the void parameters upon the induced charge is examined and discussed for spheroidal voids. It is shown that a quantitative interpretation of the induced charge requires...

  17. Zero-point energy in spheroidal geometries

    OpenAIRE

    Kitson, A. R.; Signal, A. I.

    2005-01-01

    We study the zero-point energy of a massless scalar field subject to spheroidal boundary conditions. Using the zeta-function method, the zero-point energy is evaluated for small ellipticity. Axially symmetric vector fields are also considered. The results are interpreted within the context of QCD flux tubes and the MIT bag model.

  18. Convection in Slab and Spheroidal Geometries

    Science.gov (United States)

    Porter, David H.; Woodward, Paul R.; Jacobs, Michael L.

    2000-01-01

    Three-dimensional numerical simulations of compressible turbulent thermally driven convection, in both slab and spheroidal geometries, are reviewed and analyzed in terms of velocity spectra and mixing-length theory. The same ideal gas model is used in both geometries, and resulting flows are compared. The piecewise-parabolic method (PPM), with either thermal conductivity or photospheric boundary conditions, is used to solve the fluid equations of motion. Fluid motions in both geometries exhibit a Kolmogorov-like k(sup -5/3) range in their velocity spectra. The longest wavelength modes are energetically dominant in both geometries, typically leading to one convection cell dominating the flow. In spheroidal geometry, a dipolar flow dominates the largest scale convective motions. Downflows are intensely turbulent and up drafts are relatively laminar in both geometries. In slab geometry, correlations between temperature and velocity fluctuations, which lead to the enthalpy flux, are fairly independent of depth. In spheroidal geometry this same correlation increases linearly with radius over the inner 70 percent by radius, in which the local pressure scale heights are a sizable fraction of the radius. The effects from the impenetrable boundary conditions in the slab geometry models are confused with the effects from non-local convection. In spheroidal geometry nonlocal effects, due to coherent plumes, are seen as far as several pressure scale heights from the lower boundary and are clearly distinguishable from boundary effects.

  19. Modification of the repair of potentially lethal damage in plateau-phase Chinese hamster cells by 2-chlorodeoxyadenosine

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tanabe, Kiyoshi; Hiraoka, Wakako; Kuwabara, Mikinori; Matsuda, Akira; Ueda, Tohru; Sato, Fumiaki.

    1988-09-01

    The ability of 2-chlorodeoxyadenosine, a ribonucleotide reductase inhibitor, to inhibit the repair of potentially lethal damage was demonstrated in Chinese hamster V79 cells after X irradiation in plateau-phase cultures. This ability of the drug was completely diminished when deoxycytidine was added at the same time, though this was slightly affected by the addition of adenosine, suggesting that this drug was phosphorylated by deoxycytidine kinase to serve as an inhibitor of the repair of potentially lethal damage. Compared with hydroxyurea, another ribonucleotide reductase inhibitor, this drug appeared to contain its own activity which suppressed the repair of potentially lethal damage. A combined study of post-irradiation treatment with hypertonic salt solution and with this drug on the fixation of potentially lethal damage revealed that this drug inhibited the repair of hypertonic-insensitive potentially lethal damage.

  20. Modification of the repair of potentially lethal damage in plateau-phase Chinese hamster cells by 2-chlorodeoxyadenosine

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tanabe, Kiyoshi; Hiraoka, Wakako; Kuwabara, Mikinori; Matsuda, Akira; Ueda, Tohru; Sato, Fumiaki.

    1988-01-01

    The ability of 2-chlorodeoxyadenosine, a ribonucleotide reductase inhibitor, to inhibit the repair of potentially lethal damage was demonstrated in Chinese hamster V79 cells after X irradiation in plateau-phase cultures. This ability of the drug was completely diminished when deoxycytidine was added at the same time, though this was slightly affected by the addition of adenosine, suggesting that this drug was phosphorylated by deoxycytidine kinase to serve as an inhibitor of the repair of potentially lethal damage. Compared with hydroxyurea, another ribonucleotide reductase inhibitor, this drug appeared to contain its own activity which suppressed the repair of potentially lethal damage. A combined study of post-irradiation treatment with hypertonic salt solution and with this drug on the fixation of potentially lethal damage revealed that this drug inhibited the repair of hypertonic-insensitive potentially lethal damage. (author)

  1. Cell inactivation and chromosomal aberrations induced by X-rays and fast neutrons in cells of the Chinese hamster. 1

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tolkendorf, E.

    1979-01-01

    Asynchronously grown cultures of Chinese hamster cells V79-4 were irradiated in suspension with 180 kV X-rays and fast neutrons (average energy of 6.2 MeV). The damage was assessed by measuring cell survival and frequencies of chromosome aberrations in the first post-irradiation metaphases. The experimental data for survival and chromosome aberrations were fitted by computer programmes. From the fitted curves the relative biological effectiveness (RBE) of fast neutrons was calculated. The RBE shows a similar dose dependence for killed and aberrant cells. The RBE decreases with increasing dose and amounts to approximately 5 for both effects for small neutron doses. The highest RBE is found for asymmetrical chromosomal exchanges and is dependent on the neutron dose, too. However, for isochromatid deletions the RBE is dose independent with a value of 3.6. (author)

  2. Mass Spectrometry Analyses of Multicellular Tumor Spheroids.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Acland, Mitchell; Mittal, Parul; Lokman, Noor A; Klingler-Hoffmann, Manuela; Oehler, Martin K; Hoffmann, Peter

    2018-05-01

    Multicellular tumor spheroids (MCTS) are a powerful biological in vitro model, which closely mimics the 3D structure of primary avascularized tumors. Mass spectrometry (MS) has established itself as a powerful analytical tool, not only to better understand and describe the complex structure of MCTS, but also to monitor their response to cancer therapeutics. The first part of this review focuses on traditional mass spectrometry approaches with an emphasis on elucidating the molecular characteristics of these structures. Then the mass spectrometry imaging (MSI) approaches used to obtain spatially defined information from MCTS is described. Finally the analysis of primary spheroids, such as those present in ovarian cancer, and the great potential that mass spectrometry analysis of these structures has for improved understanding of cancer progression and for personalized in vitro therapeutic testing is discussed. © 2017 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  3. Axisymmetric Eigenmodes of Spheroidal Pure Electron Plasmas

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kawai, Yosuke; Saitoh, Haruhiko; Yoshida, Zensho; Kiwamoto, Yasuhito

    2010-11-01

    The axisymmetric electrostatic eigenmodes of spheroidal pure electron plasmas have been studied experimentally. It is confirmed that the observed spheroidal plasma attains a theoretically expected equilibrium density distribution, with the exception of a low-density halo distribution surrounding the plasma. When the eigenmode frequency observed for the plasma is compared with the frequency predicted by the dispersion relation derived under ideal conditions wherein the temperature is zero and the boundary is located at an infinite distance from the plasma, it is observed that the absolute value of the observed frequency is systematically higher than the theoretical prediction. Experimental examinations and numerical calculations indicate that the upward shift of the eigenmode frequency cannot be accounted for solely by the finite temperature effect, but is significantly affected by image charges induced on the conducting boundary and the resulting distortion of the density profile from the theoretical expectation.

  4. Multi-walled carbon nanotubes (NM401) induce ROS-mediated HPRT mutations in Chinese hamster lung fibroblasts

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rubio, Laura [Grup de Mutagènesi, Departament de Genètica i de Microbiologia, Facultat de Biociències, Universitat Autònoma de Barcelona, Bellaterra (Spain); El Yamani, Naouale [Health Effects Laboratory-MILK, NILU-Norwegian Institute for Air Research, Kjeller (Norway); Kazimirova, Alena [Department of Biology, Slovak Medical University, Bratislava (Slovakia); Dusinska, Maria, E-mail: maria.dusinska@nilu.no [Health Effects Laboratory-MILK, NILU-Norwegian Institute for Air Research, Kjeller (Norway); Marcos, Ricard, E-mail: ricard.marcos@uab.es [Grup de Mutagènesi, Departament de Genètica i de Microbiologia, Facultat de Biociències, Universitat Autònoma de Barcelona, Bellaterra (Spain); CIBER Epidemiología y Salud Pública, Instituto de Salud Carlos III, Madrid (Spain)

    2016-04-15

    Although there is an important set of data showing potential genotoxic effects of nanomaterials (NMs) at the DNA (comet assay) and chromosome (micronucleus test) levels, few studies have been conducted to analyze their potential mutagenic effects at gene level. We have determined the ability of multi-walled carbon nanotubes (MWCNT, NM401), to induce mutations in the HPRT gene in Chinese hamster lung (V79) fibroblasts. NM401, characterized in the EU NanoGenotox project, were further studied within the EU Framework Programme Seven (FP7) project NANoREG. From the proliferation assay data we selected a dose-range of 0.12 to 12 µg/cm{sup 2} At these range we have been able to observe significant cellular uptake of MWCNT by using transmission electron microscopy (TEM), as well as a concentration-dependent induction of intracellular reactive oxygen species. In addition, a clear concentration-dependent increase in the induction of HPRT mutations was also observed. Data support a potential genotoxic/ carcinogenic risk associated with MWCNT exposure. - Highlights: • MWCNT were tested in V79 cells. • Cellular uptake of MWCNT was detected using TEM. • Intracellular ROS induction was observed after MWCNT exposure. • MWCNT induced a concentration-dependent increase of HPRT mutations.

  5. Semi-conservative synthesis of DNA in UV-sensitive mutant cells of Chinese hamster after UV-irradiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Vikhanskaya, F.L.; Khrebtukova, I.A.; Manuilova, E.S.

    1985-01-01

    A study was made of the rate of semi-conservative DNA synthesis in asynchronous UV-resistant (clone V79) and UV-sensitive clones (VII and XII) of Chinese hamster cells after UV-irradiation. In all 3 clones studied, UV-irradiation (5-30 J/m 2 ) induced a decrease in the rate of DNA synthesis during the subsequent 1-2 h. In the resistant clone (V79) recovery of DNA synthesis rate started after the first 2 h post-irradiation (5 J/m 2 ) and by the 3rd hour reached its maximum value, which constituted 70% of that observed in control, non-irradiated cells. The UV-sensitive mutant clones VII and XII showed no recovery in the rate of DNA synthesis during 6-7 h post-irradiation. The results obtained show that the survival of cells is correlated with the ability of DNA synthesis to recover after UV-irradiation in 3 clones studied. The observed recovery of UV-inhibited DNA synthesis in mutant clones may be due to certain defects in DNA repair. (orig.)

  6. Multi-walled carbon nanotubes (NM401) induce ROS-mediated HPRT mutations in Chinese hamster lung fibroblasts

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rubio, Laura; El Yamani, Naouale; Kazimirova, Alena; Dusinska, Maria; Marcos, Ricard

    2016-01-01

    Although there is an important set of data showing potential genotoxic effects of nanomaterials (NMs) at the DNA (comet assay) and chromosome (micronucleus test) levels, few studies have been conducted to analyze their potential mutagenic effects at gene level. We have determined the ability of multi-walled carbon nanotubes (MWCNT, NM401), to induce mutations in the HPRT gene in Chinese hamster lung (V79) fibroblasts. NM401, characterized in the EU NanoGenotox project, were further studied within the EU Framework Programme Seven (FP7) project NANoREG. From the proliferation assay data we selected a dose-range of 0.12 to 12 µg/cm 2 At these range we have been able to observe significant cellular uptake of MWCNT by using transmission electron microscopy (TEM), as well as a concentration-dependent induction of intracellular reactive oxygen species. In addition, a clear concentration-dependent increase in the induction of HPRT mutations was also observed. Data support a potential genotoxic/ carcinogenic risk associated with MWCNT exposure. - Highlights: • MWCNT were tested in V79 cells. • Cellular uptake of MWCNT was detected using TEM. • Intracellular ROS induction was observed after MWCNT exposure. • MWCNT induced a concentration-dependent increase of HPRT mutations.

  7. Non-existence of separable spheroidal beams

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Boyack, Rufus; Lekner, John

    2011-01-01

    We show that ψ = R(ξ)S(η) e imφ , a product of radial and angular oblate spheroidal functions and an azimuthal factor, cannot represent physical free-space scalar beams. The reason lies in the discontinuity in the longitudinal derivative of ψ in the focal plane, where ψ is not a solution of the Helmholtz equation on the disc ξ = 0

  8. Track segment studies with Chinese hamster cells

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bird, R.P.

    1984-01-01

    Survival curves of near-diploid and near-tetraploid Chinese hamster cell cultures following irradiation by an 241 Am α source indicate different growth rates for the two clones. Possible reasons for the difference are discussed

  9. Induction of lyme arthritis in LSH hamsters

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Schmitz, J.L.; Schell, R.F.; Hejka, A.; England, D.M.; Konick, L.

    1988-01-01

    In studies of experimental Lyme disease, a major obstacle has been the unavailability of a suitable animal model. We found that irradiated LSH/Ss Lak hamsters developed arthritis after injection of Borrelia burgdorferi in the hind paws. When nonirradiated hamsters were injected in the hind paws with B. burgdorferi, acute transient synovitis was present. A diffuse neutrophilic infiltrate involved the synovia and periarticular structures. The inflammation was associated with edema, hyperemia, and granulation tissue. Numerous spirochetes were seen in the synovial and subsynovial tissues. The histopathologic changes were enhanced in irradiated hamsters. The onset and duration of the induced swelling were dependent on the dose of radiation and the inoculum of spirochetes. Inoculation of irradiated hamsters with Formalin-killed spirochetes or medium in which B. burgdorferi had grown for 7 days failed to induce swelling. This animal model should prove useful for studies of the immune response to B. burgdorferi and the pathogenesis of Lyme arthritis

  10. Proteomic Analysis of Chinese Hamster Ovary Cells

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Baycin-Hizal, Deniz; Tabb, David L.; Chaerkady, Raghothama

    2012-01-01

    To complement the recent genomic sequencing of Chinese hamster ovary (CHO) cells, proteomic analysis was performed on CHO cells including the cellular proteome, secretome, and glycoproteome using tandem mass spectrometry (MS/MS) of multiple fractions obtained from gel electrophoresis, multidimens......To complement the recent genomic sequencing of Chinese hamster ovary (CHO) cells, proteomic analysis was performed on CHO cells including the cellular proteome, secretome, and glycoproteome using tandem mass spectrometry (MS/MS) of multiple fractions obtained from gel electrophoresis...

  11. Morphological and Immunohistochemical Characterization of Canine Osteosarcoma Spheroid Cell Cultures.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gebhard, C; Gabriel, C; Walter, I

    2016-06-01

    Spheroid cell culture emerges as powerful in vitro tool for experimental tumour research. In this study, we established a scaffold-free three-dimensional spheroid system built from canine osteosarcoma (OS) cells (D17). Spheroids (7, 14 and 19 days of cultivation) and monolayer cultures (2 and 7 days of cultivation) were evaluated and compared on light and electron microscopy. Monolayer and spheroid cultures were tested for vimentin, cytokeratin, alkaline phosphatase, osteocalcin and collagen I by means of immunohistochemistry. The spheroid cell culture exhibited a distinct network of collagen I in particular after 19-day cultivation, whereas in monolayer cultures, collagen I was arranged as a lamellar basal structure. Necrotic centres of large spheroids, as observed in 14- and 19-day cultures, were characterized by significant amounts of osteocalcin. Proliferative activity as determined by Ki-67 immunoreactivity showed an even distribution in two-dimensional cultures. In spheroids, proliferation was predominating in the peripheral areas. Metastasis-associated markers ezrin and S100A4 were shown to be continuously expressed in monolayer and spheroid cultures. We conclude that the scaffold-free spheroid system from canine OS cells has the ability to mimic the architecture of the in vivo tumour, in particular cell-cell and cell-matrix interactions. © 2015 The Authors. Anatomia, Histologia, Embryologia Published by Blackwell Verlag GmbH.

  12. Global Landslides on Rapidly Spinning Spheroids

    Science.gov (United States)

    Scheeres, Daniel J.; Sanchez, P.

    2013-10-01

    The angle of repose and conditions for global landslides on the surfaces of small, rapidly spinning, spheroidal asteroids are studied. Applying techniques of soil mechanics, we develop a theory for, and examples of, how regolith will fail and flow in this microgravity environment. Our motivation is to develop an understanding of the "top-shaped" class of asteroids based on analytical soil mechanics. Our analysis transforms the entire asteroid surface into a local frame where we can model it as a conventional granular pile with a surface slope, acceleration and height variations as a function of the body's spin rate, shape and density. A general finding is that the lowest point on a rapidly spinning spheroid is at the equator with the effective height of surface material monotonically increasing towards the polar regions, where the height can be larger than the physical radius of the body. We study the failure conditions of both cohesionless and cohesive regolith, and develop specific predictions of the surface profile as a function of the regolith angle of friction and the maximum spin rate experienced by the body. The theory also provides simple guidelines on what the shape may look like, although we do not analyze gravitationally self-consistent evolution of the body shape. The theory is tested with soft-sphere discrete element method granular mechanics simulations to better understand the dynamical aspects of global asteroid landslides. We find significant differences between failure conditions for cohesive and cohesionless regolith. In the case of cohesive regolith, we show that extremely small values of strength (much less than that found in lunar regolith) can stabilize a surface even at very rapid spin rates. Cohesionless surfaces, as expected, fail whenever their surface slopes exceed the angle of friction. Based on our analysis we propose that global landslides and the flow of material towards the equator on spheroidal bodies are precipitated by exogenous

  13. Structure of the Draco Dwarf Spheroidal Galaxy

    OpenAIRE

    Piatek, Slawomir; Pryor, Carlton; Armandroff, Taft E.; Olszewski, Edward W.

    2002-01-01

    This article studies the structure of the Draco dwarf spheroidal galaxy with an emphasis on the question of whether the spatial distribution of its stars has been affected by the tidal interaction with the Milky Way, using R- and V-band CCD photometry for eleven fields. The article reports coordinates for the center, a position angle of the major axis, and the ellipticity. It also reports the results of searches for asymmetries in the structure of Draco. These results, and searches for a ``br...

  14. Process for producing uranium carbide spheroids

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Shennan, J.V.; Ford, L.H.

    1977-01-01

    The invention deals with a method to fabricate UC spheroids which are filled into moulds made of refractory material for fuel elements. The UC fuel particles are double-coated: a first thin layer of pyrolytic carbon is coated at low temperature 1200-1400 0 C, a record layer of pyrolytic material (e.g. Si c) is coated at a higher temperature (above 1500 0 C) which holds back the fission products. The method is described more closely by means of an example. (GSC) [de

  15. Process for producing uranium carbide spheroids

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Shennan, J.V.; Ford, L.H.

    1976-01-01

    The invention deals with a method to produce UC spheroids which are filled into molded bodies of fire-proof material for fuel elements. The UC fuel particles are doubly coated: a first thin layer of pyrolytic carbon is coated at low temperature (1,200-1,400 0 C), a second layer of fire-proof material (e.g. SiC) is coated at a higher temperature (above 1,500 0 C) which holds back the fission products. The process is explained in more detail using an example. (GSCH) [de

  16. Modification of UV-induced mutation frequencies in Chinese hamster- cells by dose fractionation, cycloheximide and caffeine treatments

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chang, C.-C.; Schultz, R.; Trosko, J.E.; D'Ambrosio, S.M.; Setlow, R.B.

    1978-01-01

    Chinese hamster (V79) cells were irradiated with a fractionated regime of ultraviolet light (UV 1 +UV 2 ). The fractionation of a UV dose always increased the colony-forming ability but reduced (or it did not change) the mutation frequencies. Treatment with cycloheximide between the two UV irradiations resulted in two types of effects, depending on the protocols used. Long exposures to cycloheximide (i.e., >6h) for the entire period between UV 1 and UV 2 or partial treatment of cycloheximide (i.e., 3h) long before UV 2 always resulted in reduced colony-forming ability and enhanced or unchanged mutation frequencies. Exposure to cycloheximide for the entire period in the short fractionated regime (i.e., 4h) between UV 1 and UV 2 or partial treatment of cycloheximide just prior to UV 2 tended to give the opposite effects. Caffeine treatment before UV 2 , with or without UV 1 , significantly increased the mutation frequencies. These results suggest that an error-free postreplication repair system exists in Chinese hamster cells which is inhibitable by particular cycloheximide or caffeine treatments. (Auth.)

  17. Production and purification of polyclonal anti-hamster ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    . ... IgG showed high titer and high specificity in the designed ELISA. Purified antibody and its conjugation with HRP are used in research and diagnosis of hamster disease. Key words: Production, purification, hamster immunoglobulins.

  18. Cystolithiasis in a Syrian hamster: a different outcome | Petrini ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Considering the positive outcome and the beneficial properties of palmitoylethanolamide, glucosamine, and hesperidin, these nutritional elements in Syrian hamsters, are recommended to reduce recurrence after surgical treatment of urolithiasis. Keywords: Glucosamine, Hamster, Hesperidin, PEA, Urolithiasis ...

  19. Methods for modeling chinese hamster ovary (cho) cell metabolism

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    2015-01-01

    Embodiments of the present invention generally relate to the computational analysis and characterization biological networks at the cellular level in Chinese Hamster Ovary (CHO) cells. Based on computational methods utilizing a hamster reference genome, the invention provides methods for identify...

  20. Digital microfluidics for automated hanging drop cell spheroid culture.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aijian, Andrew P; Garrell, Robin L

    2015-06-01

    Cell spheroids are multicellular aggregates, grown in vitro, that mimic the three-dimensional morphology of physiological tissues. Although there are numerous benefits to using spheroids in cell-based assays, the adoption of spheroids in routine biomedical research has been limited, in part, by the tedious workflow associated with spheroid formation and analysis. Here we describe a digital microfluidic platform that has been developed to automate liquid-handling protocols for the formation, maintenance, and analysis of multicellular spheroids in hanging drop culture. We show that droplets of liquid can be added to and extracted from through-holes, or "wells," and fabricated in the bottom plate of a digital microfluidic device, enabling the formation and assaying of hanging drops. Using this digital microfluidic platform, spheroids of mouse mesenchymal stem cells were formed and maintained in situ for 72 h, exhibiting good viability (>90%) and size uniformity (% coefficient of variation <10% intraexperiment, <20% interexperiment). A proof-of-principle drug screen was performed on human colorectal adenocarcinoma spheroids to demonstrate the ability to recapitulate physiologically relevant phenomena such as insulin-induced drug resistance. With automatable and flexible liquid handling, and a wide range of in situ sample preparation and analysis capabilities, the digital microfluidic platform provides a viable tool for automating cell spheroid culture and analysis. © 2014 Society for Laboratory Automation and Screening.

  1. Multicellular spheroids as an in vitro tumor model

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kozubek, S.; Erzgraber, G.

    1982-01-01

    Experiments with fractionated irradiation of multicellular spheroids were performed. Our data as well as the data of other works have been evaluated by means of simple mathematical formulae on the basis of several hypothesis. The spheroids are shown to exhibit similar behaviour as in vivo carcinomas. They offer the possibility of investigation of quantitative correlations for practical purposes

  2. Short-term effects of radiation in gliolalstoma spheroids

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Petterson, Stine Asferg; Jakobsen, Ida Pind; Jensen, Stine Skov

    2016-01-01

    was to investigate the short-term effects of radiation of spheroids containing tumor-initiating stem-like cells. We used a patient-derived glioblastoma stem cell enriched culture (T76) and the standard glioblastoma cell line U87. Primary spheroids were irradiated with doses between 2 and 50 Gy and assessed after two...

  3. Variable Stars in the M31 Dwarf Spheroidal Companion Cassiopeia

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pritzl, Barton J.; Armandroff, T. E.; Jacoby, G. H.; Da Costa, G. S.

    2007-12-01

    Dwarf spheroidal galaxies show very diverse star formation histories. For the Galactic dwarf spheroidal galaxies, a correlation exists between Galactocentric distance and the prominence of intermediate-age ( 2 - 10 Gyr) populations. To test whether this correlation exists for the M31 dwarf spheroidal galaxies, we observed the Cassiopeia (And VII) dwarf galaxy, which is one of the most distant M31 dwarf spheroidal galaxies. We will present the results of a variable star search using HST/ACS data, along with a preliminary color-magnitude diagram. From the RR Lyrae stars we can obtain an independent distance and metallicity estimate for the dwarf galaxy. These results will be compared to those found for the other M31 dwarf spheroidal galaxies.This research is supported in part by NASA through grant number GO-11081.11 from the Space Telescope Science Institute.

  4. Development of controlled release spheroids using Buchananiacochinchinesis gum

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Narayan Babulal Gaikwad

    2013-03-01

    Full Text Available Chirauli nut gum was isolated from the bark of Buchanania cochinchinesis (fam. Anacadiacea and was used as a release modifier for the preparation of Diclofenac sodium spheroids using the extrusion spheronization technique. The process was studied for the effects on variables when making spheroids with satisfactory particle shape, size and size distribution. The prepared spheroids were characterized for surface morphology, qualitative surface porosity, friability, bulk density and flow properties. In vitro studies demonstrated that the release exhibited Fickian diffusion kinetics which was confirmed by the Higuchi and the Korsmeyer-Peppas models. The physico-chemical parameters of the gum could be correlated to the in vitro dissolution profile of the spheroids. The spheroids were not able to sustain the drug releases over 12 hours. A greater concentration of Chirauli nut gum and a process that can accommodate such greater concentrations may produce a formulation capable of significant sustained release.

  5. Design of a Uranium Dioxide Spheroidization System

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cavender, Daniel P.; Mireles, Omar R.; Frendi, Abdelkader

    2013-01-01

    The plasma spheroidization system (PSS) is the first process in the development of tungsten-uranium dioxide (W-UO2) fuel cermets. The PSS process improves particle spherocity and surface morphology for coating by chemical vapor deposition (CVD) process. Angular fully dense particles melt in an argon-hydrogen plasma jet at between 32-36 kW, and become spherical due to surface tension. Surrogate CeO2 powder was used in place of UO2 for system and process parameter development. Particles range in size from 100 - 50 microns in diameter. Student s t-test and hypothesis testing of two proportions statistical methods were applied to characterize and compare the spherocity of pre and post process powders. Particle spherocity was determined by irregularity parameter. Processed powders show great than 800% increase in the number of spherical particles over the stock powder with the mean spherocity only mildly improved. It is recommended that powders be processed two-three times in order to reach the desired spherocity, and that process parameters be optimized for a more narrow particles size range. Keywords: spherocity, spheroidization, plasma, uranium-dioxide, cermet, nuclear, propulsion

  6. Changes in RBE of 14-MeV (d+T) neutrons for V79 cells irradiated in air and in a phantom: Is RBE enhanced near the surface?

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Schalla, S.; Herskind, C.; Hoever, K.H.; Lorenz, W.J.; Hahn, E.W.

    1998-01-01

    The relative biological effectiveness (RBE) for inactivation of V79 cells was determined as function of dose at the Heidelberg 14-MeV (d+T) neutron therapy facility after irradiation with single doses in air and at different depths in a therapy phantom. Furthermore, to assess the reproducibility of RBE determinations in different experiments we examined the relationship between the interexperimental variation in radiosensitivity towards neutrons with that towards low LET 60 Co photons. Clonogenic survival of V79 cells was determined using the colony formation assay. The cells were irradiated in suspension in small volumes (1.2 ml) free in air or at defined positions in the perspex phantom. Neutron doses were in the range, D t =0.5-4 Gy. 60 Co photons were used as reference radiation. The radiosensitivity towards neutrons varied considerably less between individual experiments than that towards photons and also less than RBE. However, the mean sensitivity of different series was relatively constant. RBE increased with decreasing dose per fraction from RBE=2.3 at 4 Gy to RBE=3.1 at 0.5 Gy. No significant difference increased with decreasing dose per fraction from RBE=2.3 at 4 Gy to RBE=3.1 at 0.5 Gy. No significant difference in RBE could be detected between irradiation at 1.6 cm and 9.4 cm depth in the phantom. However, an approximately 20% higher RBE was found for irradiation free in air compared with inside the phantom. Combining the two effects, irradiation with 0.5 Gy free in air yielded an approximately 40% higher RBE than a dose of 2 Gy inside the phantom. The measured values of RBE as function of dose per fraction within the phantom is consistent with the energy of the neutron beam. The increased RBE free in air, however, is greater than expected from microdosimetric parameters of the beam. (orig./MG) [de

  7. Histopathology of Lyme arthritis in LSH hamsters

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hejka, A.; Schmitz, J.L.; England, D.M.; Callister, S.M.; Schell, R.F.

    1989-01-01

    The authors studied the histopathologic evolution of arthritis in nonirradiated and irradiated hamsters infected with Borrelia burgdorferi. Nonirradiated hamsters injected in the hind paws with B. burgdorferi developed an acute inflammatory reaction involving the synovium, periarticular soft tissues, and dermis. This acute inflammatory reaction was short-lived and was replaced by a mild chronic synovitis as the number of detectable spirochetes in the synovium, periarticular soft tissues, and perineurovascular areas diminished. Exposing hamsters to radiation before inoculation with B. burgdorferi exacerbated and prolonged the acute inflammatory phase. Spirochetes also persisted longer in the periarticular soft tissues. A major histopathologic finding was destructive and erosive bone changes of the hind paws, which resulted in deformation of the joints. These studies should be helpful in defining the immune mechanism participating in the onset, progression, and resolution of Lyme arthritis

  8. Laser microirradiation of Chinese hamster cells at wavelength 365 nm: effects of psoralen and caffeine

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cremer, T.; Peterson, S.P.; Cremer, C.; Berns, M.W.

    1981-01-01

    Cells of a V79 subline of the Chinese hamster were microirradiated at wavelength 365 nm in the presence of the psoralen derivative, trioxsalen. Microirradiation was accomplished by a pulsed argon laser microbeam either in anaphase or in interphase 3 h after mitosis. Inhibition of clonal growth and formation of micronuclei at the first postirradiation mitosis were observed after microirradiation of anaphase chromosomes and of small parts of the interphase nucleus. Microirradiation of the cytoplasm beside the interphase nucleus or between the sets of chromosomes moving apart from each other in anaphase did not produce these effects. Anaphase experiments showed that only the daughter cell which received microirradiated chromatin exhibited an abnormal growth pattern. Most interestingly, shattering of the whole chromosome complement could be induced by microirradiation of small parts of the interphase nucleus and post-treatment with caffeine. Since microirradiation of chromatin in the absence of psoralen was not effective, we consider formation of psoralen photoadducts to nucleic acids in microirradiated chromatin to be the specific cause of the effects. We suggest that DNA photolesions in chromosome segments present in the microirradiated part of the nucleus can induce shattering of all the chromosomes in the microirradiated nucleus. Several possibilities are discussed to explain this unexpected finding

  9. Effects of laser uv-microirradiation (lambda=2573 A) on proliferation of Chinese hamster cells

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cremer, C.; Cremer, T.; Zorn, C.; Schoeller, L.

    1976-01-01

    A laser uv-microbeam with a wavelength of 2573 A having a minimum spot diameter of approximately 0.5 μm was used to microirradiate interphase cells of a V-79 subline of Chinese hamster cells. The incident energy necessary to induce a significant decrease of proliferation was 30 to 60 times larger after microirradiation of cytoplasm as compared with microirradiation of nucleoplasm. The mean value of relative cell numbers 40 hr after irradiation as a function of incident energy did not differ whether the cells were microirradiated lying singly or together in small groups. Analysis of individual growth curves of singly lying cells microirradiated in the nucleoplasm with the same energy showed heterogeneous reactions. The incident energy per cell compatible with proliferation of about 50 percent of the cells after microirradiation of nucleoplasm was approximately 2 x 10 -3 ergs. From this value it is suggested that the energy density within the focus was in the region of several thousand ergs per square millimeter. Photochemical effects are thought to be the cause of growth disturbance, while thermal effects are excluded

  10. Ascorbate enhances u.v.-mutagenesis in E. coli but inhibits it in Chinese hamster cells

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rossman, T.G.; Klein, C.B.; Naslund, M.

    1986-01-01

    Ascorbic acid (vitamin C) causes an increase in the mutation frequency of u.v.-irradiated Escherichia coli WP2. The enhancement occurs at all u.v. fluences, and is dependent upon the ascorbate concentration in the medium. A maximum effect (approx. 8- to 13-fold) is seen at 100-150 μg/ml, although some enhancement can be seen even at 10 μg/ml. The comutagenic effect of ascorbate with u.v. in E. coli is dependent upon peptone, a constituent of nutrient broth. The enhancement of u.v.-mutagenesis by ascorbate is absent in strains WP2sub(s) (uvrA) amd WP6 (polA), suggesting that ascorbate affects the repair of pyrimidine dimers. The opposite results are observed for u.v.-mutagenesis in Chinese hamster V79 cells. The presence of ascorbate (50 μg/ml) during u.v. irradiation does not enhance the u.v. effect, but rather decreases it approx. 30%. These results are discussed with regard to differences in the mechanism of u.v.-mutagenesis and DNA repair in bacterial and mammalian cells. (author)

  11. Cultured Chinese hamster cells undergo apoptosis after exposure to cold but nonfreezing temperatures.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nagle, W A; Soloff, B L; Moss, A J; Henle, K J

    1990-08-01

    Cultured Chinese hamster V79 fibroblast cells at the transition from logarithmic to stationary growth have been shown to undergo apoptosis (programmed cell death) after cold shock [B. L. Soloff, W. A. Nagle, A. J. Moss, Jr., K. J. Henle, and J. T. Crawford, Biochem. Biophys. Res. Commun. 145, 876-883 (1987)]. In this report, we show that about 95% of the cell population was susceptible to cold-induced apoptosis, and the amount of cell killing was dependent on the duration of hypothermia. Cells treated for 0-90 min at 0 degrees C exhibited an exponential survival curve with a D0 of 32 min; thus, even short exposures to the cold (e.g., 5 min) produced measurable cell killing. The cold-induced injury was not produced by freezing, because similar results were observed at 6 degrees C, and cell killing was not influenced by the cryoprotective agent dimethyl sulfoxide. Cold-induced apoptosis was inhibited by rewarming at 23 degrees C, compared to 37 degrees C, by inhibitors of macromolecular synthesis, such as cycloheximide, and by 0.8 mM zinc sulfate. The results suggest that apoptosis represents a new manifestation of cell injury after brief exposure to 0-6 degrees C hypothermia.

  12. Differentiation of human mesenchymal stem cell spheroids under microgravity conditions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wolfgang H Cerwinka

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available To develop and characterize a novel cell culture method for the generation of undifferentiated and differentiated human mesenchymal stem cell 3D structures, we utilized the RWV system with a gelatin-based scaffold. 3 × 106 cells generated homogeneous spheroids and maximum spheroid loading was accomplished after 3 days of culture. Spheroids cultured in undifferentiated spheroids of 3 and 10 days retained expression of CD44, without expression of differentiation markers. Spheroids cultured in adipogenic and osteogenic differentiation media exhibited oil red O staining and von Kossa staining, respectively. Further characterization of osteogenic lineage, showed that 10 day spheroids exhibited stronger calcification than any other experimental group corresponding with significant expression of vitamin D receptor, alkaline phosphatase, and ERp60 . In conclusion this study describes a novel RWV culture method that allowed efficacious engineering of undifferentiated human mesenchymal stem cell spheroids and rapid osteogenic differentiation. The use of gelatin scaffolds holds promise to design implantable stem cell tissue of various sizes and shapes for future regenerative treatment.

  13. Ellipticity behaviour of relativistic Maclaurin spheroids

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Abramowicz, M.A.; Miller, J.C.; International School of Advanced Studies, Trieste; Oxford Univ.

    1990-01-01

    Chandrasekhar and Miller (1974 Mon. Not. R. Astr. Soc., 167, 63) found that, according to the general theory of relativity, when slowly rotating spheroids contract, conserving angular momentum, their eccentricity does not increase monotonically, as is the case for Newtonian gravity, but instead reaches a maximum (when the mean radius is a few times the Schwarzschild radius) and then decreases again. We show here that this can be explained within the framework of the recent discussion of rotational effects in a strong gravitational field. We suggest that it can be convenient to introduce a 'corrected' Newtonian theory, incorporating terms to approximate strong field effects, and that such a corrected theory could be useful for numerical studies. (author)

  14. Electron, proton, neutron as spheroidical particles

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bagge, E.R.

    1993-01-01

    It is shown that it is possible to describe the electron and the proton at rest within the framework of Dirac's relativistic theory of particles as electro-magnetic stable, spheroidal particles like balloons with very thin envelopes. Their properties, especially their spins and their magnetic momenta, are exactly those, which have been measured at first and later on derived by Dirac. In this picture the neutron plays the role of a system of two concentric and synchronically rotating balloons with a small distance between them at a positive energetic minimum of balance at 1.26 MeV. The magnetic moment of this particle has a negative sign and is of the correct size. (orig.)

  15. Plasma spheroidizing and cladding of powders

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Petrunichev, V.A.; Averin, V.V.; Sorokin, L.M.; Koroleva, E.B.

    1987-01-01

    Arc and high-frequency plasmatrons are used for spheroidizing nickel and chromium-base alloy particles. Different plasma-forming medium compositions are used in the arc variant and the effect of these media on the plasma treatment product is demonstrated. For a high-frequency plasmatron, a long time of plasma contact with the powder leads to the transfer of the part of the material from the treated particles into vaporous state with subsequent condensation at the outlet from the discharge zone. Results of investigations into the formation of metal coatings on oxide and carbide particles during plasma-arc action are also presented. Representative data on the output of particles with coating are obtained and factors, providing for the optimal particle cladding conditions, are indicated

  16. Magnetohydrodynamic equilibrium with spheroidal plasma-vacuum interface

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kaneko, Shobu; Chiyoda, Katsuji; Hirota, Isao.

    1983-01-01

    The Grad-Shafranov equations for an oblate and a prolate spheroidal plasmas are solved analytically under the assumptions, Bsub(phi) = 0 and dp/dpsi = constant. Here Bsub(phi) is the toroidal magnetic field, p is the kinetic pressure, and psi is the magnetic flux function. The plasmas in magnetohydrodynamic equilibrium are shown to be toroidal. The equilibrium magnetic-field configurations outside the spheroidal plasmas are considerably different from that of a spherical plasma. A line cusp or two point cusps appear outside the oblate or the prolate spheroidal plasma, respectively. (author)

  17. [Reparative and neoplastic spheroid cellular structures and their mathematical model].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kogan, E A; Namiot, V A; Demura, T A; Faĭzullina, N M; Sukhikh, G T

    2014-01-01

    Spheroid cell structures in the cell cultures have been described and are used for studying cell-cell and cell- matrix interactions. At the same time, spheroid cell structure participation in the repair and development of cancer in vivo remains unexplored. The aim of this study was to investigate the cellular composition of spherical structures and their functional significance in the repair of squamous epithelium in human papilloma virus-associated cervical pathology--chronic cervicitis and cervical intraepithelial neoplasia 1-3 degree, and also construct a mathematical model to explain the development and behavior of such spheroid cell structure.

  18. Nipah virus transmission in a hamster model.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Emmie de Wit

    2011-12-01

    Full Text Available Based on epidemiological data, it is believed that human-to-human transmission plays an important role in Nipah virus outbreaks. No experimental data are currently available on the potential routes of human-to-human transmission of Nipah virus. In a first dose-finding experiment in Syrian hamsters, it was shown that Nipah virus was predominantly shed via the respiratory tract within nasal and oropharyngeal secretions. Although Nipah viral RNA was detected in urogenital and rectal swabs, no infectious virus was recovered from these samples, suggesting no viable virus was shed via these routes. In addition, hamsters inoculated with high doses shed significantly higher amounts of viable Nipah virus particles in comparison with hamsters infected with lower inoculum doses. Using the highest inoculum dose, three potential routes of Nipah virus transmission were investigated in the hamster model: transmission via fomites, transmission via direct contact and transmission via aerosols. It was demonstrated that Nipah virus is transmitted efficiently via direct contact and inefficiently via fomites, but not via aerosols. These findings are in line with epidemiological data which suggest that direct contact with nasal and oropharyngeal secretions of Nipah virus infected individuals resulted in greater risk of Nipah virus infection. The data provide new and much-needed insights into the modes and efficiency of Nipah virus transmission and have important public health implications with regards to the risk assessment and management of future Nipah virus outbreaks.

  19. Effect of Wortmannin on the repair profiles of DNA double-strand breaks in the whole genome and in interstitial telomeric sequences of Chinese hamster cells

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Losada, Raquel; Rivero, Maria Teresa; Slijepcevic, Predrag; Goyanes, Vicente; Fernandez, Jose Luis

    2005-01-01

    The DNA breakage detection-fluorescence in situ hybridization (DBD-FISH) procedure was applied to analyze the effect of Wortmannin (WM) in the rejoining kinetics of ionizing radiation-induced DNA double-strand breaks (DSBs) in the whole genome and in the long interstitial telomeric repeat sequence (ITRS) blocks from Chinese hamster cell lines. The results indicate that the ITRS blocks from wild-type Chinese hamster cell lines, CHO9 and V79B, exhibit a slower initial rejoining rate of ionizing radiation-induced DSBs than the genome overall. Neither Rad51C nor the catalytic subunit of DNA-dependent protein kinase (DNA-PKcs) activities, involved in homologous recombination (HR) and in non-homologous end-joining (NHEJ) pathways of DSB repair respectively, influenced the rejoining kinetics within ITRS in contrast to DNA sequences in the whole genome. Nevertheless, DSB removal rate within ITRS was decreased in the absence of Ku86 activity, though at a lower affectation level than in the whole genome, thus homogenizing both rejoining kinetics rates. WM treatment slowed down the DSB rejoining kinetics rate in ITRS, this effect being more pronounced in the whole genome, resulting in a similar pattern to that of the Ku86 deficient cells. In fact, no WM effect was detected in the Ku86 deficient Chinese hamster cells, so probably WM does not add further impairment in DSB rejoining than that resulted as a consequence of absence of Ku activity. The same slowing effect was also observed after treatment of Rad51C and DNA-PKcs defective hamster cells by WM, suggesting that: (1) there is no potentiation of the HR when the NHEJ is impaired by WM, either in the whole genome or in the ITRS, and (2) that this impairment may probably involve more targets than DNA-PKcs. These results suggest that there is an intragenomic heterogeneity in DSB repair, as well as in the effect of WM on this process

  20. Protective effect of enzymatic hydrolysates from highbush blueberry (Vaccinium corymbosum L.) against hydrogen peroxide-induced oxidative damage in Chinese hamster lung fibroblast cell line.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Senevirathne, Mahinda; Kim, Soo-Hyun; Jeon, You-Jin

    2010-06-01

    Blueberry was enzymatically hydrolyzed using selected commercial food grade carbohydrases (AMG, Celluclast, Termamyl, Ultraflo and Viscozyme) and proteases (Alcalase, Flavourzyme, Kojizyme, Neutrase and Protamex) to obtain water soluble compounds, and their protective effect was investigated against H(2)O(2)-induced damage in Chinese hamster lung fibroblast cell line (V79-4) via various published methods. Both AMG and Alcalase hydrolysates showed higher total phenolic content as well as higher cell viability and ROS scavenging activities, and hence, selected for further antioxidant assays. Both AMG and Alcalase hydrolysates also showed higher protective effects against lipid peroxidation, DNA damage and apoptotic body formation in a dose-dependent fashion. Thus, the results indicated that water soluble compounds obtained by enzymatic hydrolysis of blueberry possess good antioxidant activity against H(2)O(2)-induced cell damage in vitro.

  1. Effects of 5 Thio-D-Glucose on cellular adenosine triphosphate levels and deoxyribonucleic acid rejoining in hypoxic and aerobic Chinese hamster cells

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nagle, W.A.; Moss, A.J. Jr.; Roberts, H.G. Jr.; Baker, M.L.

    1980-01-01

    Intracellular adenosine triphosphate (ATP) levels were measured in both hypoxic and aerobic cultures of V79 Chinese hamster cells treated with 5-thio-D-glucose (5-SH-D-Glc). This glucose analog, a known inhibitor of D-glucose transport and metabolism, reduced ATP in cell cultures allowed to become hypoxic by cell metabolism, but not in aerobic cultures treated similarly. Cells depleted of ATP were unable to rejoin x-ray induced deoxyribonucleic acid (DNA) strand breaks as measured by the alkaline sucrose gradient sedimentation technique. The inference for radiation therapy is that inhibition of glucose metabolism selectively depletes energy reserves in hypoxic cells, rendering these cells more radiosensitive and leading to a more effective tumor treatment

  2. Protection of ionizing radiation-induced cytogenetic damage by hydroalcoholic extract of Cynodon dactylon in Chinese hamster lung fibroblast cells and human peripheral blood lymphocytes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rao, Bola Sadashiva Satish; Upadhya, Dinesh; Adiga, Satish Kumar

    2008-01-01

    The radiomodulatory potential of hydroalcoholic extract of a medicinal plant Cynodon dactylon (family: Poaceae) against radiation-induced cytogenetic damage was analyzed using Chinese hamster lung fibroblast (V79) cells and human peripheral blood lymphocytes (HPBLs) growing in vitro. Induction of micronuclei was used as an index of cytogenetic damage, evaluated in cytokinesis blocked binucleate cells. The hydroalcoholic Cynodon dactylon extract (CDE) rendered protection against the radiation-induced DNA damage, as evidenced by the significant (p<0.001) reduction in micronucleated binucleate cells (MNBNC%) after various doses of CDE treatment in V79 cells and HPBLs. The optimum dose of CDE (40 and 50 microg/ml in HPBLs and V79 cells, respectively) with the greatest reduction in micronuclei was further used in combination with various doses of gamma radiation (0.5, 1, 2, 3, and 4 Gy) exposed 1 h after CDE treatment. A linear dose-dependent MNBNC% increase in radiation alone group was observed, while 40/50 microg/ml CDE significantly resulted in the reduction of MNBNC%, compared to the respective radiation alone groups. CDE resulted in a dose-dependent increase in free radical scavenging ability against various free radicals, viz., 2, 2-diphenyl-2-picryl-hydrazyl (DPPH); 2, 2-azinobis (3-ethylbenzothiazoline-6-sulfonic acid) (ABTS); superoxide anion (O2*-); hydroxyl radical (OH*) and nitric oxide radical (NO*) generated in vitro. Also, an excellent (70%) inhibition of lipid peroxidation in vitro was observed at a dose of 300 microg/ml CDE, attaining the saturation point at higher doses. The present findings demonstrated the radioprotective effect of CDE, also rendering protection against radiation-induced genomic instability and DNA damage. The observed radioprotective effect may be partly attributed to the free radical scavenging and antilipid peroxidative potential of CDE.

  3. Powder processing and spheroidizing with thermal inductively coupled plasma

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nutsch, G.; Linke, P.; Zakharian, S.; Dzur, B.; Weiss, K.-H.

    2001-01-01

    Processing of advanced powder materials for the spraying industry is one of the most promising applications of the thermal RF inductively coupled plasma. By selecting the feedstock carefully and adjusting the RF plasma parameters, unique materials with high quality can be achieved. Powders injected in the hot plasma core emerge with modified shapes, morphology, crystal structure and chemical composition. Ceramic oxide powders such as Al 2 O 3 , ZrO 2 , SiO 2 are spheroidized with a high spheroidization rate. By using the RF induction plasma spheroidizing process tungsten melt carbide powders are obtained with a high spheroidization rate at high feeding rates by densification of agglomerated powders consisting of di-tungsten carbide and monocarbide with a definite composition. This kind of ball-like powders is particularly suited for wear resistant applications. (author)

  4. Spheroidization of transition metal carbides in low temperature plasma

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Klinskaya, N.A.; Koroleva, E.B.; Petrunichev, V.A.; Rybalko, O.F.; Solov'ev, P.V.; Ugol'nikova, T.A.

    1986-01-01

    Plasma process of preparation of titanium, tungsten and chromium carbide spherical powders with the main particle size 40-80 μm is considered. Spheroidization degree, granulometric and phase composition of the product are investigated

  5. A preliminary investigation into the extent of increased radioresistance or hyper-radiosensitivity in cells of hamster cell lines known to be deficient in DNA repair

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Skov, K.; Marples, B.; Matthews, J.B.; Zhou, H.; Joiner, M.C.

    1994-01-01

    The response to low doses of X rays was assessed in cells of three hamster cell lines which are defective in DNA repair and was compared with their parental lines. Cells of the V79-derived double-strand break repair-deficient line XR-V15B showed no radioresistance in the 0.5-Gy range compared with the V79B wild type, but instead showed an exponential response. Cells of the single-strand break repair-deficient line EM9 showed hyper-radiosensitivity and exhibited increased radioresistance. Most interestingly, cells of the UV-20 cell line appeared to respond exponentially, as a continuation of the hyper-radiosensitive portion of the curve, with no evidence of increased radioresistance. This line is defective in an incision step of excision repair and is sensitive to crosslinking agents. Further studies are warranted to address the possible role of single- and double-strand break repair and excision repair in hyper-radiosensitivity and increased radioresistance. 24 refs., 4 figs

  6. Dwarf Spheroidal Satellite Formation in a Reionized Local Group

    OpenAIRE

    Milosavljevic, Milos; Bromm, Volker

    2013-01-01

    Dwarf spheroidal satellite galaxies have emerged a powerful probe of small-scale dark matter clustering and of cosmic reionization. They exhibit structural and chemical continuity with dwarf irregular galaxies in the field and with spheroidal galaxies in high-density environments. By combining empirical constraints derived for star formation at low gas column densities and metallicities in the local universe with a model for dark matter and baryonic mass assembly, we provide an analytical des...

  7. Self-assembly of tissue spheroids on polymeric membranes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Messina, Antonietta; Morelli, Sabrina; Forgacs, Gabor; Barbieri, Giuseppe; Drioli, Enrico; De Bartolo, Loredana

    2017-07-01

    In this study, multicellular tissue spheroids were fabricated on polymeric membranes in order to accelerate the fusion process and tissue formation. To this purpose, tissue spheroids composed of three different cell types, myoblasts, fibroblasts and neural cells, were formed and cultured on agarose and membranes of polycaprolactone (PCL) and chitosan (CHT). Membranes prepared by a phase-inversion technique display different physicochemical, mechanical and transport properties, which can affect the fusion process. The membranes accelerated the fusion process of a pair of spheroids with respect to the inert substrate. In this process, a critical role is played by the membrane properties, especially by their mechanical characteristics and oxygen and carbon dioxide mass transfer. The rate of fusion was quantified and found to be similar for fibroblast, myoblast and neural tissue spheroids on membranes, which completed the fusion within 3 days. These spheroids underwent faster fusion and maturation on PCL membrane than on agarose, the rate of fusion being proportional to the value of oxygen and carbon dioxide permeances and elastic characteristics. Consequently, tissue spheroids on the membranes expressed high biological activity in terms of oxygen uptake, making them more suitable as building blocks in the fabrication of tissues and organs. Copyright © 2015 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd. Copyright © 2015 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  8. Correlation between grade of pearlite spheroidization and laser induced spectra

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yao, Shunchun; Dong, Meirong; Lu, Jidong; Li, Jun; Dong, Xuan

    2013-12-01

    Laser induced breakdown spectroscopy (LIBS) which is used traditionally as a spectrochemical analytical technique was employed to analyze the grade of pearlite spheroidization. Three 12Cr1MoV steel specimens with different grades of pearlite spheroidization were ablated to produce plasma by pulse laser at 266 nm. In order to determine the optimal temporal condition and plasma parameters for correlating the grade of pearlite spheroidization and laser induced spectra, a set of spectra at different delays were analyzed by the principal component analysis method. Then, the relationship between plasma temperature, intensity ratios of ionic to atomic lines and grade of pearlite spheroidization was studied. The analysis results show that the laser induced spectra of different grades of pearlite spheroidization can be readily identifiable by principal component analysis in the range of 271.941-289.672 nm with 1000 ns delay time. It is also found that a good agreement exists between the Fe ionic to atomic line ratios and the tensile strength, whereas there is no obvious difference in the plasma temperature. Therefore, LIBS may be applied not only as a spectrochemical analytical technique but also as a new way to estimate the grade of pearlite spheroidization.

  9. Correlation between grade of pearlite spheroidization and laser induced spectra

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yao, Shunchun; Dong, Meirong; Lu, Jidong; Li, Jun; Dong, Xuan

    2013-01-01

    Laser induced breakdown spectroscopy (LIBS) which is used traditionally as a spectrochemical analytical technique was employed to analyze the grade of pearlite spheroidization. Three 12Cr1MoV steel specimens with different grades of pearlite spheroidization were ablated to produce plasma by pulse laser at 266 nm. In order to determine the optimal temporal condition and plasma parameters for correlating the grade of pearlite spheroidization and laser induced spectra, a set of spectra at different delays were analyzed by the principal component analysis method. Then, the relationship between plasma temperature, intensity ratios of ionic to atomic lines and grade of pearlite spheroidization was studied. The analysis results show that the laser induced spectra of different grades of pearlite spheroidization can be readily identifiable by principal component analysis in the range of 271.941–289.672 nm with 1000 ns delay time. It is also found that a good agreement exists between the Fe ionic to atomic line ratios and the tensile strength, whereas there is no obvious difference in the plasma temperature. Therefore, LIBS may be applied not only as a spectrochemical analytical technique but also as a new way to estimate the grade of pearlite spheroidization. (paper)

  10. Implications of the dwarfs spheroidal galaxy mass-metallicity relation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Smith, G.H.

    1985-01-01

    The properties of the mass-metallicity relation among dwarf spheroidal galaxies are discussed in terms of a model which assumes that the internal chemical evolution of the dwarf spheroidals was promoted by supernova activity. The model can be used to explain the observed dwarf spheroidal mass-metallicity relation assuming the present mass of these systems M sub s is proportional to their initial masses M as M sub s varies according to a power-law index of exp 7/4. It is inferred from the power-law dependence of M on the proto-cloud radius that the most massive dwarf spheroids were formed from the densest clouds. The observed slope of the mass-metallicity relation for dwarf spheroidal galaxies is found to be significantly different from theoretical estimates of this slope for elliptical galaxies. It is suggested that the difference may imply that spheroidal dwarfs and elliptical galaxies had different formation histories, confirming Kormendy's (1985) observations of differences in the brightness and luminosity trends. 54 references

  11. Intracellular contacts - effect of survival curve of mammal cells on the Dq value

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Durand, R.E.; Sutherland, R.M.

    1980-01-01

    Survival increase is observed in cells of the Chinese hamster of the V79-171 line which grow in the composition of multicell spheroids as compared with the survival after irradiation in a single state. The ratio of the Dsub(q) cell value in the composition of spheroids to Dsub(q) of separately growing cells increases as the mitotic cycle proceeds from the minimum value of 1.3 for cells in the Gi phase to the maximum value of 2.2 for cells in a late S-phase. The increase of survival during growth in the composition of spheroids is not characteristic for all cell types. Only a part of cultured MNNG-mutants of cells of the V79-171 Chinese hamster reveal radiomodifying effect of cell contact acting [ru

  12. Magnetically levitated mesenchymal stem cell spheroids cultured with a collagen gel maintain phenotype and quiescence

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Natasha S Lewis

    2017-04-01

    Full Text Available Multicellular spheroids are an established system for three-dimensional cell culture. Spheroids are typically generated using hanging drop or non-adherent culture; however, an emerging technique is to use magnetic levitation. Herein, mesenchymal stem cell spheroids were generated using magnetic nanoparticles and subsequently cultured within a type I collagen gel, with a view towards developing a bone marrow niche environment. Cells were loaded with magnetic nanoparticles, and suspended beneath an external magnet, inducing self-assembly of multicellular spheroids. Cells in spheroids were viable and compared to corresponding monolayer controls, maintained stem cell phenotype and were quiescent. Interestingly, core spheroid necrosis was not observed, even with increasing spheroid size, in contrast to other commonly used spheroid systems. This mesenchymal stem cell spheroid culture presents a potential platform for modelling in vitro bone marrow stem cell niches, elucidating interactions between cells, as well as a useful model for drug delivery studies.

  13. Nature of mutants induced by ionizing radiation in cultured hamster cells. III. Molecular characterization of HPRT-deficient mutants induced by. gamma. -rays or. cap alpha. -particles showing that the majority have deletions of all or part of the hprt gene

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Thacker, J

    1986-05-01

    DNA from 58 independent HPRT-deficient mutants of V79 hamster cells induced by ionizing radiation was analysed by Southern blot hybridization to a full-length hamster hprt cDNA. About half of the ..gamma..-ray-induced mutants (20/43) were apparently total gene deletions, because they lacked all functional hprt gene sequences hybridizing to the cDNA probe. Another 10 mutants showed various partial deletions and/or rearrangements of the hprt gene. The remaining 13 mutants showed no detectable change in comparison to the structure of the normal gene, which correlated well with previous characterization of these mutants indicating that most carry point mutations in the hprt gene. Thus, 70% or more of radiation-induced HPRT-deficient mutants arise through large genetic changes, especially deletions of all or part of the hprt gene. 16 references, 4 figures, 1 table.

  14. Development of lacrimal gland spheroids for lacrimal gland tissue regeneration.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Massie, Isobel; Spaniol, Kristina; Barbian, Andreas; Geerling, Gerd; Metzger, Marco; Schrader, Stefan

    2018-04-01

    Severe dry eye syndrome resulting from lacrimal gland (LG) dysfunction can cause blindness, yet treatments remain palliative. In vitro reconstruction of LG tissue could provide a curative treatment. We aimed to combine epithelial cells with endothelial cells and mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs) to form a 3D functional unit. Epithelial cells and MSCs were isolated from porcine LG; endothelial cells were isolated from human foreskin. MSCs were characterised (flow cytometry and differentiation potential assays). All 3 cell types were combined on Matrigel and spheroid formation observed. Spheroids were characterised [immunohistochemistry (IHC) and transmission electron microscopy] and function assessed (β-hexosaminidase assay). Spheroids were transferred to decellularised jejunum (SIS-Muc) in dynamic cultures for 1 week before further characterisation. MSCs did not express CD31 but expressed CD44 and CD105 and differentiated towards osteogenic and adipogenic lineages. Spheroids formed on Matrigel within 18 hr, contracting to ~10% of the well area (p function was increased in spheroids cf. monolayer controls (p function (p < .05), viability (p < .05), and proliferation decreased, whilst apoptosis increased. On SIS-Muc under dynamic culture, however, spheroids continued to proliferate to repopulate SIS-Muc. IHC revealed LG epithelial cells coexpressing pan-cytokeratin and lysozyme, as well as endothelial cells and MSCs and cells remained capable of responding to carbachol (p < .05). These spheroids could form the basis of a regenerative medicine treatment approach for dry eye syndrome. In vivo studies are required to evaluate this further. Copyright © 2017 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  15. Human Cardiac Progenitor Spheroids Exhibit Enhanced Engraftment Potential.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Francesca Oltolina

    Full Text Available A major obstacle to an effective myocardium stem cell therapy has always been the delivery and survival of implanted stem cells in the heart. Better engraftment can be achieved if cells are administered as cell aggregates, which maintain their extra-cellular matrix (ECM. We have generated spheroid aggregates in less than 24 h by seeding human cardiac progenitor cells (hCPCs onto methylcellulose hydrogel-coated microwells. Cells within spheroids maintained the expression of stemness/mesenchymal and ECM markers, growth factors and their cognate receptors, cardiac commitment factors, and metalloproteases, as detected by immunofluorescence, q-RT-PCR and immunoarray, and expressed a higher, but regulated, telomerase activity. Compared to cells in monolayers, 3D spheroids secreted also bFGF and showed MMP2 activity. When spheroids were seeded on culture plates, the cells quickly migrated, displaying an increased wound healing ability with or without pharmacological modulation, and reached confluence at a higher rate than cells from conventional monolayers. When spheroids were injected in the heart wall of healthy mice, some cells migrated from the spheroids, engrafted, and remained detectable for at least 1 week after transplantation, while, when the same amount of cells was injected as suspension, no cells were detectable three days after injection. Cells from spheroids displayed the same engraftment capability when they were injected in cardiotoxin-injured myocardium. Our study shows that spherical in vivo ready-to-implant scaffold-less aggregates of hCPCs able to engraft also in the hostile environment of an injured myocardium can be produced with an economic, easy and fast protocol.

  16. Radiobiological investigations of multicellular spheroids as an in vitro tumor model. 4

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kopp, J.

    1978-01-01

    Multicellular spheroids of various size were irradiated with a single dose of X-rays or fast neutrons, incubated after irradiation in roller tubes for long time, and observed light-microscopically. The observed effects were found independent of the radiation used and dependent on dose (considering the RBE) and size of spheroids. After irradiation the spheroid surface showed a loosening phenomenon and the spheroid structure changed depending on dose in three various types. Up to the 10% survival fraction the spheroids recovered within some days to the structure of non-irradiated spheroids by the growth of the surviving cells. After higher doses single surviving cells inside the dead spheroid material seemed to migrate from the inner hypoxic into the rim zone. They can start proliferation many days after irradiation leading to repopulation of irradiated spheroids. The volume changes of irradiated spheroids were also dose-dependent, but the measurement of spheroid volume seems to be of limited value for predicting the effectiveness of irradiation because the spheroid volume of irradiated spheroids is not proportional to the number of cells per spheroid. (author)

  17. Coulomb energy of uniformly charged spheroidal shell systems.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jadhao, Vikram; Yao, Zhenwei; Thomas, Creighton K; de la Cruz, Monica Olvera

    2015-03-01

    We provide exact expressions for the electrostatic energy of uniformly charged prolate and oblate spheroidal shells. We find that uniformly charged prolate spheroids of eccentricity greater than 0.9 have lower Coulomb energy than a sphere of the same area. For the volume-constrained case, we find that a sphere has the highest Coulomb energy among all spheroidal shells. Further, we derive the change in the Coulomb energy of a uniformly charged shell due to small, area-conserving perturbations on the spherical shape. Our perturbation calculations show that buckling-type deformations on a sphere can lower the Coulomb energy. Finally, we consider the possibility of counterion condensation on the spheroidal shell surface. We employ a Manning-Oosawa two-state model approximation to evaluate the renormalized charge and analyze the behavior of the equilibrium free energy as a function of the shell's aspect ratio for both area-constrained and volume-constrained cases. Counterion condensation is seen to favor the formation of spheroidal structures over a sphere of equal area for high values of shell volume fractions.

  18. Cell proliferation kinetics and radiation response in 9L tumor spheroids

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sweigert, S.E.

    1984-05-01

    Cell kinetic parameters, including population doubling-time, cell cycle time, and growth fraction, were measured in 9L gliosarcoma spheroids. These parameters were studied as the spheroids grew from 50 ..mu..m to over 900 ..mu..m in diameter. Experiments relating the cell kinetic parameters to the radiation response of 9L spheroids were also carried out. The major findings were that the average cell cycle time (T/sub c/), is considerably longer in large spheroids than in exponentially-growing monolayers, the radiosensitivity of noncycling (but still viable) cells in spheroids is not significantly different from that of cycling spheroid cells, and the radiation-induced division delay is approximately twice as long in spheroid cells as in monolayer cells given equal radiation doses. The cell loss factor for spheroids of various sizes was calculated, by using the measured kinetic parameters in the basic equations for growth of a cell population. 157 references, 6 figures, 3 tables.

  19. Cell shedding from X-irradiated multicellular spheroids of human lung carcinomas

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sakata, K.; Okada, S.; Suzuki, N.; Majima, H.

    1991-01-01

    We studied the effect of radiation on cell shedding from the surface of multicellular spheroids. Spheroids were produced from two human lung cell lines, one adenocarcinoma (LCT1) and the other small cell carcinoma (LCT2), by using a liquid overlay culture technique. The number of cells shed from both kinds of spheroids did not change significantly when they were irradiated. The number of clonogenic cells shed from both kinds of irradiated spheroids decreased sharply as the dose of irradiation increases. There were no significant differences in clonogenic cell shedding per spheroid between LCT1 and LCT2 spheroids. 400 μm spheroids were more radioresistant to inhibition of clonogenic cell shedding than 250 μm spheroids. Shed cells were more radiosensitive than speroid cells. In these experiments, we did not obtain any results indicating that radiation enchances metastasis. (orig.) [de

  20. Cell proliferation kinetics and radiation response in 9L tumor spheroids

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sweigert, S.E.

    1984-05-01

    Cell kinetic parameters, including population doubling-time, cell cycle time, and growth fraction, were measured in 9L gliosarcoma spheroids. These parameters were studied as the spheroids grew from 50 μm to over 900 μm in diameter. Experiments relating the cell kinetic parameters to the radiation response of 9L spheroids were also carried out. The major findings were that the average cell cycle time (T/sub c/), is considerably longer in large spheroids than in exponentially-growing monolayers, the radiosensitivity of noncycling (but still viable) cells in spheroids is not significantly different from that of cycling spheroid cells, and the radiation-induced division delay is approximately twice as long in spheroid cells as in monolayer cells given equal radiation doses. The cell loss factor for spheroids of various sizes was calculated, by using the measured kinetic parameters in the basic equations for growth of a cell population. 157 references, 6 figures, 3 tables

  1. Process for titanium powders spheroidization by RF induction plasma

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gu Zhongtao; Ye Gaoying; Liu Chuandong; Tong Honghui

    2010-01-01

    Spherical titanium (Ti) particles were obtained by the process of heating irregularly shaped Ti powders under the radio frequency induction plasma (RF induction plasma) condition. The effect of feed rate, various dispersion methods and Ti particle size on the spheroidization efficiency was studied. The efficiency of the spheroidization is evaluated through the measurements of the percentage of powder spheroidized based on the electron microscopic observations and the tap density measurement of the processed powder. During the short flight of the particles in the plasma flow, of the order of a few milliseconds, the individual titanium particles of the powder are heated and melt, forming a spherical liquid droplet which upon freezing gives rise to the formation of a perfectly dense spherical solid particle. So RF induction plasma is a promising method for the preparation of spherical titanium powders with high flow ability. (authors)

  2. Spheroidization of glass powders for glass ionomer cements.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gu, Y W; Yap, A U J; Cheang, P; Kumar, R

    2004-08-01

    Commercial angular glass powders were spheroidized using both the flame spraying and inductively coupled radio frequency plasma spraying techniques. Spherical powders with different particle size distributions were obtained after spheroidization. The effects of spherical glass powders on the mechanical properties of glass ionomer cements (GICs) were investigated. Results showed that the particle size distribution of the glass powders had a significant influence on the mechanical properties of GICs. Powders with a bimodal particle size distribution ensured a high packing density of glass ionomer cements, giving relatively high mechanical properties of GICs. GICs prepared by flame-spheroidized powders showed low strength values due to the loss of fine particles during flame spraying, leading to a low packing density and few metal ions reacting with polyacrylic acid to form cross-linking. GICs prepared by the nano-sized powders showed low strength because of the low bulk density of the nano-sized powders and hence low powder/liquid ratio of GICs.

  3. Monoenergetic electron parameters in a spheroid bubble model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sattarian, H.; Sh., Rahmatallahpur; Tohidi, T.

    2013-02-01

    A reliable analytical expression for the potential of plasma waves with phase velocities near the speed of light is derived. The presented spheroid cavity model is more consistent than the previous spherical and ellipsoidal models and it explains the mono-energetic electron trajectory more accurately, especially at the relativistic region. The maximum energy of electrons is calculated and it is shown that the maximum energy of the spheroid model is less than that of the spherical model. The electron energy spectrum is also calculated and it is found that the energy distribution ratio of electrons ΔE/E for the spheroid model under the conditions reported here is half that of the spherical model and it is in good agreement with the experimental value in the same conditions. As a result, the quasi-mono-energetic electron output beam interacting with the laser plasma can be more appropriately described with this model.

  4. Merging and Splitting of Plasma Spheroids in a Dusty Plasma

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mikikian, Maxime; Tawidian, Hagop; Lecas, Thomas

    2012-12-01

    Dust particle growth in a plasma is a strongly disturbing phenomenon for the plasma equilibrium. It can induce many different types of low-frequency instabilities that can be experimentally observed, especially using high-speed imaging. A spectacular case has been observed in a krypton plasma where a huge density of dust particles is grown by material sputtering. The instability consists of well-defined regions of enhanced optical emission that emerge from the electrode vicinity and propagate towards the discharge center. These plasma spheroids have complex motions resulting from their mutual interaction that can also lead to the merging of two plasma spheroids into a single one. The reverse situation is also observed with the splitting of a plasma spheroid into two parts. These results are presented for the first time and reveal new behaviors in dusty plasmas.

  5. Monoenergetic electron parameters in a spheroid bubble model

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sattarian, H.; Rahmatallahpur, Sh.; Tohidi, T.

    2013-01-01

    A reliable analytical expression for the potential of plasma waves with phase velocities near the speed of light is derived. The presented spheroid cavity model is more consistent than the previous spherical and ellipsoidal models and it explains the mono-energetic electron trajectory more accurately, especially at the relativistic region. The maximum energy of electrons is calculated and it is shown that the maximum energy of the spheroid model is less than that of the spherical model. The electron energy spectrum is also calculated and it is found that the energy distribution ratio of electrons ΔE/E for the spheroid model under the conditions reported here is half that of the spherical model and it is in good agreement with the experimental value in the same conditions. As a result, the quasi-mono-energetic electron output beam interacting with the laser plasma can be more appropriately described with this model. (physics of gases, plasmas, and electric discharges)

  6. CONCENTRIC MACLAURIN SPHEROID MODELS OF ROTATING LIQUID PLANETS

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hubbard, W. B.

    2013-01-01

    I present exact expressions for the interior gravitational potential V of a system of N concentric constant-density (Maclaurin) spheroids. I demonstrate an iteration procedure to find a self-consistent solution for the shapes of the interfaces between spheroids, and for the interior gravitational potential. The external free-space potential, expressed as a multipole expansion, emerges as part of the self-consistent solution. The procedure is both simpler and more precise than perturbation methods. One can choose the distribution and mass densities of the concentric spheroids so as to reproduce a prescribed barotrope to a specified accuracy. I demonstrate the method's efficacy by comparing its results with several published test cases.

  7. Off-center point explosion in a spheroid

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Morita, Kazuhiko; Sakashita, Shiro

    1978-01-01

    An off-center point explosion in a spheroid with exponential or Gaussian density distribution is investigated by applying the generalized Laumbach and Probstein method. For a typical example, we calculate the explosion in a spheroid with the eccentricity e = 0.7. If the separation distance between the center of the spheroid and the explosion point is larger than three times of the density scale height, the shock wave may almost propagate toward the direction of the minor axis of symmetry, within the polar angle of 30 0 . The shock envelope elongates toward the same direction and may form a polar jet and/or a tilted jet. But, in the case of an explosion in the equatorial plane (perpendicular to the minor axis of symmetry), two plasmas with the same form may be ejected into two different directions with the angle smaller than 180 0 . Explosion models of double radio sources and related objects are suggested. (author)

  8. Thermostability of sperm nuclei assessed by microinjection into hamster oocytes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nuclei isolated from spermatozoa of various species (golden hamster, mouse, human, rooster, and the fish tilapia) were heated at 60 degrees-125 degrees C for 20-120 min and then microinjected into hamster oocytes to determine whether they could decondense and develop into pronucl...

  9. Method for the determination of oxygen consumption rates and diffusion coefficients in multicellular spheroids

    OpenAIRE

    Mueller-Klieser, W.

    1984-01-01

    A method has been developed for the quantitative evaluation of oxygen tension (PO2) distributions in multicellular spheroids measured with O2-sensitive microelectrodes. The experimental data showed that multicellular tumor spheroids in stirred growth media were characterized by a diffusion-depleted zone surrounding the spheroids. This zone was elicited by an unstirred layer of medium next to the spheroid leading to a continuous decrease in the PO2 values from the bulk medium towards the spher...

  10. Halo carbon stars associated with dwarf spheroidal galaxies

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Van Den Bergh, S.; Lafontaine, A.

    1984-11-01

    Star counts have been performed for rings centered on the carbon star at 1 69 degrees, b + 55 degrees at a distance of 60 kpc. The counts were performed in order to determine whether halo carbon stars might be situated in dwarf spheroidal galaxies which are too star-poor to have been recognized as galaxies. The counts were made on a IIIa-J plate baked in forming gas that was exposed for 40 minutes through a 2C filter with the Palomar 1.2-m Schmidt telescope. It is shown that the carbon star is not situated in a dwarf spheroidal galaxy brighter than M(V) 5.7.

  11. Additive action of ionizing and non-ionizing radiations throughout the Chinese hamster cell-cycle

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Han, A.; Elkind, M.M.

    1977-01-01

    X-rays and γ-rays produce lesions in nuclear DNA which are qualitatively different from those produced by UV-light. Studies have been made of the effects of X-rays and UV light on the survival of synchronous cultures of Chinese hamster V79 cells. There were qualitative differences in the age-response patterns for survival after single doses of the two types of radiation, but combined UV-and X-irradiation produced enhanced lethality at all ages throughout the cell cycle. The minimum survival from the combined irradiation was at the middle of the S period, and the survival curves at this stage of the cell cycle were further investigated. Exposure to UV immediately before graded X-ray doses removed the shoulder on the X-ray survival curve in a progressive manner, while the D 0 value increased only slightly. The results correspond to complete additivity of X-ray damage to UV damage. Exposure to X-rays immediately before graded UV doses indicated that only part of the damage produced by the X-rays could be added to the UV-damage. Even after X-ray doses which reduced survival to levels which surpassed the shoulder of the UV-only survival curve, the shoulder persisted on the combined treatment survival curves. Measurements were made of the time-course of the change in molecular weight of single-stranded DNA after X-irradiation preceded by UV-irradiation. Only a small amount of slowing of repair of X-ray induced lesions was detected after a large UV dose. Possible mechanisms for the interactions between the two types of damage are discussed. (U.K.)

  12. Radiation-induced anorexia in Syrian hamsters

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kindt, A.; Sattler, E.L.; Schraub, A.

    1980-01-01

    The recovery of Syrian hamsters after split dose application (interval 11 days) was studied on the basis of the weight response and of food uptake. Two periods of weight loss and anorexia can be distinguished, an early one immediately after irradiation and a secondary one 6-10 days later. The secondary response is a function of the radiation dose and allows to distinguish survivors from non-survivors, since it is much more pronounced and longerlasting in the latter than in the former. The first response appears not to be influenced by a previous conditioning irradiation. (orig.) [de

  13. Radiation-induced anorexia in Syrian hamsters

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kindt, A.; Sattler, E.L.; Schraub, A.

    1980-10-01

    The recovery of Syrian hamsters after split dose application (interval 11 days) was studied on the basis of the weight response and of food uptake. Two periods of weight loss and anorexia can be distinguished, an early one immediately after irradiation and a secondary one 6-10 days later. The secondary response is a function of the radiation dose and allows to distinguish survivors from non-survivors, since it is much more pronounced and longerlasting in the latter than in the former. The first response appears not to be influenced by a previous conditioning irradiation.

  14. Effects of irradiation and cisplatin on human glioma spheroids: inhibition of cell proliferation and cell migration

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Fehlauer, Fabian; Muench, Martina; Rades, Dirk; Stalpers, Lukas J. A.; Leenstra, Sieger; van der Valk, Paul; Slotman, Ben; Smid, Ernst J.; Sminia, Peter

    2005-01-01

    Investigation of cell migration and proliferation of human glioma cell line spheroids (CLS) and evaluation of morphology, apoptosis, and immunohistochemical expression of MIB-1, p53, and p21 of organotypic muticellular spheroids (OMS) following cisplatin (CDDP) and irradiation (RT). Spheroids of the

  15. Biomaterial Substrate-Mediated Multicellular Spheroid Formation and Their Applications in Tissue Engineering.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tseng, Ting-Chen; Wong, Chui-Wei; Hsieh, Fu-Yu; Hsu, Shan-Hui

    2017-12-01

    Three-dimentional (3D) multicellular aggregates (spheroids), compared to the traditional 2D monolayer cultured cells, are physiologically more similar to the cells in vivo. So far there are various techniques to generate 3D spheroids. Spheroids obtained from different methods have already been applied to regenerative medicine or cancer research. Among the cell spheroids created by different methods, the substrate-derived spheroids and their forming mechanism are unique. This review focuses on the formation of biomaterial substrate-mediated multicellular spheroids and their applications in tissue engineering and tumor models. First, the authors will describe the special chitosan substrate-derived mesenchymal stem cell (MSC) spheroids and their greater regenerative capacities in various tissues. Second, the authors will describe tumor spheroids derived on chitosan and hyaluronan substrates, which serve as a simple in vitro platform to study 3D tumor models or to perform cancer drug screening. Finally, the authors will mention the self-assembly process for substrate-derived multiple cell spheroids (co-spheroids), which may recapitulate the heterotypic cell-cell interaction for co-cultured cells or crosstalk between different types of cells. These unique multicellular mono-spheroids or co-spheroids represent a category of 3D cell culture with advantages of biomimetic cell-cell interaction, better functionalities, and imaging possibilities. © 2017 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  16. Elastatinal and leupeptin: effects on u.v.-induced mutation and sister-chromatid exchanges in Chinese hamster cells

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Paul, P.; Fujiwara, Y.

    1981-01-01

    Microbial protease inhibitors elastatinal and leupeptin were tested for cytotoxicity and for effects on spontaneous and u.v.-induced 6-thioguanine-resistant (6TGsup(r)) mutation and sister-chromatid exchange (SCE) in V79 Chinese hamster cells. Continuous treatment with elastatinal exhibited marked cytotoxicity, while leupeptin was almost non-cytotoxic. Elastatinal rapidly induced cytotoxic effects as a function of its concentration and time of exposure. Near maximum cytotoxicity was reached after exposures of 6-8 h and this was partially abolished by the presence of 2.5 μg cycloheximide per ml. Concentrations of either protease inhibitor which gave 60-80% survival had no appreciable effects on u.v. survival and frequencies of spontaneous and u.v.-induced 6TGsup(r) mutation and SCE. However, reconstruction experiments revealed that pretreatments of 6TGsup(r) and 6TGsup(s) (wild-type) cells with these inhibitors for 6 days tended to block metabolic co-operation in their co-cultures. Thus, elastatinal and leupeptin are neither clastogenic nor mutagenic by themselves, and do not alter mutation fixation and expression. (author)

  17. Elastatinal and leupeptin: effects on u.v.-induced mutation and sister-chromatid exchanges in Chinese hamster cells

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Paul, P.; Fujiwara, Y.

    1981-01-01

    Microbial protease inhibitors elastatinal and leupeptin were tested for cytotoxicity and for effects on spontaneous and u.v.-induced 6-thioguanine-resistant (6TGr) mutation and sister-chromatid exchange (SCE) in V79 Chinese hamster cells. Continuous treatment with elastatinal exhibited marked cytotoxicity, while leupeptin was almost non-cytotoxic. Elastatinal rapidly induced cytotoxic effects as a function of its concentration and time of exposure. Near maximum cytotoxicity was reached after exposure of 6-8 h and this was partially abolished by the presence of 2.5 micrograms cycloheximide per ml. Concentrations of either protease inhibitor which gave 60-80% survival had no appreciable effects on u.v. survival and frequencies of spontaneous and u.v.-induced 6TGr mutation and SCE. However, reconstruction experiments revealed that pretreatments of 6TGr and 6TGs (wild-type) cells with these inhibitors for 6 days tended to block metabolic co-operation in their co-cultures. Thus, elastatinal and leupeptin are neither clastogenic mutagenic by themselves, and do not alter mutation fixation and expression

  18. Modification of thermal sensitivity of Chinese hamster cells by exposure to solutions of monovalent and divalent cationic salts

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Raaphorst, G.P.; Azzam, E.I.; Vadasz, J.

    1984-06-01

    Chinese hamster V79 cells were heated in culture medium or in 0.155-mol.dm -3 solutions of LiCl, NaCl, KCl, MgCl 2 , CaCl 2 and BaCl 2 . The presence of any one of these ionic solutions during heating increased the thermal sensitivity of the cells. The order of increased thermal sensitivity was KCl > LiCl > NaCl for the monovalent salts and BaCl 2 > MgCl 2 > CaCl 2 for the divalent cation salts. The addition of glucose to LiCl or NaCl solutions did not reduce the thermal sensitization caused by these solutions. When cells were sensitized by LiCl or NaCl treatment, a change in pH from 7.2 to 6.6 did not further increase thermal sensitivity. These data show that nutrient and ionic factors and their interplay are involved in cellular thermal sensitivity

  19. Mutation to ouabain-resistance in Chinese hamster cells: induction by ethyl methanesulphonate and lack of induction by ionising radiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Thacker, J.; Stephens, M.A.; Stretch, A.

    1978-01-01

    The spontaneous frequency of mutants resistant to growth inhibition by ouabian (OUAsup(R) mutants) was found to be about 5.10 -5 per viable cell in uncloned cultures of Chinese hamster V79-4 cells. In freshly-isolated clones or cultures started from a few cells this frequency was initially reduced to about 1.10 -6 in 1 mM ouabain. No increase in the frequency of OUAsup(R) mutants was found in cultures treated with γ-rays despite exploration of such variables as radiation dose, ouabain concentration, post-treatment interval before selection, cell density in selective medium, and clonal state of the cells at the time of adding ouabain (in situ vs. respreading method). A similar negative result was found for accelerated helium ions, for which the mutagenic effectiveness per unit dose has been shown to be about 10 times higher than γ-rays for the induction of thioguanine-resistant mutants in these cells. Recent evidence is reviewed in support of the suggestion that ionising radiation is unable to induce OUAsup(R) mutants because of the severity of the genetic damage it causes. (Auth.)

  20. Poly(ADP-ribose) metabolism in X-irradiated Chinese hamster cells: its relation to repair of potentially lethal damage

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ben-Hur, E.; Elkind, M.M.

    1984-01-01

    Nicotinamide-adenine dinucleotide (NAD + ) is the substrate used by cells in poly(ADP-ribose) synthesis. X-irradiation of log-phase Chinese hamster cells caused a rapid decrease in NAD + levels which was linearly dependent on radiation dose. The activity of ADP-ribosyl transferase (ADPRT) also increased linearly with radiation dose. The decrease of NAD + was slower, and the increase in ADPRT activity was less pronounced, in a radiation sensitive line, V79-AL162/S-10. An inhibitor of ADPRT, m-aminobenzamide, largely prevented the depletion of cellular NAD + and reduced the rate at which ADPRT activity disappeared during post-irradiation incubation. Post-irradiation treatment with hypertonic buffer or with medium containing D 2 O-which inhibit repair of radiation-induced potentially lethal damage-enhanced the depletion of NAD + and prevented the reduction in ADPRT activity following irradiation. The characteristics of the effects of treatment with hypertonic buffer on NAD + metabolism were qualitatively similar to the effects that such treatment has on radiation-induced cell killing. These results suggest that poly(ADP-ribose) synthesis after irradiation plays a role in the repair of potentially lethal damage. (author)

  1. Steroid metabolism in pregnant hamster. I

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Marchut, M.

    1980-01-01

    Quartered placentae from 12- and 15-day pregnant hamsters were incubated with 14 C labelled pregnenolone and progesterone and the products of their conversion were identified by chromatographic and isotope dilution methods. Pregnenolone was converted to progesterone, 7α-hydroxypregnenolone, 7α-hydroxyprogesterone, 3α-hydroxy-5β-pregnan-20-one, 3β-hydroxy-5α-pregnan-20-one, 3α-hydroxy-5α-pregnan-20-one, 5β-pregnane-3,20-dione and 5α-pregnane-3,20-dione. Except for 7α-hydroxypregnenolone, the same metabolites were identified in the incubates of the placental tissue with progesterone. Thus, the activity of Δ 5 -3β-hydroxysteroid dehydrogenase and Δsup(5→4) isomerase, 7α-hydrΔ 4 -5β- and Δ 4 -5α-reductase enzyme systems was shown in the hamster placenta. The formation of androgens from pregnenolone, progesterone and their 17-hydroxy-derivatives was not observed. There was also no evidence of the formation of estrogens from the above C-21 steroid precursors. (author)

  2. Neurochemistry of olivocochlear neurons in the hamster.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reuss, Stefan; Disque-Kaiser, Ursula; Antoniou-Lipfert, Patricia; Gholi, Maryam Najaf; Riemann, Elke; Riemann, Randolf

    2009-04-01

    The present study was conducted to characterize the superior olivary complex (SOC) of the lower brain stem in the pigmented Djungarian hamster Phodopus sungorus. Using Nissl-stained serial cryostat sections from fresh-frozen brains, we determined the borders of the SOC nuclei. We also identified olivocochlear (OC) neurons by retrograde neuronal tracing upon injection of Fluoro-Gold into the scala tympani. To evaluate the SOC as a putative source of neuronal nitric oxide synthase (nNOS), arginine-vasopressin (AVP), oxytocin (OT), vasoactive intestinal polypeptide (VIP), or pituitary adenylate cyclase-activating polypeptide (PACAP) that were all found in the cochlea, we conducted immunohistochemistry on sections exhibiting retrogradely labeled neurons. We did not observe AVP-, OT-, or VIP-immunoreactivity, neither in OC neurons nor in the SOC at all, revealing that cochlear AVP, OT, and VIP are of nonolivary origin. However, we found nNOS, the enzyme responsible for nitric oxide synthesis in neurons, and PACAP in neuronal perikarya of the SOC. Retrogradely labeled neurons of the lateral olivocochlear (LOC) system in the lateral superior olive did not contain PACAP and were only infrequently nNOS-immunoreactive. In contrast, some shell neurons and some of the medial OC (MOC) system exhibited immunofluorescence for either substance. Our data obtained from the dwarf hamster Phodopus sungorus confirm previous observations that a part of the LOC system is nitrergic. They further demonstrate that the medial olivocochlear system is partly nitrergic and use PACAP as neurotransmitter or modulator.

  3. Sulphur, zinc and carbon in the Sculptor dwarf spheroidal galaxy

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Skúladóttir, Ása

    2016-01-01

    The Sculptor dwarf spheroidal galaxy is a Milky Way satellite with predominantly old stellar population, and therefore the ideal target to study early chemical evolution. The chemical abundances of photospheres of stars reveal the composition of their birth environment; studying stars of different

  4. The early days of the Sculptor dwarf spheroidal galaxy

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Jablonka, P.; North, P.; Mashonkina, L.; Hill, V.; Revaz, Y.; Shetrone, M.; Starkenburg, E.; Irwin, M.; Tolstoy, E.; Battaglia, G.; Venn, K.; Helmi, A.; Primas, F.; François, P.

    2015-01-01

    We present the high-resolution spectroscopic study of five -3.9 ≤ [Fe/H] ≤ -2.5 stars in the Local Group dwarf spheroidal, Sculptor, thereby doubling the number of stars with comparable observations in this metallicity range. We carry out a detailed analysis of the chemical abundances of α, iron

  5. Spheroidal Integral Equations for Geodetic Inversion of Geopotential Gradients

    Science.gov (United States)

    Novák, Pavel; Šprlák, Michal

    2018-03-01

    The static Earth's gravitational field has traditionally been described in geodesy and geophysics by the gravitational potential (geopotential for short), a scalar function of 3-D position. Although not directly observable, geopotential functionals such as its first- and second-order gradients are routinely measured by ground, airborne and/or satellite sensors. In geodesy, these observables are often used for recovery of the static geopotential at some simple reference surface approximating the actual Earth's surface. A generalized mathematical model is represented by a surface integral equation which originates in solving Dirichlet's boundary-value problem of the potential theory defined for the harmonic geopotential, spheroidal boundary and globally distributed gradient data. The mathematical model can be used for combining various geopotential gradients without necessity of their re-sampling or prior continuation in space. The model extends the apparatus of integral equations which results from solving boundary-value problems of the potential theory to all geopotential gradients observed by current ground, airborne and satellite sensors. Differences between spherical and spheroidal formulations of integral kernel functions of Green's kind are investigated. Estimated differences reach relative values at the level of 3% which demonstrates the significance of spheroidal approximation for flattened bodies such as the Earth. The observation model can be used for combined inversion of currently available geopotential gradients while exploring their spectral and stochastic characteristics. The model would be even more relevant to gravitational field modelling of other bodies in space with more pronounced spheroidal geometry than that of the Earth.

  6. The dwarf spheroidal galaxies around the milky way

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Tolstoy, E.; Battaglia, G.; Helmi, A.; Irwin, M. J.; Hill, V.; Vallenari, A; Tantalo, R; Portinari, L; Moretti, A

    2007-01-01

    We review the progress of ESO/WFI Imaging and VLT/FLAMES spectroscopy of large numbers of individual stars in nearby dwarf spheroidal galaxies by the Dwarf Abundances and Radial-velocities Team (DART). These observations have allowed us to show that neither the kinematics nor the abundance nor the

  7. Optical properties of spherical and oblate spheroidal gold shell colloids

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Penninkhof, J.J.; Moroz, A.; van Blaaderen, A.; Polman, A.

    2008-01-01

    The surface plasmon modes of spherical and oblate spheroidal core−shell colloids composed of a 312 nm diameter silica core and a 20 nm thick Au shell are investigated. Large arrays of uniaxially aligned core−shell colloids with size aspect ratios ranging from 1.0 to 1.7 are fabricated using a novel

  8. Numerical simulations of the metallicity distribution in dwarf spheroidal galaxies

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Ripamonti, E.; Tolstoy, E.; Helmi, A.; Battaglia, G.; Abel, T.

    2006-01-01

    Abstract: Recent observations show that the number of stars with very low metallicities in the dwarf spheroidal satellites of the Milky Way is low, despite the low average metallicities of stars in these systems. We undertake numerical simulations of star formation and metal enrichment of dwarf

  9. The dynamical and chemical evolution of dwarf spheroidal galaxies

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Revaz, Y.; Jablonka, P.; Sawala, T.; Hill, V.; Letarte, B.; Irwin, M.; Battaglia, G.; Helmi, A.; Shetrone, M. D.; Tolstoy, E.; Venn, K. A.

    We present a large sample of fully self-consistent hydrodynamical Nbody/Tree-SPH simulations of isolated dwarf spheroidal galaxies (dSphs). It has enabled us to identify the key physical parameters and mechanisms at the origin of the observed variety in the Local Group dSph properties. The initial

  10. Estimation of scattering from a moist rough surface with spheroidal ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Administrator

    less than 5⋅5% of the magnetic wavelength. We empha- size that the surface deviation is responsible for scattering at a given electromagnetic wavelength. 2. Theoretical consideration (basic theory). We consider a horizontally rough surface with slight per- centage of moisture (2–4⋅5%) with spheroidal dust parti- cles.

  11. Cryopreservation of organotypic multicellular spheroids from human gliomas

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kaaijk, P.; van den Berg, F.; van Amstel, P.; Troost, D.

    1996-01-01

    Fresh human glioma tissue can be cultured on agarose to form organotypic multicellular spheroids (OMS). The major advantage of OMS is the preservation of the cellular heterogeneity and the tumour architecture, which is lost in conventional monolayer cultures. The present study was undertaken to

  12. Void nucleation in spheroidized steels during tensile deformation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fisher, J.R. Jr.

    1980-04-01

    An investigation was conducted to determine the effects of various mechanical and material parameters on void formation at cementite particles in axisymmetric tensile specimens of spheroidized plain carbon steels. Desired microstructures for each of three steel types were obtained. Observations of void morphology with respect to various microstructural features were made using optical and scanning electron microscopy

  13. Comparative analysis of tumor spheroid generation techniques for differential in vitro drug toxicity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Raghavan, Shreya; Rowley, Katelyn R.; Mehta, Geeta

    2016-01-01

    Multicellular tumor spheroids are powerful in vitro models to perform preclinical chemosensitivity assays. We compare different methodologies to generate tumor spheroids in terms of resultant spheroid morphology, cellular arrangement and chemosensitivity. We used two cancer cell lines (MCF7 and OVCAR8) to generate spheroids using i) hanging drop array plates; ii) liquid overlay on ultra-low attachment plates; iii) liquid overlay on ultra-low attachment plates with rotating mixing (nutator plates). Analysis of spheroid morphometry indicated that cellular compaction was increased in spheroids generated on nutator and hanging drop array plates. Collagen staining also indicated higher compaction and remodeling in tumor spheroids on nutator and hanging drop arrays compared to conventional liquid overlay. Consequently, spheroids generated on nutator or hanging drop plates had increased chemoresistance to cisplatin treatment (20-60% viability) compared to spheroids on ultra low attachment plates (10-20% viability). Lastly, we used a mathematical model to demonstrate minimal changes in oxygen and cisplatin diffusion within experimentally generated spheroids. Our results demonstrate that in vitro methods of tumor spheroid generation result in varied cellular arrangement and chemosensitivity. PMID:26918944

  14. Media additives to promote spheroid circularity and compactness in hanging drop platform.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leung, Brendan M; Lesher-Perez, Sasha Cai; Matsuoka, Toshiki; Moraes, Christopher; Takayama, Shuichi

    2015-02-01

    Three-dimensional spheroid cultures have become increasingly popular as drug screening platforms, especially with the advent of different high throughput spheroid forming technologies. However, comparing drug efficacy across different cell types in spheroid culture can be difficult due to variations in spheroid morphologies and transport characteristics. Improving the reproducibility of compact, circular spheroids contributes to standardizing and increasing the fidelity of the desired gradient profiles in these drug screening three-dimensional tissue cultures. In this study we discuss the role that circularity and compaction has on spheroids, and demonstrate the impact methylcellulose (MethoCel) and collagen additives in the culture media can contribute to more compact and circular spheroid morphology. We demonstrate that improved spheroid formation is not a simple function of increased viscosity of the different macromolecule additives, suggesting that other macromolecular characteristics contribute to improved spheroid formation. Of the various macromolecular additives tested for hanging drop culture, MethoCel provided the most desirable spheroid formation. Additionally, the higher viscosity of MethoCel-containing media improved the ease of imaging of cellular spheroids within hanging drop cultures by reducing motion-induced image blur.

  15. Spatio-temporal cell dynamics in tumour spheroid irradiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kempf, H.; Bleicher, M.; Meyer-Hermann, M.; Kempf, H.; Bleicher, M.; Kempf, H.; Meyer-Hermann, M.

    2010-01-01

    Multicellular tumour spheroids are realistic in vitro systems in radiation research that integrate cell-cell interaction and cell cycle control by factors in the medium. The dynamic reaction inside a tumour spheroid triggered by radiation is not well understood. Of special interest is the amount of cell cycle synchronization which could be triggered by irradiation, since this would allow follow-up irradiations to exploit the increased sensitivity of certain cell cycle phases. In order to investigate these questions we need to support irradiation experiments with mathematical models. In this article a new model is introduced combining the dynamics of tumour growth and irradiation treatments. The tumour spheroid growth is modelled using an agent-based Delaunay/Voronoi hybrid model in which the cells are represented by weighted dynamic vertices. Cell properties like full cell cycle dynamics are included. In order to be able to distinguish between different cell reactions in response to irradiation quality we introduce a probabilistic model for damage dynamics. The overall cell survival from this model is in agreement with predictions from the linear-quadratic model. Our model can describe the growth of avascular tumour spheroids in agreement to experimental results. Using the probabilistic model for irradiation damage dynamics the classic 'four Rs' of radiotherapy can be studied in silico. We found a pronounced reactivation of the tumour spheroid in response to irradiation. A majority of the surviving cells is synchronized in their cell cycle progression after irradiation. The cell synchronization could be actively triggered and should be exploited in an advanced fractionation scheme. Thus it has been demonstrated that our model could be used to understand the dynamics of tumour growth after irradiation and to propose optimized fractionation schemes in cooperation with experimental investigations. (authors)

  16. Fluid absorption related to ion transport in human airway epithelial spheroids

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Pedersen, P S; Holstein-Rathlou, N H; Larsen, P L

    1999-01-01

    , and amiloride inhibited both values. Fluid transport rates were calculated from repeated measurements of spheroid diameters. The results showed that 1) non-CF and CF spheroids absorbed fluid at identical rates (4.4 microl x cm(-2) x h(-1)), 2) amiloride inhibited fluid absorption to a lower residual level...... in non-CF than in CF spheroids, 3) Cl(-)-channel inhibitors increased fluid absorption in amiloride-treated non-CF spheroids to a level equal to that of amiloride-treated CF spheroids, 4) hydrochlorothiazide reduced the amiloride-insensitive fluid absorption in both non-CF and CF spheroids, and 5......) osmotic water permeabilities were equal in non-CF and CF spheroids ( approximately 27 x 10(-7) cm x s(-1) x atm(-1))....

  17. Plasma spheroidization of iron powders in a non-transferred DC thermal plasma jet

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kumar, S.; Selvarajan, V.

    2008-01-01

    In this paper, the results of plasma spheroidization of iron powders using a DC non-transferred plasma spray torch are presented. The morphology of the processed powders was characterized through scanning electron microscopy (SEM) and optical microscopy (OM). The percentages of spheroidized powders were calculated by the shape factors such as the Irregularity Parameter (IP) and Roundness (RN). A maximum of 83% of spheroidization can be achieved. The spheroidization results are compared with the theoretical estimation and they are found to be in good agreement. The phase composition of the spheroidized powder was analyzed by XRD. The effect of plasma jet temperature and plasma gas flow rate on spheroidization is discussed. At low plasma gas flow rates and at high plasma jet temperatures, the percentage of spheroidization is high

  18. Photoperiodic regulation of the hamster testis: dependence on circadian rhythms

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Eskes, G.A.; Zucker, I.

    1978-01-01

    The testes of hamsters exposed to short days (10 hr of light per day) regress within 13 weeks. Administration of 7.5 percent deuterium oxide to hamsters lengthens the period of free running circadian activity rhythms by 2.2 percent and prevents testicular regression during short-day exposure. This is consistent with predictions derived from an external coincidence model for photoperiodic time measurement: Deuterium oxide changes phase relationships between the light-dark cycle and the circadian system, the hamster's daily photosensitive phase is stimulated with light during short days, and the testes remain large. Conservation of the period of circadian rhythms within narrow limits has adaptive significance for hamster photoperiodism and for the occurrence and phasing of the annual reproductive cycle

  19. Histaminergic regulation of seasonal metabolic rhythms in Siberian hamsters.

    Science.gov (United States)

    I'anson, Helen; Jethwa, Preeti H; Warner, Amy; Ebling, Francis J P

    2011-06-01

    We investigated whether histaminergic tone contributes to the seasonal catabolic state in Siberian hamsters by determining the effect of ablation of histaminergic neurons on food intake, metabolic rate and body weight. A ribosomal toxin (saporin) conjugated to orexin-B was infused into the ventral tuberomammillary region of the hypothalamus, since most histaminergic neurons express orexin receptors. This caused not only 75-80% loss of histaminergic neurons in the posterior hypothalamus, but also some loss of other orexin-receptor expressing cells e.g. MCH neurons. In the long-day anabolic state, lesions produced a transient post-surgical decrease in body weight, but the hamsters recovered and maintained constant body weight, whereas weight gradually increased in sham-lesioned hamsters. VO(2) in the dark phase was significantly higher in the lesioned hamsters compared to shams, and locomotor activity also tended to be higher. In a second study in short days, sham-treated hamsters showed the expected seasonal decrease in body weight, but weight remained constant in the lesioned hamsters, as in the long-day study. Lesioned hamsters consumed more during the early dark phase and less during the light phase due to an increase in the frequency of meals during the dark and decreased meal size during the light, and their cumulative food intake in their home cages was greater than in the control hamsters. In summary, ablation of orexin-responsive cells in the posterior hypothalamus blocks the short-day induced decline in body weight by preventing seasonal hypophagia, evidence consistent with the hypothesis that central histaminergic mechanisms contribute to long-term regulation of body weight. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  20. Transfer, imaging, and analysis plate for facile handling of 384 hanging drop 3D tissue spheroids.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cavnar, Stephen P; Salomonsson, Emma; Luker, Kathryn E; Luker, Gary D; Takayama, Shuichi

    2014-04-01

    Three-dimensional culture systems bridge the experimental gap between in vivo and in vitro physiology. However, nonstandardized formation and limited downstream adaptability of 3D cultures have hindered mainstream adoption of these systems for biological applications, especially for low- and moderate-throughput assays commonly used in biomedical research. Here we build on our recent development of a 384-well hanging drop plate for spheroid culture to design a complementary spheroid transfer and imaging (TRIM) plate. The low-aspect ratio wells of the TRIM plate facilitated high-fidelity, user-independent, contact-based collection of hanging drop spheroids. Using the TRIM plate, we demonstrated several downstream analyses, including bulk tissue collection for flow cytometry, high-resolution low working-distance immersion imaging, and timely reagent delivery for enzymatic studies. Low working-distance multiphoton imaging revealed a cell type-dependent, macroscopic spheroid structure. Unlike ovarian cancer spheroids, which formed loose, disk-shaped spheroids, human mammary fibroblasts formed tight, spherical, and nutrient-limited spheroids. Beyond the applications we describe here, we expect the hanging drop spheroid plate and complementary TRIM plate to facilitate analyses of spheroids across the spectrum of throughput, particularly for bulk collection of spheroids and high-content imaging.

  1. Dark matter annihilations search in dwarf spheroidal galaxies with fermi

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Farnier, C.; Nuss, E.; Cohen-Tanugi, J.

    2011-01-01

    Launched in June 2008, the Fermi Gamma-ray Telescope includes a pair conversion detector designed for the 20 MeV to ∼300GeV gamma-ray sky study, the Large Area Telescope (LAT). Operating in all-sky survey mode, its excellent sensitivity and angular resolution will allow either to discover or constrain a signal coming through the annihilation of dark matter particles. Predicted by cold dark matter scenarios as the largest clumps, dwarf spheroidal galaxies are amongst the most attractive targets for indirect search of dark matter by gamma-ray experiments. We present here an overview of the Fermi LAT Dark Matter and New Physics Working Group efforts in the searches of gamma-ray fluxes coming from WIMP pair annihilations in dwarf spheroidal galaxies.

  2. Magnetohydrodynamic stability of spheromak plasma in spheroidal flux conserver

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kaneko, Shobu; Kamitani, Atsushi.

    1985-11-01

    The MHD equilibrium configurations of spheromak plasmas in a spheroidal flux conserver are determined by use of a pressure distribution whose derivative dp/dψ vanishes on the magnetic axis, and by use of an optimized distribution. Here p is the pressure and ψ is the flux function. These equilibria are shown to be stable for symmetric modes. The stability for localized modes is investigated by the Mercier criterion. The values of the maximum beta ratio β max are evaluated for both pressure distributions and are shown to become about two times larger by optimization. If the condition, q axis max are found to be less than 30 %. The oblate spheroidal flux conserver is shown to be better than the toroidal conserver with a rectangular cross section from the standpoint of stability. (author)

  3. A 2-D nucleation-growth model of spheroidal graphite

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lacaze, Jacques; Bourdie, Jacques; Castro-Román, Manuel Jesus

    2017-01-01

    Analysis of recent experimental investigations, in particular by transmission electron microscopy, suggests spheroidal graphite grows by 2-D nucleation of new graphite layers at the outer surface of the nodules. These layers spread over the surface along the prismatic direction of graphite which is the energetically preferred growth direction of graphite when the apparent growth direction of the nodules is along the basal direction of graphite. 2-D nucleation-growth models first developed for precipitation of pure substances are then adapted to graphite growth from the liquid in spheroidal graphite cast irons. Lateral extension of the new graphite layers is controlled by carbon diffusion in the liquid. This allows describing quantitatively previous experimental results giving strong support to this approach.

  4. Mass transfer inside oblate spheroidal solids: modelling and simulation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    J. E. F. Carmo

    2008-03-01

    Full Text Available A numerical solution of the unsteady diffusion equation describing mass transfer inside oblate spheroids, considering a constant diffusion coefficient and the convective boundary condition, is presented. The diffusion equation written in the oblate spheroidal coordinate system was used for a two-dimensional case. The finite-volume method was employed to discretize the basic equation. The linear equation set was solved iteratively using the Gauss-Seidel method. As applications, the effects of the Fourier number, the Biot number and the aspect ratio of the body on the drying rate and moisture content during the process are presented. To validate the methodology, results obtained in this work are compared with analytical results of the moisture content encountered in the literature and good agreement was obtained. The results show that the model is consistent and it may be used to solve cases such as those that include disks and spheres and/or those with variable properties with small modifications.

  5. Spheroidization of inorganic compounds by the LPPS method

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Mastný, L.; Brožek, Vlastimil; Medřický, Jan; Marek, I.

    2017-01-01

    Roč. 13, č. 1 (2017), s. 162 ISSN 1336-7242. [Zjazd chemikov /69./. 11.09.2017-15.09.2017, Vysoké Tatry, Starý Smokovec] R&D Projects: GA ČR GA15-12145S Institutional support: RVO:61389021 Keywords : Water stabilized plasma * Liquid precursor plasma spraying * nanoparticles * spheroidization Subject RIV: BL - Plasma and Gas Discharge Physics OBOR OECD: Fluids and plasma physics (including surface physics)

  6. Sulphur, zinc and carbon in the Sculptor dwarf spheroidal galaxy

    OpenAIRE

    Skúladóttir, Ása

    2016-01-01

    The Sculptor dwarf spheroidal galaxy is a Milky Way satellite with predominantly old stellar population, and therefore the ideal target to study early chemical evolution. The chemical abundances of photospheres of stars reveal the composition of their birth environment; studying stars of different ages, therefore, provides insight into the chemical enrichment history of the galaxy in which they dwell. High-resolution spectra of 100 stars were used to further explore the chemical enrichment hi...

  7. Method for Processing Liver Spheroids Using an Automatic Tissue Processor

    Science.gov (United States)

    2016-05-01

    alcohol dehydration and hot liquid wax infiltration. After the water in the tissue is replaced with wax and cooled, it then becomes possible to cut...effective for processing and preparing microscopy slides of liver spheroids. The general process involved formalin fixation, dehydration in a...DPBS);  formalin (37% neutral buffer formaldehyde);  series of alcohol solutions: 70, 80, 95, and 100% ethanol in water; 2  xylene

  8. A study on the spheroidization by palsma spraying

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jung, In Ha; Ji, C. G.; Bae, S. O.; Yoon, J. H.; Kwon, H. I.

    2001-01-01

    Spheroidization of a powder in thermal plasma is a plausible method for powder morphology treatment. In this experiment, the spheroidization fraction was decreased with increasing the particle size. The higher fraction of H2 gas and higher probe position resulted in a higher spheroidization fraction. From this study, it follows that the good result could be attained from smaller size particle with higher hydrogen gas fraction and higher probe position. Through the statistical assessment, the results concluded that the effect of hydrogen gas content has more influence than particle size, and the probe position affects lower than the others. The interaction between the probe position and hydrogen gas fraction affects more than the other interactions. This alluded that the result largely depended on the particle size and hydrogen gas fraction, and there was an interaction between probe position and hydrogen gas fraction. Therefore, when altering the H2 gas fraction is considered, altering the probe position should also be considered. The fractions of each effect were roughly 25% by particle size, 9% by probe position and 35% by H2 gas fraction. At the results of X-ray diffraction patterns of the spheroidized particles, the large particle exhibited higher content of tetragonal phase, while smaller particle showed nearly cubic phase. This seemed to be the quenching rate; larger particle might have more time to phase separation upon cooling that smaller one. X-ray analysis results confirmed a relation between the particle size and tetragonal phase content, when the particles were sprayed at the same conditions. When particles were the same size but sprayed at different conditions, different content of tetragonal phase exhibited according to the experienced temperatures of particles. A particle wasting longer time for cooling to room temperature showed much tetragonal content which phase is stable at low temperatures

  9. A study on the spheroidization by palsma spraying

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jung, In Ha; Ji, C. G.; Bae, S. O.; Yoon, J. H.; Kwon, H. I

    2001-01-01

    Spheroidization of a powder in thermal plasma is a plausible method for powder morphology treatment. In this experiment, the spheroidization fraction was decreased with increasing the particle size. The higher fraction of H2 gas and higher probe position resulted in a higher spheroidization fraction. From this study, it follows that the good result could be attained from smaller size particle with higher hydrogen gas fraction and higher probe position. Through the statistical assessment, the results concluded that the effect of hydrogen gas content has more influence than particle size, and the probe position affects lower than the others. The interaction between the probe position and hydrogen gas fraction affects more than the other interactions. This alluded that the result largely depended on the particle size and hydrogen gas fraction, and there was an interaction between probe position and hydrogen gas fraction. Therefore, when altering the H2 gas fraction is considered, altering the probe position should also be considered. The fractions of each effect were roughly 25% by particle size, 9% by probe position and 35% by H2 gas fraction. At the results of X-ray diffraction patterns of the spheroidized particles, the large particle exhibited higher content of tetragonal phase, while smaller particle showed nearly cubic phase. This seemed to be the quenching rate; larger particle might have more time to phase separation upon cooling that smaller one. X-ray analysis results confirmed a relation between the particle size and tetragonal phase content, when the particles were sprayed at the same conditions. When particles were the same size but sprayed at different conditions, different content of tetragonal phase exhibited according to the experienced temperatures of particles. A particle wasting longer time for cooling to room temperature showed much tetragonal content which phase is stable at low temperatures.

  10. Scaffold-free Prevascularized Microtissue Spheroids for Pulp Regeneration.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dissanayaka, W L; Zhu, L; Hargreaves, K M; Jin, L; Zhang, C

    2014-12-01

    Creating an optimal microenvironment that mimics the extracellular matrix (ECM) of natural pulp and securing an adequate blood supply for the survival of cell transplants are major hurdles that need to be overcome in dental pulp regeneration. However, many currently available scaffolds fail to mimic essential functions of natural ECM. The present study investigated a novel approach involving the use of scaffold-free microtissue spheroids of dental pulp stem cells (DPSCs) prevascularized by human umbilical vein endothelial cells (HUVECs) in pulp regeneration. In vitro-fabricated microtissue spheroids were inserted into the canal space of tooth-root slices and were implanted subcutaneously into immunodeficient mice. Histological examination revealed that, after four-week implantation, tooth-root slices containing microtissue spheroids resulted in well-vascularized and cellular pulp-like tissues, compared with empty tooth-root slices, which were filled with only subcutaneous fat tissue. Immunohistochemical staining indicated that the tissue found in the tooth-root slices was of human origin, as characterized by the expression of human mitochondria, and contained odontoblast-like cells organized along the dentin, as assessed by immunostaining for nestin and dentin sialoprotein (DSP). Vascular structures formed by HUVECs in vitro were successfully anastomosed with the host vasculature upon transplantation in vivo, as shown by immunostaining for human CD31. Collectively, these findings demonstrate that prevascularized, scaffold-free, microtissue spheroids can successfully regenerate vascular dental pulp-like tissue and also highlight the significance of the microtissue microenvironment as an optimal environment for successful pulp-regeneration strategies. © International & American Associations for Dental Research.

  11. On the swimming motion of spheroidal magnetotactic bacteria

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cui Zhen; Kong Dali; Zhang Keke [Department of Mathematical Sciences, University of Exeter, Exeter EX4 4QF (United Kingdom); Pan Yongxin, E-mail: kzhang@ex.ac.uk [Institute of Geology and Geophysics, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Beijing (China)

    2012-10-15

    We investigate, via both theoretical and experimental methods, the swimming motion of magnetotactic bacteria having the shape of an elongated prolate spheroid in a viscous liquid under the influence of an imposed magnetic field. A fully three-dimensional Stokes flow, driven by the translation and rotation of a swimming bacterium, exerts a complicated viscous drag/torque on the motion of a non-spherical bacterium. By assuming that the body of the bacterium is non-deformable and that the interaction between different bacteria is weak and hence negligible, we have derived a system of 12 coupled nonlinear ordinary differential equations that govern both the motion and the orientation of a swimming spheroidal magnetotactic bacterium. The focus of the study is on how the shape of a non-spherical magnetotactic bacterium, marked by the size of its eccentricity, affects the pattern of its swimming motion. It is revealed that the pattern/speed of a swimming spheroidal magnetotactic bacterium is highly sensitive not only to the direction of its magnetic moment but also to its shape. We also compare the theoretical pattern obtained from the solutions of the 12 coupled differential equations with that observed in the laboratory experiments using the magnetotactic bacteria found in Lake Miyun near Beijing, China, showing that the observed pattern can be largely reproduced with an appropriate set of parameters in our theoretical model. (paper)

  12. Reparative Spheroids in HPV-Associated Chronic Cervicitis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gennadiy T. Sukhikh

    2013-09-01

    Full Text Available Background: Spheroid cell structures (SCS described in cell culture are used to study cell-cell and cell-matrix interactions. However, the role of the SCS in the repair process in vivo remains unexplored. The aim of the study was to examine the cellular composition of the spherical structures and their functional significance in the repair of the squamous epithelium in human papilloma virus-associated chronic cervicitis (HPV-CC. Methods and Results: The cytology and biopsy materials from 223 patients with HPV-CC were subjected to molecular testing for HPV DNA by Real-Time Polymerase Chain Reaction (Real-Time PCR with genotyping and chromogenic in situ hybridization (CISH, as well as immunocytological and immunohistochemical analyses of p16INK4A, Ki67, SMA, Vimentin, CD34, E-cadherin, Oct4, CD44, CKW markers. In the stem cell niche zone, these spheroid structures were discovered having proliferative activity and showing signs of producing stem cells involved in the repair of the cervical mucosa in HPV-CC. Conclusion: The persistence of the HPV in the stem cell niche zone cells in the cervix determines the chronization of inflammation in this area, with the ability to perform pathological repair. The immunophenotype of the spheroid cell structures in the HPV-CC includes cells with signs of stem cells (‘stemness’ and the mesenchymal-epithelial transition.

  13. On the swimming motion of spheroidal magnetotactic bacteria

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cui Zhen; Kong Dali; Zhang Keke; Pan Yongxin

    2012-01-01

    We investigate, via both theoretical and experimental methods, the swimming motion of magnetotactic bacteria having the shape of an elongated prolate spheroid in a viscous liquid under the influence of an imposed magnetic field. A fully three-dimensional Stokes flow, driven by the translation and rotation of a swimming bacterium, exerts a complicated viscous drag/torque on the motion of a non-spherical bacterium. By assuming that the body of the bacterium is non-deformable and that the interaction between different bacteria is weak and hence negligible, we have derived a system of 12 coupled nonlinear ordinary differential equations that govern both the motion and the orientation of a swimming spheroidal magnetotactic bacterium. The focus of the study is on how the shape of a non-spherical magnetotactic bacterium, marked by the size of its eccentricity, affects the pattern of its swimming motion. It is revealed that the pattern/speed of a swimming spheroidal magnetotactic bacterium is highly sensitive not only to the direction of its magnetic moment but also to its shape. We also compare the theoretical pattern obtained from the solutions of the 12 coupled differential equations with that observed in the laboratory experiments using the magnetotactic bacteria found in Lake Miyun near Beijing, China, showing that the observed pattern can be largely reproduced with an appropriate set of parameters in our theoretical model. (paper)

  14. Formation mechanism of spheroidal carbide in ultra-low carbon ductile cast iron

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bin-guo Fu

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available The formation mechanism of the spheroidal carbide in the ultra-low carbon ductile cast iron fabricated by the metal mold casting technique was systematically investigated. The results demonstrated that the spheroidal carbide belonged to eutectic carbide and crystallized in the isolated eutectic liquid phase area. The formation process of the spheroidal carbide was related to the contact and the intersection between the primary dendrite and the secondary dendrite of austenite. The oxides of magnesium, rare earths and other elements can act as heterogeneous nucleation sites for the spheroidal carbide. It was also found that the amount of the spheroidal carbide would increase with an increase in carbon content. The cooling rate has an important influence on the spheroidal carbide under the same chemical composition condition.

  15. Porous Nb-Ti based alloy produced from plasma spheroidized powder

    OpenAIRE

    Li, Qijun; Zhang, Lin; Wei, Dongbin; Ren, Shubin; Qu, Xuanhui

    2017-01-01

    Spherical Nb-Ti based alloy powder was prepared by the combination of plasma spheroidization and mechanical alloying. Phase constituents, microstructure and surface state of the powder, and pore characteristics of the resulting porous alloy were investigated. The results show that the undissolved W and V in the mechanically alloyed powder is fully alloyed after spheroidization, and single β phase is achieved. Particle size of the spheroidized powder is in the range of 20–110 μm. With the decr...

  16. Response of the MG-63 human osteosarcoma cell line grown as multicellular spheroids to neutron irradiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kubota, Nobuo; Kakehi, Masae; Matsubara, Shou; Koike, Sachiko; Ando, Koichi.

    1993-01-01

    Multicellular tumor spheroids are composed of the mixed populations of cells with regard to cell proliferation, nutrition, oxygenation and radiosensitivity. Human osteogenic sarcoma is generally considered clinically radioresistant. However, the in vitro cell survival curves for human osteogenic sarcoma cell lines do not differ from those of other tumor cell lines. In this study, the responses of human osteogenic sarcoma cell line to gamma ray and neutrons were investigated by using spheroid system. The spheroids of the osteogenic sarcoma cell line are considered to be a good in vitro model of radioresistant tumors. The purpose of this study is to measure the response of the spheroids to fast neutron irradiation. MG-63 human osteogenic sarcoma cell line was used for this study. The cell line was cultured in alpha-MEM with supplement. Cell survival was estimated after the trypsinization of spheroids 24 hours after irradiation. The method of measuring spheroid cure is explained. The mean number of surviving cells per spheroid can be obtained from the mean clonogenic number and cell survival curve. The cell survival of MG-63 spheroids exposed to gamma ray and neutrons and the dose effect curves for spheroid cure after irradiation are shown. (K.I.)

  17. Cell Spheroids with Enhanced Aggressiveness to Mimic Human Liver Cancer In Vitro and In Vivo.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jung, Hong-Ryul; Kang, Hyun Mi; Ryu, Jea-Woon; Kim, Dae-Soo; Noh, Kyung Hee; Kim, Eun-Su; Lee, Ho-Joon; Chung, Kyung-Sook; Cho, Hyun-Soo; Kim, Nam-Soon; Im, Dong-Soo; Lim, Jung Hwa; Jung, Cho-Rok

    2017-09-05

    We fabricated a spheroid-forming unit (SFU) for efficient and economic production of cell spheroids. We optimized the protocol for generating large and homogenous liver cancer cell spheroids using Huh7 hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC) cells. The large Huh7 spheroids showed apoptotic and proliferative signals in the centre and at the surface, respectively. In particular, hypoxia-induced factor-1 alpha (HIF-1α) and ERK signal activation were detected in the cell spheroids. To diminish core necrosis and increase the oncogenic character, we co-cultured spheroids with 2% human umbilical vein endothelial cells (HUVECs). HUVECs promoted proliferation and gene expression of HCC-related genes and cancer stem cell markers in the Huh7 spheroidsby activating cytokine signalling, mimicking gene expression in liver cancer. HUVECs induced angiogenesis and vessel maturation in Huh7 spheroids in vivo by activating epithelial-mesenchymal transition and angiogenic pathways. The large Huh7 cell spheroids containing HUVECs survived at higher concentrations of anti-cancer drugs (doxorubicin and sorafenib) than did monolayer cells. Our large cell spheroid provides a useful in vitro HCC model to enable intuitive observation for anti-cancer drug testing.

  18. Measuring the light scattering and orientation of a spheroidal particle using in-line holography.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Seo, Kyung Won; Byeon, Hyeok Jun; Lee, Sang Joon

    2014-07-01

    The light scattering properties of a horizontally and vertically oriented spheroidal particle under laser illumination are experimentally investigated using digital in-line holography. The reconstructed wave field shows the bright singular points as a result of the condensed beam formed by a transparent spheroidal particle acting as a lens. The in-plane (θ) and out-of-plane (ϕ) rotating angles of an arbitrarily oriented spheroidal particle are measured by using these scattering properties. As a feasibility test, the 3D orientation of a transparent spheroidal particle suspended in a microscale pipe flow is successfully reconstructed by adapting the proposed method.

  19. Black tea extract and dental caries formation in hamsters.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Linke, Harald A B; LeGeros, Racquel Z

    2003-01-01

    Several studies have suggested that green tea and Oolong tea extracts have antibacterial and anticariogenic properties in vitro and in vivo. The aim of the present study was to determine the effect of a standardized black tea extract (BTE) on caries formation in inbred hamsters on a regular and a cariogenic diet. Eighty hamsters were divided into four groups of 20 animals each. Two groups received a pelleted regular diet (LabChow) with water or BTE ad libitum. The other two groups received a powdered cariogenic diet (Diet 2000, containing 56% sucrose) with water or BTE ad libitum. The animals were kept for 3 months on their respective diets and then were sacrificed. The heads were retained, the jaws were prepared and stained using alizarin mordant red II, and were then scored for dental caries according to the Keyes method. This is the first study indicating that BTE, as compared with water, significantly decreased caries formation by 56.6% in hamsters on a regular diet and by 63.7% in hamsters on a cariogenic diet (P cariogenic diet group BTE, reduced the mandibular caries score of the hamsters slightly more than the maxillary caries score. The fluoride content of the standardized BTE solution was frequently monitored during the experiment; the mean fluoride concentration was found to be 4.22 ppm. A frequent intake of black tea can significantly decrease caries formation, even in the presence of sugars in the diet.

  20. The hamster flank organ model: Is it relevant to man

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Franz, T.J.; Lehman, P.A.; Pochi, P.; Odland, G.F.; Olerud, J.

    1989-01-01

    The critical role that androgens play in the etiology of acne has led to a search for topically active antiandrogens and the frequent use of the flank organ of the golden Syrian hamster as an animal model. 17-alpha-propyltestosterone (17-PT) has been identified as having potent antiandrogenic activity in the hamster model, and this report describes its clinical evaluation. Two double-blind placebo controlled studies comparing 4% 17-PT in 80% alcohol versus vehicle alone were conducted. One study examined 17-PT sebosuppressive activity in 20 subjects. The second study examined its efficacy in 44 subjects having mild to moderate acne. A third study measured in vitro percutaneous absorption of 17-PT through hamster flank and monkey skin, and human face skin in-vivo, using radioactive drug. 17-PT was found to be ineffective in reducing either the sebum excretion rate or the number of inflammatory acne lesions. Failure of 17-PT to show clinical activity was not a result of poor percutaneous absorption. Total absorption in man was 7.7% of the dose and only 1.0% in the hamster. The sebaceous gland of hamster flank organ is apparently more sensitive to antiandrogens than the human sebaceous gland

  1. Hamster and Murine Models of Severe Destructive Lyme Arthritis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Munson, Erik; Nardelli, Dean T.; Du Chateau, Brian K.; Callister, Steven M.; Schell, Ronald F.

    2012-01-01

    Arthritis is a frequent complication of infection in humans with Borrelia burgdorferi. Weeks to months following the onset of Lyme borreliosis, a histopathological reaction characteristic of synovitis including bone, joint, muscle, or tendon pain may occur. A subpopulation of patients may progress to a chronic, debilitating arthritis months to years after infection which has been classified as severe destructive Lyme arthritis. This arthritis involves focal bone erosion and destruction of articular cartilage. Hamsters and mice are animal models that have been utilized to study articular manifestations of Lyme borreliosis. Infection of immunocompetent LSH hamsters or C3H mice results in a transient synovitis. However, severe destructive Lyme arthritis can be induced by infecting irradiated hamsters or mice and immunocompetent Borrelia-vaccinated hamsters, mice, and interferon-gamma- (IFN-γ-) deficient mice with viable B. burgdorferi. The hamster model of severe destructive Lyme arthritis facilitates easy assessment of Lyme borreliosis vaccine preparations for deleterious effects while murine models of severe destructive Lyme arthritis allow for investigation of mechanisms of immunopathology. PMID:22461836

  2. Molecular analysis of peroxisome proliferation in the hamster.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Choudhury, Agharul I; Sims, Helen M; Horley, Neill J; Roberts, Ruth A; Tomlinson, Simon R; Salter, Andrew M; Bruce, Mary; Shaw, P Nicholas; Kendall, David; Barrett, David A; Bell, David R

    2004-05-15

    Three novel P450 members of the cytochrome P450 4A family were cloned as partial cDNAs from hamster liver, characterised as novel members of the CYP4A subfamily, and designated CYP4A17, 18, and 19. Hamsters were treated with the peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor alpha (PPARalpha) agonists, methylclofenapate (MCP) or Wy-14,643, and shown to develop hepatomegaly and induction of CYP4A17 RNA, and concomitant induction of lauric acid 12- hydroxylase. This treatment also resulted in hypolipidaemia, which was most pronounced in the VLDL fraction, with up to 50% reduction in VLDL-triglycerides; by contrast, blood cholesterol concentration was unaffected by this treatment. These data show that hamster is highly responsive to induction of CYP4A by peroxisome proliferators. To characterise the molecular basis of peroxisome proliferation, the hamster PPARalpha was cloned and shown to encode a 468-amino-acid protein, which is highly similar to rat and mouse PPARalpha proteins. The level of expression of hamster PPARalpha in liver is intermediate between mouse and guinea pig. These results fail to support the hypothesis that the level of PPARalpha in liver is directly responsible for species differences in peroxisome proliferation.

  3. Social context modulates food hoarding in Syrian hamsters

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bibiana Montoya

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available The effect of the presence of a con-specific in the temporal organization of food hoarding was studied in two varieties of Syrian hamster (Mesocricetus auratus: golden and long-haired. Four male hamsters of each variety were used. Their foraging behavior was observed during four individual and four shared trials in which animals were not competing for the same food source or territory. During individual trials, long-haired hamsters consumed food items directly from the food source, transporting and hoarding only remaining pieces. During shared trials, the long-haired variety hoarded food items before consumption, and increased the duration of hoarding trips, food handling in the storage, and cache size. Golden hamsters maintained the same temporal organization of hoarding behavior (i.e., hoarding food items before consumption throughout both individual and shared trials. However, the golden variety increased handling time at the food source and decreased the duration of hoarding trips, the latency of hoarding and storing size throughout the shared trials. In Syrian hamsters, the presence of a con-specific may signal high probability of food source depletion suggesting that social pressures over food availability might facilitate hoarding behavior. Further studies are required to evaluate cost-benefit balance of food hoarding and the role of cache pilferage in this species.

  4. Role of caloric homeostasis and reward in alcohol intake in Syrian golden hamsters

    OpenAIRE

    Gulick, Danielle; Green, Alan I.

    2010-01-01

    The Syrian golden hamster drinks alcohol readily, but only achieves moderate blood alcohol levels, and does not go through withdrawal from alcohol. Because the hamster is a model of caloric homeostasis, both caloric content and reward value may contribute to the hamster’s alcohol consumption. The current study examines alcohol consumption in the hamster when a caloric or non-caloric sweet solution is concurrently available and caloric intake in the hamster before, during, and after exposure t...

  5. IN VITRO INVESTIGATION OF THE TRANSPLANTATION PROSPECTS OF MULTICELLULAR SPHEROID MICROAGGREGATES OF DONOR RETINAL PIGMENT EPITHELIUM

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    S. A. Borzenok

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Aim. To study in experiment the criteria for transplantability of multicellular spheroid microaggregates of retinal pigment epithelium (RPE, prepared by the method of 3D cell culture. Materials and Methods. 11 donor eyes (6 of adrenaline index «A», 5 of index «B» were used as a source of RPE cell cultures (group «A» – 6 cultures, group «B» – 5 cultures, of which over 2000 RPE spheroids were obtained by the method of three-dimensional cell culture. 1760 spheroids of them were selected for transplantability investigation (960 – group «A», 800 – group «B». Among the selected spheroids were equal numbers of spheroids of different morphology («smooth» and «rough» and of the initial cell seeding number (500, 1000, 5000, 25 000, 125 000 cells per hanging drop. We were taking out 12 spheroids of group «A» and 10 spheroids of group «B» of the 3D culture in terms of 7, 14, 21, 28 days of 3D culture to assess their viability. We were transferring the same number of spheroids in the same terms from 3D to 2D culture conditions to assess their adhesive properties. Viability of cells within spheroids was determined using the Trypan blue exclusion. The presence or absence of adhesion was determined by microscopic observation.Results. «Smooth» spheroids of 7 and 14 days of pretransplantation cultivation and derived from hanging drops containing 500 and 1000 cells showed the highest transplantability (cell viability varied from 0.83 ± 0.38 to 0.94 ± 0.24, a 100% adhesion. «Rough» spheroids were untransplantable in all variants, despite their partial preservation of viability (in comparison to “smooth” ones p < 0.05. 21 and 28 days of pretransplantation culturing and high cell seeding numbers signifi cantly lowered transplantability of obtained spheroids (p > 0.05 for low cell numbers, p < 0.05 for the high ones. Differences in adrenaline indexes A and B of donor eyes which were the primary sources of cellular

  6. Optimal formation of genetically modified and functional pancreatic islet spheroids by using hanging-drop strategy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, H J; Alam, Z; Hwang, J W; Hwang, Y H; Kim, M J; Yoon, S; Byun, Y; Lee, D Y

    2013-03-01

    Rejection and hypoxia are important factors causing islet loss at an early stage after pancreatic islet transplantation. Recently, islets have been dissociated into single cells for reaggregation into so-called islet spheroids. Herein, we used a hanging-drop strategy to form islet spheroids to achieve functional equivalence to intact islets. To obtain single islet cells, we dissociated islets with trypsin-EDTA digestion for 10 minutes. To obtain spheroids, we dropped various numbers of single cells (125, 250, or 500 cells/30 μL drop) onto a Petri dish, that was inverted for incubation in humidified air containing 5% CO(2) at 37 °C for 7 days. The aggregated spheroids in the droplets were harvested for further culture. The size of the aggregated islet spheroids depended on the number of single cells (125-500 cells/30 μL droplet). Their morphology was similar to that of intact islets without any cellular damage. When treated with various concentrations of glucose to evaluate responsiveness, their glucose-mediated stimulation index value was similar to that of intact islets, an observation that was attributed to strong cell-to-cell interactions in islet spheroids. However, islet spheroids aggregated in general culture dishes showed abnormal glucose responsiveness owing to weak cell-to-cell interactions. Cell-to-cell interactions in islet spheroids were confirmed with an anti-connexin-36 monoclonal antibody. Finally, nonviral poly(ethylene imine)-mediated interleukin-10 cytokine gene delivered beforehand into dissociated single cells before formation of islet spheroids increased the gene transfection efficacy and interleukin-10 secretion from islet spheroids >4-fold compared with intact islets. These results demonstrated the potential application of genetically modified, functional islet spheroids with of controlled size and morphology using an hanging-drop technique. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  7. In vitro characterization of self-assembled anterior cruciate ligament cell spheroids for ligament tissue engineering.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hoyer, M; Meier, C; Breier, A; Hahner, J; Heinrich, G; Drechsel, N; Meyer, M; Rentsch, C; Garbe, L-A; Ertel, W; Lohan, A; Schulze-Tanzil, G

    2015-03-01

    Tissue engineering of an anterior cruciate ligament (ACL) implant with functional enthesis requires site-directed seeding of different cell types on the same scaffold. Therefore, we studied the suitability of self-assembled three-dimensional spheroids generated by lapine ACL ligament fibroblasts for directed scaffold colonization. The spheroids were characterized in vitro during 14 days in static and 7 days in dynamic culture. Size maintenance of self-assembled spheroids, the vitality, the morphology and the expression pattern of the cells were monitored. Additionally, we analyzed the total sulfated glycosaminoglycan, collagen contents and the expression of the ligament components type I collagen, decorin and tenascin C on protein and for COL1A1, DCN and TNMD on gene level in the spheroids. Subsequently, the cell colonization of polylactide-co-caprolactone [P(LA-CL)] and polydioxanone (PDS) polymer scaffolds was assessed in response to a directed, spheroid-based seeding technique. ACL cells were able to self-assemble spheroids and survive over 14 days. The spheroids decreased in size but not in cellularity depending on the culture time and maintained or even increased their differentiation state. The area of P[LA-CL] scaffolds, colonized after 14 days by the cells of one spheroid, was in average 4.57 ± 2.3 mm(2). Scaffolds consisting of the polymer P[LA-CL] were more suitable for colonization by spheroids than PDS embroideries. We conclude that ACL cell spheroids are suitable as site-directed seeding strategy for scaffolds in ACL tissue engineering approaches and recommend the use of freshly assembled spheroids for scaffold colonization, due to their balanced proliferation and differentiation.

  8. Generating Chondromimetic Mesenchymal Stem Cell Spheroids by Regulating Media Composition and Surface Coating.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sridharan, BanuPriya; Laflin, Amy D; Detamore, Michael S

    2018-04-01

    Spheroids of mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs) in cartilage tissue engineering have been shown to enhance regenerative potential owing to their 3D structure. In this study, we explored the possibility of priming spheroids under different media to replace the use of inductive surface coatings for chondrogenic differentiation. Rat bone marrow-derived MSCs were organized into cell spheroids by the hanging drop technique and subsequently cultured on hyaluronic acid (HA) coated or non-coated well plates under different cell media conditions. Endpoint analysis included cell viability, DNA and Glycosaminoglycan (GAG) and collagen content, gene expression and immunohistochemistry. For chondrogenic applications, MSC spheroids derived on non-coated surfaces outperformed the spheroids derived from HA-coated surfaces in matrix synthesis and collagen II gene expression. Spheroids on non-coated surfaces gave rise to the highest collagen and GAG when primed with medium containing insulin-like growth factor (IGF) for 1 week during spheroid formation. Spheroids that were grown in chondroinductive raw material-inclusive media such as aggrecan or chondroitin sulfate exhibited the highest Collagen II gene expression in the non-coated surface at 1 week. Media priming by growth factors and raw materials might be a more predictive influencer of chondrogenesis compared to inductive-surfaces. Such tailored bioactivity of the stem cell spheroids in the stage of the spheroid formation may give rise to a platform technology that may eventually produce spheroids capable of chondrogenesis achieved by mere media manipulation, skipping the need for additional culture on a modified surface, that paves the way for cost-effective technologies.

  9. Chitosan derived co-spheroids of neural stem cells and mesenchymal stem cells for neural regeneration.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Han, Hao-Wei; Hsu, Shan-Hui

    2017-10-01

    Chitosan has been considered as candidate biomaterials for neural applications. The effective treatment of neurodegeneration or injury to the central nervous system (CNS) is still in lack nowadays. Adult neural stem cells (NSCs) represents a promising cell source to treat the CNS diseases but they are limited in number. Here, we developed the core-shell spheroids of NSCs (shell) and mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs, core) by co-culturing cells on the chitosan surface. The NSCs in chitosan derived co-spheroids displayed a higher survival rate than those in NSC homo-spheroids. The direct interaction of NSCs with MSCs in the co-spheroids increased the Notch activity and differentiation tendency of NSCs. Meanwhile, the differentiation potential of MSCs in chitosan derived co-spheroids was significantly enhanced toward neural lineages. Furthermore, NSC homo-spheroids and NSC/MSC co-spheroids derived on chitosan were evaluated for their in vivo efficacy by the embryonic and adult zebrafish brain injury models. The locomotion activity of zebrafish receiving chitosan derived NSC homo-spheroids or NSC/MSC co-spheroids was partially rescued in both models. Meanwhile, the higher survival rate was observed in the group of adult zebrafish implanted with chitosan derived NSC/MSC co-spheroids as compared to NSC homo-spheroids. These evidences indicate that chitosan may provide an extracellular matrix-like environment to drive the interaction and the morphological assembly between NSCs and MSCs and promote their neural differentiation capacities, which can be used for neural regeneration. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  10. 9 CFR 3.36 - Primary enclosures used to transport live guinea pigs and hamsters.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    ... live guinea pigs and hamsters. 3.36 Section 3.36 Animals and Animal Products ANIMAL AND PLANT HEALTH..., Care, Treatment, and Transportation of Guinea Pigs and Hamsters Transportation Standards § 3.36 Primary enclosures used to transport live guinea pigs and hamsters. No person subject to the Animal Welfare...

  11. Kisspeptin and the seasonal control of reproduction in hamsters

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Simonneaux, Valérie; Ansel, Laura; Revel, Florent G

    2008-01-01

    -expressing neurons, which were recently shown to be implicated in the regulation of GnRH release. Hamsters are seasonal rodents which are sexually active in long photoperiod and quiescent in short photoperiod. The photoperiodic information is transmitted to the reproductive system by melatonin, a pineal...... hormone whose secretion is adjusted to night length. The photoperiodic variation in circulating melatonin has been shown to synchronize reproductive activity with seasons, but the mechanisms involved in this effect of melatonin were so far unknown. Recently we have observed that Kiss1 mRNA level...... in the arcuate nucleus of the Syrian hamster is lower in short photoperiod, when animals are sexually quiescent. Notably, intracerebroventricular infusion of Kiss1 gene product, kisspeptin, in hamsters kept in short photoperiod is able to override the inhibitory photoperiod and to reactivate sexual activity...

  12. Arnica Tincture Cures Cutaneous Leishmaniasis in Golden Hamsters

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sara M. Robledo

    2018-01-01

    Full Text Available In search for potential therapeutic alternatives to existing treatments for cutaneous Leishmaniasis, we have investigated the effect of Arnica tincture Ph. Eur. (a 70% hydroethanolic tincture prepared from flowerheads of Arnica montana L. on the lesions caused by infection with Leishmania braziliensis in a model with golden hamsters. The animals were treated topically with a daily single dose of the preparation for 28 days. Subsequently, the healing process was monitored by recording the lesion size in intervals of 15 days up to day 90. As a result, Arnica tincture fully cured three out of five hamsters while one animal showed an improvement and another one suffered from a relapse. This result was slightly better than that obtained with the positive control, meglumine antimonate, which cured two of five hamsters while the other three showed a relapse after 90 days. This result encourages us to further investigate the potential of Arnica tincture in the treatment of cutaneous Leishmaniasis.

  13. A Syrian golden hamster model recapitulating ebola hemorrhagic fever.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ebihara, Hideki; Zivcec, Marko; Gardner, Donald; Falzarano, Darryl; LaCasse, Rachel; Rosenke, Rebecca; Long, Dan; Haddock, Elaine; Fischer, Elizabeth; Kawaoka, Yoshihiro; Feldmann, Heinz

    2013-01-15

    Ebola hemorrhagic fever (EHF) is a severe viral infection for which no effective treatment or vaccine is currently available. While the nonhuman primate (NHP) model is used for final evaluation of experimental vaccines and therapeutic efficacy, rodent models have been widely used in ebolavirus research because of their convenience. However, the validity of rodent models has been questioned given their low predictive value for efficacy testing of vaccines and therapeutics, a result of the inconsistent manifestation of coagulopathy seen in EHF. Here, we describe a lethal Syrian hamster model of EHF using mouse-adapted Ebola virus. Infected hamsters displayed most clinical hallmarks of EHF, including severe coagulopathy and uncontrolled host immune responses. Thus, the hamster seems to be superior to the existing rodent models, offering a better tool for understanding the critical processes in pathogenesis and providing a new model for evaluating prophylactic and postexposure interventions prior to testing in NHPs.

  14. Supermassive Black Holes and Their Host Spheroids. I. Disassembling Galaxies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Savorgnan, G. A. D.; Graham, A. W.

    2016-01-01

    Several recent studies have performed galaxy decompositions to investigate correlations between the black hole mass and various properties of the host spheroid, but they have not converged on the same conclusions. This is because their models for the same galaxy were often significantly different and not consistent with each other in terms of fitted components. Using 3.6 μm Spitzer imagery, which is a superb tracer of the stellar mass (superior to the K band), we have performed state-of-the-art multicomponent decompositions for 66 galaxies with directly measured black hole masses. Our sample is the largest to date and, unlike previous studies, contains a large number (17) of spiral galaxies with low black hole masses. We paid careful attention to the image mosaicking, sky subtraction, and masking of contaminating sources. After a scrupulous inspection of the galaxy photometry (through isophotal analysis and unsharp masking) and—for the first time—2D kinematics, we were able to account for spheroids large-scale, intermediate-scale, and nuclear disks bars rings spiral arms halos extended or unresolved nuclear sources; and partially depleted cores. For each individual galaxy, we compared our best-fit model with previous studies, explained the discrepancies, and identified the optimal decomposition. Moreover, we have independently performed one-dimensional (1D) and two-dimensional (2D) decompositions and concluded that, at least when modeling large, nearby galaxies, 1D techniques have more advantages than 2D techniques. Finally, we developed a prescription to estimate the uncertainties on the 1D best-fit parameters for the 66 spheroids that takes into account systematic errors, unlike popular 2D codes that only consider statistical errors.

  15. SUPERMASSIVE BLACK HOLES AND THEIR HOST SPHEROIDS. I. DISASSEMBLING GALAXIES

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Savorgnan, G. A. D.; Graham, A. W., E-mail: gsavorgn@astro.swin.edu.au [Centre for Astrophysics and Supercomputing, Swinburne University of Technology, Hawthorn, Victoria 3122 (Australia)

    2016-01-15

    Several recent studies have performed galaxy decompositions to investigate correlations between the black hole mass and various properties of the host spheroid, but they have not converged on the same conclusions. This is because their models for the same galaxy were often significantly different and not consistent with each other in terms of fitted components. Using 3.6 μm Spitzer imagery, which is a superb tracer of the stellar mass (superior to the K band), we have performed state-of-the-art multicomponent decompositions for 66 galaxies with directly measured black hole masses. Our sample is the largest to date and, unlike previous studies, contains a large number (17) of spiral galaxies with low black hole masses. We paid careful attention to the image mosaicking, sky subtraction, and masking of contaminating sources. After a scrupulous inspection of the galaxy photometry (through isophotal analysis and unsharp masking) and—for the first time—2D kinematics, we were able to account for spheroids; large-scale, intermediate-scale, and nuclear disks; bars; rings; spiral arms; halos; extended or unresolved nuclear sources; and partially depleted cores. For each individual galaxy, we compared our best-fit model with previous studies, explained the discrepancies, and identified the optimal decomposition. Moreover, we have independently performed one-dimensional (1D) and two-dimensional (2D) decompositions and concluded that, at least when modeling large, nearby galaxies, 1D techniques have more advantages than 2D techniques. Finally, we developed a prescription to estimate the uncertainties on the 1D best-fit parameters for the 66 spheroids that takes into account systematic errors, unlike popular 2D codes that only consider statistical errors.

  16. SUPERMASSIVE BLACK HOLES AND THEIR HOST SPHEROIDS. I. DISASSEMBLING GALAXIES

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Savorgnan, G. A. D.; Graham, A. W.

    2016-01-01

    Several recent studies have performed galaxy decompositions to investigate correlations between the black hole mass and various properties of the host spheroid, but they have not converged on the same conclusions. This is because their models for the same galaxy were often significantly different and not consistent with each other in terms of fitted components. Using 3.6 μm Spitzer imagery, which is a superb tracer of the stellar mass (superior to the K band), we have performed state-of-the-art multicomponent decompositions for 66 galaxies with directly measured black hole masses. Our sample is the largest to date and, unlike previous studies, contains a large number (17) of spiral galaxies with low black hole masses. We paid careful attention to the image mosaicking, sky subtraction, and masking of contaminating sources. After a scrupulous inspection of the galaxy photometry (through isophotal analysis and unsharp masking) and—for the first time—2D kinematics, we were able to account for spheroids; large-scale, intermediate-scale, and nuclear disks; bars; rings; spiral arms; halos; extended or unresolved nuclear sources; and partially depleted cores. For each individual galaxy, we compared our best-fit model with previous studies, explained the discrepancies, and identified the optimal decomposition. Moreover, we have independently performed one-dimensional (1D) and two-dimensional (2D) decompositions and concluded that, at least when modeling large, nearby galaxies, 1D techniques have more advantages than 2D techniques. Finally, we developed a prescription to estimate the uncertainties on the 1D best-fit parameters for the 66 spheroids that takes into account systematic errors, unlike popular 2D codes that only consider statistical errors

  17. Formation and field-driven dynamics of nematic spheroids.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fu, Fred; Abukhdeir, Nasser Mohieddin

    2017-07-19

    Unlike the canonical application of liquid crystals (LCs), LC displays, emerging technologies based on LC materials are increasingly leveraging the presence of nanoscale defects. The inherent nanoscale characteristics of LC defects present both significant opportunities as well as barriers for the application of this fascinating class of materials. Simulation-based approaches to the study of the effects of confinement and interface anchoring conditions on LC domains has resulted in significant progress over the past decade, where simulations are now able to access experimentally-relevant length scales while simultaneously capturing nanoscale defect structures. In this work, continuum simulations were performed in order to study the dynamics of micron-scale nematic LC spheroids of varying shape. Nematic spheroids are one of the simplest inherently defect-containing LC structures and are relevant to polymer-dispersed LC-based "smart" window technology. Simulation results include nematic phase formation and external field-switching dynamics of nematic spheroids ranging in shape from oblate to prolate. Results include both qualitative and quantitative insight into the complex coupling of nanoscale defect dynamics and structure transitions to micron-scale reorientation. Dynamic mechanisms are presented and related to structural transitions in LC defects present in the nematic domain. Domain-averaged metrics including order parameters and response times are determined for a range of experimentally-accessible electric field strengths. These results have both fundamental and technological relevance, in that increased understanding of LC dynamics in the presence of defects is a key barrier to continued advancement in the field.

  18. Hamster thecal cells express muscle characteristics

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Self, D.A.; Schroeder, P.C.; Gown, A.M.

    1988-01-01

    Contraction of the follicular wall about the time of ovulation appears to be a coordinated event; however, the cells that mediate it remain poorly studied. We examined the theca externa cells in the wall of hamster follicles for the presence of a functional actomyosin system, both in developing follicles and in culture. We used a monoclonal antibody (HHF35) that recognizes the alpha and gamma isoelectric variants of actin normally found in muscle, but not the beta variant associated with non-muscle sources, to evaluate large preovulatory follicles for actin content and composition. Antibody staining of sectioned ovaries showed intense circumferential reactivity in the outermost wall of developing follicles. Immunoblots from two-dimensional gels of theca externa lysates demonstrated the presence of the two muscle-specific isozymes of actin. Immunofluorescence of cultured follicular cells pulse-labeled with [3H] thymidine (for autoradiographic detection of DNA replication) revealed the presence, in many dividing cells, of actin filaments aligned primarily along the longitudinal axis of the cells. In cultures exposed to the calcium ionophore A23187 (10(-4) M) for varying periods (5 min to 1 h), contraction of many individual muscle-actin-positive cells was observed. Immunofluorescence of these cells, fixed immediately after ionophore-induced contraction, revealed compaction of the actin filaments. Our findings demonstrate that the cells of the theca externa contain muscle actins from an early stage and that these cells are capable of contraction even while proliferating in subconfluent cultures. They suggest that follicular growth may include a naturally occurring developmental sequence in which a contractile cell type proliferates in the differentiated state

  19. WFPC2 Observations of the URSA Minor Dwarf Spheroidal Galaxy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mighell, Kenneth J.; Burke, Christopher J.

    1999-01-01

    We present our analysis of archival Hubble Space Telescope Wide Field Planetary Camera 2 (WFPC2) observations in F555W (approximately V) and F814W (approximately I) of the central region of the Ursa Minor dwarf spheroidal galaxy. The V versus V - I color-magnitude diagram features a sparsely populated blue horizontal branch, a steep thin red giant branch, and a narrow subgiant branch. The main sequence reaches approximately 2 magnitudes below the main-sequence turnoff (V(sup UMi, sub TO) approximately equals 23.27 +/- 0.11 mag) of the median stellar population. We compare the fiducial sequence of the Galactic globular cluster M92 (NGC 6341). The excellent match between Ursa Minor and M92 confirms that the median stellar population of the UMi dSph galaxy is metal poor ([Fe/H](sub UMi) approximately equals [Fe/H](sub M92) approximately equals -2.2 dex) and ancient (age(sub UMi)approximately equalsage(sub M92) approximately equals 14 Gyr). The B - V reddening and the absorption in V are estimated to be E(B - V) = 0.03 +/- 0.01 mag and A(sup UMi, sub V) = 0.09 +/- 0.03 mag. A new estimate of the distance modulus of Ursa Minor, (m - M)(sup UMi, sub 0) = 19.18 +/- 0.12 mag, has been derived based on fiducial-sequence fitting M92 [DELTA.V(sub UMi - M92) = 4.60 +/- 0.03 mag and DELTA(V - I)(sub UMi - M92) = 0.010 +/- 0.005 mag] and the adoption of the apparent V distance modulus for M92 of (m - M)(sup M92, sub V) = 14.67 +/- 0.08 mag (Pont et al. 1998, A&A, 329, 87). The Ursa Minor dwarf spheroidal galaxy is then at a distance of 69 +/- 4 kpc from the Sun. These HST observations indicate that Ursa Minor has had a very simple star formation history consisting mainly of a single major burst of star formation about 14 Gyr ago which lasted approximately stars in the central region Ursa Minor dwarf spheroidal galaxy are ancient. If the ancient Galactic globular clusters, like M92, formed concurrently with the early formation of the Milky Way galaxy itself, then the Ursa Minor

  20. PREDICTION OF THE EXTREMAL SHAPE FACTOR OF SPHEROIDAL PARTICLES

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Daniel Hlubinka

    2011-05-01

    Full Text Available In the stereological unfolding problem for spheroidal particles the extremal shape factor is predicted. The theory of extreme values has been used to show that extremes of the planar shape factor of particle sections tend to the same limit distribution as extremes of the original shape factor for both the conditional and marginal distribution. Attention is then paid to the extreme shape factor conditioned by the particle size. Normalizing constants are evaluated for a parametric model and the numerical procedure is tested on real data from metallography.

  1. Modes of spheroidal ion plasmas at the Brillouin limit

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tinkle, M. D.; Greaves, R. G.; Surko, C. M.

    1995-01-01

    Brillouin-density pure ion plasmas have been generated in a quadrupole Penning tray by electron-beam ionization of a low-pressure gas. Large, spheroidal, steady-state plasmas are produced that extend to one of the trap electrodes. With the density fixed at the Brillouin limit by the high ion production rate, the electrode potentials determine the plasma shape. The frequencies of azimuthally propagating cyclotron and diocotron modes are found to vary significantly with the plasma aspect ratio. For oblate plasmas, we are able to test theoretical predictions of a simple fluid model, and the frequencies are in good agreement

  2. Scattering of Gaussian beam by a spherical particle with a spheroidal inclusion

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zhang Huayong; Liao Tongqing

    2011-01-01

    A generalized Lorenz-Mie theory framework (GLMT) is applied to the study of Gaussian beam scattering by a spherical particle with an embedded spheroid at the center. By virtue of a transformation between the spherical and spheroidal vector wave functions, a theoretical procedure is developed to deal with the boundary conditions. Numerical results of the normalized differential scattering cross section are presented.

  3. Spheroidal corrections to the spherical and parabolic bases of the hydrogen atom

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mardyan, L.G.; Pogosyan, G.S.; Sisakyan, A.N.

    1986-01-01

    This paper introduces the bases of the hydrogen atom and obtains recursion relations that determine the expansion of the spheroidal basis with respect to its parabolic basis. The leading spheroidal corrections to the spherical and parabolic bases are calculated by perturbation theory

  4. Stability of self-gravitating homogeneous spheroid with azimuthal magnetic field. I

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Antonov, V.A.; Zheleznyak, O.A.

    1988-01-01

    The influence of a frozen magnetic field on the stability of a self-gravitating homogeneous spheroid with respect to a deformation that transforms it into a triaxial ellipsoid is investigated. It is shown that an azimuthal magnetic field is a stabilizing factor, allowing the spheroid to be stable at e > e/sub cr/ = 0.95285

  5. Multiscale image analysis reveals structural heterogeneity of the cell microenvironment in homotypic spheroids.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schmitz, Alexander; Fischer, Sabine C; Mattheyer, Christian; Pampaloni, Francesco; Stelzer, Ernst H K

    2017-03-03

    Three-dimensional multicellular aggregates such as spheroids provide reliable in vitro substitutes for tissues. Quantitative characterization of spheroids at the cellular level is fundamental. We present the first pipeline that provides three-dimensional, high-quality images of intact spheroids at cellular resolution and a comprehensive image analysis that completes traditional image segmentation by algorithms from other fields. The pipeline combines light sheet-based fluorescence microscopy of optically cleared spheroids with automated nuclei segmentation (F score: 0.88) and concepts from graph analysis and computational topology. Incorporating cell graphs and alpha shapes provided more than 30 features of individual nuclei, the cellular neighborhood and the spheroid morphology. The application of our pipeline to a set of breast carcinoma spheroids revealed two concentric layers of different cell density for more than 30,000 cells. The thickness of the outer cell layer depends on a spheroid's size and varies between 50% and 75% of its radius. In differently-sized spheroids, we detected patches of different cell densities ranging from 5 × 10 5 to 1 × 10 6  cells/mm 3 . Since cell density affects cell behavior in tissues, structural heterogeneities need to be incorporated into existing models. Our image analysis pipeline provides a multiscale approach to obtain the relevant data for a system-level understanding of tissue architecture.

  6. Oxygenation and response to irradiation of organotypic multicellular spheroids of human glioma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sminia, Peter; Acker, Helmut; Eikesdal, Hans Petter; Kaaijk, Patricia; Enger, Per øvind; Slotman, Ben; Bjerkvig, Rolf

    2003-01-01

    Investigation of the oxygenation status of organotypic multicellular spheroids (OMS) and their response to irradiation. Tumour specimens of glioblastoma multiforme patients (n = 16) were initiated as OMS. Following 20 Gy gamma-irradiation, the cell migratory capacity was evaluated. Spheroid oxygenation was determined by micro-electrode pO2 measurements and pimonidazole immunostaining. Spheroids prepared from established human glioma cell lines were used as a reference. Irradiation inhibited spheroid outgrowth by 12 to 88% relative to the non-irradiated controls. A large interpatient variation was noticed. Oxygen measurements revealed a gradual decrease in pO2 level from the periphery to the core of the spheroids, but the pO2 values remained within an oxygenated range. However, in the cell line spheroids an intermediate layer of hypoxia surrounding the central core was observed. Cell line spheroids with a hypoxic cell fraction and well-oxygenated OMS both show high resistance to irradiation, indicating that hypoxia may not be the biological factor determining the radioresistance of glioma spheroids in vitro.

  7. Synergistic interaction between cisplatin and gemcitabine in neuroblastoma cell lines and multicellular tumor spheroids

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Besançon, Odette G.; Tytgat, Godelieve A. M.; Meinsma, Rutger; Leen, René; Hoebink, Jerry; Kalayda, Ganna V.; Jaehde, Ulrich; Caron, Huib N.; van Kuilenburg, André B. P.

    2012-01-01

    The efficacy and mechanism of action of cisplatin and gemcitabine were investigated in a panel of neuroblastoma cell lines and multicellular tumor spheroids. In neuroblastoma spheroids, the combination of cisplatin and gemcitabine induced a complete cytostasis at clinical relevant concentrations. A

  8. Solid freeform-fabricated scaffolds designed to carry multicellular mesenchymal stem cell spheroids for cartilage regeneration

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    G-S Huang

    2013-10-01

    Full Text Available Three-dimensional (3D cellular spheroids have recently emerged as a new trend to replace suspended single cells in modern cell-based therapies because of their greater regeneration capacities in vitro. They may lose the 3D structure during a change of microenvironment, which poses challenges to their translation in vivo. Besides, the conventional microporous scaffolds may have difficulty in accommodating these relatively large spheroids. Here we revealed a novel design of microenvironment for delivering and sustaining the 3D spheroids. Biodegradable scaffolds with macroporosity to accommodate mesenchymal stem cell (MSC spheroids were made by solid freeform fabrication (SFF from the solution of poly(D,L-lactide-co-glycolide. Their internal surface was modified with chitosan following air plasma treatment in order to preserve the morphology of the spheroids. It was demonstrated that human MSC spheroids loaded in SFF scaffolds produced a significantly larger amount of cartilage-associated extracellular matrix in vitro and in NOD/SCID mice compared to single cells in the same scaffolds. Implantation of MSC spheroid-loaded scaffolds into the chondral defects of rabbit knees showed superior cartilage regeneration. This study establishes new perspectives in designing the spheroid-sustaining microenvironment within a tissue engineering scaffold for in vivo applications.

  9. An mDia2/ROCK signaling axis regulates invasive egress from epithelial ovarian cancer spheroids.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pettee, Krista M; Dvorak, Kaitlyn M; Nestor-Kalinoski, Andrea L; Eisenmann, Kathryn M

    2014-01-01

    Multi-cellular spheroids are enriched in ascites of epithelial ovarian cancer (OvCa) patients. They represent an invasive and chemoresistant cellular population fundamental to metastatic dissemination. The molecular mechanisms triggering single cell invasive egress from spheroids remain enigmatic. mDia formins are Rho GTPase effectors that are key regulators of F-actin cytoskeletal dynamics. We hypothesized that mDia2-driven F-actin dynamics promote single cell invasive transitions in clinically relevant three-dimensional (3D) OvCa spheroids. The current study is a dissection of the contribution of the F-actin assembly factor mDia2 formin in invasive transitions and using a clinically relevant ovarian cancer spheroid model. We show that RhoA-directed mDia2 activity is required for tight spheroid organization, and enrichment of mDia2 in the invasive cellular protrusions of collagen-embedded OVCA429 spheroids. Depleting mDia2 in ES-2 spheroids enhanced invasive dissemination of single amoeboid-shaped cells. This contrasts with spheroids treated with control siRNA, where a mesenchymal invasion program predominated. Inhibition of another RhoA effector, ROCK, had no impact on ES-2 spheroid formation but dramatically inhibited spheroid invasion through induction of a highly elongated morphology. Concurrent inhibition of ROCK and mDia2 blocked single cell invasion from ES-2 spheroids more effectively than inhibition of either protein alone, indicating that invasive egress of amoeboid cells from mDia2-depleted spheroids is ROCK-dependent. Our findings indicate that multiple GTPase effectors must be suppressed in order to fully block invasive egress from ovarian cancer spheroids. Furthermore, tightly regulated interplay between ROCK and mDia2 signaling pathways dictates the invasive capacities and the type of invasion program utilized by motile spheroid-derived ovarian cancer cells. As loss of the gene encoding mDia2, DRF3, has been linked to cancer progression and

  10. An mDia2/ROCK signaling axis regulates invasive egress from epithelial ovarian cancer spheroids.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Krista M Pettee

    Full Text Available Multi-cellular spheroids are enriched in ascites of epithelial ovarian cancer (OvCa patients. They represent an invasive and chemoresistant cellular population fundamental to metastatic dissemination. The molecular mechanisms triggering single cell invasive egress from spheroids remain enigmatic. mDia formins are Rho GTPase effectors that are key regulators of F-actin cytoskeletal dynamics. We hypothesized that mDia2-driven F-actin dynamics promote single cell invasive transitions in clinically relevant three-dimensional (3D OvCa spheroids. The current study is a dissection of the contribution of the F-actin assembly factor mDia2 formin in invasive transitions and using a clinically relevant ovarian cancer spheroid model. We show that RhoA-directed mDia2 activity is required for tight spheroid organization, and enrichment of mDia2 in the invasive cellular protrusions of collagen-embedded OVCA429 spheroids. Depleting mDia2 in ES-2 spheroids enhanced invasive dissemination of single amoeboid-shaped cells. This contrasts with spheroids treated with control siRNA, where a mesenchymal invasion program predominated. Inhibition of another RhoA effector, ROCK, had no impact on ES-2 spheroid formation but dramatically inhibited spheroid invasion through induction of a highly elongated morphology. Concurrent inhibition of ROCK and mDia2 blocked single cell invasion from ES-2 spheroids more effectively than inhibition of either protein alone, indicating that invasive egress of amoeboid cells from mDia2-depleted spheroids is ROCK-dependent. Our findings indicate that multiple GTPase effectors must be suppressed in order to fully block invasive egress from ovarian cancer spheroids. Furthermore, tightly regulated interplay between ROCK and mDia2 signaling pathways dictates the invasive capacities and the type of invasion program utilized by motile spheroid-derived ovarian cancer cells. As loss of the gene encoding mDia2, DRF3, has been linked to cancer

  11. Multiplexing spheroid volume, resazurin and acid phosphatase viability assays for high-throughput screening of tumour spheroids and stem cell neurospheres.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Delyan P Ivanov

    Full Text Available Three-dimensional cell culture has many advantages over monolayer cultures, and spheroids have been hailed as the best current representation of small avascular tumours in vitro. However their adoption in regular screening programs has been hindered by uneven culture growth, poor reproducibility and lack of high-throughput analysis methods for 3D. The objective of this study was to develop a method for a quick and reliable anticancer drug screen in 3D for tumour and human foetal brain tissue in order to investigate drug effectiveness and selective cytotoxic effects. Commercially available ultra-low attachment 96-well round-bottom plates were employed to culture spheroids in a rapid, reproducible manner amenable to automation. A set of three mechanistically different methods for spheroid health assessment (Spheroid volume, metabolic activity and acid phosphatase enzyme activity were validated against cell numbers in healthy and drug-treated spheroids. An automated open-source ImageJ macro was developed to enable high-throughput volume measurements. Although spheroid volume determination was superior to the other assays, multiplexing it with resazurin reduction and phosphatase activity produced a richer picture of spheroid condition. The ability to distinguish between effects on malignant and the proliferating component of normal brain was tested using etoposide on UW228-3 medulloblastoma cell line and human neural stem cells. At levels below 10 µM etoposide exhibited higher toxicity towards proliferating stem cells, whereas at concentrations above 10 µM the tumour spheroids were affected to a greater extent. The high-throughput assay procedures use ready-made plates, open-source software and are compatible with standard plate readers, therefore offering high predictive power with substantial savings in time and money.

  12. A theoretical study of the spheroidal droplet evaporation in forced convection

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Li, Jie, E-mail: leejay1986@163.com; Zhang, Jian

    2014-11-07

    In many applications, the shape of a droplet may be assumed to be an oblate spheroid. A theoretical study is conducted on the evaporation of an oblate spheroidal droplet under forced convection conditions. Closed-form analytical expressions of the mass evaporation rate for an oblate spheroid are derived, in the regime of controlled mass-transfer and heat-transfer, respectively. The variation of droplet size during the evaporation process is presented in the regime of shrinking dynamic model. Comparing with the droplets having the same surface area, an increase in the aspect ratio enhances the mass evaporation rate and prolongs the burnout time. - Highlights: • Fully algebraic solutions for the spheroidal droplet evaporation rate is obtained. • We examine the effect of aspect ratio on the droplet evaporation. • We propose a calculation method of Nusselt number for spheroidal droplet.

  13. Creation of Cardiac Tissue Exhibiting Mechanical Integration of Spheroids Using 3D Bioprinting.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ong, Chin Siang; Fukunishi, Takuma; Nashed, Andrew; Blazeski, Adriana; Zhang, Huaitao; Hardy, Samantha; DiSilvestre, Deborah; Vricella, Luca; Conte, John; Tung, Leslie; Tomaselli, Gordon; Hibino, Narutoshi

    2017-07-02

    This protocol describes 3D bioprinting of cardiac tissue without the use of biomaterials, using only cells. Cardiomyocytes, endothelial cells and fibroblasts are first isolated, counted and mixed at desired cell ratios. They are co-cultured in individual wells in ultra-low attachment 96-well plates. Within 3 days, beating spheroids form. These spheroids are then picked up by a nozzle using vacuum suction and assembled on a needle array using a 3D bioprinter. The spheroids are then allowed to fuse on the needle array. Three days after 3D bioprinting, the spheroids are removed as an intact patch, which is already spontaneously beating. 3D bioprinted cardiac patches exhibit mechanical integration of component spheroids and are highly promising in cardiac tissue regeneration and as 3D models of heart disease.

  14. A theoretical study of the spheroidal droplet evaporation in forced convection

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Li, Jie; Zhang, Jian

    2014-01-01

    In many applications, the shape of a droplet may be assumed to be an oblate spheroid. A theoretical study is conducted on the evaporation of an oblate spheroidal droplet under forced convection conditions. Closed-form analytical expressions of the mass evaporation rate for an oblate spheroid are derived, in the regime of controlled mass-transfer and heat-transfer, respectively. The variation of droplet size during the evaporation process is presented in the regime of shrinking dynamic model. Comparing with the droplets having the same surface area, an increase in the aspect ratio enhances the mass evaporation rate and prolongs the burnout time. - Highlights: • Fully algebraic solutions for the spheroidal droplet evaporation rate is obtained. • We examine the effect of aspect ratio on the droplet evaporation. • We propose a calculation method of Nusselt number for spheroidal droplet

  15. The effect of defective DNA double-strand break repair on mutations and chromosome aberrations in the Chinese hamster cell mutant XR-V15B

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Helbig, R.; Speit, G.; Zdzienicka, M.Z.

    1995-01-01

    The radiosensitive Chinese hamster cell line XR-V15B was used to study the effect of decreased rejoining of DNA double-strand breaks (DSBs) on gene mutations and chromosome aberrations. XR-V15B cells are hypersensitive to the cytotoxic effects of neocarzinostatin (NCS) and methyl methanesulfonate (MMS). Both mutagens induced more chromosome aberrations in XR-V15B cells than in the parental cell strain. The clastogenic action of NCS was characterized by the induction of predominantly chromosome-type aberrations in cells of both strains, whereas MMS induced mainly chromatid aberrations. The frequency of induced gene mutations at the hprt locus was not increased compared to the parental V79 cells when considering the same survival level. Molecular analysis by multiplex polymerase chain reaction (PCR) of mutants induced by NCS revealed a high frequency of deletions in cells of both cell lines. Methyl methane-sulfonate induced mainly mutations without visible change in the PCR pattern, which probably represent point mutations. Our findings suggest a link between a defect in DNA DSB repair and increased cytotoxic and clastogenic effects. However, a decreased ability to rejoin DNA DSBs does not seem to influence the incidence and types of gene mutations at the hprt locus induced by NCS and MMS. 28 refs., 4 figs., 3 tabs

  16. Cell survival after the combined action of manganese (MnCl2) and X-rays in synchronized Chinese hamster cells

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Skreb, Y.; Nagy, B.

    1984-01-01

    The interactions between the effects of manganese chloride and X-rays were studied in synchronized populations of V79 Chinese hamster fibroblasts. The cells were selected by shaking off asynchronous cultures for detachment of mitotic cells which were plated in petri dishes and exposed to various treatments. Irradiation was carried out with a Philips RT-100 X-ray unit. A final concentration of 0.25 mM MnCl 2 was used. The main parameter was the colony forming ability of the surviving cell fraction. When MnCl 2 was administered over 1 h, its toxicity was low regardless of the phase of the cell cycle. Administered separately, 2 Gy irradiation produced only a slight decrease in survival, less marked in the S phase. However, the two agents together induced a synergistic inhibition of the surviving fraction in the S phase when the metal was given immediately after irradiation. If manganese wad administered 3 h after irradiation the two inhibitory effects apparently remained only additive. It seems that MnCl 2 can impair some repair processes starting immediately after irradiation. (orig.)

  17. Universal timescales in the rheology of spheroid cell aggregates

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yu, Miao; Mahtabfar, Aria; Beleen, Paul; Foty, Ramsey; Zahn, Jeffrey; Shreiber, David; Liu, Liping; Lin, Hao

    2017-11-01

    The rheological properties of tissue play important roles in key biological processes including embryogenesis, cancer metastasis, and wound healing. Spheroid cell aggregate is a particularly interesting model system for the study of these phenomena. In the long time, they behave like drops with a surface tension. In the short, viscoelasticity also needs to be considered. In this work, we discover two coupled and universal timescales for spheroid aggregates. A total of 12 aggregate types (total aggregate number n =290) derived from L and GBM (glioblastoma multiforme) cells are studied with microtensiometer to obtain their surface tension. They are also allowed to relax upon release of the compression forces. The two timescales are observed during the relaxation process; their values do not depend on compression time nor the degree of deformation, and are consistent among all 12 types. Following prior work (Yu et al., Phys. Rev. Lett., 115:128303; Liu et al., J. Mech. Phys. Solids, 98:309-329) we use a rigorous mathematical theory to interpret the results, which reveals intriguing properties of the aggregates on both tissue and cellular levels. The mechanics of multicellular organization reflects both complexity and regularity due to strong active regulation.

  18. Neutron diffusion in spheroidal, bispherical, and toroidal systems

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Williams, M.M.R.

    1986-01-01

    The neutron flux has been studied around absorbing bodies of spheroidal, bispherical, and toroidal shapes in an infinite nonabsorbing medium. Exact solutions have been obtained by using effective boundary conditions at the surfaces of the absorbing bodies. The problems considered are as follows: 1. Neutron flux and current distributions around prolate and oblate spheroids. It is shown that an equivalent sphere approximation can lead to accurate values for the rate of absorption. 2. Neutron flux and current in a bispherical system of unequal spheres. Three separate situations arise here: (a) two absorbing spheres, (b) two spherical sources, and (c) one spherical source and one absorbing sphere. It is shown how the absorption rate in the two spheres depends on their separation. 3. Neutron flux and current in a toroidal system: (a) an absorbing toroid and (b) a toroidal source. The latter case simulates the flux distribution from a thermonuclear reactor vessel. Finally, a brief description of how these techniques can be extended to multiregion problems is given

  19. Cell survival in spheroids irradiated with heavy-ion beams

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rodriguez, A.; Alpen, E.L.

    1981-01-01

    Biological investigations with accelerated heavy ions have been carried out regularly at the Lawrence Berkeley Laboratory Bevalac for the past four years. Most of the cellular investigations have been conducted on cell monolayer and suspension culture systems. The studies to date suggest that heavy charged particle beams may offer some radiotherapeutic advantages over conventional radiotherapy sources. The advantages are thought to lie primarily in an increased relative biological effectiveness (RBE), a decrease in the oxygen enhancement ratio (OER), and better tissue distribution dose. Experiments reported here were conducted with 400 MeV/amu carbon ions and 425 MeV/amu neon ions, using a rat brain gliosarcoma cell line grown as multicellular spheroids. Studies have been carried out with x-rays and high-energy carbon and neon ion beams. These studies evaluate high-LET (linear energy transfer) cell survival in terms of RBE and the possible contributions of intercellular communication. Comparisons were made of the post-irradiation survival characteristics for cells irradiated as multicellular spheroids (approximately 100 μm and 300 μm diameters) and for cells irradiated in suspension. These comparisons were made between 225-kVp x-rays, 400 MeV/amu carbon ions, and 425 MeV/amu neon ions

  20. Two step continuous method to synthesize colloidal spheroid gold nanorods.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chandra, S; Doran, J; McCormack, S J

    2015-12-01

    This research investigated a two-step continuous process to synthesize colloidal suspension of spheroid gold nanorods. In the first step; gold precursor was reduced to seed-like particles in the presence of polyvinylpyrrolidone and ascorbic acid. In continuous second step; silver nitrate and alkaline sodium hydroxide produced various shape and size Au nanoparticles. The shape was manipulated through weight ratio of ascorbic acid to silver nitrate by varying silver nitrate concentration. The specific weight ratio of 1.35-1.75 grew spheroid gold nanorods of aspect ratio ∼1.85 to ∼2.2. Lower weight ratio of 0.5-1.1 formed spherical nanoparticle. The alkaline medium increased the yield of gold nanorods and reduced reaction time at room temperature. The synthesized gold nanorods retained their shape and size in ethanol. The surface plasmon resonance was red shifted by ∼5 nm due to higher refractive index of ethanol than water. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  1. Oxygen consumption rate and mitochondrial density in human melanoma monolayer cultures and multicellular spheroids.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hystad, M E; Rofstad, E K

    1994-05-15

    Rate of oxygen consumption per cell has been shown in previous studies to decrease with increasing depth in the viable rim of multicellular spheroids initiated from rodent cells, human colon-carcinoma cells, and human glioma cells, due to progressive accumulation of quiescent cells during spheroid growth. The purpose of our work was to determine oxygen-consumption profiles in human melanoma spheroids. Monolayer cultures of 4 lines (BEX-c, COX-c, SAX-c, and WIX-c) and spheroid cultures of 2 lines (BEX-c and WIX-c) were subjected to investigation. Spheroids were initiated from monolayer cell cultures and grown in spinner flasks. Rate of oxygen consumption was measured with a Clarke-type electrode. Mitochondrial density was determined by stereological analysis of transmission electron micrographs. Thickness of viable rim and cell packing density were assessed by light microscopy of central spheroid sections. Cell-cycle distribution was determined by analysis of DNA histograms measured by flow cytometry. Cell volume was measured by an electronic particle counter. Rate of oxygen consumption per cell differed by a factor of approximately 1.8 between the 4 cell lines and was positively correlated to total volume of mitochondria per cell. Rate of oxygen consumption per cell and total volume of mitochondria per cell were equal for monolayer cell cultures, 600-microns spheroids and 1,200-microns spheroids of the same line. Mitochondrial density and location in the cell did not differ between cells at the spheroid surface, in the middle of the viable rim and adjacent to the central necrosis. Cell-cycle distribution, cell volume, and cell-packing density in the outer and inner halves of the viable rim were not significantly different. Consequently, the rate of oxygen consumption per cell in inner regions of the viable rim was probably equal to that at the spheroid surface, suggesting that oxygen diffusion distances may be shorter in some melanomas than in many other tumor

  2. Early Postnatal Development of the South African Hamster ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    The South African Hamster Mystromys albicaudatus has been bred in the laboratory of the Medical Ecology Centre since 1941. It is of interest taxonomically in that it is the sole representative left in Africa of the subfamily Cricetinae (Davis 1962). It has been used in Medical Research on poliomyelitis, benign histoplasmosis, ...

  3. Het effect van hamsterbeheer op de overwintering bij hamsters

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Beek, van der M.; Ligtenberg, H.; Haye, la M.J.J.

    2006-01-01

    De afgelopen decennia is het aantal hamsters (Cricetus cricetus) in Nederland sterk afgenomen. Door onderzoek te verrichten naar de levenscyclus en naar de effecten van agrarisch beheer is getracht de afname te verklaren en oplossingen aan te dragen. In voorjaar 2006 is een verkennend onderzoek

  4. Enhanced longevity in tau mutant Syrian hamsters, Mesocricetus auratus

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Oklejewicz, Malgorzata; Daan, Serge

    The single-gene mutation tau in the Syrian hamster shortens the circadian period by about 20% in the homozygous mutant and simultaneously increases the mass-specific metabolic rate by about 20%. Both effects might be expected to lead to a change in longevity. To test such expectations, the life span

  5. Secondhand smoke induces hepatic apoptosis and fibrosis in hamster fetus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huang, Chien-Wei; Horng, Chi-Ting; Huang, Chih-Yang; Cho, Ta-Hsiung; Tsai, Yi-Chang; Chen, Li-Jeng; Hsu, Tsai-Ching; Tzang, Bor-Show

    2016-09-01

    Secondhand smoke (SHS) is an important health issue worldwide. Inhaling SHS during pregnancy could cause abnormalities in the internal tissues of newborns, which may then impair fetal development and even cause severe intrauterine damage and perinatal death. However, the understanding of cytopathic mechanisms of SHS by maternal passive smoking on fetus liver during pregnancy is still limited. This study analyzed the effects of high-dose SHS (SHSH) on fetus liver using a maternal passive smoking animal model. Experiments showed that hepatic matrix metalloproteinase-9 activity and terminal deoxynucleotidyl transferase deoxyuridine triphosphate nick-end labeling-positive cells were significantly increased in livers from fetuses of hamsters treated with SHSH. Similarly, expressions of both extrinsic and intrinsic apoptotic molecules were significantly higher in livers from fetuses of hamsters exposed to SHSH. Additionally, significantly increased inflammatory proteins, including transforming growth factor β, inducible nitric oxide synthase, and interleukin 1β, and fibrotic signaling molecules, including phosphorylated Smad2/3, SP1, and α-smooth muscle actin, were observed in the fetus livers from hamsters treated with SHSH. This study revealed that SHSH not only increased apoptosis through intrinsic and extrinsic pathways in the livers of fetuses from hamsters exposed to SHSH but also augmented hepatic fibrosis via Smad2/3 signaling. © The Author(s) 2015.

  6. Development of Taenia pisiformis in golden hamster (Mesocricetus auratus

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Maravilla Pablo

    2011-07-01

    Full Text Available Abstract The life cycle of Taenia pisiformis includes canines as definitive hosts and rabbits as intermediate hosts. Golden hamster (Mesocricetus auratus is a rodent that has been successfully used as experimental model of Taenia solium taeniosis. In the present study we describe the course of T. pisiformis infection in experimentally infected golden hamsters. Ten females, treated with methyl-prednisolone acetate were infected with three T. pisiformis cysticerci each one excised from one rabbit. Proglottids released in faeces and adults recovered during necropsy showed that all animals were infected. Eggs obtained from the hamsters' tapeworms, were assessed for viability using trypan blue or propidium iodide stains. Afterwards, some rabbits were inoculated with eggs, necropsy was performed after seven weeks and viable cysticerci were obtained. Our results demonstrate that the experimental model of adult Taenia pisiformis in golden hamster can replace the use of canines in order to study this parasite and to provide eggs and adult tapeworms to be used in different types of experiments.

  7. Bioavailability and disposition of solanine in rats and hamsters

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Groen K; Pereboom-de Fauw DPKH; Besamusca P; Beekhof PK; Speijers GJA; Derks HJGM

    1992-01-01

    The toxicokinetics of [3H]-alpha-solanine after oral (po) and intravenous (iv) administration in rats and hamsters were studied, in order to decide which is the most appropriate model in risk assessment studies. The iv dose was 54 mug/kg; the oral dose was 170 mug/kg. After iv administration, the

  8. Seasonal aspects of sleep in the Djungarian hamster

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Deboer Tom

    2003-05-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Changes in photoperiod and ambient temperature trigger seasonal adaptations in the physiology and behaviour of many species, including the Djungarian hamster. Exposure of the hamsters to a short photoperiod and low ambient temperature leads to a reduction of the polyphasic distribution of sleep and waking over the light and dark period. In contrast, a long photoperiod enhances the daily sleep-wake amplitude leading to a decline of slow-wave activity in NREM sleep within the light period. It is unknown whether these changes can be attributed specifically to photoperiod and/or ambient temperature, or whether endogenous components are contributing factors. The influence of endogenous factors was investigated by recording sleep in Djungarian hamsters invariably maintained at a low ambient temperature and fully adapted to a short photoperiod. The second recording was performed when they had returned to summer physiology, despite the maintenance of the 'winter' conditions. Results Clear winter-summer differences were seen in sleep distribution, while total sleep time was unchanged. A significantly higher light-dark cycle modulation in NREM sleep, REM sleep and waking was observed in hamsters in the summer physiological state compared to those in the winter state. Moreover, only in summer, REM sleep episodes were longer and waking bouts were shorter during the light period compared to the dark period. EEG power in the slow-wave range (0.75–4.0 Hz in both NREM sleep and REM sleep was higher in animals in the summer physiological state than in those in the 'winter' state. In winter SWA in NREM sleep was evenly distributed over the 24 h, while in summer it decreased during the light period and increased during the dark period. Conclusion Endogenous changes in the organism underlie the differences in sleep-wake redistribution we have observed previously in hamsters recorded in a short and long photoperiod.

  9. Modeling the dual pacemaker system of the tau mutant hamster.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oda, G A; Menaker, M; Friesen, W O

    2000-06-01

    Circadian pacemakers in many animals are compound. In rodents, a two-oscillator model of the pacemaker composed of an evening (E) and a morning (M) oscillator has been proposed based on the phenomenon of "splitting" and bimodal activity peaks. The authors describe computer simulations of the pacemaker in tau mutant hamsters viewed as a system of mutually coupled E and M oscillators. These mutant animals exhibit normal type 1 PRCs when released into DD but make a transition to a type 0 PRC when held for many weeks in DD. The two-oscillator model describes particularly well some recent behavioral experiments on these hamsters. The authors sought to determine the relationships between oscillator amplitude, period, PRC, and activity duration through computer simulations. Two complementary approaches proved useful for analyzing weakly coupled oscillator systems. The authors adopted a "distinct oscillators" view when considering the component E and M oscillators and a "system" view when considering the system as a whole. For strongly coupled systems, only the system view is appropriate. The simulations lead the authors to two primary conjectures: (1) the total amplitude of the pacemaker system in tau mutant hamsters is less than in the wild-type animals, and (2) the coupling between the unit E and M oscillators is weakened during continuous exposure of hamsters to DD. As coupling strength decreases, activity duration (alpha) increases due to a greater phase difference between E and M. At the same time, the total amplitude of the system decreases, causing an increase in observable PRC amplitudes. Reduced coupling also increases the relative autonomy of the unit oscillators. The relatively autonomous phase shifts of E and M oscillators can account for both immediate compression and expansion of activity bands in tau mutant and wild-type hamsters subjected to light pulses.

  10. UVES Abundances of Stars in Nearby Dwarf Spheroidal Galaxies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tolstoy, Eline; Venn, Kim; Shetrone, Matt; Primas, Francesca; Hill, Vanessa; Kaufer, Andreas; Szeifert, Thomas

    2002-07-01

    It is a truth universally acknowledged, that a galaxy in possession of a good quantity of gas must want to form stars. It is the details of how and why that baffle us all. The simplest theories either would have this process a carefully self-regulated affair, or one that goes completely out of control and is capable of wrecking the galaxy which hosts it. Of course the majority of galaxies seem to amble along somewhere between these two extremes, and the mean properties tend to favour a quiescent self-regulated evolutionary scenario. But there area variety of observations which require us to invoke transitory ‘bursts’ of star-formation at one time or another in most galaxy types. Several nearby dwarf spheroidal galaxies have clearly determined star-formation histories with apparent periods of zero star formation followed by periods of fairly active star formation. If we are able to understand what separated these bursts we would understand several important phenomena in galaxy evolution. Were these galaxies able to clear out their gas reservoir in a burst of star formation? How did this gas return? or did it? Have these galaxies receieved gas from the IGM instead? Could stars from these types of galaxy contribute significantly to the halo population in our Galaxy? To answer these questions we need to combine accurate stellar photometry and Colour-Magnitude Diagram interpretation with detailed metal abundances to combine a star-formation rate versus time with a range of element abundances with time. Different elements trace different evolutionary process (e.g., relative contributions of type I and II supernovae). We often aren't even sure of the abundance spread in these galaxies. We have collected detailed high resolution UVES spectra of four nearby dwarf spheroidal galaxies (Sculptor, Fornax, Leo I & Carina) to begin to answer these questions. This is a precursor study to a more complete study with FLAMES. We presented at this meeting the initial results for

  11. Proteomic approach toward molecular backgrounds of drug resistance of osteosarcoma cells in spheroid culture system.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arai, Kazuya; Sakamoto, Ruriko; Kubota, Daisuke; Kondo, Tadashi

    2013-08-01

    Chemoresistance is one of the most critical prognostic factors in osteosarcoma, and elucidation of the molecular backgrounds of chemoresistance may lead to better clinical outcomes. Spheroid cells resemble in vivo cells and are considered an in vitro model for the drug discovery. We found that spheroid cells displayed more chemoresistance than conventional monolayer cells across 11 osteosarcoma cell lines. To investigate the molecular mechanisms underlying the resistance to chemotherapy, we examined the proteomic differences between the monolayer and spheroid cells by 2D-DIGE. Of the 4762 protein species observed, we further investigated 435 species with annotated mass spectra in the public proteome database, Genome Medicine Database of Japan Proteomics. Among the 435 protein species, we found that 17 species exhibited expression level differences when the cells formed spheroids in more than five cell lines and four species out of these 17 were associated with spheroid-formation associated resistance to doxorubicin. We confirmed the upregulation of cathepsin D in spheroid cells by western blotting. Cathepsin D has been implicated in chemoresistance of various malignancies but has not previously been implemented in osteosarcoma. Our study suggested that the spheroid system may be a useful tool to reveal the molecular backgrounds of chemoresistance in osteosarcoma. © 2013 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  12. Detachably assembled microfluidic device for perfusion culture and post-culture analysis of a spheroid array.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sakai, Yusuke; Hattori, Koji; Yanagawa, Fumiki; Sugiura, Shinji; Kanamori, Toshiyuki; Nakazawa, Kohji

    2014-07-01

    Microfluidic devices permit perfusion culture of three-dimensional (3D) tissue, mimicking the flow of blood in vascularized 3D tissue in our body. Here, we report a microfluidic device composed of a two-part microfluidic chamber chip and multi-microwell array chip able to be disassembled at the culture endpoint. Within the microfluidic chamber, an array of 3D tissue aggregates (spheroids) can be formed and cultured under perfusion. Subsequently, detailed post-culture analysis of the spheroids collected from the disassembled device can be performed. This device facilitates uniform spheroid formation, growth analysis in a high-throughput format, controlled proliferation via perfusion flow rate, and post-culture analysis of spheroids. We used the device to culture spheroids of human hepatocellular carcinoma (HepG2) cells under two controlled perfusion flow rates. HepG2 spheroids exhibited greater cell growth at higher perfusion flow rates than at lower perfusion flow rates, and exhibited different metabolic activity and mRNA and protein expression under the different flow rate conditions. These results show the potential of perfusion culture to precisely control the culture environment in microfluidic devices. The construction of spheroid array chambers allows multiple culture conditions to be tested simultaneously, with potential applications in toxicity and drug screening. Copyright © 2014 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  13. An injectable spheroid system with genetic modification for cell transplantation therapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Uchida, Satoshi; Itaka, Keiji; Nomoto, Takahiro; Endo, Taisuke; Matsumoto, Yu; Ishii, Takehiko; Kataoka, Kazunori

    2014-03-01

    The new methodology to increase a therapeutic potential of cell transplantation was developed here by the use of three-dimensional spheroids of transplanting cells subsequent to the genetic modification with non-viral DNA vectors, polyplex nanomicelles. Particularly, spheroids in regulated size of 100-μm of primary hepatocytes transfected with luciferase gene were formed on the micropatterned culture plates coated with thermosensitive polymer, and were recovered in the form of injectable liquid suspension simply by cooling the plates. After subcutaneously transplanting these hepatocyte spheroids, efficient transgene expression was observed in host tissue for more than a month, whereas transplantation of a single-cell suspension from a monolayer culture resulted in an only transient expression. The spheroid system contributed to the preservation of innate functions of transplanted hepatocytes in the host tissue, such as albumin expression, thereby possessing high potential for expressing transgene. Intravital observation of transplanted cells showed that those from spheroid cultures had a tendency to localize in the vicinity of blood vessels, making a favorable microenvironment for preserving cell functionality. Furthermore, spheroids transfected with erythropoietin-expressing DNA showed a significantly higher hematopoietic effect than that of cell suspensions from monolayer cultures, demonstrating high potential of this genetically-modified spheroid transplantation system for therapeutic applications. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  14. Identification of Lgr5-Independent Spheroid-Generating Progenitors of the Mouse Fetal Intestinal Epithelium

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Roxana C. Mustata

    2013-10-01

    Full Text Available Immortal spheroids were generated from fetal mouse intestine using the culture system initially developed to culture organoids from adult intestinal epithelium. Spheroid proportion progressively decreases from fetal to postnatal period, with a corresponding increase in production of organoids. Like organoids, spheroids show Wnt-dependent indefinite self-renewing properties but display a poorly differentiated phenotype reminiscent of incompletely caudalized progenitors. The spheroid transcriptome is strikingly different from that of adult intestinal stem cells, with minimal overlap of Wnt target gene expression. The receptor LGR4, but not LGR5, is essential for their growth. Trop2/Tacstd2 and Cnx43/Gja1, two markers highly enriched in spheroids, are expressed throughout the embryonic-day-14 intestinal epithelium. Comparison of in utero and neonatal lineage tracing using Cnx43-CreER and Lgr5-CreERT2 mice identified spheroid-generating cells as developmental progenitors involved in generation of the prenatal intestinal epithelium. Ex vivo, spheroid cells have the potential to differentiate into organoids, qualifying as a fetal type of intestinal stem cell.

  15. Promotion of malignant phenotype after disruption of the three-dimensional structure of cultured spheroids from colorectal cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Piulats, Jose M; Kondo, Jumpei; Endo, Hiroko; Ono, Hiromasa; Hagihara, Takeshi; Okuyama, Hiroaki; Nishizawa, Yasuko; Tomita, Yasuhiko; Ohue, Masayuki; Okita, Kouki; Oyama, Hidejiro; Bono, Hidemasa; Masuko, Takashi; Inoue, Masahiro

    2018-03-23

    Individual and small clusters of cancer cells may detach from the edges of a main tumor and invade vessels, which can act as the origin of metastasis; however, the mechanism for this phenomenon is not well understood. Using cancer tissue-originated spheroids, we studied whether disturbing the 3D architecture of cancer spheroids can provoke the reformation process and progression of malignancy. We developed a mechanical disruption method to achieve homogenous disruption of the spheroids while maintaining cell-cell contact. After the disruption, 9 spheroid lines from 9 patient samples reformed within a few hours, and 3 of the 9 lines exhibited accelerated spheroid growth. Marker expression, spheroid forming capacity, and tumorigenesis indicated that stemness increased after spheroid disruption. In addition, the spheroid forming capacity increased in 6 of 11 spheroid lines. The disruption signature determined by gene expression profiling supported the incidence of remodeling and predicted the prognosis of patients with colorectal cancer. Furthermore, WNT and HER3 signaling were increased in the reformed spheroids, and suppression of these signaling pathways attenuated the increased proliferation and stemness after the disruption. Overall, the disruption and subsequent reformation of cancer spheroids promoted malignancy-related phenotypes through the activation of the WNT and ERBB pathways.

  16. Pervasive plastisphere: First record of plastics in egagropiles (Posidonia spheroids).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pietrelli, Loris; Di Gennaro, Alessia; Menegoni, Patrizia; Lecce, Francesca; Poeta, Gianluca; Acosta, Alicia T R; Battisti, Corrado; Iannilli, Valentina

    2017-10-01

    The ability of Posidonia oceanica spheroids (egagropiles, EG) to incorporate plastics was investigated along the central Italy coast. Plastics were found in the 52.84% of the egagropiles collected (n = 685). The more represented size of plastics has range within 1-1.5 cm, comparable to the size of natural fibres. Comparing plastics occurring both in EG and in surrounding sand, Polyethylene, Polyester and Nylon were the most abundant polymers in EG, while PSE, PE, PP and PET were the most represented in sand. In particular PE and PP were significantly more represented in sand, while PE, Nylon, Polyester and microfibers (as pills) were more represented in EG. Within plastics found in EG, 26.9% were microfibers as small pills (PET mixing. These microfibers might be produced by discharges from washing machines and currently represents an emerging pollutant with widespread distribution in marine and freshwater ecosystems. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  17. Modes of spheroidal ion plasmas at the Brillouin limit

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tinkle, M.D.; Greaves, R.G.; Surko, C.M.

    1996-01-01

    The confinement properties and collective modes of single-component plasmas are investigated in a quadrupole Penning trap. Brillouin-density pure ion plasmas are generated by electron-beam ionization of a low-pressure gas. Large, spheroidal, steady-state plasmas are produced, extending out to contact one or more of the trap electrodes. With the density fixed at the Brillouin limit by the high ion production rate, the electrode potentials determine the plasma shape. The frequencies of azimuthally propagating cyclotron and diocotron modes are found to vary significantly with the plasma aspect ratio. For oblate plasmas, the frequencies are in good agreement with a simple fluid model. copyright 1996 American Institute of Physics

  18. Numerical simulations of bistable flows in precessing spheroidal shells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vormann, J.; Hansen, U.

    2018-05-01

    Precession of the rotation axis is an often neglected mechanical driving mechanism for flows in planetary interiors, through viscous coupling at the boundaries and topographic forcing in non-spherical geometries. We investigate precession-driven flows in spheroidal shells over a wide range of parameters and test the results against theoretical predictions. For Ekman numbers down to 8.0 × 10-7, we see a good accordance with the work of Busse, who assumed the precession-driven flow to be dominated by a rigid rotation component that is tilted to the main rotation axis. The velocity fields show localized small-scale structures for lower Ekman numbers and clear signals of inertial waves for some parameters. For the case of moderate viscosity and strong deformation, we report the realization of multiple solutions at the same parameter combination, depending on the initial condition.

  19. Patient-specific three-dimensional explant spheroids derived from human nasal airway epithelium

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Marthin, June Kehlet; Stevens, Elizabeth Munkebjerg; Larsen, Lars Allan

    2017-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Three-dimensional explant spheroid formation is an ex vivo technique previously used in studies of airway epithelial ion and water transport. Explanted cells and sheets of nasal epithelium form fully differentiated spheroids enclosing a partly fluid-filled lumen with the ciliated apical...... surface facing the outside and accessible for analysis of ciliary function. METHODS: We performed a two-group comparison study of ciliary beat pattern and ciliary beat frequency in spheroids derived from nasal airway epithelium in patients with primary ciliary dyskinesia (PCD) and in healthy controls...... in the investigation of pathophysiological aspects and drug effects in human nasal airway epithelium....

  20. Scattering of a high-order Bessel beam by a spheroidal particle

    Science.gov (United States)

    Han, Lu

    2018-05-01

    Within the framework of generalized Lorenz-Mie theory (GLMT), scattering from a homogeneous spheroidal particle illuminated by a high-order Bessel beam is formulated analytically. The high-order Bessel beam is expanded in terms of spheroidal vector wave functions, where the spheroidal beam shape coefficients (BSCs) are computed conveniently using an intrinsic method. Numerical results concerning scattered field in the far zone are displayed for various parameters of the incident Bessel beam and of the scatter. These results are expected to provide useful insights into the scattering of a Bessel beam by nonspherical particles and particle manipulation applications using Bessel beams.

  1. A theoretical study of hot plasma spheroids in the presence of low-frequency electromagnetic waves

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ahmadizadeh, Y.; Jazi, B.; Barjesteh, S.

    2016-07-01

    While taking into account thermal motion of electrons, scattering of electromagnetic waves with low frequency from hot plasma spheroids is investigated. In this theoretical research, ions are heavy to respond to electromagnetic fluctuations. The solution of scalar wave equation in spheroidal coordinates for electric potential inside the plasma spheroids are obtained. The variations of resonance frequencies vs. Debye length are studied and consistency between the obtained results in this paper and the results for the well-known plasma objects such as plasma column and spherical plasma have been proved.

  2. Low-temperature plasma spheroidizing of polydisperse powders of refractory materials

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tsymbalist, M.M.; Rudenskaya, N.A.; Kuz'min, B.P.; Pan'kov, V.A.

    2003-01-01

    A model is developed for heating and melting of a spherical particle, when powder processing in low temperature plasma, with the aim of estimation of the dependence of the degree of fusion on particle size for various materials. Spheroidizing of various refractory material powders close in shape and size composition is experimentally performed. Experimental and calculation estimates of spheroidizing criteria for the materials studied are in a satisfactory agreement. The influence of basic physical properties of refractory materials and plasma processing parameters on the degree of particle spheroidizing is analyzed [ru

  3. Multicellular tumor spheroid interactions with bone cells and bone

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wezeman, F.H.; Guzzino, K.M.; Waxler, B.

    1985-01-01

    In vitro coculture techniques were used to study HSDM1C1 murine fibrosarcoma multicellular tumor spheroid (HSDM1C1-MTS) interactions with mouse calvarial bone cells having osteoblastic characteristics and mouse bone explants. HSDM1C1-MTS attached to confluent bone cell monolayers and their attachment rate was quantified. HSDM1C1-MTS interaction with bone cells was further demonstrated by the release of 3 H-deoxyuridine from prelabeled bone cells during coculture with multicellular tumor spheroids. HSDM1C1-MTS-induced cytotoxicity was mimicked by the addition of 10(-5) M prostaglandin E2 (PGE2) to 3 H-deoxyuridine-labeled bone cells. The effects of low (10(-9) M) and high (10(-5) M) concentrations of PGE2 on bone cell proliferation were also studied. Higher concentrations of PGE2 inhibited bone cell proliferation. HSDM1C1-MTS resorbed living explants in the presence of indomethacin, suggesting that other tumor cell products may also participate in bone resorption. HSDM1C1-MTS caused direct bone resorption as measured by the significantly elevated release of 45 Ca from prelabeled, devitalized calvaria. However, the growth of a confluent bone cell layer on devitalized, 45 Ca-prelabeled calvaria resulted in a significant reduction in the amount of 45 Ca released subsequent to the seeding of HSDM1C1-MTS onto the explants. Bone cells at the bone surface may act as a barrier against invasion and tumor cell-mediated bone resorption. Violation of this cellular barrier is achieved, in part, by tumor cell products

  4. Tensile Forces Originating from Cancer Spheroids Facilitate Tumor Invasion.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Katarzyna S Kopanska

    Full Text Available The mechanical properties of tumors and the tumor environment provide important information for the progression and characterization of cancer. Tumors are surrounded by an extracellular matrix (ECM dominated by collagen I. The geometrical and mechanical properties of the ECM play an important role for the initial step in the formation of metastasis, presented by the migration of malignant cells towards new settlements as well as the vascular and lymphatic system. The extent of this cell invasion into the ECM is a key medical marker for cancer prognosis. In vivo studies reveal an increased stiffness and different architecture of tumor tissue when compared to its healthy counterparts. The observed parallel collagen organization on the tumor border and radial arrangement at the invasion zone has raised the question about the mechanisms organizing these structures. Here we study the effect of contractile forces originated from model tumor spheroids embedded in a biomimetic collagen I matrix. We show that contractile forces act immediately after seeding and deform the ECM, thus leading to tensile radial forces within the matrix. Relaxation of this tension via cutting the collagen does reduce invasion, showing a mechanical relation between the tensile state of the ECM and invasion. In turn, these results suggest that tensile forces in the ECM facilitate invasion. Furthermore, simultaneous contraction of the ECM and tumor growth leads to the condensation and reorientation of the collagen at the spheroid's surface. We propose a tension-based model to explain the collagen organization and the onset of invasion by forces originating from the tumor.

  5. Sensibility of the hamster (Cricetus auratus to the Treponema pertenue

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    F. Nery-Guimarães

    1955-05-01

    Full Text Available In two experiments, 8 Hamsters inoculated with material from yaws lesions (Treponema pertenue, developed skin lesions considered specific by their clinical and histopathological aspects and by the presence of treponemae. These lesions appeared on the scrotumm, testicle, prepuce, anus, tail, muzzle, back and hinders paws (palm surface. In the internal organs no treponemae were found in direct examinations and inoculation of brain, spleen and lymph node. The incubation period was of 35 days for the testicle, 55 days for the scrotum and 107 days for peritoneal cavity inoculation. Positive sub-inoculations were obtained. The serum reactions (Qasserman's and Kahn's were negative in all 5 tested Hamsters. Out of 4 normal females matched to infected males two developed nasal lesions resulting from direct contact. Apparently the genital lesions hindered copulation. Hamsters are very well suited for an experimental study of yaws.Em 2 experiências, 8 Hamsters inoculados com material direto de lesões boubáticas (Treponema pertenue, desenvolveram lesões cutâneas consideradas específicas, pelo aspecto clínico e histopatológico e pela presentça de treponemas. Essas lesões se manifestaram no escrôto, testículo, prepúcio, anus, cauda, focinho, dorso e patas posteriores (face palmar. Nos órgãos internos não foram vistos treponemas ao exame direto e, uma vez, por inoculação de cérebro, baço e gânglio linfático. O período incubativo foi de 35 dias pela via testicular, 55 dias pela via escrotal e 107 dias pela via peritonial. Foram obtidas sub-inoculações positivas para Hamsters normais. As experiências continuam. De 4 fêmeas normais, acasaladas com 4 hamsters infectados apenas 2 mostraram lesões positivas resultantes de contágio direto. Aparentemente, não houve copulação e, se esta ocorreu, não determinou fecundação.

  6. Hamsters' (Mesocricetus auratus) memory in a radial maze analog: the role of spatial versus olfactory cues.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tonneau, François; Cabrera, Felipe; Corujo, Alejandro

    2012-02-01

    The golden hamster's (Mesocricetus auratus) performance on radial maze tasks has not been studied a lot. Here we report the results of a spatial memory task that involved eight food stations equidistant from the center of a circular platform. Each of six male hamsters depleted the food stations along successive choices. After each choice and a 5-s retention delay, the hamster was brought back to the center of the platform for the next choice opportunity. When only one baited station was left, the platform was rotated to evaluate whether olfactory traces guided hamsters' choices. Results showed that despite the retention delay hamsters performed above chance in searching for food. The choice distributions observed during the rotation probes were consistent with spatial memory and could be explained without assuming guidance by olfactory cues. The radial maze analog we devised could be useful in furthering the study of spatial memory in hamsters.

  7. Study of human prostate spheroids treated with zinc using X-ray microfluorescence

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Leitao, Roberta G.; Lopes, Ricardo T.; Pereira, Gabriela R., E-mail: roberta@lin.ufrj.br, E-mail: gpereira@metalmat.ufrj.br [Coordenacao dos Cursos de Pos-Graduacao em Engenharia (COPPE/UFRJ), Rio de Janeiro, RJ (Brazil); Santos, Carlos A.N., E-mail: cansantos.bio@gmail.com [Instituto Nacional de Metrologia, Qualidade e Tecnologia (DIPRO/INMETRO), Duque de Caxias, RJ (Brazil). Lab. de Biotecnologia; Palumbo Junior, Antonio; Nasciutti, Luiz E., E-mail: nasciutt@ufrj.br [Universidade Federal do Rio de Janeiro (ICB/CCS/UFRJ), Rio de Janeiro, RJ (Brazil). Lab. de Interacoes Celulares; Souza, Pedro A.V.R., E-mail: pedroaugustoreis@uol.com.br [Hospital Federal do Andarai (HFA), Rio de Janeiro, RJ (Brazil). Servico de Urologia; Anjos, Marcelino J., E-mail: marcelin@lin.ufrj.br [Universidade Estatual do Rio de Janeiro (UERJ), Rio de Janeiro, RJ (Brazil). Inst. de Fisica

    2013-07-01

    Spheroids cell culture is a useful technique for tissue engineering or regenerative medicine re-search, pharmacological and toxicological studies, and fundamental studies in cell biology. In this study, we investigated Zn distribution in cell spheroids in benign prostate hyperplasia (BPH) and prostate cancer (DU145) and analyzed the differences in the response to Zinc (0-150 μM) treatment. The measurements were performed in standard geometry of 45 deg incidence, exciting with a white beam and using an optical capillary with 20 μm diameter collimation in the XRF beam line at the Synchrotron Light National Laboratory (Campinas, Brazil). The results showed non-uniform distribution of Zn in all the spheroids analyzed. The differential response to zinc of DU145 and BPH cell spheroids suggests that zinc may have an important role in prostate cancer and BPH diagnosis. (author)

  8. Axonal Spheroid Accumulation In the Brainstem and Spinal Cord of A Young Angus Cow with Ataxia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hanshaw, D M; Finnie, J W; Manavis, J; Kessell, A E

    2015-08-01

    An 18-month-old Angus cow presented with rapidly developing ataxia and subsequently died. The finding of large numbers of axonal spheroids in brainstem nuclei and spinal cord grey matter, bilaterally symmetrical in distribution, was consistent with a histopathological diagnosis of neuroaxonal dystrophy (NAD). Most of the axonal swellings were immunopositive to amyloid precursor protein, suggesting that interruption to axonal flow was important in their genesis. The topographical distribution of axonal spheroids in the brain and spinal cord in this bovine case closely resembled that found in the ovine neurodegenerative disorder termed NAD, in which axonal swellings are the major pathological feature. This appears to be the first reported case of this type of NAD in cattle. The aetiology of the spheroidal aggregations in this case was not determined. There was no evidence from the case history or neuropathology to indicate whether the axonal spheroids in this case involved an acquired or heritable aetiology. © 2015 Australian Veterinary Association.

  9. Processes of Formation of Spheroidal Concretions and Inferences for "Blueberries" in Meridiani Planum Sediments

    Science.gov (United States)

    Coleman, M. L.

    2005-03-01

    Formation of spheroidal concretions on Earth results generally from reactions of organic matter in oxidized sediments. Had organic matter been present in Merididani Planum it could have produced a reduced iron mineral phase later oxidized to hematite.

  10. Study of human prostate spheroids treated with zinc using X-ray microfluorescence

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Leitao, Roberta G.; Lopes, Ricardo T.; Pereira, Gabriela R.; Santos, Carlos A.N.; Palumbo Junior, Antonio; Nasciutti, Luiz E.; Souza, Pedro A.V.R.; Anjos, Marcelino J.

    2013-01-01

    Spheroids cell culture is a useful technique for tissue engineering or regenerative medicine re-search, pharmacological and toxicological studies, and fundamental studies in cell biology. In this study, we investigated Zn distribution in cell spheroids in benign prostate hyperplasia (BPH) and prostate cancer (DU145) and analyzed the differences in the response to Zinc (0-150 μM) treatment. The measurements were performed in standard geometry of 45 deg incidence, exciting with a white beam and using an optical capillary with 20 μm diameter collimation in the XRF beam line at the Synchrotron Light National Laboratory (Campinas, Brazil). The results showed non-uniform distribution of Zn in all the spheroids analyzed. The differential response to zinc of DU145 and BPH cell spheroids suggests that zinc may have an important role in prostate cancer and BPH diagnosis. (author)

  11. Oxidative metabolites of diethylstilbestrol in the fetal Syrian golden hamster

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Maydl, R.; Metzler, M.

    1984-01-01

    14 C-Diethylstilbestrol was administered orally, intraperitoneally, and intrafetally to 15-day pregnant hamsters at a dose of 20 mg/kg body weight, and the radioactivity was determined in the fetus, placenta, and maternal liver after 6 hours. Significant amounts of radioactivity were found in these tissues in every case, indicating maternal-fetal and fetal-maternal transfer of diethylstilbestrol. Part of the radioactivity found in the tissues could not be extracted even after excessive washing. This implied the presence of reactive metabolites. In the fetal and placental extracts, eight oxidative metabolites of diethylstilbestrol were identified by mass fragmentography as hydroxy- and methoxy-derivatives of diethylstilbestrol, pseudodiethylstilbestrol, and dienestrol. The presence of oxidative metabolites in the hamster fetus and the covalent binding to tissue macromolecules are possibly associated with the fetotoxic effects of diethylstilbestrol

  12. Autoradiography in fetal golden hamsters treated with tritiated diethylnitrosamine

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Reznik-Schueller, H.M.; Hague, B.F. Jr.

    1981-01-01

    Tritiated diethylnitrosamine was administered to female Syrian golden hamsters on each of the last 4 days (days 12-15) of pregnancy. The distribution of bound radioactivity was monitored by light microscopic autoradiography of fetal tracheas and livers, the placentas, and the maternal livers. In the trachea, the fetal target organ, bound radioactivity was restricted to the respiratory epithelium, where diethylnitrosamine-induced tracheal tumors arise. Mucous cells and nonciliated stem cells were identified as the principal sites of binding; other cell types within the tracheal epithelium contained only small amounts of bound radioactivity. The level of binding observed in the fetal trachea increased steadily from day 12 to day 15, which correlated well with the levels of differentiation of this tissue during this period. This observation also agrees with the previously reported observation that tumor incidence increases from 40 to 95% in Syrian golden hamsters between days 12 and 15

  13. Cystolithiasis in a Syrian hamster: a different outcome

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    D. Petrini

    2016-08-01

    Full Text Available A 14-month-old intact male Syrian hamster was admitted for lethargy and hematuria. A total body radiographic image and abdominal ultrasonography showed the presence of a vesical calculus. During cystotomy, a sterile urine sample was obtained and sent to the diagnostic laboratory along with the urolith for analysis. Urine culture was found negative for bacterial growth, and the urolith was identified as a calcium-oxalate stone. Diet supplementation with palmitoylethanolamide, glucosamine and hesperidin was adopted the day after discharge. One year follow up revealed no presence of vesical calculi. Although this is the report of a single clinical case, this outcome differs from the results reported in the literature characterized by recurrences after few months. Considering the positive outcome and the beneficial properties of palmitoylethanolamide, glucosamine, and hesperidin, these nutritional elements in Syrian hamsters, are recommended to reduce recurrence after surgical treatment of urolithiasis.

  14. Direct Measurements of Oxygen Gradients in Spheroid Culture System Using Electron Parametric Resonance Oximetry.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Laura M Langan

    Full Text Available Advanced in vitro culture from tissues of different origin includes three-dimensional (3D organoid micro structures that may mimic conditions in vivo. One example of simple 3D culture is spheroids; ball shaped structures typically used as liver and tumour models. Oxygen is critically important in physiological processes, but is difficult to quantify in 3D culture: and the question arises, how small does a spheroid have to be to have minimal micro-environment formation? This question is of particular importance in the growing field of 3D based models for toxicological assessment. Here, we describe a simple non-invasive approach modified for the quantitative measurement and subsequent evaluation of oxygen gradients in spheroids developed from a non-malignant fish cell line (i.e. RTG-2 cells using Electron Paramagnetic Resonance (EPR oximetry. Sonication of the paramagnetic probe Lithium phthalocyanine (LiPc allows for incorporation of probe particulates into spheroid during its formation. Spectra signal strength after incorporation of probe into spheroid indicated that a volume of 20 μl of probe (stock solution: 0.10 mg/mL is sufficient to provide a strong spectra across a range of spheroid sizes. The addition of non-toxic probes (that do not produce or consume oxygen report on oxygen diffusion throughout the spheroid as a function of size. We provide evidence supporting the use of this model over a range of initial cell seeding densities and spheroid sizes with the production of oxygen distribution as a function of these parameters. In our spheroid model, lower cell seeding densities (∼2,500 cells/spheroid and absolute size (118±32 μm allow control of factors such as pre-existing stresses (e.g. ∼ 2% normoxic/hypoxic interface for more accurate measurement of treatment response. The applied methodology provides an elegant, widely applicable approach to directly characterize spheroid (and other organoid cultures in biomedical and

  15. Axisymmetric scattering of an acoustical Bessel beam by a rigid fixed spheroid

    OpenAIRE

    Mitri, F. G.

    2015-01-01

    Based on the partial-wave series expansion (PWSE) method in spherical coordinates, a formal analytical solution for the acoustic scattering of a zeroth-order Bessel acoustic beam centered on a rigid fixed (oblate or prolate) spheroid is provided. The unknown scattering coefficients of the spheroid are determined by solving a system of linear equations derived for the Neumann boundary condition. Numerical results for the modulus of the backscattered pressure (\\theta = \\pi) in the near-field an...

  16. Theory of electrostatic fluid modes in a cold spheroidal non-neutral plasma

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dubin, D.H.E.

    1991-01-01

    The normal modes of a magnetized spheroidally shaped pure ion plasma have recently been measured. Here the theory of these modes is presented. Although one might expect that a numerical solution is required (because the plasma dielectric is anisotropic and the plasma is inhomogeneous), the problem is actually separable in an unusual coordinate system. The result is a simple electrostatic fluid dispersion relation for modes in a cloud of any spheroidal shape

  17. Radioresistance of human glioma spheroids and expression of HSP70, p53 and EGFr

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fedrigo, Carlos A; Rocha, Adriana B da; Grivicich, Ivana; Schunemann, Daniel P; Chemale, Ivan M; Santos, Daiane dos; Jacovas, Thais; Boschetti, Patryck S; Jotz, Geraldo P; Filho, Aroldo Braga

    2011-01-01

    Radiation therapy is routinely prescribed for high-grade malignant gliomas. However, the efficacy of this therapeutic modality is often limited by the occurrence of radioresistance, reflected as a diminished susceptibility of the irradiated cells to undergo cell death. Thus, cells have evolved an elegant system in response to ionizing radiation induced DNA damage, where p53, Hsp70 and/or EGFr may play an important role in the process. In the present study, we investigated whether the content of p53, Hsp70 and EGFr are associated to glioblastoma (GBM) cell radioresistance. Spheroids from U-87MG and MO59J cell lines as well as spheroids derived from primary culture of tumor tissue of one GBM patient (UGBM1) were irradiated (5, 10 and 20 Gy), their relative radioresistance were established and the p53, Hsp70 and EGFr contents were immunohistochemically determined. Moreover, we investigated whether EGFr-phospho-Akt and EGFr-MEK-ERK pathways can induce GBM radioresistance using inhibitors of activation of ERK (PD098059) and Akt (wortmannin). At 5 Gy irradiation UGBM1 and U-87MG spheroids showed growth inhibition whereas the MO59J spheroid was relatively radioresistant. Overall, no significant changes in p53 and Hsp70 expression were found following 5 Gy irradiation treatment in all spheroids studied. The only difference observed in Hsp70 content was the periphery distribution in MO59J spheroids. However, 5 Gy treatment induced a significant increase on the EGFr levels in MO59J spheroids. Furthermore, treatment with inhibitors of activation of ERK (PD098059) and Akt (wortmannin) leads to radiosensitization of MO59J spheroids. These results indicate that the PI3K-Akt and MEK-ERK pathways triggered by EGFr confer GBM radioresistance

  18. Rapid formation of size-controllable multicellular spheroids via 3D acoustic tweezers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Kejie; Wu, Mengxi; Guo, Feng; Li, Peng; Chan, Chung Yu; Mao, Zhangming; Li, Sixing; Ren, Liqiang; Zhang, Rui; Huang, Tony Jun

    2016-07-05

    The multicellular spheroid is an important 3D cell culture model for drug screening, tissue engineering, and fundamental biological research. Although several spheroid formation methods have been reported, the field still lacks high-throughput and simple fabrication methods to accelerate its adoption in drug development industry. Surface acoustic wave (SAW) based cell manipulation methods, which are known to be non-invasive, flexible, and high-throughput, have not been successfully developed for fabricating 3D cell assemblies or spheroids, due to the limited understanding on SAW-based vertical levitation. In this work, we demonstrated the capability of fabricating multicellular spheroids in the 3D acoustic tweezers platform. Our method used drag force from microstreaming to levitate cells in the vertical direction, and used radiation force from Gor'kov potential to aggregate cells in the horizontal plane. After optimizing the device geometry and input power, we demonstrated the rapid and high-throughput nature of our method by continuously fabricating more than 150 size-controllable spheroids and transferring them to Petri dishes every 30 minutes. The spheroids fabricated by our 3D acoustic tweezers can be cultured for a week with good cell viability. We further demonstrated that spheroids fabricated by this method could be used for drug testing. Unlike the 2D monolayer model, HepG2 spheroids fabricated by the 3D acoustic tweezers manifested distinct drug resistance, which matched existing reports. The 3D acoustic tweezers based method can serve as a novel bio-manufacturing tool to fabricate complex 3D cell assembles for biological research, tissue engineering, and drug development.

  19. Rapid formation of size-controllable multicellular spheroids via 3D acoustic tweezers

    OpenAIRE

    Chen, Kejie; Wu, Mengxi; Guo, Feng; Li, Peng; Chan, Chung-Yu; Mao, Zhangming; Li, Sixing; Ren, Liqiang; Zhang, Rui; Huang, Tony Jun

    2016-01-01

    The multicellular spheroid is an important 3D cell culture model for drug screening, tissue engineering, and fundamental biological research. Although several spheroid formation methods have been reported, the field still lacks high-throughput and simple fabrication methods to accelerate its adoption in drug development industry. Surface acoustic wave (SAW) based cell manipulation methods, which are known to be non-invasive, flexible, and high-throughput, have not been successfully developed ...

  20. Autoradiographic images in the hamster cheek pouch oral cancer model

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Portu, A.; Molinari, A.J.; Schwint, A.; Saint Martin, G.; Thorp, S.; Pozzi, E.C.C.; Curotto, P.

    2013-01-01

    The aim of this work is to summarize the autoradiographic study performed to samples from different protocols of the hamster cheek pouch oral cancer model. The qualitative analysis of histological and autoradiographic images, together with the determination of the boron concentration in the different structures of tumor, premalignant tissue and normal tissue contributed to the knowledge of the microdistribution of boron compounds. Besides, the study led to the optimization of the autoradiography technique applied to BNCT (Boron Neutron Capture Therapy). (author)

  1. Radioprotective effect of catecholamines on the cultured Chinese hamster fibroblasts

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chirkov, Yu.Yu.; Malatsidze, M.A.; Sobolev, A.S.

    1985-01-01

    On cultivated in vitro Chinese hamster fibroblasts radioprotective properties of adrenaline, noradrenaline and isoproterenol in different concentrations are studied. Isoproterenol radiopreventive effect is clearly manifested with its concentration being 1x10 -8 M; adrenaline and noradrenaline are efficient in higher concentrations. Propranolol, blocking β-adrenergic receptors, completely presents radioprotective effect of catecholamines on the cells. β-adrenergic mechanism of catecholamine radioprotective effect on Mammalia cells is discussed

  2. Metabolic influences on circadian rhythmicity in Siberian and Syrian hamsters exposed to long photoperiods.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Challet, E; Kolker, D E; Turek, F W

    2000-01-01

    Calorie restriction and other situations of reduced glucose availability in rodents alter the entraining effects of light on the circadian pacemaker located in the suprachiasmatic nuclei. Siberian and Syrian hamsters are photoperiodic species that are sexually active when exposed to long summer-like photoperiods, while both species show opposite changes in body mass when transferred from long to short or short to long days. Because metabolic cues may fine tune the photoperiodic responses via the suprachiasmatic nuclei, we tested whether timed calorie restriction can alter the photic synchronization of the light-entrainable pacemaker in these two hamster species exposed to long photoperiods. Siberian and Syrian hamsters were exposed to 16 h:8 h light:dark cycles and received daily hypocaloric (75% of daily food intake) or normocaloric diet (100% of daily food intake) 4 h after light onset. Four weeks later, hamsters were transferred to constant darkness and fed ad libitum. The onset of the nocturnal pattern of locomotor activity was phase advanced by 1.5 h in calorie-restricted Siberian hamsters, but not in Syrian hamsters. The lack of phase change in calorie-restricted Syrian hamsters was also observed in individuals exposed to 14 h:10 h dim light:dark cycles and fed with lower hypocaloric food (i.e. 60% of daily food intake) 2 h after light onset. Moreover, in hamsters housed in constant darkness and fed ad lib., light-induced phase shifts of the locomotor activity in Siberian hamsters, but not in Syrian hamsters were significantly reduced when glucose utilization was blocked by pretreatment with 500 mg/kg i.p. 2-deoxy-D-glucose. Taken together, these results show that the photic synchronization of the light-entrainable pacemaker can be modulated by metabolic cues in Siberian hamsters, but not in Syrian hamsters maintained on long days.

  3. Female-biased anorexia and anxiety in the Syrian hamster.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shannonhouse, John L; Fong, Li An; Clossen, Bryan L; Hairgrove, Ross E; York, Daniel C; Walker, Benjamin B; Hercules, Gregory W; Mertesdorf, Lauren M; Patel, Margi; Morgan, Caurnel

    2014-06-22

    Anorexia and anxiety cause significant mortality and disability with female biases and frequent comorbidity after puberty, but the scarcity of suitable animal models impedes understanding of their biological underpinnings. It is reported here that in adult or weanling Syrian hamsters, relative to social housing (SH), social separation (SS) induced anorexia characterized as hypophagia, weight loss, reduced adiposity, and hypermetabolism. Following anorexia, SS increased reluctance to feed, and thigmotaxis, in anxiogenic environments. Importantly, anorexia and anxiety were induced post-puberty with female biases. SS also reduced hypothalamic corticotrophin-releasing factor mRNA and serum corticosteroid levels assessed by RT-PCR and RIA, respectively. Consistent with the view that sex differences in adrenal suppression contributed to female biases in anorexia and anxiety by disinhibiting neuroimmune activity, SS elevated hypothalamic interleukin-6 and toll-like receptor 4 mRNA levels. Although corticosteroids were highest during SH, they were within the physiological range and associated with juvenile-like growth of white adipose, bone, and skeletal muscle. These results suggest that hamsters exhibit plasticity in bioenergetic and emotional phenotypes across puberty without an increase in stress responsiveness. Thus, social separation of hamsters provides a model of sex differences in anorexia and anxiety during adulthood and their pathogeneses during adolescence. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  4. Isolation of two chloroethylnitrosourea-sensitive Chinese hamster cell lines

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hata, H.; Numata, M.; Tohda, H.; Yasui, A.; Oikawa, A.

    1991-01-01

    1-[(4-Amino-2-methylpyrimidin-5-yl)methyl]-3-(2-chloroethyl)-3- nitrosourea hydrochloride (ACNU), a cancer chemotherapeutic bifunctional alkylating agent, causes chloroethylation of DNA and subsequent DNA strand cross-linking through an ethylene bridge. We isolated and characterized two ACNU-sensitive mutants from mutagenized Chinese hamster ovary cells and found them to be new drug-sensitive recessive Chinese hamster mutants. Both mutants were sensitive to various monofunctional alkylating agents in a way similar to that of the parental cell lines CHO9. One mutant (UVS1) was cross-sensitive to UV and complemented the UV sensitivity of all Chinese hamster cell lines of 7 established complementation groups. Since UV-induced unscheduled DNA synthesis was very low, a new locus related to excision repair is thought to be defective in this cell line. Another ACNU-sensitive mutant, CNU1, was slightly more sensitive to UV than the parent cell line. CNU1 was cross-sensitive to 1-(2-chloroethyl)-3-cyclohexyl-1-nitrosourea and slightly more sensitive to mitomycin C. No increased accumulation of ACNU and a low level of UV-induced unscheduled DNA synthesis in this cell as compared with the parental cell line suggest that there is abnormality in a repair response of this mutant cell to some types of DNA cross-links

  5. Delay of behavioral estrus in hamsters and phenobarbital.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alleva, J J

    1989-01-01

    The onset of behavioral estrus was used as a phase marker of the hamster timing system in SLD 16:8 (dark 20:00-04:00). TZ was injected between 11:00 of cycle day 3 and noon of cycle day 4 when onset of estrus was determined. At no time did injection of TZ cause a phase advance in SLD 16:8. Small delays of estrus resulted from 11:00-16:00 injections but marked delays began with the 17:00 injection. Phenobarbital was injected between noon and 19:30 on cycle day 3. Injections between noon and 16:00 had no effect but all later injections beginning at 17:00 delayed estrus, the 17:30 injection causing the greatest delay. Diazepam also markedly delayed estrus when tested at 17:30. These results with three drugs support results with light pulses that 18:00 in SLD 16:8 marks the same phase of the 24-h hamster timing system as the onset of wheel running does in DD, LL, and WLD. These findings with three GABA potentiators extend to SLD previous evidence based on the onset of wheel running in DD, LL and WLD that GABA may be involved in hamster timekeeping and its responses to light and drugs.

  6. Experience-independent development of the hamster circadian visual system.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    August Kampf-Lassin

    2011-04-01

    Full Text Available Experience-dependent functional plasticity is a hallmark of the primary visual system, but it is not known if analogous mechanisms govern development of the circadian visual system. Here we investigated molecular, anatomical, and behavioral consequences of complete monocular light deprivation during extended intervals of postnatal development in Syrian hamsters. Hamsters were raised in constant darkness and opaque contact lenses were applied shortly after eye opening and prior to the introduction of a light-dark cycle. In adulthood, previously-occluded eyes were challenged with visual stimuli. Whereas image-formation and motion-detection were markedly impaired by monocular occlusion, neither entrainment to a light-dark cycle, nor phase-resetting responses to shifts in the light-dark cycle were affected by prior monocular deprivation. Cholera toxin-b subunit fluorescent tract-tracing revealed that in monocularly-deprived hamsters the density of fibers projecting from the retina to the suprachiasmatic nucleus (SCN was comparable regardless of whether such fibers originated from occluded or exposed eyes. In addition, long-term monocular deprivation did not attenuate light-induced c-Fos expression in the SCN. Thus, in contrast to the thalamocortical projections of the primary visual system, retinohypothalamic projections terminating in the SCN develop into normal adult patterns and mediate circadian responses to light largely independent of light experience during development. The data identify a categorical difference in the requirement for light input during postnatal development between circadian and non-circadian visual systems.

  7. Effects of hyperthermia on the hamster immune system

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gangavalli, R.; Cain, C.A.; Tompkins, W.A.F.

    1984-01-01

    In previous studies, the authors have shown that hyperthermia can enhance antibody-complement chytotoxicity of hamster and human tumor cells. Moreover, whole body microwave exposure of hamsters resulted in activation of peritoneal macrophages to a viricidal state and transient suppression of natural killer (NK) cell activity. In this study, the authors compare the effects of whole body heating by microwaves or by an environmental chamber (hot air) on the hamster immune system. Microwave exposure (25mW/cm/sup 2/; 1 hr) caused viricidal activation of peritoneal macrophages which resulted in restriction of vaccinia and vesicular stomatitis virs (VSV) growth. However, heating in an environmental chamber (41 0 C; 1 hr) did not activate macrophages to a viricidal state. Both microwave and hot air hyperthermia caused significant augmentation of antibody producing spleen cell response to sheep red blood cells (SRBC), using the Jerne hymolytic plaque assay, four days post exposure and immunization with SRBC. Natural killer spleen cell cytotoxicity was suppressed by microwave and hot air hyperthermia showing that NK lymphocytes are extremely sensitive to changes in temperature. These alterations in cellular immune response due to hyperthermia could be of significance in treatment of tumors and viral infections

  8. High-throughput image analysis of tumor spheroids: a user-friendly software application to measure the size of spheroids automatically and accurately.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Wenjin; Wong, Chung; Vosburgh, Evan; Levine, Arnold J; Foran, David J; Xu, Eugenia Y

    2014-07-08

    The increasing number of applications of three-dimensional (3D) tumor spheroids as an in vitro model for drug discovery requires their adaptation to large-scale screening formats in every step of a drug screen, including large-scale image analysis. Currently there is no ready-to-use and free image analysis software to meet this large-scale format. Most existing methods involve manually drawing the length and width of the imaged 3D spheroids, which is a tedious and time-consuming process. This study presents a high-throughput image analysis software application - SpheroidSizer, which measures the major and minor axial length of the imaged 3D tumor spheroids automatically and accurately; calculates the volume of each individual 3D tumor spheroid; then outputs the results in two different forms in spreadsheets for easy manipulations in the subsequent data analysis. The main advantage of this software is its powerful image analysis application that is adapted for large numbers of images. It provides high-throughput computation and quality-control workflow. The estimated time to process 1,000 images is about 15 min on a minimally configured laptop, or around 1 min on a multi-core performance workstation. The graphical user interface (GUI) is also designed for easy quality control, and users can manually override the computer results. The key method used in this software is adapted from the active contour algorithm, also known as Snakes, which is especially suitable for images with uneven illumination and noisy background that often plagues automated imaging processing in high-throughput screens. The complimentary "Manual Initialize" and "Hand Draw" tools provide the flexibility to SpheroidSizer in dealing with various types of spheroids and diverse quality images. This high-throughput image analysis software remarkably reduces labor and speeds up the analysis process. Implementing this software is beneficial for 3D tumor spheroids to become a routine in vitro model

  9. Arbitrary scattering of an acoustical Bessel beam by a rigid spheroid with large aspect-ratio

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gong, Zhixiong; Li, Wei; Mitri, Farid G.; Chai, Yingbin; Zhao, Yao

    2016-11-01

    In this paper, the T-matrix (null-field) method is applied to investigate the acoustic scattering by a large-aspect-ratio rigid spheroid immersed in a non-viscous fluid under the illumination of an unbounded zeroth-order Bessel beam with arbitrary orientation. Based on the proposed method, a MATLAB software package is constructed accordingly, and then verified and validated to compute the acoustic scattering by a rigid oblate or prolate spheroid in the Bessel beam. Several numerical examples are carried out to investigate the novel phenomenon of acoustic scattering by spheroids in Bessel beams with arbitrary incidence, with particular emphasis on the aspect ratio (i.e. the ratio of the polar radius over the equatorial radius of the spheroid), the half-cone angle of Bessel beam, the dimensionless frequency, as well as the angle of incidence. The quasi-periodic oscillations are observed in the plots of the far-field backscattering form function modulus versus the dimensionless frequency, owing to the interference between the specular reflection and the Franz wave circumnavigating the spheroid in the surrounding fluid. Furthermore, the 3D far-field scattering directivity patterns at end-on incidence and 2D polar plots at arbitrary angles of incidence are exhibited, which could provide new insights into the physical mechanisms of Bessel beam scattering by flat or elongated spheroid. This research work may provide an impetus for the application of acoustic Bessel beam in engineering practices.

  10. Hypoxic fraction and binding of misonidazole in EMT6/Ed multicellular tumor spheroids

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Franko, A.J.

    1985-01-01

    Misonidazole has been shown to bind selectively to hypoxic cells in tissue culture and to cells which are presumed to be chronically hypoxic in EMT6 spheroids and tumors. Thus it has considerable potential as a marker of hypoxic cells in vivo. To further evaluate this potential EMT6/Ed spheroids were used to quantitate misonidazole binding under conditions which resulted in hypoxic fractions between 0 and 1. The patterns of binding of 14 C-labeled misonidazole determined by autoradiography were consistent with the regions of radiobiological hypoxia as predicted by oxygen diffusion theory. The overall uptake of 3 H-labeled misonidazole by spheroids correlated well with the hypoxic fraction, although binding to aerobic cells and necrotic tissue contributed appreciably to the total label in the spheroids. It is concluded that misonidazole is an excellent marker of hypoxia in EMT6/Ed spheroids at the microscopic level, and the total amount bound per spheroid provides a potentially useful measure of the hypoxic fraction

  11. The effect of spheroidizing by thermal cycling in low concentration Cr-Mo alloy steel

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yun, H.S.; Kang, C.Y.

    1979-01-01

    An intensive study was carried out on spheroidizing of pearlite (Sph) and number of spherical carbide in proeutectoid ferrite (No/100) of low concentration Cr-Mo steel with thermal cycling. Physical and mechanical properties of steel containing 0.33 % C with thermal cycling were compared with those of low concentration Cr-Mo steel with thermal cycling. The effect of normal heat treatment and cooling rate on spheroidizing of pearlite and precipitation of fine spherical carbide in the steels were investigated. The results obtained were as follows: 1) Thermal cycling of low concentration Cr-Mo steel promoted the spheroidizing of pearlite compared with that of steel without Cr and Mo to steel had significant effect on spheroidizing of pearlite. 2) Number of fine spherical carbides of low concentration Cr-Mo steel with thermal cycling was over 5 times to that of fine spherical carbides of hypoeutectoid steel with thermal cycling. 3) Spheroidizing of pearlite and number of fine spherical carbide in proeutectoid ferrite of low concentration Cr-Mo steel with increasing thermal cycle and cooling rate. 4) Hardness of steel with thermal cycling was decreased. However, low concentration Cr-Mo steel had little decreasing rate in hardness with increasing thermal cycle on the basis of 100 times in thermal cycle. Therefore, toughness was considered to be increased with increasing spheroidizing of pearlite without changing mechanical properties. (author)

  12. Cancer cell spheroids are a better screen for the photodynamic efficiency of glycosylated photosensitizers.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Patrícia M R Pereira

    Full Text Available Photodynamic Therapy (PDT relies on the use of non-toxic photosensitizers that are locally and selectively activated by light to induce cell death or apoptosis through reactive oxygen species generation. The conjugation of porphyrinoids with sugars that target cancer is increasingly viewed as an effective way to increase the selectivity of PDT. To date, in vitro PDT efficacy is mostly screened using two-dimensional monolayer cultures. Compared to monolayer cultures, three-dimensional spheroid cultures have unique spatial distributions of nutrients, metabolites, oxygen and signalling molecules; therefore better mimic in vivo conditions. We obtained 0.05 mm3 spheroids with four different human tumor cell lines (HCT-116, MCF-7, UM-UC-3 and HeLa with appropriate sizes for screening PDT agents. We observed that detachment from monolayer culture and growth as tumor spheroids was accompanied by changes in glucose metabolism, endogenous ROS levels, galectin-1 and glucose transporter GLUT1 protein levels. We compared the phototoxic responses of a porphyrin conjugated with four glucose molecules (PorGlu4 in monolayer and spheroid cultures. The uptake and phototoxicity of PorGlu4 is highly dependent on the monolayer versus spheroid model used and on the different levels of GLUT1 protein expressed by these in vitro platforms. This study demonstrates that HCT-116, MCF-7, UM-UC-3 and HeLa spheroids afford a more rational platform for the screening of new glycosylated-photosensitizers compared to monolayer cultures of these cancer cells.

  13. Fibroblast spheroids as a model to study sustained fibroblast quiescence and their crosstalk with tumor cells

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Salmenperä, Pertteli, E-mail: pertteli.salmenpera@helsinki.fi [Department of Virology, Medicum, Faculty of Medicine, University of Helsinki, P.O. Box 21, FIN-00014 (Finland); Karhemo, Piia-Riitta [Research Programs Unit, Translational Cancer Biology, and Institute of Biomedicine, University of Helsinki, P.O. Box 63, FIN-00014 (Finland); Räsänen, Kati [Department of Virology, Medicum, Faculty of Medicine, University of Helsinki, P.O. Box 21, FIN-00014 (Finland); Laakkonen, Pirjo [Research Programs Unit, Translational Cancer Biology, and Institute of Biomedicine, University of Helsinki, P.O. Box 63, FIN-00014 (Finland); Vaheri, Antti [Department of Virology, Medicum, Faculty of Medicine, University of Helsinki, P.O. Box 21, FIN-00014 (Finland)

    2016-07-01

    Stromal fibroblasts have an important role in regulating tumor progression. Normal and quiescent fibroblasts have been shown to restrict and control cancer cell growth, while cancer-associated, i. e. activated fibroblasts have been shown to enhance proliferation and metastasis of cancer cells. In this study we describe generation of quiescent fibroblasts in multicellular spheroids and their effects on squamous cell carcinoma (SCC) growth in soft-agarose and xenograft models. Quiescent phenotype of fibroblasts was determined by global down-regulation of expression of genes related to cell cycle and increased expression of p27. Interestingly, microarray analysis showed that fibroblast quiescence was associated with similar secretory phenotype as seen in senescence and they expressed senescence-associated-β-galactosidase. Quiescent fibroblasts spheroids also restricted the growth of RT3 SCC cells both in soft-agarose and xenograft models unlike proliferating fibroblasts. Restricted tumor growth was associated with marginally increased tumor cell senescence and cellular differentiation, showed with senescence-associated-β-galactosidase and cytokeratin 7 staining. Our results show that the fibroblasts spheroids can be used as a model to study cellular quiescence and their effects on cancer cell progression. - Highlights: • Fibroblasts acquire a sustained quiescence when grown as multicellular spheroids. • This quiescence is associated with drastic change in gene expression. • Fibroblasts spheroids secrete various inflammation-linked cytokines and chemokines. • Fibroblasts spheroids reduced growth of RT3 SCC cells in xenograft model.

  14. Characterization of variants isolated from BCNU-treated 9L multicellular spheroids

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hoff, M.H.B.; Deen, D.F.

    1984-01-01

    Multicellular spheroids of the 9L rat brain tumor cell line were treated with a single high-dose to produce cells of varying sensitivity. Treatment of 350-450 μm diameter 9L spheroids with 45 μM BCNU for 1 hr at 37 0 C produced 5 log cell kill. Some of the treated spheroids were dissociated immediately after treatment; others were dissociated after 1 wk. From these populations, twenty clones were selected and passaged as monolayers. Each clone was assayed at passage 2 for BCNU-induced damage using colony forming efficiency and sister chromatid exchange. 60% of the clones were resistant to BCNU, 15% were unchanged, and 15% appeared hypersensitive as compared with the control, which were uncloned 9L cells. All of the hypersensitive clones originated from the spheroids that remained in suspension after treatment. Three clones were studied during subsequent passage in monolayer. Two resistant clones maintained their resistance to BCNU over -- 25 passages, while one hypersensitive clone appeared to become progressively more resistant during passage. Thus, as with monolayer and in vivo 9L cells, a single high-dose treatment with BCNU produces a spectrum of sensitivities to BCNU. Some of these phenotypes are stable over many passages and have been used to initiate 9L spheroids having varying sensitivity to BCNU. These spheroids will be used to investigate drug-radiation interactions

  15. Imaging Herpes Simplex Virus Type 1 Amplicon Vector–Mediated Gene Expression in Human Glioma Spheroids

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Christine Kaestle

    2011-05-01

    Full Text Available Vectors derived from herpes simplex virus type 1 (HSV-1 have great potential for transducing therapeutic genes into the central nervous system; however, inefficient distribution of vector particles in vivo may limit their therapeutic potential in patients with gliomas. This study was performed to investigate the extent of HSV-1 amplicon vector–mediated gene expression in a three-dimensional glioma model of multicellular spheroids by imaging highly infectious HSV-1 virions expressing green fluorescent protein (HSV-GFP. After infection or microscopy-guided vector injection of glioma spheroids at various spheroid sizes, injection pressures and injection times, the extent of HSV-1 vector–mediated gene expression was investigated via laser scanning microscopy. Infection of spheroids with HSV-GFP demonstrated a maximal depth of vector-mediated GFP expression at 70 to 80 μm. A > 80% transduction efficiency was reached only in small spheroids with a diameter of 90%. The results demonstrated that vector-mediated gene expression in glioma spheroids was strongly dependent on the mode of vector application—injection pressure and injection time being the most important parameters. The assessment of these vector application parameters in tissue models will contribute to the development of safe and efficient gene therapy protocols for clinical application.

  16. Targeted radiotherapy of multicell neuroblastoma spheroids with high specific activity [125I]meta-iodobenzylguanidine

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Roa, Wilson H.Y.; Miller, Gerald G.; McEwan, Alexander J.B.; McQuarrie, Steve A.; Tse, Jeanie; Wu, Jonn; Wiebe, Leonard I.

    1998-01-01

    Purpose: Iodine-125 induces cell death by a mechanism similar to that of high linear energy transfer (high-LET) radiation. This study investigates the cytotoxicity of high-specific-activity [ 125 I]meta-iodobenzylguanidine ( 125 I-mIBG) in human SK-N-MC neuroblastoma cells grown as three-dimensional multicellular spheroids. Materials and Methods: Spheroids were incubated with high-specific-activity 125 I-mIBG (6 mCi/μg, 1000 times that of the conventional specific activity used for autoradiography). Cytotoxicity was assessed by fluorescence viability markers and confocal microscopy for intact spheroids, fluorescence-activated cell sorting and clonogenic assay, and clonogenic assays for dispersed whole spheroids. Distribution of radioactive mIBG was determined by quantitative light-microscope autoradiography of spheroid cryostat sections. Dose estimation was based on temporal knowledge of the retained radioactivity inside spheroids, and of the radiolabel's emission characteristics. Findings were compared with those of spheroids treated under the same conditions with 131 I-mIBG, cold mIBG, and free iodine-125. Results: 125 I-mIBG exerted significant cell killing. Complete spheroids were eradicated when they were treated with 500 μCi of 125 I-mIBG, while those treated with 500 μCi or 1000 μCi of 131 I-mIBG were not. The observed difference in cytotoxicity between treatments with 125 I- and 131 I-mIBG could not be accounted for by the absorbed dose of spheroid alone. The peripheral, proliferating cell layer of the spheroids remained viable at the moderate radioactivity of 100 μCi for both isotopes. Cytotoxicity induced by 125 I-mIBG was quantitatively comparable by the peripheral rim thickness to that of 131 I-mIBG at the dose of 100 μCi. The peripheral rim thickness decreased most significantly in the first 17 hours after initial treatment. There was no statistical decrease in the rim thickness identified afterwards for the second, third, and fourth days of

  17. Universal Dark Halo Scaling Relation for the Dwarf Spheroidal Satellites

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hayashi, Kohei; Ishiyama, Tomoaki; Ogiya, Go; Chiba, Masashi; Inoue, Shigeki; Mori, Masao

    2017-07-01

    Motivated by a recently found interesting property of the dark halo surface density within a radius, {r}\\max , giving the maximum circular velocity, {V}\\max , we investigate it for dark halos of the Milky Way’s and Andromeda’s dwarf satellites based on cosmological simulations. We select and analyze the simulated subhalos associated with Milky-Way-sized dark halos and find that the values of their surface densities, {{{Σ }}}{V\\max }, are in good agreement with those for the observed dwarf spheroidal satellites even without employing any fitting procedures. Moreover, all subhalos on the small scales of dwarf satellites are expected to obey the universal relation, irrespective of differences in their orbital evolutions, host halo properties, and observed redshifts. Therefore, we find that the universal scaling relation for dark halos on dwarf galaxy mass scales surely exists and provides us with important clues for understanding fundamental properties of dark halos. We also investigate orbital and dynamical evolutions of subhalos to understand the origin of this universal dark halo relation and find that most subhalos evolve generally along the {r}\\max \\propto {V}\\max sequence, even though these subhalos have undergone different histories of mass assembly and tidal stripping. This sequence, therefore, should be the key feature for understanding the nature of the universality of {{{Σ }}}{V\\max }.

  18. Three-dimensional alginate spheroid culture system of murine osteosarcoma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Akeda, Koji; Nishimura, Akinobu; Satonaka, Haruhiko; Shintani, Ken; Kusuzaki, Katsuyuki; Matsumine, Akihiko; Kasai, Yuichi; Masuda, Koichi; Uchida, Atsumasa

    2009-11-01

    Osteosarcoma (OS) is the most common primary malignant tumor of the bone and often forms pulmonary metastases, which are the most important prognostic factor. For further elucidation of the mechanism underlying the progression and metastasis of human OS, a culture system mimicking the microenvironment of the tumor in vivo is needed. We report a novel three-dimensional (3D) alginate spheroid culture system of murine osteosarcoma. Two different metastatic clones, the parental Dunn and its derivative line LM8, which has a higher metastatic potential to the lungs, were encapsulated in alginate beads to develop the 3D culture system. The beads containing murine OS cells were also transplanted into mice to determine their metastatic potential in vivo. In this culture system, murine OS cells encapsulated in alginate beads were able to grow in a 3D structure with cells detaching from the alginate environment. The number of detaching cells was higher in the LM8 cell line than the Dunn cell line. In the in vivo alginate bead transplantation model, the rate of pulmonary metastasis was higher with LM8 cells compared with that of Dunn cells. The cell characteristics and kinetics in this culture system closely reflect the original malignant potential of the cells in vivo.

  19. ON THE r -PROCESS ENRICHMENT OF DWARF SPHEROIDAL GALAXIES

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bramante, Joseph [Department of Physics, 225 Nieuwland Science Hall, University of Notre Dame, Notre Dame, IN 46556 (United States); Linden, Tim [Center for Cosmology and AstroParticle Physics (CCAPP) and Department of Physics The Ohio State University, Columbus OH, 43210 (United States)

    2016-07-20

    Recent observations of Reticulum II have uncovered an overabundance of r -process elements compared to similar ultra-faint dwarf spheroidal galaxies (UFDs). Because the metallicity and star formation history of Reticulum II appear consistent with all known UFDs, the high r -process abundance of Reticulum II suggests enrichment through a single, rare event, such as a double neutron star (NS) merger. However, we note that this scenario is extremely unlikely, as binary stellar evolution models require significant supernova natal kicks to produce NS–NS or NS–black hole (BH) mergers, and these kicks would efficiently remove compact binary systems from the weak gravitational potentials of UFDs. We examine alternative mechanisms for the production of r -process elements in UFDs, including a novel mechanism wherein NSs in regions of high dark matter (DM) density implode after accumulating a BH-forming mass of DM. We find that r -process proto-material ejection by tidal forces, when a single NS implodes into a BH, can occur at a rate matching the r -process abundance of both Reticulum II and the Milky Way. Remarkably, DM models which collapse a single NS in observed UFDs also solve the missing pulsar problem in the Milky Way Galactic Center. We propose tests specific to DM r -process production which may uncover or rule out this model.

  20. The Variable Stars of the Draco Dwarf Spheroidal Galaxy: Revisited

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kinemuchi, K.; Harris, H. C.; Smith, Horace A.; Silbermann, N. A.; Snyder, L. A.; La Cluyzé, A. P.; Clark, C. L.

    2008-11-01

    We present a CCD survey of variable stars in the Draco dwarf spheroidal galaxy. This survey, which has the largest areal coverage since the original variable star survey by Baade & Swope, includes photometry for 270 RR Lyrae (RRL) stars, 9 anomalous Cepheids (ACs), 2 eclipsing binaries, and 12 slow, irregular red variables, as well as 30 background QSOs. Twenty-six probable double-mode RRL stars were identified. Observed parameters, including mean V and I magnitudes, V amplitudes, and periods, have been derived. Photometric metallicities of the ab-type RRL stars were calculated according to the method of Jurcsik & Kovacs, yielding a mean metallicity of lang[Fe/H]rang = -2.19 ± 0.03. The well-known Oosterhoff intermediate nature of the RRL stars in Draco is reconfirmed, although the double-mode RRL stars, with one exception, have properties similar to those found in Oosterhoff type II globular clusters. The period-luminosity relation of the ACs is rediscussed with the addition of the new Draco ACs.

  1. A Kinematic Study of the Andromeda Dwarf Spheroidal System

    Science.gov (United States)

    Collins, Michelle L. M.; Chapman, Scott C.; Rich, R. Michael; Ibata, Rodrigo A.; Martin, Nicolas F.; Irwin, Michael J.; Bate, Nicholas F.; Lewis, Geraint F.; Peñarrubia, Jorge; Arimoto, Nobuo; Casey, Caitlin M.; Ferguson, Annette M. N.; Koch, Andreas; McConnachie, Alan W.; Tanvir, Nial

    2013-05-01

    We present a homogeneous kinematic analysis of red giant branch stars within 18 of the 28 Andromeda dwarf spheroidal (dSph) galaxies, obtained using the Keck I/LRIS and Keck II/DEIMOS spectrographs. Based on their g - i colors (taken with the CFHT/MegaCam imager), physical positions on the sky, and radial velocities, we assign probabilities of dSph membership to each observed star. Using this information, the velocity dispersions, central masses, and central densities of the dark matter halos are calculated for these objects, and compared with the properties of the Milky Way dSph population. We also measure the average metallicity ([Fe/H]) from the co-added spectra of member stars for each M31 dSph and find that they are consistent with the trend of decreasing [Fe/H] with luminosity observed in the Milky Way population. We find that three of our studied M31 dSphs appear as significant outliers in terms of their central velocity dispersion, And XIX, XXI, and XXV, all of which have large half-light radii (gsim 700 pc) and low velocity dispersions (σ v ratio within its half-light radius of just [M/L]_half=10.3^{+7.0}_{-6.7}, making it consistent with a simple stellar system with no appreciable dark matter component within its 1σ uncertainties. We suggest that the structure of the dark matter halos of these outliers have been significantly altered by tides.

  2. A Chemical Evolution Model for the Fornax Dwarf Spheroidal Galaxy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yuan Zhen

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Fornax is the brightest Milky Way (MW dwarf spheroidal galaxy and its star formation history (SFH has been derived from observations. We estimate the time evolution of its gas mass and net inflow and outflow rates from the SFH usinga simple star formation law that relates the star formation rate to the gas mass. We present a chemical evolution model on a 2D mass grid with supernovae (SNe as sources of metal enrichment. We find that a key parameter controlling the enrichment is the mass Mx of the gas to mix with the ejecta from each SN. The choice of Mx depends on the evolution of SN remnants and on the global gas dynamics. It differs between the two types of SNe involved and between the periods before and after Fornax became an MW satellite at time t = tsat. Our results indicate that due to the global gas outflow at t > tsat, part of the ejecta from each SN may directly escape from Fornax. Sample results from our model are presented and compared with data.

  3. The presence of opioidergic pinealocytes in the pineal gland of the European hamster (Cricetus cricetus): an immunocytochemical study

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Coto-Montes, A.; Masson-Pévet, M.; Pévet, P.

    1994-01-01

    Neurobiologi, pineal gland, leu-enkephalin, Met-enkephalin, synaptic contacts, paracrine regulation, European hamster, cricetus cricetus (rodents)......Neurobiologi, pineal gland, leu-enkephalin, Met-enkephalin, synaptic contacts, paracrine regulation, European hamster, cricetus cricetus (rodents)...

  4. Andes Virus M Genome Segment is Not Sufficient to Confer the Virulence Associated With Andres Virus in Syrian Hamsters

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    McElroy, A

    2004-01-01

    ...) in North and South America, respectively. Although ANDV causes a lethal HPS-like disease in hamsters, SNV, and all other HPS-associated hantaviruses that have been tested, cause asymptomatic infections of laboratory animals, including hamsters...

  5. Transplantation of hamster lung lesions induced by 239PuO2 or benz(a)pyrene

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    McDonald, K.E.; Sanders, C.L.

    1980-01-01

    None(0%) of 1000 recipients of lung lesions for 239 PuO 2 -exposed hamsters that were transplanted into other hamsters' cheek pouches, developed tumors, whereas 90% of transplants from benz(a)pyrene-induced lung lesions were malignant

  6. Experimental evidence for several spheroid growth mechanisms in the liquid-phase sintered tungsten-base composites

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zukas, E.G.; Rogers, P.S.Z.; Rogers, R.S.

    1976-01-01

    The generally accepted mechanism for spheroid growth during sintering of tungsten-base composites in the presence of a liquid phase is the dissolution of the small spheroids with simultaneous precipitation of tungsten from the molten matrix onto the larger spheroids, the process being driven by the difference in surface energy between the larger and smaller spheroids. From theoretical considerations, the slope of the straight line of log diameter versus log time should be 1 / 3 for this process. The experimental evidence for the dissolution and reprecipitation mechanism is meager, being based primarily on the spheroid growth rate during the latter stages of liquid-phase sintering. Experimental evidence is presented that shows spheroid growth taking place in systems where the tungsten and the matrix are mutually insoluble thereby making dissolution and reprecipitation impossible. Furthermore, the results from these studies and others using the usual matrix compositions indicate that spheroid growth takes place predominantly by the combination or coalescence of two or more spheroids. Deposition of tungsten from the molten matrix also occurs, although not necessarily on spheroid surfaces which have the lowest surface energy. Thus, many mechanisms, each depending on temperature and other variables, operate simultaneously. A satisfactory theoretical treatment must include them all

  7. Retrieval of spheroid particle size distribution from spectral extinction data in the independent mode using PCA approach

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tang, Hong; Lin, Jian-Zhong

    2013-01-01

    An improved anomalous diffraction approximation (ADA) method is presented for calculating the extinction efficiency of spheroids firstly. In this approach, the extinction efficiency of spheroid particles can be calculated with good accuracy and high efficiency in a wider size range by combining the Latimer method and the ADA theory, and this method can present a more general expression for calculating the extinction efficiency of spheroid particles with various complex refractive indices and aspect ratios. Meanwhile, the visible spectral extinction with varied spheroid particle size distributions and complex refractive indices is surveyed. Furthermore, a selection principle about the spectral extinction data is developed based on PCA (principle component analysis) of first derivative spectral extinction. By calculating the contribution rate of first derivative spectral extinction, the spectral extinction with more significant features can be selected as the input data, and those with less features is removed from the inversion data. In addition, we propose an improved Tikhonov iteration method to retrieve the spheroid particle size distributions in the independent mode. Simulation experiments indicate that the spheroid particle size distributions obtained with the proposed method coincide fairly well with the given distributions, and this inversion method provides a simple, reliable and efficient method to retrieve the spheroid particle size distributions from the spectral extinction data. -- Highlights: ► Improved ADA is presented for calculating the extinction efficiency of spheroids. ► Selection principle about spectral extinction data is developed based on PCA. ► Improved Tikhonov iteration method is proposed to retrieve the spheroid PSD.

  8. Radiosensitivity of different human tumor cells lines grown as multicellular spheroids determined from growth curves and survival data

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Schwachoefer, J.H.C.; Crooijmans, R.P.; van Gasteren, J.J.; Hoogenhout, J.; Jerusalem, C.R.; Kal, H.B.; Theeuwes, A.G.

    1989-01-01

    Five human tumor cell lines were grown as multicellular tumor spheroids (MTS) to determine whether multicellular tumor spheroids derived from different types of tumors would show tumor-type dependent differences in response to single-dose irradiation, and whether these differences paralleled clinical behavior. Multicellular tumor spheroids of two neuroblastoma, one lung adenocarcinoma, one melanoma, and a squamous cell carcinoma of the oral tongue, were studied in terms of growth delay, calculated cell survival, and spheroid control dose50 (SCD50). Growth delay and cell survival analysis for the tumor cell lines showed sensitivities that correlated well with clinical behavior of the tumor types of origin. Similar to other studies on melanoma multicellular tumor spheroids our spheroid control dose50 results for the melanoma cell line deviated from the general pattern of sensitivity. This might be due to the location of surviving cells, which prohibits proliferation of surviving cells and hence growth of melanoma multicellular tumor spheroids. This study demonstrates that radiosensitivity of human tumor cell lines can be evaluated in terms of growth delay, calculated cell survival, and spheroid control dose50 when grown as multicellular tumor spheroids. The sensitivity established from these evaluations parallels clinical behavior, thus offering a unique tool for the in vitro analysis of human tumor radiosensitivity

  9. Acoustic scattering of a Bessel vortex beam by a rigid fixed spheroid

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mitri, F. G.

    2015-12-01

    Partial-wave series representation of the acoustic scattering field of high-order Bessel vortex beams by rigid oblate and prolate spheroids using the modal matching method is developed. The method, which is applicable to slightly elongated objects at low-to-moderate frequencies, requires solving a system of linear equations which depends on the partial-wave index n and the order of the Bessel vortex beam m using truncated partial-wave series expansions (PWSEs), and satisfying the Neumann boundary condition for a rigid immovable surface in the least-squares sense. This original semi-analytical approach developed for Bessel vortex beams is demonstrated for finite oblate and prolate spheroids, where the mathematical functions describing the spheroidal geometry are written in a form involving single angular (polar) integrals that are numerically computed. The transverse (θ = π / 2) and 3D scattering directivity patterns are evaluated in the far-field for both prolate and oblate spheroids, with particular emphasis on the aspect ratio (i.e., the ratio of the major axis over the minor axis of the spheroid) not exceeding 3:1, the half-cone angle β and order m of the Bessel vortex beam, as well as the dimensionless size parameter kr0. Periodic oscillations in the magnitude plots of the far-field scattering form function are observed, which result from the interference of the reflected waves with the circumferential (Franz') waves circumnavigating the surface of the spheroid in the surrounding fluid. Moreover, the 3D directivity patterns illustrate the far-field scattering from the spheroid, that vanishes in the forward (θ = 0) and backward (θ = π) directions. Particular applications in underwater acoustics and scattering, acoustic levitation and the detection of submerged elongated objects using Bessel vortex waves to name a few, would benefit from the results of the present investigation.

  10. Generation of Multicellular Tumor Spheroids with Microwell-Based Agarose Scaffolds for Drug Testing.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xue Gong

    Full Text Available Three dimensional multicellular aggregate, also referred to as cell spheroid or microtissue, is an indispensable tool for in vitro evaluating antitumor activity and drug efficacy. Compared with classical cellular monolayer, multicellular tumor spheroid (MCTS offers a more rational platform to predict in vivo drug efficacy and toxicity. Nevertheless, traditional processing methods such as plastic dish culture with nonadhesive surfaces are regularly time-consuming, laborious and difficult to provide uniform-sized spheroids, thus causing poor reproducibility of experimental data and impeding high-throughput drug screening. In order to provide a robust and effective platform for in vitro drug evaluation, we present an agarose scaffold prepared with the template containing uniform-sized micro-wells in commercially available cell culture plates. The agarose scaffold allows for good adjustment of MCTS size and large-scale production of MCTS. Transparent agarose scaffold also allows for monitoring of spheroid formation under an optical microscopy. The formation of MCTS from MCF-7 cells was prepared using different-size-well templates and systematically investigated in terms of spheroid growth curve, circularity, and cell viability. The doxorubicin cytotoxicity against MCF-7 spheroid and MCF-7 monolayer cells was compared. The drug penetration behavior, cell cycle distribution, cell apoptosis, and gene expression were also evaluated in MCF-7 spheroid. The findings of this study indicate that, compared with cellular monolayer, MCTS provides a valuable platform for the assessment of therapeutic candidates in an in vivo-mimic microenvironment, and thus has great potential for use in drug discovery and tumor biology research.

  11. Functional evidence for alternative ANG II-forming pathways in hamster cardiovascular system

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Nishimura, H; Buikema, H; Baltatu, O; Ganten, D; Urata, H

    1998-01-01

    Like human chymase, hamster chymase is an ANG II-forming enzyme, but pathophysiological roles of chymase are still unknown. We determined the functional conversion of ANG I and [Pro(11), D-Ala(12)]ANG I, a chymase-selective substrate, to ANG II in the hamster cardiovascular system. ANG I and

  12. Spermatogenesis is accelerated in the immature Djungarian and Chinese hamster and rat

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van Haaster, L. H.; de rooij, D. G.

    1993-01-01

    The rate of progression of spermatogenesis was studied in immature Djungarian and Chinese hamsters and Wistar rats by scoring the most advanced cell types present at various ages after birth. From 15 days of age onward, the most advanced cell types in the Djungarian hamsters were formed at a rate

  13. Effect of prenatal and postnatal photoperiod on spermatogenic development in the Djungarian hamster (Phodopus sungorus sungorus)

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van Haaster, L. H.; van Eerdenburg, F. J.; de rooij, D. G.

    1993-01-01

    The effect of the pre- and postnatal daylength on the start of spermatogenesis and further testicular development from day 4 up to day 127 was investigated in Djungarian hamsters. Hamsters were either gestated under long (16 h light:8 h dark) photoperiod and reared under long or short (4 h light:20

  14. Stimulatory effect of RFRP-3 on the gonadotrophic axis in the male Syrian hamster

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ancel, Caroline; Bentsen, Agnete H; Sébert, Marie-Emilie

    2012-01-01

    on the gonadotrophic axis in the Syrian hamster. We show that acute central injection of RFRP-3 induces c-Fos expression in GnRH neurons and increases LH, FSH, and testosterone secretion. Moreover, chronic central administration of RFRP-3 restores testicular activity and Kiss1 levels in the arcuate nucleus of hamsters...

  15. Effect of deuterium on the circadian period and metabolism in wild-type and tau mutant Syrian hamsters

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Oklejewicz, M; Hut, RA; Daan, S

    2000-01-01

    Homozygous tau mutant Syrian hamsters (tau-/-) have a free-running circadian period (tau) around 20 h and a proportionally higher metabolic rate compared with wild-type hamsters (tau+/+) with a period of circa 24 h. In this study, we applied deuterium oxide (D2O) to hamsters to test whether

  16. Caffeine induces metformin anticancer effect on fibrosarcoma in hamsters.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Popović, D J; Lalošević, D; Miljković, D; Popović, K J; Čapo, I; Popović, J K

    2018-04-01

    We investigated the effect of metformin and caffeine on fibrosarcoma in hamsters. 32 Syrian golden hamsters of both sexes, weighing approximately 100 g, were randomly allocated to 3 experimental and 2 control groups, with a minimum of 6 animals per group. 2 x 106 BHK-21/C13 cells in 1 ml were injected subcutaneously into the animals' back in 4 groups. The first experimental group started peroral treatment with metformin 500 mg/kg daily, the second with caffeine 100 mg/kg daily and the third with a combination of metformin 500 mg/kg and caffeine 100 mg/kg daily, via a gastric probe 3 days before tumor inoculation. After 2 weeks, when the tumors were approximately 2 cm in the control group, all animals were sacrificed. The blood was collected for glucose and other analyses. The tumors were excised and weighed and their diameters were measured. The tumor samples were pathohistologically (HE) and immunohistochemically (Ki-67, CD 31, COX IV, GLUT-1, iNOS) assessed and the main organs toxicologically analyzed, including the control animals that had received metformin and caffeine. Tumor volume was determined using the formula LxS2/2, where L was the longest and S the shortest diameter. Ki-67-positive cells in the tumor samples were quantified. Images were taken and processed by software UTHSCSA Image Tools for Windows Version 3.00. Statistical significances were determined by the Student's t-test. The combination of metformin and caffeine inhibited fibrosarcoma growth in hamsters without toxicity. Administration of metformin with caffeine might be an effective and safe approach in novel nontoxic adjuvant anticancer treatment.

  17. Ambient temperature affects postnatal litter size reduction in golden hamsters.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ohrnberger, Sarah A; Monclús, Raquel; Rödel, Heiko G; Valencak, Teresa G

    2016-01-01

    To better understand how different ambient temperatures during lactation affect survival of young, we studied patterns of losses of pups in golden hamsters ( Mesocricetus auratus ) at different ambient temperatures in the laboratory, mimicking temperature conditions in natural habitats. Golden hamsters produce large litters of more than 10 young but are also known to wean fewer pups at the end of lactation than they give birth to. We wanted to know whether temperature affects litter size reductions and whether the underlying causes of pup loss were related to maternal food (gross energy) intake and reproductive performance, such as litter growth. For that, we exposed lactating females to three different ambient temperatures and investigated associations with losses of offspring between birth and weaning. Overall, around one third of pups per litter disappeared, obviously consumed by the mother. Such litter size reductions were greatest at 30 °C, in particular during the intermediate postnatal period around peak lactation. Furthermore, litter size reductions were generally higher in larger litters. Maternal gross energy intake was highest at 5 °C suggesting that mothers were not limited by milk production and might have been able to raise a higher number of pups until weaning. This was further supported by the fact that the daily increases in litter mass as well as in the individual pup body masses, a proxy of mother's lactational performance, were lower at higher ambient temperatures. We suggest that ambient temperatures around the thermoneutral zone and beyond are preventing golden hamster females from producing milk at sufficient rates. Around two thirds of the pups per litter disappeared at high temperature conditions, and their early growth rates were significantly lower than at lower ambient temperatures. It is possible that these losses are due to an intrinsic physiological limitation (imposed by heat dissipation) compromising maternal energy intake and

  18. Structure and Formation of Elliptical and Spheroidal Galaxies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kormendy, John; Fisher, David B.; Cornell, Mark E.; Bender, Ralf

    2009-05-01

    dichotomy between elliptical and spheroidal galaxies. Their properties are consistent with our understanding of their different formation processes: mergers for ellipticals and conversion of late-type galaxies into spheroidals by environmental effects and by energy feedback from supernovae. In an appendix, we develop machinery to get realistic error estimates for Sérsic parameters even when they are strongly coupled. And we discuss photometric dynamic ranges necessary to get robust results from Sérsic fits. Based in part on observations obtained with the Hobby-Eberly Telescope (HET), which is a joint project of the University of Texas at Austin, the Pennsylvania State University, Stanford University, Ludwig-Maximilians-Universität München, and Georg-August-Universität Göttingen.

  19. Axisymmetric scattering of an acoustical Bessel beam by a rigid fixed spheroid.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mitri, Farid G

    2015-10-01

    Based on the partial-wave series expansion (PWSE) method in spherical coordinates, a formal analytical solution for the acoustic scattering of a zeroth-order Bessel acoustic beam centered on a rigid fixed (oblate or prolate) spheroid is provided. The unknown scattering coefficients of the spheroid are determined by solving a system of linear equations derived for the Neumann boundary condition. Numerical results for the modulus of the backscattered pressure (θ = π) in the near field and the backscattering form function in the far field for both prolate and oblate spheroids are presented and discussed, with particular emphasis on the aspect ratio (i.e., the ratio of the major axis over the minor axis of the spheroid), the half-cone angle of the Bessel beam, and the dimensionless frequency. The plots display periodic oscillations (versus the dimensionless frequency) because of the interference of specularly reflected waves in the backscattering direction with circumferential Franz' waves circumnavigating the surface of the spheroid in the surrounding fluid. Moreover, the 3-D directivity patterns illustrate the near- and far-field axisymmetric scattering. Investigations in underwater acoustics, particle levitation, scattering, and the detection of submerged elongated objects and other related applications utilizing Bessel waves would benefit from the results of the present study.

  20. Porous Nb-Ti based alloy produced from plasma spheroidized powder

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Qijun Li

    Full Text Available Spherical Nb-Ti based alloy powder was prepared by the combination of plasma spheroidization and mechanical alloying. Phase constituents, microstructure and surface state of the powder, and pore characteristics of the resulting porous alloy were investigated. The results show that the undissolved W and V in the mechanically alloyed powder is fully alloyed after spheroidization, and single β phase is achieved. Particle size of the spheroidized powder is in the range of 20–110 μm. With the decrease of particle size, a transformation from typical dendrite solidification structure to fine cell microstructure occurs. The surface of the spheroidized powder is coated by a layer of oxides consisting mainly of TiO2 and Nb2O5. Probabilities of sinter-neck formation and particle coalescence increases with increasing sintering temperature. Porous skeleton with relatively homogeneous pore distribution and open pore channel is formed after vacuum sintering at 1700 °C, and the porosity is 32%. The sintering kinetic analysis indicates that grain boundary diffusion is the primary mass transport mechanism during sintering process. Keywords: Powder metallurgy, Nb-Ti based alloy, Porous material, Mechanical alloying, Plasma spheroidizing, Solidification microstructure

  1. Elemental mapping by synchrotron radiation X-Ray microfluorescence in cellular spheroid of prostate tumor cells

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Leitao, R.G.; Anjos, M.J.; Lopes, R.T., E-mail: roberta@lin.ufrj.br [Universidade Federal do Rio de Janeiro (UFRJ), RJ (Brazil). Lab. de Instrumentacao Nuclear; Santos, C.A.N. [Instituto Nacional de Metrologia, Qualidade e Tecnologia (INMETRO), Duque de Caxias, RJ (Brazil). Lab. de Biotecnologia; Palumbo Junior, A.; Souza, P.A.V.R.; Nasciutti, L.E. [Universidade Federal do Rio de Janeiro (UFRJ), RJ (Brazil). Instituto de Ciencias Biomedicas; Pereira, G.R. [Universidade Federal do Rio de Janeiro (UFRJ), RJ (Brazil). Lab. de Ensaios Nao Destrutivos, Corrosao e Soldagem

    2013-08-15

    Prostate cancer is the sixth most common type of cancer and the third most common in males in Western industrialized countries. Cellular spheroid serves as excellent physiologic tumor models as they mimic avascular tumors and micrometastases. Trace elements play a significant role in biological processes. They are capable of affecting human health by competing with essential elements for available binding sites and by the activation or inhibition of reactions between metabolic enzymes. It is well known that zinc levels in the peripheral zone of dorsal and lateral lobes of the prostate are almost 10 times higher than in other soft tissues. Prostate tumor cells were isolated of the prostate tissue samples that were collected from patients submitted to surgery. The measurements were performed in XRF beam line at the Synchrotron Light National Laboratory (LNLS) in Campinas, Brazil. The results showed that all elements were heterogeneously distributed in different areas of the spheroids analyzed. P, S and Cl showed similar elemental distribution in all the samples analyzed while K, Ca, Fe, and Cu showed different elemental distribution. In all spheroids analyzed, Zn presented more intense distributions in the central region of the spheroid. The relationship between the function of Zn in the secretory epithelial cells and the carcinogenic process suggests that more studies on elemental mapping in spheroids are necessary. (author)

  2. Cell invasion in the spheroid sprouting assay: a spatial organisation analysis adaptable to cell behaviour.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Silvia Blacher

    Full Text Available The endothelial cell spheroid assay provides a suitable in vitro model to study (lymph angiogenesis and test pro- and anti-(lymph angiogenic factors or drugs. Usually, the extent of cell invasion, observed through optical microscopy, is measured. The present study proposes the spatial distribution of migrated cells as a new descriptor of the (lymph angiogenic response. The utility of this novel method rests with its capacity to locally characterise spheroid structure, allowing not only the investigation of single and collective cell invasion but also the evolution of the spheroid core itself. Moreover, the proposed method can be applied to 2D-projected spheroid images obtained by optical microscopy, as well as to 3D images acquired by confocal microscopy. To validate the proposed methodology, endothelial cell invasion was evaluated under different experimental conditions. The results were compared with widely used global parameters. The comparison shows that our method prevents local spheroid modifications from being overlooked and leading to the possible misinterpretation of results.

  3. Elemental mapping by synchrotron radiation X-Ray microfluorescence in cellular spheroid of prostate tumor cells

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Leitao, R.G.; Anjos, M.J.; Lopes, R.T.; Santos, C.A.N.; Palumbo Junior, A.; Souza, P.A.V.R.; Nasciutti, L.E.; Pereira, G.R.

    2013-01-01

    Prostate cancer is the sixth most common type of cancer and the third most common in males in Western industrialized countries. Cellular spheroid serves as excellent physiologic tumor models as they mimic avascular tumors and micrometastases. Trace elements play a significant role in biological processes. They are capable of affecting human health by competing with essential elements for available binding sites and by the activation or inhibition of reactions between metabolic enzymes. It is well known that zinc levels in the peripheral zone of dorsal and lateral lobes of the prostate are almost 10 times higher than in other soft tissues. Prostate tumor cells were isolated of the prostate tissue samples that were collected from patients submitted to surgery. The measurements were performed in XRF beam line at the Synchrotron Light National Laboratory (LNLS) in Campinas, Brazil. The results showed that all elements were heterogeneously distributed in different areas of the spheroids analyzed. P, S and Cl showed similar elemental distribution in all the samples analyzed while K, Ca, Fe, and Cu showed different elemental distribution. In all spheroids analyzed, Zn presented more intense distributions in the central region of the spheroid. The relationship between the function of Zn in the secretory epithelial cells and the carcinogenic process suggests that more studies on elemental mapping in spheroids are necessary. (author)

  4. Influence of reaction chamber shape on cast-iron spheroidization process in-mold

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    S. Pietrowski

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available This paper presents a results concerning the influence of reaction chamber shape on cast – iron spheroidization process in form. The volume of the tested reaction chambers was about 118000mm3. Reaction chambers in the shape of: rectangular, cylinder and spherical cap were examined. It has been shown that the best graphite spheroidizing process was provided by spherical cap chamber shape. The reaction of cast – iron with magnesium in reaction chamber depends on the flow of cast – iron in the chamber. In rectangular and cylinder shape chambers proceed the impact of diphase stream on flat bottom wall. It causes the creation on its surface film, called: cast – iron “film”, where single grains of magnesium master alloy exist. The largest part of master alloy is drifted by liquid cast – iron to the top and only there graphite spheroidization process proceed. In the spherical cap shape reaction chamber, as a result of rotation movement of liquid cast – iron throughout its volume, graphite spheroidization process proceed. Apart from the reaction chamber shape, applying of mixing chamber ensure full cast – iron spheroidization process.

  5. Application of Mie theory to assess structure of spheroidal scattering in backscattering geometries.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chalut, Kevin J; Giacomelli, Michael G; Wax, Adam

    2008-08-01

    Inverse light scattering analysis seeks to associate measured scattering properties with the most probable theoretical scattering distribution. Although Mie theory is a spherical scattering model, it has been used successfully for discerning the geometry of spheroidal scatterers. The goal of this study was an in-depth evaluation of the consequences of analyzing the structure of spheroidal geometries, which are relevant to cell and tissue studies in biology, by employing Mie-theory-based inverse light scattering analysis. As a basis for this study, the scattering from spheroidal geometries was modeled using T-matrix theory and used as test data. In a previous study, we used this technique to investigate the case of spheroidal scatterers aligned with the optical axis. In the present study, we look at a broader scope which includes the effects of aspect ratio, orientation, refractive index, and incident light polarization. Over this wide range of parameters, our results indicate that this method provides a good estimate of spheroidal structure.

  6. Engineered Breast Cancer Cell Spheroids Reproduce Biologic Properties of Solid Tumors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ham, Stephanie L; Joshi, Ramila; Luker, Gary D; Tavana, Hossein

    2016-11-01

    Solid tumors develop as 3D tissue constructs. As tumors grow larger, spatial gradients of nutrients and oxygen and inadequate diffusive supply to cells distant from vasculature develops. Hypoxia initiates signaling and transcriptional alterations to promote survival of cancer cells and generation of cancer stem cells (CSCs) that have self-renewal and tumor-initiation capabilities. Both hypoxia and CSCs are associated with resistance to therapies and tumor relapse. This study demonstrates that 3D cancer cell models, known as tumor spheroids, generated with a polymeric aqueous two-phase system (ATPS) technology capture these important biological processes. Similar to solid tumors, spheroids of triple negative breast cancer cells deposit major extracellular matrix proteins. The molecular analysis establishes presence of hypoxic cells in the core region and expression of CSC gene and protein markers including CD24, CD133, and Nanog. Importantly, these spheroids resist treatment with chemotherapy drugs. A combination treatment approach using a hypoxia-activated prodrug, TH-302, and a chemotherapy drug, doxorubicin, successfully targets drug resistant spheroids. This study demonstrates that ATPS spheroids recapitulate important biological and functional properties of solid tumors and provide a unique model for studies in cancer research. © 2016 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  7. Spheroidal Carbonaceous Particles (SCPs) as Chronological Markers in Marine Sediments

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thornalley, D.; Rose, N.; Oppo, D.

    2016-12-01

    Spheroidal carbonaceous particles (SCPs) are a component of fly-ash, the particulate by-product of industrial high-temperature combustion of coal and fuel-oil that is released to the atmosphere with flue-gases. They are morphologically distinct and have no natural sources making them unambiguous markers of contamination from these anthropogenic sources. In naturally accumulating archives, SCPs may be used as a chronological tool as they provide a faithful record of industrial emissions and deposition. While the timing of the first presence of SCP in the 19th century, and the observed sub-surface peak are dependent on factors such as sediment accumulation rates and local industrial history, a rapid increase in SCP inputs in the mid-20thcentury appears to be a global signal corresponding to an acceleration in global electricity demand following the Second World War and the use of fuel-oil in electricity production at an industrial scale for the first time. While this approach has been widely used in lake sediments, it has not been applied to marine sediments, although there is great potential. Improved dating of 19th-20th century marine sediments has particular relevance for developing reconstructions of recent multi-decadal climate and ocean variability, and for studies that aim to place 20thcentury climate change within the context of the last millennium. Here, we present data from three sediment cores from the continental slope south of Iceland to demonstrate the temporal and spatial replicability of the SCP record in the marine environment and compare these data with cores taken from more contaminated areas off the coast of the eastern United States. The improved age model constraints provided by the analysis of SCPs has enabled a more accurate assessment of the timing of recent abrupt climate events recorded in these archives and has thus improved our understanding of likely causal climate mechanisms.

  8. A KINEMATIC STUDY OF THE ANDROMEDA DWARF SPHEROIDAL SYSTEM

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Collins, Michelle L. M.; Martin, Nicolas F. [Max-Planck-Institut fuer Astronomie, Koenigstuhl 17, D-69117 Heidelberg (Germany); Chapman, Scott C.; Irwin, Michael J. [Institute of Astronomy, Madingley Rise, Cambridge CB3 0HA (United Kingdom); Rich, R. Michael [Department of Physics and Astronomy, University of California, Los Angeles, CA 90095-1547 (United States); Ibata, Rodrigo A. [Observatoire astronomique de Strasbourg, Universite de Strasbourg, CNRS, UMR 7550, 11 rue de l' Universite, F-67000 Strasbourg (France); Bate, Nicholas F.; Lewis, Geraint F. [Sydney Institute for Astronomy, School of Physics, A28, University of Sydney, NSW 2006 (Australia); Penarrubia, Jorge [Instituto de Astrofisica de Andalucia-CSIC, Glorieta de la Astronomia s/n, E-18008 Granada (Spain); Arimoto, Nobuo [Subaru Telescope, National Astronomical Observatory of Japan, 650 North A' ohoku Place, Hilo, HI 96720 (United States); Casey, Caitlin M. [Institute for Astronomy, 2680 Woodlawn Drive, Honolulu, HI 96822-1839 (United States); Ferguson, Annette M. N. [Institute for Astronomy, University of Edinburgh, Royal Observatory, Blackford Hill, Edinburgh EH9 3HJ (United Kingdom); Koch, Andreas [Zentrum fuer Astronomie der Universitaet Heidelberg, Landessternwarte, Koenigstuhl 12, D-69117 Heidelberg (Germany); McConnachie, Alan W. [NRC Herzberg Institute of Astrophysics, 5071 West Saanich Road, British Columbia, Victoria V9E 2E7 (Canada); Tanvir, Nial [Department of Physics and Astronomy, University of Leicester, University Road, Leicester LE1 7RH (United Kingdom)

    2013-05-10

    We present a homogeneous kinematic analysis of red giant branch stars within 18 of the 28 Andromeda dwarf spheroidal (dSph) galaxies, obtained using the Keck I/LRIS and Keck II/DEIMOS spectrographs. Based on their g - i colors (taken with the CFHT/MegaCam imager), physical positions on the sky, and radial velocities, we assign probabilities of dSph membership to each observed star. Using this information, the velocity dispersions, central masses, and central densities of the dark matter halos are calculated for these objects, and compared with the properties of the Milky Way dSph population. We also measure the average metallicity ([Fe/H]) from the co-added spectra of member stars for each M31 dSph and find that they are consistent with the trend of decreasing [Fe/H] with luminosity observed in the Milky Way population. We find that three of our studied M31 dSphs appear as significant outliers in terms of their central velocity dispersion, And XIX, XXI, and XXV, all of which have large half-light radii ({approx}> 700 pc) and low velocity dispersions ({sigma}{sub v} < 5 km s{sup -1}). In addition, And XXV has a mass-to-light ratio within its half-light radius of just [M/L]{sub half}=10.3{sup +7.0}{sub -6.7}, making it consistent with a simple stellar system with no appreciable dark matter component within its 1{sigma} uncertainties. We suggest that the structure of the dark matter halos of these outliers have been significantly altered by tides.

  9. A KINEMATIC STUDY OF THE ANDROMEDA DWARF SPHEROIDAL SYSTEM

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Collins, Michelle L. M.; Martin, Nicolas F.; Chapman, Scott C.; Irwin, Michael J.; Rich, R. Michael; Ibata, Rodrigo A.; Bate, Nicholas F.; Lewis, Geraint F.; Peñarrubia, Jorge; Arimoto, Nobuo; Casey, Caitlin M.; Ferguson, Annette M. N.; Koch, Andreas; McConnachie, Alan W.; Tanvir, Nial

    2013-01-01

    We present a homogeneous kinematic analysis of red giant branch stars within 18 of the 28 Andromeda dwarf spheroidal (dSph) galaxies, obtained using the Keck I/LRIS and Keck II/DEIMOS spectrographs. Based on their g – i colors (taken with the CFHT/MegaCam imager), physical positions on the sky, and radial velocities, we assign probabilities of dSph membership to each observed star. Using this information, the velocity dispersions, central masses, and central densities of the dark matter halos are calculated for these objects, and compared with the properties of the Milky Way dSph population. We also measure the average metallicity ([Fe/H]) from the co-added spectra of member stars for each M31 dSph and find that they are consistent with the trend of decreasing [Fe/H] with luminosity observed in the Milky Way population. We find that three of our studied M31 dSphs appear as significant outliers in terms of their central velocity dispersion, And XIX, XXI, and XXV, all of which have large half-light radii (∼> 700 pc) and low velocity dispersions (σ v –1 ). In addition, And XXV has a mass-to-light ratio within its half-light radius of just [M/L] half =10.3 +7.0 -6.7 , making it consistent with a simple stellar system with no appreciable dark matter component within its 1σ uncertainties. We suggest that the structure of the dark matter halos of these outliers have been significantly altered by tides.

  10. Nature of mutants induced by ionizing radiation in cultured hamster cells. II. Antigenic response and reverse mutation of HPRT-deficient mutants induced by. gamma. -rays or ethyl methanesulphonate

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Brown, R; Stretch, A; Thacker, J

    1986-04-01

    A large series of independent mutants deficient in HPRT enzyme activity, isolated from V79-4 hamster cells, were assessed for properties which reflect the nature of the genetic changes induced. A total of 88 mutants were screened, 43 isolated from ..gamma..-ray-treated cultures and 45 induced by ethyl methanesulphonate (EMS). Firstly, each mutant was assayed for the presence of protein with the antigenic response of HPRT. In a competitive inhibition assay, 31% of EMS-induced mutants were CRM-positive compared to 7% of the ..gamma..-ray series. Secondly, each mutant was tested for ability to revert to HPRT proficiency. All except 2 of the EMS-induced mutants reverted with ethyl nitrosourea ENU, and many reverted spontaneously, under the given conditions. However reversion was not detected in about 80% of ..gamma..-ray-induced mutants, suggesting that the types of forward mutation caused by ionizing radiation differ qualitatively from those caused by EMS. (Auth.). 30 refs.; 6 figs.; 2 tabs.

  11. Radiation cell survival and growth delay studies in multicellular spheroids of small-cell lung carcinoma

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Duchesne, G.M.; Peacock, J.H.

    1987-01-01

    The radiation sensitivity of two small-cell lung carcinoma cell lines growing as multicellular spheroids in static culture was determined using clonogenic cell survival and growth delay as endpoints. Growth delay determination suggested that clonogenic cell kill was less than was obtained by direct assay of cell survival. Recovery from potentially lethal damage was assayed in one line (HC12) but was not demonstrable, and clonogenic cell survival decreased with time in treated spheroids with diameters greater than 300 μm which contained a hypoxic cell population. Microscopic examination of the treated spheroids showed the emergence of an abnormal giant-cell population, and the progressive clonogenic cell loss that occurred after treatment was thought to be due to oxygen and nutrient deprivation of the remaining viable cells by this doomed cell population. Correction of the growth delay measurements for changes in cell size and clonogenic cell population allowed correlation of the growth delay and cell survival data. (author)

  12. Magnetohydrodynamic equilibrium and stability of spheromak with spheroidal plasma-vacuum interface

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kaneko, Shobu; Kamitani, Atsushi; Takimoto, Akio.

    1985-05-01

    The analytic solutions to the Grad-Shafranov equation are obtained for a prolate and an oblate spheroidal plasma by using Hill's vortex model. Effects of a toroidal magnetic field Bsub(phi) on the MHD equilibrium configurations are investigated by using these analytic solutions. When Bsub(phi) is larger than that of the force-free configuration, the spheroidal plasmas in a vacuum magnetic field are shown to be unable in the MHD equilibrium. The several physical quantities on the equilibrium configuration are evaluated. The spheromak plasma is proved to be unstable if dp/d psi not equal 0 and d 2 V/d psi 2 >= 0 on the magnetic axis. Here p is the pressure and V(psi) the volume surrounded by a magnetic surface of psi=const. The equilibrium configurations of the spheroidal plasmas by using Hill's vortex model are shown to satisfy the above conditions, i.e., to be unstable. (author)

  13. Magnetohydrodynamic equilibrium and stability of spheromak with spheroidal plasma-vacuum interface

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kaneko, Shobu; Kamitani, Atsushi; Takimoto, Akio

    1985-01-01

    The analytic solutions to the Grad-Shafranov equation are obtained for a prolate and an oblate spheroidal plasma by using Hill's vortex model. Effects of a toroidal magnetic field Bsub(phi) on the MHD equilibrium configurations are investigated by using these analytic solutions. When Bsub(phi) is stronger than that of the force-free configuration, the spheroidal plasmas in a vacuum magnetic field are shown to be unable in the MHD equilibrium. The several physical quantities on the equilibrium configuration are evaluated. The spheromak plasma is proved to be unstable if dp/d psi not equal 0 and d 2 V/d psi 2 >= 0 on the magnetic axis. Here p is the pressure and V(psi) the volume surrounded by a magnetic surface of psi = const. The equilibrium configurations of the spheroidal plasmas by using Hill's vortex model are shown to satisfy the above conditions, i.e., to be unstable. (author)

  14. Heterogenic expression of stem cell markers in patient-derived glioblastoma spheroid cultures exposed to long-term hypoxia

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rosenberg, Tine; Aaberg-Jessen, Charlotte; Petterson, Stine Asferg

    2018-01-01

    AIM: To investigate the time profile of hypoxia and stem cell markers in glioblastoma spheroids of known molecular subtype. MATERIALS & METHODS: Patient-derived glioblastoma spheroids were cultured up to 7 days in either 2% or 21% oxygen. Levels of proliferation (Ki-67), hypoxia (HIF-1α, CA9...

  15. Scaffold-Free Coculture Spheroids of Human Colonic Adenocarcinoma Cells and Normal Colonic Fibroblasts Promote Tumorigenicity in Nude Mice

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jong-il Park

    2016-02-01

    Full Text Available The aim of this study was to form a scaffold-free coculture spheroid model of colonic adenocarcinoma cells (CACs and normal colonic fibroblasts (NCFs and to use the spheroids to investigate the role of NCFs in the tumorigenicity of CACs in nude mice. We analysed three-dimensional (3D scaffold-free coculture spheroids of CACs and NCFs. CAC Matrigel invasion assays and tumorigenicity assays in nude mice were performed to examine the effect of NCFs on CAC invasive behaviour and tumorigenicity in 3D spheroids. We investigated the expression pattern of fibroblast activation protein-α (FAP-α by immunohistochemical staining. CAC monocultures did not form densely-packed 3D spheroids, whereas cocultured CACs and NCFs formed 3D spheroids. The 3D coculture spheroids seeded on a Matrigel extracellular matrix showed higher CAC invasiveness compared to CACs alone or CACs and NCFs in suspension. 3D spheroids injected into nude mice generated more and faster-growing tumors compared to CACs alone or mixed suspensions consisting of CACs and NCFs. FAP-α was expressed in NCFs-CACs cocultures and xenograft tumors, whereas monocultures of NCFs or CACs were negative for FAP-α expression. Our findings provide evidence that the interaction between CACs and NCFs is essential for the tumorigenicity of cancer cells as well as for tumor propagation.

  16. Enhancement of postreplication repair in Chinese hamster cells

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    D'Ambrosio, S.M.; Setlow, R.B.

    1976-01-01

    Alkaline sedimentation profiles of pulse-labeled DNA from Chinese hamster cells showed that DNA from cells treated with N-acetoxy-acetylaminofluorene or ultraviolet radiation was made in segments smaller than those from untreated cells. Cells treated with a small dose (2.5 μM) of N-acetoxy-acetylaminofluorene or(2.5 J . m -2 ) 254-nm radiation, several hours before a larger dose (7 to 10 μM) of N-acetoxy-acetylaminofluorene or 5.0 J . m -2 of 254-nm radiation, also synthesized small DNA after the second dose. However, the rate at which this small DNA was joined together into parental size was appreciably greater than in absence of the small dose. This enhancement of postreplication repair (as a result of the initial small dose) was not observed when cells were incubated with cycloheximide between the two treatments. The results suggest that N-acetoxy-acetylaminofluorene and ultraviolet-damaged DNA from Chinese hamster cells are repaired by similar postreplicative mechanisms that require de novo protein synthesis for enhancement

  17. Rift Valley fever virus infection in golden Syrian hamsters.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dionna Scharton

    Full Text Available Rift Valley fever virus (RVFV is a formidable pathogen that causes severe disease and abortion in a variety of livestock species and a range of disease in humans that includes hemorrhagic fever, fulminant hepatitis, encephalitis and blindness. The natural transmission cycle involves mosquito vectors, but exposure can also occur through contact with infected fluids and tissues. The lack of approved antiviral therapies and vaccines for human use underlies the importance of small animal models for proof-of-concept efficacy studies. Several mouse and rat models of RVFV infection have been well characterized and provide useful systems for the study of certain aspects of pathogenesis, as well as antiviral drug and vaccine development. However, certain host-directed therapeutics may not act on mouse or rat pathways. Here, we describe the natural history of disease in golden Syrian hamsters challenged subcutaneously with the pathogenic ZH501 strain of RVFV. Peracute disease resulted in rapid lethality within 2 to 3 days of RVFV challenge. High titer viremia and substantial viral loads were observed in most tissues examined; however, histopathology and immunostaining for RVFV antigen were largely restricted to the liver. Acute hepatocellular necrosis associated with a strong presence of viral antigen in the hepatocytes indicates that fulminant hepatitis is the likely cause of mortality. Further studies to assess the susceptibility and disease progression following respiratory route exposure are warranted. The use of the hamsters to model RVFV infection is suitable for early stage antiviral drug and vaccine development studies.

  18. Determination of elements in blood of golden hamster by NAA

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Aguiar, Rodrigo Oliveira de

    2009-01-01

    In the present study Neutron Activation Analysis technique has been used to determine, simultaneously, some element concentrations of clinical relevance in whole blood samples of golden hamster. The normal range for Br, Ca, Cl K, Mg, Na and S considering 2 σ (Two Standard deviations) was 0.011 0.047 gL -1 (Br); 0.11 0.35 gL -1 (Ca); 2.11 3.75 gL -1 (Cl); 1.35 2.79 gL -1 (K), 0.026 0.090 gL -1 (Mg), 1.03 2.51 gL -1 (Na) e 0.97 2.01 gL -1 (S). The knowledge of these limits became possible to perform clinical investigation in this animal model using whole blood. The comparison with the results from human being whole blood estimation (Hamster and human) became possible to check the similarities or physiologic differences, an important data for animal experimentation. (author)

  19. Biological effect of focal alpha radiation on the hamster lung

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Smith, D.M.; Anderson, E.C.; Prine, J.R.; Holland, L.M.; Richmond, C.R.

    1975-11-01

    Monodispersed 10-μm diameter ZrO 2 ceramic microspheres, containing varying amounts of 239 PuO 2 or 238 PuO 2 , were injected into the jugular vein of 100-day-old Syrian hamsters. These biologically inert microspheres lodged subsequently in pulmonary capillaries and remained static in position throughout the life span of the animals with no discernible inflammatory response. The numbers of microspheres injected ranged from 2000 to 10,000 and the specific activity from 0 to 59 pCi/sphere so that the lung burdens were 0 to 354 nCi/animal. At these numbers, each plutonium-laden microsphere served as an independent, focal source of alpha radiation. No consistent alteration of life spans post-exposure was seen in the experimental hamsters compared to controls. Pulmonary tissue responses were minimal with only 0.5 percent of the animals given Pu/ZrO 2 microspheres ultimately developing primary tumors of the lung. No unexpected gross or histologic lesion were found in other major body tissues

  20. Anti-hypercholesterolemic effect of Saccharomyces boulardii in the hamster.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Girard, Philippe; Pansart, Yannick; Verleye, Marc

    2014-01-01

    Hypercholesterolemia is a major risk factor for coronary artery disease and probiotics have been suggested as tools to manage elevated cholesterol levels. The present study investigated the ability of the biotherapeutic agent Saccharomyces boulardii (Sb-Biocodex) to reduce the hypercholesterolemia induced by a 0.1% cholesterol-enriched diet in the hamster. In a first experiment, chronic oral treatment with S. boulardii at 12 × 10(10) CFU/kg (3 g/kg) twice a day was started from the beginning of the cholesterol diet and continued for 14 days ('preventive protocol'). In the second experiment, S. boulardii was given 14 days after the beginning of the cholesterol diet when hypercholesterolemia had developed and continued for an additional 14 days ('curative protocol'). In the preventive protocol, administration of the yeast significantly reduced hypercholesterolemia (14%) induced by the cholesterol-enriched diet compared to the group receiving only the cholesterol diet. In the curative protocol, S. boulardii significantly reduced hypercholesterolemia (12%) induced by the cholesterol-enriched diet, too. Moreover, the yeast significantly decreased the serum triglyceride increase by 39%. S. boulardii possesses anti-hypercholesterolemic properties in the hamster worthy of further evaluation in clinical studies. © 2014 S. Karger AG, Basel.

  1. Fully-resolved prolate spheroids in turbulent channel flows: A lattice Boltzmann study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eshghinejadfard, Amir; Hosseini, Seyed Ali; Thévenin, Dominique

    2017-09-01

    Particles are present in many natural and industrial multiphase flows. In most practical cases, particle shape is not spherical, leading to additional difficulties for numerical studies. In this paper, DNS of turbulent channel flows with finite-size prolate spheroids is performed. The geometry includes a straight wall-bounded channel at a frictional Reynolds number of 180 seeded with particles. Three different particle shapes are considered, either spheroidal (aspect ratio λ =2 or 4) or spherical (λ =1 ). Solid-phase volume fraction has been varied between 0.75% and 1.5%. Lattice Boltzmann method (LBM) is used to model the fluid flow. The influence of the particles on the flow field is simulated by immersed boundary method (IBM). In this Eulerian-Lagrangian framework, the trajectory of each particle is computed individually. All particle-particle and particle-fluid interactions are considered (four-way coupling). Results show that, in the range of examined volume fractions, mean fluid velocity is reduced by addition of particles. However, velocity reduction by spheroids is much lower than that by spheres; 2% and 1.6%, compared to 4.6%. Maximum streamwise velocity fluctuations are reduced by addition of particle. By comparing particle and fluid velocities, it is seen that spheroids move faster than the fluid before reaching the same speed in the channel center. Spheres, on the other hand, move slower than the fluid in the buffer layer. Close to the wall, all particle types move faster than the fluid. Moreover, prolate spheroids show a preferential orientation in the streamwise direction, which is stronger close to the wall. Far from the wall, the orientation of spheroidal particles tends to isotropy.

  2. Fully-resolved prolate spheroids in turbulent channel flows: A lattice Boltzmann study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Amir Eshghinejadfard

    2017-09-01

    Full Text Available Particles are present in many natural and industrial multiphase flows. In most practical cases, particle shape is not spherical, leading to additional difficulties for numerical studies. In this paper, DNS of turbulent channel flows with finite-size prolate spheroids is performed. The geometry includes a straight wall-bounded channel at a frictional Reynolds number of 180 seeded with particles. Three different particle shapes are considered, either spheroidal (aspect ratio λ=2 or 4 or spherical (λ=1. Solid-phase volume fraction has been varied between 0.75% and 1.5%. Lattice Boltzmann method (LBM is used to model the fluid flow. The influence of the particles on the flow field is simulated by immersed boundary method (IBM. In this Eulerian-Lagrangian framework, the trajectory of each particle is computed individually. All particle-particle and particle-fluid interactions are considered (four-way coupling. Results show that, in the range of examined volume fractions, mean fluid velocity is reduced by addition of particles. However, velocity reduction by spheroids is much lower than that by spheres; 2% and 1.6%, compared to 4.6%. Maximum streamwise velocity fluctuations are reduced by addition of particle. By comparing particle and fluid velocities, it is seen that spheroids move faster than the fluid before reaching the same speed in the channel center. Spheres, on the other hand, move slower than the fluid in the buffer layer. Close to the wall, all particle types move faster than the fluid. Moreover, prolate spheroids show a preferential orientation in the streamwise direction, which is stronger close to the wall. Far from the wall, the orientation of spheroidal particles tends to isotropy.

  3. Modeling mechanical inhomogeneities in small populations of proliferating monolayers and spheroids.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lejeune, Emma; Linder, Christian

    2018-06-01

    Understanding the mechanical behavior of multicellular monolayers and spheroids is fundamental to tissue culture, organism development, and the early stages of tumor growth. Proliferating cells in monolayers and spheroids experience mechanical forces as they grow and divide and local inhomogeneities in the mechanical microenvironment can cause individual cells within the multicellular system to grow and divide at different rates. This differential growth, combined with cell division and reorganization, leads to residual stress. Multiple different modeling approaches have been taken to understand and predict the residual stresses that arise in growing multicellular systems, particularly tumor spheroids. Here, we show that by using a mechanically robust agent-based model constructed with the peridynamic framework, we gain a better understanding of residual stresses in multicellular systems as they grow from a single cell. In particular, we focus on small populations of cells (1-100 s) where population behavior is highly stochastic and prior investigation has been limited. We compare the average strain energy density of cells in monolayers and spheroids using different growth and division rules and find that, on average, cells in spheroids have a higher strain energy density than cells in monolayers. We also find that cells in the interior of a growing spheroid are, on average, in compression. Finally, we demonstrate the importance of accounting for stochastic fluctuations in the mechanical environment, particularly when the cellular response to mechanical cues is nonlinear. The results presented here serve as a starting point for both further investigation with agent-based models, and for the incorporation of major findings from agent-based models into continuum scale models when explicit representation of individual cells is not computationally feasible.

  4. Radiation survival of cells from spheroids grown in different oxygen concentrations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Franko, A.J.; Sutherland, R.M.

    1979-01-01

    The position of the internal, chronically hypoxic cells in spheroids was varied by alterations in the oxygen concentration in the growth medium. Such alterations were expected to cause large changes in the size of the radiobiologically hypoxic fraction. This was tested by growing and irradiating spheroids in oxygen concentrations between 5 and 20.3%, ensuring that the irradiation and growth conditions were as similar as possible. The survival curves appeared to be linear below a surviving fraction of 3 x 10 -2 , and the slopes were intermediate between the slopes of control curves for cells from spheroids irradiated in nitrogen or when fully oxygenated. Thus direct estimates of the hypoxic fractions could not be made. Two models of oxygen diffusion might explain the data. One model assumes that a large fraction of cells was fully hypoxic (radiobiologically) and that these internal, G 1 -confined, chronically hypoxic cells had a lower inherent radioresistance than the outer proliferating cells. Evidence was presented which indicated that this model was unlikely to be correct. The other model assumes that the inherent radioresistance was equal throughout the spheroid, and that the innermost cells died before the oxygen concentration was reduced sufficiently to cause full hypoxic protection. Theoretical survival curves based on this model were generated using the measured geometries ofthe spheroids and multitarget single-hit survival theory. Acceptable agreement with the postulate that the innermost cells of spheroids die at between 0.2 and 0.4% oxygen was obtained. These data may have implications regarding the relative contributions of chronic and acute hypoxia to the fraction of hypoxic cells in tumors

  5. Supermassive Black Holes and their Host Spheroids III. The Mbh-nsph Correlation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Savorgnan, Giulia A. D.

    2016-04-01

    The Sérsic {R}1/n model is the best approximation known to date for describing the light distribution of stellar spheroidal and disk components, with the Sérsic index n providing a direct measure of the central radial concentration of stars. The Sérsic index of a galaxy’s spheroidal component, nsph, has been shown to tightly correlate with the mass of the central supermassive black hole, MBH. The {M}{BH}{--}{n}{sph} correlation is also expected from other two well known scaling relations involving the spheroid luminosity, Lsph: the {L}{sph}{--}{n}{sph} and the {M}{BH}{--}{L}{sph}. Obtaining an accurate estimate of the spheroid Sérsic index requires a careful modeling of a galaxy’s light distribution and some studies have failed to recover a statistically significant {M}{BH}{--}{n}{sph} correlation. With the aim of re-investigating the {M}{BH}{--}{n}{sph} and other black hole mass scaling relations, we performed a detailed (I.e., bulge, disks, bars, spiral arms, rings, halo, nucleus, etc.) decomposition of 66 galaxies, with directly measured black hole masses, that had been imaged at 3.6 μm with Spitzer. In this paper, the third of this series, we present an analysis of the {L}{sph}{--}{n}{sph} and {M}{BH}{--}{n}{sph} diagrams. While early-type (elliptical+lenticular) and late-type (spiral) galaxies split into two separate relations in the {L}{sph}{--}{n}{sph} and {M}{BH}{--}{L}{sph} diagrams, they reunite into a single {M}{BH}\\propto {n}{sph}3.39+/- 0.15 sequence with relatively small intrinsic scatter (ɛ ≃ 0.25 {dex}). The black hole mass appears to be closely related to the spheroid central concentration of stars, which mirrors the inner gradient of the spheroid gravitational potential.

  6. Transplantation of cord blood mesenchymal stem cells as spheroids enhances vascularization.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bhang, Suk Ho; Lee, Seahyoung; Shin, Jung-Youn; Lee, Tae-Jin; Kim, Byung-Soo

    2012-10-01

    Despite promising results from the therapeutic use of stem cells for treating ischemic diseases, the poor survival of cells transplanted into ischemic regions is one of the major problems that undermine the efficacy of stem cell therapy. Cord blood mononuclear cells (CBMNCs) are an alternative source of mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs) without disadvantages, such as the painful and invasive harvesting procedure, of MSCs derived from bone marrow or adipose tissue. In the present study, we investigated whether the angiogenic efficacy of cord blood mesenchymal stem cells (CBMSCs) can be enhanced by grafting as spheroids in a mouse hindlimb ischemia model. Human CBMSC (hCBMSC) spheroids were prepared by using the hanging-drop method. Mouse hindlimb ischemia was induced by excising the femoral artery and its branches. After surgery, the animals were divided into no-treatment, dissociated hCBMSC, and spheroid hCBMSC groups (n=8 per group) and received corresponding hCBMSC treatments. After surgery, the ischemic hindlimbs were monitored for 4 weeks, and then, the ischemic hindlimb muscles were harvested for histological analysis. Apoptotic signaling, angiogenesis-related signal pathways, and blood vessel formation were investigated in vitro and/or in vivo. The transplantation of hCBMSCs as spheroids into mouse ischemic hindlimbs significantly improved the survival of the transplanted cells by suppressing apoptotic signaling while activating antiapoptotic signaling. Furthermore, the transplantation of hCBMSCs as spheroids significantly increased the number of microvessels and smooth muscle α-actin-positive vessels in the ischemic limbs of mice, and attenuated limb loss and necrosis. Human CBMNC can be considered an alternative source of MSC, and spheroid-based hCBMSC delivery can be considered a simple and effective strategy for enhancing the therapeutic efficacy of hCBMSCs.

  7. Theoretical investigation of resonance frequencies in long wavelength electromagnetic wave scattering process from plasma prolate and oblate spheroids placed in a dielectric layer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ahmadizadeh, Y.; Jazi, B.; Abdoli-Arani, A.

    2014-01-01

    Response of a prolate spheroid plasma and/or an oblate spheroid plasma in presence of long wavelength electromagnetic wave has been studied. The resonance frequencies of these objects are obtained and it is found that they reduce to the resonance frequency of spherical cold plasma. Moreover, the resonant frequencies of prolate spheroid plasma and oblate spheroid plasma covered by a dielectric are investigated as well. Furthermore, their dependency on dielectric permittivity and geometry dimensions is simulated.

  8. Engineering fibrin hydrogels to promote the wound healing potential of mesenchymal stem cell spheroids.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Murphy, Kaitlin C; Whitehead, Jacklyn; Zhou, Dejie; Ho, Steve S; Leach, J Kent

    2017-12-01

    Mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs) secrete endogenous factors such as vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF) and prostaglandin E2 (PGE 2 ) that promote angiogenesis, modulate the inflammatory microenvironment, and stimulate wound repair, and MSC spheroids secrete more trophic factors than dissociated, individual MSCs. Compared to injection of cells alone, transplantation of MSCs in a biomaterial can enhance their wound healing potential by localizing cells at the defect site and upregulating trophic factor secretion. To capitalize on the therapeutic potential of spheroids, we engineered a fibrin gel delivery vehicle to simultaneously enhance the proangiogenic and anti-inflammatory potential of entrapped human MSC spheroids. We used multifactorial statistical analysis to determine the interaction between four input variables derived from fibrin gel synthesis on four output variables (gel stiffness, gel contraction, and secretion of VEGF and PGE 2 ). Manipulation of the four input variables tuned fibrin gel biophysical properties to promote the simultaneous secretion of VEGF and PGE 2 by entrapped MSC spheroids while maintaining overall gel integrity. MSC spheroids in stiffer gels secreted the most VEGF, while PGE 2 secretion was highest in more compliant gels. Simultaneous VEGF and PGE 2 secretion was greatest using hydrogels with intermediate mechanical properties, as small increases in stiffness increased VEGF secretion while maintaining PGE 2 secretion by entrapped spheroids. The fibrin gel formulation predicted to simultaneously increase VEGF and PGE 2 secretion stimulated endothelial cell proliferation, enhanced macrophage polarization, and promoted angiogenesis when used to treat a wounded three-dimensional human skin equivalent. These data demonstrate that a statistical approach is an effective strategy to formulate fibrin gel formulations that enhance the wound healing potential of human MSCs. Mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs) are under investigation for wound

  9. Composition of the spheroidal objects in KhN77TYuR-VD alloy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kotkis, M.A.; Nabutovskii, L.S.; Ostrov, A.E.; Zil'berman, A.G.

    1986-01-01

    The authors make an element analysis of the spheroidal objects in KhN77TYuR-VD alloy with the use of the energy dispersion microanalyzer with which the Stereoscan S-180 scanning electron microscope is equipped. Examples of the qualitative element analysis are shown. The results of the investigations show that the composition of the spheroidal inclusions includes nickel, chromium, titanium, iron, and also silicon and sulfur. The information obtained makes it possible to make an assumption on the mechanism of origin of these objects

  10. Stability of force-free spheromak plasma in spheroidal flux conserver

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kaneko, Shobu; Tsutsui, Hiroaki

    1988-01-01

    The Woltjer-Taylor method is applied to spheromak plasmas in spheroidal flux conservers. As models of the flux conserver, both oblate and prolate spheroidal vessels with a center conductor are used. The plasma is not assumed to be nearly spherical, and the Rayleigh-Ritz method and the finite element method are used to evaluate the eigenvalues. The oblate spheromak is shown to be stable irrespective of the shape of the flux conserver. Though the prolate spheromak is unstable if there is no center conductor, it can be stable if the center conductor is installed. (author)

  11. Stability of spheroidal spheromak plasma by use of force-free approximation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kaneko, Shobu; Tsutsui, Hiroaki.

    1987-09-01

    The Woltjer-Taylor method is applied to spheromak plasmas in spheroidal flux conservers. As models of the flux conserver, both oblate and prolate spheroidal vessels with a center conductor are used. The plasma is not assumed to be nearly spherical, and the Rayleigh-Ritz method and the finite element method are used to evaluate the eigenvalues. The oblate spheromak is shown to be stable irrespective of the shape of the flux conserver. Though the prolate spheromak is unstable if there is no center conductor, it can be stable if the center conductor is installed. (author)

  12. A possible formation scenario for dwarf spheroidal galaxies - III. Adding star formation histories to the fiducial model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alarcón Jara, A. G.; Fellhauer, M.; Matus Carrillo, D. R.; Assmann, P.; Urrutia Zapata, F.; Hazeldine, J.; Aravena, C. A.

    2018-02-01

    Dwarf spheroidal galaxies are regarded as the basic building blocks in the formation of larger galaxies and are the most dark matter dominated systems in the Universe, known so far. There are several models that attempt to explain their formation and evolution, but they have problems modelling the formation of isolated dwarf spheroidal galaxies. Here, we will explain a possible formation scenario in which star clusters form inside the dark matter halo of a dwarf spheroidal galaxy. These star clusters suffer from low star formation efficiency and dissolve while orbiting inside the dark matter halo. Thereby, they build the faint luminous components that we observe in dwarf spheroidal galaxies. In this paper, we study this model by adding different star formation histories to the simulations and compare the results with our previous work and observational data to show that we can explain the formation of dwarf spheroidal galaxies.

  13. Spatial distribution of elements in the spheroids by prostate tumor cells using synchrotron radiation x-ray fluorescence

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Leitao, Roberta G.; Santos, Carlos Antonio N.; Junior, Antonio Palumbo; Souza, Pedro A. V. R.; Canellas, Catarine G. L.; Anjos, Marcelino J.; Nasciutti, Luiz E.; Lopes, Ricardo T. [Laboratorio de Instrumentacao Nuclear, PEN/COPPE, Universidade Federal do Rio de Janeiro, Ilha do Fundao, 21941-972, Rio de Janeiro, RJ (Brazil); Laboratorio de Biotecnologia - Bioengenharia - DIPRO, Instituto Nacional de Metrologia, Normalizacao e Qualidade Industrial, Xerem. 25250-020, Duque de Caxias, RJ (Brazil); Laboratorio de Interacoes Celulares, ICB-CCS, Universidade Federal do Rio de Janeiro, Ilha do Fundao, 21941- 590, Rio de Janeiro, RJ (Brazil); Laboratorio de Instrumentacao Nuclear, PEN/COPPE, Universidade Federal do Rio de Janeiro, Ilha do Fundao, 21941-972, Rio de Janeiro, RJ (Brazil); Laboratorio de Interacoes Celulares, ICB-CCS, Universidade Federal do Rio de Janeiro, Ilha do Fundao, 21941- 590, Rio de Janeiro, RJ (Brazil); Laboratorio de Instrumentacao Nuclear, PEN/COPPE, Universidade Federal do Rio de Janeiro, Ilha do Fundao, 21941-972, Rio de Janeiro, RJ (Brazil)

    2012-05-17

    The formation of three-dimensional cell microspheres such as spheroids has attracted attention as a useful culture technique. In this study, we investigated the trace elemental distribution (mapping) in spheroids derived from tissue prostate cancer (PCa). The measurements were performed in standard geometry of 45 deg. incidence, exciting with a white beam and using an optical capillary with 20 {mu}m diameter collimation in the XRF beam line at the Synchrotron Light National Laboratory (Campinas, Brazil). The results showed that most elements analyzed presented non-uniform distribution. P, S and Cl showed similar elemental distribution in all the samples analyzed. K, Ca, Fe, and Cu showed different elemental distribution for the spheroids analyzed. Zinc presented more intense distributions in the spheroid central region for all spheroids analyzed.

  14. Spatial distribution of elements in the spheroids by prostate tumor cells using synchrotron radiation X-ray fluorescence

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Leitao, Roberta G.; Canellas, Catarine G.L.; Anjos, Marcelino J.; Lopes, Ricardo T.; Santos, Carlos Antonio N.; Palumbo Junior, Antonio; Souza, Pedro A.V.R.; Nasciutti, Luiz E.

    2011-01-01

    The formation of three-dimensional cell microspheres such as spheroids has attracted attention as a useful culture technique. In this study, we investigated the trace elemental distribution (mapping) in spheroids derived from tissue prostate cancer (PCa). The measurements were performed in standard geometry of 45 deg incidence, exciting with a white beam and using an optical capillary with 20 μm diameter collimation in the XRF beam line at the Synchrotron Light National Laboratory (Campinas, Brazil). The results showed that most elements analyzed presented non-uniform distribution. P, S and Cl showed similar elemental distribution in all the samples analyzed. K, Ca, Fe, and Cu showed different elemental distribution for the spheroids analyzed. Zinc presented more intense distributions in the spheroid central region for all spheroids analyzed. (author)

  15. Spatial distribution of elements in the spheroids by prostate tumor cells using synchrotron radiation x-ray fluorescence

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Leitao, Roberta G.; Santos, Carlos Antonio N.; Junior, Antonio Palumbo; Souza, Pedro A. V. R.; Canellas, Catarine G. L.; Anjos, Marcelino J.; Nasciutti, Luiz E.; Lopes, Ricardo T.

    2012-01-01

    The formation of three-dimensional cell microspheres such as spheroids has attracted attention as a useful culture technique. In this study, we investigated the trace elemental distribution (mapping) in spheroids derived from tissue prostate cancer (PCa). The measurements were performed in standard geometry of 45 deg. incidence, exciting with a white beam and using an optical capillary with 20 μm diameter collimation in the XRF beam line at the Synchrotron Light National Laboratory (Campinas, Brazil). The results showed that most elements analyzed presented non-uniform distribution. P, S and Cl showed similar elemental distribution in all the samples analyzed. K, Ca, Fe, and Cu showed different elemental distribution for the spheroids analyzed. Zinc presented more intense distributions in the spheroid central region for all spheroids analyzed.

  16. Spatial distribution of elements in the spheroids by prostate tumor cells using synchrotron radiation X-ray fluorescence

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Leitao, Roberta G.; Canellas, Catarine G.L.; Anjos, Marcelino J.; Lopes, Ricardo T. [Universidade Federal do Rio de Janeiro (PEN/COPPE/UFRJ), RJ (Brazil). Coordenacao dos Programas de Pos-Graduacao de Engenharia. Programa de Energia Nuclear; Santos, Carlos Antonio N. [Instituto Nacional de Metrologia, Normalizacao e Qualidade Industrial (INMETRO), Duque de Caxias, RJ (Brazil). Lab. de Biotecnologia - Bioengenharia; Palumbo Junior, Antonio; Souza, Pedro A.V.R.; Nasciutti, Luiz E., E-mail: nasciutt@ufrj.b [Universidade Federal do Rio de Janeiro (UFRJ), RJ (Brazil). Lab. de Interacoes Celulares

    2011-07-01

    The formation of three-dimensional cell microspheres such as spheroids has attracted attention as a useful culture technique. In this study, we investigated the trace elemental distribution (mapping) in spheroids derived from tissue prostate cancer (PCa). The measurements were performed in standard geometry of 45 deg incidence, exciting with a white beam and using an optical capillary with 20 {mu}m diameter collimation in the XRF beam line at the Synchrotron Light National Laboratory (Campinas, Brazil). The results showed that most elements analyzed presented non-uniform distribution. P, S and Cl showed similar elemental distribution in all the samples analyzed. K, Ca, Fe, and Cu showed different elemental distribution for the spheroids analyzed. Zinc presented more intense distributions in the spheroid central region for all spheroids analyzed. (author)

  17. Phase field study of interfacial diffusion-driven spheroidization in a composite comprized of two mutually insoluble phases

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tian, Liang [Ames Laboratory; Russell, Alan [Ames Laboratory

    2014-03-27

    The phase field approach is a powerful computational technique to simulate morphological and microstructural evolution at the mesoscale. Spheroidization is a frequently observed morphological change of mesoscale heterogeneous structures during annealing. In this study, we used the diffuse interface phase field method to investigate the interfacial diffusion-driven spheroidization of cylindrical rod structures in a composite comprised of two mutually insoluble phases in a two-dimensional case. Perturbation of rod radius along a cylinder's axis has long been known to cause the necessary chemical potential gradient that drives spheroidization of the rod by Lord Rayleigh's instability theory. This theory indicates that a radius perturbation wavelength larger than the initial rod circumference would lead to cylindrical spheroidization. We investigated the effect of perturbation wavelength, interfacial energy, volume diffusion, phase composition, and interfacial percentage on the kinetics of spheroidization. The results match well with both the Rayleigh's instability criterion and experimental observations.

  18. Penetration and binding of monoclonal antibody in human osteosarcoma multicell spheroids. Comparison of confocal laser scanning microscopy and autoadiography

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hjelstuen, M.H.; Rasch-Halvorsen, K.; Brekken, C.; Bruland, Oe.; Davies, C. de L.

    1996-01-01

    Penetration and binding of monoclonal antibody (MAb) in multicell osteosarcoma spheroids have been studied by autoradiography and confocal laser scanning microscopy (CLSM). Optical sectioning of the 3-dimensional spheroids was performed by CLSM. Owing to attenuation of fluorescence intensity, FITC-labelled MAb could not be detected at depths greater than 60 μm within the spheroids. The antibody uptake seen in autoradiographs and CLSM images 60 μm within the spheroids were essentially identical. MAb had reached all parts of the spheroids within 6 h. Quantitative measurements of the fluorescence intensity of FITC-labelled MAb seen in confocal images and measurements of MAb bound per cell using flow cytometry, showed that maximum uptake was reached after 6 h. The possibility to perform both quantatitive and qualitative measurements makes CLSM a promising method for studying antibody uptake in thick tissue samples. (orig.)

  19. Microscopic dose distribution around PuO2 particles in lungs of hamsters, rats and dogs

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Diel, J.H.; Mewhinney, J.A.; Guilmette, R.A.

    1982-01-01

    Syrian hamsters, Fischer-344 rats and Beagle dogs inhaled monodisperse aerosols of PuO 2 and were sacrificed 1 to 16 days after exposure. The microscopic distribution of dose and tissue-at-risk around individual particles in lung was studied using autoradiographs of the lungs. The dose pattern in dogs and rats was more diffuse than in hamsters, resulting in a calculation of about twice the tumor incidence in rats and dogs as in hamsters on the basis of dose pattern using the same dose-effect model for all three species. The tumorigenic effect of inhaled insoluble PuO 2 particles depends on the species inhaling the material; Syrian hamsters are much less susceptible than are rats or dogs. It has been suggested that a difference in dose distribution resulting from differences in particle distributions in the two species may contribute to the differences in susceptibility in Syrian hamsters and rats. The role of dose distribution in lung cancer production is explored in this study by measuring microscopic dose patterns in regions surrounding single PuO 2 particles in lung. The alveolar structures of the dog and rat are different than those of the hamster. Based on these measurements, particles of PuO 2 in lung are more likely to cause lung cancer in dogs and rats than in hamsters

  20. Determination of elements in blood of golden hamster by NAA; Determinacao de elementos em sangue de hamster dourado usando AAN

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Aguiar, Rodrigo Oliveira de

    2009-07-01

    In the present study Neutron Activation Analysis technique has been used to determine, simultaneously, some element concentrations of clinical relevance in whole blood samples of golden hamster. The normal range for Br, Ca, Cl K, Mg, Na and S considering 2 {sigma} (Two Standard deviations) was 0.011 0.047 gL{sup -1} (Br); 0.11 0.35 gL{sup -1} (Ca); 2.11 3.75 gL{sup -1} (Cl); 1.35 2.79 gL{sup -1} (K), 0.026 0.090 gL{sup -1} (Mg), 1.03 2.51 gL{sup -1} (Na) e 0.97 2.01 gL{sup -1} (S). The knowledge of these limits became possible to perform clinical investigation in this animal model using whole blood. The comparison with the results from human being whole blood estimation (Hamster and human) became possible to check the similarities or physiologic differences, an important data for animal experimentation. (author)

  1. Monitoring the effects of doxorubicin on 3D-spheroid tumor cells in real-time

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Baek N

    2016-11-01

    Full Text Available NamHuk Baek,1,* Ok Won Seo,1,* MinSung Kim,1 John Hulme,2 Seong Soo A An2 1Department of R & D, NanoEntek Inc., Seoul, Republic of Korea; 2Department of BioNano Technology Gachon University, Gyeonggi-do, Republic of Korea *These authors contributed equally to this work Abstract: Recently, increasing numbers of cell culture experiments with 3D spheroids presented better correlating results in vivo than traditional 2D cell culture systems. 3D spheroids could offer a simple and highly reproducible model that would exhibit many characteristics of natural tissue, such as the production of extracellular matrix. In this paper numerous cell lines were screened and selected depending on their ability to form and maintain a spherical shape. The effects of increasing concentrations of doxorubicin (DXR on the integrity and viability of the selected spheroids were then measured at regular intervals and in real-time. In total 12 cell lines, adenocarcinomic alveolar basal epithelial (A549, muscle (C2C12, prostate (DU145, testis (F9, pituitary epithelial-like (GH3, cervical cancer (HeLa, HeLa contaminant (HEp2, embryo (NIH3T3, embryo (PA317, neuroblastoma (SH-SY5Y, osteosarcoma U2OS, and embryonic kidney cells (293T, were screened. Out of the 12, 8 cell lines, NIH3T3, C2C12, 293T, SH-SY5Y, A549, HeLa, PA317, and U2OS formed regular spheroids and the effects of DXR on these structures were measured at regular intervals. Finally, 5 cell lines, A549, HeLa, SH-SY5Y, U2OS, and 293T, were selected for real-time monitoring and the effects of DXR treatment on their behavior were continuously recorded for 5 days. A potential correlation regarding the effects of DXR on spheroid viability and ATP production was measured on days 1, 3, and 5. Cytotoxicity of DXR seemed to occur after endocytosis, since the cellular activities and ATP productions were still viable after 1 day of the treatment in all spheroids, except SH-SY5Y. Both cellular activity and ATP production were

  2. Modeling photopolarimetric characteristics of comet dust as a polydisperse mixture of polyshaped rough spheroids

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kolokolova, L.; Das, H.; Dubovik, O.; Lapyonok, T.

    2013-12-01

    It is widely recognized now that the main component of comet dust is aggregated particles that consist of submicron grains. It is also well known that cometary dust obey a rather wide size distribution with abundant particles whose size reaches dozens of microns. However, numerous attempts of computer simulation of light scattering by comet dust using aggregated particles have not succeeded to consider particles larger than a couple of microns due to limitations in the memory and speed of available computers. Attempts to substitute aggregates by polydisperse solid particles (spheres, spheroids, cylinders) could not consistently reproduce observed angular and spectral characteristics of comet brightness and polarization even in such a general case as polyshaped (i.e. containing particles of a variety of aspect ratios) mixture of spheroids (Kolokolova et al., In: Photopolarimetry in Remote Sensing, Kluwer Acad. Publ., 431, 2004). In this study we are checking how well cometary dust can be modeled using modeling tools for rough spheroids. With this purpose we use the software package described in Dubovik et al. (J. Geophys. Res., 111, D11208, doi:10.1029/2005JD006619d, 2006) that allows for a substantial reduction of computer time in calculating scattering properties of spheroid mixtures by means of using pre-calculated kernels - quadrature coefficients employed in the numerical integration of spheroid optical properties over size and shape. The kernels were pre-calculated for spheroids of 25 axis ratios, ranging from 0.3 to 3, and 42 size bins within the size parameter range 0.01 - 625. This software package has been recently expanded with the possibility of simulating not only smooth but also rough spheroids that is used in present study. We consider refractive indexes of the materials typical for comet dust: silicate, carbon, organics, and their mixtures. We also consider porous particles accounting on voids in the spheroids through effective medium approach. The

  3. High local carcinogenic activity of 1,3-dimethyl-3-phenyl-1-nitrosourea and its inactivation by intravenous application in rats: comparison of in vivo findings with the in vitro direct and a combined in vivo/in vitro sister chromatid exchange assay in V79-E cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thust, R; Martin, J; Mendel, J; Schreiber, D

    1987-02-01

    1,3-Dimethyl-3-phenyl-1-nitrosourea (DMPNU) is a very potent local carcinogen in rats and induces a 100% frequency of forestomach carcinomas when applied i.g. in two different dosages (10 applications of 0.3 or 0.03 mmol/kg body wt, respectively, at 14-day intervals), but it is inactive upon i.v. administration (10 applications of 0.03 mmol/kg body wt at 14-day intervals). By means of the direct sister chromatid exchange (SCE) assay in V79-E cells in the presence of rat blood, serum or plasma, respectively, as well as by a 'host-mediated' SCE assay (in which the agent was given i.v. to rats, and blood taken from the animal was checked for the recovery of genotoxic activity in cell cultures), we tried to elucidate the unexpected lack of carcinogenic activity of i.v. DMPNU. The direct SCE assay revealed a drastic reduction of DMPNU genotoxicity by rat blood, serum or plasma, respectively, which is abolished by the esterase inhibitor diisopropylfluorophosphate. In the 'host-mediated' SCE assay a genotoxic activity of DMPNU was only recoverable after a very high i.v. dose and when the blood added to the cell cultures had been taken from the rat heart within 1 min after DMPNU administration in vivo. 1-Methyl-1-nitrosourea (MNU) and 1-methyl-3-phenyl-1-nitrosourea (MPNU) were used as positive controls in these experiments and also gave a lower response than theoretically expected, but the relative loss of activity with the latter compounds was much lower than with DMPNU. It is assumed that an esterase in rat blood effectively decomposes this trisubstituted nitrosourea. Problems of the novel 'host-mediated' SCE assay are discussed.

  4. Infestivity of Demodex canis to hamster skin engrafted onto SCID mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tani, Kenji; Une, Satoshi; Hasegawa, Atsuhiko; Adachi, Makoto; Kanda, Naoko; Watanabe, Shin-ichi; Nakaichi, Munekazu; Taura, Yasuho

    2005-04-01

    We demonstrated that Demodex canis was transferred to skin xenografts of a dog and a hamster onto severe combined immunodeficiency mice. After the transfer of mites, the number of eggs, larvae, nymphs and adult mites per gram of canine and hamster xenografts increased, whereas no live mites were detected on murine allograft. These results indicate that D. canis proliferates in hair follicles of dog and hamster skins but not in murine allograft. Therefore, D. canis may have host preference but not strict host-specificity.

  5. Formation of stable small cell number three-dimensional ovarian cancer spheroids using hanging drop arrays for preclinical drug sensitivity assays.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Raghavan, Shreya; Ward, Maria R; Rowley, Katelyn R; Wold, Rachel M; Takayama, Shuichi; Buckanovich, Ronald J; Mehta, Geeta

    2015-07-01

    Ovarian cancer grows and metastasizes from multicellular spheroidal aggregates within the ascites fluid. Multicellular tumor spheroids are therefore physiologically significant 3D in vitro models for ovarian cancer research. Conventional hanging drop cultures require high starting cell numbers, and are tedious for long-term maintenance. In this study, we generate stable, uniform multicellular spheroids using very small number of ovarian cancer cells in a novel 384 well hanging drop array platform. We used novel tumor spheroid platform and two ovarian cancer cell lines (A2780 and OVCAR3) to demonstrate the stable incorporation of as few as 10 cells into a single spheroid. Spheroids had uniform geometry, with projected areas (42.60×10(3)μm-475.22×10(3)μm(2) for A2780 spheroids and 37.24×10(3)μm(2)-281.01×10(3)μm(2) for OVCAR3 spheroids) that varied as a function of the initial cell seeding density. Phalloidin and nuclear stains indicated cells formed tightly packed spheroids with demarcated boundaries and cell-cell interaction within spheroids. Cells within spheroids demonstrated over 85% viability. 3D tumor spheroids demonstrated greater resistance (70-80% viability) to cisplatin chemotherapy compared to 2D cultures (30-50% viability). Ovarian cancer spheroids can be generated from limited cell numbers in high throughput 384 well plates with high viability. Spheroids demonstrate therapeutic resistance relative to cells in traditional 2D culture. Stable incorporation of low cell numbers is advantageous when translating this research to rare patient-derived cells. This system can be used to understand ovarian cancer spheroid biology, as well as carry out preclinical drug sensitivity assays. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  6. Association of 239Pu with lysosomes in rat, Syrian hamster, and Chinese hamster liver as studied by carrier-free electrophoresis and electron microscopic autoradiography with 241Pu

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Seidel, A.; Krueger, E.W.; Wiener, M.; Hotz, G.; Balani, M.; Thies, W.G.

    1985-01-01

    The binding of injected monomeric plutonium in the liver of rats, Syrian hamsters, and Chinese hamsters (species which show profound differences in their ability to eliminate 239 Pu from the liver) was investigated by carrier-free electrophoresis using 239 Pu and electron microscopic autoradiography with 241 Pu. These studies are part of a program designed to obtain a better understanding of the mechanisms of the clearance of transuranium elements from liver of different mammals and man. Between 4 and 9 days after nuclide injection, a clear correlation between the majority of the 239 Pu and lysosomal enzymes was observed when the mitochondrial-lysosomal (ML) fraction of the livers was analyzed by carrier-free electrophoresis. In the two hamster species, a second 239 Pu peak exists from the beginning and increases with time to comprise 50% of the total radioactivity at later times. During electron microscopic examination 4 days after 241 Pu injection, beta tracks were frequently observed over globular structures resembling dense bodies in Chinese hamster liver. They were also observed frequently over chromatin-rich portions of the cell nuclei. These results, together with those from previous density gradient studies, show that lysosomes are the primary deposition site for 239 Pu in the liver cytoplasm of these three rodent species. The hypothesis of a morphologic transformation of these lysosomes with time in hamster liver and of rapid bulk exocytosis of the lysosomes in rats are still possible explanations for the extreme differences in the elimination among the three species

  7. Flames High Resolution Spectroscopy of RGB Stars in the Carina Dwarf Spheroidal Galaxy

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Lemasle, B.; Hill, V.; Tolstoy, E.; Venn, K.; Koleva, M; Prugniel, P; Vauglin,

    Carina is a small and faint classical dwarf spheroidal galaxy in the halo of the Milky Way with a highly episodic star formation history (e.g., Hurley-Keller et al. 1998). Using VLT/FLAMES in high resolution mode, we significantly increase the sample of stars with abundance determinations in Carina,

  8. VLT/FLAMES spectroscopy of red giant branch stars in the Fornax dwarf spheroidal galaxy

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Lemasle, B.; de Boer, T.J.L.; Hill, V.; Tolstoy, E.; Irwin, M.J.; Jablonka, P.; Venn, K.; Battaglia, G.; Starkenburg, E.; Shetrone, M.; Letarte, B.; François, P.; Helmi, A.; Primas, F.; Kaufer, A.; Szeifert, T.

    2014-01-01

    Context. Fornax is one of the most massive dwarf spheroidal galaxies in the Local Group. The Fornax field star population is dominated by intermediate age stars but star formation was going on over almost its entire history. It has been proposed that Fornax experienced a minor merger event. Aims.

  9. Chemical composition of extremely metal-poor stars in the Sextans dwarf spheroidal galaxy

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Aoki, W.; Arimoto, N.; Sadakane, K.; Tolstoy, E.; Battaglia, G.; Jablonka, P.; Shetrone, M.; Letarte, B.; Irwin, M.; Hill, V.; Francois, P.; Venn, K.; Primas, F.; Helmi, A.; Kaufer, A.; Tafelmeyer, M.; Szeifert, T.; Babusiaux, C.

    Context. Individual stars in dwarf spheroidal galaxies around the Milky Way Galaxy have been studied both photometrically and spectroscopically. Extremely metal-poor stars among them are very valuable because they should record the early enrichment in the Local Group. However, our understanding of

  10. Internal kinematics and dynamical models of dwarf spheroidal galaxies around the Milky Way

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Battaglia, Giuseppina; Helmi, Amina; Breddels, Maarten

    We review our current understanding of the internal dynamical properties of the dwarf spheroidal galaxies surrounding the Milky Way. These are the most dark matter dominated galaxies, and as such may be considered ideal laboratories to test the current concordance cosmological model, and in

  11. VLT/UVES abundances in four nearby dwarf spheroidal galaxies. II. Implications for understanding galaxy evolution

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Tolstoy, E; Venn, KA; Shetrone, M; Primas, F; Hill, [No Value; Kaufer, A; Szeifert, T

    We have used the Ultraviolet Visual-Echelle Spectrograph (UVES) on Kueyen (UT2) of the Very Large Telescope to take spectra of 15 individual red giant stars in the centers of four nearby dwarf spheroidal galaxies (dSph's) : Sculptor, Fornax, Carina, and Leo I. We measure the abundance variations of

  12. A new study of stellar substructures in the Fornax dwarf spheroidal galaxy

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    de Boer, T. J. L.; Tolstoy, E.; Saha, A.; Olszewski, E. W.

    Using deep V, B - V wide-field photometry, we have conducted a new study of stellar over-densities in the Fornax dwarf spheroidal galaxy by determining detailed star formation histories from colour-magnitude diagram analysis. We have concentrated on the relatively young stellar component ( We have

  13. Cardiac spheroids as promising in vitro models to study the human heart microenvironment

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Polonchuk, Liudmila; Chabria, Mamta; Badi, Laura

    2017-01-01

    Three-dimensional in vitro cell systems are a promising alternative to animals to study cardiac biology and disease. We have generated three-dimensional in vitro models of the human heart ("cardiac spheroids", CSs) by co-culturing human primary or iPSC-derived cardiomyocytes, endothelial cells an...

  14. Three-dimensional spheroid culture promotes odonto/osteoblastic differentiation of dental pulp cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yamamoto, Mioko; Kawashima, Nobuyuki; Takashino, Nami; Koizumi, Yu; Takimoto, Koyo; Suzuki, Noriyuki; Saito, Masahiro; Suda, Hideaki

    2014-03-01

    Three-dimensional (3D) spheroid culture is a method for creating 3D aggregations of cells and their extracellular matrix without a scaffold mimicking the actual tissues. The aim of this study was to evaluate the effects of 3D spheroid culture on the phenotype of immortalized mouse dental papilla cells (MDPs) that have the ability to differentiate into odontoblasts. We cultured MDPs for 1, 3, 7, and 14 days in 96-well low-attachment culture plates for 3D spheroid culture or flat-bottomed plates for two-dimensional (2D) monolayer culture. Cell proliferation and apoptosis were detected by immunohistochemical staining of Ki67 and cleaved caspase-3, respectively. Hypoxia was measured by the hypoxia probe LOX-1. Odonto/osteoblastic differentiation marker gene expression was evaluated by quantitative PCR. We also determined mineralized nodule formation, alkaline phosphatase (ALP) activity, and dentine matrix protein-1 (DMP1) expression. Vinculin and integrin signalling-related proteins were detected immunohistochemically. Odonto/osteoblastic marker gene expression and mineralized nodule formation were significantly up-regulated in 3D spheroid-cultured MDPs compared with those in 2D monolayer-cultured MDPs (podonto/osteoblastic differentiation of MDPs, which may be mediated by integrin signalling. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  15. Autophagy Protects from Trastuzumab-Induced Cytotoxicity in HER2 Overexpressing Breast Tumor Spheroids.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cristina E Rodríguez

    Full Text Available Multicellular tumor spheroids represent a 3D in vitro model that mimics solid tumor essential properties including assembly and development of extracellular matrix and nutrient, oxygen and proliferation gradients. In the present study, we analyze the impact of 3D spatial organization of HER2-overexpressing breast cancer cells on the response to Trastuzumab. We cultured human mammary adenocarcinoma cell lines as spheroids with the hanging drop method and we observed a gradient of proliferating, quiescent, hypoxic, apoptotic and autophagic cells towards the inner core. This 3D organization decreased Trastuzumab sensitivity of HER2 over-expressing cells compared to monolayer cell cultures. We did not observe apoptosis induced by Trastuzumab but found cell arrest in G0/G1 phase. Moreover, the treatment downregulated the basal apoptosis only found in tumor spheroids, by eliciting protective autophagy. We were able to increase sensitivity to Trastuzumab by autophagy inhibition, thus exposing the interaction between apoptosis and autophagy. We confirmed this result by developing a resistant cell line that was more sensitive to autophagy inhibition than the parental BT474 cells. In summary, the development of Trastuzumab resistance relies on the balance between death and survival mechanisms, characteristic of 3D cell organization. We propose the use of spheroids to further improve the understanding of Trastuzumab antitumor activity and overcome resistance.

  16. Can physical stellar collisions explain the blue stragglers in the dwarf spheroidal galaxies?

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Leonard, P.J.T.

    1993-01-01

    The hypothesis that the blue stragglers in the dwarf spheroidal galaxie have a collisional origin is considered. If all of the dark matter in these galaxies is in the form of low-mass stars and the binary frequency is ≅ 50%, then it is quite possible that ≅ 10% to 20% of their blue stragglers have been produced by physical stellar collisions

  17. Three-dimensional in vitro cancer spheroid models for Photodynamic Therapy: Strengths and Opportunities

    Science.gov (United States)

    Evans, Conor

    2015-03-01

    Three dimensional, in vitro spheroid cultures offer considerable utility for the development and testing of anticancer photodynamic therapy regimens. More complex than monolayer cultures, three-dimensional spheroid systems replicate many of the important cell-cell and cell-matrix interactions that modulate treatment response in vivo. Simple enough to be grown by the thousands and small enough to be optically interrogated, spheroid cultures lend themselves to high-content and high-throughput imaging approaches. These advantages have enabled studies investigating photosensitizer uptake, spatiotemporal patterns of therapeutic response, alterations in oxygen diffusion and consumption during therapy, and the exploration of mechanisms that underlie therapeutic synergy. The use of quantitative imaging methods, in particular, has accelerated the pace of three-dimensional in vitro photodynamic therapy studies, enabling the rapid compilation of multiple treatment response parameters in a single experiment. Improvements in model cultures, the creation of new molecular probes of cell state and function, and innovations in imaging toolkits will be important for the advancement of spheroid culture systems for future photodynamic therapy studies.

  18. Stem Cell Spheroids and Ex Vivo Niche Modeling: Rationalization and Scaling-Up.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chimenti, Isotta; Massai, Diana; Morbiducci, Umberto; Beltrami, Antonio Paolo; Pesce, Maurizio; Messina, Elisa

    2017-04-01

    Improved protocols/devices for in vitro culture of 3D cell spheroids may provide essential cues for proper growth and differentiation of stem/progenitor cells (S/PCs) in their niche, allowing preservation of specific features, such as multi-lineage potential and paracrine activity. Several platforms have been employed to replicate these conditions and to generate S/PC spheroids for therapeutic applications. However, they incompletely reproduce the niche environment, with partial loss of its highly regulated network, with additional hurdles in the field of cardiac biology, due to debated resident S/PCs therapeutic potential and clinical translation. In this contribution, the essential niche conditions (metabolic, geometric, mechanical) that allow S/PCs maintenance/commitment will be discussed. In particular, we will focus on both existing bioreactor-based platforms for the culture of S/PC as spheroids, and on possible criteria for the scaling-up of niche-like spheroids, which could be envisaged as promising tools for personalized cardiac regenerative medicine, as well as for high-throughput drug screening.

  19. Electromagnetic waves in irregular multilayered spheroidal structures of finite conductivity: full wave solutions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bahar, E.

    1976-01-01

    The propagation of electromagnetic waves excited by electric dipoles oriented along the axis of multilayered spheroidal structures of finite conductivity is investigated. The electromagnetic parameters and the thickness of the layers of the structure are assumed to be functions of the latitude. In the analysis, electric and magnetic field transforms that constitute a discrete and a continuous spectrum of spherical waves are used to provide a suitable basis for the expansion of the electromagnetic fields at any point in the irregular spheroidal structure. For spheroidal structures with good conducting cores, the terms in the solutions associated with the continuous part of the wave spectrum vanish. In general, however, when the skin depth for the core is large compared to its dimensions or when the sources are located in the core of the structure and propagation in the core is of special interest, the contribution from the continuous part of the wave spectrum cannot be neglected. At each interface between the layers of the irregular spheroidal structure, exact boundary conditions are imposed. Since the terms of the field expansions in the irregular structure do not individually satisfy the boundary conditions, Maxwell's equations are reduced to sets of coupled ordinary first-order differential equations for the wave amplitudes. The solutions are shown to satisfy the reciprocity relationships in electromagnetic theory. The analysis may be applied to problems of radio wave propagation in a nonuniform model of the earth-ionosphere waveguide, particularly when focusing effects at the antipodes are important

  20. Ground eigenvalue and eigenfunction of a spin-weighted spheroidal wave equation in low frequencies

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Tang Wen-Lin; Tian Gui-Hua

    2011-01-01

    Spin-weighted spheroidal wave functions play an important role in the study of the linear stability of rotating Kerr black holes and are studied by the perturbation method in supersymmetric quantum mechanics. Their analytic ground eigenvalues and eigenfunctions are obtained by means of a series in low frequency. The ground eigenvalue and eigenfunction for small complex frequencies are numerically determined.

  1. Detailed Studies of the Sculptor Dwarf Spheroidal Galaxy in the Milky Way halo

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Tolstoy, Eline

    In and around the Milky Way halo there are a number of low mass low luminosity dwarf galaxies. Several of these systems have been studied in great detail. I describe recent photometric and spectroscopic studies of the Sculptor dwarf spheroidal galaxy made as part of the DART survey of nearby dwarf

  2. Effect of Cu Salt Molarity on the Nanostructure of CuO Prolate Spheroid

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sabeeh, Sabah H.; Hussein, Hashim Abed; Judran, Hadia Kadhim

    Copper sulfate pentahydrate was used as a source of Cu ion with five different molarities (0.02, 0.05, 0.1, 0.15, 2 and 0.25M). XRD, FE-SEM and TEM techniques all showed that CuO samples have polycrystalline monoclinic structure. CuO prolate spheroid is assembled from nanoparticles as building units. It was demonstrated that the purity, morphology, size range of prolate spheroid and density of nano building units are significantly influenced by Cu precursor’s molarity. The pure phase of CuO prolate spheroid was produced via molarity of 0.2M with crystallite size of 15.1565nm while the particle size of building units ranges from 16nm to 21nm. The stability of CuO nanosuspension or nanofluid was evaluated by zeta potential analysis. The obtained properties of specific structure with large surface area of CuO prolate spheroid make it a promising candidate for wide range of potential applications as in nanofluids for cooling purposes.

  3. Dynamics of Small Inertia-Free Spheroidal Particles in a Turbulent Channel Flow

    Science.gov (United States)

    Challabotla, Niranjan Reddy; Zhao, Lihao; Andersson, Helge I.; Department of Energy; Process Engineering Team

    2015-11-01

    The study of small non-spherical particles suspended in turbulent fluid flows is of interest in view of the potential applications in industry and the environment. In the present work, we investigated the dynamics of inertia-free spheroidal particles suspended in fully-developed turbulent channel flow at Re τ = 180 by using the direct numerical simulations (DNS) for the Eulerian fluid phase coupled with the Lagrangian point-particle tracking. We considered inertia-free spheroidal particles with a wide range of aspect ratios from 0.01 to 50, i.e. from flat disks to long rods. Although the spheroids passively translate along with the fluid, the particle orientation and rotation strongly depend on the particle shape. The flattest disks were preferentially aligned with their symmetry axis normal to the wall, whereas the longest rods aligned parallel to the wall. Strong mean rotational spin was observed for spherical particles and this has been damped with increasing asphericity both for rod-like and disk-like spheroids. The anisotropic mean and fluctuating fluid vorticity resulted in particle spin anisotropies which exhibited a complex dependence on the particle asphericty. The Research Council of Norway, Notur and COST Action FP1005 are gratefully acknowledged.

  4. Influence of boron on ferrite formation in copper-added spheroidal graphite cast iron

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ying Zou

    2014-07-01

    Full Text Available This paper reviews the original work of the authors published recently, describing the influence of B on the matrix of the Cuadded spheroidal graphite cast iron. The effect of Cu has been corrected as a ferrite formation promoter in the matrix of the grey cast iron by the usage of high-purity material. Also, this paper focuses on the ferrite formation and the observation of the Cu distribution in the B-added and B-free Cu-containing spheroidal graphite cast iron. The Cu film on the spheroidal graphite can be successfully observed in the B-free sample using a special etching method. However, in the B-added sample, no Cu film could be found, while the secondary graphite was formed on the surface of the spheroidal graphite. The interaction between B and Cu is stressed as a peculiar phenomenon by the employment of a contrast experiment of B and Mn. The heat treatment could make Cu precipitate more significantly in the eutectic cells and in the matrix in the form of large Cu particles because of the limited solubility of Cu.

  5. Porous Nb-Ti based alloy produced from plasma spheroidized powder

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Qijun; Zhang, Lin; Wei, Dongbin; Ren, Shubin; Qu, Xuanhui

    Spherical Nb-Ti based alloy powder was prepared by the combination of plasma spheroidization and mechanical alloying. Phase constituents, microstructure and surface state of the powder, and pore characteristics of the resulting porous alloy were investigated. The results show that the undissolved W and V in the mechanically alloyed powder is fully alloyed after spheroidization, and single β phase is achieved. Particle size of the spheroidized powder is in the range of 20-110 μm. With the decrease of particle size, a transformation from typical dendrite solidification structure to fine cell microstructure occurs. The surface of the spheroidized powder is coated by a layer of oxides consisting mainly of TiO2 and Nb2O5. Probabilities of sinter-neck formation and particle coalescence increases with increasing sintering temperature. Porous skeleton with relatively homogeneous pore distribution and open pore channel is formed after vacuum sintering at 1700 °C, and the porosity is 32%. The sintering kinetic analysis indicates that grain boundary diffusion is the primary mass transport mechanism during sintering process.

  6. Numerical Simulation of Spheroidization Process of TiAl Alloy Powders in Radio Frequency Plasma

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    ZHU Langping

    2017-06-01

    Full Text Available A numerical simulation method was used to study the radio frequency plasma spheroidization process of TiAl alloy powder. The effects of velocity field and temperature field on the motion trajectory and mass change of TiAl alloy powder with different particle size were analyzed.The results show that the temperature of powder particles increases rapidly under high temperature plasma, surface evaporation cause the reduction of particle size, and particles with small size tend to evaporate quickly. The motion trajectory of particles with different sizes in the lower end of the cooling tube is different obviously, small particles tend to enter the air outlet,while the larger particles are easy to fall down to the bottom of the cooling tube to be collected. Increasing air flow rate can improve the velocity of air flow in the spheroidizing system, causing larger particles to be taken away by the air, resulting in yield reduction. The simulation results of TiAl alloy powder spheroidization are close to the experimental results refer to parameters such as powder size distribution, average particle size and powder yield, and the model is in good accordance with the actual process of the spheroidization.

  7. THE STELLAR SPHEROID, THE DISK, AND THE DYNAMICS OF THE COSMIC WEB

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Domínguez-Tenreiro, R.; Obreja, A.; Brook, C. B.; Martínez-Serrano, F. J.; Serna, A.; Stinson, G.

    2015-01-01

    Models of the advanced stages of gravitational instability predict that baryons that form the stellar populations of current galaxies at z = 0 displayed a web-like structure at high z, as part of the cosmic web (CW). We explore details of these predictions using cosmological hydrodynamical simulations. When the stellar populations of the spheroid and disk components of simulated late-type galaxies are traced back separately to high zs we found CW-like structures where spheroid progenitors are more evolved than disk progenitors. The distinction between the corresponding stellar populations, as driven by their specific angular momentum content j, can be explained in terms of the CW evolution, extended to two processes occurring at lower z. First, the spheroid progenitors strongly lose j at collapse, which contrasts with the insignificant j loss of the disk progenitors. The second is related to the lack of alignment, at assembly, between the spheroid-to-be material and the already settled proto-disk, in contrast to the alignment of disk-to-be material, in some cases resulting from circumgalactic, disk-induced gravitational torques. The different final outcomes of these low-z processes have their origins in the different initial conditions driven by the CW dynamics

  8. Photometric analyses of abundances in dwarf spheroidal galaxies and globular clusters

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Light, R.M.

    1988-01-01

    This study investigated the abundance characteristics of several dwarf spheroidal galaxies. The chemical properties of stars in these galaxies are tracers of the origin and evolution of their stellar populations, and thus can provide constraints on the theories of their formation. To derive this abundance information, photometric observations of stars in a sample of globular clusters, covering a large range in metallicity, were analyzed. Parameters describing the position of the red giant branch were found to correlate very well with cluster metallicity over a large range in abundance. These measurements, made in the Thuan-Gunn photometry system, provide ranking schemes which are, with accurate photometry, more sensitive to changes in metallicity than similar broadband BV parameters. The relations were used to derive an improved estimate of the metallicity of cluster NGC 5053. These metallicity relations were used to analyze the Thuan-Gunn system photometry produced for the Sculptor, Ursa Minor, and Carina galaxies. The excellent agreement between their metallicities and those from other previous studies indicates that globular cluster red giant branch parameters are very useful in ranking dwarf spheroidal populations by metallicity. Together with other galaxian data, strong correlations can be seen between the mean metallicities and dispersions in metallicity and the luminosities of the dwarf spheroidal galaxies. These trends also seem to apply to members of the dwarf elliptical class of galaxies. The ramifications that these correlations and the existence of a metallicity gradient in Sculptor have on the formation of the dwarf spheroidals are discussed

  9. Daunorubicin and doxorubicin but not BCNU have deleterious effects on organotypic multicellular spheroids of gliomas

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kaaijk, P.; Troost, D.; de Boer, O. J.; van Amstel, P.; Bakker, P. J.; Leenstra, S.; Bosch, D. A.

    1996-01-01

    In the present study organotypic multicellular spheroids (OMS) were used to study the effects of chemotherapeutic agents on malignant gliomas. Compared with the frequently used cell line models, OMS have several advantages with respect to the preservation of the cellular heterogeneity and the

  10. Impact of a small ellipticity on the sustainability condition of developed turbulence in a precessing spheroid

    Science.gov (United States)

    Horimoto, Yasufumi; Simonet-Davin, Gabriel; Katayama, Atsushi; Goto, Susumu

    2018-04-01

    We experimentally investigate the flow transition to developed turbulence in a precessing spheroid with a small ellipticity. Fully developed turbulence appears through a subcritical transition when we fix the Reynolds number (the spin rate) and gradually increase the Poincaré number (the precession rate). In the transitional range of the Poincaré number, two qualitatively different turbulent states (i.e., fully developed turbulence and quiescent turbulence with a spin-driven global circulation) are stable and they are connected by a hysteresis loop. This discontinuous transition is in contrast to the continuous transition in a precessing sphere, for which neither bistable turbulent states nor hysteresis loops are observed. The small ellipticity of the container makes the global circulation of the confined fluid more stable, and it requires much stronger precession of the spheroid, than a sphere, for fully developed turbulence to be sustained. Nevertheless, once fully developed turbulence is sustained, its flow structures are almost identical in the spheroid and sphere. The argument [Lorenzani and Tilgner, J. Fluid Mech. 492, 363 (2003), 10.1017/S002211200300572X; Noir et al., Geophys. J. Int. 154, 407 (2003), 10.1046/j.1365-246X.2003.01934.x] on the basis of the analytical solution [Busse, J. Fluid Mech. 33, 739 (1968), 10.1017/S0022112068001655] of the steady global circulation in a weak precession range well describes the onset of the fully developed turbulence in the spheroid.

  11. Chinese hamster pleiotropic multidrug-resistant cells are not radioresistant

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mitchell, J.B.; Gamson, J.; Russo, A.; Friedman, N.; DeGraff, W.; Carmichael, J.; Glatstein, E.

    1988-01-01

    The inherent cellular radiosensitivity of a Chinese hamster ovary pleiotropic cell line that is multidrug resistant (CHRC5) was compared to that of its parental cell line (AuxB1). Radiation survival curve parameters n and D0 were 4.5 and 1.1 Gy, respectively, for the CHRC5 line and 5.0 and 1.2 Gy, respectively, for the parental line. Thus, the inherent radiosensitivity of the two lines was similar even though key intracellular free radical scavenging and detoxifying systems employing glutathione, glutathione transferase, and catalase produced enzyme levels that were 2.0-, 1.9-, and 1.9-fold higher, respectively, in the drug-resistant cell line. Glutathione depletion by buthionine sulfoximine resulted in the same extent of aerobic radiosensitization in both lines (approximately 10%). Incorporation of iododeoxyuridine into cellular DNA sensitized both cell lines to radiation. These studies indicate that pleiotropic drug resistance does not necessarily confer radiation resistance

  12. Thyroid function and cold acclimation in the hamster, Mesocricetus auratus

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tomasi, T.E.; Horwitz, B.A.

    1987-01-01

    Basal metabolic rate (BMR), thyroxine utilization rate (T 4 U), and triiodothyronine utilization rate (T 3 U) were measured in cold-acclimated (CA) and room temperature-acclimated (RA) male golden hamsters, Mesocricetus auratus. Hormone utilization rates were calculated via the plasma disappearance technique using 125 I-labeled hormones and measuring serum hormone levels via radioimmunoassay. BMR showed a significant 28% increase with cold acclimation. The same cold exposure also produced a 32% increase in T 4 U, and a 204% increase in T 3 U. The much greater increase in T 3 U implies that previous assessments of the relationship between cold acclimation and thyroid function may have been underestimated and that cold exposure induces both quantitative and qualitative changes in thyroid function. It is concluded that in the cold-acclimated state, T 3 U more accurately reflects thyroid function than does T 4 U. A mechanism for the cold-induced change in BMR is proposed

  13. Suppression of radiation mutagenesis by dactinomycin in Chinese hamster cells

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tokita, N.; Capenter, S.G.; Chen, D.J.; MacInnes, M.A.; Raju, M.R.

    1985-01-01

    Dactinomycin (AMD) suppression of radiation mutagenesis was investigated using an in vitro mutation assay (6-thioguanine resistance) in Chinese hamster ovary cells. Cells were exposed to acute single doses of x rays followed by 1 hr-treatment with 0.1 or 1 μg/ml AMD. The cell survival curves plotted as a function of x-ray doses were similar for radiation alone and radiation plus AMD. The results suggest that AMD treatment was only slightly mutagenic, however, when given immediately after irradiation, it suppressed radiatiion mutagenesis at higher x-ray dose regions (below 10% survival levels). Higher AMD concentrations appeared more suppressive than lower concentrations. Dose-response data analyzed based on Poisson distribution models suggest the stochastic dependence of x-ray mutagenesis and AMD cytotoxity

  14. Estudios inmunologicos en hamsters (Cricetus auratus infectados con Schistosoma mansoni

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Eduardo Monge

    1986-08-01

    Full Text Available Los resultados de este trabajo muestran que el hamster (Cricetus auratus puede ser utilizado como un modelo experimental para estudios inmunológicos en la infección por Schistosoma mansoni. Los datos obtenidos, relativos a inmunidad concomitante, producción de anticuerpo letal e inmunosupresión se asemejan a los conseguidos en otros modelos experimentales ya establecidos. Estas observaciones indican que el hámster, además de ser un hospedero satisfactorio para el mantenimiento del parásito en el laboratorio, puede ser considerado como un modelo experimental alterno cuyo crecimiento y mantenimiento son relativamente simples y además es un animal de fácil manejo.

  15. Mitotic spindle proteomics in Chinese hamster ovary cells.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mary Kate Bonner

    Full Text Available Mitosis is a fundamental process in the development of all organisms. The mitotic spindle guides the cell through mitosis as it mediates the segregation of chromosomes, the orientation of the cleavage furrow, and the progression of cell division. Birth defects and tissue-specific cancers often result from abnormalities in mitotic events. Here, we report a proteomic study of the mitotic spindle from Chinese Hamster Ovary (CHO cells. Four different isolations of metaphase spindles were subjected to Multi-dimensional Protein Identification Technology (MudPIT analysis and tandem mass spectrometry. We identified 1155 proteins and used Gene Ontology (GO analysis to categorize proteins into cellular component groups. We then compared our data to the previously published CHO midbody proteome and identified proteins that are unique to the CHO spindle. Our data represent the first mitotic spindle proteome in CHO cells, which augments the list of mitotic spindle components from mammalian cells.

  16. Photoperiod Regulates vgf-Derived Peptide Processing in Siberian Hamsters.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Barbara Noli

    Full Text Available VGF mRNA is induced in specific hypothalamic areas of the Siberian hamster upon exposure to short photoperiods, which is associated with a seasonal decrease in appetite and weight loss. Processing of VGF generates multiple bioactive peptides, so the objective of this study was to determine the profile of the VGF-derived peptides in the brain, pituitary and plasma from Siberian hamsters, and to establish whether differential processing might occur in the short day lean state versus long day fat. Antisera against short sequences at the C- or N- termini of proVGF, as well as against NERP-1, TPGH and TLQP peptides, were used for analyses of tissues, and both immunohistochemistry and enzyme linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA coupled with high-performance liquid (HPLC or gel chromatography were carried out. VGF peptide immunoreactivity was found within cortex cholinergic perikarya, in multiple hypothalamic nuclei, including those containing vasopressin, and in pituitary gonadotrophs. ELISA revealed that exposure to short day photoperiod led to a down-regulation of VGF immunoreactivity in the cortex, and a less pronounced decrease in the hypothalamus and pituitary, while the plasma VGF levels were not affected by the photoperiod. HPLC and gel chromatography both confirmed the presence of multiple VGF-derived peptides in these tissues, while gel chromatography showed the presence of the VGF precursor in all tissues tested except for the cortex. These observations are consistent with the view that VGF-derived peptides have pleiotropic actions related to changing photoperiod, possibly by regulating cholinergic systems in the cortex, vasopressin hypothalamic pathways, and the reproductive axis.

  17. Fluoxetine disrupts motivation and GABAergic signaling in adolescent female hamsters.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shannonhouse, John L; DuBois, Dustin W; Fincher, Annette S; Vela, Alejandra M; Henry, Morgan M; Wellman, Paul J; Frye, Gerald D; Morgan, Caurnel

    2016-08-01

    Initial antidepressant treatment can paradoxically worsen symptoms in depressed adolescents by undetermined mechanisms. Interestingly, antidepressants modulate GABAA receptors, which mediate paradoxical effects of other therapeutic drugs, particularly in females. Although the neuroanatomic site of action for this paradox is unknown, elevated GABAA receptor signaling in the nucleus accumbens can disrupt motivation. We assessed fluoxetine's effects on motivated behaviors in pubescent female hamsters - anhedonia in the reward investigational preference (RIP) test as well as anxiety in the anxiety-related feeding/exploration conflict (AFEC) test. We also assessed accumbal signaling by RT-PCR and electrophysiology. Fluoxetine initially worsened motivated behaviors at puberty, relative to adulthood. It also failed to improve these behaviors as pubescent hamsters transitioned into adulthood. Low accumbal mRNA levels of multiple GABAA receptor subunits and GABA-synthesizing enzyme, GAD67, assessed by RT-PCR, suggested low GABAergic tone at puberty. Nonetheless, rapid fluoxetine-induced reductions of α5GABAA receptor and BDNF mRNA levels at puberty were consistent with age-related differences in GABAergic responses to fluoxetine and disruption of the motivational state. Whole-cell patch clamping of accumbal slices also suggested low GABAergic tone by the low amplitude of miniature inhibitory postsynaptic currents (mIPSCs) at puberty. It also confirmed age-related differences in GABAergic responses to fluoxetine. Specifically, fluoxetine potentiated mIPSC amplitude and frequency at puberty, but attenuated the amplitude during adulthood. These results implicate GABAergic tone and GABAA receptor plasticity in adverse motivational responses and resistance to fluoxetine during adolescence. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  18. Microcirculatory effects of zinc on fructose-fed hamsters.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Castiglione, R C; Barros, C M M R; Boa, B C S; Bouskela, E

    2016-04-01

    Fructose is a major dietary component directly related to vascular dysfunction and diseases such as obesity, diabetes, and hypertension. Zinc is considered a non-pharmacological alternative for treating diabetes due to its antioxidant and hyperglycemia-lowering effects in diabetic animals. Therefore, the aim of this study was to evaluate the effects of dietary zinc supplementation on the microcirculatory parameters of fructose-fed hamsters. Male hamsters (Mesocricetus auratus) were fed drinking water substituted by 10% fructose solution for 60 days, whereas control animals were fed drinking water alone. Their microcirculatory function was evaluated using cheek pouch preparation, as well as their blood glucose and serum insulin levels. Their microcirculatory responses to acetylcholine (ACh, an endothelium-dependent vasodilator) and to sodium nitroprusside (SNP, an endothelium-independent vasodilator) as well as the increase in macromolecular permeability induced by 30 min of ischemia/reperfusion (I/R) were noted. Endothelium-dependent vasodilation was significantly increased in control animals with high zinc supplementation compared to the groups without zinc supplementation. Zinc was able to protect against plasma leakage induced by I/R in all control and fructose-fed groups, although the microvascular permeability was higher in animals fed drinking water substituted by 10% fructose solution compared to those fed filtered drinking water alone. Our results indicate that dietary zinc supplementation can improve microvascular dysfunction by increasing endothelial-dependent dilatation and reducing the increase in macromolecular permeability induced by I/R in fructose-fed animals. Copyright © 2015 The Italian Society of Diabetology, the Italian Society for the Study of Atherosclerosis, the Italian Society of Human Nutrition, and the Department of Clinical Medicine and Surgery, Federico II University. Published by Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  19. Design of Online Spheroidization Process for 1.0C-1.5Cr Bearing Steel and Microstructure Analysis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Zhen-Xing; Li, Chang-Sheng; Ren, Jin-Yi; Li, Bin-Zhou; Suh, Dong-Woo

    2018-02-01

    Using thermo-mechanical control process, the online spheroidization annealing process of 1.0C-1.5Cr bearing steel was designed. Apart from intercritical online spheroidization (IS), a novel subcritical online spheroidization (SS) process was proposed, which is characterized by water-cooling to around 773 K (500 °C) after the final rolling pass, and then directly reheating to 973 K (700 °C) for isothermal holding. Compared with the results from the traditional offline spheroidization (TS) process, the size of spheroidized carbides is similar in both the TS and IS processes, whereas it is much smaller in the SS process. After spheroidization annealing, microstructure evolution during austenitization and quenching treatment was examined. It is shown that the refining of spheroidized carbides accelerates the dissolution of carbides during the austenitizing process, and decreases the size of undissolved carbides. In addition, the SS process can obtain finer prior austenite grain after quenching, which contributes to the enhancement of final hardness.

  20. Micro-environmental mechanical stress controls tumor spheroid size and morphology by suppressing proliferation and inducing apoptosis in cancer cells.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gang Cheng

    Full Text Available Compressive mechanical stress produced during growth in a confining matrix limits the size of tumor spheroids, but little is known about the dynamics of stress accumulation, how the stress affects cancer cell phenotype, or the molecular pathways involved.We co-embedded single cancer cells with fluorescent micro-beads in agarose gels and, using confocal microscopy, recorded the 3D distribution of micro-beads surrounding growing spheroids. The change in micro-bead density was then converted to strain in the gel, from which we estimated the spatial distribution of compressive stress around the spheroids. We found a strong correlation between the peri-spheroid solid stress distribution and spheroid shape, a result of the suppression of cell proliferation and induction of apoptotic cell death in regions of high mechanical stress. By compressing spheroids consisting of cancer cells overexpressing anti-apoptotic genes, we demonstrate that mechanical stress-induced apoptosis occurs via the mitochondrial pathway.Our results provide detailed, quantitative insight into the role of micro-environmental mechanical stress in tumor spheroid growth dynamics, and suggest how tumors grow in confined locations where the level of solid stress becomes high. An important implication is that apoptosis via the mitochondrial pathway, induced by compressive stress, may be involved in tumor dormancy, in which tumor growth is held in check by a balance of apoptosis and proliferation.

  1. Allometric and radioautographic study on developing parotid gland of the golden hamster at early postnatat period

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Luca, I M.S. de [Universidade Estadual de Campinas, SP (Brazil). Inst. de Biologia

    1989-02-01

    The post-natal development of golden hamster parotid gland and the rate of proliferation of the cells are studied in the first month of the life. A comparative evaluation with other rodents is presented. (M.A.C.).

  2. A Consensus Genome-scale Reconstruction of Chinese Hamster Ovary Cell Metabolism

    KAUST Repository

    Hefzi, Hooman; Ang, Kok  Siong; Hanscho, Michael; Bordbar, Aarash; Ruckerbauer, David; Lakshmanan, Meiyappan; Orellana, Camila  A.; Baycin-Hizal, Deniz; Huang, Yingxiang; Ley, Daniel; Martinez, Veronica  S.; Kyriakopoulos, Sarantos; Jimé nez, Natalia  E.; Zielinski, Daniel  C.; Quek, Lake-Ee; Wulff, Tune; Arnsdorf, Johnny; Li, Shangzhong; Lee, Jae  Seong; Paglia, Giuseppe; Loira, Nicolas; Spahn, Philipp  N.; Pedersen, Lasse  E.; Gutierrez, Jahir  M.; King, Zachary  A.; Lund, Anne  Mathilde; Nagarajan, Harish; Thomas, Alex; Abdel-Haleem, Alyaa M.; Zanghellini, Juergen; Kildegaard, Helene  F.; Voldborg, Bjø rn  G.; Gerdtzen, Ziomara  P.; Betenbaugh, Michael  J.; Palsson, Bernhard  O.; Andersen, Mikael  R.; Nielsen, Lars  K.; Borth, Nicole; Lee, Dong-Yup; Lewis, Nathan  E.

    2016-01-01

    Chinese hamster ovary (CHO) cells dominate biotherapeutic protein production and are widely used in mammalian cell line engineering research. To elucidate metabolic bottlenecks in protein production and to guide cell engineering and bioprocess

  3. Constitutive overexpression of a growth-regulated gene in transformed Chinese hamster and human cells

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Anisowicz, A.; Bardwell, L.; Sager, R.

    1987-01-01

    Comparison by subtractive hybridization of mRNAs revealed a moderately abundant message in highly tumorigenic CHEF/16 cells present at very low levels in closely related nontumorigenic CHEF/18 cells. After cloning and sequencing the corresponding cDNA, computer comparison showed closest homology with the human connective tissue-activating peptide III (CTAP III). The human tumor cell cDNA hybridizing with the Chinese hamster clone was isolated, sequenced, and found to have closer similarity to the Chinese hamster gene than to CTAP III. Thus, the cloned cDNAs from Chinese hamster and human cells represent a different gene, named gro. Studies of its transcriptional regulation have shown that expression is tightly regulated by growth status in normal Chinese hamster and human cells and relaxed in the tumorigenic cells so far examined

  4. [Purification of arsenic-binding proteins in hamster plasma after oral administration of arsenite].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Wenwen; Zhang, Min; Li, Chunhui; Qin, Yingjie; Hua, Naranmandura

    2013-01-01

    To purify the arsenic-binding proteins (As-BP) in hamster plasma after a single oral administration of arsenite (iAs(III)). Arsenite was given to hamsters in a single dose. Three types of HPLC columns, size exclusion, gel filtration and anion exchange columns, combined with an inductively coupled argon plasma mass spectrometer (ICP MS) were used to purify the As-BP in hamster plasma. SDS-PAGE was used to confirm the arsenic-binding proteins at each purification step. The three-step purification process successfully separated As-BP from other proteins (ie, arsenic unbound proteins) in hamster plasma. The molecular mass of purified As-BP in plasma was approximately 40-50 kD on SDS-PAGE. The three-step purification method is a simple and fast approach to purify the As-BP in plasma samples.

  5. The accumulation of 134Cs in heart and skeletal muscle of healthy and dystrophic hamsters

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Szentkuti, L.; Breitrueck, H.; Giese, W.

    1976-01-01

    he accumulation of cesium-134 in heart and skeletal muscle of healthy and dystrophic hamsters was compared. It was lower in dystrophic hamsters than in normal ones after only a single dose of cesium-134. The 134 Cs-concentrations of heart and 'red' skeletal muscle were different between normal and dystrophic hamsters. When the isotope had equilibrated in the animals differences in 134 Cs-accumulation in muscle tissue between normal and dystrophic hamsters were even more obvious. The faster elimination of cesium-134 from the body as affected by muscular dystrophy was due to a reduction of 134 Cs-accumulation in muscle tissue. The reduced ability of damaged muscles to accumulate Cs-ions offers the possibility to use Cs-isotopes in diagnosis of skeletal muscle dystrophy. (author)

  6. A Consensus Genome-scale Reconstruction of Chinese Hamster Ovary Cell Metabolism

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hefzi, Hooman; Ang, Kok Siong; Hanscho, Michael

    2016-01-01

    Chinese hamster ovary (CHO) cells dominate biotherapeutic protein production and are widely used in mammalian cell line engineering research. To elucidate metabolic bottlenecks in protein production and to guide cell engineering and bioprocess optimization, we reconstructed the metabolic pathways...

  7. Familial incidence of mammary gland tumours in the Djungarian hamster (Phodopus sungaros): a case report

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Jelínek, F.; Felsberg, Jürgen; Měšťan, M.

    2013-01-01

    Roč. 58, č. 8 (2013), s. 442-448 ISSN 0375-8427 Institutional support: RVO:61388971 Keywords : hamsters * neoplasias * atypical fibrosarcoma Subject RIV: EE - Microbiology, Virology Impact factor: 0.756, year: 2013

  8. Non-parametric photic entrainment of Djungarian hamsters with different rhythmic phenotypes

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Schöttner, Konrad; Hauer, J.; Weinert, D.

    2016-01-01

    Roč. 33, č. 5 (2016), s. 506-519 ISSN 0742-0528 Institutional support: RVO:60077344 Keywords : delayed activity onset * Djungarian hamster * free- running period Subject RIV: ED - Physiology Impact factor: 2.562, year: 2016

  9. Principles of the Kenzan Method for Robotic Cell Spheroid-Based Three-Dimensional Bioprinting.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moldovan, Nicanor I; Hibino, Narutoshi; Nakayama, Koichi

    2017-06-01

    Bioprinting is a technology with the prospect to change the way many diseases are treated, by replacing the damaged tissues with live de novo created biosimilar constructs. However, after more than a decade of incubation and many proofs of concept, the field is still in its infancy. The current stagnation is the consequence of its early success: the first bioprinters, and most of those that followed, were modified versions of the three-dimensional printers used in additive manufacturing, redesigned for layer-by-layer dispersion of biomaterials. In all variants (inkjet, microextrusion, or laser assisted), this approach is material ("scaffold") dependent and energy intensive, making it hardly compatible with some of the intended biological applications. Instead, the future of bioprinting may benefit from the use of gentler scaffold-free bioassembling methods. A substantial body of evidence has accumulated, indicating this is possible by use of preformed cell spheroids, which have been assembled in cartilage, bone, and cardiac muscle-like constructs. However, a commercial instrument capable to directly and precisely "print" spheroids has not been available until the invention of the microneedles-based ("Kenzan") spheroid assembling and the launching in Japan of a bioprinter based on this method. This robotic platform laces spheroids into predesigned contiguous structures with micron-level precision, using stainless steel microneedles ("kenzans") as temporary support. These constructs are further cultivated until the spheroids fuse into cellular aggregates and synthesize their own extracellular matrix, thus attaining the needed structural organization and robustness. This novel technology opens wide opportunities for bioengineering of tissues and organs.

  10. Adult Lung Spheroid Cells Contain Progenitor Cells and Mediate Regeneration in Rodents With Bleomycin-Induced Pulmonary Fibrosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Henry, Eric; Cores, Jhon; Hensley, M Taylor; Anthony, Shirena; Vandergriff, Adam; de Andrade, James B M; Allen, Tyler; Caranasos, Thomas G; Lobo, Leonard J; Cheng, Ke

    2015-11-01

    Lung diseases are devastating conditions and ranked as one of the top five causes of mortality worldwide according to the World Health Organization. Stem cell therapy is a promising strategy for lung regeneration. Previous animal and clinical studies have focused on the use of mesenchymal stem cells (from other parts of the body) for lung regenerative therapies. We report a rapid and robust method to generate therapeutic resident lung progenitors from adult lung tissues. Outgrowth cells from healthy lung tissue explants are self-aggregated into three-dimensional lung spheroids in a suspension culture. Without antigenic sorting, the lung spheroids recapitulate the stem cell niche and contain a natural mixture of lung stem cells and supporting cells. In vitro, lung spheroid cells can be expanded to a large quantity and can form alveoli-like structures and acquire mature lung epithelial phenotypes. In severe combined immunodeficiency mice with bleomycin-induced pulmonary fibrosis, intravenous injection of human lung spheroid cells inhibited apoptosis, fibrosis, and infiltration but promoted angiogenesis. In a syngeneic rat model of pulmonary fibrosis, lung spheroid cells outperformed adipose-derived mesenchymal stem cells in reducing fibrotic thickening and infiltration. Previously, lung spheroid cells (the spheroid model) had only been used to study lung cancer cells. Our data suggest that lung spheroids and lung spheroid cells from healthy lung tissues are excellent sources of regenerative lung cells for therapeutic lung regeneration. The results from the present study will lead to future human clinical trials using lung stem cell therapies to treat various incurable lung diseases, including pulmonary fibrosis. The data presented here also provide fundamental knowledge regarding how injected stem cells mediate lung repair in pulmonary fibrosis. ©AlphaMed Press.

  11. SMIFH2-mediated mDia formin functional inhibition potentiates chemotherapeutic targeting of human ovarian cancer spheroids.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ziske, Megan A; Pettee, Krista M; Khaing, MaNada; Rubinic, Kaitlin; Eisenmann, Kathryn M

    2016-03-25

    Due to a lack of effective screening or prevention protocol for epithelial ovarian cancer (EOC), there is a critical unmet need to develop therapeutic interventions for EOC treatment. EOC metastasis is unique. Initial dissemination is not primarily hematogenous, yet is facilitated through shedding of primary tumor cells into the peritoneal fluid and accumulating ascites. Increasingly, isolated patient spheroids point to a clinical role for spheroids in EOC metastasis. EOC spheroids are highly invasive structures that disseminate upon peritoneal mesothelium, and visceral tissues including liver and omentum. Selection for this subset of chemoresistant EOC cells could influence disease progression and/or recurrence. Thus, targeting spheroid integrity/structure may improve the chemotherapeutic responsiveness of EOC. We discovered a critical role for mammalian Diaphanous (mDia)-related formin-2 in maintaining EOC spheroid structure. Both mDia2 and the related mDia1 regulate F-actin networks critical to maintain cell-cell contacts and the integrity of multi-cellular epithelial sheets. We investigated if mDia2 functional inhibition via a small molecule inhibitor SMIFH2 combined with chemotherapeutics, such as taxol and cisplatin, inhibits the viability of EOC monolayers and clinically relevant spheroids. SMIFH2-mediated mDia formin inhibition significantly reduced both ES2 and Skov3 EOC monolayer viability while spheroid viability was minimally impacted only at the highest concentrations. Combining either cisplatin or taxol with SMIFH2 did not significantly enhance the effects of either drug alone in ES2 monolayers, while Skov3 monolayers treated with taxol or cisplatin and SMIFH2 showed significant additive inhibition of viability. ES2 spheroids were highly responsive with clear additive anti-viability effects with dual taxol or cisplatin when combined with SMIFH2 treatments. While combined taxol with SMIFH2 in spheroids showed an additive effect relative to single

  12. Real-time viability and apoptosis kinetic detection method of 3D multicellular tumor spheroids using the Celigo Image Cytometer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kessel, Sarah; Cribbes, Scott; Bonasu, Surekha; Rice, William; Qiu, Jean; Chan, Leo Li-Ying

    2017-09-01

    The development of three-dimensional (3D) multicellular tumor spheroid models for cancer drug discovery research has increased in the recent years. The use of 3D tumor spheroid models may be more representative of the complex in vivo tumor microenvironments in comparison to two-dimensional (2D) assays. Currently, viability of 3D multicellular tumor spheroids has been commonly measured on standard plate-readers using metabolic reagents such as CellTiter-Glo® for end point analysis. Alternatively, high content image cytometers have been used to measure drug effects on spheroid size and viability. Previously, we have demonstrated a novel end point drug screening method for 3D multicellular tumor spheroids using the Celigo Image Cytometer. To better characterize the cancer drug effects, it is important to also measure the kinetic cytotoxic and apoptotic effects on 3D multicellular tumor spheroids. In this work, we demonstrate the use of PI and caspase 3/7 stains to measure viability and apoptosis for 3D multicellular tumor spheroids in real-time. The method was first validated by staining different types of tumor spheroids with PI and caspase 3/7 and monitoring the fluorescent intensities for 16 and 21 days. Next, PI-stained and nonstained control tumor spheroids were digested into single cell suspension to directly measure viability in a 2D assay to determine the potential toxicity of PI. Finally, extensive data analysis was performed on correlating the time-dependent PI and caspase 3/7 fluorescent intensities to the spheroid size and necrotic core formation to determine an optimal starting time point for cancer drug testing. The ability to measure real-time viability and apoptosis is highly important for developing a proper 3D model for screening tumor spheroids, which can allow researchers to determine time-dependent drug effects that usually are not captured by end point assays. This would improve the current tumor spheroid analysis method to potentially better

  13. Autoradiographic localization of tritiated dihydrotestosterone in the flank organ of the albino hamster

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lucky, A.W.; Eisenfeld, A.J.; Visintin, I.

    1985-01-01

    In the hamster flank organ, the growth of hair and growth of sebaceous glands are androgen-dependent functions. Although dihydrotestosterone (DHT) is known to be a potent stimulator of flank organ growth, there is no information about localization of DHT receptor sites in this organ. The purpose of this study was to use steroid autoradiography to localize DHT receptors in the hamster flank organ. Because steroid hormones are functional when translocated to nuclear receptors, nuclear localization by autoradiography defines receptor sites. In order to be able to visualize autoradiographic grains from radiolabeled androgens around hair follicles, albino hamsters were studied to avoid confusion between the grains and pigment granules which are abundant in the more common Golden Syrian hamster. Mature male hamsters castrated 24 hours earlier were given tritium-labeled dihydrotestosterone ( [ 3 H]DHT). Using the technique of thaw-mount steroid autoradiography, 4-micron unfixed frozen sections were mounted in the dark onto emulsion-coated glass slides and allowed to develop for 4-6 months. [ 3 H]DHT was found to be concentrated over sebocyte nuclei. The label was present peripherally as well as in differentiating sebocytes. There was no nuclear localization of [ 3 H]DHT in animals pretreated with excessive quantities of unlabeled DHT. Steroid metabolites of [ 3 H] DHT were assessed by thin-layer chromatography in paired tissue samples. Most of the label remained with DHT. Uptake was inhibited in the flank organ of hamsters pretreated with unlabeled DHT

  14. Experimental treatment with sodium stibogluconate of hamsters infected with Leishmania (Leishmania) chagasi and Leishmania (Leishmania) amazonensis Tratamento experimental com stibogluconato de sódio em hamsters infectados com Leishmania (Leishmania) chagasi e Leishmania (Leishmania) amazonensis

    OpenAIRE

    Elizabeth M. de Figueiredo; Jaime Costa e Silva; Reginaldo P. Brazil

    1999-01-01

    The present paper reports the experimental treatment of hamsters infected with Leishmania chagasi and Leishmania amazonensis with sodium stibogluconate (20mg/kg/day x 20 days). Only with L. chagasi did the treatment result in the complete elimination of parasites from the spleen. However, no parasitological cure was achieved in hamsters infected with L. amazonensis.O presente trabalho é um relato do tratamento experimental de hamsters infectado com Leishmania chagasi e Leishmania amazonensis ...

  15. Hamster-Adapted Sin Nombre Virus Causes Disseminated Infection and Efficiently Replicates in Pulmonary Endothelial Cells without Signs of Disease

    OpenAIRE

    Safronetz, David; Prescott, Joseph; Haddock, Elaine; Scott, Dana P.; Feldmann, Heinz; Ebihara, Hideki

    2013-01-01

    To date, a laboratory animal model for the study of Sin Nombre virus (SNV) infection or associated disease has not been described. Unlike infection with Andes virus, which causes lethal hantavirus pulmonary syndrome (HPS)-like disease in hamsters, SNV infection is short-lived, with no viremia and little dissemination. Here we investigated the effect of passaging SNV in hamsters. We found that a host-adapted SNV achieves prolonged and disseminated infection in hamsters, including efficient rep...

  16. Global gene expression analysis of early response to chemotherapy treatment in ovarian cancer spheroids

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tetu Bernard

    2008-02-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Chemotherapy (CT resistance in ovarian cancer (OC is broad and encompasses diverse unrelated drugs, suggesting more than one mechanism of resistance. To better understand the molecular mechanisms controlling the immediate response of OC cells to CT exposure, we have performed gene expression profiling in spheroid cultures derived from six OC cell lines (OVCAR3, SKOV3, TOV-112, TOV-21, OV-90 and TOV-155, following treatment with 10,0 μM cisplatin, 2,5 μM paclitaxel or 5,0 μM topotecan for 72 hours. Results Exposure of OC spheroids to these CT drugs resulted in differential expression of genes associated with cell growth and proliferation, cellular assembly and organization, cell death, cell cycle control and cell signaling. Genes, functionally involved in DNA repair, DNA replication and cell cycle arrest were mostly overexpressed, while genes implicated in metabolism (especially lipid metabolism, signal transduction, immune and inflammatory response, transport, transcription regulation and protein biosynthesis, were commonly suppressed following all treatments. Cisplatin and topotecan treatments triggered similar alterations in gene and pathway expression patterns, while paclitaxel action was mainly associated with induction of genes and pathways linked to cellular assembly and organization (including numerous tubulin genes, cell death and protein synthesis. The microarray data were further confirmed by pathway and network analyses. Conclusion Most alterations in gene expression were directly related to mechanisms of the cytotoxics actions in OC spheroids. However, the induction of genes linked to mechanisms of DNA replication and repair in cisplatin- and topotecan-treated OC spheroids could be associated with immediate adaptive response to treatment. Similarly, overexpression of different tubulin genes upon exposure to paclitaxel could represent an early compensatory effect to this drug action. Finally, multicellular

  17. Syrian Hamster as an Animal Model for the Study of Human Influenza Virus Infection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Iwatsuki-Horimoto, Kiyoko; Nakajima, Noriko; Ichiko, Yurie; Sakai-Tagawa, Yuko; Noda, Takeshi; Hasegawa, Hideki; Kawaoka, Yoshihiro

    2018-02-15

    Ferrets and mice are frequently used as animal models for influenza research. However, ferrets are demanding in terms of housing space and handling, whereas mice are not naturally susceptible to infection with human influenza A or B viruses. Therefore, prior adaptation of human viruses is required for their use in mice. In addition, there are no mouse-adapted variants of the recent H3N2 viruses, because these viruses do not replicate well in mice. In this study, we investigated the susceptibility of Syrian hamsters to influenza viruses with a view to using the hamster model as an alternative to the mouse model. We found that hamsters are sensitive to influenza viruses, including the recent H3N2 viruses, without adaptation. Although the hamsters did not show weight loss or clinical signs of H3N2 virus infection, we observed pathogenic effects in the respiratory tracts of the infected animals. All of the H3N2 viruses tested replicated in the respiratory organs of the hamsters, and some of them were detected in the nasal washes of infected animals. Moreover, a 2009 pandemic (pdm09) virus and a seasonal H1N1 virus, as well as one of the two H3N2 viruses, but not a type B virus, were transmissible by the airborne route in these hamsters. Hamsters thus have the potential to be a small-animal model for the study of influenza virus infection, including studies of the pathogenicity of H3N2 viruses and other strains, as well as for use in H1N1 virus transmission studies. IMPORTANCE We found that Syrian hamsters are susceptible to human influenza viruses, including the recent H3N2 viruses, without adaptation. We also found that a pdm09 virus and a seasonal H1N1 virus, as well as one of the H3N2 viruses, but not a type B virus tested, are transmitted by the airborne route in these hamsters. Syrian hamsters thus have the potential to be used as a small-animal model for the study of human influenza viruses. Copyright © 2018 American Society for Microbiology.

  18. Optimization of the formation of embedded multicellular spheroids of MCF-7 cells: How to reliably produce a biomimetic 3D model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Wenli; Li, Caibin; Baguley, Bruce C; Zhou, Fang; Zhou, Weisai; Shaw, John P; Wang, Zhen; Wu, Zimei; Liu, Jianping

    2016-12-15

    To obtain a multicellular MCF-7 spheroid model to mimic the three-dimensional (3D) of tumors, the microwell liquid overlay (A) and hanging-drop/agar (B) methods were first compared for their technical parameters. Then a method for embedding spheroids within collagen was optimized. For method A, centrifugation assisted cells form irregular aggregates but not spheroids. For method B, an extended sedimentation period of over 24 h for cell suspensions and increased viscosity of the culture medium using methylcellulose were necessary to harvest a dense and regular cell spheroid. When the number was less than 5000 cells/drop, embedded spheroids showed no tight cores and higher viability than the unembedded. However, above 5000 cells/drop, cellular viability of embedded spheroids was not significantly different from unembedded spheroids and cells invading through the collagen were in a sun-burst pattern with tight cores. Propidium Iodide staining indicated that spheroids had necrotic cores. The doxorubicin cytotoxicity demonstrated that spheroids were less susceptible to DOX than their monolayer cells. A reliable and reproducible method for embedding spheroids using the hanging-drop/agarose method within collagen is described herein. The cell culture model can be used to guide experimental manipulation of 3D cell cultures and to evaluate anticancer drug efficacy. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  19. Solving ground eigenvalue and eigenfunction of spheroidal wave equation at low frequency by supersymmetric quantum mechanics method

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Tang Wen-Lin; Tian Gui-Hua

    2011-01-01

    The spheroidal wave functions are found to have extensive applications in many branches of physics and mathematics. We use the perturbation method in supersymmetric quantum mechanics to obtain the analytic ground eigenvalue and the ground eigenfunction of the angular spheroidal wave equation at low frequency in a series form. Using this approach, the numerical determinations of the ground eigenvalue and the ground eigenfunction for small complex frequencies are also obtained.

  20. Photoperiod history differentially impacts reproduction and immune function in adult Siberian hamsters.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Prendergast, Brian J; Pyter, Leah M

    2009-12-01

    Seasonal changes in numerous aspects of mammalian immune function arise as a result of the annual variation in environmental day length (photoperiod), but it is not known if absolute photoperiod or relative change in photoperiod drives these changes. This experiment tested the hypothesis that an individual's history of exposure to day length determines immune responses to ambiguous, intermediate-duration day lengths. Immunological (blood leukocytes, delayed-type hypersensitivity reactions [DTH]), reproductive, and adrenocortical responses were assessed in adult Siberian hamsters (Phodopus sungorus) that had been raised initially in categorically long (15-h light/day; 15L) or short (9L) photoperiods and were subsequently transferred to 1 of 7 cardinal experimental photoperiods between 9L and 15L, inclusive. Initial photoperiod history interacted with contemporary experimental photoperiods to determine reproductive responses: 11L, 12L, and 13L caused gonadal regression in hamsters previously exposed to 15L, but elicited growth in hamsters previously in 9L. In hamsters with a 15L photoperiod history, photoperiods history, DTH responses were largely unaffected by increases in day length. Enhancement and suppression of blood leukocyte concentrations occurred at 13L in hamsters with photoperiod histories of 15L and 9L, respectively; however, prior exposure to 9L imparted marked hysteresis effects, which suppressed baseline leukocyte concentrations. Cortisol concentrations were only enhanced in 15L hamsters transferred to 9L and, in common with DTH, were unaffected by photoperiod treatments in hamsters with a 9L photoperiod history. Photoperiod history acquired in adulthood impacts immune responses to photoperiod, but manifests in a markedly dissimilar fashion as compared to the reproductive system. Prior photoperiod exposure has an enduring impact on the ability of the immune system to respond to subsequent changes in day length.

  1. Transmission of chronic wasting disease identifies a prion strain causing cachexia and heart infection in hamsters.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Richard A Bessen

    Full Text Available Chronic wasting disease (CWD is an emerging prion disease of free-ranging and captive cervids in North America. In this study we established a rodent model for CWD in Syrian golden hamsters that resemble key features of the disease in cervids including cachexia and infection of cardiac muscle. Following one to three serial passages of CWD from white-tailed deer into transgenic mice expressing the hamster prion protein gene, CWD was subsequently passaged into Syrian golden hamsters. In one passage line there were preclinical changes in locomotor activity and a loss of body mass prior to onset of subtle neurological symptoms around 340 days. The clinical symptoms included a prominent wasting disease, similar to cachexia, with a prolonged duration. Other features of CWD in hamsters that were similar to cervid CWD included the brain distribution of the disease-specific isoform of the prion protein, PrP(Sc, prion infection of the central and peripheral neuroendocrine system, and PrP(Sc deposition in cardiac muscle. There was also prominent PrP(Sc deposition in the nasal mucosa on the edge of the olfactory sensory epithelium with the lumen of the nasal airway that could have implications for CWD shedding into nasal secretions and disease transmission. Since the mechanism of wasting disease in prion diseases is unknown this hamster CWD model could provide a means to investigate the physiological basis of cachexia, which we propose is due to a prion-induced endocrinopathy. This prion disease phenotype has not been described in hamsters and we designate it as the 'wasting' or WST strain of hamster CWD.

  2. The intrarenal distribution of 125I-albumin in the syrian hamster

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Moeller, P.

    1977-01-01

    The intrarenal distribution of radioiodinated human serum albumin ( 125 RISA) after intravenous injection was studied in Syrian hamsters by scintillation counting and frozen section autoradiogrpahy. After 15, 30, and 60 min the virtual plasma albumin space in the renal cortex of the hamster represented 6.49, 7.13, and 8.06% respectively of the kidney tissue volume. From the cortex to the renal papilla the albumin space increased to about 30% of the tissue volume. In comparison to this the albumin space in the renal cortex of the rat was about 20%, and in the renal papilla about 33% (11). Frozen section autoradiography indicated that the distribution of radioalbumin in the renal cortex if the Syrian hamster is limited mainly to the kidney vessels, being especially noticeable in the glomerular capillaries. Toward the papilla increasingly greater (mainly extratubular) activity could be observed not only intravascularly but also interstitially. In the cortex of the rat kidney, on the other hand, radioactive albumin was accumulated (probably by filtration and reabsorption) predominantly in the proximal tubular epithelium. Within 30 min the kidneys of the rat excreted more than 10 times as much 125 I than the hamster kidneys. These results (substantially less cortical accumulation and urinary excretion of radioalbumin in the Syrian hamster) indicate that, in contrast to the rat, obviously much less albumin is filtered (and then accumulated by proximal reabsorption) by the Syrian hamster glomeruli. This suggests that the Syrian hamster kidney is more suitable than the rat kidney for determining the interstitial, cortical, albumin space. (orig./AJ) [de

  3. Diurnal rhythms in gonadotropins and progesterone in lactating and photoperiod induced acyclic hamsters

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bridges, R.S.; Goldman, B.D.

    1975-01-01

    Levels of LH, FSH, and progesterone in serum were measured in lactating hamsters and in hamsters in which acyclicity was induced with altered photoperiod. Lactating hamsters were found to have low titers of LH, FSH, and progesterone in serum at 0900 (lights on 0500--1900) on Days 4, 9, 14, and 19 of lactation and increased levels of these hormones at 1600. Levels of LH and FSH in serum at both 0900 and 1600 remained relatively constant throughout lactation. In contrast, levels of progesterone in serum obtained at both 0900 and 1600 sampling times increased as lactation progressed. Ovariectomy on Day 9 of lactation reduced serum levels of progesterone at both 0900 and 1600 and eliminated the afternoon surge in progesterone in animals bled 5 days after surgery. The levels and pattern of LH in serum remained unchanged after ovariectomy in lactating hamsters. However, serum FSH levels in the ovariectomized, lactating animals were elevated at both 0900 and 1600 when compared to levels present in intact, lactating hamsters bled at the same times. Females which were acyclic due to altered photoperiod displayed similar patterns of LH, FSH, and progesterone in serum. Levels of LH, FSH, and progesterone in serum were low at 1000 (lights on 0500--1500) and were increased 2 to 10 fold at 1500. Ovariectomy was followed by lower progesterone levels in serum at 1000 and 1500 and eliminated the afternoon rise of this hormone. Serum levels of LH were unaffected by ovariectomy. As in lactating hamsters, levels of FSH in serum were elevated 3--4 days following ovariectomy at both bleeding times, but the levels were higher at 1500. These results indicate that acyclicity induced by lactation or exposure to a short photoperiod is characterized by similar diurnal patterns of circulating hormones in the hamster

  4. Vomeronasal organ lesion disrupts social odor recognition, behaviors and fitness in golden hamsters.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Yingjuan; Zhang, Jinhua; Liu, Dingzhen; Zhang, Jianxu

    2014-06-01

    Most studies support the viewpoint that the vomeronasal organ has a profound effect on conspecific odor recognition, scent marking and mating behavior in the golden hamster (Mesocricetus auratus). However, the role of the vomeronasal organ in social odor recognition, social interaction and fitness is not well understood. Therefore, we conducted a series of behavioral and physiological tests to examine the referred points in golden hamster. We found that male hamsters with vomeronasal organ lesion showed no preference between a predator odor (the anal gland secretion of the Siberian weasels (Mustela sibirica) and putative female pheromone components (myristic acid and palmitic acid), but were still able to discriminate between these 2 kinds of odors. In behavioral tests of anxiety, we found that vomeronasal organ removal causes female hamsters to spend much less time in center grids and to cross fewer center grids and males to make fewer crossings between light and dark boxes than sham-operated controls. This indicates that a chronic vomeronasal organ lesion induced anxious responses in females. In aggressive behavioral tests, we found that a chronic vomeronasal organ lesion decreased agonistic behavior in female hamsters but not in males. The pup growth and litter size show no differences between the 2 groups. All together, our data suggested that vomeronasal organ ablation disrupted the olfactory recognition of social chemosignals in males, and induced anxiety-like and aggressive behavior changes in females. However, a vomeronasal organ lesion did not affect the reproductive capacity and fitness of hamsters. Our studies may have important implications concerning the role of the vomeronasal organ in golden hamsters and also in rodents. © 2013 International Society of Zoological Sciences, Institute of Zoology/Chinese Academy of Sciences and Wiley Publishing Asia Pty Ltd.

  5. Expansion of a zero-order Bessel beam in spheroidal coordinates by generalized Lorenz–Mie theory

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Han, L.; Han, Y.P.; Cui, Z.W.; Wang, J.J.

    2014-01-01

    An analytic solution to the scattering of the zero-order Bessel beam by a spheroidal particle is constructed on the basis of the generalized Lorenz–Mie theory (GLMT). The spheroidal beam shape coefficients (BSCs) of the zero-order Bessel beam are directly expressed in spheroidal coordinates and computed conveniently using an intrinsic method. Utilizing the tangential continuity of the electromagnetic fields, the expression coefficients of scattered and internal fields are determined. Numerical results concerning scattered field in the far zone are displayed for various parameters of the incident electromagnetic beam and of the scatter. These results are expected to provide useful insights into the scattering of a Bessel beam by spheroidal particles and particle manipulation applications using Bessel beams. - Highlights: • The scattering of zero-order Bessel beam by dielectric spheroid is investigated. • The analytic solution is constructed within the framework of the GLMT. • The spheroidal beam shape coefficients of the zero-order Bessel beam are computed by use an intrinsic method. • Numerical results concerning scattered field are displayed for various parameters

  6. Investigating the spectral characteristics of backscattering from heterogeneous spheroidal nuclei using broadband finite-difference time-domain simulations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chao, Guo-Shan; Sung, Kung-Bin

    2010-02-01

    Backscattered light spectra have been used to extract size distribution of cell nuclei in epithelial tissues for noninvasive detection of precancerous lesions. In existing experimental studies, size estimation is achieved by assuming nuclei as homogeneous spheres or spheroids and fitting the measured data with models based on Mie theory. However, the validity of simplifying nuclei as homogeneous spheres has not been thoroughly examined. In this study, we investigate the spectral characteristics of backscattering from models of spheroidal nuclei under plane wave illumination using three-dimensional finite-difference time-domain (FDTD) simulation. A modulated Gaussian pulse is used to obtain wavelength dependent scattering intensity with a single FDTD run. The simulated model of nuclei consists of a nucleolus and randomly distributed chromatin condensation in homogeneous cytoplasm and nucleoplasm. The results show that backscattering spectra from spheroidal nuclei have similar oscillating patterns to those from homogeneous spheres with the diameter equal to the projective length of the spheroidal nucleus along the propagation direction. The strength of backscattering is enhanced in heterogeneous spheroids as compared to homogeneous spheroids. The degree of which backscattering spectra of heterogeneous nuclei deviate from Mie theory is highly dependent on the distribution of chromatin/nucleolus but not sensitive to nucleolar size, refractive index fluctuation or chromatin density.

  7. Imaging- and Flow Cytometry-based Analysis of Cell Position and the Cell Cycle in 3D Melanoma Spheroids

    Science.gov (United States)

    Beaumont, Kimberley A.; Anfosso, Andrea; Ahmed, Farzana

    2015-01-01

    Three-dimensional (3D) tumor spheroids are utilized in cancer research as a more accurate model of the in vivo tumor microenvironment, compared to traditional two-dimensional (2D) cell culture. The spheroid model is able to mimic the effects of cell-cell interaction, hypoxia and nutrient deprivation, and drug penetration. One characteristic of this model is the development of a necrotic core, surrounded by a ring of G1 arrested cells, with proliferating cells on the outer layers of the spheroid. Of interest in the cancer field is how different regions of the spheroid respond to drug therapies as well as genetic or environmental manipulation. We describe here the use of the fluorescence ubiquitination cell cycle indicator (FUCCI) system along with cytometry and image analysis using commercial software to characterize the cell cycle status of cells with respect to their position inside melanoma spheroids. These methods may be used to track changes in cell cycle status, gene/protein expression or cell viability in different sub-regions of tumor spheroids over time and under different conditions. PMID:26779761

  8. Cell-free DNA in a three-dimensional spheroid cell culture model

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Aucamp, Janine; Calitz, Carlemi; Bronkhorst, Abel J.

    2017-01-01

    Background Investigating the biological functions of cell-free DNA (cfDNA) is limited by the interference of vast numbers of putative sources and causes of DNA release into circulation. Utilization of three-dimensional (3D) spheroid cell cultures, models with characteristics closer to the in vivo...... cultures can serve as effective, simplified in vivo-simulating “closed-circuit” models since putative sources of cfDNA are limited to only the targeted cells. In addition, cfDNA can also serve as an alternative or auxiliary marker for tracking spheroid growth, development and culture stability. Biological...... significance 3D cell cultures can be used to translate “closed-circuit” in vitro model research into data that is relevant for in vivo studies and clinical applications. In turn, the utilization of cfDNA during 3D culture research can optimize sample collection without affecting the stability of the growth...

  9. On the role of the transformation eigenstrain in the growth or shrinkage of spheroidal isotropic precipitations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fischer, F.D.; Boehm, H.J.

    2005-01-01

    The jumps of the strain and stress tensors on the surface of elastic homogeneous or inhomogeneous ellipsoidal inclusions embedded in an elastic matrix are obtained from results reported in the literature. They are used to derive closed-form expressions for the thermodynamic force in such matrix-inclusion systems that are subjected to a generally defined homogeneous transformation eigenstrain. A detailed study is presented for an isotropic spheroidal inclusion in an isotropic matrix in which the most important parameters are the inclusion's aspect ratio α and an eigenstrain triaxiality parameter d-bar. The fluctuations of the thermodynamic force are investigated for a set of specific transformation eigenstrain tensors and are presented for inclusion shapes ranging from disk-like to fiber-like spheroids

  10. Gravitational collision efficiency of nonspherical aerosols II: motion of an oblate spheroid in a viscous fluid

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tuttle, R.F.; Loyalka, S.K.

    1985-06-01

    The collisional dynamics of nonspherical aerosols is modeled by the introduction of a shape factor, US . Mechanistic calculation of US requires knowledge of the flow fields around the aerosols. Since actual aerosols can be complicated in shape and since the computation of flow fields can be quite difficult, insights into the nature of US are gained by using the superposition technique and studying aerosols that have tractable flow fields. The motion of an oblate spheroid in a viscous fluid is considered. The Navier-Stokes equations and associated boundary conditions are represented in oblate spheroidal coordinates. A combination of finite differences and spline-interpolation techniques is used to transform these equations to a form suitable for numerical computations. Converged results for the flow fields are obtained for a 0 to 5 range of Reynolds numbers. In the limit of zero Reynolds number, the results are found to be in agreement with the analytical solutions of Oberbeck.

  11. Generalized prolate spheroidal wave functions for optical finite fractional Fourier and linear canonical transforms.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pei, Soo-Chang; Ding, Jian-Jiun

    2005-03-01

    Prolate spheroidal wave functions (PSWFs) are known to be useful for analyzing the properties of the finite-extension Fourier transform (fi-FT). We extend the theory of PSWFs for the finite-extension fractional Fourier transform, the finite-extension linear canonical transform, and the finite-extension offset linear canonical transform. These finite transforms are more flexible than the fi-FT and can model much more generalized optical systems. We also illustrate how to use the generalized prolate spheroidal functions we derive to analyze the energy-preservation ratio, the self-imaging phenomenon, and the resonance phenomenon of the finite-sized one-stage or multiple-stage optical systems.

  12. Angular velocity of a spheroid log rolling in a simple shear at small Reynolds number

    Science.gov (United States)

    Meibohm, Jan; Candelier, Fabien; Rosen, Tomas; Einarsson, Jonas; Lundell, Fredrik; Mehlig, Bernhard

    2016-11-01

    We analyse the angular velocity of a small neutrally buoyant spheroid log rolling in a simple shear. When the effect of fluid inertia is negligible the angular velocity ω -> equals half the fluid vorticity. We compute by singular perturbation theory how weak fluid inertia reduces the angular velocity in an unbounded shear, and how this reduction depends upon the shape of the spheroid (on its aspect ratio). In addition we determine the angular velocity by direct numerical simulations. The results are in excellent agreement with the theory at small but not too small values of the shear Reynolds number, for all aspect ratios considered. For the special case of a sphere we find ω / s = - 1 / 2 + 0 . 0540Re 3 / 2 where s is the shear rate and Re is the shear Reynolds number. This result differs from that derived by Lin et al. who obtained a numerical coefficient roughly three times larger.

  13. Suspected Perinatal Depression Revealed to be Hereditary Diffuse Leukoencephalopathy with Spheroids.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Blume, Josefine; Weissert, Robert

    2017-01-01

    Early motor symptoms of neurodegenerative diseases often appear in combination with psychiatric symptoms, such as depression or personality changes, and are in danger of being misdiagnosed as psychogenic in young patients. We present the case of a 32-year-old woman who presented with rapid-onset depression, followed by a hypokinetic movement disorder and cognitive decline during pregnancy. Genetic testing revealed a mutation in the colony-stimulating factor 1 receptor gene, which led to the diagnosis of hereditary diffuse leukoencephalopathy with spheroids. Hereditary diffuse leukoencephalopathy with spheroids (HDLS) is probably an under-recognized disease. HDLS should be considered in patients with rapidly progressing parkinsonian symptoms and dementia accompanied by white matter lesions.

  14. Suspected Perinatal Depression Revealed to be Hereditary Diffuse Leukoencephalopathy with Spheroids

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Josefine Blume

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Early motor symptoms of neurodegenerative diseases often appear in combination with psychiatric symptoms, such as depression or personality changes, and are in danger of being misdiagnosed as psychogenic in young patients. We present the case of a 32-year-old woman who presented with rapid-onset depression, followed by a hypokinetic movement disorder and cognitive decline during pregnancy. Genetic testing revealed a mutation in the colony-stimulating factor 1 receptor gene, which led to the diagnosis of hereditary diffuse leukoencephalopathy with spheroids. Hereditary diffuse leukoencephalopathy with spheroids (HDLS is probably an under-recognized disease. HDLS should be considered in patients with rapidly progressing parkinsonian symptoms and dementia accompanied by white matter lesions.

  15. Generation of uniform magnetic field using a spheroidal helical coil structure

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Öztürk, Yavuz; Aktaş, Bekir

    2016-01-01

    Uniformity of magnetic fields are of great importance especially in magnetic resonance studies, namely in magnetic resonance spectroscopy applications (NMR, FMR, ESR, EPR etc.) and magnetic resonance imaging applications (MRI, FMRI). Field uniformity is also required in some other applications such as eddy current probes, magnetometers, magnetic traps, particle counters etc. Here we proposed a coil winding regime, which follows the surface of a spheroid (an ellipsoid of rotation); in light of previous theoretical studies suggesting perfect uniformity for a constant ampere per turn in the axial direction thereof. We demonstrated our theoretical results from finite element calculations suggesting 0.15% of field uniformity for the proposed structure, which we called a Spheroidal Helical Coil. (paper)

  16. Dielectric tensor elements for the description of waves in rotating inhomogeneous magnetized plasma spheroids

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abdoli-Arani, A.; Ramezani-Arani, R.

    2012-11-01

    The dielectric permittivity tensor elements of a rotating cold collisionless plasma spheroid in an external magnetic field with toroidal and axial components are obtained. The effects of inhomogeneity in the densities of charged particles and the initial toroidal velocity on the dielectric permittivity tensor and field equations are investigated. The field components in terms of their toroidal components are calculated and it is shown that the toroidal components of the electric and magnetic fields are coupled by two differential equations. The influence of thermal and collisional effects on the dielectric tensor and field equations in the rotating plasma spheroid are also investigated. In the limiting spherical case, the dielectric tensor of a stationary magnetized collisionless cold plasma sphere is presented.

  17. Simulation study of spheroidal dust gains charging: Applicable to dust grain alignment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zahed, H.; Sobhanian, S.; Mahmoodi, J.; Khorram, S.

    2006-01-01

    The charging process of nonspherical dust grains in an unmagnetized plasma as well as in the presence of a magnetic field is studied. It is shown that unlike the spherical dust grain, due to nonhomogeneity of charge distribution on the spheroidal dust surface, the resultant electric forces on electrons and ions are different. This process produces some surface charge density gradient on the nonspherical grain surface. Effects of a magnetic field and other plasma parameters on the properties of the dust particulate are studied. It has been shown that the alignment direction could be changed or even reversed with the magnetic field and plasma parameters. Finally, the charge distribution on the spheroidal grain surface is studied for different ambient parameters including plasma temperature, neutral collision frequency, and the magnitude of the magnetic field

  18. Confinement of nonneutral spheroidal plasmas in multi-ring electrode traps

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mohri, Akihiro; Yuyama, Tetsumori; Michishita, Toshinori; Higaki, Hiroyuki; Tanaka, Hitoshi; Yamazawa, Yohei; Aoyagi, Masayuki

    1998-01-01

    A nonneutral spheroidal plasma can be settled in a rigid rotor equilibrium inside a closed conducting cell independently of induced image charges on the cell wall if the electrostatic potential distribution on the wall surface is set equal to the sum of the external hyperbolic potential (r 2 -2z 2 ) and the self-potential produced by the plasma. A confinement system equipped with a train of properly biased ring electrodes can approximately generate any axisymmetric potential, including the above field. Experiments on confinement of electron spheroids in such a system showed that the confinement time became the longest when the condition to diminish the image charge effects was satisfied. The observed frequency of the centre-of-mass harmonic oscillation of the plasma in this configuration was in good agreement with the estimated one. (author)

  19. Anodic Dissolution of Spheroidal Graphite Cast Iron with Different Pearlite Areas in Sulfuric Acid Solutions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yoshikazu Miyata

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available The rate equation of anodic dissolution reaction of spheroidal graphite cast iron in sulfuric acid solutions at 298 K has been studied. The cast irons have different areas of pearlite. The anodic Tafel slope of 0.043 V decade−1 and the reaction order with respect to the hydroxyl ion activity of 1 are obtained by the linear potential sweep technique. The anodic current density does not depend on the area of pearlite. There is no difference in the anodic dissolution reaction mechanisms between pure iron and spheroidal graphite cast iron. The anodic current density of the cast iron is higher than that of the pure iron.

  20. Radiation-biological investigations with multicellular spheroids as an in vitro tumour model. 2

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Koerner, I.J.; Kopp, J.; Malz, W.

    1978-01-01

    Using the alkaline sucrose gradient sedimentation technique, the single-strand break rejoining in single cells and cells of small sheroids was studied after X-irradiation with 10 krads. The half life time for the fast rejoining process amounts to about 4 minutes for single cells and to about 1.5 minutes for small spheroids. While in single cells 7 per cent of single-strand breaks remain unrepaired after 80 minutes incubation at 37 0 C, in small spheroids practically no residual unrepaired single-strand breaks can be detected after more than 20 minutes. The corresponding survival of cells of small sheroids is increased in comparison with single cells. Possible reasons are discussed for the different repair capacities found. (author)