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Sample records for hamann amitabh varshney

  1. Amitabh Joshi | Speakers | Indian Academy of Sciences

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Jawaharlal Nehru Centre for Advanced Scientific Research, Jakkur P.O., Bangalore 560 064, Email: ajoshi@jncasr.ac.in. Amitabh Joshi, Evolutionary & Organismal Biology Unit, JNCASR, Bengaluru, elected to Fellowship in 2001. Joshi's research ... Experimental ecology and evolution in the laboratory. It is often believed ...

  2. La cuestión del nihilismo en J. G. Hamann

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cinta Canterla

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Este artículo analiza los elementos de la metacrítica de la Ilustración de Hamann que permiten remontar a su filosofía el nacimiento de la forma contemporánea que presenta la cuestión del nihilismo, patentes esencialmente en el tratamiento que realiza de la imagen de los falsos silenos o silenos invertidos (máscaras de falsa apariencia brillante para denunciar como irracionalidad el dogmatismo de cierta concepción absoluta de la razón conducente a una falsa filosofía.

  3. Joshi, Prof. Amitabh

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Specialization: Population & Quantitative Genetics, Evolutionary Genetics and ... Centre for Advanced Scientific Research, Jakkur P.O., Bengaluru 560 064, Karnataka ... Math Art and Design: MAD about Math, Math Education and Outreach.

  4. Advanced Technology for Portable Personal Visualization

    Science.gov (United States)

    1991-12-01

    Tracker to make design decisions, and another using the Virtus WalkThrough modelling program to carry them out. • Add real-time, interactive radiosity ...with radiosity illumination, lights that can be switched on or off with only 100 msec delays, textured surfaces, and near- real-time display from...Graphics. [Varshney9l] Varshney, Amitabh. "Parallel Radiosity Techniques for Mesh-Connected SIMD Computers," University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill

  5. Dental signs attributed to congenital syphilis and its treatments in the Hamann-Todd Skeletal Collection

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ioannou Stella

    2017-12-01

    Full Text Available Syphilis in the United States during the 1800s and 1900s had a high prevalence rate causing great concern to health officials. Various measures were taken to control its spread. Mercuric treatments were used up until the introduction of penicillin. The aim of this paper is to determine whether dental abnormalities related to congenital syphilis in individuals who died of syphilis or syphilis-related causes, in the Hamman Todd Osteological Collection, occur and whether mercurial treatment was effective. Hutchinson, Moon and Fournier’s works were analyzed to determine dental abnormalities associated with congenital syphilis and its treatments and used as criteria. Hillson et al. (AJPA,107:25-40 standardized method of description of dental changes was used. In the Hamman Todd Osteological Collection in Cleveland, Ohio, 102 individuals had cause of death recorded in the catalogue as syphilis or lues, and 69 had causes of death relating to syphilis which included paresis (53, aortic insufficiency (15 and pericarditis (1. Thus altogether 171 individuals were studied. Dentition was examined to determine if dental abnormalities associated with congenital syphilis and its treatments were present in individuals not recorded as having congenital syphilis. Crania were examined for any osteological changes. One individual (2266 demonstrated dental malformations possibly related to the congenital disease itself, while three demonstrated dental abnormalities associated with mercuric treatments in childhood (2118, 2263 and 3097. No remarkable bone pathologies were evident on any skull. The use of pre-penicillin treatment of congenital syphilis may have been effective to maintain health into adulthood but not always in eradicating the infection. Effects of mercury on enamel formation and bone changes, need to be considered when making a differential diagnosis of syphilis/congenital syphilis.

  6. The Language of the Genes

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Home; Journals; Resonance – Journal of Science Education; Volume 2; Issue 3. The Language of the Genes Linking the Past and the Future. Amitabh Joshi. Book Review Volume 2 ... Amitabh Joshi1. Animal Behaviour Unit, Jawaharlal Nehru Centre for Advanced Scientific Research, Jakkur P.O., Bangalore 560 064, India.

  7. Journal of Genetics | Indian Academy of Sciences

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Home; Journals; Journal of Genetics. AMITABH JOSHI. Articles written in Journal of Genetics. Volume 79 Issue 1 April 2000 pp 21-23 Book Review. Darwin's Spectre: Evolutionary Biology in the Modern World, by Michael R. Rose · Amitabh Joshi · More Details Fulltext PDF. Volume 80 Issue 1 April 2001 pp 1-7. Evolution of ...

  8. Journal of Genetics | Indian Academy of Sciences

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Are bigger flies always better: the role of genes and environment · Amitabh Joshi ... Classic. Inbreeding and sex: canalization, plasticity and sexual selection .... Niche construction in evolutionary theory: the construction of an academic niche?

  9. Evolution, Fruit Flies and Gerontology

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Home; Journals; Resonance – Journal of Science Education; Volume 1; Issue 11. Evolution, Fruit Flies and Gerontology Evolutionary Biology Helps Unravel the Mysteries of Ageing. Amitabh Joshi. General Article Volume 1 Issue 11 November 1996 pp 51-63 ...

  10. Journal of Genetics | Indian Academy of Sciences

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Author Affiliations. Sutirth Dey1 Snigdhadip Dey1 J. Mohan1 Amitabh Joshi1. Evolutionary Biology Laboratory, Evolutionary and Organismal Biology Unit, Jawaharlal Nehru Centre for Advanced Scientific Research, Jakkur, Bangalore 560 064, India ...

  11. Journal of Genetics | Indian Academy of Sciences

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Author Affiliations. N. G. Prasad1 Amitabh Joshi1. Evolutionary Biology Laboratory, Evolutionary and Organismal Biology Unit, Jawaharlal Nehru Centre for Advanced Scientific Research, P. O. Box 6436, Jakkur, Bangalore 560 064, India ...

  12. Resonance – Journal of Science Education | Indian Academy of ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Author Affiliations. Amitabh Joshi1. Evolutionary Biology Laboratory Evolutionary and Organismal Biology Unit, Jawaharlal Nehru Centre for Advanced Scientific Research, P. O. Box 6436, Jakkur, Bangalore 560 064, India.

  13. Resonance – Journal of Science Education | Indian Academy of ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Author Affiliations. Amitabh Joshi1. Evolutionary Biology Laboratory Evolutionary and Organismal Biology Unit Jawaharlal Nehru Centre for Advanced Scientific Research P. O. Box 6436, Jakkur, Bangalore 560 064, India.

  14. Resonance – Journal of Science Education | Indian Academy of ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Author Affiliations. Vishal Gohil1 2 Amitabh Joshi1. Evolution and Behaviour Laboratory, Animal Behaviour Unit, Jawaharlal Nehru Centre for Advanced Scientific Research, Jakkur P. O. Bangalore 560 064, India; 403 Shriji Palace, Station Road, Porbandar 360575 (Gujarat) ...

  15. Mechanism of recycling of post-termination ribosomal complexes in ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Madhu

    all pathway of ribosome recycling in eubacteria with especial reference to the important role of the initiation factor ... [Seshadri A and Varshney U 2006 Mechanism of recycling of post-termination ribosomal complexes in eubacteria: a new role of initiation factor 3 .... RRF binding results in a remarkable conformational change.

  16. Novel genic microsatellite markers from Cajanus scarabaeoides and ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    number of plant species, such as grape (Scott et al. 2000), sugarcane (Cordeiro et al. 2001), and cereals such as wheat, barley, rye and rice (Varshney et al. ..... Burns M. J., Edwards K. J., Newburg H. J., Ford Loyd B. V. and Baggott C. D. 2001 Development of simple sequence repeat. (SSR) markers for the assessment of ...

  17. effect of tractor forward speed on sandy loam soil physical ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Dr Obe

    Ilorin on a sandy loam soil to evaluate the effect of the imposition of different .... of the blade is 10.5cm. ... arranged in an inverted cone shape with ... replicates were taken for each speed run. The ..... Thakur, T. C; A. Yadav; B. P. Varshney and.

  18. pattern of epistaxis in sokoto,nigeria:a review of 72 cases

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Emmanuel Ameh

    otolaryngology. Lippincott-Raven,. Philadelphia.1998; 513-529. 2. Varshney S, Saxena RK. Epistaxis: a retrospective clinical study. Indian Journal of Otolaryngology,. Head Neck Surgery. 2005; 57:125-129. 3. Maran AGD, Lund VJ. Clinical rhinology. Thieme. Medical Publishers, New York. 1990; 101-103. 4. Watkinson JC.

  19. Resonance – Journal of Science Education | News

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Home; Journals; Resonance – Journal of Science Education; Volume 15; Issue 6. The Ribosome and the 2009 Nobel Prize in Chemistry. Laasya Samhita Umesh Varshney. General Article Volume 15 Issue 6 June 2010 pp 526-537. Fulltext. Click here to view fulltext PDF. Permanent link:

  20. Journal of Biosciences | Indian Academy of Sciences

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Home; Journals; Journal of Biosciences. Rahul Gaur. Articles written in Journal of Biosciences. Volume 32 Issue 4 June 2007 pp 747-754 Articles. Diet-dependent depletion of queuosine in tRNAs in Caenorhabditis elegans does not lead to a developmental block · Rahul Gaur Glenn R Björk Simon Tuck Umesh Varshney.

  1. Analysis of genetic diversity in pigeon pea germplasm using ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    MANEESHA

    2017-08-16

    Aug 16, 2017 ... fied polymorphic DNA (RAPD), simple sequence repeats. (SSR), amplified fragment length polymorphism (AFLP), single-nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs), diversity array technology (DArT), genic-simple sequence repeats (genic-. SSR) etc. (see review by Varshney et al. 2013). Since retrotransposons are ...

  2. A hard-knock life: the foraging ecology of Cape cormorants amidst ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    A hard-knock life: the foraging ecology of Cape cormorants amidst shifting prey resources and industrial fishing pressure. MH Hamann, D Grémillet, PG Ryan, F Bonadonna, CD van der Lingen, L Pichegru ...

  3. From the editor's desk

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Ever since the Indian Academy of Sciences inherited the publication of the Journal of Genetics from J. B. S. Haldane, successive Editors-in-Chief, Profs H. Sharat Chandra, K. VijayRaghavan, Amitabh Joshi and Rajiva Raman, with the support of members of the editorial board, have not only sustained but also expanded the ...

  4. Journal of Genetics | Indian Academy of Sciences

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    pp 1-7. Evolution of faster development does not lead to greater fluctuating asymmetry of sternopleural bristle number in Drosophila · Mallikarjun Shakarad N. G. Prasad M. Rajamani Amitabh Joshi · More Details Abstract Fulltext PDF. Both strong directional selection and faster development are thought to destabilize ...

  5. Fulltext PDF

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    68 Fascinating Shapes and Strudures Due to Entropic. Forces. Kheyo Sengupta and Kattero A Suresh. 73 Adaptive Significance of Circadian Rhythms. Biological Clocks andDarwinian Fitness in Cyanobacteria. V Sheeba, Vijoy Kumar Sharma and Amitabh Joshi. BOOK REVIEWS. 76 Ex-Prodigy, My Childhood and Youth.

  6. Resonance – Journal of Science Education | Indian Academy of ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Home; Journals; Resonance – Journal of Science Education; Volume 4; Issue 1. Adaptive Significance of Circadian Rhythms - Biological Clocks and Darwinian Fitness in Cyanobacteria. V Sheeba Vijay Kumar Sharma Amitabh Joshi. Research News Volume 4 Issue 1 January 1999 pp 73-75 ...

  7. Resonance – Journal of Science Education | News

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Home; Journals; Resonance – Journal of Science Education; Volume 7; Issue 2. Issue front cover thumbnail Issue back cover thumbnail. Volume 7, Issue 2. February 2002, pages 1-96. pp 1-1 Editorial. Editorial · Amitabh Joshi · More Details Fulltext PDF. pp 2-3 Article-in-a-Box. Claude Elwood Shannon · Priti Shankar.

  8. In this section of Resonance, we invite readers to pose questions ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Home; Journals; Resonance – Journal of Science Education; Volume 20; Issue 5. An Experiment on Projectile Motion. Amitabh Srivastava M K Raghavendra K P Ramesh. Classroom Volume 20 Issue 5 May 2015 pp 458-471. Fulltext. Click here to view fulltext PDF. Permanent link:

  9. Resonance – Journal of Science Education | Indian Academy of ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Home; Journals; Resonance – Journal of Science Education; Volume 8; Issue 2. Evolutionary Biology Today - What do Evolutionary Biologists do? Amitabh Joshi. Series Article Volume 8 Issue 2 February 2003 pp 6-18. Fulltext. Click here to view fulltext PDF. Permanent link:

  10. RE-SONAN-CE--INo-ve-mber--zo-oz

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    BOOK REVIEWS. 80 Ecology and Sustainable Development. M D Subash Chandran. 82 From Smiling Birds to Dancing Gods: A View of Evolution. Amitabh Joshi. Front Cover. -,... --. Back Cover. A schematic drawing of the Large Electron. Positron Collider ring, depicting the posi- tions of the four detectors Aleph, Delp i, L3.

  11. 2. Home 3. Journals 4. Resonance–Journal of Science Education 5 ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Srimath

    812 Hardy–Weinberg Equilibrium and the Foundations of Evolutionary Genetics. The Dance of the Genes. Amitabh Joshi. 836 Aerobasics – An Introduction to Aeronautics. Historical Perspective. S P Govinda Raju. GENERAL ARTICLES. 843 Space and Time in Life and Science. Vasant Natarajan, V Balakrishnan and N ...

  12. Hardy–Weinberg Equilibrium and the Foundations of Evolutionary ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Home; Journals; Resonance – Journal of Science Education; Volume 13; Issue 9. Hardy–Weinberg Equilibrium and the Foundations of Evolutionary Genetics - The Dance of the Genes. Amitabh Joshi. Series Article Volume 13 Issue 9 September 2008 pp 812-835 ...

  13. Hardy–Weinberg Equilibrium and the Foundations of Evolutionary ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Home; Journals; Resonance – Journal of Science Education; Volume 16; Issue 2. Hardy–Weinberg Equilibrium and the Foundations of Evolutionary Genetics - Incorporating Mutation and Migration. Amitabh Joshi. Series Article Volume 16 Issue 2 February 2011 pp 116-128 ...

  14. Journal of Genetics | Indian Academy of Sciences

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    The contribution of ancestry, chance, and past and ongoing selection to adaptive evolution · Amitabh Joshi Robinson B. Castillo Laurence D. Mueller · More Details Abstract Fulltext PDF. The relative contributions of ancestry, chance, and past and ongoing selection to variation in one adaptive (larval feeding rate) and one ...

  15. Journal of Genetics | Indian Academy of Sciences

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Home; Journals; Journal of Genetics. MANAN GUPTA. Articles written in Journal of Genetics. Volume 96 Issue 3 July 2017 pp 491-504 Perspectives. Niche construction in evolutionary theory: the construction of an academic niche? MANAN GUPTA N. G. PRASAD SUTIRTH DEY AMITABH JOSHI T. N. C. VIDYA.

  16. Journal of Genetics | Indian Academy of Sciences

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    L. S. Shashidhara T. N. C. Vidya · More Details Abstract Fulltext PDF. Volume 96 Issue 3 July 2017 pp 491-504 Perspectives. Niche construction in evolutionary theory: the construction of an academic niche? MANAN GUPTA N. G. PRASAD SUTIRTH DEY AMITABH JOSHI T. N. C. VIDYA · More Details Abstract Fulltext PDF.

  17. Resonance – Journal of Science Education | Indian Academy of ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Home; Journals; Resonance – Journal of Science Education; Volume 7; Issue 5. Issue front cover thumbnail Issue back cover thumbnail. Volume 7, Issue 5. May 2002, pages 1-106. pp 1-2 Editorial. Editorial · Amitabh Joshi · More Details Fulltext PDF. pp 3-5 Article-in-a-Box. Sir Mokshagundam Visvesvaraya – A Visionary ...

  18. Journal of Genetics | News

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    MANAN GUPTA1 2 N. G. PRASAD3 SUTIRTH DEY4 AMITABH JOSHI1 T. N. C. VIDYA2. Evolutionary Biology Laboratory, Evolutionary and Organismal Biology Unit, Jawaharlal Nehru Centre for Advanced Scientific Research, Jakkur, Bengaluru 560 064, India; Animal Behaviour and Sociogenetics Laboratory, Evolutionary ...

  19. Resonance – Journal of Science Education | Indian Academy of ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Annual Meetings · Mid Year Meetings · Discussion Meetings · Public Lectures · Lecture Workshops · Refresher Courses · Symposia · Live Streaming. Home; Journals; Resonance – Journal of Science Education; Volume 8; Issue 11. Of Flies and Fly Culture. Amitabh Joshi. Book Review Volume 8 Issue 11 November 2003 pp ...

  20. Hindu-Muslim Violence in India: A National and State-Level Study

    Science.gov (United States)

    2014-09-01

    clubs, sports clubs, festival organizations, trade unions, and cadre-based political parties.”25 Varshney argues that it is these groups that... tourism sectors by offering subsidies as well as fiscal and policy incentives to attract businesses to the state.37 Likewise, in 2007, Kerala also...Kerala’s tourism sector and agricultural sectors have become near equal contributors of 9% to the state’s GDP. India Brand Equity Foundation, Kerala State

  1. Resonance – Journal of Science Education | News

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    More Details Fulltext PDF. pp 2-4 Article-in-a-Box. J. Maynard Smith: From Engineering to Evolution · Amitabh Joshi · More Details Fulltext PDF. pp 5-5 Article-in-a-Box. The Logic of Animal Conflict · Raghavendra Gadagkar · More Details Fulltext PDF. pp 6-7 Table of Contents. Table of Contents · More Details Fulltext PDF.

  2. What Have We Been Writing about?: Patterns and Trends in the Scholarship of Teaching and Learning in Political Science

    Science.gov (United States)

    Craig, John

    2014-01-01

    It is more than 10 years since Kehl (2002) identified the increasing number of scholarship of teaching and learning (SoTL) papers being produced by political scientists. As noted by Hamann et al. (2009) and Whitman and Richlin (2007), this trend has developed further with increasing levels of research and publishing activity in political science…

  3. Prevalência pontual de Demodex canis e de demodicose em parcela da população canina na cidade de Guarapuava - Paraná /

    OpenAIRE

    Gueretz, Juliano Santos

    2005-01-01

    Orientador: Waldir Hamann Dissertação (mestrado) - Universidade Federal do Paraná, Setor de Ciências Agrárias, Programa de Pós-Graduação em Ciencias Veterinárias. Defesa: Curitiba, 2005 Inclui bibliografia Área de concentração: Patologia veterinária

  4. Understanding the Linguistic Turn and the Quest for Meaning ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Apart from Dilthey the linguistic turn penetrated also the thought of thinkers such as Freud, Wittgenstein, Frankl, Heidegger, Habermas, Dooyeweerd and Gadamer, all of them (implicitly or explicitly) elaborated the initial criticism raised by Herder, Jacobi, Hamann, Heidegger and Gadamer against Kant's Critique of Pure ...

  5. SMEs and CSR in Developing Countries

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jamali, Dima; Lund-Thomsen, Peter; Jeppesen, Søren

    2017-01-01

    This article is the guest editors’ introduction to the special issue in Business & Society on “SMEs and CSR in Developing Countries.” The special issue includes four original research articles by Hamann, Smith, Tashman, and Marshall; Allet; Egels-Zandén; and Puppim de Oliveira and Jabbour...

  6. Electronic structure, total energies, and STM images of clean and oxygen-covered Al(111)

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jacobsen, Joachim; Hammer, Bjørk; Jacobsen, Karsten Wedel

    1995-01-01

    an attractive O-O interaction is identified together with an enhancement in the dipole moment induced per O atom. Finally, Tersoff-Hamann-type scanning tunneling microscopy (STM) topographs are derived based on the calculated one-electron wave functions and spectra. For the clean Al(111) a theoretical STM...

  7. Theory of inelastic electron tunneling from a localized spin in the impulsive approximation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Persson, Mats

    2009-07-31

    A simple expression for the conductance steps in inelastic electron tunneling from spin excitations in a single magnetic atom adsorbed on a nonmagnetic metal surface is derived. The inelastic coupling between the tunneling electron and the spin is via the exchange coupling and is treated in an impulsive approximation using the Tersoff-Hamann approximation for the tunneling between the tip and the sample.

  8. Nach dem Deutschstudium in Afrika wird man – was? Eine ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Eva Hamann. 196. 2. Die Legitimierungsdebatte. Die Debatte um die Legitimierung und Relevanz des Studienfachs Deutsch in Afrika, geführt von afrikanischen Auslandsgermanisten, spiegelt sich ab den 80er Jahren in afrikanischen. Periodika wie Études Germano-Africaines und in deutschen Periodika wie Jahrbuch DaF.

  9. Seeking asymmetric rotors in mass region A∼100-110

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Varshney, Mani; Gupta, D K; Singh, M; Singh, Yuvraj; Bihari, Chhail; Varshney, A K; Gupta, K K

    2011-01-01

    The staggering indices S(I, I-1, I-2) versus spin (I) graphs have been plotted using known experimental data along with empirical calculations of Varshney et al (2007 Phys. Scr. 75 451) in some nuclei of mass region A∼100-110. Most of the transional nuclei of Mo, Ru and Pd isotopes have been found to be triaxial. The known B(E2) values of these nuclei are also close to the triaxial rotor model predictions (Davydov A S and Filippov G F 1958 Nucl. Phys. 8 237).

  10. Cascade of kinetic energy and scalar variance in DC electrokinetic turbulence

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhao, Wei; Wang, Guiren

    2017-11-01

    Turbulent flow can be generated by DC electrokinetic (EK) force based on the electric conductivity and permittivity variations in fluids, as have been demonstrated by Varshney et al (2016), where a -1.4 slope of velocity power spectrum is observed. Here, we theoretically found the scaling exponents of velocity and scalar structures in the electric-body-force (EBF) dominant subregion of DC EK turbulence were 2/5 (equivalent to the -7/5 slope of velocity power spectrum) and 4/5 respectively. The theory perfectly explains the experimental results of Varshney et al. (2016). Based on Kármán-Howarth equation with forcing terms, the energy cascade process of DC EK turbulence was also investigated. Depending on the electric Rayleigh number (Rae) , two different energy cascade processes may happen. When Rae is small, the kinetic energy cascades along inertial subregion and EBF dominant subregion in sequence, before it is dissipated by fluid viscosity. When Rae is sufficiently large, the inertial subregion may be absent with EBF dominant subregion left. This investigation is very important on understand EK turbulence, which could be widely existed in nature and applied in engineerings. The work was supported by NSFC (11672229), and NSF (CAREER CBET-0954977 and MRI CBET-1040227).

  11. Proceedings of the Frontiers of Retrovirology Conference 2016

    OpenAIRE

    Zurnic, Irena; H?tter, Sylvia; Lehmann, Ute; Stanke, Nicole; Reh, Juliane; Kern, Tobias; Lindel, Fabian; Gerresheim, Gesche; Hamann, Martin; M?llers, Erik; Lesbats, Paul; Cherepanov, Peter; Serrao, Erik; Engelman, Alan; Lindemann, Dirk

    2016-01-01

    Table of contents Oral presentations Session 1: Entry & uncoating O1 Host cell polo-like kinases (PLKs) promote early prototype foamy virus (PFV) replication Irena Zurnic, Sylvia H?tter, Ute Lehmann, Nicole Stanke, Juliane Reh, Tobias Kern, Fabian Lindel, Gesche Gerresheim, Martin Hamann, Erik M?llers, Paul Lesbats, Peter Cherepanov, Erik Serrao, Alan Engelman, Dirk Lindemann O2 A novel entry/uncoating assay reveals the presence of at least two species of viral capsids during synchronized HIV...

  12. Proceedings of the Frontiers of Retrovirology Conference 2016

    OpenAIRE

    Zurnic, Irena; Hütter, Sylvia; Lehmann, Ute; Stanke, Nicole; Reh, Juliane; Kern, Tobias; Lindel, Fabian; Gerresheim, Gesche; Hamann, Martin; Müllers, Erik; Lesbats, Paul; Cherepanov, Peter; Serrao, Erik; Engelman, Alan; Lindemann, Dirk

    2016-01-01

    Table of contents Oral presentations Session 1: Entry & uncoating O1 Host cell polo-like kinases (PLKs) promote early prototype foamy virus (PFV) replication Irena Zurnic, Sylvia Hütter, Ute Lehmann, Nicole Stanke, Juliane Reh, Tobias Kern, Fabian Lindel, Gesche Gerresheim, Martin Hamann, Erik Müllers, Paul Lesbats, Peter Cherepanov, Erik Serrao, Alan Engelman, Dirk Lindemann O2 A novel entry/uncoating assay reveals the presence of at least two species of viral capsids during synchronized HIV...

  13. Graywater Discharges from Vessels

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-11-01

    metals (e.g., cadmium, chromium, lead, copper , zinc, silver, nickel, and mercury), solids, and nutrients (USEPA, 2008b; USEPA 2010). Wastewater from... flotation ), and disinfection (using ultraviolet light) as compared to traditional Type II MSDs that use either simple maceration and chlorination, or...Coliform Naval Vessels Oceanographic Vessels Small Cruise Ships 25a Vendor 2 Hamann AG Biological Treatment with Dissolved Air Flotation and

  14. Meie mees Kanadas - Tõnu Altosaar / Tõnu Altosaar ; interv. Regina Viljasaar

    Index Scriptorium Estoniae

    Altosaar, Tõnu, 1943-

    2005-01-01

    Eesti päritolu Kanada arhitektuuribüroo Bregman & Hamann Architects (B&H) arhitekt Tõnu Altosaar (sünd. 1943) oma elust, perekonnast, tööst, sidemetest Eestiga, eesti ja kanada arhitektuurist, arhitektide haridusest Kanadas, oma firmast ja projektidest (Niagara Casino, BCE Place Torontos koos Santiago Calatravaga jm.). 14. III betoonipäeval räägib T. Altosaar betooni kasutamisest Ontario ja Toronto piirkonna arhitektuuris

  15. Atomic and electronic structure of MoS2 nanoparticles

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bollinger, Mikkel; Jacobsen, Karsten Wedel; Nørskov, Jens Kehlet

    2003-01-01

    Using density-functional theory (DFT) we present a detailed theoretical study of MoS2 nanoparticles. We focus on the edge structures, and a number of different edge terminations are investigated. Several, but not all, of these configurations have one-dimensional metallic states localized at the e...... and the composition of the gas phase. Using the Tersoff-Hamann formalism, scanning-tunneling microscopy (STM) images of the edges are simulated for direct comparison with recent STM experiments. In this way we identify the experimentally observed edge structure....

  16. Electric field effects in scanning tunneling microscope imaging

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Stokbro, Kurt; Quaade, Ulrich; Grey, Francois

    1998-01-01

    We present a high-voltage extension of the Tersoff-Hamann theory of scanning tunneling microscope (STM) images, which includes the effect of the electric field between the tip and the sample. The theoretical model is based on first-principles electronic structure calculations and has no adjustable...... parameters. We use the method to calculate theoretical STM images of the monohydrate Si(100)-H(2x1) surface with missing hydrogen defects at -2V and find an enhanced corrugation due to the electric field, in good agreement with experimental images....

  17. First-principles modelling of scanning tunneling microscopy using non-equilibrium Green's functions

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lin, H.P.; Rauba, J.M.C.; Thygesen, Kristian Sommer

    2010-01-01

    The investigation of electron transport processes in nano-scale architectures plays a crucial role in the development of surface chemistry and nano-technology. Experimentally, an important driving force within this research area has been the concurrent refinements of scanning tunneling microscopy...... into account. As an illustrating example we apply the NEGF-STM method to the Si(001)(2x1):H surface with sub-surface P doping and discuss the results in comparison to the Bardeen and Tersoff-Hamann methods....

  18. Hamman-Rich syndrome in a goldsmith

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kirchner, J.; Stein, A.; Jacobi, V.; Viel, K.

    1997-01-01

    We report the case of a 54-year-old goldsmith admitted because of dyspnea on exertion, persistent cough, and weakness under the suspicion of exogenous allergic alveolitis. He rapidly developed progressive lung fibrosis with exitus letalis 7 weeks after admission. Radiological examination (chest X-ray and HRCT) first showed ground glass opacities, and later rapid development of severe interstitial pattern with architectural distraction. The findings were similar to idiopathic lung fibrosis; however, the rare Hamman-Rich syndrome was confirmed by progressive course of the disease. Correlations between Hamann-Rich syndrome and idiopathic lung fibrosis are discussed. (orig.) [de

  19. First-principles theory of inelastic currents in a scanning tunneling microscope

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Stokbro, Kurt; Hu, Ben Yu-Kuang; Thirstrup, C.

    1998-01-01

    A first-principles theory of inelastic tunneling between a model probe tip and an atom adsorbed on a surface is presented, extending the elastic tunneling theory of Tersoff and Hamann. The inelastic current is proportional to the change in the local density of states at the center of the tip due...... to the addition of the adsorbate. We use the theory to investigate the vibrational heating of an adsorbate below a scanning tunneling microscopy tip. We calculate the desorption rate of PI from Si(100)-H(2 X 1) as a function of the sample bias and tunnel current, and find excellent a,agreement with recent...

  20. Subsurface contributions in epitaxial rare-earth silicides

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Luebben, Olaf; Shvets, Igor V. [Centre for Research on Adaptive Nanostructures and Nanodevices (CRANN), School of Physics, Trinity College, Dublin (Ireland); Cerda, Jorge I. [Instituto de Ciencia de Materiales de Madrid, ICMM-CSIC, Cantoblanco, Madrid (Spain); Chaika, Alexander N. [Institute of Solid State Physics, RAS, Chernogolovka (Russian Federation)

    2015-07-01

    Metallic thin films of heavy rare-earth silicides epitaxially grown on Si(111) substrates have been widely studied in recent years because of their appealing properties: unusually low values of the Schottky barrier height, an abrupt interface, and a small lattice mismatch. Previous studies also showed that these silicides present very similar atomic and electronic structures. Here, we examine one of these silicides (Gd{sub 3}Si{sub 5}) using scanning tunneling microscopy (STM) image simulations that go beyond the Tersoff-Hamann approach. These simulations strongly indicate an unusual STM depth sensitivity for this system.

  1. Review: TASHI'S TURBINE

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alexander R O'Neill

    2018-05-01

    Full Text Available Amitabh Raj Joshi (director, producer. 2015. Tashi's Turbine. New York City, NY: Vacant Light LLC. 56 mins. http://bit.ly/2tg9fTx, Nepali and Lowa, English subtitles. Color. (Institutional use 320USD; (personal use 34.95USD. In the windswept valleys of Upper Mustang, Nepal, renewable energy is transforming lives. Micro-turbine projects have connected off-grid communities with basic electricity, providing hope for sustainable growth on the Roof of the World. The documentary Tashi's Turbine follows two friends as they experiment with these technologies in Nyamdok Village, along the Sino-Nepali border. Recognizing that high-mountain valleys, including Mustang, Palpa, and Khumbu, are rich in wind resources, Tashi and his friend, Jeevan Kumar Oli, attempt to mitigate poverty using grassroots energy. Tashi Bista was inspired in his youth by tales of "wind machines" at Kagbeni Village in Upper Mustang. In 1987, the Danish Government had funded a twenty-kilowatt turbine in the area; but, it was rapidly decommissioned due to maintenance complications. In 1996, the Government of Nepal established the Alternative Energy Promotion Center (AEPC to revive this and other wind programs and address related challenges. Nevertheless, AEPC's latest Wind Energy Resource Assessment revealed two decades of inaction. Wind programs in other parts of the country remain nascent; much of Central and Western Nepal have yet to be connected to the national grid. Director and cinematographer Amitabh Raj Joshi cultivates a nuanced vision of these developments by juxtaposing majestic landscapes against simple homes and everyday struggles for existence. The film opens with panoramas of the sapphire skies and canvas valleys of Mustang. Minutes later, kerosene fixtures illuminate paltry yields from subsistence harvests; children attempt to study under candlelight, often to no avail. Voicing the narratives of villagers like Chhimi Lhamo, Karma Lutok, and Pemba Tashi, Joshi captures

  2. Secure Cooperative Spectrum Sensing for the Cognitive Radio Network Using Nonuniform Reliability

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Muhammad Usman

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Both reliable detection of the primary signal in a noisy and fading environment and nullifying the effect of unauthorized users are important tasks in cognitive radio networks. To address these issues, we consider a cooperative spectrum sensing approach where each user is assigned nonuniform reliability based on the sensing performance. Users with poor channel or faulty sensor are assigned low reliability. The nonuniform reliabilities serve as identification tags and are used to isolate users with malicious behavior. We consider a link layer attack similar to the Byzantine attack, which falsifies the spectrum sensing data. Three different strategies are presented in this paper to ignore unreliable and malicious users in the network. Considering only reliable users for global decision improves sensing time and decreases collisions in the control channel. The fusion center uses the degree of reliability as a weighting factor to determine the global decision in scheme I. Schemes II and III consider the unreliability of users, which makes the computations even simpler. The proposed schemes reduce the number of sensing reports and increase the inference accuracy. The advantages of our proposed schemes over conventional cooperative spectrum sensing and the Chair-Varshney optimum rule are demonstrated through simulations.

  3. Structural, electronic and magnetic properties of Mn{sub 3}N{sub 2}(0 0 1) surfaces

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Guerrero-Sánchez, J., E-mail: guerrero@ifuap.buap.mx [Department of Physics and Astronomy, Nanoscale and Quantum Phenomena Institute, Ohio University, Athens, OH 45701 (United States); Benemérita Universidad Autónoma de Puebla, Instituto de Física “Ing Luis Rivera Terrazas”, Apartado Postal J-48, Puebla 72570 (Mexico); Mandru, Andrada-Oana; Wang, Kangkang [Department of Physics and Astronomy, Nanoscale and Quantum Phenomena Institute, Ohio University, Athens, OH 45701 (United States); Takeuchi, Noboru [Department of Physics and Astronomy, Nanoscale and Quantum Phenomena Institute, Ohio University, Athens, OH 45701 (United States); Centro de Nanociencias y Nanotecnologia, Universidad Nacional Autónoma de México, Apartado Postal 14, Ensenada, Baja California, Codigo Postal 22800 (Mexico); Cocoletzi, Gregorio H. [Benemérita Universidad Autónoma de Puebla, Instituto de Física “Ing Luis Rivera Terrazas”, Apartado Postal J-48, Puebla 72570 (Mexico); Smith, Arthur R. [Department of Physics and Astronomy, Nanoscale and Quantum Phenomena Institute, Ohio University, Athens, OH 45701 (United States)

    2015-11-15

    Graphical abstract: - Abstract: Spin-polarized first-principles total energy calculations have been performed to study the structural, electronic and magnetic properties of Mn{sub 3}N{sub 2}(0 0 1) surfaces. It is found that three surface terminations are energetically stable, in agreement with previous scanning tunneling microscopy experiments that have found three different electronic contrasts in their images. It is also found that in all three cases, the topmost layer has a MnN stoichiometry. Density of states calculations show a metallic behavior for all the stable structures with the most important contribution close to the Fermi level coming from the Mn-d orbitals. Our Tersoff–Hamann scanning tunneling microscopy simulations are in good agreement with previous experimental results.

  4. Study of the electrons elastic scattering by atoms through pseudopotentials

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bettega, M.H.F.

    1990-01-01

    Pseudopotentials allow an extraordinary simplification in the calculation of the electronic structure of atoms, molecules and crystals. Though they have been used extensively for electronic structure calculations, little is known of their applicability to scattering. A study of the pseudopotentials of Bachelet, Hamann and Schuter in the electron scattering by atoms was made, calculating phase-shifts and cross sections for angular momenta 1=0,1 and 2 and energy up to 5 R y. The results for the pseudopotential were compared all-electron calculations. The agreement is very good in a broad energy band. A simplification of the calculation of scattering by complex molecules where an all-electron calculation is impossible is aimed. (author)

  5. First-principles description of atomic gold chains on Ge(001)

    KAUST Repository

    Ló pez-Moreno, S.; Muñ oz, A.; Romero, A. H.; Schwingenschlö gl, Udo

    2010-01-01

    We have performed density-functional theory calculations, including the spin-orbit correction, to investigate atomic gold chains on Ge(001). A set of 26 possible configurations of the Au/Ge(001) system with c(4×2) and c(8×2) symmetries is studied. Our data show that the c(4×2) order results in the lowest energy, which is not in direct agreement with recent experiments. Using total-energy calculations, we are able to explain these differences. We address the electronic band structure and apply the Tersoff-Hamann approach to correlate our data to scanning-tunneling microscopy (STM). We obtain two highly competitive structures of the atomic Au chains for which we report simulated STM images in order to clarify the composition of the experimental Au/Ge(001) surface.

  6. First-principles description of atomic gold chains on Ge(001)

    KAUST Repository

    López-Moreno, S.

    2010-01-25

    We have performed density-functional theory calculations, including the spin-orbit correction, to investigate atomic gold chains on Ge(001). A set of 26 possible configurations of the Au/Ge(001) system with c(4×2) and c(8×2) symmetries is studied. Our data show that the c(4×2) order results in the lowest energy, which is not in direct agreement with recent experiments. Using total-energy calculations, we are able to explain these differences. We address the electronic band structure and apply the Tersoff-Hamann approach to correlate our data to scanning-tunneling microscopy (STM). We obtain two highly competitive structures of the atomic Au chains for which we report simulated STM images in order to clarify the composition of the experimental Au/Ge(001) surface.

  7. Trieb et énergie chez Herder

    OpenAIRE

    Pénisson, Pierre

    2011-01-01

    Herder s’inspire à la fois de la philosophie leibnizienne de la force, de la théorie d’Albrecht von Haller sur l’excitabilité (Reizbarkeit) et des pensées françaises de l’énergie, que l’on trouve aussi chez Sulzer à Berlin et James Harris en Angleterre, et d’une autre façon chez Hamann que commentera Hegel. Mais le Trieb est plus qu’une concentration de force, et la critique herdérienne des pensées françaises de l’énergie ou du culte allemand du génie retrouve les arguments du premier discour...

  8. The prevalence cervical facet arthrosis: an osseous study in a cadveric population.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Michael J; Riew, K Daniel

    2009-09-01

    Cervical facet arthrosis has been implicated as a cause for neck pain, radiculopathy, occipital headache, and ear pain. The objective of this study was to examine the occurrence of facet arthrosis in the cervical spine. This study examined cadaveric specimens from the Hamann Todd Collection. None. None. Four hundred sixty-five skeletally mature human cervical spines from the Hamann Todd Collection in the Cleveland Museum of Natural History were obtained for analysis. We analyzed the facets for arthrosis. We graded no arthrosis as Grade 0. Facets with peripheral osteophytic reaction, but with no lateral mass distortion were graded as Grade 1. Facets with peripheral osteophytic reaction and lateral mass distortion were graded as Grade 2. Facets that were ankylosed were graded as Grade 3. Each specimen was examined bilaterally at levels from C2-C3 through C6-C7, yielding 4,650 specimen assessments. The data were analyzed to compare cervical levels, gender, facet side, age groups, and race. Proportion analysis, using the Fisher exact test, was used to assess for statistical difference between various groupings. In the entire population of 465 specimens, the upper cervical specimens appeared to be affected by facet arthrosis more frequently than the lower levels; 12.37% of the specimens had bony evidence of arthrosis at the C2-C3 level; 13.33% of the specimens had arthrosis occur at the C3-C4 level; 14.62% at the C4-C5 level; 7.85% at the C5-C6 level, and 4.84% at the C6-C7 level. The large majority of all cervical facet arthrosis was found to be Grade 1 at all levels. In the older population, the prevalence of facet arthrosis is as high as 29.87% for the C4-C5 level. C4-C5 level appears to be affected the most frequently, followed by the C3-C4 level, then C2-C3, C5-C6, and C6-C7. The prevalence of cervical facet arthrosis increases with age, and occurs more commonly in the upper cervical spine.

  9. Correlation of Periodontal Disease With Inflammatory Arthritis in the Time Before Modern Medical Intervention.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rothschild, Bruce

    2017-03-01

    Controversy exists regarding possible correlation of periodontal disease with rheumatoid arthritis (RA) and ankylosing spondylitis (AS). Confounding factors may relate to stringency of inflammatory disease diagnosis and the effect of therapeutic intervention for RA on periodontal disease. These factors are investigated in this study. Forty-five individuals with documented RA (n = 15), spondyloarthropathy (n = 15), and calcium pyrophosphate deposition disease (CPPD) (n = 15), from the Hamann-Todd collection of human skeletons compiled from 1912 to 1938, and 15 individuals contemporarily incorporated in the collection were examined for tooth loss, cavity occurrence, average and maximum lingual and buccal depth of space between tooth and bone, periosteal reaction, serpentine bone resorption, abscess formation, and root penetration of the bone surface and analyzed by analysis of variance. Tooth loss was common, but actual number of teeth lost, cavity occurrence, average and maximum lingual and buccal depth of space between tooth and bone, periosteal reaction, serpentine grooving surrounding teeth (considered a sign of inflammation), abscess formation, and root exposure (penetration of bone surface) were indistinguishable among controls and individuals with RA, spondyloarthropathy, and CPPD. Although many factors can affect periodontal disease, presence of inflammatory arthritis does not appear to be one of them. The implication is that dental disease was common in the general population and not necessarily associated with arthritis, at least before the advent of modern rheumatologic medications. As specific diagnosis did not affect prevalence, perhaps current prevalence controversy may relate to current intervention, a subject for further study.

  10. Scaling theory of tunneling diffusion of a heavy particle interacting with phonons

    Science.gov (United States)

    Itai, K.

    1988-05-01

    The author discusses motion of a heavy particle in a d-dimensional lattice interacting with phonons by different couplings. The models discussed are characterized by the dimension (d) and the set of two indices (λ,ν) which specify the momentum dependence of the dispersion of phonon energy (ω~kν) and of the particle-phonon coupling (~kλ). Scaling equations are derived by eliminating the short-time behavior in a renormalization-group scheme using Feynman's path-integral method, and the technique developed by Anderson, Yuval, and Hamann for the Kondo problem. The scaling equations show that the particle is localized in the strict sense when (2λ+d+2)/ν2. In the marginal case, i.e., (2λ+d+2)/ν=2, localization occurs for couplings larger than a critical value. This marginal case shows Ohmic dissipation and is a close analogy to the Caldeira-Leggett model for macroscopic quantum tunneling and the hopping models of Schmid's type. For large-enough (2λ+d+2)/ν, the particle is considered practically localized, but the origin of the localization is quite different from that for (2λ+d+2)/ν<=2. .AE

  11. Forgetting emotional and neutral words: an ERP study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brandt, Karen R; Nielsen, Maria Kragh; Holmes, Amanda

    2013-03-21

    Previous research has demonstrated that emotional material is more likely to be remembered than neutral material (Hamann, 2001). The present study employed the item-method of directed forgetting in order to examine whether emotionally negative words are not only easier to remember, but also harder to forget. Event-related potentials (ERPs) were additionally measured in order to investigate the processes of selective rehearsal and active inhibition in directed forgetting. The results demonstrated directed forgetting effects for both neutral and negative words, with a stronger effect for negative items. Late positive potentials (LPPs) for 'to-be-remembered' (TBR) relative to 'to-be-forgotten' (TBF) cues were enhanced when the cues followed negative in comparison to neutral words, indicating the greater selective rehearsal of TBR negative items. Frontal positivities to TBF relative to TBR cues were not modulated by word valence, indicating that inhibitory processes were unaffected by emotion. Taken together, the present research demonstrates for the first time that, not only are emotionally negative words prone to the same directed forgetting effects as neutral words, but that these effects are in fact enhanced for negative words and due to increased selective rehearsal of TBR negative items. The discrepancies between the present findings and those of previous studies are discussed. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  12. For philatelists

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1969-01-01

    From the beginning of October this year the United Nations Postal Administration has been able to issue Swiss-denomination stamps valid for correspondence posted at the Palais des Nations, Geneva. This is the first time that the UN in Geneva has been able to send mail using its own postage stamps and is therefore of great interest to philatelists. The principal aim of the UN Postal Administration is to make UN activities and those of the specialized agencies better known in the world through stamps. In 1969 there have been issues in honour of the UN Institute for Training and Research (UNITAR), the Economic Commission for Latin America, the International Law Commission and the International Labour Organisation (ILO). Among those next year will be a stamp to commemorate the efforts of the World Health Organization (WHO) to fight cancer. There are eight denominations in the new Swiss issue, each with special designs. They are 1 franc (designed by Rashid-ud-Din, Pakistan); 10 centimes, 30 centimes and 75 centime (Ole Hamann, Denmark); 5 centimes (Jozsef Vertel, Hungary); 3 francs, showing the statue in the Trusteeship Council Chamber, New York; 50 centimes (Olav S. Mathiesen, Denmark); and 20 centimes (Georges Hamori, Australia). (author)

  13. A cadaveric investigation into the demographic and bony alignment properties associated with osteoarthritis of the patellofemoral joint.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Weinberg, Douglas S; Tucker, Braden J; Drain, Joseph P; Wang, David M; Gilmore, Allison; Liu, Raymond W

    2016-06-01

    Patellofemoral joint osteoarthritis is common, although circumstances dictating its evolution and pathogenesis remain unclear. Advances in surgical technique have improved the ability to modify long-bone alignment in the coronal, sagittal, and axial planes. However, to our knowledge, there is no significant long-term data available in regard to the relationship between anatomic alignment parameters most amenable to surgical modification and patellofemoral joint osteoarthritis. Five-hundred and seventy-one cadaveric skeletons were obtained from the Hamann-Todd osteological collection. Mechanical lateral distal femoral angle, medial proximal tibial angle, tibial slope, femoral version, tibial torsion, the position of the tibial tubercle relative to the width of the tibial plateau, trochlear depth, and patellar size were measured using validated techniques. A previously published grading system for patellofemoral joint arthritis was used to quantify macroscopic signs of degenerative joint disease. Increasing age (standardized beta 0.532, ppatellofemoral joint osteoarthritis. A relatively more laterally positioned tibial tubercle trended towards predicting patellofemoral joint osteoarthritis (standardized beta 0.080, p=0.089). These findings confirm that patellofemoral joint osteoarthritis is strongly associated with increasing age and female gender. Valgus alignment of the distal femur, a relatively more lateral location of the tibial tubercle, and a shallower trochlear grove appear to have modest effects on the development of patellofemoral joint osteoarthritis. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  14. Transport properties of β-Ga2O3 nanoparticles embedded in Nb thin films

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    L.S. Vaidhyanathan

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available The origin of ferromagnetism in nanoparticles of nonmagnetic oxides is an interesting area of research. In the present work, transport properties of niobium thin films, with β-Ga2O3 nanoparticles embedded within them, are presented. Nanoparticles of β-Ga2O3 embedded in a Nb matrix were prepared at room temperature by radio frequency co-sputtering technique on Si (100 and glass substrates held at room temperature. The thin films deposited on Si substrates were subjected to Ar annealing at a temperature range of 600-650 C for 1 hour. Films were characterized by X-ray diffraction (XRD, Micro-Raman and elemental identification was performed with an Energy Dispersive X-ray Spectroscopy (EDS. Transport measurements were performed down to liquid helium temperatures by four-probe contact technique, showed characteristics analogous to those observed in the context of a Kondo system. A comparison of the experimental data with the theoretical formalism of Kondo and Hamann is presented. It is suggested that this behavior arises from the existence of magnetic moments associated with the oxygen vacancy defects in the nanoparticles of the nonmagnetic oxide Ga2O3.

  15. Reciprocity theory of apertureless scanning near-field optical microscopy with point-dipole probes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Esslinger, Moritz; Vogelgesang, Ralf

    2012-09-25

    Near-field microscopy offers the opportunity to reveal optical contrast at deep subwavelength scales. In scanning near-field optical microscopy (SNOM), the diffraction limit is overcome by a nanoscopic probe in close proximity to the sample. The interaction of the probe with the sample fields necessarily perturbs the bare sample response, and a critical issue is the interpretation of recorded signals. For a few specific SNOM configurations, individual descriptions have been modeled, but a general and intuitive framework is still lacking. Here, we give an exact formulation of the measurable signals in SNOM which is easily applicable to experimental configurations. Our results are in close analogy with the description Tersoff and Hamann have derived for the tunneling currents in scanning tunneling microscopy. For point-like scattering probe tips, such as used in apertureless SNOM, the theory simplifies dramatically to a single scalar relation. We find that the measured signal is directly proportional to the field of the coupled tip-sample system at the position of the tip. For weakly interacting probes, the model thus verifies the empirical findings that the recorded signal is proportional to the unperturbed field of the bare sample. In the more general case, it provides guidance to an intuitive and faithful interpretation of recorded images, facilitating the characterization of tip-related distortions and the evaluation of novel SNOM configurations, both for aperture-based and apertureless SNOM.

  16. Accuracy and Reliability of the Klales et al. (2012) Morphoscopic Pelvic Sexing Method.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lesciotto, Kate M; Doershuk, Lily J

    2018-01-01

    Klales et al. (2012) devised an ordinal scoring system for the morphoscopic pelvic traits described by Phenice (1969) and used for sex estimation of skeletal remains. The aim of this study was to test the accuracy and reliability of the Klales method using a large sample from the Hamann-Todd collection (n = 279). Two observers were blinded to sex, ancestry, and age and used the Klales et al. method to estimate the sex of each individual. Sex was correctly estimated for females with over 95% accuracy; however, the male allocation accuracy was approximately 50%. Weighted Cohen's kappa and intraclass correlation coefficient analysis for evaluating intra- and interobserver error showed moderate to substantial agreement for all traits. Although each trait can be reliably scored using the Klales method, low accuracy rates and high sex bias indicate better trait descriptions and visual guides are necessary to more accurately reflect the range of morphological variation. © 2017 American Academy of Forensic Sciences.

  17. Effect of dispersion on surface interactions of cobalt(II) octaethylporphyrin monolayer on Au(111) and HOPG(0001) substrates: a comparative first principles study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chilukuri, Bhaskar; Mazur, Ursula; Hipps, K W

    2014-07-21

    A density functional theory study of a cobalt(II) octaethylporphyrin (CoOEP) monolayer on Au(111) and HOPG(0001) surfaces was performed under periodic boundary conditions. Calculations with and without dispersion corrections are performed and the effect of van der Waals forces on the interface properties is analyzed. Calculations have determined that the CoOEP molecule tends to bind at the 3-fold and the 6-fold center sites on Au(111) and HOPG(0001), respectively. Geometric optimizations at the center binding sites have indicated that the porphyrin molecules (in the monolayer) lie flat on both substrates. Calculations also reveal that the CoOEP monolayer binds slightly more strongly to Au(111) than to HOPG(0001). Charge density difference plots disclose that charge is redistributed mostly around the porphyrin plane and the first layer of the substrates. Dispersion interactions cause a larger substrate to molecule charge pushback on Au(111) than on HOPG. CoOEP adsorption tends to lower the work functions of either substrate, qualitatively agreeing with the experimental photoelectron spectroscopic data. Comparison of the density of states (DOS) of the isolated CoOEP molecule with that on gold and HOPG substrates showed significant band shifts around the Fermi energy due to intermolecular orbital hybridization. Simulated STM images were plotted with the Tersoff-Hamann approach using the local density of states, which also agree with the experimental results. This study elucidates the role of dispersion for better describing porphyrin-substrate interactions. A DFT based overview of geometric, adsorption and electronic properties of a porphyrin monolayer on conductive surfaces is presented.

  18. Wolf-Rayet Stars

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hamann, Wolf-Rainer; Sander, Andreas; Todt, Helge

    Nearly 150 years ago, the French astronomers Charles Wolf and Georges Rayet described stars with very conspicuous spectra that are dominated by bright and broad emission lines. Meanwhile termed Wolf-Rayet Stars after their discoverers, those objects turned out to represent important stages in the life of massive stars. As the first conference in a long time that was specifically dedicated to Wolf-Rayet stars, an international workshop was held in Potsdam, Germany, from 1.-5. June 2015. About 100 participants, comprising most of the leading experts in the field as well as as many young scientists, gathered for one week of extensive scientific exchange and discussions. Considerable progress has been reported throughout, e.g. on finding such stars, modeling and analyzing their spectra, understanding their evolutionary context, and studying their circumstellar nebulae. While some major questions regarding Wolf-Rayet stars still remain open 150 years after their discovery, it is clear today that these objects are not just interesting stars as such, but also keystones in the evolution of galaxies. These proceedings summarize the talks and posters presented at the Potsdam Wolf-Rayet workshop. Moreover, they also include the questions, comments, and discussions emerging after each talk, thereby giving a rare overview not only about the research, but also about the current debates and unknowns in the field. The Scientific Organizing Committee (SOC) included Alceste Bonanos (Athens), Paul Crowther (Sheffield), John Eldridge (Auckland), Wolf-Rainer Hamann (Potsdam, Chair), John Hillier (Pittsburgh), Claus Leitherer (Baltimore), Philip Massey (Flagstaff), George Meynet (Geneva), Tony Moffat (Montreal), Nicole St-Louis (Montreal), and Dany Vanbeveren (Brussels).

  19. The influence of body size on adult skeletal age estimation methods.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Merritt, Catherine E

    2015-01-01

    Accurate age estimations are essential to archaeological and forensic analyses. However, reliability for adult skeletal age estimations is poor, especially for individuals over the age of 40 years. This is the first study to show that body size influences skeletal age estimation. The İşcan et al., Lovejoy et al., Buckberry and Chamberlain, and Suchey-Brooks age methods were tested on 764 adult skeletons from the Hamann-Todd and William Bass Collections. Statures ranged from 1.30 to 1.93 m and body masses ranged from 24.0 to 99.8 kg. Transition analysis was used to evaluate the differences in the age estimations. For all four methods, the smallest individuals have the lowest ages at transition and the largest individuals have the highest ages at transition. Short and light individuals are consistently underaged, while tall and heavy individuals are consistently overaged. When femoral length and femoral head diameter are compared with the log-age model, results show the same trend as the known stature and body mass measurements. The skeletal remains of underweight individuals have fewer age markers while those of obese individuals have increased surface degeneration and osteophytic lipping. Tissue type and mechanical loading have been shown to affect bone turnover rates, and may explain the differing patterns of skeletal aging. From an archaeological perspective, the underaging of light, short individuals suggests the need to revisit the current research consensus on the young mortality rates of past populations. From a forensic perspective, understanding the influence of body size will impact efforts to identify victims of mass disasters, genocides, and homicides. © 2014 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  20. L5 pedicle length is increased in subjects with spondylolysis: an anatomic study of 1072 cadavers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bajwa, Navkirat S; Toy, Jason O; Ahn, Nicholas U

    2012-11-01

    In spondylolisthesis, it is believed that as L5 slips on S1, the pedicle may become elongated in response to the instability in an attempt to bridge the defect. Whether patients with spondylolysis, which is largely developmental, also develop elongation of the pedicles is unknown. The purpose of this study is to evaluate and quantify the increase in L5 pedicle length in subjects with spondylolysis as compared with normal healthy subjects. Nine hundred fifty-two human cadaveric specimens without spondylolysis and 120 specimens with spondylolysis from the Hamann-Todd Osteological Collection were examined by a single examiner. Baseline data, including age, sex, and race of specimens, were collected. Digital calipers were used to measure the pedicle lengths at the L5 level. Linear regression analysis was performed to compare the L5 pedicle lengths in healthy patients and patients with spondylolysis. Linear regression showed a significant association of increased L5 pedicle length in subjects with spondylolysis. The average L5 pedicle length in subjects with spondylolysis was greater compared with subjects without spondylolysis. In spondylolytic specimens, pedicles start to elongate after the age of 40 years. The pedicle lengths increase progressively from 5.6 mm at 40 years to 6.7 mm at 80 years with a 1% to 3% increment every decade. The pedicle lengths showed little variation in specimens from healthy subjects. In spondylolytic specimens, there is progressive elongation of L5 pedicle length after the third decade. An increase in L5 pedicle length in all age groups compared with the specimens from healthy subjects suggests that pathologic changes occur in bony anatomy of L5 vertebrae as early as adolescence when the condition develops.

  1. Lumbar facet anatomy changes in spondylolysis: a comparative skeletal study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dar, Gali; Peleg, Smadar; Steinberg, Nili; Alperovitch-Najenson, Dvora; Salame, Khalil; Hershkovitz, Israel

    2007-01-01

    Opinions differ as to the exact mechanism responsible for spondylolysis (SP) and whether individuals with specific morphological characteristics of the lumbar vertebral neural arch are predisposed to SP. The aim of our study was to reveal the association between SP and the architecture of lumbar articular facets and the inter-facet region. Methods: Using a Microscribe three-dimensional apparatus (Immersion Co., San Jose, CA, USA), length, width and depth of all articular facets and all inter-facet distances in the lumbar spine (L1–L5) were measured. From the Hamann-Todd Human Osteological Collection (Cleveland Museum of Natural History, OH, USA) 120 normal male skeletons with lumbar spines in the control group and 115 with bilateral SP at L5 were selected. Analysis of variance was employed to examine the differences between spondylolytic and normal spines. Results: Three profound differences between SP and the norm appeared: (1) in individuals with SP, the size and shape of L4’s neural arch had significantly greater inter-facet widths, significantly shorter inter-facet heights and significantly shorter and narrower articular facets; (2) only in the L4 vertebra in individuals with SP was the inferior inter-facet width greater in size than the superior inter-facet width of the vertebra below (L5) (38.7 mm versus 40 mm); (3) in all lumbar vertebrae, the right inferior articular facets in individuals with SP were flatter compared to the control group. Conclusions: Individuals with L4 “SP” characteristics are at a greater risk of developing fatigue fractures in the form of spondylolysis at L5. PMID:17440753

  2. Progressive recruitment of muscle fibers is not necessary for the slow component of VO2 kinetics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zoladz, Jerzy A; Gladden, L Bruce; Hogan, Michael C; Nieckarz, Zenon; Grassi, Bruno

    2008-08-01

    The "slow component" of O2 uptake (VO2) kinetics during constant-load heavy-intensity exercise is traditionally thought to derive from a progressive recruitment of muscle fibers. In this study, which represents a reanalysis of data taken from a previous study by our group (Grassi B, Hogan MC, Greenhaff PL, Hamann JJ, Kelley KM, Aschenbach WG, Constantin-Teodosiu D, Gladden LB. J Physiol 538: 195-207, 2002) we evaluated the presence of a slow component-like response in the isolated dog gastrocnemius in situ (n=6) during 4 min of contractions at approximately 60-70% of peak VO2. In this preparation all muscle fibers are maximally activated by electrical stimulation from the beginning of the contraction period, and no progressive recruitment of fibers is possible. Muscle VO2 was calculated as blood flow multiplied by arteriovenous O2 content difference. The muscle fatigued (force decreased by approximately 20-25%) during contractions. Kinetics of adjustment were evaluated for 1) VO2, uncorrected for force development; 2) VO2 normalized for peak force; 3) VO2 normalized for force-time integral. A slow component-like response, described in only one muscle out of six when uncorrected VO2 was considered, was observed in all muscles when VO2/peak force and VO2/force-time were considered. The amplitude of the slow component-like response, expressed as a fraction of the total response, was higher for VO2/peak force (0.18+/-0.06, means+/-SE) and for VO2/force-time (0.22+/-0.05) compared with uncorrected VO2 (0.04+/-0.04). A progressive recruitment of muscle fibers may not be necessary for the development of the slow component of VO2 kinetics, which may be caused by the metabolic factors that induce muscle fatigue and, as a consequence, reduce the efficiency of muscle contractions.

  3. Ab initio STM and STS simulations on magnetic and nonmagnetic metallic surfaces

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dick, Alexey

    2008-04-14

    The aim of this work was to provide an in-depth understanding of a new generation of scan- ning tunneling microscopy experiments, performed employing different regimes of the STM: the spectroscopy-mode (the so-called Fourier Transformed STM, FT-STM), and the spin-sensitive mode (the so-called spin-polarized STM, SP-STM). In the present thesis ab initio tools are proposed that are based on DFT calculations to theoretically predict and analyze such types of the STM. The first part of this thesis focusses on the simulation of FT-STM, the mode that allows to probe local dispersion properties of the electrons at the surface. In order to provide the theoretical counterpart of the experimental FT-STM spectra we have introduced a new implicit approach that is derived from Tersoff-Hamann theory of the STM. The importance of an accurate description of surface wavefunctions at 5-15 A above the surface as well as the spurious quantum- size effects have been discussed in detail together with approaches to obtain converged FT-STM images. We applied our method to FT-STM experiments performed on Ag(110) surfaces. In the second part of the thesis we discuss the modeling of the spin-resolved STM, the mode that allows to characterize the magnetic structure of a surface. As a case system we studied here the magnetically-ordered transition-metal nitride surface Mn{sub 3}N{sub 2}(010). Because SP-STM experiments did not allow a conclusive understanding of the surface structure, we have first employed ab initio thermodynamics to figure out the most stable magnetic and atomic configuration of the surface that are consistent with experiments. To simulate SP-STM images on the most stable Mn{sub 3}N{sub 2}(010) surface we have employed the spin-generalized transfer-Hamiltonian formalism, assuming that the tip wavefunctions have dominant radial symmetry (s-like tip). (orig.)

  4. Latinas' heritage language as a source of resiliency: impact on academic achievement in STEM fields

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stevenson, Alma D.; Gallard Martínez, Alejandro José; Brkich, Katie Lynn; Flores, Belinda Bustos; Claeys, Lorena; Pitts, Wesley

    2017-03-01

    This article highlights how the preservation of heritage languages is essential in the construction of three Georgia Latina participants' cultural identities and the creation of support networks that allow them to develop resiliency and achieve academically. We conceptualize resiliency as a strategy developed by the Latina participants using contextually mitigating factors during their STEM education. The findings presented in this manuscript are part of a larger, ongoing study of Latina resiliency and their paths to success in STEM fields in two states: Georgia and Texas. Following James Spradley's guidelines, data were collected via three separate semi-structured interviews with each participant. Intrinsic, multiple case studies were used to find both commonalities and differences, as well as to deepen our understanding of the role of the participants' heritage language in their development of resiliency in each particular case. The findings presented here were not part of a preconceived research hypothesis, but rather a theme that emerged while analyzing data collected in the state of Georgia. Georgia is not home to a long-established Hispanic/Latino population, but rather is part of the New Latino Diaspora (Wortham, Murillo and Hamann in Education in the new Latino diaspora: policy and the politics of identity. Ablex Publishing, New York, 2002), and therefore local natives do not necessarily perceive Latino immigrants and the Spanish language either as long-standing or permanent features of the state. In fact, in response to the growing diversity of the state during the past generation, Georgia has implemented multiple educational policies hostile toward immigrants and linguistic diversity (Beck and Allexsaht-Snider in Education in the new Latino diaspora: policy and the politics of identity. Ablex Press, Westport, 2002). Our findings suggest that the Latina participants' heritage languages allow them to engage in cultural traditions, encouraged by their

  5. Techno-economic analysis for the evaluation of three UCG synthesis gas end use approaches

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nakaten, Natalie; Kempka, Thomas; Burchart-Korol, Dorota; Krawczyk, Piotr; Kapusta, Krzysztof; Stańczyk, Krzysztof

    2016-04-01

    production, the UCG synthesis gas should have a calorific value of at least 7 MJ/Nm³. However, UCG feedstock production in view of the underlying geological and chemical boundary conditions can compete on the market. Kempka, T., Plötz, M.L., Hamann, J., Deowan, S.A., Azzam, R. (2010) Carbon dioxide utilisation for carbamide production by application of the coupled UCG-urea process. Energy Procedia 4: 2200-2205. Nakaten, N., Schlüter, R., Azzam, R., Kempka, T. (2014) Development of a techno-economic model for dynamic calculation of COE, energy demand and CO2 emissions of an integrated UCG-CCS process. Energy (in print). Doi 10.1016/j.energy.2014.01.014

  6. Growth Patterns of the Neurocentral Synchondrosis (NCS) in Immature Cadaveric Vertebra.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Blakemore, Laurel; Schwend, Richard; Akbarnia, Behrooz A; Dumas, Megan; Schmidt, John

    2018-03-01

    Gross anatomic study of osteological specimens. To evaluate the age of closure for the neurocentral synchondrosis (NCS) in all 3 regions of the spine in children aged 1 to 18 years old. The ossification of the human vertebra begins from a vertebral body ossification center and a pair of neural ossification centers located within the centrum called the NCS. These bipolar cartilaginous centers of growth contribute to the growth of the vertebral body, spinal canal, and posterior elements of the spine. The closure of the synchondroses is dependent upon location of the vertebra and previous studies range from 2 to 16 years of age. Although animal and cadaveric studies have been performed regarding NCS growth and early instrumentation's effect on its development, the effects of NCS growth disturbances are still not completely understood. The vertebrae of 32 children (1 to 18 y old) from the Hamann-Todd Osteological collection were analyzed (no 2 or 9 y old specimens available). Vertebrae studied ranged from C1 to L5. A total of 768 vertebral specimens were photographed on a background grid to allow for measurement calibration. Measurements of the right and left NCS, pedicle width at the NCS, and spinal canal area were taken using Scandium image-analysis software (Olympus Soft Imaging Solutions, Germany). The percentage of the growth plate still open was found by dividing the NCS by the pedicle width and multiplying by 100. Data were analyzed with JMP 11 software (SAS Institute Inc., Cary, NC). The NCS was 100% open in all 3 regions of the spine in the 1- to 3-year age group. The cervical NCS closed first with completion around 5 years of age. The lumbar NCS was nearly fully closed by age 11. Only the thoracic region remained open through age 17 years. The left and right NCS closed simultaneously as there was no statistical difference between them. In all regions of the spine, the NCS appeared to close sooner in males than in females. Spinal canal area increased with age

  7. Highly efficient and compatible shampoo for use after hair transplant

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Schweiger D

    2015-07-01

    Full Text Available Dorothea Schweiger,1 Andrea M Schoelermann,1 Alexander Filbry,1 Tina Hamann,1 Claudia Moser,2 Frank Rippke1 1Research and Development, Beiersdorf AG, Hamburg, Germany; 2Moser Medical, Clinics for Aesthetic Plastic Surgery, Vienna, Austria Background: Sensitive or hyperreactive skin is a common condition defined by prickling, burning, pain, and pruritus. Although this skin problem was initially described on the face, the scalp is often affected. A sensitive scalp can react with irritation to harsh surfactants or other additives which are often present in shampoos. For this reason, we developed a new rinse-off hypertolerant shampoo specifically designed for the hypersensitive and problematic scalp.Methods: The shampoo formulation is based on an extremely mild surfactant system and contains bisabolol, an anti-irritant and anti-inflammatory ingredient of chamomile. The shampoo is free of additives such as perfumes, silicones, colorants, parabens, paraffins, and betaine. Since skin can remain in a hyperreactive state after wounding, the status after hair transplantation was chosen as a model system to test the shampoo. Scalp condition and compatibility of each volunteer were analyzed by a plastic surgeon directly after hair transplant and after stitch removal. The plastic surgeons also rated whether they would recommend the further use of the test shampoo. Additionally, volunteers completed a self-assessment questionnaire.Results: Following hair transplantation, regular use of the shampoo resulted in a significant reduction in the extent of scabbing and erythema. This was confirmed by dermatological scalp examinations performed by the plastic surgeon as well as in volunteers' self-assessments. The plastic surgeon highly recommended the further use of the test shampoo after hair transplant to all study participants.Conclusion: Application of the test shampoo demonstrated excellent skin compatibility and product efficacy after hair transplant. The test

  8. The Role of Stress-Effected Subgrain Size Distribution in Anelastic Recovery: An Experimental Study on Polycrystalline Ice-Ih

    Science.gov (United States)

    Caswell, T. E.; Goldsby, D. L.; Cooper, R. F.; Prior, D. J.

    2013-12-01

    initiating high-resolution microstructure mapping via cryogenic EBSD which will allow correlation of anelastic dynamics to subgrain size distribution. References: [1] Gribb & Cooper, JGR, 1989; [2] Jackson et al., JGR, 2002; [3] McCarthy et al., JGR, 2011; [4] Gueguen et al., PEPI, 1989; [5] McMillan et al., JMaterSci, 2003; [6] McCarthy, Ph.D. dissertation, Brown Univ., 2009; [7] Iliescu et al., MicroscResTech, 2004; [8] Goldsby & Kohlstedt, JGR, 2001; [9] Hamann et al., JGlaciol, 2007; [10] Korhonen et al., MaterSciEngr, 1985; [11] Stone, ActaMetallMater, 1991; [12] Stone et al., JGR, 2004.

  9. A big data geospatial analytics platform - Physical Analytics Integrated Repository and Services (PAIRS)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hamann, H.; Jimenez Marianno, F.; Klein, L.; Albrecht, C.; Freitag, M.; Hinds, N.; Lu, S.

    2015-12-01

    A big data geospatial analytics platform:Physical Analytics Information Repository and Services (PAIRS)Fernando Marianno, Levente Klein, Siyuan Lu, Conrad Albrecht, Marcus Freitag, Nigel Hinds, Hendrik HamannIBM TJ Watson Research Center, Yorktown Heights, NY 10598A major challenge in leveraging big geospatial data sets is the ability to quickly integrate multiple data sources into physical and statistical models and be run these models in real time. A geospatial data platform called Physical Analytics Information and Services (PAIRS) is developed on top of open source hardware and software stack to manage Terabyte of data. A new data interpolation and re gridding is implemented where any geospatial data layers can be associated with a set of global grid where the grid resolutions is doubling for consecutive layers. Each pixel on the PAIRS grid have an index that is a combination of locations and time stamp. The indexing allow quick access to data sets that are part of a global data layers and allowing to retrieve only the data of interest. PAIRS takes advantages of parallel processing framework (Hadoop) in a cloud environment to digest, curate, and analyze the data sets while being very robust and stable. The data is stored on a distributed no-SQL database (Hbase) across multiple server, data upload and retrieval is parallelized where the original analytics task is broken up is smaller areas/volume, analyzed independently, and then reassembled for the original geographical area. The differentiating aspect of PAIRS is the ability to accelerate model development across large geographical regions and spatial resolution ranging from 0.1 m up to hundreds of kilometer. System performance is benchmarked on real time automated data ingestion and retrieval of Modis and Landsat data layers. The data layers are curated for sensor error, verified for correctness, and analyzed statistically to detect local anomalies. Multi-layer query enable PAIRS to filter different data

  10. Origin and Evolution of the Elements

    Science.gov (United States)

    McWilliam, Andrew; Rauch, Michael

    2004-09-01

    . Chemical composition of the intracluster medium Michael Loewenstein; 28. Quasar elemental abundances and host galaxy evolution Fred Hamann, Matthias Dietrich, Bassem M. Sabra, and Craig Warner; 29. Chemical abundances in the damped Lyα systems Jason X. Prochaska; 30. Intergalactic medium abundances Robert F. Carswell; 31. Conference summary Bernard E. J. Pagel.

  11. Underground coal gasification with extended CO2 utilization as economic and carbon neutral approach to address energy and fertilizer supply shortages in Bangladesh

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nakaten, Natalie; Islam, Rafiqul; Kempka, Thomas

    2014-05-01

    injected in the scope of the scheduled EGR operation. Our techno-economic modeling results considering EGR reservoir simulations demonstrate that an economic and carbon neutral operation of UCG combined with fertilizer production and CCS is feasible. The suggested approach may provide a bridging technology to tackle fertilizer and power supply shortages in Bangladesh, and in addition support further production from depleting natural gas deposits. References Kempka, T., Plötz, M.L., Hamann, J., Deowan, S.A., Azzam, R. (2010) Carbon dioxide utilisation for carbamide production by application of the coupled UCG-urea process. Energy Procedia 4: 2200-2205. Nakaten, N., Schlüter, R., Azzam, R., Kempka, T. (2014) Development of a techno-economic model for dynamic calculation of COE, energy demand and CO2 emissions of an integrated UCG-CCS process. Energy (in print). Doi 10.1016/j.energy.2014.01.014

  12. Committees and organizers

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-07-01

    (Orsay) S Hamann (Bochum)R Varga (Košice) U Hannemann (Dresden)P Vavassori (San Sebastian) L Havela (Prague)W Wulfhekel (Karlsruhe) O Heczko (Prague)M Yamashita (Sendai) B Hernando (Oviedo)R Zdyb (Lublin) O Isnard (Grenoble)A Zhukov (San Sebastián) Z Kąkol (Kraków)A K Zvezdin (Moscow) N-T H Kim-Ngan (Kraków) International Advisory Committee (2011): Dominique Givord, President (Grenoble)Ludwig Schultz, Former President (Dresden) Manfred Albrecht (Chemnitz)Burkard Hillebrands (Kaiserslautern) Agnés Barthélémy (Paris)Andrei Kirilyuk (Nijmegen) Roy Chantrell (York)Ron Jansen (Tsukuba) Russell Cowburn (London)Nicoleta Lupu (Iasi) Tomasz Dietl (Warszawa)Caroline A Ross (Cambridge, MA) Claudia Felser (Mainz)Stefano Sanvito (Dublin) Josef Fidler (Wien)Vladimir Sechovsky (Praha) Dino Fiorani (Roma)Roberta Sessoli (Firenze) Pietro Gambardella (Bellaterra)Jozef Spałek (Kraków) Alberto Guimarães (Rio de Janeiro)

  13. Observed and simulated time evolution of HCl, ClONO2, and HF total columns

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ruhnke, Roland; Geomon, Ndacc Infrared, Modelling Working Group

    2010-05-01

    GEOmon, NDACC Infrared, and Modelling Working Group: M.P. Chipperfield (2), M. De Mazière (3), J. Notholt (4), S. Barthlott (1), R.L. Batchelor (5,17), R.D. Blatherwick (16), Th. Blumenstock (1), M.T. Coffey (17), P. Duchatelet (6), H. Fast (7), W. Feng (2), A. Goldman (16), D.W.T. Griffith (8), K. Hamann (1), J.W. Hannigan (17), F. Hase (1), N.B. Jones (8), A. Kagawa (9,10), Y. Kasai (9), O. Kirner (19), R. Kohlhepp (1), W. Kouker (1), I. Kramer (1), R. Lindenmaier (5), E. Mahieu (6), R.L. Mittermeier (7), B. Monge-Sanz (2), I. Murata (12), H. Nakajima (13), I. Morino (11), M. Palm (4), C. Paton-Walsh (8), Th. Reddmann (1), M. Rettinger (15), C.P. Rinsland (18), M. Schneider (1), C. Senten (3), B.-M. Sinnhuber (4), D. Smale (14), K. Strong (5), R. Sussmann (15), J.R. Taylor (5), G. Vanhaelewyn (3), T. Warneke (4), C. Whaley (5), M. Wiehle (1), and S.W. Wood (14) (1) Karlsruhe Institute of Technology (KIT), IMK-ASF, Karlsruhe, Germany, (2) University of Leeds, Leeds, United Kingdom, (3) Belgian Institute for Space Aeronomy (BIRA-IASB), Brussels, Belgium, (4) University of Bremen, Institute of Environmental Physics, Bremen, Germany, (5) Department of Physics, University of Toronto, Toronto, Ontario, Canada, (6) University of Liège, Institute of Astrophysics and Geophysics, Liège, Belgium, (7) Environment Canada, Toronto, Ontario, Canada, (8) Centre for Atmospheric Chemistry, University of Wollongong, Wollongong, Australia, (9) National Institute of Information and Communications Technology, Tokyo, Japan, (10) Fujitsu FIP Corporation, Tokyo, Japan, (11) Center for Global Environmental Research, National Institute for Environmental Studies (NIES), Japan, (12) Department of Environmental Studies, Graduate School of Environmental Studies, Tohoku University, Japan, (13) Atmospheric Environment Division, National Institute for Environmental Studies, Japan, (14) National Institute of Water and Atmospheric Research Ltd (NIWA), Lauder, New Zealand, (15) Karlsruhe

  14. Techno-economic analysis of integrated onshore and offshore UCG-CCS systems to produce electricity, SNG and urea

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nakaten, Natalie; Kapusta, Krzysztof; Burchart-Korol, Dorota; Kempka, Thomas

    2017-04-01

    profitable in view of the expected future development of natural gas prices. [1] Stanczyk, K., Howaniec, N., Smolinski, A., Swiadrowski, J., Kapusta, K., Wiatowski, M., Grabowski, J., Rogut, J. (2011): Gasification of lignite and hard coal with air and oxygen enriched air in a pilot scale ex-situ reactor for underground gasification. Fuel, 90, p. 1953-1962, doi:10.1016/j.fuel.2010.12.007. [2] Kempka, T., Schlüter, R., Hamann, J., Deowan, S., Azzam, R. (2011): Carbon dioxide utilisation for carbamide production by application of the coupled UCG-Urea process. Energy Procedia, 4, p. 2200-2205, doi.org/10.1016/j.egypro.2011.02.107. [3] Nakaten, N.C., Schlüter, R., Azzam, R. and Kempka, T. (2014): Development of a techno-economic model for dynamic calculation of COE, energy demand and CO2 emissions of an integrated UCG-CCS process. Energy, 66, p. 779-790, doi: 10.1016/j.energy.2014.01.014.

  15. Scientific Visualization for Atmospheric Data Analysis in Collaborative Virtual Environments

    Science.gov (United States)

    Engelke, Wito; Flatken, Markus; Garcia, Arturo S.; Bar, Christian; Gerndt, Andreas

    2016-04-01

    . Bartelmann, "Healpix: a framework for high-resolution discretization and fast analysis of data distributed on the sphere," The Astrophysical Journal, vol. 622, no. 2, p. 759, 2005. [5] R. Westerteiger, A. Gerndt, and B. Hamann, "Spherical terrain render- ing using the hierarchical healpix grid," VLUDS, vol. 11, pp. 13-23, 2011. [6] W. Schroeder, K. Martin, and B. Lorensen, The Visualization Toolkit. Kitware, 4 ed., 2006. [7] T. van Reimersdahl, T. Kuhlen, A. Gerndt, J. Henrichs, and C. Bischof, "ViSTA: a multimodal, platform-independent VR-toolkit based on WTK, VTK, and MPI," in Proceedings of the 4th International Immersive Projection Technology Workshop (IPT), 2000.

  16. Reviewer Database

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chief Editor

    2016-06-01

    RRachit NegiRadhika MariappanRafiq MirRahul BansalRahul ChaturvediRahul DandekarRahul KatiyarRaihan BoyleRaja JebasinghRajarajan KRajeev BijalwanRajesh GaikwadRajesh GargRajesh KumarRajesh KunwarRajinder SamyalRaju PatilRakesh KakkarRakesh SharmaRam MandalRama SinghR KamathRanganatha S CRanjana SinghRanjeeta KumariRapolu YadagiriRashmi GodeRashmi HullalliRavi AvRavi ShankarRavikiran KamateRavleen BakshiReema KumariReetu SharmaRenu AgarwalRenu ChauhanRenu SulakheRicha SinhaRijul RanjanRijuta PandavRitika TiwariRitu KashyapRochak SaxenaRohit DhakaRuby KhanRuchi DharRuchi JuyalRuchir RustagiRuchita DixitRujul ShuklaRujuta HadayeRupali RoyS C GuptaS D KandpalS MohapatraS SaxenaSachin GuptaSachin PandeySachin YadavSadhana AwasthiJyoti SharmaSaima AkhundSamarjeet KaurSamreen KhanS ChakrabortySandeep BabarSandeep PanigrahiSandip KumarSanjay GuptaSanjay JhaSanjay PandeySanjay TripathiSanjay ZodpeySanjeev DaveySanjeev GuptaSanjeev KhichiSanjeev KumarS VaithiyalingamSarita SoodSatya LenkaS ChakrabortyS VarshneySayani DuttaSayed K MominSeema DiwanSeema JainSenthil Kumar S KShabnam AnsariShailendra KumarShailesh KawaleShailesh SumanShaili VyasShalini DwivediPooransinghShalini SrivastavShanta KhesSharvanan UdayarShashank K JShazia ShafiSheesham AgarwalSheetal PatelSheikh SaleemShereen SadiqShibani DattaShikha HandaShivani KalraShivani RaoShivender SinghShivraj BhimteShraddha MishraShveta SainiShweta RajpalShyam DixitS ShivalliS MukherjeeSimmi OberoiSindhuri RSitanshu KarSmiji ChiramalSmita ValekarSonal RaniSonali ChoudhariSonia TiwariSonu GoelSrikanth ReddyS RanganathanS Krishnan VSrishti DixitSubodh KarmakarSudharshini SubramaniamSudhir ChawlaSudhir GuptaS BhattacharyaSugandha JauhariSujan MarahattaSumana SamantaSumeet DixitSumit DhruveSumit JethaniSunder LalSuneel KaushalSunil GargSunil MisraSunita DhakedSunny AggarwalSuprakas HazraSurabhi MishraSuraj ChawlaSuraj SenjamSuravi PatraSurekha KishoreS TripathiSurya BaliSushil BansalSushil DalalSushil KabraSushil ShuklaSwapan Maji

  17. Low Energy Electrons as Probing Tool for Astrochemical Reaction Mechanisms

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hendrik Bredehöft, Jan; Swiderek, Petra; Hamann, Thorben

    . Faraday Discuss., 133 (2006), 393-401 [7] Snow T.P. and Bierbaum V.M.: Ion chemistry in the interstellar medium. Ann. Rev. Analyt. Chem. 1 (2008), 229-259. [8] Nuevo M., Meierhenrich U.J., Muñoz Caro G.M., Dartois E., d'Hendecourt L., Deboffle D., n Auger G., Blanot D., Bredehüft J.H. and Nahon L.: The effects of circularly polarized light on amino acid enantiomers produced by the UV irradiation of interstellar ice analogs. AA 457 (2006), 741-751 [9] Shimamura I and Takayanagi K. (eds): Electron-Molecule Collisions. Plenum Press, New York, USA (1984) [10] Hamann T., Bühler E., Swiderek P.: Low-energy-electron-induced hydroamination of an alkene. Angew Chem Int Ed Engl. 48(25) (2009), 4643-4645.

  18. Obituary: Jörn Rossa (1969-2009)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Veras, Dimitri

    2009-12-01

    evolve into ellipticals. Joern then moved to the University of Florida (UF) in 2006 to work as a core team member of the Flamingos 2 Extra-Galactic Survey. This survey aims at deriving the star formation histories, masses and metallicities of star formation galaxies at redshifts between 2.0-2.5 and also at deriving the properties (e.g., black hole masses) of AGN and at studying the optically obscured AGN at intermediate to high redshifts (z > 1.5). Joern was largely responsible for the target selection strategies for both samples (star-forming galaxies and AGN), for coordinating the weekly group meetings, and for designing a web-page for the extragalactic group. He was interested in using the survey to answer several cosmological questions in collaboration with Vicki Sarajedini, Rafael Guzmän, Fred Hamann, Anthony Gonzalez, the Flamingos-2 instrument PI, Stephen Eikenberry (all from UF), and with additional collaborators from the Complutense University of Madrid, Spain. Joern also worked with Vicki Sarajedini on SED fitting of variability-selected AGN in the Chandra Deep Field South. Joern was a very versatile observer, complementing his belief that understanding of the star-formation activity in galaxies can be only achieved through a multi-wavelength study of various galaxy types. In addition to research, Joern had a strong desire to be involved in the logistical aspects of science. At STScI he participated in the support group for the time allocation committee and at UF he was the postdoctoral representative of the space allocation committee. He photographed the UF staff for the departmental webpage and was a designated photographer at a local conference and other events. He also participated in the public Museum nights at UF. He was always eager to provide his feedback on the scientific and practical issues of astronomy and filled in many surveys distributed to the astronomical community. His colleagues and friends could always count on Joern to be extremely

  19. EDITORIAL: Focus on Iron-Based Superconductors FOCUS ON IRON-BASED SUPERCONDUCTORS

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hosono, Hideo; Ren, Zhi-An

    2009-02-01

    -L Drechsler, N Kozlova, M Bartkowiak, J E Hamann-Borrero, G Behr, K Nenkov, H-H Klauss, H Maeter, A Amato, H Luetkens, A Kwadrin, R Khasanov, J Freudenberger, A Köhler, M Knupfer, E Arushanov, H Rosner, B Büchner and L Schultz Low-energy spin dynamics in the antiferromagnetic phase of CaFe2As2 N J Curro, A P Dioguardi, N ApRoberts-Warren, A C Shockley and P Klavins Muon spin rotation study of magnetism and superconductivity in BaFe2-xCoxAs2 and Pr1-xSrxFeAsO C Bernhard, A J Drew, L Schulz, V K Malik, M Rössle, Ch Niedermayer, Th Wolf, G D Varma, G Mu, H-H Wen, H Liu, G Wu and X H Chen Magnetic impurities in the pnictide superconductor Ba1-xKxFe2As2 Sutirtha Mukhopadhyay, Sangwon Oh, A M Mounce, Moohee Lee, W P Halperin, N Ni, S L Bud'ko, P C Canfield, A P Reyes and P L Kuhns Neutron scattering investigation of the magnetic order in single crystalline BaFe2As2 M Kofu, Y Qiu, Wei Bao, S-H Lee, S Chang, T Wu, G Wu and X H Chen An NMR study on the F-doping evolution of the iron oxypnictide LaFeAs(O1-xFx) Y Nakai, S Kitagawa, K Ishida, Y Kamihara, M Hirano and H Hosono The peculiar physical properties and phase diagram of BaFe2-xCoxAs2 single crystals X F Wang, T Wu, G Wu, R H Liu, H Chen, Y L Xie and X H Chen Synthesis of LnFeAsO1-y superconductors (Ln=La and Nd) using the high-pressure technique Kiichi Miyazawa, Kunihiro Kihou, Motoyuki Ishikado, Parasharam M Shirage, Chul-Ho Lee, Nao Takeshita, Hiroshi Eisaki, Hijiri Kito and Akira Iyo Correlation effects in the iron pnictides Qimiao Si, Elihu Abrahams, Jianhui Dai and Jian-Xin Zhu Competition/coexisitence of magnetism and superconductivity in iron pnictides probed by muon spin rotation Soshi Takeshita and Ryosuke Kadono Impurity-induced in-gap state and Tc in sign-reversing s-wave superconductors: analysis of iron oxypnictide superconductors Yuko Senga and Hiroshi Kontani Intrinsic magnetic properties of the superconductor NdFeAsO0.9F0.1 from local and global measurements R Prozorov, M E Tillman, E D Mun and P C Canfield