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Sample records for halophilic archaeon haloarcula

  1. Characterization of the proteasome from the extremely halophilic archaeon Haloarcula marismortui

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    B. Franzetti

    2002-01-01

    Full Text Available A 20S proteasome, comprising two subunits α and β, was purified from the extreme halophilic archaeon Haloarcula marismortui, which grows only in saturated salt conditions. The three-dimensional reconstruction of the H. marismortui proteasome (Hm proteasome, obtained from negatively stained electron micrographs, is virtually identical to the structure of a thermophilic proteasome filtered to the same resolution. The stability of the Hm proteasome was found to be less salt-dependent than that of other halophilic enzymes previously described. The proteolytic activity of the Hm proteasome was investigated using the malate dehydrogenase from H. marismortui (HmMalDH as a model substrate. The HmMalDH denatures when the salt concentration is decreased below 2 M. Under these conditions, the proteasome efficiently cleaves HmMalDH during its denaturation process, but the fully denatured HmMalDH is poorly degraded. These in vitro experiments show that, at low salt concentrations, the 20S proteasome from halophilic archaea eliminates a misfolded protein.

  2. Modeling of the structure of ribosomal protein L1 from the archaeon Haloarcula marismortui

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    Nevskaya, N. A.; Kljashtorny, V. G.; Vakhrusheva, A. V.; Garber, M. B.; Nikonov, S. V.

    2017-07-01

    The halophilic archaeon Haloarcula marismortui proliferates in the Dead Sea at extremely high salt concentrations (higher than 3 M). This is the only archaeon, for which the crystal structure of the ribosomal 50S subunit was determined. However, the structure of the functionally important side protuberance containing the abnormally negatively charged protein L1 (HmaL1) was not visualized. Attempts to crystallize HmaL1 in the isolated state or as its complex with RNA using normal salt concentrations (≤500 mM) failed. A theoretical model of HmaL1 was built based on the structural data for homologs of the protein L1 from other organisms, and this model was refined by molecular dynamics methods. Analysis of this model showed that the protein HmaL1 can undergo aggregation due to the presence of a cluster of positive charges unique for proteins L1. This cluster is located at the RNA-protein interface, which interferes with the crystallization of HmaL1 and the binding of the latter to RNA.

  3. Metabolic flux analysis of the halophilic archaeon Haladaptatus paucihalophilus

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    Liu, Guangxiu; Zhang, Manxiao [Key Laboratory of Desert and Desertification, Cold and Arid Regions Environmental and Engineering Research Institute, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Lanzhou, 730000 (China); Key Laboratory of Extreme Environmental Microbial Resources and Engineering, Gansu Province, Lanzhou, 730000 (China); Mo, Tianlu [Department of Chemistry, Fudan University, Shanghai, 200433 (China); He, Lian [Key Laboratory of Combinatory Biosynthesis and Drug Discovery (Ministry of Education), School of Pharmaceutical Sciences, Wuhan University, Wuhan, 430071 (China); Zhang, Wei [Key Laboratory of Desert and Desertification, Cold and Arid Regions Environmental and Engineering Research Institute, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Lanzhou, 730000 (China); Key Laboratory of Extreme Environmental Microbial Resources and Engineering, Gansu Province, Lanzhou, 730000 (China); Yu, Yi, E-mail: yu_yi@whu.edu.cn [Key Laboratory of Combinatory Biosynthesis and Drug Discovery (Ministry of Education), School of Pharmaceutical Sciences, Wuhan University, Wuhan, 430071 (China); Zhang, Qi, E-mail: qizhang@sioc.ac.cn [Department of Chemistry, Fudan University, Shanghai, 200433 (China); Ding, Wei, E-mail: dingw@lzu.edu.cn [Key Laboratory of Desert and Desertification, Cold and Arid Regions Environmental and Engineering Research Institute, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Lanzhou, 730000 (China); Key Laboratory of Extreme Environmental Microbial Resources and Engineering, Gansu Province, Lanzhou, 730000 (China); Department of Chemistry, Fudan University, Shanghai, 200433 (China)

    2015-11-27

    This work reports the {sup 13}C-assisted metabolic flux analysis of Haladaptatus paucihalophilus, a halophilic archaeon possessing an intriguing osmoadaption mechanism. We showed that the carbon flow is through the oxidative tricarboxylic acid (TCA) cycle whereas the reductive TCA cycle is not operative in H. paucihalophilus. In addition, both threonine and the citramalate pathways contribute to isoleucine biosynthesis, whereas lysine is synthesized through the diaminopimelate pathway and not through the α-aminoadipate pathway. Unexpected, the labeling patterns of glycine from the cells grown on [1-{sup 13}C]pyruvate and [2-{sup 13}C]pyruvate suggest that, unlike all the organisms investigated so far, in which glycine is produced exclusively from the serine hydroxymethyltransferase (SHMT) pathway, glycine biosynthesis in H. paucihalophilus involves different pathways including SHMT, threonine aldolase (TA) and the reverse reaction of glycine cleavage system (GCS), demonstrating for the first time that other pathways instead of SHMT can also make a significant contribution to the cellular glycine pool. Transcriptional analysis confirmed that both TA and GCS genes were transcribed in H. paucihalophilus, and the transcriptional level is independent of salt concentrations in the culture media. This study expands our understanding of amino acid biosynthesis and provides valuable insights into the metabolism of halophilic archaea. - Highlights: • Serine hydroxymethyltransferase, threonine aldolase, and glycine cleavage system all contribute to the glycine pool of H. paucihalophilus. • Threonine and the citramalate pathways contribute equally to the isoleucine biosynthesis in H. paucihalophilus. • Lysine in H. paucihalophilus is synthesized through the diaminopimelate pathway and not through the α-aminoadipate pathway. • Glycine biosynthesis is likely unrelated to the cell osmoadaption mechanism.

  4. Production of beta-xylanase and beta-xylosidase by the extremely halophilic archaeon Halorhabdus utahensis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Wainø, M.; Ingvorsen, K.

    2003-01-01

    The extremely halophilic archaeon, Halorhabdus utahensis, isolated from the Great Salt Lake, Utah, produced beta-xylanase and beta-xylosidase activities. Both enzymes were active over a broad NaCl range from near zero to 30% NaCl when tested with culture broth. A broad NaCl optimum was observed...

  5. Lipids of the ultra-thin square halophilic archaeon Haloquadratum walsbyi.

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    Lobasso, Simona; Lopalco, Patrizia; Mascolo, Giuseppe; Corcelli, Angela

    2008-12-01

    The lipid composition of the extremely halophilic archaeon Haloquadratum walsbyi was investigated by thin-layer chromatography and electrospray ionization-mass spectrometry. The analysis of neutral lipids showed the presence of vitamin MK-8, squalene, carotene, bacterioruberin and several retinal isomers. The major polar lipids were phosphatidylglycerophosphate methyl ester, phosphatidylglycerosulfate, phosphatidylglycerol and sulfated diglycosyl diether lipid. Among cardiolipins, the tetra-phytanyl or dimeric phospholipids, only traces of bisphosphatidylglycerol were detected. When the cells were exposed to hypotonic medium, no changes in the membrane lipid composition occurred. Distinguishing it from other extreme halophiles of the Halobacteriaceae family, the osmotic stress did not induce the neo-synthesis of cardiolipins in H. walsbyi. The difference may depend on the three-laminar structure of the cell wall, which differs significantly from that of other Haloarchaea.

  6. Lipids of the ultra-thin square halophilic archaeon Haloquadratum walsbyi

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Simona LoBasso

    2008-01-01

    Full Text Available The lipid composition of the extremely halophilic archaeon Haloquadratum walsbyi was investigated by thin-layer chromatography and electrospray ionization-mass spectrometry. The analysis of neutral lipids showed the presence of vitamin MK-8, squalene, carotene, bacterioruberin and several retinal isomers. The major polar lipids were phosphatidylglycerophosphate methyl ester, phosphatidylglycerosulfate, phosphatidylglycerol and sulfated diglycosyl diether lipid. Among cardiolipins, the tetra-phytanyl or dimeric phospholipids, only traces of bisphosphatidylglycerol were detected. When the cells were exposed to hypotonic medium, no changes in the membrane lipid composition occurred. Distinguishing it from other extreme halophiles of the Halobacteriaceae family, the osmotic stress did not induce the neo-synthesis of cardiolipins in H. walsbyi. The difference may depend on the three-laminar structure of the cell wall, which differs significantly from that of other Haloarchaea.

  7. Essential and non-essential DNA replication genes in the model halophilic Archaeon, Halobacterium sp. NRC-1

    OpenAIRE

    DasSarma Shiladitya; DasSarma Priya; Berquist Brian R

    2007-01-01

    Abstract Background Information transfer systems in Archaea, including many components of the DNA replication machinery, are similar to those found in eukaryotes. Functional assignments of archaeal DNA replication genes have been primarily based upon sequence homology and biochemical studies of replisome components, but few genetic studies have been conducted thus far. We have developed a tractable genetic system for knockout analysis of genes in the model halophilic archaeon, Halobacterium s...

  8. Halovenus aranensis gen. nov., sp. nov., an extremely halophilic archaeon from Aran-Bidgol salt lake.

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    Makhdoumi-Kakhki, A; Amoozegar, M A; Ventosa, A

    2012-06-01

    A novel red-pigmented halophilic archaeon, strain EB27(T), was isolated from Aran-Bidgol salt lake, a hypersaline playa in Iran. Cells of strain EB27(T) were non-motile and pleomorphic (rods to triangular or disc-shaped). Strain EB27(T) required at least 2.5 M NaCl and 0.1 M MgCl(2) for growth. Optimal growth was achieved at 4 M NaCl and 0.5 M MgCl(2). The optimum pH and temperature for growth were pH 7.5 and 40 °C; it was able to grow at pH 6.0-8.0 and 25-50 °C. 16S rRNA gene sequence analysis showed that strain EB27(T) is a member of the family Halobacteriaceae; however, levels of 16S rRNA gene sequence similarity were as low as 90.0, 89.3 and 89.1 % to the most closely related haloarchaeal taxa, namely Halalkalicoccus tibetensis DS12(T), Halosimplex carlsbadense 2-9-1(T) and Halorhabdus utahensis AX-2(T), respectively. The DNA G+C content of strain EB27(T) was 61 mol%. Strain EB27(T) contained phosphatidylglycerol and phosphatidylglycerol phosphate methyl ester, common phospholipids found in haloarchaea, together with two minor phospholipids. The only quinone present was MK-8(II-H(2)). Physiological, biochemical and phylogenetic differences between strain EB27(T) and recognized genera of extremely halophilic archaea suggest that this strain represents a novel species in a new genus within the family Halobacteriaceae, for which the name Halovenus aranensis gen. nov., sp. nov. is proposed. The type strain of Halovenus aranensis, the type species of the new genus, is strain EB27(T) ( = IBRC-M 10015(T) = CGMCC 1.11001(T)).

  9. Natrinema soli sp. nov., a novel halophilic archaeon isolated from a hypersaline wetland.

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    Rasooli, Mehrnoosh; Naghoni, Ali; Amoozegar, Mohammad Ali; Mirfeizi, Leila; Moshtaghi Nikou, Mahdi; Shahzadeh Fazeli, Seyed Abolhassan; Minegishi, Hiroaki; Ventosa, Antonio

    2017-07-01

    An extremely halophilic archaeon, designated strain 5-3T, was isolated from a soil sample of Meighan wetland in Iran. Strain 5-3T was strictly aerobic, catalase-positive and oxidase-negative. Cells were Gram-stain-negative, non-motile and ovoid. Colonies of strain 5-3T were cream-coloured. The isolate showed optimum growth at 4.0 M NaCl, 40 °C and pH 7.0. The major polar lipids of the strain were phosphatidylglycerol, phosphatidylglycerol phosphate methyl ester, two unknown phospholipids and three glycolipids (including one that was chromatographically identical to S2-DGD). The major respiratory quinone was menaquinone MK-8. The G+C content of the genomic DNA was 61.5 mol%. The closest relative was Natrinema salaciae JCM 17869T with 97.3 % similarity in the orthologous 16S rRNA gene sequence. Analysis of 16S rRNA and rpoB' gene sequences indicated that strain 5-3T is a member of the genus Natrinema in the family Natrialbaceae and forms a distinct cluster. On the basis of phylogenetic analysis, and phenotypic and chemotaxonomic characteristics, a novel species of the family Natrialbaceae, Natrinema soli sp. nov., is proposed. The type strain is 5-3T (=IBRC-M 11063T=LMG 29247T).

  10. Halopenitus malekzadehii sp. nov., an extremely halophilic archaeon isolated from a salt lake.

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    Amoozegar, Mohammad Ali; Makhdoumi-Kakhki, Ali; Mehrshad, Maliheh; Fazeli, Seyed Abolhassan Shahzadeh; Ventosa, Antonio

    2013-09-01

    Strain CC65(T), a novel extremely halophilic archaeon, was isolated from a brine sample of a salt lake in Iran. The novel strain was light yellow-pigmented, non-motile, pleomorphic and required at least 1.7 M NaCl and 0.02 M MgCl₂ for growth. Optimal growth was achieved at 3.5 M NaCl and 0.4 M MgCl₂. The optimum pH and temperature for growth were pH 7.5 and 40 °C, respectively, while it was able to grow over a pH and a temperature range of pH 6.5-9.0 and 30-50 °C, respectively. Analysis of 16S rRNA gene sequence revealed that strain CC65(T) clustered with the sole member of the genus Halopenitus, Halopenitus persicus DC30(T) with a sequence similarity of 98.0%. The polar lipid profile of strain CC65(T) consisted of phosphatidylglycerol and phosphatidylglycerol phosphate methyl ester. An unidentified glycolipid and two minor phospholipids were also observed. The only quinone present was MK-8(II-H₂). The DNA G+C content of strain CC65(T) was 63.8 mol%. On the basis of the biochemical and physiological characteristics, as well as DNA-DNA hybridization (44% with Halopenitus persicus IBRC 10041(T)), strain CC65(T) is classified as a novel species of the genus Halopenitus, for which the name Halopenitus malekzadehii sp. nov. is proposed. The type strain is CC65(T) ( = IBRC-M 10418(T) =KCTC 4045(T)).

  11. Halovenus salina sp. nov., an extremely halophilic archaeon isolated from a saltern.

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    Infante-Domínguez, Carmen; Corral, Paulina; Sánchez-Porro, Cristina; Ventosa, Antonio

    2015-09-01

    An extremely halophilic archaeon was isolated from a water sample of Isla Bacuta saltern in Huelva, Spain. Strain ASP54(T) is a novel red-pigmented, motile, rod-shaped, Gram-stain-negative and strictly aerobic haloarchaeon. Strain ASP54(T) grew in media containing 15-30% (w/v) salts and optimally with 25% (w/v) salts. It grew between pH 5.0 and 9.0 (optimally at pH 7.5) and at 20-40 °C (optimally at 37 °C). Phylogenetic analysis based on multi-locus sequence analysis (MLSA) and the comparison of 16S rRNA gene sequences revealed that strain ASP54(T) is most closely related to the genus Halovenus. The closest relatives were Halovenus aranensis EB27(T) (92.1% 16S rRNA gene sequence similarity), Halorientalis regularis TNN28(T) (92.1%), and Halorientalis persicus D108(T) (92.0%). The polar lipid pattern of strain ASP54(T) consisted of biphosphatidylglycerol, phosphatidylglycerol, phosphatidylglycerol phosphate methyl ester, phosphatidylglycerol sulfate, sulfated mannosyl glucosyl diether and a minor-phospholipid. The predominant respiratory quinone was menaquinone-8 (MK-8) (83%), and a minor amount of MK-8(VIII-H2) (17%) was also detected. The G+C content of the genomic DNA of this strain was 63.1 mol%. Based on the phenotypic, chemotaxonomic and phylogenetic data presented in this study, strain ASP54(T) represents a novel species of the genus Halovenus, for which the name Halovenus salina sp. nov. is proposed. The type strain is ASP54(T) ( = CEC(T) 8749(T) = IBRC-M 10946(T) = JCM 30072(T)).

  12. Halorubrum persicum sp. nov., an extremely halophilic archaeon isolated from sediment of a hypersaline lake.

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    Corral, Paulina; de la Haba, Rafael R; Sánchez-Porro, Cristina; Amoozegar, Mohammad Ali; Papke, R Thane; Ventosa, Antonio

    2015-06-01

    An extremely halophilic archaeon belonging to the genus Halorubrum, strain C49T, was isolated from sediment of the hypersaline lake Aran-Bidgol in Iran. Phylogenetic analysis based on 16S rRNA gene sequence similarities showed that strain C49T was closely related to Halorubrum saccharovorum JCM 8865T (99.5 %) and other species of the genus Halorubrum. Studies based on multilocus sequence analysis revealed that strain C49T is placed among the species of Halorubrum; the strain constituted a defined branch in comparison with the type strains of species of Halorubrum, while the 16S rRNA gene sequence divergence could not define the status of the newly isolated strain. For optimum growth, strain C49T required 20 % (w/v) salts at pH 7.0 and 37 °C under aerobic conditions. Mg2+ was not required. The cells were pleomorphic rods, motile and stained Gram-variable. Colonies of the strain were pink. Hypotonic treatment with <12 % NaCl provoked cell lysis. The polar lipid pattern of strain C49T consisted of phosphatidylglycerol, phosphatidylglycerol phosphate methyl ester derived from both C20C20 and C20C25 archaeol, phosphatidylglycerol sulfate and sulfated mannosyl glucosyl diether. The DNA G+C content was 64.2 mol%. DNA-DNA hybridization studies and average nucleotide identity confirmed that strain C49T constitutes a distinct genospecies. Data obtained in this study show that strain C49T represents a novel species, for which the name Halorubrum persicum sp. nov. is proposed. The type strain is C49T ( = IBRC-M 10232T = JCM 30541T).

  13. Halovivax limisalsi sp. nov., an extremely halophilic archaeon from hypersaline mud.

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    Amoozegar, Mohammad Ali; Makhdoumi-Kakhki, Ali; Mehrshad, Maliheh; Riazi, Siavash; Ventosa, Antonio

    2014-10-01

    A Gram-stain-negative, cream-pigmented, motile, extremely halophilic archaeon, designated strain IC38(T), was isolated from a saline mud sample taken from a hypersaline lake, Aran-Bidgol, in Iran. The strain required at least 2.5 M NaCl for growth. However, MgCl2 was not required. Optimal growth occurred with 4.3 M NaCl and 0.2 M MgCl2. The optimum pH and temperature for growth were pH 7.0 and 35 °C, respectively, and strain IC38(T) was able to grow over a pH range of 6.5-9.0, and a temperature range of 25-45 °C. Analysis of the 16S rRNA gene sequence revealed that strain IC38(T) clustered with the two species of the genus Halovivax, Halovivax asiaticus EJ-46(T) and Halovivax ruber XH-70(T), with sequence similarities of 96.4% and 96.1%, respectively. The similarities between the rpoB' gene of the novel strain and Halovivax asiaticus and Halovivax ruber were 90.7% and 90.3%, respectively. The polar lipid pattern of strain IC38(T) consisted of phosphatidylglycerol and phosphatidylglycerol phosphate methyl ester. Three unidentified glycolipids and two minor phospholipids were also observed. The DNA G+C content of strain IC38(T) was 62.6 mol%. On the basis of the phylogenetic analysis, as well as the biochemical and physiological characteristics, the new isolate is suggested to be a representative of a novel species of the genus Halovivax, for which the name Halovivax limisalsi sp. nov. is proposed. The type strain of Halovivax limisalsi is IC38(T) ( = IBRC-M 10022(T) = KCTC 4051(T)). © 2014 IUMS.

  14. Halovarius luteus gen. nov., sp. nov., an extremely halophilic archaeon from a salt lake.

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    Mehrshad, Maliheh; Amoozegar, Mohammad Ali; Makhdoumi, Ali; Rasooli, Mehrnoosh; Asadi, Basaer; Schumann, Peter; Ventosa, Antonio

    2015-08-01

    An extremely halophilic archaeon, strain DA50T, was isolated from a brine sample of Urmia lake, a hypersaline environment in north-west Iran. Strain DA50T was orange-pigmented, motile, pleomorphic and required at least 2.5 M NaCl but not MgCl2 for growth. Optimal growth was achieved at 4.0 M NaCl and 0.3 M MgCl2. The optimum pH and temperature for growth were pH 7.0 and 45 °C, while it was able to grow over a pH range of 6.5-8.0 and a temperature range of 25-50 °C. Analysis of 16S rRNA gene sequences revealed that strain DA50T is a member of the family Halobacteriaceae, showing a low level of similarity with other members of this family. Highest similarities, 94.4, 94.0 and 93.9 %, were obtained with the 16S rRNA gene sequences of the type strains of Natrialba aegyptia, Halobiforma lacisalsi and Halovivax asiaticus, respectively. Polar lipid analyses revealed that strain DA50T contains phosphatidylglycerol and phosphatidylglycerol phosphate methyl ester. Four unidentified glycolipids and two minor phospholipids were also observed. The only quinone present was MK-8(II-H2). The G+C content of its DNA was 62.3 mol%. On the basis of the data obtained, the new isolate could not be classified in any recognized genus. Strain DA50T is thus considered to represent a novel species of a new genus within the family Halobacteriaceae, order Halobacteriales, for which the name Halovarius luteus gen. nov., sp. nov. is proposed. The type strain of Halovarius luteus is DA50T ( = IBRC-M 10912T = CECT 8510T).

  15. Halovivax cerinus sp. nov., an extremely halophilic archaeon from a hypersaline lake.

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    Amoozegar, Mohammad Ali; Makhdoumi-Kakhki, Ali; Mehrshad, Maliheh; Rasooli, Mehrnoosh; Fazeli, Seyed Abolhassan Shahzadeh; Spröer, Cathrin; Ventosa, Antonio

    2015-01-01

    An extremely halophilic archaeon, strain IC35(T), was isolated from a mud sample of the Aran-Bidgol salt lake in Iran. The novel strain was cream, non-motile, rod-shaped and required at least 2.5 M NaCl, but not MgCl2, for growth. Optimal growth was achieved with 3.4 M NaCl and 0.1 M MgCl2. The optimum pH and temperature for growth were pH 7.0 (grew over a pH range of 6.5-9.0) and 40 °C (grew over a temperature range of 30-50 °C), respectively. Analysis of 16S rRNA gene sequences revealed that strain IC35(T) clustered with species of the genus Halovivax, with sequence similarities of 97.3%, 96.6% and 96.3%, respectively, to Halovivax limisalsi IC38(T), Halovivax asiaticus EJ-46(T) and Halovivax ruber XH-70(T). The rpoB' gene similarities between the novel strain and Halovivax limisalsi IBRC-M 10022(T), Halovivax ruber JCM 13892(T) and Halovivax asiaticus JCM 14624(T) were 90.2 %, 90.2% and 89.9%, respectively. The polar lipid pattern of strain IC35(T) consisted of phosphatidylglycerol and phosphatidylglycerol phosphate methyl ester; six unknown glycolipids and two minor phospholipids were also observed. The only quinone present was MK-8 (II-H2). The G+C content of the genomic DNA was 63.2 mol%. DNA-DNA hybridization studies (29% hybridization with Halovivax limisalsi IBRC-M 10022(T)), as well as biochemical and physiological characterization, allowed strain IC35(T) to be differentiated from other species of the genus Halovivax. A novel species, Halovivax cerinus sp. nov., is therefore proposed to accommodate this strain. The type strain is IC35(T) ( = IBRC-M 10256(T) = KCTC 4050(T)). © 2015 IUMS.

  16. Multistage bioassociation of uranium onto an extremely halophilic archaeon revealed by a unique combination of spectroscopic and microscopic techniques

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bader, Miriam; Müller, Katharina; Foerstendorf, Harald; Drobot, Björn [Helmholtz-Zentrum Dresden – Rossendorf, Institute of Resource Ecology, Bautzner Landstraße 400, 01328 Dresden (Germany); Schmidt, Matthias; Musat, Niculina [Helmholtz Centre for Environmental Research–UFZ, Department of Isotope Biogeochemistry, Permoserstraße 15, 04318 Leipzig (Germany); Swanson, Juliet S.; Reed, Donald T. [Los Alamos National Laboratory, Repository Science and Operations, 1400 University Drive, Carlsbad, NM, 88220 (United States); Stumpf, Thorsten [Helmholtz-Zentrum Dresden – Rossendorf, Institute of Resource Ecology, Bautzner Landstraße 400, 01328 Dresden (Germany); Cherkouk, Andrea, E-mail: a.cherkouk@hzdr.de [Helmholtz-Zentrum Dresden – Rossendorf, Institute of Resource Ecology, Bautzner Landstraße 400, 01328 Dresden (Germany)

    2017-04-05

    Highlights: • First prolonged kinetics study of uranium to halophilic archaea was performed. • An atypical time-dependent bioassociation behavior of uranium was observed. • Unique combination of spectroscopic and microscopic methods was used. • In situ ATR FT-IR showed association of U(VI) to phosphoryl and carboxylate groups. • Time-dependent changes of U(VI) localization could be monitored by SEM/EDX. - Abstract: The interactions of two extremely halophilic archaea with uranium were investigated at high ionic strength as a function of time, pH and uranium concentration. Halobacterium noricense DSM-15987 and Halobacterium sp. putatively noricense, isolated from the Waste Isolation Pilot Plant repository, were used for these investigations. The kinetics of U(VI) bioassociation with both strains showed an atypical multistage behavior, meaning that after an initial phase of U(VI) sorption, an unexpected interim period of U(VI) release was observed, followed by a slow reassociation of uranium with the cells. By applying in situ attenuated total reflection Fourier-transform infrared spectroscopy, the involvement of phosphoryl and carboxylate groups in U(VI) complexation during the first biosorption phase was shown. Differences in cell morphology and uranium localization become visible at different stages of the bioassociation process, as shown with scanning electron microscopy in combination with energy dispersive X-ray spectroscopy. Our results demonstrate for the first time that association of uranium with the extremely halophilic archaeon is a multistage process, beginning with sorption and followed by another process, probably biomineralization.

  17. Complete Genome Sequence of the Halophilic Methylotrophic Methanogen Archaeon Methanohalophilus portucalensis Strain FDF-1T

    KAUST Repository

    L’Haridon, Stéphane

    2018-01-17

    We report here the complete genome sequence (2.08 Mb) of Methanohalophilus portucalensis strain FDF-1T, a halophilic methylotrophic methanogen isolated from the sediment of a saltern in Figeria da Foz, Portugal. The average nucleotide identity and DNA-DNA hybridization analyses show that Methanohalophilus mahii, M. halophilus, and M. portucalensis are three different species within the Methanosarcinaceae family.

  18. Perchlorate and halophilic prokaryotes: implications for possible halophilic life on Mars.

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    Oren, Aharon; Elevi Bardavid, Rahel; Mana, Lily

    2014-01-01

    In view of the finding of perchlorate among the salts detected by the Phoenix Lander on Mars, we investigated the relationships of halophilic heterotrophic microorganisms (archaea of the family Halobacteriaceae and the bacterium Halomonas elongata) toward perchlorate. All strains tested grew well in NaCl-based media containing 0.4 M perchlorate, but at the highest perchlorate concentrations, tested cells were swollen or distorted. Some species (Haloferax mediterranei, Haloferax denitrificans, Haloferax gibbonsii, Haloarcula marismortui, Haloarcula vallismortis) could use perchlorate as an electron acceptor for anaerobic growth. Although perchlorate is highly oxidizing, its presence at a concentration of 0.2 M for up to 2 weeks did not negatively affect the ability of a yeast extract-based medium to support growth of the archaeon Halobacterium salinarum. These findings show that presence of perchlorate among the salts on Mars does not preclude the possibility of halophilic life. If indeed the liquid brines that may exist on Mars are inhabited by salt-requiring or salt-tolerant microorganisms similar to the halophiles on Earth, presence of perchlorate may even be stimulatory when it can serve as an electron acceptor for respiratory activity in the anaerobic Martian environment.

  19. Adaptation, Ecology, and Evolution of the Halophilic Stromatolite Archaeon Halococcus hamelinensis Inferred through Genome Analyses

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Reema K. Gudhka

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Halococcus hamelinensis was the first archaeon isolated from stromatolites. These geomicrobial ecosystems are thought to be some of the earliest known on Earth, yet, despite their evolutionary significance, the role of Archaea in these systems is still not well understood. Detailed here is the genome sequencing and analysis of an archaeon isolated from stromatolites. The genome of H. hamelinensis consisted of 3,133,046 base pairs with an average G+C content of 60.08% and contained 3,150 predicted coding sequences or ORFs, 2,196 (68.67% of which were protein-coding genes with functional assignments and 954 (29.83% of which were of unknown function. Codon usage of the H. hamelinensis genome was consistent with a highly acidic proteome, a major adaptive mechanism towards high salinity. Amino acid transport and metabolism, inorganic ion transport and metabolism, energy production and conversion, ribosomal structure, and unknown function COG genes were overrepresented. The genome of H. hamelinensis also revealed characteristics reflecting its survival in its extreme environment, including putative genes/pathways involved in osmoprotection, oxidative stress response, and UV damage repair. Finally, genome analyses indicated the presence of putative transposases as well as positive matches of genes of H. hamelinensis against various genomes of Bacteria, Archaea, and viruses, suggesting the potential for horizontal gene transfer.

  20. Adaptation, ecology, and evolution of the halophilic stromatolite archaeon Halococcus hamelinensis inferred through genome analyses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gudhka, Reema K; Neilan, Brett A; Burns, Brendan P

    2015-01-01

    Halococcus hamelinensis was the first archaeon isolated from stromatolites. These geomicrobial ecosystems are thought to be some of the earliest known on Earth, yet, despite their evolutionary significance, the role of Archaea in these systems is still not well understood. Detailed here is the genome sequencing and analysis of an archaeon isolated from stromatolites. The genome of H. hamelinensis consisted of 3,133,046 base pairs with an average G+C content of 60.08% and contained 3,150 predicted coding sequences or ORFs, 2,196 (68.67%) of which were protein-coding genes with functional assignments and 954 (29.83%) of which were of unknown function. Codon usage of the H. hamelinensis genome was consistent with a highly acidic proteome, a major adaptive mechanism towards high salinity. Amino acid transport and metabolism, inorganic ion transport and metabolism, energy production and conversion, ribosomal structure, and unknown function COG genes were overrepresented. The genome of H. hamelinensis also revealed characteristics reflecting its survival in its extreme environment, including putative genes/pathways involved in osmoprotection, oxidative stress response, and UV damage repair. Finally, genome analyses indicated the presence of putative transposases as well as positive matches of genes of H. hamelinensis against various genomes of Bacteria, Archaea, and viruses, suggesting the potential for horizontal gene transfer.

  1. Halococcus hamelinensis sp. nov., a novel halophilic archaeon isolated from stromatolites in Shark Bay, Australia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goh, Falicia; Leuko, Stefan; Allen, Michelle A; Bowman, John P; Kamekura, Masahiro; Neilan, Brett A; Burns, Brendan P

    2006-06-01

    Several halophilic archaea belonging to the genus Halococcus were isolated from stromatolites from Hamelin Pool, Shark Bay, Western Australia, collected during field trips in 1996 and 2002. This is the first incidence of halophilic archaea being isolated from this environment. Stromatolites are biosedimentary structures that have been formed throughout the earth's evolutionary history and have been preserved in the geological record for over 3 billion years. The stromatolites from Hamelin Pool, Western Australia, are the only known example of extant stromatolites forming in hypersaline coastal environments. Based on their 16S rRNA gene sequences and morphology, the isolates belong to the genus Halococcus. Strain 100NA1, isolated from stromatolites collected in 2002, was closely related to strain 100A6(T) that was isolated from the stromatolites collected in 1996, with a DNA-DNA hybridization value of 94 +/- 8 %. DNA-DNA hybridization values of strain 100A6(T) with Halococcus morrhuae NRC 16008 and Halococcus saccharolyticus ATCC 49257(T) were 17 +/- 6 and 11 +/-7 %, respectively. The DNA G + C content of strain 100A6(T) was 60.5 mol% (T(m)). The main polar lipid was S-DGA-1, a sulphated glycolipid that has been detected in all strains of the genus Halococcus. Whole-cell protein profiles, enzyme composition and utilization of various carbon sources were distinct from those of all previously characterized Halococcus species. The recognition of this strain as representing a novel species within the genus Halococcus is justified, and the name Halococcus hamelinensis sp. nov. is proposed. The type strain is 100A6(T) (=JCM 12892(T) = ACM 5227(T)).

  2. Molecular assessment of UVC radiation-induced DNA damage repair in the stromatolitic halophilic archaeon, Halococcus hamelinensis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leuko, S; Neilan, B A; Burns, B P; Walter, M R; Rothschild, L J

    2011-02-07

    The halophilic archaeon Halococcus hamelinensis was isolated from living stromatolites in Shark Bay, Western Australia, that are known to be exposed to extreme conditions of salinity, desiccation, and UV radiation. Modern stromatolites are considered analogues of very early life on Earth and thus inhabitants of modern stromatolites, and Hcc. hamelinensis in particular, are excellent candidates to examine responses to high UV radiation. This organism was exposed to high dosages (up to 500 J/m(2)) of standard germicidal UVC (254 nm) radiation and overall responses such as survival, thymine-thymine cyclobutane pyrimidine dimer formation, and DNA repair have been assessed. Results show that Hcc. hamelinensis is able to survive high UVC radiation dosages and that intact cells give an increased level of DNA protection over purified DNA. The organism was screened for the bacterial-like nucleotide excision repair (NER) genes uvrA, uvrB, uvrC, as well as for the photolyase phr2 gene. All four genes were discovered and changes in the expression levels of those genes during repair in either light or dark were investigated by means of quantitative Real-Time (qRT) PCR. The data obtained and presented in this study show that the uvrA, uvrB, and uvrC genes were up-regulated during both repair conditions. The photolyase phr2 was not induced during dark repair, yet showed a 20-fold increase during repair in light conditions. The data presented is the first molecular study of different repair mechanisms in the genus Halococcus following exposure to high UVC radiation levels. Copyright © 2010 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  3. Halorientalis persicus sp. nov., an extremely halophilic archaeon isolated from a salt lake and emended description of the genus Halorientalis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Amoozegar, Mohammad Ali; Makhdoumi-Kakhki, Ali; Mehrshad, Maliheh; Fazeli, Seyed Abolhassan Shahzadeh; Spröer, Cathrin; Ventosa, Antonio

    2014-03-01

    An extremely halophilic archaeon, strain D108(T), was isolated from a brine sample of Aran-Bidgol salt lake in Iran. The novel strain was cream-pigmented, motile, pleomorphic rod-shaped and required at least 2.5 M NaCl but not MgCl2 for growth. Optimal growth was achieved with 4.3 M NaCl and 0.1 M MgCl2. The optimum pH and temperature for growth were pH 7.5 and 40 °C, respectively, and the strain was able to grow over a pH range of 6.5 to 9.0, and a temperature range of 30 to 50 °C. Phylogenetic analysis based on 16S rRNA gene sequence comparisons revealed that strain D108(T) clustered with the type strain of the sole species of the genus Halorientalis, Halorientalis regularis TNN28(T), with a sequence similarity of 98.8 %. The polar lipid pattern of strain D108(T) consisted of phosphatidylglycerol, phosphatidylglycerol phosphate methyl ester, one phosphoglycolipid and two glycolipids. The only quinone present was MK-8(II-H2). The DNA G+C content of strain D108(T) was 62.8 mol%. DNA-DNA hybridization studies (45 % with Halorientalis regularis IBRC-M 10760(T)), as well as biochemical and physiological characterization, allowed strain D108(T) to be differentiated from Halorientalis regularis. A novel species of the genus Halorientalis, Halorientalis persicus sp. nov., is therefore proposed to accommodate this strain. The type strain is D108(T) ( = IBRC-M 10043(T) = CECT 8375(T)). An emended description of the genus Halorientalis is also proposed.

  4. Halobellus rarus sp. nov., a halophilic archaeon from an inland salt lake of China.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Wen-Jiao; Han, Dong; Qiu, Xing-Xing; Zhao, Mei-Lin; Mou, Yun-Zhuang; Cui, Heng-Lin; Li, Zheng-Rong

    2013-09-01

    Two halophilic archaeal strains, YC21(T) and YC77, were isolated from an inland salt lake of China. Both have pleomorphic rod-shaped cells that lyse in distilled water, stain Gram-negative and form red-pigmented colonies. They are neutrophilic, require at least 2.1 M NaCl for growth under the optimum growth temperature of 37 °C. The major polar lipids of the two strains were phosphatidylglycerol (PG), phosphatidylglycerol phosphate methyl ester (PGP-Me), phosphatidylglycerol sulfate (PGS), two major glycolipids (GL1 and GL2) chromatographically identical to sulfated mannosyl glucosyl diether (S-DGD-1) and mannosyl glucosyl diether (DGD-1), respectively. Trace amounts of two unidentified lipids (GL0-1 and GL0-2) were also detected. The 16S rRNA gene sequences of the two strains are 99.9 % identical, show 94.0-98.9 % similarity to the closest relative members of Halobellus of the family Halobacteriaceae. The rpoB' gene similarity between strains YC21(T) and YC77 is 99.8 % and show 90.3-95.3 % similarity to the closest relative members of Halobellus. The DNA G+C content of strains YC21(T) and YC77 were 66.1 and 66.2 mol%, respectively. The DNA-DNA hybridization value between strain YC20(T) and strain YC77 was 89 %, and the two strains showed low DNA-DNA relatedness with Halobellus limi TBN53(T), the most related member of Halobellus. The phenotypic, chemotaxonomic and phylogenetic properties suggest that strains YC21(T) and YC77 represent a novel species of the genus Halobellus, for which the name Halobellus rarus sp. nov. is proposed. The type strain is YC21(T) (=CGMCC 1.12121(T) = JCM 18362(T)).

  5. Halorubrum halodurans sp. nov., an extremely halophilic archaeon isolated from a hypersaline lake.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Corral, Paulina; de la Haba, Rafael R; Sánchez-Porro, Cristina; Ali Amoozegar, Mohammad; Thane Papke, R; Ventosa, Antonio

    2016-01-01

    Two extremely halophilic archaea, strains Cb34T and C170, belonging to the genus Halorubrum, were isolated from the brine of the hypersaline lake Aran-Bidgol in Iran. Cells of the two strains were motile, pleomorphic rods, stained Gram-variable and produced red-pigmented colonies. Strains Cb34T and C170 required 25 % (w/v) salts, pH 7.0 and 37 °C for optimal growth under aerobic conditions; 0.3 M Mg2+ was required. Cells of both isolates were lysed in distilled water and hypotonic treatment with < 10 % NaCl provoked cell lysis. Phylogenetic analysis based on 16S rRNA gene sequence similarities showed that these two strains were closely related to Halorubrum cibi B31T (98.8 %) and other members of the genus Halorubrum. In addition, studies based on the rpoB' gene revealed that strains Cb34T and C170 are placed among the species of Halorubrum and are closely related to Halorubrum cibi B31T, with rpoB' gene sequence similarity less than or equal to 95.7 %. The polar lipid patterns of both strains consisted of phosphatidylglycerol, phosphatidylglycerol phosphate methyl ester, phosphatidylglycerol sulfate and sulfated mannosyl glucosyl diether. The DNA G+C content was 62.1-62.4 mol%. DNA-DNA hybridization studies confirmed that strains Cb34T and C170 constitute a distinct species. Data obtained in this study show that the two strains represent a novel species, for which the name Halorubrum halodurans sp. nov. is proposed. The type strain is Cb34T ( = CECT 8745T = IBRC-M 10233T).

  6. Essential and non-essential DNA replication genes in the model halophilic Archaeon, Halobacterium sp. NRC-1

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    DasSarma Shiladitya

    2007-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Information transfer systems in Archaea, including many components of the DNA replication machinery, are similar to those found in eukaryotes. Functional assignments of archaeal DNA replication genes have been primarily based upon sequence homology and biochemical studies of replisome components, but few genetic studies have been conducted thus far. We have developed a tractable genetic system for knockout analysis of genes in the model halophilic archaeon, Halobacterium sp. NRC-1, and used it to determine which DNA replication genes are essential. Results Using a directed in-frame gene knockout method in Halobacterium sp. NRC-1, we examined nineteen genes predicted to be involved in DNA replication. Preliminary bioinformatic analysis of the large haloarchaeal Orc/Cdc6 family, related to eukaryotic Orc1 and Cdc6, showed five distinct clades of Orc/Cdc6 proteins conserved in all sequenced haloarchaea. Of ten orc/cdc6 genes in Halobacterium sp. NRC-1, only two were found to be essential, orc10, on the large chromosome, and orc2, on the minichromosome, pNRC200. Of the three replicative-type DNA polymerase genes, two were essential: the chromosomally encoded B family, polB1, and the chromosomally encoded euryarchaeal-specific D family, polD1/D2 (formerly called polA1/polA2 in the Halobacterium sp. NRC-1 genome sequence. The pNRC200-encoded B family polymerase, polB2, was non-essential. Accessory genes for DNA replication initiation and elongation factors, including the putative replicative helicase, mcm, the eukaryotic-type DNA primase, pri1/pri2, the DNA polymerase sliding clamp, pcn, and the flap endonuclease, rad2, were all essential. Targeted genes were classified as non-essential if knockouts were obtained and essential based on statistical analysis and/or by demonstrating the inability to isolate chromosomal knockouts except in the presence of a complementing plasmid copy of the gene. Conclusion The results showed that ten

  7. Halorubrum rubrum sp. nov., an extremely halophilic archaeon from a Chinese salt lake.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Qiu, Xing-Xing; Zhao, Mei-Lin; Han, Dong; Zhang, Wen-Jiao; Cui, Heng-Lin

    2013-11-01

    Two halophilic archaeal strains, YC87(T) and YCA11, were isolated from Yuncheng salt lake in Shanxi, China. Cells of the two strains were observed to be pleomorphic rod-shaped, stained Gram-negative and produced red-pigmented colonies. Strain YC87(T) was able to grow at 20-50 °C (optimum 37 °C), at 1.4-4.8 M NaCl (optimum 2.1 M NaCl), at 0.05-1.0 M MgCl2 (optimum 0.3 M MgCl2) and at pH 6.0-9.0 (optimum pH 7.0) while strain YCA11 was able to grow at 20-50 °C (optimum 37 °C), at 2.1-4.8 M NaCl (optimum 3.1 M NaCl), at 0.01-0.7 M MgCl2 (optimum 0.1 M MgCl2) and at pH 6.0-9.0 (optimum pH 7.5). The cells of both isolates were observed to lyse in distilled water. The minimum NaCl concentrations that prevented cell lysis were determined to be 8 % (w/v) for strain YC87(T) and 12 % (w/v) for strain YCA11. The major polar lipids of the two strains were identified as phosphatidylglycerol, phosphatidylglycerol phosphate methyl ester, phosphatidylglycerol sulfate and one major glycolipid chromatographically identical to sulfated mannosyl glucosyl diether; another major glycolipid and trace amounts of several unidentified lipids were also detected. The 16S rRNA gene sequences of the two strains were 99.8 % identical, showing 93.2-98.2 % similarity to members of the genus Halorubrum of the family Halobacteriaceae. The rpoB' gene similarity between strains YC87(T) and YCA11 was 99.3 % and showed 87.5-95.2 % similarity to the closest relative members of the genus Halorubrum. The DNA G+C content of strains YC87(T) and YCA11 were determined to be 64.9 and 64.5 mol%, respectively. The DNA-DNA hybridization value between strain YC20(T) and strain YC77 was 87 % and the two strains showed low DNA-DNA relatedness with Halorubrum cibi JCM 15757(T) and Halorubrum aquaticum CGMCC 1.6377(T), the most related members of the genus Halorubrum. The phenotypic, chemotaxonomic and phylogenetic properties suggest that strains YC87(T) and YCA11 represent a novel species of the

  8. Utilization of vinasse for the production of polyhydroxybutyrate by Haloarcula marismortui.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pramanik, Arnab; Mitra, Anindita; Arumugam, Meyyappan; Bhattacharyya, Anirban; Sadhukhan, Sohini; Ray, Atrayee; Haldar, Saubhik; Mukhopadhyay, Ujjal Kumar; Mukherjee, Joydeep

    2012-01-01

    Vinasse, a recalcitrant waste of the ethanol industry was employed for the production of polyhydroxyalkanoate (PHA) by the extremely halophilic archaeon, Haloarcula marismortui in shake flasks. The PHA was recovered by osmotic lysis of the cells and subsequent purification by sodium hypochlorite and organic solvents. Through UV-vis spectroscopy, differential scanning calorimetry, Fourier transform infrared, and nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy, the PHA was found to have characteristics very similar to that of the standard polyhydroxybutyrate (PHB) from Sigma. Inhibitory effect of polyphenols contained in vinasse was assessed by a quick and reliable cup-plate agar-diffusion method. Raw vinasse (10%) was utilized leading to accumulation of 23% PHA (of cell dry weight) and following an efficacious pre-treatment process through adsorption on activated carbon, 100% pre-treated vinasse could be utilized leading to 30% accumulation of PHB by H. marismortui. Maximum specific growth rate, specific production rate, and volumetric productivity attained using 10% raw vinasse were comparable to that obtained using a previously reported nutrient deficient medium (NDM), while the values with 100% pre-treated vinasse were higher than that determined using NDM medium. This is the first report of polyhydroxybutyrate production by a halophilic microorganism utilizing vinasse.

  9. ATP- and NAD+-dependent DNA ligases share an essential function in the halophilic archaeon Haloferax volcanii

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Zhao, A.; Gray, F. C; MacNeill, S. A.

    2006-01-01

    DNA ligases join the ends of DNA molecules during replication, repair and recombination. ATP-dependent ligases are found predominantly in the eukarya and archaea whereas NAD+-dependent DNA ligases are found only in the eubacteria and in entomopoxviruses. Using the genetically tractable halophile....... volcanii also encodes an NAD+-dependent DNA ligase family member, LigN, the first such enzyme to be identified in the archaea, and present phylogenetic analysis indicating that the gene encoding this protein has been acquired by lateral gene transfer (LGT) from eubacteria. As with LigA, we show that Lig...

  10. MutS and MutL are dispensable for maintenance of the genomic mutation rate in the halophilic archaeon Halobacterium salinarum NRC-1.

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    Courtney R Busch

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: The genome of the halophilic archaeon Halobacterium salinarum NRC-1 encodes for homologs of MutS and MutL, which are key proteins of a DNA mismatch repair pathway conserved in Bacteria and Eukarya. Mismatch repair is essential for retaining the fidelity of genetic information and defects in this pathway result in the deleterious accumulation of mutations and in hereditary diseases in humans. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: We calculated the spontaneous genomic mutation rate of H. salinarum NRC-1 using fluctuation tests targeting genes of the uracil monophosphate biosynthesis pathway. We found that H. salinarum NRC-1 has a low incidence of mutation suggesting the presence of active mechanisms to control spontaneous mutations during replication. The spectrum of mutational changes found in H. salinarum NRC-1, and in other archaea, appears to be unique to this domain of life and might be a consequence of their adaption to extreme environmental conditions. In-frame targeted gene deletions of H. salinarum NRC-1 mismatch repair genes and phenotypic characterization of the mutants demonstrated that the mutS and mutL genes are not required for maintenance of the observed mutation rate. CONCLUSIONS/SIGNIFICANCE: We established that H. salinarum NRC-1 mutS and mutL genes are redundant to an alternative system that limits spontaneous mutation in this organism. This finding leads to the puzzling question of what mechanism is responsible for maintenance of the low genomic mutation rates observed in the Archaea, which for the most part do not have MutS and MutL homologs.

  11. Isolation and cultivation of Walsby's square archaeon

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bolhuis, H; Poele, EMT; Rodriguez-Valera, F

    2004-01-01

    In 1980, A. E. Walsby described a square halophilic archaeon. This archaeon is of specific interest because of its unique shape and its abundance in hypersaline ecosystems, which suggests an important ecophysiological role. Ever since its discovery, the isolation and cultivation of 'Walsby's square

  12. Solid-state fermentation as a potential technique for esterase/lipase production by halophilic archaea.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martin del Campo, Martha; Camacho, Rosa M; Mateos-Díaz, Juan C; Müller-Santos, Marcelo; Córdova, Jesus; Rodríguez, Jorge A

    2015-11-01

    Halophilic archaea are extremophiles, adapted to high-salt environments, showing a big biotechnological potential as enzyme, lipids and pigments producers. Four inert supports (perlite, vermiculite, polyurethane foam and glass fiber) were employed for solid-state fermentation (SSF) of the halophilic archaeon Natronococcus sp. TC6 to investigate biomass and esterase production. A very low esterase activity and high water activity were observed when perlite, vermiculite and polyurethane were used as supports. When glass fiber was employed, an important moisture loss was observed (8.6%). Moreover, moisture retention was improved by mixing polyurethane and glass fiber, resulting in maximal biomass and esterase production. Three halophilic archaea: Natronococcus sp. TC6, Halobacterium sp. NRC-1 and Haloarcula marismortui were cultured by submerged fermentation (SmF) and by SSF; an improvement of 1.3- to 6.2-fold was observed in the biomass and esterase production when SSF was used. Growth was not homogeneous in the mixture, but was predominant in the glass fiber thus was probably because the glass fiber provides a holder to the cells, while the polyurethane acts as an impregnation medium reservoir. To the best of our knowledge, this work is the first report on haloarchaea cultivation by SSF aiming biomass and esterase/lipase activity production.

  13. The genome of the square archaeon Haloquadratum walsbyi : life at the limits of water activity

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bolhuis, Henk; Palm, Peter; Wende, Andy; Falb, Michaela; Rampp, Markus; Rodriguez-Valera, Francisco; Pfeiffer, Friedhelm; Oesterhelt, Dieter

    2006-01-01

    Background: The square halophilic archaeon Haloquadratum walsbyi dominates NaCl- saturated and MgCl2 enriched aquatic ecosystems, which imposes a serious desiccation stress, caused by the extremely low water activity. The genome sequence was analyzed and physiological and physical experiments were

  14. Osmoadaptive strategies of the archaeon Halococcus hamelinensis isolated from a hypersaline stromatolite environment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goh, Falicia; Jeon, Young Jae; Barrow, Kevin; Neilan, Brett A; Burns, Brendan P

    2011-01-01

    Biogenic stromatolites are sources of significant information on the evolution of microbial life. Despite their evolutionary significance, little is known about the mechanisms of osmoadaptation by microorganisms that comprise living stromatolites thriving in hypersaline environments. Osmoadaptive strategies for Halococcus hamelinensis, a novel halophilic archaeon recently isolated from living stromatolites in the hypersaline reaches of Shark Bay, were thus a particular interest in this study. To investigate the possibility of "salt-in-cytoplasm"-associated osmoadaptation for this archaeon, flame photometry studies were performed. From the results, it was evident that this halophilic archaeon did not accumulate intracellular K(+) ions when cells were exposed to either osmotic shock or conditions with gradual increments in salinity. These results were further supported by polymerase chain reaction (PCR) analyses where there was no evidence for the existence of homologous genes to an ATP-driven, high-affinity potassium uptake system in Halococcus hamelinensis. To identify an alternative salt adaptation mechanism associated with accumulation of compatible solutes for this archaeon, (1)H nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) spectroscopy experiments were carried out. Results indicate that glycine betaine, trehalose, and glutamate are solutes likely to be involved in osmoregulation in this archeaon. Subsequent (1)H NMR analysis of cell extracts from this microorganism grown under various NaCl concentrations revealed that intracellular levels of glycine betaine increased with increasing concentrations of NaCl. This behavior of increasing glycine betaine concentration with increasing external NaCl is consistent with its identity as an osmolyte. In contrast, intracellular levels of trehalose were decreased in high concentrations of NaCl. This provides evidence that compatible solute accumulation appears to be the preferential salt regulation mechanism for this haloarchaeon, in

  15. Comparison of two extreme halophilic Halobacterium noricense strains on DNA and protein level

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bader, Miriam; Cherkouk, Andrea [Helmholtz-Zentrum Dresden-Rossendorf e.V., Dresden (Germany). HZDR Young Investigator Group; Flemming, Katrin [Helmholtz-Zentrum Dresden-Rossendorf e.V., Dresden (Germany). Biogeochemistry; Swanson, J.S. [Los Alamos National Laboratory, Carlsbad, NM (United States)

    2017-06-01

    Two strains of the halophilic archaeon Halobacterium noricense isolated from rock salt of different locations were used for interaction studies with uranium. It was found that both strains showed similar, atypical bioassociation kinetics accompanied by cell agglomeration as a stress response. The 16S rRNA gene sequences of both strains had a high similarity (> 99 %). However, differences in the whole protein pattern were apparent.

  16. Halophilic adaptation of enzymes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Madern, D; Ebel, C; Zaccai, G

    2000-04-01

    It is now clear that the understanding of halophilic adaptation at a molecular level requires a strategy of complementary experiments, combining molecular biology, biochemistry, and cellular approaches with physical chemistry and thermodynamics. In this review, after a discussion of the definition and composition of halophilic enzymes, the effects of salt on their activity, solubility, and stability are reviewed. We then describe how thermodynamic observations, such as parameters pertaining to solvent-protein interactions or enzyme-unfolding kinetics, depend strongly on solvent composition and reveal the important role played by water and ion binding to halophilic proteins. The three high-resolution crystal structures now available for halophilic proteins are analyzed in terms of haloadaptation, and finally cellular response to salt stress is discussed briefly.

  17. Microarray analysis in the archaeon Halobacterium salinarum strain R1.

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    Jens Twellmeyer

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Phototrophy of the extremely halophilic archaeon Halobacterium salinarum was explored for decades. The research was mainly focused on the expression of bacteriorhodopsin and its functional properties. In contrast, less is known about genome wide transcriptional changes and their impact on the physiological adaptation to phototrophy. The tool of choice to record transcriptional profiles is the DNA microarray technique. However, the technique is still rarely used for transcriptome analysis in archaea. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: We developed a whole-genome DNA microarray based on our sequence data of the Hbt. salinarum strain R1 genome. The potential of our tool is exemplified by the comparison of cells growing under aerobic and phototrophic conditions, respectively. We processed the raw fluorescence data by several stringent filtering steps and a subsequent MAANOVA analysis. The study revealed a lot of transcriptional differences between the two cell states. We found that the transcriptional changes were relatively weak, though significant. Finally, the DNA microarray data were independently verified by a real-time PCR analysis. CONCLUSION/SIGNIFICANCE: This is the first DNA microarray analysis of Hbt. salinarum cells that were actually grown under phototrophic conditions. By comparing the transcriptomics data with current knowledge we could show that our DNA microarray tool is well applicable for transcriptome analysis in the extremely halophilic archaeon Hbt. salinarum. The reliability of our tool is based on both the high-quality array of DNA probes and the stringent data handling including MAANOVA analysis. Among the regulated genes more than 50% had unknown functions. This underlines the fact that haloarchaeal phototrophy is still far away from being completely understood. Hence, the data recorded in this study will be subject to future systems biology analysis.

  18. Hans Georg Trüper (1936–2016 and His Contributions to Halophile Research

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Aharon Oren

    2016-05-01

    Full Text Available Prof. Hans Georg Trüper, one of the most important scientists in the field of halophile research, passed away on 9 March 2016 at the age of 79. I here present a brief obituary with special emphasis on Prof. Trüper’s contributions to our understanding of the halophilic prokaryotes and their adaptations to life in hypersaline environments. He has pioneered the study of the halophilic anoxygenic phototrophic sulfur bacteria of the Ectothiorhodospira—Halorhodospira group. Some of the species he and his group isolated from hypersaline and haloalkaline environments have become model organisms for the study of the mechanisms of haloadaptation: the functions of three major organic compounds – glycine betaine, ectoine, and trehalose – known to serve as “compatible solutes” in halophilic members of the Bacteria domain, were discovered during studies of these anoxygenic phototrophs. Prof. Trüper’s studies of hypersaline alkaline environments in Egypt also led to the isolation of the first known extremely halophilic archaeon (Natronomonas pharaonis. The guest editors dedicate this special volume of Life to the memory of Prof. Hans Georg Trüper.

  19. Archaeal Haloarcula californiae Icosahedral Virus 1 Highlights Conserved Elements in Icosahedral Membrane-Containing DNA Viruses from Extreme Environments

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    Tatiana A. Demina

    2016-07-01

    Full Text Available Despite their high genomic diversity, all known viruses are structurally constrained to a limited number of virion morphotypes. One morphotype of viruses infecting bacteria, archaea, and eukaryotes is the tailless icosahedral morphotype with an internal membrane. Although it is considered an abundant morphotype in extreme environments, only seven such archaeal viruses are known. Here, we introduce Haloarcula californiae icosahedral virus 1 (HCIV-1, a halophilic euryarchaeal virus originating from salt crystals. HCIV-1 also retains its infectivity under low-salinity conditions, showing that it is able to adapt to environmental changes. The release of progeny virions resulting from cell lysis was evidenced by reduced cellular oxygen consumption, leakage of intracellular ATP, and binding of an indicator ion to ruptured cell membranes. The virion contains at least 12 different protein species, lipids selectively acquired from the host cell membrane, and a 31,314-bp-long linear double-stranded DNA (dsDNA. The overall genome organization and sequence show high similarity to the genomes of archaeal viruses in the Sphaerolipoviridae family. Phylogenetic analysis based on the major conserved components needed for virion assembly—the major capsid proteins and the packaging ATPase—placed HCIV-1 along with the alphasphaerolipoviruses in a distinct, well-supported clade. On the basis of its virion morphology and sequence similarities, most notably, those of its core virion components, we propose that HCIV-1 is a member of the PRD1-adenovirus structure-based lineage together with other sphaerolipoviruses. This addition to the lineage reinforces the notion of the ancient evolutionary links observed between the viruses and further highlights the limits of the choices found in nature for formation of a virion.

  20. Analysis of Carotenoid Production by Halorubrum sp. TBZ126; an Extremely Halophilic Archeon from Urmia Lake

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    Davood Naziri

    2014-03-01

    Full Text Available Purpose: Carotenoids are of great interest in many scientific disciplines because of their wide distribution, diverse functions and interesting properties. The present report describes a new natural source for carotenoid production. Methods: Halorubrum sp., TBZ126, an extremely halophilic archaeon, was isolated from Urmia Lack following culture of water sample on marine agar medium and incubation at 30 °C. Then single colonies were cultivated in broth media. After that the cells were collected and carotenoids were extracted with acetone-methanol (7:3 v/v. The identification of carotenoids was performed by UV-VIS spectroscopy and confirmed by thin layer chromatography (TLC in the presence of antimony pentachloride (SbCl5. The production profile was analyzed using liquid-chromatography mass spectroscopy (LC-MS techniques. Phenotypic characteristics of the isolate were carried out and the 16S rRNA gene was amplified using polymerase chain reaction (PCR. Results: LC-MS analytical results revealed that produced carotenoids are bacterioruberin, lycopene and β-carotene. Bacterioruberin was found to be the predominant produced carotenoid. 16S rRNA analysis showed that TBZ126 has 100% similarity with Halorubrum chaoviator Halo-G*T (AM048786. Conclusion: Halorubrum sp. TBZ126, isolated from Urmia Lake has high capacity in the production of carotenoids. This extremely halophilic archaeon could be considered as a prokaryotic candidate for carotenoid production source for future studies.

  1. Synthesis and production of polyhydroxyalkanoates by halophiles: current potential and future prospects.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Quillaguamán, Jorge; Guzmán, Héctor; Van-Thuoc, Doan; Hatti-Kaul, Rajni

    2010-02-01

    Biodegradable materials with plastic or elastomeric properties are in great demand for a variety of applications. Polyhydroxyalkanoates (PHAs), polyesters synthesized by microorganisms, possess such desired features. Industrial production of PHAs is currently achieved using recombinant Escherichia coli. Nevertheless, recent research on halophiles, salt requiring microorganisms, has shown a remarkable potential for biotechnological production of PHAs. The halophilic archaeon Haloferax mediterranei accumulates a co-polymer, i.e., poly(3-hydroxybutyrate-co-3-hydroxyvalerate) in large amounts using glucose, starch, and hydrolyzed whey as carbon sources. Chemical composition and molecular weight of PHAs produced by H. mediterranei can be modified depending on the substrate utilized as precursor. Phylogenetic studies on haloarchaeal enzymes able to polymerize the components of PHAs (i.e., PHA synthases) reveal a novel cluster, with a close relationship with PHA polymerases of bacteria and archaea found in marine-related niches. On the other hand, sequences of PHA synthases of two halophilic bacteria are more closely affiliated to synthases of Proteobacteria. Several bacterial species of the family Halomonadaceae accumulate PHAs. Halomonas boliviensis reached PHA yields and volumetric productivities close to the highest reported so far. Furthermore, H. boliviensis and other Halomonas species are able to co-produce PHA and osmolytes, i.e., ectoines and hydroxyectoine, in one process.

  2. Enzymatic activity of a novel halotolerant lipase from Haloarcula hispanica 2TK2

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    Ozgen Melis

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available A strain of Haloarcula hispanica isolated from Tuzkoy salt mine, Turkey exhibited extracellular lipolytic activity. Important parameters such as carbon sources and salt concentration for lipase production were investigated. Optimal conditions for the enzyme production from Haloarcula hispanica 2TK2 were determined. It was observed that the lipolytic activity of Haloarcula hispanica was stimulated by some of the carbon sources. The high lipase acitivity values were obtained in the presence of 2% (v/v walnut oil (6.16 U/ml, 1% (v/v fish oil (5.07 U/ml, 1% (v/v olive oil (4.52 U/ml and 1% (w/v stearic acid (4.88 U/ml at 4M NaCl concentration. Lipase was partially purified by ammonium sulfate precipitation and ultrafiltration. Optimal temperature and pH values were determined as 45°C and 8.0, respectively. Lipase activity decreased with the increasing salt concentration, but 85% activity of the enzyme was maintained at 5M NaCl concentration. The enzyme preserved 41% of its relative activity at 90°C. The partially purified lipase maintained its activity in the presence of surfactants such as Triton X-100 and SDS. Therefore, the lipase which is an extremozyme may have potential applications especially in detergent industry.

  3. Antimicrobial Activity and Mechanism of inhibition of Silver Nanoparticles against Extreme Halophilic Archaea

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    Rebecca Thombre

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available Haloarchaea are salt-loving halophilic microorganism’s that inhabit marine environments, sea water, salterns, and lakes. The resistance of haloarchaea to physical extremities that challenge organismic survival is ubiquitous. Metal and antibiotic resistance of haloarchaea has been on an upsurge due to the exposure of these organisms to metal sinks and drug resistance genes augmented in their natural habitats due to anthropogenic activities and environmental pollution. The efficacy of silver nanoparticles (SNPs as a potent and broad spectrum inhibitory agent is known however, there are no reports on the inhibitory activity of SNPs against haloarchaea. In the present study, we have investigated the antimicrobial potentials of SNPs synthesized using aqueous leaf extract of Cinnamomum tamala against antibiotic resistant haloarchaeal isolates Haloferax prahovense RR8, Haloferax lucentense RR15, Haloarcula argentinensis RR10 and Haloarcula tradensis RR13. The synthesized SNPs were characterized by UV-Vis spectroscopy, scanning electron microscopy, energy dispersive X-ray spectroscopy, dynamic light scattering, X-ray diffraction and Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy. The SNPs demonstrated potent antimicrobial activity against the haloarchaea with a minimum inhibitory concentration of 300- 400µg/ml. Growth kinetics of haloarchaea in the presence of SNPs was studied by employing the Baranyi mathematical model for microbial growth using the DMFit curve fitting programme. The C. tamala SNPs also demonstrated cytotoxic activity against human lung adenocarcinoma epithelial cell line (A540 and human breast adenocarcinoma cell line (MCF-7. The mechanism of inhibition of haloarchaea by the SNPs was investigated. The plausible mechanism proposed is the alterations and disruption of haloarchaeal membrane permeability by turbulence, inhibition of respiratory dehydrogenases and lipid peroxidation causing cellular and DNA damage resulting in cell death.

  4. Morphological and structural aspects of the extremely halophilic archaeon Haloquadratum walsbyi.

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    Matilde Sublimi Saponetti

    Full Text Available Ultrathin square cell Haloquadratum walsbyi from the Archaea domain are the most abundant microorganisms in the hypersaline water of coastal salterns and continental salt lakes. In this work, we explore the cell surface of these microorganisms using amplitude-modulation atomic-force microscopy in nearly physiological conditions. We demonstrate the presence of a regular corrugation with a periodicity of 16-20 nm attributed to the surface layer (S-layer protein lattice, striped domains asymmetrically distributed on the cell faces and peculiar bulges correlated with the presence of intracellular granules. Besides, subsequent images of cell evolution during the drying process indicate the presence of an external capsule that might correspond to the giant protein halomucin, predicted by the genome but never before observed by other microscopy studies.

  5. Harnessing the native type I-B CRISPR-Cas for genome editing in a polyploid archaeon.

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    Cheng, Feiyue; Gong, Luyao; Zhao, Dahe; Yang, Haibo; Zhou, Jian; Li, Ming; Xiang, Hua

    2017-11-20

    Research on CRISPR-Cas (clustered regularly interspaced short palindromic repeats-CRISPR associated protein) systems has led to the revolutionary CRISPR/Cas9 genome editing technique. However, for most archaea and half of bacteria, exploitation of their native CRISPR-Cas machineries may be more straightforward and convenient. In this study, we harnessed the native type I-B CRISPR-Cas system for precise genome editing in the polyploid haloarchaeon Haloarcula hispanica. After testing different designs, the editing tool was optimized to be a single plasmid that carries both the self-targeting mini-CRISPR and a 600-800 bp donor. Significantly, chromosomal modifications, such as gene deletion, gene tagging or single nucleotide substitution, were precisely introduced into the vast majority of the transformants. Moreover, we showed that simultaneous editing of two genomic loci could also be readily achieved by one step. In summary, our data demonstrate that the haloarchaeal CRISPR-Cas system can be harnessed for genome editing in this polyploid archaeon, and highlight the convenience and efficiency of the native CRISPR-based genome editing strategy. Copyright © 2017 Institute of Genetics and Developmental Biology, Chinese Academy of Sciences, and Genetics Society of China. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  6. Crystal Structure of the 23S rRNA Fragment Specific to r-Protein L1 and Designed Model of the Ribosomal L1 Stalk from Haloarcula marismortui

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    Azat Gabdulkhakov

    2017-02-01

    Full Text Available The crystal structure of the 92-nucleotide L1-specific fragment of 23S rRNA from Haloarcula marismortui (Hma has been determined at 3.3 Å resolution. Similar to the corresponding bacterial rRNA fragments, this structure contains joined helix 76-77 topped by an approximately globular structure formed by the residual part of the L1 stalk rRNA. The position of HmaL1 relative to the rRNA was found by its docking to the rRNA fragment using the L1-rRNA complex from Thermus thermophilus as a guide model. In spite of the anomalous negative charge of the halophilic archaeal protein, the conformation of the HmaL1-rRNA interface appeared to be very close to that observed in all known L1-rRNA complexes. The designed structure of the L1 stalk was incorporated into the H. marismortui 50S ribosomal subunit. Comparison of relative positions of L1 stalks in 50S subunits from H. marismortui and T. thermophilus made it possible to reveal the site of inflection of rRNA during the ribosome function.

  7. Halopenitus persicus gen. nov., sp. nov., an archaeon from an inland salt lake.

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    Amoozegar, Mohammad Ali; Makhdoumi-Kakhki, Ali; Shahzadeh Fazeli, Seyed Abolhassan; Azarbaijani, Reza; Ventosa, Antonio

    2012-08-01

    A novel pale pink-pigmented halophilic archaeon, strain DC30(T), was isolated from Aran-Bidgol salt lake, a hypersaline playa in Iran. Cells of strain DC30(T) were non-motile and pleomorphic, from rods to triangular or disc-shaped. Strain DC30(T) required at least 1.7 M NaCl and 0.05 M MgCl(2) for growth (optimum, 3 M NaCl and 0.1 M MgCl(2)). The optimum pH and temperature for growth of strain DC30(T) were pH 7.5 and 40 °C, respectively, although it was capable of growth over pH and temperature ranges of 6.5-8.5 and 25-50 °C, respectively. Analysis of the 16S rRNA gene sequence showed that strain DC30(T) was a member of the family Halobacteriaceae. However, it had low 16S rRNA gene sequence similarities of 92.4%, 89.4% and 89.1% to the most closely related haloarchaeal taxa, the type species of the genera Halorubrum, Halogranum and Haloplanus, respectively. The DNA G+C content was 66.0 mol%. Phosphatidylglycerol and phosphatidylglycerol phosphate methyl ester, common phospholipids found in haloarchaea, were present. Three minor phospholipids and one unidentified glycolipid were also observed. The only quinone present was MK-8(II-H(2)). The physiological, biochemical and phylogenetic differences between strain DC30(T) and other previously described genera of extremely halophilic archaea suggest that strain DC30(T) represents a novel species in a new genus within the family Halobacteriaceae, for which the name Halopenitus persicus gen. nov., sp. nov. is proposed. The type strain of Halopenitus persicus is DC30(T) ( = IBRC 10041(T) = KCTC 4046(T)).

  8. Evidence from phylogenetic and genome fingerprinting analyses suggests rapidly changing variation in Halorubrum and Haloarcula populations

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    Ram Mohan, Nikhil; Fullmer, Matthew S.; Makkay, Andrea M.; Wheeler, Ryan; Ventosa, Antonio; Naor, Adit; Gogarten, J. Peter; Papke, R. Thane

    2014-01-01

    Halobacteria require high NaCl concentrations for growth and are the dominant inhabitants of hypersaline environments above 15% NaCl. They are well-documented to be highly recombinogenic, both in frequency and in the range of exchange partners. In this study, we examine the genetic and genomic variation of cultured, naturally co-occurring environmental populations of Halobacteria. Sequence data from multiple loci (~2500 bp) identified many closely and more distantly related strains belonging to the genera Halorubrum and Haloarcula. Genome fingerprinting using a random priming PCR amplification method to analyze these isolates revealed diverse banding patterns across each of the genera and surprisingly even for isolates that are identical at the nucleotide level for five protein coding sequenced loci. This variance in genome structure even between identical multilocus sequence analysis (MLSA) haplotypes indicates that accumulation of genomic variation is rapid: faster than the rate of third codon substitutions. PMID:24782838

  9. Evidence from phylogenetic and genome fingerprinting analyses suggests rapidly changing variation in Halorubrum and Haloarcula populations

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    Nikhil eRam Mohan

    2014-04-01

    Full Text Available Halobacteria require high NaCl concentrations for growth and are the dominant inhabitants of hypersaline environments above 15% NaCl. They are well documented to be highly recombinogenic, both in frequency and in the range of exchange partners. In this study, we examine the genetic and genomic variation of cultured, naturally co-occurring environmental populations of Halobacteria. Sequence data from multiple loci (~2500bp identified closely related strains belonging to the genera Halorubrum and Haloarcula. Genome fingerprinting using a random priming PCR amplification method to analyze these isolates revealed diverse banding patterns within and across each of the genera and surprisingly even for isolates that are identical at the nucleotide level for five protein coding sequenced loci. This variance in genome structure even between identical multilocus sequence analysis (MLSA haplotypes suggests that accumulation of variation is rapid, perhaps occurring every generation.

  10. Biology of Moderately Halophilic Aerobic Bacteria

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    Ventosa, Antonio; Nieto, Joaquín J.; Oren, Aharon

    1998-01-01

    The moderately halophilic heterotrophic aerobic bacteria form a diverse group of microorganisms. The property of halophilism is widespread within the bacterial domain. Bacterial halophiles are abundant in environments such as salt lakes, saline soils, and salted food products. Most species keep their intracellular ionic concentrations at low levels while synthesizing or accumulating organic solutes to provide osmotic equilibrium of the cytoplasm with the surrounding medium. Complex mechanisms of adjustment of the intracellular environments and the properties of the cytoplasmic membrane enable rapid adaptation to changes in the salt concentration of the environment. Approaches to the study of genetic processes have recently been developed for several moderate halophiles, opening the way toward an understanding of haloadaptation at the molecular level. The new information obtained is also expected to contribute to the development of novel biotechnological uses for these organisms. PMID:9618450

  11. Halophiles, coming stars for industrial biotechnology.

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    Yin, Jin; Chen, Jin-Chun; Wu, Qiong; Chen, Guo-Qiang

    2015-11-15

    Industrial biotechnology aims to produce chemicals, materials and biofuels to ease the challenges of shortage on petroleum. However, due to the disadvantages of bioprocesses including energy consuming sterilization, high fresh water consumption, discontinuous fermentation to avoid microbial contamination, highly expensive stainless steel fermentation facilities and competing substrates for human consumption, industrial biotechnology is less competitive compared with chemical processes. Recently, halophiles have shown promises to overcome these shortcomings. Due to their unique halophilic properties, some halophiles are able to grow in high pH and high NaCl containing medium under higher temperature, allowing fermentation processes to run contamination free under unsterile conditions and continuous way. At the same time, genetic manipulation methods have been developed for halophiles. So far, halophiles have been used to produce bioplastics polyhydroxyalkanoates (PHA), ectoines, enzymes, and bio-surfactants. Increasing effects have been made to develop halophiles into a low cost platform for bioprocessing with advantages of low energy, less fresh water consumption, low fixed capital investment, and continuous production. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  12. Salty sisters: The women of halophiles

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    Bonnie K. Baxter

    2014-06-01

    Full Text Available A history of halophile research reveals the commitment of scientists to uncovering the secrets of the limits of life, in particular life in high salt concentration and under extreme osmotic pressure. During the last 40 years, halophile scientists have indeed made important contributions to extremophile research, and prior international halophiles congresses have documented both the historical and the current work. During this period of salty discoveries, female scientists, in general, have grown in number worldwide. But those who worked in the field when there were small numbers of women sometimes saw their important contributions overshadowed by their male counterparts. Recent studies suggest that modern female scientists experience gender bias in matters such as conference invitations and even representation among full professors. In the field of halophilic microbiology, what is the impact of gender bias? How has the participation of women changed over time? What do women uniquely contribute to this field? What are factors that impact current female scientists to a greater degree? This essay emphasizes the herstory (not history of halophile discovery.

  13. Industrial and environmental applications of halophilic microorganisms.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oren, Aharon

    2010-01-01

    In comparison with the thermophilic and the alkaliphilic extremophiles, halophilic microorganisms have as yet found relatively few biotechnological applications. Halophiles are involved in centuries-old processes such as the manufacturing of solar salt from seawater and the production of traditional fermented foods. Two biotechnological processes involving halophiles are highly successful: the production of beta-carotene by the green alga Dunaliella and the production of ectoine (1,4,5,6-tetrahydro-2-methyl-4-pyrimidinecarboxylic acid), used as a stabilizer for enzymes and now also applied in cosmetic products, from moderately halophilic bacteria. The potential use of bacteriorhodopsin, the retinal protein proton pump of Halobacterium, in optoelectronic devices and photochemical processes is being explored, and may well lead to commercial applications in the near future. Demand for salt-tolerant enzymes in current manufacturing or related processes is limited. Other possible uses of halophilic microorganisms such as treatment of saline and hypersaline wastewaters, and the production of exopolysaccharides, poly-beta-hydroxyalkanoate bioplastics and biofuel are being investigated, but no large-scale applications have yet been reported.

  14. Purification and characterization of an extremely halophilic acetoacetyl-CoA thiolase from a newly isolated Halobacterium strain ZP-6.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Tiehan; Liu, Shuang-Jiang; Xue, Yanfen; Ma, Yanhe; Zhou, Peijin

    2002-04-01

    The extremely halophilic archaeon ZP-6 was isolated from Ai-Ding salt lake in Xinjiang Uighur Autonomous Region of the People's Republic of China. Based on its physiological properties, 16S rDNA sequence, and DNA-DNA homology with known haloarchaea, the isolate was tentatively identified as a Halobacterium sp. An acetoacetyl-CoA thiolase was purified and characterized from this organism. The native enzyme has a molecular mass of 80 +/- 8 kDa and consists of two identical subunits of 43 +/- 2 kDa each. The N-terminus 14 amino acid residues were sequenced and showed identity with the respective part of a putative thiolase (AcaB1) of Halobacterium sp. NRC-1. The purified enzyme has an optimal pH of 7.9 for acetoacetyl-CoA thiolysis. The thiolytic activity was inhibited by the presence of Mg'- and was stimulated by KCl or NaCl. The thiolysis reaction of Halobacterium sp. ZP-6 thiolase can be inhibited by either substrate when present in excess. The distinct kinetic profile indicates that the thiolase from Halobacterium sp. ZP-6 may have a different catalytic mechanism from the so-called ping-pong mechanism employed by other thiolases. To our knowledge, this is the first report of the purification and characterization of a halophilic thiolase from an archaeal species.

  15. Regulated polyploidy in halophilic archaea.

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    Sebastian Breuert

    Full Text Available Polyploidy is common in higher eukaryotes, especially in plants, but it is generally assumed that most prokaryotes contain a single copy of a circular chromosome and are therefore monoploid. We have used two independent methods to determine the genome copy number in halophilic archaea, 1 cell lysis in agarose blocks and Southern blot analysis, and 2 Real-Time quantitative PCR. Fast growing H. salinarum cells contain on average about 25 copies of the chromosome in exponential phase, and their ploidy is downregulated to 15 copies in early stationary phase. The chromosome copy number is identical in cultures with a twofold lower growth rate, in contrast to the results reported for several other prokaryotic species. Of three additional replicons of H. salinarum, two have a low copy number that is not growth-phase regulated, while one replicon even shows a higher degree of growth phase-dependent regulation than the main replicon. The genome copy number of H. volcanii is similarly high during exponential phase (on average 18 copies/cell, and it is also downregulated (to 10 copies as the cells enter stationary phase. The variation of genome copy numbers in the population was addressed by fluorescence microscopy and by FACS analysis. These methods allowed us to verify the growth phase-dependent regulation of ploidy in H. salinarum, and they revealed that there is a wide variation in genome copy numbers in individual cells that is much larger in exponential than in stationary phase. Our results indicate that polyploidy might be more widespread in archaea (or even prokaryotes in general than previously assumed. Moreover, the presence of so many genome copies in a prokaryote raises questions about the evolutionary significance of this strategy.

  16. Investigating the effects of simulated martian ultraviolet radiation on Halococcus dombrowskii and other extremely halophilic archaebacteria.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fendrihan, Sergiu; Bérces, Attila; Lammer, Helmut; Musso, Maurizio; Rontó, György; Polacsek, Tatjana K; Holzinger, Anita; Kolb, Christoph; Stan-Lotter, Helga

    2009-01-01

    The isolation of viable extremely halophilic archaea from 250-million-year-old rock salt suggests the possibility of their long-term survival under desiccation. Since halite has been found on Mars and in meteorites, haloarchaeal survival of martian surface conditions is being explored. Halococcus dombrowskii H4 DSM 14522(T) was exposed to UV doses over a wavelength range of 200-400 nm to simulate martian UV flux. Cells embedded in a thin layer of laboratory-grown halite were found to accumulate preferentially within fluid inclusions. Survival was assessed by staining with the LIVE/DEAD kit dyes, determining colony-forming units, and using growth tests. Halite-embedded cells showed no loss of viability after exposure to about 21 kJ/m(2), and they resumed growth in liquid medium with lag phases of 12 days or more after exposure up to 148 kJ/m(2). The estimated D(37) (dose of 37 % survival) for Hcc. dombrowskii was > or = 400 kJ/m(2). However, exposure of cells to UV flux while in liquid culture reduced D(37) by 2 orders of magnitude (to about 1 kJ/m(2)); similar results were obtained with Halobacterium salinarum NRC-1 and Haloarcula japonica. The absorption of incoming light of shorter wavelength by color centers resulting from defects in the halite crystal structure likely contributed to these results. Under natural conditions, haloarchaeal cells become embedded in salt upon evaporation; therefore, dispersal of potential microscopic life within small crystals, perhaps in dust, on the surface of Mars could resist damage by UV radiation.

  17. Isolation and characterization of extreme halophilic archaea

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    Franze, Madlen; Cherkouk, Andrea [Helmholtz-Zentrum Dresden-Rossendorf e.V., Dresden (Germany). HZDR Young Investigator Group

    2017-06-01

    Extreme halophilic archaea from the family Halobactereacea represent a dominant part of the microbial community present in saline soils as well as rock salts. By using a culture-dependent approach different Haloarchaea could be isolated and were phylogenetic analysed. Interestingly, isolates closely related to different Halobacterium spp. were found in both environments.

  18. Salt-bridge energetics in halophilic proteins.

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    Arnab Nayek

    Full Text Available Halophilic proteins have greater abundance of acidic over basic and very low bulky hydrophobic residues. Classical electrostatic stabilization was suggested as the key determinant for halophilic adaptation of protein. However, contribution of specific electrostatic interactions (i.e. salt-bridges to overall stability of halophilic proteins is yet to be understood. To understand this, we use Adaptive-Poison-Boltzmann-Solver Methods along with our home-built automation to workout net as well as associated component energy terms such as desolvation energy, bridge energy and background energy for 275 salt-bridges from 20 extremely halophilic proteins. We then perform extensive statistical analysis on general and energetic attributes on these salt-bridges. On average, 8 salt-bridges per 150 residues protein were observed which is almost twice than earlier report. Overall contributions of salt-bridges are -3.0 kcal mol-1. Majority (78% of salt-bridges in our dataset are stable and conserved in nature. Although, average contributions of component energy terms are equal, their individual details vary greatly from one another indicating their sensitivity to local micro-environment. Notably, 35% of salt-bridges in our database are buried and stable. Greater desolvation penalty of these buried salt-bridges are counteracted by stable network salt-bridges apart from favorable equal contributions of bridge and background terms. Recruitment of extensive network salt-bridges (46% with a net contribution of -5.0 kcal mol-1 per salt-bridge, seems to be a halophilic design wherein favorable average contribution of background term (-10 kcal mol-1 exceeds than that of bridge term (-7 kcal mol-1. Interiors of proteins from halophiles are seen to possess relatively higher abundance of charge and polar side chains than that of mesophiles which seems to be satisfied by cooperative network salt-bridges. Overall, our theoretical analyses provide insight into halophilic

  19. [Experimental interaction of halophilic prokaryotes and opportunistic bacteria in brine].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Selivanova, E A; Nemtseva, N V

    2013-01-01

    Study the effect of extremely halophilic archaea and moderately halophilic bacteria on preservation of opportunistic bacteria in brine. 17 strains of moderately halophilic bacteria and 2 strains of extremely halophilic archaea were isolated from continental hypersaline lake Razval of Sol-Iletsk area of Orenburg Region. Identification of pure cultures of prokaryotes was carried out taking into account their phenotype properties and based on determination of 16S RNA gene sequence. The effect of halophilic prokaryote on elimination of Escherichia coli from brine was evaluated during co-cultivation. Antagonistic activity of cell extracts of the studied microorganisms was evaluated by photometric method. A more prolonged preservation of an E. coli strain in brine in the presence of live cells of extremely halophilic archaea Halorubrum tebenquichense and moderately halophilic bacteria Marinococcus halophilus was established. Extracts of cells of extremely halophilic archaea and moderately halophilic bacteria on the contrary displayed antagonistic activity. The protective effect of live cells of halophilic prokaryotes and antagonistic activity of their cell extracts change the period of conservation of opportunistic bacteria in brine that regulates inter-microbial interactions and changes the period of self-purification that reflects the sanitary condition of a hypersaline water body.

  20. Engineering substrate promiscuity in halophilic alcohol dehydrogenase (HvADH2 by in silico design.

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    Jennifer Cassidy

    Full Text Available An alcohol dehydrogenase from the halophilic archaeon Haloferax volcanii (HvADH2 has been engineered by rational design to broaden its substrate scope towards the conversion of a range of aromatic substrates, including flurbiprofenol, that is an intermediate of the non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drug, flurbiprofen. Wild-type HvADH2 showed minimal activity with flurbiprofenol (11.1 mU/mg. A homology model of HvADH2 was built and docking experiments with this substrate revealed that the biphenyl rings of flurbiprofenol formed strong interactions with residues F85 and F108, preventing its optimal binding in the active site. Mutations at position 85 however did not increase activity. Site directed mutagenesis at position F108 allowed the identification of three variants showing a significant (up to 2.3-fold enhancement of activity towards flurbiprofenol, when compared to wild-type HvADH2. Interestingly, F108G variant did not show the classic inhibition in the presence of (R-enantiomer when tested with rac-1-phenylethanol, underling its potential in racemic resolution of secondary alcohols.

  1. Halophiles and their enzymes: negativity put to good use.

    Science.gov (United States)

    DasSarma, Shiladitya; DasSarma, Priya

    2015-06-01

    Halophilic microorganisms possess stable enzymes that function in very high salinity, an extreme condition that leads to denaturation, aggregation, and precipitation of most other proteins. Genomic and structural analyses have established that the enzymes of halophilic Archaea and many halophilic Bacteria are negatively charged due to an excess of acidic over basic residues, and altered hydrophobicity, which enhance solubility and promote function in low water activity conditions. Here, we provide an update on recent bioinformatic analysis of predicted halophilic proteomes as well as experimental molecular studies on individual halophilic enzymes. Recent efforts on discovery and utilization of halophiles and their enzymes for biotechnology, including biofuel applications are also considered. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  2. Evaluation of organophosphorus pesticide biodegradation by halophilic bacteria

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    Shokufeh Rafieyan

    2018-03-01

    Discussion and conclusion: Halophilic bacteria due to compatibility with the salty condition, can be a good option for the removal of organophosphorus pesticides in the contaminated salty environments.

  3. Alkaline thermostable and halophilic endoglucanase from Bacillus ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    An endoglucanase was purified from halophilic alkaline Bacillus licheniformis isolated from soils of Lake Van in Turkey. The optimal pH and temperature of the endoglucanase produced by B.licheniformis C108 were 10.0 and 30°C, respectively. The enzyme was highly stable up to 100°C at pH 10.0 and the enzyme ...

  4. Sugar transport in the thermoacidophilic archaeon Sulfolobus solfataricus

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Albers, Sonja-Verena

    2001-01-01

    Summary and concluding remarks Introduction The archaeon Sulfolobus solfataricus is a thermoacidophile preferring growth at around 80oC and a pH of 2.5 to 3.5. As a thermoacidophile S. solfataricus faces two major problems: firstly, the proton permeability of membranes increases with temperature

  5. Draft Genome Sequence of Halostagnicola sp. A56, an Extremely Halophilic Archaeon Isolated from the Andaman Islands

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kanekar, Sagar P.; Saxena, Neha; Pore, Soham D.; Arora, Preeti; Kanekar, P. P.

    2015-01-01

    The first draft genome of Halostagnicola sp. A56, isolated from the Andaman Islands is reported here. The A56 genome comprises 3,178,490 bp in 26 contigs with a G+C content of 60.8%. The genome annotation revealed that A56 could have potential applications for the production of polyhydroxyalkanoate or bioplastics. PMID:26564049

  6. Divalent metal ion-induced folding mechanism of RNase H1 from extreme halophilic archaeon Halobacterium sp. NRC-1.

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    Elias Tannous

    Full Text Available RNase H1 from Halobacterium sp. NRC-1 (Halo-RNase H1 is characterized by the abundance of acidic residues on the surface, including bi/quad-aspartate site residues. Halo-RNase H1 exists in partially folded (I and native (N states in low-salt and high-salt conditions respectively. Its folding is also induced by divalent metal ions. To understand this unique folding mechanism of Halo-RNase H1, the active site mutant (2A-RNase H1, the bi/quad-aspartate site mutant (6A-RNase H1, and the mutant at both sites (8A-RNase H1 were constructed. The far-UV CD spectra of these mutants suggest that 2A-RNase H1 mainly exists in the I state, 6A-RNase H1 exists both in the I and N states, and 8A-RNase H1 mainly exists in the N state in a low salt-condition. These results suggest that folding of Halo-RNase H1 is induced by binding of divalent metal ions to the bi/quad-aspartate site. To examine whether metal-induced folding is unique to Halo-RNase H1, RNase H2 from the same organism (Halo-RNase H2 was overproduced and purified. Halo-RNase H2 exists in the I and N states in low-salt and high-salt conditions respectively, as does Halo-RNase H1. However, this protein exists in the I state even in the presence of divalent metal ions. Halo-RNase H2 exhibits junction ribonuclease activity only in a high-salt condition. A tertiary model of this protein suggests that this protein does not have a quad-aspartate site. We propose that folding of Halo-RNase H1 is induced by binding of divalent metal ion to the quad-aspartate site in a low-salt condition.

  7. Salt-dependent properties of proteins from extremely halophilic bacteria

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lanyi, J. K.

    1974-01-01

    Based on information concerning the interaction of salts and macromolecules the literature of the enzymes of halophilic bacteria and their constituents is examined. Although in halophilic systems the salt requirement of enzyme activity is variable the enzymes investigated show a time-dependent inactivation at lower salt concentrations especially in the absence of salt. The studies described show that in some halophilic systems the effect of salt may be restricted to a small region on the protein molecule. The concept of the hydrophobic bond to consider certain solvent-dependent phenomena is introduced. It is shown that some halophilic enzymes are unable to maintain their structure without the involvement of hydrophobic interactions that are usually not supported by water. A table lists indices of hydrophobicity and polarity for various halophilic and nonhalophilic proteins.

  8. Systematic and biotechnological aspects of halophilic and halotolerant actinomycetes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hamedi, Javad; Mohammadipanah, Fatemeh; Ventosa, Antonio

    2013-01-01

    More than 70 species of halotolerant and halophilic actinomycetes belonging to at least 24 genera have been validly described. Halophilic actinomycetes are a less explored source of actinomycetes for discovery of novel bioactive secondary metabolites. Degradation of aliphatic and aromatic organic compounds, detoxification of pollutants, production of new enzymes and other metabolites such as antibiotics, compatible solutes and polymers are other potential industrial applications of halophilic and halotolerant actinomycetes. Especially new bioactive secondary metabolites that are derived from only a small fraction of the investigated halophilic actinomycetes, mainly from marine habitats, have revealed the huge capacity of this physiological group in production of new bioactive chemical entities. Combined high metabolic capacities of actinomycetes and unique features related to extremophilic nature of the halophilic actinomycetes have conferred on them an influential role for future biotechnological applications.

  9. True marine and halophilic anoxygenic phototrophic bacteria.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Imhoff, J F

    2001-10-01

    Anoxygenic phototrophic bacteria are widely distributed in marine sediments and shallow waters of the coastal zone, where they often form intensely colored mass developments. The phototrophic bacteria have adapted to the whole spectrum of salt concentrations, from freshwater to saturated brines, and it is apparent that individual species have adapted well to particular habitats and mineral salts compositions, both qualitatively and quantitatively. This adaptation is reflected not only in the demand for defined ranges of salt concentrations, but also in the phylogenetic relationships of these bacteria, as established by 16S rDNA sequences. Major phylogenetic branches of purple sulfur bacteria are represented by: (1) marine and extremely halophilic Ectothiorhodospiraceae, (2) truly marine and halophilic Chromatiaceae and (3) freshwater Chromatiaceae, some of which are tolerant to low salt concentrations and are successful competitors in brackish and marine habitats. Quite similarly, salt-dependent green sulfur bacteria form distinct phylogenetic lines. In addition, also among the phototrophic alpha-Proteobacteria (purple nonsulfur bacteria), distinct phylogenetic lines of salt-dependent species are recognized. Available data give rise to the assumption that salt concentrations of natural habitats are an important selective factor that determines the development of a selected range of phototrophic bacteria in an exclusive way. As a consequence, the salt responses of these bacteria are reflected in their phylogenetic relationships.

  10. Resistance of the Extreme Halophile Halobacterium sp. NRC-1 to Multiple Stresses

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gygli, Patrick E.; Prajapati, Surendra; DeVeaux, Linda C.; DasSarma, Shiladitya; DasSarma, Priya; Mestari, Mohammed Amine; Wells, Douglas P.

    2009-03-01

    The model Archaeon Halobacterium sp. NRC-1 is an extreme halophile known for its resistance to multiple stressors, including electron-beam and ultraviolet radiation. It is a well-developed system with a completely sequenced genome and extensive post-genomic tools for the study of a variety of biological processes. To further understand the mechanisms of Halobacterium's, radiation resistance, we previously reported the selection for multiple independent highly resistant mutants using repeated exposure to high doses of 18-20 MeV electrons using a medical S-band Linac. Molecular analysis of the transcriptional profile of several of these mutants revealed a single common change: upregulation of the rfa3 operon. These genes encode proteins homologous to the subunits of eukaryotic Replication Protein A (RPA), a DNA binding protein with major roles in DNA replication, recombination, and repair. This operon has also been implicated in a somewhat lesser role in resistance of wild type Halobacterium to ultraviolet radiation, suggesting common mechanisms for resistance. To further understand the mechanism of radiation resistance in the mutant strains, we measured the survival after exposure to both electron-beam and ultraviolet radiation, UV-A, B, and C All mutant strains showed increased resistance to electrons when compared with the parent. However, the mutant strains do not display increased UV resistance, and in one case is more sensitive than the parent strain. Thus, the protective role of increased RPA expression within a cell may be specific to the DNA damage caused by the different physical effects induced by high energy electron-beam radiation.

  11. Systems analysis of bioenergetics and growth of the extreme halophile Halobacterium salinarum.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Orland Gonzalez

    2009-04-01

    Full Text Available Halobacterium salinarum is a bioenergetically flexible, halophilic microorganism that can generate energy by respiration, photosynthesis, and the fermentation of arginine. In a previous study, using a genome-scale metabolic model, we have shown that the archaeon unexpectedly degrades essential amino acids under aerobic conditions, a behavior that can lead to the termination of growth earlier than necessary. Here, we further integratively investigate energy generation, nutrient utilization, and biomass production using an extended methodology that accounts for dynamically changing transport patterns, including those that arise from interactions among the supplied metabolites. Moreover, we widen the scope of our analysis to include phototrophic conditions to explore the interplay between different bioenergetic modes. Surprisingly, we found that cells also degrade essential amino acids even during phototropy, when energy should already be abundant. We also found that under both conditions considerable amounts of nutrients that were taken up were neither incorporated into the biomass nor used as respiratory substrates, implying the considerable production and accumulation of several metabolites in the medium. Some of these are likely the products of forms of overflow metabolism. In addition, our results also show that arginine fermentation, contrary to what is typically assumed, occurs simultaneously with respiration and photosynthesis and can contribute energy in levels that are comparable to the primary bioenergetic modes, if not more. These findings portray a picture that the organism takes an approach toward growth that favors the here and now, even at the cost of longer-term concerns. We believe that the seemingly "greedy" behavior exhibited actually consists of adaptations by the organism to its natural environments, where nutrients are not only irregularly available but may altogether be absent for extended periods that may span several years

  12. Response of Haloalkaliphilic Archaeon Natronococcus Jeotgali RR17 to Hypergravity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thombre, Rebecca S.; Bhalerao, Aniruddha R.; Shinde, Vinaya D.; Dhar, Sunil Kumar; Shouche, Yogesh S.

    2017-06-01

    The survival of archaeabacteria in extreme inhabitable environments on earth that challenge organismic survival is ubiquitously known. However, the studies related to the effect of hypergravity on the growth and proliferation of archaea are unprecedented. The survival of organisms in hypergravity and rocks in addition to resistance to cosmic radiations, pressure and other extremities is imperative to study the possibilities of microbial travel between planets and endurance in hyperaccelerative forces faced during ejection of rocks from planets. The current investigation highlights the growth of an extremophilic archaeon isolated from a rocky substrate in hypergravity environment. The haloalkaliphilic archaeon, Natronococcus jeotgali RR17 was isolated from an Indian laterite rock, submerged in the Arabian sea lining Coastal Maharashtra, India. The endolithic haloarchaeon was subjected to hypergravity from 56 - 893 X gusing acceleration generated by centrifugal rotation. The cells of N. jeotgali RR17 proliferated and demonstrated good growth in hypergravity (223 X g). This is the first report on isolation of endolithic haloarchaeon N. jeotgali RR17 from an Indian laterite rock and its ability to proliferate in hypergravity. The present study demonstrates the ability of microbial life to survive and proliferate in hypergravity. Thus the inability of organismic growth in hypergravity may no longer be a limitation for astrobiology studies related to habitability of substellar objects, brown dwarfs and other planetary bodies in the universe besides planet earth.

  13. Bioprospecting Archaea: Focus on Extreme Halophiles

    KAUST Repository

    Antunes, André

    2016-12-12

    In 1990, Woese et al. divided the Tree of Life into three separate domains: Eukarya, Bacteria, and Archaea. Archaea were originally perceived as little more than “odd bacteria” restricted to extreme environmental niches, but later discoveries challenged this assumption. Members of this domain populate a variety of unexpected environments (e.g. soils, seawater, and human bodies), and we currently witness ongoing massive expansions of the archaeal branch of the Tree of Life. Archaea are now recognized as major players in the biosphere and constitute a significant fraction of the earth’s biomass, yet they remain underexplored. An ongoing surge in exploration efforts is leading to an increase in the (a) number of isolated strains, (b) associated knowledge, and (c) utilization of Archaea in biotechnology. They are increasingly employed in fields as diverse as biocatalysis, biocomputing, bioplastic production, bioremediation, bioengineering, food, pharmaceuticals, and nutraceuticals. This chapter provides a general overview on bioprospecting Archaea, with a particular focus on extreme halophiles. We explore aspects such as diversity, ecology, screening techniques and biotechnology. Current and future trends in mining for applications are discussed.

  14. Identification and molecular characterization of the first alpha -xylosidase from an archaeon

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Moracci, M; Cobucci Ponzano, B; Trincone, A; Fusco, S; De Rosa, M; van Der Oost, J; Sensen, C W; Charlebois, R L; Rossi, M

    2000-01-01

    We here report the first molecular characterization of an alpha-xylosidase (XylS) from an Archaeon. Sulfolobus solfataricus is able to grow at temperatures higher than 80 degrees C on several carbohydrates at acidic pH...

  15. Purification, crystallization and preliminary crytallographic analysis of phosphoglucose isomerase from the hyperthermophilic archaeon Pyrococcus furiosus

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Akerboom, A.P.; Turnbull, A.P.; Hargreaves, D.; Fischer, M.; Geus, de D.; Sedelnikova, S.E.; Berrisford, J.M.; Baker, P.J.; Verhees, C.H.; Oost, van der J.; Rice, D.W.

    2003-01-01

    The glycolytic enzyme phosphoglucose isomerase catalyses the reversible isomerization of glucose 6-phosphate to fructose 6-phosphate. The phosphoglucose isomerase from the hyperthermophilic archaeon Pyrococcus furiosus, which shows no sequence similarity to any known bacterial or eukaryotic

  16. Support vector machine with a Pearson VII function kernel for discriminating halophilic and non-halophilic proteins.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Guangya; Ge, Huihua

    2013-10-01

    Understanding of proteins adaptive to hypersaline environment and identifying them is a challenging task and would help to design stable proteins. Here, we have systematically analyzed the normalized amino acid compositions of 2121 halophilic and 2400 non-halophilic proteins. The results showed that halophilic protein contained more Asp at the expense of Lys, Ile, Cys and Met, fewer small and hydrophobic residues, and showed a large excess of acidic over basic amino acids. Then, we introduce a support vector machine method to discriminate the halophilic and non-halophilic proteins, by using a novel Pearson VII universal function based kernel. In the three validation check methods, it achieved an overall accuracy of 97.7%, 91.7% and 86.9% and outperformed other machine learning algorithms. We also address the influence of protein size on prediction accuracy and found the worse performance for small size proteins might be some significant residues (Cys and Lys) were missing in the proteins. Copyright © 2013 The Authors. Published by Elsevier Ltd.. All rights reserved.

  17. Culturable diversity of halophilic bacteria in foreshore soils

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Aarzoo Irshad

    2014-06-01

    Full Text Available Halophilic bacteria are commonly found in natural environments containing significant concentration of NaCl such as inland salt lakes and evaporated sea-shore pools, as well as environments such as curing brines, salted food products and saline soils. Dependence on salt is an important phenotypic characteristic of halophilic bacteria, which can be used in the polyphasic characterization of newly discovered microorganisms. In this study the diversity of halophilic bacteria in foreshore soils of Daecheon, Chungnam, and Saemangeum, Jeonbuk, was investigated. Two types of media, namely NA and R2A supplemented with 3%, 5%, 9%, 15%, 20% and 30% NaCl were used. More than 200 halophilic bacteria were isolated and BOX-PCR fingerprinting analysis was done for the typing of the isolates. The BLAST identification results showed that isolated strains were composed of 4 phyla, Firmicutes (60%, Proteobacteria (31%, Bacteriodetes (5% and Actinobacteria (4%. Isolates were affiliated with 16 genera and 36 species. Bacillus was the dominant genus in the phylum Firmicutes, comprising 24% of the total isolates. Halomonas (12% and Shewanella (12% were also found as the main genera. These findings show that the foreshore soil of Daecheon Beach and Saemangeum Sea of Korea represents an untapped source of bacterial biodiversity.

  18. Biomineralization of carbonate and phosphate by moderately halophilic bacteria

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Sánchez-Román, Mónica; Rivadeneyra, Maria A.; Vasconcelos, Crisogono; McKenzie, Judith A.

    We investigated the precipitation of carbonate and phosphate minerals by 19 species of moderately halophilic bacteria using media with variable Mg 2+/Ca2+ ratios. The precipitated minerals were calcite, magnesium (Mg) calcite, and struvite (MgNH4PO4· 6H2O) in variable proportions depending on the

  19. Generation of PHB from Spent Sulfite Liquor Using Halophilic Microorganisms

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Michaela Weissgram

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available Halophilic microorganisms thrive at elevated concentrations of sodium chloride up to saturation and are capable of growing on a wide variety of carbon sources like various organic acids, hexose and also pentose sugars. Hence, the biotechnological application of these microorganisms can cover many aspects, such as the treatment of hypersaline waste streams of different origin. Due to the fact that the high osmotic pressure of hypersaline environments reduces the risk of contamination, the capacity for cost-effective non-sterile cultivation can make extreme halophilic microorganisms potentially valuable organisms for biotechnological applications. In this contribution, the stepwise use of screening approaches, employing design of experiment (DoE on model media and subsequently using industrial waste as substrate have been implemented to investigate the applicability of halophiles to generate PHB from the industrial waste stream spent sulfite liquor (SSL. The production of PHB on model media as well as dilutions of industrial substrate in a complex medium has been screened for by fluorescence microscopy using Nile Blue staining. Screening was used to investigate the ability of halophilic microorganisms to withstand the inhibiting substances of the waste stream without negatively affecting PHB production. It could be shown that neither single inhibiting substances nor a mixture thereof inhibited growth in the investigated range, hence, leaving the question on the inhibiting mechanisms open. However, it could be demonstrated that some haloarchaea and halophilic bacteria are able to produce PHB when cultivated on 3.3% w/w dry matter spent sulfite liquor, whereas H. halophila was even able to thrive on 6.6% w/w dry matter spent sulfite liquor and still produce PHB.

  20. Halophilic Bacteria as a Source of Novel Hydrolytic Enzymes

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    Encarnación Mellado

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Hydrolases constitute a class of enzymes widely distributed in nature from bacteria to higher eukaryotes. The halotolerance of many enzymes derived from halophilic bacteria can be exploited wherever enzymatic transformations are required to function under physical and chemical conditions, such as in the presence of organic solvents and extremes in temperature and salt content. In recent years, different screening programs have been performed in saline habitats in order to isolate and characterize novel enzymatic activities with different properties to those of conventional enzymes. Several halophilic hydrolases have been described, including amylases, lipases and proteases, and then used for biotechnological applications. Moreover, the discovery of biopolymer-degrading enzymes offers a new solution for the treatment of oilfield waste, where high temperature and salinity are typically found, while providing valuable information about heterotrophic processes in saline environments. In this work, we describe the results obtained in different screening programs specially focused on the diversity of halophiles showing hydrolytic activities in saline and hypersaline habitats, including the description of enzymes with special biochemical properties. The intracellular lipolytic enzyme LipBL, produced by the moderately halophilic bacterium Marinobacter lipolyticus, showed advantages over other lipases, being an enzyme active over a wide range of pH values and temperatures. The immobilized LipBL derivatives obtained and tested in regio- and enantioselective reactions, showed an excellent behavior in the production of free polyunsaturated fatty acids (PUFAs. On the other hand, the extremely halophilic bacterium, Salicola marasensis sp. IC10 showing lipase and protease activities, was studied for its ability to produce promising enzymes in terms of its resistance to temperature and salinity.

  1. Biological control of grey mould in strawberry fruits by halophilic bacteria

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Essghaier, B; Fardeau, M L; Cayol, J L; Hajlaoui, M R; Boudabous, A; Jijakli, H; Sadfi-Zouaoui, N

    2009-01-01

    .... The aim of this study was to select effective halophilic bacteria from hypersaline ecosystems and evaluate the abilities of antifungal bacteria to secrete extracellular hydrolytic enzymes, anti...

  2. Metabolic reconstruction of the archaeon methanogen Methanosarcina Acetivorans

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Maranas Costas D

    2011-02-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Methanogens are ancient organisms that are key players in the carbon cycle accounting for about one billion tones of biological methane produced annually. Methanosarcina acetivorans, with a genome size of ~5.7 mb, is the largest sequenced archaeon methanogen and unique amongst the methanogens in its biochemical characteristics. By following a systematic workflow we reconstruct a genome-scale metabolic model for M. acetivorans. This process relies on previously developed computational tools developed in our group to correct growth prediction inconsistencies with in vivo data sets and rectify topological inconsistencies in the model. Results The generated model iVS941 accounts for 941 genes, 705 reactions and 708 metabolites. The model achieves 93.3% prediction agreement with in vivo growth data across different substrates and multiple gene deletions. The model also correctly recapitulates metabolic pathway usage patterns of M. acetivorans such as the indispensability of flux through methanogenesis for growth on acetate and methanol and the unique biochemical characteristics under growth on carbon monoxide. Conclusions Based on the size of the genome-scale metabolic reconstruction and extent of validated predictions this model represents the most comprehensive up-to-date effort to catalogue methanogenic metabolism. The reconstructed model is available in spreadsheet and SBML formats to enable dissemination.

  3. Single gene insertion drives bioalcohol production by a thermophilic archaeon

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Basen, M; Schut, GJ; Nguyen, DM; Lipscomb, GL; Benn, RA; Prybol, CJ; Vaccaro, BJ; Poole, FL; Kelly, RM; Adams, MWW

    2014-12-09

    Bioethanol production is achieved by only two metabolic pathways and only at moderate temperatures. Herein a fundamentally different synthetic pathway for bioalcohol production at 70 degrees C was constructed by insertion of the gene for bacterial alcohol dehydrogenase (AdhA) into the archaeon Pyrococcus furiosus. The engineered strain converted glucose to ethanol via acetate and acetaldehyde, catalyzed by the host-encoded aldehyde ferredoxin oxidoreductase (AOR) and heterologously expressed AdhA, in an energy-conserving, redox-balanced pathway. Furthermore, the AOR/AdhA pathway also converted exogenously added aliphatic and aromatic carboxylic acids to the corresponding alcohol using glucose, pyruvate, and/or hydrogen as the source of reductant. By heterologous coexpression of a membrane-bound carbon monoxide dehydrogenase, CO was used as a reductant for converting carboxylic acids to alcohols. Redirecting the fermentative metabolism of P. furiosus through strategic insertion of foreign genes creates unprecedented opportunities for thermophilic bioalcohol production. Moreover, the AOR/AdhA pathway is a potentially game-changing strategy for syngas fermentation, especially in combination with carbon chain elongation pathways.

  4. Methanohalophilus zhilinae sp. nov., an alkaliphilic, halophilic, methylotrophic methanogen

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mathrani, I. M.; Boone, D. R.; Mah, R. A.; Fox, G. E.; Lau, P. P.

    1988-01-01

    Methanohalophilus zhilinae, a new alkaliphilic, halophilic, methylotrophic species of methanogenic bacteria, is described. Strain WeN5T (T = type strain) from Bosa Lake of the Wadi el Natrun in Egypt was designated the type strain and was further characterized. This strain was nonmotile, able to catabolize dimethylsulfide, and able to grow in medium with a methyl group-containing substrate (such as methanol or trimethylamine) as the sole organic compound added. Sulfide (21 mM) inhibited cultures growing on trimethylamine. The antibiotic susceptibility pattern of strain WeN5T was typical of the pattern for archaeobacteria, and the guanine-plus-cytosine content of the deoxyribonucleic acid was 38 mol%. Characterization of the 16S ribosomal ribonucleic acid sequence indicated that strain WeN5T is phylogenetically distinct from members of previously described genera other than Methanohalophilus and supported the partition of halophilic methanogens into their own genus.

  5. Draft genome sequence of sulfur-reducing archaeon Thermococcus thioreducens DSM 14981T

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sung-Jun Hong

    Full Text Available Abstract Thermococcus thioreducens DSM 14981T, a sulfur-reducing archaeon, was isolated from the rainbow hydrothermal vent site on the Mid-Atlantic Ridge. Herein, we report the draft genome sequence of T. thioreducens DSM 14981T; we obtained 41 contigs with a genome size of 2,052,483 bp and G + C content of 53.5%. This genome sequence will not only help understand how the archaeon adapts to the deep-sea hydrothermal environment but also aid the development of enzymes that are highly stable under extreme conditions for industrial applications.

  6. The nif Gene Operon of the Methanogenic Archaeon Methanococcus maripaludis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kessler, Peter S.; Blank, Carrine; Leigh, John A.

    1998-01-01

    Nitrogen fixation occurs in two domains, Archaea and Bacteria. We have characterized a nif (nitrogen fixation) gene cluster in the methanogenic archaeon Methanococcus maripaludis. Sequence analysis revealed eight genes, six with sequence similarity to known nif genes and two with sequence similarity to glnB. The gene order, nifH, ORF105 (similar to glnB), ORF121 (similar to glnB), nifD, nifK, nifE, nifN, and nifX, was the same as that found in part in other diazotrophic methanogens and except for the presence of the glnB-like genes, also resembled the order found in many members of the Bacteria. Using transposon insertion mutagenesis, we determined that an 8-kb region required for nitrogen fixation corresponded to the nif gene cluster. Northern analysis revealed the presence of either a single 7.6-kb nif mRNA transcript or 10 smaller mRNA species containing portions of the large transcript. Polar effects of transposon insertions demonstrated that all of these mRNAs arose from a single promoter region, where transcription initiated 80 bp 5′ to nifH. Distinctive features of the nif gene cluster include the presence of the six primary nif genes in a single operon, the placement of the two glnB-like genes within the cluster, the apparent physical separation of the cluster from any other nif genes that might be in the genome, the fragmentation pattern of the mRNA, and the regulation of expression by a repression mechanism described previously. Our study and others with methanogenic archaea reporting multiple mRNAs arising from gene clusters with only a single putative promoter sequence suggest that mRNA processing following transcription may be a common occurrence in methanogens. PMID:9515920

  7. Formate hydrogenlyase in the hyperthermophilic archaeon, Thermococcus litoralis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rákhely Gábor

    2008-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Thermococcus litoralis is a heterotrophic facultative sulfur dependent hyperthermophilic Archaeon, which was isolated from a shallow submarine thermal spring. It has been successfully used in a two-stage fermentation system, where various keratinaceous wastes of animal origin were converted to biohydrogen. In this system T. litoralis performed better than its close relative, P. furiosus. Therefore, new alternative enzymes involved in peptide and hydrogen metabolism were assumed in T. litoralis. Results An about 10.5 kb long genomic region was isolated and sequenced from Thermococcus litoralis. In silico analysis revealed that the region contained a putative operon consisting of eight genes: the fdhAB genes coding for a formate dehydrogenase and the mhyCDEFGH genes encoding a [NiFe] hydrogenase belonging to the group of the H2-evolving, energy-conserving, membrane-bound hydrogenases. Reverse transcription linked quantitative Real-Time PCR and Western blotting experiments showed that the expression of the fdh-mhy operon was up-regulated during fermentative growth on peptides and down-regulated in cells cultivated in the presence of sulfur. Immunoblotting and protein separation experiments performed on cell fractions indicated that the formate dehydrogenase part of the complex is associated to the membrane-bound [NiFe] hydrogenase. Conclusion The formate dehydrogenase together with the membrane-bound [NiFe] hydrogenase formed a formate hydrogenlyase (formate dehydrogenase coupled hydrogenase, FDH-MHY complex. The expression data suggested that its physiological role is linked to the removal of formate likely generated during anaerobic peptide fermentation.

  8. Formate hydrogenlyase in the hyperthermophilic archaeon, Thermococcus litoralis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Takács, Mária; Tóth, András; Bogos, Balázs; Varga, András; Rákhely, Gábor; Kovács, Kornél L

    2008-01-01

    Background Thermococcus litoralis is a heterotrophic facultative sulfur dependent hyperthermophilic Archaeon, which was isolated from a shallow submarine thermal spring. It has been successfully used in a two-stage fermentation system, where various keratinaceous wastes of animal origin were converted to biohydrogen. In this system T. litoralis performed better than its close relative, P. furiosus. Therefore, new alternative enzymes involved in peptide and hydrogen metabolism were assumed in T. litoralis. Results An about 10.5 kb long genomic region was isolated and sequenced from Thermococcus litoralis. In silico analysis revealed that the region contained a putative operon consisting of eight genes: the fdhAB genes coding for a formate dehydrogenase and the mhyCDEFGH genes encoding a [NiFe] hydrogenase belonging to the group of the H2-evolving, energy-conserving, membrane-bound hydrogenases. Reverse transcription linked quantitative Real-Time PCR and Western blotting experiments showed that the expression of the fdh-mhy operon was up-regulated during fermentative growth on peptides and down-regulated in cells cultivated in the presence of sulfur. Immunoblotting and protein separation experiments performed on cell fractions indicated that the formate dehydrogenase part of the complex is associated to the membrane-bound [NiFe] hydrogenase. Conclusion The formate dehydrogenase together with the membrane-bound [NiFe] hydrogenase formed a formate hydrogenlyase (formate dehydrogenase coupled hydrogenase, FDH-MHY) complex. The expression data suggested that its physiological role is linked to the removal of formate likely generated during anaerobic peptide fermentation. PMID:18522724

  9. Draft Genome Sequence of the Moderately Halophilic Bacterium Marinobacter lipolyticus Strain SM19

    Science.gov (United States)

    Papke, R. Thane; de la Haba, Rafael R.; Infante-Domínguez, Carmen; Pérez, Dolores; Sánchez-Porro, Cristina; Lapierre, Pascal

    2013-01-01

    Marinobacter lipolyticus strain SM19, isolated from saline soil in Spain, is a moderately halophilic bacterium belonging to the class Gammaproteobacteria. Here, we report the draft genome sequence of this strain, which consists of a 4.0-Mb chromosome and which is able to produce the halophilic enzyme lipase LipBL. PMID:23814106

  10. Draft Genome Sequence of the Moderately Halophilic Bacterium Marinobacter lipolyticus Strain SM19.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Papke, R Thane; de la Haba, Rafael R; Infante-Domínguez, Carmen; Pérez, Dolores; Sánchez-Porro, Cristina; Lapierre, Pascal; Ventosa, Antonio

    2013-06-27

    Marinobacter lipolyticus strain SM19, isolated from saline soil in Spain, is a moderately halophilic bacterium belonging to the class Gammaproteobacteria. Here, we report the draft genome sequence of this strain, which consists of a 4.0-Mb chromosome and which is able to produce the halophilic enzyme lipase LipBL.

  11. Genome Sequence of a Hyperthermophilic Archaeon, Thermococcus nautili 30-1, That Produces Viral Vesicles.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oberto, Jacques; Gaudin, Marie; Cossu, Matteo; Gorlas, Aurore; Slesarev, Alexeï; Marguet, Evelyne; Forterre, Patrick

    2014-03-27

    Thermococcus nautili 30-1 (formerly Thermococcus nautilus), an anaerobic hyperthermophilic marine archaeon, was isolated in 1999 from a deep-sea hydrothermal vent during the Amistad campaign. Here, we present the complete sequence of T. nautili, which is able to produce membrane vesicles containing plasmid DNA. This property makes T. nautili a model organism to study horizontal gene transfer.

  12. THE HALOPHILICITY OF FILAMENTOUS FUNGI ISOLATED FROM SALINE SOILS OF SOUTH CAUCASUS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kvesitadze E.

    2015-08-01

    Full Text Available The work is devoted to the isolation, purification, determination of taxonomical characteristics and application in soil improvement and other biotechnological processes halophilic microscopic fungi strains isolated from saline soils of Eastern Georgia (middle part of South Caucasus, where their existence is maximally supposed. In all soilclimatic zones the dominate forms of spread fungi are genera Aspergillus, Penicillium and Fusarium, followed by Trichoderma and Mucor. Other genera are met less intensively. The genera Aspergillus is widely spread in chestnut soils and in chernozem, in green forest soils the genera Penicillium is prevailing. The salinity of soil, lake or any other objects from which the isolation of microscopic fungi is performed greatly determines halophilisity of isolated strains. Finally, the collection of halophilic microscopic fungi has been created accounting 96 isolates of extreme halophiles, halophiles and week halophiles.

  13. Genetic and transcriptomic analysis of transcription factor genes in the model halophilic Archaeon: coordinate action of TbpD and TfbA

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    DasSarma Shiladitya

    2007-09-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Archaea are prokaryotic organisms with simplified versions of eukaryotic transcription systems. Genes coding for the general transcription factors TBP and TFB are present in multiple copies in several Archaea, including Halobacterium sp. NRC-1. Multiple TBP and TFBs have been proposed to participate in transcription of genes via recognition and recruitment of RNA polymerase to different classes of promoters. Results We attempted to knock out all six TBP and seven TFB genes in Halobacterium sp. NRC-1 using the ura3-based gene deletion system. Knockouts were obtained for six out of thirteen genes, tbpCDF and tfbACG, indicating that they are not essential for cell viability under standard conditions. Screening of a population of 1,000 candidate mutants showed that genes which did not yield mutants contained less that 0.1% knockouts, strongly suggesting that they are essential. The transcriptomes of two mutants, ΔtbpD and ΔtfbA, were compared to the parental strain and showed coordinate down regulation of many genes. Over 500 out of 2,677 total genes were regulated in the ΔtbpD and ΔtfbA mutants with 363 regulated in both, indicating that over 10% of genes in both strains require the action of both TbpD and TfbA for normal transcription. Culturing studies on the ΔtbpD and ΔtfbA mutant strains showed them to grow more slowly than the wild-type at an elevated temperature, 49°C, and they showed reduced viability at 56°C, suggesting TbpD and TfbA are involved in the heat shock response. Alignment of TBP and TFB protein sequences suggested the expansion of the TBP gene family, especially in Halobacterium sp. NRC-1, and TFB gene family in representatives of five different genera of haloarchaea in which genome sequences are available. Conclusion Six of thirteen TBP and TFB genes of Halobacterium sp. NRC-1 are non-essential under standard growth conditions. TbpD and TfbA coordinate the expression of over 10% of the genes in the NRC-1 genome. The ΔtbpD and ΔtfbA mutant strains are temperature sensitive, possibly as a result of down regulation of heat shock genes. Sequence alignments suggest the existence of several families of TBP and TFB transcription factors in Halobacterium which may function in transcription of different classes of genes.

  14. Succinyl-CoA:Mesaconate CoA-Transferase and Mesaconyl-CoA Hydratase, Enzymes of the Methylaspartate Cycle in Haloarcula hispanica

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Farshad Borjian

    2017-09-01

    Full Text Available Growth on acetate or other acetyl-CoA-generating substrates as a sole source of carbon requires an anaplerotic pathway for the conversion of acetyl-CoA into cellular building blocks. Haloarchaea (class Halobacteria possess two different anaplerotic pathways, the classical glyoxylate cycle and the novel methylaspartate cycle. The methylaspartate cycle was discovered in Haloarcula spp. and operates in ∼40% of sequenced haloarchaea. In this cycle, condensation of one molecule of acetyl-CoA with oxaloacetate gives rise to citrate, which is further converted to 2-oxoglutarate and then to glutamate. The following glutamate rearrangement and deamination lead to mesaconate (methylfumarate that needs to be activated to mesaconyl-C1-CoA and hydrated to β-methylmalyl-CoA. The cleavage of β-methylmalyl-CoA results in the formation of propionyl-CoA and glyoxylate. The carboxylation of propionyl-CoA and the condensation of glyoxylate with another acetyl-CoA molecule give rise to two C4-dicarboxylic acids, thus regenerating the initial acetyl-CoA acceptor and forming malate, its final product. Here we studied two enzymes of the methylaspartate cycle from Haloarcula hispanica, succinyl-CoA:mesaconate CoA-transferase (mesaconate CoA-transferase, Hah_1336 and mesaconyl-CoA hydratase (Hah_1340. Their genes were heterologously expressed in Haloferax volcanii, and the corresponding enzymes were purified and characterized. Mesaconate CoA-transferase was specific for its physiological substrates, mesaconate and succinyl-CoA, and produced only mesaconyl-C1-CoA and no mesaconyl-C4-CoA. Mesaconyl-CoA hydratase had a 3.5-fold bias for the physiological substrate, mesaconyl-C1-CoA, compared to mesaconyl-C4-CoA, and virtually no activity with other tested enoyl-CoA/3-hydroxyacyl-CoA compounds. Our results further prove the functioning of the methylaspartate cycle in haloarchaea and suggest that mesaconate CoA-transferase and mesaconyl-CoA hydratase can be regarded as

  15. Useful halophilic, thermostable and ionic liquids tolerant cellulases

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zhang, Tao; Datta, Supratim; Simmons, Blake A.; Rubin, Edward M.

    2016-06-28

    The present invention provides for an isolated or recombinant polypeptide comprising an amino acid sequence having at least 70% identity with the amino acid sequence of a Halorhabdus utahensis cellulase, such as Hu-CBH1, wherein said amino acid sequence has a halophilic thermostable and/or thermophilic cellobiohydrolase (CBH) activity. In some embodiments, the polypeptide has a CBH activity that is resistant to up to about 20% of ionic liquids. The present invention also provides for compositions comprising and methods using the isolated or recombinant polypeptide.

  16. Halophiles as a source of polyextremophilic α-amylase for industrial applications

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sumit Kumar

    2016-02-01

    Full Text Available Halophiles are perceived as an excellent source of novel enzymes possessing inherent ability to function under saline and hypersaline environment conditions. The article covers and puts in perspective the structural and biocatalytic features of α-amylases from halophilic sources. The choice of α-amylase as the target enzyme is based on the fact that this is among the largest selling enzymes. Oligosaccharide synthesis is favored in presence of organic solvents and at high temperature. For this reason, the demand for α-amylases that are functional at high temperature and salt as well as stable towards organic solvents, is on the rise in recent years. Halophilic α-amylases are deemed to possess all the above characteristics. They are generally salt stable. In terms of water activity, saline environments are similar to non-aqueous systems. Therefore halophilic α-amylases also exhibit stability in organic solvents. In this context, the review encompasses α-amylase producing predominant halophilic microorganisms from saline habitats; strategies adopted for purification of halophilic α-amylase; their salient structural features and unique functional characteristics. Halophilic α-amylase applications and future aspects in research are also analyzed.

  17. An experimental point of view on hydration/solvation in halophilic proteins

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Romain eTalon

    2014-02-01

    Full Text Available Protein-solvent interactions govern the behaviour of proteins isolated from extreme halophiles. In this work, we compared the solvent envelopes of two orthologous tetrameric malate dehydrogenases from halophilic and non-halophilic bacteria. The crystal structure of the malate dehydrogenase from the non-halophilic bacterium Chloroflexus aurantiacus (Ca MalDH solved, de novo, at 1.7 Å resolution exhibits numerous water molecules in its solvation shell. We observed that a large number of these water molecules are arranged in pentagonal polygons in the first hydration shell of Ca MalDH. Some of them are clustered in large networks, which cover non-polar amino acid surface. The crystal structure of malate dehydrogenase from the extreme halophilic bacterium Salinibacter ruber (Sr solved at 1.55 Å resolution shows that its surface is strongly enriched in acidic amino acids. The structural comparison of these two models is the first direct observation of the relative impact of acidic surface enrichment on the water structure organisation between a halophilic protein and its non-adapted counterpart. The data show that surface acidic amino acids disrupt pentagonal water networks in the hydration shell. These crystallographic observations are discussed with respect to halophilic protein behaviour in solution

  18. The Structures of Antibiotics Bound to the E Site Region of the 50 S Ribosomal Subunit of Haloarcula marismortui: 13-Deoxytedanolide and Girodazole

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Schroeder,S.; Blaha, G.; Tirado-Rives, J.; Steitz, T.; Moore, P.

    2007-01-01

    Crystal structures of the 50 S ribosomal subunit from Haloarcula marismortui complexed with two antibiotics have identified new sites at which antibiotics interact with the ribosome and inhibit protein synthesis. 13-Deoxytedanolide binds to the E site of the 50 S subunit at the same location as the CCA of tRNA, and thus appears to inhibit protein synthesis by competing with deacylated tRNAs for E site binding. Girodazole binds near the E site region, but is somewhat buried and may inhibit tRNA binding by interfering with conformational changes that occur at the E site. The specificity of 13-deoxytedanolide for eukaryotic ribosomes is explained by its extensive interactions with protein L44e, which is an E site component of archaeal and eukaryotic ribosomes, but not of eubacterial ribosomes. In addition, protein L28, which is unique to the eubacterial E site, overlaps the site occupied by 13-deoxytedanolide, precluding its binding to eubacterial ribosomes. Girodazole is specific for eukarytes and archaea because it makes interactions with L15 that are not possible in eubacteria.

  19. On the Response of Halophilic Archaea to Space Conditions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Stefan Leuko

    2014-02-01

    Full Text Available Microorganisms are ubiquitous and can be found in almost every habitat and ecological niche on Earth. They thrive and survive in a broad spectrum of environments and adapt to rapidly changing external conditions. It is of great interest to investigate how microbes adapt to different extreme environments and with modern human space travel, we added a new extreme environment: outer space. Within the last 50 years, technology has provided tools for transporting microbial life beyond Earth’s protective shield in order to study in situ responses to selected conditions of space. This review will focus on halophilic archaea, as, due to their ability to survive in extremes, they are often considered a model group of organisms to study responses to the harsh conditions associated with space. We discuss ground-based simulations, as well as space experiments, utilizing archaea, examining responses and/or resistance to the effects of microgravity and UV in particular. Several halophilic archaea (e.g., Halorubrum chaoviator have been exposed to simulated and actual space conditions and their survival has been determined as well as the protective effects of halite shown. Finally, the intriguing potential of archaea to survive on other planets or embedded in a meteorite is postulated.

  20. Purification and characterization of a proteasome from the hyperthermophilic archaeon pyrococcus furiosus

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bauer, M.W.; Bauer, S.H.; Kelly, R.M. [North Carolina State Univ., Raleigh, NC (United States)

    1997-03-01

    A 640-kDa proteasome consisting of {alpha} (25-kDa) and {beta} (22-kDa) subunits, and with a temperature optimum of 95{degrees}C, was purified from crude cell extracts of a hyperthermophilic archaeon, Pyrococcus furiosus. Although this is the fourth member of the kingdom Euryarchaeota (and the first hyperthermophile) found to contain a proteasome, none has been identified among the members of the kingdom Crenarchaeota. 38 refs., 5 figs., 2 tabs.

  1. Membrane homeoviscous adaptation in the piezo-hyperthermophilic archaeon Thermococcus barophilus

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Anaïs eCario

    2015-10-01

    Full Text Available The archaeon Thermococcus barophilus, one of the most extreme members of hyperthermophilic piezophiles known thus far, is able to grow at temperatures up to 103°C and pressures up to 80MPa. We analyzed the membrane lipids of T. barophilus by HPLC-MS as a function of pressure and temperature. In contrast to previous reports, we show that under optimal growth conditions (40 MPa, 85°C the membrane spanning tetraether lipid GDGT-0 (sometimes called caldarchaeol is a major membrane lipid of T. barophilus together with archaeol. Increasing pressure and decreasing temperature lead to an increase of the proportion of archaeol and, reversely, a higher proportion of GDGT-0 is observed under low pressure and high temperature conditions. Noticeably, pressure and temperature fluctuations also impact the level of unsaturation of non-polar lipids with an irregular polyisoprenoid carbon skeleton (polyunsaturated lycopane derivatives, suggesting a structural role for these neutral lipids in the membrane of T. barophilus. Whether these apolar lipids insert in the membrane or not remains to be addressed. However, our results raise questions about the structure of the membrane in this archaeon and other archaeon harboring a mixture of di- and tetraether lipids.

  2. Biological control of grey mould in strawberry fruits by halophilic bacteria

    OpenAIRE

    Essghaier, B.; Fardeau, Marie-Laure; Cayol, Jean-Luc; Hajlaoui, M. R.; Boudabous, A.; Jijakli, H.; Sadfi Zouaoui, N.

    2009-01-01

    Grey mould caused by Botrytis cinerea is an economically important disease of strawberries in Tunisia and worldwide. The aim of this study was to select effective halophilic bacteria from hypersaline ecosystems and evaluate the abilities of antifungal bacteria to secrete extracellular hydrolytic enzymes, anti-Botrytis metabolites and volatiles. Grey mould was reduced in strawberry fruits treated with halophilic antagonists and artificially inoculated with B. cinerea. Thirty strains (20.2%) we...

  3. Structural basis for the aminoacid composition of proteins from halophilic archea.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xavier Tadeo

    2009-12-01

    Full Text Available Proteins from halophilic organisms, which live in extreme saline conditions, have evolved to remain folded at very high ionic strengths. The surfaces of halophilic proteins show a biased amino acid composition with a high prevalence of aspartic and glutamic acids, a low frequency of lysine, and a high occurrence of amino acids with a low hydrophobic character. Using extensive mutational studies on the protein surfaces, we show that it is possible to decrease the salt dependence of a typical halophilic protein to the level of a mesophilic form and engineer a protein from a mesophilic organism into an obligate halophilic form. NMR studies demonstrate complete preservation of the three-dimensional structure of extreme mutants and confirm that salt dependency is conferred exclusively by surface residues. In spite of the statistically established fact that most halophilic proteins are strongly acidic, analysis of a very large number of mutants showed that the effect of salt on protein stability is largely independent of the total protein charge. Conversely, we quantitatively demonstrate that halophilicity is directly related to a decrease in the accessible surface area.

  4. Response surface method optimization of ectoine fermentation medium with moderate halophilic bacteria Halomonas sp. H02

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, T. T.; Qu, A.; Yuan, X. N.; Tan, F. X.; Li, X. W.; Wang, T.; Zhang, L. H.

    2017-07-01

    Moderate halophilic bacteria are of halophilic bacteria whose suitable growth of NaCl is 5-10%. When the moderate halophilic bacteria response to high osmotic stress, the intracellular will synthesize small organic molecule compatible solutes. Ectoine, which is the major synthetic osmotic compatible solutes for moderate halophilic bacteria, can help microbial enzymes, nucleic acids and the whole cell resist to hypertonic, high temperature, freezing and other inverse environment. In order to increase the Ectoine production of Moderate halophilic bacteria Halomonas sp. H02, the Ectoine fermentation medium component was optimized by Plackett-Burman (PB) and Response Surface Methodology (RSM) based on the principle of non-complete equilibrium The results of PB experiments showed that the three main influencing factors of Moderate halophilic bacteria Halomonas sp. H02 synthesis Ectoine culture medium were C5H8NNaO4 concentration, NaCl concentration and initial pH. According to the center point of the steepest climbing experiment, the central combination design experiment was used to show that the model is consistent with the actual situation. The optimum combination of three influencing factors were C5H8NNaO4 41 g/L, NaCl 87.2 g/L and initial pH 5.9, and the predicted amount of Ectoine was 1835.8 mg/L, increased by 41.6%.

  5. The complete genome sequence of Haloferax volcanii DS2, a model archaeon.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Amber L Hartman

    2010-03-01

    Full Text Available Haloferax volcanii is an easily culturable moderate halophile that grows on simple defined media, is readily transformable, and has a relatively stable genome. This, in combination with its biochemical and genetic tractability, has made Hfx. volcanii a key model organism, not only for the study of halophilicity, but also for archaeal biology in general.We report here the sequencing and analysis of the genome of Hfx. volcanii DS2, the type strain of this species. The genome contains a main 2.848 Mb chromosome, three smaller chromosomes pHV1, 3, 4 (85, 438, 636 kb, respectively and the pHV2 plasmid (6.4 kb.The completed genome sequence, presented here, provides an invaluable tool for further in vivo and in vitro studies of Hfx. volcanii.

  6. Bypassing rRNA methylation by RsmA/Dim1during ribosome maturation in the hyperthermophilic archaeon Nanoarchaeum equitans

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Seistrup, Kenneth H; Rose, Simon; Birkedal, Ulf

    2017-01-01

    In all free-living organisms a late-stage checkpoint in the biogenesis of the small ribosomal subunit involves rRNA modification by an RsmA/Dim1 methyltransferase. The hyperthermophilic archaeon Nanoarchaeum equitans, whose existence is confined to the surface of a second archaeon, Ignicoccus....... hospitalis to N. equitans across their fused cell membrane structures and the corresponding nucleotides in N. equitans 16S rRNA remain unmethylated. An alternative mechanism for ribosomal subunit maturation in N. equitans is suggested by sRNA interactions that span the redundant RsmA/Dim1 site to introduce 2...

  7. Purification and biochemical properties of a cytochrome bc complex from the aerobic hyperthermophilic archaeon Aeropyrum pernix.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kabashima, Yoshiki; Sakamoto, Junshi

    2011-03-14

    The bioenergetics of Archaea with respect to the evolution of electron transfer systems is very interesting. In contrast to terminal oxidases, a canonical bc1 complex has not yet been isolated from Archaea. In particular, c-type cytochromes have been reported only for a limited number of species. Here, we isolated a c-type cytochrome-containing enzyme complex from the membranes of the hyperthermophilic archaeon, Aeropyrum pernix, grown aerobically. The redox spectrum of the isolated c-type cytochrome showed a characteristic α-band peak at 553 nm corresponding to heme C. The pyridine hemochrome spectrum also revealed the presence of heme B. In non-denaturing polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis, the cytochrome migrated as a single band with an apparent molecular mass of 80 kDa, and successive SDS-PAGE separated the 80-kDa band into 3 polypeptides with apparent molecular masses of 40, 30, and 25 kDa. The results of mass spectrometry indicated that the 25-kDa band corresponded to the hypothetical cytochrome c subunit encoded by the ORF APE_1719.1. In addition, the c-type cytochrome-containing polypeptide complex exhibited menaquinone: yeast cytochrome c oxidoreductase activities. In conclusion, we showed that A. pernix, a hyperthemophilic archaeon, has a "full" bc complex that includes a c-type cytochrome, and to the best of our knowledge, A. pernix is the first archaea from which such a bc complex has been identified. However, an electron donor candidates for cytochrome c oxidase, such as a blue copper protein, have not yet been identified in the whole genome data of this archaeon. We are currently trying to identify an authentic substrate between a bc complex and terminal oxidase.

  8. Purification and biochemical properties of a cytochrome bc complex from the aerobic hyperthermophilic archaeon Aeropyrum pernix

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kabashima Yoshiki

    2011-03-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The bioenergetics of Archaea with respect to the evolution of electron transfer systems is very interesting. In contrast to terminal oxidases, a canonical bc1 complex has not yet been isolated from Archaea. In particular, c-type cytochromes have been reported only for a limited number of species. Results Here, we isolated a c-type cytochrome-containing enzyme complex from the membranes of the hyperthermophilic archaeon, Aeropyrum pernix, grown aerobically. The redox spectrum of the isolated c-type cytochrome showed a characteristic α-band peak at 553 nm corresponding to heme C. The pyridine hemochrome spectrum also revealed the presence of heme B. In non-denaturing polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis, the cytochrome migrated as a single band with an apparent molecular mass of 80 kDa, and successive SDS-PAGE separated the 80-kDa band into 3 polypeptides with apparent molecular masses of 40, 30, and 25 kDa. The results of mass spectrometry indicated that the 25-kDa band corresponded to the hypothetical cytochrome c subunit encoded by the ORF APE_1719.1. In addition, the c-type cytochrome-containing polypeptide complex exhibited menaquinone: yeast cytochrome c oxidoreductase activities. Conclusion In conclusion, we showed that A. pernix, a hyperthemophilic archaeon, has a "full" bc complex that includes a c-type cytochrome, and to the best of our knowledge, A. pernix is the first archaea from which such a bc complex has been identified. However, an electron donor candidates for cytochrome c oxidase, such as a blue copper protein, have not yet been identified in the whole genome data of this archaeon. We are currently trying to identify an authentic substrate between a bc complex and terminal oxidase.

  9. Identification of novel non-coding RNAs as potential antisense regulators in the archaeon Sulfolobus solfataricus

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    tang, T. H.; Polacek, N.; Zywicki, M.

    2005-01-01

    By generating a specialized cDNA library from the archaeon Sulfolobus solfataricus, we have identified 57 novel small non-coding RNA (ncRNA) candidates and confirmed their expression by Northern blot analysis. The majority was found to belong to one of two classes, either antisense or antisense......-box RNAs, where the latter only exhibit partial complementarity to RNA targets. The most prominent group of antisense RNAs is transcribed in the opposite orientation to the transposase genes, encoded by insertion elements (transposons). Thus, these antisense RNAs may regulate transposition of insertion...

  10. Gracilibacillus kimchii sp. nov., a halophilic bacterium isolated from kimchi.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oh, Young Joon; Lee, Hae-Won; Lim, Seul Ki; Kwon, Min-Sung; Lee, Jieun; Jang, Ja-Young; Park, Hae Woong; Nam, Young-Do; Seo, Myung-Ji; Choi, Hak-Jong

    2016-09-01

    A novel halophilic bacterium, strain K7(T), was isolated from kimchi, a traditional Korean fermented food. The strain is Gram-positive, motile, and produces terminal endospores. The isolate is facultative aerobic and grows at salinities of 0.0-25.0% (w/v) NaCl (optimum 10-15% NaCl), pH 5.5-8.5 (optimum pH 7.0-7.5), and 15-42°C (optimum 37°C). The predominant isoprenoid quinone in the strain is menaquinone-7 and the peptidoglycan of the strain is meso-diaminopimelic acid. The major fatty acids of the strain are anteisio-C15:0, iso-C15:0, and, C16:0 (other components were < 10.0%), while the major polar lipids are diphosphatidylglycerol, phosphatidylglycerol, phosphatidylcholine, and three unidentified lipids. A phylogenetic analysis of 16S rRNA gene sequence similarity showed that the isolated strain was a cluster of the genus Gracilibacillus. High levels of gene sequence similarity were observed between strain K7(T) and Gracilibacillus orientalis XH-63(T) (96.5%), and between the present strain and Gracilibacillus xinjiangensis (96.5%). The DNA G+C content of this strain is 37.7 mol%. Based on these findings, strain K7(T) is proposed as a novel species: Gracilibacillus kimchii sp. nov. The type strain is K7(T) (KACC 18669(T); JCM 31344(T)).

  11. Halophilic microorganism resources and their applications in industrial and environmental biotechnology

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hakuto Kageyama

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available Hypersaline environments are extreme habitats on the planet and have a diverse microbial population formed by halophilic microorganisms. They are considered to be actual or potential sources for discovery bioactive compounds, compatible solutes including novel and/or extraordinarily enzymes. To date, a number of bioactive compounds for the use in various fields of biotechnology which show assorted biological activities ranging from antioxidant, sunscreen and antibiotic actions have been reported. In addition, some halophilic microorganisms are capable of producing massive amounts of compatible solutes that are useful as stabilizers for biomolecules or stress-protective agents. The present review will impart knowledge and discuss on (i potential biotechnological applications of bioactive compounds, compatible solutes and some novel hydrolytic enzymes; (ii recent efforts on discovery and utilization of halophiles for biotechnological interest; (iii future perspective of aforementioned points.

  12. Biochemical evidence for the presence of two α-glucoside ABC-transport systems in the hyperthermophilic archaeon Pyrococcus furiosus

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Koning, Sonja M.; Konings, Wil N.; Driessen, Arnold J.M.

    2002-01-01

    The hyperthermophilic archaeon Pyrococcus furiosus can utilize different carbohydrates, such as starch, maltose and trehalose. Uptake of α-glucosides is mediated by two different, binding protein-dependent, ATP-binding cassette (ABC)-type transport systems. The maltose transporter also transports

  13. A hydrophobic ammonia-oxidizing archaeon of the Nitrosocosmicus clade isolated from coal tar-contaminated sediment

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Jung, Man-Young; Kim, Jong-Geol; Sinninghe Damsté, Jaap S; Rijpstra, W Irene C; Madsen, Eugene L; Kim, So-Jeong; Hong, Heeji; Si, Ok-Ja; Kerou, Melina; Schleper, Christa; Rhee, Sung-Keun

    2016-01-01

    A wide diversity of ammonia-oxidizing archaea (AOA) within the phylum Thaumarchaeota exists and plays a key role in the N cycle in a variety of habitats. In this study, we isolated and characterized an ammonia-oxidizing archaeon, strain MY3, from a coal tar-contaminated sediment. Phylogenetically,

  14. Proteomic mapping of the hyperthermophilic and acidophilic archaeon Sulfolobus solfataricus P2

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Barry, Richard C.; Young, Mark J.; Stedman, Kenneth M.; Dratz, Edward A.

    2006-07-14

    A proteomic map of Sulfolobus solfataricus P2, an archaeon that grows optimally at 80 C and pH 3.2, was developed using high resolution two-dimensional gel electrophoresis and peptide mass fingerprinting. A total of 867 protein spots (659 aqueous tris-soluble spots and 208 aqueous tris-insoluble) were mapped over IPG 3-10, 4-7, and 6-11, with second dimension gels made of 8-18% polyacrylamide. 324 different gene products were represented by the 867 spots, with 274 gene products being identified in the tris-soluble fractions and 100 gene products in the tris-insoluble portion. Fifty gene products were found on gels from both fractions. Additionally, an average of 1.50 + 0.12 isoforms/per protein were identified. This mapping study confirmed the expression of proteins involved in numerous metabolic, transport, energy production, nucleic acid replication, translation, and transcription pathways. Of particular interest, phosphoenolpyruvate carboxykinase (SSO2537) was detected even though the pathway for gluconeogenesis is unknown for this archaeon. Tris-soluble fractions contained many cytosolic proteins while tris-insoluble fractions contained many membrane-associated proteins, including ABC transporters and an ATP synthase. This study provides an optimized 2-DE approach for investigating the biochemical pathways and post-translational modifications employed by Sulfolobus to survive in its extreme environment.

  15. Virgibacillus kimchii sp. nov., a halophilic bacterium isolated from kimchi.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oh, Young Joon; Jang, Ja-Young; Lim, Seul Ki; Kwon, Min-Sung; Lee, Jieun; Kim, NamHee; Shin, Mi-Young; Park, Hyo Kyeong; Seo, Myung-Ji; Choi, Hak-Jong

    2017-12-01

    A Gram-stain-positive, halophilic, rod-shaped, non-motile, spore forming bacterium, strain NKC1-2 T , was isolated from kimchi, a Korean fermented food. Comparative analysis based on 16S rRNA gene sequence demonstrated that the isolated strain was a species of the genus Virgibacillus. Strain NKC1-2 T exhibited high level of 16S rRNA gene sequence similarity with the type strains of Virgibacillus xinjiangensis SL6-1 T (96.9%), V. sediminis YIM kkny3 T (96.8%), and V. salarius SA-Vb1 T (96.7%). The isolate grew at pH 6.5-10.0 (optimum, pH 8.5-9.0), 0.0-25.0% (w/v) NaCl (optimum, 10-15% NaCl), and 15-50°C (optimum, 37°C). The major menaquinone in the strain was menaquinone-7, and the main peptidoglycan of the strain was meso-diaminopimelic acid. The predominant fatty acids of the strain were iso-C 14:0 , anteisio-C 15:0 , iso- C 15:0 , and iso-C 16:0 (other components were < 10.0%). The polar lipids consisted of diphosphatidylglycerol and phosphatidylglycerol. The genomic DNA G + C content of NKC1-2 T was 42.5 mol%. On the basis of these findings, strain NKC1-2 T is proposed as a novel species in the genus Virgibacillus, for which the name Virgibacillus kimchii sp. nov. is proposed (=KACC 19404 T =JCM 32284 T ). The type strain of Virgibacillus kimchii is NKC1-2T.

  16. Biodegradation of polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons by a halophilic microbial consortium.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dastgheib, Seyed Mohammad Mehdi; Amoozegar, Mohammad Ali; Khajeh, Khosro; Shavandi, Mahmoud; Ventosa, Antonio

    2012-08-01

    In this study we investigated the phenanthrene degradation by a halophilic consortium obtained from a saline soil sample. This consortium, named Qphe, could efficiently utilize phenanthrene in a wide range of NaCl concentrations, from 1% to 17% (w/v). Since none of the purified isolates could degrade phenanthrene, serial dilutions were performed and resulted in a simple polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbon (PAH)-degrading culture named Qphe-SubIV which was shown to contain one culturable Halomonas strain and one unculturable strain belonging to the genus Marinobacter. Qphe-SubIV was shown to grow on phenanthrene at salinities as high as 15% NaCl (w/v) and similarly to Qphe, at the optimal NaCl concentration of 5% (w/v), could degrade more than 90% of the amended phenanthrene in 6 days. The comparison of the substrate range of the two consortiums showed that the simplified culture had lost the ability to degrade chrysene but still could grow on other polyaromatic substrates utilized by Qphe. Metabolite analysis by HPLC and GC-MS showed that 2-hydroxy 1-naphthoic acid and 2-naphthol were among the major metabolites accumulated in the Qphe-SubIV culture media, indicating that an initial dioxygenation step might proceed at C1 and C2 positions. By investigating the growth ability on various substrates along with the detection of catechol dioxygenase gene, it was postulated that the uncultured Marinobacter strain had the central role in phenanthrene degradation and the Halomonas strain played an auxiliary role in the culture by utilizing phenanthrene metabolites whose accumulation in the media could be toxic.

  17. Enrichment and Characterization of an Autotrophic Ammonia-Oxidizing Archaeon of Mesophilic Crenarchaeal Group I.1a from an Agricultural Soil

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Jung, M.Y.; Park, S.J.; Min, D.; Kim, J.S.; Rijpstra, W.I.C.; Sinninghe Damsté, J.S.; Kim, G.J.; Madsen, E.L.; Rhee, S.K.

    2011-01-01

    Soil nitrification is an important process for agricultural productivity and environmental pollution. Though one cultivated representative of ammonia-oxidizing Archaea from soil has been described, additional representatives warrant characterization. We describe an ammonia-oxidizing archaeon (strain

  18. Biological control of grey mould in strawberry fruits by halophilic bacteria.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Essghaier, B; Fardeau, M L; Cayol, J L; Hajlaoui, M R; Boudabous, A; Jijakli, H; Sadfi-Zouaoui, N

    2009-03-01

    Grey mould caused by Botrytis cinerea is an economically important disease of strawberries in Tunisia and worldwide. The aim of this study was to select effective halophilic bacteria from hypersaline ecosystems and evaluate the abilities of antifungal bacteria to secrete extracellular hydrolytic enzymes, anti-Botrytis metabolites and volatiles. Grey mould was reduced in strawberry fruits treated with halophilic antagonists and artificially inoculated with B. cinerea. Thirty strains (20.2%) were active against the pathogen and reduced the percentage of fruits infected after 3 days of storage at 20 degrees C, from 50% to 91.66%. The antagonists were characterized by phenotypic tests and 16S rDNA sequencing. They were identified as belonging to one of the species: Virgibacillus marismortui, B. subtilis, B. pumilus, B. licheniformis, Terribacillus halophilus, Halomonas elongata, Planococcus rifietoensis, Staphylococcus equorum and Staphylococcus sp. The effective isolates were tested for antifungal secondary metabolites. Moderately halophilic bacteria may be useful in biological control against this pathogen during postharvest storage of strawberries. The use of such bacteria may constitute an important alternative to synthetic fungicides. These moderate halophiles can be exploited in commercial production and application of the effective strains under storage and greenhouse conditions.

  19. DNA Repair and Photoprotection: Mechanisms of Overcoming Environmental Ultraviolet Radiation Exposure in Halophilic Archaea

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jones, Daniel L.; Baxter, Bonnie K.

    2017-01-01

    Halophilic archaea push the limits of life at several extremes. In particular, they are noted for their biochemical strategies in dealing with osmotic stress, low water activity and cycles of desiccation in their hypersaline environments. Another feature common to their habitats is intense ultraviolet (UV) radiation, which is a challenge that microorganisms must overcome. The consequences of high UV exposure include DNA lesions arising directly from bond rearrangement of adjacent bipyrimidines, or indirectly from oxidative damage, which may ultimately result in mutation and cell death. As such, these microorganisms have evolved a number of strategies to navigate the threat of DNA damage, which we differentiate into two categories: DNA repair and photoprotection. Photoprotection encompasses damage avoidance strategies that serve as a “first line of defense,” and in halophilic archaea include pigmentation by carotenoids, mechanisms of oxidative damage avoidance, polyploidy, and genomic signatures that make DNA less susceptible to photodamage. Photolesions that do arise are addressed by a number of DNA repair mechanisms that halophilic archaea efficiently utilize, which include photoreactivation, nucleotide excision repair, base excision repair, and homologous recombination. This review seeks to place DNA damage, repair, and photoprotection in the context of halophilic archaea and the solar radiation of their hypersaline environments. We also provide new insight into the breadth of strategies and how they may work together to produce remarkable UV-resistance for these microorganisms. PMID:29033920

  20. Evaluation of biodecolorization of the textile azo dye by halophilic archaea

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Masoomeh Selseleh Hassan-Kiadehi

    2017-09-01

    Discussion and conclusion: In conclusion, our results indicate that halophilic archaea have very high potential to decolorize azo dyes. Regarding high amounts of salts in textile wastewaters, using such microorganisms which can tolerate the harsh environment in order to decolorize azo dyes, could be a new approach in this field.

  1. Draft Genome Sequence of the Moderately Halophilic Bacterium Pseudoalteromonas ruthenica Strain CP76.

    Science.gov (United States)

    de la Haba, Rafael R; Sánchez-Porro, Cristina; León, María José; Papke, R Thane; Ventosa, Antonio

    2013-05-23

    Pseudoalteromonas ruthenica strain CP76, isolated from a saltern in Spain, is a moderately halophilic bacterium belonging to the Gammaproteobacteria. Here we report the draft genome sequence, which consists of a 4.0-Mb chromosome, of this strain, which is able to produce the extracellular enzyme haloprotease CPI.

  2. Efficient utilization of ectoine by halophilic Brevibacterium species and Escherichia coli subjected to osmotic downshock.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nagata, Shinichi; Wang, Chenxiang

    2005-01-01

    Halophilic and non-halophilic bacteria subjected to osmotic downshock, from 0.7 M NaCl to deionized water, were examined for their survival, with the uptake and utilization of the cyclic amino acid ectoine, one of the representative compatible solutes, being taken into account. The uptake of ectoine added externally and survival of the cells were monitored as a function of incubation time in the presence and absence of NaCl. The halophilic Brevibacterium sp. JCM 6894 and B. epidermidis JCM 2593 actively accumulated ectoine regardless of the presence of NaCl, which led to cell survival. Brevibacterium casei JCM 2594 belonging to the same Brevibacterium species, however, revealed Na+-dependence of its uptake activity of ectoine. Non-halophilic Escherichia coli K-12 did not accumulate ectoine, and thereby this strain failed to survive irrespective of whether NaCl was present. The physiological meanings of the downshock procedure are discussed in connection with the uptake and the subsequent utilization of ectoine.

  3. DNA Repair and Photoprotection: Mechanisms of Overcoming Environmental Ultraviolet Radiation Exposure in Halophilic Archaea

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Daniel L. Jones

    2017-09-01

    Full Text Available Halophilic archaea push the limits of life at several extremes. In particular, they are noted for their biochemical strategies in dealing with osmotic stress, low water activity and cycles of desiccation in their hypersaline environments. Another feature common to their habitats is intense ultraviolet (UV radiation, which is a challenge that microorganisms must overcome. The consequences of high UV exposure include DNA lesions arising directly from bond rearrangement of adjacent bipyrimidines, or indirectly from oxidative damage, which may ultimately result in mutation and cell death. As such, these microorganisms have evolved a number of strategies to navigate the threat of DNA damage, which we differentiate into two categories: DNA repair and photoprotection. Photoprotection encompasses damage avoidance strategies that serve as a “first line of defense,” and in halophilic archaea include pigmentation by carotenoids, mechanisms of oxidative damage avoidance, polyploidy, and genomic signatures that make DNA less susceptible to photodamage. Photolesions that do arise are addressed by a number of DNA repair mechanisms that halophilic archaea efficiently utilize, which include photoreactivation, nucleotide excision repair, base excision repair, and homologous recombination. This review seeks to place DNA damage, repair, and photoprotection in the context of halophilic archaea and the solar radiation of their hypersaline environments. We also provide new insight into the breadth of strategies and how they may work together to produce remarkable UV-resistance for these microorganisms.

  4. Bactericidal effect of lactoferrin and lactoferrin chimera against halophilic Vibrio parahaemolyticus

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Leon-Sicairos, N.; Canizalez-Roman, A.; de la Garza, M.; Reyes-Lopez, M.; Zazueta-Beltran, J.; Nazmi, K.; Gomez-Gil, B.; Bolscher, J.G.

    2009-01-01

    Infections caused by Vibrio parahaemolyticus, an halophilic member of the genus Vibrio, have increased globally in the last 5 years. Diarrhea caused by V. parahaemolyticus results from eating raw or undercooked seafood. The aim of this work was to investigate whether lactoferrin and some

  5. Roseivivax sediminis sp. nov., a moderately halophilic bacterium isolated from salt mine sediment

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Xiao, Wei; Wang, Yong-Xia; Liu, Ji-Hui; Wang, Zhi-Gang; Zhang, Xiao-Xia; Ji, Kai-Yan; Lai, Yong-Hong; Wen, Meng-Liang; Cui, Xiao-Long

    2012-01-01

    ...(T), was isolated from a salt mine in Yunnan province, south-west China. Strain YIM D21(T) formed cream-yellow colonies, was non-motile and moderately halophilic, and tolerated NaCl concentrations of 1-15% (w/v...

  6. Bipyrimidine Signatures as a Photoprotective Genome Strategy in G + C-rich Halophilic Archaea

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Daniel L. Jones

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available Halophilic archaea experience high levels of ultraviolet (UV light in their environments and demonstrate resistance to UV irradiation. DNA repair systems and carotenoids provide UV protection but do not account for the high resistance observed. Herein, we consider genomic signatures as an additional photoprotective strategy. The predominant forms of UV-induced DNA damage are cyclobutane pyrimidine dimers, most notoriously thymine dimers (T^Ts, which form at adjacent Ts. We tested whether the high G + C content seen in halophilic archaea serves a photoprotective function through limiting T nucleotides, and thus T^T lesions. However, this speculation overlooks the other bipyrimidine sequences, all of which capable of forming photolesions to varying degrees. Therefore, we designed a program to determine the frequencies of the four bipyrimidine pairs (5’ to 3’: TT, TC, CT, and CC within genomes of halophilic archaea and four other randomized sample groups for comparison. The outputs for each sampled genome were weighted by the intrinsic photoreactivities of each dinucleotide pair. Statistical methods were employed to investigate intergroup differences. Our findings indicate that the UV-resistance seen in halophilic archaea can be attributed in part to a genomic strategy: high G + C content and the resulting bipyrimidine signature reduces the genomic photoreactivity.

  7. Structural characteristics of alkaline phosphatase from the moderately halophilic bacterium Halomonas sp. 593

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Arai, Shigeki; Yonezawa, Yasushi [Japan Atomic Energy Agency, 2-4 Shirakata-shirane, Tokai, Ibaraki 319-1195 (Japan); Ishibashi, Matsujiro [Faculty of Agriculture, Kagoshima University, 1-21-24 Korimoto, Kagoshima 890-0065 (Japan); Matsumoto, Fumiko; Adachi, Motoyasu; Tamada, Taro [Japan Atomic Energy Agency, 2-4 Shirakata-shirane, Tokai, Ibaraki 319-1195 (Japan); Tokunaga, Hiroko [Faculty of Agriculture, Kagoshima University, 1-21-24 Korimoto, Kagoshima 890-0065 (Japan); Blaber, Michael [Florida State University, 1115 West Call Street, Tallahassee, FL 32306-4300 (United States); Tokunaga, Masao [Faculty of Agriculture, Kagoshima University, 1-21-24 Korimoto, Kagoshima 890-0065 (Japan); Kuroki, Ryota, E-mail: kuroki.ryota@jaea.go.jp [Japan Atomic Energy Agency, 2-4 Shirakata-shirane, Tokai, Ibaraki 319-1195 (Japan)

    2014-03-01

    In order to clarify the structural basis of the halophilic characteristics of an alkaline phosphatase derived from the moderate halophile Halomonas sp. 593 (HaAP), the tertiary structure of HaAP was determined to 2.1 Å resolution by X-ray crystallography. The structural properties of surface negative charge and core hydrophobicity were shown to be intermediate between those characteristic of halophiles and non-halophiles, and may explain the unique functional adaptation to a wide range of salt concentrations. Alkaline phosphatase (AP) from the moderate halophilic bacterium Halomonas sp. 593 (HaAP) catalyzes the hydrolysis of phosphomonoesters over a wide salt-concentration range (1–4 M NaCl). In order to clarify the structural basis of its halophilic characteristics and its wide-range adaptation to salt concentration, the tertiary structure of HaAP was determined by X-ray crystallography to 2.1 Å resolution. The unit cell of HaAP contained one dimer unit corresponding to the biological unit. The monomer structure of HaAP contains a domain comprised of an 11-stranded β-sheet core with 19 surrounding α-helices similar to those of APs from other species, and a unique ‘crown’ domain containing an extended ‘arm’ structure that participates in formation of a hydrophobic cluster at the entrance to the substrate-binding site. The HaAP structure also displays a unique distribution of negatively charged residues and hydrophobic residues in comparison to other known AP structures. AP from Vibrio sp. G15-21 (VAP; a slight halophile) has the highest similarity in sequence (70.0% identity) and structure (C{sup α} r.m.s.d. of 0.82 Å for the monomer) to HaAP. The surface of the HaAP dimer is substantially more acidic than that of the VAP dimer (144 exposed Asp/Glu residues versus 114, respectively), and thus may enable the solubility of HaAP under high-salt conditions. Conversely, the monomer unit of HaAP formed a substantially larger hydrophobic interior

  8. Structure of flap endonuclease 1 from the hyperthermophilic archaeon Desulfuro­coccus amylolyticus

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mase, Tomoko; Kubota, Keiko; Miyazono, Ken-ichi; Kawarabayasi, Yutaka; Tanokura, Masaru

    2011-01-01

    Flap endonuclease 1 (FEN1) is a key enzyme in DNA repair and DNA replication. It is a structure-specific nuclease that removes 5′-overhanging flaps and the RNA/DNA primer during maturation of the Okazaki fragment. Homologues of FEN1 exist in a wide range of bacteria, archaea and eukaryotes. In order to further understand the structural basis of the DNA recognition, binding and cleavage mechanism of FEN1, the structure of FEN1 from the hyperthermophilic archaeon Desulfurococcus amylolyticus (DaFEN1) was determined at 2.00 Å resolution. The overall fold of DaFEN1 was similar to those of other archaeal FEN1 proteins; however, the helical clamp and the flexible loop exhibited a putative substrate-binding pocket with a unique conformation. PMID:21301087

  9. A novel phospholipase A2/esterase from hyperthermophilic archaeon Aeropyrum pernix K1.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Baijing; Lu, Dongmei; Gao, Renjun; Yang, Zhen; Cao, Shugui; Feng, Yan

    2004-06-01

    An open reading frame of the hyperthermophilic archaeon Aeropyrum pernix K1 APE2325, which composed of 474 bases, was cloned and expressed in Escherichia coli BL21 (DE3) Codon Plus-RIL. The recombinant protein was purified by Ni-chelation affinity chromatography. It showed a single band with a molecular mass of 18kDa in SDS-PAGE. The purified enzyme exhibited both phospholipase A(2) and esterase activities with the optimal catalytic temperature at 90 degrees C. The enzyme activity was Ca(2+)-independent. Kinetic analysis revealed its Km, k cat, and Vm for the p-nitrophenyl propionate substrate were 103microM, 39s(-1), and 249micromol/min/mg, respectively. The recombinant protein was thermostable and its half-life at 100 degrees C was about 1h.

  10. Characterization of thermostable native alkaline phosphatase from an aerobic hyperthermophilic archaeon, Aeropyrum pernix K1.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Helianti, Is; Okubo, Takako; Morita, Yasutaka; Tamiya, Eiichi

    2007-02-01

    This paper reports the characterization of an alkaline phosphatase (AP) from an aerobic hyperthermophilic Archaeon Aeropyrum pernix K1. The native AP was purified into homogeneity. The enzyme is predicted as a homodimeric structure with a native molecular mass of about 75 kDa and monomer of about 40 kDa. Apparent optimum pH and temperature were estimated at 10.0 and above 95 degrees C, respectively. Magnesium ion increased both the stability and the activity of the enzyme. A. pernix AP has been demonstrated as a very thermostable AP, retaining about 76% of its activity after being incubated at 90 degrees C for 5.5 h and 67% of its activity after being incubated at 100 degrees C for 2.5 h, respectively, under the presence of Mg(II). Enzyme activity was increased in addition of exogenous Mg(II), Ca(II), Zn(II), and Co(II).

  11. Substrate specificity of undecaprenyl diphosphate synthase from the hyperthermophilic archaeon Aeropyrum pernix.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mori, Takeshi; Ogawa, Takuya; Yoshimura, Tohru; Hemmi, Hisashi

    2013-06-28

    Cis-prenyltransferase from a hyperthermophilic archaeon Aeropyrum pernix was expressed in Escherichia coli and purified for characterization. Properties such as substrate specificity, product chain-length, thermal stability and cofactor requirement were investigated using the recombinant enzyme. In particular, the substrate specificity of the enzyme attracts interest because only dimethylallyl diphosphate and geranylfarnesyl diphosphate, both of which are unusual substrates for known cis-prenyltransferases, are likely available as an allylic primer substrate in A. pernix. From the enzymatic study, the archaeal enzyme was shown to be undecaprenyl diphosphate synthase that has anomalous substrate specificity, which results in a preference for geranylfarnesyl diphosphate. This means that the product of the enzyme, which is probably used as the precursor of the glycosyl carrier lipid, would have an undiscovered structure. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  12. Optimization of growth for the hyperthermophilic archaeon Aeropyrum pernix on a small-batch scale.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Milek, Igor; Cigic, Blaz; Skrt, Mihaela; Kaletunç, Gönül; Ulrih, Natasa Poklar

    2005-09-01

    Growth of Aeropyrum pernix, the first reported aerobic neutrophilic hyperthermophilic archaeon, was investigated under different cultivation parameters. Different sources of seawater, pH, and the cultivation methods were tested with the aim to improve the biomass production. A 1-L glass flask fitted with a condenser and air diffuser was used as a bioreactor. The optimum conditions for maximizing A. pernix biomass were obtained when Na2S2O3.5H2O (1 g/L) with added marine broth 2216 at pH 7.0 (20 mmol HEPES buffer/L) was used as a growing medium in a 1-L flask. The biomass production was 0.45 g dry cell mass/L in 40 h under the optimum conditions, which is more than the 0.42 g dry cell mass/L in 60 h previously obtained.

  13. Cloning, expression, and characterization of the first archaeal ATP-dependent glucokinase from aerobic hyperthermophilic archaeon Aeropyrum pernix.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sakuraba, Haruhiko; Mitani, Yuri; Goda, Shuichiro; Kawarabayasi, Yutaka; Ohshima, Toshihisa

    2003-02-01

    The gene encoding the ATP-dependent glucokinase of hyperthermophilic archaeon Aeropyrum pernix was identified, cloned, and functionally expressed in Escherichia coli. The deduced amino acid sequence showed 40% identity to that of the putative glucokinase from hyperthermophilic archaeon Pyrobacurum aerophilum. The purified recombinant enzyme was a monomer with a molecular mass of 35 kDa. The enzyme retained its full activity on heating at 70 degrees C for 10 min and retained 65% of the activity after 10-min incubation at 100 degrees C. The enzyme exclusively catalyzed the phosphorylation of D-glucose using ATP as a phosphoryl donor. ITP was accepted in addition to ATP. The rate dependence with both glucose and ATP followed Michaelis-Menten kinetics, with apparent K(m) values of 0.054 and 0.50 mM, respectively. The enzyme activity required divalent cations; Mg(2+), which was most effective, could partially be replaced by Mn(2+) or Ca(2+). Phylogenetic analysis revealed that the glucokinase from A. pernix does not belong to the clusters of enzymes found in bacteria and eukarya. This is the first description of the characteristics of an ATP-dependent glucokinase from an archaeon.

  14. Halophilic biohydrogen and 1,3-propanediol production from raw glycerol: A genomic perspective

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kivisto, A.

    2013-11-01

    Glycerol is produced in large amounts as a by-product in biodiesel industry (10 kg per 100 kg biodiesel). By-products and waste materials are typically economical substrates for bioprocesses. Furthermore, microorganisms are able to combine the degradation of organic material with production of a wide range of metabolites and other cellular products. The current biotechnological interest of industrial glycerol lies on bioprocesses yielding environmentally friendly energy carrier molecules (hydrogen, methane, ethanol, butanol) and reduced chemicals (1,3-propanediol, dihydroxyacetone). Industrial glycerol also called as raw or crude glycerol, however, is a challenging substrate for microorganisms due to its impurities including alcohol, soaps, salts and metals. Halophiles (the salt-loving microorganisms) require salt for growth and heavy metal resistances have been characterized for numerous halophiles. Therefore, halophiles are potentially useful for the utilization of raw glycerol from biodiesel waste streams without pre-processing. Another challenge for large-scale microbial bioprocesses is a potential contamination with unfavorable microorganisms. For example, H{sub 2}-producing systems tend to get contaminated with H{sub 2}-consuming microorganisms. Extremophiles are organisms that have been adapted for life under extreme conditions, such as high salinity, high or low temperature, asidic or basic pH, dryness or high pressure. For extremophilic pure cultures contamination and thus the need to ensure a sterile environment might not be a problem due to the extreme process conditions that efficiently prevent the growth of most other bacteria. In addition, hypersaline environments (above 12 % NaCl) do not support the growth of H{sub 2} utilizing methanogens due to bioenergetic reasons. Halophilic fermentative H{sub 2} producers, on the other hand, have been shown to be active up to near salt saturation. The aims of the present study can be divided into two categories

  15. Halophilic Archaea: Life with Desiccation, Radiation and Oligotrophy over Geological Times.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stan-Lotter, Helga; Fendrihan, Sergiu

    2015-07-28

    Halophilic archaebacteria (Haloarchaea) can survive extreme desiccation, starvation and radiation, sometimes apparently for millions of years. Several of the strategies that are involved appear specific for Haloarchaea (for example, the formation of halomucin, survival in fluid inclusions of halite), and some are known from other prokaryotes (dwarfing of cells, reduction of ATP). Several newly-discovered haloarchaeal strategies that were inferred to possibly promote long-term survival-halomucin, polyploidy, usage of DNA as a phosphate storage polymer, production of spherical dormant stages-remain to be characterized in detail. More information on potential strategies is desirable, since evidence for the presence of halite on Mars and on several moons in the solar system increased interest in halophiles with respect to the search for extraterrestrial life. This review deals in particular with novel findings and hypotheses on haloarchaeal long-term survival.

  16. Cryo-electron microscopy of an extremely halophilic microbe: technical aspects.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bollschweiler, Daniel; Schaffer, Miroslava; Lawrence, C Martin; Engelhardt, Harald

    2017-03-01

    Most halophilic Archaea of the class Halobacteriaceae depend on the presence of several molar sodium chloride for growth and cell integrity. This poses problems for structural studies, particularly for electron microscopy, where the high salt concentration results in diminished contrast. Since cryo-electron microscopy of intact cells provides new insights into the cellular and molecular organization under close-to-live conditions, we evaluated strategies and conditions to make halophilic microbes available for investigations in situ. Halobacterium salinarum, the test organism for this study, usually grows at 4.3 M NaCl. Adaptation to lower concentrations and subsequent NaCl reduction via dialysis led to still vital cells at 3 M salt. A comprehensive evaluation of vitrification parameters, thinning of frozen cells by focused-ion-beam micromachining, and cryo-electron microscopy revealed that structural studies under high salt conditions are possible in situ.

  17. Halophilic Archaea: Life with Desiccation, Radiation and Oligotrophy over Geological Times

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Helga Stan-Lotter

    2015-07-01

    Full Text Available Halophilic archaebacteria (Haloarchaea can survive extreme desiccation, starvation and radiation, sometimes apparently for millions of years. Several of the strategies that are involved appear specific for Haloarchaea (for example, the formation of halomucin, survival in fluid inclusions of halite, and some are known from other prokaryotes (dwarfing of cells, reduction of ATP. Several newly-discovered haloarchaeal strategies that were inferred to possibly promote long-term survival—halomucin, polyploidy, usage of DNA as a phosphate storage polymer, production of spherical dormant stages—remain to be characterized in detail. More information on potential strategies is desirable, since evidence for the presence of halite on Mars and on several moons in the solar system increased interest in halophiles with respect to the search for extraterrestrial life. This review deals in particular with novel findings and hypotheses on haloarchaeal long-term survival.

  18. Genomic adaptations of the halophilic Dead Sea filamentous fungus Eurotium rubrum.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kis-Papo, Tamar; Weig, Alfons R; Riley, Robert; Peršoh, Derek; Salamov, Asaf; Sun, Hui; Lipzen, Anna; Wasser, Solomon P; Rambold, Gerhard; Grigoriev, Igor V; Nevo, Eviatar

    2014-05-09

    The Dead Sea is one of the most hypersaline habitats on Earth. The fungus Eurotium rubrum (Eurotiomycetes) is among the few species able to survive there. Here we highlight its adaptive strategies, based on genome analysis and transcriptome profiling. The 26.2 Mb genome of E. rubrum shows, for example, gains in gene families related to stress response and losses with regard to transport processes. Transcriptome analyses under different salt growth conditions revealed, among other things differentially expressed genes encoding ion and metabolite transporters. Our findings suggest that long-term adaptation to salinity requires cellular and metabolic responses that differ from short-term osmotic stress signalling. The transcriptional response indicates that halophilic E. rubrum actively counteracts the salinity stress. Many of its genes encode for proteins with a significantly higher proportion of acidic amino acid residues. This trait is characteristic of the halophilic prokaryotes as well, supporting the theory of convergent evolution under extreme hypersaline stress.

  19. Halophilic and halotolerant actinomycetes from a marine saltern of Goa, India producing anti-bacterial metabolites.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ballav, Shuvankar; Kerkar, Savita; Thomas, Sabu; Augustine, Nimmy

    2015-03-01

    Marine salterns are estuarine ecosystems in Goa, receiving inputs from riverine and marine waters. The Salinity fluctuates between 0 and 300 psu which makes it a conducive niche for salt tolerant and salt loving Actinomycetales. Halotolerant and halophilic Actinomycetales producing anti-bacterial metabolites were studied from crystallizer pond sediments of Ribandar saltern, Goa. Three media viz. Starch casein, R2A and Inorganic salt starch agar at four different salinities (35, 50, 75 and 100 psu) were used for isolation. R2A agar at 35 psu was the most preferred by hypersaline actinomycetes. The dominant group was halotolerant Streptomyces spp. others being rare actinomycetes viz. Nocardiopsis, Micromonospora and Kocuria spp. More than 50% of the isolates showed anti-bacterial activity against one or more of the fifteen human pathogens tested. Eight strains from 4 genera showed consistent anti-bacterial activity and studied in detail. Most halotolerant isolates grew from 0 to 75 psu, with optimum antibiotic production at 35 psu whereas halophiles grew at 20 to 100 psu with optimum antibiotic production at 35 psu. Four Streptomyces strains showed multiple inhibition against test organisms while four rare actinomycetes were specific in their inhibitory activity. This is the first report of a halophilic Kocuria sp., Nocardiopsis sp., and halotolerant Micromonospora sp. producing anti-bacterial compound(s) against Staphylococcus aureus, Staphylococcus citreus, and Vibrio cholerae, respectively. Sequential extraction with varying polarity of organic solvents showed that the extracts inhibited different test pathogens. These results suggest that halophilic and halotolerant actinomycetes from marine salterns are a potential source of anti-bacterial compounds. Copyright © 2014 The Society for Biotechnology, Japan. Published by Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  20. Distribution of osmophilic and halophilic fungi in combine harvester sorghum dust particles from Egypt

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    S. I. Abdel-Hafez

    2014-08-01

    Full Text Available Fifty-two osmophilic (or osmotolerant and halophilic (or halotolerant species and one variety representing 24 genera were encountered from 20 combine harvester sorghum dust samples collected from four Covernorates in Upper Egypt, on 50% sucrose - and 15% NaCl-Czapck's agar at 28°C. The results obtained on the two media were basically similar, but numerous fungi could not tolerate 15% NaCl. The most frequent genera were Aspergillus Eurotium, Penicillium and Cladosporium.

  1. Microbial culturomics unravels the halophilic microbiota repertoire of table salt: description of Gracilibacillus massiliensis sp. nov.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Awa Diop

    2016-10-01

    Full Text Available Background: Microbial culturomics represents an ongoing revolution in the characterization of environmental and human microbiome. Methods: By using three media containing high salt concentration (100, 150, and 200 g/L, the halophilic microbial culturome of a commercial table salt was determined. Results: Eighteen species belonging to the Terrabacteria group were isolated including eight moderate halophilic and 10 halotolerant bacteria. Gracilibacillus massiliensis sp. nov., type strain Awa-1T (=CSUR P1441=DSM 29726, is a moderately halophilic gram-positive, non-spore-forming rod, and is motile by using a flagellum. Strain Awa-1T shows catalase activity but no oxidase activity. It is not only an aerobic bacterium but also able to grow in anaerobic and microaerophilic atmospheres. The draft genome of G. massiliensis is 4,207,226 bp long, composed of 13 scaffolds with 36.05% of G+C content. It contains 3,908 genes (3,839 protein-coding and 69 RNA genes. At least 1,983 (52% orthologous proteins were not shared with the closest phylogenetic species. Hundred twenty-six genes (3.3% were identified as ORFans. Conclusions: Microbial culturomics can dramatically improve the characterization of the food and environmental microbiota repertoire, deciphering new bacterial species and new genes. Further studies will clarify the geographic specificity and the putative role of these new microbes and their related functional genetic content in environment, health, and disease.

  2. Genome-scale reconstruction of metabolic network for a halophilic extremophile, Chromohalobacter salexigens DSM 3043

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Oner Ebru

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Chromohalobacter salexigens (formerly Halomonas elongata DSM 3043 is a halophilic extremophile with a very broad salinity range and is used as a model organism to elucidate prokaryotic osmoadaptation due to its strong euryhaline phenotype. Results C. salexigens DSM 3043's metabolism was reconstructed based on genomic, biochemical and physiological information via a non-automated but iterative process. This manually-curated reconstruction accounts for 584 genes, 1386 reactions, and 1411 metabolites. By using flux balance analysis, the model was extensively validated against literature data on the C. salexigens phenotypic features, the transport and use of different substrates for growth as well as against experimental observations on the uptake and accumulation of industrially important organic osmolytes, ectoine, betaine, and its precursor choline, which play important roles in the adaptive response to osmotic stress. Conclusions This work presents the first comprehensive genome-scale metabolic model of a halophilic bacterium. Being a useful guide for identification and filling of knowledge gaps, the reconstructed metabolic network iOA584 will accelerate the research on halophilic bacteria towards application of systems biology approaches and design of metabolic engineering strategies.

  3. Communities structure of the planktonic halophiles in the solar saltern of Sfax, Tunisia

    Science.gov (United States)

    Elloumi, Jannet; Carrias, Jean-François; Ayadi, Habib; Sime-Ngando, Télesphore; Bouaïn, Abderrahmen

    2009-01-01

    The composition and distribution of the main planktonic halophilic micro-organisms (heterotrophic and autotrophic picoplankton, nanoplankton, phytoplankton, ciliates) and metazooplankton were investigated in six ponds of increasing salinity in the solar salt works of Sfax, Tunisia, from January to December 2003. Marked changes in the composition and biomass of the communities were found along the salinity gradient, especially at salinities of 150 and 350. Autotrophic picoplankton, nanoplankton, diatoms, dinoflagellates and ciliates characterized the less salted ponds. Planktonic biomass was the highest at intermediate salinity as a consequence of a bloom of Ochromonas. Species richness of phytoplankton, ciliates and zooplankton greatly decrease above a salinity of 150 and typical halophiles ( Dunaliella salina, cyanobacteria, Fabrea salina and Artemia salina) were found between 150 and 350 salinity. In this environment, F. salina appeared more adapted than the brine shrimp to survive during phytoplankton blooms. The halophilic plankton was however almost entirely composed of heterotrophic prokaryotes in the crystallizers. We thus observed a progressive disappearance of the autotrophic planktonic communities along the salinity gradient. Multivariate analysis of the communities provides evidence that ponds represent discrete aquatic ecosystems within this salt works.

  4. A Structurally Novel Chitinase from the Chitin-Degrading Hyperthermophilic Archaeon Thermococcus chitonophagus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Horiuchi, Ayumi; Aslam, Mehwish; Kanai, Tamotsu; Atomi, Haruyuki

    2016-06-15

    A structurally novel chitinase, Tc-ChiD, was identified from the hyperthermophilic archaeon Thermococcus chitonophagus, which can grow on chitin as the sole organic carbon source. The gene encoding Tc-ChiD contains regions corresponding to a signal sequence, two chitin-binding domains, and a putative catalytic domain. This catalytic domain shows no similarity with previously characterized chitinases but resembles an uncharacterized protein found in the mesophilic anaerobic bacterium Clostridium botulinum Two recombinant Tc-ChiD proteins were produced in Escherichia coli, one without the signal sequence [Tc-ChiD(ΔS)] and the other corresponding only to the putative catalytic domain [Tc-ChiD(ΔBD)]. Enzyme assays using N-acetylglucosamine (GlcNAc) oligomers indicated that both proteins hydrolyze GlcNAc oligomers longer than (GlcNAc)4 Chitinase assays using colloidal chitin suggested that Tc-ChiD is an exo-type chitinase that releases (GlcNAc)2 or (GlcNAc)3 Analysis with GlcNAc oligomers modified with p-nitrophenol suggested that Tc-ChiD recognizes the reducing end of chitin chains. While Tc-ChiD(ΔBD) displayed a higher initial velocity than that of Tc-ChiD(ΔS), we found that the presence of the two chitin-binding domains significantly enhanced the thermostability of the catalytic domain. In T. chitonophagus, another chitinase ortholog that is similar to the Thermococcus kodakarensis chitinase ChiA is present and can degrade chitin from the nonreducing ends. Therefore, the presence of multiple chitinases in T. chitonophagus with different modes of cleavage may contribute to its unique ability to efficiently degrade chitin. A structurally novel chitinase, Tc-ChiD, was identified from Thermococcus chitonophagus, a hyperthermophilic archaeon. The protein contains a signal peptide for secretion, two chitin-binding domains, and a catalytic domain that shows no similarity with previously characterized chitinases. Tc-ChiD thus represents a new family of chitinases. Tc

  5. The crystal structure of Haloferax volcanii proliferating cell nuclear antigen reveals unique surface charge characteristics due to halophilic adaptation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Morroll Shaun

    2009-08-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The high intracellular salt concentration required to maintain a halophilic lifestyle poses challenges to haloarchaeal proteins that must stay soluble, stable and functional in this extreme environment. Proliferating cell nuclear antigen (PCNA is a fundamental protein involved in maintaining genome integrity, with roles in both DNA replication and repair. To investigate the halophilic adaptation of such a key protein we have crystallised and solved the structure of Haloferax volcanii PCNA (HvPCNA to a resolution of 2.0 Å. Results The overall architecture of HvPCNA is very similar to other known PCNAs, which are highly structurally conserved. Three commonly observed adaptations in halophilic proteins are higher surface acidity, bound ions and increased numbers of intermolecular ion pairs (in oligomeric proteins. HvPCNA possesses the former two adaptations but not the latter, despite functioning as a homotrimer. Strikingly, the positive surface charge considered key to PCNA's role as a sliding clamp is dramatically reduced in the halophilic protein. Instead, bound cations within the solvation shell of HvPCNA may permit sliding along negatively charged DNA by reducing electrostatic repulsion effects. Conclusion The extent to which individual proteins adapt to halophilic conditions varies, presumably due to their diverse characteristics and roles within the cell. The number of ion pairs observed in the HvPCNA monomer-monomer interface was unexpectedly low. This may reflect the fact that the trimer is intrinsically stable over a wide range of salt concentrations and therefore additional modifications for trimer maintenance in high salt conditions are not required. Halophilic proteins frequently bind anions and cations and in HvPCNA cation binding may compensate for the remarkable reduction in positive charge in the pore region, to facilitate functional interactions with DNA. In this way, HvPCNA may harness its environment as

  6. Reversible Activation of Halophilic β-lactamase from Methanol-Induced Inactive Form: Contrast to Irreversible Inactivation of Non-Halophilic Counterpart.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tokunaga, Hiroko; Maeda, Junpei; Arakawa, Tsutomu; Tokunaga, Masao

    2017-06-01

    Effects of a water-miscible organic solvent, methanol, on the structure and activity of halophilic β-lactamase derived from Chromohalobacter sp.560 (HaBla), were investigated by means of circular dichroism (CD) measurement and enzymatic activity determination. Beta-lactamase activity was enhanced about 1.2-fold in the presence of 10-20% methanol. CD measurement of HaBla revealed different structures depending on the methanol concentration: native-like active form (Form I) in 10-20% methanol and methanol-induced inactive form at higher concentration (Form II in 40-60% and Form III in 75-80% methanol). Incubation of HaBla with 40% methanol led to the complete loss of activity within ~80 min accompanied by the formation of Form II, whose activity was recovered promptly up to ~80% of full activity upon dilution of the methanol concentration to 10%. In addition, when the protein concentration was sufficiently high (e.g., 0.7 mg/ml), HaBla activity of Form III in 75% methanol could be recovered in the same way (with slightly slower recovery rate), upon dilution of the methanol concentration. In contrast, non-halophilic β-lactamase from Escherichia coli K12 strain MG1655 (EcBla) was irreversibly denatured in the presence of 40% methanol. HaBla showed remarkable ability to renature from the methanol-induced inactive states.

  7. Functional organization of a single nif cluster in the mesophilic archaeon Methanosarcina mazei strain Gö1

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    Claudia Ehlers

    2002-01-01

    Full Text Available The mesophilic methanogenic archaeon Methanosarcina mazei strain Gö1 is able to utilize molecular nitrogen (N2 as its sole nitrogen source. We have identified and characterized a single nitrogen fixation (nif gene cluster in M. mazei Gö1 with an approximate length of 9 kbp. Sequence analysis revealed seven genes with sequence similarities to nifH, nifI1, nifI2, nifD, nifK, nifE and nifN, similar to other diazotrophic methanogens and certain bacteria such as Clostridium acetobutylicum, with the two glnB-like genes (nifI1 and nifI2 located between nifH and nifD. Phylogenetic analysis of deduced amino acid sequences for the nitrogenase structural genes of M. mazei Gö1 showed that they are most closely related to Methanosarcina barkeri nif2 genes, and also closely resemble those for the corresponding nif products of the gram-positive bacterium C. acetobutylicum. Northern blot analysis and reverse transcription PCR analysis demonstrated that the M. mazei nif genes constitute an operon transcribed only under nitrogen starvation as a single 8 kb transcript. Sequence analysis revealed a palindromic sequence at the transcriptional start site in front of the M. mazei nifH gene, which may have a function in transcriptional regulation of the nif operon.

  8. Characterization of a temperature-responsive two component regulatory system from the Antarctic archaeon, Methanococcoides burtonii.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Najnin, T; Siddiqui, K S; Taha, T; Elkaid, N; Kornfeld, G; Curmi, P M G; Cavicchioli, R

    2016-04-07

    Cold environments dominate the Earth's biosphere and the resident microorganisms play critical roles in fulfilling global biogeochemical cycles. However, only few studies have examined the molecular basis of thermosensing; an ability that microorganisms must possess in order to respond to environmental temperature and regulate cellular processes. Two component regulatory systems have been inferred to function in thermal regulation of gene expression, but biochemical studies assessing these systems in Bacteria are rare, and none have been performed in Archaea or psychrophiles. Here we examined the LtrK/LtrR two component regulatory system from the Antarctic archaeon, Methanococcoides burtonii, assessing kinase and phosphatase activities of wild-type and mutant proteins. LtrK was thermally unstable and had optimal phosphorylation activity at 10 °C (the lowest optimum activity for any psychrophilic enzyme), high activity at 0 °C and was rapidly thermally inactivated at 30 °C. These biochemical properties match well with normal environmental temperatures of M. burtonii (0-4 °C) and the temperature this psychrophile is capable of growing at in the laboratory (-2 to 28 °C). Our findings are consistent with a role for LtrK in performing phosphotransfer reactions with LtrR that could lead to temperature-dependent gene regulation.

  9. Minimal sulfur requirement for growth and sulfur-dependent metabolism of the hyperthermophilic archaeon Staphylothermus marinus

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    Xiaolei Hao

    2003-01-01

    Full Text Available Staphylothermus marinus is an anaerobic hyperthermophilic archaeon that uses peptides as carbon and energy sources. Elemental sulfur (S° is obligately required for its growth and is reduced to H2S. The metabolic functions and mechanisms of S° reduction were explored by examining S°-dependent growth and activities of key enzymes present in this organism. All three forms of S° tested—sublimed S°, colloidal S° and polysulfide—were used by S. marinus, and no other sulfur-containing compounds could replace S°. Elemental sulfur did not serve as physical support but appeared to function as an electron acceptor. The minimal S° concentration required for optimal growth was 0.05% (w/v. At this concentration, there appeared to be a metabolic transition from H2 production to S° reduction. Some enzymatic activities related to S°-dependent metabolism, including sulfur reductase, hydrogenase, glutamate dehydrogenase and electron transfer activities, were detected in cell-free extracts of S. marinus. These results indicate that S° plays an essential role in the heterotrophic metabolism of S. marinus. Reducing equivalents generated by the oxidation of amino acids from peptidolysis may be transferred to sulfur reductase and hydrogenase, which then catalyze the production of H2S and H2, respectively.

  10. Identification and analysis of proton-translocating pyrophosphatases in the methanogenic archaeon Methansarcina mazei.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bäumer, Sebastian; Lentes, Sabine; Gottschalk, Gerhard; Deppenmeier, Uwe

    2002-03-01

    Analysis of genome sequence data from the methanogenic archaeon Methanosarcina mazei Gö1 revealed the existence of two open reading frames encoding proton-translocating pyrophosphatases (PPases). These open reading frames are linked by a 750-bp intergenic region containing TC-rich stretches and are transcribed in opposite directions. The corresponding polypeptides are referred to as Mvp1 and Mvp2 and consist of 671 and 676 amino acids, respectively. Both enzymes represent extremely hydrophobic, integral membrane proteins with 15 predicted transmembrane segments and an overall amino acid sequence similarity of 50.1%. Multiple sequence alignments revealed that Mvp1 is closely related to eukaryotic PPases, whereas Mvp2 shows highest homologies to bacterial PPases. Northern blot experiments with RNA from methanol-grown cells harvested in the mid-log growth phase indicated that only Mvp2 was produced under these conditions. Analysis of washed membranes showed that Mvp2 had a specific activity of 0.34 U mg (protein)(-1). Proton translocation experiments with inverted membrane vesicles prepared from methanol-grown cells showed that hydrolysis of 1 mol of pyrophosphate was coupled to the translocation of about 1 mol of protons across the cytoplasmic membrane. Appropriate conditions for mvp1 expression could not be determined yet. The pyrophosphatases of M. mazei Gö1 represent the first examples of this enzyme class in methanogenic archaea and may be part of their energy-conserving system.

  11. Functional screening of hydrolytic activities reveals an extremely thermostable cellulase from a deep-sea archaeon

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    Benedikt eLeis

    2015-07-01

    Full Text Available Extreme habitats serve as a source of enzymes which are active under extreme conditions and are candidates for industrial applications. In this work, six large-insert mixed genomic libraries were screened for hydrolase activities in a broad temperature range (8 to 70 °C. Among a variety of hydrolytic activities, one fosmid clone, derived from a library of pooled isolates of hyperthermophilic archaea from deep sea vents, displayed hydrolytic activity on carboxymethyl cellulose substrate plates at 70 °C but not at lower temperatures. Sequence analysis of the fosmid insert revealed a gene encoding a novel glycoside hydrolase family 12 (GHF12 endo-1,4-β-glucanase, termed Cel12E. The enzyme shares 45 % sequence identity with a protein from the archaeon Thermococcus sp. AM4 and displays a unique multidomain architecture. Biochemical characterization of Cel12E revealed a remarkably thermostable protein, which appears to be of archaeal origin. The enzyme displayed maximum activity at 92 °C and was active on a variety of linear 1,4-β-glucans like carboxymethyl cellulose, β-glucan, lichenan, and phosphoric acid swollen cellulose. The protein is able to bind to various insoluble β-glucans. Product pattern analysis indicated that Cel12E is an endo-cleaving β-glucanase. Cel12E expands the toolbox of hyperthermostable archaeal cellulases with biotechnological potential.

  12. High hydrostatic pressure increases amino acid requirements in the piezo-hyperthermophilic archaeon Thermococcus barophilus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cario, Anaïs; Lormières, Florence; Xiang, Xiao; Oger, Philippe

    2015-11-01

    We have established a defined growth medium for the piezophilic hyperthermophilic archaeon Thermococcus barophilus, which allows growth yields of ca. 10(8) cells/ml under both atmospheric and high hydrostatic pressure. Our results demonstrate a major impact of hydrostatic pressure on amino acid metabolism, with increases from 3 amino acids required at atmospheric pressure to 17 at 40 MPa. We observe in T. barophilus and other Thermococcales a similar discrepancy between the presence/absence of amino acid synthesis pathways and amino acid requirements, which supports the existence of alternate, but yet unknown, amino acid synthesis pathways, and may explain the low number of essential amino acids observed in T. barophilus and other Thermococcales. T. barophilus displays a strong metabolic preference for organic polymers such as polypeptides and chitin, which may constitute a more readily available resource of carbon and energy in situ in deep-sea hydrothermal vents. We hypothesize that the low energy yields of fermentation of organic polymers, together with energetic constraints imposed by high hydrostatic pressure, may render de novo synthesis of amino acids ecologically unfavorable. Induction of this metabolic switch to amino acid recycling can explain the requirement for non-essential amino acids by Thermococcales for efficient growth in defined medium. Copyright © 2015 Institut Pasteur. Published by Elsevier Masson SAS. All rights reserved.

  13. Proteomic Insights into Sulfur Metabolism in the Hydrogen-Producing Hyperthermophilic Archaeon Thermococcus onnurineus NA1

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    Yoon-Jung Moon

    2015-04-01

    Full Text Available The hyperthermophilic archaeon Thermococcus onnurineus NA1 has been shown to produce H2 when using CO, formate, or starch as a growth substrate. This strain can also utilize elemental sulfur as a terminal electron acceptor for heterotrophic growth. To gain insight into sulfur metabolism, the proteome of T. onnurineus NA1 cells grown under sulfur culture conditions was quantified and compared with those grown under H2-evolving substrate culture conditions. Using label-free nano-UPLC-MSE-based comparative proteomic analysis, approximately 38.4% of the total identified proteome (589 proteins was found to be significantly up-regulated (≥1.5-fold under sulfur culture conditions. Many of these proteins were functionally associated with carbon fixation, Fe–S cluster biogenesis, ATP synthesis, sulfur reduction, protein glycosylation, protein translocation, and formate oxidation. Based on the abundances of the identified proteins in this and other genomic studies, the pathways associated with reductive sulfur metabolism, H2-metabolism, and oxidative stress defense were proposed. The results also revealed markedly lower expression levels of enzymes involved in the sulfur assimilation pathway, as well as cysteine desulfurase, under sulfur culture condition. The present results provide the first global atlas of proteome changes triggered by sulfur, and may facilitate an understanding of how hyperthermophilic archaea adapt to sulfur-rich, extreme environments.

  14. Hydrogenase-independent uptake and metabolism of electrons by the archaeon Methanococcus maripaludis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lohner, Svenja T; Deutzmann, Jörg S; Logan, Bruce E; Leigh, John; Spormann, Alfred M

    2014-08-01

    Direct, shuttle-free uptake of extracellular, cathode-derived electrons has been postulated as a novel mechanism of electron metabolism in some prokaryotes that may also be involved in syntrophic electron transport between two microorganisms. Experimental proof for direct uptake of cathodic electrons has been mostly indirect and has been based on the absence of detectable concentrations of molecular hydrogen. However, hydrogen can be formed as a transient intermediate abiotically at low cathodic potentials (electrons. Methane formation from cathodic electrons was observed in a wild-type strain of the methanogenic archaeon Methanococcus maripaludis as well as in a hydrogenase-deletion mutant lacking all catabolic hydrogenases, indicating the presence of a hydrogenase-independent mechanism of electron catabolism. In addition, we discovered a new route for hydrogen or formate production from cathodic electrons: Upon chemical inhibition of methanogenesis with 2-bromo-ethane sulfonate, hydrogen or formate accumulated in the bioelectrochemical cells instead of methane. These results have implications for our understanding on the diversity of microbial electron uptake and metabolism.

  15. Characterization of the glycolytic enzyme enolase which is abundant in the hyperthermophilic archaeon, Pyrococcus furiosus

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Peak, M.J.; Peak, J.G.; Stevens, F.J. [Argonne National Lab., IL (United States); Blamey, J.; Mai, X.; Zhou, Z.H.; Adams, M.W.W. [Georgia Univ., Athens, GA (United States)

    1993-12-31

    High enolase activity, as measured by the conversion of 2-phosphoglycerate to phosphoenolphyruvate, was found in the cytoplasm of Pyrococcus (an anaerobic, hyperthermophilic archaeon that grows optimally at 100{degree}C). In this organism, the enzyme probably functions in a sugar fermentation pathway. The enzyme was purified to homogeneity. It had a temperature optimum of >90 {degree}C, and a pH optimum of 8.1. The enzyme was extremely thermostable with a half time for inactivation at 100{degree}C of 40 min. In contrast, an enolase from yeast was inactivated in 1 min at 88{degree}C. Both the P. furiosus and yeast enzymes required a metal ion for activity, but whereas the yeast enzyme has an absolute requirement for Mg{sup ++} the P. furiosus enolase was equally active in the presence of Mn{sup ++}. Both enzymes were competitively inhibited by citrate. P. furiosus enolase, as for mesophilic enolases, probably has a homodimeric structure with subunit M{sub r} greater than 45,000. A highly conserved sequence of eight amino acids in the N-terminal region was found in enolases from P. furiosus and a wide range of other organisms including bacteria, yeast, birds, and mammals.

  16. Dynamic Metabolite Profiling in an Archaeon Connects Transcriptional Regulation to Metabolic Consequences.

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    Horia Todor

    Full Text Available Previous work demonstrated that the TrmB transcription factor is responsible for regulating the expression of many enzyme-coding genes in the hypersaline-adapted archaeon Halobacterium salinarum via a direct interaction with a cis-regulatory sequence in their promoters. This interaction is abolished in the presence of glucose. Although much is known about the effects of TrmB at the transcriptional level, it remains unclear whether and to what extent changes in mRNA levels directly affect metabolite levels. In order to address this question, here we performed a high-resolution metabolite profiling time course during a change in nutrients using a combination of targeted and untargeted methods in wild-type and ΔtrmB strain backgrounds. We found that TrmB-mediated transcriptional changes resulted in widespread and significant changes to metabolite levels across the metabolic network. Additionally, the pattern of growth complementation using various purines suggests that the mis-regulation of gluconeogenesis in the ΔtrmB mutant strain in the absence of glucose results in low phosphoribosylpyrophosphate (PRPP levels. We confirmed these low PRPP levels using a quantitative mass spectrometric technique and found that they are associated with a metabolic block in de novo purine synthesis, which is partially responsible for the growth defect of the ΔtrmB mutant strain in the absence of glucose. In conclusion, we show how transcriptional regulation of metabolism affects metabolite levels and ultimately, phenotypes.

  17. Functional organization of a single nif cluster in the mesophilic archaeon Methanosarcina mazei strain Gö1

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ehlers, Claudia; Veit, Katharina; Gottschalk, Gerhard; Schmitz, Ruth A.

    2002-01-01

    The mesophilic methanogenic archaeon Methanosarcina mazei strain Gö1 is able to utilize molecular nitrogen (N2) as its sole nitrogen source. We have identified and characterized a single nitrogen fixation (nif) gene cluster in M. mazei Gö1 with an approximate length of 9 kbp. Sequence analysis revealed seven genes with sequence similarities to nifH, nifI1, nifI2, nifD, nifK, nifE and nifN, similar to other diazotrophic methanogens and certain bacteria such as Clostridium acetobutylicum, with the two glnB-like genes (nifI1 and nifI2) located between nifH and nifD. Phylogenetic analysis of deduced amino acid sequences for the nitrogenase structural genes of M. mazei Gö1 showed that they are most closely related to Methanosarcina barkeri nif2 genes, and also closely resemble those for the corresponding nif products of the gram-positive bacterium C. acetobutylicum. Northern blot analysis and reverse transcription PCR analysis demonstrated that the M. mazei nif genes constitute an operon transcribed only under nitrogen starvation as a single 8 kb transcript. Sequence analysis revealed a palindromic sequence at the transcriptional start site in front of the M. mazei nifH gene, which may have a function in transcriptional regulation of the nif operon. PMID:15803652

  18. Pyrobaculum calidifontis sp. nov., a novel hyperthermophilic archaeon that grows in atmospheric air

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    Taku Amo

    2002-01-01

    Full Text Available A novel, facultatively aerobic, heterotrophic hyperthermophilic archaeon was isolated from a terrestrial hot spring in the Philippines. Cells of the new isolate, strain VA1, were rod-shaped with a length of 1.5 to 10 μm and a width of 0.5 to 1.0 μm. Isolate VA1 grew optimally at 90 to 95 °C and pH 7.0 under atmospheric air. Oxygen served as a final electron acceptor under aerobic growth conditions, and vigorous shaking of the medium significantly enhanced growth. Elemental sulfur inhibited cell growth under aerobic growth conditions, whereas thiosulfate stimulated cell growth. Under anaerobic growth conditions, nitrate served as a final electron acceptor, but nitrite or sulfur-containing compounds such as elemental sulfur, thiosulfate, sulfate and sulfite could not act as final electron acceptors. The G+C content of the genomic DNA was 51 mol%. Phylogenetic analysis based on 16S rRNA sequences indicated that strain VA1 exhibited close relationships to species of the genus Pyrobaculum. A DNA–DNA hybridization study revealed a low level of similarity (≤ 18% between strain VA1 and previously described members of the genus Pyrobaculum. Physiological characteristics also indicated that strain VA1 was distinct from these Pyrobaculum species. Our results indicate that isolate VA1 represents a novel species, named Pyrobaculum calidifontis.

  19. Approach toward enhancement of halophilic protease production by Halobacterium sp. strain LBU50301 using statistical design response surface methodology

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    Julalak Chuprom

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available A new potent halophilic protease producer, Halobacterium sp. strain LBU50301 was isolated from salt-fermented fish samples (budu and identified by phenotypic analysis, and 16S rDNA gene sequencing. Thereafter, sequential statistical strategy was used to optimize halophilic protease production from Halobacterium sp. strain LBU50301 by shake-flask fermentation. The classical one-factor-at-a-time (OFAT approach determined gelatin was the best nitrogen source. Based on Plackett–Burman (PB experimental design; gelatin, MgSO4·7H2O, NaCl and pH significantly influenced the halophilic protease production. Central composite design (CCD determined the optimum level of medium components. Subsequently, an 8.78-fold increase in corresponding halophilic protease yield (156.22 U/mL was obtained, compared with that produced in the original medium (17.80 U/mL. Validation experiments proved the adequacy and accuracy of model, and the results showed the predicted value agreed well with the experimental values. An overall 13-fold increase in halophilic protease yield was achieved using a 3 L laboratory fermenter and optimized medium (231.33 U/mL.

  20. Analysis of intergenic spacer region length polymorphisms to investigate the halophilic archaeal diversity of stromatolites and microbial mats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leuko, S; Goh, F; Allen, M A; Burns, B P; Walter, M R; Neilan, B A

    2007-01-01

    Hamelin Pool in Western Australia is one of the two major sites in the world with active marine stromatolite formation. Surrounded by living smooth and pustular mats, these ancient laminated structures are associated with cyanobacterial communities. Recent studies have identified a wide diversity of bacteria and archaea in this habitat. By understanding and evaluating the microbial diversity of this environment we can obtain insights into the formation of early life on Earth, as stromatolites have been dated in the geological record as far back as 3.5 billion years. Automated ribosomal intergenic spacer analysis (ARISA) patterns were shown to be a useful method to genetically discriminate halophilic archaea within this environment. Patterns of known halophilic archaea are consistent, by replicate analysis, and the halophilic strains isolated from stromatolites have novel intergenic spacer profiles. ARISA-PCR, performed directly on extracted DNA from different sample sites, provided significant insights into the extent of previous unknown diversity of halophilic archaea within this environment. Cloning and sequence analysis of the spacer regions obtained from stromatolites confirmed the novel and broad diversity of halophilic archaea in this environment.

  1. Molecular recognition of histidine tRNA by histidyl-tRNA synthetase from hyperthermophilic archaeon, Aeropyrum pernix K1.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nagatoyo, Yukari; Iwaki, Jun; Suzuki, Satoko; Kuno, Atsushi; Hasegawa, Tsunemi

    2005-01-01

    To investigate the recognition sites of histidine tRNA for histidyl-tRNA synthetase from an extreme hyperthermophilic archaeon, Aeropyrum pernix K1, we examined histidylation activities by using overexpressed histidyl-tRNA synthetase and various histidine tRNA transcripts that were prepared by in vitro transcription system. Results indicated that anticodon was not recognized by the histidyl-tRNA synthetase similar to that of Escherichia coli histidine tRNA recognition system. Discriminator base C73 was weekly recognized and an additional G residue was specifically recognized by the enzyme.

  2. Recognition sites of glycine tRNA for glycyl-tRNA synthetase from hyperthermophilic archaeon, Aeropyrum pernix K1.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Okamoto, Koji; Kuno, Atsushi; Hasegawa, Tsunemi

    2005-01-01

    To elucidate the tRNA recognition sites of glycine tRNA from an extreme thermophilic and aerobic archaeon, Aeropyrum pernix K1, we examined glycylation activities using in vitro mutant glycine tRNA transcripts and recombinant A. pernix glycyl-tRNA synthetase. The recognition nucleotides were determined to be C35 and C36 of anticodon, C2-G71 and G3-C70 base-pairs of acceptor stem. However, discriminator base A73 was not recognized by glycyl-tRNA synthetase.

  3. Shortcut nitrification-denitrification by means of autochthonous halophilic biomass in an SBR treating fish-canning wastewater.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Capodici, Marco; Corsino, Santo Fabio; Torregrossa, Michele; Viviani, Gaspare

    2018-02-15

    Autochthonous halophilic biomass was cultivated in a sequencing batch reactor (SBR) aimed at analyzing the potential use of autochthonous halophilic activated sludge in treating saline industrial wastewater. Despite the high salt concentration (30 g NaCl L-1), biological oxygen demand (BOD) and total suspended solids (TSS), removal efficiencies were higher than 90%. More than 95% of the nitrogen was removed via a shortcut nitrification-denitrification process. Both the autotrophic and heterotrophic biomass samples exhibited high biological activity. The use of autochthonous halophilic biomass led to high-quality effluent and helped to manage the issues related to nitrogen removal in saline wastewater treatment. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  4. Interactions between nitrogen fixation and osmoregulation in the methanogenic archaeon Methanosarcina barkeri 227

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    Brabban, A.D.; Orcutt, E.N.; Zinder, S.H. [Cornell Univ., Ithaca, NY (United States). Section of Microbiology

    1999-03-01

    The nitrogenase enzyme complex of Methanosarcina barkeri 227 was found to be more sensitive to NaCl than previously studied molybdenum nitrogenases are, with total inhibition of activity occurring at 190 mM NaCl, compared with >600 mM NaCl for Azotobacter vinelandii and Clostridium pasteurianum nitrogenases. Na{sup +} and K{sup +} had equivalent effects, whereas Mg{sup 2+} was more inhibitory than either monovalent cation, even on a per-charge basis. The anion Cl{sup {minus}} was more inhibitory than acetate was. Because M. barkeri 227 is a facultative halophile, the authors examined the effects of external salt on growth and diazotrophy and found that inhibition of growth was not greater with N{sub 2} than with NH{sub 4}{sup +}. Cells grown with N{sub 2} and cells grown with NH{sub 4}{sup +} produced equal concentrations of {alpha}-glutamate at low salt concentrations and equal concentrations of N{sup {var_epsilon}}-acetyl-{beta}-lysine at NaCl concentrations greater than 500 mM. Despite the high energetic cost of fixing nitrogen for these osmolytes, the authors obtained no evidence that there is a shift towards nonnitrogenous osmolytes during diazotrophic growth. In vitro nitrogenase enzyme assays showed that at a low concentration potassium glutamate enhanced activity but at higher concentrations this compound inhibited activity; 50% inhibition occurred at a potassium glutamate concentration of approximately 400 mM.

  5. Archaeon and archaeal virus diversity classification via sequence entropy and fractal dimension

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tremberger, George, Jr.; Gallardo, Victor; Espinoza, Carola; Holden, Todd; Gadura, N.; Cheung, E.; Schneider, P.; Lieberman, D.; Cheung, T.

    2010-09-01

    Archaea are important potential candidates in astrobiology as their metabolism includes solar, inorganic and organic energy sources. Archaeal viruses would also be expected to be present in a sustainable archaeal exobiological community. Genetic sequence Shannon entropy and fractal dimension can be used to establish a two-dimensional measure for classification and phylogenetic study of these organisms. A sequence fractal dimension can be calculated from a numerical series consisting of the atomic numbers of each nucleotide. Archaeal 16S and 23S ribosomal RNA sequences were studied. Outliers in the 16S rRNA fractal dimension and entropy plot were found to be halophilic archaea. Positive correlation (R-square ~ 0.75, N = 18) was observed between fractal dimension and entropy across the studied species. The 16S ribosomal RNA sequence entropy correlates with the 23S ribosomal RNA sequence entropy across species with R-square 0.93, N = 18. Entropy values correspond positively with branch lengths of a published phylogeny. The studied archaeal virus sequences have high fractal dimensions of 2.02 or more. A comparison of selected extremophile sequences with archaeal sequences from the Humboldt Marine Ecosystem database (Wood-Hull Oceanography Institute, MIT) suggests the presence of continuous sequence expression as inferred from distributions of entropy and fractal dimension, consistent with the diversity expected in an exobiological archaeal community.

  6. Grappling archaea: ultrastructural analyses of an uncultivated, cold-loving archaeon and its biofilm

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    Alexandra ePerras

    2014-08-01

    Full Text Available Similarly to Bacteria, Archaea are microorganisms that interact with their surrounding environment in a versatile manner. To date, interactions based on cellular structure and surface appendages have mainly been documented using model systems of cultivable archaea under laboratory conditions. Here, we report on the microbial interactions and ultrastructural features of the uncultivated SM1 Euryarchaeon, which is highly dominant in its biotope. Therefore, biofilm samples taken from the Sippenauer Moor, Germany, were investigated via transmission electron microscopy (TEM; negative staining, thin-sectioning and scanning electron microscopy (SEM in order to elucidate the fine structures of the microbial cells and the biofilm itself. The biofilm consisted of small archaeal cocci (0.6 µm diameter, arranged in a regular pattern (1.2-2.0 µm distance from cell to cell, whereas each archaeon was connected to 6 other archaea on average. Extracellular polymeric substances (EPS were limited to the close vicinity of the archaeal cells, and specific cell surface appendages (hami, Moissl et al., 2005 protruded beyond the EPS matrix enabling microbial interaction by cell-cell contacts among the archaea and between archaea and bacteria. All analyzed hami revealed their previously described architecture of nano-grappling hooks and barb-wire basal structures. Considering the archaeal cell walls, the SM1 Euryarchaea exhibited a double-membrane, which has rarely been reported for members of this phylogenetic domain. Based on these findings, the current generalized picture on archaeal cell walls needs to be revisited, as archaeal cell structures are more complex and sophisticated than previously assumed, particularly when looking into the uncultivated majority.

  7. Identification and analysis of proton-translocating pyrophosphatases in the methanogenic archaeon Methanosarcina mazei

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bäumer, Sebastian; Lentes, Sabine; Gottschalk, Gerhard; Deppenmeier, Uwe

    2002-01-01

    Analysis of genome sequence data from the methanogenic archaeon Methanosarcina mazei Gö1 revealed the existence of two open reading frames encoding proton-translocating pyrophosphatases (PPases). These open reading frames are linked by a 750-bp intergenic region containing TC-rich stretches and are transcribed in opposite directions. The corresponding polypeptides are referred to as Mvp1 and Mvp2 and consist of 671 and 676 amino acids, respectively. Both enzymes represent extremely hydrophobic, integral membrane proteins with 15 predicted transmembrane segments and an overall amino acid sequence similarity of 50.1%. Multiple sequence alignments revealed that Mvp1 is closely related to eukaryotic PPases, whereas Mvp2 shows highest homologies to bacterial PPases. Northern blot experiments with RNA from methanol-grown cells harvested in the mid-log growth phase indicated that only Mvp2 was produced under these conditions. Analysis of washed membranes showed that Mvp2 had a specific activity of 0.34 U mg (protein)–1. Proton translocation experiments with inverted membrane vesicles prepared from methanol-grown cells showed that hydrolysis of 1 mol of pyrophosphate was coupled to the translocation of about 1 mol of protons across the cytoplasmic membrane. Appropriate conditions for mvp1 expression could not be determined yet. The pyrophosphatases of M. mazei Gö1 represent the first examples of this enzyme class in methanogenic archaea and may be part of their energy-conserving system. Abbreviations: DCCD, N,N′-dicyclohexylcarbodiimide; PPase, inorganic pyrophosphatase; PPi, inorganic pyrophosphate; Δp, proton motive force. PMID:15803653

  8. Identification and characterization of small RNAs in the hyperthermophilic archaeon Sulfolobus solfataricus.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ning Xu

    Full Text Available The term RNA silencing (RNA interference, RNAi describes a set of mechanisms that regulate gene expression in eukaryotes. Small interfering RNAs (siRNA and microRNAs (miRNAs are two major types of RNAi-associated small RNAs (smRNAs found in most eukaryotic organisms. Despite the presence of a plethora of non-coding RNAs longer than 50-nucleotide (nt in length in various species of Archaea, little is known about smRNAs in archaea that resemble the 20-24-nt long smRNAs found in eukaryotes, which have been implicated in the post-transcriptional control of gene expression. Here, we report the finding of a large number of smRNAs approximatelly 20-nt in length, including phased smRNAs and potential miRNAs, from the hyperthermophilic archaeon Sulfolobus solfataricus p2 (Ssp2 based on deep sequencing. The expression of some of the miRNA candidates in Ssp2 was confirmed. Consistent with the Ssp2 hyperthermophilic properties, we found that higher temperatures more efficiently induced the production of the miRNA candidates in an in vitro system using the putative foldback precursor transcripts incubated with Ssp2 extract. Although we initially predicted putative target genes of some miRNA candidates, further analysis mapped the cleavage sites downstream of the miRNA candidate complementary regions, similar to those involved in plant miRNA-mediated TAS transcript cleavage. We also identified smRNAs from clustered, regularly interspaced, short palindromic repeat (CRISPR loci, which play important roles in prokaryotic microbial defense systems. Archaea represent a unique life form next to Bacteria and Eukarya, and our results may provide a useful resource for further in-depth study on the regulation and evolution of smRNAs in this special organism.

  9. Enzymes of the benzoyl-coenzyme A degradation pathway in the hyperthermophilic archaeon Ferroglobus placidus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schmid, Georg; René, Sandra Bosch; Boll, Matthias

    2015-09-01

    The Fe(III)-respiring Ferroglobus placidus is the only known archaeon and hyperthermophile for which a complete degradation of aromatic substrates to CO2 has been reported. Recent genome and transcriptome analyses proposed a benzoyl-coenzyme A (CoA) degradation pathway similar to that found in the phototrophic Rhodopseudomonas palustris, which involves a cyclohex-1-ene-1-carboxyl-CoA (1-enoyl-CoA) forming, ATP-dependent key enzyme benzoyl-CoA reductase (BCR). In this work, we demonstrate, by first in vitro studies, that benzoyl-CoA is ATP-dependently reduced by two electrons to cyclohexa-1,5-dienoyl-CoA (1,5-dienoyl-CoA), which is further degraded by hydration to 6-hydroxycyclohex-1-ene-1-carboxyl-CoA (6-OH-1-enoyl-CoA); upon addition of NAD(+) , the latter was subsequently converted to β-oxidation intermediates. The four candidate genes of BCR were heterologously expressed, and the enriched, oxygen-sensitive enzyme catalysed the two-electron reduction of benzoyl-CoA to 1,5-dienoyl-CoA. A gene previously assigned to a 2,3-didehydropimeloyl-CoA hydratase was heterologously expressed and shown to act as a typical 1,5-dienoyl-CoA hydratase that does not accept 1-enoyl-CoA. A gene previously assigned to a 1-enoyl-CoA hydratase was heterologously expressed and identified to code for a bifunctional crotonase/3-OH-butyryl-CoA dehydrogenase. In summary, the results consistently provide biochemical evidence that F. placidus and probably other archaea predominantly degrade aromatics via the Thauera/Azoarcus type and not or only to a minor extent via the predicted R. palustris-type benzoyl-CoA degradation pathway. © 2015 Society for Applied Microbiology and John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  10. Structural characterization of ether lipids from the archaeon Sulfolobus islandicus by high-resolution shotgun lipidomics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jensen, Sara Munk; Brandl, Martin; Treusch, Alexander H; Ejsing, Christer S

    2015-03-01

    The molecular structures, biosynthetic pathways and physiological functions of membrane lipids produced by organisms in the domain Archaea are poorly characterized as compared with that of counterparts in Bacteria and Eukaryota. Here we report on the use of high-resolution shotgun lipidomics to characterize, for the first time, the lipid complement of the archaeon Sulfolobus islandicus. To support the identification of lipids in S. islandicus, we first compiled a database of ether lipid species previously ascribed to Archaea. Next, we analyzed the lipid complement of S. islandicus by high-resolution Fourier transform mass spectrometry using an ion trap-orbitrap mass spectrometer. This analysis identified five clusters of molecular ions that matched ether lipids in the database with sub-ppm mass accuracy. To structurally characterize and validate the identities of the potential lipid species, we performed structural analysis using multistage activation on the ion trap-orbitrap instrument as well as tandem mass analysis using a quadrupole time-of-flight machine. Our analysis identified four ether lipid species previously reported in Archaea, and one ether lipid species that had not been described before. This uncharacterized lipid species features two head group structures composed of a trisaccharide residue carrying an uncommon sulfono group (-SO3) and an inositol phosphate group. Both head groups are linked to a glycerol dialkyl glycerol tetraether core structure having isoprenoid chains with a total of 80 carbon atoms and 4 cyclopentane moieties. The shotgun lipidomics approach deployed here defines a novel workflow for exploratory lipid profiling of Archaea. Copyright © 2015 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  11. Outside the unusual cell wall of the hyperthermophilic archaeon Aeropyrum pernix K1.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Palmieri, Gianna; Cannio, Raffaele; Fiume, Immacolata; Rossi, Mosé; Pocsfalvi, Gabriella

    2009-11-01

    In contrast to the extensively studied eukaryal and bacterial protein secretion systems, comparatively less is known about how and which proteins cross the archaeal cell membrane. To identify secreted proteins of the hyperthermophilic archaeon Aeropyrum pernix K1 we used a proteomics approach to analyze the extracellular and cell surface protein fractions. The experimentally obtained data comprising 107 proteins were compared with the in silico predicted secretome. Because of the lack of signal peptide and cellular localization prediction tools specific for archaeal species, programs trained on eukaryotic and/or Gram-positive and Gram-negative bacterial signal peptide data sets were used. PSortB Gram-negative and Gram-positive analysis predicted 21 (1.2% of total ORFs) and 24 (1.4% of total ORFs) secreted proteins, respectively, from the entire A. pernix K1 proteome, 12 of which were experimentally identified in this work. Six additional proteins were predicted to follow non-classical secretion mechanisms using SecP algorithms. According to at least one of the two PSortB predictions, 48 proteins identified in the two fractions possess an unknown localization site. In addition, more than half of the proteins do not contain signal peptides recognized by current prediction programs. This suggests that known mechanisms only partly describe archaeal protein secretion. The most striking characteristic of the secretome was the high number of transport-related proteins identified from the ATP-binding cassette (ABC), tripartite ATP-independent periplasmic, ATPase, small conductance mechanosensitive ion channel (MscS), and dicarboxylate amino acid-cation symporter transporter families. In particular, identification of 21 solute-binding receptors of the ABC superfamily of the 24 predicted in silico confirms that ABC-mediated transport represents the most frequent strategy adopted by A. pernix for solute translocation across the cell membrane.

  12. Crystal structure of novel dye-linked L-proline dehydrogenase from hyperthermophilic archaeon Aeropyrum pernix.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sakuraba, Haruhiko; Satomura, Takenori; Kawakami, Ryushi; Kim, Kwang; Hara, Yusuke; Yoneda, Kazunari; Ohshima, Toshihisa

    2012-06-08

    Two types of dye-linked L-proline dehydrogenase (PDH1, α4β4-type hetero-octamer, and PDH2, αβγδ-type heterotetramer) have been identified so far in hyperthermophilic archaea. Here, we report the crystal structure of a third type of L-proline dehydrogenase, found in the aerobic hyperthermophilic archaeon Aeropyrum pernix, whose structure (homodimer) is much simpler than those of previously studied L-proline dehydrogenases. The structure was determined at a resolution of 1.92 Å. The asymmetric unit contained one subunit, and a crystallographic 2-fold axis generated the functional dimer. The overall fold of the subunit showed similarity to that of the PDH1 β-subunit, which is responsible for catalyzing L-proline dehydrogenation. However, the situation at the subunit-subunit interface of the A. pernix enzyme was totally different from that in PDH1. The presence of additional surface elements in the A. pernix enzyme contributes to a unique dimer association. Moreover, the C-terminal Leu(428), which is provided by a tail extending from the FAD-binding domain, shielded the active site, and an L-proline molecule was entrapped within the active site cavity. The K(m) value of a Leu(428) deletion mutant for L-proline was about 800 times larger than the K(m) value of the wild-type enzyme, although the k(cat) values did not differ much between the two enzymes. This suggests the C-terminal Leu(428) is not directly involved in catalysis, but it is essential for maintaining a high affinity for the substrate. This is the first description of an LPDH structure with L-proline bound, and it provides new insight into the substrate binding of LPDH.

  13. Refolding, characterization and crystal structure of (S)-malate dehydrogenase from the hyperthermophilic archaeon Aeropyrum pernix.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kawakami, Ryushi; Sakuraba, Haruhiko; Goda, Shuichiro; Tsuge, Hideaki; Ohshima, Toshihisa

    2009-10-01

    Tartrate oxidation activity was found in the crude extract of an aerobic hyperthermophilic archaeon Aeropyrum pernix, and the enzyme was identified as (S)-malate dehydrogenase (MDH), which, when produced in Escherichia coli, was mainly obtained as an inactive inclusion body. The inclusion body was dissolved in 6 M guanidine-HCl and gradually refolded to the active enzyme through dilution of the denaturant. The purified recombinant enzyme consisted of four identical subunits with a molecular mass of about 110 kDa. NADP was preferred as a coenzyme over NAD for (S)-malate oxidation and, unlike MDHs from other sources, this enzyme readily catalyzed the oxidation of (2S,3S)-tartrate and (2S,3R)-tartrate. The tartrate oxidation activity was also observed in MDHs from the hyperthermophilic archaea Methanocaldococcus jannaschii and Archaeoglobus fulgidus, suggesting these hyperthermophilic MDHs loosely bind their substrates. The refolded A. pernix MDH was also crystallized, and the structure was determined at a resolution of 2.9 A. Its overall structure was similar to those of the M. jannaschii, Chloroflexus aurantiacus, Chlorobium vibrioforme and Cryptosporidium parvum [lactate dehydrogenase-like] MDHs with root-mean-square-deviation values between 1.4 and 2.1 A. Consistent with earlier reports, Ala at position 53 was responsible for coenzyme specificity, and the next residue, Arg, was important for NADP binding. Structural comparison revealed that the hyperthermostability of the A. pernix MDH is likely attributable to its smaller cavity volume and larger numbers of ion pairs and ion-pair networks, but the molecular strategy for thermostability may be specific for each enzyme.

  14. Crystal Structure of Novel Dye-linked l-Proline Dehydrogenase from Hyperthermophilic Archaeon Aeropyrum pernix*

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sakuraba, Haruhiko; Satomura, Takenori; Kawakami, Ryushi; Kim, Kwang; Hara, Yusuke; Yoneda, Kazunari; Ohshima, Toshihisa

    2012-01-01

    Two types of dye-linked l-proline dehydrogenase (PDH1, α4β4-type hetero-octamer, and PDH2, αβγδ-type heterotetramer) have been identified so far in hyperthermophilic archaea. Here, we report the crystal structure of a third type of l-proline dehydrogenase, found in the aerobic hyperthermophilic archaeon Aeropyrum pernix, whose structure (homodimer) is much simpler than those of previously studied l-proline dehydrogenases. The structure was determined at a resolution of 1.92 Å. The asymmetric unit contained one subunit, and a crystallographic 2-fold axis generated the functional dimer. The overall fold of the subunit showed similarity to that of the PDH1 β-subunit, which is responsible for catalyzing l-proline dehydrogenation. However, the situation at the subunit-subunit interface of the A. pernix enzyme was totally different from that in PDH1. The presence of additional surface elements in the A. pernix enzyme contributes to a unique dimer association. Moreover, the C-terminal Leu428, which is provided by a tail extending from the FAD-binding domain, shielded the active site, and an l-proline molecule was entrapped within the active site cavity. The Km value of a Leu428 deletion mutant for l-proline was about 800 times larger than the Km value of the wild-type enzyme, although the kcat values did not differ much between the two enzymes. This suggests the C-terminal Leu428 is not directly involved in catalysis, but it is essential for maintaining a high affinity for the substrate. This is the first description of an LPDH structure with l-proline bound, and it provides new insight into the substrate binding of LPDH. PMID:22511758

  15. Characterization of a Zinc-Containing Alcohol Dehydrogenase with Stereoselectivity from the Hyperthermophilic Archaeon Thermococcus guaymasensis▿

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ying, Xiangxian; Ma, Kesen

    2011-01-01

    An alcohol dehydrogenase (ADH) from hyperthermophilic archaeon Thermococcus guaymasensis was purified to homogeneity and was found to be a homotetramer with a subunit size of 40 ± 1 kDa. The gene encoding the enzyme was cloned and sequenced; this gene had 1,095 bp, corresponding to 365 amino acids, and showed high sequence homology to zinc-containing ADHs and l-threonine dehydrogenases with binding motifs of catalytic zinc and NADP+. Metal analyses revealed that this NADP+-dependent enzyme contained 0.9 ± 0.03 g-atoms of zinc per subunit. It was a primary-secondary ADH and exhibited a substrate preference for secondary alcohols and corresponding ketones. Particularly, the enzyme with unusual stereoselectivity catalyzed an anti-Prelog reduction of racemic (R/S)-acetoin to (2R,3R)-2,3-butanediol and meso-2,3-butanediol. The optimal pH values for the oxidation and formation of alcohols were 10.5 and 7.5, respectively. Besides being hyperthermostable, the enzyme activity increased as the temperature was elevated up to 95°C. The enzyme was active in the presence of methanol up to 40% (vol/vol) in the assay mixture. The reduction of ketones underwent high efficiency by coupling with excess isopropanol to regenerate NADPH. The kinetic parameters of the enzyme showed that the apparent Km values and catalytic efficiency for NADPH were 40 times lower and 5 times higher than those for NADP+, respectively. The physiological roles of the enzyme were proposed to be in the formation of alcohols such as ethanol or acetoin concomitant to the NADPH oxidation. PMID:21515780

  16. Crenarchaeol dominates the membrane lipids of Candidatus Nitrososphaera gargensis, a thermophilic group I.1b Archaeon.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pitcher, Angela; Rychlik, Nicolas; Hopmans, Ellen C; Spieck, Eva; Rijpstra, W Irene C; Ossebaar, Jort; Schouten, Stefan; Wagner, Michael; Damsté, Jaap S Sinninghe

    2010-04-01

    Analyses of archaeal membrane lipids are increasingly being included in ecological studies as a comparatively unbiased complement to gene-based microbiological approaches. For example, crenarchaeol, a glycerol dialkyl glycerol tetraether (GDGT) with a unique cyclohexane moiety, has been postulated as biomarker for ammonia-oxidizing Archaea (AOA). Crenarchaeol has been detected in Nitrosopumilus maritimus and 'Candidatus Nitrosocaldus yellowstonii' representing two of the three lineages within the Crenarchaeota containing described AOA. In this paper we present the membrane GDGT composition of 'Candidatus Nitrososphaera gargensis', a moderately thermophilic AOA, and the only cultivated Group I.1b Crenarchaeon. At a cultivation temperature of 46 degrees C, GDGTs of this organism consisted primarily of crenarchaeol, its regioisomer, and a novel GDGT. Intriguingly, 'Ca. N. gargensis' is the first cultivated archaeon to synthesize substantial amounts of the crenarchaeol regioisomer, a compound found in large relative abundances in tropical ocean water and some soils, and an important component of the TEX(86) paleothermometer. Intact polar lipid (IPL) analysis revealed that 'Ca. N. gargensis' synthesizes IPLs similar to those reported for the Goup I.1a AOA, Nitrosopumilus maritimus SCMI, in addition to IPLs containing uncharacterized headgroups. Overall, the unique GDGT composition of 'Ca. N. gargensis' extends the known taxonomic distribution of crenarchaeol synthesis to the Group I.1b Crenarchaeota, implicating this clade as a potentially important source of crenarchaeol in soils and moderately high temperature environments. Moreover, this work supports the hypothesis that crenarchaeol is specific to all AOA and highlights specific lipids, which may prove useful as biomarkers for 'Ca. N. gargensis'-like AOA.

  17. Apo and ligand-bound structures of ModA from the archaeon Methanosarcina acetivorans.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chan, Sum; Giuroiu, Iulia; Chernishof, Irina; Sawaya, Michael R; Chiang, Janet; Gunsalus, Robert P; Arbing, Mark A; Perry, L Jeanne

    2010-03-01

    The trace-element oxyanion molybdate, which is required for the growth of many bacterial and archaeal species, is transported into the cell by an ATP-binding cassette (ABC) transporter superfamily uptake system called ModABC. ModABC consists of the ModA periplasmic solute-binding protein, the integral membrane-transport protein ModB and the ATP-binding and hydrolysis cassette protein ModC. In this study, X-ray crystal structures of ModA from the archaeon Methanosarcina acetivorans (MaModA) have been determined in the apoprotein conformation at 1.95 and 1.69 A resolution and in the molybdate-bound conformation at 2.25 and 2.45 A resolution. The overall domain structure of MaModA is similar to other ModA proteins in that it has a bilobal structure in which two mixed alpha/beta domains are linked by a hinge region. The apo MaModA is the first unliganded archaeal ModA structure to be determined: it exhibits a deep cleft between the two domains and confirms that upon binding ligand one domain is rotated towards the other by a hinge-bending motion, which is consistent with the 'Venus flytrap' model seen for bacterial-type periplasmic binding proteins. In contrast to the bacterial ModA structures, which have tetrahedral coordination of their metal substrates, molybdate-bound MaModA employs octahedral coordination of its substrate like other archaeal ModA proteins.

  18. Apo and ligand-bound structures of ModA from the archaeon Methanosarcina acetivorans

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chan, Sum; Giuroiu, Iulia; Chernishof, Irina; Sawaya, Michael R.; Chiang, Janet; Gunsalus, Robert P.; Arbing, Mark A.; Perry, L. Jeanne

    2010-01-01

    The trace-element oxyanion molybdate, which is required for the growth of many bacterial and archaeal species, is transported into the cell by an ATP-binding cassette (ABC) transporter superfamily uptake system called ModABC. ModABC consists of the ModA periplasmic solute-binding protein, the integral membrane-transport protein ModB and the ATP-binding and hydrolysis cassette protein ModC. In this study, X-ray crystal structures of ModA from the archaeon Methanosarcina acetivorans (MaModA) have been determined in the apo­protein conformation at 1.95 and 1.69 Å resolution and in the molybdate-bound conformation at 2.25 and 2.45 Å resolution. The overall domain structure of MaModA is similar to other ModA proteins in that it has a bilobal structure in which two mixed α/β domains are linked by a hinge region. The apo MaModA is the first unliganded archaeal ModA structure to be determined: it exhibits a deep cleft between the two domains and confirms that upon binding ligand one domain is rotated towards the other by a hinge-bending motion, which is consistent with the ‘Venus flytrap’ model seen for bacterial-type periplasmic binding proteins. In contrast to the bacterial ModA structures, which have tetrahedral coordination of their metal substrates, molybdate-bound MaModA employs octahedral coordination of its substrate like other archaeal ModA proteins. PMID:20208152

  19. 3-Phosphoglycerate is an allosteric activator of pyruvate kinase from the hyperthermophilic archaeon Pyrobaculum aerophilum.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Solomons, J T Graham; Johnsen, Ulrike; Schönheit, Peter; Davies, Christopher

    2013-08-27

    Pyruvate kinase (PK) is a highly regulated enzyme that catalyzes the final step of glycolysis. PK from the hyperthermophilic archaeon Pyrobaculum aerophilum (PaPK) is distinguished from most PK enzymes of eukarya and bacteria by not responding to any known allosteric effectors and apparently exhibiting only cooperative regulation. We determined the crystal structure of PaPK to 2.2 Å resolution and, in a manner consistent with the lack of a response to conventional effectors, observed that the canonical allosteric site is occluded by a tyrosine. Unexpectedly, though, a bound sulfate was observed at a position equivalent to the 6'-phosphate of sugar effectors, suggesting an allosteric site, but for an unknown effector and sharing only the phosphate position. A search of three-carbon intermediates of glycolysis revealed 3-phosphoglycerate (3PG) as a potent allosteric activator of PaPK. The response was abolished by mutation of residues that contact the sulfate and of an arginine proposed to interact with the 3PG carboxylate group. Regulation of PK by 3PG is consistent with the ancestral glycolysis of hyperthermophilic archaea in which this intermediate is produced by an irreversible enzyme, glyceraldehyde 3-phosphate ferredoxin oxidoreductase. Coordinated regulation within the lower half of glycolysis contrasts sharply with conventional glycolysis in which 3PG is produced reversibly and PK is regulated by fructose 1,6-bisphosphate, the product of phosphofructokinase, an irreversible enzyme in the upper half of the pathway. Regulation of PaPK by a carboxylate molecule rather than a sugar phosphate may reflect a step in the evolution of glycolysis that predates the dominance of sugars in metabolism.

  20. Isolation of extracellular polymeric substances from biofilms of the thermoacidophilic archaeon Sulfolobus acidocaldarius

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Silke eJachlewski

    2015-08-01

    Full Text Available Extracellular polymeric substances (EPS are the major structural and functional components of microbial biofilms. The aim of this study was to establish a method for EPS isolation from biofilms of the thermoacidophilic archaeon Sulfolobus acidocaldarius as a basis for EPS analysis. Biofilms of S. acidocaldarius were cultivated on the surface of gellan gum-solidified Brock medium at 78 °C for 4 days. Five EPS extraction methods were compared, including shaking of biofilm suspensions in phosphate buffer, cation-exchange resin (CER extraction and stirring with addition of EDTA, crown ether or NaOH. With respect to EPS yield, impact on cell viability and compatibility with subsequent biochemical analysis, the CER extraction method was found to be the best suited isolation procedure resulting in the detection of carbohydrates and proteins as the major constituents and DNA as a minor component of the EPS. Culturability of CER-treated cells was not impaired. Analysis of the extracellular proteome using two-dimensional gel electrophoresis resulted in the detection of several hundredshundred of protein spots, mainly with molecular masses of 25 kDa to 116 kDa and pI values of 5 to 8. Identification of proteins suggested a cytoplasmic origin for many of these proteins, possibly released via membrane vesicles or biofilm-inherent cell lysis during biofilm maturation. Functional analysis of EPS proteins, using fluorogenic substrates as well as zymography, demonstrated the activity of diverse groups of enzymes such as proteases, lipases, esterases, phosphatases and glucosidases. In conclusion, the CER extraction method, as previously applied to bacterial biofilms, also represents a suitable method for isolation of water soluble EPS from the archaeal biofilms of S. acidocaldarius, allowing the investigation of composition and function of EPS components in these types of biofilms.

  1. Osmoregulation in the Halophilic Bacterium Halomonas elongata: A Case Study for Integrative Systems Biology

    Science.gov (United States)

    Knabe, Nicole; Siedler, Frank; Scheffer, Beatrix; Pflüger-Grau, Katharina; Pfeiffer, Friedhelm; Oesterhelt, Dieter; Marin-Sanguino, Alberto

    2017-01-01

    Halophilic bacteria use a variety of osmoregulatory methods, such as the accumulation of one or more compatible solutes. The wide diversity of compounds that can act as compatible solute complicates the task of understanding the different strategies that halophilic bacteria use to cope with salt. This is specially challenging when attempting to go beyond the pathway that produces a certain compatible solute towards an understanding of how the metabolic network as a whole addresses the problem. Metabolic reconstruction based on genomic data together with Flux Balance Analysis (FBA) is a promising tool to gain insight into this problem. However, as more of these reconstructions become available, it becomes clear that processes predicted by genome annotation may not reflect the processes that are active in vivo. As a case in point, E. coli is unable to grow aerobically on citrate in spite of having all the necessary genes to do it. It has also been shown that the realization of this genetic potential into an actual capability to metabolize citrate is an extremely unlikely event under normal evolutionary conditions. Moreover, many marine bacteria seem to have the same pathways to metabolize glucose but each species uses a different one. In this work, a metabolic network inferred from genomic annotation of the halophilic bacterium Halomonas elongata and proteomic profiling experiments are used as a starting point to motivate targeted experiments in order to find out some of the defining features of the osmoregulatory strategies of this bacterium. This new information is then used to refine the network in order to describe the actual capabilities of H. elongata, rather than its genetic potential. PMID:28081159

  2. Extremely Halotolerant and Halophilic Fungi Inhabit Brine in Solar Salterns Around the Globe

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Polona Zalar

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available For a long time halotolerant and halophilic fungi have been known exclusively as contaminants of food preserved with high concentrations of either salt or sugar. They were first reported in 2000 to be active inhabitants of hypersaline environments, when they were found in man-made solar salterns in Slovenia. Since then, they have been described in different salterns and salt lakes on three continents. The mycobiota that inhabit these natural hypersaline environments are composed of phylogenetically unrelated halotolerant, extremely halotolerant, and halophilic fungi, which are represented not only by species previously known only as food contaminants, but also by new and rare species. The dominant representatives are different species of black yeast-like and related melanized fungi of the genus Cladosporium, different species within the anamorphic Aspergillus and Penicillium, and the teleomorphic Emericella and Eurotium, certain species of non-melanized yeasts, and Wallemia spp. Until the discovery and description of indigenous saltern mycobiota, the physiological and molecular mechanisms related to salt tolerance in eukaryotic microorganisms were studied using salt-sensitive model organisms. The most studied eukaryotic microorganism was Saccharomyces cerevisiae, which cannot adapt to hypersaline conditions. Species like Debaryomyces hansenii, Aureobasidum pullulans, Hortaea werneckii and Wallemia ichthyophaga, which have now been isolated globally from natural hypersaline environments, represent more suitable model organisms for the study of halotolerance in eukaryotes. Such studies in these species, and particularly with the extremely halotolerant H. werneckii and obligately halophilic W. ichthyophaga have continued to unravel the different strategies that these microorganisms can use to cope with the problems of ion toxicity and low water activity. The focus of this review is to present the main species of fungi inhabiting solar salterns

  3. Production of halophilic proteins using Haloferax volcanii H1895 in a stirred-tank bioreactor

    KAUST Repository

    Strillinger, Eva

    2015-10-01

    The success of biotechnological processes is based on the availability of efficient and highly specific biocatalysts, which can satisfy industrial demands. Extreme and remote environments like the deep brine pools of the Red Sea represent highly interesting habitats for the discovery of novel halophilic and thermophilic enzymes. Haloferax volcanii constitutes a suitable expression system for halophilic enzymes obtained from such brine pools. We developed a batch process for the cultivation of H. volcanii H1895 in controlled stirred-tank bioreactors utilising knockouts of components of the flagella assembly system. The standard medium Hv-YPC was supplemented to reach a higher cell density. Without protein expression, cell dry weight reaches 10 g L−1. Two halophilic alcohol dehydrogenases were expressed under the control of the tryptophanase promoter p.tna with 16.8 and 3.2 mg gCDW −1, respectively, at a maximum cell dry weight of 6.5 g L−1. Protein expression was induced by the addition of l-tryptophan. Investigation of various expression strategies leads to an optimised two-step induction protocol introducing 6 mM l-tryptophan at an OD650 of 0.4 followed by incubation for 16 h and a second induction step with 3 mM l-tryptophan followed by a final incubation time of 4 h. Compared with the uncontrolled shaker-flask cultivations used until date, dry cell mass concentrations were improved by a factor of more than 5 and cell-specific enzyme activities showed an up to 28-fold increased yield of the heterologous proteins.

  4. Methods of hydrolyzing a cellulose using halophilic, thermostable and ionic liquids tolerant cellulases

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zhang, Tao; Datta, Supratim; Simmons, Blake A.; Rubin, Edward M.

    2018-01-09

    The present invention provides for an isolated or recombinant polypeptide comprising an amino acid sequence having at least 70% identity with the amino acid sequence of a Halorhabdus utahensis cellulase, such as Hu-CBH1, wherein said amino acid sequence has a halophilic thermostable and/or thermophilic cellobiohydrolase (CBH) activity. In some embodiments, the polypeptide has a CBH activity that is resistant to up to about 20% of ionic liquids. The present invention also provides for compositions comprising and methods using the isolated or recombinant polypeptide.

  5. Synthesis of Glycine Betaine from Exogenous Choline in the Moderately Halophilic Bacterium Halomonas elongata

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cánovas, David; Vargas, Carmen; Csonka, Laszlo N.; Ventosa, Antonio; Nieto, Joaquín J.

    1998-01-01

    The role of choline in osmoprotection in the moderate halophile Halomonas elongata has been examined. Transport and conversion of choline to betaine began immediately after addition of choline to the growth medium. Intracellular accumulation of betaine synthesized from choline was salt dependent up to 2.5 M NaCl. Oxidation of choline was enhanced at 2.0 M NaCl in the presence or absence of externally provided betaine. This indicates that the NaCl concentration in the growth medium has major effects on the choline-betaine pathway of H. elongata. PMID:9758852

  6. Isolation, cloning and characterization of an azoreductase from the halophilic bacterium Halomonas elongata.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eslami, Maryam; Amoozegar, Mohammad Ali; Asad, Sedigheh

    2016-04-01

    Azo dyes are a major class of colorants used in various industries including textile, paper and food. These dyes are regarded as pollutant since they are not readily reduced under aerobic conditions. Halomonas elongata, a halophilic bacterium, has the ability to decolorize different mono and di-azo dyes in anoxic conditions. In this study the putative azoreductase gene of H. elongata, formerly annotated as acp, was isolated, heterologously expressed in Escherichia coli, purified and characterized. The gene product, AzoH, was found to have a molecular mass of 22 kDa. The enzyme requires NADH, as an electron donor for its activity. The apparent Km was 63 μM for NADH and 12 μM for methyl red as a mono-azo dye substrate. The specific activity for methyl red was 0.27 μmol min(-1)mg(-1). The optimum enzyme activity was achieved in 50mM sodium phosphate buffer at pH 6. Although increased salinity resulted in reduced activity, AzoH could decolorize azo dye at NaCl concentrations up to 15% (w/v). The enzyme was also shown to be able to decolorize remazol black B as a representative of di-azo dyes. This is the first report describing the sequence and activity of an azo-reducing enzyme from a halophilic bacterium. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  7. Selenihalanaerobacter shriftii gen. nov., sp. nov., a halophilic anaerobe from Dead Sea sediments that respires selenate

    Science.gov (United States)

    Switzer, Blum J.; Stolz, J.F.; Oren, A.; Oremland, R.S.

    2001-01-01

    We isolated an obligately anaerobic halophilic bacterium from the Dead Sea that grew by respiration of selenate. The isolate, designated strain DSSe-1, was a gram-negative, non-motile rod. It oxidized glycerol or glucose to acetate+CO2 with concomitant reduction of selenate to selenite plus elemental selenium. Other electron acceptors that supported anaerobic growth on glycerol were nitrate and trimethylamine-N-oxide; nitrite, arsenate, fumarate, dimethylsulfoxide, thiosulfate, elemental sulfur, sulfite or sulfate could not serve as electron acceptors. Growth on glycerol in the presence of nitrate occurred over a salinity range from 100 to 240 g/l, with an optimum at 210 g/l. Analysis of the 16S rRNA gene sequence suggests that strain DSSe-1 belongs to the order Halanaerobiales, an order of halophilic anaerobes with a fermentative or homoacetogenic metabolism, in which anaerobic respiratory metabolism has never been documented. The highest 16S rRNA sequence similarity (90%) was found with Acetohalobium arabaticum (X89077). On the basis of physiological properties as well as the relatively low homology of 16S rRNA from strain DSSe-1 with known genera, classification in a new genus within the order Halanaerobiales, family Halobacteroidaceae is warranted. We propose the name Selenihalanaerobacter shriftii. Type strain is strain DSSe-1 (ATCC accession number BAA-73).

  8. Nesterenkonia sp. strain F, a halophilic bacterium producing acetone, butanol, and ethanol under aerobic conditions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Amiri, Hamid; Azarbaijani, Reza; Parsa Yeganeh, Laleh; Shahzadeh Fazeli, Abolhassan; Tabatabaei, Meisam; Salekdeh, Ghasem Hosseini; Karimi, Keikhosro

    2016-01-04

    The moderately halophilic bacterium Nesterenkonia sp. strain F, which was isolated from Aran-Bidgol Lake (Iran), has the ability to produce acetone, butanol, and ethanol (ABE) as well as acetic and butyric acids under aerobic and anaerobic conditions. This result is the first report of ABE production with a wild microorganism from a family other than Clostridia and also the first halophilic species shown to produce butanol under aerobic cultivation. The cultivation of Nesterenkonia sp. strain F under anaerobic conditions with 50 g/l of glucose for 72 h resulted in the production of 105 mg/l of butanol, 122 mg/l of acetone, 0.2 g/l of acetic acid, and 2.5 g/l of butyric acid. Furthermore, the strain was cultivated on media with different glucose concentrations (20, 50, and 80 g/l) under aerobic and anaerobic conditions. Through fermentation with a 50 g/l initial glucose concentration under aerobic conditions, 66 mg/l of butanol, 125 mg/l of acetone, 291 mg/l of ethanol, 5.9 g/l of acetic acid, and 1.2 g/l of butyric acid were produced. The enzymes pertaining to the fermentation pathway in the strain were compared with the enzymes of Clostridium spp., and the metabolic pathway of fermentation used by Nesterenkonia sp. strain F was investigated.

  9. Diversity of Extremely Halophilic Archaeal and Bacterial Communities from Commercial Salts

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ashagrie Gibtan

    2017-05-01

    Full Text Available Salting is one of the oldest food preservation techniques. However, salt is also the source of living halophilic microorganisms that may affect human health. In order to determine the microbial communities of commercial salts, an investigation were done using amplicon sequencing approach in four commercial salts: Ethiopian Afdera salt (EAS, Ethiopian rock salt (ERS, Korean Jangpan salt (KJS, and Korean Topan salt (KTS. Using domain-specific primers, a region of the 16S rRNA gene was amplified and sequenced using a Roche 454 instrument. The results indicated that these microbial communities contained 48.22–61.4% Bacteria, 37.72–51.26% Archaea, 0.51–0.86% Eukarya, and 0.005–0.009% unclassified reads. Among bacteria, the communities in these salts were dominated by the phyla Proteobacteria, Bacteroidetes, Actinobacteria, and Firmicutes. Of the archaea, 91.58% belonged to the class Halobacteria, whereas the remaining 7.58, 0.83, and 0.01% were Nanoarchaea, Methanobacteria, and Thermococci, respectively. This comparison of microbial diversity in salts from two countries showed the presence of many archaeal and bacterial genera that occurred in salt samples from one country but not the other. The bacterial genera Enterobacter and Halovibrio were found only in Korean and Ethiopian salts, respectively. This study indicated the occurrence and diversity of halophilic bacteria and archaea in commercial salts that could be important in the gastrointestinal tract after ingestion.

  10. Marinimicrobium haloxylanilyticum sp. nov., a new moderately halophilic, polysaccharide-degrading bacterium isolated from Great Salt Lake, Utah

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Fogh Møller, Mette; Kjeldsen, Kasper Urup; Ingvorsen, Kjeld

    2010-01-01

    A new moderately halophilic, strictly aerobic, Gram-negative bacterium, strain SX15T, was isolated from hypersaline surface sediment of the southern arm of Great Salt Lake (Utah, USA). The strain grew on a number of carbohydrates and carbohydrate polymers such as xylan, starch, carboxymethyl...

  11. Dynamic structure mediates halophilic adaptation of a DNA polymerase from the deep-sea brines of the Red Sea

    KAUST Repository

    Takahashi, Masateru

    2018-01-24

    The deep-sea brines of the Red Sea are remote and unexplored environments characterized by high temperatures, anoxic water, and elevated concentrations of salt and heavy metals. This environment provides a rare system to study the interplay between halophilic and thermophilic adaptation in biologic macromolecules. The present article reports the first DNA polymerase with halophilic and thermophilic features. Biochemical and structural analysis by Raman and circular dichroism spectroscopy showed that the charge distribution on the protein’s surface mediates the structural balance between stability for thermal adaptation and flexibility for counteracting the salt-induced rigid and nonfunctional hydrophobic packing. Salt bridge interactions via increased negative and positive charges contribute to structural stability. Salt tolerance, conversely, is mediated by a dynamic structure that becomes more fixed and functional with increasing salt concentration. We propose that repulsive forces among excess negative charges, in addition to a high percentage of negatively charged random coils, mediate this structural dynamism. This knowledge enabled us to engineer a halophilic version of KOD DNA polymerase.—Takahashi, M., Takahashi, E., Joudeh, L. I., Marini, M., Das, G., Elshenawy, M. M., Akal, A., Sakashita, K., Alam, I., Tehseen, M., Sobhy, M. A., Stingl, U., Merzaban, J. S., Di Fabrizio, E., Hamdan, S. M. Dynamic structure mediates halophilic adaptation of a DNA polymerase from the deep-sea brines of the Red Sea.

  12. The Haloprotease CPI Produced by the Moderately Halophilic Bacterium Pseudoalteromonas ruthenica Is Secreted by the Type II Secretion Pathway▿ †

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sánchez-Porro, Cristina; Mellado, Encarnación; Pugsley, Anthony P.; Francetic, Olivera; Ventosa, Antonio

    2009-01-01

    The gene (cpo) encoding the extracellular protease CPI produced by the moderately halophilic bacterium Pseudoalteromonas ruthenica CP76 was cloned, and its nucleotide sequence was analyzed. The cpo gene encodes a 733-residue protein showing sequence similarity to metalloproteases of the M4 family. The type II secretion apparatus was shown to be responsible for secretion of the haloprotease CPI. PMID:19376897

  13. Genome-wide transcriptional response of the archaeon Thermococcus gammatolerans to cadmium.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Arnaud Lagorce

    Full Text Available Thermococcus gammatolerans, the most radioresistant archaeon known to date, is an anaerobic and hyperthermophilic sulfur-reducing organism living in deep-sea hydrothermal vents. Knowledge of mechanisms underlying archaeal metal tolerance in such metal-rich ecosystem is still poorly documented. We showed that T. gammatolerans exhibits high resistance to cadmium (Cd, cobalt (Co and zinc (Zn, a weaker tolerance to nickel (Ni, copper (Cu and arsenate (AsO(4 and that cells exposed to 1 mM Cd exhibit a cellular Cd concentration of 67 µM. A time-dependent transcriptomic analysis using microarrays was performed at a non-toxic (100 µM and a toxic (1 mM Cd dose. The reliability of microarray data was strengthened by real time RT-PCR validations. Altogether, 114 Cd responsive genes were revealed and a substantial subset of genes is related to metal homeostasis, drug detoxification, re-oxidization of cofactors and ATP production. This first genome-wide expression profiling study of archaeal cells challenged with Cd showed that T. gammatolerans withstands induced stress through pathways observed in both prokaryotes and eukaryotes but also through new and original strategies. T. gammatolerans cells challenged with 1 mM Cd basically promote: 1 the induction of several transporter/permease encoding genes, probably to detoxify the cell; 2 the upregulation of Fe transporters encoding genes to likely compensate Cd damages in iron-containing proteins; 3 the induction of membrane-bound hydrogenase (Mbh and membrane-bound hydrogenlyase (Mhy2 subunits encoding genes involved in recycling reduced cofactors and/or in proton translocation for energy production. By contrast to other organisms, redox homeostasis genes appear constitutively expressed and only a few genes encoding DNA repair proteins are regulated. We compared the expression of 27 Cd responsive genes in other stress conditions (Zn, Ni, heat shock, γ-rays, and showed that the Cd transcriptional pattern is

  14. A three-dimensional model of RNase P in the hyperthermophilic archaeon Pyrococcus horikoshii OT3.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gao, Xuzhu; Oshima, Kosuke; Ueda, Toshifumi; Nakashima, Takashi; Kimura, Makoto

    2017-11-18

    Ribonuclease P (RNase P) is an endoribonuclease involved in maturation of the 5'-end of tRNA. We found previously that RNase P in the hyperthermophilic archaeon Pyrococcus horikoshii OT3 consists of a catalytic RNase P RNA (PhopRNA) and five protein cofactors designated PhoPop5, PhoRpp21, PhoRpp29, PhoRpp30, and PhoRpp38. The crystal structures of the five proteins have been determined, a three-dimensional (3-D) model of PhopRNA has been constructed, and biochemical data, including protein-RNA interaction sites, have become available. Here, this information was combined to orient the crystallographic structures of the proteins relative to their RNA binding sites in the PhopRNA model. Some alterations were made to the PhopRNA model to improve the fit. In the resulting structure, a heterotetramer composed of PhoPop5 and PhoRpp30 bridges helices P3 and P16 in the PhopRNA C-domain, thereby probably stabilizing a double-stranded RNA structure (helix P4) containing catalytic Mg(2+) ions, while a heterodimer of PhoRpp21 and PhoRpp29 locates on a single-stranded loop connecting helices P11 and P12 in the specificity domain (S-domain) in PhopRNA, probably forming an appropriate conformation of the precursor tRNA (pre-tRNA) binding site. The fifth protein PhoRpp38 binds each kink-turn (K-turn) motif in helices P12.1, P12.2, and P16 in PhopRNA. Comparison of the structure of the resulting 3-D model with that of bacterial RNase P suggests transition from RNA-RNA interactions in bacterial RNase P to protein-RNA interactions in archaeal RNase P. The proposed 3-D model of P. horikoshii RNase P will serve as a framework for further structural and functional studies on archaeal, as well as eukaryotic, RNase Ps. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  15. Great Salt Lake halophilic microorganisms as models for astrobiology: evidence for desiccation tolerance and ultraviolet irradiation resistance

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baxter, Bonnie K.; Eddington, Breanne; Riddle, Misty R.; Webster, Tabitha N.; Avery, Brian J.

    2007-09-01

    Great Salt Lake (GSL) is home to halophiles, salt-tolerant Bacteria and Archaea, which live at 2-5M NaCl. In addition to salt tolerance, GSL halophiles exhibit resistance to both ultraviolet (UV) irradiation and desiccation. First, to understand desiccation resistance, we sought to determine the diversity of GSL halophiles capable of surviving desiccation in either recently formed GSL halite crystals or GSL Artemia (brine shrimp) cysts. From these desiccated environments, surviving microorganisms were cultured and isolated, and genomic DNA was extracted from the individual species for identification by 16S rRNA gene homology. From the surface-sterilized cysts we also extracted DNA of the whole microbial population for non-cultivation techniques. We amplified the archaeal or bacterial 16S rRNA gene from all genomic DNA, cloned the cyst population amplicons, and sequenced. These sequences were compared to gene databases for determination of closest matched species. Interestingly, the isolates from the crystal dissolution are distinct from those previously isolated from GSL brine. The cyst population results reveal species not found in crystals or brine, and may indicate microorganisms that live as endosymbionts of this hypersaline arthropod. Second, we explored UV resistance in a GSL haloarchaea species, "H. salsolis." This strain resists UV irradiation an order of magnitude better than control species, all of which have intact repair systems. To test the hypothesis that halophiles have a photoprotection system, which prevents DNA damage from occurring, we designed an immunoassay to detect thymine dimers following UV irradiation. "H. salsolis" showed remarkable resistance to dimer formation. Evidence for both UV and desiccation resistance in these salt-tolerant GSL halophiles makes them well-suited as models for Astrobiological studies in pursuit of questions about life beyond earth.

  16. Crystallization and preliminary X-ray diffraction analysis of thioredoxin peroxidase from the aerobic hyperthermophilic archaeon Aeropyrum pernix K1.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nakamura, Tsutomu; Matsumura, Hiroyoshi; Inoue, Tsuyoshi; Kai, Yasushi; Uegaki, Koichi; Hagihara, Yoshihisa; Ataka, Mitsuo; Ishikawa, Kazuhiko

    2005-03-01

    Thioredoxin peroxidase is a member of the peroxiredoxin family and plays a dominant role in a hydrogen peroxide metabolism. A recombinant form of the hyperthermostable thioredoxin peroxidase from the aerobic hyperthermophilic archaeon Aeropyrum pernix K1, a polypeptide consisting of 250 amino acids, was purified. The C207S mutant protein was crystallized by the hanging-drop vapour-diffusion method using potassium sodium tartrate as the precipitant at 298 K. Diffraction data were collected and processed to 2.7 A resolution. The crystal belongs to space group P1, with unit-cell parameters a = 126.2, b = 126.3, c = 213.7 A, alpha = 80.4, beta = 80.3, gamma = 70.7 degrees. Calculation of the self-rotation function showed that the protein quaternary structure includes a fivefold axis and five twofold axes.

  17. The Genome Sequence of the psychrophilic archaeon, Methanococcoides burtonii: the Role of Genome Evolution in Cold-adaptation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Allen, Michelle A.; Lauro, Federico M.; Williams, Timothy J.; Burg, Dominic; Siddiqui, Khawar S.; De Francisci, David; Chong, Kevin W.Y.; Pilak, Oliver; Chew, Hwee H.; De Maere, Matthew Z.; Ting, Lily; Katrib, Marilyn; Ng, Charmaine; Sowers, Kevin R.; Galperin, Michael Y.; Anderson, Iain J.; Ivanova, Natalia; Dalin, Eileen; Martinez, Michelle; Lapidus, Alla; Hauser, Loren; Land, Miriam; Thomas, Torsten; Cavicchioli, Ricardo

    2009-04-01

    Psychrophilic archaea are abundant and perform critical roles throughout the Earth's expansive cold biosphere. Here we report the first complete genome sequence for a psychrophilic methanogenic archaeon, Methanococcoides burtonii. The genome sequence was manually annotated including the use of a five tiered Evidence Rating system that ranked annotations from Evidence Rating (ER) 1 (gene product experimentally characterized from the parent organism) to ER5 (hypothetical gene product) to provide a rapid means of assessing the certainty of gene function predictions. The genome is characterized by a higher level of aberrant sequence composition (51%) than any other archaeon. In comparison to hyper/thermophilic archaea which are subject to selection of synonymous codon usage, M. burtonii has evolved cold adaptation through a genomic capacity to accommodate highly skewed amino acid content, while retaining codon usage in common with its mesophilic Methanosarcina cousins. Polysaccharide biosynthesis genes comprise at least 3.3% of protein coding genes in the genome, and Cell wall/membrane/envelope biogenesis COG genes are over-represented. Likewise, signal transduction (COG category T) genes are over-represented and M. burtonii has a high 'IQ' (a measure of adaptive potential) compared to many methanogens. Numerous genes in these two over-represented COG categories appear to have been acquired from {var_epsilon}- and {delta}-proteobacteria, as do specific genes involved in central metabolism such as a novel B form of aconitase. Transposases also distinguish M. burtonii from other archaea, and their genomic characteristics indicate they play an important role in evolving the M. burtonii genome. Our study reveals a capacity for this model psychrophile to evolve through genome plasticity (including nucleotide skew, horizontal gene transfer and transposase activity) that enables adaptation to the cold, and to the biological and physical changes that have

  18. Biocalcification by halophilic bacteria for remediation of concrete structures in marine environment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bansal, Roohi; Dhami, Navdeep Kaur; Mukherjee, Abhijit; Reddy, M Sudhakara

    2016-11-01

    Microbial carbonate precipitation has emerged as a promising technology for remediation and restoration of concrete structures. Deterioration of reinforced concrete structures in marine environments is a major concern due to chloride-induced corrosion. In the current study, halophilic bacteria Exiguobacterium mexicanum was isolated from sea water and tested for biomineralization potential under different salt stress conditions. The growth, urease and carbonic anhydrase production significantly increased under salt stress conditions. Maximum calcium carbonate precipitation was recorded at 5 % NaCl concentration. Application of E. mexicanum on concrete specimens significantly increased the compressive strength (23.5 %) and reduced water absorption about five times under 5 % salt stress conditions compared to control specimens. SEM and XRD analysis of bacterial-treated concrete specimens confirmed the precipitation of calcite. The present study results support the potential of this technology for improving the strength and durability properties of building structures in marine environments.

  19. Structural Insight of a Trimodular Halophilic Cellulase with a Family 46 Carbohydrate-Binding Module.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Huaidong Zhang

    Full Text Available Cellulases are the key enzymes used in the biofuel industry. A typical cellulase contains a catalytic domain connected to a carbohydrate-binding module (CBM through a flexible linker. Here we report the structure of an atypical trimodular cellulase which harbors a catalytic domain, a CBM46 domain and a rigid CBM_X domain between them. The catalytic domain shows the features of GH5 family, while the CBM46 domain has a sandwich-like structure. The catalytic domain and the CBM46 domain form an extended substrate binding cleft, within which several tryptophan residues are well exposed. Mutagenesis assays indicate that these residues are essential for the enzymatic activities. Gel affinity electrophoresis shows that these tryptophan residues are involved in the polysaccharide substrate binding. Also, electrostatic potential analysis indicates that almost the entire solvent accessible surface of CelB is negatively charged, which is consistent with the halophilic nature of this enzyme.

  20. Borrelidins C–E: New Antibacterial Macrolides from a Saltern-Derived Halophilic Nocardiopsis sp.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jungwoo Kim

    2017-06-01

    Full Text Available Chemical investigation of a halophilic actinomycete strain belonging to the genus Nocardiopsis inhabiting a hypersaline saltern led to the discovery of new 18-membered macrolides with nitrile functionality, borrelidins C–E (1–3, along with a previously reported borrelidin (4. The planar structures of borrelidins C–E, which are new members of the rare borrelidin class of antibiotics, were elucidated by NMR, mass, IR, and UV spectroscopic analyses. The configurations of borrelidines C–E were determined by the interpretation of ROESY NMR spectra, J-based configuration analysis, a modified Mosher’s method, and CD spectroscopic analysis. Borrelidins C and D displayed inhibitory activity, particularly against the Gram-negative pathogen Salmonella enterica, and moderate cytotoxicity against the SNU638 and K562 carcinoma cell lines.

  1. Efficient proteolysis and application of an alkaline protease from halophilic Bacillus sp. EMB9.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sinha, Rajeshwari; Srivastava, A K; Khare, S K

    2014-10-03

    A salt-stable alkaline protease from moderately halophilic Bacillus sp. EMB9, isolated from the western coast of India, is described. This protease was capable of efficiently removing silver from used/waste X-Ray films, as well as hydrolyzing defatted soy flour with 31% degree of hydrolysis (DH). Production of the protease was optimized by using response surface methodology. Ca(2+) and NaCl were the most critical factors in enhancing the yield. Under optimized culture conditions, a maximum of 369 U protease/mL was obtained, which is quite comparable to the yields of commercial proteases. The elevated production level coupled with ability to efficiently hydrolyze protein-laden soy flour and complete recovery of silver from used X-Ray films makes it a prospective industrial enzyme.

  2. Selection of halophilic bacteria for biological control of tomato gray mould caused by Botrytis cinerea

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Imane BERRADA

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available In Morocco, tomato gray mould caused by Botrytis cinerea Pers: Fr. is a serious threat for postharvest storage of tomatoes. Fifteen halophilic bacteria were evaluated for their antagonistic activity against B. cinerea: 11 Gram positive strains assigned to the genera Bacillus (9, Jeotgalibacillus (1 and Planococcus (1 and four Gram negative strains assigned to the genera Salinivibrio (1, Vibrio (2 and Photobacterium (1. In in vitro screening, 12 antifungal isolates secreted diffusible compounds, hydrolytic enzymes or volatile compounds. In vivo screening of the isolates, Bacillus safensis CCMM B582 and Bacillus oceanisediminis CCMM B584 showed permanent antagonistic activity on tomato fruits, with 100% inhibition of B. cinerea after 7 days. These two strains may offer potential for biological control of tomato gray mould.

  3. PROTEOLYTIC AND FIBRINOLYTIC ACTIVITIES OF HALOPHILIC LACTIC ACID BACTERIA FROM TWO INDONESIAN FERMENTED FOODS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Asep A. Prihanto

    2013-04-01

    Full Text Available Exploration of fermented foods as sources of fibrinolytic enzymes is increased in the last decades. Terasi and Jambal roti is Indonesian traditional fermented fish products, which were famous in Java Island. Both are important products in Indonesian dishes, especially in Java. Investigation on halophilic lactic acid bacteria using MRS and M-17 agar obtained seventy four isolated strains. Their proteolytic and fibrinolytic activities were determined using skim milk agar and plasminogen-free fibrin plate. Twenty five isolates showed protease activities, while only four of them secreted fibrinolitic enzyme. The highest proteolytic and fibrinolytic activity was shown by TB1 strain, which is identified as Bacillus coagulans. The 16s rDNA is still in investigating to confirm the TB1 strain identity.

  4. Cold-active halophilic bacteria from the ice-sealed Lake Vida, Antarctica.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mondino, Lindsay J; Asao, Marie; Madigan, Michael T

    2009-10-01

    Lake Vida is a large, permanently ice-covered lake in the Victoria Valley of the McMurdo Dry Valleys, Antarctica and is unique among Dry Valley lakes because it is ice-sealed, with an ice-cover of nearly 19 m. Enrichment cultures of melt-water from Lake Vida 15.9 m ice yielded five pure cultures of aerobic, heterotrophic bacteria. Of these, one strain grew at -8 degrees C and the four others at -4 degrees C. All isolates were either halotolerant or halophilic, with two strains capable of growth at 15% NaCl. Phylogenetic analysis revealed the Lake Vida isolates to be Gammaproteobacteria, related to species of Psychrobacter and Marinobacter. This is the first report of pure cultures of bacteria from Lake Vida, and the isolates displayed a phenotype consistent with life in a cold hypersaline environment.

  5. Biochemical characterization of a halophilic, alkalithermophilic protease from Alkalibacillus sp. NM-Da2.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abdel-Hamed, Asmaa R; Abo-Elmatty, Dina M; Wiegel, Juergen; Mesbah, Noha M

    2016-11-01

    An extracellular, halophilic, alkalithermophilic serine protease from the halo-alkaliphilic Alkalibacillus sp. NM-Da2 was purified to homogeneity by ethanol precipitation and anion-exchange chromatography. The purified protease was a monomeric enzyme with an approximate molecular mass of 35 kDa and exhibited maximal activity at 2.7 M NaCl, pH55 °C 9 and 56 °C. The protease showed great temperature stability, retaining greater than 80 % of initial activity after 2 h incubation at 55 °C. The protease was also extremely pH tolerant, retaining 80 % of initial activity at pH55 °C 10.5 after 30 min incubation. Protease hydrolyzed complex substrates, displaying activity on yeast extract, tryptone, casein, gelatin and peptone. Protease activity was inhibited at casein concentrations greater than 1.2 mg/mL. The enzyme was stable and active in 40 % (v/v) solutions of isopropanol, ethanol and benzene and was stable in the presence of the polysorbate surfactant Tween 80. Activity was stimulated with the oxidizing agent hydrogen peroxide. Inhibition with phenyl methylsulfonylfluoride indicates it is a serine protease. Synthetic saline wastewater treated with the protease showed 50 % protein removal after 5 h. Being halophilic, alkaliphilic and thermophilic, in addition to being resistant to organic solvents, this protease has potential for various applications in biotechnological and pharmaceutical industries.

  6. [Identification and phylogenetic analysis of an okenone-containing halophilic purple sulfur bacterium].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Suping; Lian, Jianke; Zhao, Chungui; Ma, Wenli; Qu, Yinbo

    2008-05-01

    To exploit resources of purple sulfur bacteria and their photosynthetic genes. A purple sulfur bacterium strain 283-1 of okenone-containing, halophilic, high sulfide tolerance was isolated by agar dilution method in Pfennig medium from photolithoautotrophic enrichments of Dongfeng saltern, Qingdao, China. Cells of strain 283-1 were Gram-negative, halophile, straight or slightly curved rods, motile by monopolar single flagella, no gas vacuoles, carotenoid of okenone series and bacteriochlorophylla as photosynthetic pigment, purple red. It could photolithoautotrophically grow under anoxic condition in the light with sulfide as electron donor, sulfur globules accumulate as intermediate oxidation product and stored in the form of highly refractile globules inside the cells. The strain 283-1 belonged to Gammaproteobacteria, Chromatiales, Chroamtiaceae, genus of Marichromatium. Phylogenetic analysis based on 16S rRNA gene sequence also confirmed that strain 283-1 belonged to Marichromatium genus. However, the physiological characteristics of strain 283-1 were significantly different from four species of the genus Marichromatium. NaCl requirement range from 1% to 15%, good growth was observed at 7.5 mmol x L-(-1) NaS x 9H2O, 45 degrees C, 5000 lux and pH 9.0, a number of organic substances of C3 and C4 of TCA cycles and gluconate could be photoassililated in the presence of sulfide, no growth factors were required. On the basis of 16S rRNA gene sequence analysis and its morphological and physiological characteristics, strain 283-1 is a new isolate of Marichromatium genus, named as Marichromatium sp. 283-1.

  7. Adaptation to high salt concentrations in halotolerant/ halophilic fungi: a molecular perspective

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ana ePlemenitas

    2014-05-01

    Full Text Available Molecular studies of salt tolerance of eukaryotic microorganisms have until recently been limited to the baker’s yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae and a few other moderately halotolerant yeast. Discovery of the extremely halotolerant and adaptable fungus Hortaea werneckii and the obligate halophile Wallemia ichthyophaga introduced two new model organisms into studies on the mechanisms of salt tolerance in eukaryotes. H. werneckii is unique in its adaptability to fluctuations in salt concentrations, as it can grow without NaCl as well as in the presence of up to 5 M NaCl. On the other hand, W. ichthyophaga requires at least 1.5 M NaCl for growth, but also grows in up to 5 M NaCl. Our studies have revealed the novel and intricate molecular mechanisms used by these fungi to combat high salt concentrations, which differ in many aspects between the extremely halotolerant H. werneckii and the halophilic W. ichthyophaga. Specifically, the high osmolarity glycerol signalling pathway that is important for sensing and responding to increased salt concentrations is here compared between H. werneckii and W. ichthyophaga. In both of these fungi, the key signalling components are conserved, but there are structural and regulation differences between these pathways in H. werneckii and W. ichthyophaga. We also address differences that have been revealed from analysis of their newly sequenced genomes. The most striking characteristics associated with H. werneckii are the large genetic redundancy, the expansion of genes encoding metal cation transporters, and a relatively recent whole genome duplication. In contrast, the genome of W. ichthyophaga is very compact, as only 4,884 protein-coding genes are predicted, which cover almost three quarters of the sequence. Importantly, there has been a significant increase in their hydrophobins, cell-wall proteins that have multiple cellular functions.

  8. Crystallization and preliminary X-ray diffraction study of an active-site mutant of pro-Tk-subtilisin from a hyperthermophilic archaeon

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tanaka, Shun-ichi; Saito, Kenji; Chon, Hyongi [Department of Material and Life Science, Graduate School of Engineering, Osaka University, 2-1 Yamadaoka, Suita, Osaka 565-0871 (Japan); Matsumura, Hiroyoshi [Department of Applied Chemistry, Graduate School of Engineering, Osaka University, 2-1 Yamadaoka, Suita, Osaka 565-0871 (Japan); CREST (Sosho Project), JST, 2-1 Yamadaoka, Suita, Osaka 565-0871 (Japan); Koga, Yuichi [Department of Material and Life Science, Graduate School of Engineering, Osaka University, 2-1 Yamadaoka, Suita, Osaka 565-0871 (Japan); Takano, Kazufumi [Department of Material and Life Science, Graduate School of Engineering, Osaka University, 2-1 Yamadaoka, Suita, Osaka 565-0871 (Japan); CREST (Sosho Project), JST, 2-1 Yamadaoka, Suita, Osaka 565-0871 (Japan); Kanaya, Shigenori, E-mail: kanaya@mls.eng.osaka-u.ac.jp [Department of Material and Life Science, Graduate School of Engineering, Osaka University, 2-1 Yamadaoka, Suita, Osaka 565-0871 (Japan)

    2006-09-01

    Crystallization of and preliminary crystallographic studies on an active-site mutant of pro-Tk-subtilisin from the hyperthermophilic archaeon T. kodakaraensis were performed. Crystallization of and preliminary crystallographic studies on an active-site mutant of pro-Tk-subtilisin from the hyperthermophilic archaeon Thermococcus kodakaraensis were performed. The crystal was grown at 277 K by the sitting-drop vapour-diffusion method. Native X-ray diffraction data were collected to 2.3 Å resolution using synchrotron radiation from station BL41XU at SPring-8. The crystal belongs to the orthorhombic space group I222, with unit-cell parameters a = 92.69, b = 121.78, c = 77.53 Å. Assuming the presence of one molecule per asymmetric unit, the Matthews coefficient V{sub M} was calculated to be 2.6 Å{sup 3} Da{sup −1} and the solvent content was 53.1%.

  9. Neptunium (V) Adsorption to a Halophilic Bacterium Under High Ionic Strength Conditions: A Surface Complexation Modeling Approach

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ams, David A [Los Alamos National Laboratory

    2012-06-11

    Rationale for experimental design: Np(V) -- important as analog for Pu(V) and for HLW scenarios; High ionic strength -- relevant to salt-based repositories such as the WIPP; Halophilic microorganisms -- representative of high ionic strength environments. For the first time showed: Significant adsorbant to halophilic microorganisms over entire pH range under high ionic strength conditions; Strong influence of ionic strength with increasing adsorption with increasing ionic strength (in contrast to trends of previous low ionic strength studies); Effect of aqueous Np(V) and bacterial surface site speciation on adsorption; and Developed thermodynamic models that can be incorporated into geochemical speciation models to aid in the prediction of the fate and transport of Np(V) in more complex systems.

  10. Genome sequence of the moderately halophilic bacterium Salinicoccus carnicancri type strain Crm(T) (= DSM 23852(T)).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hyun, Dong-Wook; Whon, Tae Woong; Cho, Yong-Joon; Chun, Jongsik; Kim, Min-Soo; Jung, Mi-Ja; Shin, Na-Ri; Kim, Joon-Yong; Kim, Pil Soo; Yun, Ji-Hyun; Lee, Jina; Oh, Sei Joon; Bae, Jin-Woo

    2013-01-01

    Salinicoccus carnicancri Jung et al. 2010 belongs to the genus Salinicoccus in the family Staphylococcaceae. Members of the Salinicoccus are moderately halophilic and originate from various salty environments. The halophilic features of the Salinicoccus suggest their possible uses in biotechnological applications, such as biodegradation and fermented food production. However, the genus Salinicoccus is poorly characterized at the genome level, despite its potential importance. This study presents the draft genome sequence of S. carnicancri strain Crm(T) and its annotation. The 2,673,309 base pair genome contained 2,700 protein-coding genes and 78 RNA genes with an average G+C content of 47.93 mol%. It was notable that the strain carried 72 predicted genes associated with osmoregulation, which suggests the presence of beneficial functions that facilitate growth in high-salt environments.

  11. Adaptations to High Salt in a Halophilic Protist: Differential Expression and Gene Acquisitions through Duplications and Gene Transfers

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    Tommy Harding

    2017-05-01

    Full Text Available The capacity of halophiles to thrive in extreme hypersaline habitats derives partly from the tight regulation of ion homeostasis, the salt-dependent adjustment of plasma membrane fluidity, and the increased capability to manage oxidative stress. Halophilic bacteria, and archaea have been intensively studied, and substantial research has been conducted on halophilic fungi, and the green alga Dunaliella. By contrast, there have been very few investigations of halophiles that are phagotrophic protists, i.e., protozoa. To gather fundamental knowledge about salt adaptation in these organisms, we studied the transcriptome-level response of Halocafeteria seosinensis (Stramenopiles grown under contrasting salinities. We provided further evolutionary context to our analysis by identifying genes that underwent recent duplications. Genes that were highly responsive to salinity variations were involved in stress response (e.g., chaperones, ion homeostasis (e.g., Na+/H+ transporter, metabolism and transport of lipids (e.g., sterol biosynthetic genes, carbohydrate metabolism (e.g., glycosidases, and signal transduction pathways (e.g., transcription factors. A significantly high proportion (43% of duplicated genes were also differentially expressed, accentuating the importance of gene expansion in adaptation by H. seosinensis to high salt environments. Furthermore, we found two genes that were lateral acquisitions from bacteria, and were also highly up-regulated and highly expressed at high salt, suggesting that this evolutionary mechanism could also have facilitated adaptation to high salt. We propose that a transition toward high-salt adaptation in the ancestors of H. seosinensis required the acquisition of new genes via duplication, and some lateral gene transfers (LGTs, as well as the alteration of transcriptional programs, leading to increased stress resistance, proper establishment of ion gradients, and modification of cell structure properties like

  12. Draft Genome Sequence of Natranaerobius trueperi DSM 18760T, an Anaerobic, Halophilic, Alkaliphilic, Thermotolerant Bacterium Isolated from a Soda Lake

    OpenAIRE

    Guo, Xiaomeng; Liao, Ziya; Holtzapple, Mark; Hu, Qingping; Zhao, Baisuo

    2017-01-01

    ABSTRACT The anaerobic, halophilic, alkaliphilic, thermotolerant bacterium Natranaerobius trueperi was isolated from a soda lake in Wadi An Natrun, Egypt. It grows optimally at 3.7?M Na+, pH?9.5, and 43?C. The draft genome consists of 2.63?Mb and is composed of 2,681 predicted genes. Genomic analysis showed that various genes are potentially involved in the adaptation mechanisms for osmotic stress, pH homeostasis, and high temperatures.

  13. [Comparative analysis of clustered regularly interspaced short palindromic repeats (CRISPRs) loci in the genomes of halophilic archaea].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Fan; Zhang, Bing; Xiang, Hua; Hu, Songnian

    2009-11-01

    Clustered Regularly Interspaced Short Palindromic Repeats (CRISPR) is a widespread system that provides acquired resistance against phages in bacteria and archaea. Here we aim to genome-widely analyze the CRISPR in extreme halophilic archaea, of which the whole genome sequences are available at present time. We used bioinformatics methods including alignment, conservation analysis, GC content and RNA structure prediction to analyze the CRISPR structures of 7 haloarchaeal genomes. We identified the CRISPR structures in 5 halophilic archaea and revealed a conserved palindromic motif in the flanking regions of these CRISPR structures. In addition, we found that the repeat sequences of large CRISPR structures in halophilic archaea were greatly conserved, and two types of predicted RNA secondary structures derived from the repeat sequences were likely determined by the fourth base of the repeat sequence. Our results support the proposal that the leader sequence may function as recognition site by having palindromic structures in flanking regions, and the stem-loop secondary structure formed by repeat sequences may function in mediating the interaction between foreign genetic elements and CAS-encoded proteins.

  14. Alleviation of salt stress by halotolerant and halophilic plant growth-promoting bacteria in wheat (Triticum aestivum

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    Furkan Orhan

    Full Text Available ABSTRACT In the current study, 18 halotolerant and halophilic bacteria have been investigated for their plant growth promoting abilities in vitro and in a hydroponic culture. The bacterial strains have been investigated for ammonia, indole-3-acetic acid and 1-aminocyclopropane-1-carboxylate-deaminase production, phosphate solubilisation and nitrogen fixation activities. Of the tested bacteria, eight were inoculated with Triticum aestivum in a hydroponic culture. The investigated bacterial strains were found to have different plant-growth promoting activities in vitro. Under salt stress (200 mM NaCl, the investigated bacterial strains significantly increased the root and shoot length and total fresh weight of the plants. The growth rates of the plants inoculated with bacterial strains ranged from 62.2% to 78.1%.Identifying of novel halophilic and halotolerant bacteria that promote plant growth can be used as alternatives for salt sensitive plants. Extensive research has been conducted on several halophilic and halotolerant bacterial strains to investigate their plant growth promoting activities. However, to the best of my knowledge, this is the first study to inoculate these bacterial strains with wheat.

  15. Isolation of the moderately halophilic bacteria and effects of pH and incubation on their growth

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    Maryam Zanjirband

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available Micro organisms that grow in habitats characterized by high or low temperatures, acidic or alkaline pHs, high salt concentrations and high pressures have been termed extremophiles. The halophilic microorganisms are a group of extremophiles that are able to grow in the presence of NaCl. For isolation of moderately halophilic bacteria, specimens were collected from sea water (Persian Gulf and different parts of tannery factory. Samples were enriched in specific medium for halophils, and bacteria were purred with streak plate method and were identified. To investigate the effects of various temperatures and various pH on their growth, drop plate method and microtitre plate method were used. In this study, 8 bacteria from different parts of tannery factory and 8 bacteria from Persian Gulf were isolated. Phenotypic and biotipic studies were accomplished the collected bacteria. Results indicated that, the best temperature for tannery factory and Persian Gulf isolates were 28C and 37C respectively. Optimum pH for tannery factory and Persian Gulf isolates was 7.2.

  16. A novel halophilic lipase, LipBL, showing high efficiency in the production of eicosapentaenoic acid (EPA.

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    Dolores Pérez

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Among extremophiles, halophiles are defined as microorganisms adapted to live and thrive in diverse extreme saline environments. These extremophilic microorganisms constitute the source of a number of hydrolases with great biotechnological applications. The interest to use extremozymes from halophiles in industrial applications is their resistance to organic solvents and extreme temperatures. Marinobacter lipolyticus SM19 is a moderately halophilic bacterium, isolated previously from a saline habitat in South Spain, showing lipolytic activity. METHODS AND FINDINGS: A lipolytic enzyme from the halophilic bacterium Marinobacter lipolyticus SM19 was isolated. This enzyme, designated LipBL, was expressed in Escherichia coli. LipBL is a protein of 404 amino acids with a molecular mass of 45.3 kDa and high identity to class C β-lactamases. LipBL was purified and biochemically characterized. The temperature for its maximal activity was 80°C and the pH optimum determined at 25°C was 7.0, showing optimal activity without sodium chloride, while maintaining 20% activity in a wide range of NaCl concentrations. This enzyme exhibited high activity against short-medium length acyl chain substrates, although it also hydrolyzes olive oil and fish oil. The fish oil hydrolysis using LipBL results in an enrichment of free eicosapentaenoic acid (EPA, but not docosahexaenoic acid (DHA, relative to its levels present in fish oil. For improving the stability and to be used in industrial processes LipBL was immobilized in different supports. The immobilized derivatives CNBr-activated Sepharose were highly selective towards the release of EPA versus DHA. The enzyme is also active towards different chiral and prochiral esters. Exposure of LipBL to buffer-solvent mixtures showed that the enzyme had remarkable activity and stability in all organic solvents tested. CONCLUSIONS: In this study we isolated, purified, biochemically characterized and immobilized a

  17. A Novel Halophilic Lipase, LipBL, Showing High Efficiency in the Production of Eicosapentaenoic Acid (EPA)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pérez, Dolores; Martín, Sara; Fernández-Lorente, Gloria; Filice, Marco; Guisán, José Manuel; Ventosa, Antonio; García, María Teresa; Mellado, Encarnación

    2011-01-01

    Background Among extremophiles, halophiles are defined as microorganisms adapted to live and thrive in diverse extreme saline environments. These extremophilic microorganisms constitute the source of a number of hydrolases with great biotechnological applications. The interest to use extremozymes from halophiles in industrial applications is their resistance to organic solvents and extreme temperatures. Marinobacter lipolyticus SM19 is a moderately halophilic bacterium, isolated previously from a saline habitat in South Spain, showing lipolytic activity. Methods and Findings A lipolytic enzyme from the halophilic bacterium Marinobacter lipolyticus SM19 was isolated. This enzyme, designated LipBL, was expressed in Escherichia coli. LipBL is a protein of 404 amino acids with a molecular mass of 45.3 kDa and high identity to class C β-lactamases. LipBL was purified and biochemically characterized. The temperature for its maximal activity was 80°C and the pH optimum determined at 25°C was 7.0, showing optimal activity without sodium chloride, while maintaining 20% activity in a wide range of NaCl concentrations. This enzyme exhibited high activity against short-medium length acyl chain substrates, although it also hydrolyzes olive oil and fish oil. The fish oil hydrolysis using LipBL results in an enrichment of free eicosapentaenoic acid (EPA), but not docosahexaenoic acid (DHA), relative to its levels present in fish oil. For improving the stability and to be used in industrial processes LipBL was immobilized in different supports. The immobilized derivatives CNBr-activated Sepharose were highly selective towards the release of EPA versus DHA. The enzyme is also active towards different chiral and prochiral esters. Exposure of LipBL to buffer-solvent mixtures showed that the enzyme had remarkable activity and stability in all organic solvents tested. Conclusions In this study we isolated, purified, biochemically characterized and immobilized a lipolytic enzyme from

  18. Impact of growth mode, phase, and rate on the metabolic state of the extremely thermophilic archaeon Pyrococcus furiosus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Khatibi, Piyum A; Chou, Chung-Jung; Loder, Andrew J; Zurawski, Jeffrey V; Adams, Michael W W; Kelly, Robert M

    2017-12-01

    The archaeon Pyrococcus furiosus is emerging as a metabolic engineering platform for production of fuels and chemicals, such that more must be known about this organism's characteristics in bioprocessing contexts. Its ability to grow at temperatures from 70 to greater than 100°C and thereby avoid contamination, offers the opportunity for long duration, continuous bioprocesses as an alternative to batch systems. Toward that end, we analyzed the transcriptome of P. furiosus to reveal its metabolic state during different growth modes that are relevant to bioprocessing. As cells progressed from exponential to stationary phase in batch cultures, genes involved in biosynthetic pathways important to replacing diminishing supplies of key nutrients and genes responsible for the onset of stress responses were up-regulated. In contrast, during continuous culture, the progression to higher dilution rates down-regulated many biosynthetic processes as nutrient supplies were increased. Most interesting was the contrast between batch exponential phase and continuous culture at comparable growth rates (∼0.4 hr-1 ), where over 200 genes were differentially transcribed, indicating among other things, N-limitation in the chemostat and the onset of oxidative stress. The results here suggest that cellular processes involved in carbon and electron flux in P. furiosus were significantly impacted by growth mode, phase and rate, factors that need to be taken into account when developing successful metabolic engineering strategies. © 2017 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  19. A novel acidophilic, thermophilic iron and sulfur-oxidizing archaeon isolated from a hot spring of tengchong, yunnan, China

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    Jiannan Ding

    2011-06-01

    Full Text Available A novel thermoacidophilic iron and sulfur-oxidizing archaeon, strain YN25, was isolated from an in situ enriched acid hot spring sample collected in Yunnan, China. Cells were irregular cocci, about 0.9-1.02 µm×1.0-1.31 µm in the medium containing elemental sulfur and 1.5-2.22 µm×1.8-2.54 µm in ferrous sulfate medium. The ranges of growth and pH were 50-85 (optimum 65 and pH 1.0-6.0 (optimum 1.5-2.5. The acidophile was able to grow heterotrophically on several organic substrates, including various monosaccharides, alcohols and amino acids, though the growth on single substrate required yeast extract as growth factor. Growth occurred under aerobic conditions or via anaerobic respiration using elemental sulfur as terminal electron acceptor. Results of morphology, physiology, fatty acid analysis and analysis based on 16S rRNA gene sequence indicated that the strain YN25 should be grouped in the species Acidianus manzaensis. Bioleaching experiments indicated that this strain had excellent leaching capacity, with a copper yielding ratio up to 79.16% in 24 d. The type strain YN25 was deposited in China Center for Type Culture Collection (=CCTCCZNDX0050.

  20. The structure of TON1937 from archaeon Thermococcus onnurineus NA1 reveals a eukaryotic HEAT-like architecture.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jeong, Jae-Hee; Kim, Yi-Seul; Rojviriya, Catleya; Cha, Hyung Jin; Ha, Sung-Chul; Kim, Yeon-Gil

    2013-10-01

    The members of the ARM/HEAT repeat-containing protein superfamily in eukaryotes have been known to mediate protein-protein interactions by using their concave surface. However, little is known about the ARM/HEAT repeat proteins in prokaryotes. Here we report the crystal structure of TON1937, a hypothetical protein from the hyperthermophilic archaeon Thermococcus onnurineus NA1. The structure reveals a crescent-shaped molecule composed of a double layer of α-helices with seven anti-parallel α-helical repeats. A structure-based sequence alignment of the α-helical repeats identified a conserved pattern of hydrophobic or aliphatic residues reminiscent of the consensus sequence of eukaryotic HEAT repeats. The individual repeats of TON1937 also share high structural similarity with the canonical eukaryotic HEAT repeats. In addition, the concave surface of TON1937 is proposed to be its potential binding interface based on this structural comparison and its surface properties. These observations lead us to speculate that the archaeal HEAT-like repeats of TON1937 have evolved to engage in protein-protein interactions in the same manner as eukaryotic HEAT repeats. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  1. Overexpression, purification and crystallization of tyrosyl-tRNA synthetase from the hyperthermophilic archaeon Aeropyrum pernix K1

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Iwaki, Jun [Department of Material and Biological Chemistry, Faculty of Science, Yamagata University, Yamagata 990-8560 (Japan); Department of Biochemistry, National Institute of Agrobiological Sciences, Tsukuba, Ibaraki 305-8602 (Japan); Suzuki, Ryuichiro [Department of Material and Biological Chemistry, Faculty of Science, Yamagata University, Yamagata 990-8560 (Japan); Department of Biochemistry, National Institute of Agrobiological Sciences, Tsukuba, Ibaraki 305-8602 (Japan); Research Centre for Glycoscience, National Institute of Advanced Industrial Science and Technology, Tsukuba, Ibaraki 305-8566 (Japan); Fujimoto, Zui, E-mail: zui@affrc.go.jp; Momma, Mitsuru [Department of Biochemistry, National Institute of Agrobiological Sciences, Tsukuba, Ibaraki 305-8602 (Japan); Kuno, Atsushi [Department of Material and Biological Chemistry, Faculty of Science, Yamagata University, Yamagata 990-8560 (Japan); Research Centre for Glycoscience, National Institute of Advanced Industrial Science and Technology, Tsukuba, Ibaraki 305-8566 (Japan); Hasegawa, Tsunemi [Department of Material and Biological Chemistry, Faculty of Science, Yamagata University, Yamagata 990-8560 (Japan)

    2005-11-01

    Tyrosyl-tRNA synthetase from the hyperthermophilic archaeon A. pernix K1 was cloned, purified and crystallized. The crystals belonged to the tetragonal space group P4{sub 3}2{sub 1}2, with unit-cell parameters a = b = 66.1, c = 196.2 Å, and diffracted to beyond 2.15 Å resolution at 100 K. Hyperthermophilic archaeal tyrosyl-tRNA synthetase from Aeropyrum pernix K1 was cloned and overexpressed in Escherichia coli. The expressed protein was purified by Cibacron Blue affinity chromatography following heat treatment at 363 K. Crystals suitable for X-ray diffraction studies were obtained under optimized crystallization conditions in the presence of 1.5 M ammonium sulfate using the hanging-drop vapour-diffusion method. The crystals belonged to the tetragonal space group P4{sub 3}2{sub 1}2, with unit-cell parameters a = b = 66.1, c = 196.2 Å, and diffracted to beyond 2.15 Å resolution at 100 K.

  2. Enhanced activity and enantioselectivity of a hyperthermophilic esterase from archaeon Aeropyrum pernix K1 by acetone treatment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cong, Fangdi; Xing, Kezhi; Gao, Renjun; Cao, Shugui; Zhang, Guirong

    2011-10-01

    To improve the activity and enantioselectivity of hyperthermophilic archaeon Aeropyrum pernix K1 esterase (APE1547) and its mutants, they were purified by acetone-treated method. It was found that the acetone treatment not only caused APE1547 and its mutants to display higher activity and enantioselectivity but also saved more than 90% of time spent in purifying them by Ni-chelating column. In hydrolysis of p-nitrophenyl caprylate, the acetone-treated APE1547 and mutant A containing the following substitutions R11G, L36P, V225A, I551L, and A564T showed 5.7- and 6.9-fold active increase, respectively. In the resolution of 2-octanol acetate, the acetone-treated mutant A had a 9-fold enantioselective increase relative to that purified by Ni-chelating column. In addition, the impact of pH, temperature, and chemical reagents on activity of APE1547 and mutant A was discussed in this paper.

  3. Temperature- and pH-induced structural changes in the membrane of the hyperthermophilic archaeon Aeropyrum pernix K1.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ulrih, Natasa Poklar; Adamlje, Urska; Nemec, Marjanca; Sentjurc, Marjeta

    2007-10-01

    The influence of pH and temperature on the structural organization, fluidity and permeability of the hyperthermophilic archaeon membrane was investigated in situ by a combination of electron paramagnetic resonance (EPR) and fluorescence emission spectroscopy. For EPR measurements, Aeropyrum pernix cells, after growing at different pHs, were spin-labeled with the doxyl derivative of palmitic acid methylester (MeFASL(10,3)). From the EPR spectra maximal hyperfine splitting (2A (max)) and empirical correlation time (tau (emp)), which are related to mean membrane fluidity, were determined. The mean membrane fluidity increases with temperature and depends on the pH of the growth medium. Computer simulation of the EPR spectra shows that membrane of A. pernix is heterogeneous and consists of the regions characterized with three different types of motional characteristics, which define three types of membrane domains. Order parameter and proportion of the spin probes in the three types of domains define mean membrane fluidity. The fluidity changes of the membrane with pH and temperature correlate well with the ratio between the fluorescence emission intensity of the first and third bands in the vibronic spectra of pyrene, I(1)/I(3). At pH 7.0 a decrease of I(1)/I(3) from 2.0 to 1.2, due to the penetration of pyrene into the nonpolar membrane region, is achieved at temperatures above 65 degrees C, the lower temperature limit of A. pernix growth.

  4. Thermostability and reactivity in organic solvent of O-phospho-L-serine sulfhydrylase from hyperthermophilic archaeon Aeropyrum pernix K1.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nakamura, Takashi; Asai, Shinji; Nakata, Kaori; Kunimoto, Kohei; Oguri, Masateru; Ishikawa, Kazuhiko

    2015-01-01

    O-phospho-l-serine sulfhydrylase (OPSS) from archaeon Aeropyrum pernix K1 is able to synthesize l-cysteine even at 80 °C. In this article, we compared thermal stability and reactivity in organic solvent of OPSS with those of O-acetyl-l-serine sulfhydrylase B (OASS-B) from Escherichia coli. As a result, the thermostability of OPSS was much higher than that of OASS-B. Moreover, the activity of OPSS increased in the reaction mixture containing the organic solvent, such as N, N'-dimethyl formamide and 1,4-dioxane, whereas that of OASS-B gradually decreased as the content of organic solvent increased. From the crystal structural analysis, the intramolecular electrostatic interactions of N-terminal domain in OPSS seemed to be correlated with the tolerance of OPSS to high temperature and organic solvent. These results indicate that OPSS is more superior to OASS-B for the industrial production of l-cysteine and unnatural amino acids that are useful pharmaceuticals in the presence of organic solvent.

  5. Oxidative stress protection and the repair response to hydrogen peroxide in the hyperthermophilic archaeon Pyrococcus furiosus and in related species.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Strand, Kari R; Sun, Chengjun; Li, Ting; Jenney, Francis E; Schut, Gerrit J; Adams, Michael W W

    2010-06-01

    Pyrococcus furiosus is a shallow marine, anaerobic archaeon that grows optimally at 100 degrees C. Addition of H(2)O(2) (0.5 mM) to a growing culture resulted in the cessation of growth with a 2-h lag before normal growth resumed. Whole genome transcriptional profiling revealed that the main response occurs within 30 min of peroxide addition, with the up-regulation of 62 open reading frames (ORFs), 36 of which are part of 10 potential operons. More than half of the up-regulated ORFs are of unknown function, while some others encode proteins that are involved potentially in sequestering iron and sulfide, in DNA repair and in generating NADPH. This response is thought to involve primarily damage repair rather than protection, since cultures exposed to sub-toxic levels of H(2)O(2) were not more resistant to the subsequent addition of H(2)O(2) (0.5-5.0 mM). Consequently, there is little if any induced protective response to peroxide. The organism maintains a constitutive protective mechanism involving high levels of oxidoreductase-type enzymes such as superoxide reductase, rubrerythrin, and alkyl hydroperoxide reductase. Related hyperthermophiles contain homologs of the proteins involved in the constitutive protective mechanism but these organisms were more sensitive to peroxide than P. furiosus and lack several of its peroxide-responsive ORFs.

  6. Crystallization and preliminary X-ray analysis of a RecB-family nuclease from the archaeon Pyrococcus abyssi

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ren, Bin, E-mail: ren@csb.ki.se [Center for Structural Biochemistry, Karolinska Institute, NOVUM, S-141 57 Huddinge (Sweden); Kuhn, Joëlle; Meslet-Cladiere, Laurence; Myllykallio, Hannu [Université Paris-Sud, Institut de Génétique et Microbiologie, Centre National de la Recherche Scientifique Unité Mixte de Recherche 8621, F-91405 Orsay CEDEX (France); Ladenstein, Rudolf [Center for Structural Biochemistry, Karolinska Institute, NOVUM, S-141 57 Huddinge (Sweden)

    2007-05-01

    A RecB-like nuclease from the archaeon Pyrococcus abyssi was expressed, purified and crystallized. The crystals belong to the orthorhombic space group C222{sub 1} with a = 81.5, b = 159.8, c = 100.8 Å, and a native data set was collected to 2.65 Å resolution. Nucleases are required to process and repair DNA damage in living cells. One of the best studied nucleases is the RecB protein, which functions in Escherichia coli as a component of the RecBCD enzyme complex that amends double-strand breaks in DNA. Although archaea do not contain the RecBCD complex, a RecB-like nuclease from Pyrococcus abyssi has been cloned, expressed and purified. The protein was crystallized by the sitting-drop vapour-diffusion method using polyethylene glycol 8000 as the precipitant. The crystals belong to the orthorhombic space group C222{sub 1}, with unit-cell parameters a = 81.5, b = 159.8, c = 100.8 Å. Self-rotation function and native Patterson map calculations revealed that there is a dimer in the asymmetric unit with its local twofold axis running parallel to the crystallographic twofold screw axis. The crystals diffracted to about 2 Å and a complete native data set was collected to 2.65 Å resolution.

  7. Unusual Starch Degradation Pathway via Cyclodextrins in the Hyperthermophilic Sulfate-Reducing Archaeon Archaeoglobus fulgidus Strain 7324▿

    Science.gov (United States)

    Labes, Antje; Schönheit, Peter

    2007-01-01

    The hyperthermophilic archaeon Archaeoglobus fulgidus strain 7324 has been shown to grow on starch and sulfate and thus represents the first sulfate reducer able to degrade polymeric sugars. The enzymes involved in starch degradation to glucose 6-phosphate were studied. In extracts of starch-grown cells the activities of the classical starch degradation enzymes, α-amylase and amylopullulanase, could not be detected. Instead, evidence is presented here that A. fulgidus utilizes an unusual pathway of starch degradation involving cyclodextrins as intermediates. The pathway comprises the combined action of an extracellular cyclodextrin glucanotransferase (CGTase) converting starch to cyclodextrins and the intracellular conversion of cyclodextrins to glucose 6-phosphate via cyclodextrinase (CDase), maltodextrin phosphorylase (Mal-P), and phosphoglucomutase (PGM). These enzymes, which are all induced after growth on starch, were characterized. CGTase catalyzed the conversion of starch to mainly β-cyclodextrin. The gene encoding CGTase was cloned and sequenced and showed highest similarity to a glucanotransferase from Thermococcus litoralis. After transport of the cyclodextrins into the cell by a transport system to be defined, these molecules are linearized via a CDase, catalyzing exclusively the ring opening of the cyclodextrins to the respective maltooligodextrins. These are degraded by a Mal-P to glucose 1-phosphate. Finally, PGM catalyzes the conversion of glucose 1-phosphate to glucose 6-phosphate, which is further degraded to pyruvate via the modified Embden-Meyerhof pathway. PMID:17921308

  8. Partial characterization of an extracellular polysaccharide produced by the moderately halophilic bacterium Halomonas xianhensis SUR308.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Biswas, Jhuma; Ganguly, J; Paul, A K

    2015-01-01

    A moderately halophilic bacterium, Halomonas xianhensis SUR308 (Genbank Accession No. KJ933394) was isolated from a multi-pond solar saltern at Surala, Ganjam district, Odisha, India. The isolate produced a significant amount (7.87 g l(-1)) of extracellular polysaccharides (EPS) when grown in malt extract-yeast extract medium supplemented with 2.5% NaCl, 0.5% casein hydrolysate and 3% glucose. The EPS was isolated and purified following the conventional method of precipitation and dialysis. Chromatographic analysis (paper, GC and GC-MS) of the hydrolyzed EPS confirmed its heteropolymeric nature and showed that it is composed mainly of glucose (45.74 mol%), galactose (33.67 mol %) and mannose (17.83 mol%). Fourier-transform infrared spectroscopy indicated the presence of methylene and carboxyl groups as characteristic functional groups. In addition, its proton nuclear magnetic resonance spectrum revealed functional groups specific for extracellular polysaccharides. X-ray diffraction analysis revealed the amorphous nature (CIxrd, 0.56) of the EPS. It was thermostable up to 250 °C and displayed pseudoplastic rheology and remarkable stability against pH and salts. These unique properties of the EPS produced by H. xianhensis indicate its potential to act as an agent for detoxification, emulsification and diverse biological activities.

  9. Low Water Activity Induces the Production of Bioactive Metabolites in Halophilic and Halotolerant Fungi

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nina Gunde-Cimerman

    2010-12-01

    Full Text Available The aim of the present study was to investigate indigenous fungal communities isolated from extreme environments (hypersaline waters of solar salterns and subglacial ice, for the production of metabolic compounds with selected biological activities: hemolysis, antibacterial, and acetylcholinesterase inhibition. In their natural habitats, the selected fungi are exposed to environmental extremes, and therefore the production of bioactive metabolites was tested under both standard growth conditions for mesophilic microorganisms, and at high NaCl and sugar concentrations and low growth temperatures. The results indicate that selected halotolerant and halophilic species synthesize specific bioactive metabolites under conditions that represent stress for non-adapted species. Furthermore, adaptation at the level of the chemical nature of the solute lowering the water activity of the medium was observed. Increased salt concentrations resulted in higher hemolytic activity, particularly within species dominating the salterns. The appearance of antibacterial potential under stress conditions was seen in the similar pattern of fungal species as for hemolysis. The active extracts exclusively affected the growth of the Gram-positive bacterium tested, Bacillus subtilis. None of the extracts tested showed inhibition of acetylcholinesterase activity.

  10. Thermostable alkaline halophilic-protease production by Natronolimnobius innermongolicus WN18.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Selim, Samy; Hagagy, Nashwa; Abdel Aziz, Mohamed; El-Meleigy, El Syaed; Pessione, Enrica

    2014-01-01

    This study reports the production and biochemical characterisation of a thermostable alkaline halophilic protease from Natronolimnobius innermongolicus WN18 (HQ658997), isolated from soda Lake of Wadi An-Natrun, Egypt. The enzyme was concentrated by spinning through a centriplus, centrifugal ultrafiltration Millipore membrane with a total yield of 25%. The relative molecular mass of this protease determined by sodium dodecyl sulfate-polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis ranged from 67 to 43 kDa. The extracellular protease of N. innermongolicus WN18 was dependent on high salt concentrations for activity and stability, and it had an optimum temperature of 60°C in the presence of 2.5 M NaCl. This enzyme was stable in a broad pH range (6-12) with an optimum pH of 9-10 for azocasein hydrolysis. This extracellular protease, therefore, could be defined as thermostable and haloalkaliphilic with distinct properties that make the enzyme applicable for different industrial purposes.

  11. THE EXTREMELY HALOPHILIC MICROORGANISMS, A POSSIBLE MODEL FOR LIFE ON OTHER PLANETS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sergiu Fendrihan

    2017-12-01

    Full Text Available Abstract The group of halophilic Archaea was discovered in the beginning of XX th century. They are able to live in more than 2-3 M of sodium chloride concentration that can be found in hypersaline natural lakes, in alkaline saline lakes, in man-made hypersaline mats, in rock salt, in very salted foods, on salted fish, on salted hides, in stromatolites, in saline soils. Their adaptations consist in resistance to high ionic contents with internal accumulation of K ions in order to face high Na ion content from the near environment. They belong to the Halobacteriaceae family. Their adaptation and their resistance to UV radiation and their resistance in oligotrophic conditions in rock salt, apparently over geological times, increase the possibility to find similar microorganisms in the Martian subsurface and in meteorites, and to support the panspermia theory. Some of the research of a working group in this field of activity and their possible uses are shortly reviewed here.

  12. Determination of tryptophan tRNA recognition sites for tryptophanyl-tRNA synthetase from hyperthermophilic archaeon, Aeropyrum pernix K1.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tsuchiya, Wataru; Umehara, Takuya; Kuno, Atsushi; Hasegawa, Tsunemi

    2004-01-01

    To investigate the recognition mechanism of tryptophan tRNA by tryptophanyl-tRNA synthetase from extreme hyperthermophilic and aerobic archaeon, Aeropyrum pernix K1, tryptophanylation activities were examined by using mutant tryptophan tRNA transcripts prepared by in vitro transcription system. Their transcripts were aminoacylated with tryptophan by overexpressed A. pernix tryptophanyl-tRNA synthetase. The results indicated that anticodon nucleotides C34, C35 and A36, discriminator base A73, G1-C72 and G2-C71 base pairs of acceptor stem were base-specifically recognized by A. pernix tryptophanyl-tRNA synthetase.

  13. Crystallization and preliminary X-ray analysis of a dye-linked D-lactate dehydrogenase from the aerobic hyperthermophilic archaeon Aeropyrum pernix.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shibahara, Takenori; Satomura, Takenori; Kawakami, Ryushi; Ohshima, Toshihisa; Sakuraba, Haruhiko

    2011-11-01

    A dye-linked D-lactate dehydrogenase from the aerobic hyperthermophilic archaeon Aeropyrum pernix was crystallized using the hanging-drop vapour-diffusion method with polyethylene glycol 8000 as the precipitant. The crystals belonged to the monoclinic space group P2(1), with unit-cell parameters a = 63.4, b = 119.4, c = 70.2 Å, β = 112.0°, and diffracted to 2.0 Å resolution on the BL26B1 beamline at SPring-8. The overall R(merge) was 4.5% and the completeness was 99.8%. © 2011 International Union of Crystallography. All rights reserved.

  14. Determination of phenylalanine tRNA recognition sites by phenylalanyl-tRNA synthetase from hyperthermophilic archaeon, Aeropyrum pernix K1.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tsuchiya, Wataru; Kimura, Manami; Hasegawa, Tsunemi

    2007-01-01

    Phenylalanine tRNA identity has been determined in the bacteria and the eukaryote system, but remains unknown for the archaea system. To investigate the molecular recognition mechanism of phenylalanine tRNA by phenylalanyl-tRNA synthetase from hyperthermophilic and aerobic archaeon, Aeropyrum pernix K1, various mutant transcripts of phenylalanine tRNA prepared by an in vitro transcription system were examined by overexpressed A. pernix phenylalanyl tRNA synthetase. The results indicated that anticodon nucleotides G34, A35 and A36, discriminator base A73 and G20 in the variable pocket were base-specifically recognized by A. pernix phenylalanyl-tRNA synthetase.

  15. Draft Genome Sequence of Natranaerobius trueperi DSM 18760T, an Anaerobic, Halophilic, Alkaliphilic, Thermotolerant Bacterium Isolated from a Soda Lake.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guo, Xiaomeng; Liao, Ziya; Holtzapple, Mark; Hu, Qingping; Zhao, Baisuo

    2017-09-07

    The anaerobic, halophilic, alkaliphilic, thermotolerant bacterium Natranaerobius trueperi was isolated from a soda lake in Wadi An Natrun, Egypt. It grows optimally at 3.7 M Na+, pH 9.5, and 43°C. The draft genome consists of 2.63 Mb and is composed of 2,681 predicted genes. Genomic analysis showed that various genes are potentially involved in the adaptation mechanisms for osmotic stress, pH homeostasis, and high temperatures. Copyright © 2017 Guo et al.

  16. Joint Workshop on Aspects of Halophilism Held in Jerusalem, March 23-28, 1986. Program/Abstracts.

    Science.gov (United States)

    1986-04-30

    8217 protein than do the ’A’ proteins from the other archaebacteria. If the archaebacteria are earlier than the eubacteria in the evolu- tionary scale it is...possible that the ’A’ protein from the extreme halo- phile gave rise to the ’A’ proteins in the eubacteria (moderate halo- philes). The data also...Valera, F. 1984. Betaine is the main compatible solute of halophilic eubacteria . J. Bacteriol. 160: 478-479. 6. Hanna, K., Bengisa-Garber, C., Kushner, 0

  17. Reduction of salt-requirement of halophilic nucleoside diphosphate kinase by engineering S-S bond.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ishibashi, Matsujiro; Uchino, Manami; Arai, Shigeki; Kuroki, Ryota; Arakawa, Tsutomu; Tokunaga, Masao

    2012-09-01

    Nucleoside diphosphate kinase (HsNDK) from extremely halophilic haloarchaeon, Halobacterium salinarum, requires salt at high concentrations for folding. A D148C mutant, in which Asp148 was replaced with Cys, was designed to enhance stability and folding in low salt solution by S-S bond. It showed increased thermal stability by about 10 °C in 0.2 M NaCl over the wild type HsNDK. It refolded from heat-denaturation even in 0.1 M NaCl, while the wild type required 2 M NaCl to achieve the same level of activity recovery. This enhanced refolding is due to the three S-S bonds between two basic dimeric units in the hexameric HsNDK structure, indicating that assembly of the dimeric unit may be the rate-limiting step in low salt solution. Circular dichroism and native-PAGE analysis showed that heat-denatured HsNDK formed partially folded dimeric structure, upon refolding, in the absence of salt and the native-like secondary structure in the presence of salt above 0.1 M NaCl. However, it remained dimeric upon prolonged incubation at this salt concentration. In contrary, heat-denatured D148C mutant refolded into tetrameric folding intermediate in the absence of salt and native-like structure above 0.1 M salt. This native-like structure was then converted to the native hexamer with time. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  18. Halophilic alkali- and thermostable amylase from a novel polyextremophilic Amphibacillus sp. NM-Ra2.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mesbah, Noha M; Wiegel, Juergen

    2014-09-01

    Extracellular gluco-amylo-pullulanase from Amphibacillus sp. NM-Ra2 was purified to homogeneity by ethanol precipitation, anion exchange chromatography and gel filtration chromatography. Molecular mass of the enzyme was 50kDa (SDS-PAGE). The enzyme showed maximal activity at 1.9 M NaCl, pH50°C 8.0 and 54°C and was active from 0 to 4.3 M NaCl and 37 to 65°C. The enzyme was inhibited by EDTA and was stable and active in the presence of PMSF, DTT, H2O2, Triton-X-100, Tween 20 and Tween 80. Ca2+ is inessential for activity. The amylase was stimulated with K+ and inhibited with Cu2+ and Mg2+. Hg2+, Zn2+ and Fe2+ had no effect on activity. Amylase was stable and active in the presence of ethanol, methanol and benzene (25%, v/v). The enzyme hydrolyzed linear and branched polysaccharides including pullulan, glycogen and amylopectin, and hydrolyzed raw wheat starch and raw corn starch (14.6% and 13.5% over 2 h). Amylase activity was inhibited by soluble starch concentrations greater than 0.3%. The major products of soluble starch hydrolysis were maltose and maltotriose. The amylase, being halophilic and alkali-thermostable, in addition to being resistant to surfactants, oxidizing agents and organic solvents, can find applications in the starch processing, pharmaceutical, food and paper/pulp industries. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  19. Lentibacillus kimchii sp. nov., an extremely halophilic bacterium isolated from kimchi, a Korean fermented vegetable.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oh, Young Joon; Lee, Hae-Won; Lim, Seul Ki; Kwon, Min-Sung; Lee, Jieun; Jang, Ja-Young; Lee, Jong Hee; Park, Hae Woong; Nam, Young-Do; Seo, Myung-Ji; Roh, Seong Woon; Choi, Hak-Jong

    2016-06-01

    A Gram-positive, aerobic, non-motile and extremely halophilic bacterial strain, designated K9(T), was isolated from kimchi, a Korean fermented food. The strain was observed as endospore-forming rod-shaped cells showing oxidase and catalase activity. It was found to grow at 10.0-30.0 % (w/v) NaCl (optimum, 15.0-20.0 %), pH 7.0-8.0 (optimum, pH 7.5) and 15-40 °C (optimum, 30 °C). The polar lipids of strain K9(T) were identified as phosphatidylglycerol, three unidentified phospholipids and an unidentified glycolipid. The isoprenoid quinone was identified as menaquinone-7. The major cellular fatty acids (>20 % of the total) were found to be anteisio-C15:0 and anteisio-C17:0. The cell wall peptidoglycan composition was determined to contain meso-diaminopimelic acid. The G + C content of genomic DNA was determined to be 48.2 mol %. Phylogenetic analysis based on the 16S rRNA gene sequence revealed that the isolated strain is closely related to Lentibacillus salinarum AHS-1(T) (96.7 % sequence similarity). Based on its phenotypic, chemotaxonomic and phylogenetic data, strain K9(T) is considered to represent a novel species of the genus Lentibacillus, for which the name Lentibacillus kimchii sp. nov., is proposed. The type strain is K9(T) (=KACC 18490(T) = JCM 30234(T)).

  20. Actinopolyspora lacussalsi sp. nov., an extremely halophilic actinomycete isolated from a salt lake.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guan, Tong-Wei; Wei, Bei; Zhang, Yao; Xia, Zhan-Fen; Che, Zhen-Ming; Chen, Xiang-Gui; Zhang, Li-Li

    2013-08-01

    A novel halophilic, filamentous actinobacterium, designated strain TRM 40139(T), was isolated from a hypersaline habitat in Xinjiang Province, north-west China. Its taxonomic status was determined using a polyphasic approach. Phylogenetic analysis based on the almost-complete 16S rRNA gene sequence of the strain showed that it formed a well-separated sub-branch within the radiation of the genus Actinopolyspora and the organism was related most closely to the type strains of Actinopolyspora alba (97.6 % similarity), Actinopolyspora xinjiangensis (97.6 %) and Actinopolyspora erythraea (97.1 %). However, it had relatively lower mean DNA-DNA relatedness values with the above strains (36.4, 31.3 and 26.1 %, respectively). Optimal growth occurred at 35 °C, at pH 7.0 and in the presence of 12 % (w/v) NaCl. The whole-cell sugar pattern consisted of xylose, glucose, ribose and arabinose. The major fatty acids were iso-C16 : 0 (28.0 %) and anteiso-C17 : 0 (27.6 %). The diagnostic phospholipids detected were diphosphatidylglycerol, phosphatidylglycerol, phosphatidylcholine, phosphatidylinositol and two unknown phospholipids. The predominant menaquinones were MK-9(H4) (49.8 %) and MK-10(H4) (24.2 %). The G+C content of the genomic DNA was 66.4 mol%. Strain TRM 40139(T) therefore represents a novel species of the genus Actinopolyspora, for which the name Actinopolyspora lacussalsi sp. nov. is proposed. The type strain is TRM 40139(T) (= KCTC 19657(T) = CCTCC AA 2012020(T)).

  1. Bacillus kiskunsagensis sp. nov., a novel alkaliphilic and moderately halophilic bacterium isolated from soda soil.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Borsodi, Andrea K; Tóth, Erika; Aszalós, Júlia M; Bárány, Ágnes; Schumann, Peter; Spröer, Cathrin; Kovács, Attila L; Márialigeti, Károly; Szili-Kovács, Tibor

    2017-09-01

    An alkaliphilic and moderately halophilic strain characterized by optimal growth at pH 9.0-10.0 and 7 % (w/v) NaCl, and designated B16-24T, was isolated from the rhizosphere soil of the bayonet grass Bolboschoenus maritimus at a soda pond in the Kiskunság National Park, Hungary. Cells of the strain were Gram-staining-positive, non-motile, straight rods, and formed central, ellipsoidal endospores with slightly swollen sporangia. The isolate was facultative anaerobic, catalase positive, oxidase negative, and contained a peptidoglycan of type A1γ based on meso-diaminopimelic acid. Menaquinone-7 (MK-7) was the predominant isoprenoid quinone, and anteiso-C15 : 0 the major cellular fatty acid. The DNA G+C content of strain B16-24T was 36.6 mol%. The 16S rRNA gene-based phylogenetic analysis revealed that the novel isolate had the greatest similarities to the type strains of Bacillus okhensis Kh10-101T (97.8 %), B. akibai 1139T (97.4 %), B. alkalisediminis K1-25T (97.3 %) and B. wakoensis N-1T (97.1 %). The DNA-DNA relatedness of strain B16-24T and the closely related Bacillus species ranged between 24±6 % and 35±3 %. The distinctive phenotypic and genetic results of this study confirmed that strain B16-24T represents a novel species within the genus Bacillus, for which the name Bacillus kiskunsagensis sp. nov. is proposed. The type strain is B16-24T (=DSM 29791T=NCAIM B.02610T).

  2. Salt Specificity of a Reduced Nicotinamide Adenine Dinucleotide Oxidase Prepared from a Halophilic Bacterium1

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hochstein, L. I.; Dalton, B. P.

    1968-01-01

    Extracts prepared from a halophilic bacterium contained a reduced nicotinamide adenine dinucleotide (NADH2) oxidase active at high solute concentrations. The cation requirement was nonspecific, since KCl, RbCl, and CsCl replaced NaCl with little or no loss of activity, and NH4Cl was only partially effective. Only LiCl failed to replace NaCl. No specific chloride requirement was observed although not all anions replaced chloride. Bromide, nitrate, and iodide were essentially ineffective, whereas acetate, formate, citrate, and sulfate proved suitable. The presence of sulfate affected the ability of a cation to satisfy the solute requirement. Sulfate enhanced the rate of NADH2 oxidation when compared with the rate observed in the presence of chloride. Cations which were inactive as chlorides (LiCl and MgCl2 at high concentrations) satisfied the cation requirement when added as sulfate salts. Although magnesium satisfied the cation requirement, a concentration effect, as well as an anion effect, was observed. In the presence of MgCl2, little NADH2 oxidation was observed at concentrations greater than 1 m. At lower concentrations, the rate of oxidation increased, reaching a maximal value at 0.1 m and remaining constant up to a concentration of 0.05 m MgCl2. Magnesium acetate and MgSO4 also replaced NaCl, and the maximal rate of oxidation occurred at 0.05 m with respect to magnesium. There was no change in the rate of oxidation at high magnesium acetate concentrations, whereas the rate of NADH2 oxidation increased at higher concentrations of MgSO4. PMID:5636829

  3. On the origin of prokaryotic "species": the taxonomy of halophilic Archaea

    Science.gov (United States)

    DasSarma, Priya; DasSarma, Shiladitya

    2008-01-01

    The consistent use of the taxonomic system of binomial nomenclature (genus and species) was first popularized by Linnaeus nearly three-hundred years ago to classify mainly plants and animals. His main goal was to give labels that would ensure that biologists could agree on which organism was under investigation. One-hundred fifty years later, Darwin considered the term species as one of convenience and not essentially different from variety. In the modern era, exploration of the world's niches together with advances in genomics have expanded the number of named species to over 1.8 million, including many microorganisms. However, even this large number excludes over 90% of microorganisms that have yet to be cultured or classified. In naming new isolates in the microbial world, the challenge remains the lack of a universally held and evenly applied standard for a species. The definition of species based on the capacity to form fertile offspring is not applicable to microorganisms and 70% DNA-DNA hybridization appears rather crude in light of the many completed genome sequences. The popular phylogenetic marker, 16S rRNA, is tricky for classification since it does not provide multiple characteristics or phenotypes used classically for this purpose. Using most criteria, agreement may usually be found at the genus level, but species level distinctions are problematic. These observations lend credence to the proposal that the species concept is flawed when applied to prokaryotes. In order to address this topic, we have examined the taxonomy of extremely halophilic Archaea, where the order, family, and even a genus designation have become obsolete, and the naming and renaming of certain species has led to much confusion in the scientific community. PMID:18485204

  4. Spiribacter roseus sp. nov., a moderately halophilic species of the genus Spiribacter from salterns.

    Science.gov (United States)

    León, María José; Vera-Gargallo, Blanca; Sánchez-Porro, Cristina; Ventosa, Antonio

    2016-10-01

    Four pink-pigmented, non-motile, Gram-staining-negative and moderately halophilic curved rods, designated strains SSL50T, SSL25, SSL97 and SSL4, were isolated from a saltern located in Isla Cristina, Huelva, south-west Spain. Phylogenetic analyses based on 16S rRNA gene sequences showed that they were members of the genus Spiribacter, most closely related to Spiribacter curvatus UAH-SP71T (99.3-99.5 % sequence similarity) and Spiribacter salinus M19-40T (96.5-96.7 %). Other related strains were Alkalilimnicola ehrlichii MLHE-1T (95.1-95.3 %), Arhodomonas recens RS91T (95.1-95.2 %) and Arhodomonas aquaeolei ATCC 49307T (95.0-95.1 %), all members of the family Ectothiorhodospiraceae. The major fatty acids were C18 : 1ω6c and/or C18 : 1ω7c, C16 : 0 and C12 : 0. The DNA G+C range was 64.0-66.3 mol%. The DNA-DNA hybridization values between strains SSL50T, SSL25, SSL97, SSL4 and S. piribacter. curvatus UAH-SP71T were 37-49 %. The average nucleotide identity (ANIb) values between the genome of strain SSL50T and those of the two other representatives of the genus Spiribacter, S. curvatus UAH-SP71T and S. salinus M19-40T, were 82.4 % and 79.1 %, respectively, supporting the proposal of a novel species of the genus Spiribacter. On the basis of the polyphasic analysis, the four new isolates are considered to represent a novel species of the genus Spiribacter, for which the name Spiribacter roseus sp. nov. is proposed. The type strain is SSL50T (=CECT 9117T=IBRC-M 11076T).

  5. Pseudomonas salegens sp. nov., a halophilic member of the genus Pseudomonas isolated from a wetland.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Amoozegar, Mohammad Ali; Shahinpei, Azadeh; Sepahy, Abbas Akhavan; Makhdoumi-Kakhki, Ali; Seyedmahdi, Shima Sadat; Schumann, Peter; Ventosa, Antonio

    2014-10-01

    A novel Gram-stain-negative, aerobic, non-endospore-forming, non-pigmented, rod-shaped, slightly halophilic bacterium, designated GBPy5(T), was isolated from aquatic plants of the Gomishan wetland, Iran. Cells of strain GBPy5(T) were motile. Growth occurred with between 1 and 10% (w/v) NaCl and the isolate grew optimally with 3% (w/v) NaCl. The optimum pH and temperature for growth of the strain were pH 8.0 and 30 °C, respectively, while it was able to grow over a pH range of 6.5-9.0 and a temperature range of 4-35 °C. Phylogenetic analysis, based on 16S rRNA gene sequences, revealed that strain GBPy5(T) is a member of the genus Pseudomonas forming a monophyletic branch. The novel strain exhibited 16S rRNA gene sequence similarity of 95.4% with type strains of Pseudomonas guariconensis PCAVU11(T) and Pseudomonas sabulinigri J64(T), respectively. The major cellular fatty acids of the isolate were C18:1ω7c (37.8%), C16:0 (14.9%), C16:1ω7c (12.9%), C12:0 3-OH (7.1%) and C12:0 (7.0%). The polar lipid pattern of strain GBPy5(T) comprised phosphatidylglycerol, diphosphatidylglycerol, phosphatidylethanolamine and one phospholipid. Ubiquinone 9 (Q-9) was the predominant lipoquinone. The G+C content of the genomic DNA of strain GBPy5(T) was 59.2 mol%. On the basis of the phenotypic and phylogenetic data, strain GBPY5(T) represents a novel species of the genus Pseudomonas, for which the name Pseudomonas salegens sp. nov. is proposed. The type strain is GBPy5(T) ( = IBRC-M 10762(T) = CECT 8338(T)). IUMS.

  6. Limimonas halophila gen. nov., sp. nov., an extremely halophilic bacterium in the family Rhodospirillaceae.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Amoozegar, Mohammad Ali; Makhdoumi-Kakhki, Ali; Ramezani, Mohadaseh; Nikou, Mahdi Moshtaghi; Fazeli, Seyed Abolhassan Shahzadeh; Schumann, Peter; Ventosa, Antonio

    2013-04-01

    A novel, Gram-staining-negative, non-pigmented, rod-shaped, strictly aerobic, extremely halophilic bacterium, designated strain IA16(T), was isolated from the mud of the hypersaline Lake Aran-Bidgol, in Iran. Cells of strain IA16(T) were not motile. Growth occurred with 2.5-5.2 M NaCl (optimum 3.4 M), at pH 6.0-8.0 (optimum pH 7.0) and at 30-50 °C (optimum 40 °C). Phylogenetic analysis based on 16S rRNA gene sequences indicated that strain IA16(T) belonged in the family Rhodospirillaceae and that its closest relatives were Rhodovibrio sodomensis DSM 9895(T) (91.6 % sequence similarity), Rhodovibrio salinarum NCIMB 2243(T) (91.2 %), Pelagibius litoralis CL-UU02(T) (88.9 %) and Fodinicurvata sediminis YIM D82(T) (88.7 %). The novel strain's major cellular fatty acids were C19 : 0 cyclo ω7c and C18 : 0 and its polar lipid profile comprised phosphatidylglycerol, diphosphatidylglycerol, four unidentified phospholipids, three unidentified aminolipids and two other unidentified lipids. The cells of strain IA16(T) contained the ubiquinone Q-10. The G+C content of the novel strain's genomic DNA was 67.0 mol%. The physiological, biochemical and phylogenetic differences between strain IA16(T) and other previously described taxa indicate that the strain represents a novel species in a new genus within the family Rhodospirillaceae, for which the name Limimonas halophila gen. nov., sp. nov. is proposed. The type strain of Limimonas halophila is IA16(T) ( = IBRC-M 10018(T)  = DSM 25584(T)).

  7. Salinithrix halophila gen. nov., sp. nov., a halophilic bacterium in the family Thermoactinomycetaceae.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zarparvar, Parisa; Amoozegar, Mohammad Ali; Nikou, Mahdi Moshtaghi; Schumann, Peter; Ventosa, Antonio

    2014-12-01

    A halophilic actinomycete, strain R4S8(T), was isolated from soil of Inche-Broun hypersaline wetland in the north of Iran. The isolate grew aerobically at temperatures of 30-50 °C (optimum 40 °C), pH 6-10 (optimum pH 7.0) and in the presence of 1-15 % (w/v) NaCl (optimum 3-5 %). It formed short and straight to moderately flexuous aerial mycelium without motile elements. The cell wall of strain R4S8(T) contained meso-diaminopimelic acid as the diamino acid without any diagnostic sugars. The polar lipid pattern consisted of phosphatidylglycerol, diphosphatidylglycerol, phosphatidylethanolamine, phosphatidylserine, phosphatidylmonomethylethanolamine two unknown phospholipids and one unknown aminophospholipid. It synthesized anteiso-C15 : 0 (44.8 %), iso-C15 : 0 (28.8 %) and iso-C14 : 0 (8.5 %) as major fatty acids. MK-6 was the predominant respiratory quinone. The G+C content of the genomic DNA was 52.6 mol%. Phylogenetic analysis based on 16S rRNA gene sequences revealed that strain R4S8(T) belongs to the family Thermoactinomycetaceae and showed the closest 16S rRNA gene sequence similarity with Desmospora activa IMMIB L-1269(T) (95.5 %) and Marininema mesophilum SCSIO 10219(T) (95.3 %). On the basis of phylogenetic analysis and phenotypic characteristics, strain R4S8(T) represents a novel species in a new genus within the family Thermoactinomycetaceae, for which the name Salinithrix halophila gen. nov., sp. nov. is proposed. The type strain of the type species is R4S8(T) ( = IBRC-M 10813(T) = CECT 8506(T)). © 2014 IUMS.

  8. The composition, structure and stability of a group II chaperonin are temperature regulated in a hyperthermophilic archaeon.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kagawa, Hiromi K; Yaoi, Takuro; Brocchieri, Luciano; McMillan, R Andrew; Alton, Thomas; Trent, Jonathan D

    2003-04-01

    The hyperthermoacidophilic archaeon Sulfolobus shibatae contains group II chaperonins, known as rosettasomes, which are two nine-membered rings composed of three different 60 kDa subunits (TF55 alpha, beta and gamma). We sequenced the gene for the gamma subunit and studied the temperature-dependent changes in alpha, beta and gamma expression, their association into rosettasomes and their phylogenetic relationships. Alpha and beta gene expression was increased by heat shock (30 min, 86 degrees C) and decreased by cold shock (30 min, 60 degrees C). Gamma expression was undetectable at heat shock temperatures and low at normal temperatures (75-79 degrees C), but induced by cold shock. Polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis indicated that in vitro alpha and beta subunits form homo-oligomeric rosettasomes, and mixtures of alpha, beta and gamma form hetero-oligomeric rosettasomes. Transmission electron microscopy revealed that beta homo-oligomeric rosettasomes and all hetero-oligomeric rosettasomes associate into filaments. In vivo rosettasomes were hetero-oligomeric with an average subunit ratio of 1alpha:1beta:0.1gamma in cultures grown at 75 degrees C, a ratio of 1alpha:3beta:1gamma in cultures grown at 60 degrees C and a ratio of 2alpha:3beta:0gamma after 86 degrees C heat shock. Using differential scanning calorimetry, we determined denaturation temperatures (Tm) for alpha, beta and gamma subunits of 95.7 degrees C, 96.7 degrees C and 80.5 degrees C, respectively, and observed that rosettasomes containing gamma were relatively less stable than those with alpha and/or beta only. We propose that, in vivo, the rosettasome structure is determined by the relative abundance of subunits and not by a fixed geometry. Furthermore, phylogenetic analyses indicate that archaeal chaperonin subunits underwent multiple duplication events within species (paralogy). The independent evolution of these paralogues raises the possibility that chaperonins have functionally diversified between

  9. Structural analysis of the substrate recognition mechanism in O-phosphoserine sulfhydrylase from the hyperthermophilic archaeon Aeropyrum pernix K1.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nakamura, Takashi; Kawai, Yoshito; Kunimoto, Kohei; Iwasaki, Yuka; Nishii, Kaoru; Kataoka, Misumi; Ishikawa, Kazuhiko

    2012-09-07

    L-Cysteine is synthesized from O-acetyl-L-serine (OAS) and sulfide by O-acetylserine sulfhydrylase (OASS; EC 2.5.1.47) in plants and bacteria. O-phosphoserine sulfhydrylase (OPSS; EC 2.5.1.65) is a novel enzyme from the hyperthermophilic aerobic archaeon Aeropyrum pernix K1 (2003). OPSS can use OAS or O-phospho-L-serine (OPS) to synthesize L-cysteine. To elucidate the mechanism of the substrate specificity of OPSS, we analyzed three-dimensional structures of the active site of the enzyme. The active-site lysine (K127) of OPSS forms an internal Schiff base with pyridoxal 5'-phosphate. Therefore, crystals of the complexes formed by the K127A mutant with the external Schiff base of pyridoxal 5'-phosphate with either OPS or OAS were prepared and examined by X-ray diffraction analysis. In contrast to that observed for OASS, no significant difference was seen in the overall structure between the free and complexed forms of OPSS. The side chains of T152, S153, and Q224 interacted with the carboxylate of the substrates, as a previous study has suggested. The side chain of R297 has been proposed to recognize the phosphate group of OPS. Surprisingly, however, the position of R297 was significantly unchanged in the complex of the OPSS K127A mutant with the external Schiff base, allowing enough space for an interaction with OPS. The positively charged environment around the entrance of the active site including S153 and R297 is important for accepting negatively charged substrates such as OPS. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  10. Chloride Activated Halophilic α-Amylase from Marinobacter sp. EMB8: Production Optimization and Nanoimmobilization for Efficient Starch Hydrolysis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sumit Kumar

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Halophiles have been perceived as potential source of novel enzymes in recent years. The interest emanates from their ability to catalyze efficiently under high salt and organic solvents. Present work encompasses production optimization and nanoimmobilization of an α-amylase from moderately halophilic Marinobacter sp. EMB8. Media ingredients and culture conditions were optimized by “one-at-a-time approach.” Starch was found to be the best carbon source at 5% (w/v concentration. Glucose acted as catabolic repressor for amylase production. Salt proved critical for amylase production and maximum production was attained at 5% (w/v NaCl. Optimization of various culture parameters resulted in 48.0 IU/mL amylase production, a 12-fold increase over that of unoptimized condition (4.0 IU/mL. α-Amylase was immobilized on 3-aminopropyl functionalized silica nanoparticles using glutaraldehyde as cross-linking agent. Optimization of various parameters resulted in 96% immobilization efficiency. Starch hydrolyzing efficiency of immobilized enzyme was comparatively better. Immobilized α-amylase retained 75% of its activity after 5th cycle of repeated use.

  11. Halophilic microorganisms are responsible for the rosy discolouration of saline environments in three historical buildings with mural paintings.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ettenauer, Jörg D; Jurado, Valme; Piñar, Guadalupe; Miller, Ana Z; Santner, Markus; Saiz-Jimenez, Cesareo; Sterflinger, Katja

    2014-01-01

    A number of mural paintings and building materials from monuments located in central and south Europe are characterized by the presence of an intriguing rosy discolouration phenomenon. Although some similarities were observed among the bacterial and archaeal microbiota detected in these monuments, their origin and nature is still unknown. In order to get a complete overview of this biodeterioration process, we investigated the microbial communities in saline environments causing the rosy discolouration of mural paintings in three Austrian historical buildings using a combination of culture-dependent and -independent techniques as well as microscopic techniques. The bacterial communities were dominated by halophilic members of Actinobacteria, mainly of the genus Rubrobacter. Representatives of the Archaea were also detected with the predominating genera Halobacterium, Halococcus and Halalkalicoccus. Furthermore, halophilic bacterial strains, mainly of the phylum Firmicutes, could be retrieved from two monuments using special culture media. Inoculation of building materials (limestone and gypsum plaster) with selected isolates reproduced the unaesthetic rosy effect and biodeterioration in the laboratory.

  12. Characterization of halophilic C50 carotenoid-producing archaea isolated from solar saltworks in Bohai Bay, China

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sui, Liying; Liu, Liangsen; Deng, Yuangao

    2014-11-01

    Halophilic archaea comprise the majority of microorganisms found in hypersaline environments. C50 carotenoids accumulated in archaea cells are considered potential biotechnological products and possess a number of biological functions. Ten red colonies were isolated from brine water in a saltern crystallizer pond of the Hangu Saltworks, China. 16S rRNA gene sequence analysis showed that the colonies belonged to the extremely halophilic archaea genera Halobacterium and Halorubrum. Two representative strains, Halobacterium strain SP-2 and Halorubrum strain SP-4, were selected for further study on the phenotypic characteristics and effects of salinity and pH on accumulation and composition of pigments in their cells. The archaeal strains were isolated and grown in a culture medium prepared by dissolving yeast extract (10 g/L) and acid-hydrolyzed casein (7.5 g/L) into brine water obtained from a local salt pond. Their optimum salinity and pH for growth were 250 and 7, respectively, although pigment accumulation (OD490 / mL broth) was highest at pH 8. In addition, at 150-300 salinity, increasing salinity resulted in decreasing pigment accumulation. Analysis of the UV-Vis spectrum, TLC and HLPC chromatograms showed that C50 carotenoid bacterioruberin is the major pigment in both strains.

  13. Studies on the Biodiversity of Halophilic Microorganisms Isolated from El-Djerid Salt Lake (Tunisia under Aerobic Conditions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Abdeljabbar Hedi

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available Bacterial and archaeal aerobic communities were recovered from sediments from the shallow El-Djerid salt lake in Tunisia, and their salinity gradient distribution was established. Six samples for physicochemical and microbiological analyses were obtained from 6 saline sites in the lake for physico-chemical and microbiological analyses. All samples studied were considered hypersaline with NaCl concentration ranging from 150 to 260 g/L. A specific halophilic microbial community was recovered from each site, and characterization of isolated microorganisms was performed via both phenotypic and phylogenetic approaches. Only one extreme halophilic organism, domain Archaea, was isolated from site 4 only, whereas organisms in the domain Bacteria were recovered from the five remaining sampling sites that contained up to 250 g/L NaCl. Members of the domain Bacteria belonged to genera Salicola, Pontibacillus, Halomonas, Marinococcus, and Halobacillus, whereas the only member of domain Archaea isolated belonged to the genus Halorubrum. The results of this study are discussed in terms of the ecological significance of these microorganisms in the breakdown of organic matter in Lake El-Djerid and their potential for industry applications.

  14. Halophilic Microorganisms Are Responsible for the Rosy Discolouration of Saline Environments in Three Historical Buildings with Mural Paintings

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ettenauer, Jörg D.; Jurado, Valme; Piñar, Guadalupe; Miller, Ana Z.; Santner, Markus; Saiz-Jimenez, Cesareo; Sterflinger, Katja

    2014-01-01

    A number of mural paintings and building materials from monuments located in central and south Europe are characterized by the presence of an intriguing rosy discolouration phenomenon. Although some similarities were observed among the bacterial and archaeal microbiota detected in these monuments, their origin and nature is still unknown. In order to get a complete overview of this biodeterioration process, we investigated the microbial communities in saline environments causing the rosy discolouration of mural paintings in three Austrian historical buildings using a combination of culture-dependent and -independent techniques as well as microscopic techniques. The bacterial communities were dominated by halophilic members of Actinobacteria, mainly of the genus Rubrobacter. Representatives of the Archaea were also detected with the predominating genera Halobacterium, Halococcus and Halalkalicoccus. Furthermore, halophilic bacterial strains, mainly of the phylum Firmicutes, could be retrieved from two monuments using special culture media. Inoculation of building materials (limestone and gypsum plaster) with selected isolates reproduced the unaesthetic rosy effect and biodeterioration in the laboratory. PMID:25084531

  15. The active natural anti-oxidant properties of chamomile, milk thistle, and halophilic bacterial components in human skin in vitro.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mamalis, Andrew; Nguyen, Duc-Huy; Brody, Neil; Jagdeo, Jared

    2013-07-01

    The number of skin cancers continues to rise, accounting for approximately 40% of all cancers reported in the United States and approximately 9,500 deaths per year. Studies have shown reactive oxygen species (ROS) type free radicals are linked to skin cancer and aging. Therefore, it is important for us to identify agents that have anti-oxidant properties to protect skin against free radical damage. The purpose of this research is to investigate the anti-oxidant properties of bisabolol, silymarin, and ectoin that are components from chamomile, milk thistle, and halophilic bacteria, respectively. We measured the ability of bisabolol, silymarin, and ectoin to modulate the hydrogen peroxide (H2O2)-induced upregulation of ROS free radicals in normal human skin fibroblasts in vitro. Using a flow cytometry-based assay, we demonstrated that varying concentrations of these natural components were able to inhibit upregulation of H2O2-generated free radicals in human skin fibroblasts in vitro. Our results indicate components of chamomile, milk thistle, and halophilic bacteria exhibit anti-oxidant capabilities and warrant further study in clinical trials to characterize their anti-cancer and anti-aging capabilities.

  16. Gene expression and characterization of a third type of dye-linked L-proline dehydrogenase from the aerobic hyperthermophilic archaeon, Aeropyrum pernix.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Satomura, Takenori; Hara, Yusuke; Suye, Shin-ichiro; Sakuraba, Haruhiko; Ohshima, Toshihisa

    2012-01-01

    A third novel type of dye-linked L-proline dehydrogenase (LPDH) has recently been found in the hyperthermophilic archaeon, Pyrobaculum calidifontis, by Satomura et al. The gene encoding the enzyme homologue was identified in the aerobic hyperthermophilic archaeon, Aeropyrum pernix. The gene was successfully expressed in Escherichia coli, and the product was purified to homogeneity and characterized. The expressed enzyme was highly thermostable LPDH having a molecular mass of about 88 kDa and a homodimeric structure. The preferred substrate for the enzyme was L-proline with 2,6-dichloroindophenol (DCIP) as the electron acceptor. However, the enzyme did not utilize ferricyanide as the electron acceptor, in contrast to all other known LPDHs. The electrochemical determination of L-proline at concentrations from 0 to 0.7 mM was achieved by using A. pernix LPDH. A phylogenetic analysis revealed A. pernix LPDH to be clustered with the third type of LPDHs, and to be clearly separated from the clusters of previously known heterooligomeric LPDHs.

  17. The Human-Associated Archaeon Methanosphaera stadtmanae Is Recognized through Its RNA and Induces TLR8-Dependent NLRP3 Inflammasome Activation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tim Vierbuchen

    2017-11-01

    Full Text Available The archaeon Methanosphaera stadtmanae is a member of the gut microbiota; yet, the molecular cross-talk between archaea and the human immune system and its potential contribution to inflammatory diseases has not been evaluated. Although archaea are as bacteria prokaryotes, they form a distinct domain having unique features such as different cell wall structures and membrane lipids. So far, no microbe-associated molecular patterns of archaea which activate innate immune receptors have been identified. By stimulating human myeloid cells with M. stadtmanae and purified archaeal nucleic acids, we identified both the microorganism and its RNA as potent stimuli for the innate immune system. To dissect the recognition and activation pathways induced by M. stadtmanae, human monocytic BLaER1 knockout cells were generated using the CRISPR/Cas9 system targeting components of TLR and inflammasome signaling. While the recognition of M. stadtmanae is mediated by TLR7 and TLR8, activation of the NLRP3 inflammasome depends solely on TLR8 engagement. Notably, this process resembles hallmarks of both the canonical and the recently described alternative inflammasome activation. Thus, we have demonstrated for the first time the specific recognition of and response to an archaeon by human cells at the molecular level.

  18. Halomonas indalinina sp.nov., a moderately halophilic bacterium isolated from a solar saltern in Cabo de Gata, Al,eria, southern Spain

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Cabrera, A.; Aguilera, M.; Fuentes Enriquez de Salamanca, S.; Incerti, C.; Russell, N.J.; Ramos-Cormenzana, A.; Monteoliva-Sanchez, M.

    2007-01-01

    moderately halophilic bacterium, strain CG2.1T, isolated from a solar saltern at Cabo de Gata, a wildlife reserve located in the province of Almería, southern Spain, was subjected to a polyphasic taxonomic study. This organism was an aerobic, motile, Gram-negative rod that produced orange-pigmented

  19. Salimicrobium salexigens sp. nov., a moderately halophilic bacterium from salted hides.

    Science.gov (United States)

    de la Haba, Rafael R; Yilmaz, Pinar; Sánchez-Porro, Cristina; Birbir, Meral; Ventosa, Antonio

    2011-09-01

    Two Gram-positive, moderately halophilic bacteria, designated strains 29CMI(T) and 53CMI, were isolated from salted hides. Both strains were non-motile, strictly aerobic cocci, growing in the presence of 3-25% (w/v) NaCl (optimal growth at 7.5-12.5% [w/v] NaCl), between pH 5.0 and 10.0 (optimal growth at pH 7.5) and at temperatures between 15 and 40°C (optimal growth at 37°C). Phylogenetic analysis based on 16S rRNA gene sequence comparison showed that both strains showed a similarity of 98.7% and were closely related to species of the genus Salimicrobium, within the phylum Firmicutes. Strains 29CMI(T) and 53CMI exhibited 16S rRNA gene sequence similarity values of 97.9-97.6% with Salimicrobium album DSM 20748(T), Salimicrobium halophilum DSM 4771(T), Salimicrobium flavidum ISL-25(T) and Salimicrobium luteum BY-5(T). The DNA G+C content was 50.7mol% and 51.5mol% for strains 29CMI(T) and 53CMI, respectively. The DNA-DNA hybridization between both strains was 98%, whereas the values between strain 29CMI(T) and the species S. album CCM 3517(T), S. luteum BY-5(T), S. flavidum ISL-25(T) and S. halophilum CCM 4074(T) were 45%, 28%, 15% and 10%, respectively, showing unequivocally that strains 29CMI(T) and 53CMI constitute a new genospecies. The major cellular fatty acids were anteiso-C(15:0), anteiso-C(17:0), iso-C(15:0) and iso-C(14:0). The main respiratory isoprenoid quinone was MK-7, although small amounts of MK-6 were also found. The polar lipids of the type strain consist of diphosphatidylglycerol, phosphatidylglycerol, one unidentified phospholipid and one glycolipid. The peptidoglycan type is A1γ, with meso-diaminopimelic acid as the diagnostic diamino acid. On the basis of the phylogenetic analysis, and phenotypic, genotypic and chemotaxonomic characteristics, we propose strains 29CMI(T) and 53CMI as a novel species of the genus Salimicrobium, with the name Salimicrobium salexigens sp. nov. The type strain is 29CMI(T) (=CECT 7568(T)=JCM 16414(T)=LMG 25386(T

  20. Lanthanide behavior in hypersaline evaporation ponds at Guerrero Negro, Baja California, Mexico - an environment with halophiles

    Science.gov (United States)

    Choumiline, K.; López-Cortés, A.; Grajeda-Muñoz, M.; Shumilin, E.; Sapozhnikov, D.

    2013-12-01

    Lanthanides are known, in some cases, to be sensitive to changes in water column or sediment chemistry, a fact that allows them to be used as environmental fingerprints. Nevertheless, the behavior of these elements in hypersaline environments is insufficiently understood, especially in those colonized by bacteria, archaea and eukarya halophiles. Extreme environments like the mentioned exist in the artificially-controlled ponds of the 'Exportadora de Sal' salt-producing enterprise located in Guerrero Negro (Baja California, Mexico). Sediment cores from various ponds were collected, subsampled and measured by ICP-MS and INAA. This allowed differencing the behavior of lanthanides and trace elements under a water column salinity gradient along the evaporation sequence of ponds. Sediment profiles (30 mm long), obtained in Pond 5, dominated by Ca and Mg precipitation and at the same time rich in organic matter due to bacterial mat presence, showed highs and lows of the shale-normalized patterns along different in-core depths. Two groups of elements could be distinguished with similar trends: set A (La, Ce, Pr and Nd) and set B (Sm, Gd, Tb, Dy, Ho, Er, Tm, Yb and Lu). The first 'group A' had two prominent peaks at 15 mm and around 22 mm, whereas the 'group B' showed only slight increase at 15 mm and none at 22 mm. Microscopic analyses of prokaryotic cells of a stratified mat in Pond 5 (collected in 2004) showed filamentous bacteria and cyanobacteria with a cell abundance and morphotype richness maxima of prokaryotic cells in a chemocline from 3 mm to 7 mm depth which co-exists nine morphotypes of aerobic and anaerobic prokaryotes Microcoleus chthonoplastes, Leptolyngbya, Cyanothece, Geitlerinema, Spirulina, Chloroflexus, Beggiatoa, Chromatium and Thioploca. Below the 7 mm depth, oxygenic photosynthesis depletes and sulfur reducing compounds increase. The highs of the shale-normalized lanthanide contents of the 'group A' (at 15 mm depth) seem to correlate with the

  1. Fodinicurvata halophila sp. nov., a moderately halophilic bacterium from a marine saltern.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Infante-Dominguez, Carmen; Lawson, Paul A; Johnson, Crystal N; Sánchez-Porro, Cristina; Ventosa, Antonio

    2015-03-01

    A Gram-stain-negative, rod-shaped, facultatively anaerobic, moderately halophilic bacterium, designated strain BA45AL(T), was isolated from water of a saltern located in Santa Pola, Alicante, Spain. Cells were motile, and catalase- and oxidase-positive. Strain BA45AL(T) grew at temperatures in the range 14-45 °C (optimally at 37 °C), at pH 5.0-9.0 (optimally at pH 7.5), and in media containing 5-20 % (w/v) salts [optimally in media containing 10 % (w/v) salts]. Phylogenetic analysis based on the comparison of 16S rRNA gene sequences revealed that strain BA45AL(T) is a member of the genus Fodinicurvata. The closest relatives to the novel strain were Fodinicurvata fenggangensis YIM D812(T) and Fodinicurvata sediminis YIM D82(T) with sequence similarities of 98.2 % and 97.4 %, respectively. DNA-DNA hybridization between the novel isolate and these phylogenetically related species revealed relatedness values of 30 % and 15 %, respectively, with respect to the aforementioned species. The major cellular fatty acids of strain BA45AL(T) were C18 : 1ω7c, C16 : 0 and iso-C15 : 0. The G+C content of the genomic DNA of strain BA45AL(T) was 58.0 mol%, and the polar lipid pattern consisted of diphosphatidylglycerol, phosphatidylmethylethanolamine and a number of unknown phospholipids and lipids. Based on phenotypic, chemotaxonomic and phylogenetic data presented in this study, strain BA45AL(T) constituted a novel species of the genus Fodinicurvata, for which the name Fodinicurvata halophila sp. nov. is suggested. The type strain is BA45AL(T) ( = CCM 8504(T) = CECT 8472(T) = JCM 19075(T) = LMG 27945(T)). © 2015 IUMS.

  2. Aquisalimonas lutea sp. nov., a moderately halophilic bacterium from a saltern.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Infante-Domínguez, Carmen; Sánchez-Porro, Cristina; Ventosa, Antonio

    2015-04-01

    A yellow-pigmented, motile, Gram-stain-negative, moderately halophilic and strictly aerobic bacterium, designated BA42AL-1(T), was isolated from water of a saltern of Santa Pola, Alicante, Spain. Strain BA42AL-1(T) grew in media containing 5-20% (w/v) salts (optimum 7.5% salts). It grew between pH 6.0 and 9.0 (optimally at pH 7.5) and at 15-45 °C (optimally at 37 °C). Phylogenetic analysis based on the comparison of 16S rRNA gene sequences revealed that strain BA42AL-1(T) is a member of the genus Aquisalimonas . The closest relatives to this strain were Aquisalimonas halophila YIM 95345(T) and Aquisalimonas asiatica CG12(T) with sequence similarities of 99.4% and 97.0%, respectively. DNA-DNA hybridization between the novel isolate and Aquisalimonas halophila YIM 95345(T) revealed a relatedness of 54%. The major fatty acids of strain BA42AL-1(T) were C(18 : 1)ω6c/C(18 : 1)ω7c, C(19 : 0) cyclo ω8c and C(16 : 0), and lower contents of C12 : 0 and C18 : 0. The polar lipid pattern of strain BA42AL-1(T) consisted of diphosphatidylglycerol, phosphatidylglycerol, phosphatidylmethylethanolamine, phosphatidylcholine, two glycolipids, a lipid and four unknown phospholipids. The G+C content of the genomic DNA of this strain was 65.0 mol%. Based on the DNA-DNA hybridization, phenotypic, chemotaxonomic and phylogenetic data presented in this study, strain BA42AL-1(T) is proposed as a novel species of the genus Aquisalimonas , for which the name Aquisalimonas lutea sp. nov. is suggested. The type strain is BA42AL-1(T) ( = CCM 8472(T) = CECT 8326(T) = LMG 27614(T)). © 2015 IUMS.

  3. Oceanobacillus halophilus sp. nov., a novel moderately halophilic bacterium from a hypersaline lake.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Amoozegar, Mohammad Ali; Bagheri, Maryam; Makhdoumi, Ali; Nikou, Mahdi Moshtaghi; Fazeli, Seyed Abolhassan Shahzadeh; Schumann, Peter; Spröer, Cathrin; Sánchez-Porro, Cristina; Ventosa, Antonio

    2016-03-01

    A moderately halophilic bacterium was isolated from a brine sample of a hypersaline lake, Aran-Bidgol, in Iran. The strain, designated J8BT, was Gram-stain-positive, endospore-forming, rod-shaped, strictly aerobic, motile and produced cream colonies. Strain J8BT grew in NaCl at between 3.0-15.0 % (w/v) (optimally at 7.5 % NaCl, w/v), between pH 6.5-9.0 (optimally at pH 8.0) and between 20-45 °C (optimally at 35 °C). Phylogenetic analysis, based on 16S rRNA gene sequences, revealed that strain J8BT is a member of the genus Oceanobacillus and most closely related to Oceanobacillus profundus CL-MP28T, Oceanobacillus polygoni SA9T and Oceanobacillus oncorhynchi R-2T (96.9 %, 96.3 % and 96.2 % similarities, respectively). The level of DNA-DNA relatedness between the novel isolate and O. profundus IBRC-M 10567T was 10 %. The major cellular fatty acids of the isolate were anteiso-C15 : 0, iso-C15 : 0 and anteiso-C17 : 0. The polar lipid pattern of strain J8BT consisted of phosphatidylglycerol, diphosphatidylglycerol, five phospholipids, two aminolipids and two glycoaminolipids. It contained MK-7 as the predominant menaquinone and meso-diaminopimelic acid in the cell-wall peptidoglycan. The G+C content of the genomic DNA of this strain was 39.2 mol%. Phenotypic characteristics, phylogenetic analysis and DNA-DNA relatedness data suggest that this strain represents a novel species of the genus Oceanobacillus, for which the name Oceanobacillus halophilus sp. nov. is proposed. The type strain is strain J8BT ( = IBRC-M 10444T = DSM 23996T).

  4. Oceanobacillus longus sp. nov., a moderately halophilic bacterium isolated from a salt lake.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Amoozegar, Mohammad Ali; Bagheri, Maryam; Makhdoumi, Ali; Mehrshad, Maliheh; Didari, Maryam; Schumann, Peter; Spröer, Cathrin; Sánchez-Porro, Cristina; Ventosa, Antonio

    2016-10-01

    A Gram-stain-positive, endospore-forming, long rod-shaped, strictly aerobic, moderately halophilic bacterium, designated strain T9BT, was isolated from a brine sample of the hypersaline lake Aran-Bidgol in Iran. Cells of strain T9BT were motile and produced colonies with a brown pigment. Growth occurred between 1.0 and 20 % (w/v) NaCl and the isolate grew optimally at 5.0 % (v/w) NaCl. The optimum pH and temperature for growth of the strain were pH 7.0 and 35 °C, while it was able to grow over pH and temperature ranges of pH 6.0-9.0 and 25-45 °C. Phylogenetic analysis based on the comparison of 16S rRNA gene sequences revealed that strain T9BT is a member of the genus Oceanobacillus. The closest relative to this strain was Oceanobacillus rekensis PT-11T with a similarity of 97.4 %, followed by Oceanobacillus profundus CL-MP28T and Oceanobacillus polygoni SA9T with 97.3 and 97.1 % similarity, respectively. The major cellular fatty acids of the isolate were anteiso-C15 : 0, iso-C14 : 0 and iso-C16 : 0. The polar lipids of strain T9BT consisted of phosphatidylglycerol, diphosphatidylglycerol, three phospholipids and one aminoglycolipid. It contained MK-7 as the predominant menaquinone and meso-diaminopimelic acid in the cell-wall peptidoglycan. The G+C content of the genomic DNA of this strain was 42.9 mol%. Phylogenetic analysis, DNA-DNA hybridization data and phenotypic characteristics allowed strain T9BT to be differentiated from other members of the genus Oceanobacillus. A novel species, Oceanobacillus longus sp. nov., is therefore proposed to accommodate this strain. The type strain is T9BT (=IBRC-M 10703T=LMG 29250T).

  5. Salinivibrio kushneri sp. nov., a moderately halophilic bacterium isolated from salterns.

    Science.gov (United States)

    López-Hermoso, Clara; de la Haba, Rafael R; Sánchez-Porro, Cristina; Ventosa, Antonio

    2017-12-21

    Ten Gram-strain-negative, facultatively anaerobic, moderately halophilic bacterial strains, designated AL184T, IB560, IB563, IC202, IC317, MA421, ML277, ML318, ML328A and ML331, were isolated from water ponds of five salterns located in Spain. The cells were motile, curved rods and oxidase and catalase positive. All of them grew optimally at 37°C, at pH 7.2-7.4 and in the presence of 7.5% (w/v) NaCl. Based on phylogenetic analyses of the 16S rRNA, the isolates were most closely related to Salinivibrio sharmensis BAGT (99.6-98.2% 16S rRNA gene sequence similarity) and Salinivibrio costicola subsp. costicola ATCC 35508T (99.0-98.1%). According to the MLSA analyses based on four (gyrB, recA, rpoA and rpoD) and eight (ftsZ, gapA, gyrB, mreB, pyrH, recA, rpoA and topA) concatenated gene sequences, the most closely relatives were S. siamensis JCM 14472T (96.8-95.4% and 94.9-94.7%, respectively) and S. sharmensis DSM 18182T (94.0-92.6% and 92.9-92.7%, respectively). In silico DNA-DNA hybridization (GGDC) and average nucleotide identity (ANI) showed values of 23.3-44.8% and 80.2-91.8%, respectively with the related species demonstrating that the ten isolates constituted a single novel species of the genus Salinivibrio. Its pangenome and core genome consist of 6041 and 1230 genes, respectively. The phylogeny based on the concatenated orthologous core genes revealed that the ten strains form a coherent phylogroup well separated from the rest of the species of the genus Salinivibrio. The major cellular fatty acids of strain AL184T were C16:0 and C18:1. The DNA G+C content range was 51.9-52.5mol% (Tm) and 50.2-50.9mol% (genome). Based on the phylogenetic-phylogenomic, phenotypic and chemotaxonomic data, the ten isolates represent a novel species of the genus Salinivibrio, for which the name Salinivibrio kushneri sp. nov. is proposed. The type strain is AL184T (=CECT 9177T=LMG 29817T). Copyright © 2017 Elsevier GmbH. All rights reserved.

  6. Bacillus halosaccharovorans sp. nov., a moderately halophilic bacterium from a hypersaline lake.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mehrshad, Maliheh; Amoozegar, Mohammad Ali; Didari, Maryam; Bagheri, Maryam; Fazeli, Seyed Abolhassan Shahzadeh; Schumann, Peter; Spröer, Cathrin; Sánchez-Porro, Cristina; Ventosa, Antonio

    2013-08-01

    A novel Gram-stain-positive, moderately halophilic bacterium, designated strain E33(T), was isolated from water of the hypersaline lake Aran-Bidgol in Iran and characterized taxonomically using a polyphasic approach. Cells of strain E33(T) were motile rods and produced ellipsoidal endospores at a central or subterminal position in swollen sporangia. Strain E33(T) was a strictly aerobic bacterium, catalase- and oxidase-positive. The strain was able to grow at NaCl concentrations of 0.5-25 % (w/v), with optimum growth occurring at 5-15 % (w/v) NaCl. The optimum temperature and pH for growth were 40 °C and pH 7.5-8.0, respectively. On the basis of 16S rRNA gene sequence analysis, strain E33(T) was shown to belong to the genus Bacillus within the phylum Firmicutes and showed the closest phylogenetic similarity with the species Bacillus niabensis 4T19(T) (99.2 %), Bacillus herbersteinensis D-1-5a(T) (97.3 %) and Bacillus litoralis SW-211(T) (97.2 %). The DNA G+C content of the type strain of the novel species was 42.6 mol%. The major cellular fatty acids of strain E33(T) were anteiso-C15 : 0 and iso-C15 : 0, and the polar lipid pattern consisted of diphosphatidylglycerol, phosphatidylglycerol, two unknown glycolipids, an unknown lipid and an unknown phospholipid. The isoprenoid quinones were MK-7 (97 %), MK-6 (2 %) and MK-8 (0.5 %). The peptidoglycan contained meso-diaminopimelic acid as the diagnostic diamino acid. All these features confirm the placement of isolate E33(T) within the genus Bacillus. DNA-DNA hybridization experiments revealed low levels of relatedness between strain E33(T) and Bacillus niabensis IBRC-M 10590(T) (22 %), Bacillus herbersteinensis CCM 7228(T) (38 %) and Bacillus litoralis DSM 16303(T) (19 %). On the basis of polyphasic evidence from this study, a novel species of the genus Bacillus, Bacillus halosaccharovorans sp. nov. is proposed, with strain E33(T) (= IBRC-M 10095(T) = DSM 25387(T)) as the type strain.

  7. Bacillus salsus sp. nov., a halophilic bacterium from a hypersaline lake.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Amoozegar, Mohammad Ali; Didari, Maryam; Bagheri, Maryam; Fazeli, Seyed Abolhassan Shahzadeh; Schumann, Peter; Spröer, Cathrin; Sánchez-Porro, Cristina; Ventosa, Antonio

    2013-09-01

    A Gram-staining-positive, endospore-forming, rod-shaped, strictly aerobic, slightly halophilic bacterium, designated strain A24(T), was isolated from the hypersaline lake Aran-Bidgol in Iran. Cells of strain A24(T) were motile rods and produced oval endospores at a terminal position in swollen sporangia. Strain A24(T) was catalase and oxidase positive. Growth occurred with between 0.5 and 7.5% (w/v) NaCl and the isolate grew optimally at 3% (v/w) NaCl. The optimum temperature and pH for growth were 35 °C and pH 8.0, respectively. Phylogenetic analysis based on 16S rRNA gene sequences revealed that strain A24(T) belonged to the genus Bacillus within the phylum Firmicutes and showed the closest phylogenetic similarity with the species Bacillus alkalitelluris BA288(T) (97.2%), Bacillus herbersteinensis D-1,5a(T) (96.0%) and Bacillus litoralis SW-211(T) (95.6%). The G+C content of the genomic DNA of this strain was 35.9 mol%. The polar lipid pattern of strain A24(T) consisted of phosphatidylglycerol, diphosphatidylglycerol, phosphatidylethanolamine and two unknown phospholipids. The major cellular fatty acids of strain A24(T) were anteiso-C(15:0) and iso-C(15:0). The respiratory quinones were MK-7 (94%) and MK-6 (4%). The peptidoglycan contained meso-diaminopimelic acid as the diagnostic diamino acid. All these features confirm the placement of isolate A24(T) within the genus Bacillus. DNA-DNA hybridization experiments revealed a relatedness of 8% between strain A24(T) and Bacillus alkalitelluris IBRC-M 10596(T), supporting its placement as a novel species. Phenotypic characteristics, phylogenetic analysis and DNA-DNA relatedness data suggest that this strain represents a novel species of the genus Bacillus, for which the name Bacillus salsus sp. nov. is proposed. The type strain is strain A24(T) ( = IBRC-M 10078 (T) = KCTC 13816(T)).

  8. Marinobacter persicus sp. nov., a moderately halophilic bacterium from a saline lake in Iran.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bagheri, Maryam; Amoozegar, Mohammad Ali; Didari, Maryam; Makhdoumi-Kakhki, Ali; Schumann, Peter; Spröer, Cathrin; Sánchez-Porro, Cristina; Ventosa, Antonio

    2013-07-01

    A Gram-negative, non-endospore-forming, rod shaped, strictly aerobic, moderately halophilic bacterium, designated strain M9B(T), was isolated from the hypersaline lake Aran-Bidgol in Iran. Cells of strain M9B(T) were found to be motile and produce colonies with an orange-yellow pigment. Growth was determined to occur between 5 and 20 % (w/v) NaCl and the isolate grew optimally at 7.5-10 % (v/w) NaCl. The optimum pH and temperature for growth of the strain were determined to be pH 7.0 and 35 °C, respectively, while it was able to grow over pH and temperature ranges of 6-8 and 25-45 °C, respectively. Phylogenetic analysis based on the comparison of 16S rRNA gene sequences revealed that strain M9B(T) is a member of the genus Marinobacter. The closest relative to this strain was found to be Marinobacter hydrocarbonoclasticus MBIC 1303(T) with a similarity level of 97.7 %. DNA-DNA hybridization between the novel isolate and this phylogenetically related species was 13 ± 2 %. The major cellular fatty acids of the isolate were identified as C16:0, C19:1 ω6c, C18:1 ω9c and C16:1 ω9c. The polar lipid pattern of strain M9B(T) was determined to consist of phosphatidylglycerol, diphosphatidylglycerol, phosphatidylethanolamine, phosphatidylserine and three phospholipids. Ubiquinone 9 (Q-9) was the only lipoquinone detected. The G+C content of the genomic DNA of this strain was determined to be 58.6 mol%. Phenotypic characteristics, phylogenetic analysis and DNA-DNA relatedness data suggest that this strain represents a novel species of the genus Marinobacter, for which the name Marinobacter persicus sp. nov. is proposed. The type strain of Marinobacter persicus is strain M9B(T) (=IBRC-M 10445(T) = CCM 7970(T) = CECT 7991(T) = KCTC 23561(T)).

  9. Marinobacter aquaticus sp. nov., a moderately halophilic bacterium from a solar saltern.

    Science.gov (United States)

    León, María José; Sánchez-Porro, Cristina; Ventosa, Antonio

    2017-08-01

    A moderately halophilic bacterium designated strain M6-53T was isolated from water of a pond from a marine saltern located in Huelva, south-west Spain. Cells of the strain were Gram-stain-negative, strictly aerobic, motile, slightly curved rods, able to grow in media containing 5-25 % (w/v) NaCl (optimal growth at 10 %, w/v), at temperatures from 20 to 40 °C (optimally at 37 °C) and at pH 6.5-9 (optimally at pH 7.0). Phylogenetic analysis based on 16S rRNA gene sequences placed the new isolate within the genus Marinobacter, with the type strains of the most closely related species being Marinobacter persicus IBRC-M 10445T (98.5 % similarity), Marinobacter oulmenensis Set74T (97.2 %) and Marinobacter hydrocarbonoclasticus ATCC 49840T (97.1 %). The major fatty acids present in strain M6-53T were C18 : 1ω9c (29.5 %), C16 : 0 (26.7 %), C12 : 0 3-OH (15.1 %), C18 : 0 (10.2 %) and C16 : ω9c (9.6 %). The G+C content of the genomic DNA for this strain was determined to be 56.4 mol%. The DNA-DNA hybridization values between strain M6-53T and M. persicus CECT 7991T, M. oulmenensis CECT 7499T and M. hydrocarbonoclasticus DSM 50418 were 8, 41 and 38 %, respectively. These values are lower than the accepted 70 % threshold and showed that the new isolate represented a different species within the genus Marinobacter. Phylogenetic analysis based on the 16S rRNA gene sequence and the phenotypic, genotypic and chemotaxonomic features of this new isolate support the placement of strain M6-53T as a representative of a novel species of the genus Marinobacter, for which we propose the name Marinobacter aquaticus sp. nov., with strain M6-53T (=CECT 9228T=LMG 30006T) as the type strain.

  10. Bacillus persicus sp. nov., a halophilic bacterium from a hypersaline lake.

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    Didari, Maryam; Amoozegar, Mohammad Ali; Bagheri, Maryam; Mehrshad, Maliheh; Schumann, Peter; Spröer, Cathrin; Sánchez-Porro, Cristina; Ventosa, Antonio

    2013-04-01

    A novel gram-positive, slightly halophilic bacterium, designated strain B48(T), was isolated from soil around the hypersaline lake Aran-Bidgol in Iran and characterized taxonomically using a polyphasic approach. Cells of strain B48(T) were non-motile rods and produced ellipsoidal endospores at a central or subterminal position in swollen sporangia. Strain B48(T) was a strictly aerobic bacterium, catalase- and oxidase-positive. The strain was able to grow at NaCl concentrations of 0.5-10.0 % (w/v), with optimum growth occurring at 2.5 % (w/v) NaCl. The optimum temperature and pH for growth were 35 °C and pH 7.5-8.0, respectively. On the basis of 16S rRNA gene sequence analysis, strain B48(T) was shown to belong to the genus Bacillus within the phylum Firmicutes and showed the closest phylogenetic similarity to the species Bacillus foraminis CV53(T) (97.4 %) and Bacillus purgationiresistens DS22(T) (96.9 %). The DNA G+C content of this new isolate was 40.1 mol%. The major cellular fatty acids of strain B48(T) were iso-C15 : 0 and anteiso-C15 : 0, and its polar lipid pattern consisted of diphosphatidylglycerol, phosphatidylglycerol, phosphatidylethanolamine, an aminophospholipid and two unknown phospholipids. The only quinone present was menaquinone 7 (MK-7). The peptidoglycan contained meso-diaminopimelic acid as the diagnostic diamino acid. All these features confirm the placement of isolate B48(T) within the genus Bacillus. DNA-DNA hybridization experiments revealed a low level of relatedness between strain B48(T) and Bacillus foraminis IBRC-M 10625(T) (8.1 %). On the basis of polyphasic evidence from this study, a new species of the genus Bacillus, Bacillus persicus sp. nov., is proposed, with strain B48(T) ( = IBRC-M 10115(T) = DSM 25386(T) = CECT 8001(T)) as the type strain.

  11. Saliterribacillus persicus gen. nov., sp. nov., a moderately halophilic bacterium isolated from a hypersaline lake.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Amoozegar, Mohammad Ali; Bagheri, Maryam; Didari, Maryam; Shahzedeh Fazeli, Seyed Abolhassan; Schumann, Peter; Sánchez-Porro, Cristina; Ventosa, Antonio

    2013-01-01

    A novel Gram-positive, moderately halophilic bacterium, designated strain X4B(T), was isolated from soil around the hypersaline lake Aran-Bidgol in Iran and characterized taxonomically using a polyphasic approach. Cells of strain X4B(T) were motile rods and formed ellipsoidal endospores at a terminal or subterminal position in swollen sporangia. Strain X4B(T) was a strictly aerobic bacterium, catalase- and oxidase-positive. The strain was able to grow at NaCl concentrations of 0.5-22.5 % (w/v), with optimum growth occurring at 7.5 % (w/v) NaCl. The optimum temperature and pH for growth were 35 °C and pH 7.0. Analysis of 16S rRNA gene sequence revealed that strain X4B(T) is a member of the family Bacillaceae, constituting a novel phyletic lineage within this family. Highest sequence similarities were obtained with the 16S rRNA gene sequences of the type strains of Sediminibacillus albus (96.0 %), Paraliobacillus ryukyuensis (95.9 %), Paraliobacillus quinghaiensis (95.8 %) and Sediminibacillus halophilus (95.7 %), respectively. The DNA G+C content of this novel isolate was 35.2 mol%. The major cellular fatty acids of strain X4B(T) were anteiso-C(15 : 0) and anteiso-C(17 : 0) and its polar lipid pattern consisted of diphosphatidylglycerol, phosphatidylglycerol, two aminolipids, an aminophospholipid and an unknown phospholipid. The isoprenoid quinones were MK-7 (89 %) and MK-6 (11 %). The peptidoglycan contained meso-diaminopimelic acid as the diagnostic diamino acid. On the basis of 16S rRNA gene sequence analysis in combination with chemotaxonomic and phenotypic data, strain X4B(T) represents a novel species in a new genus in the family Bacillaceae, order Bacillales for which the name Saliterribacillus persicus gen. nov., sp. nov. is proposed. The type strain of the type species (Saliterribacillus persicus) is X4B(T) ( = IBRC-M 10629(T) = KCTC 13827(T)).

  12. Oceanobacillus limi sp. nov., a moderately halophilic bacterium from a salt lake.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Amoozegar, Mohammad Ali; Bagheri, Maryam; Makhdoumi-Kakhki, Ali; Didari, Maryam; Schumann, Peter; Spröer, Cathrin; Sánchez-Porro, Cristina; Ventosa, Antonio

    2014-04-01

    A Gram-stain-positive, endospore-forming, rod-shaped, strictly aerobic, moderately halophilic bacterium, designated strain H9B(T), was isolated from a mud sample of the hypersaline lake Aran-Bidgol in Iran. Cells of strain H9B(T) were motile and produced colonies with a yellowish-grey pigment. Growth occurred between 2.5 and 10 % (w/v) NaCl and the isolate grew optimally at 7.5 % (w/v) NaCl. The optimum pH and temperature for growth of the strain were pH 7.0 and 35 °C, respectively, while it was able to grow over pH and temperature ranges of pH 6-10 and 25-45 °C, respectively. Phylogenetic analysis based on 16S rRNA gene sequences revealed that strain H9B(T) is a member of the genus Oceanobacillus. The closest relative to this strain was Oceanobacillus profundus CL-MP28(T) with 97.1 % 16S rRNA gene sequences similarity. The level of DNA-DNA relatedness between the novel isolate and this phylogenetically related species was 17 %. The major cellular fatty acids of the isolate were anteiso-C15 : 0, anteiso-C17 : 0, iso-C15 : 0 and iso-C16 : 0. The polar lipid pattern of strain H9B(T) consisted of phosphatidylglycerol, diphosphatidylglycerol, four phospholipids and an aminolipid. It contained MK-7 as the predominant menaquinone and meso-diaminopimelic acid in the cell-wall peptidoglycan. The G+C content of the genomic DNA of this strain was 37.1 mol%. Phenotypic characteristics, phylogenetic analysis and DNA-DNA relatedness data suggest that this strain represents a novel species of the genus Oceanobacillus, for which the name Oceanobacillus limi sp. nov. is proposed. The type strain of Oceanobacillus limi is strain H9B(T) ( = IBRC-M 10780(T) = KCTC 13823(T) = CECT 7997(T)).

  13. Activities of methionine-γ-lyase in the acidophilic archaeon “Ferroplasma acidarmanus” strain fer1

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    Khan MA

    2013-04-01

    Full Text Available M A Khan,1 Madeline M López-Muñoz,2 Charles W Kaspar,3 Kai F Hung1 1Department of Biological Sciences, Eastern Illinois University, Charleston, IL, USA; 2Department of Biology, Universidad de Puerto Rico, Mayaguez, Puerto Rico; 3Bacteriology Department, University of Wisconsin, Madison, WI, USA Abstract: Biogeochemical processes on exposed pyrite ores result in extremely high levels of sulfuric acid at these locations. Acidophiles that thrive in these conditions must overcome significant challenges, including an environment with proton concentrations at pH 3 or below. The role of sulfur metabolism in the archaeon “Ferroplasma acidarmanus” strain fer1's ability to thrive in this environment was investigated due to its growth-dependent production of methanethiol, a volatile organic sulfur compound. Two putative sequences for methionine-γ-lyase (EC 4.4.1.11, an enzyme known to carry out α, γ-elimination on L-methionine to produce methanethiol, were identified in fer1. Bioinformatic analyses identified a conserved pyridoxal-5'-phosphate (PLP binding domain and a partially conserved catalytic domain in both putative sequences. Detection of PLP-dependent and L-methionine-dependent production of α-keto compounds and thiol groups in fer1 confirmed the presence of methionine-γ-lyase activity. Further, fer1 lysate was capable of processing related substrates, including D-methionine, L-cysteine, L-cystathionine, and L/D-homocysteine. When the two putative fer1 methionine-γ-lyase gene-coded proteins were expressed in Escherichia coli cells, one sequence demonstrated an ability to carry out α, γ-elimination activity, while the other exhibited γ-replacement activity. These fer1 methionine-γ-lyases also exhibited optimum pH, substrate specificity, and catalytic preferences that are different from methionine-γ-lyases from other organisms. These differences are discussed in the context of molecular phylogeny constructed using a maximum

  14. Cloning, characterization and analysis of cat and ben genes from the phenol degrading halophilic bacterium Halomonas organivorans.

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    Maria de Lourdes Moreno

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Extensive use of phenolic compounds in industry has resulted in the generation of saline wastewaters that produce significant environmental contamination; however, little information is available on the degradation of phenolic compounds in saline conditions. Halomonas organivorans G-16.1 (CECT 5995(T is a moderately halophilic bacterium that we isolated in a previous work from saline environments of South Spain by enrichment for growth in different pollutants, including phenolic compounds. PCR amplification with degenerate primers revealed the presence of genes encoding ring-cleaving enzymes of the β-ketoadipate pathway for aromatic catabolism in H. organivorans. FINDINGS: The gene cluster catRBCA, involved in catechol degradation, was isolated from H. organivorans. The genes catA, catB, catC and the divergently transcribed catR code for catechol 1,2-dioxygenase (1,2-CTD, cis,cis-muconate cycloisomerase, muconolactone delta-isomerase and a LysR-type transcriptional regulator, respectively. The benzoate catabolic genes (benA and benB are located flanking the cat genes. The expression of cat and ben genes by phenol and benzoic acid was shown by RT-PCR analysis. The induction of catA gene by phenol and benzoic acid was also probed by the measurement of 1,2-CTD activity in H. organivorans growth in presence of these inducers. 16S rRNA and catA gene-based phylogenies were established among different degrading bacteria showing no phylogenetic correlation between both genes. CONCLUSIONS/SIGNIFICANCE: In this work, we isolated and determined the sequence of a gene cluster from a moderately halophilic bacterium encoding ortho-pathway genes involved in the catabolic metabolism of phenol and analyzed the gene organization, constituting the first report characterizing catabolic genes involved in the degradation of phenol in moderate halophiles, providing an ideal model system to investigate the potential use of this group of extremophiles in

  15. Carbon monoxide as a metabolic energy source for extremely halophilic microbes: implications for microbial activity in Mars regolith.

    Science.gov (United States)

    King, Gary M

    2015-04-07

    Carbon monoxide occurs at relatively high concentrations (≥800 parts per million) in Mars' atmosphere, where it represents a potentially significant energy source that could fuel metabolism by a localized putative surface or near-surface microbiota. However, the plausibility of CO oxidation under conditions relevant for Mars in its past or at present has not been evaluated. Results from diverse terrestrial brines and saline soils provide the first documentation, to our knowledge, of active CO uptake at water potentials (-41 MPa to -117 MPa) that might occur in putative brines at recurrent slope lineae (RSL) on Mars. Results from two extremely halophilic isolates complement the field observations. Halorubrum str. BV1, isolated from the Bonneville Salt Flats, Utah (to our knowledge, the first documented extremely halophilic CO-oxidizing member of the Euryarchaeota), consumed CO in a salt-saturated medium with a water potential of -39.6 MPa; activity was reduced by only 28% relative to activity at its optimum water potential of -11 MPa. A proteobacterial isolate from hypersaline Mono Lake, California, Alkalilimnicola ehrlichii MLHE-1, also oxidized CO at low water potentials (-19 MPa), at temperatures within ranges reported for RSL, and under oxic, suboxic (0.2% oxygen), and anoxic conditions (oxygen-free with nitrate). MLHE-1 was unaffected by magnesium perchlorate or low atmospheric pressure (10 mbar). These results collectively establish the potential for microbial CO oxidation under conditions that might obtain at local scales (e.g., RSL) on contemporary Mars and at larger spatial scales earlier in Mars' history.

  16. From metagenomics to pure culture: isolation and characterization of the moderately halophilic bacterium Spiribacter salinus gen. nov., sp. nov.

    Science.gov (United States)

    León, María José; Fernández, Ana B; Ghai, Rohit; Sánchez-Porro, Cristina; Rodriguez-Valera, Francisco; Ventosa, Antonio

    2014-07-01

    Recent metagenomic studies on saltern ponds with intermediate salinities have determined that their microbial communities are dominated by both Euryarchaeota and halophilic bacteria, with a gammaproteobacterium closely related to the genera Alkalilimnicola and Arhodomonas being one of the most predominant microorganisms, making up to 15% of the total prokaryotic population. Here we used several strategies and culture media in order to isolate this organism in pure culture. We report the isolation and taxonomic characterization of this new, never before cultured microorganism, designated M19-40(T), isolated from a saltern located in Isla Cristina, Spain, using a medium with a mixture of 15% salts, yeast extract, and pyruvic acid as the carbon source. Morphologically small curved cells (young cultures) with a tendency to form long spiral cells in older cultures were observed in pure cultures. The organism is a Gram-negative, nonmotile bacterium that is strictly aerobic, non-endospore forming, heterotrophic, and moderately halophilic, and it is able to grow at 10 to 25% (wt/vol) NaCl, with optimal growth occurring at 15% (wt/vol) NaCl. Phylogenetic analysis based on 16S rRNA gene sequence comparison showed that strain M19-40(T) has a low similarity with other previously described bacteria and shows the closest phylogenetic similarity with species of the genera Alkalilimnicola (94.9 to 94.5%), Alkalispirillum (94.3%), and Arhodomonas (93.9%) within the family Ectothiorhodospiraceae. The phenotypic, genotypic, and chemotaxonomic features of this new bacterium showed that it constitutes a new genus and species, for which the name Spiribacter salinus gen. nov., sp. nov., is proposed, with strain M19-40(T) (= CECT 8282(T) = IBRC-M 10768(T) = LMG 27464(T)) being the type strain. Copyright © 2014, American Society for Microbiology. All Rights Reserved.

  17. Crystallization and preliminary X-ray analysis of a novel dye-linked L-proline dehydrogenase from the aerobic hyperthermophilic archaeon Aeropyrum pernix.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Satomura, Takenori; Sakuraba, Haruhiko; Hara, Yusuke; Ohshima, Toshihisa

    2010-11-01

    A novel dye-linked L-proline dehydrogenase from the aerobic hyperthermophilic archaeon Aeropyrum pernix was crystallized using the sitting-drop vapour-diffusion method with polyethylene glycol 8000 as the precipitant. The crystals belonged to the tetragonal space group P4(1)2(1)2 or its enantiomorph P4(3)2(1)2, with unit-cell parameters a = b = 61.1, c = 276.3 Å, and diffracted to 2.87 Å resolution using a Cu Kα rotating-anode generator with an R-AXIS VII detector. The asymmetric unit contained one protein molecule, giving a crystal volume per enzyme mass (V(M)) of 2.75 Å(3) Da(-1) and a solvent content of 55.3%.

  18. Metabolic versatility and indigenous origin of the archaeon Thermococcus sibiricus, isolated from a siberian oil reservoir, as revealed by genome analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mardanov, Andrey V; Ravin, Nikolai V; Svetlitchnyi, Vitali A; Beletsky, Alexey V; Miroshnichenko, Margarita L; Bonch-Osmolovskaya, Elizaveta A; Skryabin, Konstantin G

    2009-07-01

    Thermococcus species are widely distributed in terrestrial and marine hydrothermal areas, as well as in deep subsurface oil reservoirs. Thermococcus sibiricus is a hyperthermophilic anaerobic archaeon isolated from a well of the never flooded oil-bearing Jurassic horizon of a high-temperature oil reservoir. To obtain insight into the genome of an archaeon inhabiting the oil reservoir, we have determined and annotated the complete 1,845,800-base genome of T. sibiricus. A total of 2,061 protein-coding genes have been identified, 387 of which are absent in other members of the order Thermococcales. Physiological features and genomic data reveal numerous hydrolytic enzymes (e.g., cellulolytic enzymes, agarase, laminarinase, and lipases) and metabolic pathways, support the proposal of the indigenous origin of T. sibiricus in the oil reservoir, and explain its survival over geologic time and its proliferation in this habitat. Indeed, in addition to proteinaceous compounds known previously to be present in oil reservoirs at limiting concentrations, its growth was stimulated by cellulose, agarose, and triacylglycerides, as well as by alkanes. Two polysaccharide degradation loci were probably acquired by T. sibiricus from thermophilic bacteria following lateral gene transfer events. The first, a "saccharolytic gene island" absent in the genomes of other members of the order Thermococcales, contains the complete set of genes responsible for the hydrolysis of cellulose and beta-linked polysaccharides. The second harbors genes for maltose and trehalose degradation. Considering that agarose and laminarin are components of algae, the encoded enzymes and the substrate spectrum of T. sibiricus indicate the ability to metabolize the buried organic matter from the original oceanic sediment.

  19. Nitrososphaera viennensis gen. nov., sp. nov., an aerobic and mesophilic, ammonia-oxidizing archaeon from soil and a member of the archaeal phylum Thaumarchaeota.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stieglmeier, Michaela; Klingl, Andreas; Alves, Ricardo J E; Rittmann, Simon K-M R; Melcher, Michael; Leisch, Nikolaus; Schleper, Christa

    2014-08-01

    A mesophilic, neutrophilic and aerobic, ammonia-oxidizing archaeon, strain EN76(T), was isolated from garden soil in Vienna (Austria). Cells were irregular cocci with a diameter of 0.6-0.9 µm and possessed archaella and archaeal pili as cell appendages. Electron microscopy also indicated clearly discernible areas of high and low electron density, as well as tubule-like structures. Strain EN76(T) had an S-layer with p3 symmetry, so far only reported for members of the Sulfolobales. Crenarchaeol was the major core lipid. The organism gained energy by oxidizing ammonia to nitrite aerobically, thereby fixing CO2, but growth depended on the addition of small amounts of organic acids. The optimal growth temperature was 42 °C and the optimal pH was 7.5, with ammonium and pyruvate concentrations of 2.6 and 1 mM, respectively. The genome of strain EN76(T) had a DNA G+C content of 52.7 mol%. Phylogenetic analyses of 16S rRNA genes showed that strain EN76(T) is affiliated with the recently proposed phylum Thaumarchaeota, sharing 85% 16S rRNA gene sequence identity with the closest cultivated relative 'Candidatus Nitrosopumilus maritimus' SCM1, a marine ammonia-oxidizing archaeon, and a maximum of 81% 16S rRNA gene sequence identity with members of the phyla Crenarchaeota and Euryarchaeota and any of the other recently proposed phyla (e.g. 'Korarchaeota' and 'Aigarchaeota'). We propose the name Nitrososphaera viennensis gen. nov., sp. nov. to accommodate strain EN76(T). The type strain of Nitrososphaera viennensis is strain EN76(T) ( = DSM 26422(T) = JMC 19564(T)). Additionally, we propose the family Nitrososphaeraceae fam. nov., the order Nitrososphaerales ord. nov. and the class Nitrososphaeria classis nov. © 2014 IUMS.

  20. Identification of a novel amino acid racemase from a hyperthermophilic archaeon Pyrococcus horikoshii OT-3 induced by D-amino acids.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kawakami, Ryushi; Ohmori, Taketo; Sakuraba, Haruhiko; Ohshima, Toshihisa

    2015-08-01

    To date, there have been few reports analyzing the amino acid requirement for growth of hyperthermophilic archaea. We here found that the hyperthermophilic archaeon Pyrococcus horikoshii OT-3 requires Thr, Leu, Val, Phe, Tyr, Trp, His and Arg in the medium for growth, and shows slow growth in medium lacking Met or Ile. This largely corresponds to the presence, or absence, of genes related to amino acid biosynthesis in its genome, though there are exceptions. The amino acid requirements were dramatically lost by addition of D-isomers of Met, Leu, Val, allo-Ile, Phe, Tyr, Trp and Arg. Tracer analysis using (14)C-labeled D-Trp showed that D-Trp in the medium was used as a protein component in the cells, suggesting the presence of D-amino acid metabolic enzymes. Pyridoxal 5'-phosphate (PLP)-dependent racemase activity toward Met, Leu and Phe was detected in crude extract of P. horikoshii and was enhanced in cells grown in the medium supplemented with D-amino acids, especially D-allo-Ile. The gene encoding the racemase was narrowed down to one open reading frame on the basis of enzyme purification from P. horikoshii cells, and the recombinant enzyme exhibited PLP-dependent racemase activity toward several amino acids, including Met, Leu and Phe, but not Pro, Asp or Glu. This is the first report showing the presence in a hyperthermophilic archaeon of a PLP-dependent amino acid racemase with broad substrate specificity that is likely responsible for utilization of D-amino acids for growth.

  1. Draft Genome Sequence of Saccharomonospora sp. Strain LRS4.154, a Moderately Halophilic Actinobacterium with the Biotechnologically Relevant Polyketide Synthase and Nonribosomal Peptide Synthetase Systems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alonso-Carmona, Scarlett; Vera-Gargallo, Blanca; de la Haba, Rafael R.; Ventosa, Antonio; Sandoval-Trujillo, Horacio

    2017-01-01

    ABSTRACT The draft genome sequence of Saccharomonospora sp. strain LRS4.154, a moderately halophilic actinobacterium, has been determined. The genome has 4,860,108 bp, a G+C content of 71.0%, and 4,525 open reading frames (ORFs). The clusters of PKS and NRPS genes, responsible for the biosynthesis of a large number of biomolecules, were identified in the genome. PMID:28546487

  2. Taxonomic study and partial characterization of antimicrobial compounds from a moderately halophilic strain of the genus Actinoalloteichus

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boudjelal, Farida; Zitouni, Abdelghani; Mathieu, Florence; Lebrihi, Ahmed; Sabaou, Nasserdine

    2011-01-01

    A moderately halophilic actinomycete strain designated AH97 was isolated from a saline Saharan soil, and selected for its antimicrobial activities against bacteria and fungi. The AH97 strain was identified by morphological, chemotaxonomic and phylogenetic analyses to the genus Actinoalloteichus. Analysis of the 16S rDNA sequence of strain AH97 showed a similarity level ranging between 95.8% and 98.4% within Actinoalloteichus species, with A. hymeniacidonis the most closely related. The comparison of the physiological characteristics of AH97 with those of known species of Actinoalloteichus showed significant differences. Strain AH97 showed an antibacterial and antifungal activity against broad spectrum of microorganisms known to be human and plant pathogens. The bioactive compounds were extracted from the filtrate culture with n-butanol and purified using thin layer chromatography and high pressure liquid chromatography procedures. Two active products were isolated, one hydrophilic fraction (F1) and another hydrophobic (F2). Ultraviolet-visible, infrared, mass and 1H and 13C nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy studies suggested that these molecules were the dioctyl phthalate (F2) and an aminoglycosidic compound (F1). PMID:24031699

  3. Taxonomic study and partial characterization of antimicrobial compounds from a moderately halophilic strain of the genus Actinoalloteichus

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    Farida Boudjelal

    2011-09-01

    Full Text Available A moderately halophilic actinomycete strain designated AH97 was isolated from a saline Saharan soil, and selected for its antimicrobial activities against bacteria and fungi. The AH97 strain was identified by morphological, chemotaxonomic and phylogenetic analyses to the genus Actinoalloteichus. Analysis of the 16S rDNA sequence of strain AH97 showed a similarity level ranging between 95.8% and 98.4% within Actinoalloteichus species, with A. hymeniacidonis the most closely related. The comparison of the physiological characteristics of AH97 with those of known species of Actinoalloteichus showed significant differences. Strain AH97 showed an antibacterial and antifungal activity against broad spectrum of microorganisms known to be human and plant pathogens. The bioactive compounds were extracted from the filtrate culture with n-butanol and purified using thin layer chromatography and high pressure liquid chromatography procedures. Two active products were isolated, one hydrophilic fraction (F1 and another hydrophobic (F2. Ultraviolet-visible, infrared, mass and ¹H and 13C nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy studies suggested that these molecules were the dioctyl phthalate (F2 and an aminoglycosidic compound (F1.

  4. Reverse micelles in organic solvents: a medium for the biotechnological use of extreme halophilic enzymes at low salt concentration

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    Frutos C. Marhuenda-Egea

    2002-01-01

    Full Text Available Alkaline p-nitrophenylphosphate phosphatase (pNPPase from the halophilic archaeobacterium Halobacterium salinarum (previously halobium was solubilized at low salt concentration in reverse micelles of hexadecyltrimethylammoniumbromide in cyclohexane with 1-butanol as cosurfactant. The enzyme maintained its catalytic properties under these conditions. The thermodynamic “solvation–stabilization hypothesis” has been used to explain the bell-shaped dependence of pNPPase activity on the water content of reverse micelles, in terms of protein–solvent interactions. According to this model, the stability of the folded protein depends on a network of hydrated ions associated with acidic residues at the protein surface. At low salt concentration and low water content (the ratio of water concentration to surfactant concentration; w0, the network of hydrated ions within the reverse micelles may involve the cationic heads of the surfactant. The bell-shaped profile of the relationship between enzyme activity and w0 varied depending on the concentrations of NaCl and Mn2+.

  5. Thiocyanate hydrolase, the primary enzyme initiating thiocyanate degradation in the novel obligately chemolithoautotrophic halophilic sulfur-oxidizing bacterium Thiohalophilus thiocyanoxidans.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bezsudnova, Ekaterina Yu; Sorokin, Dimitry Yu; Tikhonova, Tamara V; Popov, Vladimir O

    2007-12-01

    Thiohalophilus thiocyanoxidans is a first halophilic sulfur-oxidizing chemolithoautotrophic bacterium capable of growth with thiocyanate as an electron donor at salinity up to 4 M NaCl. The cells, grown with thiocyanate, but not with thiosulfate, contained an enzyme complex hydrolyzing thiocyanate to sulfide and ammonia under anaerobic conditions with carbonyl sulfide as an intermediate. Despite the fact of utilization of the , high cyanase activity was also detected in thiocyanate-induced cells. Three-stage column chromotography resulted in a highly purified thiocyanate-hydrolyzing protein with an apparent molecular mass of 140 kDa that consists of three subunits with masses 17, 19 and 29 kDa. The enzyme is a Co,Fe-containing protein resembling on its function and subunit composition the enzyme thiocyanate hydrolase from the Betaproteobacterium Thiobacillus thioparus. Cyanase, copurified with thiocyanate hydrolase, is a bisubstrate multisubunit enzyme with an apparent subunit molecular mass of 14 kDa. A possible role of cyanase in thiocyanate degradation by T. thiocyanoxidans is discussed.

  6. Whole genome sequencing and annotation of halophilic Salinicoccus sp. BAB 3246 isolated from the coastal region of Gujarat.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mevada, Vishal; Patel, Shradhdha; Pandya, Jignesh; Joshi, Himani; Patel, Rajesh

    2017-09-01

    Salinicoccus sp. BAB 3246 is a halophilic bacterium isolated from a marine water sample collected from the coastal region of Gujarat, India, from a surface water stream. Based on 16sRNA sequencing, the organism was identified as Salinicoccus sp. BAB 3246 (Genebank ID: KF889285). The present work was performed to determine the whole genome sequence of the organism using Ion Torrent PGM platform followed by assembly using the CLC genomics workbench and genome annotation using RAST, BASys and MaGe. The complete genome sequence was 713,204 bp identified by with second largest size for Salinicoccus sp. reported in the NCBI genome database. A total of 652 degradative pathways were identified by KEGG map analysis. Comparative genomic analysis revealed Salinicoccus sp. BAB 3246 as most highly related to Salinicoccus halodurans H3B36. Data mining identified stress response genes and operator pathway for degradation of various environmental pollutants. Annotation data and analysis indicate potential use in pollution control in industrial influent and saline environment.

  7. Unravelling the suitability of biological induction for halophilic lipase production by Halomonas sp. LM1C cultures.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gutiérrez-Arnillas, Esther; Arellano, María; Deive, Francisco J; Rodríguez, Ana; Sanromán, María Ángeles

    2017-09-01

    In this study, the viability of using biological induction as an alternative to the conventional chemical induction in lipase production by a novel halophilic microorganism, Halomonas sp. LM1C, has been demonstrated. Thus, a 9-times increase of lipase activity (3000U/L) was recorded when Staphylococcus equorum sp. AMC7 was present in the medium, which is competitive with the results obtained when Triton X-100 was added as chemical inducer. The GC-MS data allowed concluding the true nature of the biological inducer effect, as the existence of high percentages of isomeric forms of pentadecanoic acid were detected. The suitability of the proposed strategy was validated by operating at bench scale bioreactor, and the influence of bioreactor configuration on the biomass and lipolytic activity levels was studied. All the data were fitted to logistic and Luedeking & Piret models to characterize the bioprocess kinetics, concluding the growth-associated character of the produced lipolytic enzymes. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  8. An extreme-halophile archaebacterium possesses the interlock type of prephenate dehydratase characteristic of the Gram-positive eubacteria

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jensen, R. A.; d'Amato, T. A.; Hochstein, L. I.

    1988-01-01

    The focal point of phenylalanine biosynthesis is a dehydratase reaction which in different organisms may be prephenate dehydratase, arogenate dehydratase, or cyclohexadienyl dehydratase. Gram-positive, Gram-negative, and cyanobacterial divisions of the eubacterial kingdom exhibit different dehydratase patterns. A new extreme-halophile isolate, which grows on defined medium and is tentatively designated as Halobacterium vallismortis CH-1, possesses the interlock type of prephenate dehydratase present in Gram-positive bacteria. In addition to the conventional sensitivity to feedback inhibition by L-phenylalanine, the phenomenon of metabolic interlock was exemplified by the sensitivity of prephenate dehydratase to allosteric effects produced by extra-pathway (remote) effectors. Thus, L-tryptophan inhibited activity while L-tyrosine, L-methionine, L-leucine and L-isoleucine activated the enzyme. L-Isoleucine and L-phenylalanine were effective at micromolar levels; other effectors operated at mM levels. A regulatory mutant selected for resistance to growth inhibition caused by beta-2-thienylalanine possessed an altered prephenate dehydratase in which a phenomenon of disproportionately low activity at low enzyme concentration was abolished. Inhibition by L-tryptophan was also lost, and activation by allosteric activators was diminished. Not only was sensitivity to feedback inhibition by L-phenylalanine lost, but the mutant enzyme was now activated by this amino acid (a mutation type previously observed in Bacillus subtilis). It remains to be seen whether this type of prephenate dehydratase will prove to be characteristic of all archaebacteria or of some archaebacterial subgroup cluster.

  9. Virgibacillus ainsalahensis sp. nov., a Moderately Halophilic Bacterium Isolated from Sediment of a Saline Lake in South of Algeria.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Amziane, Meriam; Darenfed-Bouanane, Amel; Abderrahmani, Ahmed; Selama, Okba; Jouadi, Lydia; Cayol, Jean-Luc; Nateche, Farida; Fardeau, Marie-Laure

    2017-02-01

    A Gram-positive, moderately halophilic, endospore-forming bacterium, designated MerVT, was isolated from a sediment sample of a saline lake located in Ain Salah, south of Algeria. The cells were rod shaped and motile. Isolate MerVT grew at salinity interval of 0.5-25% NaCl (optimum, 5-10%), pH 6.0-12.0 (optimum, 8.0), and temperature between 10 and 40 °C (optimum, 30 °C).The polar lipids comprised diphosphatidylglycerol, phosphatidylglycerol, a glycolipid, a phospholipid, and two lipids, and MK-7 is the predominant menaquinone. The predominant cellular fatty acids were anteiso C15:0 and anteiso C17:0. The DNA G+C content was 45.3 mol%. Phylogenetic analysis based on 16S rRNA gene sequence comparisons revealed that strain MerVT was most closely related to Virgibacillus halodenitrificans (gene sequence similarity of 97.0%). On the basis of phenotypic, chemotaxonomic properties, and phylogenetic analyses, strain MerVT (=DSM = 28944T) should be placed in the genus Virgibacillus as a novel species, for which the name Virgibacillus ainsalahensis is proposed.

  10. Expression and bioconversion of recombinant m- and p-hydroxybenzoate hydroxylases from a novel moderate halophile, Chromohalobacter sp.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Wonduck; Park, Yu Ri; Im, Seonghun; Kim, Dockyu; Kim, Si Wouk

    2012-09-01

    p-Hydroxybenzoate hydroxylase (pobA) and m-hydroxybenzoate hydroxylase (mobA) genes, from the moderate halophile Chromohalobacter sp. HS-2, were expressed and characterized. Solubilities of overexpressed recombinant MobA and PobA were enhanced by the induction of the heat-shock proteins DnaJ and DnaK. Each MobA and PobA maintained stable activity under high NaCl concentrations. V (max) and K (m) values for MobA with m-hydroxybenzoate were 70 μmol min(-1) mg(-1) protein and 81 μM, respectively. Similarly, those of PobA with p-hydroxybenzoate as substrate were 5 μmol min(-1) mg(-1) protein and 129 μM, respectively. The Escherichia coli expression system, including induction of heat shock proteins, was used to convert hydroxybenzoates into protocatechuate (3,4-dihydroxybenzoate) and revealed that resting cells harboring mobA converted 15 mM m-hydroxybenzoate to 15 mM protocatechuate while those harboring pobA converted 50 mM p-hydroxybenzoate to 35 mM protocatechuate at 30 °C, respectively.

  11. Structural insights into the adaptation of proliferating cell nuclear antigen (PCNA) from Haloferax volcanii to a high-salt environment

    OpenAIRE

    Morgunova, Ekaterina; Gray, Fiona C.; MacNeill, Stuart A.; Ladenstein, Rudolf

    2009-01-01

    The crystal structure of PCNA from the halophilic archaeon H. volcanii reveals specific features of the charge distribution on the protein surface that reflect adaptation to a high-salt environment and suggests a different type of interaction with DNA in halophilic PCNAs.

  12. A systems biology approach reveals major metabolic changes in the thermoacidophilic archaeon Sulfolobus solfataricus in response to the carbon source L-fucose versus D-glucose.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wolf, Jacqueline; Stark, Helge; Fafenrot, Katharina; Albersmeier, Andreas; Pham, Trong K; Müller, Katrin B; Meyer, Benjamin H; Hoffmann, Lena; Shen, Lu; Albaum, Stefan P; Kouril, Theresa; Schmidt-Hohagen, Kerstin; Neumann-Schaal, Meina; Bräsen, Christopher; Kalinowski, Jörn; Wright, Phillip C; Albers, Sonja-Verena; Schomburg, Dietmar; Siebers, Bettina

    2016-12-01

    Archaea are characterised by a complex metabolism with many unique enzymes that differ from their bacterial and eukaryotic counterparts. The thermoacidophilic archaeon Sulfolobus solfataricus is known for its metabolic versatility and is able to utilize a great variety of different carbon sources. However, the underlying degradation pathways and their regulation are often unknown. In this work, the growth on different carbon sources was analysed, using an integrated systems biology approach. The comparison of growth on L-fucose and D-glucose allows first insights into the genome-wide changes in response to the two carbon sources and revealed a new pathway for L-fucose degradation in S. solfataricus. During growth on L-fucose major changes in the central carbon metabolic network, as well as an increased activity of the glyoxylate bypass and the 3-hydroxypropionate/4-hydroxybutyrate cycle were observed. Within the newly discovered pathway for L-fucose degradation the following key reactions were identified: (i) L-fucose oxidation to L-fuconate via a dehydrogenase, (ii) dehydration to 2-keto-3-deoxy-L-fuconate via dehydratase, (iii) 2-keto-3-deoxy-L-fuconate cleavage to pyruvate and L-lactaldehyde via aldolase and (iv) L-lactaldehyde conversion to L-lactate via aldehyde dehydrogenase. This pathway as well as L-fucose transport shows interesting overlaps to the D-arabinose pathway, representing another example for pathway promiscuity in Sulfolobus species. © 2016 The Authors. Molecular Microbiology Published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  13. Three Proliferating Cell Nuclear Antigen-Like Proteins Found in the Hyperthermophilic Archaeon Aeropyrum pernix: Interactions with the Two DNA Polymerases

    Science.gov (United States)

    Daimon, Katsuya; Kawarabayasi, Yutaka; Kikuchi, Hisashi; Sako, Yoshihiko; Ishino, Yoshizumi

    2002-01-01

    Proliferating cell nuclear antigen (PCNA) is an essential component in the eukaryotic DNA replication machinery, in which it works for tethering DNA polymerases on the DNA template to accomplish processive DNA synthesis. The PCNA also interacts with many other proteins in important cellular processes, including cell cycle control, DNA repair, and an apoptotic pathway in the domain Eucarya. We identified three genes encoding PCNA-like sequences in the genome of Aeropyrum pernix, a crenarchaeal archaeon. We cloned and expressed these genes in Escherichia coli and analyzed the gene products. All three PCNA homologs stimulated the primer extension activities of the two DNA polymerases, polymerase I (Pol I) and Pol II, identified in A. pernix to various extents, among which A. pernix PCNA 3 (ApePCNA3) provided a most remarkable effect on both Pol I and Pol II. The three proteins were confirmed to exist in the A. pernix cells. These results suggest that the three PCNAs work as the processivity factor of DNA polymerases in A. pernix cells under different conditions. In Eucarya, three checkpoint proteins, Hus1, Rad1, and Rad9, have been proposed to form a PCNA-like ring structure and may work as a sliding clamp for the translesion DNA polymerases. Therefore, it is very interesting that three active PCNAs were found in one archaeal cell. Further analyses are necessary to determine whether each PCNA has specific roles, and moreover, how they reveal different functions in the cells. PMID:11790738

  14. Enantioselective Resolution of γ-Lactam by a Novel Thermostable Type II (+)-γ-Lactamase from the Hyperthermophilic Archaeon Aeropyrum pernix.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ren, Lu; Zhu, Shaozhou; Shi, Ying; Gao, Shuahua; Zheng, Guojun

    2015-05-01

    A thermostable formamidase from the aerobic hyperthermophilic archaeon Aeropyrum pernix was revealed a novel type II (+)-γ-lactamase. This type II (+)-γ-lactamase is only composed of 377 amino acid residues, in contrast to another thermostable (+)-γ-lactamase from Sulfolobus solfataricus with 504 amino acid residues (type I). It is interesting that there are low identities between these two (+)-γ-lactamases, and herein, we further proved that at least two types of (+)-γ-lactamases exist in nature due to enzyme promiscuity. The gene of this thermostable (+)-γ-lactamase was cloned, functionally expressed in Escherichia coli BL21, and purified by a simple yet effective heat treatment method. It showed incredible thermostability, retaining 100% of its activity after 12 h at 100 °C. The optimum temperature for this enzyme was supposed to be more than 100 °C, and the optimum pH for this enzyme was about 9.0. The lactamase maintained its activity in the presence of most metal ions, except for Cu(2+). This thermo- and alkaline-tolerant (+)-γ-lactamase presents promising properties for the industrial application. Specifically, it could be used for the production of chirally pure (-)-γ-lactam for the synthesis of well-known carbocyclic nucleosides like abacavir and peramivir. The optical purity of the chiral product reached over 97% enantiomeric excess.

  15. The conserved N-terminal helix of acylpeptide hydrolase from archaeon Aeropyrum pernix K1 is important for its hyperthermophilic activity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Zuoming; Zheng, Baisong; Wang, Yanping; Chen, Yiqian; Manco, Giuseppe; Feng, Yan

    2008-09-01

    The acylpeptide hydrolases from hyperthermophilic archaeon Aeropyrum pernix K1 has a short conserved N-terminal helix in its family. The role of this N-terminal helix in the function of the hyperthermophilic enzyme, however, is unknown. Here, we investigated this question by protein engineering and biophysical methods. We found that a mutant (DeltaN21) with the N-terminal helix deleted is no longer functional at the optimum temperature for WT enzyme (95 degrees C), required for the survival of Aeropyrum pernix K1. Instead, DeltaN21 has the optimum activity at approximately 77 degrees C, with higher activities than the WT enzyme below this temperature. DeltaN21 is less stable than the WT enzyme and started unfolding at approximately 77 degrees C, indicating that the loss of the enzymatic activity of DeltaN21 at higher temperature is due to its low thermodynamic stability. In addition, we found that the salt bridges formed between the N-terminal helix and the catalytic domain of the enzyme play only a minor role in stabilizing the enzyme, suggesting that hydrophobic interactions mainly contribute to the stabilization. Since the N-terminal helix is conserved in this family of enzymes, our results suggest that the N-terminal helix is likely to play an important role for stabilizing all other enzymes in this family.

  16. Molecular dynamics study of the structural and dynamic characteristics of the polyextremophilic short-chain dehydrogenase from the Thermococcus sibiricus archaeon and its homologues

    Science.gov (United States)

    Popinako, Anna V.; Antonov, Mikhail Yu.; Bezsudnova, Ekaterina Yu.; Prokopiev, Georgiy A.; Popov, Vladimir O.

    2017-11-01

    The study of structural adaptations of proteins from polyextremophilic organisms using computational molecular dynamics method is appealing because the obtained knowledge can be applied to construction of synthetic proteins with high activity and stability in polyextreme media which is useful for many industrial applications. To investigate molecular adaptations to high temperature, we have focused on a superthermostable short-chain dehydrogenase TsAdh319 from the Thermococcus sibiricus polyextremophilic archaeon and its closest structural homologues. Molecular dynamics method is widely used for molecular structure refinement, investigation of biological macromolecules motion, and, consequently, for interpreting the results of certain biophysical experiments. We performed molecular dynamics simulations of the proteins at different temperatures. Comparison of root mean square fluctuations (RMSF) of the atoms in thermophilic alcohol dehydrogenases (ADHs) at 300 K and 358 K revealed the existence of stable residues at 358 K. These residues surround the active site and form a "nucleus of rigidity" in thermophilic ADHs. The results of our studies suggest that the existence of the "nucleus of rigidity" is crucial for the stability of TsAdh319. Absence of the "nucleus of rigidity" in non-thermally stable proteins causes fluctuations throughout the protein, especially on the surface, triggering the process of denaturation at high temperatures.

  17. The Potential Biotechnological Applications of the Exopolysaccharide Produced by the Halophilic Bacterium Halomonas almeriensis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Victoria Béjar

    2012-06-01

    Full Text Available We have studied the extracellular polysaccharide (EPS produced by the type strain, M8T, of the halophilic bacterium Halomonas almeriensis, to ascertain whether it might have any biotechnological applications. All the cultural parameters tested influenced both bacterial growth and polysaccharide production. EPS production was mainly growth-associated and under optimum environmental and nutritional conditions M8T excreted about 1.7 g of EPS per litre of culture medium (about 0.4 g of EPS per gram of dry cell weight. Analysis by anion-exchange chromatography and high-performance size-exclusion chromatography indicated that the exopolysaccharide was composed of two fractions, one of 6.3 × 106 and another of 1.5 × 104 Daltons. The monosaccharide composition of the high-molecular-weight fraction was mannose (72% w/w, glucose (27.5% w/w and rhamnose (0.5% w/w. The low-molecular-weight fraction contained mannose (70% w/w and glucose (30% w/w. The EPS has a substantial protein fraction (1.1% w/w and was capable of emulsifying several hydrophobic substrates, a capacity presumably related to its protein content. The EPS produced solutions of low viscosity with pseudoplastic behaviour. It also had a high capacity for binding some cations. It contained considerable quantities of sulphates (1.4% w/w, an unusual feature in bacterial polysaccharides. All these characteristics render it potentially useful as a biological agent, bio-detoxifier and emulsifier.

  18. Virgibacillus albus sp. nov., a novel moderately halophilic bacterium isolated from Lop Nur salt lake in Xinjiang province, China.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Yun-Jiao; Zhou, Yu; Ja, Man; Shi, Rong; Chun-Yu, Wei-Xun; Yang, Ling-Ling; Tang, Shu-Kun; Li, Wen-Jun

    2012-11-01

    A Gram-positive, moderately halophilic, strictly aerobic bacterium, designated YIM 93624(T), was isolated from a salt lake in Xinjiang province of China and subjected to a polyphasic taxonomic study. Strain YIM 93624(T) grew at 15-45 °C (optimum 25-30 °C), 1-17% (w/v) NaCl (optimum 5-10 %, w/v) and pH 4.0-9.0 (optimum pH 7.0). The predominant menaquinone was found to be MK-7. The major fatty acids were anteiso-C(15:0) and C(16:0). The polar lipids consisted of diphosphatidylglycerol, phosphatidylglycerol, phosphatidylinositol, a glycolipid and two unidentified phospholipids. The cell-wall peptidoglycan contained meso-diaminopimelic acid. The G+C content of the genomic DNA was 37.9 mol%. Phylogenetic analysis based on 16S rRNA gene sequences showed that strain YIM 93624(T) was a member of the genus Virgibacillus and exhibited the highest similarity of 97.0 % to Virgibacillus koreensis KCTC 3823(T). However, the level of DNA-DNA relatedness between strain YIM 93624(T) and V. koreensis KCTC 3823(T) was 32.5 %. On the basis of phylogenetic, physiological and chemotaxonomic analysis data, the isolate is concluded to represent a novel species of the genus Virgibacillus, for which the name Virgibacillus albus sp. nov., is proposed, with type strain of YIM 93624(T) (=DSM 23711(T) = JCM 17364(T)).

  19. Patterns and determinants of halophilic archaea (class halobacteria) diversity in tunisian endorheic salt lakes and sebkhet systems.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Najjari, Afef; Elshahed, Mostafa S; Cherif, Ameur; Youssef, Noha H

    2015-07-01

    We examined the diversity and community structure of members of the halophilic Archaea (class Halobacteria) in samples from central and southern Tunisian endorheic salt lakes and sebkhet (also known as sebkha) systems using targeted 16S rRNA gene diversity survey and quantitative PCR (qPCR) approaches. Twenty-three different samples from four distinct locations exhibiting a wide range of salinities (2% to 37%) and physical characteristics (water, salt crust, sediment, and biofilm) were examined. A total of 4,759 operational taxonomic units at the 0.03 (species-level) cutoff (OTU0.03s) belonging to 45 currently recognized genera were identified, with 8 to 43 genera (average, 30) identified per sample. In spite of the large number of genera detected per sample, only a limited number (i.e., 2 to 16) usually constituted the majority (≥80%) of encountered sequences. Halobacteria diversity showed a strong negative correlation to salinity (Pearson correlation coefficient = -0.92), and community structure analysis identified salinity, rather than the location or physical characteristics of the sample, as the most important factor shaping the Halobacteria community structure. The relative abundance of genera capable of biosynthesis of the compatible solute(s) trehalose or 2-sulfotrehalose decreased with increasing salinities (Pearson correlation coefficient = -0.80). Indeed, qPCR analysis demonstrated that the Halobacteria otsB (trehalose-6-phosphatase)/16S rRNA gene ratio decreases with increasing salinities (Pearson correlation coefficient = -0.87). The results highlight patterns and determinants of Halobacteria diversity at a previously unexplored ecosystem and indicate that genera lacking trehalose biosynthetic capabilities are more adapted to growth in and colonization of hypersaline (>25% salt) ecosystems than trehalose producers. Copyright © 2015, American Society for Microbiology. All Rights Reserved.

  20. The halophilic alkalithermophile Natranaerobius thermophilus adapts to multiple environmental extremes using a large repertoire of Na(K)/H antiporters.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mesbah, Noha M; Cook, Gregory M; Wiegel, Juergen

    2009-10-01

    Natranaerobius thermophilus is an unusual extremophile because it is halophilic, alkaliphilic and thermophilic, growing optimally at 3.5 M Na(+), pH(55 degrees C) 9.5 and 53 degrees C. Mechanisms enabling this tripartite lifestyle are essential for understanding how microorganisms grow under inhospitable conditions, but remain unknown, particularly in extremophiles growing under multiple extremes. We report on the response of N. thermophilus to external pH at high salt and elevated temperature and identify mechanisms responsible for this adaptation. N. thermophilus exhibited cytoplasm acidification, maintaining an unanticipated transmembrane pH gradient of 1 unit over the entire extracellular pH range for growth. N. thermophilus uses two distinct mechanisms for cytoplasm acidification. At extracellular pH values at and below the optimum, N. thermophilus utilizes at least eight electrogenic Na(+)(K(+))/H(+) antiporters for cytoplasm acidification. Characterization of these antiporters in antiporter-deficient Escherichia coli KNabc showed overlapping pH profiles (pH 7.8-10.0) and Na(+) concentrations for activity (K(0.5) values 1.0-4.4 mM), properties that correlate with intracellular conditions of N. thermophilus. As the extracellular pH increases beyond the optimum, electrogenic antiport activity ceases, and cytoplasm acidification is achieved by energy-independent physiochemical effects (cytoplasmic buffering) potentially mediated by an acidic proteome. The combination of these strategies allows N. thermophilus to grow over a range of extracellular pH and Na(+) concentrations and protect biomolecules under multiple extreme conditions.

  1. The halophilic alkalithermophile Natranaerobius thermophilus adapts to multiple environmental extremes using a large repertoire of Na+(K+)/H+ antiporters

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mesbah, Noha M; Cook, Gregory M; Wiegel, Juergen

    2009-01-01

    Natranaerobius thermophilus is an unusual extremophile because it is halophilic, alkaliphilic and thermophilic, growing optimally at 3.5 M Na+, pH55°C 9.5 and 53°C. Mechanisms enabling this tripartite lifestyle are essential for understanding how microorganisms grow under inhospitable conditions, but remain unknown, particularly in extremophiles growing under multiple extremes. We report on the response of N. thermophilus to external pH at high salt and elevated temperature and identify mechanisms responsible for this adaptation. N. thermophilus exhibited cytoplasm acidification, maintaining an unanticipated transmembrane pH gradient of 1 unit over the entire extracellular pH range for growth. N. thermophilus uses two distinct mechanisms for cytoplasm acidification. At extracellular pH values at and below the optimum, N. thermophilus utilizes at least eight electrogenic Na+(K+)/H+ antiporters for cytoplasm acidification. Characterization of these antiporters in antiporter-deficient Escherichia coli KNabc showed overlapping pH profiles (pH 7.8–10.0) and Na+ concentrations for activity (K0.5 values 1.0–4.4 mM), properties that correlate with intracellular conditions of N. thermophilus. As the extracellular pH increases beyond the optimum, electrogenic antiport activity ceases, and cytoplasm acidification is achieved by energy-independent physiochemical effects (cytoplasmic buffering) potentially mediated by an acidic proteome. The combination of these strategies allows N. thermophilus to grow over a range of extracellular pH and Na+ concentrations and protect biomolecules under multiple extreme conditions. PMID:19708921

  2. A novel NhaD-type Na(+)/H(+) antiporter from the moderate halophile and alkaliphile Halomonas alkaliphila.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Yanhong; Song, Na; Yang, Lina; Abdel-Motaal, Heba; Zhang, Rui; Zhang, Zhenglai; Meng, Fankui; Jiang, Juquan

    2017-07-01

    In this study, a NhaD-type Na(+)/H(+) antiporter gene designated Ha-nhaD was obtained by selection of genomic DNA from the moderate halophile and alkaliphile Halomonas alkaliphila in Escherichia coli KNabc lacking 3 major Na(+)/H(+) antiporters. The presence of Ha-NhaD conferred tolerance of E. coli KNabc to NaCl up to 0.6 mol·L(-1) and to LiCl up to 0.2 mol·L(-1) and to an alkaline pH. pH-dependent Na(+)(Li(+))/H(+) antiport activity was detected from everted membrane vesicles prepared from E. coli KNabc/pUC-nhaD but not those of KNabc/pUC18. Ha-NhaD exhibited Na(+)(Li(+))/H(+) antiport activity over a wide pH range from 7.0 to 9.5, with the highest activity at pH 9.0. Protein sequence alignment and phylogenetic analysis revealed that Ha-NhaD is significantly different from the 7 known NhaD-type Na(+)/H(+) antiporters, including Dw-NhaD, Dl-NhaD, Vp-NhaD, Vc-NhaD, Aa-NhaD, He-NhaD, and Ha-NhaD1. Although Ha-NhaD showed a closer phylogenetic relationship with Ha-NhaD2, a significant difference in pH-dependent activity profile exists between Ha-NhaD and Ha-NhaD2. Taken together, Ha-nhaD encodes a novel pH-dependent NhaD-type Na(+)/H(+) antiporter.

  3. Desulfovibrio legallis sp. nov.: a moderately halophilic, sulfate-reducing bacterium isolated from a wastewater digestor in Tunisia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thabet, Olfa Ben Dhia; Wafa, Terres; Eltaief, Khelifi; Cayol, Jean-Luc; Hamdi, Moktar; Fauque, Guy; Fardeau, Marie-Laure

    2011-02-01

    A new moderately halophilic sulfate-reducing bacterium (strain H₁(T) ) was enriched and isolated from a wastewater digestor in Tunisia. Cells were curved, motile rods (2-3 x 0.5 μm). Strain H₁(T) grew at temperatures between 22 and 43°C (optimum 35°C), and at pH between 5.0 and 9.2 (optimum 7.3-7.5). Strain H₁(T) required salt for growth (1-45 g of NaCl/l), with an optimum at 20-30 g/l. Sulfate, sulfite, thiosulfate, and elemental sulfur were used as terminal electron acceptors but not nitrate and nitrite. Strain H₁(T) utilized lactate, pyruvate, succinate, fumarate, ethanol, and hydrogen (in the presence of acetate and CO₂) as electron donors in the presence of sulfate as electron acceptor. The main end-products from lactate oxidation were acetate with H₂ and CO₂. The G + C content of the genomic DNA was 55%. The predominant fatty acids of strain H₁(T) were C(15:0) iso (38.8%), C(16:0) (19%), and C(14:0) iso 3OH (12.2%), and menaquinone MK-6 was the major respiratory quinone. Phylogenetic analysis of the small-subunit (SSU) ribosomal RNA (rRNA) gene sequence indicated that strain H₁(T) was affiliated to the genus Desulfovibrio. On the basis of SSU rRNA gene sequence comparisons and physiological characteristics, strain H₁(T) is proposed to be assigned to a novel species of sulfate reducers of the genus Desulfovibrio, Desulfovibrio legallis sp. nov. (= DSM 19129(T) = CCUG 54389(T)).

  4. Mn-superoxide dismutase from the halophilic halotolerant bacterium Ba1--isolation and active site spectroscopic studies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yorkovsky, Y; Silver, B L

    1997-01-01

    The superoxide-dismutase (SOD) enzyme, isolated from the halophilic halotolerant bacterium Ba1, was found to be a dimer with a molecular weight of 40 kD and a subunit weight of 23.5 kD. The partial N-terminal sequence showed significant homology to SODs isolated from various sources. Metal analysis showed that SOD from Ba1 contains manganese and iron with the following stoichiometries: 0.9 +/- 0.4 Mn/dimer and 0.6 +/- 0.2 Fe/dimer. Two bands were obtained by isoelectric-focusing, at pI of 4.45 and at 4.40. Native SOD from Ba1 at room temperature was ESR silent. An ESR spectrum of hydrated Mn(II) was obtained from denaturated enzyme. Native enzyme cooled to 97 K showed an ESR spectrum identified as being due to Fe(III). The spectrum was pH-independent. SOD from Ba1 was not inactivated by H2O2. On the basis of these observations, SOD from Ba1 was characterized as MnSOD. The excitation fluorescence spectrum of SOD from Ba1 showed four main peaks in the visible region. The effects on the spectra of KSCN, NaN3, NaF, and ascorbate were examined. Measurements of H2(17)O-nmr relaxation times T1 and T2, for solutions containing E. coli MnSOD and FeSOD, showed no paramagnetic contribution. These results support the assumption that the water molecule at the active site is strongly bound.

  5. Bacillus daqingensis sp. nov., a halophilic, alkaliphilic bacterium isolated from saline-sodic soil in Daqing, China.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Shuang; Sun, Lei; Wei, Dan; Zhou, Baoku; Zhang, Junzheng; Gu, Xuejia; Zhang, Lei; Liu, Ying; Li, Yidan; Guo, Wei; Jiang, Shuang; Pan, Yaqing; Wang, Yufeng

    2014-07-01

    An alkaliphilic, moderately halophilic, bacterium, designated strain X10-1(T), was isolated from saline-alkaline soil in Daqing, Heilongjiang Province, China. Strain X10-1(T) was determined to be a Gram-positive aerobe with rod-shaped cells. The isolate was catalase-positive, oxidase-negative, non-motile, and capable of growth at salinities of 0-16% (w/v) NaCl (optimum, 3%). The pH range for growth was 7.5-11.0 (optimum, pH 10.0). The genomic DNA G+C content was 47.7 mol%. Its major isoprenoid quinone was MK-7 and its cellular fatty acid profile mainly consisted of anteiso-C15:0, anteiso-C17:0, iso-C15:0, C16:0, and iso-C16:0. The peptidoglycan contained meso-diaminopimelic acid as the diagnostic diamino acid. The predominant polar lipids were diphosphatidylglycerol, phosphatidylethanolamine, and phosphatidylglycerol. Phylogenetic analysis based on 16S rRNA gene sequences showed that X10-1(T) is a member of the genus Bacillus, being most closely related to B. saliphilus DSM15402(T) (97.8% similarity) and B. agaradhaerens DSM 8721(T) (96.2%). DNA-DNA relatedness to the type strains of these species was less than 40%. On the basis of the phylogenetic, physiological, and biochemical data, strain X10-1(T) represents a novel species of the genus Bacillus, for which the name Bacillus daqingensis sp. nov. is proposed. The type strain is X10-1(T) (=NBRC 109404(T) = CGMCC 1.12295(T)).

  6. Characterization of an organic solvent-tolerant thermostable glucoamylase from a halophilic isolate, Halolactibacillus sp. SK71 and its application in raw starch hydrolysis for bioethanol production.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yu, Hui-Ying; Li, Xin

    2014-01-01

    A halophilic bacterium Halolactibacillus sp. SK71 producing extracellular glucoamylase was isolated from saline soil of Yuncheng Salt Lake, China. Enzyme production was strongly influenced by the salinity of growth medium with maximum in the presence of 5% NaCl. The glucoamylase was purified to homogeneity with a molecular mass of 78.5 kDa. It showed broad substrate specificity and raw starch hydrolyzing activity. Analysis of hydrolysis products from soluble starch by thin-layer chromatography revealed that glucose was the sole end-product, indicating the enzyme was a true glucoamylase. Optimal enzyme activity was found to be at 70°C, pH 8.0, and 7.5% NaCl. In addition, it was highly active and stable over broad ranges of temperature (0-100°C), pH (7.0-12.0), and NaCl concentration (0-20%), showing excellent thermostable, alkali stable, and halotolerant properties. Furthermore, it displayed high stability in the presence of hydrophobic organic solvents. The purified glucoamylase was applied for raw corn starch hydrolysis and subsequent bioethanol production using Saccharomyces cerevisiae. The yield in terms of grams of ethanol produced per gram of sugar consumed was 0.365 g/g, with 71.6% of theoretical yield from raw corn starch. This study demonstrated the feasibility of using enzymes from halophiles for further application in bioenergy production. © 2014 American Institute of Chemical Engineers.

  7. Bacillus coahuilensis sp. nov., a moderately halophilic species from a desiccation lagoon in the Cuatro Ciénegas Valley in Coahuila, Mexico.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cerritos, René; Vinuesa, Pablo; Eguiarte, Luis E; Herrera-Estrella, Luis; Alcaraz-Peraza, Luis D; Arvizu-Gómez, Jackeline L; Olmedo, Gabriela; Ramirez, Enrique; Siefert, Janet L; Souza, Valeria

    2008-04-01

    A moderately halophilic, Gram-positive and rod-shaped bacterium, strain m4-4T, was isolated from a Chihuahuan desert lagoon in Cuatro Ciénegas, Coahuila, Mexico. Strain m4-4T was found to grow optimally at 30-37 degrees C, pH 7.0-8.0 and 5 % NaCl and to tolerate from 0.5 % to 10 % NaCl. It was shown to be aerobic. The genomic DNA G+C content was about 37 mol%. Strain m4-4T exhibited minimal or no growth on most sugars tested. Its major cellular fatty acids were C14 : 0, C16 : 0 and C18 : 1. Based on phylogenetic analysis of 16S rRNA and recA gene sequences, we observed that the closest relatives of the isolate are moderately halophilic Bacillus species, with 16S rRNA gene sequence similarity ranging from 96.6 to 97.4 % (Bacillus marisflavi, Bacillus aquimaris and Bacillus vietnamensis). Additionally, using genomic data it was determined that the type strain contains a total of nine rRNA operons with three slightly different sequences. On the basis of phenotypic and molecular properties, strain m4-4T represents a novel species within the genus Bacillus, for which the name Bacillus coahuilensis sp. nov. is proposed, with the type strain m4-4T (=NRRL B-41737T =CECT 7197T).

  8. Halophilic starch degrading bacteria isolated from Sambhar Lake, India, as potential anode catalyst in microbial fuel cell: A promising process for saline water treatment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vijay, Ankisha; Arora, Shivam; Gupta, Sandeep; Chhabra, Meenu

    2018-02-10

    In this study, Microbial Fuel Cell (MFC) capable of treating saline starch water was developed. Sodium chloride (NaCl) concentrations ranging from 500 mM to 3000 mM were tested at the anode. Nitrate was used as an electron acceptor at the biocathode. The halophilic bacteria were isolated from Sambhar Lake, India. Results indicated successful removal of starch (1.83 kg/m 3 -d) and nitrate (0.13 kg/m 3 -d NO 3 - -N) with concomitant power output of 207.05 mW/m 2 at 1000 mM NaCl concentration. An increase in power density from 71.06 mW/m 2 to 207.05 mW/m 2 (2.92 folds) was observed when NaCl concentration was increased from 500 mM to 1000 mM. A decline in power density was observed when the salt concentrations >1000 mM were used. Concentration of 3000 mM supported power output as well as the highest starch degradation (3.2 kg/m 3 -d) and amylase activity of 2.26 IU/ml. The halophilic exoelectrogens were isolated and identified. The present study demonstrates the utility of MFC for degrading starch in saline water. Copyright © 2018 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  9. Isolation and characterization of halophilic lactic acid bacteria acting as a starter culture for sauce fermentation of the red alga Nori (Porphyra yezoensis).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Uchida, M; Miyoshi, T; Yoshida, G; Niwa, K; Mori, M; Wakabayashi, H

    2014-06-01

    A screening test was conducted for environmental samples to isolate halophilic lactic acid bacteria (HLAB) that can act as a starter in a Nori (Porphyra yezoensis)-sauce culture. After 9 months of incubation of enrichment cultures added with 25 kinds of environmental samples, growth of HLAB-like microorganisms was observed in six cultures salted at a 15% w/w level, including culture samples originally from mesopelagic water taken from 321 m-depth and from mountain snow taken at 2450 m-height. Ten strains were isolated and characterized as Tetragenococcus halophilus based on sequence analysis of the 16S rRNA gene. The isolates were inoculated into a newly prepared Nori-sauce culture and were confirmed to be able to act as a starter culture while three reference strains of T. halophilus obtained from a culture collection could not grow in the same culture. Halophilic lactic acid bacteria strains that can make growth in a highly salted Nori-sauce culture were isolated from environmental samples for the first time. All the isolates were identified as T. halophilus. The isolated strains are expected to be utilized as a starter culture for manufacturing fermented seaweed-sauce, which will be the first fermented food products obtained from algae. © 2014 The Society for Applied Microbiology.

  10. Raman spectroscopy as a potentialmethod for the detection of extremely halophilic archaea embedded in halite in terrestrial and possibly extraterrestrial samples.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fendrihan, Sergiu; Musso, Maurizio; Stan-Lotter, Helga

    2009-12-01

    Evidence for the widespread occurrence of extraterrestrial halite, particularly on Mars, has led to speculations on the possibility of halophilic microbial forms of life; these ideas have been strengthened by reports of viable haloarchaea from sediments of geological age (millions of years). Raman spectroscopy, being a sensitive detection method for future astrobiological investigations onsite, has been used in the current study for the detection of nine different extremely halophilic archaeal strains which had been embedded in laboratory-made halite crystals in order to simulate evaporitic conditions. The cells accumulated preferentially in tiny fluid inclusions, in simulation of the precipitation of salt in natural brines. FT-Raman spectroscopy using laser excitation at 1064 nm and dispersive micro Raman spectroscopy at 514.5 nm were applied. The spectra showed prominent peaks at 1507, 1152 and 1002 cm(-1) which are attributed to haloarchaeal C(50) carotenoid compounds (mainly bacterioruberins). Their intensity varied from strain to strain at 1064-nm laser excitation. Other distinguishable features were peaks due to peptide bonds (amide I, amide III) and to nucleic acids. No evidence for fatty acids was detected, consistent with their general absence in all archaea.These results contribute to a growing database on Raman spectra of terrestrial microorganisms from hypersaline environments and highlight the influence of the different macromolecular composition of diverse strains on these spectra.

  11. Enrichment and genome sequence of the group I.1a ammonia-oxidizing Archaeon "Ca. Nitrosotenuis uzonensis" representing a clade globally distributed in thermal habitats.

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    Elena V Lebedeva

    Full Text Available The discovery of ammonia-oxidizing archaea (AOA of the phylum Thaumarchaeota and the high abundance of archaeal ammonia monooxygenase subunit A encoding gene sequences in many environments have extended our perception of nitrifying microbial communities. Moreover, AOA are the only aerobic ammonia oxidizers known to be active in geothermal environments. Molecular data indicate that in many globally distributed terrestrial high-temperature habits a thaumarchaeotal lineage within the Nitrosopumilus cluster (also called "marine" group I.1a thrives, but these microbes have neither been isolated from these systems nor functionally characterized in situ yet. In this study, we report on the enrichment and genomic characterization of a representative of this lineage from a thermal spring in Kamchatka. This thaumarchaeote, provisionally classified as "Candidatus Nitrosotenuis uzonensis", is a moderately thermophilic, non-halophilic, chemolithoautotrophic ammonia oxidizer. The nearly complete genome sequence (assembled into a single scaffold of this AOA confirmed the presence of the typical thaumarchaeotal pathways for ammonia oxidation and carbon fixation, and indicated its ability to produce coenzyme F420 and to chemotactically react to its environment. Interestingly, like members of the genus Nitrosoarchaeum, "Candidatus N. uzonensis" also possesses a putative artubulin-encoding gene. Genome comparisons to related AOA with available genome sequences confirmed that the newly cultured AOA has an average nucleotide identity far below the species threshold and revealed a substantial degree of genomic plasticity with unique genomic regions in "Ca. N. uzonensis", which potentially include genetic determinants of ecological niche differentiation.

  12. Crystal structure of the NADP+and tartrate-bound complex of L-serine 3-dehydrogenase from the hyperthermophilic archaeon Pyrobaculum calidifontis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yoneda, Kazunari; Sakuraba, Haruhiko; Araki, Tomohiro; Ohshima, Toshihisa

    2018-01-20

    A gene encoding L-serine dehydrogenase (L-SerDH) that exhibits extremely low sequence identity to the Agrobacterium tumefaciens L-SerDH was identified in the hyperthermophilic archaeon Pyrobaculum calidifontis. The predicted amino acid sequence showed 36% identity with that of Pseudomonas aeruginosa L-SerDH, suggesting that P. calidifontis L-SerDH is a novel type of L-SerDH, like Ps. aeruginosa L-SerDH. The overexpressed enzyme appears to be the most thermostable L-SerDH described to date, and no loss of activity was observed by incubation for 30 min at temperatures up to 100 °C. The enzyme showed substantial reactivity towards D-serine, in addition to L-serine. Two different crystal structures of P. calidifontis L-SerDH were determined using the Se-MAD and MR method: the structure in complex with NADP + /sulfate ion at 1.18 Å and the structure in complex with NADP + /L-tartrate (substrate analog) at 1.57 Å. The fold of the catalytic domain showed similarity with that of Ps. aeruginosa L-SerDH. However, the active site structure significantly differed between the two enzymes. Based on the structure of the tartrate, L- and D-serine and 3-hydroxypropionate molecules were modeled into the active site and the substrate binding modes were estimated. A structural comparison suggests that the wide cavity at the substrate binding site is likely responsible for the high reactivity of the enzyme toward both L- and D-serine enantiomers. This is the first description of the structure of the novel type of L-SerDH with bound NADP + and substrate analog, and it provides new insight into the substrate binding mechanism of L-SerDH. The results obtained here may be very informative for the creation of L- or D-serine-specific SerDH by protein engineering.

  13. Biochemical Characterization of a Carboxylesterase from the Archaeon Pyrobaculum sp. 1860 and a Rational Explanation of Its Substrate Specificity and Thermostability

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    Hua Shao

    2014-09-01

    Full Text Available In this work, genome mining was used to identify esterase/lipase genes in the archaeon Pyrobaculum sp. 1860. A gene was cloned and functionally expressed in Escherichia coli as His-tagged protein. The recombinant enzyme (rP186_1588 was verified by western blotting and peptide mass fingerprinting. Biochemical characterization revealed that rP186_1588 exhibited optimum activity at pH 9.0 and 80 °C towards p-nitrophenyl acetate (Km: 0.35 mM, kcat: 11.65 s−1. Interestingly, the purified rP186_1588 exhibited high thermostability retaining 70% relative activity after incubation at 90 °C for 6 h. Circular dichroism results indicated that rP186_1588 showed slight structure alteration from 60 to 90 °C. Structural modeling showed P186_1588 possessed a typical α/β hydrolase’s fold with the catalytic triad consisting of Ser97, Asp147 and His172, and was further confirmed by site-directed mutagenesis. Comparative molecular simulations at different temperatures (300, 353, 373 and 473 K revealed that its thermostability was associated with its conformational rigidity. The binding free energy analysis by MM-PBSA method revealed that the van der Waals interaction played a major role in p-NP ester binding for P186_1588. Our data provide insights into the molecular structures of this archaeal esterase, and may help to its further protein engineering for industrial applications.

  14. Molecular Characterization and Postsplicing Fate of Three Introns within the Single rRNA Operon of the Hyperthermophilic Archaeon Aeropyrum pernix K1

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nomura, Norimichi; Sako, Yoshihiko; Uchida, Aritsune

    1998-01-01

    The single rRNA operon (arnS-arnL) of the hyperthermophilic archaeon Aeropyrum pernix K1 was sequenced. The DNA sequence data and detailed RNA analyses disclosed an unusual feature: the presence of three introns at hitherto undescribed insertion positions within the rRNA genes. The 699-nucleotide (nt) intron Iα was located at position 908 (Escherichia coli numbering [H. F. Noller, Annu. Rev. Biochem. 53:119–162, 1984]) of the 16S rRNA, while the 202-nt intron Iβ and 575-nt intron Iγ were located at positions 1085 and 1927 (E. coli numbering), respectively, of the 23S rRNA. They were located within highly conserved sites which have been implicated as crucial for rRNA function in E. coli. All three introns were remarkably AT rich (41.5 to 43.1 mol% G+C) compared with the mature rRNAs (67.7 and 69.2 mol% G+C for 16S and 23S rRNAs, respectively). No obvious primary sequence similarities were detected among them. After splicing from rRNA transcripts in vivo, a large quantity of intronic RNAs were stably retained in the linear monomeric form, whereas a trace of topoisomeric RNA molecules also appeared, as characterized by their behavior in two-dimensional gel electrophoresis. Secondary structural models of the Iα-, Iβ-, and Iγ-containing rRNA precursors agree with the bulge-helix-bulge motif. Two of the introns, Iα and Iγ, contained open reading frames whose protein translation exhibited no overall similarity with proteins reported so far. However, both share a LAGLI-DADG motif characteristic of homing endonucleases. PMID:9658008

  15. Halomonas qijiaojingensis sp. nov. and Halomonas flava sp. nov., two moderately halophilic bacteria isolated from a salt lake.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Chao; Shi, Rong; Liu, Bing-Bing; Zhang, Yun-Jiao; Sun, Hong-Zhuan; Li, Chang-Tian; Tang, Shu-Kun; Zhang, Li-Li; Li, Wen-Jun

    2011-10-01

    Two moderately halophilic, Gram-negative, rod-shaped bacteria, designated YIM 93003(T) and YIM 94343(T), were isolated from a salt lake in Xinjiang province, north-west China. The two strains YIM 93003(T) and YIM 94343(T) grew at 20-40°C, pH 6-9, 0.5-24% (w/v) NaCl and at 20-40°C, pH 6-9, 0.5-23% (w/v) NaCl, respectively. No growth occurred in absence of NaCl. Phylogenetic analyses based on 16S rRNA gene sequences showed that strains YIM 93003(T) and YIM 94343(T) were phylogenetically affiliated to the genus Halomonas and exhibited sequence similarity of 97.5% and 97.4% to the type strain Halomonas anticariensis DSM 16096(T), respectively. The strains possessed chemotaxonomic markers that were consistent with their classification in the genus Halomonas (Q-9 as predominant respiratory quinine; C18:1ω7c, C16:0 and C16:1 ω7c/iso-C15:02-OH as the major fatty acids). The DNA-DNA hybridization values for strains YIM 93003(T) and YIM 94343(T), YIM 93003(T) and DSM 16096(T), YIM 94343(T) and DSM 16096(T) were 38.1 ± 3.0, 18.3 ± 4.7, and 20.8 ± 4.6%, respectively. The G+C contents of the strains YIM 93003(T) and YIM 94343(T) were 63.4 and 64.0 mol%, respectively. Based on comparative analysis of physiological, biochemical and chemotaxonomic data, including low DNA-DNA hybridization results, two novel species, Halomonas qijiaojingensis sp. nov., and Halomonas flava sp. nov., are proposed. The type strains are YIM 93003(T) (=CCTCC AB 208133(T) =KCTC 22228(T)) and YIM 94343(T) (=CCTCC AB 2010382(T) =KCTC 23356(T)), respectively.

  16. Aliicoccus persicus gen. nov., sp. nov., a halophilic member of the Firmicutes isolated from a hypersaline lake.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Amoozegar, Mohammad Ali; Bagheri, Maryam; Makhdoumi-Kakhki, Ali; Didari, Maryam; Schumann, Peter; Nikou, Mahdi Moshtaghi; Sánchez-Porro, Cristina; Ventosa, Antonio

    2014-06-01

    A novel Gram-staining-positive, moderately halophilic bacterium, designated strain A76(T), was isolated from a brine sample of the hypersaline lake Aran-Bidgol in Iran. Cells were strictly aerobic, coccus-shaped, non-motile, non-sporulating, and catalase- and oxidase-positive. Strain A76(T) grew between pH 7.0 and 10.0 (optimal growth at pH 8.0), between 20 and 45 °C (optimal growth at 35 °C) and at salinities of 0.5 to 12.5% (w/v) NaCl (optimal growth at 7.5%, w/v, NaCl). On the basis of 16S rRNA gene sequence analysis, strain A76(T) was shown to belong to the phylum Firmicutes with sequence similarities of 94.1, 93.1 and 91.1%, to the type species of the genera Jeotgalicoccus, Salinicoccus and Nosocomiicoccus, respectively. The DNA G+C content of this new isolate was 38.8 mol%. The major cellular fatty acids of strain A76(T) were anteiso-C(15 : 0) and iso-C(15 : 0), and its polar lipid pattern consisted of diphosphatidylglycerol, phosphatidylglycerol, a glycolipid, an unknown lipid and two unknown phospholipids. The isoprenoid quinones were MK-6 (94%), MK-5 (3%) and MK-7 (3%). The amino acid constituents of the cell wall were Lys, Asp, Gly, Glu and Ala. The physiological, biochemical and phylogenetic differences between strain A76(T) and type strains of taxa with validly published names suggest that this strain represents a novel species in a novel genus within the family Staphylococcaceae, for which the name Aliicoccus persicus gen. nov., sp. nov. is proposed. The type strain of Aliicoccus persicus is strain A76(T) ( = CECT 8508(T) = DSM 28306(T) = IBRC-M 10081(T)). © 2014 IUMS.

  17. Ornithinibacillus halophilus sp. nov., a moderately halophilic, Gram-stain-positive, endospore-forming bacterium from a hypersaline lake.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bagheri, Maryam; Amoozegar, Mohammad Ali; Schumann, Peter; Didari, Maryam; Mehrshad, Malihe; Spröer, Cathrin; Sánchez-Porro, Cristina; Ventosa, Antonio

    2013-03-01

    A novel Gram-stain-positive, moderately halophilic bacterium, designated strain G8B(T), was isolated from water of the hypersaline lake Aran-Bidgol in Iran and characterized taxonomically using a polyphasic approach. Cells of strain G8B(T) were rod-shaped, motile and produced oval endospores at a terminal position in swollen sporangia. Strain G8B(T) was strictly aerobic, catalase-positive and oxidase-negative. The strain was able to grow at NaCl concentrations of 0.5-12.5 % (w/v), with optimum growth occurring at 5-7.5 % (w/v) NaCl. The optimum temperature and pH for growth were 35-40 °C and pH 7.5-8.0, respectively. On the basis of 16S rRNA gene sequence analysis, strain G8B(T) was shown to belong to the genus Ornithinibacillus within the phylum Firmicutes and showed closest phylogenetic similarity with Ornithinibacillus bavariensis WSBC 24001(T) (97.6 %). The DNA G+C content of strain G8B(T) was 36.9 mol%. The major cellular fatty acids of strain G8B(T) were anteiso-C15 : 0, anteiso-C17 : 0, iso-C15 : 0 and iso-C16 : 0, and its polar lipid pattern consisted of phosphatidylglycerol, diphosphatidylglycerol, four unknown phospholipids and an unknown aminolipid. The isoprenoid quinones were MK-7 (98 %) and MK-8 (2 %). Strain G8B(T) contained a peptidoglycan of type A4β, l-Orn-d-Asp. All these features confirmed the placement of isolate G8B(T) within the genus Ornithinibacillus. DNA-DNA hybridization experiments revealed a low level of relatedness (6 %) between strain G8B(T) and Ornithinibacillus bavariensis DSM 15681(T). On the basis of evidence from this study, a novel species of the genus Ornithinibacillus, Ornithinibacillus halophilus sp. nov., is proposed, with strain G8B(T) ( = IBRC-M 10683(T) = KCTC 13822(T)) as the type strain.

  18. Draft genome sequence of the halophilic Halobacillus mangrovi KTB 131 isolated from Topan salt of the Jeon-nam in Korea.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Woo, Mingyeong; Park, Sun-Hee; Park, Kyounghee; Park, Min-Kyu; Kim, Ji-Yeon; Lee, Han-Seung; Sohn, Jae Hak; Lee, Dong-Woo; Nam, Gaewon; Shin, Kee-Sun; Lee, Sang-Jae

    2017-12-01

    The draft genome sequence of the halophilic bacterium Halobacillus mangrovi KTB 131, isolated from Topan salt of the Jeon-nam in Korea, was established. The genome comprises 4,151,649 bp, with a G + C content of 41.6%. The strain displays a high number of genes responsible for secondary metabolite biosynthesis, transport, and catabolism compared to other Halobacillus bacterial genus members. Numerous genes responsible for various transport systems, solute accumulation, and aromatic/sulfur decomposition were detected. The first genomic analysis encourages further research on comparative genomics and potential biotechnological applications. The whole draft genome sequence of Halobacillus mangrovi KTB 131 is now available (Bioproject PRJNA380285).

  19. Catalytic properties and crystal structure of thermostable NAD(P)H-dependent carbonyl reductase from the hyperthermophilic archaeon Aeropyrum pernix K1.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fukuda, Yudai; Sakuraba, Haruhiko; Araki, Tomohiro; Ohshima, Toshihisa; Yoneda, Kazunari

    2016-09-01

    A gene encoding NAD(P)H-dependent carbonyl reductase (CR) from the hyperthermophilic archaeon Aeropyrum pernix K1 was overexpressed in Escherichia coli. Its product was effectively purified and characterized. The expressed enzyme was the most thermostable CR found to date; the activity remained at approximately 75% of its activity after incubation for 10min up to 90°C. In addition, A. pernix CR exhibited high stability at a wider range of pH values and longer periods of storage compared with CRs previously identified from other sources. A. pernix CR catalyzed the reduction of various carbonyl compounds including ethyl 4-chloro-3-oxobutanoate and 9,10-phenanthrenequinone, similar to the CR from thyroidectomized (Tx) chicken fatty liver. However, A. pernix CR exhibited significantly higher Km values against several substrates than Tx chicken fatty liver CR. The three-dimensional structure of A. pernix CR was determined using the molecular replacement method at a resolution of 2.09Å, in the presence of NADPH. The overall fold of A. pernix CR showed moderate similarity to that of Tx chicken fatty liver CR; however, A. pernix CR had no active-site lid unlike Tx chicken fatty liver CR. Consequently, the active-site cavity in the A. pernix CR was much more solvent-accessible than that in Tx chicken fatty liver CR. This structural feature may be responsible for the enzyme's lower affinity for several substrates and NADPH. The factors contributing to the much higher thermostability of A. pernix CR were analyzed by comparing its structure with that of Tx chicken fatty liver CR. This comparison showed that extensive formation of the intrasubunit ion pair networks, and the presence of the strong intersubunit interaction, is likely responsible for A. pernix CR thermostability. Site-directed mutagenesis showed that Glu99 plays a major role in the intersubunit interaction. This is the first report regarding the characteristics and three-dimensional structure of

  20. Biochemical characterisation of LigN, an NAD+-dependent DNA ligase from the halophilic euryarchaeon Haloferax volcanii that displays maximal in vitro activity at high salt concentrations

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    MacNeill Stuart A

    2006-11-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background DNA ligases are required for DNA strand joining in all forms of cellular life. NAD+-dependent DNA ligases are found primarily in eubacteria but also in some eukaryotic viruses, bacteriophage and archaea. Among the archaeal NAD+-dependent DNA ligases is the LigN enzyme of the halophilic euryarchaeon Haloferax volcanii, the gene for which was apparently acquired by Hfx.volcanii through lateral gene transfer (LGT from a halophilic eubacterium. Genetic studies show that the LGT-acquired LigN enzyme shares an essential function with the native Hfx.volcanii ATP-dependent DNA ligase protein LigA. Results To characterise the enzymatic properties of the LigN protein, wild-type and three mutant forms of the LigN protein were separately expressed in recombinant form in E.coli and purified to apparent homogeneity by immobilised metal ion affinity chromatography (IMAC. Non-isotopic DNA ligase activity assays using λ DNA restriction fragments with 12 bp cos cohesive ends were used to show that LigN activity was dependent on addition of divalent cations and salt. No activity was detected in the absence of KCl, whereas maximum activity could be detected at 3.2 M KCl, close to the intracellular KCl concentration of Hfx.volcanii cells. Conclusion LigN is unique amongst characterised DNA ligase enzymes in displaying maximal DNA strand joining activity at high (> 3 M salt levels. As such the LigN enzyme has potential both as a novel tool for biotechnology and as a model enzyme for studying the adaptation of proteins to high intracellular salt levels.

  1. Structure of a highly acidic β-lactamase from the moderate halophile Chromohalobacter sp. 560 and the discovery of a Cs{sup +}-selective binding site

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Arai, Shigeki; Yonezawa, Yasushi; Okazaki, Nobuo; Matsumoto, Fumiko; Shibazaki, Chie; Shimizu, Rumi; Yamada, Mitsugu; Adachi, Motoyasu; Tamada, Taro [Japan Atomic Energy Agency, 2-4 Shirakata-shirane, Tokai, Ibaraki 319-1195 (Japan); Kawamoto, Masahide [Kyushu Synchrotron Light Research Center, 8-7 Yayoigaoka, Tosu, Saga 841-0005 (Japan); Tokunaga, Hiroko; Ishibashi, Matsujiro [Faculty of Agriculture, Kagoshima University, 1-21-24 Korimoto, Kagoshima 890-0065 (Japan); Blaber, Michael [Japan Atomic Energy Agency, 2-4 Shirakata-shirane, Tokai, Ibaraki 319-1195 (Japan); Florida State University, 1115 West Call Street, Tallahassee, FL 32306-4300 (United States); Tokunaga, Masao [Faculty of Agriculture, Kagoshima University, 1-21-24 Korimoto, Kagoshima 890-0065 (Japan); Kuroki, Ryota, E-mail: kuroki.ryota@jaea.go.jp [Japan Atomic Energy Agency, 2-4 Shirakata-shirane, Tokai, Ibaraki 319-1195 (Japan)

    2015-03-01

    The tertiary structure of a β-lactamase derived from the halobacterium Chromohalobacter sp. 560 (HaBLA) was determined by X-ray crystallography. Three unique Sr{sup 2+}-binding sites and one Cs{sup +}-binding site were discovered in the HaBLA molecule. Environmentally friendly absorbents are needed for Sr{sup 2+} and Cs{sup +}, as the removal of the radioactive Sr{sup 2+} and Cs{sup +} that has leaked from the Fukushima Nuclear Power Plant is one of the most important problems in Japan. Halophilic proteins are known to have many acidic residues on their surface that can provide specific binding sites for metal ions such as Cs{sup +} or Sr{sup 2+}. The crystal structure of a halophilic β-lactamase from Chromohalobacter sp. 560 (HaBLA) was determined to resolutions of between 1.8 and 2.9 Å in space group P3{sub 1} using X-ray crystallography. Moreover, the locations of bound Sr{sup 2+} and Cs{sup +} ions were identified by anomalous X-ray diffraction. The location of one Cs{sup +}-specific binding site was identified in HaBLA even in the presence of a ninefold molar excess of Na{sup +} (90 mM Na{sup +}/10 mM Cs{sup +}). From an activity assay using isothermal titration calorimetry, the bound Sr{sup 2+} and Cs{sup +} ions do not significantly affect the enzymatic function of HaBLA. The observation of a selective and high-affinity Cs{sup +}-binding site provides important information that is useful for the design of artificial Cs{sup +}-binding sites that may be useful in the bioremediation of radioactive isotopes.

  2. Identification and characterization of a new erythromycin biosynthetic gene cluster in Actinopolyspora erythraea YIM90600, a novel erythronolide-producing halophilic actinomycete isolated from salt field.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dandan Chen

    Full Text Available Erythromycins (Ers are clinically potent macrolide antibiotics in treating pathogenic bacterial infections. Microorganisms capable of producing Ers, represented by Saccharopolyspora erythraea, are mainly soil-dwelling actinomycetes. So far, Actinopolyspora erythraea YIM90600, a halophilic actinomycete isolated from Baicheng salt field, is the only known Er-producing extremophile. In this study, we have reported the draft genome sequence of Ac. erythraea YIM90600, genome mining of which has revealed a new Er biosynthetic gene cluster encoding several novel Er metabolites. This Er gene cluster shares high identity and similarity with the one of Sa. erythraea NRRL2338, except for two absent genes, eryBI and eryG. By correlating genotype and chemotype, the biosynthetic pathways of 3'-demethyl-erythromycin C, erythronolide H (EH and erythronolide I have been proposed. The formation of EH is supposed to be sequentially biosynthesized via C-6/C-18 epoxidation and C-14 hydroxylation from 6-deoxyerythronolide B. Although an in vitro enzymatic activity assay has provided limited evidence for the involvement of the cytochrome P450 oxidase EryFAc (derived from Ac. erythraea YIM90600 in the catalysis of a two-step oxidation, resulting in an epoxy moiety, the attempt to construct an EH-producing Sa. erythraea mutant via gene complementation was not successful. Characterization of EryKAc (derived from Ac. erythraea YIM90600 in vitro has confirmed its unique role as a C-12 hydroxylase, rather than a C-14 hydroxylase of the erythronolide. Genomic characterization of the halophile Ac. erythraea YIM90600 will assist us to explore the great potential of extremophiles, and promote the understanding of EH formation, which will shed new insights into the biosynthesis of Er metabolites.

  3. Insight into the Recent Genome Duplication of the Halophilic Yeast Hortaea werneckii: Combining an Improved Genome with Gene Expression and Chromatin Structure

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sunita Sinha

    2017-07-01

    Full Text Available Extremophilic organisms demonstrate the flexibility and adaptability of basic biological processes by highlighting how cell physiology adapts to environmental extremes. Few eukaryotic extremophiles have been well studied and only a small number are amenable to laboratory cultivation and manipulation. A detailed characterization of the genome architecture of such organisms is important to illuminate how they adapt to environmental stresses. One excellent example of a fungal extremophile is the halophile Hortaea werneckii (Pezizomycotina, Dothideomycetes, Capnodiales, a yeast-like fungus able to thrive at near-saturating concentrations of sodium chloride and which is also tolerant to both UV irradiation and desiccation. Given its unique lifestyle and its remarkably recent whole genome duplication, H. werneckii provides opportunities for testing the role of genome duplications and adaptability to extreme environments. We previously assembled the genome of H. werneckii using short-read sequencing technology and found a remarkable degree of gene duplication. Technology limitations, however, precluded high-confidence annotation of the entire genome. We therefore revisited the H. wernickii genome using long-read, single-molecule sequencing and provide an improved genome assembly which, combined with transcriptome and nucleosome analysis, provides a useful resource for fungal halophile genomics. Remarkably, the ∼50 Mb H. wernickii genome contains 15,974 genes of which 95% (7608 are duplicates formed by a recent whole genome duplication (WGD, with an average of 5% protein sequence divergence between them. We found that the WGD is extraordinarily recent, and compared to Saccharomyces cerevisiae, the majority of the genome’s ohnologs have not diverged at the level of gene expression of chromatin structure.

  4. Bioenergetics of halophiles

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lanyi, Janos K. [Univ. of California, Irvine, CA (United States); Balashov, Sergei [Univ. of California, Irvine, CA (United States)

    2016-02-26

    In the last grant period we explored the Na+ binding site of the recently discovered light-driven sodium ion pump. The rationale was that comparison of this novel system to the similar proton pumps and chloride ion pumps would reveal the amazingly (and unexpectedly) wide variety of structural features that govern conversion of light-energy into biologically useful transmembrane gradients and thus production of biomass. A thorough description of this system would establish the basis for continuing our funded research on these proteins.

  5. Biochemical characterisation of LigN, an NAD+-dependent DNA ligase from the halophilic euryarchaeon Haloferax volcanii that displays maximal in vitro activity at high salt concentrations

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Poidevin, L.; MacNeill, S. A.

    2006-01-01

    concentration of Hfx.volcanii cells. Conclusion LigN is unique amongst characterised DNA ligase enzymes in displaying maximal DNA strand joining activity at high (> 3 M) salt levels. As such the LigN enzyme has potential both as a novel tool for biotechnology and as a model enzyme for studying the adaptation......Background DNA ligases are required for DNA strand joining in all forms of cellular life. NAD+-dependent DNA ligases are found primarily in eubacteria but also in some eukaryotic viruses, bacteriophage and archaea. Among the archaeal NAD+-dependent DNA ligases is the LigN enzyme of the halophilic...... euryarchaeon Haloferax volcanii, the gene for which was apparently acquired by Hfx.volcanii through lateral gene transfer (LGT) from a halophilic eubacterium. Genetic studies show that the LGT-acquired LigN enzyme shares an essential function with the native Hfx.volcanii ATP-dependent DNA ligase protein Lig...

  6. Thiohalospira halophila gen. nov., sp. nov. and Thiohalospira alkaliphila sp. nov., novel obligately chemolithoautotrophic, halophilic, sulfur-oxidizing gammaproteobacteria from hypersaline habitats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sorokin, Dimitry Yu; Tourova, Tatjana P; Muyzer, Gerard; Kuenen, Gijs J

    2008-07-01

    A previously unknown ecotype of obligately chemolithoautotrophic, sulfur-oxidizing bacteria was discovered in sediments of various inland hypersaline lakes and a solar saltern. The salt requirements for these bacteria were similar to those of haloarchaea, representing the first example of extreme halophiles occurring among the chemolithoautotrophs. They were enriched and isolated at 4 M NaCl under aerobic conditions with thiosulfate or tetrathionate as the electron donor or under micro-oxic conditions with sulfide. In total, 20 strains were obtained from hypersaline inland lakes in central Asia, central Russia and Crimea and a sea saltern of the Adriatic Sea. The isolates were thin, motile spirilla, some of which possessed a yellow, membrane-bound pigment. They were obligately aerobic, chemolithoautotrophic, sulfur-oxidizing bacteria that used thiosulfate, sulfide, sulfur and tetrathionate as electron donors. The characteristic feature of the group was the production of large amounts of tetrathionate as an intermediate during the oxidation of thiosulfate to sulfate. All but one of the strains grew within the pH range 6.5-8.2 (optimally at pH 7.3-7.8) and at NaCl concentrations from 2.0 to 5 M (optimally at 3.0 M). A single strain, designated ALgr 6sp(T), obtained (by enrichment) from the hypersaline alkaline lakes of the Wadi Natrun valley, was found to be moderately halophilic and facultatively alkaliphilic (capable of growth at pH 10). The predominant cellular fatty acids were quite unusual, with 10-methyl C(16 : 0) and C(16 : 0) predominating. Cells grown at 4 M NaCl accumulated extremely high concentrations of glycine betaine as a compatible solute. The 20 neutrophilic isolates contained three genospecies (on the basis of DNA-DNA relatedness data) but could not be discriminated phenotypically. On the basis of the phenotypic and genotypic analyses, the isolates constitute a novel genus and species, for which the name Thiohalospira halophila gen. nov., sp. nov

  7. Investigations on ideal mode of cell disruption in extremely halophilic Actinopolyspora halophila (MTCC 263 for efficient release of glycine betaine and trehalose

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jayaranjan R. Kar

    2015-03-01

    Full Text Available Actinopolyspora halophila produces glycine betaine and trehalose intracellularly in considerable quantities. These biomolecules are commercially important as they have applications in food, pharmaceuticals, and agricultural sector. Development of an efficient cell disruption technique is an important step for the release of these biomolecules. In this study, various cell disruption methods such as chemical, enzymatic, physico-mechanical and physical methods were evaluated. Cell disruption by osmotic shock was found to be the best suited method for A. halophila which also has a potential to be industrially scaled up. Cell bursting pressure that is generated during osmotic shock in A. halophila was computed using Morse equation and was found to be π = 238.37 ± 29.54 atm or 2.35 ± 0.29 kPa. In addition, it was found that osmotic shock followed a first order release rate kinetics in A. halophila. The findings can be used for commercially important biomolecules from other halophilic and/or halotolerant microbes.

  8. Spherical particles of halophilic archaea correlate with exposure to low water activity--implications for microbial survival in fluid inclusions of ancient halite.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fendrihan, S; Dornmayr-Pfaffenhuemer, M; Gerbl, F W; Holzinger, A; Grösbacher, M; Briza, P; Erler, A; Gruber, C; Plätzer, K; Stan-Lotter, H

    2012-09-01

    Viable extremely halophilic archaea (haloarchaea) have been isolated from million-year-old salt deposits around the world; however, an explanation of their supposed longevity remains a fundamental challenge. Recently small roundish particles in fluid inclusions of 22 000- to 34 000-year-old halite were identified as haloarchaea capable of proliferation (Schubert BA, Lowenstein TK, Timofeeff MN, Parker MA, 2010, Environmental Microbiology, 12, 440-454). Searching for a method to produce such particles in the laboratory, we exposed rod-shaped cells of Halobacterium species to reduced external water activity (a(w)). Gradual formation of spheres of about 0.4 μm diameter occurred in 4 M NaCl buffer of a(w) ≤ 0.75, but exposure to buffered 4 M LiCl (a(w) ≤ 0.73) split cells into spheres within seconds, with concomitant release of several proteins. From one rod, three or four spheres emerged, which re-grew to normal rods in nutrient media. Biochemical properties of rods and spheres were similar, except for a markedly reduced ATP content (about 50-fold) and an increased lag phase of spheres, as is known from dormant bacteria. The presence of viable particles of similar sizes in ancient fluid inclusions suggested that spheres might represent dormant states of haloarchaea. The easy production of spheres by lowering a(w) should facilitate their investigation and could help to understand the mechanisms for microbial survival over geological times. © 2012 Blackwell Publishing Ltd.

  9. Sediminibacillus massiliensis sp. nov., a moderately halophilic, Gram-positive bacterium isolated from a stool sample of a young Senegalese man.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Senghor, Bruno; Bassène, Hubert; Khelaifia, Saber; Robert, Catherine; Fournier, Pierre-Edouard; Ruimy, Raymond; Sokhna, Cheikh; Raoult, Didier; Lagier, Jean-Christophe

    2018-02-07

    A Gram-positive, moderately halophilic bacterium, referred to as strain Marseille-P3518 T , was isolated from a stool sample with 2% NaCl concentration from a healthy 15-year-old male living in Dielmo, a village in Senegal. Cells are aerobic, rod-shaped and motile and display endospore formation. Strain Marseille-P3518 T can grow in a medium with 0-20% (w/v) sodium chloride (optimally at 5-7.5% w/v). The major fatty acids were 12-methyl-tetradecanoic acid (45.8%), 13-methyl-tetradecanoic acid (26.9%) and 12-methyl-tridecanoic acid (12.8%). The genome is 4,347,479 bp long with 42.1% G+C content. It contains 4282 protein-coding and 107 RNA genes. Phylogenetic analysis based on 16S rRNA gene sequence comparisons showed that strain Marseille-P3518 T is a member of the Bacillaceae family and is closely related to Sediminibacillus albus (97.4% gene sequence similarity). Strain Marseille-P3518 T was clearly differentiated from its phylogenetic neighbors on the basis of phenotypic and genotypic features. Strain Marseille-P3518 T is, therefore, considered to be a novel representative of the genus Sediminibacillus, for which the name Sediminibacillus massiliensis sp. nov. is proposed, and the type strain is Marseille-P3518 T (CSUR P3518T, DSM69894).

  10. The freshwater cyanobacterium Anabaena doliolum transformed with ApGSMT-DMT exhibited enhanced salt tolerance and protection to nitrogenase activity, but became halophilic.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Singh, Meenakshi; Sharma, Naveen K; Prasad, Shyam Babu; Yadav, Suresh Singh; Narayan, Gopeshwar; Rai, Ashwani K

    2013-03-01

    Glycine betaine (GB) is an important osmolyte synthesized in response to different abiotic stresses, including salinity. The two known pathways of GB synthesis involve: 1) two step oxidation of choline (choline → betaine aldehyde → GB), generally found in plants, microbes and animals; and 2) three step methylation of glycine (glycine → sarcosine → dimethylglycine → GB), mainly found in halophilic archaea, sulphur bacteria and the cyanobacterium Aphanothece (Ap.) halophytica. Here, we transformed a salt-sensitive freshwater diazotrophic filamentous cyanobacterium Anabaena (An.) doliolum with N-methyltransferase genes (ApGSMT-DMT) from Ap. halophytica using the triparental conjugation method. The transformed An. doliolum synthesized and accumulated GB in cells, and showed increased salt tolerance and protection to nitrogenase activity. The salt responsiveness of the transformant was also apparent as GB synthesis increased with increasing concentrations of NaCl in the nutrient solution, and maximal [12.92 µmol (g dry weight)(-1)] in cells growing at 0.5 M NaCl. Therefore, the transformed cyanobacterium has changed its behaviour from preferring freshwater to halophily. This study may have important biotechnological implications for the development of stress tolerant nitrogen-fixing cyanobacteria as biofertilizers for sustainable agriculture.

  11. Morphotypes and pigment profiles of halophilic bacteria: Practical data useful for novelty, taxonomic categorization and for describing novel species or new taxa

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bhagwan N. Rekadwad

    2017-08-01

    Full Text Available Halophilic bacteria were isolated from oil spill samples collected from West-coast of Goa. Bacteria were isolated from oil studded soil, salt marsh and offshore samples (A, A7, CSM, CB and CM collected along the West coastline in Goa (India i.e. Arambol beach, Calanguate beach, Candolim beach and Colva beach on Zobell Marine agar, R2A agar, Mannitol salt agar and Blood agar at temperature 22 to 24 °C. Isolates showed growth in the presence of hydrocarbons (1% phenanthrene and 2% bitumen. Diverse profiles of pigments were observed on different nutrient medium. Color of pigments produced on agar media recorded as per standard color chart. All isolates showed different growth pattern. Isolate no 11 (GOACSMMS-11 showed three different morphological features/growth patterns on Zobell Marine Agar and R2A medium in the presence of hydrocarbons. Results obtained yield new information which gives a clear idea about morphological features and pigmented profiles of hydrocarbon resistant morphotypes in the presence different media compositions. The presented datasets will be useful for studies on bacterial species showing high sequence similarity. Hence, generated data serves as a benchmark for to distinguish between genetically similar bacteria and for further research in phenotype based microbial diversity, microbial ecology of microorganisms and microbial systematics and taxonomy in addition to genotype data.

  12. Morphotypes and pigment profiles of halophilic bacteria: Practical data useful for novelty, taxonomic categorization and for describing novel species or new taxa.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rekadwad, Bhagwan N; Khobragade, Chandrahasya N

    2017-08-01

    Halophilic bacteria were isolated from oil spill samples collected from West-coast of Goa. Bacteria were isolated from oil studded soil, salt marsh and offshore samples (A, A7, CSM, CB and CM) collected along the West coastline in Goa (India) i.e. Arambol beach, Calanguate beach, Candolim beach and Colva beach on Zobell Marine agar, R2A agar, Mannitol salt agar and Blood agar at temperature 22 to 24 °C. Isolates showed growth in the presence of hydrocarbons (1% phenanthrene and 2% bitumen). Diverse profiles of pigments were observed on different nutrient medium. Color of pigments produced on agar media recorded as per standard color chart. All isolates showed different growth pattern. Isolate no 11 (GOACSMMS-11) showed three different morphological features/growth patterns on Zobell Marine Agar and R2A medium in the presence of hydrocarbons. Results obtained yield new information which gives a clear idea about morphological features and pigmented profiles of hydrocarbon resistant morphotypes in the presence different media compositions. The presented datasets will be useful for studies on bacterial species showing high sequence similarity. Hence, generated data serves as a benchmark for to distinguish between genetically similar bacteria and for further research in phenotype based microbial diversity, microbial ecology of microorganisms and microbial systematics and taxonomy in addition to genotype data.

  13. Circular dichroism and fluorescence spectroscopy of cysteinyl-tRNA synthetase from Halobacterium salinarum ssp. NRC-1 demonstrates that group I cations are particularly effective in providing structure and stability to this halophilic protein.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Christopher J Reed

    Full Text Available Proteins from extremophiles have the ability to fold and remain stable in their extreme environment. Here, we investigate the presence of this effect in the cysteinyl-tRNA synthetase from Halobacterium salinarum ssp. NRC-1 (NRC-1, which was used as a model halophilic protein. The effects of salt on the structure and stability of NRC-1 and of E. coli CysRS were investigated through far-UV circular dichroism (CD spectroscopy, fluorescence spectroscopy, and thermal denaturation melts. The CD of NRC-1 CysRS was examined in different group I and group II chloride salts to examine the effects of the metal ions. Potassium was observed to have the strongest effect on NRC-1 CysRS structure, with the other group I salts having reduced strength. The group II salts had little effect on the protein. This suggests that the halophilic adaptations in this protein are mediated by potassium. CD and fluorescence spectra showed structural changes taking place in NRC-1 CysRS over the concentration range of 0-3 M KCl, while the structure of E. coli CysRS was relatively unaffected. Salt was also shown to increase the thermal stability of NRC-1 CysRS since the melt temperature of the CysRS from NRC-1 was increased in the presence of high salt, whereas the E. coli enzyme showed a decrease. By characterizing these interactions, this study not only explains the stability of halophilic proteins in extremes of salt, but also helps us to understand why and how group I salts stabilize proteins in general.

  14. Antibacterial efficacy of silver nanoparticles and ethyl acetate's metabolites of the potent halophilic (marine) bacterium, Bacillus cereus A30 on multidrug resistant bacteria.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arul, Dhayalan; Balasubramani, Govindasamy; Balasubramanian, Velramar; Natarajan, Thillainathan; Perumal, Pachiappan

    2017-10-01

    Bacteria are generally responsible for the prevalence of several diseases and pathogenic bacteria are showing increasing resistance to different antibacterials. During the present study an extremophilic bacterium-A30 isolated from the marine waters was characterized and evaluated against four multi-drug resistant (MDR) pathogens, viz; Methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA), Escherichia coli, Klebsiella pneumoniae, and Pseudomonas aeruginosa. The sensitivity pattern of the selected pathogens was tested with 31 antibiotics. Among the 47 marine microbial extracts tested on 4-MDR pathogens viz: Methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA), E. coli, K. pneumoniae and P. aeruginosa, only our strain A30 strain exhibited highest efficacy. This strain was subsequently subjected to 16S rDNA sequencing which confirmed its allocation as Bacillus cereus. Silver nanoparticle (AgNPs) synthesis and ethyl acetate extraction were performed using the supernatant of B. cereus. The synthesized AgNPs were characterized by UV-Visible, Fourier-transform infra-red (FT-IR), X-ray diffraction (XRD), Field emission-scanning electron microscopy (FE-SEM), energy dispersive X-ray spectroscopy (EDX), and Zeta potential analyses. The presence of functional groups and 13 bioactive components in the ethyl acetate extract were analyzed using FT-IR and gas chromatography-mass spectrometry (GC-MS). The synthesized of AgNPs and the ethyl acetate extract showed preponderant activity against P. aeruginosa and MRSA, respectively. The effects of AgNPs were significant when compared to ethyl acetate extract. Therefore, the halophilic bacterium, B. cereus mediated AgNPs could provide antibacterial applications in the biomedical industries.

  15. Sporosalibacterium tautonense sp. nov., a thermotolerant, halophilic, hydrolytic bacterium isolated from a gold mine, and emended description of the genus Sporosalibacterium.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Podosokorskaya, Olga A; Merkel, Alexander Y; Heerden, Esta van; Cason, Errol D; Kopitsyn, Dmitry S; Vasilieva, Maria; Bonch-Osmolovskaya, Elizaveta A; Kublanov, Ilya V

    2017-05-01

    A novel strictly anaerobic, thermotolerant, moderately halophilic, organotrophic bacterium, strain MRo-4T, was isolated from a sample of a microbial mat, developed under the flow of subsurface water in TauTona gold mine, South Africa. Cells of the novel isolate stained Gram-positive and were motile, spore-forming rods, 0.2-0.3 µm in width and 5-20 µm in length. Strain MRo-4T grew at 25-50 °C, at pH 7.0-8.8 and at an NaCl concentration of 5-100 g l-1. The isolate was able to ferment yeast extract, peptone and mono-, oligo- and polysaccharides, including cellulose and chitin. Elemental sulfur, thiosulfate, sulfate, sulfite, nitrate, nitrite, fumarate and arsenate were not reduced. The major fatty acids were iso-C15 : 0, iso-C15 : 0 dimethyl acetyl and anteiso-C15 : 0. The G+C content of the DNA was 32.9 mol%. Phylogenetic analysis of 16S rRNA gene sequences of strain MRo-4T and its nearest relatives showed its affiliation to the genus Sporosalibacterium. Sporosalibacteriumfaouarense SOL3f37T, the only valid published representative of the genus, appeared to be its closest relative (96.8 % 16S rRNA gene sequence similarity). However, strains MRo-4T and S. faouarense SOL3f37T differed in temperature, pH and salinity ranges for growth, requirement for yeast extract and substrate profiles. Based on the phylogenetic analysis and physiological properties of the novel isolate, we propose a novel species, Sporosalibacterium tautonense sp. nov. The type strain is MRo-4T (=DSM 28179T=VKM B-2948T).

  16. Optimization of EPS Production and Characterization by a Halophilic Bacterium, Kocuria rosea ZJUQH from Chaka Salt Lake with Response Surface Methodology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gu, Di; Jiao, Yingchun; Wu, Jianan; Liu, Zhengjie; Chen, Qihe

    2017-05-16

    With the rising awareness of microbial exopolysaccharides (EPSs) application in various fields, halophilic microorganisms which produce EPSs have received broad attention. A newly identified Kocuria rosea ZJUQH CCTCC M2016754 was determined to be a moderate halobacterium on account of its successful adaption to the environment containing 10% NaCl. The optimal combination of fermentation medium compositions on EPS production was studied. In this work, a fractional factorial design was adopted to investigate the significant factors that affected EPS production. The factors of KCl and MgSO₄ were found to have a profound impact on EPS production. We utilized central composite design and response surface methodology to derive a statistical model for optimizing the submerged culture medium composition. Judging from these experimental results, the optimum culture medium for producing EPSs was composed of 0.50% casein hydrolysate, 1.00% sodium citrate, 0.30% yeast extract, 0.50% KCl, 0.50% peptone, and 5.80% MgSO₄ (initial pH 7.0). The maximal EPS was 48.01 g/L, which is close to the predicted value (50.39 g/L). In the validation experiment, the highest concentration of 70.64 g/L EPSs was obtained after 120 h under the optimized culture medium in a 5-L bioreactor. EPS from this bacterium was also characterized by differential scanning calorimetry (DSC) and Fourier transform infrared analysis (FT-IR). The findings in this study imply that Kocuria rosea ZJUQH has great potential to be exploited as a source of EPSs utilized in food, the pharmaceutical and agriculture industry, and in the biotreatment of hypersaline environments.

  17. Natronovirga wadinatrunensis gen. nov., sp. nov. and Natranaerobius trueperi sp. nov., halophilic, alkalithermophilic micro-organisms from soda lakes of the Wadi An Natrun, Egypt.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mesbah, Noha M; Wiegel, Juergen

    2009-08-01

    Novel strains of anaerobic, halophilic, alkalithermophilic bacteria were isolated from sediments of the alkaline, hypersaline lakes of the Wadi An Natrun, Egypt. Strains JW/NM-WN-LUT (and related strains) and JW/NM-WN-LH1T were non-spore-forming, non-motile bacteria with a Gram-type positive cell wall. Optimal growth of strain JW/NM-WN-LUT occurred at pH55 degrees C 9.5, 52 degrees C and with 3.7 M Na+ (2.2 M added NaCl). Optimal growth of strain JW/NM-WN-LH1T occurred at pH55 degrees C 9.9, 51 degrees C and with 3.9 M Na+ (2.3 M added NaCl). Both strains were obligately anaerobic and chemoorganotrophic; producing lactate and acetate as organic acids from pyruvate in different ratios. The DNA G+C contents of strains JW/NM-WN-LUT and JW/NM-WN-LH1T were 41.0 and 42.0 mol%, respectively. The main cellular fatty acids in both strains were anteiso-branched 15:0 and iso-branched 15:0. Phylogenetic analysis showed that both novel isolates belonged to the family Natranaerobiaceae within the order Natranaerobiales. Based on genotypic and phenotypic data, strain JW/NM-WN-LUT (=DSM 18760T=ATCC BAA-1443T) represents the type strain of a novel species, Natranaerobius trueperi sp. nov. Strain JW/NM-WN-LH1T represents a novel genus and species within the family Natranaerobiaceae, Natronovirga wadinatrunensis gen. nov., sp. nov. The type strain of the type species is JW/NM-WN-LH1T (=DSM 18770T=ATCC BAA-1444T).

  18. Antagonistic Properties of Some Halophilic Thermoactinomycetes Isolated from Superficial Sediment of a Solar Saltern and Production of Cyclic Antimicrobial Peptides by the Novel Isolate Paludifilum halophilum

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Donyez Frikha Dammak

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available This study has focused on the isolation of twenty-three halophilic actinomycetes from two ponds of different salinity and the evaluation of their ability to exert an antimicrobial activity against both their competitors and several other pathogens. From the 23 isolates, 18 strains showed antagonistic activity, while 19 showed activities against one or more of the seven pathogen strains tested. Six strains exhibited consistent antibacterial activity against Gram-negative and Gram-positive pathogens characterized at the physiological and molecular levels. These strains shared only 94-95% 16S rRNA sequence identity with the closely related species of the Thermoactinomycetaceae family. Among them, the potent strain SMBg3 was further characterized and assigned to a new genus in the family for which the name Paludifilum halophilum (DSM 102817T is proposed. Sequential extraction of the antimicrobial compounds with ethyl acetate revealed that the crude extract from SMBg3 strain had inhibitory effect on the growth of the plant pathogen Agrobacterium tumefaciens and the human pathogens Staphylococcus aureus, Salmonella enterica, Escherichia coli, and Pseudomonas aeruginosa. Based on the HRESI-MS spectral data, the cyclic lipopeptide Gramicidin S and four cyclic dipeptides (CDPs named cyclo(L-4-OH-Pro-L-Leu, cyclo(L-Tyr-L-Pro, cyclo(L-Phe-L-Pro, and cyclo(L-Leu-L-Pro were detected in the fermentation broth of Paludifilum halophilum. To our knowledge, this is the first report on the isolation of these compounds from members of the Thermoactinomycetaceae family.

  19. Cloning and identification of Group 1 mrp operon encoding a novel monovalent cation/proton antiporter system from the moderate halophile Halomonas zhaodongensis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Meng, Lin; Hong, Shan; Liu, Henan; Huang, Haipeng; Sun, Hao; Xu, Tong; Jiang, Juquan

    2014-11-01

    The novel species Halomonas zhaodongensis NEAU-ST10-25(T) recently identified by our group is a moderate halophile which can grow at the range of 0-2.5 M NaCl (optimum 0.5 M) and pH 6-12 (optimum pH 9). To explore its halo-alkaline tolerant mechanism, genomic DNA was screened from NEAU-ST10-25(T) in this study for Na(+)(Li(+))/H(+) antiporter genes by selection in Escherichia coli KNabc lacking three major Na(+)(Li(+))/H(+) antiporters. One mrp operon could confer tolerance of E. coli KNabc to 0.8 M NaCl and 100 mM LiCl, and an alkaline pH. This operon was previously mainly designated mrp (also mnh, pha or sha) due to its multiple resistance and pH-related activity. Here, we will also use mrp to designate the homolog from H. zhaodongensis (Hz_mrp). Sequence analysis and protein alignment showed that Hz_mrp should belong to Group 1 mrp operons. Further phylogenetic analysis reveals that Hz_Mrp system should represent a novel sub-class of Group 1 Mrp systems. This was confirmed by a significant difference in pH-dependent activity profile or the specificity and affinity for the transported monovalent cations between Hz_Mrp system and all the known Mrp systems. Therefore, we propose that Hz_Mrp should be categorized as a novel Group 1 Mrp system.

  20. Characterization of a salt-induced DhAHP, a gene coding for alkyl hydroperoxide reductase, from the extremely halophilic yeast Debaryomyces hansenii

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ku Maurice SB

    2009-08-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Debaryomyces hansenii is one of the most salt tolerant species of yeast and has become a model organism for the study of tolerance mechanisms against salinity. The goal of this study was to identify key upregulated genes that are involved in its adaptation to high salinity. Results By using forward subtractive hybridization we have cloned and sequenced DhAHP from D. hansenii that is significantly upregulated during salinity stress. DhAHP is orthologous to the alkly hydroperoxide reductase of the peroxiredoxin gene family, which catalyzes the reduction of peroxides at the expense of thiol compounds. The full-lengthed cDNA of DhAHP has 674 bp of nucleotide and contains a 516 bp open reading frame (ORF encoding a deduced protein of 172 amino acid residues (18.3 kDa. D. hansenii Ahp is a cytosolic protein that belongs to the Ahp of the 1-Cys type peroxiredoxins. Phylogentically, the DhAhp and Candida albicans Ahp11 (Swiss-Prot: Q5AF44 share a common ancestry but show divergent evolution. Silence of its expression in D. hansenii by RNAi resulted in decreased tolerance to salt whereas overexpression of DhAHP in D. hansenii and the salt-sensitive yeasts Saccharomyces cereviasiae and Pichia methanolica conferred a higher tolerance with a reduced level of reactive oxygen species. Conclusion In conclusion, for the first time our study has identified alkly hydroperoxide reductase as a key protein involved in the salt tolerance of the extremely halophilic D. hansenii. Apparently, this enzyme plays a multi-functional role in the yeast's adaptation to salinity; it serves as a peroxidase in scavenging reactive oxygen species, as a molecular chaperone in protecting essential proteins from denaturation, and as a redox sensor in regulating H2O2-mediated cell defense signaling.

  1. Three-dimensional structure of a new enzyme, O-phosphoserine sulfhydrylase, involved in l-cysteine biosynthesis by a hyperthermophilic archaeon, Aeropyrum pernix K1, at 2.0A resolution.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oda, Yutaka; Mino, Koshiki; Ishikawa, Kazuhiko; Ataka, Mitsuo

    2005-08-12

    O-Phosphoserine sulfhydrylase is a new enzyme found in a hyperthermophilic archaeon, Aeropyrum pernix K1. This enzyme catalyzes a novel cysteine synthetic reaction from O-phospho-l-serine and sulfide. The crystal structure of the enzyme was determined at 2.0A resolution using the method of multi-wavelength anomalous dispersion. A monomer consists of three domains, including an N-terminal domain with a new alpha/beta fold. The topology folds of the middle and C-terminal domains were similar to those of the O-acetylserine sulfhydrylase-A from Salmonella typhimurium and the cystathionine beta-synthase from human. The cofactor, pyridoxal 5'-phosphate, is bound in a cleft between the middle and C-terminal domains through a covalent linkage to Lys127. Based on the structure determined, O-phospho-l-serine could be rationally modeled into the active site of the enzyme. An enzyme-substrate complex model and a mutation experiment revealed that Arg297, unique to hyperthermophilic archaea, is one of the most crucial residues for O-phosphoserine sulfhydrylation activity. There are more hydrophobic areas and less electric charges at the dimer interface, compared to the S.typhimurium O-acetylserine sulfhydrylase.

  2. Deuterium incorporation experiments from (3R)- and (3S)-[3-2H]leucine into characteristic isoprenoidal lipid-core of halophilic archaea suggests the involvement of isovaleryl-CoA dehydrogenase.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yamauchi, Noriaki; Tanoue, Ryo

    2017-11-01

    The stereochemical reaction course for the two C-3 hydrogens of leucine to produce a characteristic isoprenoidal lipid in halophilic archaea was observed using incubation experiments with whole cell Halobacterium salinarum. Deuterium-labeled (3R)- and (3S)-[3-2H]leucine were freshly prepared as substrates from 2,3-epoxy-4-methyl-1-pentanol. Incorporation of deuterium from (3S)-[3-2H]leucine and loss of deuterium from (3R)-[3-2H]leucine in the lipid-core of H. salinarum was observed. Taken together with the results of our previous report, involving the incubation of chiral-labeled [5-2H]leucine, these results strongly suggested an involvement of isovaleryl-CoA dehydrogenase in leucine conversion to isoprenoid lipid in halophilic archaea. The stereochemical course of the reaction (anti-elimination) might have been the same as that previously reported for mammalian enzyme reactions. Thus, these results suggested that branched amino acids were metabolized to mevalonate in archaea in a manner similar to other organisms.

  3. Reclassification of Bacillus saliphilus as Alkalicoccus saliphilus gen. nov., comb. nov., and description of Alkalicoccus halolimnae sp. nov., a moderately halophilic bacterium isolated from a salt lake.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhao, Baisuo; Lu, Weidong; Zhang, Shanshan; Liu, Kang; Yan, Yanchun; Li, Jun

    2017-05-01

    A Gram-stain-positive, cocci-shaped, non-spore-forming and moderately halophilic bacterium, designed BZ-SZ-XJ29T, was isolated from a salt lake of China. On the basis of 16S rRNA gene sequence similarity, the closest phylogenetic relatives were Bacillus saliphilus 6AGT (97.3 % 16S rRNA gene sequence similarity) and five other species of the genus Bacillus(95.4-96.3 %). However, strain BZ-SZ-XJ29T shared only 89.5 % 16S rRNA gene sequence similarity with Bacillus subtilis subsp. subtilis DSM 10T, indicating that this isolate might not be a member of the genus Bacillus. The genomic DNA G+C content was 40.0 mol% (Tm). The DNA-DNA relatedness value with B. saliphilus 6AGT was 45±2 %. Strain BZ-SZ-XJ29T formed yellow pigment and grew in the presence of 0.74-4.15 M Na+ [optimum 1.42-2.10 M Na+], at pH 6.0-10.5 (optimum pH 7.5), and at 5-41 °C (optimum 33 °C). The predominant (>10 %) fatty acids were anteiso-C15 : 0 and anteiso-C15 : 0. The dominant polar lipids consisted of diphosphatidylglycerol and the respiratory quinone was menaquinone-7 (MK-7). The peptidoglycan type of the cell wall was A1γ, based on meso-diaminopimelic acid as the diagnostic diamino acid. On the basis of the combined phylogenetic data, phenotypic features and chemotaxonomic properties, it is proposed that B. saliphilus and strain BZ-SZ-XJ29T should be assigned to a single novel genus as two separate species. Bacillus. saliphilus is reclassified in a new genus, Alkalicoccus gen. nov., as Alkalicoccus saliphilus comb. nov., and is the type species of the new genus; the type strain of the type species is 6AGT (=DSM 15402T=ATCC BAA-957T). Strain BZ-SZ-XJ29T (=DSM 29191T=JCM 30193T=CGMCC 1.12936T) is placed in the genus Alkalicoccus as a novel species, Alkalicoccus halolimnae sp. nov.

  4. Marinilactibacillus psychrotolerans gen. nov., sp. nov., a halophilic and alkaliphilic marine lactic acid bacterium isolated from marine organisms in temperate and subtropical areas of Japan.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ishikawa, Morio; Nakajima, Kazuyuki; Yanagi, Miyoko; Yamamoto, Yasushi; Yamasato, Kazuhide

    2003-05-01

    A novel marine lactic acid rod bacterium has been described for eight strains isolated from living and decomposing marine organisms collected from temperate and subtropical areas of Japan. The isolates were Gram-positive, catalase-negative, non-sporulating and motile with peritrichous flagella. They were slightly halophilic, highly halotolerant and alkaliphilic; the optimum NaCl concentration for growth was 2.0-3.75% (w/v) with a range from 0 to 17.0-20.5% (depending on the strain); the optimum pH was between 8.0 and 9.5 with a range from 6.0 to 10.0. They were psychrotolerant, growing well at -1.8 degrees C with a maximum at 40-45 degrees C and the optimum at 37-40 degrees C. Lactate yields were 87-100% per consumed glucose; the residual products were formate, acetate and ethanol with a molar ratio of approximately 2 : 1 : 1. The product composition was markedly affected by the pH of fermentation medium; at higher pH, the yield of lactate decreased (60-65% at pH 9.0) and that of other products increased conversely. The cell-wall peptidoglycan type was type A4beta, Orn-D-Glu, whereas that of the genus Alkalibacterium, the phylogenetically closest lactic acid bacterium, was type A4beta, Orn-D-Asp. The major cellular fatty acids were C16 : 0, C16 : 1delta9, C18 : 0 and C18 : 1delta9 (oleic acid). The G + C content of the DNA was 34.6-36.2 mol%. The eight isolates were phenotypically homogeneous and formed a single genomic species. The 16S rRNA gene sequence analysis indicated that the isolates constituted an independent phylogenetic lineage within the radiation of lactic acid bacteria with 96.2% similarity to the genus Alkalibacterium. The secondary structure and the nucleotide sequence of the V6 region of the 16S rRNA were characteristic of the organism among other related lactic acid genera. On the bases of phenotypic and phylogenetic distinctness, the organism was proposed to belong to a new genus and species, Marinilactibacillus psychrotolerans gen. nov., sp. nov

  5. Draft Genome Sequence of an Obligately Methylotrophic Methanogen, Methanococcoides methylutens, Isolated from Marine Sediment

    KAUST Repository

    Guan, Yue

    2014-11-20

    Methanococcoides methylutens, the type species of the genus Methanococcoides, is a slightly halophilic methanogenic archaeon with a methylotrophic metabolism. Here, we present the annotated draft genome sequence of M. methylutens, which comprises 2,508,511 bp with 2,482 coding sequences, 51 tRNA genes, and a G+C content of 42.5%.

  6. Complete Genome Sequence of Salinarchaeum sp. Strain HArcht-Bsk1T, Isolated from Hypersaline Lake Baskunchak, Russia

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Dominova, I.N.; Sorokin, D.Y.; Kublanov, I.V.; Patrushev, M.V.; Toshchakova, S.V.

    2013-01-01

    The complete genome sequence of a novel halophilic archaeon, Salinarchaeum sp. strain HArcht-Bsk1T, was determined using next-generation sequencing. The genome comprises a 3,255,260-bp circular chromosome with a G+C content of 66.7%. Automatic annotation of the genome revealed a single rRNA operon,

  7. Alteribacillus bidgolensis gen. nov., sp. nov., a moderately halophilic bacterium from a hypersaline lake, and reclassification of Bacillus persepolensis as Alteribacillus persepolensis comb. nov.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Didari, Maryam; Amoozegar, Mohammad Ali; Bagheri, Maryam; Schumann, Peter; Spröer, Cathrin; Sánchez-Porro, Cristina; Ventosa, Antonio

    2012-11-01

    A novel Gram-stain-positive, moderately halophilic bacterium, designated strain P4B(T), was isolated from water of the hypersaline Aran-Bidgol lake in Iran and characterized taxonomically by using a polyphasic approach. Cells of strain P4B(T) were non-motile rods producing ellipsoidal endospores at a central position in non-swollen sporangia. Strain P4B(T) was strictly aerobic and catalase- and oxidase-positive. It was able to grow at NaCl concentrations of 0.5-12.5% (w/v), with optimum growth occurring at 5-7.5% (w/v) NaCl. The optimum temperature and pH for growth were 35 °C and pH 7.0. On the basis of 16S rRNA gene sequence analysis, strain P4B(T) was shown to belong to the phylum Firmicutes and shared highest similarity with Bacillus persepolensis HS136(T) (97.1%) and Bacillus salarius BH169(T) (95.1%). However, it shared only 91.3% 16S rRNA gene sequence similarity with Bacillus subtilis subsp. subtilis DSM 10(T), indicating that strain P4B(T) might not be a member of the genus Bacillus. The DNA G+C content of this new isolate was 38.9 mol%. DNA-DNA hybridization experiments revealed a low level of relatedness between strain P4B(T) and B. persepolensis HS136(T) (6%). The major cellular fatty acids of strain P4B(T) were iso-C(15:0) and anteiso-C(15:0), as for B. persepolensis HS136(T) but in contrast to B. salarius DSM 16461(T) and B. subtilis subsp. subtilis DSM 10(T). Its polar lipid pattern consisted of phosphatidylglycerol, an aminoglycolipid and an unknown phospholipid. This polar lipid profile was similar to that obtained for B. persepolensis DSM 21632(T) but different from those of B. salarius DSM 16461(T) and B. subtilis subsp. subtilis DSM 10(T). The isoprenoid quinones were MK-7 (88%) and MK-8 (2%). The peptidoglycan contained meso-diaminopimelic acid as the diagnostic diamino acid. All these features indicate placement of strain P4B(T) within the Firmicutes, closely related to B. persepolensis but with features clearly distinct from those of the

  8. Constant enthalpy change value during pyrophosphate hydrolysis within the physiological limits of NaCl.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wakai, Satoshi; Kidokoro, Shun-ichi; Masaki, Kazuo; Nakasone, Kaoru; Sambongi, Yoshihiro

    2013-10-11

    A decrease in water activity was thought to result in smaller enthalpy change values during PPi hydrolysis, indicating the importance of solvation for the reaction. However, the physiological significance of this phenomenon is unknown. Here, we combined biochemistry and calorimetry to solve this problem using NaCl, a physiologically occurring water activity-reducing reagent. The pyrophosphatase activities of extremely halophilic Haloarcula japonica, which can grow at ∼4 M NaCl, and non-halophilic Escherichia coli and Saccharomyces cerevisiae were maximal at 2.0 and 0.1 M NaCl, respectively. Thus, halophilic and non-halophilic pyrophosphatases exhibit distinct maximal activities at different NaCl concentration ranges. Upon calorimetry, the same exothermic enthalpy change of -35 kJ/mol was obtained for the halophile and non-halophiles at 1.5-4.0 and 0.1-2.0 M NaCl, respectively. These results show that solvation changes caused by up to 4.0 M NaCl (water activity of ∼0.84) do not affect the enthalpy change in PPi hydrolysis. It has been postulated that PPi is an ATP analog, having a so-called high energy phosphate bond, and that the hydrolysis of both compounds is enthalpically driven. Therefore, our results indicate that the hydrolysis of high energy phosphate compounds, which are responsible for biological energy conversion, is enthalpically driven within the physiological limits of NaCl.

  9. Genome variation in the hyperthermophilic archaeon Aeropyrum.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Daifuku, Takashi; Yoshida, Takashi; Sako, Yoshihiko

    2013-09-01

    Aeropyrum spp are aerobic, heterotrophic, and hyperthermophilic marine archaea. There are two closely related Aeropyrum species, Aeropyrum camini and Aeropyrum pernix, which are isolated from geographically distinct locations. Recently, we compared their genome sequences to determine their genomic variation. They possess highly conserved small genomes, reflecting their close relationship. The entire genome similarity may result from their survival strategies in adapting to extreme environmental conditions. Meanwhile, synteny disruptions were observed in some regions including clustered regularly interspaced short palindromic repeats elements. Further, the largest portion of their non-orthologous genes were genes in the two proviral regions of A. pernix (Aeropyrum pernix spindle-shaped virus 1 and Aeropyrum pernix ovoid virus 1) or ORFans considered to be derived from viruses. Our data shows that genomic diversification of Aeropyrum spp may be substantially induced by viruses. This suggests that Aeropyrum spp may have a large pan-genome that can be extended by viruses, while each of the species shares a highly conserved small genome specializing for extreme environments.

  10. Genome variation in the hyperthermophilic archaeon Aeropyrum

    OpenAIRE

    Daifuku, Takashi; Yoshida, Takashi; Sako, Yoshihiko

    2013-01-01

    Aeropyrum spp are aerobic, heterotrophic, and hyperthermophilic marine archaea. There are two closely related Aeropyrum species, Aeropyrum camini and Aeropyrum pernix, which are isolated from geographically distinct locations. Recently, we compared their genome sequences to determine their genomic variation. They possess highly conserved small genomes, reflecting their close relationship. The entire genome similarity may result from their survival strategies in adapting to extreme environment...

  11. Natranaerobius thermophilus gen. nov., sp. nov., a halophilic, alkalithermophilic bacterium from soda lakes of the Wadi An Natrun, Egypt, and proposal of Natranaerobiaceae fam. nov. and Natranaerobiales ord. nov.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mesbah, Noha M; Hedrick, David B; Peacock, Aaron D; Rohde, Manfred; Wiegel, Juergen

    2007-11-01

    Novel halophilic, alkalithermophilic, Gram-type-positive bacterial strains were isolated from sediment of alkaline, hypersaline lakes of the Wadi An Natrun, Egypt. Cells of strain JW/NM-WN-LFT were rod-shaped, non-spore-forming and non-motile. Strain JW/NM-WN-LFT grew (at pH55 degrees C 9.5) between 35 and 56 degrees C, with an optimum at 53 degrees C. The pH55 degrees C range for growth was 8.3-10.6, with an optimum at pH55 degrees C 9.5 and no growth at pH55 degrees C 8.2 or below, or at pH55 degrees C 10.8 or above. At the optimum pH and temperature, the strain grew in the Na+ range of 3.1-4.9 M (1.5-3.3 M added NaCl) and optimally between 3.3 and 3.9 M Na+ (1.7-2.3 M added NaCl). Strain JW/NM-WN-LFT utilized fructose, cellobiose, ribose, trehalose, trimethylamine, pyruvate, Casamino acids, acetate, xylose and peptone as carbon and energy sources. Fumarate (20 mM), S2O3(2-) (20 mM), NO3- (20 mM) and iron(III) citrate (20 mM) were utilized as electron acceptors. During growth on sucrose, the isolate produced acetate and formate as major fermentation products. Main cellular fatty acids were iso-branched 15:0, i17:0 dimethylacetal and 16:0 dimethylacetal. The G+C content of genomic DNA was 40.4 mol% (HPLC). On the basis of genotypic and phenotypic characteristics, it is proposed that strain JW/NM-WN-LFT represents a novel genus and species, Natranaerobius thermophilus gen. nov., sp. nov. The type strain is JW/NM-WN-LFT (=DSM 18059T=ATCC BAA-1301T). Based on 16S rRNA gene sequence analysis, the strain forms a novel lineage within the class 'Clostridia' and clusters with uncultivated bacteria and unidentified strains retrieved from alkaline, hypersaline environments. The phylogenetic data suggest that the lineage represents a novel family, Natranaerobiaceae fam. nov., and order, Natranaerobiales ord. nov.

  12. Salinifilum gen. nov., with description of Salinifilum proteinilyticum sp. nov., an extremely halophilic actinomycete isolated from Meighan wetland, Iran, and reclassification of Saccharopolyspora aidingensis as Salinifilum aidingensis comb. nov. and Saccharopolyspora ghardaiensis as Salinifilum ghardaiensis comb. nov.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moshtaghi Nikou, Mahdi; Ramezani, Mohaddaseh; Harirchi, Sharareh; Makzoom, Somayyeh; Amoozegar, Mohammad Ali; Shahzadeh Fazeli, Seyed Abolhassan; Schumann, Peter; Ventosa, Antonio

    2017-10-01

    A Gram-positive, halophilic actinobacterial strain Miq-12T was isolated from Meighan wetland in Iran. Strain Miq-12T was strictly aerobic, catalase positive and oxidase negative. The isolate grew at 12-25 % NaCl, at 30-50 °C and pH 5.5-10.5. The optimum NaCl, temperature and pH for growth were 15-20 %, 40 °C and 7.0-8.0, respectively. The cell wall of strain Miq-12T contained meso-diaminopimelic acid as diagnostic diamino acid and arabinose as whole-cell sugar. The polar lipid pattern consisted of diphosphatidylglycerol, phosphatidylglycerol, phosphatidylcholine and phosphatidylinositol. It synthesized cellular fatty acids of anteiso and iso-branched types, anteiso-C17 : 0, iso-C17:0, iso-C15:0, iso-C16 : 0. The major respiratory quinone was MK-9(H4). The G+C content of its genomic DNA was 72.1 mol%. Phylogenetic analysis based on 16S rRNA gene sequence comparison revealed that strain Miq-12T belongs to the family Pseudonocardiaceae, constituted a separate clade, and showed the closest phylogenetic similarity to Saccharopolyspora aidingensis TRM 46074T (96.99 %) and Saccharopolyspora ghardaiensis CCUG 63370T (96.92 %). On the basis of phylogenetic analysis, phenotypic and chemotaxonomic characteristics, a novel genus and species of the family Pseudonocardiaceae, Salinifilum proteinilyticum gen. nov., sp. nov., are proposed. The type strain is Miq-12T (=IBRCM 11033T=LMG 28390T). We also propose that S. aidingensis and S. ghardaiensis should be transferred to this new genus and be named Salinifilum aidingensis comb. nov. and Salinifilum ghardaiensis comb. nov., respectively. The type strain of Salinifilum aidingensis comb. nov. is TRM 46074T (=CCTCCAA 2012014T=JCM 30185T) and the type strain of Salinifilum ghardaiensis comb. nov. is CCUG 63370T (=DSM 45606T=CECT 8304T).

  13. Aquibacillus halophilus gen. nov., sp. nov., a moderately halophilic bacterium from a hypersaline lake, and reclassification of Virgibacillus koreensis as Aquibacillus koreensis comb. nov. and Virgibacillus albus as Aquibacillus albus comb. nov.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Amoozegar, Mohammad Ali; Bagheri, Maryam; Didari, Maryam; Mehrshad, Maliheh; Schumann, Peter; Spröer, Cathrin; Sánchez-Porro, Cristina; Ventosa, Antonio

    2014-11-01

    A novel Gram-stain-positive, moderately halophilic bacterium, designated strain B6B(T), was isolated from the water of an Iranian hypersaline lake, Aran-Bidgol, and characterized taxonomically using a polyphasic approach. Cells of strain B6B(T) were rod-shaped, motile and produced ellipsoidal endospores in terminal positions in non-swollen sporangia. Strain B6B(T) was a strictly aerobic bacterium and catalase- and oxidase-positive. The strain was able to grow at NaCl concentrations of 0.5-20.0% (w/v), with optimum growth occurring at 10.0% (w/v) NaCl. The optimum temperature and pH for growth were 35 °C and pH 7.0. On the basis of 16S rRNA gene sequence analysis, strain B6B(T) was shown to belong to the phylum Firmicutes and its closest phylogenetic similarities were with the species Virgibacillus koreensis BH30097(T) (97.5%), Virgibacillus albus YIM 93624(T) (97.4%), Sediminibacillus halophilus EN8d(T) (96.8%), Sediminibacillus albus NHBX5(T) (96.6%), Virgibacillus carmonensis LMG 20964(T) (96.3%) and Paraliobacillus quinghaiensis YIM-C158(T) (96.0%), respectively. Phylogenetic analysis revealed that strain B6B(T), along with V. koreensis BH30097(T) and V. albus YIM 93624(T), clustered in a separate clade in the family Bacillaceae. The DNA G+C content of the novel isolate was 35.8 mol%. DNA-DNA hybridization experiments revealed low levels of relatedness between strain B6B(T)and V. koreensis BH30097(T) (13%) and V. albus YIM 93624(T) (33%). The major cellular fatty acid of strain B6B(T) was anteiso-C15 : 0 (75.1%) and its polar lipid pattern consisted of phosphatidylglycerol, diphosphatidylglycerol, an unknown phospholipid and an unknown glycolipid. The isoprenoid quinones were MK-7 (90%) and MK-6 (3%). The peptidoglycan contained meso-diaminopimelic acid as the diagnostic diamino acid. All of these features support the placement of isolate B6B(T) within the phylum Firmicutes. It is closely related to V. koreensis and V. albus, but with features that clearly

  14. Evolutionary advantages of polyploidy in halophilic archaea.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Soppa, Jörg

    2013-02-01

    Several species of haloarchaea have been shown to be polyploid and thus this trait might be typical for and widespread in haloarchaea. In the present paper, nine different possible evolutionary advantages of polyploidy for haloarchaea are discussed, including low mutation rate, radiation/desiccation resistance, gene redundancy and survival over geological times and at extraterrestrial sites. Experimental indications exist for all but one of these evolutionary advantages. Several of the advantages require gene conversion, which has been shown to be present and active in haloarchaea.

  15. Diversity and industrial potential of hydrolaseproducing halophilic ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    These organisms have been shown to produce a wide array of hydrolytic enzymes including proteases, amylases, xylanases, cellulases as well as lipases and DNases. These enzymes are commonly applied in the production of fermented food and food supplements, in animal feed, laundry detergents and textile industries.

  16. Antimicrobial susceptibilty of potentially pathogenic halophilic Vibrio ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Surveillance of antimicrobial resistance is indispensable for empirical treatment of infections and in preventing the spread of antimicrobial resistant microorganisms. This study is aimed at determining the antibiotic susceptibility of potentially pathogenic halophylic Vibrio species isolated in Lagos, Nigeria. Susceptibility ...

  17. THE ASTROBIOLOGICAL POTENTIAL OF HALOPHILIC ARCHAEA

    OpenAIRE

    Leuko, Stefan; Rettberg, Petra

    2016-01-01

    The universe we know is a hostile place and currently we only know one planet that harbors life: Earth. Most of the extant life on Earth thrives in moderate environmental conditions, however, over the last decades extreme environments have been shown to harbor a great di- versity of life. The quest to understand modern life in these extreme environments addresses some of the most profound questions of humankind. How can organisms survive and thrive in these environments and cou...

  18. A ubiquitous thermoacidophilic archaeon from deep-sea hydrothermal vents.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reysenbach, Anna-Louise; Liu, Yitai; Banta, Amy B; Beveridge, Terry J; Kirshtein, Julie D; Schouten, Stefan; Tivey, Margaret K; Von Damm, Karen L; Voytek, Mary A

    2006-07-27

    Deep-sea hydrothermal vents are important in global biogeochemical cycles, providing biological oases at the sea floor that are supported by the thermal and chemical flux from the Earth's interior. As hot, acidic and reduced hydrothermal fluids mix with cold, alkaline and oxygenated sea water, minerals precipitate to form porous sulphide-sulphate deposits. These structures provide microhabitats for a diversity of prokaryotes that exploit the geochemical and physical gradients in this dynamic ecosystem. It has been proposed that fluid pH in the actively venting sulphide structures is generally low (pH cycling at deep-sea vents.

  19. Alpha-amylase from the Hyperthermophilic Archaeon Thermococcus thioreducens

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bernhardsdotter, E. C. M. J.; Pusey, M. L.; Ng, M. L.; Garriott, O. K.

    2003-01-01

    Extremophiles are microorganisms that thrive in, from an anthropocentric view, extreme environments such as hot springs. The ability of survival at extreme conditions has rendered enzymes from extremophiles to be of interest in industrial applications. One approach to producing these extremozymes entails the expression of the enzyme-encoding gene in a mesophilic host such as E.coli. This method has been employed in the effort to produce an alpha-amylase from a hyperthermophile (an organism that displays optimal growth above 80 C) isolated from a hydrothermal vent at the Rainbow vent site in the Atlantic Ocean. alpha-amylases catalyze the hydrolysis of starch to produce smaller sugars and constitute a class of industrial enzymes having approximately 25% of the enzyme market. One application for thermostable alpha-amylases is the starch liquefaction process in which starch is converted into fructose and glucose syrups. The a-amylase encoding gene from the hyperthermophile Thermococcus thioreducens was cloned and sequenced, revealing high similarity with other archaeal hyperthermophilic a-amylases. The gene encoding the mature protein was expressed in E.coli. Initial characterization of this enzyme has revealed an optimal amylolytic activity between 85-90 C and around pH 5.3-6.0.

  20. Genetic analyses in the hyperthermophilic archaeon Sulfolobus islandicus

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    She, Qunxin; Zhang, Changyi; Deng, Ling

    2009-01-01

    been developed, including methods for constructing gene knockouts and for identifying essential genes. These genetic tools enable us to conduct genetic analysis on the functions of the genes involved in DNA replication and repair processes in S. islandicus and they should also facilitate in vivo......Sulfolobus belongs to the hyperthermophilic archaea and it serves as a model organism to study archaeal molecular biology and evolution. In the last few years, we have focused on developing genetic systems for Sulfolobus islandicus using pyrEF as a selection marker and versatile genetic tools have...

  1. Isolation of an autotrophic ammonia-oxidizing marine archaeon.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Könneke, Martin; Bernhard, Anne E; de la Torre, José R; Walker, Christopher B; Waterbury, John B; Stahl, David A

    2005-09-22

    For years, microbiologists characterized the Archaea as obligate extremophiles that thrive in environments too harsh for other organisms. The limited physiological diversity among cultivated Archaea suggested that these organisms were metabolically constrained to a few environmental niches. For instance, all Crenarchaeota that are currently cultivated are sulphur-metabolizing thermophiles. However, landmark studies using cultivation-independent methods uncovered vast numbers of Crenarchaeota in cold oxic ocean waters. Subsequent molecular surveys demonstrated the ubiquity of these low-temperature Crenarchaeota in aquatic and terrestrial environments. The numerical dominance of marine Crenarchaeota--estimated at 10(28) cells in the world's oceans--suggests that they have a major role in global biogeochemical cycles. Indeed, isotopic analyses of marine crenarchaeal lipids suggest that these planktonic Archaea fix inorganic carbon. Here we report the isolation of a marine crenarchaeote that grows chemolithoautotrophically by aerobically oxidizing ammonia to nitrite--the first observation of nitrification in the Archaea. The autotrophic metabolism of this isolate, and its close phylogenetic relationship to environmental marine crenarchaeal sequences, suggests that nitrifying marine Crenarchaeota may be important to global carbon and nitrogen cycles.

  2. Low-pass sequencing for microbial comparative genomics

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kennedy Sean

    2004-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background We studied four extremely halophilic archaea by low-pass shotgun sequencing: (1 the metabolically versatile Haloarcula marismortui; (2 the non-pigmented Natrialba asiatica; (3 the psychrophile Halorubrum lacusprofundi and (4 the Dead Sea isolate Halobaculum gomorrense. Approximately one thousand single pass genomic sequences per genome were obtained. The data were analyzed by comparative genomic analyses using the completed Halobacterium sp. NRC-1 genome as a reference. Low-pass shotgun sequencing is a simple, inexpensive, and rapid approach that can readily be performed on any cultured microbe. Results As expected, the four archaeal halophiles analyzed exhibit both bacterial and eukaryotic characteristics as well as uniquely archaeal traits. All five halophiles exhibit greater than sixty percent GC content and low isoelectric points (pI for their predicted proteins. Multiple insertion sequence (IS elements, often involved in genome rearrangements, were identified in H. lacusprofundi and H. marismortui. The core biological functions that govern cellular and genetic mechanisms of H. sp. NRC-1 appear to be conserved in these four other halophiles. Multiple TATA box binding protein (TBP and transcription factor IIB (TFB homologs were identified from most of the four shotgunned halophiles. The reconstructed molecular tree of all five halophiles shows a large divergence between these species, but with the closest relationship being between H. sp. NRC-1 and H. lacusprofundi. Conclusion Despite the diverse habitats of these species, all five halophiles share (1 high GC content and (2 low protein isoelectric points, which are characteristics associated with environmental exposure to UV radiation and hypersalinity, respectively. Identification of multiple IS elements in the genome of H. lacusprofundi and H. marismortui suggest that genome structure and dynamic genome reorganization might be similar to that previously observed in the

  3. HCIV-1 and Other Tailless Icosahedral Internal Membrane-Containing Viruses of the Family Sphaerolipoviridae

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tatiana A. Demina

    2017-02-01

    Full Text Available Members of the virus family Sphaerolipoviridae include both archaeal viruses and bacteriophages that possess a tailless icosahedral capsid with an internal membrane. The genera Alpha- and Betasphaerolipovirus comprise viruses that infect halophilic euryarchaea, whereas viruses of thermophilic Thermus bacteria belong to the genus Gammasphaerolipovirus. Both sequence-based and structural clustering of the major capsid proteins and ATPases of sphaerolipoviruses yield three distinct clades corresponding to these three genera. Conserved virion architectural principles observed in sphaerolipoviruses suggest that these viruses belong to the PRD1-adenovirus structural lineage. Here we focus on archaeal alphasphaerolipoviruses and their related putative proviruses. The highest sequence similarities among alphasphaerolipoviruses are observed in the core structural elements of their virions: the two major capsid proteins, the major membrane protein, and a putative packaging ATPase. A recently described tailless icosahedral haloarchaeal virus, Haloarcula californiae icosahedral virus 1 (HCIV-1, has a double-stranded DNA genome and an internal membrane lining the capsid. HCIV-1 shares significant similarities with the other tailless icosahedral internal membrane-containing haloarchaeal viruses of the family Sphaerolipoviridae. The proposal to include a new virus species, Haloarcula virus HCIV1, into the genus Alphasphaerolipovirus was submitted to the International Committee on Taxonomy of Viruses (ICTV in 2016.

  4. Monitoring Physiological Changes in Haloarchaeal Cell during Virus Release

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    Julija Svirskaitė

    2016-02-01

    Full Text Available The slow rate of adsorption and non-synchronous release of some archaeal viruses have hindered more thorough analyses of the mechanisms of archaeal virus release. To address this deficit, we utilized four viruses that infect Haloarcula hispanica that represent the four virion morphotypes currently known for halophilic euryarchaeal viruses: (1 icosahedral internal membrane-containing SH1; (2 icosahedral tailed HHTV-1; (3 spindle-shaped His1; and (4 pleomorphic His2. To discern the events occurring as the progeny viruses exit, we monitored culture turbidity, as well as viable cell and progeny virus counts of infected and uninfected cultures. In addition to these traditional metrics, we measured three parameters associated with membrane integrity: the binding of the lipophilic anion phenyldicarbaundecaborane, oxygen consumption, and both intra- and extra-cellular ATP levels.

  5. Ecological Performances of Plant Species of Halophilous Hydromorphic Ecosystems

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    Maria Speranza

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available Coastal wetlands are very special environments, characterized by soils permanently or seasonally saturated by salt or brackish water. They host microorganisms and plants able to adapt to anoxic conditions. This paper proposes a review of recent scientific papers dealing with the study of coastal wetlands from different points of view. Some studies examine the species composition and the pattern of the spatial distribution of plant communities, depending on the depth of the salt water table, as well as on other related factors. A significant number of studies analyse instead the coastal wetlands in their ability for the phytoremediation (phytostabilisation and/or phytoextraction and highlight the importance of interactions between the rhizosphere of the halophytes and the physical environment. Finally, more recent studies consider the plant species of the coastal wetlands as a source of useful products (food, feed, oils and expose the results of promising researches on their cultivation.

  6. Two Tales of Prokaryotic Genomic Diversity: Escherichia coli and Halophiles

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    Lejla Pašić

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Prokaryotes are generally characterized by vast genomic diversity that has been shaped by mutations, horizontal gene transfer, bacteriocins and phage predation. Enormous genetic diversity has developed as a result of stresses imposed in harsh environments and the ability of microorganisms to adapt. Two examples of prokaryotic diversity are presented: on intraspecies level, exemplified by Escherichia coli, and the diversity of the hypersaline environment, with the discussion of food-related health issues and biotechnological potential.

  7. The methylaspartate cycle in haloarchaea and its possible role in carbon metabolism.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Borjian, Farshad; Han, Jing; Hou, Jing; Xiang, Hua; Berg, Ivan A

    2016-03-01

    Haloarchaea (class Halobacteria) live in extremely halophilic conditions and evolved many unique metabolic features, which help them to adapt to their environment. The methylaspartate cycle, an anaplerotic acetate assimilation pathway recently proposed for Haloarcula marismortui, is one of these special adaptations. In this cycle, acetyl-CoA is oxidized to glyoxylate via methylaspartate as a characteristic intermediate. The following glyoxylate condensation with another molecule of acetyl-CoA yields malate, a starting substrate for anabolism. The proposal of the functioning of the cycle was based mainly on in vitro data, leaving several open questions concerning the enzymology involved and the occurrence of the cycle in halophilic archaea. Using gene deletion mutants of H. hispanica, enzyme assays and metabolite analysis, we now close these gaps by unambiguous identification of the genes encoding all characteristic enzymes of the cycle. Based on these results, we were able to perform a solid study of the distribution of the methylaspartate cycle and the alternative acetate assimilation strategy, the glyoxylate cycle, among haloarchaea. We found that both of these cycles are evenly distributed in haloarchaea. Interestingly, 83% of the species using the methylaspartate cycle possess also the genes for polyhydroxyalkanoate biosynthesis, whereas only 34% of the species with the glyoxylate cycle are capable to synthesize this storage compound. This finding suggests that the methylaspartate cycle is shaped for polyhydroxyalkanoate utilization during carbon starvation, whereas the glyoxylate cycle is probably adapted for growth on substrates metabolized via acetyl-CoA.

  8. Comparison of four phaC genes from Haloferax mediterranei and their function in different PHBV copolymer biosyntheses in Haloarcula hispanica

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Han, Jing; Li, Ming; Hou, Jing

    2010-01-01

    , PhaCHme and PhaEHme, has been identified in this strain, and shown to account for the PHBV biosynthesis. RESULTS: With the aid of the genome sequence of Hfx. mediterranei CGMCC 1.2087, three additional phaC genes (designated phaC1, phaC2, and phaC3) were identified, which encoded putative PhaCs. Like...... PhaCHme (54.8 kDa), PhaC1 (49.7 kDa) and PhaC3 (62.5 kDa) possessed the conserved motifs of type III PHA synthase, which was not observed in PhaC2 (40.4 kDa). Furthermore, the longer C terminus found in the other three PhaCs was also absent in PhaC2. Reverse transcription PCR (RT-PCR) revealed that...... meet various application requirements. CONCLUSION: We discover three cryptic phaC genes in Hfx. mediterranei, and demonstrate that genetic engineering of these newly identified phaC genes has biotechnological potential for PHBV production with tailor-made material properties....

  9. Characterization and stability of extracellular alkaline proteases from halophilic and alkaliphilic bacteria isolated from saline habitat of coastal Gujarat, India Caracterização e estabilidade de proteases alcalinas extracelulares de bactérias halofílicas e alcalifílicas isoladas de habitat salino de Gujarat, Índia

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    Mital S. Dodia

    2006-09-01

    Full Text Available The present study deals with the isolation and characterization of the moderately halophilic-alkaliphilic bacteria from a saline habitat in western India. Eight different bacterial strains were isolated using enrichment techniques at 20% (w/v NaCl and pH 10. The isolates exhibited diversity towards gram's reaction, colony and cell morphology. They were able to grow and produce alkaline protease over a broad range of NaCl, 5-20% (w/v and pH, 8-10. None of the isolates could grow at pH 7, and one could not grow even at pH 8. Crude and partially purified proteases from strain S5 were subjected to characterization with reference to pH, salt stability and protein folding. Optimum protease activity and stability was recorded at 10% salt and pH 9-9.5. Denaturation kinetics of S5 alkaline protease along with a reference protease was studied at 8M urea followed by renaturation. The S5 alkaline protease could be partially renatured up to 32% of the original activity. Despite of the fact that all the 8 isolates were from the same site, they displayed significant diversity with respect to their salt requirement for growth and enzyme secretion. While the effect of pH was less demarcated on growth, the protease production was significantly affected. Isolate S5 produced substantial amount of halotolerant and alkaline protease. The activity and stability of the alkaline protease in a broader range of pH and salt would definitely make this enzyme an important candidate for various industrial applications.O presente estudo relata o isolamento e caracterização de bactérias moderadamente halofilicas e alcalífilicas de um habitat salino no oeste da Índia. Oito cepas diferentes de bactérias foram isoladas empregando técnicas de enriquecimento em NaCl a 20% (p/v e pH 10. As cepas apresentaram diversidade em relação à coloração de Gram e à morfologia das colônias e células. As cepas foram capazes de multiplicar e produzir protease alcalina em uma ampla

  10. Identification of a haloalkaliphilic and thermostable cellulase with improved ionic liquid tolerance

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zhang, Tao; Datta, Supratim; Eichler, Jerry; Ivanova, Natalia; Axen, Seth D.; Kerfeld, Cheryl A.; Chen, Feng; Kyrpides, Nikos; Hugenholtz, Philip; Cheng, Jan-Fang; Sale, Kenneth L.; Simmons, Blake; Rubin, Eddy

    2011-02-17

    Some ionic liquids (ILs) have been shown to be very effective solvents for biomass pretreatment. It is known that some ILs can have a strong inhibitory effect on fungal cellulases, making the digestion of cellulose inefficient in the presence of ILs. The identification of IL-tolerant enzymes that could be produced as a cellulase cocktail would reduce the costs and water use requirements of the IL pretreatment process. Due to their adaptation to high salinity environments, halophilic enzymes are hypothesized to be good candidates for screening and identifying IL-resistant cellulases. Using a genome-based approach, we have identified and characterized a halophilic cellulase (Hu-CBH1) from the halophilic archaeon, Halorhabdus utahensis. Hu-CBH1 is present in a gene cluster containing multiple putative cellulolytic enzymes. Sequence and theoretical structure analysis indicate that Hu-CBH1 is highly enriched with negatively charged acidic amino acids on the surface, which may form a solvation shell that may stabilize the enzyme, through interaction with salt ions and/or water molecules. Hu-CBH1 is a heat tolerant haloalkaliphilic cellulase and is active in salt concentrations up to 5 M NaCl. In high salt buffer, Hu-CBH1 can tolerate alkali (pH 11.5) conditions and, more importantly, is tolerant to high levels (20percent w/w) of ILs, including 1-allyl-3-methylimidazolium chloride ([Amim]Cl). Interestingly, the tolerances to heat, alkali and ILs are found to be salt-dependent, suggesting that the enzyme is stabilized by the presence of salt. Our results indicate that halophilic enzymes are good candidates for the screening of IL-tolerant cellulolytic enzymes.

  11. A role for programmed cell death in the microbial loop.

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    Mónica V Orellana

    Full Text Available The microbial loop is the conventional model by which nutrients and minerals are recycled in aquatic eco-systems. Biochemical pathways in different organisms become metabolically inter-connected such that nutrients are utilized, processed, released and re-utilized by others. The result is that unrelated individuals end up impacting each others' fitness directly through their metabolic activities. This study focused on the impact of programmed cell death (PCD on a population's growth as well as its role in the exchange of carbon between two naturally co-occurring halophilic organisms. Flow cytometric, biochemical, ¹⁴C radioisotope tracing assays, and global transcriptomic analyses show that organic algal photosynthate released by Dunalliela salina cells undergoing PCD complements the nutritional needs of other non-PCD D. salina cells. This occurs in vitro in a carbon limited environment and enhances the growth of the population. In addition, a co-occurring heterotroph Halobacterium salinarum re-mineralizes the carbon providing elemental nutrients for the mixoheterotrophic chlorophyte. The significance of this is uncertain and the archaeon can also subsist entirely on the lysate of apoptotic algae. PCD is now well established in unicellular organisms; however its ecological relevance has been difficult to decipher. In this study we found that PCD in D. salina causes the release of organic nutrients such as glycerol, which can be used by others in the population as well as a co-occurring halophilic archaeon. H. salinarum also re-mineralizes the dissolved material promoting algal growth. PCD in D. salina was the mechanism for the flow of dissolved photosynthate between unrelated organisms. Ironically, programmed death plays a central role in an organism's own population growth and in the exchange of nutrients in the microbial loop.

  12. Cloning and characterization of ftsZ and pyrF from the archaeon Thermoplasma acidophilum

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yaoi, T.; Laksanalamai, P.; Jiemjit, A.; Kagawa, H. K.; Alton, T.; Trent, J. D.

    2000-01-01

    To characterize cytoskeletal components of archaea, the ftsZ gene from Thermoplasma acidophilum was cloned and sequenced. In T. acidophilum ftsZ, which is involved in cell division, was found to be in an operon with the pyrF gene, which encodes orotidine-5'-monophosphate decarboxylase (ODC), an essential enzyme in pyrimidine biosynthesis. Both ftsZ and pyrF from T. acidophilum were expressed in Escherichia coli and formed functional proteins. FtsZ expression in wild-type E. coli resulted in the filamentous phenotype characteristic of ftsZ mutants. T. acidophilum pyrF expression in an E. coli mutant lacking pyrF complemented the mutation and rescued the strain. Sequence alignments of ODCs from archaea, bacteria, and eukarya reveal five conserved regions, two of which have homology to 3-hexulose-6-phosphate synthase (HPS), suggesting a common substrate recognition and binding motif. Copyright 2000 Academic Press.

  13. Analysis of ATPases of putative secretion operons in the thermoacidophilic archaeon Sulfolobus solfataricus

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Albers, SV; Driessen, AJM

    Gram-negative bacteria use a wide variety of complex mechanisms to secrete proteins across their membranes or to assemble secreted proteins into surface structures. As most archaea only possess a cytoplasmic membrane surrounded by a membrane-anchored S-layer, the organization of such complexes might

  14. Conservation of chromosomal arrangement among three strains of the genetically unstable archaeon Halobacterium salinarium.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hackett, N R; Bobovnikova, Y; Heyrovska, N

    1994-12-01

    Phenotypic variants of Halobacterium salinarium NRC-1 arise at a frequency of 10(-2). These result from transpositions of halobacterial insertion sequences and rearrangements mediated by halobacterial insertion sequences. We have tested the hypothesis that such mutations are confined to only a portion of the genome by comparing the chromosomal restriction map of H. salinarium NRC-1 and that of the derivative S9, which was made in 1969. The two chromosomes were mapped by using two-dimensional pulsed-field gel electrophoresis and the restriction enzymes AflII, AseI, and DraI. A comparison of the two deduced maps showed a domain of about 210 kbp to be subject to many rearrangements, including an inversion in S9 relative to NRC-1. However, the rest of the chromosome was conserved among NRC-1, S9, and an independent Halobacterium isolate, GRB, previously mapped by St. Jean et al. (A. St. Jean, B. A. Trieselmann, and R. L. Charlebois, Nucleic Acids Res. 22:1476-1483, 1994). This concurs with data from eubacteria suggesting strong selective forces maintaining gene order even in the face of rearrangement events occurring at a high frequency.

  15. Visualization and analysis of EPS glycoconjugates of the thermoacidophilic archaeon Sulfolobus metallicus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Ruiyong; Neu, Thomas R; Zhang, Yutong; Bellenberg, Sören; Kuhlicke, Ute; Li, Qian; Sand, Wolfgang; Vera, Mario

    2015-09-01

    Biofilms are surface-associated colonies of microorganisms embedded in a matrix of extracellular polymeric substances (EPS). As EPS mediate the contact between cells and surfaces, an understanding of their composition and production is of particular interest. In this study, the EPS components of Sulfolobus metallicus DSM 6482(T) forming biofilms on elemental sulfur (S(0)) were investigated by confocal laser scanning microscopy (CLSM). In order to visualize cell and EPS distributions, biofilm cells were stained with various dyes specific for glycoconjugates, proteins, nucleic acids and lipids. Biofilm cells on S(0) were heterogeneously distributed and characterized as individual cells, microcolonies, and large clusters up to a hundred micrometers in diameter. The glycoconjugates in biofilms were detected by fluorescence lectin-binding analysis (FLBA). Screening of 72 commercially available lectins resulted in the selection of 21 lectins useful for staining biofilms of S. metallicus (T). Capsular EPS from planktonic cells were mainly composed of carbohydrates and proteins. In contrast, colloidal EPS from planktonic cells were dominated by carbohydrates. Proteins were found to be major components in EPS from biofilms on S(0). Using specific probes combined with CLSM, we showed that extracellular proteins and nucleic acids were present in the EPS matrix. Finally, we showed that S. metallicus (T) cells were embedded in a flexible EPS matrix. This study provides new insights into archaeal biofilms and EPS composition and properties with respect to their interactions with S(0).

  16. Anaerobic Oxidation of Benzene by the Hyperthermophilic Archaeon Ferroglobus placidus▿†

    Science.gov (United States)

    Holmes, Dawn E.; Risso, Carla; Smith, Jessica A.; Lovley, Derek R.

    2011-01-01

    Anaerobic benzene oxidation coupled to the reduction of Fe(III) was studied in Ferroglobus placidus in order to learn more about how such a stable molecule could be metabolized under strict anaerobic conditions. F. placidus conserved energy to support growth at 85°C in a medium with benzene provided as the sole electron donor and Fe(III) as the sole electron acceptor. The stoichiometry of benzene loss and Fe(III) reduction, as well as the conversion of [14C]benzene to [14C]carbon dioxide, was consistent with complete oxidation of benzene to carbon dioxide with electron transfer to Fe(III). Benzoate, but not phenol or toluene, accumulated at low levels during benzene metabolism, and [14C]benzoate was produced from [14C]benzene. Analysis of gene transcript levels revealed increased expression of genes encoding enzymes for anaerobic benzoate degradation during growth on benzene versus growth on acetate, but genes involved in phenol degradation were not upregulated during growth on benzene. A gene for a putative carboxylase that was more highly expressed in benzene- than in benzoate-grown cells was identified. These results suggest that benzene is carboxylated to benzoate and that phenol is not an important intermediate in the benzene metabolism of F. placidus. This is the first demonstration of a microorganism in pure culture that can grow on benzene under strict anaerobic conditions and for which there is strong evidence for degradation of benzene via clearly defined anaerobic metabolic pathways. Thus, F. placidus provides a much-needed pure culture model for further studies on the anaerobic activation of benzene in microorganisms. PMID:21742914

  17. NADP-Dependent Aldehyde Dehydrogenase from Archaeon Pyrobaculum sp.1860: Structural and Functional Features

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    Ekaterina Yu. Bezsudnova

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available We present the functional and structural characterization of the first archaeal thermostable NADP-dependent aldehyde dehydrogenase AlDHPyr1147. In vitro, AlDHPyr1147 catalyzes the irreversible oxidation of short aliphatic aldehydes at 60–85°С, and the affinity of AlDHPyr1147 to the NADP+ at 60°С is comparable to that for mesophilic analogues at 25°С. We determined the structures of the apo form of AlDHPyr1147 (3.04 Å resolution, three binary complexes with the coenzyme (1.90, 2.06, and 2.19 Å, and the ternary complex with the coenzyme and isobutyraldehyde as a substrate (2.66 Å. The nicotinamide moiety of the coenzyme is disordered in two binary complexes, while it is ordered in the ternary complex, as well as in the binary complex obtained after additional soaking with the substrate. AlDHPyr1147 structures demonstrate the strengthening of the dimeric contact (as compared with the analogues and the concerted conformational flexibility of catalytic Cys287 and Glu253, as well as Leu254 and the nicotinamide moiety of the coenzyme. A comparison of the active sites of AlDHPyr1147 and dehydrogenases characterized earlier suggests that proton relay systems, which were previously proposed for dehydrogenases of this family, are blocked in AlDHPyr1147, and the proton release in the latter can occur through the substrate channel.

  18. Physiological plasticity of the thermophilic ammonia oxidizing archaeon Nitrosocaldus yellowstonii in response to a changing environment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jewell, T.; Johnson, A.; Gelsinger, D.; de la Torre, J. R.

    2012-12-01

    Our understanding of nitrogen biogeochemical cycling in high temperature environments underwent a dramatic revision with the discovery of ammonia oxidizing archaea (AOA). The importance of AOA to the global nitrogen cycle came to light when recent studies of marine AOA demonstrated the dominance of these organisms in the ocean microbiome and their role as producers of the greenhouse gas nitrous oxide (N2O). Understanding how AOA respond to fluctuating environments is crucial to fully comprehending their contribution to global biogeochemical cycling and climate change. In this study we use the thermophilic AOA Nitrosocaldus yellowstonii strain HL72 to explore the physiological plasticity of energy metabolism in these organisms. Previous studies have shown that HL72 grows autotrophically by aerobically oxidizing ammonia (NH3) to nitrite (NO2-). Unlike studies of marine AOA, we find that HL72 can grow over a wide ammonia concentration range (0.25 - 10 mM NH4Cl) with comparable generation times when in the presence of 0.25 to 4 mM NH4Cl. However, preliminary data indicate that amoA, the alpha subunit of ammonia monooxygenase (AMO), is upregulated at low ammonia concentrations (soil habitats that, when hydrolyzed, forms NH3 and CO2. We examined urea as an alternate source of ammonia for the ammonia oxidation pathway. HL72 grows over a wide range of urea concentrations (0.25 - 10 mM) at rates comparable to growth on ammonia. In a substrate competition experiment HL72 preferentially consumed NH3 from NH4Cl when both substrates were provided in equal molar concentrations. However, the urease alpha subunit ureC was expressed in both the presence and absence of urea. One consequence of urea hydrolysis is consumption of intracellular protons during the reaction. As ammonia oxidation produces H+, leading to a decrease in pH, the hydrolysis of urea prior to ammonia oxidation may help alleviate metabolism-driven pH change in HL72. A survey of archaeal ureC sequences from metagenomic data covering a range of hydrothermal features revealed that ureolytic potential is common to many Nitrosocaldus-like organisms and is geographically widespread. Measurements of urea from siliceous circumneutral springs indicate that the concentrations are generally low, below 10 μM. One possible explanation for low steady state urea concentrations is high consumption rates by ureolytic organisms. This, combined with abiotic thermal degradation, may mask high fluxes of urea in microbial hot spring communities.

  19. Characterization of the cupin-type phosphoglucose isomerase from the hyperthermophilic archaeon Thermococcus litoralis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jeong, Jong-Jin; Fushinobu, Shinya; Ito, Sohei; Jeon, Beong-Sam; Shoun, Hirofumi; Wakagi, Takayoshi

    2003-01-30

    The gene encoding phosphoglucose isomerase was cloned from Thermococcus litoralis, and functionally expressed in Escherichia coli. The purified enzyme, a homodimer of 21.5 kDa subunits, was biochemically characterized. The inhibition constants for four competitive inhibitors were determined. The enzyme contained 1.25 mol Fe and 0.24 mol Zn per dimer. The activity was enhanced by the addition of Fe(2+), but inhibited by Zn(2+) and EDTA. Enzymes with mutations in conserved histidine and glutamate residues in their cupin motifs contained no metals, and showed large decreases in k(cat). The circular dichroism spectra of the mutant enzymes and the wild type enzyme were essentially the same but with slight differences.

  20. Relationships between fuselloviruses infecting the extremely thermophilic archaeon Sulfolobus: SSV1 and SSV2

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Stedman, Kenneth M; She, Qunxin; Phan, Hien

    2003-01-01

    The fusellovirus SSV2 from an Icelandic Sulfolobus strain was isolated, characterized and its complete genomic sequence determined. SSV2 is very similar in morphology, replication, genome size and number of open reading frames (ORFs) to the type virus of the family, SSV1 from Japan, except in its...

  1. The ABC of ABC-transport in the hyperthermophilic archaeon Pyrococcus furiosus

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Koning, S

    2003-01-01

    Living organisms of our earth can be divided into two groups, the prokaryotes and the eukaryotes. Eukaryotic cells have a nucleus, a special compartment in the cell, where the genetic material, the DNA is located. The DNA in the prokaryotic cell is floating freely in the cell. The eukaryotes, that

  2. Activation of methanogenesis by cadmium in the marine archaeon Methanosarcina acetivorans.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Elizabeth Lira-Silva

    Full Text Available Methanosarcina acetivorans was cultured in the presence of CdCl(2 to determine the metal effect on cell growth and biogas production. With methanol as substrate, cell growth and methane synthesis were not altered by cadmium, whereas with acetate, cadmium slightly increased both, growth and methane rate synthesis. In cultures metabolically active, incubations for short-term (minutes with 10 µM total cadmium increased the methanogenesis rate by 6 and 9 folds in methanol- and acetate-grown cells, respectively. Cobalt and zinc but not copper or iron also activated the methane production rate. Methanogenic carbonic anhydrase and acetate kinase were directly activated by cadmium. Indeed, cells cultured in 100 µM total cadmium removed 41-69% of the heavy metal from the culture and accumulated 231-539 nmol Cd/mg cell protein. This is the first report showing that (i Cd(2+ has an activating effect on methanogenesis, a biotechnological relevant process in the bio-fuels field; and (ii a methanogenic archaea is able to remove a heavy metal from aquatic environments.

  3. Variation of the virus-related elements within syntenic genomes of the hyperthermophilic Archaeon Aeropyrum.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Daifuku, Takashi; Yoshida, Takashi; Kitamura, Takayuki; Kawaichi, Satoshi; Inoue, Takahiro; Nomura, Keigo; Yoshida, Yui; Kuno, Sotaro; Sako, Yoshihiko

    2013-10-01

    The increasing number of genome sequences of archaea and bacteria show their adaptation to different environmental conditions at the genomic level. Aeropyrum spp. are aerobic and hyperthermophilic archaea. Aeropyrum camini was isolated from a deep-sea hydrothermal vent, and Aeropyrum pernix was isolated from a coastal solfataric vent. To investigate the adaptation strategy in each habitat, we compared the genomes of the two species. Shared genome features were a small genome size, a high GC content, and a large portion of orthologous genes (86 to 88%). The genomes also showed high synteny. These shared features may have been derived from the small number of mobile genetic elements and the lack of a RecBCD system, a recombinational enzyme complex. In addition, the specialized physiology (aerobic and hyperthermophilic) of Aeropyrum spp. may also contribute to the entire-genome similarity. Despite having stable genomes, interference of synteny occurred with two proviruses, A. pernix spindle-shaped virus 1 (APSV1) and A. pernix ovoid virus 1 (APOV1), and clustered regularly interspaced short palindromic repeat (CRISPR) elements. Spacer sequences derived from the A. camini CRISPR showed significant matches with protospacers of the two proviruses infecting A. pernix, indicating that A. camini interacted with viruses closely related to APSV1 and APOV1. Furthermore, a significant fraction of the nonorthologous genes (41 to 45%) were proviral genes or ORFans probably originating from viruses. Although the genomes of A. camini and A. pernix were conserved, we observed nonsynteny that was attributed primarily to virus-related elements. Our findings indicated that the genomic diversification of Aeropyrum spp. is substantially caused by viruses.

  4. Biochemical analysis of a DNA replication origin in the archaeon Aeropyrum pernix.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grainge, Ian; Gaudier, Martin; Schuwirth, Barbara S; Westcott, Sarah L; Sandall, Jane; Atanassova, Neli; Wigley, Dale B

    2006-10-20

    We have characterised the interaction of the Aeropyrum pernix origin recognition complex proteins (ORC1 and ORC2) with DNA using DNase I footprinting. Each protein binds upstream of its respective gene. However, ORC1 protein alone interacts more tightly with an additional region containing multiple origin recognition box (ORB) sites that we show to be a replication origin. At this origin, there are four ORB elements disposed either side of an A+T-rich region. An ORC1 protein dimer binds at each of these ORB sites. Once all four ORB sites have bound ORC1 protein, there is a transition to a higher-order assembly with a defined alteration in topology and superhelicity. Furthermore, after this transition, the A+T-rich region becomes sensitive to digestion by DNase I and P1 nuclease, revealing that the transition promotes distortion of the DNA in this region, presumably as a prelude to loading of MCM helicase.

  5. Purification and characterization of the oxygen-thermostable hydrogenase from the aerobic hyperthermophilic archaeon Aeropyrum camini.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nishimura, Hiroshi; Sako, Yoshihiko

    2009-10-01

    Aeropyrum camini that was isolated from a deep-sea hydrothermal vent chimney, possessed two hydrogenases (161 and 85 kDa) in its soluble fraction. The 85-kDa hydrogenase was purified to homogeneity using several chromatography columns. The specific activities of the purified hydrogenase were: 14.8 micromol methyl viologen(ox)/mg/min for hydrogen oxidation, and 14.6 micromol methyl viologen(red)/mg/min for proton reduction. The oxygen stabilities of hydrogenases that were purified from A. camini and the hydrogen thermophilic bacterium Persephonella hydrogeniphila, were compared. The hydrogenase purified from P. hydrogeniphila completely lost its activity following a 96-h exposure to atmosphere; however, the A. camini hydrogenase maintained 75% of its initial activity, even after a 168 h of atmospheric exposure. A. camini hydrogenase showed a half-life of 48 h at 90 degrees C, while P. hydrogeniphila hydrogenase showed complete denaturation after a 30 min incubation at the same temperature. Nine residues of the N-terminal amino acid sequence of A. camini hydrogenases (MARLLMIPGT) correspond to the protein sequence encoded by the hypothetical soluble hydrogenase subunit gene (APE2423) from A. pernix strain K1. A. camini hydrogenase has a high thermostability and is very tolerant to oxygen; therefore, it may be used for actual H(2) production.

  6. Stability of diether C(25,25) liposomes from the hyperthermophilic archaeon Aeropyrum pernix K1.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gmajner, Dejan; Ota, Ajda; Sentjurc, Marjeta; Ulrih, Nataša Poklar

    2011-03-01

    Temperature and pH effects were studied for stability, structural organization, fluidity and permeability of vesicles from a polar lipid methanol fraction isolated from the Aeropyrum pernix. We determined the permeability of C(25,25) liposomes using fluorescence intensity of released calcein. At pH 7.0 and 9.0, and from 85°C to 98°C, only 10% of entrapped calcein was released. After 10 h at 90°C, calcein release reached 27%, independent of pH. Fluorescence anisotropy measurements of hydrophobic probe 1,6-diphenyl-1,3,5-hexatriene revealed gradual changes up to 60°C. At higher temperatures, the anisotropy did not change significantly. Fluorescence alone did not provide detailed and direct structural information about these C(25,25) liposomes, so we used electron paramagnetic resonance spectroscopy (EPR) and differential scanning calorimetry (DSC). From EPR spectra, mean membrane fluidity determined according to maximal hyperfine splitting and empirical correlation times showed continuous increases with temperature. Computer simulation of EPR spectra showed heterogeneous membranes of these C(25,25) liposomes: at low temperatures, they showed three types of membrane regions characterized by different motional modes. Above 65°C, the membrane becomes homogeneous with only one fluid-like region. DSC thermograms of C(25,25) liposomes reveal a very broad and endothermic transition in the temperature range from 0°C to 40°C. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  7. Association of a multi-synthetase complex with translating ribosomes in the archaeon Thermococcus kodakarensis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Raina, Medha; Elgamal, Sara; Santangelo, Thomas J

    2012-01-01

    )-triphosphatase 205, thiamine monophosphate kinase 179, pyruvate formate lyase family activating protein 298, 3-hydroxy-3-methylglutaryl-CoA reductase (mevanolate), N(2), N(2)-dimethylguanosine tRNA methyltransferase 145, N2, N2-dimethylguanosine tRNA methyltransferase 170, putative 5-methylcytosine restriction......-oxoglutarate ferredoxin oxidoreductase subunit gamma 352, 2-oxoglutarate ferredoxin oxidoreductase subunit alpha 407, methylmalonyl-CoA mutase, N-terminus of large subunit 172, AP endonuclease (base excision repair pathway) 365, CTP synthetase 105, PBP family phospholipid-binding protein 272, lipoate...

  8. Candidatus Nitrosocaldus cavascurensis, an Ammonia Oxidizing, Extremely Thermophilic Archaeon with a Highly Mobile Genome

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abby, Sophie S.; Melcher, Michael; Kerou, Melina; Krupovic, Mart; Stieglmeier, Michaela; Rossel, Claudia; Pfeifer, Kevin; Schleper, Christa

    2018-01-01

    Ammonia oxidizing archaea (AOA) of the phylum Thaumarchaeota are widespread in moderate environments but their occurrence and activity has also been demonstrated in hot springs. Here we present the first enrichment of a thermophilic representative with a sequenced genome, which facilitates the search for adaptive strategies and for traits that shape the evolution of Thaumarchaeota. Candidatus Nitrosocaldus cavascurensis has been enriched from a hot spring in Ischia, Italy. It grows optimally at 68°C under chemolithoautotrophic conditions on ammonia or urea converting ammonia stoichiometrically into nitrite with a generation time of approximately 23 h. Phylogenetic analyses based on ribosomal proteins place the organism as a sister group to all known mesophilic AOA. The 1.58 Mb genome of Ca. N. cavascurensis harbors an amoAXCB gene cluster encoding ammonia monooxygenase and genes for a 3-hydroxypropionate/4-hydroxybutyrate pathway for autotrophic carbon fixation, but also genes that indicate potential alternative energy metabolisms. Although a bona fide gene for nitrite reductase is missing, the organism is sensitive to NO-scavenging, underlining the potential importance of this compound for AOA metabolism. Ca. N. cavascurensis is distinct from all other AOA in its gene repertoire for replication, cell division and repair. Its genome has an impressive array of mobile genetic elements and other recently acquired gene sets, including conjugative systems, a provirus, transposons and cell appendages. Some of these elements indicate recent exchange with the environment, whereas others seem to have been domesticated and might convey crucial metabolic traits. PMID:29434576

  9. Production of Recombinant and Tagged Proteins in the Hyperthermophilic Archaeon Sulfolobus solfataricus

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Albers, S.-V.; Jonuscheit, M.; Dinkelaker, S.; Urich, T.; Kletzin, A.; Tampé, R.; Driessen, A.J.M.; Schleper, C.

    Many systems are available for the production of recombinant proteins in bacterial and eukaryotic model organisms, which allow us to study proteins in their native hosts and to identify protein-protein interaction partners. In contrast, only a few transformation systems have been developed for

  10. Genome-scale reconstruction and analysis of the metabolic network in the hyperthermophilic archaeon Sulfolobus solfataricus.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Thomas Ulas

    Full Text Available We describe the reconstruction of a genome-scale metabolic model of the crenarchaeon Sulfolobus solfataricus, a hyperthermoacidophilic microorganism. It grows in terrestrial volcanic hot springs with growth occurring at pH 2-4 (optimum 3.5 and a temperature of 75-80°C (optimum 80°C. The genome of Sulfolobus solfataricus P2 contains 2,992,245 bp on a single circular chromosome and encodes 2,977 proteins and a number of RNAs. The network comprises 718 metabolic and 58 transport/exchange reactions and 705 unique metabolites, based on the annotated genome and available biochemical data. Using the model in conjunction with constraint-based methods, we simulated the metabolic fluxes induced by different environmental and genetic conditions. The predictions were compared to experimental measurements and phenotypes of S. solfataricus. Furthermore, the performance of the network for 35 different carbon sources known for S. solfataricus from the literature was simulated. Comparing the growth on different carbon sources revealed that glycerol is the carbon source with the highest biomass flux per imported carbon atom (75% higher than glucose. Experimental data was also used to fit the model to phenotypic observations. In addition to the commonly known heterotrophic growth of S. solfataricus, the crenarchaeon is also able to grow autotrophically using the hydroxypropionate-hydroxybutyrate cycle for bicarbonate fixation. We integrated this pathway into our model and compared bicarbonate fixation with growth on glucose as sole carbon source. Finally, we tested the robustness of the metabolism with respect to gene deletions using the method of Minimization of Metabolic Adjustment (MOMA, which predicted that 18% of all possible single gene deletions would be lethal for the organism.

  11. Purification and biochemical characterization of the haloalkaliphilic archaeon Natronococcus occultus extracellular serine protease

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Studdert, C A; Herrera Seitz, M K; Plasencia, I

    2001-01-01

    other halobacteria nor with commercial proteases except subtilisin. The amino acid sequences of three tryptic peptides obtained from Natronococcus occultus protease did not show significant similarity to other known proteolytic enzymes. This fact, in addition to its high molecular mass suggests...

  12. Microbial weeds in hypersaline habitats: the enigma of the weed-like Haloferax mediterranei

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oren, Aharon; Hallsworth, John E.

    2014-10-01

    Heterotrophic prokaryotic communities that inhabit saltern crystallizer ponds are typically dominated by two species, the archaeon Haloquadratum walsbyi and the bacterium Salinibacter ruber, regardless of location. These organisms behave as 'microbial weeds' as defined by Cray et al. (Microb Biotechnol6: 453–492, 2013) that possess the biological traits required to dominate the microbiology of these open habitats. Here, we discuss the enigma of the less abundant Haloferax mediterranei, an archaeon that grows faster than any other, comparable extreme halophile. It has a wide window for salt tolerance, can grow on simple as well as on complex substrates and degrade polymeric substances, has different modes of anaerobic growth, can accumulate storage polymers, produces gas vesicles, and excretes halocins capable of killing other Archaea. Therefore, Hfx. mediterranei is apparently more qualified as a 'microbial weed' than Haloquadratum and Salinibacter. However, the former differs because it produces carotenoid pigments only in the lower salinity range and lacks energy-generating retinal-based, light-driven ion pumps such as bacteriorhodopsin and halorhodopsin. We discuss these observations in relation to microbial weed biology in, and the open-habitat ecology of, hypersaline systems.

  13. Extracellular DNA metabolism in Haloferax volcanii

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Scott eChimileski

    2014-02-01

    Full Text Available Extracellular DNA is found in all environments and is a dynamic component of the micro-bial ecosystem. Microbial cells produce and interact with extracellular DNA through many endogenous mechanisms. Extracellular DNA is processed and internalized for use as genetic information and as a major source of macronutrients, and plays several key roles within prokaryotic biofilms. Hypersaline sites contain some of the highest extracellular DNA con-centrations measured in nature–a potential rich source of carbon, nitrogen and phosphorus for halophilic microorganisms. We conducted DNA growth studies for the halophilic archaeon Haloferax volcanii DS2 and show that this model Halobacteriales strain is capable of using exogenous double-stranded DNA as a nutrient. Further experiments with varying medium composition, DNA concentration and DNA types revealed that DNA is utilized primarily as a phosphorus source, that growth on DNA is concentration-dependent and that DNA isolated from different sources is metabolized selectively, with a bias against highly divergent methylated DNA sources. Additionally, fluorescence microscopy experiments showed that labeled DNA colocalized with Haloferax volcanii cells. The gene Hvo_1477 was also identified using a comparative genomic approach as a factor likely to be involved in extracellular DNA processing at the cell surface, and deletion of Hvo_1477 created an H. volcanii strain deficient in its ability to grow on extracellular DNA. Widespread distribution of Hvo_1477 homologs in archaea suggests metabolism of extracellular DNA may be of broad ecological and physiological relevance in this domain of life.

  14. Production enhancement and characterization of the polyhydroxyalkanoate produced by Natrinema ajinwuensis (as synonym) ≡ Natrinema altunense strain RM-G10.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mahansaria, Riddhi; Dhara, Anusua; Saha, Amit; Haldar, Saubhik; Mukherjee, Joydeep

    2018-02-01

    Application of halophiles can decrease the cost of polyhydroxyalkanoate (PHA) production or bioplastic which are an alternative to the petroleum-derived plastic. Extremely halophilic archaeon, Natrinema ajinwuensis RM-G10 accumulated 61.02±0.68% PHA of its cell dry mass at 72h in repeated batch cultures yielding 0.210±0.001gL-1h-1 volumetric productivity after selection of the best cultivation conditions. Transmission electron microscopy showed the presence of PHA granules inside the archaeal cells. Characterization by gas chromatographic analysis, gas chromatographic- mass spectrophotometric analysis, thermogravimetric analysis, differential scanning calorimetric analysis, X-ray diffraction analysis, Fourier transform infra red spectroscopy and nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy revealed the polymer to be poly(3-hydroxybutyrate-co-3-hydroxyvalerate) with 13.93mol% 3-hydroxyvalerate content and having 35.45% crystallinity, -12.3°C glass transition temperature, 143°C and 157.5°C melting temperatures and 284°C degradation temperature. This is the first report on production enhancement (on a small scale) and characterization of the polyhydroxyalkanoate produced by Natrinema ajinwuensis (as synonym) ≡ Natrinema altunense strain RM-G10 and the Natrinema genus in general. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  15. The fluctuating ribosome: thermal molecular dynamics characterized by neutron scattering

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zaccai, Giuseppe; Natali, Francesca; Peters, Judith; Řihová, Martina; Zimmerman, Ella; Ollivier, J.; Combet, J.; Maurel, Marie-Christine; Bashan, Anat; Yonath, Ada

    2016-11-01

    Conformational changes associated with ribosome function have been identified by X-ray crystallography and cryo-electron microscopy. These methods, however, inform poorly on timescales. Neutron scattering is well adapted for direct measurements of thermal molecular dynamics, the ‘lubricant’ for the conformational fluctuations required for biological activity. The method was applied to compare water dynamics and conformational fluctuations in the 30 S and 50 S ribosomal subunits from Haloarcula marismortui, under high salt, stable conditions. Similar free and hydration water diffusion parameters are found for both subunits. With respect to the 50 S subunit, the 30 S is characterized by a softer force constant and larger mean square displacements (MSD), which would facilitate conformational adjustments required for messenger and transfer RNA binding. It has been shown previously that systems from mesophiles and extremophiles are adapted to have similar MSD under their respective physiological conditions. This suggests that the results presented are not specific to halophiles in high salt but a general property of ribosome dynamics under corresponding, active conditions. The current study opens new perspectives for neutron scattering characterization of component functional molecular dynamics within the ribosome.

  16. Acidophilic halophilic microorganisms in fluid inclusions in halite from Lake Magic, Western Australia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Conner, Amber J; Benison, Kathleen C

    2013-09-01

    Lake Magic is one of the most extreme of hundreds of ephemeral acid-saline lakes in southern Western Australia. It has pH as low as 1.7, salinity as high as 32% total dissolved solids, temperatures ranging from 0°C to 50°C, and an unusually complex aqueous composition. Optical petrography, UV-vis petrography, and laser Raman spectrometry were used to detect microorganisms and organic compounds within primary fluid inclusions in modern bedded halite from Lake Magic. Rare prokaryotes appear as 1-3 μm, bright cocci that fluoresce green with UV-vis illumination. Dimpled, 5-7 μm yellow spherules that fluoresce blue with UV-vis illumination are interpreted as Dunaliella algae. Yellow-orange beta-carotene crystals, globules, and coatings are characterized by orange-red fluorescence and three distinct Raman peaks. Because acid saline lakes are good Mars analogues, the documentation of prokaryotes, eukaryotes, and organic compounds preserved in the halite here has implications for the search for life on Mars. Missions to Mars should incorporate such in situ optical and chemical examination of martian evaporites for possible microorganisms and/or organic compounds in fluid inclusions.

  17. Marinobacter nitratireducens sp. nov., a halophilic and lipolytic bacterium isolated from coastal surface sea water

    Digital Repository Service at National Institute of Oceanography (India)

    Bhumika, V.; Ravinder, K.; Korpole, S.; Srinivas, T; AnilKumar, P.

    of the genus of 94.0–96.8 %. The mean DNA–DNA relatedness of strain AK21T with M. xestospongiae JCM 17469T was 34.5 %, and relatedness with Marinobacter mobilis JCM 15154T was 40.5 %. Phylogenetic analysis showed that strain AK21T...

  18. Electrophoresis and isoelectric focusing of whole cell and membrane proteins from the extremely halophilic archaebacteria

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stan-Lotter, Helga; Lang, Frank J., Jr.; Hochstein, Lawrence I.

    1989-01-01

    The subunits from two purified halobacterial membrane enzymes (ATPase and nitrate reductase) behaved differently with respect to isoelectric focusing, silver staining and interaction with ampholytes. Differential behavior was also observed in whole cell proteins from Halobacterium saccharovorum regarding resolution in two-dimensional gels and silver staining. It is proposed that these differences reflect the existence of two classes of halobacterial proteins.

  19. Identification, Characterization, and Application of the Replicon Region of the Halophilic Temperate Sphaerolipovirus SNJ1.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Yuchen; Sima, Linshan; Lv, Jie; Huang, Suiyuan; Liu, Ying; Wang, Jiao; Krupovic, Mart; Chen, Xiangdong

    2016-07-15

    The temperate haloarchaeal virus SNJ1 displays lytic and lysogenic life cycles. During the lysogenic cycle, the virus resides in its host, Natrinema sp. strain J7-1, in the form of an extrachromosomal circular plasmid, pHH205. In this study, a 3.9-kb region containing seven predicted genes organized in two operons was identified as the minimal replicon of SNJ1. Only RepA, encoded by open reading frame 11-12 (ORF11-12), was found to be essential for replication, and its expression increased during the lytic cycle. Sequence analysis suggested that RepA is a distant homolog of HUH endonucleases, a superfamily that includes rolling-circle replication initiation proteins from various viruses and plasmids. In addition to RepA, two genetic elements located within both termini of the 3.9-kb replicon were also required for SNJ1 replication. SNJ1 genome and SNJ1 replicon-based shuttle vectors were present at 1 to 3 copies per chromosome. However, the deletion of ORF4 significantly increased the SNJ1 copy number, suggesting that the product of ORF4 is a negative regulator of SNJ1 abundance. Shuttle vectors based on the SNJ1 replicon were constructed and validated for stable expression of heterologous proteins, both in J7 derivatives and in Natrinema pallidum JCM 8980(T), suggesting their broad applicability as genetic tools for Natrinema species. Archaeal viruses exhibit striking morphological diversity and unique gene content. In this study, the minimal replicon of the temperate haloarchaeal virus SNJ1 was identified. A number of ORFs and genetic elements controlling virus genome replication, maintenance, and copy number were characterized. In addition, based on the replicon, a novel expression shuttle vector has been constructed and validated for protein expression and purification in Natrinema sp. CJ7 and Natrinema pallidum JCM 8980(T) This study not only provided mechanistic and functional insights into SNJ1 replication but also led to the development of useful genetic tools to investigate SNJ1 and other viruses infecting Natrinema species as well as their hosts. Copyright © 2016, American Society for Microbiology. All Rights Reserved.

  20. Identification, Characterization, and Application of the Replicon Region of the Halophilic Temperate Sphaerolipovirus SNJ1

    OpenAIRE

    Wang, Yuchen; Sima, Linshan; Lv, Jie; Huang, Suiyuan; Liu, Ying; Wang, Jiao; Krupovic, Mart; Chen, Xiangdong

    2016-01-01

    The temperate haloarchaeal virus SNJ1 displays lytic and lysogenic life cycles. During the lysogenic cycle, the virus resides in its host, Natrinema sp. strain J7-1, in the form of an extrachromosomal circular plasmid, pHH205. In this study, a 3.9-kb region containing seven predicted genes organized in two operons was identified as the minimal replicon of SNJ1. Only RepA, encoded by open reading frame 11-12 (ORF11-12), was found to be essential for replication, and its expression increased du...

  1. Habitability: Where to look for life? Halophilic habitats: Earth analogs to study Mars habitability

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gómez, F.; Rodríguez-Manfredi, J. A.; Rodríguez, N.; Fernández-Sampedro, M.; Caballero-Castrejón, F. J.; Amils, R.

    2012-08-01

    Oxidative stress, high radiation doses, low temperature and pressure are parameters which made Mars's surface adverse for life. Those conditions found on Mars surface are harsh conditions for life to deal with. Life, as we know it on Earth, needs several requirements for its establishment but, the only "sine qua nom" element is water. Extremophilic microorganisms widened the window of possibilities for life to develop in the universe, and as a consequence on Mars. Recently reported results in extreme environments indicate the possibility of presence of "oasys" for life in microniches due to water deliquescence in salts deposits. The compilation of data produced by the ongoing missions (Mars Global Surveyor, Mars Odyssey, Mars Express and Mars Exploration Rover Opportunity) offers a completely different view from that reported by Viking missions: signs of an early wet Mars and rather recent volcanic activity. The discovery of important accumulations of sulfates, and the existence of iron minerals like jarosite, goethite and hematite in rocks of sedimentary origin has allowed specific terrestrial models related with this type of mineralogy to come into focus. Río Tinto (Southwestern Spain, Iberian Pyritic Belt) is an extreme acidic environment, product of the chemolithotrophic activity of microorganisms that thrive in the massive pyrite-rich deposits of the Iberian Pyritic Belt. The high concentration of ferric iron and sulfates, products of the metabolism of pyrite, generate a collection of minerals, mainly gypsum, jarosite, goethite and hematites, all of which have been detected in different regions of Mars. Some particular protective environments or elements could house organic molecules or the first bacterial life forms on Mars surface. Terrestrial analogs could help us to afford its comprehension. We are reporting here some preliminary studies about endolithic niches inside salt deposits used by phototrophs for taking advantage of sheltering particular light wavelengths. These acidic salts deposits located in Río Tinto shelter life forms which are difficult to localize by eye. Techniques for its localization and study during space missions are needed to develop. Extreme environments are good scenarios where to test and train those techniques and where hypothetical astrobiological space missions could be simulated for increasing possibilities of micro niches identification.

  2. Genome sequence of the moderately thermophilic halophile Flexistipes sinusarabici strain (MAS10T)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lapidus, Alla L. [U.S. Department of Energy, Joint Genome Institute; Chertkov, Olga [Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL); Nolan, Matt [U.S. Department of Energy, Joint Genome Institute; Lucas, Susan [U.S. Department of Energy, Joint Genome Institute; Hammon, Nancy [U.S. Department of Energy, Joint Genome Institute; Deshpande, Shweta [U.S. Department of Energy, Joint Genome Institute; Cheng, Jan-Fang [U.S. Department of Energy, Joint Genome Institute; Tapia, Roxanne [Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL); Han, Cliff [Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL); Goodwin, Lynne A. [Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL); Pitluck, Sam [U.S. Department of Energy, Joint Genome Institute; Liolios, Konstantinos [U.S. Department of Energy, Joint Genome Institute; Pagani, Ioanna [U.S. Department of Energy, Joint Genome Institute; Ivanova, N [U.S. Department of Energy, Joint Genome Institute; Huntemann, Marcel [U.S. Department of Energy, Joint Genome Institute; Mavromatis, K [U.S. Department of Energy, Joint Genome Institute; Mikhailova, Natalia [U.S. Department of Energy, Joint Genome Institute; Pati, Amrita [U.S. Department of Energy, Joint Genome Institute; Chen, Amy [U.S. Department of Energy, Joint Genome Institute; Palaniappan, Krishna [U.S. Department of Energy, Joint Genome Institute; Land, Miriam L [ORNL; Hauser, Loren John [ORNL; Brambilla, Evelyne-Marie [DSMZ - German Collection of Microorganisms and Cell Cultures GmbH, Braunschweig, Germany; Rohde, Manfred [HZI - Helmholtz Centre for Infection Research, Braunschweig, Germany; Abt, Birte [DSMZ - German Collection of Microorganisms and Cell Cultures GmbH, Braunschweig, Germany; Spring, Stefan [DSMZ - German Collection of Microorganisms and Cell Cultures GmbH, Braunschweig, Germany; Goker, Markus [DSMZ - German Collection of Microorganisms and Cell Cultures GmbH, Braunschweig, Germany; Bristow, James [U.S. Department of Energy, Joint Genome Institute; Eisen, Jonathan [U.S. Department of Energy, Joint Genome Institute; Markowitz, Victor [U.S. Department of Energy, Joint Genome Institute; Hugenholtz, Philip [U.S. Department of Energy, Joint Genome Institute; Kyrpides, Nikos C [U.S. Department of Energy, Joint Genome Institute; Klenk, Hans-Peter [DSMZ - German Collection of Microorganisms and Cell Cultures GmbH, Braunschweig, Germany; Woyke, Tanja [U.S. Department of Energy, Joint Genome Institute

    2011-01-01

    Flexistipes sinusarabici Fiala et al. 2000 is the type species of the genus Flexistipes in the fami- ly Deferribacteraceae. The species is of interest because of its isolated phylogenetic location in a genomically under-characterized region of the tree of life, and because of its origin from a multiply extreme environment; the Atlantis Deep brines of the Red Sea, where it had to struggle with high temperatures, high salinity, and a high concentrations of heavy metals. This is the fourth completed genome sequence to be published of a type strain of the family Deferribacteraceae. The 2,526,590 bp long genome with its 2,346 protein-coding and 53 RNA genes is a part of the Genomic Encyclopedia of Bacteria and Archaea project.

  3. Halomonas titanicae sp. nov., a halophilic bacterium isolated from the RMS Titanic.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sánchez-Porro, Cristina; Kaur, Bhavleen; Mann, Henrietta; Ventosa, Antonio

    2010-12-01

    A Gram-negative, heterotrophic, aerobic, non-endospore-forming, peritrichously flagellated and motile bacterial strain, designated BH1(T), was isolated from samples of rusticles, which are formed in part by a consortium of micro-organisms, collected from the RMS Titanic wreck site. The strain grew optimally at 30-37°C, pH 7.0-7.5 and in the presence of 2-8 % (w/v) NaCl. We carried out a polyphasic taxonomic study in order to characterize the strain in detail. Phylogenetic analyses based on 16S rRNA gene sequence comparison indicated that strain BH1(T) clustered within the branch consisting of species of Halomonas. The most closely related type strains were Halomonas neptunia (98.6 % 16S rRNA sequence similarity), Halomonas variabilis (98.4 %), Halomonas boliviensis (98.3 %) and Halomonas sulfidaeris (97.5 %). Other closely related species were Halomonas alkaliphila (96.5 % sequence similarity), Halomonas hydrothermalis (96.3 %), Halomonas gomseomensis (96.3 %), Halomonas venusta (96.3 %) and Halomonas meridiana (96.2 %). The major fatty acids of strain BH1(T) were C(18 : 1)ω7c (36.3 %), C(16 : 0) (18.4 %) and C(19 : 0) cyclo ω8c (17.9 %). The DNA G+C content was 60.0 mol% (T(m)). Ubiquinone 9 (Q-9) was the major lipoquinone. The phenotypic features, fatty acid profile and DNA G+C content further supported the placement of strain BH1(T) in the genus Halomonas. DNA-DNA hybridization values between strain BH1(T) and H. neptunia CECT 5815(T), H. variabilis DSM 3051(T), H. boliviensis DSM 15516(T) and H. sulfidaeris CECT 5817(T) were 19, 17, 30 and 29 %, respectively, supporting the differential taxonomic status of BH1(T). On the basis of the phenotypic, chemotaxonomic and phylogenetic data, strain BH1(T) is considered to represent a novel species, for which the name Halomonas titanicae sp. nov. is proposed. The type strain is BH1(T) (=ATCC BAA-1257(T) =CECT 7585(T) =JCM 16411(T) =LMG 25388(T)).

  4. Production of enzymes and antimicrobial compounds by halophilic Antarctic Nocardioides sp. grown on different carbon sources.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gesheva, Victoria; Vasileva-Tonkova, Evgenia

    2012-05-01

    This study demonstrated the potential of microbial isolates from Antarctic soils to produce hydrolytic enzymes by using specific substrates. The results revealed potential of the strains to produce a broad spectrum of hydrolytic enzymes. Strain A-1 isolated from soil samples in Casey Station, Wilkes Land, was identified as Nocardioides sp. on the basis of morphological, biochemical, physiological observations and also chemotaxonomy analysis. Enzymatic and antimicrobial activities of the cell-free supernatants were explored after growth of strain A-1 in mineral salts medium supplemented with different carbon sources. It was found that the carbon sources favored the production of a broad spectrum of enzymes as well as compounds with antimicrobial activity against Gram-positive and Gram-negative bacteria, especially Staphylococcus aureus and Xanthomonas oryzae. Preliminary analysis showed that the compounds with antimicrobial activity produced by the strain A-1 are mainly glycolipids and/or lipopeptides depending on the used carbon source. The results revealed a great potential of the Antarctic Nocardioides sp. strain A-1 for biotechnological, biopharmaceutical and biocontrol applications as a source of industrially important enzymes and antimicrobial/antifungal compounds.

  5. Damage Avoidance and Repair Mechanisms of Extreme Halophiles to Ionizing Radiation

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-07-01

    radioprotective   properties   might   be   found   in   these   cells.   There   are   indeed...these   isolates.   While   the   accumulation   of   antioxidant   Mn-­‐complexes   can   confer   radioprotection   to   the...Mn2+  (determined  to  be  physiologically   relevant  from  the  whole  cell  analysis)  the   radioprotection

  6. Ponticoccus marisrubri sp. nov., a moderately halophilic marine bacterium of the family Rhodobacteraceae

    KAUST Repository

    Zhang, Guishan

    2017-10-06

    Strain SJ5A-1T, a Gram-stain-negative, coccus-shaped, non-motile, aerobic bacterium, was isolated from the brine-seawater interface of the Erba Deep in the Red Sea, Saudi Arabia. The colonies of strain SJ5A-1T have a beige to pale-brown pigmentation, are approximately 0.5-0.7 µm in diameter, and are catalase and oxidase positive. Growth occurred optimally at 30-33 °C, pH 7.0-7.5, and in the presence of 9.0-12.0 % NaCl (w/v). Phylogenetic analysis of the 16S rRNA gene indicates that strain SJ5A-1T is a member of the genus Ponticoccus within the family Rhodobacteraceae. Ponticoccus litoralis DSM 18986T is the most closely related described species based on 16S rRNA gene sequence identity (96.7 %). The DNA-DNA hybridization value between strain SJ5A-1T and P. litoralis DSM 18986T was 36.7 %. The major respiratory quinone of strain SJ5A-1T is Q-10; it predominantly uses the fatty acids C18 : 1 (54.2 %), C18 : 0 (11.2 %), C16 : 0 (8.6 %), 11-methyl C18 : 1ω7c (7.7 %), C19 : 0cyclo ω8c (3.3 %), and C12 : 1 3-OH (3.5 %), and its major polar lipids are phosphatidylethanolamine, phosphatidylglycerol, phosphocholine, an unknown aminolipid, an unknown phospholipid and two unknown lipids. The genome draft of strain SJ5A-1T as presented here is 4 562 830 bp in size and the DNA G+C content is 68.0 mol %. Based on phenotypic, phylogenetic and genotypic data, strain SJ5A-1T represents a novel species in the genus Ponticoccus, for which we propose the name Ponticoccus marisrubri sp. nov. The type strain of P. marisrubri is SJ5A-1T (=JCM 19520T=ACCC19863T).

  7. The origin of a derived superkingdom: how a gram-positive bacterium crossed the desert to become an archaeon

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bourne Philip E

    2011-02-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The tree of life is usually rooted between archaea and bacteria. We have previously presented three arguments that support placing the root of the tree of life in bacteria. The data have been dismissed because those who support the canonical rooting between the prokaryotic superkingdoms cannot imagine how the vast divide between the prokaryotic superkingdoms could be crossed. Results We review the evidence that archaea are derived, as well as their biggest differences with bacteria. We argue that using novel data the gap between the superkingdoms is not insurmountable. We consider whether archaea are holophyletic or paraphyletic; essential to understanding their origin. Finally, we review several hypotheses on the origins of archaea and, where possible, evaluate each hypothesis using bioinformatics tools. As a result we argue for a firmicute ancestry for archaea over proposals for an actinobacterial ancestry. Conclusion We believe a synthesis of the hypotheses of Lake, Gupta, and Cavalier-Smith is possible where a combination of antibiotic warfare and viral endosymbiosis in the bacilli led to dramatic changes in a bacterium that resulted in the birth of archaea and eukaryotes. Reviewers This article was reviewed by Patrick Forterre, Eugene Koonin, and Gáspár Jékely

  8. The 1.5 resolution structure of the [Fe4S3]-ferredoxin from the hyperthermiphilic archaeon Pyrococcus furiosus

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nielsen, Michael Ericsson Skovbo; Harris, Pernille; Ooi, Bee Lean

    2004-01-01

    of the ferredoxin from Thermotoga maritima. The fold is similar to that of related monocluster ferredoxins and contains two double-stranded antiparallel beta-sheets and two alpha-helices. The hydrophobic interaction between Trp2 and Tyr46 is confirmed, linking the C-terminus to the longer alpha-helix. The structure...... contains a double-conformation disulfide bond existing in a left-handed and a right-handed spiral conformation. The crystal packing reveals a beta-sheet interaction, which supports the suggestion that P. furiosus ferredoxin is a functional dimer. The extraordinary thermostability of P. furiosus ferredoxin...

  9. Doubling Power Output of Starch Biobattery Treated by the Most Thermostable Isoamylase from an Archaeon Sulfolobus tokodaii.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cheng, Kun; Zhang, Fei; Sun, Fangfang; Chen, Hongge; Percival Zhang, Y-H

    2015-08-20

    Biobattery, a kind of enzymatic fuel cells, can convert organic compounds (e.g., glucose, starch) to electricity in a closed system without moving parts. Inspired by natural starch metabolism catalyzed by starch phosphorylase, isoamylase is essential to debranch alpha-1,6-glycosidic bonds of starch, yielding linear amylodextrin - the best fuel for sugar-powered biobattery. However, there is no thermostable isoamylase stable enough for simultaneous starch gelatinization and enzymatic hydrolysis, different from the case of thermostable alpha-amylase. A putative isoamylase gene was mined from megagenomic database. The open reading frame ST0928 from a hyperthermophilic archaeron Sulfolobus tokodaii was cloned and expressed in E. coli. The recombinant protein was easily purified by heat precipitation at 80 (o)C for 30 min. This enzyme was characterized and required Mg(2+) as an activator. This enzyme was the most stable isoamylase reported with a half lifetime of 200 min at 90 (o)C in the presence of 0.5 mM MgCl2, suitable for simultaneous starch gelatinization and isoamylase hydrolysis. The cuvett-based air-breathing biobattery powered by isoamylase-treated starch exhibited nearly doubled power outputs than that powered by the same concentration starch solution, suggesting more glucose 1-phosphate generated.

  10. Draft Genome Sequence of a Highly Flagellated, Fast-Swimming Archaeon, Methanocaldococcus villosus Strain KIN24-T80 (DSM 22612)

    KAUST Repository

    Thennarasu, Sugumar

    2013-07-11

    We report the draft genome sequence of a hyperthermophilic Methanocaldococcus villosus strain, KIN24-T80. The gene associated with its heavy flagellum formation was annotated in the 1.2-Mb draft genome sequence, and this strain may be a good model system to study the extensive functional role of flagella and their fast motor activity.

  11. Structures of the signal recognition particle receptor from the archaeon Pyrococcus furiosus: implications for the targeting step at the membrane.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Egea, Pascal F; Tsuruta, Hiro; de Leon, Gladys P; Napetschnig, Johanna; Walter, Peter; Stroud, Robert M

    2008-01-01

    In all organisms, a ribonucleoprotein called the signal recognition particle (SRP) and its receptor (SR) target nascent proteins from the ribosome to the translocon for secretion or membrane insertion. We present the first X-ray structures of an archeal FtsY, the receptor from the hyper-thermophile Pyrococcus furiosus (Pfu), in its free and GDP*magnesium-bound forms. The highly charged N-terminal domain of Pfu-FtsY is distinguished by a long N-terminal helix. The basic charges on the surface of this helix are likely to regulate interactions at the membrane. A peripheral GDP bound near a regulatory motif could indicate a site of interaction between the receptor and ribosomal or SRP RNAs. Small angle X-ray scattering and analytical ultracentrifugation indicate that the crystal structure of Pfu-FtsY correlates well with the average conformation in solution. Based on previous structures of two sub-complexes, we propose a model of the core of archeal and eukaryotic SRP*SR targeting complexes.

  12. Structures of the Signal Recognition Particle Receptor From the Archaeon Pyrococcus Furiosus: Implications for the Targeting Step at the Membrane

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Egea, P.F.; Tsuruta, H.; Leon, G.P.de; Napetschnig, J.; Walter, P.; Stroud, R.M.

    2009-05-18

    In all organisms, a ribonucleoprotein called the signal recognition particle (SRP) and its receptor (SR) target nascent proteins from the ribosome to the translocon for secretion or membrane insertion. We present the first X-ray structures of an archeal FtsY, the receptor from the hyper-thermophile Pyrococcus furiosus (Pfu), in its free and GDP {center_dot} magnesium-bound forms. The highly charged N-terminal domain of Pfu-FtsY is distinguished by a long N-terminal helix. The basic charges on the surface of this helix are likely to regulate interactions at the membrane. A peripheral GDP bound near a regulatory motif could indicate a site of interaction between the receptor and ribosomal or SRP RNAs. Small angle X-ray scattering and analytical ultracentrifugation indicate that the crystal structure of Pfu-FtsY correlates well with the average conformation in solution. Based on previous structures of two sub-complexes, we propose a model of the core of archeal and eukaryotic SRP {center_dot} SR targeting complexes.

  13. Structural characterization of ether lipids from the archaeon Sulfolobus islandicus by high-resolution shotgun lipidomics

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jensen, Sara Munk; Brandl, Martin; Treusch, Alexander H

    2015-01-01

    The molecular structures, biosynthetic pathways and physiological functions of membrane lipids produced by organisms in the domain Archaea are poorly characterized as compared with that of counterparts in Bacteria and Eukaryota. Here we report on the use of high-resolution shotgun lipidomics......-resolution Fourier transform mass spectrometry using an ion trap-orbitrap mass spectrometer. This analysis identified five clusters of molecular ions that matched ether lipids in the database with sub-ppm mass accuracy. To structurally characterize and validate the identities of the potential lipid species, we...... performed structural analysis using multistage activation on the ion trap-orbitrap instrument as well as tandem mass analysis using a quadrupole time-of-flight machine. Our analysis identified four ether lipid species previously reported in Archaea, and one ether lipid species that had not been described...

  14. An Integrative Genomic Island Affects the Adaptations of Piezophilic Hyperthermophilic Archaeon Pyrococcus yayanosii to High Temperature and High Hydrostatic Pressure

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zhen Li

    2016-11-01

    Full Text Available Deep-sea hydrothermal vent environments are characterized by high hydrostatic pressure and sharp temperature and chemical gradients. Horizontal gene transfer is thought to play an important role in the microbial adaptation to such an extreme environment. In this study, a 21.4-kb DNA fragment was identified as a genomic island, designated PYG1, in the genomic sequence of the piezophilic hyperthermophile Pyrococcus yayanosii. According to the sequence alignment and functional annotation, the genes in PYG1 could tentatively be divided into five modules, with functions related to mobility, DNA repair, metabolic processes and the toxin-antitoxin system. Integrase can mediate the site-specific integration and excision of PYG1 in the chromosome of P. yayanosii A1. Gene replacement of PYG1 with a SimR cassette was successful. The growth of the mutant strain ∆PYG1 was compared with its parent strain P. yayanosii A2 under various stress conditions, including different pH, salinity, temperature and hydrostatic pressure. The ∆PYG1 mutant strain showed reduced growth when grown at 100 °C, while the biomass of ∆PYG1 increased significantly when cultured at 80 MPa. Differential expression of the genes in module Ⅲ of PYG1 was observed under different temperature and pressure conditions. This study demonstrates the first example of an archaeal integrative genomic island that could affect the adaptation of the hyperthermophilic piezophile P. yayanosii to high temperature and high hydrostatic pressure.

  15. Genome sequence of Halorhabdus tiamatea, the first archaeon isolated from a deep-sea anoxic brine lake.

    KAUST Repository

    Antunes, Andre

    2011-09-01

    We present the draft genome of Halorhabdus tiamatea, the first member of the Archaea ever isolated from a deep-sea anoxic brine. Genome comparison with Halorhabdus utahensis revealed some striking differences, including a marked increase in genes associated with transmembrane transport and putative genes for a trehalose synthase and a lactate dehydrogenase.

  16. The phosphoglucose isomerase from the hyperthermophilic archaeon Pyrococcus furiosus is a unique glycolytic enzyme that belongs to the cupin superfamily.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Verhees, C H; Huynen, M A; Ward, D E; Schiltz, E; de Vos, W M; van der Oost, J

    2001-11-02

    Pyrococcus furiosus uses a variant of the Embden-Meyerhof pathway during growth on sugars. All but one of the genes that encode the glycolytic enzymes of P. furiosus have previously been identified, either by homology searching of its genome or by reversed genetics. We here report the isolation of the missing link of the pyrococcal glycolysis, the phosphoglucose isomerase (PGI), which was purified to homogeneity from P. furiosus and biochemically characterized. The P. furiosus PGI, a dimer of identical 23.5-kDa subunits, catalyzes the reversible isomerization of glucose 6-phosphate to fructose 6-phosphate, with K(m) values of 1.99 and 0.63 mm, respectively. An optimum pH of 7.0 has been determined in both directions, and at its optimum temperature of 90 degrees C the enzyme has a half-life of 2.4 h. The N-terminal sequence was used for the identification of the pgiA gene in the P. furiosus genome. The pgiA transcription start site has been determined, and a monocistronic messenger was detected in P. furiosus during growth on maltose and pyruvate. The pgiA gene was functionally expressed in Escherichia coli BL21(DE3). The deduced amino acid sequence of this first archaeal PGI revealed that it is not related to its bacterial and eukaryal counterparts. In contrast, this archaeal PGI shares similarity with the cupin superfamily that consists of a variety of proteins that are generally involved in sugar metabolism in both prokaryotes and eukaryotes. As for the P. furiosus PGI, distinct phylogenetic origins have previously been reported for other enzymes from the pyrococcal glycolytic pathway. Apparently, convergent evolution by recruitment of several unique enzymes has resulted in the unique Pyrococcus glycolysis.

  17. The genome and transcriptome of a newly described psychrophilic archaeon, Methanolobus psychrophilus R15, reveal its cold adaptive characteristics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Zijuan; Yu, Haiying; Li, Lingyan; Hu, Songnian; Dong, Xiuzhu

    2012-12-01

    We analysed the cold-responsive gene repertoire for a psychrophilic methanogen, Methanolobus psychrophilus R15 through genomic and RNA-seq assayed transcriptomic comparisons for cultures at 18°C (optimal temperature) versus 4°C. The differences found by RNA-seq analysis were verified using quantitative real time-PCR assay. The results showed that as in the Antarctic methanogen, Methanococcoides burtonii, genes for methanogenesis, biosynthesis and protein synthesis were all downregulated by the cold in R15. However, the RNA polymerase complex was upregulated at cold, as well as a gene cluster for a putative exosome complex, suggesting that exosome-mediated RNA decay may be cold-accelerated. Unexpectedly, the chaperonin genes for both thermosome and GroES/EL were all upregulated at 4°C. Strain R15 possessed eight protein families for oxygen detoxification, including both anaerobe-specific superoxide reductase (SOR) and the aerobe-typical superoxide dismutase (SOD)-catalase oxidant-removing system, implying the higher oxidative tolerance. Compared with a mesophilic methanogen, R15 survived in higher paraquat, a redox-cycling drug. Moreover, 71 one-component systems and 50 two-component systems for signal transduction ranked strain R15, together with M. burtonii, as being highly adaptive among archaea. Most of them exhibited cold-enhanced expression, indicating their involvement in cold adaptation. This study has added new perspectives on the cold adaptation of methanogenic archaea. © 2012 Society for Applied Microbiology and Blackwell Publishing Ltd.

  18. Energy conservation by oxidation of formate to carbon dioxide and hydrogen via a sodium ion current in a hyperthermophilic archaeon.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lim, Jae Kyu; Mayer, Florian; Kang, Sung Gyun; Müller, Volker

    2014-08-05

    Thermococcus onnurineus NA1 is known to grow by the anaerobic oxidation of formate to CO2 and H2, a reaction that operates near thermodynamic equilibrium. Here we demonstrate that this reaction is coupled to ATP synthesis by a transmembrane ion current. Formate oxidation leads to H(+) translocation across the cytoplasmic membrane that then drives Na(+) translocation. The ion-translocating electron transfer system is rather simple, consisting of only a formate dehydrogenase module, a membrane-bound hydrogenase module, and a multisubunit Na(+)/H(+) antiporter module. The electrochemical Na(+) gradient established then drives ATP synthesis. These data give a mechanistic explanation for chemiosmotic energy conservation coupled to formate oxidation to CO2 and H2. Because it is discussed that the membrane-bound hydrogenase with the Na(+)/H(+) antiporter module are ancestors of complex I of mitochondrial and bacterial electron transport these data also shed light on the evolution of ion transport in complex I-like electron transport chains.

  19. Cloning and expression of the catalase-peroxidase gene from the hyperthermophilic archaeon Archaeoglobus fulgidus and characterization of the enzyme

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kengen, S.W.M.; Bikker, F.; Vos, de W.M.; Oost, van der J.

    2001-01-01

    A putative perA gene from Archaeoglobus fulgidus was cloned and expressed in Escherichia coli BL21(DE3), and the recombinant catalase-peroxidase was purified to homogeneity. The enzyme is a homodimer with a subunit molecular mass of 85 kDa. UV-visible spectroscopic analysis indicated the presence of

  20. The Phosphoglucose Isomerase from the Hyperthermophilic Archaeon Pyrococcus furiosus is a Unique Glycolytic Enzyme that belongs to the Cupin Superfamily

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Verhees, C.H.; Huynen, M.A.; Ward, D.E.; Schiltz, E.; Vos, de W.M.; Oost, van der J.

    2001-01-01

    Pyrococcus furiosus uses a variant of the Embden-Meyerhof pathway during growth on sugars. All but one of the genes that encode the glycolytic enzymes of P. furiosus have previously been identified, either by homology searching of its genome or by reversed genetics. We here report the isolation of

  1. I-ApeI: a novel intron-encoded LAGLIDADG homing endonuclease from the archaeon, Aeropyrum pernix K1

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nomura, Norimichi; Morinaga, Yayoi; Shirai, Nobuaki; Sako, Yoshihiko

    2005-01-01

    Over 50 introns have been reported in archaeal rRNA genes (rDNAs), a subset of which nests putative homing endonuclease (HEase) genes. Here, we report the identification and characterization of a novel archaeal LAGLIDADG-type HEase, I-ApeI, encoded by the ApeK1.S908 intron within the 16S rDNA of Aeropyrum pernix K1. I-ApeI consists of 222 amino acids and harbors two LAGLIDADG-like sequences. It recognizes the 20 bp non-palindromic sequence 5′-GCAAGGCTGAAAC↓TTAAAGG and cleaves target DNA to produce protruding tetranucleotide 3′ ends. Either Mn2+ or Co2+ can be substituted for Mg2+ as a cofactor in the cleavage reaction. Of the 20 bases within the minimal recognition site, 7 are essential for cleavage and are located at positions proximal to the cleavage sites. PMID:16049020

  2. I-ApeKI [corrected]: a novel intron-encoded LAGLIDADG homing endonuclease from the archaeon, Aeropyrum pernix K1.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nomura, Norimichi; Morinaga, Yayoi; Shirai, Nobuaki; Sako, Yoshihiko

    2005-07-26

    Over 50 introns have been reported in archaeal rRNA genes (rDNAs), a subset of which nests putative homing endonuclease (HEase) genes. Here, we report the identification and characterization of a novel archaeal LAGLIDADG-type HEase, I-ApeKI [corrected], encoded by the ApeK1.S908 intron within the 16S rDNA of Aeropyrum pernix K1. I-ApeKI [corrected] consists of 222 amino acids and harbors two LAGLIDADG-like sequences. It recognizes the 20 bp non-palindromic sequence 5'-GCAAGGCTGAAAC downward arrowTTAAAGG and cleaves target DNA to produce protruding tetranucleotide 3' ends. Either Mn2+ or Co2+ can be substituted for Mg2+ as a cofactor in the cleavage reaction. Of the 20 bases within the minimal recognition site, 7 are essential for cleavage and are located at positions proximal to the cleavage sites.

  3. Overexpression, purification and crystallization of tyrosyl-tRNA synthetase from the hyperthermophilic archaeon Aeropyrum pernix K1.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Iwaki, Jun; Suzuki, Ryuichiro; Fujimoto, Zui; Momma, Mitsuru; Kuno, Atsushi; Hasegawa, Tsunemi

    2005-11-01

    Hyperthermophilic archaeal tyrosyl-tRNA synthetase from Aeropyrum pernix K1 was cloned and overexpressed in Escherichia coli. The expressed protein was purified by Cibacron Blue affinity chromatography following heat treatment at 363 K. Crystals suitable for X-ray diffraction studies were obtained under optimized crystallization conditions in the presence of 1.5 M ammonium sulfate using the hanging-drop vapour-diffusion method. The crystals belonged to the tetragonal space group P4(3)2(1)2, with unit-cell parameters a = b = 66.1, c = 196.2 A, and diffracted to beyond 2.15 A resolution at 100 K.

  4. Genome of a low-salinity ammonia-oxidizing archaeon determined by single-cell and metagenomic analysis.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Paul C Blainey

    2011-02-01

    Full Text Available Ammonia-oxidizing archaea (AOA are thought to be among the most abundant microorganisms on Earth and may significantly impact the global nitrogen and carbon cycles. We sequenced the genome of AOA in an enrichment culture from low-salinity sediments in San Francisco Bay using single-cell and metagenomic genome sequence data. Five single cells were isolated inside an integrated microfluidic device using laser tweezers, the cells' genomic DNA was amplified by multiple displacement amplification (MDA in 50 nL volumes and then sequenced by high-throughput DNA pyrosequencing. This microscopy-based approach to single-cell genomics minimizes contamination and allows correlation of high-resolution cell images with genomic sequences. Statistical properties of coverage across the five single cells, in combination with the contrasting properties of the metagenomic dataset allowed the assembly of a high-quality draft genome. The genome of this AOA, which we designate Candidatus Nitrosoarchaeum limnia SFB1, is ∼1.77 Mb with >2100 genes and a G+C content of 32%. Across the entire genome, the average nucleotide identity to Nitrosopumilus maritimus, the only AOA in pure culture, is ∼70%, suggesting this AOA represents a new genus of Crenarchaeota. Phylogenetically, the 16S rRNA and ammonia monooxygenase subunit A (amoA genes of this AOA are most closely related to sequences reported from a wide variety of freshwater ecosystems. Like N. maritimus, the low-salinity AOA genome appears to have an ammonia oxidation pathway distinct from ammonia oxidizing bacteria (AOB. In contrast to other described AOA, these low-salinity AOA appear to be motile, based on the presence of numerous motility- and chemotaxis-associated genes in the genome. This genome data will be used to inform targeted physiological and metabolic studies of this novel group of AOA, which may ultimately advance our understanding of AOA metabolism and their impacts on the global carbon and nitrogen cycles.

  5. Structures of the signal recognition particle receptor from the archaeon Pyrococcus furiosus: implications for the targeting step at the membrane.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pascal F Egea

    Full Text Available In all organisms, a ribonucleoprotein called the signal recognition particle (SRP and its receptor (SR target nascent proteins from the ribosome to the translocon for secretion or membrane insertion. We present the first X-ray structures of an archeal FtsY, the receptor from the hyper-thermophile Pyrococcus furiosus (Pfu, in its free and GDP*magnesium-bound forms. The highly charged N-terminal domain of Pfu-FtsY is distinguished by a long N-terminal helix. The basic charges on the surface of this helix are likely to regulate interactions at the membrane. A peripheral GDP bound near a regulatory motif could indicate a site of interaction between the receptor and ribosomal or SRP RNAs. Small angle X-ray scattering and analytical ultracentrifugation indicate that the crystal structure of Pfu-FtsY correlates well with the average conformation in solution. Based on previous structures of two sub-complexes, we propose a model of the core of archeal and eukaryotic SRP*SR targeting complexes.

  6. Malonic Semialdehyde Reductase from the Archaeon Nitrosopumilus maritimus Is Involved in the Autotrophic 3-Hydroxypropionate/4-Hydroxybutyrate Cycle

    Science.gov (United States)

    Otte, Julia; Mall, Achim; Schubert, Daniel M.; Könneke, Martin

    2014-01-01

    The recently described ammonia-oxidizing archaea of the phylum Thaumarchaeota are highly abundant in marine, geothermal, and terrestrial environments. All characterized representatives of this phylum are aerobic chemolithoautotrophic ammonia oxidizers assimilating inorganic carbon via a recently described thaumarchaeal version of the 3-hydroxypropionate/4-hydroxybutyrate cycle. Although some genes coding for the enzymes of this cycle have been identified in the genomes of Thaumarchaeota, many other genes of the cycle are not homologous to the characterized enzymes from other species and can therefore not be identified bioinformatically. Here we report the identification and characterization of malonic semialdehyde reductase Nmar_1110 in the cultured marine thaumarchaeon Nitrosopumilus maritimus. This enzyme, which catalyzes the reduction of malonic semialdehyde with NAD(P)H to 3-hydroxypropionate, belongs to the family of iron-containing alcohol dehydrogenases and is not homologous to malonic semialdehyde reductases from Chloroflexus aurantiacus and Metallosphaera sedula. It is highly specific to malonic semialdehyde (Km, 0.11 mM; Vmax, 86.9 μmol min−1 mg−1 of protein) and exhibits only low activity with succinic semialdehyde (Km, 4.26 mM; Vmax, 18.5 μmol min−1 mg−1 of protein). Homologues of N. maritimus malonic semialdehyde reductase can be found in the genomes of all Thaumarchaeota sequenced so far and form a well-defined cluster in the phylogenetic tree of iron-containing alcohol dehydrogenases. We conclude that malonic semialdehyde reductase can be regarded as a characteristic enzyme for the thaumarchaeal version of the 3-hydroxypropionate/4-hydroxybutyrate cycle. PMID:25548047

  7. Mutational analyses of the enzymes involved in the metabolism of hydrogen by the hyperthermophilic archaeon Pyrococcus furiosus

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gerrit J Schut

    2012-05-01

    Full Text Available Pyrococcus furiosus grows optimally near 100°C by fermenting carbohydrates to produce hydrogen (H2 or, if elemental sulfur (S0, is present hydrogen sulfide instead. It contains two cytoplasmic hydrogenases, SHI and SHII, that use NADP(H as an electron carrier, and a membrane bound hydrogenase (MBH, that utilizes the redox protein ferredoxin. We previously constructed deletion strains lacking SHI and/or SHII and showed that they exhibited no obvious phenotype. This study has now been extended to include biochemical analyses and growth studies using the ΔSHI and ΔSHII deletion strains together with strains lacking a functional MBH (ΔMbhL. Hydrogenase activities in cytoplasmic extracts of ΔSHII and the parent strain were similar but were much lower (<10% in the ΔSHI strain, and no activity was detected in the ΔSHIΔSHII double deletion strain, indicating that SHI is responsible for most of the cytoplasmic hydrogenase activity. In contrast, the ΔmbhL strain showed no growth in the absence of S0, confirming the hypothesis that, in the absence of S0, MBH is the only enzyme that can dispose of reductant (as H2 generated during sugar oxidation. The deletion strain devoid of all three hydrogenases also grew only in the presence of S0 and did not produce any detectable H2. When grown in the presence of limiting S0, both H2S and H2 were produced by the parent and ΔSHI/ΔSHII strains. A significant amount of H2 was also produced by the ΔmbhL strain, showing that SHI can produce H2 from NADPH in vivo, although this does not enable significant growth of ΔmbhL in the absence of S0. We propose that the physiological function of SHI is to recycle H2 and provide a link between external H2 and the intracellular pool of NADPH needed for biosynthesis. This likely has a distinct energetic advantage in the environment, but it is clearly not required for growth of the organism under the usual laboratory conditions. The function of SHII, however, remains unknown.

  8. Transcriptional Regulation of the Gene Encoding an Alcohol Dehydrogenase in the Archaeon Sulfolobus solfataricus Involves Multiple Factors and Control Elements

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fiorentino, Gabriella; Cannio, Raffaele; Rossi, Mosè; Bartolucci, Simonetta

    2003-01-01

    A transcriptionally active region has been identified in the 5′ flanking region of the alcohol dehydrogenase gene of the crenarchaeon Sulfolobus solfataricus through the evaluation of the activity of putative transcriptional regulators and the role of the region upstream of the gene under specific metabolic circumstances. Electrophoretic mobility shift assays with crude extracts revealed protein complexes that most likely contain TATA box-associated factors. When the TATA element was deleted from the region, binding sites for both DNA binding proteins, such as the small chromatin structure-modeling Sso7d and Sso10b (Alba), and transcription factors, such as the repressor Lrs14, were revealed. To understand the molecular mechanisms underlying the substrate-induced expression of the adh gene, the promoter was analyzed for the presence of cis-acting elements recognized by specific transcription factors upon exposure of the cell to benzaldehyde. Progressive dissection of the identified promoter region restricted the analysis to a minimal responsive element (PAL) located immediately upstream of the transcription factor B-responsive element-TATA element, resembling typical bacterial regulatory sequences. A benzaldehyde-activated transcription factor (Bald) that specifically binds to the PAL cis-acting element was also identified. This protein was purified from heparin-fractionated extracts of benzaldehyde-induced cells and was shown to have a molecular mass of ∼16 kDa. The correlation between S. solfataricus adh gene activation and benzaldehyde-inducible occupation of a specific DNA sequence in its promoter suggests that a molecular signaling mechanism is responsible for the switch of the aromatic aldehyde metabolism as a response to environmental changes. PMID:12813087

  9. The ultrastructure of Ignicoccus: Evidence for a novel outer membrane and for intracellular vesicle budding in an archaeon

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Reinhard Rachel

    2002-01-01

    Full Text Available A novel genus of hyperthermophilic, strictly chemolithotrophic archaea, Ignicoccus, has been described recently, with (so far three isolates in pure culture. Cells were prepared for ultrastructural investigation by cultivation in cellulose capillaries and processing by high-pressure freezing, freeze-substitution and embedding in Epon. Cells prepared in accordance with this protocol consistently showed a novel cell envelope structure previously unknown among the Archaea: a cytoplasmic membrane; a periplasmic space with a variable width of 20 to 400 nm, containing membrane-bound vesicles; and an outer sheath, approximately 10 nm wide, resembling the outer membrane of gram-negative bacteria. This sheath contained three types of particles: numerous tightly, irregularly packed single particles, about 8 nm in diameter; pores with a diameter of 24 nm, surrounded by tiny particles, arranged in a ring with a diameter of 130 nm; and clusters of up to eight particles, each particle 12 nm in diameter. Freeze-etched cells exhibited a smooth surface, without a regular pattern, with frequent fracture planes through the outer sheath, indicating the presence of an outer membrane and the absence of an S-layer. The study illustrates the novel complex architecture of the cell envelope of Ignicoccus as well as the importance of elaborate preparation procedures for ultrastructural investigations.

  10. Genomics and genetics of Sulfolobus islandicus LAL14/1, a model hyperthermophilic archaeon

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jaubert, Carole; Danioux, Chloë; Oberto, Jacques

    2013-01-01

    The 2 465 177 bp genome of Sulfolobus islandicus LAL14/1, host of the model rudivirus SIRV2, was sequenced. Exhaustive comparative genomic analysis of S. islandicus LAL14/1 and the nine other completely sequenced S. islandicus strains isolated from Iceland, Russia and USA revealed a highly synten...

  11. ORF Alignment: NC_006396 [GENIUS II[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available se ... [Haloarcula marismortui ATCC 43049] ... Length = 280 ... Query: 375 FEWEHIANFNFDHLPVRRHLLDAVAQWAELVDGFRCDMA...WAVPNGFWREIHDYCKDRDSE 434 ... FEWEHIANFNFDHLPVRRHLLDAVAQWAELVDGFRCDMA...WAVPNGFWREIHDYCKDRDSE Sbjct: 1 ... FEWEHIANFNFDHLPVRRHLLDAVAQWAELVDGFRCDMAWAVPNGFWREIHDYCKDRDSE 60

  12. ORF Alignment: NC_006395 [GENIUS II[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available ess ... protein family [Haloarcula marismortui ATCC 43049] ... Length = 138 ... Query: 1 ... MYSDILVPTDGSASME...QVLEHTIDIADGRDVTVHALYVIDDRAFLSMDDEMQDEVLENLR 60 ... MYSDILVPTDGSASME...QVLEHTIDIADGRDVTVHALYVIDDRAFLSMDDEMQDEVLENLR Sbjct: 1 ... MYSDILVPTDGSASMEQVLEHTIDIADGRDVTVHALYVIDDRAFLSMD

  13. ORF Alignment: NC_006396 [GENIUS II[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available ... biosynthesis protein [Haloarcula marismortui ATCC 43049] ... Length = 133 ... Query: 143 ITLETLVADVKRDPDEVYSGAIATF...TGRVRAQEGPEDPPTELLEFERYDEVAAEKMAALR 202 ... ITLETLVADVKRDPDEVYSGAIATF...TGRVRAQEGPEDPPTELLEFERYDEVAAEKMAALR Sbjct: 1 ... ITLETLVADVKRDPDEVYSGAIATFTGRVRAQEGPEDPPTELLE

  14. A multilocus sequence analysis approach to the phylogeny and taxonomy of the Halobacteriales.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Papke, R Thane; White, Emma; Reddy, Prajwal; Weigel, Griffin; Kamekura, Masahiro; Minegishi, Hiroaki; Usami, Ron; Ventosa, Antonio

    2011-12-01

    Members of the order Halobacteriales are obligate extreme halophiles that belong to the domain Archaea. The classification of the Halobacteriales currently relies on a polyphasic approach, which integrates phenotypic, genotypic and chemotaxonomic characterization. However, the most utilized genetic marker for phylogeny, the 16S rRNA gene, has multiple drawbacks for use with the Halobacteriales: the species of many genera exhibit large intragenic differences between multiple ribosomal RNA operons, the gene is too conserved to discriminate reliably at the species level and it appears to be the most frequently recombined gene between closely related species. Moreover, the Halobacteriales is a rapidly expanding group due to recent successes at cultivating novel strains from a diverse set of hypersaline environments; a fast, reliable, inexpensive, portable molecular method for discriminating species is required for their investigation. Recently, multilocus sequence analysis (MLSA) has been shown to be an effective tool for strain identification and taxonomic designation, even for those taxa that experience frequent lateral gene transfer and homologous recombination. In this study, MLSA was utilized for evolutionary and taxonomic investigation of the Halobacteriales. Efficacy of the MLSA approach was tested across a hierarchical gradient using 52 halobacterial strains, representing 33 species (including names without standing in nomenclature) and 14 genera. A subset of 21 strains from the genus Haloarcula was analysed separately to test the sensitivity and relevance of the MLSA approach among closely related strains and species. The results demonstrated that MLSA differentiated individual strains, reliably grouped strains into species and species into genera and identified potential novel species and also family-like relationships. This study demonstrates that MLSA is a rapid and informative molecular method that will probably accommodate strain analysis at any taxonomic

  15. NCBI nr-aa BLAST: CBRC-CBRE-01-0788 [SEVENS

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available CBRC-CBRE-01-0788 ref|YP_134663.1| xanthine permease [Haloarcula marismortui ATCC 4...3049] gb|AAV44957.1| xanthine permease [Haloarcula marismortui ATCC 43049] YP_134663.1 0.002 32% ...

  16. NCBI nr-aa BLAST: CBRC-DSIM-04-0090 [SEVENS

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available CBRC-DSIM-04-0090 ref|YP_134857.1| hypothetical protein rrnAC0071 [Haloarcula marismort...ui ATCC 43049] gb|AAV45151.1| unknown [Haloarcula marismortui ATCC 43049] YP_134857.1 2e-04 38% ...

  17. NCBI nr-aa BLAST: CBRC-OLAT-09-0013 [SEVENS

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available CBRC-OLAT-09-0013 ref|YP_136278.1| halorhodopsin precursor [Haloarcula marismortui ...ATCC 43049] gb|AAV46572.1| halorhodopsin precursor [Haloarcula marismortui ATCC 43049] YP_136278.1 0.84 27% ...

  18. NCBI nr-aa BLAST: CBRC-TNIG-09-0033 [SEVENS

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available CBRC-TNIG-09-0033 ref|YP_134927.1| hypothetical protein rrnAC0151 [Haloarcula marismort...ui ATCC 43049] gb|AAV45221.1| unknown [Haloarcula marismortui ATCC 43049] YP_134927.1 0.009 27% ...

  19. NCBI nr-aa BLAST: CBRC-PMAR-01-0304 [SEVENS

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available CBRC-PMAR-01-0304 ref|YP_136457.1| ABC transporter ATP-binding protein [Haloarcula marismort...ui ATCC 43049] gb|AAV46751.1| ABC transporter ATP-binding protein [Haloarcula marismortui ATCC 43049] YP_136457.1 6.6 32% ...

  20. Culture-independent study of the diversity of microbial populations in brines during fermentation of naturally-fermented Aloreña green table olives.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abriouel, Hikmate; Benomar, Nabil; Lucas, Rosario; Gálvez, Antonio

    2011-01-05

    Aloreña table olives are naturally fermented traditional green olives with a denomination of protection (DOP). The present study focused on Aloreña table olives manufactured by small and medium enterprises (SMEs) from Valle del Guadalhorce (Southern Spain) under three different conditions (cold storage, and ambient temperature fermentations in small vats and in large fermentation tanks). The microbial load of brines during fermentation was studied by plate counting, and the microbial diversity was determined by a culture-independent approach based on PCR-DGGE analysis. The viable microbial populations (total mesophilic counts, yeasts and molds, and lactic acid bacteria - LAB) changed in cell numbers during the course of fermentation. Great differences were also observed between cold, vat and tank fermentations and also from one SME to another. Yeasts seemed to be the predominant populations in cold-fermented olives, while LAB counts increased towards the end of vat and tank fermentations at ambient temperature. According to PCR-DGGE analysis, microbial populations in cold-fermented olives were composed mostly by Gordonia sp./Pseudomonas sp. and Sphingomonas sp./Sphingobium sp./Sphingopyxis sp. together with halophilic archaea (mainly by haloarchaeon/Halosarcina pallida and uncultured archaeon/uncultured haloarchaeon/Halorubrum orientalis) and yeasts (Saccharomyces cerevisiae and Candida cf. apicola). Vat-fermented olives stored at ambient temperature included a more diverse bacterial population: Gordonia sp./Pseudomonas sp., Sphingomonas sp./Sphingobium sp./Sphingopyxis sp. and Thalassomonas agarivorans together with halophilic archaea and yeasts (mainly S. cerevisiae and C. cf. apicola, but also Pichia sp., and Pichia manshurica/Pichia galeiformis). Some LAB were detected towards the end of vat fermentations, including Lactobacillus pentosus/Lactobacillus plantarum and Lactobacillus vaccinostercus/Lactobacillus suebicus. Only the tank fermentation showed a clear

  1. The Adaptive Immune System of Haloferax volcanii

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lisa-Katharina Maier

    2015-02-01

    Full Text Available To fight off invading genetic elements, prokaryotes have developed an elaborate defence system that is both adaptable and heritable—the CRISPR-Cas system (CRISPR is short for: clustered regularly interspaced short palindromic repeats and Cas: CRISPR associated. Comprised of proteins and multiple small RNAs, this prokaryotic defence system is present in 90% of archaeal and 40% of bacterial species, and enables foreign intruders to be eliminated in a sequence-specific manner. There are three major types (I–III and at least 14 subtypes of this system, with only some of the subtypes having been analysed in detail, and many aspects of the defence reaction remaining to be elucidated. Few archaeal examples have so far been analysed. Here we summarize the characteristics of the CRISPR-Cas system of Haloferax volcanii, an extremely halophilic archaeon originally isolated from the Dead Sea. It carries a single CRISPR-Cas system of type I-B, with a Cascade like complex composed of Cas proteins Cas5, Cas6b and Cas7. Cas6b is essential for CRISPR RNA (crRNA maturation but is otherwise not required for the defence reaction. A systematic search revealed that six protospacer adjacent motif (PAM sequences are recognised by the Haloferax defence system. For successful invader recognition, a non-contiguous seed sequence of 10 base-pairs between the crRNA and the invader is required.

  2. High salinity facilitates dolomite precipitation mediated by Haloferax volcanii DS52

    Science.gov (United States)

    Qiu, Xuan; Wang, Hongmei; Yao, Yanchen; Duan, Yong

    2017-08-01

    Although most modern dolomites occur in hypersaline environments, the effects of elevated salinity on the microbial mediation of dolomite precipitation have not been fully evaluated. Here we report results of dolomite precipitation in association with a batch culture of Haloferax volcanii DS52, a halophilic archaeon, under various salinities (from 120‰ to 360‰) and the impact of salinity on microbe-mediated dolomite formation. The mineral phases, morphology and atomic arrangement of the precipitates were analyzed by XRD, SEM and TEM, respectively. The amount of amino acids on the archaeal cell surface was quantified by HPLC/MS. The XRD analysis indicated that disordered dolomite formed successfully with the facilitation of cells harvested from cultures with relatively high salinities (200‰ and 280‰) but was not observed in association with cells harvested from cultures with lower salinity (120‰) or the lysates of cells harvested from extremely high salinity (360‰). The TEM analysis demonstrated that the crystals from cultures with a salinity of 200‰ closely matched that of dolomite. Importantly, we found that more carboxyl groups were presented on the cell surface under high salinity conditions to resist the high osmotic pressure, which may result in the subsequent promotion of dolomite formation. Our finding suggests a link between variations in the hydro-chemical conditions and the formation of dolomite via microbial metabolic activity and enhances our understanding about the mechanism of microbially mediated dolomite formation under high salinity conditions.

  3. A tRNA-derived fragment competes with mRNA for ribosome binding and regulates translation during stress.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gebetsberger, Jennifer; Wyss, Leander; Mleczko, Anna M; Reuther, Julia; Polacek, Norbert

    2017-10-03

    Posttranscriptional processing of RNA molecules is a common strategy to enlarge the structural and functional repertoire of RNomes observed in all 3 domains of life. Fragmentation of RNA molecules of basically all functional classes has been reported to yield smaller non-protein coding RNAs (ncRNAs) that typically possess different roles compared with their parental transcripts. Here we show that a valine tRNA-derived fragment (Val-tRF) that is produced under certain stress conditions in the halophilic archaeon Haloferax volcanii is capable of binding to the small ribosomal subunit. As a consequence of Val-tRF binding mRNA is displaced from the initiation complex which results in global translation attenuation in vivo and in vitro. The fact that the archaeal Val-tRF also inhibits eukaryal as well as bacterial protein biosynthesis implies a functionally conserved mode of action. While tRFs and tRNA halves have been amply identified in recent RNA-seq project, Val-tRF described herein represents one of the first functionally characterized tRNA processing products to date.

  4. N-Linked Glycosylation in Archaea: a Structural, Functional, and Genetic Analysis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ding, Yan; Meyer, Benjamin H.; Albers, Sonja-Verena; Kaminski, Lina; Eichler, Jerry

    2014-01-01

    SUMMARY N-glycosylation of proteins is one of the most prevalent posttranslational modifications in nature. Accordingly, a pathway with shared commonalities is found in all three domains of life. While excellent model systems have been developed for studying N-glycosylation in both Eukarya and Bacteria, an understanding of this process in Archaea was hampered until recently by a lack of effective molecular tools. However, within the last decade, impressive advances in the study of the archaeal version of this important pathway have been made for halophiles, methanogens, and thermoacidophiles, combining glycan structural information obtained by mass spectrometry with bioinformatic, genetic, biochemical, and enzymatic data. These studies reveal both features shared with the eukaryal and bacterial domains and novel archaeon-specific aspects. Unique features of N-glycosylation in Archaea include the presence of unusual dolichol lipid carriers, the use of a variety of linking sugars that connect the glycan to proteins, the presence of novel sugars as glycan constituents, the presence of two very different N-linked glycans attached to the same protein, and the ability to vary the N-glycan composition under different growth conditions. These advances are the focus of this review, with an emphasis on N-glycosylation pathways in Haloferax, Methanococcus, and Sulfolobus. PMID:24847024

  5. Flexibility of the Cytoplasmic Domain of the Phototaxis Transducer II from Natronomonas pharaonis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ivan L. Budyak

    2008-01-01

    Full Text Available Chemo- and phototaxis systems in bacteria and archaea serve as models for more complex signal transduction mechanisms in higher eukaryotes. Previous studies of the cytoplasmic fragment of the phototaxis transducer (pHtrII-cyt from the halophilic archaeon Natronomonas pharaonis showed that it takes the shape of a monomeric or dimeric rod under low or high salt conditions, respectively. CD spectra revealed only approximately 24% helical structure, even in 4 M KCl, leaving it an open question how the rod-like shape is achieved. Here, we conducted CD, FTIR, and NMR spectroscopic studies under different conditions to address this question. We provide evidence that pHtrII-cyt is highly dynamic with strong helical propensity, which allows it to change from monomeric to dimeric helical coiled-coil states without undergoing dramatic shape changes. A statistical analysis of predicted disorder for homologous sequences suggests that structural flexibility is evolutionarily conserved within the methyl-accepting chemotaxis protein family.

  6. Recycling of Waste Streams of the Biotechnological Poly(hydroxyalkanoate Production by Haloferax mediterranei on Whey

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Martin Koller

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available For manufacturing “bioplastics” such as poly(hydroxyalkanoates (PHA, the combination of utilization of inexpensive carbon sources with the application of robust microbial production strains is considered a decisive step to make this process more cost-efficient and sustainable. PHA production based on surplus whey from dairy industry was accomplished by the extremely halophile archaeon Haloferax mediterranei. After fermentative production of PHA-rich biomass and the subsequent cell harvest and downstream processing for PHA recovery, environmentally hazardous, highly saline residues, namely spent fermentation broth and cell debris, remain as residues. These waste streams were used for recycling experiments to assess their recyclability in subsequent production processes. It was demonstrated that spent fermentation broth can be used to replace a considerable part of fresh saline fermentation medium in subsequent production processes. In addition, 29% of the expensive yeast extract, needed as nitrogen and phosphate source for efficient cultivation of the microorganism, can be replaced by cell debris from prior cultivations. The presented study provides strategies to combine the reduction of costs for biomediated PHA production with minimizing ecological risks by recycling precarious waste streams. Overall, the presented work shall contribute to the quick economic success of these promising biomaterials.

  7. Saturation mutagenesis of the TATA box and upstream activator sequence in the haloarchaeal bop gene promoter.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baliga, N S; DasSarma, S

    1999-04-01

    Degenerate oligonucleotides were used to randomize 21 bp of the 53-bp minimal bop promoter in three 7-bp segments, including the putative TATA box and the upstream activator sequence (UAS). The mutagenized bop promoter and the wild-type structural gene and transcriptional terminator were inserted into a shuttle plasmid capable of replication in the halophilic archaeon Halobacterium sp. strain S9. Active promoters were isolated by screening transformants of an orange (Pum- bop) Halobacterium mutant for purple (Pum+ bop+) colonies on agar plates and analyzed for bop mRNA and/or bacteriorhodopsin content. Sequence analysis yielded the consensus sequence 5'-tyT(T/a)Ta-3', corresponding to the promoter TATA box element 30 to 25 bp 5' of the transcription start site. A putative UAS, 5'-ACCcnactagTTnG-3', located 52 to 39 bp 5' of the transcription start site was found to be conserved in active promoters. This study provides direct evidence for the requirement of the TATA box and UAS for bop promoter activity.

  8. Recombinant production of Zymomonas mobilis pyruvate decarboxylase in the haloarchaeon Haloferax volcanii

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Steven J. Kaczowka

    2005-01-01

    Full Text Available The unusual physiological properties of archaea (e.g., growth in extreme salt concentration, temperature and pH make them ideal platforms for metabolic engineering. Towards the ultimate goal of modifying an archaeon to produce bioethanol or other useful products, the pyruvate decarboxylase gene of Zymomonas mobilis (Zm pdc was expressed in Haloferax volcanii. This gene has been used successfully to channel pyruvate to ethanol in various Gram-negative bacteria, including Escherichia coli. Although the ionic strength of the H. volcanii cytosol differs over 15-fold from that of E. coli, gel filtration and circular dichroism revealed no difference in secondary structure between the ZmPDC protein isolated from either of these hosts. Like the E. coli purified enzyme, ZmPDC from H. volcanii catalyzed the nonoxidative decarboxylation of pyruvate. A decrease in the amount of soluble ZmPDC protein was detected as H. volcanii transitioned from log phase to late stationary phase that was inversely proportional to the amount of pdc-specific mRNA. Based on these results, proteins from non-halophilic organisms can be actively synthesized in haloarchaea; however, post-transcriptional mechanisms present in stationary phase appear to limit the amount of recombinant protein expressed.

  9. Evaluation of three automated genome annotations for Halorhabdus utahensis.

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    Peter Bakke

    2009-07-01

    Full Text Available Genome annotations are accumulating rapidly and depend heavily on automated annotation systems. Many genome centers offer annotation systems but no one has compared their output in a systematic way to determine accuracy and inherent errors. Errors in the annotations are routinely deposited in databases such as NCBI and used to validate subsequent annotation errors. We submitted the genome sequence of halophilic archaeon Halorhabdus utahensis to be analyzed by three genome annotation services. We have examined the output from each service in a variety of ways in order to compare the methodology and effectiveness of the annotations, as well as to explore the genes, pathways, and physiology of the previously unannotated genome. The annotation services differ considerably in gene calls, features, and ease of use. We had to manually identify the origin of replication and the species-specific consensus ribosome-binding site. Additionally, we conducted laboratory experiments to test H. utahensis growth and enzyme activity. Current annotation practices need to improve in order to more accurately reflect a genome's biological potential. We make specific recommendations that could improve the quality of microbial annotation projects.

  10. Structure of Halorhodopsin from Halobacterium salinarum in a new crystal form that imposes little restraint on the E-F loop.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schreiner, Madeleine; Schlesinger, Ramona; Heberle, Joachim; Niemann, Hartmut H

    2015-06-01

    Halorhodopsin from the halophilic archaeon Halobacterium salinarum is a membrane located light-driven chloride pump. Upon illumination Halorhodopsin undergoes a reversible photocycle initiated by the all-trans to 13-cis isomerization of the covalently bound retinal chromophore. The photocycle consists of several spectroscopically distinct intermediates. The structural basis of the chloride transport mechanism remains elusive, presumably because packing contacts have so far precluded protein conformational changes in the available crystals. With the intention to structurally characterize late photocycle intermediates by X-ray crystallography we crystallized Halorhodopsin in a new crystal form using the vesicle fusion method. In the new crystal form lateral contacts are mediated by helices A and G. Helices E and F that were suggested to perform large movements during the photocycle are almost unrestrained by packing contacts. This feature might permit the displacement of these helices without disrupting the crystal lattice. Therefore, this new crystal form might be an excellent system for the structural characterization of late Halorhodopsin photocycle intermediates by trapping or by time resolved experiments, especially at XFELs. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  11. Draft genome sequence of Halomonas sp. strain KM-1, a moderately halophilic bacterium that produces the bioplastic poly(3-hydroxybutyrate).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kawata, Yoshikazu; Kawasaki, Kazunori; Shigeri, Yasushi

    2012-05-01

    We report the draft genome sequence of Halomonas sp. strain KM-1, which was isolated in Ikeda City, Osaka, Japan, and which produces the bioplastic poly(3-hydroxybutyrate). The total length of the assembled genome is 4,992,811 bp, and 4,220 coding sequences were predicted within the genome. Genes encoding proteins that are involved in the production and depolymerization of poly(3-hydroxybutyrate) were identified. The identification of these genes might be of use in the production of the bioplastic poly(3-hydroxybutyrate) and its monomer 3-hydroxybutyrate.

  12. Desulfovibrio brasiliensis sp. nov., a moderate halophilic sulfate-reducing bacterium from Lagoa Vermelha (Brazil) mediating dolomite formation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Warthmann, Rolf; Vasconcelos, Crisogono; Sass, Henrik; McKenzie, Judith A

    2005-06-01

    A novel halotolerant sulfate-reducing bacterium, Desulfovibrio brasiliensis strain LVform1, was isolated from sediments of a dolomite-forming hypersaline coastal lagoon, Lagoa Vermelha, in the state of Rio de Janeiro, Brazil. The cells are vibrio-shaped and 0.30 to 0.45 microm by 1.0 to 3.5 microm in size. These bacteria mediate the precipitation of dolomite [CaMg(CO3)2] in culture experiments. The strain was identified as a member of the genus Desulfovibrio in the delta-subclass of the Proteobacteria on the basis of its 16S rRNA gene sequence, its physiological and morphological properties. Strain LVform1 is obligate sodium-dependent and grows at NaCl concentrations of up to 15%. The 16S rRNA sequence revealed that this strain is closely related to Desulfovibrio halophilus (96.2% similarity) and to Desulfovibrio oxyclinae (96.8% similarity), which were both isolated from Solar Lake, a hypersaline coastal lake in the Sinai, Egypt. Strain LVform1 is barotolerant, growing under pressures of up to 370 bar (37 MPa). We propose strain LVform1 to be the type strain of a novel species of the genus Desulfovibrio, Desulfovibrio brasiliensis (type strain LVform1 = DSMZ No. 15816 and JCM No. 12178). The GenBank/EMBL accession number for the 16S rDNA sequence of strain LVform1 is AJ544687.

  13. Detection of pigments of halophilic endoliths from gypsum: Raman portable instrument and European Space Agency's prototype analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Culka, Adam; Osterrothová, Kateřina; Hutchinson, Ian; Ingley, Richard; McHugh, Melissa; Oren, Aharon; Edwards, Howell G M; Jehlička, Jan

    2014-12-13

    A prototype instrument, under development at the University of Leicester, for the future European Space Agency (ESA) ExoMars mission, was used for the analysis of microbial pigments within a stratified gypsum crust from a hypersaline saltern evaporation pond at Eilat (Israel). Additionally, the same samples were analysed using a miniaturized Raman spectrometer, featuring the same 532 nm excitation. The differences in the position of the specific bands, attributed to carotenoid pigments from different coloured layers, were minor when analysed by the ESA prototype instrument; therefore, making it difficult to distinguish among the different pigments. The portable Delta Nu Advantage instrument allowed for the discrimination of microbial carotenoids from the orange/green and purple layers. The purpose of this study was to complement previous laboratory results with new data and experience with portable or handheld Raman systems, even with a dedicated prototype Raman system for the exploration of Mars. The latter is equipped with an excitation wavelength falling within the carotenoid polyene resonance region. The ESA prototype Raman instrument detected the carotenoid pigments (biomarkers) with ease, although further detailed distinctions among them were not achieved. © 2014 The Author(s) Published by the Royal Society. All rights reserved.

  14. The presence of PHB granules in cytoplasm protects non-halophilic bacterial cells against the harmful impact of hypertonic environments

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Obruča, S.; Sedláček, P.; Mravec, F.; Krzyžánek, Vladislav; Nebesářová, Jana; Samek, Ota; Kučera, D.; Benešová, P.; Hrubanová, Kamila; Milerová, M.; Márová, I.

    2017-01-01

    Roč. 39, OCT (2017), s. 68-80 ISSN 1871-6784 R&D Projects: GA ČR(CZ) GA15-20645S Institutional support: RVO:68081731 ; RVO:60077344 Keywords : Poly(3-hydroxybutyrate) * PHB * cupriavidus necator * hyperosmotic conditions * plasmolysis * stress conditions Subject RIV: BH - Optics, Masers, Lasers; CE - Biochemistry (BC-A) Impact factor: 3.813, year: 2016

  15. Desulfohalophilus alkaliarsenatis gen. nov., sp. nov., an extremely halophilic sulfate- and arsenate-respiring bacterium from Searles Lake, California

    Science.gov (United States)

    Blum, Jodi Switzer; Kulp, Thomas R.; Han, Sukkyun; Lanoil, Brian; Saltikov, Chad W.; Stolz, John F.; Miller, Laurence G.; Oremland, Ronald S.

    2012-01-01

    A haloalkaliphilic sulfate-respiring bacterium, strain SLSR-1, was isolated from a lactate-fed stable enrichment culture originally obtained from the extreme environment of Searles Lake, California. The isolate proved capable of growth via sulfate-reduction over a broad range of salinities (125–330 g/L), although growth was slowest at salt-saturation. Strain SLSR-1 was also capable of growth via dissimilatory arsenate-reduction and displayed an even broader range of salinity tolerance (50–330 g/L) when grown under these conditions. Strain SLSR-1 could also grow via dissimilatory nitrate reduction to ammonia. Growth experiments in the presence of high borate concentrations indicated a greater sensitivity of sulfate-reduction than arsenate-respiration to this naturally abundant anion in Searles Lake. Strain SLSR-1 contained genes involved in both sulfate-reduction (dsrAB) and arsenate respiration (arrA). Amplicons of 16S rRNA gene sequences obtained from DNA extracted from Searles Lake sediment revealed the presence of close relatives of strain SLSR-1 as part of the flora of this ecosystem despite the fact that sulfate-reduction activity could not be detected in situ. We conclude that strain SLSR-1 can only achieve growth via arsenate-reduction under the current chemical conditions prevalent at Searles Lake. Strain SLSR-1 is a deltaproteobacterium in the family Desulfohalobiacea of anaerobic, haloalkaliphilic bacteria, for which we propose the name Desulfohalophilus alkaliarsenatis gen. nov., sp. nov.

  16. Production and Characterization of Alkaline Protease from a High Yielding and Moderately Halophilic Strain of SD11 Marine Bacteria

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hongxia Cui

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available A marine bacterium SD11, which was isolated from sea muds (Geziwo Qinhuangdao Sea area, China, was used to produce thermostable alkaline serine nonmetal protease in the skim milk agar plate medium with 10% NaCl. The optimal temperature about the manufacture of the extracellular protease was ~60°C. The crude enzyme was stable at 20–50°C. The activity was retained to 60% and 45% after heating for 1 h at 60 and 70°C, respectively. The protease was highly active in a wide pH scope (8.0–10.0 and maximum protease activity exhibited at pH 10.0. The activity was restrained by phenylmethylsulfonyl fluoride (PMSF but mildly increased (~107% in the presence of ethylenediaminetetraacetic acid (EDTA, indicating that the production contains serine-protease(s and nonmetal protease(s. Moreover, the crude alkaline protease was active with the 5 mM Ca2+, Mn2+, Zn2+, Cu2+, Na+, and K+ that existed separately. In addition, the protease showed superduper stability when exposed to an anionic surfactant (5 mM SDS, an oxidizing agent (1% H2O2, and several organic solvents (methanol, isopropanol, and acetone. These results suggest that the marine bacterium SD11 is significant in the industry from the prospects of its ability to produce thermally stable alkaline protease.

  17. Can the halophilic ciliate Fabrea salina be used as a bio-control of microalgae blooms in solar salterns?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hong, Hyun Pyo; Choi, Joong Ki

    2015-09-01

    The microlage Dunaliella salina, a major producer in salterns, is a serious problem for salt production. In this study we tried to assess if Fabrea salina can control D. salina. By parameterising numerical and functional response (growth and grazing vs prey abundance, respectively) at 90 psu and 30°C, where the ciliate is abundant and grows well, we developed a predator-prey model. The model is used to explore how change in microalga growth rate affect the dynamics, and the functional response is used in combination with field data to assess the potential impact of F. salina on D. salina. Over the 20 d simulation the ciliate controlled the prey population under all prey growth rates; although once D. salina were exhausted below the threshold level, F. salina died due to starvation, allowing the alga to increase in abundance, resulting in one or two predatorprey cycle, depending on prey growth rate. In general, the model predicted trends observed by others in the field, suggesting that it provided a good prediction of what may occur under the conditions we examined. Likewise we show that the ciliate can have a high impact on microalgal populations in the field. Finally, a literature review indicated that F. salina could be a good competitor with other protozoa and metazoan in salterns, depending on salinity and temperature, which requires further study and attention. In summary, we encourage continued studies on this unique ciliate on solar salterns and suggest that it may be useful in the bio-control of micoalgae.

  18. Biochemical and physiological responses of halophilic nanophytoplankton (Dunaliella salina) from exposure to xeno-estrogen 17α-ethinylestradiol.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Belhaj, Dalel; Athmouni, Khaled; Frikha, Doniez; Kallel, Monem; El Feki, Abdelfattah; Maalej, Sami; Zhou, John L; Ayadi, Habib

    2017-03-01

    The environmental impacts of various pollutants on the entire levels of organisms are under investigation. Among these pollutants, endocrine-disrupting compounds (EDCs) present a serious hazard, even though the environmental significance of these compounds remains basically unknown. To drop some light on this field, we assessed the effects of a 11-day exposure of 17α-ethinylestradiol (EE2) on the growth, metabolic content, antioxidant response, oxidative stress, and genetic damage of Dunaliella salina, isolated from Tunisian biotopes. The results showed that at 10 ng L(-1), EE2 could stimulate the growth of D. salina and increase its cellular content of photosynthetic pigments and metabolites; however, it did not significantly increase the activities of superoxide dismutase (SOD), catalase (CAT), and glutathione peroxidase (GPx) or the level of malondialdehyde (MDA) and hydrogen peroxide (H2O2). In contrast, exposure to high levels of EE2 concentrations significantly inhibited the growth of D. salina (P algae to EE2. The results of this study suggest that EE2 toxicity could result in environmental impacts with consequences on the whole aquatic community. Graphical abstract.

  19. Noncontiguous finished genome sequence and description of Virgibacillus massiliensis sp. nov., a moderately halophilic bacterium isolated from human gut

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    S. Khelaifia

    2015-11-01

    Full Text Available Strain Vm-5T was isolated from the stool specimen of a 10-year-old Amazonian boy. This bacterium is a Gram-positive, strictly aerobic rod, motile by a polar flagellum. Here we describe its phenotypic characteristics and complete genome sequence. The 4 353 177 bp long genome exhibits a G + C content of 36.87% and contains 4394 protein-coding and 125 predicted RNA genes. Phylogenetically and genetically, strain Vm-c is a member of the genus Virgibacillus but is distinct enough to be classified as a new species. We propose the creation of V. massiliensis sp. nov., whose type strain is strain Vm-5T (CSUR P971 = DSM 28587.

  20. Biodegradation of aniline in an alkaline environment by a novel strain of the halophilic bacterium, Dietzia natronolimnaea JQ-AN.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jin, Qiong; Hu, Zhongce; Jin, Zanfang; Qiu, Lequan; Zhong, Weihong; Pan, Zhiyan

    2012-08-01

    Dietzia natronolimnaea JQ-AN was isolated from industrial wastewater containing aniline. Under aerobic conditions, the JQ-AN strain degraded 87% of the aniline in a 300 mg L(-1) aniline solution after 120 h of shake flask incubation in a medium containing sodium acetate. This strain had an unusually high salinity tolerance in minimal medium (0-6% NaCl, w/v). The optimal pH for microbial growth and aniline biodegradation was pH 8.0. Two liters of simulated aniline wastewater was created in a reactor at pH 8.0 and 3% NaCl (w/v), and biodegradation of aniline was tested over 7 days at 30 °C. For the initial concentrations of 100, 300, and 500 mg L(-1), 100%, 80.5% and 72% of the aniline was degraded, respectively. Strain JQ-AN may use an ortho-cleavage pathway for dissimilation of the catechol intermediate. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  1. Encapsulation of carotenoids extracted from halophilic Archaea in oil-in-water (O/W) micro- and nano-emulsions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chaari, Marwa; Theochari, Ioanna; Papadimitriou, Vassiliki; Xenakis, Aristotelis; Ammar, Emna

    2017-10-16

    Carotenoids extracted from halophilc Archaea have potential health benefits. Their poor water-solubility and low bioavailability is a challenge to their incorporation into foods. The aim of this work was the carotenoids encapsulation into two oil-in-water (O/W) dispersions, to increase their use as functional food applications. A nanoemulsion produced by high pressure homogenization and a spontaneously formed microemulsion were conceived. The limonene was the dispersed oil phase, and mixtures of Triton X-100/Tween-80 (3:1) as emulsifiers and of water/glycerol (2:1) as the continuous aqueous phase. The microemulsion monophasic area was determined through the pseudo-ternary phase diagram. Dynamic Light Scattering was used for the structural characterization of the nano- and micro-emulsions in the presence of the carotenoids. Moreover, the radical scavenging activity of the encapsulated carotenoids was examined by Electron Paramagnetic Resonance spectroscopy. The results confirmed the delivery systems design effectiveness to encapsulate and stabilize the carotenoids for food applications. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  2. Draft Genome Sequence of Halomonas sp. Strain KM-1, a Moderately Halophilic Bacterium That Produces the Bioplastic Poly(3-Hydroxybutyrate)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kawasaki, Kazunori; Shigeri, Yasushi

    2012-01-01

    We report the draft genome sequence of Halomonas sp. strain KM-1, which was isolated in Ikeda City, Osaka, Japan, and which produces the bioplastic poly(3-hydroxybutyrate). The total length of the assembled genome is 4,992,811 bp, and 4,220 coding sequences were predicted within the genome. Genes encoding proteins that are involved in the production and depolymerization of poly(3-hydroxybutyrate) were identified. The identification of these genes might be of use in the production of the bioplastic poly(3-hydroxybutyrate) and its monomer 3-hydroxybutyrate. PMID:22535927

  3. Statistical Optimization of the Production of NaCl-Tolerant Proteases by a Moderate Halophile, Virgibacillus sp. SK37

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sornchai Sinsuwan

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available The objectives of this study are to optimize the conditions for providing high yield of NaCl-tolerant extracellular protease from Virgibacillus sp. SK37 based on a fi sh-based medium and to investigate the eff ects of the key factors (mass per volume ratios of dried anchovy, yeast extract and NaCl, and initial pH of the medium on the secretion patt ern of proteases. Based on the predicted response model, the optimized medium contained 1.81 % of dried anchovy, 0.33 % of yeast extract and 1.25 % of NaCl at pH=7.8. Under these conditions, a 5.3-fold increase in protease production was achieved, compared with the broth containing only 1.2 % of dried anchovy (5 % of NaCl at pH=7. The cubic regression adequately described the protease production. Protease activity was determined using sodium dodecyl sulphate-polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis (SDS-PAGE on the synthetic substrate (Suc-Ala-Ala-Pro-Phe-AMC. Proteases of molecular masses of 19, 34, 35 and 44 kDa were secreted in the presence of NaCl, whereas those of 22 and 42 kDa were the main proteases detected in the absence of NaCl. In addition, no secreted proteases were detected when initial pH of the medium was pH=6. The peptide mass fi ngerprint of the medium cultured with 10 % NaCl showed a higher abundance of peptides with lower mass of 500– 1000 m/z compared with the medium containing 0 % NaCl, indicating the higher proteolytic activity of the high-salt medium. The Virgibacillus sp. SK37 proteases showed a marked preference towards Lys, Arg and Tyr in the presence of NaCl and towards Lys and Arg in the absence of NaCl.

  4. Bipolar tetraether lipids derived from thermoacidophilic archaeon Sulfolobus acidocaldarius for membrane stabilization of chlorin e6 based liposomes for photodynamic therapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mahmoud, Gihan; Jedelská, Jarmila; Strehlow, Boris; Bakowsky, Udo

    2015-09-01

    The initial burst release of water-soluble photosensitizers is one of the major problems encountered the development of controlled release formulations. In this study, the freely water soluble chlorin e6 (Ce6) was assembled with cationic lipid 1,2-dioleoyl-3-trimethylammonium-propane (DOTAP) to improve its loading efficiency in the liposomal bilayer. Tetraether lipids (TELs) derived from Sulfolobus acidocaldarius were added to DOTAP:Ce6 assembly in a concentration range of 2.5×10(-4)-1.6×10(-3)M to stabilize the membrane rigidity of the liposomes and to provide controlled release system. From the comparative spectroscopic experiments, it has been shown that the assembled DOTAP:Ce6 along with addition of TELs have improved the loading efficiency of Ce6 in TELs-liposomes and obviously modified the release profile of Ce6. The in vitro cell viability of Ce6 in mouse neuro-blastoma (Neuro-2a) and ovarian cell carcinoma (SK-OV-3) confirmed neglected dark cytotoxicity and presented potential photo-induced cytotoxicity with the effect was being more pronounced in Neuro 2a than in SK-OV-3. In-situ IV-injection of chick chorioallantoic membrane (CAM) showed hemorrhage and necrosis 30 min post irradiation at 1.8 mol% TELs (19.9J/cm(2)). Higher TELs of 2.2 and 3.7 mol% in particular demonstrated localized vascular destruction within the irradiated area. Our results suggest that TELs favored slower release rates of Ce6. This, in turn, tetraether lipids can be considered as a versatile class of lipids for photodynamic modality for destruction of cancer cells and tumor vasculature while sparing the quiescent ones. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  5. Lesion-Induced Mutation in the Hyperthermophilic Archaeon Sulfolobus acidocaldarius and Its Avoidance by the Y-Family DNA Polymerase Dbh.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sakofsky, Cynthia J; Grogan, Dennis W

    2015-10-01

    Hyperthermophilic archaea offer certain advantages as models of genome replication, and Sulfolobus Y-family polymerases Dpo4 (S. solfataricus) and Dbh (S. acidocaldarius) have been studied intensively in vitro as biochemical and structural models of trans-lesion DNA synthesis (TLS). However, the genetic functions of these enzymes have not been determined in the native context of living cells. We developed the first quantitative genetic assays of replication past defined DNA lesions and error-prone motifs in Sulfolobus chromosomes and used them to measure the efficiency and accuracy of bypass in normal and dbh(-) strains of Sulfolobus acidocaldarius. Oligonucleotide-mediated transformation allowed low levels of abasic-site bypass to be observed in S. acidocaldarius and demonstrated that the local sequence context affected bypass specificity; in addition, most erroneous TLS did not require Dbh function. Applying the technique to another common lesion, 7,8-dihydro-8-oxo-deoxyguanosine (8-oxo-dG), revealed an antimutagenic role of Dbh. The efficiency and accuracy of replication past 8-oxo-dG was higher in the presence of Dbh, and up to 90% of the Dbh-dependent events inserted dC. A third set of assays, based on phenotypic reversion, showed no effect of Dbh function on spontaneous -1 frameshifts in mononucleotide tracts in vivo, despite the extremely frequent slippage at these motifs documented in vitro. Taken together, the results indicate that a primary genetic role of Dbh is to avoid mutations at 8-oxo-dG that occur when other Sulfolobus enzymes replicate past this lesion. The genetic evidence that Dbh is recruited to 8-oxo-dG raises questions regarding the mechanism of recruitment, since Sulfolobus spp. have eukaryotic-like replisomes but no ubiquitin. Copyright © 2015 by the Genetics Society of America.

  6. Deletion of the topoisomerase III gene in the hyperthermophilic archaeon Sulfolobus islandicus results in slow growth and defects in cell cycle control

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Li, Xiyang; Guo, Li; Deng, Ling

    2011-01-01

    Topoisomerase III (topo III), a type IA topoisomerase, is widespread in hyperthermophilic archaea. In order to interrogate the in vivo role of archaeal topo III, we constructed and characterized a topo III gene deletion mutant of Sulfolobus islandicus. The mutant was viable but grew more slowly......-growing cultures. As shown by fluorescence microscopy, a fraction of mutant cells in the cultures were drastically enlarged, and at least some of the enlarged cells were apparently capable of resuming cell division. The mutant also shows a different transcriptional profile from that of the wild-type strain. Our...... results suggest that the enzyme may serve roles in chromosomal segregation and control of the level of supercoiling in the cell....

  7. The genes coding for the hsp70(dnaK) molecular chaperone machine occur in the moderate thermophilic archaeon Methanosarcina thermophila TM-1

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hofman-Bang, H Jacob Peider; Lange, Marianne; Ahring, Birgitte Kiær

    1999-01-01

    of response by hsp70(dnaK), and a similar response by trkA. The data suggest that the moderate thermophile TM-1 has an active Hsp70(DnaK)-chaperone machine in contrast to hyperthermophilic archaea, and that trkA is a stress gene, inasmuch as it responds like classic heat-shock genes to stressors that induce...

  8. Structure and Subunit Arrangement of the A-type ATP Synthase Complex from the Archaeon Methanococcus jannaschii Visualized by Electron Microscopy

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Coskun, Ünal; Chaban, Yuriy L.; Lingl, Astrid; Müller, Volker; Keegstra, Wilko; Boekema, Egbert J.; Grüber, Gerhard; Gruber, 27460

    2004-01-01

    In Archaea, bacteria, and eukarya, ATP provides metabolic energy for energy-dependent processes. It is synthesized by enzymes known as A-type or F-type ATP synthase, which are the smallest rotatory engines in nature. Here, we report the first projected structure of an intact A1A0 ATP synthase from

  9. A synthetic arabinose-inducible promoter confers high levels of recombinant protein expression in hyperthermophilic archaeon Sulfolobus islandicus

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Peng, Nan; Deng, Ling; Mei, Yuxia

    2012-01-01

    in Sulfolobus islandicus, a hyperthermophilic crenarchaeon. Two expression vectors, pSeSD and pEXA, harboring 11 unique restriction sites were constructed. They contain coding sequences of two hexahistidine (6×His) peptide tags and those coding for two protease sites, the latter of which make it possible...... levels of target gene expression. More strikingly, N-terminal amino acid sequencing of recombinant proteins unraveled that the protein synthesized from pEXA-N-lacS lacked the designed 6×His tag and that translation initiation did not start at the ATG codon of the fusion gene. Instead, it started......-terminal coding sequences of proteins to specify translation initiation in the absence of an RBS site....

  10. Draft Genome Sequence of Candidatus Methanomethyllophilus sp. 1R26m -Enriched from Bovine Rumen, a Methanogenic Archaeon Belonging to the Methanomassiliicoccales Order

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Noel, Samantha Joan; Højberg, Ole; Urich, T.

    2016-01-01

    Olsenella scatoligenes SK9K4(T) is a strictly anaerobic bacterium isolated from pig feces that produces the malodorous compounds 3-methylindole (skatole) and 4-methylphenol (p-cresol). Here, we report the 2.47 Mbp draft genome sequence of SK9K4(T), exploring pathways for the synthesis of skatole ...

  11. A thermostable sugar-binding protein from the Archaeon Pyrococcus horikoshii as a probe for the development of a stable fluorescence biosensor for diabetic patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Staiano, Maria; Sapio, MariaRosaria; Scognamiglio, Viviana; Marabotti, Anna; Facchiano, Angelo M; Bazzicalupo, Paolo; Rossi, Mose'; D'Auria, Sabato

    2004-01-01

    In this work is presented the first attempt to develop an innovative ultrastable protein-based biosensor for blood glucose detections. The gene of a putative thermostable sugar-binding protein has been cloned and expressed in E. coli. The recombinant protein has been purified to homogeneity by thermoprecipitation and affinity chromatography steps. The recombinant protein is a monomer with an apparent molecular weight of 55,000 as judged by gel filtration and sodium dodecyl sulfate polyacrylamide gel eletrophoresis. Circular dichroism experiments showed that the protein possesses a secondary structure content rich in alpha-helices and beta-structures and that the protein is highly stable as investigated in the range of temperature between 20 and 95 degrees C. Fluorescence spectroscopy experiments demonstrated that the recombinant protein binds glucose with a dissociation constant of about 10 mM, a concentration of sugar very close to the concentration of glucose present in the human blood. A docking simulation on the modeled structure of the protein confirms its ability to bind glucose and proposes possible modifications to improve the affinity for glucose and/or its detection. The obtained results suggest the use of the protein as a probe for a stable glucose biosensor.

  12. Systematic deletion analyses of the fla genes in the flagella operon identify several genes essential for proper assembly and function of flagella in the archaeon, Methanococcus maripaludis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chaban, Bonnie; Ng, Sandy Y M; Kanbe, Masaomi; Saltzman, Ilana; Nimmo, Graeme; Aizawa, Shin-Ichi; Jarrell, Ken F

    2007-11-01

    The archaeal flagellum is a unique motility apparatus in the prokaryotic domain, distinct from the bacterial flagellum. Most of the currently recognized archaeal flagella-associated genes fall into a single fla operon that contains the genes for the flagellin proteins (two or more genes designated as flaA or flaB), some variation of a set of conserved proteins of unknown function (flaC, flaD, flaE, flaF, flaG and flaH), an ATPase (flaI) and a membrane protein (flaJ). In addition, the flaD gene has been demonstrated to encode two proteins: a full-length gene product and a truncated product derived from an alternate, internal start site. A systematic deletion approach was taken using the methanogen Methanococcus maripaludis to investigate the requirement and a possible role for these proposed flagella-associated genes. Markerless in-frame deletion strains were created for most of the genes in the M. maripaludis fla operon. In addition, a strain lacking the truncated FlaD protein [FlaD M(191)I] was also created. DNA sequencing and Southern blot analysis confirmed each mutant strain, and the integrity of the remaining operon was confirmed by immunoblot. With the exception of the DeltaFlaB3 and FlaD M(191)I strains, all mutants were non-motile by light microscopy and non-flagellated by electron microscopy. A detailed examination of the DeltaFlaB3 mutant flagella revealed that these structures had no hook region, while the FlaD M(191)I strain appeared identical to wild type. Each deletion strain was complemented, and motility and flagellation was restored. Collectively, these results demonstrate for first time that these fla operon genes are directly involved and critically required for proper archaeal flagella assembly and function.

  13. Specificities and pH profiles of adenine and hypoxanthine-guanine-xanthine phosphoribosyltransferases (nucleotide synthases) of the thermoacidophile archaeon Sulfolobus solfataricus

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hansen, Michael Riis; Jensen, Kristine Steen; Rasmussen, Mads Skytte

    2014-01-01

    Two open reading frames in the genome of Sulfolobus solfataricus (SSO2341 and SSO2424) were cloned and expressed in E. coli. The protein products were purified and their enzymatic activity characterized. Although SSO2341 was annotated as a gene (gpT-1) encoding a 6-oxopurine phosphoribosyltransfe...

  14. Halosiccatus urmianus gen. nov., sp. nov., a haloarchaeon from a salt lake.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mehrshad, Maliheh; Amoozegar, Mohammad Ali; Makhdoumi, Ali; Fazeli, Seyed Abolhassan Shahzadeh; Farahani, Homa; Asadi, Basaer; Schumann, Peter; Ventosa, Antonio

    2016-02-01

    A novel, orange-pigmented, halophilic archaeon, strain DC8T, was isolated from Urmia salt lake in north-west Iran. The cells of strain DC8T were non-motile and pleomorphic, from small rods to triangular or disc shaped. The novel strain needed at least 2.5 M NaCl and 0.02 M MgCl2 for growth. Optimal growth was achieved at 4.0 M NaCl and 0.1 M MgCl2. The optimum pH and temperature for growth were pH 7.5 and 45 °C, respectively, and it was able to grow over a pH range of 7.0 to 8.5 and a temperature range of 25 to 55 °C. Analysis of the 16S rRNA gene sequence showed that strain DC8T was a member of the family Halobacteriaceae; however, its similarity was as low as 90.1 %, 89.3 % and 89.1 % to the most closely related haloarchaeal taxa, including type species of members of the genera Halosimplex, Halobaculum and Halomicrobium, respectively. The G+C content of its DNA was 68.1 mol%. Polar lipid analyses revealed that strain DC8T contained phosphatidylglycerol, phosphatidylglycerol phosphate methyl ester, phosphatidylglycerol sulfate and phosphatidic acid. One unknown phospholipid, two major glycolipids and one minor glycolipid were also detected. The only quinone present was MK-8 (II-H2). The physiological, biochemical and phylogenetic differences between strain DC8T and other extremely halophilic archaeal genera with validly published names supported that this strain represents a novel species of a new genus within the family Halobacteriaceae, for which the name Halosiccatus urmianus gen. nov., sp. nov. is proposed. The type strain is strain DC8T ( = IBRC-M 10911T = CECT 8793T).

  15. Bacterial and archaeal resistance to ionizing radiation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Confalonieri, F; Sommer, S, E-mail: fabrice.confalonieri@u-psud.fr, E-mail: suzanne.sommer@u-psud.fr [University Paris-Sud, CNRS UMR8621, Institut de Genetique et Microbiologie, Batiments 400-409, Universite Paris-Sud, 91405 Orsay (France)

    2011-01-01

    Organisms living in extreme environments must cope with large fluctuations of temperature, high levels of radiation and/or desiccation, conditions that can induce DNA damage ranging from base modifications to DNA double-strand breaks. The bacterium Deinococcus radiodurans is known for its resistance to extremely high doses of ionizing radiation and for its ability to reconstruct a functional genome from hundreds of radiation-induced chromosomal fragments. Recently, extreme ionizing radiation resistance was also generated by directed evolution of an apparently radiation-sensitive bacterial species, Escherichia coli. Radioresistant organisms are not only found among the Eubacteria but also among the Archaea that represent the third kingdom of life. They present a set of particular features that differentiate them from the Eubacteria and eukaryotes. Moreover, Archaea are often isolated from extreme environments where they live under severe conditions of temperature, pressure, pH, salts or toxic compounds that are lethal for the large majority of living organisms. Thus, Archaea offer the opportunity to understand how cells are able to cope with such harsh conditions. Among them, the halophilic archaeon Halobacterium sp and several Pyrococcus or Thermococcus species, such as Thermococcus gammatolerans, were also shown to display high level of radiation resistance. The dispersion, in the phylogenetic tree, of radioresistant prokaryotes suggests that they have independently acquired radioresistance. Different strategies were selected during evolution including several mechanisms of radiation byproduct detoxification and subtle cellular metabolism modifications to help cells recover from radiation-induced injuries, protection of proteins against oxidation, an efficient DNA repair tool box, an original pathway of DNA double-strand break repair, a condensed nucleoid that may prevent the dispersion of the DNA fragments and specific radiation-induced proteins involved in

  16. Nucleotide fluctuation of radiation-resistant Halobacterium sp. NRC-1 single-stranded DNA-binding protein (RPA) genes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Holden, Todd; Tremberger, G., Jr.; Cheung, E.; Subramaniam, R.; Gadura, N.; Schneider, P.; Sullivan, R.; Flamholz, A.; Lieberman, D.; Cheung, T. D.

    2009-08-01

    The Single-Stranded DNA-Binding Protein (RPA) Genes in gamma ray radiation-resistant halophilic archaeon Halobacterium sp. NRC-1 were analyzed in terms of their nucleotide fluctuations. In an ATCG sequence, each base was assigned a number equal to its atomic number. The resulting numerical sequence was the basis of the statistical analysis in this study. Fractal analysis using the Higuchi method gave fractal dimensions of 2.04 and 2.06 for the gene sequences VNG2160 and VNG2162, respectively. The 16S rRNA sequence has a fractal dimension of 1.99. The di-nucleotide Shannon entropy values were found to be negatively correlated with the observed fractal dimensions (R2~ 0.992, N=3). Inclusion of Deinococcus radiodurans Rad-A in the regression analysis decreases the R2 slightly to 0.98 (N=4). A third VNG2163 RPA gene of unknown function but with upregulation activity under irradiation was found to have a fractal dimension of 2.05 and a Shannon entropy of 3.77 bits. The above results are similar to those found in bacterial Deinococcus radiodurans and suggest that their high radiation resistance property would have favored selection of CG di-nucleotide pairs. The two transcription factors TbpD (VNG7114) and TfbA (VNG 2184) were also studied. Using VNG7114, VNG2184, and VNG2163; the regression analysis of fractal dimension versus Shannon entropy shows that R2 ~ 0.997 for N =3. The VNG2163 unknown function may be related to the pathways with transcriptions closely regulated to sequences VNG7114 and VNG2184.

  17. Environmental genomics of "Haloquadratum walsbyi" in a saltern crystallizer indicates a large pool of accessory genes in an otherwise coherent species

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bolhuis Henk

    2006-07-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Mature saturated brine (crystallizers communities are largely dominated (>80% of cells by the square halophilic archaeon "Haloquadratum walsbyi". The recent cultivation of the strain HBSQ001 and thesequencing of its genome allows comparison with the metagenome of this taxonomically simplified environment. Similar studies carried out in other extreme environments have revealed very little diversity in gene content among the cell lineages present. Results The metagenome of the microbial community of a crystallizer pond has been analyzed by end sequencing a 2000 clone fosmid library and comparing the sequences obtained with the genome sequence of "Haloquadratum walsbyi". The genome of the sequenced strain was retrieved nearly complete within this environmental DNA library. However, many ORF's that could be ascribed to the "Haloquadratum" metapopulation by common genome characteristics or scaffolding to the strain genome were not present in the specific sequenced isolate. Particularly, three regions of the sequenced genome were associated with multiple rearrangements and the presence of different genes from the metapopulation. Many transposition and phage related genes were found within this pool which, together with the associated atypical GC content in these areas, supports lateral gene transfer mediated by these elements as the most probable genetic cause of this variability. Additionally, these sequences were highly enriched in putative regulatory and signal transduction functions. Conclusion These results point to a large pan-genome (total gene repertoire of the genus/species even in this highly specialized extremophile and at a single geographic location. The extensive gene repertoire is what might be expected of a population that exploits a diverse nutrient pool, resulting from the degradation of biomass produced at lower salinities.

  18. Impact of a homing intein on recombination frequency and organismal fitness

    Science.gov (United States)

    Naor, Adit; Altman-Price, Neta; Soucy, Shannon M.; Green, Anna G.; Mitiagin, Yulia; Turgeman-Grott, Israela; Davidovich, Noam; Gophna, Uri

    2016-01-01

    Inteins are parasitic genetic elements that excise themselves at the protein level by self-splicing, allowing the formation of functional, nondisrupted proteins. Many inteins contain a homing endonuclease (HEN) domain and rely on its activity for horizontal propagation. However, successful invasion of an entire population will make this activity redundant, and the HEN domain is expected to degenerate quickly under these conditions. Several theories have been proposed for the continued existence of the both active HEN and noninvaded alleles within a population. However, to date, these models were not directly tested experimentally. Using the natural cell fusion ability of the halophilic archaeon Haloferax volcanii we were able to examine this question in vivo, by mating polB intein-positive [insertion site c in the gene encoding DNA polymerase B (polB-c)] and intein-negative cells and examining the dispersal efficiency of this intein in a natural, polyploid population. Through competition between otherwise isogenic intein-positive and intein-negative strains we determined a surprisingly high fitness cost of over 7% for the polB-c intein. Our laboratory culture experiments and samples taken from Israel’s Mediterranean coastline show that the polB-c inteins do not efficiently take over an inteinless population through mating, even under ideal conditions. The presence of the HEN/intein promoted recombination when intein-positive and intein-negative cells were mated. Increased recombination due to HEN activity contributes not only to intein dissemination but also to variation at the population level because recombination tracts during repair extend substantially from the homing site. PMID:27462108

  19. Natronoarchaeum persicum sp. nov., a haloarchaeon isolated from a hypersaline lake.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Naghoni, Ali; Emtiazi, Giti; Amoozegar, Mohammad Ali; Rasooli, Mehrnoosh; Etemadifar, Zahra; Shahzadeh Fazeli, Seyed Abolhassan; Minegishi, Hiroaki; Ventosa, Antonio

    2017-09-01

    A novel halophilic archaeon, designated strain WIIAL99T, was isolated from Lake Meyghan, a hypersaline lake in Iran. Cells of strain WIIAL99T were non-motile, catalase-positive and oxidase-negative. Strain WIIAL99T required at least 2.5 M NaCl and 0.05 M MgCl2 for growth. Optimal growth was achieved at 3.5 M NaCl and 0.1 M MgCl2. The optimum pH and temperature for growth were pH 7.0 and 37-40 °C; it was able to grow at pH 6.0-8.5 and 20-55 °C. Cells lysed in distilled water and the minimal NaCl concentration to prevent cell lysis was 8 % (w/v). The major polar lipids of strain WIIAL99T were phosphatidylglycerol, phosphatidylglycerol phosphate methyl ester, disulfated diglycosyl diether and one unidentified glycolipid. The DNA G+C content of strain WIIAL99T was 66.7 mol%. The closest relative was Natronoarchaeum rubrum JCM 17119T with 98.2 % similarity in the orthologous 16S rRNA gene sequence. Analysis of 16S rRNA and rpoB' gene sequences indicated that strain WIIAL99T is a member of the genus Natronoarchaeum in the family Halobacteriaceae and forms a distinct cluster. It was concluded that strain WIIAL99T (=IBRC-M 11062T=LMG 29814T) represents a novel species of the genus Natronoarchaeum, for which the name Natronoarchaeum persicum sp. nov. is proposed.

  20. Utilization of vinasse for production of poly-3-(hydroxybutyrate-co-hydroxyvalerate) by Haloferax mediterranei.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bhattacharyya, Anirban; Pramanik, Arnab; Maji, Sudipta Kumar; Haldar, Saubhik; Mukhopadhyay, Ujjal Kumar; Mukherjee, Joydeep

    2012-07-09

    Vinasse, a highly polluting waste of the ethanol industry was utilized for the production of polyhydroxyalkanoate (PHA) by the extremely halophilic archaeon, Haloferax mediterranei in shake-flasks. Following pre-treatment through adsorption on activated carbon, 25%-50% (v/v) pre-treated vinasse was utilized leading to 70% maximum accumulation of PHA. Maximum PHA concentration of 19.7 g/l, product yield coefficient (based on total carbohydrates) of 0.87 and 0.21 g/l h volumetric productivity were achieved. Concomitant lowering of BOD5 of pre-treated vinasse by at least 78% and COD by at least 80% was attained at the end of this process. The PHA was recovered by osmotic lysis of the cells and purification by sodium hypochlorite and organic solvents. Through UV-vis spectroscopy, gas chromatography, differential scanning calorimetry and nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy, the PHA was identified as poly-3-(hydroxybutyrate-co-hydroxyvalerate). The 3-hydroxyvalerate content was 12.36 mol % (utilizing 25% pre-treated vinasse) and 14.09 mol % (utilizing 50% pre-treated vinasse). High salt concentration in the medium allowed this process without sterile conditions and thus reduction in costs of sterilization can be envisaged. Activated charcoal pre-treatment of vinasse is economical than competing processes such as ultrafiltration of whey, extrusion and enzymatic treatment of rice and corn starch. Without impacting sugar prices, this process can easily be integrated into a distillery that has fermentation equipment and trained personnel. High PHA content, productivity, zero-cost carbon source, low-cost isolation of a high-purity product and potential integration into ethanol manufacturing unit with concomitant wastewater treatment should merit further development of this process to higher scales.

  1. Draft genome sequence of the extremely halophilic Halorubrum sp. SAH-A6 isolated from rock salts of the Danakil depression, Ethiopia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ashagrie Gibtan

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available The draft genome sequence of Halorubrum sp. SAH-A6, isolated from commercial rock salts of the Danakil depression, Ethiopia. The genome comprised 3,325,770 bp, with the G + C content of 68.0%. The strain has many genes which are responsible for secondary metabolites biosynthesis, transport and catabolism as compared to other Halorubrum archaea members. Abundant genes responsible for numerous transport systems, solute accumulation, and aromatic/sulfur decomposition were detected. The first genomic analysis encourages further research on comparative genomics, and biotechnological applications. The NCBI accession number for this genome is SAMN04278861 and ID: 4278861 and strain deposited with accession number KCTC 43215.

  2. Changes in growth, carbon and nitrogen enzyme activity and mRNA accumulation in the halophilic microalga Dunaliella viridis in response to NaCl stress

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Dongmei; Wang, Weiwei; Xu, Nianjun; Sun, Xue

    2016-12-01

    Many species of microalga Dunaliella exhibit a remarkable tolerance to salinity and are therefore ideal for probing the effects of salinity. In this work, we assessed the effects of NaCl stress on the growth, activity and mRNA level of carbon and nitrogen metabolism enzymes of D. viridis. The alga could grow over a salinity range of 0.44 mol L-1 to 3.00 mol L-1 NaCl, but the most rapid growth was observed at 1.00 mol L-1 NaCl, followed by 2.00 mol L-1 NaCl. Paralleling these growth patterns, the highest initial and total Rubisco activities were detected in the presence of 1.00 mol L-1 NaCl, decreasing to 37.33% and 26.39% of those values, respectively, in the presence of 3.00 mol L-1 NaCl, respectively. However, the highest extracellular carbonic anhydrase (CA) activity was measured in the presence of 2.00 mol L-1 NaCl, followed by 1.00 mol L-1 NaCl. Different from the two carbon enzymes, nitrate reductase (NR) activity showed a slight change under different NaCl concentrations. At the transcriptional level, the mRNAs of Rubisco large subunit ( rbcL), and small subunit ( rbcS), attained their highest abundances in the presence of 1.00 and 2.00 mol L-1 NaCl, respectively. The CA mRNA accumulation was induced from 0.44 mol L-1 to 3.00 mol L-1 NaCl, but the NR mRNA showed the decreasing tendency with the increasing salinity. In conclusion, the growth and carbon fixation enzyme of Rubisco displayed similar tendency in response to NaCl stress, CA was proved be salt-inducible within a certain salinity range and NR showed the least effect by NaCl in D. viridis.

  3. Desulfonatronovibrio halophilus sp. nov., a novel moderately halophilic sulfate-reducing bacterium from hypersaline chloride-sulfate lakes in Central Asia

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Sorokin, D.Y.; Tourova, T.P.; Abbas, B.; Suhacheva, M.V.; Muyzer, G.

    2012-01-01

    Four strains of lithotrophic sulfate-reducing bacteria (SRB) have been enriched and isolated from anoxic sediments of hypersaline chloride-sulfate lakes in the Kulunda Steppe (Altai, Russia) at 2 M NaCl and pH 7.5. According to the 16S rRNA gene sequence analysis, the isolates were closely related

  4. Removal of Soluble Strontium via Incorporation into Biogenic Carbonate Minerals by Halophilic Bacterium Bacillus sp. Strain TK2d in a Highly Saline Solution.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Horiike, Takumi; Dotsuta, Yuma; Nakano, Yuriko; Ochiai, Asumi; Utsunomiya, Satoshi; Ohnuki, Toshihiko; Yamashita, Mitsuo

    2017-10-15

    Radioactive strontium ( 90 Sr) leaked into saline environments, including the ocean, from the Fukushima Daiichi Nuclear Power Plant after a nuclear accident. Since the removal of 90 Sr using general adsorbents (e.g., zeolite) is not efficient at high salinity, a suitable alternative immobilization method is necessary. Therefore, we incorporated soluble Sr into biogenic carbonate minerals generated by urease-producing microorganisms from a saline solution. An isolate, Bacillus sp. strain TK2d, from marine sediment removed >99% of Sr after contact for 4 days in a saline solution (1.0 × 10 -3 mol liter -1 of Sr, 10% marine broth, and 3% [wt/vol] NaCl). Transmission electron microscopy and energy-dispersive X-ray spectroscopy showed that Sr and Ca accumulated as phosphate minerals inside the cells and adsorbed at the cell surface at 2 days of cultivation, and then carbonate minerals containing Sr and Ca developed outside the cells after 2 days. Energy-dispersive spectroscopy revealed that Sr, but not Mg, was present in the carbonate minerals even after 8 days. X-ray absorption fine-structure analyses showed that a portion of the soluble Sr changed its chemical state to strontianite (SrCO 3 ) in biogenic carbonate minerals. These results indicated that soluble Sr was selectively solidified into biogenic carbonate minerals by the TK2d strain in highly saline environments. IMPORTANCE Radioactive nuclides ( 134 Cs, 137 Cs, and 90 Sr) leaked into saline environments, including the ocean, from the Fukushima Daiichi Nuclear Power Plant accident. Since the removal of 90 Sr using general adsorbents, such as zeolite, is not efficient at high salinity, a suitable alternative immobilization method is necessary. Utilizing the known concept that radioactive 90 Sr is incorporated into bones by biomineralization, we got the idea of removing 90 Sr via incorporation into biominerals. In this study, we revealed the ability of the isolated ureolytic bacterium to remove Sr under high-salinity conditions and the mechanism of Sr incorporation into biogenic calcium carbonate over a longer duration. These findings indicated the mechanism of the biomineralization by the urease-producing bacterium and the possibility of the biomineralization application for a new purification method for 90 Sr in highly saline environments. Copyright © 2017 American Society for Microbiology.

  5. Optimization of EPS Production and Characterization by a Halophilic Bacterium, Kocuria rosea ZJUQH from Chaka Salt Lake with Response Surface Methodology

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Di Gu; Yingchun Jiao; Jianan Wu; Zhengjie Liu; Qihe Chen

    2017-01-01

    .... The optimal combination of fermentation medium compositions on EPS production was studied. In this work, a fractional factorial design was adopted to investigate the significant factors that affected EPS production...

  6. Prauserella oleivorans sp. nov., a halophilic and thermotolerant crude-oil-degrading actinobacterium isolated from an oil-contaminated mud pit.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dastgheib, Seyed Mohammad Mehdi; Tirandaz, Hassan; Moshtaghi Nikou, Mahdi; Ramezani, Mohaddaseh; Shavandi, Mahmoud; Amoozegar, Mohammad Ali; Ventosa, Antonio

    2017-09-01

    A crude-oil-degrading, Gram-stain-positive actinobacterial strain, RIPIT, was isolated from a soil sample collected from an oil-contaminated mud pit in Khangiran oil and gas field, in the north-east of Iran. RIPIT was strictly aerobic, catalase- and oxidase-positive. The strain grew with 0-12.5 % (w/v) NaCl (optimum 3-5 %), at 25-55 °C (optimum 45 °C) and at pH 6.0-9.5 (optimum pH 7.0). The results of 16S rRNA gene sequence comparative analysis indicated that RIPIT represents a member of the genus Prauserella, with high phylogenetic similarity to Prauserella coralliicola SCSIO 11529T (97.5 %), Prauserella endophytica SP28S-3T (97.5 %) and Prauserella marina MS498T (97.2 %). DNA-DNA relatedness values between the novel strain and P. coralliicola DSM 45821T, P. endophytica DSM 46655T and P. marina DSM 45268T were 28 , 19 and 23 %, respectively. The cell wall peptidoglycan of RIPIT contained meso-diaminopimelic acid as the diamino acid and the whole-cell sugars are galactose and arabinose. The polar lipids pattern contained phosphatidylethanolamine, diphosphatidylglycerol, phosphatidylinositol and two unknown phospholipids. Its cellular fatty acids pattern consisted of C17 : 1ω6c, iso-C16 : 0 and summed feature 3 (C16 : 1ω7c and/or iso-C15 : 0 2-OH), and the major respiratory quinone was MK-9(H4). The G+C content of the genomic DNA was 69 mol%. On the basis of polyphasic taxonomic data we propose that RIPIT represents a novel species of the genus Prauserella, for which the name Prauserella oleivorans sp. nov. is proposed. The type strain of Prauserellaoleivorans is RIPIT (=IBRC-M 10906T=LMG 28389T).

  7. Salininema proteolyticum gen. nov., sp. nov., a halophilic rare actinomycete isolated from wetland soil, and emended description of the family Glycomycetaceae.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nikou, Mahdi Moshtaghi; Ramezani, Mohaddaseh; Amoozegar, Mohammad Ali; Rasouli, Mehrnoush; Fazeli, Seyed Abolhassan Shahzadeh; Schumann, Peter; de la Haba, Rafael R; Ventosa, Antonio

    2015-10-01

    A Gram-stain-positive actinobacterial strain, Miq-4T, was isolated from soil around Meighan wetland in the centre of Iran. Strain Miq-4T was strictly aerobic, catalase- and oxidase-positive. The isolate grew in the presence of 3–15 % (w/v) NaCl, at 20–40 °C and pH 6.0–11.0. The optimum NaCl, temperature and pH for growth were 7.0 %, 30 °C and 7.0–8.5, respectively. The cell wall of strain Miq-4T contained meso-diaminopimelic acid as the diamino acid and glucose and ribose as the whole-cell sugars. The polar lipid pattern consisted of diphosphatidylglycerol, phosphatidylglycerol, phosphatidylethanolamine, phosphatidylinositol and phosphatidylinositol mannoside. Strain Miq-4T synthesized cellular fatty acids of anteiso- and iso-branched types, including anteiso-C17 : 0, anteiso- C15 : 0 and iso-C16 : 0, and the major respiratory quinone was MK-9(H4). The G+C content of the genomic DNA was 68.2 mol%. Phylogenetic analysis based on 16S rRNA gene sequences and characteristic patterns of 16S rRNA gene signature nucleotides revealed that strain Miq-4T belongs to the family Glycomycetaceae and showed the closest phylogenetic similarity with Haloglycomyces albus YIM 92370T (94.1 % 16S rRNA gene sequence similarity). On the basis of phylogenetic analysis and phenotypic and chemotaxonomic characteristics, strain Miq-4T represents a novel species of a new genus in the family Glycomycetaceae, for which the name Salininema proteoliyticum gen. nov., sp. nov. is proposed. The type strain of the type species is Miq-4T ( = IBRC-M 10908T = LMG 28391T). An emended description of the family Glycomycetaceae is also proposed in order to include features of the new genus.

  8. Complete genome sequence of the halophilic bacterium Spirochaeta africana type strain (Z-7692(T)) from the alkaline Lake Magadi in the East African Rift.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liolos, Konstantinos; Abt, Birte; Scheuner, Carmen; Teshima, Hazuki; Held, Brittany; Lapidus, Alla; Nolan, Matt; Lucas, Susan; Deshpande, Shweta; Cheng, Jan-Fang; Tapia, Roxanne; Goodwin, Lynne A; Pitluck, Sam; Pagani, Ioanna; Ivanova, Natalia; Mavromatis, Konstantinos; Mikhailova, Natalia; Huntemann, Marcel; Pati, Amrita; Chen, Amy; Palaniappan, Krishna; Land, Miriam; Rohde, Manfred; Tindall, Brian J; Detter, John C; Göker, Markus; Bristow, James; Eisen, Jonathan A; Markowitz, Victor; Hugenholtz, Philip; Woyke, Tanja; Klenk, Hans-Peter; Kyrpides, Nikos C

    2013-01-01

    Spirochaeta africana Zhilina et al. 1996 is an anaerobic, aerotolerant, spiral-shaped bacterium that is motile via periplasmic flagella. The type strain of the species, Z-7692(T), was isolated in 1993 or earlier from a bacterial bloom in the brine under the trona layer in a shallow lagoon of the alkaline equatorial Lake Magadi in Kenya. Here we describe the features of this organism, together with the complete genome sequence, and annotation. Considering the pending reclassification of S. caldaria to the genus Treponema, S. africana is only the second 'true' member of the genus Spirochaeta with a genome-sequenced type strain to be published. The 3,285,855 bp long genome of strain Z-7692(T) with its 2,817 protein-coding and 57 RNA genes is a part of the G enomic E ncyclopedia of B acteria and A rchaea project.

  9. Complete genome sequence of the halophilic bacterium Spirochaeta africana type strain (Z-7692T) from the alkaline Lake Magadi in the East African Rift

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Liolios, Konstantinos [U.S. Department of Energy, Joint Genome Institute; Abt, Birte [DSMZ - German Collection of Microorganisms and Cell Cultures GmbH, Braunschweig, Germany; Scheuner, Carmen [DSMZ - German Collection of Microorganisms and Cell Cultures GmbH, Braunschweig, Germany; Teshima, Hazuki [Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL); Held, Brittany [Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL); Lapidus, Alla L. [U.S. Department of Energy, Joint Genome Institute; Nolan, Matt [U.S. Department of Energy, Joint Genome Institute; Lucas, Susan [U.S. Department of Energy, Joint Genome Institute; Deshpande, Shweta [U.S. Department of Energy, Joint Genome Institute; Cheng, Jan-Fang [U.S. Department of Energy, Joint Genome Institute; Tapia, Roxanne [Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL); Goodwin, Lynne A. [Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL); Pitluck, Sam [U.S. Department of Energy, Joint Genome Institute; Pagani, Ioanna [U.S. Department of Energy, Joint Genome Institute; Ivanova, N [U.S. Department of Energy, Joint Genome Institute; Mavromatis, K [U.S. Department of Energy, Joint Genome Institute; Mikhailova, Natalia [U.S. Department of Energy, Joint Genome Institute; Huntemann, Marcel [U.S. Department of Energy, Joint Genome Institute; Pati, Amrita [U.S. Department of Energy, Joint Genome Institute; Chen, Amy [U.S. Department of Energy, Joint Genome Institute; Palaniappan, Krishna [U.S. Department of Energy, Joint Genome Institute; Land, Miriam L [ORNL; Rohde, Manfred [HZI - Helmholtz Centre for Infection Research, Braunschweig, Germany; Tindall, Brian [DSMZ - German Collection of Microorganisms and Cell Cultures GmbH, Braunschweig, Germany; Detter, J. Chris [U.S. Department of Energy, Joint Genome Institute; Goker, Markus [DSMZ - German Collection of Microorganisms and Cell Cultures GmbH, Braunschweig, Germany; Bristow, James [U.S. Department of Energy, Joint Genome Institute; Eisen, Jonathan [U.S. Department of Energy, Joint Genome Institute; Markowitz, Victor [U.S. Department of Energy, Joint Genome Institute; Hugenholtz, Philip [U.S. Department of Energy, Joint Genome Institute; Woyke, Tanja [U.S. Department of Energy, Joint Genome Institute; Klenk, Hans-Peter [DSMZ - German Collection of Microorganisms and Cell Cultures GmbH, Braunschweig, Germany; Kyrpides, Nikos C [U.S. Department of Energy, Joint Genome Institute

    2013-01-01

    Spirochaeta africana Zhilina et al. 1996 is an anaerobic, aerotolerant, spiral-shaped bacte- rium that is motile via periplasmic flagella. The type strain of the species, Z-7692T, was iso- lated in 1993 or earlier from a bacterial bloom in the brine under the trona layer in a shallow lagoon of the alkaline equatorial Lake Magadi in Kenya. Here we describe the features of this organism, together with the complete genome sequence, and annotation. Considering the pending reclassification of S. caldaria to the genus Treponema, S. africana is only the second 'true' member of the genus Spirochaeta with a genome-sequenced type strain to be pub- lished. The 3,285,855 bp long genome of strain Z-7692T with its 2,817 protein-coding and 57 RNA genes is a part of the Genomic Encyclopedia of Bacteria and Archaea project.

  10. Modern Aspects of Halophilism: The Edmond de Rothschild School in Molecular Biophysics (12th) Held in Israel on March 26-April 5, 1989. Program and Abstracts

    Science.gov (United States)

    1989-04-01

    Spirulina sp are used as food supplements for cattle and poultry . Their ability to adapt to all environments also allows them to play a major role in soil...other transposons resulted in transposition frequencies of approximately 10- 6 . Among them Tn5 was extensively used to isolate pigment deficient mutants...gram negative bacterium produces a dark brown pigmentation during its latelog-stationary phase of cultural growth in liquid as well as solid Jensen’s

  11. Diversity of viruses of the hyperthermophilic archaeal genus Aeropyrum, and isolation of the Aeropyrum pernix bacilliform virus 1, APBV1, the first representative of the family Clavaviridae

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Mochizuki, Tomohiro; Yoshida, Takashi; Tanaka, Reiji; Forterre, Patrick; Sako, Yoshihiko; Prangishvili, David

    2010-01-01

    We have surveyed the morphological diversity of viruses infecting the archaeon Aeropyrum pernix, the most thermophilic species among aerobic organisms, growing optimally at 90 degrees C, and isolated...

  12. Evidence that biosynthesis of the second and third sugars of the archaellin Tetrasaccharide in the archaeon Methanococcus maripaludis occurs by the same pathway used by Pseudomonas aeruginosa to make a di-N-acetylated sugar.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Siu, Sarah; Robotham, Anna; Logan, Susan M; Kelly, John F; Uchida, Kaoru; Aizawa, Shin-Ichi; Jarrell, Ken F

    2015-05-01

    Methanococcus maripaludis has two surface appendages, archaella and type IV pili, which are composed of glycoprotein subunits. Archaellins are modified with an N-linked tetrasaccharide with the structure Sug-1,4-β-ManNAc3NAmA6Thr-1,4-β-GlcNAc3NAcA-1,3-β-GalNAc, where Sug is (5S)-2-acetamido-2,4-dideoxy-5-O-methyl-α-L-erythro-hexos-5-ulo-1,5-pyranose. The pilin glycan has an additional hexose attached to GalNAc. In this study, genes located in two adjacent, divergently transcribed operons (mmp0350-mmp0354 and mmp0359-mmp0355) were targeted for study based on annotations suggesting their involvement in biosynthesis of N-glycan sugars. Mutants carrying deletions in mmp0350, mmp0351, mmp0352, or mmp0353 were nonarchaellated and synthesized archaellins modified with a 1-sugar glycan, as estimated from Western blots. Mass spectroscopy analysis of pili purified from the Δmmp0352 strain confirmed a glycan with only GalNAc, suggesting mmp0350 to mmp0353 were all involved in biosynthesis of the second sugar (GlcNAc3NAcA). The Δmmp0357 mutant was archaellated and had archaellins with a 2-sugar glycan, as confirmed by mass spectroscopy of purified archaella, indicating a role for MMP0357 in biosynthesis of the third sugar (ManNAc3NAmA6Thr). M. maripaludis mmp0350, mmp0351, mmp0352, mmp0353, and mmp0357 are proposed to be functionally equivalent to Pseudomonas aeruginosa wbpABEDI, involved in converting UDP-N-acetylglucosamine to UDP-2,3-diacetamido-2,3-dideoxy-d-mannuronic acid, an O5-specific antigen sugar. Cross-domain complementation of the final step of the P. aeruginosa pathway with mmp0357 supports this hypothesis. This work identifies a series of genes in adjacent operons that are shown to encode the enzymes that complete the entire pathway for generation of the second and third sugars of the N-linked tetrasaccharide that modifies archaellins of Methanococcus maripaludis. This posttranslational modification of archaellins is important, as it is necessary for archaellum assembly. Pilins are modified with a different N-glycan consisting of the archaellin tetrasaccharide but with an additional hexose attached to the linking sugar. Mass spectrometry analysis of the pili of one mutant strain provided insight into how this different glycan might ultimately be assembled. This study includes a rare example of an archaeal gene functionally replacing a bacterial gene in a complex sugar biosynthesis pathway. Copyright © 2015, American Society for Microbiology. All Rights Reserved.

  13. Genome sequence of the mud-dwelling archaeon Methanoplanus limicola type strain (DSM 2279(T)), reclassification of Methanoplanus petrolearius as Methanolacinia petrolearia and emended descriptions of the genera Methanoplanus and Methanolacinia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Göker, Markus; Lu, Megan; Fiebig, Anne; Nolan, Matt; Lapidus, Alla; Tice, Hope; Del Rio, Tijana Glavina; Cheng, Jan-Fang; Han, Cliff; Tapia, Roxanne; Goodwin, Lynne A; Pitluck, Sam; Liolios, Konstantinos; Mavromatis, Konstantinos; Pagani, Ioanna; Ivanova, Natalia; Mikhailova, Natalia; Pati, Amrita; Chen, Amy; Palaniappan, Krishna; Land, Miriam; Mayilraj, Shanmugam; Rohde, Manfred; Detter, John C; Bunk, Boyke; Spring, Stefan; Wirth, Reinhard; Woyke, Tanja; Bristow, James; Eisen, Jonathan A; Markowitz, Victor; Hugenholtz, Philip; Kyrpides, Nikos C; Klenk, Hans-Peter

    2014-06-15

    Methanoplanus limicola Wildgruber et al. 1984 is a mesophilic methanogen that was isolated from a swamp composed of drilling waste near Naples, Italy, shortly after the Archaea were recognized as a separate domain of life. Methanoplanus is the type genus in the family Methanoplanaceae, a taxon that felt into disuse since modern 16S rRNA gene sequences-based taxonomy was established. Methanoplanus is now placed within the Methanomicrobiaceae, a family that is so far poorly characterized at the genome level. The only other type strain of the genus with a sequenced genome, Methanoplanus petrolearius SEBR 4847(T), turned out to be misclassified and required reclassification to Methanolacinia. Both, Methanoplanus and Methanolacinia, needed taxonomic emendations due to a significant deviation of the G+C content of their genomes from previously published (pre-genome-sequence era) values. Until now genome sequences were published for only four of the 33 species with validly published names in the Methanomicrobiaceae. Here we describe the features of M. limicola, together with the improved-high-quality draft genome sequence and annotation of the type strain, M3(T). The 3,200,946 bp long chromosome (permanent draft sequence) with its 3,064 protein-coding and 65 RNA genes is a part of the G enomic E ncyclopedia of B acteria and Archaea project.

  14. NCBI nr-aa BLAST: CBRC-PMAR-01-0237 [SEVENS

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available CBRC-PMAR-01-0237 ref|YP_687144.1| hypothetical protein RRC32 [uncultured methanoge...nic archaeon RC-I] emb|CAJ37818.1| hypothetical protein [uncultured methanogenic archaeon RC-I] YP_687144.1 6e-19 34% ...

  15. NCBI nr-aa BLAST: CBRC-MEUG-01-2690 [SEVENS

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available CBRC-MEUG-01-2690 ref|YP_687144.1| hypothetical protein RRC32 [uncultured methanoge...nic archaeon RC-I] emb|CAJ37818.1| hypo