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Sample records for haloalkaliphilic halomonas nitrilicus

  1. [Moderately haloalkaliphilic aerobic methylobacteria].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Trotsenko, Iu A; Doronina, N V; Li, Ts D; Reshetnikov, A S

    2007-01-01

    Aerobic methylobacteria utilizing oxidized and substituted methane derivatives as carbon and energy sources are widespread in nature and involved in the global carbon cycle, being a unique biofilter on the path of these C1 compounds from different ecosystems to the atmosphere. New data on the biological features of moderately halophilic, neutrophilic, and alkaliphilic methylobacteria isolated from biotopes with higher osmolarity (seas, saline and soda lakes, saline soils, and deteriorating marble) are reviewed. Particular attention is paid to the latest advances in the study of the mechanisms of osmoadaptation of aerobic moderately haloalkaliphilic methylobacteria: formation of osmolytes, in particular, molecular and genetic aspects of biosynthesis of the universal bioprotectant ectoine. The prospects for further studies of the physiological and biochemical principles of haloalkalophily and for the application of haloalkaliphilic aerobic methylobacteria in biosynthesis and biodegradation are discussed.

  2. Evaluation of haloalkaliphilic sulfur-oxidizing microorganisms with potential application in the effluent treatment of the petroleum industry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Olguín-Lora, P; Le Borgne, S; Castorena-Cortés, G; Roldán-Carrillo, T; Zapata-Peñasco, I; Reyes-Avila, J; Alcántara-Pérez, S

    2011-02-01

    Haloalkaliphilic sulfur-oxidizing mixed cultures for the treatment of alkaline-saline effluents containing sulfide were characterized and evaluated. The mixed cultures (IMP-PB, IMP-XO and IMP-TL) were obtained from Mexican alkaline soils collected in Puebla (PB), Xochimilco (XO) and Tlahuac (TL), respectively. The Ribosomal Intergenic Spacer Analysis (RISA) revealed bacteria related to Thioalkalibacterium and Thioalkalivibrio in IMP-XO and IMP-PB mixed cultures. Halomonas strains were detected in IMP-XO and IMP-TL. In addition, an uncultured Bacteroides bacterium was present in IMP-TL. Mixed cultures were evaluated at different pH and NaCl concentrations at 30°C. IMP-PB and IMP-TL expressed thiosulfate-oxidizing activity in the 7.5-10.5 pH range, whereas IMP-XO presented its maximal activity with 19.0 mg O₂ g (protein)⁻¹ min⁻¹, at pH 10.6; it was not affected by NaCl concentrations up to 1.7 M. In continuous culture, IMP-XO showed a growth rate of 15 day⁻¹, productivity of 433.4 mg(protein) l⁻¹ day⁻¹ and haloalkaliphilic sulfur-oxidizing activity was also detected up to 170 mM by means of N-methyl-diethanolamine (MDEA). Saline-alkaline soil samples are potential sources of haloalkaliphilic sulfur-oxidizing bacteria and the mixed cultures could be applied in the treatment of inorganic sulfur compounds in petroleum industry effluents under alkaline-saline conditions.

  3. Salt and alkali stresses reduction in wheat by plant growth promoting haloalkaliphilic bacteria

    OpenAIRE

    Torbaghan, Mehrnoush Eskandari; Lakzian, Amir; Astaraei, Ali Reza; Fotovat, Amir; Besharati, Hossein

    2017-01-01

    Haloalkaliphilic bacteria have plant growth promoting characteristics that can be used to deal with different environmental stresses. To study the effect of haloalkaliphilic bacteria to reduce salinity and alkalinity stress in wheat, 48 isolates were isolated and grouped into halophiles, alkaliphiles and haloalkaliphiles based on growth characteristics. The ammonia, 3-indole acetic acid and ACC (1-aminocyclopropane-1-carboxylate) deaminase production were studied. Wheat yield was evaluated in...

  4. Genomic diversity within the haloalkaliphilic genus Thioalkalivibrio.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ahn, Anne-Catherine; Meier-Kolthoff, Jan P; Overmars, Lex; Richter, Michael; Woyke, Tanja; Sorokin, Dimitry Y; Muyzer, Gerard

    2017-01-01

    Thioalkalivibrio is a genus of obligate chemolithoautotrophic haloalkaliphilic sulfur-oxidizing bacteria. Their habitat are soda lakes which are dual extreme environments with a pH range from 9.5 to 11 and salt concentrations up to saturation. More than 100 strains of this genus have been isolated from various soda lakes all over the world, but only ten species have been effectively described yet. Therefore, the assignment of the remaining strains to either existing or novel species is important and will further elucidate their genomic diversity as well as give a better general understanding of this genus. Recently, the genomes of 76 Thioalkalivibrio strains were sequenced. On these, we applied different methods including (i) 16S rRNA gene sequence analysis, (ii) Multilocus Sequence Analysis (MLSA) based on eight housekeeping genes, (iii) Average Nucleotide Identity based on BLAST (ANIb) and MUMmer (ANIm), (iv) Tetranucleotide frequency correlation coefficients (TETRA), (v) digital DNA:DNA hybridization (dDDH) as well as (vi) nucleotide- and amino acid-based Genome BLAST Distance Phylogeny (GBDP) analyses. We detected a high genomic diversity by revealing 15 new "genomic" species and 16 new "genomic" subspecies in addition to the ten already described species. Phylogenetic and phylogenomic analyses showed that the genus is not monophyletic, because four strains were clearly separated from the other Thioalkalivibrio by type strains from other genera. Therefore, it is recommended to classify the latter group as a novel genus. The biogeographic distribution of Thioalkalivibrio suggested that the different "genomic" species can be classified as candidate disjunct or candidate endemic species. This study is a detailed genome-based classification and identification of members within the genus Thioalkalivibrio. However, future phenotypical and chemotaxonomical studies will be needed for a full species description of this genus.

  5. Draft Genome of the Marine Gammaproteobacterium Halomonas titanicae

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sánchez-Porro, Cristina; de la Haba, Rafael R.; Cruz-Hernández, Norge; González, Juan M.; Reyes-Guirao, Cristina; Navarro-Sampedro, Laura; Carballo, Modesto

    2013-01-01

    Halomonas titanicae strain BH1 is a heterotrophic, aerobic marine bacterium which was isolated from rusticles of the RMS Titanic wreck. Here we report the draft genome sequence of this halophilic gammaproteobacterium. PMID:23516210

  6. Biodegradation of Para Amino Acetanilide by Halomonas sp. TBZ3.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hajizadeh, Nader; Sefidi Heris, Youssof; Zununi Vahed, Sepideh; Vallipour, Javad; Hejazi, Mohammad Amin; Golabi, Sayyed Mahdi; Asadpour-Zeynali, Karim; Hejazi, Mohammad Saeid

    2015-09-01

    Aromatic compounds are known as a group of highly persistent environmental pollutants. Halomonas sp. TBZ3 was isolated from the highly salty Urmia Lake of Iran. In this study, characterization of a new Halomonas isolate called Halomonas sp. TBZ3 and its employment for biodegradation of para-amino acetanilide (PAA), as an aromatic environmental pollutant, is described. This study aimed to characterize the TBZ3 isolate and to elucidate its ability as a biodegradative agent that decomposes PAA. Primarily, DNA-DNA hybridization between TBZ3, Halomonas denitrificans DSM18045T and Halomonas saccharevitans LMG 23976T was carried out. Para-amino acetanilide biodegradation was assessed using spectrophotometry and confirmed by gas chromatography-mass spectroscopy (GC-MS). Parameters effective on biodegradation of PAA were optimized by the Response Surface Methodology (RSM). The DNA-DNA hybridization experiments between isolate TBZ3, H. denitrificans and H. saccharevitans revealed relatedness levels of 57% and 65%, respectively. According to GC-MS results, TBZ3 degrades PAA to benzene, hexyl butanoate, 3-methyl-1-heptanol and hexyl hexanoate. Temperature 32.92°C, pH 6.76, and salinity 14% are the optimum conditions for biodegradation with a confidence level of 95% (at level α = 0.05). According to our results, Halomonas sp. TBZ3 could be considered as a biological agent for bioremediation of PAA and possibly other similar aromatic compounds.

  7. Bioreduction of chromate by immobilized cells of Halomonas sp

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Murugavelh, S.; Mohanty, Kaustubha [Department of Chemical Engineering, Indian Institute of Technology Guwahati, Guwahati – 781039, Assam (India)

    2013-07-01

    In this work, the bioreduction of Cr(VI) by immobilized cells of Halomonas sp was reported. Ca alginate, acryl amide and agar were tested as the matrices for immobilization. Ca alginate was found to be the suitable matrix among the different matrices studied. Of the various dosages of inoculum studied 2 g/L was found to be the optimum. Glucose at 1 g L-1 was completely utilized by the immobilized Halomonas sp even in the presence of Cr(VI) at 40 mg L-1. The optimum pH for the bioreduction of Cr(VI) by immobilized Halomonas sp was found to be pH 6. The mechanical strength of the beads plays an essential role in the bioreduction process. Halomonas sp entrapped in a alginate matrix reported a maximum of 98.9 % of reduction for an initial Cr(VI) concentration of 10 mg L-1. The alginate beads can be reused for 3 times with slight drop in the percentage reduction. The presence of other metals decreased the bioreduction percentage.

  8. Response of Haloalkaliphilic Archaeon Natronococcus Jeotgali RR17 to Hypergravity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thombre, Rebecca S.; Bhalerao, Aniruddha R.; Shinde, Vinaya D.; Dhar, Sunil Kumar; Shouche, Yogesh S.

    2017-06-01

    The survival of archaeabacteria in extreme inhabitable environments on earth that challenge organismic survival is ubiquitously known. However, the studies related to the effect of hypergravity on the growth and proliferation of archaea are unprecedented. The survival of organisms in hypergravity and rocks in addition to resistance to cosmic radiations, pressure and other extremities is imperative to study the possibilities of microbial travel between planets and endurance in hyperaccelerative forces faced during ejection of rocks from planets. The current investigation highlights the growth of an extremophilic archaeon isolated from a rocky substrate in hypergravity environment. The haloalkaliphilic archaeon, Natronococcus jeotgali RR17 was isolated from an Indian laterite rock, submerged in the Arabian sea lining Coastal Maharashtra, India. The endolithic haloarchaeon was subjected to hypergravity from 56 - 893 X gusing acceleration generated by centrifugal rotation. The cells of N. jeotgali RR17 proliferated and demonstrated good growth in hypergravity (223 X g). This is the first report on isolation of endolithic haloarchaeon N. jeotgali RR17 from an Indian laterite rock and its ability to proliferate in hypergravity. The present study demonstrates the ability of microbial life to survive and proliferate in hypergravity. Thus the inability of organismic growth in hypergravity may no longer be a limitation for astrobiology studies related to habitability of substellar objects, brown dwarfs and other planetary bodies in the universe besides planet earth.

  9. Disproportionation of elemental sulfur by haloalkaliphilic bacteria from soda lakes.

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    Poser, Alexander; Lohmayer, Regina; Vogt, Carsten; Knoeller, Kay; Planer-Friedrich, Britta; Sorokin, Dimitry; Richnow, Hans-H; Finster, Kai

    2013-11-01

    Microbial disproportionation of elemental sulfur to sulfide and sulfate is a poorly characterized part of the anoxic sulfur cycle. So far, only a few bacterial strains have been described that can couple this reaction to cell growth. Continuous removal of the produced sulfide, for instance by oxidation and/or precipitation with metal ions such as iron, is essential to keep the reaction exergonic. Hitherto, the process has exclusively been reported for neutrophilic anaerobic bacteria. Here, we report for the first time disproportionation of elemental sulfur by three pure cultures of haloalkaliphilic bacteria isolated from soda lakes: the Deltaproteobacteria Desulfurivibrio alkaliphilus and Desulfurivibrio sp. AMeS2, and a member of the Clostridia, Dethiobacter alkaliphilus. All cultures grew in saline media at pH 10 by sulfur disproportionation in the absence of metals as sulfide scavengers. Our data indicate that polysulfides are the dominant sulfur species under highly alkaline conditions and that they might be disproportionated. Furthermore, we report the first organism (Dt. alkaliphilus) from the class Clostridia that is able to grow by sulfur disproportionation.

  10. Halomonas titanicae sp. nov., a halophilic bacterium isolated from the RMS Titanic.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sánchez-Porro, Cristina; Kaur, Bhavleen; Mann, Henrietta; Ventosa, Antonio

    2010-12-01

    A Gram-negative, heterotrophic, aerobic, non-endospore-forming, peritrichously flagellated and motile bacterial strain, designated BH1(T), was isolated from samples of rusticles, which are formed in part by a consortium of micro-organisms, collected from the RMS Titanic wreck site. The strain grew optimally at 30-37°C, pH 7.0-7.5 and in the presence of 2-8 % (w/v) NaCl. We carried out a polyphasic taxonomic study in order to characterize the strain in detail. Phylogenetic analyses based on 16S rRNA gene sequence comparison indicated that strain BH1(T) clustered within the branch consisting of species of Halomonas. The most closely related type strains were Halomonas neptunia (98.6 % 16S rRNA sequence similarity), Halomonas variabilis (98.4 %), Halomonas boliviensis (98.3 %) and Halomonas sulfidaeris (97.5 %). Other closely related species were Halomonas alkaliphila (96.5 % sequence similarity), Halomonas hydrothermalis (96.3 %), Halomonas gomseomensis (96.3 %), Halomonas venusta (96.3 %) and Halomonas meridiana (96.2 %). The major fatty acids of strain BH1(T) were C(18 : 1)ω7c (36.3 %), C(16 : 0) (18.4 %) and C(19 : 0) cyclo ω8c (17.9 %). The DNA G+C content was 60.0 mol% (T(m)). Ubiquinone 9 (Q-9) was the major lipoquinone. The phenotypic features, fatty acid profile and DNA G+C content further supported the placement of strain BH1(T) in the genus Halomonas. DNA-DNA hybridization values between strain BH1(T) and H. neptunia CECT 5815(T), H. variabilis DSM 3051(T), H. boliviensis DSM 15516(T) and H. sulfidaeris CECT 5817(T) were 19, 17, 30 and 29 %, respectively, supporting the differential taxonomic status of BH1(T). On the basis of the phenotypic, chemotaxonomic and phylogenetic data, strain BH1(T) is considered to represent a novel species, for which the name Halomonas titanicae sp. nov. is proposed. The type strain is BH1(T) (=ATCC BAA-1257(T) =CECT 7585(T) =JCM 16411(T) =LMG 25388(T)).

  11. Characterization of the promising poly(3-hydroxybutyrate) producing halophilic bacterium Halomonas halophila

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Kučera, D.; Pernicová, I.; Kovalčik, A.; Koller, M.; Müllerová, L.; Sedláček, P.; Mravec, F.; Nebesářová, Jana; Kalina, M.; Márová, I.; Krzyžánek, Vladislav; Obruča, S.

    2018-01-01

    Roč. 256, May (2018), s. 552-556 ISSN 0960-8524 R&D Projects: GA MŠk(CZ) LM2015062; GA ČR(CZ) GA15-20645S Institutional support: RVO:68081731 Keywords : Halomonas halophila * halophiles * lignocellulose hydrolysates * morphology of bacterial cells * polyhydroxyalkanoates Impact factor: 5.651, year: 2016

  12. Chemotactic responses to gas oil of Halomonas spp. strains isolated from saline environments in Argentina Respuesta quimiotáctica hacia gas oil de cepas de Halomonas spp. aisladas de ambientes salinos de Argentina

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    Sebastián D´Ippólito

    2011-06-01

    Full Text Available In this study, two halophilic bacterial strains isolated from saline habitats in Argentina grew in the presence of gas oil. They were identified as Halomonas spp. and Nesterenkonia sp. by 16S ribosomal RNA sequencing. Chemotaxis towards gas oil was observed in Halomonas spp. by using swimming assays.En el presente trabajo se aislaron dos cepas bacterianas halofílicas a partir de muestras obtenidas en ambientes salinos de Argentina, que crecieron en presencia de gasoil como única fuente de carbono. Las cepas aisladas se identificaron como Halomonas spp. y Nesterenkonia sp. mediante secuenciación del gen del ARN ribosomal 16S. En ensayos de swimming, las cepas del genero Halomonas spp. mostraron una respuesta quimiotáctica hacia el gas oil.

  13. Monitoring the degradation capability of novel haloalkaliphilic tributyltin chloride (TBTCl) resistant bacteria from butyltin-polluted site.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hassan, Hamdy A; Dawah, Somya E; El-Sheekh, Mostafa M

    2018-03-28

    Tributyltin (TBT) is recognized as a major environmental problem at a global scale. Haloalkaliphilic tributyltin (TBT)-degrading bacteria may be a key factor in the remediation of TBT polluted sites. In this work, three haloalkaliphilic bacteria strains were isolated from a TBT-contaminated site in the Mediterranean Sea. After analysis of the 16S rRNA gene sequences the isolates were identified as Sphingobium sp. HS1, Stenotrophomonas chelatiphaga HS2 and Rhizobium borbori HS5. The optimal growth conditions for biodegradation of TBT by the three strains were pH 9 and 7% (w/v) salt concentration. S. chelatiphaga HS2 was the most effective TBT degrader and has the ability to transform most TBT into dibutyltin and monobutyltin (DBT and MBT). A gene was amplified from strain HS2 and identified as TBTB-permease-like, that encodes an ArsB-permease. A reverse transcription polymerase chain reaction analysis in the HS2 strain confirmed that the TBTB-permease-like gene contributes to TBT resistance. The three novel haloalkaliphilic TBT degraders have never been reported previously. Copyright © 2018 Asociación Argentina de Microbiología. Publicado por Elsevier España, S.L.U. All rights reserved.

  14. Structural adaptations of octaheme nitrite reductases from haloalkaliphilic Thioalkalivibrio bacteria to alkaline pH and high salinity.

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    Anna Popinako

    Full Text Available Bacteria Tv. nitratireducens and Tv. paradoxus from soda lakes grow optimally in sodium carbonate/NaCl brines at pH range from 9.5 to 10 and salinity from 0.5 to 1.5 M Na+. Octaheme nitrite reductases (ONRs from haloalkaliphilic bacteria of genus Thioalkalivibrio are stable and active in a wide range of pH (up to 11 and salinity (up to 1 M NaCl. To establish adaptation mechanisms of ONRs from haloalkaliphilic bacteria a comparative analysis of amino acid sequences and structures of ONRs from haloalkaliphilic bacteria and their homologues from non-halophilic neutrophilic bacteria was performed. The following adaptation strategies were observed: (1 strategies specific for halophilic and alkaliphilic proteins (an increase in the number of aspartate and glutamate residues and a decrease in the number of lysine residues on the protein surface, (2 strategies specific for halophilic proteins (an increase in the arginine content and a decrease in the number of hydrophobic residues on the solvent-accessible protein surface, (3 strategies specific for alkaliphilic proteins (an increase in the area of intersubunit hydrophobic contacts. Unique adaptation mechanism inherent in the ONRs from bacteria of genus Thioalkalivibrio was revealed (an increase in the core in the number of tryptophan and phenylalanine residues, and an increase in the number of small side chain residues, such as alanine and valine, in the core.

  15. Denitrifying sulfide removal process on high-salinity wastewaters in the presence of Halomonas sp.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Chunshuang; Zhao, Dongfeng; Ma, Wenjuan; Guo, Yadong; Wang, Aijie; Wang, Qilin; Lee, Duu-Jong

    2016-02-01

    Biological conversion of sulfide, acetate, and nitrate to, respectively, elemental sulfur (S(0)), carbon dioxide, and nitrogen-containing gas (such as N2) at NaCl concentration of 35-70 g/L was achieved in an expanded granular sludge bed (EGSB) reactor. A C/N ratio of 1:1 was noted to achieve high sulfide removal and S(0) conversion rate at high salinity. The extracellular polymeric substance (EPS) quantities were increased with NaCl concentration, being 11.4-mg/g volatile-suspended solids at 70 mg/L NaCl. The denitrifying sulfide removal (DSR) consortium incorporated Thauera sp. and Halomonas sp. as the heterotrophs and Azoarcus sp. being the autotrophs at high salinity condition. Halomonas sp. correlates with the enhanced DSR performance at high salinity.

  16. The Lipid A from the Haloalkaliphilic Bacterium Salinivibrio sharmensis Strain BAGT

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    Maria Michela Corsaro

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Lipid A is a major constituent of the lipopolysaccharides (or endotoxins, which are complex amphiphilic macromolecules anchored in the outer membrane of Gram-negative bacteria. The glycolipid lipid A is known to possess the minimal chemical structure for LPSs endotoxic activity, able to cause septic shock. Lipid A isolated from extremophiles is interesting, since very few cases of pathogenic bacteria have been found among these microorganisms. In some cases their lipid A has shown to have an antagonist activity, i.e., it is able to interact with the immune system of the host without triggering a proinflammatory response by blocking binding of substances that could elicit such a response. However, the relationship between the structure and the activity of these molecules is far from being completely clear. A deeper knowledge of the lipid A chemical structure can help the understanding of these mechanisms. In this manuscript, we present our work on the complete structural characterization of the lipid A obtained from the lipopolysaccharides (LPS of the haloalkaliphilic bacterium Salinivibrio sharmensis. Lipid A was obtained from the purified LPS by mild acid hydrolysis. The lipid A, which contains different number of fatty acids residues, and its partially deacylated derivatives were completely characterized by means of electrospray ionization Fourier transform ion cyclotron (ESI FT-ICR mass spectrometry and chemical analysis.

  17. Halomonas sp. BS4, A biosurfactant producing halophilic bacterium isolated from solar salt works in India and their biomedical importance

    OpenAIRE

    Donio, Mariathason Birdilla Selva; Ronica, Fernando Arul; Viji, Vijayaragavan Thanga; Velmurugan, Subramanian; Jenifer, John Selesteen Charles Adlin; Michaelbabu, Mariavincent; Dhar, Prasenjit; Citarasu, Thavasimuthu

    2013-01-01

    Halophilic bacteria were isolated from Thamaraikulam solar salt works in India. After routine biosurfactant screening by various methods, the biosurfactant producing bacteria, Halomonas sp BS4 was confirmed by 16?S rRNA sequencing. The growth optimization of Halomonas sp BS4 revealed their optimum growth at 8% NaCl and 6-8?pH in the growth medium. Further the partially purified biosurfactants were characterized by TLC, FTIR and GC-MS analysis. GC-MS results revealed that, the partial purified...

  18. Response surface method optimization of ectoine fermentation medium with moderate halophilic bacteria Halomonas sp. H02

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, T. T.; Qu, A.; Yuan, X. N.; Tan, F. X.; Li, X. W.; Wang, T.; Zhang, L. H.

    2017-07-01

    Moderate halophilic bacteria are of halophilic bacteria whose suitable growth of NaCl is 5-10%. When the moderate halophilic bacteria response to high osmotic stress, the intracellular will synthesize small organic molecule compatible solutes. Ectoine, which is the major synthetic osmotic compatible solutes for moderate halophilic bacteria, can help microbial enzymes, nucleic acids and the whole cell resist to hypertonic, high temperature, freezing and other inverse environment. In order to increase the Ectoine production of Moderate halophilic bacteria Halomonas sp. H02, the Ectoine fermentation medium component was optimized by Plackett-Burman (PB) and Response Surface Methodology (RSM) based on the principle of non-complete equilibrium The results of PB experiments showed that the three main influencing factors of Moderate halophilic bacteria Halomonas sp. H02 synthesis Ectoine culture medium were C5H8NNaO4 concentration, NaCl concentration and initial pH. According to the center point of the steepest climbing experiment, the central combination design experiment was used to show that the model is consistent with the actual situation. The optimum combination of three influencing factors were C5H8NNaO4 41 g/L, NaCl 87.2 g/L and initial pH 5.9, and the predicted amount of Ectoine was 1835.8 mg/L, increased by 41.6%.

  19. [Methylophaga murata sp. nov.: a haloalkaliphilic aerobic methylotroph from deteriorating marble].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Doronina, N V; Li, Ts D; Ivanova, E G; Trotsenko, Iu A

    2005-01-01

    The haloalkaliphilic methylotrophic bacterium (strain Kr3) isolated from material scraped off the deteriorating marble of the Moscow Kremlin masonry has been found to be able to utilize methanol, methylamine, trimethylamine, and fructose as carbon and energy sources. Its cells are gram-negative motile rods multiplying by binary fission. Spores are not produced. The isolate is strictly aerobic and requires vitamin B12 and Na+ ions for growth. It is oxidase- and catalase-positive and reduces nitrates to nitrites. Growth occurs at temperatures between 0 and 42 degrees C (with the optimum temperatures being 20-32 degrees C), pH values between 6 and 11 (with the optimum at 8-9), and NaCl concentrations between 0.05 and 3 M (with the optimum at 0.5-1.5 M). The dominant cellular phospholipids are phosphatidylethanolamine, phosphatidylglycerol, and cardiolipin. The major cellular fatty acids are palmitic (C16:0), palmitoleic (C16:1), and octadecenoic (C18:1) acids. The major ubiquinone is Q8. The isolate accumulates ectoine and glutamate, as well as a certain amount of sucrose, to function as osmoprotectants and synthesizes an exopolysaccharide composed of carbohydrate and protein components. It is resistant to heating at 70 degrees C, freezing, and drying; utilizes methanol, with the resulting production of formic acid, which is responsible for the marble-degrading activity of the isolate; and implements the 2-keto-3-deoxy-6-phosphogluconate variant of the ribulose monophosphate pathway. The G+C content of its DNA is 44.6 mol%. Based on 16S rRNA gene sequencing and DNA-DNA homology levels (23-41%) with neutrophilic and alkaliphilic methylobacteria from the genus Methylophaga, the isolate has been identified as a new species, Methylophaga murata (VKM B-2303T = NCIMB 13993T).

  20. Identification of a haloalkaliphilic and thermostable cellulase with improved ionic liquid tolerance

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zhang, Tao; Datta, Supratim; Eichler, Jerry; Ivanova, Natalia; Axen, Seth D.; Kerfeld, Cheryl A.; Chen, Feng; Kyrpides, Nikos; Hugenholtz, Philip; Cheng, Jan-Fang; Sale, Kenneth L.; Simmons, Blake; Rubin, Eddy

    2011-02-17

    Some ionic liquids (ILs) have been shown to be very effective solvents for biomass pretreatment. It is known that some ILs can have a strong inhibitory effect on fungal cellulases, making the digestion of cellulose inefficient in the presence of ILs. The identification of IL-tolerant enzymes that could be produced as a cellulase cocktail would reduce the costs and water use requirements of the IL pretreatment process. Due to their adaptation to high salinity environments, halophilic enzymes are hypothesized to be good candidates for screening and identifying IL-resistant cellulases. Using a genome-based approach, we have identified and characterized a halophilic cellulase (Hu-CBH1) from the halophilic archaeon, Halorhabdus utahensis. Hu-CBH1 is present in a gene cluster containing multiple putative cellulolytic enzymes. Sequence and theoretical structure analysis indicate that Hu-CBH1 is highly enriched with negatively charged acidic amino acids on the surface, which may form a solvation shell that may stabilize the enzyme, through interaction with salt ions and/or water molecules. Hu-CBH1 is a heat tolerant haloalkaliphilic cellulase and is active in salt concentrations up to 5 M NaCl. In high salt buffer, Hu-CBH1 can tolerate alkali (pH 11.5) conditions and, more importantly, is tolerant to high levels (20percent w/w) of ILs, including 1-allyl-3-methylimidazolium chloride ([Amim]Cl). Interestingly, the tolerances to heat, alkali and ILs are found to be salt-dependent, suggesting that the enzyme is stabilized by the presence of salt. Our results indicate that halophilic enzymes are good candidates for the screening of IL-tolerant cellulolytic enzymes.

  1. Draft Genome Sequence of Halomonas elongata Strain K4, an Endophytic Growth-Promoting Bacterium Enhancing Salinity Tolerance In Planta

    KAUST Repository

    Lafi, Feras Fawzi

    2016-11-04

    Halomonas elongata strain K4 is an endophytic bacterial strain that was isolated from roots of Cyperus conglomeratus collected at the Red Sea coast in Thuwal, Saudi Arabia. Here, we present a draft genome sequence of this strain, highlighting a number of pathways involved in plant growth promotion under salt stress.

  2. Draft Genome Sequence of Halomonas elongata Strain K4, an Endophytic Growth-Promoting Bacterium Enhancing Salinity Tolerance In Planta

    KAUST Repository

    Lafi, Feras Fawzi; Ramirez Prado, Juan Sebastian; Alam, Intikhab; Bajic, Vladimir B.; Hirt, Heribert; Saad, Maged

    2016-01-01

    Halomonas elongata strain K4 is an endophytic bacterial strain that was isolated from roots of Cyperus conglomeratus collected at the Red Sea coast in Thuwal, Saudi Arabia. Here, we present a draft genome sequence of this strain, highlighting a number of pathways involved in plant growth promotion under salt stress.

  3. Draft genome sequence of Halomonas meridiana R1t3 isolated from the surface microbiota of the Caribbean Elkhorn coral Acropora palmata.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Meyer, Julie L; Dillard, Brian A; Rodgers, John M; Ritchie, Kim B; Paul, Valerie J; Teplitski, Max

    2015-01-01

    Members of the gammaproteobacterial genus Halomonas are common in marine environments. Halomonas and other members of the Oceanospirillales have recently been identified as prominent members of the surface microbiota of reef-building corals. Halomonas meridiana strain R1t3 was isolated from the surface mucus layer of the scleractinian coral Acropora palmata in 2005 from the Florida Keys. This strain was chosen for genome sequencing to provide insight into the role of commensal heterotrophic bacteria in the coral holobiont. The draft genome consists of 290 scaffolds, totaling 3.5 Mbp in length and contains 3397 protein-coding genes.

  4. Halomonas maura is a physiologically versatile bacterium of both ecological and biotechnological interest.

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    Llamas, Inmaculada; del Moral, Ana; Martínez-Checa, Fernando; Arco, Yolanda; Arias, Soledad; Quesada, Emilia

    2006-01-01

    Halomonas maura is a bacterium of great metabolic versatility. We summarise in this work some of the properties that make it a very interesting microorganism both from an ecological and biotechnological point of view. It plays an active role in the nitrogen cycle, is capable of anaerobic respiration in the presence of nitrate and has recently been identified as a diazotrophic bacterium. Of equal interest is mauran, the exopolysaccharide produced by H. maura, which contributes to the formation of biofilms and thus affords the bacterium advantages in the colonisation of its saline niches. Mauran is highly viscous, shows thixotropic and pseudoplastic behaviour, has the capacity to capture heavy metals and exerts a certain immunomodulator effect in medicine. All these attributes have prompted us to make further investigations into its molecular characteristics. To date we have described 15 open reading frames (ORF's) related to exopolysaccharide production, nitrogen fixation and nitrate reductase activity among others.

  5. Performance of a haloalkaliphilic bioreactor and bacterial community shifts under different COD/SO{sub 4}{sup 2−} ratios and hydraulic retention times

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zhou, Jie-Min [National Key Laboratory of Biochemical Engineering, Institute of Process Engineering, Chinese Academy of Sciences, PO Box 353, Beijing 100190 (China); University of Chinese Academy of Sciences, Beijing 100049 (China); Song, Zi-Yu [National Key Laboratory of Biochemical Engineering, Institute of Process Engineering, Chinese Academy of Sciences, PO Box 353, Beijing 100190 (China); Yan, Dao-Jiang; Liu, Yi-Lan [National Key Laboratory of Biochemical Engineering, Institute of Process Engineering, Chinese Academy of Sciences, PO Box 353, Beijing 100190 (China); University of Chinese Academy of Sciences, Beijing 100049 (China); Yang, Mao-Hua [National Key Laboratory of Biochemical Engineering, Institute of Process Engineering, Chinese Academy of Sciences, PO Box 353, Beijing 100190 (China); Cao, Hong-Bin [National Engineering Laboratory for Hydrometallurgical Cleaner Production Technology, Institute of Process Engineering, Chinese Academy of Sciences, PO Box 353, Beijing 100190 (China); Xing, Jian-Min, E-mail: jmxing@home.ipe.ac.cn [National Key Laboratory of Biochemical Engineering, Institute of Process Engineering, Chinese Academy of Sciences, PO Box 353, Beijing 100190 (China)

    2014-06-01

    Highlights: • Haloalkaliphilic microorganisms were used to reduce sulfate. • Sulfide concentration reached up to 1603 mg/L. • There was no sulfide inhibition to haloalkaliphilic microorganisms. • Bacterial community of haloalkaliphilic bioreactor was studied. - Abstract: Sulfur dioxide from flue gas was converted into sulfate after the absorption of alkaline solutions. Haloalkaliphilic microorganisms have been used in reducing sulfate to decrease expenses and avoid sulfide inhibition. The effects of different COD/SO{sub 4}{sup 2−} ratios and hydraulic retention times (HRTs) on the sulfate removal efficiency and bacterial community were investigated in model experiments. Ethanol showed better performance as an electron donor than lactate. The optimum COD/SO{sub 4}{sup 2−} ratio and HRT were 4.0 and 18 h, respectively, with respective sulfate removal efficiency and rate of 97.8 ± 1.11% and 6.26 ± 0.0710 g/L d. Sulfide concentrations reached 1603 ± 3.38 mg/L. Based on denaturing gradient gel electrophoresis analysis of 16S rDNA, the major sulfate-reducing bacterium (SRB) was Desulfonatronovibrio sp., which was only detected at a COD/SO{sub 4}{sup 2−} ratio of 4.0 using ethanol as an electron donor. Different HRTs had no significant effect on the band corresponding to this species. PCR results show that methane-producing archaea (MPA) were from the acetoclastic methanogenic family Methanosarcinaceae. Quantitative real-time PCR did not demonstrate any significant competition between SRB and MPA. The findings of this study indicate that sulfate reduction, nitrate reduction, and sulfide oxidization may occur in the same bioreactor.

  6. Halomonas sp. BS4, A biosurfactant producing halophilic bacterium isolated from solar salt works in India and their biomedical importance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Donio, Mariathason Birdilla Selva; Ronica, Fernando Arul; Viji, Vijayaragavan Thanga; Velmurugan, Subramanian; Jenifer, John Selesteen Charles Adlin; Michaelbabu, Mariavincent; Dhar, Prasenjit; Citarasu, Thavasimuthu

    2013-12-01

    Halophilic bacteria were isolated from Thamaraikulam solar salt works in India. After routine biosurfactant screening by various methods, the biosurfactant producing bacteria, Halomonas sp BS4 was confirmed by 16 S rRNA sequencing. The growth optimization of Halomonas sp BS4 revealed their optimum growth at 8% NaCl and 6-8 pH in the growth medium. Further the partially purified biosurfactants were characterized by TLC, FTIR and GC-MS analysis. GC-MS results revealed that, the partial purified biosurfactants contain 1, 2-Ethanediamine N, N, N', N'-tetra, 8-Methyl-6-nonenamide, (Z)-9-octadecenamide and a fatty acid derivative. Pharmacological screening of antibacterial, antifungal, antiviral and anticancer assays revealed that, the biosurfactant extracted from Halomonas sp BS4 effectively controlled the human pathogenic bacteria and fungi an aquaculturally important virus, WSSV. The biosurfactant also suppressed the proliferation of mammary epithelial carcinoma cell by 46.77% at 2.5 μg concentration. Based on these findings, the present study concluded that, there is a possibility to develop eco-friendly antimicrobial and anticancer drugs from the extremophilic origin.

  7. Characterization of arsenite tolerant Halomonas sp. Alang-4, originated from heavy metal polluted shore of Gulf of Cambay.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jain, Raina; Jha, Sanjay; Mahatma, Mahesh K; Jha, Anamika; Kumar, G Naresh

    2016-01-01

    Arsenite [As(III)]-oxidizing bacteria were isolated from heavy metal contaminated shore of Gulf of Cambay at Alang, India. The most efficient bacterial strain Alang-4 could tolerate up to 15 mM arsenite [As(III)] and 200 mM of arsenate [As(V)]. Its 16S rRNA gene sequence was 99% identical to the 16S rRNA genes of genus Halomonas (Accession no. HQ659187). Arsenite oxidase enzyme localized on membrane helped in conversion of As(III) to As(V). Arsenite transporter genes (arsB, acr3(1) and acr3(2)) assisted in extrusion of arsenite from Halomonas sp. Alang-4. Generation of ROS in response to arsenite stress was alleviated by higher activities of catalase, ascorbate peroxidase, superoxide dismutase and glutathione S-transferase enzymes. Down-regulation in the specific activities of nearly all dehydrogenases of carbon assimilatory pathway viz., glucose-6-phosphate, pyruvate, α-ketoglutarate, isocitrate and malate dehydrogenases, was observed in presence of As(III), whereas, the specific activities of phosphoenol pyruvate carboxylase, pyruvate carboxylase and isocitrate lyase enzymes were found to increase two times in As(III) treated cells. The results suggest that in addition to efficient ars operon, alternative pathways of carbon utilization exist in the marine bacterium Halomonas sp. Alang-4 to overcome the toxic effects of arsenite on its dehydrogenase enzymes.

  8. Structural characteristics of alkaline phosphatase from the moderately halophilic bacterium Halomonas sp. 593

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Arai, Shigeki; Yonezawa, Yasushi; Ishibashi, Matsujiro; Matsumoto, Fumiko; Adachi, Motoyasu; Tamada, Taro; Tokunaga, Hiroko; Blaber, Michael; Tokunaga, Masao; Kuroki, Ryota

    2014-01-01

    In order to clarify the structural basis of the halophilic characteristics of an alkaline phosphatase derived from the moderate halophile Halomonas sp. 593 (HaAP), the tertiary structure of HaAP was determined to 2.1 Å resolution by X-ray crystallography. The structural properties of surface negative charge and core hydrophobicity were shown to be intermediate between those characteristic of halophiles and non-halophiles, and may explain the unique functional adaptation to a wide range of salt concentrations. Alkaline phosphatase (AP) from the moderate halophilic bacterium Halomonas sp. 593 (HaAP) catalyzes the hydrolysis of phosphomonoesters over a wide salt-concentration range (1–4 M NaCl). In order to clarify the structural basis of its halophilic characteristics and its wide-range adaptation to salt concentration, the tertiary structure of HaAP was determined by X-ray crystallography to 2.1 Å resolution. The unit cell of HaAP contained one dimer unit corresponding to the biological unit. The monomer structure of HaAP contains a domain comprised of an 11-stranded β-sheet core with 19 surrounding α-helices similar to those of APs from other species, and a unique ‘crown’ domain containing an extended ‘arm’ structure that participates in formation of a hydrophobic cluster at the entrance to the substrate-binding site. The HaAP structure also displays a unique distribution of negatively charged residues and hydrophobic residues in comparison to other known AP structures. AP from Vibrio sp. G15-21 (VAP; a slight halophile) has the highest similarity in sequence (70.0% identity) and structure (C α r.m.s.d. of 0.82 Å for the monomer) to HaAP. The surface of the HaAP dimer is substantially more acidic than that of the VAP dimer (144 exposed Asp/Glu residues versus 114, respectively), and thus may enable the solubility of HaAP under high-salt conditions. Conversely, the monomer unit of HaAP formed a substantially larger hydrophobic interior comprising 329

  9. Structural characteristics of alkaline phosphatase from the moderately halophilic bacterium Halomonas sp. 593

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Arai, Shigeki; Yonezawa, Yasushi [Japan Atomic Energy Agency, 2-4 Shirakata-shirane, Tokai, Ibaraki 319-1195 (Japan); Ishibashi, Matsujiro [Faculty of Agriculture, Kagoshima University, 1-21-24 Korimoto, Kagoshima 890-0065 (Japan); Matsumoto, Fumiko; Adachi, Motoyasu; Tamada, Taro [Japan Atomic Energy Agency, 2-4 Shirakata-shirane, Tokai, Ibaraki 319-1195 (Japan); Tokunaga, Hiroko [Faculty of Agriculture, Kagoshima University, 1-21-24 Korimoto, Kagoshima 890-0065 (Japan); Blaber, Michael [Florida State University, 1115 West Call Street, Tallahassee, FL 32306-4300 (United States); Tokunaga, Masao [Faculty of Agriculture, Kagoshima University, 1-21-24 Korimoto, Kagoshima 890-0065 (Japan); Kuroki, Ryota, E-mail: kuroki.ryota@jaea.go.jp [Japan Atomic Energy Agency, 2-4 Shirakata-shirane, Tokai, Ibaraki 319-1195 (Japan)

    2014-03-01

    In order to clarify the structural basis of the halophilic characteristics of an alkaline phosphatase derived from the moderate halophile Halomonas sp. 593 (HaAP), the tertiary structure of HaAP was determined to 2.1 Å resolution by X-ray crystallography. The structural properties of surface negative charge and core hydrophobicity were shown to be intermediate between those characteristic of halophiles and non-halophiles, and may explain the unique functional adaptation to a wide range of salt concentrations. Alkaline phosphatase (AP) from the moderate halophilic bacterium Halomonas sp. 593 (HaAP) catalyzes the hydrolysis of phosphomonoesters over a wide salt-concentration range (1–4 M NaCl). In order to clarify the structural basis of its halophilic characteristics and its wide-range adaptation to salt concentration, the tertiary structure of HaAP was determined by X-ray crystallography to 2.1 Å resolution. The unit cell of HaAP contained one dimer unit corresponding to the biological unit. The monomer structure of HaAP contains a domain comprised of an 11-stranded β-sheet core with 19 surrounding α-helices similar to those of APs from other species, and a unique ‘crown’ domain containing an extended ‘arm’ structure that participates in formation of a hydrophobic cluster at the entrance to the substrate-binding site. The HaAP structure also displays a unique distribution of negatively charged residues and hydrophobic residues in comparison to other known AP structures. AP from Vibrio sp. G15-21 (VAP; a slight halophile) has the highest similarity in sequence (70.0% identity) and structure (C{sup α} r.m.s.d. of 0.82 Å for the monomer) to HaAP. The surface of the HaAP dimer is substantially more acidic than that of the VAP dimer (144 exposed Asp/Glu residues versus 114, respectively), and thus may enable the solubility of HaAP under high-salt conditions. Conversely, the monomer unit of HaAP formed a substantially larger hydrophobic interior

  10. Characterization of a bioflocculant produced by a consortium of Halomonas sp. Okoh and Micrococcus sp. Leo.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Okaiyeto, Kunle; Nwodo, Uchechukwu U; Mabinya, Leonard V; Okoh, Anthony I

    2013-10-16

    The physicochemical and flocculating properties of a bioflocculant produced by a bacterial consortium composed of Halomonas sp. Okoh and Micrococcus sp. Leo were investigated. The purified bioflocculant was cation and pH dependent, and optimally flocculated kaolin clay suspension at a dosage of 0.1 mg/mL. The flocculating activity of the bioflocculant was stimulated in the presence of Ca2+, Mn2+, Al3+ and had a wide pH range of 2-10, with the highest flocculating activity of 86% at pH 8. The bioflocculant was thermostable and retained more than 70% of its flocculating activity after being heated at 80 °C for 30 min. Thermogravimetric analyses revealed a partial thermal decomposition of the biofloculant at 400 °C. The infrared spectrum showed the presence of hydroxyl, carboxyl and amino moieties as functional groups. The bioflocculant produced by the bacterial consortium appears to hold promising alternative to inorganic and synthetic organic flocculants that are widely used in wastewater treatment.

  11. Construction of Halomonas bluephagenesis capable of high cell density growth for efficient PHA production.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ren, Yilin; Ling, Chen; Hajnal, Ivan; Wu, Qiong; Chen, Guo-Qiang

    2018-05-01

    High-cell-density cultivation is an effective way to improve the productivity of microbial fermentations and in turn reduce the cost of the final products, especially in the case of intracellular products. Halomonas bluephagenesis TD01 is a halophilic platform bacterium for the next generation of industrial biotechnology with a native PHA synthetic pathway, able to grow under non-sterile continuous fermentation conditions. A selection strategy for mutant strains that can grow to a high cell density was developed. Based on an error-prone DNA polymerase III ε subunit, a genome-wide random mutagenesis system was established and used in conjunction with an artificial high cell density culture environment during the selection process. A high-cell-density H. bluephagenesis TDHCD-R3 obtained after 3 rounds of selection showed an obvious enhancement of resistance to toxic metabolites including acetate, formate, lactate and ethanol compared to wild-type. H. bluephagenesis TDHCD-R3-8-3 constructed from H. bluephagenesis TDHCD-R3 by overexpressing an optimized phaCAB operon was able to grow to 15 g/L cell dry weight (CDW) containing 94% PHA in shake flask studies. H. bluephagenesis TDHCD-R3-8-3 was grown to more than 90 g/L CDW containing 79% PHA compared with only 81 g/L with 70% PHA by the wild type when incubated in a 7-L fermentor under the same conditions.

  12. Isolation, cloning and characterization of an azoreductase from the halophilic bacterium Halomonas elongata.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eslami, Maryam; Amoozegar, Mohammad Ali; Asad, Sedigheh

    2016-04-01

    Azo dyes are a major class of colorants used in various industries including textile, paper and food. These dyes are regarded as pollutant since they are not readily reduced under aerobic conditions. Halomonas elongata, a halophilic bacterium, has the ability to decolorize different mono and di-azo dyes in anoxic conditions. In this study the putative azoreductase gene of H. elongata, formerly annotated as acp, was isolated, heterologously expressed in Escherichia coli, purified and characterized. The gene product, AzoH, was found to have a molecular mass of 22 kDa. The enzyme requires NADH, as an electron donor for its activity. The apparent Km was 63 μM for NADH and 12 μM for methyl red as a mono-azo dye substrate. The specific activity for methyl red was 0.27 μmol min(-1)mg(-1). The optimum enzyme activity was achieved in 50mM sodium phosphate buffer at pH 6. Although increased salinity resulted in reduced activity, AzoH could decolorize azo dye at NaCl concentrations up to 15% (w/v). The enzyme was also shown to be able to decolorize remazol black B as a representative of di-azo dyes. This is the first report describing the sequence and activity of an azo-reducing enzyme from a halophilic bacterium. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  13. Partial characterization of an extracellular polysaccharide produced by the moderately halophilic bacterium Halomonas xianhensis SUR308.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Biswas, Jhuma; Ganguly, J; Paul, A K

    2015-01-01

    A moderately halophilic bacterium, Halomonas xianhensis SUR308 (Genbank Accession No. KJ933394) was isolated from a multi-pond solar saltern at Surala, Ganjam district, Odisha, India. The isolate produced a significant amount (7.87 g l(-1)) of extracellular polysaccharides (EPS) when grown in malt extract-yeast extract medium supplemented with 2.5% NaCl, 0.5% casein hydrolysate and 3% glucose. The EPS was isolated and purified following the conventional method of precipitation and dialysis. Chromatographic analysis (paper, GC and GC-MS) of the hydrolyzed EPS confirmed its heteropolymeric nature and showed that it is composed mainly of glucose (45.74 mol%), galactose (33.67 mol %) and mannose (17.83 mol%). Fourier-transform infrared spectroscopy indicated the presence of methylene and carboxyl groups as characteristic functional groups. In addition, its proton nuclear magnetic resonance spectrum revealed functional groups specific for extracellular polysaccharides. X-ray diffraction analysis revealed the amorphous nature (CIxrd, 0.56) of the EPS. It was thermostable up to 250 °C and displayed pseudoplastic rheology and remarkable stability against pH and salts. These unique properties of the EPS produced by H. xianhensis indicate its potential to act as an agent for detoxification, emulsification and diverse biological activities.

  14. Astrobiology as a framework for investigating antibiotic susceptibility: a study of Halomonas hydrothermalis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Harrison, Jesse P; Angel, Roey; Cockell, Charles S

    2017-01-01

    Physical and chemical boundaries for microbial multiplication on Earth are strongly influenced by interactions between environmental extremes. However, little is known about how interactions between multiple stress parameters affect the sensitivity of microorganisms to antibiotics. Here, we assessed how 12 distinct permutations of salinity, availability of an essential nutrient (iron) and atmospheric composition (aerobic or microaerobic) affect the susceptibility of a polyextremotolerant bacterium, Halomonas hydrothermalis, to ampicillin, kanamycin and ofloxacin. While salinity had a significant impact on sensitivity to all three antibiotics (as shown by turbidimetric analyses), the nature of this impact was modified by iron availability and the ambient gas composition, with differing effects observed for each compound. These two parameters were found to be of particular importance when considered in combination and, in the case of ampicillin, had a stronger combined influence on antibiotic tolerance than salinity. Our data show how investigating microbial responses to multiple extremes, which are more representative of natural habitats than single extremes, can improve our understanding of the effects of antimicrobial compounds and suggest how studies of habitability, motivated by the desire to map the limits of life, can be used to systematically assess the effectiveness of antibiotics. © 2017 The Author(s).

  15. Going from Microbial Ecology to Genome Data and Back: Studies on a Haloalkaliphilic Bacterium Isolated from Soap Lake, Washington State

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Melanie R. Mormile

    2014-11-01

    Full Text Available Soap Lake is a meromictic, alkaline (~pH 9.8 and saline (~14 to 140 g liter-1 lake located in the semiarid area of eastern Washington State. Of note is the length of time it has been meromictic (at least 2000 years and the extremely high sulfide level (~140 mM in its monimolimnion. As expected, the microbial ecology of this lake is greatly influenced by these conditions. A bacterium, Halanaerobium hydrogeniformans, was isolated from the mixolimnion region of this lake. H. hydrogeniformans is a haloalkaliphilic bacterium capable of forming hydrogen from 5- and 6-carbon sugars derived from hemicellulose and cellulose. Due to its ability to produce hydrogen under saline and alkaline conditions, in amounts that rival genetically modified organisms, its genome was sequenced. This sequence data provides an opportunity to explore the unique metabolic capabilities of this organism, including the mechanisms for tolerating the extreme conditions of both high salinity and alkalinity of its environment.

  16. Isolation and characterization of Halomonas sp. strain C2SS100, a hydrocarbon-degrading bacterium under hypersaline conditions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mnif, S; Chamkha, M; Sayadi, S

    2009-09-01

    To isolate and characterize an efficient hydrocarbon-degrading bacterium under hypersaline conditions, from a Tunisian off-shore oil field. Production water collected from 'Sercina' petroleum reservoir, located near the Kerkennah island, Tunisia, was used for the screening of halotolerant or halophilic bacteria able to degrade crude oil. Bacterial strain C2SS100 was isolated after enrichment on crude oil, in the presence of 100 g l(-1) NaCl and at 37 degrees C. This strain was aerobic, Gram-negative, rod-shaped, motile, oxidase + and catalase +. Phenotypic characters and phylogenetic analysis based on the 16S rRNA gene of the isolate C2SS100 showed that it was related to members of the Halomonas genus. The degradation of several compounds present in crude oil was confirmed by GC-MS analysis. The use of refined petroleum products such as diesel fuel and lubricating oil as sole carbon source, under the same conditions of temperature and salinity, showed that significant amounts of these heterogenic compounds could be degraded. Strain C2SS100 was able to degrade hexadecane (C16). During growth on hexadecane, cells surface hydrophobicity and emulsifying activity increased indicating the production of biosurfactant by strain C2SS100. A halotolerant bacterial strain Halomonas sp. C2SS100 was isolated from production water of an oil field, after enrichment on crude oil. This strain is able to degrade hydrocarbons efficiently. The mode of hydrocarbon uptake is realized by the production of a biosurfactant which enhances the solubility of hydrocarbons and renders them more accessible for biodegradation. The biodegradation potential of the Halomonas sp. strain C2SS100 gives it an advantage for possibly application on bioremediation of water, hydrocarbon-contaminated sites under high-salinity level.

  17. Aplicaciones del exopolisac??rido producido por la cepa HK30 de Halomonas nitroreducens en la industria farmac??utica

    OpenAIRE

    Amjres, Hakima; B??jar Luque, Mar??a Victoria; Quesada Arroquia, Emilia; Abrini, J.; Llamas Company, Inmaculada

    2010-01-01

    INTRODUCCI??N Una de las l??neas de investigaci??n que desarrolla el Grupo Exopolisac??ridos Microbianos (BIO 188) es el aislamiento y caracterizaci??n de nuevos microorganismos hal??filos productores de EPSs con propiedades f??sicas y qu??micas competitivas con los ya existentes en la industria. De estos estudios destaca el pol??mero V2-7 (Halomonas eurihalina F2-7) que origina geles transparentes1, el maurano (H. maura S-30) cuya viscosidad compite con la del xantano2 y los E...

  18. Osmoregulation in the Halophilic Bacterium Halomonas elongata: A Case Study for Integrative Systems Biology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kindzierski, Viktoria; Raschke, Silvia; Knabe, Nicole; Siedler, Frank; Scheffer, Beatrix; Pflüger-Grau, Katharina; Pfeiffer, Friedhelm; Oesterhelt, Dieter; Marin-Sanguino, Alberto; Kunte, Hans-Jörg

    2017-01-01

    Halophilic bacteria use a variety of osmoregulatory methods, such as the accumulation of one or more compatible solutes. The wide diversity of compounds that can act as compatible solute complicates the task of understanding the different strategies that halophilic bacteria use to cope with salt. This is specially challenging when attempting to go beyond the pathway that produces a certain compatible solute towards an understanding of how the metabolic network as a whole addresses the problem. Metabolic reconstruction based on genomic data together with Flux Balance Analysis (FBA) is a promising tool to gain insight into this problem. However, as more of these reconstructions become available, it becomes clear that processes predicted by genome annotation may not reflect the processes that are active in vivo. As a case in point, E. coli is unable to grow aerobically on citrate in spite of having all the necessary genes to do it. It has also been shown that the realization of this genetic potential into an actual capability to metabolize citrate is an extremely unlikely event under normal evolutionary conditions. Moreover, many marine bacteria seem to have the same pathways to metabolize glucose but each species uses a different one. In this work, a metabolic network inferred from genomic annotation of the halophilic bacterium Halomonas elongata and proteomic profiling experiments are used as a starting point to motivate targeted experiments in order to find out some of the defining features of the osmoregulatory strategies of this bacterium. This new information is then used to refine the network in order to describe the actual capabilities of H. elongata, rather than its genetic potential.

  19. Bacterial communities in haloalkaliphilic sulfate-reducing bioreactors under different electron donors revealed by 16S rRNA MiSeq sequencing

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zhou, Jiemin [National Key Laboratory of Biochemical Engineering, Institute of Process Engineering, Chinese Academy of Sciences, P.O. Box 353, Beijing 100190 (China); University of Chinese Academy of Sciences, Beijing 100049 (China); Zhou, Xuemei; Li, Yuguang [101 Institute, Ministry of Civil Affairs, Beijing 100070 (China); Xing, Jianmin, E-mail: jmxing@ipe.ac.cn [National Key Laboratory of Biochemical Engineering, Institute of Process Engineering, Chinese Academy of Sciences, P.O. Box 353, Beijing 100190 (China)

    2015-09-15

    Highlights: • Bacterial communities of haloalkaliphilic bioreactors were investigated. • MiSeq was first used in analysis of communities of haloalkaliphilic bioreactors. • Electron donors had significant effect on bacterial communities. - Abstract: Biological technology used to treat flue gas is useful to replace conventional treatment, but there is sulfide inhibition. However, no sulfide toxicity effect was observed in haloalkaliphilic bioreactors. The performance of the ethanol-fed bioreactor was better than that of lactate-, glucose-, and formate-fed bioreactor, respectively. To support this result strongly, Illumina MiSeq paired-end sequencing of 16S rRNA gene was applied to investigate the bacterial communities. A total of 389,971 effective sequences were obtained and all of them were assigned to 10,220 operational taxonomic units (OTUs) at a 97% similarity. Bacterial communities in the glucose-fed bioreactor showed the greatest richness and evenness. The highest relative abundance of sulfate-reducing bacteria (SRB) was found in the ethanol-fed bioreactor, which can explain why the performance of the ethanol-fed bioreactor was the best. Different types of SRB, sulfur-oxidizing bacteria, and sulfur-reducing bacteria were detected, indicating that sulfur may be cycled among these microorganisms. Because high-throughput 16S rRNA gene paired-end sequencing has improved resolution of bacterial community analysis, many rare microorganisms were detected, such as Halanaerobium, Halothiobacillus, Desulfonatronum, Syntrophobacter, and Fusibacter. 16S rRNA gene sequencing of these bacteria would provide more functional and phylogenetic information about the bacterial communities.

  20. Production and characterisation of glycolipid biosurfactant by Halomonas sp. MB-30 for potential application in enhanced oil recovery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dhasayan, Asha; Kiran, G Seghal; Selvin, Joseph

    2014-12-01

    Biosurfactant-producing Halomonas sp. MB-30 was isolated from a marine sponge Callyspongia diffusa, and its potency in crude oil recovery from sand pack column was investigated. The biosurfactant produced by the strain MB-30 reduced the surface tension to 30 mN m(-1) in both glucose and hydrocarbon-supplemented minimal media. The critical micelle concentration of biosurfactant obtained from glucose-based medium was at 0.25 mg ml(-1) at critical micelle dilution 1:10. The chemical structure of glycolipid biosurfactant was characterised by infrared spectroscopy and proton magnetic resonance spectroscopy. The emulsification activity of MB-30 biosurfactant was tested with different hydrocarbons, and 93.1 % emulsification activity was exhibited with crude oil followed by kerosene (86.6 %). The formed emulsion was stable for up to 1 month. To identify the effectiveness of biosurfactant for enhanced oil recovery in extreme environments, the interactive effect of pH, temperature and salinity on emulsion stability with crude oil and kerosene was evaluated. The stable emulsion was formed at and above pH 7, temperature >80 °C and NaCl concentration up to 10 % in response surface central composite orthogonal design model. The partially purified biosurfactant recovered 62 % of residual crude oil from sand pack column. Thus, the stable emulsifying biosurfactant produced by Halomonas sp. MB-30 could be used for in situ biosurfactant-mediated enhanced oil recovery process and hydrocarbon bioremediation in extreme environments.

  1. Novel Halomonas sp. B15 isolated from Larnaca Salt Lake in Cyprus that generates vanillin and vanillic acid from ferulic acid.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vyrides, Ioannis; Agathangelou, Maria; Dimitriou, Rodothea; Souroullas, Konstantinos; Salamex, Anastasia; Ioannou, Aristostodimos; Koutinas, Michalis

    2015-08-01

    Vanillin is a high value added product with many applications in the food, fragrance and pharmaceutical industries. A natural and low-cost method to produce vanillin is by microbial bioconversions through ferulic acid. Until now, limited microorganisms have been found capable of bioconverting ferulic acid to vanillin at high yield. This study aimed to screen halotolerant strains of bacteria from Larnaca Salt Lake which generate vanillin and vanillic acid from ferulic acid. From a total of 50 halotolenant/halophilic strains 8 grew in 1 g/L ferulic acid and only 1 Halomonas sp. B15 and 3 Halomonas elognata strains were capable of bioconverting ferulic acid to vanillic acid at 100 g NaCl/L. The highest vanillic acid (365 mg/L) at these conditions generated by Halomonas sp. B15 which corresponds to ferulic acid bioconversion yield of 36.5%. Using the resting cell technique with an initial ferulic acid concentration of 0.5 g/L at low salinity, the highest production of vanillin (245 mg/L) took place after 48 h, corresponding to a bioconversion yield of 49%. This is the first reported Halomonas sp. with high yield of vanillin production from ferulic acid at low salinity.

  2. Screening for Genes Coding for Putative Antitumor Compounds, Antimicrobial and Enzymatic Activities from Haloalkalitolerant and Haloalkaliphilic Bacteria Strains of Algerian Sahara Soils

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Okba Selama

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Extreme environments may often contain unusual bacterial groups whose physiology is distinct from those of normal environments. To satisfy the need for new bioactive pharmaceuticals compounds and enzymes, we report here the isolation of novel bacteria from an extreme environment. Thirteen selected haloalkalitolerant and haloalkaliphilic bacteria were isolated from Algerian Sahara Desert soils. These isolates were screened for the presence of genes coding for putative antitumor compounds using PCR based methods. Enzymatic, antibacterial, and antifungal activities were determined by using cultural dependant methods. Several of these isolates are typical of desert and alkaline saline soils, but, in addition, we report for the first time the presence of a potential new member of the genus Nocardia with particular activity against the yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae. In addition to their haloalkali character, the presence of genes coding for putative antitumor compounds, combined with the antimicrobial activity against a broad range of indicator strains and their enzymatic potential, makes them suitable for biotechnology applications.

  3. Tindallia Californiensis sp. nov.: A New Halo-Alkaliphilic Primary Anaerobe, Isolated from Meromictic soda Mono Lake in California and the Correction of Diagnosis for Genus Tindallia

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pikuta, Elena; Marsic, Damien; Hoover, Richard B.; Kevbrin, Vadim; Whitman, William B.; Krader, Paul; Cleland, Dave; Six, N. Frank (Technical Monitor)

    2002-01-01

    A novel extremely halo-alkaliphilic, bacterium strain APO (sup T) was isolated from sediments of the athalassic, meromictic, soda Mono Lake in California. Gram positive, spore-forming, slightly curved rods with sizes 0.6-0.7x 2.5-4.0 micrometers which occur singly, in pairs or short curved chains. Cells, are motile by singular subcentral flagellum. Strain APO (sup T) is mesophilic: growth was observed over the temperature range of +10 C to +48 C (optimum +37 C), NaCl concentration range 1-20 %, wt/vol (optimum 3-5%, wt/vol) and pH range 8.0-11.0 (optimum pH 9.5). The novel isolate is strictly halo-alkaliphilic, requires sodium chloride in medium, obligately anaerobic and catalase-negative. Strain APO (sup T) is organo-heterotroph with fermentative type of metabolism, and uses as substrates: peptone, badotryptone, casamino acids, yeast extract, L-serine, L-lysine, L-histidine, L-arginine, and pyruvate. The main end products of growth on peptone medium were: lactate, acetate, propionate, and ethanol. Strain APO (sup T) is resistant to kanamycin, but sensitive to chloramphenicol, tetracycline, and gentamycin. The sum of G+C in DNA is 44.4 mol% (by HPLC method). On the bait of physiological and molecular properties, the isolate was considered as novel species of genus Tindallia; and the name Tindallia californiensis sp. nov., is proposed for new isolate (type strain APO (sup T) - ATCC BAA_393(sup T) = DSMZ 14871 (sup T)).

  4. Biosynthesis and characterization of polyhydroxyalkanoates produced by an extreme halophilic bacterium, Halomonas nitroreducens, isolated from hypersaline ponds.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cervantes-Uc, J M; Catzin, J; Vargas, I; Herrera-Kao, W; Moguel, F; Ramirez, E; Rincón-Arriaga, S; Lizama-Uc, G

    2014-10-01

    Morphological, biochemical and genotypic characterization of a halophilic bacterium isolated from hypersaline ponds located at Las Coloradas (Río Lagartos, Yucatán, Mexico). Characterization of polymer produced by this strain was also performed. Twenty strains were isolated from water samples of salt ponds and selected based on both morphological features and their PHA storage capacity, which were determined by SEM and staining methods with Nile red and Nile blue, respectively; strains were also analysed by the fluorescence imaging technique. Among them, JCCOL25.8 strain showed the highest production of PHA's reason why phenotypic and genotypic characterization was performed; this strain was identified as Halomonas nitroreducens. Polymer produced by this strain was characterized by FTIR, DSC, GPC and EDX spectroscopy. Results indicated that the biosynthesized polymer was polyhydroxybutyrate (PHB) which had a melting peak at 170°C and a crystallinity percentage of about 36%. Based on phenotypic and genotypic aspects, JCCOL25.8 strain was identified as H. nitroreducens and it was capable to accumulate PHB. To our knowledge, there is only one study published on the biosynthesis of PHA's by H. nitroreducens strains, although the characterization of the obtained polymer was not reported. © 2014 The Society for Applied Microbiology.

  5. A novel NhaD-type Na+/H+ antiporter from the moderate halophile and alkaliphile Halomonas alkaliphila.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Yanhong; Song, Na; Yang, Lina; Abdel-Motaal, Heba; Zhang, Rui; Zhang, Zhenglai; Meng, Fankui; Jiang, Juquan

    2017-07-01

    In this study, a NhaD-type Na + /H + antiporter gene designated Ha-nhaD was obtained by selection of genomic DNA from the moderate halophile and alkaliphile Halomonas alkaliphila in Escherichia coli KNabc lacking 3 major Na + /H + antiporters. The presence of Ha-NhaD conferred tolerance of E. coli KNabc to NaCl up to 0.6 mol·L -1 and to LiCl up to 0.2 mol·L -1 and to an alkaline pH. pH-dependent Na + (Li + )/H + antiport activity was detected from everted membrane vesicles prepared from E. coli KNabc/pUC-nhaD but not those of KNabc/pUC18. Ha-NhaD exhibited Na + (Li + )/H + antiport activity over a wide pH range from 7.0 to 9.5, with the highest activity at pH 9.0. Protein sequence alignment and phylogenetic analysis revealed that Ha-NhaD is significantly different from the 7 known NhaD-type Na + /H + antiporters, including Dw-NhaD, Dl-NhaD, Vp-NhaD, Vc-NhaD, Aa-NhaD, He-NhaD, and Ha-NhaD1. Although Ha-NhaD showed a closer phylogenetic relationship with Ha-NhaD2, a significant difference in pH-dependent activity profile exists between Ha-NhaD and Ha-NhaD2. Taken together, Ha-nhaD encodes a novel pH-dependent NhaD-type Na + /H + antiporter.

  6. Cloning, Characterization and Analysis of cat and ben Genes from the Phenol Degrading Halophilic Bacterium Halomonas organivorans

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moreno, Maria de Lourdes; Sánchez-Porro, Cristina; Piubeli, Francine; Frias, Luciana; García, María Teresa; Mellado, Encarnación

    2011-01-01

    Background Extensive use of phenolic compounds in industry has resulted in the generation of saline wastewaters that produce significant environmental contamination; however, little information is available on the degradation of phenolic compounds in saline conditions. Halomonas organivorans G-16.1 (CECT 5995T) is a moderately halophilic bacterium that we isolated in a previous work from saline environments of South Spain by enrichment for growth in different pollutants, including phenolic compounds. PCR amplification with degenerate primers revealed the presence of genes encoding ring-cleaving enzymes of the β-ketoadipate pathway for aromatic catabolism in H. organivorans. Findings The gene cluster catRBCA, involved in catechol degradation, was isolated from H. organivorans. The genes catA, catB, catC and the divergently transcribed catR code for catechol 1,2-dioxygenase (1,2-CTD), cis,cis-muconate cycloisomerase, muconolactone delta-isomerase and a LysR-type transcriptional regulator, respectively. The benzoate catabolic genes (benA and benB) are located flanking the cat genes. The expression of cat and ben genes by phenol and benzoic acid was shown by RT-PCR analysis. The induction of catA gene by phenol and benzoic acid was also probed by the measurement of 1,2-CTD activity in H. organivorans growth in presence of these inducers. 16S rRNA and catA gene-based phylogenies were established among different degrading bacteria showing no phylogenetic correlation between both genes. Conclusions/Significance In this work, we isolated and determined the sequence of a gene cluster from a moderately halophilic bacterium encoding ortho-pathway genes involved in the catabolic metabolism of phenol and analyzed the gene organization, constituting the first report characterizing catabolic genes involved in the degradation of phenol in moderate halophiles, providing an ideal model system to investigate the potential use of this group of extremophiles in the decontamination of

  7. Natronolimnobius baerhuensis gen. nov., sp. nov. and Natronolimnobius innermongolicus sp. nov., novel haloalkaliphilic archaea isolated from soda lakes in Inner Mongolia, China.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Itoh, Takashi; Yamaguchi, Takashi; Zhou, Peijin; Takashina, Tomonori

    2005-04-01

    Three novel isolates of haloalkaliphilic archaea, strains IHC-005T, IHC-010, and N-1311T, from soda lakes in Inner Mongolia, China, were characterized to elucidate their taxonomic positions. The three strains were aerobic, Gram-negative chemoorganotrophs growing optimally at 37-45 degrees C, pH 9.0-9.5, and 15-20% NaCl. Cells of strains IHC-005T/IHC-010 were motile rods, while those of strain N-1311T were non-motile pleomorphic flats or cocci. The three strains contained diphytanyl and phytanyl-sesterterpanyl diether derivatives of phosphatidylglycerol and phosphatidylglycerophosphate methyl ester. No glycolipids were detected. On phylogenetic analysis of 16S rRNA gene sequences, they formed an independent cluster in the Natro group of the family Halobacteriaceae. Comparison of their morphological, physiological, and biochemical properties, DNA G + C content and 16S rRNA gene sequences, and DNA-DNA hybridization study support the view that strains IHC-005T/IHC-010 and strain N-1311T represent separate species. Therefore, we propose Natronolimnobius baerhuensis gen. nov., sp. nov. for strains IHC-005T (=CGMCC 1.3597T =JCM 12253T)/IHC-010 (=CGMCC 1.3598 = JCM 12254) and Natronolimnobius innermongolicus sp. nov. for N-1311T (=CGMCC 1.2124T =JCM 12255T).

  8. Inhibitory activity of an extract from a marine bacterium Halomonas sp. HSB07 against the red-tide microalga Gymnodinium sp. (Pyrrophyta)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Juan; Li, Fuchao; Liu, Ling; Jiang, Peng; Liu, Zhaopu

    2013-11-01

    In recent years, red tides occurred frequently in coastal areas worldwide. Various methods based on the use of clay, copper sulfate, and bacteria have been successful in controlling red tides to some extent. As a new defensive agent, marine microorganisms are important sources of compounds with potent inhibitory bioactivities against red-tide microalgae, such as Gymnodinium sp. (Pyrrophyta). In this study, we isolated a marine bacterium, HSB07, from seawater collected from Hongsha Bay, Sanya, South China Sea. Based on its 16S rRNA gene sequence and biochemical characteristics, the isolated strain HSB07 was identified as a member of the genus Halomonas. A crude ethyl acetate extract of strain HSB07 showed moderate inhibition activity against Gymnodinium sp. in a bioactive prescreening experiment. The extract was further separated into fractions A, B, and C by silica gel column chromatography. Fractions B and C showed strong inhibition activities against Gymnodinium. This is the first report of inhibitory activity of secondary metabolites of a Halomonas bacterium against a red-tide-causing microalga.

  9. Cloning, characterization and analysis of cat and ben genes from the phenol degrading halophilic bacterium Halomonas organivorans.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Maria de Lourdes Moreno

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Extensive use of phenolic compounds in industry has resulted in the generation of saline wastewaters that produce significant environmental contamination; however, little information is available on the degradation of phenolic compounds in saline conditions. Halomonas organivorans G-16.1 (CECT 5995(T is a moderately halophilic bacterium that we isolated in a previous work from saline environments of South Spain by enrichment for growth in different pollutants, including phenolic compounds. PCR amplification with degenerate primers revealed the presence of genes encoding ring-cleaving enzymes of the β-ketoadipate pathway for aromatic catabolism in H. organivorans. FINDINGS: The gene cluster catRBCA, involved in catechol degradation, was isolated from H. organivorans. The genes catA, catB, catC and the divergently transcribed catR code for catechol 1,2-dioxygenase (1,2-CTD, cis,cis-muconate cycloisomerase, muconolactone delta-isomerase and a LysR-type transcriptional regulator, respectively. The benzoate catabolic genes (benA and benB are located flanking the cat genes. The expression of cat and ben genes by phenol and benzoic acid was shown by RT-PCR analysis. The induction of catA gene by phenol and benzoic acid was also probed by the measurement of 1,2-CTD activity in H. organivorans growth in presence of these inducers. 16S rRNA and catA gene-based phylogenies were established among different degrading bacteria showing no phylogenetic correlation between both genes. CONCLUSIONS/SIGNIFICANCE: In this work, we isolated and determined the sequence of a gene cluster from a moderately halophilic bacterium encoding ortho-pathway genes involved in the catabolic metabolism of phenol and analyzed the gene organization, constituting the first report characterizing catabolic genes involved in the degradation of phenol in moderate halophiles, providing an ideal model system to investigate the potential use of this group of extremophiles in

  10. Halomonas desiderata as a bacterial model to predict the possible biological nitrate reduction in concrete cells of nuclear waste disposals.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alquier, Marjorie; Kassim, Caroline; Bertron, Alexandra; Sablayrolles, Caroline; Rafrafi, Yan; Albrecht, Achim; Erable, Benjamin

    2014-01-01

    After closure of a waste disposal cell in a repository for radioactive waste, resaturation is likely to cause the release of soluble species contained in cement and bituminous matrices, such as ionic species (nitrates, sulfates, calcium and alkaline ions, etc.), organic matter (mainly organic acids), or gases (from steel containers and reinforced concrete structures as well as from radiolysis within the waste packages). However, in the presence of nitrates in the near-field of waste, the waste cell can initiate oxidative conditions leading to enhanced mobility of redox-sensitive radionuclides (RN). In biotic conditions and in the presence of organic matter and/or hydrogen as electron donors, nitrates may be microbiologically reduced, allowing a return to reducing conditions that promote the safety of storage. Our work aims to analyze the possible microbial reactivity of nitrates at the bitumen - concrete interface in conditions as close as possible to radioactive waste storage conditions in order (i) to evaluate the nitrate reaction kinetics; (ii) to identify the by-products (NO2(-), NH4(+), N2, N2O, etc.); and (iii) to discriminate between the roles of planktonic bacteria and those adhering as a biofilm structure in the denitrifying activity. Leaching experiments on solid matrices (bitumen and cement pastes) were first implemented to define the physicochemical conditions that microorganisms are likely to meet at the bitumen-concrete interface, e.g. highly alkaline pH conditions (10 < pH < 11) imposed by the cement matrix. The screening of a range of anaerobic denitrifying bacterial strains led us to select Halomonas desiderata as a model bacterium capable of catalyzing the reaction of nitrate reduction in these particular conditions of pH. The denitrifying activity of H. desiderata was quantified in a batch bioreactor in the presence of solid matrices and/or leachate from bitumen and cement matrices. Denitrification was relatively fast in the presence of cement

  11. Evaluation of harmful heavy metal (Hg, Pb and Cd reduction using Halomonas elongata and Tetragenococcus halophilusfor protein hydrolysate product

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ruttiya Asksonthon

    2016-04-01

    Full Text Available Background: Many health claims surrounding antioxidative, antihypertensive and anti-inflammatory properties have been addressed in natural protein hydrolysates, including fermented fish. Besides being sold as animal feed, tuna viscera is used for the production of fermented products like fish sauce and Tai pla, fermented viscera. However, toxic heavy metals including Hg, Pb and Cd have been found in various food items, particularly within the internal organs of tuna. Therefore, the consumption of fermented tuna viscera containing heavy metal involves health risks. Consequently, the detoxification and reduction of these toxic elements are relevant and important issues, particularly with the use of their bacterial cells and metabolic products. Halomonas elongatais a moderately halophilic bacterium which has the ability to remove heavy metal, and is normally found in hypersaline environments. Tetragenococcus halophilusis a moderately halophilic lactic acid bacterium and probiotic which is found in fermented food products, such as fish sauce, shrimp paste, and fermented fish. Some scientific studies have reported using T. halophilus improves amino acid profiles and desirable volatile compounds, in addition to reducing biogenic amine content in fish sauce product. Therefore, it was hypothesized that using H.elongata and T. halophilus could reduce heavy metal content and improve the organoleptic quality of fermented fish viscera product (Tai pla. Objective: This present work attempted to determine the growth characteristic of H. elongataand T. halophilus reared at various NaCl concentrations:10, 15, 20 and 25%. Consequently, heavy metal reduction using these microorganisms reared at optimum NaCl concentration was evaluated. Methods: H. elongate and T. halophilus were reared in saline nutrient broth (SNB and de Man, Rogosa and Sharpe (MRS-broth added with NaCl at concentration 10, 15, 20 and 25%, respectively. Cultures at each NaCl content were added

  12. Characterization of Halomonas sp. ZM3 isolated from the Zelazny Most post-flotation waste reservoir, with a special focus on its mobile DNA.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dziewit, Lukasz; Pyzik, Adam; Matlakowska, Renata; Baj, Jadwiga; Szuplewska, Magdalena; Bartosik, Dariusz

    2013-03-14

    Halomonas sp. ZM3 was isolated from Zelazny Most post-flotation mineral waste repository (Poland), which is highly contaminated with heavy metals and various organic compounds. Mobile DNA of the strain (i.e. plasmids and transposons) were analyzed in order to identify genetic information enabling adaptation of the bacterium to the harsh environmental conditions. The analysis revealed that ZM3 carries plasmid pZM3H1 (31,370 bp), whose replication system may be considered as an archetype of a novel subgroup of IncU-like replicons. pZM3H1 is a narrow host range, mobilizable plasmid (encodes a relaxase of the MOBV family) containing mercury resistance operon (mer) and czcD genes (mediate resistance to zinc and cobalt), which are part of a large truncated Tn3 family transposon. Further analysis demonstrated that the phenotypes determined by the pZM3H1 resistance cassette are highly dependent on the host strain. In another strand of the study, the trap plasmid pMAT1 was employed to identify functional transposable elements of Halomonas sp. ZM3. Using the sacB positive selection strategy two insertion sequences were identified: ISHsp1 - representing IS5 group of IS5 family and ISHsp2 - a distinct member of the IS630 family. This study provides the first detailed description of mobile DNA in a member of the family Halomonadaceae. The identified IncU plasmid pZM3H1 confers resistance phenotypes enabling adaptation of the host strain to the Zelazny Most environment. The extended comparative analysis has shed light on the distribution of related IncU plasmids among bacteria, which, in many cases, reflects the frequency and direction of horizontal gene transfer events. Our results also identify plasmid-encoded modules, which may form the basis of novel shuttle vectors, specific for this group of halophilic bacteria.

  13. Characterisation of copolymer, poly (hydroxybutyrate-co-hydroxyvalerate) (PHB-co-PHV) produced by Halomonas campisalis (MCM B-1027), its biodegradability and potential application.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kulkarni, Snehal O; Kanekar, Pradnya P; Jog, Jyoti P; Patil, Prashant A; Nilegaonkar, Smita S; Sarnaik, Seema S; Kshirsagar, Pranav R

    2011-06-01

    Characterisation of polyhydroxyalkanoate (PHA) film produced by haloalkalitolerant Halomonas campisalis (MCM B-1027) in 14L SS fermenter revealed it to have composition of monomer units, HB:HV as 96:4 as analysed by (1)H NMR indicating the PHA as a co-polymer of PHB-co-PHV, molecular weight by gel permeation chromatography as 2.08 × 10(6), melting temperature 166.51°C, tensile strength 18.8 MPa; two relaxations namely beta transition corresponding to the glass rubber transition and alpha transition corresponding to crystalline relaxation by Dynamic Mechanical Thermal analysis and only one relaxation corresponding to MWS interfacial polarisation with activation energy of 129 kJ/mol by broadband dielectric spectroscopy. Optical microscopic studies showed typical Maltese-cross pattern of spherulites. The PHA film was found to be biodegradable by standard ASTM method as well as by soil burial method. The leak proof polymer bags prepared from the film could be used as a packaging material. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  14. Cloning and identification of Group 1 mrp operon encoding a novel monovalent cation/proton antiporter system from the moderate halophile Halomonas zhaodongensis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Meng, Lin; Hong, Shan; Liu, Henan; Huang, Haipeng; Sun, Hao; Xu, Tong; Jiang, Juquan

    2014-11-01

    The novel species Halomonas zhaodongensis NEAU-ST10-25(T) recently identified by our group is a moderate halophile which can grow at the range of 0-2.5 M NaCl (optimum 0.5 M) and pH 6-12 (optimum pH 9). To explore its halo-alkaline tolerant mechanism, genomic DNA was screened from NEAU-ST10-25(T) in this study for Na(+)(Li(+))/H(+) antiporter genes by selection in Escherichia coli KNabc lacking three major Na(+)(Li(+))/H(+) antiporters. One mrp operon could confer tolerance of E. coli KNabc to 0.8 M NaCl and 100 mM LiCl, and an alkaline pH. This operon was previously mainly designated mrp (also mnh, pha or sha) due to its multiple resistance and pH-related activity. Here, we will also use mrp to designate the homolog from H. zhaodongensis (Hz_mrp). Sequence analysis and protein alignment showed that Hz_mrp should belong to Group 1 mrp operons. Further phylogenetic analysis reveals that Hz_Mrp system should represent a novel sub-class of Group 1 Mrp systems. This was confirmed by a significant difference in pH-dependent activity profile or the specificity and affinity for the transported monovalent cations between Hz_Mrp system and all the known Mrp systems. Therefore, we propose that Hz_Mrp should be categorized as a novel Group 1 Mrp system.

  15. Production and characterization of a biodegradable poly (hydroxybutyrate-co-hydroxyvalerate) (PHB-co-PHV) copolymer by moderately haloalkalitolerant Halomonas campisalis MCM B-1027 isolated from Lonar Lake, India.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kulkarni, S O; Kanekar, P P; Nilegaonkar, S S; Sarnaik, S S; Jog, J P

    2010-12-01

    Several microorganisms produce polyhydroxyalkanoates (PHA). They are accumulated intracellularly as energy storage compounds. The PHAs are of interest because of their potential in biomedical applications. Halophilic bacteria and archaea are known to produce polyhydroxybutyrate (PHB). This paper describes production of a biodegradable copolymer, PHB-co-PHV by a moderately haloalkalitolerant Halomonas campisalis, isolated from Lonar Lake, India. The production of PHA was in the range of 45-81% on dry cell weight basis when the organism was grown in a production medium containing 1% (w/v) maltose and 0.1% (w/v) yeast extract, at pH ranging from 6 to 9 with an inoculum density of 10(5)-10(7) cells/ml of medium, for incubation period of 15-30 h and at 37 degrees C. The polymer produced by the organism is a hydroxyester with molecular weight of 1.3014 x 10(6). Its melting temperature was 171 degrees C. The (1)H NMR analysis revealed that the polymer was a copolymer of PHB-co-PHV. This could be achieved by providing simple carbon source viz. maltose. Copyright (c) 2010 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  16. Cloning, expression and characterisation of P450-Hal1 (CYP116B62) from Halomonas sp. NCIMB 172: A self-sufficient P450 with high expression and diverse substrate scope.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Porter, Joanne L; Sabatini, Selina; Manning, Jack; Tavanti, Michele; Galman, James L; Turner, Nicholas J; Flitsch, Sabine L

    2018-06-01

    Cytochrome P450 monooxygenases are able to catalyse a range of synthetically challenging reactions ranging from hydroxylation and demethylation to sulfoxidation and epoxidation. As such they have great potential for biocatalytic applications but are underutilised due to often-poor expression, stability and solubility in recombinant bacterial hosts. The use of self-sufficient P450 s with fused haem and reductase domains has already contributed heavily to improving catalytic efficiency and simplifying an otherwise more complex multi-component system of P450 and redox partners. Herein, we present a new addition to the class VII family with the cloning, sequencing and characterisation of the self-sufficient CYP116B62 Hal1 from Halomonas sp. NCIMB 172, the genome of which has not yet been sequenced. Hal1 exhibits high levels of expression in a recombinant E. coli host and can be utilised from cell lysate or used in purified form. Hal1 favours NADPH as electron donor and displays a diverse range of activities including hydroxylation, demethylation and sulfoxidation. These properties make Hal1 suitable for future biocatalytic applications or as a template for optimisation through engineering. Copyright © 2018 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  17. Halophilic and haloalkaliphilic sulfur-oxidizing bacteria

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Sorokin, D.Y.; Banciu, H.; Robertson, L.A.; Kuenen, J.G.; Muntyan, M.S.; Muyzer, G.; Rosenberg, E.; DeLong, F.; Delong, E.; Lory, S.; Stackebrandt, E.; Thompson, F.

    2013-01-01

    Chemotrophic sulfur-oxidizing bacteria (SOB) represent an important functional group of microorganisms responsible for the dark oxidation of reduced sulfur compounds generated by sulfidogens. Until recently, only a single genus of halophilic SOB (Halothiobacillus) has been described, and nothing was

  18. Identification of anaerobic arsenite-oxidizing and arsenate-reducing bacteria associated with an alkaline saline lake in Khovsgol, Mongolia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hamamura, Natsuko; Itai, Takaaki; Liu, Yitai; Reysenbach, Anna-Louise; Damdinsuren, Narantuya; Inskeep, William P

    2014-10-01

    Microbial arsenic transformation pathways associated with a saline lake located in northern Mongolia were examined using molecular biological and culturing approaches. Bacterial 16S rRNA gene sequences recovered from saline lake sediments and soils were affiliated with haloalkaliphiles, including Bacillus and Halomonas spp. Diverse sequences of arsenate respiratory reductase (arrA) and a new group of arsenite oxidase (arxA) genes were also identified. Pure cultures of arsenate-reducing Nitrincola strain and anaerobic arsenite-oxidizing Halomonas strain were isolated. The chemoorganotrophic Halomonas strain contains arxA gene similar to that of a chemoautotrophic arsenite-oxidizing Alkalilimnicola ehrlichii strain MLHE-1. These results revealed the diversity of arsenic transformation pathways associated with a geographically distinct saline system and the potential contribution of arx-dependent arsenite oxidation by heterotrophic bacteria.

  19. Biodegradation Potential of Halo(alkali)philic Prokaryotes

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Sorokin, D.Y.; Janssen, A.J.H.; Muyzer, G.

    2012-01-01

    Oil and gas exploitation and downstream processing may generate large volumes of contaminated aqueous wastewaters. Without treatment, the discharge of these streams into the environment would lead to considerable environmental problems. A combination of physicochemical and biological treatment

  20. Transformation of monothioarsenate by haloalkaliphilic, anoxygenic photosynthetic purple sulfur bacteria.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Edwardson, Christian F; Planer-Friedrich, Britta; Hollibaugh, James T

    2014-12-01

    Thioarsenates are the dominant arsenic species in arsenic-rich, alkaline, and sulfidic waters, but bacterial interactions with these compounds have only recently been examined. Previous studies have shown that microorganisms play a role in the transformation of monothioarsenate to arsenate, including use of monothioarsenate as a chemolithotrophic electron donor coupled with oxygen as an electron acceptor. We obtained enrichment cultures from two saline, alkaline lakes (Mono Lake, CA and Big Soda Lake, NV) that are able to use monothioarsenate as the sole electron donor for anoxygenic photosynthesis. These anoxic cultures were able to convert a 1 mM mixture of thioarsenates completely to arsenate in c. 13 days and 4 mM monothioarsenate to arsenate in c. 17 days. This conversion was light dependent; thus, monothioarsenate can be used as the sole electron donor for anoxygenic photosynthesis. Both of the Mono Lake and Big Soda Lake enrichment cultures were dominated by an organism closely related to Ectothiorhodospira species. We tested additional strains of purple sulfur bacteria and found widespread ability to use monothioarsenate as an electron donor. The ability of bacteria to transform thioarsenates directly via anoxygenic photosynthesis adds a new perspective to the well-studied arsenic and sulfur cycles. © 2014 Federation of European Microbiological Societies. Published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd. All rights reserved.

  1. Microbial ecology of halo-alkaliphilic sulfur bacteria

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Foti, M.J.

    2007-01-01

    The research of this thesis focussed on the investigation of the microbial diversity in soda lakes, giving a special attention to the micro-organisms involved in the sulphur cycle. The present PhD was part of a bigger project aiming to develop a biological process for the removal of hydrogen

  2. Genomic Analysis of the Evolution of Phototrophy among Haloalkaliphilic Rhodobacterales

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Kopejtka, Karel; Tomasch, J.; Zeng, Y.; Tichý, Martin; Sorokin, D. Y.; Koblížek, Michal

    2017-01-01

    Roč. 9, č. 7 (2017), s. 1950-1962 ISSN 1759-6653 R&D Projects: GA ČR GBP501/12/G055; GA MŠk(CZ) LO1416 Institutional support: RVO:61388971 Keywords : Anoxygenic photosynthesis * bacteriochlorophyll * horizontal gene transfer Subject RIV: EE - Microbiology, Virology OBOR OECD: Microbiology Impact factor: 3.979, year: 2016

  3. Biological treatment of refinery spent caustics under halo-alkaline conditions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    de Graaff, Marco; Bijmans, Martijn F M; Abbas, Ben; Euverink, Gert-J W; Muyzer, Gerard; Janssen, Albert J H

    2011-08-01

    The present research demonstrates the biological treatment of refinery sulfidic spent caustics in a continuously fed system under halo-alkaline conditions (i.e. pH 9.5; Na(+)= 0.8M). Experiments were performed in identical gas-lift bioreactors operated under aerobic conditions (80-90% saturation) at 35°C. Sulfide loading rates up to 27 mmol L(-1)day(-1) were successfully applied at a HRT of 3.5 days. Sulfide was completely converted into sulfate by the haloalkaliphilic sulfide-oxidizing bacteria belonging to the genus Thioalkalivibrio. Influent benzene concentrations ranged from 100 to 600 μM. At steady state, benzene was removed by 93% due to high stripping efficiencies and biodegradation. Microbial community analysis revealed the presence of haloalkaliphilic heterotrophic bacteria belonging to the genera Marinobacter, Halomonas and Idiomarina which might have been involved in the observed benzene removal. The work shows the potential of halo-alkaliphilic bacteria in mitigating environmental problems caused by alkaline waste. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  4. Controlling cell volume for efficient PHB production by Halomonas.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jiang, Xiao-Ran; Yao, Zhi-Hao; Chen, Guo-Qiang

    2017-11-01

    Bacterial morphology is decided by cytoskeleton protein MreB and cell division protein FtsZ encoded by essential genes mreB and ftsZ, respectively. Inactivating mreB and ftsZ lead to increasing cell sizes and cell lengths, respectively, yet seriously reduce cell growth ability. Here we develop a temperature-responsible plasmid expression system for compensated expression of relevant gene(s) in mreB or ftsZ disrupted recombinants H. campaniensis LS21, allowing mreB or ftsZ disrupted recombinants to grow normally at 30°C in a bioreactor for 12h so that a certain cell density can be reached, followed by 36h cell size expansions or cell shape elongations at elevated 37°C at which the mreB and ftsZ encoded plasmid pTKmf failed to replicate in the recombinants and thus lost themselves. Finally, 80% PHB yield increase was achieved via controllable morphology manipulated H. campaniensis LS21. It is concluded that controllable expanding cell volumes (widths or lengths) provides more spaces for accumulating more inclusion body polyhydroxybutyrate (PHB) and the resulting cell gravity precipitation benefits the final separation of cells and product during downstream. Copyright © 2017 International Metabolic Engineering Society. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  5. Natronobacillus azotifigens gen. nov., sp. nov., an anaerobic diazotrophic haloalkaliphile from soda-rich habitats

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Sorokin, I.D.; Zadorina, E.V.; Kravchenko, I.K.; Boulygina, E.S.; Tourova, T.P.; Sorokin, D.Y.

    2009-01-01

    Gram-positive bacteria capable of nitrogen fixation were obtained in microoxic enrichments from soda soils in south-western Siberia, north-eastern Mongolia, and the Lybian desert (Egypt). The same organisms were obtained in anoxic enrichments with glucose from soda lake sediments in the Kulunda

  6. Purification and biochemical characterization of the haloalkaliphilic archaeon Natronococcus occultus extracellular serine protease

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Studdert, C A; Herrera Seitz, M K; Plasencia, I

    2001-01-01

    A serine protease was purified from Natronococcus occultus stationary phase culture medium (328-fold, yield 19%) and characterized at the biochemical level. The enzyme has a native molecular mass of 130 kDa, has chymotrypsin-like activity, is stable and active in a broad pH range (5.5-12), is rat......A serine protease was purified from Natronococcus occultus stationary phase culture medium (328-fold, yield 19%) and characterized at the biochemical level. The enzyme has a native molecular mass of 130 kDa, has chymotrypsin-like activity, is stable and active in a broad pH range (5.......5-12), is rather thermophilic (optimal activity at 60 degrees C in 1-2 M NaCl) and is dependent on high salt concentrations for activity and stability (1-2 M NaCl or KCl). Polyclonal antibodies were raised against the purified protease. In Western blots, they presented no cross-reactivity with culture medium from...... other halobacteria nor with commercial proteases except subtilisin. The amino acid sequences of three tryptic peptides obtained from Natronococcus occultus protease did not show significant similarity to other known proteolytic enzymes. This fact, in addition to its high molecular mass suggests...

  7. Effect of amino acids on the repression of alkaline protease synthesis in haloalkaliphilic Nocardiopsis dassonvillei

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Amit K. Sharma

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available A newly isolated salt-tolerant alkaliphilic actinomycete, Nocardiopsis dassonvillei strain OK-18 grows on mineral salts medium with glucose as carbon source. It also grows and produces protease with amino acids as sole carbon source. The synthesis of extracellular alkaline protease parallel to growth was repressible by substrate concentrations. The absolute production of the protease was delinked with growth under nutritional stress, as protease production was high, despite poor growth. When amino acids served as the sole source of carbon and nitrogen, the enzyme production was significantly controlled by the number of amino acids. Maximal protease production was achieved with proline, asparagine, tyrosine, alanine, methionine and valine as sole source of carbon and nitrogen in minimal medium. With the increasing number of different amino acids in the presence and absence of glucose, the protease production was synergistically lower as compared to complex medium.

  8. Topological analysis of carbon flux during multi-stress adaptation in Halomonas sp. AAD12

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hilal Mangaoglu Yoruk

    2015-11-01

    Conclusions: The operation of the glyoxylate shunt as the major anaplerotic pathway and the degradation of 6-phosphogluconate through the Entner–Doudoroff Pathway were the major factors in causing a distinction between the observed phenotypes.

  9. Alleviation of salt stress by Halomonas sp. and osmolytes in Zea mays

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    use

    2011-12-05

    Dec 5, 2011 ... transpiration causes build-up of excess salts in the soil which is adverse to .... for the same period of time in disposable sterile plastic pots filled with 120 g sieved ..... stabilizing macromolecules to extreme conditions and thus ...

  10. Alleviation of salt stress by Halomonas sp. and osmolytes in Zea mays

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    To ascertain this, strains were checked for osmolyte accumulation under salt stress. Growth and osmolyte accumulation of inoculated and non-inoculated seeds of the economically significant plant, Zea mays Var. EV.90, was recorded. Seeds were sown in soil supplemented with and without exogenous proline and glycine ...

  11. A newly isolated Haloalkaliphilic bacterium from middle-late Eocene halite formed in salt lakes in China

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Meng, F. W.; Wang, X.-Q.; Ni, P.; Kletetschka, Günther; Li, Y-P.; Yang, Ch.-H.

    2015-01-01

    Roč. 30, č. 3 (2015), s. 321-330 ISSN 0891-2556 Institutional support: RVO:67985831 Keywords : ancient microorganism * primary fluid inclusion * halite * Eocene Subject RIV: DB - Geology ; Mineralogy Impact factor: 0.440, year: 2015

  12. Partial genome sequence of Thioalkalivibrio thiocyanodenitrificans ARhD 1T, a chemolithoautotrophic haloalkaliphilic sulfur-oxidizing bacterium capable of complete denitrification

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Berben, T.; Sorokin, D.Y.; Ivanova, N.; Pati, A.; Kyrpides, N.; Goodwin, L.A; Woyke, T.; Muyzer, G.

    2015-01-01

    Thioalkalivibrio thiocyanodenitrificans strain ARhD 1 T is a motile, Gram-negative bacterium isolated from soda lakes that belongs to the Gammaproteobacteria. It derives energy for growth and carbon fixation from the oxidation of sulfur compounds, most notably thiocyanate, and so is a

  13. Desulfuribacillus alkaliarsenatis gen. nov., sp. nov., a deep-lineage, obligately anaerobic, dissimilatory sulfur and arsenate-reducing, haloalkaliphilic representative of the order Bacillales from soda lakes

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Sorokin, D.Y.; Tourova, T.P.; Sukhacheva, M.V.; Muyzer, G.

    2012-01-01

    An anaerobic enrichment culture inoculated with a sample of sediments from soda lakes of the Kulunda Steppe with elemental sulfur as electron acceptor and formate as electron donor at pH 10 and moderate salinity inoculated with sediments from soda lakes in Kulunda Steppe (Altai, Russia) resulted in

  14. Desulfuribacillus alkaliarsenatis gen. nov. sp. nov., a deep-lineage, obligately anaerobic, dissimilatory sulfur and arsenate-reducing, haloalkaliphilic representative of the order Bacillales from soda lakes

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Sorokin, D.Y.; Tourova, T.P.; Sukhacheva, M.V.; Muyzer, G.

    2012-01-01

    An anaerobic enrichment culture inoculated with a sample of sediments from soda lakes of the Kulunda Steppe with elemental sulfur as electron acceptor and formate as electron donor at pH 10 and moderate salinity inoculated with sediments from soda lakes in Kulunda Steppe (Altai, Russia) resulted in

  15. Halomonas indalinina sp.nov., a moderately halophilic bacterium isolated from a solar saltern in Cabo de Gata, Al,eria, southern Spain

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Cabrera, A.; Aguilera, M.; Fuentes Enriquez de Salamanca, S.; Incerti, C.; Russell, N.J.; Ramos-Cormenzana, A.; Monteoliva-Sanchez, M.

    2007-01-01

    moderately halophilic bacterium, strain CG2.1T, isolated from a solar saltern at Cabo de Gata, a wildlife reserve located in the province of Almería, southern Spain, was subjected to a polyphasic taxonomic study. This organism was an aerobic, motile, Gram-negative rod that produced orange-pigmented

  16. Physiology of alkaliphilic sulfur-oxidizing bacteria from soda lakes

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Banciu, H.L.

    2004-01-01

    The inorganic sulfur oxidation by obligate haloalkaliphilic chemolithoautotrophs was only recently discovered and investigated. These autotrophic sulfur oxidizing bacteria (SOB), capable of oxidation of inorganic sulfur compounds at moderate to high salt concentration and at high pH, can be divided

  17. Complete genome sequence of Desulfurivibrio alkaliphilus strain AHT2

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Melton, Emily Denise; Sorokin, Dimitry Y.; Overmars, Lex; Chertkov, Olga; Clum, Alicia; Pillay, Manoj; Ivanova, Natalia; Shapiro, Nicole; Kyrpides, Nikos C.; Woyke, Tanja; Lapidus, Alla L.; Muyzer, Gerard

    2016-01-01

    Desulfurivibrio alkaliphilus strain AHT2T is a strictly anaerobic sulfidogenic haloalkaliphile isolated from a composite sediment sample of eight hypersaline alkaline lakes in the Wadi al Natrun valley in the Egyptian Libyan Desert. D. alkaliphilus AHT2T is Gram-negative and

  18. Microbial population analysis of the midgut of Melophagus ovinus via high-throughput sequencing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Duan, De-Yong; Liu, Guo-Hua; Cheng, Tian-Yin; Wang, Ya-Qin

    2017-08-09

    Melophagus ovinus, one of the most common haematophagous ectoparasites of sheep, can cause anaemia and reductions in weight gain, wool growth and hide value. However, no information is available about the microfloral structure of the midgut of this ectoparasite. In the present study, we investigated the microbial community structure of the midgut contents of fully engorged female and male M. ovinus using Illumina HiSeq. The phylum showing the highest abundance was Proteobacteria (99.9%). The dominant bacterial genera in females and males were Bartonella, Arsenophonus and Wolbachia. Some less abundant bacterial genera were also detected, including Enterobacter, Acinetobacter, Halomonas, Shewanella, Bacillus and Staphylococcus. Bartonella, Arsenophonus and Wolbachia were the dominant bacterial genera in the midgut of female and male M. ovinus. Although detected, Enterobacter, Acinetobacter, Halomonas, Shewanella, Bacillus and Staphylococcus showed low abundances. Importantly, this is the first report of the presence of Arsenophonus, Wolbachia, Enterobacter, Halomonas, Shewanella, Bacillus and Staphylococcus in the midgut of M. ovinus.

  19. Contrasting the genetic patterns of microbial communities in Soda lakes with and without cyanobacterial bloom

    OpenAIRE

    Andreote, A. P. D.; Dini-Andreote, F.; Rigonato, J.; Machineski, G. S.; Souza, B. C. E.; Barbiéro, Laurent; Rezende, A. T.; Fiore, M. F.

    2018-01-01

    Soda lakes have high levels of sodium carbonates and are characterized by salinity and elevated pH. These ecosystems are found across Africa, Europe, Asia, Australia, North, Central, and South America. Particularly in Brazil, the Pantanal region has a series of hundreds of shallow soda lakes (ca. 600) potentially colonized by a diverse haloalkaliphilic microbial community. Biological information of these systems is still elusive, in particular data on the description of the main taxa involved...

  20. A physiologically based kinetic model for bacterial sulfide oxidation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Klok, Johannes B M; de Graaff, Marco; van den Bosch, Pim L F; Boelee, Nadine C; Keesman, Karel J; Janssen, Albert J H

    2013-02-01

    In the biotechnological process for hydrogen sulfide removal from gas streams, a variety of oxidation products can be formed. Under natron-alkaline conditions, sulfide is oxidized by haloalkaliphilic sulfide oxidizing bacteria via flavocytochrome c oxidoreductase. From previous studies, it was concluded that the oxidation-reduction state of cytochrome c is a direct measure for the bacterial end-product formation. Given this physiological feature, incorporation of the oxidation state of cytochrome c in a mathematical model for the bacterial oxidation kinetics will yield a physiologically based model structure. This paper presents a physiologically based model, describing the dynamic formation of the various end-products in the biodesulfurization process. It consists of three elements: 1) Michaelis-Menten kinetics combined with 2) a cytochrome c driven mechanism describing 3) the rate determining enzymes of the respiratory system of haloalkaliphilic sulfide oxidizing bacteria. The proposed model is successfully validated against independent data obtained from biological respiration tests and bench scale gas-lift reactor experiments. The results demonstrate that the model is a powerful tool to describe product formation for haloalkaliphilic biomass under dynamic conditions. The model predicts a maximum S⁰ formation of about 98 mol%. A future challenge is the optimization of this bioprocess by improving the dissolved oxygen control strategy and reactor design. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  1. Characterization of bacterial populations in Danish raw milk cheeses made with different starter cultures by denaturating gradient gel electrophoresis and pyrosequencing

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Masoud, Wafa Mahmoud Hasan; Takamiya, Monica K Wik; Vogensen, Finn Kvist

    2011-01-01

    ripening. Other bacteria like Corynebacterium, Halomonas, Pediococcus, Micrococcus and Staphylococcus, which were encountered in some cheese samples at low percentages compared with the total bacterial populations, were only detected by pyrosequencing. 16S rRNA gene pyrosequencing is an efficient method...

  2. Short communication: Industrial effluent treatments using heavy ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Bioflocculants produced by Herbaspirillium sp. CH7, Paenibacillus sp. CH11, Bacillus sp. CH15 and a Halomonas sp. were preliminarily evaluated as flocculating agents in the treatment of industrial wastewater effluents. Industrial (1 local chemical-industry and 2 textile-industry: Biavin 109-medium blue dye and Whale dye) ...

  3. [Biosynthesis of the bioprotectant ectoin by aerobic methylotrophic bacteria from methanol].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Doronina, N V; Ezhov, V A; Beschastnyĭ, A P; Trotsenko, Iu A

    2010-01-01

    It is shown that neutrophilic methylobacteria Methylophaga thalassica and M. marina have higher rates of growth and ectoin accumulation compared to the haloalkaliphilic species M. alcalica and M. natronia and methanotrophs Methylomicrobium alcaliphilum and M. kenyense. The conditions of M. thalassica cultivation in methanol-containing medium were optimized. The yield of this process reached 60 g/l of absolutely dry biomass containing 15-19% (9-11 g/l) ectoine. The scheme of ectoin isolation from the biomass by extraction and subsequent purification, which allowed obtaining preparations of different degree of purity, was developed.

  4. Microbial communities associated with the anthropogenic, highly alkaline environment of a saline soda lime, Poland

    OpenAIRE

    Kalwasi?ska, Agnieszka; Felf?ldi, Tam?s; Szab?, Attila; Deja-Sikora, Edyta; Kosobucki, Przemys?aw; Walczak, Maciej

    2017-01-01

    Soda lime is a by-product of the Solvay soda process for the production of sodium carbonate from limestone and sodium chloride. Due to a high salt concentration and alkaline pH, the lime is considered as a potential habitat of haloalkaliphilic and haloalkalitolerant microbial communities. This artificial and unique environment is nutrient-poor and devoid of vegetation, due in part to semi-arid, saline and alkaline conditions. Samples taken from the surface layer of the lime and from the depth...

  5. Comparative study of plant growth promoting bacteria in minimizing toxic effects of chromium on growth and metabolic activities in wheat (triticum aestivum)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Naseem, S.; Ahmed, A.; Yasin, M.

    2016-01-01

    In this study, effect of inoculation of five bacterial strains i.e., Kushneria avicenniae AHT, Halomonas sp. AST, Bacillus sp. AMP2, Halomonas venusta APA and Arthrobacter mysorens AHA on the growth of Triticum aestivum var. Inqilab 97 was observed under various concentrations (0, 10 and 20 mu gml-1) of different chromium salts (CrCl/sub 3/, K/sub 2/CrO/sub 4/, K/sub 2/Cr/sub 2/O/sub 7/). Bacterial inoculation caused reduction in the chromium uptake (22-32, 5-22 and 2-18%) of seedlings both at 10 and 20 mu g ml-1 CrCl3, K/sub 2/CrO/sub 4/ and K/sub 2/Cr/sub 2/O/sub 7/ when compared with respective non- inoculated treatment. Also increase in acid phosphatase and peroxidase contents was recorded due to bacterial inoculations compared to control. (author)

  6. [From waste to treasure: turning activated sludge into bioplastic poly-3-hydroxybutyrate].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Jia'ni

    2017-12-25

    Large quantity of activated sludge is generated from wastewater treatment but without yet an appropriate deposition. High temperature can lyse the activate sludge so that nitrogen and phosphorus containing nutrients are released. Halomonas CJN was found to grow on the heat lysed activated sludge and glucose for production of bioplastic poly-3-hydroxybutyrate (PHB) in the absence of yeast extract, nitrogen and phosphorus sources as well as trace elements. This reduces the PHB production cost significantly. Furthermore, acetic acid formed from anaerobic fermentation of heat lysed activated sludge can be used to replace glucose for cell growth but not much for PHB production. After construction of an additional PHB synthesis pathway in Halomonas CJN, we can produce PHB entirely from heat lysed activated sludge, reducing production cost of PHB roughly from ¥ 30 000 Yuan/ton to ¥ 20 000 Yuan/ton, thus turning waste activated sludge to valuable raw material resource.

  7. Enrichment of Fusobacteria in Sea Surface Oil Slicks from the Deepwater Horizon Oil Spill

    OpenAIRE

    Gutierrez, Tony; Berry, David; Teske, Andreas; Aitken, Michael D.

    2016-01-01

    The Deepwater Horizon (DWH) oil spill led to rapid microbial community shifts in the Gulf of Mexico, including the formation of unprecedented quantities of marine oil snow (MOS) and of a massive subsurface oil plume. The major taxa that bloomed in sea surface oil slicks during the spill included Cycloclasticus, and to a lesser extent Halomonas, Alteromonas, and Pseudoalteromonas?organisms that grow and degrade oil hydrocarbons aerobically. Here, we show that sea surface oil slicks at DWH cont...

  8. Microbial communities associated with the anthropogenic, highly alkaline environment of a saline soda lime, Poland.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kalwasińska, Agnieszka; Felföldi, Tamás; Szabó, Attila; Deja-Sikora, Edyta; Kosobucki, Przemysław; Walczak, Maciej

    2017-07-01

    Soda lime is a by-product of the Solvay soda process for the production of sodium carbonate from limestone and sodium chloride. Due to a high salt concentration and alkaline pH, the lime is considered as a potential habitat of haloalkaliphilic and haloalkalitolerant microbial communities. This artificial and unique environment is nutrient-poor and devoid of vegetation, due in part to semi-arid, saline and alkaline conditions. Samples taken from the surface layer of the lime and from the depth of 2 m (both having pH ~11 and EC e up to 423 dS m -1 ) were investigated using culture-based (culturing on alkaline medium) and culture-independent microbiological approaches (microscopic analyses and pyrosequencing). A surprisingly diverse bacterial community was discovered in this highly saline, alkaline and nutrient-poor environment, with the bacterial phyla Proteobacteria (representing 52.8% of the total bacterial community) and Firmicutes (16.6%) showing dominance. Compared to the surface layer, higher bacterial abundance and diversity values were detected in the deep zone, where more stable environmental conditions may occur. The surface layer was dominated by members of the genera Phenylobacterium, Chelativorans and Skermanella, while in the interior layer the genus Fictibacillus was dominant. The culturable aerobic, haloalkaliphilic bacteria strains isolated in this study belonged mostly to the genus Bacillus and were closely related to the species Bacillus pseudofirmus, B. cereus, B. plakortidis, B. thuringensis and B. pumilus.

  9. The Use of a Fractional Factorial Design to Determine the Factors That Impact 1,3-Propanediol Production from Glycerol by Halanaerobium hydrogeniformans

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shivani Kalia

    2016-08-01

    Full Text Available In recent years, biodiesel, a substitute for fossil fuels, has led to the excessive production of crude glycerol. The resulting crude glycerol can possess a high concentration of salts and an alkaline pH. Moreover, current crude glycerol purification methods are expensive, rendering this former commodity a waste product. However, Halanaerobium hydrogeniformans, a haloalkaliphilic bacterium, possesses the metabolic capability to convert glycerol into 1,3-propanediol, a valuable commodity compound, without the need for salt dilution or adjusting pH when grown on this waste. Experiments were performed with different combinations of 24 medium components to determine their impact on the production of 1,3-propanediol by using a fractional factorial design. Tested medium components were selected based on data from the organism’s genome. Analysis of HPLC data revealed enhanced production of 1,3-propanediol with additional glycerol, pH, vitamin B12, ammonium ions, sodium sulfide, cysteine, iron, and cobalt. However, other selected components; nitrate ions, phosphate ions, sulfate ions, sodium:potassium ratio, chloride, calcium, magnesium, silicon, manganese, zinc, borate, nickel, molybdenum, tungstate, copper and aluminum, did not enhance 1,3-propanediol production. The use of a fractional factorial design enabled the quick and efficient assessment of the impact of 24 different medium components on 1,3-propanediol production from glycerol from a haloalkaliphilic bacterium.

  10. The Use of a Fractional Factorial Design to Determine the Factors That Impact 1,3-Propanediol Production from Glycerol by Halanaerobium hydrogeniformans.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kalia, Shivani; Trager, Jordan; Sitton, Oliver C; Mormile, Melanie R

    2016-08-20

    In recent years, biodiesel, a substitute for fossil fuels, has led to the excessive production of crude glycerol. The resulting crude glycerol can possess a high concentration of salts and an alkaline pH. Moreover, current crude glycerol purification methods are expensive, rendering this former commodity a waste product. However, Halanaerobium hydrogeniformans, a haloalkaliphilic bacterium, possesses the metabolic capability to convert glycerol into 1,3-propanediol, a valuable commodity compound, without the need for salt dilution or adjusting pH when grown on this waste. Experiments were performed with different combinations of 24 medium components to determine their impact on the production of 1,3-propanediol by using a fractional factorial design. Tested medium components were selected based on data from the organism's genome. Analysis of HPLC data revealed enhanced production of 1,3-propanediol with additional glycerol, pH, vitamin B12, ammonium ions, sodium sulfide, cysteine, iron, and cobalt. However, other selected components; nitrate ions, phosphate ions, sulfate ions, sodium:potassium ratio, chloride, calcium, magnesium, silicon, manganese, zinc, borate, nickel, molybdenum, tungstate, copper and aluminum, did not enhance 1,3-propanediol production. The use of a fractional factorial design enabled the quick and efficient assessment of the impact of 24 different medium components on 1,3-propanediol production from glycerol from a haloalkaliphilic bacterium.

  11. Desulfohalophilus alkaliarsenatis gen. nov., sp. nov., an extremely halophilic sulfate- and arsenate-respiring bacterium from Searles Lake, California

    Science.gov (United States)

    Blum, Jodi Switzer; Kulp, Thomas R.; Han, Sukkyun; Lanoil, Brian; Saltikov, Chad W.; Stolz, John F.; Miller, Laurence G.; Oremland, Ronald S.

    2012-01-01

    A haloalkaliphilic sulfate-respiring bacterium, strain SLSR-1, was isolated from a lactate-fed stable enrichment culture originally obtained from the extreme environment of Searles Lake, California. The isolate proved capable of growth via sulfate-reduction over a broad range of salinities (125–330 g/L), although growth was slowest at salt-saturation. Strain SLSR-1 was also capable of growth via dissimilatory arsenate-reduction and displayed an even broader range of salinity tolerance (50–330 g/L) when grown under these conditions. Strain SLSR-1 could also grow via dissimilatory nitrate reduction to ammonia. Growth experiments in the presence of high borate concentrations indicated a greater sensitivity of sulfate-reduction than arsenate-respiration to this naturally abundant anion in Searles Lake. Strain SLSR-1 contained genes involved in both sulfate-reduction (dsrAB) and arsenate respiration (arrA). Amplicons of 16S rRNA gene sequences obtained from DNA extracted from Searles Lake sediment revealed the presence of close relatives of strain SLSR-1 as part of the flora of this ecosystem despite the fact that sulfate-reduction activity could not be detected in situ. We conclude that strain SLSR-1 can only achieve growth via arsenate-reduction under the current chemical conditions prevalent at Searles Lake. Strain SLSR-1 is a deltaproteobacterium in the family Desulfohalobiacea of anaerobic, haloalkaliphilic bacteria, for which we propose the name Desulfohalophilus alkaliarsenatis gen. nov., sp. nov.

  12. Nitrate reducing bacterial activity in concrete cells of nuclear waste disposal

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alquier, M.; Kassim, C.; Bertron, A.; Rafrafi, Y.; Sablayrolles, C.; Albrecht, A.; Erable, B.

    2013-07-01

    Leaching experiments of solid matrices (bitumen and cement pastes) have been first implemented to define the physicochemical conditions that microorganisms are likely to meet at the bitumen-concrete interface (see the paper of Bertron et al.). Of course, as might be suspected, the cement matrix imposes highly alkaline pH conditions (10 Halomonas desiderata as a model bacterium capable of catalyzing the reaction of nitrate reduction in these extreme conditions of pH. The denitrifying activity of Halomonas desiderata was quantified in batch bioreactor in the presence of solid matrices and / or leachate from bitumen and cement matrices. Denitrification was relatively fast in the presence of cement matrix (<100 hours) and 2 to 3 times slower in the presence of bituminous matrix. Overall, the presence of solid cement promoted the kinetics of denitrification. The observation of solid surfaces at the end of the experiment revealed the presence of a biofilm of Halomonas desiderata on the cement paste surface. These attached bacteria showed a denitrifying activity comparable to planktonic bacterial culture. On the other side, no colonization of bitumen could be highlighted as either by SEM or epifluorescence microscopy. Now, we are currently developing a continuous experimental bioreactor which should allow us a more rational understanding of the bitumen-cement-microbe interactions.

  13. Nitrate reducing bacterial activity in concrete cells of nuclear waste disposal

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Albrecht A.

    2013-07-01

    Full Text Available Leaching experiments of solid matrices (bitumen and cement pastes have been first implemented to define the physicochemical conditions that microorganisms are likely to meet at the bitumen-concrete interface (see the paper of Bertron et al.. Of course, as might be suspected, the cement matrix imposes highly alkaline pH conditions (10 Halomonas desiderata as a model bacterium capable of catalyzing the reaction of nitrate reduction in these extreme conditions of pH. The denitrifying activity of Halomonas desiderata was quantified in batch bioreactor in the presence of solid matrices and / or leachate from bitumen and cement matrices. Denitrification was relatively fast in the presence of cement matrix (<100 hours and 2 to 3 times slower in the presence of bituminous matrix. Overall, the presence of solid cement promoted the kinetics of denitrification. The observation of solid surfaces at the end of the experiment revealed the presence of a biofilm of Halomonas desiderata on the cement paste surface. These attached bacteria showed a denitrifying activity comparable to planktonic bacterial culture. On the other side, no colonization of bitumen could be highlighted as either by SEM or epifluorescence microscopy. Now, we are currently developing a continuous experimental bioreactor which should allow us a more rational understanding of the bitumen-cement-microbe interactions.

  14. Respiratory arsenate reductase as a bidirectional enzyme

    Science.gov (United States)

    Richey, C.; Chovanec, P.; Hoeft, S.E.; Oremland, R.S.; Basu, P.; Stolz, J.F.

    2009-01-01

    The haloalkaliphilic bacterium Alkalilimnicola ehrlichii is capable of anaerobic chemolithoautotrophic growth by coupling the oxidation of arsenite (As(III)) to the reduction of nitrate and carbon dioxide. Analysis of its complete genome indicates that it lacks a conventional arsenite oxidase (Aox), but instead possesses two operons that each encode a putative respiratory arsenate reductase (Arr). Here we show that one homolog is expressed under chemolithoautotrophic conditions and exhibits both arsenite oxidase and arsenate reductase activity. We also demonstrate that Arr from two arsenate respiring bacteria, Alkaliphilus oremlandii and Shewanella sp. strain ANA-3, is also biochemically reversible. Thus Arr can function as a reductase or oxidase. Its physiological role in a specific organism, however, may depend on the electron potentials of the molybdenum center and [Fe–S] clusters, additional subunits, or constitution of the electron transfer chain. This versatility further underscores the ubiquity and antiquity of microbial arsenic metabolism.

  15. Uranium association with halophilic and non-halophilic bacteria and archaea

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Francis, A.J.; Gillow, J.B.; Dodge, C.J.; Harris, R.; Beveridge, T.J.; Papenguth, H.W.

    2004-01-01

    We determined the association of uranium with bacteria isolated from the Waste Isolation Pilot Plant (WIPP), Carlsbad, New Mexico, and compared this with known strains of halophilic and non-halophilic bacteria and archaea. Examination of the cultures by transmission electron microscopy (TEM) and energy dispersive X-ray spectroscopy (EDS) showed uranium accumulation extracellularly and/or intracellularly to a varying degree. In Pseudomonas fluorescens and Bacillus subtilis uranium was associated with the cell surface and in the latter it was present as irregularly shaped grains. In Halobacterium halobium, the only archeon studied here, uranium was present as dense deposits and with Haloanaerobium praevalens as spikey deposits. Halomonas sp. isolated from the WIPP site accumulated uranium both extracellularly on the cell surface and intracellularly as electron-dense discrete granules. Extended X-ray absorption fine structure (EXAFS) analysis of uranium with the halophilic and non-halophilic bacteria and archaea showed that the uranium present in whole cells was bonded to an average of 2.4 ± 0.7 phosphoryl groups at a distance of 3.65 ± 0.03 Aa. Comparison of whole cells of Halomonas sp. with the cell wall fragments of lysed cells showed the presence of a uranium bidentate complex at 2.91 ± 0.03 Aa with the carboxylate group on the cell wall, and uranyl hydroxide with U-U interaction at 3.71 ± 0.03 Aa due to adsorption or precipitation reactions; no U-P interaction was observed. Addition of uranium to the cell lysate of Halomonas sp. resulted in the precipitation of uranium due to the inorganic phosphate produced by the cells. These results show that the phosphates released from bacteria bind a significant amount of uranium. However, the bacterially immobilized uranium was readily solubilized by bicarbonate with concurrent release of phosphate into solution. (orig.)

  16. Sorption behavior of europium(III) and curium(III) on the cell surfaces of microorganisms

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ozaki, T.; Kimura, T.; Ohnuki, T.; Yoshida, Z.; Gillow, J.B.; Francis, A.J.

    2004-01-01

    We investigated the association of europium(III) and curium(III) with the microorganisms Chlorella vulgaris, Bacillus subtilis, Pseudomonas fluorescens, Halomonas sp., Halobacterium salinarum, and Halobacterium halobium. We determined the kinetics and distribution coefficients (K d ) for Eu(III) and Cm(III) sorption at pH 3-5 by batch experiments, and evaluated the number of water molecules in the inner-sphere (N H 2 O ) and the degree of strength of ligand field (R E/M ) for Eu(III) by time-resolved laser-induced fluorescence spectroscopy (TRLFS). Exudates from C. vulgaris, Halomonas sp., and H. halobium had an affinity for Eu(III) and Cm(III). The log K d of Eu(III) and Cm(III) showed that their sorption was not fully due to the exchange with three protons on the functional groups on cell surfaces. The halophilic microorganisms (Halomonas sp., Halobacterium salinarum, H. halobium) showed almost no pH dependence in log K d , indicating that an exchange with Na + on the functional groups was involved in their sorption. The ΔN H 2 O (= 9 - N H 2 O ) for Eu(III) on C. vulgaris was 1-3, while that for the other microorganisms was over 3, demonstrating that the coordination of Eu(III) with C. vulgaris was predominantly an outer-spherical process. The R E/M for Eu(III) on halophilic microorganisms was 2.5-5, while that for non-halophilic ones was 1-2.5. This finding suggests that the coordination environment of Eu(III) on the halophilic microorganisms is more complicated than that on the other three non-halophilic ones. (orig.)

  17. Sorption behavior of europium(III) and curium(III) on the cell surfaces of microorganisms

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ozaki, T.; Kimura, T.; Ohnuki, T.; Yoshida, Z. [Advanced Science Research Center, Japan Atomic Energy Research Inst., Ibaraki (Japan); Gillow, J.B.; Francis, A.J. [Environmental Sciences Dept., Brookhaven National Lab., Upton, NY (United States)

    2004-07-01

    We investigated the association of europium(III) and curium(III) with the microorganisms Chlorella vulgaris, Bacillus subtilis, Pseudomonas fluorescens, Halomonas sp., Halobacterium salinarum, and Halobacterium halobium. We determined the kinetics and distribution coefficients (K{sub d}) for Eu(III) and Cm(III) sorption at pH 3-5 by batch experiments, and evaluated the number of water molecules in the inner-sphere (N{sub H{sub 2}O}) and the degree of strength of ligand field (R{sub E/M}) for Eu(III) by time-resolved laser-induced fluorescence spectroscopy (TRLFS). Exudates from C. vulgaris, Halomonas sp., and H. halobium had an affinity for Eu(III) and Cm(III). The log K{sub d} of Eu(III) and Cm(III) showed that their sorption was not fully due to the exchange with three protons on the functional groups on cell surfaces. The halophilic microorganisms (Halomonas sp., Halobacterium salinarum, H. halobium) showed almost no pH dependence in log K{sub d}, indicating that an exchange with Na{sup +} on the functional groups was involved in their sorption. The {delta}N{sub H{sub 2}O} (= 9 - N{sub H{sub 2}O}) for Eu(III) on C. vulgaris was 1-3, while that for the other microorganisms was over 3, demonstrating that the coordination of Eu(III) with C. vulgaris was predominantly an outer-spherical process. The R{sub E/M} for Eu(III) on halophilic microorganisms was 2.5-5, while that for non-halophilic ones was 1-2.5. This finding suggests that the coordination environment of Eu(III) on the halophilic microorganisms is more complicated than that on the other three non-halophilic ones. (orig.)

  18. Bacterias halotolerantes/alcalofilas productoras de acido indol acético (AIA asociadas a Arthrospira platensis (Cyanophyceae

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Liliana Cecilia Gómez Gómez

    2012-07-01

    Full Text Available Título en ingles: Halotolerant alkalophilic and indolacetic acid producing acid producing bacteria associated with Arthrospira platensis (Cyanophyceae Resumen: Este trabajo tuvo como propósito contribuir al conocimiento de la interacción entre la cianobacteria alcalófila Arthrospira platensis y las bacterias que crecen asociadas a su mucilago. Se desarrolló un  medio de cultivo heterotrófico en el cual se aislaron cinco cepas bacterianas asociadas a un monocultivo de A. platensis. Se determinó la capacidad de estas cinco cepas para producir ácido 3- indol acético (AIA. La tipificación molecular de los aislamientos bacterianos permitió identificarlos como Exiguobacterium aurantiacum str. DSM 20416, Xanthomonas sp. ML-122, Halomonas sp. Ap-5, Bacillus okhensis str.  Kh10-101, Indibacter alkaliphilus, type str. LW1T; todas las cepas bacterianas obtenidas  son halotolerantes, alcalófilas y productoras de AIA. Los resultados aportan evidencia para sugerir una interacción benéfica entre A. platensis y sus bacterias asociadas,  quizá como estrategia evolutiva  de cooperación para desarrollarse en  un ambiente hipersalino.    Palabras claves: Bacillus okhensis, Exiguobacterium aurantiacum, Halomonas sp., Indibacter alkaliphilus. Xanthomonas sp. Abstract: The aim of this study was contribute to knowledge over alkalophilic cianobacteryum  Arthrospira platensis  and their  interaction with some associated bacteria growing in their mucilage. Heterotrophic culture medium was designed, in this medium were isolated five bacterial strains associated to single culture of A. platensis. It was measured the 3-indol acetic acid (IAA production by these bacterial strains. Molecular typing allowed identify these bacterial strains like Exiguobacterium aurantiacum str. DSM 20416, Xanthomonas sp. ML-122, Halomonas sp. Ap-5, Bacillus okhensis str. Kh10-101, Indibacter alkaliphilus, type str. LW1T; all these bacteria are halotolerant

  19. "Artifactual" arsenate DNA

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nielsen, Peter E

    2012-01-01

    The recent claim by Wolfe-Simon et al. that the Halomonas bacterial strain GFAJ-1 when grown in arsenate-containing medium with limiting phosphate is able to substitute phosphate with arsenate in biomolecules including nucleic acids and in particular DNA(1) arose much skepticism, primarily due...... to the very limited chemical stability of arsenate esters (see ref. 2 and references therein). A major part of the criticisms was concerned with the insufficient (bio)chemical evidence in the Wolfe-Simon study for the actual chemical incorporation of arsenate in DNA (and/or RNA). Redfield et al. now present...... evidence that the identification of arsenate DNA was artifactual....

  20. Complete genome sequence of the halophilic and highly halotolerant Chromohalobacter salexigens type strain (1H11T)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Copeland, A [U.S. Department of Energy, Joint Genome Institute; O' Connor, Kathleen [Purdue University; Lucas, Susan [U.S. Department of Energy, Joint Genome Institute; Lapidus, Alla L. [U.S. Department of Energy, Joint Genome Institute; Berry, Kerrie W. [United States Department of Energy Joint Genome Institute; Detter, J. Chris [U.S. Department of Energy, Joint Genome Institute; Glavina Del Rio, Tijana [U.S. Department of Energy, Joint Genome Institute; Hammon, Nancy [U.S. Department of Energy, Joint Genome Institute; Dalin, Eileen [U.S. Department of Energy, Joint Genome Institute; Tice, Hope [U.S. Department of Energy, Joint Genome Institute; Pitluck, Sam [U.S. Department of Energy, Joint Genome Institute; Bruce, David [Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL); Goodwin, Lynne A. [Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL); Han, Cliff [Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL); Tapia, Roxanne [Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL); Saunders, Elizabeth H [Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL); Schmutz, Jeremy [Stanford University; Brettin, Thomas S [ORNL; Larimer, Frank W [ORNL; Land, Miriam L [ORNL; Hauser, Loren John [ORNL; Vargas, Carmen [University of Seville; Nieto, Joaquin J. [University of Seville; Kyrpides, Nikos C [U.S. Department of Energy, Joint Genome Institute; Ivanova, N [U.S. Department of Energy, Joint Genome Institute; Goker, Markus [DSMZ - German Collection of Microorganisms and Cell Cultures GmbH, Braunschweig, Germany; Klenk, Hans-Peter [DSMZ - German Collection of Microorganisms and Cell Cultures GmbH, Braunschweig, Germany; Csonka, Laszlo N. [Purdue University; Woyke, Tanja [U.S. Department of Energy, Joint Genome Institute

    2011-01-01

    Chromohalobacter salexigens is one of nine currently known species of the genus Chromoha- lobacter in the family Halomonadaceae. It is the most halotolerant of the so-called mod- erately halophilic bacteria currently known and, due to its strong euryhaline phenotype, it is an established model organism for prokaryotic osmoadaptation. C. salexigens strain 1H11T and Halomonas elongata are the first and the second members of the family Halomonada- ceae with a completely sequenced genome. The 3,696,649 bp long chromosome with a total of 3,319 protein-coding and 93 RNA genes was sequenced as part of the DOE Joint Genome Institute Program DOEM 2004.

  1. Synthetic biology of microbes synthesizing polyhydroxyalkanoates (PHA

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Guo-Qiang Chen

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available Microbial polyhydroxyalkanoates (PHA have been produced as bioplastics for various purposes. Under the support of China National Basic Research 973 Project, we developed synthetic biology methods to diversify the PHA structures into homo-, random, block polymers with improved properties to better meet various application requirements. At the same time, various pathways were assembled to produce various PHA from glucose as a simple carbon source. At the end, Halomonas bacteria were reconstructed to produce PHA in changing morphology for low cost production under unsterile and continuous conditions. The synthetic biology will advance the PHA into a bio- and material industry.

  2. Isolation and characterization of halophilic bacteria and archaea from salt ponds in Hangu Saltworks, Tianjin, China

    Science.gov (United States)

    Deng, Yuangao; Xu, Gaochao; Sui, Liying

    2015-07-01

    A total of 26 isolates were obtained from solar salt ponds of different salinities (100, 150, 200, and 250) in Hangu Saltworks Co. Ltd., Tianjin, China. Phylogenetic analysis of 16S rRNA gene sequences indicated that five bacteria genera Halomonas, Salinicoccus, Oceanobacillus, Gracibacillus, and Salimicrobium and one archaea genera Halorubrum were present. The genus Halomonas was predominant with eight strains distributed in a salinity range of 100-200, followed by Halorubrum with six strains in salinity 250. Based on the genus and original sampling salinity, eight bacterial and two archaeal isolates were selected for further morphological, physiological, and biochemical characterization. All of the bacterial strains were moderately halophilic with the optimal salinity for growth being either 50 or 100, while two archaeal strains were extremely halophilic with an optimal growth salinity of 200. Additionally, we put forth strain SM.200-5 as a new candidate Salimicrobium species based on the phylogenic analysis of the 16S rRNA gene sequence and its biochemical characteristics when compared with known related species.

  3. Isolation and identification of crude oil degrading bacteria from gastropod Haustrum scobina collected from Persian Gulf (Bandar Abbas Shoreline provenance

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zinab Bayat

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: Biodegradation is a good alternative rather than chemical and physical methods for cleaning oil contaminated areas. Several factors like crude oil concentration, biosurfactant production, salinity and incubation time affect the biodegradation. Materials and methods: In this study, seawater sample and gastropod were collected from Persian Gulf. To isolate oil degrading bacteria from collected samples, ONR7a medium was used. The strains that had more growth and higher oil removal were selected and identified. The factors such as the effect of different concentrations of oil, incubation time, mixed cultures and salinity on the biodegradation were investigated. Results: Six crude oil degrading bacteria were isolated. Between these bacteria 2 strains were selected based on higher oil removal. These strains belonged to the genus Vibrio and Halomonas. Strains with higher Emulsification activity produce more biosurfactant and have higher oil biodegradation. Growth and oil degradation have increment pattern by prolonging the incubation time. Mixed culture of Vibrio and Halomonas strains have higher rates of degradation rather than culturing with one of them. Increase in crudeoil concentration to 2.5% caused reduction in growth of bacteria and degradation of oil. Discussion and conclusion: The results of this study show that crude oil degrading bacteria have high diversity in Persian Gulf. These bacteria have higher capability for oil degradation thus they can be used for remediation of oil contaminated areas.

  4. Phenotypic responses to interspecies competition and commensalism in a naturally-derived microbial co-culture

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Khan, Nymul; Maezato, Yukari; McClure, Ryan S.; Brislawn, Colin J.; Mobberley, Jennifer M.; Isern, Nancy; Chrisler, William B.; Markillie, Lye Meng; Barney, Brett M.; Song, Hyun-Seob; Nelson, William C.; Bernstein, Hans C.

    2018-01-10

    The fundamental question of whether different microbial species will co-exist or compete in a given environment depends on context, composition and environmental constraints. Model microbial systems can yield some general principles related to this question. In this study we employed a naturally occurring co-culture composed of heterotrophic bacteria, Halomonas sp. HL-48 and Marinobacter sp. HL-58, to ask two fundamental scientific questions: 1) how do the phenotypes of two naturally co-existing species respond to partnership as compared to axenic growth? and 2) how do growth and molecular phenotypes of these species change with respect to competitive and commensal interactions? We hypothesized – and confirmed – that co-cultivation under glucose as the sole carbon source would result in a competitive interactions. Similarly, when glucose was swapped with xylose, the interactions became commensal because Marinobacter HL-58 was supported by metabolites derived from Halomonas HL-48. Each species responded to partnership by changing both its growth and molecular phenotype as assayed via batch growth kinetics and global transcriptomics. These phenotypic responses depended nutrient availability and so the environment ultimately controlled how they responded to each other. This simplified model community revealed that microbial interactions are context-specific and different environmental conditions dictate how interspecies partnerships will unfold.

  5. Fermentative Polyhydroxybutyrate Production from a Novel Feedstock Derived from Bakery Waste

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lam, Wan Chi; Han, Wei; Lau, Kin Yan; Lei, Ho Man; Lo, Kin Yu; Ng, Wai Yee; Melikoglu, Mehmet

    2014-01-01

    In this study, Halomonas boliviensis was cultivated on bakery waste hydrolysate and seawater in batch and fed-batch cultures for polyhydroxybutyrate (PHB) production. Results demonstrated that bakery waste hydrolysate and seawater could be efficiently utilized by Halomonas boliviensis while PHB contents between 10 and 30% (w/w) were obtained. Furthermore, three methods for bakery waste hydrolysis were investigated for feedstock preparation. These include: (1) use of crude enzyme extracts from Aspergillus awamori, (2) Aspergillus awamori solid mashes, and (3) commercial glucoamylase. In the first method, the resultant free amino nitrogen (FAN) concentration in hydrolysates was 150 and 250 mg L−1 after 20 hours at enzyme-to-solid ratios of 6.9 and 13.1 U g−1, respectively. In both cases, the final glucose concentration was around 130–150 g L−1. In the second method, the resultant FAN and glucose concentrations were 250 mg L−1 and 150 g L−1, respectively. In the third method, highest glucose and lowest FAN concentrations of 170–200 g L−1 and 100 mg L−1, respectively, were obtained in hydrolysates after only 5 hours. The present work has generated promising information contributing to the sustainable production of bioplastic using bakery waste hydrolysate. PMID:25136626

  6. Fermentative Polyhydroxybutyrate Production from a Novel Feedstock Derived from Bakery Waste

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Daniel Pleissner

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available In this study, Halomonas boliviensis was cultivated on bakery waste hydrolysate and seawater in batch and fed-batch cultures for polyhydroxybutyrate (PHB production. Results demonstrated that bakery waste hydrolysate and seawater could be efficiently utilized by Halomonas boliviensis while PHB contents between 10 and 30% (w/w were obtained. Furthermore, three methods for bakery waste hydrolysis were investigated for feedstock preparation. These include: (1 use of crude enzyme extracts from Aspergillus awamori, (2 Aspergillus awamori solid mashes, and (3 commercial glucoamylase. In the first method, the resultant free amino nitrogen (FAN concentration in hydrolysates was 150 and 250 mg L−1 after 20 hours at enzyme-to-solid ratios of 6.9 and 13.1 U g−1, respectively. In both cases, the final glucose concentration was around 130–150 g L−1. In the second method, the resultant FAN and glucose concentrations were 250 mg L−1 and 150 g L−1, respectively. In the third method, highest glucose and lowest FAN concentrations of 170–200 g L−1 and 100 mg L−1, respectively, were obtained in hydrolysates after only 5 hours. The present work has generated promising information contributing to the sustainable production of bioplastic using bakery waste hydrolysate.

  7. Bacterial exopolysaccharide and biofilm formation stimulate chickpea growth and soil aggregation under salt stress

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Aisha Waheed Qurashi

    2012-09-01

    Full Text Available To compensate for stress imposed by salinity, biofilm formation and exopolysaccharide production are significant strategies of salt tolerant bacteria to assist metabolism. We hypothesized that two previously isolated salt-tolerant strains Halomonas variabilis (HT1 and Planococcus rifietoensis (RT4 have an ability to improve plant growth, These strains can form biofilm and accumulate exopolysacharides at increasing salt stress. These results showed that bacteria might be involved in developing microbial communities under salt stress and helpful in colonizing of bacterial strains to plant roots and soil particles. Eventually, it can add to the plant growth and soil structure. We investigated the comparative effect of exopolysacharide and biofilm formation in two bacterial strains Halomonas variabilis (HT1 and Planococcus rifietoensis (RT4 in response to varying salt stress. We found that biofilm formation and exopolysaccharide accumulation increased at higher salinity. To check the effect of bacterial inoculation on the plant (Cicer arietinum Var. CM-98 growth and soil aggregation, pot experiment was conducted by growing seedlings under salt stress. Inoculation of both strains increased plant growth at elevated salt stress. Weight of soil aggregates attached with roots and present in soil were added at higher salt concentrations compared to untreated controls. Soil aggregation was higher at plant roots under salinity. These results suggest the feasibility of using above strains in improving plant growth and soil fertility under salinity.

  8. Acetate biostimulation as an effective treatment for cleaning up alkaline soil highly contaminated with Cr(VI).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lara, Paloma; Morett, Enrique; Juárez, Katy

    2017-11-01

    Stimulation of microbial reduction of Cr(VI) to the less toxic and less soluble Cr(III) through electron donor addition has been regarded as a promising approach for the remediation of chromium-contaminated soil and groundwater sites. However, each site presents different challenges; local physicochemical characteristics and indigenous microbial communities influence the effectiveness of the biostimulation processes. Here, we show microcosm assays stimulation of microbial reduction of Cr(VI) in highly alkaline and saline soil samples from a long-term contaminated site in Guanajuato, Mexico. Acetate was effective promoting anaerobic microbial reduction of 15 mM of Cr(VI) in 25 days accompanied by an increase in pH from 9 to 10. Our analyses showed the presence of Halomonas, Herbaspirillum, Nesterenkonia/Arthrobacter, and Bacillus species in the soil sample collected. Moreover, from biostimulated soil samples, it was possible to isolate Halomonas spp. strains able to grow at 32 mM of Cr(VI). Additionally, we found that polluted groundwater has bacterial species different to those found in soil samples with the ability to resist and reduce chromate using acetate and yeast extract as electron donors.

  9. Identification and characterization of bacteria in a selenium-contaminated hypersaline evaporation pond.

    Science.gov (United States)

    de Souza, M P; Amini, A; Dojka, M A; Pickering, I J; Dawson, S C; Pace, N R; Terry , N

    2001-09-01

    Solar evaporation ponds are commonly used to reduce the volume of seleniferous agricultural drainage water in the San Joaquin Valley, Calif. These hypersaline ponds pose an environmental health hazard because they are heavily contaminated with selenium (Se), mainly in the form of selenate. Se in the ponds may be removed by microbial Se volatilization, a bioremediation process whereby toxic, bioavailable selenate is converted to relatively nontoxic dimethylselenide gas. In order to identify microbes that may be used for Se bioremediation, a 16S ribosomal DNA phylogenetic analysis of an aerobic hypersaline pond in the San Joaquin Valley showed that a previously unaffiliated group of uncultured bacteria (belonging to the order Cytophagales) was dominant, followed by a group of cultured gamma-Proteobacteria which was closely related to Halomonas species. Se K-edge X-ray absorption spectroscopy of selenate-treated bacterial isolates showed that they accumulated a mixture of predominantly selenate and a selenomethionine-like species, consistent with the idea that selenate was assimilated via the S assimilation pathway. One of these bacterial isolates (Halomonas-like strain MPD-51) was the best candidate for the bioremediation of hypersaline evaporation ponds contaminated with high Se concentrations because it tolerated 2 M selenate and 32.5% NaCl, grew rapidly in media containing selenate, and accumulated and volatilized Se at high rates (1.65 microg of Se g of protein(-1) x h(-1)), compared to other cultured bacterial isolates.

  10. Potential for plant growth promotion of rhizobacteria associated with Salicornia growing in Tunisian hypersaline soils.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mapelli, Francesca; Marasco, Ramona; Rolli, Eleonora; Barbato, Marta; Cherif, Hanene; Guesmi, Amel; Ouzari, Imen; Daffonchio, Daniele; Borin, Sara

    2013-01-01

    Soil salinity and drought are among the environmental stresses that most severely affect plant growth and production around the world. In this study the rhizospheres of Salicornia plants and bulk soils were collected from Sebkhet and Chott hypersaline ecosystems in Tunisia. Depiction of bacterial microbiome composition by Denaturing Gradient Gel Electrophoresis unveiled the occurrence of a high bacterial diversity associated with Salicornia root system. A large collection of 475 halophilic and halotolerant bacteria was established from Salicornia rhizosphere and the surrounding bulk soil, and the bacteria were characterized for the resistance to temperature, osmotic and saline stresses, and plant growth promotion (PGP) features. Twenty Halomonas strains showed resistance to a wide set of abiotic stresses and were able to perform different PGP activities in vitro at 5% NaCl, including ammonia and indole-3-acetic acid production, phosphate solubilisation, and potential nitrogen fixation. By using a gfp-labelled strain it was possible to demonstrate that Halomonas is capable of successfully colonising Salicornia roots in the laboratory conditions. Our results indicated that the culturable halophilic/halotolerant bacteria inhabiting salty and arid ecosystems have a potential to contribute to promoting plant growth under the harsh salinity and drought conditions. These halophilic/halotolerant strains could be exploited in biofertilizer formulates to sustain crop production in degraded and arid lands.

  11. Isolation and identification of poly-extremophilic alkalophilic, halophilic and halotolerant bacteria from alkaline thalassohaline Gomishan wetland

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Azadeh Shahinpei

    2013-06-01

    Full Text Available Gomishan wetland is a natural ecosystem located in 35 km north west of Gorgan, in the west vicinity of Khajeh Nafas city and Gomishan. Twice sampling from 3 different geographic positions in dry and rainy seasons, led to the isolation of 224 isolates. For 57 isolates, halophilic and halotolerant behaviors and also optimum and growth range in different pH and temperatures were determined. Most of the moderately halophilic and halotolerant strains were capable of growing optimally in media with pH 8.5-9 and optimum growth temperatures ranging from <4 to 40 °C. The isolates were examined for hydrolytic enzymes production. Most of the isolates showed lipase activites and a total of 15, 7 and 3 strains produced amylases, proteases and DNases, respectively. The enzymes could be useful in some industrial processes. 16S rDNA phylogenetic analysis were done for 55 strains. According to this analysis, strains were placed in 22 different genera: Achromobacter, Aeromicrobium, Altererythrobacter, Bacillus, Caenispirillum, Cyclobacterium, Erythrobacter, Halobacillus, Halomonas, Idiomarina, Jonesia, Marinobacter, Martelella, Nesiotobacter, Paenibacillus, Planococcus, Pseudomonas, Rheinheimera, Saccharospirillum, Stappia, Thalassospira and Vibrio. 23% of these strains were haloalkalophilic bacteria and belonged to the Bacillus, Halobacillus, Halomonas, Idiomarina and Marinobacter. This was the first study on the culturable bacteria at Gomishan wetland, an area of considerable alkaline thalassohaline ecosystem.

  12. [Phylogenetic analysis and nitrogen removal characteristics of a heterotrophic nitrifying-aerobic denitrifying bacteria strain from marine environment].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sun, Xuemei; Li, Qiufen; Zhang, Yan; Liu, Huaide; Zhao, Jun; Qu, Keming

    2012-06-04

    We determined the phylogenetic position of a heterotrophic nitrifying-aerobic denitrifying bacterium X3, and detected its nitrogen removal characteristics for providing evidence to explain the principle of heterotrophic nitrification-aerobic denitrification and to improve the process in purification of marine-culture wastewater. The evolutionary position of the strain was determined based on its morphological, physiological, biochemical characteristics and 16SrRNA gene sequence. The nitrification-denitrification ability of this strain was detected by detecting its nitrogen removal efficiency and growth on different inorganic nitrogen source. Strain X3 was identified as Halomonas sp. It grew optimally at salinity 3%, pH 8.5, C:N 10:1 at 28 degrees C, and it could still survive at 15% salinity. The removal of NH4+ -N, NO2(-) -N and NO3(-) -N was 98.29%, 99.07%, 96.48% respectively within 24 h. When three inorganic nitrogen existed simultaneously, it always utilized ammonia firstly, and the total inorganic nitrogen removal was higher than with only one nitrogen, suggesting that strain X3 has the ability of simultaneous nitrification and denitrification and completing the whole nitrogen removing process. Strain X3 belonged to the genus of Halomonas. It had strong simultaneous nitrification and denitrification capability and could live in high-salinity environment.

  13. Conversion of Uric Acid into Ammonium in Oil-Degrading Marine Microbial Communities: a Possible Role of Halomonads

    KAUST Repository

    Gertler, Christoph; Bargiela, Rafael; Mapelli, Francesca; Han, Xifang; Chen, Jianwei; Hai, Tran; Amer, Ranya A.; Mahjoubi, Mouna; Malkawi, Hanan Issa; Magagnini, Mirko; Cherif, Ameur; Abdel-Fattah, Yasser Refaat; Kalogerakis, Nicolas E.; Daffonchio, Daniele; Ferrer, Manuel; Golyshin, Peter N.

    2015-01-01

    Uric acid is a promising hydrophobic nitrogen source for biostimulation of microbial activities in oil-impacted marine environments. This study investigated metabolic processes and microbial community changes in a series of microcosms using sediment from the Mediterranean and the Red Sea amended with ammonium and uric acid. Respiration, emulsification, ammonium and protein concentration measurements suggested a rapid production of ammonium from uric acid accompanied by the development of microbial communities containing hydrocarbonoclastic bacteria after 3 weeks of incubation. About 80 % of uric acid was converted to ammonium within the first few days of the experiment. Microbial population dynamics were investigated by Ribosomal Intergenic Spacer Analysis and Illumina sequencing as well as by culture-based techniques. Resulting data indicated that strains related to Halomonas spp. converted uric acid into ammonium, which stimulated growth of microbial consortia dominated by Alcanivorax spp. and Pseudomonas spp. Several strains of Halomonas spp. were isolated on uric acid as the sole carbon source showed location specificity. These results point towards a possible role of halomonads in the conversion of uric acid to ammonium utilized by hydrocarbonoclastic bacteria. © 2015 Springer Science+Business Media New York

  14. Conversion of Uric Acid into Ammonium in Oil-Degrading Marine Microbial Communities: a Possible Role of Halomonads

    KAUST Repository

    Gertler, Christoph

    2015-04-29

    Uric acid is a promising hydrophobic nitrogen source for biostimulation of microbial activities in oil-impacted marine environments. This study investigated metabolic processes and microbial community changes in a series of microcosms using sediment from the Mediterranean and the Red Sea amended with ammonium and uric acid. Respiration, emulsification, ammonium and protein concentration measurements suggested a rapid production of ammonium from uric acid accompanied by the development of microbial communities containing hydrocarbonoclastic bacteria after 3 weeks of incubation. About 80 % of uric acid was converted to ammonium within the first few days of the experiment. Microbial population dynamics were investigated by Ribosomal Intergenic Spacer Analysis and Illumina sequencing as well as by culture-based techniques. Resulting data indicated that strains related to Halomonas spp. converted uric acid into ammonium, which stimulated growth of microbial consortia dominated by Alcanivorax spp. and Pseudomonas spp. Several strains of Halomonas spp. were isolated on uric acid as the sole carbon source showed location specificity. These results point towards a possible role of halomonads in the conversion of uric acid to ammonium utilized by hydrocarbonoclastic bacteria. © 2015 Springer Science+Business Media New York

  15. Potential for Plant Growth Promotion of Rhizobacteria Associated with Salicornia Growing in Tunisian Hypersaline Soils

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Francesca Mapelli

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Soil salinity and drought are among the environmental stresses that most severely affect plant growth and production around the world. In this study the rhizospheres of Salicornia plants and bulk soils were collected from Sebkhet and Chott hypersaline ecosystems in Tunisia. Depiction of bacterial microbiome composition by Denaturing Gradient Gel Electrophoresis unveiled the occurrence of a high bacterial diversity associated with Salicornia root system. A large collection of 475 halophilic and halotolerant bacteria was established from Salicornia rhizosphere and the surrounding bulk soil, and the bacteria were characterized for the resistance to temperature, osmotic and saline stresses, and plant growth promotion (PGP features. Twenty Halomonas strains showed resistance to a wide set of abiotic stresses and were able to perform different PGP activities in vitro at 5% NaCl, including ammonia and indole-3-acetic acid production, phosphate solubilisation, and potential nitrogen fixation. By using a gfp-labelled strain it was possible to demonstrate that Halomonas is capable of successfully colonising Salicornia roots in the laboratory conditions. Our results indicated that the culturable halophilic/halotolerant bacteria inhabiting salty and arid ecosystems have a potential to contribute to promoting plant growth under the harsh salinity and drought conditions. These halophilic/halotolerant strains could be exploited in biofertilizer formulates to sustain crop production in degraded and arid lands.

  16. Biosurfactants, bioemulsifiers and exopolysaccharides from marine microorganisms.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Satpute, Surekha K; Banat, Ibrahim M; Dhakephalkar, Prashant K; Banpurkar, Arun G; Chopade, Balu A

    2010-01-01

    Marine biosphere offers wealthy flora and fauna, which represents a vast natural resource of imperative functional commercial grade products. Among the various bioactive compounds, biosurfactant (BS)/bioemulsifiers (BE) are attracting major interest and attention due to their structural and functional diversity. The versatile properties of surface active molecules find numerous applications in various industries. Marine microorganisms such as Acinetobacter, Arthrobacter, Pseudomonas, Halomonas, Myroides, Corynebacteria, Bacillus, Alteromonas sp. have been studied for production of BS/BE and exopolysaccharides (EPS). Due to the enormity of marine biosphere, most of the marine microbial world remains unexplored. The discovery of potent BS/BE producing marine microorganism would enhance the use of environmental biodegradable surface active molecule and hopefully reduce total dependence or number of new application oriented towards the chemical synthetic surfactant industry. Our present review gives comprehensive information on BS/BE which has been reported to be produced by marine microorganisms and their possible potential future applications.

  17. The interaction of Plutonium with Bacteria in the Repository Environment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gillow, J. B.; Francis, A. J.; Lucero, D. A.; Papenguth, H. W.

    2000-01-01

    Microorganisms in the nuclear waste repository environment may interact with plutonium through (1) sorption, (2) intracellular accumulation, and (3) transformation speciation. These interactions may retard or enhance the mobility of Pu by precipitation reactions, biocolloid formation, or production of more soluble species. Current and planned radioactive waste repository environments, such as deep subsurface halite and granite formations, are considered extreme relative to life processes in the near-surface terrestrial environment. There is a paucity of information on the biotransformation of radionuclides by microorganisms present in such extreme environments. In order to gain a better understanding of the interaction of plutonium with microorganisms present in the waste repository sites we investigated a pure culture (Halomonas sp.) and a mixed culture of bacteria (Haloarcula sinaiiensis, Marinobacter hydrocarbonoclasticus, Altermonas sp., and a γ-proteobacterium) isolated from the Waste Isolation Pilot Plant (WIPP) site and an Acetobacterium sp. from alkaline groundwater at the Grimsel Test Site in Switzerland

  18. SOILS, FERTILIZATION AND MANAGEMENT OF WATER Halotolerant/alkalophilic bacteria associated with the cyanobacterium Arthrospira platensis (Nordstedt Gomont that promote early growth in Sorghum bicolor (L. Moench

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Liliana Gómez G

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Arthrospira platensis associated bacteria (APAB identified through molecuar biology like Bacillus okhensis, Indibacter alkaliphilus and Halomonas sp., are also producing 3-indol acetic acid (IAA, these bacteria was used in early plant growth promotion tests over Sorghum bicolor, these bioassay was considered indirect evidence to suggest that APAB also may have stimulatory effects over A. platensis growth naturally. I. alkaliphilus and B. okhensis enhanced early germination of S. bicolor seads, with better results than that achieved by Azospirillum brasilense, bacterium used like reference as a common plant growth promoting rizobacteria. The three APAB enhanced significative differences (P≤0.05 over morphoagronomic parameters, I. alkaliphilus and B. okhensis exhibith better resoults in elongation stimulation and root and foliage dry weight. Above evidence suggest this bacteria like plant growth promoting and it recomended testing with A. platensis axenic cultures and its associated bactteri for understanding true interaction between them.

  19. A novel cell autolysis system for cost-competitive downstream processing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hajnal, Ivan; Chen, Xiangbin; Chen, Guo-Qiang

    2016-11-01

    The industrial production of low value-added biological products poses significant challenges due to cost pressures. In recent years, it has been argued that synthetic biology approaches will lead to breakthroughs that eliminate price bottlenecks for the production of a wide range of biological products including bioplastics and biofuels. One significant bottleneck lies in the necessity to break the tough cell walls of microbes in order to release intracellular products. We here report the implementation of the first synthetic biology standard part based on the lambda phage SRRz genes and a synthetic ribosome binding site (RBS) that works in Escherichia coli and Halomonas campaniensis, which enables the producer strains to induce lysis after the addition of small amounts (1-5 %) of solvents or to spontaneously lyse during the stresses of downstream processing, and thus has the potential to eliminate the mechanical cell disruption step as both an efficiency bottleneck and a significant capex barrier when implementing downstream bioprocesses.

  20. Marine Microorganisms as Source of Stereoselective Esterases and Ketoreductases: Kinetic Resolution of a Prostaglandin Intermediate

    KAUST Repository

    De Vitis, Valerio; Guidi, Benedetta; Contente, Martina Letizia; Granato, Tiziana Mariarita; Conti, Paola; Molinari, Francesco; Crotti, Elena; Mapelli, Francesca; Borin, Sara S.; Daffonchio, Daniele; Romano, Diego

    2014-01-01

    A screening among bacterial strains isolated from water-brine interface of the deep hypersaline anoxic basins (DHABs) of the Eastern Mediterranean was carried out for the biocatalytical resolution of racemic propyl ester of anti-2-oxotricyclo[2.2.1.0]heptan-7-carboxylic acid (R,S)-1, a key intermediate for the synthesis of d-cloprostenol. Bacillus horneckiae 15A gave highly stereoselective reduction of (R,S)-1, whereas Halomonas aquamarina 9B enantioselectively hydrolysed (R,S)-1; in both cases, enantiomerically pure unreacted (R)-1 could be easily recovered and purified at molar conversion below 57–58 %, showing the potential of DHAB extremophile microbiome and marine-derived enzymes in stereoselective biocatalysis.

  1. Marine Microorganisms as Source of Stereoselective Esterases and Ketoreductases: Kinetic Resolution of a Prostaglandin Intermediate

    KAUST Repository

    De Vitis, Valerio

    2014-09-30

    A screening among bacterial strains isolated from water-brine interface of the deep hypersaline anoxic basins (DHABs) of the Eastern Mediterranean was carried out for the biocatalytical resolution of racemic propyl ester of anti-2-oxotricyclo[2.2.1.0]heptan-7-carboxylic acid (R,S)-1, a key intermediate for the synthesis of d-cloprostenol. Bacillus horneckiae 15A gave highly stereoselective reduction of (R,S)-1, whereas Halomonas aquamarina 9B enantioselectively hydrolysed (R,S)-1; in both cases, enantiomerically pure unreacted (R)-1 could be easily recovered and purified at molar conversion below 57–58 %, showing the potential of DHAB extremophile microbiome and marine-derived enzymes in stereoselective biocatalysis.

  2. Distribution of PAHs and the PAH-degrading bacteria in the deep-sea sediments of the high-latitude Arctic Ocean

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dong, C.; Bai, X.; Sheng, H.; Jiao, L.; Zhou, H.; Shao, Z.

    2015-04-01

    Polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs) are common organic pollutants that can be transferred long distances and tend to accumulate in marine sediments. However, less is known regarding the distribution of PAHs and their natural bioattenuation in the open sea, especially the Arctic Ocean. In this report, sediment samples were collected at four sites from the Chukchi Plateau to the Makarov Basin in the summer of 2010. PAH compositions and total concentrations were examined with GC-MS. The concentrations of 16 EPA-priority PAHs varied from 2.0 to 41.6 ng g-1 dry weight and decreased with sediment depth and movement from the southern to the northern sites. Among the targeted PAHs, phenanthrene was relatively abundant in all sediments. The 16S rRNA gene of the total environmental DNA was analyzed with Illumina high-throughput sequencing (IHTS) to determine the diversity of bacteria involved in PAH degradation in situ. The potential degraders including Cycloclasticus, Pseudomonas, Halomonas, Pseudoalteromonas, Marinomonas, Bacillus, Dietzia, Colwellia, Acinetobacter, Alcanivorax, Salinisphaera and Shewanella, with Dietzia as the most abundant, occurred in all sediment samples. Meanwhile, enrichment with PAHs was initiated onboard and transferred to the laboratory for further enrichment and to obtain the degrading consortia. Most of the abovementioned bacteria in addition to Hahella, Oleispira, Oceanobacter and Hyphomonas occurred alternately as predominant members in the enrichment cultures from different sediments based on IHTS and PCR-DGGE analysis. To reconfirm their role in PAH degradation, 40 different bacteria were isolated and characterized, among which Cycloclasticus Pseudomonas showed the best degradation capability under low temperatures. Taken together, PAHs and PAH-degrading bacteria were widespread in the deep-sea sediments of the Arctic Ocean. We propose that bacteria of Cycloclasticus, Pseudomonas, Pseudoalteromonas, Halomonas, Marinomonas and Dietzia may

  3. Biogeographical note on Antarctic microflorae: Endemism and cosmopolitanism

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Waqar Azeem Jadoon

    2013-11-01

    Full Text Available This study deals with the biogeography of Antarctic microflora (Antarctica acts as best model to study microbial biogeography such as cyanobacteria and selected halophiles with special emphasis on Halomonas variabilis and Bacillus licheniformis. Halophiles are known to be resistant not only to salt stress, but also to extreme temperature, pressure, and aridity and they are capable of surviving in harsh environments such as polar regions, deep-sea habitats, and deserts. Many microbes are known to be resistant to hostile environmental conditions, and are capable of surviving in harsh environments. Our group has isolated 444 strains belonging to 28 genera of halophiles from various environments around the world. The 16S rRNA gene sequences revealed that many of the isolated strains from geographically distant habitats having different environmental conditions, were closely related to each other, with some strains possessing 100% identical sequences. Organisms possessing survival mechanism such as spore formation are usually ubiquitous. The genus Halomonas is represented by potentially endemic strains and the ubiquitous H. variabilis, while spore-forming B. licheniformis showed cosmopolitan distribution. One potentially endemic (moderate endemicity that is regional and/or continental distribution strain was reported from Syowa station, East Antarctica, and Mario Zucchelli station, West Antarctica, which are geographically separated by 3000 km. Moreover, 15 strains having 100% similarity with B. licheniformis were considered cosmopolitans. The results of this work provide support for the middle-ground model that some microbes have moderate endemicity and others have cosmopolitan distribution. These results will contribute to a greater understanding of microbial biogeography with special emphasis on Antarctica.

  4. Extraction, purification and characterization of a protease from Micrococcus sp. VKMM 037.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Manikandan, Muthu; Kannan, Vijayaraghavan; Pasić, Lejla

    2011-10-01

    The haloalkaliphilic bacterium Micrococcus sp. VKMM 037, isolated from an effluent of the caustic soda industry, was found to produce a protease. Maximal proteolytic activity was observed in cell culture grown at 40 degrees C using 2% (w/v) glycerol, 2% (w/v) beef extract and 2% (w/v) peptone as nutrients in medium also containing 0.85 M NaCl with a pH of 10.0. An efficient purification procedure combining ammonium sulphate precipitation and Q-Sepharose ion-exchange chromatography was developed. The purified 41 kDa protease was stable in a temperature range between 20 degrees C and 60 degrees C. The protease remained active over a wide range of pH values (4.0-12.0) and NaCl concentrations (0-3.42 M) with an optimum at pH 10.0 and 0.85 M NaCl, respectively. Furthermore, the enzyme remained stable or was only marginally inhibited in the presence of various organic solvents, surfactants and reducing agents. The purified protease of Micrococcus sp. VKMM 037 efficiently removed blood stains within 40 minutes of treatment. Given the biochemical characteristics determined, this novel protease could be exploited as an additive in the detergent industry and also for the synthesis of biomolecules and the degradation of protein.

  5. Natronorubrum sediminis sp. nov., an archaeon isolated from a saline lake.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gutiérrez, M C; Castillo, A M; Corral, P; Minegishi, H; Ventosa, A

    2010-08-01

    Two novel haloalkaliphilic archaea, strains CG-6T and CG-4, were isolated from sediment of the hypersaline Lake Chagannor in Inner Mongolia, China. Cells of the two strains were pleomorphic, non-motile and strictly aerobic. They required at least 2.5 M NaCl for growth, with optimum growth at 3.4 M NaCl. They grew at pH 8.0-11.0, with optimum growth at pH 9.0. Hypotonic treatment with less than 1.5 M NaCl caused cell lysis. The two strains had similar polar lipid compositions, possessing C20C20 and C20C25 derivatives of phosphatidylglycerol and phosphatidylglycerol phosphate methyl ester. No glycolipids were detected. Comparison of 16S rRNA gene sequences and morphological features placed them in the genus Natronorubrum. 16S rRNA gene sequence similarities to strains of recognized species of the genus Natronorubrum were 96.2-93.8%. Detailed phenotypic characterization and DNA-DNA hybridization studies revealed that the two strains belong to a novel species in the genus Natronorubrum, for which the name Natronorubrum sediminis sp. nov. is proposed; the type strain is CG-6T (=CECT 7487T =CGMCC 1.8981T =JCM 15982T).

  6. Microbiology of Lonar Lake and other soda lakes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Paul Antony, Chakkiath; Kumaresan, Deepak; Hunger, Sindy; Drake, Harold L; Murrell, J Colin; Shouche, Yogesh S

    2013-01-01

    Soda lakes are saline and alkaline ecosystems that are believed to have existed throughout the geological record of Earth. They are widely distributed across the globe, but are highly abundant in terrestrial biomes such as deserts and steppes and in geologically interesting regions such as the East African Rift valley. The unusual geochemistry of these lakes supports the growth of an impressive array of microorganisms that are of ecological and economic importance. Haloalkaliphilic Bacteria and Archaea belonging to all major trophic groups have been described from many soda lakes, including lakes with exceptionally high levels of heavy metals. Lonar Lake is a soda lake that is centered at an unusual meteorite impact structure in the Deccan basalts in India and its key physicochemical and microbiological characteristics are highlighted in this article. The occurrence of diverse functional groups of microbes, such as methanogens, methanotrophs, phototrophs, denitrifiers, sulfur oxidizers, sulfate reducers and syntrophs in soda lakes, suggests that these habitats harbor complex microbial food webs that (a) interconnect various biological cycles via redox coupling and (b) impact on the production and consumption of greenhouse gases. Soda lake microorganisms harbor several biotechnologically relevant enzymes and biomolecules (for example, cellulases, amylases, ectoine) and there is the need to augment bioprospecting efforts in soda lake environments with new integrated approaches. Importantly, some saline and alkaline lake ecosystems around the world need to be protected from anthropogenic pressures that threaten their long-term existence. PMID:23178675

  7. Methylophaga natronica sp. nov., a new alkaliphilic and moderately halophilic, restricted-facultatively methylotrophic bacterium from soda lake of the Southern Transbaikal region.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Doronina, Nina; Darmaeva, Tsyregma; Trotsenko, Yuri

    2003-09-01

    A new, moderately haloalkaliphilic and restricted-facultatively methylotrophic bacterium (strain Bur2T) with the ribulose monophosphate pathway of carbon assimilation is described. The isolate, which utilizes methanol, methylamine and fructose, is an aerobic, Gram-negative, asporogenous, motile short rod multiplying by binary fission. It is auxotrophic for vitamin B12, and requires NaHCO3 or NaCl for growth in alkaline medium. Cellular fatty acids profile consists primarily of straight-chain saturated C16:0, unsaturated C16:1 and C18:1 acids. The major ubiquinone is Q-8. The dominant phospholipids are phosphatidylethanolamine and phosphatidylglycerol. Diphosphatidylglycerol is also present. Optimal growth conditions are 25-29 degrees C, pH 8.5-9.0 and 2-3% (w/v) NaCl. Cells accumulate ectoine and glutamate as the main osmoprotectants. The G + C content of the DNA is 45.0 mol%. Based on 16S rDNA sequence analysis and DNA-DNA relatedness (25-35%) with type strains of marine and soda lake methylobacteria belonging to the genus Methylophaga, the novel isolate was classified as a new species of this genus and named Methylophaga natronica (VKM B-2288T).

  8. Some unique features of alkaliphilic anaerobes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roof, Erin; Pikuta, Elena; Otto, Christopher; Williams, George; Hoover, Richard

    2013-09-01

    This article explores two topics involving the examination of four strains of alkaliphilic anaerobes. The first topic was dedicated to detection of the ability of microorganisms to metabolize alternative chirality substrates. Two saccharolytic anaerobic bacteria were chosen for the first experiment: Anaerovirgula multivorans strain SCAT, which is gram positive and spore-forming; and Spirochaeta dissipatitropha, strain ASpC2T, which is gram negative. It was found that both checked sugarlytics were able to use L-ribose and L-arabinose, as growth substrates. The second part was concerned of study a chemolithotrophy in two halo-alkaliphilic sulfate reducing bacteria: Desulfonatornum thiodismutans strain MLF1T and Desulfonatronum lacustre strain Z-7951T. The experiments with lithotrophs had demonstrated that strain MLF1T was capable to grow without any organic source of carbon, while strain Z-7951T had required at least 2 mM sodium acetate for growth. Anaerobic technique was used for preparation of the growth media and maintenance of these bacterial cultures. Standard methods for Gram, spore, and flagella staining were applied for characterization of cytomorphology. In this article, the results of the experiments performed on cytological, physiological, and biochemical levels are presented and discussed.

  9. Effect of salinity on diazotrophic activity and microbial composition of phototrophic communities from Bitter-1 soda lake (Kulunda Steppe, Russia).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Namsaraev, Zorigto; Samylina, Olga; Sukhacheva, Marina; Borisenko, Gennadii; Sorokin, Dimitry Y; Tourova, Tatiana

    2018-04-16

    Bitter-1 is a shallow hypersaline soda lake in Kulunda Steppe (Altai region, Russia). During a study period between 2005 and 2016, the salinity in the littoral area of the lake fluctuated within the range from 85 to 400 g/L (in July of each year). Light-dependent nitrogen fixation occurred in this lake up to the salt-saturating conditions. The rates increased with a decrease in salinity, both under environmental conditions and in laboratory simulations. The salinities below 100 g/L were favorable for light-dependent nitrogen fixation, while the process was dramatically inhibited above 200 g/L salts. The analysis of nifH genes in environmental samples and in enrichment cultures of diazotrophic phototrophs suggested that anaerobic fermenting and sulfate-reducing bacteria could participate in the dark nitrogen fixation process up to soda-saturating conditions. However, we cannot exclude the possibility that haloalkaliphilic nonheterocystous cyanobacteria (Euhalothece sp. and Geitlerinema sp.) and anoxygenic purple sulfur bacteria (Ectothiorhodospira sp.) might also play a role in the process at light conditions. The heterocystous cyanobacterium Nodularia sp. develops at low salinity (below 80 g/L) that is not characteristic for Bitter-1 Lake and thus does not make a significant contribution to the nitrogen fixation in this lake.

  10. Biochemical characterization of a halophilic, alkalithermophilic protease from Alkalibacillus sp. NM-Da2.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abdel-Hamed, Asmaa R; Abo-Elmatty, Dina M; Wiegel, Juergen; Mesbah, Noha M

    2016-11-01

    An extracellular, halophilic, alkalithermophilic serine protease from the halo-alkaliphilic Alkalibacillus sp. NM-Da2 was purified to homogeneity by ethanol precipitation and anion-exchange chromatography. The purified protease was a monomeric enzyme with an approximate molecular mass of 35 kDa and exhibited maximal activity at 2.7 M NaCl, pH 55 °C 9 and 56 °C. The protease showed great temperature stability, retaining greater than 80 % of initial activity after 2 h incubation at 55 °C. The protease was also extremely pH tolerant, retaining 80 % of initial activity at pH 55 °C 10.5 after 30 min incubation. Protease hydrolyzed complex substrates, displaying activity on yeast extract, tryptone, casein, gelatin and peptone. Protease activity was inhibited at casein concentrations greater than 1.2 mg/mL. The enzyme was stable and active in 40 % (v/v) solutions of isopropanol, ethanol and benzene and was stable in the presence of the polysorbate surfactant Tween 80. Activity was stimulated with the oxidizing agent hydrogen peroxide. Inhibition with phenyl methylsulfonylfluoride indicates it is a serine protease. Synthetic saline wastewater treated with the protease showed 50 % protein removal after 5 h. Being halophilic, alkaliphilic and thermophilic, in addition to being resistant to organic solvents, this protease has potential for various applications in biotechnological and pharmaceutical industries.

  11. A wide variety of putative extremophiles and large beta-diversity at the Mars Desert Research Station (Utah)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Direito, Susana O. L.; Ehrenfreund, Pascale; Marees, Andries; Staats, Martijn; Foing, Bernard; Röling, Wilfred F. M.

    2011-07-01

    Humankind's innate curiosity makes us wonder whether life is or was present on other planetary bodies such as Mars. The EuroGeoMars 2009 campaign was organized at the Mars Desert Research Station (MDRS) to perform multidisciplinary astrobiology research. MDRS in southeast Utah is situated in a cold arid desert with mineralogy and erosion processes comparable to those on Mars. Insight into the microbial community composition of this terrestrial Mars analogue provides essential information for the search for life on Mars: including sampling and life detection methodology optimization and what kind of organisms to expect. Soil samples were collected from different locations. Culture-independent molecular analyses directed at ribosomal RNA genes revealed the presence of all three domains of life (Archaea, Bacteria and Eukarya), but these were not detected in all samples. Spiking experiments revealed that this appears to relate to low DNA recovery, due to adsorption or degradation. Bacteria were most frequently detected and showed high alpha- and beta-diversity. Members of the Actinobacteria, Proteobacteria, Bacteroidetes and Gemmatimonadetes phyla were found in the majority of samples. Archaea alpha- and beta-diversity was very low. For Eukarya, a diverse range of organisms was identified, such as fungi, green algae and several phyla of Protozoa. Phylogenetic analysis revealed an extraordinary variety of putative extremophiles, mainly Bacteria but also Archaea and Eukarya. These comprised radioresistant, endolithic, chasmolithic, xerophilic, hypolithic, thermophilic, thermoacidophilic, psychrophilic, halophilic, haloalkaliphilic and alkaliphilic micro-organisms. Overall, our data revealed large difference in occurrence and diversity over short distances, indicating the need for high-sampling frequency at similar sites. DNA extraction methods need to be optimized to improve extraction efficiencies.

  12. Contrasting the Genetic Patterns of Microbial Communities in Soda Lakes with and without Cyanobacterial Bloom.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Andreote, Ana P D; Dini-Andreote, Francisco; Rigonato, Janaina; Machineski, Gabriela Silva; Souza, Bruno C E; Barbiero, Laurent; Rezende-Filho, Ary T; Fiore, Marli F

    2018-01-01

    Soda lakes have high levels of sodium carbonates and are characterized by salinity and elevated pH. These ecosystems are found across Africa, Europe, Asia, Australia, North, Central, and South America. Particularly in Brazil, the Pantanal region has a series of hundreds of shallow soda lakes (ca. 600) potentially colonized by a diverse haloalkaliphilic microbial community. Biological information of these systems is still elusive, in particular data on the description of the main taxa involved in the biogeochemical cycling of life-important elements. Here, we used metagenomic sequencing to contrast the composition and functional patterns of the microbial communities of two distinct soda lakes from the sub-region Nhecolândia, state of Mato Grosso do Sul, Brazil. These two lakes differ by permanent cyanobacterial blooms (Salina Verde, green-water lake) and by no record of cyanobacterial blooms (Salina Preta, black-water lake). The dominant bacterial species in the Salina Verde bloom was Anabaenopsis elenkinii . This cyanobacterium altered local abiotic parameters such as pH, turbidity, and dissolved oxygen and consequently the overall structure of the microbial community. In Salina Preta, the microbial community had a more structured taxonomic profile. Therefore, the distribution of metabolic functions in Salina Preta community encompassed a large number of taxa, whereas, in Salina Verde, the functional potential was restrained across a specific set of taxa. Distinct signatures in the abundance of genes associated with the cycling of carbon, nitrogen, and sulfur were found. Interestingly, genes linked to arsenic resistance metabolism were present at higher abundance in Salina Verde and they were associated with the cyanobacterial bloom. Collectively, this study advances fundamental knowledge on the composition and genetic potential of microbial communities inhabiting tropical soda lakes.

  13. Contrasting the Genetic Patterns of Microbial Communities in Soda Lakes with and without Cyanobacterial Bloom

    Science.gov (United States)

    Andreote, Ana P. D.; Dini-Andreote, Francisco; Rigonato, Janaina; Machineski, Gabriela Silva; Souza, Bruno C. E.; Barbiero, Laurent; Rezende-Filho, Ary T.; Fiore, Marli F.

    2018-01-01

    Soda lakes have high levels of sodium carbonates and are characterized by salinity and elevated pH. These ecosystems are found across Africa, Europe, Asia, Australia, North, Central, and South America. Particularly in Brazil, the Pantanal region has a series of hundreds of shallow soda lakes (ca. 600) potentially colonized by a diverse haloalkaliphilic microbial community. Biological information of these systems is still elusive, in particular data on the description of the main taxa involved in the biogeochemical cycling of life-important elements. Here, we used metagenomic sequencing to contrast the composition and functional patterns of the microbial communities of two distinct soda lakes from the sub-region Nhecolândia, state of Mato Grosso do Sul, Brazil. These two lakes differ by permanent cyanobacterial blooms (Salina Verde, green-water lake) and by no record of cyanobacterial blooms (Salina Preta, black-water lake). The dominant bacterial species in the Salina Verde bloom was Anabaenopsis elenkinii. This cyanobacterium altered local abiotic parameters such as pH, turbidity, and dissolved oxygen and consequently the overall structure of the microbial community. In Salina Preta, the microbial community had a more structured taxonomic profile. Therefore, the distribution of metabolic functions in Salina Preta community encompassed a large number of taxa, whereas, in Salina Verde, the functional potential was restrained across a specific set of taxa. Distinct signatures in the abundance of genes associated with the cycling of carbon, nitrogen, and sulfur were found. Interestingly, genes linked to arsenic resistance metabolism were present at higher abundance in Salina Verde and they were associated with the cyanobacterial bloom. Collectively, this study advances fundamental knowledge on the composition and genetic potential of microbial communities inhabiting tropical soda lakes. PMID:29520256

  14. Contrasting the Genetic Patterns of Microbial Communities in Soda Lakes with and without Cyanobacterial Bloom

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ana P. D. Andreote

    2018-02-01

    Full Text Available Soda lakes have high levels of sodium carbonates and are characterized by salinity and elevated pH. These ecosystems are found across Africa, Europe, Asia, Australia, North, Central, and South America. Particularly in Brazil, the Pantanal region has a series of hundreds of shallow soda lakes (ca. 600 potentially colonized by a diverse haloalkaliphilic microbial community. Biological information of these systems is still elusive, in particular data on the description of the main taxa involved in the biogeochemical cycling of life-important elements. Here, we used metagenomic sequencing to contrast the composition and functional patterns of the microbial communities of two distinct soda lakes from the sub-region Nhecolândia, state of Mato Grosso do Sul, Brazil. These two lakes differ by permanent cyanobacterial blooms (Salina Verde, green-water lake and by no record of cyanobacterial blooms (Salina Preta, black-water lake. The dominant bacterial species in the Salina Verde bloom was Anabaenopsis elenkinii. This cyanobacterium altered local abiotic parameters such as pH, turbidity, and dissolved oxygen and consequently the overall structure of the microbial community. In Salina Preta, the microbial community had a more structured taxonomic profile. Therefore, the distribution of metabolic functions in Salina Preta community encompassed a large number of taxa, whereas, in Salina Verde, the functional potential was restrained across a specific set of taxa. Distinct signatures in the abundance of genes associated with the cycling of carbon, nitrogen, and sulfur were found. Interestingly, genes linked to arsenic resistance metabolism were present at higher abundance in Salina Verde and they were associated with the cyanobacterial bloom. Collectively, this study advances fundamental knowledge on the composition and genetic potential of microbial communities inhabiting tropical soda lakes.

  15. Role of EPS, Dispersant and Nutrients on the Microbial Response and MOS Formation in the Subarctic Northeast Atlantic

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tony Gutierrez

    2017-04-01

    Full Text Available In this study we report the formation of marine oil snow (MOS, its associated microbial community, the factors influencing its formation, and the microbial response to crude oil in surface waters of the Faroe-Shetland Channel (FSC. The FSC is a subarctic region that is hydrodynamically complex located in the northeast Atlantic where oil extraction is currently occurring and where exploration is likely to expand into its deeper waters (>500 m. A major oil spill in this region may mirror the aftermath that ensued following the Deepwater Horizon (DWH blowout in the Gulf of Mexico, where the massive influx of Macondo crude oil triggered the formation of copious quantities of rapidly sinking MOS and successional blooms of opportunistic oil-degrading bacteria. In laboratory experiments, we simulated environmental conditions in sea surface waters of the FSC using water collected from this site during the winter of 2015. We demonstrated that the presence of dispersant triggers the formation of MOS, and that nutrient amendments magnify this. Illumina MiSeq sequencing revealed the enrichment on MOS of associated oil-degrading (Cycloclasticus, Thalassolituus, Marinobacter and EPS-producing (Halomonas, Pseudoalteromonas, Alteromonas bacteria, and included major representation by Psychrobacter and Cobetia with putative oil-degrading/EPS-producing qualities. The formation of marine snow, in the absence of crude oil and dispersant, in seawater amended with nutrients alone indicated that the de novo synthesis of bacterial EPS is a key factor in MOS formation, and the glycoprotein composition of the MOS aggregates confirmed that its amorphous biopolymeric matrix was of microbial (likely bacterial origin. The presence of dispersants and crude oil with/without nutrients resulted in distinct microbial responses marked by intermittent, and in some cases short-lived, blooms of opportunistic heterotrophs, principally obligate hydrocarbonoclastic (Alcanivorax

  16. RNA-Based Amplicon Sequencing Reveals Microbiota Development during Ripening of Artisanal versus Industrial Lard d'Arnad.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ferrocino, Ilario; Bellio, Alberto; Romano, Angelo; Macori, Guerrino; Rantsiou, Kalliopi; Decastelli, Lucia; Cocolin, Luca

    2017-08-15

    Valle d'Aosta Lard d'Arnad is a protected designation of origin (PDO) product produced from fat of the shoulder and back of heavy pigs. Its manufacturing process can be very diverse, especially regarding the maturation temperature and the NaCl concentration used for the brine; thereby, the main goal of this study was to investigate the impact of those parameters on the microbiota developed during curing and ripening. Three farms producing Lard d'Arnad were selected. Two plants, reflecting the industrial process characterized either by low maturation temperature (plant A [10% NaCl, 2°C]) or by using a low NaCl concentration (plant B [2.5% NaCl, 4°C]), were selected, while the third was characterized by an artisanal process (plant C [30% NaCl, 8°C]). Lard samples were obtained at time 0 and after 7, 15, 30, 60, and 90 days of maturation. From each plant, 3 independent lots were analyzed. The diversity of live microbiota was evaluated by using classical plate counts and amplicon target sequencing of small subunit (SSU) rRNA. The main taxa identified by sequencing were Acinetobacter johnsonii , Psychrobacter , Staphylococcus equorum , Staphylococcus sciuri , Pseudomonas fragi , Brochothrix , Halomonas , and Vibrio , and differences in their relative abundances distinguished samples from the individual plants. The composition of the microbiota was more similar among plants A and B, and it was characterized by the higher presence of taxa recognized as undesired bacteria in food-processing environments. Oligotype analysis of Halomonas and Acinetobacter revealed the presence of several characteristic oligotypes associated with A and B samples. IMPORTANCE Changes in the food production process can drastically affect the microbial community structure, with a possible impact on the final characteristics of the products. The industrial processes of Lard d'Arnad production are characterized by a reduction in the salt concentration in the brines to address a consumer demand

  17. Construction of ectoine absorption defective mutant for efficient ectoine production%四氢嘧啶吸收缺陷突变株高效制备四氢嘧啶

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    徐蕊; 张苓花

    2012-01-01

    [Objective] To further enhance ectoine (1, 4, 5, 6-tetrahydro-2-methyl-4- pyrimidinecarboxylic acid) synthesis efficiency. [Methods] We cloned Halomonas salina DSM 5928T teaABC gene of ectoine-specific transporter TeaABC by walking PCR and constructed ectoine absorption defective mutant H. salina DSM 5928 (teaABC) by Red recombination technology. [Results] The total concentration of ectoine and productivity in a 10 L fennentor were 9. 10 (±0.08) g/L and 9.93 (±0.09) g/L. d. [Conclusion] The ectoine absorption defect mutant H. salina DSM 5928T (teaABC-) compromised the negative feedback regulation of ectoine synthesis, which can significantly improve the efficiency of ectoine production.%[目的]为进一步提高四氢嘧啶(1,4,5,6-四氢-2-甲基-4-嘧啶羧酸;1,4,5,6-tetrahydro-2-methyl-4-pyrimidinecarboxylic acid;ectoine)合成效率,[方法]利用步移PCR方法克隆了Halomonas salinaDSM 5928T四氢嘧啶特异性转运蛋白(ectoine-specific transporter; TeaABC)编码基因teaABC,Red重组技术构建了四氢嘧啶吸收缺陷突变株H.salina DSM 5928T(teaABC -).[结果]H.salina DSM 5928T(teaABC -)10 L发酵罐的四氢嘧啶发酵,四氢嘧啶总浓度9.10(±0.08) g/L,合成效率为9.93(±0.09) g/L.d.[结论]四氢嘧啶吸收缺陷突变株H.salina DSM 5928T(teaABC-),解除了四氢嘧啶吸收对其合成的负反馈调节,从而显著提高了四氢嘧啶合成效率.

  18. Coupling of anaerobic waste treatment to produce protein- and lipid-rich bacterial biomass

    Science.gov (United States)

    Steinberg, Lisa M.; Kronyak, Rachel E.; House, Christopher H.

    2017-11-01

    Future long-term manned space missions will require effective recycling of water and nutrients as part of a life support system. Biological waste treatment is less energy intensive than physicochemical treatment methods, yet anaerobic methanogenic waste treatment has been largely avoided due to slow treatment rates and safety issues concerning methane production. However, methane is generated during atmosphere regeneration on the ISS. Here we propose waste treatment via anaerobic digestion followed by methanotrophic growth of Methylococcus capsulatus to produce a protein- and lipid-rich biomass that can be directly consumed, or used to produce other high-protein food sources such as fish. To achieve more rapid methanogenic waste treatment, we built and tested a fixed-film, flow-through, anaerobic reactor to treat an ersatz wastewater. During steady-state operation, the reactor achieved a 97% chemical oxygen demand (COD) removal rate with an organic loading rate of 1740 g d-1 m-3 and a hydraulic retention time of 12.25 d. The reactor was also tested on three occasions by feeding ca. 500 g COD in less than 12 h, representing 50x the daily feeding rate, with COD removal rates ranging from 56-70%, demonstrating the ability of the reactor to respond to overfeeding events. While investigating the storage of treated reactor effluent at a pH of 12, we isolated a strain of Halomonas desiderata capable of acetate degradation under high pH conditions. We then tested the nutritional content of the alkaliphilic Halomonas desiderata strain, as well as the thermophile Thermus aquaticus, as supplemental protein and lipid sources that grow in conditions that should preclude pathogens. The M. capsulatus biomass consisted of 52% protein and 36% lipids, the H. desiderata biomass consisted of 15% protein and 7% lipids, and the Thermus aquaticus biomass consisted of 61% protein and 16% lipids. This work demonstrates the feasibility of rapid waste treatment in a compact reactor design

  19. Isolation of Radiation-Resistant Bacteria from Mars Analog Antarctic Dry Valleys by Preselection, and the Correlation between Radiation and Desiccation Resistance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Musilova, Michaela; Wright, Gary; Ward, John M; Dartnell, Lewis R

    2015-12-01

    Extreme radiation-resistant microorganisms can survive doses of ionizing radiation far greater than are present in the natural environment. Radiation resistance is believed to be an incidental adaptation to desiccation resistance, as both hazards cause similar cellular damage. Desert soils are, therefore, promising targets to prospect for new radiation-resistant strains. This is the first study to isolate radiation-resistant microbes by using gamma-ray exposure preselection from the extreme cold desert of the Antarctic Dry Valleys (a martian surface analogue). Halomonads, identified by 16S rRNA gene sequencing, were the most numerous survivors of the highest irradiation exposures. They were studied here for the first time for both their desiccation and irradiation survival characteristics. In addition, the association between desiccation and radiation resistance has not been investigated quantitatively before for a broad diversity of microorganisms. Thus, a meta-analysis of scientific literature was conducted to gather a larger data set. A strong correlation was found between desiccation and radiation resistance, indicating that an increase in the desiccation resistance of 5 days corresponds to an increase in the room-temperature irradiation survival of 1 kGy. Irradiation at -79°C (representative of average martian surface temperatures) increases the microbial radiation resistance 9-fold. Consequently, the survival of the cold-, desiccation-, and radiation-resistant organisms isolated here has implications for the potential habitability of dormant or cryopreserved life on Mars. Extremophiles-Halomonas sp.-Antarctica-Mars-Ionizing radiation-Cosmic rays.

  20. Isolation and characterization of biosurfactant-producing Alcanivorax strains: hydrocarbon accession strategies and alkane hydroxylase gene analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Olivera, Nelda L; Nievas, Marina L; Lozada, Mariana; Del Prado, Guillermo; Dionisi, Hebe M; Siñeriz, Faustino

    2009-01-01

    Biosurfactant-producing bacteria belonging to the genera Alcanivorax, Cobetia and Halomonas were isolated from marine sediments with a history of hydrocarbon exposure (Aristizábal and Gravina Peninsulas, Argentina). Two Alcanivorax isolates were found to form naturally occurring consortia with strains closely related to Pseudomonas putida and Microbacterium esteraromaticum. Alkane hydroxylase gene analysis in these two Alcanivorax strains resulted in the identification of two novel alkB genes, showing 86% and 60% deduced amino acid sequence identity with those of Alcanivorax sp. A-11-3 and Alcanivorax dieselolei P40, respectively. In addition, a gene homologous to alkB2 from Alcanivorax borkumensis was present in one of the strains. The consortium formed by this strain, Alcanivorax sp. PA2 (98.9% 16S rRNA gene sequence identity with A. borkumensis SK2(T)) and P. putida PA1 was characterized in detail. These strains form cell aggregates when growing as mixed culture, though only PA2 was responsible for biosurfactant activity. During exponential growth phase of PA2, cells showed high hydrophobicity and adherence to hydrocarbon droplets. Biosurfactant production was only detectable at late growth and stationary phases, suggesting that it is not involved in initiating oil degradation and that direct interfacial adhesion is the main hydrocarbon accession mode of PA2. This strain could be useful for biotechnological applications due to its biosurfactant production, catabolic and aggregation properties.

  1. A highly active endo-levanase BT1760 of a dominant mammalian gut commensal Bacteroides thetaiotaomicron cleaves not only various bacterial levans, but also levan of timothy grass

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Mardo, Karin; Visnapuu, Triinu; Vija, Heiki

    2017-01-01

    of Pseudomonas syringae pv. tomato, its mutant Asp300Asn, levansucrases of Zymomonas mobilis, Erwinia herbicola, Halomonas smyrnensis as well as on levan isolated from timothy grass. For the first time a plant levan is shown as a perfect substrate for an endo-fructanase of a human gut bacterium. BT1760 degraded...... levans to FOS with degree of polymerization from 2 to 13. At optimal reaction conditions up to 1 g of FOS were produced per 1 mg of BT1760 protein. Low molecular weight (grass levan and levan synthesized from sucrose by the Lsc3Asp300Asn, were degraded most rapidly...... whilst levan produced by Lsc3 from raffinose least rapidly. BT1760 catalyzed finely at human body temperature (37°C) and in moderately acidic environment (pH 5-6) that is typical for the gut lumen. According to differential scanning fluorimetry, the Tm of the endo-levanase was 51.5°C. All tested levans...

  2. Complexity and Dynamics of the Winemaking Bacterial Communities in Berries, Musts, and Wines from Apulian Grape Cultivars through Time and Space.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marinella Marzano

    Full Text Available Currently, there is very little information available regarding the microbiome associated with the wine production chain. Here, we used an amplicon sequencing approach based on high-throughput sequencing (HTS to obtain a comprehensive assessment of the bacterial community associated with the production of three Apulian red wines, from grape to final product. The relationships among grape variety, the microbial community, and fermentation was investigated. Moreover, the winery microbiota was evaluated compared to the autochthonous species in vineyards that persist until the end of the winemaking process. The analysis highlighted the remarkable dynamics within the microbial communities during fermentation. A common microbial core shared among the examined wine varieties was observed, and the unique taxonomic signature of each wine appellation was revealed. New species belonging to the genus Halomonas were also reported. This study demonstrates the potential of this metagenomic approach, supported by optimized protocols, for identifying the biodiversity of the wine supply chain. The developed experimental pipeline offers new prospects for other research fields in which a comprehensive view of microbial community complexity and dynamics is desirable.

  3. Halotolerant PGPRs Prevent Major Shifts in Indigenous Microbial Community Structure Under Salinity Stress.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bharti, Nidhi; Barnawal, Deepti; Maji, Deepamala; Kalra, Alok

    2015-07-01

    The resilience of soil microbial populations and processes to environmental perturbation is of increasing interest as alteration in rhizosphere microbial community dynamics impacts the combined functions of plant-microbe interactions. The present study was conducted to investigate the effect of inoculation with halotolerant rhizobacteria Bacillus pumilus (STR2), Halomonas desiderata (STR8), and Exiguobacterium oxidotolerans (STR36) on the indigenous root-associated microbial (bacterial and fungal) communities in maize under non-saline and salinity stress. Plants inoculated with halotolerant rhizobacteria recorded improved growth as illustrated by significantly higher shoot and root dry weight and elongation in comparison to un-inoculated control plants under both non-saline and saline conditions. Additive main effect and multiplicative interaction ordination analysis revealed that plant growth promoting rhizobacteria (PGPR) inoculations as well as salinity are major drivers of microbial community shift in maize rhizosphere. Salinity negatively impacts microbial community as analysed through diversity indices; among the PGPR-inoculated plants, STR2-inoculated plants recorded higher values of diversity indices. As observed in the terminal-restriction fragment length polymorphism analysis, the inoculation of halotolerant rhizobacteria prevents major shift of the microbial community structure, thus enhancing the resilience capacity of the microbial communities.

  4. Screening of biosurfactant producers from petroleum hydrocarbon contaminated sources in cold marine environments.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cai, Qinhong; Zhang, Baiyu; Chen, Bing; Zhu, Zhiwen; Lin, Weiyun; Cao, Tong

    2014-09-15

    An overview of literature about isolating biosurfactant producers from marine sources indicated no such producers have been reported form North Atlantic Canada. Water and sediment samples were taken from petroleum hydrocarbon contaminated coastal and offshore areas in this region. Either n-hexadecane or diesel was used as the sole carbon source for the screening. A modified colony-based oil drop collapsing test was used to cover sessile biosurfactant producers. Fifty-five biosurfactant producers belong to genera of Alcanivorax, Exiguobacterium, Halomonas, Rhodococcus, Bacillus, Acinetobacter, Pseudomonas, and Streptomyces were isolated. The first three genera were established after 1980s with interesting characteristics and limited relevant publications. Some of the 55 isolated strains were found with properties such as greatly reducing surface tension, stabilizing emulsion and producing flocculant. Isolates P6-4P and P1-5P were selected to demonstrate the performance of biosurfactant production, and were found to reduce the surface tension of water to as low as 28 dynes/cm. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  5. Isolation, screening, and characterization of surface-active agent-producing, oil-degrading marine bacteria of Mumbai Harbor.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mohanram, Rajamani; Jagtap, Chandrakant; Kumar, Pradeep

    2016-04-15

    Diverse marine bacterial species predominantly found in oil-polluted seawater produce diverse surface-active agents. Surface-active agents produced by bacteria are classified into two groups based on their molecular weights, namely biosurfactants and bioemulsifiers. In this study, surface-active agent-producing, oil-degrading marine bacteria were isolated using a modified Bushnell-Haas medium with high-speed diesel as a carbon source from three oil-polluted sites of Mumbai Harbor. Surface-active agent-producing bacterial strains were screened using nine widely used methods. The nineteen bacterial strains showed positive results for more than four surface-active agent screening methods; further, these strains were characterized using biochemical and nucleic acid sequencing methods. Based on the results, the organisms belonged to the genera Acinetobacter, Alcanivorax, Bacillus, Comamonas, Chryseomicrobium, Halomonas, Marinobacter, Nesterenkonia, Pseudomonas, and Serratia. The present study confirmed the prevalence of surface-active agent-producing bacteria in the oil-polluted waters of Mumbai Harbor. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  6. Shifts of microbial communities of wheat (Triticum aestivum L.) cultivation in a closed artificial ecosystem.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Qin, Youcai; Fu, Yuming; Dong, Chen; Jia, Nannan; Liu, Hong

    2016-05-01

    The microbial communities of plant ecosystems are in relation to plant growing environment, but the alteration in biodiversity of rhizosphere and phyllosphere microbial communities in closed and controlled environments is unknown. The purpose of this study is to analyze the change regularity of microbial communities with wheat plants dependent-cultivated in a closed artificial ecosystem. The microbial community structures in closed-environment treatment plants were investigated by a culture-dependent approach, polymerase chain reaction-denaturing gradient gel electrophoresis (PCR-DGGE), and Illumina Miseq high-throughput sequencing. The results indicated that the number of microbes decreased along with time, and the magnitude of bacteria, fungi, and actinomycetes were 10(7)-10(8), 10(5), and 10(3)-10(4) CFU/g (dry weight), respectively. The analysis of PCR-DGGE and Illumina Miseq revealed that the wheat leaf surface and near-root substrate had different microbial communities at different periods of wheat ecosystem development and showed that the relative highest diversity of microbial communities appeared at late and middle periods of the plant ecosystem, respectively. The results also indicated that the wheat leaf and substrate had different microbial community compositions, and the wheat substrate had higher richness of microbial community than the leaf. Flavobacterium, Pseudomonas, Paenibacillus, Enterobacter, Penicillium, Rhodotorula, Acremonium, and Alternaria were dominant in the wheat leaf samples, and Pedobacter, Flavobacterium, Halomonas, Marinobacter, Salinimicrobium, Lysobacter, Pseudomonas, Halobacillus, Xanthomonas, Acremonium, Monographella, and Penicillium were dominant populations in the wheat near-root substrate samples.

  7. Pyrosequencing Analysis of Subgingival Microbiota in Distinct Periodontal Conditions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Park, O-J; Yi, H; Jeon, J H; Kang, S-S; Koo, K-T; Kum, K-Y; Chun, J; Yun, C-H; Han, S H

    2015-07-01

    Subgingival microorganisms are potentially associated with periodontal diseases. However, changes in the subgingival microbiota during the progress of periodontal diseases are poorly understood. In this study, we analyzed bacterial communities in the subgingival paper point samples from 32 Korean individuals with no sign of disease, gingivitis, or periodontitis using 454 FLX Titanium pyrosequencing. A total of 256,113 reads representing 26 phyla, 433 genera, and 1,016 species were detected. Bacteroidetes, Fusobacteria, Synergistetes, and Spirochaetes were the abundant phyla in periodontitis subjects, whereas Firmicutes and Proteobacteria were identified as the dominant phyla in the gingivitis and healthy subjects, respectively. Although high levels of Porphyromonas, Fusobacterium, Fretibacterium, Rothia, Filifactor, and Treponema genera were observed in the periodontitis subjects, Streptococcus, Capnocytophaga, Leptotrichia, and Haemophilus genera were found at high frequency in the gingivitis subjects. Species including Porphyromonas gingivalis, Fusobacterium nucleatum, and Fretibacterium fastidiosum were significantly increased in periodontitis subjects. On the other hand, Streptococcus pseudopneumoniae, Haemophilus parainfluenzae, and Leptotrichia hongkongensis were preferentially observed in the gingivitis subjects. Intriguingly, the halophile Halomonas hamiltonii was revealed as a predominant species in the healthy subjects. Based on Fast UniFrac analysis, distinctive bacterial clusters were classified for the healthy, gingivitis, and periodontitis state. The current findings might be useful for understanding the pathogenesis, diagnosis, and treatment of periodontal diseases. © International & American Associations for Dental Research 2015.

  8. High-Throughput Screening for a Moderately Halophilic Phenol-Degrading Strain and Its Salt Tolerance Response

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lu, Zhi-Yan; Guo, Xiao-Jue; Li, Hui; Huang, Zhong-Zi; Lin, Kuang-Fei; Liu, Yong-Di

    2015-01-01

    A high-throughput screening system for moderately halophilic phenol-degrading bacteria from various habitats was developed to replace the conventional strain screening owing to its high efficiency. Bacterial enrichments were cultivated in 48 deep well microplates instead of shake flasks or tubes. Measurement of phenol concentrations was performed in 96-well microplates instead of using the conventional spectrophotometric method or high-performance liquid chromatography (HPLC). The high-throughput screening system was used to cultivate forty-three bacterial enrichments and gained a halophilic bacterial community E3 with the best phenol-degrading capability. Halomonas sp. strain 4-5 was isolated from the E3 community. Strain 4-5 was able to degrade more than 94% of the phenol (500 mg·L−1 starting concentration) over a range of 3%–10% NaCl. Additionally, the strain accumulated the compatible solute, ectoine, with increasing salt concentrations. PCR detection of the functional genes suggested that the largest subunit of multicomponent phenol hydroxylase (LmPH) and catechol 1,2-dioxygenase (C12O) were active in the phenol degradation process. PMID:26020478

  9. [Community structure and diversity of culturable moderate halophilic bacteria isolated from Qrhan salt lake on Qinghai-Tibet Plateau].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shen, Shuo

    2017-04-04

    I studied the community structure and diversity of culturable moderate halophilic bacteria isolated from Qrhan Salt Lake. I isolated and cultured the moderate halophilic bacteria on different selective media. After the 16S rRNA gene sequences was amplified and measured, I constructed the phylogenic tree, analyzed the community structure and calculated the diversity indexes according to the 16S rRNA gene information. A total of 421 moderate halophilic bacteria were isolated from water and mud samples in Qrhan Salt Lake. The 16S rRNA gene information showed that 4 potential novel species belonged to the family Bacillaceae. Eighty-three model strains belonged to 3 phylurms 6 families 16 genus. Among them, Bacillus sp., Oceanobacillus sp. and Halomonas sp. were dominant species. Diversity analysis showed that the diversity of strains isolated from water sample was higher than that from mud sample, but the dominance degree of strains isolated from mud sample was higher than that from water sample. The genetic diversity of moderate halophilic bacteria isolated from Qrhan Salt Lake was abundant. Also, there were dominant and novel species of culturable moderate halophilic bacteria in this lake.

  10. Perchlorate and halophilic prokaryotes: implications for possible halophilic life on Mars.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oren, Aharon; Elevi Bardavid, Rahel; Mana, Lily

    2014-01-01

    In view of the finding of perchlorate among the salts detected by the Phoenix Lander on Mars, we investigated the relationships of halophilic heterotrophic microorganisms (archaea of the family Halobacteriaceae and the bacterium Halomonas elongata) toward perchlorate. All strains tested grew well in NaCl-based media containing 0.4 M perchlorate, but at the highest perchlorate concentrations, tested cells were swollen or distorted. Some species (Haloferax mediterranei, Haloferax denitrificans, Haloferax gibbonsii, Haloarcula marismortui, Haloarcula vallismortis) could use perchlorate as an electron acceptor for anaerobic growth. Although perchlorate is highly oxidizing, its presence at a concentration of 0.2 M for up to 2 weeks did not negatively affect the ability of a yeast extract-based medium to support growth of the archaeon Halobacterium salinarum. These findings show that presence of perchlorate among the salts on Mars does not preclude the possibility of halophilic life. If indeed the liquid brines that may exist on Mars are inhabited by salt-requiring or salt-tolerant microorganisms similar to the halophiles on Earth, presence of perchlorate may even be stimulatory when it can serve as an electron acceptor for respiratory activity in the anaerobic Martian environment.

  11. Screening and isolation of halophilic bacteria producing industrially important enzymes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kumar, Sumit; Karan, Ram; Kapoor, Sanjay; S P, Singh; S K, Khare

    2012-10-01

    Halophiles are excellent sources of enzymes that are not only salt stable but also can withstand and carry out reactions efficiently under extreme conditions. The aim of the study was to isolate and study the diversity among halophilic bacteria producing enzymes of industrial value. Screening of halophiles from various saline habitats of India led to isolation of 108 halophilic bacteria producing industrially important hydrolases (amylases, lipases and proteases). Characterization of 21 potential isolates by morphological, biochemical and 16S rRNA gene analysis found them related to Marinobacter, Virgibacillus, Halobacillus, Geomicrobium, Chromohalobacter, Oceanobacillus, Bacillus, Halomonas and Staphylococcus genera. They belonged to moderately halophilic group of bacteria exhibiting salt requirement in the range of 3-20%. There is significant diversity among halophiles from saline habitats of India. Preliminary characterization of crude hydrolases established them to be active and stable under more than one extreme condition of high salt, pH, temperature and presence of organic solvents. It is concluded that these halophilic isolates are not only diverse in phylogeny but also in their enzyme characteristics. Their enzymes may be potentially useful for catalysis under harsh operational conditions encountered in industrial processes. The solvent stability among halophilic enzymes seems a generic novel feature making them potentially useful in non-aqueous enzymology.

  12. [Diversity and enzyme-producing activity of culturable halophilic bacteria in Daishan Saltern of East China].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Dan-Dan; Li, Qian; Huang, Jing-Jing; Chen, Min

    2012-11-01

    Soil and saline water samples were collected from the Daishan Saltern of East China, and the halophilic bacteria were isolated and cultured by using selective media, aimed to investigate the diversity and enzyme-producing activity of culturable halophilic bacteria in saltern environment. A total of 181 strains were isolated by culture-dependent method. Specific primers were used to amplify the 16S rRNA gene of bacteria and archaea. The operation taxonomy units (OTUs) were determined by ARDRA method, and the representative strain of each OTU was sequenced. The phylogenetic position of all the isolated strains was determined by 16S rRNA sequencing. The results showed that the isolated 181 strains displayed 21 operational taxonomic units (OTUs), of which, 12 OTUs belonged to halophilic bacteria, and the others belonged to halophilic archaea. Phylogenetic analysis indicated that there were 7 genera presented among the halophilic bacteria group, and 4 genera presented among the halophilic archaea group. The dominant halophilic strains were of Halomonas and Haloarcula, with 46.8% in halophilic bacteria and 49.1% in halophilic archaea group, respectively. Enzyme-producing analysis indicated that most strains displayed enzyme-producing activity, including the activities of producing amylase, proteinase and lipase, and the dominant strains capable of enzyme-producing were of Haloarcula. Our results showed that in the environment of Daishan Saltern, there existed a higher diversity of halophilic bacteria, being a source sink for screening enzyme-producing bacterial strains.

  13. Culturable diversity of halophilic bacteria in foreshore soils.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Irshad, Aarzoo; Ahmad, Irshad; Kim, Seung Bum

    2014-01-01

    Halophilic bacteria are commonly found in natural environments containing significant concentration of NaCl such as inland salt lakes and evaporated sea-shore pools, as well as environments such as curing brines, salted food products and saline soils. Dependence on salt is an important phenotypic characteristic of halophilic bacteria, which can be used in the polyphasic characterization of newly discovered microorganisms. In this study the diversity of halophilic bacteria in foreshore soils of Daecheon, Chungnam, and Saemangeum, Jeonbuk, was investigated. Two types of media, namely NA and R2A supplemented with 3%, 5%, 9%, 15%, 20% and 30% NaCl were used. More than 200 halophilic bacteria were isolated and BOX-PCR fingerprinting analysis was done for the typing of the isolates. The BLAST identification results showed that isolated strains were composed of 4 phyla, Firmicutes (60%), Proteobacteria (31%), Bacteriodetes (5%) and Actinobacteria (4%). Isolates were affiliated with 16 genera and 36 species. Bacillus was the dominant genus in the phylum Firmicutes, comprising 24% of the total isolates. Halomonas (12%) and Shewanella (12%) were also found as the main genera. These findings show that the foreshore soil of Daecheon Beach and Saemangeum Sea of Korea represents an untapped source of bacterial biodiversity.

  14. Transposon-mediated random gene disruption with moderate halophilic bacteria and its application for halophilic bacterial siderophore analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Matsui, Toru; Nishino, Tomohiko

    2016-12-01

    Analytical conditions using chromo azurol S was validated for quantification of siderophore in aqueous samples, followed by the characterization of siderophore derived from newly isolated moderately halophilic bacteria. Conditions with good linearity between the absorbance and the siderophore concentration were obtained at a siderophore concentration less than 20 µM, in the wavelength range between 630 and 660 nm with developing time for at least 2 h. Of the halophilic bacteria isolated from Tunisian soil, Halomonas sp., namely strain 21a was selected as siderophore producing halophiles. The strain produced siderophore significantly in the absence of iron in minimal medium. Siderophore-deficient mutant, namely IIa10, of the strain 21a was obtained from gene disruptant library constructed using transposon complex by electroporation. Genomic sequence analysis of the mutant IIa10 revealed that the transposon-inserted gene was TonB-dependent receptor. © 2016 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  15. Factors Determining the Biodiversity of Halophilic Microorganisms on Historic Masonry Buildings.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Otlewska, Anna; Adamiak, Justyna; Stryszewska, Teresa; Kańka, Stanisław; Gutarowska, Beata

    2017-06-24

    The aim of the present study was to obtain insights into the relationship between the chemical (salt content and pH) and physico-mechanical (humidity and compressive strength) properties of mineral-based materials from historic buildings with salt efflorescence and the growth and biodiversity of halophilic microorganisms. Samples were mainly characterized by pH 6.5-8.5 and a moisture content of between 0.12 and 3.3%. Significant variations were also found in the salt content (sulfates, chlorides, and nitrates) of the materials. An SEM/EDS analysis of material surfaces revealed the presence of halite, calcite, gypsum, sodium sulfate, and potassium-sodium sulfate. Culture-dependent and culture-independent (clone library construction) approaches were both applied to detect halophilic microorganisms. Results derived from culturable methods and the materials analysis revealed a correlation between the total halophile count and pH value as well as sulfate content. A correlation was not observed between the concentration of chlorides or nitrates and the number of halophilic microorganisms. The materials studied were inhabited by the culturable halophilic bacteria Halobacillus sp., Virgibacillus sp., and Marinococcus sp. as well as the yeast Sterigmatomyces sp., which was isolated for the first time from mineral materials. Culture-independent techniques revealed the following bacterial species: Salinibacterium, Salinisphaera, Rubrobacter, Rubricoccus, Halomonas, Halorhodospira, Solirubrobacter, Salinicoccus, and Salinibacter. Biodiversity was the highest in materials with high or moderate salinity.

  16. Comparative metagenomic analysis of soil microbial communities across three hexachlorocyclohexane contamination levels.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Naseer Sangwan

    Full Text Available This paper presents the characterization of the microbial community responsible for the in-situ bioremediation of hexachlorocyclohexane (HCH. Microbial community structure and function was analyzed using 16S rRNA amplicon and shotgun metagenomic sequencing methods for three sets of soil samples. The three samples were collected from a HCH-dumpsite (450 mg HCH/g soil and comprised of a HCH/soil ratio of 0.45, 0.0007, and 0.00003, respectively. Certain bacterial; (Chromohalobacter, Marinimicrobium, Idiomarina, Salinosphaera, Halomonas, Sphingopyxis, Novosphingobium, Sphingomonas and Pseudomonas, archaeal; (Halobacterium, Haloarcula and Halorhabdus and fungal (Fusarium genera were found to be more abundant in the soil sample from the HCH-dumpsite. Consistent with the phylogenetic shift, the dumpsite also exhibited a relatively higher abundance of genes coding for chemotaxis/motility, chloroaromatic and HCH degradation (lin genes. Reassembly of a draft pangenome of Chromohalobacter salaxigenes sp. (∼8X coverage and 3 plasmids (pISP3, pISP4 and pLB1; 13X coverage containing lin genes/clusters also provides an evidence for the horizontal transfer of HCH catabolism genes.

  17. Bacteriocin Isolated From Halomon sp.: A Bacterial Ding Protein?

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Atirah Azemin; Klappa, P.; Mohd Shahir Shamsir Omar

    2015-01-01

    A marine halophile, Halomonas sp. strain M3 was isolated from Straits of Johor, Malaysia and produce bacteriocin CC that acts as bacteriostatic agent. Characterisation of the bacterium showed that optimal growth and bacteriocin production is at ambient temperature, pH of 8-8.5 in nutrient broth medium supplemented with 2.9 % w/v NaCI to mimic saltwater conditions. The stability studies indicated that bacteriocin CC is heat-labile (35-50 degree Celsius) and was stable over 2 years when stored in 0.02 M Tris- HCI with 30-60 % glycerol at 4 degree Celsius. A loss of activity was detected after proteolytic enzymes treatment, indicating the proteinaceous nature of the antimicrobial compound. The amino acid sequence of bacteriocin CC was obtained by Edman degradation and MALDI-TOF analysis, showed the characteristic sequence of a DING protein (D-I-N-G-G-G-A-T-L-P-Q-A-LY- Q) in size 38.9-kDa at pI of 6.8. These proteins constitute a conserved and widely distributed set of proteins found in all kingdoms with ligand-binding activities and hydrolytic enzyme, suggesting a possible role in cell signalling and bio mineralization in DING isolates. Intriguingly, DING proteins also have been involved as an anti-tumour agent in humans. Thus, bacteriocin CC as DING protein family members should be further studied to investigate its potential as a novel antimicrobial agent. (author)

  18. Isolation, diversity, and biotechnological potential of rhizo- and endophytic bacteria associated with mangrove plants from Saudi Arabia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bibi, F; Ullah, I; Alvi, S A; Bakhsh, S A; Yasir, M; Al-Ghamdi, A A K; Azhar, E I

    2017-06-20

    Marine bacteria have been exceptional sources of halotolerant enzymes since decades. The aim of the present study was to isolate bacteria producing hydrolytic enzymes from seven different mangroves collected from the coastal area of Thuwal, Jeddah, Saudi Arabia, and to further screen them for other enzymatic and antifungal activities. We have isolated 46 different rhizo- and endophytic bacteria from the soil, roots, and leaves of the mangroves using different enzymatic media. These bacterial strains were capable of producing industrially important enzymes (cellulase, protease, lipase, and amylase). The bacteria were screened further for antagonistic activity against fungal pathogens. Finally, these bacterial strains were identified on the basis of the16S rDNA sequence. Taxonomic and phylogenetic analysis revealed 95.9-100% sequence identity to type strains of related species. The dominant phylum was Gammaproteobacteria (γ-Proteobacteria), which comprised 10 different genera - Erwinia, Vibrio, Psychrobacter, Aidingimonas, Marinobacter, Chromohalobacter, Halomonas, Microbulbifer, and Alteromonas. Firmicutes was the second dominant phylum, which contained only the genus Bacillus. Similarly, only Isoptericola belonged to Actinobacteria. Further these enzyme-producing bacteria were tested for the production of other enzymes. Most of the active strains showed cellulytic and lipolytic activities. Several were also active against fungal pathogens. Our results demonstrated that the mangroves represent an important source of potentially active bacteria producing enzymes and antifungal metabolites (bioactive products). These bacteria are a source of novel halophilic enzymes and antibiotics that can find industrial and medicinal use.

  19. A novel plant-based-sea water culture media for in vitro cultivation and in situ recovery of the halophyte microbiome

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mohamed Y. Saleh

    2017-11-01

    Full Text Available The plant-based-sea water culture medium is introduced to in vitro cultivation and in situ recovery of the microbiome of halophytes. The ice plant (Mesembryanthemum crystallinum was used, in the form of juice and/or dehydrated plant powder packed in teabags, to supplement the natural sea water. The resulting culture medium enjoys the combinations of plant materials as rich source of nutrients and sea water exercising the required salt stress. As such without any supplements, the culture medium was sufficient and efficient to support very good in vitro growth of halotolerant bacteria. It was also capable to recover their in situ culturable populations in the phyllosphere, ecto-rhizosphere and endo-rhizosphere of halophytes prevailing in Lake Mariout, Egypt. When related to the total bacterial numbers measured for Suaeda pruinosa roots by quantitative-PCR, the proposed culture medium increased culturability (15.3–19.5% compared to the conventional chemically-synthetic culture medium supplemented with (11.2% or without (3.8% NaCl. Based on 16S rRNA gene sequencing, representative isolates of halotolerant bacteria prevailed on such culture medium were closely related to Bacillus spp., Halomonas spp., and Kocuria spp. Seed germination tests on 25–50% sea water agar indicated positive interaction of such bacterial isolates with the germination and seedlings’ growth of barley seeds.

  20. Design of an ectoine-responsive AraC mutant and its application in metabolic engineering of ectoine biosynthesis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Wei; Zhang, Shan; Jiang, Peixia; Yao, Jun; He, Yongzhi; Chen, Lincai; Gui, Xiwu; Dong, Zhiyang; Tang, Shuang-Yan

    2015-07-01

    Advanced high-throughput screening methods for small molecules may have important applications in the metabolic engineering of the biosynthetic pathways of these molecules. Ectoine is an excellent osmoprotectant that has been widely used in cosmetics. In this study, the Escherichia coli regulatory protein AraC was engineered to recognize ectoine as its non-natural effector and to activate transcription upon ectoine binding. As an endogenous reporter of ectoine, the mutated AraC protein was successfully incorporated into high-throughput screening of ectoine hyper-producing strains. The ectoine biosynthetic cluster from Halomonas elongata was cloned into E. coli. By engineering the rate-limiting enzyme L-2,4-diaminobutyric acid (DABA) aminotransferase (EctB), ectoine production and the specific activity of the EctB mutant were increased. Thus, these results demonstrated the effectiveness of engineering regulatory proteins into sensitive and rapid screening tools for small molecules and highlighted the importance and efficacy of directed evolution strategies applied to the engineering of genetic components for yield improvement in the biosynthesis of small molecules. Copyright © 2015 International Metabolic Engineering Society. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  1. Factors Determining the Biodiversity of Halophilic Microorganisms on Historic Masonry Buildings

    Science.gov (United States)

    Otlewska, Anna; Adamiak, Justyna; Stryszewska, Teresa; Kańka, Stanisław; Gutarowska, Beata

    2017-01-01

    The aim of the present study was to obtain insights into the relationship between the chemical (salt content and pH) and physico-mechanical (humidity and compressive strength) properties of mineral-based materials from historic buildings with salt efflorescence and the growth and biodiversity of halophilic microorganisms. Samples were mainly characterized by pH 6.5–8.5 and a moisture content of between 0.12 and 3.3%. Significant variations were also found in the salt content (sulfates, chlorides, and nitrates) of the materials. An SEM/EDS analysis of material surfaces revealed the presence of halite, calcite, gypsum, sodium sulfate, and potassium-sodium sulfate. Culture-dependent and culture-independent (clone library construction) approaches were both applied to detect halophilic microorganisms. Results derived from culturable methods and the materials analysis revealed a correlation between the total halophile count and pH value as well as sulfate content. A correlation was not observed between the concentration of chlorides or nitrates and the number of halophilic microorganisms. The materials studied were inhabited by the culturable halophilic bacteria Halobacillus sp., Virgibacillus sp., and Marinococcus sp. as well as the yeast Sterigmatomyces sp., which was isolated for the first time from mineral materials. Culture-independent techniques revealed the following bacterial species: Salinibacterium, Salinisphaera, Rubrobacter, Rubricoccus, Halomonas, Halorhodospira, Solirubrobacter, Salinicoccus, and Salinibacter. Biodiversity was the highest in materials with high or moderate salinity. PMID:28592721

  2. Diversity of bacterioplankton in the surface seawaters of Drake Passage near the Chinese Antarctic station.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xing, Mengxin; Li, Zhao; Wang, Wei; Sun, Mi

    2015-07-01

    The determination of relative abundances and distribution of different bacterial groups is a critical step toward understanding the functions of various bacteria and its surrounding environment. Few studies focus on the taxonomic composition and functional diversity of microbial communities in Drake Passage. In this study, marine bacterioplankton communities from surface seawaters at five locations in Drake Passage were examined by 16S rRNA gene sequence analyses. The results indicated that psychrophilic bacteria were the most abundant group in Drake Passage, and mainly made up of Bacillus, Aeromonas, Psychrobacter, Pseudomonas and Halomonas. Diversity analysis showed that surface seawater communities had no significant correlation with latitudinal gradient. Additionally, a clear difference among five surface seawater communities was evident, with 1.8% OTUs (only two) belonged to Bacillus consistent across five locations and 71% OTUs (80) existed in only one location. However, the few cosmopolitans had the largest population sizes. Our results support the hypothesis that the dominant bacterial groups appear to be analogous between geographical sites, but significant differences may be detected among rare bacterial groups. The microbial diversity of surface seawaters would be liable to be affected by environmental factors. © FEMS 2015. All rights reserved. For permissions, please e-mail: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  3. Response of microbial communities to pesticide residues in soil restored with Azolla imbricata.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lu, Xiao-Ming; Lu, Peng-Zhen

    2018-01-01

    Under conditions of Azolla imbricata restoration, the high-throughput sequencing technology was employed to determine change trends of microbial community structures in the soil that had undergone long-term application of pesticides. The relationship between the content of pesticide residues in the soil and the microbial community structure was analyzed. The results indicated that the microbial diversity was strongly negatively correlated with the contents of pesticide residues in the soil. At a suitable dosage of 5 kg fresh A. imbricata per square meter of soil area, the soil microbial diversity increased by 12.0%, and the contents of pesticide residues decreased by 26.8-72.1%. Sphingobacterium, Sphingopyxis, Thermincola, Sphingobium, Acaryochloris, Megasphaera, Ralstonia, Pseudobutyrivibrio, Desulfitobacterium, Nostoc, Oscillochloris, and Aciditerrimonas may play major roles in the degradation of pesticide residues. Thauera, Levilinea, Geothrix, Thiobacillus, Thioalkalispira, Desulfobulbus, Polycyclovorans, Fluviicola, Deferrisoma, Erysipelothrix, Desulfovibrio, Cytophaga, Vogesella, Zoogloea, Azovibrio, Halomonas, Paludibacter, Crocinitomix, Haliscomenobacter, Hirschia, Silanimonas, Alkalibacter, Woodsholea, Peredibacter, Leptolinea, Chitinivorax, Candidatus_Lumbricincola, Anaerovorax, Propionivibrio, Parasegetibacter, Byssovorax, Runella, Leptospira, and Nitrosomonas may be indicators to evaluate the contents of pesticide residues.

  4. Halotolerant/alkalophilic bacteria associated with the cyanobacterium Arthrospira platensis (Nordstedt Gomont that promote early growth in Sorghum bicolor (L. Moench

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gómez G. Liliana Cecilia

    2012-04-01

    Full Text Available

    Arthrospira platensis associated bacteria (APAB identified through molecuar biology like Bacillus okhensis, Indibacter alkaliphilus and Halomonas sp., are also producing 3-indol acetic acid (IAA, these bacteria was used in early plant growth promotion tests over Sorghum bicolor, these bioassay was considered indirect evidence to suggest that APAB also may have stimulatory effects over A. platensis growth naturally. I. alkaliphilus and B. okhensis enhanced early germination of S. bicolor seads, with better results than that achieved by Azospirillum brasilense, bacterium used like reference as a common plant growth promoting rizobacteria. The three APAB enhanced significative differences (P≤0.05 over morphoagronomic parameters, I. alkaliphilus and B. okhensis exhibit better resoults in elongation stimulation and root and foliage dry weight. Above evidence suggest this bacteria like plant growth promoting and it recomended testing with A. platensis axenic cultures and its associated bactteri for understanding true interaction between them.

  5. Cultivation-dependent and cultivation-independent characterisation of hydrocarbon-degrading bacteria in Guaymas Basin sediments

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tony eGutierrez

    2015-07-01

    Full Text Available Marine hydrocarbon-degrading bacteria perform a fundamental role in the biodegradation of crude oil and its petrochemical derivatives in coastal and open ocean environments. However, there is a paucity of knowledge on the diversity and function of these organisms in deep-sea sediment. Here we used stable-isotope probing (SIP, a valuable tool to link the phylogeny and function of targeted microbial groups, to investigate polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbon (PAH-degrading bacteria under aerobic conditions in sediments from Guaymas Basin with uniformly labeled [13C]phenanthrene. The dominant sequences in clone libraries constructed from 13C-enriched bacterial DNA (from phenanthrene enrichments were identified to belong to the genus Cycloclasticus. We used quantitative PCR primers targeting the 16S rRNA gene of the SIP-identified Cycloclasticus to determine their abundance in sediment incubations amended with unlabeled phenanthrene and showed substantial increases in gene abundance during the experiments. We also isolated a strain, BG-2, representing the SIP-identified Cycloclasticus sequence (99.9% 16S rRNA gene sequence identity, and used this strain to provide direct evidence of phenanthrene degradation and mineralization. In addition, we isolated Halomonas, Thalassospira and Lutibacterium spp. with demonstrable phenanthrene-degrading capacity from Guaymas Basin sediment. This study demonstrates the value of coupling SIP with cultivation methods to identify and expand on the known diversity of PAH-degrading bacteria in the deep-sea.

  6. Analysis of bacterial metagenomes from the Southwestern Gulf of Mexico for pathogens detection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Escobedo-Hinojosa, Wendy; Pardo-López, Liliana

    2017-07-31

    Little is known about the diversity of bacteria in the Southwestern Gulf of Mexico. The aim of the study illustrated in this perspective was to search for the presence of bacterial pathogens in this ecosystem, using metagenomic data recently generated by the Mexican research group known as the Gulf of Mexico Research Consortium. Several genera of bacteria annotated as pathogens were detected in water and sediment marine samples. As expected, native and ubiquitous pathogenic bacteria genera such as Burkolderia, Halomonas, Pseudomonas, Shewanella and Vibrio were highly represented. Surprisingly, non-native genera of public health concern were also detected, including Borrelia, Ehrlichia, Leptospira, Mycobacterium, Mycoplasma, Salmonella, Staphylococcus, Streptococcus and Treponema. While there are no previous metagenomics studies of this environment, the potential influences of natural, anthropogenic and ecological factors on the diversity of putative pathogenic bacteria found in it are reviewed. The taxonomic annotation herein reported provides a starting point for an improved understanding of bacterial biodiversity in the Southwestern Gulf of Mexico. It also represents a useful tool in public health as it may help identify infectious diseases associated with exposure to marine water and ingestion of fish or shellfish, and thus may be useful in predicting and preventing waterborne disease outbreaks. © FEMS 2017. All rights reserved. For permissions, please e-mail: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  7. Utilization of mucus from the coral Acropora palmata by the pathogen Serratia marcescens and by environmental and coral commensal bacteria.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Krediet, Cory J; Ritchie, Kim B; Cohen, Matthew; Lipp, Erin K; Sutherland, Kathryn Patterson; Teplitski, Max

    2009-06-01

    In recent years, diseases of corals caused by opportunistic pathogens have become widespread. How opportunistic pathogens establish on coral surfaces, interact with native microbiota, and cause disease is not yet clear. This study compared the utilization of coral mucus by coral-associated commensal bacteria ("Photobacterium mandapamensis" and Halomonas meridiana) and by opportunistic Serratia marcescens pathogens. S. marcescens PDL100 (a pathogen associated with white pox disease of Acroporid corals) grew to higher population densities on components of mucus from the host coral. In an in vitro coculture on mucus from Acropora palmata, S. marcescens PDL100 isolates outgrew coral isolates. The white pox pathogen did not differ from other bacteria in growth on mucus from a nonhost coral, Montastraea faveolata. The ability of S. marcescens to cause disease in acroporid corals may be due, at least in part, to the ability of strain PDL100 to build to higher population numbers within the mucus surface layer of its acroporid host. During growth on mucus from A. palmata, similar glycosidase activities were present in coral commensal bacteria, in S. marcescens PDL100, and in environmental and human isolates of S. marcescens. The temporal regulation of these activities during growth on mucus, however, was distinct in the isolates. During early stages of growth on mucus, enzymatic activities in S. marcescens PDL100 were most similar to those in coral commensals. After overnight incubation on mucus, enzymatic activities in a white pox pathogen were most similar to those in pathogenic Serratia strains isolated from human mucosal surfaces.

  8. Metagenomic insights into ultraviolet disinfection effects on antibiotic resistome in biologically treated wastewater.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hu, Qing; Zhang, Xu-Xiang; Jia, Shuyu; Huang, Kailong; Tang, Junying; Shi, Peng; Ye, Lin; Ren, Hongqiang

    2016-09-15

    High-throughput sequencing-based metagenomic approaches were used to comprehensively investigate ultraviolet effects on the microbial community structure, and diversity and abundance of antibiotic resistance genes (ARGs) and mobile genetic elements (MGEs) in biologically treated wastewater. After ultraviolet radiation, some dominant genera, like Aeromonas and Halomonas, in the wastewater almost disappeared, while the relative abundance of some minor genera including Pseudomonas and Bacillus increased dozens of times. Metagenomic analysis showed that 159 ARGs within 14 types were detectable in the samples, and the radiation at 500 mJ/cm(2) obviously increased their total relative abundance from 31.68 ppm to 190.78 ppm, which was supported by quantitative real time PCR. As the dominant persistent ARGs, multidrug resistance genes carried by Pseudomonas and bacitracin resistance gene bacA carried by Bacillus mainly contributed to the ARGs abundance increase. Bacterial community shift and MGEs replication induced by the radiation might drive the resistome alteration. The findings may shed new light on the mechanism behind the ultraviolet radiation effects on antibiotic resistance in wastewater. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  9. Bioremediation of oil-based drill cuttings by a halophilic consortium isolated from oil-contaminated saline soil.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rezaei Somee, Maryam; Shavandi, Mahmoud; Dastgheib, Seyed Mohammad Mehdi; Amoozegar, Mohammad Ali

    2018-05-01

    Oil-based drill cuttings are hazardous wastes containing complex hydrocarbons, heavy metals, and brine. Their remediation is a crucial step before release to the environment. In this work, we enriched a halophilic consortium, from oil-polluted saline soil, which is capable of degrading diesel as the main pollutant of oil-based drill cuttings. The degradation ability of the consortium was evaluated in microcosms using two different diluting agents (fine sand and biologically active soil). During the bioremediation process, the bacterial community dynamics of the microcosms was surveyed using PCR amplification of a fragment of 16S rRNA gene followed by denaturing gradient gel electrophoresis (DGGE). The diesel degradation rates were monitored by total petroleum hydrocarbon (TPH) measurement and the total count of heterotrophic and diesel-degrading bacteria. After 3 months, the microcosm containing fine sand and drill cuttings with the ratio of 1:1 (initial TPH of 36,000 mg/kg) showed the highest TPH removal (40%) and its dominant bacterial isolates belonged to the genera Dietzia, Arthrobacter , and Halomonas . DGGE results also confirmed the role of these genera in drill cuttings remediation. DGGE analysis of the bacterial diversity showed that Propionibacterium, Salinimicrobium, Marinobacter , and Dietzia are dominant in active soil microcosm; whereas Bacillus, Salinibacillus , and Marinobacter are abundant in sand microcosm. Our results suggest that the bioaugmentation strategy would be more successful if the diluting agent does not contain a complex microbial community.

  10. Biotic and abiotic catalysis of nitrate reduction in alkaline environment of repository storage cell for long-lived intermediate-level radioactive wastes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bertron, A.; Jacquemet, N.; Escadeillas, G.; Erable, B.; Alquier, M.; Kassim, C.; Albasi, C.; Basseguy, R.; Strehaiano, P.; Sablayrolles, C.; Vignoles, M.; Albrecht, A.

    2013-01-01

    This study investigates the reactivity of nitrates at the bitumen-concrete interface with the aim of determining redox conditions inside a repository storage cell for long-lived intermediate-level radioactive wastes. The first part of the work aimed to identify, under abiotic conditions, the interactions between two components of the system: concrete (introduced as cement pastes in the system) and bitumen (represented by leachates composed of organic acids and nitrates). The second part of the study was conducted under biotic conditions with selected denitrifying heterotrophic bacteria (Pseudomonas stutzeri - Ps and Halomonas desiderata - Hd) and aimed to analyse the microbial reaction of nitrate reduction (kinetics, by-products, role of the organic matter) under neutral to alkaline pH conditions (i.e. imposed by a concrete environment). Results showed that strong interactions occurred between cementitious matrices and acetic and oxalic organic acids, likely reducing the bio-availability of this organic matter (oxalate in particular). Results also confirmed the stability of nitrates under these conditions. Under biotic conditions, nitrates were reduced by both Ps and Hd following an anaerobic denitrification metabolic pathway. Reduction kinetics was higher with Ps but the reaction was inhibited for pH ≥ 9. Hd was capable of denitrification at least up to pH 11. (authors)

  11. Complexity and Dynamics of the Winemaking Bacterial Communities in Berries, Musts, and Wines from Apulian Grape Cultivars through Time and Space.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marzano, Marinella; Fosso, Bruno; Manzari, Caterina; Grieco, Francesco; Intranuovo, Marianna; Cozzi, Giuseppe; Mulè, Giuseppina; Scioscia, Gaetano; Valiente, Gabriel; Tullo, Apollonia; Sbisà, Elisabetta; Pesole, Graziano; Santamaria, Monica

    2016-01-01

    Currently, there is very little information available regarding the microbiome associated with the wine production chain. Here, we used an amplicon sequencing approach based on high-throughput sequencing (HTS) to obtain a comprehensive assessment of the bacterial community associated with the production of three Apulian red wines, from grape to final product. The relationships among grape variety, the microbial community, and fermentation was investigated. Moreover, the winery microbiota was evaluated compared to the autochthonous species in vineyards that persist until the end of the winemaking process. The analysis highlighted the remarkable dynamics within the microbial communities during fermentation. A common microbial core shared among the examined wine varieties was observed, and the unique taxonomic signature of each wine appellation was revealed. New species belonging to the genus Halomonas were also reported. This study demonstrates the potential of this metagenomic approach, supported by optimized protocols, for identifying the biodiversity of the wine supply chain. The developed experimental pipeline offers new prospects for other research fields in which a comprehensive view of microbial community complexity and dynamics is desirable.

  12. Modelling of microbial polyhydroxyalkanoate surface binding protein PhaP for rational mutagenesis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhao, Hongyu; Yao, Zhenyu; Chen, Xiangbin; Wang, Xinquan; Chen, Guo-Qiang

    2017-11-01

    Phasins are unusual amphiphilic proteins that bind to microbial polyhydroxyalkanoate (PHA) granules in nature and show great potential for various applications in biotechnology and medicine. Despite their remarkable diversity, only the crystal structure of PhaP A h from Aeromonas hydrophila has been solved to date. Based on the structure of PhaP A h , homology models of PhaP A z from Azotobacter sp. FA-8 and PhaP TD from Halomonas bluephagenesis TD were successfully established, allowing rational mutagenesis to be conducted to enhance the stability and surfactant properties of these proteins. PhaP A z mutants, including PhaP A z Q38L and PhaP A z Q78L, as well as PhaP TD mutants, including PhaP TD Q38M and PhaP TD Q72M, showed better emulsification properties and improved thermostability (6-10°C higher melting temperatures) compared with their wild-type homologues under the same conditions. Importantly, the established PhaP homology-modelling approach, based on the high-resolution structure of PhaP A h , can be generalized to facilitate the study of other PhaP members. © 2017 The Authors. Microbial Biotechnology published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd and Society for Applied Microbiology.

  13. Importance of passive diffusion in the uptake of polychlorinated biphenyls by phagotrophic protozoa

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kujawinski, E.B.; Farrington, J.W.; Moffett, J.W.

    2000-05-01

    Unicellular protozoan grazers represent a size class of organisms where a transition in the mechanism of chlorobiphenyl (CB) introduction, from diffusion through surface membranes to ingestion of contaminated prey, could occur. This study compares the relative importance of these two processes in the overall uptake of polychlorinated biphenyls by protists. Uptake rates and steady-state concentrations were compared in laboratory cultures of grazing and nongrazing protozoa. These experiments were conducted with a 10-{micro}m marine scuticociliate (Uronema sp.), bacterial prey (Halomonas halodurans), and a suite of 21 CB congeners spanning a range of aqueous solubilities. The dominant pathway of CB uptake by both grazing and nongrazing protozoa was diffusion. Organic-carbon-normalized CB concentrations (in the protozoan cell) were equivalent in grazing and nongrazing protozoa for all congeners studied. Rate constants for uptake into and loss from the protozoan cell were independently determined by using [3,3{prime}, 4,4{prime}-{sup 14}C]tetrachlorobiphenyl (IUPAC no. 77), 0.38 {+-} 0.03 min{sup {minus}1} and (1.1 {+-} 0.1) x 10{sup {minus}5} (g of organic carbon){minus}{sup {minus}1} min{sup {minus}1}, respectively. Magnitudes of the uptake and loss processes were calculated and compared by using a numerical model. The model result was consistent with data from the bioaccumulation experiment and supported the hypothesis that diffusive uptake is faster than ingestive uptake in phagotrophic unicellular protozoa.

  14. A Rapid and Efficient Screening Method for Antibacterial Compound-Producing Bacteria.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hettiarachchi, Sachithra; Lee, Su-Jin; Lee, Youngdeuk; Kwon, Young-Kyung; De Zoysa, Mahanama; Moon, Song; Jo, Eunyoung; Kim, Taeho; Kang, Do-Hyung; Heo, Soo-Jin; Oh, Chulhong

    2017-08-28

    Antibacterial compounds are widely used in the treatment of human and animal diseases. The overuse of antibiotics has led to a rapid rise in the prevalence of drug-resistant bacteria, making the development of new antibacterial compounds essential. This study focused on developing a fast and easy method for identifying marine bacteria that produce antibiotic compounds. Eight randomly selected marine target bacterial species ( Agrococcus terreus, Bacillus algicola, Mesoflavibacter zeaxanthinifaciens, Pseudoalteromonas flavipulchra, P. peptidolytica, P. piscicida, P. rubra , and Zunongwangia atlantica ) were tested for production of antibacterial compounds against four strains of test bacteria ( B. cereus, B. subtilis, Halomonas smyrnensis , and Vibrio alginolyticus ). Colony picking was used as the primary screening method. Clear zones were observed around colonies of P. flavipulchra, P. peptidolytica, P. piscicida , and P. rubra tested against B. cereus, B. subtilis , and H. smyrnensis . The efficiency of colony scraping and broth culture methods for antimicrobial compound extraction was also compared using a disk diffusion assay. P. peptidolytica, P. piscicida , and P. rubra showed antagonistic activity against H. smyrnensis, B. cereus , and B. subtilis , respectively, only in the colony scraping method. Our results show that colony picking and colony scraping are effective, quick, and easy methods of screening for antibacterial compound-producing bacteria.

  15. Hexavalent chromium reduction by bacterial consortia and pure strains from an alkaline industrial effluent.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Piñón-Castillo, H A; Brito, E M S; Goñi-Urriza, M; Guyoneaud, R; Duran, R; Nevarez-Moorillon, G V; Gutiérrez-Corona, J F; Caretta, C A; Reyna-López, G E

    2010-12-01

    To characterize the bacterial consortia and isolates selected for their role in hexavalent chromium removal by adsorption and reduction. Bacterial consortia from industrial wastes revealed significant Cr(VI) removal after 15 days when incubated in medium M9 at pH 6·5 and 8·0. The results suggested chromium reduction. The bacterial consortia diversity (T-RFLP based on 16S rRNA gene) indicated a highest number of operational taxonomic units in an alkaline carbonate medium mimicking in situ conditions. However, incubations under such conditions revealed low Cr(VI) removal. Genomic libraries were obtained for the consortia exhibiting optimal Cr(VI) removal (M9 medium at pH 6·5 and 8·0). They revealed the dominance of 16S rRNA gene sequences related to the genera Pseudomonas/Stenotrophomonas or Enterobacter/Halomonas, respectively. Isolates related to Pseudomonas fluorescens and Enterobacter aerogenes were efficient in Cr(VI) reduction and adsorption to the biomass. Cr(VI) reduction was better at neutral pH rather than under in situ conditions (alkaline pH with carbonate). Isolated strains exhibited significant capacity for Cr(VI) reduction and adsorption. Bacterial communities from chromium-contaminated industrial wastes as well as isolates were able to remove Cr(VI). The results suggest a good potential for bioremediation of industrial wastes when optimal conditions are applied. Journal of Applied Microbiology © 2010 The Society for Applied Microbiology. No claim to Mexican Government works.

  16. Caracterización de bacterias halófilas productoras de amilasas aisladas de las Salinas de San Blas en Junín

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pamela Elizabeth Canales Mormontoy

    2014-07-01

    Full Text Available Título en español: Caracterización de bacterias halófilas productoras de amilasas aisladas de las Salinas de San Blas en Junín Título en ingles: Characterization of halophilic bacteria producing amylase isolated from San Blas Salterns in Junin Título corto: Bacterias halófilas amilolíticas de las Salinas de San Blas Resumen:  El objetivo de este estudio fue caracterizar bacterias halófilas con actividad amilolítica provenientes de las Salinas de San Blas-Junín, ubicadas en los Andes peruanos aproximadamente a 4100 m de altitud. Este estudio se realizó con 34 bacterias aisladas de muestras de suelos las cuales se cultivaron en agar agua de sales (SW 5 % conteniendo extracto de levadura 0,5 % y almidón 1 %. El 41 % de bacterias mostró la capacidad de hidrolizar almidón, éstas fueron caracterizadas mediante pruebas fisiológicas y bioquímicas convencionales. Tres bacterias fueron Gram-negativas y once Gram-positivas. El 21 % (3/14 creció en un amplio rango de concentración de sales, entre 5 y 20 %. El 14 % (2/14 de las bacterias presentó actividad lipolítica, proteolítica y nucleolítica, y el 29 % (4/14, presentó actividad proteolítica y nucleolítica. Las bacterias se identificaron mediante los perfiles de restricción de los genes ribosómicos 16S amplificados, las enzimas usadas fueron Hae III, BstU I, Hinf I y Cfo I. Los genes ribosómicos 16S de siete bacterias que presentaron perfiles de ADN diferentes se amplificaron, secuenciaron y analizaron mediante programas bioinformáticos. Del análisis fenotípico y molecular de las 14 bacterias amilolíticas se obtuvieron dos grupos, uno perteneciente al género Halomonas (3 y el otro, al género Bacillus (11. Las bacterias amilolíticas caracterizadas podrían ser de potencial uso a nivel industrial.  Palabras clave: Salinas de San Blas, amilasas, genes ribosómicos 16S, ARDRA, Bacillus, Halomonas. Abstract: The aim of this study was to characterize halophilic

  17. Complete genome of Cobetia marina JCM 21022T and phylogenomic analysis of the family Halomonadaceae

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tang, Xianghai; Xu, Kuipeng; Han, Xiaojuan; Mo, Zhaolan; Mao, Yunxiang

    2018-03-01

    Cobetia marina is a model proteobacteria in researches on marine biofouling. Its taxonomic nomenclature has been revised many times over the past few decades. To better understand the role of the surface-associated lifestyle of C. marina and the phylogeny of the family Halomonadaceae, we sequenced the entire genome of C. marina JCM 21022T using single molecule real-time sequencing technology (SMRT) and performed comparative genomics and phylogenomics analyses. The circular chromosome was 4 176 300 bp with an average GC content of 62.44% and contained 3 611 predicted coding sequences, 72 tRNA genes, and 21 rRNA genes. The C. marina JCM 21022T genome contained a set of crucial genes involved in surface colonization processes. The comparative genome analysis indicated the significant differences between C. marina JCM 21022T and Cobetia amphilecti KMM 296 (formerly named C. marina KMM 296) resulted from sequence insertions or deletions and chromosomal recombination. Despite these differences, pan and core genome analysis showed similar gene functions between the two strains. The phylogenomic study of the family Halomonadaceae is reported here for the first time. We found that the relationships were well resolved among every genera tested, including Chromohalobacter, Halomonas, Cobetia, Kushneria, Zymobacter, and Halotalea.

  18. Distinct Osmoadaptation Strategies in the Strict Halophilic and Halotolerant Bacteria Isolated from Lunsu Salt Water Body of North West Himalayas.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vaidya, Shivani; Dev, Kamal; Sourirajan, Anuradha

    2018-07-01

    Two strict halophilic bacterial strains, Halobacillus trueperi SS1, and Halobacillus trueperi SS3, and three halotolerant bacterial strains, Shewanella algae SS2, Halomonas venusta SS5, and Marinomonas sp. SS8 of Lunsu salt water body, Himachal Pradesh, India, were selected to study the mechanism of salt tolerance and the role of osmolytes therein. A combination of flame photometry, chromatographic and colorimetric assays was used to study the mechanism of salt tolerance in the selected strict halophilic and halotolerant bacterial strains. The strict halophiles and, one of the halotolerants, Marinomonas sp. SS8 were found to utilize both "salt-in strategy" and "accumulation of compatible solutes strategy" for osmoregulation in hypersaline conditions. On the contrary, the remaining two halotolerants used "accumulation of compatible solutes strategy" under saline stress and not the "salt-in strategy". The present study suggests towards distinct mechanisms of salt tolerance in the two classes, wherein strict halophiles accumulate compatible solutes as well as adopt salt-in strategy, while the halotolerant bacteria accumulate a range of compatible solutes, except Marinomonas sp. SS8, which utilizes both the strategies to combat salt stress.

  19. Culturable diversity of halophilic bacteria in foreshore soils

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    Aarzoo Irshad

    2014-06-01

    Full Text Available Halophilic bacteria are commonly found in natural environments containing significant concentration of NaCl such as inland salt lakes and evaporated sea-shore pools, as well as environments such as curing brines, salted food products and saline soils. Dependence on salt is an important phenotypic characteristic of halophilic bacteria, which can be used in the polyphasic characterization of newly discovered microorganisms. In this study the diversity of halophilic bacteria in foreshore soils of Daecheon, Chungnam, and Saemangeum, Jeonbuk, was investigated. Two types of media, namely NA and R2A supplemented with 3%, 5%, 9%, 15%, 20% and 30% NaCl were used. More than 200 halophilic bacteria were isolated and BOX-PCR fingerprinting analysis was done for the typing of the isolates. The BLAST identification results showed that isolated strains were composed of 4 phyla, Firmicutes (60%, Proteobacteria (31%, Bacteriodetes (5% and Actinobacteria (4%. Isolates were affiliated with 16 genera and 36 species. Bacillus was the dominant genus in the phylum Firmicutes, comprising 24% of the total isolates. Halomonas (12% and Shewanella (12% were also found as the main genera. These findings show that the foreshore soil of Daecheon Beach and Saemangeum Sea of Korea represents an untapped source of bacterial biodiversity.

  20. Search for the algorithm of genes distribution during the process of microbial evolution

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pikuta, Elena V.

    2015-09-01

    Previous two and three dimensional graph analysis of eco-physiological data of Archaea demonstrated specific geometry for distribution of major Prokaryotic groups in a hyperboloid function. The function of a two-sheet hyperboloid covered all known biological groups, and therefore, could be applied for the entire evolution of life on Earth. The vector of evolution was indicated from the point of hyper temperature, extreme acidity and low salinity to the point of low temperature and increased alkalinity and salinity. According to this vector, the following groups were chosen for the gene screening analysis. In the vector "High-Temperature → Low-Temperature" within extreme acidic pH (0-3), it is: 1) the hyperthermophilic Crenarchaeota - order Sulfolobales, 2) moderately thermophilic Euryarchaeota - Class Thermoplasmata, and 3) mesophilic acidophiles- genus Thiobacillus and others. In the vector "Low pH → High pH" the following groups were selected in three temperature ranges: a) Hyperthermophilic Archaea and Eubacteria, b) moderately thermophilic - representatives of the genera Anaerobacter and Anoxybacillus, and c) mesophilic haloalkaliphiles (Eubacteria and Archaea). The genes associated with acidophily (H+ pump), chemolitho-autotrophy (proteins of biochemichal cycles), polymerases, and histones were proposed for the first vector, and for the second vector the genes associated with halo-alkaliphily (Na+ pumps), enzymes of organotrophic metabolisms (sugar- and proteolytics), and others were indicated for the screening. Here, an introduction to the phylogenetic constant (ρη) is presented and discussed. This universal characteristic is calculated for two principally different life forms -Prokaryotes and Eukaryotes; Existence of the second type of living forms is impossible without the first one. The number of chromosomes in Prokaryotic organisms is limited to one (with very rare exceptions, to two), while in Eukaryotic organisms this number is larger. Currently

  1. IDENTIFICACIÓN MOLECULAR DE POBLACIONES BACTERIANAS ASOCIADAS AL CARACOL PALA (Strombus gigas DEL CARIBE COLOMBIANO

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    EDINSON ACOSTA

    2009-05-01

    Full Text Available RESUMEN El caracol Pala, Strombus gigas (Strombidae, es de gran importancia ecológica y socioeconómica en el área caribeña colombiana. Sin embargo, es una especie catalogada como “vulnerable” y existe muy poca información referente a las especies bacterianas asociadas al caracol que puedan ser importantes para el desarrollo, manejo productivo y de seguridad acuícola de estos gastrópodos. En este trabajo, nosotros empleamos un estudio microbiológico y molecular de la región intergénica entre los genes 16S y 23S rDNA, análisis del gen rDNA 16S y secuenciación, para analizar las bacterias asociadas al caracol Pala (S. gigas. La composición de bacterias cultivables asociadas fue evaluada por su capacidad para crecer en agar marino y en medios de cultivos selectivos. De un total de 28 muestras analizadas encontramos que el número de bacterias cultivadas en condiciones aerobias fue de alrededor 106 ufc mL-1 donde las bacterias pertenecientes a la familia Vibrionacea fueron las más abundantes, cerca de >105 ufc mL-1 . El análisis molecular de la región intergénica entre los genes 16S y 23S rDNA de las diferentes muestras, reveló una gran complejidad bacteriana asociada a S. gigas. Las secuencias de los amplificados del gen rDNA 16S identificó Pseudoalteromonas sp., Halomonas sp., Psycrobacter sp., Cobetia sp., Pseudomonas sp. y Vibrios sp. Nuestros resultados podrían sugerir un rol importante de estas bacterias como componentes de la comunidad asociada al S. gigas. Esta información puede complementar los estudios que se están implementando en los procesos para la conservación y repoblamiento de las poblaciones de S. gigas en Colombia. Palabras clave: Strombus gigas, Caracol pala, Bacteria, Región intergénica 16S-23S, rDNA 16S. ABSTRACT The Queen Conch, Strombus gigas (Strombidae, is a species of great ecological and socioeconomic importance in the Caribbean area of Colombia. However, it is currently catalogued as

  2. Effect of Mg/Ca ratios on microbially induced carbonate precipitation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Balci, Nurgul; Demirel, Cansu; Seref Sonmez, M.; Kurt, M. Ali

    2016-04-01

    Influence of Mg/Ca ratios on microbially induced carbonate mineralogy were investigated by series of experiments carried out under various environmental conditions (Mg/Ca ratio, temperature and salinity). Halophilic bacterial cultures used for biomineralization experiments were isolated from hypersaline Lake Acıgöl (Denizli, SW Turkey), displaying extreme water chemistry with an average pH around 8.6 (Balci eta l.,2015). Enriched bacterial culture used in the experiments consisted of Halomonas saccharevitans strain AJ275, Halomonas alimentaria strain L7B; Idiomarina sp. TBZ29, 98% Idiomarina seosensis strain CL-SP19. Biomineralization experiments were set up using above enriched culture with Mg/Ca ratios of 0.05, 1, 4 and 15 and salinity of 8% and 15% experiments at 30oC and 10oC. Additionally, long-term biomineralization experiments were set up to last for a year, for Mg/Ca=4 and Mg/Ca=15 experiments at 30oC. For each experimental condition abiotic experiments were also conducted. Solution chemistry throughout incubation was monitored for Na, K, Mg, Ca, bicarbonate, carbonate, ammonium and phosphate for a month. At the end of the experiments, precipitates were collected and morphology and mineralogy of the biominerals were investigated and results were evaluated using the software DIFFRAC.SUITE EVA. Overall the preliminary results showed chemical precipitation of calcite, halite, hydromagnesite and sylvite. Results obtained from biological experiments indicate that, low Mg/Ca ratios (0.05 and 1) favor chlorapatite precipitation, whereas higher Mg/Ca ratios favor struvite precipitation. Biomineralization of dolomite, huntite and magnesite is favorable at high Mg/Ca ratios (4 and 15), in the presence of halophilic bacteria. Moreover, results indicate that supersaturation with respect to Mg (Mg/Ca=15) combined with NaCl (15%) inhibits biomineralization and forms chemical precipitates. 15% salinity is shown to favor chemical precipitation of mineral phases more than

  3. Characterization of the microbial community composition and the distribution of Fe-metabolizing bacteria in a creek contaminated by acid mine drainage.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sun, Weimin; Xiao, Enzong; Krumins, Valdis; Dong, Yiran; Xiao, Tangfu; Ning, Zengping; Chen, Haiyan; Xiao, Qingxiang

    2016-10-01

    A small watershed heavily contaminated by long-term acid mine drainage (AMD) from an upstream abandoned coal mine was selected to study the microbial community developed in such extreme system. The watershed consists of AMD-contaminated creek, adjacent contaminated soils, and a small cascade aeration unit constructed downstream, which provide an excellent contaminated site to study the microbial response in diverse extreme AMD-polluted environments. The results showed that the innate microbial communities were dominated by acidophilic bacteria, especially acidophilic Fe-metabolizing bacteria, suggesting that Fe and pH are the primary environmental factors in governing the indigenous microbial communities. The distribution of Fe-metabolizing bacteria showed distinct site-specific patterns. A pronounced shift from diverse communities in the upstream to Proteobacteria-dominated communities in the downstream was observed in the ecosystem. This location-specific trend was more apparent at genus level. In the upstream samples (sampling sites just below the coal mining adit), a number of Fe(II)-oxidizing bacteria such as Alicyclobacillus spp., Metallibacterium spp., and Acidithrix spp. were dominant, while Halomonas spp. were the major Fe(II)-oxidizing bacteria observed in downstream samples. Additionally, Acidiphilium, an Fe(III)-reducing bacterium, was enriched in the upstream samples, while Shewanella spp. were the dominant Fe(III)-reducing bacteria in downstream samples. Further investigation using linear discriminant analysis (LDA) effect size (LEfSe), principal coordinate analysis (PCoA), and unweighted pair group method with arithmetic mean (UPGMA) clustering confirmed the difference of microbial communities between upstream and downstream samples. Canonical correspondence analysis (CCA) and Spearman's rank correlation indicate that total organic carbon (TOC) content is the primary environmental parameter in structuring the indigenous microbial communities

  4. The Genome-Based Metabolic Systems Engineering to Boost Levan Production in a Halophilic Bacterial Model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aydin, Busra; Ozer, Tugba; Oner, Ebru Toksoy; Arga, Kazim Yalcin

    2018-03-01

    Metabolic systems engineering is being used to redirect microbial metabolism for the overproduction of chemicals of interest with the aim of transforming microbial hosts into cellular factories. In this study, a genome-based metabolic systems engineering approach was designed and performed to improve biopolymer biosynthesis capability of a moderately halophilic bacterium Halomonas smyrnensis AAD6 T producing levan, which is a fructose homopolymer with many potential uses in various industries and medicine. For this purpose, the genome-scale metabolic model for AAD6 T was used to characterize the metabolic resource allocation, specifically to design metabolic engineering strategies for engineered bacteria with enhanced levan production capability. Simulations were performed in silico to determine optimal gene knockout strategies to develop new strains with enhanced levan production capability. The majority of the gene knockout strategies emphasized the vital role of the fructose uptake mechanism, and pointed out the fructose-specific phosphotransferase system (PTS fru ) as the most promising target for further metabolic engineering studies. Therefore, the PTS fru of AAD6 T was restructured with insertional mutagenesis and triparental mating techniques to construct a novel, engineered H. smyrnensis strain, BMA14. Fermentation experiments were carried out to demonstrate the high efficiency of the mutant strain BMA14 in terms of final levan concentration, sucrose consumption rate, and sucrose conversion efficiency, when compared to the AAD6 T . The genome-based metabolic systems engineering approach presented in this study might be considered an efficient framework to redirect microbial metabolism for the overproduction of chemicals of interest, and the novel strain BMA14 might be considered a potential microbial cell factory for further studies aimed to design levan production processes with lower production costs.

  5. The Development of Microbiota and Metabolome in Small Intestine of Sika Deer (Cervus nippon from Birth to Weaning

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    Zhipeng Li

    2018-01-01

    Full Text Available The dense and diverse community of microorganisms inhabiting the gastrointestinal tract of ruminant animals plays critical roles in the metabolism and absorption of nutrients, and gut associated immune function. Understanding microbial colonization in the small intestine of new born ruminants is a vital first step toward manipulating gut function through interventions during early life to produce long-term positive effects on host productivity and health. Yet the knowledge of microbiota colonization and its induced metabolites of small intestine during early life is still limited. In the present study, we examined the microbiota and metabolome in the jejunum and ileum of neonatal sika deer (Cervus nippon from birth to weaning at days 1, 42, and 70. The microbial data showed that diversity and richness were increased with age, but a highly individual variation was observed at day 1. Principal coordinate analysis revealed significant differences in microbial community composition across three time points in the jejunum and ileum. The abundance of Halomonas spp., Lactobacillus spp., Escherichia–Shigella, and Bacteroides spp. tended to be decreased, while the proportion of Intestinibacter spp., Cellulosilyticum spp., Turicibacter spp., Clostridium sensu stricto 1 and Romboutsia spp. was significantly increased with age. For metabolome, metabolites separated from each other across the three time points in both jejunum and ileum. Moreover, the amounts of methionine, threonine, and putrescine were increased, while the amounts of myristic acid and pentadecanoic acid were decreased with age, respectively. The present study demonstrated that microbiota colonization and the metabolome becomes more developed in the small intestine with age. This may shed new light on the microbiota-metabolome-immune interaction during development.

  6. Yield emulsifiers exopolysaccharides produced by native halophilic bacteria concentrations molasses three Saccharum officinarum L. "sugarcane"

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    Ángel Fuentes, Carmen Carreño

    2013-06-01

    Full Text Available The microbial exopolysaccharide with emulsifying properties are an alternative to polymers and chemicals from algae and plants. Its production in molasses as carbon source lowers costs and generates added value to this byproduct of the sugar industry, so the aim of this study was to determine the performance and productivity of EPS emulsifiers by native halophilic bacteria in 20, 30 and 40 gL-1 of molasses. In MY synthetic medium with 5 % w/v of salts, 138 isolates of bacteria obtained from soil samples of salt water and in the districts of San Jose and Santa Rosa, in Lambayeque. In 10.8 % of these gummy colony forming bacteria and grown on glucose as carbon source EPS recovered whose maximum values of the mixtures in water emulsion - oil phase were 63.3 and 56.6 % after 1 and 24 hours, respectively. The M5 bacteria identified as Halomonas C1 10-1 sp. M5 EPS synthesized emulsifiers molasses broth, reaching yields Yp/s of 0.296 gg-1 and 0.200 gg-1 with 20 and 30 gL-1 of molasses respectively, a productivity of 0.016 and 0.017 gL-1 h -1 , not differing significantly between them. With 10 gL-1 glucose was reached Yp/s of 0.171 gg-1 and a productivity of 0.018 gL-1 h -1 . It was shown that the EPS produced native halophilic bacteria utilizing molasses emulsifiers as carbon source.

  7. Producción de polihidroxialcanoatos por bacterias halófilas nativas utilizando almidón de cáscaras de Solanum tuberosum L.

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    César Guzmán

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available The aim of this study was to determine the concentration of starch Solanum tuberosum L. “potato” peels for the production of polyhydroxyalkanoates, PHA, from native halophilic bacteria as an alternative to reduce production costs of these biopolymers, possible replacements for petrochemical plastics. The bacteria were isolated of water samples of eight saline Lamba yeque region and were enriched in HM 1 broth at 30 °C with 5, 10, 15, 20, 25 and 30 g 100 mL - 1 NaCl. Dilutions were performed subsequently, aliquots were taken and plated on HM 1 agar, 203 isolates of halophilic bacteria were obtained, they were grown in HM 2 broth with 10 g.L - 1 glucose as carbon source and the 38.92% of the isolates showed PHA granules stained by Sudan Black B. Twenty bacteria with PHA granules in 65 – 75% over carried to fermentation, reaching between 0.174 to 0.889 g . g - 1 of yield Y (p / x. Three isolates were selected with the highest values among which Halomonas sp M4C1 grew and synthesized PHA in HM 2 broth with 5, 10, 15 and 20 g . L - 1 of starch as carbon source, reaching 0.019; 0.016; 0.007 y 0.006 g . L - 1 of PHA, with 0.177; 0.111; 0.056 an d 0.066 g . L - 1 of biomass after 20, 40, 24 and 16 hours respectively. The highest yield of 0.144 g . g - 1 corresponded to 10 g . L - 1 of starch demonstrating that this concentration is feasible PHA production by native halophilic bacteria.

  8. Bacterial diversity determination using culture-dependent and culture-independent methods

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    M. Ghiasian

    2017-04-01

    Full Text Available Mud volcanoes are taken into consideration by geologists and oil industry experts have given their association with oil and gas reserves and methane greenhouse gas production in hydrosphere and atmosphere. Gomishan mud volcano phenomenon in the southeastern edge of the Caspian Sea, given its oil and gas resources, has been studied by some geologists in terms of geology and tectonics but not in terms of microbiology. Accordingly, it seems necessary to study this phenomenon from the perspective of microbiology in order to identify prokaryotes living in this area. Prokaryotes diversity in Mud volcano has been studied by cultivation techniques, fluorescence in situ hybridization, and denaturing gradient gel electrophoresis of PCR-amplified fragments of 16S rRNA genes. Total cell abundance in the mud volcano from 1×101-6×101per milliliter was determined by 4', 6-diamidino-2-phenylindole direct count. The detectable proportion of Archaea to Bacteria in the community by FISH was one to five. High viable counts (1 – 3 × 106 were obtained in culture media. A total of 122 isolates were obtained, 46 colonies were selected based on primarily morphological and physiological traits, and their 16S rRNA sequences were determined. The isolated genera included Halomonas (20%, Arthrobacter (5%, Kocuria (5%, Thalassobacillus (5%, Marinobacter (20%, Paracoccus (5%, Roseovarius (5%, Jeotgalicoccus (5%, Bacillus (15%, and Staphylococcus (15%. Regarding DGGE analysis, selected bands were obtained from the gels, reamplified and sequenced. Overall, 75% of the bacterial sequences were related to Rahnella and 25% related to Serratia.

  9. Dissimilatory nitrogen reduction in intertidal sediments of a temperate estuary: small scale heterogeneity and novel nitrate-to-ammonium reducers.

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    Helen eDecleyre

    2015-10-01

    Full Text Available The estuarine nitrogen cycle can be substantially altered due to anthropogenic activities resulting in increased amounts of inorganic nitrogen (mainly nitrate. In the past, denitrification was considered to be the main ecosystem process removing reactive nitrogen from the estuarine ecosystem. However, recent reports on the contribution of dissimilatory nitrate reduction to ammonium (DNRA to nitrogen removal in these systems indicated a similar or higher importance, although the ratio between both processes remains ambiguous. Compared to denitrification, DNRA has been underexplored for the last decades and the key organisms carrying out the process in marine environments are largely unknown. Hence, as a first step to better understand the interplay between denitrification, DNRA and reduction of nitrate to nitrite in estuarine sediments, nitrogen reduction potentials were determined in sediments of the Paulina polder mudflat (Westerschelde estuary. We observed high variability in dominant nitrogen removing processes over a short distance (1.6 m, with nitrous oxide, ammonium and nitrite production rates differing significantly between all sampling sites. Denitrification occurred at all sites, DNRA was either the dominant process (two out of five sites or absent, while nitrate reduction to nitrite was observed in most sites but never dominant. In addition, novel nitrate-to-ammonium reducers assigned to Thalassospira, Celeribacter and Halomonas, for which DNRA was thus far unreported, were isolated, with DNRA phenotype reconfirmed through nrfA gene amplification. This study demonstrates high small scale heterogeneity among dissimilatory nitrate reduction processes in estuarine sediments and provides novel marine DNRA organisms that represent valuable alternatives to the current model organisms.

  10. Dissimilatory nitrogen reduction in intertidal sediments of a temperate estuary: small scale heterogeneity and novel nitrate-to-ammonium reducers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Decleyre, Helen; Heylen, Kim; Van Colen, Carl; Willems, Anne

    2015-01-01

    The estuarine nitrogen cycle can be substantially altered due to anthropogenic activities resulting in increased amounts of inorganic nitrogen (mainly nitrate). In the past, denitrification was considered to be the main ecosystem process removing reactive nitrogen from the estuarine ecosystem. However, recent reports on the contribution of dissimilatory nitrate reduction to ammonium (DNRA) to nitrogen removal in these systems indicated a similar or higher importance, although the ratio between both processes remains ambiguous. Compared to denitrification, DNRA has been underexplored for the last decades and the key organisms carrying out the process in marine environments are largely unknown. Hence, as a first step to better understand the interplay between denitrification, DNRA and reduction of nitrate to nitrite in estuarine sediments, nitrogen reduction potentials were determined in sediments of the Paulina polder mudflat (Westerschelde estuary). We observed high variability in dominant nitrogen removing processes over a short distance (1.6 m), with nitrous oxide, ammonium and nitrite production rates differing significantly between all sampling sites. Denitrification occurred at all sites, DNRA was either the dominant process (two out of five sites) or absent, while nitrate reduction to nitrite was observed in most sites but never dominant. In addition, novel nitrate-to-ammonium reducers assigned to Thalassospira, Celeribacter, and Halomonas, for which DNRA was thus far unreported, were isolated, with DNRA phenotype reconfirmed through nrfA gene amplification. This study demonstrates high small scale heterogeneity among dissimilatory nitrate reduction processes in estuarine sediments and provides novel marine DNRA organisms that represent valuable alternatives to the current model organisms.

  11. New test method for the evaluation of the preservation efficacy of soaps at very alkaline pH made by saponification.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Témoin-Fardini, S; Servant, J; Sellam, S

    2017-10-01

    The aim of this study was to develop a test method to evaluate the preservation efficacy for a specific product, a very high-alkaline liquid soap (pH around 10) made by a saponification process. Several manufacturers have experienced contamination issues with these high-pH soaps despite passing a classic preservative efficacy challenge test or even a multi-inoculation challenge test. Bacteria were isolated from contaminated soaps and were identified using 16S rRNA gene sequencing. High-alkaline-pH unpreserved soaps were tested using the Thor Personal Care internal multichallenge test method (TM206) with classical microorganisms and then with the bacterial strains isolated from various contaminated soaps (TM768). Preservatives were added to these soaps and assessed for their efficacy using the newly developed test. Four different species of bacteria (Nesterenkonia lacusekhoensis, Dermacoccus sp., Halomonas sp. and Roseomonas sp.) were identified by sequencing among the contaminants of the various soaps tested. Among these, only one bacterial species, Nesterenkonia lacusekhoensis, appeared to be responsible for the specific contamination of these high-alkaline soaps. Thus, one specific wild-type strain of Nesterenkonia lacusekhoensis, named as strain 768, was used in a new multi-inoculation test (TM768). Unlike the single inoculation challenge test, the multi-inoculation test using the Nesterenkonia strain 768 was able to predict the sensitivity of a product towards this bacterium. Among the 27 different preservatives tested, 10 were able to protect the formula against contamination with this bacterium. This study enabled the development of a test method to evaluate the efficacy of preservation using a specific bacterium, Nesterenkonia lacusekhoensis, responsible for the contamination of very alkaline soaps made by saponification and identify an appropriate preservative system. © 2017 Society of Cosmetic Scientists and the Société Française de Cosmétologie.

  12. Hydrocarbon-degrading bacteria enriched by the Deepwater Horizon oil spill identified by cultivation and DNA-SIP

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gutierrez, Tony; Singleton, David R; Berry, David; Yang, Tingting; Aitken, Michael D; Teske, Andreas

    2013-01-01

    The massive influx of crude oil into the Gulf of Mexico during the Deepwater Horizon (DWH) disaster triggered dramatic microbial community shifts in surface oil slick and deep plume waters. Previous work had shown several taxa, notably DWH Oceanospirillales, Cycloclasticus and Colwellia, were found to be enriched in these waters based on their dominance in conventional clone and pyrosequencing libraries and were thought to have had a significant role in the degradation of the oil. However, this type of community analysis data failed to provide direct evidence on the functional properties, such as hydrocarbon degradation of organisms. Using DNA-based stable-isotope probing with uniformly 13C-labelled hydrocarbons, we identified several aliphatic (Alcanivorax, Marinobacter)- and polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbon (Alteromonas, Cycloclasticus, Colwellia)-degrading bacteria. We also isolated several strains (Alcanivorax, Alteromonas, Cycloclasticus, Halomonas, Marinobacter and Pseudoalteromonas) with demonstrable hydrocarbon-degrading qualities from surface slick and plume water samples collected during the active phase of the spill. Some of these organisms accounted for the majority of sequence reads representing their respective taxa in a pyrosequencing data set constructed from the same and additional water column samples. Hitherto, Alcanivorax was not identified in any of the previous water column studies analysing the microbial response to the spill and we discuss its failure to respond to the oil. Collectively, our data provide unequivocal evidence on the hydrocarbon-degrading qualities for some of the dominant taxa enriched in surface and plume waters during the DWH oil spill, and a more complete understanding of their role in the fate of the oil. PMID:23788333

  13. Microbes, Minerals and Electrodes at the Sanford Underground Research Facility (SURF): Electrochemistry 4100 ft below the surface.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rowe, A. R.; Abuyen, K.; Casar, C. P.; Osburn, M. R.; Kruger, B.; El-Naggar, M.; Amend, J.

    2017-12-01

    Little is known about the importance of mineral oxidation processes in subsurface environments. This stems, in part from our limited insight into the biochemistry of many of these metabolisms, especially where redox interactions with solid surfaces is concerned. To this aim, we have been developing electrochemical cultivation techniques, to target enrichment and isolation of microbes capable of oxidative extracellular electron transfer (oxEET)—transfer of electrons from the exterior of the cell to the interior. Our previous worked focused on marine sediments; using an electrode poised at a given redox potential to isolate mineral-oxidizing microbes. Electrode oxidizing microbes isolated from these enrichments belong to the genera Thioclava, Marinobacter, Halomonas, Idiomarina, Thalassospira, and Pseudamonas; organisms commonly detected in marine and deep sea sediments but not generally associated with mineral, sulfur and/or iron oxidation. At the Sanford Underground Research Facility (SURF) in Leed, South Dakota, we have been utilizing similar electrocultivation techniques to understand: 1) the potential for mineral oxidation by subsurface microbes, 2) their selective colonization on mineral vs. electrode surfaces, as well as 3) the community composition of microbes capable of these metabolic interactions. An electrochemical and mineral enrichment scheme was designed and installed into a sulfidic groundwater flow, located at the 4100 ft level of the former gold mine. The communities enriched on electrodes (graphite and indium tin oxide coated glass) and minerals (sulfur, pyrite, and schists from the location) were compared to the long-term ground water microbial community observed. Ultimately, these observations will help inform the potential activity of a lithotrophic microbes in situ and will in turn guide our culturing efforts.

  14. The Bacterial Community Structure and Dynamics of Carbon and Nitrogen when Maize (Zea mays L.) and Its Neutral Detergent Fibre Were Added to Soil from Zimbabwe with Contrasting Management Practices.

    Science.gov (United States)

    De la Cruz-Barrón, Magali; Cruz-Mendoza, Alejandra; Navarro-Noya, Yendi E; Ruiz-Valdiviezo, Victor M; Ortíz-Gutiérrez, Daniel; Ramírez-Villanueva, Daniel A; Luna-Guido, Marco; Thierfelder, Cristian; Wall, Patrick C; Verhulst, Nele; Govaerts, Bram; Dendooven, Luc

    2017-01-01

    Water infiltration, soil carbon content, aggregate stability and yields increased in conservation agriculture practices compared to conventionally ploughed control treatments at the Henderson research station near Mazowe (Zimbabwe). How these changes in soil characteristics affect the bacterial community structure and the bacteria involved in the degradation of applied organic material remains unanswered. Soil was sampled from three agricultural systems at Henderson, i.e. (1) conventional mouldboard ploughing with continuous maize (conventional tillage), (2) direct seeding with a Fitarelli jab planter and continuous maize (direct seeding with continuous maize) and (3) direct seeding with a Fitarelli jab planter with rotation of maize sunn hemp (direct seeding with crop rotation). Soil was amended with young maize plants or their neutral detergent fibre (NDF) and incubated aerobically for 56 days, while C and N mineralization and the bacterial community structure were monitored. Bacillus (Bacillales), Micrococcaceae (Actinomycetales) and phylotypes belonging to the Pseudomonadales were first degraders of the applied maize plants. At day 3, Streptomyces (Actinomycetales), Chitinophagaceae ([Saprospirales]) and Dyella (Xanthomonadales) participated in the degradation of the applied maize and at day 7 Oxalobacteraceae (Burkholderiales). Phylotypes belonging to Halomonas (Oceanospirillales) were the first degraders of NDF and were replaced by Phenylobacterium (Caulobacterales) and phylotypes belonging to Pseudomonadales at day 3. Afterwards, similar bacterial groups were favoured by application of NDF as they were by the application of maize plants, but there were also clear differences. Phylotypes belonging to the Micrococcaceae and Bacillus did not participate in the degradation of NDF or its metabolic products, while phylotypes belonging to the Acidobacteriaceae participated in the degradation of NDF but not in that of maize plants. It was found that agricultural

  15. Comparative analysis of bacterial community-metagenomics in coastal Gulf of Mexico sediment microcosms following exposure to Macondo oil (MC252)

    KAUST Repository

    Koo, Hyunmin

    2014-09-10

    The indigenous bacterial communities in sediment microcosms from Dauphin Island (DI), Petit Bois Island (PB) and Perdido Pass (PP) of the coastal Gulf of Mexico were compared following treatment with Macondo oil (MC252) using pyrosequencing and culture-based approaches. After quality-based trimming, 28,991 partial 16S rRNA sequence reads were analyzed by rarefaction, confirming that analyses of bacterial communities were saturated with respect to species diversity. Changes in the relative abundances of Proteobacteria, Bacteroidetes and Firmicutes played an important role in structuring bacterial communities in oil-treated sediments. Proteobacteria were dominant in oil-treated samples, whereas Firmicutes and Bacteroidetes were either the second or the third most abundant taxa. Tenericutes, members of which are known for oil biodegradation, were detected shortly after treatment, and continued to increase in DI and PP sediments. Multivariate statistical analyses (ADONIS) revealed significant dissimilarity of bacterial communities between oil-treated and untreated samples and among locations. In addition, a similarity percentage analysis showed the contribution of each species to the contrast between untreated and oil-treated samples. PCR amplification using DNA from pure cultures of Exiguobacterium,  Pseudoalteromonas,  Halomonas and Dyadobacter, isolated from oil-treated microcosm sediments, produced amplicons similar to polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbon-degrading genes. In the context of the 2010 Macondo blowout, the results from our study demonstrated that the indigenous bacterial communities in coastal Gulf of Mexico sediment microcosms responded to the MC252 oil with altered community structure and species composition. The rapid proliferation of hydrocarbonoclastic bacteria suggests their involvement in the degradation of the spilt oil in the Gulf of Mexico ecosystem.

  16. Biodiversity of polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbon-degrading bacteria from deep sea sediments of the Middle Atlantic Ridge.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cui, Zhisong; Lai, Qiliang; Dong, Chunming; Shao, Zongze

    2008-08-01

    The bacteria involved in the biodegradation of polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs) in deep sea subsurface environments are largely unknown. In order to reveal their biodiversity, sediments from 2.2 m under the bottom surface at a water depth of 3542 m were sampled on the Middle Atlantic Ridge with a gravity column sampler. The sediments were promptly enriched with either crude oil or a mixture of PAHs (naphthalene, phenanthrene and pyrene) as the sole carbon source, and further enriched with the PAH mixture mentioned above in the lab. The resulting consortia were named C2CO and C2PPN respectively. Their bacterial composition was analysed with plate cultivation, PCR-DGGE and 16S rDNA library analysis. On plates, isolates belonging to Pseudoalteromonas, Halomonas, Marinobacter, Thalassospira and Tistrella dominated the culturable populations. With PCR-DGGE, five major bands closely related to Cycloclasticus, Alteromonas, Thalassospira, Alcanivorax and Rhodospirillaceae were detected in consortium C2CO, while only one major band of Cycloclasticus was detected in consortium C2PPN. In addition, the dynamics of community structure in response to aromatic substrate alterations were examined. As a result, three ribotypes of Cycloclasticus were detected by 16S rDNA library analysis, one which played a key role in phenanthrene degradation; two Alteromonas bacteria dominated the naphthalene reselected consortium. Although bacteria of the two genera grew as the main members of the communities, none of them were isolated, probably owing to their poor cultivability. These results confirm that bacteria of Cycloclasticus are important obligate PAH degraders in marine environments, and coexist with other degrading bacteria that inhabit the deep subsurface sediment of the Atlantic. This supports the view that PAH accumulation and bioattenuation occur in remote areas consistently and continuously.

  17. Influences of dissolved oxygen concentration on biocathodic microbial communities in microbial fuel cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rago, Laura; Cristiani, Pierangela; Villa, Federica; Zecchin, Sarah; Colombo, Alessandra; Cavalca, Lucia; Schievano, Andrea

    2017-08-01

    Dissolved oxygen (DO) at cathodic interface is a critical factor influencing microbial fuel cells (MFC) performance. In this work, three MFCs were operated with cathode under different DO conditions: i) air-breathing (A-MFC); ii) water-submerged (W-MFC) and iii) assisted by photosynthetic microorganisms (P-MFC). A plateau of maximum current was reached at 1.06±0.03mA, 1.48±0.06mA and 1.66±0.04mA, increasing respectively for W-MFC, P-MFC and A-MFC. Electrochemical and microbiological tools (Illumina sequencing, confocal microscopy and biofilm cryosectioning) were used to explore anodic and cathodic biofilm in each MFC type. In all cases, biocathodes improved oxygen reduction reaction (ORR) as compared to abiotic condition and A-MFC was the best performing system. Photosynthetic cultures in the cathodic chamber supplied high DO level, up to 16mg O2 L -1 , which sustained aerobic microbial community in P-MFC biocathode. Halomonas, Pseudomonas and other microaerophilic genera reached >50% of the total OTUs. The presence of sulfur reducing bacteria (Desulfuromonas) and purple non-sulfur bacteria in A-MFC biocathode suggested that the recirculation of sulfur compounds could shuttle electrons to sustain the reduction of oxygen as final electron acceptor. The low DO concentration limited the cathode in W-MFC. A model of two different possible microbial mechanisms is proposed which can drive predominantly cathodic ORR. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  18. Catabolite regulation of enzymatic activities in a white pox pathogen and commensal bacteria during growth on mucus polymers from the coral Acropora palmata.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Krediet, Cory J; Ritchie, Kim B; Teplitski, Max

    2009-11-16

    Colonization of host mucus surfaces is one of the first steps in the establishment of coral-associated microbial communities. Coral mucus contains a sulfated glycoprotein (in which oligosaccharide decorations are connected to the polypeptide backbone by a mannose residue) and molecules that result from its degradation. Mucus is utilized as a growth substrate by commensal and pathogenic organisms. Two representative coral commensals, Photobacterium mandapamensis and Halomonas meridiana, differed from a white pox pathogen Serratia marcescens PDL100 in the pattern with which they utilized mucus polymers of Acropora palmata. Incubation with the mucus polymer increased mannopyranosidase activity in S. marcescens, suggestive of its ability to cleave off oligosaccharide side chains. With the exception of glucosidase and N-acetyl galactosaminidase, glycosidases in S. marcescens were subject to catabolite regulation by galactose, glucose, arabinose, mannose and N-acetyl-glucosamine. In commensal P. mandapamensis, at least 10 glycosidases were modestly induced during incubation on coral mucus. Galactose, arabinose, mannose, but not glucose or N-acetyl-glucosamine had a repressive effect on glycosidases in P. mandapamensis. Incubation with the mucus polymers upregulated 3 enzymatic activities in H. meridiana; glucose and galactose appear to be the preferred carbon source in this bacterium. Although all these bacteria were capable of producing the same glycosidases, the differences in the preferred carbon sources and patterns of enzymatic activities induced during growth on the mucus polymer in the presence of these carbon sources suggest that to establish themselves within the coral mucus surface layer commensals and pathogens rely on different enzymatic activities.

  19. Utilization of Mucus from the Coral Acropora palmata by the Pathogen Serratia marcescens and by Environmental and Coral Commensal Bacteria▿ †

    Science.gov (United States)

    Krediet, Cory J.; Ritchie, Kim B.; Cohen, Matthew; Lipp, Erin K.; Sutherland, Kathryn Patterson; Teplitski, Max

    2009-01-01

    In recent years, diseases of corals caused by opportunistic pathogens have become widespread. How opportunistic pathogens establish on coral surfaces, interact with native microbiota, and cause disease is not yet clear. This study compared the utilization of coral mucus by coral-associated commensal bacteria (“Photobacterium mandapamensis” and Halomonas meridiana) and by opportunistic Serratia marcescens pathogens. S. marcescens PDL100 (a pathogen associated with white pox disease of Acroporid corals) grew to higher population densities on components of mucus from the host coral. In an in vitro coculture on mucus from Acropora palmata, S. marcescens PDL100 isolates outgrew coral isolates. The white pox pathogen did not differ from other bacteria in growth on mucus from a nonhost coral, Montastraea faveolata. The ability of S. marcescens to cause disease in acroporid corals may be due, at least in part, to the ability of strain PDL100 to build to higher population numbers within the mucus surface layer of its acroporid host. During growth on mucus from A. palmata, similar glycosidase activities were present in coral commensal bacteria, in S. marcescens PDL100, and in environmental and human isolates of S. marcescens. The temporal regulation of these activities during growth on mucus, however, was distinct in the isolates. During early stages of growth on mucus, enzymatic activities in S. marcescens PDL100 were most similar to those in coral commensals. After overnight incubation on mucus, enzymatic activities in a white pox pathogen were most similar to those in pathogenic Serratia strains isolated from human mucosal surfaces. PMID:19395569

  20. Metabarcoding of the kombucha microbial community grown in different microenvironments.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reva, Oleg N; Zaets, Iryna E; Ovcharenko, Leonid P; Kukharenko, Olga E; Shpylova, Switlana P; Podolich, Olga V; de Vera, Jean-Pierre; Kozyrovska, Natalia O

    2015-12-01

    Introducing of the DNA metabarcoding analysis of probiotic microbial communities allowed getting insight into their functioning and establishing a better control on safety and efficacy of the probiotic communities. In this work the kombucha poly-microbial probiotic community was analysed to study its flexibility under different growth conditions. Environmental DNA sequencing revealed a complex and flexible composition of the kombucha microbial culture (KMC) constituting more bacterial and fungal organisms in addition to those found by cultural method. The community comprised bacterial and yeast components including cultured and uncultivable microorganisms. Culturing the KMC under different conditions revealed the core part of the community which included acetobacteria of two genera Komagataeibacter (former Gluconacetobacter) and Gluconobacter, and representatives of several yeast genera among which Brettanomyces/Dekkera and Pichia (including former Issatchenkia) were dominant. Herbaspirillum spp. and Halomonas spp., which previously had not been described in KMC, were found to be minor but permanent members of the community. The community composition was dependent on the growth conditions. The bacterial component of KMC was relatively stable, but may include additional member-lactobacilli. The yeast species composition was significantly variable. High-throughput sequencing showed complexity and variability of KMC that may affect the quality of the probiotic drink. It was hypothesized that the kombucha core community might recruit some environmental bacteria, particularly lactobacilli, which potentially may contribute to the fermentative capacity of the probiotic drink. As many KMC-associated microorganisms cannot be cultured out of the community, a robust control for community composition should be provided by using DNA metabarcoding.

  1. Metabolomic and high-throughput sequencing analysis—modern approach for the assessment of biodeterioration of materials from historic buildings

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gutarowska, Beata; Celikkol-Aydin, Sukriye; Bonifay, Vincent; Otlewska, Anna; Aydin, Egemen; Oldham, Athenia L.; Brauer, Jonathan I.; Duncan, Kathleen E.; Adamiak, Justyna; Sunner, Jan A.; Beech, Iwona B.

    2015-01-01

    Preservation of cultural heritage is of paramount importance worldwide. Microbial colonization of construction materials, such as wood, brick, mortar, and stone in historic buildings can lead to severe deterioration. The aim of the present study was to give modern insight into the phylogenetic diversity and activated metabolic pathways of microbial communities colonized historic objects located in the former Auschwitz II–Birkenau concentration and extermination camp in Oświecim, Poland. For this purpose we combined molecular, microscopic and chemical methods. Selected specimens were examined using Field Emission Scanning Electron Microscopy (FESEM), metabolomic analysis and high-throughput Illumina sequencing. FESEM imaging revealed the presence of complex microbial communities comprising diatoms, fungi and bacteria, mainly cyanobacteria and actinobacteria, on sample surfaces. Microbial diversity of brick specimens appeared higher than that of the wood and was dominated by algae and cyanobacteria, while wood was mainly colonized by fungi. DNA sequences documented the presence of 15 bacterial phyla representing 99 genera including Halomonas, Halorhodospira, Salinisphaera, Salinibacterium, Rubrobacter, Streptomyces, Arthrobacter and nine fungal classes represented by 113 genera including Cladosporium, Acremonium, Alternaria, Engyodontium, Penicillium, Rhizopus, and Aureobasidium. Most of the identified sequences were characteristic of organisms implicated in deterioration of wood and brick. Metabolomic data indicated the activation of numerous metabolic pathways, including those regulating the production of primary and secondary metabolites, for example, metabolites associated with the production of antibiotics, organic acids and deterioration of organic compounds. The study demonstrated that a combination of electron microscopy imaging with metabolomic and genomic techniques allows to link the phylogenetic information and metabolic profiles of microbial

  2. Metabolomic and high-throughput sequencing analysis – modern approach for the assessment of biodeterioration of materials from historic buildings

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Beata eGutarowska

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available Preservation of cultural heritage is of paramount importance worldwide. Microbial colonization of construction materials, such as wood, brick, mortar and stone in historic buildings can lead to severe deterioration. The aim of the present study was to give modern insight into the phylogenetic diversity and activated metabolic pathways of microbial communities colonized historic objects located in the former Auschwitz II-Birkenau concentration and extermination camp in Oświęcim, Poland. For this purpose we combined molecular, microscopic and chemical methods. Selected specimens were examined using Field Emission Scanning Electron Microscopy (FESEM, metabolomic analysis and high-throughput Illumina sequencing. FESEM imaging revealed the presence of complex microbial communities comprising diatoms, fungi and bacteria, mainly cyanobacteria and actinobacteria, on sample surfaces. Microbial diversity of brick specimens appeared higher than that of the wood and was dominated by algae and cyanobacteria, while wood was mainly colonized by fungi. DNA sequences documented the presence of 15 bacterial phyla representing 99 genera including Halomonas, Halorhodospira, Salinisphaera, Salinibacterium, Rubrobacter, Streptomyces, Arthrobacter and 9 fungal classes represented by 113 genera including Cladosporium, Acremonium, Alternaria, Engyodontium, Penicillium, Rhizopus and Aureobasidium. Most of the identified sequences were characteristic of organisms implicated in deterioration of wood and brick. Metabolomic data indicated the activation of numerous metabolic pathways, including those regulating the production of primary and secondary metabolites, for example, metabolites associated with the production of antibiotics, organic acids and deterioration of organic compounds. The study demonstrated that a combination of electron microscopy imaging with metabolomic and genomic techniques allows to link the phylogenetic information and metabolic profiles of

  3. Metabolomic and high-throughput sequencing analysis-modern approach for the assessment of biodeterioration of materials from historic buildings.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gutarowska, Beata; Celikkol-Aydin, Sukriye; Bonifay, Vincent; Otlewska, Anna; Aydin, Egemen; Oldham, Athenia L; Brauer, Jonathan I; Duncan, Kathleen E; Adamiak, Justyna; Sunner, Jan A; Beech, Iwona B

    2015-01-01

    Preservation of cultural heritage is of paramount importance worldwide. Microbial colonization of construction materials, such as wood, brick, mortar, and stone in historic buildings can lead to severe deterioration. The aim of the present study was to give modern insight into the phylogenetic diversity and activated metabolic pathways of microbial communities colonized historic objects located in the former Auschwitz II-Birkenau concentration and extermination camp in Oświecim, Poland. For this purpose we combined molecular, microscopic and chemical methods. Selected specimens were examined using Field Emission Scanning Electron Microscopy (FESEM), metabolomic analysis and high-throughput Illumina sequencing. FESEM imaging revealed the presence of complex microbial communities comprising diatoms, fungi and bacteria, mainly cyanobacteria and actinobacteria, on sample surfaces. Microbial diversity of brick specimens appeared higher than that of the wood and was dominated by algae and cyanobacteria, while wood was mainly colonized by fungi. DNA sequences documented the presence of 15 bacterial phyla representing 99 genera including Halomonas, Halorhodospira, Salinisphaera, Salinibacterium, Rubrobacter, Streptomyces, Arthrobacter and nine fungal classes represented by 113 genera including Cladosporium, Acremonium, Alternaria, Engyodontium, Penicillium, Rhizopus, and Aureobasidium. Most of the identified sequences were characteristic of organisms implicated in deterioration of wood and brick. Metabolomic data indicated the activation of numerous metabolic pathways, including those regulating the production of primary and secondary metabolites, for example, metabolites associated with the production of antibiotics, organic acids and deterioration of organic compounds. The study demonstrated that a combination of electron microscopy imaging with metabolomic and genomic techniques allows to link the phylogenetic information and metabolic profiles of microbial communities

  4. Mevalonosomes: specific vacuoles containing the mevalonate pathway in Plocamium brasiliense cortical cells (Rhodophyta).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Paradas, Wladimir Costa; Crespo, Thalita Mendes; Salgado, Leonardo Tavares; de Andrade, Leonardo Rodrigues; Soares, Angélica Ribeiro; Hellio, Claire; Paranhos, Ricardo Rogers; Hill, Lilian Jorge; de Souza, Geysa Marinho; Kelecom, Alphonse Germaine Albert Charles; Da Gama, Bernardo Antônio Perez; Pereira, Renato Crespo; Amado-Filho, Gilberto Menezes

    2015-04-01

    This paper has identified, for the first time in a member of the Rhodophyta, a vacuolar organelle containing enzymes that are involved in the mevalonate pathway-an important step in red algal isoprenoid biosynthesis. These organelles were named mevalonosomes (Mev) and were found in the cortical cells (CC) of Plocamium brasiliense, a marine macroalgae that synthesizes several halogenated monoterpenes. P. brasiliense specimens were submitted to a cytochemical analysis of the activity of the 3-hydroxy-3-methylglutaryl-CoA synthase (HMGS). Using transmission electron microscopy (TEM), we confirmed the presence of HMGS activity within the Mev. Because HMGS is necessary for the biosynthesis of halogenated monoterpenes, we isolated a hexanic fraction (HF) rich in halogenated monoterpenes from P. brasiliense that contained a pentachlorinated monoterpene as a major metabolite. Because terpenes are often related to chemical defense, the antifouling (AF) activity of pentachlorinated monoterpene was tested. We found that the settlement of the mussel Perna perna was reduced by HF treatment (2.25 times less than control; 40% and 90% of fouled surface, respectively; P = 0.001; F9,9 = 1.13). The HF (at 10 μg · mL(-1) ) also inhibited three species of fouling microalgae (Chlorarachnion reptans, Cylindrotheca cloisterium, and Exanthemachrysis gayraliae), while at a higher concentration (50 μg · mL(-1) ), it inhibited the bacteria Halomonas marina, Polaribacter irgensii, Pseudoalteromonas elyakovii, Shewanella putrefaciens, and Vibrio aestuarianus. The AF activity of P. brasiliense halogenated monoterpenes and the localization of HMGS activity inside Mev suggest that this cellular structure found in CC may play a role in thallus protection against biofouling. © 2015 Phycological Society of America.

  5. Copper-resistant halophilic bacterium isolated from the polluted Maruit Lake, Egypt.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Osman, O; Tanguichi, H; Ikeda, K; Park, P; Tanabe-Hosoi, S; Nagata, S

    2010-04-01

    To isolate and characterize copper-resistant halophilic bacteria from the polluted Maruit Lake, Egypt and identify the role of plasmids in toxic metal resistance. We isolated strain MA2, showing high copper resistance up to the 1.5 mmol l(-1) concentration; it was also resistant to other metals such as nickel, cobalt and zinc and a group of antibiotics. Partial 16S rRNA analysis revealed that strain MA2 belonged to the genus Halomonas. Copper uptake, measured by atomic absorption spectrophotometery, was higher in the absence of NaCl than in the presence of 0.5-1.0 mol l(-1) NaCl during 5-15 min of incubation. Cell fractionation and electron microscopic observation clarified that most of the copper accumulated in the outer membrane and periplasmic fractions of the cells. Plasmid screening yielded two plasmids: pMA21 (11 kb) and pMA22 (5 kb). Plasmid curing resulted in a strain that lost both the plasmids and was sensitive to cobalt and chromate but not copper, nickel and zinc. This cured strain also showed weak growth in the presence of 0.5-1.0 mol l(-1) NaCl. Partial sequencing of both plasmids led to the identification of different toxic metals transporters but copper transporters were not identified. The highest cell viability was found in the presence of 1.0 mol l(-1) NaCl at different copper concentrations, and copper uptake was optimal in the absence of NaCl. Plasmid pMA21 encoded chromate, cobalt, zinc and cadmium transporters, whereas pMA22 encoded specific zinc and RND (resistance, nodulation, cell division) efflux transporters as well as different kinds of metabolic enzymes. Copper resistance was mainly incorporated in the chromosome. Strain MA2 is a fast and efficient tool for copper bioremediation and the isolated plasmids show significant characteristics of both toxic metal and antibiotic resistance.

  6. Natural sunlight shapes crude oil-degradingbacterial communities in northern Gulf of Mexico surface waters

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hernando P Bacosa

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available Following the Deepwater Horizon (DWH spill in 2010, an enormous amount of oil was observed in the deep and surface waters of the northern Gulf of Mexico. Surface waters are characterized by intense sunlight and high temperature during summer. While the oil-degrading bacterial communities in the deep-sea plume have been widely investigated, the effect of natural sunlight on those in oil polluted surface waters remains unexplored to date. In this study, we incubated surface water from the DWH site with amendments of crude oil, Corexit dispersant, or both for 36 d under natural sunlight in the northern Gulf of Mexico. The bacterial community was analyzed over time for total abundance, density of alkane and polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbon degraders, and community composition via pyrosequencing. Our results showed that, for treatments with oil and/or Corexit, sunlight significantly reduced bacterial diversity and evenness and was a key driver of shifts in bacterial community structure. In samples containing oil or dispersant, sunlight greatly reduced abundance of the Cyanobacterium Synechococcus but increased the relative abundances of Alteromonas, Marinobacter, Labrenzia, Sandarakinotalea, Bartonella, and Halomonas. Dark samples with oil were represented by members of Thalassobius, Winogradskyella, Alcanivorax, Formosa, Pseudomonas, Eubacterium, Erythrobacter, Natronocella, and Coxiella. Both oil and Corexit inhibited the Candidatus Pelagibacter with or without sunlight exposure. For the first time, we demonstrated the effects of light in structuring microbial communities in water with oil and/or Corexit. Overall, our findings improve understanding of oil pollution in surface water, and provide unequivocal evidence that sunlight is a key factor in determining bacterial community composition and dynamics in oil polluted marine waters.

  7. Exploring the Cultivable Ectocarpus Microbiome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    KleinJan, Hetty; Jeanthon, Christian; Boyen, Catherine; Dittami, Simon M

    2017-01-01

    Coastal areas form the major habitat of brown macroalgae, photosynthetic multicellular eukaryotes that have great ecological value and industrial potential. Macroalgal growth, development, and physiology are influenced by the microbial community they accommodate. Studying the algal microbiome should thus increase our fundamental understanding of algal biology and may help to improve culturing efforts. Currently, a freshwater strain of the brown macroalga Ectocarpus subulatus is being developed as a model organism for brown macroalgal physiology and algal microbiome studies. It can grow in high and low salinities depending on which microbes it hosts. However, the molecular mechanisms involved in this process are still unclear. Cultivation of Ectocarpus -associated bacteria is the first step toward the development of a model system for in vitro functional studies of brown macroalgal-bacterial interactions during abiotic stress. The main aim of the present study is thus to provide an extensive collection of cultivable E . subulatus -associated bacteria. To meet the variety of metabolic demands of Ectocarpus -associated bacteria, several isolation techniques were applied, i.e., direct plating and dilution-to-extinction cultivation techniques, each with chemically defined and undefined bacterial growth media. Algal tissue and algal growth media were directly used as inoculum, or they were pretreated with antibiotics, by filtration, or by digestion of algal cell walls. In total, 388 isolates were identified falling into 33 genera (46 distinct strains), of which Halomonas ( Gammaproteobacteria ), Bosea ( Alphaproteobacteria ), and Limnobacter ( Betaproteobacteria ) were the most abundant. Comparisons with 16S rRNA gene metabarcoding data showed that culturability in this study was remarkably high (∼50%), although several cultivable strains were not detected or only present in extremely low abundance in the libraries. These undetected bacteria could be considered as part

  8. Exploring the Cultivable Ectocarpus Microbiome

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hetty KleinJan

    2017-12-01

    Full Text Available Coastal areas form the major habitat of brown macroalgae, photosynthetic multicellular eukaryotes that have great ecological value and industrial potential. Macroalgal growth, development, and physiology are influenced by the microbial community they accommodate. Studying the algal microbiome should thus increase our fundamental understanding of algal biology and may help to improve culturing efforts. Currently, a freshwater strain of the brown macroalga Ectocarpus subulatus is being developed as a model organism for brown macroalgal physiology and algal microbiome studies. It can grow in high and low salinities depending on which microbes it hosts. However, the molecular mechanisms involved in this process are still unclear. Cultivation of Ectocarpus-associated bacteria is the first step toward the development of a model system for in vitro functional studies of brown macroalgal–bacterial interactions during abiotic stress. The main aim of the present study is thus to provide an extensive collection of cultivable E. subulatus-associated bacteria. To meet the variety of metabolic demands of Ectocarpus-associated bacteria, several isolation techniques were applied, i.e., direct plating and dilution-to-extinction cultivation techniques, each with chemically defined and undefined bacterial growth media. Algal tissue and algal growth media were directly used as inoculum, or they were pretreated with antibiotics, by filtration, or by digestion of algal cell walls. In total, 388 isolates were identified falling into 33 genera (46 distinct strains, of which Halomonas (Gammaproteobacteria, Bosea (Alphaproteobacteria, and Limnobacter (Betaproteobacteria were the most abundant. Comparisons with 16S rRNA gene metabarcoding data showed that culturability in this study was remarkably high (∼50%, although several cultivable strains were not detected or only present in extremely low abundance in the libraries. These undetected bacteria could be considered

  9. Molecular- and cultivation-based analyses of microbial communities in oil field water and in microcosms amended with nitrate to control H{sub 2}S production

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kumaraswamy, Raji; Ebert, Sara; Fedorak, Phillip M.; Foght, Julia M. [Alberta Univ., Edmonton, AB (Canada). Biological Sciences; Gray, Murray R. [Alberta Univ., Edmonton, AB (Canada). Chemical and Materials Engineering

    2011-03-15

    Nitrate injection into oil fields is an alternative to biocide addition for controlling sulfide production ('souring') caused by sulfate-reducing bacteria (SRB). This study examined the suitability of several cultivation-dependent and cultivation-independent methods to assess potential microbial activities (sulfidogenesis and nitrate reduction) and the impact of nitrate amendment on oil field microbiota. Microcosms containing produced waters from two Western Canadian oil fields exhibited sulfidogenesis that was inhibited by nitrate amendment. Most probable number (MPN) and fluorescent in situ hybridization (FISH) analyses of uncultivated produced waters showed low cell numbers ({<=}10{sup 3} MPN/ml) dominated by SRB (>95% relative abundance). MPN analysis also detected nitrate-reducing sulfide-oxidizing bacteria (NRSOB) and heterotrophic nitrate-reducing bacteria (HNRB) at numbers too low to be detected by FISH or denaturing gradient gel electrophoresis (DGGE). In microcosms containing produced water fortified with sulfate, near-stoichiometric concentrations of sulfide were produced. FISH analyses of the microcosms after 55 days of incubation revealed that Gammaproteobacteria increased from undetectable levels to 5-20% abundance, resulting in a decreased proportion of Deltaproteobacteria (50-60% abundance). DGGE analysis confirmed the presence of Delta- and Gammaproteobacteria and also detected Bacteroidetes. When sulfate-fortified produced waters were amended with nitrate, sulfidogenesis was inhibited and Deltaproteobacteria decreased to levels undetectable by FISH, with a concomitant increase in Gammaproteobacteria from below detection to 50-60% abundance. DGGE analysis of these microcosms yielded sequences of Gamma- and Epsilonproteobacteria related to presumptive HNRB and NRSOB (Halomonas, Marinobacterium, Marinobacter, Pseudomonas and Arcobacter), thus supporting chemical data indicating that nitrate-reducing bacteria out-compete SRB when nitrate is

  10. Diets Alter the Gut Microbiome of Crocodile Lizards

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hai-Ying Jiang

    2017-10-01

    Full Text Available The crocodile lizard is a critically endangered reptile, and serious diseases have been found in this species in recent years, especially in captive lizards. Whether these diseases are caused by changes in the gut microbiota and the effect of captivity on disease remains to be determined. Here, we examined the relationship between the gut microbiota and diet and disease by comparing the fecal microbiota of wild lizards with those of sick and healthy lizards in captivity. The gut microbiota in wild crocodile lizards was consistently dominated by Proteobacteria (∼56.4% and Bacteroidetes (∼19.1%. However, the abundance of Firmicutes (∼2.6% in the intestine of the wild crocodile lizards was distinctly lower than that in other vertebrates. In addition, the wild samples from Guangdong Luokeng Shinisaurus crocodilurus National Nature Reserve also had a high abundance of Deinococcus–Thermus while the wild samples from Guangxi Daguishan Crocodile Lizard National Nature Reserve had a high abundance of Tenericutes. The gut microbial community in loach-fed crocodile lizards was significantly different from the gut microbial community in the earthworm-fed and wild lizards. In addition, significant differences in specific bacteria were detected among groups. Notably, in the gut microbiota, the captive lizards fed earthworms resulted in enrichment of Fusobacterium, and the captive lizards fed loaches had higher abundances of Elizabethkingia, Halomonas, Morganella, and Salmonella, all of which are pathogens or opportunistic pathogens in human or other animals. However, there is no sufficient evidence that the gut microbiota contributes to either disease A or disease B. These results provide a reference for the conservation of endangered crocodile lizards and the first insight into the relationship between disease and the gut microbiota in lizards.

  11. Screening of polyhydroxyalkanoate-producing bacteria and PhaC-encoding genes in two hypersaline microbial mats from Guerrero Negro, Baja California Sur, Mexico

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Carolina A. Martínez-Gutiérrez

    2018-05-01

    Full Text Available Hypersaline microbial mats develop through seasonal and diel fluctuations, as well as under several physicochemical variables. Hence, resident microorganisms commonly employ strategies such as the synthesis of polyhydroxyalkanoates (PHAs in order to resist changing and stressful conditions. However, the knowledge of bacterial PHA production in hypersaline microbial mats has been limited to date, particularly in regard to medium-chain length PHAs (mcl-PHAs, which have biotechnological applications due to their plastic properties. The aim of this study was to obtain evidence for PHA production in two hypersaline microbial mats of Guerrero Negro, Mexico by searching for PHA granules and PHA synthase genes in isolated bacterial strains and environmental samples. Six PHA-producing strains were identified by 16S rRNA gene sequencing; three of them corresponded to a Halomonas sp. In addition, Paracoccus sp., Planomicrobium sp. and Staphylococcus sp. were also identified as PHA producers. Presumptive PHA granules and PHA synthases genes were detected in both sampling sites. Moreover, phylogenetic analysis showed that most of the phylotypes were distantly related to putative PhaC synthases class I sequences belonging to members of the classes Alphaproteobacteria and Gammaproteobacteria distributed within eight families, with higher abundances corresponding mainly to Rhodobacteraceae and Rhodospirillaceae. This analysis also showed that PhaC synthases class II sequences were closely related to those of Pseudomonas putida, suggesting the presence of this group, which is probably involved in the production of mcl-PHA in the mats. According to our state of knowledge, this study reports for the first time the occurrence of phaC and phaC1 sequences in hypersaline microbial mats, suggesting that these ecosystems may be a novel source for the isolation of short- and medium-chain length PHA producers.

  12. Culture-dependent and culture-independent characterization of microbial assemblages associated with high-temperature petroleum reservoirs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Orphan, V J; Taylor, L T; Hafenbradl, D; Delong, E F

    2000-02-01

    Recent investigations of oil reservoirs in a variety of locales have indicated that these habitats may harbor active thermophilic prokaryotic assemblages. In this study, we used both molecular and culture-based methods to characterize prokaryotic consortia associated with high-temperature, sulfur-rich oil reservoirs in California. Enrichment cultures designed for anaerobic thermophiles, both autotrophic and heterotrophic, were successful at temperatures ranging from 60 to 90 degrees C. Heterotrophic enrichments from all sites yielded sheathed rods (Thermotogales), pleomorphic rods resembling Thermoanaerobacter, and Thermococcus-like isolates. The predominant autotrophic microorganisms recovered from inorganic enrichments using H(2), acetate, and CO(2) as energy and carbon sources were methanogens, including isolates closely related to Methanobacterium, Methanococcus, and Methanoculleus species. Two 16S rRNA gene (rDNA) libraries were generated from total community DNA collected from production wellheads, using either archaeal or universal oligonucleotide primer sets. Sequence analysis of the universal library indicated that a large percentage of clones were highly similar to known bacterial and archaeal isolates recovered from similar habitats. Represented genera in rDNA clone libraries included Thermoanaerobacter, Thermococcus, Desulfothiovibrio, Aminobacterium, Acidaminococcus, Pseudomonas, Halomonas, Acinetobacter, Sphingomonas, Methylobacterium, and Desulfomicrobium. The archaeal library was dominated by methanogen-like rDNAs, with a lower percentage of clones belonging to the Thermococcales. Our results strongly support the hypothesis that sulfur-utilizing and methane-producing thermophilic microorganisms have a widespread distribution in oil reservoirs and the potential to actively participate in the biogeochemical transformation of carbon, hydrogen, and sulfur in situ.

  13. Natural Sunlight Shapes Crude Oil-Degrading Bacterial Communities in Northern Gulf of Mexico Surface Waters.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bacosa, Hernando P; Liu, Zhanfei; Erdner, Deana L

    2015-01-01

    Following the Deepwater Horizon (DWH) spill in 2010, an enormous amount of oil was observed in the deep and surface waters of the northern Gulf of Mexico. Surface waters are characterized by intense sunlight and high temperature during summer. While the oil-degrading bacterial communities in the deep-sea plume have been widely investigated, the effect of natural sunlight on those in oil polluted surface waters remains unexplored to date. In this study, we incubated surface water from the DWH site with amendments of crude oil, Corexit dispersant, or both for 36 days under natural sunlight in the northern Gulf of Mexico. The bacterial community was analyzed over time for total abundance, density of alkane and polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbon degraders, and community composition via pyrosequencing. Our results showed that, for treatments with oil and/or Corexit, sunlight significantly reduced bacterial diversity and evenness and was a key driver of shifts in bacterial community structure. In samples containing oil or dispersant, sunlight greatly reduced abundance of the Cyanobacterium Synechococcus but increased the relative abundances of Alteromonas, Marinobacter, Labrenzia, Sandarakinotalea, Bartonella, and Halomonas. Dark samples with oil were represented by members of Thalassobius, Winogradskyella, Alcanivorax, Formosa, Pseudomonas, Eubacterium, Erythrobacter, Natronocella, and Coxiella. Both oil and Corexit inhibited the Candidatus Pelagibacter with or without sunlight exposure. For the first time, we demonstrated the effects of light in structuring microbial communities in water with oil and/or Corexit. Overall, our findings improve understanding of oil pollution in surface water, and provide unequivocal evidence that sunlight is a key factor in determining bacterial community composition and dynamics in oil polluted marine waters.

  14. Culture-independent analysis of bacterial fuel contamination provides insight into the level of concordance with the standard industry practice of aerobis cultivation.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    White, J.; Gilbert, J. A.; Hill, G.; Hill, E.; Huse, S. M.; Weightman, A. J.; Mahenthiralingam, E. (CLS-CI); (Organisms and Environment Division, Cardiff School of Biosciences, Cardiff University); (ECHA Microbiology Ltd.); (Josephine Bay Paul Centre for Comparative Molecular Biology and Evolution)

    2011-07-01

    Bacterial diversity in contaminated fuels has not been systematically investigated using cultivation-independent methods. The fuel industry relies on phenotypic cultivation-based contaminant identification, which may lack accuracy and neglect difficult-to-culture taxa. By the use of industry practice aerobic cultivation, 16S rRNA gene sequencing, and strain genotyping, a collection of 152 unique contaminant isolates from 54 fuel samples was assembled, and a dominance of Pseudomonas (21%), Burkholderia (7%), and Bacillus (7%) was demonstrated. Denaturing gradient gel electrophoresis (DGGE) of 15 samples revealed Proteobacteria and Firmicutes to be the most abundant phyla. When 16S rRNA V6 gene pyrosequencing of four selected fuel samples (indicated by 'JW') was performed, Betaproteobacteria (42.8%) and Gammaproteobacteria (30.6%) formed the largest proportion of reads; the most abundant genera were Marinobacter (15.4%; JW57), Achromobacter (41.6%; JW63), Burkholderia (80.7%; JW76), and Halomonas (66.2%; JW78), all of which were also observed by DGGE. However, the Clostridia (38.5%) and Deltaproteobacteria (11.1%) identified by pyrosequencing in sample JW57 were not observed by DGGE or aerobic culture. Genotyping revealed three instances where identical strains were found: (i) a Pseudomonas sp. strain recovered from 2 different diesel fuel tanks at a single industrial site; (ii) a Mangroveibacter sp. strain isolated from 3 biodiesel tanks at a single refinery site; and (iii) a Burkholderia vietnamiensis strain present in two unrelated automotive diesel samples. Overall, aerobic cultivation of fuel contaminants recovered isolates broadly representative of the phyla and classes present but lacked accuracy by overrepresenting members of certain groups such as Pseudomonas.

  15. The Arsenic Cycle in Searles Lake, California: An Arsenic-Rich, Salt-Saturated Soda Lake. II. Isolation of Arsenic-Metabolizing Microbes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Switzer Blum, J.; Hoeft, S. E.; Stolz, J. F.; Langley, S.; Beveridge, T. J.; Kulp, T. R.; Oremland, R. S.

    2004-12-01

    The motivation for isolating arsenic-metabolizing prokaryotes from Searles Lake was to characterize the physiology of microbes that can cope simultaneously with at least 3 environmental extremes: saturating salt concentration, high pH, and high dissolved inorganic arsenic. A secondary motivation was to find extremely halophilc Archaea that could respire As(V), as this has only been reported for the Crenarchaea. Enrichment cultures of arsenate [As(V)]-respirers were established by inoculating Searles Lake mud into an anaerobic, alkaline (pH = 9.8) artificial medium containing 346 g/L dissolved salts, with lactate as the electron donor and As(V) as the electron acceptor. After about 6 months of bi-weekly transfers, the enrichment was purified by serial dilution, with the highest growth-positive dilution tube exhibiting motile cells having uniform morphology (curved rods). This culture, strain SLAS-1, grew by oxidizing lactate to acetate plus carbon dioxide while reducing As(V) to arsenite [As(III)]. The doubling time was 48 hours at 346 g/L salinity, and nearly equivalent growth rates were observed over a salinity range of 200 to 346 g/l, with no growth evident below 200 g/L. The pH range was 8.5 to 10, with an optimum at 9.5. Strain SLAS-1 has an unusual motility that can be characterized as a "fish-like" swimming motion. Thin section electron micrographs revealed the presence of an internal cytoplasmic filament that runs the full length of the microorganism. We suggest that this filament may be involved in cellular motility. However, taxonomic classification of SLAS-1 made by 16S rRNA gene sequences aligned it in the order Haloanaerobacteriales of the Domain Bacteria. In a further effort to isolate haloalkaliphilic Archaea, a similar enrichment strategy was employed as above, but cell-wall antibiotics were added to the medium to discourage the growth of Bacteria. An enrichment culture, designated Serl-Ab, was established that oxidized lactate to acetate plus carbon

  16. Microbiological monitoring of carbon dioxide storage in a subsurface saline aquifer in Ketzin/Germany within the scope of CO2SINK

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wandrey, M.; Morozova, D.; Zemke, K.; Lerm, S.; Scherf, A.-K.; Vieth, A.; Würdemann, H.; Co2SINK Group

    2009-04-01

    Within the scope of the EU project CO2SINK (www.co2sink.org) a research facility in Ketzin (Germany, west of Berlin) is operated to store CO2 in a saline subsurface aquifer (Würdemann et al., EGU General Assembly 2009). In order to examine the influence of CO2 storage on the environment a comprehensive monitoring program is applied at this site including molecular and microbiological investigations. With the injection of CO2 into the geological formation chemical and physical reservoir characteristics are changed. This may influence the composition and activities of the deep biosphere at the storage horizon. Mineral precipitation, dissolution and corrosion of reservoir casing may be consequences, influencing permeability and long-term stability of the reservoir. The objective of the microbial monitoring program is the characterisation of the microbial community (biocenosis) in fluid samples, as well as in samples from reservoir and cap rock before and during CO2storage using molecular biological methods. 16S rRNA taxonomic studies, Fluorescence in situ hybridisation (FISH), and RealTime PCR are used to examine the composition of the biocenosis. First results of fluid sampling revealed that the microbial community of the saline aquifer is dominated by haloalkaliphilic fermentative bacteria and extremophilic organisms, coinciding with reduced conditions, high salinity and pressure. RealTime RT-PCR of selected genes and the creation and analysis of cDNA libraries will allow the prediction of microbial metabolic activities. In addition, the analysis of organic and inorganic components of the samples will add to the knowledge of possible metabolic shifts during CO2 storage. In order to simulate the storage conditions in situ, long term laboratory experiments in high pressure incubators have been set up using original rock cores from Ketzin. Since DNA and RNA analysis techniques are very sensitive, contamination entries from the adjacent environment have to be excluded

  17. Retreived bacteria from Noctiluca miliaris (green) bloom of the northeastern Arabian Sea

    Science.gov (United States)

    Basu, Subhajit; Matondkar, S. G. Prabhu; Furtado, Irene

    2013-01-01

    In recent years, seasonal blooms of the dinoflagellate Noctiluca miliaris have appeared in the open-waters of the northern Arabian Sea (NAS). This study provides the first characterization of bacteria from a seasonal bloom of green Noctiluca of NAS (20°N-17°N and 64°E-70°E), during the spring-inter-monsoon cruise of Sagar Sampada 253, in March 2007. Bacterial growth as assessed by most-probable number (MPN) and plate counts, revealed `variable-physiotypes' over a wide range of salinities (0%-25% w/v NaCl), pH levels (5-8.5), and organic nutrient strengths, in comparison to non-bloom waters. MPN indices of bacteria in surface waters of bloom stations *DWK and *PRB, corresponded to (3.08-4.41)×103 cells/mL at 3.5% NaCl (w/v), and (2.82-9.49)×102 cells/mL at 25% (w/v) NaCl in tryptone-yeast extract broth (TYE). Plate counts were (1.12-4)×106 CFU/mL at 0% (w/v) NaCl, (1.28-3.9)×106 CFU/mL at 3.5% (w/v) NaCl, and (0.4-7)×104 CFU/mL at 25% NaCl (w/v) on TYE. One-tenth-strength Zobell's gave (0.6-3.74)×105 CFU/mL at pH 5 to (3.58-7.5)×105 CFU/mL at pH 8.5. These bacteria were identified to the genera Bacillus, Cellulomonas, Staphylococcus, Planococcus, Dietzia, Virgibacillus, Micrococcus, Sporosarcinae, Leucobacter, and Halomonas. The identity of three strains (GUFBSS253N2, GUFBSS253N30, and GUFBSS253N84) was confirmed through 16S rDNA sequence homology as Bacillus cohnii, Bacillus flexus, and Bacillus cereus. The ˜2-3-fold higher plate counts of culturable bacteria from the open-waters of the NAS indicate that these bacteria could critically determine the biogeochemical dynamics of the bloom and its milieu. The role of these bacteria in sustaining/terminating the bloom is under evaluation.

  18. Magnesium isotope fractionation in bacterial mediated carbonate precipitation experiments

    Science.gov (United States)

    Parkinson, I. J.; Pearce, C. R.; Polacskek, T.; Cockell, C.; Hammond, S. J.

    2012-12-01

    Magnesium is an essential component of life, with pivotal roles in the generation of cellular energy as well as in plant chlorophyll [1]. The bio-geochemical cycling of Mg is associated with mass dependant fractionation (MDF) of the three stable Mg isotopes [1]. The largest MDF of Mg isotopes has been recorded in carbonates, with foraminiferal tests having δ26Mg compositions up to 5 ‰ lighter than modern seawater [2]. Magnesium isotopes may also be fractionated during bacterially mediated carbonate precipitation and such carbonates are known to have formed in both modern and ancient Earth surface environments [3, 4], with cyanobacteria having a dominant role in carbonate formation during the Archean. In this study, we aim to better constrain the extent to which Mg isotope fractionation occurs during cellular processes, and to identify when, and how, this signal is transferred to carbonates. To this end we have undertaken biologically-mediated carbonate precipitation experiments that were performed in artificial seawater, but with the molar Mg/Ca ratio set to 0.6 and with the solution spiked with 0.4% yeast extract. The bacterial strain used was marine isolate Halomonas sp. (gram-negative). Experiments were run in the dark at 21 degree C for two to three months and produced carbonate spheres of various sizes up to 300 μm in diameter, but with the majority have diameters of ~100 μm. Control experiments run in sterile controls (`empty` medium without bacteria) yielded no precipitates, indicating a bacterial control on the precipitation. The carbonate spheres are produced are amenable to SEM, EMP and Mg isotopic analysis by MC-ICP-MS. Our new data will shed light on tracing bacterial signals in carbonates from the geological record. [1] Young & Galy (2004). Rev. Min. Geochem. 55, p197-230. [2] Pogge von Strandmann (2008). Geochem. Geophys. Geosys. 9 DOI:10.1029/2008GC002209. [3] Castanier, et al. (1999). Sed. Geol. 126, 9-23. [4] Cacchio, et al. (2003

  19. Microbial Life of North Pacific Oceanic Crust

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schumann, G.; Koos, R.; Manz, W.; Reitner, J.

    2003-12-01

    Information on the microbiology of the deep subsurface is necessary in order to understand the factors controlling the rate and extent of the microbially catalyzed reactions that influence the geophysical properties of these environments. Drilling into 45-Ma oceanic basaltic crust in a deepwater environment during ODP Leg 200 provided a promising opportunity to explore the abundance, diversity and activity of micro-organisms. The combined use of culture-independent molecular phylogenetic analyses and enrichment culture techniques is an advantageous approach in investigating subsurface microbial ecosystems. Enrichment culture methods allow the evaluation of potential activities and functions. Microbiological investigations revealed few aerobic cultivable, in part hitherto unknown, micro-organisms in deep submarine sediments and basaltic lava flows. 16S rDNA sequencing of isolates from sediment revealed the next relatives to be members of the genera Halomonas, Pseudomonas, and Lactobacillus. Within the Pseudomonadaceae the closest relative is Acinetobacter sp., which was isolated from a deep subsurface environment. The next phylogenetical relatives within the Halomonadaceae are bacteria typically isolated from Soda lakes, which are considered as model of early life conditions. Interestingly, not only sediment bacteria could be obtained in pure culture. Aerobic strains could also be successfully isolated from the massive tholeiitic basalt layer at a depth of 76.16 mbsf (46 m below the sediment/basement contact). These particular isolates are gram-positive with low G+C content of DNA, phylogenetically affiliated to the phylum Firmicutes. The closest neighbors are e.g. a marine Bacillus isolated from the Gulf of Mexico and a low G+C gram-positive bacterium, which belongs to the microbial flora in the deepest sea mud of the Mariana Trench, isolated from a depth of 10,897 m. Based on the similarity values, the isolates represent hitherto undescribed species of the deep

  20. Effects of coexisting BDE-47 on the migration and biodegradation of BDE-99 in river-based aquifer media recharged with reclaimed water.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yan, Y; Li, Y; Ma, M; Ma, W; Cheng, X; Xu, K

    2018-02-01

    Two prominent polybrominated diphenyl ether (PBDE) congeners have been included in the persistent organic pollutant list, 2,2',4,4',5-tetrabromodiphenyl ether (BDE-99) and 2,2,4,4'-tetrabromodiphenyl ether (BDE-47), which have been detected in treated municipal wastewater, river water, and sediments in China. A lab-scale column experiment was established to investigate the effects of the competitive sorption of BDE-47 on BDE-99 biodegradation and migration in two types of river-based aquifer soils during groundwater recharge with reclaimed water. Two types of recharge columns were used, filled with either silty clay (SC) or black carbon-amended silty clay (BCA). The decay rate constants of BDE-99 in the BCA and SC systems were 0.186 and 0.13 m -1 in the single-solute system and 0.128 and 0.071 m -1 in the binary-solute system, respectively, showing that the decay of BDE-99 was inhibited by the coexistence of BDE-47. This was particularly evident in the SC system because the higher hydrophobicity of BDE-99 determined the higher affinity and competition for sorption sites onto black carbon. The biodegradation of BDE-99 was suppressed by the coexistence of BDE-47, especially in the SC system. Lesser-brominated congeners (BDE-47 and BDE-28) and higher-brominated congeners (BDE-100, BDE-153, BDE-154, and BDE-183) were generated in the four recharge systems, albeit at different ratios. Bacterial biodiversity was influenced by the presence of BDE-47 in the SC system, while it had no significant effect on the BCA system, because the high sorption capacity of black carbon on the hydrophobic PBDEs effectively reduced their toxicity. The ranking order of the most abundant classes changed markedly due to the coexistence of BDE-47 in both the SC and BCA systems. The ranking order of the most abundant genera changed from Azospira, Methylotenera, Desulfovibrio, Methylibium, and Bradyrhizobium to Halomonas, Hyphomicrobium, Pseudomonas, Methylophaga, and Shewanella, which could

  1. Evolution of Hydrocarbon-Degrading Microbial Communities in the Aftermath of the Deepwater Horizon Oil Well Blowout in the Gulf of Mexico

    Science.gov (United States)

    Andersen, G.; Dubinsky, E. A.; Chakraborty, R.; Hollibaugh, J. T.; Hazen, T. C.

    2012-12-01

    The Deepwater Horizon oil spill created large plumes of dispersed oil and gas that remained deep in the water column and stimulated growth of several deep-sea bacteria that can degrade hydrocarbons at cold temperatures. We tracked microbial community composition before, during and after the 83-day spill to determine relationships between microbial dynamics, and hydrocarbon and dissolved-oxygen concentrations. Dominant bacteria in plumes shifted drastically over time and were dependent on the concentration of hydrocarbons, and the relative quantities of insoluble and soluble oil fractions. Unmitigated flow from the wellhead early in the spill resulted in the highest concentrations of oil and relatively more n-alkanes suspended in the plume as small oil droplets. These conditions resulted in near complete dominance by alkane-degrading Oceanospirillales, Pseudomonas and Shewanella. Six-weeks into the spill overall hydrocarbon concentrations in the plume decreased and were almost entirely composed of BTEX after management actions reduced emissions into the water column. These conditions corresponded with the emergence of Colwellia, Pseudoalteromonas, Cycloclasticus and Halomonas that are capable of degrading aromatic compounds. After the well was contained dominant plume bacteria disappeared within two weeks after the spill and transitioned to an entirely different set of bacteria dominated by Flavobacteria, Methylophaga, Alteromonas and Rhodobacteraceae that were found in anomalous oxygen depressions throughout August and are prominent degraders of both high molecular weight organic matter as well as hydrocarbons. Bio-Sep beads amended with volatile hydrocarbons from MC-252 oil were used from August through September to create hydrocarbon-amended traps for attracting oil-degrading microbes in situ. Traps were placed at multiple depths on a drilling rig about 600-m from the original MC-252 oil spill site. Microbes were isolated on media using MC-252 oil as the sole

  2. Characterization of the Skin Microbiota of the Cane Toad Rhinella cf. marina in Puerto Rico and Costa Rica

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Juan G. Abarca

    2018-01-01

    Full Text Available Rhinella marina is a toad native to South America that has been introduced in the Antilles, likely carrying high loads of microorganisms, potentially impacting local community diversity. The amphibian skin is involved in pathogen defense and its microbiota has been relatively well studied, however, research focusing on the cane toad microbiota is lacking. We hypothesize that the skin microbial communities will differ between toads inhabiting different geographical regions in Central America and the Caribbean. To test our hypothesis, we compared the microbiota of three populations of R. cf. marina toads, two from Costa Rican (native and one Puerto Rican (exotic locations. In Costa Rica, we collected 11 toads, 7 in Sarapiquí and 4 from Turrialba while in Puerto Rico, 10 animals were collected in Santa Ana. Separate swab samples were collected from the dorsal and ventral sites resulting in 42 samples. We found significant differences in the structure of the microbial communities between Puerto Rico and Costa Rica. We detected as much as 35 different phyla; however, communities were dominated by Proteobacteria, Bacteroidetes, Firmicutes, and Actinobacteria. Alpha diversity and richness were significantly higher in toads from Puerto Rico and betadiversity revealed significant differences between the microbiota samples from the two countries. At the genus level, we found in Santa Ana, Puerto Rico, a high dominance of Kokuria, Niabella, and Rhodobacteraceae, while in Costa Rica we found Halomonas and Pseudomonas in Sarapiquí, and Acinetobacter and Citrobacter in Turrialba. This is the first report of Niabella associated with the amphibian skin. The core microbiome represented 128 Operational Taxonomic Units (OTUs mainly from five genera shared among all samples, which may represent the symbiotic Rhinella’s skin. These results provide insights into the habitat-induced microbial changes facing this amphibian species. The differences in the microbial

  3. Environmental Impact of Tributyltin-Resistant Marine Bacteria in the Indigenous Microbial Population of Tributyltin-Polluted Surface Sediments.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mimura, Haruo; Yagi, Masahiro; Yoshida, Kazutoshi

    2017-01-01

     We compared the TBT-resistant ability of resting cells prepared from isolates that formed colonies on nutrient agar plates containing 100 µM tributyltin (TBT) chloride, such as Photobacterium sp. TKY1, Halomonas sp. TKY2, and Photobacterium sp. NGY1, with those from taxonomically similar type strains. Photobacterium sp. TKY1 showed the highest ability among those three isolates. The number of surviving Photobacterium sp. TKY1 cells was hardly decreased after 1 h of exposure to 100 µM TBTCl, regardless of the number of resting cells in the range from 10 9.4 to 10 4.2 CFU mL -1 . In such an experimental condition, the maximum number of TBT molecules available to associate with a single cell was estimated to be approximately 6.0 x 10 11.8 . Resting cells prepared from type strains Photobacterium ganghwense JCM 12487 T and P. halotolerans LMG 22194 T , which have 16S rDNA sequences highly homologous with those of Photobacterium sp. TKY1, showed sensitivity to TBT, indicating that TBT-resistant marine bacterial species are not closely related in spite of their taxonomic similarity. We also estimated the impact of TBT-resistant bacterial species to indigenous microbial populations of TBT-polluted surface sediments. The number of surviving TBT-sensitive Vibrio natriegens ATCC 14048 T cells, 10 6.2±0.3 CFU mL -1 , was reduced to 10 4.4±0.4 CFU mL -1 when TBT-resistant Photobacterium sp. TKY1 cells, 10 9.1±0.2 CFU mL -1 , coexisted with 10 9.4±0.2 CFU mL -1 of V. natriegens ATCC 14048 T cells in the presence of 100 µM TBTCl. These results indicate that the toxicity of TBT to TBT-sensitive marine bacterial populations might be enhanced when a TBT-resistant marine bacterial species inhabits TBT-polluted surface sediments.

  4. Sampling natural biofilms: a new route to build efficient microbial anodes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Erable, Benjamin; Roncato, Marie-Anne; Achouak, Wafa; Bergel, Alain

    2009-05-01

    Electrochemically active biofilms were constructed on graphite anodes under constant polarization at -0.1V vs saturated calomel reference (SCE) with 10 mM acetate as substrate. The reactors were inoculated with three different microbial samples that were drawn from exactly the same place in a French Atlantic coastal port (i) by scraping the biofilm that had formed naturally on the surface of a floating bridge, (ii) by taking marine sediments just under the floating bridge, and (iii) by taking nearby beach sand. Current densities of 2.0 A/m2 were reached using the biofilm sample as inoculum while only 0.4 A/m2 and 0.8 A/m2 were obtained using the underlying sediments and the beach sand, respectively. The structure of bacterial communities forming biofilms was characterized by denaturing gradient gel electrophoresis (DGGE) analysis, and revealed differences between samples with the increase in relative intensities of some bands and the appearance of others. Bacteria close related to Bacteroidetes, Halomonas, and Marinobacterium were retrieved only from the efficient EA-biofilms formed from natural biofilms, whereas, bacteria close related to Mesoflavibacter were predominant on biofilm formed from sediments. The marine biofilm was selected as the inoculum to further optimize the microbial anode. Epifluorescence microscopy and SEM confirmed that maintaining the electrode under constant polarization promoted rapid settlement of the electrode surface by a bacterial monolayer film. The microbial anode was progressively adapted to the consumption of acetate by three serial additions of substrate, thus improving the Coulombic efficiency of acetate consumption from 31 to 89%. The possible oxidation of sulfide played only a very small part in the current production and the biofilm was not able to oxidize hydrogen. Graphite proved to be more efficient than dimensionally stable anode (DSA) or stainless steel butthis result might be due to differences in the surface roughness

  5. Epimicrobiota associated with the decay and recovery of Orbicella corals exhibiting Dark Spot Syndrome

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Julie L Meyer

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available Dark Spot Syndrome (DSS is one of the most common diseases of boulder corals in the Caribbean. It presents as sunken brown lesions in coral tissue, which can spread quickly over coral colonies. With this study, we tested the hypothesis that similar to other coral diseases, DSS is a dysbiosis characterized by global shifts in the coral microbiome. Because Black Band Disease (BBD was sometimes found following DSS lesions, we also tested the hypothesis that DSS is a precursor of BBD. To track disease initiation and progression 24 coral colonies were tagged. Of them five Orbicella annularis corals and three O. faveolata corals exhibited DSS lesions at tagging. Microbiota of lesions and apparently healthy tissues from DSS-affected corals over the course of 18 months were collected. Final visual assessment showed that five of eight corals incurred substantial tissue loss while two corals remained stable and one appeared to recover from DSS lesions. Illumina sequencing of the V6 region of bacterial 16S rRNA genes demonstrated no significant differences in bacterial community composition associated with healthy tissue or DSS lesions. The epimicrobiomes of both healthy tissue and DSS lesions contained high relative abundances of Operational Taxonomic Units (OTUs assigned to Halomonas, an unclassified gammaproteobacterial genus, Moritella, an unclassified Rhodobacteraceae genus, Renibacterium, Pseudomonas, and Acinetobacter. The relative abundance of bacterial taxa was not significantly different between samples when grouped by tissue type (healthy tissue vs. DSS lesion, coral species, collection month, or the overall outcome of DSS-affected corals (substantial tissue loss vs. stable/recovered. Two of the tagged corals with substantial tissue loss also developed BBD during the 18-month sampling period. The bacterial community of the BBD layer was distinct from both healthy tissue and DSS lesions, with high relative abundances of the presumed BBD pathogen

  6. Biodegradation and photooxidation of crude oil under natural sunlight in the northern Gulf of Mexico

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bacosa, H. P.; Erdner, D.; Liu, Z.

    2016-02-01

    An enormous amount of oil was observed in the deep and surface waters of the northern Gulf of Mexico (nGoM) following the Deepwater Horizon (DWH) spill. While the oil degradation and bacterial communities in the deep-sea plume have been widely investigated, the effect of sunlight on oil and bacterial assemblages in surface waters have received less attention. In this study, we amended surface water collected near the DWH site with crude oil and/or Corexit dispersant and incubated under natural sunlight in the nGoM for 36 d in summer of 2013. The residual alkanes, polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs), and alkalyted PAHs were analyzed by GC-MS, and bacterial community was determined via pyrosequencing. The results show that n-alkane biodegradation rate constants (first order) were ca. ten-fold higher than the photooxidation rate constants. While biodegradation was characterized by a lag phase, photooxidation rate constants for the 2-3 ring and 4-5 ring PAHs, were 0.08-0.98 day-1 and 0.01-0.07 day-1, respectively. Compared to biodegradation, photooxidation increased the transformation of 4-5 ring PAHs by 70% and 3-4 ring alkylated PAHs by 36%. Sunlight significantly reduced bacterial diversity and a driver of shifts in bacterial community structure in oil and Corexit treatments. In amended treatments, sunlight increased the relative abundances of Alteromonas, Marinobacter, Labrenzia, Sandarakinotalea, Halomonas and Bartonella, while the dark treatments enriched Thalassobius, Winogradskyella, Alcanivorax, Formosa, Eubacterium, Erythrobacter, Natronocella, and Pseudomonas. This suggests that different bacteria are degrading the hydrocarbons in the dark and under light exposure. In a follow up study using DNA-Stable isotope probing (SIP), we identified the alkane and PAH degraders using 13C-labeled hexadecane and phenanthrene, respectively. The results of metagenomic and metatranscriptomic analyses in the light and dark incubations will be presented. For the first

  7. Potential for luxS related signalling in marine bacteria and production of autoinducer-2 in the genus Shewanella

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wagner-Döbler Irene

    2008-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The autoinducer-2 (AI-2 group of signalling molecules are produced by both Gram positive and Gram negative bacteria as the by-product of a metabolic transformation carried out by the LuxS enzyme. They are the only non species-specific quorum sensing compounds presently known in bacteria. The luxS gene coding for the AI-2 synthase enzyme was found in many important pathogens. Here, we surveyed its occurrence in a collection of 165 marine isolates belonging to abundant marine phyla using conserved degenerated PCR primers and sequencing of selected positive bands to determine if the presence of the luxS gene is phylogenetically conserved or dependent on the habitat. Results The luxS gene was not present in any of the Alphaproteobacteria (n = 71 and Bacteroidetes strains (n = 29 tested; by contrast, these bacteria harboured the sahH gene, coding for an alternative enzyme for the detoxification of S-adenosylhomocysteine (SAH in the activated methyl cycle. Within the Gammaproteobacteria (n = 76, luxS was found in all Shewanella, Vibrio and Alteromonas isolates and some Pseudoalteromonas and Halomonas species, while sahH was detected in Psychrobacter strains. A number of Gammaproteobacteria (n = 27 appeared to have neither the luxS nor the sahH gene. We then studied the production of AI-2 in the genus Shewanella using the Vibrio harveyi bioassay. All ten species of Shewanella tested produced a pronounced peak of AI-2 towards the end of the exponential growth phase in several media investigated. The maximum of AI-2 activity was different in each Shewanella species, ranging from 4% to 46% of the positive control. Conclusion The data are consistent with those of fully sequenced bacterial genomes and show that the potential for luxS related signalling is dependent on phylogenetic affiliation rather than ecological niche and is largest in certain groups of Gammaproteobacteria in the marine environment. This is the first report on AI-2

  8. Status Report on the Microbial Characterization of Halite and Groundwater Samples from the WIPP

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Swanson, Juliet S.; Reed, Donald T.; Ams, David A.; Norden, Diana; Simmons, Karen A.

    2012-01-01

    This report summarizes the progress made in the ongoing task of characterizing the microbial community structures within the WIPP repository and in surrounding groundwaters. Through cultivation and DNA-based identification, the potential activity of these organisms is being inferred, thus leading to a better understanding of their impact on WIPP performance. Members of the three biological domains - Bacteria, Archaea, and Eukarya (in this case, Fungi) - that are associated with WIPP halite have been identified. Thus far, their activity has been limited to aerobic respiration; anaerobic incubations are underway. WIPP halite constitutes the near-field microbial environment. We expect that microbial activity in this setting will proceed from aerobic respiration, through nitrate reduction to focus on sulfate reduction. This is also the current WIPP performance assessment (PA) position. Sulfate reduction can occur at extremely high ionic strengths, and sulfate is available in WIPP brines and in the anhydrite interbeds. The role of methanogenesis in the WIPP remains unclear, due to both energetic constraints imposed by a high-salt environment and substrate selectivity, and it is no longer considered in PA. Archaea identified in WIPP halite thus far fall exclusively within the family Halobacteriaceae. These include Halobacterium noricense, cultivated from both low- and high-salt media, and a Halorubrum-like species. The former has also been detected in other salt mines worldwide; the latter likely constitutes a new species. Little is known of its function, but it was prevalent in experiments investigating the biodegradation of organic complexing agents in WIPP brines. Bacterial signatures associated with WIPP halite include members of the phylum Proteobacteria - Halomonas, Pelomonas, Limnobacter, and Chromohalobacter - but only the latter has been isolated. Also detected and cultivated were Salinicoccus and Nesterenkonia spp. Fungi were also isolated from halite. Although

  9. Comparative Genomics of the Ubiquitous, Hydrocarbon-degrading Genus Marinobacter

    Science.gov (United States)

    Singer, E.; Webb, E.; Edwards, K. J.

    2012-12-01

    using fimbriae and pili. Formation of biofilm with biosurfactant characteristics has been observed in Marinobacter cultures and environmental strains in relation to hydrocarbon degradation. Genomic potential exists for the synthesis of biofilm-related carbon and energy storage compounds, e.g. alginate and isoprenoid wax esters, and quorum sensing encoded by the regulatory luxR gene and N-acyl-L-homoserine lactone (AHL) signals. Halotolerance is predicted to be achieved through biosynthesis and/or import of compatible solutes, including glycine betaine, choline, ectoine, sucrose, periplasmic glucans as well as membrane channel activity regulating intracellular sodium, potassium and chloride concentration balance. Gene abundances concur with those observed in sequenced halophilic Halomonas genomes. Defense mechanisms are plentiful and include arsenate, organic solvent, copper, and mercuric resistance, compounds, which frequently occur in oil refinery wastewater. The Marinobacter genomes reflect dynamic environments and diverse interactions with viruses and other bacteria with similar metabolic strategies, as reflected by the large number of integrases and transposases. This study has provided comprehensive genomic insights into the metabolic versatility and predicted environmental impact potential of one of the most ubiquitous bacterial genera.

  10. Phenotypic characterization and 16S rDNA identification of culturable non-obligate halophilic bacterial communities from a hypersaline lake, La Sal del Rey, in extreme South Texas (USA).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Phillips, Kristen; Zaidan, Frederic; Elizondo, Omar R; Lowe, Kristine L

    2012-02-02

    with regards to the types and number of positive tests from the strip. Isolates taken from water samples at the highest salinity (420 ppt) tended to be less diverse and have only a limited number of positive tests. Sequencing of 16S DNA displayed the presence of members of bacterial genera Bacillus, Halomonas, Pseudomonas, Exiguobacterium and others. The genus Bacillus was most commonly identified. None of the isolates were members of the Archaea probably due to dilution of salts in the samples. The La Sal del Rey ecosystem supports a robust and diverse bacterial community despite the high salinity of the lake and soil. However, salinity does appear to a limiting factor with regards to the density and diversity of the bacterial communities that inhabit the lake and surrounding area.

  11. Biofilms and planktonic cells of Deinococcus geothermalis in extreme environments

    Science.gov (United States)

    Panitz, Corinna; Reitz, Guenther; Rabbow, Elke; Rettberg, Petra; Flemming, Hans-Curt; Wingender, Jost; Froesler, Jan

    radiation. D. geothermalis besides others, like co-cultures of Halomonas muralis and Halococcus morrhuae, Bacillus horneckiae, Chroococcidiopsis CCMEE 029 and Streptomyces + Polaromonas and Arthrobacter strains from volcanic rocks, was involved in the several preparatory test runs at the Planetary and Space Simulation facilities at the German Aerospace Center in Cologne. Results of the already carried out EVTs (Experiment Verification Test) and the SVT (Science verification test) as EXPOSE-R2 mission pre-paration tests, where investigated parameters like dehydration, temperature extremes, extraterrestrial UV radiation, simulated Martian atmosphere, and a Mars-like UV climate were tested individually as well as in combination will be presented. Following exposure to the parameters listed above, the survival of both biofilms and planktonic cells of D. geothermalis was assessed in terms of (i) culturability by colony counts on R2A medium, (ii) membrane integrity by using the Live/Dead differential staining kit, (iii) ATP content by using a commercial luminometric assay, and (iv) the presence of 16S rRNA by fluorescence in situ hybridization. So far, the results suggest that Deinococcus geothermalis remains viable in the desiccated state over weeks to months, whereas culturability, intracellular ATP levels, and membrane integrity were preserved in biofilm cells at a significantly higher level than in planktonic cells. Furthermore, cells of both sample types were able to survive simulated space and Martian conditions and showed high resistance after irradiation with monochromatic and polychromatic UV. The results will contribute to the fundamental understanding of the opportunities and limitations of viability of microorganisms organized in biofilms or as planktonic cells under the extreme environ-mental conditions of space or other planets.

  12. Halotolerant and halophilic bacteria in the oceans of the icy satellites

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ramirez, S. I.; Montoya, L.; Avendaño, R.

    2013-05-01

    Halotolerant and halophilic prokaryotes require salt concentrations equal to or higher than those present at terrestrial oceans (Rothschild and Mancinelli, 2001). They are a particular kind of extremophiles and as expected, their halotolerance is mainly expressed in terms of a certain NaCl percentage, at least on Earth. With the discovery of putative salty liquid oceans beneath the iced surfaces of some of the satellites of Jupiter and Saturn (Mueller and McKinnon, 1988; Kargel et al., 2000; Zolotov, 2007), information about the impact of other types of salts, different from NaCl, on the growth of complex biological systems is necessary. We have found that when three specific bacteria strains are growing in media enriched with salts containing chaotropic and kosmotropic ions, their specific optimal growth value is modified (Montoya et al., 2010). The changes can be broadly explained in terms of the Hofmeister series (Zhang and Cremer, 2006). These results can be used to infer an extension in the limits of biological activity. For terrestrial organisms there is scarce information to determine the impact of another salt in the growth of an organism. In these sense we have found that when media enriched with magnesium sulfate (MgSO4) at water activity values (aw) similar to those reported as optimal for NaCl, their growth and tolerance is considerably enhanced. On the other hand, the combination of chaotropic and kosmotropic ions result in salts of astrobiological importance such as the sulphate already mentioned, carbonates or chlorides that can tentatively exist in the putative ocean of Europa, Ganymedes, or Enceladus or even at the subsurface of Mars. In this frame, we studied the growth rate of Halomonas halodurans, H. magadiensis and Bacillus pumillus when exposed to media enriched with NaCl, MgSO4, Mg(NO3)2, MgCl2, Na2SO4 and NH4SO4. Equivalent values of water activity (aw) for each salt were compared and correlated with microbial activity (Montoya et al., 2010

  13. Status Report on the Microbial Characterization of Halite and Groundwater Samples from the WIPP

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Swanson, Juliet S. [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Reed, Donald T. [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Ams, David A. [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Norden, Diana [Ohio State University; Simmons, Karen A. [Los Alamos National Laboratory

    2012-07-10

    This report summarizes the progress made in the ongoing task of characterizing the microbial community structures within the WIPP repository and in surrounding groundwaters. Through cultivation and DNA-based identification, the potential activity of these organisms is being inferred, thus leading to a better understanding of their impact on WIPP performance. Members of the three biological domains - Bacteria, Archaea, and Eukarya (in this case, Fungi) - that are associated with WIPP halite have been identified. Thus far, their activity has been limited to aerobic respiration; anaerobic incubations are underway. WIPP halite constitutes the near-field microbial environment. We expect that microbial activity in this setting will proceed from aerobic respiration, through nitrate reduction to focus on sulfate reduction. This is also the current WIPP performance assessment (PA) position. Sulfate reduction can occur at extremely high ionic strengths, and sulfate is available in WIPP brines and in the anhydrite interbeds. The role of methanogenesis in the WIPP remains unclear, due to both energetic constraints imposed by a high-salt environment and substrate selectivity, and it is no longer considered in PA. Archaea identified in WIPP halite thus far fall exclusively within the family Halobacteriaceae. These include Halobacterium noricense, cultivated from both low- and high-salt media, and a Halorubrum-like species. The former has also been detected in other salt mines worldwide; the latter likely constitutes a new species. Little is known of its function, but it was prevalent in experiments investigating the biodegradation of organic complexing agents in WIPP brines. Bacterial signatures associated with WIPP halite include members of the phylum Proteobacteria - Halomonas, Pelomonas, Limnobacter, and Chromohalobacter - but only the latter has been isolated. Also detected and cultivated were Salinicoccus and Nesterenkonia spp. Fungi were also isolated from halite. Although