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Sample records for haloacid permease deh4p

  1. Enhanced degradation of haloacid by heterologous expression in related Burkholderia species.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Su, Xianbin; Deng, Liyu; Kong, Ka Fai; Tsang, Jimmy S H

    2013-10-01

    Haloacids are environmental pollutant and can be transformed to non-toxic alkanoic acids by microbial dehalogenase. Bacterium Burkholderia species MBA4 was enriched from soil for its ability to bioremediate haloacids such as mono-chloroacetate (MCA), mono-bromoacetate (MBA), 2-mono-chloropropionate, and 2-mono-bromopropionate. MBA4 produces an inducible dehalogenase Deh4a that catalyzes the dehalogenation process. The growth of MBA4 on haloacid also relies on the presence of a haloacid-uptake system. Similar dehalogenase genes can be found in the genome of many related species. However, wildtype Burkholderia caribensis MWAP64, Burkholderia phymatum STM815, and Burkholderia xenovorans LB400 were not able to grow on MCA. When a plasmid containing the regulatory and structural gene of Deh4a was transformed to these species, they were able to grow on haloacid. The specific enzyme activities in these recombinants ranges from 2- to 30-fold that of MBA4 in similar condition. Reverse transcription-quantitative real-time PCR showed that the relative transcript levels in these recombinant strains ranges from 9 to over 1,600 times that of MBA4 in similar condition. A recombinant has produced nearly five times of dehalogenase that MBA4 could ever achieve. While the expressions of Deh4a were more relaxed in these phylogenetically related species, an MCA-uptake activity was found to be inducible. These metabolically engineered strains are better degraders than the haloacid-enriched MBA4. Copyright © 2013 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  2. Insights into the molecular mechanism of dehalogenation catalyzed by D-2-haloacid dehalogenase from crystal structures.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Yayue; Feng, Yanbin; Cao, Xupeng; Liu, Yinghui; Xue, Song

    2018-01-23

    D-2-haloacid dehalogenases (D-DEXs) catalyse the hydrolytic dehalogenation of D-2-haloacids, releasing halide ions and producing the corresponding 2-hydroxyacids. A structure-guided elucidation of the catalytic mechanism of this dehalogenation reaction has not been reported yet. Here, we report the catalytic mechanism of a D-DEX, HadD AJ1 from Pseudomonas putida AJ1/23, which was elucidated by X-ray crystallographic analysis and the H 2 18 O incorporation experiment. HadD AJ1 is an α-helical hydrolase that forms a homotetramer with its monomer including two structurally axisymmetric repeats. The product-bound complex structure was trapped with L-lactic acid in the active site, which is framed by the structurally related helices between two repeats. Site-directed mutagenesis confirmed the importance of the residues lining the binding pocket in stabilizing the enzyme-substrate complex. Asp205 acts as a key catalytic residue and is responsible for activating a water molecule along with Asn131. Then, the hydroxyl group of the water molecule directly attacks the C2 atom of the substrate to release the halogen ion instead of forming an enzyme-substrate ester intermediate as observed in L-2-haloacid dehalogenases. The newly revealed structural and mechanistic information on D-DEX may inspire structure-based mutagenesis to engineer highly efficient haloacid dehalogenases.

  3. Crystal Structures of Intermediates in the Dehalogenation of Haloalkanoates by L-2-Haloacid Dehalogenase

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Ridder, Ivo S.; Rozeboom, Henriëtte J.; Kalk, Kor H.; Dijkstra, Bauke W.

    1999-01-01

    The L-2-haloacid dehalogenase from the 1,2-dichloroethane-degrading bacterium Xanthobacter autotrophicus GJ10 catalyzes the hydrolytic dehalogenation of small L-2-haloalkanoates to their corresponding D-2-hydroxyalkanoates, with inversion of the configuration at the C2 atom. The structure of the

  4. CONSTRUCTION OF A FUNCTIONAL LACTOSE PERMEASE DEVOID OF CYSTEINE RESIDUES

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    VANIWAARDEN, PR; PASTORE, JC; KONINGS, WN; KABACK, HR

    1991-01-01

    By use of oligonucleotide-directed, site-specific mutagenesis, a lactose (lac) permease molecule was constructed in which all eight cysteinyl residues were simultaneously mutagenized (C-less permease). Cys154 was replaced with valine, and Cys117, -148, -176, -234, -333, -353, and -355 were replaced

  5. Amino Acid Permeases and Virulence in Cryptococcus neoformans.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kevin Felipe Cruz Martho

    Full Text Available Fungal opportunistic pathogens colonize various environments, from plants and wood to human and animal tissue. Regarding human pathogens, one great challenge during contrasting niche occupation is the adaptation to different conditions, such as temperature, osmolarity, salinity, pressure, oxidative stress and nutritional availability, which may constitute sources of stress that need to be tolerated and overcome. As an opportunistic pathogen, C. neoformans faces exactly these situations during the transition from the environment to the human host, encountering nutritional constraints. Our previous and current research on amino acid biosynthetic pathways indicates that amino acid permeases are regulated by the presence of the amino acids, nitrogen and temperature. Saccharomyces cerevisiae and Candida albicans have twenty-four and twenty-seven genes encoding amino acid permeases, respectively; conversely, they are scarce in number in Basidiomycetes (C. neoformans, Coprinopsis cinerea and Ustilago maydis, where nine to ten permease genes can be found depending on the species. In this study, we have demonstrated that two amino acid permeases are essential for virulence in C. neoformans. Our data showed that C. neoformans uses two global and redundant amino acid permeases, Aap4 and Aap5 to respond correctly to thermal and oxidative stress. Double deletion of these permeases causes growth arrest in C. neoformans at 37°C and in the presence of hydrogen peroxide. The inability to uptake amino acid at a higher temperature and under oxidative stress also led to virulence attenuation in vivo. Our data showed that thermosensitivity caused by the lack of permeases Aap4 and Aap5 can be remedied by alkaline conditions (higher pH and salinity. Permeases Aap4 and Aap5 are also required during fluconazole stress and they are the target of the plant secondary metabolite eugenol, a potent antifungal inhibitor that targets amino acid permeases. In summary, our work

  6. Bacterial PerO Permeases Transport Sulfate and Related Oxyanions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hoffmann, Marie-Christine; Pfänder, Yvonne; Tintel, Marc; Masepohl, Bernd

    2017-07-15

    Rhodobacter capsulatus synthesizes the high-affinity ABC transporters CysTWA and ModABC to specifically import the chemically related oxyanions sulfate and molybdate, respectively. In addition, R. capsulatus has the low-affinity permease PerO acting as a general oxyanion transporter, whose elimination increases tolerance to molybdate and tungstate. Although PerO-like permeases are widespread in bacteria, their function has not been examined in any other species to date. Here, we present evidence that PerO permeases from the alphaproteobacteria Agrobacterium tumefaciens , Dinoroseobacter shibae , Rhodobacter sphaeroides , and Sinorhizobium meliloti and the gammaproteobacterium Pseudomonas stutzeri functionally substitute for R. capsulatus PerO in sulfate uptake and sulfate-dependent growth, as shown by assimilation of radioactively labeled sulfate and heterologous complementation. Disruption of perO genes in A. tumefaciens , R. sphaeroides , and S. meliloti increased tolerance to tungstate and, in the case of R. sphaeroides , to molybdate, suggesting that heterometal oxyanions are common substrates of PerO permeases. This study supports the view that bacterial PerO permeases typically transport sulfate and related oxyanions and, hence, form a functionally conserved permease family. IMPORTANCE Despite the widespread distribution of PerO-like permeases in bacteria, our knowledge about PerO function until now was limited to one species, Rhodobacter capsulatus In this study, we showed that PerO proteins from diverse bacteria are functionally similar to the R. capsulatus prototype, suggesting that PerO permeases form a conserved family whose members transport sulfate and related oxyanions. Copyright © 2017 American Society for Microbiology.

  7. Characterization of the haloacid dehalogenase from Xanthobacter autotrophicus GJ10 and sequencing of the dhlB gene

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    van der Ploeg, J; Van Hall, Gerrit; Janssen, D B

    1991-01-01

    B) was cloned and could be allocated to a 6.5-kb EcoRI-BglII fragment. Part of this fragment was sequenced, and the dhlB open reading frame was identified by comparison with the N-terminal amino acid sequence of the protein. The gene was found to encode a protein of 27,433 Da that showed considerable homology...... chromatography. The enzyme was active with 2-halogenated carboxylic acids and converted only the L-isomer of 2-chloropropionic acid with inversion of configuration to produce D-lactate. The activity of the enzyme was not readily influenced by thiol reagents. The gene encoding the haloacid dehalogenase (dhl...... (60.5 and 61.0% similarity) with the two other haloacid dehalogenases sequenced to date but not with the haloalkane dehalogenase from X. autotrophicus GJ10....

  8. Cloning and characterization of an aromatic amino acid and leucine permease of Penicillium chrysogenum

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Trip, Hein; Evers, Melchior E.; Konings, Wil N.; Driessen, Arnold J.M.

    2002-01-01

    The gene encoding the amino acid permease ArlP (Aromatic and leucine Permease) was isolated from the filamentous fungus Penicillium chrysogenum after PCR using degenerated oligonucleotides based on conserved regions of fungal amino acid permeases. The cDNA clone was used for expression of the

  9. Interdomain interactions in the mannitol permease of E-coli

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Meijberg, W; Schuurman-Wolters, GK; Robillard, GT; Ladbury, E.; Chowdhry, B.Z.

    1998-01-01

    The mannitol permease of E. coli, Enzyme IImannitol, catalyses the concomitant phosphorylation and transport of mannitol across the cytoplasmic membrane. The protein consists of three domains, one N-terminal transmembrane domain (C) and two cytoplasmic domains, A and B. During the catalytic cycle

  10. Functional Diversity of Haloacid Dehalogenase Superfamily Phosphatases from Saccharomyces cerevisiae: BIOCHEMICAL, STRUCTURAL, AND EVOLUTIONARY INSIGHTS.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kuznetsova, Ekaterina; Nocek, Boguslaw; Brown, Greg; Makarova, Kira S; Flick, Robert; Wolf, Yuri I; Khusnutdinova, Anna; Evdokimova, Elena; Jin, Ke; Tan, Kemin; Hanson, Andrew D; Hasnain, Ghulam; Zallot, Rémi; de Crécy-Lagard, Valérie; Babu, Mohan; Savchenko, Alexei; Joachimiak, Andrzej; Edwards, Aled M; Koonin, Eugene V; Yakunin, Alexander F

    2015-07-24

    The haloacid dehalogenase (HAD)-like enzymes comprise a large superfamily of phosphohydrolases present in all organisms. The Saccharomyces cerevisiae genome encodes at least 19 soluble HADs, including 10 uncharacterized proteins. Here, we biochemically characterized 13 yeast phosphatases from the HAD superfamily, which includes both specific and promiscuous enzymes active against various phosphorylated metabolites and peptides with several HADs implicated in detoxification of phosphorylated compounds and pseudouridine. The crystal structures of four yeast HADs provided insight into their active sites, whereas the structure of the YKR070W dimer in complex with substrate revealed a composite substrate-binding site. Although the S. cerevisiae and Escherichia coli HADs share low sequence similarities, the comparison of their substrate profiles revealed seven phosphatases with common preferred substrates. The cluster of secondary substrates supporting significant activity of both S. cerevisiae and E. coli HADs includes 28 common metabolites that appear to represent the pool of potential activities for the evolution of novel HAD phosphatases. Evolution of novel substrate specificities of HAD phosphatases shows no strict correlation with sequence divergence. Thus, evolution of the HAD superfamily combines the conservation of the overall substrate pool and the substrate profiles of some enzymes with remarkable biochemical and structural flexibility of other superfamily members. © 2015 by The American Society for Biochemistry and Molecular Biology, Inc.

  11. Expression, purification and preliminary X-ray characterization of dl-2-haloacid dehalogenase from Methylobacterium sp. CPA1

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Omi, Rie [Institute for Chemical Research, Kyoto University, Uji, Kyoto 611-0011 (Japan); Department of Chemistry, Graduate School of Science, Osaka City University, Sumiyoshi-ku, Osaka 558-8585 (Japan); Jitsumori, Keiji; Yamauchi, Takahiro; Ichiyama, Susumu; Kurihara, Tatsuo; Esaki, Nobuyoshi [Institute for Chemical Research, Kyoto University, Uji, Kyoto 611-0011 (Japan); Kamiya, Nobuo; Hirotsu, Ken, E-mail: hirotsu@sci.osaka-cu.ac.jp; Miyahara, Ikuko [Department of Chemistry, Graduate School of Science, Osaka City University, Sumiyoshi-ku, Osaka 558-8585 (Japan); Institute for Chemical Research, Kyoto University, Uji, Kyoto 611-0011 (Japan)

    2007-07-01

    A recombinant form of dl-2-haloacid dehalogenase from Methylobacterium sp. CPA1 has been expressed in E. coli, purified and crystallized. The crystal belongs to space group P6{sub 3}. Diffraction data have been collected to 1.75 Å resolution. dl-2-Haloacid dehalogenase from Methylobacterium sp. CPA1 (dl-DEX Mb) is a unique enzyme that catalyzes the dehalogenation reaction without the formation of an ester intermediate. A recombinant form of dl-DEX Mb has been expressed in Escherichia coli, purified and crystallized using the hanging-drop vapour-diffusion method. The crystal belongs to the hexagonal space group P6{sub 3}, with unit-cell parameters a = b = 186.2, c = 114.4 Å. The crystals are likely to contain between four and eight monomers in the asymmetric unit, with a V{sub M} value of 4.20–2.10 Å{sup 3} Da{sup −1}. A self-rotation function revealed peaks on the χ = 180° section. X-ray data have been collected to 1.75 Å resolution.

  12. Conserved oligopeptide permeases modulate sporulation initiation in Clostridium difficile.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Edwards, Adrianne N; Nawrocki, Kathryn L; McBride, Shonna M

    2014-10-01

    The anaerobic gastrointestinal pathogen Clostridium difficile must form a metabolically dormant spore to survive in oxygenic environments and be transmitted from host to host. The regulatory factors by which C. difficile initiates and controls the early stages of sporulation in C. difficile are not highly conserved in other Clostridium or Bacillus species. Here, we investigated the role of two conserved oligopeptide permeases, Opp and App, in the regulation of sporulation in C. difficile. These permeases are known to positively affect sporulation in Bacillus species through the import of sporulation-specific quorum-sensing peptides. In contrast to other spore-forming bacteria, we discovered that inactivating these permeases in C. difficile resulted in the earlier expression of early sporulation genes and increased sporulation in vitro. Furthermore, disruption of opp and app resulted in greater virulence and increased the amounts of spores recovered from feces in the hamster model of C. difficile infection. Our data suggest that Opp and App indirectly inhibit sporulation, likely through the activities of the transcriptional regulator SinR and its inhibitor, SinI. Taken together, these results indicate that the Opp and App transporters serve a different function in controlling sporulation and virulence in C. difficile than in Bacillus subtilis and suggest that nutrient availability plays a significant role in pathogenesis and sporulation in vivo. This study suggests a link between the nutritional status of the environment and sporulation initiation in C. difficile. Copyright © 2014, American Society for Microbiology. All Rights Reserved.

  13. PcMtr, an aromatic and neutral aliphatic amino acid permease of Penicillium chrysogenum

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Trip, H; Evers, ME; Driessen, AJM

    2004-01-01

    The gene encoding an aromatic and neutral aliphatic amino acid permease of Penicillium chrysogenum was cloned, functionally expressed and characterized in Saccharomyces cerevisiae M4276. The permease, designated PcMtr, is structurally and functionally homologous to Mtr of Neurospora crassa, and

  14. Sugar transport across lactose permease probed by steered molecular dynamics

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jensen, Morten Østergaard; Yin, Ying; Tajkhorshid, Emad

    2007-01-01

    Escherichia coli lactose permease (LacY) transports sugar across the inner membrane of the bacterium using the proton motive force to accumulate sugar in the cytosol. We have probed lactose conduction across LacY using steered molecular dynamics, permitting us to follow molecular and energetic...... details of lactose interaction with the lumen of LacY during its permeation. Lactose induces a widening of the narrowest parts of the channel during permeation, the widening being largest within the periplasmic half-channel. During permeation, the water-filled lumen of LacY only partially hydrates lactose......, forcing it to interact with channel lining residues. Lactose forms a multitude of direct sugar-channel hydrogen bonds, predominantly with residues of the flexible N-domain, which is known to contribute a major part of LacY's affinity for lactose. In the periplasmic half-channel lactose predominantly...

  15. Inactivation of the lactose permease of Escherichia coli by monochromatic ultraviolet light

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Robb, F T; Peak, M J [Rhodes Univ., Grahamstown (South Africa)

    1979-09-01

    The lactose permease of E. coli was inactivated exponetially by seven wavelengths of monochromatic UV light. An action spectrum revealed that the shorter wavelengths (243, 290 and 313 nm) were much more efficient than longer wavelengths. Inactivation at 290 nm was most efficient and was not due to generalized membrane damage. The rate of counterflux of intracellular ..beta..-galactoside in response to externally added ..beta..-galactoside was slowed by 290 nm irradiation, indicating destruction of the facilitated diffusion mechanism. The induction of ..beta..-galactosidase and ..beta..-galactoside permease was co-ordinate both with and without pre-irradiation by 290 nm light. The ..beta.. galactosidase was approximately 26-fold more resistant to 290 nm than the permease. These results are discussed in terms of a greater sensitivity of membrane proteins to 290 nm light, which may be due to the role of aromatic amino acids in conferring stability to the permease in the membrane.

  16. Characterization of the Phthalate Permease OphD from Burkholderia cepacia ATCC 17616†

    OpenAIRE

    Chang, Hung-Kuang; Zylstra, Gerben J.

    1999-01-01

    The ophD gene, encoding a permease for phthalate transport, was cloned from Burkholderia cepacia ATCC 17616. Expression of the gene in Escherichia coli results in the ability to transport phthalate rapidly into the cell. Uptake inhibition experiments show that 4-hydroxyphthalate, 4-chlorophthalate, 4-methylphthalate, and cinchomeronate compete for the phthalate permease. An ophD knockout mutant of 17616 grows slightly more slowly on phthalate but is still able to take up phthalate at rates eq...

  17. Sulfhydryl oxidation of mutants with cysteine in place of acidic residues in the lactose permease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Voss, J; Sun, J; Venkatesan, P; Kaback, H R

    1998-06-02

    To examine further the role of charge-pair interactions in the structure and function of lactose permease, Asp237 (helix VII), Asp240 (helix VII), Glu126 (cytoplasmic loop IV/V), Glu269 (helix VIII), and Glu325 (helix X) were replaced individually with Cys in a functional mutant devoid of Cys residues. Each mutant was then oxidized with H2O2 in order to generate a sulfinic and/or sulfonic acid at these positions. Due to the isosteric relationship between aspartate and sulfinate, in particular, and the lower pKa of the sulfinic and sulfonic acid side chains, oxidized derivatives of Cys are useful probes for examining the role of carboxylates. Asp237-->Cys or Asp240-->Cys permease is inactive, as shown previously, but H2O2 oxidation restores activity to an extent similar to that observed when a negative charge is reintroduced by other means. Glu126-->Cys, Glu269-->Cys, or Glu325-->Cys permease is inactive, but oxidation does not restore active lactose transport. The data are consistent with previous observations indicating that Asp237 and Asp240 are not critical for active lactose transport, while Glu126, Glu269, and Glu325 are irreplaceable. Although Glu269-->Cys permease does not transport lactose, the oxidized mutant exhibits significant transport of beta,D-galactosylpyranosyl 1-thio-beta,D-galactopyranoside, a property observed with Glu269-->Asp permease. The observation supports the idea that an acidic residue at position 269 is important for substrate recognition. Finally, oxidized Glu325-->Cys permease catalyzes equilibrium exchange with an apparent pKa of about 6.5, more than a pH unit lower than that observed with Glu325-->Asp permease, thereby providing strong confirmatory evidence that a negative charge at position 325 determines the rate of translocation of the ternary complex between the permease, substrate, and H+.

  18. Substrate-induced ubiquitylation and endocytosis of yeast amino acid permeases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ghaddar, Kassem; Merhi, Ahmad; Saliba, Elie; Krammer, Eva-Maria; Prévost, Martine; André, Bruno

    2014-12-01

    Many plasma membrane transporters are downregulated by ubiquitylation, endocytosis, and delivery to the lysosome in response to various stimuli. We report here that two amino acid transporters of Saccharomyces cerevisiae, the general amino acid permease (Gap1) and the arginine-specific permease (Can1), undergo ubiquitin-dependent downregulation in response to their substrates and that this downregulation is not due to intracellular accumulation of the transported amino acids but to transport catalysis itself. Following an approach based on permease structural modeling, mutagenesis, and kinetic parameter analysis, we obtained evidence that substrate-induced endocytosis requires transition of the permease to a conformational state preceding substrate release into the cell. Furthermore, this transient conformation must be stable enough, and thus sufficiently populated, for the permease to undergo efficient downregulation. Additional observations, including the constitutive downregulation of two active Gap1 mutants altered in cytosolic regions, support the model that the substrate-induced conformational transition inducing endocytosis involves remodeling of cytosolic regions of the permeases, thereby promoting their recognition by arrestin-like adaptors of the Rsp5 ubiquitin ligase. Similar mechanisms might control many other plasma membrane transporters according to the external concentrations of their substrates. Copyright © 2014, American Society for Microbiology. All Rights Reserved.

  19. Purification, crystallization and preliminary crystallographic analysis of DehI, a group I α-haloacid dehalogenase from Pseudomonas putida strain PP3

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Schmidberger, Jason W. [School of Pharmacology and Medicine, University of Western Australia, Crawley, Western Australia (Australia); Wilce, Jackie A. [Department of Biochemistry and Molecular Biology, Monash University, Clayton, Victoria (Australia); Weightman, Andrew J. [School of Biosciences, Cardiff University, Cardiff,Wales (United Kingdom); Wilce, Matthew C. J., E-mail: matthew.wilce@med.monash.edu.au [Department of Biochemistry and Molecular Biology, Monash University, Clayton, Victoria (Australia); School of Pharmacology and Medicine, University of Western Australia, Crawley, Western Australia (Australia)

    2008-07-01

    The α-haloacid dehalogenase DehI from P. putida strain PP3 was cloned into a vector with an N-terminal His tag and expressed in E. coli Nova Blue strain. Purified protein was crystallized in a primitive monoclinic form and a complete native data set was collected and analysed. Pseudomonas putida strain PP3 produces two dehalogenases, DehI and DehII, which belong to the group I and II α-haloacid dehalogenases, respectively. Group I dehalogenases catalyse the removal of halides from d-haloalkanoic acids and in some cases also the l-enantiomers, both substituted at their chiral centres. Studies of members of this group have resulted in the proposal of general catalytic mechanisms, although no structural information is available in order to better characterize their function. This work presents the initial stages of the structural investigation of the group I α-haloacid dehalogenase DehI. The DehI gene was cloned into a pET15b vector with an N-terminal His tag and expressed in Escherichia coli Nova Blue strain. Purified protein was crystallized in 25% PEG 3350, 0.4 M lithium sulfate and 0.1 M bis-tris buffer pH 6.0. The crystals were primitive monoclinic (space group P2{sub 1}), with unit-cell parameters a = 68.32, b = 111.86, c = 75.13 Å, α = 90, β = 93.7, γ = 90°, and a complete native data set was collected. Molecular replacement is not an option for structure determination, so further experimental phasing methods will be necessary.

  20. Purification, crystallization and preliminary crystallographic analysis of DehI, a group I α-haloacid dehalogenase from Pseudomonas putida strain PP3

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Schmidberger, Jason W.; Wilce, Jackie A.; Weightman, Andrew J.; Wilce, Matthew C. J.

    2008-01-01

    The α-haloacid dehalogenase DehI from P. putida strain PP3 was cloned into a vector with an N-terminal His tag and expressed in E. coli Nova Blue strain. Purified protein was crystallized in a primitive monoclinic form and a complete native data set was collected and analysed. Pseudomonas putida strain PP3 produces two dehalogenases, DehI and DehII, which belong to the group I and II α-haloacid dehalogenases, respectively. Group I dehalogenases catalyse the removal of halides from d-haloalkanoic acids and in some cases also the l-enantiomers, both substituted at their chiral centres. Studies of members of this group have resulted in the proposal of general catalytic mechanisms, although no structural information is available in order to better characterize their function. This work presents the initial stages of the structural investigation of the group I α-haloacid dehalogenase DehI. The DehI gene was cloned into a pET15b vector with an N-terminal His tag and expressed in Escherichia coli Nova Blue strain. Purified protein was crystallized in 25% PEG 3350, 0.4 M lithium sulfate and 0.1 M bis-tris buffer pH 6.0. The crystals were primitive monoclinic (space group P2 1 ), with unit-cell parameters a = 68.32, b = 111.86, c = 75.13 Å, α = 90, β = 93.7, γ = 90°, and a complete native data set was collected. Molecular replacement is not an option for structure determination, so further experimental phasing methods will be necessary

  1. Effect of Detergents on Galactoside Binding by Melibiose Permeases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Amin, Anowarul; Hariharan, Parameswaran; Chae, Pil Seok; Guan, Lan

    2015-09-29

    The effect of various detergents on the stability and function of the melibiose permeases of Escherichia coli (MelBEc) and Salmonella typhimurium (MelBSt) was studied. In n-dodecyl-β-d-maltoside (DDM) or n-undecyl-β-d-maltoside (UDM), WT MelBSt binds melibiose with an affinity similar to that in the membrane. However, with WT MelBEc or MelBSt mutants (Arg141 → Cys, Arg295 → Cys, or Arg363 → Cys), galactoside binding is not detected in these detergents, but binding to the phosphotransferase protein IIA(Glc) is maintained. In the amphiphiles lauryl maltose neopentyl glycol (MNG-3) or glyco-diosgenin (GDN), galactoside binding with all of the MelB proteins is observed, with slightly reduced affinities. MelBSt is more thermostable than MelBEc, and the thermostability of either MelB is largely increased in MNG-3 or GDN. Therefore, the functional defect with DDM or UDM likely results from the relative instability of the sensitive MelB proteins, and stability, as well as galactoside binding, is retained in MNG-3 or GDN. Furthermore, isothermal titration calorimetry of melibiose binding with MelBSt shows that the favorable entropic contribution to the binding free energy is decreased in MNG-3, indicating that the conformational dynamics of MelB is restricted in this detergent.

  2. In-silico gene co-expression network analysis in Paracoccidioides brasiliensis with reference to haloacid dehalogenase superfamily hydrolase gene

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Raghunath Satpathy

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Context: Paracoccidioides brasiliensis, a dimorphic fungus is the causative agent of paracoccidioidomycosis, a disease globally affecting millions of people. The haloacid dehalogenase (HAD superfamily hydrolases enzyme in the fungi, in particular, is known to be responsible in the pathogenesis by adhering to the tissue. Hence, identification of novel drug targets is essential. Aims: In-silico based identification of co-expressed genes along with HAD superfamily hydrolase in P. brasiliensis during the morphogenesis from mycelium to yeast to identify possible genes as drug targets. Materials and Methods: In total, four datasets were retrieved from the NCBI-gene expression omnibus (GEO database, each containing 4340 genes, followed by gene filtration expression of the data set. Further co-expression (CE study was performed individually and then a combination these genes were visualized in the Cytoscape 2. 8.3. Statistical Analysis Used: Mean and standard deviation value of the HAD superfamily hydrolase gene was obtained from the expression data and this value was subsequently used for the CE calculation purpose by selecting specific correlation power and filtering threshold. Results: The 23 genes that were thus obtained are common with respect to the HAD superfamily hydrolase gene. A significant network was selected from the Cytoscape network visualization that contains total 7 genes out of which 5 genes, which do not have significant protein hits, obtained from gene annotation of the expressed sequence tags by BLAST X. For all the protein PSI-BLAST was performed against human genome to find the homology. Conclusions: The gene co-expression network was obtained with respect to HAD superfamily dehalogenase gene in P. Brasiliensis.

  3. Crystallization and preliminary X-ray studies of TON-1713 from Thermococcus onnurineus NA1, a putative member of the haloacid dehalogenase superfamily

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Le, Binh Van; Lee, Hyun Sook; Cho, Yona; Kang, Sung Gyun; Kim, Dong Young; Kim, Yang-Gyun; Kim, Kyeong Kyu

    2007-01-01

    A putative member of the haloacid dehalogenase superfamily from T. onnurineus has been expressed, purified and crystallized using 1.6 M magnesium sulfate as a precipitant. The crystals belonged to the triclinic space group P1 and diffracted to 1.8 Å resolution. The haloacid dehalogenase (HAD) protein superfamily is one of the largest enzyme families and shows hydrolytic activity towards diverse substrates. Structural analyses of enzymes belonging to the HAD family are required to elucidate the molecular basis underlying their broad substrate specificity and reaction mechanism. For this purpose, TON-1713, a hypothetical protein from Thermococcus onnurineus that is a member of the HAD superfamily, was expressed in Escherichia coli, purified and crystallized at 295 K using 1.6 M magnesium sulfate as a precipitant. X-ray diffraction data were collected to 1.8 Å resolution using a synchrotron-radiation source. The crystals belong to the triclinic space group P1, with unit-cell parameters a = 52.5, b = 65.8, c = 203.4 Å, α = 71.1, β = 79.9, γ = 74.3°

  4. Temperature effects on sulfate permease in a thermophile and related mesophile

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wang, J.L.; Woodin, T.

    1986-01-01

    The activity and stability of a specific membrane function, sulfate permease, from Penicillium duponti (PD) a thermophilic fungus capable of growth between 30 and 58 0 and from Pencilium chrysogenum (PC) a mesophial capable of growth between 4 and 33 0 were compared to determine whether such activity reflects actual or optimal growth temperature. Permease was assayed by incubating derepressed mycelia (grown in media containing 1.0 mg/l cysteic acid instead of 1.0 g/l SO 4 ) with radioactive sulfate, collecting mycelia at 30 sec intervals and counting the 35 S incorporated into mycelial pellets. Mycelia from cells grown at 8 0 (PC only), 30 0 (PC and PD) or 50 0 (PD only) were assayed. The temperature optimum from PC cells grown at either 8 or 30 0 is 25 0 , while the temperature optimum from PD cells grown at either 30 or 50 0 is 45 0 . However the specific activity of the permease, the shape of the temperature optimum curve and the stability of the permease vary dramatically with the growth temperature and growth stage of the mycelia. There is an apparent ability to compensate for growth at lower temperature by either an increase in permease specific activity in 30 0 grown PD cells or a broadening of the temperature optimum curve for 8 0 grown PC. Transfer of cells grown in complete media (citrate No. 3 containing 4% glucose and 1 g/l sodium sulfate) to media lacking sulfate also results in derepression for sulfate permease. The time course and maximum amount of derepression observed reflects fungal growth temperature

  5. Kinetic Analysis of Lactose Exchange in Proteoliposomes Reconstituted with Purified lac Permease

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Lolkema, Julius S.; Carrasco, Nancy; Kaback, H. Ronald

    1991-01-01

    Lactose exchange catalyzed by purified lac permease reconstituted into proteoliposomes was analyzed with unequal concentrations of lactose on either side of the membrane and at low pH so as to prevent equilibration of the two pools. Exchange with external concentrations below 1.0 mM is a

  6. In vivo expression of the lacY gene in two segments leads to functional lac permease

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bibi, E.; Kaback, H.R.

    1990-01-01

    The lacY gene of Escherichia coli was cut into two approximately equal-size fragments with Afl II and subcloned individually or together under separate lac operator/promoters in plasmid pT7-5. Under these conditions, lac permease is expressed in two portions: (i) the N-terminal portion (the N terminus, the first six putative transmembrane helices, and most of putative loop 7) and (ii) the C-terminal portion (the last six putative transmembrane helices and the C terminus). Cells harboring pT7-5 encoding both fragments transport lactose at about 30% the rate of cells expressing intact permease to a comparable steady-state level of accumulation. In contrast, cells expressing either half of the permease independently do not transport lactose. As judged by [ 35 S]methionine labeling and immunoblotting, intact permease in completely absent from the membrane of cells expressing lacY fragments either individually or together. Thus, transport activity must result from an association between independently synthesized pieces of lac permease. When the gene fragments are expressed individually, the N-terminal portion of the permease is observed inconsistently, and the C-terminal portion is not observed. When the gene fragments are expressed together, polypeptides identified as the N- and C-terminal moieties of the permease are found in the membrane. It is concluded that the N- or C-terminal halves of lac permease are proteolyzed when synthesized independently and that association between the two complementing polypeptides leads to a more stable, catalytically active complex

  7. The Role of Amino Acid Permeases and Tryptophan Biosynthesis in Cryptococcus neoformans Survival.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    João Daniel Santos Fernandes

    Full Text Available Metabolic diversity is an important factor during microbial adaptation to different environments. Among metabolic processes, amino acid biosynthesis has been demonstrated to be relevant for survival for many microbial pathogens, whereas the association between pathogenesis and amino acid uptake and recycling are less well-established. Cryptococcus neoformans is an opportunistic fungal pathogen with many habitats. As a result, it faces frequent metabolic shifts and challenges during its life cycle. Here we studied the C. neoformans tryptophan biosynthetic pathway and found that the pathway is essential. RNAi indicated that interruptions in the biosynthetic pathway render strains inviable. However, auxotroph complementation can be partially achieved by tryptophan uptake when a non preferred nitrogen source and lower growth temperature are applied, suggesting that amino acid permeases may be the target of nitrogen catabolism repression (NCR. We used bioinformatics to search for amino acid permeases in the C. neoformans and found eight potential global permeases (AAP1 to AAP8. The transcriptional profile of them revealed that they are subjected to regulatory mechanisms which are known to respond to nutritional status in other fungi, such as (i quality of nitrogen (Nitrogen Catabolism Repression, NCR and carbon sources (Carbon Catabolism Repression, CCR, (ii amino acid availability in the extracellular environment (SPS-sensing and (iii nutritional deprivation (Global Amino Acid Control, GAAC. This study shows that C. neoformans has fewer amino acid permeases than other model yeasts, and that these proteins may be subjected to complex regulatory mechanisms. Our data suggest that the C. neoformans tryptophan biosynthetic pathway is an excellent pharmacological target. Furthermore, inhibitors of this pathway cause Cryptococcus growth arrest in vitro.

  8. pH Regulation of Electrogenic Sugar/H+ Symport in MFS Sugar Permeases

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bazzone, Andre; Madej, M. Gregor; Kaback, H. Ronald

    2016-01-01

    Bacterial sugar symporters in the Major Facilitator Superfamily (MFS) use the H+ (and in a few cases Na+) electrochemical gradients to achieve active transport of sugar into the cell. Because a number of structures of MFS sugar symporters have been solved recently, molecular insight into the transport mechanism is possible from detailed functional analysis. We present here a comparative electrophysiological study of the lactose permease (LacY), the fucose permease (FucP) and the xylose permease (XylE), which reveals common mechanistic principles and differences. In all three symporters energetically downhill electrogenic sugar/H+ symport is observed. Comparison of the pH dependence of symport at symmetrical pH exhibits broad bell-shaped pH profiles extending over 3 to 6 pH units and a decrease at extremely alkaline pH ≥ 9.4 and at acidic to neutral pH = 4.6–7.5. The pH dependence can be described by an acidic to neutral apparent pK (pKapp) and an alkaline pKapp. Experimental evidence suggests that the alkaline pKapp is due to H+ depletion at the protonation site, while the acidic pKapp is due to inhibition of deprotonation. Since previous studies suggest that a single carboxyl group in LacY (Glu325) may be the only side chain directly involved in H+ translocation and a carboxyl side chain with similar properties has been identified in FucP (Asp46) and XylE (Asp27), the present results imply that the pK of this residue is switched during H+/sugar symport in all three symporters. PMID:27227677

  9. Contribution of chloride channel permease to fluoride resistance in Streptococcus mutans.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Murata, Takatoshi; Hanada, Nobuhiro

    2016-06-01

    Genes encoding fluoride transporters have been identified in bacterial and archaeal species. The genome sequence of the cariogenic Streptococcus mutans bacteria suggests the presence of a putative fluoride transporter, which is referred to as a chloride channel permease. Two homologues of this gene (GenBank locus tags SMU_1290c and SMU_1289c) reside in tandem in the genome of S. mutans The aim of this study was to determine whether the chloride channel permeases contribute to fluoride resistance. We constructed SMU_1290c- and SMU_1289c-knockout S. mutans UA159 strains. We also constructed a double-knockout strain lacking both genes. SMU_1290c or SMU_1289c was transformed into a fluoride transporter- disrupted Escherichia coli strain. All bacterial strains were cultured under appropriate conditions with or without sodium fluoride, and fluoride resistance was evaluated. All three gene-knockout S. mutans strains showed lower resistance to sodium fluoride than did the wild-type strain. No significant changes in resistance to other sodium halides were recognized between the wild-type and double-knockout strains. Both SMU_1290c and SMU_1289c transformation rescued fluoride transporter-disrupted E. coli cell from fluoride toxicity. We conclude that the chloride channel permeases contribute to fluoride resistance in S. mutans. © FEMS 2016. All rights reserved. For permissions, please e-mail: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  10. An Expanding Role For Purine Uptake Permease (PUP -like Transporters In Plant Secondary Metabolism.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    John G. Jelesko

    2012-05-01

    Full Text Available For the past decade, our understanding of the plant purine uptake permease (PUP transporter family of was primarily oriented on purine nucleobase substrates and their tissue-specific expression patterns in Arabidopsis. However, a tobacco PUP-like homolog demonstrating nicotine uptake permease (NUP activity was recently shown to affect both nicotine metabolism and root cell growth. These new findings expand the physiological role for PUP-like transporters to include plant secondary metabolism. Molecular evolution analyses of PUP-like transporters indicate they are distinct group within an ancient super family of drug and metabolite transporters (DMTs. The PUP-like family originated during terrestrial plant evolution sometime between the bryophytes and the lycophytes. A phylogenetic analysis indicates that the PUP-like transporters were likely were derived from a pre-existing nucleotide sugar transporter family within the DMT super family. Within the lycophyte Selaginella, there are three paralogous groups of PUP-like transporters. One of the three PUP-like paralogous groups showed an extensive pattern of gene duplication and diversification within the angiosperm lineage, whereas the other two more ancestral PUP-like paralogous groups did not. Biochemical characterization of four closely-related PUP-like paralogs together with model-based phylogenetic analyses indicate both subfunctionalization and neofunctionalization during the molecular evolution of angiosperm PUP-like transporters. These findings suggest that members of the PUP-like family of DMT transporters are likely involved in diverse primary and secondary plant metabolic pathways.

  11. Characterization of the Candida albicans Amino Acid Permease Family: Gap2 Is the Only General Amino Acid Permease and Gap4 Is an S-Adenosylmethionine (SAM) Transporter Required for SAM-Induced Morphogenesis

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Kraidlová, Lucie; Schrevens, S.; Tournu, H.; Van Zeebroeck, G.; Sychrová, Hana; Van Dijck, P.

    2016-01-01

    Roč. 1, č. 6 (2016), č. článku e00284-16. ISSN 2379-5042 R&D Projects: GA ČR(CZ) GA16-03398S Institutional support: RVO:67985823 Keywords : Candida albicans * GAP1 * S-adenosyl methionine * general amino acid permease * morphogenesis Subject RIV: EE - Microbiology, Virology

  12. TOR induced resistance to toxic adenosine analogs in Leishmania brought about by the internalization and degradation of the adenosine permease

    Science.gov (United States)

    Detke, Siegfried

    2007-01-01

    TOR is an atypical multidrug resistance protein present in the human protozoan parasite, Leishmania. Resistance to the toxic adenosine analog tubercidin was brought about by redirecting the adenosine permease from the plasma membrane to the multivesicular tubule lysosome. The cells became resistant to tubercidin because they were unable to take up and accumulate this toxic purine. The domain which was recognized by TOR in this internalization pathway was identified by expressing portions of this transporter in Leishmania and assessing whether they were capable of hindering the multidrug resistance capability of TOR. This approach identified the adenosine permease region spanning Met289 to Trp305. This region was also the epitope recognized by the internalization mechanism. An internal deletion mutant lacking Met289-Trp305 was functionally active but could no longer be internalized in cells with high TOR levels. The internalization and altered trafficking of the adenosine permease by TOR was observed in yeast and human embryonic kidney cells co-expressing these two Leishmania proteins indicating that the internalization process was conserved in evolutionary diverse organisms. The inability of Saccharomyces with a temperature sensitive ubiquitin ligase to internalize adenosine permease suggested that ubiquitination was involved in this altered trafficking. PMID:17428463

  13. Characterization of a second physiologically relevant lactose permease gene (lacpB) in Aspergillus nidulans.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fekete, Erzsébet; Orosz, Anita; Kulcsár, László; Kavalecz, Napsugár; Flipphi, Michel; Karaffa, Levente

    2016-05-01

    In Aspergillus nidulans, uptake rather than hydrolysis is the rate-limiting step of lactose catabolism. Deletion of the lactose permease A-encoding gene (lacpA) reduces the growth rate on lactose, while its overexpression enables faster growth than wild-type strains are capable of. We have identified a second physiologically relevant lactose transporter, LacpB. Glycerol-grown mycelia from mutants deleted for lacpB appear to take up only minute amounts of lactose during the first 60 h after a medium transfer, while mycelia of double lacpA/lacpB-deletant strains are unable to produce new biomass from lactose. Although transcription of both lacp genes was strongly induced by lactose, their inducer profiles differ markedly. lacpA but not lacpB expression was high in d-galactose cultures. However, lacpB responded strongly also to β-linked glucopyranose dimers cellobiose and sophorose, while these inducers of the cellulolytic system did not provoke any lacpA response. Nevertheless, lacpB transcript was induced to higher levels on cellobiose in strains that lack the lacpA gene than in a wild-type background. Indeed, cellobiose uptake was faster and biomass formation accelerated in lacpA deletants. In contrast, in lacpB knockout strains, growth rate and cellobiose uptake were considerably reduced relative to wild-type, indicating that the cellulose and lactose catabolic systems employ common elements. Nevertheless, our permease mutants still grew on cellobiose, which suggests that its uptake in A. nidulans prominently involves hitherto unknown transport systems.

  14. Amino acid residues important for substrate specificity of the amino acid permeases Can I p and Gnp I p in Saccharomyces cerevisiae

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Regenberg, Birgitte; Kielland-Brandt, M.C.

    2001-01-01

    Deletion of the general amino acid permease gene GAP1 abolishes uptake of L-citrulline in Saccharomyces cerevisiae, resulting in the inability to grow on L-citrulline as sole nitrogen source. Selection for suppressor mutants that restored growth on L-citrulline led to isolation of 21 mutations...... in the arginine permease gene CAN1. One similar mutation was found in the glutamine-asparagine permease gene GNP1. L-[C-14]citrulline uptake measurements confirmed that suppressor mutations in CAN1 conferred uptake of this amino acid, while none of the mutant permeases had lost the ability to transport L-[C-14......]arginine. Substrate specificity seemed to remain narrow in most cases, and broad substrate specificity was only observed in the cases where mutations affect two proline residues (P148 and P313) that are both conserved in the amino acid-polyamine-choline (APC) transporter superfamily. We found mutations...

  15. Identification and characterization of trimethylamine N-oxide (TMAO) demethylase and TMAO permease in Methylocella silvestris BL2

    OpenAIRE

    Zhu, Yijun; Jameson, Eleanor; Parslow, Rosemary A.; Lidbury, Ian; Fu, Tiantian; Dafforn, Tim; Schäfer, Hendrik; Chen, Yin

    2014-01-01

    Methylocella silvestris, an alphaproteobacterium isolated from a forest soil, can grow on trimethylamine N-oxide (TMAO) as a sole nitrogen source, however, the molecular and biochemical mechanisms underpinning its growth remain unknown. Marker-exchange mutagenesisenabled the identification of several genes involved in TMAO metabolism, including Msil_3606, a permease of the amino acids-polyamine (APC) superfamily, and Msil_3603, consisting of anN-terminal domain of unknown function (DUF1989) a...

  16. Coarse-grained Simulations of Sugar Transport and Conformational Changes of Lactose Permease

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Jin; Jewel, S. M. Yead; Dutta, Prashanta

    2016-11-01

    Escherichia coli lactose permease (LacY) actively transports lactose and other galactosides across cell membranes through lactose/H+ symport process. Lactose/H+ symport is a highly complex process that involves sugar translocation, H+ transfer, as well as large-scale protein conformational changes. The complete picture of lactose/H+ symport is largely unclear due to the complexity and multiscale nature of the process. In this work, we develop the force field for sugar molecules compatible with PACE, a hybrid and coarse-grained force field that couples the united-atom protein models with the coarse-grained MARTINI water/lipid. After validation, we implement the new force field to investigate the transport of a β-D-galactopyranosyl-1-thio- β-D-galactopyranoside (TDG) molecule across a wild-type LacY during lactose/H+ symport process. Results show that the local interactions between TDG and LacY at the binding pocket are consistent with the X-ray experiment. Protonation of Glu325 stabilizes the TDG and inward-facing conformation of LacY. Protonation of Glu269 induces a dramatic protein structural reorganization and causes the expulsion of TDG from LacY to both sides of the membrane. The structural changes occur primarily in the N-terminal domain of LacY. This work is supported by NSF Grants: CBET-1250107 and CBET -1604211.

  17. Exploration of Structural Changes in Lactose Permease on Sugar Binding and Proton Transport through Atomistic Simulations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Jin; Jewel, Yead; Dutta, Prashanta

    2017-11-01

    Escherichia coli lactose permease (LacY) actively transports lactose and other galactosides across cell membranes through lactose/H+ symport process. Lactose/H+ symport is a highly complex process that involves large-scale protein conformational changes. The complete picture of lactose/H+ symport is largely unclear. In this work, we develop the force field for sugar molecules compatible with PACE, a hybrid and coarse-grained force field that couples the united-atom protein models with the coarse-grained MARTINI water/lipid. After validation, we implement the new force field to investigate the binding of a β-D-galactopyranosyl-1-thio- β-D-galactopyranoside (TDG) molecule to a wild-type LacY. Transitions from inward-facing to outward-facing conformations upon TDG binding and protonation of Glu269 have been achieved from microsecond simulations. Both the opening of the periplasmic side and closure of the cytoplasmic side of LacY are consistent with experiments. Our analysis suggest that the conformational changes of LacY are a cumulative consequence of inter-domain H-bonds breaking at the periplasmic side, inter-domain salt-bridge formation at the cytoplasmic side, as well as the TDG orientational changes during the transition. This work is supported by US National Science Foundation under Grant No. CBET-1604211.

  18. Medicago truncatula Zinc-Iron Permease6 provides zinc to rhizobia-infected nodule cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abreu, Isidro; Saéz, Ángela; Castro-Rodríguez, Rosario; Escudero, Viviana; Rodríguez-Haas, Benjamín; Senovilla, Marta; Larue, Camille; Grolimund, Daniel; Tejada-Jiménez, Manuel; Imperial, Juan; González-Guerrero, Manuel

    2017-11-01

    Zinc is a micronutrient required for symbiotic nitrogen fixation. It has been proposed that in model legume Medicago truncatula, zinc is delivered by the root vasculature into the nodule and released in the infection/differentiation zone. There, transporters must introduce this element into rhizobia-infected cells to metallate the apoproteins that use zinc as a cofactor. MtZIP6 (Medtr4g083570) is an M. truncatula Zinc-Iron Permease (ZIP) that is expressed only in roots and nodules, with the highest expression levels in the infection/differentiation zone. Immunolocalization studies indicate that it is located in the plasma membrane of nodule rhizobia-infected cells. Down-regulating MtZIP6 expression levels with RNAi does not result in any strong phenotype when plants are fed mineral nitrogen. However, these plants displayed severe growth defects when they depended on nitrogen fixed by their nodules, losing of 80% of their nitrogenase activity. The reduction of this activity was likely an indirect effect of zinc being retained in the infection/differentiation zone and not reaching the cytosol of rhizobia-infected cells. These data are consistent with a model in which MtZIP6 would be responsible for zinc uptake by rhizobia-infected nodule cells in the infection/differentiation zone. © 2017 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  19. Endocytosis of a maltose permease is induced when amylolytic enzyme production is repressed in Aspergillus oryzae.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hiramoto, Tetsuya; Tanaka, Mizuki; Ichikawa, Takanori; Matsuura, Yuka; Hasegawa-Shiro, Sachiko; Shintani, Takahiro; Gomi, Katsuya

    2015-09-01

    In the filamentous fungus Aspergillus oryzae, amylolytic enzyme production is induced by the presence of maltose. Previously, we identified a putative maltose permease (MalP) gene in the maltose-utilizing cluster of A. oryzae. malP disruption causes a significant decrease in α-amylase activity and maltose consumption, indicating that MalP is a maltose transporter required for amylolytic enzyme production in A. oryzae. Although the expression of amylase genes and malP is repressed by the presence of glucose, the effect of glucose on the abundance of functional MalP is unknown. In this study, we examined the effect of glucose and other carbon sources on the subcellular localization of green fluorescence protein (GFP)-tagged MalP. After glucose addition, GFP-MalP at the plasma membrane was internalized and delivered to the vacuole. This glucose-induced internalization of GFP-MalP was inhibited by treatment with latrunculin B, an inhibitor of actin polymerization. Furthermore, GFP-MalP internalization was inhibited by repressing the HECT ubiquitin ligase HulA (ortholog of yeast Rsp5). These results suggest that MalP is transported to the vacuole by endocytosis in the presence of glucose. Besides glucose, mannose and 2-deoxyglucose also induced the endocytosis of GFP-MalP and amylolytic enzyme production was inhibited by the addition of these sugars. However, neither the subcellular localization of GFP-MalP nor amylolytic enzyme production was influenced by the addition of xylose or 3-O-methylglucose. These results imply that MalP endocytosis is induced when amylolytic enzyme production is repressed. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  20. Functional mapping and implications of substrate specificity of the yeast high-affinity leucine permease Bap2.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Usami, Yuki; Uemura, Satsohi; Mochizuki, Takahiro; Morita, Asami; Shishido, Fumi; Inokuchi, Jin-ichi; Abe, Fumiyoshi

    2014-07-01

    Leucine is a major amino acid in nutrients and proteins and is also an important precursor of higher alcohols during brewing. In Saccharomyces cerevisiae, leucine uptake is mediated by multiple amino acid permeases, including the high-affinity leucine permease Bap2. Although BAP2 transcription has been extensively analyzed, the mechanisms by which a substrate is recognized and moves through the permease remain unknown. Recently, we determined 15 amino acid residues required for Tat2-mediated tryptophan import. Here we introduced homologous mutations into Bap2 amino acid residues and showed that 7 residues played a role in leucine import. Residues I109/G110/T111 and E305 were located within the putative α-helix break in TMD1 and TMD6, respectively, according to the structurally homologous Escherichia coli arginine/agmatine antiporter AdiC. Upon leucine binding, these α-helix breaks were assumed to mediate a conformational transition in Bap2 from an outward-open to a substrate-binding occluded state. Residues Y336 (TMD7) and Y181 (TMD3) were located near I109 and E305, respectively. Bap2-mediated leucine import was inhibited by some amino acids according to the following order of severity: phenylalanine, leucine>isoleucine>methionine, tyrosine>valine>tryptophan; histidine and asparagine had no effect. Moreover, this order of severity clearly coincided with the logP values (octanol-water partition coefficients) of all amino acids except tryptophan. This result suggests that the substrate partition efficiency to the buried Bap2 binding pocket is the primary determinant of substrate specificity rather than structural amino acid side chain recognition. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  1. Deletion mutants of the Escherichia coli K-12 mannitol permease: dissection of transport-phosphorylation, phospho-exchange, and mannitol-binding activities.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grisafi, P L; Scholle, A; Sugiyama, J; Briggs, C; Jacobson, G R; Lengeler, J W

    1989-05-01

    We have constructed a series of deletion mutations of the cloned Escherichia coli K-12 mtlA gene, which encodes the mannitol-specific enzyme II of the phosphoenolpyruvate (PEP)-dependent carbohydrate phosphotransferase system. This membrane-bound permease consists of 637 amino acid residues and is responsible for the concomitant transport and phosphorylation of D-mannitol in E. coli. Deletions into the 3' end of mtlA were constructed by exonuclease III digestion. Restriction mapping of the resultant plasmids identified several classes of deletions that lacked approximately 5% to more than 75% of the gene. Immunoblotting experiments revealed that many of these plasmids expressed proteins within the size range predicted by the restriction analyses, and all of these proteins were membrane localized, which demonstrated that none of the C-terminal half of the permease is required for membrane insertion. Functional analyses of the deletion proteins, expressed in an E. coli strain deleted for the chromosomal copy of mtlA, showed that all but one of the strains containing confirmed deletions were inactive in transport and PEP-dependent phosphorylation of mannitol, but deletions removing up to at least 117 amino acid residues from the C terminus of the permease were still active in catalyzing phospho exchange between mannitol 1-phosphate and mannitol. A deletion protein that lacked 240 residues from the C terminus of the permease was inactive in phospho exchange but still bound mannitol with high affinity. These experiments localize sites important for transport and PEP-dependent phosphorylation to the extreme C terminus of the mannitol permease, sites important for phospho exchange to between residues 377 and 519, and sites necessary for mannitol binding to the N-terminal 60% of the molecule. The results are discussed with respect to the fact that the mannitol permease consists of structurally independent N- and C-terminal domains.

  2. Agp2, a Member of the Yeast Amino Acid Permease Family, Positively Regulates Polyamine Transport at the Transcriptional Level

    KAUST Repository

    Aouida, Mustapha

    2013-06-03

    Agp2 is a plasma membrane protein of the Saccharomyces cerevisiae amino acid transporter family, involved in high-affinity uptake of various substrates including L-carnitine and polyamines. The discovery of two high affinity polyamine permeases, Dur3 and Sam3, prompted us to investigate whether Agp2 directly transports polyamines or acts instead as a regulator. Herein, we show that neither dur3? nor sam3? single mutant is defective in polyamine transport, while the dur3? sam3? double mutant exhibits a sharp decrease in polyamine uptake and an increased resistance to polyamine toxicity similar to the agp2? mutant. Studies of Agp2 localization indicate that in the double mutant dur3? sam3?, Agp2-GFP remains plasma membrane-localized, even though transport of polyamines is strongly reduced. We further demonstrate that Agp2 controls the expression of several transporter genes including DUR3 and SAM3, the carnitine transporter HNM1 and several hexose, nucleoside and vitamin permease genes, in addition to SKY1 encoding a SR kinase that positively regulates low-affinity polyamine uptake. Furthermore, gene expression analysis clearly suggests that Agp2 is a strong positive regulator of additional biological processes. Collectively, our data suggest that Agp2 might respond to environmental cues and thus regulate the expression of several genes including those involved in polyamine transport. © 2013 Aouida et al.

  3. Agp2, a Member of the Yeast Amino Acid Permease Family, Positively Regulates Polyamine Transport at the Transcriptional Level

    KAUST Repository

    Aouida, Mustapha; Texeira, Marta Rubio; Thevelein, Johan M.; Poulin, Richard; Ramotar, Dindial

    2013-01-01

    Agp2 is a plasma membrane protein of the Saccharomyces cerevisiae amino acid transporter family, involved in high-affinity uptake of various substrates including L-carnitine and polyamines. The discovery of two high affinity polyamine permeases, Dur3 and Sam3, prompted us to investigate whether Agp2 directly transports polyamines or acts instead as a regulator. Herein, we show that neither dur3? nor sam3? single mutant is defective in polyamine transport, while the dur3? sam3? double mutant exhibits a sharp decrease in polyamine uptake and an increased resistance to polyamine toxicity similar to the agp2? mutant. Studies of Agp2 localization indicate that in the double mutant dur3? sam3?, Agp2-GFP remains plasma membrane-localized, even though transport of polyamines is strongly reduced. We further demonstrate that Agp2 controls the expression of several transporter genes including DUR3 and SAM3, the carnitine transporter HNM1 and several hexose, nucleoside and vitamin permease genes, in addition to SKY1 encoding a SR kinase that positively regulates low-affinity polyamine uptake. Furthermore, gene expression analysis clearly suggests that Agp2 is a strong positive regulator of additional biological processes. Collectively, our data suggest that Agp2 might respond to environmental cues and thus regulate the expression of several genes including those involved in polyamine transport. © 2013 Aouida et al.

  4. Identification and Characterization of Novel Plant Adenylate Cyclases – The Arabidopsis Thaliana Potassium Uptake Permeases

    KAUST Repository

    Al-Younis, Inas M.

    2018-05-01

    Adenylyl Cyclases (ACs) catalyze the formation of the key universal second messenger adenosine 3’, 5’-cyclic monophosphate (cAMP) from adenosine 5’- triphosphate. Cyclic AMP participates in several signal transduction pathways and is present in bacteria and higher and lower eukaryotes including higher plants. Previous studies in plants have shown a role for cAMP in signal transduction during e.g. the cell cycle, elongation of the pollen tube and stimulation of protein kinase activity. More recently cAMP has been shown to play a role in stress responses. Interestingly, cAMP has also been shown to regulate ion transport in plant cells. Here we used a similar strategy that led to the discovery of the first guanylyl cyclase in plants that was based on the alignment of conserved and functionally assigned amino acids in the catalytic centre of annotated nucleotide cyclases from lower and higher eukaryotes, to identify a novel candidate ACs in Arabidopsis (Arabidopsis thaliana K+ Uptake 5 and 7). ATKUP5 and 7 are homologous to K+ uptake permeases (KUPs) from bacteria and high-affinity K+ transporters (HAKs) from fungi. The AC activity was investigated by recombinantly expressing the ATKUP5 and 7 AC domain in vitro and by complementation of an E. coli AC mutant (cyaA). Furthermore, ATKUP5 was tested for its ability to functionally complement a yeast mutant deficient in Trk1 and Trk2 high affinity potassium uptake transporters. Site-mutagenesis in the AC domain was used to test the effect of both functions in each other. Furthermore, ATKUP5 was characterized electrophysiologically in HEK-293 cells to characterize the nature of this transporter. The localization of the ATKUP5 in Arabidopsis was examined using a Green Fluorescent Protein (GFP) fusion with the ATKUP5 to determine whether ATKUP5 is expressed at the plasma or tonoplast membrane. Arabiodpsis thaliana of the wild type, overexpressing ATKUP5 and atkup5 mutant lines were used to examine phenotypic differences.

  5. The Arabidopsis thalianaK+-uptake permease 7 (AtKUP7) contains a functional cytosolic adenylate cyclase catalytic centre

    KAUST Repository

    Al-Younis, Inas

    2015-11-27

    Adenylate Cyclases (ACs) catalyze the formation of the second messenger cyclic adenosine 3′, 5′-monophosphate (cAMP) from adenosine 5’-triphosphate (ATP). Although cAMP is increasingly recognized as an important signaling molecule in higher plants, ACs have remained somewhat elusive. Here we used a search motif derived from experimentally tested guanylyl cyclases (GCs), substituted the residues essential for substrate specificity and identified the Arabidopsis thaliana K+-uptake permease 7 (AtKUP7) as one of several candidate ACs. Firstly, we show that a recombinant N-terminal, cytosolic domain of AtKUP71-100 is able to complement the AC-deficient mutant cyaA in Escherichia coli and thus restoring the fermentation of lactose, and secondly, we demonstrate with both enzyme immunoassays and mass spectrometry that a recombinant AtKUP71-100 generates cAMP in vitro.

  6. Crystal structure of lactose permease in complex with an affinity inactivator yields unique insight into sugar recognition

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chaptal, Vincent; Kwon, Seunghyug; Sawaya, Michael R.; Guan, Lan; Kaback, H. Ronald; Abramson, Jeff (UCLA); (TTU)

    2011-08-29

    Lactose permease of Escherichia coli (LacY) with a single-Cys residue in place of A122 (helix IV) transports galactopyranosides and is specifically inactivated by methanethiosulfonyl-galactopyranosides (MTS-gal), which behave as unique suicide substrates. In order to study the mechanism of inactivation more precisely, we solved the structure of single-Cys122 LacY in complex with covalently bound MTS-gal. This structure exhibits an inward-facing conformation similar to that observed previously with a slight narrowing of the cytoplasmic cavity. MTS-gal is bound covalently, forming a disulfide bond with C122 and positioned between R144 and W151. E269, a residue essential for binding, coordinates the C-4 hydroxyl of the galactopyranoside moiety. The location of the sugar is in accord with many biochemical studies.

  7. Insight on specificity of uracil permeases of the NAT/NCS2 family from analysis of the transporter encoded in the pyrimidine utilization operon of Escherichia coli.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Botou, Maria; Lazou, Panayiota; Papakostas, Konstantinos; Lambrinidis, George; Evangelidis, Thomas; Mikros, Emmanuel; Frillingos, Stathis

    2018-04-01

    The uracil permease UraA of Escherichia coli is a structurally known prototype for the ubiquitous Nucleobase-Ascorbate Transporter (NAT) or Nucleobase-Cation Symporter-2 (NCS2) family and represents a well-defined subgroup of bacterial homologs that remain functionally unstudied. Here, we analyze four of these homologs, including RutG of E. coli which shares 35% identity with UraA and is encoded in the catabolic rut (pyrimidine utilization) operon. Using amplified expression in E. coli K-12, we show that RutG is a high-affinity permease for uracil, thymine and, at low efficiency, xanthine and recognizes also 5-fluorouracil and oxypurinol. In contrast, UraA and the homologs from Acinetobacter calcoaceticus and Aeromonas veronii are permeases specific for uracil and 5-fluorouracil. Molecular docking indicates that thymine is hindered from binding to UraA by a highly conserved Phe residue which is absent in RutG. Site-directed replacement of this Phe with Ala in the three uracil-specific homologs allows high-affinity recognition and/or transport of thymine, emulating the RutG profile. Furthermore, all RutG orthologs from enterobacteria retain an Ala at this position, implying that they can use both uracil and thymine and, possibly, xanthine as substrates and provide the bacterial cell with a range of catabolizable nucleobases. © 2018 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  8. Identification and characterization of trimethylamine N-oxide (TMAO) demethylase and TMAO permease in Methylocella silvestris BL2.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhu, Yijun; Jameson, Eleanor; Parslow, Rosemary A; Lidbury, Ian; Fu, Tiantian; Dafforn, Timothy R; Schäfer, Hendrik; Chen, Yin

    2014-10-01

    Methylocella silvestris, an alphaproteobacterium isolated from a forest soil, can grow on trimethylamine N-oxide (TMAO) as a sole nitrogen source; however, the molecular and biochemical mechanisms underpinning its growth remain unknown. Marker-exchange mutagenesis enabled the identification of several genes involved in TMAO metabolism, including Msil_3606, a permease of the amino acids-polyamine (APC) superfamily, and Msil_3603, consisting of an N-terminal domain of unknown function (DUF1989) and a C-terminal tetrahydrofolate-binding domain. Null mutants of Msil_3603 and Msil_3606 can no longer grow on TMAO. Purified Msil_3603 from recombinant Escherichia coli can convert TMAO to dimethylamine and formaldehyde (1 TMAO → 1 dimethylamine + 1 formaldehyde), confirming that it encodes a bona fide TMAO demethylase (Tdm). Tdm of M. silvestris and eukaryotic Tdms have no sequence homology and contrasting characteristics. Recombinant Tdm of M. silvestris appears to be hexameric, has a high affinity for TMAO (Km = 3.3 mM; Vmax = 21.7 nmol min(-1)  mg(-1) ) and only catalyses demethylation of TMAO and a structural homologue, dimethyldodecylamine N-oxide. Our study has contributed to the understanding of the genetic and biochemical mechanisms for TMAO degradation in M. silvestris. © 2014 Society for Applied Microbiology and John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  9. Isolation and Characterization of a Gene Specific to Lager Brewing Yeast That Encodes a Branched-Chain Amino Acid Permease

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kodama, Yukiko; Omura, Fumihiko; Ashikari, Toshihiko

    2001-01-01

    We found two types of branched-chain amino acid permease gene (BAP2) in the lager brewing yeast Saccharomyces pastorianus BH-225 and cloned one type of BAP2 gene (Lg-BAP2), which is identical to that of Saccharomyces bayanus (by-BAP2-1). The other BAP2 gene of the lager brewing yeast (cer-BAP2) is very similar to the Saccharomyces cerevisiae BAP2 gene. This result substantiates the notion that lager brewing yeast is a hybrid of S. cerevisiae and S. bayanus. The amino acid sequence homology between S. cerevisiae Bap2p and Lg-Bap2p was 88%. The transcription of Lg-BAP2 was not induced by the addition of leucine to the growth medium, while that of cer-BAP2 was induced. The transcription of Lg-BAP2 was repressed by the presence of ethanol and weak organic acid, while that of cer-BAP2 was not affected by these compounds. Furthermore, Northern analysis during beer fermentation revealed that the transcription of Lg-BAP2 was repressed at the beginning of the fermentation, while cer-BAP2 was highly expressed throughout the fermentation. These results suggest that the transcription of Lg-BAP2 is regulated differently from that of cer-BAP2 in lager brewing yeasts. PMID:11472919

  10. A constitutive pan-hexose permease for the Plasmodium life cycle and transgenic models for screening of antimalarial sugar analogs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Blume, Martin; Hliscs, Marion; Rodriguez-Contreras, Dayana; Sanchez, Marco; Landfear, Scott; Lucius, Richard; Matuschewski, Kai; Gupta, Nishith

    2011-04-01

    Glucose is considered essential for erythrocytic stages of the malaria parasite, Plasmodium falciparum. Importance of sugar and its permease for hepatic and sexual stages of Plasmodium, however, remains elusive. Moreover, increasing global resistance to current antimalarials necessitates the search for novel drugs. Here, we reveal that hexose transporter 1 (HT1) of Plasmodium berghei can transport glucose (K(m)~87 μM), mannose (K(i)~93 μM), fructose (K(i)~0.54 mM), and galactose (K(i)~5 mM) in Leishmania mexicana mutant and Xenopus laevis; and, therefore, is functionally equivalent to HT1 of P. falciparum (Glc, K(m)~175 μM; Man, K(i)~276 μM; Fru, K(i)~1.25 mM; Gal, K(i)~5.86 mM). Notably, a glucose analog, C3361, attenuated hepatic (IC(50)~15 μM) and ookinete development of P. berghei. The PbHT1 could be ablated during intraerythrocytic stages only by concurrent complementation with PbHT1-HA or PfHT1. Together; these results signify that PbHT1 and glucose are required for the entire life cycle of P. berghei. Accordingly, PbHT1 is expressed in the plasma membrane during all parasite stages. To permit a high-throughput screening of PfHT1 inhibitors and their subsequent in vivo assessment, we have generated Saccharomyces cerevisiae mutant expressing codon-optimized PfHT1, and a PfHT1-dependent Δpbht1 parasite strain. This work provides a platform to facilitate the development of drugs against malaria, and it suggests a disease-control aspect by reducing parasite transmission.

  11. Exploration of conformational changes in lactose permease upon sugar binding and proton transfer through coarse-grained simulations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jewel, Yead; Dutta, Prashanta; Liu, Jin

    2017-10-01

    Escherichia coli lactose permease (LacY) actively transports lactose and other galactosides across cell membranes through lactose/H + symport process. Lactose/H + symport is a highly complex process that involves sugar translocation, H + transfer, and large-scale protein conformational changes. The complete picture of lactose/H + symport is largely unclear due to the complexity and multiscale nature of the process. In this work, we develop the force field for sugar molecules compatible with PACE, a hybrid and coarse-grained force field that couples the united-atom protein models with the coarse-grained MARTINI water/lipid. After validation, we implement the new force field to investigate the binding of a β-d-galactopyranosyl-1-thio- β-d-galactopyranoside (TDG) molecule to a wild-type LacY. Results show that the local interactions between TDG and LacY at the binding pocket are consistent with the X-ray experiment. Transitions from inward-facing to outward-facing conformations upon TDG binding and protonation of Glu269 have been achieved from ∼5.5 µs simulations. Both the opening of the periplasmic side and closure of the cytoplasmic side of LacY are consistent with double electron-electron resonance and thiol cross-linking experiments. Our analysis suggests that the conformational changes of LacY are a cumulative consequence of interdomain H-bonds breaking at the periplasmic side, interdomain salt-bridge formation at the cytoplasmic side, and the TDG orientational changes during the transition. © 2017 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  12. Melibiose permease and alpha-galactosidase of Escherichia coli: Identification by selective labeling using a T7 RNA polymerase/promoter expression system

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pourcher, T.; Bassilana, M.; Sarkar, H.K.; Kaback, H.R.; Leblanc, G.

    1990-01-01

    Identification and selective labeling of the melibiose permease and alpha-galactosidase in Escherichia coli, which are encoded by the melB and melA genes, respectively, have been accomplished by selectively labeling the two gene products with a T7 RNA polymerase expression system. Following generation of a novel EcoRI restriction site in the intergenic sequence between the two genes of the mel operon by oligonucleotide-directed, site-specific mutagenesis, melA and melB were separately inserted into plasmid pT7-6 of the T7 expression system. Expression of melB was markedly enhanced by placing a strong, synthetic ribosome binding site at an optimal distance upstream from the initiation codon of melB. Expression of cloned gene products was characterized functionally and by performing autoradiographic analysis on total cell, inner membrane, and cytoplasmic proteins from cells pulse labeled with (35S)methionine in the presence of rifampicin and resolved by sodium dodecyl sulfate/polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis. The results first confirm that alpha-galactosidase is a cytoplasmic protein with an Mr of 50K; in contrast, the membrane-bound melibiose permease is identified as a protein with an apparent Mr of 39K, a value significantly higher than that of 30K previously suggested

  13. A putative role for amino acid permeases in sink-source communication of barley tissues uncovered by RNA-seq

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kohl Stefan

    2012-08-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The majority of nitrogen accumulating in cereal grains originates from proteins remobilised from vegetative organs. However, interactions between grain filling and remobilisation are poorly understood. We used transcriptome large-scale pyrosequencing of flag leaves, glumes and developing grains to identify cysteine peptidase and N transporter genes playing a role in remobilisation and accumulation of nitrogen in barley. Results Combination of already known and newly derived sequence information reduced redundancy, increased contig length and identified new members of cysteine peptidase and N transporter gene families. The dataset for N transporter genes was aligned with N transporter amino acid sequences of rice and Arabidopsis derived from Aramemnon database. 57 AAT, 45 NRT1/PTR and 22 OPT unigenes identified by this approach cluster to defined subgroups in the respective phylogenetic trees, among them 25 AAT, 8 NRT1/PTR and 5 OPT full-length sequences. Besides, 59 unigenes encoding cysteine peptidases were identified and subdivided into different families of the papain cysteine peptidase clade. Expression profiling of full-length AAT genes highlighted amino acid permeases as the group showing highest transcriptional activity. HvAAP2 and HvAAP6 are highly expressed in vegetative organs whereas HvAAP3 is grain-specific. Sequence similarities cluster HvAAP2 and the putative transporter HvAAP6 together with Arabidopsis transporters, which are involved in long-distance transfer of amino acids. HvAAP3 is closely related to AtAAP1 and AtAAP8 playing a role in supplying N to developing seeds. An important role in amino acid re-translocation can be considered for HvLHT1 and HvLHT2 which are specifically expressed in glumes and flag leaves, respectively. PCA and K-means clustering of AAT transcript data revealed coordinate developmental stages in flag leaves, glumes and grains. Phloem-specific metabolic compounds are proposed that

  14. The General Amino Acid Permease FfGap1 of Fusarium fujikuroi Is Sorted to the Vacuole in a Nitrogen-Dependent, but Npr1 Kinase-Independent Manner.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Andreas Pfannmüller

    Full Text Available The rice pathogenic fungus Fusarium fujikuroi is well known for the production of a broad spectrum of secondary metabolites (SMs such as gibberellic acids (GAs, mycotoxins and pigments. The biosynthesis of most of these SMs strictly depends on nitrogen availability and of the activity of permeases of nitrogen sources, e.g. the ammonium and amino acid permeases. One of the three ammonium permeases, MepB, was recently shown to act not only as a transporter but also as a nitrogen sensor affecting the production of nitrogen-repressed SMs. Here we describe the identification of a general amino acid permease, FfGap1, among the 99 putative amino acid permeases (AAPs in the genome of F. fujikuroi. FfGap1 is able to fully restore growth of the yeast gap1∆ mutant on several amino acids including citrulline and tryptophane. In S. cerevisiae, Gap1 activity is regulated by shuttling between the plasma membrane (nitrogen limiting conditions and the vacuole (nitrogen sufficiency, which we also show for FfGap1. In yeast, the Npr1 serine/threonine kinase stabilizes the Gap1 position at the plasma membrane. Here, we identified and characterized three NPR1-homologous genes, encoding the putative protein kinases FfNpr1-1, FfNpr1-2 and FfNpr1-3 with significant similarity to yeast Npr1. Complementation of the yeast npr1Δ mutant with each of the three F. fujikuroi NPR1 homologues, resulted in partial restoration of ammonium, arginine and proline uptake by FfNPR1-1 while none of the three kinases affect growth on different nitrogen sources and nitrogen-dependent sorting of FfGap1 in F. fujikuroi. However, exchange of the putative ubiquitin-target lysine 9 (K9A and 15 (K15A residues of FfGap1 resulted in extended localization to the plasma membrane and increased protein stability independently of nitrogen availability. These data suggest a similar regulation of FfGap1 by nitrogen-dependent ubiquitination, but differences regarding the role of Fusarium Npr1

  15. Expression of a xanthine permease and phosphate transporter in cultures and field populations of the harmful alga Aureococcus anophagefferens: tracking nutritional deficiency during brown tides.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wurch, Louie L; Gobler, Christopher J; Dyhrman, Sonya T

    2014-08-01

    Targeted gene expression using quantitative reverse transcription polymerase chain reaction (qRT-PCR) was employed to track patterns in the expression of genes indicative of nitrogen or phosphorus deficiency in the brown tide-forming alga Aureococcus anophagefferens. During culture experiments, a xanthine/uracil/vitamin C permease (XUV) was upregulated ∼20-fold under nitrogen-deficient conditions relative to a nitrogen-replete control and rapidly returned to nitrogen-replete levels after nitrogen-deficient cells were resupplied with nitrate or ammonium. It was not responsive to phosphorus deficiency. Expression of an inorganic phosphate transporter (PTA3) was enriched ∼10-fold under phosphorus-deficient conditions relative to a phosphorus-replete control, and this signal was rapidly lost upon phosphate resupply. PTA3 was not upregulated by nitrogen deficiency. Natural A. anophagefferens populations from a dense brown tide that occurred in Long Island, NY, in 2009 were assayed for XUV and PTA3 expression and compared with nutrient concentrations over the peak of a bloom. Patterns in XUV expression were consistent with nitrogen-replete growth, never reaching the values observed in N-deficient cultures. PTA3 expression was highest prior to peak bloom stages, reaching expression levels within the range of P-deficient cultures. These data highlight the value of molecular-level assessments of nutrient deficiency and suggest that phosphorus deficiency could play a role in the dynamics of destructive A. anophagefferens blooms. © 2013 Society for Applied Microbiology and John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  16. A Putative ABC Transporter Permease Is Necessary for Resistance to Acidified Nitrite and EDTA in Pseudomonas aeruginosa under Aerobic and Anaerobic Planktonic and Biofilm Conditions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McDaniel, Cameron; Su, Shengchang; Panmanee, Warunya; Lau, Gee W; Browne, Tristan; Cox, Kevin; Paul, Andrew T; Ko, Seung-Hyun B; Mortensen, Joel E; Lam, Joseph S; Muruve, Daniel A; Hassett, Daniel J

    2016-01-01

    Pseudomonas aeruginosa (PA) is an important airway pathogen of cystic fibrosis and chronic obstructive disease patients. Multiply drug resistant PA is becoming increasing prevalent and new strategies are needed to combat such insidious organisms. We have previously shown that a mucoid, mucA22 mutant PA is exquisitely sensitive to acidified nitrite ([Formula: see text], pH 6.5) at concentrations that are well tolerated in humans. Here, we used a transposon mutagenesis approach to identify PA mutants that are hypersensitive to [Formula: see text]. Among greater than 10,000 mutants screened, we focused on PA4455, in which the transposon was found to disrupt the production of a putative cytoplasmic membrane-spanning ABC transporter permease. The PA4455 mutant was not only highly sensitive to [Formula: see text], but also the membrane perturbing agent, EDTA and the antibiotics doxycycline, tigecycline, colistin, and chloramphenicol, respectively. Treatment of bacteria with [Formula: see text] plus EDTA, however, had the most dramatic and synergistic effect, with virtually all bacteria killed by 10 mM [Formula: see text], and EDTA (1 mM, aerobic, anaerobic). Most importantly, the PA4455 mutant was also sensitive to [Formula: see text] in biofilms. [Formula: see text] sensitivity and an anaerobic growth defect was also noted in two mutants (rmlC and wbpM) that are defective in B-band LPS synthesis, potentially indicating a membrane defect in the PA4455 mutant. Finally, this study describes a gene, PA4455, that when mutated, allows for dramatic sensitivity to the potential therapeutic agent, [Formula: see text] as well as EDTA. Furthermore, the synergy between the two compounds could offer future benefits against antibiotic resistant PA strains.

  17. Physiological desensitization of carbohydrate permeases and adenylate cyclase to regulation by the phosphoenolpyruvate:sugar phosphotransferase system in Escherichia coli and Salmonella typhimurium. Involvement of adenosine cyclic 3',5'-phosphate and inducer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Saier, M H; Keeler, D K; Feucht, B U

    1982-03-10

    Adenylate cyclase and a number of carbohydrate transport systems are subject to regulation by the phosphoenolpyruvate:sugar phosphotransferase system. These sensitive carbohydrate transport systems are desensitized to regulation by the phosphotransferase system, and adenylate cyclase is deactivated when cells are grown in medium containing cyclic AMP. These effects are specific for cyclic AMP and are potentiated by the genetic loss of cyclic AMP phosphodiesterase. Inclusion in the growth medium of an inducer of a sensitive transport system also promotes desensitization of that particular transport system. Inducer-promoted desensitization is specific for the particular target transport system, while cyclic AMP-promoted desensitization is general and affects several systems. Desensitization of the permeases to regulation, and inactivation of adenylate cyclase, are slow processes which are blocked by chloramphenicol and are therefore presumably dependent on protein synthesis. Several sugar substrates of the phosphotransferase system are capable of regulating the sensitive carbohydrate transport systems. The evidence suggests that desensitization to this regulation does not result from a direct effect on the functioning of Enzyme I, a small heat-stable protein of the phosphotransferase system, HPr, or an Enzyme II of the phosphotransferase system, but specifically uncouples the permease systems from regulation.

  18. Improved α-Amylase Production by Dephosphorylation Mutation of CreD, an Arrestin-Like Protein Required for Glucose-Induced Endocytosis of Maltose Permease and Carbon Catabolite Derepression in Aspergillus oryzae.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tanaka, Mizuki; Hiramoto, Tetsuya; Tada, Hinako; Shintani, Takahiro; Gomi, Katsuya

    2017-07-01

    Aspergillus oryzae produces copious amount of amylolytic enzymes, and MalP, a major maltose permease, is required for the expression of amylase-encoding genes. The expression of these genes is strongly repressed by carbon catabolite repression (CCR) in the presence of glucose. MalP is transported from the plasma membrane to the vacuole by endocytosis, which requires the homolog of E6-AP carboxyl terminus ubiquitin ligase HulA, an ortholog of yeast Rsp5. In yeast, arrestin-like proteins mediate endocytosis as adaptors of Rsp5 and transporters. In the present study, we examined the involvement of CreD, an arrestin-like protein, in glucose-induced MalP endocytosis and CCR of amylase-encoding genes. Deletion of creD inhibited the glucose-induced endocytosis of MalP, and CreD showed physical interaction with HulA. Phosphorylation of CreD was detected by Western blotting, and two serine residues were determined as the putative phosphorylation sites. However, the phosphorylation state of the serine residues did not regulate MalP endocytosis and its interaction with HulA. Although α-amylase production was significantly repressed by creD deletion, both phosphorylation and dephosphorylation mimics of CreD had a negligible effect on α-amylase activity. Interestingly, dephosphorylation of CreD was required for CCR relief of amylase genes that was triggered by disruption of the deubiquitinating enzyme-encoding gene creB The α-amylase activity of the creB mutant was 1.6-fold higher than that of the wild type, and the dephosphorylation mimic of CreD further improved the α-amylase activity by 2.6-fold. These results indicate that a combination of the dephosphorylation mutation of CreD and creB disruption increased the production of amylolytic enzymes in A. oryzae IMPORTANCE In eukaryotes, glucose induces carbon catabolite repression (CCR) and proteolytic degradation of plasma membrane transporters via endocytosis. Glucose-induced endocytosis of transporters is mediated by

  19. HALOACID INDUCED ALTERATIONS IN FERTILITY AND THE SPERM BIOMARKER SP22 IN THE RAT ARE ADDITIVE: VALIDATION OF AN ELISA

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dibromoacetic acid (DBA) and bromochloroacetic acid (BCA) are prevalent disinfection by-products of drinking water that produce defects in spermatogenesis and fertility in adult rats. Previously we demonstrated that BCA compromises the fertility of cauda epididymal rat sperm an...

  20. Identification and Characterization of Novel Plant Adenylate Cyclases – The Arabidopsis Thaliana Potassium Uptake Permeases

    KAUST Repository

    Al-Younis, Inas

    2018-01-01

    Adenylyl Cyclases (ACs) catalyze the formation of the key universal second messenger adenosine 3’, 5’-cyclic monophosphate (cAMP) from adenosine 5’- triphosphate. Cyclic AMP participates in several signal transduction pathways and is present

  1. Characterization of phospate permease in Fusarium oxysporum f. sp vasinfectum growth, virulence and secondary metabolism

    Science.gov (United States)

    Microbial development depends on the effective sensing of environmental signals and appropriate acquisition of nutrients and other molecules critical for the organism’s growth. Levels of nutrients and other molecules within the cell, and those outside of the cell, are usually relayed to the nucleus...

  2. Characterization of the Escherichia coli codBA operon encoding cytosine permease and cytosine deaminase

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Danielsen, S; Kilstrup, M; Barilla, K

    1992-01-01

    . A two-codon overlap between the two reading frames indicates that they constitute an operon. Transcription of the operon was found to be regulated by exogenous purines. Polypeptides specified by each of the two reading frames were expressed in minicells, and the codB gene product was found to be highly...

  3. Functional Characterization of PaLAX1, a Putative Auxin Permease, in Heterologous Plant Systems

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Hoyerová, Klára; Perry, Lucie; Hand, P.; Laňková, Martina; Kocábek, Tomáš; May, S.; Kottová, Jana; Pačes, Jan; Napier, R.; Zažímalová, Eva

    2008-01-01

    Roč. 146, č. 3 (2008), s. 1128-1141 ISSN 0032-0889 R&D Projects: GA ČR GP206/02/P106; GA ČR GA206/02/0967; GA AV ČR IAB6038203; GA AV ČR IAA6038303; GA AV ČR KJB600380702; GA MŠk(CZ) LC06034; GA MŠk(CZ) 1M0520 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z50380511; CEZ:AV0Z50510513; CEZ:AV0Z50520514 Keywords : Plant hormones * auxin influx carrier * AUX1 * Arabidopsis * tobacco Subject RIV: EB - Genetics ; Molecular Biology Impact factor: 6.110, year: 2008

  4. The roles of organic anion permeases in aluminium resistance and mineral nutrition.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Delhaize, Emmanuel; Gruber, Benjamin D; Ryan, Peter R

    2007-05-25

    Soluble aluminium (Al(3+)) is the major constraint to plant growth on acid soils. Plants have evolved mechanisms to tolerate Al(3+) and one type of mechanism relies on the efflux of organic anions that protect roots by chelating the Al(3+). Al(3+) resistance genes of several species have now been isolated and found to encode membrane proteins that facilitate organic anion efflux from roots. These proteins belong to the Al(3+)-activated malate transporter (ALMT) and multi-drug and toxin extrusion (MATE) families. We review the roles of these proteins in Al(3+) resistance as well as their roles in other aspects of mineral nutrition.

  5. The Arabidopsis thalianaK+-uptake permease 7 (AtKUP7) contains a functional cytosolic adenylate cyclase catalytic centre

    KAUST Repository

    Al-Younis, Inas; Wong, Aloysius Tze; Gehring, Christoph A

    2015-01-01

    KUP7) as one of several candidate ACs. Firstly, we show that a recombinant N-terminal, cytosolic domain of AtKUP71-100 is able to complement the AC-deficient mutant cyaA in Escherichia coli and thus restoring the fermentation of lactose, and secondly

  6. The γ-Aminobutyrate Permease GabP Serves as the Third Proline Transporter of Bacillus subtilis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zaprasis, Adrienne; Hoffmann, Tamara; Stannek, Lorena; Gunka, Katrin; Commichau, Fabian M.

    2014-01-01

    PutP and OpuE serve as proline transporters when this imino acid is used by Bacillus subtilis as a nutrient or as an osmostress protectant, respectively. The simultaneous inactivation of the PutP and OpuE systems still allows the utilization of proline as a nutrient. This growth phenotype pointed to the presence of a third proline transport system in B. subtilis. We took advantage of the sensitivity of a putP opuE double mutant to the toxic proline analog 3,4-dehydro-dl-proline (DHP) to identify this additional proline uptake system. DHP-resistant mutants were selected and found to be defective in the use of proline as a nutrient. Whole-genome resequencing of one of these strains provided the lead that the inactivation of the γ-aminobutyrate (GABA) transporter GabP was responsible for these phenotypes. DNA sequencing of the gabP gene in 14 additionally analyzed DHP-resistant strains confirmed this finding. Consistently, each of the DHP-resistant mutants was defective not only in the use of proline as a nutrient but also in the use of GABA as a nitrogen source. The same phenotype resulted from the targeted deletion of the gabP gene in a putP opuE mutant strain. Hence, the GabP carrier not only serves as an uptake system for GABA but also functions as the third proline transporter of B. subtilis. Uptake studies with radiolabeled GABA and proline confirmed this conclusion and provided information on the kinetic parameters of the GabP carrier for both of these substrates. PMID:24142252

  7. Phenotypic, Proteomic, and Genomic Characterization of a Putative ABC-Transporter Permease Involved in Listeria monocytogenes Biofilm Formation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Zhu, Xinna; Liu, Weibing; Lametsch, René

    2011-01-01

    Δ1771 was more sensitive to Triton X-100 and less resistant to cationic antibiotics, which might be explained by the down-regulation of dlt operon in this deletant and the fact that dlt involves the incorporation of D-alanine residues into lipoteichoic acids, resulting in a positive net charge...

  8. Structural model of a putrescine-cadaverine permease from Trypanosoma cruzi predicts residues vital for transport and ligand binding

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Soysa, R.; Venselaar, H.; Poston, J.; Ullman, B.; Hasne, M.P.

    2013-01-01

    The TcPOT1.1 gene from Trypanosoma cruzi encodes a high affinity putrescine-cadaverine transporter belonging to the APC (amino acid/polyamine/organocation) transporter superfamily. No experimental three-dimensional structure exists for any eukaryotic member of the APC family, and thus the structural

  9. Systems Analysis of Lactose Metabolism in Trichoderma reesei Identifies a Lactose Permease That Is Essential for Cellulase Induction

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ivanova, Christa; Bååth, Jenny A.; Seiboth, Bernhard; Kubicek, Christian P.

    2013-01-01

    Trichoderma reesei colonizes predecayed wood in nature and metabolizes cellulose and hemicellulose from the plant biomass. The respective enzymes are industrially produced for application in the biofuel and biorefinery industry. However, these enzymes are also induced in the presence of lactose (1,4-0-ß-d-galactopyranosyl-d-glucose), a waste product from cheese manufacture or whey processing industries. In fact, lactose is the only soluble carbon source that induces these enzymes in T. reesei on an industrial level but the reason for this unique phenomenon is not understood. To answer this question, we used systems analysis of the T. reesei transcriptome during utilization of lactose. We found that the respective CAZome encoded all glycosyl hydrolases necessary for cellulose degradation and particularly for the attack of monocotyledon xyloglucan, from which ß-galactosides could be released that may act as the inducers of T. reesei’s cellulases and hemicellulases. In addition, lactose also induces a high number of putative transporters of the major facilitator superfamily. Deletion of fourteen of them identified one gene that is essential for lactose utilization and lactose uptake, and for cellulase induction by lactose (but not sophorose) in pregrown mycelia of T. reesei. These data shed new light on the mechanism by which T. reesei metabolizes lactose and offers strategies for its improvement. They also illuminate the key role of ß-D-galactosides in habitat specificity of this fungus. PMID:23690947

  10. Functional Characterization of PaLAX1, a Putative Auxin Permease, in Heterologous Plant Systems1[W][OA

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hoyerová, Klára; Perry, Lucie; Hand, Paul; Laňková, Martina; Kocábek, Tomáš; May, Sean; Kottová, Jana; Pačes, Jan; Napier, Richard; Zažímalová, Eva

    2008-01-01

    We have isolated the cDNA of the gene PaLAX1 from a wild cherry tree (Prunus avium). The gene and its product are highly similar in sequences to both the cDNAs and the corresponding protein products of AUX/LAX-type genes, coding for putative auxin influx carriers. We have prepared and characterized transformed Nicotiana tabacum and Arabidopsis thaliana plants carrying the gene PaLAX1. We have proved that constitutive overexpression of PaLAX1 is accompanied by changes in the content and distribution of free indole-3-acetic acid, the major endogenous auxin. The increase in free indole-3-acetic acid content in transgenic plants resulted in various phenotype changes, typical for the auxin-overproducing plants. The uptake of synthetic auxin, 2,4-dichlorophenoxyacetic acid, was 3 times higher in transgenic lines compared to the wild-type lines and the treatment with the auxin uptake inhibitor 1-naphthoxyacetic acid reverted the changes caused by the expression of PaLAX1. Moreover, the agravitropic response could be restored by expression of PaLAX1 in the mutant aux1 plants, which are deficient in auxin influx carrier activity. Based on our data, we have concluded that the product of the gene PaLAX1 promotes the uptake of auxin into cells, and, as a putative auxin influx carrier, it affects the content and distribution of free endogenous auxin in transgenic plants. PMID:18184737

  11. Co-ordinate regulation of lactate metabolism genes in yeast: the role of the lactate permease gene JEN1.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lodi, T; Fontanesi, F; Guiard, B

    2002-01-01

    In the yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae, the first step in lactate metabolism is its transport across the plasma membrane, a proton symport process mediated by the product of the gene JEN1. Under aerobic conditions, the expression of JEN1 is regulated by the carbon source: the gene is repressed by glucose and induced by non-fermentable substrates. JEN1 expression is also controlled by oxygen availability, but is unaffected by the absence of haem biosynthesis. JEN1 is negatively regulated by the repressors Mig1p and Mig2p, and requires Cat8p for full derepression. In this report we demonstrate that, in addition to these regulators, the Hap2/3/4/5 complex interacts specifically with a CAAT-box element in the JEN1 promoter, and acts to derepress JEN1 expression. We also provide evidence for transcriptional stimulation of JEN1 by the protein kinase Snf1p. Data are presented which provide a better understanding of the molecular mechanisms implicated in the co-regulation of genes involved in the metabolism of lactate.

  12. Uncoupling in Secondary Transport Proteins. A Mechanistic Explanation for Mutants of lac Permease with an Uncoupled Phenotype

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Lolkema, J.S.; Poolman, B.

    1995-01-01

    The kinetic behavior of a H+-substrate symporter has been studied in which in addition to the unloaded (E) and fully loaded states (E.S.H) of the carrier also one of the binary complexes (E.S or E.H) may reorient its binding sites. This results in two types of uncoupled mutants, the ES leak and the

  13. Wnt/β-Catenin Signaling Regulates the Expression of the Ammonium Permease Gene RHBG in Human Cancer Cells.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ahmad Merhi

    Full Text Available Ammonium is a metabolic waste product mainly detoxified by the liver. Hepatic dysfunction can lead to cytotoxic accumulation of circulating ammonium and to subsequent encephalopathy. Transmembrane ammonium transport is a widely spread process ensured by the highly conserved proteins of the Mep-Amt-Rh superfamily, including the mammalian Rhesus (Rh factors. The regulatory mechanisms involved in the control of RH genes expression remain poorly studied. Here we addressed the expression regulation of one of these factors, RHBG. We identify HepG2 hepatocellular carcinoma cells and SW480 colon adenocarcinoma cells as expressing RHBG and show that its expression relies on β-catenin signaling. siRNA-mediated β-catenin knockdown resulted in significant reduction of RHBG mRNA in both cell lines. Pharmaceutical inhibition of the TCF4/β-catenin interaction or knockdown of the transcription factor TCF4 also downregulated RHBG expression. We identify a minimal RHBG regulatory sequence displaying a promoter activity and show that β-catenin and TCF4 bind to this fragment in vivo. We finally characterize the role of potential TCF4 binding sites in RHBG regulation. Taken together, our results indicate RHBG expression as a direct target of β-catenin regulation, a pathway frequently deregulated in many cancers and associated with tumorigenesis.

  14. Protein (Cyanobacteria): 652400677 [PGDBj - Ortholog DB

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available WP_026796473.1 ... 1117:3549 ... 1150:52595 1301283:73827 ... 54304:285 54307:343 ... haloacid dehalogenase Plankt...LRDVVQKFGERLGFSPTPTELESLANSIQDWQPFPDTIAALKALKQKYKLVIISNIDDNLFAQTNQHLQIEFDHIITAQQAQSYKPSAHNFQFALNKTGLSSDKLLHVAQSIFHDIATANSLGLTTVWVNRRQGQPGGGATKAAIAQPDLEVPDLKSLVDLIFEV

  15. ORF Sequence: NC_002937 [GENIUS II[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available rotein/permease protein [Desulfovibrio vulgaris subsp. vulgaris str. Hildenborough] MSGIDEEHMGGYQGADAGDASGQD...IAMGVPNADDRMIMRAADVAGVTEFARNHPAGFGLQVGERGMALSGGQRQAVALARALLHDPDVLILDEPTSNMDTGSEFAFKQRLRALLGDKTLVLITHRMSVIDLVDRLVVVDGGRIVADGPRDAVIKALRSTGVQAAPAARFRKNGTVGAAGGAA

  16. ORF Sequence: NC_002937 [GENIUS II[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available rotein/permease protein [Desulfovibrio vulgaris subsp. vulgaris str. Hildenborough] MGEPSTTQRASLPLLRRIGRYFLP...LFNLSVSDNITYGTPNVGAGRIEAAAHAAFAHEFVQQLAQGYDTVLGERGVKLSGGQKQRLTIARALLKDAPLLILDEATS

  17. Identification and functional characterization of the Lactococcus lactis CodY-regulated branched-chain amino acid permease BcaP (CtrA)

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    den Hengst, CD; Groeneveld, M; Kuipers, OP; Kok, J; Hengst, Chris D. den

    Transcriptome analyses have previously revealed that a gene encoding the putative amino acid transporter CtrA (YhdG) is one of the major targets of the pleiotropic regulator CodY in Lactococcus lactis and Bacillus subtilis. The role of ctrA in L. lactis was further investigated with respect to both

  18. Properties of a reconstituted eukaryotic hexose/proton symporter solubilized by structurally related non-ionic detergents: specific requirement of phosphatidylcholine for permease stability

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Robl, I.; Grassl, R.; Tanner, W.; Opekarová, Miroslava

    2000-01-01

    Roč. 1463, - (2000), s. 407-418 ISSN 0005-2736 R&D Projects: GA ČR GA204/99/0492; GA AV ČR KSK2052601 Grant - others:Deutsche Forschungsgemeinschaft(DE) SFB521; NATO Collaborative Research Grant(NQ) LST.ClG974804 Institutional research plan: CEZ:A53/98:Z5-020-9ii Subject RIV: EE - Microbiology, Virology Impact factor: 2.313, year: 2000

  19. Genome-wide Screening Identifies Phosphotransferase System Permease BepA to Be Involved in Enterococcus faecium Endocarditis and Biofilm Formation

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Paganelli, Fernanda L.; Huebner, Johannes; Singh, Kavindra V.; Zhang, Xinglin; Van Schaik, Willem; Wobser, Dominique; Braat, Johanna C.; Murray, Barbara E.; Bonten, Marc J M; Willems, Rob J L; Leavis, Helen L.

    2016-01-01

    Enterococcus faecium is a common cause of nosocomial infections, of which infective endocarditis is associated with substantial mortality. In this study, we used a microarray-based transposon mapping (M-TraM) approach to evaluate a rat endocarditis model and identified a gene, originally annotated

  20. Grr1p is required for transcriptional induction of amino acid permease genes and proper transcriptional regulation of genes in carbon metabolism of Saccharomyces cerevisiae

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Eckert-Boulet, Nadine; Regenberg, Birgitte; Nielsen, Jens

    2005-01-01

    and a grr1 Delta strain and adding citrulline in the exponential phase. Whole-genome transcription analyses were performed on samples from each cultivation, both immediately before and 30 min after citrulline addition. Transcriptional induction of the AAP genes AGP1, BAP2, BAP3, DIP5, GNP1 and TAT1 is fully...

  1. The AAP gene family for amino acid permeases contributes to development of the cyst nematode Heterodera schachtii in roots of Arabidopsis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Elashry, Abdelnaser; Okumoto, Sakiko; Siddique, Shahid; Koch, Wolfgang; Kreil, David P; Bohlmann, Holger

    2013-09-01

    The beet cyst nematode Heterodera schachtii is able to infect Arabidopsis plants and induce feeding sites in the root. These syncytia are the only source of nutrients for the nematodes throughout their life and are a nutrient sink for the host plant. We have studied here the role of amino acid transporters for nematode development. Arabidopsis contains a large number of different amino acid transporters in several gene families but those of the AAP family were found to be especially expressed in syncytia. Arabidopsis contains 8 AAP genes and they were all strongly expressed in syncytia with the exception of AAP5 and AAP7, which were slightly downregulated. We used promoter::GUS lines and in situ RT-PCR to confirm the expression of several AAP genes and LHT1, a lysine- and histidine-specific amino acid transporter, in syncytia. The strong expression of AAP genes in syncytia indicated that these transporters are important for the transport of amino acids into syncytia and we used T-DNA mutants for several AAP genes to test for their influence on nematode development. We found that mutants of AAP1, AAP2, and AAP8 significantly reduced the number of female nematodes developing on these plants. Our study showed that amino acid transport into syncytia is important for the development of the nematodes. Copyright © 2013 The Authors. Published by Elsevier Masson SAS.. All rights reserved.

  2. NCBI nr-aa BLAST: CBRC-CBRI-05-0377 [SEVENS

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available CBRC-CBRI-05-0377 gb|AAT81598.2| phosphate permease [Litomosoides sigmodontis] gb|A...BA63170.1| phosphate permease variant 2 [Litomosoides sigmodontis] gb|ABA63171.1| phosphate permease variant 3 [Litomosoides sigmodontis] AAT81598.2 4e-28 31% ...

  3. NCBI nr-aa BLAST: CBRC-TTRU-01-0084 [SEVENS

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available CBRC-TTRU-01-0084 ref|ZP_03665674.1| amino acid permease [Francisella tularensis su...bsp. tularensis MA00-2987] ref|ZP_04986598.1| amino acid permease [Francisella tularensis subsp. tularensis ...FSC033] ref|ZP_05247618.1| amino acid permease [Francisella tularensis subsp. tularensis MA00-2987] gb|EDN34...490.1| amino acid permease [Francisella tularensis subsp. tularensis FSC033] gb|E...ET19343.1| amino acid permease [Francisella tularensis subsp. tularensis MA00-2987] ZP_03665674.1 0.22 27% ...

  4. ORF Alignment: NC_006396 [GENIUS II[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available porter ... permease protein [Haloarcula marismortui ATCC 43049] ... Length = 228 ... Query: 33 ... GDSQTLTAGTAPGFPPFEM...KQDGELVGFDVELLEAVVAATEYELSGWEELEFKSLIPALN 92 ... GDSQTLTAGTAPGFPPFEM...KQDGELVGFDVELLEAVVAATEYELSGWEELEFKSLIPALN Sbjct: 1 ... GDSQTLTAGTAPGFPPFEMKQDGELVGFDVELLEAVVAATEYE

  5. NCBI nr-aa BLAST: CBRC-CBRI-04-0044 [SEVENS

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available CBRC-CBRI-04-0044 ref|NP_595047.1| malate permease [Schizosaccharomyces pombe 972h-...] ref|NP_595048.1| malate permease [Schizosaccharomyces pombe 972h-] ref|NP_595049.1| malate permease [Schizosaccharomyce...s pombe 972h-] ref|NP_595050.1| malate permease [Schizosaccharomyces pombe 972h-] emb|CAC36913....1| membrane transporter (predicted) [Schizosaccharomyces pombe] emb|CAC36914.1| m...embrane transporter (predicted) [Schizosaccharomyces pombe] emb|CAC36915.1| membrane transporter (predicted) [Schizosaccharomyce

  6. A review on non-stereospecific haloalkanoic acid dehalogenases ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Haloalkanoic acid dehalogenases remove halides from organic haloacids and have potential as bioremediation agents. DehE from Rhizobium sp. RC1, DehI from Pseudomonas putida PP3 and D,LDEX 113 from Pseudomonas sp. 113 are non-stereospecific dehalogenases that invert the configurations of D- and L- ...

  7. NCBI nr-aa BLAST: CBRC-BTAU-01-0582 [SEVENS

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available CBRC-BTAU-01-0582 ref|ZP_01115488.1| Permease of the major facilitator superfamily protein [Rein...ekea sp. MED297] gb|EAR08550.1| Permease of the major facilitator superfamily protein [Reinekea sp. MED297] ZP_01115488.1 0.003 29% ...

  8. NCBI nr-aa BLAST: CBRC-LAFR-01-0233 [SEVENS

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available CBRC-LAFR-01-0233 ref|ZP_01459279.1| ABC transporter, permease protein [Stigmatella... aurantiaca DW4/3-1] gb|EAU69855.1| ABC transporter, permease protein [Stigmatella aurantiaca DW4/3-1] ZP_01459279.1 0.98 29% ...

  9. NCBI nr-aa BLAST: CBRC-LAFR-01-1419 [SEVENS

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available CBRC-LAFR-01-1419 ref|ZP_01459279.1| ABC transporter, permease protein [Stigmatella... aurantiaca DW4/3-1] gb|EAU69855.1| ABC transporter, permease protein [Stigmatella aurantiaca DW4/3-1] ZP_01459279.1 0.061 29% ...

  10. NCBI nr-aa BLAST: CBRC-LAFR-01-1856 [SEVENS

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available CBRC-LAFR-01-1856 ref|ZP_01459279.1| ABC transporter, permease protein [Stigmatella... aurantiaca DW4/3-1] gb|EAU69855.1| ABC transporter, permease protein [Stigmatella aurantiaca DW4/3-1] ZP_01459279.1 0.33 29% ...

  11. NCBI nr-aa BLAST: CBRC-CINT-01-0058 [SEVENS

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available CBRC-CINT-01-0058 ref|ZP_01183563.1| transport system permease protein [Bacillus weihenstep...hanensis KBAB4] gb|EAR76999.1| transport system permease protein [Bacillus weihenstephanensis KBAB4] ZP_01183563.1 2.4 23% ...

  12. NCBI nr-aa BLAST: CBRC-TBEL-01-2529 [SEVENS

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available CBRC-TBEL-01-2529 ref|YP_001162719.1| 4-hydroxyphenylacetate permease [Yersinia pestis Pest...oides F] gb|ABP39746.1| 4-hydroxyphenylacetate permease [Yersinia pestis Pestoides F] YP_001162719.1 0.21 30% ...

  13. NCBI nr-aa BLAST: CBRC-CINT-01-0088 [SEVENS

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available CBRC-CINT-01-0088 ref|ZP_00997731.1| ABC transporter, ATP binding/permease protein [Oceanicola bats...ensis HTCC2597] gb|EAQ04798.1| ABC transporter, ATP binding/permease protein [Oceanicola batsensis HTCC2597] ZP_00997731.1 0.040 24% ...

  14. NCBI nr-aa BLAST: CBRC-DYAK-08-0032 [SEVENS

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available obable SP0913 [Streptococcus gordonii str. Challis substr. CH1] YP_001450777.1 0.013 25% ... ...CBRC-DYAK-08-0032 ref|YP_001450777.1| ABC transporter, permease protein, probable SP0913 [Streptococcus gord...onii str. Challis substr. CH1] gb|ABV09319.1| ABC transporter, permease protein, pr

  15. NCBI nr-aa BLAST: CBRC-DYAK-08-0031 [SEVENS

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available obable SP0913 [Streptococcus gordonii str. Challis substr. CH1] YP_001450777.1 0.35 26% ... ...CBRC-DYAK-08-0031 ref|YP_001450777.1| ABC transporter, permease protein, probable SP0913 [Streptococcus gord...onii str. Challis substr. CH1] gb|ABV09319.1| ABC transporter, permease protein, pr

  16. NCBI nr-aa BLAST: CBRC-DYAK-08-0041 [SEVENS

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available obable SP0913 [Streptococcus gordonii str. Challis substr. CH1] YP_001450777.1 0.003 24% ... ...CBRC-DYAK-08-0041 ref|YP_001450777.1| ABC transporter, permease protein, probable SP0913 [Streptococcus gord...onii str. Challis substr. CH1] gb|ABV09319.1| ABC transporter, permease protein, pr

  17. NCBI nr-aa BLAST: CBRC-MMUR-01-1348 [SEVENS

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available CBRC-MMUR-01-1348 ref|YP_003196911.1| transport system permease protein [Desulfohalobium retba...ense DSM 5692] gb|ACV67333.1| transport system permease protein [Desulfohalobium retbaense DSM 5692] YP_003196911.1 0.002 30% ...

  18. NCBI nr-aa BLAST: CBRC-DNOV-01-1963 [SEVENS

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available CBRC-DNOV-01-1963 ref|NP_622305.1| ABC-type nitrate/sulfonate/taurine/bicarbonate t...ransport systems, permease components [Thermoanaerobacter tengcongensis MB4] gb|AAM23909.1| ABC-type nitrate/sulfonate/taurine/bicarb...onate transport systems, permease components [Thermoanaerobacter tengcongensis MB4] NP_622305.1 0.013 26% ...

  19. NCBI nr-aa BLAST: CBRC-OPRI-01-0183 [SEVENS

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available CBRC-OPRI-01-0183 ref|YP_003067109.1| ABC family transporter permease protein [Methylobacterium extorque...ns DM4] emb|CAX23124.1| ABC family transporter permease protein [Methylobacterium extorquens DM4] YP_003067109.1 3.3 27% ...

  20. NCBI nr-aa BLAST: CBRC-OPRI-01-0183 [SEVENS

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available CBRC-OPRI-01-0183 ref|YP_002962013.1| ABC family transporter permease protein [Methylobacterium extorque...ns AM1] gb|ACS38736.1| ABC family transporter permease protein [Methylobacterium extorquens AM1] YP_002962013.1 3.3 27% ...

  1. NCBI nr-aa BLAST: CBRC-SARA-01-0488 [SEVENS

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available CBRC-SARA-01-0488 ref|YP_064024.1| sulfate permease (SulP) [Desulfotalea psychrophi...la LSv54] emb|CAG35017.1| probable sulfate permease (SulP) [Desulfotalea psychrophila LSv54] YP_064024.1 6.1 37% ...

  2. NCBI nr-aa BLAST: CBRC-MDOM-02-0387 [SEVENS

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available CBRC-MDOM-02-0387 ref|YP_002730825.1| oligopeptide transport system permease protein AppB [Persephone...lla marina EX-H1] gb|ACO04361.1| oligopeptide transport system permease protein AppB [Persephonella marina EX-H1] YP_002730825.1 0.47 27% ...

  3. NCBI nr-aa BLAST: CBRC-TTRU-01-0103 [SEVENS

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available CBRC-TTRU-01-0103 ref|YP_763917.1| HAAAP family serine permease [Francisella tulare...nsis subsp. holarctica OSU18] gb|ABI83280.1| HAAAP family serine permease [Francisella tularensis subsp. holarctica OSU18] YP_763917.1 0.077 25% ...

  4. NCBI nr-aa BLAST: CBRC-PABE-24-0030 [SEVENS

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available CBRC-PABE-24-0030 ref|YP_927793.1| uracil-xanthine permease [Shewanella amazonensis... SB2B] gb|ABM00124.1| uracil-xanthine permease [Shewanella amazonensis SB2B] YP_927793.1 3.4 27% ...

  5. NCBI nr-aa BLAST: CBRC-DSIM-08-0043 [SEVENS

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available CBRC-DSIM-08-0043 ref|NP_540905.1| PHOSPHATE TRANSPORT SYSTEM PERMEASE PROTEIN PSTC... [Brucella melitensis 16M] gb|AAL53169.1| PHOSPHATE TRANSPORT SYSTEM PERMEASE PROTEIN PSTC [Brucella melitensis 16M] NP_540905.1 7.9 35% ...

  6. NCBI nr-aa BLAST: CBRC-DNOV-01-2378 [SEVENS

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available CBRC-DNOV-01-2378 ref|NP_325931.1| MULTIPLE SUGAR ABC TRANSPORTER PERMEASE PROTEIN ...[Mycoplasma pulmonis UAB CTIP] emb|CAC13273.1| MULTIPLE SUGAR ABC TRANSPORTER PERMEASE PROTEIN [Mycoplasma pulmonis] NP_325931.1 0.090 22% ...

  7. NCBI nr-aa BLAST: CBRC-AGAM-07-0010 [SEVENS

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available CBRC-AGAM-07-0010 ref|YP_001141362.1| amino acid permease [Aeromonas salmonicida subsp. salmon...icida A449] gb|ABO89614.1| amino acid permease [Aeromonas salmonicida subsp. salmonicida A449] YP_001141362.1 1e-132 96% ...

  8. NCBI nr-aa BLAST: CBRC-XTRO-01-0514 [SEVENS

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available modenitrificans NG80-2] gb|ABO66879.1| Branched-chain amino acid ABC transporter (permease) [Geobacillus thermodenitrificans NG80-2] YP_001125624.1 2e-97 62% ... ...CBRC-XTRO-01-0514 ref|YP_001125624.1| Branched-chain amino acid ABC transporter (permease) [Geobacillus ther

  9. NCBI nr-aa BLAST: CBRC-DDIS-05-0159 [SEVENS

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available CBRC-DDIS-05-0159 ref|YP_001124941.1| Amino acid permease [Geobacillus thermodenitr...ificans NG80-2] gb|ABO66196.1| Amino acid permease [Geobacillus thermodenitrificans NG80-2] YP_001124941.1 4e-49 39% ...

  10. NCBI nr-aa BLAST: CBRC-XTRO-01-0450 [SEVENS

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available CBRC-XTRO-01-0450 ref|YP_001099288.1| putative sulfate permease (SulP family) [Herminiimonas arsenico...xydans] emb|CAL61161.1| putative sulfate permease (SulP family) [Herminiimonas arsenicoxydans] YP_001099288.1 1e-103 51% ...

  11. NCBI nr-aa BLAST: CBRC-TTRU-01-0583 [SEVENS

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available CBRC-TTRU-01-0583 ref|ZP_04742692.1| ABC transporter, permease protein [Roseburia i...ntestinalis L1-82] gb|EEV02164.1| ABC transporter, permease protein [Roseburia intestinalis L1-82] ZP_04742692.1 0.17 28% ...

  12. NCBI nr-aa BLAST: CBRC-TTRU-01-0889 [SEVENS

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available CBRC-TTRU-01-0889 ref|ZP_04743451.1| iron compound ABC transporter, permease protein [Roseburi...a intestinalis L1-82] gb|EEV01396.1| iron compound ABC transporter, permease protein [Roseburia intestinalis L1-82] ZP_04743451.1 0.10 26% ...

  13. NCBI nr-aa BLAST: CBRC-ACAR-01-0595 [SEVENS

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available CBRC-ACAR-01-0595 ref|YP_246431.1| Zinc/manganese ABC transporter permease protein ...[Rickettsia felis URRWXCal2] gb|AAY61266.1| Zinc/manganese ABC transporter permease protein [Rickettsia felis URRWXCal2] YP_246431.1 2.0 21% ...

  14. NCBI nr-aa BLAST: CBRC-LAFR-01-1577 [SEVENS

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available CBRC-LAFR-01-1577 ref|ZP_01754031.1| oligopeptide ABC transporter permease protein [Rose...obacter sp. SK209-2-6] gb|EBA17512.1| oligopeptide ABC transporter permease protein [Roseobacter sp. SK209-2-6] ZP_01754031.1 0.50 31% ...

  15. NCBI nr-aa BLAST: CBRC-XTRO-01-0279 [SEVENS

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available CBRC-XTRO-01-0279 ref|ZP_01441822.1| polyamine ABC transporter (permease) [Roseovar...ius sp. HTCC2601] gb|EAU47986.1| polyamine ABC transporter (permease) [Roseovarius sp. HTCC2601] ZP_01441822.1 8e-39 36% ...

  16. NCBI nr-aa BLAST: CBRC-CREM-01-1290 [SEVENS

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available CBRC-CREM-01-1290 ref|YP_001478049.1| uracil-xanthine permease [Serratia proteamacu...lans 568] gb|ABV40921.1| uracil-xanthine permease [Serratia proteamaculans 568] YP_001478049.1 3e-95 65% ...

  17. NCBI nr-aa BLAST: CBRC-CREM-01-1331 [SEVENS

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available CBRC-CREM-01-1331 ref|YP_001479441.1| amino acid permease-associated region [Serratia proteam...aculans 568] gb|ABV42313.1| amino acid permease-associated region [Serratia proteamaculans 568] YP_001479441.1 5e-75 52% ...

  18. NCBI nr-aa BLAST: CBRC-SARA-01-1753 [SEVENS

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available CBRC-SARA-01-1753 ref|YP_001476411.1| amino acid permease-associated region [Serratia proteam...aculans 568] gb|ABV39283.1| amino acid permease-associated region [Serratia proteamaculans 568] YP_001476411.1 0.83 35% ...

  19. NCBI nr-aa BLAST: CBRC-LAFR-01-2596 [SEVENS

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available CBRC-LAFR-01-2596 ref|YP_676997.1| possible permease [Cytophaga hutchinsonii ATCC 3...3406] gb|ABG57657.1| possible permease [Cytophaga hutchinsonii ATCC 33406] YP_676997.1 0.14 30% ...

  20. Purification, crystallization and preliminary crystallographic analysis of SMU.1108c protein from Streptococcus mutans

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Feng, Ming-Jing; Fu, Tian-Min; Liu, Xiang; Li, Lan-Fen

    2010-01-01

    SMU.1108c, a putative uncharacterized protein from S. mutans, was crystallized and X-ray diffraction data were collected to a resolution of 2.2 Å. Streptococcus mutans SMU.1108c (KEGG database) encodes a functionally uncharacterized protein consisting of 270 amino-acid residues. This protein is predicted to have a haloacid dehalogenase hydrolase-like domain and is a homologue of haloacid dehalogenase phosphatases that catalyze phosphoryl-transfer reactions. In this work, SMU.1108c was cloned into the pET28a vector and overexpressed in Escherichia coli strain BL21 (DE3). The protein was purified to homogeneity and crystallized using the sitting-drop vapour-diffusion method. The best crystal diffracted to 2.0 Å resolution and belonged to space group C2, with unit-cell parameters a = 77.1, b = 80.2, c = 47.9 Å, β = 99.5°

  1. Involvement of AmpG in mediating a dynamic relationship between serine beta-lactamase induction and biofilm-forming ability of Escherichia coli.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mallik, Dhriti; Pal, Shilpa; Ghosh, Anindya S

    2018-04-01

    AmpG permease is implicated both in beta-lactamase induction and peptidoglycan recycling in enterobacterial isolates. Here, physiological studies using molecular genetics show that deletion of AmpG permease dramatically increases beta-lactam susceptibility even in the presence of AmpC, TEM-1 and OXA beta-lactamases. Also, there is an appreciable decrease in the biofilm-forming ability of strains lacking this protein. Expression of this permease in excess probably compromises the integrity of the bacterial cells, leading to cell lysis. Based on these results, we propose that AmpG permease may be used as a potential antibiotic target and its suppression could efficiently inhibit both beta-lactamase induction and biofilm formation.

  2. NCBI nr-aa BLAST: CBRC-TTRU-01-1400 [SEVENS

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available n, putative [Campylobacter upsaliensis RM3195] gb|EAL52818.1| iron compound ABC transporter, permease protein, putative [Campylobacter upsaliensis RM3195] ZP_00371683.1 0.004 26% ...

  3. NCBI nr-aa BLAST: CBRC-TTRU-01-0904 [SEVENS

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available n, putative [Campylobacter upsaliensis RM3195] gb|EAL52818.1| iron compound ABC transporter, permease protein, putative [Campylobacter upsaliensis RM3195] ZP_00371683.1 0.006 27% ...

  4. Sequence Classification: 567561 [

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available Non-TMB TMH Non-TMB TMB TMB Non-TMB >gi|15966874|ref|NP_387227.1| PUTATIVE PEPTIDE TRANSPORT... SYSTEM PERMEASE ABC TRANSPORTER PROTEIN || http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/protein/15966874 ...

  5. Sequence Classification: 564951 [

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available Non-TMB TMH Non-TMB TMB TMB Non-TMB >gi|15964264|ref|NP_384617.1| PROBABLE PHOSPHATE TRANSPORT... SYSTEM PERMEASE ABC TRANSPORTER PROTEIN || http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/protein/15964264 ...

  6. Cationic amino acid uptake constitutes a metabolic regulation mechanism and occurs in the flagellar pocket of Trypanosoma cruzi.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mariana R Miranda

    Full Text Available Trypanosomatids' amino acid permeases are key proteins in parasite metabolism since they participate in the adaptation of parasites to different environments. Here, we report that TcAAP3, a member of a Trypanosoma cruzi multigene family of permeases, is a bona fide arginine transporter. Most higher eukaryotic cells incorporate cationic amino acids through a single transporter. In contrast, T. cruzi can recognize and transport cationic amino acids by mono-specific permeases since a 100-fold molar excess of lysine could not affect the arginine transport in parasites that over-express the arginine permease (TcAAP3 epimastigotes. In order to test if the permease activity regulates downstream processes of the arginine metabolism, the expression of the single T. cruzi enzyme that uses arginine as substrate, arginine kinase, was evaluated in TcAAP3 epimastigotes. In this parasite model, intracellular arginine concentration increases 4-folds and ATP level remains constant until cultures reach the stationary phase of growth, with decreases of about 6-folds in respect to the controls. Interestingly, Western Blot analysis demonstrated that arginine kinase is significantly down-regulated during the stationary phase of growth in TcAAP3 epimastigotes. This decrease could represent a compensatory mechanism for the increase in ATP consumption as a consequence of the displacement of the reaction equilibrium of arginine kinase, when the intracellular arginine concentration augments and the glucose from the medium is exhausted. Using immunofluorescence techniques we also determined that TcAAP3 and the specific lysine transporter TcAAP7 co-localize in a specialized region of the plasma membrane named flagellar pocket, staining a single locus close to the flagellar pocket collar. Taken together these data suggest that arginine transport is closely related to arginine metabolism and cell energy balance. The clinical relevance of studying trypanosomatids' permeases

  7. Stoichiometry and Substrate Affinity of the Mannitol Transporter, EnzymeIImtl, from Escherichia coli

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Veldhuis, Gertjan; Broos, Jaap; Poolman, Bert; Scheek, Ruud M.

    2005-01-01

    Uptake and consecutive phosphorylation of mannitol in Escherichia coli is catalyzed by the mannitol permease EnzymeIImtl. The substrate is bound at an extracellular-oriented binding site, translocated to an inward-facing site, from where it is phosphorylated, and subsequently released into the cell.

  8. Dynamic fluorescence spectroscopy on single tryptophan mutants of EIImtl in detergent micelles : Effects of substrate binding and phosphorylation on the fluorescence and anisotropy decay

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Swaving Dijkstra, Dolf; Broos, J.; Visser, Antonie J.W.G.; van Hoek, A.; Robillard, George

    1997-01-01

    The effects of substrate and substrate analogue binding and phosphorylation on the conformational dynamics of the mannitol permease of Escherichia coli were investigated, using time-resolved fluorescence spectroscopy on mutants containing five single tryptophans situated in the membrane-embedded C

  9. NCBI nr-aa BLAST: CBRC-DMEL-02-0080 [SEVENS

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available CBRC-DMEL-02-0080 ref|NP_622419.1| Ribose/xylose/arabinose/galactoside ABC-type transport systems...inose/galactoside ABC-type transport systems, permease components [Thermoanaerobacter tengcongensis MB4] NP_622419.1 0.92 33% ...

  10. NCBI nr-aa BLAST: CBRC-OSAT-10-0002 [SEVENS

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available CBRC-OSAT-10-0002 ref|NP_623489.1| ABC-type dipeptide/oligopeptide/nickel transport systems...peptide/nickel transport systems, permease components [Thermoanaerobacter tengcongensis MB4] NP_623489.1 1.9 30% ...

  11. Sequence Classification: 890552 [

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available Non-TMB TMH Non-TMB Non-TMB Non-TMB Non-TMB >gi|6322219|ref|NP_012294.1| Allantoin permease; express...ion sensitive to nitrogen catabolite repression and induced by allophanate, an intermediate

  12. Characterization, expression, and mutation of the Lactococcus lactis galPMKTE genes, involved in galactose utilization via the Leloir pathway

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Groossiord, B.P.; Luesink, E.J.; Vaughan, E.E.; Arnaud, A.; Vos, de W.M.

    2003-01-01

    A cluster containing five similarly oriented genes involved in the metabolism of galactose via the Leloir pathway in Lactococcus lactis subsp. cremoris MG1363 was cloned and characterized. The order of the genes is galPMKTE, and these genes encode a galactose permease (GalP), an aldose I-epimerase

  13. Sequence Classification: 567013 [

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available Non-TMB TMH Non-TMB Non-TMB TMB Non-TMB >gi|15966326|ref|NP_386679.1| PUTATIVE TRANSPORT... SYSTEM PERMEASE ABC TRANSPORTER PROTEIN || http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/protein/15966326 ...

  14. Sequence Classification: 182166 [

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available TMB TMH Non-TMB TMB Non-TMB Non-TMB >gi|17986643|ref|NP_539277.1| ABC TRANSPORTER A...TP-BINDING PROTEIN / ABC TRANSPORTER PERMEASE PROTEIN || http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/protein/17986643 ...

  15. Sequence Classification: 567406 [

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available Non-TMB TMH Non-TMB Non-TMB Non-TMB Non-TMB >gi|15966719|ref|NP_387072.1| PUTATIVE TRANSPORT... SYSTEM PERMEASE ABC TRANSPORTER PROTEIN || http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/protein/15966719 ...

  16. Sequence Classification: 567688 [

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available Non-TMB TMH Non-TMB TMB TMB Non-TMB >gi|15967001|ref|NP_387354.1| PUTATIVE AMINO-ACID TRANSPORT... SYSTEM PERMEASE ABC TRANSPORTER PROTEIN || http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/protein/15967001 ...

  17. Sequence Classification: 565916 [

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available Non-TMB TMH Non-TMB TMB TMB Non-TMB >gi|15965229|ref|NP_385582.1| PROBABLE GENERAL L-AMINO ACID TRANSPORT... PERMEASE ABC TRANSPORTER PROTEIN || http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/protein/15965229 ...

  18. Sequence Classification: 566953 [

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available Non-TMB TMH Non-TMB TMB Non-TMB Non-TMB >gi|15966266|ref|NP_386619.1| PUTATIVE SUGAR TRANSPORT... SYSTEM PERMEASE ABC TRANSPORTER PROTEIN || http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/protein/15966266 ...

  19. The gntP Gene of Escherichia coli Involved in Gluconate Uptake

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Klemm, Per; Tong, S.; Nielsen, Henrik

    1996-01-01

    The gntP gene, located between the fim and uxu loci in Escherichia coli K-12, has been cloned and characterized. Nucleotide sequencing of a region encompassing the gntP gene revealed an open reading frame of 447 codons with significant homology to the Bacillus subtilis gluconate permease. Northern...

  20. TMFunction data: 414 [TMFunction[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available G386A;I395S ... yes LACTOSE UPTAKE (non toxic, reduced activity) TM 12; Lactose permease Escherichia coli ... Ste...wart C, Bailey J, Manoil C. J Biol Chem. 1998 Oct 23;273(43):28078-84 cassette muta

  1. TMFunction data: 408 [TMFunction[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available Y382S;V397L ... yes LACTOSE UPTAKE (non toxic, reduced activity) TM 12; Lactose permease Escherichia coli ... Ste...wart C, Bailey J, Manoil C. J Biol Chem. 1998 Oct 23;273(43):28078-84 cassette muta

  2. TMFunction data: 409 [TMFunction[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available L383M;F398L ... yes LACTOSE UPTAKE (non toxic, reduced activity) TM 12; Lactose permease Escherichia coli ... Ste...wart C, Bailey J, Manoil C. J Biol Chem. 1998 Oct 23;273(43):28078-84 cassette muta

  3. TMFunction data: 407 [TMFunction[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available A381S;S396F ... yes LACTOSE UPTAKE (non toxic, reduced activity) TM 12; Lactose permease Escherichia coli ... Ste...wart C, Bailey J, Manoil C. J Biol Chem. 1998 Oct 23;273(43):28078-84 cassette muta

  4. TMFunction data: 417 [TMFunction[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available S396A;F398L ... yes LACTOSE UPTAKE (non toxic, reduced activity) TM 12; Lactose permease Escherichia coli ... Ste...wart C, Bailey J, Manoil C. J Biol Chem. 1998 Oct 23;273(43):28078-84 cassette muta

  5. TMFunction data: 412 [TMFunction[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available L385R;L394F ... yes LACTOSE UPTAKE (non toxic, reduced activity) TM 12; Lactose permease Escherichia coli ... Ste...wart C, Bailey J, Manoil C. J Biol Chem. 1998 Oct 23;273(43):28078-84 cassette muta

  6. TMFunction data: 406 [TMFunction[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available A381V;L385K ... yes LACTOSE UPTAKE (non toxic, reduced activity) TM 12; Lactose permease Escherichia coli ... Ste...wart C, Bailey J, Manoil C. J Biol Chem. 1998 Oct 23;273(43):28078-84 cassette muta

  7. TMFunction data: 418 [TMFunction[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available F398I;T399K ... yes LACTOSE UPTAKE (non toxic, reduced activity) TM 12; Lactose permease Escherichia coli ... Ste...wart C, Bailey J, Manoil C. J Biol Chem. 1998 Oct 23;273(43):28078-84 cassette muta

  8. TMFunction data: 410 [TMFunction[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available L383Q;T399K ... yes LACTOSE UPTAKE (non toxic, reduced activity) TM 12; Lactose permease Escherichia coli ... Ste...wart C, Bailey J, Manoil C. J Biol Chem. 1998 Oct 23;273(43):28078-84 cassette muta

  9. TMFunction data: 415 [TMFunction[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available G391C;T393L ... yes LACTOSE UPTAKE (non toxic, reduced activity) TM 12; Lactose permease Escherichia coli ... Ste...wart C, Bailey J, Manoil C. J Biol Chem. 1998 Oct 23;273(43):28078-84 cassette muta

  10. TMFunction data: 411 [TMFunction[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available V384G;G391D ... yes LACTOSE UPTAKE (non toxic, reduced activity) TM 12; Lactose permease Escherichia coli ... Ste...wart C, Bailey J, Manoil C. J Biol Chem. 1998 Oct 23;273(43):28078-84 cassette muta

  11. Effector Overlap between the lac and mel Operons of Escherichia coli: Induction of the mel Operon with β-Galactosides.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Narang, Atul; Oehler, Stefan

    2017-05-01

    The lac (lactose) operon (which processes β-galactosides) and the mel (melibiose) operon (which processes α-galactosides) of Escherichia coli have a close historical connection. A number of shared substrates and effectors of the permeases and regulatory proteins have been reported over the years. Until now, β-thiogalactosides like TMG (methyl-β-d-thiogalactopyranoside) and IPTG (isopropyl-β-d-thiogalactopyranoside) have not generally been considered to be inducers of the mel operon. The same is true for β-galactosides such as lactose [β-d-galactopyranosyl-(1→4)-d-glucose], which is a substrate but is not itself an inducer of the lac operon. This report shows that all three sugars can induce the mel operon significantly when they are accumulated in the cell by Lac permease. Strong induction by β-thiogalactosides is observed in the presence of Lac permease, and strong induction by lactose (more than 200-fold) is observed in the absence of β-galactosidase. This finding calls for reevaluation of TMG uptake experiments as assays for Lac permease that were performed with mel + strains. IMPORTANCE The typical textbook picture of bacterial operons is that of stand-alone units of genetic information that perform, in a regulated manner, well-defined cellular functions. Less attention is given to the extensive interactions that can be found between operons. Well-described examples of such interactions are the effector molecules shared by the lac and mel operons. Here, we show that this set has to be extended to include β-galactosides, which have been, until now, considered not to effect the expression of the mel operon. That they can be inducers of the mel operon as well as the lac operon has not been noted in decades of research because of the Escherichia coli genetic background used in previous studies. Copyright © 2017 American Society for Microbiology.

  12. Effects of spermine on the detection of induced forward mutation at the CAN1 locus in yeast: evidence for selection against canavanine-resistant mutants

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    McDougall, K.J.; Lemontt, J.F.

    1979-01-01

    The effect of exogenous spermine tetrahydrochloride (0.5 mg/ml) on hydrazine- and nitrous acid-induced forward mutation to canavanine resistance (CAN1 ..-->.. can1, normal to defective arginine permease) was examined in stationary-phase haploid Saccharomyces cerevisiae. Post-treatment cell division (specifically DNA replication) is required for hydrazine mutagenesis at this locus, whereas nitrous acid mutagenesis exhibits, in addition, a significant post-treatment-independent component.

  13. Relevance of Peptide Uptake Systems to the Physiology and Virulence of Streptococcus agalactiae

    OpenAIRE

    Samen, Ulrike; Gottschalk, Birgit; Eikmanns, Bernhard J.; Reinscheid, Dieter J.

    2004-01-01

    Streptococcus agalactiae is a major cause of invasive infections in human newborns. To satisfy its growth requirements, S. agalactiae takes up 9 of the 20 proteinogenic amino acids from the environment. Defined S. agalactiae mutants in one or several of four putative peptide permease systems were constructed and tested for peptide uptake, growth in various media, and expression of virulence traits. Oligopeptide uptake by S. agalactiae was shown to be mediated by the ABC transporter OppA1-F, w...

  14. Respiration-Dependent Utilization of Sugars in Yeasts: a Determinant Role for Sugar Transporters

    OpenAIRE

    Goffrini, Paola; Ferrero, Iliana; Donnini, Claudia

    2002-01-01

    In many yeast species, including Kluyveromyces lactis, growth on certain sugars (such as galactose, raffinose, and maltose) occurs only under respiratory conditions. If respiration is blocked by inhibitors, mutation, or anaerobiosis, growth does not take place. This apparent dependence on respiration for the utilization of certain sugars has often been suspected to be associated with the mechanism of the sugar uptake step. We hypothesized that in many yeast species, the permease activities fo...

  15. Multilevel regulation of an alpha-arrestin by glucose depletion controls hexose transporter endocytosis

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Hovsepian, J.; Defenouillere, Q.; Albanese, V.; Váchová, Libuše; Garcia, C.; Palková, Zdena; Léon, S.

    2017-01-01

    Roč. 216, č. 6 (2017), s. 1811-1831 ISSN 0021-9525 R&D Projects: GA MŠk(CZ) LQ1604; GA ČR(CZ) GA15-08225S Institutional support: RVO:61388971 Keywords : YEAST SACCHAROMYCES-CEREVISIAE * BIMOLECULAR FLUORESCENCE COMPLEMENTATION * GAP1 PERMEASE UBIQUITYLATION Subject RIV: EE - Microbiology, Virology OBOR OECD: Microbiology Impact factor: 7.955, year: 2016

  16. Genetic analysis of amino acid transport in the facultatively heterotrophic cyanobacterium Synechocystis sp. Strain 6803

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Labarre, J.; Thuriaux, P.; Chauvat, F.

    1987-01-01

    The existence of active transport systems (permeases) operating on amino acids in the photoautotrophic cyanobacterium Synechocystis sp. strain 6803 was demonstrated by following the initial rates of uptake with 14 C-labeled amino acids, measuring the intracellular pools of amino acids, and isolating mutants resistant to toxic amino acids. One class of mutants (Pfa1) corresponds to a regulatory defect in the biosynthesis of the aromatic amino acids, but two other classes (Can1 and Aza1) are defective in amino acid transport. The Can1 mutants are defective in the active transport of three basic amino acids (arginine, histidine, and lysine) and in one of two transport systems operating on glutamine. The Aza1 mutants are not affected in the transport of the basic amino acids but have lost the capacity to transport all other amino acids except glutamate. The latter amino acid is probably transported by a third permease which could be identical to the Can1-independent transport operating on glutamine. Thus, genetic evidence suggests that strain 6803 has only a small number of amino acid transport systems with fairly broad specificity and that, with the exception of glutamine, each amino acid is accumulated by only one major transport system. Compared with heterotrophic bacteria such as Escherichia coli, these permeases are rather inefficient in terms of affinity (apparent K/sub m/ ranging from 6 to 60 μM) and of V/sub max/

  17. Subcellular localization and logistics of integral membrane protein biogenesis in Escherichia coli.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bogdanov, Mikhail; Aboulwafa, Mohammad; Saier, Milton H

    2013-01-01

    Transporters catalyze entry and exit of molecules into and out of cells and organelles, and protein-lipid interactions influence their activities. The bacterial phosphoenolpyruvate: sugar phosphotransferase system (PTS) catalyzes transport-coupled sugar phosphorylation as well as nonvectorial sugar phosphorylation in the cytoplasm. The vectorial process is much more sensitive to the lipid environment than the nonvectorial process. Moreover, cytoplasmic micellar forms of these enzyme-porters have been identified, and non-PTS permeases have similarly been shown to exist in 'soluble' forms. The latter porters exhibit lipid-dependent activities and can adopt altered topologies by simply changing the lipid composition. Finally, intracellular membranes and vesicles exist in Escherichia coli leading to the following unanswered questions: (1) what determines whether a PTS permease catalyzes vectorial or nonvectorial sugar phosphorylation? (2) How do phospholipids influence relative amounts of the plasma membrane, intracellular membrane, inner membrane-derived vesicles and cytoplasmic micelles? (3) What regulates the route(s) of permease insertion and transfer into and between the different subcellular sites? (4) Do these various membranous forms have distinct physiological functions? (5) What methods should be utilized to study the biogenesis and interconversion of these membranous structures? While research concerning these questions is still in its infancy, answers will greatly enhance our understanding of protein-lipid interactions and how they control the activities, conformations, cellular locations and biogenesis of integral membrane proteins. Copyright © 2013 S. Karger AG, Basel.

  18. Monitoring the degradation capability of novel haloalkaliphilic tributyltin chloride (TBTCl) resistant bacteria from butyltin-polluted site.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hassan, Hamdy A; Dawah, Somya E; El-Sheekh, Mostafa M

    2018-03-28

    Tributyltin (TBT) is recognized as a major environmental problem at a global scale. Haloalkaliphilic tributyltin (TBT)-degrading bacteria may be a key factor in the remediation of TBT polluted sites. In this work, three haloalkaliphilic bacteria strains were isolated from a TBT-contaminated site in the Mediterranean Sea. After analysis of the 16S rRNA gene sequences the isolates were identified as Sphingobium sp. HS1, Stenotrophomonas chelatiphaga HS2 and Rhizobium borbori HS5. The optimal growth conditions for biodegradation of TBT by the three strains were pH 9 and 7% (w/v) salt concentration. S. chelatiphaga HS2 was the most effective TBT degrader and has the ability to transform most TBT into dibutyltin and monobutyltin (DBT and MBT). A gene was amplified from strain HS2 and identified as TBTB-permease-like, that encodes an ArsB-permease. A reverse transcription polymerase chain reaction analysis in the HS2 strain confirmed that the TBTB-permease-like gene contributes to TBT resistance. The three novel haloalkaliphilic TBT degraders have never been reported previously. Copyright © 2018 Asociación Argentina de Microbiología. Publicado por Elsevier España, S.L.U. All rights reserved.

  19. Dynamics and bistability in a reduced model of the lac operon

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yildirim, Necmettin; Santillán, Moisés; Horike, Daisuke; Mackey, Michael C.

    2004-06-01

    It is known that the lac operon regulatory pathway is capable of showing bistable behavior. This is an important complex feature, arising from the nonlinearity of the involved mechanisms, which is essential to understand the dynamic behavior of this molecular regulatory system. To find which of the mechanisms involved in the regulation of the lac operon is the origin of bistability, we take a previously published model which accounts for the dynamics of mRNA, lactose, allolactose, permease and β-galactosidase involvement and simplify it by ignoring permease dynamics (assuming a constant permease concentration). To test the behavior of the reduced model, three existing sets of data on β-galactosidase levels as a function of time are simulated and we obtain a reasonable agreement between the data and the model predictions. The steady states of the reduced model were numerically and analytically analyzed and it was shown that it may indeed display bistability, depending on the extracellular lactose concentration and growth rate.

  20. Respiration-dependent utilization of sugars in yeasts: a determinant role for sugar transporters.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goffrini, Paola; Ferrero, Iliana; Donnini, Claudia

    2002-01-01

    In many yeast species, including Kluyveromyces lactis, growth on certain sugars (such as galactose, raffinose, and maltose) occurs only under respiratory conditions. If respiration is blocked by inhibitors, mutation, or anaerobiosis, growth does not take place. This apparent dependence on respiration for the utilization of certain sugars has often been suspected to be associated with the mechanism of the sugar uptake step. We hypothesized that in many yeast species, the permease activities for these sugars are not sufficient to ensure the high substrate flow that is necessary for fermentative growth. By introducing additional sugar permease genes, we have obtained K. lactis strains that were capable of growing on galactose and raffinose in the absence of respiration. High dosages of both the permease and maltase genes were indeed necessary for K. lactis cells to grow on maltose in the absence of respiration. These results strongly suggest that the sugar uptake step is the major bottleneck in the fermentative assimilation of certain sugars in K. lactis and probably in many other yeasts.

  1. Concurrent Haloalkanoate Degradation and Chlorate Reduction by Pseudomonas chloritidismutans AW-1T.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peng, Peng; Zheng, Ying; Koehorst, Jasper J; Schaap, Peter J; Stams, Alfons J M; Smidt, Hauke; Atashgahi, Siavash

    2017-06-15

    Haloalkanoates are environmental pollutants that can be degraded aerobically by microorganisms producing hydrolytic dehalogenases. However, there is a lack of information about the anaerobic degradation of haloalkanoates. Genome analysis of Pseudomonas chloritidismutans AW-1 T , a facultative anaerobic chlorate-reducing bacterium, showed the presence of two putative haloacid dehalogenase genes, the l-DEX gene and dehI , encoding an l-2-haloacid dehalogenase (l-DEX) and a halocarboxylic acid dehydrogenase (DehI), respectively. Hence, we studied the concurrent degradation of haloalkanoates and chlorate as a yet-unexplored trait of strain AW-1 T The deduced amino acid sequences of l-DEX and DehI revealed 33 to 37% and 26 to 86% identities with biochemically/structurally characterized l-DEX and the d- and dl-2-haloacid dehalogenase enzymes, respectively. Physiological experiments confirmed that strain AW-1 T can grow on chloroacetate, bromoacetate, and both l- and d-α-halogenated propionates with chlorate as an electron acceptor. Interestingly, growth and haloalkanoate degradation were generally faster with chlorate as an electron acceptor than with oxygen as an electron acceptor. In line with this, analyses of l-DEX and DehI dehalogenase activities using cell-free extract (CFE) of strain AW-1 T grown on dl-2-chloropropionate under chlorate-reducing conditions showed up to 3.5-fold higher dehalogenase activity than the CFE obtained from AW-1 T cells grown on dl-2-chloropropionate under aerobic conditions. Reverse transcription-quantitative PCR showed that the l-DEX gene was expressed constitutively independently of the electron donor (haloalkanoates or acetate) or acceptor (chlorate or oxygen), whereas the expression of dehI was induced by haloalkanoates. Concurrent degradation of organic and inorganic halogenated compounds by strain AW-1 T represents a unique metabolic capacity in a single bacterium, providing a new piece of the puzzle of the microbial halogen cycle

  2. Adaptation to diverse nitrogen-limited environments by deletion or extrachromosomal element formation of the GAP1 locus

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Gresham, D.; Usaite, Renata; Germann, S.M.

    2010-01-01

    and deletions at the GAP1 locus. GAP1 encodes the general amino acid permease, which transports amino acids across the plasma membrane. We identified a self-propagating extrachromosomal circular DNA molecule that results from intrachromosomal recombination between long terminal repeats (LTRs) flanking GAP1....... Extrachromosomal DNA circles (GAP1(circle)) contain GAP1, the replication origin ARS1116, and a single hybrid LTR derived from recombination between the two flanking LTRs. Formation of the GAP1(circle) is associated with deletion of chromosomal GAP1 (gap1 Delta) and production of a single hybrid LTR at the GAP1...

  3. Functional mining of transporters using synthetic selections

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Genee, Hans Jasper; Bali, Anne Pihl; Petersen, Søren Dalsgård

    2016-01-01

    transporters, PnuT, which is widely distributed across multiple bacterial phyla. We demonstrate that with modular replacement of the biosensor, we could expand our method to xanthine and identify xanthine permeases from gut and soil metagenomes. Our results demonstrate how synthetic-biology approaches can......-responsive biosensor systems that enable selective growth of cells only if they encode a ligand-specific importer. We developed such a synthetic selection system for thiamine pyrophosphate and mined soil and gut metagenomes for thiamine-uptake functions. We identified several members of a novel class of thiamine...

  4. Purine Restriction Induces Pronounced Translational Upregulation of the NT1 Adenosine/Pyrimidine Nucleoside Transporter in Leishmania major

    OpenAIRE

    Ortiz, Diana; Valdés, Raquel; Sanchez, Marco A.; Hayenga, Johanna; Elya, Carolyn; Detke, Siegfried; Landfear, Scott M.

    2010-01-01

    Leishmania and other parasitic protozoa are unable to synthesize purines de novo and are reliant upon purine nucleoside and nucleobase transporters to import preformed purines from their hosts. To study the roles of the four purine permeases NT1-NT4 in Leishmania major, null mutants in each transporter gene were prepared and the effect of each gene deletion on purine uptake was monitored. Deletion of the NT3 purine nucleobase transporter gene or both NT3 and the NT2 nucleoside transporter gen...

  5. NCBI nr-aa BLAST: CBRC-TTRU-01-0103 [SEVENS

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available CBRC-TTRU-01-0103 ref|YP_514171.1| serine transporter [Francisella tularensis subsp.... holarctica] ref|YP_001429039.1| hypothetical protein FTA_1608 [Francisella tularensis subsp. holarctica FT...NF002-00] ref|ZP_02274778.1| serine permease [Francisella tularensis subsp. holarctica FSC200] ref|ZP_049841...11.1| serine transporter [Francisella tularensis subsp. holarctica 257] emb|CAJ79...963.1| serine transporter [Francisella tularensis subsp. holarctica LVS] gb|EBA52995.1| serine transporter [Fran

  6. Maltase protein of Ogataea (Hansenula) polymorpha is a counterpart to resurrected ancestor protein ancMALS of yeast maltases and isomaltases

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Viigand, Katrin; Visnapuu, Triinu; Mardo, Karin

    2016-01-01

    and mutation of the genes. We studied substrate specificity of the maltase protein MAL1 from an earlier diverged yeast, Ogataea polymorpha (Op), in the light of this hypothesis. MAL1 has extended substrate specificity and its properties are strikingly similar to those of resurrected ancMALS. Moreover, amino......, indicating the power of the method to predict substrate binding. Deletion of either the maltase (MAL1) or α-glucoside permease (MAL2) gene in Op abolished the growth of yeast on MAL1 substrates, confirming the requirement of both proteins for usage of these sugars....

  7. Structural evidence for induced fit and a mechanism for sugar/H+ symport in LacY

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Mirza, Osman Asghar; Guan, Lan; Verner, Gill

    2006-01-01

    Cation-coupled active transport is an essential cellular process found ubiquitously in all living organisms. Here, we present two novel ligand-free X-ray structures of the lactose permease (LacY) of Escherichia coli determined at acidic and neutral pH, and propose a model for the mechanism...... of coupling between lactose and H+ translocation. No sugar-binding site is observed in the absence of ligand, and deprotonation of the key residue Glu269 is associated with ligand binding. Thus, substrate induces formation of the sugar-binding site, as well as the initial step in H+ transduction....

  8. NCBI nr-aa BLAST: CBRC-PHAM-01-0469 [SEVENS

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available CBRC-PHAM-01-0469 ref|ZP_04755732.1| fucose permease-like protein [Francisella philomiragia subsp. philo...miragia ATCC 25015] ref|ZP_05249399.1| major facilitator superfamily transporter [Francisella philo...miragia subsp. philomiragia ATCC 25015] gb|ACA66108.1| major facilitator superfamily protein [Francisella philo...miragia subsp. philomiragia] gb|EET21124.1| major facilitator supe...rfamily transporter [Francisella philomiragia subsp. philomiragia ATCC 25015] ZP_04755732.1 0.099 25% ...

  9. Sulfobacillus thermosulfidooxidans strain Cutipay enhances chalcopyrite bioleaching under moderate thermophilic conditions in the presence of chloride ion.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bobadilla-Fazzini, Roberto A; Cortés, Maria Paz; Maass, Alejandro; Parada, Pilar

    2014-12-01

    Currently more than 90% of the world's copper is obtained through sulfide mineral processing. Among the copper sulfides, chalcopyrite is the most abundant and therefore economically relevant. However, primary copper sulfide bioleaching is restricted due to high ionic strength raffinate solutions and particularly chloride coming from the dissolution of ores. In this work we describe the chalcopyrite bioleaching capacity of Sulfobacillus thermosulfidooxidans strain Cutipay (DSM 27601) previously described at the genomic level (Travisany et al. (2012) Draft genome sequence of the Sulfobacillus thermosulfidooxidans Cutipay strain, an indigenous bacterium isolated from a naturally extreme mining environment in Northern Chile. J Bacteriol 194:6327-6328). Bioleaching assays with the mixotrophic strain Cutipay showed a strong increase in copper recovery from chalcopyrite concentrate at 50°C in the presence of chloride ion, a relevant inhibitory element present in copper bioleaching processes. Compared to the abiotic control and a test with Sulfobacillus acidophilus DSM 10332, strain Cutipay showed an increase of 42 and 69% in copper recovery, respectively, demonstrating its high potential for chalcopyrite bioleaching. Moreover, a genomic comparison highlights the presence of the 2-Haloacid dehalogenase predicted-protein related to a potential new mechanism of chloride resistance in acidophiles. This novel and industrially applicable strain is under patent application CL 2013-03335.

  10. YbiV from E. coli K12 is a HAD phosphatase

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Roberts, Anne; Lee, Seok-Yong; McCullagh, Emma; Silversmith, Ruth E.; Wemmer, David E.

    2004-03-16

    The protein YbiV from Escherichia coli K12 MG1655 is a hypothetical protein with sequence homology to the haloacid dehalogenase (HAD) superfamily of proteins. Although numerous members of this family have been identified, the functions of few are known. Using the crystal structure, sequence analysis, and biochemical assays, we have characterized ybiV as a HAD phosphatase. The crystal structure of YbiV reveals a two domain protein, one with the characteristic HAD hydrolase fold, the other an inserted a/b fold. In an effort to understand the mechanism we also solved and report the structures of YbiV in complex with beryllofluoride (BeF3-) and aluminum trifluoride (AlF3) which have been shown to mimic the phosphorylated intermediate and transition state for hydrolysis, respectively, in analogy to other HAD phosphatases. Analysis of the structures reveals the substrate binding cavity, which is hydrophilic in nature. Both structure and sequence homology indicate ybiV may be a sugar phosphatase, which is supported by biochemical assays which measured the release of free phosphate on a number of sugar-like substrates. We also investigated available genomic and functional data in an effort to determine the physiological substrate.

  11. A Stevedore's protein knot.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Daniel Bölinger

    2010-04-01

    Full Text Available Protein knots, mostly regarded as intriguing oddities, are gradually being recognized as significant structural motifs. Seven distinctly knotted folds have already been identified. It is by and large unclear how these exceptional structures actually fold, and only recently, experiments and simulations have begun to shed some light on this issue. In checking the new protein structures submitted to the Protein Data Bank, we encountered the most complex and the smallest knots to date: A recently uncovered alpha-haloacid dehalogenase structure contains a knot with six crossings, a so-called Stevedore knot, in a projection onto a plane. The smallest protein knot is present in an as yet unclassified protein fragment that consists of only 92 amino acids. The topological complexity of the Stevedore knot presents a puzzle as to how it could possibly fold. To unravel this enigma, we performed folding simulations with a structure-based coarse-grained model and uncovered a possible mechanism by which the knot forms in a single loop flip.

  12. Trehalose 6-phosphate phosphatases of Pseudomonas aeruginosa.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cross, Megan; Biberacher, Sonja; Park, Suk-Youl; Rajan, Siji; Korhonen, Pasi; Gasser, Robin B; Kim, Jeong-Sun; Coster, Mark J; Hofmann, Andreas

    2018-04-24

    The opportunistic bacterium Pseudomonas aeruginosa has been recognized as an important pathogen of clinical relevance and is a leading cause of hospital-acquired infections. The presence of a glycolytic enzyme in Pseudomonas, which is known to be inhibited by trehalose 6-phosphate (T6P) in other organisms, suggests that these bacteria may be vulnerable to the detrimental effects of intracellular T6P accumulation. In the present study, we explored the structural and functional properties of trehalose 6-phosphate phosphatase (TPP) in P. aeruginosa in support of future target-based drug discovery. A survey of genomes revealed the existence of 2 TPP genes with either chromosomal or extrachromosomal location. Both TPPs were produced as recombinant proteins, and characterization of their enzymatic properties confirmed specific, magnesium-dependent catalytic hydrolysis of T6P. The 3-dimensional crystal structure of the chromosomal TPP revealed a protein dimer arising through β-sheet expansion of the individual monomers, which possess the overall fold of halo-acid dehydrogenases.-Cross, M., Biberacher, S., Park, S.-Y., Rajan, S., Korhonen, P., Gasser, R. B., Kim, J.-S., Coster, M. J., Hofmann, A. Trehalose 6-phosphate phosphatases of Pseudomonas aeruginosa.

  13. Differential protein accumulations in isolates of the strawberry wilt pathogen Fusarium oxysporum f. sp. fragariae differing in virulence.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fang, Xiangling; Barbetti, Martin J

    2014-08-28

    This study was conducted to define differences in Fusarium oxysporum f. sp. fragariae (Fof) isolates with different virulence efficiency to strawberry at the proteome level, in combination with their differences in mycelial growth, conidial production and germination. Comparative proteome analyses revealed substantial differences in mycelial proteomes between Fof isolates, where the 54 differentially accumulated protein spots were consistently over-accumulated or exclusively in the highly virulent isolate. These protein spots were identified through MALDI-TOF/TOF mass spectrometry analyses, and the identified proteins were mainly related to primary and protein metabolism, antioxidation, electron transport, cell cycle and transcription based on their putative functions. Proteins of great potential as Fof virulence factors were those involved in ubiquitin/proteasome-mediated protein degradation and reactive oxygen species detoxification; the hydrolysis-related protein haloacid dehalogenase superfamily hydrolase; 3,4-dihydroxy-2-butanone 4-phosphate synthase associated with riboflavin biosynthesis; and those exclusive to the highly virulent isolate. In addition, post-translational modifications may also make an important contribution to Fof virulence. F. oxysporum f. sp. fragariae (Fof), the causal agent of Fusarium wilt in strawberry, is a serious threat to commercial strawberry production worldwide. However, factors and mechanisms contributing to Fof virulence remained unknown. This study provides knowledge of the molecular basis for the differential expression of virulence in Fof, allowing new possibilities towards developing alternative and more effective strategies to manage Fusarium wilt. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  14. Adaptation of Xanthobacter autotrophicus GJ10 to bromoacetate due to activation and mobilization of the haloacetate dehalogenase gene by insertion element IS1247

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    van der Ploeg, J; Willemsen, M; Van Hall, Gerrit

    1995-01-01

    B gene. In mutant GJ10M50, a DNA fragment (designated IS1247) had copied itself from a position on the chromosome that was not linked to the dhlB region to a site immediately upstream of dhlB, resulting in a 1,672-bp insertion. IS1247 was found to encode an open reading frame corresponding to 464 amino...... acids which showed similarity to putative transposases from two other insertion elements. In most of the other MBA-resistant mutants of GJ10, IS1247 was also present in one more copy than in the wild type, which had two copies located within 20 kb. After insertion to a site proximal to dhlB, IS1247...... was able to transpose itself together with the dhlB gene to a plasmid, without the requirement of a second insertion element being present downstream of dhlB. The results show that IS1247 causes bromoacetate resistance by overexpression and mobilization of the haloacid dehalogenase gene, which mimics steps...

  15. A conserved tryptophan within the WRDPLVDID domain of yeast Pah1 phosphatidate phosphatase is required for its in vivo function in lipid metabolism.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Park, Yeonhee; Han, Gil-Soo; Carman, George M

    2017-12-01

    PAH1 -encoded phosphatidate phosphatase, which catalyzes the dephosphorylation of phosphatidate to produce diacylglycerol at the endoplasmic reticulum membrane, plays a major role in controlling the utilization of phosphatidate for the synthesis of triacylglycerol or membrane phospholipids. The conserved N-LIP and haloacid dehalogenase-like domains of Pah1 are required for phosphatidate phosphatase activity and the in vivo function of the enzyme. Its non-conserved regions, which are located between the conserved domains and at the C terminus, contain sites for phosphorylation by multiple protein kinases. Truncation analyses of the non-conserved regions showed that they are not essential for the catalytic activity of Pah1 and its physiological functions ( e.g. triacylglycerol synthesis). This analysis also revealed that the C-terminal region contains a previously unrecognized WRDPLVDID domain (residues 637-645) that is conserved in yeast, mice, and humans. The deletion of this domain had no effect on the catalytic activity of Pah1 but caused the loss of its in vivo function. Site-specific mutational analyses of the conserved residues within WRDPLVDID indicated that Trp-637 plays a crucial role in Pah1 function. This work also demonstrated that the catalytic activity of Pah1 is required but is not sufficient for its in vivo functions. © 2017 by The American Society for Biochemistry and Molecular Biology, Inc.

  16. Susceptibility to breast cancer and three polymorphisms of GSTZ1.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Saadat, Iraj; Khalili, Maryam; Nafissi, Samane; Omidvari, Shahpour; Saadat, Mostafa

    2012-03-01

    Glutathione S-transferases class zeta (GSTζ) is involved in the detoxification of xenobiotic compounds and catalyzes the biotransformation of a variety of α-haloacids including dichloroacetic acid and chlorofluoroacetic acid. It has been reported that, in mice, deficiency of Gstz1 (a member of GSTζ) resulted in the generation of a constant level of oxidative stress. The present study was carried out to investigate the association between genetic polymorphisms of GSTZ1 (in promoter site G-1002A and in coding sites Glu32Lys and Gly42Arg) and risk of breast cancer. We included 106 females with breast cancer and 106 healthy females frequency matched for age. The study polymorphisms were not associated with risk of breast cancer (p>0.05). The polymorphisms of GSTZ1 showed strong linkage disequilibrium among cancer patients and control subjects (p0.05). It seems there is no meaningful relationship between the genetic polymorphisms of GSTZ1 and risk of breast cancer.

  17. Thermophilic archaeal enzymes and applications in biocatalysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Littlechild, Jennifer A

    2011-01-01

    Thermophilic enzymes have advantages for their use in commercial applications and particularly for the production of chiral compounds to produce optically pure pharmaceuticals. They can be used as biocatalysts in the application of 'green chemistry'. The thermophilic archaea contain enzymes that have already been used in commercial applications such as the L-aminoacylase from Thermococcus litoralis for the resolution of amino acids and amino acid analogues. This enzyme differs from bacterial L-aminoacylases and has similarities to carboxypeptidases from other archaeal species. An amidase/γ-lactamase from Sulfolobus solfataricus has been used for the production of optically pure γ-lactam, the building block for antiviral carbocyclic nucleotides. This enzyme has similarities to the bacterial signature amidase family. An alcohol dehydrogenase from Aeropyrum pernix has been used for the production of optically pure alcohols and is related to the zinc-containing eukaryotic alcohol dehydrogenases. A transaminase and a dehalogenase from Sulfolobus species have also been studied. The archaeal transaminase is found in a pathway for serine synthesis which is found only in eukaryotes and not in bacteria. It can be used for the asymmetric synthesis of homochiral amines of high enantioselective purity. The L-2-haloacid dehalogenase has applications both in biocatalysis and in bioremediation. All of these enzymes have increased thermostability over their mesophilic counterparts.

  18. 15N-labelled glycine synthesis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tavares, Claudineia R.O.; Bendassolli, Jose A.; Sant'Ana Filho, Carlos R.; Prestes, Clelber V.; Coelho, Fernando

    2006-01-01

    This work describes a method for 15 N-isotope-labeled glycine synthesis, as well as details about a recovery line for nitrogen residues. To that effect, amination of α-haloacids was performed, using carboxylic chloroacetic acid and labeled aqueous ammonia ( 15 NH 3 ). Special care was taken to avoid possible 15 NH 3 losses, since its production cost is high. In that respect, although the purchase cost of the 13 N-labeled compound (radioactive) is lower, the stable tracer produced constitutes an important tool for N cycling studies in living organisms, also minimizing labor and environmental hazards, as well as time limitation problems in field studies. The tests were carried out with three replications, and variable 15 NH 3(aq) volumes in the reaction were used (50, 100, and 150 mL), in order to calibrate the best operational condition; glycine masses obtained were 1.7, 2, and 3.2 g, respectively. With the development of a system for 15 NH 3 recovery, it was possible to recover 71, 83, and 87% of the ammonia initially used in the synthesis. With the required adaptations, the same system was used to recover methanol, and 75% of the methanol initially used in the amino acid purification process were recovered. (author)

  19. Mapping of the minimal inorganic phosphate transporting unit of human PiT2 suggests a structure universal to PiT-related proteins from all kingdoms of life

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bøttger, Pernille; Pedersen, Lene

    2011-01-01

    -keeping functions. Alignment of protein sequences representing PiT family members from all kingdoms reveals the presence of conserved amino acids and that bacterial phosphate permeases and putative phosphate permeases from archaea lack substantial parts of the protein sequence when compared to the mammalian Pi...... PiT2 histidine, H502, and the human PiT1 glutamate, E70, - both conserved in eukaryotic PiT family members - are critical for Pi transport function. Noticeably, human PiT2 H502 is located in the C-terminal PiT family signature sequence, and human PiT1 E70 is located in ProDom domains characteristic....... Conclusions The results suggest that the overall structure of the Pi-transporting unit of the PiT family proteins has remained unchanged during evolution. Moreover, in combination, our studies of the gene structure of the human PiT1 and PiT2 genes (SLC20A1 and SLC20A2, respectively) and alignment of protein...

  20. Metabolic engineering to expand the substrate spectrum of Pseudomonas putida toward sucrose.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Löwe, Hannes; Schmauder, Lukas; Hobmeier, Karina; Kremling, Andreas; Pflüger-Grau, Katharina

    2017-08-01

    Sucrose is an important disaccharide used as a substrate in many industrial applications. It is a major component of molasses, a cheap by-product of the sugar industry. Unfortunately, not all industrially relevant organisms, among them Pseudomonas putida, are capable of metabolizing sucrose. We chose a metabolic engineering approach to circumvent this blockage and equip P. putida with the activities necessary to consume sucrose. Therefore, we constructed a pair of broad-host range mini-transposons (pSST - sucrose splitting transposon), carrying either cscA, encoding an invertase able to split sucrose into glucose and fructose, or additionally cscB, encoding a sucrose permease. Introduction of cscA was sufficient to convey sucrose consumption and the additional presence of cscB had no further effect, though the sucrose permease was built and localized to the membrane. Sucrose was split extracellularly by the activity of the invertase CscA leaking out of the cell. The transposons were also used to confer sucrose consumption to Cupriavidus necator. Interestingly, in this strain, CscB acted as a glucose transporter, such that C. necator also gained the ability to grow on glucose. Thus, the pSST transposons are functional tools to extend the substrate spectrum of Gram-negative bacterial strains toward sucrose. © 2017 The Authors. MicrobiologyOpen published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  1. Purine restriction induces pronounced translational upregulation of the NT1 adenosine/pyrimidine nucleoside transporter in Leishmania major.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ortiz, Diana; Valdés, Raquel; Sanchez, Marco A; Hayenga, Johanna; Elya, Carolyn; Detke, Siegfried; Landfear, Scott M

    2010-10-01

    Leishmania and other parasitic protozoa are unable to synthesize purines de novo and are reliant upon purine nucleoside and nucleobase transporters to import preformed purines from their hosts. To study the roles of the four purine permeases NT1-NT4 in Leishmania major, null mutants in each transporter gene were prepared and the effect of each gene deletion on purine uptake was monitored. Deletion of the NT3 purine nucleobase transporter gene or both NT3 and the NT2 nucleoside transporter gene resulted in pronounced upregulation of adenosine and uridine uptake mediated by the NT1 permease and also induced up to a 200-fold enhancement in the level of the NT1 protein but not mRNA. A similar level of upregulation of NT1 was achieved in wild-type promastigotes that were transferred to medium deficient in purines. Pulse labelling and treatment of cells with the translation inhibitor cycloheximide revealed that control of NT1 expression occurs primarily at the level of translation and not protein turnover. These observations imply the existence of a translational control mechanism that enhances the ability of Leishmania parasites to import essential purines when they are present at limiting concentrations. © 2010 Blackwell Publishing Ltd.

  2. Yeast genes involved in regulating cysteine uptake affect production of hydrogen sulfide from cysteine during fermentation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huang, Chien-Wei; Walker, Michelle E; Fedrizzi, Bruno; Gardner, Richard C; Jiranek, Vladimir

    2017-08-01

    An early burst of hydrogen sulfide (H2S) produced by Saccharomyces cerevisiae during fermentation could increase varietal thiols and therefore enhance desirable tropical aromas in varieties such as Sauvignon Blanc. Here we attempted to identify genes affecting H2S formation from cysteine by screening yeast deletion libraries via a colony colour assay on media resembling grape juice. Both Δlst4 and Δlst7 formed lighter coloured colonies and produced significantly less H2S than the wild type on high concentrations of cysteine, likely because they are unable to take up cysteine efficiently. We then examined the nine known cysteine permeases and found that deletion of AGP1, GNP1 and MUP1 led to reduced production of H2S from cysteine. We further showed that deleting genes involved in the SPS-sensing pathway such as STP1 and DAL81 also reduced H2S from cysteine. Together, this study indirectly confirms that Agp1p, Gnp1p and Mup1p are the major cysteine permeases and that they are regulated by the SPS-sensing and target of rapamycin pathways under the grape juice-like, cysteine-supplemented, fermentation conditions. The findings highlight that cysteine transportation could be a limiting factor for yeast to generate H2S from cysteine, and therefore selecting wine yeasts without defects in cysteine uptake could maximise thiol production potential. © FEMS 2017. All rights reserved. For permissions, please e-mail: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  3. A New Catabolic Plasmid in Xanthobacter and Starkeya spp. from a 1,2-Dichloroethane-Contaminated Site

    Science.gov (United States)

    Munro, Jacob E.; Liew, Elissa F.; Ly, Mai-Anh

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT 1,2-Dichloroethane (DCA) is a problematic xenobiotic groundwater pollutant. Bacteria are capable of biodegrading DCA, but the evolution of such bacteria is not well understood. In particular, the mechanisms by which bacteria acquire the key dehalogenase genes dhlA and dhlB have not been well defined. In this study, the genomic context of dhlA and dhlB was determined in three aerobic DCA-degrading bacteria (Starkeya novella strain EL1, Xanthobacter autotrophicus strain EL4, and Xanthobacter flavus strain EL8) isolated from a groundwater treatment plant (GTP). A haloalkane dehalogenase gene (dhlA) identical to the canonical dhlA gene from Xanthobacter sp. strain GJ10 was present in all three isolates, and, in each case, the dhlA gene was carried on a variant of a 37-kb circular plasmid, which was named pDCA. Sequence analysis of the repA replication initiator gene indicated that pDCA was a member of the pTAR plasmid family, related to catabolic plasmids from the Alphaproteobacteria, which enable growth on aromatics, dimethylformamide, and tartrate. Genes for plasmid replication, mobilization, and stabilization were identified, along with two insertion sequences (ISXa1 and ISPme1) which were likely to have mobilized dhlA and dhlB and played a role in the evolution of aerobic DCA-degrading bacteria. Two haloacid dehalogenase genes (dhlB1 and dhlB2) were detected in the GTP isolates; dhlB1 was most likely chromosomal and was similar to the canonical dhlB gene from strain GJ10, while dhlB2 was carried on pDCA and was not closely related to dhlB1. Heterologous expression of the DhlB2 protein confirmed that this plasmid-borne dehalogenase was capable of chloroacetate dechlorination. IMPORTANCE Earlier studies on the DCA-degrading Xanthobacter sp. strain GJ10 indicated that the key dehalogenases dhlA and dhlB were carried on a 225-kb linear plasmid and on the chromosome, respectively. The present study has found a dramatically different gene organization in more

  4. Transport Deficiency Is the Molecular Basis of Candida albicans Resistance to Antifungal Oligopeptides

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marta Schielmann

    2017-11-01

    Full Text Available Oligopeptides incorporating N3-(4-methoxyfumaroyl-L-2,3-diaminopropanoic acid (FMDP, an inhibitor of glucosamine-6-phosphate synthase, exhibited growth inhibitory activity against Candida albicans, with minimal inhibitory concentration values in the 0.05–50 μg mL-1 range. Uptake by the peptide permeases was found to be the main factor limiting an anticandidal activity of these compounds. Di- and tripeptide containing FMDP (F2 and F3 were transported by Ptr2p/Ptr22p peptide transporters (PTR and FMDP-containing hexa-, hepta-, and undecapeptide (F6, F7, and F11 were taken up by the oligopeptide transporters (OPT oligopeptide permeases, preferably by Opt2p/Opt3p. A phenotypic, apparent resistance of C. albicans to FMDP-oligopeptides transported by OPT permeases was triggered by the environmental factors, whereas resistance to those taken up by the PTR system had a genetic basis. Anticandidal activity of longer FMDP-oligopeptides was strongly diminished in minimal media containing easily assimilated ammonium sulfate or L-glutamine as the nitrogen source, both known to downregulate expression of the OPT genes. All FMDP-oligopeptides tested were more active at lower pH and this effect was slightly more remarkable for peptides F6, F7, and F11, compared to F2 and F3. Formation of isolated colonies was observed inside the growth inhibitory zones induced by F2 and F3 but not inside those induced by F6, F7, and F11. The vast majority (98% of those colonies did not originate from truly resistant cells. The true resistance of 2% of isolates was due to the impaired transport of di- and to a lower extent, tripeptides. The resistant cells did not exhibit a lower expression of PTR2, PTR22, or OPT1–3 genes, but mutations in the PTR2 gene resulting in T422H, A320S, D119V, and A320S substitutions in the amino acid sequence of Ptr2p were found.

  5. Trypanosoma cruzi: Transporte de metabolitos esenciales obtenidos del hospedador Trypanosoma cruzi: Transport of essential metabolites acquired from the host

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Claudio A. Pereira

    2008-10-01

    Full Text Available El Trypanosoma cruzi es el agente causal de la enfermedad de Chagas, endémica en Argentina y en toda América Latina. Presenta numerosas características metabólicas diferenciales respecto a sus hospedadores insectos y mamíferos. Algunas de estas diferencias fueron consecuencia de millones de años de adaptación al parasitismo en los cuales estos organismos protozoarios reemplazaron, a lo largo de su evolución, muchas rutas metabólicas de biosíntesis por sistemas de transporte de metabolitos desde el hospedador. En esta revisión se describen los avances en el conocimiento de los sistemas de transporte tanto bioquímicos como también de las moléculas involucradas en dichos procesos. Se aborda con especial énfasis los transportadores de aminoácidos y poliaminas de T. cruzi de la familia AAAP (Amino Acid/Auxin Permeases ya que parece ser exclusiva de los tripanosomátidos. Teniendo en cuenta que estas moléculas se encuentran completamente ausentes en mamíferos podrían ser consideradas como potenciales blancos contra el Trypanosoma cruzi.Trypanosoma cruzi is the etiological agent of Chagas disease, a disease endemic not only in Argentina but also in all of Latinamerica. T. cruzi presents several metabolic characteristics which are completely absent in its insect vectors and in mammalian hosts. Some of these differences were acquired after millions of years of adaptation to parasitism, during which this protozoan replaced many biosynthetic routes for transport systems. In the present review, we describe the advances in the knowledge of T. cruzi transport processes and the molecules involved. In particular, we focus on aminoacid and polyamine transporters from the AAAP family (Amino Acid/Auxin Permeases, because they seem to be exclusive transporters from trypanosomatids. Taking into account that these permeases are completely absent in mammals, they could be considered as a potential target against Trypanosoma cruzi.

  6. Coordinated Regulation of the EIIMan and fruRKI Operons of Streptococcus mutans by Global and Fructose-Specific Pathways.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zeng, Lin; Chakraborty, Brinta; Farivar, Tanaz; Burne, Robert A

    2017-11-01

    The glucose/mannose-phosphotransferase system (PTS) permease EII Man encoded by manLMN in the dental caries pathogen Streptococcus mutans has a dominant influence on sugar-specific, CcpA-independent catabolite repression (CR). Mutations in manL affect energy metabolism and virulence-associated traits, including biofilm formation, acid tolerance, and competence. Using promoter::reporter fusions, expression of the manLMN and the fruRKI operons, encoding a transcriptional regulator, a fructose-1-phosphate kinase and a fructose-PTS permease EII Fru , respectively, was monitored in response to carbohydrate source and in mutants lacking CcpA, FruR, and components of EII Man Expression of genes for EII Man and EII Fru was directly regulated by CcpA and CR, as evinced by in vivo and in vitro methods. Unexpectedly, not only was the fruRKI operon negatively regulated by FruR, but also so was manLMN Carbohydrate transport by EII Man had a negative influence on expression of manLMN but not fruRKI In agreement with the proposed role of FruR in regulating these PTS operons, loss of fruR or fruK substantially altered growth on a number of carbohydrates, including fructose. RNA deep sequencing revealed profound changes in gene regulation caused by deletion of fruK or fruR Collectively, these findings demonstrate intimate interconnection of the regulation of two major PTS permeases in S. mutans and reveal novel and important contributions of fructose metabolism to global regulation of gene expression. IMPORTANCE The ability of Streptococcus mutans and other streptococcal pathogens to survive and cause human diseases is directly dependent upon their capacity to metabolize a variety of carbohydrates, including glucose and fructose. Our research reveals that metabolism of fructose has broad influences on the regulation of utilization of glucose and other sugars, and mutants with changes in certain genes involved in fructose metabolism display profoundly different abilities to grow and

  7. Site-Specific, Covalent Immobilization of Dehalogenase ST2570 Catalyzed by Formylglycine-Generating Enzymes and Its Application in Batch and Semi-Continuous Flow Reactors

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hui Jian

    2016-07-01

    Full Text Available Formylglycine-generating enzymes can selectively recognize and oxidize cysteine residues within the sulfatase sub motif at the terminus of proteins to form aldehyde-bearing formylglycine (FGly residues, and are normally used in protein labeling. In this study, an aldehyde tag was introduced to proteins using formylglycine-generating enzymes encoded by a reconstructed set of the pET28a plasmid system for enzyme immobilization. The haloacid dehalogenase ST2570 from Sulfolobus tokodaii was used as a model enzyme. The C-terminal aldehyde-tagged ST2570 (ST2570CQ exhibited significant enzymological properties, such as new free aldehyde groups, a high level of protein expression and improved enzyme activity. SBA-15 has widely been used as an immobilization support for its large surface and excellent thermal and chemical stability. It was functionalized with amino groups by aminopropyltriethoxysilane. The C-terminal aldehyde-tagged ST2570 was immobilized to SBA-15 by covalent binding. The site-specific immobilization of ST2570 avoided the chemical denaturation that occurs in general covalent immobilization and resulted in better fastening compared to physical adsorption. The site-specific immobilized ST2570 showed 3-fold higher thermal stability, 1.2-fold higher catalytic ability and improved operational stability than free ST2570. The site-specific immobilized ST2570 retained 60% of its original activity after seven cycles of batch operation, and it was superior to the ST2570 immobilized to SBA-15 by physical adsorption, which loses 40% of its original activity when used for the second time. It is remarkable that the site-specific immobilized ST2570 still retained 100% of its original activity after 10 cycles of reuse in the semi-continuous flow reactor. Overall, these results provide support for the industrial-scale production and application of site-specific, covalently immobilized ST2570.

  8. Structure Prediction, Molecular Dynamics Simulation and Docking Studies of D-Specific Dehalogenase from Rhizobium sp. RC1

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ismaila Yada Sudi

    2012-11-01

    Full Text Available Currently, there is no three-dimensional structure of D-specific dehalogenase (DehD in the protein database. We modeled DehD using ab initio technique, performed molecular dynamics (MD simulation and docking of D-2-chloropropionate (D-2CP, D-2-bromopropionate (D-2BP, monochloroacetate (MCA, monobromoacetate (MBA, 2,2-dichloropropionate (2,2-DCP, d,l-2,3-dichloropropionate (d,l-2,3-DCP, and 3-chloropropionate (3-CP into the DehD active site. The sequences of DehD and D-2-haloacid dehalogenase (HadD from Pseudomonas putida AJ1 have 15% sequence similarity. The model had 80% of the amino acid residues in the most favored region when compared to the crystal structure of DehI from Pseudomonas putida PP3. Docking analysis revealed that Arg107, Arg134 and Tyr135 interacted with D-2CP, and Glu20 activated the water molecule for hydrolytic dehalogenation. Single residue substitutions at 25–30 °C showed that polar residues of DehD were stable when substituted with nonpolar residues and showed a decrease in activity within the same temperature range. The molecular dynamics simulation of DehD and its variants showed that in R134A variant, Arg107 interacted with D-2CP, while in Y135A, Gln221 and Arg231 interacted with D-2CP. It is our emphatic belief that the new model will be useful for the rational design of DehDs with enhanced potentials.

  9. Transports of acetate and haloacetate in Burkholderia species MBA4 are operated by distinct systems

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Su Xianbin

    2012-11-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Acetate is a commonly used substrate for biosynthesis while monochloroacetate is a structurally similar compound but toxic and inhibits cell metabolism by blocking the citric acid cycle. In Burkholderia species MBA4 haloacetate was utilized as a carbon and energy source for growth. The degradation of haloacid was mediated by the production of an inducible dehalogenase. Recent studies have identified the presence of a concomitantly induced haloacetate-uptake activity in MBA4. This uptake activity has also been found to transport acetate. Since acetate transporters are commonly found in bacteria it is likely that haloacetate was transported by such a system in MBA4. Results The haloacetate-uptake activity of MBA4 was found to be induced by monochloroacetate (MCA and monobromoacetate (MBA. While the acetate-uptake activity was also induced by MCA and MBA, other alkanoates: acetate, propionate and 2-monochloropropionate (2MCPA were also inducers. Competing solute analysis showed that acetate and propionate interrupted the acetate- and MCA- induced acetate-uptake activities. While MCA, MBA, 2MCPA, and butyrate have no effect on acetate uptake they could significantly quenched the MCA-induced MCA-uptake activity. Transmembrane electrochemical potential was shown to be a driving force for both acetate- and MCA- transport systems. Conclusions Here we showed that acetate- and MCA- uptake in Burkholderia species MBA4 are two transport systems that have different induction patterns and substrate specificities. It is envisaged that the shapes and the three dimensional structures of the solutes determine their recognition or exclusion by the two transport systems.

  10. Synthesis of {sup 15}N isotope labeled alanine; Sintese da alanina enriquecida com {sup 15}N

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Oliveira, Claudineia R. de; Bendassolli, Jose Albertino; Sant' Ana, Carlos Roberto; Tagliassachi, Romulo Barbieri; Maximo, Everaldo; Prestes, Clelber Vieira [Centro de Energia Nuclear na Agricultura (CENA), Piracicaba, SP (Brazil). Dept. de Isotopos Estaveis]. E-mail: crolivei@cena.usp.br

    2005-07-01

    The application of light chemical elements and their stable isotopes in biological studies have been increased over the last years. The use of {sup 15}N labeled amino acids is an important tool for elucidation of peptides structures. This paper describe a method for the synthesis of {sup 15}N isotope labeled alanine at lower costs than international ones, as well as the details of the recovery system of the nitrogen residues. In the present work an amination of {alpha}-haloacids, with the bromopropionic carboxylic acid and labeled aqua ammonia ({sup 15}NH{sub 3} aq) was carried out. In order to avoid eventually losses of {sup 15}NH{sub 3}, special cares were adopted, since the production cost is high. Although the acquisition cost of the {sup 13}N (radioactive) labeled compounds is lower, the obtained stable tracer will allow the accomplishment of important studies of the nitrogen cycling in living things, less occupational and environment hazards, and the time limitation problems in field studies. The tests took place in triplicates with NH{sub 3} (aq) being employed. With the establishment of the system for {sup 15}NH{sub 3} recovery, an average of 94 % of the ammonia employed in the synthesis process was recovered. The purity of the amino acid was state determined by TLC (Thin Layer Chromatography) and HPLC (High-Performance Liquid Chromatography) with a fluorescence detector. The Rf and the retention time of the synthesized sample were similar the sigma standard. Finally, regarding the established conditions, it was possible to obtain the alanine with a production cost about 40 % lower than the international price. (author)

  11. Synthesis of 15N isotope labeled alanine

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Oliveira, Claudineia R. de; Bendassolli, Jose Albertino; Sant'Ana, Carlos Roberto; Tagliassachi, Romulo Barbieri; Maximo, Everaldo; Prestes, Clelber Vieira

    2005-01-01

    The application of light chemical elements and their stable isotopes in biological studies have been increased over the last years. The use of 15 N labeled amino acids is an important tool for elucidation of peptides structures. This paper describe a method for the synthesis of 15 N isotope labeled alanine at lower costs than international ones, as well as the details of the recovery system of the nitrogen residues. In the present work an amination of α-haloacids, with the bromopropionic carboxylic acid and labeled aqua ammonia ( 15 NH 3 aq) was carried out. In order to avoid eventually losses of 15 NH 3 , special cares were adopted, since the production cost is high. Although the acquisition cost of the 13 N (radioactive) labeled compounds is lower, the obtained stable tracer will allow the accomplishment of important studies of the nitrogen cycling in living things, less occupational and environment hazards, and the time limitation problems in field studies. The tests took place in triplicates with NH 3 (aq) being employed. With the establishment of the system for 15 NH 3 recovery, an average of 94 % of the ammonia employed in the synthesis process was recovered. The purity of the amino acid was state determined by TLC (Thin Layer Chromatography) and HPLC (High-Performance Liquid Chromatography) with a fluorescence detector. The Rf and the retention time of the synthesized sample were similar the sigma standard. Finally, regarding the established conditions, it was possible to obtain the alanine with a production cost about 40 % lower than the international price. (author)

  12. Diversity of hydrolases from hydrothermal vent sediments of the Levante Bay, Vulcano Island (Aeolian archipelago) identified by activity-based metagenomics and biochemical characterization of new esterases and an arabinopyranosidase.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Placido, Antonio; Hai, Tran; Ferrer, Manuel; Chernikova, Tatyana N; Distaso, Marco; Armstrong, Dale; Yakunin, Alexander F; Toshchakov, Stepan V; Yakimov, Michail M; Kublanov, Ilya V; Golyshina, Olga V; Pesole, Graziano; Ceci, Luigi R; Golyshin, Peter N

    2015-12-01

    A metagenomic fosmid expression library established from environmental DNA (eDNA) from the shallow hot vent sediment sample collected from the Levante Bay, Vulcano Island (Aeolian archipelago) was established in Escherichia coli. Using activity-based screening assays, we have assessed 9600 fosmid clones corresponding to approximately 350 Mbp of the cloned eDNA, for the lipases/esterases/lactamases, haloalkane and haloacid dehalogenases, and glycoside hydrolases. Thirty-four positive fosmid clones were selected from the total of 120 positive hits and sequenced to yield ca. 1360 kbp of high-quality assemblies. Fosmid inserts were attributed to the members of ten bacterial phyla, including Proteobacteria, Bacteroidetes, Acidobateria, Firmicutes, Verrucomicrobia, Chloroflexi, Spirochaetes, Thermotogae, Armatimonadetes, and Planctomycetes. Of ca. 200 proteins with high biotechnological potential identified therein, we have characterized in detail three distinct α/β-hydrolases (LIPESV12_9, LIPESV12_24, LIPESV12_26) and one new α-arabinopyranosidase (GLV12_5). All LIPESV12 enzymes revealed distinct substrate specificities tested against 43 structurally diverse esters and 4 p-nitrophenol carboxyl esters. Of 16 different glycosides tested, the GLV12_5 hydrolysed only p-nitrophenol-α-(L)-arabinopyranose with a high specific activity of about 2.7 kU/mg protein. Most of the α/β-hydrolases were thermophilic and revealed a high tolerance to, and high activities in the presence of, numerous heavy metal ions. Among them, the LIPESV12_24 was the best temperature-adapted, retaining its activity after 40 min of incubation at 90 °C. Furthermore, enzymes were active in organic solvents (e.g., >30% methanol). Both LIPESV12_24 and LIPESV12_26 had the GXSXG pentapeptides and the catalytic triads Ser-Asp-His typical to the representatives of carboxylesterases of EC 3.1.1.1.

  13. Regulation of Maltodextrin Phosphorylase Synthesis in Escherichia coli by Cyclic Adenosine 3′, 5′-Monophosphate and Glucose1

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chao, Julie; Weathersbee, Carolyn J.

    1974-01-01

    Cyclic adenosine 3′, 5′-monophosphate (AMP) stimulates maltodextrin phosphorylase synthesis in Escherichia coli cells induced with maltose. A maximal effect occurs at 2 to 3 mM cyclic AMP. The action of cyclic AMP is specific, inasmuch as adenosine triphosphate, 3′-AMP, 5′-AMP, adenosine, and dibutyryl cyclic AMP are inactive. Glucose, α-methyl glucoside, 2-deoxyglucose, and pyridoxal 5′-phosphate repress maltodextrin phosphorylase synthesis. This repression is reversed by cyclic AMP. The action of cyclic AMP appears to be at the transcriptional level, since cyclic AMP fails to stimulate phosphorylase production in induced cells in which messenger ribonucleic acid synthesis has been arrested by rifampin or by inducer removal. The two other enzymes involved in the metabolism of maltose, amylomaltase and maltose permease, are also induced in this strain of E. coli and affected by glucose and cyclic AMP in a manner similar to phosphorylase. PMID:4358043

  14. Structural features of PhoX, one of the phosphate-binding proteins from Pho regulon of Xanthomonas citri

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pegos, Vanessa R.; Santos, Rodrigo M. L.; Medrano, Francisco J.

    2017-01-01

    In Escherichia coli, the ATP-Binding Cassette transporter for phosphate is encoded by the pstSCAB operon. PstS is the periplasmic component responsible for affinity and specificity of the system and has also been related to a regulatory role and chemotaxis during depletion of phosphate. Xanthomonas citri has two phosphate-binding proteins: PstS and PhoX, which are differentially expressed under phosphate limitation. In this work, we focused on PhoX characterization and comparison with PstS. The PhoX three-dimensional structure was solved in a closed conformation with a phosphate engulfed in the binding site pocket between two domains. Comparison between PhoX and PstS revealed that they originated from gene duplication, but despite their similarities they show significant differences in the region that interacts with the permeases. PMID:28542513

  15. Mutations in sit B and sit D genes affect manganese-growth requirements in Sinorhizobium meliloti.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Platero, Raúl A; Jaureguy, Melina; Battistoni, Federico J; Fabiano, Elena R

    2003-01-21

    Two transposon-induced mutants of Sinorhizobium meliloti 242 were isolated based on their inability to grow on rich medium supplemented with the metal chelator ethylenediamine di-o-hydroxyphenylacetic acid (EDDHA) and either heme-compounds or siderophores as iron sources. Tagged loci of these mutants were identified as sit B and sit D genes. These genes encode components of an ABC (ATP-binding cassette) metal-type permease in several Gram-negative bacteria. In this work, the phenotypes of these two mutants were compared with those of two siderophore-mediated iron transport mutants. The results strongly implicate a role of the sit genes in manganese acquisition when this metal is limiting in S. meliloti.

  16. In silico analysis of amino acid biosynthesis and proteolysis in Lactobacillus delbrueckii subsp. bulgaricus 2038 and the implications for bovine milk fermentation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zheng, Huajun; Liu, Enuo; Hao, Pei; Konno, Tomonobu; Oda, Munehiro; Ji, Zai-Si

    2012-08-01

    The amino acid biosynthesis pathway and proteolytic system of Lactobacillus delbrueckii subsp. bulgaricus 2038 (L. bulgaricus 2038), a mainstay of large-scale yogurt production, were modeled based on its genomic sequence. L. bulgaricus 2038 retains more potential for amino acid synthesis and a more powerful proteolytic system than other L. bulgaricus strains, but favors amino acid uptake over de novo synthesis. Free amino acids and peptides in bovine milk provide the main nitrogen sources; whey is more important than casein for L. bulgaricus during fermentation. Free amino acids are imported by amino acid permeases and by ABC-type transport systems whereas exogenous oligopeptides are imported by ABC-type proteins only. Histidine is neither synthesized nor imported singly, which might explain why L. bulgaricus cannot grow in synthetic media.

  17. Alleviation of glucose repression of maltose metabolism by MIG1 disruption in Saccharomyces cerevisiae

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Klein, Christopher; Olsson, Lisbeth; Rønnow, B.

    1996-01-01

    The MIG1 gene was disrupted in a haploid laboratory strain (B224) and in an industrial polyploid strain (DGI 342) of Saccharomyces cerevisiae. The alleviation of glucose repression of the expression of MAL genes and alleviation of glucose control of maltose metabolism were investigated in batch...... cultivations on glucose-maltose mixtures. In the MIG1-disrupted haploid strain, glucose repression was partly alleviated; i.e., maltose metabolism was initiated at higher glucose concentrations than in the corresponding wild-type strain. In contrast, the polyploid Delta mig1 strain exhibited an even more...... stringent glucose control of maltose metabolism than the corresponding wild-type strain, which could be explained by a more rigid catabolite inactivation of maltose permease, affecting the uptake of maltose. Growth on the glucose-sucrose mixture showed that the polyploid Delta mig1 strain was relieved...

  18. Production, regulation and transportation of bacillibactin in bacillus subtilis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Raza, W.; Hussain, Q.; Shen, Q.

    2012-01-01

    Bacillus subtilis produces a catecholate type siderophore 'Bacillibactin'. This review focuses on the non-ribosomal synthesis, transport and regulation of bacillibactin. Bacillibactin biosynthetic operon contains five genes (dhbACEBF). The uptake of bacillibactin requires the FeuABC transporter, inner-membrane permease, FepDG and YusV ATPase and an esterase encoding gene, besA and while export required YmfE major facilitator super-family (MFS)-type transporter. Fur is the major iron-controlled transcriptional regulator in B. subtilis, which acts as an iron-dependent repressor of the dhb operon in vivo while an iron-independent repressor in vitro. Knowledge of the Fur regulon will be useful in interpreting other global analysis of transcriptional responses. (author)

  19. Dicty_cDB: Contig-U11706-1 [Dicty_cDB

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available one) Shewanella baltica OS195, complet... 37 1.1 AJ875406_1( AJ875406 |pid:none) Candida intermedia mRNA for...none) Leishmania major strain Friedlin... 35 4.3 AD2736( AD2736 ) MFS permease [imported] - Agrobacterium tumefacie..... 36 3.0 8 ( ER451042 ) 1092963849549 Global-Ocean-Sampling_GS-35-01-01-1... 34 3.2 3 ( AC115626 ) Homo sapie...J956921 ) 1093018976377 Global-Ocean-Sampling_GS-30-02-01-1... 38 0.13 2 ( EJ412209 ) 1093012157126 Global-Ocean-Sampli...6 0.33 2 ( EK421366 ) 1095515508395 Global-Ocean-Sampling_GS-31-01-01-1... 42 0.48 2 ( AM430719 ) Vitis vini

  20. Structure-based analysis of CysZ-mediated cellular uptake of sulfate

    Science.gov (United States)

    Assur Sanghai, Zahra; Liu, Qun; Clarke, Oliver B; Belcher-Dufrisne, Meagan; Wiriyasermkul, Pattama; Giese, M Hunter; Leal-Pinto, Edgar; Kloss, Brian; Tabuso, Shantelle; Love, James; Punta, Marco; Banerjee, Surajit; Rajashankar, Kanagalaghatta R; Rost, Burkhard; Logothetis, Diomedes; Quick, Matthias; Hendrickson, Wayne A

    2018-01-01

    Sulfur, most abundantly found in the environment as sulfate (SO42-), is an essential element in metabolites required by all living cells, including amino acids, co-factors and vitamins. However, current understanding of the cellular delivery of SO42- at the molecular level is limited. CysZ has been described as a SO42- permease, but its sequence family is without known structural precedent. Based on crystallographic structure information, SO42- binding and flux experiments, we provide insight into the molecular mechanism of CysZ-mediated translocation of SO42- across membranes. CysZ structures from three different bacterial species display a hitherto unknown fold and have subunits organized with inverted transmembrane topology. CysZ from Pseudomonas denitrificans assembles as a trimer of antiparallel dimers and the CysZ structures from two other species recapitulate dimers from this assembly. Mutational studies highlight the functional relevance of conserved CysZ residues. PMID:29792261

  1. A putative ABC transporter is involved in negative regulation of biofilm formation by Listeria monocytogenes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Zhu, Xinna; Long, Fei; Chen, Yonghui

    2008-01-01

    Listeria monocytogenes may persist for long periods in food processing environments. In some instances, this may be due to aggregation or biofilm formation. To investigate the mechanism controlling biofilm formation in the food-borne pathogen L. monocytogenes, we characterized LM-49, a mutant...... with enhanced ability of biofilm-formation generated via transposon Tn917 mutagenesis of L. monocytogenes 4b G. In this mutant, a Tn917 insertion has disrupted the coding region of the gene encoding a putative ATP binding cassette (ABC) transporter permease identical to Lmof2365_1771 (a putative ABC...... the same amount of biofilm biomass as the wild-type strain. Furthermore, transcription of the downstream lm.G_1770 was not influenced by the upstream Tn917 insertion, and the presence of Tn917 has no effect on biofilm formation. These results suggest that lm.G_1771 was solely responsible for the negative...

  2. Genetic diversity of b-glucuronidase activity among 14 strains of the dominant human gut anaerobe Ruminococcus gnavus

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Diane Beaud

    2006-01-01

    Full Text Available Bacterial beta-glucuronidase activity in the gut increases the enterohepatic circulation of toxic compounds and plays a major role in the etiology of colon cancer. Previously, we had found that the gus gene, which codes for beta-glucuronidase in a dominant anaerobic species of the gut microbiota, Ruminococcus gnavus strain E1, is transcribed as part of an operon that includes three ORFs that code for beta-glucoside permeases of the phosphotransferase systems. This genetic organization had never been described. We have now compared beta-glucuronidase activity and the genetic environment of the gus gene in 14 strains of Ruminococcus gnavus.We found that five out of the seven glucuronidase-positive R. gnavus strains possessed another glucuronidase gene different from the gusA operon of R. gnavus E1. This dominant commensal intestinal species appears to have a high degree of genetic diversity in the genes that control beta-glucuronidase activity.

  3. Visualization of the endocytic pathway in the filamentous fungus Aspergillus oryzae using an EGFP-fused plasma membrane protein

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Higuchi, Yujiro; Nakahama, Tomoyuki; Shoji, Jun-ya; Arioka, Manabu; Kitamoto, Katsuhiko

    2006-01-01

    Endocytosis is an important process for cellular activities. However, in filamentous fungi, the existence of endocytosis has been so far elusive. In this study, we used AoUapC-EGFP, the fusion protein of a putative uric acid-xanthine permease with enhanced green fluorescent protein (EGFP) in Aspergillus oryzae, to examine whether the endocytic process occurs or not. Upon the addition of ammonium into the medium the fusion protein was internalized from the plasma membrane. The internalization of AoUapC-EGFP was completely blocked by sodium azide, cold, and cytochalasin A treatments, suggesting that the internalization possesses the general features of endocytosis. These results demonstrate the occurrence of endocytosis in filamentous fungi. Moreover, we discovered that the endosomal compartments appeared upon the induction of endocytosis and moved in a microtubule-dependent manner

  4. Acquisition and Role of Molybdate in Pseudomonas aeruginosa

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pederick, Victoria G.; Eijkelkamp, Bart A.; Ween, Miranda P.; Begg, Stephanie L.; Paton, James C.

    2014-01-01

    In microaerophilic or anaerobic environments, Pseudomonas aeruginosa utilizes nitrate reduction for energy production, a process dependent on the availability of the oxyanionic form of molybdenum, molybdate (MoO42−). Here, we show that molybdate acquisition in P. aeruginosa occurs via a high-affinity ATP-binding cassette permease (ModABC). ModA is a cluster D-III solute binding protein capable of interacting with molybdate or tungstate oxyanions. Deletion of the modA gene reduces cellular molybdate concentrations and results in inhibition of anaerobic growth and nitrate reduction. Further, we show that conditions that permit nitrate reduction also cause inhibition of biofilm formation and an alteration in fatty acid composition of P. aeruginosa. Collectively, these data highlight the importance of molybdate for anaerobic growth of P. aeruginosa and reveal novel consequences of nitrate reduction on biofilm formation and cell membrane composition. PMID:25172858

  5. Phytophthora have distinct endogenous small RNA populations that include short interfering and microRNAs.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Noah Fahlgren

    Full Text Available In eukaryotes, RNA silencing pathways utilize 20-30-nucleotide small RNAs to regulate gene expression, specify and maintain chromatin structure, and repress viruses and mobile genetic elements. RNA silencing was likely present in the common ancestor of modern eukaryotes, but most research has focused on plant and animal RNA silencing systems. Phytophthora species belong to a phylogenetically distinct group of economically important plant pathogens that cause billions of dollars in yield losses annually as well as ecologically devastating outbreaks. We analyzed the small RNA-generating components of the genomes of P. infestans, P. sojae and P. ramorum using bioinformatics, genetic, phylogenetic and high-throughput sequencing-based methods. Each species produces two distinct populations of small RNAs that are predominantly 21- or 25-nucleotides long. The 25-nucleotide small RNAs were primarily derived from loci encoding transposable elements and we propose that these small RNAs define a pathway of short-interfering RNAs that silence repetitive genetic elements. The 21-nucleotide small RNAs were primarily derived from inverted repeats, including a novel microRNA family that is conserved among the three species, and several gene families, including Crinkler effectors and type III fibronectins. The Phytophthora microRNA is predicted to target a family of amino acid/auxin permeases, and we propose that 21-nucleotide small RNAs function at the post-transcriptional level. The functional significance of microRNA-guided regulation of amino acid/auxin permeases and the association of 21-nucleotide small RNAs with Crinkler effectors remains unclear, but this work provides a framework for testing the role of small RNAs in Phytophthora biology and pathogenesis in future work.

  6. Phytophthora have distinct endogenous small RNA populations that include short interfering and microRNAs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fahlgren, Noah; Bollmann, Stephanie R; Kasschau, Kristin D; Cuperus, Josh T; Press, Caroline M; Sullivan, Christopher M; Chapman, Elisabeth J; Hoyer, J Steen; Gilbert, Kerrigan B; Grünwald, Niklaus J; Carrington, James C

    2013-01-01

    In eukaryotes, RNA silencing pathways utilize 20-30-nucleotide small RNAs to regulate gene expression, specify and maintain chromatin structure, and repress viruses and mobile genetic elements. RNA silencing was likely present in the common ancestor of modern eukaryotes, but most research has focused on plant and animal RNA silencing systems. Phytophthora species belong to a phylogenetically distinct group of economically important plant pathogens that cause billions of dollars in yield losses annually as well as ecologically devastating outbreaks. We analyzed the small RNA-generating components of the genomes of P. infestans, P. sojae and P. ramorum using bioinformatics, genetic, phylogenetic and high-throughput sequencing-based methods. Each species produces two distinct populations of small RNAs that are predominantly 21- or 25-nucleotides long. The 25-nucleotide small RNAs were primarily derived from loci encoding transposable elements and we propose that these small RNAs define a pathway of short-interfering RNAs that silence repetitive genetic elements. The 21-nucleotide small RNAs were primarily derived from inverted repeats, including a novel microRNA family that is conserved among the three species, and several gene families, including Crinkler effectors and type III fibronectins. The Phytophthora microRNA is predicted to target a family of amino acid/auxin permeases, and we propose that 21-nucleotide small RNAs function at the post-transcriptional level. The functional significance of microRNA-guided regulation of amino acid/auxin permeases and the association of 21-nucleotide small RNAs with Crinkler effectors remains unclear, but this work provides a framework for testing the role of small RNAs in Phytophthora biology and pathogenesis in future work.

  7. Phytophthora Have Distinct Endogenous Small RNA Populations That Include Short Interfering and microRNAs

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fahlgren, Noah; Bollmann, Stephanie R.; Kasschau, Kristin D.; Cuperus, Josh T.; Press, Caroline M.; Sullivan, Christopher M.; Chapman, Elisabeth J.; Hoyer, J. Steen; Gilbert, Kerrigan B.; Grünwald, Niklaus J.; Carrington, James C.

    2013-01-01

    In eukaryotes, RNA silencing pathways utilize 20-30-nucleotide small RNAs to regulate gene expression, specify and maintain chromatin structure, and repress viruses and mobile genetic elements. RNA silencing was likely present in the common ancestor of modern eukaryotes, but most research has focused on plant and animal RNA silencing systems. Phytophthora species belong to a phylogenetically distinct group of economically important plant pathogens that cause billions of dollars in yield losses annually as well as ecologically devastating outbreaks. We analyzed the small RNA-generating components of the genomes of P. infestans, P. sojae and P. ramorum using bioinformatics, genetic, phylogenetic and high-throughput sequencing-based methods. Each species produces two distinct populations of small RNAs that are predominantly 21- or 25-nucleotides long. The 25-nucleotide small RNAs were primarily derived from loci encoding transposable elements and we propose that these small RNAs define a pathway of short-interfering RNAs that silence repetitive genetic elements. The 21-nucleotide small RNAs were primarily derived from inverted repeats, including a novel microRNA family that is conserved among the three species, and several gene families, including Crinkler effectors and type III fibronectins. The Phytophthora microRNA is predicted to target a family of amino acid/auxin permeases, and we propose that 21-nucleotide small RNAs function at the post-transcriptional level. The functional significance of microRNA-guided regulation of amino acid/auxin permeases and the association of 21-nucleotide small RNAs with Crinkler effectors remains unclear, but this work provides a framework for testing the role of small RNAs in Phytophthora biology and pathogenesis in future work. PMID:24204767

  8. Two Gene Clusters Coordinate Galactose and Lactose Metabolism in Streptococcus gordonii

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zeng, Lin; Martino, Nicole C.

    2012-01-01

    Streptococcus gordonii is an early colonizer of the human oral cavity and an abundant constituent of oral biofilms. Two tandemly arranged gene clusters, designated lac and gal, were identified in the S. gordonii DL1 genome, which encode genes of the tagatose pathway (lacABCD) and sugar phosphotransferase system (PTS) enzyme II permeases. Genes encoding a predicted phospho-β-galactosidase (LacG), a DeoR family transcriptional regulator (LacR), and a transcriptional antiterminator (LacT) were also present in the clusters. Growth and PTS assays supported that the permease designated EIILac transports lactose and galactose, whereas EIIGal transports galactose. The expression of the gene for EIIGal was markedly upregulated in cells growing on galactose. Using promoter-cat fusions, a role for LacR in the regulation of the expressions of both gene clusters was demonstrated, and the gal cluster was also shown to be sensitive to repression by CcpA. The deletion of lacT caused an inability to grow on lactose, apparently because of its role in the regulation of the expression of the genes for EIILac, but had little effect on galactose utilization. S. gordonii maintained a selective advantage over Streptococcus mutans in a mixed-species competition assay, associated with its possession of a high-affinity galactose PTS, although S. mutans could persist better at low pHs. Collectively, these results support the concept that the galactose and lactose systems of S. gordonii are subject to complex regulation and that a high-affinity galactose PTS may be advantageous when S. gordonii is competing against the caries pathogen S. mutans in oral biofilms. PMID:22660715

  9. lac operon induction in Escherichia coli: Systematic comparison of IPTG and TMG induction and influence of the transacetylase LacA.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marbach, Anja; Bettenbrock, Katja

    2012-01-01

    Most commonly used expression systems in bacteria are based on the Escherichia coli lac promoter. Furthermore, lac operon elements are used today in systems and synthetic biology. In the majority of the cases the gratuitous inducers IPTG or TMG are used. Here we report a systematic comparison of lac promoter induction by TMG and IPTG which focuses on the aspects inducer uptake, population heterogeneity and a potential influence of the transacetylase, LacA. We provide induction curves in E. coli LJ110 and in isogenic lacY and lacA mutant strains and we show that both inducers are substrates of the lactose permease at low inducer concentrations but can also enter cells independently of lactose permease if present at higher concentrations. Using a gfp reporter strain we compared TMG and IPTG induction at single cell level and showed that bimodal induction with IPTG occurred at approximately ten-fold lower concentrations than with TMG. Furthermore, we observed that lac operon induction is influenced by the transacetylase, LacA. By comparing two Plac-gfp reporter strains with and without a lacA deletion we could show that in the lacA(+) strain the fluorescence level decreased after few hours while the fluorescence further increased in the lacA(-) strain. The results indicate that through the activity of LacA the IPTG concentration can be reduced below an inducing threshold concentration-an influence that should be considered if low inducer amounts are used. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  10. Functional analysis of human aromatic amino acid transporter MCT10/TAT1 using the yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Uemura, Satoshi; Mochizuki, Takahiro; Kurosaka, Goyu; Hashimoto, Takanori; Masukawa, Yuki; Abe, Fumiyoshi

    2017-10-01

    Tryptophan is an essential amino acid in humans and an important serotonin and melatonin precursor. Monocarboxylate transporter MCT10 is a member of the SLC16A family proteins that mediates low-affinity tryptophan transport across basolateral membranes of kidney, small intestine, and liver epithelial cells, although the precise transport mechanism remains unclear. Here we developed a simple functional assay to analyze tryptophan transport by human MCT10 using a deletion mutant for the high-affinity tryptophan permease Tat2 in Saccharomyces cerevisiae. tat2Δtrp1 cells are defective in growth in YPD medium because tyrosine present in the medium competes for the low-affinity tryptophan permease Tat1 with tryptophan. MCT10 appeared to allow growth of tat2Δtrp1 cells in YPD medium, and accumulate in cells deficient for Rsp5 ubiquitin ligase. These results suggest that MCT10 is functional in yeast, and is subject to ubiquitin-dependent quality control. Whereas growth of Tat2-expressing cells was significantly impaired by neutral pH, that of MCT10-expressing cells was nearly unaffected. This property is consistent with the transport mechanism of MCT10 via facilitated diffusion without a need for pH gradient across the plasma membrane. Single-nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) are known to occur in the human MCT10 coding region. Among eight SNP amino acid changes in MCT10, the N81K mutation completely abrogated tryptophan import without any abnormalities in the expression or localization. In the MCT10 modeled structure, N81 appeared to protrude into the putative trajectory of tryptophan. Plasma membrane localization of MCT10 and the variant proteins was also verified in human embryonic kidney 293T cells. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  11. Mechanism and site of inhibition of Bacillus cereus spore outgrowth by nitrosothiols

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Morris, S.L.

    1982-01-01

    Structure vs. activity studies demonstrate that nitrosothiols inhibit outgrowth of B. cereus spores by reversible covalent bond formation with sensitive spore components. Kinetic studies of the binding of nitrosothiols and iodoacetate, a known sulfhydryl reagent, show that they complete for the same spore sites. Since two other nitrite derivatives, the Perigo factor and the transferrin inhibitor, interfere with iodoacetate label uptake in a kinetically similar fashion, all of these compounds may inhibit spore outgrowth by interacting with the same spore thiol groups. Disruption of spores which have been inhibited by radioactive iodoacetate demonstrates that much of the label is incorporated into a membrane-rich fraction that sediments as a single peak on a sucrose density gradient. SDS gel electrophoresis and autofluorography allows the identification of four intensely labelled proteins with molecular weights of 13,000, 28,000, 29,000, and 30,000. If the iodoacetate labelling is carried out in the presence of nitrosothiol, incorporation is greatly reduced into all components. When germinating spores are labelled with succinate or the lactose analog, o-nitrophenylgalactopyranoside, a significant reduction in the amount of label bound is also observed suggesting that two iodoacetate-reactive sites may be the succinate and lactose permease systems. Severe decreases in the transport of succinate and lactose into iodoacetate and nitrosothiol inhibited spores further implicates a nitrosothiol (iodoacetate) permease interaction. Iodoacetate and nitrosothiols therefore may exert their inhibitory effects by interfering with critical membrane protein sulfhydryl groups, possibly by a a covalent modification mechanism. Some of these sensitive thiols may be involved in active transport processes

  12. Mechanistic insights into a novel exporter-importer system of Mycobacterium tuberculosis unravel its role in trafficking of iron.

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    Aisha Farhana

    2008-05-01

    Full Text Available Elucidation of the basic mechanistic and biochemical principles underlying siderophore mediated iron uptake in mycobacteria is crucial for targeting this principal survival strategy vis-à-vis virulence determinants of the pathogen. Although, an understanding of siderophore biosynthesis is known, the mechanism of their secretion and uptake still remains elusive.Here, we demonstrate an interplay among three iron regulated Mycobacterium tuberculosis (M.tb proteins, namely, Rv1348 (IrtA, Rv1349 (IrtB and Rv2895c in export and import of M.tb siderophores across the membrane and the consequent iron uptake. IrtA, interestingly, has a fused N-terminal substrate binding domain (SBD, representing an atypical subset of ABC transporters, unlike IrtB that harbors only the permease and ATPase domain. SBD selectively binds to non-ferrated siderophores whereas Rv2895c exhibits relatively higher affinity towards ferrated siderophores. An interaction between the permease domain of IrtB and Rv2895c is evident from GST pull-down assay. In vitro liposome reconstitution experiments further demonstrate that IrtA is indeed a siderophore exporter and the two-component IrtB-Rv2895c system is an importer of ferrated siderophores. Knockout of msmeg_6554, the irtA homologue in Mycobacterium smegmatis, resulted in an impaired M.tb siderophore export that is restored upon complementation with M.tb irtA.Our data suggest the interplay of three proteins, namely IrtA, IrtB and Rv2895c in synergizing the balance of siderophores and thus iron inside the mycobacterial cell.

  13. Fob1 and Fob2 Proteins Are Virulence Determinants of Rhizopus oryzae via Facilitating Iron Uptake from Ferrioxamine.

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    Mingfu Liu

    2015-05-01

    Full Text Available Dialysis patients with chronic renal failure receiving deferoxamine for treating iron overload are uniquely predisposed for mucormycosis, which is most often caused by Rhizopus oryzae. Although the deferoxamine siderophore is not secreted by Mucorales, previous studies established that Rhizopus species utilize iron from ferrioxamine (iron-rich form of deferoxamine. Here we determined that the CBS domain proteins of Fob1 and Fob2 act as receptors on the cell surface of R. oryzae during iron uptake from ferrioxamine. Fob1 and Fob2 cell surface expression was induced in the presence of ferrioxamine and bound radiolabeled ferrioxamine. A R. oryzae strain with targeted reduced Fob1/Fob2 expression was impaired for iron uptake, germinating, and growing on medium with ferrioxamine as the sole source of iron. This strain also exhibited reduced virulence in a deferoxamine-treated, but not the diabetic ketoacidotic (DKA, mouse model of mucormycosis. The mechanism by which R. oryzae obtains iron from ferrioxamine involves the reductase/permease uptake system since the growth on ferrioxamine supplemented medium is associated with elevated reductase activity and the use of the ferrous chelator bathophenanthroline disulfonate abrogates iron uptake and growth on medium supplemented with ferrioxamine as a sole source of iron. Finally, R. oryzae mutants with reduced copies of the high affinity iron permease (FTR1 or with decreased FTR1 expression had an impaired iron uptake from ferrioxamine in vitro and reduced virulence in the deferoxamine-treated mouse model of mucormycosis. These two receptors appear to be conserved in Mucorales, and can be the subject of future novel therapy to maintain the use of deferoxamine for treating iron-overload.

  14. Effects of Carbohydrate Source on Genetic Competence in Streptococcus mutans.

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    Moye, Zachary D; Son, Minjun; Rosa-Alberty, Ariana E; Zeng, Lin; Ahn, Sang-Joon; Hagen, Stephen J; Burne, Robert A

    2016-08-01

    The capacity to internalize and catabolize carbohydrates is essential for dental caries pathogens to persist and cause disease. The expression of many virulence-related attributes by Streptococcus mutans, an organism strongly associated with human dental caries, is influenced by the peptide signaling pathways that control genetic competence. Here, we demonstrate a relationship between the efficiency of competence signaling and carbohydrate source. A significant increase in the activity of the promoters for comX, comS, and comYA after exposure to competence-stimulating peptide (CSP) was observed in cells growing on fructose, maltose, sucrose, or trehalose as the primary carbohydrate source, compared to cells growing on glucose. However, only cells grown in the presence of trehalose or sucrose displayed a significant increase in transformation frequency. Notably, even low concentrations of these carbohydrates in the presence of excess glucose could enhance the expression of comX, encoding a sigma factor needed for competence, and the effects on competence were dependent on the cognate sugar:phosphotransferase permease for each carbohydrate. Using green fluorescent protein (GFP) reporter fusions, we observed that growth in fructose or trehalose resulted in a greater proportion of the population activating expression of comX and comS, encoding the precursor of comX-inducing peptide (XIP), after addition of CSP, than growth in glucose. Thus, the source of carbohydrate significantly impacts the stochastic behaviors that regulate subpopulation responses to CSP, which can induce competence in S. mutans The signaling pathways that regulate development of genetic competence in Streptococcus mutans are intimately intertwined with the pathogenic potential of the organism, impacting biofilm formation, stress tolerance, and expression of known virulence determinants. Induction of the gene for the master regulator of competence, ComX, by competence-stimulating peptide (CSP

  15. Delineation of the Pasteurellaceae-specific GbpA-family of glutathione-binding proteins

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    Vergauwen Bjorn

    2011-11-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The Gram-negative bacterium Haemophilus influenzae is a glutathione auxotroph and acquires the redox-active tripeptide by import. The dedicated glutathione transporter belongs to the ATP-binding cassette (ABC-transporter superfamily and displays more than 60% overall sequence identity with the well-studied dipeptide (Dpp permease of Escherichia coli. The solute binding protein (SBP that mediates glutathione transport in H. influenzae is a lipoprotein termed GbpA and is 54% identical to E. coli DppA, a well-studied member of family 5 SBP's. The discovery linking GbpA to glutathione import came rather unexpectedly as this import-priming SBP was previously annotated as a heme-binding protein (HbpA, and was thought to mediate heme acquisition. Nonetheless, although many SBP's have been implicated in more than one function, a prominent physiological role for GbpA and its partner permease in heme acquisition appears to be very unlikely. Here, we sought to characterize five representative GbpA homologs in an effort to delineate the novel GbpA-family of glutathione-specific family 5 SBPs and to further clarify their functional role in terms of ligand preferences. Results Lipoprotein and non-lipoprotein GbpA homologs were expressed in soluble form and substrate specificity was evaluated via a number of ligand binding assays. A physiologically insignificant affinity for hemin was observed for all five GbpA homologous test proteins. Three out of five test proteins were found to bind glutathione and some of its physiologically relevant derivatives with low- or submicromolar affinity. None of the tested SBP family 5 allocrites interacted with the remaining two GbpA test proteins. Structure-based sequence alignments and phylogenetic analysis show that the two binding-inert GbpA homologs clearly form a separate phylogenetic cluster. To elucidate a structure-function rationale for this phylogenetic differentiation, we determined the crystal

  16. Effects of Carbohydrate Source on Genetic Competence in Streptococcus mutans

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moye, Zachary D.; Son, Minjun; Rosa-Alberty, Ariana E.; Zeng, Lin; Ahn, Sang-Joon

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT The capacity to internalize and catabolize carbohydrates is essential for dental caries pathogens to persist and cause disease. The expression of many virulence-related attributes by Streptococcus mutans, an organism strongly associated with human dental caries, is influenced by the peptide signaling pathways that control genetic competence. Here, we demonstrate a relationship between the efficiency of competence signaling and carbohydrate source. A significant increase in the activity of the promoters for comX, comS, and comYA after exposure to competence-stimulating peptide (CSP) was observed in cells growing on fructose, maltose, sucrose, or trehalose as the primary carbohydrate source, compared to cells growing on glucose. However, only cells grown in the presence of trehalose or sucrose displayed a significant increase in transformation frequency. Notably, even low concentrations of these carbohydrates in the presence of excess glucose could enhance the expression of comX, encoding a sigma factor needed for competence, and the effects on competence were dependent on the cognate sugar:phosphotransferase permease for each carbohydrate. Using green fluorescent protein (GFP) reporter fusions, we observed that growth in fructose or trehalose resulted in a greater proportion of the population activating expression of comX and comS, encoding the precursor of comX-inducing peptide (XIP), after addition of CSP, than growth in glucose. Thus, the source of carbohydrate significantly impacts the stochastic behaviors that regulate subpopulation responses to CSP, which can induce competence in S. mutans. IMPORTANCE The signaling pathways that regulate development of genetic competence in Streptococcus mutans are intimately intertwined with the pathogenic potential of the organism, impacting biofilm formation, stress tolerance, and expression of known virulence determinants. Induction of the gene for the master regulator of competence, ComX, by competence

  17. Engineered coryneform bacteria as a bio-tool for arsenic remediation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Villadangos, Almudena F; Ordóñez, Efrén; Pedre, Brandán; Messens, Joris; Gil, Jose A; Mateos, Luis M

    2014-12-01

    Despite current remediation efforts, arsenic contamination in water sources is still a major health problem, highlighting the need for new approaches. In this work, strains of the nonpathogenic and highly arsenic-resistant bacterium Corynebacterium glutamicum were used as inexpensive tools to accumulate inorganic arsenic, either as arsenate (As(V)) or arsenite (As(III)) species. The assays made use of "resting cells" from these strains, which were assessed under well-established conditions and compared with C. glutamicum background controls. The two mutant As(V)-accumulating strains were those used in a previously published study: (i) ArsC1/C2, in which the gene/s encoding the mycothiol-dependent arsenate reductases is/are disrupted, and (ii) MshA/C mutants unable to produce mycothiol, the low molecular weight thiol essential for arsenate reduction. The As(III)-accumulating strains were either those lacking the arsenite permease activities (Acr3-1 and Acr3-2) needed in As(III) release or recombinant strains overexpressing the aquaglyceroporin genes (glpF) from Corynebacterium diphtheriae or Streptomyces coelicolor, to improve As(III) uptake. Both genetically modified strains accumulated 30-fold more As(V) and 15-fold more As(III) than the controls. The arsenic resistance of the modified strains was inversely proportional to their metal accumulation ability. Our results provide the basis for investigations into the use of these modified C. glutamicum strains as a new bio-tool in arsenic remediation efforts.

  18. Crystallisation and Preliminary Crystallographic Analysis of Helicobacter pylori Periplasmic Binding Protein YckK

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    Mohammad Mizanur Rahman

    2017-10-01

    Full Text Available Helicobacter pylori infection can lead to the development of gastric and duodenal ulcers and gastric cancer. In recent years, the efficacy of the standard therapy has been falling, necessitating ongoing efforts to identify new drug targets. Due to their important role in chemotaxis and nutrient uptake, periplasmic binding proteins (PBPs represent potential targets for new antimicrobial agents that have not yet been fully explored and exploited. The H. pylori PBP YckK is homologous to polar amino acid-binding proteins from other bacteria. The yckK gene overlaps the gene tcyB—a gene annotated as a polar amino acid-transporting permease. Purified recombinant YckK behaved as a monomer in solution. Crystals of YckK were grown by the hanging drop vapour diffusion method using PEG 3350 as the precipitating agent. The crystals belong to the primitive triclinic space group P1 with unit cell parameters a = 63.0, b = 63.5, c = 74.6 Å, α = 72.5, β = 68.3, γ = 69.4°. X-ray diffraction data were collected to 1.8 Å resolution using synchrotron radiation. Molecular replacement using this data revealed that the asymmetric unit contains three subunits: two in the open and one in the closed conformation.

  19. Molecular cloning and expression of the hyu genes from Microbacterium liquefaciens AJ 3912, responsible for the conversion of 5-substituted hydantoins to alpha-amino acids, in Escherichia coli.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Suzuki, Shun'ichi; Takenaka, Yasuhiro; Onishi, Norimasa; Yokozeki, Kenzo

    2005-08-01

    A DNA fragment from Microbacterium liquefaciens AJ 3912, containing the genes responsible for the conversion of 5-substituted-hydantoins to alpha-amino acids, was cloned in Escherichia coli and sequenced. Seven open reading frames (hyuP, hyuA, hyuH, hyuC, ORF1, ORF2, and ORF3) were identified on the 7.5 kb fragment. The deduced amino acid sequence encoded by the hyuA gene included the N-terminal amino acid sequence of the hydantoin racemase from M. liquefaciens AJ 3912. The hyuA, hyuH, and hyuC genes were heterologously expressed in E. coli; their presence corresponded with the detection of hydantoin racemase, hydantoinase, and N-carbamoyl alpha-amino acid amido hydrolase enzymatic activities respectively. The deduced amino acid sequences of hyuP were similar to those of the allantoin (5-ureido-hydantoin) permease from Saccharomyces cerevisiae, suggesting that hyuP protein might function as a hydantoin transporter.

  20. Sucrose fermentation by Saccharomyces cerevisiae lacking hexose transport.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Batista, Anderson S; Miletti, Luiz C; Stambuk, Boris U

    2004-01-01

    Sucrose is the major carbon source used by Saccharomyces cerevisiae during production of baker's yeast, fuel ethanol and several distilled beverages. It is generally accepted that sucrose fermentation proceeds through extracellular hydrolysis of the sugar, mediated by the periplasmic invertase, producing glucose and fructose that are transported into the cells and metabolized. In the present work we analyzed the contribution to sucrose fermentation of a poorly characterized pathway of sucrose utilization by S. cerevisiae cells, the active transport of the sugar through the plasma membrane and its intracellular hydrolysis. A yeast strain that lacks the major hexose transporters (hxt1-hxt7 and gal2) is incapable of growing on or fermenting glucose or fructose. Our results show that this hxt-null strain is still able to ferment sucrose due to direct uptake of the sugar into the cells. Deletion of the AGT1 gene, which encodes a high-affinity sucrose-H(+) symporter, rendered cells incapable of sucrose fermentation. Since sucrose is not an inducer of the permease, expression of the AGT1 must be constitutive in order to allow growth of the hxt-null strain on sucrose. The molecular characterization of active sucrose transport and fermentation by S. cerevisiae cells opens new opportunities to optimize yeasts for sugarcane-based industrial processes.

  1. Transcriptional Analysis Allows Genome Reannotation and Reveals that Cryptococcus gattii VGII Undergoes Nutrient Restriction during Infection

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    Patrícia Aline Gröhs Ferrareze

    2017-08-01

    Full Text Available Cryptococcus gattii is a human and animal pathogen that infects healthy hosts and caused the Pacific Northwest outbreak of cryptococcosis. The inhalation of infectious propagules can lead to internalization of cryptococcal cells by alveolar macrophages, a niche in which C. gattii cells can survive and proliferate. Although the nutrient composition of macrophages is relatively unknown, the high induction of amino acid transporter genes inside the phagosome indicates a preference for amino acid uptake instead of synthesis. However, the presence of countable errors in the R265 genome annotation indicates significant inhibition of transcriptomic analysis in this hypervirulent strain. Thus, we analyzed RNA-Seq data from in vivo and in vitro cultures of C. gattii R265 to perform the reannotation of the genome. In addition, based on in vivo transcriptomic data, we identified highly expressed genes and pathways of amino acid metabolism that would enable C. gattii to survive and proliferate in vivo. Importantly, we identified high expression in three APC amino acid transporters as well as the GABA permease. The use of amino acids as carbon and nitrogen sources, releasing ammonium and generating carbohydrate metabolism intermediaries, also explains the high expression of components of several degradative pathways, since glucose starvation is an important host defense mechanism.

  2. Coccolithoviruses: A Review of Cross-Kingdom Genomic Thievery and Metabolic Thuggery

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    Jozef I. Nissimov

    2017-03-01

    Full Text Available Coccolithoviruses (Phycodnaviridae infect and lyse the most ubiquitous and successful coccolithophorid in modern oceans, Emiliania huxleyi. So far, the genomes of 13 of these giant lytic viruses (i.e., Emiliania huxleyi viruses—EhVs have been sequenced, assembled, and annotated. Here, we performed an in-depth comparison of their genomes to try and contextualize the ecological and evolutionary traits of these viruses. The genomes of these EhVs have from 444 to 548 coding sequences (CDSs. Presence/absence analysis of CDSs identified putative genes with particular ecological significance, namely sialidase, phosphate permease, and sphingolipid biosynthesis. The viruses clustered into distinct clades, based on their DNA polymerase gene as well as full genome comparisons. We discuss the use of such clustering and suggest that a gene-by-gene investigation approach may be more useful when the goal is to reveal differences related to functionally important genes. A multi domain “Best BLAST hit” analysis revealed that 84% of the EhV genes have closer similarities to the domain Eukarya. However, 16% of the EhV CDSs were very similar to bacterial genes, contributing to the idea that a significant portion of the gene flow in the planktonic world inter-crosses the domains of life.

  3. The Divergence in Bacterial Components Associated with Bactrocera dorsalis across Developmental Stages

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    Xiaofeng Zhao

    2018-02-01

    Full Text Available Eco-evolutionary dynamics of microbiotas at the macroscale level are largely driven by ecological variables. The diet and living environment of the oriental fruit fly, Bactrocera dorsalis, diversify during development, providing a natural system to explore convergence, divergence, and repeatability in patterns of microbiota dynamics as a function of the host diet, phylogeny, and environment. Here, we characterized the microbiotas of 47 B. dorsalis individuals from three distinct populations by 16S rRNA amplicon sequencing. A significant deviation was found within the larvae, pupae, and adults of each population. Pupae were characterized by an increased bacterial taxonomic and functional diversity. Principal components analysis showed that the microbiotas of larvae, pupae, and adults clearly separated into three clusters. Acetobacteraceae, Lactobacillaceae, and Enterobacteriaceae were the predominant families in larval and adult samples, and PICRUSt analysis indicated that phosphoglycerate mutases and transketolases were significantly enriched in larvae, while phosphoglycerate mutases, transketolases, and proteases were significantly enriched in adults, which may support the digestive function of the microbiotas in larvae and adults. The abundances of Intrasporangiaceae, Dermabacteraceae (mainly Brachybacterium and Brevibacteriaceae (mainly Brevibacterium were significantly higher in pupae, and the antibiotic transport system ATP-binding protein and antibiotic transport system permease protein pathways were significantly enriched there as well, indicating the defensive function of microbiotas in pupae. Overall, differences in the microbiotas of the larvae, pupae, and adults are likely to contribute to differences in nutrient assimilation and living environments.

  4. Improvement of pea biomass and seed productivity by simultaneous increase of phloem and embryo loading with amino acids.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Lizhi; Garneau, Matthew G; Majumdar, Rajtilak; Grant, Jan; Tegeder, Mechthild

    2015-01-01

    The development of sink organs such as fruits and seeds strongly depends on the amount of nitrogen that is moved within the phloem from photosynthetic-active source leaves to the reproductive sinks. In many plant species nitrogen is transported as amino acids. In pea (Pisum sativum L.), source to sink partitioning of amino acids requires at least two active transport events mediated by plasma membrane-localized proteins, and these are: (i) amino acid phloem loading; and (ii) import of amino acids into the seed cotyledons via epidermal transfer cells. As each of these transport steps might potentially be limiting to efficient nitrogen delivery to the pea embryo, we manipulated both simultaneously. Additional copies of the pea amino acid permease PsAAP1 were introduced into the pea genome and expression of the transporter was targeted to the sieve element-companion cell complexes of the leaf phloem and to the epidermis of the seed cotyledons. The transgenic pea plants showed increased phloem loading and embryo loading of amino acids resulting in improved long distance transport of nitrogen, sink development and seed protein accumulation. Analyses of root and leaf tissues further revealed that genetic manipulation positively affected root nitrogen uptake, as well as primary source and sink metabolism. Overall, the results suggest that amino acid phloem loading exerts regulatory control over pea biomass production and seed yield, and that import of amino acids into the cotyledons limits seed protein levels. © 2014 The Authors The Plant Journal © 2014 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  5. Whole-Genome Sequence Analysis of Bombella intestini LMG 28161T, a Novel Acetic Acid Bacterium Isolated from the Crop of a Red-Tailed Bumble Bee, Bombus lapidarius.

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    Leilei Li

    Full Text Available The whole-genome sequence of Bombella intestini LMG 28161T, an endosymbiotic acetic acid bacterium (AAB occurring in bumble bees, was determined to investigate the molecular mechanisms underlying its metabolic capabilities. The draft genome sequence of B. intestini LMG 28161T was 2.02 Mb. Metabolic carbohydrate pathways were in agreement with the metabolite analyses of fermentation experiments and revealed its oxidative capacity towards sucrose, D-glucose, D-fructose and D-mannitol, but not ethanol and glycerol. The results of the fermentation experiments also demonstrated that the lack of effective aeration in small-scale carbohydrate consumption experiments may be responsible for the lack of reproducibility of such results in taxonomic studies of AAB. Finally, compared to the genome sequences of its nearest phylogenetic neighbor and of three other insect associated AAB strains, the B. intestini LMG 28161T genome lost 69 orthologs and included 89 unique genes. Although many of the latter were hypothetical they also included several type IV secretion system proteins, amino acid transporter/permeases and membrane proteins which might play a role in the interaction with the bumble bee host.

  6. Interaction of the deubiquitinating enzyme Ubp2 and the e3 ligase Rsp5 is required for transporter/receptor sorting in the multivesicular body pathway.

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    Mandy H Y Lam

    Full Text Available Protein ubiquitination is essential for many events linked to intracellular protein trafficking. We sought to elucidate the possible involvement of the S. cerevisiae deubiquitinating enzyme Ubp2 in transporter and receptor trafficking after we (this study and others established that affinity purified Ubp2 interacts stably with the E3 ubiquitin ligase Rsp5 and the (ubiquitin associated UBA domain containing protein Rup1. UBP2 interacts genetically with RSP5, while Rup1 facilitates the tethering of Ubp2 to Rsp5 via a PPPSY motif. Using the uracil permease Fur4 as a model reporter system, we establish a role for Ubp2 in membrane protein turnover. Similar to hypomorphic rsp5 alleles, cells deleted for UBP2 exhibited a temporal stabilization of Fur4 at the plasma membrane, indicative of perturbed protein trafficking. This defect was ubiquitin dependent, as a Fur4 N-terminal ubiquitin fusion construct bypassed the block and restored sorting in the mutant. Moreover, the defect was absent in conditions where recycling was absent, implicating Ubp2 in sorting at the multivesicular body. Taken together, our data suggest a previously overlooked role for Ubp2 as a positive regulator of Rsp5-mediated membrane protein trafficking subsequent to endocytosis.

  7. A Nostoc punctiforme sugar transporter necessary to establish a Cyanobacterium-plant symbiosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ekman, Martin; Picossi, Silvia; Campbell, Elsie L; Meeks, John C; Flores, Enrique

    2013-04-01

    In cyanobacteria-plant symbioses, the symbiotic nitrogen-fixing cyanobacterium has low photosynthetic activity and is supplemented by sugars provided by the plant partner. Which sugars and cyanobacterial sugar uptake mechanism(s) are involved in the symbiosis, however, is unknown. Mutants of the symbiotically competent, facultatively heterotrophic cyanobacterium Nostoc punctiforme were constructed bearing a neomycin resistance gene cassette replacing genes in a putative sugar transport gene cluster. Results of transport activity assays using (14)C-labeled fructose and glucose and tests of heterotrophic growth with these sugars enabled the identification of an ATP-binding cassette-type transporter for fructose (Frt), a major facilitator permease for glucose (GlcP), and a porin needed for the optimal uptake of both fructose and glucose. Analysis of green fluorescent protein fluorescence in strains of N. punctiforme bearing frt::gfp fusions showed high expression in vegetative cells and akinetes, variable expression in hormogonia, and no expression in heterocysts. The symbiotic efficiency of N. punctiforme sugar transport mutants was investigated by testing their ability to infect a nonvascular plant partner, the hornwort Anthoceros punctatus. Strains that were specifically unable to transport glucose did not infect the plant. These results imply a role for GlcP in establishing symbiosis under the conditions used in this work.

  8. A Nostoc punctiforme Sugar Transporter Necessary to Establish a Cyanobacterium-Plant Symbiosis1[C][W

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ekman, Martin; Picossi, Silvia; Campbell, Elsie L.; Meeks, John C.; Flores, Enrique

    2013-01-01

    In cyanobacteria-plant symbioses, the symbiotic nitrogen-fixing cyanobacterium has low photosynthetic activity and is supplemented by sugars provided by the plant partner. Which sugars and cyanobacterial sugar uptake mechanism(s) are involved in the symbiosis, however, is unknown. Mutants of the symbiotically competent, facultatively heterotrophic cyanobacterium Nostoc punctiforme were constructed bearing a neomycin resistance gene cassette replacing genes in a putative sugar transport gene cluster. Results of transport activity assays using 14C-labeled fructose and glucose and tests of heterotrophic growth with these sugars enabled the identification of an ATP-binding cassette-type transporter for fructose (Frt), a major facilitator permease for glucose (GlcP), and a porin needed for the optimal uptake of both fructose and glucose. Analysis of green fluorescent protein fluorescence in strains of N. punctiforme bearing frt::gfp fusions showed high expression in vegetative cells and akinetes, variable expression in hormogonia, and no expression in heterocysts. The symbiotic efficiency of N. punctiforme sugar transport mutants was investigated by testing their ability to infect a nonvascular plant partner, the hornwort Anthoceros punctatus. Strains that were specifically unable to transport glucose did not infect the plant. These results imply a role for GlcP in establishing symbiosis under the conditions used in this work. PMID:23463784

  9. Cytokinins and Expression of SWEET, SUT, CWINV and AAP Genes Increase as Pea Seeds Germinate

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    Paula E. Jameson

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available Transporter genes and cytokinins are key targets for crop improvement. These genes are active during the development of the seed and its establishment as a strong sink. However, during germination, the seed transitions to being a source for the developing root and shoot. To determine if the sucrose transporter (SUT, amino acid permease (AAP, Sugar Will Eventually be Exported Transporter (SWEET, cell wall invertase (CWINV, cytokinin biosynthesis (IPT, activation (LOG and degradation (CKX gene family members are involved in both the sink and source activities of seeds, we used RT-qPCR to determine the expression of multiple gene family members, and LC-MS/MS to ascertain endogenous cytokinin levels in germinating Pisum sativum L. We show that genes that are actively expressed when the seed is a strong sink during its development, are also expressed when the seed is in the reverse role of being an active source during germination and early seedling growth. Cytokinins were detected in the imbibing seeds and were actively biosynthesised during germination. We conclude that, when the above gene family members are targeted for seed yield improvement, a downstream effect on subsequent seed germination or seedling vigour must be taken into consideration.

  10. Alkali production associated with malolactic fermentation by oral streptococci and protection against acid, oxidative, or starvation damage.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sheng, Jiangyun; Baldeck, Jeremiah D; Nguyen, Phuong T M; Quivey, Robert G; Marquis, Robert E

    2010-07-01

    Alkali production by oral streptococci is considered important for dental plaque ecology and caries moderation. Recently, malolactic fermentation (MLF) was identified as a major system for alkali production by oral streptococci, including Streptococcus mutans. Our major objectives in the work described in this paper were to further define the physiology and genetics of MLF of oral streptococci and its roles in protection against metabolic stress damage. L-Malic acid was rapidly fermented to L-lactic acid and CO(2) by induced cells of wild-type S. mutans, but not by deletion mutants for mleS (malolactic enzyme) or mleP (malate permease). Mutants for mleR (the contiguous regulator gene) had intermediate capacities for MLF. Loss of capacity to catalyze MLF resulted in loss of capacity for protection against lethal acidification. MLF was also found to be protective against oxidative and starvation damage. The capacity of S. mutans to produce alkali from malate was greater than its capacity to produce acid from glycolysis at low pH values of 4 or 5. MLF acted additively with the arginine deiminase system for alkali production by Streptococcus sanguinis, but not with urease of Streptococcus salivarius. Malolactic fermentation is clearly a major process for alkali generation by oral streptococci and for protection against environmental stresses.

  11. Interaction between Polyketide Synthase and Transporter Suggests Coupled Synthesis and Export of Virulence Lipid in M. tuberculosis.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    2005-09-01

    Full Text Available Virulent mycobacteria utilize surface-exposed polyketides to interact with host cells, but the mechanism by which these hydrophobic molecules are transported across the cell envelope to the surface of the bacteria is poorly understood. Phthiocerol dimycocerosate (PDIM, a surface-exposed polyketide lipid necessary for Mycobacterium tuberculosis virulence, is the product of several polyketide synthases including PpsE. Transport of PDIM requires MmpL7, a member of the MmpL family of RND permeases. Here we show that a domain of MmpL7 biochemically interacts with PpsE, the first report of an interaction between a biosynthetic enzyme and its cognate transporter. Overexpression of the interaction domain of MmpL7 acts as a dominant negative to PDIM synthesis by poisoning the interaction between synthase and transporter. This suggests that MmpL7 acts in complex with the synthesis machinery to efficiently transport PDIM across the cell membrane. Coordination of synthesis and transport may not only be a feature of MmpL-mediated transport in M. tuberculosis, but may also represent a general mechanism of polyketide export in many different microorganisms.

  12. The major facilitator superfamily transporter Knq1p modulates boron homeostasis in Kluyveromyces lactis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Svrbicka, Alexandra; Toth Hervay, Nora; Gbelska, Yvetta

    2016-03-01

    Boron is an essential micronutrient for living cells, yet its excess causes toxicity. To date, the mechanisms of boron toxicity are poorly understood. Recently, the ScATR1 gene has been identified encoding the main boron efflux pump in Saccharomyces cerevisiae. In this study, we analyzed the ScATR1 ortholog in Kluyveromyces lactis--the KNQ1 gene, to understand whether it participates in boron stress tolerance. We found that the KNQ1 gene, encoding a permease belonging to the major facilitator superfamily, is required for K. lactis boron tolerance. Deletion of the KNQ1 gene led to boron sensitivity and its overexpression increased K. lactis boron tolerance. The KNQ1 expression was induced by boron and the intracellular boron concentration was controlled by Knq1p. The KNQ1 promoter contains two putative binding motifs for the AP-1-like transcription factor KlYap1p playing a central role in oxidative stress defense. Our results indicate that the induction of the KNQ1 expression requires the presence of KlYap1p and that Knq1p like its ortholog ScAtr1p in S. cerevisiae functions as a boron efflux pump providing boron resistance in K. lactis.

  13. A Cluster of Five Genes Essential for the Utilization of Dihydroxamate Xenosiderophores in Synechocystis sp. PCC 6803.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Obando S, Tobias A; Babykin, Michael M; Zinchenko, Vladislav V

    2018-05-21

    The unicellular freshwater cyanobacterium Synechocystis sp. PCC 6803 is capable of using dihydroxamate xenosiderophores, either ferric schizokinen (FeSK) or a siderophore of the filamentous cyanobacterium Anabaena variabilis ATCC 29413 (SAV), as the sole source of iron in the TonB-dependent manner. The fecCDEB1-schT gene cluster encoding a siderophore transport system that is involved in the utilization of FeSK and SAV in Synechocystis sp. PCC 6803 was identified. The gene schT encodes TonB-dependent outer membrane transporter, whereas the remaining four genes encode the ABC-type transporter FecB1CDE formed by the periplasmic binding protein FecB1, the transmembrane permease proteins FecC and FecD, and the ATPase FecE. Inactivation of any of these genes resulted in the inability of cells to utilize FeSK and SAV. Our data strongly suggest that Synechocystis sp. PCC 6803 can readily internalize Fe-siderophores via the classic TonB-dependent transport system.

  14. Transformation and characterization of an arsenic gene operon from urease-positive thermophilic Campylobacter (UPTC) in Escherichia coli.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Matsuda, M; Kuribayashi, T; Yamamoto, S; Millar, B C; Moore, J E

    2016-01-01

    An arsenate susceptibility test was performed with transformed and cultured Escherichia coli DH5α cells, which carried recombinant DNA of full-length arsenic (ars) operon, namely a putative membrane permease, ArsP; a transcriptional repressor, ArsR; an arsenate reductase, ArsC; and an arsenical-resistance membrane transporter, Acr3, from the Japanese urease-positive thermophilic Campylobacter lari (UPTC) CF89-12. The E. coli DH5α transformant showed reduced susceptibility to arsenate (~1536 μg/mL), compared to the control. Thus, these ars four-genes from the UPTC CF89-12 strain cells could confer a reduced susceptibility to arsenate in the transformed and E. coli DH5α cells. E. coli transformants with truncated ars operons, acr3 (acr3) and arsC-acr3 (∆arsC-acr3), of the ars operon, showed an MIC value of 384 μg/mL (~384 μg/mL), similar to the E. coli cells which carried the pGEM-T vector (control). Reverse transcription PCR confirmed in vivo transcription of recombinant full-length ars operon and deletion variants (∆acr3 and ∆arsC-acr3) in the transformed E. coli cells.

  15. A Novel Superfamily of Transporters for Allantoin and Other Oxo Derivatives of Nitrogen Heterocyclic Compounds in Arabidopsis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Desimone, Marcelo; Catoni, Elisabetta; Ludewig, Uwe; Hilpert, Melanie; Schneider, Anja; Kunze, Reinhard; Tegeder, Mechthild; Frommer, Wolf Bernd; Schumacher, Karin

    2002-01-01

    A wide spectrum of soil heterocyclic nitrogen compounds are potential nutrients for plants. Here, it is shown that Arabidopsis plants are able to use allantoin as sole nitrogen source. By functional complementation of a yeast mutant defective in allantoin uptake, an Arabidopsis transporter, AtUPS1 (Arabidopsis thaliana ureide permease 1), was identified. AtUPS1 belongs to a novel superfamily of plant membrane proteins with five open reading frames in Arabidopsis (identity, 64 to 82%). UPS proteins have 10 putative transmembrane domains with a large cytosolic central domain containing a “Walker A” motif. Transport of 14C-labeled allantoin by AtUPS1 in yeast exhibited saturation kinetics (Km ∼ 52 μM), was dependent on Glc and a proton gradient, and was stimulated by acidic pH. AtUPS1 transports uric acid and xanthine, besides allantoin, but not adenine. Protons are cosubstrates in allantoin transport by AtUPS1, as demonstrated by expression in Xenopus laevis oocytes. In plants, AtUPS1 gene expression was dependent on the nitrogen source. Therefore, AtUPS1 presumably is involved in the uptake of allantoin and other purine degradation products when primary sources are limiting. PMID:11971139

  16. FecB, a periplasmic ferric-citrate transporter from E. coli, can bind different forms of ferric-citrate as well as a wide variety of metal-free and metal-loaded tricarboxylic acids.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Banerjee, Sambuddha; Paul, Subrata; Nguyen, Leonard T; Chu, Byron C H; Vogel, Hans J

    2016-01-01

    The Escherichia coli Fec system, consisting of an outer membrane receptor (FecA), a periplasmic substrate binding protein (FecB) and an inner membrane permease-ATPase type transporter (FecC/D), plays an important role in the uptake and transport of Fe(3+)-citrate. Although several FecB sequences from various organisms have been reported, there are no biophysical or structural data available for this protein to date. In this work, using isothermal titration calorimetry (ITC), we report for the first time the ability of FecB to bind different species of Fe(3+)-citrate as well as other citrate complexes with trivalent (Ga(3+), Al(3+), Sc(3+) and In(3+)) and a representative divalent metal ion (Mg(2+)) with low μM affinity. Interestingly, ITC experiments with various iron-free di- and tricarboxylic acids show that FecB can bind tricarboxylates with μM affinity but not biologically relevant dicarboxylates. The ability of FecB to bind with metal-free citrate is also observed in (1)H,(15)N HSQC-NMR titration experiments reported here at two different pH values. Further, differential scanning calorimetry (DSC) experiments indicate that the ligand-bound form of FecB has greater thermal stability than ligand-free FecB under all pH and ligand conditions tested, which is consistent with the idea of domain closure subsequent to ligand binding for this type of periplasmic binding proteins.

  17. Target of rapamycin complex 1 and Tap42-associated phosphatases are required for sensing changes in nitrogen conditions in the yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Jinmei; Yan, Gonghong; Liu, Sichi; Jiang, Tong; Zhong, Mingming; Yuan, Wenjie; Chen, Shaoxian; Zheng, Yin; Jiang, Yong; Jiang, Yu

    2017-12-01

    In yeast target of rapamycin complex 1 (TORC1) and Tap42-associated phosphatases regulate expression of genes involved in nitrogen limitation response and the nitrogen discrimination pathway. However, it remains unclear whether TORC1 and the phosphatases are required for sensing nitrogen conditions. Utilizing temperature sensitive mutants of tor2 and tap42, we examined the role of TORC1 and Tap42 in nuclear entry of Gln3, a key transcription factor in yeast nitrogen metabolism, in response to changes in nitrogen conditions. Our data show that TORC1 is essential for Gln3 nuclear entry upon nitrogen limitation and downshift in nitrogen quality. However, Tap42-associated phosphatases are required only under nitrogen limitation condition. In cells grown in poor nitrogen medium, the nitrogen permease reactivator kinase (Npr1) inhibits TORC1 activity and alters its association with Tap42, rendering Tap42-associated phosphatases unresponsive to nitrogen limitation. These findings demonstrate a direct role for TORC1 and Tap42-associated phosphatases in sensing nitrogen conditions and unveil an Npr1-dependent mechanism that controls TORC1 and the phosphatases in response to changes in nitrogen quality. © 2017 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  18. Transcriptional and functional characterization of genetic elements involved in galacto-oligosaccharide utilization by Bifidobacterium breve UCC2003.

    Science.gov (United States)

    O'Connell Motherway, Mary; Kinsella, Michael; Fitzgerald, Gerald F; van Sinderen, Douwe

    2013-01-01

    Several prebiotics, such as inulin, fructo-oligosaccharides and galacto-oligosaccharides, are widely used commercially in foods and there is convincing evidence, in particular for galacto-oligosaccharides, that prebiotics can modulate the microbiota and promote bifidobacterial growth in the intestinal tract of infants and adults. In this study we describe the identification and functional characterization of the genetic loci responsible for the transport and metabolism of purified galacto-oligosaccharides (PGOS) by Bifidobacterium breve UCC2003. We further demonstrate that an extracellular endogalactanase specified by several B. breve strains, including B. breve UCC2003, is essential for partial degradation of PGOS components with a high degree of polymerization. These partially hydrolysed PGOS components are presumed to be transported into the bifidobacterial cell via various ABC transport systems and sugar permeases where they are further degraded to galactose and glucose monomers that feed into the bifid shunt. This work significantly advances our molecular understanding of bifidobacterial PGOS metabolism and its associated genetic machinery to utilize this prebiotic. © 2012 The Authors. Published by Society for Applied Microbiology and Blackwell Publishing Ltd. This is an open access article under the terms of the Creative Commons Attribution License, which permits use, distribution and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited.

  19. Transcriptional and functional characterization of genetic elements involved in galacto-oligosaccharide utilization by Bifidobacterium breve UCC2003

    Science.gov (United States)

    O'Connell Motherway, Mary; Kinsella, Michael; Fitzgerald, Gerald F; Sinderen, Douwe

    2013-01-01

    Several prebiotics, such as inulin, fructo-oligosaccharides and galacto-oligosaccharides, are widely used commercially in foods and there is convincing evidence, in particular for galacto-oligosaccharides, that prebiotics can modulate the microbiota and promote bifidobacterial growth in the intestinal tract of infants and adults. In this study we describe the identification and functional characterization of the genetic loci responsible for the transport and metabolism of purified galacto-oligosaccharides (PGOS) by Bifidobacterium breve UCC2003. We further demonstrate that an extracellular endogalactanase specified by several B. breve strains, including B. breve UCC2003, is essential for partial degradation of PGOS components with a high degree of polymerization. These partially hydrolysed PGOS components are presumed to be transported into the bifidobacterial cell via various ABC transport systems and sugar permeases where they are further degraded to galactose and glucose monomers that feed into the bifid shunt. This work significantly advances our molecular understanding of bifidobacterial PGOS metabolism and its associated genetic machinery to utilize this prebiotic. PMID:23199239

  20. Structure of the nucleotide-binding domain of a dipeptide ABC transporter reveals a novel iron-sulfur cluster-binding domain.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Xiaolu; Zhuo, Wei; Yu, Jie; Ge, Jingpeng; Gu, Jinke; Feng, Yue; Yang, Maojun; Wang, Linfang; Wang, Na

    2013-02-01

    Dipeptide permease (Dpp), which belongs to an ABC transport system, imports peptides consisting of two or three L-amino acids from the matrix to the cytoplasm in microbes. Previous studies have indicated that haem competes with dipeptides to bind DppA in vitro and in vivo and that the Dpp system can also translocate haem. Here, the crystal structure of DppD, the nucleotide-binding domain (NBD) of the ABC-type dipeptide/oligopeptide/nickel-transport system from Thermoanaerobacter tengcongensis, bound with ATP, Mg(2+) and a [4Fe-4S] iron-sulfur cluster is reported. The N-terminal domain of DppD shares a similar structural fold with the NBDs of other ABC transporters. Interestingly, the C-terminal domain of DppD contains a [4Fe-4S] cluster. The UV-visible absorbance spectrum of DppD was consistent with the presence of a [4Fe-4S] cluster. A search with DALI revealed that the [4Fe-4S] cluster-binding domain is a novel structural fold. Structural analysis and comparisons with other ABC transporters revealed that this iron-sulfur cluster may act as a mediator in substrate (dipeptide or haem) binding by electron transfer and may regulate the transport process in Dpp ABC transport systems. The crystal structure provides a basis for understanding the properties of ABC transporters and will be helpful in investigating the functions of NBDs in the regulation of ABC transporter activity.

  1. Investigation of nutrient sensing in the yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Eckert-Boulet, Nadine

    2006-01-01

    medfører transkriptionel induktion. For at kunne bekræfte eller identificere nye gener som reguleres via SPS-systemet, blev der udført global transkriptionel profilering af vildtype stammer samt af stammer deleterede for enten SSY1 eller STP1 og STP2, både med og uden aminosyren L-citrullin i mediet. L......-citrulline kan ikke optages af disse stammer, da de mangler GAP1 (General Amino acid Permease). Det blev bekræftet, at AAP generne TAT1, BAP2, BAP3 og PTR2 er under kontrol af aminosyre induktionsvejen, mens AGP2 blev identificeret som et nyt gen under kontrol af denne mekanisme. Den globale...... transkriptionsanalyse viste at 46 gener induceres af L-citrullin, afhængigt af Ssy1p og Stp1p/Stp2p. Sekvenssammenligning af promoterregionerne muliggjorde en mere præcis definition af den tidligere beskrevet Upstream Activating Sequence (UASaa). Udover effekten på AAP gener, viste ssy1 og stp1 stp2 mutanter mange...

  2. Genome sequence and physiological analysis of Yamadazyma laniorum f.a. sp. nov. and a reevaluation of the apocryphal xylose fermentation of its sister species, Candida tenuis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Haase, Max A B; Kominek, Jacek; Langdon, Quinn K; Kurtzman, Cletus P; Hittinger, Chris Todd

    2017-05-01

    Xylose fermentation is a rare trait that is immensely important to the cellulosic biofuel industry, and Candida tenuis is one of the few yeasts that has been reported with this trait. Here we report the isolation of two strains representing a candidate sister species to C. tenuis. Integrated analysis of genome sequence and physiology suggested the genetic basis of a number of traits, including variation between the novel species and C. tenuis in lactose metabolism due to the loss of genes encoding lactose permease and β-galactosidase in the former. Surprisingly, physiological characterization revealed that neither the type strain of C. tenuis nor this novel species fermented xylose in traditional assays. We reexamined three xylose-fermenting strains previously identified as C. tenuis and found that these strains belong to the genus Scheffersomyces and are not C. tenuis. We propose Yamadazyma laniorum f.a. sp. nov. to accommodate our new strains and designate its type strain as yHMH7 (=CBS 14780 = NRRL Y-63967T). Furthermore, we propose the transfer of Candida tenuis to the genus Yamadazyma as Yamadazyma tenuis comb. nov. This approach provides a roadmap for how integrated genome sequence and physiological analysis can yield insight into the mechanisms that generate yeast biodiversity. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of FEMS 2017. This work is written by (a) US Government employee(s) and is in the public domain in the US.

  3. Chitinase determinants of Vibrio vulnificus: gene cloning and applications of a chitinase probe

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wortman, A.T.; Somerville, C.C.; Colwell, R.R.

    1986-01-01

    To initiate study of the genetic control of chitinolytic activity in vibrios, the chitobiase gene was isolated by cloning chromosomal DNA prepared from Vibrio vulnificus. Chimeric plasmids were constructed from Sau3A I partial digests of chromosomal DNA by ligating 5 to 15-kilobase fragments into the BamHI site, i.e., in the Tc/sup r/ gene, of pBR322 (Am/sup r/Tc/sup r/). The resulting plasmids were transformed into Escherichia coli DH1. Chitobiase activity of the insert-bearing clones was detected by using a chromogenic substrate, p-nitrophenyl-N-acetyl-β,D-glucosaminide, and confirmed by the appearance of a fluorescent end product from the hydrolysis of 4-methylumbelliferyl-β,D-N-N'-diacetylchitiobiose. Endochitinase activity was demonstrated by liberation of water-soluble products produced by the degradation of [ 3 H]chitin. Transformation of E. coli Y10R (lacY) with plasmids from chitinase-positive clones restored the lactose-positive phenotype, suggesting the presence of a permease associated with chitinase activity. Physical mapping of plasmids containing the chitinase determinants indicate that transcription of these genes in E. coli may be initiated at a V. vulnificus promoter

  4. Metabolic Characteristics of a Glucose-Utilizing Shewanella oneidensis Strain Grown under Electrode-Respiring Conditions.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gen Nakagawa

    Full Text Available In bioelectrochemical systems, the electrode potential is an important parameter affecting the electron flow between electrodes and microbes and microbial metabolic activities. Here, we investigated the metabolic characteristics of a glucose-utilizing strain of engineered Shewanella oneidensis under electrode-respiring conditions in electrochemical reactors for gaining insight into how metabolic pathways in electrochemically active bacteria are affected by the electrode potential. When an electrochemical reactor was operated with its working electrode poised at +0.4 V (vs. an Ag/AgCl reference electrode, the engineered S. oneidensis strain, carrying a plasmid encoding a sugar permease and glucose kinase of Escherichia coli, generated current by oxidizing glucose to acetate and produced D-lactate as an intermediate metabolite. However, D-lactate accumulation was not observed when the engineered strain was grown with a working electrode poised at 0 V. We also found that transcription of genes involved in pyruvate and D-lactate metabolisms was upregulated at a high electrode potential compared with their transcription at a low electrode potential. These results suggest that the carbon catabolic pathway of S. oneidensis can be modified by controlling the potential of a working electrode in an electrochemical bioreactor.

  5. Molecular characterization of the pSinB plasmid of the arsenite oxidizing, metallotolerant Sinorhizobium sp. M14 - insight into the heavy metal resistome of sinorhizobial extrachromosomal replicons.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Romaniuk, Krzysztof; Dziewit, Lukasz; Decewicz, Przemyslaw; Mielnicki, Sebastian; Radlinska, Monika; Drewniak, Lukasz

    2017-01-01

    Sinorhizobium sp. M14 is an As(III)-oxidizing, psychrotolerant strain, capable of growth in the presence of extremely high concentrations of arsenic and many other heavy metals. Metallotolerant abilities of the M14 strain depend upon the presence of two extrachromosomal replicons: pSinA (∼ 109 kb) and pSinB (∼ 300 kb). The latter was subjected to complex analysis. The performed analysis demonstrated that the plasmid pSinB is a narrow-host-range repABC-type replicon, which is fully stabilized by the phd-vapC-like toxin-antitoxin stabilizing system. In silico analysis showed that among the phenotypic gene clusters of the plasmid pSinB, eight modules are potentially involved in heavy metals resistance (HMR). These modules carry genes encoding efflux pumps, permeases, transporters and copper oxidases, which provide resistance to arsenic, cadmium, cobalt, copper, iron, mercury, nickel, silver and zinc. The functional analysis revealed that the HMR modules are active and have an effect on the minimal inhibitory concentration (MIC) values observed for the heterological host cells. The phenotype was manifested by an increase or decrease of the MICs of heavy metals and it was strain specific. The analysis of distribution of the heavy metal resistance genes, i.e. resistome, in Sinorhizobium spp. plasmids, revealed that the HMR modules are common in these replicons. © FEMS 2016. All rights reserved. For permissions, please e-mail: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  6. The ArfGAP2/3 Glo3 and ergosterol collaborate in transport of a subset of cargoes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alejandro F. Estrada

    2015-07-01

    Full Text Available Proteins reach the plasma membrane through the secretory pathway in which the trans Golgi network (TGN acts as a sorting station. Transport from the TGN to the plasma membrane is maintained by a number of different pathways that act either directly or via the endosomal system. Here we show that a subset of cargoes depends on the ArfGAP2/3 Glo3 and ergosterol to maintain their proper localization at the plasma membrane. While interfering with neither ArfGAP2/3 activity nor ergosterol biosynthesis individually significantly altered plasma membrane localization of the tryptophan transporter Tat2, the general amino acid permease Gap1 and the v-SNARE Snc1, in a Δglo3 Δerg3 strain those proteins accumulated in internal endosomal structures. Export from the TGN to the plasma membrane and recycling from early endosomes appeared unaffected as the chitin synthase Chs3 that travels along these routes was localized normally. Our data indicate that a subset of proteins can reach the plasma membrane efficiently but after endocytosis becomes trapped in endosomal structures. Our study supports a role for ArfGAP2/3 in recycling from endosomes and in transport to the vacuole/lysosome.

  7. Functional and immunochemical characterization of a mutant of Escherichia coli energy uncoupled for lactose transport

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Herzlinger, D.; Carrasco, N.; Kaback, H.R.

    1985-01-01

    Right-side-out cytoplasmic membrane vesicles from Escherichia coli ML 308-22, a mutant ''uncoupled'' for beta-galactoside/H + symport are specifically defective in the ability to catalyze accumulation of methyl 1-thio-beta-D-galactopyranoside (TMG) in the presence of an H + electrochemical gradient (interior negative and alkaline). Furthermore, the rate of carrier-mediated efflux under nonenergized conditions is slow and unaffected by ambient pH from pH 5.5 to 7.5, and TMG-induced H + influx is only about 15% of that observed in vesicles containing wild-type lac permease (ML 308-225). Alternatively, ML 308-22 vesicles bind p-nitrophenyl alpha-D-galactopyranoside and monoclonal antibody 4B1 to the same extent as ML 308-225 vesicles and catalyze facilitated diffusion and equilibrium exchange as well as ML 308-225 vesicles. When entrance counterflow is studied with external substrate at saturating and subsaturating concentrations, it is apparent that the mutation simulates the effects of deuterium oxide. That is, the mutation has no effect on the rate or extent of counterflow when external substrate is saturating but stimulates the efficiency of counterflow when external substrate is below the apparent K/sub m/. Moreover, although replacement of protium with deuterium stimulates counterflow in ML 308-225 vesicles when external substrate is subsaturating, the isotope has no effect on the mutant vesicles under the same conditions

  8. Inducer expulsion in Streptococcus pyogenes: properties and mechanism of the efflux reaction

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sutrina, S.L.; Reizer, J.; Saier, M.H Jr.

    1988-01-01

    Expulsion of preaccumulated methyl-β-D-thiogalactoside-phosphate (TMG-P) from Streptococcus pyogenes is a two-step process comprising intracellular dephosphorylation of TMG-P followed by rapid efflux of the intracellularly formed free galactoside. The present study identifies the mechanism and the order and characterizes the temperature dependency of the efflux step. Unidirectional efflux of the intracellularly formed [ 14 C]TMG was only slightly affected when measured in the presence of unlabeled TMG (25 to 400 mM) in the extracellular medium. In contrast, pronounced inhibition of net efflux was observed in the presence of relatively low concentrations (1 to 16 mM) of extracellular [ 14 C]TMG. Since net efflux was nearly arrested when the external concentration of [ 14 C]TMG approached the intracellular concentration of this sugar, we propose that a facilitated diffusion mechanism is responsible for efflux and equilibration of TMG between the intracellular and extracellular milieus. The exit reaction was markedly dependent upon temperature, exhibited a high energy of activation (23 kcal [ca. 96 kJ] per mol), and followed first-order kinetics, indicating that the permease mediating this efflux was not saturated under the conditions of expulsion employed

  9. High level bacterial contamination of secondary school students' mobile phones.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kõljalg, Siiri; Mändar, Rando; Sõber, Tiina; Rööp, Tiiu; Mändar, Reet

    2017-06-01

    While contamination of mobile phones in the hospital has been found to be common in several studies, little information about bacterial abundance on phones used in the community is available. Our aim was to quantitatively determine the bacterial contamination of secondary school students' mobile phones. Altogether 27 mobile phones were studied. The contact plate method and microbial identification using MALDI-TOF mass spectrometer were used for culture studies. Quantitative PCR reaction for detection of universal 16S rRNA, Enterococcus faecalis 16S rRNA and Escherichia coli allantoin permease were performed, and the presence of tetracycline ( tet A, tet B, tet M), erythromycin ( erm B) and sulphonamide ( sul 1) resistance genes was assessed. We found a high median bacterial count on secondary school students' mobile phones (10.5 CFU/cm 2 ) and a median of 17,032 bacterial 16S rRNA gene copies per phone. Potentially pathogenic microbes ( Staphylococcus aureus , Acinetobacter spp. , Pseudomonas spp., Bacillus cereus and Neisseria flavescens ) were found among dominant microbes more often on phones with higher percentage of E. faecalis in total bacterial 16S rRNA. No differences in contamination level or dominating bacterial species between phone owner's gender and between phone types (touch screen/keypad) were found. No antibiotic resistance genes were detected on mobile phone surfaces. Quantitative study methods revealed high level bacterial contamination of secondary school students' mobile phones.

  10. Enhanced longevity by ibuprofen, conserved in multiple species, occurs in yeast through inhibition of tryptophan import.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chong He

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available The common non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drug ibuprofen has been associated with a reduced risk of some age-related pathologies. However, a general pro-longevity role for ibuprofen and its mechanistic basis remains unclear. Here we show that ibuprofen increased the lifespan of Saccharomyces cerevisiae, Caenorhabditis elegans and Drosophila melanogaster, indicative of conserved eukaryotic longevity effects. Studies in yeast indicate that ibuprofen destabilizes the Tat2p permease and inhibits tryptophan uptake. Loss of Tat2p increased replicative lifespan (RLS, but ibuprofen did not increase RLS when Tat2p was stabilized or in an already long-lived strain background impaired for aromatic amino acid uptake. Concomitant with lifespan extension, ibuprofen moderately reduced cell size at birth, leading to a delay in the G1 phase of the cell cycle. Similar changes in cell cycle progression were evident in a large dataset of replicatively long-lived yeast deletion strains. These results point to fundamental cell cycle signatures linked with longevity, implicate aromatic amino acid import in aging and identify a largely safe drug that extends lifespan across different kingdoms of life.

  11. Enhanced Longevity by Ibuprofen, Conserved in Multiple Species, Occurs in Yeast through Inhibition of Tryptophan Import

    Science.gov (United States)

    He, Chong; Tsuchiyama, Scott K.; Nguyen, Quynh T.; Plyusnina, Ekaterina N.; Terrill, Samuel R.; Sahibzada, Sarah; Patel, Bhumil; Faulkner, Alena R.; Shaposhnikov, Mikhail V.; Tian, Ruilin; Tsuchiya, Mitsuhiro; Kaeberlein, Matt; Moskalev, Alexey A.; Kennedy, Brian K.; Polymenis, Michael

    2014-01-01

    The common non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drug ibuprofen has been associated with a reduced risk of some age-related pathologies. However, a general pro-longevity role for ibuprofen and its mechanistic basis remains unclear. Here we show that ibuprofen increased the lifespan of Saccharomyces cerevisiae, Caenorhabditis elegans and Drosophila melanogaster, indicative of conserved eukaryotic longevity effects. Studies in yeast indicate that ibuprofen destabilizes the Tat2p permease and inhibits tryptophan uptake. Loss of Tat2p increased replicative lifespan (RLS), but ibuprofen did not increase RLS when Tat2p was stabilized or in an already long-lived strain background impaired for aromatic amino acid uptake. Concomitant with lifespan extension, ibuprofen moderately reduced cell size at birth, leading to a delay in the G1 phase of the cell cycle. Similar changes in cell cycle progression were evident in a large dataset of replicatively long-lived yeast deletion strains. These results point to fundamental cell cycle signatures linked with longevity, implicate aromatic amino acid import in aging and identify a largely safe drug that extends lifespan across different kingdoms of life. PMID:25521617

  12. A peptide export-import control circuit modulating bacterial development regulates protein phosphatases of the phosphorelay.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Perego, M

    1997-08-05

    The phosphorelay signal transduction system activates developmental transcription in sporulation of Bacillus subtilis by phosphorylation of aspartyl residues of the Spo0F and Spo0A response regulators. The phosphorylation level of these response regulators is determined by the opposing activities of protein kinases and protein aspartate phosphatases that interpret positive and negative signals for development in a signal integration circuit. The RapA protein aspartate phosphatase of the phosphorelay is regulated by a peptide that directly inhibits its activity. This peptide is proteolytically processed from an inactive pre-inhibitor protein encoded in the phrA gene. The pre-inhibitor is cleaved by the protein export apparatus to a putative pro-inhibitor that is further processed to the active inhibitor peptide and internalized by the oligopeptide permease. This export-import circuit is postulated to be a mechanism for timing phosphatase activity where the processing enzymes regulate the rate of formation of the active inhibitor. The processing events may, in turn, be controlled by a regulatory hierarchy. Chromosome sequencing has revealed several other phosphatase-prepeptide gene pairs in B. subtilis, suggesting that the use of this mechanism may be widespread in signal transduction.

  13. Transcriptional and Proteomic Profiling of Aspergillus flavipes in Response to Sulfur Starvation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    El-Sayed, Ashraf S A; Yassin, Marwa A; Ali, Gul Shad

    2015-01-01

    Aspergillus flavipes has received considerable interest due to its potential to produce therapeutic enzymes involved in sulfur amino acid metabolism. In natural habitats, A. flavipes survives under sulfur limitations by mobilizing endogenous and exogenous sulfur to operate diverse cellular processes. Sulfur limitation affects virulence and pathogenicity, and modulates proteome of sulfur assimilating enzymes of several fungi. However, there are no previous reports aimed at exploring effects of sulfur limitation on the regulation of A. flavipes sulfur metabolism enzymes at the transcriptional, post-transcriptional and proteomic levels. In this report, we show that sulfur limitation affects morphological and physiological responses of A. flavipes. Transcription and enzymatic activities of several key sulfur metabolism genes, ATP-sulfurylase, sulfite reductase, methionine permease, cysteine synthase, cystathionine β- and γ-lyase, glutathione reductase and glutathione peroxidase were increased under sulfur starvation conditions. A 50 kDa protein band was strongly induced by sulfur starvation, and the proteomic analyses of this protein band using LC-MS/MS revealed similarity to many proteins involved in the sulfur metabolism pathway.

  14. The organization of the fuc regulon specifying L-fucose dissimilation in Escherichia coli K12 as determined by gene cloning.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Y M; Zhu, Y; Lin, E C

    1987-12-01

    In Escherichia coli the six known genes specifying the utilization of L-fucose as carbon and energy source cluster at 60.2 min and constitute a regulon. These genes include fucP (encoding L-fucose permease), fucI (encoding L-fucose isomerase), fucK (encoding L-fuculose kinase), fucA (encoding L-fuculose 1-phosphate aldolase), fucO (encoding L-1,2-propanediol oxidoreductase), and fucR (encoding the regulatory protein). In this study the fuc genes were cloned and their positions on the chromosome were established by restriction endonuclease and complementation analyses. Clockwise, the gene order is: fucO-fucA-fucP-fucI-fucK-fucR. The operons comprising the structural genes and the direction of transcription were determined by complementation analysis and Southern blot hybridization. The fucPIK and fucA operons are transcribed clockwise. The fucO operon is transcribed counterclockwise. The fucR gene product activates the three structural operons in trans.

  15. L-fucose utilization provides Campylobacter jejuni with a competitive advantage.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stahl, Martin; Friis, Lorna M; Nothaft, Harald; Liu, Xin; Li, Jianjun; Szymanski, Christine M; Stintzi, Alain

    2011-04-26

    Campylobacter jejuni is a prevalent gastrointestinal pathogen in humans and a common commensal of poultry. When colonizing its hosts, C. jejuni comes into contact with intestinal carbohydrates, including L-fucose, released from mucin glycoproteins. Several strains of C. jejuni possess a genomic island (cj0480c-cj0490) that is up-regulated in the presence of both L-fucose and mucin and allows for the utilization of L-fucose as a substrate for growth. Strains possessing this genomic island show increased growth in the presence of L-fucose and mutation of cj0481, cj0486, and cj0487 results in the loss of the ability to grow on this substrate. Furthermore, mutants in the putative fucose permease (cj0486) are deficient in fucose uptake and demonstrate a competitive disadvantage when colonizing the piglet model of human disease, which is not paralleled in the colonization of poultry. This identifies a previously unrecorded metabolic pathway in select strains of C. jejuni associated with a virulent lifestyle.

  16. Identification of Selective Inhibitors of the Plasmodium falciparum Hexose Transporter PfHT by Screening Focused Libraries of Anti-Malarial Compounds.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Diana Ortiz

    Full Text Available Development of resistance against current antimalarial drugs necessitates the search for novel drugs that interact with different targets and have distinct mechanisms of action. Malaria parasites depend upon high levels of glucose uptake followed by inefficient metabolic utilization via the glycolytic pathway, and the Plasmodium falciparum hexose transporter PfHT, which mediates uptake of glucose, has thus been recognized as a promising drug target. This transporter is highly divergent from mammalian hexose transporters, and it appears to be a permease that is essential for parasite viability in intra-erythrocytic, mosquito, and liver stages of the parasite life cycle. An assay was developed that is appropriate for high throughput screening against PfHT based upon heterologous expression of PfHT in Leishmania mexicana parasites that are null mutants for their endogenous hexose transporters. Screening of two focused libraries of antimalarial compounds identified two such compounds that are high potency selective inhibitors of PfHT compared to human GLUT1. Additionally, 7 other compounds were identified that are lower potency and lower specificity PfHT inhibitors but might nonetheless serve as starting points for identification of analogs with more selective properties. These results further support the potential of PfHT as a novel drug target.

  17. Nitrogen-responsive genes are differentially regulated in planta during Fusarium oxyspsorum f. sp. lycopersici infection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Divon, Hege H; Rothan-Denoyes, Beatrice; Davydov, Olga; DI Pietro, Antonio; Fluhr, Robert

    2005-07-01

    SUMMARY Nitrogen is an essential growth component whose availability will limit microbial spread, and as such it serves as a key control point in dictating an organism's adaptation to various environments. Little is known about fungal nutrition in planta. To enhance our understanding of this process we examined the transcriptional adaptation of Fusarium oxysporum f. sp. lycopersici, the causal agent for vascular wilt in tomato, during nutritional stress and plant colonization. Using RT-PCR and microarray technology we compared fungal gene expression in planta to axenic nitrogen starvation culture. Several expressed sequence tags, representing at least four genes, were identified that are concomitantly induced during nitrogen starvation and in planta growth. Three of these genes show similarity to a general amino acid permease, a peptide transporter and an uricase, all functioning in organic nitrogen acquisition. We further show that these genes represent a distinguishable subset of the nitrogen-responsive transcripts that respond to amino acids commonly available in the plant. Our results indicate that nitrogen starvation partially mimics in planta growth conditions, and further suggest that minute levels of organic nitrogen sources dictate the final outcome of fungal gene expression in planta. The nature of the identified transcripts suggests modes of nutrient uptake and survival for Fusarium during colonization.

  18. Relationship among Shigella spp. and enteroinvasive Escherichia coli (EIEC) and their differentiation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ud-Din, Abu; Wahid, Syeda

    2014-01-01

    Shigellosis produces inflammatory reactions and ulceration on the intestinal epithelium followed by bloody or mucoid diarrhea. It is caused by enteroinvasive E. coli (EIEC) as well as any species of the genus Shigella, namely, S. dysenteriae, S. flexneri, S. boydii, and S. sonnei. This current species designation of Shigella does not specify genetic similarity. Shigella spp. could be easily differentiated from E. coli, but difficulties observed for the EIEC-Shigella differentiation as both show similar biochemical traits and can cause dysentery using the same mode of invasion. Sequencing of multiple housekeeping genes indicates that Shigella has derived on several different occasions via acquisition of the transferable forms of ancestral virulence plasmids within commensal E. coli and form a Shigella-EIEC pathovar. EIEC showed lower expression of virulence genes compared to Shigella, hence EIEC produce less severe disease than Shigella spp. Conventional microbiological techniques often lead to confusing results concerning the discrimination between EIEC and Shigella spp. The lactose permease gene (lacY) is present in all E. coli strains but absent in Shigella spp., whereas β-glucuronidase gene (uidA) is present in both E. coli and Shigella spp. Thus uidA gene and lacY gene based duplex real-time PCR assay could be used for easy identification and differentiation of Shigella spp. from E. coli and in particular EIEC.

  19. [Detection of putative polysaccharide biosynthesis genes in Azospirillum brasilense strains from serogroups I and II].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Petrova, L P; Prilipov, A G; Katsy, E I

    2017-01-01

    It is known that in Azospirillum brasilense strains Sp245 and SR75 included in serogroup I, the repeat units of their O-polysaccharides consist of five residues of D-rhamnose, and in strain SR15, of four; and the heteropolymeric O-polysaccharide of A. brasilense type strain Sp7 from serogroup II contains not less than five types of repeat units. In the present work, a complex of nondegenerate primers to the genes of A. brasilense Sp245 plasmids AZOBR_p6, AZOBR_p3, and AZOBR_p2, which encode putative enzymes for the biosynthesis of core oligosaccharide and O-polysaccharide of lipopolysaccharide, capsular polysaccharides, and exopolysaccharides, was proposed. By using the designed primers, products of the expected sizes were synthesized in polymerase chain reactions on genomic DNA of A. brasilense Sp245, SR75, SR15, and Sp7 in 36, 29, 23, and 12 cases, respectively. As a result of sequencing of a number of amplicons, a high (86–99%) level of identity of the corresponding putative polysaccharide biosynthesis genes in three A. brasilense strains from serogroup I was detected. In a blotting-hybridization reaction with the biotin-labeled DNA of the A. brasilense gene AZOBR_p60122 coding for putative permease of the ABC transporter of polysaccharides, localization of the homologous gene in ~120-MDa plasmids of the bacteria A. brasilense SR15 and SR75 was revealed.

  20. Involvement of the ornithine decarboxylase gene in acid stress response in probiotic Lactobacillus delbrueckii UFV H2b20.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ferreira, A B; Oliveira, M N V de; Freitas, F S; Paiva, A D; Alfenas-Zerbini, P; Silva, D F da; Queiroz, M V de; Borges, A C; Moraes, C A de

    2015-01-01

    Amino acid decarboxylation is important for the maintenance of intracellular pH under acid stress. This study aims to carry out phylogenetic and expression analysis by real-time PCR of two genes that encode proteins involved in ornithine decarboxylation in Lactobacillus delbrueckii UFV H2b20 exposed to acid stress. Sequencing and phylogeny analysis of genes encoding ornithine decarboxylase and amino acid permease in L. delbrueckii UFV H2b20 showed their high sequence identity (99%) and grouping with those of L. delbrueckii subsp. bulgaricus ATCC 11842. Exposure of L. delbrueckii UFV H2b20 cells in MRS pH 3.5 for 30 and 60 min caused a significant increase in expression of the gene encoding ornithine decarboxylase (up to 8.1 times higher when compared to the control treatment). Increased expression of the ornithine decarboxylase gene demonstrates its involvement in acid stress response in L. delbrueckii UFV H2b20, evidencing that the protein encoded by that gene could be involved in intracellular pH regulation. The results obtained show ornithine decarboxylation as a possible mechanism of adaptation to an acidic environmental condition, a desirable and necessary characteristic for probiotic cultures and certainly important to the survival and persistence of the L. delbrueckii UFV H2b20 in the human gastrointestinal tract.

  1. Transcriptional analysis of prebiotic uptake and catabolism by Lactobacillus acidophilus NCFM.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Joakim Mark Andersen

    Full Text Available The human gastrointestinal tract can be positively modulated by dietary supplementation of probiotic bacteria in combination with prebiotic carbohydrates. Here differential transcriptomics and functional genomics were used to identify genes in Lactobacillus acidophilus NCFM involved in the uptake and catabolism of 11 potential prebiotic compounds consisting of α- and β-linked galactosides and glucosides. These oligosaccharides induced genes encoding phosphoenolpyruvate-dependent sugar phosphotransferase systems (PTS, galactoside pentose hexuronide (GPH permease, and ATP-binding cassette (ABC transporters. PTS systems were upregulated primarily by di- and tri-saccharides such as cellobiose, isomaltose, isomaltulose, panose and gentiobiose, while ABC transporters were upregulated by raffinose, Polydextrose, and stachyose. A single GPH transporter was induced by lactitol and galactooligosaccharides (GOS. The various transporters were associated with a number of glycoside hydrolases from families 1, 2, 4, 13, 32, 36, 42, and 65, involved in the catabolism of various α- and β-linked glucosides and galactosides. Further subfamily specialization was also observed for different PTS-associated GH1 6-phospho-β-glucosidases implicated in the catabolism of gentiobiose and cellobiose. These findings highlight the broad oligosaccharide metabolic repertoire of L. acidophilus NCFM and establish a platform for selection and screening of both probiotic bacteria and prebiotic compounds that may positively influence the gastrointestinal microbiota.

  2. Alkali production associated with malolactic fermentation by oral streptococci and protection against acid, oxidative, or starvation damage

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sheng, Jiangyun; Baldeck, Jeremiah D.; Nguyen, Phuong T.M.; Quivey, Robert G.; Marquis, Robert E.

    2011-01-01

    Alkali production by oral streptococci is considered important for dental plaque ecology and caries moderation. Recently, malolactic fermentation (MLF) was identified as a major system for alkali production by oral streptococci, including Streptococcus mutans. Our major objectives in the work described in this paper were to further define the physiology and genetics of MLF of oral streptococci and its roles in protection against metabolic stress damage. l-Malic acid was rapidly fermented to l-lactic acid and CO2 by induced cells of wild-type S. mutans, but not by deletion mutants for mleS (malolactic enzyme) or mleP (malate permease). Mutants for mleR (the contiguous regulator gene) had intermediate capacities for MLF. Loss of capacity to catalyze MLF resulted in loss of capacity for protection against lethal acidification. MLF was also found to be protective against oxidative and starvation damage. The capacity of S. mutans to produce alkali from malate was greater than its capacity to produce acid from glycolysis at low pH values of 4 or 5. MLF acted additively with the arginine deiminase system for alkali production by Streptococcus sanguinis, but not with urease of Streptococcus salivarius. Malolactic fermentation is clearly a major process for alkali generation by oral streptococci and for protection against environmental stresses. PMID:20651853

  3. High yield cell-free production of integral membrane proteins without refolding or detergents.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wuu, Jessica J; Swartz, James R

    2008-05-01

    Integral membrane proteins act as critical cellular components and are important drug targets. However, difficulties in producing membrane proteins have hampered investigations of structure and function. In vivo production systems are often limited by cell toxicity, and previous in vitro approaches have required unnatural folding pathways using detergents or lipid solutions. To overcome these limitations, we present an improved cell-free expression system which produces high yields of integral membrane proteins without the use of detergents or refolding steps. Our cell-free reaction activates an Escherichia coli-derived cell extract for transcription and translation. Purified E. coli inner membrane vesicles supply membrane-bound components and the lipid environment required for insertion and folding. Using this system, we demonstrated successful synthesis of two complex integral membrane transporters, the tetracycline pump (TetA) and mannitol permease (MtlA), in yields of 570+/-50 microg/mL and 130+/-30 microg/mL of vesicle-associated protein, respectively. These yields are up to 400 times typical in vivo concentrations. Insertion and folding of these proteins are verified by sucrose flotation, protease digestion, and activity assays. Whereas TetA incorporates efficiently into vesicle membranes with over two-thirds of the synthesized protein being inserted, MtlA yields appear to be limited by insufficient concentrations of a membrane-associated chaperone.

  4. Identification of conserved drought stress responsive gene-network across tissues and developmental stages in rice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smita, Shuchi; Katiyar, Amit; Pandey, Dev Mani; Chinnusamy, Viswanathan; Archak, Sunil; Bansal, Kailash Chander

    2013-01-01

    Identification of genes that are coexpressed across various tissues and environmental stresses is biologically interesting, since they may play coordinated role in similar biological processes. Genes with correlated expression patterns can be best identified by using coexpression network analysis of transcriptome data. In the present study, we analyzed the temporal-spatial coordination of gene expression in root, leaf and panicle of rice under drought stress and constructed network using WGCNA and Cytoscape. Total of 2199 differentially expressed genes (DEGs) were identified in at least three or more tissues, wherein 88 genes have coordinated expression profile among all the six tissues under drought stress. These 88 highly coordinated genes were further subjected to module identification in the coexpression network. Based on chief topological properties we identified 18 hub genes such as ABC transporter, ATP-binding protein, dehydrin, protein phosphatase 2C, LTPL153 - Protease inhibitor, phosphatidylethanolaminebinding protein, lactose permease-related, NADP-dependent malic enzyme, etc. Motif enrichment analysis showed the presence of ABRE cis-elements in the promoters of > 62% of the coordinately expressed genes. Our results suggest that drought stress mediated upregulated gene expression was coordinated through an ABA-dependent signaling pathway across tissues, at least for the subset of genes identified in this study, while down regulation appears to be regulated by tissue specific pathways in rice.

  5. Identificação de transcritos diferencialmente expressos por Pasteurella multocida em condições de privação de ferro

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mayara I.V. Silva

    Full Text Available RESUMO: Ferro (Fe é um elemento essencial e a capacidade de adquiri-lo in vivo têm sido descrita em diversos agentes patogênicos através de fatores de virulência. Análises de transcritos durante a privação de Fe tem sido descritos através da técnica de "microarray", entretanto a técnica de RNA-seq recentemente tem demonstrado resultados superiores. Neste trabalho, o isolado de Pasteurella multocida (Pm 16759 altamente patogênico em suínos foi cultivado em duas condições com diferentes concentrações de Fe (controle e privação com o objetivo de analisar transcritos diferencialmente expressos. O RNA total das duas condições foi extraído e sequenciado através da plataforma de nova geração Ion Torrent. Os dados foram analisados no Software Ion Reporter(tm e processados no programa Rockhopper. Foram obtidas 1.341.615 leituras com tamanho médio de 81pb, com 96% de alinhamento com o genoma de Pasteurella multocida subsp. multocida 3480 e 98,8% de acurácia. No mapeamento das leituras das duas condições, observou-se 2,652 transcritos e destes, 177 (6,7% foram diferencialmente expressos, sendo 93 na condição controle (Fe+ e 84 na condição de privação (Fe-. Na condição de privação de Fe, o perfil de transcritos foram associados a função de transporte celular (fbp ABC, permease de alta afinidade com Fe2+/Pb2+ e proteína periplasmática de alta afinidade com Fe2+ , reguladores transcricionais e proteínas hipotéticas. O perfil na condição controle (Fe+ apresentou transcritos diferencialmente expressos associados ao RNAs anti-sense (asRNA e genes do metabolismo energético (fructose-1,6-bisfosfatase. O estudo comprovou que a restrição de Fe aumenta a expressão de genes envolvidos no transporte celular, reguladores transcricionais, proteínas hipotéticas e desconhecidas e permitiu ainda a identificação de novos genes como a permease de alta afinidade com Fe2+/Pb2+ e proteina periplasmática de alta afinidade

  6. The MEDIATOR genes MED12 and MED13 control Arabidopsis root system configuration influencing sugar and auxin responses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Raya-González, Javier; López-Bucio, Jesús Salvador; Prado-Rodríguez, José Carlos; Ruiz-Herrera, León Francisco; Guevara-García, Ángel Arturo; López-Bucio, José

    2017-09-01

    Arabidopsis med12 and med13 mutants exhibit shoot and root phenotypes related to an altered auxin homeostasis. Sucrose supplementation reactivates both cell division and elongation in primary roots as well as auxin-responsive and stem cell niche gene expression in these mutants. An analysis of primary root growth of WT, med12, aux1-7 and med12 aux1 single and double mutants in response to sucrose and/or N-1-naphthylphthalamic acid (NPA) placed MED12 upstream of auxin transport for the sugar modulation of root growth. The MEDIATOR (MED) complex plays diverse functions in plant development, hormone signaling and biotic and abiotic stress tolerance through coordination of transcription. Here, we performed genetic, developmental, molecular and pharmacological analyses to characterize the role of MED12 and MED13 on the configuration of root architecture and its relationship with auxin and sugar responses. Arabidopsis med12 and med13 single mutants exhibit shoot and root phenotypes consistent with altered auxin homeostasis including altered primary root growth, lateral root development, and root hair elongation. MED12 and MED13 were required for activation of cell division and elongation in primary roots, as well as auxin-responsive and stem cell niche gene expression. Remarkably, most of these mutant phenotypes were rescued by supplying sucrose to the growth medium. The growth response of primary roots of WT, med12, aux1-7 and med12 aux1 single and double mutants to sucrose and application of auxin transport inhibitor N-1-naphthylphthalamic acid (NPA) revealed the correlation of med12 phenotype with the activity of the auxin intake permease and suggests that MED12 acts upstream of AUX1 in the root growth response to sugar. These data provide compelling evidence that MEDIATOR links sugar sensing to auxin transport and distribution during root morphogenesis.

  7. Reduction of chalcogen oxyanions and generation of nanoprecipitates by the photosynthetic bacterium Rhodobacter capsulatus

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Borghese, Roberto, E-mail: roberto.borghese@unibo.it [Department of Pharmacy and Biotechnology, University of Bologna (Italy); Baccolini, Chiara; Francia, Francesco [Department of Pharmacy and Biotechnology, University of Bologna (Italy); Sabatino, Piera [Department of Chemistry G. Ciamician, University of Bologna (Italy); Turner, Raymond J. [Department of Biological Sciences, University of Calgary, Calgary, Alberta (Canada); Zannoni, Davide, E-mail: davide.zannoni@unibo.it [Department of Pharmacy and Biotechnology, University of Bologna (Italy)

    2014-03-01

    Graphical abstract: - Highlights: • R. capsulatus cells produce extracellular chalcogens nanoprecipitates when lawsone is present. • Lawsone acts as a redox mediator from reducing equivalents to tellurite and selenite. • Nanoprecipitates production depends on carbon source and requires metabolically active cells. • Te{sup 0} and Se{sup 0} nanoprecipitates are identified by X-ray diffraction (XRD) spectroscopy. - Abstract: The facultative photosynthetic bacterium Rhodobacter capsulatus is characterized in its interaction with the toxic oxyanions tellurite (Te{sup IV}) and selenite (Se{sup IV}) by a highly variable level of resistance that is dependent on the growth mode making this bacterium an ideal organism for the study of the microbial interaction with chalcogens. As we have reported in the past, while the oxyanion tellurite is taken up by R. capsulatus cells via acetate permease and it is reduced to Te{sup 0} in the cytoplasm in the form of splinter-like black intracellular deposits no clear mechanism was described for Se{sup 0} precipitation. Here, we present the first report on the biotransformation of tellurium and selenium oxyanions into extracellular Te{sup 0} and Se{sup 0}nanoprecipitates (NPs) by anaerobic photosynthetically growing cultures of R. capsulatus as a function of exogenously added redox-mediator lawsone, i.e. 2-hydroxy-1,4-naphthoquinone. The NPs formation was dependent on the carbon source used for the bacterial growth and the rate of chalcogen reduction was constant at different lawsone concentrations, in line with a catalytic role for the redox mediator. X-ray diffraction (XRD) analysis demonstrated the Te{sup 0} and Se{sup 0} nature of the nanoparticles.

  8. Residues in the H+ Translocation Site Define the pKa for Sugar Binding to LacY†

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smirnova, Irina; Kasho, Vladimir; Sugihara, Junichi; Choe, Jun-Yong; Kaback, H. Ronald

    2009-01-01

    A remarkably high pKa of approximately 10.5 has been determined for sugar-binding affinity to the lactose permease of Escherichia coli (LacY), indicating that, under physiological conditions, substrate binds to fully protonated LacY. We have now systematically tested site-directed replacements for the residues involved in sugar binding, as well as H+ translocation and coupling, in order to determine which residues may be responsible for this alkaline pKa. Mutations in the sugar-binding site (Glu126, Trp151, Glu269) markedly decrease affinity for sugar but do not alter the pKa for binding. In contrast, replacements for residues involved in H+ translocation (Arg302, Tyr236, His322, Asp240, Glu325, Lys319) exhibit pKa values for sugar binding that are either shifted toward neutral pH or independent of pH. Values for the apparent dissociation constant for sugar binding (Kdapp) increase greatly for all mutants except neutral replacements for Glu325 or Lys319, which are characterized by remarkably high affinity sugar binding (i.e., low Kdapp) from pH 5.5 to pH 11. The pH dependence of the on- and off-rate constants for sugar binding measured directly by stopped-flow fluorometry implicates koff as a major factor for the affinity change at alkaline pH and confirms the effects of pH on Kdapp inferred from steady-state fluorometry. These results indicate that the high pKa for sugar binding by wild-type LacY cannot be ascribed to any single amino acid residue but appears to reside within a complex of residues involved in H+ translocation. There is structural evidence for water bound in this complex, and the water could be the site of protonation responsible for the pH dependence of sugar binding. PMID:19689129

  9. Elevated temperature inhibits recruitment of transferrin-positive vesicles and induces iron-deficiency genes expression in Aiptasia pulchella host-harbored Symbiodinium.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Song, Po-Ching; Wu, Tsung-Meng; Hong, Ming-Chang; Chen, Ming-Chyuan

    2015-10-01

    Coral bleaching is the consequence of disruption of the mutualistic Cnidaria-dinoflagellate association. Elevated seawater temperatures have been proposed as the most likely cause of coral bleaching whose severity is enhanced by a limitation in the bioavailability of iron. Iron is required by numerous organisms including the zooxanthellae residing inside the symbiosome of cnidarian cells. However, the knowledge of how symbiotic zooxanthellae obtain iron from the host cells and how elevated water temperature affects the association is very limited. Since cellular iron acquisition is known to be mediated through transferrin receptor-mediated endocytosis, a vesicular trafficking pathway specifically regulated by Rab4 and Rab5, we set out to examine the roles of these key proteins in the iron acquisition by the symbiotic Symbiodinium. Thus, we hypothesized that the iron recruitments into symbiotic zooxanthellae-housed symbiosomes may be dependent on rab4/rab5-mediated fusion with vesicles containing iron-bound transferrins and will be retarded under elevated temperature. In this study, we cloned a novel monolobal transferrin (ApTF) gene from the tropical sea anemone Aiptasia pulchella and confirmed that the association of ApTF with A. pulchella Rab4 (ApRab4) or A. pulchella Rab5 (ApRab5) vesicles is inhibited by elevated temperature through immunofluorescence analysis. We confirmed the iron-deficient phenomenon by demonstrating the induced overexpression of iron-deficiency-responsive genes, flavodoxin and high-affinity iron permease 1, and reduced intracellular iron concentration in zooxanthellae under desferrioxamine B (iron chelator) and high temperature treatment. In conclusion, our data are consistent with algal iron deficiency being a contributing factor for the thermal stress-induced bleaching of symbiotic cnidarians. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  10. Molecular Dynamics Simulations of the Human Glucose Transporter GLUT1.

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    Min-Sun Park

    Full Text Available Glucose transporters (GLUTs provide a pathway for glucose transport across membranes. Human GLUTs are implicated in devastating diseases such as heart disease, hyper- and hypo-glycemia, type 2 diabetes and cancer. The human GLUT1 has been recently crystalized in the inward-facing open conformation. However, there is no other structural information for other conformations. The X-ray structures of E. coli Xylose permease (XylE, a glucose transporter homolog, are available in multiple conformations with and without the substrates D-xylose and D-glucose. XylE has high sequence homology to human GLUT1 and key residues in the sugar-binding pocket are conserved. Here we construct a homology model for human GLUT1 based on the available XylE crystal structure in the partially occluded outward-facing conformation. A long unbiased all atom molecular dynamics simulation starting from the model can capture a new fully opened outward-facing conformation. Our investigation of molecular interactions at the interface between the transmembrane (TM domains and the intracellular helices (ICH domain in the outward- and inward-facing conformation supports that the ICH domain likely stabilizes the outward-facing conformation in GLUT1. Furthermore, inducing a conformational transition, our simulations manifest a global asymmetric rocker switch motion and detailed molecular interactions between the substrate and residues through the water-filled selective pore along a pathway from the extracellular to the intracellular side. The results presented here are consistent with previously published biochemical, mutagenesis and functional studies. Together, this study shed light on the structure and functional relationships of GLUT1 in multiple conformational states.

  11. New insights into the interplay between the lysine transporter LysP and the pH sensor CadC in Escherichia coli.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rauschmeier, Martina; Schüppel, Valentina; Tetsch, Larissa; Jung, Kirsten

    2014-01-09

    The coordination of signal transduction and substrate transport represents a sophisticated way to integrate information on metabolite fluxes into transcriptional regulation. This widely distributed process involves protein-protein interactions between two integral membrane proteins. Here we report new insights into the molecular mechanism of the regulatory interplay between the lysine-specific permease LysP and the membrane-integrated pH sensor CadC, which together induce lysine-dependent adaptation of E. coli under acidic stress. In vivo analyses revealed that, in the absence of either stimulus, the two proteins form a stable association, which is modulated by lysine and low pH. In addition to its transmembrane helix, the periplasmic domain of CadC also participated in the interaction. Site-directed mutagenesis pinpointed Arg265 and Arg268 in CadC as well as Asp275 and Asp278 in LysP as potential periplasmic interaction sites. Moreover, a systematic analysis of 100 LysP variants with single-site replacements indicated that the lysine signal is transduced from co-sensor to sensor via lysine-dependent conformational changes (upon substrate binding and/or transport) of LysP. Our results suggest a scenario in which CadC is inhibited by LysP via intramembrane and periplasmic contacts under non-inducing conditions. Upon induction, lysine-dependent conformational changes in LysP transduce the lysine signal via a direct conformational coupling to CadC without resolving the interaction completely. Moreover, concomitant pH-dependent protonation of periplasmic amino acids in both proteins dissolves their electrostatic connections resulting in further destabilization of the CadC/LysP interaction. © 2013.

  12. Expression of multidrug resistance efflux pump gene norA is iron responsive in Staphylococcus aureus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Deng, Xin; Sun, Fei; Ji, Quanjiang; Liang, Haihua; Missiakas, Dominique; Lan, Lefu; He, Chuan

    2012-04-01

    Staphylococcus aureus utilizes efflux transporter NorA to pump out a wide range of structurally dissimilar drugs, conferring low-level multidrug resistance. The regulation of norA expression has yet to be fully understood although past studies have revealed that this gene is under the control of the global transcriptional regulator MgrA and the two-component system ArlRS. To identify additional regulators of norA, we screened a transposon library in strain Newman expressing the transcriptional fusion norA-lacZ for altered β-galactosidase activity. We identify a transposon insertion in fhuB, a gene that encodes a ferric hydroxamate uptake system permease, and propose that the norA transcription is iron responsive. In agreement with this observation, addition of FeCl(3) repressed the induction of norA-lacZ, suggesting that bacterial iron uptake plays an important role in regulating norA transcription. In addition, a fur (ferric uptake regulator) deletion exhibited compromised norA transcription and reduced resistance to quinolone compared to the wild-type strain, indicating that fur functions as a positive regulator of norA. A putative Fur box identified in the promoter region of norA was confirmed by electrophoretic mobility shift and DNase I footprint assays. Finally, by employing a siderophore secretion assay, we reveal that NorA may contribute to the export of siderophores. Collectively, our experiments uncover some novel interactions between cellular iron level and norA regulation in S. aureus.

  13. Zinc ion coordination as a modulating factor of the ZnuA histidine-rich loop flexibility: A molecular modeling and fluorescence spectroscopy study

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Castelli, Silvia [Department of Biology, University of Rome Tor Vergata, Via della Ricerca Scientifica, 00133 Rome (Italy); Stella, Lorenzo [Department of Chemical Sciences and Technologies, University of Roma Tor Vergata, Via della Ricerca Scientifica, 00133 Rome (Italy); Neuromed, IRCCS, Pozzilli 86077 (Italy); Petrarca, Patrizia [Department of Biology, University of Rome Tor Vergata, Via della Ricerca Scientifica, 00133 Rome (Italy); Battistoni, Andrea [Department of Biology, University of Rome Tor Vergata, Via della Ricerca Scientifica, 00133 Rome (Italy); Interuniversity Consortium, National Institute Biostructure and Biosystem (INBB), Viale delle Medaglie D' Oro 305, 00136 Rome (Italy); Desideri, Alessandro [Department of Biology, University of Rome Tor Vergata and CIBB, Center of Biostatistics and Bioinformatics, Via della Ricerca Scientifica, 00133 Rome (Italy); Interuniversity Consortium, National Institute Biostructure and Biosystem (INBB), Viale delle Medaglie D' Oro 305, 00136 Rome (Italy); Falconi, Mattia, E-mail: falconi@uniroma2.it [Department of Biology, University of Rome Tor Vergata and CIBB, Center of Biostatistics and Bioinformatics, Via della Ricerca Scientifica, 00133 Rome (Italy); Interuniversity Consortium, National Institute Biostructure and Biosystem (INBB), Viale delle Medaglie D' Oro 305, 00136 Rome (Italy)

    2013-01-11

    Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Fluorescence data indicate that the His-loop of ZnuA interacts with Zn{sup +2} ions. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer The ZnuA structural model proposed validates these spectroscopic findings. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer It is proposed that a zinc loaded His-loop may facilitate the ZnuA-ZnuB recognition. -- Abstract: ZnuA is the soluble component of the high-affinity ZnuABC zinc transporter belonging to the ATP-binding cassette-type periplasmic Zn-binding proteins. The zinc transporter ZnuABC is composed by three proteins: ZnuB, the membrane permease, ZnuC, the ATPase component and ZnuA, the soluble periplasmic metal-binding protein which captures Zn and delivers it to ZnuB. The ZnuA protein contains a charged flexible loop, rich in histidines and acidic residues, showing significant species-specific differences. Various studies have established that this loop contributes to the formation of a secondary zinc binding site, which has been proposed to be important in the acquisition of periplasmic Zn for its delivery to ZnuB or for regulation of zinc uptake. Due to its high mobility the structure of the histidine-rich loop has never been solved by X-ray diffraction studies. In this paper, through a combined use of molecular modeling, mutagenesis and fluorescence spectroscopy, we confirm the presence of two zinc binding sites characterized by different affinities for the metal ion and show that the flexibility of the loop is modulated by the binding of the zinc ions to the protein. The data obtained by fluorescence spectroscopy have then be used to validate a 3D model including the unsolved histidine-rich loop.

  14. Characterization and protective property of Brucella abortus cydC and looP mutants.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Truong, Quang Lam; Cho, Youngjae; Barate, Abhijit Kashinath; Kim, Suk; Hahn, Tae-Wook

    2014-11-01

    Brucella abortus readily multiplies in professional or nonprofessional phagocytes in vitro and is highly virulent in mice. Isogenic mutants of B. abortus biovar 1 strain IVKB9007 lacking the ATP/GDP-binding protein motif A (P-loop) (named looP; designated here the IVKB9007 looP::Tn5 mutant) and the ATP-binding/permease protein (cydC; designated here the IVKB9007 cydC::Tn5 mutant) were identified and characterized by transposon mutagenesis using the mini-Tn5Km2 transposon. Both mutants were found to be virtually incapable of intracellular replication in both murine macrophages (RAW264.7) and the HeLa cell line, and their virulence was significantly impaired in BALB/c mice. Respective complementation of the IVKB9007 looP::Tn5 and IVKB9007 cydC::Tn5 mutants restored their ability to survive in vitro and in vivo to a level comparable with that of the wild type. These findings indicate that the cydC and looP genes play important roles in the virulence of B. abortus. In addition, intraperitoneal immunization of mice with a dose of the live IVKB9007 looP::Tn5 and IVKB9007 cydC::Tn5 mutants provided a high degree of protection against challenge with pathogenic B. abortus strain 544. Both mutants should be evaluated further as a live attenuated vaccine against bovine brucellosis for their ability to stimulate a protective immune response. Copyright © 2014, American Society for Microbiology. All Rights Reserved.

  15. Identification of new IS711 insertion sites in Brucella abortus field isolates.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mancilla, Marcos; Ulloa, Marcos; López-Goñi, Ignacio; Moriyón, Ignacio; María Zárraga, Ana

    2011-08-03

    Brucellosis is a zoonosis caused by Brucella spp., a group of highly homogeneous bacteria. The insertion sequence IS711 is characteristic of these bacteria, and occurs in variable numbers and positions, but always constant within a given species. This species-associated polymorphism is used in molecular typing and identification. Field isolates of B. abortus, the most common species infecting cattle, typically carry seven IS711 copies (one truncated). Thus far, IS711 transposition has only been shown in vitro and only for B. ovis and B. pinnipedialis, two species carrying a high number of IS711 copies, but never in other Brucella species, neither in vitro nor in field strains. We found several B. abortus strains isolated from milk and aborted fetuses that carried additional IS711 copies in two hitherto undescribed insertion sites: one in an intergenic region near to the 3' end of a putative lactate permease gene and the other interrupting the sequence of a marR transcriptional regulator gene. Interestingly, the second type of insertion was identified in isolates obtained repeatedly from the same herd after successive brucellosis outbreaks, an observation that proves the stability and virulence of the new genotype under natural conditions. Sequence analyses revealed that the new copies probably resulted from the transposition of a single IS711 copy common to all Brucella species sequenced so far. Our results show that the replicative transposition of IS711 can occur under field conditions. Therefore, it represents an active mechanism for the emergence of genetic diversity in B. abortus thus contributing to intra-species genetic polymorphism.

  16. Identification of Important Amino Acids in Gal2p for Improving the L-arabinose Transport and Metabolism in Saccharomyces cerevisiae

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    Chengqiang Wang

    2017-07-01

    Full Text Available Efficient and cost-effective bioethanol production from lignocellulosic materials requires co-fermentation of the main hydrolyzed sugars, including glucose, xylose, and L-arabinose. Saccharomyces cerevisiae is a glucose-fermenting yeast that is traditionally used for ethanol production. Fermentation of L-arabinose is also possible after metabolic engineering. Transport into the cell is the first and rate-limiting step for L-arabinose metabolism. The galactose permease, Gal2p, is a non-specific, endogenous monosaccharide transporter that has been shown to transport L-arabinose. However, Gal2p-mediated transport of L-arabinose occurs at a low efficiency. In this study, homologous modeling and L-arabinose docking were used to predict amino acids in Gal2p that are crucial for L-arabinose transport. Nine amino acid residues in Gal2p were identified and were the focus for site-directed mutagenesis. In the Gal2p transport-deficient chassis cells, the capacity for L-arabinose transport of the different Gal2p mutants was compared by testing growth rates using L-arabinose as the sole carbon source. Almost all the tested mutations affected L-arabinose transport capacity. Among them, F85 is a unique site. The F85S, F85G, F85C, and F85T point mutations significantly increased L-arabinose transport activities, while, the F85E and F85R mutations decreased L-arabinose transport activities compared to the Gal2p-expressing wild-type strain. These results verified F85 as a key residue in L-arabinose transport. The F85S mutation, having the most significant effect, elevated the exponential growth rate by 40%. The F85S mutation also improved xylose transport efficiency and weakened the glucose transport preference. Overall, enhancing the L-arabinose transport capacity further improved the L-arabinose metabolism of engineered S. cerevisiae.

  17. Analysis of the LIV system of Campylobacter jejuni reveals alternative roles for LivJ and LivK in commensalism beyond branched-chain amino acid transport.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ribardo, Deborah A; Hendrixson, David R

    2011-11-01

    Campylobacter jejuni is a leading cause of diarrheal disease in humans and an intestinal commensal in poultry and other agriculturally important animals. These zoonotic infections result in significant amounts of C. jejuni present in the food supply to contribute to disease in humans. We previously found that a transposon insertion in Cjj81176_1038, encoding a homolog of the Escherichia coli LivJ periplasmic binding protein of the leucine, isoleucine, and valine (LIV) branched-chain amino acid transport system, reduced the commensal colonization capacity of C. jejuni 81-176 in chicks. Cjj81176_1038 is the first gene of a six-gene locus that encodes homologous components of the E. coli LIV system. By analyzing mutants with in-frame deletions of individual genes or pairs of genes, we found that this system constitutes a LIV transport system in C. jejuni responsible for a high level of leucine acquisition and, to a lesser extent, isoleucine and valine acquisition. Despite each LIV protein being required for branched-chain amino acid transport, only the LivJ and LivK periplasmic binding proteins were required for wild-type levels of commensal colonization of chicks. All LIV permease and ATPase components were dispensable for in vivo growth. These results suggest that the biological functions of LivJ and LivK for colonization are more complex than previously hypothesized and extend beyond a role for binding and acquiring branched-chain amino acids during commensalism. In contrast to other studies indicating a requirement and utilization of other specific amino acids for colonization, acquisition of branched-chain amino acids does not appear to be a determinant for C. jejuni during commensalism.

  18. Reprint of “Extracellular production of tellurium nanoparticles by the photosynthetic bacterium Rhodobacter capsulatus”

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Borghese, Roberto, E-mail: roberto.borghese@unibo.it [Dept. of Pharmacy and Biotechnology, University of Bologna (Italy); Brucale, Marco [Institute for the Study of Nanostructured Materials (CNR-ISMN), Rome (Italy); Fortunato, Gianuario [Dept. of Pharmacy and Biotechnology, University of Bologna (Italy); Lanzi, Massimiliano [Dept. of Industrial Chemistry “Toso Montanari”, University of Bologna (Italy); Mezzi, Alessio [Institute for the Study of Nanostructured Materials (CNR-ISMN), Rome (Italy); Valle, Francesco; Cavallini, Massimiliano [Institute for the Study of Nanostructured Materials (CNR-ISMN), Bologna (Italy); Zannoni, Davide [Dept. of Pharmacy and Biotechnology, University of Bologna (Italy)

    2017-02-15

    Highlights: • Tellurite is reduced by R. capsulatus as cytosolic tellurium nanoprecipitates TeNPs. • Lawsone allows R. capsulatus to produce extracellular TeNPs. • Extracellular TeNPs production depends on the carbon source used for cells growth. • Both lawsone concentration and the incubation time determine the TeNPs size. • Extracellular TeNPs are coated with extracellular polymeric substances (EPS). - Abstract: The toxic oxyanion tellurite (TeO{sub 3}{sup 2−}) is acquired by cells of Rhodobacter capsulatus grown anaerobically in the light, via acetate permease ActP2 and then reduced to Te{sup 0} in the cytoplasm as needle-like black precipitates. Interestingly, photosynthetic cultures of R. capsulatus can also generate Te{sup 0} nanoprecipitates (TeNPs) outside the cells upon addition of the redox mediator lawsone (2-hydroxy-1,4-naphtoquinone). TeNPs generation kinetics were monitored to define the optimal conditions to produce TeNPs as a function of various carbon sources and lawsone concentration. We report that growing cultures over a 10 days period with daily additions of 1 mM tellurite led to the accumulation in the growth medium of TeNPs with dimensions from 200 up to 600–700 nm in length as determined by atomic force microscopy (AFM). This result suggests that nucleation of TeNPs takes place over the entire cell growth period although the addition of new tellurium Te{sup 0} to pre-formed TeNPs is the main strategy used by R. capsulatus to generate TeNPs outside the cells. Finally, X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS) and Fourier transform infrared (FT-IR) analysis of TeNPs indicate they are coated with an organic material which keeps the particles in solution in aqueous solvents.

  19. Reconstruction of metabolic module with improved promoter strength increases the productivity of 2-phenylethanol in Saccharomyces cerevisiae.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Zhaoyue; Jiang, Mingyue; Guo, Xuena; Liu, Zhaozheng; He, Xiuping

    2018-04-11

    2-phenylethanol (2-PE) is an important aromatic compound with a lovely rose-like scent. Saccharomyces cerevisiae is a desirable microbe for 2-PE production but its natural yield is not high, and one or two crucial genes' over-expression in S. cerevisiae did not improve 2-PE greatly. A new metabolic module was established here, in which, permease Gap1p for L-phenylalanine transportation, catalytic enzymes Aro8p, Aro10p and Adh2p in Ehrlich pathway respectively responsible for transamination, decarboxylation and reduction were assembled, besides, glutamate dehydrogenase Gdh2p was harbored for re-supplying another substrate 2-oxoglutarate, relieving product glutamate repression and regenerating cofactor NADH. Due to different promoter strengths, GAP1, ARO8, ARO9, ARO10, ADH2 and GDH2 in the new modularized YS58(G1-A8-A10-A2)-GDH strain enhanced 11.6-, 15.4-, 3.6-, 17.7-, 12.4- and 7.5-folds respectively, and crucial enzyme activities of aromatic aminotransferases and phenylpyruvate decarboxylase were 4.8- and 7-folds respectively higher than that of the control. Under the optimum medium and cell density, YS58(G1-A8-A10-A2)-GDH presented efficient 2-PE synthesis ability with ~ 6.3 g L -1 of 2-PE titer in 5-L fermenter reaching 95% of conversation ratio. Under fed-batch fermentation, 2-PE productivity at 24 h increased 29% than that of single-batch fermentation. Metabolic modularization with promoter strategy provides a new prospective for efficient 2-PE production.

  20. Genome-centric evaluation of Burkholderia sp. strain SRS-W-2-2016 resistant to high concentrations of uranium and nickel isolated from the Savannah River Site (SRS, USA

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    Ashish Pathak

    2017-06-01

    Full Text Available Savannah River Site (SRS, an approximately 800-km2 former nuclear weapons production facility located near Aiken, SC remains co-contaminated by heavy metals and radionuclides. To gain a better understanding on microbially-mediated bioremediation mechanisms, several bacterial strains resistant to high concentrations of Uranium (U and Nickel (Ni were isolated from the Steeds Pond soils located within the SRS site. One of the isolated strains, designated as strain SRS-W-2-2016, grew robustly on both U and Ni. To fully understand the arsenal of metabolic functions possessed by this strain, a draft whole genome sequence (WGS was obtained, assembled, annotated and analyzed. Genome-centric evaluation revealed the isolate to belong to the Burkholderia genus with close affiliation to B. xenovorans LB400, an aggressive polychlorinated biphenyl-degrader. At a coverage of 90×, the genome of strain SRS-W-2-2016 consisted of 8,035,584 bases with a total number of 7071 putative genes assembling into 191 contigs with an N50 contig length of 134,675 bases. Several gene homologues coding for resistance to heavy metals/radionuclides were identified in strain SRS-W-2-2016, such as a suite of outer membrane efflux pump proteins similar to nickel/cobalt transporter regulators, peptide/nickel transport substrate and ATP-binding proteins, permease proteins, and a high-affinity nickel-transport protein. Also noteworthy were two separate gene fragments in strain SRS-W-2-2016 homologous to the spoT gene; recently correlated with bacterial tolerance to U. Additionally, a plethora of oxygenase genes were also identified in the isolate, potentially involved in the breakdown of organic compounds facilitating the strain's successful colonization and survival in the SRS co-contaminated soils. The WGS project of Burkholderia sp. strain SRS-W-2-2016 is available at DDBJ/ENA/GenBank under the accession #MSDV00000000.

  1. Harnessing natural diversity to probe metabolic pathways.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Oliver R Homann

    2005-12-01

    Full Text Available Analyses of cellular processes in the yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae rely primarily upon a small number of highly domesticated laboratory strains, leaving the extensive natural genetic diversity of the model organism largely unexplored and unexploited. We asked if this diversity could be used to enrich our understanding of basic biological processes. As a test case, we examined a simple trait: the utilization of di/tripeptides as nitrogen sources. The capacity to import small peptides is likely to be under opposing selective pressures (nutrient utilization versus toxin vulnerability and may therefore be sculpted by diverse pathways and strategies. Hitherto, dipeptide utilization in S. cerevisiae was solely ascribed to the activity of a single protein, the Ptr2p transporter. Using high-throughput phenotyping and several genetically diverse strains, we identified previously unknown cellular activities that contribute to this trait. We find that the Dal5p allantoate/ureidosuccinate permease is also capable of facilitating di/tripeptide transport. Moreover, even in the absence of Dal5p and Ptr2p, an additional activity--almost certainly the periplasmic asparaginase II Asp3p--facilitates the utilization of dipeptides with C-terminal asparagine residues by a different strategy. Another, as-yet-unidentified activity enables the utilization of dipeptides with C-terminal arginine residues. The relative contributions of these activities to the utilization of di/tripeptides vary among the strains analyzed, as does the vulnerability of these strains to a toxic dipeptide. Only by sampling the genetic diversity of multiple strains were we able to uncover several previously unrecognized layers of complexity in this metabolic pathway. High-throughput phenotyping facilitates the rapid exploration of the molecular basis of biological complexity, allowing for future detailed investigation of the selective pressures that drive microbial evolution.

  2. Identification and Characterization of RibN, a Novel Family of Riboflavin Transporters from Rhizobium leguminosarum and Other Proteobacteria

    Science.gov (United States)

    García Angulo, Víctor A.; Bonomi, Hernán R.; Posadas, Diana M.; Serer, María I.; Torres, Alfredo G.; Zorreguieta, Ángeles

    2013-01-01

    Rhizobia are symbiotic bacteria able to invade and colonize the roots of legume plants, inducing the formation of nodules, where bacteria reduce atmospheric nitrogen (N2) to ammonia (NH3). Riboflavin availability influences the capacity of rhizobia to survive in the rhizosphere and to colonize roots. In this study, we identified the RL1692 gene of Rhizobium leguminosarum downstream of a flavin mononucleotide (FMN) riboswitch. RL1692 encodes a putative transmembrane permease with two EamA domains. The presence of an FMN riboswitch regulating a transmembrane protein is usually observed in riboflavin transporters, suggesting that RL1692 may be involved in riboflavin uptake. The product of RL1692, which we named RibN, is conserved in members of the alpha-, beta-, and gammaproteobacteria and shares no significant identity with any riboflavin transporter previously identified. In this work, we show that RibN is localized in the membrane cellular fraction and its expression is downregulated by riboflavin. By heterologous expression in a Brucella abortus mutant auxotrophic for riboflavin, we demonstrate that RibN possesses flavin transport activity. Similarly, we also demonstrate that RibN orthologues from Ochrobactrum anthropi and Vibrio cholerae (which lacks the FMN riboswitch) are able to transport riboflavin. An R. leguminosarum ribN null mutant exhibited lower nodule occupancy levels in pea plants during symbiosis assays. Thus, we propose that RibN and its homologues belong to a novel family of riboflavin transporters. This work provides the first experimental description of riboflavin transporters in Gram-negative bacteria. PMID:23935051

  3. Identification of lactose phosphotransferase systems in Lactobacillus gasseri ATCC 33323 required for lactose utilization.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Francl, Alyssa L; Hoeflinger, Jennifer L; Miller, Michael J

    2012-04-01

    Improving the annotation of sugar catabolism-related genes requires functional characterization. Our objective was to identify the genes necessary for lactose utilization by Lactobacillus gasseri ATCC 33323 (NCK334). The mechanism of lactose transport in many lactobacilli is a lactose/galactose-specific permease, yet no orthologue was found in NCK334. Characterization of an EI knockout strain [EI (enzyme I) is required for phosphotransferase system transporter (PTS) function] demonstrated that L. gasseri requires PTS(s) to utilize lactose. In order to determine which PTS(s) were necessary for lactose utilization, we compared transcript expression profiles in response to lactose for the 15 complete PTSs identified in the NCK334 genome. PTS 6CB (LGAS_343) and PTS 8C (LGAS_497) were induced in the presence of lactose 107- and 53-fold, respectively. However, L. gasseri ATCC 33323 PTS 6CB, PTS 8C had a growth rate similar to that of the wild-type on semisynthetic deMan, Rogosa, Sharpe (MRS) medium with lactose. Expression profiles of L. gasseri ATCC 33323 PTS 6CB, PTS 8C in response to lactose identified PTS 9BC (LGAS_501) as 373-fold induced, whereas PTS 9BC was not induced in NCK334. Elimination of growth on lactose required the inactivation of both PTS 6CB and PTS 9BC. Among the six candidate phospho-β-galactosidase genes present in the NCK334 genome, LGAS_344 was found to be induced 156-fold in the presence of lactose. In conclusion, we have determined that: (1) NCK334 uses a PTS to import lactose; (2) PTS 6CB and PTS 8C gene expression is strongly induced by lactose; and (3) elimination of PTS 6CB and PTS 9BC is required to prevent growth on lactose.

  4. In Vitro Effect of Malachite Green on Candida albicans Involves Multiple Pathways and Transcriptional Regulators UPC2 and STP2

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dhamgaye, Sanjiveeni; Devaux, Frederic; Manoharlal, Raman; Vandeputte, Patrick; Shah, Abdul Haseeb; Singh, Ashutosh; Blugeon, Corinne; Sanglard, Dominique

    2012-01-01

    In this study, we show that a chemical dye, malachite green (MG), which is commonly used in the fish industry as an antifungal, antiparasitic, and antibacterial agent, could effectively kill Candida albicans and non-C. albicans species. We have demonstrated that Candida cells are susceptible to MG at a very low concentration (MIC that reduces growth by 50% [MIC50], 100 ng ml−1) and that the effect of MG is independent of known antifungal targets, such as ergosterol metabolism and major drug efflux pump proteins. Transcriptional profiling in response to MG treatment of C. albicans cells revealed that of a total of 207 responsive genes, 167 genes involved in oxidative stress, virulence, carbohydrate metabolism, heat shock, amino acid metabolism, etc., were upregulated, while 37 genes involved in iron acquisition, filamentous growth, mitochondrial respiration, etc., were downregulated. We confirmed experimentally that Candida cells exposed to MG resort to a fermentative mode of metabolism, perhaps due to defective respiration. In addition, we showed that MG triggers depletion of intracellular iron pools and enhances reactive oxygen species (ROS) levels. These effects could be reversed by the addition of iron or antioxidants, respectively. We provided evidence that the antifungal effect of MG is exerted through the transcription regulators UPC2 (regulating ergosterol biosynthesis and azole resistance) and STP2 (regulating amino acid permease genes). Taken together, our transcriptome, genetic, and biochemical results allowed us to decipher the multiple mechanisms by which MG exerts its anti-Candida effects, leading to a metabolic shift toward fermentation, increased generation of ROS, labile iron deprivation, and cell necrosis. PMID:22006003

  5. Markerless deletion of putative alanine dehydrogenase genes in Bacillus licheniformis using a codBA-based counterselection technique.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kostner, David; Rachinger, Michael; Liebl, Wolfgang; Ehrenreich, Armin

    2017-11-01

    Bacillus licheniformis strains are used for the large-scale production of industrial exoenzymes from proteinaceous substrates, but details of the amino acid metabolism involved are largely unknown. In this study, two chromosomal genes putatively involved in amino acid metabolism of B. licheniformis were deleted to clarify their role. For this, a convenient counterselection system for markerless in-frame deletions was developed for B. licheniformis. A deletion plasmid containing up- and downstream DNA segments of the chromosomal deletion target was conjugated to B. licheniformis and integrated into the genome by homologous recombination. Thereafter, the counterselection was done by using a codBA cassette. The presence of cytosine deaminase and cytosine permease exerted a conditionally lethal phenotype on B. licheniformis cells in the presence of the cytosine analogue 5-fluorocytosine. Thereby clones were selected that lost the integrated vector sequence and the anticipated deletion target after a second recombination step. This method allows the construction of markerless mutants in Bacillus strains in iterative cycles. B. licheniformis MW3 derivatives lacking either one of the ORFs BL03009 or BL00190, encoding a putative alanine dehydrogenase and a similar putative enzyme, respectively, retained the ability to grow in minimal medium supplemented with alanine as the carbon source. In the double deletion mutant MW3 ΔBL03009 ΔBL00190, however, growth on alanine was completely abolished. These data indicate that the two encoded enzymes are paralogues fulfilling mutually replaceable functions in alanine utilization, and suggest that in B. licheniformis MW3 alanine utilization is initiated by direct oxidative transamination to pyruvate and ammonium.

  6. Cloning and nucleotide sequence analysis of pepV, a carnosinase gene from Lactobacillus delbrueckii subsp. lactis DSM 7290, and partial characterization of the enzyme.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vongerichten, K F; Klein, J R; Matern, H; Plapp, R

    1994-10-01

    Cell extracts of Lactobacillus delbrueckii subsp. lactis DSM 7290 were found to exhibit unique peptolytic ability against unusual beta-alanyl-dipeptides. In order to clone the gene encoding this activity, designated pepV, a gene library of strain DSM 7290 genomic DNA, prepared in the low-copy-number plasmid pLG339, was screened for heterologous expression in Escherichia coli. Recombinant clones harbouring pepV were identified by their ability to allow the utilization of carnosine (beta-alanyl-histidine) as a source of histidine by the E. coli mutant strain UK197 (pepD, hisG). Complementation was observed in a colony harbouring a recombinant plasmid (pKV101), carrying pepV. A 2.4 kb fragment containing pepV was subcloned and its nucleotide sequence revealed an open reading frame (ORF) of 1413 nucleotides, corresponding to a protein with predicted molecular mass of 51998 Da. A single transcription initiation site 71 bp upstream of the ATG translational start codon was identified by primer extension. No significant homology was detected between pepV or its deduced amino acid sequence with any entry in the databases. The only similarity was found in a region conserved in the ArgE/DapE/CPG2/YscS family of proteins. This observation, and protease inhibitor studies, indicated that pepV is of the metalloprotease type. A second ORF present in the sequenced fragment showed extensive homology to a variety of amino acid permeases from E. coli and Saccharomyces cerevisiae.

  7. The role of iron uptake in pathogenicity and symbiosis in Photorhabdus luminescens TT01

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    Joyce Susan A

    2010-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Photorhabdus are Gram negative bacteria that are pathogenic to insect larvae whilst also having a mutualistic interaction with nematodes from the family Heterorhabditis. Iron is an essential nutrient and bacteria have different mechanisms for obtaining both the ferrous (Fe2+ and ferric (Fe3+ forms of this metal from their environments. In this study we were interested in analyzing the role of Fe3+ and Fe2+ iron uptake systems in the ability of Photorhabdus to interact with its invertebrate hosts. Results We constructed targeted deletion mutants of exbD, feoABC and yfeABCD in P. luminescens TT01. The exbD mutant was predicted to be crippled in its ability to obtain Fe3+ and we show that this mutant does not grow well in iron-limited media. We also show that this mutant was avirulent to the insect but was unaffected in its symbiotic interaction with Heterorhabditis. Furthermore we show that a mutation in feoABC (encoding a predicted Fe2+ permease was unaffected in both virulence and symbiosis whilst the divalent cation transporter encoded by yfeABCD is required for virulence in the Tobacco Hornworm, Manduca sexta (Lepidoptera but not in the Greater Wax Moth, Galleria mellonella (Lepidoptera. Moreover the Yfe transporter also appears to have a role during colonization of the IJ stage of the nematode. Conclusion In this study we show that iron uptake (via the TonB complex and the Yfe transporter is important for the virulence of P. luminescens to insect larvae. Moreover this study also reveals that the Yfe transporter appears to be involved in Mn2+-uptake during growth in the gut lumen of the IJ nematode. Therefore, the Yfe transporter in P. luminescens TT01 is important during colonization of both the insect and nematode and, moreover, the metal ion transported by this pathway is host-dependent.

  8. Metagenomic Study of Iron Homeostasis in Iron Depositing Hot Spring Cyanobacterial Community

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brown, I.; Franklin H.; Tringe, S. G.; Klatt, C. G.; Bryant, D. A.; Sarkisova, S. A.; Guevara, M.

    2010-01-01

    Introduction: It is not clear how an iron-rich thermal hydrosphere could be hospitable to cyanobacteria, since reduced iron appears to stimulate oxidative stress in all domains of life and particularly in oxygenic phototrophs. Therefore, metagenomic study of cyanobacterial community in iron-depositing hot springs may help elucidate how oxygenic prokaryotes can withstand the extremely high concentrations of reactive oxygen species (ROS) produced by interaction between environmental Fe2+ and O2. Method: Anchor proteins from various species of cyanobacteria and some anoxygenic phototrophs were selected on the basis of their hypothetical role in Fe homeostasis and the suppression of oxidative stress and were BLASTed against the metagenomes of iron-depositing Chocolate Pots and freshwater Mushroom hot springs. Results: BLASTing proteins hypothesized to be involved in Fe homeostasis against the microbiomes from the two springs revealed that iron-depositing hot spring has a greater abundance of defensive proteins such as bacterioferritin comigratory protein (Bcp) and DNA-binding Ferritin like protein (Dps) than a fresh-water hot spring. One may speculate that the abundance of Bcp and Dps in an iron-depositing hot spring is connected to the need to suppress oxidative stress in bacteria inhabiting environments with high Fe2+ concnetration. In both springs, Bcp and Dps are concentrated within the cyanobacterial fractions of the microbial community (regardless of abundance). Fe3+ siderophore transport (from the transport system permease protein query) may be less essential to the microbial community of CP because of the high [Fe]. Conclusion: Further research is needed to confirm that these proteins are unique to photoautotrophs such as those living in iron-depositing hot spring.

  9. Elucidation of Operon Structures across Closely Related Bacterial Genomes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Guojun

    2014-01-01

    About half of the protein-coding genes in prokaryotic genomes are organized into operons to facilitate co-regulation during transcription. With the evolution of genomes, operon structures are undergoing changes which could coordinate diverse gene expression patterns in response to various stimuli during the life cycle of a bacterial cell. Here we developed a graph-based model to elucidate the diversity of operon structures across a set of closely related bacterial genomes. In the constructed graph, each node represents one orthologous gene group (OGG) and a pair of nodes will be connected if any two genes, from the corresponding two OGGs respectively, are located in the same operon as immediate neighbors in any of the considered genomes. Through identifying the connected components in the above graph, we found that genes in a connected component are likely to be functionally related and these identified components tend to form treelike topology, such as paths and stars, corresponding to different biological mechanisms in transcriptional regulation as follows. Specifically, (i) a path-structure component integrates genes encoding a protein complex, such as ribosome; and (ii) a star-structure component not only groups related genes together, but also reflects the key functional roles of the central node of this component, such as the ABC transporter with a transporter permease and substrate-binding proteins surrounding it. Most interestingly, the genes from organisms with highly diverse living environments, i.e., biomass degraders and animal pathogens of clostridia in our study, can be clearly classified into different topological groups on some connected components. PMID:24959722

  10. Nitrogen Metabolite Repression of Metabolism and Virulence in the Human Fungal Pathogen Cryptococcus neoformans

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, I. Russel; Chow, Eve W. L.; Morrow, Carl A.; Djordjevic, Julianne T.; Fraser, James A.

    2011-01-01

    Proper regulation of metabolism is essential to maximizing fitness of organisms in their chosen environmental niche. Nitrogen metabolite repression is an example of a regulatory mechanism in fungi that enables preferential utilization of easily assimilated nitrogen sources, such as ammonium, to conserve resources. Here we provide genetic, transcriptional, and phenotypic evidence of nitrogen metabolite repression in the human pathogen Cryptococcus neoformans. In addition to loss of transcriptional activation of catabolic enzyme-encoding genes of the uric acid and proline assimilation pathways in the presence of ammonium, nitrogen metabolite repression also regulates the production of the virulence determinants capsule and melanin. Since GATA transcription factors are known to play a key role in nitrogen metabolite repression, bioinformatic analyses of the C. neoformans genome were undertaken and seven predicted GATA-type genes were identified. A screen of these deletion mutants revealed GAT1, encoding the only global transcription factor essential for utilization of a wide range of nitrogen sources, including uric acid, urea, and creatinine—three predominant nitrogen constituents found in the C. neoformans ecological niche. In addition to its evolutionarily conserved role in mediating nitrogen metabolite repression and controlling the expression of catabolic enzyme and permease-encoding genes, Gat1 also negatively regulates virulence traits, including infectious basidiospore production, melanin formation, and growth at high body temperature (39°–40°). Conversely, Gat1 positively regulates capsule production. A murine inhalation model of cryptococcosis revealed that the gat1Δ mutant is slightly more virulent than wild type, indicating that Gat1 plays a complex regulatory role during infection. PMID:21441208

  11. Salt Stress in Desulfovibrio vulgaris Hildenborough: An integratedgenomics approach

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mukhopadhyay, Aindrila; He, Zhili; Alm, Eric J.; Arkin, Adam P.; Baidoo, Edward E.; Borglin, Sharon C.; Chen, Wenqiong; Hazen, Terry C.; He, Qiang; Holman, Hoi-Ying; Huang, Katherine; Huang, Rick; Hoyner,Dominique C.; Katz, Natalie; Keller, Martin; Oeller, Paul; Redding,Alyssa; Sun, Jun; Wall, Judy; Wei, Jing; Yang, Zamin; Yen, Huei-Che; Zhou, Jizhong; Keasling Jay D.

    2005-12-08

    The ability of Desulfovibrio vulgaris Hildenborough to reduce, and therefore contain, toxic and radioactive metal waste has made all factors that affect the physiology of this organism of great interest. Increased salinity is an important and frequent fluctuation faced by D. vulgaris in its natural habitat. In liquid culture, exposure to excess salt resulted in striking elongation of D. vulgaris cells. Using data from transcriptomics, proteomics, metabolite assays, phospholipid fatty acid profiling, and electron microscopy, we used a systems approach to explore the effects of excess NaCl on D. vulgaris. In this study we demonstrated that import of osmoprotectants, such as glycine betaine and ectoine, is the primary mechanism used by D. vulgaris to counter hyperionic stress. Several efflux systems were also highly up-regulated, as was the ATP synthesis pathway. Increases in the levels of both RNA and DNA helicases suggested that salt stress affected the stability of nucleic acid base pairing. An overall increase in the level of branched fatty acids indicated that there were changes in cell wall fluidity. The immediate response to salt stress included up-regulation of chemotaxis genes, although flagellar biosynthesis was down-regulated. Other down-regulated systems included lactate uptake permeases and ABC transport systems. The results of an extensive NaCl stress analysis were compared with microarray data from a KCl stress analysis, and unlike many other bacteria, D. vulgaris responded similarly to the two stresses. Integration of data from multiple methods allowed us to develop a conceptual model for the salt stress response in D. vulgaris that can be compared to those in other microorganisms.

  12. Isolation and characterization of xylitol-assimilating mutants of recombinant Saccharomyces cerevisiae.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tani, Tatsunori; Taguchi, Hisataka; Fujimori, Kazuhiro E; Sahara, Takehiko; Ohgiya, Satoru; Kamagata, Yoichi; Akamatsu, Takashi

    2016-10-01

    To clarify the mechanisms of xylitol utilization, three xylitol-assimilating mutants were isolated from recombinant Saccharomyces cerevisiae strains showing highly efficient xylose-utilization. The nucleotide sequences of the mutant genomes were analyzed and compared with those of the wild-type strains and the mutation sites were identified. gal80 mutations were common to all the mutants, and recessive to the wild-type allele. Hence we constructed a gal80Δ mutant and confirmed that the gal80Δ mutant showed a xylitol-assimilation phenotype. When the constructed gal80Δ mutant was crossed with the three isolated mutants, all diploid hybrids showed xylitol assimilation, indicating that the mutations were all located in the GAL80. We analyzed the role of the galactose permease Gal2, controlled by the regulatory protein Gal80, in assimilating xylitol. A gal2Δ gal80Δ double mutant did not show xylitol assimilation, whereas expression of GAL2 under the control of the TDH3 promoter in the GAL80 strain did result in assimilation. These data indicate that Gal2 was needed for xylitol assimilation in the wild-type strain. When the gal80 mutant with an initial cell concentration of A660 = 20 was used for batch fermentation in a complex medium containing 20 g/L xylose or 20 g/L xylitol at pH 5.0 and 30°C under oxygen limitation, the gal80 mutant consumed 100% of the xylose within 12 h, but xylitol within 100 h, indicating that xylose reductase is required for xylitol consumption in oxygen-limited conditions. Copyright © 2016 The Society for Biotechnology, Japan. Published by Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  13. Analysis of the LIV System of Campylobacter jejuni Reveals Alternative Roles for LivJ and LivK in Commensalism beyond Branched-Chain Amino Acid Transport ▿

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ribardo, Deborah A.; Hendrixson, David R.

    2011-01-01

    Campylobacter jejuni is a leading cause of diarrheal disease in humans and an intestinal commensal in poultry and other agriculturally important animals. These zoonotic infections result in significant amounts of C. jejuni present in the food supply to contribute to disease in humans. We previously found that a transposon insertion in Cjj81176_1038, encoding a homolog of the Escherichia coli LivJ periplasmic binding protein of the leucine, isoleucine, and valine (LIV) branched-chain amino acid transport system, reduced the commensal colonization capacity of C. jejuni 81-176 in chicks. Cjj81176_1038 is the first gene of a six-gene locus that encodes homologous components of the E. coli LIV system. By analyzing mutants with in-frame deletions of individual genes or pairs of genes, we found that this system constitutes a LIV transport system in C. jejuni responsible for a high level of leucine acquisition and, to a lesser extent, isoleucine and valine acquisition. Despite each LIV protein being required for branched-chain amino acid transport, only the LivJ and LivK periplasmic binding proteins were required for wild-type levels of commensal colonization of chicks. All LIV permease and ATPase components were dispensable for in vivo growth. These results suggest that the biological functions of LivJ and LivK for colonization are more complex than previously hypothesized and extend beyond a role for binding and acquiring branched-chain amino acids during commensalism. In contrast to other studies indicating a requirement and utilization of other specific amino acids for colonization, acquisition of branched-chain amino acids does not appear to be a determinant for C. jejuni during commensalism. PMID:21949065

  14. RiArsB and RiMT-11: Two novel genes induced by arsenate in arbuscular mycorrhiza.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maldonado-Mendoza, Ignacio E; Harrison, Maria J

    Plants associated with arbuscular mycorrhizal fungi (AMF) increase their tolerance to arsenic-polluted soils. This study aims to investigate the genes involved in the AMF molecular response to arsenic pollution. Genes encoding proteins involved in arsenic metabolism were identified and their expression assessed by PCR or RT-qPCR. The As-inducible gene GiArsA (R. irregularis ABC ATPase component of the ArsAB arsenite efflux pump) and two new genes, an arsenate/arsenite permease component of ArsAB (RiArsB) and a methyltransferase type 11 (RiMT-11) were induced when arsenate was added to two-compartment in vitro monoxenic cultures of R. irregularis-transformed carrot roots. RiArsB and RiMT-11 expression in extraradical hyphae in response to arsenate displayed maximum induction 4-6 h after addition of 350 μM arsenate. Their expression was also detected in colonized root tissues grown in pots, or in the root-fungus compartment of two-compartment in vitro systems. We used a Medicago truncatula double mutant (mtpt4/mtpt8) to demonstrate that RiMT-11 and RiArsB transcripts accumulate in response to the addition of arsenate but not in response to phosphate. These results suggest that these genes respond to arsenate addition regardless of non-functional Pi symbiotic transport, and that RiMT-11 may be involved in arsenate detoxification by methylation in AMF-colonized tissues. Copyright © 2017 British Mycological Society. All rights reserved.

  15. Identification of new IS711 insertion sites in Brucella abortus field isolates

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    Moriyón Ignacio

    2011-08-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Brucellosis is a zoonosis caused by Brucella spp., a group of highly homogeneous bacteria. The insertion sequence IS711 is characteristic of these bacteria, and occurs in variable numbers and positions, but always constant within a given species. This species-associated polymorphism is used in molecular typing and identification. Field isolates of B. abortus, the most common species infecting cattle, typically carry seven IS711 copies (one truncated. Thus far, IS711 transposition has only been shown in vitro and only for B. ovis and B. pinnipedialis, two species carrying a high number of IS711 copies, but never in other Brucella species, neither in vitro nor in field strains. Results We found several B. abortus strains isolated from milk and aborted fetuses that carried additional IS711 copies in two hitherto undescribed insertion sites: one in an intergenic region near to the 3' end of a putative lactate permease gene and the other interrupting the sequence of a marR transcriptional regulator gene. Interestingly, the second type of insertion was identified in isolates obtained repeatedly from the same herd after successive brucellosis outbreaks, an observation that proves the stability and virulence of the new genotype under natural conditions. Sequence analyses revealed that the new copies probably resulted from the transposition of a single IS711 copy common to all Brucella species sequenced so far. Conclusions Our results show that the replicative transposition of IS711 can occur under field conditions. Therefore, it represents an active mechanism for the emergence of genetic diversity in B. abortus thus contributing to intra-species genetic polymorphism.

  16. Two group A streptococcal peptide pheromones act through opposing Rgg regulators to control biofilm development.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jennifer C Chang

    2011-08-01

    Full Text Available Streptococcus pyogenes (Group A Streptococcus, GAS is an important human commensal that occasionally causes localized infections and less frequently causes severe invasive disease with high mortality rates. How GAS regulates expression of factors used to colonize the host and avoid immune responses remains poorly understood. Intercellular communication is an important means by which bacteria coordinate gene expression to defend against host assaults and competing bacteria, yet no conserved cell-to-cell signaling system has been elucidated in GAS. Encoded within the GAS genome are four rgg-like genes, two of which (rgg2 and rgg3 have no previously described function. We tested the hypothesis that rgg2 or rgg3 rely on extracellular peptides to control target-gene regulation. We found that Rgg2 and Rgg3 together tightly regulate two linked genes encoding new peptide pheromones. Rgg2 activates transcription of and is required for full induction of the pheromone genes, while Rgg3 plays an antagonistic role and represses pheromone expression. The active pheromone signals, termed SHP2 and SHP3, are short and hydrophobic (DI[I/L]IIVGG, and, though highly similar in sequence, their ability to disrupt Rgg3-DNA complexes were observed to be different, indicating that specificity and differential activation of promoters are characteristics of the Rgg2/3 regulatory circuit. SHP-pheromone signaling requires an intact oligopeptide permease (opp and a metalloprotease (eep, supporting the model that pro-peptides are secreted, processed to the mature form, and subsequently imported to the cytoplasm to interact directly with the Rgg receptors. At least one consequence of pheromone stimulation of the Rgg2/3 pathway is increased biogenesis of biofilms, which counteracts negative regulation of biofilms by RopB (Rgg1. These data provide the first demonstration that Rgg-dependent quorum sensing functions in GAS and substantiate the role that Rggs play as peptide

  17. Glial cell ceruloplasmin and hepcidin differentially regulate iron efflux from brain microvascular endothelial cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McCarthy, Ryan C; Kosman, Daniel J

    2014-01-01

    We have used an in vitro model system to probe the iron transport pathway across the brain microvascular endothelial cells (BMVEC) of the blood-brain barrier (BBB). This model consists of human BMVEC (hBMVEC) and C6 glioma cells (as an astrocytic cell line) grown in a transwell, a cell culture system commonly used to quantify metabolite flux across a cell-derived barrier. We found that iron efflux from hBMVEC through the ferrous iron permease ferroportin (Fpn) was stimulated by secretion of the soluble form of the multi-copper ferroxidase, ceruloplasmin (sCp) from the co-cultured C6 cells. Reciprocally, expression of sCp mRNA in the C6 cells was increased by neighboring hBMVEC. In addition, data indicate that C6 cell-secreted hepcidin stimulates internalization of hBMVEC Fpn but only when the end-feet projections characteristic of this glia-derived cell line are proximal to the endothelial cells. This hepcidin-dependent loss of Fpn correlated with knock-down of iron efflux from the hBMVEC; this result was consistent with the mechanism by which hepcidin regulates iron efflux in mammalian cells. In summary, the data support a model of iron trafficking across the BBB in which the capillary endothelium induce the underlying astrocytes to produce the ferroxidase activity needed to support Fpn-mediated iron efflux. Reciprocally, astrocyte proximity modulates the effective concentration of hepcidin at the endothelial cell membrane and thus the surface expression of hBMVEC Fpn. These results are independent of the source of hBMVEC iron (transferrin or non-transferrin bound) indicating that the model developed here is broadly applicable to brain iron homeostasis.

  18. Maltase protein of Ogataea (Hansenula) polymorpha is a counterpart to the resurrected ancestor protein ancMALS of yeast maltases and isomaltases

    Science.gov (United States)

    Viigand, Katrin; Visnapuu, Triinu; Mardo, Karin; Aasamets, Anneli

    2016-01-01

    Abstract Saccharomyces cerevisiae maltases use maltose, maltulose, turanose and maltotriose as substrates, isomaltases use isomaltose, α‐methylglucoside and palatinose and both use sucrose. These enzymes are hypothesized to have evolved from a promiscuous α‐glucosidase ancMALS through duplication and mutation of the genes. We studied substrate specificity of the maltase protein MAL1 from an earlier diverged yeast, Ogataea polymorpha (Op), in the light of this hypothesis. MAL1 has extended substrate specificity and its properties are strikingly similar to those of resurrected ancMALS. Moreover, amino acids considered to determine selective substrate binding are highly conserved between Op MAL1 and ancMALS. Op MAL1 represents an α‐glucosidase in which both maltase and isomaltase activities are well optimized in a single enzyme. Substitution of Thr200 (corresponds to Val216 in S. cerevisiae isomaltase IMA1) with Val in MAL1 drastically reduced the hydrolysis of maltose‐like substrates (α‐1,4‐glucosides), confirming the requirement of Thr at the respective position for this function. Differential scanning fluorimetry (DSF) of the catalytically inactive mutant Asp199Ala of MAL1 in the presence of its substrates and selected monosaccharides suggested that the substrate‐binding pocket of MAL1 has three subsites (–1, +1 and +2) and that binding is strongest at the –1 subsite. The DSF assay results were in good accordance with affinity (K m) and inhibition (K i) data of the enzyme for tested substrates, indicating the power of the method to predict substrate binding. Deletion of either the maltase (MAL1) or α‐glucoside permease (MAL2) gene in Op abolished the growth of yeast on MAL1 substrates, confirming the requirement of both proteins for usage of these sugars. © 2016 The Authors. Yeast published by John Wiley & Sons, Ltd. PMID:26919272

  19. Analysis of hypoxia and hypoxia-like states through metabolite profiling.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Julie E Gleason

    Full Text Available In diverse organisms, adaptation to low oxygen (hypoxia is mediated through complex gene expression changes that can, in part, be mimicked by exposure to metals such as cobalt. Although much is known about the transcriptional response to hypoxia and cobalt, little is known about the all-important cell metabolism effects that trigger these responses.Herein we use a low molecular weight metabolome profiling approach to identify classes of metabolites in yeast cells that are altered as a consequence of hypoxia or cobalt exposures. Key findings on metabolites were followed-up by measuring expression of relevant proteins and enzyme activities. We find that both hypoxia and cobalt result in a loss of essential sterols and unsaturated fatty acids, but the basis for these changes are disparate. While hypoxia can affect a variety of enzymatic steps requiring oxygen and heme, cobalt specifically interferes with diiron-oxo enzymatic steps for sterol synthesis and fatty acid desaturation. In addition to diiron-oxo enzymes, cobalt but not hypoxia results in loss of labile 4Fe-4S dehydratases in the mitochondria, but has no effect on homologous 4Fe-4S dehydratases in the cytosol. Most striking, hypoxia but not cobalt affected cellular pools of amino acids. Amino acids such as aromatics were elevated whereas leucine and methionine, essential to the strain used here, dramatically decreased due to hypoxia induced down-regulation of amino acid permeases.These studies underscore the notion that cobalt targets a specific class of iron proteins and provide the first evidence for hypoxia effects on amino acid regulation. This research illustrates the power of metabolite profiling for uncovering new adaptations to environmental stress.

  20. An L-Fucose Operon in the Probiotic Lactobacillus rhamnosus GG Is Involved in Adaptation to Gastrointestinal Conditions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Becerra, Jimmy E; Yebra, María J; Monedero, Vicente

    2015-06-01

    L-Fucose is a sugar present in human secretions as part of human milk oligosaccharides, mucins, and other glycoconjugates in the intestinal epithelium. The genome of the probiotic Lactobacillus rhamnosus GG (LGG) carries a gene cluster encoding a putative L-fucose permease (fucP), L-fucose catabolic pathway (fucI, fucK, fucU, and fucA), and a transcriptional regulator (fucR). The metabolism of L-fucose in LGG results in 1,2-propanediol production, and their fucI and fucP mutants displayed a severe and mild growth defect on L-fucose, respectively. Transcriptional analysis revealed that the fuc genes are induced by L-fucose and subject to a strong carbon catabolite repression effect. This induction was triggered by FucR, which acted as a transcriptional activator necessary for growth on L-fucose. LGG utilized fucosyl-α1,3-N-acetylglucosamine and contrarily to other lactobacilli, the presence of fuc genes allowed this strain to use the L-fucose moiety. In fucI and fucR mutants, but not in fucP mutant, L-fucose was not metabolized and it was excreted to the medium during growth on fucosyl-α1,3-N-acetylglucosamine. The fuc genes were induced by this fucosyl-disaccharide in the wild type and the fucP mutant but not in a fucI mutant, showing that FucP does not participate in the regulation of fuc genes and that L-fucose metabolism is needed for FucR activation. The l-fucose operon characterized here constitutes a new example of the many factors found in LGG that allow this strain to adapt to the gastrointestinal conditions. Copyright © 2015, American Society for Microbiology. All Rights Reserved.

  1. A mutant crp allele that differentially activates the operons of the fuc regulon in Escherichia coli.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhu, Y; Lin, E C

    1988-05-01

    L-Fucose is used by Escherichia coli through an inducible pathway mediated by a fucP-encoded permease, a fucI-encoded isomerase, a fucK-encoded kinase, and a fucA-encoded aldolase. The adolase catalyzes the formation of dihydroxyacetone phosphate and L-lactaldehyde. Anaerobically, lactaldehyde is converted by a fucO-encoded oxidoreductase to L-1,2-propanediol, which is excreted. The fuc genes belong to a regulon comprising four linked operons: fucO, fucA, fucPIK, and fucR. The positive regulator encoded by fucR responds to fuculose 1-phosphate as the effector. Mutants serially selected for aerobic growth on propanediol became constitutive in fucO and fucA [fucO(Con) fucA(Con)], but noninducible in fucPIK [fucPIK(Non)]. An external suppressor mutation that restored growth on fucose caused constitutive expression of fucPIK. Results from this study indicate that this suppressor mutation occurred in crp, which encodes the cyclic AMP-binding (or receptor) protein. When the suppressor allele (crp-201) was transduced into wild-type strains, the recipient became fucose negative and fucose sensitive (with glycerol as the carbon and energy source) because of impaired expression of fucA. The fucPIK operon became hyperinducible. The growth rate on maltose was significantly reduced, but growth on L-rhamnose, D-galactose, L-arabinose, glycerol, or glycerol 3-phosphate was close to normal. Lysogenization of fuc+ crp-201 cells by a lambda bacteriophage bearing crp+ restored normal growth ability on fucose. In contrast, lysogenization of [fucO(Con)fucA(Con)fucPIK(Non)crp-201] cells by the same phage retarded their growth on fucose.

  2. A survey of the interaction of calcium ions with mitochondria from different tissues and species

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carafoli, Ernesto; Lehninger, Albert L.

    1971-01-01

    A survey was made of the capacity of mitochondria isolated from a number of different tissues and species to accumulate Ca2+ from the suspending medium during electron transport. The species examined included the rat, mouse, rabbit, hamster, guinea pig, cow, chicken, turtle, blowfly, yeast and Neurospora crassa. The tissues examined included vertebrate liver, kidney, brain, heart, spleen, thyroid and adrenal cortex, and the flight muscle of the blowfly. The mitochondria from all vertebrate tissues examined showed: (a) stimulation of State 4 respiration by added Ca2+ (Ca2+/~ activation ratio about 2.0), accompanied by accumulation of Ca2+ and ejection of H+, with a H+/Ca2+ ratio about 1.0; (b) a requirement of phosphate for accumulation of large amounts of Ca2+; (c) respiration-independent high-affinity binding sites for Ca2+; (d) endogenous Ca2+, which is largely released by uncoupling agents. However, mitochondria from yeast and blowfly flight muscle are unable to accumulate Ca2+ in a respiration-dependent process and possess no high-affinity Ca2+-binding sites. These findings support the view that the high-affinity sites represent the ligand-binding sites of a specific Ca2+ `permease' or transport system in the membrane. The relatively high affinity for Ca2+, which equals or exceeds the affinity for ADP, and the generally uniform characteristics of Ca2+ transport in all the vertebrate mitochondria tested strongly suggest that respiration-linked Ca2+ accumulation plays a general and fundamental role in vertebrate cell physiology. PMID:5129264

  3. Connecting Source with Sink: The Role of Arabidopsis AAP8 in Phloem Loading of Amino Acids1[OPEN

    Science.gov (United States)

    Santiago, James P.; Tegeder, Mechthild

    2016-01-01

    Allocation of large amounts of nitrogen to developing organs occurs in the phloem and is essential for plant growth and seed development. In Arabidopsis (Arabidopsis thaliana) and many other plant species, amino acids represent the dominant nitrogen transport forms in the phloem, and they are mainly synthesized in photosynthetically active source leaves. Following their synthesis, a broad spectrum of the amino nitrogen is actively loaded into the phloem of leaf minor veins and transported within the phloem sap to sinks such as developing leaves, fruits, or seeds. Controlled regulation of the source-to-sink transport of amino acids has long been postulated; however, the molecular mechanism of amino acid phloem loading was still unknown. In this study, Arabidopsis AMINO ACID PERMEASE8 (AAP8) was shown to be expressed in the source leaf phloem and localized to the plasma membrane, suggesting its function in phloem loading. This was further supported by transport studies with aap8 mutants fed with radiolabeled amino acids and by leaf exudate analyses. In addition, biochemical and molecular analyses revealed alterations in leaf nitrogen pools and metabolism dependent on the developmental stage of the mutants. Decreased amino acid phloem loading and partitioning to sinks led to decreased silique and seed numbers, but seed protein levels were unchanged, demonstrating the importance of AAP8 function for sink development rather than seed quality. Overall, these results show that AAP8 plays an important role in source-to-sink partitioning of nitrogen and that its function affects source leaf physiology and seed yield. PMID:27016446

  4. Structural Basis for a Ribofuranosyl Binding Protein: Insights into the Furanose Specific Transport

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bagaria, A.; Swaminathan, S.; Kumaran, D.; Burley, S. K.

    2011-04-01

    The ATP-binding cassette transporters (ABC-transporters) are members of one of the largest protein superfamilies, with representatives in all extant phyla. These integral membrane proteins utilize the energy of ATP hydrolysis to carry out certain biological processes, including translocation of various substrates across membranes and non-transport related processes such as translation of RNA and DNA repair. Typically, such transport systems in bacteria consist of an ATP binding component, a transmembrane permease, and a periplasmic receptor or binding protein. Soluble proteins found in the periplasm of gram-negative bacteria serve as the primary receptors for transport of many compounds, such as sugars, small peptides, and some ions. Ligand binding activates these periplasmic components, permitting recognition by the membrane spanning domain, which supports for transport and, in some cases, chemotaxis. Transport and chemotaxis processes appear to be independent of one another, and a few mutants of bifunctional periplasmic components reveal the absence of one or the other function. Previously published high-resolution X-ray structures of various periplasmic ligand binding proteins include Arabinose binding protein (ABP), Allose binding protein (ALBP), Glucose-galactose binding protein (GBP) and Ribose binding protein (RBP). Each of these proteins consists of two structurally similar domains connected by a three-stranded hinge region, with ligand buried between the domains. Upon ligand binding and release, various conformational changes have been observed. For RBP, open (apo) and closed (ligand bound) conformations have been reported and so for MBP. The closed/active form of the protein interacts with the integral membrane component of the system in both transport and chemotaxis. Herein, we report 1.9{angstrom} resolution X-ray structure of the R{sub f}BP periplasmic component of an ABC-type sugar transport system from Hahella chejuensis (UniProt Id Q2S7D2) bound to

  5. Study of the Cupriavidus metallidurans CH34 resistance of selenite and selenate oxy-anions: accumulation, localisation and transformation of selenium; Etude de la resistance de Cupriavidus metallidurans CH34 aux oxyanions selenite et seleniate: accumulation, localisation et transformation du selenium

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Avoscan, L

    2007-06-15

    Selenium is an essential trace element for the living organisms but it is very toxic at high concentration. Selenite and selenate oxides, soluble forms, highly toxic and bio-assimilable, are the most prevalent forms in the environment. Some soil micro-organisms play a dominant role and contribute to the natural cycle of selenium. Our study model, Cupriavidus (formerly Ralstonia) metallidurans CH34, a telluric bacterium characteristic of metal-contaminated biotopes, is known to resist selenite by reducing it into elemental selenium, an insoluble and less toxic form of selenium. In order to better understand the mechanisms of selenium reduction in the bacteria, three methods of speciation were combined (XAS (XANES and EXAFS), HPLC-ICP-MS and SDS-PAGEPIXE). They were completed by the direct quantification of selenium accumulated in the bacteria. Speciation analyses highlighted the existence of two mechanisms of reduction of selenium oxides in C. metallidurans CH34. Assimilation transforms selenite and selenate into organic selenium, identified as seleno-methionine and leads to its non-specific incorporation into bacterial proteins (presence of selenious proteins). Detoxication precipitates selenite in nano-particles of elemental selenium. This way of detoxication is not set up after an exposure to selenate although it is nevertheless possible to detect elemental selenium but in very small amount compared to the exposure of selenite. Seleno-diglutathion is detected in bacteria stressed by an exposure to selenate in medium limited in sulphate. Bacteria exposed to selenite accumulate 25 times more selenium than when they are exposed to selenate. The study of mutants resistant to selenite, which do not express the membrane protein DedA, showed that the accumulation of selenium after exposure to selenite is decreased compared with the wild strain meaning probable link between the transport of selenite and the DedA protein. Finally, selenate would use the sulphate permease

  6. Identification of a Novel Membrane Transporter Mediating Resistance to Organic Arsenic in Campylobacter jejuni

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shen, Zhangqi; Luangtongkum, Taradon; Qiang, Zhiyi; Jeon, Byeonghwa; Wang, Liping

    2014-01-01

    Although bacterial mechanisms involved in the resistance to inorganic arsenic are well understood, the molecular basis for organic arsenic resistance has not been described. Campylobacter jejuni, a major food-borne pathogen causing gastroenteritis in humans, is highly prevalent in poultry and is reportedly resistant to the arsenic compound roxarsone (4-hydroxy-3-nitrobenzenearsonic acid), which has been used as a feed additive in the poultry industry for growth promotion. In this study, we report the identification of a novel membrane transporter (named ArsP) that contributes to organic arsenic resistance in Campylobacter. ArsP is predicted to be a membrane permease containing eight transmembrane helices, distinct from other known arsenic transporters. Analysis of multiple C. jejuni isolates from various animal species revealed that the presence of an intact arsP gene is associated with elevated resistance to roxarsone. In addition, inactivation of arsP in C. jejuni resulted in 4- and 8-fold reductions in the MICs of roxarsone and nitarsone, respectively, compared to that for the wild-type strain. Furthermore, cloning of arsP into a C. jejuni strain lacking a functional arsP gene led to 16- and 64-fold increases in the MICs of roxarsone and nitarsone, respectively. Neither mutation nor overexpression of arsP affected the MICs of inorganic arsenic, including arsenite and arsenate, in Campylobacter. Moreover, acquisition of arsP in NCTC 11168 led to accumulation of less roxarsone than the wild-type strain lacking arsP. Together, these results indicate that ArsP functions as an efflux transporter specific for extrusion of organic arsenic and contributes to the resistance to these compounds in C. jejuni. PMID:24419344

  7. C1-Pathways in Methyloversatilis universalis FAM5: Genome Wide Gene Expression and Mutagenesis Studies

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nathan M. Good

    2015-04-01

    Full Text Available Methyloversatilis universalis FAM5 utilizes single carbon compounds such as methanol or methylamine as a sole source of carbon and energy. Expression profiling reveals distinct sets of genes altered during growth on methylamine vs methanol. As expected, all genes for the N-methylglutamate pathway were induced during growth on methylamine. Among other functions responding to the aminated source of C1-carbon, are a heme-containing amine dehydrogenase (Qhp, a distant homologue of formaldehyde activating enzyme (Fae3, molybdenum-containing formate dehydrogenase, ferredoxin reductase, a set of homologues to urea/ammonium transporters and amino-acid permeases. Mutants lacking one of the functional subunits of the amine dehydrogenase (ΔqhpA or Δfae3 showed no growth defect on C1-compounds. M. universalis FAM5 strains with a lesion in the H4-folate pathway were not able to use any C1-compound, methanol or methylamine. Genes essential for C1-assimilation (the serine cycle and glyoxylate shunt and H4MTP-pathway for formaldehyde oxidation showed similar levels of expression on both C1-carbon sources. M. universalis FAM5 possesses three homologs of the formaldehyde activating enzyme, a key enzyme of the H4MTP-pathway. Strains lacking the canonical Fae (fae1 lost the ability to grow on both C1-compounds. However, upon incubation on methylamine the fae1-mutant produced revertants (Δfae1R, which regained the ability to grow on methylamine. Double and triple mutants (Δfae1RΔfae3, or Δfae1RΔfae2 or Δfae1RΔfae2Δfae3 constructed in the revertant strain background showed growth similar to the Δfae1R phenotype. The metabolic pathways for utilization of methanol and methylamine in Methyloversatilis universalis FAM5 are reconstructed based on these gene expression and phenotypic data.

  8. Carbohydrate metabolism is essential for the colonization of Streptococcus thermophilus in the digestive tract of gnotobiotic rats.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Muriel Thomas

    Full Text Available Streptococcus thermophilus is the archetype of lactose-adapted bacterium and so far, its sugar metabolism has been mainly investigated in vitro. The objective of this work was to study the impact of lactose and lactose permease on S. thermophilus physiology in the gastrointestinal tract (GIT of gnotobiotic rats. We used rats mono-associated with LMD-9 strain and receiving 4.5% lactose. This model allowed the analysis of colonization curves of LMD-9, its metabolic profile, its production of lactate and its interaction with the colon epithelium. Lactose induced a rapid and high level of S. thermophilus in the GIT, where its activity led to 49 mM of intra-luminal L-lactate that was related to the induction of mono-carboxylic transporter mRNAs (SLC16A1 and SLC5A8 and p27(Kip1 cell cycle arrest protein in epithelial cells. In the presence of a continuous lactose supply, S. thermophilus recruited proteins involved in glycolysis and induced the metabolism of alternative sugars as sucrose, galactose, and glycogen. Moreover, inactivation of the lactose transporter, LacS, delayed S. thermophilus colonization. Our results show i/that lactose constitutes a limiting factor for colonization of S. thermophilus, ii/that activation of enzymes involved in carbohydrate metabolism constitutes the metabolic signature of S. thermophilus in the GIT, iii/that the production of lactate settles the dialogue with colon epithelium. We propose a metabolic model of management of carbohydrate resources by S. thermophilus in the GIT. Our results are in accord with the rationale that nutritional allegation via consumption of yogurt alleviates the symptoms of lactose intolerance.

  9. Comprehensive analysis of the soybean (Glycine max GmLAX auxin transporter gene family

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chenglin eChai

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available The phytohormone auxin plays a critical role in regulation of plant growth and development as well as plant responses to abiotic stresses. This is mainly achieved through its uneven distribution in plants via a polar auxin transport process. Auxin transporters are major players in polar auxin transport. The AUXIN RESISTANT 1 ⁄ LIKE AUX1 (AUX⁄LAX auxin influx carriers belong to the amino acid permease family of proton-driven transporters and function in the uptake of indole-3-acetic acid (IAA. In this study, genome-wide comprehensive analysis of the soybean AUX⁄LAX (GmLAX gene family, including phylogenic relationships, chromosome localization, and gene structure, were carried out. A total of 15 GmLAX genes, including seven duplicated gene pairs, were identified in the soybean genome. They were distributed on 10 chromosomes. Despite their higher percentage identities at the protein level, GmLAXs exhibited versatile tissue-specific expression patterns, indicating coordinated functioning during plant growth and development. Most GmLAXs were responsive to drought and dehydration stresses and auxin and abscisic acid (ABA stimuli, in a tissue- and/or time point- sensitive mode. Several GmLAX members were involved in responding to salt stress. Sequence analysis revealed that promoters of GmLAXs contained different combinations of stress-related cis-regulatory elements. These studies suggest that the soybean GmLAXs were under control of a very complex regulatory network, responding to various internal and external signals. This study helps to identity candidate GmLAXs for further analysis of their roles in soybean development and adaption to adverse environments.

  10. Study of the Cupriavidus metallidurans CH34 resistance of selenite and selenate oxy-anions: accumulation, localisation and transformation of selenium

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Avoscan, L.

    2007-06-01

    Selenium is an essential trace element for the living organisms but it is very toxic at high concentration. Selenite and selenate oxides, soluble forms, highly toxic and bio-assimilable, are the most prevalent forms in the environment. Some soil micro-organisms play a dominant role and contribute to the natural cycle of selenium. Our study model, Cupriavidus (formerly Ralstonia) metallidurans CH34, a telluric bacterium characteristic of metal-contaminated biotopes, is known to resist selenite by reducing it into elemental selenium, an insoluble and less toxic form of selenium. In order to better understand the mechanisms of selenium reduction in the bacteria, three methods of speciation were combined (XAS (XANES and EXAFS), HPLC-ICP-MS and SDS-PAGEPIXE). They were completed by the direct quantification of selenium accumulated in the bacteria. Speciation analyses highlighted the existence of two mechanisms of reduction of selenium oxides in C. metallidurans CH34. Assimilation transforms selenite and selenate into organic selenium, identified as seleno-methionine and leads to its non-specific incorporation into bacterial proteins (presence of selenious proteins). Detoxication precipitates selenite in nano-particles of elemental selenium. This way of detoxication is not set up after an exposure to selenate although it is nevertheless possible to detect elemental selenium but in very small amount compared to the exposure of selenite. Seleno-diglutathion is detected in bacteria stressed by an exposure to selenate in medium limited in sulphate. Bacteria exposed to selenite accumulate 25 times more selenium than when they are exposed to selenate. The study of mutants resistant to selenite, which do not express the membrane protein DedA, showed that the accumulation of selenium after exposure to selenite is decreased compared with the wild strain meaning probable link between the transport of selenite and the DedA protein. Finally, selenate would use the sulphate permease

  11. Apolipoprotein L1 confers pH-switchable ion permeability to phospholipid vesicles.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bruno, Jonathan; Pozzi, Nicola; Oliva, Jonathan; Edwards, John C

    2017-11-03

    Apolipoprotein L1 (ApoL1) is a human serum protein conferring resistance to African trypanosomes, and certain ApoL1 variants increase susceptibility to some progressive kidney diseases. ApoL1 has been hypothesized to function like a pore-forming colicin and has been reported to have permeability effects on both intracellular and plasma membranes. Here, to gain insight into how ApoL1 may function in vivo , we used vesicle-based ion permeability, direct membrane association, and intrinsic fluorescence to study the activities of purified recombinant ApoL1. We found that ApoL1 confers chloride-selective permeability to preformed phospholipid vesicles and that this selectivity is strongly pH-sensitive, with maximal activity at pH 5 and little activity above pH 7. When ApoL1 and lipid were allowed to interact at low pH and were then brought to neutral pH, chloride permeability was suppressed, and potassium permeability was activated. Both chloride and potassium permeability linearly correlated with the mass of ApoL1 in the reaction mixture, and both exhibited lipid selectivity, requiring the presence of negatively charged lipids for activity. Potassium, but not chloride, permease activity required the presence of calcium ions in both the association and activation steps. Direct assessment of ApoL1-lipid associations confirmed that ApoL1 stably associates with phospholipid vesicles, requiring low pH and the presence of negatively charged phospholipids for maximal binding. Intrinsic fluorescence of ApoL1 supported the presence of a significant structural transition when ApoL1 is mixed with lipids at low pH. This pH-switchable ion-selective permeability may explain the different effects of ApoL1 reported in intracellular and plasma membrane environments. © 2017 by The American Society for Biochemistry and Molecular Biology, Inc.

  12. Transcriptomic and proteomic analyses of Desulfovibrio vulgaris biofilms: carbon and energy flow contribute to the distinct biofilm growth state.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Clark, Melinda E; He, Zhili; Redding, Alyssa M; Joachimiak, Marcin P; Keasling, Jay D; Zhou, Jizhong Z; Arkin, Adam P; Mukhopadhyay, Aindrila; Fields, Matthew W

    2012-04-16

    Desulfovibrio vulgaris Hildenborough is a sulfate-reducing bacterium (SRB) that is intensively studied in the context of metal corrosion and heavy-metal bioremediation, and SRB populations are commonly observed in pipe and subsurface environments as surface-associated populations. In order to elucidate physiological changes associated with biofilm growth at both the transcript and protein level, transcriptomic and proteomic analyses were done on mature biofilm cells and compared to both batch and reactor planktonic populations. The biofilms were cultivated with lactate and sulfate in a continuously fed biofilm reactor, and compared to both batch and reactor planktonic populations. The functional genomic analysis demonstrated that biofilm cells were different compared to planktonic cells, and the majority of altered abundances for genes and proteins were annotated as hypothetical (unknown function), energy conservation, amino acid metabolism, and signal transduction. Genes and proteins that showed similar trends in detected levels were particularly involved in energy conservation such as increases in an annotated ech hydrogenase, formate dehydrogenase, pyruvate:ferredoxin oxidoreductase, and rnf oxidoreductase, and the biofilm cells had elevated formate dehydrogenase activity. Several other hydrogenases and formate dehydrogenases also showed an increased protein level, while decreased transcript and protein levels were observed for putative coo hydrogenase as well as a lactate permease and hyp hydrogenases for biofilm cells. Genes annotated for amino acid synthesis and nitrogen utilization were also predominant changers within the biofilm state. Ribosomal transcripts and proteins were notably decreased within the biofilm cells compared to exponential-phase cells but were not as low as levels observed in planktonic, stationary-phase cells. Several putative, extracellular proteins (DVU1012, 1545) were also detected in the extracellular fraction from biofilm cells

  13. A designated centre for people with disabilities operated by Brothers of Charity Services Roscommon, Roscommon

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    O' Leary, Niall D

    2011-10-13

    Abstract Background Styrene is a toxic and potentially carcinogenic alkenylbenzene used extensively in the polymer processing industry. Significant quantities of contaminated liquid waste are generated annually as a consequence. However, styrene is not a true xenobiotic and microbial pathways for its aerobic assimilation, via an intermediate, phenylacetic acid, have been identified in a diverse range of environmental isolates. The potential for microbial bioremediation of styrene waste has received considerable research attention over the last number of years. As a result the structure, organisation and encoded function of the genes responsible for styrene and phenylacetic acid sensing, uptake and catabolism have been elucidated. However, a limited understanding persists in relation to host specific regulatory molecules which may impart additional control over these pathways. In this study the styrene degrader Pseudomonas putida CA-3 was subjected to random mini-Tn5 mutagenesis and mutants screened for altered styrene\\/phenylacetic acid utilisation profiles potentially linked to non-catabolon encoded regulatory influences. Results One mutant, D7, capable of growth on styrene, but not on phenylacetic acid, harboured a Tn5 insertion in the rpoN gene encoding σ54. Complementation of the D7 mutant with the wild type rpoN gene restored the ability of this strain to utilise phenylacetic acid as a sole carbon source. Subsequent RT-PCR analyses revealed that a phenylacetate permease, PaaL, was expressed in wild type P. putida CA-3 cells utilising styrene or phenylacetic acid, but could not be detected in the disrupted D7 mutant. Expression of plasmid borne paaL in mutant D7 was found to fully restore the phenylacetic acid utilisation capacity of the strain to wild type levels. Bioinformatic analysis of the paaL promoter from P. putida CA-3 revealed two σ54 consensus binding sites in a non-archetypal configuration, with the transcriptional start site being resolved by

  14. Modeling of Glycerol-3-Phosphate Transporter Suggests a Potential ‘Tilt’ Mechanism involved in its Function

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tsigelny, Igor F.; Greenberg, Jerry; Kouznetsova, Valentina; Nigam, Sanjay K.

    2009-01-01

    Many major facilitator superfamily (MFS) transporters have similar 12-transmembrane α-helical topologies with two six-helix halves connected by a long loop. In humans, these transporters participate in key physiological processes and are also, as in the case of members of the organic anion transporter (OAT) family, of pharmaceutical interest. Recently, crystal structures of two bacterial representatives of the MFS family — the glycerol-3-phosphate transporter (GlpT) and lac-permease (LacY) — have been solved and, because of assumptions regarding the high structural conservation of this family, there is hope that the results can be applied to mammalian transporters as well. Based on crystallography, it has been suggested that a major conformational “switching” mechanism accounts for ligand transport by MFS proteins. This conformational switch would then allow periodic changes in the overall transporter configuration, resulting in its cyclic opening to the periplasm or cytoplasm. Following this lead, we have modeled a possible “switch” mechanism in GlpT, using the concept of rotation of protein domains as in the DynDom program17 and membranephilic constraints predicted by the MAPAS program.23 We found that the minima of energies of intersubunit interactions support two alternate positions consistent with their transport properties. Thus, for GlpT, a “tilt” of 9°–10° rotation had the most favorable energetics of electrostatic interaction between the two halves of the transporter; moreover, this confirmation was sufficient to suggest transport of the ligand across the membrane. We conducted steered molecular dynamics simulations of the GlpT-ligand system to explore how glycerol-3-phosphate would be handled by the “tilted” structure, and obtained results generally consistent with experimental mutagenesis data. While biochemical data remain most consistent with a single-site alternating access model, our results raise the possibility that, while

  15. Modeling of glycerol-3-phosphate transporter suggests a potential 'tilt' mechanism involved in its function.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tsigelny, Igor F; Greenberg, Jerry; Kouznetsova, Valentina; Nigam, Sanjay K

    2008-10-01

    Many major facilitator superfamily (MFS) transporters have similar 12-transmembrane alpha-helical topologies with two six-helix halves connected by a long loop. In humans, these transporters participate in key physiological processes and are also, as in the case of members of the organic anion transporter (OAT) family, of pharmaceutical interest. Recently, crystal structures of two bacterial representatives of the MFS family--the glycerol-3-phosphate transporter (GlpT) and lac-permease (LacY)--have been solved and, because of assumptions regarding the high structural conservation of this family, there is hope that the results can be applied to mammalian transporters as well. Based on crystallography, it has been suggested that a major conformational "switching" mechanism accounts for ligand transport by MFS proteins. This conformational switch would then allow periodic changes in the overall transporter configuration, resulting in its cyclic opening to the periplasm or cytoplasm. Following this lead, we have modeled a possible "switch" mechanism in GlpT, using the concept of rotation of protein domains as in the DynDom program17 and membranephilic constraints predicted by the MAPAS program.(23) We found that the minima of energies of intersubunit interactions support two alternate positions consistent with their transport properties. Thus, for GlpT, a "tilt" of 9 degrees -10 degrees rotation had the most favorable energetics of electrostatic interaction between the two halves of the transporter; moreover, this confirmation was sufficient to suggest transport of the ligand across the membrane. We conducted steered molecular dynamics simulations of the GlpT-ligand system to explore how glycerol-3-phosphate would be handled by the "tilted" structure, and obtained results generally consistent with experimental mutagenesis data. While biochemical data remain most consistent with a single-site alternating access model, our results raise the possibility that, while the

  16. Characterization in Helicobacter pylori of a Nickel Transporter Essential for Colonization That Was Acquired during Evolution by Gastric Helicobacter Species

    Science.gov (United States)

    Turlin, Evelyne; Mancuso, Francesco; Michel, Valérie; Richaud, Pierre; Veyrier, Frédéric J.; De Reuse, Hilde; Vinella, Daniel

    2016-01-01

    Metal acquisition is crucial for all cells and for the virulence of many bacterial pathogens. In particular, nickel is a virulence determinant for the human gastric pathogen Helicobacter pylori as it is the cofactor of two enzymes essential for in vivo colonization, urease and a [NiFe] hydrogenase. To import nickel despite its scarcity in the human body, H. pylori requires efficient uptake mechanisms that are only partially defined. Indeed, alternative ways of nickel entry were predicted to exist in addition to the well-described NixA permease. Using a genetic screen, we identified an ABC transporter, that we designated NiuBDE, as a novel H. pylori nickel transport system. Unmarked mutants carrying deletions of nixA, niuD and/or niuB, were constructed and used to measure (i) tolerance to toxic nickel exposure, (ii) intracellular nickel content by ICP-OES, (iii) transport of radioactive nickel and (iv) expression of a reporter gene controlled by nickel concentration. We demonstrated that NiuBDE and NixA function separately and are the sole nickel transporters in H. pylori. NiuBDE, but not NixA, also transports cobalt and bismuth, a metal currently used in H. pylori eradication therapy. Both NiuBDE and NixA participate in nickel-dependent urease activation at pH 5 and survival under acidic conditions mimicking those encountered in the stomach. However, only NiuBDE is able to carry out this activity at neutral pH and is essential for colonization of the mouse stomach. Phylogenomic analyses indicated that both nixA and niuBDE genes have been acquired via horizontal gene transfer by the last common ancestor of the gastric Helicobacter species. Our work highlights the importance of this evolutionary event for the emergence of Helicobacter gastric species that are adapted to the hostile environment of the stomach where the capacity of Helicobacter to import nickel and thereby activate urease needs to be optimized. PMID:27923069

  17. Interaction of the heterotrimeric G protein alpha subunit SSG-1 of Sporothrix schenckii with proteins related to stress response and fungal pathogenicity using a yeast two-hybrid assay

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    González-Méndez Ricardo

    2010-12-01

    of G protein alpha subunits to transport molecules reinforces the role of G proteins in the response to environmental signals and also highlights the involvement of fungal G protein alpha subunits in nutrient sensing in S. schenckii. These interactions suggest that these permeases could function as transceptors for G proteins in fungi.

  18. The Physiopathological Role of the Exchangers Belonging to the SLC37 Family

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cappello, Anna Rita; Curcio, Rosita; Lappano, Rosamaria; Maggiolini, Marcello; Dolce, Vincenza

    2018-04-01

    The human SLC37 gene family includes four proteins SLC37A1-4, localized in the endoplasmic reticulum (ER) membrane. They have been grouped into the SLC37 family due to their sequence homology to the bacterial organophosphate/phosphate (Pi) antiporter. SLC37A1-3 are the less characterized isoforms. SLC37A1 and SLC37A2 are Pi-linked glucose-6-phosphate (G6P) antiporters, catalyzing both homologous (Pi/Pi) and heterologous (G6P/Pi) exchanges, whereas SLC37A3 transport properties remain to be clarified. Furthermore, SLC37A1 is highly homologous to the bacterial glycerol 3-phosphate permeases, so it is supposed to transport also glycerol-3-phosphate. The physiological role of SLC37A1-3 is yet to be further investigated. SLC37A1 seems to be required for lipid biosynthesis in cancer cell lines, SLC37A2 has been proposed as a vitamin D and a phospho-progesterone receptor target gene, while mutations in the SLC37A3 gene appear to be associated with congenital hyperinsulinism of infancy. SLC37A4, also known as glucose-6-phosphate translocase (G6PT), transports G6P from the cytoplasm into the ER lumen, working in complex with either glucose-6-phosphatase-α (G6Pase-α) or G6Pase-β to hydrolyze intraluminal G6P to Pi and glucose. G6PT and G6Pase-β are ubiquitously expressed, whereas G6Pase-α is specifically expressed in the liver, kidney and intestine. G6PT/G6Pase-α complex activity regulates fasting blood glucose levels, whereas G6PT/G6Pase-β is required for neutrophil functions. G6PT deficiency is responsible for glycogen storage disease type Ib (GSD-Ib), an autosomal recessive disorder associated with both defective metabolic and myeloid phenotypes. Several kinds of mutations have been identified in the SLC37A4 gene, affecting G6PT function. An increased autoimmunity risk for GSD-Ib patients has also been reported, moreover, SLC37A4 seems to be involved in autophagy.

  19. The Physiopathological Role of the Exchangers Belonging to the SLC37 Family

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Anna Rita Cappello

    2018-04-01

    Full Text Available The human SLC37 gene family includes four proteins SLC37A1-4, localized in the endoplasmic reticulum (ER membrane. They have been grouped into the SLC37 family due to their sequence homology to the bacterial organophosphate/phosphate (Pi antiporter. SLC37A1-3 are the less characterized isoforms. SLC37A1 and SLC37A2 are Pi-linked glucose-6-phosphate (G6P antiporters, catalyzing both homologous (Pi/Pi and heterologous (G6P/Pi exchanges, whereas SLC37A3 transport properties remain to be clarified. Furthermore, SLC37A1 is highly homologous to the bacterial glycerol 3-phosphate permeases, so it is supposed to transport also glycerol-3-phosphate. The physiological role of SLC37A1-3 is yet to be further investigated. SLC37A1 seems to be required for lipid biosynthesis in cancer cell lines, SLC37A2 has been proposed as a vitamin D and a phospho-progesterone receptor target gene, while mutations in the SLC37A3 gene appear to be associated with congenital hyperinsulinism of infancy. SLC37A4, also known as glucose-6-phosphate translocase (G6PT, transports G6P from the cytoplasm into the ER lumen, working in complex with either glucose-6-phosphatase-α (G6Pase-α or G6Pase-β to hydrolyze intraluminal G6P to Pi and glucose. G6PT and G6Pase-β are ubiquitously expressed, whereas G6Pase-α is specifically expressed in the liver, kidney and intestine. G6PT/G6Pase-α complex activity regulates fasting blood glucose levels, whereas G6PT/G6Pase-β is required for neutrophil functions. G6PT deficiency is responsible for glycogen storage disease type Ib (GSD-Ib, an autosomal recessive disorder associated with both defective metabolic and myeloid phenotypes. Several kinds of mutations have been identified in the SLC37A4 gene, affecting G6PT function. An increased autoimmunity risk for GSD-Ib patients has also been reported, moreover, SLC37A4 seems to be involved in autophagy.

  20. Steady-state and dynamic gene expression programs in Saccharomyces cerevisiae in response to variation in environmental nitrogen

    Science.gov (United States)

    Airoldi, Edoardo M.; Miller, Darach; Athanasiadou, Rodoniki; Brandt, Nathan; Abdul-Rahman, Farah; Neymotin, Benjamin; Hashimoto, Tatsu; Bahmani, Tayebeh; Gresham, David

    2016-01-01

    -regulated permease genes GAP1, MEP2, DAL5, PUT4, and DIP5. Our results reveal novel aspects of nitrogen-regulated gene expression and highlight the need for a quantitative approach to study how the cell coordinates protein translation and nitrogen assimilation to optimize cell growth in different environments. PMID:26941329

  1. Differential Gene Expression by Lactobacillus plantarum WCFS1 in Response to Phenolic Compounds Reveals New Genes Involved in Tannin Degradation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reverón, Inés; Jiménez, Natalia; Curiel, José Antonio; Peñas, Elena; López de Felipe, Félix; de Las Rivas, Blanca; Muñoz, Rosario

    2017-04-01

    located close to each other in the chromosome, suggesting concomitant regulation. Proteins involved in tannin metabolism and regulation, such GacP (gallic acid permease) and TanR (tannin transcriptional regulator), were identified by differential gene expression in knockout mutants with mutations in genes from this region. This study provides insights into the highly coordinated mechanisms that enable L. plantarum to adapt to plant food fermentations. Copyright © 2017 American Society for Microbiology.

  2. A novel fermentation strategy for removing the key inhibitor acetic acid and efficiently utilizing the mixed sugars from lignocellulosic hydrolysates

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mark A. Eiteman PHD; Elliot Altman Phd

    2009-02-11

    As part of preliminary research efforts, we have completed several experiments which demonstrate 'proof of concept.' These experiments addressed the following three questions: (1) Can a synthetic mixed sugar solution of glucose and xylose be efficiently consumed using the multi-organism approach? (2) Can this approach be used to accumulate a model product? (3) Can this approach be applied to the removal of an inhibitor, acetate, selectively from mixtures of xylose and glucose? To answer the question of whether this multi-organism approach can effectively consume synthetic mixed sugar solutions, we first tested substrate-selective uptake using two strains, one unable to consume glucose and one unable to consume xylose. The xylose-selective strain ALS998 has mutations in the three genes involved in glucose uptake, rendering it unable to consume glucose: ptsG codes for the Enzyme IICB{sup Glc} of the phosphotransferase system (PTS) for carbohydrate transport (Postma et al., 1993), manZ codes for the IID{sup Man} domain of the mannose PTS permease (Huber, 1996), glk codes for glucokinase (Curtis and Epstein 1975) We also constructed strain ALS1008 which has a knockout in the xylA gene encoding for xylose isomerase, rendering ALS1008 unable to consume xylose. Two batch experiments and one continuous bioprocess were completed. In the first experiment, each strain was grown separately in a defined medium of 8 g/L xylose and 15 g/L glucose which represented xylose and glucose concentrations that can be generated by actual biomass. In the second experiment, the two strains were grown together in batch in the same defined, mixed-sugar medium. In a third experiment, we grew the strains continuously in a 'chemostat', except that we shifted the concentrations of glucose and xylose periodically to observe how the system would respond. (For example, we shifted the glucose concentration suddenly from 15 g/L to 30 g/L in the feed).

  3. Switching the mode of sucrose utilization by Saccharomyces cerevisiae

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Miletti Luiz C

    2008-02-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Overflow metabolism is an undesirable characteristic of aerobic cultures of Saccharomyces cerevisiae during biomass-directed processes. It results from elevated sugar consumption rates that cause a high substrate conversion to ethanol and other bi-products, severely affecting cell physiology, bioprocess performance, and biomass yields. Fed-batch culture, where sucrose consumption rates are controlled by the external addition of sugar aiming at its low concentrations in the fermentor, is the classical bioprocessing alternative to prevent sugar fermentation by yeasts. However, fed-batch fermentations present drawbacks that could be overcome by simpler batch cultures at relatively high (e.g. 20 g/L initial sugar concentrations. In this study, a S. cerevisiae strain lacking invertase activity was engineered to transport sucrose into the cells through a low-affinity and low-capacity sucrose-H+ symport activity, and the growth kinetics and biomass yields on sucrose analyzed using simple batch cultures. Results We have deleted from the genome of a S. cerevisiae strain lacking invertase the high-affinity sucrose-H+ symporter encoded by the AGT1 gene. This strain could still grow efficiently on sucrose due to a low-affinity and low-capacity sucrose-H+ symport activity mediated by the MALx1 maltose permeases, and its further intracellular hydrolysis by cytoplasmic maltases. Although sucrose consumption by this engineered yeast strain was slower than with the parental yeast strain, the cells grew efficiently on sucrose due to an increased respiration of the carbon source. Consequently, this engineered yeast strain produced less ethanol and 1.5 to 2 times more biomass when cultivated in simple batch mode using 20 g/L sucrose as the carbon source. Conclusion Higher cell densities during batch cultures on 20 g/L sucrose were achieved by using a S. cerevisiae strain engineered in the sucrose uptake system. Such result was accomplished by

  4. The Small Protein SgrT Controls Transport Activity of the Glucose-Specific Phosphotransferase System.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lloyd, Chelsea R; Park, Seongjin; Fei, Jingyi; Vanderpool, Carin K

    2017-06-01

    The bacterial small RNA (sRNA) SgrS has been a fruitful model for discovery of novel RNA-based regulatory mechanisms and new facets of bacterial physiology and metabolism. SgrS is one of only a few characterized dual-function sRNAs. SgrS can control gene expression posttranscriptionally via sRNA-mRNA base-pairing interactions. Its second function is coding for the small protein SgrT. Previous work demonstrated that both functions contribute to relief of growth inhibition caused by glucose-phosphate stress, a condition characterized by disrupted glycolytic flux and accumulation of sugar phosphates. The base-pairing activity of SgrS has been the subject of numerous studies, but the activity of SgrT is less well characterized. Here, we provide evidence that SgrT acts to specifically inhibit the transport activity of the major glucose permease PtsG. Superresolution microscopy demonstrated that SgrT localizes to the cell membrane in a PtsG-dependent manner. Mutational analysis determined that residues in the N-terminal domain of PtsG are important for conferring sensitivity to SgrT-mediated inhibition of transport activity. Growth assays support a model in which SgrT-mediated inhibition of PtsG transport activity reduces accumulation of nonmetabolizable sugar phosphates and promotes utilization of alternative carbon sources by modulating carbon catabolite repression. The results of this study expand our understanding of a basic and well-studied biological problem, namely, how cells coordinate carbohydrate transport and metabolism. Further, this work highlights the complex activities that can be carried out by sRNAs and small proteins in bacteria. IMPORTANCE Sequencing, annotation and investigation of hundreds of bacterial genomes have identified vast numbers of small RNAs and small proteins, the majority of which have no known function. In this study, we explore the function of a small protein that acts in tandem with a well-characterized small RNA during metabolic

  5. Deletion of Lytic Transglycosylases Increases Beta-Lactam Resistance in Shewanella oneidensis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yin, Jianhua; Sun, Yiyang; Sun, Yijuan; Yu, Zhiliang; Qiu, Juanping; Gao, Haichun

    2018-01-01

    Production of chromosome-encoded β-lactamases confers resistance to β-lactams in many Gram-negative bacteria. Some inducible β-lactamases, especially the class C β-lactamase AmpC in Enterobacteriaceae, share a common regulatory mechanism, the ampR-ampC paradigm. Induction of ampC is intimately linked to peptidoglycan recycling, and the LysR-type transcriptional regulator AmpR plays a central role in the process. However, our previous studies have demonstrated that the expression of class D β-lactamase gene blaA in Shewanella oneidensis is distinct from the established paradigm since an AmpR homolog is absent and major peptidoglycan recycling enzymes play opposite roles in β-lactamase expression. Given that lytic transglycosylases (LTs), a class of peptidoglycan hydrolases cleaving the β-1,4 glycosidic linkage in glycan strands of peptidoglycan, can disturb peptidoglycan recycling, and thus may affect induction of blaA. In this study, we investigated impacts of such enzymes on susceptibility to β-lactams. Deletion of three LTs (SltY, MltB and MltB2) increased β-lactam resistance, while four other LTs (MltD, MltD2, MltF, and Slt2) seemed dispensable to β-lactam resistance. The double LT mutants ΔmltBΔmltB2 and ΔsltYΔmltB2 had β-lactam resistance stronger than any of the single mutants. Deletion of ampG (encoding permease AmpG) and mrcA (encoding penicillin binding protein 1a, PBP1a) from both double LT mutants further increased the resistance to β-lactams. Notably, all increased β-lactam resistance phenotypes were in accordance with enhanced blaA expression. Although significant, the increase in β-lactamase activity after inactivating LTs is much lower than that produced by PBP1a inactivation. Our data implicate that LTs play important roles in blaA expression in S. oneidensis. PMID:29403465

  6. Transcriptome analysis of Neisseria meningitidis in human whole blood and mutagenesis studies identify virulence factors involved in blood survival.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hebert Echenique-Rivera

    2011-05-01

    Full Text Available During infection Neisseria meningitidis (Nm encounters multiple environments within the host, which makes rapid adaptation a crucial factor for meningococcal survival. Despite the importance of invasion into the bloodstream in the meningococcal disease process, little is known about how Nm adapts to permit survival and growth in blood. To address this, we performed a time-course transcriptome analysis using an ex vivo model of human whole blood infection. We observed that Nm alters the expression of ≈30% of ORFs of the genome and major dynamic changes were observed in the expression of transcriptional regulators, transport and binding proteins, energy metabolism, and surface-exposed virulence factors. In particular, we found that the gene encoding the regulator Fur, as well as all genes encoding iron uptake systems, were significantly up-regulated. Analysis of regulated genes encoding for surface-exposed proteins involved in Nm pathogenesis allowed us to better understand mechanisms used to circumvent host defenses. During blood infection, Nm activates genes encoding for the factor H binding proteins, fHbp and NspA, genes encoding for detoxifying enzymes such as SodC, Kat and AniA, as well as several less characterized surface-exposed proteins that might have a role in blood survival. Through mutagenesis studies of a subset of up-regulated genes we were able to identify new proteins important for survival in human blood and also to identify additional roles of previously known virulence factors in aiding survival in blood. Nm mutant strains lacking the genes encoding the hypothetical protein NMB1483 and the surface-exposed proteins NalP, Mip and NspA, the Fur regulator, the transferrin binding protein TbpB, and the L-lactate permease LctP were sensitive to killing by human blood. This increased knowledge of how Nm responds to adaptation in blood could also be helpful to develop diagnostic and therapeutic strategies to control the devastating

  7. Lysinibacillus fusiformis M5 Induces Increased Complexity in Bacillus subtilis 168 Colony Biofilms via Hypoxanthine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gallegos-Monterrosa, Ramses; Kankel, Stefanie; Götze, Sebastian; Barnett, Robert; Stallforth, Pierre; Kovács, Ákos T

    2017-11-15

    In recent years, biofilms have become a central subject of research in the fields of microbiology, medicine, agriculture, and systems biology, among others. The sociomicrobiology of multispecies biofilms, however, is still poorly understood. Here, we report a screening system that allowed us to identify soil bacteria which induce architectural changes in biofilm colonies when cocultured with Bacillus subtilis We identified the soil bacterium Lysinibacillus fusiformis M5 as an inducer of wrinkle formation in B. subtilis colonies mediated by a diffusible signaling molecule. This compound was isolated by bioassay-guided chromatographic fractionation. The elicitor was identified to be the purine hypoxanthine using mass spectrometry and nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) spectroscopy. We show that the induction of wrinkle formation by hypoxanthine is not dependent on signal recognition by the histidine kinases KinA, KinB, KinC, and KinD, which are generally involved in phosphorylation of the master regulator Spo0A. Likewise, we show that hypoxanthine signaling does not induce the expression of biofilm matrix-related operons epsABCDEFGHIJKLMNO and tasA-sipW-tapA Finally, we demonstrate that the purine permease PbuO, but not PbuG, is necessary for hypoxanthine to induce an increase in wrinkle formation of B. subtilis biofilm colonies. Our results suggest that hypoxanthine-stimulated wrinkle development is not due to a direct induction of biofilm-related gene expression but rather is caused by the excess of hypoxanthine within B. subtilis cells, which may lead to cell stress and death. IMPORTANCE Biofilms are a bacterial lifestyle with high relevance regarding diverse human activities. Biofilms can be beneficial, for instance, in crop protection. In nature, biofilms are commonly found as multispecies communities displaying complex social behaviors and characteristics. The study of interspecies interactions will thus lead to a better understanding and use of biofilms as they

  8. GABA metabolism pathway genes, UGA1 and GAD1, regulate replicative lifespan in Saccharomycescerevisiae

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kamei, Yuka; Tamura, Takayuki [Department of Bioscience, Faculty of Bioscience, Nagahama Institute of Bio-Science and Technology, 1266 Tamura, Nagahama, Shiga 526-0829 (Japan); Yoshida, Ryo [Department of Biotechnology, Graduate School of Engineering, Osaka University, 2-1 Yamadaoka, Suita, Osaka 565-0871 (Japan); Ohta, Shinji [Department of Bioscience, Faculty of Bioscience, Nagahama Institute of Bio-Science and Technology, 1266 Tamura, Nagahama, Shiga 526-0829 (Japan); Fukusaki, Eiichiro [Department of Biotechnology, Graduate School of Engineering, Osaka University, 2-1 Yamadaoka, Suita, Osaka 565-0871 (Japan); Mukai, Yukio, E-mail: y_mukai@nagahama-i-bio.ac.jp [Department of Bioscience, Faculty of Bioscience, Nagahama Institute of Bio-Science and Technology, 1266 Tamura, Nagahama, Shiga 526-0829 (Japan)

    2011-04-01

    Highlights: {yields}We demonstrate that two genes in the yeast GABA metabolism pathway affect aging. {yields} Deletion of the UGA1 or GAD1 genes extends replicative lifespan. {yields} Addition of GABA to wild-type cultures has no effect on lifespan. {yields} Intracellular GABA levels do not differ in longevity mutants and wild-type cells. {yields} Levels of tricarboxylic acid cycle intermediates positively correlate with lifespan. -- Abstract: Many of the genes involved in aging have been identified in organisms ranging from yeast to human. Our previous study showed that deletion of the UGA3 gene-which encodes a zinc-finger transcription factor necessary for {gamma}-aminobutyric acid (GABA)-dependent induction of the UGA1 (GABA aminotransferase), UGA2 (succinate semialdehyde dehydrogenase), and UGA4 (GABA permease) genes-extends replicative lifespan in the budding yeast Saccharomycescerevisiae. Here, we found that deletion of UGA1 lengthened the lifespan, as did deletion of UGA3; in contrast, strains with UGA2 or UGA4 deletions exhibited no lifespan extension. The {Delta}uga1 strain cannot deaminate GABA to succinate semialdehyde. Deletion of GAD1, which encodes the glutamate decarboxylase that converts glutamate into GABA, also increased lifespan. Therefore, two genes in the GABA metabolism pathway, UGA1 and GAD1, were identified as aging genes. Unexpectedly, intracellular GABA levels in mutant cells (except for {Delta}uga2 cells) did not differ from those in wild-type cells. Addition of GABA to culture media, which induces transcription of the UGA structural genes, had no effect on replicative lifespan of wild-type cells. Multivariate analysis of {sup 1}H nuclear magnetic resonance spectra for the whole-cell metabolite levels demonstrated a separation between long-lived and normal-lived strains. Gas chromatography-mass spectrometry analysis of identified metabolites showed that levels of tricarboxylic acid cycle intermediates positively correlated with lifespan

  9. GABA metabolism pathway genes, UGA1 and GAD1, regulate replicative lifespan in Saccharomycescerevisiae

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kamei, Yuka; Tamura, Takayuki; Yoshida, Ryo; Ohta, Shinji; Fukusaki, Eiichiro; Mukai, Yukio

    2011-01-01

    Highlights: →We demonstrate that two genes in the yeast GABA metabolism pathway affect aging. → Deletion of the UGA1 or GAD1 genes extends replicative lifespan. → Addition of GABA to wild-type cultures has no effect on lifespan. → Intracellular GABA levels do not differ in longevity mutants and wild-type cells. → Levels of tricarboxylic acid cycle intermediates positively correlate with lifespan. -- Abstract: Many of the genes involved in aging have been identified in organisms ranging from yeast to human. Our previous study showed that deletion of the UGA3 gene-which encodes a zinc-finger transcription factor necessary for γ-aminobutyric acid (GABA)-dependent induction of the UGA1 (GABA aminotransferase), UGA2 (succinate semialdehyde dehydrogenase), and UGA4 (GABA permease) genes-extends replicative lifespan in the budding yeast Saccharomycescerevisiae. Here, we found that deletion of UGA1 lengthened the lifespan, as did deletion of UGA3; in contrast, strains with UGA2 or UGA4 deletions exhibited no lifespan extension. The Δuga1 strain cannot deaminate GABA to succinate semialdehyde. Deletion of GAD1, which encodes the glutamate decarboxylase that converts glutamate into GABA, also increased lifespan. Therefore, two genes in the GABA metabolism pathway, UGA1 and GAD1, were identified as aging genes. Unexpectedly, intracellular GABA levels in mutant cells (except for Δuga2 cells) did not differ from those in wild-type cells. Addition of GABA to culture media, which induces transcription of the UGA structural genes, had no effect on replicative lifespan of wild-type cells. Multivariate analysis of 1 H nuclear magnetic resonance spectra for the whole-cell metabolite levels demonstrated a separation between long-lived and normal-lived strains. Gas chromatography-mass spectrometry analysis of identified metabolites showed that levels of tricarboxylic acid cycle intermediates positively correlated with lifespan extension. These results strongly suggest

  10. Switching the mode of sucrose utilization by Saccharomyces cerevisiae.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Badotti, Fernanda; Dário, Marcelo G; Alves, Sergio L; Cordioli, Maria Luiza A; Miletti, Luiz C; de Araujo, Pedro S; Stambuk, Boris U

    2008-02-27

    Overflow metabolism is an undesirable characteristic of aerobic cultures of Saccharomyces cerevisiae during biomass-directed processes. It results from elevated sugar consumption rates that cause a high substrate conversion to ethanol and other bi-products, severely affecting cell physiology, bioprocess performance, and biomass yields. Fed-batch culture, where sucrose consumption rates are controlled by the external addition of sugar aiming at its low concentrations in the fermentor, is the classical bioprocessing alternative to prevent sugar fermentation by yeasts. However, fed-batch fermentations present drawbacks that could be overcome by simpler batch cultures at relatively high (e.g. 20 g/L) initial sugar concentrations. In this study, a S. cerevisiae strain lacking invertase activity was engineered to transport sucrose into the cells through a low-affinity and low-capacity sucrose-H+ symport activity, and the growth kinetics and biomass yields on sucrose analyzed using simple batch cultures. We have deleted from the genome of a S. cerevisiae strain lacking invertase the high-affinity sucrose-H+ symporter encoded by the AGT1 gene. This strain could still grow efficiently on sucrose due to a low-affinity and low-capacity sucrose-H+ symport activity mediated by the MALx1 maltose permeases, and its further intracellular hydrolysis by cytoplasmic maltases. Although sucrose consumption by this engineered yeast strain was slower than with the parental yeast strain, the cells grew efficiently on sucrose due to an increased respiration of the carbon source. Consequently, this engineered yeast strain produced less ethanol and 1.5 to 2 times more biomass when cultivated in simple batch mode using 20 g/L sucrose as the carbon source. Higher cell densities during batch cultures on 20 g/L sucrose were achieved by using a S. cerevisiae strain engineered in the sucrose uptake system. Such result was accomplished by effectively reducing sucrose uptake by the yeast cells

  11. The Rhizobium etli rpoN locus: DNA sequence analysis and phenotypical characterization of rpoN, ptsN, and ptsA mutants.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Michiels, J; Van Soom, T; D'hooghe, I; Dombrecht, B; Benhassine, T; de Wilde, P; Vanderleyden, J

    1998-04-01

    The rpoN region of Rhizobium etli was isolated by using the Bradyrhizobium japonicum rpoN1 gene as a probe. Nucleotide sequence analysis of a 5,600-bp DNA fragment of this region revealed the presence of four complete open reading frames (ORFs), ORF258, rpoN, ORF191, and ptsN, coding for proteins of 258, 520, 191, and 154 amino acids, respectively. The gene product of ORF258 is homologous to members of the ATP-binding cassette-type permeases. ORF191 and ptsN are homologous to conserved ORFs found downstream from rpoN genes in other bacterial species. Unlike in most other microorganisms, rpoN and ORF191 are separated by approximately 1.6 kb. The R. etli rpoN gene was shown to control in free-living conditions the production of melanin, the activation of nifH, and the metabolism of C4-dicarboxylic acids and several nitrogen sources (ammonium, nitrate, alanine, and serine). Expression of the rpoN gene was negatively autoregulated and occurred independently of the nitrogen source. Inactivation of the ptsN gene resulted in a decrease of melanin synthesis and nifH expression. In a search for additional genes controlling the synthesis of melanin, an R. etli mutant carrying a Tn5 insertion in ptsA, a gene homologous to the Escherichia coli gene coding for enzyme I of the phosphoenolpyruvate:sugar phosphotransferase system, was obtained. The R. etli ptsA mutant also displayed reduced expression of nifH. The ptsN and ptsA mutants also displayed increased sensitivity to the toxic effects of malate and succinate. Growth of both mutants was inhibited by these C4-dicarboxylates at 20 mM at pH 7.0, while wild-type cells grow normally under these conditions. The effect of malate occurred independently of the nitrogen source used. Growth inhibition was decreased by lowering the pH of the growth medium. These results suggest that ptsN and ptsA are part of the same regulatory cascade, the inactivation of which renders the cells sensitive to toxic effects of elevated concentrations of

  12. Regulation of phenylacetic acid uptake is sigma54 dependent in Pseudomonas putida CA-3.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    O' Leary, Niall D

    2011-10-13

    Abstract Background Styrene is a toxic and potentially carcinogenic alkenylbenzene used extensively in the polymer processing industry. Significant quantities of contaminated liquid waste are generated annually as a consequence. However, styrene is not a true xenobiotic and microbial pathways for its aerobic assimilation, via an intermediate, phenylacetic acid, have been identified in a diverse range of environmental isolates. The potential for microbial bioremediation of styrene waste has received considerable research attention over the last number of years. As a result the structure, organisation and encoded function of the genes responsible for styrene and phenylacetic acid sensing, uptake and catabolism have been elucidated. However, a limited understanding persists in relation to host specific regulatory molecules which may impart additional control over these pathways. In this study the styrene degrader Pseudomonas putida CA-3 was subjected to random mini-Tn5 mutagenesis and mutants screened for altered styrene\\/phenylacetic acid utilisation profiles potentially linked to non-catabolon encoded regulatory influences. Results One mutant, D7, capable of growth on styrene, but not on phenylacetic acid, harboured a Tn5 insertion in the rpoN gene encoding σ54. Complementation of the D7 mutant with the wild type rpoN gene restored the ability of this strain to utilise phenylacetic acid as a sole carbon source. Subsequent RT-PCR analyses revealed that a phenylacetate permease, PaaL, was expressed in wild type P. putida CA-3 cells utilising styrene or phenylacetic acid, but could not be detected in the disrupted D7 mutant. Expression of plasmid borne paaL in mutant D7 was found to fully restore the phenylacetic acid utilisation capacity of the strain to wild type levels. Bioinformatic analysis of the paaL promoter from P. putida CA-3 revealed two σ54 consensus binding sites in a non-archetypal configuration, with the transcriptional start site being resolved by

  13. Rewiring the reductive tricarboxylic acid pathway and L-malate transport pathway of Aspergillus oryzae for overproduction of L-malate.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Jingjing; Xie, Zhipeng; Shin, Hyun-Dong; Li, Jianghua; Du, Guocheng; Chen, Jian; Liu, Long

    2017-07-10

    Aspergillus oryzae finds wide application in the food, feed, and wine industries, and is an excellent cell factory platform for production of organic acids. In this work, we achieved the overproduction of L-malate by rewiring the reductive tricarboxylic acid (rTCA) pathway and L-malate transport pathway of A. oryzae NRRL 3488. First, overexpression of native pyruvate carboxylase and malate dehydrogenase in the rTCA pathway improved the L-malate titer from 26.1gL -1 to 42.3gL -1 in shake flask culture. Then, the oxaloacetate anaplerotic reaction was constructed by heterologous expression of phosphoenolpyruvate carboxykinase and phosphoenolpyruvate carboxylase from Escherichia coli, increasing the L-malate titer to 58.5gL -1 . Next, the export of L-malate from the cytoplasm to the external medium was strengthened by overexpression of a C4-dicarboxylate transporter gene from A. oryzae and an L-malate permease gene from Schizosaccharomyces pombe, improving the L-malate titer from 58.5gL -1 to 89.5gL -1 . Lastly, guided by transcription analysis of the expression profile of key genes related to L-malate synthesis, the 6-phosphofructokinase encoded by the pfk gene was identified as a potential limiting step for L-malate synthesis. Overexpression of pfk with the strong sodM promoter increased the L-malate titer to 93.2gL -1 . The final engineered A. oryzae strain produced 165gL -1 L-malate with a productivity of 1.38gL -1 h -1 in 3-L fed-batch culture. Overall, we constructed an efficient L-malate producer by rewiring the rTCA pathway and L-malate transport pathway of A. oryzae NRRL 3488, and the engineering strategy adopted here may be useful for the construction of A. oryzae cell factories to produce other organic acids. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  14. Lethal and mutagenic effects of ion beams and γ-rays in Aspergillus oryzae

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Toyoshima, Yoshiyuki; Takahashi, Akemi; Tanaka, Hisaki; Watanabe, Jun; Mogi, Yoshinobu; Yamazaki, Tatsuo; Hamada, Ryoko; Iwashita, Kazuhiro; Satoh, Katsuya; Narumi, Issay

    2012-01-01

    Highlights: ► We investigated the effects of different LET radiation in A. oryzae. ► Both γ-rays and ion beams induced base substitutions, frameshifts, deletions. ► Both γ-rays and ion beams induced genome-wide large-scale mutations in A. oryzae. ► Some differences in the types and frequencies of mutations were found. ► Our results provide new basic insights into the mutation breeding of A. oryzae. - Abstract: Aspergillus oryzae is a fungus that is used widely in traditional Japanese fermentation industries. In this study, the lethal and mutagenic effects of different linear energy transfer (LET) radiation in freeze-dried conidia of A. oryzae were investigated. The lethal effect, which was evaluated by a 90% lethal dose, was dependent on the LET value of the ionizing radiation. The most lethal ionizing radiation among that tested was 12 C 5+ ion beams with an LET of 121 keV/μm. The 12 C 5+ ion beams had a 3.6-times higher lethal effect than low-LET (0.2 keV/μm) γ-rays. The mutagenic effect was evaluated by the frequency of selenate resistant mutants. 12 C 6+ ion beams with an LET of 86 keV/μm were the most effective in inducing selenate resistance. The mutant frequency following exposure to 12 C 6+ ion beams increased with an increase in dose and reached 3.47 × 10 −3 at 700 Gy. In the dose range from 0 to 700 Gy, 12 C 5+ ion beams were the second most effective in inducing selenate resistance, the mutant frequency of which reached a maximum peak (1.67 × 10 −3 ) at 400 Gy. To elucidate the characteristics of mutation induced by ionizing radiation, mutations in the sulphate permease gene (sB) and ATP sulfurylase gene (sC) loci, the loss of function of which results in a selenate resistant phenotype, were compared between 12 C 5+ ion beams and γ-rays. We detected all types of transversions and transitions. For frameshifts, the frequency of a +1 frameshift was the highest in all cases. Although the incidence of deletions >2 bp was generally low

  15. Lethal and mutagenic effects of ion beams and γ-rays in Aspergillus oryzae.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Toyoshima, Yoshiyuki; Takahashi, Akemi; Tanaka, Hisaki; Watanabe, Jun; Mogi, Yoshinobu; Yamazaki, Tatsuo; Hamada, Ryoko; Iwashita, Kazuhiro; Satoh, Katsuya; Narumi, Issay

    2012-12-01

    Aspergillus oryzae is a fungus that is used widely in traditional Japanese fermentation industries. In this study, the lethal and mutagenic effects of different linear energy transfer (LET) radiation in freeze-dried conidia of A. oryzae were investigated. The lethal effect, which was evaluated by a 90% lethal dose, was dependent on the LET value of the ionizing radiation. The most lethal ionizing radiation among that tested was (12)C(5+) ion beams with an LET of 121keV/μm. The (12)C(5+) ion beams had a 3.6-times higher lethal effect than low-LET (0.2keV/μm) γ-rays. The mutagenic effect was evaluated by the frequency of selenate resistant mutants. (12)C(6+) ion beams with an LET of 86keV/μm were the most effective in inducing selenate resistance. The mutant frequency following exposure to (12)C(6+) ion beams increased with an increase in dose and reached 3.47×10(-3) at 700Gy. In the dose range from 0 to 700Gy, (12)C(5+) ion beams were the second most effective in inducing selenate resistance, the mutant frequency of which reached a maximum peak (1.67×10(-3)) at 400Gy. To elucidate the characteristics of mutation induced by ionizing radiation, mutations in the sulphate permease gene (sB) and ATP sulfurylase gene (sC) loci, the loss of function of which results in a selenate resistant phenotype, were compared between (12)C(5+) ion beams and γ-rays. We detected all types of transversions and transitions. For frameshifts, the frequency of a +1 frameshift was the highest in all cases. Although the incidence of deletions >2bp was generally low, deletions >20bp were characteristic for (12)C(5+) ion beams. γ-rays had a tendency to generate mutants carrying a multitude of mutations in the same locus. Both forms of radiation also induced genome-wide large-scale mutations including chromosome rearrangements and large deletions. These results provide new basic insights into the mutation breeding of A. oryzae using ionizing radiation. Crown Copyright © 2012. Published

  16. Efficient Overproduction of Membrane Proteins in Lactococcus lactis Requires the Cell Envelope Stress Sensor/Regulator Couple CesSR

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pinto, Joao P. C.; Kuipers, Oscar P.; Marreddy, Ravi K. R.; Poolman, Bert; Kok, Jan

    2011-01-01

    Background Membrane proteins comprise an important class of molecules whose study is largely frustrated by several intrinsic constraints, such as their hydrophobicity and added requirements for correct folding. Additionally, the complexity of the cellular mechanisms that are required to insert membrane proteins functionally in the membrane and to monitor their folding state makes it difficult to foresee the yields at which one can obtain them or to predict which would be the optimal production host for a given protein. Methods and Findings We describe a rational design approach to improve the lactic acid bacterium Lactococcus lactis as a producer of membrane proteins. Our transcriptome data shows that the two-component system CesSR, which senses cell envelope stresses of different origins, is one of the major players when L. lactis is forced to overproduce the endogenous membrane protein BcaP, a branched-chain amino acid permease. Growth of the BcaP-producing L. lactis strain and its capability to produce membrane proteins are severely hampered when the CesSR system itself or particular members of the CesSR regulon are knocked out, notably the genes ftsH, oxaA2, llmg_2163 and rmaB. Overexpressing cesSR reduced the growth defect, thus directly improving the production yield of BcaP. Applying this rationale to eukaryotic proteins, some of which are notoriously more difficult to produce, such as the medically-important presenilin complex, we were able to significantly diminish the growth defect seen in the wild-type strain and improve the production yield of the presenilin variant PS1Δ9-H6 more than 4-fold. Conclusions The results shed light into a key, and perhaps central, membrane protein quality control mechanism in L. lactis. Modulating the expression of CesSR benefited the production yields of membrane proteins from different origins. These findings reinforce L. lactis as a legitimate alternative host for the production of membrane proteins. PMID:21818275

  17. Atomic structure of nitrate-binding protein crucial for photosynthetic productivity

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Koropatkin, Nicole M.; Pakrasi, Himadri B.; Smith, Thomas J.

    2006-06-27

    Cyanobacteria, blue-green algae, are the most abundant autotrophs in aquatic environments and form the base of all aquatic food chains by fixing carbon and nitrogen into cellular biomass. The single most important nutrient for photosynthesis and growth is nitrate, which is severely limiting in many aquatic environments particularly the open ocean (1, 2). It is therefore not surprising that NrtA, the solute-binding component of the high-affinity nitrate ABC transporter, is the single-most abundant protein in the plasma membrane of these bacteria (3). Here we describe the first structure of a nitratespecific receptor, NrtA from Synechocystis sp. PCC 6803, complexed with nitrate and determined to a resolution of 1.5Å. NrtA is significantly larger than other oxyanionbinding proteins, representing a new class of transport proteins. From sequence alignments, the only other solute-binding protein in this class is CmpA, a bicarbonatebinding protein. Therefore, these organisms created a novel solute-binding protein for two of the most important nutrients; inorganic nitrogen and carbon. The electrostatic charge distribution of NrtA appears to force the protein off of the membrane while the flexible tether facilitates the delivery of nitrate to the membrane pore. The structure not only details the determinants for nitrate selectivity in NrtA, but also the bicarbonate specificity in CmpA. Nitrate and bicarbonate transport are regulated by the cytoplasmic proteins NrtC and CmpC, respectively. Interestingly, the residues lining the ligand binding pockets suggest that they both bind nitrate. This implies that the nitrogen and carbon uptake pathways are synchronized by intracellular nitrate and nitrite.3 The nitrate ABC transporter of cyanobacteria is composed of four polypeptides (Figure 1): a high-affinity periplasmic solute-binding lipoprotein (NrtA), an integral membrane permease (NrtB), a cytoplasmic ATPase (NrtD), and a unique ATPase/solute-binding fusion protein (Nrt

  18. Lethal and mutagenic effects of ion beams and γ-rays in Aspergillus oryzae

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Toyoshima, Yoshiyuki, E-mail: toyoshima@yamasa.com [Soy Sauce Laboratory, Yamasa Corporation, 2-10-1 Araoicho, Choshi, Chiba 288-0056 (Japan); Takahashi, Akemi; Tanaka, Hisaki; Watanabe, Jun; Mogi, Yoshinobu; Yamazaki, Tatsuo [Soy Sauce Laboratory, Yamasa Corporation, 2-10-1 Araoicho, Choshi, Chiba 288-0056 (Japan); Hamada, Ryoko; Iwashita, Kazuhiro [Fundamental Research Division, National Research Institute of Brewing, 3-7-1 Kagamiyama, Higashihiroshima, Hiroshima 739-0046 (Japan); Satoh, Katsuya; Narumi, Issay [Ion Beam Mutagenesis Research Group, Quantum Beam Science Directorate, Japan Atomic Energy Agency, 1233 Watanuki, Takasaki, Gunma 370-1292 (Japan)

    2012-12-15

    Highlights: ► We investigated the effects of different LET radiation in A. oryzae. ► Both γ-rays and ion beams induced base substitutions, frameshifts, deletions. ► Both γ-rays and ion beams induced genome-wide large-scale mutations in A. oryzae. ► Some differences in the types and frequencies of mutations were found. ► Our results provide new basic insights into the mutation breeding of A. oryzae. - Abstract: Aspergillus oryzae is a fungus that is used widely in traditional Japanese fermentation industries. In this study, the lethal and mutagenic effects of different linear energy transfer (LET) radiation in freeze-dried conidia of A. oryzae were investigated. The lethal effect, which was evaluated by a 90% lethal dose, was dependent on the LET value of the ionizing radiation. The most lethal ionizing radiation among that tested was {sup 12}C{sup 5+} ion beams with an LET of 121 keV/μm. The {sup 12}C{sup 5+} ion beams had a 3.6-times higher lethal effect than low-LET (0.2 keV/μm) γ-rays. The mutagenic effect was evaluated by the frequency of selenate resistant mutants. {sup 12}C{sup 6+} ion beams with an LET of 86 keV/μm were the most effective in inducing selenate resistance. The mutant frequency following exposure to {sup 12}C{sup 6+} ion beams increased with an increase in dose and reached 3.47 × 10{sup −3} at 700 Gy. In the dose range from 0 to 700 Gy, {sup 12}C{sup 5+} ion beams were the second most effective in inducing selenate resistance, the mutant frequency of which reached a maximum peak (1.67 × 10{sup −3}) at 400 Gy. To elucidate the characteristics of mutation induced by ionizing radiation, mutations in the sulphate permease gene (sB) and ATP sulfurylase gene (sC) loci, the loss of function of which results in a selenate resistant phenotype, were compared between {sup 12}C{sup 5+} ion beams and γ-rays. We detected all types of transversions and transitions. For frameshifts, the frequency of a +1 frameshift was the highest in all

  19. Microbial iron management mechanisms in extremely acidic environments: comparative genomics evidence for diversity and versatility

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nieto Pamela A

    2008-11-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Iron is an essential nutrient but can be toxic at high intracellular concentrations and organisms have evolved tightly regulated mechanisms for iron uptake and homeostasis. Information on iron management mechanisms is available for organisms living at circumneutral pH. However, very little is known about how acidophilic bacteria, especially those used for industrial copper bioleaching, cope with environmental iron loads that can be 1018 times the concentration found in pH neutral environments. This study was motivated by the need to fill this lacuna in knowledge. An understanding of how microorganisms thrive in acidic ecosystems with high iron loads requires a comprehensive investigation of the strategies to acquire iron and to coordinate this acquisition with utilization, storage and oxidation of iron through metal responsive regulation. In silico prediction of iron management genes and Fur regulation was carried out for three Acidithiobacilli: Acidithiobacillus ferrooxidans (iron and sulfur oxidizer A. thiooxidans and A. caldus (sulfur oxidizers that can live between pH 1 and pH 5 and for three strict iron oxidizers of the Leptospirillum genus that live at pH 1 or below. Results Acidithiobacilli have predicted FeoB-like Fe(II and Nramp-like Fe(II-Mn(II transporters. They also have 14 different TonB dependent ferri-siderophore transporters of diverse siderophore affinity, although they do not produce classical siderophores. Instead they have predicted novel mechanisms for dicitrate synthesis and possibly also for phosphate-chelation mediated iron uptake. It is hypothesized that the unexpectedly large number and diversity of Fe(III-uptake systems confers versatility to this group of acidophiles, especially in higher pH environments (pH 4–5 where soluble iron may not be abundant. In contrast, Leptospirilla have only a FtrI-Fet3P-like permease and three TonB dependent ferri-dicitrate siderophore systems. This paucity of iron

  20. A novel ex vivo immunoproteomic approach characterising Fasciola hepatica tegumental antigens identified using immune antibody from resistant sheep.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cameron, Timothy C; Cooke, Ira; Faou, Pierre; Toet, Hayley; Piedrafita, David; Young, Neil; Rathinasamy, Vignesh; Beddoe, Travis; Anderson, Glenn; Dempster, Robert; Spithill, Terry W

    2017-08-01

    A more thorough understanding of the immunological interactions between Fasciola spp. and their hosts is required if we are to develop new immunotherapies to control fasciolosis. Deeper knowledge of the antigens that are the target of the acquired immune responses of definitive hosts against both Fasciola hepatica and Fasciola gigantica will potentially identify candidate vaccine antigens. Indonesian Thin Tail sheep express a high level of acquired immunity to infection by F. gigantica within 4weeks of infection and antibodies in Indonesian Thin Tail sera can promote antibody-dependent cell-mediated cytotoxicity against the surface tegument of juvenile F. gigantica in vitro. Given the high protein sequence similarity between F. hepatica and F. gigantica, we hypothesised that antibody from F. gigantica-infected sheep could be used to identify the orthologous proteins in the tegument of F. hepatica. Purified IgG from the sera of F. gigantica-infected Indonesian Thin Tail sheep collected pre-infection and 4weeks p.i. were incubated with live adult F. hepatica ex vivo and the immunosloughate (immunoprecipitate) formed was isolated and analysed via liquid chromatography-electrospray ionisation-tandem mass spectrometry to identify proteins involved in the immune response. A total of 38 proteins were identified at a significantly higher abundance in the immunosloughate using week 4 IgG, including eight predicted membrane proteins, 20 secreted proteins, nine proteins predicted to be associated with either the lysosomes, the cytoplasm or the cytoskeleton and one protein with an unknown cellular localization. Three of the membrane proteins are transporters including a multidrug resistance protein, an amino acid permease and a glucose transporter. Interestingly, a total of 21 of the 38 proteins matched with proteins recently reported to be associated with the proposed small exosome-like extracellular vesicles of adult F. hepatica, suggesting that the Indonesian Thin Tail week

  1. A novel pink-pigmented facultative methylotroph, Methylobacterium thiocyanatum sp. nov., capable of growth on thiocyanate or cyanate as sole nitrogen sources.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wood, A P; Kelly, D P; McDonald, I R; Jordan, S L; Morgan, T D; Khan, S; Murrell, J C; Borodina, E

    1998-02-01

    M thiosulfate, but unaffected by 0.25 mM sulfide or 1 mM thiosulfate. Polypeptides that might be a cyanase subunit (mol.wt. 17.9 kDa), a cyanate (and/or thiocyanate) permease (mol.wt. 25.1 and 27.2 kDa), and a putative thiocyanate hydrolase (mol.wt. 39.3 kDa) were identified by SDS-PAGE. Correlation of the growth rate of cultures with thiocyanate concentration (both stimulatory and inhibitory) and the kinetics of cyanase activity might indicate that growth on thiocyanate involved the intermediate formation of cyanate, hence requiring cyanase activity. The very high activity of cyanase observed during growth on thiocyanate could be in compensation for the inhibitory effect of thiocyanate on cyanase. Alternatively, thiocyanate may be a nonsubstrate inducer of cyanase, while thiocyanate degradation itself proceeds by a carbonyl sulfide pathway not involving cyanate. A formal description of the new species (DSM 11490) is given.

  2. Mobile genetic elements, a key to microbial adaptation in extreme environments

    Science.gov (United States)

    van Houdt, Rob; Mijnendonckx, Kristel; Provoost, Ann; Monsieurs, Pieter; Mergeay, Max; Leys, Natalie

    hydrogenotrophy. Five transposons were identified in CH34. Two mercury transposons Tn4378 and Tn4380, respectively located on pMOL28 and pMOL30, were previously described. In addition, 3 novel transposons were identified. The large Tn6048 transposon contained 8 genes highly induced by zinc and lead. Transposon Tn6049 was found in twelve copies in the genome of strain CH34 and is seem-ingly often associated with genomic islands. Finally, Tn6050 was observed twice in the second chromosome with accessory genes not classically associated with transposons, namely a sulfate permease, a universal stress protein (UspA) and a DksA-like DnaK suppressor protein. The role of these genes is unclear but a functional association could be assumed. Finally, a set of 21 IS elements was found, counting in total for 57 copies dispersed over the genome. The number of copies ranged from 1 to 9 (IS1088 ) and 10 (ISRme3 ). The 21 IS elements could be divided into 10 different families. The elements ISRme5 and IS1071 were putatively involved in the recruitment of the genes for hydrogenotrophy and CO2 fixation, with mutants unable to grow on H2 and CO2 appeared to have lost these genes by IS1071 -mediated excision. These data clearly showed that the C. metallidurans CH34 model bacterium and some of it's Cupriavidus and Ralstonia relatives carry a multitude of tools that allowed them to genetically adapt to polluted and extreme soil environments, and that are a key in their success to adapt to the new anthropogenic spacecraft environments. Furthermore, these tools could be exploited to assess and measure genetic effects of spaceflight conditions. Acknowledgements This work was supported by the European Space Agency (ESA-PRODEX) and the Belgian Science Policy (Belspo) through the MISSEX and COMICS projects.