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Sample records for haloacid dehalogenase dehiva

  1. Crystal Structures of Intermediates in the Dehalogenation of Haloalkanoates by L-2-Haloacid Dehalogenase

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Ridder, Ivo S.; Rozeboom, Henriëtte J.; Kalk, Kor H.; Dijkstra, Bauke W.

    1999-01-01

    The L-2-haloacid dehalogenase from the 1,2-dichloroethane-degrading bacterium Xanthobacter autotrophicus GJ10 catalyzes the hydrolytic dehalogenation of small L-2-haloalkanoates to their corresponding D-2-hydroxyalkanoates, with inversion of the configuration at the C2 atom. The structure of the

  2. Characterization of the haloacid dehalogenase from Xanthobacter autotrophicus GJ10 and sequencing of the dhlB gene

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    van der Ploeg, J; Van Hall, Gerrit; Janssen, D B

    1991-01-01

    The haloacid dehalogenase of the 1,2-dichloroethane-utilizing bacterium Xanthobacter autotrophicus GJ10 was purified from a mutant with an eightfold increase in expression of the enzyme. The mutant was obtained by selecting for enhanced resistance to monobromoacetate. The enzyme was purified...... through (NH4)2SO4 fractionation, DEAE-cellulose chromatography, and hydroxylapatite chromatography. The molecular mass of the protein was 28 kDa as determined with sodium dodecyl sulfate-polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis and 36 kDa as determined with gel filtration on Superose 12 fast protein liquid...

  3. Deletion of PHO13, encoding haloacid dehalogenase type IIA phosphatase, results in upregulation of the pentose phosphate pathway in Saccharomyces cerevisiae.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Soo Rin; Xu, Haiqing; Lesmana, Anastashia; Kuzmanovic, Uros; Au, Matthew; Florencia, Clarissa; Oh, Eun Joong; Zhang, Guochang; Kim, Kyoung Heon; Jin, Yong-Su

    2015-03-01

    The haloacid dehalogenase (HAD) superfamily is one of the largest enzyme families, consisting mainly of phosphatases. Although intracellular phosphate plays important roles in many cellular activities, the biological functions of HAD enzymes are largely unknown. Pho13 is 1 of 16 putative HAD enzymes in Saccharomyces cerevisiae. Pho13 has not been studied extensively, but previous studies have identified PHO13 to be a deletion target for the generation of industrially attractive phenotypes, namely, efficient xylose fermentation and high tolerance to fermentation inhibitors. In order to understand the molecular mechanisms underlying the improved xylose-fermenting phenotype produced by deletion of PHO13 (pho13Δ), we investigated the response of S. cerevisiae to pho13Δ at the transcriptomic level when cells were grown on glucose or xylose. Transcriptome sequencing analysis revealed that pho13Δ resulted in upregulation of the pentose phosphate (PP) pathway and NADPH-producing enzymes when cells were grown on glucose or xylose. We also found that the transcriptional changes induced by pho13Δ required the transcription factor Stb5, which is activated specifically under NADPH-limiting conditions. Thus, pho13Δ resulted in the upregulation of the PP pathway and NADPH-producing enzymes as a part of an oxidative stress response mediated by activation of Stb5. Because the PP pathway is the primary pathway for xylose, its upregulation by pho13Δ might explain the improved xylose metabolism. These findings will be useful for understanding the biological function of S. cerevisiae Pho13 and the HAD superfamily enzymes and for developing S. cerevisiae strains with industrially attractive phenotypes.

  4. Exploration of the transcription factors that regulate the expression of the haloacid operon in Burkholderia caribensis MBA4

    OpenAIRE

    Deng, Liyu; 鄧麗瑜

    2014-01-01

    Bacterial dehalogenase is a key enzyme involved in bioremediation of halogenated organic compounds. A dehalogenase, Deh4a, was isolated from the Gram-negative bacterium Burkholderia caribensis MBA4, which can utilize haloacetic acids as carbon source. The haloacid operon in MBA4 was identified and characterized. It is composed of the structural genes forDeh4a and a transporter Deh4p. Transcription of this operon is negatively regulated, but the mechanism and the relevant regulator are still p...

  5. Synthesis of {beta}-haloacids by radiation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Albarran, G.; Negron-Mendoza, A. [Instituto de Ciencias y Artes, Chiapas (Mexico). Escuela de Biologia

    1995-10-01

    Hydrogen halides add to alkenes yielding the corresponding haloalkane. The addition of HX ordinally follows the course of Markownikoff`s rule. In this paper we analyze the HBr addition reaction to unsaturated carboxylic acids. The course of the addition is anti-Markownikoff. This implies that the reaction goes through free radical mechanism and the haloacid formed is in the {beta}-position. The acids under study are fumaric, itaconic, citraconic acids and the methyl ester of fumaric acid. The {beta}-haloacids formed are easily purified from the bulk solutions. (author).

  6. Structure Prediction, Molecular Dynamics Simulation and Docking Studies of D-Specific Dehalogenase from Rhizobium sp. RC1

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ismaila Yada Sudi

    2012-11-01

    Full Text Available Currently, there is no three-dimensional structure of D-specific dehalogenase (DehD in the protein database. We modeled DehD using ab initio technique, performed molecular dynamics (MD simulation and docking of D-2-chloropropionate (D-2CP, D-2-bromopropionate (D-2BP, monochloroacetate (MCA, monobromoacetate (MBA, 2,2-dichloropropionate (2,2-DCP, d,l-2,3-dichloropropionate (d,l-2,3-DCP, and 3-chloropropionate (3-CP into the DehD active site. The sequences of DehD and D-2-haloacid dehalogenase (HadD from Pseudomonas putida AJ1 have 15% sequence similarity. The model had 80% of the amino acid residues in the most favored region when compared to the crystal structure of DehI from Pseudomonas putida PP3. Docking analysis revealed that Arg107, Arg134 and Tyr135 interacted with D-2CP, and Glu20 activated the water molecule for hydrolytic dehalogenation. Single residue substitutions at 25–30 °C showed that polar residues of DehD were stable when substituted with nonpolar residues and showed a decrease in activity within the same temperature range. The molecular dynamics simulation of DehD and its variants showed that in R134A variant, Arg107 interacted with D-2CP, while in Y135A, Gln221 and Arg231 interacted with D-2CP. It is our emphatic belief that the new model will be useful for the rational design of DehDs with enhanced potentials.

  7. Adaptation of Xanthobacter autotrophicus GJ10 to bromoacetate due to activation and mobilization of the haloacetate dehalogenase gene by insertion element IS1247

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    van der Ploeg, J; Willemsen, M; Van Hall, Gerrit;

    1995-01-01

    Monobromoacetate (MBA) is toxic for the 1,2-dichloroethane-degrading bacterium Xanthobacter autotrophicus GJ10 at concentrations higher than 5 mM. Mutants which are able to grow on higher concentrations of MBA were isolated and found to overexpress haloacid dehalogenase, which is encoded by the dhl......B gene. In mutant GJ10M50, a DNA fragment (designated IS1247) had copied itself from a position on the chromosome that was not linked to the dhlB region to a site immediately upstream of dhlB, resulting in a 1,672-bp insertion. IS1247 was found to encode an open reading frame corresponding to 464 amino...... acids which showed similarity to putative transposases from two other insertion elements. In most of the other MBA-resistant mutants of GJ10, IS1247 was also present in one more copy than in the wild type, which had two copies located within 20 kb. After insertion to a site proximal to dhlB, IS1247...

  8. Oxazolidinone Synthesis through Halohydrin Dehalogenase-Catalyzed Dynamic Kinetic Resolution

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Mikleusevic, Ana; Hamersak, Zdenko; Salopek-Sondi, Branka; Tang, Lixia; Janssen, Dick B.; Elenkov, Maja Majeric

    2015-01-01

    An efficient dynamic kinetic resolution protocol using a single enzyme is described. Both the kinetic resolution and substrate racemization are catalyzed by halohydrin dehalogenase from Agrobacterium radiobacter AD1 (HheC). The HheC-catalyzed reaction of epibromohydrin and

  9. Purification and characterization of the 3-chloro-4-hydroxy-phenylacetate reductive dehalogenase of Desulfitobacterium hafniense

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Christensen, Nina; Ahring, Birgitte Kiær; Wohlfarth, Gert;

    1998-01-01

    The membrane-bound 3-chloro-4-hydroxyphenylacetate (Cl-OHPA) reductive dehalogenase from the chlorophenol- educing anaerobe Desulfitobacterium hafniense was purified 11.3-fold to apparent homogeneity in the presence of the detergent CHAPS. The purified dehalogenase catalyzed the reductive dechlor...

  10. Site-Specific, Covalent Immobilization of Dehalogenase ST2570 Catalyzed by Formylglycine-Generating Enzymes and Its Application in Batch and Semi-Continuous Flow Reactors

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hui Jian

    2016-07-01

    Full Text Available Formylglycine-generating enzymes can selectively recognize and oxidize cysteine residues within the sulfatase sub motif at the terminus of proteins to form aldehyde-bearing formylglycine (FGly residues, and are normally used in protein labeling. In this study, an aldehyde tag was introduced to proteins using formylglycine-generating enzymes encoded by a reconstructed set of the pET28a plasmid system for enzyme immobilization. The haloacid dehalogenase ST2570 from Sulfolobus tokodaii was used as a model enzyme. The C-terminal aldehyde-tagged ST2570 (ST2570CQ exhibited significant enzymological properties, such as new free aldehyde groups, a high level of protein expression and improved enzyme activity. SBA-15 has widely been used as an immobilization support for its large surface and excellent thermal and chemical stability. It was functionalized with amino groups by aminopropyltriethoxysilane. The C-terminal aldehyde-tagged ST2570 was immobilized to SBA-15 by covalent binding. The site-specific immobilization of ST2570 avoided the chemical denaturation that occurs in general covalent immobilization and resulted in better fastening compared to physical adsorption. The site-specific immobilized ST2570 showed 3-fold higher thermal stability, 1.2-fold higher catalytic ability and improved operational stability than free ST2570. The site-specific immobilized ST2570 retained 60% of its original activity after seven cycles of batch operation, and it was superior to the ST2570 immobilized to SBA-15 by physical adsorption, which loses 40% of its original activity when used for the second time. It is remarkable that the site-specific immobilized ST2570 still retained 100% of its original activity after 10 cycles of reuse in the semi-continuous flow reactor. Overall, these results provide support for the industrial-scale production and application of site-specific, covalently immobilized ST2570.

  11. Functional heterologous production of reductive dehalogenases from Desulfitobacterium hafniense strains.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mac Nelly, Anita; Kai, Marco; Svatoš, Aleš; Diekert, Gabriele; Schubert, Torsten

    2014-07-01

    The anaerobic dehalogenation of organohalides is catalyzed by the reductive dehalogenase (RdhA) enzymes produced in phylogenetically diverse bacteria. These enzymes contain a cobamide cofactor at the active site and two iron-sulfur clusters. In this study, the tetrachloroethene (PCE) reductive dehalogenase (PceA) of the Gram-positive Desulfitobacterium hafniense strain Y51 was produced in a catalytically active form in the nondechlorinating, cobamide-producing bacterium Shimwellia blattae (ATCC 33430), a Gram-negative gammaproteobacterium. The formation of recombinant catalytically active PceA enzyme was significantly enhanced when its dedicated PceT chaperone was coproduced and when 5,6-dimethylbenzimidazole and hydroxocobalamin were added to the S. blattae cultures. The experiments were extended to D. hafniense DCB-2, a reductively dehalogenating bacterium harboring multiple rdhA genes. To elucidate the substrate spectrum of the rdhA3 gene product of this organism, the recombinant enzyme was tested for the conversion of different dichlorophenols (DCP) in crude extracts of an RdhA3-producing S. blattae strain. 3,5-DCP, 2,3-DCP, and 2,4-DCP, but not 2,6-DCP and 3,4-DCP, were reductively dechlorinated by the recombinant RdhA3. In addition, this enzyme dechlorinated PCE to trichloroethene at low rates. Copyright © 2014, American Society for Microbiology. All Rights Reserved.

  12. Recent advances on halohydrin dehalogenases-from enzyme identification to novel biocatalytic applications.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schallmey, Anett; Schallmey, Marcus

    2016-09-01

    Halohydrin dehalogenases are industrially relevant enzymes that catalyze the reversible dehalogenation of vicinal haloalcohols with formation of the corresponding epoxides. In the reverse reaction, also other negatively charged nucleophiles such as azide, cyanide, or nitrite are accepted besides halides to open the epoxide ring. Thus, novel C-N, C-C, or C-O bonds can be formed by halohydrin dehalogenases, which makes them attractive biocatalysts for the production of various β-substituted alcohols. Despite the fact that only five individual halohydrin dehalogenase enzyme sequences have been known until recently enabling their heterologous production, a large number of different biocatalytic applications have been reported using these enzymes. The recent characterization of specific sequence motifs has facilitated the identification of novel halohydrin dehalogenase sequences available in public databases and has largely increased the number of recombinantly available enzymes. These will help to extend the biocatalytic repertoire of this enzyme family and to foster novel biotechnological applications and developments in the future. This review gives a general overview on the halohydrin dehalogenase enzyme family and their biochemical properties and further focuses on recent developments in halohydrin dehalogenase biocatalysis and protein engineering.

  13. Crystallization and preliminary X-ray analysis of an enantioselective halohydrin dehalogenase from Agrobacterium radiobacter AD1

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Jong, René M. de; Rozeboom, Henriëtte J.; Kalk, Kor H.; Tang, Lixia; Janssen, Dick B.; Dijkstra, Bauke W.

    2002-01-01

    Halohydrin dehalogenases are key enzymes in the bacterial degradation of vicinal halopropanols and structurally related nematocides. Crystals of the enantioselective halohydrin dehalogenase HheC from Agrobacterium radiobacter AD1 have been obtained at room temperature from hanging-drop vapour-diffus

  14. REPLACEMENT OF TRYPTOPHAN RESIDUES IN HALOALKANE DEHALOGENASE REDUCES HALIDE BINDING AND CATALYTIC ACTIVITY

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    KENNES, C; PRIES, F; KROOSHOF, GH; BOKMA, E; Kingma, Jacob; JANSSEN, DB

    1995-01-01

    Haloalkane dehalogenase catalyzes the hydrolytic cleavage of carbon-halogen bonds in short-chain haloalkanes. Two tryptophan residues of the enzyme (Trp125 and Trp175) form a halide-binding site in the active-site cavity, and were proposed to play a role in catalysis. The function of these residues

  15. Thermodynamic analysis of halide binding to haloalkane dehalogenase suggests the occurrence of large conformational changes

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Krooshof, Geja H.; Floris, René; Tepper, Armand W.J.W.; Janssen, Dick B.

    Haloalkane dehalogenase (DhlA) hydrolyzes short-chain haloalkanes to produce the corresponding alcohols and halide ions. Release of the halide ion from the active-site cavity can proceed via a two-step and a three-step route, which both contain slow enzyme isomerization steps. Thermodynamic analysis

  16. Improved stability of halohydrin dehalogenase from Agrobacterium radiobacter AD1 by replacement of cysteine residues

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Tang, Lixia; van Hylckama Vlieg, Johan E.T.; Lutje Spelberg, Jeffrey H.; Fraaije, Marco W.; Janssen, DB

    2002-01-01

    Halohydrin dehalogenase from Agrobacterium radiobacter AD1 is a homo-tetrameric protein containing three cysteines per 28 kDa subunit. Under oxidizing conditions the enzyme was found to be susceptible to inactivation which could be prevented by the addition of beta-mercaptoethanol or glycerol. Gel f

  17. THE ROLE OF SPONTANEOUS CAP DOMAIN MUTATIONS IN HALOALKANE DEHALOGENASE SPECIFICITY AND EVOLUTION

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Pries, Frens; Wijngaard, Arjan J. van den; Bos, Rolf; Pentenga, Marjan; Janssen, Dick B.

    1994-01-01

    The first step in the utilization of the xenobiotic chlorinated hydrocarbon 1,2-dichloroethane by Xanthobacter autotrophicus is catalyzed by haloalkane dehalogenase (DhlA). The enzyme hydrolyses 1-haloalkanes to the corresponding alcohols. This allows the organism to grow also on short-chain (C-2-C-

  18. Directed Evolution Strategies for Enantiocomplementary Haloalkane Dehalogenases : From Chemical Waste to Enantiopure Building Blocks

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van Leeuwen, Jan G. E.; Wijma, Hein J.; Floor, Robert J.; van der Laan, Jan-Metske; Janssen, Dick B.

    2012-01-01

    We used directed evolution to obtain enantiocomplementary haloalkane dehalogenase variants that convert the toxic waste compound 1,2,3-trichloropropane (TCP) into highly enantioenriched (R)- or (S)-2,3-dichloropropan-1-ol, which can easily be converted into optically active

  19. Bacterial degradation of 3-chloroacrylic acid and the characterization of cis- and trans-specific dehalogenases

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Hylckama Vlieg, Johan E.T. van; Janssen, Dick B.

    1992-01-01

    A coryneform bacterium that is able to utilize cis- and trans-3-chloroacrylic acid as sole carbon source for growth was isolated from freshwater sediment. The organism was found to produce two inducible dehalogenases, one specific for the cis- and the other for trans-3-chloroacrylic acid. Both dehal

  20. Characterization of the corrinoid iron-sulfur protein tetrachloroethene reductive dehalogenase of Dehalobacter restrictus

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Maillard, J.; Schumacher, W.; Vazquez, F.; Regeard, C.; Hagen, W.R.; Holliger, C.

    2003-01-01

    The membrane-bound tetrachloroethene reductive dehalogenase (PCE-RDase) (PceA; EC 1.97.1.8), the terminal component of the respiratory chain of Dehalobacter restrictus, was purified 25-fold to apparent electrophoretic homogeneity. Sodium dodecyl sulfate-polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis revealed a

  1. Novel Dehalogenase Mechanism for 2,3-Dichloro-1-Propanol Utilization in Pseudomonas putida Strain MC4

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Arif, Muhammad Ilan; Samin, Ghufrana; van Leeuwen, Jan G. E.; Oppentocht, Jantien; Janssen, Dick B.

    2012-01-01

    A Pseudomonas putida strain (MC4) that can utilize 2,3-dichloro-1-propanol (DCP) and several aliphatic haloacids and haloalcohols as sole carbon and energy source for growth was isolated from contaminated soil. Degradation of DCP was found to start with oxidation and concomitant dehalogenation catal

  2. Concurrent ethene generation and growth of Dehalococcoides containing vinyl chloride reductive dehalogenase genes during an enhanced reductive dechlorination field demonstration

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Scheutz, Charlotte; Durant, N. D.; Dennis, P.;

    2008-01-01

    Dehalococcoides bacteria that produce catabolic vinyl chloride (VC) reductive dehalogenase enzymes have been implicated as a requirement for successful biological dechlorination of VC to ethene in groundwater systems. Therefore, the functional genes in Dehalococcoides that produce VC reductase (e...

  3. Diversity of reductive dehalogenase genes from environmental samples and enrichment cultures identified with degenerate primer PCR screens.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Laura Audrey Hug

    2013-11-01

    Full Text Available Reductive dehalogenases are the critical enzymes for anaerobic organohalide respiration, a microbial metabolic process that has been harnessed for bioremediation efforts to resolve chlorinated solvent contamination in groundwater and is implicated in the global halogen cycle. Reductive dehalogenase sequence diversity is informative for the dechlorination potential of the site or enrichment culture. A suite of degenerate PCR primers targeting a comprehensive curated set of reductive dehalogenase genes was designed and applied to twelve DNA samples extracted from contaminated and pristine sites, as well as six enrichment cultures capable of reducing chlorinated compounds to non-toxic end-products. The amplified gene products from four environmental sites and two enrichment cultures were sequenced using Illumina HiSeq, and the reductive dehalogenase complement of each sample determined. The results indicate that the diversity of the reductive dehalogenase gene family is much deeper than is currently accounted for: one-third of the translated proteins have less than 70% pairwise amino acid identity to database sequences. Approximately 60% of the sequenced reductive dehalogenase genes were broadly distributed, being identified in four or more samples, and often in previously sequenced genomes as well. In contrast, 17% of the sequenced reductive dehalogenases were unique, present in only a single sample and bearing less than 90% pairwise amino acid identity to any previously identified proteins. Many of the broadly distributed reductive dehalogenases are uncharacterized in terms of their substrate specificity, making these intriguing targets for further biochemical experimentation. Finally, comparison of samples from a contaminated site and an enrichment culture derived from the same site eight years prior allowed examination of the effect of the enrichment process.

  4. A bacterial haloalkane dehalogenase gene as a negative selectable marker in Arabidopsis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Næsted, Henrik; Fennema, M.; Hao, L.

    1999-01-01

    catabolized by alcohol and aldehyde dehydrogenase activities, and by the product of the dhlB gene to a second halide and a hydroxyacid. The intermediate halogenated alcohols and, in particular, the aldehydes are more toxic than the haloalkane substrates or the pathway products. We show here that plants......The dhlA gene of Xanthobacter autotrophicus GJ10 encodes a dehalogenase which hydrolyzes dihalo- alkanes, such as 1,2-dichloroethane (DCE), to a halo- genated alcohol and an inorganic halide ( Janssen et al. 1994 , Annu. Rev. Microbiol. 48, 163-191). In Xanthobacter, these alcohols are further...

  5. Biodegradation of 1,2,3-trichloropropane through directed evolution and heterologous expression of a haloalkane dehalogenase gene

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bosma, Tjibbe; Damborský, Jiří; Stucki, Gerhard; Janssen, Dick B.

    2002-01-01

    Using a combined strategy of random mutagenesis of haloalkane dehalogenase and genetic engineering of a chloropropanol-utilizing bacterium, we constructed an organism that is capable of growth on 1,2,3-trichloropropane (TCP). This highly toxic and recalcitrant compound is a waste product generated f

  6. Transient kinetic analysis of the catalytic mechanism of haloalkane dehalogenase : Identification of the rate-determining step

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Schanstra, JP; Kingma, Jacob; Janssen, DB; Ornstein, RL

    1997-01-01

    We have studied the rate-determining step(s) in the conversion (k(cat)) of 1,2-dibromoethane by haloalkane dehalogenase, a bacterial enzyme involved in degradation of halogenated aliphatic compounds. Analysis of solvent kinetic isotope effects and stopped-flow fluorescence experiments with enzyme

  7. Organohalide Respiring Bacteria and Reductive Dehalogenases: Key Tools in Organohalide Bioremediation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bat-Erdene eJugder

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available Organohalides are recalcitrant pollutants that have been responsible for substantial contamination of soils and groundwater. Organohalide-respiring bacteria (ORB provide a potential solution to remediate contaminated sites, through their ability to use organohalides as terminal electron acceptors to yield energy for growth (i.e. organohalide respiration. Ideally, this process results in non- or lesser-halogenated compounds that are mostly less toxic to the environment or more easily degraded. At the heart of these processes are reductive dehalogenases (RDase, which are membrane bound enzymes coupled with other components that facilitate dehalogenation of organohalides to generate cellular energy. This review focuses RDases, concentrating on those which have been purified (partially or wholly and functionally characterized. Further, the paper reviews the major bacteria involved in organohalide breakdown and the evidence for microbial evolution of RDases. Finally, the capacity for using ORB in a bioremediation and bioaugmentation capacity are discussed.

  8. Biocatalysis of azidolysis of epoxides: Computational evidences on the role of halohydrin dehalogenase (HheC)

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Dhurairajan senthilnathan; Venkatachalam Tamilmani; Ponnambalam Venuvanalingam

    2011-05-01

    Biocatalytic azidolysis of 9 unsymmetrical epoxides by halohydrin dehalogenase enzyme (HheC) in gas phase and uncatalysed azidolysis of the same epoxides in gas phase and in aqueous solution have been modelled at DFT level. Aliphatic epoxides (1-6) and aromatic epoxides (9) undergo cleavage while styrene oxide (7) and -nitro styrene (8) oxide prefer cleavage in the gas phase. Inclusion of aqueous solvation effect via Polarizable Continuum Model (PCM) increases the activation barrier and makes the reaction endothermic due to extensive solvation of azide anion and oxido anionic products, but does not alter the regioselectivity. Halohydrin dehalogenase from Agrobacterium radiobactor AD1 catalyses (E1-E9) ring opening of all these epoxides by azide ion with selectivity and the reversal of selectivity in epoxide 7 and 8 is notable. These reactions follow, in both enzymatic and non-enzymatic environment, S2 mechanism. Calculations while agreeing totally with experimental results offer better insights on the factors determining the regioselectivity and particularly the role of enzyme. Active site model and crystal structure data reveal that the Tyr145 and Ser132 form weak hydrogen bonds with epoxide oxygen lone pair and form reactant enzyme complex (REC). The enzyme complex activates the epoxide ring towards azidolysis. The NBO deletion and second order perturbation analyses clearly bring out the role of catalytic duo Tyr145 and Ser132 and particularly shed light on the dominant contribution of Tyr145 in selectively activating C-O bond. The present results indicate that Arg149 or other residues in the pocket do not seem to have any significant effect on the reaction.

  9. Crystallization and preliminary crystallographic analysis of a haloalkane dehalogenase, DbjA, from Bradyrhizobium japonicum USDA110

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sato, Yukari [Department of Environmental Life Sciences, Graduate School of Life Sciences, Tohoku University, 2-1-1 Katahira, Sendai 980-8577 (Japan); Japan Biological Information Research Center (JBIRC), Japan Biological Informatics Consortium (JBIC), 2-42 Aomi, Koto-ku, Tokyo 135-0064 (Japan); Natsume, Ryo [Japan Biological Information Research Center (JBIRC), Japan Biological Informatics Consortium (JBIC), 2-42 Aomi, Koto-ku, Tokyo 135-0064 (Japan); Tsuda, Masataka [Department of Environmental Life Sciences, Graduate School of Life Sciences, Tohoku University, 2-1-1 Katahira, Sendai 980-8577 (Japan); Damborsky, Jiri [Loschmidt Laboratories, Masaryk University, Kamenice 5/A4, 625 00 Brno (Czech Republic); Nagata, Yuji [Department of Environmental Life Sciences, Graduate School of Life Sciences, Tohoku University, 2-1-1 Katahira, Sendai 980-8577 (Japan); Senda, Toshiya, E-mail: tsenda@jbirc.aist.go.jp [Biological Information Research Center (BIRC), National Institute of Advanced Industrial Science and Technology (AIST), 2-42 Aomi, Koto-ku, Tokyo 135-0064 (Japan); Department of Environmental Life Sciences, Graduate School of Life Sciences, Tohoku University, 2-1-1 Katahira, Sendai 980-8577 (Japan)

    2007-04-01

    A haloalkane dehalogenase, DbjA, was crystallized by the hanging-drop vapour-diffusion method using PEG 4000 as a precipitant. The crystal belongs to the orthorhombic system, space group P2{sub 1}2{sub 1}2 and diffracts to 1.75 Å resolution. Haloalkane dehalogenases are key enzymes for the degradation of halogenated aliphatic pollutants. The haloalkane dehalogenase DbjA constitutes a novel substrate-specificity class with high catalytic activity for β-methylated haloalkanes. In order to reveal the mechanism of its substrate specificity, DbjA has been crystallized using the hanging-drop vapour-diffusion method. The best crystals were obtained using the microseeding technique with a reservoir solution consisting of 17–19.5%(w/v) PEG 4000, 0.2 M calcium acetate and 0.1 M Tris–HCl pH 7.7–8.0. The space group of the DbjA crystal is P2{sub 1}2{sub 1}2, with unit-cell parameters a = 212.9, b = 117.8, c = 55.8 Å. The crystal diffracts to 1.75 Å resolution.

  10. In Silico Phylogenetic Analysis and Molecular Modelling Study of 2-Haloalkanoic Acid Dehalogenase Enzymes from Bacterial and Fungal Origin

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Raghunath Satpathy

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available 2-Haloalkanoic acid dehalogenase enzymes have broad range of applications, starting from bioremediation to chemical synthesis of useful compounds that are widely distributed in fungi and bacteria. In the present study, a total of 81 full-length protein sequences of 2-haloalkanoic acid dehalogenase from bacteria and fungi were retrieved from NCBI database. Sequence analysis such as multiple sequence alignment (MSA, conserved motif identification, computation of amino acid composition, and phylogenetic tree construction were performed on these primary sequences. From MSA analysis, it was observed that the sequences share conserved lysine (K and aspartate (D residues in them. Also, phylogenetic tree indicated a subcluster comprised of both fungal and bacterial species. Due to nonavailability of experimental 3D structure for fungal 2-haloalkanoic acid dehalogenase in the PDB, molecular modelling study was performed for both fungal and bacterial sources of enzymes present in the subcluster. Further structural analysis revealed a common evolutionary topology shared between both fungal and bacterial enzymes. Studies on the buried amino acids showed highly conserved Leu and Ser in the core, despite variation in their amino acid percentage. Additionally, a surface exposed tryptophan was conserved in all of these selected models.

  11. Diverse Reductive Dehalogenases Are Associated with Clostridiales-Enriched Microcosms Dechlorinating 1,2-Dichloroethane

    KAUST Repository

    Merlino, Giuseppe

    2015-03-06

    The achievement of successful biostimulation of active microbiomes for the cleanup of a polluted site is strictly dependent on the knowledge of the key microorganisms equipped with the relevant catabolic genes responsible for the degradation process. In this work, we present the characterization of the bacterial community developed in anaerobic microcosms after biostimulation with the electron donor lactate of groundwater polluted with 1,2-dichloroethane (1,2-DCA). Through a multilevel analysis, we have assessed (i) the structural analysis of the bacterial community; (ii) the identification of putative dehalorespiring bacteria; (iii) the characterization of functional genes encoding for putative 1,2-DCA reductive dehalogenases (RDs). Following the biostimulation treatment, the structure of the bacterial community underwent a notable change of the main phylotypes, with the enrichment of representatives of the order Clostridiales . Through PCR targeting conserved regions within known RD genes, four novel variants of RDs previously associated with the reductive dechlorination of 1,2-DCA were identified in the metagenome of the Clostridiales-dominated bacterial community.

  12. [Degradation of halogenated compounds by haloalkane dehalogenase DadA from Alcanivorax dieselolei B-5 ].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Anzhang; Shao, Zongze

    2014-09-04

    [OBJECTIVE] Alcanivorax dieselolei B-5 is an important oil-degrading bacterium. We studied its substrate range and degradation of halogenated compounds. [METHODS] Growth capability of B-5 was examined with different halogenated substrates as sole carbon source. A putative haloalkane dehalogenase (HLD) gene named dadA was found from the genome of strain B-5 and analyzed by sequence alignment, phylogenetic analysis and homologous modeling. After heterologous expression in Escherichia coli and purification, the activity of DadA towards 46 substrates was determined. [RESULTS] Strain B-5 was capable of utilizing various halogenated compounds (C3-C,8) as the sole carbon source. DadA had typical catalytic pentad residues of HLD-II subfamily, but it was independent from other members of this subfamily according to phylogenetic analysis. Activity assay showed that DadA has higher specificity and narrower substrate range than other characterized HLDs and it only showed activity toward 1,2,3-tribromopropane, 1,2-dibromo-3-chloropropane and 2,3-dichloroprop-1-ene among 46 tested substrates. [CONCLUSIONS] Strain B-5 and its HLD DadA can degrade halogenated aliphatic pollutants although.

  13. Functional Characterization of Reductive Dehalogenases by Using Blue Native Polyacrylamide Gel Electrophoresis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tang, Shuiquan; Chan, Winnie W. M.; Fletcher, Kelly E.; Seifert, Jana; Liang, Xiaoming; Löffler, Frank E.; Adrian, Lorenz

    2013-01-01

    Dehalococcoides mccartyi strains are obligate organohalide-respiring bacteria harboring multiple distinct reductive dehalogenase (RDase) genes within their genomes. A major challenge is to identify substrates for the enzymes encoded by these RDase genes. We demonstrate an approach that involves blue native polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis (BN-PAGE) followed by enzyme activity assays with gel slices and subsequent identification of proteins in gel slices using liquid chromatography coupled to tandem mass spectrometry (LC-MS/MS). RDase expression was investigated in cultures of Dehalococcoides mccartyi strain BAV1 and in the KB-1 consortium growing on chlorinated ethenes and 1,2-dichloroethane. In cultures of strain BAV1, BvcA was the only RDase detected, revealing that this enzyme catalyzes the dechlorination not only of vinyl chloride, but also of all dichloroethene isomers and 1,2-dichloroethane. In cultures of consortium KB-1, five distinct Dehalococcoides RDases and one Geobacter RDase were expressed under the conditions tested. Three of the five RDases included orthologs to the previously identified chlorinated ethene-dechlorinating enzymes VcrA, BvcA, and TceA. This study revealed substrate promiscuity for these three enzymes and provides a path forward to further explore the largely unknown RDase protein family. PMID:23204411

  14. High frequency of phylogenetically diverse reductive dehalogenase-homologous genes in deep subseafloor sedimentary metagenomes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kawai, Mikihiko; Futagami, Taiki; Toyoda, Atsushi; Takaki, Yoshihiro; Nishi, Shinro; Hori, Sayaka; Arai, Wataru; Tsubouchi, Taishi; Morono, Yuki; Uchiyama, Ikuo; Ito, Takehiko; Fujiyama, Asao; Inagaki, Fumio; Takami, Hideto

    2014-01-01

    Marine subsurface sediments on the Pacific margin harbor diverse microbial communities even at depths of several hundreds meters below the seafloor (mbsf) or more. Previous PCR-based molecular analysis showed the presence of diverse reductive dehalogenase gene (rdhA) homologs in marine subsurface sediment, suggesting that anaerobic respiration of organohalides is one of the possible energy-yielding pathways in the organic-rich sedimentary habitat. However, primer-independent molecular characterization of rdhA has remained to be demonstrated. Here, we studied the diversity and frequency of rdhA homologs by metagenomic analysis of five different depth horizons (0.8, 5.1, 18.6, 48.5, and 107.0 mbsf) at Site C9001 off the Shimokita Peninsula of Japan. From all metagenomic pools, remarkably diverse rdhA-homologous sequences, some of which are affiliated with novel clusters, were observed with high frequency. As a comparison, we also examined frequency of dissimilatory sulfite reductase genes (dsrAB), key functional genes for microbial sulfate reduction. The dsrAB were also widely observed in the metagenomic pools whereas the frequency of dsrAB genes was generally smaller than that of rdhA-homologous genes. The phylogenetic composition of rdhA-homologous genes was similar among the five depth horizons. Our metagenomic data revealed that subseafloor rdhA homologs are more diverse than previously identified from PCR-based molecular studies. Spatial distribution of similar rdhA homologs across wide depositional ages indicates that the heterotrophic metabolic processes mediated by the genes can be ecologically important, functioning in the organic-rich subseafloor sedimentary biosphere. PMID:24624126

  15. Comparison of targeted peptide quantification assays for reductive dehalogenases by selective reaction monitoring (SRM) and precursor reaction monitoring (PRM).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schiffmann, Christian; Hansen, Rasmus; Baumann, Sven; Kublik, Anja; Nielsen, Per Halkjær; Adrian, Lorenz; von Bergen, Martin; Jehmlich, Nico; Seifert, Jana

    2014-01-01

    Targeted absolute protein quantification yields valuable information about physiological adaptation of organisms and is thereby of high interest. Especially for this purpose, two proteomic mass spectrometry-based techniques namely selective reaction monitoring (SRM) and precursor reaction monitoring (PRM) are commonly applied. The objective of this study was to establish an optimal quantification assay for proteins with the focus on those involved in housekeeping functions and putative reductive dehalogenase proteins from the strictly anaerobic bacterium Dehalococcoides mccartyi strain CBDB1. This microbe is small and slow-growing; hence, it provides little biomass for comprehensive proteomic analysis. We therefore compared SRM and PRM techniques. Eleven peptides were successfully quantified by both methods. In addition, six peptides were solely quantified by SRM and four by PRM, respectively. Peptides were spiked into a background of Escherichia coli lysate and the majority of peptides were quantifiable down to 500 amol absolute on column by both methods. Peptide quantification in CBDB1 lysate resulted in the detection of 15 peptides using SRM and 14 peptides with the PRM assay. Resulting quantification of five dehalogenases revealed copy numbers of <10 to 115 protein molecules per cell indicating clear differences in abundance of RdhA proteins during growth on hexachlorobenzene. Our results indicated that both methods show comparable sensitivity and that the combination of the mass spectrometry assays resulted in higher peptide coverage and thus more reliable protein quantification.

  16. Characterization of Cg10062 from Corynebacterium glutamicum : Implications for the evolution of cis-3-chloroacrylic acid dehalogenase activity in the tautomerase superfamily

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Poelarends, Gerrit J.; Serrano, Hector; Person, Maria D.; Johnson, William H.; Whitman, Christian P.

    2008-01-01

    A 149-amino acid protein designated Cg10062 is encoded by a gene from Corynebacterium glutamicum. The physiological function of Cg10062 is unknown, and the gene encoding this protein has no obvious genomic context. Sequence analysis links Cg10062 to the cis-3-chloroacrylic acid dehalogenase (cis-Caa

  17. Non-covalent binding of the heavy atom compound [Au(CN)2]- at the halide binding site of haloalkane dehalogenase from Xanthobacter autotrophicus GJ10

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Verschueren, K.H.G.; Rozeboom, H.J.; Kalk, K.H.; Dijkstra, B.W.

    1993-01-01

    The Na[Au(CN)2] heavy atom derivative contributed considerably to the successful elucidation of the crystal structure of haloalkane dehalogenase isolated from Xanthobacter autotrophicus GJ10. The gold cyanide was located in an internal cavity of the enzyme, which also contains the catalytic residues

  18. Crystallographic and Fluorescence Studies of the Interaction of Haloalkane Dehalogenase with Halide Ions. Studies with Halide Compounds Reveal a Halide Binding Site in the Active Site

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    VERSCHUEREN, KHG; Kingma, Jacob; ROZEBOOM, HJ; KALK, KH; JANSSEN, DB; DIJKSTRA, BW

    1993-01-01

    Haloalkane dehalogenase from Xanthobacter autotrophicus GJ10 catalyzes the conversion of 1,2-dichloroethane to 2-chloroethanol and chloride without use of oxygen or cofactors. The active site is situated in an internal cavity, which is accesible from the solvent, even in the crystal. Crystal structu

  19. NONCOVALENT BINDING OF THE HEAVY-ATOM COMPOUND [AU(CN)2]- AT THE HALIDE BINDING-SITE OF HALOALKANE DEHALOGENASE FROM XANTHOBACTER-AUTOTROPHICUS GJ10

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    VERSCHUEREN, KHG; FRANKEN, SM; ROZEBOOM, HJ; KALK, KH; DIJKSTRA, BW

    1993-01-01

    The Na[Au(CN)2] heavy atom derivative contributed considerably to the successful elucidation of the crystal structure of haloalkane dehalogenase isolated from Xanthobacter autotrophicus GJ10. The gold cyanide was located in an internal cavity of the enzyme, which also contains the catalytic residues

  20. Kinetic characterization and X-ray structure of a mutant of haloalkane dehalogenase with higher catalytic activity and modified substrate range

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Schanstra, Joost P.; Ridder, Ivo S.; Heimeriks, Gaston J.; Rink, Rick; Poelarends, Gerrit J.; Kalk, Kor H.; Dijkstra, Bauke W.; Janssen, Dick B.

    1996-01-01

    Conversion of halogenated aliphatics by haloalkane dehalogenase proceeds via the formation of a covalent alkyl-enzyme intermediate which is subsequently hydrolyzed by water. In the wild type enzyme, the slowest step for both 1,2-dichloroethane and 1,2-dibromoethane conversion is a unimolecular

  1. Enhancing the biocatalytic manufacture of the key intermediate of atorvastatin by focused directed evolution of halohydrin dehalogenase

    Science.gov (United States)

    Luo, Yu; Chen, Yangzi; Ma, Hongmin; Tian, ZhenHua; Zhang, Yeqi; Zhang, Jian

    2017-01-01

    Halohydrin dehalogenases (HHDHs) are biocatalytically interesting enzymes due to their ability to form C-C, C-N, C-O, and C-S bonds. One of most important application of HHDH was the protein engineering of HheC (halohydrin dehalogenase from Agrobacterium radiobacter AD1) for the industrial manufacturing of ethyl (R)-4-cyano-3-hydroxybutanoate (HN), a key chiral synthon of a cholesterol-lowering drug of atorvastatin. During our development of an alternative, more efficient and economic route for chemo-enzymatic preparation of the intermediate of atorvastatin, we found that the HheC2360 previously reported for HN manufacture, had insufficient activity for the cyanolysis production of tert-butyl (3 R,5 S)-6-cyano-3,5-dihydroxyhexanoate (A7). Herein, we present the focused directed evolution of HheC2360 with higher activity and enhanced biocatalytic performance using active site mutagenesis. Through docking of the product, A7, into the crystal structure of HheC2360, 6 residues was selected for combined active sites testing (CASTing). After library screening, the variant V84G/W86F was identified to have a 15- fold increase in activity. Time course analysis of the cyanolysis reaction catalyzed by this variant, showed 2- fold increase in space time productivity compared with HheC2360. These results demonstrate the applicability of the variant V84G/W86F as a biocatalyst for the efficient and practical production of atorvastatin intermediate. PMID:28165015

  2. Identification of Multiple Dehalogenase Genes Involved in Tetrachloroethene-to-Ethene Dechlorination in a Dehalococcoides-Dominated Enrichment Culture

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mohamed Ismaeil

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Chloroethenes (CEs are widespread groundwater toxicants that are reductively dechlorinated to nontoxic ethene (ETH by members of Dehalococcoides. This study established a Dehalococcoides-dominated enrichment culture (designated “YN3” that dechlorinates tetrachloroethene (PCE to ETH with high dechlorination activity, that is, complete dechlorination of 800 μM PCE to ETH within 14 days in the presence of Dehalococcoides species at 5.7±1.9×107 copies of 16S rRNA gene/mL. The metagenome of YN3 harbored 18 rdhA genes (designated YN3rdhA1–18 encoding the catalytic subunit of reductive dehalogenase (RdhA, four of which were suggested to be involved in PCE-to-ETH dechlorination based on significant increases in their transcription in response to CE addition. The predicted proteins for two of these four genes, YN3RdhA8 and YN3RdhA16, showed 94% and 97% of amino acid similarity with PceA and VcrA, which are well known to dechlorinate PCE to trichloroethene (TCE and TCE to ETH, respectively. The other two rdhAs, YN3rdhA6 and YN3rdhA12, which were never proved as rdhA for CEs, showed particularly high transcription upon addition of vinyl chloride (VC, with 75±38 and 16±8.6 mRNA copies per gene, respectively, suggesting their possible functions as novel VC-reductive dehalogenases. Moreover, metagenome data indicated the presence of three coexisting bacterial species, including novel species of the genus Bacteroides, which might promote CE dechlorination by Dehalococcoides.

  3. Refined X-ray Structures of Haloalkane Dehalogenase at pH 6.2 and pH 8.2 and Implications for the Reaction Mechanism

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Verschueren, Koen H.G.; Franken, Sybille M.; Rozeboom, Henriëtte J.; Kalk, Kor H.; Dijkstra, Bauke W.

    1993-01-01

    The crystal structure of haloalkane dehalogenase from Xanthobacter autotrophicus GJ10 has been refined at 1.9 Å resolution at two different pH values, the pH of crystallization (pH 6.2) and the pH of optimal activity (pH 8.2), to final R-factors of 16.8% and 16.4%, respectively. Both models show goo

  4. Refined X-ray Structures of Haloalkane Dehalogenase at pH 6.2 and pH 8.2 and Implications for the Reaction Mechanism

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Verschueren, Koen H.G.; Franken, Sybille M.; Rozeboom, Henriëtte J.; Kalk, Kor H.; Dijkstra, Bauke W.

    1993-01-01

    The crystal structure of haloalkane dehalogenase from Xanthobacter autotrophicus GJ10 has been refined at 1.9 Å resolution at two different pH values, the pH of crystallization (pH 6.2) and the pH of optimal activity (pH 8.2), to final R-factors of 16.8% and 16.4%, respectively. Both models show goo

  5. How Many Conformations of Enzymes Should Be Sampled for DFT/MM Calculations? A Case Study of Fluoroacetate Dehalogenase

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yanwei Li

    2016-08-01

    Full Text Available The quantum mechanics/molecular mechanics (QM/MM method (e.g., density functional theory (DFT/MM is important in elucidating enzymatic mechanisms. It is indispensable to study “multiple” conformations of enzymes to get unbiased energetic and structural results. One challenging problem, however, is to determine the minimum number of conformations for DFT/MM calculations. Here, we propose two convergence criteria, namely the Boltzmann-weighted average barrier and the disproportionate effect, to tentatively address this issue. The criteria were tested by defluorination reaction catalyzed by fluoroacetate dehalogenase. The results suggest that at least 20 conformations of enzymatic residues are required for convergence using DFT/MM calculations. We also tested the correlation of energy barriers between small QM regions and big QM regions. A roughly positive correlation was found. This kind of correlation has not been reported in the literature. The correlation inspires us to propose a protocol for more efficient sampling. This saves 50% of the computational cost in our current case.

  6. Tetrachloroethene Dehalogenase from Dehalospirillum multivorans: Cloning, Sequencing of the Encoding Genes, and Expression of the pceA Gene in Escherichia coli

    Science.gov (United States)

    Neumann, Anke; Wohlfarth, Gert; Diekert, Gabriele

    1998-01-01

    The genes encoding tetrachloroethene reductive dehalogenase, a corrinoid-Fe/S protein, of Dehalospirillum multivorans were cloned and sequenced. The pceA gene is upstream of pceB and overlaps it by 4 bp. The presence of a ς70-like promoter sequence upstream of pceA and of a ρ-independent terminator downstream of pceB indicated that both genes are cotranscribed. This assumption is supported by reverse transcriptase PCR data. The pceA and pceB genes encode putative 501- and 74-amino-acid proteins, respectively, with calculated molecular masses of 55,887 and 8,354 Da, respectively. Four peptides obtained after trypsin treatment of tetrachloroethene (PCE) dehalogenase were found in the deduced amino acid sequence of pceA. The N-terminal amino acid sequence of the PCE dehalogenase isolated from D. multivorans was found 30 amino acids downstream of the N terminus of the deduced pceA product. The pceA gene contained a nucleotide stretch highly similar to binding motifs for two Fe4S4 clusters or for one Fe4S4 cluster and one Fe3S4 cluster. A consensus sequence for the binding of a corrinoid was not found in pceA. No significant similarities to genes in the databases were detected in sequence comparisons. The pceB gene contained two membrane-spanning helices as indicated by two hydrophobic stretches in the hydropathic plot. Sequence comparisons of pceB revealed no sequence similarities to genes present in the databases. Only in the presence of pUBS 520 supplying the recombinant bacteria with high levels of the rare Escherichia coli tRNA4Arg was pceA expressed, albeit nonfunctionally, in recombinant E. coli BL21 (DE3). PMID:9696761

  7. The corrinoid cofactor of reductive dehalogenases affects dechlorination rates and extents in organohalide-respiring Dehalococcoides mccartyi.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yan, Jun; Şimşir, Burcu; Farmer, Abigail T; Bi, Meng; Yang, Yi; Campagna, Shawn R; Löffler, Frank E

    2016-05-01

    Corrinoid auxotrophic organohalide-respiring Dehalococcoides mccartyi (Dhc) strains are keystone bacteria for reductive dechlorination of toxic and carcinogenic chloroorganic contaminants. We demonstrate that the lower base attached to the essential corrinoid cofactor of reductive dehalogenase (RDase) enzyme systems modulates dechlorination activity and affects the vinyl chloride (VC) RDases BvcA and VcrA differently. Amendment of 5,6-dimethylbenzimidazolyl-cobamide (DMB-Cba) to Dhc strain BAV1 and strain GT cultures supported cis-1,2-dichloroethene-to-ethene reductive dechlorination at rates of 107.0 (±12.0) μM and 67.4 (±1.4) μM Cl(-) released per day, respectively. Strain BAV1, expressing the BvcA RDase, reductively dechlorinated VC to ethene, although at up to fivefold lower rates in cultures amended with cobamides carrying 5-methylbenzimidazole (5-MeBza), 5-methoxybenzimidazole (5-OMeBza) or benzimidazole (Bza) as the lower base. In contrast, strain GT harboring the VcrA RDase failed to grow and dechlorinate VC to ethene in medium amended with 5-OMeBza-Cba or Bza-Cba. The amendment with DMB to inactive strain GT cultures restored the VC-to-ethene-dechlorinating phenotype and intracellular DMB-Cba was produced, demonstrating cobamide uptake and remodeling. The distinct responses of Dhc strains with BvcA versus VcrA RDases to different cobamides implicate that the lower base exerts control over Dhc reductive dechlorination rates and extents (that is, detoxification), and therefore the dynamics of Dhc strains with discrete reductive dechlorination capabilities. These findings emphasize that the role of the corrinoid/lower base synthesizing community must be understood to predict strain-specific Dhc activity and achieve efficacious contaminated site cleanup.

  8. The Catalytic Scaffold fo the Haloalkanoic Acid Dehalogenase Enzyme Superfamily Acts as a Mold for the Trigonal Bipyramidal Transition State

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lu,Z.; Dunaway-Mariano, D.; Allen, K.

    2008-01-01

    The evolution of new catalytic activities and specificities within an enzyme superfamily requires the exploration of sequence space for adaptation to a new substrate with retention of those elements required to stabilize key intermediates/transition states. Here, we propose that core residues in the large enzyme family, the haloalkanoic acid dehalogenase enzyme superfamily (HADSF) form a 'mold' in which the trigonal bipyramidal transition states formed during phosphoryl transfer are stabilized by electrostatic forces. The vanadate complex of the hexose phosphate phosphatase BT4131 from Bacteroides thetaiotaomicron VPI-5482 (HPP) determined at 1.00 Angstroms resolution via X-ray crystallography assumes a trigonal bipyramidal coordination geometry with the nucleophilic Asp-8 and one oxygen ligand at the apical position. Remarkably, the tungstate in the complex determined to 1.03 Angstroms resolution assumes the same coordination geometry. The contribution of the general acid/base residue Asp-10 in the stabilization of the trigonal bipyramidal species via hydrogen-bond formation with the apical oxygen atom is evidenced by the 1.52 Angstroms structure of the D10A mutant bound to vanadate. This structure shows a collapse of the trigonal bipyramidal geometry with displacement of the water molecule formerly occupying the apical position. Furthermore, the 1.07 Angstroms resolution structure of the D10A mutant complexed with tungstate shows the tungstate to be in a typical 'phosphate-like' tetrahedral configuration. The analysis of 12 liganded HADSF structures deposited in the protein data bank (PDB) identified stringently conserved elements that stabilize the trigonal bipyramidal transition states by engaging in favorable electrostatic interactions with the axial and equatorial atoms of the transferring phosphoryl group.

  9. Identification and environmental distribution of dcpA encoding the 1,2-dichloropropane-to-propene reductive dehalogenase in organohalide-respiring Chloroflexi

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Padilla-Crespo, Elizabeth [University of Tennessee (UTK) and Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL); Yan, Jun [ORNL; Swift, Cynthia M [ORNL; Chourey, Karuna [ORNL; Hettich, Robert {Bob} L [ORNL; Ritalahti, Kirsti M [ORNL; Loeffler, Frank E [ORNL

    2014-01-01

    Dehalococcoides mccartyi (Dhc) strains KS and RC grow with 1,2-dichloropropane (1,2-D) as an electron acceptor in enrichment cultures derived from hydrocarbon-contaminated and pristine river sediments, respectively. Transcription, expression, enzymatic and PCR analyses implicated the reductive dehalogenase gene dcpA in 1,2-D dichloroelimination to propene and inorganic chloride. Quantitative real-time PCR (qPCR) analyses demonstrated Dhc cell increase during growth with 1,2-D and suggested that both Dhc strains carried a single dcpA gene copy per genome. Dhc strain RC and strain KS produced 1.8 0.1 x 107 and 1.4 0.5 x 107 cells per mole of propene formed, respectively. The dcpA gene was identified in 1,2-D-to-propene-dechlorinating microcosms established with sediment samples collected from different geographical locations in Europe and North and South America. Clone library analysis revealed two distinct dcpA phylogenetic clusters, both of which the dcpA gene-targeted qPCR assay captured, suggesting the qPCR assay is useful for site assessment and bioremediation monitoring at 1,2-D-contaminated sites.

  10. A Single Mutation in a Tunnel to the Active Site Changes the Mechanism and Kinetics of Product Release in Haloalkane Dehalogenase LinB*

    Science.gov (United States)

    Biedermannová, Lada; Prokop, Zbyněk; Gora, Artur; Chovancová, Eva; Kovács, Mihály; Damborský, Jiří; Wade, Rebecca C.

    2012-01-01

    Many enzymes have buried active sites. The properties of the tunnels connecting the active site with bulk solvent affect ligand binding and unbinding and also the catalytic properties. Here, we investigate ligand passage in the haloalkane dehalogenase enzyme LinB and the effect of replacing leucine by a bulky tryptophan at a tunnel-lining position. Transient kinetic experiments show that the mutation significantly slows down the rate of product release. Moreover, the mechanism of bromide ion release is changed from a one-step process in the wild type enzyme to a two-step process in the mutant. The rate constant of bromide ion release corresponds to the overall steady-state turnover rate constant, suggesting that product release became the rate-limiting step of catalysis in the mutant. We explain the experimental findings by investigating the molecular details of the process computationally. Analysis of trajectories from molecular dynamics simulations with a tunnel detection software reveals differences in the tunnels available for ligand egress. Corresponding differences are seen in simulations of product egress using a specialized enhanced sampling technique. The differences in the free energy barriers for egress of a bromide ion obtained using potential of mean force calculations are in good agreement with the differences in rates obtained from the transient kinetic experiments. Interactions of the bromide ion with the introduced tryptophan are shown to affect the free energy barrier for its passage. The study demonstrates how the mechanism of an enzymatic catalytic cycle and reaction kinetics can be engineered by modification of protein tunnels. PMID:22745119

  11. Bacterial diversity and reductive dehalogenase redundancy in a 1,2-dichloroethane-degrading bacterial consortium enriched from a contaminated aquifer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wittebolle Lieven

    2010-02-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Bacteria possess a reservoir of metabolic functionalities ready to be exploited for multiple purposes. The use of microorganisms to clean up xenobiotics from polluted ecosystems (e.g. soil and water represents an eco-sustainable and powerful alternative to traditional remediation processes. Recent developments in molecular-biology-based techniques have led to rapid and accurate strategies for monitoring and identification of bacteria and catabolic genes involved in the degradation of xenobiotics, key processes to follow up the activities in situ. Results We report the characterization of the response of an enriched bacterial community of a 1,2-dichloroethane (1,2-DCA contaminated aquifer to the spiking with 5 mM lactate as electron donor in microcosm studies. After 15 days of incubation, the microbial community structure was analyzed. The bacterial 16S rRNA gene clone library showed that the most represented phylogenetic group within the consortium was affiliated with the phylum Firmicutes. Among them, known degraders of chlorinated compounds were identified. A reductive dehalogenase genes clone library showed that the community held four phylogenetically-distinct catalytic enzymes, all conserving signature residues previously shown to be linked to 1,2-DCA dehalogenation. Conclusions The overall data indicate that the enriched bacterial consortium shares the metabolic functionality between different members of the microbial community and is characterized by a high functional redundancy. These are fundamental features for the maintenance of the community's functionality, especially under stress conditions and suggest the feasibility of a bioremediation treatment with a potential prompt dehalogenation and a process stability over time.

  12. Reactions of Cg10062, a cis-3-Chloroacrylic Acid Dehalogenase Homologue, with Acetylene and Allene Substrates: Evidence for a Hydration-Dependent Decarboxylation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huddleston, Jamison P; Johnson, William H; Schroeder, Gottfried K; Whitman, Christian P

    2015-05-19

    Cg10062 is a cis-3-chloroacrylic acid dehalogenase (cis-CaaD) homologue from Corynebacterium glutamicum with an unknown function and an uninformative genomic context. It shares 53% pairwise sequence similarity with cis-CaaD including the six active site amino acids (Pro-1, His-28, Arg-70, Arg-73, Tyr-103, and Glu-114) that are critical for cis-CaaD activity. However, Cg10062 is a poor cis-CaaD: it lacks catalytic efficiency and isomer specificity. Two acetylene compounds (propiolate and 2-butynoate) and an allene compound, 2,3-butadienoate, were investigated as potential substrates. Cg10062 functions as a hydratase/decarboxylase using propiolate as well as the cis-3-chloro- and 3-bromoacrylates, generating mixtures of malonate semialdehyde and acetaldehyde. The two activities occur sequentially at the active site using the initial substrate. With 2,3-butadienoate and 2-butynoate, Cg10062 functions as a hydratase and converts both to acetoacetate. Mutations of the proposed water-activating residues (E114Q, E114D, and Y103F) have a range of consequences from a reduction in wild type activity to a switch of activities (i.e., hydratase into a hydratase/decarboxylase or vice versa). The intermediates for the hydration and decarboxylation products can be trapped as covalent adducts to Pro-1 when NaCNBH3 is incubated with the E114D mutant and 2,3-butadienoate or 2-butynoate, and the Y103F mutant and 2-butynoate. Three mechanisms are presented to explain these findings. One mechanism involves the direct attack of water on the substrate, whereas the other two mechanisms use covalent catalysis in which a covalent bond forms between Pro-1 and the hydration product or the substrate. The strengths and weaknesses of the mechanisms and the implications for Cg10062 function are discussed.

  13. Expanded Bed Recovery of D-2-Chloropropionic Acid Dehalogenase Using TiO2-Densified Cellulose Anion Exchanger%使用纤维素-钛白粉复合扩张床阴离子吸附剂提取D-2-氯丙酸脱卤酶

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    雷引林; 金志华; 童微星; 姚善泾; 朱自强

    2006-01-01

    The TiO2-densified cellulose composite beads were activated by epichlorohydrin and coupled with diethylamine, to function as an anion exchanger for expanded bed chromatography. The adsorbent exhibited a favorable performance of expanded bed adsorption for proteins, and therefore was applied to the expanded bed recovery of D-2-chloropropionic acid dehalogenase directly from the unclarified homogenate of Pseudomonas sp. NT21. The binding capacity of the dehalogenase was found to be 8.54U·ml-1 adsorbent, and two active peaks were eluted respectively at 0.15mol· L-1 and 0.3mol· L-1 (NH4)2SO4. The result indicated that the overall enzyme yield was 68%,with a purification factor of 22. In comparison to other recovery processes, the yield of the expanded bed process rises at least 70%, simultaneously saving a great deal of operation time and costs.

  14. The crystal structure of Arabidopsis VSP1 reveals the plant class C-like phosphatase structure of the DDDD superfamily of phosphohydrolases.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yuhong Chen

    Full Text Available Arabidopsis thaliana vegetative storage proteins, VSP1 and VSP2, are acid phosphatases and belong to the haloacid dehalogenase (HAD superfamily. In addition to their potential nutrient storage function, they were thought to be involved in plant defense and flower development. To gain insights into the architecture of the protein and obtain clues about its function, we have tested their substrate specificity and solved the structure of VSP1. The acid phosphatase activities of these two enzymes require divalent metal such as magnesium ion. Conversely, the activity of these two enzymes is inhibited by vanadate and molybdate, but is resistant to inorganic phosphate. Both VSP1 and VSP2 did not exhibit remarkable activities to any physiological substrates tested. In the current study, we presented the crystal structure of recombinant VSP1 at 1.8 Å resolution via the selenomethionine single-wavelength anomalous diffraction (SAD. Specifically, an α-helical cap domain on the top of the α/β core domain is found to be involved in dimerization. In addition, despite of the low sequence similarity between VSP1 and other HAD enzymes, the core domain of VSP1 containing conserved active site and catalytic machinery displays a classic haloacid dehalogenase fold. Furthermore, we found that VSP1 is distinguished from bacterial class C acid phosphatase P4 by several structural features. To our knowledge, this is the first study to reveal the crystal structure of plant vegetative storage proteins.

  15. Degradation of halogenated compounds by haloalkane dehalogenase DadA from Alcanivorax dieselolei B-5%柴油食烷菌B-5及其卤代烷烃脱卤酶DadA对卤代化合物的降解

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    李安章; 邵宗泽

    2014-01-01

    [目的]柴油食烷菌(Alcanivorax dieselolei)B-5是重要的石油降解菌.为研究其对卤代化合物的降解范围和降解机制,[方法]以不同的卤代化合物作为唯一碳源,观察菌株B-5在其中的生长情况;通过多重序列比对、系统发育分析和三维结构同源建模,分析该菌株基因组内一个假定的卤代烷烃脱卤酶(Haloalkane dehalogenase,HLD) DadA;利用大肠杆菌异源表达、纯化DadA,并测定了其对46个卤代底物的酶活.[结果]菌株B-5能够利用C3-C18链长范围的多种卤代化合物为唯一碳源生长;在系统进化树中,DadA相对独立于其他HLD-Ⅱ亚家族成员,但具有典型的HLD-Ⅱ亚家族的催化五联体残基;DadA确实具有脱卤活性,但该酶特异性高,底物范围明显小于其他已鉴定的HLDs,仅对1,2,3-三溴丙烷、1,2-二溴-3-氯丙烷和2,3-二氯-1-丙烯有脱卤酶活.[结论]因为DadA对很多B-5菌株可以利用做碳源的卤代底物没有脱卤酶活,所以推测B-5菌中可能还有其他脱卤酶参与了卤代烷烃的降解.菌株B-5及其卤代烷烃脱卤酶DadA在卤代烷烃污染物的生物降解方面具有应用潜力.

  16. The putative α/β-hydrolases of Dietzia cinnamea P4 strain as potential enzymes for biocatalytic applications.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Procópio, Luciano; Macrae, Andrew; van Elsas, Jan Dirk; Seldin, Lucy

    2013-03-01

    The draft genome of the soil actinomycete Dietzia cinnamea P4 reveals a versatile group of α/β-hydrolase fold enzymes. Phylogenetic and comparative sequence analyses were used to classify the α/β-hydrolases of strain P4 into six different groups: (i) lipases, (ii) esterases, (iii) epoxide hydrolases, (iv) haloacid dehalogenases, (v) C-C breaking enzymes and (vi) serine peptidases. The high number of lipases/esterases (41) and epoxide hydrolase enzymes (14) present in the relatively small (3.6 Mb) P4 genome is unusual; it is likely to be linked to the survival of strain P4 in its natural environment. Strain P4 is thus equipped with a large number of genes which would appear to confer survivability in harsh hot tropical soil. As such, this highly resilient soil bacterial strain provides an interesting genome for enzyme mining for applications in the field of biotransformations of polymeric compounds.

  17. Human PHOSPHO1 exhibits high specific phosphoethanolamine and phosphocholine phosphatase activities

    Science.gov (United States)

    2004-01-01

    Human PHOSPHO1 is a phosphatase enzyme for which expression is upregulated in mineralizing cells. This enzyme has been implicated in the generation of Pi for matrix mineralization, a process central to skeletal development. PHOSPHO1 is a member of the haloacid dehalogenase (HAD) superfamily of Mg2+-dependent hydrolases. However, substrates for PHOSPHO1 are, as yet, unidentified and little is known about its activity. We show here that PHOSPHO1 exhibits high specific activities toward phosphoethanolamine (PEA) and phosphocholine (PCho). Optimal enzymic activity was observed at approx. pH 6.7. The enzyme shows a high specific Mg2+-dependence, with apparent Km values of 3.0 μM for PEA and 11.4 μM for PCho. These results provide a novel mechanism for the generation of Pi in mineralizing cells from PEA and PCho. PMID:15175005

  18. AcEST: BP915992 [AcEST

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available p|Q08623|HDD1A_HUMAN Haloacid dehalogenase-like hydrolase domai... 33 0.60 sp|P03080|ST_POVHA Small t antigen OS=Hamster... polyomavirus PE=3 ... 30 3.9 sp|P03079|MT_POVHA Middle T antigen OS=Hamster polyomavirus PE=1...... 30 3.9 sp|P03075|LT_POVHA Large T antigen OS=Hamster polyomavirus PE=3 ... 30 3...+P +GLP ++ Sbjct: 182 DGNLSRDLTTKATLVLNSLQDFQPELFGLPSYE 214 >sp|P03080|ST_POVHA Small t antigen OS=Hamster p...KQALISLLDLEPQYWG 25 >sp|P03079|MT_POVHA Middle T antigen OS=Hamster polyomavirus

  19. Structure- and function-based characterization of a new phosphoglycolate phosphatase from Thermoplasma acidophilum.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kim, Y.; Yakunin, A. F.; Kuznetsova, E.; Xu, X.; Pennycooke, M.; Gu, J.; Cheung, F.; Proudfoot, M.; Arrowsmith, C. H.; Joachimiak, A.; Edwards, A.; Christendat, D.; Biosciences Division; Univ. of Toronto; Clinical Genomics Centre

    2004-01-02

    The protein TA0175 has a large number of sequence homologues, most of which are annotated as unknown and a few as belonging to the haloacid dehalogenase superfamily, but has no known biological function. Using a combination of amino acid sequence analysis, three-dimensional crystal structure information, and kinetic analysis, we have characterized TA0175 as phosphoglycolate phosphatase from Thermoplasma acidophilum. The crystal structure of TA0175 revealed two distinct domains, a larger core domain and a smaller cap domain. The large domain is composed of a centrally located five-stranded parallel {beta}-sheet with strand order S10, S9, S8, S1, S2 and a small {beta}-hairpin, strands S3 and S4. This central sheet is flanked by a set of three {alpha}-helices on one side and two helices on the other. The smaller domain is composed of an open faced {beta}-sandwich represented by three antiparallel {beta}-strands, S5, S6, and S7, flanked by two oppositely oriented {alpha}-helices, H3 and H4. The topology of the large domain is conserved; however, structural variation is observed in the smaller domain among the different functional classes of the haloacid dehalogenase superfamily. Enzymatic assays on TA0175 revealed that this enzyme catalyzed the dephosphorylation of phosphoglycolate in vitro with similar kinetic properties seen for eukaryotic phosphoglycolate phosphatase. Activation by divalent cations, especially Mg{sup 2+}, and competitive inhibition behavior with Cl{sup -} ions are similar between TA0175 and phosphoglycolate phosphatase. The experimental evidence presented for TA0175 is indicative of phosphoglycolate phosphatase.

  20. Engineering a catabolic pathway in plants for the degradation of 1,2-dichloroethane.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mena-Benitez, Gilda L; Gandia-Herrero, Fernando; Graham, Stuart; Larson, Tony R; McQueen-Mason, Simon J; French, Christopher E; Rylott, Elizabeth L; Bruce, Neil C

    2008-07-01

    Plants are increasingly being employed to clean up environmental pollutants such as heavy metals; however, a major limitation of phytoremediation is the inability of plants to mineralize most organic pollutants. A key component of organic pollutants is halogenated aliphatic compounds that include 1,2-dichloroethane (1,2-DCA). Although plants lack the enzymatic activity required to metabolize this compound, two bacterial enzymes, haloalkane dehalogenase (DhlA) and haloacid dehalogenase (DhlB) from the bacterium Xanthobacter autotrophicus GJ10, have the ability to dehalogenate a range of halogenated aliphatics, including 1,2-DCA. We have engineered the dhlA and dhlB genes into tobacco (Nicotiana tabacum 'Xanthi') plants and used 1,2-DCA as a model substrate to demonstrate the ability of the transgenic tobacco to remediate a range of halogenated, aliphatic hydrocarbons. DhlA converts 1,2-DCA to 2-chloroethanol, which is then metabolized to the phytotoxic 2-chloroacetaldehyde, then chloroacetic acid, by endogenous plant alcohol dehydrogenase and aldehyde dehydrogenase activities, respectively. Chloroacetic acid is dehalogenated by DhlB to produce the glyoxylate cycle intermediate glycolate. Plants expressing only DhlA produced phytotoxic levels of chlorinated intermediates and died, while plants expressing DhlA together with DhlB thrived at levels of 1,2-DCA that were toxic to DhlA-expressing plants. This represents a significant advance in the development of a low-cost phytoremediation approach toward the clean-up of halogenated organic pollutants from contaminated soil and groundwater.

  1. Differential protein accumulations in isolates of the strawberry wilt pathogen Fusarium oxysporum f. sp. fragariae differing in virulence.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fang, Xiangling; Barbetti, Martin J

    2014-08-28

    This study was conducted to define differences in Fusarium oxysporum f. sp. fragariae (Fof) isolates with different virulence efficiency to strawberry at the proteome level, in combination with their differences in mycelial growth, conidial production and germination. Comparative proteome analyses revealed substantial differences in mycelial proteomes between Fof isolates, where the 54 differentially accumulated protein spots were consistently over-accumulated or exclusively in the highly virulent isolate. These protein spots were identified through MALDI-TOF/TOF mass spectrometry analyses, and the identified proteins were mainly related to primary and protein metabolism, antioxidation, electron transport, cell cycle and transcription based on their putative functions. Proteins of great potential as Fof virulence factors were those involved in ubiquitin/proteasome-mediated protein degradation and reactive oxygen species detoxification; the hydrolysis-related protein haloacid dehalogenase superfamily hydrolase; 3,4-dihydroxy-2-butanone 4-phosphate synthase associated with riboflavin biosynthesis; and those exclusive to the highly virulent isolate. In addition, post-translational modifications may also make an important contribution to Fof virulence. F. oxysporum f. sp. fragariae (Fof), the causal agent of Fusarium wilt in strawberry, is a serious threat to commercial strawberry production worldwide. However, factors and mechanisms contributing to Fof virulence remained unknown. This study provides knowledge of the molecular basis for the differential expression of virulence in Fof, allowing new possibilities towards developing alternative and more effective strategies to manage Fusarium wilt. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  2. A synthetic suicide riboswitch for the high-throughput screening of metabolite production in Saccharomyces cerevisiae.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Sang-Woo; Oh, Min-Kyu

    2015-03-01

    Artificial devices such as the synthetic riboswitch have shown potential to introduce unnatural phenotypic perturbation because its synthetic traits are distinct from that of innate metabolism. In this study, a riboswitch, a small regulatory element found in RNAs, was employed to reprogram microorganisms to produce valuable metabolites. A self-cleaving ribozyme glmS, found in gram-positive bacteria, cleaves its own transcript in response to the intracellular glucosamine 6-phosphate (GlcN6P) concentration. The glmS ribozyme was integrated into the 3'-untranslated region of FCY1, which encodes cytosine deaminase in Saccharomyces cerevisiae to construct a suicide riboswitch for evolutionary engineering. Growth of the strain harboring the suicide riboswitch was hampered by the addition of fluorocytosine, and was recovered as metabolite level increased. By using this riboswitch, we isolated a N-acetyl glucosamine (GlcNAc) producer strain by screening an efficient glutamine-fructose-6-phosphate transaminase (Gfa1p) and haloacid dehalogenase-like phosphatases (HAD phosphatases) originated from Escherichia coli. The suicide riboswitch was also applied to different metabolite by using artificial allosteric ribozyme. Since the mechanisms used in this work are universal in microorganisms, our synthetic suicide riboswitch can be applied to a wide range of organisms and can be exploited to the efficient and high-throughput screening of inconspicuous phenotypes.

  3. Identification of a novel sesquiterpene biosynthetic machinery involved in astellolide biosynthesis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shinohara, Yasutomo; Takahashi, Shunji; Osada, Hiroyuki; Koyama, Yasuji

    2016-01-01

    Esterified drimane-type sesquiterpene lactones such as astellolides display various biological activities and are widely produced by plants and fungi. Given their low homology to known sesquiterpene cyclases, the genes responsible for their biosynthesis have not been uncovered yet. Here, we identified the astellolide gene cluster from Aspergillus oryzae and discovered a novel sesquiterpene biosynthetic machinery consisting of AstC, AstI, and AstK. All these enzymes are annotated as haloacid dehalogenase-like hydrolases, whereas AstC also contains a DxDTT motif conserved in class II diterpene cyclases. Based on enzyme reaction analyses, we found that AstC catalysed the protonation-initiated cyclisation of farnesyl pyrophosphate into drimanyl pyrophosphate. This was successively dephosphorylated by AstI and AstK to produce drim-8-ene-11-ol. Moreover, we also identified and characterised a unique non-ribosomal peptide synthetase, AstA, responsible for esterifying aryl acids to drimane-type sesquiterpene lactones. In this study, we highlight a new biosynthetic route for producing sesquiterpene and its esterified derivative. Our findings shed light on the identification of novel sesquiterpenes via genome mining. PMID:27628599

  4. YbiV from E. coli K12 is a HAD phosphatase

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Roberts, Anne; Lee, Seok-Yong; McCullagh, Emma; Silversmith, Ruth E.; Wemmer, David E.

    2004-03-16

    The protein YbiV from Escherichia coli K12 MG1655 is a hypothetical protein with sequence homology to the haloacid dehalogenase (HAD) superfamily of proteins. Although numerous members of this family have been identified, the functions of few are known. Using the crystal structure, sequence analysis, and biochemical assays, we have characterized ybiV as a HAD phosphatase. The crystal structure of YbiV reveals a two domain protein, one with the characteristic HAD hydrolase fold, the other an inserted a/b fold. In an effort to understand the mechanism we also solved and report the structures of YbiV in complex with beryllofluoride (BeF3-) and aluminum trifluoride (AlF3) which have been shown to mimic the phosphorylated intermediate and transition state for hydrolysis, respectively, in analogy to other HAD phosphatases. Analysis of the structures reveals the substrate binding cavity, which is hydrophilic in nature. Both structure and sequence homology indicate ybiV may be a sugar phosphatase, which is supported by biochemical assays which measured the release of free phosphate on a number of sugar-like substrates. We also investigated available genomic and functional data in an effort to determine the physiological substrate.

  5. Transports of acetate and haloacetate in Burkholderia species MBA4 are operated by distinct systems

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Su Xianbin

    2012-11-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Acetate is a commonly used substrate for biosynthesis while monochloroacetate is a structurally similar compound but toxic and inhibits cell metabolism by blocking the citric acid cycle. In Burkholderia species MBA4 haloacetate was utilized as a carbon and energy source for growth. The degradation of haloacid was mediated by the production of an inducible dehalogenase. Recent studies have identified the presence of a concomitantly induced haloacetate-uptake activity in MBA4. This uptake activity has also been found to transport acetate. Since acetate transporters are commonly found in bacteria it is likely that haloacetate was transported by such a system in MBA4. Results The haloacetate-uptake activity of MBA4 was found to be induced by monochloroacetate (MCA and monobromoacetate (MBA. While the acetate-uptake activity was also induced by MCA and MBA, other alkanoates: acetate, propionate and 2-monochloropropionate (2MCPA were also inducers. Competing solute analysis showed that acetate and propionate interrupted the acetate- and MCA- induced acetate-uptake activities. While MCA, MBA, 2MCPA, and butyrate have no effect on acetate uptake they could significantly quenched the MCA-induced MCA-uptake activity. Transmembrane electrochemical potential was shown to be a driving force for both acetate- and MCA- transport systems. Conclusions Here we showed that acetate- and MCA- uptake in Burkholderia species MBA4 are two transport systems that have different induction patterns and substrate specificities. It is envisaged that the shapes and the three dimensional structures of the solutes determine their recognition or exclusion by the two transport systems.

  6. Genome-wide mutagenesis of Xanthomonas axonopodis pv. citri reveals novel genetic determinants and regulation mechanisms of biofilm formation.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jinyun Li

    Full Text Available Xanthomonas axonopodis pv. citri (Xac causes citrus canker disease, a major threat to citrus production worldwide. Accumulating evidence suggests that the formation of biofilms on citrus leaves plays an important role in the epiphytic survival of this pathogen prior to the development of canker disease. However, the process of Xac biofilm formation is poorly understood. Here, we report a genome-scale study of Xac biofilm formation in which we identified 92 genes, including 33 novel genes involved in biofilm formation and 7 previously characterized genes, colR, fhaB, fliC, galU, gumD, wxacO, and rbfC, known to be important for Xac biofilm formation. In addition, 52 other genes with defined or putative functions in biofilm formation were identified, even though they had not previously reported been to be associated with biofilm formation. The 92 genes were isolated from 292 biofilm-defective mutants following a screen of a transposon insertion library containing 22,000 Xac strain 306 mutants. Further analyses indicated that 16 of the novel genes are involved in the production of extracellular polysaccharide (EPS and/or lipopolysaccharide (LPS, 7 genes are involved in signaling and regulatory pathways, and 5 genes have unknown roles in biofilm formation. Furthermore, two novel genes, XAC0482, encoding a haloacid dehalogenase-like phosphatase, and XAC0494 (designated as rbfS, encoding a two-component sensor protein, were confirmed to be biofilm-related genes through complementation assays. Our data demonstrate that the formation of mature biofilm requires EPS, LPS, both flagellum-dependent and flagellum-independent cell motility, secreted proteins and extracellular DNA. Additionally, multiple signaling pathways are involved in Xac biofilm formation. This work is the first report on a genome-wide scale of the genetic processes of biofilm formation in plant pathogenic bacteria. The report provides significant new information about the genetic

  7. Bacterial and plant HAD enzymes catalyse a missing phosphatase step in thiamin diphosphate biosynthesis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hasnain, Ghulam; Roje, Sanja; Sa, Na; Zallot, Rémi; Ziemak, Michael J; de Crécy-Lagard, Valérie; Gregory, Jesse F; Hanson, Andrew D

    2016-01-15

    The penultimate step of thiamin diphosphate (ThDP) synthesis in plants and many bacteria is dephosphorylation of thiamin monophosphate (ThMP). Non-specific phosphatases have been thought to mediate this step and no genes encoding specific ThMP phosphatases (ThMPases) are known. Comparative genomic analysis uncovered bacterial haloacid dehalogenase (HAD) phosphatase family genes (from subfamilies IA and IB) that cluster on the chromosome with, or are fused to, thiamin synthesis genes and are thus candidates for the missing phosphatase (ThMPase). Three typical candidates (from Anaerotruncus colihominis, Dorea longicatena and Syntrophomonas wolfei) were shown to have efficient in vivo ThMPase activity by expressing them in an Escherichia coli strain engineered to require an active ThMPase for growth. In vitro assays confirmed that these candidates all preferred ThMP to any of 45 other phosphate ester substrates tested. An Arabidopsis thaliana ThMPase homologue (At4g29530) of unknown function whose expression pattern and compartmentation fit with a role in ThDP synthesis was shown to have in vivo ThMPase activity in E. coli and to prefer ThMP to any other substrate tested. However, insertional inactivation of the At4g29530 gene did not affect growth or the levels of thiamin or its phosphates, indicating that Arabidopsis has at least one other ThMPase gene. The Zea mays orthologue of At4g29530 (GRMZM2G035134) was also shown to have ThMPase activity. These data identify HAD genes specifying the elusive ThMPase activity, indicate that ThMPases are substrate-specific rather than general phosphatases and suggest that different evolutionary lineages have recruited ThMPases independently from different branches of the HAD family.

  8. Structural basis of the inhibition of class C acid phosphatases by adenosine 5;#8242;-phosphorothioate

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Singh, Harkewal; Reilly, Thomas J.; Tanner, John J. (UMC)

    2012-01-20

    The inhibition of phosphatases by adenosine 5'-phosphorothioate (AMPS) was first reported in the late 1960s; however, the structural basis for the inhibition has remained unknown. Here, it is shown that AMPS is a submicromolar inhibitor of class C acid phosphatases, a group of bacterial outer membrane enzymes belonging to the haloacid dehalogenase structural superfamily. Furthermore, the 1.35-{angstrom} resolution crystal structure of the inhibited recombinant Haemophilus influenzae class C acid phosphatase was determined; this is the first structure of a phosphatase complexed with AMPS. The conformation of AMPS is identical to that of the substrate 5'-AMP, except that steric factors force a rotation of the thiophosphoryl out of the normal phosphoryl-binding pocket. This conformation is catalytically nonproductive, because the P atom is not positioned optimally for nucleophilic attack by Asp64, and the O atom of the scissile O-P bond is too far from the Asp (Asp66) that protonates the leaving group. The structure of 5'-AMP complexed with the Asp64 {yields} Asn mutant enzyme was also determined at 1.35-{angstrom} resolution. This mutation induces the substrate to adopt the same nonproductive binding mode that is observed in the AMPS complex. In this case, electrostatic considerations, rather than steric factors, underlie the movement of the phosphoryl. The structures not only provide an explanation for the inhibition by AMPS, but also highlight the precise steric and electrostatic requirements of phosphoryl recognition by class C acid phosphatases. Moreover, the structure of the Asp64 {yields} Asn mutant illustrates how a seemingly innocuous mutation can cause an unexpected structural change.

  9. Arabidopsis TH2 Encodes the Orphan Enzyme Thiamin Monophosphate Phosphatase[OPEN

    Science.gov (United States)

    Niehaus, Thomas D.; Hasnain, Ghulam; Gidda, Satinder K.; Nguyen, Thuy N.D.; Anderson, Erin M.; Brown, Greg; Yakunin, Alexander F.; de Crécy-Lagard, Valérie; Gregory, Jesse F.

    2016-01-01

    To synthesize the cofactor thiamin diphosphate (ThDP), plants must first hydrolyze thiamin monophosphate (ThMP) to thiamin, but dedicated enzymes for this hydrolysis step were unknown and widely doubted to exist. The classical thiamin-requiring th2-1 mutation in Arabidopsis thaliana was shown to reduce ThDP levels by half and to increase ThMP levels 5-fold, implying that the THIAMIN REQUIRING2 (TH2) gene product could be a dedicated ThMP phosphatase. Genomic and transcriptomic data indicated that TH2 corresponds to At5g32470, encoding a HAD (haloacid dehalogenase) family phosphatase fused to a TenA (thiamin salvage) family protein. Like the th2-1 mutant, an insertional mutant of At5g32470 accumulated ThMP, and the thiamin requirement of the th2-1 mutant was complemented by wild-type At5g32470. Complementation tests in Escherichia coli and enzyme assays with recombinant proteins confirmed that At5g32470 and its maize (Zea mays) orthologs GRMZM2G148896 and GRMZM2G078283 are ThMP-selective phosphatases whose activity resides in the HAD domain and that the At5g32470 TenA domain has the expected thiamin salvage activity. In vitro and in vivo experiments showed that alternative translation start sites direct the At5g32470 protein to the cytosol and potentially also to mitochondria. Our findings establish that plants have a dedicated ThMP phosphatase and indicate that modest (50%) ThDP depletion can produce severe deficiency symptoms. PMID:27677881

  10. Arabidopsis thaliana PECP1: enzymatic characterization and structural organization of the first plant phosphoethanolamine/phosphocholine phosphatase.

    Science.gov (United States)

    May, Anett; Spinka, Michael; Köck, Margret

    2012-02-01

    Maintenance of cellular phosphate homeostasis is crucial for primary and energy metabolism. In plants, low exogenous phosphate availability activates adaptive responses that include the immediate liberation of Pi from phosphorylated metabolites by yet uncharacterized intracellular phosphatases. Based on transcriptional analyses, the Arabidopsis thaliana gene At1g17710, a member of the HAD (Haloacid Dehalogenase) superfamily, was one of the most promising candidates. Here, we show by recombinant protein production and analysis of purified protein that the gene At1g17710 encodes a phosphoethanolamine/phosphocholine phosphatase (EC 3.1.3.75). Thus, the gene product was termed AtPECP1. The present study demonstrates that the Mg(2+)-dependent enzyme exhibits pronounced specificity for both substrates. The enzyme displays a broad pH optimum ranging from pH 6 to pH 8. Comparison of K(m) values indicates a slightly higher affinity for phosphocholine (0.44 mM) than for phosphoethanolamine (1.16 mM). The catalytic efficiency, however, is markedly higher for phosphoethanolamine than for phosphocholine being 1.06 × 10(4)M(-1)s(-1) and 2.34 × 10(3)M(-1)s(-1), respectively. Size exclusion chromatography, native gel electrophoresis and SAXS experiments with recombinant protein clearly point to a rapid monomer-dimer equilibrium of protein subunits. Given its established substrate specificity the enzyme is likely to be involved in the liberation of inorganic phosphate from intracellular sources and is especially in demand under phosphate-deprived conditions. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  11. Compositional profile of α / β-hydrolase fold proteins in mangrove soil metagenomes : Prevalence of epoxide hydrolases and haloalkane dehalogenases in oil-contaminated sites

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Jiménez Avella, Diego; Dini Andreote, Francisco; Ottoni, Júlia Ronzella; de Oliveira, Valéria Maia; van Elsas, Jan Dirk; Andreote, Fernando Dini

    The occurrence of genes encoding biotechnologically relevant α/β-hydrolases in mangrove soil microbial communities was assessed using data obtained by whole-metagenome sequencing of four mangroves areas, denoted BrMgv01 to BrMgv04, in São Paulo, Brazil. The sequences (215 Mb in total) were filtered

  12. Glycerol-3-phosphate phosphatase/PGP: Role in intermediate metabolism and target for cardiometabolic diseases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Possik, Elite; Madiraju, S R Murthy; Prentki, Marc

    2017-08-04

    Metabolic diseases, including obesity, type 2 diabetes, and metabolic syndrome arise because of disturbances in glucose and fat metabolism, which impact associated physiological events such as insulin secretion and action, fat storage and oxidation. Even though, decades of research has contributed to our current understanding of the components involved in glucose and fat metabolism and their regulation, that led to the development of many therapeutics, there are still many unanswered questions. Glycerol-3-phosphate (Gro3P), which is formed during glycolysis, is at the intersection of glucose and fat metabolism, and the availability of this metabolite can regulate energy and intermediary metabolism in mammalian cells. During the course of evolution, mammalian cells are assumed to have lost the capacity to directly hydrolyze Gro3P to glycerol, until the recent discovery from our laboratory showing that a previously known mammalian enzyme, phosphoglycolate phosphatase (PGP), can function as Gro3P phosphatase (G3PP) and regulate this metabolite levels. Emerging evidence indicates that G3PP/PGP is an evolutionarily conserved "multi-tasking" enzyme that belongs to the superfamily of haloacid dehalogenase-like phosphatase enzymes, and is capable of hydrolyzing Gro3P, an abundant physiologically relevant substrate, as well as other metabolites including 2-phosphoglycolate, 4-phospherythronate and 2-phospholactate, which are present in much smaller amounts in cells, under normal conditions. G3PP, by regulating Gro3P levels, plays a critical role in intermediary metabolism, including glycolysis, glucose oxidation, cellular redox and ATP production, gluconeogenesis, esterification of fatty acids towards glycerolipid synthesis and fatty acid oxidation. Because of G3PP's ability to regulate energy and intermediary metabolism as well as physiological functions such as insulin secretion, hepatic glucose production, and fat synthesis, storage and oxidation, the pathophysiological

  13. AcEST: BP921018 [AcEST

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available HAD-hydrolase MK0970 OS=Met... 44 2e-04 sp|Q3UGR5|HDHD2_MOUSE Haloacid dehalogena...311|Y209_METTH Uncharacterized HAD-hydrolase MTH_209 OS=Me... 45 1e-04 sp|Q8TWR2|Y970_METKA Uncharacterized

  14. Primers That Target Functional Genes of Organohalide-Respiring Bacteria (online first)

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Lu, Y.; Atashgahi, S.; Hug, L.A.; Smidt, H.

    2015-01-01

    Halogenated organic hydrocarbons are problematic environmental pollutants that can be reductively dehalogenated by organohalide-respiring bacteria (OHRB) in anoxic environments. This energy-conserving process is mediated by reductive dehalogenases (RDases). To amplify the diversity of reductive deha

  15. One pot 'click' reactions : tandem enantioselective biocatalytic epoxide ring opening and [3+2] azide alkyne cycloaddition

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Campbell-Verduyn, Lachlan S.; Szymanski, Wiktor; Postema, Christiaan P.; Dierckx, Rudi A.; Elsinga, Philip H.; Janssen, Dick B.; Feringa, Ben L.

    2010-01-01

    Halohydrin dehalogenase (HheC) can perform enantioselective azidolysis of aromatic epoxides to 1,2-azido alcohols which are subsequently ligated to alkynes producing chiral hydroxy triazoles in a one-pot procedure with excellent enantiomeric excess.

  16. 来自假单胞菌ZJU26的R-2-氯丙酸脱卤酶的手性识别过程研究%Studying of Chiral Recognition Process of R-2-CPA Dehalogenase from Pseudomonas sp.ZJU26

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    张滢潭; 杨立荣; 徐刚; 吴坚平

    2014-01-01

    立体选择性是2-卤代酸脱卤酶最重要的性质之一,但目前其手性识别过程尚不明确,对其进行研究和解析具有重要意义.以来自假单胞菌ZJU26的R-2-氯丙酸脱卤酶dehDIV-R为模型,研究了R-2-卤代酸脱卤酶的手性识别过程.首先通过测定反应产物的构型,确定dehDIV-R催化底物为SN2反应.通过Discovery Studio 3.0对dehDIV-R进行同源模建及底物分子对接,由对接结果和序列比对确定dehDIV-R立体选择性的关键位点Asn236,预测dehDIV-R的立体选择性与反应时底物到达反应位置的空间位阻密切相关.对dehDIV-R进行虚拟突变,将Asn236位点突变成具有不同空间位阻的残基Ala和Ser,并分别与底物分子进行分子对接,预测突变酶的立体选择性.根据预测结果,对Asn236氨基酸残基进行定点突变,发现在Asn236突变为Ala后的A1酶显示出对RS底物的活力;在Asn236突变为Ser后的S1酶显示出与原始酶相反的立体选择性,实现了立体选择性的反转.与模型的预测结果相符,证明了模型的合理性.

  17. Roles of horizontal gene transfer and gene integration in evolution of 1,3-dichloropropene- and 1,2-dibromoethane-degradative pathways

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Poelarends, GJ; Kulakov, LA; Larkin, MJ; Vlieg, JETV; Janssen, DB; Kulakov, Leonid A.; Larkin, Michael J.; Hylckama Vlieg, Johan E.T. van

    2000-01-01

    The haloalkane-degrading bacteria Rhodococcus rhodochrous NCIMB13064, Pseudomonas pavonaceae 170, and Mycobacterium sp. strain GP1 share a highly conserved haloalkane dehalogenase gene (dhaA). Here, we describe the extent of the conserved dhaA segments in these three phylogenetically distinct bacter

  18. The chemical versatility of the beta-alpha-beta fold : Catalytic promiscuity and divergent evolution in the tautomerase superfamily

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Poelarends, G. J.; Veetil, V. Puthan; Whitman, C. P.

    2008-01-01

    Tautomerase superfamily members have an amino-terminal proline and a beta-alpha-beta fold, and include 4-oxalocrotonate tautomerase (4-OT), 5-(carboxymethyl)-2-hydroxymuconate isomerase (CHMI), trans- and cis-3-chloroacrylic acid dehalogenase (CaaD and cis-CaaD, respectively), malonate semialdehyde

  19. Vitamin B{sub 1}2 in Enrichments of hydrothermal vents sediments supplements with cobalt and methanol

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gomez y Gomez, Y.; Garcia-Pena, I.; Guerrero-Barajas, C.

    2009-07-01

    Vitamin B{sub 1}2 (VB12) is an important cofactor present in methanogens and acetogenic bacterium. Biosynthesis of cyanocobalamin under different anaerobic and aerobic conditions has been reported for sewage, granular sludge and pure cultures. Corrinoids containing cobalt have also been identified as components in at least one dehalogenases belonging to Dehalooccoides bacteria. (Author)

  20. Degradation of munitions and chlorinated solvents by aquatic plants

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wolfe, N.L.

    1995-04-22

    Nitroreductase and dehalogenase enzymes have been isolated from sediments and soils. Using enzyme linked immunospecific assays (ELISA), a number of aquatic plants have been identified as sources of the enzymes. The plants were then brought back into the laboratory and evaluated as candidates for further remediation studies.

  1. Functional genomics of corrinoid starvation in the organohalide-respiring bacterium Dehalobacter restrictus strain PER-K23

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Rupakula, A.; Lu, Y.; Kruse, T.; Boeren, S.; Holliger, C.; Smidt, H.; Maillard, J.

    2015-01-01

    De novo corrinoid biosynthesis represents one of the most complicated metabolic pathways in nature. Organohalide-respiring bacteria (OHRB) have developed different strategies to deal with their need of corrinoid, as it is an essential cofactor of reductive dehalogenases, the key enzymes in OHR metab

  2. Concurrent haloalkanoate degradation and chlorate reduction by Pseudomonas chloritidismutans AW-1

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Peng, Peng; Zheng, Ying; Koehorst, Jasper J.; Schaap, Peter J.; Stams, Fons; Smidt, Hauke; Atashgahi, Siavash

    2017-01-01

    Haloalkanoates are environmental pollutants that can be degraded aerobically by microorganisms producing hydrolytic dehalogenases. However, there is a lack of information about the anaerobic degradation of haloalkanoates. Genome analysis of Pseudomonas chloritidismutans AW-1T, a

  3. Complete genome sequence of Dehalobacter restrictus PER-K23T

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kruse, Thomas; Maillard, Julien; Goodwin, Lynne; Woyke, Tanja; Teshima, Hazuki; Bruce, David; Detter, Chris; Tapia, Roxanne; Han, Cliff; Huntemann, Marcel; Wei, Chia-Lin; Han, James; Chen, Amy; Kyrpides, Nikos; Szeto, Ernest; Markowitz, Victor; Ivanova, Natalia; Pagani, Ioanna; Pati, Amrita; Pitluck, Sam; Nolan, Matt; Holliger, Christof; Smidt, Hauke

    2013-01-01

    Dehalobacter restrictus strain PER-K23 (DSM 9455) is the type strain of the species Dehalobacter restrictus. D. restrictus strain PER-K23 grows by organohalide respiration, coupling the oxidation of H2 to the reductive dechlorination of tetra- or trichloroethene. Growth has not been observed with any other electron donor or acceptor, nor has fermentative growth been shown. Here we introduce the first full genome of a pure culture within the genus Dehalobacter. The 2,943,336 bp long genome contains 2,826 protein coding and 82 RNA genes, including 5 16S rRNA genes. Interestingly, the genome contains 25 predicted reductive dehalogenase genes, the majority of which appear to be full length. The reductive dehalogenase genes are mainly located in two clusters, suggesting a much larger potential for organohalide respiration than previously anticipated. PMID:24501624

  4. Maintenance Role of a Glutathionyl-Hydroquinone Lyase (PcpF) in Pentachlorophenol Degradation by Sphingobium chlorophenolicum ATCC 39723 ▿

    OpenAIRE

    Huang, Yan; Xun, Randy; Chen, Guanjun; Xun, Luying

    2008-01-01

    Pentachlorophenol (PCP) is a toxic pollutant. Its biodegradation has been extensively studied in Sphingobium chlorophenolicum ATCC 39723. All enzymes required to convert PCP to a common metabolic intermediate before entering the tricarboxylic acid cycle have been characterized. One of the enzymes is tetrachloro-p-hydroquinone (TeCH) reductive dehalogenase (PcpC), which is a glutathione (GSH) S-transferase (GST). PcpC catalyzes the GSH-dependent conversion of TeCH to trichloro-p-hydroquinone (...

  5. European Science Notes. Volume 41, Number 7.

    Science.gov (United States)

    1987-07-01

    production of many nigh-value products kanes and simple cyclic terpenes , the such as pharmaceuticals and agricultural use of the microorganisms concerned... terpene esters terize the enzyme responsible for this " Microbial dehalogenases, their genet- bioconversion with a view to improving ics and biochemistry...positives. Sera from all individuals genes. Marcker and his group have so far were absorbed on HSV-infected varicella isolated six separate Lb genes from soy

  6. A Pseudomonas putida strain genetically engineered for 1,2,3-trichloropropane bioremediation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Samin, Ghufrana; Pavlova, Martina; Arif, M Irfan; Postema, Christiaan P; Damborsky, Jiri; Janssen, Dick B

    2014-09-01

    1,2,3-Trichloropropane (TCP) is a toxic compound that is recalcitrant to biodegradation in the environment. Attempts to isolate TCP-degrading organisms using enrichment cultivation have failed. A potential biodegradation pathway starts with hydrolytic dehalogenation to 2,3-dichloro-1-propanol (DCP), followed by oxidative metabolism. To obtain a practically applicable TCP-degrading organism, we introduced an engineered haloalkane dehalogenase with improved TCP degradation activity into the DCP-degrading bacterium Pseudomonas putida MC4. For this purpose, the dehalogenase gene (dhaA31) was cloned behind the constitutive dhlA promoter and was introduced into the genome of strain MC4 using a transposon delivery system. The transposon-located antibiotic resistance marker was subsequently removed using a resolvase step. Growth of the resulting engineered bacterium, P. putida MC4-5222, on TCP was indeed observed, and all organic chlorine was released as chloride. A packed-bed reactor with immobilized cells of strain MC4-5222 degraded >95% of influent TCP (0.33 mM) under continuous-flow conditions, with stoichiometric release of inorganic chloride. The results demonstrate the successful use of a laboratory-evolved dehalogenase and genetic engineering to produce an effective, plasmid-free, and stable whole-cell biocatalyst for the aerobic bioremediation of a recalcitrant chlorinated hydrocarbon. Copyright © 2014, American Society for Microbiology. All Rights Reserved.

  7. Dehalogenimonas lykanthroporepellens BL-DC-9T simultaneously transcribes many rdhA genes during organohalide respiration with 1,2-DCA, 1,2-DCP, and 1,2,3-TCP as electron acceptors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mukherjee, Kalpataru; Bowman, Kimberly S; Rainey, Fred A; Siddaramappa, Shivakumara; Challacombe, Jean F; Moe, William M

    2014-05-01

    The genome sequence of the organohalide-respiring bacterium Dehalogenimonas lykanthroporepellensBL-DC-9(T) contains numerous loci annotated as reductive dehalogenase homologous (rdh) genes based on inferred protein sequence identity with functional dehalogenases of other bacterial species. Many of these genes are truncated, lack adjacent regulatory elements, or lack cognate genes coding for membrane-anchoring proteins typical of the functionally characterized active reductive dehalogenases of organohalide-respiring bacteria. To investigate the expression patterns of the rdh genes in D. lykanthroporepellensBL-DC-9(T), oligonucleotide primers were designed to uniquely target 25 rdh genes present in the genome as well as four putative regulatory genes. RNA extracts from cultures of strain BL-DC-9(T) actively dechlorinating three different electron acceptors, 1,2-dichloroethane, 1,2-dichloropropane, and 1,2,3-trichloropropane were reverse-transcribed and subjected to PCR amplification using rdh-specific primers. Nineteen rdh gene transcripts, including 13 full-length rdhA genes, six truncated rdhA genes, and five rdhA genes having cognate rdhB genes were consistently detected during the dechlorination of all three of the polychlorinated alkanes tested. Transcripts from all four of the putative regulatory genes were also consistently detected. Results reported here expand the diversity of bacteria known to simultaneously transcribe multiple rdh genes and provide insights into the transcription factors associated with rdh gene expression.

  8. A metagenomic-based survey of microbial (de)halogenation potential in a German forest soil.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Weigold, Pascal; El-Hadidi, Mohamed; Ruecker, Alexander; Huson, Daniel H; Scholten, Thomas; Jochmann, Maik; Kappler, Andreas; Behrens, Sebastian

    2016-06-29

    In soils halogens (fluorine, chlorine, bromine, iodine) are cycled through the transformation of inorganic halides into organohalogen compounds and vice versa. There is evidence that these reactions are microbially driven but the key enzymes and groups of microorganisms involved are largely unknown. Our aim was to uncover the diversity, abundance and distribution of genes encoding for halogenating and dehalogenating enzymes in a German forest soil by shotgun metagenomic sequencing. Metagenomic libraries of three soil horizons revealed the presence of genera known to be involved in halogenation and dehalogenation processes such as Bradyrhizobium or Pseudomonas. We detected a so far unknown diversity of genes encoding for (de)halogenating enzymes in the soil metagenome including specific and unspecific halogenases as well as metabolic and cometabolic dehalogenases. Genes for non-heme, no-metal chloroperoxidases and haloalkane dehalogenases were the most abundant halogenase and dehalogenase genes, respectively. The high diversity and abundance of (de)halogenating enzymes suggests a strong microbial contribution to natural halogen cycling. This was also confirmed in microcosm experiments in which we quantified the biotic formation of chloroform and bromoform. Knowledge on microorganisms and genes that catalyze (de)halogenation reactions is critical because they are highly relevant to industrial biotechnologies and bioremediation applications.

  9. Biodegradation and metabolic pathway of β-chlorinated aliphatic acid in Bacillus sp. CGMCC no. 4196.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lin, Chunjiao; Yang, Lirong; Xu, Gang; Wu, Jianping

    2011-04-01

    In this study, a bacterial Bacillus sp. CGMCC no. 4196 was isolated from mud. This strain exhibited the ability to degrade high concentration of 3-chloropropionate (3-CPA, 120 mM) or 3-chlorobutyrate (30 mM), but not chloroacetate or 2-chloropropionate (2-CPA). The growing cells, resting cells, and cell-free extracts from this bacterium had the capability of 3-CPA degradation. The results indicated that the optimum biocatalyst for 3-CPA biodegradation was the resting cells. The 3-CPA biodegradation pathway was further studied through the metabolites and critical enzymes analysis by HPLC, LC-MS, and colorimetric method. The results demonstrated that the metabolites of 3-CPA were 3-hydroxypropionic acid (3-HP) and malonic acid semialdehyde, and the critical enzymes were 3-CPA dehalogenase and 3-HP dehydroxygenase. Thus, the mechanism of the dehalogenase-catalyzed reaction was inferred as hydrolytic dehalogenation which was coenzyme A-independent and oxygen-independent. Finally, the pathway of β-chlorinated aliphatic acid biodegradation could be concluded as follows: the β-chlorinated acid is first hydrolytically dehalogenated to the β-hydroxyl aliphatic acid, and the hydroxyl aliphatic acid is oxidized to β-carbonyl aliphatic acid by β-hydroxy aliphatic acid dehydroxygenase. It is the first report that 3-HP was produced from 3-CPA by β-chlorinated aliphatic acid dehalogenase.

  10. Development of an enzymatic fiber-optic biosensor for detection of halogenated hydrocarbons

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bidmanova, Sarka; Chaloupkova, Radka; Damborsky, Jiri; Prokop, Zbynek [Masaryk University, Loschmidt Laboratories, Department of Experimental Biology and Research Centre for Toxic Compounds in the Environment, Faculty of Science, Brno (Czech Republic)

    2010-11-15

    An enzyme-based biosensor was developed by co-immobilization of purified enzyme haloalkane dehalogenase (EC 3.8.1.5) and a fluorescence pH indicator on the tip of an optical fiber. Haloalkane dehalogenase catalyzes hydrolytic dehalogenation of halogenated aliphatic hydrocarbons, which is accompanied by a pH change influencing the fluorescence of the indicator. The pH sensitivity of several fluorescent dyes was evaluated. The selected indicator 5(6)-carboxyfluorescein was conjugated with bovine serum albumin and its reaction was tested under different immobilization conditions. The biosensor was prepared by cross-linking of the conjugate in tandem with haloalkane dehalogenase using glutaraldehyde vapor. The biosensor, stored for 24 h in 50 mM phosphate buffer (pH 7.5) prior to measurement, was used after 15 min of equilibration, the halogenated compound was added, and the response was monitored for 30 min. Calibration of the biosensor with 1,2-dibromoethane and 3-chloro-2-(chloromethyl)-1-propene showed an excellent linear dependence, with detection limits of 0.133 and 0.014 mM, respectively. This biosensor provides a new tool for continuous in situ monitoring of halogenated environmental pollutants. (orig.)

  11. Proteomic analysis of differently cultured endemic medicinal mushroom Antrodia cinnamomea T.T. Chang et W.N. Chou from Taiwan.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lin, Yan-Liang; Wen, Tuan-Nan; Chang, Shang-Tzen; Chu, Fang-Hua

    2011-01-01

    Antrodia cinnamomea is peculiar to Taiwan. It only grows on one host and is highly valued as an important component of several traditional Chinese medicines. In this study, the different protein expression profiles of artificially cultivated vegetative mycelium and wild-type basidiomatal fruiting bodies were compared and unique protein spots from wild-type basidiomatal fruiting body were investigated using 2D polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis and LC-MS/MS protein identification. Most of the wild-type proteins not seen in the artificially cultivated mycelium were associated to function in metabolism, cell stress, ROS scavenging, and cell growth. Several proteins from wild-type basidiomes, such as catalase, aryl-alcohol dehydrogenase, S-adenosyl-L-homocysteine hydrolase, intradiol dioxygenase, haloacid dyhydrogenase, alpha- and beta-form tubulin, prohibitin, septin, chaperone, and HSP90 ATPase, showed higher expression than those from artificially cultured mycelium at the mRNA level.

  12. Crystal Structure of the Cystic Fibrosis Transmembrane Conductance Regulator Inhibitory Factor Cif Reveals Novel Active-Site Features of an Epoxide Hydrolase Virulence Factor▿ †

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bahl, Christopher D.; Morisseau, Christophe; Bomberger, Jennifer M.; Stanton, Bruce A.; Hammock, Bruce D.; O'Toole, George A.; Madden, Dean R.

    2010-01-01

    Cystic fibrosis transmembrane conductance regulator (CFTR) inhibitory factor (Cif) is a virulence factor secreted by Pseudomonas aeruginosa that reduces the quantity of CFTR in the apical membrane of human airway epithelial cells. Initial sequence analysis suggested that Cif is an epoxide hydrolase (EH), but its sequence violates two strictly conserved EH motifs and also is compatible with other α/β hydrolase family members with diverse substrate specificities. To investigate the mechanistic basis of Cif activity, we have determined its structure at 1.8-Å resolution by X-ray crystallography. The catalytic triad consists of residues Asp129, His297, and Glu153, which are conserved across the family of EHs. At other positions, sequence deviations from canonical EH active-site motifs are stereochemically conservative. Furthermore, detailed enzymatic analysis confirms that Cif catalyzes the hydrolysis of epoxide compounds, with specific activity against both epibromohydrin and cis-stilbene oxide, but with a relatively narrow range of substrate selectivity. Although closely related to two other classes of α/β hydrolase in both sequence and structure, Cif does not exhibit activity as either a haloacetate dehalogenase or a haloalkane dehalogenase. A reassessment of the structural and functional consequences of the H269A mutation suggests that Cif's effect on host-cell CFTR expression requires the hydrolysis of an extended endogenous epoxide substrate. PMID:20118260

  13. Isolation and Identification of Sodium Fluoroacetate Degrading Bacteria from Caprine Rumen in Brazil

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Expedito K. A. Camboim

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available The objective of this paper was to report the isolation of two fluoroacetate degrading bacteria from the rumen of goats. The animals were adult goats, males, crossbred, with rumen fistula, fed with hay, and native pasture. The rumen fluid was obtained through the rumen fistula and immediately was inoculated 100 μL in mineral medium added with 20 mmol L−1 sodium fluoroacetate (SF, incubated at 39°C in an orbital shaker. Pseudomonas fluorescens (strain DSM 8341 was used as positive control for fluoroacetate dehalogenase activity. Two isolates were identified by 16S rRNA gene sequencing as Pigmentiphaga kullae (ECPB08 and Ancylobacter dichloromethanicus (ECPB09. These bacteria degraded sodium fluoroacetate, releasing 20 mmol L−1 of fluoride ion after 32 hours of incubation in Brunner medium containing 20 mmol L−1 of SF. There are no previous reports of fluoroacetate dehalogenase activity for P. kullae and A. dichloromethanicus. Control measures to prevent plant intoxication, including use of fences, herbicides, or other methods of eliminating poisonous plants, have been unsuccessful to avoid poisoning by fluoroacetate containing plants in Brazil. In this way, P. kullae and A. dichloromethanicus may be used to colonize the rumen of susceptible animals to avoid intoxication by fluoroacetate containing plants.

  14. Non-conventional gas phase remediation of volatile halogenated compounds by dehydrated bacteria.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Erable, Benjamin; Goubet, Isabelle; Seltana, Amira; Maugard, Thierry

    2009-06-01

    Traditional biological removal processes are limited by the low solubility of halogenated compounds in aqueous media. A new technology appears very suitable for the remediation of these volatile organic compounds (VOCs). Solid/gas bio-catalysis applied in VOC remediation can transform halogenated compounds directly in the gas phase using dehydrated cells as a bio-catalyst. The hydrolysis of volatile halogenated substrates into the corresponding alcohol was studied in a solid/gas biofilter where lyophilised bacterial cultures were used as the catalyst. Four strains containing dehalogenase enzymes were tested for the hydrolysis of 1-chlorobutane. The highest removal yield was obtained using the dhaA-containing strains, the maximal reaction rate of 0.8 micromol min(-1)g(-1) being observed with Escherichia coli BL21(DE3)(dhaA). Various treatments such as cell disruption by lysozyme or alkaline gas addition in the bio-filter could stabilise the dehalogenase activity of the bacteria. A pre-treatment of the dehydrated bacterial cells by ammonia vapour improved the stability of the catalyst and a removal activity of 0.9 micromol min(-1)g(-1) was then obtained for 60h. Finally, the process was extended to a range of halogenated substrates including bromo- and chloro-substrates. It was shown that the removal capacity for long halogenated compounds (C(5)-C(6)) was greatly increased relative to traditional biological processes.

  15. Crystal Structure of the Cystic Fibrosis Transmembrane Conductance Regulator Inhibitory Factor Cif Reveals Novel Active-Site Features of an Epoxide Hydrolase Virulence Factor

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bahl, C.; Morisseau, C; Bomberger, J; Stanton, B; Hammock, B; O& apos; Toole, G; Madden, D

    2010-01-01

    Cystic fibrosis transmembrane conductance regulator (CFTR) inhibitory factor (Cif) is a virulence factor secreted by Pseudomonas aeruginosa that reduces the quantity of CFTR in the apical membrane of human airway epithelial cells. Initial sequence analysis suggested that Cif is an epoxide hydrolase (EH), but its sequence violates two strictly conserved EH motifs and also is compatible with other {alpha}/{beta} hydrolase family members with diverse substrate specificities. To investigate the mechanistic basis of Cif activity, we have determined its structure at 1.8-{angstrom} resolution by X-ray crystallography. The catalytic triad consists of residues Asp129, His297, and Glu153, which are conserved across the family of EHs. At other positions, sequence deviations from canonical EH active-site motifs are stereochemically conservative. Furthermore, detailed enzymatic analysis confirms that Cif catalyzes the hydrolysis of epoxide compounds, with specific activity against both epibromohydrin and cis-stilbene oxide, but with a relatively narrow range of substrate selectivity. Although closely related to two other classes of {alpha}/{beta} hydrolase in both sequence and structure, Cif does not exhibit activity as either a haloacetate dehalogenase or a haloalkane dehalogenase. A reassessment of the structural and functional consequences of the H269A mutation suggests that Cif's effect on host-cell CFTR expression requires the hydrolysis of an extended endogenous epoxide substrate.

  16. Crystal structure of the cystic fibrosis transmembrane conductance regulator inhibitory factor Cif reveals novel active-site features of an epoxide hydrolase virulence factor.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bahl, Christopher D; Morisseau, Christophe; Bomberger, Jennifer M; Stanton, Bruce A; Hammock, Bruce D; O'Toole, George A; Madden, Dean R

    2010-04-01

    Cystic fibrosis transmembrane conductance regulator (CFTR) inhibitory factor (Cif) is a virulence factor secreted by Pseudomonas aeruginosa that reduces the quantity of CFTR in the apical membrane of human airway epithelial cells. Initial sequence analysis suggested that Cif is an epoxide hydrolase (EH), but its sequence violates two strictly conserved EH motifs and also is compatible with other alpha/beta hydrolase family members with diverse substrate specificities. To investigate the mechanistic basis of Cif activity, we have determined its structure at 1.8-A resolution by X-ray crystallography. The catalytic triad consists of residues Asp129, His297, and Glu153, which are conserved across the family of EHs. At other positions, sequence deviations from canonical EH active-site motifs are stereochemically conservative. Furthermore, detailed enzymatic analysis confirms that Cif catalyzes the hydrolysis of epoxide compounds, with specific activity against both epibromohydrin and cis-stilbene oxide, but with a relatively narrow range of substrate selectivity. Although closely related to two other classes of alpha/beta hydrolase in both sequence and structure, Cif does not exhibit activity as either a haloacetate dehalogenase or a haloalkane dehalogenase. A reassessment of the structural and functional consequences of the H269A mutation suggests that Cif's effect on host-cell CFTR expression requires the hydrolysis of an extended endogenous epoxide substrate.

  17. Anaerobic reductive dechlorination of tetrachloroethene: how can dual Carbon-Chlorine isotopic measurements help elucidating the underlying reaction mechanism?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Badin, Alice; Buttet, Géraldine; Maillard, Julien; Holliger, Christof; Hunkeler, Daniel

    2014-05-01

    Chlorinated ethenes (CEs) such as tetrachloroethene (PCE) are common persistent groundwater contaminants. Among clean-up strategies applied to sites affected by such pollution, bioremediation has been considered with a growing interest as it represents a cost-effective, environmental friendly approach. This technique however sometimes leads to an incomplete and slow biodegradation of CEs resulting in an accumulation of toxic metabolites. Understanding the reaction mechanisms underlying anaerobic reductive dechlorination would thus help assessing PCE biodegradation in polluted sites. Stable isotope analysis can provide insight into reaction mechanisms. For chlorinated hydrocarbons, carbon (C) and chlorine (Cl) isotope data (δ13C and δ37Cl) tend to show a linear correlation with a slope (m ≡ ɛC/ɛCl) characteristic of the reaction mechanism [1]. This study hence aims at exploring the potential of a dual C-Cl isotope approach in the determination of the reaction mechanisms involved in PCE reductive dechlorination. C and Cl isotope fractionation were investigated during anaerobic PCE dechlorination by two bacterial consortia containing members of the Sulfurospirillum genus. The specificity in these consortia resides in the fact that they each conduct PCE reductive dechlorination catalysed by one different reductive dehalogenase, i.e. PceADCE which yields trichloroethene (TCE) and cis-dichloroethene (cDCE), and PceATCE which yields TCE only. The bulk C isotope enrichment factors were -3.6±0.3 o for PceATCE and -0.7±0.1o for PceADCE. The bulk Cl isotope enrichment factors were -1.3±0.2 o for PceATCE and -0.9±0.1 o for PceADCE. When applying the dual isotope approach, two m values of 2.7±0.1 and 0.7±0.2 were obtained for the reductive dehalogenases PceATCE and PceADCE, respectively. These results suggest that PCE can be degraded according to two different mechanisms. Furthermore, despite their highly similar protein sequences, each reductive dehalogenase seems

  18. Sister Dehalobacter Genomes Reveal Specialization in Organohalide Respiration and Recent Strain Differentiation Likely Driven by Chlorinated Substrates

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shuiquan eTang

    2016-02-01

    Full Text Available The genomes of two closely related Dehalobacter strains (strain CF and strain DCA were assembled from the metagenome of an anaerobic enrichment culture that reductively dechlorinates chloroform (CF, 1,1,1-trichloroethane (1,1,1-TCA and 1,1-dichloroethane (1,1-DCA. The 3.1 Mbp genomes of strain CF (that dechlorinates CF and 1,1,1-TCA and strain DCA (that dechlorinates 1,1-DCA each contain 17 putative reductive dehalogenase homologous (rdh genes. These two genomes were systematically compared to three other available organohalide-respiring Dehalobacter genomes (Dehalobacter restrictus strain PER-K23, Dehalobacter sp. strain E1 and Dehalobacter sp. strain UNSWDHB, and to the genomes of Dehalococcoides mccartyi strain 195 and Desulfitobacterium hafniense strain Y51. This analysis compared 42 different metabolic and physiological categories. The genomes of strains CF and DCA share 90% overall average nucleotide identity and greater than 99.8% identity over a 2.9 Mbp alignment that excludes large insertions, indicating that these genomes differentiated from a close common ancestor. This differentiation was likely driven by selection pressures around two orthologous reductive dehalogenase genes, cfrA and dcrA, that code for the enzymes that reduce CF or 1,1,1-TCA and 1,1-DCA. The many reductive dehalogenase genes found in the five Dehalobacter genomes cluster into two small conserved regions and were often associated with Crp/Fnr transcriptional regulators. Specialization is on-going on a strain-specific basis, as some strains but not others have lost essential genes in the Wood-Ljungdahl (strain E1 and corrinoid biosynthesis pathways (strains E1 and PER-K23. The gene encoding phosphoserine phosphatase, which catalyzes the last step of serine biosynthesis, is missing from all five Dehalobacter genomes, yet D. restrictus can grow without serine, suggesting an alternative or unrecognized biosynthesis route exists. In contrast to Dehalococcoides mccartyi

  19. Sister Dehalobacter Genomes Reveal Specialization in Organohalide Respiration and Recent Strain Differentiation Likely Driven by Chlorinated Substrates.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tang, Shuiquan; Wang, Po Hsiang; Higgins, Steven A; Löffler, Frank E; Edwards, Elizabeth A

    2016-01-01

    The genomes of two closely related Dehalobacter strains (strain CF and strain DCA) were assembled from the metagenome of an anaerobic enrichment culture that reductively dechlorinates chloroform (CF), 1,1,1-trichloroethane (1,1,1-TCA) and 1,1-dichloroethane (1,1-DCA). The 3.1 Mbp genomes of strain CF (that dechlorinates CF and 1,1,1-TCA) and strain DCA (that dechlorinates 1,1-DCA) each contain 17 putative reductive dehalogenase homologous (rdh) genes. These two genomes were systematically compared to three other available organohalide-respiring Dehalobacter genomes (Dehalobacter restrictus strain PER-K23, Dehalobacter sp. strain E1 and Dehalobacter sp. strain UNSWDHB), and to the genomes of Dehalococcoides mccartyi strain 195 and Desulfitobacterium hafniense strain Y51. This analysis compared 42 different metabolic and physiological categories. The genomes of strains CF and DCA share 90% overall average nucleotide identity and >99.8% identity over a 2.9 Mbp alignment that excludes large insertions, indicating that these genomes differentiated from a close common ancestor. This differentiation was likely driven by selection pressures around two orthologous reductive dehalogenase genes, cfrA and dcrA, that code for the enzymes that reduce CF or 1,1,1-TCA and 1,1-DCA. The many reductive dehalogenase genes found in the five Dehalobacter genomes cluster into two small conserved regions and were often associated with Crp/Fnr transcriptional regulators. Specialization is on-going on a strain-specific basis, as some strains but not others have lost essential genes in the Wood-Ljungdahl (strain E1) and corrinoid biosynthesis pathways (strains E1 and PER-K23). The gene encoding phosphoserine phosphatase, which catalyzes the last step of serine biosynthesis, is missing from all five Dehalobacter genomes, yet D. restrictus can grow without serine, suggesting an alternative or unrecognized biosynthesis route exists. In contrast to D. mccartyi, a complete heme biosynthesis

  20. Complete genome sequencing of Dehalococcoides sp. strain UCH007 using a differential reads picking method.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Uchino, Yoshihito; Miura, Takamasa; Hosoyama, Akira; Ohji, Shoko; Yamazoe, Atsushi; Ito, Masako; Takahata, Yoh; Suzuki, Ken-Ichiro; Fujita, Nobuyuki

    2015-01-01

    A novel Dehalococcoides sp. strain UCH007 was isolated from the groundwater polluted with chlorinated ethenes in Japan. This strain is capable of dechlorinating trichloroethene, cis-1,2-dichloroethene and vinyl chloride to ethene. Dehalococcoides bacteria are hardly cultivable, so genome sequencing has presented a challenge. In this study, we developed a differential reads picking method for mixed genomic DNA obtained from a co-culture, and applied it to the sequencing of strain UCH007. The genome of strain UCH007 consists of a 1,473,548-bp chromosome that encodes 1509 coding sequences including 29 putative reductive dehalogenase genes. Strain UCH007 is the first strain in the Victoria subgroup found to possess the pceA, tceA and vcrA genes.

  1. Chloroform respiration to dichloromethane by a Dehalobacter population.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grostern, Ariel; Duhamel, Melanie; Dworatzek, Sandra; Edwards, Elizabeth A

    2010-04-01

    Chloroform (CF), or trichloromethane, is an ubiquitous environmental pollutant because of its widespread industrial use, historically poor disposal and recalcitrance to biodegradation. Chloroform is a potent inhibitor of metabolism and no known organism uses it as a growth substrate. We discovered that CF was rapidly and sustainably dechlorinated in the course of investigating anaerobic reductive dechlorination of 1,1,1-trichloroethane in a Dehalobacter-containing culture. Like 1,1,1-trichloroethane dechlorination in this culture, CF dechlorination was a growth-linked respiratory process, requiring H(2) as an electron donor and CF as an electron acceptor. Moreover, the same specific reductive dehalogenase likely catalyzed both reactions. This Dehalobacter population appears specialized for substrates with three halogen substituents on the same carbon atom, with widespread implications for bioremediation.

  2. Identification of Chromobacterium violaceum genes with potential biotechnological application in environmental detoxification.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carepo, Marta S P; Azevedo, Juliana S Nina de; Porto, Jorge I R; Bentes-Sousa, Alexandra R; Batista, Jacqueline da Silva; Silva, Artur L C da; Schneider, Maria P C

    2004-01-01

    Chromobacterium violaceum is a Gram-negative bacterium found in a wide variety of tropical and subtropical ecosystems. The complete genome sequence of C. violaceum ATCC 12472 is now available, and it has considerable biotechnological potential for various applications, such as environmental detoxification, as well as medical and agricultural use. We examined the biotechnological potential of C. violaceum for environmental detoxification. Three operons, comprising the ars operon, involved in arsenic resistance, the cyn operon, involved in cyanate detoxification, and the hcn operon, encoding a cyanase, responsible for biogenic production of cyanide, as well as an open reading frame, encoding an acid dehalogenase, were analyzed in detail. Probable catalytic mechanisms for the enzymes were determined, based on amino acid sequence comparisons and on published structural information for these types of proteins.

  3. Fully automatized high-throughput enzyme library screening using a robotic platform.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dörr, Mark; Fibinger, Michael P C; Last, Daniel; Schmidt, Sandy; Santos-Aberturas, Javier; Böttcher, Dominique; Hummel, Anke; Vickers, Clare; Voss, Moritz; Bornscheuer, Uwe T

    2016-07-01

    A fully automatized robotic platform has been established to facilitate high-throughput screening for protein engineering purposes. This platform enables proper monitoring and control of growth conditions in the microtiter plate format to ensure precise enzyme production for the interrogation of enzyme mutant libraries, protein stability tests and multiple assay screenings. The performance of this system has been exemplified for four enzyme classes important for biocatalysis such as Baeyer-Villiger monooxygenase, transaminase, dehalogenase and acylase in the high-throughput screening of various mutant libraries. This allowed the identification of novel enzyme variants in a sophisticated and highly reliable manner. Furthermore, the detailed optimization protocols should enable other researchers to adapt and improve their methods. Biotechnol. Bioeng. 2016;113: 1421-1432. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  4. Biodegradation of Trihalomethanes and Other Halogenated Aliphatic Compounds

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smith, G. B.

    1996-01-01

    The biological dehalogenation of common water pollutants such as trichloromethane (chloroform) and other halogenated aliphatic compounds was the subject of this project. Samples from diverse water environments such as from groundwater contaminated with halogenated compounds and wastewaters from regional treatment plants were studied to identify conditions that favor certain dehalogenation reactions over others. Gene probe analyses of DNA extracted from the dichlormethane-degrading wastewater indicated the presence of the gene coding for dichloromethane dehalogenase, indicating the genetic basis for the dechlorination activity observed. These studies indicate that methanogenic bacteria are the organisms responsible for the chloroform dechlorination. Dechlorination of a common chlorofluorocarbon (CFC-11) was identified in samples taken from a regional aquifer contaminated with halogenated aliphatic compounds.

  5. The pentachlorophenol-dehalogenating Desulfitobacterium hafniense strain PCP-1.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Villemur, Richard

    2013-04-19

    In this report, a complete description of Desulfitobacterium hafniense strain PCP-1 is presented. The D. hafniense strain PCP-1 was isolated from a methanogenic consortium for its capacity to dehalogenate pentachlorophenol (PCP) into 3-chlorophenol. This strain is also capable of dehalogenating several other chloroaromatic compounds and tetrachloroethene into trichloroethene. Four gene loci encoding putative chlorophenol-reductive dehalogenases (CprA2 to CprA5) were detected, and the products of two of these loci have been demonstrated to dechlorinate different chlorinated phenols. Strain PCP-1 was used in laboratory-scale bioprocesses to degrade PCP present in contaminated environments. Desulfitobacterium hafniense PCP-1 is an excellent candidate for the development of efficient bioprocesses to degrade organohalide compounds.

  6. New generation of biocatalysts for organic synthesis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nestl, Bettina M; Hammer, Stephan C; Nebel, Bernd A; Hauer, Bernhard

    2014-03-17

    The use of enzymes as catalysts for the preparation of novel compounds has received steadily increasing attention over the past few years. High demands are placed on the identification of new biocatalysts for organic synthesis. The catalysis of more ambitious reactions reflects the high expectations of this field of research. Enzymes play an increasingly important role as biocatalysts in the synthesis of key intermediates for the pharmaceutical and chemical industry, and new enzymatic technologies and processes have been established. Enzymes are an important part of the spectrum of catalysts available for synthetic chemistry. The advantages and applications of the most recent and attractive biocatalysts--reductases, transaminases, ammonia lyases, epoxide hydrolases, and dehalogenases--will be discussed herein and exemplified by the syntheses of interesting compounds.

  7. Characterization of new bacterial catabolic genes and mobile genetic elements by high throughput genetic screening of a soil metagenomic library.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jacquiod, Samuel; Demanèche, Sandrine; Franqueville, Laure; Ausec, Luka; Xu, Zhuofei; Delmont, Tom O; Dunon, Vincent; Cagnon, Christine; Mandic-Mulec, Ines; Vogel, Timothy M; Simonet, Pascal

    2014-11-20

    A mix of oligonucleotide probes was used to hybridize soil metagenomic DNA from a fosmid clone library spotted on high density membranes. The pooled radio-labeled probes were designed to target genes encoding glycoside hydrolases GH18, dehalogenases, bacterial laccases and mobile genetic elements (integrases from integrons and insertion sequences). Positive hybridizing spots were affiliated to the corresponding clones in the library and the metagenomic inserts were sequenced. After assembly and annotation, new coding DNA sequences related to genes of interest were identified with low protein similarity against the closest hits in databases. This work highlights the sensitivity of DNA/DNA hybridization techniques as an effective and complementary way to recover novel genes from large metagenomic clone libraries. This study also supports that some of the identified catabolic genes might be associated with horizontal transfer events.

  8. Study on the production of enzymes from thermophiles%嗜热菌产酶现状的研究

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    潘丽贞; 陆利霞; 熊晓辉

    2012-01-01

    嗜热菌是应用最广泛的一种极端微生物,而其产生的酶在工业催化中有着广泛的应用。阐述了嗜热菌产脂肪酶、脱卤酶以及葡糖醛酸酯酶等几种酶的研究现状。%Thermophiles are a kind of extremophiles which are most widely used,and the enzymes produced by thermophiles are also widely used in industrial catalysis.The recent studies on the production of enzymes from thermophiles,such as lipase,dehalogenase,glucuronoyl esterase etc were summarized.

  9. Metagenomics as a Tool for Enzyme Discovery: Hydrolytic Enzymes from Marine-Related Metagenomes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Popovic, Ana; Tchigvintsev, Anatoly; Tran, Hai; Chernikova, Tatyana N; Golyshina, Olga V; Yakimov, Michail M; Golyshin, Peter N; Yakunin, Alexander F

    2015-01-01

    This chapter discusses metagenomics and its application for enzyme discovery, with a focus on hydrolytic enzymes from marine metagenomic libraries. With less than one percent of culturable microorganisms in the environment, metagenomics, or the collective study of community genetics, has opened up a rich pool of uncharacterized metabolic pathways, enzymes, and adaptations. This great untapped pool of genes provides the particularly exciting potential to mine for new biochemical activities or novel enzymes with activities tailored to peculiar sets of environmental conditions. Metagenomes also represent a huge reservoir of novel enzymes for applications in biocatalysis, biofuels, and bioremediation. Here we present the results of enzyme discovery for four enzyme activities, of particular industrial or environmental interest, including esterase/lipase, glycosyl hydrolase, protease and dehalogenase.

  10. Phytoremediation of small organic contaminants using transgenic plants

    Science.gov (United States)

    James, C Andrew; Strand, Stuart E

    2010-01-01

    The efficacy of transgenic plants in the phytoremediation of small organic contaminants has been investigated. Two principal strategies have been pursued (1) the manipulation of phase I metabolic activity to enhance in planta degradation rates, or to impart novel metabolic activity, and (2) the enhanced secretion of reactive enzymes from roots leading to accelerated ex planta degradation of organic contaminants. A pair of dehalogenase genes from Xanthobacter autotrophicus was expressed in tobacco resulting in the dehalogenation of 1,2-dichloroethane, which was otherwise recalcitrant. A laccase gene from cotton was overexpressed in Arabidopsis thaliana resulting in increased secretory laccase activity and the enhanced resistance to trichlorophenol in soils. Although the results to date are promising, much of the work has been limited to laboratory settings; field demonstrations are needed. PMID:19342219

  11. Identification of Serratia marcescens SE1 and determination of its Herbicide 2,2-dichloropropionate (2,2-DCP Degradation Potential

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Abel, E.

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Aims: The goal of the study is to isolate species of bacteria that capable of utilizing 2,2-dichloropropionic acid (2,2-DCP as sole carbon source from soil sample collected from surrounding lake water located in Universiti Teknologi Malaysia, Skudai, Johor. Methodology and Results: Genomic DNA from bacterium SE1 was extracted and PCR amplification was carried out using universal primers, Fd1 (5’ - AGA GTT TGA TCC TGGCTC AG - 3’ and rP1 (5’- ACG GTC ATA CCT TGT TAC GAC TT - 3’ before sending for sequencing. The 16S rDNA nucleotide sequences were compared with Basic Local Alignment Search Tool nucleotide (BLASTn and further analyzed using phylogenetic tree of Neighbour-Joining method (MEGA 5. Phylogenetic analysis indicated that SE1 strain clearly shared 97% homology to the genus of Serratia marcescens and therefore designated as Serratia marcescens sp. SE1. SE1 exhibited the ability to utilize 2,2-DCP as sole carbon source at 20 mM concentration with cell doubling time of 5 h and maximum chloride ion release of 38 μmolCl-/mL. This result suggests that the dehalogenase enzyme present in the bacteria has high affinity towards the substrate. Based on morphological and partial biochemical characteristics, strain SE1 was a non-motile Gram negative bacterium with red colonies, that gave a catalase positive reaction. Conclusion, significance and impact of study: A better understanding of dehalogenases enzyme produce by this S. marcescens sp. SE1 in general will be useful to be used as bioremediation tools for environmental management. This is the first reported case that Serratia sp. has the ability to degrade halogenated compound.

  12. Detoxification of 1,1,2-trichloroethane to ethene by desulfitobacterium and identification of its functional reductase gene.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Siyan Zhao

    Full Text Available 1,1,2-trichloroethane (1,1,2-TCA has become a common groundwater pollutant due to historically extensive utilization, improper disposal, as well as from incomplete dechlorination of 1,1,2,2-tetrachloroethane. Currently, limited information is available on microbial detoxification of 1,1,2-TCA. Desulfitobacterium sp. strain PR, which was isolated from an anaerobic bioreactor maintained to dechlorinate chloroethenes/ethanes, exhibited the capacity to dechlorinate 1,1,1-trichloroethane and chloroform. In this study, the dechlorinating ability of strain PR was further explored. Strain PR showed the capability to dechlorinate 1,1,2-TCA (~1.12 mM predominantly to 1,2-dichloroethane (1,2-DCA and chloroethane, and to trace amounts of vinyl chloride and ethene within 20 days. Strain PR coupled growth with dechlorination of 1,1,2-TCA to 1,2-DCA, while no cell growth was observed with dechlorination of 1,2-DCA to chloroethane. Later, through transcriptomic and enzymatic analysis, the reductive dehalogenase CtrA, which was previously reported to be responsible for 1,1,1-trichloroethane and chloroform dechlorination, was identified as the 1,1,2-TCA reductive dehalogenase. Since trichloroethene (TCE is usually co-contaminated with 1,1,2-TCA, a co-culture containing Dehalococcoides mccartyi strain 11a capable of detoxifying TCE and 1,2-DCA and strain PR was established. Interestingly, this co-culture dechlorinated 1,1,2-TCA and TCE to the non-toxic end-product ethene within 48 days without chloroethane production. This novel pathway avoids production of the carcinogenic intermediate dechlorination product vinyl chloride, providing a more environmentally friendly strategy to treat 1,1,2-TCA.

  13. Isolation and characterization of tetrachloroethylene- and cis-1,2-dichloroethylene-dechlorinating propionibacteria.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chang, Young-Cheol; Ikeutsu, Kaori; Toyama, Tadashi; Choi, Dubok; Kikuchi, Shintaro

    2011-10-01

    Two rapidly growing propionibacteria that could reductively dechlorinate tetrachloroethylene (PCE) and cis-1,2-dichloroethylene (cis-DCE) to ethylene were isolated from environmental sediments. Metabolic characterization and partial sequence analysis of their 16S rRNA genes showed that the new isolates, designated as strains Propionibacterium sp. HK-1 and Propionibacterium sp. HK-3, did not match any known PCE- or cis-DCE-degrading bacteria. Both strains dechlorinated relatively high concentrations of PCE (0.3 mM) and cis-DCE (0.52 mM) under anaerobic conditions without accumulating toxic intermediates during incubation. Cell-free extracts of both strains catalyzed PCE and cis-DCE dechlorination; degradation was accelerated by the addition of various electron donors. PCE dehalogenase from strain HK-1 was mediated by a corrinoid protein, since the dehalogenase was inactivated by propyl iodide only after reduction by titanium citrate. The amounts of chloride ions (0.094 and 0.103 mM) released after PCE (0.026 mM) and cis-DCE (0.05 mM) dehalogenation using the cell-free enzyme extracts of both strains, HK-1 and HK-3, were stoichiometrically similar (91 and 100%), indicating that PCE and cis-DCE were fully dechlorinated. Radiotracer studies with [1,2-¹⁴C] PCE and [1,2-¹⁴C] cis-DCE indicated that ethylene was the terminal product; partial conversion to ethylene was observed. Various chlorinated aliphatic compounds (PCE, trichloroethylene, cis-DCE, trans-1,2-dichloroethylene, 1,1-dichloroethylene, 1,1-dichloroethane, 1,2-dichloroethane, 1,2-dichloropropane, 1,1,2-trichloroethane, and vinyl chloride) were degraded by cell-free extracts of strain HK-1.

  14. Phenol Is the Initial Product Formed during Growth and Degradation of Bromobenzene by Tropical Marine Yeast, Yarrowia lipolytica NCIM 3589 via an Early Dehalogenation Step

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Aakanksha A. Vatsal

    2017-06-01

    Full Text Available Bromobenzene (BrB, a hydrophobic, recalcitrant organic compound, is listed by the environmental protection agencies as an environmental and marine pollutant having hepatotoxic, mutagenic, teratogenic, and carcinogenic effects. The tropical marine yeast Yarrowia lipolytica 3589 was seen to grow aerobically on BrB and displayed a maximum growth rate (μmax of 0.04 h-1. Furthermore, we also observed an increase in cell size and sedimentation velocity for the cells grown on BrB as compared to the glucose grown cells. The cells attached to the hydrophobic bromobenzene droplets through its hydrophobic and acid–base interactions. The BrB (0.5%, 47.6 mM was utilized by the cells with the release of a corresponding amount of bromide (12.87 mM and yielded a cell mass of 1.86 g/L after showing 34% degradation in 96 h. Maximum dehalogenase activity of 16.16 U/mL was seen in the cell free supernatant after 24 h of growth. Identification of metabolites formed as a result of BrB degradation, namely, phenol, catechol, cis, cis muconic acid, and carbon dioxide were determined by LC–MS and GC–MS. The initial attack on bromobenzene by Y. lipolytica cells lead to the transient accumulation of phenol as an early intermediate which is being reported for the first time. Degradation of phenol led to catechol which was degraded by the ortho- cleavage pathway forming cis, cis muconic acid and then to Krebs cycle intermediates eventually leading to CO2 production. The study shows that dehalogenation via an extracellular dehalogenase occurs prior to ring cleavage with phenol as the preliminary degradative compound being produced. The yeast was also able to grow on the degradative products, i.e., phenol and catechol, to varying degrees which would be of potential relevance in the degradation and remediation of xenobiotic environmental bromoaromatic pollutants such as bromobenzene.

  15. Anaerobic degradation of tetrachloroethylene; Anaerober Abbau von Tetrachlorethylen

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Diekert, G. [Stuttgart Univ. (Germany). Inst. fuer Mikrobiologie; Scholz-Muramatsu, H. [Stuttgart Univ. (Germany). Inst. fuer Siedlungswasserbau

    1996-12-31

    Dehalospirillum multivorans, a tetrachloroethylene-dechlorinating bacterium, was isolated in activated sludge. This organism is able to grow on a defined medium with hydrogen and tetrachloroethylene (PCE) as its only energy source. The organism was characterised and the physiology of dechlorination was studied. In this process PCE is dechlorinated to cis-1,2-dichloroethene (DCE) via trichloroethene (TCE). A fluidized-bed reactor which reduces PCE to DCE at a high rate (15 nmol/min/mg of protein at 5 {mu}M PCE) was inoculated with the bacterium. Meanwhile a reactor inoculated with D. multivorans and a fully dechlorinating mixed culture has become available which catalyses the complete dechlorination of PCE to ethene at just as high rates. Tetrachloroethene dehalogenase was purified from D. multivorans (unpublished results) and characterised. (orig./SR) [Deutsch] Aus Belebtschlamm wurde ein Tetrachlorethen-dechlorierendes Bakterium, Dehalospirillum multivorans, isoliert. Der Organismus waechst auf definiertem Medium mit Wasserstoff und Tetrachlorethen (PCE) als einziger Energiequelle. Der Organismus wurde charakterisiert und die Physiologie der Dechlorierung wurde untersucht. PCE wird dabei ueber Trichlorethen (TCE) bis zum cis-1,2-Dichlorethen (DCE) dechloriert. Mit diesem Bakterium wurde ein Wirbelschichtreaktor inokuliert, der mit hohen Raten (15 nmol/min/mg Protein bei 5 {mu}M PCE) PCE zu DCE reduziert. Inzwischen steht ein Reaktor zur Verfuegung, der mit D. multivorans und einer voellig dechlorierenden Mischkultur inokuliert wurde und der mit ebenso hohen Raten eine vollstaendige Dechlorierung von PCE bis zum Ethen katalysiert. Aus D. multivorans wurde die Tetrachlorethen-Dehalogenase gereinigt (unveroeffentlichte Ergebnisse) und charakterisiert. (orig./SR)

  16. The Potential Feasibility of Chlorinic Photosynthesis on Extrasolar Planets

    Science.gov (United States)

    Haas, Johnson

    2009-09-01

    It is highly likely that the first convincing evidence of extrasolar life will arrive in the form of atmospheric absorption spectra. The modern search for life-bearing extrasolar planets emphasizes the potential detection of O2 and O3 absorption spectra in exoplanetary atmospheres as archetypal signatures of biology. However, oxygenic photosynthesis apparently failed to evolve independently more than once on Earth, and is thus unlikely to be reliably ubiquitous throughout the universe. Alternative evolutionary paths may yield planetary atmospheres tinted with the waste products of other dominant metabolisms, including potentially exotic biochemistries. This study examines the potential feasibility of one such exotic metabolism: chlorinic photosynthesis (CPS), defined as biologically-mediated halogenation of aqueous chloride to HClO, Cl2 or partially-oxidized intermediates (e.g. haloalkanes, haloacids, haloaromatics), coupled with photosynthetic CO2 fixation. This metabolic couple is feasible thermodynamically and appears to be geochemically plausible under approximately terrestrial conditions. This study hypothesizes that planetary biospheres dominated by CPS would develop atmospheres enriched with dihalogens and other halogenated compounds, evolve a highly oxidizing surface geochemical environment, and foster biological selection pressures favoring halogen resistance and eventual metazoan heterotrophy based on dihalogen and halocarbon respiration. Planets favoring the evolution of CPS would probably receive equivalent or greater surface UV flux than Earth did in the Paleoarchean (promoting abiotic photo-oxidation of aqueous halides, and establishing a strong biological selective pressure toward their accommodation), and would orbit stars having equivalent or greater bulk metallicities (promoting greater planetary halide abundances) relative to the Sun. Directed searches for such worlds should probably focus on A, F and G0 spectral class stars having bulk

  17. Synthesis of {sup 15}N isotope labeled alanine; Sintese da alanina enriquecida com {sup 15}N

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Oliveira, Claudineia R. de; Bendassolli, Jose Albertino; Sant' Ana, Carlos Roberto; Tagliassachi, Romulo Barbieri; Maximo, Everaldo; Prestes, Clelber Vieira [Centro de Energia Nuclear na Agricultura (CENA), Piracicaba, SP (Brazil). Dept. de Isotopos Estaveis]. E-mail: crolivei@cena.usp.br

    2005-07-01

    The application of light chemical elements and their stable isotopes in biological studies have been increased over the last years. The use of {sup 15}N labeled amino acids is an important tool for elucidation of peptides structures. This paper describe a method for the synthesis of {sup 15}N isotope labeled alanine at lower costs than international ones, as well as the details of the recovery system of the nitrogen residues. In the present work an amination of {alpha}-haloacids, with the bromopropionic carboxylic acid and labeled aqua ammonia ({sup 15}NH{sub 3} aq) was carried out. In order to avoid eventually losses of {sup 15}NH{sub 3}, special cares were adopted, since the production cost is high. Although the acquisition cost of the {sup 13}N (radioactive) labeled compounds is lower, the obtained stable tracer will allow the accomplishment of important studies of the nitrogen cycling in living things, less occupational and environment hazards, and the time limitation problems in field studies. The tests took place in triplicates with NH{sub 3} (aq) being employed. With the establishment of the system for {sup 15}NH{sub 3} recovery, an average of 94 % of the ammonia employed in the synthesis process was recovered. The purity of the amino acid was state determined by TLC (Thin Layer Chromatography) and HPLC (High-Performance Liquid Chromatography) with a fluorescence detector. The Rf and the retention time of the synthesized sample were similar the sigma standard. Finally, regarding the established conditions, it was possible to obtain the alanine with a production cost about 40 % lower than the international price. (author)

  18. The 380 kb pCMU01 plasmid encodes chloromethane utilization genes and redundant genes for vitamin B12- and tetrahydrofolate-dependent chloromethane metabolism in Methylobacterium extorquens CM4: a proteomic and bioinformatics study.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sandro Roselli

    Full Text Available Chloromethane (CH3Cl is the most abundant volatile halocarbon in the atmosphere and contributes to the destruction of stratospheric ozone. The only known pathway for bacterial chloromethane utilization (cmu was characterized in Methylobacterium extorquens CM4, a methylotrophic bacterium able to utilize compounds without carbon-carbon bonds such as methanol and chloromethane as the sole carbon source for growth. Previous work demonstrated that tetrahydrofolate and vitamin B12 are essential cofactors of cmuA- and cmuB-encoded methyltransferases of chloromethane dehalogenase, and that the pathway for chloromethane utilization is distinct from that for methanol. This work reports genomic and proteomic data demonstrating that cognate cmu genes are located on the 380 kb pCMU01 plasmid, which drives the previously defined pathway for tetrahydrofolate-mediated chloromethane dehalogenation. Comparison of complete genome sequences of strain CM4 and that of four other M. extorquens strains unable to grow with chloromethane showed that plasmid pCMU01 harbors unique genes without homologs in the compared genomes (bluB2, btuB, cobA, cbiD, as well as 13 duplicated genes with homologs of chromosome-borne genes involved in vitamin B12-associated biosynthesis and transport, or in tetrahydrofolate-dependent metabolism (folC2. In addition, the presence of both chromosomal and plasmid-borne genes for corrinoid salvaging pathways may ensure corrinoid coenzyme supply in challenging environments. Proteomes of M. extorquens CM4 grown with one-carbon substrates chloromethane and methanol were compared. Of the 49 proteins with differential abundance identified, only five (CmuA, CmuB, PurU, CobH2 and a PaaE-like uncharacterized putative oxidoreductase are encoded by the pCMU01 plasmid. The mainly chromosome-encoded response to chloromethane involves gene clusters associated with oxidative stress, production of reducing equivalents (PntAA, Nuo complex, conversion of

  19. The SMUL_1544 Gene Product Governs Norcobamide Biosynthesis in the Tetrachloroethene-Respiring Bacterium Sulfurospirillum multivorans.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Keller, Sebastian; Treder, Aaron; von Reuss, Stephan H; Escalante-Semerena, Jorge C; Schubert, Torsten

    2016-08-15

    The tetrachloroethene (PCE)-respiring bacterium Sulfurospirillum multivorans produces a unique cobamide, namely, norpseudo-B12, which, in comparison to other cobamides, e.g., cobalamin and pseudo-B12, lacks the methyl group in the linker moiety of the nucleotide loop. In this study, the protein SMUL_1544 was shown to be responsible for the formation of the unusual linker moiety, which is most probably derived from ethanolamine-phosphate (EA-P) as the precursor. The product of the SMUL_1544 gene successfully complemented a Salmonella enterica ΔcobD mutant. The cobD gene encodes an l-threonine-O-3-phosphate (l-Thr-P) decarboxylase responsible for the synthesis of (R)-1-aminopropan-2-ol O-2-phosphate (AP-P), required specifically for cobamide biosynthesis. When SMUL_1544 was produced in the heterologous host lacking CobD, norpseudo-B12 was formed, which pointed toward the formation of EA-P rather than AP-P. Guided cobamide biosynthesis experiments with minimal medium supplemented with l-Thr-P supported cobamide biosynthesis in S. enterica producing SMUL_1544 or S. multivorans Under these conditions, both microorganisms synthesized pseudo-B12 This observation indicated a flexibility in the SMUL_1544 substrate spectrum. From the formation of catalytically active PCE reductive dehalogenase (PceA) in S. multivorans cells producing pseudo-B12, a compatibility of the respiratory enzyme with the cofactor was deduced. This result might indicate a structural flexibility of PceA in cobamide binding. Feeding of l-[3-(13)C]serine to cultures of S. multivorans resulted in isotope labeling of the norpseudo-B12 linker moiety, which strongly supports the hypothesis of EA-P formation from l-serine-O-phosphate (l-Ser-P) in this organism. The identification of the gene product SMUL_1544 as a putative l-Ser-P decarboxylase involved in norcobamide biosynthesis in S. multivorans adds a novel module to the assembly line of cobamides (complete corrinoids) in prokaryotes. Selected cobamide

  20. Comparative Single-Cell Genomics of Chloroflexi from the Okinawa Trough Deep-Subsurface Biosphere.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fullerton, Heather; Moyer, Craig L

    2016-05-15

    Chloroflexi small-subunit (SSU) rRNA gene sequences are frequently recovered from subseafloor environments, but the metabolic potential of the phylum is poorly understood. The phylum Chloroflexi is represented by isolates with diverse metabolic strategies, including anoxic phototrophy, fermentation, and reductive dehalogenation; therefore, function cannot be attributed to these organisms based solely on phylogeny. Single-cell genomics can provide metabolic insights into uncultured organisms, like the deep-subsurface Chloroflexi Nine SSU rRNA gene sequences were identified from single-cell sorts of whole-round core material collected from the Okinawa Trough at Iheya North hydrothermal field as part of Integrated Ocean Drilling Program (IODP) expedition 331 (Deep Hot Biosphere). Previous studies of subsurface Chloroflexi single amplified genomes (SAGs) suggested heterotrophic or lithotrophic metabolisms and provided no evidence for growth by reductive dehalogenation. Our nine Chloroflexi SAGs (seven of which are from the order Anaerolineales) indicate that, in addition to genes for the Wood-Ljungdahl pathway, exogenous carbon sources can be actively transported into cells. At least one subunit for pyruvate ferredoxin oxidoreductase was found in four of the Chloroflexi SAGs. This protein can provide a link between the Wood-Ljungdahl pathway and other carbon anabolic pathways. Finally, one of the seven Anaerolineales SAGs contains a distinct reductive dehalogenase homologous (rdhA) gene. Through the use of single amplified genomes (SAGs), we have extended the metabolic potential of an understudied group of subsurface microbes, the Chloroflexi These microbes are frequently detected in the subsurface biosphere, though their metabolic capabilities have remained elusive. In contrast to previously examined Chloroflexi SAGs, our genomes (several are from the order Anaerolineales) were recovered from a hydrothermally driven system and therefore provide a unique window into

  1. Exploring the potential of megaprimer PCR in conjunction with orthogonal array design for mutagenesis library construction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tang, Lixia; Zheng, Kai; Liu, Yu; Zheng, Huayu; Wang, Hu; Song, Chunlei; Zhou, Hong

    2013-01-01

    Although megaprimer PCR mutagenesis has been used routinely in protein directed evolution, users sometimes encounter technical hurdles, particularly inefficiency during amplification when large fragments are used or the template is difficult to be amplified. Instead of methodology development, here we simply overcome the limitation by optimizing megaprimer PCR conditions via orthogonal array design of the four PCR components in three levels of each: template, primer, Mg(2+) , and dNTPs. For this, only nine PCRs need to be performed. The strategy (termed as OptiMega) was not only successfully applied for the construction of one multiple-site saturation mutagenesis library of halohydrin dehalogenase HheC, which failed to be constructed previously using the standard QuikChange™ protocol, but also expanded the construction of two high-quality random mutagenesis libraries of HheA and HheC. Most importantly, OptiMega offers a quick and simple way of constructing random mutagenesis libraries by eliminating the ligation step. Our results demonstrated that the OptiMega strategy could greatly strengthen the potential of megaprimer PCR mutagenesis for library construction.

  2. Mechanistic insights into the dehalogenation reaction of fluoroacetate/fluoroacetic acid

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Miranda-Rojas, Sebastián, E-mail: sebastian.miranda@unab.cl [Chemical Processes and Catalysis (CPC), Departamento de Ciencias Químicas, Facultad de Ciencias Exactas, Universidad Andres Bello, Avenida República 275, Santiago (Chile); Toro-Labbé, Alejandro [Laboratorio de Química Teórica Computacional (QTC), Facultad de Química, Pontificia Universidad Católica de Chile, Avenida Vicuña Mackenna 4860, Macul, Santiago (Chile)

    2015-05-21

    Fluoroacetate is a toxic compound whose environmental accumulation may represent an important contamination problem, its elimination is therefore a challenging issue. Fluoroacetate dehalogenase catalyzes its degradation through a two step process initiated by an S{sub N}2 reaction in which the aspartate residue performs a nucleophilic attack on the carbon bonded to the fluorine; the second step is hydrolysis that releases the product as glycolate. In this paper, we present a study based on density functional theory calculations of the S{sub N}2 initiation reaction modeled through the interaction between the substrate and the propionate anion as the nucleophile. Results are analyzed within the framework of the reaction force and using the reaction electronic flux to identify and characterize the electronic activity that drives the reaction. Our results reveal that the selective protonation of the substrate catalyzes the reaction by decreasing the resistance of the structural and electronic reorganization needed to reach the transition state. Finally, the reaction energy is modulated by the degree of stabilization of the fluoride anion formed after the S{sub N}2 reaction. In this way, a site-induced partial protonation acts as a chemical switch in a key process that determines the output of the reaction.

  3. Cobamide-mediated enzymatic reductive dehalogenation via long-range electron transfer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kunze, Cindy; Bommer, Martin; Hagen, Wilfred R; Uksa, Marie; Dobbek, Holger; Schubert, Torsten; Diekert, Gabriele

    2017-07-03

    The capacity of metal-containing porphyrinoids to mediate reductive dehalogenation is implemented in cobamide-containing reductive dehalogenases (RDases), which serve as terminal reductases in organohalide-respiring microbes. RDases allow for the exploitation of halogenated compounds as electron acceptors. Their reaction mechanism is under debate. Here we report on substrate-enzyme interactions in a tetrachloroethene RDase (PceA) that also converts aryl halides. The shape of PceA's highly apolar active site directs binding of bromophenols at some distance from the cobalt and with the hydroxyl substituent towards the metal. A close cobalt-substrate interaction is not observed by electron paramagnetic resonance spectroscopy. Nonetheless, a halogen substituent para to the hydroxyl group is reductively eliminated and the path of the leaving halide is traced in the structure. Based on these findings, an enzymatic mechanism relying on a long-range electron transfer is concluded, which is without parallel in vitamin B12-dependent biochemistry and represents an effective mode of RDase catalysis.

  4. The organohalide-respiring bacterium Sulfurospirillum multivorans: a natural source for unusual cobamides.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schubert, Torsten

    2017-05-01

    Cobamides ('complete' corrinoids) are essential for organohalide-respiring bacteria because they act as cofactors of reductive dehalogenases (RDases). RDases are the key enzymes in organohalide respiration, a process relevant for environmental remediation. More than a decade ago, the unusual norpseudo-B12 was identified as cofactor of the tetrachloroethene RDase (PceA) purified from the epsilonproteobacterium Sulfurospirillum multivorans. Since then, the question was raised whether or not the production of the uncommon cobamide is a specific adaptation to the requirements of PceA. Recently, efforts were made to unravel variations in the cobamide biosynthetic pathway, which lead to the production of the structurally unique norpseudo-B12. The acquisition of genomic and proteomic data together with structural analyses of PceA provided insights into norcobamide formation and utilization. By the use of guided biosynthesis, S. multivorans was shown to be an effective cobamide producer capable of generating unusual norcobamides either functional or non-functional as cofactors of PceA. The organism turned out to be a suitable tool for testing the impact of cobamide structure on enzyme function. The results summarized here highlight S. multivorans in particular and the organohalide-respiring bacteria in general as a resource for new discoveries on cobamide diversity and utilization.

  5. Stereoselective microbial dehalorespiration with vicinal dichlorinated alkanes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    De Wildeman, Stefaan; Diekert, Gabriele; Van Langenhove, Herman; Verstraete, Willy

    2003-09-01

    The suspected carcinogen 1,2-dichloroethane (1,2-DCA) is the most abundant chlorinated C(2) groundwater pollutant on earth. However, a reductive in situ detoxification technology for this compound does not exist. Although anaerobic dehalorespiring bacteria are known to catalyze several dechlorination steps in the reductive-degradation pathway of chlorinated ethenes and ethanes, no appropriate isolates that selectively and metabolically convert them into completely dechlorinated end products in defined growth media have been reported. Here we report on the isolation of Desulfitobacterium dichloroeliminans strain DCA1, a nutritionally defined anaerobic dehalorespiring bacterium that selectively converts 1,2-dichloroethane and all possible vicinal dichloropropanes and -butanes into completely dechlorinated end products. Menaquinone was identified as an essential cofactor for growth of strain DCA1 in pure culture. Strain DCA1 converts chiral chlorosubstrates, revealing the presence of a stereoselective dehalogenase that exclusively catalyzes an energy-conserving anti mechanistic dichloroelimination. Unlike any known dehalorespiring isolate, strain DCA1 does not carry out reductive hydrogenolysis reactions but rather exclusively dichloroeliminates its substrates. This unique dehalorespiratory biochemistry has shown promising application possibilities for bioremediation purposes and fine-chemical synthesis.

  6. Degradation of 4-chlorobenzoic acid by Arthrobacter sp

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Marks, T.S.; Smith, A.R.W.; Quirk, A.V.

    1984-11-01

    A mixed population, enriched and established in a defined medium, from a sewage sludge inoculum was capable of complete mineralization of 4-chlorobenzoate. An organism, identified as Arthrobacter sp., was isolated from the consortium and shown to be capable of utilizing 4-chlorobenzoate as the sole carbon and energy source in pure culture. This organism (strain TM-1), dehalogenated 4-chlorobenzoate as the initial step in the degradative pathway. The production, 4-hydroxybenzoate, was further metabolized via protocatechuate. The ability of strain TM-1 to degrade 4-chlorobenzoate in liquid medium at 25/sup 0/C was improved by the use of continuous culture and repeated sequential subculturing. Other chlorinated benzoates and the parent compound benzoate did not support growth of strain TM-1. An active cell extract was prepared and shown to dehalogenate 4-chloro-, 4-fluoro-, and 4-bromobenzoate. Dehalogenase activity had an optimum pH of 6.8 and an optimum temperature of 20/sup 0/C and was inhibited by dissolved oxygen and stimulated by manganese (Mn/sup 2 +/). Strain improvement resulted in an increase in the specific activity of the cell extract from 0.09 to 0.85 nmol of 4-hydroxybenzoate per min per mg of protein and a decrease in the doubling time of the organism from 50 to 1.6 h. 18 references, 3 figures, 2 tables.

  7. Single cell genomic study of dehalogenating Chloroflexi from deep sea sediments of Peruvian Margin

    Science.gov (United States)

    Spormann, A.; Kaster, A.; Meyer-Blackwell, K.; Biddle, J.

    2012-12-01

    Dehalogenating Chloroflexi, such as Dehalococcoidites (Dhc), are members of the rare biosphere of deep sea sediments but were originally discovered as the key microbes mediating reductive dehalogenation of the prevalent groundwater contaminants tetrachloroethene and trichloroethene to ethene. Dhc are slow growing, highly niche adapted microbes that are specialized to organohalide respiration as the sole mode of energy conservation. These strictly anaerobic microbes depend on a supporting microbial community to mitigate electron donor and cofactor requirements among other factors. Molecular and genomic studies on the key enzymes for energy conservation, reductive dehalogenases, have provided evidence for rapid adaptive evolution in terrestrial environments. However, the metabolic life style of Dhc in the absence of anthropogenic contaminants, such as in pristine deep sea sediments, is still unknown. In order to provide fundamental insights into life style, genomic population structure and evolution of Dhc, we analyzed a non-contaminated deep sea sediment sample of the Peru Margin 1230 site collected 6 mbf by a metagenomic and single cell genomic. We present for the first time single cell genomic data on dehalogenating Chloroflexi, a significant microbial population in the poorly understood oligotrophic marine sub-surface environments.

  8. Single cell genomic study of dehalogenating Chloroflexi in deep sea sediments of Peru Margin 1230

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kaster, A.; Meyer-Blackwell, K.; Biddle, J.; Spormann, A.

    2012-12-01

    Dehalogenating Chloroflexi, such as Dehalococcoidites (Dhc), are members of the rare biosphere of deep sea sediments but were originally discovered as the key microbes mediating reductive dehalogenation of the prevalent groundwater contaminants tetrachloroethene and trichloroethene to ethene. Dhc are slow growing, highly niche adapted microbes that are specialized to organohalide respiration as the sole mode of energy conservation. They are strictly anaerobic microbes that depend on a supporting microbial community for electron donor and cofactor requirements among other factors. Molecular and genomic studies on the key enzymes for energy conservation, reductive dehalogenases, have provided evidence for rapid adaptive evolution in terrestrial environments. However, the metabolic life style of Dhc in the absence of anthropogenic contaminants, such as in pristine deep sea sediments, is still unknown. In order to provide fundamental insights into life style, genomic population structure and evolution of Dhc, we analyzed a non-contaminated deep sea sediment sample of the Peru Margin 1230 site collected 6 mbsf by a metagenomic and single cell genomic approach. We present for the first time single cell genomic data on dehalogenating Chloroflexi, a significant microbial population in the poorly understood oligotrophic marine sub-surface environment.

  9. Single cell genomic study of Dehalococcoidites in deep sea sediments of Peru Margin 1230

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kaster, A.; Meyer-Blackwell, K.; Spormann, A. M.

    2013-12-01

    Dehalogenating Chloroflexi, such as Dehalococcoidites Dhc were originally discovered as the key microorganisms mediating reductive dehalogenation of the prevalent groundwater contaminants tetrachloroethene and trichloroethene. Molecular and genomic studies on their key enzymes for energy conservation, reductive dehalogenases rdh, have provided evidence for ubiquitous horizontal gene transfer. A pioneering study by Futagami et al. discovered novel putative rdh phylotypes in sediments from the Pacific, revealing an unknown and surprising abundance of rdh genes in pristine habitats. The frequent detection of Dhc-related 16S rRNA genes from these environments implied the occurrence of dissimilatory dehalorespiration in marine subsurface sediments, however, pristine Dhc could never be linked to this activity. Despite being ubiquitous in those environments, metabolic life style or ecological function of Dhc in the absence of anthropogenic contaminants is still completely unknown. We therefore analyzed a non-contaminated deep sea sediment sample of the Peru Margin 1230 site by a single cell genomic (SGC) approach. We present for the first time data on three single Dhc cells, helping to elucidate their role in the poorly understood oligotrophic marine sub-surface environment.

  10. Identification of molecular markers to follow up the bioremediation of sites contaminated with chlorinated compounds.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marzorati, Massimo; Balloi, Annalisa; De Ferra, Francesca; Daffonchio, Daniele

    2010-01-01

    The use of microorganisms to clean up xenobiotics from polluted ecosystems (soil and water) represents an ecosustainable and powerful alternative to traditional remediation processes. Recent developments in molecular-biology-based techniques have led to rapid and sensitive strategies for monitoring and identifying bacteria and catabolic genes involved in the degradation of xenobiotics. This chapter provides a description of recently developed molecular-biology-based techniques, such as PCR with degenerate primers set, real-time quantitative PCR (qPCR), reverse transcription PCR (RT-PCR), southern blot hybridization, and long-range PCR, used to give a picture of the catabolically relevant microorganisms and of the functional genes present in a polluted system. By using a case study of a groundwater aquifer contaminated with 1,2-dichloroethane (1,2-DCA), we describe the identification of microorganisms potentially involved in the 1,2-DCA dehalorespiration (Dehalobacter sp. and Desulfitobacterium sp.) and a complete new gene cluster encoding for a 1,2-DCA reductive dehalogenase. The application of these techniques to bioremediation can improve our understanding of the inner mechanisms to evaluate the feasibility of a given treatment and provide us with a method to follow up bacteria and catabolic genes involved in the degradation of contaminants during the activities in situ.

  11. Spatial Abundance and Distribution of Potential Microbes and Functional Genes Associated with Anaerobic Mineralization of Pentachlorophenol in a Cylindrical Reactor

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Zhi-Ling; Nan, Jun; Huang, Cong; Liang, Bin; Liu, Wen-Zong; Cheng, Hao-Yi; Zhang, Chunfang; Zhang, Dongdong; Kong, Deyong; Kanamaru, Kyoko; Kobayashi, Tetsuo; Wang, Ai-Jie; Katayama, Arata

    2016-01-01

    Functional interplays of microbial activity, genetic diversity and contaminant transformation are poorly understood in reactors for mineralizing halogenated aromatics anaerobically. Here, we investigated abundance and distribution of potential microbes and functional genes associated with pentachlorophenol (PCP) anaerobic mineralization in a continuous-flow cylindrical reactor (15 cm in length). PCP dechlorination and the metabolite (phenol) were observed at segments 0–8 cm from inlet, where key microbes, including potential reductive dechlorinators (Dehalobacter, Sulfurospirillum, Desulfitobacterium and Desulfovibrio spp.) and phenol degraders (Cryptanaerobacter and Syntrophus spp.), as well as putative functional genes, including putative chlorophenol reductive dehalogenase (cprA) and benzoyl-CoA reductase (bamB), were highly enriched simultaneously. Five types of putative cprAs, three types of putative bamBs and seven types of putative nitrogenase reductase (nifHs) were determined, with their copy numbers decreased gradually from inlet to outlet. Distribution of chemicals, bacteria and putative genes confirmed PCP dechlorination and phenol degradation accomplished in segments 0–5 cm and 0–8 cm, respectively, contributing to a high PCP mineralization rate of 3.86 μM d‑1. Through long-term incubation, dechlorination, phenol degradation and nitrogen fixation bacteria coexisted and functioned simultaneously near inlet (0–8 cm), verified the feasibility of anaerobic mineralization of halogenated aromatics in the compact reactor containing multiple functional microbes.

  12. Fast and effective transformation of toxaphene by superreduced vitamin B12 and dicyanocobalamin

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Recke, R. von der; Gaul, S. [Inst. of Food Chemistry, Univ. of Hohenheim, Stuttgart (Germany); Ruppe, S.; Vetter, W. [Inst. of Food and Nutrition, Friedrich-Schiller-Univ. Jena (Germany); Neumann, A. [Dept. of Technical Biology, Univ. of Karlsruhe (Germany)

    2004-09-15

    The chloropesticide toxaphene (Camphechlor, Melipax) has been used in high quantities since 1945. Toxaphene has been classified as a persistent organohalogen pollutant (POP) and belongs to the ''dirty dozen''. Due to its heavy use in the 1960s and 1970s, several environmental compartments were significantly contaminated with toxaphene. For instance, concentrations in polluted areas could exceed 1 mg/kg sediment. Recently, it was shown that cultures of the isolated bacterium Dehalospirillum multivorans transformed toxaphene in a similar way as anaerobic sediment and soil samples. The potential of D. multivorans for the anaerobic transformation of organohalogens was previously demonstrated for chloroethenes (PCE and TCE) 6. The reactive dehalogenase of D. multivorans contains a corrinoide co-factor. In this study two corrinoids cyanocobalamin (vitamin B12, CCA) and dicyanocobinamide (DCC) were used in their superreduced forms (i. e. those having the central atom Co in the oxidation state +I). Interestingly, a very fast transformation of toxaphene was observed with superreduced DCC. Unfortunately, the transformation occurred so fast that no transformation products could be identified. For this reason, we performed further experiments with the less reactive superreduced vitamin B12 (CCA{sub s}). CCA{sub s} has previously been used for the transformation of PCBs, hexachlorobenzene, chloroform, and chloroethanes.

  13. Directed evolution of enzymes using microfluidic chips

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pilát, Zdeněk.; Ježek, Jan; Šmatlo, Filip; Kaůka, Jan; Zemánek, Pavel

    2016-12-01

    Enzymes are highly versatile and ubiquitous biological catalysts. They can greatly accelerate large variety of reactions, while ensuring appropriate catalytic activity and high selectivity. These properties make enzymes attractive biocatalysts for a wide range of industrial and biomedical applications. Over the last two decades, directed evolution of enzymes has transformed the field of protein engineering. We have devised microfluidic systems for directed evolution of haloalkane dehalogenases in emulsion droplets. In such a device, individual bacterial cells producing mutated variants of the same enzyme are encapsulated in microdroplets and supplied with a substrate. The conversion of a substrate by the enzyme produced by a single bacterium changes the pH in the droplet which is signalized by pH dependent fluorescence probe. The droplets with the highest enzymatic activity can be separated directly on the chip by dielectrophoresis and the resultant cell lineage can be used for enzyme production or for further rounds of directed evolution. This platform is applicable for fast screening of large libraries in directed evolution experiments requiring mutagenesis at multiple sites of a protein structure.

  14. The HaloTag: Improving Soluble Expression and Applications in Protein Functional Analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    N Peterson, Scott; Kwon, Keehwan

    2012-01-01

    Technological and methodological advances have been critical for the rapidly evolving field of proteomics. The development of fusion tag systems is essential for purification and analysis of recombinant proteins. The HaloTag is a 34 KDa monomeric protein derived from a bacterial haloalkane dehalogenase. The majority of fusion tags in use today utilize a reversible binding interaction with a specific ligand. The HaloTag system is unique in that it forms a covalent linkage to its chloroalkane ligand. This linkage permits attachment of the HaloTag to a variety of functional reporters, which can be used to label and immobilize recombinant proteins. The success rate for HaloTag expression of soluble proteins is very high and comparable to maltose binding protein (MBP) tag. Furthermore, cleavage of the HaloTag does not result in protein insolubility that often is observed with the MBP tag. In the present report, we describe applications of the HaloTag system in our ongoing investigation of protein-protein interactions of the Y. pestis Type 3 secretion system on a custom protein microarray. We also describe the utilization of affinity purification/mass spectroscopy (AP/MS) to evaluate the utility of the Halo Tag system to characterize DNA binding activity and protein specificity.

  15. Functional genomics of corrinoid starvation in the organohalide-respiring bacterium Dehalobacter restrictus strain PER-K23

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Aamani eRupakula

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available De novo corrinoid biosynthesis represents one of the most complicated metabolic pathways in nature. Organohalide-respiring bacteria (OHRB have developed different strategies to deal with their need of corrinoid, as it is an essential cofactor of reductive dehalogenases, the key enzymes in OHR metabolism.In contrast to Dehalococcoides mccartyi, the genome of Dehalobacter restrictus strain PER-K23 contains a complete set of corrinoid biosynthetic genes, of which cbiH appears to be truncated and therefore non-functional, possibly explaining the corrinoid auxotrophy of this obligate OHRB. Comparative genomics within Dehalobacter spp. revealed that one (operon-2 of the five distinct corrinoid biosynthesis associated operons present in the genome of D. restrictus appeared to be present only in that particular strain, which encodes multiple members of corrinoid transporters and salvaging enzymes. Operon-2 was highly up-regulated upon corrinoid starvation both at the transcriptional (346-fold and proteomic level (46-fold on average, in line with the presence of an upstream cobalamin riboswitch. Together, these data highlight the importance of this operon in corrinoid homeostasis in D. restrictus and the augmented salvaging strategy this bacterium adopted to cope with the need for this essential cofactor.

  16. Aerobic dechlorination of cis- and trans-dichloroethenes by some indigenous bacteria isolated from contaminated sites in Africa

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Ademola O. Olaniran; Dorsamy Pillay; Balakrishna Pillay

    2004-01-01

    The innate toxicity of dichloroethenes(DCEs) and their tendency to be reduced to vinyl chloride(VC)(a known human carcinogen) is a cause for environmental concern. Aerobic bacteria capable of growth on cis- and trans-DCEs as sole carbon and energy sources were isolated by enrichment culture technique and identified to belong to the genera; Bacillus, Pseudomonas and Acinetobacter. Axenic and mixed cultures of the bacterial isolates utilized DCEs at concentrations above the maximum contaminant level allowable in drinking water by the Environmental Protection Agency. Their specific growth rate constant ranged significantly(P<0.05) between 0.346-0.552 and 0.461-0.667 d-1; while the maximum specific substrate utilization rate ranged significantly(P<0.05) between 20.01-29.79 and 31.40-42.83 nmol h-1 (mg of protein)-1 in cis- and trans- DCE, respectively. The optimum growth was observed at 30℃ and at a pH of 7.0 with up to 96% of the stoichiometric-expected chloride released. Serial adaptation positively affected the growth yields and dehalogenase activities of the organisms with multiple antibiotic patterns also demonstrated by the isolates. These findings therefore indicated the important roles that these organisms may play in the bioremediation of sites polluted with chlorinated ethene compounds in Africa.

  17. The little bacteria that can - diversity, genomics and ecophysiology of 'Dehalococcoides' spp. in contaminated environments.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Taş, Neslihan; van Eekert, Miriam H A; de Vos, Willem M; Smidt, Hauke

    2010-07-01

    The fate and persistence of chlorinated organics in the environment have been a concern for the past 50 years. Industrialization and extensive agricultural activities have led to the accumulation of these pollutants in the environment, while their adverse impact on various ecosystems and human health also became evident. This review provides an update on the current knowledge of specialized anaerobic bacteria, namely 'Dehalococcoides' spp., which are dedicated to the transformation of various chlorinated organic compounds via reductive dechlorination. Advances in microbiology and molecular techniques shed light into the diversity and functioning of Dehalococcoides spp. in several different locations. Recent genome sequencing projects revealed a large number of genes that are potentially involved in reductive dechlorination. Molecular approaches towards analysis of diversity and expression especially of reductive dehalogenase-encoding genes are providing a growing body of knowledge on biodegradative pathways active in defined pure and mixed cultures as well as directly in the environment. Moreover, several successful field cases of bioremediation strengthen the notion of dedicated degraders such as Dehalococcoides spp. as key players in the restoration of contaminated environments. © 2009 The Authors. Journal compilation © 2009 Society for Applied Microbiology and Blackwell Publishing Ltd.

  18. The development and application of engineered proteins for bioremediation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Trewhella, J. [ed.

    1995-09-26

    Clean up of the toxic legacy of the Cold War is projected to be the most expensive domestic project the nation has yet undertaken. Remediation of the Department of Energy and Department of Defense toxic waste sites alone are projected to cost {approximately}$1 trillion over a 20-30 year period. New, cost effective technologies are needed to attack this enormous problem. Los Alamos has put together a cross-divisional team of scientist to develop science based bioremediation technology to work toward this goal. In the team we have expertise in: (1) molecular, ecosystem and transport modeling; (2) genetic and protein engineering; (3) microbiology and microbial ecology; (4) structural biology; and (5) bioinorganic chemistry. This document summarizes talks at a workshop of different aspects of bioremediation technology including the following: Introducing novel function into a Heme enzyme: engineering by excavation; cytochrome P-450: ideal systems for bioremediation?; selection and development of bacterial strains for in situ remediation of cholorinated solvents; genetic analysis and preparation of toluene ortho-monooxygenase for field application in remediation of trichloroethylene; microbial ecology and diversity important to bioremediation; engineering haloalkane dehalogenase for bioremediation; enzymes for oxidative biodegradation; indigenous bacteria as hosts for engineered proteins; performance of indigenous bacterial, hosting engineered proteins in microbial communities.

  19. Metagenomic analysis reveals potential biodegradation pathways of persistent pesticides in freshwater and marine sediments.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fang, Hua; Cai, Lin; Yang, Ying; Ju, Feng; Li, Xiangdong; Yu, Yunlong; Zhang, Tong

    2014-02-01

    The abundance and diversity of biodegradation genes (BDGs) and potential degradation pathways of dichlorodiphenyltrichloroethane (DDT), hexachlorocyclohexane (HCH), and atrazine (ATZ) in freshwater and marine sediments were investigated by metagenomic analysis using 6 datasets (16Gb in total). The datasets were derived using Illumina high-throughput sequencing and were based on BLAST against self-established databases of BDGs, DDT degradation genes (DDGs), HCH degradation genes (HDGs), and ATZ degradation genes (ADGs). The results showed that the abundance and diversity of BDGs, DDGs, HDGs, and ADGs varied with sample source and locations. The lip and mnp genes, which encode for peroxidase, and the carA gene, which encodes for laccase, were detected as the dominant genes for degradation of organic pollutants. The hdt, hdg, and atzB genes, which encode for hydratase, dehalogenase, and ethylaminohydrolase, were found to be the most abundant genes involved in DDT, HCH, and ATZ degradation, respectively. The identified 69 genera capable of degrading organic pollutants were mostly affiliated with Proteobacteria (49.3%) and Actinobacteria (21.7%). Four genera, including Plesiocystis, Anaerolinea, Jannaschia, and Mycobacterium, were the major biodegradation populations in all sediments. In this study, the nearly complete biodegradation pathways of DDT and ATZ were found, and the partial degradation pathway of HCH was detected in all sediments.

  20. Structure of Human B12 Trafficking Protein CblD Reveals Molecular Mimicry and Identifies a New Subfamily of Nitro-FMN Reductases*

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yamada, Kazuhiro; Gherasim, Carmen; Banerjee, Ruma; Koutmos, Markos

    2015-01-01

    In mammals, B12 (or cobalamin) is an essential cofactor required by methionine synthase and methylmalonyl-CoA mutase. A complex intracellular pathway supports the assimilation of cobalamin into its active cofactor forms and delivery to its target enzymes. MMADHC (the methylmalonic aciduria and homocystinuria type D protein), commonly referred to as CblD, is a key chaperone involved in intracellular cobalamin trafficking, and mutations in CblD cause methylmalonic aciduria and/or homocystinuria. Herein, we report the first crystal structure of the globular C-terminal domain of human CblD, which is sufficient for its interaction with MMADHC (the methylmalonic aciduria and homocystinuria type C protein), or CblC, and for supporting the cytoplasmic cobalamin trafficking pathway. CblD contains an α+β fold that is structurally reminiscent of the nitro-FMN reductase superfamily. Two of the closest structural relatives of CblD are CblC, a multifunctional enzyme important for cobalamin trafficking, and the activation domain of methionine synthase. CblD, CblC, and the activation domain of methionine synthase share several distinguishing features and, together with two recently described corrinoid-dependent reductive dehalogenases, constitute a new subclass within the nitro-FMN reductase superfamily. We demonstrate that CblD enhances oxidation of cob(II)alamin bound to CblC and that disease-causing mutations in CblD impair the kinetics of this reaction. The striking structural similarity of CblD to CblC, believed to be contiguous in the cobalamin trafficking pathway, suggests the co-option of molecular mimicry as a strategy for achieving its function. PMID:26364851

  1. Loop-Mediated Isothermal Amplification (LAMP) for Rapid Detection and Quantification of Dehalococcoides Biomarker Genes in Commercial Reductive Dechlorinating Cultures KB-1 and SDC-9.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kanitkar, Yogendra H; Stedtfeld, Robert D; Steffan, Robert J; Hashsham, Syed A; Cupples, Alison M

    2016-01-08

    Real-time quantitative PCR (qPCR) protocols specific to the reductive dehalogenase (RDase) genes vcrA, bvcA, and tceA are commonly used to quantify Dehalococcoides spp. in groundwater from chlorinated solvent-contaminated sites. In this study, loop-mediated isothermal amplification (LAMP) was developed as an alternative approach for the quantification of these genes. LAMP does not require a real-time thermal cycler (i.e., amplification is isothermal), allowing the method to be performed using less-expensive and potentially field-deployable detection devices. Six LAMP primers were designed for each of three RDase genes (vcrA, bvcA, and tceA) using Primer Explorer V4. The LAMP assays were compared to conventional qPCR approaches using plasmid standards, two commercially available bioaugmentation cultures, KB-1 and SDC-9 (both contain Dehalococcoides species). DNA was extracted over a growth cycle from KB-1 and SDC-9 cultures amended with trichloroethene and vinyl chloride, respectively. All three genes were quantified for KB-1, whereas only vcrA was quantified for SDC-9. A comparison of LAMP and qPCR using standard plasmids indicated that quantification results were similar over a large range of gene concentrations. In addition, the quantitative increase in gene concentrations over one growth cycle of KB-1 and SDC-9 using LAMP was comparable to that of qPCR. The developed LAMP assays for vcrA and tceA genes were validated by comparing quantification on the Gene-Z handheld platform and a real-time thermal cycler using DNA isolated from eight groundwater samples obtained from an SDC-9-bioaugmented site (Tulsa, OK). These assays will be particularly useful at sites subject to bioaugmentation with these two commonly used Dehalococcoides species-containing cultures.

  2. Global Transcriptomic and Proteomic Responses of Dehalococcoides ethenogenes Strain 195 to Fixed Nitrogen Limitation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lee, Patrick K. H. [University of California, Berkeley; Dill, Brian [ORNL; Louie, Tiffany S. [University of California, Berkeley; Shah, Manesh B [ORNL; Verberkmoes, Nathan C [ORNL; Andersen, Gary L. [Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory (LBNL); Zinder, Stephen H. [Cornell University; Alvarez-Cohen, Lisa [Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory (LBNL)

    2012-01-01

    Bacteria of the genus Dehalococcoides play an important role in the reductive dechlorination of chlorinated ethenes. A systems level approach was taken in this study to examine the global transcriptomic and proteomic responses of exponentially growing D. ethenogenes strain 195 to fixed nitrogen limitation (FNL) as dechlorination activity and cell yield both decrease during FNL. As expected, the nitrogen-fixing (nif) genes were differentially up-regulated in the transcriptome and proteome of strain 195 during FNL. Aside from the nif operon, a putative methylglyoxal synthase-encoding gene (DET1576), the product of which is predicted to catalyze the formation of the toxic electrophile methylglyoxal and implicated in the uncoupling of anabolism from catabolism in bacteria, was strongly up-regulated in the transcriptome and could potentially play a role in the observed growth inhibition during FNL. Carbon catabolism genes were generally down regulated in response to FNL and a number of transporters were differentially regulated in response to nitrogen limitation, with some playing apparent roles in nitrogen acquisition while others were associated with general stress responses. A number of genes related to the functions of nucleotide synthesis, replication, transcription, translation, and post-translational modifications were also differentially expressed. One gene coding for a putative reductive dehalogenase (DET1545) and a number coding for oxidoreductases, which have implications in energy generation and redox reactions, were also differentially regulated. Interestingly, most of the genes within the multiple integrated elements were not differentially expressed. Overall, this study elucidates the molecular responses of strain 195 to FNL and identifies differentially expressed genes that are potential biomarkers to evaluate environmental cellular nitrogen status.

  3. Unexpected specificity of interspecies cobamide transfer from Geobacter spp. to organohalide-respiring Dehalococcoides mccartyi strains.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yan, Jun; Ritalahti, Kirsti M; Wagner, Darlene D; Löffler, Frank E

    2012-09-01

    Dehalococcoides mccartyi strains conserve energy from reductive dechlorination reactions catalyzed by corrinoid-dependent reductive dehalogenase enzyme systems. Dehalococcoides lacks the ability for de novo corrinoid synthesis, and pure cultures require the addition of cyanocobalamin (vitamin B(12)) for growth. In contrast, Geobacter lovleyi, which dechlorinates tetrachloroethene to cis-1,2-dichloroethene (cis-DCE), and the nondechlorinating species Geobacter sulfurreducens have complete sets of cobamide biosynthesis genes and produced 12.9 ± 2.4 and 24.2 ± 5.8 ng of extracellular cobamide per liter of culture suspension, respectively, during growth with acetate and fumarate in a completely synthetic medium. G. lovleyi-D. mccartyi strain BAV1 or strain FL2 cocultures provided evidence for interspecies corrinoid transfer, and cis-DCE was dechlorinated to vinyl chloride and ethene concomitant with Dehalococcoides growth. In contrast, negligible increase in Dehalococcoides 16S rRNA gene copies and insignificant dechlorination occurred in G. sulfurreducens-D. mccartyi strain BAV1 or strain FL2 cocultures. Apparently, G. lovleyi produces a cobamide that complements Dehalococcoides' nutritional requirements, whereas G. sulfurreducens does not. Interestingly, Dehalococcoides dechlorination activity and growth could be restored in G. sulfurreducens-Dehalococcoides cocultures by adding 10 μM 5',6'-dimethylbenzimidazole. Observations made with the G. sulfurreducens-Dehalococcoides cocultures suggest that the exchange of the lower ligand generated a cobalamin, which supported Dehalococcoides activity. These findings have implications for in situ bioremediation and suggest that the corrinoid metabolism of Dehalococcoides must be understood to faithfully predict, and possibly enhance, reductive dechlorination activities.

  4. Structure of Human B12 Trafficking Protein CblD Reveals Molecular Mimicry and Identifies a New Subfamily of Nitro-FMN Reductases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yamada, Kazuhiro; Gherasim, Carmen; Banerjee, Ruma; Koutmos, Markos

    2015-12-04

    In mammals, B12 (or cobalamin) is an essential cofactor required by methionine synthase and methylmalonyl-CoA mutase. A complex intracellular pathway supports the assimilation of cobalamin into its active cofactor forms and delivery to its target enzymes. MMADHC (the methylmalonic aciduria and homocystinuria type D protein), commonly referred to as CblD, is a key chaperone involved in intracellular cobalamin trafficking, and mutations in CblD cause methylmalonic aciduria and/or homocystinuria. Herein, we report the first crystal structure of the globular C-terminal domain of human CblD, which is sufficient for its interaction with MMADHC (the methylmalonic aciduria and homocystinuria type C protein), or CblC, and for supporting the cytoplasmic cobalamin trafficking pathway. CblD contains an α+β fold that is structurally reminiscent of the nitro-FMN reductase superfamily. Two of the closest structural relatives of CblD are CblC, a multifunctional enzyme important for cobalamin trafficking, and the activation domain of methionine synthase. CblD, CblC, and the activation domain of methionine synthase share several distinguishing features and, together with two recently described corrinoid-dependent reductive dehalogenases, constitute a new subclass within the nitro-FMN reductase superfamily. We demonstrate that CblD enhances oxidation of cob(II)alamin bound to CblC and that disease-causing mutations in CblD impair the kinetics of this reaction. The striking structural similarity of CblD to CblC, believed to be contiguous in the cobalamin trafficking pathway, suggests the co-option of molecular mimicry as a strategy for achieving its function.

  5. Ecology and distribution of a new biomarker linked to 1,2-dichloropropane dechlorination in subsurface environments

    Science.gov (United States)

    Padilla-Crespo, E.; Loeffler, F. E.

    2011-12-01

    Reductive dechlorination plays a major role in the transformation and detoxification of chlorinated solvents, including chlorinated ethenes. Molecular biological tools are being applied at contaminated sites in order to assess the process-specific biomarkers that impact site performance, and to monitor the progress of bioremediation approaches. The few current biomarker genes in use provide an incomplete picture of the reductively dechlorinating bacterial community; this is a limitation for implementing enhanced bioremediation and monitored natural attenuation as cleanup strategies at chlorinated solvent contaminated sites. Reductively dehalogenating organisms, particularly Dehalococcoides (Dhc) strains, possess multiple reductive dehalogenase (RDase) genes, which are promising targets to specifically monitor dehalogenation processes of interest. Dehalococcoides populations in two highly enriched cultures (RC and KS) have been implicated in the reductive dechlorination of dechlorination of 1,2-dichloropropane (1,2-D), a widespread halogenated organic pollutant, to the non-toxic propene. Using a combined approach of transcription, expression and molecular analysis a new biomarker linked to 1,2-dichloropropane has been identified in Dhc strains RC and KS providing for the first time, convincing evidence of a specific RDase implicated in 1,2-D dechlorination to propene. Further analyses imply that new biomarker is in a "mobile DNA segment", a genomic island (GI) of horizontal gene transfer origin. A valid quantitative PCR approach was designed to detect and enumerate this gene in cultures and environmental samples; this will be a useful to bioremediation practitioners to more efficiently implement reductive dechlorination as a remediation tool. The new biomarker has been identified in fresh water sediment samples from different geographical locations in Europe, North and South America. Further research aims to shed light on RDase gene dissemination and the adaptation

  6. Interest of nuclear medicine in the diagnosis of congenital and childhood hypothyroidism; Apports de la medecine nucleaire au diagnostic des hypothyroidies congenitales et de l'enfant

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Clerc, J. [Hopital Necker, Medecine Nucleaire, 75 - Paris (France)

    2002-08-01

    The paediatric thyroid scan (PTS) remains a cornerstone test in guiding the etiological diagnosis of congenital hypothyroidism (CH). In hypothyroid babies, thyroxine therapy must be started immediately. A reliable PTS can be obtained in the following days even under T4 therapy. {sup 123}I is the isotope of choice since it provides quantitated images and a clinically relevant grading of dys-hormonal-genetic disorders. The dosimetry of {sup 123}I is lower than usually considered because iodine uptake is absent or low in most cases of CH and because the energy deposited within the colloid has no expected radiobiological detriment. PTS is a highly contributive, sensitive and reproducible test in identifying thyroid dysgenesis the most frequent etiology (70%) of permanent CH. Since agenesis requires a very careful T4 therapy monitoring, PTS is also of therapeutic interest. PTS can distinguish 3 types of dys-hormonal-genetic disorders (10%). In type 1, low uptake indicates a defective R-TSH or a NIS defect when {sup 123}I gastric uptake is absent. Type 2 - high uptake, goiter and positive perchlorate discharge test (PDT) - refers to organification defects (TPO, THOX1,2, Pendrin). Type 3 (goiter, high uptake, negative PDT) includes coupling defects, thyroglobulin abnormalities and dehalogenase deficiency. Main transient aetiologies (20%) of CH are iodine overload and blocking anti hR-TSH antibodies, while thyroiditis and dietary iodine overload are more frequent thereafter The molecular understanding of the defects involved in CH rapidly develops. However, precocious diagnosis, appropriate T4 therapy and sorting out the etiology are the most relevant parameters which determine the final clinical prognosis. (author)

  7. Reductive dechlorination of tetrachloroethene in marine sediments: Biodiversity and dehalorespiring capabilities of the indigenous microbes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Matturro, B; Presta, E; Rossetti, S

    2016-03-01

    Chlorinated compounds pose environmental concerns due to their toxicity and wide distribution in several matrices. Microorganisms specialized in leading anaerobic reductive dechlorination (RD) processes, including Dehalococcoides mccartyi (Dhc), are able to reduce chlorinated compounds to harmless products or to less toxic forms. Here we report the first detailed study dealing with the RD potential of heavy polluted marine sediment by evaluating the biodegradation kinetics together with the composition, dynamics and activity of indigenous microbial population. A microcosm study was conducted under strictly anaerobic conditions on marine sediment collected near the marine coast of Sarno river mouth, one of the most polluted river in Europe. Tetrachloroethene (PCE), used as model pollutant, was completely converted to ethene within 150 days at reductive dechlorination rate equal to 0.016 meq L(-1) d(-1). Consecutive spikes of PCE allowed increasing the degradation kinetics up to 0.1 meq L(-1)d(-1) within 20 days. Strictly anaerobiosis and repeated spikes of PCE stimulated the growth of indigenous Dhc cells (growth yield of ~7.0 E + 07 Dhc cells per μM Cl(-1) released). Dhc strains carrying the reductive dehalogenase genes tceA and vcrA were detected in the original marine sediment and their number increased during the treatment as demonstrated by the high level of tceA expression at the end of the microcosm study (2.41 E + 05 tceA gene transcripts g(-1)). Notably, the structure of the microbial communities was fully described by Catalysed Reporter Deposition Fluorescence In Situ Hybridization (CARD-FISH) as wells as the dynamics of the dechlorinating bacteria during the microcosms operation. Interestingly, a direct role of Dhc cells was ascertained suggesting the existence of strains adapted at salinity conditions. Additionally, non-Dhc Chloroflexi were retrieved in the original sediment and were kept stable over time suggesting their likely flanking role of the RD

  8. Detection of dichloromethane with a bioluminescent (lux) bacterial bioreporter.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lopes, Nicholas; Hawkins, Shawn A; Jegier, Patricia; Menn, Fu-Min; Sayler, Gary S; Ripp, Steven

    2012-01-01

    The focus of this research effort was to develop an autonomous, inducible, lux-based bioluminescent bioreporter for the real-time detection of dichloromethane. Dichloromethane (DCM), also known as methylene chloride, is a volatile organic compound and one of the most commonly used halogenated solvents in the U.S., with applications ranging from grease and paint stripping to aerosol propellants and pharmaceutical tablet coatings. Predictably, it is released into the environment where it contaminates air and water resources. Due to its classification as a probable human carcinogen, hepatic toxin, and central nervous system effector, DCM must be carefully monitored and controlled. Methods for DCM detection usually rely on analytical techniques such as solid-phase microextraction (SPME) and capillary gas chromatography or photoacoustic environmental monitors, all of which require trained personnel and/or expensive equipment. To complement conventional monitoring practices, we have created a bioreporter for the self-directed detection of DCM by taking advantage of the evolutionary adaptation of bacteria to recognize and metabolize chemical agents. This bioreporter, Methylobacterium extorquens DCM( lux ), was engineered to contain a bioluminescent luxCDABE gene cassette derived from Photorhabdus luminescens fused downstream to the dcm dehalogenase operon, which causes the organism to generate visible light when exposed to DCM. We have demonstrated detection limits down to 1.0 ppm under vapor phase exposures and 0.1 ppm under liquid phase exposures with response times of 2.3 and 1.3 h, respectively, and with specificity towards DCM under relevant industrial environmental monitoring conditions.

  9. Development and Characterization of PCE-to-Ethene Dechlorinating Microcosms with Contaminated River Sediment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Jaejin; Lee, Tae Kwon

    2016-01-01

    An industrial complex in Wonju, contaminated with trichloroethene (TCE), was one of the most problematic sites in Korea. Despite repeated remedial trials for decades, chlorinated ethenes remained as sources of down-gradient groundwater contamination. Recent efforts were being made to remove the contaminants of the area, but knowledge of the indigenous microbial communities and their dechlorination abilities were unknown. Thus, the objectives of the present study were (i) to evaluate the dechlorination abilities of indigenous microbes at the contaminated site, (ii) to characterize which microbes and reductive dehalogenase genes were responsible for the dechlorination reactions, and (iii) to develop a PCE-to-ethene dechlorinating microbial consortium. An enrichment culture that dechlorinates PCE to ethene was obtained from Wonju stream, nearby a trichloroethene (TCE)-contaminated industrial complex. The community profiling revealed that known organohalide-respiring microbes, such as Geobacter, Desulfuromonas, and Dehalococcoides grew during the incubation with chlorinated ethenes. Although Chloroflexi populations (i.e., Longilinea and Bellilinea) were the most enriched in the sediment microcosms, those were not found in the transfer cultures. Based upon the results from pyrosequencing of 16S rRNA gene amplicons and qPCR using TaqMan chemistry, close relatives of Dehalococcoides mccartyi strains FL2 and GT seemed to be dominant and responsible for the complete detoxification of chlorinated ethenes in the transfer cultures. This study also demonstrated that the contaminated site harbors indigenous microbes that can convert PCE to ethene, and the developed consortium can be an important resource for future bioremediation efforts.

  10. Site-Specific Mobilization of Vinyl Chloride Respiration Islands by a Mechanism Common in Dehalococcoides

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Edwards Elizabeth A

    2011-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Vinyl chloride is a widespread groundwater pollutant and Group 1 carcinogen. A previous comparative genomic analysis revealed that the vinyl chloride reductase operon, vcrABC, of Dehalococcoides sp. strain VS is embedded in a horizontally-acquired genomic island that integrated at the single-copy tmRNA gene, ssrA. Results We targeted conserved positions in available genomic islands to amplify and sequence four additional vcrABC -containing genomic islands from previously-unsequenced vinyl chloride respiring Dehalococcoides enrichments. We identified a total of 31 ssrA-specific genomic islands from Dehalococcoides genomic data, accounting for 47 reductive dehalogenase homologous genes and many other non-core genes. Sixteen of these genomic islands contain a syntenic module of integration-associated genes located adjacent to the predicted site of integration, and among these islands, eight contain vcrABC as genetic 'cargo'. These eight vcrABC -containing genomic islands are syntenic across their ~12 kbp length, but have two phylogenetically discordant segments that unambiguously differentiate the integration module from the vcrABC cargo. Using available Dehalococcoides phylogenomic data we estimate that these ssrA-specific genomic islands are at least as old as the Dehalococcoides group itself, which in turn is much older than human civilization. Conclusions The vcrABC -containing genomic islands are a recently-acquired subset of a diverse collection of ssrA-specific mobile elements that are a major contributor to strain-level diversity in Dehalococcoides, and may have been throughout its evolution. The high similarity between vcrABC sequences is quantitatively consistent with recent horizontal acquisition driven by ~100 years of industrial pollution with chlorinated ethenes.

  11. New insights into Dehalococcoides mccartyi metabolism from a reconstructed metabolic network-based systems-level analysis of D. mccartyi transcriptomes.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M Ahsanul Islam

    Full Text Available Organohalide respiration, mediated by Dehalococcoides mccartyi, is a useful bioremediation process that transforms ground water pollutants and known human carcinogens such as trichloroethene and vinyl chloride into benign ethenes. Successful application of this process depends on the fundamental understanding of the respiration and metabolism of D. mccartyi. Reductive dehalogenases, encoded by rdhA genes of these anaerobic bacteria, exclusively catalyze organohalide respiration and drive metabolism. To better elucidate D. mccartyi metabolism and physiology, we analyzed available transcriptomic data for a pure isolate (Dehalococcoides mccartyi strain 195 and a mixed microbial consortium (KB-1 using the previously developed pan-genome-scale reconstructed metabolic network of D. mccartyi. The transcriptomic data, together with available proteomic data helped confirm transcription and expression of the majority genes in D. mccartyi genomes. A composite genome of two highly similar D. mccartyi strains (KB-1 Dhc from the KB-1 metagenome sequence was constructed, and operon prediction was conducted for this composite genome and other single genomes. This operon analysis, together with the quality threshold clustering analysis of transcriptomic data helped generate experimentally testable hypotheses regarding the function of a number of hypothetical proteins and the poorly understood mechanism of energy conservation in D. mccartyi. We also identified functionally enriched important clusters (13 for strain 195 and 11 for KB-1 Dhc of co-expressed metabolic genes using information from the reconstructed metabolic network. This analysis highlighted some metabolic genes and processes, including lipid metabolism, energy metabolism, and transport that potentially play important roles in organohalide respiration. Overall, this study shows the importance of an organism's metabolic reconstruction in analyzing various "omics" data to obtain improved understanding

  12. Genome sequence of Desulfitobacterium hafniense DCB-2, a Gram-positive anaerobe capable of dehalogenation and metal reduction

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kim Sang-Hoon

    2012-02-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The genome of the Gram-positive, metal-reducing, dehalorespiring Desulfitobacterium hafniense DCB-2 was sequenced in order to gain insights into its metabolic capacities, adaptive physiology, and regulatory machineries, and to compare with that of Desulfitobacterium hafniense Y51, the phylogenetically closest strain among the species with a sequenced genome. Results The genome of Desulfitobacterium hafniense DCB-2 is composed of a 5,279,134-bp circular chromosome with 5,042 predicted genes. Genome content and parallel physiological studies support the cell's ability to fix N2 and CO2, form spores and biofilms, reduce metals, and use a variety of electron acceptors in respiration, including halogenated organic compounds. The genome contained seven reductive dehalogenase genes and four nitrogenase gene homologs but lacked the Nar respiratory nitrate reductase system. The D. hafniense DCB-2 genome contained genes for 43 RNA polymerase sigma factors including 27 sigma-24 subunits, 59 two-component signal transduction systems, and about 730 transporter proteins. In addition, it contained genes for 53 molybdopterin-binding oxidoreductases, 19 flavoprotein paralogs of the fumarate reductase, and many other FAD/FMN-binding oxidoreductases, proving the cell's versatility in both adaptive and reductive capacities. Together with the ability to form spores, the presence of the CO2-fixing Wood-Ljungdahl pathway and the genes associated with oxygen tolerance add flexibility to the cell's options for survival under stress. Conclusions D. hafniense DCB-2's genome contains genes consistent with its abilities for dehalogenation, metal reduction, N2 and CO2 fixation, anaerobic respiration, oxygen tolerance, spore formation, and biofilm formation which make this organism a potential candidate for bioremediation at contaminated sites.

  13. Interfacing microwells with nanoliter compartments: a sampler generating high-resolution concentration gradients for quantitative biochemical analyses in droplets.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gielen, Fabrice; Buryska, Tomas; Van Vliet, Liisa; Butz, Maren; Damborsky, Jiri; Prokop, Zbynek; Hollfelder, Florian

    2015-01-06

    Analysis of concentration dependencies is key to the quantitative understanding of biological and chemical systems. In experimental tests involving concentration gradients such as inhibitor library screening, the number of data points and the ratio between the stock volume and the volume required in each test determine the quality and efficiency of the information gained. Titerplate assays are currently the most widely used format, even though they require microlitre volumes. Compartmentalization of reactions in pico- to nanoliter water-in-oil droplets in microfluidic devices provides a solution for massive volume reduction. This work addresses the challenge of producing microfluidic-based concentration gradients in a way that every droplet represents one unique reagent combination. We present a simple microcapillary technique able to generate such series of monodisperse water-in-oil droplets (with a frequency of up to 10 Hz) from a sample presented in an open well (e.g., a titerplate). Time-dependent variation of the well content results in microdroplets that represent time capsules of the composition of the source well. By preserving the spatial encoding of the droplets in tubing, each reactor is assigned an accurate concentration value. We used this approach to record kinetic time courses of the haloalkane dehalogenase DbjA and analyzed 150 combinations of enzyme/substrate/inhibitor in less than 5 min, resulting in conclusive Michaelis-Menten and inhibition curves. Avoiding chips and merely requiring two pumps, a magnetic plate with a stirrer, tubing, and a pipet tip, this easy-to-use device rivals the output of much more expensive liquid handling systems using a fraction (∼100-fold less) of the reagents consumed in microwell format.

  14. Microbiome Dynamics of a Polychlorobiphenyl (PCB) Historically Contaminated Marine Sediment under Conditions Promoting Reductive Dechlorination

    Science.gov (United States)

    Matturro, Bruna; Ubaldi, Carla; Rossetti, Simona

    2016-01-01

    The toxicity of polychlorinated biphenyls (PCB) can be efficiently reduced in contaminated marine sediments through the reductive dechlorination (RD) process lead by anaerobic organohalide bacteria. Although the process has been extensively investigated on PCB-spiked sediments, the knowledge on the identity and metabolic potential of PCB-dechlorinating microorganisms in real contaminated matrix is still limited. Aim of this study was to explore the composition and the dynamics of the microbial communities of the marine sediment collected from one of the largest Sites of National Interest (SIN) in Italy (Mar Piccolo, Taranto) under conditions promoting the PCBs RD. A long-term microcosm study revealed that autochthonous bacteria were able to sustain the PCB dechlorination at a high extent and the successive addition of an external fermentable organic substrate (lactate) caused the further depletion of the high-chlorinated PCBs (up to 70%). Next Generation Sequencing was used to describe the core microbiome of the marine sediment and to follow the changes caused by the treatments. OTUs affiliated to sulfur-oxidizing ε-proteobacteria, Sulfurovum, and Sulfurimonas, were predominant in the original sediment and increased up to 60% of total OTUs after lactate addition. Other OTUs detected in the sediment were affiliated to sulfate reducing (δ-proteobacteria) and to organohalide respiring bacteria within Chloroflexi phylum mainly belonging to Dehalococcoidia class. Among others, Dehalococcoides mccartyi was enriched during the treatments even though the screening of the specific reductive dehalogenase genes revealed the occurrence of undescribed strains, which deserve further investigations. Overall, this study highlighted the potential of members of Dehalococcoidia class in reducing the contamination level of the marine sediment from Mar Piccolo with relevant implications on the selection of sustainable bioremediation strategies to clean-up the site.

  15. Structure-Function Analysis of 2-Keto-3-Deoxy-D-Glycero-D-Galacto-Nononate-9-Phosphate Phosphatase Defines Specificity Elements in Type C0 had Family Members

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lu, Z.; Wang, L; Dunaway-Mariano, D; Allen, K

    2009-01-01

    The phosphotransferases of the haloalkanoate dehalogenase superfamily (HADSF) act upon a wide range of metabolites in all eukaryotes and prokaryotes and thus constitute a significant force in cell function. The challenge posed for biochemical function assignment of HADSF members is the identification of the structural determinants that target a specific metabolite. The '8KDOP' subfamily of the HADSF is defined by the known structure and catalytic activity of 2-keto-3-deoxy-8-phospho-d-manno-octulosonic acid (KDO-8-P) phosphatase. Homologues of this enzyme have been uniformly annotated as KDO-8-P phosphatase. One such gene, BT1713, from the Bacteroides thetaiotaomicron genome was recently found to encode the enzyme 2-keto-3-deoxy-d-glycero-d-galacto-9-phosphonononic acid (KDN-9-P) phosphatase in the biosynthetic pathway of the 9-carbon ?-keto acid, 2-keto-3-deoxy-d-glycero-d-galactonononic acid (KDN). To find the structural elements that provide substrate-specific interactions and to allow identification of genomic sequence markers, the x-ray crystal structures of BT1713 liganded to the cofactor Mg2+and complexed with tungstate or Formula/Neu5Ac were determined to 1.1, 1.85, and 1.63 A resolution, respectively. The structures define the active site to be at the subunit interface and, as confirmed by steady-state kinetics and site-directed mutagenesis, reveal Arg-64*, Lys-67*, and Glu-56 to be the key residues involved in sugar binding that are essential for BT1713 catalytic function. Bioinformatic analyses of the differentially conserved residues between BT1713 and KDO-8-P phosphatase homologues guided by the knowledge of the structure-based specificity determinants define Glu-56 and Lys-67* to be the key residues that can be used in future annotations.

  16. Bacterial diversity and real-time PCR based assessment of linA and linB gene distribution at hexachlorocyclohexane contaminated sites.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lal, Devi; Jindal, Swati; Kumari, Hansi; Jit, Simran; Nigam, Aeshna; Sharma, Pooja; Kumari, Kirti; Lal, Rup

    2015-03-01

    The disposal of hexachlorocyclohexane (HCH) muck has created large number of HCH dumpsites all over the world from where the harmful HCH isomers are leaking into the environment. Bacteria have evolved at such contaminated sites that have the ability to degrade HCH. Degradation of various HCH isomers in bacterial strains is mediated primarily by two genes: linA and linB which encode dehydrochlorinase and haloalkane dehalogenase respectively. In this study we explored one such highly contaminated HCH dumpsite located in Lucknow, Uttar Pradesh, India. To assess the biostimulation potential of the contaminated site, microbial diversity study and real-time PCR based quantification of lin genes was carried out. The soil samples from dumpsite and surrounding areas were found to be highly contaminated with HCH residue levels as high as 1.8 × 10(5)  mg kg(-1). The residues were detected in areas upto 13 km from the dumpsite. Sphingomonads, Chromohalobacter, and Marinobacter were the dominant genera present at the dump-site. Role of Sphingomonads in HCH degradation has been well documented. The highest copy numbers of linA and linB genes as determined using real-time PCR were 6.2 × 10(4) and 5.3 × 10(5), respectively, were found in sample from the dump site. The presence of Sphingomonads, linA, and linB genes from HCH contaminated soil indicates the presence of indigenous bacterial communities capable of HCH degradation.

  17. Polychlorinated biphenyl (PCB) anaerobic degradation in marine sediments: microcosm study and role of autochthonous microbial communities.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Matturro, Bruna; Ubaldi, Carla; Grenni, Paola; Caracciolo, Anna Barra; Rossetti, Simona

    2016-07-01

    Polychlorobiphenyl (PCB) biodegradation was followed for 1 year in microcosms containing marine sediments collected from Mar Piccolo (Taranto, Italy) chronically contaminated by this class of hazardous compounds. The microcosms were performed under strictly anaerobic conditions with or without the addition of Dehalococcoides mccartyi, the main microorganism known to degrade PCBs through the anaerobic reductive dechlorination process. Thirty PCB congeners were monitored during the experiments revealing that the biodegradation occurred in all microcosms with a decrease in hepta-, hexa-, and penta-chlorobiphenyls (CBs) and a parallel increase in low chlorinated PCBs (tri-CBs and tetra-CBs). The concentrations of the most representative congeners detected in the original sediment, such as 245-245-CB and 2345-245-CB, and of the mixture 2356-34-CB+234-245-CB, decreased by 32.5, 23.8, and 46.7 %, respectively, after only 70 days of anaerobic incubation without any bioaugmentation treatment. Additionally, the structure and population dynamics of the microbial key players involved in the biodegradative process and of the entire mixed microbial community were accurately defined by Catalyzed Reporter Deposition Fluorescence In Situ Hybridization (CARD-FISH) in both the original sediment and during the operation of the microcosm. The reductive dehalogenase genes of D. mccartyi, specifically involved in PCB dechlorination, were also quantified using real-time PCR (qPCR). Our results demonstrated that the autochthonous microbial community living in the marine sediment, including D. mccartyi (6.32E+06 16S rRNA gene copy numbers g(-1) sediment), was able to efficiently sustain the biodegradation of PCBs when controlled anaerobic conditions were imposed.

  18. Global Transcriptomic and Proteomic Responses of Dehalococcoides ethenogenes Strain 195 to Fixed Nitrogen Limitation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Patrick K. H.; Dill, Brian D.; Louie, Tiffany S.; Shah, Manesh; VerBerkmoes, Nathan C.; Andersen, Gary L.; Zinder, Stephen H.

    2012-01-01

    Bacteria of the genus Dehalococcoides play an important role in the reductive dechlorination of chlorinated ethenes. A systems-level approach was taken in this study to examine the global transcriptomic and proteomic responses of exponentially growing cells of Dehalococcoides ethenogenes strain 195 to fixed nitrogen limitation (FNL), as dechlorination activity and cell yield both decrease during FNL. As expected, the nitrogen-fixing (nif) genes were differentially upregulated in the transcriptome and proteome of strain 195 during FNL. Aside from the nif operon, a putative methylglyoxal synthase-encoding gene (DET1576), the product of which is predicted to catalyze the formation of the toxic electrophile methylglyoxal and is implicated in the uncoupling of anabolism from catabolism in bacteria, was strongly upregulated in the transcriptome and could potentially play a role in the observed growth inhibition during FNL. Carbon catabolism genes were generally downregulated in response to FNL, and a number of transporters were differentially regulated in response to nitrogen limitation, with some playing apparent roles in nitrogen acquisition, while others were associated with general stress responses. A number of genes related to the functions of nucleotide synthesis, replication, transcription, translation, and posttranslational modifications were also differentially expressed. One gene coding for a putative reductive dehalogenase (DET1545) and a number of genes coding for oxidoreductases, which have implications in energy generation and redox reactions, were also differentially regulated. Interestingly, most of the genes within the multiple integrated elements were not differentially expressed. Overall, this study elucidates the molecular responses of strain 195 to FNL and identifies differentially expressed genes that are potential biomarkers to evaluate environmental cellular nitrogen status. PMID:22179257

  19. Algorithms and semantic infrastructure for mutation impact extraction and grounding.

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    Laurila, Jonas B; Naderi, Nona; Witte, René; Riazanov, Alexandre; Kouznetsov, Alexandre; Baker, Christopher J O

    2010-12-02

    Mutation impact extraction is a hitherto unaccomplished task in state of the art mutation extraction systems. Protein mutations and their impacts on protein properties are hidden in scientific literature, making them poorly accessible for protein engineers and inaccessible for phenotype-prediction systems that currently depend on manually curated genomic variation databases. We present the first rule-based approach for the extraction of mutation impacts on protein properties, categorizing their directionality as positive, negative or neutral. Furthermore protein and mutation mentions are grounded to their respective UniProtKB IDs and selected protein properties, namely protein functions to concepts found in the Gene Ontology. The extracted entities are populated to an OWL-DL Mutation Impact ontology facilitating complex querying for mutation impacts using SPARQL. We illustrate retrieval of proteins and mutant sequences for a given direction of impact on specific protein properties. Moreover we provide programmatic access to the data through semantic web services using the SADI (Semantic Automated Discovery and Integration) framework. We address the problem of access to legacy mutation data in unstructured form through the creation of novel mutation impact extraction methods which are evaluated on a corpus of full-text articles on haloalkane dehalogenases, tagged by domain experts. Our approaches show state of the art levels of precision and recall for Mutation Grounding and respectable level of precision but lower recall for the task of Mutant-Impact relation extraction. The system is deployed using text mining and semantic web technologies with the goal of publishing to a broad spectrum of consumers.

  20. Algorithms and semantic infrastructure for mutation impact extraction and grounding

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kouznetsov Alexandre

    2010-12-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Mutation impact extraction is a hitherto unaccomplished task in state of the art mutation extraction systems. Protein mutations and their impacts on protein properties are hidden in scientific literature, making them poorly accessible for protein engineers and inaccessible for phenotype-prediction systems that currently depend on manually curated genomic variation databases. Results We present the first rule-based approach for the extraction of mutation impacts on protein properties, categorizing their directionality as positive, negative or neutral. Furthermore protein and mutation mentions are grounded to their respective UniProtKB IDs and selected protein properties, namely protein functions to concepts found in the Gene Ontology. The extracted entities are populated to an OWL-DL Mutation Impact ontology facilitating complex querying for mutation impacts using SPARQL. We illustrate retrieval of proteins and mutant sequences for a given direction of impact on specific protein properties. Moreover we provide programmatic access to the data through semantic web services using the SADI (Semantic Automated Discovery and Integration framework. Conclusion We address the problem of access to legacy mutation data in unstructured form through the creation of novel mutation impact extraction methods which are evaluated on a corpus of full-text articles on haloalkane dehalogenases, tagged by domain experts. Our approaches show state of the art levels of precision and recall for Mutation Grounding and respectable level of precision but lower recall for the task of Mutant-Impact relation extraction. The system is deployed using text mining and semantic web technologies with the goal of publishing to a broad spectrum of consumers.

  1. Acetylene fuels TCE reductive dechlorination by defined Dehalococcoides/Pelobacter consortia

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mao, Xinwei; Oremland, Ronald S.; Liu, Tong; Landers, Abigail A; Baesman, Shaun; Alvarez-Cohen, Lisa

    2017-01-01

    Acetylene (C2H2) can be generated in contaminated groundwater sites as a consequence of chemical degradation of trichloroethene (TCE) by in situ minerals, and C2H2 is known to inhibit bacterial dechlorination. In this study, we show that while high C2H2 (1.3 mM) concentrations reversibly inhibit reductive dechlorination of TCE by Dehalococcoides mccartyi isolates as well as enrichment cultures containing D. mccartyi sp., low C2H2 (0.4 mM) concentrations do not inhibit growth or metabolism of D. mccartyi. Cocultures of Pelobacter SFB93, a C2H2-fermenting bacterium, with D. mccartyi strain 195 or with D. mccartyi strain BAV1 were actively sustained by providing acetylene as the electron donor and carbon source while TCE or cis-DCE served as the electron acceptor. Inhibition by acetylene of reductive dechlorination and methanogenesis in the enrichment culture ANAS was observed, and the inhibition was removed by adding Pelobacter SFB93 into the consortium. Transcriptomic analysis of D. mccartyi strain 195 showed genes encoding for reductive dehalogenases (e.g., tceA) were not affected during the C2H2-inhibition, while genes encoding for ATP synthase, biosynthesis, and Hym hydrogenase were down-regulated during C2H2 inhibition, consistent with the physiological observation of lower cell yields and reduced dechlorination rates in strain 195. These results will help facilitate the optimization of TCE-bioremediation at contaminated sites containing both TCE and C2H2.

  2. Dehalococcoides' gene transcripts as quantitative bioindicators of tetrachloroethene, trichloroethene, and cis-1,2-dichloroethene dehalorespiration rates.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rahm, Brian G; Richardson, Ruth E

    2008-07-15

    Gene transcripts corresponding to 16S rRNA, the hydrogenase (H2ase) Hup, a sequence annotated asformate dehydrogenase (Fdh) and reductive dehalogenases (RDases) TceA, PceA, DET1559, and DET1545 in Dehalococcoides ethenogenes strain 195 (DET) hold promise as potential bioindicators of the dehalorespiration of chlorinated ethenes. Here, we present quantitative reverse-transcriptase polymerase chain reaction (qRT-PCR) data taken from DET-containing mixed culture microcosms (4.4 x 10(8) DET 16S rRNA gene copies/mL) operated under continuous-feed conditions, with the aim of clarifying the relationships between pseudosteady-state abundances of bioindicator transcripts and respiration rate of various substrates: tetrachloroethene (PCE), trichloroethene (TCE), and cis-1,2-dichloroethene (cDCE). Results from PCE-fed microcosms suggested an induction threshold for transcription of some bioindicator genes between chloroethene respiration rates of 2.1 and 9.5 microeeq/L/hr. Putative RDase genes DET1559 and DET1545, however, were up-regulated at low PCE respiration rates and may be functionally significant when substrate levels are low. Data from PCE-fed microcosms operated at saturation kinetics indicated that a high respiration rate was not necessarily associated with a correspondingly high bioindicator transcript abundance. From these microcosms we calculated an approximate yield value of 1.6 x 10(8) 16S rRNA gene copies (cells) per micromol Cl- released and estimated a kmax of PCE respiration of 3 x 10(-9) micromol Cl- per 16S rRNA gene copy per day. TCE- and cDCE-fed microcosm studies indicated that Fdh, Hup, and TceA were the most abundant transcripts and could make suitable choices as bioindicators of activity for these substrates. Hup transcripts could be positively correlated to respiration rate (between approximately 8 and 45 microeeq/L/hr) regardless of chloroethene substrate, with transcript levels predicted to increase by 1.8 x 10(9) copies/mL culture for every

  3. Inferring Gene Networks for Strains of Dehalococcoides Highlights Conserved Relationships between Genes Encoding Core Catabolic and Cell-Wall Structural Proteins.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mansfeldt, Cresten B; Heavner, Gretchen W; Rowe, Annette R; Hayete, Boris; Church, Bruce W; Richardson, Ruth E

    2016-01-01

    The interpretation of high-throughput gene expression data for non-model microorganisms remains obscured because of the high fraction of hypothetical genes and the limited number of methods for the robust inference of gene networks. Therefore, to elucidate gene-gene and gene-condition linkages in the bioremediation-important genus Dehalococcoides, we applied a Bayesian inference strategy called Reverse Engineering/Forward Simulation (REFS™) on transcriptomic data collected from two organohalide-respiring communities containing different Dehalococcoides mccartyi strains: the Cornell University mixed community D2 and the commercially available KB-1® bioaugmentation culture. In total, 49 and 24 microarray datasets were included in the REFS™ analysis to generate an ensemble of 1,000 networks for the Dehalococcoides population in the Cornell D2 and KB-1® culture, respectively. Considering only linkages that appeared in the consensus network for each culture (exceeding the determined frequency cutoff of ≥ 60%), the resulting Cornell D2 and KB-1® consensus networks maintained 1,105 nodes (genes or conditions) with 974 edges and 1,714 nodes with 1,455 edges, respectively. These consensus networks captured multiple strong and biologically informative relationships. One of the main highlighted relationships shared between these two cultures was a direct edge between the transcript encoding for the major reductive dehalogenase (tceA (D2) or vcrA (KB-1®)) and the transcript for the putative S-layer cell wall protein (DET1407 (D2) or KB1_1396 (KB-1®)). Additionally, transcripts for two key oxidoreductases (a [Ni Fe] hydrogenase, Hup, and a protein with similarity to a formate dehydrogenase, "Fdh") were strongly linked, generalizing a strong relationship noted previously for Dehalococcoides mccartyi strain 195 to multiple strains of Dehalococcoides. Notably, the pangenome array utilized when monitoring the KB-1® culture was capable of resolving signals from multiple

  4. Inferring Gene Networks for Strains of Dehalococcoides Highlights Conserved Relationships between Genes Encoding Core Catabolic and Cell-Wall Structural Proteins

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mansfeldt, Cresten B.; Heavner, Gretchen W.; Rowe, Annette R.; Hayete, Boris; Church, Bruce W.; Richardson, Ruth E.

    2016-01-01

    The interpretation of high-throughput gene expression data for non-model microorganisms remains obscured because of the high fraction of hypothetical genes and the limited number of methods for the robust inference of gene networks. Therefore, to elucidate gene-gene and gene-condition linkages in the bioremediation-important genus Dehalococcoides, we applied a Bayesian inference strategy called Reverse Engineering/Forward Simulation (REFS™) on transcriptomic data collected from two organohalide-respiring communities containing different Dehalococcoides mccartyi strains: the Cornell University mixed community D2 and the commercially available KB-1® bioaugmentation culture. In total, 49 and 24 microarray datasets were included in the REFS™ analysis to generate an ensemble of 1,000 networks for the Dehalococcoides population in the Cornell D2 and KB-1® culture, respectively. Considering only linkages that appeared in the consensus network for each culture (exceeding the determined frequency cutoff of ≥ 60%), the resulting Cornell D2 and KB-1® consensus networks maintained 1,105 nodes (genes or conditions) with 974 edges and 1,714 nodes with 1,455 edges, respectively. These consensus networks captured multiple strong and biologically informative relationships. One of the main highlighted relationships shared between these two cultures was a direct edge between the transcript encoding for the major reductive dehalogenase (tceA (D2) or vcrA (KB-1®)) and the transcript for the putative S-layer cell wall protein (DET1407 (D2) or KB1_1396 (KB-1®)). Additionally, transcripts for two key oxidoreductases (a [Ni Fe] hydrogenase, Hup, and a protein with similarity to a formate dehydrogenase, “Fdh”) were strongly linked, generalizing a strong relationship noted previously for Dehalococcoides mccartyi strain 195 to multiple strains of Dehalococcoides. Notably, the pangenome array utilized when monitoring the KB-1® culture was capable of resolving signals from

  5. Metabolism of 4-chloro-2-nitrophenol in a Gram-positive bacterium, Exiguobacterium sp. PMA

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    Arora Pankaj

    2012-11-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Chloronitrophenols (CNPs are widely used in the synthesis of dyes, drugs and pesticides, and constitute a major group of environmental pollutants. 4-Chloro-2-nitrophenol (4C2NP is an isomer of CNPs that has been detected in various industrial effluents. A number of physicochemical methods have been used for treatment of wastewater containing 4C2NP. These methods are not as effective as microbial degradation, however. Results A 4C2NP-degrading bacterium, Exiguobacterium sp. PMA, which uses 4C2NP as the sole carbon and energy source was isolated from a chemically-contaminated site in India. Exiguobacterium sp. PMA degraded 4C2NP with the release of stoichiometeric amounts of chloride and ammonium ions. The effects of different substrate concentrations and various inoculum sizes on degradation of 4C2NP were investigated. Exiguobacterium sp. PMA degraded 4C2NP up to a concentration of 0.6 mM. High performance liquid chromatography and gas chromatography–mass spectrometry identified 4-chloro-2-aminophenol (4C2AP and 2-aminophenol (2AP as possible metabolites of the 4C2NP degradation pathway. The crude extract of 4C2NP-induced PMA cells contained enzymatic activity for 4C2NP reductase and 4C2AP dehalogenase, suggesting the involvement of these enzymes in the degradation of 4C2NP. Microcosm studies using sterile and non-sterile soils spiked with 4C2NP were carried out to monitor the bioremediation potential of Exiguobacterium sp. PMA. The bioremediation of 4C2NP by Exiguobacterium sp. PMA was faster in non-sterilized soil than sterilized soil. Conclusions Our studies indicate that Exiguobacterium sp. PMA may be useful for the bioremediation of 4C2NP-contaminated sites. This is the first report of (i the formation of 2AP in the 4C2NP degradation pathway by any bacterium and (iii the bioremediation of 4C2NP by any bacterium.

  6. A Functional Genomic Approach to Chlorinated Ethenes Bioremediation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, P. K.; Brodie, E. L.; MacBeth, T. W.; Deeb, R. A.; Sorenson, K. S.; Andersen, G. L.; Alvarez-Cohen, L.

    2007-12-01

    With the recent advances in genomic sciences, a knowledge-based approach can now be taken to optimize the bioremediation of trichloroethene (TCE). During the bioremediation of a heterogeneous subsurface, it is vital to identify and quantify the functionally important microorganisms present, characterize the microbial community and measure their physiological activity. In our field experiments, quantitative PCR (qPCR) was coupled with reverse-transcription (RT) to analyze both copy numbers and transcripts expressed by the 16S rRNA gene and three reductive dehalogenase (RDase) genes as biomarkers of Dehalococcoides spp. in the groundwater of a TCE-DNAPL site at Ft. Lewis (WA) that was serially subjected to biostimulation and bioaugmentation. Genes in the Dehalococcoides genus were targeted as they are the only known organisms that can completely dechlorinate TCE to the innocuous product ethene. Biomarker quantification revealed an overall increase of more than three orders of magnitude in the total Dehalococcoides population and quantification of the more liable and stringently regulated mRNAs confirmed that Dehalococcoides spp. were active. Parallel with our field experiments, laboratory studies were conducted to explore the physiology of Dehalococcoides isolates in order to develop relevant biomarkers that are indicative of the metabolic state of cells. Recently, we verified the function of the nitrogenase operon in Dehalococcoides sp. strain 195 and nitrogenase-encoding genes are ideal biomarker targets to assess cellular nitrogen requirement. To characterize the microbial community, we applied a high-density phylogenetic microarray (16S PhyloChip) that simultaneous monitors over 8,700 unique taxa to track the bacterial and archaeal populations through different phases of treatment. As a measure of species richness, 1,300 to 1,520 taxa were detected in groundwater samples extracted during different stages of treatment as well as in the bioaugmentation culture. We

  7. Selection of clc, cba, and fcb chlorobenzoate-catabolic genotypes from groundwater and surface waters adjacent to the Hyde park, Niagara Falls, chemical landfill.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peel, M C; Wyndham, R C

    1999-04-01

    The frequency of isolation of three nonhomologous chlorobenzoate catabolic genotypes (clc, cba, and fcb) was determined for 464 isolates from freshwater sediments and groundwater in the vicinity of the Hyde Park industrial landfill site in the Niagara watershed. Samples were collected from both contaminated and noncontaminated sites during spring, summer, and fall and enriched at 4, 22, or 32 degrees C with micromolar to millimolar concentrations of chlorobenzoates and 3-chlorobiphenyl (M. C. Peel and R. C. Wyndham, Microb. Ecol: 33:59-68, 1997). Hybridization at moderate stringency to restriction-digested genomic DNA with DNA probes revealed the chlorocatechol 1,2-dioxygenase operon (clcABD), the 3-chlorobenzoate 3,4-(4,5)-dioxygenase operon (cbaABC), and the 4-chlorobenzoate dehalogenase (fcbB) gene in isolates enriched from all contaminated sites in the vicinity of the industrial landfill. Nevertheless, the known genes were found in less than 10% of the isolates from the contaminated sites, indicating a high level of genetic diversity in the microbial community. The known genotypes were not enriched from the noncontaminated control sites nearby. The clc, cba, and fcb isolates were distributed across five phenotypically distinct groups based on Biolog carbon source utilization, with the breadth of the host range decreasing in the order clc > cba > fcb. Restriction fragment length polymorphism (RFLP) patterns showed that the cba genes were conserved in all isolates whereas the clc and fcb genes exhibited variation in RFLP patterns. These observations are consistent with the recent spread of the cba genes by horizontal transfer as part of transposon Tn5271 in response to contaminant exposure at Hyde Park. Consistent with this hypothesis, IS1071, the flanking element in Tn5271, was found in all isolates that carried the cba genes. Interestingly, IS1071 was also found in a high proportion of isolates from Hyde Park carrying the clc and fcb genes, as well as in type

  8. Validation of an integrative methodology to assess and monitor reductive dechlorination of chlorinated ethenes in contaminated aquifers

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    Sonia-Estelle eTarnawski

    2016-02-01

    Full Text Available Bioremediation of tetra-and trichloroethene-contaminated aquifers is frequently hampered due to incomplete dechlorination to the more toxic dichloroethene (DCE and vinyl chloride (VC, indicating insufficient knowledge about the biological mechanisms related to aquifer functioning. A methodology based on the joint analysis of geochemical and microbiological datasets was developed to assess the presence of the biochemical potential for complete reductive dechlorination to harmless ethene and to explain the reasons for which degradation often stalls at the more toxic intermediates. This methodology is composed of three successive steps, with i the acquisition of geochemical data including chlorinated ethenes, ii the detailed analysis of the bacterial community structures as well as the biochemical potential for complete dechlorination using microcosms and molecular detection of organohalide-respiring bacteria and key reductive dehalogenases, and iii a statistical Multiple Factor Analysis combining the above mentioned abiotic and biotic variables in a functional modelling of the contaminated aquifer. The methodology was validated by analyzing two chlorinated ethenes-contaminated sites. Results from the first site showed that the full biochemical potential for ethene production was present in situ. However, redox potential was overall too high and locally manganese reduction out-competed chlorinated ethenes reduction, explaining the reasons for the local accumulation of DCE and VC to a lesser extent. The second contaminated aquifer was under bioremediation by successive cheese whey injections. Analysis demonstrated that cheese whey additions led to increasingly reduced redox conditions and that hampered reductive dechlorination was not due to competition with other anaerobic respiration processes. Complete reductive dechlorination to ethene was preferentially occurring under methanogenic conditions. DCE and VC accumulation was probably induced first

  9. DDE remediation and degradation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thomas, John E; Ou, Li-Tse; All-Agely, Abid

    2008-01-01

    DDT and its metabolites, DDD and DDE, have been shown to be recalcitrant to degradation. The parent compound, DDT, was used extensively worldwide starting in 1939 and was banned in the United States in 1973. The daughter compound, DDE, may result from aerobic degradation, abiotic dehydrochlorination, or photochemical decomposition. DDE has also occurred as a contaminant in commercial-grade DDT. The p,p'-DDE isomer is more biologically active than the o,p-DDE, with a reported half-life of -5.7 years. However, when DDT was repeatedly applied to the soil, the DDE concentration may remain unchanged for more than 20 yr. Remediation of DDE-contaminated soil and water may be done by several techniques. Phytoremediation involves translocating DDT, DDD, and DDE from the soil into the plant, although some aquatic species (duckweed > elodea > parrot feather) can transform DDT into predominantly DDD with some DDE being formed. Of all the plants that can uptake DDE, Cucurbita pepo has been the most extensively studied, with translocation values approaching "hyperaccumulation" levels. Soil moisture, temperature, and plant density have all been documented as important factors in the uptake of DDE by Cucurbita pepo. Uptake may also be influenced positively by amendments such as biosurfactants, mycorrhizal inoculants, and low molecular weight organic acids (e.g., citric and oxalic acids). DDE microbial degradation by dehalogenases, dioxygenases, and hydrolases occurs under the proper conditions. Although several aerobic degradation pathways have been proposed, none has been fully verified. Very few aerobic pure cultures are capable of fully degrading DDE to CO2. Cometabolism of DDE by Pseudomonas sp., Alicaligens sp., and Terrabacter sp. grown on biphenyl has been reported; however, not all bacterial species that produce biphenyl dioxygenase degraded DDE. Arsenic and copper inhibit DDE degradation by aerobic microorganisms. Similarly, metal chelates such as EDTA inhibit the

  10. Specificity in transition state binding: the Pauling model revisited.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Amyes, Tina L; Richard, John P

    2013-03-26

    -transition state complex compared with that of the free enzyme. Evidence is presented that supports a model in which the binding energy of the phosphite dianion piece, or the phosphodianion group of the whole substrate, is utilized to drive an enzyme conformational change from an inactive open form E(O) to an active closed form E(C), by closure of a phosphodianion gripper loop. Members of the enolase and haloalkanoic acid dehalogenase superfamilies use variable capping domains to interact with nonreacting portions of the substrate and sequester the substrate from interaction with bulk solvent. Interactions of this capping domain with the phenyl group of mandelate have been shown to activate mandelate racemase for catalysis of deprotonation of α-carbonyl carbon. We propose that an important function of these capping domains is to utilize the binding interactions with nonreacting portions of the substrate to activate the enzyme for catalysis.

  11. Genomic determinants of organohalide-respiration in Geobacter lovleyi, an unusual member of the Geobacteraceae

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    Wagner Darlene D

    2012-05-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Geobacter lovleyi is a unique member of the Geobacteraceae because strains of this species share the ability to couple tetrachloroethene (PCE reductive dechlorination to cis-1,2-dichloroethene (cis-DCE with energy conservation and growth (i.e., organohalide respiration. Strain SZ also reduces U(VI to U(IV and contributes to uranium immobilization, making G. lovleyi relevant for bioremediation at sites impacted with chlorinated ethenes and radionuclides. G. lovleyi is the only fully sequenced representative of this distinct Geobacter clade, and comparative genome analyses identified genetic elements associated with organohalide respiration and elucidated genome features that distinguish strain SZ from other members of the Geobacteraceae. Results Sequencing the G. lovleyi strain SZ genome revealed a 3.9 Mbp chromosome with 54.7% GC content (i.e., the percent of the total guanines (Gs and cytosines (Cs among the four bases within the genome, and average amino acid identities of 53–56% compared to other sequenced Geobacter spp. Sequencing also revealed the presence of a 77 kbp plasmid, pSZ77 (53.0% GC, with nearly half of its encoded genes corresponding to chromosomal homologs in other Geobacteraceae genomes. Among these chromosome-derived features, pSZ77 encodes 15 out of the 24 genes required for de novo cobalamin biosynthesis, a required cofactor for organohalide respiration. A plasmid with 99% sequence identity to pSZ77 was subsequently detected in the PCE-dechlorinating G. lovleyi strain KB-1 present in the PCE-to-ethene-dechlorinating consortium KB-1. Additional PCE-to-cis-DCE-dechlorinating G. lovleyi strains obtained from the PCE-contaminated Fort Lewis, WA, site did not carry a plasmid indicating that pSZ77 is not a requirement (marker for PCE respiration within this species. Chromosomal genomic islands found within the G. lovleyi strain SZ genome encode two reductive dehalogenase (RDase homologs and a putative

  12. Comparação da sensibilidade de bovinos e búfalos à intoxicação por Palicourea marcgravii (Rubiaceae Comparison of the sensibility of cattle and buffaloes to poisoning by Palicourea marcgravii (Rubiaceae

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    José Diomedes Barbosa

    2003-12-01

    , pesquisadores australianos modificaram geneticamente a bactéria ruminal Butyrivibrio fibrisolvens, mediante a introdução de um gene, isolado de Moraxella sp, que codifica uma dehalogenase, capaz de hidrolizar fluoroacetato. A transferência de B. fibrisolvens geneticamente modificado para o rúmen de animais ingerindo plantas que contêm fluoroacetato, como é o caso de P. marcgravii, seria um método viável para o controle da intoxicação mediante a detoxificação ruminal do princípio ativo. Em contatos preliminares o diretor responsável do consórcio na Austrália responsável pela modificação da bactéria, declarou o interesse em vender a tecnologia ao nosso país, porém seria necessário saber se é possível importar essa bactéria geneticamente modificada no Brasil. Caso positivo, seria indispensável realizar pesquisas sobre a viabilidade e a metodologia para o uso dessa bactéria em nosso meio.In order to verify if buffaloes are more resistant than cattle to poisoning by Palicourea marcgravii, the plant was given per os simultaneously to buffaloes and cattle. Seven buffaloes and three head of cattle were used. Doses of 0.5, 1.0 and 2.0 g/kg did not cause signs of poisoning in buffaloes; but doses of 3.0, 4.0 and 6.0 g/kg caused death. In cattle 0.25 g/kg did not cause symptoms; but 0.5 and 2.0 g/kg were lethal. The influence of exercise on the onset of symptoms, the time which elapsed from the beginning of the administration of the plant to the appearance of symptoms, and the symptoms themselves, were similar in the two animal species. The clinical course was longer in buffaloes; whilst in cattle the period between the onset of severe symptoms and death lasted 9 to 17 minutes; in buffaloes it varied from 10 minutes to 1 hour 28 minutes. It can be concluded, that buffaloes are about six times more resistant than cattle to the toxic action of P. maracgravii. The lower incidence of deaths in buffaloes by poisonous plants in the Amazon region is, at least in part