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Sample records for hallux

  1. Hallux abductus interphalangeus in normal feet, early-stage hallux limitus, and hallux valgus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Castillo-Lopez, Jose M; Ramos-Ortega, Javier; Reina-Bueno, Maria; Domínguez-Maldonado, Gabriel; Palomo-Toucedo, Inmaculada C; Munuera, Pedro V

    2014-03-01

    Excessive deviation of the distal phalanx in abduction frequently occurs in advanced stages of hallux rigidus but not in hallux valgus. Therefore, theoretically there should be no significant differences in the hallux interphalangeal angle (HIPA) between individuals with normal feet, those with hallux valgus, and those with mild hallux limitus. The objective of the present study was thus to determine if significant differences in HIPA exist in the early stages of hallux valgus or hallux limitus deformities. The hallux interphalangeal angle was measured in three groups of participants: a control group with normal feet (45 participants), a hallux valgus group (49 participants), and a hallux limitus group (48 participants). Both of the pathologies were at an early stage. A dorsoplantar radiograph under weightbearing conditions was taken for each individual, and measurements (HIPA and hallux abductus angle [HAA]) were taken using AutoCAD (Autodesk Inc, San Rafael, California) software. Intergroup comparisons of HIPA, and correlations between HIPA, HAA, and hallux dorsiflexion were calculated. The comparisons revealed no significant differences in the values of HIPA between any of the groups (15.2 ± 5.9 degrees in the control group, 15.5 ± 3.9 degrees in the hallux valgus group, and 16.15 ± 4.3 in the hallux limitus group; P  =  0.634). The Pearson correlation coefficients in particular showed no correlation between hallux dorsiflexion, HAA, and HIPA. For the study participants, there were similar deviations of the distal phalanx of the hallux with respect to the proximal phalanx in normal feet and in feet with the early stages of the hallux limitus and hallux valgus deformities.

  2. Treatment of hallux valgus deformity.

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    Fraissler, Lukas; Konrads, Christian; Hoberg, Maik; Rudert, Maximilian; Walcher, Matthias

    2016-08-01

    Hallux valgus deformity is a very common pathological condition which commonly produces painful disability. It is characterised as a combined deformity with a malpositioning of the first metatarsophalangeal joint caused by a lateral deviation of the great toe and a medial deviation of the first metatarsal bone.Taking the patient's history and a thorough physical examination are important steps. Anteroposterior and lateral weight-bearing radiographs of the entire foot are crucial for adequate assessment in the treatment of hallux valgus.Non-operative treatment of the hallux valgus cannot correct the deformity. However, insoles and physiotherapy in combination with good footwear can help to control the symptoms.There are many operative techniques for hallux valgus correction. The decision on which surgical technique is used depends on the degree of deformity, the extent of degenerative changes of the first metatarsophalangeal joint and the shape and size of the metatarsal bone and phalangeal deviation. The role of stability of the first tarsometatarsal joint is controversial.Surgical techniques include the modified McBride procedure, distal metatarsal osteotomies, metatarsal shaft osteotomies, the Akin osteotomy, proximal metatarsal osteotomies, the modified Lapidus fusion and the hallux joint fusion. Recently, minimally invasive percutaneous techniques have gained importance and are currently being evaluated more scientifically.Hallux valgus correction is followed by corrective dressings of the great toe post-operatively. Depending on the procedure, partial or full weight-bearing in a post-operative shoe or cast immobilisation is advised. Post-operative radiographs are taken in regular intervals until osseous healing is achieved. Cite this article: Fraissler L, Konrads C, Hoberg M, Rudert M, Walcher M. Treatment of hallux valgus deformity. EFORT Open Rev 2016;1:295-302. DOI: 10.1302/2058-5241.1.000005.

  3. Radiographic evaluation of hallux valgus

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Richardson, M.L.; Hansen, S.T.; Kilcoyne, R.F.

    1987-01-01

    This paper presents the common preoperative and postoperative findings in hallux valgus, a common foot disorder of multiple etiologies, which can lead to significant foot pain and deformity. Little has been published in radiologic literature about the proper initial radiographic workup and the postoperative follow-up of this very common and very treatable cause of foot pain. Besides the primary findings of varus angulation of the first metatarsal and valgus angulation of the great toe, one may also see dorsal slaying of the first metatarsal head. As increased weight is borne by the central metatarsals, they may develop hyperostosis and stress fractures. Angular deformities of the hallux sesamoid joint and lesser toes may also be seen

  4. Therapeutic Management of the Hallux Rigidus

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    Anoop Aggarwal

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Background. Hallux rigidus is a chronic, disabling condition of foot characterized by reduced great toe extension. The manual therapy approaches are described theoretically however their practical published evidence has not been analyzed well. Objective. Aim of the present paper was to systematically review the literature available for therapeutic management of the hallux rigidus by identifying and evaluating the randomized controlled trials (RCTs and non-RCTs. Methods. To view the hallux rigidus and its rehabilitation, a webbased published literature search of Pubmed, Ovid Medline, Science direct, Cochrane Database, PEDro database, CINAHL was conducted for last 35 years in August 2010 using 4 specific keywords “hallux rigidus, physical therapy, chiropractic, and manual therapy” typed in exactly same manner in the search column of the databases. Result. the review finds that there is acute need of the quality studies and RCTs for the manual therapy, chiropractic, or physiotherapeutic management of the hallux rigidus. Conclusion. Review conclude that conservative programs for hallux rigidus consists of comprehensive intervention program that includes great toe mobilization, toe flexor strengthening, sesamoid bones mobilization and long MTP joint. The clinician should put an emphasis on the mobilization program with proper follow up along with comparative studies for rehabilitation of hallux rigidus.

  5. Helpotusta hallux valgukseen! : 8 viikon harjoitusohjelman ja kinesioteippauksen vaikutus hallux valgus virheasentoon, koettuun kipuun ja toimintakykyyn

    OpenAIRE

    Uusihaka, Noora; Hiirikoski, Joonas

    2013-01-01

    Hallux valgus eli vaivaisenluu on yleinen jalkaterän toimintahäiriö, jota esiintyy jopa 25 prosentilla ihmisistä. Usein hallux valgus on kivulias ja vaikuttaa toimintakykyyn ja elämänlaatuun negatiivisesti. Jalkaterän toimintahäiriöt, jotka aiheuttavat hallux valgusta, ovat usein seurausta jalkaterän lihasten alentuneesta lihasvoimasta ja –kontrollista. Opinnäytetyön tarkoituksena on tuottaa tietoa hallux valguksen yleisyydestä, sen etiologisista tekijöistä ja konservatiivisen hoidon mahd...

  6. SURGICAL TREATMENT OF HALLUX VALGUS AND ITS POSSIBLE COMPLICATIONS (REVIEW

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    E. P. Sorokin

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Hallux valgus surgery remains the most important direction of modern orthopedics. In this article authors analyzed the history of Hallux valgus surgical treatment development observing the details of different types of methods directing on various pathogenic parts of pathology as well as complications occurring with different types of methods. Main tendencies of development and improvements of hallux valgus surgery are described.

  7. First Metatarsal Head and Medial Eminence Widths with and Without Hallux Valgus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lenz, Robin C; Nagesh, Darshan; Park, Hannah K; Grady, John

    2016-09-02

    Resection of the medial eminence in hallux valgus surgery is common. True hypertrophy of the medial eminence in hallux valgus is debated. No studies have compared metatarsal head width in patients with hallux valgus and control patients. We reviewed 43 radiographs with hallux valgus and 27 without hallux valgus. We measured medial eminence width, first metatarsal head width, and first metatarsal shaft width in patients with and without radiographic hallux valgus. Medial eminence width was 1.12 mm larger in patients with hallux valgus (P hallux valgus (P hallux valgus. However, frontal plane rotation of the first metatarsal likely accounts for this difference.

  8. [Hallux valgus : Etiology, diagnosis, and therapeutic principles].

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    Zirngibl, B; Grifka, J; Baier, C; Götz, J

    2017-03-01

    Hallux valgus-the most common forefoot deformity-can cause both pain and decreased mobility. The development and progress of the hallux valgus is a multifactorial process. Different intrinsic and extrinsic causes are responsible. Various conservative and operative treatment options exist and have to been chosen regarding the stage of the disease. Conservative orthopedic measures may prevent a deterioration of hallux valgus only at an early stage of the disease. Concerning operative techniques, more than 150 different surgical procedures are described in the literature, which can be reduced to some common procedures. These are dependent on the manifestation of the bunion as well as on associated foot and ankle pathologies. Patients should be informed that postoperative follow-up treatment until complete recovery is time-consuming.

  9. THE CORRECTION OF HALLUX VARUS DEFORMITY IN CONSEQUENCE OF SURGICAL TREATMENT FOR HALLUX VALGUS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    V. M. Mashkov

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available The analysis of treatment of 21 patients (24 feet with postoperative hallux varus deformity which have arisen after operations apropos hallux valgus is carried out. For correction of vicious position of the first finger we successfully carried out the Brandes procedure, sometimes in a combination to operations on sinews of muscles of the first finger - an adductor hallucis tendotomy and/or lengthening of the extensor hallucis longus tendon.

  10. Radiographic correlates of hallux valgus severity in older people

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    D'Arcangelo Paul R

    2010-09-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The severity of hallux valgus is easily appreciated by its clinical appearance, however x-ray measurements are also frequently used to evaluate the condition, particularly if surgery is being considered. There have been few large studies that have assessed the validity of these x-ray observations across a wide spectrum of the deformity. In addition, no studies have specifically focused on older people where the progression of the disorder has largely ceased. Therefore, this study aimed to explore relationships between relevant x-ray observations with respect to hallux valgus severity in older people. Methods This study utilised 402 x-rays of 201 participants (74 men and 127 women aged 65 to 94 years. All participants were graded using the Manchester Scale - a simple, validated system to grade the severity of hallux valgus - prior to radiographic assessment. A total of 19 hallux valgus-related x-ray observations were performed on each set of x-rays. These measurements were then correlated with the Manchester Scale scores. Results Strong, positive correlations were identified between the severity of hallux valgus and the hallux abductus angle, the proximal articular set angle, the sesamoid position and congruency of the first metatarsophalangeal joint. As hallux valgus severity increased, so did the frequency of radiographic osteoarthritis of the first metatarsophalangeal joint and a round first metatarsal head. A strong linear relationship between increased relative length of the first metatarsal and increased severity of hallux valgus was also observed. Conclusions Strong associations are evident between the clinical appearance of hallux valgus and a number of hallux valgus-related x-ray observations indicative of structural deformity and joint degeneration. As it is unlikely that metatarsal length increases as a result of hallux valgus deformity, increased length of the first metatarsal relative to the second metatarsal may

  11. First Metatarsophalangeal Joint Arthrodesis in Hallux Valgus Versus Hallux Rigidus Using Cup and Cone Preparation Compression Screw and Dorsal Plate Fixation.

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    Chien, Calvin; Alfred, Terrence; Freihaut, Richard; Pit, Sabrina

    2017-10-19

    Various techniques have been described for first metatarsophalangeal (MTP) joint arthrodesis. The purpose of this study was to determine if cup and cone preparation by a single surgeon with an interfragmentary screw and dorsal plate fixation provides a comparable union rate in hallux valgus versus hallux rigidus. Our study included all patients who underwent first MTP joint fusions using cup and cone preparation with an interfragmentary compression screw and dorsal plate fixation from 2010 to 2015. We compared union rates in 65 patients with hallux rigidus with 47 who had hallux valgus. One of 65 hallux rigidus cases developed non-union and underwent revision surgery. One of 47 patients in the hallux valgus group developed a painless non-union. All other patients achieved union based on post operative radiographs. Our rate of painful non-union was 1.5% for hallux rigidus and 0% for hallux valgus, which is lower than recent published literature of 7% for hallux valgus and 3.7% for hallux rigidus. We found no difference between the two groups suggesting this method may provide stronger fixation and may be preferable when dealing with hallux valgus. First metatarsophalangeal joint fusion in patients with severe hallux valgus and hallux rigidus, using spherical reamers, compression screw and dorsal plate fixation is equally successful at achieving clinical and radiographic fusion in both hallux valgus and hallux rigidus.

  12. Severe Hallux Valgus With Coalition of the Hallux Sesamoids Treated With Modified Lapidus Procedure: A Case Report.

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    Kurashige, Toshinori; Suzuki, Seiichi

    2017-12-01

    Coalition of the hallux sesamoids is an extremely rare condition. To our knowledge, only 1 case report has been published. We report a case of severe hallux valgus deformities with coalitions of the hallux sesamoids. The coalitions themselves were asymptomatic; however, this severe hallux valgus deformity needed to be surgically treated. The hallux sesamoids in both feet appeared to be fused and heart shaped on anteroposterior radiographs and dumbbell shaped on axial radiographs. It is known that postoperative incomplete reduction of the medial sesamoids can be a risk factor for the recurrence of hallux valgus. The computed tomography scan demonstrated a groove in the bottom of the center of the heart-shaped sesamoid. The flexor hallucis longus tendon was located in the groove. Therefore, a modified Lapidus procedure was performed considering the medial half of the heart-shaped sesamoid as the medial sesamoid. Although delayed union occurred, successful correction of the deformity was achieved. Level IV.

  13. History of surgical treatments for hallux valgus.

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    Galois, Laurent

    2018-05-31

    In the nineteenth century, the prevalent understanding of the hallux valgus was that it was purely an enlargement of the soft tissue, first metatarsal head, or both, most commonly caused by ill-fitting footwear. Thus, treatment had varying results, with controversy over whether to remove the overlying bursa alone or in combination with an exostectomy of the medial head. Since 1871, when the surgical technique was first described, many surgical treatments for the correction of hallux valgus have been proposed. A number of these techniques have come into fashion, and others have fallen into oblivion. Progress in biomechanical knowledge, and improvements in materials and supports have allowed new techniques to be developed over the years. We have developed techniques that sacrifice the metatarsophalangeal joint (arthrodesis, arthroplasties), as well as conservative procedures, and one can distinguish those which only involve the soft tissues from those that are linked with a first ray osteotomy.

  14. Reliability and relationship of radiographic measurements in hallux valgus.

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    Lee, Kyoung Min; Ahn, Soyeon; Chung, Chin Youb; Sung, Ki Hyuk; Park, Moon Seok

    2012-09-01

    Although various radiographic measurements have been developed and used for evaluating hallux valgus, not all are universally believed to be necessary and their relationships have not been clearly established. Determining which are related could provide some insight into which might be useful and which would not. We investigated the reliability of eight radiographic measurements used to evaluate hallux valgus, and determined which were correlated and which predicted the hallux valgus angle. We determined eight radiographic indices for 732 patients (mean age, 51 years; SD, 17 years; 107 males and 625 females) with hallux valgus: hallux valgus angle, intermetatarsal angle, hallux interphalangeal angle, distal metatarsal articular angle, proximal phalangeal articular angle, simplified metatarsus adductus angle, first metatarsal protrusion distance, and sesamoid rotation angle. Intraobserver and interobserver reliabilities of each radiographic measurement were analyzed on 36 feet from 36 randomly selected patients. Correlations among the radiographic measurements were analyzed. Radiographic measurements predicting hallux valgus angle were evaluated using multiple regression analysis. Hallux valgus angle had the highest reliability, whereas the distal metatarsal articular angle and simplified metatarsus adductus angle had the lowest. Distal metatarsal articular angle, intermetatarsal angle, and sesamoid rotation angle had the highest correlations with hallux valgus angle. Distal metatarsal articular angle correlated with sesamoid rotation angle. The intermetatarsal angle, interphalangeal angle, distal metatarsal articular angle, first metatarsal protrusion distance, sesamoid rotation angle, and metatarsus adductus angle predicted the hallux valgus angle. We suggest using hallux valgus angle, intermetatarsal angle, interphalangeal angle, sesamoid rotation angle, and first metatarsal protrusion distance considering their reliability and prediction of the deformity.

  15. A modified Austin/chevron osteotomy for treatment of hallux valgus and hallux rigidus.

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    Vasso, Michele; Del Regno, Chiara; D'Amelio, Antonio; Schiavone Panni, Alfredo

    2016-03-01

    The purpose of this brief paper is to present the preliminary results of a modified Austin/chevron osteotomy for treatment of hallux valgus and hallux rigidus. In this procedure, the dorsal arm of the osteotomy is performed orthogonal to the horizontal plane of the first metatarsal, the main advantage being that this allows much easier and more accurate multiplanar correction of first metatarsal deformities. From 2010 to 2013, 184 consecutive patients with symptomatic hallux valgus and 48 patients with hallux rigidus without severe metatarsophalangeal joint degeneration underwent such modified chevron osteotomy. Mean patient age was 54.9 (range 21-70) years, and mean follow-up duration was 41.7 (range 24-56) months. Ninety-three percent of patients were satisfied with the surgery. Mean American Orthopaedic Foot and Ankle Society (AOFAS) score improved from 56.6 preoperatively to 90.6 at last follow-up, and mean visual analog scale (VAS) pain score decreased from 5.7 preoperatively to 1.6 at final follow-up (p hallux valgus, mean hallux valgus angle decreased from 34.1° preoperatively to 6.2° at final follow-up, and mean intermetatarsal angle decreased from 18.5° preoperatively to 4.1° at final follow-up (p < 0.05). One patient developed postoperative transfer metatarsalgia, treated successfully with second-time percutaneous osteotomy of the minor metatarsals, whilst one patient had wound infection that resolved with systemic antibiotics. Level IV.

  16. Pain Resolution After Hallux Valgus Surgery.

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    Chen, Jerry Yongqiang; Ang, Benjamin Fu Hong; Jiang, Lei; Yeo, Nicholas Eng Meng; Koo, Kevin; Singh Rikhraj, Inderjeet

    2016-10-01

    Although more than 1500 publications on hallux valgus can be found in the current literature, none of them have reported on the course of pain resolution after hallux valgus surgery. Thus, this study aimed to investigate pain resolution after hallux valgus surgery and to identify predictive factors associated with residual pain at 6 months after surgery. We prospectively followed up 308 patients who underwent hallux valgus surgery at a tertiary hospital at 6 months and 2 years after surgery. Multivariate logistic regression analysis was performed to evaluate the risk factors associated with residual pain after surgery. Ninety-four patients (31%) had some degree of residual pain at 6 months after surgery. After excluding 4 patients who developed osteoarthritis of the first metatarsophalangeal joint over the next 18 months, 73 of the remaining 90 (81%) experienced improvement in visual analog scale (VAS) by the 2-years follow-up. Their median VAS improved from 4 (interquartile range [IQR] 3, 5) at 6 months to 0 (IQR 0, 3) at 2 years (P < .001). A higher preoperative VAS increased the risk of having persistent pain at 6 months after sugery (odds ratio [OR] 1.388, 95% confidence interval [CI] 1.092, 1.764, P = .007), whereas a higher preoperative Mental Component Score of SF-36 (MCS) reduced this risk (OR 0.952, 95% CI 0.919, 0.987, P = .007). As much as 31% of patients will have residual pain at 6 months after surgery. Preoperative VAS and MCS are predictors for residual pain. However, these patients will continue to improve over the next 18 months, with 71% of them being pain free at 2 years after surgery. Level II, prospective comparative study. © The Author(s) 2016.

  17. Treatment of Pseudoarthrosis After Minimally Invasive Hallux Valgus ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    access techniques enable correction of 80-90% of hallux valgus deformities solely via hallux manipulation without removal of the eminence or open lateral release yielding more than 90% excellent and good results.[2,4,5] Nonunion is rarely reported. We describe our operative technique for nonunion following minimally ...

  18. Hallux valgus angle as main predictor for correction of hallux valgus.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Deenik, A.R.; Visser, E. de; Louwerens, J.W.; Waal Malefijt, M.C. de; Draijer, F.; Bie, R.A. de

    2008-01-01

    BACKGROUND: It is recognized that different types of hallux valgus exist. Classification occurs with radiographic and clinical parameters. Severity of different parameters is used in algorithms to choose between different surgical procedures. Because there is no consensus about each parameter nor

  19. Tendon shift in hallux valgus: observations at MR imaging

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Eustace, S. [Department of Radiology, Boston University Medical Center Hospital, 88 East Newton Street, Atrium - 2, Boston, MA 02118 (United States); Williamson, D. [Department of Radiology, Brigham and Womens Hospital, Boston, Massachusetts (United States); Wilson, M. [Department of Orthopedics, Brigham and Womens Hospital, Boston, Massachusetts (United States); O`Byrne, J. [Department of Radiology, Boston University Medical Center Hospital, 88 East Newton Street, Atrium - 2, Boston, MA 02118 (United States); Bussolari, L. [Department of Radiology, Brigham and Womens Hospital, Boston, Massachusetts (United States); Thomas, M. [Department of Radiology, Brigham and Womens Hospital, Boston, Massachusetts (United States); Stephens, M. [Department of Radiology, Boston University Medical Center Hospital, 88 East Newton Street, Atrium - 2, Boston, MA 02118 (United States); Stack, J. [Department of Radiology, Boston University Medical Center Hospital, 88 East Newton Street, Atrium - 2, Boston, MA 02118 (United States); Weissman, B. [Department of Radiology, Brigham and Womens Hospital, Boston, Massachusetts (United States)

    1996-08-01

    Objective. This study was undertaken to demonstrate a shift in tendon alignment at the first metatarsophalangeal joint in patients with hallux valgus by means of magnetic resonance imaging. Design. Ten normal feet and 20 feet with the hallux valgus deformity conforming to conventional clinical and radiographic criteria were prospectively studied using magnetic resonance imaging. Correlation was made between tendon position at the first metatarsophalangeal joint and the severity of the hallux valgus deformity. Results. There is a significant shift in tendon position at the first metatarsophalangeal joint of patients with hallux valgus. The insertion of the abductor hallucis tendon is markedly plantarward and the flexor and extensor tendons bowstring at the first metatarsophalangeal joint compared with patients without the deformity. The severity of the tendon shift correlates with the hallux valgus angle and clinical severity of the hallux valgus deformity in each case. Conclusion. Patients with hallux valgus have a significant tendon shift at the first metatarsophalangeal joint which appears to contribute to development of the deformity. (orig.). With 4 figs., 1 tab.

  20. Tendon shift in hallux valgus: observations at MR imaging

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Eustace, S.; Williamson, D.; Wilson, M.; O'Byrne, J.; Bussolari, L.; Thomas, M.; Stephens, M.; Stack, J.; Weissman, B.

    1996-01-01

    Objective. This study was undertaken to demonstrate a shift in tendon alignment at the first metatarsophalangeal joint in patients with hallux valgus by means of magnetic resonance imaging. Design. Ten normal feet and 20 feet with the hallux valgus deformity conforming to conventional clinical and radiographic criteria were prospectively studied using magnetic resonance imaging. Correlation was made between tendon position at the first metatarsophalangeal joint and the severity of the hallux valgus deformity. Results. There is a significant shift in tendon position at the first metatarsophalangeal joint of patients with hallux valgus. The insertion of the abductor hallucis tendon is markedly plantarward and the flexor and extensor tendons bowstring at the first metatarsophalangeal joint compared with patients without the deformity. The severity of the tendon shift correlates with the hallux valgus angle and clinical severity of the hallux valgus deformity in each case. Conclusion. Patients with hallux valgus have a significant tendon shift at the first metatarsophalangeal joint which appears to contribute to development of the deformity. (orig.). With 4 figs., 1 tab

  1. Effect of Bipartite Hallucal Sesamoid on Hallux Valgus Surgery.

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    Park, Young Hwan; Jeong, Chan Dong; Choi, Gi Won; Kim, Hak Jun

    2017-06-01

    Bipartite hallucal sesamoids are often found in patients with hallux valgus. However, it is unknown whether bipartite hallucal sesamoids affect the results of hallux valgus surgery or not. The purpose of the present study was to evaluate the outcomes of chevron osteotomy for hallux valgus with and without bipartite hallucal sesamoid. A total of 152 patients (168 feet) treated with distal or proximal chevron osteotomy for hallux valgus constituted the study cohort. The 168 feet were divided into 2 groups: bipartite hallucal sesamoid (31 feet) and without bipartite hallucal sesamoid (137 feet). Hallux valgus angle (HVA), intermetatarsal angle (IMA), distal metatarsal articular angle (DMAA), tibial sesamoid position, and first metatarsal length were measured for radiographic outcomes and the American Orthopaedic Foot & Ankle Society (AOFAS) hallux metatarsophalangeal-interphalangeal (MTP-IP) score was measured for clinical outcomes. All radiographic measurements and the AOFAS score showed significant ( P .05) were found between the 2 groups in terms of HVA, IMA, DMAA, tibial sesamoid position, metatarsal shortening, and AOFAS score on final follow-up. This study suggests that bipartite hallucal sesamoids do not affect the results of hallux valgus surgery. Level III, retrospective comparative study.

  2. Hallux valgus and hallux rigidus: a comparison of impact on health-related quality of life in patients presenting to foot surgeons in Australia

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    Landorf Karl B

    2008-12-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Hallux valgus and hallux rigidus are common foot conditions that lead to a deterioration in health status. Patients with significant pain or deformity from these conditions frequently resort to surgery. In this project, the foot health status of patients with hallux valgus and hallux rigidus presenting to foot surgeons in Australia was compared. Methods Foot health status was measured in 120 participants using the Foot Health Status Questionnaire (FHSQ, a validated 0 – 100 point health status instrument. All participants had presented for surgical advice regarding hallux valgus/rigidus. The mean age of participants was 48.0 years (SD ± 14.3, range 19 – 79. Results In the sample, 68% of participants were diagnosed with hallux valgus and 32% with hallux rigidus. Participants with hallux rigidus had greater levels of pain and functional limitation compared with hallux valgus. The mean difference for pain was 13.8 points (95% CI 4.6 to 22.9 and the mean difference for function was 15.0 points (95% CI 5.3 to 24.7. Both conditions result in similarly negative levels of impact on shoe fit and overall foot health. Conclusion This study found measurable differences in foot health status between hallux valgus and hallux rigidus in participants presenting for surgical consultation. While both appear to have a negative impact on health status, hallux rigidus has a more significant impact.

  3. Hallux valgus and hallux rigidus: a comparison of impact on health-related quality of life in patients presenting to foot surgeons in Australia

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gilheany, Mark F; Landorf, Karl B; Robinson, Priscilla

    2008-01-01

    Background Hallux valgus and hallux rigidus are common foot conditions that lead to a deterioration in health status. Patients with significant pain or deformity from these conditions frequently resort to surgery. In this project, the foot health status of patients with hallux valgus and hallux rigidus presenting to foot surgeons in Australia was compared. Methods Foot health status was measured in 120 participants using the Foot Health Status Questionnaire (FHSQ), a validated 0 – 100 point health status instrument. All participants had presented for surgical advice regarding hallux valgus/rigidus. The mean age of participants was 48.0 years (SD ± 14.3, range 19 – 79). Results In the sample, 68% of participants were diagnosed with hallux valgus and 32% with hallux rigidus. Participants with hallux rigidus had greater levels of pain and functional limitation compared with hallux valgus. The mean difference for pain was 13.8 points (95% CI 4.6 to 22.9) and the mean difference for function was 15.0 points (95% CI 5.3 to 24.7). Both conditions result in similarly negative levels of impact on shoe fit and overall foot health. Conclusion This study found measurable differences in foot health status between hallux valgus and hallux rigidus in participants presenting for surgical consultation. While both appear to have a negative impact on health status, hallux rigidus has a more significant impact. PMID:19077213

  4. Algorithm for Severe Hallux Valgus Associated With Metatarsus Adductus.

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    Sharma, Jyoti; Aydogan, Umur

    2015-12-01

    Radiographic angles, such as the intermetatarsal angle, hallux valgus angle, and distal metatarsal articular angle, are commonly used to help guide operative planning for soft tissue and osseous treatment options for hallux valgus. Hallux valgus treatment in the setting of associated metatarsus adductus is less common and not well described. The presence of metatarsus adductus reduces the gap between the first and second metatarsals. Consequently, it complicates the measurement of the first-second intermetatarsal angle and can limit the area available for transposition of the first metatarsal head. A compensatory pronation is also created, which must be compensated for. We present 4 cases of patients that had hallux valgus with severe metatarsus adductus treated operatively, as well as a treatment algorithm. For concomitant correction of both the metatarsus adductus and the hallux valgus, a thorough surgical treatment algorithm was implemented to address the hallux, lesser toe deformities, and pes planus deformity. Postoperatively, the patients were kept non-weight bearing for 6 weeks, followed by gradual weight bearing in a protective boot. Physical therapy was instituted at the start of weight bearing to encourage a return to activities of daily living. At follow-up, patients reported significant relief of their pain symptoms with a narrower and improved appearance of the foot. No recurrence was noted. One patient used a medial arch support but was otherwise symptom free. Radiographic measurements improved on postoperative radiographs. For the treatment of hallux valgus with metatarsus adductus, the second and third metatarsals may need to be addressed for the first metatarsal to be laterally transposed adequately. Overall, this comprehensive approach addresses the hindfoot, midfoot, and forefoot for patients with hallux valgus associated with metatarsus adductus, with successful results. © The Author(s) 2015.

  5. Multisegmental Foot and Ankle Motion Analysis After Hallux Valgus Surgery

    Science.gov (United States)

    Canseco, Karl; Long, Jason; Smedberg, Thomas; Tarima, Sergey; Marks, Richard M.; Harris, Gerald F.

    2015-01-01

    Background Gait changes in patients with hallux valgus, including altered kinematic and temporal-spatial parameters, have been documented in the literature. Although operative treatment can yield favorable clinical and radiographic results, restoration of normal gait in this population remains unclear. Segmental kinematic changes within the foot and ankle during ambulation after operative correction of hallux valgus have not been reported. The aim of this study was to analyze changes in multisegmental foot and ankle kinematics in patients who underwent operative correction of hallux valgus. Methods A 15-camera Vicon Motion Analysis System was used to evaluate 24 feet in 19 patients with hallux valgus preoperatively and postoperatively. The Milwaukee Foot Model was used to characterize segmental kinematics and temporal-spatial parameters (TSPs). Preoperative and postoperative kinematics and TSPs were compared using paired nonparametric methods; comparisons with normative data were performed using unpaired nonparametric methods. Outcomes were evaluated using the SF-36 assessment tool. Results Preoperatively, patients with hallux valgus showed significantly altered temporal-spatial and kinematic parameters. Postoperatively, kinematic analysis demonstrated restoration of hallux position to normal. Hallux valgus angles and intermetatarsal angles were significantly improved, and outcomes showed a significant increase in performance of physical activities. Temporal-spatial parameters and kinematics in the more proximal segments were not significantly changed postoperatively. Conclusion Postoperative results demonstrated significant improvement in foot geometry and hallux kinematics in the coronal and transverse planes. However, the analysis did not identify restoration of proximal kinematics. Clinical Relevance Further investigation is necessary to explore possible causes/clinical relevance and appropriate treatment interventions for the persistently altered kinematics

  6. Hallux valgus surgery affects kinematic parameters during gait.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Klugarova, Jitka; Janura, Miroslav; Svoboda, Zdenek; Sos, Zdenek; Stergiou, Nicholas; Klugar, Miloslav

    2016-12-01

    The aim of our study was to compare spatiotemporal parameters and lower limb and pelvis kinematics during the walking in patients with hallux valgus before and after surgery and in relation to a control group. Seventeen females with hallux valgus, who underwent first metatarsal osteotomy, constituted our experimental group. The control group consisted of thirteen females. Kinematic data during walking were obtained using the Vicon MX system. Our results showed that hallux valgus before surgery affects spatiotemporal parameters and lower limb and pelvis kinematics during walking. Hallux valgus surgery further increased the differences that were present before surgery. Specifically after hallux valgus surgery, the walking speed decreased even more (p=0.09, η 2 =0.19) while step time increased (p=0.002, η 2 =0.44) on both legs. The maximum ankle plantar flexion of the operated leg during toe-off decreased to a greater extend (p=0.03, η 2 =0.26). The asymmetry in the hip and the pelvis movements in the frontal plane (present preoperatively) persisted after surgery. Hallux valgus is not an isolated problem of the first ray, which could be just surgically addressed by correcting the foot's alignment. It is a long-term progressive malfunction of the foot affecting the entire kinematic chain of the lower extremity. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  7. Use of Minimally Invasive Distal Metatarsal Osteotomy for Correction of Hallux Valgus

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chun-Kit Tong

    2012-06-01

    Conclusion: Good clinical and radiographic results have been achieved with minimally invasive techniques for treatment of hallux valgus. This is an acceptable alternative operation for mild-to-moderate hallux valgus.

  8. Subcutaneous tissue flaps for hallux covering.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vaienti, Luca; Urzola, Victor; Scotti, Andrea; Masetto, L

    2010-03-01

    With the understanding of the extensive vascular supply of the subcutaneous tissue, of its efficacy in the protection of the anatomical structures and of its capability of promoting the adequate functioning of very stressed regions of the human body, the use of subcutaneous adipose flaps has become a valid and sometimes the only reasonable therapeutic weapon in the treatment of small and medium-sized tissue loss. Such a defect represents a common complication of great toe injuries and surgery. Here subcutaneous flap reconstruction is proposed for the treatment of dorsal and medial soft tissue losses of the hallux complicated with infection. Two case are reported. To the best of the authors' knowledge, this application has not been reported in this anatomical site so far. The technique might be worth knowing both for orthopedic and plastic surgeons, as it may represent a safe, less invasive solution for most tegumentary problems of the dorso-medial side of the first ray.

  9. Proximal supination osteotomy of the first metatarsal for hallux valgus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yasuda, Toshito; Okuda, Ryuzo; Jotoku, Tsuyoshi; Shima, Hiroaki; Hida, Takashi; Neo, Masashi

    2015-06-01

    Risk factors for hallux valgus recurrence include postoperative round-shaped lateral edge of the first metatarsal head and postoperative incomplete reduction of the sesamoids. To prevent the occurrence of such conditions, we developed a proximal supination osteotomy of the first metatarsal. Our aim was to describe this novel technique and report the outcomes in this report. Sixty-six patients (83 feet) underwent a distal soft tissue procedure combined with a proximal supination osteotomy. After the proximal crescentic osteotomy, the proximal fragment was pushed medially, and the distal fragment was abducted, and then the distal fragment of the first metatarsal was manually supinated. Outcomes were assessed using the American Orthopaedic Foot & Ankle Society (AOFAS) score and radiographic examinations. The average follow-up duration was 34 (range, 25 to 52) months. The mean AOFAS score improved significantly from 58.0 points preoperatively to 93.8 points postoperatively (P hallux valgus and intermetatarsal angle decreased significantly from 38.6 and 18.0 degrees preoperatively to 11.0 and 7.9 degrees postoperatively, respectively (both, P hallux valgus, defined as a hallux valgus angle ≥ 25 degrees. The rates of occurrence of a positive round sign and incomplete reduction of the sesamoids significantly decreased postoperatively, which may have contributed to the low hallux valgus recurrence rates. We conclude that a proximal supination osteotomy was an effective procedure for correction of hallux valgus and can achieve a low rate of hallux valgus recurrence. Level IV, retrospective case series. © The Author(s) 2015.

  10. Bilateral Hallux Valgus: A Utility Outcome Score Assessment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Makhdom, Asim M; Sinno, Hani; Aldebeyan, Sultan; Cota, Adam; Hamdy, Reggie Charles; Alzahrani, Mohammad; Janelle, Chantal

    2016-01-01

    Hallux valgus is the most common forefoot problem in adults. Although it can cause considerable disability and affect the quality of life of those affected, many patients seek medical attention because of cosmetic concerns. Our aim was to objectively measure the perceived health burden of living with bilateral hallux valgus. Previously validated utility outcome measures, including the visual analog scale, time trade-off, and standard gamble tests, were used to quantify the health burden for single-eye blindness, double-eye blindness, and bilateral hallux valgus in 103 healthy subjects using an online survey. The Student t test and linear regression analysis were used for statistical analysis. The mean visual analog scale, time trade-off, and standard gamble scores for bilateral hallux valgus were 0.86 ± 1.6, 0.95 ± 0.5, and 0.95 ± 0.14, respectively. These were significantly greater than the utility scores for single-eye and double-eye blindness (p hallux valgus. In conclusion, we have objectively demonstrated the effect of living with bilateral hallux valgus deformities. Our sample population reported being willing to undergo a procedure with a 5% mortality rate and sacrifice 1.8 years of life to attain perfect health and avoid the bilateral hallux valgus health state. Our findings will guide us in counseling our patients and understanding how they perceive their foot deformity. Copyright © 2016 American College of Foot and Ankle Surgeons. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  11. Hallux valgus angle as main predictor for correction of hallux valgus

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Malefijt Maarten

    2008-05-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background It is recognized that different types of hallux valgus exist. Classification occurs with radiographic and clinical parameters. Severity of different parameters is used in algorithms to choose between different surgical procedures. Because there is no consensus about each parameter nor their cut-off point we conducted this study to analyze the influence of these variables on the postoperative hallux valgus angle. Methods After informed consent 115 patients (136 feet were included. Bunionectomy, osteotomy, lateralization of the distal fragment, lateral release and medial capsulorraphy were performed in all patients. Data were collected on preoperative and postoperative HVA, IMA and DMAA measurements. Forty cases were included since our findings in a previous article 1, therefore, current data concern an expanded study group with longer follow-up and were not published before. At least two-year follow-up data were evaluated with logistic regression and independent t-tests. Results Preoperative HVA was significant for prediction of postoperative HVA in logistic regression. IMA and DMAA were not significant for prediction of postoperative HVA in logistic regression, although they were significantly increased in larger deformities. In patients with preoperative HVA of 37 degrees or more, satisfactory correction could be obtained in 65 percent. The other nine of these 26 patients developed subluxation. Conclusion The preoperative HVA was the main radiological predictor for correction of hallux valgus, correction rate declined from preoperative HVA of 37. IMA and DMAA did have a minor role in patients with preoperative HVA lower than 37 degrees, however, likely contributed to preoperative HVA of 37 degrees or more.

  12. Treatment of Hallux Valgus with Hyaluronic Acid: A Pilot Study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ižlhan Sezer

    2017-05-01

    Full Text Available Aim: Hallux valgus is the deformity of the first metatarsophalangeal (MTP joint with abduction and valgus rotation of the great toe, combined with a medially prominent first metatarsal head. Hyaluronic acid injection has been used in the treatment of degenerative disorders of several joints successfully. In this research, we aimed to investigate the effectiveness of hyaluronic acid injection in patients with hallux valgus. Material and Method: Eleven female and two male patients with hallux valgus were included in this pilot study. Only patients with mild and moderate hallux valgus were included in the study. 1 cc hyaluronic acid was injected into the affected MTF joint three times, at one-week intervals. Visual analogue scale(VAS score, walking time without pain, walking distance, and daily analgesic needs of the patients were recorded. All clinical outcomes were assessed before, and then one and three months after the first injection. Results:The mean VAS score was 83.08±4.58. One month after the first injection, VAS scores of patients had decreased significantly (30±4.38, P: 0.001. Also, increased walking time and distance and decreased daily analgesic need were observed at the first month of postinjection follow-up (P: 0.001. After 3 months, the positive outcomes remained significant compared to preinjection evaluations. Discussion: According to our preliminary results, we suggest thathyaluronic acid injectionsmay be effective in reducing pain and increasing walking time and distance in patients with hallux valgus.Future studies are needed to clarify the beneficial effects of hyaluronic acid injection in patients with hallux valgus.

  13. [Distal soft-tissue procedure in hallux valgus deformity].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arbab, D; Wingenfeld, C; Frank, D; Bouillon, B; König, D P

    2016-04-01

    Distal, lateral soft tissue release to restore mediolateral balance of the first metatarsophalangeal (MTP) joint in hallux valgus deformity. Incision of the adductor hallucis tendon from the fibular sesamoid, the lateral capsule, the lateral collateral ligament, and the lateral metatarsosesamoid ligament. Hallux valgus deformities or recurrent hallux valgus deformities with an incongruent MTP joint. General medical contraindications to surgical interventions. Painful stiffness of the MTP joint, osteonecrosis, congruent joint. Relative contraindications: connective tissue diseases (Marfan syndrome, Ehler-Danlos syndrome). Longitudinal, dorsal incision in the first intermetatarsal web space between the first and second MTP joint. Blunt dissection and identification of the adductor hallucis tendon. Release of the adductor tendon from the fibular sesamoid. Incision of the lateral capsule, the lateral collateral ligament, and the lateral metatarsosesamoid ligament. Postoperative management depends on bony correction. In joint-preserving procedures, dressing for 3 weeks in corrected position. Subsequently hallux valgus orthosis at night and a toe spreader for a further 3 months. Passive mobilization of the first MTP joint. Postoperative weight-bearing according to the osteotomy. A total of 31 patients with isolated hallux valgus deformity underwent surgery with a Chevron and Akin osteotomy and a distal medial and lateral soft tissue balancing. The mean preoperative intermetatarsal (IMA) angle was 12.3° (range 11-15°); the hallux valgus (HV) angle was 28.2° (25-36°). The mean follow-up was 16.4 months (range 12-22 months). The mean postoperative IMA correction ranged between 2 and 7° (mean 5.2°); the mean HV correction was 15.5° (range 9-21°). In all, 29 patients (93%) were satisfied or very satisfied with the postoperative outcome, while 2 patients (7%) were not satisfied due to one delayed wound healing and one recurrent hallux valgus deformity. There were no

  14. The Gibson and Piggott osteotomy for adult hallux valgus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rangrez, Arshad Bashir; Dar, Tahir Ahmed; Badoo, Abdul Rashid; Wani, Sharief Ahmed; Dhar, Shabir Ahmed; Mumtaz, Imran; Ahmed, Muzzaffar

    2012-01-01

    The Gibson and Piggott procedure for hallux valgus is based on sound surgical principles addressing the basic pathologies of this disorder. However, this procedure has not been studied extensively in the literature in comparison to the Mitchell and Chevron osteotomies. We report a prospective study conducted on 50 adult feet with hallux valgus. The Gibson and Piggot osteotomy was done on all the feet. We obtained 76% excellent and 18% good results with this procedure. The results bear out the fact that this procedure is a useful procedure for the management of this disorder.

  15. PREVALENCE OF HALLUX ABDUCTO VALGUS AMONG VARIOUS GROUPS IN ANAMBRA STATE OF NIGERIA; Predominio de hallux abducto valgus entre varios grupos en el estado de anambra de Nigeria

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chijioke Mmadueke Okeke

    2017-08-01

    Full Text Available Hallux Abducto Valgus is characterized by lateral deviation of the proximal phalanx of the hallux, medial deviation of the first metatarsal bone, and subluxation of the first metartasophalangeal joint. The objective of this study was to determine the prevalence of hallux abducto valgus among residents of Anambra State of Nigeria. The study was a cross sectional descriptive study, using a structured questionnaire. It was conducted among male and female subjects in the following occupational groups: Farmers, Traders, Medical student, Nursing student, Road Safety Corps, Police and the Military. A total of 1033 subjects within the age range of 15 to 74 years were studied. Hallux abducto valgus was identified by inspection of the foot. Prevalence of hallux abducto valgus in the study population was 12.9%. Hallux abducto valgus was more prevalent in males (14.3% than in females (11.2%. Bilateral affectation of hallux abducto valgus (5.5% was more prevalent than unilateral affectation (Right – 2.6%, left – 4.7%. Prevalence of hallux abducto valgus increased with increment in age. The prevalence of hallux abducto valgus among various occupational groups include: Police (18.0%, Road Safety Corps (16.7%, Nursing students (10%, Military (20%, Medical students (9.9%, Traders (8.3% and farmers (17.0%. The prevalence of hallux abducto valgus in our study was 12.9%. The prevalence increased with increasing age and hallux abducto valgus was more prevalent in males than in females. Hallux Abducto Valgus es caracterizado por la desviación lateral del falange próximo del hallux, la desviación intermedia del primer hueso metatarsal, y el subluxation del primer empalme metartasophalangeal. El objetivo de este estudio era determinar el predominio del valgus del abducto del hallux entre residentes del estado de Anambra de Nigeria. El estudio era un estudio descriptivo representativo, usando un cuestionario estructurado. Fue conducido entre los temas masculinos

  16. Why do lesser toes deviate laterally in hallux valgus? A radiographic study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roan, Li-Yi; Tanaka, Yasuhito; Taniguchi, Akira; Tomiwa, Kiyonori; Kumai, Tsukasa; Cheng, Yuh-Min

    2015-06-01

    Hallux valgus foot with laterally deviated lesser toes is a complex condition to treat. Ignoring the laterally deviated lesser toes in hallux valgus might result in unsatisfactory foot shape. Without lateral support of the lesser toes, it might increase the risk of recurrence of hallux valgus. We sought to identify associated radiographic findings in patients where lesser toes follow the great toe in hallux valgus and deviate laterally. The weight-bearing, anteroposterior foot radiographs of 24 female hallux valgus feet with laterally deviated lesser toes (group L), 34 female hallux valgus feet with normal lesser toes (group H), and 43 normal female feet (group N) were selected for the study. A 2-dimensional coordinated system was used to analyze the shapes and angles of these feet by converting each dot made on the radiographs onto X and Y coordinates. Diagrams of the feet in each group were drawn for comparison. The hallux valgus angle, lateral deviation angle of the second toe, intermetatarsal angles, toe length, metatarsal length, and metatarsus adductus were calculated according to the coordinates of the corresponding points. The mapping showed the bases of the second, third, and fourth toe in group L shifted laterally away from their corresponding metatarsal head (P hallux valgus angles (P hallux valgus angle, more adducted first metatarsal, and divergent lateral splaying of the lesser metatarsals were associated with lateral deviation of the lesser toes in hallux valgus. Level III, comparative study. © The Author(s) 2015.

  17. Perisciatic infusion of ropivacaine and analgesia after hallux valgus repair

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Zaric, D; Jørgensen, B G; Laigaard, F

    2010-01-01

    Moderate to severe pain after hallux valgus repair can be successfully treated with a continuous popliteal sciatic nerve block in ambulatory patients. Different anesthesiologists use various infusion rates for this purpose. The aim of this study was to compare the analgesic efficacy of two infusi...... rates of ropivacaine 2 mg/ml: 5 and 8 ml/h....

  18. New modified technique of osteotomy for hallux valgus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oh, I S; Kim, M K; Lee, S H

    2004-12-01

    To improve the technique of osteotomy for hallux valgus (bunion). 38 cases of a new modified osteotomy procedure for hallux valgus were performed for 22 patients (21 women and one man). During a 3-year (range, 2-5 years) follow-up, the patients underwent physical examination; and their American Orthopedic Foot and Ankle Society hallux-metatarso-phalangeal-interphalangeal scale scores and standard foot radiographic measurements were recorded. 20 of the 22 patients (38 cases) had no pain, achieved good cosmesis, and were completely satisfied with the results of the operation. The remaining 2 patients had occasional mild discomfort. The mean hallux-metatarso-phalangeal-interphalangeal scale score was 93 points (range, 78-100 points). The mean preoperative and postoperative metatarsophalangeal angles were 34 degrees and 11 degrees, respectively. The mean postoperative reduction of the intermetatarsal angle and metatarsophalangeal angle were 6 degrees and 23 degrees, respectively. The new technique of osteotomy achieved even greater stability and accurate correction of the deformity in our 38 cases. Furthermore, it was more effective than conventional 'chevron' osteotomy in terms of correction of the deformity. Therefore, it should be used more widely.

  19. Perisciatic infusion of ropivacaine and analgesia after hallux valgus repair

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Zaric, D; Jørgensen, B G; Laigaard, F

    2010-01-01

    Moderate to severe pain after hallux valgus repair can be successfully treated with a continuous popliteal sciatic nerve block in ambulatory patients. Different anesthesiologists use various infusion rates for this purpose. The aim of this study was to compare the analgesic efficacy of two infusion...

  20. Osteosarcoma: A rare cause of painful enlargement of the hallux.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Sproule, J A

    2011-12-01

    Malignant osseous and soft-tissue tumors of the foot are rare. We report a case of osteosarcoma in the proximal phalanx of the hallux in a 45-year-old man. In patients with foot-related symptoms, a high index of suspicion for pedal osteosarcoma is required. Delayed or inappropriate diagnosis may compromise limb-sparing surgery and survivorship.

  1. Sex-related differences in outcomes after hallux valgus surgery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Choi, Gi Won; Kim, Hak Jun; Kim, Tae Wan; Lee, Ji Wun; Park, Sung Bum; Kim, Jin Kak

    2015-03-01

    With differences between the sexes in foot bone anatomy and ligamentous laxity, there is the possibility that the results of hallux valgus surgery may also differ between the sexes. We aimed to compare the results of hallux valgus surgery between the sexes. The authors retrospectively reviewed 60 males (66 feet) and 70 females (82 feet) who underwent distal or proximal chevron osteotomy for the treatment of hallux valgus deformity between June 2005 and December 2011. We compared the clinical and radiologic outcomes between the sexes. There were no statistically significant differences in demographics between the sexes. The mean American Orthopedic Foot and Ankle Society score, visual analogue scale for pain, and patient satisfaction at the last follow-up did not differ significantly between the sexes. The mean preoperative hallux valgus angle (HVA) and inter-metatarsal angle (IMA) were not significantly different between the sexes. At the last follow-up, the mean HVA was significantly greater in females (p=0.003) than in males; mean IMA was not significantly different between the sexes. The mean correction of HVA in males was significantly greater than that in females (p=0.014). There were no significant differences between the sexes regarding clinical outcomes after distal and proximal chevron osteotomy. However, male patients achieved greater correction of HVA than female patients. There is a possibility that sexual dimorphism of the foot may affect postoperative HVA.

  2. The position of the hallux and the first metatarsophalangeal | Didia ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Background: The great toe is commonly involved in lateral deviations (hallux valgus) due to intrinsic and extrinsic factors. However, studies on these areas for Africans and especially Nigerians are relatively scarce. Objectives: To establish the normal range of values of the first metatarsophalangeal joint MTPJ angle and the ...

  3. Effect of toe-spread-out exercise on hallux valgus angle and cross-sectional area of abductor hallucis muscle in subjects with hallux valgus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Moon-Hwan; Yi, Chung-Hwi; Weon, Jong-Hyuck; Cynn, Heon-Seock; Jung, Do-Young; Kwon, Oh-Yun

    2015-04-01

    [Purpose] This study investigated whether the toe-spread-out exercise affects the hallux valgus angle, the cross-sectional area of the abductor hallucis muscle, and the hallux valgus angle during active abduction. [Subjects and Methods] Twenty-four subjects with hallux valgus were randomly assigned to orthosis and orthosis plus toe-spread-out exercise groups. The orthosis group wore the orthosis for 8 weeks, while the orthosis plus toe-spread-out group also performed the toe-spread-out exercise. The hallux valgus angle, the cross-sectional area of the abductor hallucis muscle, and the hallux valgus angle during active abduction were measured initially and after 8 weeks by radiography and ultrasonography. [Results] While there were no significant changes in the three parameters in the orthosis group, there were significant differences in the orthosis plus toe-spread-out exercise group after 8 weeks. In addition there were significant differences in the three measures between the two groups. [Conclusion] The toe-spread-out exercise reduces the hallux valgus angle and hallux valgus angle during active abduction, and increases the cross-sectional area of the abductor hallucis muscle. The toe-spread-out exercise is recommended for patients with mild to moderate hallux valgus.

  4. Recurrence of Hallux Valgus Can Be Predicted from Immediate Postoperative Non-Weight-Bearing Radiographs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Park, Chul Hyun; Lee, Woo-Chun

    2017-07-19

    The aims of this study were to identify risk factors for the recurrence of hallux valgus deformity and to clarify whether recurrence after surgery to treat hallux valgus can be predicted using radiographic parameters assessed on immediate postoperative non-weight-bearing radiographs. A proximal chevron osteotomy combined with a distal soft-tissue procedure was performed by a single surgeon to treat moderate to severe hallux valgus deformity in 93 patients (117 feet). The feet were grouped according to nonrecurrence or recurrence. Changes in the hallux valgus angle, the intermetatarsal angle, and sesamoid position over time were analyzed by comparing values measured during each postoperative period. The relative risks of recurrence as indicated by preoperative and postoperative radiographic parameters were determined. Twenty (17.1%) of the 117 feet showed hallux valgus recurrence at the time of the last follow-up. The hallux valgus angle and the intermetatarsal angle stabilized at 6 months after surgery in the nonrecurrence group. An immediate postoperative hallux valgus angle of ≥8°, an immediate postoperative sesamoid position of grade 4 or greater, a preoperative metatarsus adductus angle of ≥23°, and a preoperative hallux valgus angle of ≥40° were significantly associated with recurrence. Recurrence of hallux valgus after a proximal chevron osteotomy can be reliably predicted from immediate postoperative non-weight-bearing radiographs. Therapeutic Level III. See Instructions for Authors for a complete description of levels of evidence.

  5. Neinvazivní obrazová analýza hallux valgus

    OpenAIRE

    Setínková, Jana

    2014-01-01

    6 Abstract Title: Noninvasive image analysis of hallux valgus. Objectives: Propose a simple, cheap, fast and non-invasive method for diagnostics and monitoring the effect of therapy of hallux valgus deformity. Methods: Evaluation the parameters in X-ray and photography which were taken before and after therapy of hallux valgus. I measured angles on foot in programme AutoCAD and confront the correlation of angles in X-ray and photography. I also looked for an angle similar to the hallux valgus...

  6. Relationship between pedographic analysis and the Manchester scale in hallux valgus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Iliou, Kalliopi; Paraskevas, George; Kanavaros, Panagiotis; Gekas, Christos; Barbouti, Alexandra; Kitsoulis, Panagiotis

    2015-01-01

    The aim of this study was to evaluate the correlation between the Manchester scale and foot pressure distribution in patients with hallux valgus deformity. The study included 152 feet of 87 patients with hallux valgus and a control group of 391 feet of 241 individuals without hallux valgus deformity. The severity of hallux valgus was determined using the Manchester scale grading system. Plantar loading patterns in 10 foot areas were determined for all participants. According to the Manchester scale, 72% of the participants had no, 12.9% mild, 10.7% moderate and 4.4% severe deformity. The Manchester scale grade was highly correlated with both hallux valgus angle and first intermetatarsal angle (p=0.00). Significant differences between the four grades were present for mean pressure under the hallux and the first and second metatarsal heads only (p=0.00). The load distribution under these areas was higher as the hallux valgus progressed from mild to more severe. In all groups, the highest pressure was observed under the second metatarsal head. The Manchester scale was strongly associated with both the hallux valgus angle and the first intermetatarsal angle. The progression from mild to moderate and severe deformation is associated with peak pressure raise at the hallux, first and second metatarsal heads. The Manchester scale appears to be a useful tool to provide information for the degree of deformity and the pressure under painful foot areas.

  7. The comparison of designed slipper splints with the splints available on the market in the treatment of hallux valgus

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    babak Mirzashahi

    2011-08-01

    Conclusion: This study showed that despite the contraversies in nonoperative treatment of Hallux valgus, if the Hallux valgus angle of patients are mild to moderate, this splints can be used to treat it.

  8. Results of Lindgren-Turan Operation in Hallux Valgus

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    İstemi YÜCEL,

    2010-05-01

    Full Text Available Purpose: We evaluated the results of the Lindgren-Turan operation in the treatment of halluxvalgus.Methods: 24 feet of 18 patients were operated by the Lindgren-Turan osteotomy. Radiological,functional and pain assessments were applied to all patients.Results: Treatment produced a statistically highly significant difference in the hallux valgusangle and 1.-2.intermetatarsal angle (p0.001. Themean subjective evaluations of the patients were 8.43±0.72.Conclusion: We conclude that Lindgren-Turan osteotomy which revealed successful results onpain, deformity correction and bone healing and also provided high personal satisfaction, is areliable technique in the surgical correction of hallux valgus

  9. Hallux valgus with Scarf Osteotomy - A revision of 82 cases

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mendez Gonzalez, Mauricio; Gamba Sanchez, Carlos Enrique

    2005-01-01

    Descriptive observational study, type series of cases, whose objective was to describe the treatment of hallux valgus with Scarf Osteotomy; this study reviewed the clinical, radiological and subjective aspects of 82 feet, mean age of 49 years, and a mean of 14 degrades and 31 degrades to 9 degrades and 14 degrades (p<0,0001). The mean of the AOFAS scale improved from 49 points preoperatively to 92 points (p<0,0001). 61% of the patients were very satisfied, 34% were satisfied and 5% were not satisfied with the procedure. The recurrence of the deformity appeared in 3% of the patients. The rate of complications was of 6%. The SCARF osteotomy is a safe procedure. We recommended it like an effective technique for the correction of hallux valgus mild, moderate and severe

  10. Distal Metatarsal Osteotomy in Hallux Valgus Surgery: Chevron Osteotomy

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    Fatih Dogar

    2016-04-01

    Full Text Available Aim: Hallux valgus is a complex foot deformity resulting from medial deviation of first metatarsal and lateral deviation of toe. Radiographic and functional outcomes of chevron type distal metatarsal osteotomy applied to symptomatic hallux valgus patients with moderate deformity were assessed in the present study. Chevron osteotomy was applied to 27 feet (13 left, 14 right of 22 patients (12 women and 10 men; mean age: 45±16.7 years. Mean follow-up was 15.4± 4.71 months (range, 10%u201324. Material and Method: The average preoperative AOFAS score of 39.1 ± 8.55 (range, 32%u201357 improved (p < 0.0001 to 87.8 ± 4.7 (range, 82%u201397. The average preoperative hallux valgus angle (HVA of 37.4 ± 5.8 (range, 29%u201350 improved (p < 0.0001 to 14.8 ± 3.1 (range, 10%u201320 , and the average preoperative intermetatarsal 1-2 angle (IMA of 13.1 ± 1.5 (range, 11%u201317 improved (p < 0.0001 to 7.1 ± 1.4 (range, 5%u20139 . The average sesamoid position improved from 2.9 ± 0.2 (range, 2-3 preoperatively to 1.2 ± 0.4 (range, 1-2 (p < 0.0001. Toe hypoesthesia was developed in one patient as a complication. At the end of follow-up, patient satisfaction was found to be excellent in 16 feet (59.2% and good in 11 feet (40.8%. Results: The results of the study that chevron osteotomy yields good radiological result, high degree of postoperative patient satisfaction with minimal complications. Chevron ostoetomy is most effective method in the treatment of moderate hallux valgus.

  11. Approach for measuring the angle of hallux valgus

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jin Zhou

    2013-01-01

    Materials and Methods: Fifteen age, body weight, and height matched male students were included and those with foot disorders, deformities, or injuries were excluded from the study. The dorsal protrusions of the first metatarsal and the hallux were marked by palpating from three experienced observers; then their barefoot model in standing was collected by a three dimensional laser scanning system. The AoH was defined in the X-Y plane by the angle between the line joining the marks of centre of head and centre of base of metatarsal shaft and the one connecting the marks of the centre of metatarsal head and the hallux. The same procedure was repeated a week later. Besides, other measures based on the footprint, outline, and the radiography were also available for comparisons. Paired t-test, linear regression, and reliability analysis were applied for statistical analysis with significant level of 0.05 and 95% confidence interval. Results: There were no significant differences recorded between the new method and the radiographic method ( P = 0.069. The AoH was superior to the methods of footprint and outline and it displayed a relative higher correlation with the radiographic method (r = 0.94, r2 = 0.89. Moreover both the inter and intraobserver reliabilities of this method were proved to be good. Conclusion: This new method can be used for hallux valgus inspection and evaluation.

  12. A radiographic analysis of the contribution of hallux valgus interphalangeus to the total valgus deformity of the hallux.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Strydom, Andrew; Saragas, Nikiforos Pandelis; Ferrao, Paulo Norberto Faria

    2017-03-01

    The hallux valgus interphalangeus (HVI) deformity is described as rare, but improved outcomes in hallux valgus (HV) surgery is associated with its surgical correction via an Akin osteotomy. The hypothesis of this study is that HVI is common and makes a significant contribution to the total valgus deformity of the hallux (TVDH). 285 pre-operative foot radiographs (193 with HV, 92 non-HV), utilising standardised radiographic and measurement techniques, were analysed retrospectively. The hallux valgus angle (HVA), intermetatarsal angle (IMA), interphalangeal angle (IPA) and distal metatarsal articular angle (DMAA) were measured. The TVDH was calculated as the sum of the HVA and IPA. 163 (57.2%) of the study population were Caucasian, 119 (41.8%) African and 3 Indian (1.0%). 236 (82.8%) of the population was female. There was a statistically significant difference in the proportion of abnormal IPA in the Caucasian population 112 (68.7%) compared to the proportion of abnormal IPA in the African population 64 (53.8%), p=0.01. The average contribution of the IPA to the TVDH across the whole study population was a mean (SD) of 37.9% (21.2). The average contribution of IPA to TVDH was greater in feet without HV (58.0%) when compared to feet with HV (28.3%). HVI is common, particularly in Caucasians (p=0.01) and makes a significant contribution to the TVDH (p<0.01). The contribution to the TVDH is more significant in mild HV. There is an inverse relationship between the IPA and other angular measurements in the foot. HVI is a common entity. The significant contribution of the IPA to the TVDH dictates that HVI must be incorporated in management algorithms. The TVDH should replace the isolated concepts of HV and HVI. Level III, retrospective cohort. Copyright © 2016 European Foot and Ankle Society. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  13. Traumatic hallux varus repair utilizing a soft-tissue anchor: a case report.

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    Labovitz, J M; Kaczander, B I

    2000-01-01

    Hallux varus is usually iatrogenic in nature; however, congenital and acquired etiologies have been described in the literature. The authors present a case of traumatic hallux varus secondary to rupture of the adductor tendon. Surgical correction was performed using a soft tissue anchor for maintenance of the soft tissues utilized for repair.

  14. Measurement of first ray of foot with reference to hallux valgus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Howale, Deepak S; Iyer, Kanaklata V; Shah, Jigesh V

    2012-06-01

    A study was carried out on 58 healthy volunteers. None of the volunteeres had any foot complaints. This was done to study Indian feet, as foot is an important part of human anatomy and its certain deformities eg, hallux valgus, can be very disabling. We have studied anatomical angles between 1st and 2nd rays of foot eg, angle of hallux valgus and angle of slant of distal facet of medial cuneiform and have shown significant correlation between them and development of hallux valgus. The coefficient of correlation (r) calculated between these two angles is significant, showing that this angle influences the angle of hallux valgus and hence development of hallux valgus. These are anatomical angles and indicate shapes of medial cuneiform and 1st metatarsal. Hence these seem to be inherited, making the feet anatomically predisposed to develop hallux valgus. This view is supported by Gray's Anatomy. The extrinsic factors such as narrow toes, closed, footwear worn for an extended period do increase the angle of hallux valgus. So, in predisposed feet, this is one of the extrinsic factor which can lead to development of hallux valgus. On studying these two angles, orthopaedicians should be on alert and should advise such individuals on wearing foot- friendly foot-wear.

  15. Foot Pressure Comparison Between Hallux Rigidus Patients and Normal Asymptomatic Matched Individuals Using Pedobarograph

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    Hadi Mohammed

    2012-06-01

    Conclusion: This study has demonstrated an increased pressure transmitted through the outer aspect of the sole of the foot in the patients suffering from hallux rigidus. This is helpful in choosing treatment options and managing hallux rigidus patients particularly when using conservative and foot wear considerations.

  16. Surgical correction of hallux valgus complicated with adult-type pes plano-valgus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Choi, Jun Young; Yoon, Hyeong Hwa; Suh, Yu Min; Suh, Jin Soo

    2017-01-01

    To investigate the efficiency of simultaneous correction of moderate to severe hallux valgus deformity and adult-type pes planus. Twenty cases of moderate to severe hallux valgus complicated with adult-type pes planus in 19 consecutive patients (15 (79%) women, 4 (11%) men; mean age: 44.50 ± 17.13 years, mean follow-up duration: 31.30 ± 17.02 months) were included. Medial calcaneal sliding osteotomy was performed to correct hindfoot valgus, whereas treatments of hallux valgus were case dependent. The mean postoperative hallux valgus angle, intermetatarsal angle, hindfoot alignment angle, and hindfoot alignment ratio were 8.40 ± 5.29°, 4.20 ± 2.54°, 3.09 ± 2.92º and 0.41 ± 0.17, respectively. Although a hallux varus deformity occurred as a postoperative complication in one case (5%), there were no cases of postoperative recurrence. Simultaneous correction of hallux valgus and pes plano-valgus using medial calcaneal sliding osteotomy is an effective technique that reduces recurrence of hallux valgus and increases satisfaction in patients with moderate to severe hallux valgus deformity complicated with adult-type pes planus accompanying hindfoot valgus.

  17. Unilateral hallux valgus: is it true unilaterality, or does it progress to bilateral deformity?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Young, Ki Won; Park, Young Uk; Kim, Jin Su; Jegal, Hyuk; Lee, Kyung Tai

    2013-04-01

    This study was undertaken to determine whether unilateral hallux valgus progresses unilaterally and to evaluate the demographics, etiologies, and radiographic findings associated with symptomatic unilateral hallux valgus deformities. Patients treated for hallux valgus between January 2004 and December 2008 were identified, and of these, 33 patients with unilateral deformities were enrolled. Progression of deformities in normal feet were evaluated at last follow-up visit, and the clinical information and radiographic measurements of those with a deformed normal foot or an unchanged normal foot were compared. Thirty-three patients (3.4%) had a unilateral hallux valgus deformity on preoperative radiographs. The mean length of follow up was 4.7 years (range, 2.4-11). Twenty-four cases had no deformity of the normal foot at last follow-up (the unchanged group), but 15 cases had developed hallux valgus deformity (the deformed group). No significant intergroup differences were found in terms of metatarsus adductus angle (P = .412), Meary angle (P = .771), talocalcaneal angle (P = 1.000), or calcaneal pitch angle (P = .267). However, members of the deformed group were significantly younger at disease onset (P = .045), exhibited a curved first metatarsal head (P = .046), and had a larger initial hallux valgus angle (P hallux valgus was found to be over 97.3%, and significant differences were found between the deformed and unchanged groups in terms of age of onset, metatarsal head shape, and hallux valgus angle.

  18. Geometry of the Proximal Phalanx of Hallux and First Metatarsal Bone to Predict Hallux Abducto Valgus: A Radiological Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Perez Boal, Eduardo; Becerro de Bengoa Vallejo, Ricardo; Fuentes Rodriguez, Miguel; Lopez Lopez, Daniel; Losa Iglesias, Marta Elena

    2016-01-01

    Hallux abducto valgus (HAV) is one of the most common forefoot deformities in adulthood with a variable prevalence but has been reported as high as 48%. The study proposed that HAV development involves a skeletal parameter of the first metatarsal bone and proximal phalanx hallux (PPH) to determine if the length measurements of the metatarsal and PPH can be used to infer adult HAV. All consecutive patients over 21 years of age with HAV by roentgenographic evaluation were included in a cross-sectional study. The control group included patients without HAV. The study included 160 individuals. We identified and assessed the following radiographic measurements to evaluate HAV: the distances from the medial (LDM), central (LDC), and lateral (LDL) aspects of the base to the corresponding regions of the head of the PPH. The difference between the medial and lateral aspect of PPH was also calculated. The reliability of the variables measured in 40 radiographic films show perfect reliability ranging from 0.941 to 1 with a small error ranging from 0.762 to 0. Also, there were no systematic errors between the two measurements for any variable (P > 0.05). The LDM PPH showed the highest reliability and lowest error. It is more suitable to measure the LDM PPH instead of the LDC PPH when calculating the hallux valgus angle based on our reliability results. When the differences of the medial and lateral PPH are greater, the risk for developing HAV increases.

  19. Radiologic assessment of the outcome of Keller and Brandes arthroplasty for hallux rigidus; Hallux rigidus operiert nach Keller und Brandes: Radiologische Erfolgs- und Prognoseparameter

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    Breitenseher, M.J. [Abt. fuer Osteologie, Universitaetsklinik fueer Radiodiagnostik und Besondere Klinische Einrichtung Magnet Resonanz, Wien (Austria)]|[Ludwig-Boltzmann-Institut fuer Radiologische Tumordiagnostik, Wien (Austria); Toma, C.D. [Universitaetsklinik fuer Orthopaedie, Wien (Austria); Gottsauner-Wolf, F. [Universitaetsklinik fuer Orthopaedie, Wien (Austria); Imhof, H. [Abt. fuer Osteologie, Universitaetsklinik fueer Radiodiagnostik und Besondere Klinische Einrichtung Magnet Resonanz, Wien (Austria)]|[Ludwig-Boltzmann-Institut fuer Radiologische Tumordiagnostik, Wien (Austria)

    1996-06-01

    The aim of this study was to evaluate the pre- and postoperative radiographic findings of hallux rigidus treated with Keller and Brandes arthroplasty to determine the radiographic outcome and to identify a prognostic marker. 83 patients with a total of 121 cases of hallux rigidus operated using Keller and Brandes arthroplasty were followed up (mean 9.7 y). A comparison of the pre- and postoperative radiographs, the clinical and subjective findings was predicated on a five point scale: 1. Percentage of proximal phalanx resected (<33%, 33-50%, >50%), 2. joint space, 3. ratio of the length of the first and second metatarsals, 4. first intermetatarsal angle, and 5. hallux valgus angle. In the patient group which had 33-50% of the proximal phalanx excised (n=67. 55%) the highest patient satisfaction was observed (96%). If resection of the proximal phalanx exceeded 50% (n=13. 11%), non physiologic dorsiflexion of the toe occurred and patients were unsatisfied (62%). Excision of less than 33% of the hallux (n=41. 34%) was associated with a recurrent hallux rigidus. No other evaluated radiological parameter proved to be of significance. The most important radiological parameter in the evaluation of the outcome of Keller and Brandes arthroplasty as the percentage of the proximal phalanx which had ben excised. (orig.) [Deutsch] Ziel der Studie war es, auf prae- und postoperativen Roentgenbildern des Hallux rigidus radiologische Parameter zu ermitteln, die den Erfolg der Arthroplastik nach Keller und Brandes abschaetzen und von prognostischer Relevanz sind. 121 Hallux-rigidus-Operationen bei 83 Patienten wurden nachuntersucht (9,7 a). 5 Kriterien wurden an den prae- und postoperativen Roentgenbildern ausgewertet: 1. Anteil der Grosszehengrundgliedresektion in Prozent (<33%, 33-50%, >50%), 2. Gelenkspaltbreite, 3. Laengenverhaeltnis von erstem und zweitem Metartasalknochen, 4. erster Intermetatarsalwinkel und 5. Hallux-valgus-Winkel und mit den klinischen Ergebnissen

  20. Characterization of gait in female patients with moderate to severe hallux valgus deformity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chopra, S; Moerenhout, K; Crevoisier, X

    2015-07-01

    Hallux valgus is one of the most common forefoot problems in females. Studies have looked at gait alterations due to hallux valgus deformity, assessing temporal, kinematic or plantar pressure parameters individually. The present study, however, aims to assess all listed parameters at once and to isolate the most clinically relevant gait parameters for moderate to severe hallux valgus deformity with the intent of improving post-operative patient prognosis and rehabilitation. The study included 26 feet with moderate to severe hallux valgus deformity and 30 feet with no sign of hallux valgus in female participants. Initially, weight bearing radiographs and foot and ankle clinical scores were assessed. Gait assessment was then performed utilizing pressure insoles (PEDAR) and inertial sensors (Physilog) and the two groups were compared using a non-parametric statistical hypothesis test (Wilcoxon rank sum, Phallux valgus group compared to controls and 9 gait parameters (effect size between 1.03 and 1.76) were successfully isolated to best describe the altered gait in hallux valgus deformity (r(2)=0.71) as well as showed good correlation with clinical scores. Our results, and nine listed parameters, could serve as benchmark for characterization of hallux valgus and objective evaluation of treatment efficacy. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  1. Mild hallux valgus angle affects single-limb postural stability in asymptomatic subjects.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Çınar-Medeni, Özge; Atalay Guzel, Nevin; Basar, Selda

    2016-01-01

    Single-limb postural stability is a key component of lower extremity functional status. Factors affecting postural stability should be well defined to prevent injuries. The aim of this study was to investigate the effect of the hallux valgus angle on postural stability in asymptomatic subjects. A total of 19 subjects were included in the study. The hallux valgus angle and postural stability were assessed. Participants were assigned to two groups according to whether the hallux valgus angle was pathological or not. A hallux valgus angle greater than 15 degrees was accepted as pathological. The relationship between the hallux valgus angle and postural stability, and the differences in postural stability scores between the two groups were analyzed. Postural stability was assessed with a stabilometer. The test was performed with the eyes open. We found a significant correlation between the hallux valgus angle and mediolateral and overall stability index (r= 0.484, p= 0.036; r = 0.463, p= 0.046 respectively). Subjects with a pathological mild hallux valgus angle had greater stability index scores than normal subjects (phallux valgus angle has negative effects on postural stability as a forefoot deformity. This deformity should be taken into account for injury prevention strategies in pain-free younger adults.

  2. Radiographic Outcomes of Postoperative Taping Following Hallux Valgus Correction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ponzio, Danielle Y; Pedowitz, David I; Verma, Kushagra; Maltenfort, Mitchell G; Winters, Brian S; Raikin, Steven M

    2015-07-01

    Traditionally, hallux valgus operative correction has been accompanied by serial spica taping of the great toe during the postoperative period. We retrospectively reviewed 187 adult patients who underwent proximal first metatarsal osteotomy with a modified McBride procedure in 2008-2009 (n = 83) and 2011-2012 (n = 104). Postoperatively, to maintain the corrected position of the hallux, patients from 2008 through 2009 underwent weekly spica taping, while patients from 2011 through 2012 utilized a toe separator. The hallux valgus angle (HVA) and intermetatarsal angle (IMA) were measured using anteroposterior weight-bearing preoperative, 2-week postoperative non-weight-bearing, and 3-month weight-bearing final follow-up radiographs. A mixed-effects linear regression model identified differences between the treatment groups over time, and a t test compared actual radiographic differences at final follow-up. The mixed-effects model revealed no significant difference in the HVA over time when comparing patients taped to those not taped at the preoperative (33 ± 6 vs 33 ± 6), 2-week postoperative (10 ± 7 vs 9 ± 6), and 3-month follow-up (14 ± 6 vs 11 ± 7) visits (P = .08). At final follow-up, the HVA was lower for the group that was not taped, but the difference (2.5 degrees) was below the minimal clinically important difference (MCID) (P = .015, 95% CI 0.5-4.5). For IMA, there was improved maintenance of correction over time in the patients that were not taped compared to those taped at the preoperative (15 ± 3 vs 15 ± 3), 2-week postoperative (2 ± 2 vs 3 ± 3), and 3-month follow-up (5 ± 4 vs 7 ± 4) visits (P = .002). At final follow-up, the IMA was lower for the group that was not taped, but the difference (1.7 degrees) was below the MCID (P = .004, 95% CI 0.7-2.9). We report no radiographic benefit of postoperative taping after hallux valgus correction. The present study challenges the previous dogma of postoperative spica taping as the protocol is cost and

  3. Reliability of Two Smartphone Applications for Radiographic Measurements of Hallux Valgus Angles.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mattos E Dinato, Mauro Cesar; Freitas, Marcio de Faria; Milano, Cristiano; Valloto, Elcio; Ninomiya, André Felipe; Pagnano, Rodrigo Gonçalves

    The objective of the present study was to assess the reliability of 2 smartphone applications compared with the traditional goniometer technique for measurement of radiographic angles in hallux valgus and the time required for analysis with the different methods. The radiographs of 31 patients (52 feet) with a diagnosis of hallux valgus were analyzed. Four observers, 2 with >10 years' experience in foot and ankle surgery and 2 in-training surgeons, measured the hallux valgus angle and intermetatarsal angle using a manual goniometer technique and 2 smartphone applications (Hallux Angles and iPinPoint). The interobserver and intermethod reliability were estimated using intraclass correlation coefficients (ICCs), and the time required for measurement of the angles among the 3 methods was compared using the Friedman test. A very good or good interobserver reliability was found among the 4 observers measuring the hallux valgus angle and intermetatarsal angle using the goniometer (ICC 0.913 and 0.821, respectively) and iPinPoint (ICC 0.866 and 0.638, respectively). Using the Hallux Angles application, a very good interobserver reliability was found for measurements of the hallux valgus angle (ICC 0.962) and intermetatarsal angle (ICC 0.935) only among the more experienced observers. The time required for the measurements was significantly shorter for the measurements using both smartphone applications compared with the goniometer method. One smartphone application (iPinPoint) was reliable for measurements of the hallux valgus angles by either experienced or nonexperienced observers. The use of these tools might save time in the evaluation of radiographic angles in the hallux valgus. Copyright © 2016 American College of Foot and Ankle Surgeons. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  4. EFFICACY OF BILATERAL SIMULTANEOUS HALLUX VALGUS CORRECTION COMPARED TO UNILATERAL

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    A. V. Boychenko

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available The aim - to compare the results of simultaneous bilateral and unilateral surgical correction of hallux valgus and to create recommendations for treatment of the patients with this pathology. Material and methods. The authorse analyzed the data of 40 patients (60 feet who carried out an operative treatment of hallux valgus in SPb multiprofile city hospital N 2 since 2011 to 2013. Functional (AOFAS score and X-ray results were compared between groups with bilateral and unilateral correction. Mean AOFAS score in these 2 groups after 12 months after surgery was 85,6±6,2 and 85,5±6,9 (p>0,05, mean intermetatarsal angle - 8,4±0,5° and 8,8±0,8° (p>0,05 respectively. No statistically significant difference between these two groups was found. Conclusion. A bigger surgical trauma in case of simultaneous bilateral correction neither worsens functional and x-ray results nor increases a complication rate.

  5. Use of Kinesio-Taping in the Management of Hallux Rigidus: A Case Report

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    Gul Oznur Karabicak

    2017-03-01

    Full Text Available Hallux rigidus is a progressive degenerative disease of the first metatarsophalangeal joint. It is characterized by pain, limitation of the metatarsophalangeal joint motion, mainly dorsiflexion, progressive osteophyte formation and functional impairment. Although there have been many studies concerning non-operative management of hallux rigidus, no research has yet examined the effects of kinesio-taping in hallux rigidus. We present a 57-year-old woman with pain and stiffness around the big toe while walking, and functional insufficiency. The patient received kinesio-taping combined with therapeutic exercise. Pain intensity, range of motion (ROM, functional status were used as the outcome measures. According to the results, kinesio-taping may help reduce pain, increase the range of motion and functional levels in patients with hallux rigidus.

  6. Radiological Characteristics and Anatomical Risk Factors in the Evaluation of Hallux Valgus in Chinese Adults

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xu, Hailin; Jin, Kaiji; Fu, Zhongguo; Ma, Mingtai; Liu, Zhongdi; An, Shuai; Jiang, Baoguo

    2015-01-01

    Background: There are no unified theories as to the anatomical changes that occur with hallux valgus, we investigated the radiological characteristics and anatomical risk factors for hallux valgus deformity in Chinese adults. Methods: We reviewed 141 patients with hallux valgus (206 feet; 15 males, 126 females; mean age, 58.5 years). These patients attended Peking University People's Hospital from April 2008 to March 2014. All feet had intact radiological data, obtained using the Centricity RIS/PACS system. We measured hallux valgus angle (HVA), 1–2 intermetatarsal angle (IMA), proximal articular set angle (PASA), distal articular set angle, hallux interphalangeal angle, metatarsocuneiform angle, size of the medial eminence of the distal first metatarsal, tibial sesamoid position, and joint congruity of the first metatarsophalangeal joint (MTPJ). Results: We found positive correlations between the HVA and IMA (r = 0.279, P 0.05). Feet were divided into three groups based on HVA severity. IMA (P 0.05). Feet were then grouped based on the shape of the first metatarsal head. Using this grouping, HVA was significant higher in the rounded shape (19.92°) than in a flat shape (17.66°). The size of the medial eminence of the distal first metatarsal was positively correlated with HVA (r = 0.185, P hallux valgus formation, and decompensation leads to subdislocation in the first MTPJ. A rounded first metatarsal head would thus predispose a foot to hallux valgus. Furthermore, bone proliferation at the medial eminence may also lead to early hallux valgus development. PMID:25563313

  7. Radiological Characteristics and Anatomical Risk Factors in the Evaluation of Hallux Valgus in Chinese Adults

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    Hailin Xu

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: There are no unified theories as to the anatomical changes that occur with hallux valgus, we investigated the radiological characteristics and anatomical risk factors for hallux valgus deformity in Chinese adults. Methods: We reviewed 141 patients with hallux valgus (206 feet; 15 males, 126 females; mean age, 58.5 years. These patients attended Peking University People′s Hospital from April 2008 to March 2014. All feet had intact radiological data, obtained using the Centricity RIS/PACS system. We measured hallux valgus angle (HVA, 1-2 intermetatarsal angle (IMA, proximal articular set angle (PASA, distal articular set angle, hallux interphalangeal angle, metatarsocuneiform angle, size of the medial eminence of the distal first metatarsal, tibial sesamoid position, and joint congruity of the first metatarsophalangeal joint (MTPJ. Results: We found positive correlations between the HVA and IMA (r = 0.279, P 0.05. Feet were divided into three groups based on HVA severity. IMA (P 0.05. Feet were then grouped based on the shape of the first metatarsal head. Using this grouping, HVA was significant higher in the rounded shape (19.92° than in a flat shape (17.66°. The size of the medial eminence of the distal first metatarsal was positively correlated with HVA (r = 0.185, P < 0.01. The medial eminence in the moderate and severe groups was significantly larger than that in the mild group; moderate and severe groups were not significantly different. Conclusions: PASA enlargement is an adaptive change during early hallux valgus formation, and decompensation leads to subdislocation in the first MTPJ. A rounded first metatarsal head would thus predispose a foot to hallux valgus. Furthermore, bone proliferation at the medial eminence may also lead to early hallux valgus development.

  8. WITHDRAWN: Interventions for treating hallux valgus (abductovalgus) and bunions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ferrari, Jill; Higgins, Julian Pt; Prior, Trevor D

    2009-04-15

    Hallux valgus is classified as an abnormal deviation of the great toe (hallux) towards the midline of the foot. To identify and evaluate the evidence from randomised trials of interventions used to correct hallux valgus. We searched the Cochrane Bone, Joint and Muscle Trauama Group trials register (2003/1), the Cochrane Central Register of Controlled Trials (The Cochrane Library issue 1, 2003), MEDLINE (January 1966 to March 2003) and EMBASE (1980 to January 2003). No language restrictions were applied. Hand searching of specific foot journals was also undertaken.Date of the most recent search: 31st March 2003. Randomised or quasi-randomised trials of both conservative and surgical treatments of hallux valgus. Excluded were studies comparing areas of surgery not specific to the control of the deformity such as use of anaesthetics or tourniquet placement. Methodological quality of trials which met the inclusion criteria was independently assessed by two reviewers. Data extraction was undertaken by two reviewers. The trials were grouped according to the interventions being compared, but the dissimilarity in the comparisons prevented pooling of results. The methodological quality of the 21 included trials was generally poor and trial sizes were small.Three trials involving 332 participants evaluated conservative treatments versus no treatment. There was no evidence of a difference in outcomes between treatment and no treatment.One good quality trial involving 140 participants compared surgery to conservative treatment. Evidence was shown of an improvement in all outcomes in patients receiving chevron osteotomy compared with those receiving orthoses. The same trial also compared surgery to no treatment in 140 participants. Evidence was shown of an improvement in all outcomes in patients receiving chevron osteotomy compared with those receiving no treatment.Two trials involving 133 people with hallux valgus compared Keller's arthroplasty with other surgical techniques

  9. Interventions for treating hallux valgus (abductovalgus) and bunions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ferrari, J; Higgins, J P T; Prior, T D

    2004-01-01

    Hallux valgus is classified as an abnormal deviation of the great toe (hallux) towards the midline of the foot. To identify and evaluate the evidence from randomised trials of interventions used to correct hallux valgus. We searched the Cochrane Musculoskeletal Injuries Group trials register (2003/1), the Cochrane Central Register of Controlled Trials (The Cochrane Library issue 1, 2003), MEDLINE (January 1966 to March 2003) and EMBASE (1980 to January 2003). No language restrictions were applied. Hand searching of specific foot journals was also undertaken. Date of the most recent search: 31st March 2003. Randomised or quasi-randomised trials of both conservative and surgical treatments of hallux valgus. Excluded were studies comparing areas of surgery not specific to the control of the deformity such as use of anaesthetics or tourniquet placement. Methodological quality of trials which met the inclusion criteria was independently assessed by two reviewers. Data extraction was undertaken by two reviewers. The trials were grouped according to the interventions being compared, but the dissimilarity in the comparisons prevented pooling of results. The methodological quality of the 21 included trials was generally poor and trial sizes were small. Three trials involving 332 participants evaluated conservative treatments versus no treatment. There was no evidence of a difference in outcomes between treatment and no treatment. One good quality trial involving 140 participants compared surgery to conservative treatment. Evidence was shown of an improvement in all outcomes in patients receiving chevron osteotomy compared with those receiving orthoses. The same trial also compared surgery to no treatment in 140 participants. Evidence was shown of an improvement in all outcomes in patients receiving chevron osteotomy compared with those receiving no treatment. Two trials involving 133 people with hallux valgus compared Keller's arthroplasty with other surgical techniques. In

  10. Evaluating the Quality, Accuracy, and Readability of Online Resources Pertaining to Hallux Valgus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tartaglione, Jason P; Rosenbaum, Andrew J; Abousayed, Mostafa; Hushmendy, Shazaan F; DiPreta, John A

    2016-02-01

    The Internet is one of the most widely utilized resources for health-related information. Evaluation of the medical literature suggests that the quality and accuracy of these resources are poor and written at inappropriately high reading levels. The purpose of our study was to evaluate the quality, accuracy, and readability of online resources pertaining to hallux valgus. Two search terms ("hallux valgus" and "bunion") were entered into Google, Yahoo, and Bing. With the use of scoring criteria specific to hallux valgus, the quality and accuracy of online information related to hallux valgus was evaluated by 3 reviewers. The Flesch-Kincaid score was used to determine readability. Statistical analysis was performed with t tests and significance was determined by P values hallux valgus" (P = .045). Quality and accuracy were significantly higher in resources authored by physicians as compared to nonphysicians (quality, P = .04; accuracy, P hallux valgus is poor and written at inappropriate reading levels. Furthermore, the search term used, authorship, and presence of commercial bias influence the value of these materials. It is important for orthopaedic surgeons to become familiar with patient education materials, so that appropriate recommendations can be made regarding valuable resources. Level IV. © 2015 The Author(s).

  11. Staple fixation for akin proximal phalangeal osteotomy in the treatment of hallux valgus interphalangeus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Neumann, Julie A; Reay, Kathleen D; Bradley, Kendall E; Parekh, Selene G

    2015-04-01

    The Akin proximal phalangeal osteotomy is commonly used in conjunction with metatarsal osteotomies to treat hallux valgus. Multiple fixation methods including suture, wire, screw, and staple fixation have been described. The aims of this study were to assess the intraoperative and postoperative complications and to evaluate short-term postoperative outcomes in patients who underwent Akin osteotomy with staple fixation. Forty-four patients (51 feet) with painful hallux valgus were retrospectively reviewed at an average of 40.4 ± 15.8 (range, 25.9 to 79.9) weeks following an Akin osteotomy with staple fixation. Patient reported preoperative and postoperative Visual Analog Score (VAS) (0 to 10, 0 = no pain) was recorded. Level of activity was reported postoperatively. Hallux valgus angles (HVAs), intermetatarsal angles (IMAs), and hallux valgus interphalangeus angles (IPAs) were evaluated on preoperative as well as final postoperative radiographs. Postoperative clinical and radiographic examinations were used to evaluate for complications. Mean VAS improved from 4.4 ± 2.6 to 1.0 ± 1.2 (P hallux valgus correction with improvement in pain and hallux valgus deformity with a low risk for complications. Level IV, case series. © The Author(s) 2014.

  12. The study of surface electromyography used for the assessment of abductor hallucis muscle activity in patients with hallux valgus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mortka, Kamila; Lisiński, Przemysław; Wiertel-Krawczuk, Agnieszka

    2018-01-26

    Hallux valgus is a common foot disorder. In patients with hallux valgus, the anatomy and biomechanics of foot is subject to alterations. The aim of this clinical and neurophysiological study is to compare the activity of abductor hallucis (AbdH) muscle between the group of patients with hallux valgus and control group of healthy people, with the use of surface electromyography. The study involved 44 feet with diagnosed hallux valgus (research group) and 42 feet without deformation (control group). The X-ray images, measurements of range of motion in the first metatarsophalangeal joint and in hallux interphalangeal joint, and the surface electromyography study recorded from AbdH muscle were performed. Considering the amplitude of motor unit action potential, study participants with hallux valgus demonstrate significantly less activity of AbdH muscle than people without hallux valgus deformity. This activity is not dependent on the severity of valgus, age, or range of motion. It is speculated that the changes of the AbdH function may occur in the period before clinical appearance of hallux valgus deformity, or at the onset of distortion development. Further studies are needed for a comprehensive assessment of AbdH muscle in patients with hallux valgus.

  13. Mobility of the First Ray in Patients With or Without Hallux Valgus Deformity: Systematic Review and Meta-Analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shibuya, Naohiro; Roukis, Thomas S; Jupiter, Daniel C

    The hypermobility theory of the first ray is the reason for the popularization of procedures such as the modified Lapidus procedure involving arthrodesis of the first tarsal-metatarsal joint for correction of hallux valgus deformity. Although many studies have involved motion of the first ray in hallux valgus patients, the presence and clinical significance of hypermobility in the first ray remains controversial. We performed a systematic review and meta-analysis to evaluate the difference in the first ray range of motion between patients with or without hallux valgus deformity. The databases used for the present review included Ovid EMBASE, Ovid MEDLINE, CINAHL, and the Cochrane Database. We searched for comparative studies that had evaluated the motion of the first ray in patients with or without hallux valgus. After screening for inclusion and exclusion criteria, we identified 3 studies that were relevant to our study question. All 3 studies showed more first ray motion in the hallux valgus group. Our quantitative synthesis showed a mean difference in the range of motion of the first ray of 3.62 mm (95% confidence interval 2.26 to 4.98) between those with and without hallux valgus deformity. Thus, we found statistically significantly increased first ray motion in patients with hallux valgus deformity compared with those without hallux valgus deformity. However, the clinical significance of this small amount of increased sagittal plane motion as a response to or a cause of hallux valgus remains unanswered. Published by Elsevier Inc.

  14. Disorders of the hallux sesamoid complex: MR features

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    Karasick, D.; Schweitzer, M.E. [Thomas Jefferson Univ., Philadelphia, PA (United States). Dept. of Radiology

    1998-08-01

    Numerous painful conditions can affect the first metatarsophalangeal-sesamoid joint complex. Symptoms can be of sudden or insidious onset, and be of acute or chronic duration. Although conventional radiography is recognized as the initial diagnostic procedure for these symptoms, there is often a need to proceed to MR imaging. MR imaging is sensitive and can be utilized in the investigation of the hallux sesamoid complex to differentiate soft tissue from osseous pathology. Synovitis, tendonitis, and bursitis can be distinguished from bony abnormalities such as sesamoid fracture, avascular necrosis, and osteomyelitis. An understanding of MR imaging features and techniques will result in the highest diagnostic yield. Early and accurate diagnosis of sesamoid complex disorders can guide the physician to the appropriate clinical management and prevent potentially harmful longstanding joint dysfunction. (orig.) With 11 figs., 30 refs.

  15. Disorders of the hallux sesamoid complex: MR features

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Karasick, D.; Schweitzer, M.E.

    1998-01-01

    Numerous painful conditions can affect the first metatarsophalangeal-sesamoid joint complex. Symptoms can be of sudden or insidious onset, and be of acute or chronic duration. Although conventional radiography is recognized as the initial diagnostic procedure for these symptoms, there is often a need to proceed to MR imaging. MR imaging is sensitive and can be utilized in the investigation of the hallux sesamoid complex to differentiate soft tissue from osseous pathology. Synovitis, tendonitis, and bursitis can be distinguished from bony abnormalities such as sesamoid fracture, avascular necrosis, and osteomyelitis. An understanding of MR imaging features and techniques will result in the highest diagnostic yield. Early and accurate diagnosis of sesamoid complex disorders can guide the physician to the appropriate clinical management and prevent potentially harmful longstanding joint dysfunction. (orig.)

  16. Hallux valgus and plantar pressure loading: the Framingham foot study

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-01-01

    Background Hallux valgus (HV), a common structural foot deformity, can cause foot pain and lead to limited mobility. The purpose of this study was to evaluate differences in plantar pressure and force during gait by HV status in a large population-based cohort of men and women. Methods A trained examiner performed a validated physical examination on participants’ feet and recorded the presence of hallux valgus and other specific foot disorders. Each foot was classified into one of four mutually exclusive groups based on the foot examination. Foot groups were: (i) HV only, (ii) HV and at least one additional foot disorder (FD), (iii) no HV but at least one other FD, and (iv) neither HV nor FD (referent). Biomechanical data for both feet were collected using Tekscan Matscan. Foot posture during quiet standing, using modified arch index (MAI), and foot function during gait, using center of pressure excursion index (CPEI), were calculated per foot. Further, walking scans were masked into eight sub-regions using Novel Automask, and peak pressure and maximum force exerted in each region were calculated. Results There were 3205 participants, contributing 6393 feet with complete foot exam data and valid biomechanical measurements. Participants with HV had lower hallucal loading and higher forces at lesser toes as well as higher MAI and lower CPEI values compared to the referent. Participants with HV and other FDs were also noted to have aberrant rearfoot forces and pressures. Conclusions These results suggest that HV alters foot loading patterns and pressure profiles. Future work should investigate how these changes affect the risk of other foot and lower extremity ailments. PMID:24138804

  17. IATROGENIC HALLUX VARUS: CAUSES OF DEFORMITY AND POSSIBILITIES OF PERCUTANEOUS SURGICAL CORRECTION (RETROSPECTIVE ANALYSIS OF CASE REPORTS

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    S. Yu. Berezhnoy

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Introduction. Hallux varus is a relatively rare foot deformity. Commonly, hallux varus is a complication after the hallux valgus surgery and typically is the result of the first metatarsal medial eminence over resection, first and second metatarsal excessive convergence, over release of the lateral soft tissues, overtightening of the medial soft tissues and soft tissue imbalance of the first metatarsophalangeal joint.The purpose of this study was to clarify the causes and timing of the iatrogenic hallux varus formation and to evaluate the possibility and efficiency of percutaneous techniques in its surgical treatment.Material and methods. Thirty-one feet (31 females suffering from iatrogenic hallux varus were examined clinically and radiologically, including 14 patients who underwent surgery. The average age of the whole group was 57 years (range, 39 to 74, the subgroup of operated patients — 60 years (range from 53 to 68. The time after primary interventions before the examination varied from 2 to 44 years. The mean follow-up after surgery was 6 months (range from 1.5 to 54.Results. No infection or wound-healing issues were observed. Overall, the patients were completely satisfied with the outcomes of 12 surgeries and satisfied with reservation in 2 cases.Conclusions. The visual manifestations of hallux varus are determined not only by the hallux varus angle, but also by the value of the first intermetatarsal angle. In addition to well-known factors, hallux varus formation is determined by first metatarsal bone elongation and first metatarsophalangeal joint instability. In rare cases, only one of the factors leads to the hallux varus; as a rule, we see a combination of factors with their mutual reinforcement. Despite the demonstration of usage possibility and the efficiency of percutaneous techniques in hallux varus correcting, a small number of observations in the study does not yet allow giving recommendations on the use of specific

  18. Factors Associated with Hallux Valgus in a Population-Based Study of Older Women and Men: the MOBILIZE Boston Study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nguyen, Uyen-Sa D.T.; Hillstrom, Howard J.; Li, Wenjun; Dufour, Alyssa B.; Kiel, Douglas P.; Procter-Gray, Elizabeth; Gagnon, Margaret M.; Hannan, Marian T.

    2009-01-01

    Objective To examine potential risk factors for hallux valgus in community-dwelling elders. Method Data from 600 MOBILIZE Boston Study participants (386 women and 214 men) were analyzed. Hallux valgus was defined as > 15 degrees angular deviation of the hallux with respect to the first metatarsal bone toward the lesser toes. Associations of hallux valgus with age, body mass index (BMI), race, education, pes planus, foot pain, and in women, history of high heel shoe use, were assessed using sex-specific Poisson regression with robust variance estimation for risk ratios (RR) and 95% confidence intervals (CI). Results Hallux valgus was present in 58% of women and 25% of men. Higher BMI was inversely associated with presence of hallux valgus in women (p trend = 0.001), with the strongest inverse association observed in those with BMI of 30.0 or more compared to those with normal BMI (RR=0.7, 95% CI: 0.5, 0.9). Women, who usually wore high-heeled shoes during ages 20 to 64 years compared to those who did not, had increased likelihood of hallux valgus (RR=1.2, 95% CI: 1.0, 1.5). Among men, those with BMI between 25.0 and 29.9 had increased likelihood of hallux valgus compared to those with normal BMI (RR=1.9, 95% CI: 1.0, 3.5). Men with pes planus were more likely to have hallux valgus (RR=2.1, 95% CI: 1.3, 3.3) compared to men without pes planus. Conclusion In women, hallux valgus was associated with lower BMI and high heel use during ages 20 to 64, while in men, associations were observed with higher BMI and pes planus. Our results suggest that the etiologic mechanisms for hallux valgus may differ between men and women. PMID:19747997

  19. Radiographic Shape of Foot With Second Metatarsophalangeal Joint Dislocation Associated With Hallux Valgus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kokubo, Tetsuro; Hashimoto, Takeshi; Suda, Yasunori; Waseda, Akeo; Ikezawa, Hiroko

    2017-12-01

    Second metatarsophalangeal (MTP) joint dislocation is associated with hallux valgus, and the treatment of complete dislocation can be difficult. The purpose of this study was to radiographically clarify the characteristic foot shape in the presence of second MTP joint dislocation. Weight-bearing foot radiographs of the 268 patients (358 feet) with hallux valgus were examined. They were divided into 2 groups: those with second MTP joint dislocation (study group = 179 feet) and those without dislocation (control group = 179 feet). Parameters measured included the hallux valgus angle (HVA), first-second intermetatarsal angle (IMA), second MTP joint angle, hallux interphalangeal angle (IPA), second metatarsal protrusion distance (MPD), metatarsus adductus angle (MAA), and the second metatarsal declination angle (2MDA). Furthermore, the dislocation group was divided into 3 subgroups according to second toe deviation direction: group M (medial type), group N (neutral type), and group L (lateral type). The IPA and the 2MDA were significantly greater in the study group than in the control group. By multiple comparison analysis, the IMA was greatest in group M and smallest in group L. The IPA was smaller and 2MDA greater in group N than in group L. The HVA and MAA in group L were greatest, and MPD in group L was smallest. The patients with second MTP joint dislocation associated with hallux valgus had greater hallux interphalangeal joint varus and a second metatarsal more inclined than with hallux valgus alone. The second toe deviated in a different direction according to the foot shape. Level III, retrospective comparative study.

  20. Mitchell′s osteotomy in the management of hallux valgus: An Indian perspective

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    Baba Asif

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: Hallux valgus is a common condition that affects the forefoot. A large number of procedures are described for managing this condition. Mitchell′s osteotomy and its modifications are being widely used for treating hallux valgus. However, most of the studies describe the results from the developed world. We present results of the classic Mitchell′s osteotomy in hallux valgus in Indian subcontinent. Materials and Methods: Forty eight adult patients (including 12 bilateral ones in the age range of 18-60 years with hallux valgus were managed with the classic Mitchell′s osteotomy. Pain over the bunion was the reason for surgery in 53 of 60 feet and cosmesis in the remaining 7 feet. Patients with hallux valgus angle more than 20° degrees and not responding to a trial of conservative treatment were included. Patients having metatarsophalangeal (MTP joint osteoarthritis (Grade II and higher, hallux rigidus, rheumatoid arthritis, and with subluxation of MTP joint were excluded from the study. Further, patients with first metatarsal more than 3 mm shorter than second metatarsal were also excluded. Results: The average follow-up period is 3 yrs (range 18months - 6yrs. About 55 feet (83% were painless after surgery. Forty-two (70% patients were happy with the cosmetic results of the surgery. Metatarsalgia was the reason for dissatisfaction with the procedure in five patients. The average correction of hallux valgus and the intermetatarsal angles achieved was 19.7° and 6.9°, respectively. Using the Broughton and Winson scoring system, 37 (61.7% feet had excellent results, 18 (30% had good, and five (8.3% feet had a poor results. Conclusion: The classic Mitchell′s procedure is a simple procedure and gives good cosmetic and radiological results.

  1. Effect of First Ray Insufficiency and Metatarsal Index on Metatarsalgia in Hallux Valgus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Slullitel, Gaston; López, Valeria; Calvi, Juan Pablo; Seletti, Maximiliano; Bartolucci, Carla; Pinton, Gustavo

    2016-03-01

    Two concepts have been proposed to explain the etiology of metatarsalgia in hallux valgus patients: First, as the magnitude of hallux valgus increases, there is a mechanical overload of the lesser metatarsals. Second, increased relative lesser metatarsal length is a factor in the development of metatarsalgia. However, there is no current evidence that these structural factors lead to primary metatarsalgia. The purpose of the study was to evaluate the factors associated with metatarsalgia in hallux valgus patients. A cross-sectional study of 121 consecutive adult patients with non-arthritic hallux valgus was carried out. Binary logistic regression was performed to identify the effect of the clinical and demographic factors on the occurrence of metatarsalgia. One hundred twenty-one patients (184 feet) with hallux valgus were analyzed. The median weight was 65 kg (interquartile range 58-72). Metatarsalgia was present in 84 (45.6%) feet. The binary logistic regression showed that lesser toe deformity (OR 2.6, 95% CI 0.2-0.5), gastrocnemius shortening (OR 5.8, 95% CI 2.8-12.3), metatarsal index (OR 0.3, 95% CI 0.2-0.5), and weight (OR 2.5, 95% CI 1.2-5.3) were significantly associated. Metatarsalgia occurs in almost half of hallux valgus patients. It has a multifactorial etiology. Our findings contradict the common theory that both the magnitude of hallux valgus deformity and an increased length of the lesser metatarsals, by themselves, lead to primary metatarsalgia. Metatarsalgia was associated with Achilles shortening, excessive weight, and associated lesser toe deformity. These factors should be addressed in order to treat this disorder adequately. Level III, comparative series. © The Author(s) 2015.

  2. High Rate of Recurrence Following Proximal Medial Opening Wedge Osteotomy for Correction of Moderate Hallux Valgus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Iyer, Sravisht; Demetracopoulos, Constantine A; Sofka, Carolyn M; Ellis, Scott J

    2015-07-01

    The proximal medial opening wedge (PMOW) osteotomy has become more popular to treat moderate to severe hallux valgus with the recent development of specifically designed, low-profile modular plates. Despite the promising results previously reported in the literature, we have noted a high incidence of recurrence in patients treated with a PMOW. The purpose of this study was to report the clinical and radiographic outcomes of an initial cohort of patients treated with a PMOW osteotomy for moderate hallux valgus. We retrospectively analyzed prospectively gathered data on a cohort of 17 consecutive patients who were treated by the senior author using a PMOW osteotomy for moderate hallux valgus deformity. Average time to follow-up was 2.4 years (range, 1.0-3.5 years). The intermetatarsal angle (IMA), the hallux valgus angle (HVA), and the distal metatarsal articular angle (DMAA) were assessed on standard weightbearing radiographs of the foot preoperatively and at all follow-up visits. The Foot and Ankle Outcome Score (FAOS) was collected on all patients preoperatively and at final follow-up. Despite demonstrating good correction of their deformity initially, 11 of the 17 patients (64.7%) had evidence of recurrence of their hallux valgus deformity at final follow-up. Patients who recurred had a greater preoperative HVA (P = .023) and DMAA (P = .049) than patients who maintained their correction. Improvement in the quality-of-life subscale of the FAOS was noted at final follow-up for all patients (P = .05). There was no significant improvement in any of the other FAOS subscales. There was a high rate of recurrence of the hallux valgus deformity in this cohort of patients. Recurrence was associated with greater preoperative deformity and an increased preoperative DMAA. The PMOW without a concomitant distal metatarsal osteotomy may be best reserved for patients with mild hallux valgus deformity without an increased DMAA. Level IV, retrospective case series. © The Author

  3. Short-Term Radiographic Outcome After Distal Chevron Osteotomy for Hallux Valgus Using Intramedullary Plates With an Amended Algorithm for the Surgical Management of Hallux Valgus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Matsumoto, Takumi; Gross, Christopher E; Parekh, Selene G

    2018-03-01

    Distal Chevron osteotomy is a well-established surgical procedure for mild to moderate hallux valgus deformity. Many methods have been described for fixation of osteotomy site; secure fixation, enabling large displacement of the metatarsal head, is one of the essentials of this procedure. The purpose of the present study was to evaluate the short-term radiographic outcome of a distal Chevron osteotomy using an intramedullary plate for the correction of hallux valgus deformity. The present study evaluated 37 patients (40 feet) who underwent distal Chevron osteotomy using an intramedullary plate by periodic radiographs obtained preoperatively and at 4 weeks, 8 weeks, 3 months, and 6 months postoperatively. Correction of the hallux valgus angle averaged 17.8°, intermetatarsal angle 7.4°, distal metatarsal articular angle 2.7°, and sesamoid position 1.4 stages at 3 months postoperatively. The average lateral shift of the capital fragment was 6.5 mm. All patients achieved bone union, and there were no cases of dislocation, displacement, or avascular necrosis of the metatarsal head fragment. In conclusion, a distal Chevron osteotomy using an intramedullary plate was a favorable method for the correction of mild to moderate hallux valgus deformity. Level IV: Case series.

  4. Radiographic Measurements of the Affected and Unaffected Feet in Patients with Unilateral Hallux Limitus A Case-Control Pilot Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Knox, Andrew F; Bryant, Alan R

    2016-05-01

    Controversy exists regarding the structural and functional causes of hallux limitus, including metatarsus primus elevatus, a long first metatarsal, first-ray hypermobility, the shape of the first metatarsal head, and the presence of hallux interphalangeus. Some articles have reported on the radiographic evaluation of these measurements in feet affected by hallux limitus, but no study has directly compared the affected and unaffected feet in patients with unilateral hallux limitus. This case-control pilot study aimed to establish whether any such differences exist. Dorsoplantar and lateral weightbearing radiographs of both feet in 30 patients with unilateral hallux limitus were assessed for grade of disease, lateral intermetatarsal angle, metatarsal protrusion distance, plantar gapping at the first metatarsocuneiform joint, metatarsal head shape, and hallux abductus interphalangeus angle. Data analysis was performed using a statistical software program. Mean radiographic measurements for affected and unaffected feet demonstrated that metatarsus primus elevatus, a short first metatarsal, first-ray hypermobility, a flat metatarsal head shape, and hallux interphalangeus were prevalent in both feet. There was no statistically significant difference between feet for any of the radiographic parameters measured (Mann-Whitney U tests, independent-samples t tests, and Pearson χ(2) tests: P > .05). No significant differences exist in the presence of the structural risk factors examined between affected and unaffected feet in patients with unilateral hallux limitus. The influence of other intrinsic factors, including footedness and family history, should be investigated further.

  5. Comparison of Designed Slippers Splints with the Splints Available on the Market in the Treatment of Hallux Valgus

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    Yadollah Pournia

    2012-02-01

    Full Text Available Hallux valgus or the lateral deviation of the great toe is a complex disease. If it is not treated, it will cause the deviation of other toes. Hallux valgus is three times more common in females and may cause uncomfortable deformity of the foot, problems in putting on unsuitable and narrow toe box shoes, and pain on the medial side of the first metatarsophalangeal joint; therefore, patients seek medical services. Untreated hallux valgus may cause the hammer toe deformity of the second toe. In this cohort study, 30 patients referring to the Orthopedic Clinic of Shohada Ashayer Hospital of Khorramabad, Iran, with a complaint of hallux valgus were randomly divided into two groups. The splints designed by the researches (slippers splints were given to the case group, and the splints on the market including night splints and interdigital pads were given to the control group. The patients were followed every three months for a year and every time the weight bearing anteroposterior radiography of both feet were taken and hallux valgus and inter-metatarsal angles were measured. The data was analyzed by the SPSS software using repeated measure tests. In the case group that used the designed splints regularly, hallux valgus angles decreased more dramatically than in the control group (P<0.001. This study showed that, despite controversies over the nonoperative treatment of hallux valgus, if hallux valgus angle in patient is mild to moderate, the splint can be used as a nonoperative treatment.

  6. A comparison of hallux valgus angles assessed with computerised plantar pressure measurements, clinical examination and radiography in patients with diabetes

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Janssen, D.M.; Sanders, A.P.; Guldemond, N.A.; Hermus, J.; Walenkamp, G.H.; Van Rhijn, L.W.

    2014-01-01

    Background Hallux valgus deformity is a common musculoskeletal foot disorder with a prevalence of 3.5% in adolescents to 35.7% in adults aged over 65 years. Radiographic measurements of hallux valgus angles (HVA) are considered to be the most reproducible and accurate assessment of HVA. However, in

  7. Equivalent correction in scarf and chevron osteotomy in moderate and severe hallux valgus: a randomized controlled trial.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Deenik, A.; Mameren, H. van; Visser, E. de; Waal Malefijt, M.C. de; Draijer, F.; Bie, R. de

    2008-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Chevron osteotomy is a widely accepted osteotomy for correction of hallux valgus.(18) Algorithms were developed to overcome the limitations of distal osteotomies. Scarf osteotomy has become popular as a versatile procedure that should be able to correct most cases of acquired hallux

  8. Radiologic assessment of the outcome of Keller and Brandes arthroplasty for hallux rigidus

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Breitenseher, M.J.; Toma, C.D.; Gottsauner-Wolf, F.; Imhof, H.

    1996-01-01

    The aim of this study was to evaluate the pre- and postoperative radiographic findings of hallux rigidus treated with Keller and Brandes arthroplasty to determine the radiographic outcome and to identify a prognostic marker. 83 patients with a total of 121 cases of hallux rigidus operated using Keller and Brandes arthroplasty were followed up (mean 9.7 y). A comparison of the pre- and postoperative radiographs, the clinical and subjective findings was predicated on a five point scale: 1. Percentage of proximal phalanx resected ( 50%), 2. joint space, 3. ratio of the length of the first and second metatarsals, 4. first intermetatarsal angle, and 5. hallux valgus angle. In the patient group which had 33-50% of the proximal phalanx excised (n=67. 55%) the highest patient satisfaction was observed (96%). If resection of the proximal phalanx exceeded 50% (n=13. 11%), non physiologic dorsiflexion of the toe occurred and patients were unsatisfied (62%). Excision of less than 33% of the hallux (n=41. 34%) was associated with a recurrent hallux rigidus. No other evaluated radiological parameter proved to be of significance. The most important radiological parameter in the evaluation of the outcome of Keller and Brandes arthroplasty as the percentage of the proximal phalanx which had ben excised. (orig.) [de

  9. Preliminary Results and Learning Curve of the Minimally Invasive Chevron Akin Operation for Hallux Valgus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jowett, Charlie R J; Bedi, Harvinder S

    Minimally invasive surgery is increasing in popularity. It is relevant in hallux valgus surgery owing to the potential for reduced disruption of the soft tissues and improved wound healing. We present our results and assess the learning curve of the minimally invasive Chevron Akin operation for hallux valgus. A total of 120 consecutive feet underwent minimally invasive Chevron Akin for symptomatic hallux valgus, of which 14 were excluded. They were followed up for a mean of 25 (range 18 to 38) months. The patients were clinically assessed using the American Orthopaedic Foot and Ankle Society score. Complications and patient satisfaction were recorded. The radiographs were analyzed and measurements recorded for hallux valgus and intermetatarsal angle correction. The mean age of the patients undergoing surgery was 55 (range 25 to 81) years. Of the 78 patients, 76 (97.4%) were female and 2 (2.6%) were male; 28 (35.9%) cases were bilateral. The mean American Orthopaedic Foot and Ankle Society score improved from 56 (range 23 to 76) preoperatively to 87 (range 50 to 100) postoperatively (p technique. They display a steep associated learning curve. However, the results are promising, and the learning curve is comparable to that for open hallux valgus surgery. Copyright © 2017 American College of Foot and Ankle Surgeons. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  10. Prenatal diagnosis of congenital hallux varus deformity associated with pericentric inversion of chromosome 9.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gürel, Sebahat Atar

    2015-04-01

    Congenital hallux varus is a rare deformity of the great toe characterized by adduction of the hallux and medial displacement of the first metatarsophalangeal joint. Prenatal diagnosis of congenital hallux varus is presented herein. A 32-year-old woman was referred to our unit due to significant deviation of the fetal right great toe at 22(+2) weeks of pregnancy. Ultrasound examination revealed a thick and short great toe, which was significantly angulated medially on the right side. Amniocentesis was performed and the result was reported as inv(9) (p11;q12). After delivery, the clinical examination confirmed the prenatal diagnosis. To our knowledge, this is the first reported prenatal diagnosis of an isolated congenital hallux varus. Congenital hallux varus can be diagnosed easily in the prenatal period by 2-D and 4-D ultrasonography. Prenatal karyotyping should be taken into consideration, especially in the presence of associated anomalies, such as polydactyly and clubfoot. © 2014 The Author. Journal of Obstetrics and Gynaecology Research © 2014 Japan Society of Obstetrics and Gynecology.

  11. The progression of hallux valgus in the oriental Chinese population in Hong Kong.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Koo, Kenneth Kin-Hoo; Tse, Lung Fung; Cheng, Hi Shan; Ho, Kevin Ki Wai

    2017-08-01

    Hallux valgus is the lateral deviation of the great toe at the MTPJ that has many attributing aetiologies. This study will aim to identify whether hallux valgus progresses over time in the oriental Chinese population in Hong Kong. Patients with acquired symptomatic hallux valgus who presented to clinic between 2008 and 2013 were included. The deformities were analysed radiologically at presentation and pre-operative and angles were measured. These angles were analysed in relation to the waiting time from presentation to surgery. A sample of 43 cases from 38 patients (Mean age 63 years, range 48-80 years) were included. Forty-one cases had a hallux valgus angle (HVA) >24° at presentation (Mean 40.4°) and all had an intermetatarsal angle (IMA) >9°. A significant difference is seen with HVA (p=0.040, t=-2.128) at presentation and pre-op but not IMA (p=0.281, t=-1.095). The average wait for surgery was 705.7days which had shown significant correlation with progression in HVA (p=0.031). No significant difference was seen between IMA and waiting time to surgery (p=0.195). The findings suggests severe hallux valgus deformity does progress over time in Hong Kong. Shorter waiting times for surgery could be beneficial to this population. Level III, retrospective comparative series. Crown Copyright © 2017. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  12. Hallux valgus—a case for a physiotherapist or only for a surgeon? Literature review

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mortka, Kamila; Lisiński, Przemysław

    2015-01-01

    [Purpose] Hallux valgus is one of the most common deformations of the human foot, and it causes great difficulties for the patients. The aim of this paper was to review available medical literature in search of evidence which would justify implementation of physiotherapy, based on its effectiveness for patients with hallux valgus. [Subjects and Methods] The following databases were searched for applicable papers: PubMed, Google Scholar, Clinical Key and UpToDate. Full-text articles from the last 15 years were subjected to a review, which ultimately selected seven papers about hallux valgus therapy published over the past 12 years. These studies were grouped according to their design and level of evidence and classified depending on whether they concerned physiotherapy as postoperative therapy or as the only treatment. [Results] The studies included in the present analysis used the following interventions for patients with hallux valgus: exercise, manual therapy, gait training, taping and orthosis. All the studies showed beneficial effects and the most frequently observed results were reductions in pain and improvements in function. [Conclusion] The evidence found in the reviewed materials clearly indicates that patients with hallux valgus should not only be subject to surgical procedures but also undergo physiotherapeutic treatment. PMID:26644698

  13. Minimally Invasive Distal Metatarsal Osteotomy for Mild-to-Moderate Hallux Valgus Deformity

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yu-Chuan Lin

    2009-08-01

    Full Text Available Minimally invasive surgery has recently been introduced for foot and ankle surgery, and hallux valgus surgery is no exception. The purpose of our study was to analyze the early results and to present our experience of minimally invasive distal metatarsal osteotomy in correcting mild-to-moderate hallux valgus deformities. Between September 2005 and December 2006, 31 consecutive patients (47 feet with mild-to-moderate hallux valgus deformities underwent minimally invasive distal metatarsal osteotomies. The clinical and radiographic outcomes were assessed. The satisfaction rate was 90.32%. The mean total American Orthopedic Foot and Ankle Society halluxmetatarsophalangeal-interphalangeal scale was 92.7 points. Complications included two (4.26% episodes of stiffness, six (12.77% episodes of pin tract infection, and one (2.13% deep infection. There were no cases with nonunion, malunion, overcorrection, transfer metatarsalgia or osteonecrosis. On weight-bearing anteroposterior foot radiographs, the mean hallux valgus angle and first intermetatarsal angle corrections were 11.8° and 6.3°, respectively, which is a statistically significant difference (p < 0.001 between the preoperative and postoperative status. Here, minimally invasive distal metatarsal osteotomy was associated with good satisfaction, functional improvement and low complication rates. This technique offers an effective, safe and simple way to treat hallux valgus with a first intermetatarsal angle less than 15°.

  14. Tibial Sesamoid Position Influence on Functional Outcome and Satisfaction After Hallux Valgus Surgery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Jerry Yongqiang; Rikhraj, Kiran; Gatot, Cheryl; Lee, Justine Yun Yu; Singh Rikhraj, Inderjeet

    2016-11-01

    During hallux valgus surgery, the abnormal position of the first metatarsal bone relative to the sesamoids is addressed. Our study aimed to investigate the influence of postoperative tibial sesamoid position (TSP) on functional outcome and patient satisfaction after hallux valgus surgery. Between February 2007 and November 2011, 250 patients who underwent hallux valgus surgery at our tertiary hospital were followed for 2 years after surgery. They were categorized into 2 groups based on Hardy and Clapham's TSP classification, recorded on postoperative weight-bearing anteroposterior (AP) radiographs: (1) normal (grades I-IV) and (2) outliers (grades V-VII). The mode TSP improved from grade VII preoperatively to grade IV postoperatively (P Hallux Metatarsophalangeal-Interphalangeal Scale was 6 (95% CI 2, 11) points higher in the normal group (P = .009). Patients in the outlier group were also more likely to be dissatisfied with the surgery performed when compared to the normal group (OR 3.881, 95% CI 1.689, 8.920, P = .001). We recommend correcting the TSP to grade of IV or less to improve functional outcome and satisfaction after hallux valgus surgery. Level III, retrospective comparative series. © The Author(s) 2016.

  15. Open wedge metatarsal osteotomy versus crescentic osteotomy to correct severe hallux valgus deformity

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Wester, Jens Ulrik; Hamborg-Petersen, Ellen; Herold, Niels

    2016-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Different techniques of proximal osteotomies have been introduced to correct severe hallux valgus. The open wedge osteotomy is a newly introduced method for proximal osteotomy. The aim of this prospective randomized study was to compare the radiological and clinical results after...... operation for severe hallux valgus, comparing the open wedge osteotomy to the crescentic osteotomy which is our traditional treatment. METHODS: Forty-five patients with severe hallux valgus (hallux valgus angle >35̊, and intermetatarsal angle >15̊) were included in this study. The treatment was proximal...... and 12 months after the operation. RESULTS: In group 1 the hallux valgus angle decreased from 39.0̊ to 24.1̊ after 4 months and 27.9̊ after 12 months. In group 2 the angle decreased from 38.3̊ to 21.4̊ after 4 months and 27.0̊ after 12 months. The intermetatarsal angle in group 1 was 19.0̊ preoperatively...

  16. [A cadaveric study of a new capsulorrhaphy for the surgical treatment of hallux valgus].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Orozco-Villaseñor, S L; Monzó-Planella, M; Martín-Oliva, X; Vázquez-Escamilla, J; Mayagoitia-Vázquez, J J; Frías-Chimal, J E

    2017-01-01

    There are many surgical options for the treatment of hallux valgus in combination with capsular repairs for the correction of hallux valgus. This report corresponds to a descriptive study where a new capsulorrhaphy technique in hallux valgus is proposed. Six dissections were performed on cadavers with hallux valgus deformity using the following surgical technique: medial approach on the first toe longitudinally, dissecting by planes and locating the metatarsophalangeal joint capsule; it was incised longitudinally. The capsule was separated and an exostectomy of the first metatarsal head was done, the edges were regularized and a release of the abductor hallucis was performed. Later, the capsular remnant was resected and repaired. Six cadaveric feet with hallux valgus were studied, five with mild deformity, one with moderate deformity, one foot with the 2nd finger on supraductus. Many capsular repairs have been reported in the literature, including «L», triangular, «V-Y», rectangular, with satisfactory results, along with osteotomy of the first metatarsal. In this report, a new capsular repair was described. Applying this new capsular repair, we reduced the metatarsophalangeal and intermetatarsal angles and achieved a capsular closure with suitable tension; the metatarsophalangeal joint mobility was preserved.

  17. Intra- and Interobserver Reliability of Three Classification Systems for Hallux Rigidus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dillard, Sarita; Schilero, Christina; Chiang, Sharon; Pham, Peter

    2018-04-18

    There are over ten classification systems currently used in the staging of hallux rigidus. This results in confusion and inconsistency with radiographic interpretation and treatment. The reliability of hallux rigidus classification systems has not yet been tested. The purpose of this study was to evaluate intra- and interobserver reliability using three commonly used classifications for hallux rigidus. Twenty-one plain radiograph sets were presented to ten ACFAS board-certified foot and ankle surgeons. Each physician classified each radiograph based on clinical experience and knowledge according to the Regnauld, Roukis, and Hattrup and Johnson classification systems. The two-way mixed single-measure consistency intraclass correlation was used to calculate intra- and interrater reliability. The intrarater reliability of individual sets for the Roukis and Hattrup and Johnson classification systems was "fair to good" (Roukis, 0.62±0.19; Hattrup and Johnson, 0.62±0.28), whereas the intrarater reliability of individual sets for the Regnauld system bordered between "fair to good" and "poor" (0.43±0.24). The interrater reliability of the mean classification was "excellent" for all three classification systems. Conclusions Reliable and reproducible classification systems are essential for treatment and prognostic implications in hallux rigidus. In our study, Roukis classification system had the best intrarater reliability. Although there are various classification systems for hallux rigidus, our results indicate that all three of these classification systems show reliability and reproducibility.

  18. Incidence of hallux valgus deformity among Iranian university students

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    Abbas Rahimi

    2012-07-01

    Full Text Available Background and Aim: The dramatically increased incidence of hallux valgus (HV deformity is more related to the cultural rather than genetic parameters. Due to the lack of reliable information about the rate of this disorder in Iraninan societies, the researchers of the current study aimed to find out the incidence of this disorder in Iranian university students as a sample of Iranian youngsters. Materials and Methods: This descriptive study was carried out using a self-constructed and the American Orthopaedic Foot and Ankle Society (AOFAS questionnaires among 290 university students with the mean age of 21±2 years old. The HV angles (HVA was described as normal for up to 20º, mild for angles between 21º and 25º, moderate for angles between 26º and 40º, and severe for angles higher than 40 º. Then, the HVA of the subjects of this study was compared with the data from other societies.Results: The results of this study showed a 34.1% involvement of the participants (30% females and 41% males. 58% of the subjects showed a bilateral hallux valgus involvement. No significant differences were found between the males and females in terms of the severity of the deformity and the right or left side involvement (P>0.05. 71% of the involved subjects showed a mild degree and 29% showed a moderate degree of deformity. No severe deformity (above 40º was found in this study. In terms of the associated deformities, in subjects with mild deformity, 25% showed flat foot and 69% showed bunion disorder; While these were 21% and 82% in subjects with moderate deformity, respectively. In terms of inheritance correlation, while this deformity was shown in only 7% of normal subjects’ first degree relatives (father, mother, brothers or sisters, it increased to 21.1% in mild degree and 46.4% in moderate degree groups. Conclusion: This study revealed a very high incidence of HV deformity in Iranian university students as a sample of Iranian youngsters, which is

  19. Correlation between Manchester Grading Scale and American Orthopaedic Foot and Ankle Society Score in Patients with Hallux Valgus

    Science.gov (United States)

    Iliou, Kalliopi; Paraskevas, George; Kanavaros, Panagiotis; Barbouti, Alexandra; Vrettakos, Aristidis; Gekas, Christos; Kitsoulis, Panagiotis

    2015-01-01

    Objective To evaluate the correlation between the Manchester Grading Scale and the American Orthopaedic Foot and Ankle Society (AOFAS) score in patients with a hallux valgus deformity. Subjects and Methods The study sample included 181 feet of 122 patients with hallux valgus and 424 feet of 212 individuals without hallux valgus deformity as the control group. The severity of hallux valgus, utilizing a relative nonmetric scale, the Manchester Grading Scale, and the metric AOFAS score, was determined for all individuals in the hallux valgus and control groups. SPSS version 18 (Chicago, Ill., USA) was used for data analysis. Results According to the Manchester Grading Scale, the 424 feet of the normal group were classified as ‘no deformity−. In the hallux valgus group, 85 feet were classified as ‘mild deformity−, 67 as ‘moderate deformity' and 29 as ‘severe deformity−. The AOFAS total score in the control group was 99.14. In the hallux valgus group, patients with mild or moderate deformity had total scores of 86.20 and 68.19, respectively. For those with severe hallux valgus, the total score was 44.69 and the differences were statistically significant (p = 0.000). Using the Pearson correlation, strong negative correlations were found between the AOFAS score and the hallux valgus angle (HVA; r = −0.899, p = 0.000). Strong negative correlations were demonstrated between the AOFAS score and the first intermetatarsal angle (IMA) as well (r = −0.748, p = 0.000). Conclusions The AOFAS score was negatively associated with the Manchester Grading Scale, HVA and first IMA. As the severity of hallux valgus increased, the AOFAS score seemed to decrease. PMID:26335050

  20. Lateral sesamoid position in hallux valgus: correlation with the conventional radiological assessment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Agrawal, Yuvraj; Desai, Aravind; Mehta, Jaysheel

    2011-12-01

    We aimed to quantify the severity of the hallux valgus based on the lateral sesamoid position and to establish a correlation of our simple assessment method with the conventional radiological assessments. We reviewed one hundred and twenty two dorso-plantar weight bearing radiographs of feet. The intermetatarsal and hallux valgus angles were measured by the conventional methods; and the position of lateral sesamoid in relation to first metatarsal neck was assessed by our new and simple method. Significant correlation was noted between intermetatarsal angle and lateral sesamoid position (Rho 0.74, p lateral sesamoid position and hallux valgus angle (Rho 0.56, p lateral sesamoid position is simple, less time consuming and has statistically significant correlation with that of the established conventional radiological measurements. Copyright © 2011 European Foot and Ankle Society. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  1. Bipartite hallucal sesamoid bones: relationship with hallux valgus and metatarsal index

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    Munuera, Pedro V.; Dominguez, Gabriel [University of Seville, Department of Podiatrics, Seville (Spain); Centro Docente de Fisioterapia y Podologia, Departamento de Podologia, Seville (Spain); Reina, Maria; Trujillo, Piedad [Centro Docente de Fisioterapia y Podologia, Departamento de Podologia, Seville (Spain)

    2007-11-15

    The objective was to relate the incidence of the partition of the hallucal sesamoid bones to the size of the first metatarsal and the hallux valgus deformity. In a sample of 474 radiographs, the frequency of appearance of bipartite sesamoids was studied. The length and relative protrusion of the first metatarsal, and the hallux abductus angle, were measured and compared between the feet with and without sesamoid partition. The results showed that 14.6% of the feet studied had at least one partite sesamoid, that the sesamoid most frequently divided was the medial, and that unilateral partition was the most common. No difference was found in the incidence of partite sesamoids between men and women, or between left and right feet. Protrusion and length of the first metatarsal are greater in feet with partite sesamoids than in feet without this condition. A significantly higher incidence of bipartite medial sesamoid was obtained in feet with hallux valgus compared with normal feet. (orig.)

  2. First metatarsophalangeal arthroscopy in patients with post-traumatic hallux valgus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lui, T H

    2015-12-01

    Post-traumatic hallux valgus is relatively rare and has been reported after rupture of the medial collateral ligament of the first metatarsophalangeal (MTP-1) joint; Lisfranc joint injury; turf toe injury; medial plantar nerve entrapment secondary to tibial fracture or first metatarsal fracture. Post-traumatic hallux valgus after medial collateral ligament injury has a high incidence of MTP-1 pathology. Detailed history and clinical examination can facilitate differentiation of the source(s) of the patient's symptoms and assist accurate formulation of the surgical plan. First, MTP arthroscopy is a feasible diagnostic and therapeutic tool to manage the MTP-1 joint pain in hallux valgus following injury to the MTP-1 joint. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  3. Our Experience with Double Metatarsal Osteotomy in the Treatment of Hallux Valgus

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pradeep George Mathew

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Adolescent hallux valgus (HV is a progressive deformity of adolescent age consisting of metatarsus primus varus and hallux valgus. It has a high recurrence rate after conventional surgical correction. Ten feet in nine patients (two males, seven females were treated surgically with the Peterson Newman bunion procedure, with a minimum follow‑up of one year. During the final follow‑up all these patients had no complaints of pain, joint stiffness or limping. Even though the patients had some mild loss of range of movements at the MTP joints 4–6° compared to preoperative value, it did not cause any functional impairment and all were satisfied with the final outcome. The double ostetomy for treatment of hallux valgus is technically precise procedure, provides excellent correction and stability and has low rate of recurrence of deformity. We had an excellent outcome in 10 feet in our study without residual deformity or complications.

  4. Shortening Scarf osteotomy for correction of severe hallux valgus. Does shortening affect the outcome?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Karpe, Prasad; Killen, Marie C; Pollock, Raymond D; Limaye, Rajiv

    2016-12-01

    Translation and shortening of Scarf osteotomy allows correction of severe hallux valgus deformity. Shortening may result in transfer metatarsalgia. To evaluate outcome of patients undergoing shortening Scarf osteotomy for severe hallux valgus deformities. Fifteen patients (20feet, mean age 58 years) underwent shortening Scarf osteotomy for severe hallux valgus deformities. Outcomes were pre and postoperative AOFAS scores, IM and HV angles, patient satisfaction. Mean follow-up was 25 months (range 22-30). The IM angle improved from a median of 18.60 (range 13.4-26.20) preoperatively to 9.70 (range 8.0-13.70) postoperatively (8.9; 95% CI=7.6-10.3; phallux valgus deformities with no transfer metatarsalgia. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  5. Bipartite hallucal sesamoid bones: relationship with hallux valgus and metatarsal index

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Munuera, Pedro V.; Dominguez, Gabriel; Reina, Maria; Trujillo, Piedad

    2007-01-01

    The objective was to relate the incidence of the partition of the hallucal sesamoid bones to the size of the first metatarsal and the hallux valgus deformity. In a sample of 474 radiographs, the frequency of appearance of bipartite sesamoids was studied. The length and relative protrusion of the first metatarsal, and the hallux abductus angle, were measured and compared between the feet with and without sesamoid partition. The results showed that 14.6% of the feet studied had at least one partite sesamoid, that the sesamoid most frequently divided was the medial, and that unilateral partition was the most common. No difference was found in the incidence of partite sesamoids between men and women, or between left and right feet. Protrusion and length of the first metatarsal are greater in feet with partite sesamoids than in feet without this condition. A significantly higher incidence of bipartite medial sesamoid was obtained in feet with hallux valgus compared with normal feet. (orig.)

  6. A geometric analysis of hallux valgus: correlation with clinical assessment of severity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Piqué-Vidal, Carlos; Vila, Joan

    2009-01-01

    Background Application of plane geometry to the study of bunion deformity may represent an interesting and novel approach in the research field of hallux valgus. For the purpose of contributing to development of a different perspective in the assessment of hallux valgus, this study was conducted with three objectives: a) to determine the position on the intersection point of the perpendicular bisectors of the longitudinal axes of the first metatarsal and proximal phalanx (IP), b) to correlate the location of this point with hallux valgus deformity according to angular measurements and according to visual assessment of the severity carried out by three independent observers, and c) to assess whether this IP correlated with the radius of the first metatarsophalangeal arc circumference. Methods Measurements evaluated were intermetatarsal angle (IMA), hallux valgus angle (HVA), and proximal phalangeal articular angle (PPAA). The Autocad® program computed the location of the IP inside or outside of the foot. Three independent observers rated the severity of hallux valgus in photographs using a 100-mm visual analogue scale (VAS). Results Measurements of all angles except PPAA showed significantly lower values when the IP was located out of the foot more distantly and vice versa, significantly higher values for severe deformities in which the IP was found inside the foot (p < 0.001). The IP correlated significantly with VAS scores and with the length of the radius of the circle that included the first metatarsophalangeal arc circumference (p < 0.001) Conclusion The IP is a useful indicator of hallux valgus deformity because correlated significantly with IMA and HVA measurements, VAS scores obtained by visual inspection of the degree of deformity, and location of the center of the first metatarsophalangeal arc circumference. PMID:19442286

  7. A geometric analysis of hallux valgus: correlation with clinical assessment of severity

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vila Joan

    2009-05-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Application of plane geometry to the study of bunion deformity may represent an interesting and novel approach in the research field of hallux valgus. For the purpose of contributing to development of a different perspective in the assessment of hallux valgus, this study was conducted with three objectives: a to determine the position on the intersection point of the perpendicular bisectors of the longitudinal axes of the first metatarsal and proximal phalanx (IP, b to correlate the location of this point with hallux valgus deformity according to angular measurements and according to visual assessment of the severity carried out by three independent observers, and c to assess whether this IP correlated with the radius of the first metatarsophalangeal arc circumference. Methods Measurements evaluated were intermetatarsal angle (IMA, hallux valgus angle (HVA, and proximal phalangeal articular angle (PPAA. The Autocad® program computed the location of the IP inside or outside of the foot. Three independent observers rated the severity of hallux valgus in photographs using a 100-mm visual analogue scale (VAS. Results Measurements of all angles except PPAA showed significantly lower values when the IP was located out of the foot more distantly and vice versa, significantly higher values for severe deformities in which the IP was found inside the foot (p p Conclusion The IP is a useful indicator of hallux valgus deformity because correlated significantly with IMA and HVA measurements, VAS scores obtained by visual inspection of the degree of deformity, and location of the center of the first metatarsophalangeal arc circumference.

  8. Minimally invasive distal linear metatarsal osteotomy combined with selective release of lateral soft tissue for severe hallux valgus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Seki, Hiroyuki; Suda, Yasunori; Takeshima, Kenichiro; Kokubo, Tetsuro; Ishii, Ken; Nakamura, Masaya; Matsumoto, Morio; Niki, Yasuo

    2018-03-21

    Minimally invasive techniques for hallux valgus have been widely used to treat mild to moderate hallux valgus deformities. The purpose of this study was to evaluate the clinical and radiographic outcomes of distal linear metatarsal osteotomy (DLMO), which is one of the minimally invasive techniques, for severe hallux valgus. 95 patients (141 feet) with severe hallux valgus underwent DLMOs. Lateral soft tissue release (LSTR) was performed at the same time for the cases selected by an original manual test. The satisfaction level, the Japanese Society of Surgery of the Foot (JSSF) hallux scale score, and weight-bearing radiographs of the foot were assessed preoperatively and after more than 24 months. In addition, the clinical and radiographic outcomes were compared among three groups divided by the kind of LSTR: no LSTR; manual correction; and open release through skin incision. Although the first metatarsal bone was significantly shortened, dorsiflexed, and elevated on postoperative radiographs, the rate of satisfaction was 87.2% (123/141), and the mean JSSF hallux scale score improved significantly from 60.4 (44-73) to 90.4 (65-100). The mean hallux valgus and intermetatarsal angles also improved significantly from 45.5° (40.0-60.0°) to 10.3° (-28.0-40.9°) and from 19.9° (14.0-28.7°) to 8.3° (-1.6-18.5°), respectively. Delayed union (18 feet), metatarsalgia (16 feet), recurrence (22 feet), and hallux varus (22 feet) were observed, and they were more obvious in DLMO combined with open release through a skin incision. DLMO combined selectively with LSTR is an effective procedure for correcting severe hallux valgus. However, the indication for open release with DLMO should be considered carefully. Copyright © 2018. Published by Elsevier B.V.

  9. Severe Degeneration of the Medial Collateral Ligament in Hallux Valgus: A Histopathologic Study in 12 Consecutive Patients

    Science.gov (United States)

    Prasitdumrong, Ittipol; Rungprai, Chamnanni; Reeboonlarb, Nitit; Poonpracha, Tara; Phisitkul, Phinit

    2013-01-01

    Objective To determine the degree and location of degenerative changes of the medial collateral ligament of the first metatarsophalangeal joint, using the lateral collateral ligament as a control, in patients undergoing hallux valgus correction. Materials and Methods A strip of medial and lateral collateral ligaments were biopsied from 12 consecutive patients (age 45 ± 4.8 years) with symptomatic hallux valgus. A blinded analysis of histopathology was performed by an experienced pathologist. Results The medial collateral ligament was significantly more degenerated compared to the lateral collateral ligament (x2 = 23.41, DF = 2, p hallux valgus correction. The Authors received no financial support for this study. PMID:24027461

  10. Modified Chevron osteotomy for hallux valgus deformity in female athletes. A 2-year follow-up study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Giotis, Dimitrios; Paschos, Nikolaos K; Zampeli, Franceska; Giannoulis, Dionisios; Gantsos, Apostolos; Mantellos, George

    2016-09-01

    Hallux valgus is an increasingly common deformity in young female athletes that constricts their daily athletic activities and influences foot cosmesis. The aim of this study was to evaluate the outcome of modified Chevron osteotomy for hallux valgus deformity in this specific population. Forty-two cases of modified Chevron osteotomies were carried out in 33 patients with mild to moderate hallux valgus deformity. Each participant was evaluated for AOFAS score, pain, range of motion, cosmetic and radiological outcome. Mean AOFAS score improved to 96.3 (phallux valgus deformity in young female athletes, with excellent clinical outcome. Copyright © 2015 European Foot and Ankle Society. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  11. Hallux Valgus, By Nature or Nurture? A Twin Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Munteanu, Shannon E; Menz, Hylton B; Wark, John D; Christie, Jemma J; Scurrah, Katrina J; Bui, Minh; Erbas, Bircan; Hopper, John L; Wluka, Anita E

    2017-09-01

    To evaluate the contributions of shared but unmeasured genetic and environmental factors to hallux valgus (HV). Between 2011 and 2012, 74 monozygotic (MZ) and 56 dizygotic (DZ) female twin pairs self-reported HV and putative risk factors, including footwear use across their lifespan. Estimates of casewise concordance (P C ), correlation (ρ), and odds ratios (ORs) were calculated, adjusting for age and other risk factors, and compared between MZ and DZ pairs using logistic regression, generalized estimating equations, and a maximum likelihood-based method, respectively. A total of 70 participants (27%) reported HV, with 12 MZ and 7 DZ pairs being concordant. After adjusting for age, twins were correlated (ρ = 0.27 [95% confidence interval (95% CI) 0.08, 0.46]) and concordant (P C  = 0.45 [95% CI 0.29, 0.61]; mean age 58 years), with no difference between MZ and DZ pairs (P = 0.7). HV was associated with regularly wearing footwear with a constrictive toe-box during the fourth decade (adjusted OR 2.73 [95% CI 1.12, 6.67]). This risk factor was correlated in MZ (ρ = 0.38 [95% CI 0.15, 0.60]) but not DZ (ρ = -0.20 [95% CI -0.43, 0.03]) pairs. These correlations were significantly different (P = 0.002). Twins are correlated for HV, but we found no evidence that correlation was due to shared genetic factors. We identified an environmental risk factor, footwear with a constrictive toe-box, that is not shared to the same extent by MZ and DZ pairs, contrary to the assumption of the classic twin model. Footwear, and possibly genetic factors and unknown shared environmental factors, could contribute to developing HV. © 2016, American College of Rheumatology.

  12. No midterm benefit from low intensity pulsed ultrasound after chevron osteotomy for hallux valgus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zacherl, Max; Gruber, Gerald; Radl, Roman; Rehak, Peter H; Windhager, Reinhard

    2009-08-01

    Chevron osteotomy is a widely accepted method for correction of symptomatic hallux valgus deformity. Full weight bearing in regular shoes is not recommended before 6 weeks after surgery. Low intensity pulsed ultrasound is known to stimulate bone formation leading to more stable callus and faster bony fusion. We performed a randomized, placebo-controlled, double-blinded study on 44 participants (52 feet) who underwent chevron osteotomy to evaluate the influence of daily transcutaneous low intensity pulsed ultrasound (LIPUS) treatment at the site of osteotomy. Follow-up at 6 weeks and 1 year included plain dorsoplantar radiographs, hallux-metatarsophalangeal-interphalangeal scale and a questionnaire on patient satisfaction. There was no statistical difference in any pre- or postoperative clinical features, patient satisfaction or radiographic measurements (hallux valgus angle, intermetatarsal angle, sesamoid index and metatarsal index) except for the first distal metatarsal articular angle (DMAA). The DMAA showed statistically significant (p = 0.046) relapse in the placebo group upon comparison of intraoperative radiographs after correction and fixation (5.2 degrees) and at the 6-week follow-up (10.6 degrees). Despite potential impact of LIPUS on bone formation, we found no evidence of an influence on outcome 6 weeks and 1 year after chevron osteotomy for correction of hallux valgus deformity.

  13. Youngswick-Austin versus distal oblique osteotomy for the treatment of Hallux Rigidus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Viladot, Antonio; Sodano, Luca; Marcellini, Lorenzo; Zamperetti, Marco; Hernandez, Elsa Sanchez; Perice, Ramon Viladot

    2017-08-01

    Hallux Rigidus is the most common degenerative joint pathology of the foot. Several procedures are described for the management of this deformity. In this prospective study we compared Youngswick-Austin and distal oblique osteotomy in the treatment of grade II Hallux Rigidus, in terms of clinical outcomes, efficacy and complications. Forty-six patients (50 feet) with moderate Hallux Rigidus (Regnauld grade II) were recruited and operated between March 2009 and December 2012. Surgical technique was Youngswick-Austin osteotomy (Group A) or distal oblique osteotomy (Group B). Mean follow-up was 42.7 ±12.2 (range, 24-70) months. Both groups achieved significant improvement of AOFAS score and first metatarsophalangeal joint range of motion (p value Austin and distal oblique osteotomies provides subjective patient improvement and increases the first metatarsophalangeal joint range of motion. The results of grade II Hallux Rigidus treatment were comparable when using a Youngswick-Austin or distal oblique osteotomy. Level II, prospective comparative study. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  14. Ultrasonic evaluation of the abductor hallucis muscle in hallux valgus: a cross-sectional observational study

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    Stewart Sarah

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The aim of the study was to investigate the abductor hallucis muscle characteristics, defined as dorso-plantar (DP thickness, medio-lateral (ML width, and cross-sectional area (CSA in relation to the severity of hallux valgus using musculoskeletal ultrasound. One hundred and two feet, mean (SD age of 60.3 (20.54 years old, displaying varying severities of hallux valgus were stratified into four groups representing the four grades of the Manchester Scale (grade 0: no deformity, grade 1: mild deformity, grade 2: moderate deformity and grade 3: severe deformity. Methods The abductor hallucis muscle was imaged in each foot using a portable ultrasound system. The mean (SD DP thickness, ML width, and CSA measurements were compared across the four Manchester Scale grades using a one-way ANOVA. Results Significant differences in DP thickness were found between feet with no hallux valgus (grade 0 and feet with hallux valgus grade 2 (p = 0.001 and 3 (p  0.0125. Conclusions We speculate that morphological changes to the abductor hallucis muscle occur early in the development of the deformity.

  15. Improved ankle push-off power following cheilectomy for hallux rigidus: a prospective gait analysis study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smith, Sheryl M; Coleman, Scott C; Bacon, Stacy A; Polo, Fabian E; Brodsky, James W

    2012-06-01

    There is limited objective scientific information on the functional effects of cheilectomy. The purpose of this study was to test the hypothesis that cheilectomy for hallux rigidus improves gait by increasing ankle push-off power. Seventeen patients with symptomatic Stage 1 or Stage 2 hallux rigidus were studied. Pre- and postoperative first metatarsophalangeal (MTP) range of motion and AOFAS hallux scores were recorded. A gait analysis was performed within 4 weeks prior to surgery and repeated at a minimum of 1 year after surgery. Gait analysis was done using a three-dimensional motion capture system and a force platform embedded in a 10-m walkway. Gait velocity sagittal plane ankle range of motion and peak sagittal plane ankle push-off power were analyzed. Following cheilectomy, significant increases were noted for first MTP range of motion and AOFAS hallux score. First MTP motion improved an average of 16.7 degrees, from means of 33.9 degrees preoperatively to 50.6 degrees postoperatively (ppush-off power from 1.71±0.92 W/kg to 2.05±0.75 W/kg (ppush-off power.

  16. Evaluation of Hallux Valgus Correction With Versus Without Akin Proximal Phalanx Osteotomy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shibuya, Naohiro; Thorud, Jakob C; Martin, Lanster R; Plemmons, Britton S; Jupiter, Daniel C

    2016-01-01

    Although the efficacy of Akin proximal phalanx closing wedge osteotomy as a sole procedure for correction of hallux valgus deformity is questionable, when used in combination with other osseous corrective procedures, the procedure has been believed to be efficacious. However, a limited number of comparative studies have confirmed the value of this additional procedure. We identified patients who had undergone osseous hallux valgus correction with first metatarsal osteotomy or first tarsometatarsal joint arthrodesis with (n = 73) and without (n = 81) Akin osteotomy and evaluated their radiographic measurements at 3 points (preoperatively, within 3 months after surgery, and ≥6 months after surgery). We found that those people who had undergone the Akin procedure tended to have a larger hallux abduction angle and a more laterally deviated tibial sesamoid position preoperatively. Although the radiographic correction of the deformity was promising immediately after corrective surgery with the Akin osteotomy, maintenance of the correction was questionable in our cohort. The value of additional Akin osteotomy for correction of hallux valgus deformity is uncertain. Published by Elsevier Inc.

  17. Hallux Valgus and the First Tarsometatarsal Joint: Clinical and Biomechanical Aspects

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    F.W.M. Faber (Frank)

    2003-01-01

    textabstractThis thesis describes a series of cadaver, experimental, radiographic and clinical studies on the relation between a hallux valgus deformity and mobility of the first tarsometatarsal joint. Hypermobility of stiffnes of the joint was determined by Doppler imaging of vibrations and by

  18. Outcomes in chevron osteotomy for Hallux Valgus in a large cohort

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van Groningen, B. (Bart); M.C.M. (Marieke) van der Steen,; M. Reijman (Max); Bos, J. (Janneke); Hendriks, J.G.E. (Johannes G.E.)

    2016-01-01

    textabstractClinical and radiological related outcomes have been reported for Chevron osteotomy as correction for mild to moderate hallux valgus, but only for relatively small patient series. Moreover, evaluation of the patient's point of view has mostly been conducted by means of more

  19. Relationship of Radiographic and Clinical Parameters With Hallux Valgus and Second Ray Pathology.

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    Gribbin, Caitlin K; Ellis, Scott J; Nguyen, Joseph; Williamson, Emilie; Cody, Elizabeth A

    2017-01-01

    Hallux valgus is frequently associated with additional forefoot pathologies, including hammertoes and midfoot osteoarthritis (OA). However, the pathogenesis of these concurrent pathologies remains to be elucidated. We sought to determine whether there is a relationship between demographic and radiographic parameters and the incidence of secondary pathologies in the setting of a bunion, with an emphasis on second tarsometatarsal (TMT) OA and hammertoes. A total of 153 patients (172 feet) who underwent reconstruction for hallux valgus were divided into 3 groups: (1) bunion only (61 patients), (2) bunion with hammertoe without second TMT joint OA (78 patients), and (3) bunion with second TMT joint OA (14 patients). Preoperative age, sex, and body mass index (BMI) as well as hallux valgus angle (HVA), intermetatarsal angle (IMA), metatarsus adductus angle (MAA), ratio of second to first metatarsal length, and Meary's angle were recorded. One-way analysis of variance (normality demonstrated) and Kruskal-Wallis (normality not demonstrated) tests were used to assess differences in continuous variables. Post hoc tests were conducted with the Bonferroni technique. Associations between discrete variables and the study groups were analyzed using χ 2 tests. Following the univariate analysis, multinomial logistic regression models were built to determine potential risk factors for hammertoe or TMT OA group placement. Patients in the hammertoe and TMT OA groups were significantly older than patients in the bunion only group ( P hallux valgus who are at greater risk for developing secondary pathologies. Level III, retrospective comparative series.

  20. The Mechanical Axis of the First Ray: A Radiographic Assessment in Hallux Abducto Valgus Evaluation.

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    LaPorta, Guido A; Nasser, Ellianne M; Mulhern, Jennifer L; Malay, D Scot

    2016-01-01

    The present report describes a new method of hallux abducto valgus deformity correction planning using the mechanical axis of the medial column (mechanical axis planning). This method of radiographic evaluation identifies an ideal position for the first metatarsal after correction and is useful regardless of the surgical procedure chosen. We retrospectively reviewed 200 radiographs to identify a "normal" value for the mechanical axis angle. We reviewed 100 radiographs of patients with hallux abducto valgus deformity (deformity group) and 100 radiographs of patients without hallux abducto valgus deformity (control group). The deformity group revealed an M1-M2 anatomic axis angle of 13.5° ± 2.83° and an M1-M2 mechanical axis angle of 11.58° ± 1°. The control group revealed an M1-M2 anatomic axis angle of 7.5° ± 1.76° and an M1-M2 mechanical axis angle of 11.19° ± 0.9°. The differences in the M1-M2 anatomic axis angle and M1-M2 mechanical axis angle were statistically significant between the control and deformity groups. We sought to provide a reliable method for planning hallux abducto valgus deformity correction by aligning the mechanical axis of the medial column and the mechanical axis of the first ray to the "normal" value of 11° to reduce the deformity. Copyright © 2016 American College of Foot and Ankle Surgeons. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  1. Quality of Life in Patients With Untreated and Symptomatic Hallux Valgus.

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    Yamamoto, Yohei; Yamaguchi, Satoshi; Muramatsu, Yuta; Terakado, Atsushi; Sasho, Takahisa; Akagi, Ryuichiro; Endo, Jun; Sato, Yasunori; Takahashi, Kazuhisa

    2016-11-01

    The purposes of this study were to compare the quality of life (QOL) of subjects who had untreated symptomatic hallux valgus with the QOL of the general population and to investigate factors associated with the QOL of the subjects. One hundred sixteen subjects with previously untreated and symptomatic hallux valgus were surveyed. QOL was assessed using the 36-item Short Form Health Survey (SF-36). Additionally, clinical evaluations (the visual analog scale for pain, Japanese Society for Surgery of the Foot Scale, lesser toe pain, and pain in other parts of the body) and radiographic evaluations (hallux valgus angle, intermetatarsal angle between the first and second metatarsals, and dislocation of the second metatarsophalangeal joint) were performed. Differences in the SF-36 between the subjects and the general population were tested using independent t tests. Correlations between the QOL measurements, clinical evaluations, and radiographic evaluations were assessed using Spearman rank correlation coefficient. All SF-36 subscales and physical component summary scores for the subjects were significantly lower than those of the general population. Notably, the standardized physical function subscale (38.2 ± 15.8, P hallux valgus subjects was lower than that of the general population. All QOL and clinical evaluation parameters were not significantly or negligibly correlated with the severity of toe deformities. Surgical decision making should not be based on the severity of the deformity alone, but rather patient QOL should also be carefully assessed. Level III, comparative series. © The Author(s) 2016.

  2. Triple osteotomy for the correction of severe hallux valgus deformity: Patient reported outcomes and radiological evaluation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Booth, Sean; Bhosale, Abhijit; Mustafa, Abubakar; Shenoy, Ravi; Pillai, Anand

    2016-08-01

    Symptomatic Hallux valgus can be treated with metatarsal osteotomy combined with proximal phalangeal osteotomy, however this might not be sufficient to treat severe HV deformities. Fifteen feet in eleven female patients treated with double first metatarsal and proximal phalanx osteotomies without lateral release were prospectively studied and outcome measures including radiological angles and validated patient reported outcome scores collected. Mean radiological follow up was 15 months and PROMs data 17 months. Mean hallux valgus and intermetatarsal angles were corrected from 45 to 24.7° and 18.7 to 7.4° respectively. There was an eight degree recurrence of hallux valgus angle. There was no wound problems, non-unions or evidence of avascular necrosis. The EQ-5D descriptive index showed a non-statistically significant improvement. All three elements of the MOxFQ score showed a statistically significant improvement: Forefoot pain (59-26.8), Walking and Stability (49.9-29.6) and Social Interaction (56.4-33.1) CONCLUSION: Triple osteotomy, without a lateral soft tissue release, leads to good radiological and functional outcomes in those with severe hallux valgus deformity. Patients need to be warned of the recovery time and potential for future metalwork removal. The risk of early recurrence suggests that a lateral release should be included in order to maintain a long lasting correction. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  3. Perioperative analgesia with a buprenorphine transdermal patch for hallux valgus surgery: a prospective, randomized, controlled study

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    Xu C

    2018-04-01

    Full Text Available Can Xu, Mingqing Li, Chenggong Wang, Hui Li, Hua Liu Department of Orthopaedics, Xiangya Hospital, Central South University, Changsha, Hunan Province, People’s Republic of China Purpose: Hallux valgus surgery often results in significant postoperative pain. Adequate control of pain is essential for patient satisfaction and improves the outcome of the procedure. This study aimed to investigate the perioperative analgesic effect of a buprenorphine transdermal patch in patients who underwent hallux valgus surgery.Patients and methods: A total of 90 patients were randomly divided into the following three groups based on the perioperative analgesic method: flurbiprofen axetil intravenous injection (Group F, oral celecoxib (Group C, and buprenorphine transdermal delivery system (BTDS (Group BTDS. The pain status, degree of satisfaction, adverse effects, and administration of tramadol hydrochloride for uncontrolled pain were recorded on the night before surgery, postoperative day 1, postoperative day 2, and postoperative day 3.Results: The BTDS could effectively control perioperative pain for patients undergoing ­hallux valgus surgery. The analgesic effect of the BTDS was better than that of oral celecoxib. In addition, statistically significant differences were not observed in the visual analog scale (VAS scores, adverse effects, and rescue analgesia between the patients who received the BTDS and the patients who received the flurbiprofen axetil intravenous injection. However, the degree of patient satisfaction of the BTDS group was significantly higher (P<0.05 than that of the other two groups.Conclusion: The BTDS (a preemptive analgesia regimen could exert an analgesic effect during the perioperative period for patients who had received hallux valgus surgery, and this effect is beneficial for sustaining postoperative physiological and psychological states and promoting functional rehabilitation. Keywords: hallux valgus, buprenorphine transdermal

  4. Radiographic angles in hallux valgus: differences between measurements made manually and with a computerized program.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Piqué-Vidal, Carlos; Maled-García, Ignaci; Arabi-Moreno, Juanjo; Vila, Joan

    2006-03-01

    The objective of this study was to compare angular measurements in the evaluation of hallux valgus deformities using a goniometer and a computerized program to assess degree of concordance between the two methods and determine the reliability of manual measurements. Angles measured included the hallux valgus angle (HVA), the intermetatarsal angle (IMA), the distal metatarsal articular angle (DMAA), and the proximal phalangeal articular angle (PPAA), also called the hallux valgus interphalangeus angle or interphalangeal angle. Measurements were made on preoperative weightbearing radiographs in 176 patients with symptomatic hallux valgus. Manual measurements were made with a goniometer by an orthopaedic surgeon. An independent experienced technician used digitized images to perform angular measurements with the Autocad software program (Autodesk Inc., San Rafael, CA). HVA values obtained with the two techniques were similar. However, significantly higher mean values were obtained with the Autocad for the IMA and PPAA measurements, and higher mean values were obtained for the DMAA measurement with the manual technique. Whereas differences were more or less randomly distributed for the HVA, in the remaining patients, measurements were clearly related to the measurement technique, i.e., for the DMAA, the manual technique had a tendency to show higher values, and for the IMA and PPAA the manual technique showed lower values than the computer. Correlations between both techniques for the different angular measurements were as follows: HVA, -0.179 (p = 0.018); DMMA, -0.294 (p Autocad angular measurements was excellent for the HVA (ICC = 0.89) and DMAA (ICC = 0.80) and very poor for the PPAA (ICC = 0.11) and IMA (ICC = 0.42). Angular measurements made on weightbearing radiographs with the Autocad in patients with hallux valgus deformities were more reliable than those made with a goniometer. Although for large angles, such as HVA and DMAA, results obtained with both

  5. Minimally invasive distal first metatarsal osteotomy can be an option for recurrent hallux valgus.

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    Magnan, Bruno; Negri, Stefano; Maluta, Tommaso; Dall'Oca, Carlo; Samaila, Elena

    2018-01-12

    Recurrence rate of surgical treatment of hallux valgus ranges in the literature from 2.7% to 16%, regardless of used procedure. In this study, long-term results of a minimally invasive distal osteotomy of the first metatarsal bone for treatment of recurrent hallux valgus are described. 32 consecutive percutaneous distal osteotomies of the first metatarsal were performed in 26 patients for treatment of recurrent hallux valgus. Primary surgery had been soft tissue procedures in 8 cases (25%), first metatarsal or phalangeal osteotomies in 19 cases (59.4%) and Keller procedures in 5 cases (15.6%). Patients were assessed with a mean follow-up of 9.8±4.3 years. All patients reported the disappearance or reduction of the pain. The mean overall AOFAS score improved from 46.9±17.8 points to 85.2±14.9 at final follow-up. The mean hallux valgus angle decreased from 26.1±9.1 to 9.7±5.4°, the intermetatarsal angle decreased from 11.5±4.5 to 6.7±4.0°. No major complications were recorded with a re-recurrence rate of 3.1% (1 case). Percutaneous distal osteotomy of the first metatarsal can be a reliable and safe surgical option in the recurrent hallux valgus with low complication rate and the advantages of a minimally invasive surgery. IV, Retrospective Case Series. Copyright © 2018 European Foot and Ankle Society. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  6. Primary Arthrodesis in the Treatment of High Grade Hallux Rigidus with Single Cortical Screw

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    Umut Yavuz

    2014-09-01

    Full Text Available Aim: The aim of this study was to evaluate the clinical and radiological results in patients with severe hallux rigidus who underwent arthrodesis using single cortical screw. Methods: We retrospectively evaluated 18 patients (16 females, 2 males who underwent arthrodesis for severe hallux rigidus using single cortical screw. The mean age of the patients was 58.1 (range: 44-69 years. According to the Coughlin and Shurnas classification, 5 feet were rated as stage 3 and 13 feet were stage 4. 3 of the stage 3 patients had cheilectomy previously. The American Orthopaedic Foot and Ankle Society (AOFAS clinical rating scale for the metatarsophalangeal - interphalangeal joints was used for clinical evaluation. Hallux valgus angles and hallux dorsiflexion angles were measured on X-rays. Results: The mean follow-up period was 32.4 (range: 15-69 months. Radiological signs of non-union was found in one patient. The mean preoperative AOFAS score was 56.1 (range: 38-72. The mean final follow-up AOFAS score was found to be 81.1. Moderate results in 2 patients (11.1%, good results in 11 patients (61.1% and excellent results in 5 patients (27.8% were obtained. When the last X-rays were evaluated, 15.1° (7-24 valgus at the metatarsophalangeal joint and 11.9° (8-18 extension (to the floor at the metatarsophalangeal joint were detected. Late surgical wound healing was observed in one patient. The screws were removed due to irritation in 8 (44% patients. Conclusion: We assume that in the treatment of severe hallux rigidus, arthrodesis using a single cortical screw may be considered as a favorable surgical technique with its high union rates and increased functional results. (The Me­di­cal Bul­le­tin of Ha­se­ki 2014; 52:158-63

  7. Z-osteotomy in hallux valgus: clinical and radiological outcome after Scarf osteotomy

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    Marcus Jaeger

    2009-05-01

    Full Text Available Correction osteotomies of the first metatarsal are common surgical approaches in treating hallux valgus deformities whereas the Scarf osteotomy has gained popularity. The purpose of this study was to analyze short- and mid-term results in hallux valgus patients who underwent a Scarf osteotomy. The subjective and radiological outcome of 131 Scarf osteotomies (106 hallux valgus patients, mean age: 57.5 years, range: 22-90 years were retrospectively analyzed. Mean follow-up was 22.4 months (range: 6 months-5 years. Surgical indications were: intermetatarsal angle (IMA of 12-23°; increased proximal articular angle (PAA>8°, and range of motion of the metatarsophalangeal joint in flexion and extension >40°. Exclusion criteria were severe osteoporosis and/or osteoarthritis. The mean subjective range of motion (ROM of the great toe post-surgery was 0.8±1.73 points (0: full ROM, 10: total stiffness. The mean subjective cosmetic result was 2.7±2.7 points (0: excellent, 10: poor. The overall post-operative patient satisfaction with the result was high (2.1±2.5 points (0: excellent, 10: poor. The mean hallux valgus angle improvement was 16.6° (pre-operative mean value: 37.5° which was statistically significant (p<0.01. The IMA improved by an average of 5.96° from a pre-operative mean value of 15.4° (p<0.01. Neither osteonecrosis of the distal fragment nor peri-operative fractures were noted during the follow-up. In keeping with our follow-up results, the Scarf osteotomy approach shows potential in the therapy of hallux valgus. 筻

  8. The early functional outcome of Mau osteotomy for the correction of moderate-severe hallux valgus

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    Tanujan Thangarajah

    2013-11-01

    Full Text Available Hallux valgus is one of the commonest conditions of the foot and has been reported to affect nearly half of the adult population. It is most effectively treated by a corrective osteotomy of which there a numerous subtypes. The Mau osteotomy confers the greatest structural stability but is not thought to provide adequate correction of moderate-severe deformities. Accordingly, complications such as under correction and non-union are common. The aim of this study was to determine the functional outcome in patients with moderate-severe hallux valgus following a Mau osteotomy. A retrospective review of 23 patients with moderate-severe hallux valgus treated by Mau osteotomy was conducted. Patients were assessed clinically by the American Orthopedic Foot and Ankle Society (AOFAS scoring system and radiologically by measuring the first intermetatarsal (IM and hallux abductovalgus angles (HAV. The mean AOFAS score had improved from 47 preoperatively to 92 postoperatively (P<0.01. Additionally, preoperative HAV and IM angles improved from 39° and 15° respectively to 15° and 9° respectively (P<0.01. There were no cases of undercorrection or non-union. In this series, the Mau osteotomy was able to achieve good correction of the IM and HAV angles in patients with moderate-severe hallux valgus. This was reflected in a significantly higher postoperative AOFAS score. Contrary to other studies there were no cases of undercorrection and despite allowing patients to fully weight-bear postoperatively there were no cases of non-union.

  9. Surgical treatment of hallux valgus associated with flexible flatfoot during growing age.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Faldini, Cesare; Nanni, Matteo; Traina, Francesco; Fabbri, Daniele; Borghi, Raffaele; Giannini, Sandro

    2016-04-01

    During growth, hallux valgus could present associated with flatfoot. Considering the current disagreement about correction of hallux valgus during growth and the lack of reports about simultaneous correction of hallux valgus associated with flexible flatfoot, we present simultaneous treatment of both deformities during growth combining subtalar arthroeresis and SERI first metatarsal osteotomy, reporting results at an average five-year follow-up. Thirty-two children (64 feet, age range 8-12 years) affected by hallux valgus associated with flexible flatfoot underwent surgical treatment combining SERI first metatarsal osteotomy and subtalar arthroereisis with bioabsorbable endorthotic implant. Clinical evaluation was summarized with AOFAS score, and standard standing radiographs were performed. AOFAS score ranged from 86 ± 2 to 98 ± 2 (hindfoot) and from 80 ± 4 to 98 ± 2 (forefoot). HVA ranged from 21° ± 2 to 5° ± 2, IMA from 14° ± 2 to 7° ± 2, DMAA from 18° ± 2 to 2° ± 2, and Meary's angle from 162° ± 11 to 175° ± 4. Complications included one case of delayed wound healing, inflammatory skin reaction around the outlet of the percutaneous Kirschner wire in two cases, displacement of the endorthotic implant in one case, and a second surgery to replace the implant. SERI osteotomy and subtalar arthroereisis resulted in an effective, technically simple and easily combined approach, with a high rate of good results and low rate of complications at mid-term follow-up. These techniques performed simultaneously represent a viable option in case of hallux valgus associated with flexible flatfoot during growth. Nevertheless, considering the limitations of this study, we believe that a larger case series and a longer follow-up should be desirable.

  10. The Effect of Incorrect Foot Placement on the Accuracy of Radiographic Measurements of the Hallux Valgus and Inter-Metatarsal Angles for Treating Hallux Valgus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kuyucu, E; Ceylan, H H; Surucu, S; Erdil, I; Kara, A; Gulenc, B G; Bulbul, M; Erdil, M

    2017-01-01

    PURPOSE OF THE STUDY Accurate radiographic measurements are crucial in treating hallux valgus (HV). This three-dimensional deformity should not be evaluated from one joint on one plane. However, in practice, surgeons measure the deformity only on transverse dorsoplantar radiographs. We determined the amount of error associated with positioning the foot incorrectly on radiographs. MATERIAL AND METHODS To simulate incorrect positions of the foot in radiographic evaluation, we designed an angled device that can move in transverse and frontal plane. In four patients with symptomatic HV, we took weight-bearing radiographs of the involved foot in seven different positions. These 28 radiographs were given identifying but meaningless labels. On each radiograph, six surgeons blinded to the position of the radiograph measured the HV angle (HVA) and the inter-metatarsal angle (IMA) and state the treatment plan according to five treatment options were given to participants. RESULTS Inter-observer agreement was high for measurements of HVA and IMA in all positions (interclass correlation coefficients, 0.96 and 0.88, respectively). However, intra-observer agreement was poor for HVA (intra-observer agreement, 0.17) but good for IMA (intra-observer agreement, 0.64). According to the measurements in different positions, intra-observer treatment choices revealed moderate results (ICC: 0.524). Clinical Relevance Radiographic measurements are very important on the treatment decisions of hallux valgus. The foot position can influence the measurement accuracy and can cause incorrect decisions. In this study, we evaluated the impact of foot positions on measurements of hallux valgus angle and inter-metatarsal angle. Additionally, we evaluated the incorrect foot positioning on treatment decisions. Moreover, we analyzed intra-observer and inter-observer agreements of these angles in various positions. CONCLUSIONS We recommend that measurements of IMA are more reliable than those of HVA for

  11. Comparison of 2D-3D Measurements of Hallux and First Ray Sagittal Motion in Patients With and Without Hallux Valgus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Swanson, Jessica E; Stoltman, Matthew G; Oyen, Cheyenne R; Mohrbacher, Jessica A; Orandi, Atefeh; Olson, Jeff M; Glasoe, Ward M

    2016-02-01

    Clinicians base treatment decisions on measures of hallux and first ray motion in the management of first metatarsophalangeal joint disorders. Women account for a majority of the patients. This study assessed the reliability of a 2D approach for the measurements of sagittal motion, and compared the result to a Cardan (3D) angle criterion standard and evaluated how hallux valgus (bunion) deformity affected the comparisons. Twenty-nine women (controls n = 10; bunion n = 19) were examined using a retrospective repeated measures design. Weightbearing magnetic resonance (MR) images were acquired to replicate the position of the foot during the stance phase of gait. The images were reconstructed into virtual bone models using computer processes, whereby measures of hallux and first ray motion were represented by 2D and 3D methods of measurement. An examiner measured 2D motion on the image data sets using a goniometer, and reliability was assessed. The 3D Cardan angle result was derived from a matrix calculation. The 2D-3D comparison of measurements was evaluated with an analysis of variance (ANOVA) model across gait conditions, run separate for groups. The 2D measurement was reliable (ICC ≥ 0.98, SEM ≤ 0.89 degrees). There was no method-by-condition interaction (F ≤ 1.37, P ≥ .25) between variables. No significant difference was detected between the 2D-3D measurements in the control group (F ≤ 1.24, P ≥ .30), but the measurements were statistically different (F ≥ 4.46, P ≤ .049) in the bunion group. This study described a reliable 2D approach for measuring hallux and first ray sagittal motion from weightbearing images. The 2D measurements were comparable to a Cardan angle component motion result in controls, but not in women with bunion. Joint motion measurements may augment clinical decision making. These results suggest that a 2D image-based approach may be adequate to estimate hallux and first ray sagittal motion, although bunion deformity creates out

  12. Relationship of frontal plane rotation of first metatarsal to proximal articular set angle and hallux alignment in patients undergoing tarsometatarsal arthrodesis for hallux abducto valgus: a case series and critical review of the literature.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dayton, Paul; Feilmeier, Mindi; Kauwe, Merrell; Hirschi, Jordan

    2013-01-01

    Rotation of the first metatarsal, as a component of hallux abducto valgus, is rarely discussed and is not addressed as a component of most hallux valgus corrective procedures. We believe frontal plane rotation of the first metatarsal to be an integral component of hallux abducto valgus deformity (the "third plane of deformity") and believe de-rotation is necessary for complete deformity correction. We observed the change in angular measurements commonly used in the evaluation of hallux valgus deformity in patients who underwent a modified lapidus procedure. We measured the intermetatarsal angle, hallux abductus angle, proximal articular set angle, and tibial sesamoid position on weightbearing radiographs of 25 feet in 24 patients who had undergone tarsal metatarsal corrective arthrodesis and lateral capsular release. Specific attention was given to reduction of the frontal plane rotation of the first metatarsal during correction. Our results showed a change in the angular measurements observed by 4 investigators as follows. The mean change in the intermetatarsal angle was 10.1° (p hallux abductus angle was 17.8° (p valgus, or everted position of the first metatarsal, was noted as a component of the hallux abducto valgus deformity in our patient population and was corrected by varus rotation or inversion of the metatarsal. We also reviewed the current literature related to anatomic changes in the first ray in the patient with hallux valgus deformity and reviewed our hypothesis regarding the reduction in the proximal articular set angle, which we believe to be related to frontal plane rotation of the first metatarsal, resulting in a radiographic artifact. Copyright © 2013. Published by Elsevier Inc.

  13. Technique tip: Simultaneous first metatarsal lengthening and metatarsophalangeal joint fusion for failed hallux valgus surgery with transfer metatarsalgia.

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    Chowdhary, Ashwin; Drittenbass, Lisca; Stern, Richard; Assal, Mathieu

    2017-03-01

    Failed hallux valgus surgery may result in residual or recurrent hallux valgus, and as well transfer metatarsalgia. The present technical tip concerns the combination of fusion of the first metatarsophalangeal (MTP) joint and lengthening of the first metatarsal (MT) through a scarf osteotomy. Six patients underwent the presented technique, all for the indication of failed hallux valgus surgery with shortening of the first MT and degenerative changes in the 1st MTP joint. Follow-up at six months revealed all patients had complete healing of the osteotomy and arthrodesis sites. They were all asymptomatic and fully active, completely satisfied with the outcome. Combined fusion of the first MTP joint and lengthening of the first MT through a scarf osteotomy results in an excellent outcome in patients with failed hallux valgus surgery with shortening of the first MT and degenerative changes in the 1st MTP joint. Copyright © 2016 European Foot and Ankle Society. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  14. Association Between Patient Factors and Outcome of Synthetic Cartilage Implant Hemiarthroplasty vs First Metatarsophalangeal Joint Arthrodesis in Advanced Hallux Rigidus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goldberg, Andy; Singh, Dishan; Glazebrook, Mark; Blundell, Chris M; De Vries, Gwyneth; Le, Ian L D; Nielsen, Dominic; Pedersen, M Elizabeth; Sakellariou, Anthony; Solan, Matthew; Younger, Alastair S E; Daniels, Timothy R; Baumhauer, Judith F

    2017-11-01

    We evaluated data from a clinical trial of first metatarsophalangeal joint (MTPJ1) implant hemiarthroplasty and arthrodesis to determine the association between patient factors and clinical outcomes. Patients ≥18 years with hallux rigidus grade 2, 3, or 4 were treated with synthetic cartilage implant MTPJ1 hemiarthroplasty or arthrodesis. Pain visual analog scale (VAS), Foot and Ankle Ability Measure (FAAM) sports and activities of daily living (ADL) scores, and Short Form-36 Physical Function (SF-36 PF) subscore were obtained preoperatively, and at 2, 6, 12, 24, 52, and 104 weeks postoperatively. Final outcome data, great toe active dorsiflexion motion, secondary procedures, radiographs, and safety parameters were evaluated for 129 implant hemiarthroplasties and 47 arthrodeses. The composite primary endpoint criteria for clinical success included VAS pain reduction ≥30%, maintenance/improvement in function, no radiographic complications, and no secondary surgical intervention at 24 months. Predictor variables included hallux rigidus grade; gender; age; body mass index (BMI); symptom duration; prior MTPJ1 surgery; preoperative hallux valgus angle, range of motion (ROM), and pain. Two-sided Fisher exact test was used ( P .05) when stratified by hallux rigidus grade, gender, age, BMI, symptom duration, prior MTPJ1 surgery status, and preoperative VAS pain, hallux valgus, and ROM. Synthetic cartilage implant hemiarthroplasty was appropriate for patients with grade 2, 3, or 4 hallux rigidus. Its results in those with associated mild hallux valgus (≤20 degrees) or substantial preoperative stiffness were equivalent to MTPJ1 fusion, irrespective of gender, age, BMI, hallux rigidus grade, preoperative pain or symptom duration. Level II, randomized clinical trial.

  15. Short-Term Effects of Kinesiotaping on Pain and Joint Alignment in Conservative Treatment of Hallux Valgus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Karabicak, Gul Oznur; Bek, Nilgun; Tiftikci, Ugur

    2015-10-01

    The main aim of this study was to measure short-term effects of kinesiotaping on pain and joint alignment in the conservative treatment of hallux valgus. Twenty-one female patients diagnosed with a total of 34 feet with hallux valgus (13 bilateral, 6 right, and 2 left) participated in this study. Kinesiotaping was implemented after the first assessment and renewed in days 3, 7, and 10. The main outcome measures were pain, as assessed using visual analog scale, and hallux adduction angle, as measured by goniometry. Secondary outcome measure was patients' functional status, as measured by Foot Function Index and the hallux valgus scale of the American Orthopaedic Foot and Ankle Society (AOFAS). The radiographic results were also measured before and after 1 month of treatment. The Wilcoxon test was used to compare the differences between initial and final scores of AOFAS, as well as FFI scales and hallux valgus angle assessment scores. There was a significant reduction in goniometric measurement of hallux valgus angle (P = .001). There was a significant reduction in pain intensity (P = .001) and AOFAS and Foot Function Index scores at the end of the treatment (P = .001 and P = .001, respectively). There was a significant difference between radiographic results in 1-month control (P = .009). For this group of female patients, pain and joint alignment were improved after a 10-day kinesiotape implementation in patients with hallux valgus. The findings showed short-term decreased pain and disability in hallux valgus deformity. Copyright © 2015 National University of Health Sciences. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  16. Radiographic Measurements Associated With the Natural Progression of the Hallux Valgus During at Least 2 Years of Follow-up.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Seung Yeol; Chung, Chin Youb; Park, Moon Seok; Sung, Ki Hyuk; Ahmed, Sonya; Koo, Seungbum; Kang, Dong-Wan; Lee, Kyoung Min

    2018-04-01

    This study aimed to investigate the radiographic measurements associated with the progression of hallux valgus during at least 2 years of follow-up. Seventy adult patients with hallux valgus who were followed for at least 2 years and underwent weightbearing foot radiography were included. Radiographic measurements included the hallux valgus angle (HVA), hallux interphalangeal angle, intermetatarsal angle (IMA), metatarsus adductus angle, distal metatarsal articular angle (DMAA), tibial sesamoid position, anteroposterior (AP) talo-first metatarsal angle, and lateral talo-first metatarsal angle. Patients were divided into progressive and nonprogressive groups. Binary logistic regression analysis was performed to identify factors that significantly affected the progression of hallux valgus deformity. The correlation between change in HVA and changes in other radiographic indices during follow-up was analyzed. The DMAA ( P = .027) and AP talo-first metatarsal angle ( P = .034) at initial presentation were found to be significant factors affecting the progression of hallux valgus deformity. Change in the HVA during follow-up was significantly correlated with changes in the IMA ( r = 0.423; P = .001) and DMAA ( r = 0.541; P < .001). The change in the HVA was found to be significantly correlated with changes in the IMA and DMAA. A future study is required to elucidate whether this correlation can be explained by the progressive instability of the first tarsometatarsal joint. We believe special attention needs to be paid to patients with pes planus and increased DMAA. Level III, comparative study.

  17. [Double Osteotomy of the First Metatarsal for Treatment of Juvenile Hallux Valgus Deformity - Our Experience].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jochymek, J; Peterková, T

    2016-01-01

    The aim of the study was to evaluate the mid-term results in a group of selected patients undergoing corrective surgery for juvenile hallux valgus, using double osteotomy of the first metatarsal. The group included eight patients, seven girls and one boy, with a more severe form of this deformity treated by double osteotomy of the first metatarsal between 2010 and 2013. The indication for corrective surgery was serious pain when walking; all patients had previously undergone conservative treatment with no effect. All patients had pre-operative clinical examination, the affected foot was X-rayed with the patient standing and radiographic assessments of the intermetatarsal and hallux valgus angles were made. The evaluation of treatment outcomes was based on the scoring system of the American Orthopaedic Foot and Ankle Society (AOFAS) and X-ray images of the foot. The average follow-up was 37 months. Post-operatively, none of the patients reported pain while walking, only two of them experienced pain during sports activities. The average post-operative AOFAS score was 92 points. Both the intermetatarsal angle and the hallux valgus angle improved after surgery in all patients, with two reporting only mild hallux valgus deformity. One patient showed postoperative restriction of motion at the first metatarsophalangeal joint. This was the only complication recorded in association with the surgery. Almost all authors dealing with the treatment of hallux valgus deformity primarily prefer conservative therapy. However, this treatment is usually not very effective in severe forms of the disorder. Surgical management is indicated in symptomatic patients or in those with severe juvenile hallux valgus deformity. In paediatric patients it is necessary to respect the presence of an epiphyseal growth plate in the first proximal metatarsal and therefore it is often preferred to use distal first metatarsal osteotomy. At our department, Mitchell's osteotomy for hallux valgus deformity

  18. Surgery of the hallux valgus in an ambulatory setting: a liability risk?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Galois, L; Serwier, J-M; Arashvand, A D

    2017-05-01

    The primary objective of the study is to make an inventory of malpractice in hallux valgus surgery in an ambulatory setting and to identify the patient characteristics for a higher risk of malpractice. The secondary objective is creating a methodology for analyzing the medicolegal aspects of a surgery in day case comparing with hospitalization. The database of the Branchet insurance company was used. A total of 11,000 claims for a period of 11 years (2002-2013) have been investigated. The files of the patients with hallux valgus surgery were isolated from the insurer's database using CCAM codes. The medical director, a medical officer, the legal expert and finally the judge had already analyzed all these cases. The authors reviewed the various documents with a specific questionnaire. We identified 14 cases of claims in relation with hallux valgus 1-day surgery among a total of 138 claims for hallux valgus including all techniques (10%). All patients were female. The mean age was 42.6 years (19-64) in ambulatory patients (AG group) in comparison with 49.5 years (19-73) in hospitalized patients (HG group). Percutaneous techniques were significantly more represented in the AG group (p = 0.002) and scarfs osteotomies in the HG group (p = 0.004). The use of tourniquet seemed to be lower in the AG group, but it was a not significant trend (p = 0.085). In term of anesthesia procedures, no significant differences were seen between the two groups. The comparison of the complications common to both groups showed no significant difference except for insufficient results which were more frequent in the AG group (p = 0.026). The rate of insufficient informed consent seemed to be higher in the AG group, but it was a not significant trend (p = 0.084). No specific data regarding claims in relation with hallux valgus 1-day surgery are available to our knowledge in the literature. We did not identify in our study specific complications related to ambulatory procedures

  19. Outcomes in chevron osteotomy for Hallux Valgus in a large cohort.

    Science.gov (United States)

    van Groningen, Bart; van der Steen, M C Marieke; Reijman, Max; Bos, Janneke; Hendriks, Johannes G E

    2016-12-01

    Clinical and radiological related outcomes have been reported for Chevron osteotomy as correction for mild to moderate hallux valgus, but only for relatively small patient series. Moreover, evaluation of the patient's point of view has mostly been conducted by means of more physician-based outcome measures. The goal of this study was to evaluate the effect of the Chevron osteotomy for hallux valgus on patients' daily lives using the Foot and Ankle Outcome Score (FAOS) as a validated and a hallux valgus specific patient reported outcome measure (PROM). Secondary outcome measures were radiological correction, complication rate, and re-operations. All 438 Chevron procedures (336 patients), at two surgical hospital sites in the period between January 2010 and October 2014, were retrospectively evaluated with a follow-up of at least 6 months. Patients were invited to fill in a cross-sectional online FAOS. For the FAOS, a total response of 60% was achieved. The FAOS ranged between 71 and 88 with a follow-up of on average 36 months. Patients with an undercorrection of their hallux valgus (11.6% of the procedures) scored significantly lower on three subscales of the FAOS (range between 61 and 77 versus 72-84). Patients who had a reoperation (12.6% of the procedures) also scored significantly lower on four subscales: 58-100 versus 73-89. Postoperative radiological measurements improved significantly with a mean difference of 6.1 (5.9; 6.4) degrees for the intermetatarsal angle and 13.7 (13.0; 14.5) degrees for the hallux valgus angle. In this large study cohort, Chevron osteotomy for hallux valgus offers good PROM scores on FAOS. These scores were significantly lower in patients with radiological undercorrection or with a reoperation. Results of the FAOS appear to modulate with physician based outcomes and therapeutic incidents. Improvement of outcome may therefore well be possible by increased attention on these surgical details. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights

  20. Increased hallux angle in children and its association with insufficient length of footwear: A community based cross-sectional study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kundi Michael

    2009-12-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Wearing shoes of insufficient length during childhood has often been cited as leading to deformities of the foot, particularly to the development of hallux valgus disorders. Until now, these assumptions have not been confirmed through scientific research. This study aims to investigate whether this association can be statistically proven, and if children who wear shoes of insufficient length actually do have a higher risk of a more pronounced lateral deviation of the hallux. Methods 858 pre-school children were included in the study. The study sample was stratified by sex, urban/rural areas and Austrian province. The hallux angle and the length of the feet were recorded. The inside length of the children's footwear (indoor shoes worn in pre-school and outdoor shoes were assessed. Personal data and different anthropometric measurements were taken. The risk of hallux valgus deviation was statistically tested by a stepwise logistic regression analysis and the relative risk (odds ratio for a hallux angle ≥ 4 degrees was calculated. Results Exact examinations of the hallux angle could be conducted on a total of 1,579 individual feet. Only 23.9% out of 1,579 feet presented a straight position of the great toe. The others were characterized by lateral deviations (valgus position at different degrees, equalling 10 degrees or greater in 14.2% of the children's feet. 88.8% of 808 children examined wore indoor footwear that was of insufficient length, and 69.4% of 812 children wore outdoor shoes that were too short. A significant relationship was observed between the lengthwise fit of the shoes and the hallux angle: the shorter the shoe, the higher the value of the hallux angle. The relative risk (odds ratio of a lateral hallux deviation of ≥ 4 degrees in children wearing shoes of insufficient length was significantly increased. Conclusions There is a significant relationship between the hallux angle in children and footwear that is

  1. Increased hallux angle in children and its association with insufficient length of footwear: A community based cross-sectional study

    Science.gov (United States)

    2009-01-01

    Background Wearing shoes of insufficient length during childhood has often been cited as leading to deformities of the foot, particularly to the development of hallux valgus disorders. Until now, these assumptions have not been confirmed through scientific research. This study aims to investigate whether this association can be statistically proven, and if children who wear shoes of insufficient length actually do have a higher risk of a more pronounced lateral deviation of the hallux. Methods 858 pre-school children were included in the study. The study sample was stratified by sex, urban/rural areas and Austrian province. The hallux angle and the length of the feet were recorded. The inside length of the children's footwear (indoor shoes worn in pre-school and outdoor shoes) were assessed. Personal data and different anthropometric measurements were taken. The risk of hallux valgus deviation was statistically tested by a stepwise logistic regression analysis and the relative risk (odds ratio) for a hallux angle ≥ 4 degrees was calculated. Results Exact examinations of the hallux angle could be conducted on a total of 1,579 individual feet. Only 23.9% out of 1,579 feet presented a straight position of the great toe. The others were characterized by lateral deviations (valgus position) at different degrees, equalling 10 degrees or greater in 14.2% of the children's feet. 88.8% of 808 children examined wore indoor footwear that was of insufficient length, and 69.4% of 812 children wore outdoor shoes that were too short. A significant relationship was observed between the lengthwise fit of the shoes and the hallux angle: the shorter the shoe, the higher the value of the hallux angle. The relative risk (odds ratio) of a lateral hallux deviation of ≥ 4 degrees in children wearing shoes of insufficient length was significantly increased. Conclusions There is a significant relationship between the hallux angle in children and footwear that is too short in length. The

  2. Operative treatment of hallux valgus – the effect of three osteotomy types on the first metatarsal, hallux valgus and metatarsal distal articulation angles

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Andrej Prlja

    2007-11-01

    Full Text Available Background: Modern approach to hallux valgus deformations enables not only the stage treatment considering the magnitude of the deformity but also the objective evaluation of the results.We investigated the influence of the three most commonly used osteotomies on three most common demonstrative factors, especially proximal osteotomy on the distal metatasal articulation angle.Methods: Three groups were created regarding the magnitude of the deformation. X rays of 15 corrections in each group were reviewed (45 cases, 34 women, 2 men. Each group was treated with only one of the three osteotomies: distal chevron osteotomy (Ch, distal chevron osteotomy with medial edge (ChM and proximal osteotomy (POT. The effect on the three most comonly used demonstrative factors were noted: first intermetatarsal angle (IM, hallux valgus angle (HV, distal metatarsal articulation angle (DMAA. The age and the demonstrative factors were compared pre- and postoperative, in and between the groups.Results: The correct, graded selection of the patients for the treatment was confirmed and false negative results excluded. Preoperative values of HV and DMAA are significantely different between three groups (p < 0.001 while IM are not (p = 0.118. Postoperative values of the HV and IM are significantely lower in all three groups (p < 0.001. DMAA is statisticaly different (positive postoperatively in the ChM group (p < 0.001 but not in the Ch and POT groups (P = 0.398; p = 0.456.Conclusions: Modern approach on hallux valgus deformations enables stage treatment and objective evaluation of the results what is demonstrated by the effect of the osteotomies on the demonstrative factors. Further investigations of the factors not yet considered or even unknown are also possible as shown on the example of the difference between the expected and measured effect of POT on DMAA.

  3. Hallux Valgus Deformity and Treatment: A Three-Dimensional Approach: Modified Technique for Lapidus Procedure.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Santrock, Robert D; Smith, Bret

    2018-06-01

    In a hallux valgus deformity, the problem is deviation of the hallux at the metatarsophalangeal joint and of the first metatarsal at the tarsometatarsal joint. Although anterior-posterior radiograph findings have been prioritized, deviation in the other planes can substantially change visible cues. The modified technique for Lapidus procedure procedure, uses all 3 planes to evaluate and correct the deformity, making radiographic measurements less useful. Using a triplane framework and focusing on the apex of the deformity, all bunions become the same modified technique for Lapidus procedure can be performed regardless of the degree of deformity, always includes triplane correction, and deformity size becomes irrelevant. Copyright © 2018 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  4. Effectiveness of the custom-mold room temperature vulcanizing silicone toe separator on hallux valgus: A prospective, randomized single-blinded controlled trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chadchavalpanichaya, Navaporn; Prakotmongkol, Voraluck; Polhan, Nattapong; Rayothee, Pitchaya; Seng-Iad, Sirirat

    2018-04-01

    Silicone toe separator is considered as a conservative treatment for hallux valgus. The prefabricated toe separator does not fit all. However, effectiveness in prescription of the custom-mold toe separator is still unknown. To investigate the effect of using a custom-mold room temperature vulcanizing silicone toe separator to decrease hallux valgus angle and hallux pain. The compliances, complications, and satisfactions of toe separator were also explored. A prospective, randomized single-blinded controlled trial. A total of 90 patients with a moderate degree of hallux valgus were enrolled in a study at the Foot Clinic, Siriraj Hospital, Thailand. Patients were randomized into two groups; the study group was prescribed a custom-mold room temperature vulcanizing silicone toe separator for 6 h per night for 12 months. Patients in both groups received proper foot care and shoes and were permitted to continue drug treatment. In total, 40 patients in the study group and 39 patients in the control group completed the study. The hallux valgus angle was obtained through radiographic measurement. At month 12, both groups had significant differences in mean hallux valgus angle with a decrease of 3.3° ± 2.4° for the study group and increase of 1.9° ± 1.9° for the control group. There were statistically significant differences of hallux valgus angle between the two groups ( p Hallux pain was decreased in the study group. A custom-mold room temperature vulcanizing silicone toe separator can decrease hallux valgus angle and pain with no serious complications. Clinical relevance The custom-mold room temperature vulcanizing silicone toe separator for treatment of hallux valgus reduces deformity and hallux pain.

  5. Minimally Invasive and Open Distal Chevron Osteotomy for Mild to Moderate Hallux Valgus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brogan, Kit; Lindisfarne, Edward; Akehurst, Harold; Farook, Usama; Shrier, Will; Palmer, Simon

    2016-11-01

    Minimally invasive surgical (MIS) techniques are increasingly being used in foot and ankle surgery but it is important that they are adopted only once they have been shown to be equivalent or superior to open techniques. We believe that the main advantages of MIS are found in the early postoperative period, but in order to adopt it as a technique longer-term studies are required. The aim of this study was to compare the 2-year outcomes of a third-generation MIS distal chevron osteotomy with a comparable traditional open distal chevron osteotomy for mild-moderate hallux valgus. Our null hypothesis was that the 2 techniques would yield equivalent clinical and radiographic results at 2 years. This was a retrospective cohort study. Eighty-one consecutive feet (49 MIS and 32 open distal chevron osteotomies) were followed up for a minimum 24 months (range 24-58). All patients were clinically assessed using the Manchester-Oxford Foot Questionnaire. Radiographic measures included hallux valgus angle, the intermetatarsal angle, hallux interphalangeal angle, metatarsal phalangeal joint angle, distal metatarsal articular angle, tibial sesamoid position, shape of the first metatarsal head, and plantar offset. Statistical analysis was done using Student t test or Wilcoxon rank-sum test for continuous data and Pearson chi-square test for categorical data. Clinical and radiologic postoperative scores in all domains were substantially improved in both groups (P .05). There were no significant differences in complications between the 2 groups ( > .5). The midterm results of this third-generation technique show that it was a safe procedure with good clinical outcomes and comparable to traditional open techniques for symptomatic mild-moderate hallux valgus. Level III, retrospective comparative study. © The Author(s) 2016.

  6. Footwear modification following hallux valgus surgery: The all-or-none phenomenon.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Robinson, Cal; Bhosale, Abhijit; Pillai, Anand

    2016-06-26

    To define footwear outcomes following hallux valgus surgery, focusing on patient return to comfortable and heeled footwear and patterns of post-operative footwear selection. Surgical intervention is indicated for symptomatic cases of hallux valgus unresponsive to conservative methods, with favourable reported outcomes. The return to various types of footwear post-operatively is reflective of the degree of correction achieved, and corresponds to patient satisfaction. Patients are expected to return to comfortable footwear post-operatively without significant residual symptoms. Many female patients will additionally attempt to return to high-heeled, narrow toe box shoes. However, minimal evidence exists to guide their expectations. Sixty-five female hallux valgus patients that had undergone primary surgery between 2011 and 2013 were retrospectively identified using our hospital surgical database. Patients were reviewed using a footwear-specific outcome questionnaire at a mean 18.5 mo follow-up. Eighty-six percent of patients were able to return to comfortable footwear post-operatively with minimal discomfort. Of those intending to resume wearing heeled footwear, 62% were able to do so, with 77% of these patients wearing these as or more frequently than pre-operatively. No significant difference was observed between pre- and post-operative heel size. Mean time to return to heeled footwear was 21.4 wk post-operation. Cosmetic outcomes were very high and did not adversely impact footwear selection. We report high rates of return to both comfortable and heeled shoes in female patients following primary hallux valgus surgery. We observed an "all-or-none phenomenon" where patients rejected a return to heeled footwear unless able to tolerate them at the same frequency and heel size as pre-operatively. A minority of patients were unable to return to comfortable footwear post-operatively, which had adverse ramifications on their quality-of-life. We recommend that the

  7. Hallux Valgus Correction Comparing Percutaneous Chevron/Akin (PECA) and Open Scarf/Akin Osteotomies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Moses; Walsh, James; Smith, Margaret M; Ling, Jeff; Wines, Andrew; Lam, Peter

    2017-08-01

    Minimally invasive surgery is being used increasingly, including for hallux valgus surgery. Despite the growing interest in minimally invasive procedures, there have been few publications on percutaneous chevron/akin (PECA) procedures, and no studies have been published comparing PECA to open scarf/akin osteotomies (SA). This was a prospective, randomized study of 50 patients undergoing operative correction of hallux valgus using one of 2 techniques (PECA vs open SA). Data were collected preoperatively and on 1 day, 2 weeks, 6 weeks, and 6 months postoperatively. Outcome measures include the American Orthopaedic Foot & Ankle Society Hallux-Metatarsophalangeal-Interphalangeal (AOFAS-HMI) Score, visual analog pain score, hallux valgus angle (HVA), and 1-2 intermetatarsal angle (IMA). Twenty-five patients underwent PECA procedures and 25 patients received SA procedures. Both groups showed significantly improved AOFAS-HMI scores after surgery (PECA group: 61.8 to 88.9, SA group: 57.3 to 84.1, P = .560) with comparable final scores. HVA and IMA also presented similar outcomes at final follow-up ( P = .520 and P = .270, respectively). However, the PECA group showed significantly lower pain level (VAS) in the early postoperative phase (postoperative day 1 to postoperative week 6, P < .001 and P = .004, respectively). No serious complications were observed in either group. Both groups showed comparable good to excellent clinical and radiologic outcomes at final follow-up. However, the PECA group had significantly less pain in the first 6 weeks following surgery. Level of Evidence Level II, prospective comparative study.

  8. Impact of Podiatry Resident Experience Level in Hallux Valgus Surgery on Postoperative Outcomes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fleischer, Adam E.; Yorath, Martin C.; Joseph, Robert; Baron, Adam; Nordquist, Thomas; Moore, Braden; Robinson, Richmond; Reilly, Charles

    2018-01-01

    Background Despite modern advancements in transosseous fixation and operative technique, hallux valgus (i.e., bunion) surgery is still associated with a higher than usual amount of patient dissatisfaction, and is generally recognized as a complex and nuanced procedure requiring precise osseous and capsulotendon balancing. It stands to reason then that familiarity and skill level of trainee surgeons might impact surgical outcomes in this surgery. The aim of this study was to determine whether podiatry resident experience level influences mid-term outcomes in hallux valgus surgery. Methods Consecutive adults who underwent isolated hallux valgus surgery via distal metatarsal osteotomy at a single US metropolitan teaching hospital from January 2004 to January 2009 were contacted and asked to complete a validated outcome measure of foot health (Manchester-Oxford Foot Questionnaire) regarding their operated foot. Resident experience level was quantified using the surgical logs for the primary resident of record at the time of each case. Associations were assessed using simple, multiple and logistic regression analyses. Results A total of 102 adult patients (n=102 feet) agreed to participate with a mean age of 46.8 (SD 13.1 years, range 18-71) and average length of follow-up 6.2 years (SD 1.4, range 3.6-8.6). Level of trainee experience was not associated with postoperative outcomes in either the univariate (odds ratio 0.99 [95% CI 0.98-1.01], p = 0.827) or multivariate analyses (odds ratio 1.00 [95% CI 0.97-1.02], p = 0.907). Conclusions We conclude that podiatry resident level of experience in hallux valgus surgery does not contribute appreciably to postoperative clinical outcomes. PMID:24726058

  9. In-vivo imaging of the sentinel vein using the near-infrared vascular imaging system in hallux valgus patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nakasa, Tomoyuki; Ishikawa, Masakazu; Ikuta, Yasunari; Yoshikawa, Masahiro; Sawa, Mikiya; Tsuyuguchi, Yusuke; Adachi, Nobuo

    2017-11-01

    A high incidence of dorsomedial cutaneous nerve (DMCN) damage in hallux valgus surgery has been reported. Identification of the vein around 1st metatarsal head is reported to be helpful to reduce the DMCN damage during surgery. The near-infrared (NIR) vascular imaging system, the VeinViewer ® Flex, projects the vein onto the skin. The purpose of this study was to investigate the difference of the vein course between normal and hallux valgus foot using the VeinViewer ® Flex, and to validate that the DMCN was accompanied with its vein. Twenty-seven feet with the hallux valgus and 27 feet in healthy subjects were included. The vein was projected onto the skin at the metatarsal head by the VeinViewer ® Flex. The distance between the vein and the mid-line of the metatarsal head was measured. The correlation of the distance and hallux valgus angle or 1-2 intermetatarsal angle (IMA) was analyzed. The vein depicted by the VeinViewer ® Flex and operative findings was compared in 4 patients during surgery. The vein in the hallux valgus patients shifted toward the dorsolateral side on the metatarsal bone head compared to that in healthy subjects. The distance from the midline of the 1st metatarsal bone to the vein in the hallux valgus (12.1 mm) was significantly higher than that in healthy subjects (2.7 mm) (p hallux valgus patients shifted toward the dorsolateral on the metatarsal bone and it could be a landmark to identify DMCN. The NIR vascular imaging system would be useful to reduce the risk of nerve damage in great toe surgery. Copyright © 2017 The Japanese Orthopaedic Association. Published by Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  10. "Angle to Be Corrected" in Preoperative Evaluation for Hallux Valgus Surgery: Analysis of a New Angular Measurement.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ortiz, Cristian; Wagner, Pablo; Vela, Omar; Fischman, Daniel; Cavada, Gabriel; Wagner, Emilio

    2016-02-01

    The most common methods for assessing severity of hallux valgus deformity and the effects of an operative procedure are the angular measurements in weightbearing radiographs, specifically the hallux valgus angle and intermetatarsal angle (IMA). Our objective was to analyze the interobserver variability in hallux valgus patients of a new angle called the "angle to be corrected" (ATC), and to compare its capacity to differentiate between different deformities against IMA. We included 28 symptomatic hallux valgus patients with 48 weightbearing foot x-rays. Three trained observers measured the 1 to 2 IMA and the ATC. We then identified retrospectively 45 hallux valgus patients, which were divided into 3 operative technique groups having used the ATC as reference, and analyzed the capacity of the IMA to differentiate between them. The IMA average value was 13.6 degrees, and there was a significant difference between observer 3 and observer 1 (P = .001). The average value for the ATC was 8.9 degrees, and there was no difference between observers. Both angles showed a high intraclass correlation. Regarding the capacity to differentiate between operative technique groups, the ATC was different between the 3 operative technique groups analyzed, but the IMA showed differences only between 2. The ATC was at least as reliable as the intermetatarsal angle for hallux valgus angular measurements, showing a high intraclass correlation with no interobserver difference. It can be suggested that the ATC was better than the IMA to stratify hallux valgus patients when deciding between different operative treatments. Level III, comparative study. © The Author(s) 2015.

  11. Tensile Properties of the Deep Transverse Metatarsal Ligament in Hallux Valgus: A CONSORT-Compliant Article.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abdalbary, Sahar Ahmed; Elshaarawy, Ehab A A; Khalid, Bahaa E A

    2016-02-01

    The deep transverse metatarsal ligament (DTML) connects the neighboring2 metatarsal heads and is one of the stabilizers connecting the lateral sesamoid and second metatarsal head. In this study, we aimed to determine the tensile properties of the DTML in normal specimens and to compare these results with hallux valgus specimens. We hypothesized that the tensile properties of the DTML would be different between the 2 groups of specimens.The DTML in the first interspace was dissected from 12 fresh frozen human cadaveric specimens. Six cadavers had bilateral hallux valgus and the other 6 cadavers had normal feet. The initial length (L0) and cross-sectional area (A0) of the DTML were measured using a digital caliper, and tensile tests with load failure were performed using a material testing machine.There were significant between-groups differences in the initial length (L0) P = 0.009 and cross-sectional area (A0) of the DTML P = 0.007. There were also significant between-groups differences for maximum force (N) P = 0.004, maximum distance (mm) P = 0.005, maximum stress (N/mm) P = 0.003, and maximum strain (%) P = 0.006.The DTML is an anatomical structure for which the tensile properties differ in hallux valgus.

  12. Radiographic Relevance of the Distal Medial Cuneiform Angle in Hallux Valgus Assessment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hatch, Daniel J; Smith, Abigail; Fowler, Troy

    2016-01-01

    The angle formed by the distal articular facet of the medial cuneiform has been evaluated and discussed by various investigators. However, no consistent method has been available to radiograph and measure this entity. The wide variability of the angle is not conducive to comparative analysis. Additionally, investigators have noted that the angles observed (obliquity) vary greatly because of changes in radiographic angle, foot position, rotation of the first ray, and declination of the first metatarsal. Recognizing that these variables exist, we propose a reproducible assessment using digital radiography and application of deformity of correction principles. Our results have indicated a mean distal medial cuneiform angle of 20.69° in normal feet, 23.51° with moderate hallux valgus, and 20.41° with severe hallux valgus deformity. The radiograph beam was kept at 15° from the coronal plane. An inverse relationship was found between the distal medial cuneiform angle and bunion severity. This was in contrast to our expected hypothesis. The overall angle of the first metatarsal-medial cuneiform did, however, correlate with the severity of the bunion deformity (p hallux valgus. A better indicator appears to be the first metatarsal-medial cuneiform angle. This pathologic entity is a 3-dimensional one that incorporates the joint morphology of the first ray, triplane osseous positioning, and soft tissue imbalances. Perhaps, 3-dimensional computed tomography imaging will provide better insight into this entity. Copyright © 2016 American College of Foot and Ankle Surgeons. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  13. Subjective versus objective assessment in early clinical outcome of modified Lapidus procedure for hallux valgus deformity.

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    Chopra, S; Moerenhout, K; Crevoisier, X

    2016-02-01

    Studies have assessed the outcome of hallux valgus surgeries based on subjective questionnaires, usually the American Orthopaedic Foot and Ankle Society Score, and radiographic results reporting good to excellent outcome at 6-12 months postoperatively. However, contrasting results were reported by gait studies at 12-24 months postoperatively. In a previous study, we found nine gait parameters which can describe the altered gait in hallux valgus deformity. This study aimed, to assess the outcome of modified Lapidus at 6 months postoperatively, using gait assessment method, to determine if the nine specified gait parameters effectively relates with the clinical scores and the radiological results or add information missed by these commonly used clinical assessments. We assessed 21 participants including 11 controls and 10 patients with moderate to severe hallux valgus deformity. The patient group was followed 6 months postoperatively. The ambulatory gait assessment was performed utilizing pressure insoles and inertial sensors. Clinical assessment includes foot and ankle questionnaires along with radiographic results. Comparison was made using non parametric tests, Phallux valgus surgeries. The existing clinical assessment overestimates the functional outcome at the early postoperative phase. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  14. Tensile Properties of the Deep Transverse Metatarsal Ligament in Hallux Valgus

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abdalbary, Sahar Ahmed; Elshaarawy, Ehab A.A.; Khalid, Bahaa E.A.

    2016-01-01

    Abstract The deep transverse metatarsal ligament (DTML) connects the neighboring 2 metatarsal heads and is one of the stabilizers connecting the lateral sesamoid and second metatarsal head. In this study, we aimed to determine the tensile properties of the DTML in normal specimens and to compare these results with hallux valgus specimens. We hypothesized that the tensile properties of the DTML would be different between the 2 groups of specimens. The DTML in the first interspace was dissected from 12 fresh frozen human cadaveric specimens. Six cadavers had bilateral hallux valgus and the other 6 cadavers had normal feet. The initial length (L0) and cross-sectional area (A0) of the DTML were measured using a digital caliper, and tensile tests with load failure were performed using a material testing machine. There were significant between-groups differences in the initial length (L0) P = 0.009 and cross-sectional area (A0) of the DTML P = 0.007. There were also significant between-groups differences for maximum force (N) P = 0.004, maximum distance (mm) P = 0.005, maximum stress (N/mm2) P = 0.003, and maximum strain (%) P = 0.006. The DTML is an anatomical structure for which the tensile properties differ in hallux valgus. PMID:26937914

  15. Hallux valgus interphalangeus deformity: A case series in the pediatric population.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grawe, Brian; Parikh, Shital; Crawford, Alvin; Tamai, Junichi

    2012-03-01

    The objective of this report is to describe three cases (four feet) of hallux valgus interphalangeus deformity in the pediatric population. A retrospective review was completed to identify three patients (four feet) with a deformity consistent with hallux valgus interphalangeus. Patients were followed at regular intervals for a minimum of 6 months. Treatment modalities and clinical results were reviewed for all patients for this relatively rare entity in the skeletally immature population. All patients in this report had a deformity that was not consistent with a traumatic etiology. Case number 1 had a significantly symptomatic deformity that failed conservative treatment, and eventually necessitated full surgical correction of the deformity. Symptom free unrestricted activity was obtained post-operatively, however final follow-up radiographs have demonstrated early changes consistent with arthritis. Case numbers 2 & 3 were relatively asymptomatic throughout their course of treatment, and responded well to non-operative intervention. Based on these findings excision of the exostosis and soft-tissue realignment appears to be a reliable option for symptom relief for patients who present with a painful symptomatic hallux valgus interphalangeus deformity. However, the risk of degenerative changes following spur removal must be entertained prior to the procedure. On the contrary a pain free deformity that does not impact functionality of toe, or impair shoe ware may be treated successfully with conservative measures. Copyright © 2011 European Foot and Ankle Society. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  16. Combined rotation scarf and Akin osteotomies for hallux valgus: a patient focussed 9 year follow up of 50 patients

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    Kilmartin Timothy E

    2010-02-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The Cochrane review of hallux valgus surgery has disputed the scientific validity of hallux valgus research. Scoring systems and surrogate measures such as x-ray angles are commonly reported at just one year post operatively but these are of dubious relevance to the patient. In this study we extended the follow up to a minimum of 8 years and sought to address patient specific concerns with hallux valgus surgery. The long term follow up also allowed a comprehensive review of the complications associated with the combined rotation scarf and Akin osteotomies. Methods Between 1996 and 1999, 101 patients underwent rotation scarf and Akin osteotomies for the treatment of hallux valgus. All patients were contacted and asked to participate in this study. 50 female participants were available allowing review of 73 procedures. The average follow up was over 9 years and the average age at the time of surgery was 57. The participants were physically examined and interviewed. Results Post-operatively, in 86% of the participants there were no footwear restrictions. Stiffness of the first metatarsophalangeal joint was reported in 8% (6 feet; 10% were unhappy with the cosmetic appearance of their feet, 3 feet had hallux varus, and 2 feet had recurrent hallux valgus. There were no foot-related activity restrictions in 92% of the group. Metatarsalgia occurred in 4% (3 feet. 96% were better than before surgery and 88% were completely satisfied with their post-operative result. Hallux varus was the greatest single cause of dissatisfaction. The most common adverse event in the study was internal fixation irritation. Hallux valgus surgery is not without risk and these findings could be useful in the informed consent process. Conclusions When combined the rotation scarf and Akin osteotomies are an effective treatment for hallux valgus that achieves good long-term correction with a low incidence of recurrence, footwear restriction or metatarsalgia

  17. Use of a percutaneous osteotomy with plate fixation in hallux valgus correction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Díaz Fernández, Rodrigo

    2017-09-20

    With hundreds of operative methods described for correction of hallux valgus we can state that the ideal surgical treatment is still controversial. The Bösch technique has been used as a percutaneous way of correcting hallux valgus deformities with the use of a pin fixation. The aim of this study is to evaluate a new method of fixation by using a percutaneous locking plate. Between June 2013 and January 2015, 24 consecutive percutaneous subcapital osteotomies of the first metatarsal bone were performed for the treatment of painful hallux valgus deformities in 24 patients. Additional surgical procedures included DMMO's (Distal Metatarsal Minimally-Invasive Osteotomies) in 12 of the operated feet (44.44%); minor digits were corrected in 7 cases (25.9%). An Akin procedure was performed in 81% of cases and all cases underwent an adductor hallucis tenotomy. All patients were clinically assessed using the AOFAS score. Radiographic measures included the preoperative and postoperative values of the Hallux Valgus Angle (HVA), Intermetatarsal Angle (IMA), and the Distal Metatarsal Articular Angle (DMAA). The mean correction achieved improved for AHV from 36.57±7.1 to 12.22±8.69°, for IMA from 13.8±1.59 to 7.08±2.72 and for DMAA from 13.98±7.38 to 6.07±4.99. Clinically, scores on the AOFAS scale improved from a 45.8±9.6 to 91.29±9.8. Although healing of the osteotomies was observed radiographically within 6 to 12 weeks, two cases (8.3%) exhibited delayed healing. There were no cases of nonunion. There were no superficial or deep infections or wound healing problems. Plate had to be removed in 3 cases (12.5%). This technique modification is an acceptable procedure to correct hallux valgus in patients with a moderate level of deformity. Level IV. Copyright © 2017 European Foot and Ankle Society. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  18. Effectiveness of Percutaneous Proximal Closing Wedge Osteotomy With Akin Osteotomy to Correct Severe Hallux Valgus Determined by Radiographic Parameters.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kurashige, Toshinori; Suzuki, Seiichi

    2017-04-01

    Some authors reported the results from percutaneous distal metatarsal osteotomy for hallux valgus recently. On the other hand, there are few reports of percutaneous proximal metatarsal osteotomy. The purpose of the present study was to evaluate the radiographic results of percutaneous proximal closing wedge osteotomy with Akin osteotomy for correction of severe hallux valgus and increasing longitudinal arch height. Consecutive 17 feet (mean age = 70.8 years) were investigated. The mean follow-up was 22 months. Excision of medial eminence, distal soft tissue release, and Akin osteotomy were all performed percutaneously and concurrently. Weight-bearing anteroposterior and lateral radiographs of the feet were acquired preoperatively and at final follow-up. On the anteroposterior radiographs, hallux valgus angle, intermetatarsal angle, and first metatarsal shortening were measured. On the lateral radiographs, talometatarsal angle, calcaneal pitch angle, and first metatarsal dorsiflexion were measured. The average improvements in hallux valgus angle and intermetatarsal angle were 27.6° and 9.9°, respectively. The average first metatarsal shortening was 2.7 mm. The first metatarsal dorsiflexion improved by 2.2°; however, other parameters did not improve significantly. In conclusion, percutaneous proximal closing wedge osteotomy with Akin osteotomy corrects severe hallux valgus; however, the procedure does not increase the medial longitudinal arch. Therapeutic, Level IV: Case series.

  19. [Treatment of Hallux Valgus: Current Diagnostic Testing and Surgical Treatment Performed by German Foot and Ankle Surgeons].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arbab, Dariusch; Schneider, Lisa-Maria; Schnurr, Christoph; Bouillon, Bertil; Eysel, Peer; König, Dietmar Pierre

    2018-04-01

    Hallux valgus is one of the most prevalent foot deformities, and surgical treatment of Hallux valgus is one of the most common procedures in foot and ankle surgery. Diagnostic and treatment standards show large variation despite medical guidelines and national foot and ankle societies. The aim of this nationwide survey is a description of the current status of diagnostics and therapy of Hallux valgus in Germany. A nationwide online questionnaire survey was sent to two German foot and ankle societies. The participants were asked to answer a questionnaire of 53 questions with four subgroups (general, diagnostics, operation, preoperative management). Surgical treatment for three clinical cases demonstrating a mild, moderate and severe Hallux valgus deformity was inquired. 427 foot and ankle surgeons answered the questionnaire. 388 participants were certified foot and ankle surgeons from one or both foot and ankle societies. Medical history (78%), preoperative radiographs (100%) and preoperative radiographic management (78%) are of high or very high importance for surgical decision pathway. Outcome scores are used by less than 20% regularly. Open surgery is still the gold standard, whereas minimally invasive surgery is performed by only 7%. Our survey showed that diagnostic standards are met regularly. There is a wide variation in the type of procedures used to treat Hallux valgus deformity. TMT I arthrodesis is preferred in severe Hallux valgus, but also used to treat moderate and mild deformities. Minimally invasive surgery is still used by a minority of surgeons. It remains to be seen, to what extent minimally invasive surgery will be performed in the future. Georg Thieme Verlag KG Stuttgart · New York.

  20. Comparison of the Modified McBride Procedure and the Distal Chevron Osteotomy for Mild to Moderate Hallux Valgus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Choi, Gi Won; Kim, Hak Jun; Kim, Taik Seon; Chun, Sung Kwang; Kim, Tae Wan; Lee, Yong In; Kim, Kyoung Ho

    2016-01-01

    Distal metatarsal osteotomy and the modified McBride procedure have each been used for the treatment of mild to moderate hallux valgus. However, few studies have compared the results of these 2 procedures for mild to moderate hallux valgus. The purpose of the present study was to compare the results of distal chevron osteotomy and the modified McBride procedure for treatment of mild to moderate hallux valgus according to the severity of the deformity. We analyzed the data from 45 patients (49.5%; 48 feet [49.0%]), who had undergone an isolated modified McBride procedure (McBride group), and 46 patients (50.5%; 50 feet [51.0%]), who had a distal chevron osteotomy (chevron group). We subdivided each group into those with mild and moderate deformity and compared the clinical and radiologic outcomes between the groups in relation to the severity of the deformity. The improvements in the American Orthopaedic Foot and Ankle Society scale score and the visual analog scale for pain were significantly better for the chevron group for both mild and moderate deformity. The chevron group experienced significantly greater correction in the hallux valgus angle and intermetatarsal angle for both mild and moderate deformity. The chevron group experienced a significantly greater decrease in the grade of sesamoid displacement for patients with moderate deformity. The McBride group had a greater risk of recurrence than did the chevron group for moderate deformity (odds ratio 14.00, 95% confidence interval 3.91 to 50.06, p hallux valgus recurrence than did the distal chevron group. Therefore, we recommend distal chevron osteotomy rather than a modified McBride procedure for the treatment of mild and moderate hallux valgus. Copyright © 2016 American College of Foot and Ankle Surgeons. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  1. First Metatarsophalangeal Contact Properties Following Proximal Opening Wedge and Scarf Osteotomies for Hallux Valgus Correction: A Biomechanical Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kia, Cameron; Yoshida, Ryu; Cote, Mark; DiVenere, Jessica; Geaney, Lauren E

    2017-04-01

    Proximal opening wedge osteotomy (POWO) is an established procedure for moderate to severe hallux valgus. A common concern of this procedure is that it results in lengthening of the first metatarsal, which could cause increased intra-articular pressure of the first metatarsophalangeal joint (MTP) and may ultimately lead to arthritis because of these altered mechanics. The purpose of this study was to use a cadaveric model to compare intra-articular pressures and articulating contact properties of the MTP joint following either scarf osteotomy or POWO. Fresh-frozen cadaveric below-knee specimens with pre-existing hallux valgus (n = 12) and specimens without hallux valgus (n = 6, control group) were used. The hallux valgus specimens were stratified into 2 groups (n = 6 each): POWO or scarf osteotomy. The groups were matched based on the degree of deformity. Peak intra-articular pressure, force, and area were measured in all normal, preoperative, and postoperative specimens with a simulated weightbearing model. These measurements were made with a pressure transducer placed within the first MTP joint. Postoperatively POWO group had slightly higher contact forces and pressures compared to the scarf group and lower contact forces and pressures than those of the normal group but were not statistically significant ( P > .05). Normal specimens had higher intra-articular force, pressure, and area than postoperative specimens but the difference was not found to be significant. First metatarsal lengthening was found in both the scarf and POWO specimens; however, neither increase was found to be significant ( P > .05). The results from this study show that after operative correction, contact properties of the fist MTP joint among normal, POWO, and scarf osteotomy groups revealed no significant differences. First MTP joints in those with hallux valgus had significantly lower contact force and pressure compared to those without hallux valgus. With little long-term outcomes of

  2. Long-term Follow-up of a Randomized Controlled Trial Comparing Scarf to Chevron Osteotomy in Hallux Valgus Correction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jeuken, Ralph M; Schotanus, Martijn G M; Kort, Nanne P; Deenik, Axel; Jong, Bob; Hendrickx, Roel P M

    2016-07-01

    Hallux valgus is one of the most common foot deformities. This long-term follow-up study compared the results of 2 widely used operative treatments for hallux valgus: the scarf and chevron osteotomy. Conventional weight bearing anteroposterior (AP) radiographs of the foot were made for evaluating the intermetatarsal angle and hallux valgus angle. For clinical evaluation, the American Orthopaedic Foot & Ankle Society (AOFAS) rating system for the hallux metatarsophalangeal-interphalangeal scale was used together with physical examination of the foot. These data were compared with the results from the original study. The Short Form 36 questionnaire, the Manchester-Oxford Foot Questionnaire (MOXFQ), and a general questionnaire including a visual analog scale (VAS) pain score were used for subjective evaluation. The primary outcome measures were the radiologic recurrence of hallux valgus and reoperation rate of the same toe. Secondary outcome measures were the results from the radiographs and subjective and clinical evaluation. The response rate was 76% at the follow-up of 14 years; in the chevron group, 37 feet were included compared with 36 feet in the scarf group. Twenty-eight feet in the chevron group and 27 in the scarf group developed recurrence of hallux valgus (P = .483). One patient in the scarf group had a reoperation of the same toe compared with none in the chevron group (P = .314). Current VAS pain scores and results from the SF-36, MOXFQ, and AOFAS did not significantly differ between groups. Both techniques showed similar results after 2 years of follow-up. At 14 years of follow-up, neither technique was superior in preventing recurrence. Level II, randomized controlled trial. © The Author(s) 2016.

  3. Etiological factors in hallux valgus, a three-dimensional analysis of the first metatarsal.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ota, Tomohiko; Nagura, Takeo; Kokubo, Tetsuro; Kitashiro, Masateru; Ogihara, Naomichi; Takeshima, Kenichiro; Seki, Hiroyuki; Suda, Yasunori; Matsumoto, Morio; Nakamura, Masaya

    2017-01-01

    It has been reported that hallux valgus (HV) is associated with axial rotation of the first metatarsal (1MT). However, the association between HV and torsion of the 1MT head with respect to the base has not been previously investigated. The present study examined whether there was a significant difference in 1MT torsion between HV and control groups. Three-dimensional (3D) computed tomography (CT) scans of 39 ft were obtained, and 3D surface models of the 1MT were generated to quantify the torsion of the head with respect to the base. The HV group consisted of 27 ft from 27 women (69.5 ± 7.5 years old). Only the feet of HV patients with an HV angle >20° on weight-bearing radiography were selected for analysis. The control group consisted of 12 ft from 12 women (67.7 ± 7.2 years old). In a virtual 3D space, two unit vectors, which describe the orientation of the 1MT head and base, were calculated. The angle formed by these two unit vectors representing 1MT torsion was compared between the control and hallux valgus groups. The mean (± standard deviation) of the torsional angle of the 1MT was 17.6 (± 7.7)° and 4.7 (± 4.0)° in the HV and control groups, respectively, and the difference was significant ( p  hallux valgus patients compared to control group patients.

  4. Foot pain and functional limitation in healthy adults with hallux valgus: a cross-sectional study

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    Nix Sheree E

    2012-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Hallux valgus (HV is a very common deformity of the first metatarsophalangeal joint that often requires surgical correction. However, the association between structural HV deformity and related foot pain and disability is unclear. Furthermore, no previous studies have investigated concerns about appearance and difficulty with footwear in a population with HV not seeking surgical correction. The aim of this cross-sectional study was to investigate foot pain, functional limitation, concern about appearance and difficulty with footwear in otherwise healthy adults with HV compared to controls. Methods Thirty volunteers with HV (radiographic HV angle >15 degrees and 30 matched controls were recruited for this study (50 women, 10 men; mean age 44.4 years, range 20 to 76 years. Differences between groups were examined for self-reported foot pain and disability, satisfaction with appearance, footwear difficulty, and pressure-pain threshold at the first metatarsophalangeal joint. Functional measures included balance tests, walking performance, and hallux muscle strength (abduction and plantarflexion. Mean differences (MD and 95% confidence intervals (CI were calculated. Results All self-report measures showed that HV was associated with higher levels of foot pain and disability and significant concerns about appearance and footwear (p Conclusions These findings show that HV negatively impacts on self-reported foot pain and function, and concerns about foot appearance and footwear in otherwise healthy adults. There was also evidence of impaired hallux muscle strength and increased postural sway in HV subjects compared to controls, although general physical functioning and participation in physical activity were not adversely affected.

  5. Treatment of moderate hallux valgus by percutaneous, extra-articular reverse-L Chevron (PERC) osteotomy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lucas y Hernandez, J; Golanó, P; Roshan-Zamir, S; Darcel, V; Chauveaux, D; Laffenêtre, O

    2016-03-01

    The aim of this study was to report a single surgeon series of consecutive patients with moderate hallux valgus managed with a percutaneous extra-articular reverse-L chevron (PERC) osteotomy. A total of 38 patients underwent 45 procedures. There were 35 women and three men. The mean age of the patients was 48 years (17 to 69). An additional percutaneous Akin osteotomy was performed in 37 feet and percutaneous lateral capsular release was performed in 22 feet. Clinical and radiological assessments included the type of forefoot, range of movement, the American Orthopedic Foot and Ankle (AOFAS) score, a subjective rating and radiological parameters. The mean follow-up was 59.1 months (45.9 to 75.2). No patients were lost to follow-up. The mean AOFAS score increased from 62.5 (30 to 80) pre-operatively to 97.1 (75 to 100) post-operatively. A total of 37 patients (97%) were satisfied. At the last follow up there was a statistically significant decrease in the hallux valgus angle, the intermetatarsal angle and the proximal articular set angle. The range of movement of the first metatarsophalangeal joint improved significantly.. There was more improvement in the range of movement in patients who had fixation of the osteotomy of the proximal phalanx. Preliminary results of this percutaneous approach are promising. This technique is reliable and reproducible. Its main asset is that it maintains an excellent range of movement. The PERC osteotomy procedure is an effective approach for surgical management of moderate hallux valgus which combines the benefits of percutaneous surgery with the versatility of the chevron osteotomy whilst maintaining excellent first MTPJ range of motion. ©2016 The British Editorial Society of Bone & Joint Surgery.

  6. Management of pain on hallux valgus with percutaneous intra-articular Pulse-Dose Radiofrequency.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Masala, Salvatore; Fiori, Roberto; Calabria, Eros; Raguso, Mario; de Vivo, Dominique; Cuzzolino, Alessandro; Simonetti, Giovanni

    2017-01-01

    The purpose of our study was to investigate the role of intra-articular pulse-dose radiofrequency in management of painful hallux valgus refractory to conservative therapies. Between November 2010 and April 2012, 51 patients (15 male, 36 female) with a median age of 71.4 years were included in our clinical trial. Under fluoroscopic guidance we introduced a 22 gauge 10 cm length cannula by a percutaneous access in the first metatarsophalangeal joint and its tip was placed intra-articularly. After removing the spindle, a radiofrequency needle with a 5 mm active tip was introduced. The following parameters were used: 1200 pulses at high voltage (45 V) with 20 msec duration followed by 480 msec silent phases. A great reduction in pain intensity was documented at 1 week, 1 month and 3 months after procedures. Pain intensity increased between 5 and 8 months after treatments, so we performed a second procedure in all patients between 7 months and 9 months since the first treatment. Also in this case we obtained a great reduction of pain intensity in the first 3 months after the procedure. Pain intensity returned at preprocedural values after 9 months after second procedure. No complications were observed. Our experience shows pulse-dose radiofrequency is a safe, repeatable and effective technique for managing patients with symptomatic hallux valgus in the short and medium term. Pulse-dose radiofrequency may improve pain control and quality of life in patients with hallux valgus refractory to conservative therapies. © 2014 Asia Pacific League of Associations for Rheumatology and Wiley Publishing Asia Pty Ltd.

  7. Effect of medial arch support foot orthosis on plantar pressure distribution in females with mild-to-moderate hallux valgus after one month of follow-up.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Farzadi, Maede; Safaeepour, Zahra; Mousavi, Mohammad E; Saeedi, Hassan

    2015-04-01

    Higher plantar pressures at the medial forefoot are reported in hallux valgus. Foot orthoses with medial arch support are considered as an intervention in this pathology. However, little is known about the effect of foot orthoses on plantar pressure distribution in hallux valgus. To investigate the effect of a foot orthosis with medial arch support on pressure distribution in females with mild-to-moderate hallux valgus. Quasi-experimental. Sixteen female volunteers with mild-to-moderate hallux valgus participated in this study and used a medial arch support foot orthosis for 4 weeks. Plantar pressure for each participant was assessed using the Pedar-X(®) in-shoe system in four conditions including shoe-only and foot orthosis before and after the intervention. The use of the foot orthosis for 1 month led to a decrease in peak pressure and maximum force under the hallux, first metatarsal, and metatarsals 3-5 (p hallux and the first metatarsal head by transferring the load to the other regions. It would appear that this type of foot orthosis can be an effective method of intervention in this pathology. Findings of this study will improve the clinical knowledge about the effect of the medial arch support foot orthosis used on plantar pressure distribution in hallux valgus pathology. © The International Society for Prosthetics and Orthotics 2014.

  8. Pronación del dedo gordo en el hallux valgus

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    Gómez Galván, Mercedes

    2015-01-01

    La pronación del dedo gordo en el hallux valgus (HV) es difícil de estudiar y cuantificar. Objetivos: evaluar la pronación del dedo gordo en el HV. Material y métodos: estudio prospectivo de 132 pacientes con HV que estaban en lista de espera quirúrgica y grupo control de 30 pacientes sin HV. Se realizó un estudio experimental con 6 falanges proximales creando un sistema de calibrado que permitía controlar su pronación a 0º, 10º, 20º, 30º, 40º, 50º y 60º. El paciente se coloca...

  9. Prevalence of flat foot and hallux valgus deformity among primary school female students in Kiar city of Chaharmahal and Bakhtiari

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    Reza Vahab Kashani

    2013-08-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: Foot deformities are common among complaints of patients referred to the orthopedic centers. Most of naturally occurring lower limb deformities in children, which are rather common, would be corrected with further normal growth. However, a small percentage of these problems remain unresolved and may cause complications in the future. The main aim of this study is determination of prevalence of flat foot and hallux valgus deformity among primary school female students in Kiar city of Chaharmahal and BakhtiariMaterial and Methods: This is a cross sectional study. Foot posture index (FPI 6 test evaluate for 345 students in age range 7- 11 years and two groups of 7 to 9 years and 11 to 10 years. Also prevalence of hallux valgus among 345 students evaluated.Results: 7.8 % of studied subjects had flat foot deformity. Among 345 students, 12 (6.6% students in range of age 7 -9 years and 15 (9.3 % students in range of 10-11 had flat foot deformity. Also prevalence of hallux valgus was 16.5%.Conclusion: These findings point to the importance of proper physical examination, early diagnosis and on-time treatment of foot deformities such as flat foot and hallux valgus deformity in children.

  10. Effect of arch support insole on plantar pressure distribution in females with mild and moderate hallux valgus

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    Maedeh Farzadi

    2013-10-01

    Full Text Available Objective: Hallux Valgus is one of the most foot deformities which increase plantar pressure beneath big toe and first metatarsal. The aim of this study was to assess the effect of foot orthosis on plantar pressure distribution in subjects with mild and moderate Hallux Valgus. Materials & Methods: in this quasi-experimental study, females 16 with Hallux Valgus were recruited. Plantar pressure in 8 area of foot was measured by Pedar-X insole when wearing standard shoe only shoe with foot orthosis and shoe with foot orthosis after a month of using orthosis. Data were analyzed by repeated measure analysis of variance test. Results: using foot orthosis for a month leaded to decrease pressure in the big toe (P<0/019 first metatarsal and 3-5 metatarsals (P<0.001 and also increased pressure in medial mid foot (P<0.001. Conclusion: Foot orthosis decreased peak pressure in fore foot and increased it in medial mid foot. Therefore redistribute plantar pressure to the more normal pattern in Hallux Valgus subjects. So it could be one of the effective methods to prevent the progression of this deformity in its initial steps of formation.

  11. A patient-based questionnaire to assess outcomes of foot surgery: validation in the context of surgery for hallux valgus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dawson, Jill; Coffey, Jane; Doll, Helen; Lavis, Grahame; Cooke, Paul; Herron, Mark; Jenkinson, Crispin

    2006-09-01

    A patient-based outcome measure with good measurement properties is urgently needed for use in clinical trials of foot surgery. We evaluated an existing foot pain and disability questionnaire (the Manchester Foot Pain and Disability Questionnaire) for its suitability as an outcome measure in the context of hallux valgus corrective surgery. Interviews with patients led to initial changes, resulting in 20 candidate questionnaire items with five response categories each. These were tested in a prospective study of 100 patients (representing 138 foot operations) undergoing hallux valgus corrective surgery. Analysis of underlying factor structure, dimensionality, internal reliability, construct validity and responsiveness of the questionnaire items in relation to (i) SF-36 general health survey and (ii) American Orthopaedic Foot & Ankle Society (AOFAS) hallux clinical scale resulted in a final 16 item questionnaire (the 'Manchester-Oxford Foot Questionnaire' (MOXFQ)), consisting of three domains/scales: 'Walking/standing' (seven items), 'Pain' (five items) and 'Social interaction' (four items) each having good measurement properties. All three domains were unidimensional. The new 16-item MOXFQ has good measurement properties in the context of outcomes assessment of surgery for hallux valgus. Future studies should assess the MOXFQ in the context of surgery for other foot and ankle conditions.

  12. Comparison of dorsal and dorsomedial displacement in evaluation of first ray hypermobility in feet with and without hallux valgus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Singh, Dishan; Biz, Carlo; Corradin, Marco; Favero, Laura

    2016-06-01

    Hypermobility of the first ray, a probable primary cause of hallux valgus, has traditionally been evaluated in the dorsal direction only although the first tarso-metatarsal joint allows movement in a dorso-medial direction. 600 feet, divided according to the presence or absence of hallux valgus, were evaluated for both dorsal and dorso-medial displacement using a Klaue device. In the control group, the mean first ray displacement was 7.2mm (4.2-11.3) in the dorsal direction (sagittal plane) and 8.3mm (4.0-12.6) in the 45° dorso-medial direction. In the hallux valgus group, the mean first ray mobility was 9.8mm (5.2-14.1) in the dorsal direction compared to a mean of 11.0mm (5.9-16.2) in the 45° dorso-medial direction. It is a paradox that hypermobility of the first ray is measured in only a dorsal (vertical) direction whereas a hallux valgus angle and an intermetatarsal angle are only measured in a transverse plane. Furthermore, the weightbearing foot pronates during gait and the first metatarsal is displaced in a dorsomedial direction rather than a pure dorsal direction. It is suggested that measurement hypermobility of the first ray at a 45° dorso-medial direction is more appropriate. Copyright © 2015 European Foot and Ankle Society. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  13. Isolated intraosseous gout in hallux sesamoid mimicking a bone tumor in a teenaged patient

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Liu, Shi-Zuo; Yeh, LeeRen; Chen, Clement Kuen-Huang; Pan, Huay-Ban; Chou, Yi-Jiun

    2003-01-01

    We are reporting an unusual case of isolated intraosseous tophus in medial hallux sesamoid presenting as tumor-like lesion in a teenage patient without prior history of gouty attack and underlying systemic disorders. The lesion manifested isointensity to surrounding muscles with internal low signal on spin echo (SE) T1-weighted images, and heterogeneous low signal intensity on fast spin echo (FSE) T2-weighted images. Computed tomography (CT) scan disclosed expansion and diffusely increased attenuation of the medial hallux sesamoid with focal cortical erosion and extraosseous extension of high attenuation content. The subsequent resection and pathology revealed intraosseous tophus deposition, which is particularly rare at this site and at this age. Imaging studies revealed some characteristic imaging features which can retrospectively be attributed to gouty tophus. When an expansile osteolytic lesion manifesting low signal intensity on T2-weighted image and internal calcifications on CT scan is encountered, the possibility of intraosseous tophus should be included in the list of differential diagnoses, even in a teenage patient without prior history of gout. (orig.)

  14. Intra-rater reliability of hallux flexor strength measures using the Nintendo Wii Balance Board.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Quek, June; Treleaven, Julia; Brauer, Sandra G; O'Leary, Shaun; Clark, Ross A

    2015-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to investigate the intra-rater reliability of a new method in combination with the Nintendo Wii Balance Board (NWBB) to measure the strength of hallux flexor muscle. Thirty healthy individuals (age: 34.9 ± 12.9 years, height: 170.4 ± 10.5 cm, weight: 69.3 ± 15.3 kg, female = 15) participated. Repeated testing was completed within 7 days. Participants performed strength testing in sitting using a wooden platform in combination with the NWBB. This new method was set up to selectively recruit an intrinsic muscle of the foot, specifically the flexor hallucis brevis muscle. Statistical analysis was performed using intra-class coefficients and ordinary least product analysis. To estimate measurement error, standard error of measurement (SEM), minimal detectable change (MDC) and percentage error were calculated. Results indicate excellent intra-rater reliability (ICC = 0.982, CI = 0.96-0.99) with an absence of systematic bias. SEM, MDC and percentage error value were 0.5, 1.4 and 12 % respectively. This study demonstrates that a new method in combination with the NWBB application is reliable to measure hallux flexor strength and has potential to be used for future research and clinical application.

  15. [Minimally invasive therapy for hallux valgus with deformity of little toe varus].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gu, Shi-Wei; Yang, Ke; Zhao, Si-Qiao; Gao, Zhan-Ao; Ma, Shun-Qian; Zhang, Wen-Qing

    2018-03-25

    To explore clinical effect of minimally corrective osteotomy for the treatment of hallux valgus with deformity of little toe varus through small incision. From January 2013 to June 2016, 168 hallux valgus patients with deformity of little toe varus were treated by minimally corrective osteotomy through small incision. Among them, 7 males and 161 females were aged from 22 to 75 years old with an average of(59.3±3.5) years old. Preoperative clinical manifestation mainly focus on red and swollen of bunion, pain around with metatarsal bones, and diagnosed as hallux valgus with deformity of little toe varus through small incision. Operative time, postoperative complications, pre and post-operative IMA(angle between the first and the second metatarsal bones), HVA (hallux valgus angle), LDA(valgus angle of the fifth metatarsal bones), MPA(valgus angle of little toe), IM4-5 (angle between the forth and the fifth metatarsal bones) and PASA(fixed angle of proximal joint), postoperative AOFAS score were used to evaluate foot function. One hundred and sixty-eight patients were followed up for 6 to 48 months with an average of (28.6±3.2) months. All wounds were healed well without infection, sinus tract and other complications. Operative time ranged from 16 to 28 min with an average of (18.3±2.1) min. IMA, HVA, LDA, MPA and IM A 4-5 were (10.1±2.1)°, (32.6±4.2)°, (6.9±2.3)°, (18.5±5.2)°, (15.1±2.9)°preoperatively, improved to (8.3±2.2)°, (10.9±2.9)°, (2.7±0.4)°, (6.5±1.6)°, (8.9±1.8)° postoperatively, and had significant differences before and after operation. While there was no difference in PASA before (9.1±2.1)°and after operation(8.7±1.9)°. AOFAS score were improved from (31.6±3.9) before operation to(83.7±5.2) after operation, but no significant difference( P >0.05). According to AOFAS score, 147 patients obtained excellent results, 13 good, 6 moderate and 2 poor. Minimally corrective osteotomy for the treatment of hallux valgus with deformity

  16. [Treatment of moderate and severe hallux valgus by performing percutaneous double osteotomy of the first metatarsal bone].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Díaz Fernández, R

    2015-01-01

    To evaluate the clinical and radiological results in the surgical treatment of moderate and severe hallux valgus by performing percutaneous double osteotomy. A retrospective study was conducted on 45 feet of 42 patients diagnosed with moderate-severe hallux valgus, operated on in a single centre and by the same surgeon from May 2009 to March 2013. Two patients were lost to follow-up. Clinical and radiological results were recorded. An improvement from 48.14 ± 4.79 points to 91.28 ± 8.73 points was registered using the American Orthopedic Foot and Ankle Society (AOFAS) scale. A radiological decrease from 16.88 ± 2.01 to 8.18 ± 3.23 was observed in the intermetatarsal angle, and from 40.02 ± 6.50 to 10.51 ± 6.55 in hallux valgus angle. There was one case of hallux varus, one case of non-union, a regional pain syndrome type I, an infection that resolved with antibiotics, and a case of loosening of the osteosynthesis that required an open surgical refixation. Percutaneous distal osteotomy of the first metatarsal when performed as an isolated procedure, show limitations when dealing with cases of moderate and severe hallux valgus. The described technique adds the advantages of minimally invasive surgery by expanding applications to severe deformities. Percutaneous double osteotomy is a reproducible technique for correcting severe deformities, with good clinical and radiological results with a complication rate similar to other techniques with the advantages of shorter surgical times and less soft tissue damage. Copyright © 2014 SECOT. Published by Elsevier Espana. All rights reserved.

  17. Hallux Valgus and Lesser Toe Deformities are Highly Heritable in Adult Men and Women: the Framingham Foot Study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hannan, Marian T.; Menz, Hylton B.; Jordan, Joanne M.; Cupples, L. Adrienne; Cheng, Chia-Ho; Hsu, Yi-Hsiang

    2013-01-01

    Objective To estimate heritability of three common disorders affecting the forefoot: hallux valgus, lesser toe deformities and plantar forefoot soft tissue atrophy in adult Caucasian men and women. Methods Between 2002-2008, a trained examiner used a validated foot exam to document presence of hallux valgus, lesser toe deformities and plantar soft tissue atrophy in 2,446 adults from the Framingham Foot Study. Among these, 1,370 participants with available pedigree structure were included. Heritability (h2) was estimated using pedigree structures by Sequential Oligogenic Linkage Analysis Routines (SOLAR) package. Results were adjusted for age, sex and BMI. Results Mean age of participants was 66 years (range 39 to 99 years) and 57% were female. Prevalence of hallux valgus, lesser toe deformities and plantar soft tissue atrophy was 31%, 29.6% and 28.4%, respectively. Significant h2 was found for hallux valgus (0.29 ~ 0.89, depending on age and sex) and lesser toe deformity (0.49 ~ 0.90 depending on age and sex). The h2 for lesser toe deformity in men and women aged 70+ years was 0.65 (p= 9×10−7). Significant h2 was found for plantar soft tissue atrophy in men and women aged 70+ years (h2 = 0.37; p=3.8×10−3). Conclusion To our knowledge, these are the first findings of heritability of foot disorders in humans, and they confirm the widely-held view that hallux valgus and lesser toe deformities are highly heritable in European-descent Caucasian men and women, underscoring the importance of future work to identify genetic determinants of the underlying genetic susceptibility to these common foot disorders. PMID:23696165

  18. Can Double Osteotomy Be a Solution for Adult Hallux Valgus Deformity With an Increased Distal Metatarsal Articular Angle?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Park, Chul Hyun; Cho, Jae Ho; Moon, Jeong Jae; Lee, Woo Chun

    2016-01-01

    No previous study has reported the results of double metatarsal osteotomy for adult hallux valgus deformity with an increased distal metatarsal articular angle (DMAA). The purpose of the present study was to evaluate the results after double metatarsal osteotomy in adult patients with incongruent hallux valgus deformity. We retrospectively reviewed 16 cases of consecutive first metatarsal double metatarsal osteotomy without lateral soft tissue release in 14 patients with symptomatic hallux valgus associated with an increased DMAA (≥15° after proximal chevron osteotomy on intraoperative radiographs). Clinical results were assessed using the American Orthopaedic Foot and Ankle Society scale and the visual analog scale. The radiographic results were assessed over time, and changes in the DMAA and the relative length of the first metatarsal were assessed by measuring each value preoperatively and at the last follow-up visit. The American Orthopaedic Foot and Ankle Society and visual analog scale scores were significantly improved after surgery. The hallux valgus angle and intermetatarsal angle were stabilized >3 months after surgery. The sesamoid position did not increase significantly beyond the immediate postoperative period. The mean DMAA was corrected from 21.6° (range 15° to 29°) preoperatively to 11.1° (range -2° to 17°) at the last follow-up visit. The mean amount of shortening of the first metatarsal after surgery was 5.5 (range 4 to 7) mm. In conclusion, double metatarsal osteotomy without lateral soft tissue release in adult hallux valgus deformity results in high postoperative recurrence and complication rates. Copyright © 2016 American College of Foot and Ankle Surgeons. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  19. Epidemiology of Shoe Wearing Patterns Over Time in Older Women: Associations With Foot Pain and Hallux Valgus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Menz, Hylton B; Roddy, Edward; Marshall, Michelle; Thomas, Martin J; Rathod, Trishna; Peat, George M; Croft, Peter R

    2016-12-01

    Foot problems are prevalent in older women and are thought to be associated with footwear. This study examined women's shoe wearing patterns over time and evaluated associations between footwear characteristics and foot pain and hallux valgus. Women aged 50-89 years (n = 2,627) completed a survey that included drawings of four toe-box shapes and four heel heights. For each life decade, participants indicated which footwear style they wore most of the time. Foot pain in the past 12 months and hallux valgus were documented by self-report. Logistic regression examined associations between heel height, toe-box shape, foot pain and hallux valgus. Wearing shoes with a high heel and very narrow toe box between the ages of 20 and 29 was common, but decreased to less than 10% by the age of 40. Compared with women who had worn shoes with a very wide toe box, the likelihood of hallux valgus increased in those who had worn shoes with a wide (odds ratio [OR] 1.96, 95% CI 1.03-3.71), narrow (2.39, 1.29-4.42) and very narrow (2.70, 1.46-5.00) toe box between the ages of 20 and 29 and those who wore shoes with a very narrow toe box (1.93, 1.10-3.39) between the ages of 30 and 39. Women wear shoes with a lower heel and broader toe box as they age. Wearing constrictive footwear between the ages of 20 and 39 may be critical for developing hallux valgus in later life. © The Author 2016. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of The Gerontological Society of America.

  20. Three-dimensional analysis of tarsal bone response to axial loading in patients with hallux valgus and normal feet.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Watanabe, Kota; Ikeda, Yasutoshi; Suzuki, Daisuke; Teramoto, Atsushi; Kobayashi, Takuma; Suzuki, Tomoyuki; Yamashita, Toshihiko

    2017-02-01

    Patients with hallux valgus present a variety of symptoms that may be related to the type of deformity. Weightbearing affects the deformities, and the evaluation of the load response of tarsal bones has been mainly performed using two-dimensional plane radiography. The purpose of this study was to investigate and compare structural changes in the medial foot arch between patients with hallux valgus and normal controls using a computer image analysis technique and weightbearing computed tomography data. Eleven patients with hallux valgus and eleven normal controls were included. Computed tomograms were obtained with and without simulated weightbearing using a compression device. Computed tomography data were transferred into a personal computer, and a three-dimensional bone model was created using image analysis software. The load responses of each tarsal bone in the medial foot arch were measured three-dimensionally and statistically compared between the two groups. Displacement of each tarsal bone under two weightbearing conditions was visually observed by creating three-dimensional bone models. At the first metatarsophalangeal joint, the proximal phalanges of the hallux valgus group showed significantly different displacements in multiple directions. Moreover, opposite responses to axial loading were also observed in both translation and rotation between the two groups. Weightbearing caused deterioration of the hallux valgus deformity three-dimensionally at the first metatarsophalangeal joint. Information from the computer image analysis was useful for understanding details of the pathology of foot disorders related to the deformities or instability and may contribute to the development of effective conservative and surgical treatments. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  1. Lateral Sesamoid Position Relative to the Second Metatarsal in Feet With and Without Hallux Valgus: A Prospective Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Geng, Xiang; Zhang, Chao; Ma, Xin; Wang, Xu; Huang, Jiazhang; Xu, Jian; Wang, Chen

    2016-01-01

    We sought to determine whether hallux valgus displaces the sesamoid bones laterally away from a stationary first metatarsal or whether the first metatarsal head is displaced medially from the stationary sesamoids, which remain in position relative to the rest of the forefoot. We reviewed weightbearing radiographs in the dorsal plantar view of 128 consecutive patients (149 feet) seen over 2 months in 2014. Of these, 82 feet (55%) had a hallux valgus angle of >15° (hallux valgus group) and 67 feet (45%) had an angle of no more than 15° (control group). We measured the absolute distances from the center of the lateral sesamoid and the first metatarsal head to the long axis of the second metatarsal. Next, the relative distances, defined as the ratio of these 2 absolute distances to the length of the second metatarsal, were calculated to adjust for foot size. Both the absolute and the relative distances from the center of the first metatarsal head to the second metatarsal differed significantly between the 2 groups and correlated positively with the hallux valgus angle and first intermetatarsal angle. However, neither the absolute nor the relative distance to the lateral sesamoid bone differed significantly between the groups, nor did they correlate with either of the 2 angles. Thus, despite medial shifting of the first metatarsal in hallux valgus, the lateral sesamoid retains its relationship to the second metatarsal in transverse plane. Its apparent lateral movement is a radiographic misinterpretation. Awareness of this misinterpretation should improve the success of corrective surgery. Copyright © 2016 American College of Foot and Ankle Surgeons. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  2. Plate fixation for proximal chevron osteotomy has greater risk for hallux valgus recurrence than Kirschner wire fixation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Park, Chul-Hyun; Ahn, Ji-Yong; Kim, Yu-Mi; Lee, Woo-Chun

    2013-06-01

    The purpose of this study was to compare the results of hallux valgus surgery between feet fixed with Kirschner wires and those fixed with a plate and screws. Between December 2008 and November 2009, 53 patients (62 feet) were treated with proximal chevron osteotomy and distal soft tissue procedure for symptomatic moderate to severe hallux valgus deformity. Thirty-four patients (41 feet) were stabilised with Kirschner wires (K-wire group) and 19 patients (21 feet) were stabilised with a locking plate (plate group). Clinical results were assessed using American Orthopaedic Foot and Ankle Society (AOFAS) score. Radiographic parameters were compared between these groups. Recurrence rate at the last follow-up was compared between the K-wire and plate groups. Mean AOFAS score was lower in the plate group, however, the difference between the groups was not statistically significant in AOFAS score at the last follow-up. Hallux valgus angle and intermetatarsal angle were significantly larger in the plate group at the last follow-up. Mean 1-2 metatarsal (MT) distance on immediately postoperative radiographs was significant larger in the plate group. Four (9.8 %) of the 41 feet in the K-wire group and 7 (33.3 %) of the 21 feet in the plate group showed hallux valgus recurrence at the last follow-up. The plate group had a significantly higher risk of recurrence than the K-wire group. Fixation of proximal chevron osteotomy using a plate and screws has a greater risk of hallux valgus recurrence than fixation using Kirschner wires.

  3. Evaluation of First-Ray Mobility in Patients with Hallux Valgus Using Weight-Bearing CT and a 3-D Analysis System: A Comparison with Normal Feet.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kimura, Tadashi; Kubota, Makoto; Taguchi, Tetsuya; Suzuki, Naoki; Hattori, Asaki; Marumo, Keishi

    2017-02-01

    Some physicians report that patients with hallux valgus have hypermobility at the tarsometatarsal (TMT) joint of the first ray and 3-dimensional (3-D) deformity. With use of non-weight-bearing and weight-bearing computed tomography (CT), we evaluated the 3-D mobility of each joint of the first ray in feet with hallux valgus compared with normal feet. Ten feet of 10 patients with hallux valgus and 10 feet of 10 healthy volunteers with no foot disorders were examined. All participants were women. Weight-bearing (a load equivalent to body weight) and non-weight-bearing CT scans were made with use of a device that we developed. Orthogonal coordinate axes were set and a 3-D model was reconstructed. Each joint of the first ray was aligned with the respective proximal bone, and 3-D displacement of the distal bone relative to the proximal bone under loading was quantified. At the talonavicular joint, significantly greater dorsiflexion of the navicular relative to the talus was observed in the hallux valgus group compared with the control group. At the medial cuneonavicular joint, the hallux valgus group showed significantly greater eversion and abduction of the medial cuneiform relative to the navicular. At the first TMT joint, the hallux valgus group showed significantly greater dorsiflexion, inversion, and adduction of the first metatarsal relative to the medial cuneiform. At the first metatarsophalangeal joint, the hallux valgus group showed significantly greater eversion and abduction of the first proximal phalanx relative to the first metatarsal (all p hallux valgus.

  4. Transferencia microquirúrgica hemipulpar del hallux en la reconstrucción del pulgar

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    José-Manuel Rodríguez-Vegas

    Full Text Available Introducción y Objetivo. La transferencia hemipulpar del hallux permite excelentes reconstrucciones de pulgar porque ofrece tejidos blandos de alta calidad, contorno pulpar casi normal y recuperación sensitiva satisfactoria sin necesidad de reorientación cortical. Además, a diferencia de colgajos locales y regionales, evita la agresión adicional a una mano ya lesionada, optimizando así el período de rehabilitación y el resultado final. El artículo revisa la experiencia del autor en la técnica y compara el procedimiento con otras opciones reconstructivas. Material y Método. Realizamos una revisión retrospectiva de 16 pacientes sometidos a transferencia hemipulpar del hallux en el período 2007-2013. Todos los pacientes fueron varones, con una edad media de 34 años y una alta demanda funcional (trabajadores manuales con traumatismo laboral. La técnica fue indicada en defectos mayores del 50% de la superficie pulpar del pulgar en pacientes sin factores de riesgo asociados relevantes. En 3 de los casos el defecto pulpar asoció un defecto óseo de falange distal de tamaño suficiente para aconsejar la transferencia combinada osteo-pulpar. Resultados. Quince de los 16 colgajos sobrevivieron sin incidencias postoperatorias. Un colgajo sufrió trombosis arterial con retirada del colgajo y cirugía adicional de cobertura. En 2 pacientes se realizó revisión estética del colgajo de manera diferida. Excepto en el caso fallido, todos los pacientes volvieron a su actividad laboral previa con excelente recuperación funcional de la mano. El cierre de la zona donante se realizó mediante cierre directo (12 pacientes o injerto cutáneo (4 pacientes. Ninguno de los pacientes, independientemente del tipo de cierre del defecto en el pie, refirió problemas en la deambulación o apariencia estética del pie. Conclusiones. La reconstrucción de defectos pulpares del pulgar mediante transferencia hemipulpar del hallux permite un excelente resultado

  5. Proximal Intermetatarsal Divergence in Distal Chevron Osteotomy for Hallux Valgus: An Overlooked Finding.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Akpinar, Evren; Buyuk, Abdul Fettah; Cetinkaya, Engin; Gursu, Sarper; Ucpunar, Hanifi; Albayrak, Akif

    2016-01-01

    The goal of distal chevron osteotomy for hallux valgus is to restore proper first-toe joint alignment by performing lateral translation of the distal first metatarsal fragment (the metatarsal head). We hypothesized that in some patients this procedure might also result in involuntary medial translation of the proximal first metatarsal fragment, which we called proximal intermetatarsal divergence. The aim of the present study was to compare the pre- and postoperative radiographs of patients with hallux valgus to determine whether we could identify proximal intermetatarsal divergence. We retrospectively compared the pre- and postoperative radiographs of 29 feet in 28 patients treated with distal chevron osteotomy. Two different methods were used to measure the intermetatarsal angles: the anatomic intermetatarsal angle (aIMA) and the mechanical intermetatarsal angle (mIMA). The maximum intermetatarsal distance (MID) was also measured. We defined proximal intermetatarsal divergence as a postoperative increase in the aIMA or MID, coupled with a decrease in the mIMA. For data analysis, we divided the patients into low-angle (mild deformity) and high-angle (severe deformity) groups, according to their preoperative mIMA. The mean ± standard deviation patient age was 41 ± 14 years. In the low-angle group, the mean mIMA decreased (from 10.91° to 7.00°), the mean aIMA increased (from 11.80° to 13.55°), and the mean MID increased (from 17.97 mm to 20.60 mm; p = .001, for all). In the high-angle group, the mean mIMA decreased (from 14.30° to 6.90°; p = .001), the mean aIMA decreased (from 14.77° to 13.54°; p = .06), and the mean MID decreased (from 20.74 mm to 20.37 mm; p = .64). The results of our study suggest that proximal intermetatarsal divergence might occur after distal chevron osteotomy for hallux valgus, primarily in patients with a low preoperative mIMA. Copyright © 2016 American College of Foot and Ankle Surgeons. Published by Elsevier Inc. All

  6. Open wedge metatarsal osteotomy versus crescentic osteotomy to correct severe hallux valgus deformity - A prospective comparative study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wester, Jens Ulrik; Hamborg-Petersen, Ellen; Herold, Niels; Hansen, Palle Bo; Froekjaer, Johnny

    2016-03-01

    Different techniques of proximal osteotomies have been introduced to correct severe hallux valgus. The open wedge osteotomy is a newly introduced method for proximal osteotomy. The aim of this prospective randomized study was to compare the radiological and clinical results after operation for severe hallux valgus, comparing the open wedge osteotomy to the crescentic osteotomy which is our traditional treatment. Forty-five patients with severe hallux valgus (hallux valgus angle >35̊, and intermetatarsal angle >15̊) were included in this study. The treatment was proximal open wedge osteotomy and fixation with plate (Hemax), group 1, or operation with proximal crescentic osteotomy and fixation with a 3mm cannulated screw, group 2. The mean age was 52 years (19-71). Forty-one females and four males were included. Clinical and radiological follow-ups were performed 4 and 12 months after the operation. In group 1 the hallux valgus angle decreased from 39.0̊ to 24.1̊ after 4 months and 27.9̊ after 12 months. In group 2 the angle decreased from 38.3̊ to 21.4̊ after 4 months and 27.0̊ after 12 months. The intermetatarsal angle in group 1 was 19.0̊ preoperatively, 11.6̊ after 4 months and 12.6̊ after 12 months. In group 2 the mean intermetatarsal angle was 18.9̊ preoperatively, 12.0̊ after 4 months and 12.6̊ after 12 months. The AOFAS score improved from 59.3 to 81.5 in group 1 and from 61.8 to 84.8 in group 2 respectively measured 12 months postoperatively. The relative length of the 1 metatarsal compared to 2 metatarsal bone was 0.88 and 0.87 preoperatively and 0.88 and 0.86 for group 1 and 2 respectively measured after 12 months. Crescentic osteotomy and open wedge osteotomy improve AOFAS score and VAS scores on patients operated with severe hallux valgus. No significant difference was found in the two groups looking at the postoperative improvement of HVA and IMA measured 4 and 12 months postoperatively. The postoperative VAS score and AOFAS score were

  7. Lengthening of the shortened first metatarsal after Wilson's osteotomy for hallux valgus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Singh, D; Dudkiewicz, I

    2009-12-01

    Metatarsalgia is a recognised complication following iatrogenic shortening of the first metatarsal in the management of hallux valgus. The traditional surgical treatment is by shortening osteotomies of the lesser metatarsals. We describe the results of lengthening of iatrogenic first brachymetatarsia in 16 females. A Scarf-type osteotomy was used in the first four cases and a step-cut of equal thicknesses along the axis of the first metatarsal was performed in the others. The mean follow-up was 21 months (19 to 26). Relief of metatarsalgia was obtained in the six patients in whom 10 mm of lengthening had been achieved, compared to only 50% relief in those where less than 8 mm of lengthening had been gained. One-stage step-cut lengthening osteotomy of the first metatarsal may be preferable to shortening osteotomies of the lesser metatarsals in the treatment of metatarsalgia following surgical shortening of the first metatarsal.

  8. Modified Wilson’s Osteotomy for Hallux Valgus Deformity. A New Approach

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xarchas, Konstantinos C; Mavrolias, Dimitrios; Kyriakopoulos, Georgios

    2014-01-01

    We introduce a new set of modifications and present the results from 48 patients (a total of 60 feet operated), who underwent this modified Wilson’s osteotomy for the correction of Hallux Valgus. Patients were of an average age of 52 years old (from 21 to 75 years of age) and were followed up for a mean of 12 months post-operatively. Patient evaluation was made with the symptom scoring system as presented by Kataraglis et al., with the final outcome being satisfactory in all of the cases. This set of modifications introduced to the original Wilson’s osteotomy, proved to offer a stable, predictable and satisfactory outcome in all cases and we strongly recommend it. PMID:25352929

  9. Relationship Between Displacement and Degenerative Changes of the Sesamoids in Hallux Valgus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Katsui, Ryuhei; Samoto, Norihiro; Taniguchi, Akira; Akahane, Manabu; Isomoto, Shinji; Sugimoto, Kazuya; Tanaka, Yasuhito

    2016-12-01

    Although the tangential sesamoid view is used to visualize the sesamoid position relative to the first metatarsal head, correctly evaluating patients with severe varus of the first metatarsal is difficult. Computed tomography (CT) can be helpful due to its cross-sectional images in any plane. The purposes of this study were to evaluate the alignment of the tibial sesamoid and investigate the relationship between malalignment and degenerative change in the sesamoid metatarsal joint (SMJ) using simulated weight-bearing CT imaging in patients with hallux valgus. In total, 269 feet from 142 patients with hallux valgus were included. The mean age was 63.7 years (range, 33-87 years). An anteroposterior weight-bearing radiograph was assessed for sesamoid position into 3 grades: grade 1, the tibial sesamoid was medial to the axis of the first metatarsal; grade 2, the tibial sesamoid was located below the first metatarsal axis; and grade 3, the tibial sesamoid was lateral to the first metatarsal axis. The hallux valgus and intermetatarsal angles (HVA and IMA, respectively) were measured. The lateral shift of the tibial sesamoid relative to the first metatarsal was classified into 3 grades on simulated weight-bearing CT classification: grade 1, tibial sesamoid was entirely medial to the intersesamoid ridge; grade 2, tibial sesamoid was subluxated laterally but located below the intersesamoid ridge; and grade 3, tibial sesamoid was located entirely lateral to the intersesamoid ridge. The differences of HVA and IMA in each grade were confirmed by using 1-way analysis of variance with Bonferroni post hoc corrections. Furthermore, multiple linear regression analysis was used to predict the degenerative change in the SMJ for age, sex, sesamoid position determined by CT or plain radiography, HVA, and IMA. The χ 2 test was used for descriptive statistics to analyze the agreement between radiography or CT classifications of sesamoid position against degenerative change in the SMJ

  10. Use of 3D Printed Bone Plate in Novel Technique to Surgically Correct Hallux Valgus Deformities

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smith, Kathryn E.; Dupont, Kenneth M.; Safranski, David L.; Blair, Jeremy; Buratti, Dawn; Zeetser, Vladimir; Callahan, Ryan; Lin, Jason; Gall, Ken

    2016-01-01

    Three-dimensional (3-D) printing offers many potential advantages in designing and manufacturing plating systems for foot and ankle procedures that involve small, geometrically complex bony anatomy. Here, we describe the design and clinical use of a Ti-6Al-4V ELI bone plate (FastForward™ Bone Tether Plate, MedShape, Inc., Atlanta, GA) manufactured through 3-D printing processes. The plate protects the second metatarsal when tethering suture tape between the first and second metatarsals and is a part of a new procedure that corrects hallux valgus (bunion) deformities without relying on doing an osteotomy or fusion procedure. The surgical technique and two clinical cases describing the use of this procedure with the 3-D printed bone plate are presented within. PMID:28337049

  11. Revisional Surgery for Hallux Valgus with Serial Osteotomies at Two Levels

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jason B. T. Lim

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available The aetiology and form of hallux valgus (HV is varied with many corrective procedures described. We report a 39-year-old woman, previously treated with a Chevron osteotomy, who presented with recurrent right HV, metatarsus primus varus, and associated bunion. Osteotomies were performed at two levels as a revisional procedure. This report highlights (1 limitations of the Chevron osteotomy and (2 the revisional procedure of the two level osteotomies: (i proximal opening-wedge basal osteotomy and (ii distal short Scarf with medial closing wedges. If a Chevron osteotomy is used inappropriately, for example, in an attempt to correct too large a deformity, it may angulate laterally causing a malunion with an increased distal metatarsal articular angle. Secondly, it is feasible to correct this combined deformity using a combination of proximal opening-wedge and distal short Scarf osteotomies.

  12. Impact of podiatry resident experience level in hallux valgus surgery on postoperative outcomes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fleischer, Adam E; Yorath, Martin C; Joseph, Robert M; Baron, Adam; Nordquist, Thomas; Moore, Braden J; Robinson, Richmond C O; Reilly, Charles H

    2014-06-15

    Despite modern advancements in transosseous fixation and operative technique, hallux valgus (i.e., bunion) surgery is still associated with a higher than usual amount of patient dissatisfaction and is generally recognized as a complex and nuanced procedure requiring precise osseous and capsulotendon balancing. It stands to reason then that familiarity and skill level of trainee surgeons might impact surgical outcomes in this surgery. The aim of this study was to determine whether podiatry resident experience level influences midterm outcomes in hallux valgus surgery (HVS). Consecutive adults who underwent isolated HVS via distal metatarsal osteotomy at a single US metropolitan teaching hospital from January 2004 to January 2009 were contacted and asked to complete a validated outcome measure of foot health (Manchester-Oxford Foot Questionnaire) regarding their operated foot. Resident experience level was quantified using the surgical logs for the primary resident of record at the time of each case. Associations were assessed using linear and logistic regression analyses. A total of 102 adult patients (n = 102 feet) agreed to participate with a mean age of 46.8 years (standard deviation 13.1, range 18-71) and average length of follow-up 6.2 y (standard deviation 1.4, range 3.6-8.6). Level of trainee experience was not associated with postoperative outcomes in either the univariate (odds ratio 0.99 [95% confidence interval, 0.98-1.01], P = 0.827) or multivariate analyses (odds ratio 1.00 [95% confidence interval, 0.97-1.02], P = 0.907). We conclude that podiatry resident level of experience in HVS does not contribute appreciably to postoperative clinical outcomes. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  13. Point-Connecting Measurements of the Hallux Valgus Deformity: A New Measurement and Its Clinical Application

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    Seo, Jeong-Ho; Boedijono, Dimas

    2016-01-01

    Purpose The aim of this study was to investigate new point-connecting measurements for the hallux valgus angle (HVA) and the first intermetatarsal angle (IMA), which can reflect the degree of subluxation of the first metatarsophalangeal joint (MTPJ). Also, this study attempted to compare the validity of midline measurements and the new point-connecting measurements for the determination of HVA and IMA values. Materials and Methods Sixty feet of hallux valgus patients who underwent surgery between 2007 and 2011 were classified in terms of the severity of HVA, congruency of the first MTPJ, and type of chevron metatarsal osteotomy. On weight-bearing dorsal-plantar radiographs, HVA and IMA values were measured and compared preoperatively and postoperatively using both the conventional and new methods. Results Compared with midline measurements, point-connecting measurements showed higher inter- and intra-observer reliability for preoperative HVA/IMA and similar or higher inter- and intra-observer reliability for postoperative HVA/IMA. Patients who underwent distal chevron metatarsal osteotomy (DCMO) had higher intraclass correlation coefficient for inter- and intra-observer reliability for pre- and post-operative HVA and IMA measured by the point-connecting method compared with the midline method. All differences in the preoperative HVAs and IMAs determined by both the midline method and point-connecting methods were significant between the deviated group and subluxated groups (p=0.001). Conclusion The point-connecting method for measuring HVA and IMA in the subluxated first MTPJ may better reflect the severity of a HV deformity with higher reliability than the midline method, and is more useful in patients with DCMO than in patients with proximal chevron metatarsal osteotomy. PMID:26996576

  14. Influence of first proximal phalanx geometry on hallux valgus deformity: a finite element analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Morales-Orcajo, Enrique; Bayod, Javier; Becerro-de-Bengoa-Vallejo, Ricardo; Losa-Iglesias, Marta; Doblare, Manuel

    2015-07-01

    Hallux abducto valgus (HAV), one of the most common forefoot deformities, occurs primarily in elderly women. HAV is a complex disease without a clearly identifiable cause for its higher prevalence in women compared with men. Several studies have reported various skeletal parameters related to HAV. This study examined the geometry of the proximal phalanx of the hallux (PPH) as a potential etiologic factor in this deformity. A total of 43 cadaver feet (22 males and 21 females) were examined by means of cadaveric dissection. From these data, ten representative PPHs for both genders were selected, corresponding to five percentiles for males (0, 25, 50, 75, and 100%) and five for females. These ten different PPHs were modeled and inserted in ten foot models. Stress distribution patterns within these ten PPH models were qualitatively compared using finite element analysis. In the ten cases analyzed, tensile stresses were larger on the lateral side, whereas compressive stresses were larger on the medial side. The bones of males were larger than female bones for each of the parameters examined; however, the mean difference between lateral and medial sides of the PPH (mean ± SD) was larger in women. Also the shallower the concavity at the base of the PPH, the larger the compressive stresses predicted. Internal forces on the PPH, due to differences in length between its medial and lateral sides, may force the PPH into a less-stressful position. The geometry of the PPH is a significant factor in HAV development influencing the other reported skeletal parameters and, thus, should be considered during preoperative evaluation. Clinical assessment should evaluate the first ray as a whole and not as isolated factors.

  15. Evaluation of the Pain and Foot Functions in Women with Hallux valgus deformities

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    Burcu Talu

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available Objectives: The aim of this study was to investigate whether deformity affects pain and associated functional status in women with hallux valgus (HV. Methods: The study included 27 women (mean age: 40.5±10.3 years diagnosed with HV and with a deformity level of two or more as determined using the Manchester scale. Demographic data of the participants were recorded. In addi­tion, Visual Analog Scale (VAS was used to determine the intensity of pain during walking. To determine the function affected by pain and deformity, Foot Function Index (FFI, and the American Orthopaedic Foot and Ankle Society MTP-IP (AOFAS MTP-IP Scale along with AOFAS Midfoot (MF Scale were used. Results: Based on the study results, we determined a statistically significant relationship between foot function and pain among our patients (p<0.05. These significant relationships were observed between the pain and total scores of the Foot Function Index (p<0.05, the pain parameter of AOFAS MTP-IP and the pain and total scores of AOFAS midfoot-pain scale (p<0.05. Conclusion: It was concluded that when assessing and planning treatment for hallux valgus, all health profession­als dealing with foot health, pathologies, deformities and treatment should consider the patient as a whole, bearing in mind that pathologies can affect not only the perceived symptoms of individuals, but also their normal functions through various physical and social limitations. J Clin Exp Invest 2016; 7 (2: 144-149

  16. Revision with suture-tape augmentation after failed collateral ligament reconstruction for chronic interphalangeal instability of the hallux.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cho, Byung-Ki; Park, Ji-Kang; Choi, Seung-Myung; SooHoo, Nelson F

    2017-12-01

    Chronic varus instability or recurrent subluxation following isolated interphalangeal dislocation of the hallux is a rare injury. No consensus has been reached regarding the best joint-salvage procedure for patients with the failed collateral ligament reconstruction using tendon graft. We report a case who achieved satisfactory clinical outcome through a modified surgical procedure (revision collateral ligament reconstruction augmented with suture-tape). Copyright © 2017 European Foot and Ankle Society. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  17. Validation of the Korean Version of the Manchester-Oxford Foot Questionnaire in Patients With Hallux Valgus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Park, Man-Jun; Ko, Young-Chul; Huh, Jung-Wook; Park, Sook-Hyun; Park, Tae-Hong; Park, Joon-Hyung

    The Manchester-Oxford Foot Questionnaire (MOXFQ) is a practical, reliable, and valid questionnaire for hallux valgus surgery and has been translated into several languages. However, the MOXFQ has not been translated into Korean. In the present study, we aimed to translate and evaluate the validity and reliability of the Korean version of the MOXFQ for patients affected by hallux valgus. In accordance with the guidelines of cross-cultural adaptation, we translated the English version of MOXFQ into Korean and then backward translated it into English. We sent out letters that included the Korean version of the MOXFQ, a visual analog scale measure of pain, and a validated Korean version of the short-form 36-item Health Survey to 135 patients with hallux valgus. A retest was administered after 2 weeks. Of the 135 patients, 104 responded to the first questionnaire, and 82 of the first-time responders returned their second questionnaires. We evaluated the test-retest reliability, internal consistency, concurrent validity, and construct validity of the Korean version of the MOXFQ. The intraclass correlation coefficient for test-retest reliability was 0.82 for the total MOXFQ and ranged from 0.81 to 0.82 for the 3 subscales. Cronbach's alpha for the total MOXFQ was 0.85 and ranged from 0.8 to 0.92 for the 3 subscales. Concurrent and construct validity was supported by significant correlation with the visual analog scale and short-form 36-item Health Survey subscale scores. The Korean version of the MOXFQ was tested, and it was found to be a valid and reliable instrument for patients with hallux valgus. Copyright © 2016 American College of Foot and Ankle Surgeons. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  18. Comparison of Intercuneiform 1-2 Joint Mobility Between Hallux Valgus and Normal Feet Using Weightbearing Computed Tomography and 3-Dimensional Analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kimura, Tadashi; Kubota, Makoto; Suzuki, Naoki; Hattori, Asaki; Marumo, Keishi

    2018-03-01

    An association has been reported between hallux valgus and hypermobility of the first ray, but subluxation of the intercuneiform 1-2 joint was also suspected in some cases. However, dynamics of the intercuneiform 1-2 joint has seldom been investigated. This study used weightbearing computed tomography (CT) and a 3-dimensional (3D) analysis system to evaluate displacement of the intercuneiform 1-2 joint, intercuneiform 2-3 joint, and second cuneonavicular joint due to weightbearing in hallux valgus and normal feet. Patients were 11 women with hallux valgus (mean age, 56 years; mean hallux valgus angle, 43 degrees; mean first-second intermetatarsal angle, 22 degrees) and 11 women with normal feet (mean age, 57 years; mean hallux valgus angle, 14 degrees; mean first-second intermetatarsal angle, 9 degrees). Each patient was placed supine with the lower limbs extended, and CT was performed under nonweightbearing and weightbearing conditions (load equivalent to body weight). 3D models reconstructed from CT images were used to compare displacement of the intermediate cuneiform relative to the medial cuneiform under nonweightbearing and weightbearing conditions. Relative to the medial cuneiform, the middle cuneiform was displaced by 0.1 and 0.8 degrees due to dorsiflexion, 0.2 and 1.0 degrees due to inversion, and 0.7 and 0.7 degrees due to abduction in normal feet and feet with hallux valgus, respectively, with the latter having significantly greater dorsiflexion ( P = .0067) and inversion ( P = .0019). There was no significant intergroup difference at the intercuneiform 2-3 joint and second cuneonavicular joint. This study clarified the detailed load-induced displacement of the cuneiform 3-dimensionally. Compared with normal feet, hallux valgus feet had significantly greater mobility of the intercuneiform 1-2 joint, suggesting hypermobility of this joint. Level III, case-control study.

  19. Validity and reliability of the Turkish version of the Manchester-Oxford Foot Questionnaire for hallux valgus deformity evaluation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Talu, Burcu; Bayramlar, Kezban; Bek, Nilgün; Yakut, Yavuz

    2016-01-01

    The aim of this study was to evaluate the reliability and validity of the Turkish version of the Manchester-Oxford Foot Questionnaire (MOXFQ) in patients affected by hallux valgus in order to assess the accuracy of this cross-cultural adaption. Thirty female volunteers aged between 18 and 55 years were included in the study. Subjects with hallux valgus were asked to complete the MOXFQ and the Short-Form 36 Health Survey (SF-36). After receiving permission from the author, the MOXFQ was translated into Turkish twice and then back translated to English, after which its compatibility was evaluated. The Turkish version of the MOXFO was applied twice, 1-3 days apart, to the study subjects. Internal consistency and test-retest reliability were assessed using Cronbach's alpha and intraclass correlation coefficient (ICC), respectively. Construct validity was assessed with the use of Spearman's rank correlation coefficient, using a priori hypothesized correlations with SF-36 domains. Subjects achieved similar scores at the first and second administration of the questionnaire (validity was supported by the presence of all the hypothesized correlations, with SF-36 within its physical parameters. The Turkish version of the MOXFQ is a valid and reliable tool for evaluating foot pain and functional status in patients affected by hallux valgus.

  20. [Correlative analysis on metatarsalgia and the X-ray measurement indexes under weight-bearing and non-weight-bearing of hallux valgus].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gong, Hao; Sang, Zhi-Cheng; Wen, Jian-Min; Sun, Wei-Dong; Hu, Hai-Wei; Zhang, Yong-Chao; Zuo, Jian-Gang; Wang, Hai-Xiong

    2014-04-01

    To study changes in the radiographic appearance during weight-bearing and non-weigh-bearing in hallux valgus, and to analyse the correlation between the elasticity of plantar soft tissue of hallux valgus and the pain under the metatarsal head. From May 2012 to October 2012, 240 feet of 120 patients with hallux valgus were enrolled in the study. The degrees of the pian under the metatarsal head of all the patients were observed. AP and lateral X-ray films of feet were taken on the condition of weight-bearing and non-weight-bearing. So the hallux valgus angle (HVA), the inter-metatarsal angle between the first and second metatarsals (IM1-2), the inter-metatarsal angle between the first and fifth metatarsals (IM1-5), top angle of the medial longitudinal arch (TAOTMLA),and anterior angle of the medial longitudinal arch (AAOTMLA) were measured on the X-ray films. The differences of HVA, IM1-2, IM1-5, TAOTMLA and AAOTMLA between two groups were compared, and the correlation between the changes of IM1-2, IM 1-5, TAOTMLA, AAOTMLA and the degree of the pain under the metatarsal head were analysed. One hundred and forty-eight feet had the pain under the metatarsal head. The IM1-2, IM1-5 and TAOTMLA increased on weight-bearing position compared with those on non-weight-bearing position, but the HVA and AAOTMLA decreased on weight-bearing position compared with those on non-weight-bearing position. There was a moderate relationship between the changes of IM 1-2,IM1-5 and the degree of the hallux valgus deformity, as well as the relationship between the different of IM1-5 and the degree of the pian under the metatarsal head. The degree of the collapse of the arch of foot with hallux valgus becomes serious with its deformity increasing. The pain under the metatarsal head of hallux valgus increases with the increased changes of IM 1-2,IM 1-5 and TAOTMLA. Analysis of the X-ray observation indexes of hallux valgus on weight-bearing position and non-weight-bearing position has

  1. Consequences of Avulsion Fracture of the Proximal Phalanx Caused by a Technical Failure of Hallux Valgus Surgery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Park, Young Uk; Lee, Kyung Tai; Jegal, Hyuk; Kim, Ki Chun; Choo, Ho Sik; Kweon, Heon Ju

    2016-01-01

    Several cases of avulsion fracture of the proximal phalanx of the big toe during the lateral capsular release procedure were observed. However, these fractures have not been reported as a complication of hallux valgus surgery. The purpose of the present study was to report the proximal phalanx base fracture as an unrecognized complication and to evaluate the clinical and radiographic consequences of this complication. We retrospectively reviewed 225 feet that had undergone hallux valgus surgery involving proximal chevron osteotomy and distal soft tissue release from May 2009 to December 2012. Of these 225 feet (198 patients), 12 (5.3%) developed proximal phalanx base fracture postoperatively. These patients were assigned to the fracture group. The remaining patients were assigned to the nonfracture group. Patients were followed to observe whether the fractures united and whether degenerative changes developed at the first metatarsophalangeal joint because of this fracture. The mean follow-up period was 36 (range 12 to 72) months. All the subjects in the fracture and nonfracture groups underwent weightbearing anteroposterior and lateral radiographs of the foot at the initial presentation and final follow-up point. The 2 groups were compared with respect to the hallux valgus angle, intermetatarsal angle, range of motion, American Orthopaedic Foot and Ankle Society score, satisfaction, and degenerative changes. No significant differences were found in age, follow-up period, hallux valgus angle, intermetatarsal angle, range of motion of the first metatarsophalangeal joint, American Orthopaedic Foot and Ankle Society score, satisfaction, and degenerative changes between the 2 groups. Ten (83.3%) of the 12 fractures healed, 2 (16.7% of the fractures, 0.89% of the operated feet) progressed to asymptomatic nonunion, and 3 (1.33%) developed first metatarsophalangeal joint degeneration. Avulsion fracture of the proximal phalanx of the big toe is an uncommon complication of

  2. Comparison of Clinical Outcomes of Scarf and Chevron Osteotomies and the McBride Procedure in the Treatment of Hallux Valgus Deformity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fakoor, Mohammad; Sarafan, Naser; Mohammadhoseini, Payam; Khorami, Mohsen; Arti, Hamidreza; Mosavi, SeyedShahnam; Aghaeeaghdam, Amir

    2014-01-01

    Background: Hallux valgus deformity is a common chronic problem with a reported prevalence of 28.4% and its chief complaint is pain. Thus far, different surgical procedures with their proposed indications have been introduced. This study compared three current procedures, namely the chevron and scarf osteotomies and the McBride procedure. Methods: This retrospective cohort was conducted at the Ahvaz University of Medical Sciences on 44 patients with moderate hallux valgus deformity from 2010 and 2013. All of the patients underwent one of the three procedures (chevron, scarf or McBride). Preoperative and follow up radiographies were evaluated in terms of hallux valgus and intermetatarsal angle correction. The Foot and Ankle Disability Index was filled out to assess the functional outcome and the Visual Analogue Scale was used to evaluate pain. Also, satisfaction, aesthetics and the rate of recurrence was evaluated. Results: Hallux valgus angle and intermetatarsal angle correction were significantly higher in scarf, but not in chevron and McBride. However, from amongst the three procedures, there was no significant difference in terms of the Foot and Ankle Disability Index score, aesthetics, satisfaction level, pain score and recurrence rate. Conclusions: Considering that scarf osteotomy had better results in this study, we think that scarf osteotomy can be considered as a first choice for the treatment of moderate hallux valgus deformity. PMID:25207310

  3. Minimal Clinically Important Differences for American Orthopaedic Foot & Ankle Society Score in Hallux Valgus Surgery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chan, Hiok Yang; Chen, Jerry Yongqiang; Zainul-Abidin, Suraya; Ying, Hao; Koo, Kevin; Rikhraj, Inderjeet Singh

    2017-05-01

    The American Orthopaedic Foot & Ankle Society (AOFAS) score is one of the most common and adapted outcome scales in hallux valgus surgery. However, AOFAS is predominantly physician based and not patient based. Although it may be straightforward to derive statistical significance, it may not equate to the true subjective benefit of the patient's experience. There is a paucity of literature defining MCID for AOFAS in hallux valgus surgery although it could have a great impact on the accuracy of analyzing surgical outcomes. Hence, the primary aim of this study was to define the Minimal Clinically Important Difference (MCID) for the AOFAS score in these patients, and the secondary aim was to correlate patients' demographics to the MCID. We conducted a retrospective cross-sectional study. A total of 446 patients were reviewed preoperatively and followed up for 2 years. An anchor question was asked 2 years postoperation: "How would you rate the overall results of your treatment for your foot and ankle condition?" (excellent, very good, good, fair, poor, terrible). The MCID was derived using 4 methods, 3 from an anchor-based approach and 1 from a distribution-based approach. Anchor-based approaches were (1) mean difference in 2-year AOFAS scores of patients who answered "good" versus "fair" based on the anchor question; (2) mean change of AOFAS score preoperatively and at 2-year follow-up in patients who answered good; (3) receiver operating characteristic (ROC) curves method, where the area under the curve (AUC) represented the likelihood that the scoring system would accurately discriminate these 2 groups of patients. The distribution-based approach used to calculate MCID was the effect size method. There were 405 (90.8%) females and 41 (9.2%) males. Mean age was 51.2 (standard deviation [SD] = 13) years, mean preoperative BMI was 24.2 (SD = 4.1). Mean preoperative AOFAS score was 55.6 (SD = 16.8), with significant improvement to 85.7 (SD = 14.4) in 2 years ( P value

  4. Validity of self-assessment of hallux valgus using the Manchester scale

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    Wee Elin

    2010-09-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Hallux valgus (HV is a common condition involving the progressive subluxation of the first metatarsophalangeal joint due to lateral deviation of the hallux and medial deviation of the first metatarsal. The objective of this study was to evaluate the re-test reliability and validity of self-assessment of HV using a simple clinical screening tool involving four standardised photographs (the Manchester scale, in order to determine whether this tool could be used for postal surveys of the condition. Methods HV was assessed with the Manchester scale in 138 people aged 65 to 93 years of age (102 women and 36 men as part of a larger randomised controlled trial. At the six month follow-up assessment, HV was reassessed to determine re-test reliability, and participants were asked to self-assess their degree of HV independent of the examiners. Associations between (i baseline and follow-up assessments of the examiners and (ii participant and examiner assessments were performed using weighted kappa statistics. Analyses were then repeated after HV was dichotomised as present or absent using unweighted kappa, and sensitivity and specificity of self-assessment of HV was determined. Results Re-test reliability of the examiners was substantial to almost perfect (weighted kappa = 0.78 to 0.90, and there was a substantial level of agreement between observations of the participants and the examiners (weighted kappa = 0.71 to 0.80. Overall, there was a slight tendency for participants to rate their HV as less severe than the examiners. When the Manchester scale scores were dichotomised, agreement was substantial to almost perfect for both re-test comparisons (kappa = 0.80 to 0.89 and substantial for comparisons between participants and examiners (kappa = 0.64 to 0.76. The sensitivity and specificity of self-assessment of HV using the dichotomous scale were 85 and 88%, respectively. Conclusions The Manchester scale demonstrates high re

  5. Longitudinal bracketed epiphysis of proximal phalanx of the great toe with congenital hallux varus managed simultaneously with monorail external fixator: a case report.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Verma, Vineet; Batra, Amit; Singla, Rohit; Gogna, Paritosh; Magu, Narender; Gupta, Rakesh

    2014-02-01

    Longitudinal bracketed epiphysis (delta phalanx) is a rare congenital anomaly that affects phalanges in the hand more commonly than toes. We present a rare case of congenital hallux varus with longitudinal bracketed epiphysis of proximal phalanx with bifid distal phalanx of the great toe, which was managed with monorail type of external fixator. To the best of our knowledge, this is the first report of its successful implementation in simultaneous treatment of longitudinal bracketed epiphysis of the proximal phalanx of the great toe and hallux varus. Apart from adding to the literature a case of rare subtype of delta phalanx with hallux varus, the present study highlights the role of a reliable alternative in its management.

  6. Ultrasound evaluation of intrinsic plantar muscles and fascia in hallux valgus: A case-control study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lobo, César Calvo; Marín, Alejandro Garrido; Sanz, David Rodríguez; López, Daniel López; López, Patricia Palomo; Morales, Carlos Romero; Corbalán, Irene Sanz

    2016-11-01

    A cross-sectional area (CSA) and thickness reduction of the abductor hallucis (AbH) is shown in subjects with hallux valgus (HV). To date, other soft-tissue structures have not been researched in relation with HV. The aim of this study was to compare the CSA and thickness of the intrinsic plantar muscles and fascia (PF) between feet with and without HV. Therefore, a cross-sectional and case-control study was performed using B-mode with an iU22 Philips ultrasound system and a 5 to 17-MHz transducer. The CSA and thickness were measured for the AbH, flexor digitorum brevis (FDB) and flexor hallucis brevis (FHB), and also the thickness for the anterior, middle, and posterior PF portions. A convenience sample of 40 feet, 20 with HV and 20 without HV, was recruited from a clinical and research center. A multivariate regression analysis using linear regression was performed to evaluate the ultrasound imaging measurements (α = 0.05). Consequently, statistically significant differences were observed between the groups (P plantar fascia thickness increase in favor of the HV group. On the contrary, the FDB thickness and CSA did not show statistically significant differences (P ≥ 0.05). In conclusion, the CSA and thickness of the AbH and FHB intrinsic plantar muscles are reduced, whereas the thickness of the anterior, middle, and posterior PF portions are increased, in subjects with HV compared with those without HV.

  7. Radiographic features that enable assessment of first metatarsal rotation: the role of pronation in hallux valgus

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    Eustace, S. (Dept. of Radiology, Mater Misericordiae Hospital, Dublin (Ireland)); O' Byrne, J. (Dept. of Orthopaedics, Mater Misericordiae Hospital, Dublin (Ireland)); Stack, J. (Dept. of Radiology, Mater Misericordiae Hospital, Dublin (Ireland)); Stephens, M.M. (Dept. of Orthopaedics, Mater Misericordiae Hospital, Dublin (Ireland))

    1993-04-01

    This study describes a method of detecting first metatarsal pronation on the basis of the movement of the inferior tuberosity of the base of 20 cadaveric first metatarsals at 0 , 10 , 20 and 30 pronation. On pronation, the inferior tuberosity of the base of the first metatarsal moved lateral to the mid-line axis. At 10 , the tuberosity pointed to the junction of the inner third and outer two-thirds of a line between the midpoint and lateral tubercle of the base. At 20 , it pointed to the junction of the inner two-thirds and outer third of that line. At 30 , it pointed to the outer marting of the lateral third. Using these features, the amount of first metatarsal pronation in 100 consecutive weigth-bearing views of feet was recorded and plotted against the corresponding intermetatarsal angles in those feet. Four of 43 patients with an intermetatarsal angle of less than 9 had pronation greater than 10 , 48 of 57 patients with an intermetatarsal angle greater than 9 had pronation greater than 10 (P<0.001). As intermetatarsal angles increase, the amount of first metatarsal pronation increases (r=0.69). Pronation and varus deviation of the first metatarsal are linked; both alter the tendon balance maintaining proximal phalanx alignment and lead to the development of hallux valgus. (orig.)

  8. Radiographic features that enable assessment of first metatarsal rotation: the role of pronation in hallux valgus

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Eustace, S.; O'Byrne, J.; Stack, J.; Stephens, M.M.

    1993-01-01

    This study describes a method of detecting first metatarsal pronation on the basis of the movement of the inferior tuberosity of the base of 20 cadaveric first metatarsals at 0 , 10 , 20 and 30 pronation. On pronation, the inferior tuberosity of the base of the first metatarsal moved lateral to the mid-line axis. At 10 , the tuberosity pointed to the junction of the inner third and outer two-thirds of a line between the midpoint and lateral tubercle of the base. At 20 , it pointed to the junction of the inner two-thirds and outer third of that line. At 30 , it pointed to the outer marting of the lateral third. Using these features, the amount of first metatarsal pronation in 100 consecutive weigth-bearing views of feet was recorded and plotted against the corresponding intermetatarsal angles in those feet. Four of 43 patients with an intermetatarsal angle of less than 9 had pronation greater than 10 , 48 of 57 patients with an intermetatarsal angle greater than 9 had pronation greater than 10 (P<0.001). As intermetatarsal angles increase, the amount of first metatarsal pronation increases (r=0.69). Pronation and varus deviation of the first metatarsal are linked; both alter the tendon balance maintaining proximal phalanx alignment and lead to the development of hallux valgus. (orig.)

  9. Rotational Osteotomy for Hallux Valgus. A New Technique for Primary and Revision Cases

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ortiz, Cristian; Wagner, Emilio

    2017-01-01

    More than 200 different surgical techniques exist for hallux valgus (HV). Some of them are designed for mild, moderate, or severe deformities depending on their correction power. Nevertheless, they all correct only the coronal and/or sagittal plane deformity. Just a handful of them correct the known axial malrotation that exists in most HV cases. This malrotation is one possible factor that could be the source of recurrence of an operated HV as it has been described. We describe a new technique which simultaneously corrects the metatarsal internal rotation and varus deformity by rotating the metatarsal through an oblique plane osteotomy. This is performed with no bone wedge resection. Also, there is a broader bone surface contact than on a transverse proximal osteotomy. This technique is easy to remember and relatively simple to perform in primary and revision cases. The authors results show that it is as safe and effective as other procedures, with some advantages to be discussed. Levels of Evidence: Diagnostic Level 5. See Instructions for Authors for a complete description of levels of evidence. PMID:28286430

  10. Correction of moderate to severe hallux valgus with combined proximal opening wedge and distal chevron osteotomies: a reliable technique.

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    Jeyaseelan, L; Chandrashekar, S; Mulligan, A; Bosman, H A; Watson, A J S

    2016-09-01

    The mainstay of surgical correction of hallux valgus is first metatarsal osteotomy, either proximally or distally. We present a technique of combining a distal chevron osteotomy with a proximal opening wedge osteotomy, for the correction of moderate to severe hallux valgus. We reviewed 45 patients (49 feet) who had undergone double osteotomy. Outcome was assessed using the American Orthopaedic Foot and Ankle Society (AOFAS) and the Short Form (SF) -36 Health Survey scores. Radiological measurements were undertaken to assess the correction. The mean age of the patients was 60.8 years (44.2 to 75.3). The mean follow-up was 35.4 months (24 to 51). The mean AOFAS score improved from 54.7 to 92.3 (p hallux valgus and intermetatarsal angles were improved from 41.6(o) to 12.8(o) (p < 0.001) and from 22.1(o) to 7.1(o), respectively (p < 0.001). The mean distal metatarsal articular angle improved from 23(o) to 9.7(o). The mean sesamoid position, as described by Hardy and Clapham, improved from 6.8 to 3.5. The mean length of the first metatarsal was unchanged. The overall rate of complications was 4.1% (two patients). These results suggest that a double osteotomy of the first metatarsal is a reliable, safe technique which, when compared with other metatarsal osteotomies, provides strong angular correction and excellent outcomes with a low rate of complications. Cite this article: Bone Joint J 2016;98-B:1202-7. ©2016 The British Editorial Society of Bone & Joint Surgery.

  11. Correction of Hallux Valgus Interphalangeus With an Osteotomy of the Distal End of the Proximal Phalanx (Distal Akin Osteotomy).

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    Vander Griend, Robert

    2017-02-01

    Operative correction of a symptomatic hallux valgus interphalangeus (HVI) deformity is often achieved with an osteotomy at the proximal end of the proximal phalanx (Akin osteotomy). However, the apex of the typical HVI deformity (center of rotation angle) is at the interphalangeal joint of the hallux. This study was done to evaluate the results of performing a medial closing wedge osteotomy at the distal end of the proximal phalanx. Thirty-three patients (33 feet) underwent an osteotomy at the distal end of the proximal phalanx for correction of HVI. All of the patients had other forefoot deformities which were corrected at the same time. Eight of these were revision procedures of prior forefoot operations. The length of follow-up was determined by the associated procedures with a minimum follow-up of 4 months. The preoperative hallux valgus interphalangeus angle averaged 16 degrees of valgus (range 7-32 degrees) and was corrected to an average of 2 degrees of valgus (range 5 degrees valgus to 5 degrees varus). All of the patients were satisfied with the postoperative appearance and function of the first toe. Because of simultaneous correction of numerous other forefoot problems, it was not possible to specifically isolate or evaluate the effects and benefits of this osteotomy using outcomes measures. There was one intraoperative complication resulting in a fracture extending into the adjacent IP joint. Correction of an HVI deformity can be achieved with an osteotomy at the distal end of the proximal phalanx. This was a safe technique with few complications and with good results in terms of both correction and patient satisfaction. Level IV, retrospective case series.

  12. Nuevo tratamiento percutáneo para la corrección quirúrgica del hallux valgus.

    OpenAIRE

    D' Angelo, Fabio

    2017-01-01

    En la literatura se han descrito más de 100 procedimientos que pueden aplicarse al tratamiento del Hallux Valgus (HV) y el criterio de selección será tomado en base a la evolución de la deformidad, edad del paciente y calidad del hueso, entre otros. Cuando se habla de corrección quirúrgica del HV, comúnmente pensamos en una técnica quirúrgica que contempla una serie de gestos sobre las partes blandas y sobre las estructuras oseas, como las osteotomías del metatarso y/o de la falange. ...

  13. Kinematic adaptations of the hindfoot, forefoot, and hallux during cross-slope walking.

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    Damavandi, Mohsen; Dixon, Philippe C; Pearsall, David J

    2010-07-01

    Despite cross-slope surfaces being a regular feature of our environment, little is known about segmental adaptations required to maintain both balance and forward locomotion. The purpose of this study was to determine kinematic adaptations of the foot segments in relation to transverse (cross-sloped) walking surfaces. Ten young adult males walked barefoot along an inclinable walkway (level, 0° and cross-slope, 10°). Kinematic adaptations of hindfoot with respect to tibia (HF/TB), forefoot with respect to hindfoot (FF/HF), and hallux with respect to forefoot (HX/FF) in level walking (LW), inclined walking up-slope (IWU), i.e., the foot at the higher elevation, and inclined walking down-slope (IWD), i.e., the foot at the lower elevation, were measured. Multivariate analysis of variance (MANOVA) for repeated measures was used to analyze the data. In the sagittal plane, the relative FF/HF and HX/FF plantar/dorsiflexion angles differed across conditions (p=0.024 and p=0.026, respectively). More importantly, numerous frontal plane alterations occurred. For the HF/TB angle, inversion of IWU and eversion of IWD was seen at heel-strike (p<0.001). This pattern reversed with IWU showing eversion and IWD inversion in early stance (p=0.024). For the FF/HF angle, significant differences were observed in mid-stance with IWD revealing inversion while IWU was everted (p<0.004). At toe-off, the pattern switched to eversion of IWD and inversion of IWU (p=0.032). The information obtained from this study enhances our understanding of the kinematics of the human foot in stance during level and cross-slope walking. Copyright © 2010 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  14. Ultrasound evaluation of intrinsic plantar muscles and fascia in hallux valgus

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    Lobo, César Calvo; Marín, Alejandro Garrido; Sanz, David Rodríguez; López, Daniel López; López, Patricia Palomo; Morales, Carlos Romero; Corbalán, Irene Sanz

    2016-01-01

    Abstract A cross-sectional area (CSA) and thickness reduction of the abductor hallucis (AbH) is shown in subjects with hallux valgus (HV). To date, other soft-tissue structures have not been researched in relation with HV. The aim of this study was to compare the CSA and thickness of the intrinsic plantar muscles and fascia (PF) between feet with and without HV. Therefore, a cross-sectional and case-control study was performed using B-mode with an iU22 Philips ultrasound system and a 5 to 17-MHz transducer. The CSA and thickness were measured for the AbH, flexor digitorum brevis (FDB) and flexor hallucis brevis (FHB), and also the thickness for the anterior, middle, and posterior PF portions. A convenience sample of 40 feet, 20 with HV and 20 without HV, was recruited from a clinical and research center. A multivariate regression analysis using linear regression was performed to evaluate the ultrasound imaging measurements (α = 0.05). Consequently, statistically significant differences were observed between the groups (P plantar fascia thickness increase in favor of the HV group. On the contrary, the FDB thickness and CSA did not show statistically significant differences (P ≥ 0.05). In conclusion, the CSA and thickness of the AbH and FHB intrinsic plantar muscles are reduced, whereas the thickness of the anterior, middle, and posterior PF portions are increased, in subjects with HV compared with those without HV. PMID:27828846

  15. Midterm outcome after correction of hallux valgus deformity using scarf osteotomy in adult population

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    Laura Ibrahim Alolayan

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Context: Determining the efficacy of any surgical treatment is the key to achieve better practice and best outcomes for patients. Aims: This study is designed to address midterm outcome in adult patients with moderate-to-severe hallux valgus (HV, who underwent scarf osteotomy from 2012 to 2014. Settings and Design: This is a retrospective cohort study in which charts of all adult patients with moderate-to-severe HV who underwent scarf osteotomy from 2011 to 2014 were reviewed. Subjects and Methods: Between 2011 and 2014, 39 patients (41 feet who underwent scarf osteotomy for correction of HV deformity were retrospectively evaluated. Standard weight-bearing dorsoplantar radiographs were obtained pre- and postoperatively. HV angle (HVA, intermetatarsal angle (IMA and distal metatarsal articular angles (DMAA were measured pre- and postoperatively to evaluate the efficacy of the surgery. The complication rate was reported. The average follow-up was 13.5 months, and the patients' mean age was 37 years. Statistical Analysis Used: Data were compared using Chi-square test or Fisher's exact test whichever was appropriate. All tests were two-sided, and a P> 0.01 was considered statistically significant. Results: The average preoperative HVA and IMA were 32° and 14.3°, which improved to 11° and 7.9°, respectively. The changes were statistically significant (P 0.18. Conclusions: This study suggests that scarf osteotomy surgery is a very versatile osteotomy in correcting moderate-to-severe HV deformity. It offers a greater degree of correction and stability, lower rate of complications and good outcome. However, long-term follow-up studies are still needed.

  16. Factors Related to Prevalence of Hallux Valgus in Female University Students: A Cross-Sectional Study

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    Okuda, Hiroto; Juman, Sachiko; Ueda, Ai; Miki, Tomohiro; Shima, Masayuki

    2014-01-01

    Background We investigated the prevalence of hallux valgus (HV) and examined its association with various factors in a cross-sectional study of Japanese female university students. Methods A questionnaire survey of foot symptoms, lifestyle, and body mass index (BMI) was administered to 343 women who provided informed consent at a women’s university. Footprints were obtained and bone density was measured. Associations of HV with various factors were analyzed by logistic regression analysis. Results Big toe pain was reported in 26.5% of the women. HV (HV angle, ≥15°) was present in the left foot in 22.4%, the right foot in 20.7%, and unilaterally or bilaterally in 29.7% of women. Mild HV (HV angle, ≥15° to <20°) was noted in the left foot and right foot in 13.4% and 13.1% of women, respectively; no severe HV (HV angle, ≥40°) was observed. HV was associated with big toe pain (adjusted OR: 3.56, 95% CI: 2.01–6.32), history of HV in the mother or maternal grandmother (adjusted OR: 2.45, 95% CI: 1.19–5.02), and history of HV in other family members (adjusted OR: 3.09, 95% CI: 1.35–7.06). Moderate HV was associated with big toe pain (adjusted OR: 4.58, 95% CI: 2.17–9.66) and history of HV in the mother or maternal grandmother (adjusted OR: 3.36, 95% CI: 1.40–8.07). The proportion of women with big toe pain increased significantly with HV severity. Conclusions HV was present in about 30% of female university students. Young women with big toe pain or a family history of HV should be evaluated for HV. PMID:24705646

  17. ARTHRODESIS OF THE FIRST METATARSOPHALANGEAL JOINT IN PATIENTS WITH RHEUMATOID ARTHRITIS AND HALLUX VALGUS: CHOICE OF TECHNIQUE OF ARTHRODESIS FIXATION, COMPLICATIONS AND LONG-TERM RESULTS

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    V. P. Pavlov

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Objective: to study results of arthrodesis of the first metatarsophalangeal joint (I MPT joint in patients with rheumatoidarthritis (RA and hallux valgus, assess methods of arthrodesis fixation, reveal complications and analyze longterm results.Subjects and methods. Authors observed 86 patients with RA, female : male ratio 3.2:1, mean age was 53.8±9.5 years (from 18 to 75 years; 80 from them had seropositive and 6 – seronegative RA. 72 patients had low, and 14 –moderate activity of the disease. II stage of RA was revealed in 31.4%, III – in 62.8%, IV – in 5.8%; 52.3% of  patients had I and 47.7% – II functional class. All patients  ad hallux valgus as a component of typical deformation of the forefoot – digitis V rheumaticus (DVR. Standard global reconstructive operation (SGRO and its modification (MGRO were used. Both techniques included arthrodesis of the I MTP joint where fusion of bones was fixed with Kirschner wire and compression clamps in groups A and B respectively. Results of surgical treatmentwere assessed separately for I and II–V toes. The present work provides solely the results of the I MTP joint arthrodesis.Results. Assessment of the I MTP joint with hallux valgus before and 2.3±1.5 years after operation based on AOFAS comprised 35.51±8.16/82.32±6.09 in the group A and 39.93±6.65/82.26±5,59 in the group B. Inefficiency of arthrodesis of the I MTP joint was observed in 3 patients from the group B (2.15%. Before operation, 3 from 141 feet had hallux valgus of the II stage (21–40°; III (41–60° and IV (>60° stages of hallux valgus were recorded in 90 and48 feet respectively. Following 2.3 years after arthrodesis normal I MTP joints (10–11° were observed in 131 feet whereas, that of the II stage of hallux valgus (12–20° – in 10 feet.Conclusion. High efficacy of arthrodesis of the I MTP joint in patients with RA and hallux valgus and, subsequently, low failure rate (2.15% were achieved as

  18. A Prospective Study of Distal Metatarsal Chevron Osteotomies with K-Wire Fixations to Treat Hallux Valgus Deformities

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    Baig, Usman; Tariq, Ali; Din, Robert

    2017-01-01

    Introduction Hallux valgus is one of the most common forefoot deformities worldwide. Females are affected more often than males. The three most common clinical symptoms are the painful bunion, transfer metatarsalgia, and hammer or claw toes. Methods This case series consisted of 20 patients who had chevron osteotomy from January 2015 to January 2016. The clinical assessment was measured by The American Orthopedic Foot and Ankle Score (AOFAS), and radiologic assessment was determined by preoperative and postoperative hallux valgus angle (HVA) and intermetatarsal angle (IMA). Results The patients’ mean age was 56 years. Out of 20 patients, 19 were female, and one was male. The mean AOFAS improved from 51 preoperatively to 82 postoperatively. The HVA improved from 26° preoperatively to 14°. There were five complications including four Kirschner (K)-wire complications. Conclusion Distal chevron osteotomy is a reliable and time-tested procedure. The K-wire fixation has a relatively high complication rate. We planned to use other methods of fixation and then compared them with K-wires fixation results for future studies. PMID:29167752

  19. Prevalence of hallux valgus in the general population: a systematic review and meta-analysis

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    Vicenzino Bill

    2010-09-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Hallux valgus (HV is a foot deformity commonly seen in medical practice, often accompanied by significant functional disability and foot pain. Despite frequent mention in a diverse body of literature, a precise estimate of the prevalence of HV is difficult to ascertain. The purpose of this systematic review was to investigate prevalence of HV in the overall population and evaluate the influence of age and gender. Methods Electronic databases (Medline, Embase, and CINAHL and reference lists of included papers were searched to June 2009 for papers on HV prevalence without language restriction. MeSH terms and keywords were used relating to HV or bunions, prevalence and various synonyms. Included studies were surveys reporting original data for prevalence of HV or bunions in healthy populations of any age group. Surveys reporting prevalence data grouped with other foot deformities and in specific disease groups (e.g. rheumatoid arthritis, diabetes were excluded. Two independent investigators quality rated all included papers on the Epidemiological Appraisal Instrument. Data on raw prevalence, population studied and methodology were extracted. Prevalence proportions and the standard error were calculated, and meta-analysis was performed using a random effects model. Results A total of 78 papers reporting results of 76 surveys (total 496,957 participants were included and grouped by study population for meta-analysis. Pooled prevalence estimates for HV were 23% in adults aged 18-65 years (CI: 16.3 to 29.6 and 35.7% in elderly people aged over 65 years (CI: 29.5 to 42.0. Prevalence increased with age and was higher in females [30% (CI: 22 to 38] compared to males [13% (CI: 9 to 17]. Potential sources of bias were sampling method, study quality and method of HV diagnosis. Conclusions Notwithstanding the wide variation in estimates, it is evident that HV is prevalent; more so in females and with increasing age. Methodological quality

  20. SURGICAL CORRECTION OF HALLUX VALGUS IN PATIENTS WITH TRANSVERSE FLATFOOT AND DEFORMING ARTHROSIS OF THE FIRST METATARSOPHALANGEAL JOINT

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    V. M. Mashkov

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Objective: to determine the opportunity of usage of Schede-Brandes procedure in the treatment of patients with hallux valgus. Material and methods. The results of Shede-Brandeis operation were studied in 119 patients (198 feet. The study included patients who were followed up long-term results of treatment for up to 10 years. The results of the surgical treatment were assessed by the AOFAS scale and total criteria proposed I.A. Pakhomov. According to these scales the following results were obtained: the good - in 59,59% of patients, satisfactory - in 22,73%, poor - in 17,68%. Conclusion. These results allow to recommend Schede-Brandes procedure for use in elderly patients with osteoporosis, concomitant vascular diseases of lower extremities and with rheumatoid arthritis.

  1. First Metatarsal Proximal Opening Wedge Osteotomy for Correction of Hallux Valgus Deformity: Comparison of Straight versus Oblique Osteotomy

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    Han, Seung Hwan; Park, Eui Hyun; Jo, Joon; Koh, Yong Gon; Lee, Jin Woo; Choi, Woo Jin

    2015-01-01

    Purpose The aim of this study was to compare clinical and radiographic outcomes of proximal opening wedge osteotomy using a straight versus oblique osteotomy. Materials and Methods We retrospectively reviewed 104 consecutive first metatarsal proximal opening wedge osteotomies performed in 95 patients with hallux valgus deformity. Twenty-six feet were treated using straight metatarsal osteotomy (group A), whereas 78 feet were treated using oblique metatarsal osteotomy (group B). The hallux valgus angle (HVA), intermetatarsal angle (IMA), distal metatarsal articular angle, and distance from the first to the second metatarsal (distance) were measured for radiographic evaluation, whereas the American Orthopaedic Foot and Ankle Society (AOFAS) forefoot score was used for clinical evaluation. Results Significant corrections in the HVA, IMA, and distance from the first to the second metatarsal were obtained in both groups at the last follow-up (p<0.001). There was no difference in the mean IMA correction between the 2 groups (6.1±2.7° in group A and 6.0±2.1° in group B). However, a greater correction in the HVA and distance from the first to the second metatarsal were found in group B (HVA, 13.2±8.2°; distance, 25.1±0.2 mm) compared to group A (HVA, 20.9±7.7°; distance, 28.1±0.3 mm; p<0.001). AOFAS scores were improved in both groups. However, group B demonstrated a greater improvement relative to group A (p=0.005). Conclusion Compared with a straight first metatarsal osteotomy, an oblique first metatarsal osteotomy yielded better clinical and radiological outcomes. PMID:25837181

  2. Effectiveness of surgery for adults with hallux valgus deformity: a systematic review.

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    Klugarova, Jitka; Hood, Victoria; Bath-Hextall, Fiona; Klugar, Miloslav; Mareckova, Jana; Kelnarova, Zuzana

    2017-06-01

    Hallux valgus (HV) is a common foot deformity. In severe stages of this condition, surgery is often necessary. Currently, there is no systematic review comparing the effectiveness of surgery over conservative treatment. The objective of this review was to establish the effectiveness of surgery compared to conservatory management for adults with HV. The current review included adults (18 years or over) with HV deformity, excluding adults with neurological problems causing foot deformities, for example, cerebral palsy, neuropathy, stroke and multiple sclerosis. The review included any type of HV surgery compared to no surgery, conservative treatment or different types of HV surgeries. The primary outcome was gait measurement, and secondary outcomes included quality of life, patient satisfaction, pain assessed using any validated assessment tool and adverse events. The review included randomized controlled trials. The search strategy aimed to find both published and unpublished studies. A three-step search strategy was utilized in 16 databases without language and date limitations. Papers selected for retrieval were assessed by two independent reviewers for methodological validity prior to inclusion in the review using standardized critical appraisal instruments developed by the Joanna Briggs Institute (JBI). Data were extracted from papers included in the review using the standardized data extraction tool developed by the JBI. Quantitative data were, where possible, pooled in statistical meta-analysis using RevMan5 (Copenhagen: The Nordic Cochrane Centre, Cochrane). Effect sizes expressed as risk ratio (for categorical data) and mean differences (MD) or standardized MD (for continuous data) and their 95% confidence intervals were calculated for analysis. Where statistical pooling was not possible, the findings have been presented in narrative form. Searching identified 2412 citations. After removal of duplicates, paper retrieval and critical appraisal, 25 studies

  3. The results of Scarf osteotomy combined with distal soft tissue procedure are mostly satisfactory in surgical management of moderate to severe hallux valgus.

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    Şaylı, Uğur; Akman, Budak; Tanrıöver, Altuğ; Kaspar, Çiğdem; Güven, Melih; Özler, Turhan

    2017-05-29

    Intrinsically stable diaphyseal osteotomy gained popularity in recent years for symptomatic hallux valgus deformities. In this study, Scarf osteotomy results, in surgical management of moderate to severe hallux valgus, are presented. Study group consisted of 40 feet of 32 (28 females, four males) patients surgically managed by Scarf osteotomy between September 2009 and 2011, with a mean age of 52,98 (range, 31-75) years at the time of surgery. Patient satisfaction and VAS were used for subjective evaluation while for objective measures AOFAS score, first metatarsophalangeal joint ROM and radiological measurements (intermetatarsal, hallux valgus and distal metatarsal articular angles) were evaluated. Mean follow-up period was 38 (range, 24-60) months. Sixteen feet (40%) were reported as very satisfied, 19 (47,5%) as satisfied and the remaining five (12,5%) as unsatisfied resulting with a total of 35 (87,5%) satisfaction. The mean preoperative VAS and AOFAS forefoot scores improved from 8,13±0,791 to 2,68±1,228 (p=0,0001) and from 58,25±6,15 to 78,25±8,13 (p=0,0001) on the final follow-up, respectively. The postoperative change of first metatarsophalangeal joint ROM was not statistically significant (p=0,281). On the radiological evaluation; intermetatarsal and hallux valgus angles improved from a mean value of 14,77±1,76 to 8,13±1,52° (p=0,0001) and from 35,28±5,86 to 20,10±5,55° (p=0,0001), respectively. Distal metatarsal articular angle did not show any statistically significant change (p=0,195). Scarf osteotomy combined with distal soft tissue procedure is a technically demanding procedure. The osteotomy is intrinsically stable and the correction power is high and the results are mostly satisfactory. Copyright © 2017. Published by Elsevier Ltd.

  4. [Lack of correlation between plantar arthrosis of the first metatarsal joint and sesamoids and pain in patients after hallux valgus surgery].

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    Villas, C; Escribano, R J; Alfonso, M

    2012-01-01

    To determine the relationship between osteoarthritis in the plantar region of the first metatarsophalangeal joint of the foot and patient pain after hallux valgus surgery. A total of 28 patients undergoing hallux valgus surgery were examined. The patients were examined for pain in the plantar region of the metatarsophalangeal joint (sesamoid bones area), by looking into their medical records and by means of palpation during the physical exam. X-rays were taken to look for metatarsophalangeal arthritis, and PASA and sesamoid displacement were measured. During the surgical procedure, the metatarsal head was macroscopically assessed for arthritis according to the ICRS Score. Of the 28 patients, 18 had no pain, 7 had mild pain (VAS 1-3) and 3 had moderate pain (VAS 4-6). Macroscopically, all the patients had some degree of plantar osteoarthritis. Only 5 patients had radiological signs of metatarsophalangeal arthritis. There was no correlation (P=.44) between pain and plantar osteoarthritis. There was a mild but non-significant correlation between PASA and osteoarthritis (P=.06). There was a weak but significant correlation between patient age and arthritis (P=.04). Osteoarthritis in the plantar aspect of the first metatarsal head does not correlate with patient symptoms or with pain intensity in patients undergoing hallux valgus surgery. Copyright © 2011 SECOT. Published by Elsevier Espana. All rights reserved.

  5. Inter and intra-observer reliability in assessment of the position of the lateral sesamoid in determining the severity of hallux valgus.

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    Panchani, Sunil; Reading, Jonathan; Mehta, Jaysheel

    2016-06-01

    The position of the lateral sesamoid on standard dorso-plantar weight bearing radiographs, with respect to the lateral cortex of the first metatarsal, has been shown to correlate well with the degree of the hallux valgus angle. This study aimed to assess the inter- and intra-observer error of this new classification system. Five orthopaedic consultants and five trainee orthopaedic surgeons were recruited to assess and document the degree of displacement of the lateral sesamoid on 144 weight-bearing dorso-plantar radiographs on two separate occasions. The severity of hallux valgus was defined as normal (0%), mild (≤50%), moderate (51-≤99%) or severe (≥100%) depending on the percentage displacement of the lateral sesamoid body from the lateral cortical border of the first metatarsal. Consultant intra-observer variability showed good agreement between repeated assessment of the radiographs (mean Kappa=0.75). Intra-observer variability for trainee orthopaedic surgeons also showed good agreement with a mean Kappa=0.73. Intraclass correlations for consultants and trainee surgeons was also high. The new classification system of assessing the severity of hallux valgus shows high inter- and intra-observer variability with good agreement and reproducibility between surgeons of consultant and trainee grades. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  6. Comparison of Clinical Outcomes of Scarf and Chevron Osteotomies and the McBride Procedure in the Treatment of Hallux Valgus Deformity

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    Mohammad Fakoor

    2014-03-01

    Full Text Available Background:   Hallux valgus deformity is a common chronic problem in middle age and elderly. Different surgical procedures have been introduced so far with their proposed indications for each. This study aimed to compare three   current procedures namely Chevron osteotomy, Scarf osteotomy and McBride technique.     Methods:   In this study, 44 patients were included from 2010 to 2013. All patients had been undergone one of the three current procedures including Chevron, Scarf or McBride techniques. Preoperative and follow-up radiographies     were evaluated in terms of hallux valgus and intermetatarsal angles. Foot Ankle Disability Index was filled to assess the functional. A Visual Analogue Scale evaluated pain. Also, satisfaction, aesthetic and the rate of recurrence were evaluated. Results:   Functional score, aesthetic and satisfaction level were higher in Scarf technique rather than Chevron and McBride techniques. Also, pain score and recurrence rate were lower in Scarf Technique rather the other two techniques.     Conclusions:   With respect to better results with Scarf osteotomy in this study, we recommend Scarf osteotomy as   a first choice for treatment of moderate hallux valgus deformity.

  7. Rehabilitation after hallux valgus surgery: importance of physical therapy to restore weight bearing of the first ray during the stance phase.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schuh, Reinhard; Hofstaetter, Stefan G; Adams, Samuel B; Pichler, Florian; Kristen, Karl-Heinz; Trnka, Hans-Joerg

    2009-09-01

    Operative treatment of people with hallux valgus can yield favorable clinical and radiographic results. However, plantar pressure analysis has demonstrated that physiologic gait patterns are not restored after hallux valgus surgery. The purpose of this study was to illustrate the changes of plantar pressure distribution during the stance phase of gait in patients who underwent hallux valgus surgery and received a multimodal rehabilitation program. This was a prospective descriptive study. Thirty patients who underwent Austin (n=20) and scarf (n=10) osteotomy for correction of mild to moderate hallux valgus deformity were included in this study. Four weeks postoperatively they received a multimodal rehabilitation program once per week for 4 to 6 weeks. Plantar pressure analysis was performed preoperatively and 4 weeks, 8 weeks, and 6 months postoperatively. In addition, range of motion of the first metatarsophalangeal joint was measured, and the American Orthopaedic Foot and Ankle Society (AOFAS) forefoot questionnaire was administered preoperatively and at 6 months after surgery. The mean AOFAS score significantly increased from 60.7 points (SD=11.9) preoperatively to 94.5 points (SD=4.5) 6 months after surgery. First metatarsophalangeal joint range of motion increased at 6 months postoperatively, with a significant increase in isolated dorsiflexion. In the first metatarsal head region, maximum force increased from 117.8 N to 126.4 N and the force-time integral increased from 37.9 N.s to 55.6 N.s between the preoperative and 6-month assessments. In the great toe region, maximum force increased from 66.1 N to 87.2 N and the force-time integral increased from 18.7 N.s to 24.2 N.s between the preoperative and 6-month assessments. A limitation of the study was the absence of a control group due to the descriptive nature of the study. The results suggest that postoperative physical therapy and gait training may lead to improved function and weight bearing of the first

  8. [Clinical effect modified Chevron osteotomy combined with lateral tissue loosening in treating mild-moderate hallux valgus through internal signal approach].

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    Chen, Xue-Qiang; Wu, Qun-Feng; Dong, Wei-Qin; Yu, Li-Xin; Li, Xiong-Feng

    2018-03-25

    To explore clinical effect of modified Chevron osteotomy combined with lateral tissue loosening for the treatment of mild-moderate hallux valgus through internal signal approach. From July 2015 to June 2016, 26 patients with mild-moderate hallux valgus treated with modified Chevron osteotomy combined with lateral tissue loosening through internal signal approach, including 2 males and 24 females aged from 45 to 65 years old with an average of(54.6±4.8) years old;the courses of diseases ranged from 1 to 5 months with an average of (7.5±3.3) months. Hallux valgus angle(HVA), inter metatarsal angle(IMA) were measured at 12 months after operation, and AOFAS score was applied to evaluate clinical effect before and after operation. All incisions were healed at stage I. No incision occurred infection, metatarsal necrosis and recurrence of hallux valgus deformity. Two patients occurred skin numbness caused by musculocutaneous nerve injury. Twenty-six patients were followed up from 6 to 12 months with an average of(9.12±2.06) months. HVA, IMA were(30.01±3.71)°, (14.00±1.50)° before operation and(9.41±4.16)°, (7.00±0.60)° after operation, which had significant difference. There was statistical significance in AOFAS score before operation 54.77±9.59 and after operation 92.73±5.47, and 19 cases obtained excellent results and 7 moderate. Modified Chevron osteotomy combined with full thread headless pressure screw fixation and lateral tissue loosening for the treatment of mild-moderate hallux valgus has advantages of excellent exposure, simple operation, stable fixation, rapid recovery. Akin osteotomy with internal capsulorrhaphy were used with lateral loosening and could recover soft tissue balance between lateral and internal, and could receive satisfied clinical effects. Copyright© 2018 by the China Journal of Orthopaedics and Traumatology Press.

  9. Comparison of distal soft-tissue procedures combined with a distal chevron osteotomy for moderate to severe hallux valgus: first web-space versus transarticular approach.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Park, Yu-Bok; Lee, Keun-Bae; Kim, Sung-Kyu; Seon, Jong-Keun; Lee, Jun-Young

    2013-11-06

    There are two surgical approaches for distal soft-tissue procedures for the correction of hallux valgus-the dorsal first web-space approach, and the medial transarticular approach. The purpose of this study was to compare the outcomes achieved after use of either of these approaches combined with a distal chevron osteotomy in patients with moderate to severe hallux valgus. One hundred and twenty-two female patients (122 feet) who underwent a distal chevron osteotomy as part of a distal soft-tissue procedure for the treatment of symptomatic unilateral moderate to severe hallux valgus constituted the study cohort. The 122 feet were randomly divided into two groups: namely, a dorsal first web-space approach (group D; sixty feet) and a medial transarticular approach (group M; sixty-two feet). The clinical and radiographic results of the two groups were compared at a mean follow-up time of thirty-eight months. The American Orthopaedic Foot & Ankle Society (AOFAS) hindfoot scale hallux metatarsophalangeal-interphalangeal scores improved from a mean and standard deviation of 55.5 ± 12.8 points preoperatively to 93.5 ± 6.3 points at the final follow-up in group D and from 54.9 ± 12.6 points preoperatively to 93.6 ± 6.2 points at the final follow-up in group M. The mean hallux valgus angle in groups D and M was reduced from 32.2° ± 6.3° and 33.1° ± 8.4° preoperatively to 10.5° ± 5.5° and 9.9° ± 5.5°, respectively, at the time of final follow-up. The mean first intermetatarsal angle in groups D and M was reduced from 15.0° ± 2.8° and 15.3° ± 2.7° preoperatively to 6.5° ± 2.2° and 6.3° ± 2.4°, respectively, at the final follow-up. The clinical and radiographic outcomes were not significantly different between the two groups. The final clinical and radiographic outcomes between the two approaches for distal soft-tissue procedures were comparable and equally successful. Accordingly, the results of this study suggest that the medial transarticular

  10. Surgery for the correction of hallux valgus: minimum five-year results with a validated patient-reported outcome tool and regression analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chong, A; Nazarian, N; Chandrananth, J; Tacey, M; Shepherd, D; Tran, P

    2015-02-01

    This study sought to determine the medium-term patient-reported and radiographic outcomes in patients undergoing surgery for hallux valgus. A total of 118 patients (162 feet) underwent surgery for hallux valgus between January 2008 and June 2009. The Manchester-Oxford Foot Questionnaire (MOXFQ), a validated tool for the assessment of outcome after surgery for hallux valgus, was used and patient satisfaction was sought. The medical records and radiographs were reviewed retrospectively. At a mean of 5.2 years (4.7 to 6.0) post-operatively, the median combined MOXFQ score was 7.8 (IQR:0 to 32.8). The median domain scores for pain, walking/standing, and social interaction were 10 (IQR: 0 to 45), 0 (IQR: 0 to 32.1) and 6.3 (IQR: 0 to 25) respectively. A total of 119 procedures (73.9%, in 90 patients) were reported as satisfactory but only 53 feet (32.7%, in 43 patients) were completely asymptomatic. The mean (SD) correction of hallux valgus, intermetatarsal, and distal metatarsal articular angles was 18.5° (8.8°), 5.7° (3.3°), and 16.6° (8.8°), respectively. Multivariable regression analysis identified that an American Association of Anesthesiologists grade of >1 (Incident Rate Ratio (IRR) = 1.67, p-value = 0.011) and recurrent deformity (IRR = 1.77, p-value = 0.003) were associated with significantly worse MOXFQ scores. No correlation was found between the severity of deformity, the type, or degree of surgical correction and the outcome. When using a validated outcome score for the assessment of outcome after surgery for hallux valgus, the long-term results are worse than expected when compared with the short- and mid-term outcomes, with 25.9% of patients dissatisfied at a mean follow-up of 5.2 years. ©2015 The British Editorial Society of Bone & Joint Surgery.

  11. PROMIS Pain Interference and Physical Function Scores Correlate With the Foot and Ankle Ability Measure (FAAM) in Patients With Hallux Valgus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nixon, Devon C; McCormick, Jeremy J; Johnson, Jeffrey E; Klein, Sandra E

    2017-11-01

    Traditional patient-reported outcome instruments like the Foot and Ankle Ability Measure (FAAM) quantify patient disability but often are limited by responder burden and incomplete questionnaires. The Patient-Reported Outcome Measurement Information System (PROMIS) overcomes such obstacles through computer-adaptive technology and can capture outcome data from various domains including physical and psychosocial function. Prior work has compared the FAAM with PROMIS physical function; however, there is little evidence comparing the association between foot and ankle-specific tools like the FAAM with more general outcomes measures of PROMIS pain interference and depression in foot and ankle conditions. (1) We asked whether there was a relationship between FAAM Activities of Daily Living (ADL) scores with PROMIS physical function, pain interference, and depression in patients with hallux valgus. (2) Additionally, we asked if we could identify specific factors that are associated with variance in FAAM and PROMIS physical function scores in patients with hallux valgus. Eighty-five new patients with either a primary or secondary diagnosis of hallux valgus based on clinic billing codes from July 2015 to February 2016 were retrospectively identified. Patients completed FAAM ADL paper-based surveys and electronic PROMIS questionnaires for physical function, pain interference, and depression from new patient visits at a single time. Spearman rho correlations were performed between FAAM ADL and PROMIS scores. Analyses then were used to identify differences in FAAM ADL and PROMIS physical function measures based on demographic variables. Stepwise linear regressions then determined which demographic and/or outcome variable(s) accounted for the variance in FAAM ADL and PROMIS physical function scores. FAAM scores correlated strongly with PROMIS physical function (r = 0.70, p hallux valgus. PROMIS tools allow for more-efficient data collection across multiple domains and, moving

  12. A comparison of proximal and distal Chevron osteotomy, both with lateral soft-tissue release, for moderate to severe hallux valgus in patients undergoing simultaneous bilateral correction: a prospective randomised controlled trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, K B; Cho, N Y; Park, H W; Seon, J K; Lee, S H

    2015-02-01

    Moderate to severe hallux valgus is conventionally treated by proximal metatarsal osteotomy. Several recent studies have shown that the indications for distal metatarsal osteotomy with a distal soft-tissue procedure could be extended to include moderate to severe hallux valgus. The purpose of this prospective randomised controlled trial was to compare the outcome of proximal and distal Chevron osteotomy in patients undergoing simultaneous bilateral correction of moderate to severe hallux valgus. The original study cohort consisted of 50 female patients (100 feet). Of these, four (8 feet) were excluded for lack of adequate follow-up, leaving 46 female patients (92 feet) in the study. The mean age of the patients was 53.8 years (30.1 to 62.1) and the mean duration of follow-up 40.2 months (24.1 to 80.5). After randomisation, patients underwent a proximal Chevron osteotomy on one foot and a distal Chevron osteotomy on the other. At follow-up, the American Orthopedic Foot and Ankle Society (AOFAS) hallux metatarsophalangeal interphalangeal (MTP-IP) score, patient satisfaction, post-operative complications, hallux valgus angle, first-second intermetatarsal angle, and tibial sesamoid position were similar in each group. Both procedures gave similar good clinical and radiological outcomes. This study suggests that distal Chevron osteotomy with a distal soft-tissue procedure is as effective and reliable a means of correcting moderate to severe hallux valgus as proximal Chevron osteotomy with a distal soft-tissue procedure. ©2015 The British Editorial Society of Bone & Joint Surgery.

  13. Characteristics Associated with Hallux Valgus in a Population-Based Study of Older Adults: The Framingham Foot Study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dufour, Alyssa B.; Casey, Virginia A.; Golightly, Yvonne M.; Hannan, Marian T.

    2015-01-01

    Objective Hallux valgus (HV) is common in older adults, but limited studies of risk factors have reported conflicting results. This cross-sectional analysis examined the association of HV with foot pain and other characteristics in older adults. Methods HV, foot pain, foot structure (planus, rectus, cavus), current and past high heel use, age, and body mass index were assessed in the population-based Framingham Foot Study. Sex-specific logistic and multinomial logistic regression examined the association of HV and HV with pain with study variables. Results Of 1352 men and 1725 women (mean age 66 ± 10.5 years), 22% of men and 44% of women had HV and 3% of men and 11% of women had HV with pain. Foot pain increased odds of HV in both sexes (p 30 kg/m2 decreased odds of HV by 33% in men and 45% in women (p<0.05). In women only, odds of Pain & HV vs. No Pain & No HV were greater with older age and planus foot structure. Conclusions Our work showed different associations in participants who had HV with pain compared to those without foot pain. In both men and women, strong relations were observed between HV and foot pain and inversely with BMI. Older age was associated with HV in women only, as were protective associations with cavus foot structure. PMID:24965070

  14. Quality of Life Impact Related to Foot Health in a Sample of Older People with Hallux Valgus

    Science.gov (United States)

    López, Daniel López; Callejo González, Lucía; Iglesias, Marta Elena Losa; Canosa, Jesús Luis Saleta; Sanz, David Rodríguez; Lobo, Cesar Calvo; de Bengoa Vallejo, Ricardo Becerro

    2016-01-01

    Hallux Valgus (HV) is a highly prevalent forefoot deformity in older people associated with progressive subluxation and osteoarthritis of the first metatarsophalangeal (MTP) joint and it is believed to be associated with varying degrees of HV effect on the quality of life related to foot health. The aim of this study is to compare the impact of varying degrees of HV on foot health in a sample of older people. The sample consisted of 115 participants, mean age 76.7 ± 9.1, who attended an outpatient center where self-report data were recorded. The degree of HV deformity was determined in both feet using the Manchester Scale (MS) from stage 1 (mild) to 4 (very severe). Scores obtained on the Foot Health Status Questionnaire (FHSQ) were compared. This has 13 questions that assess 4 health domains of the feet, namely pain, function, general health and footwear. The stage 4 of HV shown lower scores for the footwear domain (11.23 ± 15.6); general foot health (27.62 ± 19.1); foot pain (44.65 ± 24.5); foot function (53.04 ± 27.2); vigour (42.19 ± 16.8); social capacity (44.46 ± 28.1); and general health (41.15 ± 25.5) compared with stage 1 of HV (Phallux valgus deformity which appears to be associated with the presence of greater degree of HV, regardless of gender. PMID:26816663

  15. [Austin's horizontal V-shaped sliding osteotomy of the metatarsal head [Chevron-osteotomy) in the treatment of hallux valgus].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Steinböck, G

    1996-08-01

    From 1983 to 1995, 1587 patients suffering from hallux abductovalgus were treated with the Austin bunionectomy. The operation consists of a medial exostosis removal, a V-shaped laterally directed displacement osteotomy of the metatarsal head, lateral release and medial reefing of the capsulo-ligamentous structures. Lateral transposition is facilitated by performing a sufficient lateral release consisting of dissection of the lateral metatarsophalangeal ligament and separation of the adductor tendon from the base of the phalanx and the lateral sesamoid. In the case of intermetatarsal angles greater than 15 degrees, the metatarsal-sesamoid ligament is also severed just above the lateral sesamoid. The periosteum is stripped in a limited fashion dorsally and toward the plantar, leaving its insertion at the metatarsal head intact. After this procedure, reposition of the metatarsal head onto the sesamoids is usually possible and is maintained by reconstruction of the medial metatarsal-sesamoid ligament. In the author's own research material, metatarsophalangeal angles larger than 50 degrees and intermetatarsal angles of over 20 degrees could be corrected. Pronation of the toe is usually corrected by tenotomy of the abductor tendon near the base of the phalanx. Avascular necrosis is extremely rare with a careful operative technique. In our extensive research material, four cases of AVN were recognized. Provided there is free motion of the joint (60-0-20), mild radiological signs of osteoarthritis are no contraindication for the operation. Even in the aged, good results can be achieved provided there are no trophic problems. The Austin bunionectomy has proved to be a versatile method for treating bunion problems. The possibility of transposing the metatarsal head laterally, toward the plantar, proximally and distally by altering the direction of the osteotomy, as well as tilting it medially or laterally, has made this osteotomy an invaluable tool for addressing various

  16. Factors Associated with Hallux Valgus in a Community-Based Cross-Sectional Study of Adults with and without Osteoarthritis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Golightly, Yvonne M.; Hannan, Marian T.; Dufour, Alyssa B.; Renner, Jordan B.; Jordan, Joanne M.

    2014-01-01

    Objective To determine whether hallux valgus (HV) was associated with potential risk factors including foot pain in a large, bi-racial cohort of older men and women. Methods We conducted a cross-sectional analysis of cohort members of the Johnston County Osteoarthritis Project of whom 1,502 had complete clinical and demographic data available (mean age 68 years, mean body mass index [BMI] 31.3 kg/m2, 68% women, 30% African American). The presence of HV was assessed visually using a validated examination. Multivariate logistic regression models with generalized estimating equations for the total sample and for each sex and race subgroup were used to examine the effect of age, BMI, foot pain, pes planus, and knee or hip radiographic osteoarthritis (OA) on HV. Results HV was present in 64% of the total sample (African American men=69%, African American women=70%, Caucasian men=54%, Caucasian women=65%). The association between HV and foot pain was elevated but not statistically significant (adjusted odds ratio [aOR] 1.21, 95% confidence interval 0.99, 1.47). Women, African American, older individuals, and those with pes planus or knee/hip OA had significantly higher odds of HV (aORs 1.17–1.48). Participants with higher BMI had lower odds of HV compared to those with normal BMI (aORs 0.54–0.72). Overall, patterns of associations were similar across subgroups. Conclusion HV was associated with female sex, African American race, older age, pes planus, and knee/hip OA and inversely associated with higher BMI. Early prevention and intervention approaches may be needed in high-risk groups; longitudinal studies would inform these approaches. PMID:25418024

  17. Integrating health economics into the product development cycle: a case study of absorbable pins for treating hallux valgus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vallejo-Torres, Laura; Steuten, Lotte; Parkinson, Bonny; Girling, Alan J; Buxton, Martin J

    2011-01-01

    The probability of reimbursement is a key factor in determining whether to proceed with or abandon a product during its development. The purpose of this article is to illustrate how the methods of iterative Bayesian economic evaluation proposed in the literature can be incorporated into the development process of new medical devices, adapting them to face the relative scarcity of data and time that characterizes the process. A 3-stage economic evaluation was applied: an early phase in which simple methods allow for a quick prioritization of competing products; a mid-stage in which developers synthesize the data into a decision model, identify the parameters for which more information is most valuable, and explore uncertainty; and a late stage, in which all relevant information is synthesized. A retrospective analysis was conducted of the case study of absorbable pins, compared with metallic fixation, in osteotomy to treat hallux valgus. The results from the early analysis suggest absorbable pins to be cost-effective under the beliefs and assumptions applied. The outputs from the models at the mid-stage analyses show the device to be cost-effective with a high probability. Late-stage analysis synthesizes evidence from a randomized controlled trial and informative priors, which are based on previous evidence. It also suggests that absorbable pins are the most cost-effective strategy, although the uncertainty in the model output increased considerably. This example illustrates how the method proposed allows decisions in the product development cycle to be based on the best knowledge that is available at each stage.

  18. Multi-modal-analgesia for pain management after Hallux Valgus surgery: a prospective randomised study on the effect of ankle block

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rolf Christer

    2007-12-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Pain and emesis are the two major complaints after day case surgery. Local anaesthesia has become an important part of optimizing intra and post-operative pain treatment, but is sometimes not entirely sufficient. The aim of the present study was to study the effect of adding an ankle block to a multi-modal analgesic approach on the first 24-hour-need for rescue analgesia in patients undergoing elective Hallux Valgus surgery. Type of study Prospective, randomized patient-blind study comparing ankle block with levo-bupivacaine, lidocaine and Saline placebo control. Methods Ninety patients were studied comparing ankle block (15 cc using levo-bupivacaine 2.5 mg/ml, lidocaine 10 mg/ml or placebo (saline on day-case elective Hallux Valgus surgery, supported by general anaesthesia in all cases. Primary study endpoint was number of patient's requiring oral analgesics during the first 24 post-operative hours. Results Ankle block had no effect on need for rescue analgesia and pain ratings during the 1st 24 postoperative hours, there was no difference seen between placebo and any of the two active local anaesthesia studied. The only differences seen was that both lidocaine and levo-bupivacaine reduced the intra-operative need for anaesthetic (sevoflurane and that levo-bupivacaine patients had a lower need as compared to the lidocaine patients for oral analgesics during the afternoon of surgery. Conclusion Adding a single shot ankle block to a multi-modal pain management strategy reduces the need for intra-operative anaesthesia but has no major impact of need of rescue analgesics or pain during the first 24-hour after surgery.

  19. Bunions (Hallux Abducto Valgus)

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... a 5-digit zip code. Please enter a city or last name. Search Where do you hurt? Interactive Foot Diagram Tailor's Bunion (Bunionette) What Is a Tailor’s Bunion? Tailor’s bunion, also called a bunionette, is a prominence of the fifth metatarsal bone at the base of the little toe. The ...

  20. Effects of using hallux valgus (HV splint, HV splint plus exercise or HV splint plus electrical stimulation (ES on treatment of flexible HV in Young Population

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Abbas Rahimi

    2012-10-01

    Full Text Available Background and Aim: The dramatically increased incidence of hallux valgus (HV deformity is more related to the cultural rather than genetic parameters. Satisfaction rate following either conservative or surgical treatments are very low. The current study aimed to compare the effects of three commonly used conservative treatments including hallux valgus (HV splint, HV splint plus electrical stimulation (ES currents, or HV splint plus exercise to treat this deformity. Materials & Methods: Thirty-six university students with a mild to moderate HV deformity were recruited in this study. Before starting the study, anterior-posterior view radiographies were taken from their feet. HV angle (HVA less than 20º was considered as normal, between 21-25º as mild, between 26-40 º as moderate and higher than 40 degrees was considered as a sever HV deformity. Then, the subjects were divided into three groups (n=12 and were randomly placed into Splint, Splint plus Exercise, and Splint plus Exercise plus ES groups for 6 weeks. At the end of week six, the radiographies were repeated and the pre/post treatments HVA were compared. Results: The results of the current study showed a non-significant 4.7% reduction of HVA in Splint group (p=0.12. However, 15.4% reduction of HVA occurred in Splint plus Exercise group, which was significant (p=0.005.The subjects used Splint plus Electrical stimulation showed a significant 13.9% reduction in HVA (p=0.008. Furthermore, AOFAS scores of the subjects revealed no significant differences among treatment groups in terms of pain reduction.Conclusion: Although using a HV splint alone could not significantly reduce the HVA, mixing it with either exercise or ES could significantly expedite its corrective effects. It should be mentioned that correction of the deformity was not always associated with decreasing the subjects’ pain, which might be due to the immediate counter force of the splint. Repeating the study with a long

  1. The Relationship Between the Sesamoid Complex and the First Metatarsal After Hallux Valgus Surgery Without Lateral Soft-Tissue Release: A Prospective Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lamo-Espinosa, José María; Flórez, Borja; Villas, Carlos; Pons-Villanueva, Juan; Bondía, José M; Aquerreta, Jesús Dámaso; Alfonso, Matias

    2015-01-01

    Some investigators have emphasized restoring the relationship between the sesamoid complex and the first metatarsal head to reduce the risk of hallux valgus recurring after surgical reconstruction. In a prospective study, we analyzed whether the first metatarsophalangeal joint could be realigned after scarf-Akin bunionectomy without lateral soft tissue release. A total of 25 feet, in 22 patients, were prospectively enrolled and analyzed using anteroposterior radiographs and coronal computed tomography scans obtained before and 3 months after surgery. The Yildirim sesamoid position decreased from a preoperative of 2 (range 1 to 3) to a postoperative position of 0 (range 0 to 1; p < .001), the mean first intermetatarsal angle decreased from 12.6° ± 2.4° to 5.8° ± 2.1° (p < .001), and the mean distance between the second metatarsal and the tibial sesamoid changed from 25.7 ± 4.6 to 25.9 ± 4.6 (p = .59). Our findings suggest that dislocation of the sesamoid complex is actually caused by displacement of the first metatarsal. In conclusion, the scarf-Akin bunionectomy adequately restores the alignment of the first metatarsophalangeal joint, including restoration of the sesamoid apparatus, without direct plantar-lateral soft tissue release. Copyright © 2015 American College of Foot and Ankle Surgeons. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  2. Prospective, Randomized, Multi-centered Clinical Trial Assessing Safety and Efficacy of a Synthetic Cartilage Implant Versus First Metatarsophalangeal Arthrodesis in Advanced Hallux Rigidus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baumhauer, Judith F; Singh, Dishan; Glazebrook, Mark; Blundell, Chris; De Vries, Gwyneth; Le, Ian L D; Nielsen, Dominic; Pedersen, M Elizabeth; Sakellariou, Anthony; Solan, Matthew; Wansbrough, Guy; Younger, Alastair S E; Daniels, Timothy

    2016-05-01

    Although a variety of great toe implants have been tried in an attempt to maintain toe motion, the majority have failed with loosening, malalignment/dislocation, implant fragmentation and bone loss. In these cases, salvage to arthrodesis is more complicated and results in shortening of the ray or requires structural bone graft to reestablish length. This prospective study compared the efficacy and safety of this small (8/10 mm) hydrogel implant to the gold standard of a great toe arthrodesis for advanced-stage hallux rigidus. In this prospective, randomized non-inferiority study, patients from 12 centers in Canada and the United Kingdom were randomized (2:1) to a synthetic cartilage implant or first metatarsophalangeal (MTP) joint arthrodesis. VAS pain scale, validated outcome measures (Foot and Ankle Ability Measure [FAAM] sport scale), great toe active dorsiflexion motion, secondary procedures, radiographic assessment, and safety parameters were evaluated. Analysis was performed using intent-to-treat (ITT) and modified ITT (mITT) methodology. The primary endpoint for the study consisted of a single composite endpoint using the 3 primary study outcomes (pain, function, and safety). The individual subject's outcome was considered a success if all of the following criteria were met: (1) improvement (decrease) from baseline in VAS pain of ≥30% at 12 months; (2) maintenance of function from baseline in FAAM sports subscore at 12 months; and (3) absence of major safety events at 2 years. The proportion of successes in each group was determined and 1-sided 95% confidence interval for the difference between treatment groups was calculated. Noninferiority of the implant to arthrodesis was considered statistically significant if the 1-sided 95% lower confidence interval was greater than the equivalence limit (sports and activity of daily living subscores improved significantly at 12 and 24 months in both groups. First MTP active dorsiflexion motion improvement was 6

  3. Genome-Wide Association Meta-Analyses to Identify Common Genetic Variants Associated with Hallux Valgus in Caucasian and African Americans

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hsu, Yi-Hsiang; Liu, Youfang; Hannan, Marian T.; Maixner, William; Smith, Shad B.; Diatchenko, Luda; Golightly, Yvonne M.; Menz, Hylton B.; Kraus, Virginia B.; Doherty, Michael; Wilson, A.G.; Jordan, Joanne M.

    2016-01-01

    Objective Hallux valgus (HV) affects ~36% of Caucasian adults. Although considered highly heritable, the underlying genetic determinants are unclear. We conducted the first genome-wide association study (GWAS) aimed to identify genetic variants associated with HV. Methods HV was assessed in 3 Caucasian cohorts (n=2,263, n=915, and n=1,231 participants, respectively). In each cohort, a GWAS was conducted using 2.5M imputed single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs). Mixed-effect regression with the additive genetic model adjusted for age, sex, weight and within-family correlations was used for both sex-specific and combined analyses. To combine GWAS results across cohorts, fixed-effect inverse-variance meta-analyses were used. Following meta-analyses, top-associated findings were also examined in an African American cohort (n=327). Results The proportion of HV variance explained by genome-wide genotyped SNPs was 50% in men and 48% in women. A higher proportion of genetic determinants of HV was sex-specific. The most significantly associated SNP in men was rs9675316 located on chr17q23-a24 near the AXIN2 gene (p=5.46×10−7); the most significantly associated SNP in women was rs7996797 located on chr13q14.1-q14.2 near the ESD gene (p=7.21×10−7). Genome-wide significant SNP-by-sex interaction was found for SNP rs1563374 located on chr11p15.1 near the MRGPRX3 gene (interaction p-value =4.1×10−9). The association signals diminished when combining men and women. Conclusion Findings suggest that the potential pathophysiological mechanisms of HV are complex and strongly underlined by sex-specific interactions. The identified genetic variants imply contribution of biological pathways observed in osteoarthritis as well as new pathways, influencing skeletal development and inflammation. PMID:26337638

  4. Is it too early to move to full electronic PROM data collection?: A randomized controlled trial comparing PROM's after hallux valgus captured by e-mail, traditional mail and telephone.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Palmen, Leonieke N; Schrier, Joost C M; Scholten, Ruben; Jansen, Justus H W; Koëter, Sander

    2016-03-01

    Patient reported outcome measures (PROM's) after hallux valgus surgery are used to rate the effectiveness as perceived by the patient. The interpretability of these PROM's is highly dependent on participation rate. Data capture method may be an important factor contributing to the response rate. We investigated the effect on response rate of traditional paper mail, telephone and e-mail PROM's after hallux valgus surgery. All consecutive patients operated between January and September 2013, were identified. Included patients were randomized by envelope in three groups: traditional pen and paper mail, e-mail and telephone. They were asked to fill in a FFI and EQ-5D. Two weeks later non-responders were sent a reminder. Of the 73 included patients, 25 were approached by mail, 24 by e-mail and 24 patients by telephone. The response rate on traditional mail was highest (88%), while response on e-mail was lowest (33%). Response rate on telephone was also high (79%). Response rate on traditional mail and telephone was significantly higher (pmail. Though electronic data collection has enormous potential, this study shows that e-mail yields unacceptable low response rates. It is too early to replace traditional pen-and-paper PROM's by electronic questionnaires. Copyright © 2015 European Foot and Ankle Society. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  5. Hálux valgo: estudo comparativo entre duas técnicas cirúrgicas de osteotomia proximal de adição Hallux valgus: comparative study between two surgical techniques of proximal addition osteotomy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Luiz Carlos Ribeiro Lara

    2012-12-01

    Full Text Available OBJETIVO: Comparar clínica e radiograficamente os resultados da correção do hálux valgo, através de duas técnicas de osteotomia de adição: uma utilizando-se da exostose ressecada e outra, mediante a fixação com placa para cunha de adição. MÉTODOS: Avaliamos 24 pés em 19 pacientes, com média de idade de 51,3 anos, portadores de hálux valgo, com seguimento médio de 50,1 meses. Submeteram-se à técnica de osteotomia de adição com exostose óssea (OAEO 13 pés e à osteotomia de adição com placa para cunha de adição (OPCA 11 pés. Foram avaliados no pré e pós operatório o escore AOFAS, os ângulos intermetatársicos 1 e 2, e ângulo de valgismo do hálux. RESULTADOS: Na técnica OAEO a média no pré-operatório do AOFAS foi 46,6 pontos, AIM 14º e AVH 32º, enquanto no pós-operatório AOFAS 81,3 pontos, AIM 9º e AVH 25ºcom 92,3% de resultados satisfatórios. Na técnica OPCA a média no pré-operatório do AOFAS foi 42,1 pontos, AIM 15º e AVH 29º, enquanto no pós-operatório AOFAS 77,4 pontos, AIM 11º e AMF 23º com 81,8% de resultados satisfatórios. CONCLUSÕES: Ambas as técnicas cirúrgicas mostraram-se eficazes no tratamento do hálux valgo, clínica e radiograficamente, sem diferença estatística entre elas. Nível de evidência III, Estudo retrospectivo comparativo.OBJECTIVE: To clinically and radiographically compare the results of treatment of hallux valgus, by two addition osteotomy techniques: one using resected exostosis, and the other using a plate fixation for addition wedge. METHODS: We evaluated 24 feet of 19 patients, mean age 51.3 years, affected by hallux valgus, with a mean follow-up of 50.1 months. 13 feet underwent addition osteotomy with resected exostosis (AORE and 11 patients (11 feet underwent addition osteotomy with plate (AOP. The AOFAS score, intermetatarsal 1 and 2 angles, and hallux valgus angle were evaluated before and after surgery. RESULTS: In the AORE technique, the mean

  6. Hálux valgo e pés planos: as forças plantares são iguais? Hallux valgus and flat feet: are plantar forces equal?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Elaine Cristina Martinez Teodoro

    2007-01-01

    Full Text Available OBJETIVO: Este trabalho teve como objetivo estimar as forças plantares nos dedos dos pés de mulheres com hálux valgo e/ou pés planos. MÉTODOS: Trata-se de um estudo transversal envolvendo mulheres com hálux valgo e/ou pés planos confirmado através de análise radiográfica. Mediram-se as forças plantares, utilizando plataformas de forças. Coletaram-se estas forças com as mulheres descalças e em posição ereta, por três medidas sendo obtida uma média. Os dados foram adquiridos através da ponte amplificadora Spider 8 da HBM e analisados através do programa Catman®. Obtiveram-se as medidas de forças dos dedos de ambos os pés e as médias foram comparadas pelo teste t de Student segundo a presença de hálux valgo e pés planos; a associação entre essas deformidades foi estimada pelo teste exato de Fischer bicaudal, a significância estatística adotada foi alfa = 5%. RESULTADOS: Foram incluídas no estudo, vinte mulheres com presença ou não de hálux valgo. As forças médias encontradas mostraram-se maiores no 5º dedo em relação ao 1º dedo de ambos os pés (pOBJECTIVE: to measure the plantar forces above the toes of women with hallux valgus and/or flat feet. METHODS: This study involved women with hallux valgus and/or flat feet confirmed by X-ray images. The plantar forces were measured utilizing force plates. Force was measured three times, which were taken with the women on barefoot and at upright position, recording the average for the three measurements. Data were acquired from Spider 8 system (HBM and analyzed by using a Catman® software. The measurements for both feet's toes force were reported and the averages were compared by the Student's t-test according to the presence of hallux valgus and flat feet; the association between these deformities was estimated by using the two-tailed Fischer's exact test, the statistical significance adopted was alpha = 5%. RESULTS: For this study, 20 women with or without hallux

  7. Avaliação radiográfica do hálux valgo: estudo populacional de novos parâmetros angulares Radiographic evaluation of the hallux valgus: population study of new angular parameters

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    Caio Augusto de Souza Nery

    2001-06-01

    Full Text Available Estimulados pelo crescente interesse, pelos fatores intrínsecos na gênese da deformidade do hálux valgo, os autores estudaram os ângulos articulares distal do primeiro metatársico (AADM, articular proximal (AAPFP e articular distal da falange proximal do hálux (AADFP. Para isso, avaliaram as radiografias na incidência AP em ortostase de 70 indivíduos brasileiros adultos e normais (140 pés, com idades variando de 18 a 55 anos (média 29 anos, distribuídos entre 40 indivíduos do sexo feminino (57,1% e 30 do masculino (42,9%. A análise estatística a que se submeteram os dados indicaram como limites superiores da normalidade para a população estudada os valores de 8 graus para o AADN, 8 graus para o AAPFP e 10 graus para o AADFP.Stimulated by the growing interest in the intrinsic factors at the genesis of the deformity of the hallux valgus, the authors studied the distal articular angle of the first metatarsal (DMAA, the proximal articular (PFPAA, and the distal articular of the proximal phalanx of the hallux (PFDAA. To do so, they evaluated the AP incidence of 70 grownup and normal Brazilian individual (140 feet in orthostatic position with ages ranging from 18 to 55 years (29 in the average, 40 of which (57.1% were female and 30 (42.9% were male. The statistical analysis to wich the data were submitted pointed out as upper limts of normality, for the population studied, the following figures: 8 degrees for DMAA, 8 degrees for PFPAA and 10 degrees for PFDAA.

  8. Estudo retrospectivo da osteotomia de base do primeiro metatarso com tratamento do hálux valgo Retrospective study of first metatarsal base osteotomy as a treatment os hallux valgus

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Helencar Ignácio

    2006-01-01

    Full Text Available Os autores avaliaram 33 pacientes (48 pés com hálux valgo moderado a grave tratados cirurgicamente com a técnica de osteotomia de base do I metatarso em cunha de adição associada a reparação de tecidos moles. Comparações correlacionando sexo, idade e parâmetros radiográficos, foram feitas pelo teste t para amostras independentes; o desvio do sesamóide foi comparado pelo teste não paramétrico de Kruskal-Wallis. Todos os pacientes responderam a um questionário no qual expressaram o grau de satisfação com o resultado final da cirurgia. 76% dos pacientes eram do sexo feminino, com idade entre 14 e 60 anos (média de 38,15 anos, com tempo médio de seguimento de 41 meses. Em relação ao sexo não houve diferença na variação radiográfica. Também não foram constatadas diferenças no pré e pós-operatório quando comparado os valores médios dos pés direito e esquerdo. A avaliação radiológica apresentou 73% de resultados excelentes e o grau de satisfação total foi de 60,7% . Não há evidência da idade média influenciar no grau de satisfação, porém acima de 60 anos todos os pacientes relataram satisfação parcial. Concluímos que o procedimento cirúrgico apresentado seja um método seguro e eficaz para o tratamento do halux valgo moderado e grave.The authors evaluated 33 patients (48 feet with moderate to severe hallux valgus, surgically treated by using a 1st metatarsal wedged base osteotomy technique associated to soft tissues repair. Comparisons correlating gender, age, and x-ray parameters were performed by using the t-test for independent samples; sesamoid deviation was compared by Kruskal-Wallis non-parametric test. All patients answered to a questionnaire in which they expressed their degree of satisfaction regarding the final results of the surgery. Seventy six per cent of patients were women between 14 and 60 years old (average 38.15 years old with an average follow-up time of 41 months. There was no

  9. Osteotomia da base do I metatarsal no tratamento do hálux valgo moderado e grave: resultados após seguimento médio de oito anos Osteotomy of the 1st metatarsal base on the treatment of moderate to severe hallux valgus after mean follow-up time of 8 years

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    Marco Túlio Costa

    2009-06-01

    to severe hallux valgus with osteotomy of the first metatarsal base associated to distal release of soft parts and medial capsuloplasty. METHODS: 13 patients were assessed (15 feet submitted to surgical treatment of hallux valgus moderate to severe. The mean follow-up time was 102 months; there were 12 female and 1 male patients, with mean age at the time of surgery of 49 years. The patients enrolled were interviewed according to the questionnaire developed by our service, clinically examined according to the AOFAS scale and submitted to X-ray tests for comparing the results with baseline images. RESULTS: The mean score of the AOFAS scale obtained at the final assessment was 82 points. Nine of the 15 feet (60% showed some late complications, with four (27% varus deformities, three (20% recurrences; two patients (13% presenting with pain complaints with no associated deformity. In the hallux metatarsophalangeal joint, movement loss was 41º (57%; dorsiflexion movement was mostly affected, with a mean loss of 37º (60%. The range of motion on the contralateral intact side served as control group. Arthrosis progression was seen on the final X-ray evaluation. In all cases, shortening and lifting of the first metatarsal were noticed; however, we couldn't correlate the shortening and lifting with metatarsalgia, plant callosity or lower scoring on the AOFAS scale at the final evaluation. CONCLUSIONS: The osteotomy technique by the basis and with distal realignment of soft parts employed in the treatment of moderate to severe hallux valgus showed a high rate of late complications. Due to the high number of complications, we believe that adopting this technique for correcting hallux valgus deformities should be carefully considered.

  10. The influence of hallux valgus on pelvis and lower extremity movement during gait [Vliv valgózní deformity palce na pohyb pánve a dolních končetin při chůzi

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    Miloslav Klugar

    2011-12-01

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: The hallux and the first metatarsophalangeal joint play a major role in load transmission during walking. OBJECTIVE: The main aim of this study was to investigate differences in kinematics of the pelvis and lower extremities during gait by comparing people with hallux valgus (HV and a control group (CG. METHODS: We compared subjects with asymptomatic bilateral HV (n = 6, 57.8 ± 5.64 years with those who had CG (n = 11, 50.7 ± 4.41 years. Gait analysis was investigated using an optoelectronic system Vicon MX. The subjects walked at self-selected speeds. In total, five trials of each subject were analyzed. The statistical processing was performed by means of the Student t-test. The effect size was determined using the ω2 measure. RESULTS: In people with HV there was a significantly smaller maximum of dorsal flexion during the stance phase (p 0.06 and a greater maximum of plantar flexion at the beginning of the stance phase (p 0.06. The maximum of knee extension at the end of the swing phase was significantly greater (p 0.06 in subjects with HV. In the frontal plane, a significantly smaller maximum of hip abduction (p 0.06 during the gait cycle was observed in people with HV. The range of the pelvic obliquity (p 0.06 and the pelvic rotation (p 0.06 were significantly smaller in people with HV. CONCLUSION: This study demonstrated that HV does not exclusively concern the foot. The valgus deformity of the big toe can negatively influence function of the lower extremities and can cause overloading of those segments as well.[VÝCHODISKA: Palec a I. metatarzofalangeální kloub hrají klíčovou úlohu v přenosu zatížení při chůzi. CÍLE: Účelem této studie bylo analyzovat a interpretovat rozdíly v kinematických parametrech chůze u osob s hallux valgus v porovnání s kontrolní skupinou. METODIKA: Porovnávali jsme osoby s asymptomatickou oboustrannou valgózní deformitou palce (n = 6; 57,8 ± 5,64 let s kontrolní skupinou

  11. Avaliação do ângulo intermetatarsal após a artrodese da primeira articulação metatarsofalangeana para tratamento do hálux valgo Evaluation of the intermetatarsal angle after the arthrodesis of the first metatarsophalangeal joint for treatment of the hallux valgus

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marco Túlio Costa

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available OBJETIVO: Avaliar a correção do ângulo intermetatarsal após a artrodese da articulação metatarsofalangeana do hálux. Acreditamos que a deformidade em varo do primeiro metatarso pode ser corrigida após a artrodese da primeira articulação metatarsofalangeana, sem a necessidade da osteotomia proximal. MÉTODO: Foram analisados, retrospectivamente, 43 pés de pacientes submetidos à artrodese da primeira articulação metatarsofalangeana no período de maio de 1997 a outubro de 2009 utilizando radiografias. O tempo médio de seguimento foi de 58 meses. A mensuração dos ângulos metatarsofalangeano, intermetatarsal e a luxação dos sesamoides foram realizadas nas radiografias no pré-operatório, pós-operatório imediato e pós-operatório tardio. RESULTADOS: O ângulo médio metatarsofalangeano foi de 37,6 graus no pré-operatório, 12,8 graus no pós-operatório imediato e 16,4 graus no pósoperatório tardio. O ângulo médio intermetatarsal foi de 16 graus no pré-operatório, 10 graus no pós-operatório imediato e 10,2 graus no pós-operatório tardio. Quanto à luxação dos sesamoides, nas radiografias pré-operatórias a maioria dos pés foram classificados como G3, no pós-operatório imediato foi classificada como G2 e no pós-operatório tardio como G1. CONCLUSÃO: O ângulo intermetatarsal e a luxação dos sesamoides melhoram com a artrodese da primeira articulação metatarsofalangeana sem a necessidade de uma osteotomia na base do primeiro metatarso.OBJECTIVE: To evaluate the correction of the intermetatarsal angle after arthrodesis of the metatarsophalangeal joint of the hallux. We believe that varus deformity of the first metatarsal can be corrected after arthrodesis of the first metatarsophalangeal joint, without the need for proximal osteotomy. METHODS: Forty-three feet of patients who had undergone arthrodesis of the first metatarsophalangeal joint between May 1997 and October 2009 were retrospectively analyzed by

  12. Conventional Tape versus Kinesiotape for Hallux Valgus Correction

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    Nadia Lotfy Radwan

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available This study was commenced to compare the effect of Kinesiotape (KT versus conventional tape (CT on HVA and IMA as well as the intensity of pain from HV deformity. Methodology: Female patients with age 45 to 60 years and diagnosed with mild to moderate HV were included in the study. The foot pain intensity was assessed by visual analogue scale (VAS before applying tape and after completion of the study. Results: The outcome measures of pain intensity showed a non-significant difference between both groups before intervention (p>0.05. Within both KT and CT groups, the pre-and post-treatment scores were significantly different (p˂0.05. In the comparison of the post treatment scores, there was a significant difference (p˂0.05 between both groups favouring the KT group..

  13. Chevron osteotomy for the treatment of hallux valgus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Horne, G; Tanzer, T; Ford, M

    1984-03-01

    Seventy-six chevron osteotomies with follow-up periods ranging from six months to eight years were reviewed. The majority of patients had pain over the bunion prior to operation, and 27 also presented with second metatarsalgia. After surgery there was a marked decrease of pain in the first metatarsophalangeal joint, and in 18 feet the second metatarsalgia was either eliminated or markedly decreased. Most patients were pleased with the appearance of the feet after surgery, but almost one-third of the women complained of difficulty in wearing high heels. The surgical technique is straightforward, but careful attention to detail is necessary to obtain a consistent and satisfactory result.

  14. Correlation between generalized joint hypermobility and hallux valgus

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    A. A. Kardanov

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Purpose: to evaluate correlation between generalized joint hypermobility, forefoot deformities and elasticity of the first ray of the foot. Material and methods. We examined 138 patients with complaints related with deformities at the forefoot level. During this study the medical history was obtained, the elasticity type of the feet was defined and the degree of motion of the medial metatarsal-cuneiform joint was evaluated. Forefoot elasticity was identified by bringing together the heads I and V metatarsal bones with fingers. If convergence occurred with little resistance, those feet were called hyperelastic. The convergence of the heads I and V metatarsal bones of the foot with an average type of elasticity occurred with resistance. It was impossible to converge the heads of I and V metatarsal bones. Due to the results of weight-bearing and non-weight bearing X-ray, analysis of the main radiographic angles of the foot was performed: between I and V metatarsal bones, between the first and second metatarsal bones and between the first metatarsal bone and proximal phalanx of the great toe. Calculation formula of the forefoot flatness index, showing the average ratios of basic radiographic angles of the foot on the x-ray images (weight-bearing and non-weight bearing was created. An assessment of total joint hypermobility using Beighton scale and evaluation of first ray deformity using DuPont scale were performed. Statistical analysis of obtained data was performed, as a result of which significantly strong correlation between total joint hypermobility, forefoot elasticity and valgus deviation of the great toe were revealed. Results. 11% of the feet were hyperelastic. Calculation of the index of forefoot flatness showed that forefoot flatness wasn’t significant for a rigid foot - 5.6 %, for the feet with an average degree of mobility it was 6.0% and it was expressed for hypemobile feet - 12.3 %. Strong correlation relation between the forefeet mobility degree, the number of points on a DuPont scale and the degree of sagittal mobility of the medial metatarsal-cuneiform joint were revealed. Conclusion. Our study demonstrates that generalized joint hypermobility, horizontal and sagittal first ray mobility and forefoot deformities are directly proportional.

  15. McBride's operation for hallux valgus can be used in patients older than 30 years

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Gebuhr, Peter Henrik; Soelberg, M; Larsen, T

    1992-01-01

    . In patients older than 30 years there were significant reductions. In patients younger than 30 years, the reduction was not significant. The rate of problems with daily footwear was reduced from 36 of 46 feet to 13 of 38 feet. The authors noted few problems and a high rate of satisfied patients, despite...

  16. SURGICAL TREATMENT OF PATIENTS WITH HALLUX VALGUS BY MINI-APPARATUS OF EXTERNAL FIXATION

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    K.K. Levchenko

    2008-06-01

    Full Text Available The authors of article suggest methods of surgical correction of pathology by means of fixation of the first metatarsal bone with specialconstruction ofmini-apparatus for externalfixation. This approach provides decrease of recovery period, reduces complications riskas well as deformation relapse.

  17. Integrating Health Economics Into the Product Development Cycle: A Case Study of Absorbable Pins for Treating Hallux Vargus

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Vallejo-Torres, Laura; Steuten, Lotte Maria Gertruda; Parkinson, Bonny; Girling, Alan J.; Buxton, Martin J.

    2011-01-01

    Background. The probability of reimbursement is a key factor in determining whether to proceed with or abandon a product during its development. The purpose of this article is to illustrate how the methods of iterative Bayesian economic evaluation proposed in the literature can be incorporated into

  18. Bunion removal

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bunionectomy; Hallux valgus correction; Bunion excision; Osteotomy - bunion; Exostomy - bunion; Arthrodesis - bunion ... Coughlin MJ, Anderson RB. Hallux valgus. In: Coughlin MJ, Saltzman CL, ... of the Foot and Ankle . 9th ed. Philadelphia, PA: Elsevier ...

  19. Detecting intrinsic muscle weakness of the hallux as an addition to early-stage screening of the feet in patients with diabetes

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Mahieu, R.; Coenen, M. N. O.; van Bemmel, T.; van der Zaag-Loonen, H. J.; Theuvenet, W. J.

    Aims: Present-day screening of the diabetic foot involves the Semmes Weinstein Monofilament Test for evaluating loss of sensibility, while testing for intrinsic muscle weakness is not implied. Just as with the early detection of sensibility loss, early detection of intrinsic muscle weakness might

  20. Cutaneous onchocerciasis in Dumbu, a pastoral area in the North ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    ... bone in extra-skeletal sites leading to severe disability and eventually death. We present a sporadic case from Northern Tanzania with a minor unilateral hallux anomaly and the common ACVR1 c.617G>A mutation. Key words: Fibrodysplasia ossificans progressiva, heterotopic ossification, hallux valgus, recurrent ACVR1 ...

  1. Relative sensory sparing in the diabetic foot implied through vibration testing

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    Todd O'Brien

    2013-09-01

    Full Text Available Background: The dorsal aspect of the hallux is often cited as the anatomic location of choice for vibration testing in the feet of diabetic patients. To validate this preference, vibration tests were performed and compared at the hallux and 5th metatarsal head in diabetic patients with established neuropathy. Methods: Twenty-eight neuropathic, diabetic patients and 17 non-neuropathic, non-diabetic patients underwent timed vibration testing (TVT with a novel 128 Hz electronic tuning fork (ETF at the hallux and 5th metatarsal head. Results: TVT values in the feet of diabetic patients were found to be reduced at both locations compared to controls. Unexpectedly, these values were significantly lower at the hallux (P < 0.001 compared to the 5th metatarsal head. Conclusion: This study confirms the hallux as the most appropriate location for vibration testing and implies relative sensory sparing at the 5th metatarsal head, a finding not previously reported in diabetic patients.

  2. Proximal Opening Wedge Osteotomy Provides Satisfactory Midterm Results With a Low Complication Rate.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oravakangas, Rami; Leppilahti, Juhana; Laine, Vesa; Niinimäki, Tuukka

    2016-01-01

    Hallux valgus is one of the most common foot deformities. Proximal opening wedge osteotomy is used for the treatment of moderate and severe hallux valgus with metatarsus primus varus. However, hypermobility of the first tarsometatarsal joint can compromise the results of the operation, and a paucity of midterm results are available regarding proximal open wedge osteotomy surgery. The aim of the present study was to assess the midterm results of proximal open wedge osteotomy in a consecutive series of patients with severe hallux valgus. Thirty-one consecutive adult patients (35 feet) with severe hallux valgus underwent proximal open wedge osteotomy. Twenty patients (35.5%) and 23 feet (34.3%) were available for the final follow-up examination. The mean follow-up duration was 5.8 (range 4.6 to 7.0) years. The radiologic measurements and American Orthopaedic Foot and Ankle Society hallux-metatarsophalangeal-interphalangeal scores were recorded pre- and postoperatively, and subjective questionnaires were completed and foot scan analyses performed at the end of the follow-up period. The mean hallux valgus angle decreased from 38° to 23°, and the mean intermetatarsal angle correction decreased from 17° to 10°. The mean improvement in the American Orthopaedic Foot and Ankle Society hallux metatarsophalangeal-interphalangeal score increased from 52 to 84. Two feet (5.7%) required repeat surgery because of recurrent hallux valgus. No nonunions were identified. Proximal open wedge osteotomy provided satisfactory midterm results in the treatment of severe hallux valgus, with a low complication rate. The potential instability of the first tarsometatarsal joint does not seem to jeopardize the midterm results of the operation. Copyright © 2016 American College of Foot and Ankle Surgeons. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  3. MR findings in acute Lyme disease affecting the knee. A case report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cavallaro, A.; Harrer, T.; Richter, H.; Bautz, W.; Fellner, F.A.

    2002-01-01

    In this paper we report a case with primarily unspecific arthralgia after surgical therapy of hallux valgus deformity and consecutive reflex sympathetic dystrophy in which MR led to the diagnosis of Lyme disease. (orig.)

  4. MR findings in acute Lyme disease affecting the knee. A case report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cavallaro, A.; Harrer, T.; Richter, H.; Bautz, W.; Fellner, F.A. [Friedrich-Alexander-Univ., Erlangen-Nuernberg (Germany)

    2002-07-01

    In this paper we report a case with primarily unspecific arthralgia after surgical therapy of hallux valgus deformity and consecutive reflex sympathetic dystrophy in which MR led to the diagnosis of Lyme disease. (orig.)

  5. Array comparative genomic hybridization analysis of a familial duplication of chromosome 13q: A recognizable syndrome

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Mathijssen, Inge B.; Hoovers, Jan M. N.; Mul, Adri N. P. M.; Man, Hai-Yen; Ket, Jan L.; Hennekam, Raoul C. M.

    2005-01-01

    We report on a family with six persons in three generations who have mild mental retardation, behavioral problems, seizures, hearing loss, strabismus, dental anomalies, hypermobility, juvenile hallux valgus, and mild dysmorphic features. Classical cytogenetic analysis showed a partial duplication of

  6. Tetradactyl footprints of an unknown affinity theropod dinosaur from the Upper Jurassic of Morocco.

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    Jaouad Nouri

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: New tetradactyl theropod footprints from Upper Jurassic (Oxfordian-Kimmeridgian have been found in the Iouaridène syncline (Morocco. The tracksites are at several layers in the intermediate lacustrine unit of Iouaridène Formation. The footprints were named informally in previous works "Eutynichnium atlasipodus". We consider as nomen nudum. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: Boutakioutichnium atlasicus ichnogen. et ichnosp. nov. is mainly characterized by the hallux impression. It is long, strong, directed medially or forward, with two digital pads and with the proximal part of the first pad in lateral position. More than 100 footprints in 15 trackways have been studied with these features. The footprints are large, 38-48 cm in length, and 26-31 cm in width. CONCLUSIONS/SIGNIFICANCE: Boutakioutichnium mainly differs from other ichnotaxa with hallux impression in lacking metatarsal marks and in not being a very deep footprint. The distinct morphology of the hallux of the Boutakioutichnium trackmaker -i.e. size and hallux position- are unique in the dinosaur autopodial record to date.

  7. Lump Sum Alternatives to Current Veterans’ Disability Compensation

    Science.gov (United States)

    2006-11-01

    5281 FOOT CONDITION: HALLUX RIGIDUS 5282 HAMMER TOE 5286 SPINE, COMPLETE BONY FIXATION 5287 ANKYLOSIS OF CERVICAL SPINE 5288 ANKYLOSIS OF... HERNIA 5327 MALIGNANT MUSCLE GROWTH 5328 BENIGN MUSCLE GROWTH 5399 MUSCLE CONDITION 6002 INFLAMMATION OF SCLERA 6003 INFLAMMATION OF IRIS 6009...HEPATIC 7330 FISTULA OF THE INTESTINE 7333 STRICTURE OF RECTUM AND ANUS 7336 HEMORRHOIDS 7337 PRURITUS ANI 7338 INGUINAL HERNIA 7501 ABCESS

  8. Plantar Hyperkeratotic Patterns in Older Patients

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    Caleb Araguas García

    2017-12-01

    Conclusions: The most common hyperkeratotic patterns were found on the first radius, corresponding to 36% of total lesions. In addition, hyperkeratotic lesions appear to be associated with the presence of hallux valgus and with lesser deformities of the second, third and fourth toes.

  9. Turner/Down mosaicism

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Brushfield Spots and flat nasal bridge. The mouth and teeth were normal. The thorax, cardiovascular system and external genitalia were normal. The upper limbs showed a simian palmar crease in the left hand, moderate brachydactylia and clinodactyly. The first two toes of the left foot were widely spaced. Moderate hallux ...

  10. H Syndrome: A case report and review of literature

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    Dilip Meena

    2018-01-01

    Full Text Available H syndrome is a rare autosomal recessive syndrome characterised by constellation of clinical features and systemic manifestations including cutaneous hyperpigmentation, hypertrichosis, hepatosplenomegaly, hearing loss, heart anomalies, hypogonadism, hyperglycaemia, low height, and hallux valgus. We report a case of this syndrome with typical clinical findings. We report this case citing the rarity of this uncommon entity.

  11. H Syndrome: A Case Report and Review of Literature

    Science.gov (United States)

    Meena, Dilip; Chauhan, Payal; Hazarika, Neirita; Kansal, Naveen Kumar

    2018-01-01

    H syndrome is a rare autosomal recessive syndrome characterised by constellation of clinical features and systemic manifestations including cutaneous hyperpigmentation, hypertrichosis, hepatosplenomegaly, hearing loss, heart anomalies, hypogonadism, hyperglycaemia, low height, and hallux valgus. We report a case of this syndrome with typical clinical findings. We report this case citing the rarity of this uncommon entity. PMID:29527032

  12. Prevalence, severity and factors associated with peripheral ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    6.5%, ii). A fasting plasma ... clinical diagnosis (e.g., a patient in a hyperglycemic crisis or with classic symptoms of hyperglycemia and a ... Vibration sense was elicited using a 128 Hz turning fork at the hallux of the big toe. Pain perception was.

  13. The role of foot morphology on foot function in diabetic subjects with or without neuropathy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guiotto, Annamaria; Sawacha, Zimi; Guarneri, Gabriella; Cristoferi, Giuseppe; Avogaro, Angelo; Cobelli, Claudio

    2013-04-01

    The aim of this study was to investigate the role of foot morphology, related with respect to diabetes and peripheral neuropathy in altering foot kinematics and plantar pressure during gait. Healthy and diabetic subjects with or without neuropathy with different foot types were analyzed. Three dimensional multisegment foot kinematics and plantar pressures were assessed on 120 feet: 40 feet (24 cavus, 20 with valgus heel and 11 with hallux valgus) in the control group, 80 feet in the diabetic (25 cavus 13 with valgus heel and 13 with hallux valgus) and the neuropathic groups (28 cavus, 24 with valgus heel and 18 with hallux valgus). Subjects were classified according to their foot morphology allowing further comparisons among the subgroups with the same foot morphology. When comparing neuropathic subjects with cavus foot, valgus heel with controls with the same foot morphology, important differences were noticed: increased dorsiflexion and peak plantar pressure on the forefoot (Pfoot morphology in altering both kinematics and plantar pressure in diabetic subjects, diabetes appeared to further contribute in altering foot biomechanics. Surprisingly, all the diabetic subjects with normal foot arch or with valgus hallux were no more likely to display significant differences in biomechanics parameters than controls. This data could be considered a valuable support for future research on diabetic foot function, and in planning preventive interventions. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  14. Children with ADHD Show No Deficits in Plantar Foot Sensitivity and Static Balance Compared to Healthy Controls

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schlee, Gunther; Neubert, Tom; Worenz, Andreas; Milani, Thomas L.

    2012-01-01

    The goal of this study was to investigate plantar foot sensitivity and balance control of ADHD (n = 21) impaired children compared to age-matched healthy controls (n = 25). Thresholds were measured at 200 Hz at three anatomical locations of the plantar foot area of both feet (hallux, first metatarsal head (METI) and heel). Body balance was…

  15. Journal of Surgical Technique and Case Report - Vol 6, No 1 (2014)

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Treatment of Pseudoarthrosis After Minimally Invasive Hallux Valgus Correction · EMAIL FREE FULL TEXT EMAIL FREE FULL TEXT DOWNLOAD FULL TEXT DOWNLOAD FULL TEXT. M Cianforlini, C Rosini, M Marinelli, L de Palma, 39-42. http://dx.doi.org/10.4103/2006-8808.135153 ...

  16. Analysis of foot structural damage in rheumatoid arthritis: clinical evaluation by validated measures and serological correlations

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    E. Bartoloni Bocci

    2011-06-01

    Full Text Available Objective: To examine foot involvement in rheumatoid arthritis (RA and to characterize structural alterations in patients with anti-cyclic citrullinated peptide (CCP antibody-positive and -negative disease. Methods: Seventy-eight patients with RA with foot pain were consecutively enrolled. The Manchester Hallux Valgus (MHV rating scale was used to evaluate the hallux valgus deformity degree. The Foot Posture Index (FPI6, a novel, foot-specific outcome measure, was adopted in order to quantify variation in the position of the foot. The findings were correlated with disease duration and presence or absence of anti-CCP antibodies. Results: About 84.6% patients had different degrees of hallux valgus and 65.4% subjects had a pronated foot. These two foot alterations were prevalently found in patients with long-standing disease and circulating anti-CCP antibodies. On the contrary, RA patients without anti-CCP and early disease essentially displayed a supinated foot without relevant hallux valgus deformity. Conclusion: Our findings allowed to identify different anatomic foot alterations in RA patients according to disease duration and negative prognostic factors such as anti-CCP antibodies. Our findings support the role of an accurate analysis of foot structural damage and may suggest the usefulness of a correct plantar orthosis prescription also in early phases of the disease.

  17. Study on forefoot by computerized tomography

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Machida, Eiichi (Nihon Univ., Tokyo. School of Medicine)

    1983-10-01

    Computerized tomography (CT) was used to study coronary sections of the forefoot in both normal and abnormal human feet. CT images of the transverse arches at the metatarsal head, middle and base of the shaft were classified into five patterns. In the pattern most commonly found in normal feet, the second metatarsus appeared elevated above the other metatarsal bones at all points, and there was a gradual and even reduction in elevation from the second to the fifth metatarsal. In cases of hallux valgus, however, a variety of deformities were noted in the arc of the second to fifth metatarsals, particularly at the head. The rotation of the first metatarsus and shift of the sesamoids were measured from CT images at the head of the first metatarsus. In hallux valgus, both the rotation and the sesamoid shift appeared to have a wider angle than in the case of normal feet. In normal feet, the differences between the rotation of the first metatarsus and shift of the sesamoids were relatively small, whereas in hallux valgus there was a much greater degree of variation. Furthermore, while normal feet the variation in rotation of the first metatarsus and sesamoid shift both tended to be either great or small, in hallux valgus a large degree of sesamoid shift was sometimes found in combination with a small degree of rotation of the first metatarsus.

  18. Hereditary onycho-osteo dysplasia syndrome

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yadav T

    1995-01-01

    Full Text Available We report a two and a half year old male child with dystrophy of all the nails, absent patellae and iliac horns. In addition he had dysmorphic facial features, sparing of lunula and bilateral hallux valgus deformity, hitherto not reported earlier.

  19. Fibrodysplasia ossificans progressiva: a case report | Baidoo ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    ... in unyielding new bone leading to disability and ultimately death from cardiorespiratory failure. The present case brings to light the delays and potential pitfalls in diagnosis as a result of the rarity of the condition. Keywords: Fibrodysplasia Ossificans Progressiva, ACVR1, Extra-skeletal ossification, Hallux valgus, Steroids.

  20. Study on forefoot by computerized tomography

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Machida, Eiichi

    1983-01-01

    Computerized tomography (CT) was used to study coronary sections of the forefoot in both normal and abnormal human feet. CT images of the transverse arches at the metatarsal head, middle and base of the shaft were classified into five patterns. In the pattern most commonly found in normal feet, the second metatarsus appeared elevated above the other metatarsal bones at all points, and there was a gradual and even reduction in elevation from the second to the fifth metatarsal. In cases of hallux valgus, however, a variety of deformities were noted in the arc of the second to fifth metatarsals, particularly at the head. The rotation of the first metatarsus and shift of the sesamoids were measured from CT images at the head of the first metatarsus. In hallux valgus, both the rotation and the sesamoid shift appeared to have a wider angle than in the case of normal feet. In normal feet, the differences between the rotation of the first metatarsus and shift of the sesamoids were relatively small, whereas in hallux valgus there was a much greater degree of variation. Furthermore, while normal feet the variation in rotation of the first metatarsus and sesamoid shift both tended to be either great or small, in hallux valgus a large degree of sesamoid shift was sometimes found in combination with a small degree of rotatin of the first metatarsus. (author)

  1. First inter metatarsal (IM) angles in Nigerians and their relationship ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Background: No age is immune to the deformity known as Hallux valgus as it has been proven that 50% of adults developed it during adolescence, while 40% of juveniles developed it before the age of 10.5 years. Aim: To determine from radiographs the normal value of the first inter metatarsal (IM) angle and to establish if ...

  2. FIRST METATARSOPHALANGEAL JOINT OSTEOARTHRITIS: PERCUTANEOUS SURGERY, CHOICE OF A SURGICAL PROCEDURE, CLINICAL AND RADIOGRAPHIC CLASSIFICATION

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    S. Yu. Berezhnoy

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Introduction. Hallux rigidus is observed in approximately 2.5% of the adult population. Until now neither a unified classification of hallux rigidus appears to exist nor any clear principles to choose the surgical method. The variety of clinical and radiological signs explains the difficulties in establishing a comprehensive classification system and in selection of the criteria for surgical procedure. There are few published reports about hallux rigidus percutaneous surgical treatment. Existing papers are dedicated to a limited number of percutaneous techniques.The purpose of this study was to evaluate the efficacy of percutaneous techniques for surgical treatment of the first metatarsophalangeal joint osteoarthritis; to specify factors determining the choice of procedure; to develop a grading system of the hallux rigidus severity which will help in selection of surgery. Materials and methods. Based on 156 surgeries (107 patients the author demonstrated the possibilities of percutaneous techniques in the surgical treatment of hallux rigidus of different stages as well as provided a brief description of used surgical techniques.Results. The mean age of patients was 48.8 years (ranged from 18 to 73. The mean follow-up was 7 months (ranged from 3 to 54. At the specified time the treatment outcomes of 103 patients (150 feet were analyzed. Mean hospital stay was 0.78 days (ranged from 0 to 1. No infectious or wound-healing problems were observed. Overall, the patients were completely satisfied with the outcomes of 89 surgical treatment, qualified satisfaction was reported with patients in respect of outcomes of 57 surgeries. Four unsatisfactory outcomes were observed. The role of the relatively long first metatarsal in the development of hallux rigidus was confirmed. Conclusion. Percutaneous techniques provide successful treatment for all stages of hallux rigidus. The choice of a specific surgical technique may be challenging and requires

  3. Bunion correction using proximal chevron osteotomy: a single-incision technique.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sammarco, G J; Russo-Alesi, F G

    1998-07-01

    Proximal chevron first metatarsal osteotomy with lateral capsulotomy, adductor tenotomy, and binding of the first and second metatarsals was reviewed in 88 consecutive cases. Seventy-two cases in 55 patients are reported, with an average clinical follow-up of 41 months. The hallux valgus angle improved an average of 15 degrees , from 32.0 degrees preoperatively to an average of 17.0 degrees postoperatively. The intermetatarsal I-II angle improved an average of 5.5 degrees, from 15.3 degrees preoperatively to 9.0 degrees postoperatively. The lateral plantar first metatarsal angle did not change. First metatarsal length was decreased by 2.0 mm. Union occurred at an average of 2 months. Sesamoid position improved 49%, from a preoperative average subluxation of 80% to a postoperative average subluxation of 29%. Subjective foot score profiles improved from a preoperative average of 70.1/100 to a postoperative average of 94.4/100 with respect to pain, deformity, motion, disability, and cosmesis. There were 10 patients with complications, including three patients with delayed unions, two with second metatarsal stress fractures, one with hallux varus, two with hallux limitus, one with progressive arthritis, one with cellulitis, and one with hallux elevatus. Eighty-four percent of the patients stated that they would undergo the procedure again without reservation, 9% would proceed with reservation, and 7% would not proceed with surgery again if offered. This technique provides reliable successful long-term results for the treatment of moderate and severe symptomatic bunion, hallux valgus, and metatarsus primus varus.

  4. Single absorbable polydioxanone pin fixation for distal chevron bunion osteotomies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Deorio, J K; Ware, A W

    2001-10-01

    The distal chevron osteotomy is a well-established technique for correction of symptomatic mild to moderate metatarsus primus varus with hallux valgus deformity. Fixation of the osteotomy ranges from none to bone pegs, Kirschner wires, screws, or absorbable pins. We evaluated one surgeon's (J.K.D.) results of distal chevron osteotomy fixation with a single, nonpredrilled, 1.3-mm poly-p-dioxanone pin and analyzed any differences in patients with unilateral or bilateral symptomatic metatarsus primus varus with hallux valgus deformities. All osteotomies healed without evidence of infection, osteolysis, nonunion, or necrosis. Equal correction was achieved in unilateral and bilateral procedures. The technique is quick and easy, and adequate fixation is achieved.

  5. Chevron closing base wedge bunionectomy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bruyn, J M

    1993-01-01

    The Chevron-base wedge Association for Osteosynthesis fixated bunionectomy provides a stable, aggressive correction of the severe hallux abducto valgus deformity. It is intended for the bunion requiring a double osteotomy in order to adequately reduce both intermetatarsal and proximal articular facet angle with minimal shortening and elevation. This article presents the rationale for the procedure, technique, and a 4-year follow-up of six patients with eight Chevron-base wedge bunionectomies.

  6. A cross-sectional observational study comparing foot and ankle characteristics in people with stroke and healthy controls

    OpenAIRE

    Kunkel, Dorit; Potter, Julia; Mamode, Louis

    2016-01-01

    Purpose: The purpose of this study was to explore and compare foot and ankle characteristics in people with stroke and healthy controls; and between stroke fallers and non-fallers.Methods: Participants were recruited from community groups and completed standardized tests assessing sensation, foot posture, foot function, ankle dorsiflexion and first metatarsal phalangeal joint range of motion (1st MPJ ROM), hallux valgus presence and severity.Results: Twenty-three stroke participants (mean age...

  7. Intermuscular force transmission between human plantarflexor muscles in vivo

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bojsen-Møller, Jens; Schwartz, Sidse; Kalliokoski, Kari K

    2010-01-01

    of the present study was to investigate if intermuscular force transmission occurs within and between human plantarflexor muscles in vivo. Seven subjects performed four types of either active contractile tasks or passive joint manipulations: passive knee extension, voluntary isometric plantarflexion, voluntary...... surae muscles was seen during passive hallux extension. Large interindividual differences with respect to deep plantarflexor activation during voluntary contractions were observed. The present results suggest that force may be transmitted between the triceps surae muscles in vivo, while only limited...

  8. Interphalangeal joint involvement of the big toe in gout: a rare presentation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dobson, Michael; Alwahab, Yasir; Fazal, Muhammad A

    2012-01-01

    Atypical presentation of gout can cause diagnostic dilemmas. We report a case of gout that presented with an expansile lytic lesion involving the interphalangeal joint of the hallux, lack of a history of gout, and an associated solitary lung nodule. Magnetic resonance imaging showed an expansile destructive bony lesion with soft-tissue involvement suggestive of a possible bony metastasis. A needle biopsy was performed, and histopathologic features were diagnostic of chronic tophaceous gout.

  9. Foot Morphological Difference between Habitually Shod and Unshod Runners.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yang Shu

    Full Text Available Foot morphology and function has received increasing attention from both biomechanics researchers and footwear manufacturers. In this study, 168 habitually unshod runners (90 males whose age, weight & height were 23±2.4 years, 66±7.1 kg & 1.68±0.13 m and 78 females whose age, weight & height were 22±1.8 years, 55±4.7 kg & 1.6±0.11 m (Indians and 196 shod runners (130 males whose age, weight & height were 24±2.6 years, 66±8.2 kg & 1.72±0.18 m and 66 females whose age, weight & height were 23±1.5 years, 54±5.6 kg & 1.62±0.15 m (Chinese participated in a foot scanning test using the easy-foot-scan (a three-dimensional foot scanning system to obtain 3D foot surface data and 2D footprint imaging. Foot length, foot width, hallux angle and minimal distance from hallux to second toe were calculated to analyze foot morphological differences. This study found that significant differences exist between groups (shod Chinese and unshod Indians for foot length (female p = 0.001, width (female p = 0.001, hallux angle (male and female p = 0.001 and the minimal distance (male and female p = 0.001 from hallux to second toe. This study suggests that significant differences in morphology between different ethnicities could be considered for future investigation of locomotion biomechanics characteristics between ethnicities and inform last shape and design so as to reduce injury risks and poor performance from mal-fit shoes.

  10. Outcomes After Interpositional Arthroplasty of the First Metatarsophalangeal Joint.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aynardi, Michael C; Atwater, Lara; Dein, Eric J; Zahoor, Talal; Schon, Lew C; Miller, Stuart D

    2017-05-01

    For patients with hallux rigidus seeking a motion-sparing procedure, interposition arthroplasty is an alternative to fusion. The purpose of this study was to report patient outcomes after interpositional arthroplasty for hallux rigidus. All patients undergoing interpositional arthroplasty at our institution from 2001 to 2014 were identified and a retrospective chart review was performed. Follow-up was conducted through a telephone survey to obtain survivorship, satisfaction, and functional scores. Survivorship of the interpositional arthroplasty procedure was defined as no subsequent surgery on the hallux after the index procedure. Patients were excluded for incomplete records. Complications were recorded. From 2001 to 2014, 183 patients were identified. Of these, 14 were excluded for incomplete data, leaving 169 patients. Of these, 133 had an average follow-up of 62.2 months (range, 24.3 months to 151.2 months). The overall failure rate was 3.8% (5/133). Patient-reported outcome was rated as excellent in 65.4% (87/133) or good in 24.1% (32/133) of patients and fair or poor in 10.5% (14/133) of patients. Of 133 patients, 101 (76%) were able to return to fashionable or regular footwear. The infection rate was 1.5% (2/133). Patient-reported cock-up deformity of the first metatarsophalangeal joint (MTPJ) occurred in 4.5% (6/133) of patients. In addition, 17.3% (23/133) of patients reported metatarsalgia of the second or third MTPJ at the time of final follow-up, and there was no significant difference between interposition types ( P = .441). Interpositional arthroplasty for hallux rigidus was found to have excellent or good results in most patients at a mean follow-up of 62.2 months. Level IV, retrospective case series.

  11. Effect of surgical shoes on brake response time after first metatarsal osteotomy?a prospective cohort study

    OpenAIRE

    Dammerer, Dietmar; Braito, Matthias; Biedermann, Rainer; Ban, Michael; Giesinger, Johannes; Haid, Christian; Liebensteiner, Michael C.; Kaufmann, Gerhard

    2016-01-01

    Background The aim of this study is to assess patients? driving ability when wearing surgical shoes following right-sided first metatarsal osteotomy. Methods From August 2013 to August 2015, 42 consecutive patients (mean age 54.5?years) with right-sided hallux valgus deformity underwent first metatarsal osteotomy. Patients were tested for brake response time (BRT) 1?day preoperatively (control run) and at 2 and 6?weeks postoperatively. Two different types of foot orthosis were investigated. B...

  12. Arthroscopic management of painful first metatarsophalangeal joint

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Debnath U

    2005-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: Arthroscopy of the great toe MTP joint has been practiced with favourable outcomes. A range of indications have been described ranging from synovitis to osteochondral defects. The purpose of the present study was to describe our technique and to assess the functional outcome following arthroscopic management of Hallux MTP disorders using AOFAS scoring system. Methods: We describe the technique of Hallux MTP joint arthroscopy in twenty patients. Indications included hallux rigidus with osteophytes, chondromalacia, OCDs, loose bodies, arthrofibrosis, synovitis, tophaceous gout arthritis and intra-articular fractures of MTP joint. All patients had been evaluated clinically and radiologically with record of their AOFAS scores pre-operatively. At a minimum follow-up of two years the clinical assessment was carried out with AOFAS scores. Results: The mean pre-operative and post-operative AOFAS score were 47 (range 10-78 and 97 (87 -100 respectively. The patient with intra-articular fracture had an excellent outcome following arthroscopic reduction of the fracture. Conclusion: Arthroscopic management of painful hallucial MTP joint is a specialized technique, which if performed for the right indications, gives a favourable outcome with minimal complications.

  13. [The minimally invasive Chevron and Akin osteotomy (MICA)].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Altenberger, Sebastian; Kriegelstein, Stefanie; Gottschalk, Oliver; Dreyer, Florian; Mehlhorn, Alexander; Röser, Anke; Walther, Markus

    2018-04-18

    Percutaneous correction of a hallux valgus deformity with or without transfer metatarsalgia. Hallux valgus deformity up to 20° intermetatarsal angle, without instability of the first tarsometatarsal joint. Symptomatic arthritis of the first metatarsophalangeal joint, as well as instability of the first tarsometatarsal joint. Percutaneous performed osteotomy of the distal metatarsal 1 in combination with a medial closing wedge osteotomy of the proximal phalanx of the first toe. The use of a postoperative shoe with a rigid sole allows adapted weight bearing in the first 6 weeks. Active and passive mobilization can start immediately after surgery. The method is very effective to treat even severe deformities with or without metatarsalgia. The amount of correction is similar to open procedures. We recommend cadaver training to become familiar with this technique. Thus, complications such as nerve, vessel or tendon injuries can be avoided. The intraoperative radiation exposure remains significantly elevated even for experienced surgeons. In addition to the aesthetic benefits, there is less soft tissue traumatization compared to conventional open procedures. There is no need of bloodlessness. The minimally invasive Chevron and Akin osteotomy is a safe and powerful technique for the treatment of hallux valgus deformity.

  14. Foot ulcer risk and location in relation to prospective clinical assessment of foot shape and mobility among persons with diabetes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cowley, Matthew S; Boyko, Edward J; Shofer, Jane B; Ahroni, Jessie H; Ledoux, William R

    2008-11-01

    We assessed baseline clinical foot shape for 2939 feet of diabetic subjects who were monitored prospectively for foot ulceration. Assessments included hammer/claw toes, hallux valgus, hallux limitus, prominent metatarsal heads, bony prominences, Charcot deformity, plantar callus, foot type, muscle atrophy, ankle and hallux mobility, and neuropathy. Risk factors were linked to ulcer occurrence and location via a Cox proportional hazards model. Hammer/claw toes (hazard ratio [HR] (95% confidence interval [CI])=1.43 (1.06, 1.94) p=0.02), marked hammer/claw toes (HR=1.77 (1.18, 2.66) p=0.006), bony prominences (HR=1.38 (1.02, 1.88), p=0.04), and foot type (Charcot or drop foot vs. neutrally aligned) (HR=2.34 (1.33, 4.10), p=0.003) were significant risk factors for ulceration adjusting for age, body mass index, insulin medication, ulcer history and amputation history. With adjustment for neuropathy only hammer/claw toes (HR=1.40 (1.03, 1.90), p=0.03) and foot type (HR=1.76 (1.04, 3.04), p=0.05) were significantly related to ulceration. However, there was no relationship between ulcer location and foot deformity. Certain foot deformities were predictive of ulceration, although there was no relationship between clinical foot deformity and ulcer location.

  15. The pattern of skeletal anomalies in the cervical spine, hands and feet in patients with Saethre-Chotzen syndrome and Muenke-type mutation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Trusen, Andreas; Beissert, Matthias; Darge, Kassa; Collmann, Hartmut

    2003-01-01

    Saethre-Chotzen syndrome (SCS) and Muenke-type mutation (MTM) are complex syndromes with craniosynostosis and skeletal anomalies including syndactyly, carpal and tarsal fusions, and cervical spine abnormalities. In this study, we analysed radiographs of the cervical spine, hands and feet of a large patient population with genetically proven SCS and MTM. The aim was to describe the pattern of skeletal anomalies and to determine whether specific features are present that could help differentiate between the two entities. Radiographs of 43 patients (23 males, 20 females) with SCS (n=35) or MTM (n=8) were evaluated. The median age was 8 years (range 1 month-36 years). All radiographs were reviewed by two radiologists. In the hands and feet, a variety of anomalies such as brachyphalangy, clinodactyly, partial syndactyly, partial carpal or tarsal fusion, and cone-shaped epiphyses were noted. Duplicated distal phalanx of the hallux (n=12/35) and triangular deformity of the epiphysis of the distal phalanx of the hallux (n=10/35) were detected in SCS only; calcaneo-cuboid fusion (n=2/35) was detected in MTM only. In the cervical spine, fusion of vertebral bodies and/or the posterior elements occurred only in patients with SCS. Pathognomonic signs for SCS are the triangular shape of the epiphysis and duplicated distal phalanx of the hallux. Calcaneo-cuboid fusion was detected in MTM only. These signs may be helpful in the differentiation of SCS from MTM. (orig.)

  16. Foot loading characteristics during three fencing-specific movements.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Trautmann, Caroline; Martinelli, Nicolo; Rosenbaum, Dieter

    2011-12-01

    Plantar pressure characteristics during fencing movements may provide more specific information about the influence of foot loading on overload injury patterns. Twenty-nine experienced fencers participated in the study. Three fencing-specific movements (lunge, advance, retreat) and normal running were performed with three different shoe models: Ballestra (Nike, USA), Adistar Fencing Lo (Adidas, Germany), and the fencers' own shoes. The Pedar system (Novel, Munich, Germany) was used to collect plantar pressures at 50 Hz. Peak pressures, force-time integrals and contact times for five foot regions were compared between four athletic tasks in the lunge leg and supporting leg. Plantar pressure analysis revealed characteristic pressure distribution patterns for the fencing movements. For the lunge leg, during the lunge and advance movements the heel is predominantly loaded; during retreat, it is the hallux. For the supporting leg, during the lunge and advance movements the forefoot is predominantly loaded; during retreat, it is the hallux. Fencing-specific movements load the plantar surface in a distinct way compared with running. An effective cushioning in the heel and hallux region would help to minimize foot loading during fencing-specific movements.

  17. Characteristics of Selected Anthropometric Foot Indicators in Physically Active Students.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bac, Aneta; Bogacz, Gabriela; Ogrodzka-Ciechanowicz, Katarzyna; Kulis, Aleksandra; Szaporów, Tomasz; Woźniacka, Renata; Radlińska, Natalia

    2018-05-01

    The aim of this study was to determine the type of medial longitudinal arch (MLA) in students of Krakow universities, investigate the relationship between physical activity and the shaping of the feet, and examine the relationship between hallux valgus angle and the type of footwear chosen most often. The study group consisted of 120 students, of which 56 respondents were students of the University School of Physical Education in Krakow, whereas the remaining 64 respondents were students of the Pedagogical University of Krakow. To evaluate the MLA, a podoscope was used, which allowed us to determine the length and width of the foot, and calculation of the Clarke angle, heel angle γ, and the angle of hallux valgus. All students were also subjected to a measurement of body weight and height. There was a statistically significant relationship between physical activity and the Clarke angle in the group of women studying at the University School of Physical Education. There was no correlation between the hallux valgus angle and the type of footwear chosen most often in the research groups. The most frequently diagnosed type of longitudinal and transverse arch foot in the research group was normal MLA. There was no relationship between physical activity and transverse arch foot in any of the research groups.

  18. Diabetic foot ulcer incidence in relation to plantar pressure magnitude and measurement location.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ledoux, William R; Shofer, Jane B; Cowley, Matthew S; Ahroni, Jessie H; Cohen, Victoria; Boyko, Edward J

    2013-01-01

    We prospectively examined the relationship between site-specific peak plantar pressure (PPP) and ulcer risk. Researchers have previously reported associations between diabetic foot ulcer and elevated plantar foot pressure, but the effect of location-specific pressures has not been studied. Diabetic subjects (n=591) were enrolled from a single VA hospital. Five measurements of in-shoe plantar pressure were collected using F-Scan. Pressures were measured at 8 areas: heel, lateral midfoot, medial midfoot, first metatarsal, second through fourth metatarsal, fifth metatarsal, hallux, and other toes. The relationship between incident plantar foot ulcer and PPP or pressure-time integral (PTI) was assessed using Cox regression. During follow-up (2.4years), 47 subjects developed plantar ulcers (10 heel, 12 metatarsal, 19 hallux, 6 other). Overall mean PPP was higher for ulcer subjects (219 vs. 194kPa), but the relationship differed by site (the metatarsals with ulcers had higher pressure, while the opposite was true for the hallux and heel). A statistical analysis was not performed on the means, but hazard ratios from a Cox survival analysis were nonsignificant for PPP across all sites and when adjusted for location. However, when the metatarsals were considered separately, higher baseline PPP was significantly associated with greater ulcer risk; at other sites, this relationship was nonsignificant. Hazard ratios for all PTI data were nonsignificant. Location must be considered when assessing the relationship between PPP and plantar ulceration. © 2013.

  19. Bunion foot

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vukašinović Zoran

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Hallux valgus deformity is a complex chronic progressive disease primarily characterized by a lateral great toe deviation and deformity of the first metatarsophalageal joint. Numerous etiological factors are related with the expression of this disease, and they are divided into two categories: endogenous and exogenous. Complexity of the hallux valgus deformity is reflected with the progression of the disease that gives rise to numerous forefoot deformities. The diagnosis is first of all affirmed by clinical examination and x-ray of the feet in a standing position. Treatment could be either operative or conservative. Conservative treatment has shown to be totally unsuccessful. Before decision making on the type of operative treatment, the patient’s complaints, age, profession, clinical and x-ray findings must be taken into consideration. Until now, over two hundred different operative procedures have been described, which clearly supports the observation that there is no single method which could resolve all clinical varieties of this deformity. Therefore, today, when making a choice on the surgical procedure of hallux valgus deformity, the utilization of surgical algorithm is recommended. [Projekat Ministarstva nauke Republike Srbije, br. III 41004

  20. Postoperative pain management with transdermal fentanyl after forefoot surgery: a randomized, placebo-controlled study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Merivirta R

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Riika Merivirta,1 Mikko Pitkänen,2 Jouko Alanen,3 Elina Haapoja,1 Mari Koivisto,4 Kristiina Kuusniemi11Department of Anaesthesiology, Intensive Care, Emergency Care and Pain Medicine of Turku University Hospital and University of Turku, Turku, 2Department of Anaesthesia, Hospital Orton, Invalid Foundation, Helsinki, 3Terveystalo Clinic Hospital, Helsinki, 4Department of Biostatistics, University of Turku, Turku, FinlandBackground: Quality of life is decreased in patients with hallux valgus deformity, mainly because of pain. Significant improvement is usually achieved by surgery. However, postoperative pain can be moderate to severe for 2–3 days. The aim of the present study was to evaluate the use of transdermal fentanyl for postoperative pain management after forefoot surgery.Methods: Sixty patients undergoing hallux valgus or hallux rigidus surgery were allocated to receive a patch delivering either fentanyl 12 µg/hour or placebo for postoperative pain. The consumption of rescue opioid oxycodone, the primary outcome measure, was evaluated daily until the fourth postoperative day. Total consumption of oxycodone during the study period was also assessed. Pain scores and possible adverse effects were evaluated every 6 hours during the first 24 hours and on the fourth postoperative day.Results: The use of rescue opioid was low in both groups, the median (range consumption of oxycodone being 10 (0–50 mg on the day of surgery (no difference between the groups, P=0.31 and 0 (0–35 mg thereafter. The total combined consumption was 10 (0–105 mg in the fentanyl group and 20 (0–70 mg in the placebo group (P=0.23. There were no statistically significant differences in pain scores or adverse effects between the groups.Conclusion: As a part of multimodal analgesia with ibuprofen and acetaminophen, a patch delivering fentanyl 12 µg/hour did not significantly decrease the consumption of rescue opioid or pain scores after forefoot surgery

  1. Foot length measurements of newborns of high and low risk pregnancies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Salge, Ana Karina Marques; Rocha, Érika Lopes; Gaíva, Maria Aparecida Munhoz; Castral, Thaíla Correa; Guimarães, Janaína Valadares; Xavier, Raphaela Maioni

    2017-03-09

    Comparing foot length measurements of newborns in high and low risk pregnancies at a public hospital in Goiânia, GO, Brazil. A cross-sectional study carried out between April, 2013 and May, 2015, with a sample consisting of 180 newborns; 106 infants of women from high-risk pregnancies and 74 of women from low-risk pregnancies. Data were descriptively analyzed. Foot length measurement was performed using a stiff transparent plastic ruler, graduated in millimeters. The length of both feet was measured from the tip of the hallux (big toe) to the end of the heel. A statistically significant relationship was found between the foot length and newborn's weight, between the cephalic and thoracic perimeters in the high-risk group and between the cephalic perimeter in the control group. There is a need for creating cut-off points to identify newborns with intrauterine growth disorders using foot length. Comparar as medidas do comprimento hálux-calcâneo de recém-nascidos em gestações de alto e baixo risco em um hospital público de Goiânia, GO. Estudo transversal, realizado no período de abril de 2013 a maio de 2015, cuja amostra constituiu-se de 180 recém-nascidos, 106 filhos de mulheres com gestação de alto risco e 74 de mulheres com gestação de baixo risco. Os dados foram analisados descritivamente. A medida do comprimento hálux-calcâneo foi realizada utilizando-se de régua plástica transparente rígida, graduada em milímetros. Foram medidos ambos os pés, aferindo-se o comprimento da ponta do hálux até a extremidade do calcâneo. Foi encontrada relação estatisticamente significante entre o comprimento hálux-calcâneo e o peso do recém-nascido, entre os perímetros cefálico e torácico no grupo de alto risco e entre o perímetro cefálico no grupo controle. Existe necessidade da criação de pontos de corte para identificar recém-nascidos com desvios de crescimento intrauterino utilizando-se do comprimento hálux-calcâneo. Comparar las mediciones

  2. Correlation between static radiographic measurements and intersegmental angular measurements during gait using a multisegment foot model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Dong Yeon; Seo, Sang Gyo; Kim, Eo Jin; Kim, Sung Ju; Lee, Kyoung Min; Farber, Daniel C; Chung, Chin Youb; Choi, In Ho

    2015-01-01

    Radiographic examination is a widely used evaluation method in the orthopedic clinic. However, conventional radiography alone does not reflect the dynamic changes between foot and ankle segments during gait. Multiple 3-dimensional multisegment foot models (3D MFMs) have been introduced to evaluate intersegmental motion of the foot. In this study, we evaluated the correlation between static radiographic indices and intersegmental foot motion indices. One hundred twenty-five females were tested. Static radiographs of full-leg and anteroposterior (AP) and lateral foot views were performed. For hindfoot evaluation, we measured the AP tibiotalar angle (TiTA), talar tilt (TT), calcaneal pitch, lateral tibiocalcaneal angle, and lateral talcocalcaneal angle. For the midfoot segment, naviculocuboid overlap and talonavicular coverage angle were calculated. AP and lateral talo-first metatarsal angles and metatarsal stacking angle (MSA) were measured to assess the forefoot. Hallux valgus angle (HVA) and hallux interphalangeal angle were measured. In gait analysis by 3D MFM, intersegmental angle (ISA) measurements of each segment (hallux, forefoot, hindfoot, arch) were recorded. ISAs at midstance phase were most highly correlated with radiography. Significant correlations were observed between ISA measurements using MFM and static radiographic measurements in the same segment. In the hindfoot, coronal plane ISA was correlated with AP TiTA (P foot motion indices at midstance phase during gait measured by 3D MFM gait analysis were correlated with the conventional radiographic indices. The observed correlation between MFM measurements at midstance phase during gait and static radiographic measurements supports the fundamental basis for the use of MFM in analysis of dynamic motion of foot segment during gait. © The Author(s) 2014.

  3. Analysis of foot kinematics wearing high heels using the Oxford foot model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Meizi; Gu, Yaodong; Baker, Julien Steven

    2018-04-29

    Wearing high heels is thought to lead to various foot disorders and injuries such as metatarsal pain, Achilles tendon tension, plantar fasciitis and Haglund malformation. However, there is little available information explaining the specific mechanisms and reasons why wearing high heels causes foot deformity. Therefore, the purpose of this study was to investigate the foot kinematics of high heel wearers and compare any differences with barefoot individuals using the Oxford Foot Model (OFM). Fifteen healthy women aged 20-25 years were measured while walking barefoot and when wearing high heels. The peak value of angular motion for the hallux with respect to the forefoot, the forefoot with respect to the hind foot, and the hind foot with respect to the tibia were all analyzed. Compared to the barefoot, participants wearing high heels demonstrated larger hallux dorsiflexion (22.55∘± 1.62∘ VS 26.6∘± 2.33∘ for the barefoot; P= 0.001), and less hallux plantarflexion during the initial stance phase (-4.86∘± 2.32∘ VS -8.68∘± 1.13∘; Pfoot demonstrated a larger dorsiflexion in the horizontal plane (16.59∘± 1.69∘ VS 12.08∘± 0.9∘; Pfoot extension rotation (-5.49∘± 0.69∘ VS -10.73∘± 0.42∘; P= 0.001). These findings complement existing kinematic evidence that wearing high heels can lead to foot deformities and injuries.

  4. Foot deformities, function in the lower extremities, and plantar pressure in patients with diabetes at high risk to develop foot ulcers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tang, Ulla Hellstrand; Zügner, Roland; Lisovskaja, Vera; Karlsson, Jon; Hagberg, Kerstin; Tranberg, Roy

    2015-01-01

    Foot deformities, neuropathy, and dysfunction in the lower extremities are known risk factors that increase plantar peak pressure (PP) and, as a result, the risk of developing foot ulcers in patients with diabetes. However, knowledge about the prevalence of these factors is still limited. The aim of the present study was to describe the prevalence of risk factors observed in patients with diabetes without foot ulcers and to explore possible connections between the risk factors and high plantar pressure. Patients diagnosed with type 1 (n=27) or type 2 (n=47) diabetes (mean age 60.0±15.0 years) were included in this cross-sectional study. Assessments included the registration of foot deformities; test of gross function at the hip, knee, and ankle joints; a stratification of the risk of developing foot ulcers according to the Swedish National Diabetes Register; a walking test; and self-reported questionnaires including the SF-36 health survey. In-shoe PP was measured in seven regions of interests on the sole of the foot using F-Scan(®). An exploratory analysis of the association of risk factors with PP was performed. Neuropathy was present in 28 (38%), and 39 (53%) had callosities in the heel region. Low forefoot arch was present in 57 (77%). Gait-related parameters, such as the ability to walk on the forefoot or heel, were normal in all patients. Eighty percent had normal function at the hip and ankle joints. Gait velocity was 1.2±0.2 m/s. All patients were stratified to risk group 3. Hallux valgus and hallux rigidus were associated with an increase in the PP in the medial forefoot. A higher body mass index (BMI) was found to increase the PP at metatarsal heads 4 and 5. Pes planus was associated with a decrease in PP at metatarsal head 1. Neuropathy did not have a high association with PP. This study identified several potential risk factors for the onset of diabetic foot ulcers (DFU). Hallux valgus and hallux rigidus appeared to increase the PP under the medial

  5. Resultados y prospectiva de la investigación podológica en el baile flamenco.

    OpenAIRE

    José Manuel Castillo-López

    2016-01-01

    La expansión mundial y el grado de profesionalización del baile flamenco han equiparado las demandas físicas de esta forma dancística a la de cualquier disciplina deportiva de alto rendimiento. El propio gesto técnico del flamenco, especialmente el zapateado y el impacto que éste genera, es el principal factor predisponentes de lesiones en los pies y miembros inferiores. De estas lesiones, destacan por su alta incidencia el hallux abductus valgus, dedos en garra, juanetes de sastre y onicodis...

  6. Foot deformities, function in the lower extremities, and plantar pressure in patients with diabetes at high risk to develop foot ulcers

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ulla Hellstrand Tang

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available Objective: Foot deformities, neuropathy, and dysfunction in the lower extremities are known risk factors that increase plantar peak pressure (PP and, as a result, the risk of developing foot ulcers in patients with diabetes. However, knowledge about the prevalence of these factors is still limited. The aim of the present study was to describe the prevalence of risk factors observed in patients with diabetes without foot ulcers and to explore possible connections between the risk factors and high plantar pressure. Patients and methods: Patients diagnosed with type 1 (n=27 or type 2 (n=47 diabetes (mean age 60.0±15.0 years were included in this cross-sectional study. Assessments included the registration of foot deformities; test of gross function at the hip, knee, and ankle joints; a stratification of the risk of developing foot ulcers according to the Swedish National Diabetes Register; a walking test; and self-reported questionnaires including the SF-36 health survey. In-shoe PP was measured in seven regions of interests on the sole of the foot using F-Scan®. An exploratory analysis of the association of risk factors with PP was performed. Results: Neuropathy was present in 28 (38%, and 39 (53% had callosities in the heel region. Low forefoot arch was present in 57 (77%. Gait-related parameters, such as the ability to walk on the forefoot or heel, were normal in all patients. Eighty percent had normal function at the hip and ankle joints. Gait velocity was 1.2±0.2 m/s. All patients were stratified to risk group 3. Hallux valgus and hallux rigidus were associated with an increase in the PP in the medial forefoot. A higher body mass index (BMI was found to increase the PP at metatarsal heads 4 and 5. Pes planus was associated with a decrease in PP at metatarsal head 1. Neuropathy did not have a high association with PP. Conclusions: This study identified several potential risk factors for the onset of diabetic foot ulcers (DFU. Hallux valgus

  7. Presence of a long accessory flexor tendon of the toes in surgical treatment for tendinopathy of the insertion of the calcaneal tendon: case report

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nelson Pelozo Gomes Júnior

    2016-02-01

    Full Text Available ABSTRACT The presence of accessory tendons in the foot and ankle needs to be recognized, given that depending on their location, they may cause disorders relating either to pain processes or to handling of the surgical findings. We describe the presence of an accessory flexor tendon of the toes, seen in surgical exposure for transferring the long flexor tendon of the hallux to the calcaneus, due to the presence of a disorder of tendinopathy of the insertion of the calcaneal tendon in association with Haglund's syndrome.

  8. The association of foot structure and footwear fit with disability in children and adolescents with Down syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lim, Polly Qx; Shields, Nora; Nikolopoulos, Nikolaos; Barrett, Joanna T; Evans, Angela M; Taylor, Nicholas F; Munteanu, Shannon E

    2015-01-01

    Foot deformity, flat feet, and the use of ill-fitting footwear are common in children and adolescents with Down syndrome (DS). The aim of this study was to determine whether these observations are associated with foot-specific disability in this group. A cross-sectional study design. Foot structure (foot posture determined using the Arch Index, presence of hallux valgus and lesser toe deformities) and footwear fit (determined by length and width percentage differences between the participant's foot and footwear) were assessed in 50 participants with DS (22 females, 28 males) aged five to 18 with a mean (SD) age of 10.6 (3.9) years. Foot-specific disability was determined using the parent-reported Oxford Ankle Foot Questionnaire for Children (OxAFQ-C). Associations between foot structure and footwear fit with the four domains (Physical, School and play, Emotional and Footwear) of the OxAFQ-C were determined using multivariate regression modelling. The mean (SD) Arch Index was 0.29 (0.08), and the prevalence of flat feet, hallux valgus and lesser toe deformities was 76%, 10% and 12% respectively. Few participants wore footwear that was too short (10%), but the use of footwear that was too narrow was common (58%). The presence of hallux valgus was significantly associated with increased disability for the OxAFQ-C School and play domain scores. The use of narrow-fitting footwear was significantly associated with increased levels of disability for the OxAFQ-C Physical, School and play, and Emotional domains. However, these variables only explained between 10% to 14% of the variance in the OxAFQ-C domain scores. There were no significant associations between foot structure and footwear fit with the OxAFQ-C Footwear domain scores. Flatter feet and lesser toe deformities are not associated with foot-specific disability in children and adolescents with DS. Hallux valgus is associated with foot-specific disability during school and play activities. Ill-fitting footwear (too

  9. Turf toe and sesamoiditis: what the radiologist needs to know.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schein, Aaron J; Skalski, Matthew R; Patel, Dakshesh B; White, Eric A; Lundquist, Ryan; Gottsegen, Christopher J; Forrester, Deborah M; Matcuk, George R

    2015-01-01

    The first metatarsophalangeal (MTP) joint complex is a critical weight-bearing structure important to biomechanics. An acute dorsiflexion injury, named "turf toe," is common among American football and soccer players. "Sesamoiditis" is a name often given for pain arising from the hallux sesamoids in the absence of acute trauma, and may result from a variety of causes. The first MTP joint complex can also be affected by degenerative or inflammatory arthritis, infarct, and infection. This review article will cover the anatomy and biomechanics of the first MTP joint complex, its patterns of injury and pathology, imaging techniques, and management. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  10. Post-operative X-ray morphology: Joints

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Vogel, H.

    1987-01-01

    The description of X-ray findings after operations with the object of implanting protheses in joints makes up most of the contents of this book. The reconstruction of joints after trauma is only marginally dealt with. Among the various indications for implanting protheses, the replacement of joints destroyed by wear and trauma is the most important. Also considered were X-ray examinations after hallux-valgus operations and plastic surgery on hands and feet, as well as X-ray findings following operations on the lumbar part of the vertebral column (disc surgery). (orig./MG) [de

  11. Post-operative X-ray morphology: Joints. Handbook and atlas for clinical and practical use. Postoperative Roentgenmorphologie: Gelenke. Handbuch und Atlas fuer Klinik und Praxis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Vogel, H.

    1987-01-01

    The description of X-ray findings after operations with the object of implanting protheses in joints makes up most of the contents of this book. The reconstruction of joints after trauma is only marginally dealt with. Among the various indications for implanting protheses, the replacement of joints destroyed by wear and trauma is the most important. Also considered were X-ray examinations after hallux-valgus operations and plastic surgery on hands and feet, as well as X-ray findings following operations on the lumbar part of the vertebral column (disc surgery).

  12. Early detection of Freiberg's disease by radionuclide bone imaging

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Peng Jingjing

    1993-01-01

    56 hallux valgus deformities of 28 patients were studied with radionuclide bone imaging (RNBI). Among them, 24 feet(42.85%) revealed increased uptake of radioactivity in second or third metatarsal. The ratio of radioactivity in lesion and contralateral normal site (D/N) was increased, the difference between the patient and normal groups was significant (P<0.01). The histologic study showed that there have been degenerative changes and bone cell necrosis in increased uptake area. It was concluded that RNBI was more sensitive than X ray and can be used for the early diagnosis of Freiberg's Disease

  13. Functional CT imaging: load-dependent visualization of the subchondral mineralization by means of CT osteoabsorptionmetry (CT-OAM); Funktionelle Computertomographie: Beanspruchungsabhaengige Darstellung der subchondralen Mineralisierung mittels CT gestuetzter Osteoabsorptiometrie (CTOAM)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Linsenmaier, U.; Schlichtenhorst, K.; Pfeifer, K.J.; Reiser, M. [Inst. fuer Klinische Radiologie, Innenstadt, Ludwig-Maximilians-Univ. Muenchen (Germany); Kersting, S.; Putz, R.; Mueller-Gerbl, M. [Anatomische Anstalt, Ludwig-Maximilians-Univ. Muenchen (Germany)

    2003-05-01

    Purpose: Functional computed tomography for visualization and quantification of subchondral bone mineralization using CT osteoabsorptiometry (CT-OAM). Materials and Methods: Tarsometatarsal (TMT) and metatarsophalangeal (MTP) joints of 46 human hallux valgus (HV) specimens were examined (sagittal 1/1/1 mm) on a single slice CT scanner SCT (Somatom Plus 4, Siemens AG). Subchondral bone pixels were segmented and assigned to 10 density value groups (triangle 100 HU, range 200 - 1200 HU) the pixels using volume rendering technique (VRT). The data analysis considered the severity of HV as determined by the radiographically measured HV-angle (a.p. projection). Results: CT-OAM could generate reproducible densitograms of the distribution pattern of the subchondral bone density for all four joint surfaces (TMT and MTP joints). The bone density localization enables the assignment to different groups, showing a characteristic HV-angle-dependent distribution of the maximum bone mineralization of the load-dependent densitogram (p < 0.001). Conclusion: CT-OAM is a functional CT technique for visualizing and quantifying the distribution of the subchondral bone density, enabling a noninvasive load-dependent assessment of the joint surfaces. Load-dependent densitograms of hallux valgus specimens show a characteristic correlation with an increase of the HV-angle. (orig.) [German] Ziel: Darstellung und Quantifizierung der subchondralen Mineralisierung in Abhaengigkeit von unterschiedlichen Beanspruchungssituationen mittels funktioneller Computertomographie als CT-Osteoabsorptiometrie (CT-OAM). Methode: An 46 humanen Praeparaten mit Hallux valgus (HV) wurden exemplarisch die TMT I (Tarsometatarsal)- und MTP I (Metatarsophalangeal)-Gelenke des ersten Strahles (sagittal 1/1/1 mm) an einem Singleslice Spiral-CT (SCT, Somatom Plus 4, Siemens AG) untersucht. Der subchondrale Knochen wurde segmentiert, den Pixel wurde mittels Volume Rendering Technik (VRT) 10 Graustufenbereiche (D100 HU

  14. Biomechanics of the arch of the foot. Pre- and postoperative radiological examination; Biomechanik des Fussgewoelbes. Prae- und postoperative Radiometrie

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kristen, K.H. [Fusszentrum Wien, Wien (Austria)

    2007-03-15

    The human foot is a complex biomechanical structure. The arch of the foot is formed by the bony and articular structure of the midfoot and supported by strong ligaments and tendons. The normal arch develops in childhood. Tendon and ligament rupture and degeneration often lead to flattening of the arch. Frequent painful conditions include hallux valgus deformity and rupture of the posterior tibial tendon both leading to flat feet. Radiological examination is necessary in a standardized, full weight bearing standing position. The standing dorsoplantar view shows hallux valgus angle and intermetatarsal 1/2 angle. The side view shows Lisfranc joint instability and decrease of the talometatarsal angle. Talonavicular instability is a frequent secondary sign of spring ligament and posterior tibial tendon lesion. After failure of conservative therapy, corrective surgery with osteotomy and realignment procedure of the malpositioned bones in combination with tendon and ligament reconstruction is the state of the art procedure. In postoperative follow-up a standing X-ray of the foot is again the standard tool. Additional MRI and CT examinations help to detect bone and cartilage lesions and tendon/ligament ruptures. (orig.) [German] Der menschliche Fuss ist ein biomechanisch hoch komplexes System. Das Gewoelbe des Fusses ist durch Knochen und Gelenksstruktur vorgegeben und wird statisch durch straffe Baender sowie dynamisch durch kraeftige Sehnen in seiner Form gehalten. Das Fussgewoelbe entwickelt sich in der Kindheit. Sehnen- und Bandverletzungen sowie Degenerationen fuehren zu einer progredienten Abflachung des Fussgewoelbes. Haeufige schmerzhafte Erkrankungen sind die Hallux-valgus-Deformitaet und die Ruptur der Tibialis-posterior-Sehne. Beide Erkrankungen fuehren zu einem Plattfuss. Roentgenaufnahmen bei strukturellen Stoerungen des Fusses muessen als belastete stehende Aufnahmen erfolgen. Die stehende dorsoplantare Aufnahme zeigt einen Hallux-valgus-Winkel und den

  15. Homo sapiens are bilaterally symmetrical but not with toe length and ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    A digital Vernier caliper was used to obtain direct linear measurements of the toe length of both feet; hallux (1T), second toe (2T), third toe (3T), fourth toe (4T), and the fifth toe (5T). Ten (10) possible toe-length ratios were also determined and named as follows; 1T/2T, 1T/3T, 1T/4T, 1T/5T, 2T/3T, 2T/4T, 2T/5T, 3T/4T, 3T/5T, ...

  16. Correlation between anatomic foot and ankle movement measured with MRI and with a motion analysis system.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marquez-Barrientos, C; Liu, X C; Lyon, R; Tassone, C; Thometz, J; Tarima, S

    2012-07-01

    Several studies have attempted to measure how well external markers track internal bone movement using pins drilled into the foot, but this is too invasive for the pediatric population. This study investigated how well a six segment foot model (6SFM) using external markers was able to measure bone movement in the foot compared to MRI measurements. The foot was moved into different positions using a plastic foot jig and measurements were taken with both systems. The aims were to: (1) Look at the correlation between movement tracked with an Electronic Motion Tracking System (EMTS) and by measurements derived from MRI images, specifically the principal intercept angles (PIAs) which are the angles of intersection between principal axes of inertia of bone volumes. (2) To see how well external motion measured by the 6SFM could predict PIAs. Four bone pairs had their movement tracked: Tibia-Calcaneus, Calcaneus-Cuboid, Navicular-1st Metatarsal, and 1st Metatarsal-Hallux. The results showed moderate correlation between measured PIAs and those predicted at the Tibia-Calcaneus, Navicular-1st Metatarsal, and 1st Metatarsal-Hallux joints. Moderate to high correlation was found between the PIA and movement in a single anatomic plane for all four joints at several positions. The 6SFM using the EMTS allows reliable tracking of 3D rotations in the pediatric foot, except at the Calcaneus-Cuboid joint. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  17. Foot kinematics in patients with two patterns of pathological plantar hyperkeratosis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bowker Peter

    2011-02-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The Root paradigm of foot function continues to underpin the majority of clinical foot biomechanics practice and foot orthotic therapy. There are great number of assumptions in this popular paradigm, most of which have not been thoroughly tested. One component supposes that patterns of plantar pressure and associated hyperkeratosis lesions should be associated with distinct rearfoot, mid foot, first metatarsal and hallux kinematic patterns. Our aim was to investigate the extent to which this was true. Methods Twenty-seven subjects with planter pathological hyperkeratosis were recruited into one of two groups. Group 1 displayed pathological plantar hyperkeratosis only under metatarsal heads 2, 3 and 4 (n = 14. Group 2 displayed pathological plantar hyperkeratosis only under the 1st and 5th metatarsal heads (n = 13. Foot kinematics were measured using reflective markers on the leg, heel, midfoot, first metatarsal and hallux. Results The kinematic data failed to identify distinct differences between these two groups of subjects, however there were several subtle (generally Conclusions There was some evidence of small differences between planter pathological hyperkeratosis groups. Nevertheless, there was too much similarity between the kinematic data displayed in each group to classify them as distinct foot types as the current clinical paradigm proposes.

  18. Axial loading screw fixation for chevron type osteotomies of the distal first metatarsal: a retrospective outcomes analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Murphy, Ryan M; Fallat, Lawrence M; Kish, John P

    2014-01-01

    The distal chevron osteotomy is a widely accepted technique for the treatment of hallux abductovalgus deformity. Although the osteotomy is considered to be stable, displacements of the capital fragment has been described. We propose a new method for fixation of the osteotomy involving the axial loading screw (ALS) used in addition to single screw fixation. We believe this method will provide a more mechanically stable construct. We reviewed the charts of 46 patients in whom 52 feet underwent a distal chevron osteotomy that was fixated with either 1 screw or 2 screws that included the ALS. We hypothesized that the ALS group would have fewer displacements and would heal more quickly than the single screw fixation group. We found that the group with ALS fixation had healed at a mean of 6.5 weeks and that the group with single screw fixation had healed at 9.53 weeks (p = .001). Also, 8 cases occurred of displacement of the capital fragment in the single screw, control group compared with 2 cases of displacement in the ALS group. However, this finding was not statistically significant. The addition of the ALS to single screw fixation allowed the patients to heal approximately 3 weeks earlier than single screw fixation alone. The ALS is a fixation option for the surgeon to consider when osseous correction of hallux abducto valgus is performed. Copyright © 2014 American College of Foot and Ankle Surgeons. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  19. The Efficacy of a Silicone Sheet in Postoperative Scar Management.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Jin Sam; Hong, Joon Pio; Choi, Jong Woo; Seo, Dong Kyo; Lee, Eun Sook; Lee, Ho Seong

    2016-09-01

    Silicone gel sheeting has been introduced to prevent scarring, but objective evidence for its usefulness in scar healing is limited. Therefore, the authors' objective was to examine the effectiveness of silicone gel sheeting by randomly applying it to only unilateral scars from a bilateral hallux valgus surgery with symmetrical closure. In a prospective randomized, blinded, intraindividual comparison study, the silicone gel sheeting was applied to 1 foot of a hallux valgus incision scar (an experiment group) for 12 weeks upon removal of the stitches, whereas the symmetrical scar from the other foot was left untreated (a control group). The scars were evaluated at 4 and 12 weeks after the silicon sheet application. The Vancouver Scar Scale was used to measure the vascularity, pigmentation, pliability, height, and length of the scars. Adverse effects were also evaluated, and they included pain, itchiness, rash, erythema, and skin softening. At weeks 4 and 12, the experiment group scored significantly better on the Vancouver Scar Scale in all items, except length (P sheet does not cause adverse effects (P sheet application did show a significant improvement in prevention of postoperative scarring.

  20. A comparative biomechanical analysis of habitually unshod and shod runners based on a foot morphological difference.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mei, Qichang; Fernandez, Justin; Fu, Weijie; Feng, Neng; Gu, Yaodong

    2015-08-01

    Running is one of the most accessible physical activities and running with and without footwear has attracted extensive attention in the past several years. In this study 18 habitually male unshod runners and 20 habitually male shod runners (all with dominant right feet) participated in a running test. A Vicon motion analysis system was used to capture the kinematics of each participant's lower limb. The in-shoe plantar pressure measurement system was employed to measure the pressure and force exerted on the pressure sensors of the insole. The function of a separate hallux in unshod runners is analyzed through the comparison of plantar pressure parameters. Owing to the different strike patterns in shod and unshod runners, peak dorsiflexion and plantarflexion angle were significantly different. Habitually shod runners exhibited a decreased foot strike angle (FSA) under unshod conditions; and the vertical average loading rate (VALR) of shod runners under unshod conditions was larger than that under shod conditions. This suggests that the foot strike pattern is more important than the shod or unshod running style and runners need to acquire the technique. It can be concluded that for habitually unshod runners the separate hallux takes part of the foot loading and reduces loading to the forefoot under shod conditions. The remaining toes of rearfoot strike (RFS) runners function similarly under unshod conditions. These morphological features of shod and unshod runners should be considered in footwear design to improve sport performance and reduce injury. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  1. A clinically applicable six-segmented foot model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    De Mits, Sophie; Segers, Veerle; Woodburn, Jim; Elewaut, Dirk; De Clercq, Dirk; Roosen, Philip

    2012-04-01

    We describe a multi-segmented foot model comprising lower leg, rearfoot, midfoot, lateral forefoot, medial forefoot, and hallux for routine use in a clinical setting. The Ghent Foot Model describes the kinematic patterns of functional units of the foot, especially the midfoot, to investigate patient populations where midfoot deformation or dysfunction is an important feature, for example, rheumatoid arthritis patients. Data were obtained from surface markers by a 6 camera motion capture system at 500 Hz. Ten healthy subjects walked barefoot along a 12 m walkway at self-selected speed. Joint angles (rearfoot to shank, midfoot to rearfoot, lateral and medial forefoot to midfoot, and hallux to medial forefoot) in the sagittal, frontal, and transverse plane are reported according to anatomically based reference frames. These angles were calculated and reported during the foot rollover phases in stance, detected by synchronized plantar pressure measurements. Repeated measurements of each subject revealed low intra-subject variability, varying between 0.7° and 2.3° for the minimum values, between 0.5° and 2.1° for the maximum values, and between 0.8° and 5.8° for the ROM. The described movement patterns were repeatable and consistent with biomechanical and clinical knowledge. As such, the Ghent Foot model permits intersegment, in vivo motion measurement of the foot, which is crucial for both clinical and research applications. Copyright © 2011 Orthopaedic Research Society.

  2. Foot shape in arboreal birds: two morphological patterns for the same pincer-like tool.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abourachid, Anick; Fabre, Anne-Claire; Cornette, Raphaël; Höfling, Elizabeth

    2017-07-01

    The feet are the only contact between the body and the substrate in limbed animals and as such they provide a crucial interface between the animal and its environment. This is especially true for bipedal and arboreal species living in a complex three-dimensional environment that likely induces strong selection on foot morphology. In birds, foot morphology is highly variable, with different orientations of the toes, making it a good model for the study of the role of functional, developmental, and phylogenetic constraints in the evolution of phenotypic diversity. Our data on the proportions of the phalanges analyzed in a phylogenetic context show that two different morphological patterns exist that depend mainly on habitat and toe orientation. In the anisodactyl foot, the hallux is the only backward-oriented toe and is enlarged in climbing species and reduced in terrestrial ones. Moreover, a proximo-distal gradient in phalanx size is observed depending on the degree of terrestriality. In the two other cases (heterodactyl and zygodactyl) that have two toes that point backward, the hallux is rather small in contrast to the other backward-pointing toe, which is enlarged. The first pattern is convergent and common among tetrapods and follows rules of skeletal development. The second pattern is unique for the clade and under muscle-morphogenetic control. In all cases, the functional result is the same tool, a pincer-like foot. © 2017 Anatomical Society.

  3. [Case report: comprehensive treatment of forefoot with double brachymetatarsia in one surgical stage].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Caldiño-Lozada, I; Gallegos-de la Torre, O; Esperón-Hernández, R

    2017-01-01

    Brachymetatarsia (shortening of the metatarsal) directly affects the transversal arch of the foot causing severe deformities, such as hallux valgus, divergent toes, overlapping toes, metatarsalgia, all of these alter the biomechanics of the foot and gait. Treatment consists of two main techniques, one-stage lengthening with bone graft or elongation through callotaxis with external fixator; there are variants of both techniques used to minimize the disadvantages of each. The objective of treatment must be to return the structural harmony to the forefoot, improving the biomechanics, resulting in a satisfactory outcome for the patients. This article presents a surgical treatment for feet with closed physis to obtain the appropriate metatarsal formula and to reestablish aesthetics and function. This case was treated by means of one-stage lengthening with bone graft to the affected metatarsal; shortening of the adjacent metatarsals; hallux valgus alignment through the necessary osteotomies and the treatment of deformities of the lesser toes as needed. This surgical technique has as one of its advantages the correction of the entire forefoot at one time, without the need of an external fixator and its required postoperative care. Its main disadvantages are its dependence on structural bone graft and the need of postoperative dressing until healing of the bone has taken place. Satisfactory clinical and radiographical outcomes were obtained in treated patient.

  4. Concurrent validity of an automated algorithm for computing the center of pressure excursion index (CPEI).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Diaz, Michelle A; Gibbons, Mandi W; Song, Jinsup; Hillstrom, Howard J; Choe, Kersti H; Pasquale, Maria R

    2018-01-01

    Center of Pressure Excursion Index (CPEI), a parameter computed from the distribution of plantar pressures during stance phase of barefoot walking, has been used to assess dynamic foot function. The original custom program developed to calculate CPEI required the oversight of a user who could manually correct for certain exceptions to the computational rules. A new fully automatic program has been developed to calculate CPEI with an algorithm that accounts for these exceptions. The purpose of this paper is to compare resulting CPEI values computed by these two programs on plantar pressure data from both asymptomatic and pathologic subjects. If comparable, the new program offers significant benefits-reduced potential for variability due to rater discretion and faster CPEI calculation. CPEI values were calculated from barefoot plantar pressure distributions during comfortable paced walking on 61 healthy asymptomatic adults, 19 diabetic adults with moderate hallux valgus, and 13 adults with mild hallux valgus. Right foot data for each subject was analyzed with linear regression and a Bland-Altman plot. The automated algorithm yielded CPEI values that were linearly related to the original program (R 2 =0.99; Pcomputation methods. Results of this analysis suggest that the new automated algorithm may be used to calculate CPEI on both healthy and pathologic feet. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  5. Ecological divergence and medial cuneiform morphology in gorillas.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tocheri, Matthew W; Solhan, Christyna R; Orr, Caley M; Femiani, John; Frohlich, Bruno; Groves, Colin P; Harcourt-Smith, William E; Richmond, Brian G; Shoelson, Brett; Jungers, William L

    2011-02-01

    Gorillas are more closely related to each other than to any other extant primate and are all terrestrial knuckle-walkers, but taxa differ along a gradient of dietary strategies and the frequency of arboreality in their behavioral repertoire. In this study, we test the hypothesis that medial cuneiform morphology falls on a morphocline in gorillas that tracks function related to hallucial abduction ability and relative frequency of arboreality. This morphocline predicts that western gorillas, being the most arboreal, should display a medial cuneiform anatomy that reflects the greatest hallucial abduction ability, followed by grauer gorillas, and then by mountain gorillas. Using a three-dimensional methodology to measure angles between articular surfaces, relative articular and nonarticular areas, and the curvatures of the hallucial articular surface, the functional predictions are partially confirmed in separating western gorillas from both eastern gorillas. Western gorillas are characterized by a more medially oriented, proportionately larger, and more mediolaterally curved hallucial facet than are eastern gorillas. These characteristics follow the predictions for a more prehensile hallux in western gorillas relative to a more stable, plantigrade hallux in eastern gorillas. The characteristics that distinguish eastern gorilla taxa from one another appear unrelated to hallucial abduction ability or frequency of arboreality. In total, this reexamination of medial cuneiform morphology suggests differentiation between eastern and western gorillas due to a longstanding ecological divergence and more recent and possibly non-adaptive differences between eastern taxa. Published by Elsevier Ltd.

  6. Lindgren-Turan metodu ile halluks valgus cerrahisi uygulanan hastaların yaşam kalitesi

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Erhan Şükür

    2012-12-01

    Full Text Available Objectives: In this study, we aimed to investigate thechanges in health-related life quality via EQ-5D surveyin patients with hallux valgus deformity who were treatedwith Lindgren-Turan method.Materials and methods: Totally 60 patients (30 patientsin Stockholm and 30 patients in Istanbul with halluxvalgus deformity who were treated with Lindgren-Turanmethod were included in the study. The health-related lifequality levels were preoperatively and postoperatively recordedand compared for all patients via EQ-5D surveyand changes were noted. Visual analogue scale (VASwas used to evaluate the patient’s response to the questionof how much healthy they feel. Radiological parameterswere not taken into account in the course of lifequality comparison.Results: Pain and discomfort were found to be the mostcommon complaints (87% among the patients in the preoperativeperiod which were followed by restricted motioncaused by the deformity and difficulty in daily activities(60%. VAS score were significantly much worse in Turkishpatients in the preoperative period. All parameters, includingespecially daily personal care and hygiene, weresignificantly improved postoperatively. VAS score whichwas questioning the general health status of the patientswas also increased significantly (p<0.01.Conclusions: Lindgren-Turan method for the surgicaltreatment of hallux valgus provides a significant recoveryin patient’s health-related life quality. J Clin Exp Invest2012; 3(4: 510-513Key words: Health, life quality, outpatient surgery, halluxvalgus

  7. Biomechanics of the arch of the foot. Pre- and postoperative radiological examination

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kristen, K.H.

    2007-01-01

    The human foot is a complex biomechanical structure. The arch of the foot is formed by the bony and articular structure of the midfoot and supported by strong ligaments and tendons. The normal arch develops in childhood. Tendon and ligament rupture and degeneration often lead to flattening of the arch. Frequent painful conditions include hallux valgus deformity and rupture of the posterior tibial tendon both leading to flat feet. Radiological examination is necessary in a standardized, full weight bearing standing position. The standing dorsoplantar view shows hallux valgus angle and intermetatarsal 1/2 angle. The side view shows Lisfranc joint instability and decrease of the talometatarsal angle. Talonavicular instability is a frequent secondary sign of spring ligament and posterior tibial tendon lesion. After failure of conservative therapy, corrective surgery with osteotomy and realignment procedure of the malpositioned bones in combination with tendon and ligament reconstruction is the state of the art procedure. In postoperative follow-up a standing X-ray of the foot is again the standard tool. Additional MRI and CT examinations help to detect bone and cartilage lesions and tendon/ligament ruptures. (orig.) [de

  8. Lymphoscintigraphy for sentinel lymph node mapping in Japanese patients with malignant skin neoplasms of the lower extremities. Comparison with previously investigated Japanese lymphatic anatomy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Miura, Hiroyuki; Ono, Shuichi; Nagahata, Morio

    2010-01-01

    Lymph nodes (LN) and lymphatic drainage were identified by lymphoscintigraphy using 99m Tc-phytate in order to map the sentinel lymph nodes (SLNs) in patients with malignant skin neoplasms of the lower extremities, and to compare the results with an atlas of Japanese lymphatic anatomy. Sentinel lymphoscintigraphs of 18 patients with malignant skin neoplasms of the lower extremities (9 men, 9 women; age range 45-84 years, mean age 66 years) were analyzed retrospectively, and the LNs detected were identified as SLNs or secondary nodes. The patterns of lymphatic drainage were divided into three different categories: initial drainage into inguinal LN without visualization of popliteal LNs (inguinal type), initial drainage into popliteal LNs and then into intrapelvic LNs (popliteal type), and initial drainage into both popliteal and inguinal LNs (inguinal and popliteal type). More than half of the cases were the inguinal and popliteal type, as both inguinal and popliteal LNs were identified as SLNs. In the cases in which the hallux and its surrounding area were injected, all were the inguinal type and popliteal LNs were not visualized. In one case, only dynamic images detected lymphatic drainage without visualization of popliteal LNs. In contrast to the previously published literature on Japanese lymphatic anatomy, SLN lymphatic drainage from the skin of the lower extremities was wide and overlapping in many areas. However, in agreement with currently accepted anatomy, only the great saphenous lymphatic vessel drained the skin of the hallux and its surrounding area. The present results suggest that it is important to confirm lymphatic drainage in order to identify SLNs in the lower extremities. The patterns of lymphatic drainage from the skin of the foot were divided into three different categories. In contrast to previously published Japanese lymphatic anatomy, lymphatic drainage from the skin of the lower extremities was wide and overlapping in many areas. However

  9. Does obtaining an initial magnetic resonance imaging decrease the reamputation rates in the diabetic foot?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marlena Jbara

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available Objective: Diabetes mellitus (DM through its over glycosylation of neurovascular structures and resultant peripheral neuropathy continues to be the major risk factor for pedal amputation. Repetitive trauma to the insensate foot results in diabetic foot ulcers, which are at high risk to develop osteomyelitis. Many patients who present with diabetic foot complications will undergo one or more pedal amputations during the course of their disease. The purpose of this study was to determine if obtaining an initial magnetic resonance imaging (MRI, prior to the first amputation, is associated with a decreased rate of reamputation in the diabetic foot. Our hypothesis was that the rate of reamputation may be associated with underutilization of obtaining an initial MRI, useful in presurgical planning. This study was designed to determine whether there was an association between the reamputation rate in diabetic patients and utilization of MRI in the presurgical planning and prior to initial forefoot amputations. Methods: Following approval by our institutional review board, our study design consisted of a retrospective cohort analysis of 413 patients at Staten Island University Hospital, a 700-bed tertiary referral center between 2008 and 2013 who underwent an initial great toe (hallux amputation. Of the 413 patients with a hallux amputation, there were 368 eligible patients who had a history of DM with documented hemoglobin A1c (HbA1c within 3 months of the initial first ray (hallux and first metatarsal amputation and available radiographic data. Statistical analysis compared the incidence rates of reamputation between patients who underwent initial MRI and those who did not obtain an initial MRI prior to their first amputation. The reamputation rate was compared after adjustment for age, gender, ethnicity, HbA1c, cardiovascular disease, hypoalbuminemia, smoking, body mass index, and prior antibiotic treatment. Results: The results of our statistical

  10. Three-dimensional quantitative analysis of healthy foot shape: a proof of concept study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stanković, Kristina; Booth, Brian G; Danckaers, Femke; Burg, Fien; Vermaelen, Philippe; Duerinck, Saartje; Sijbers, Jan; Huysmans, Toon

    2018-01-01

    Foot morphology has received increasing attention from both biomechanics researches and footwear manufacturers. Usually, the morphology of the foot is quantified by 2D footprints. However, footprint quantification ignores the foot's vertical dimension and hence, does not allow accurate quantification of complex 3D foot shape. The shape variation of healthy 3D feet in a population of 31 adult women and 31 adult men who live in Belgium was studied using geometric morphometric methods. The effect of different factors such as sex, age, shoe size, frequency of sport activity, Body Mass Index (BMI), foot asymmetry, and foot loading on foot shape was investigated. Correlation between these factors and foot shape was examined using multivariate linear regression. The complex nature of a foot's 3D shape leads to high variability in healthy populations. After normalizing for scale, the major axes of variation in foot morphology are (in order of decreasing variance): arch height, combined ball width and inter-toe distance, global foot width, hallux bone orientation (valgus-varus), foot type (e.g. Egyptian, Greek), and midfoot width. These first six modes of variation capture 92.59% of the total shape variation. Higher BMI results in increased ankle width, Achilles tendon width, heel width and a thicker forefoot along the dorsoplantar axis. Age was found to be associated with heel width, Achilles tendon width, toe height and hallux orientation. A bigger shoe size was found to be associated with a narrow Achilles tendon, a hallux varus, a narrow heel, heel expansion along the posterior direction, and a lower arch compared to smaller shoe size. Sex was found to be associated with differences in ankle width, Achilles tendon width, and heel width. Frequency of sport activity was associated with Achilles tendon width and toe height. A detailed analysis of the 3D foot shape, allowed by geometric morphometrics, provides insights in foot variations in three dimensions that can not be

  11. Distribution and correlates of plantar hyperkeratotic lesions in older people

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Menz Hylton B

    2009-03-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Plantar hyperkeratotic lesions are common in older people and are associated with pain, mobility impairment and functional limitations. However, little has been documented in relation to the frequency or distribution of these lesions. The aim of this study was to document the occurrence of plantar hyperkeratotic lesions and the patterns in which they occur in a random sample of older people. Methods A medical history questionnaire was administered to a random sample of 301 people living independently in the community (117 men, 184 women aged between 70 and 95 years (mean 77.2, SD 4.9, who also underwent a clinical assessment of foot problems, including the documentation of plantar lesion locations, toe deformities and the presence and severity of hallux valgus. Results Of the 301 participants, 180 (60% had at least one plantar hyperkeratotic lesion. Those with plantar lesions were more likely to be female (χ2 = 18.75, p 2 = 6.15, p vs 36.3 ± 8.4°; t = 2.68, df = 286, p vs 4.8 ± 1.3 hours, t = -2.46, df = 299, p = 0.01. No associations were found between the presence of plantar lesions and body mass index, obesity, foot posture, dominant foot or forefoot pain. A total of 53 different lesions patterns were observed, with the most common lesion pattern being "roll-off" hyperkeratosis on the medial aspect of the 1st metatarsophalangeal joint (MPJ, accounting for 12% of all lesion patterns. "Roll-off" lesions under the 1st MPJ and interphalangeal joint were significantly associated with moderate to severe hallux valgus (p p Conclusion Plantar hyperkeratotic lesions affect 60% of older people and are associated with female gender, hallux valgus, toe deformity, increased ankle flexibility and time spent on feet, but are not associated with obesity, limb dominance, forefoot pain or foot posture. Although there are a wide range of lesion distribution patterns, most can be classified into medial, central or lateral groups. Further

  12. Negative BOLD signal changes in ipsilateral primary somatosensory cortex are associated with perfusion decreases and behavioral evidence for functional inhibition

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Schäfer, Katharina; Blankenburg, Felix; Kupers, Ron

    2012-01-01

    that the negative BOLD signal is associated with functional inhibition. Electrical stimulation of the median nerve at 7Hz evoked robust negative BOLD signals in the primary somatosensory cortex (SI) ipsilateral to stimulation, and positive BOLD signals in contralateral SI. The negative BOLD signal in ipsilateral SI......) at the ipsilateral finger during concomitant stimulation of the contralateral median nerve increased significantly, suggesting augmented functional inhibition. Since the CPT in the ipsilateral hallux did not significantly change in response to median nerve stimulation, it is more likely that the CPT......-increase for the finger is due to functional inhibition (Kastrup et al., 2008) than to changes in selective attention. In conclusion, our data provide evidence that stimulus-induced reductions in relative rCBF may underlie the negative BOLD signal, which in turn may reflect increments in functional inhibition....

  13. Rhupus, un síndrome poco frecuente: Reporte de un caso

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bryan Abarca-Acuña

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available El Rhupus es uno de los síndromes de overlap, en la que existe sobreposición de artritis reumatoide y lupus eritematoso sistémico. Se reporta el caso de una mujer de 47 años de edad, con un cuadro caracterizado por poliartralgias a predominio en ambas rodillas y cadera derecha, fotosensibilidad, alopecia difusa, úlceras orales, dedos en cuello de cisne en manos, hallux valgus en ambos pies y edema en miembros superiores e inferiores. La coexistencia de dos o más enfermedades del tejido conectivo en un mismo paciente es un raro fenómeno, en especial la de LES y AR, la cual ha sido estimada entre el 0,01 y el 2%.

  14. A survey of rate and causes of deformity in boys and girls youngsters in Lorestan province

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    mostafa Bahrami

    2007-01-01

    Materials and methods: The statistical community of the research included all the youngsters in Lorestan Province. The subjects in this study were 400 boys and 450 girls (11-15 years old that collected randomly. Data collection was done by questionnaires and physical examination (posture screen, tape-measure, Scales and…. The results were analyzed by SPSS software Results: In general, the results of this study indicated that abnormal posture in male was 57.67% and in female was 68.89%. additionally, there was a significant relationship between the level of kyphosis and lordosis and sleep habit, between shoulder dropping and briefcase carriage, between Bow leg and sitting between Hallux Valgus and high heel shoes of subjects ( P<0.05 . Conclusion: Considering the generated results, the level and rate of deformity among youngsters is very high. So, it seems that there is a need to plan an especial program by managers to reduce the burden of this abnormality.

  15. Fibrodysplasia ossificans progressiva: case report

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    NUCCI ANAMARLI

    2000-01-01

    Full Text Available Fibrodysplasia ossificans progressiva is a rare genetic disease characterized by widespread soft tissue ossification and congenital stigmata of the extremities. We report on a male child followed for ten years since the age of 3 years and 9 months, when the diagnosis was made. He was born with bilateral hypoplasic hallux valgus and ventricular septal defect, corrected by transsternal approach when 32 months old. Restriction of neck mobility followed and foci of ectopic ossification appeared. Four crises of disease exacerbation were treated with oral prednisone and/or other antiinflammatory drugs. Sodium etidronate 5 to 10 mg/kg/day was prescribed intermittently during about six years but was discontinued due to osteopenia. The disease course has been relentless, with severe movement restriction including the chest wall. A review showed few similar case reports in the Brazilian literature. We revisit the criteria for diagnosis and the essentials of management and treatment.

  16. Radiographic and CT findings in a case of fibro-dysplasia ossificans progressiva

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Haddad, S.; Menassa, L.; Slaba, S.; Atallah, N.; Nasnas, R.; Abadjian, G.

    1997-01-01

    Fibro-dysplasia ossificans progressiva is a rare congenital disease that affects children under the age of five years. Soft tissue swelling of the cervical and dorsal regions with local pain, warmth and low grade fever are the early clinical manifestations, usually associated with hallux valgus and microdactyly of the fingers and toes. Calcifications of the fascias and muscles cause muscular contractures leading to progressive disability and restrictive lung disease. In the early stage, CT shows edema of the soft tissues and later on, calcifications of muscular fascia. The association of these radiographic and CT findings is specific and should avoid muscular biopsies which are known to be an aggravating factor in this disease. (author)

  17. Effect of custom-made and prefabricated insoles on plantar loading parameters during running with and without fatigue.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lucas-Cuevas, Angel Gabriel; Pérez-Soriano, Pedro; Llana-Belloch, Salvador; Macián-Romero, Cecili; Sánchez-Zuriaga, Daniel

    2014-01-01

    Controversy exists whether custom-made insoles are more effective in reducing plantar loading compared to prefabricated insoles. Forty recreational athletes ran using custom-made, prefabricated, and the original insoles of their running shoes, at rest and after a fatigue run. Contact time, stride rate, and plantar loading parameters were measured. Neither the insole conditions nor the fatigue state modified contact time and stride rate. Addressing prevention of running injuries, post-fatigue loading values are of great interest. Custom-made insoles reduced the post-fatigue loading under the hallux (92 vs. 130 kPa, P heel compared to the prefabricated insoles. Finally, fatigue state did not influence plantar loading regardless the insole condition. In long-distance races, even a slight reduction in plantar loading at each foot strike may suppose a significant decrease in the overall stress experienced by the foot, and therefore the use of insoles may be an important protective mechanism for plantar overloading.

  18. Bioabsorbable metal screws in traumatology: A promising innovation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Roland Biber

    2017-04-01

    Full Text Available MAGNEZIX® CS (Syntellix AG, Hanover, Germany is a bioabsorbable compression screw made of a magnesium alloy (MgYREZr. Currently there are only two clinical studies reporting on a limited number of elective patients who received this screw in a hallux valgus operation. We applied MAGNEZIX® CS for fixation of distal fibular fracture in a trauma patient who had sustained a bimalleolar fracture type AO 44-B2.3. Clinical course was uneventful, fracture healing occurred within three months. Follow-up X-rays showed a radiolucent area around the implant for some months, yet this radiolucent area had disappeared in the 17-months follow-up X-ray. Keywords: Magnesium, Bioabsorbable, Compression screw, Osteosynthesis, Ankle fracture

  19. Radiographic and CT findings in a case of fibro-dysplasia ossificans progressiva; Aspect en imagerie d`un cas de fibrodysplasie ossifiante progressive

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Haddad, S.; Menassa, L.; Slaba, S.; Atallah, N. [Service de Radiologie, Hotel-Dieu de France, Beyrouth, (Lebanon); Nasnas, R.; Abadjian, G. [Hotel-Dieu de France (France)

    1997-06-01

    Fibro-dysplasia ossificans progressiva is a rare congenital disease that affects children under the age of five years. Soft tissue swelling of the cervical and dorsal regions with local pain, warmth and low grade fever are the early clinical manifestations, usually associated with hallux valgus and microdactyly of the fingers and toes. Calcifications of the fascias and muscles cause muscular contractures leading to progressive disability and restrictive lung disease. In the early stage, CT shows edema of the soft tissues and later on, calcifications of muscular fascia. The association of these radiographic and CT findings is specific and should avoid muscular biopsies which are known to be an aggravating factor in this disease. (author) 11 refs.

  20. Metatarsalgia located by synovitis and uncertainty of the articulation metatarsus-phalanges of the II toe

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gerstner G, Juan Bernardo

    2002-01-01

    The synovitis and the uncertainty of the articulation metatarsus-phalanges (MP) of the II toe they are the causes more frequent of metatersalgia located in this articulation of the foot, frequently bad diagnosed and not well managed by the general orthopedist. The natural history understands stadiums so precocious as the synovitis without alteration of peri-articular structures, going by the frank uncertainty, and finishing with the angular deformities and the complete luxation of the articulation MP. The meticulous and directed interrogation, the physical exam specifies and the classification of the diagnostic they are the keys for the successful handling of the pathology. The surgical correction of this condition should always be associated to the correction of associate deformities as the hallux valgus and the fingers in claw

  1. Functional CT imaging: load-dependent visualization of the subchondral mineralization by means of CT osteoabsorptionmetry (CT-OAM)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Linsenmaier, U.; Schlichtenhorst, K.; Pfeifer, K.J.; Reiser, M.; Kersting, S.; Putz, R.; Mueller-Gerbl, M.

    2003-01-01

    Purpose: Functional computed tomography for visualization and quantification of subchondral bone mineralization using CT osteoabsorptiometry (CT-OAM). Materials and Methods: Tarsometatarsal (TMT) and metatarsophalangeal (MTP) joints of 46 human hallux valgus (HV) specimens were examined (sagittal 1/1/1 mm) on a single slice CT scanner SCT (Somatom Plus 4, Siemens AG). Subchondral bone pixels were segmented and assigned to 10 density value groups (triangle 100 HU, range 200 - 1200 HU) the pixels using volume rendering technique (VRT). The data analysis considered the severity of HV as determined by the radiographically measured HV-angle (a.p. projection). Results: CT-OAM could generate reproducible densitograms of the distribution pattern of the subchondral bone density for all four joint surfaces (TMT and MTP joints). The bone density localization enables the assignment to different groups, showing a characteristic HV-angle-dependent distribution of the maximum bone mineralization of the load-dependent densitogram (p [de

  2. Jackson-Weiss syndrome: Clinical and radiological findings in a large kindred and exclusion of the gene from 7p21 and 5qter

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ades, L.C.; Haan, E.A.; Mulley, J.C.; Senga, I.P.; Morris, L.L.; David, D.J. [Women`s and Children`s Hospital, North Adelaide (Australia)

    1994-06-01

    We describe the clinical and radiological manifestations of the Jackson-Weiss syndrome (JWS) in a large South Australian kindred. Radiological abnormalities not previously described in the hands include coned epiphyses, distal and middle phalangeal hypoplasia, and carpal bone malsegmentation. New radiological findings in the feet include coned epiphyses, hallux valgus, phalangeal, tarso-navicular and calcaneo-navicular fusions, and uniform absence of metatarsal fusions. Absence of linkage to eight markers along the short arm of chromosome 7 excluded allelian between JWS and Saethre-Chotzen syndrome at 7p21. No linkage was detected to D5S211, excluding allelism to another recently described cephalosyndactyly syndrome mapping to 5qter. 35 refs., 5 figs., 4 tabs.

  3. Osteotomia em Chevron modificada: análise preliminar do comportamento baropodométrico Modified Chevron osteotomy: preliminary analysis of baropodometric behavior

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Juliana Motta Costa

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available OBJETIVO: Avaliar as características clínicas e baropodométricas da marcha de indivíduos com Hálux Valgo após a osteotomia em Chevron modificada, isolada ou em associação com a osteotomia de Weil. MÉTODOS: FORAM avaliados, antes e três meses após a cirurgia, 27 pés com deformidade leve e moderada. A avaliação clínica incluiu a pontuação da AOFAS e medidas radiográficas. A avaliação baropodométrica foi realizada através da Plataforma Emed-at. As variáveis Pico de Pressão, Integral Pressão-Tempo e Carga Relativa foram calculadas em 10 regiões: calcanhar, mediopé, 1-5º metatársicos, hálux, 2º, 3-5º dedos. RESULTADOS: Após a cirurgia houve aumento na pontuação da AOFAS e redução dos parâmetros radiográficos. A avaliação baropodométrica, após osteotomia em Chevron isolada, demonstrou redução da pressão e da força sob o 1º metatársico e hálux, assim como, aumento dessas variáveis nos metatársicos centrais e laterais. Após a osteotomia em Chevron/Weil ocorreram alterações significativas apenas na região do hálux e dos dedos. CONCLUSÃO: Em curto prazo, a técnica em Chevron modificada promoveu melhora das condições clínicas e dos parâmetros radiográficos. Em relação a avaliação baropodométrica constatou-se uma transferência de cargas da região medial para lateral do antepé, possivelmente pelo curto período de pós-operatório.OBJECTIVE: To evaluate the clinical and baropodometric characteristics of the gaits of individuals with a hallux valgus deformity after modified Chevron osteotomy, in isolation or in association with the Weil osteotomy. METHODS: Foot evaluation happened before and three months after surgery analyzing 27 mildly and moderately deformed feet. The clinical evaluation included the AOFAS score and radiographic measurements. The baropodometric evaluation was done with the Emed-at platform. Peak of Pressure, Pressure-Time Integral and Relative Load were calculated in

  4. Effect of surgical shoes on brake response time after first metatarsal osteotomy--a prospective cohort study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dammerer, Dietmar; Braito, Matthias; Biedermann, Rainer; Ban, Michael; Giesinger, Johannes; Haid, Christian; Liebensteiner, Michael C; Kaufmann, Gerhard

    2016-01-20

    The aim of this study is to assess patients' driving ability when wearing surgical shoes following right-sided first metatarsal osteotomy. From August 2013 to August 2015, 42 consecutive patients (mean age 54.5 years) with right-sided hallux valgus deformity underwent first metatarsal osteotomy. Patients were tested for brake response time (BRT) 1 day preoperatively (control run) and at 2 and 6 weeks postoperatively. Two different types of foot orthosis were investigated. BRT was assessed using a custom-made driving simulator. Preoperative BRT was 712 msec (standard deviation (SD), 221 msec). BRT was significantly slower at all tested postoperative times than preoperatively (p shoes. Mean global American Orthopaedic Foot and Ankle Society (AOFAS) outcome score and AOFAS pain and alignment subscores increased postoperatively (p shoe after bunionectomy. However, patients should have sufficient recovery, exercise, and training before resuming driving a car, because safety is always a priority. ClinicalTrials.gov, NCT02354066.

  5. Ankle and toe muscle strength characteristics in runners with a history of medial tibial stress syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Saeki, Junya; Nakamura, Masatoshi; Nakao, Sayaka; Fujita, Kosuke; Yanase, Ko; Morishita, Katsuyuki; Ichihashi, Noriaki

    2017-01-01

    A high proportion of flexor digitorum longus attachment is found at the posteromedial border of the tibia, which is the most common location of medial tibial stress syndrome (MTSS). Therefore, plantar flexion strength of the lesser toes could be related to MTSS; however, the relationship between MTSS and muscle strength of the hallux and lesser toes is not yet evaluated due to the lack of quantitative methods. This study investigated the muscle strength characteristics in runners with a history of MTSS by using a newly developed device to measure the muscle strength of the hallux, lesser toes, and ankle. This study comprised 27 collegiate male runner participants (20.0 ± 1.6 years, 172.1 ± 5.1 cm, 57.5 ± 4.0 kg). Maximal voluntary isometric contraction (MVIC) torque of the plantar flexion, dorsiflexion, inversion, and eversion of the ankle were measured by using an electric dynamometer. MVIC torque of the 1st metatarsophalangeal joint (MTPJ) and 2nd-5th MTPJ were measured by using a custom-made torque-measuring device. MVIC torques were compared between runners with and without a history of MTSS. MVIC torque of the 1st MTPJ plantar flexion was significantly higher in runners with a history of MTSS than in those without it. In contrast, there were no significant differences in the MVIC torque values of the 2nd-5th MTPJ plantar flexion and each MVIC torque of the ankle between runners with and without a history of MTSS. A history of MTSS increased the isometric FHL strength.

  6. Effects of turf and cleat footwear on plantar load distributions in adolescent American football players during resisted pushing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Taylor, Jeffrey B; Nguyen, Anh-Dung; Griffin, Janet R; Ford, Kevin R

    2018-06-01

    Metatarsal and midfoot injuries are common in American football. Footwear design may influence injury rates by altering plantar foot loading patterns in these regions. The purpose of this study was to determine the effect of cleat design on in-shoe plantar foot loading during a football-specific, resisted pushing task. Twenty competitive football players (age 14.7 ± 1.8 years, height 1.72 ± 0.10 m, and mass 71.8 ± 26.9 kg) completed three trials of pushing a weighted sled at maximal effort in a standard shoe (CLEAT) and artificial turf-specific shoe (TURF), with flexible in-shoe force measuring insoles. Repeated measures ANOVAs identified mean differences in maximum force and relative load under all regions of the foot. Results showed higher forces in the CLEAT under the medial (p < 0.001) and lateral (p = 0.004) midfoot, central (p = 0.007) and lateral (p < 0.001) forefoot, and lesser toes (p = 0.01), but lower forces in the hallux (p = 0.02) compared to the TURF shoe. Additionally, relative loading was higher in the CLEAT under the medial (p < 0.001) and lateral (p = 0.002) midfoot and lateral (p < 0.001) forefoot, but lower in the medial forefoot (p = 0.006) and hallux (p < 0.001) compared to the TURF shoe. The two shoes elicited distinct plantar loading profiles and may influence shoe selection decisions during injury prevention or rehabilitation practices.

  7. Operative Outcomes of Grade 3 Turf Toe Injuries in Competitive Football Players.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smith, Kenneth; Waldrop, Norman

    2018-06-01

    Turf toe is a term used to describe a hyperextension injury to the first metatarsophalangeal joint. Although the vast majority of turf toe injuries can be treated successfully without operative intervention, there are instances where surgery is required to allow the athlete to return to play. Although there is a plethora of literature on turf toe injuries and nonoperative management, there are currently few reports on operative outcomes in athletes. We obtained all cases of turf toe repair according to the ICD-10 procedural code. The inclusion criteria included: age greater than 16, turf toe injury requiring operative management and at least a varsity level high school football player. The charts were reviewed for age, BMI, level of competition, injury mechanism, football position, setting of injury and playing surface. In addition, we recorded the specifics of the operative procedure, a listing of all injured structures, the implants used and the great toe range of motion at final follow-up visit. The AOFAS Hallux score and VAS was used postoperatively as our outcome measures. Our patient population included 15 patients. The average follow-up time was 27.5 months. The average patient was 19.3 years old with a body mass index of 32.3. The average playing time missed was 16.5 weeks. The average dorsiflexion range of motion at the final follow-up was 42.3 degrees. At final follow-up, the average AOFAS Hallux score was 91.3. The average VAS pain score was 0.7 at rest and 0.8 with physical activity. Complete turf toe injuries are often debilitating and may require operative management to restore a pain-free, stable, and functional forefoot. This study represents the largest cohort of operatively treated grade 3 turf toe injuries in the literature and demonstrates that good clinical outcomes were achieved with operative repair. Level IV, case series.

  8. Resultados y prospectiva de la investigación podológica en el baile flamenco.

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    José Manuel Castillo-López

    2016-11-01

    Full Text Available La expansión mundial y el grado de profesionalización del baile flamenco han equiparado las demandas físicas de esta forma dancística a la de cualquier disciplina deportiva de alto rendimiento. El propio gesto técnico del flamenco, especialmente el zapateado y el impacto que éste genera, es el principal factor predisponentes de lesiones en los pies y miembros inferiores. De estas lesiones, destacan por su alta incidencia el hallux abductus valgus, dedos en garra, juanetes de sastre y onicodistrofias, además de problemas de sobrecarga y dolor metatarsal, que afecta a más del 80% de la muestra analizada, 44 bailaoras profesionales de flamenco con más de 20h de práctica semanal de baile. Desde el campo de la podología, han sido registradas dos patentes dirigidas a prevenir y/o paliar la sintomatología asociada a estas patologías y alteraciones podológicas: soportes plantares y calzado fisiológico para baile flamenco. The global expansion and the degree of flamenco dancing professionalization have matched the physical demands of this dance to any high-performance sport. The technical gesture, typical of flamenco, especially the footwork and its generated impacts, is the main predisposing factor of injury in feet and lower limbs. Forty four professional flamenco dancers, with more than 20 hours of weekly dance practice, have been studied. The following injuries are noted for their high incidence: hallux abductus valgus, hammertoes, bunions tailor, onychodystrophy, overload problems and metatarsal pain, which affect more than 80% of the sample. From the field of podiatry, two patents have been registered to prevent and/or alleviate the symptoms associated with these diseases and podiatry disorders: orthotic devices and physiological footwear for flamenco dancing.

  9. A multi-segment foot model based on anatomically registered technical coordinate systems: method repeatability in pediatric feet.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Saraswat, Prabhav; MacWilliams, Bruce A; Davis, Roy B

    2012-04-01

    Several multi-segment foot models to measure the motion of intrinsic joints of the foot have been reported. Use of these models in clinical decision making is limited due to lack of rigorous validation including inter-clinician, and inter-lab variability measures. A model with thoroughly quantified variability may significantly improve the confidence in the results of such foot models. This study proposes a new clinical foot model with the underlying strategy of using separate anatomic and technical marker configurations and coordinate systems. Anatomical landmark and coordinate system identification is determined during a static subject calibration. Technical markers are located at optimal sites for dynamic motion tracking. The model is comprised of the tibia and three foot segments (hindfoot, forefoot and hallux) and inter-segmental joint angles are computed in three planes. Data collection was carried out on pediatric subjects at two sites (Site 1: n=10 subjects by two clinicians and Site 2: five subjects by one clinician). A plaster mold method was used to quantify static intra-clinician and inter-clinician marker placement variability by allowing direct comparisons of marker data between sessions for each subject. Intra-clinician and inter-clinician joint angle variability were less than 4°. For dynamic walking kinematics, intra-clinician, inter-clinician and inter-laboratory variability were less than 6° for the ankle and forefoot, but slightly higher for the hallux. Inter-trial variability accounted for 2-4° of the total dynamic variability. Results indicate the proposed foot model reduces the effects of marker placement variability on computed foot kinematics during walking compared to similar measures in previous models. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  10. Study on the foot shape characteristics of the elderly in China.

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    Luo, Xiang Dong; Xue, Chao-Hua; Li, Yan

    2017-12-01

    With aging, the feet of the elderly above 60 years old in China present degenerative changes, deformities, and diseases, which significantly affect their daily activities. The authors aimed to study the morphological characteristics of the feet and identify the foot type according to size (length and width) and defect characteristics of elderly feet in China. A convenient sample of 1000 subjects above 60 years old was recruited mainly in the regions of Shanghai, Shaanxi, Henan, Hebei, and Sichuan in China. Foot images were collected, and 800 (male 398, female 402) valid questionnaires were recovered. A total of 800 elderly subjects as the test group were invited to measure their foot sizes by means of a Footprint Collector (Tong Yuan Tang Health Management Limited, Qingdao in Shandong province). The foot type of the elderly was compared with that of the general adult Chinese population as the control group using the t-test for independent samples. Hallux valgus (46.9%) and flat foot (50.0%) were the most common foot shape deformities. The most frequent foot diseases were foot scaling (91.2%) and calluses (96.3%). The medial width of the first metatarsal-toe joint of the elderly was significantly higher (elderly female, 44.95±4.86mm; elderly male, 48.55±4.94mm) than that of the general adult population (adult female, 40.18±3.43mm; adult male, 43.22±3.20mm) (p<0.01). The foot length of the elderly was not significantly different from that of the general adult Chinese population. The width of the first metatarsal-toe joint in the forefoot of the elderly was significantly higher than that of the general adult Chinese population, which was consistent with the result that a high proportion of elderly subjects presented hallux valgus. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  11. Movement coordination patterns between the foot joints during walking

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    John B. Arnold

    2017-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background In 3D gait analysis, kinematics of the foot joints are usually reported via isolated time histories of joint rotations and no information is provided on the relationship between rotations at different joints. The aim of this study was to identify movement coordination patterns in the foot during walking by expanding an existing vector coding technique according to an established multi-segment foot and ankle model. A graphical representation is also described to summarise the coordination patterns of joint rotations across multiple patients. Methods Three-dimensional multi-segment foot kinematics were recorded in 13 adults during walking. A modified vector coding technique was used to identify coordination patterns between foot joints involving calcaneus, midfoot, metatarsus and hallux segments. According to the type and direction of joints rotations, these were classified as in-phase (same direction, anti-phase (opposite directions, proximal or distal joint dominant. Results In early stance, 51 to 75% of walking trials showed proximal-phase coordination between foot joints comprising the calcaneus, midfoot and metatarsus. In-phase coordination was more prominent in late stance, reflecting synergy in the simultaneous inversion occurring at multiple foot joints. Conversely, a distal-phase coordination pattern was identified for sagittal plane motion of the ankle relative to the midtarsal joint, highlighting the critical role of arch shortening to locomotor function in push-off. Conclusions This study has identified coordination patterns between movement of the calcaneus, midfoot, metatarsus and hallux by expanding an existing vector cording technique for assessing and classifying coordination patterns of foot joints rotations during walking. This approach provides a different perspective in the analysis of multi-segment foot kinematics, and may be used for the objective quantification of the alterations in foot joint

  12. Validation of the Foot and Ankle Outcome Score in adult acquired flatfoot deformity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mani, Sriniwasan B; Brown, Haydée C; Nair, Pallavi; Chen, Lan; Do, Huong T; Lyman, Stephen; Deland, Jonathan T; Ellis, Scott J

    2013-08-01

    The American Orthopaedic Foot and Ankle Society (AOFAS) Ankle-Hindfoot Score has been under recent scrutiny. The Foot and Ankle Outcome Score (FAOS) is an alternative subjective survey, assessing outcomes in 5 subscales. It is validated for lateral ankle instability and hallux valgus patients. The aim of our study was to validate the FAOS for assessing outcomes in flexible adult acquired flatfoot deformity (AAFD). Patients from the authors' institution diagnosed with flexible AAFD from 2006 to 2011 were eligible for the study. In all, 126 patients who completed the FAOS and the Short-Form 12 (SF-12) on the same visit were included in the construct validity component. Correlation was deemed moderate if the Spearman's correlation coefficient was .4 to .7. Content validity was assessed in 63 patients by a questionnaire that asked patients to rate the relevance of each FAOS question, with a score of 2 or greater considered acceptable. Reliability was measured using intraclass correlation coefficients (ICCs) in 41 patients who completed a second FAOS survey. In 49 patients, preoperative and postoperative FAOS scores were compared to determine responsiveness. All of the FAOS subscales demonstrated moderate correlation with 2 physical health related SF-12 domains. Mental health related domains showed poor correlation. Content validity was high for the Quality of Life (QoL; mean 2.26) and Sports/Recreation subscales (mean 2.12). All subscales exhibited very good test-retest reliability, with ICCs of .7 and above. Symptoms, QoL, pain, and daily activities (ADLs) were responsive to change in postoperative patients (P validated the FAOS for AAFD with acceptable construct and content validity, reliability, and responsiveness. Given its previous validation for patients with ankle instability and hallux valgus, the additional findings in this study support its use as an alternative to less reliable outcome surveys. Level II, prospective comparative study.

  13. The impact of rheumatoid foot on disability in Colombian patients with rheumatoid arthritis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rojas-Villarraga, Adriana; Bayona, Javier; Zuluaga, Natalia; Mejia, Santiago; Hincapie, Maria-Eugenia; Anaya, Juan-Manuel

    2009-01-01

    Background Alterations in the feet of patients with rheumatoid arthritis (RA) are a cause of disability in this population. The purpose of this research was to evaluate the impact that foot impairment has on the patients' global quality of life (QOL) based on validated scales and its relationship to disease activity. Methods This was a cross-sectional study in which 95 patients with RA were enrolled. A complete physical examination, including a full foot assessment, was done. The Spanish versions of the Health Assessment Questionnaire (HAQ) Disability Index and of the Disease Activity Score (DAS 28) were administered. A logistic regression model was used to analyze data and obtain adjusted odds ratios (AORs). Results Foot deformities were observed in 78 (82%) of the patients; hallux valgus (65%), medial longitudinal arch flattening (42%), claw toe (lesser toes) (39%), dorsiflexion restriction (tibiotalar) (34%), cock-up toe (lesser toes) (25%), and transverse arch flattening (25%) were the most frequent. In the logistic regression analysis (adjusted for age, gender and duration of disease), forefoot movement pain, subtalar movement pain, tibiotalar movement pain and plantarflexion restriction (tibiotalar) were strongly associated with disease activity and disability. The positive squeeze test was significantly associated with disability risk (AOR = 6,3; 95% CI, 1.28–30.96; P = 0,02); hallux valgus, and dorsiflexion restriction (tibiotalar) were associated with disease activity. Conclusion Foot abnormalities are associated with active joint disease and disability in RA. Foot examinations provide complementary information related to the disability as an indirect measurement of quality of life and activity of disease in daily practice. PMID:19527518

  14. Are Pressure Time Integral and Cumulative Plantar Stress Related to First Metatarsophalangeal Joint Pain? Results From a Community-Based Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rao, Smita; Douglas Gross, K; Niu, Jingbo; Nevitt, Michael C; Lewis, Cora E; Torner, James C; Hietpas, Jean; Felson, David; Hillstrom, Howard J

    2016-09-01

    To examine the relationship between plantar stress over a step, cumulative plantar stress over a day, and first metatarsophalangeal (MTP) joint pain among older adults. Plantar stress and first MTP pain were assessed within the Multicenter Osteoarthritis Study. All included participants were asked if they had pain, aching, or stiffness at the first MTP joint on most days for the past 30 days. Pressure time integral (PTI) was quantified as participants walked on a pedobarograph, and mean steps per day were obtained using an accelerometer. Cumulative plantar stress was calculated as the product of regional PTI and mean steps per day. Quintiles of hallucal and second metatarsal PTI and cumulative plantar stress were generated. The relationship between predictors and the odds ratio of first MTP pain was assessed using a logistic regression model. Feet in the quintile with the lowest hallux PTI had 2.14 times increased odds of first MTP pain (95% confidence interval [95% CI] 1.42-3.25, P pain (95% CI 1.01-2.23, P = 0.042). Cumulative plantar stress was unassociated with first MTP pain. Lower PTI was modestly associated with increased prevalence of frequent first MTP pain at both the hallux and second metatarsal. Lower plantar loading may indicate the presence of an antalgic gait strategy and may reflect an attempt at pain avoidance. The lack of association with cumulative plantar stress may suggest that patients do not limit their walking as a pain-avoidance mechanism. © 2016, American College of Rheumatology.

  15. The impact of rheumatoid foot on disability in Colombian patients with rheumatoid arthritis

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    Rojas-Villarraga Adriana

    2009-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Alterations in the feet of patients with rheumatoid arthritis (RA are a cause of disability in this population. The purpose of this research was to evaluate the impact that foot impairment has on the patients' global quality of life (QOL based on validated scales and its relationship to disease activity. Methods This was a cross-sectional study in which 95 patients with RA were enrolled. A complete physical examination, including a full foot assessment, was done. The Spanish versions of the Health Assessment Questionnaire (HAQ Disability Index and of the Disease Activity Score (DAS 28 were administered. A logistic regression model was used to analyze data and obtain adjusted odds ratios (AORs. Results Foot deformities were observed in 78 (82% of the patients; hallux valgus (65%, medial longitudinal arch flattening (42%, claw toe (lesser toes (39%, dorsiflexion restriction (tibiotalar (34%, cock-up toe (lesser toes (25%, and transverse arch flattening (25% were the most frequent. In the logistic regression analysis (adjusted for age, gender and duration of disease, forefoot movement pain, subtalar movement pain, tibiotalar movement pain and plantarflexion restriction (tibiotalar were strongly associated with disease activity and disability. The positive squeeze test was significantly associated with disability risk (AOR = 6,3; 95% CI, 1.28–30.96; P = 0,02; hallux valgus, and dorsiflexion restriction (tibiotalar were associated with disease activity. Conclusion Foot abnormalities are associated with active joint disease and disability in RA. Foot examinations provide complementary information related to the disability as an indirect measurement of quality of life and activity of disease in daily practice.

  16. Síndrome de Waardenburg: clasificación clínica de una familia Waardenburg's syndrome: clinical classification of a family

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    Fidel Castro Pérez

    2012-06-01

    Full Text Available Introducción: El síndrome de Waardenburg (SW es una entidad infrecuente, hereditaria, que cursa con cierto grado de discapacidad cuando aparece la hipoacusia neurosensorial y su cuadro clínico no está completamente definido. Objetivo: Describir las características clínicas de una familia afectada con el síndrome y las variantes encontradas. Material y Método: Estudio de casos, observacional, transversal y descriptivo. Se confeccionó una base de datos automatizada. Las variables utilizadas fueron los signos clínicos, incluyendo la clasificación de la hipoacusia. Se utilizaron medidas de frecuencia: absolutas y relativas porcentuales, y se empleó la prueba de X² al 95 % de certeza. Resultados: De los signos clásicos el 100 % mostró distopia cantorum, el resto apareció con variabilidad. Se observaron signos no descritos anteriormente, entre los cuales destacó el dorso nasal recto (65,4 %. Se detectó hallux valgus en 4 de los individuos, lo que permitió clasificar a los individuos en 19 del tipo I, y los 7 restantes en la subvariante 1 del tipo III. Conclusiones: Las alteraciones óseas encontradas en individuos con SW permiten clasificarlos como portadores de la subvariante III-1, no descrita previamente.Background: Waardenburg Syndrome (SW is a rare inherited disorder characterized by varying degrees of disability, when sensorineural hearing loss appear and its clinical chart is not definitely complete. Objective: to describe the clinical characteristics of a family suffering from this entity and the variables found. Material and Method: observational, cross-sectional and descriptive case studies. An automated database was created, using the variables of clinical signs, including the classification of hypoacusis. Measures of frequency were employed: absolute and relative percentages as well as X² test with 95% of confidence. Results: out of the classical signs 100% showed dystopia canthorum, the rest appeared with variability

  17. RELIABILITY OF ANKLE-FOOT MORPHOLOGY, MOBILITY, STRENGTH, AND MOTOR PERFORMANCE MEASURES.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fraser, John J; Koldenhoven, Rachel M; Saliba, Susan A; Hertel, Jay

    2017-12-01

    Assessment of foot posture, morphology, intersegmental mobility, strength and motor control of the ankle-foot complex are commonly used clinically, but measurement properties of many assessments are unclear. To determine test-retest and inter-rater reliability, standard error of measurement, and minimal detectable change of morphology, joint excursion and play, strength, and motor control of the ankle-foot complex. Reliability study. 24 healthy, recreationally-active young adults without history of ankle-foot injury were assessed by two clinicians on two occasions, three to ten days apart. Measurement properties were assessed for foot morphology (foot posture index, total and truncated length, width, arch height), joint excursion (weight-bearing dorsiflexion, rearfoot and hallux goniometry, forefoot inclinometry, 1 st metatarsal displacement) and joint play, strength (handheld dynamometry), and motor control rating during intrinsic foot muscle (IFM) exercises. Clinician order was randomized using a Latin Square. The clinicians performed independent examinations and did not confer on the findings for the duration of the study. Test-retest and inter-tester reliability and agreement was assessed using intraclass correlation coefficients (ICC 2,k ) and weighted kappa ( K w ). Test-retest reliability ICC were as follows: morphology: .80-1.00, joint excursion: .58-.97, joint play: -.67-.84, strength: .67-.92, IFM motor rating: K W -.01-.71. Inter-rater reliability ICC were as follows: morphology: .81-1.00, joint excursion: .32-.97, joint play: -1.06-1.00, strength: .53-.90, and IFM motor rating: K w .02-.56. Measures of ankle-foot posture, morphology, joint excursion, and strength demonstrated fair to excellent test-retest and inter-rater reliability. Test-retest reliability for rating of perceived difficulty and motor performance was good to excellent for short-foot, toe-spread-out, and hallux exercises and poor to fair for lesser toe extension. Joint play measures had

  18. Preoperative transcranial direct current stimulation: Exploration of a novel strategy to enhance neuroplasticity before surgery to control postoperative pain. A randomized sham-controlled study.

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    Hugo Ribeiro

    Full Text Available An imbalance in the excitatory/inhibitory systems in the pain networks may explain the persistent chronic pain after hallux valgus surgery. Thus, to contra-regulate this dysfunction, the use of transcranial direct current stimulation (tDCS becomes attractive.We tested the hypothesis that two preoperative active(a-tDCS sessions compared with sham(s-tDCS could improve the postoperative pain [as indexed by Visual Analogue Scale (VAS at rest and during walking (primary outcomes]. To assess their effect on the change in the Numerical Pain Scale (NPS0-10 during Conditioned Pain Modulation (CPM-task, disability related to pain (DRP and analgesic consumption (secondary outcomes. Also, we assessed if the brain derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF in the cerebral spinal fluid (CSF after tDCS could predict the intervention's effect on the DRP.It is a prospective, double blind, sham-controlled, randomized single center, 40 women (18-70 years-old who had undergone hallux valgus surgery were randomized to receive two sessions (20 minutes each of anodal a-tDCS or s-tDCS on the primary motor cortex at night and in the morning before the surgery. To assess the DRP was used the Brazilian Profile of Chronic Pain: Screen (B-PCP:S.A-tDCS group showed lower scores on VAS at rest and during walking (P<0.001. At rest, the difference between groups was 2.13cm (95%CI = 1.59 to 2.68 while during walking was 1.67cm (95%CI = 1.05 to 2.28. A-tDCS, when compared to s-tDCS reduced analgesic doses in 73.25% (P<0.001, produced a greater reduction in B-PCP:S (mean difference of 9.41 points, 95%CI = 0.63 to 18.21 and higher function of descending pain modulatory system (DPMS during CPM-task.A-tDCS improves postoperative pain, the DRP and the function of DPMS. Also, the CSF BDNF after a-tDCS predicted the improvement in the DRP. In overall, these findings suggest that a-tDCS effects may be mediated by top-down regulatory mechanisms associated with the inhibitory cortical control

  19. Interventions for treating osteoarthritis of the big toe joint.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zammit, Gerard V; Menz, Hylton B; Munteanu, Shannon E; Landorf, Karl B; Gilheany, Mark F

    2010-09-08

    Osteoarthritis affecting of the big toe joint of the foot (hallux limitus or rigidus) is a common and painful condition. Although several treatments have been proposed, few have been adequately evaluated. To identify controlled trials evaluating interventions for osteoarthritis of the big toe joint and to determine the optimum intervention(s). Literature searches were conducted across the following electronic databases: CENTRAL; MEDLINE; EMBASE; CINAHL; and PEDro (to 14th January 2010). No language restrictions were applied. Randomised controlled trials, quasi-randomised trials, or controlled clinical trials that assessed treatment outcomes for osteoarthritis of the big toe joint. Participants of any age or gender with osteoarthritis of the big toe joint (defined either radiographically or clinically) were included. Two authors examined the list of titles and abstracts identified by the literature searches. One content area expert and one methodologist independently applied the pre-determined inclusion and exclusion criteria to the full text of identified trials. To minimise error and reduce potential bias, data were extracted independently by two content experts. Only one trial satisfactorily fulfilled the inclusion criteria and was included in this review. This trial evaluated the effectiveness of two physical therapy programs in 20 individuals with osteoarthritis of the big toe joint. Assessment outcomes included pain levels, big toe joint range of motion and plantar flexion strength of the hallux. Mean differences at four weeks follow up were 3.80 points (95% CI 2.74 to 4.86) for self reported pain, 28.30 degrees (95% CI 21.37 to 35.23) for big toe joint range of motion, and 2.80 kg (95% CI 2.13 to 3.47) for muscle strength. Although differences in outcomes between treatment and control groups were reported, the risk of bias was high. The trial failed to employ appropriate randomisation or adequate allocation concealment, used a relatively small sample and

  20. Incidence of re-amputation following partial first ray amputation associated with diabetes mellitus and peripheral sensory neuropathy: a systematic review.

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    Sara L. Borkosky

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Diabetes mellitus with peripheral sensory neuropathy frequently results in forefoot ulceration. Ulceration at the first ray level tends to be recalcitrant to local wound care modalities and off-loading techniques. If healing does occur, ulcer recurrence is common. When infection develops, partial first ray amputation in an effort to preserve maximum foot length is often performed. However, the survivorship of partial first ray amputations in this patient population and associated re-amputation rate remain unknown. Therefore, in an effort to determine the actual re-amputation rate following any form of partial first ray amputation in patients with diabetes mellitus and peripheral neuropathy, the authors conducted a systematic review. Only studies involving any form of partial first ray amputation associated with diabetes mellitus and peripheral sensory neuropathy but without critical limb ischemia were included. Our search yielded a total of 24 references with 5 (20.8% meeting our inclusion criteria involving 435 partial first ray amputations. The weighted mean age of patients was 59 years and the weighted mean follow-up was 26 months. The initial amputation level included the proximal phalanx base 167 (38.4% times; first metatarsal head resection 96 (22.1% times; first metatarsal-phalangeal joint disarticulation 53 (12.2% times; first metatarsal mid-shaft 39 (9% times; hallux fillet flap 32 (7.4% times; first metatarsal base 29 (6.7% times; and partial hallux 19 (4.4% times. The incidence of re-amputation was 19.8% (86/435. The end stage, most proximal level, following re-amputation was an additional digit 32 (37.2% times; transmetatarsal 28 (32.6% times; below-knee 25 (29.1% times; and LisFranc 1 (1.2% time. The results of our systematic review reveal that one out of every five patients undergoing any version of a partial first ray amputation will eventually require more proximal re-amputation. These results reveal that partial first ray

  1. A double-blind randomized controlled trial comparing dexamethasone and clonidine as adjuvants to a ropivacaine sciatic popliteal block for foot surgery

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    Vermeylen K

    2016-05-01

    Full Text Available Kris Vermeylen,1 Joris De Puydt,2 Stefan Engelen,3 Eva Roofthooft,3 Filiep Soetens,1 Arne Neyrinck,4 Marc Van de Velde4 1Department of Anesthesia and Intensive Care, AZ Turnhout, Turnhout, 2Department of Anesthesia, University Hospital Antwerp, Antwerp, 3Department of Anesthesia, ZNA Hospital Network Antwerp, Antwerp, 4Department of Cardiovascular Sciences and Anesthesiology, Catholic University Hospitals, Louvain, Belgium Background and aims: A popliteal block is effective in managing postoperative pain for foot surgery, but since the duration of analgesia is limited following a single-shot popliteal fossa block technique, methods to prolong effective postoperative analgesia are mandatory. The aim of this study was to assess the effect of adjuvants to ropivacaine on the duration of sensory and motor block.Methods: In this double-blind randomized placebo-controlled study, we evaluated the analgesic effect of clonidine or dexamethasone (DXM when added to ropivacaine for hallux valgus surgery. After obtaining institutional ethics research board approval and written informed consent, a total of 72 patients were randomly allocated. Fifty-seven of these patients were statistically analyzed. All patients received an ultrasound-guided single-shot popliteal fossa block with 30 mL of ropivacaine 0.75%, supplemented with saline, clonidine 100 µg, or DXM 5 mg. The primary end point was time to first pain sensation. Secondary end points were time to complete sensory and motor block regression.Results: Compared to saline, duration to first pain sensation was prolonged by 9 hours (mean ± standard deviation: 31±9 hours (42% in the DXM group (P=0.024 and by 6 hours (28±10 hours (27% in the clonidine group (P=0.024. Compared to saline, DXM prolonged both complete sensory and motor blockade by 12 hours (25±7 hours (46% and 13 hours (36±6 hours (55%, respectively, while clonidine prolonged complete sensory and motor blockade by 7 hours (30±7 hours (27% and

  2. Investigating the effect of external trauma through a dynamic system modeling approach for clustering causality in diabetic foot ulcer development.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Salimi, Parisa; Hamedi, Mohsen; Jamshidi, Nima; Vismeh, Milad

    2017-04-01

    Diabetes and its associated complications are realized as one of the most challenging medical conditions threatening more than 29 million people only in the USA. The forecasts suggest a suffering of more than half a billion worldwide by 2030. Amid all diabetic complications, diabetic foot ulcer (DFU) has attracted much scientific investigations to lead to a better management of this disease. In this paper, a system thinking methodology is adopted to investigate the dynamic nature of the ulceration. The causal loop diagram as a tool is utilized to illustrate the well-researched relations and interrelations between causes of the DFU. The result of clustering causality evaluation suggests a vicious loop that relates external trauma to callus. Consequently a hypothesis is presented which localizes development of foot ulceration considering distribution of normal and shear stress. It specifies that normal and tangential forces, as the main representatives of external trauma, play the most important role in foot ulceration. The evaluation of this hypothesis suggests the significance of the information related to both normal and shear stress for managing DFU. The results also discusses how these two react on different locations on foot such as metatarsal head, heel and hallux. The findings of this study can facilitate tackling the complexity of DFU problem and looking for constructive mitigation measures. Moreover they lead to developing a more promising methodology for managing DFU including better prognosis, designing prosthesis and insoles for DFU and patient caring recommendations. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  3. Interpreting the results of the Semmes-Weinstein monofilament test: accounting for false-positive answers in the international consensus on the diabetic foot protocol by a new model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Slater, Robert A; Koren, Shlomit; Ramot, Yoram; Buchs, Andreas; Rapoport, Micha J

    2014-01-01

    The Semmes-Weinstein monofilament is the most widely used test to diagnose the loss of protective sensation. The commonly used protocol of the International Consensus on the Diabetic Foot includes a 'sham' application that allows for false-positive answers. We sought to study the heretofore unexamined significance of false-positive answers. Forty-five patients with diabetes and a history of pedal ulceration (Group I) and 81 patients with diabetes but no history of ulceration (Group II) were studied. The three original sites of the International Consensus on the Diabetic Foot at the hallux, 1st metatarsal and 5th metatarsal areas were used. At each location, the test was performed three times: 2 actual and 1 "sham" applications. Scores were graded from 0 to 3 based upon correct responses. Determination of loss of protective sensation was performed with and without calculating a false-positive answer as a minus 1 score. False-positive responses were found in a significant percentage of patients with and without history of ulceration. Introducing false-positive results as minus 1 into the test outcome significantly increased the number of patients diagnosed with loss of protective sensation in both groups. False-positive answers can significantly affect Semmes-Weinstein monofilament test results and the diagnosis of LOPS. A model that accounts for false-positive answers is offered. Copyright © 2013 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  4. Comparative morphology among northern populations of breeding Cooper's Hawks

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rosenfield, Robert N.; Rosenfield, Laura J.; Bielefeldt, John; Murphy, Robert K.; Stewart, Andrew C.; Stout, William E.; Driscoll, Timothy G.; Bozek, Michael A.

    2010-01-01

    Few studies at a broad geographical scale have characterized intraspecific variation in morphology of woodland hawks in the genus Accipiter. From 1999 to 2007 we investigated morphological variation in large samples of live Cooper's Hawks (A. cooperii) nesting in four study areas: coniferous woodland around Victoria, British Columbia, Canada, isolated deciduous woodlands in short-grass prairies of northwestern North Dakota, towns and rural deciduous woodlands along the border of North Dakota and Minnesota, and urban and rural mixed deciduous and coniferous landscapes of Wisconsin. These sites span 2660 km across the northern part of the species' breeding range. We measured body mass (i.e., size), wing chord, tail length, tarsus diameter, hallux length, and culmen length of breeding adults, finding significant and clinal variation in body mass (or size). The smallest and most similar-sized birds occurred in British Columbia and western North Dakota, larger birds along the border between North Dakota and Minnesota, and the largest birds in Wisconsin. Several other characters varied significantly when mass was used as a covariate. Variation by study site in mean indices of sexual size dimorphism was negligible and not significant. We speculate that the morphological differences we found, in part, are the result of geographic isolation, where diets, migratory behavior, and structural characteristics of nesting habitats vary across landscape types.

  5. The influence of tennis court surfaces on player perceptions and biomechanical response.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Starbuck, Chelsea; Damm, Loïc; Clarke, James; Carré, Matt; Capel-Davis, Jamie; Miller, Stuart; Stiles, Victoria; Dixon, Sharon

    2016-09-01

    This study aimed to examine player perceptions and biomechanical responses to tennis surfaces and to evaluate the influence of prior clay court experience. Two groups with different clay experiences (experience group, n = 5 and low-experience group, n = 5) performed a 180° turning movement. Three-dimensional ankle and knee movements (50 Hz), plantar pressure of the turning step (100 Hz) and perception data (visual analogue scale questionnaire) were collected for two tennis courts (acrylic and clay). Greater initial knee flexion (acrylic 20. 8 ± 11.2° and clay 32.5 ± 9.4°) and a more upright position were reported on the clay compared to the acrylic court (P < 0.05). This suggests adaptations to increase player stability on clay. Greater hallux pressures and lower midfoot pressures were observed on the clay court, allowing for sliding whilst providing grip at the forefoot. Players with prior clay court experience exhibited later peak knee flexion compared to those with low experience. All participants perceived the differences in surface properties between courts and thus responded appropriately to these differences. The level of previous clay court experience did not influence players' perceptions of the surfaces; however, those with greater clay court experience may reduce injury risk as a result of reduced loading through later peak knee flexion.

  6. Analysis of Msx1; Msx2 double mutants reveals multiple roles for Msx genes in limb development.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lallemand, Yvan; Nicola, Marie-Anne; Ramos, Casto; Bach, Antoine; Cloment, Cécile Saint; Robert, Benoît

    2005-07-01

    The homeobox-containing genes Msx1 and Msx2 are highly expressed in the limb field from the earliest stages of limb formation and, subsequently, in both the apical ectodermal ridge and underlying mesenchyme. However, mice homozygous for a null mutation in either Msx1 or Msx2 do not display abnormalities in limb development. By contrast, Msx1; Msx2 double mutants exhibit a severe limb phenotype. Our analysis indicates that these genes play a role in crucial processes during limb morphogenesis along all three axes. Double mutant limbs are shorter and lack anterior skeletal elements (radius/tibia, thumb/hallux). Gene expression analysis confirms that there is no formation of regions with anterior identity. This correlates with the absence of dorsoventral boundary specification in the anterior ectoderm, which precludes apical ectodermal ridge formation anteriorly. As a result, anterior mesenchyme is not maintained, leading to oligodactyly. Paradoxically, polydactyly is also frequent and appears to be associated with extended Fgf activity in the apical ectodermal ridge, which is maintained up to 14.5 dpc. This results in a major outgrowth of the mesenchyme anteriorly, which nevertheless maintains a posterior identity, and leads to formation of extra digits. These defects are interpreted in the context of an impairment of Bmp signalling.

  7. Ultrasound-Guided Hyaluronic Acid Injection for the Management of Morton's Neuroma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Kang; Hwang, Il-Yeong; Ryu, Chang Hyun; Lee, Jae Woo; Kang, Seung Woo

    2018-02-01

    Morton's neuroma is one of the common causes of forefoot pain. In the present study, hyaluronic acid injection was performed on patients to determine the efficacy and adverse effects of hyaluronic acid in management of Morton's neuroma. Eighty-three patients with Morton's neuroma in their third intermetatarsal space with definite Mulder's click were included in the study. Those with severe forefoot deformities such as forefoot cavus or hallux valgus on plain X-rays were excluded. Ultrasound-guided hyaluronic acid injections were performed on all patients weekly for 3 weeks. Pain during walking using visual analogue scale (VAS) and AOFAS Forefoot Scale were prospectively evaluated preinjection, and at 2, 4, 6, 12 months postinjection. Significant improvement in VAS and AOFAS Forefoot Scale were seen overall at 2 months after hyaluronic acid injections ( P hyaluronic injection was clinically effective for pain relief and functional improvement for at least 12 months in patients with Morton's neuroma. However, numbness associated with Morton's neuroma should be addressed more cautiously since it may persist without much improvement. Level IV, retrospective case series.

  8. Multi-segment foot kinematics and ground reaction forces during gait of individuals with plantar fasciitis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chang, Ryan; Rodrigues, Pedro A; Van Emmerik, Richard E A; Hamill, Joseph

    2014-08-22

    Clinically, plantar fasciitis (PF) is believed to be a result and/or prolonged by overpronation and excessive loading, but there is little biomechanical data to support this assertion. The purpose of this study was to determine the differences between healthy individuals and those with PF in (1) rearfoot motion, (2) medial forefoot motion, (3) first metatarsal phalangeal joint (FMPJ) motion, and (4) ground reaction forces (GRF). We recruited healthy (n=22) and chronic PF individuals (n=22, symptomatic over three months) of similar age, height, weight, and foot shape (p>0.05). Retro-reflective skin markers were fixed according to a multi-segment foot and shank model. Ground reaction forces and three dimensional kinematics of the shank, rearfoot, medial forefoot, and hallux segment were captured as individuals walked at 1.35 ms(-1). Despite similarities in foot anthropometrics, when compared to healthy individuals, individuals with PF exhibited significantly (pfoot kinematics and kinetics. Consistent with the theoretical injury mechanisms of PF, we found these individuals to have greater total rearfoot eversion and peak FMPJ dorsiflexion, which may put undue loads on the plantar fascia. Meanwhile, increased medial forefoot plantar flexion at initial contact and decreased propulsive GRF are suggestive of compensatory responses, perhaps to manage pain. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  9. Obese older adults suffer foot pain and foot-related functional limitation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mickle, Karen J; Steele, Julie R

    2015-10-01

    There is evidence to suggest being overweight or obese places adults at greater risk of developing foot complications such as osteoarthritis, tendonitis and plantar fasciitis. However, no research has comprehensively examined the effects of overweight or obesity on the feet of individuals older than 60 years of age. Therefore we investigated whether foot pain, foot structure, and/or foot function is affected by obesity in older adults. Three hundred and twelve Australian men and women, aged over 60 years, completed validated questionnaires to establish the presence of foot pain and health related quality of life. Foot structure (anthropometrics and soft tissue thickness) and foot function (ankle dorsiflexion strength and flexibility, toe flexor strength, plantar pressures and spatiotemporal gait parameters) were also measured. Obese participants (BMI >30) were compared to those who were overweight (BMI=25-30) and not overweight (BMI foot pain and scored significantly lower on the SF-36. Obesity was also associated with foot-related functional limitation whereby ankle dorsiflexion strength, hallux and lesser toe strength, stride/step length and walking speed were significantly reduced in obese participants compared to their leaner counterparts. Therefore, disabling foot pain and altered foot structure and foot function are consequences of obesity for older adults, and impact upon their quality of life. Interventions designed to reduce excess fat mass may relieve loading of the foot structures and, in turn, improve foot pain and quality of life for older obese individuals. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  10. Constitutional Mosaic Trisomy 13 in Two Germ Cell Layers is Different from Patau Syndrome? A Case Report.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kunwar, Fulesh; Pandya, Vidhi; Bakshi, Sonal R

    2016-03-01

    The heterogeneous phenotype of known syndromes is a clinical challenge, and harmonized description using globally accepted ontology is desirable. This report attempts phenotypic analysis in a patient of constitutional mosaic trisomy 13 in mesoderm and ectoderm to make globally comparable clinical description. Phenotypic features (minor/major abnormalities) were recorded and matched with the Human Phenotype Ontology terms that were used to query web-based tool Phenomizer. We report here a case of 24-year-old girl born to non consanguineous parents with history of one abortion. Her phenotypic evaluation included short columella, low-set ears, seizures, enlarged naris, bifid tongue, infra-orbital fold, smooth philtrum, microtia, microcephaly, carious teeth, downslanted palpebral fissures, proportionate short stature, high palate, thin upper lip vermilion, small for gestational age, broad fingertip, broad hallux, mandibular prognathia and dental malocclusion. Karyotype and interphase FISH (Fluorescence in situ hybridization) was done in blood cells. Interphase FISH was also performed on buccal epithelial cells. Cytogenetic analysis demonstrated trisomy 13 mosaicism in 25% cells i.e. 47, XX,+13(9)/46,XX(27). The interphase FISH in blood cells showed trisomy 13 in 15%, whereas in buccal mucosa cells showed nearly 6%. Mosaic aneuploidy in constitutional karyotype can be responsible for variation in clinical and morphological presentation of patient with genetic disorder.

  11. Foot length measurements of newborns of high and low risk pregnancies

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ana Karina Marques Salge

    Full Text Available Abstract OBJECTIVE Comparing foot length measurements of newborns in high and low risk pregnancies at a public hospital in Goiânia, GO, Brazil. METHOD A cross-sectional study carried out between April, 2013 and May, 2015, with a sample consisting of 180 newborns; 106 infants of women from high-risk pregnancies and 74 of women from low-risk pregnancies. Data were descriptively analyzed. Foot length measurement was performed using a stiff transparent plastic ruler, graduated in millimeters. The length of both feet was measured from the tip of the hallux (big toe to the end of the heel. RESULTS A statistically significant relationship was found between the foot length and newborn’s weight, between the cephalic and thoracic perimeters in the high-risk group and between the cephalic perimeter in the control group. CONCLUSION There is a need for creating cut-off points to identify newborns with intrauterine growth disorders using foot length.

  12. A comparison of results from two mycology laboratories for the diagnosis of onychomycosis: a study of 85 cases in a geriatric population.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Scherer, William P; Scherer, Michael D

    2004-01-01

    An investigative study was performed to compare the results from two mycology laboratories for the diagnosis of onychomycosis in a geriatric population and to determine the possible pharmacologic treatments based on the two laboratories' results. In this study, 85 cases of suspected onychomycosis involving men and women 65 years and older from a nursing home setting in South Florida were used. Samples were taken from the hallux toenail and sent to two different mycology laboratories for fluorescent potassium hydroxide preparation and microscopic examination of a fungal culture. Of the 85 cases studied, the two mycology laboratories reported similar potassium hydroxide preparation results for 58.8% of the patients and similar fungal culture results for genus and species identification for 37.6% of the patients. When the potassium hydroxide preparation and fungal culture results were combined, the two mycology laboratories reported similar results for only 27.1% of the patients. As a result of the two mycology laboratories' findings, the possible US Food and Drug Administration-approved pharmacologic treatments may differ for 43.5% of the patients studied. The discrepancy between the two independent laboratories leaves physicians to question the reproducibility of fluorescent potassium hydroxide preparation and fungal culture analysis in a geriatric patient population for the diagnosis of onychomycosis.

  13. Performance of mycology and histopathology tests for the diagnosis of toenail onychomycosis due to filamentous fungi: Dermatophyte and non-dermatophyte moulds.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lavorato, Fernanda G; Guimarães, Dávson A; Premazzi, Mario G; Piñeiro-Maceira, Juan M; Bernardes-Engemann, Andréa R; Orofino-Costa, Rosane

    2017-09-01

    Improvement of laboratory diagnosis of onychomychosis is important so that adequate treatment can be safely implemented. To evaluate and compare the performance of mycological and histopathological examinations in onychomycoses caused by dermatophyte and non-dermatophyte moulds. Patients with lateral/distal subungual onychomycosis in at least one hallux were enrolled in the protocol and assessed via mycological and histopathological tests. The isolation of filamentous fungi was considered the gold standard. Test performance was evaluated through sensitivity, specificity and positive and negative predictive values. A total of 212 patients were enrolled in the study. Direct microscopy (DM) was positive in 57.5% patients, and cultures in 34.4%. Among these patients, 23.3% were positive for dermatophytes, with Trichophyton rubrum the most frequently isolated, and 86.3% were positive for non-dermatophytes, with Neoscytalidium dimidiatum predominance. Histopathology was positive in 41.0% samples. Direct microscopy showed better sensitivity for non-dermatophyte moulds (P=.000) and nail clipping was more specific for dermatophyte (P=.018). Histopathology of the distal nail plate is a valuable complementary tool for the diagnosis of onychomycosis caused by dermatophytes and direct microscopy is especially useful for non-dermatophyte molds. © 2017 Blackwell Verlag GmbH.

  14. Flexor Hallucis Longus tendon rupture in RA-patients is associated with MTP 1 damage and pes planus

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Buurke Jaap J

    2007-11-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background To assess the prevalence of and relation between rupture or tenosynovitis of the Flexor Hallucis Longus (FHL tendon and range of motion, deformities and joint damage of the forefoot in RA patients with foot complaints. Methods Thirty RA patients with painful feet were analysed, their feet were examined clinically for the presence of pes planus and range of motion (ROM, radiographs were scored looking for the presence of forefoot damage, and ultrasound examination was performed, examining the presence of tenosyovitis or rupture of the FHL at the level of the medial malleolus. The correlation between the presence or absence of the FHL and ROM, forefoot damage and pes planus was calculated. Results In 11/60(18% of the feet, a rupture of the FHL was found. This was associated with a limited motion of the MTP1-joint, measured on the JAM (χ2 = 10.4, p = 0.034, a higher prevalence of pes planus (χ2 = 5.77, p = 0.016 and a higher prevalence of erosions proximal at the MTP-1 joint (χ2 = 12.3, p = 0.016, and joint space narrowing of the MTP1 joint (χ2 = 12.7, p = 0.013. Conclusion Rupture of the flexor hallucis longus tendon in RA-patients is associated with limited range of hallux motion, more erosions and joint space narrowing of the MTP-1-joint, as well as with pes planus.

  15. Genetic diversity and antifungal susceptibility of Fusarium isolates in onychomycosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rosa, Priscila D; Heidrich, Daiane; Corrêa, Carolina; Scroferneker, Maria Lúcia; Vettorato, Gerson; Fuentefria, Alexandre M; Goldani, Luciano Z

    2017-09-01

    Fusarium species have emerged as an important human pathogen in skin disease, onychomycosis, keratitis and invasive disease. Onychomycosis caused by Fusarium spp. The infection has been increasingly described in the immunocompetent and immunosuppressed hosts. Considering onychomycosis is a difficult to treat infection, and little is known about the genetic variability and susceptibility pattern of Fusarium spp., further studies are necessary to understand the pathogenesis and better to define the appropriate antifungal treatment for this infection. Accordingly, the objective of this study was to describe the in vitro susceptibility to different antifungal agents and the genetic diversity of 35 Fusarium isolated from patients with onychomycosis. Fusarium spp. were isolated predominantly from female Caucasians, and the most frequent anatomical location was the nail of the hallux. Results revealed that 25 (71.4%) of isolates belonged to the Fusarium solani species complex, followed by 10 (28.5%) isolates from the Fusarium oxysporum species complex. Noteworthy, the authors report the first case of Neocosmospora rubicola isolated from a patient with onychomycosis. Amphotericin B was the most effective antifungal agent against the majority of isolates (60%, MIC ≤4 μg/mL), followed by voriconazole (34.2%, MIC ≤4 μg/mL). In general, Fusarium species presented MIC values >64 μg/mL for fluconazole, itraconazole and terbinafine. Accurate pathogen identification, characterisation and susceptibility testing provide a better understanding of pathogenesis of Fusarium in onychomycosis. © 2017 Blackwell Verlag GmbH.

  16. Short-term step-to-step correlation in plantar pressure distributions during treadmill walking, and implications for footprint trail analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pataky, Todd C; Savage, Russell; Bates, Karl T; Sellers, William I; Crompton, Robin H

    2013-09-01

    The gait cycle is continuous, but for practical reasons one is often forced to analyze one or only a few adjacent cycles, for example in non-treadmill laboratory investigations and in fossilized footprint analysis. The nature of variability in long-term gait cycle dynamics has been well-investigated, but short-term variability, and specifically correlation, which are highly relevant to short gait bouts, have not. We presently tested for step-to-step autocorrelation in a total of 5243 plantar pressure (PP) distributions from ten subjects who walked at 1.1m/s on an instrumented treadmill. Following spatial foot alignment, data were analyzed both from three points of interest (POI): heel, central metatarsals, and hallux, and for the foot surface as a whole, in a mass-univariate manner. POI results revealed low average step-to-step autocorrelation coefficients (r=0.327±0.094; mean±st. dev.). Formal statistical testing of the whole-foot r distributions reached significance over an average of only 0.42±0.52% of the foot's surface, even for a highly conservative uncorrected threshold of p<0.05. The common assumption, that short gait bouts consist of independent cycles, is therefore not refuted by the present PP results. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  17. Inter- and intra-observer reliability of masking in plantar pressure measurement analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Deschamps, K; Birch, I; Mc Innes, J; Desloovere, K; Matricali, G A

    2009-10-01

    Plantar pressure measurement is an important tool in gait analysis. Manual placement of small masks (masking) is increasingly used to calculate plantar pressure characteristics. Little is known concerning the reliability of manual masking. The aim of this study was to determine the reliability of masking on 2D plantar pressure footprints, in a population with forefoot deformity (i.e. hallux valgus). Using a random repeated-measure design, four observers identified the third metatarsal head on a peak-pressure barefoot footprint, using a small mask. Subsequently, the location of all five metatarsal heads was identified, using the same size of masks and the same protocol. The 2D positional variation of the masks and the peak pressure (PP) and pressure time integral (PTI) values of each mask were calculated. For single-masking the lowest inter-observer reliability was found for the distal-proximal direction, causing a clear, adverse impact on the reliability of the pressure characteristics (PP and PTI). In the medial-lateral direction the inter-observer reliability could be scored as high. Intra-observer reliability was better and could be scored as high or good for both directions, with a correlated improved reliability of the pressure characteristics. Reliability of multi-masking showed a similar pattern, but overall values tended to be lower. Therefore, small sized masking in order to define pressure characteristics in the forefoot should be done with care.

  18. Experimentally generated footprints in sand: Analysis and consequences for the interpretation of fossil and forensic footprints.

    Science.gov (United States)

    D'Août, Kristiaan; Meert, L; Van Gheluwe, B; De Clercq, D; Aerts, P

    2010-04-01

    Fossilized footprints contain information about the dynamics of gait, but their interpretation is difficult, as they are the combined result of foot anatomy, gait dynamics, and substrate properties. We explore how footprints are generated in modern humans. Sixteen healthy subjects walked on a solid surface and in a layer of fine-grained sand. In each condition, 3D kinematics of the leg and foot were analyzed for three trials at preferred speed, using an infrared camera system. Additionally, calibrated plantar pressures were recorded. After each trial in sand, the depth of the imprint was measured under specific sites. When walking in sand, subjects showed greater toe clearance during swing and a 7 degrees higher knee yield during stance. Maximal pressure was the most influential factor for footprint depth under the heel. For other foot zones, a combination of factors correlates with imprint depth, with pressure impulse (the pressure-time integral) gaining importance distally, at the metatarsal heads and the hallux. We conclude that footprint topology cannot be related to a single variable, but that different zones of the footprint reflect different aspects of the kinesiology of walking. Therefore, an integrated approach, combining anatomical, kinesiological, and substrate-mechanical insights, is necessary for a correct interpretation. (c) 2009 Wiley-Liss, Inc.

  19. Estimation of calcaneal loading during standing from human footprint depths using 3D scanner

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wibowo, Dwi Basuki; Haryadi, Gunawan Dwi; Widodo, Achmad; Rahayu, Sri Puji

    2017-01-01

    This research studies the relationship between footprint depths and load in the calcaneal area when human standing in an upright posture. Footprint depths are deformation in the calcaneal area obtained from the z-value extraction of the Boolean operation acquired from unloaded foot scanning using 3D scanner and loaded foot using foot plantar scanner. To compare peak loads estimated from footprint depth maximum, force sensing resistor (FSR) sensor is attached over the shoe insole with zero heel height in the calcaneal area. Twenty participants were selected from students of Mechanical Engineering Department Diponegoro University with the average the age and the body weight 19.5 years and 55.27 kg respectively. Results that were relatively accurate was found on the calcaneal loading estimation by footprint depth is presented by curve and data distribution which are in good agreement with the result of the measurement. A significant difference in estimating calcaneal loading is mainly caused by plantar foot position of research subjects which is not perpendicular to foot ankle and hallux. In addition, plantar foot position which bends to front/back/side affects the result of footprint depths.

  20. [Spasticity and dynamic plantar pressure distribution measurements in hemiplegic spastic children].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Femery, V; Moretto, P; Renaut, H; Thévenon, A

    2001-02-01

    The aim of this study was to analyse the plantar pressure distribution in nine hemiplegic spastic children to illustrate the dynamic alteration during stance phase linked spasticity grade. The graduation of the lower limbs muscle tone related to the Aschworth spasticity scale enabled us to identify two groups of hemiplegics subjects. The groups Asch 1 and Asch 3 have respectively presented a low and a strong spasticity. The peak pressures during consecutive gait cycles were determined under the feet of 30 healthy subjects and two cerebral palsy groups using a wearable footprint analysis system. A statistical study showed a similarity between the two disabled groups. Peak pressures under the midfoot were significantly higher compared to the control group. While the plantar pressure distribution profile was specific for each group under all other anatomical structures. The significant alterations were observed under the forefoot and hallux. Spasticity modifies the foot contact to ground and leads to a specific plantar pressure distribution profile linked to the spasticity grade. The equinovarus with clawed toes deformity due to higher spasticity seems to be an important factor in terminal stance phase perturbations. However spastic hemiplegic subjects seem to adopt a gait pattern in agreement with stability optimization criteria.

  1. Clinical comparison and complete cure rates of Terbinafine efficacy in affected onychomycotic toenails.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shemer, A; Sakka, N; Baran, R; Scher, R; Amichai, B; Norman, L; Farhi, R; Magun, R; Brazilai, A; Daniel, R

    2015-03-01

    Clinical studies regarding complete cure rate of onychomycosis using oral Terbinafine have a very broad range (14-90%) based solely on response to treatment on the big toenail. To evaluate the efficacy of Terbinafine in all affected onychomycotic toenails and, furthermore, to evaluate differences in mycological, clinical and complete cure rate between affected onychomycotic toenails. Inclusion criteria are as follows: distolateralsubungual onychomycotic involvement of the hallux and additional involvement of at least two more toenails of the same foot. Exclusion criteria are as follows: patients with nail traumata and hypersensitivity to Terbinafine. Patients were treated with oral Terbinafine 250 mg/day for 16 weeks. Mycological analysis was performed using direct microscopy and culture. Clinical improvement was assessed using digital photography. Statistically significant difference was found in clinical improvement between the great toenail and all other involved toenails. The rate of complete cure (100% clinical cure and mycological cure) of the big toenail was lower (23%) as compared to the second (65%), third (51%) and the fourth toenail (67%). This is a case series study that was based on a single-centre cohort. Our results support findings that efficacy of Terbinafine should be based on all involved onychomycotic toenails; the big toenail is not superior in response compared to other affected toenails. © 2014 European Academy of Dermatology and Venereology.

  2. Analysis of a kinetic multi-segment foot model. Part I: Model repeatability and kinematic validity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bruening, Dustin A; Cooney, Kevin M; Buczek, Frank L

    2012-04-01

    Kinematic multi-segment foot models are still evolving, but have seen increased use in clinical and research settings. The addition of kinetics may increase knowledge of foot and ankle function as well as influence multi-segment foot model evolution; however, previous kinetic models are too complex for clinical use. In this study we present a three-segment kinetic foot model and thorough evaluation of model performance during normal gait. In this first of two companion papers, model reference frames and joint centers are analyzed for repeatability, joint translations are measured, segment rigidity characterized, and sample joint angles presented. Within-tester and between-tester repeatability were first assessed using 10 healthy pediatric participants, while kinematic parameters were subsequently measured on 17 additional healthy pediatric participants. Repeatability errors were generally low for all sagittal plane measures as well as transverse plane Hindfoot and Forefoot segments (median<3°), while the least repeatable orientations were the Hindfoot coronal plane and Hallux transverse plane. Joint translations were generally less than 2mm in any one direction, while segment rigidity analysis suggested rigid body behavior for the Shank and Hindfoot, with the Forefoot violating the rigid body assumptions in terminal stance/pre-swing. Joint excursions were consistent with previously published studies. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  3. Kinematic repeatability of a multi-segment foot model for dance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carter, Sarah L; Sato, Nahoko; Hopper, Luke S

    2018-03-01

    The purpose of this study was to determine the intra and inter-assessor repeatability of a modified Rizzoli Foot Model for analysing the foot kinematics of ballet dancers. Six university-level ballet dancers performed the movements; parallel stance, turnout plié, turnout stance, turnout rise and flex-point-flex. The three-dimensional (3D) position of individual reflective markers and marker triads was used to model the movement of the dancers' tibia, entire foot, hindfoot, midfoot, forefoot and hallux. Intra and inter-assessor reliability demonstrated excellent (ICC ≥ 0.75) repeatability for the first metatarsophalangeal joint in the sagittal plane. Intra-assessor reliability demonstrated excellent (ICC ≥ 0.75) repeatability during flex-point-flex across all inter-segmental angles except for the tibia-hindfoot and hindfoot-midfoot frontal planes. Inter-assessor repeatability ranged from poor to excellent (0.5 > ICC ≥ 0.75) for the 3D segment rotations. The most repeatable measure was the tibia-foot dorsiflexion/plantar flexion articulation whereas the least repeatable measure was the hindfoot-midfoot adduction/abduction articulation. The variation found in the inter-assessor results is likely due to inconsistencies in marker placement. This 3D dance specific multi-segment foot model provides insight into which kinematic measures can be reliably used to ascertain in vivo technical errors and/or biomechanical abnormalities in a dancer's foot motion.

  4. Foot Structure in Boys with Down Syndrome

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    Ewa Puszczałowska-Lizis

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Introduction and Aim. Down syndrome (DS is associated with numerous developmental abnormalities, some of which cause dysfunctions of the posture and the locomotor system. The analysis of selected features of the foot structure in boys with DS versus their peers without developmental disorders is done. Materials and Methods. The podoscopic examination was performed on 30 boys with DS aged 14-15 years. A control group consisted of 30 age- and gender-matched peers without DS. Results. The feet of boys with DS are flatter compared to their healthy peers. The hallux valgus angle is not the most important feature differentiating the shape of the foot in the boys with DS and their healthy peers. In terms of the V toe setting, healthy boys had poorer results. Conclusions. Specialized therapeutic treatment in individuals with DS should involve exercises to increase the muscle strength around the foot joints, enhancing the stabilization in the joints and proprioception. Introducing orthotics and proper footwear is also important. It is also necessary to monitor the state of the foot in order to modify undertaken therapies.

  5. Stress fractures of the foot and ankle, part 2: site-specific etiology, imaging, and treatment, and differential diagnosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mandell, Jacob C; Khurana, Bharti; Smith, Stacy E

    2017-09-01

    Stress fractures of the foot and ankle are a commonly encountered problem among athletes and individuals participating in a wide range of activities. This illustrated review, the second of two parts, discusses site-specific etiological factors, imaging appearances, treatment options, and differential considerations of stress fractures of the foot and ankle. The imaging and clinical management of stress fractures of the foot and ankle are highly dependent on the specific location of the fracture, mechanical forces acting upon the injured site, vascular supply of the injured bone, and the proportion of trabecular to cortical bone at the site of injury. The most common stress fractures of the foot and ankle are low risk and include the posteromedial tibia, the calcaneus, and the second and third metatarsals. The distal fibula is a less common location, and stress fractures of the cuboid and cuneiforms are very rare, but are also considered low risk. In contrast, high-risk stress fractures are more prone to delayed union or nonunion and include the anterior tibial cortex, medial malleolus, navicular, base of the second metatarsal, proximal fifth metatarsal, hallux sesamoids, and the talus. Of these high-risk types, stress fractures of the anterior tibial cortex, the navicular, and the proximal tibial cortex may be predisposed to poor healing because of the watershed blood supply in these locations. The radiographic differential diagnosis of stress fracture includes osteoid osteoma, malignancy, and chronic osteomyelitis.

  6. Estimation of foot pressure from human footprint depths using 3D scanner

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wibowo, Dwi Basuki; Haryadi, Gunawan Dwi; Priambodo, Agus

    2016-03-01

    The analysis of normal and pathological variation in human foot morphology is central to several biomedical disciplines, including orthopedics, orthotic design, sports sciences, and physical anthropology, and it is also important for efficient footwear design. A classic and frequently used approach to study foot morphology is analysis of the footprint shape and footprint depth. Footprints are relatively easy to produce and to measure, and they can be preserved naturally in different soils. In this study, we need to correlate footprint depth with corresponding foot pressure of individual using 3D scanner. Several approaches are used for modeling and estimating footprint depths and foot pressures. The deepest footprint point is calculated from z max coordinate-z min coordinate and the average of foot pressure is calculated from GRF divided to foot area contact and identical with the average of footprint depth. Evaluation of footprint depth was found from importing 3D scanner file (dxf) in AutoCAD, the z-coordinates than sorted from the highest to the lowest value using Microsoft Excel to make footprinting depth in difference color. This research is only qualitatif study because doesn't use foot pressure device as comparator, and resulting the maximum pressure on calceneus is 3.02 N/cm2, lateral arch is 3.66 N/cm2, and metatarsal and hallux is 3.68 N/cm2.

  7. Clinical aspects and conservative dental management of a patient with fibrodysplasia ossificans progressiva.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oliveira, Francisco Artur Forte; Fernandes, Clarissa Pessoa; Araujo, Kenia Samara Barbosa; Alves, Ana Paula Negreiros Nunes; Sousa, Fabrício Bitu; Mota, Mário Rogério Lima

    2014-01-01

    T o present the clinical findings of a patient with fibrodysplasia ossificans progressiva (FOP), highlighting peculiarities of dental treatment in patients with this condition. FOP is a rare genetic disease characterized by skeletal malformations and ectopic ossifications in skeletal muscles, tendons, ligaments and aponeurosis. Exacerbation of these ossifications can be caused by dental treatment, resulting in disease progression. A 26-year-old male patient with a diagnosis of FOP was referred to our service for dental treatment. The patient presented decreased mobility in peripheral joints (knees and elbows), postural disability (ankylosis of the vertebral column), lateral deviation and shortness of the hallux, as well as heterotopic ossifications on the hands and back. The implementation of conservative dental procedures, such as oral hygiene instructions and recurrent topical fluoride applications, were performed in addition to endodontic and restorative treatments. Brief dental appointments were conducted without using regional anesthesia or dental dam clamps. The dental chair was positioned at 45° to provide more comfort and to avoid exacerbating the disease. The patient has now completed 6 months of follow-up and is free of heterotopic ossifications resulting from dental treatment. The dental treatment modifications implemented for the present case were sufficient to establish good oral health and to prevent the formation of heterotopic ossifications in the maxillofacial region. FOP is a rare disease dentists must familiarize themselves with to provide adequate, personalized treatment, which minimizes traumas that may exacerbate the disease.

  8. Kaufman oculo-cerebro-facial syndrome in a child with small and absent terminal phalanges and absent nails.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kariminejad, Ariana; Ajeawung, Norbert Fonya; Bozorgmehr, Bita; Dionne-Laporte, Alexandre; Molidperee, Sirinart; Najafi, Kimia; Gibbs, Richard A; Lee, Brendan H; Hennekam, Raoul C; Campeau, Philippe M

    2017-04-01

    Kaufman oculo-cerebro-facial syndrome (KOS) is caused by recessive UBE3B mutations and presents with microcephaly, ocular abnormalities, distinctive facial morphology, low cholesterol levels and intellectual disability. We describe a child with microcephaly, brachycephaly, hearing loss, ptosis, blepharophimosis, hypertelorism, cleft palate, multiple renal cysts, absent nails, small or absent terminal phalanges, absent speech and intellectual disability. Syndromes that were initially considered include DOORS syndrome, Coffin-Siris syndrome and Dubowitz syndrome. Clinical investigations coupled with karyotype analysis, array-comparative genomic hybridization, exome and Sanger sequencing were performed to characterize the condition in this child. Sanger sequencing was negative for the DOORS syndrome gene TBC1D24 but exome sequencing identified a homozygous deletion in UBE3B (NM_183415:c.3139_3141del, p.1047_1047del) located within the terminal portion of the HECT domain. This finding coupled with the presence of characteristic features such as brachycephaly, ptosis, blepharophimosis, hypertelorism, short palpebral fissures, cleft palate and developmental delay allowed us to make a diagnosis of KOS. In conclusion, our findings highlight the importance of considering KOS as a differential diagnosis for patients under evaluation for DOORS syndrome and expand the phenotype of KOS to include small or absent terminal phalanges, nails, and the presence of hallux varus and multicystic dysplastic kidneys.

  9. Trisomy 18 Syndrome with Incomplete Cantrell Syndrome

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    Yi-Jen Hou

    2008-06-01

    Full Text Available The pentalogy of Cantrell was first described in 1958 by Cantrell and coworkers, who reported five cases in which they described a pentad of findings including a midline supraumbilical thoracoabdominal wall defect, a defect of the lower sternum, abnormalities of the diaphragmatic pericardium and the anterior diaphragm, and congenital cardiac anomalies. Trisomy 18 has an incidence of about 0.3 per 1000 newborns. We present a case of trisomy 18 with incomplete Cantrell syndrome. The patient presented with hypogenesis of the corpus callosum, vermian-cerebellar hypoplasia (Dandy-Walker variant, ventricular septal defect, dextrocardia, patent ductus arteriosus, a defect of the lower sternum, a midline supraumbilical abdominal wall defect with omphalocele, congenital left posterior diaphragmatic hernia (Bochdalek hernia, micrognathia, low-set and malformed ears, rocker-bottom feet, dorsiflexed hallux, hypoplastic nails, short neck, and wrist deformity. Trisomy 18 syndrome was unusually combined with the pentalogy of Cantrell. We present this case because of its rarity and high risk of mortality.

  10. Three saints with deformed extremities in an Italian Renaissance altarpiece.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Albury, W R; Weisz, G M

    2017-03-01

    A fifteenth-century Florentine altarpiece painted by the Pollaiuolo brothers, Antonio (1433-1498) and Piero (1443-1496), shows three saints with evident deformities of the hands and feet. The pathologies concerned are tentatively identified, and various rationales for their presence in the painting are discussed. Of particular importance is the location of the altarpiece in a chapel which houses the tomb of the Cardinal of Portugal, Prince James of Lusitania (1433-1459). It is argued that both the artistic style of the day and the religious symbolism of the Cardinal's funeral chapel contributed to the artists' decision to portray the saints with deformities. An unnatural curvature of the fifth finger was apparently considered elegant in fifteenth-century paintings, and the depiction of bare feet with hallux valgus gave them a shape which approximated and could have been caused by fashionable pointed shoes. But in addition, deformities in religious art could be symbolic of suffering and martyrdom, a theme which the Cardinal's chapel emphasised in a number of ways. It is suggested therefore that the Pollaiuolo altarpiece reconciles these two disparate factors, portraying genuine deformities in a way that was artistically stylish and symbolically meaningful.

  11. Radiographic findings of the hand and foot in patients with systemic lupus erythematosus

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Scutellari, P.N.; Stabellini, R.; Orzincolo, C.; Franceschini, F.; Govoni, M.; Trotta, F.

    1987-01-01

    A detail examination of the hands and feet was performed in a group of 34 patients affected by systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE), using low-dose mammographic film and Rank Xerox selenium plate, according to current diagnostic techniques. All patients presented articular symptoms (pain and arthralgia). The high incidence (38.8%) of patients with no radiographic evidence of bone damage-even though articular symptoms are present-is emphasized. In such cases, it is very difficult to distinguish SLE from rheumatoid arthritis, especially as far as therapeutic management and prognosis are concerned. The lack of any pathognomonic radiological sign of the lupus arthritis, in the hands as well as in the feet, is then stressed. Nevertheless, artropathy in SLE is defined as a deforming unerosive arthritis, with a typical symmetric distribution, affecting most commonly (according to incidence) the proximal interphalangeal and metacarpophalangeal joints. In the hand, arthropathy is referred to as Jaccoud's type arthritis, because it is characterized by joint deformities which can be corrected. In the foot, the main abnormalities include hallux valgus, subluxation of the matatarsophalangeal joints and widening of the forefoot

  12. Radiographic findings of the hand and foot in patients with systemic lupus erythematosus

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Scutellari, P N; Stabellini, R; Orzincolo, C; Franceschini, F; Govoni, M; Trotta, F

    1987-01-01

    A detail examination of the hands and feet was performed in a group of 34 patients affected by systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE), using low-dose mammographic film and Rank Xerox selenium plate, according to current diagnostic techniques. All patients presented articular symptoms (pain and arthralgia). The high incidence (38.8%) of patients with no radiographic evidence of bone damage-even though articular symptoms are present-is emphasized. In such cases, it is very difficult to distinguish SLE from rheumatoid arthritis, especially as far as therapeutic management and prognosis are concerned. The lack of any pathognomonic radiological sign of the lupus arthritis, in the hands as well as in the feet, is then stressed. Nevertheless, artropathy in SLE is defined as a deforming unerosive arthritis, with a typical symmetric distribution, affecting most commonly (according to incidence) the proximal interphalangeal and metacarpophalangeal joints. In the hand, arthropathy is referred to as Jaccoud's type arthritis, because it is characterized by joint deformities which can be corrected. In the foot, the main abnormalities include hallux valgus, subluxation of the matatarsophalangeal joints and widening of the forefoot.

  13. The prevalence of foot ulceration in patients with rheumatoid arthritis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Firth, Jill; Hale, Claire; Helliwell, Philip; Hill, Jackie; Nelson, E Andrea

    2008-02-15

    To establish the prevalence of foot ulceration in patients with rheumatoid arthritis (RA) in secondary care. A postal survey of all patients with RA (n = 1,130) under the care of rheumatologists in Bradford, West Yorkshire, UK was performed. The prevalence data were validated through clinical examination, case-note review, and contact with health professionals. The false-negative rate was investigated in a subsample of patients (n = 70) who denied any history of ulceration. The postal survey achieved a 78% response rate. Following validation, the point prevalence of foot ulceration was 3.39% and the overall prevalence was 9.73%. The false-positive rate was initially high at 21.21%, but use of diagrammatic questionnaire data to exclude leg ulceration reduced the rate to 10.76%. The false-negative rate was 11.76%. The most common sites for ulceration were the dorsal aspect of hammer toes, the metatarsal heads, and the metatarsophalangeal joint in patients with hallux abducto valgus, with 33% of patients reporting multiple sites of ulceration. Patients with open-foot and healed-foot ulceration had significantly longer RA disease duration, reported significantly greater use of special footwear, and had a higher prevalence of foot surgery than ulcer-free patients. Foot ulceration affects a significant proportion of patients with RA. Further work is needed to establish risk factors for foot ulceration in RA and to target foot health provision more effectively.

  14. Reliability, validity and responsiveness of the Spanish Manchester-Oxford Foot Questionnaire (MOXFQ) in patients with foot or ankle surgery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Garcés, Juan B Gerstner; Winson, Ian; Goldhahn, Sabine; Castro, Michael D; Swords, Michael P; Grujic, Leslie; Rammelt, Stefan; Sands, Andrew K

    2016-03-01

    The Manchester-Oxford Foot Questionnaire (MOXFQ) has been validated in Spanish for use in patients undergoing foot and ankle surgery. 120 patients completed the MOXFQ and the SF-36 before surgery and 6 and 12 months postoperative. Surgeons completed the American Orthopaedic Foot and Ankle Society (AOFAS) Clinical Rating System. Psychometric properties were assessed for all three MOXFQ dimensions, and for the MOXFQ Index. The Spanish MOXFQ demonstrated consistency with Cronbach's alpha values between 0.65 and 0.90, and reliability ([ICCs] >0.95). It shows a moderate to strong correlation between the Walking/standing dimension and the related domains of the SF-36 (|r|>0.6), the AOFAS Ankle-Hindfoot Scale (|r|>0.47) and Hallux-MTP-IP Scale (|r|>0.64). Responsiveness was excellent, (effect sizes >2.1). The respective minimal detectable change (MDC90) was 14.18 for the MOXFQ Index. The Spanish version of the MOXFQ showed good psychometric properties in patients with foot and ankle disorders. Copyright © 2015 European Foot and Ankle Society. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  15. Ergonomic footwear for Sri Lankan primary schoolchildren: A review of the literature.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hettigama, I S; Punchihewa, H K G; Heenkenda, N K

    2016-10-17

    Foot ailments are common among schoolchildren, some of which may be attributed to wearing ill-fitting footwear. As schoolchildren often participate in athletic activity, they are doubly vulnerable to foot ailments, and are particularly vulnerable to conditions such as hallux valgus, Achilles tendonitis, athlete's foot, corns and calluses. Thus, there is an acute need for the design and manufacture of ergonomic footwear for this target group. While research on appropriate footwear for children has been carried out in relation to child populations in other societies, research on the circumstances of Sri Lankan schoolchildren is lacking. Neither the requisite design know-how nor the information for design is available to footwear manufacturers. This review of the literature is aimed at confirming the need for ergonomic footwear from the point of view of the effects of wearing ill-fitting shoes and at identifying the requirements in terms of design information, especially for schoolchildren of the age group five to ten years, to empower footwear manufacturers. PubMed, Google scholar and Science Direct were used for the literature search. 208 publications were read in full, 94 of which are referenced in this review. The review shows morphological measurements, behavior and activity patterns of schoolchildren and environmental conditions they are exposed to should be determined to formulate design information.

  16. Radiographic evaluation for AVN following distal metatarsal Stoffella bunion osteotomy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Klein, Christian; Zembsch, Alexander; Dorn, Ulrich

    2009-01-01

    Avascular necrosis of the metatarsal head, delayed bone healing and nonunion are complications that may occur after distal first metatarsal osteotomies. Intraoperative damage to the extraosseous blood supply, the location of the osteotomy and postoperative vasospasm have been cited as possible causes of such changes. We evaluated Stoffella's subcapital osteotomies which were performed at our department for the correction of moderate to severe hallux valgus deformities. Standardized radiographs of 300 feet, taken 6weeks, 3 months, and 6 months postoperatively and at the final followup were examined with regard to postoperative AVN or signs of delayed bone healing. Of 228 patients, 202 were women and 26 were men. The patients' mean age was 49 years, and the mean followup was 12 months. In 278 cases the radiographs revealed an unremarkable first metatarsal head. Seventeen cases showed diffuse or localized osteopenia or small cysts in the subchondral bone. These changes fully resolved on subsequent radiographs. The X-rays of two patients revealed progressive narrowing of the joint space, irregular contours on the surface of the joint and an abnormal bone structure. The patients subsequently developed a characteristic picture of avascular necrosis, in one case combined with nonunion. Three patients had delayed bone healing, but ultimately healed successfully. Ischemic changes in bone are known to occur after distal first metatarsal osteotomies. There is a very low incidence of postoperative perfusion problems after Stoffella;s technique, even with lateral soft tissue release.

  17. Computed tomography-guided bupivacaine and corticosteroid injection for the treatment of symptomatic calcification in the great toe tendon

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Karatoprak O

    2014-04-01

    Full Text Available Omer Karatoprak,1 Sinan Karaca,2 Mehmet Nuri Erdem,3 Ozgur Karaman,2 Azmi Hamzaoglu41Department of Orthopedic Surgery, Kadikoy Florence Nightingale Hospital, Istanbul, Turkey; 2Department of Orthopedic Surgery, Fatih Sultan Mehmet Training and Research Hospital Atasehir, Istanbul, Turkey; 3Department of Orthopedics and Traumatology, Kolan International Hospital Sisli, Istanbul, Turkey; 4Department of Orthopedic Surgery, Istanbul Florence Nightingale Hospital, Istanbul TurkeyBackground: Calcification in the great toe tendon is a rare disorder that is characterized by the deposition of calcium on degenerative collagen fibrils.Case presentations: In this report, we present two cases of calcific tendonitis: one in the adductor hallucis and the other in the flexor hallucis longus tendon. We preferred computed tomography-guided steroid injection in our cases because of pain unresponsive to conservative treatment. Patients were free of symptoms at the follow-up visit, 4 weeks after injection.Conclusion: Calcification of the hallux tendons is a rare disorder. Treatment of tendonitis consists of nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs. Local anesthetic and steroid injection may be considered in cases unresponsive to conservative treatment. Because of the anatomic location of tendons, injection could be difficult. Computed tomography guidance may improve the success rate of injections.Keywords: bupivacaine, calcification, great toe tendons, corticosteroid injection

  18. A tiny short-legged bird from the early Oligocene of Poland

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    Bochenski Zbigniew M.

    2016-10-01

    Full Text Available We describe an articulated partial leg of an Oligocene bird. It is one of the smallest avian fossils ever recorded. Its slender and exceptionally short tarsometatarsus, hallux as long as the tarsometatarsus and stout moderately curved claws agree with stem-group Apodidae (swifts, stem-group Trochilidae (hummingbirds, and stem-group Upupidae/Phoeniculidae (hoopoes/woodhoopoes. Unfortunately, due to the poor preservation of the specimen its more precise affinities remain unresolved. The specimen differs in many details from all other tiny Palaeogene birds and therefore most probably it represents a new taxon but it is too fragmentary to describe it. It is just the twelfth avian fossil from the Oligocene marine deposits of the Outer Carpathians and Central Palaeogene Basin — a huge area that covers south-eastern Poland, north-eastern Czech Republic and northern Slovakia — and therefore it adds to our very limited knowledge on the avifauna of that region. The remains of land birds from Jamna Dolna and other sites of the region can be attributed to the general sea level fall at that time, which led to limitation of the connection with the open ocean and resulted in many shallow shoals, temporary islands and exposed dry land areas along the coast.

  19. Fibrodisplasia ossificante progressiva: relato de caso Fibrodysplasia ossificans progressiva: a case report

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Daiana Martins de Campos

    2005-09-01

    Full Text Available Os autores descrevem um caso de fibrodisplasia ossificante progressiva, doença hereditária caracterizada por calcificações heterotópicas do tecido conectivo, geralmente induzida por trauma, gerando imobilidade permanente das articulações. Hálux valgo, clinodactilia e polegares curtos são as principais malformações congênitas associadas. Manifesta-se na infância, sendo o diagnóstico clínico-radiológico importante, pois procedimentos invasivos exacerbam a doença. Tratamentos disponíveis são apenas paliativos, tendo a prevenção relevância nesse contexto.The authors describe a case of fibrodysplasia ossificans progressiva, a hereditary disease characterized by heterotopic ossification of the connective tissues, usually triggered by trauma, resulting in permanent immobility of the joints. Hallux valgus, clinodactyly and short thumbs are the main associated congenital anomalies. Fibrodysplasia ossificans progressiva usually develops during early childhood. Clinical and radiological diagnosis is essential, since invasive procedures exacerbate the disease. Only palliative treatments are available and prevention plays an important role in patients with fibrodysplasia ossificans progressiva.

  20. TREATMENT OF BRACHIMETATARSIA IN CHILDREN

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    N. A. Kovalenko-Klychkova

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Brachimetatarsia is a malformation of one or more of the metatarsal bones, characterized by its shortening. Abnormal anatomy of the forefoot leads to the convergence of epiphyses of adjacent metatarsals, deformation of the forefeet, including the formation of hallux valgus, pain and cosmetic defects. The authors have conducted the surgical treatment (lengthening the shortened metatarsal bones in 18 female patients (28 feet, 32 metatarsal bones and determined the optimal method of surgical correction. Depending on the severity of metatarsal bone shortening 3 methods of surgical treatment were applied: in shortening of less than 1,2 cm -the slide osteotomy; in shortening up to 1.8 cm - a one-staged lengthening of metatarsal bone with autograft; more than 1.8 cm - the distraction osteosynthesis. Due to existing disorders it is advisable to perform restoration of the shortened toe length according to the type of the metatarsal parabola, inherent to the patient. The optimal method of surgical treatment is a one-staged lengthening of the shortened metatarsal bone with the use of autograft from the iliac wing borrowed by means of “window-form” method without damage to the integrity of the apophysis.

  1. SURGICAL TREATMENT OF SEVERE (2-3 DEGREE DEFORMING ARTHROSIS OF FIRST METATARSOPHALANGEAL JOINT OF FOOT: TASKS, APPROACHES, TECHNIQUE

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. V. Mazalov

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Based on the experience of treating 67 patients (98 feet with deforming arthrosis of first metatarsophalangeal joint is shown that the treatment of this disease the distal decompressing osteotomy in combination with maximally radical the separation of the unions and cheilectomy possesses the significant health-improvement potential, which makes it possible to be turned to arthrodesis or arthroplasty only in the limiting cases of that the heavy cases of hallux rigidus. L-osteotomy 1-st metatarsus gives more than possibilities for the correction with the heavy deformations and the degenerate changes, the basic criterion of sufficiency of which is the volume of the intra-operating straightening of 1-st fingers reached. Optimum is reaching the straightening 1-st toes to 65° even above. An indispensable stage of complex operation is maximally radical of cheilectomy. During the formation of arthrodesis 1-st metatarsophalangeal joint in the horizontal plane the axis of 1 finger should be oriented in parallel to axis second metatarsal bones. The sagittal angle of the formation of arthrodesis depends on the manifestation of valgus of rear division. Active postoperative conducting essentially improves the distant results of the surgical treatment of deforming arthrosis of first metatarsophalangeal joint.

  2. Fibrodisplasia osificante progresiva: informe de caso con diagnóstico temprano y propuesta de rehabilitación

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    D Colmenares-Bonilla

    2017-03-01

    Full Text Available La fibrodisplasia osificante progresiva es una alteración genética extremadamente rara; se caracteriza por osificación heterotópica espontánea catastrófica, causada por un traumatismo mínimo y por malformación tipo hallux valgus en 95% de los casos. Su prevalencia es de 1 en 2,000,000 de habitantes. La mayoría de pacientes son mal diagnosticados en etapas tempranas y es frecuente que sean sometidos a pruebas diagnósticas causando discapacidad importante por limitación del movimiento. En la primera década de vida hay episodios de dolor y edema en tejidos blandos, que precede a la osificación; éstos son precipitados por traumatismos mínimos, inyecciones intramusculares o procedimientos quirúrgicos, entre otras muchas causas. Las osificaciones causan dolor crónico, anquilosis articular, restricción de movimiento, infecciones graves, desnutrición y muerte por insuficiencia respiratoria. Generalmente, estos pacientes son sometidos a procedimientos diagnósticos o terapéuticos que agravan su problema. Presentamos el caso de una paciente de 2.6 años de edad, proveniente de una comunidad rural, que fue diagnosticada tempranamente con este padecimiento y se describen propuestas del tratamiento de rehabilitación.

  3. Die Osteonekrose des Fußes: Eine Übersicht

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    Schenk S

    2007-01-01

    Full Text Available Die Osteonekrose (ON am Fuß ist eine heterogene Gruppe von Krankheitsbildern, die sich deutlich hinsichtlich Klinik, Verlauf, Prädilektionsalter und Prognose unterscheiden. Ebenso sind die Ursachen für diese Erkrankungen vielfältig: Neben idiopathischen finden sich auch posttraumatische und postoperative Formen. Seltene Ursachen sind Kollagenosen, Stoffwechselerkrankungen wie Diabetes mellitus und Kortikoidtherapie. ON finden sich gehäuft nach Nierentransplantationen. Je nach Ursache tritt eine ON gehäuft in typischer Lokalisation auf. Idiopathische Formen findet man am Os naviculare pedis – Morbus Köhler 1 (MK1, an den Metatarsaleköpfchen – Morbus Köhler 2, "Freiberg’s disease" (MK2, an den Sesambeinen und an der Apophyse des Calcaneus. Operationsbedingte Fälle sind gehäuft am Metatarsaleköpfchen 1 nach Versorgung eines Hallux valgus lokalisiert, posttraumatische Nekrosen am Talus. In diesem Artikel werden die idiopathischen Formen hinsichtlich Klinik und Therapie näher beleuchtet. Bezüglich der Therapie gibt es konservative und operative Ansätze. Die wissenschaftlichen Daten zur Behandlung von idiopathischen Nekrosen sind spärlich, die Behandlungsstrategien jedoch einheitlich und allgemein anerkannt.

  4. El pie en la danza clásica_

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    Nuria Massó Ortigosa.

    2010-05-01

    Full Text Available La danza es una forma de lenguaje que utiliza como instrumento al propio cuerpo, y su práctica continuada genera cambios y adaptaciones debidas a las altas exigencias de esta actividad. En este artículo se analizan las demandas, patologías y exigencias osteo-musculares del pie en la danza clásica. Para ello se ha partido del análisis de las estructuras del pie en distintas posiciones técnicas como la punta, media punta, o el “en dehors”. Como consecuencia de estas demandas de esfuerzo, se observa que una alta proporción de bailarines/as presenta alteraciones en el pie como hallux valgus y dedos en garra. También se ha estudiado la implicación en las técnicas básicas del pie de danza clásica de los músculos tríceps sural, peroneo lateral largo, tibial posterior, flexor largo y flexor corto del dedo gordo, tibial anterior, extensor propio del dedo gordo, abductor del dedo gordo, así como la musculatura interósea y plantar.

  5. Unilateral Hypoglossal Nerve Palsy after Use of the Laryngeal Mask Airway Supreme

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    Kenichi Takahoko

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Purpose. Hypoglossal nerve palsy after use of the laryngeal mask airway (LMA is an exceptionally rare complication. We present the first case of unilateral hypoglossal nerve palsy after use of the LMA Supreme. Clinical Features. A healthy 67-year-old female was scheduled for a hallux valgus correction under general anesthesia combined with femoral and sciatic nerve blocks. A size 4 LMA Supreme was inserted successfully at the first attempt and the cuff was inflated with air at an intracuff pressure of 60 cmH2O using cuff pressure gauge. Anesthesia was maintained with oxygen, nitrous oxide (67%, and sevoflurane under spontaneous breathing. The surgery was uneventful and the duration of anesthesia was two hours. The LMA was removed as the patient woke and there were no immediate postoperative complications. The next morning, the patient complained of dysarthria and dysphasia. These symptoms were considered to be caused by the LMA compressing the nerve against the hyoid bone. Conservative treatment was chosen and the paralysis recovered completely after 5 months. Conclusion. Hypoglossal nerve injury may occur despite correct positioning of the LMA under the appropriate intracuff pressure. A follow-up period of at least 6 months should be taken into account for the recovery.

  6. Psychophysical estimate of plantar vibration sensitivity brings additional information to the detection threshold in young and elderly subjects

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    Yves Jammes

    Full Text Available Objective: Vibration detection threshold of the foot sole was compared to the psychophysical estimate of vibration in a wide range of amplitudes in young (20–34 years old and elderly subjects (53–67 years old. Methods: The vibration detection threshold was determined on the hallux, 5th metatarsal head, and heel at frequencies of 25, 50 and 150 Hz. For vibrations of higher amplitude (reaching 360 μm, the Stevens power function (Ψ = k * Φn allowed to obtain regression equations between the vibration estimate (Ψ and its physical magnitude (Φ, the n coefficient giving the subjective intensity in vibration perception. We searched for age-related changes in the vibration perception by the foot sole. Results: In all participants, higher n values were measured at vibration frequencies of 150 Hz and, compared to the young adults the elderly had lower n values measured at this frequency. Only in the young participants, the vibration detection threshold was lowered at 150 Hz. Conclusion: The psychophysical estimate brings further information than the vibration detection threshold which is less affected by age. Significance: The clinical interest of psychophysical vibration estimate was assessed in a patient with a unilateral alteration of foot sensitivity. Keywords: Vibration sensitivity, Vibration detection threshold, Foot sole, Elderly

  7. The impact of exercise therapy on the musculoskeletal abnormalities of blind boy students of 12- 18 years old at Tehran Mohebbi blind school

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    Habib Allah Jadidi

    2009-08-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: The purpose of this study was to examine the 13 musculoskeletal abnormalities (fronthead, lateral bending head, shoulder dropping, scoliosis, kyphosis, lumbar lordosis, flat back,pelvicobliguity, genu varum, x.leg, flat foot, pes cavus, and hallux valgus after a period of exercisetherapy on the blind boy students without secondary disability.Materials and Methods: In this semi-experimental research, 60 boy students were included fromsecondary and high school (12-18 years old including 34 congenital blind and 26 semi blind. Theywere selected among 135 students at Tehran Mohebbi blind school. They were tested by measurementtools (symetrigraph, antropometer, and podioscope. After examining the results by the New York test,the students who were diagnosed with one or more musculoskeletal abnormalities took part in fourmonth’sexercises with 3 sessions at weak. The results were registered after the end of the exerciseprogram and administered secondary exam. The data before and after the exam were analyzed.Results: 80 percents of the blind students at pre-exam had musculoskeletal abnormalities which aredecreased to 45 percent after exercises. There were significant differences on the rate of recovery at 11abnormalities (Exact – Sign = 0 < 0/05 and there were not significant differences at pelvicobliguityand x.leg abnormalities (Exact – Sign = 1 < 0/05.Conclusion: the research findings emphasized on the validation and important of exercise therapyon musculoskeletal abnormalities.

  8. Fibrodisplasia ossificante progressiva: diagnóstico em atenção primária Fibrodisplasia osificante progresiva: diagnostico desde la atención primaria Fibrodysplasia ossificans progressiva: diagnosis in primary care

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jesus Garcia-Pinzas

    2013-03-01

    Full Text Available OBJETIVO: Buscou-se demonstrar ser possível diagnosticar a fibrodisplasia ossificante progressiva na atenção primária à saúde. DESCRIÇÃO DO CASO: Paciente de dez anos que, desde os quatro anos, mostrava rigidez progressiva nas articulações e na coluna vertebral, além de ossificações de partes moles, muitas vezes associadas a traumatismos. Havia desvio de hálux valgo dos primeiros artelhos de ambos os pés, presente desde o nascimento. Por meio de radiografias, demonstrou-se a presença de ossificações heterotópicas. COMENTÁRIOS: É possível realizar o diagnóstico desta doença com recursos disponíveis em atenção primária à saúde, uma vez que se baseia fundamentalmente em critérios clínicos. Atualmente, não existe cura para a doença, mas é possível limitar o desenvolvimento de novas calcificações, assim como mitigar a dor causada pelos recrudescimentos da doença, melhorando a qualidade de vida dos pacientes. Para isso, são utilizadas altas doses de corticoides e anti-inflamatórios não esteroides, disponíveis nos níveis primários de atenção.OBJETIVO: Se buscó demostrar que es posible diagnosticar la Fibrodisplasia Osificante Progresiva (FOP desde la atención primaria de Salud. DESCRIPCIÓN DEL CASO: Se describe el caso de una paciente de 10 años que desde los 4 años, desarrolla rigidez progresiva en las articulaciones y en la columna vertebral, además de osificaciones de partes blandas, muchas veces asociada con traumatismos; un rasgo importante fue la desviación en Hallux Valgus de los primeros dedos de ambos pies, presente desde su nacimiento; por medio de radiografías se demostró la presencia de osificaciones heterotópicas. COMENTARIOS: el diagnóstico de esta enfermedad es factible de realizarse con recursos disponibles en la Atención Primaria de Salud ya que se basa fundamentalmente en criterios clínicos. Actualmente no existe cura para esta enfermedad, pero es posible limitar el

  9. Hardness and posting of foot orthoses modify plantar contact area, plantar pressure, and perceived comfort when cycling.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bousie, Jaquelin A; Blanch, Peter; McPoil, Thomas G; Vicenzino, Bill

    2018-07-01

    To evaluate the effects of hardness and posting of orthoses on plantar profile and perceived comfort and support during cycling. A repeated measures study with randomised order of orthoses, hardness, and posting conditions. Twenty-three cyclists cycled at a cadence of 90rpm and a perceived exertion rating of twelve. Contoured soft and hard orthoses with or without a medial forefoot or lateral forefoot post were evaluated. Plantar contact area, mean pressure and peak pressure were measured for nine plantar regions using the pedar ® -X system and represented as a percentage of the total (CA%, MP%, and PP% respectively). Perceived comfort and support was rated on a visual analogue scale. The softer orthosis significantly increased CA% (p=0.014) across the midfoot and heel with a decrease in the toe region and forefoot. MP% (p=0.034) and PP% (p=0.012) were significantly increased at the mid and lateral forefoot with reductions in MP% at the midfoot and in PP% at the hallux and toes. Forefoot posting significantly increased CA% (p=0.018) at the toes and forefoot and decreased it at the heel. PP% was significantly altered (p=0.013) based on posting position. Lateral forefoot posting significantly decreased heel comfort (p=0.036). When cycling, a soft, contoured orthosis increased contact across the midfoot and heel, modulating forefoot and midfoot plantar pressures but not altering comfort or support. Forefoot postings significantly modified contact areas and plantar pressures and reduced comfort at the heel. Copyright © 2017. Published by Elsevier Ltd.

  10. The structure, organisation and perioperative management of ambulatory surgery and anaesthesia in France: Methodology of the SFAR-OPERA study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Albaladejo, Pierre; Aubrun, Frédéric; Samama, Charles-Marc; Jouffroy, Laurent; Beaussier, Marc; Benhamou, Dan; Romegoux, Pauline; Skaare, Kristina; Bosson, Jean-Luc; Ecoffey, Claude

    2017-10-01

    The organization of health care establishments and perioperative care are essential for ensuring the quality of care and safety of patients undergoing outpatient surgery. In order to correctly inventory these organizations and practices, in 2013-2014, the French society of anaesthesia and intensive care organized an extensive practical survey in French ambulatory surgery units entitled the "OPERA" study (Organisation periopératoire de l'anesthésie en chirurgie ambulatoire). From among all of the ambulatory surgery centres listed by the Agences régionales de santé (Regional health agencies, France), 206 public and private centres were randomly selected. A structural (typology, organization) survey and a medical-practice survey (focusing on the management of postoperative pain, nausea and vomiting as well as the prevention of venous thromboembolism) were collected and managed by a prospective audit of practices occurring on two randomly selected days. The latter was further accompanied by an additional audit specifically focussing on ten representative procedures: (1) stomatology surgery (third molar removal); (2) knee arthroscopy; (3) surgery of the abdominal wall (including inguinal hernia); (4) perianal surgery; (5) varicose vein surgery; (6) digestive laparoscopy-cholecystectomy; (7) breast surgery (tumourectomy); (8) uterine surgery; (9) hallux valgus and (10) hand surgery (excluding carpal tunnel). Over the 2 days of observation, 7382 patients were included comprising 2174 patients who underwent one of the procedures from the above list. The analysis of these data will provide an overview of the organization of health establishments, the modalities thus supported and compliance with standards. Copyright © 2016 Société française d'anesthésie et de réanimation (Sfar). Published by Elsevier Masson SAS. All rights reserved.

  11. MEG-compatible pneumatic stimulator to elicit passive finger and toe movements.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Piitulainen, Harri; Bourguignon, Mathieu; Hari, Riitta; Jousmäki, Veikko

    2015-05-15

    Magnetoencephalographic (MEG) signals recorded from the primary sensorimotor (SM1) cortex are coherent with kinematics of both active and passive finger movements. The coherence mainly reflects movement-related proprioceptive afference to the cortex. Here we describe a novel MEG-compatible stimulator to generate computer-controlled passive finger and toe movements that can be used as stimuli in functional brain-imaging experiments. The movements are produced by pneumatic artificial muscle (PAM), elastic actuator that shortens with increasing air pressure. To test the applicability of the stimulator to functional brain-imaging, 4-min trains of passive repetitive 5-mm flexion-extension movements of the right and left index finger and the right hallux were produced at 3Hz while the subject's brain activity was measured with whole-scalp MEG and finger or toe kinematics with an accelerometer. In all ten subjects studied, statistically significant coherence (up to 0.78) occurred between the accelerometer and MEG signals at the movement frequency or its first harmonic. Sources of coherent activity were in the contralateral hand or foot SM1 cortices. Movement-evoked fields elicited with intermittent movements of the right index finger (once every 3.2-4.0s; mean±SD peak response latency 88±25ms) were co-located with the respective coherent sources. We further moved the right index finger at 3, 6, and 12Hz (movement ranges 5, 3, and 2mm, respectively), and analyzed the first 1, 2, and 4-min epochs of data. One minute of data was sufficient to locate the left hand area of the SM1 cortex at all movement frequencies. Sound-induced spurious coherence was reliably ruled out in a control experiment. Our novel movement stimulator thus provides a robust and reliable tool to track proprioceptive afference to the cortex and to locate the SM1 cortex. Copyright © 2015 The Authors. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  12. Plantar pressures are higher in cases with diabetic foot ulcers compared to controls despite a longer stance phase duration.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fernando, Malindu E; Crowther, Robert G; Lazzarini, Peter A; Sangla, Kunwarjit S; Wearing, Scott; Buttner, Petra; Golledge, Jonathan

    2016-09-15

    Current international guidelines advocate achieving at least a 30 % reduction in maximum plantar pressure to reduce the risk of foot ulcers in people with diabetes. However, whether plantar pressures differ in cases with foot ulcers to controls without ulcers is not clear. The aim of this study was to assess if plantar pressures were higher in patients with active plantar diabetic foot ulcers (cases) compared to patients with diabetes without a foot ulcer history (diabetes controls) and people without diabetes or a foot ulcer history (healthy controls). Twenty-one cases with diabetic foot ulcers, 69 diabetes controls and 56 healthy controls were recruited for this case-control study. Plantar pressures at ten sites on both feet and stance phase duration were measured using a pre-established protocol. Primary outcomes were mean peak plantar pressure, pressure-time integral and stance phase duration. Non-parametric analyses were used with Holm's correction to correct for multiple testing. Binary logistic regression models were used to adjust outcomes for age, sex and body mass index. Median differences with 95 % confidence intervals and Cohen's d values (standardised mean difference) were reported for all significant outcomes. The majority of ulcers were located on the plantar surface of the hallux and toes. When adjusted for age, sex and body mass index, the mean peak plantar pressure and pressure-time integral of toes and the mid-foot were significantly higher in cases compared to diabetes and healthy controls (p diabetic foot ulcers despite having a longer stance phase duration which would be expected to lower plantar pressure. Whether plantar pressure changes can predict ulcer healing should be the focus of future research. These results highlight the importance of offloading feet during active ulceration in addition to before ulceration.

  13. Comparison of plantar pressure distribution in CAD-CAM and prefabricated foot orthoses in patients with flexible flatfeet.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Khodaei, Banafsheh; Saeedi, Hassan; Jalali, Maryam; Farzadi, Maede; Norouzi, Ehsan

    2017-12-01

    The effect of foot orthoses on plantar pressure distribution has been proven by researchers but there are some controversies about advantages of custom-made foot orthoses to less expensive prefabricated foot orthoses. Nineteen flatfeet adults between 18 and 45 participated in this study. CAD-CAM foot orthoses were made for these patients according to their foot scan. Prefabricated foot orthoses were prepared according to their foot size. Plantar pressure, force and contact area were measured using pedar ® -x in-shoe system wearing shoe alone, wearing CAD-CAM foot orthoses and wearing prefabricated foot orthoses. Repeated measures ANOVA model with post-hoc, Bonferroni comparison were used to test differences. CAD-CAM and prefabricated foot orthoses both decreased pressure and force under 2nd, 3-5 metatarsal and heel regions comparing to shoe alone condition. CAD-CAM foot orthosis increased pressure under lateral toe region in comparison to shoe alone and prefabricated foot orthosis. Both foot orthoses increased pressure and contact area in medial midfoot region comparing to shoe alone condition. Increased forces were seen at hallux and lateral toes by prefabricated foot orthoses in comparison with CAD-CAM foot orthoses and control condition, respectively. According to the results, both foot orthoses could decrease the pressure under heel and metatarsal area. It seems that the special design of CAD-CAM foot orthoses could not make great differences in plantar pressure distribution in this sample. Further research is required to determine whether these results are associated with different scan systems or design software. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  14. Increasing preferred step rate during running reduces plantar pressures.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gerrard, James M; Bonanno, Daniel R

    2018-01-01

    Increasing preferred step rate during running is a commonly used strategy in the management of running-related injuries. This study investigated the effect of different step rates on plantar pressures during running. Thirty-two healthy runners ran at a comfortable speed on a treadmill at five step rates (preferred, ±5%, and ±10%). For each step rate, plantar pressure data were collected using the pedar-X in-shoe system. Compared to running with a preferred step rate, a 10% increase in step rate significantly reduced peak pressure (144.5±46.5 vs 129.3±51 kPa; P=.033) and maximum force (382.3±157.6 vs 334.0±159.8 N; P=.021) at the rearfoot, and reduced maximum force (426.4±130.4 vs 400.0±116.6 N; P=.001) at the midfoot. In contrast, a 10% decrease in step rate significantly increased peak pressure (144.5±46.5 vs 161.5±49.3 kPa; P=.011) and maximum force (382.3±157.6 vs 425.4±155.3 N; P=.032) at the rearfoot. Changing step rate by 5% provided no effect on plantar pressures, and no differences in plantar pressures were observed at the medial forefoot, lateral forefoot or hallux between the step rates. This study's findings indicate that increasing preferred step rate by 10% during running will reduce plantar pressures at the rearfoot and midfoot, while decreasing step rate by 10% will increase plantar pressures at the rearfoot. However, changing preferred step rate by 5% will provide no effect on plantar pressures, and forefoot pressures are unaffected by changes in step rate. © 2017 John Wiley & Sons A/S. Published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  15. Statin use and peripheral sensory perception: a pilot study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    West, Brenton; Williams, Cylie M; Jilbert, Elise; James, Alicia M; Haines, Terry P

    2014-06-01

    Peripheral sensory neuropathy is a neurological deficit resulting in decreased detection of sensation through the peripheral nervous system. Peripheral sensory neuropathy is commonly diagnosed with the use of a monofilament and either a tuning fork or neurothesiometer. Statins are a widely used medication and there has been some debate of association with their use and peripheral sensory neuropathy. This pilot study aimed to test the sensory perception of participants with long-term statin use and compare these results to their peers who were not taking statins. Thirty participants were recruited and equally divided into a statin and non-statin group. Healthy participants were screened by their medical and medication history, Australian Type 2 Diabetes Risk assessment, and random blood glucose level. An assessor who was blinded to the participant group conducted sensory assessments using a 10 g monofilament and neurothesiometer. There was no difference in monofilament testing results between the groups. The statin group was less sensate at the styloid process (p = 0.031) and medial malleolus (p = 0.003) than the control group. Results at the hallux were not statistically significant (p = 0.183). This result is suggestive of a potential association between long-term statin use and a decrease in peripheral sensory perception. This may be because of peripheral sensory neuropathy. Limitations such as consideration of participant height, participant numbers, and inability to analyze results against statin groups are reported. As statins are a life-saving medication, careful consideration should be applied to these results and further research be conducted to determine if these results are applicable to larger populations.

  16. A developing world experience with distal foot amputations for diabetic limb salvage

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Omer Salahuddin

    2013-10-01

    Full Text Available Objectives: To evaluate the functional outcome, morbidity, and viability of foot salvage in diabetic patients. Materials and methods: This prospective case series was conducted from March 2007 to December 2012 at the department of surgery Pakistan Ordnance Factories Hospital, Wah Cantt, Pakistan. 123 males and 26 female patients were included in the study. All the patients were treated after getting admitted in the hospital and wounds were managed with daily dressings, nursing care and debridement of necrotic tissue with adequate antibiotic coverage. Results: In total, 149 patients (mean age: 56±7.52 years with 171 amputations were included in the study. The mean duration of diabetes mellitus (DM was 9±4.43 years. Ninety-seven percent of the patients were diagnosed with type 2 DM. Wound debridement was performed under general anesthesia in 48 (33.2% patients, whereas local anesthesia was used for the rest of the patients after having good glycemic control and improvement in general health. The most common pathogen isolated from the infected wounds was Staphylococcus aureus in approximately 46% cases. Regarding the types of amputation, partial toe amputation was performed in 21 (12.2% cases, second-toe amputation in 60 (35% cases, hallux amputation in 41 (24% cases, multiple toe amputations in 29 (17% cases, bilateral feet involvement was observed in 16 (9.3% cases, and transmetatarsal amputation was performed in 4 (2.3% cases. The wounds healed well except in 19 cases where amputation had to be revised to a more proximal level. Thirty-nine patients died during the study period: 3 died of wound-related complications and 36 died of systemic complications. Conclusion: With the ever-increasing epidemic of DM, the number of patients with diabetic foot ulcers has also significantly risen. Early surgical management with good glycemic control and foot care with close monitoring can decrease amputations and thus foot salvage can be successfully

  17. Long-Term Effects of Habitual Barefoot Running and Walking: A Systematic Review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hollander, Karsten; Heidt, Christoph; VAN DER Zwaard, Babette C; Braumann, Klaus-Michael; Zech, Astrid

    2017-04-01

    Barefoot locomotion is widely believed to be beneficial for motor development and biomechanics but are implied to be responsible for foot pathologies and running-related injuries. Although most of available studies focused on acute effects of barefoot running and walking little is known regarding the effects of long-term barefoot versus shod locomotion. The purpose of this study was to systematically review the literature to evaluate current evidence of habitual barefoot (HB) versus habitual shod locomotion on foot anthropometrics, biomechanics, motor performance, and pathologies. Four electronic databases were searched using terms related to habitually barefoot locomotion. Relevant studies were identified based on title, abstract, and full text, and a forward (citation tracking) and backward (references) search was performed. Risk of bias was assessed, data pooling, and meta-analysis (random effects model) performed and finally levels of evidence determined. Fifteen studies with 8399 participants were included. Limited evidence was found for a reduced ankle dorsiflexion at footstrike (pooled effect size, -3.47; 95% confidence interval [CI], -5.18 to -1.76) and a lower pedobarographically measured hallux angle (-1.16; 95% CI, -1.64 to -0.68). HB populations had wider (0.55; 95% CI, 0.06-1.05) but no shorter (-0.22; 95% CI, -0.51 to 0.08) feet compared with habitual shod populations. No differences in relative injury rates were found, with limited evidence for a different body part distribution of musculoskeletal injuries and more foot pathologies and less foot deformities and defects in HB runners. Only limited or very limited evidence is found for long-term effects of HB locomotion regarding biomechanics or health-related outcomes. Moreover, no evidence exists for motor performance. Future research should include prospective study designs.

  18. The influence of cadence and power output on force application and in-shoe pressure distribution during cycling by competitive and recreational cyclists.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sanderson, D J; Hennig, E M; Black, A H

    2000-03-01

    The aim of this study was to determine the response of cyclists to manipulations of cadence and power output in terms of force application and plantar pressure distribution. Two groups of cyclists, 17 recreational and 12 competitive, rode at three nominal cadences (60, 80, 100 rev x min(-1)) and four power outputs (100, 200, 300, 400 W) while simultaneous force and in-shoe pressure data were collected. Two piezoelectric triaxial force transducers mounted in the right pedal measured components of the pedal force and orientation, and a discrete transducer system with 12 transducers recorded the in-shoe pressures. Force application was characterized by calculating peak resultant and peak effective pedal forces and positive and negative impulses. In-shoe pressures were analysed as peak pressures and as the percent relative load. The force data showed no significant group effect but there was a cadence and power main effect. The impulse data showed a significant three-way interaction. Increased cadence resulted in a decreased positive impulse, while increased power output resulted in an increased impulse. The competitive group produced less positive impulse but the difference became less at higher cadences. Few between-group differences were found in pressure, notable only in the pressure under the first metatarsal region. This showed a consistent pattern of in-shoe pressure distribution, where the primary loading structures were the first metatarsal and hallux. There was no indication that pressure at specific sites influenced the pedal force application. The absence of group differences indicated that pressure distribution was not the result of training, but reflected the intrinsic relationship between the foot, the shoe and the pedal.

  19. Ultrasound-guided therapeutic injections for neural pathology about the foot and ankle: a 4 year retrospective review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Walter, William R; Burke, Christopher J; Adler, Ronald S

    2017-06-01

    To describe a 4-year clinical experience with ultrasound-guided therapeutic perineural injections of peripheral nerves about the foot and ankle. Retrospective analysis of foot and ankle perineural injections performed between January 2012 and August 2016. Demographics, clinical indications, presence of structural pathology, immediate and interval pain relief, as well as complications were recorded. Fifty-nine therapeutic injections were performed among 46 patients, accounting for multiple injections in a single visit or multiple visits [mean age = 43 years (range 18-75), 31 female (67%) and 15 male (33%)]. Most commonly, perineural injections involved the hallux branch of the medial plantar nerve (n = 17, 22%). Least commonly, perineural injections involved the saphenous nerve (n = 3, 4%). Other injections in our series include sural (10), superficial (11) and deep (7) peroneal, medial (5) and lateral (3) plantar nerves, and the posterior tibial nerve (3). Ultrasound evaluation revealed structural abnormality associated with the nerve in 30 cases (51%)-most commonly thickening with perineural scarring (n = 14). Of 45 injections with complete documentation, immediate relief of symptoms was reported in 43 (96%) cases. Interval symptom relief was achieved in 23 injections [short term (n = 12), intermediate (n = 6), and long term (n = 5)] out of 38 for which follow-up was available (61%). Complications are rare, occurring in only one case. Ultrasound-guided perineural injections about the foot and ankle are safe and provide lasting symptomatic relief for many indications. Concomitant sonographic evaluation identifies structural abnormalities that may contribute to neuropathic symptoms, allowing targeting of injection or clinical therapy.

  20. Validation of hand and foot anatomical feature measurements from smartphone images

    Science.gov (United States)

    Amini, Mohammad; Vasefi, Fartash; MacKinnon, Nicholas

    2018-02-01

    A smartphone mobile medical application, previously presented as a tool for individuals with hand arthritis to assess and monitor the progress of their disease, has been modified and expanded to include extraction of anatomical features from the hand (joint/finger width, and angulation) and foot (length, width, big toe angle, and arch height index) from smartphone camera images. Image processing algorithms and automated measurements were validated by performing tests on digital hand models, rigid plastic hand models, and real human hands and feet to determine accuracy and reproducibility compared to conventional measurement tools such as calipers, rulers, and goniometers. The mobile application was able to provide finger joint width measurements with accuracy better than 0.34 (+/-0.25) millimeters. Joint angulation measurement accuracy was better than 0.50 (+/-0.45) degrees. The automatically calculated foot length accuracy was 1.20 (+/-1.27) millimeters and the foot width accuracy was 1.93 (+/-1.92) millimeters. Hallux valgus angle (used in assessing bunions) accuracy was 1.30 (+/-1.29) degrees. Arch height index (AHI) measurements had an accuracy of 0.02 (+/-0.01). Combined with in-app documentation of symptoms, treatment, and lifestyle factors, the anatomical feature measurements can be used by both healthcare professionals and manufacturers. Applications include: diagnosing hand osteoarthritis; providing custom finger splint measurements; providing compression glove measurements for burn and lymphedema patients; determining foot dimensions for custom shoe sizing, insoles, orthotics, or foot splints; and assessing arch height index and bunion treatment effectiveness.

  1. Preoperative Planning and Intraoperative Technique for Accurate Translation of a Distal First Metatarsal Osteotomy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wynes, Jacob; Lamm, Bradley M; Andrade, Bijan J; Malay, D Scot

    2016-01-01

    We used preoperative radiographic and intraoperative anatomic measurements to predict and achieve, respectively, the precise amount of capital fragment lateral translation required to restore anatomic balance to the first metatarsophalangeal joint. Correlation was used to relate the amount of capital fragment translation and operative reduction of the first intermetatarsal angle (IMA), hallux abductus angle (HAA), tibial sesamoid position (TSP), metatarsus adductus angle, and first metatarsal length. The mean capital fragment lateral translation was 5.54 ± 1.64 mm, and the mean radiographic reductions included a first IMA of 5.04° ± 2.85°, an HAA of 9.39° ± 8.38°, and a TSP of 1.38 ± 0.9. These changes were statistically (p < .001) and clinically (≥32.55%) significant. The mean reduction of the metatarsus adductus angle was 0.66° ± 4.44° and that for the first metatarsal length was 0.33 ± 7.27 mm, and neither of these were statistically (p = .5876 and 0.1247, respectively) or clinically (≤3.5%) significant. Pairwise correlations between the amount of lateral translation of the capital fragment and the first IMA, HAA, and TSP values were moderately positive and statistically significant (r = 0.4412, p = .0166; r = 0.5391, p = .0025; and r = 0.3729, p = .0463; respectively). In contrast, the correlation with metatarsus adductus and the first metatarsal shortening were weak and not statistically significant (r = 0.2296, p = .2308 and r = -0.2394, p = .2109, respectively). The results of our study indicate that predicted preoperative and executed intraoperative lateral translation of the capital fragment correlates with statistically and clinically significant reductions in the first IMA, HAA, and TSP. Copyright © 2016 American College of Foot and Ankle Surgeons. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  2. A designated centre for people with disabilities operated by St Joseph's Foundation, Cork

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Pinhasi, Ron

    2010-01-01

    In 2008, a well preserved and complete shoe was recovered at the base of a Chalcolithic pit in the cave of Areni-1, Armenia. Here, we discuss the chronology of this find, its archaeological context and its relevance to the study of the evolution of footwear. Two leather samples and one grass sample from the shoe were dated at the Oxford Radiocarbon Accelerator Unit (ORAU). A third leather sample was dated at the University of California-Irvine Accelerator Mass Spectrometry Facility (UCIAMS). The R_Combine function for the three leather samples provides a date range of 3627-3377 Cal BC (95.4% confidence interval) and the calibrated range for the straw is contemporaneous (3627-3377 Cal BC). The shoe was stuffed with loose, unfastened grass (Poaceae) without clear orientation which was more than likely used to maintain the shape of the shoe and\\/or prepare it for storage. The shoe is 24.5 cm long (European size 37), 7.6 to 10 cm wide, and was made from a single piece of leather that wrapped around the foot. It was worn and shaped to the wearer\\'s right foot, particularly around the heel and hallux where the highest pressure is exerted in normal gait. The Chalcolithic shoe provides solid evidence for the use of footwear among Old World populations at least since the Chalcolithic. Other 4th millennium discoveries of shoes (Italian and Swiss Alps), and sandals (Southern Israel) indicate that more than one type of footwear existed during the 4th millennium BC, and that we should expect to discover more regional variations in the manufacturing and style of shoes where preservation conditions permit.

  3. Anchor enhanced capsulorraphy in bunionectomies using an L-shaped capsulotomy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gould, John S; Ali, Sheriff; Fowler, Rachel; Fleisig, Glenn S

    2003-01-01

    The objective of this study was to investigate potential benefit of a suture anchor-enhanced capsulorraphy in the early maintenance of correction in bunionectomies. We compared, retrospectively, in successive series, the loss of correction of the Hallux Valgus (HV) and intermetatarsal (IM) angle, in those repaired with an L-shaped capsulorraphy enhanced with anchors to those without. Intraoperative and second week postoperative simulated weightbearing anterior posterior (AP) X-rays were used to evaluate results. By using only intraoperative and early postoperative X-rays, we should have effectively eliminated extraneous factors that might have influenced our results. A Total of 106 cases were investigated, 65 of which were repaired using anchors, the remaining 41 without. In the anchor group, 38 underwent a proximal metatarsal concentric shelf osteotomy (CSO)/modified McBride procedure, while the remaining 27 had a distal Chevron correction. In the without-anchor group, 21 had a CSO/modified McBride procedure while 20 underwent the Chevron procedure. In the without-anchor group, the average HV and IM loss of correction was 4.60 degrees (range, -2 to 21 degrees) and 0.6 degrees (range, -1 to 9 degrees) respectively. In the anchor group, the corresponding loss was 2.8 degrees (range, -3 to 17 degrees) and 0.6 degrees (range, -2 to 14 degrees) respectively. These results, when statistically analyzed, demonstrated that while the IM angle change was not statistically significant, the HV angle change was statistically significant, implying that the anchor plays a significant role in maintaining the surgical correction in both the distal Chevron and CSO/ modified McBride bunionectomies.

  4. Tail function during arboreal quadrupedalism in squirrel monkeys (Saimiri boliviensis) and tamarins (Saguinus oedipus).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Young, Jesse W; Russo, Gabrielle A; Fellmann, Connie D; Thatikunta, Meena A; Chadwell, Brad A

    2015-10-01

    The need to maintain stability on narrow branches is often presented as a major selective force shaping primate morphology, with adaptations to facilitate grasping receiving particular attention. The functional importance of a long and mobile tail for maintaining arboreal stability has been comparatively understudied. Tails can facilitate arboreal balance by acting as either static counterbalances or dynamic inertial appendages able to modulate whole-body angular momentum. We investigate associations between tail use and inferred grasping ability in two closely related cebid platyrrhines-cotton-top tamarins (Saguinus oedipus) and black-capped squirrel monkeys (Saimiri boliviensis). Using high-speed videography of captive monkeys moving on 3.2 cm diameter poles, we specifically test the hypothesis that squirrel monkeys (characterized by grasping extremities with long digits) will be less dependent on the tail for balance than tamarins (characterized by claw-like nails, short digits, and a reduced hallux). Tamarins have relatively longer tails than squirrel monkeys, move their tails through greater angular amplitudes, at higher angular velocities, and with greater angular accelerations, suggesting dynamic use of tail to regulate whole-body angular momentum. By contrast, squirrel monkeys generally hold their tails in a comparatively stationary posture and at more depressed angles, suggesting a static counterbalancing mechanism. This study, the first empirical test of functional tradeoffs between grasping ability and tail use in arboreal primates, suggests a critical role for the tail in maintaining stability during arboreal quadrupedalism. Our findings have the potential to inform our functional understanding of tail loss during primate evolution. © 2015 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  5. A new podiatry service for patients with arthritis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rome, Keith; Erikson, Kathryn; Ng, Anthony; Gow, Peter J; Sahid, Hazra; Williams, Anita E

    2013-03-01

    The aims of this study were to identify the impact of a new podiatric rheumatology service on reducing foot pain, impairment and disability in patients with foot problems associated with rheumatic disease, and to report on patient satisfaction with the service. A retrospective study of 245 patients with rheumatic disease at Counties Manukau DHB was conducted. Foot pain, impairment and disability were measured using a self-reporting patient outcome measure, the Foot Function Index. A range of podiatric interventions were reported. A self-administered, postal patient satisfaction questionnaire was sent to 148 patients. Over two-thirds of patients were observed with hallux valgus (bunions). The results demonstrate a significant reduction in foot pain (p<0.001) from initial visit to second visit (18% reduction in pain). A significant decrease in foot disability (p=0.04) was found from initial visit to second visit. No significant differences were seen with foot impairment (p=0.78). A variety of intervention measures were used with 24% of patients being prescribed foot orthoses and 28% of patients given footwear advice. The patient satisfaction survey found 84% of patients reported they were satisfied with the new service and 80% of patients reported that the service helped with their foot problems. The current service meets the needs of patients who suffer from rheumatological foot conditions such as rheumatoid arthritis and gout. The need for good foot education, provision of foot orthoses and advice on footwear are crucial to reduce the burden on patients with rheumatological foot conditions.

  6. Evaluation of Nitinol staples for the Lapidus arthrodesis in a reproducible biomechanical model

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nicholas Alexander Russell

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available While the Lapidus procedure is a widely accepted technique for treatment of hallux valgus, the optimal fixation method to maintain joint stability remains controversial. The purpose of this study was to evaluate the biomechanical properties of new Shape Memory Alloy staples arranged in different configurations in a repeatable 1st Tarsometatarsal arthrodesis model. Ten sawbones models of the whole foot (n=5 per group were reconstructed using a single dorsal staple or two staples in a delta configuration. Each construct was mechanically tested in dorsal four-point bending, medial four-point bending, dorsal three-point bending and plantar cantilever bending with the staples activated at 37°C. The peak load, stiffness and plantar gapping were determined for each test. Pressure sensors were used to measure the contact force and area of the joint footprint in each group. There was a significant (p < 0.05 increase in peak load in the two staple constructs compared to the single staple constructs for all testing modalities. Stiffness also increased significantly in all tests except dorsal four-point bending. Pressure sensor readings showed a significantly higher contact force at time zero and contact area following loading in the two staple constructs (p < 0.05. Both groups completely recovered any plantar gapping following unloading and restored their initial contact footprint. The biomechanical integrity and repeatability of the models was demonstrated with no construct failures due to hardware or model breakdown. Shape memory alloy staples provide fixation with the ability to dynamically apply and maintain compression across a simulated arthrodesis following a range of loading conditions.

  7. Swift and sure-footed on the Savanna: A study of Hadzabe gaits and feet in Northern Tanzania.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Musiba, Charles M; Tuttle, Russell H; Hallgrímsson, Benedikt; Webb, David M

    1997-01-01

    Data on footprints and gait of 54 Hadzabe, 6-70 years of age expand understanding of pedal morphology of unshod people and assist the development of ideas about the evolution of hominid bipedality and upright posture. Contrary to published data on gaits and pedal morphology of unshod populations, Hadzabe (also known as Hadza) from northern Tanzania exhibit values of stride length, relative stride length, and walking speeds that exceed those of rural and small-town populations. In all observable plantar features, including foot indices, an interdigital space between the hallux and second toe, fanning of the foot anteriorly, and foot angles (in-toeing and out-toeing), Hadzabe feet are comparable with those of never-shod Machiguengas in Perú. On average, Hadzabe hallucal gaps and ball widths are narrower than those of Machiguengas and other unshod short people. Hadzabe feet are also characterized by valgus halluces versus the varus halluces of never-shod Machiguengas and certain West Africans. Although characterized by a valgus toe, Hadzabe hallucal angles, which do not exceed 20°, are lower than those of Northern Hemispheric urbanites and shod rural populations of the Southern and Northern Hemispheres. Hadzabe also exhibit less medial and lateral rotation of the hip joint than Machiguengas do. The heel and the longitudinal arch impressions of the Hadzabe footprints closely resemble those of the Laetoli bipeds in the manner of weight distribution during locomotion. The striking similarity of footprint impressions, especially the heel and the longitudinal arch, between Hadzabe and Laetoli hominid footprints clearly imply that the pedal features of the Laetoli printmakers are remarkably humanoid. Am. J. Hum. Biol. 9:303-321, 1997. © 1997 Wiley-Liss, Inc. Copyright © 1997 Wiley-Liss, Inc.

  8. Foot and ankle problems in Muay Thai kickboxers.

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    Vaseenon, Tanawat; Intharasompan, Piyapong; Wattanarojanapom, Thongaek; Theeraamphon, Nipon; Auephanviriyakul, Sansanee; Phisitkul, Phinit

    2015-01-01

    Muay Thai kickboxing is a common sport that uses the foot and ankle in fighting. Muay Thai kickboxing trainees usually receive training in Thailand Foot and ankle problems in this group ofpeople who usually train barefoot remain unexplored To evaluate the prevalence of common foot and ankle problems in Muay Thai kick boxers. The present study is a cross-sectional survey of Muay Thai kick boxers practicing in northern Thailand. Interviews were conducted and foot and ankle examinations were evaluated Foot morphology was examined using a Harris mat footprint. One hundred and twenty-three Muay Thai kickbox ersinnine training gyms were included in this study. Common foot and ankle problems found in the Muay Thai kick boxers were callosity (59%), gastrocnemius contracture (57%), toe deformities (49.3%), wounds (10%) and heel pain (9%). Callosity was most commonly found on the forefoot (77.5%), on the plantar first metatarsal (55.3%) and on the big toe (33.3%). An association was found between a tight heel cord and a history of foot injury with prolonged periods of weekly training. Toe deformities such as hallux rigidus (37.6%) were also associated with prolonged periods of training (p = 0.001). No correlation was found between type of foot arch and foot and ankle problems. Plantar forefoot callosities and wounds as well as toe deformities including tight heel cords are some of the foot and ankle problems commonly found in Muay Thai kick boxers. They are associated with prolonged periods of barefoot training. The unique pattern of training and of the kicks in Muay Thai might be a path mechanism, leading to the development of foot and ankle problems.

  9. Evaluation of Nitinol Staples for the Lapidus Arthrodesis in a Reproducible Biomechanical Model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Russell, Nicholas A; Regazzola, Gianmarco; Aiyer, Amiethab; Nomura, Tomohiro; Pelletier, Matthew H; Myerson, Mark; Walsh, William R

    2015-01-01

    While the Lapidus procedure is a widely accepted technique for treatment of hallux valgus, the optimal fixation method to maintain joint stability remains controversial. The purpose of this study is to evaluate the biomechanical properties of new shape memory alloy (SMA) staples arranged in different configurations in a repeatable first tarsometatarsal arthrodesis model. Ten sawbones models of the whole foot (n = 5 per group) were reconstructed using a single dorsal staple or two staples in a delta configuration. Each construct was mechanically tested non-destructively in dorsal four-point bending, medial four-point bending, dorsal three-point bending, and plantar cantilever bending with the staples activated at 37°C. The peak load (newton), stiffness (newton per millimeter), and plantar gapping (millimeter) were determined for each test. Pressure sensors were used to measure the contact force and area of the joint footprint in each group. There was a statistically significant increase in peak load in the two staple constructs compared to the single staple constructs for all testing modalities with P values range from 0.016 to 0.000. Stiffness also increased significantly in all tests except dorsal four-point bending. Pressure sensor readings showed a significantly higher contact force at time zero (P = 0.037) and contact area following loading in the two staple constructs (P = 0.045). Both groups completely recovered any plantar gapping following unloading and restored their initial contact footprint. The biomechanical integrity and repeatability of the models was demonstrated with no construct failures due to hardware or model breakdown. SMA staples provide fixation with the ability to dynamically apply and maintain compression across a simulated arthrodesis following a range of loading conditions.

  10. Onychomycosis by Paecilomyces lilacinus in a patient with leukonychia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Patrizia Innocenti

    2010-03-01

    Full Text Available Paecilomyces lilacinus, a filamentous fungus living saprophytic in the environment, very rarely causes infection in immunocompetent humans, mostly ocular or cutaneous and sub-cutaneous infections.The fungal isolates usually show low susceptibility to conventional antifungal drugs in vitro and variable susceptibility to novel triazoles. During a period of 2 years, 4 cultures of nail fragments were grown from a 41 years old female on modified Sabouraud/Dextrose agar (S.D.A. (CAF bioMérieux, CAF+CEX Biolife. Cultures were continued in suspension and the hyphae stained with lactophenole blue analysed microscopically. 2 samples were tested with molecular methods, i.e. DNA extraction, amplification of internal transcribed spacer (ITS region 1 and 2 and automated sequencing. The sequence results were evaluated using a validated reference database for humanpathogenic fungi. Additionally the BLAST algorithm on NIH database GenBank was used. A growth of a filamentous hyaline fungus with white colonies and lila shade was observed in all samples. The presence of Penicillium like conidiophores with divergent long terminal phialides was seen with little elliptical conidia. DNA sequencing determined the species as Paecilomyces lilacinus with 99% homology with GenBank isolate AY213667. The infection of the right hallux did not improve by systemic (Lamisil/terbinafine and local treatment (Locetar/amorolfin nail lacquer.Also change to Sporanox/itraconazol only led to deterioriation, so finally the extraction of the nail had to be performed given the known difficulties with treatment described in the literature. This case highlights the usefulness of molecular techniques, especially use of the highly discriminative ITS region for fungal typing.

  11. Type 1 diabetes in a patient with Ellis-van Creveld syndrome

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    Carla Graziadio

    Full Text Available CONTEXT: Ellis-van Creveld (EVC syndrome is a rare autosomal recessive disease characterized by disproportionate short stature, narrow thorax, postaxial polydactyly, nail and tooth abnormalities and congenital heart disease. CASE REPORT: The patient was a 22-year-old Caucasian man, the third child of consanguineous parents. He received the diagnosis of insulin-dependent diabetes mellitus (DM at 16 years of age, and around one year later, he underwent surgery to correct a partial atrioventricular septal defect. Upon physical examination, at 22 years of age, he presented stature of 145.5 cm (P3, weight of 49 kg (P3, head circumference of 54 cm (P2-50, high palate, absence of one of the lower lateral incisor teeth, narrow shoulders, narrowing of the upper thorax, scoliosis, rhizomelic shortening of the upper limbs, brachydactyly, postaxial polydactyly and clinodactyly of the second and third fingers. The lower limbs showed rhizomelic shortening with significant genu valgum (knock-knee deformity, small feet with postaxial polydactyly, syndactyly between the second and third toes and hallux valgus. Multiple melanocytic nevi were evident on the face, thorax and limbs. At that time, he was using neutral protamine Hagedorn (NPH insulin, with poorly controlled DM. The clinical findings presented led to the diagnosis of EVC syndrome. Only one case of this syndrome has been described with DM so far. Attention is drawn to the fact that the genes associated with this syndrome are located close to those of the Wolfram syndrome, a condition that leads to early-onset diabetes.

  12. The impact of obesity on foot morphology in women aged 48 years or older

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    Kristína Tománková

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available Background: Obesity is major risk factor for many diseases within society and represents extensive loads for the feet which lead to various foot disorders and deformities. Objective: The aim of this study was to evaluate the impact of obesity as represented by percent body fat (PBF on foot morphology. Methods: The study sample included 139 Czech women aged 48-69 years. The women were divided into two groups by PBF: non-obese women (NOW (n = 66; PBF < 35% and obese women (OW (n = 73; PBF > 35%. Measurements included % PBF and width, length and angle dimensions of foot. The Chippaux-Smirak index (CSI was calculated for each foot. Results: We found significant differences between OW and NOW in these parameters: direct forefoot width (sin. p = .02, rpb = .20, direct heel width (sin. p = .01, rpb = .22; dex. p < .01, rpb = .22, hallux angle (sin. p = .01, rpb = .25 and CSI (sin. p < .01, rpb = .26; dex. p < .01, rpb = .27. The results showed that the mean values of the heel width and CSI were significantly higher in OW on both feet, the mean values of forefoot width only on the left foot. Conclusions: Results proved that obesity impacts all parts of the foot (heel, longitudinal foot arch, forefoot. Despite significant differences of the CSI between NOW and OW, the number of subjects with flat feet was in both groups negligible.

  13. Comparison of Multisegmental Foot and Ankle Motion Between Total Ankle Replacement and Ankle Arthrodesis in Adults.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Seo, Sang Gyo; Kim, Eo Jin; Lee, Doo Jae; Bae, Kee Jeong; Lee, Kyoung Min; Lee, Dong Yeon

    2017-09-01

    Total ankle replacement (TAR) and ankle arthrodesis (AA) are usually performed for severe ankle arthritis. We compared postoperative foot segmental motion during gait in patients treated with TAR and AA. Gait analysis was performed in 17 and 7 patients undergoing TAR and AA, respectively. Subjects were evaluated using a 3-dimensional multisegmental foot model with 15 markers. Temporal gait parameters were calculated. The maximum and minimum values and the differences in hallux, forefoot, hindfoot, and arch in 3 planes (sagittal, coronal, transverse) were compared between the 2 groups. One hundred healthy adults were evaluated as a control. Gait speed was faster in the TAR ( P = .028). On analysis of foot and ankle segmental motion, the range of hindfoot sagittal motion was significantly greater in the TAR (15.1 vs 10.2 degrees in AA; P = .004). The main component of motion increase was hindfoot dorsiflexion (12.3 and 8.6 degrees). The range of forefoot sagittal motion was greater in the TAR (9.3 vs 5.8 degrees in AA; P = .004). Maximum ankle power in the TAR (1.16) was significantly higher than 0.32 in AA; P = .008). However, the range of hindfoot and forefoot sagittal motion was decreased in both TAR and AA compared with the control group ( P = .000). Although biomechanical results of TAR and AA were not similar to those in the normal controls, joint motions in the TAR more closely matched normal values. Treatment decision making should involve considerations of the effect of surgery on the adjacent joints. Level III, case-control study.

  14. Determining the maximum diameter for holes in the shoe without compromising shoe integrity when using a multi-segment foot model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shultz, Rebecca; Jenkyn, Thomas

    2012-01-01

    Measuring individual foot joint motions requires a multi-segment foot model, even when the subject is wearing a shoe. Each foot segment must be tracked with at least three skin-mounted markers, but for these markers to be visible to an optical motion capture system holes or 'windows' must be cut into the structure of the shoe. The holes must be sufficiently large avoiding interfering with the markers, but small enough that they do not compromise the shoe's structural integrity. The objective of this study was to determine the maximum size of hole that could be cut into a running shoe upper without significantly compromising its structural integrity or changing the kinematics of the foot within the shoe. Three shoe designs were tested: (1) neutral cushioning, (2) motion control and (3) stability shoes. Holes were cut progressively larger, with four sizes tested in all. Foot joint motions were measured: (1) hindfoot with respect to midfoot in the frontal plane, (2) forefoot twist with respect to midfoot in the frontal plane, (3) the height-to-length ratio of the medial longitudinal arch and (4) the hallux angle with respect to first metatarsal in the sagittal plane. A single subject performed level walking at her preferred pace in each of the three shoes with ten repetitions for each hole size. The largest hole that did not disrupt shoe integrity was an oval of 1.7cm×2.5cm. The smallest shoe deformations were seen with the motion control shoe. The least change in foot joint motion was forefoot twist in both the neutral shoe and stability shoe for any size hole. This study demonstrates that for a hole smaller than this size, optical motion capture with a cluster-based multi-segment foot model is feasible for measure foot in shoe kinematics in vivo. Copyright © 2011. Published by Elsevier Ltd.

  15. Does excessive flatfoot deformity affect function? A comparison between symptomatic and asymptomatic flatfeet using the Oxford Foot Model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hösl, Matthias; Böhm, Harald; Multerer, Christel; Döderlein, Leonhard

    2014-01-01

    Treatment of asymptomatic flexible flatfeet is a subject of great controversy. The purpose of this study was to examine foot function during walking in symptomatic (SFF) and asymptomatic (ASFF) flexible flatfeet. Thirty-five paediatric and juvenile patients with idiopathic flexible flatfeet were recruited from an orthopaedic outpatient department (14 SFF and 21 ASFF). Eleven age-matched participants with typically developing feet served as controls (TDF). To study foot function, 3D multi-segment foot kinematics and ankle joint kinetics were captured during barefoot gait analysis. Overall, alterations in foot kinematics in flatfeet were pronounced but differences between SFF and ASFF were not observed. Largest discriminatory effects between flatfeet and TDF were noticed in reduced hindfoot dorsiflexion as well as in increased forefoot supination and abduction. Upon clinical examination, restrictions in passive dorsiflexion in ASFF and SFF were significant. During gait, the hindfoot in flatfeet (both ASFF and SFF) was more everted, but less flexible. In sagittal plane, limited hindfoot dorsiflexion of ASFF and SFF was compensated for by increased forefoot mobility and a hypermobile hallux. Concerning ankle kinetics, SFF lacked positive joint energy for propulsion while ASFF needed to absorb more negative ankle joint energy during loading response. This may risk fatigue and overuse syndrome of anterior shank muscles in ASFF. Hence, despite a lack of symptoms flatfoot deformity in ASFF affected function. Yet, contrary to what was expected, SFF did not show greater deviations in 3D foot kinematics than ASFF. Symptoms may rather depend on tissue wear and subjective pain thresholds. Copyright © 2013. Published by Elsevier B.V.

  16. Estimation of foot joint kinetics in three and four segment foot models using an existing proportionality scheme: Application in paediatric barefoot walking.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Deschamps, Kevin; Eerdekens, Maarten; Desmet, Dirk; Matricali, Giovanni Arnoldo; Wuite, Sander; Staes, Filip

    2017-08-16

    Recent studies which estimated foot segment kinetic patterns were found to have inconclusive data on one hand, and did not dissociate the kinetics of the chopart and lisfranc joint. The current study aimed therefore at reproducing independent, recently published three-segment foot kinetic data (Study 1) and in a second stage expand the estimation towards a four-segment model (Study 2). Concerning the reproducibility study, two recently published three segment foot models (Bruening et al., 2014; Saraswat et al., 2014) were reproduced and kinetic parameters were incorporated in order to calculate joint moments and powers of paediatric cohorts during gait. Ground reaction forces were measured with an integrated force/pressure plate measurement set-up and a recently published proportionality scheme was applied to determine subarea total ground reaction forces. Regarding Study 2, moments and powers were estimated with respect to the Instituto Ortopedico Rizzoli four-segment model. The proportionality scheme was expanded in this study and the impact of joint centre location on kinetic data was evaluated. Findings related to Study 1 showed in general good agreement with the kinetic data published by Bruening et al. (2014). Contrarily, the peak ankle, midfoot and hallux powers published by Saraswat et al. (2014) are disputed. Findings of Study 2 revealed that the chopart joint encompasses both power absorption and generation, whereas the Lisfranc joint mainly contributes to power generation. The results highlights the necessity for further studies in the field of foot kinetic models and provides a first estimation of the kinetic behaviour of the Lisfranc joint. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  17. Progress on Botulinum Toxin Type A-Induced Pain Relief in the Field of Plastics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lu, Xiaona; Chen, Guocheng; Ren, Pengjie; Yang, Yan; Fan, Fei

    2017-11-01

    To retrospectively evaluate the effectiveness of Botulinum Toxin Type A (BTX-A) injections relieve pain in the field of plastic surgery and postoperative rehabilitation, and discuss the analgesic mechanism of BTX- A in plastics and related research progress. From appearance to September 1, 2016, PUBMED, EMBASE, and Web of Science were searched, using the key words related to "Botulinum Toxin Type A" and "Pain." Furtherly, nonplastic surgery-related literature was excluded by manual screening. Eleven literatures met the inclusion criteria, including 6 prospective controlled cohorts, 4 patient series, and 1 retrospective cohort. These studies involved Lower Limb, Breast, Hallux, Amputees, and Temporomandibular joint disk disfigurement and enrolled 402 patients. Among the patients, 360 received intraoperative BTX-A injection at the time of the main surgical procedure, 16 injected postoperatively and 26 did not undergo surgery. And 85.32% reported pain alleviation and 69.96% got favorable side effects and no one occurred major adverse effects. But 1.83% accepted injections more than once. Mechanism analysis explained these studies' results and demonstrated the analgesic effectiveness of BTX-A in plastics with nociceptive pain, inflammatory pain, and neuropathic pain. The results suggest that BTX-A may induce postoperative pain associated with plastic surgeries relief. But the available data of outcome assessment involved in this review are inconsistent and failed to meet methodological rigor. And pain alleviations are influenced by many factors. So further randomized controlled clinical trials with large sample sizes are needed to support this practice, determine standard usage methods, and establish corresponding specification systems.

  18. Factors Associated With Callus in Patients with Diabetes, Focused on Plantar Shear Stress During Gait.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hamatani, Masako; Mori, Taketoshi; Oe, Makoto; Noguchi, Hiroshi; Takehara, Kimie; Amemiya, Ayumi; Ohashi, Yumiko; Ueki, Kohjiro; Kadowaki, Takashi; Sanada, Hiromi

    2016-11-01

    The aim of this study is to identify whether plantar shear stress in neuropathic patients with diabetes with callus is increased compared with those without callus. The differences in foot deformity, limited joint mobility, repetitive stress of walking, and ill-fitting shoes between patients with callus and those without callus were also determined. Subjects were recruited from the Diabetic Foot Outpatient Clinic. A newly developed in-shoe measurement system, which has flexible and thin insoles, enabled measurement of both plantar pressure and shear stress simultaneously when subjects walked as usual on a 10 m walkway. It was found that plantar shear stress adjusted for weight during the push-off phase was increased by 1.32 times in patients with callus compared with those without callus (mean ± SD: 0.0500 ± 0.0160 vs 0.0380 ± 0.0144, P = .031). Moreover, hallux valgus deformity, reduction in dorsiflexion of the ankle joint and increase in plantar flexion were showed in feet with callus. Increased plantar shear stress may be caused by gait change that patients having callus push off with the metatarsal head instead of the toe as a result of foot deformity and limited joint mobility. It was found that plantar shear stress adjusted for weight during the push-off phase was increased in patients with callus compared with those without callus by using the newly developed measurement system. These results suggest that reduction of plantar shear stress during the push-off phase can prevent callus formation in neuropathic patients with diabetes. © 2016 Diabetes Technology Society.

  19. Effects of ballet training of children in Turkey on foot anthropometric measurements and medial longitudinal arc development.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ozdinc, Sevgi Anar; Turan, Fatma Nesrin

    2016-07-01

    To investigate the effects of ballet training on foot structure and the formation of the medial longitudinal arc in childhood, and the association of body mass index with structural change secondary to ballet training. This study was conducted at Öykü Ballet and Dance School and Trakya University, Edirne, Turkey, from September 2007 to November 2008, and comprised girl students who were taking ballet classes, and a group of those who were not taking such who acted as the controls. Static footprints of both feet of all participants were taken with an ink paedogram. Parameters evaluated from footprints included foot length, metatarsal width, heel width and medial longitudinal arch. The relationship between the parameters, the ballet starting age, training duration and body mass index was investigated. Of the 67 participants, there were 36(53.7%) in the experimental group and 31(48.3%) in the control group. The difference between age, height, weight and body mass index between the two groups was insignificant (p>0.05). The average ballet starting age was 6.47±1.55 years and duration was 4.36±2.002 years. Positive correlations were found between body mass index and foot length, metatarsal width, heel width, medial longitudinal arch contact width and halluxvalgus angle; between ballet starting age and metatarsal width, heel width; between duration of training and foot length, metatarsal width and hallux valgus angle (p?0.05 each). Evidence supporting the education in children on foot anthropometric measurements and medial longitudinal arc development could not be found.

  20. Biomechanical Effects of Prefabricated Foot Orthoses and Rocker‐Sole Footwear in Individuals With First Metatarsophalangeal Joint Osteoarthritis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Auhl, Maria; Tan, Jade M.; Levinger, Pazit; Roddy, Edward; Munteanu, Shannon E.

    2016-01-01

    Objective To evaluate the effects of prefabricated foot orthoses and rocker‐sole footwear on spatiotemporal parameters, hip and knee kinematics, and plantar pressures in people with first metatarsophalangeal (MTP) joint osteoarthritis (OA). Methods. A total of 102 people with first MTP joint OA were randomly allocated to receive prefabricated foot orthoses or rocker‐sole footwear. The immediate biomechanical effects of the interventions (compared to usual footwear) were examined using a wearable sensor motion analysis system and an in‐shoe plantar pressure measurement system. Results Spatiotemporal/kinematic and plantar pressure data were available from 88 and 87 participants, respectively. The orthoses had minimal effect on spatiotemporal or kinematic parameters, while the rocker‐sole footwear resulted in reduced cadence, percentage of the gait cycle spent in stance phase, and sagittal plane hip range of motion. The orthoses increased peak pressure under the midfoot and lesser toes. Both interventions significantly reduced peak pressure under the first MTP joint, and the rocker‐sole shoes also reduced peak pressure under the second through fifth MTP joints and heel. When the effects of the orthoses and rocker‐sole shoes were directly compared, there was no difference in peak pressure under the hallux, first MTP joint, or heel; however, the rocker‐sole shoes exhibited lower peak pressure under the lesser toes, second through fifth MTP joints, and midfoot. Conclusion Prefabricated foot orthoses and rocker‐sole footwear are effective at reducing peak pressure under the first MTP joint in people with first MTP joint OA, but achieve this through different mechanisms. Further research is required to determine whether these biomechanical changes result in improvements in symptoms. PMID:26640157

  1. Effect of turf toe on foot contact pressures in professional American football players.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brophy, Robert H; Gamradt, Seth C; Ellis, Scott J; Barnes, Ronnie P; Rodeo, Scott A; Warren, Russell F; Hillstrom, Howard

    2009-05-01

    The relationship between turf toe and plantar foot pressures has not been extensively studied. Two hypotheses were tested in a cohort of professional American football players: first, that a history of turf toe is associated with increased peak hallucal and first metatarsophalangeal (MTP) plantar pressures; second, that decreased range of motion (ROM) of the first MTP correlates with increased peak hallucal and first MTP plantar pressures. Forty-four athletes from one National Football League (NFL) team were screened for a history of turf toe during preseason training. Dorsal passive MTP ROM and dynamic plantar pressures were measured in both feet of each player. Anatomical masking was used to assess peak pressure at the first MTP and hallux. First MTP dorsiflexion was significantly lower in halluces with a history of turf toe (40.6 +/- 15.1 degrees versus 48.4 +/- 12.8 degrees, p = 0.04). Peak hallucal pressures were higher in athletes with turf toe (535 +/- 288 kPa versus 414 +/- 202 kPa, p = 0.05) even after normalizing for athlete body mass index (p = 0.0003). Peak MTP pressure was not significantly different between the two groups tested. First MTP dorsiflexion did not correlate with peak hallucal or first MTP pressures. This study showed that turf toe is associated with decreased MTP motion. In addition, increased peak hallucal pressures were found. Further study is warranted to determine whether these pressures correlate with the severity of symptoms or progression of turf toe to first MTP arthritis.

  2. First direct evidence of chalcolithic footwear from the near eastern highlands.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Pinhasi, Ron

    2010-01-01

    In 2008, a well preserved and complete shoe was recovered at the base of a Chalcolithic pit in the cave of Areni-1, Armenia. Here, we discuss the chronology of this find, its archaeological context and its relevance to the study of the evolution of footwear. Two leather samples and one grass sample from the shoe were dated at the Oxford Radiocarbon Accelerator Unit (ORAU). A third leather sample was dated at the University of California-Irvine Accelerator Mass Spectrometry Facility (UCIAMS). The R_Combine function for the three leather samples provides a date range of 3627-3377 Cal BC (95.4% confidence interval) and the calibrated range for the straw is contemporaneous (3627-3377 Cal BC). The shoe was stuffed with loose, unfastened grass (Poaceae) without clear orientation which was more than likely used to maintain the shape of the shoe and\\/or prepare it for storage. The shoe is 24.5 cm long (European size 37), 7.6 to 10 cm wide, and was made from a single piece of leather that wrapped around the foot. It was worn and shaped to the wearer\\'s right foot, particularly around the heel and hallux where the highest pressure is exerted in normal gait. The Chalcolithic shoe provides solid evidence for the use of footwear among Old World populations at least since the Chalcolithic. Other 4th millennium discoveries of shoes (Italian and Swiss Alps), and sandals (Southern Israel) indicate that more than one type of footwear existed during the 4th millennium BC, and that we should expect to discover more regional variations in the manufacturing and style of shoes where preservation conditions permit.

  3. Hypermobility of the first metatarsal bone in patients with Rheumatoid arthritis treated by lapidus procedure

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    Popelka Stanislav

    2012-08-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Foot deformities and related problems of the forefoot are very common in patients with rheumatoid arthritis. The laxity of the medial cuneometatarsal joint and its synovitis are important factors in the development of forefoot deformity. The impaired joint causes the first metatarsal bone to become unstable in the frontal and sagittal planes. In this retrospective study we evaluated data of patients with rheumatoid arthritis who underwent Lapidus procedure. We evaluated the role of the instability in a group of patients, focusing mainly on the clinical symptoms and X-ray signs of the instability. Methods The study group included 125 patients with rheumatoid arthritis. The indications of the Lapidus procedure were a hallux valgus deformity greater than 15 degrees and varus deformity of the first metatarsal bone with the intermetatarsal angle greater than 15 degrees on anterio-posterior weight-bearing X-ray. Results Data of 143 Lapidus procedures of 125 patients with rheumatoid arthritis, who underwent surgery between 2004 and 2010 was evaluated. Signs and symptoms of the first metatarsal bone instability was found in 92 feet (64.3% in our group. The AOFAS score was 48.6 before and 87.6 six months after the foot reconstruction. Nonunion of the medial cuneometatarsal joint arthrodesis on X-rays occurred in seven feet (4.9%. Conclusion The Lapidus procedure provides the possibility to correct the first metatarsal bone varus position and its instability, as well as providing the possibility to achieve a painless foot for walking. We recommend using the procedure as a preventive surgery in poorly symptomatic patients with rheumatoid arthritis in case of the first metatarsal bone hypermobility.

  4. Modified Mitchell osteotomy alone does not have higher rate of residual metatarsalgia than combined first and lesser metatarsal osteotomy

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    Shu-Jung Chen

    2015-04-01

    Full Text Available Transfer metatarsalgia (TM is a common forefoot disorder secondary to hallux valgus (HV. Some authors suggest that a combined lesser metatarsal osteotomy while undergoing HV surgery improves metatarsalgia, whereas others concluded that isolated HV corrective osteotomy can improve symptomatic metatarsalgia. The main purpose of this retrospective study was to compare clinical outcomes in patients with and without combined lesser metatarsal osteotomy while receiving HV correction surgery. We retrospectively reviewed the patients who underwent osteotomy for HV correction between January 2000 and December 2010. All patients underwent HV correction with modified Mitchell osteotomy. Clinical evaluations including the American Orthopaedic Foot and Ankle Society score and residual metatarsalgia were assessed, and radiographic measurements were carried out. Sixty-five patients (83 feet meeting the selection criteria were enrolled. Thirty feet receiving a combined lesser metatarsal osteotomy were classified as the combined surgery (CS group, and the others were classified as the control (CN group (53 feet. The overall rate of persistent symptomatic metatarsalgia was 19.28% after operative treatment. There were six feet with residual metatarsalgia in the CS group, and 10 feet in the CN group. There was no significant difference in the rate of persistent symptoms between the two groups (p = 0.9. According to this result, modified Mitchell osteotomy alone did not have a higher rate of residual metatarsalgia than CS. We also found that the average recovery rate of TM was about 80.7% and those patients whose preoperative HV angle was > 30° had the higher risk of residual metatarsalgia after surgery.

  5. Evaluation of foot static disturbances in patients with rheumatic diseases

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    Anna Kuryliszyn-Moskal

    2017-04-01

    Full Text Available Objectives : Rheumatic diseases such as osteoarthritis and rheumatoid arthritis constitute the most frequent pathological states leading to the development of foot deformities, which reduce quality of life and cause disability. The aim of the present study was to compare the results of plantoconturographic examinations, obtained by means of a computer podoscope, in osteoarthritis and rheumatoid arthritis patients. Special attention was paid to the differences in the values of each parameter determining the level of foot function. Material and methods : The study was performed in 94 female patients divided into two groups according to the type of disease. There were 54 patients with rheumatoid arthritis and 40 with osteoarthritis. The control group consisted of 34 healthy women. The plantographic assessment of static foot structure was carried out by means of a device for computer-aided foot examination. Results : A fallen transverse arch of the right foot was statistically much more frequent in the rheumatoid arthritis patients than in osteoarthritis patients or the control group (p < 0.005 and p < 0.05, respectively. Significant differences in the values of the Wejsflog index were observed in the case of left foot between rheumatoid arthritis patients and the control group (p < 0.05. Similarly, there were statistically significant differences in the values of the hallux valgus angle ( for the right foot between rheumatoid arthritis and osteoarthritis patients or control group (in both cases p < 0.05. Conclusions : Rheumatic diseases predispose patients to disturbances of static foot function. The obtained results highlight the importance of diagnosing foot static disturbances in the prevention of destructive changes affecting the functioning of osteoarthritis and rheumatoid arthritis patients.

  6. A biomechanical investigation of right-forward lunging step among badminton players.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mei, Qichang; Gu, Yaodong; Fu, Fengqin; Fernandez, Justin

    2017-03-01

    This study presents the kinematics and plantar pressure characteristics of eight elite national-level badminton athletes and eight recreational college-level badminton players while performing a right-forward lunge movement in a laboratory-simulated badminton court. The hypothesis was that recreational players would be significantly different from elite players in kinematics and plantar pressure measures. Vicon ® motion capture and Novel ® insole plantar pressure measurement were simultaneously taken to record the lower extremity kinematics and foot loading during stance. Recreational players showed significantly higher peak pressure in the lateral forefoot (P = 0.002) and force time integral in the lateral forefoot (P = 0.013) and other toes (P = 0.005). Elite athletes showed higher peak pressure in the medial forefoot (P = 0.003), hallux (P = 0.037) and force time integral in the medial forefoot (P = 0.009). The difference in landing techniques for the lunge step between elite athletes and recreational players was observed with peak ankle eversion (-38.2°±2.4° for athletes and -11.1°±3.9° for players, P = 0.015); smaller knee range of motion in the coronal and transverse planes, with differences in peak knee adduction (28.9°±6.8° for athletes and 15.7°±6.2° for players, P = 0.031); peak knee internal rotation (20.3°±1.3° for athletes and 11.8°±3.2° for players, P = 0.029) and peak hip flexion (77.3°±4.1° for athletes and 91.3°±9.3° for players, P = 0.037).

  7. Real-time subject-specific monitoring of internal deformations and stresses in the soft tissues of the foot: a new approach in gait analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yarnitzky, G; Yizhar, Z; Gefen, A

    2006-01-01

    No technology is presently available to provide real-time information on internal deformations and stresses in plantar soft tissues of individuals during evaluation of the gait pattern. Because internal deformations and stresses in the plantar pad are critical factors in foot injuries such as diabetic foot ulceration, this severely limits evaluation of patients. To allow such real-time subject-specific analysis, we developed a hierarchal modeling system which integrates a two-dimensional gross structural model of the foot (high-order model) with local finite element (FE) models of the plantar tissue padding the calcaneus and medial metatarsal heads (low-order models). The high-order whole-foot model provides real-time analytical evaluations of the time-dependent plantar fascia tensile forces during the stance phase. These force evaluations are transferred, together with foot-shoe local reaction forces, also measured in real time (under the calcaneus, medial metatarsals and hallux), to the low-order FE models of the plantar pad, where they serve as boundary conditions for analyses of local deformations and stresses in the plantar pad. After careful verification of our custom-made FE solver and of our foot model system with respect to previous literature and against experimental results from a synthetic foot phantom, we conducted human studies in which plantar tissue loading was evaluated in real time during treadmill gait in healthy individuals (N = 4). We concluded that internal deformations and stresses in the plantar pad during gait cannot be predicted from merely measuring the foot-shoe force reactions. Internal loading of the plantar pad is constituted by a complex interaction between the anatomical structure and mechanical behavior of the foot skeleton and soft tissues, the body characteristics, the gait pattern and footwear. Real-time FE monitoring of internal deformations and stresses in the plantar pad is therefore required to identify elevated deformation

  8. Treatment of Athlete's Plantar Warts Using a Botanical Blend: A Case Report.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nelson, Erik O; Kozin, Adam F; Ruiz, Guillermo; Lasku, Arben; Langland, Jeffrey O

    2017-05-01

    Context • Viral plantar warts, or verruca plantaris, are a benign epithelial tumor caused by various strains of the human papilloma virus (HPV). Current treatments have had mixed degrees of success, are moderately invasive, and are often incompatible with participation in sports. Objective • The study intended to examine the benefits of treating plantar warts with a topical, botanical blend that has had clinical success treating herpes simplex virus cold sores. Methods • A synergistic botanical blend was applied topically. Setting • The case report was completed at the Southwest College of Naturopathic Medicine (Tempe, Arizona, USA). Participant • The participant was a 24-y-old male soccer player, 177.8 cm tall, and weighing 69 kg with previously diagnosed, viral mosaic warts. Intervention • The patient used a pumice stone during bathing for the first week to remove dead tissue and ensure sufficient contact and entry of the botanical gel into infected tissue. After drying the area, the patient applied the botanical gel blend 1 to 2 times daily postshower, spreading it evenly across the surface of the entire lesion. The patient discontinued the exfoliation technique after the first week. Results • Within the first week of treatment, the patient noted changes to the infected area of the hallux epidermal tissue. The combination of exfoliation and application of the gel caused marked, visible differences in presentation by the fifth day of treatment. At 1-mo postintervention, or day 90, the epidermal tissue was asymptomatic and devoid of petechiae, malformations, or visible infection. Conclusions • The results of the current case study directly contrast with the drawbacks of commonly accepted, first-line interventions in the treatment of viral plantar warts and, in many respects, demonstrate better efficacy and fewer side effects than the standard of care. The positive results also highlight the necessity for additional study in the fields of sports

  9. Diagnostic Accuracy of Clinical Methods for Detection of Diabetic Sensory Neuropathy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Arshad, A. R.; Alvi, K. Y.

    2016-01-01

    Objective: To determine the accuracy of clinical methods for detection of sensory neuropathy as compared to biothesiometry. Study Design: Cross-sectional analytical study. Place and Duration of Study: 1 Mountain Medical Battalion, Azad Kashmir, from October 2013 to September 2014. Methodology: Patients with type 2 diabetes were enrolled by convenience sampling. Exclusion criteria included other identifiable causes of neuropathy, extensive ulceration of feet, amputated feet, those on treatment for neuropathy and unwilling patients. Average of 3 vibration perception threshold values measured with a biothesiometer on distal hallux was calculated. Ten gm monofilament was used to examine touch sensation over dorsal surfaces of great toes. Vibration sensation was checked over the tips of great toes using 128Hz tuning fork. Ankle jerks were checked bilaterally. Result: Neuropathy (vibration perception threshold > 25 volts) was present in 34 (21.12 percentage) out of 161 patients and 93 (57.76 percentage) were symptomatic. Measures of diagnostic accuracy for monofilament, tuning fork and ankle jerks were: sensitivity 41.18 percentage, 55.88 percentage and 64.71 percentage; specificity 92.91 percentage, 93.70 percentage and 80.31 percentage; positive predictive value (PPV) 60.87 percentage, 70.37 percentage and 46.81 percentage; negative predictive value (NPV) 85.51 percentage, 88.81 percentage and 89.47 percentage; and, diagnostic accuracy 81.99 percentage, 85.71 percentage and 77.02 percentage, respectively. Values for any 1 positive sign, any 2 positive signs or all 3 positive signs were: sensitivity 35.29 percentage, 14.71 percentage and 32.35 percentage; specificity 81.89 percentage, 93.70 percentage and 99.21 percentage; PPV 34.29 percentage, 38.46 percentage and 91.67 percentage; NPV 82.54 percentage, 80.41 percentage and 84.56 percentage; and, diagnostic accuracy 72.05 percentage, 77.02 percentage and 85.09 percentage, respectively. Conclusion: Clinical methods are

  10. Effect of children's shoes on gait: a systematic review and meta-analysis

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    Burns Joshua

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The effect of footwear on the gait of children is poorly understood. This systematic review synthesises the evidence of the biomechanical effects of shoes on children during walking and running. Methods Study inclusion criteria were: barefoot and shod conditions; healthy children aged ≤ 16 years; sample size of n > 1. Novelty footwear was excluded. Studies were located by online database-searching, hand-searching and contact with experts. Two authors selected studies and assessed study methodology using the Quality Index. Meta-analysis of continuous variables for homogeneous studies was undertaken using the inverse variance approach. Significance level was set at P 2. Where I2 > 25%, a random-effects model analysis was used and where I2 Results Eleven studies were included. Sample size ranged from 4-898. Median Quality Index was 20/32 (range 11-27. Five studies randomised shoe order, six studies standardised footwear. Shod walking increased: velocity, step length, step time, base of support, double-support time, stance time, time to toe-off, sagittal tibia-rearfoot range of motion (ROM, sagittal tibia-foot ROM, ankle max-plantarflexion, Ankle ROM, foot lift to max-plantarflexion, 'subtalar' rotation ROM, knee sagittal ROM and tibialis anterior activity. Shod walking decreased: cadence, single-support time, ankle max-dorsiflexion, ankle at foot-lift, hallux ROM, arch length change, foot torsion, forefoot supination, forefoot width and midfoot ROM in all planes. Shod running decreased: long axis maximum tibial-acceleration, shock-wave transmission as a ratio of maximum tibial-acceleration, ankle plantarflexion at foot strike, knee angular velocity and tibial swing velocity. No variables increased during shod running. Conclusions Shoes affect the gait of children. With shoes, children walk faster by taking longer steps with greater ankle and knee motion and increased tibialis anterior activity. Shoes reduce foot motion and

  11. Effects of strengthening, stretching and functional training on foot function in patients with diabetic neuropathy: results of a randomized controlled trial

    Science.gov (United States)

    2014-01-01

    Background Foot musculoskeletal deficits are seldom addressed by preventive medicine despite their high prevalence in patients with diabetic polyneuropathy. AIM: To investigate the effects of strengthening, stretching, and functional training on foot rollover process during gait. Methods A two-arm parallel-group randomized controlled trial with a blinded assessor was designed. Fifty-five patients diagnosed with diabetic polyneuropathy, 45 to 65 years-old were recruited. Exercises for foot-ankle and gait training were administered twice a week, for 12 weeks, to 26 patients assigned to the intervention group, while 29 patients assigned to control group received recommended standard medical care: pharmacological treatment for diabetes and foot care instructions. Both groups were assessed after 12 weeks, and the intervention group at follow-up (24 weeks). Primary outcomes involved foot rollover changes during gait, including peak pressure (PP). Secondary outcomes involved time-to-peak pressure (TPP) and pressure–time integral (PTI) in six foot-areas, mean center of pressure (COP) velocity, ankle kinematics and kinetics in the sagittal plane, intrinsic and extrinsic muscle function, and functional tests of foot and ankle. Results Even though the intervention group primary outcome (PP) showed a not statistically significant change under the six foot areas, intention-to-treat comparisons yielded softening of heel strike (delayed heel TPP, p=.03), better eccentric control of forefoot contact (decrease in ankle extensor moment, pforefoot contact with respect to medial forefoot (TPP anticipation, p<.01), and increased participation of hallux (increased PP and PTI, p=.03) and toes (increase in PTI, medium effect size). A slower COP mean velocity (p=.05), and an increase in overall foot and ankle function (p<.05) were also observed. In most cases, the values returned to baseline after the follow-up (p<.05). Conclusions Intervention discreetly changed foot rollover towards a

  12. A cross-sectional observational study comparing foot and ankle characteristics in people with stroke and healthy controls.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kunkel, Dorit; Potter, Julia; Mamode, Louis

    2017-06-01

    The purpose of this study was to explore and compare foot and ankle characteristics in people with stroke and healthy controls; and between stroke fallers and non-fallers. Participants were recruited from community groups and completed standardized tests assessing sensation, foot posture, foot function, ankle dorsiflexion and first metatarsal phalangeal joint range of motion (1st MPJ ROM), hallux valgus presence and severity. Twenty-three stroke participants (mean age 75.09 ± 7.57 years; 12 fallers) and 16 controls (mean age 73.44 ± 8.35 years) took part. Within the stroke group, reduced 1st MPJ sensation (p = 0.016) and 1st MPJ ROM (p = 0.025) were observed in the affected foot in comparison to the non-affected foot; no other differences were apparent. Pooled data (for both feet) was used to explore between stroke/control (n = 78 feet) and stroke faller/non-faller (n = 46 feet) group differences. In comparison to the control group, stroke participants exhibited reduced sensation of the 1st MPJ (p = 0.020), higher Foot Posture Index scores (indicating greater foot pronation, p = 0.008) and reduced foot function (p = 0.003). Stroke fallers exhibited significantly greater foot pronation in comparison to non-fallers (p = 0.027). Results indicated differences in foot and ankle characteristics post stroke in comparison to healthy controls. These changes may negatively impact functional ability and the ability to preserve balance. Further research is warranted to explore the influence of foot problems on balance ability and falls in people with stroke. Implications for Rehabilitation Foot problems are common post stroke. As foot problems have been linked to increased fall risk among the general population we recommend that it would be beneficial to include foot and ankle assessments or a referral to a podiatrist for people with stroke who report foot problems. Further research is needed to explore if we can improve functional

  13. [Asymmetries in dynamic plantar pressure distribution measurement in able-bodied gait: application to the study of the gait asymmetries in children with hemiplegic cerebral palsy].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Femery, V; Moretto, P; Renaut, H; Lensel, G; Thevenon, A

    2002-03-01

    The aim of this study was to analyse, firstly, the plantar pressure distribution in healthy subjects in order to validate or invalidate the previous studies results on the asymmetrical profile of the stance phase. The studies of asymmetries was based on the identification of a propulsive foot and a loading foot from a concept introduced by Viel. Secondly, the approach was applied to the study of gait asymmetries in two children with hemiplegic cerebral plasy. Thirty healthy control subjects and two hemiplegic children (H1 and H2) performed a walking test at self selected speed. The recordings of dynamic parameters were realized thanks to an in-shoe plantar pressure analysis system (Parotec, by Paromed Medizintechnik, GMBH, Germany). The pressure peaks were determined from the recording of pressures under eight footprint locations. A program calculated the sum of forces under the heel and determined the loading foot. By defect, the second foot is the propulsive foot. The asymmetrical profile of the human normal stance phase was validated. Under the heel, the pressure peaks lower by 28 % were noticed beneath the loading foot compared to the propulsive foot. Inversely, under the metatarsal heads and the hallux, the pressure peaks were greater by 32 % beneath the propulsive foot. For the two hemiplegic children, the plantar pressure profile equally highlighted significant differences between the unaffected and affected feet. The pressure peaks under the affected heel were respectively lower by 21 % and 97 % for H1 and H2. The loading function was found and associated to the affected limb. The propulsive function was not systematically found under the unaffected foot. The analysis of plantar pressure measurements during able-bodied gait showed differences between the two lower limbs. These dynamic asymmetries are the results of a natural functional organization of the supports differentiating a loading foot and a propulsive foot and corroborating the concept proposed by

  14. Ichnotaxonomy of the Laetoli trackways: The earliest hominin footprints

    Science.gov (United States)

    Meldrum, D. J.; Lockley, Martin G.; Lucas, Spencer G.; Musiba, Charles

    2011-04-01

    At 3.6 Ma, the Laetoli Pliocene hominin trackways are the earliest direct evidence of hominin bipedalism. Three decades since their discovery, not only is the question of their attribution still discussed, but marked differences in interpretation concerning the footprints' qualitative features and the inferred nature of the early hominin foot morphology remain. Here, we establish a novel ichnotaxon, Praehominipes laetoliensis, for these tracks and clarify the distinctions of these footprints from those of later hominins, especially modern humans. We also contrast hominin, human, and ape footprints to establish morphological features of these footprints correlated with a midtarsal break versus a stiff longitudinal arch. Original photos, including stereo photographs, and casts of footprints from the 1978 Laetoli excavation, confirm midtarsal flexibility, and repeatedly indicate an associated midfoot pressure ridge. In contrast, the modern human footprint reflects the derived arched-foot architecture, combined with a stiff-legged striding gait. Fossilized footprints of unshod modern human pedestrians in Hawaii and Nicaragua unambiguously illustrate these contrasts. Some points of comparisons with ape footprints are complicated by a variable hallucal position and the distinct manner of ape facultative bipedalism. In contrast to the comparatively rigid platform of the modern human foot, midtarsal flexibility is present in the chimpanzee foot. In ape locomotion, flexion at the transverse tarsal joint, referred to as the "midtarsal break," uncouples the respective functions of the prehensile forefoot and the propulsive hindfoot during grasp-climbing. At some point after the transition to habitual bipedalism, these grasp-climb adaptations, presumed to be present in the last common ancestor of apes and humans, were initially compromised by the loss of divergence of the hallux. An analogous trajectory is evident along an array of increasingly terrestrial extant ape species

  15. Investigation of first ray mobility during gait by kinematic fluoroscopic imaging-a novel method

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    Martin Heiner

    2012-02-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background It is often suggested that sagittal instability at the first tarso-metatarsal joint level is a primary factor for hallux valgus and that sagittal instability increases with the progression of the deformity. The assessment of the degree of vertical instability is usually made by clinical evaluation while any measurements mostly refer to a static assessment of medial ray mobility (i.e. the plantar/dorsal flexion in the sagittal plane. Testing methods currently available cannot attribute the degree of mobility to the corresponding anatomical joints making up the medial column of the foot. The aim of this study was to develop a technique which allows for a quantification of the in-vivo sagittal mobility of the joints of the medial foot column during the roll-over process under full weight bearing. Methods Mobility of first ray bones was investigated by dynamic distortion-free fluoroscopy (25 frames/s of 14 healthy volunteers and 8 patients with manifested clinical instability of the first ray. A CAD-based evaluation method allowed the determination of mobility and relative displacements and rotations of the first ray bones within the sagittal plane during the stance phase of gait. Results Total flexion of the first ray was found to be 13.63 (SD 6.14 mm with the healthy volunteers and 13.06 (SD 8.01 mm with the patients (resolution: 0.245 mm/pixel. The dorsiflexion angle was 5.27 (SD 2.34 degrees in the healthy volunteers and increased to 5.56 (SD 3.37 degrees in the patients. Maximum rotations were found at the naviculo-cuneiform joints and least at the first tarso-metatarsal joint level in both groups. Conclusions Dynamic fluoroscopic assessment has been shown to be a valuable tool for characterisation of the kinematics of the joints of the medial foot column during gait. A significant difference in first ray flexion and angular rotation between the patients and healthy volunteers however could not be found.

  16. Fibrodysplasia ossificans progressiva: case report Fibrodisplasia ossificante progressiva: relato de caso

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    Andre Leite Gonçalves

    2005-12-01

    Full Text Available Fibrodysplasia ossificans progressiva (FOP is a rare autosomal dominant disorder characterized by postnatal progressive heterotopic ossification of the connective tissue and congenital malformation of the big toes. We report on a nine-year-old girl with clinical and radiological features of FOP. She was born with bilateral hallux valgus and at the age of nine presented an indurate mass in the left cervical region that was painful. A significant decreased range of motion in all levels of the spine and shoulder girdle was found. The radiographs showed heterotopic ossification in the thoracic region. The patient had two outbreaks of the disease ("flare-ups" that were treated with prednisone 2 mg/kg/day for four days. After the "flare-ups", she had a continuous therapy with a Cox-2 inhibitor (25 mg/day and a leukotriene inhibitor, montelukast (10 mg/day.A fibrodisplasia ossificante progressiva (FOP é doença rara, autossômica dominante, caracterizada por ossificação heterotópica progressiva pós-natal do tecido conjuntivo e malformação congênita dos háluces. Relatamos o caso de menina de nove anos com o quadro clínico-radiológico típico de FOP, nascida com hálux valgo bilateral e que aos 9 anos de idade apresentou massa dolorosa, de consistência endurecida, sem sinais inflamatórios, situada na região cervical. Adicionalmente, era possível observar diminuição importante da movimentação em todos os níveis da coluna vertebral e da cintura escapular. A avaliação radiológica revelou a presença de ossificações heterotópicas na região torácica e malformação bilateral dos háluces. A paciente teve outros dois surtos da doença, que foram tratados com corticosteróide oral por quatro dias, (2 mg/kg/dia seguido por tratamento prolongado com inibidores da Cox-2 (25 mg/dia e com inibidor de leucotrienos (10 mg/dia.

  17. The 2016 HIGh Heels: Health effects And psychosexual BenefITS (HIGH HABITS study: systematic review of reviews and additional primary studies

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    Max Barnish

    2017-08-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background High-heeled shoes (high heels are frequently worn by many women and form an important part of female gender identity. Issues of explicit and implicit compulsion to wear high heels have been noted. Previous studies and reviews have provided evidence that high heels are detrimental to health. However, the evidence base remains fragmented and no review has covered both the epidemiological and biomechanical literature. In addition, no review has considered the psychosexual benefits that offer essential context in understanding the public health challenge of high heels. Methods We searched seven major bibliographic databases up to November 2016, in addition to supplementary searches. We initially identified all review articles of any design that assessed either the psychosexual benefits or negative musculoskeletal health effects of high heels, the latter looking at both the epidemiological and biomechanical perspectives. We additionally considered additional primary studies on areas that had not been reviewed before or in which a marked lack of evidence had been noted. Data were extracted onto standardised forms. Proportionate second review was conducted. Results A total of 506 unique records were identified, 27 full-text publications were screened and 20 publications (7 reviews and 13 additional studies were included in our evidence synthesis. The most up-to-date epidemiological review provides clear evidence of an association between high heel wear and hallux valgus, musculoskeletal pain and first-party injury. The body of biomechanical reviews provides clear evidence of changes indicative of increased risk of these outcomes, as well as osteoarthritis, which is not yet evidenced by epidemiological studies. There were no reviews on psychosexual benefits, but all five identified original studies provided evidence of increased attractiveness and/or an impact on men’s behaviour associated with high heel wear. With regard to second

  18. Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nilton Di Chiacchio

    2013-02-01

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Onychomycosis is a type of fungal infection that accounts for over 50% of all onycopathies. Some authors consider superficial mycosis the most difficult to be treated. Very few studies have been carried out in order to assess the epidemiology of onychomycosis in Brazil.OBJECTIVE: To describe the epidemiological profile of onychomycosis in Brazilian dermatology offices and to assess the etiology of the disease, how often mycosis exams are requested, and the treatment adopted.METHODS: A descriptive, observational study was carried out between May and July, 2010. Thirty-eight dermatologists from different Brazilian regions participated in the study, and 7,852 patients with any skin diseases who had all of their nails examined were included in the study.RESULTS: Of the 7,852 patients, 28.3% were clinically diagnosed as having onychomycosis. Women over 45 years old who practiced exercises or with a personal history of the disease showed greater likelihood of having onychomycosis. The disease was most seen in the feet, and the majority of cases involved the hallux. On the hands, the index finger was the most affected. Mycosis exams were not requested for all clinically suspected cases. When exams were done, results showed that the most common fungus was Trichophyton rubrum. The most common clinical lesion was distal-lateral. The most prescribed topical treatments were amorolfine and ciclopirox olamine, while systemic treatments included fluconazole and terbinafine.CONCLUSION: This study was important to describe the epidemiological behavior of onychomycosis in Brazilian dermatology offices and to determine important risk factors, such as gender, age, practice of exercises, personal history of the disease, and comorbidities.BACKGROUND: Fundamentos: As onicomicoses são infecções fúngicas que representam mais de 50% de todas onicopatias e são consideradas por alguns autores a micose superficial de mais difícil tratamento. Poucos estudos

  19. Estudo da impressão plantar obtida durante o teste de Jack em crianças Footprint study in children during the Jack test

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    José Antonio Pinto

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available OBJETIVO: Avaliar as impressões plantares durante o teste de Jack em crianças quantificando e observando os resultados numa faixa etária crítica para a formação do arco plantar. MÉTODO: Avaliamos 60 crianças brancas (120 pés sendo 35 meninos e 25 meninas com idades entre 2 e 5 anos, sem queixas ortopédicas. Simulamos o teste de Jack com uma órtese em cunha de 45º apoiada sob o hálux. Obtivemos impressões em apoio monopodálico bilateralmente utilizando um pedígrafo. O exame dividiu-se em duas etapas: com e sem o uso da órtese. A metodologia de Valenti e Volpon foi utilizada para mensurar as impressões plantares e os dados obtidos foram analisados estatisticamente. RESULTADOS: Os valores dos índices de Valenti e Volpon diminuiram quando a órtese foi utilizada. A diferença entre os índices com ou sem órtese diminuiu gradualmente com a progressão etária. CONCLUSÕES: É possível quantificar o teste de Jack pelwas impressões plantares pelo método de Valenti e Volpon. A variação do seu formato apresentou tendência a ser menor a partir dos 4 anos. O teste de Jack perdeu gradativamente a capacidade de modificar a impressão plantar com a idade, diminuindo sua acuidade como parâmetro de bom prognóstico na formação do arco longitudinal medial. Nível de Evidência: Nível IV, estudo descritivo observacional.OBJECTIVE: To assess the plantar impressions obtained in children during the Jack test, with the aim of quantifying and analyzing their variability in the critical period for plantar foot arch formation. METHOD: A hundred and twenty feet from 60 healthy White children, recruited in an outpatient pediatric clinic, were examined. Our sample included 35 boys and 25 girls, ranging from 2 to 5 years. The Jack test was simulated using a 45o wedge-shaped orthosis applied to the hallux. Bilateral plantar impressions were acquired in the alternate single-foot standing position using a pedigraph. Two plantar impressions were

  20. Aspectos epidemiológicos de pacientes com lesões ungueais e cutâneas causadas por Scytalidium spp Epidemiological aspects of patients with ungual and cutaneous lesions caused by Scytalidium spp

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    Ana Paula Martins Xavier

    2010-12-01

    spp, obtained from 74 patients referred to the Laboratory of Investigation in Dermatology (ID located in the city of Rio de Janeiro, RJ, between 1997 and 2006. The samples were submitted to diagnostic confirmation through direct exam and culture. RESULTS: The prevalence of onychomycosis caused by Scytalidium spp. was of 0,87%. The most prevalent age was between 41-60 years (48.64%. Regarding the site of infection, the feet (91.36% were most affected, with predominance of the left hallux. Hyaline hyphae were the most common structures in direct examination and the species S. dimidiatum was the most frequent in culture. CONCLUSION: Onychomycosis caused by Scytalidium spp. is rare and S. dimidiatum was the most isolated species in this laboratory during the period of the study.

  1. Ocena występowania wad stóp u dzieci w wieku 9-10 lat w środowisku miejskim i wiejskim = Estimate the prevalence the feet defects in children aged 9-10 years in the urban and rural environment

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    Anna Plaskiewicz

    2015-04-01

    prevalence the feet defects in children aged 9-10 years in the urban and rural environment. Materials and methods. The study was conducted on 40 children aged 9-10 years. The children were divided into two groups according to their place of residence. Analysis of the feet were an