WorldWideScience

Sample records for hall sensors performance

  1. Stability of the Hall sensors performance under neutron irradiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Duran, I.; Hron, M.; Stockel, J.; Viererbl, L.; Vsolak, R.; Cerva, V.; Bolshakova, I.; Holyaka, R.; Vayakis, G.

    2004-01-01

    A principally new diagnostic method must be developed for magnetic measurements in steady state regime of operation of fusion reactor. One of the options is the use of transducers based on Hall effect. The use of Hall sensors in ITER is presently limited by their questionable radiation and thermal stability. Issues of reliable operation in ITER like radiation and thermal environment are addressed in the paper. The results of irradiation tests of candidate Hall sensors in LVR-15 and IBR-2 experimental fission reactors are presented. Stable operation (deterioration of sensitivity below one percent) of the specially prepared sensors was demonstrated during irradiation by the total fluence of 3.10 16 n/cm 2 in IBR-2 reactor. Increasing the total neutron fluence up to 3.10 17 n/cm 2 resulted in deterioration of the best sensor's output still below 10% as demonstrated during irradiation in LVR-15 fission reactor. This level of neutron is already higher than the expected ITER life time neutron fluence for a sensor location just outside the ITER vessel. (authors)

  2. Cryogenic microsize Hall sensors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kvitkovic, J.; Polak, M.

    1993-01-01

    Hall sensors have a variety of applications in magnetic field measurements. The active area of the Hall sensor does not play an important role in measuring of homogeneous magnetic field. Actually Hall sensors are widely used to measure profiles of magnetic fields produced by magnetization currents in samples of HTC superconductors, as well as of LTC ones. Similar techniques are used to measure magnetization of both HTC and LTC superconductors. In these cases Hall sensor operates in highly inhomogeneous magnetic fields. Because of that, Hall sensors with very small active area are required. We developed and tested Hall sensors with active area 100 μm x 100 μm - type M and 50 μm x 50 μm - type V. Here we report on the most imporant parameters of these units, as well as on their properties as differential magnetometer. (orig.)

  3. Three-dimensional simulations in optimal performance trial between two types of Hall sensors fabrication technologies

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Paun, Maria-Alexandra, E-mail: map65@cam.ac.uk

    2015-10-01

    The main objective of the present work is to make a comparison between Hall devices integrated in regular bulk and Silicon-on-Insulator (SOI) CMOS technology. A three-dimensional model based on numerical estimation is provided for a particular XL Hall structure in two different technologies (the first one is XFAB XH 0.35 µm regular bulk CMOS and the second one is XFAB SOI XI10 1 µm non-fully depleted). In assessing the performance of the Hall Effect sensors included in the comparison, both three-dimensional physical simulations and measurements results will be used. In order to discriminate which category of sensors has the highest performance, their main characteristic parameters, including input resistance, Hall voltage, absolute sensitivity and their temperature drift, will be extracted and compared. Electrostatic potential and current density distribution are important aspects that are also investigated. The particular technology offering the highest sensor performance is identified. - Highlights: • A comparison between Hall devices integrated in regular bulk and SOI CMOS technologies is made. • A three-dimensional model for the XL Hall structure, in the two technologies, is provided. • The main characteristic parameters and the temperature drift are investigated. • The sensors performance is evaluated using 3D physical simulations and measurements data.

  4. Planar Hall effect bridge magnetic field sensors

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Henriksen, A.D.; Dalslet, Bjarke Thomas; Skieller, D.H.

    2010-01-01

    Until now, the planar Hall effect has been studied in samples with cross-shaped Hall geometry. We demonstrate theoretically and experimentally that the planar Hall effect can be observed for an exchange-biased ferromagnetic material in a Wheatstone bridge topology and that the sensor signal can...... Hall effect bridge sensors....

  5. Hall Sensor Output Signal Fault-Detection & Safety Implementation Logic

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lee SangHun

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Recently BLDC motors have been popular in various industrial applications and electric mobility. Recently BLDC motors have been popular in various industrial applications and electric mobility. In most brushless direct current (BLDC motor drives, there are three hall sensors as a position reference. Low resolution hall effect sensor is popularly used to estimate the rotor position because of its good comprehensive performance such as low cost, high reliability and sufficient precision. Various possible faults may happen in a hall effect sensor. This paper presents a fault-tolerant operation method that allows the control of a BLDC motor with one faulty hall sensor and presents the hall sensor output fault-tolerant control strategy. The situations considered are when the output from a hall sensor stays continuously at low or high levels, or a short-time pulse appears on a hall sensor signal. For fault detection, identification of a faulty signal and generating a substitute signal, this method only needs the information from the hall sensors. There are a few research work on hall effect sensor failure of BLDC motor. The conventional fault diagnosis methods are signal analysis, model based analysis and knowledge based analysis. The proposed method is signal based analysis using a compensation signal for reconfiguration and therefore fault diagnosis can be fast. The proposed method is validated to execute the simulation using PSIM.

  6. Assessment of elevator rope using Hall Sensor

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lee, Jong O; Yoon, Woon Ha; Son, Young Ho; Kim, Jung Woo [Korea Institute of Machinery and Materials, Daejeon (Korea, Republic of); Lee, Jong Ku [Pukyung National University, Pusan (Korea, Republic of)

    2003-07-01

    Defect detection of wire rope for an elevator was investigated through the measurement of magnetic flux leakage. The types of defect usually found in wire rope categorized such as inner and outer wire breakage and wear. The specimens that has artificial defects were magnetized via permanent magnet, and measurement of magnetic flux leakage on the defects was performed with Hall sensor. In wire broken model, a defect smaller than 0.4 mm and 1 mm in depth on outer and inner wire rope, respectively, could be detected well. In wear model, smaller defect could not be detected clearly, however, appearance of changing of total magnetic flux during magnetic pole of the sensor passing through a defect 0.2 mm in depth at 4 mm or above width could make possible to detect it. From the results, the measurement via Hall sensor might be useful tool for defect detection of wire rope.

  7. Assesment of elevator rope using hall sensor

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lee, Jong O; Yoon, Woon Ha; Son, Young Ho [Korea Institute of Machinery and Materials, Daejeon (Korea, Republic of); Kim, Jung Woo; Lee, Jong Ku [Pukyong National University, Pusan (Korea, Republic of)

    2003-05-15

    Defect detection of wire rope for an elevator was investigated through the measurement of magnetic flux leakage. The types of defect usually found in wire rope categorized such as inner and outer wire breakage and wear. The specimens that has artificial defects were magnetized via permanent magnet, and measurement of magnetic flux leakage on the defects was performed with Hall sensor. In wire broken model, a defect smaller than 0.4mm and 1mm in depth on outer and inner wire rope, respectively, could be detected well. In wear model, smaller defect could not be detected clearly, however, appearance of changing of total magnetic flux during magnetic pole of the sensor passing through a defect 0.2mm in depth at 4mm or above width could make possible to detect it. From the results, the measurement via Hall sensor might be useful tool for defect detection of wire rope.

  8. Assessment of elevator rope using Hall Sensor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lee, Jong O; Yoon, Woon Ha; Son, Young Ho; Kim, Jung Woo; Lee, Jong Ku

    2003-01-01

    Defect detection of wire rope for an elevator was investigated through the measurement of magnetic flux leakage. The types of defect usually found in wire rope categorized such as inner and outer wire breakage and wear. The specimens that has artificial defects were magnetized via permanent magnet, and measurement of magnetic flux leakage on the defects was performed with Hall sensor. In wire broken model, a defect smaller than 0.4 mm and 1 mm in depth on outer and inner wire rope, respectively, could be detected well. In wear model, smaller defect could not be detected clearly, however, appearance of changing of total magnetic flux during magnetic pole of the sensor passing through a defect 0.2 mm in depth at 4 mm or above width could make possible to detect it. From the results, the measurement via Hall sensor might be useful tool for defect detection of wire rope.

  9. Assesment of elevator rope using hall sensor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lee, Jong O; Yoon, Woon Ha; Son, Young Ho; Kim, Jung Woo; Lee, Jong Ku

    2003-01-01

    Defect detection of wire rope for an elevator was investigated through the measurement of magnetic flux leakage. The types of defect usually found in wire rope categorized such as inner and outer wire breakage and wear. The specimens that has artificial defects were magnetized via permanent magnet, and measurement of magnetic flux leakage on the defects was performed with Hall sensor. In wire broken model, a defect smaller than 0.4mm and 1mm in depth on outer and inner wire rope, respectively, could be detected well. In wear model, smaller defect could not be detected clearly, however, appearance of changing of total magnetic flux during magnetic pole of the sensor passing through a defect 0.2mm in depth at 4mm or above width could make possible to detect it. From the results, the measurement via Hall sensor might be useful tool for defect detection of wire rope.

  10. Performance of Hall sensor-based devices for magnetic field diagnosis at fusion reactors

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Bolshakova, I.; Ďuran, Ivan; Holyaka, R.; Hristoforou, E.; Marusenkov, A.

    2007-01-01

    Roč. 5, č. 1 (2007), s. 283-288 ISSN 1546-198X R&D Projects: GA AV ČR KJB100430504 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z20430508 Keywords : Galvanomagnetic * Sensor * Fusion Reactor * Magnetic Diagnostics * Radiation Hardness Subject RIV: BG - Nuclear, Atomic and Molecular Physics, Colliders Impact factor: 1.587, year: 2007

  11. Novel Hall sensors developed for magnetic field imaging systems

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cambel, Vladimir; Karapetrov, Goran; Novosad, Valentyn; Bartolome, Elena; Gregusova, Dagmar; Fedor, Jan; Kudela, Robert; Soltys, Jan

    2007-01-01

    We report here on the fabrication and application of novel planar Hall sensors based on shallow InGaP/AlGaAs/GaAs heterostructure with a two-dimensional electron gas (2DEG) as an active layer. The sensors are developed for two kinds of experiments. In the first one, magnetic samples are placed directly on the Hall sensor. Room temperature experiments of permalloy objects evaporated onto the sensor are presented. In the second experiment, the sensor scans close over a multigranular superconducting sample prepared on a YBCO thin film. Large-area and high-resolution scanning experiments were performed at 4.2 K with the Hall probe scanning system in a liquid helium flow cryostat

  12. A new CMOS Hall angular position sensor

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Popovic, R.S.; Drljaca, P. [Swiss Federal Inst. of Tech., Lausanne (Switzerland); Schott, C.; Racz, R. [SENTRON AG, Zug (Switzerland)

    2001-06-01

    The new angular position sensor consists of a combination of a permanent magnet attached to a shaft and of a two-axis magnetic sensor. The permanent magnet produces a magnetic field parallel with the magnetic sensor plane. As the shaft rotates, the magnetic field also rotates. The magnetic sensor is an integrated combination of a CMOS Hall integrated circuit and a thin ferromagnetic disk. The CMOS part of the system contains two or more conventional Hall devices positioned under the periphery of the disk. The ferromagnetic disk converts locally a magnetic field parallel with the chip surface into a field perpendicular to the chip surface. Therefore, a conventional Hall element can detect an external magnetic field parallel with the chip surface. As the direction of the external magnetic field rotates in the chip plane, the output voltage of the Hall element varies as the cosine of the rotation angle. By placing the Hall elements at the appropriate places under the disk periphery, we may obtain the cosine signals shifted by 90 , 120 , or by any other angle. (orig.)

  13. Planar Hall Effect Sensors for Biodetection

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rizzi, Giovanni

    . In the second geometry (dPHEB) half of the sensor is used as a local negative reference to subtract the background signal from magnetic beads in suspension. In all applications below, the magnetic beads are magnetised using the magnetic field due to the bias current passed through the sensor, i.e., no external...... as labels and planar Hall effect bridge (PHEB) magnetic field sensor as readout for the beads. The choice of magnetic beads as label is motivated by the lack of virtually any magnetic background from biological samples. Moreover, magnetic beads can be manipulated via an external magnetic field...... hybridisation in real-time, in a background of suspended magnetic beads. This characteristic is employed in single nucleotide polymorphism (SNP) genotyping, where the denaturation of DNA is monitored in real-time upon washing with a stringency buffer. The sensor setup includes temperature control and a fluidic...

  14. Single particle detection: Phase control in submicron Hall sensors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Di Michele, Lorenzo; Shelly, Connor; Gallop, John; Kazakova, Olga

    2010-01-01

    We present a phase-sensitive ac-dc Hall magnetometry method which allows a clear and reliable separation of real and parasitic magnetic signals of a very small magnitude. High-sensitivity semiconductor-based Hall crosses are generally accepted as a preferential solution for non-invasive detection of superparamagnetic nanobeads used in molecular biology, nanomedicine, and nanochemistry. However, detection of such small beads is often hindered by inductive pick-up and other spurious signals. The present work demonstrates an unambiguous experimental route for detection of small magnetic moments and provides a simple theoretical background for it. The reliability of the method has been tested for a variety of InSb Hall sensors in the range 600 nm-5 μm. Complete characterization of empty devices, involving Hall coefficients and noise measurements, has been performed and detection of a single FePt bead with diameter of 140 nm and magnetic moment of μ≅10 8 μ B has been achieved with a 600 nm-wide sensor.

  15. Irradiation tests of ITER candidate Hall sensors using two types of neutron spectra

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Duran, I.; Bolshakova, I.; Holyaka, R.; Viererbl, L.; Lahodova, Z.; Sentkerestiova, J.; Bem, P.

    2010-01-01

    We report on irradiation tests of InSb based Hall sensors at two irradiation facilities with two distinct types of neutron spectra. One was a fission reactor neutron spectrum with a significant presence of thermal neutrons, while another one was purely fast neutron field. Total neutron fluence of the order of 10 16 cm -2 was accumulated in both cases, leading to significant drop of Hall sensor sensitivity in case of fission reactor spectrum, while stable performance was observed at purely fast neutron spectrum. This finding suggests that performance of this particular type of Hall sensors is governed dominantly by transmutation. Additionally, it further stresses the need to test ITER candidate Hall sensors under neutron flux with ITER relevant spectrum.

  16. A Novel Hall Effect Sensor Using Elaborate Offset Cancellation Method

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vlassis N. Petoussis

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available The Hall effect is caused by a traverse force that is formed in the electrons or holes of metal element or semiconductor when are polarized by current source and simultaneously all the system it is found vertical in external magnetic field. Result is finally the production of difference of potential (Hall voltage in address vertical in that of current and magnetic field directions. In the present work is presented a new Hall sensor exploiting the former operation. In combination with his pioneering form and using dynamic spinning current technique with an elaborate sequence, it leads to satisfactory results of produced Hall voltage with small noise in a presence of external magnetic field. Anyone can see both the spinning current and anti-Hall technique in the same sensor simultaneously.

  17. Low-frequency noise in planar Hall effect bridge sensors

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Persson, Anders; Bejhedb, R.S.; Bejhed, R.S.

    2011-01-01

    The low-frequency characteristics of planar Hall effect bridge sensors are investigated as function of the sensor bias current and the applied magnetic field. The noise spectra reveal a Johnson-like spectrum at high frequencies, and a 1/f-like excess noise spectrum at lower frequencies, with a kn...

  18. Planar Hall effect sensor for magnetic micro- and nanobead detection

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ejsing, Louise Wellendorph; Hansen, Mikkel Fougt; Menon, Aric Kumaran

    2004-01-01

    Magnetic bead sensors based on the planar Hall effect in thin films of exchange-biased permalloy have been fabricated and characterized. Typical sensitivities are 3 muV/Oe mA. The sensor response to an applied magnetic field has been measured without and with coatings of commercially available 2 ...

  19. Signal conditioning and processing for metallic Hall sensors.

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Entler, Slavomír; Ďuran, Ivan; Sládek, P.; Vayakis, G.; Kočan, M.

    2017-01-01

    Roč. 123, November (2017), s. 783-786 ISSN 0920-3796. [SOFT 2016: Symposium on Fusion Technology /29./. Prague, 05.09.2016-09.09.2016] R&D Projects: GA MŠk LG14002 Institutional support: RVO:61389021 Keywords : Hall sensor * Lock-in * Synchronous detection * Current spinning * Hall effect * Planar hall effect suppression Subject RIV: JF - Nuclear Energetics OBOR OECD: Nuclear related engineering Impact factor: 1.319, year: 2016 http://www.sciencedirect.com/science/article/pii/S0920379617305070

  20. Planar Hall effect sensor with magnetostatic compensation layer

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Dalslet, Bjarke Thomas; Donolato, Marco; Hansen, Mikkel Fougt

    2012-01-01

    Demagnetization effects in cross-shaped planar Hall effect sensors cause inhomogeneous film magnetization and a hysteretic sensor response. Furthermore, when using sensors for detection of magnetic beads, the magnetostatic field from the sensor edges attracts and holds magnetic beads near...... the sensor edges causing inhomogeneous and non-specific binding of the beads. We show theoretically that adding a compensation magnetic stack beneath the sensor stack and exchange-biasing it antiparallel to the sensor stack, the magnetostatic field is minimized. We show experimentally that the compensation...... stack removes nonlinear effects from the sensor response, it strongly reduces hysteresis, and it increases the homogeneity of the bead distribution. Finally, it reduces the non-specific binding due to magnetostatic fields allowing us to completely remove beads from the compensated sensor using a water...

  1. Enhanced Performance of Cylindrical Hall Thrusters

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Raitses, Y.; Smirnov, A.; Fisch, N.J.

    2007-01-01

    The cylindrical thruster differs significantly in its underlying physical mechanisms from the conventional annular Hall thruster. It features high ionization efficiency, quiet operation, ion acceleration in a large volume-to-surface ratio channel, and performance comparable with the state-of-the-art conventional Hall thrusters. Very significant plume narrowing, accompanied by the increase of the energetic ion fraction and improvement of ion focusing, led to 50-60% increase of the thruster anode efficiency. These improvements were achieved by overrunning the discharge current in the magnetized thruster plasma

  2. Planar Hall effect sensor bridge geometries optimized for magnetic bead detection

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Østerberg, Frederik Westergaard; Rizzi, Giovanni; Henriksen, Anders Dahl

    2014-01-01

    Novel designs of planar Hall effect bridge sensors optimized for magnetic bead detection are presented and characterized. By constructing the sensor geometries appropriately, the sensors can be tailored to be sensitive to an external magnetic field, the magnetic field due to beads being magnetized...... by the sensor self-field or a combination thereof. The sensors can be made nominally insensitive to small external magnetic fields, while being maximally sensitive to magnetic beads, magnetized by the sensor self-field. Thus, the sensor designs can be tailored towards specific applications with minimal...... of the dynamic magnetic response of suspensions of magnetic beads with a nominal diameter of 80 nm are performed. Furthermore, a method to amplify the signal by appropriate combinations of multiple sensor segments is demonstrated....

  3. Design and Characterization of a Three-Axis Hall Effect-Based Soft Skin Sensor

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tito Pradhono Tomo

    2016-04-01

    Full Text Available This paper presents an easy means to produce a 3-axis Hall effect–based skin sensor for robotic applications. It uses an off-the-shelf chip and is physically small and provides digital output. Furthermore, the sensor has a soft exterior for safe interactions with the environment; in particular it uses soft silicone with about an 8 mm thickness. Tests were performed to evaluate the drift due to temperature changes, and a compensation using the integral temperature sensor was implemented. Furthermore, the hysteresis and the crosstalk between the 3-axis measurements were evaluated. The sensor is able to detect minimal forces of about 1 gf. The sensor was calibrated and results with total forces up to 1450 gf in the normal and tangential directions of the sensor are presented. The test revealed that the sensor is able to measure the different components of the force vector.

  4. Hall-Effect Sensors for Real-Time Monitoring Pier Scour

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chen-Chia CHEN

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Scour around bridge pier is a major cause of bridge failure such as collapse resulted in loss of life and property. Most of available sensors and approaches for monitoring bridge pier scour are very expensive, which is a main challenge for mass deployment of numerous bridges. Our proposed scour monitoring system utilized low-cost commercial sensors, hall-effect sensors (unit price< $1 that are capable of real-time measuring bridge pier scour with resolution of ~ 2.5 cm, and overall cost for single sensor node of our proposed work is at least 40 % less expensive than existing work. The hall- effect sensor is evaluated under controlled conditions in two laboratory flumes. After scour event, the typical voltage change of the hall-effect sensor is ~ 300 mV, and the system achieve signal-to-noise ratio performance of ~ 60 dB. Finally, we also provide an equation to predict the time variation of scour depth around pier model. Moreover, the master-slave architecture of bridge pier scour monitoring system has scalability and flexibility for mass deployment. This technique has the potential for further widespread implementation in the field.

  5. A Monolithic CMOS Magnetic Hall Sensor with High Sensitivity and Linearity Characteristics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huang, Haiyun; Wang, Dejun; Xu, Yue

    2015-10-27

    This paper presents a fully integrated linear Hall sensor by means of 0.8 μm high voltage complementary metal-oxide semiconductor (CMOS) technology. This monolithic Hall sensor chip features a highly sensitive horizontal switched Hall plate and an efficient signal conditioner using dynamic offset cancellation technique. An improved cross-like Hall plate achieves high magnetic sensitivity and low offset. A new spinning current modulator stabilizes the quiescent output voltage and improves the reliability of the signal conditioner. The tested results show that at the 5 V supply voltage, the maximum Hall output voltage of the monolithic Hall sensor microsystem, is up to ±2.1 V and the linearity of Hall output voltage is higher than 99% in the magnetic flux density range from ±5 mT to ±175 mT. The output equivalent residual offset is 0.48 mT and the static power consumption is 20 mW.

  6. 50 KW Class Krypton Hall Thruster Performance

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jacobson, David T.; Manzella, David H.

    2003-01-01

    The performance of a 50-kilowatt-class Hall thruster designed for operation on xenon propellant was measured using kryton propellant. The thruster was operated at discharge power levels ranging from 6.4 to 72.5 kilowatts. The device produced thrust ranging from 0.3 to 2.5 newtons. The thruster was operated at discharge voltages between 250 and 1000 volts. At the highest anode mass flow rate and discharge voltage and assuming a 100 percent singly charged condition, the discharge specific impulse approached the theoretical value. Discharge specific impulse of 4500 seconds was demonstrated at a discharge voltage of 1000 volts. The peak discharge efficiency was 64 percent at 650 volts.

  7. A New Design of a Single-Device 3D Hall Sensor: Cross-Shaped 3D Hall Sensor

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wei Tang

    2018-04-01

    Full Text Available In this paper, a new single-device three-dimensional (3D Hall sensor called a cross-shaped 3D Hall device is designed based on the five-contact vertical Hall device. Some of the device parameters are based on 0.18 μm BCDliteTM technology provided by GLOBALFOUNDRIES. Two-dimensional (2D and 3D finite element models implemented in COMSOL are applied to understand the device behavior under a constant magnetic field. Besides this, the influence of the sensing contacts, active region’s depth, and P-type layers are taken into account by analyzing the distribution of the voltage along the top edge and the current density inside the devices. Due to the short-circuiting effect, the sensing contacts lead to degradation in sensitivities. The P-type layers and a deeper active region in turn are responsible for the improvement of sensitivities. To distinguish the P-type layer from the active region which plays the dominant role in reducing the short-circuiting effect, the current-related sensitivity of the top edge (Stop is defined. It is found that the short-circuiting effect fades as the depth of the active region grows. Despite the P-type layers, the behavior changes a little. When the depth of the active region is 7 μm and the thickness of the P-type layers is 3 μm, the sensitivities in the x, y, and z directions can reach 91.70 V/AT, 92.36 V/AT, and 87.10 V/AT, respectively.

  8. A highly sensitive CMOS digital Hall sensor for low magnetic field applications.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xu, Yue; Pan, Hong-Bin; He, Shu-Zhuan; Li, Li

    2012-01-01

    Integrated CMOS Hall sensors have been widely used to measure magnetic fields. However, they are difficult to work with in a low magnetic field environment due to their low sensitivity and large offset. This paper describes a highly sensitive digital Hall sensor fabricated in 0.18 μm high voltage CMOS technology for low field applications. The sensor consists of a switched cross-shaped Hall plate and a novel signal conditioner. It effectively eliminates offset and low frequency 1/f noise by applying a dynamic quadrature offset cancellation technique. The measured results show the optimal Hall plate achieves a high current related sensitivity of about 310 V/AT. The whole sensor has a remarkable ability to measure a minimum ± 2 mT magnetic field and output a digital Hall signal in a wide temperature range from -40 °C to 120 °C.

  9. Design and development of DC high current sensor using Hall-Effect method

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dewi, Sasti Dwi Tungga; Panatarani, C.; Joni, I. Made

    2016-02-01

    This paper report a newly developed high DC current sensor by using a Hall effect method and also the measurement system. The Hall effect sensor receive the magnetic field generated by a current carrying conductor wire. The SS49E (Honeywell) magnetoresistive sensor was employed to sense the magnetic field from the field concentrator. The voltage received from SS49E then converted into digital by using analog to digital converter (ADC-10 bit). The digital data then processed in the microcontroller to be displayed as the value of the electric current in the LCD display. In addition the measurement was interfaced into Personal Computer (PC) using the communication protocols of RS232 which was finally displayed in real-time graphical form on the PC display. The performance test on the range ± 40 Ampere showed that the maximum relative error is 5.26%. It is concluded that the sensors and the measurement system worked properly according to the design with acceptable accuracy.

  10. The transformation of equation of the characteristic curves to widen the working area of the Hall effect sensor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Darmawan, D; Rahmawati, F; Suprayogi; Suhendi, A

    2017-01-01

    The ability of a measuring instrument is determined by the characteristics of the sensor used. One of the important characteristics of a sensor is its area of work. The working area of a sensor is determined by a linear relationship between the physical quantities to be measured with the actual measured physical quantity. A narrow sensor working area will limit the use of the instruments. Transformation equation of sensor characteristic curve is expected to widen the working area of this sensor. In this study, the magnitude of a magnetic field is used as an example of the physical quantity to be measured. Hall Effect sensors are used as sensing elements and the transformation equation performed on the sensor characteristic curve. Hall Effect sensor which is used as the object of widening the area of work is UGN3503UA while the reference sensor is A1302UA. The result of this equation transformation is embedded inside a micro-controller. The interpolation value of the magnetic field, as the result of the characteristic curve transformation, which compared to the actual value of the magnetic field provides an average relative error of measurement results of 3.83%. (paper)

  11. Low-Cost, High-Performance Hall Thruster Support System

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hesterman, Bryce

    2015-01-01

    Colorado Power Electronics (CPE) has built an innovative modular PPU for Hall thrusters, including discharge, magnet, heater and keeper supplies, and an interface module. This high-performance PPU offers resonant circuit topologies, magnetics design, modularity, and a stable and sustained operation during severe Hall effect thruster current oscillations. Laboratory testing has demonstrated discharge module efficiency of 96 percent, which is considerably higher than current state of the art.

  12. Hall effect enhanced low-field sensitivity in a three-contact extraordinary magnetoresistance sensor

    KAUST Repository

    Sun, Jian

    2012-06-06

    An extraordinary magnetoresistance (EMR) device with a 3-contact geometry has been fabricated and characterized. A large enhancement of the output sensitivity at low magnetic fields compared to the conventional EMR device has been found, which can be attributed to an additional influence coming from the Hall effect. Output sensitivities of 0.19 mV/T at zero-field and 0.2 mV/T at 0.01 T have been measured in the device, which is equivalent to the ones of the conventional EMR sensors with a bias of ∼0.04 T. The exceptional performance of EMR sensors in the high field region is maintained in the 3-contact device.

  13. A Monolithic CMOS Magnetic Hall Sensor with High Sensitivity and Linearity Characteristics

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Haiyun Huang

    2015-10-01

    Full Text Available This paper presents a fully integrated linear Hall sensor by means of 0.8 μm high voltage complementary metal-oxide semiconductor (CMOS technology. This monolithic Hall sensor chip features a highly sensitive horizontal switched Hall plate and an efficient signal conditioner using dynamic offset cancellation technique. An improved cross-like Hall plate achieves high magnetic sensitivity and low offset. A new spinning current modulator stabilizes the quiescent output voltage and improves the reliability of the signal conditioner. The tested results show that at the 5 V supply voltage, the maximum Hall output voltage of the monolithic Hall sensor microsystem, is up to ±2.1 V and the linearity of Hall output voltage is higher than 99% in the magnetic flux density range from ±5 mT to ±175 mT. The output equivalent residual offset is 0.48 mT and the static power consumption is 20 mW.

  14. Improvements to a Flow Sensor for Liquid Bismuth-Fed Hall Thrusters

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bonds, Kevin; Polzin, Kurt A.

    2010-01-01

    Recently, there has been significant interest in using bismuth metal as a propellant in Hall Thrusters [1, 2]. Bismuth offers some considerable cost, weight, and space savings over the traditional propellant--xenon. Quantifying the performance of liquid metal-fed Hall thrusters requires a very precise measure of the low propellant flow rates [1, 2]. The low flow rates (10 mg/sec) and the temperature at which free flowing liquid bismuth exists (above 300 C) preclude the use of off-the-shelf flow sensing equipment [3]. Therefore a new type of sensor is required. The hotspot bismuth flow sensor, described in Refs. [1-5] is designed to perform a flow rate measurement by measuring the velocity at which a thermal feature moves through a flow chamber. The mass flow rate can be determined from the time of flight of the thermal peak, [4, 5]. Previous research and testing has been concerned mainly with the generation of the thermal peak and it's subsequent detection. In this paper, we present design improvements to the sensor concept; and the results of testing conducted to verify the functionality of these improvements. A ceramic material is required for the sensor body (see Fig. 1), which must allow for active heating of the bismuth flow channel to keep the propellant in a liquid state. The material must be compatible with bismuth and must be bonded to conductive elements to allow for conduction of current into the liquid metal and measurement of the temperature in the flow. The new sensor requires fabrication techniques that will allow for a very small diameter flow chamber, which is required to produce useful measurements. Testing of various materials has revealed several that are potentially compatible with liquid bismuth. Of primary concern in the fabrication and testing of a robust, working prototype, is the compatibility of the selected materials with one another. Specifically, the thermal expansion rates of the materials relative to the ceramic body cannot expand so

  15. Bending strain study of Bi-2223/Ag tapes using Hall sensor magnetometry

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lahtinen, M.; Paasi, J.; Sarkaniemi, J.; Han, Z.; Freltoft, T.

    1996-01-01

    The influence of room temperature bending on critical current (I c ) of Bi-2223/Ag tapes is studied by Hall sensor magnetometry, four-point method and scanning electron microscopy. Hall sensor magnetometry allows one to assess tape homogeneity and the amount of mechanical damage caused by bending. The microstructure of the Bi-2223 ceramic is found to strongly affect the tape behavior under bending strain. In a tape with moderate I c = 6.1 A at 77 K and a porous ceramic core, crack propagation took place normal to the Ag-ceramic interface, whereas in tapes with dense core, I c above 10 A at 77 K, cracks propagated in the tape plane. In monofilamentary tapes core homogeneity correlated with good bending strain performance. In multifilamentary tapes crack propagation between filaments was prohibited by the Ag matrix, thus leading to enhanced strain tolerance. In the high I c tapes studied, bending to 25 mm radius resulted in 1%--2% I c degradation

  16. Voltage transients in thin-film InSb Hall sensor

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alexey Bardin

    Full Text Available The work is reached to study temperature transients in thin-film Hall sensors. We experimentally study InSb thin-film Hall sensor. We find transients of voltage with amplitude about 10 μV on the sensor ports after current switching. We demonstrate by direct measurements that the transients is caused by thermo-e.m.f., and both non-stationarity and heterogeneity of temperature in the film. We find significant asymmetry of temperature field for different direction of the current, which is probably related to Peltier effect. The result can be useful for wide range of scientist who works with switching of high density currents in any thin semiconductor films. 2000 MSC: 41A05, 41A10, 65D05, 65D17, Keywords: Thin-films, Semiconductors, Hall sensor, InSb, thermo-e.m.f.

  17. Sensitivity Enhancement of a Vertical-Type CMOS Hall Device for a Magnetic Sensor

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sein Oh

    2018-01-01

    Full Text Available This study presents a vertical-type CMOS Hall device with improved sensitivity to detect a 3D magnetic field in various types of sensors or communication devices. To improve sensitivity, trenches are implanted next to the current input terminal, so that the Hall current becomes maximum. The effect of the dimension and location of trenches on sensitivity is simulated in the COMSOL simulator. A vertical-type Hall device with a width of 16 μm and a height of 2 μm is optimized for maximum sensitivity. The simulation result shows that it has a 23% better result than a conventional vertical-type CMOS Hall device without a trench.

  18. Focused ion beam patterned Hall nano-sensors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Candini, A.; Gazzadi, G.C.; Di Bona, A.; Affronte, M.; Ercolani, D.; Biasiol, G.; Sorba, L.

    2007-01-01

    By means of focused ion beam milling, we fabricate Hall magnetometers with active areas as small as 100x100nm 2 . The constituent material can either be metallic (Au), semimetallic (Bi) or doped bulk semiconducting (Si doped GaAs). We experimentally show that Au nano-probes can work from room temperature down to liquid helium with magnetic flux sensitivity -1 Φ 0

  19. Exchange-biased planar Hall effect sensor optimized for biosensor applications

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Damsgaard, Christian Danvad; Freitas, S.C.; Freitas, P.P.

    2008-01-01

    This article presents experimental investigations of exchange-biased Permalloy planar Hall effect sensor crosses with a fixed active area of w x w = 40 x 40 mu m(2) and Permalloy thicknesses of t = 20, 30, and 50 nm. It is shown that a single domain model describes the system well...

  20. Planar Hall ring sensor for ultra-low magnetic moment sensing

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hung, Tran Quang; Terki, Ferial; Kamara, Souleymanne

    2015-01-01

    The field sensitivity of a planar Hall effect (PHE) micro-ring type biosensor has been investigated as a function of magnetizing angle of the sensor material, for the sensing of low magnetic moment superparamagnetic labels. The field sensitivity is maximal at a magnetizing angle of α = 20°. At th...

  1. Temperature effects in exchange-biased planar Hall sensors for bioapplications

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Damsgaard, Christian Danvad; Dalslet, Bjarke Thomas; Freitas, S.C.

    2009-01-01

    The temperature dependence of exchange biased planar Hall effect sensors is investigated between T = −10 and 70 °C. It is shown that a single domain model describes the system well and that the temperature coefficient of the low-field sensitivity at T = 25 °C is 0.32%/°C. A procedure for temperat...

  2. Theoretical and Experimental Investigation of Force Estimation Errors Using Active Magnetic Bearings with Embedded Hall Sensors

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Voigt, Andreas Jauernik; Santos, Ilmar

    2012-01-01

    to ∼ 20% of the nominal air gap the force estimation error is found to be reduced by the linearized force equation as compared to the quadratic force equation, which is supported by experimental results. Additionally the FE model is employed in a comparative study of the force estimation error behavior...... of AMBs by embedding Hall sensors instead of mounting these directly on the pole surfaces, force estimation errors are investigated both numerically and experimentally. A linearized version of the conventionally applied quadratic correspondence between measured Hall voltage and applied AMB force...

  3. Voltage transients in thin-film InSb Hall sensor

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bardin, Alexey; Ignatjev, Vyacheslav; Orlov, Andrey; Perchenko, Sergey

    The work is reached to study temperature transients in thin-film Hall sensors. We experimentally study InSb thin-film Hall sensor. We find transients of voltage with amplitude about 10 μ V on the sensor ports after current switching. We demonstrate by direct measurements that the transients is caused by thermo-e.m.f., and both non-stationarity and heterogeneity of temperature in the film. We find significant asymmetry of temperature field for different direction of the current, which is probably related to Peltier effect. The result can be useful for wide range of scientist who works with switching of high density currents in any thin semiconductor films.

  4. Mover Position Detection for PMTLM Based on Linear Hall Sensors through EKF Processing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yan, Leyang; Zhang, Hui; Ye, Peiqing

    2017-04-06

    Accurate mover position is vital for a permanent magnet tubular linear motor (PMTLM) control system. In this paper, two linear Hall sensors are utilized to detect the mover position. However, Hall sensor signals contain third-order harmonics, creating errors in mover position detection. To filter out the third-order harmonics, a signal processing method based on the extended Kalman filter (EKF) is presented. The limitation of conventional processing method is first analyzed, and then EKF is adopted to detect the mover position. In the EKF model, the amplitude of the fundamental component and the percentage of the harmonic component are taken as state variables, and they can be estimated based solely on the measured sensor signals. Then, the harmonic component can be calculated and eliminated. The proposed method has the advantages of faster convergence, better stability and higher accuracy. Finally, experimental results validate the effectiveness and superiority of the proposed method.

  5. A Magnetic Tracking System based on Highly Sensitive Integrated Hall Sensors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schlageter, Vincent; Drljaca, Predrag; Popovic, Radivoje S.; KuČERA, Pavel

    A tracking system with five degrees of freedom based on a 2D-array of 16 Hall sensors and a permanent magnet is presented in this paper. The sensitivity of the Hall sensors is increased by integrated micro- and external macro-flux-concentrators. Detection distance larger than 20cm (during one hour without calibration) is achieved using a magnet of 0.2cm3. This corresponds to a resolution of the sensors of 0.05µTrms. The position and orientation of the marker is displayed in real time at least 20 times per second. The sensing system is small enough to be hand-held and can be used in a normal environment. This presented tracking system has been successfully applied to follow a small swallowed magnet through the entire human digestive tube. This approach is extremely promising as a new non-invasive diagnostic technique in gastro-enterology.

  6. Coherent Pound-Drever-Hall technique for high resolution fiber optic strain sensor at very low light power

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, Mengxin; Liu, Qingwen; Chen, Jiageng; He, Zuyuan

    2017-04-01

    Pound-Drever-Hall (PDH) technique has been widely adopted for ultrahigh resolution fiber-optic sensors, but its performance degenerates seriously as the light power drops. To solve this problem, we developed a coherent PDH technique for weak optical signal detection, with which the signal-to-noise ratio (SNR) of demodulated PDH signal is dramatically improved. In the demonstrational experiments, a high resolution fiber-optic sensor using the proposed technique is realized, and n"-order strain resolution at a low light power down to -43 dBm is achieved, which is about 15 dB lower compared with classical PDH technique. The proposed coherent PDH technique has great potentials in longer distance and larger scale sensor networks.

  7. PENGEMBANGAN ALAT PRAKTIKUM VISKOMETER METODE BOLA JATUH BEBAS BERBASIS SENSOR EFEK HALL UGN3503 SEBAGAI MEDIA PEMBELAJARAN FISIKA

    OpenAIRE

    Ramadhan, Diajeng; Serevina, Vina; Raihanati, Raihanati

    2016-01-01

    This research aims to develop learning media in the form of practical tool viscometer to measure the viscosity of the fluid using the method ball free fall to utilize hall effect sensor UGN3503 as detection sensor iron ball as it passes through the fluid and causes the magnetic field of the sensor is changed because the sensor is blocked by a magnetic iron ball, the magnitude magnetic field strength by a hall effect sensor changed into electrical quantities such as voltage output. The voltage...

  8. Methods and instrumentation for investigating Hall sensors during their irradiation in nuclear research reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bolshakova, I.; Holyaka, R.; Makido, E.; Marusenkov, A.; Shurygin, F.; Yerashok, V.; Moreau, P. J.; Vayakis, G.; Duran, I.; Stockel, J.; Chekanov, V.; Konopleva, R.; Nazarkin, I.; Kulikov, S.; Leroy, C.

    2009-01-01

    Present work discusses the issues of creating the instrumentation for testing the semiconductor magnetic field sensors during their irradiation with neutrons in nuclear reactors up to fluences similar to neutron fluences in steady-state sensor locations in ITER. The novelty of the work consists in Hall sensor parameters being investigated: first, directly during the irradiation (in real time), and, second, at high irradiation levels (fast neutron fluence > 10 18 n/cm 2 ). Developed instrumentation has been successfully tested and applied in the research experiments on radiation stability of magnetic sensors in IBR-2 (JINR, Dubna) and VVR-M (PNPI, Saint-Petersburg) reactors. The 'Remote-Rad' bench consists of 2 heads (head 1 and head 2) bearing investigated sensors put in a ceramic setting, of electronic unit, of personal computer and of signal lines. Each head contains 6 Hall sensors and a coil for generating test magnetic field. Moreover head 1 contains thermocouples for temperature measurement while the temperature of head 2 is measured by thermo-resistive method. The heads are placed in the reactor channel

  9. Calibration of Hall sensor array for critical current measurement of YBCO tape with ferromagnetic substrate

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zhu, Yunpeng; Wang, Gang; Liu, Liyuan; Yang, Xinsheng; Zhao, Yong

    2015-01-01

    Abstract : HAS (Hall sensor array) is a powerful tool to detect the uniformity of HTS (high temperature superconductor) tape through mapping the distribution of remanent or shielding field along the surface of the tape. However, measurement of HTS tape with ferromagnetic parts by HSA is still an issue because the ferromagnetic substrate has influence on the magnetic field around the HTS layer. In this work, a continuous HSA system has been designed to measure the critical current of the YBCO tape with ferromagnetic substrate. The relationship between the remanent field and critical current was calibrated by the finite element method. The result showed that the HSA is an effective method for evaluating the critical current of the HTS tape with ferromagnetic substrate. - Highlight: • A continuous Hall sensor array system has been designed. • The inhomogeneity of YBCO tape with ferromagnetic substrate can be detected by HAS. • Finite element method is an effective method for calibrating the remanent field.

  10. Calibration of Hall sensor array for critical current measurement of YBCO tape with ferromagnetic substrate

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zhu, Yunpeng; Wang, Gang; Liu, Liyuan [Key laboratory of Magnetic levitation Technologies and Maglev Trains (Ministry of Education), Superconductor and New Energy R& D Center, Mail Stop 165#, Southwest Jiaotong University, Chengdu, 610031 (China); Yang, Xinsheng, E-mail: xsyang@swjtu.edu.cn [Key laboratory of Magnetic levitation Technologies and Maglev Trains (Ministry of Education), Superconductor and New Energy R& D Center, Mail Stop 165#, Southwest Jiaotong University, Chengdu, 610031 (China); Zhao, Yong [Key laboratory of Magnetic levitation Technologies and Maglev Trains (Ministry of Education), Superconductor and New Energy R& D Center, Mail Stop 165#, Southwest Jiaotong University, Chengdu, 610031 (China); Superconductivity Research Group, School of Materials Science and Engineering, University of New South Wale, Sydney 2052, NSW (Australia)

    2015-12-15

    Abstract : HAS (Hall sensor array) is a powerful tool to detect the uniformity of HTS (high temperature superconductor) tape through mapping the distribution of remanent or shielding field along the surface of the tape. However, measurement of HTS tape with ferromagnetic parts by HSA is still an issue because the ferromagnetic substrate has influence on the magnetic field around the HTS layer. In this work, a continuous HSA system has been designed to measure the critical current of the YBCO tape with ferromagnetic substrate. The relationship between the remanent field and critical current was calibrated by the finite element method. The result showed that the HSA is an effective method for evaluating the critical current of the HTS tape with ferromagnetic substrate. - Highlight: • A continuous Hall sensor array system has been designed. • The inhomogeneity of YBCO tape with ferromagnetic substrate can be detected by HAS. • Finite element method is an effective method for calibrating the remanent field.

  11. Hall effect enhanced low-field sensitivity in a three-contact extraordinary magnetoresistance sensor

    KAUST Repository

    Sun, Jian; Kosel, Jü rgen

    2012-01-01

    be attributed to an additional influence coming from the Hall effect. Output sensitivities of 0.19 mV/T at zero-field and 0.2 mV/T at 0.01 T have been measured in the device, which is equivalent to the ones of the conventional EMR sensors with a bias of ∼0.04 T

  12. Application of novel hall sensor technique to evaluate internal defect nondestructively in squirrel cage rotor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Park, Myung Ju; Lee, Joon Hyun

    1998-01-01

    Development of Nondestructive Tester for industrial application to detect flaws in aluminum die-casted squirrel case rotor is reported in this paper. Electronic currents are supplied to the end-ring and Hall effect sensors are used to detect the variation of currents which flow in the bar of the rotor. Some signal processing techniques are introduced to classify the signals due to the defects in the bars

  13. A PC Based Level Indicating Controller Using a Hall Probe Sensor

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    S. C. Bera

    2007-10-01

    Full Text Available A PC-based measurement and control of liquid level is a very important part of the modern instrumentation system of a process plant in any process industry. In this measurement and control system, the liquid level is measured by using a suitable level transducer. Among the different types of level transducers for measurement and control of liquid level in storage tank the cheapest one is perhaps the float type sensor and the movement of the float with level is generally converted into the movement of a pointer or that of a flapper or that of a potentiometer. In all of these system float is connected with the output device through a mechanical linkage and thus the measurement is subjected to errors due to wear and tear, friction etc. at the mechanical linkage. Here a non-contact float & magnet type level transducer using hall probe has been described in the present paper. A control system has been designed by using thyristor driven pump as the final control element, the speed of which is controlled by the computer through an opto-isolator unit. Experiments have been performed to find the operational characteristics of the transducer and the control loop. The experimental reports are presented in the paper. A very good performance characteristic has been observed.

  14. Digital data filtering in a Hall effect based angular position sensor

    OpenAIRE

    Solana Muñoz, Jorge

    2009-01-01

    Este proyecto empieza con el análisis de un sensor de efecto Hall como los estudiados en la asignatura Instrumentación Electrónica. Durante su estudio se pondrán en práctica algunos de los conocimientos adquiridos en ella. Posteriormente se entra en una fase de diseño de un sistema electrónico digital que procesará la señal procedente del sensor. En esta parte entran en juego conceptos de Sistemas Electrónicos Digitales necesarios para la elección de los bloques y las funciones lógicas oportu...

  15. Linear-hall sensor based force detecting unit for lower limb exoskeleton

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Hongwu; Zhu, Yanhe; Zhao, Jie; Wang, Tianshuo; Zhang, Zongwei

    2018-04-01

    This paper describes a knee-joint human-machine interaction force sensor for lower-limb force-assistance exoskeleton. The structure is designed based on hall sensor and series elastic actuator (SEA) structure. The work we have done includes the structure design, the parameter determination and dynamic simulation. By converting the force signal into macro displacement and output voltage, we completed the measurement of man-machine interaction force. And it is proved by experiments that the design is simple, stable and low-cost.

  16. 14 GHz longitudinally detected electron spin resonance using microHall sensors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bouterfas, M.; Mouaziz, S.; Popovic, R. S.

    2017-09-01

    In this work we developed a home-made LOngitudinally Detected Electron Spin Resonance (LODESR) spectrometer based on a microsize Hall sensor. A coplanar waveguide (CPW)-resonator is used to induce microwave-excitation on the sample at 14 GHz. We used InSb cross-shaped Hall devices with active areas of (10 μm × 10 μm) and (5 μm × 5 μm) . Signal intensities of the longitudinal magnetization component of DPPH and YIG samples of volumes about (10 μm) 3 and (5 μm) 3 , are measured under amplitude and frequency modulated microwave magnetic field generated by the CPW-resonator. At room temperature, 109spins /G √Hz sensitivity is achieved for 0.2mT linewidth, a result which is still better than most of inductive detected LODESR sensitivities.

  17. High magneticfield test of Bismuth Hall sensors for ITER steady state magnetic diagnostic

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Ďuran, Ivan; Entler, Slavomír; Kohout, Michal; Kocan, M.; Vayakis, G.

    2016-01-01

    Roč. 87, č. 11 (2016), č. článku 11D446. ISSN 0034-6748. [Topical Conference on High-Temperature Plasma Diagnostics (HTPD2016) /21./. Madison, Wisconsin, 05.06.2016-09.06.2016] R&D Projects: GA MŠk LG14002 Institutional support: RVO:61389021 ; RVO:68378271 Keywords : Hall sensors * ITER * Hall effect * magnetic diagnostic Subject RIV: BL - Plasma and Gas Discharge Physics; BL - Plasma and Gas Discharge Physics (FZU-D) OBOR OECD: 2.11 Other engineering and technologies; 2.11 Other engineering and technologies (FZU-D) Impact factor: 1.515, year: 2016 http://scitation.aip.org/content/aip/journal/rsi/87/11/10.1063/1.4964435

  18. A fully integrated GaAs-based three-axis Hall magnetic sensor exploiting self-positioned strain released structures

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Todaro, Maria T; Sileo, Leonardo; Epifani, Gianmichele; Tasco, Vittorianna; Cingolani, Roberto; De Vittorio, Massimo; Passaseo, Adriana

    2010-01-01

    In this work, we demonstrate a fully integrated three-axis Hall magnetic sensor by exploiting microfabrication technologies applied to a GaAs-based heterostructure. This allows us to obtain, by the same process, three mutually orthogonal sensors: an in-plane Hall sensor and two out-of-plane Hall sensors. The micromachined devices consist of a two-dimensional electron gas AlGaAs/InGaAs/GaAs multilayer which represents the sensing structure, grown on the top of an InGaAs/GaAs strained bilayer. After the release from the substrate, the strained bilayer acts as a hinge for the multilayered structure allowing the out-of-plane self-positioning of devices. Both the in-plane and out-of-plane Hall sensors show a linear response versus the magnetic field with a sensitivity for current-biased devices higher than 1000 V A −1 T −1 , corresponding to an absolute sensitivity more than 0.05 V T −1 at 50 µA. Moreover, Hall voltage measurements, as a function of the mechanical angle for both in-plane and out-of-plane sensors, demonstrate the potential of such a device for measurements of the three vector components of a magnetic field

  19. A cavity ring-down spectroscopy sensor for real-time Hall thruster erosion measurements

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lee, B. C.; Huang, W.; Tao, L.; Yamamoto, N.; Yalin, A. P.; Gallimore, A. D.

    2014-01-01

    A continuous-wave cavity ring-down spectroscopy sensor for real-time measurements of sputtered boron from Hall thrusters has been developed. The sensor uses a continuous-wave frequency-quadrupled diode laser at 250 nm to probe ground state atomic boron sputtered from the boron nitride insulating channel. Validation results from a controlled setup using an ion beam and target showed good agreement with a simple finite-element model. Application of the sensor for measurements of two Hall thrusters, the H6 and SPT-70, is described. The H6 was tested at power levels ranging from 1.5 to 10 kW. Peak boron densities of 10 ± 2 × 10 14 m −3 were measured in the thruster plume, and the estimated eroded channel volume agreed within a factor of 2 of profilometry. The SPT-70 was tested at 600 and 660 W, yielding peak boron densities of 7.2 ± 1.1 × 10 14 m −3 , and the estimated erosion rate agreed within ∼20% of profilometry. Technical challenges associated with operating a high-finesse cavity in the presence of energetic plasma are also discussed

  20. Design, building and test of one prototype and four final position sensor assemblies: Hall effect position sensors

    Science.gov (United States)

    1976-01-01

    This report covers the development of a three channel Hall effect position sensing system for the commutation of a three phase dc torquer motor. The effort consisted of the evaluation, modification and re-packaging of a commercial position sensor and the design of a target configuration unique to this application. The resulting design meets the contract requirements and, furthermore, the test results indicate not only the practicality and versatility of the design, but also that there may be higher limits of resolution and accuracy achievable.

  1. Development of Bismuth Hall sensors for ITER steady state magnetic diagnostics.

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Ďuran, Ivan; Entler, Slavomír; Kočan, M.; Kohout, Michal; Viererbl, L.; Mušálek, Radek; Chráska, Tomáš; Vayakis, G.

    2017-01-01

    Roč. 123, November (2017), s. 690-694 ISSN 0920-3796. [SOFT 2016: Symposium on Fusion Technology /29./. Prague, 05.09.2016-09.09.2016] R&D Projects: GA MŠk LG14002 Institutional support: RVO:61389021 ; RVO:68378271 Keywords : ITER * Magnetic diagnostic * Hall sensor * Bismuth * Neutron irradiation * Radiation hardness Subject RIV: JF - Nuclear Energetics; JF - Nuclear Energetics (FZU-D) OBOR OECD: Nuclear related engineering; Nuclear related engineering (FZU-D) Impact factor: 1.319, year: 2016 http://www.sciencedirect.com/science/article/pii/S0920379617306956

  2. High-performance LED luminaire for sports hall

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Xuan-Hao; Yang, Jin-Tsung; Chien, Wei-Ting; Chang, Jung-Hsuan; Lo, Yi-Chien; Lin, Che-Chu; Sun, Ching-Cherng

    2015-09-01

    In this paper, we present a luminaire design with anti-glare and energy-saving effects for sports hall. Compared with traditional lamps using in a badminton court, the average illuminance on the ground of the proposed LED luminaire is enhanced about 300%. Besides, the uniformity is obviously enhanced and improved. The switch-on speed of lighting in sports hall is greatly reduced from 5-10 minutes to 1 second. The simulation analysis and the corresponding experiment results are demonstrated.

  3. Metal Hall sensors for the new generation fusion reactors of DEMO scale

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bolshakova, I.; Bulavin, M.; Kargin, N.; Kost, Ya.; Kuech, T.; Kulikov, S.; Radishevskiy, M.; Shurygin, F.; Strikhanov, M.; Vasil'evskii, I.; Vasyliev, A.

    2017-11-01

    For the first time, the results of on-line testing of metal Hall sensors based on nano-thickness (50-70) nm gold films, which was conducted under irradiation by high-energy neutrons up to the high fluences of 1 · 1024 n · m-2, are presented. The testing has been carried out in the IBR-2 fast pulsed reactor in the neutron flux with the intensity of 1.5 · 1017 n · m-2 · s-1 at the Joint Institute for Nuclear Research. The energy spectrum of neutron flux was very close to that expected for the ex-vessel sensors locations in the ITER experimental reactor. The magnetic field sensitivity of the gold sensors was stable within the whole fluence range under research. Also, sensitivity values at the start and at the end of irradiation session were equal within the measurement error (<1%). The results obtained make it possible to recommend gold sensors for magnetic diagnostics in the new generation fusion reactors of DEMO scale.

  4. Comment on "Planar Hall resistance ring sensor based on NiFe/Cu/IrMn trilayer structure" [J. Appl. Phys. 113, 063903 (2013)

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Østerberg, Frederik Westergaard; Henriksen, Anders Dahl; Rizzi, Giovanni

    2013-01-01

    In a recent paper, Sinha et al. compared sensitivities of planar Hall effect sensors with different geometries that are all based on the anisotropic magnetoresistance of permalloy. They write that the sensitivity of a planar Hall effect sensor with a ring geometry is a factor of √2 larger than...

  5. The magnetic flux leakage measurement by the hall sensor in the longitudinal magnetic field

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Joo, Gwang Tae; Son, Dae Rok; Han, Jung Hee; Park, Jae Hyung

    1998-01-01

    This paper is concerned with magnetic leakage flux measurement using by the hall sensor in the longitudinal magnetic field of the feromagnetic specimen. For detection sensitivity by the hall probe according to various depth of the subsurface defects, the specimen are prepared by six drilled holes of 0.5 mm φ from 1 mm depth to 4 mm depth in the carbon steel plate(10 x 35 x 265 mm). When the specimen applied by various frequency(2 - 9 Hz) of the AC through synthesizer and power amplifier in the yoke, the signals of the magnetic flux leakage using lack-in amplifier and synthesizer are decreased linearly with defect depth at 2 Hz, but these signals are decreased suddenly with defect depth from the surface and obscured with increasing frequency. And, when the specimen applied range of 1 Amp. to 5 Amp. by DC power supply in the yoke, the signals of the magnetic flux leakage through DVM decreased linearly with defect depth up to 2.5 mm depth and change slightly defect depth above 2.5 mm depth from the surface, but its signals appeared predominately.

  6. Performance Comparison of Cross-Like Hall Plates with Different Covering Layers

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fei Lyu

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available This paper studies the effects of the covering layers on the performance of a cross-like Hall plate. Three different structures of a cross-like Hall plate in various sizes are designed and analyzed. The Hall plate sensitivity and offset are characterized using a self-built measurement system. The effect of the P-type region over the active area on the current-related sensitivity is studied for different Hall plate designs. In addition, the correlation between the P-type covering layer and offset is analyzed. The best structure out of three designs is determined. Besides, a modified eight-resistor circuit model for the Hall plate is presented with improved accuracy by taking the offset into account.

  7. Design and performance evaluation of a hall effect magnetic compass for oceanographic and meteorological applications

    Digital Repository Service at National Institute of Oceanography (India)

    Joseph, A.; Desai, R.G.P.; Agarvadekar, Y.; Tengali, T.; Mishra, M.; Fadate, C.; Gomes, L.

    A Hall Effect magnetic compass, suitable for oceanographic and meteorological applications, has been designed and its performance characteristics have been evaluated. Slope of the least-squares-fitted linear graph was found to be close to the ideal...

  8. Audience noise in concert halls during musical performances

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jeong, Cheol-Ho; Marie, Pierre; Brunskog, Jonas

    2012-01-01

    functions of the sound pressure levels were obtained in octave bands, which were fitted with three Gaussian distribution curves. The Gaussian distribution curve with the lowest mean value corresponds to a mixture of the technical background noise and audience generated noise, which is named the mixed...... background noise. Finally, the audience noise distribution is extracted by energy subtraction of the technical background noise levels measured in an empty condition from the mixed background noise levels. As a single index, L-90 of the audience noise distribution is named the audience noise level. Empirical...... prediction models were made using the four orchestra concert halls, revealing that the audience noise level is significantly correlated with the technical background noise level. It is therefore concluded that a relaxation of the current background noise recommendations for concert halls is not recommended...

  9. Audience noise in concert halls during musical performances

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Marie, Pierre; Jeong, Cheol-Ho; Brunskog, Jonas

    2012-01-01

    functions of the sound pressure levels were obtained in octave bands, which were fitted with three Gaussian distribution curves. The Gaussian distribution curve with the lowest mean value corresponds to a mixture of the technical background noise and audience generated noise, which is named the mixed...... background noise. Finally, the audience noise distribution is extracted by energy subtraction of the technical background noise levels measured in an empty condition from the mixed background noise levels. As a single index, L90 of the audience noise distribution is named the audience noise level. Empirical...... prediction models were made using the four orchestra concert halls, revealing that the audience noise level is significantly correlated with the technical background noise level. It is therefore concluded that a relaxation of the current background noise recommendations for concert halls is not recommended....

  10. Performance evaluation of multi-sensor data fusion technique for ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    R. Narasimhan (Krishtel eMaging) 1461 1996 Oct 15 13:05:22

    Multi-sensor data fusion; Test Range application; trajectory .... Kalman filtering technique utilizes the noise statistics of the underlying system under con- ..... Hall D L 1992 Mathematical techniques in multi-sensor data fusion (Boston, MA: ...

  11. A simple approach to detect and correct signal faults of Hall position sensors for brushless DC motors at steady speed

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shi, Yongli; Wu, Zhong; Zhi, Kangyi; Xiong, Jun

    2018-03-01

    In order to realize reliable commutation of brushless DC motors (BLDCMs), a simple approach is proposed to detect and correct signal faults of Hall position sensors in this paper. First, the time instant of the next jumping edge for Hall signals is predicted by using prior information of pulse intervals in the last electrical period. Considering the possible errors between the predicted instant and the real one, a confidence interval is set by using the predicted value and a suitable tolerance for the next pulse edge. According to the relationship between the real pulse edge and the confidence interval, Hall signals can be judged and the signal faults can be corrected. Experimental results of a BLDCM at steady speed demonstrate the effectiveness of the approach.

  12. Using permalloy based planar hall effect sensors to capture and detect superparamagnetic beads for lab on a chip applications

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Volmer, Marius; Avram, Marioara

    2015-01-01

    Experimental studies have been carried out on planar Hall effect (PHE) sensors used to detect magnetic nanoparticles employed as labels for biodetection applications. Disk shaped sensors, 1 mm diameter, were structured on Permalloy film, 20 nm thick. To control the sensor magnetisation state and thus the field sensitivity and linearity, a DC biasing field has been applied parallel to the driving current. Maghemite nanoparticles (10 nm) functionalised with Polyethylene glycol (PEG) 6000 were immobilised over the sensor surface using particular magnetisation state and applied magnetic fields. In order to obtain a higher response from the magnetic nanoparticles, it was used a detection setup which allows the application of magnetic fields larger than 100 Oe but avoiding saturation of the PHE signal. Based on this setup, two field scanning methods are presented in this paper. During our experiments, low magnetic moments, of about 1.87×10 −5 emu, have been easily detected. This value corresponds to a mass of 9.35 µg of maghemite nanoparticles functionalised with PEG 6000. The results suggest that this type of structure is feasible for building low cost micrometer sized PHE sensors to be used for high-resolution bio sensing applications. - Highlights: • Disk-shaped Permalloy planar Hall effect sensors have been obtained and tested. • Two field scanning methods have been proposed. • The magnetic nanoparticles can be trapped on the sensor surface. • High detection sensitivity has been obtained

  13. Reversible and irreversible temperature-induced changes in exchange-biased planar Hall effect bridge (PHEB) magnetic field sensors

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rizzi, G.; Lundtoft, N.C.; Østerberg, F.W.

    2012-01-01

    We investigate the changes of planar Hall effect bridge magnetic field sensors upon exposure to temperatures between 25° C and 90°C. From analyses of the sensor response vs. magnetic fields we extract the exchange bias field Hex, the uniaxial anisotropy field HK and the anisotropic...... magnetoresistance (AMR) of the exchange biased thin film at a given temperature and by comparing measurements carried out at elevated temperatures T with measurements carried out at 25° C after exposure to T, we can separate the reversible from the irreversible changes of the sensor. The results are not only...... relevant for sensor applications but also demonstrate the method as a useful tool for characterizing exchange-biased thin films....

  14. Non-destructive evaluation of austenite stainless steels using a scanning Hall-sensor microscope

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Oota, Akio

    2004-01-01

    Spontaneous magnetic field on the surface of austenite stainless steel SUS304 was measured under a static condition by using a scanning Hall-sensor microscope, which had magnetic sensitive area of 50μm x 50μm. The precursor of fatigue fracture was tentatively detected from the change of magnetic image observed by the microscope. Specimens used in this experiment were prepared by following procedures: Rolled SUS304 was cut into a piece of 110 mm length x 40 mm width by electric discharge processing, and then notches were carved at both centers of the length of the piece. A test of tensile strength of the piece was run at room temperature, and the change of spontaneous magnetization image was studied before and after the tensile strength test. After the test, spontaneous magnetic field was observed around the notches although it was not detected before the test. Many slip lines were found around the location where the spontaneous magnetic field was observed, and a significant increase of hardness was examined by Vickers hardness. These facts indicated that the spontaneous magnetic field observed after the test would be caused from stress-induced martensitic transformation in austenite stainless steel. The stress distribution after applying tensile stress was simulated and the result was compared with the distribution of the spontaneous magnetic field. After the comparison between the stress and the spontaneous magnetic field distribution, it was concluded that the distribution of spontaneous magnetic field resembled that of principal shear stress rather than of principal stress. Therefore, the principal shear stress would be suggested to be a driving force for the stress-induced martensitic transformation. (Y. Kazumata)

  15. Performance and Environmental Test Results of the High Voltage Hall Accelerator Engineering Development Unit

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kamhawi, Hani; Haag, Thomas; Huang, Wensheng; Shastry, Rohit; Pinero, Luis; Peterson, Todd; Mathers, Alex

    2012-01-01

    NASA Science Mission Directorate's In-Space Propulsion Technology Program is sponsoring the development of a 3.5 kW-class engineering development unit Hall thruster for implementation in NASA science and exploration missions. NASA Glenn and Aerojet are developing a high fidelity high voltage Hall accelerator that can achieve specific impulse magnitudes greater than 2,700 seconds and xenon throughput capability in excess of 300 kilograms. Performance, plume mappings, thermal characterization, and vibration tests of the high voltage Hall accelerator engineering development unit have been performed. Performance test results indicated that at 3.9 kW the thruster achieved a total thrust efficiency and specific impulse of 58%, and 2,700 sec, respectively. Thermal characterization tests indicated that the thruster component temperatures were within the prescribed material maximum operating temperature limits during full power thruster operation. Finally, thruster vibration tests indicated that the thruster survived the 3-axes qualification full-level random vibration test series. Pre and post-vibration test performance mappings indicated almost identical thruster performance. Finally, an update on the development progress of a power processing unit and a xenon feed system is provided.

  16. An orientation measurement method based on Hall-effect sensors for permanent magnet spherical actuators with 3D magnet array.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yan, Liang; Zhu, Bo; Jiao, Zongxia; Chen, Chin-Yin; Chen, I-Ming

    2014-10-24

    An orientation measurement method based on Hall-effect sensors is proposed for permanent magnet (PM) spherical actuators with three-dimensional (3D) magnet array. As there is no contact between the measurement system and the rotor, this method could effectively avoid friction torque and additional inertial moment existing in conventional approaches. Curved surface fitting method based on exponential approximation is proposed to formulate the magnetic field distribution in 3D space. The comparison with conventional modeling method shows that it helps to improve the model accuracy. The Hall-effect sensors are distributed around the rotor with PM poles to detect the flux density at different points, and thus the rotor orientation can be computed from the measured results and analytical models. Experiments have been conducted on the developed research prototype of the spherical actuator to validate the accuracy of the analytical equations relating the rotor orientation and the value of magnetic flux density. The experimental results show that the proposed method can measure the rotor orientation precisely, and the measurement accuracy could be improved by the novel 3D magnet array. The study result could be used for real-time motion control of PM spherical actuators.

  17. Effects of facility backpressure on the performance and plume of a Hall thruster

    Science.gov (United States)

    Walker, Mitchell Louis Ronald

    2005-07-01

    This dissertation presents research aimed at understanding the relationship between facility background pressure, Hall thruster performance, and plume characteristics. Due to the wide range of facilities used in Hall thruster testing, it is difficult for researchers to make adequate comparisons between data sets because of both dissimilar instrumentation and backpressures. The differences in the data sets are due to the ingestion of background gas into the Hall thruster discharge channel and charge-exchange collisions in the plume. Thus, this research aims to understand facility effects and to develop the tools needed to allow researchers to obtain relevant plume and performance data for a variety of chambers and backpressures. The first portion of this work develops a technique for calibrating a vacuum chamber in terms of pressure to account for elevated backpressures while testing Hall thrusters. Neutral gas background pressure maps of the Large Vacuum Test Facility are created at a series of cold anode flow rates and one hot flow rate at two UM/AFRL P5 5 kW Hall thruster operating conditions. These data show that a cold flow pressure map can be used to approximate the neutral background pressure in the chamber with the thruster in operation. In addition, the data are used to calibrate a numerical model that accurately predicts facility backpressure within a vacuum chamber of specified geometry and pumping speed. The second portion of this work investigates how facility backpressure influences the plume, plume diagnostics, and performance of the P5 Hall thruster. Measurements of the plume and performance characteristics over a wide range of pressures show that ingestion, a decrease in the downstream plasma potential, and broadening of the ion energy distribution function cause the increase in thrust with backpressure. Furthermore, a magnetically-filtered Faraday probe accurately measures ion current density at elevated operating pressures. The third portion of

  18. Design and Realization of a Three Degrees of Freedom Displacement Measurement System Composed of Hall Sensors Based on Magnetic Field Fitting by an Elliptic Function

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bo Zhao

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available This paper presents the design and realization of a three degrees of freedom (DOFs displacement measurement system composed of Hall sensors, which is built for the XYθz displacement measurement of the short stroke stage of the reticle stage of lithography. The measurement system consists of three pairs of permanent magnets mounted on the same plane on the short stroke stage along the Y, Y, X directions, and three single axis Hall sensors correspondingly mounted on the frame of the reticle stage. The emphasis is placed on the decoupling and magnetic field fitting of the three DOFs measurement system. The model of the measurement system is illustrated, and the XY positions and θZ rotation of the short stroke stage can be obtained by decoupling the sensor outputs. A magnetic field fitting by an elliptic function-based compensation method is proposed. The practical field intensity of a permanent magnet at a certain plane height can be substituted for the output voltage of a Hall sensors, which can be expressed by the elliptic function through experimental data as the crucial issue to calculate the three DOFs displacement. Experimental results of the Hall sensor displacement measurement system are presented to validate the proposed three DOFs measurement system.

  19. Performance of a Cylindrical Hall-Effect Thruster Using Permanent Magnets

    Science.gov (United States)

    Polzin, Kurt A.; Raitses, Y.; Merino, E.; Fisch, N. J.

    2009-01-01

    While annular Hall thrusters can operate at high efficiency at kW power levels, it is difficult to construct one that operates over a broad envelope from 1 kW down to 100 W while maintaining an efficiency of 45-55%. Scaling to low power while holding the main dimensionless parameters constant requires a decrease in the thruster channel size and an increase in the magnetic field strength. Increasing the magnetic field becomes technically challenging since the field can saturate the miniaturized inner components of the magnetic circuit and scaling down the magnetic circuit leaves very little room for magnetic pole pieces and heat shields. In addition, the central magnetic pole piece defining the interior wall of the annular channel can experience excessive heat loads in a miniaturized Hall thruster, with the temperature eventually exceeding the Curie temperature of the material and in extreme circumstances leading to accelerated erosion of the channel wall. An alternative approach is to employ a cylindrical Hall thruster (CHT) geometry. Laboratory model CHTs have operated at power levels ranging from 50 W up to 1 kW. These thrusters exhibit performance characteristics that are comparable to conventional, annular Hall thrusters of similar size. Compared to the annular Hall thruster, the CHTs insulator surface area to discharge chamber volume ratio is lower. Consequently, there is the potential for reduced wall losses in the channel of a CHT, and any reduction in wall losses should translate into lower channel heating rates and reduced erosion, making the CHT geometry promising for low-power applications. This potential for high performance in the low-power regime has served as the impetus for research and development efforts aimed at understanding and improving CHT performance. Recently, a 2.6 cm channel diameter permanent magnet CHT (shown in Fig. 1) was tested. This thruster has the promise of reduced power consumption over previous CHT iterations that employed

  20. Experimental measurement of magnetic field null in the vacuum chamber of KTM tokamak based on matrix of 2D Hall sensors

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Shapovalov, G.; Chektybayev, B., E-mail: chektybaev@nnc.kz; Sadykov, A.; Skakov, M.; Kupishev, E.

    2016-11-15

    Experimental technique of measurement of magnetic field null region inside of the KTM tokamak vacuum chamber has been developed. Square matrix of 36 2D Hall sensors, which used in the technique, allows carrying out direct measurements of poloidal magnetic field dynamics in the vacuum chamber. To better measuring accuracy, Hall sensor’s matrix was calibrated with commercial Helmholtz coils and in situ measurement of defined magnetic field from poloidal and toroidal coils. Standard KTM Data-Acquisition System has been used to collect data from Hall sensors. Experimental results of measurement of magnetic field null in the vacuum chamber of KTM are shown in the paper. Additionally results of the magnetic field null reconstruction from signals of inductive total flux loops are shown in the paper.

  1. Energy-related environmental and economic performance analysis of two different types of electrically heated student residence halls

    Science.gov (United States)

    Amber, Khuram Pervez; Aslam, Muhammad Waqar

    2018-03-01

    Student residence halls occupy 26% of the total area of a typical university campus in the UK and are directly responsible for 24% of university's annual CO2 emissions. Based on five years measured data, this paper aims to investigate the energy-related environmental and economic performance of electrically heated residence halls in which space heating is provided by two different types of electric heaters, that is, panel heater (PHT) and storage heater (SHT). Secondly, using statistical and machine learning methods, the paper attempts to investigate the relationship between daily electricity consumption and five factors (ambient temperature, solar radiation, relative humidity, wind speed and type of day). Data analysis revealed that electricity consumption of both halls is mainly driven by ambient temperature only, whereas SHT residence has 39% higher annual electricity bill and emits 70% higher CO2 emissions on a per square metre basis compared to the PHT residence hall.

  2. Performance of a Permanent-Magnet Cylindrical Hall-Effect Thruster

    Science.gov (United States)

    Polzin, K. A.; Sooby, E. S.; Kimberlin, A. C.; Raites, Y.; Merino, E.; Fisch, N. J.

    2009-01-01

    The performance of a low-power cylindrical Hall thruster, which more readily lends itself to miniaturization and low-power operation than a conventional (annular) Hall thruster, was measured using a planar plasma probe and a thrust stand. The field in the cylindrical thruster was produced using permanent magnets, promising a power reduction over previous cylindrical thruster iterations that employed electromagnets to generate the required magnetic field topology. Two sets of ring-shaped permanent magnets are used, and two different field configurations can be produced by reorienting the poles of one magnet relative to the other. A plasma probe measuring ion flux in the plume is used to estimate the current utilization for the two magnetic topologies. The measurements indicate that electron transport is impeded much more effectively in one configuration, implying higher thrust efficiency. Thruster performance measurements on this configuration were obtained over a power range of 70-350 W and with the cathode orifice located at three different axial positions relative to the thruster exit plane. The thrust levels over this power range were 1.25-6.5 mN, with anode efficiencies and specific impulses spanning 4-21% and 400-1950 s, respectively. The anode efficiency of the permanent-magnet thruster compares favorable with the efficiency of the electromagnet thruster when the power consumed by the electromagnets is taken into account.

  3. Comparisons in Performance of Electromagnet and Permanent-Magnet Cylindrical Hall-Effect Thrusters

    Science.gov (United States)

    Polzin, K. A.; Raitses, Y.; Gayoso, J. C.; Fisch, N. J.

    2010-01-01

    Three different low-power cylindrical Hall thrusters, which more readily lend themselves to miniaturization and low-power operation than a conventional (annular) Hall thruster, are compared to evaluate the propulsive performance of each. One thruster uses electromagnet coils to produce the magnetic field within the discharge channel while the others use permanent magnets, promising power reduction relative to the electromagnet thruster. A magnetic screen is added to the permanent magnet thruster to improve performance by keeping the magnetic field from expanding into space beyond the exit of the thruster. The combined dataset spans a power range from 50-350 W. The thrust levels over this range were 1.3-7.3 mN, with thruster efficiencies and specific impulses spanning 3.5-28.7% and 400-1940 s, respectively. The efficiency is generally higher for the permanent magnet thruster with the magnetic screen, while That thruster s specific impulse as a function of discharge voltage is comparable to the electromagnet thruster.

  4. The design and performance of the electromagnetic calorimeters in Hall C at Jefferson Lab

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tadevosyan, V; Mkrtchyan, H; Asaturyan, A; Mkrtchyan, A; Zhamkochyan, S

    2012-01-01

    The design and performance of the electromagnetic calorimeters in the magnetic spectrometers in Hall C at Jefferson Lab are presented. For the existing HMS and SOS spectrometers, construction information and comparisons of simulated and experimental results are presented. The design and simulated performance for a new calorimeter to be used in the new SHMS spectrometer is also presented. We have developed and constructed electromagnetic calorimeters from TF-1 type lead-glass blocks for the HMS and SOS magnetic spectrometers at JLab Hall C. The HMS/SOS calorimeters are of identical design and construction except for their total size. Blocks of dimension 10 cm × 10 cm × 70 cm are arranged in four planes and stacked 13 and 11 blocks high in the HMS and SOS respectively. The energy resolution of these calorimeters is better than 6%/√E, and pion/electron (π/e) separation of about 100:1 has been achieved in energy range 1–5 GeV. Good agreement has been observed between the experimental and GEANT4 simulated energy resolutions. The HMS/SOS calorimeters have been used nearly in all Hall C experiments, providing good energy resolution and a high pion suppression factor. No significant deterioration in their performance has been observed in the course of use since 1994. For the SHMS spectrometer, presently under construction, details on the calorimeter design and accompanying GEANT4 simulation efforts are given. A Preshower+Shower design was selected as the most cost-effective among several design choices. The preshower will consist of a layer of 28 modules with TF-1 type lead glass radiators, stacked in two columns. The shower part will consist of 224 modules with F-101 type lead glass radiators, stacked in a “fly's eye” configuration of 14 columns and 16 rows. The active area of 120 × 130 cm 2 will encompass the beam envelope at the calorimeter. The anticipated performance of the new calorimeter is simulated over the full momentum range of the SHMS, predicting

  5. Magnetic measurements using array of integrated Hall sensors on the CASTOR tokamak

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Ďuran, Ivan; Hronová-Bilyková, Olena; Stöckel, Jan; Sentkerestiová, J.; Havlíček, Josef

    2008-01-01

    Roč. 79, č. 10 (2008), 10F123-10F123 ISSN 0034-6748. [Topical Conference on High-Temperature Plasma Diagnostics/17th./. Albuquerque, 11.05.2008-15.05.2008] R&D Projects: GA MPO 2A-1TP1/101 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z20430508 Keywords : Galvanomagnetic Sensor * Fusion Reactor * Magnetic Diagnostics * CASTOR tokamak Subject RIV: BG - Nuclear, Atomic and Molecular Physics, Colliders Impact factor: 1.738, year: 2008

  6. Irradiation tests of ITER candidate Hall sensors using two types of neutron spectra

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Ďuran, Ivan; Bolshakova, I.; Viererbl, L.; Sentkerestiová, J.; Holyaka, R.; Lahodová, Z.; Bém, Pavel

    2010-01-01

    Roč. 81, č. 10 (2010), 10E122-10E122 ISSN 0034-6748. [Topical Conference on High-Temperature Plasma Diagnostics/18th./. Wildwood, 16.05.2010-20.05.2010] R&D Projects: GA ČR GD202/08/H057; GA MPO 2A-1TP1/101 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z20430508; CEZ:AV0Z10480505 Keywords : Galvanomagnetic Sensor * Fusion Reactor * Magnetic Diagnostics * Radiation Subject RIV: BG - Nuclear, Atomic and Molecular Physics, Colliders Impact factor: 1.598, year: 2010

  7. Miniaturized high performance sensors for space plasmas

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Young, D.T.

    1996-01-01

    Operating under ever more constrained budgets, NASA has turned to a new paradigm for instrumentation and mission development in which smaller, faster, better, cheaper is of primary consideration for future space plasma investigations. The author presents several examples showing the influence of this new paradigm on sensor development and discuss certain implications for the scientific return from resource constrained sensors. The author also discusses one way to improve space plasma sensor performance which is to search out new technologies, measurement techniques and instrument analogs from related fields including among others, laboratory plasma physics

  8. On-Chip Magnetorelaxometry Using Planar Hall Effect Magnetic Field Sensors

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Østerberg, Frederik Westergaard

    In recent years there has been an increasing interest in developing lab-on-a-chip devices that potentially can be used as point-of-care biosensors. The advantage of point-of-care biosensors is that they can analyze samples obtained from patients immediately, cutting away the time needed for sending...... the sample to a laboratory for analysis. Many different read out techniques can be used for point-of-care biosensors, among these are magnetic readouts, which are especially interesting because most biological samples are non-magnetic. The goal of this thesis is to explore the possibilities and limitations...... signals by a factor of six compared to the cross sensor without significant noise being added to the measurements. A study varying the concentration of magnetic beads with a nominal diameter of 40 nm shows that the hydrodynamic diameters can be extracted reliably for concentrations down to 64 _g...

  9. Modelling and design of planar Hall effect bridge sensors for low-frequency applications

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Persson, Åsa; Bejhed, R.S.; Østerberg, Frederik Westergaard

    2013-01-01

    .g., disregarding shape anisotropy effects, and also incorporates some approximations. To validate the results, modelled data was compared to measurements on actual PHEBs and was found to predict the measured values within 13% for the investigated geometries. Subsequently, the model was used to establish a design...... that PHEBs can be applicable to several different areas within science including satellite attitude determination and magnetic bead detection in lab-on-a-chip applications, where detectivities down towards 1 nT Hz -0.5 at 1 Hz are required, and maybe even magnetic field measurements in scientific space......The applicability of miniaturized magnetic field sensors is being explored in several areas of magnetic field detection due to their integratability, low mass, and potentially low cost. In this respect, different thin-film technologies, especially those employing magnetoresistance, show great...

  10. Developments in Scanning Hall Probe Microscopy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chouinard, Taras; Chu, Ricky; David, Nigel; Broun, David

    2009-05-01

    Low temperature scanning Hall probe microscopy is a sensitive means of imaging magnetic structures with high spatial resolution and magnetic flux sensitivity approaching that of a Superconducting Quantum Interference Device. We have developed a scanning Hall probe microscope with novel features, including highly reliable coarse positioning, in situ optimization of sensor-sample alignment and capacitive transducers for linear, long range positioning measurement. This has been motivated by the need to reposition accurately above fabricated nanostructures such as small superconducting rings. Details of the design and performance will be presented as well as recent progress towards time-resolved measurements with sub nanosecond resolution.

  11. Performance Test Results of the NASA-457M v2 Hall Thruster

    Science.gov (United States)

    Soulas, George C.; Haag, Thomas W.; Herman, Daniel A.; Huang, Wensheng; Kamhawi, Hani; Shastry, Rohit

    2012-01-01

    Performance testing of a second generation, 50 kW-class Hall thruster labeled NASA-457M v2 was conducted at the NASA Glenn Research Center. This NASA-designed thruster is an excellent candidate for a solar electric propulsion system that supports human exploration missions. Thruster discharge power was varied from 5 to 50 kW over discharge voltage and current ranges of 200 to 500 V and 15 to 100 A, respectively. Anode efficiencies varied from 0.56 to 0.71. The peak efficiency was similar to that of other state-of-the-art high power Hall thrusters, but outperformed these thrusters at lower discharge voltages. The 0.05 to 0.18 higher anode efficiencies of this thruster compared to its predecessor were primarily due to which of two stable discharge modes the thruster was operated. One stable mode was at low magnetic field strengths, which produced high anode efficiencies, and the other at high magnetic fields where its predecessor was operated. Cathode keeper voltages were always within 2.1 to 6.2 V and cathode voltages were within 13 V of tank ground during high anode efficiency operation. However, during operation at high magnetic fields, cathode-to-ground voltage magnitudes increased dramatically, exceeding 30 V, due to the high axial magnetic field strengths in the immediate vicinity of the centrally-mounted cathode. The peak thrust was 2.3 N and this occurred at a total thruster input power of 50.0 kW at a 500 V discharge voltage. The thruster demonstrated a thrust-to-power range of 76.4 mN/kW at low power to 46.1 mN/kW at full power, and a specific impulse range of 1420 to 2740 s. For a discharge voltage of 300 V, where specific impulses would be about 2000 s, thrust efficiencies varied from 0.57 to 0.63.

  12. On the feasibility to perform integral transmission experiments in the GELINA target hall at IRMM

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leconte, Pierre; Jean, Cyrille De Saint; Geslot, Benoit; Plompen, Arjan; Belloni, Francesca; Nyman, Markus

    2017-09-01

    Shielding experiments are relevant to validate elastic and inelastic scattering cross sections in the fast energy range. In this paper, we are focusing on the possibility to use the pulsed white neutron time-of-flight facility GELINA to perform this kind of measurement. Several issues need to be addressed: neutron source intensity, room return effect, distance of the materials to be irradiated from the source, and the sensitivity of various reaction rate distributions through the material to different input cross sections. MCNP6 and TRIPOLI4 calculations of the outgoing neutron spectrum are compared, based on electron/positron/gamma/neutron simulations. A first guess of an integral transmission experiment through a 238U slab is considered. It shows that a 10 cm thickness of uranium is sufficient to reach a high sensitivity to the 238U inelastic scattering cross section in the [2-5 MeV] energy range, with small contributions from elastic and fission cross sections. This experiment would contribute to reduce the uncertainty on this nuclear data, which has a significant impact on the power distribution in large commercial reactors. Other materials that would be relevant for the ASTRID 4th generation prototype reactor are also tested, showing that a sufficient sensitivity to nuclear data would be obtained by using a 50 to 100cm thick slab of side 60x60cm. This study concludes on the feasibility and interest of such experiments in the target hall of the GELINA facility.

  13. Performance of active edge pixel sensors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bomben, M.; Ducourthial, A.; Bagolini, A.; Boscardin, M.; Bosisio, L.; Calderini, G.; D'Eramo, L.; Giacomini, G.; Marchiori, G.; Zorzi, N.; Rummler, A.; Weingarten, J.

    2017-05-01

    To cope with the High Luminosity LHC harsh conditions, the ATLAS inner tracker has to be upgraded to meet requirements in terms of radiation hardness, pile up and geometrical acceptance. The active edge technology allows to reduce the insensitive area at the border of the sensor thanks to an ion etched trench which avoids the crystal damage produced by the standard mechanical dicing process. Thin planar n-on-p pixel sensors with active edge have been designed and produced by LPNHE and FBK foundry. Two detector module prototypes, consisting of pixel sensors connected to FE-I4B readout chips, have been tested with beams at CERN and DESY. In this paper the performance of these modules are reported. In particular the lateral extension of the detection volume, beyond the pixel region, is investigated and the results show high hit efficiency also at the detector edge, even in presence of guard rings.

  14. Performance study of double SOI image sensors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miyoshi, T.; Arai, Y.; Fujita, Y.; Hamasaki, R.; Hara, K.; Ikegami, Y.; Kurachi, I.; Nishimura, R.; Ono, S.; Tauchi, K.; Tsuboyama, T.; Yamada, M.

    2018-02-01

    Double silicon-on-insulator (DSOI) sensors composed of two thin silicon layers and one thick silicon layer have been developed since 2011. The thick substrate consists of high resistivity silicon with p-n junctions while the thin layers are used as SOI-CMOS circuitry and as shielding to reduce the back-gate effect and crosstalk between the sensor and the circuitry. In 2014, a high-resolution integration-type pixel sensor, INTPIX8, was developed based on the DSOI concept. This device is fabricated using a Czochralski p-type (Cz-p) substrate in contrast to a single SOI (SSOI) device having a single thin silicon layer and a Float Zone p-type (FZ-p) substrate. In the present work, X-ray spectra of both DSOI and SSOI sensors were obtained using an Am-241 radiation source at four gain settings. The gain of the DSOI sensor was found to be approximately three times that of the SSOI device because the coupling capacitance is reduced by the DSOI structure. An X-ray imaging demonstration was also performed and high spatial resolution X-ray images were obtained.

  15. Direct measurement of the field from a magnetic recording head using an InAs Hall sensor on a contact write/read tester

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gokemeijer, N.J.; Clinton, T.W.; Crawford, T.M.; Johnson, Mark

    2005-01-01

    At 1 Tbit/in 2 areal density magnetic recording dimensions, reliable magnetic field metrology does not exist. One technique to map the spatial profile of the magnetic field of a write head is to use a contact read/write tester. A magnetic recording head is brought into contact with a Hall sensor, and is subsequently scanned with nm resolution. For a 300 nm track width longitudinal recording head, the magnetic field of the head was mapped. Measurements include the down track field gradient and cross-track field profile and the current-field transfer curve. These results suggest this technique offers a viable write field metrology

  16. Chip-Based Measurements of Brownian Relaxation of Magnetic Beads Using a Planar Hall Effect Magnetic Field Sensor

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Østerberg, Frederik Westergaard; Dalslet, Bjarke Thomas; Snakenborg, Detlef

    2010-01-01

    using only the self-field arising from the bias current applied to the sensors as excitation field. We present measurements on a suspension of magnetic beads with a nominal diameter of 250 nm vs. temperature and find that the observations are consistent with the Cole-Cole model for Brownian relaxation...... with a constant hydrodynamic bead diameter when the temperature dependence of the viscosity of water is taken into account. These measurements demonstrate the feasibility of performing measurements of the Brownian relaxation response in a lab-on-a-chip system and constitute the first step towards an integrated...... biosensor based on the detection of the dynamic response of magnetic beads....

  17. Handheld magnetic probe with permanent magnet and Hall sensor for identifying sentinel lymph nodes in breast cancer patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sekino, Masaki; Kuwahata, Akihiro; Ookubo, Tetsu; Shiozawa, Mikio; Ohashi, Kaichi; Kaneko, Miki; Saito, Itsuro; Inoue, Yusuke; Ohsaki, Hiroyuki; Takei, Hiroyuki; Kusakabe, Moriaki

    2018-01-19

    The newly developed radioisotope-free technique based on magnetic nanoparticle detection using a magnetic probe is a promising method for sentinel lymph node biopsy. In this study, a novel handheld magnetic probe with a permanent magnet and magnetic sensor is developed to detect the sentinel lymph nodes in breast cancer patients. An outstanding feature of the probe is the precise positioning of the sensor at the magnetic null point of the magnet, leading to highly sensitive measurements unaffected by the strong ambient magnetic fields of the magnet. Numerical and experimental results show that the longitudinal detection length is approximately 10 mm, for 140 μg of iron. Clinical tests were performed, for the first time, using magnetic and blue dye tracers-without radioisotopes-in breast cancer patients to demonstrate the performance of the probe. The nodes were identified through transcutaneous and ex-vivo measurements, and the iron accumulation in the nodes was quantitatively revealed. These results show that the handheld magnetic probe is useful in sentinel lymph node biopsy and that magnetic techniques are widely being accepted as future standard methods in medical institutions lacking nuclear medicine facilities.

  18. Scanning vector Hall probe microscopy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cambel, V.; Gregusova, D.; Fedor, J.; Kudela, R.; Bending, S.J.

    2004-01-01

    We have developed a scanning vector Hall probe microscope for mapping magnetic field vector over magnetic samples. The microscope is based on a micromachined Hall sensor and the cryostat with scanning system. The vector Hall sensor active area is ∼5x5 μm 2 . It is realized by patterning three Hall probes on the tilted faces of GaAs pyramids. Data from these 'tilted' Hall probes are used to reconstruct the full magnetic field vector. The scanning area of the microscope is 5x5 mm 2 , space resolution 2.5 μm, field resolution ∼1 μT Hz -1/2 at temperatures 10-300 K

  19. Magnetic Measuring Instrumentation with Radiation-Resistant Hall Sensors for Fusion Reactors: Experience of Testing at JET

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Bolshakova, I.; Quercia, A.; Coccorese, V.; Murari, A.; Holyaka, R.; Ďuran, Ivan; Viererbl, L.; Konopleva, R.; Yerashok, V.

    2012-01-01

    Roč. 59, č. 4 (2012), s. 1224-1231 ISSN 0018-9499. [International Conference on Advancements in Nuclear Instrumentation, Measurement Methods and their Applications. Ghent, 06.06.2011-09.06.2011] R&D Projects: GA ČR GAP205/10/2055 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z20430508 Keywords : plasma * tokamak * JET * Hall probes * radiation resistance Subject RIV: BL - Plasma and Gas Discharge Physics Impact factor: 1.219, year: 2012

  20. Hall A

    Data.gov (United States)

    Federal Laboratory Consortium — The instrumentation in Hall A at the Thomas Jefferson National Accelerator Facility was designed to study electroand photo-induced reactions at very high luminosity...

  1. Hall C

    Data.gov (United States)

    Federal Laboratory Consortium — Hall C's initial complement of equipment (shown in the figure), includes two general-purpose magnetic spectrometers. The High Momentum Spectrometer (HMS) has a large...

  2. Data Driven Performance Evaluation of Wireless Sensor Networks

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Antonio A. F. Loureiro

    2010-03-01

    Full Text Available Wireless Sensor Networks are presented as devices for signal sampling and reconstruction. Within this framework, the qualitative and quantitative influence of (i signal granularity, (ii spatial distribution of sensors, (iii sensors clustering, and (iv signal reconstruction procedure are assessed. This is done by defining an error metric and performing a Monte Carlo experiment. It is shown that all these factors have significant impact on the quality of the reconstructed signal. The extent of such impact is quantitatively assessed.

  3. Hydrogen Safety Sensor Performance and Use Gap Analysis: Preprint

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Buttner, William J [National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL), Golden, CO (United States); Burgess, Robert M [National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL), Golden, CO (United States); Schmidt, Kara [National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL), Golden, CO (United States); Hartmann, Kevin S [National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL), Golden, CO (United States); Wright, Hannah [National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL), Golden, CO (United States); Weidner, Eveline [Joint Research Centre, Petten, the Netherlands; Cebolla, Rafael O. [Joint Research Centre, Petten, the Netherlands; Bonato, Christian [Joint Research Centre, Petten, the Netherlands; Moretto, Pietro [Joint Research Centre, Petten, the Netherlands

    2017-11-15

    Hydrogen sensors are recognized as an important technology for facilitating the safe implementation of hydrogen as an alternative fuel, and there are numerous reports of a sensor alarm successfully preventing a potentially serious event. However, gaps in sensor metrological specifications, as well as in their performance for some applications, exist.The U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Fuel Cell Technology Office published a short list of critical gaps in the 2007 and 2012 multiyear project plans; more detailed gap analyses were independently performed by the JRC and NREL. There have been, however, some significant advances in sensor technologies since these assessments, including the commercial availability of hydrogen sensors with fast response times (t90 less than 1 s, which had been an elusive DOE target since 2007), improved robustness to chemical poisons, improved selectivity, and improved lifetime and stability. These improvements, however, have not been universal and typically pertain to select platforms or models. Moreover, as hydrogen markets grow and new applications are being explored, more demands will be imposed on sensor performance. The hydrogen sensor laboratories at NREL and JRC are currently updating the hydrogen safety sensor gap analysis through direct interaction with international stakeholders in the hydrogen community, especially end-users. NREL and the JRC are currently organizing a series of workshops (in Europe and the U.S.) with sensor developers, end-users, and other stakeholders in 2017 to identify technology gaps and to develop a path forward to address them. One workshop is scheduled for May 10 in Brussels, Belgium at the Headquarters of the Fuel Cell and Hydrogen Joint Undertaking. A second workshop is planned at the National Renewable Energy Laboratory in Golden, CO, USA. This presentation will review improvements in sensor technologies in the past 5 to 10 years, identify gaps in sensor performance and use requirements, and identify

  4. Flexible Sensors for Pressure Therapy: Effect of Substrate Curvature and Stiffness on Sensor Performance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Khodasevych, Iryna; Parmar, Suresh; Troynikov, Olga

    2017-10-20

    Flexible pressure sensors are increasingly being used in medical and non-medical applications, and particularly in innovative health monitoring. Their efficacy in medical applications such as compression therapy depends on the accuracy and repeatability of their output, which in turn depend on factors such as sensor type, shape, pressure range, and conformability of the sensor to the body surface. Numerous researchers have examined the effects of sensor type and shape, but little information is available on the effect of human body parameters such as support surfaces' curvature and the stiffness of soft tissues on pressure sensing performance. We investigated the effects of body parameters on the performance of pressure sensors using a custom-made human-leg-like test setup. Pressure sensing parameters such as accuracy, drift and repeatability were determined in both static (eight hours continuous pressure) and dynamic (10 cycles of pressure application of 30 s duration) testing conditions. The testing was performed with a focus on compression therapy application for venous leg ulcer treatments, and was conducted in a low-pressure range of 20-70 mmHg. Commercially available sensors manufactured by Peratech and Sensitronics were used under various loading conditions to determine the influence of stiffness and curvature. Flat rigid, flat soft silicone and three cylindrical silicone surfaces of radii of curvature of 3.5 cm, 5.5 cm and 6.5 cm were used as substrates under the sensors. The Peratech sensor averaged 94% accuracy for both static and dynamic measurements on all substrates; the Sensitronics sensor averaged 88% accuracy. The Peratech sensor displayed moderate variations and the Sensitronics sensor large variations in output pressure readings depending on the underlying test surface, both of which were reduced markedly by individual pressure calibration for surface type. Sensor choice and need for calibration to surface type are important considerations for

  5. Performance evaluation of multi-sensor data-fusion systems

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    In this paper, the utilization of multi-sensors of different types, their characteristics, and their data-fusion in launch vehicles to achieve the goal of injecting the satellite into a precise orbit is explained. Performance requirements of sensors and their redundancy management in a typical launch vehicle are also included.

  6. Fabrication of advanced military radiation detector sensor and performance evaluation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kang, Sin Yang

    2010-02-01

    shows a performance comparable to commercial ones. The beta ray sensor was manufactured using a BC-408 organic plastic scintillator. The main goal of this study was the measurement of beta - ray responses of the PMMA light guide attached to the sensor and the determination of window materials. Finally, the CsI(Tl) scintillator gamma ray sensor manufactured as engineering model and the shielding case was made of duralumin (side plane) and aluminium (window). The performance of the gamma - ray sensor was comparable to commercial high - sensitivity industrial sensors. These three types of scintillation sensors can be used directly as military equipment. And this study helps improving the protection of our country from nuclear threats

  7. Performance analysis of a self-locating mobile sensor

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bøgsted, Martin; Rasmussen, Jakob Gulddahl; Lundbye-Christensen, Søren

    to an autoregressive model. Measurement uncertainty is assumed to follow a Gaussian distribution and the probability for detecting a distance to a given sensor is assumed to fall off exponentially with squared distance. The combined model is formulated as a nonlinear state space model and Bayesian inference......We consider the ability of a mobile sensor to locate its own geographical location, the so-called self-localization problem. The need to locate people and objects has inspired the development of many systems for automatic localization. Most systems are based on location information and measured...... the performance of localization algorithms in mobile and critical situations. This is done by exploring the performance of various filtering techniques for self-localization of a mobile sensor in a field of sensors. More specifically, we model the mobility of the sensor such that the velocity varies according...

  8. Performance, Facility Pressure Effects, and Stability Characterization Tests of NASA's Hall Effect Rocket with Magnetic Shielding Thruster

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kamhawi, Hani; Huang, Wensheng; Haag, Thomas; Yim, John; Herman, Daniel; Williams, George; Gilland, James; Peterson, Peter; Hofer, Richard; Mikellides, Ioannis

    2016-01-01

    NASAs Hall Effect Rocket with Magnetic Shielding (HERMeS) 12.5 kW Technology Demonstration Unit-1 (TDU-1) Hall thruster has been the subject of extensive technology maturation in preparation for flight system development. Part of the technology maturation effort included experimental evaluation of the TDU-1 thruster with conducting and dielectric front pole cover materials in two different electrical configurations. A graphite front pole cover thruster configuration with the thruster body electrically tied to cathode and an alumina front pole cover thruster configuration with the thruster body floating were evaluated. Both configurations were also evaluated at different facility background pressure conditions to evaluate background pressure effects on thruster operation. Performance characterization tests found that higher thruster performance was attained with the graphite front pole cover configuration with the thruster electrically tied to cathode. A total thrust efficiency of 68 and a total specific impulse of 2,820 s was demonstrated at a discharge voltage of 600 V and a discharge power of 12.5 kW. Thruster stability regimes were characterized with respect to the thruster discharge current oscillations and with maps of the current-voltage-magnetic field (IVB). Analysis of TDU-1 discharge current waveforms found that lower normalized discharge current peak-to-peak and root mean square magnitudes were attained when the thruster was electrically floated with alumina front pole covers. Background pressure effects characterization tests indicated that the thruster performance and stability was mostly invariant to changes in the facility background pressure for vacuum chamber pressure below 110-5 Torr-Xe (for thruster flow rate above 8 mgs). Power spectral density analysis of the discharge current waveform showed that increasing the vacuum chamber background pressure resulted in a higher discharge current dominant frequency. Finally the IVB maps of the TDU-1

  9. Investigation of the Performance of an Inductive Seawater Conductivity Sensor

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    WU Sheng

    2015-03-01

    Full Text Available As one of the factors in marine hydrographic survey, seawater salinity plays an important role in marine scientific research, marine exploitation and military defense. In practical measurement, the salinity is always presented indirectly by seawater conductivity value. Compared with the electrode conductivity sensors, inductive conductivity sensors have an advantage of anti-biofouling, and that is very interested in long term ocean observation device. From the principle point of view, this paper discus the different methods to improve inductive sensor output signal, which is confirmed by the relative experimental results. The basic working system of inductive sensor is described here as well as a calibration in standard seawater. From a wide range of temperature, measurement absolute error and stability are close to those of actual electrode conductivity sensors. Furthermore, in the 1000 meters deep sea experiment, our inductive sensor presents a perfect similarity of conductivity profile like sea- bird sensor, even for some small variations. The performance of our inductive sensor can compete with that of commercially available electrode conductivity sensors.

  10. Scanning vector Hall probe microscope

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Fedor, J.; Cambel, V.; Gregušová, D.; Hanzelka, Pavel; Dérer, J.; Volko, J.

    2003-01-01

    Roč. 74, č. 12 (2003), s. 5105 - 5110 ISSN 0034-6748 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z2065902 Keywords : VHPM * Hall sensor * Helium cryostat Subject RIV: JB - Sensors, Measurment, Regulation Impact factor: 1.343, year: 2003 http://web. ebscohost .com/ehost/pdf?vid=8&hid=115&sid=a7c0555a-21f4-4932-b1c6-a308ac4dd50b%40sessionmgr2

  11. Sensors

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jensen, H. [PBI-Dansensor A/S (Denmark); Toft Soerensen, O. [Risoe National Lab., Materials Research Dept. (Denmark)

    1999-10-01

    A new type of ceramic oxygen sensors based on semiconducting oxides was developed in this project. The advantage of these sensors compared to standard ZrO{sub 2} sensors is that they do not require a reference gas and that they can be produced in small sizes. The sensor design and the techniques developed for production of these sensors are judged suitable by the participating industry for a niche production of a new generation of oxygen sensors. Materials research on new oxygen ion conducting conductors both for applications in oxygen sensors and in fuel was also performed in this project and finally a new process was developed for fabrication of ceramic tubes by dip-coating. (EHS)

  12. Performance of the NPP CrIS Sensor

    Science.gov (United States)

    Emch, P. G.; Farrow, S. V.; Gu, D.; Wang, C.; Hagan, D. E.; Sabet-Peyman, F.

    2009-12-01

    This paper discusses the performance of the first Cross-track Infrared Sounder (CrIS) flight instrument and its data product performance. Together with ATMS, the CrIS sensor is a critical payload for National Polar-orbiting Operational Environmental Satellite System (NPOESS) providing temperature and moisture profiles, and will first fly on the NPOESS Preparatory Project (NPP) mission, the risk reduction flight for NPOESS. NPOESS is the next generation weather and climate monitoring system for the Department of Defense and National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration (NOAA), being developed under contract by Northrop Grumman Aerospace Systems. The NPP flight sensor has recently completed thermal vacuum, electro-magnetic interference, and vibration testing. By the time of the presentation, the sensor sell-off is expected to have been completed as well. An overview of the sensor, the FM1 measurement performance, and details of the retrieval algorithms will be provided in this presentation.

  13. Acoustic/seismic signal propagation and sensor performance modeling

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wilson, D. Keith; Marlin, David H.; Mackay, Sean

    2007-04-01

    Performance, optimal employment, and interpretation of data from acoustic and seismic sensors depend strongly and in complex ways on the environment in which they operate. Software tools for guiding non-expert users of acoustic and seismic sensors are therefore much needed. However, such tools require that many individual components be constructed and correctly connected together. These components include the source signature and directionality, representation of the atmospheric and terrain environment, calculation of the signal propagation, characterization of the sensor response, and mimicking of the data processing at the sensor. Selection of an appropriate signal propagation model is particularly important, as there are significant trade-offs between output fidelity and computation speed. Attenuation of signal energy, random fading, and (for array systems) variations in wavefront angle-of-arrival should all be considered. Characterization of the complex operational environment is often the weak link in sensor modeling: important issues for acoustic and seismic modeling activities include the temporal/spatial resolution of the atmospheric data, knowledge of the surface and subsurface terrain properties, and representation of ambient background noise and vibrations. Design of software tools that address these challenges is illustrated with two examples: a detailed target-to-sensor calculation application called the Sensor Performance Evaluator for Battlefield Environments (SPEBE) and a GIS-embedded approach called Battlefield Terrain Reasoning and Awareness (BTRA).

  14. A portable Hall magnetometer probe for characterization of magnetic iron oxide nanoparticles

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Araujo, Jefferson F.D.F.; Costa, Mateus C.; Louro, Sonia R.W.; Bruno, Antonio C., E-mail: acbruno@puc-rio.br

    2017-03-15

    We have built a portable Hall magnetometer probe, for measuring magnetic properties of iron oxide nanoparticles, that can be used for bulk materials and liquid samples as well. The magnetometer probe consists of four voltage-programmable commercial Hall sensors and a thin acrylic plate for positioning the sensors. In order to operate, it needs to be attached to a pole of an electromagnet and connected to an AD converter and a computer. It acquires a complete magnetization curve in a couple of minutes and has a magnetic moment sensitivity of 3.5×10{sup −7} Am{sup 2}. We tested its performance with magnetic nanoparticles containing an iron oxide core and having coating layers with different sizes. The magnetization results obtained were compared with measurements performed on commercial stand-alone magnetometers, and exhibited errors of about ±0.2 Am{sup 2}/kg (i.e 0.4%) at saturation and below 0.5 Am{sup 2}/kg (i.e. 10%) at remanence. - Highlights: • A low-cost portable Hall magnetometer probe has been built. • The Hall magnetometer probe can be attached to any electromagnet. • The Hall probe was calibrated and successfully compared to industry standard magnetometers. • The Hall probe was able to measure iron oxide nanoparticles with different coatings.

  15. A portable Hall magnetometer probe for characterization of magnetic iron oxide nanoparticles

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Araujo, Jefferson F.D.F.; Costa, Mateus C.; Louro, Sonia R.W.; Bruno, Antonio C.

    2017-01-01

    We have built a portable Hall magnetometer probe, for measuring magnetic properties of iron oxide nanoparticles, that can be used for bulk materials and liquid samples as well. The magnetometer probe consists of four voltage-programmable commercial Hall sensors and a thin acrylic plate for positioning the sensors. In order to operate, it needs to be attached to a pole of an electromagnet and connected to an AD converter and a computer. It acquires a complete magnetization curve in a couple of minutes and has a magnetic moment sensitivity of 3.5×10 −7 Am 2 . We tested its performance with magnetic nanoparticles containing an iron oxide core and having coating layers with different sizes. The magnetization results obtained were compared with measurements performed on commercial stand-alone magnetometers, and exhibited errors of about ±0.2 Am 2 /kg (i.e 0.4%) at saturation and below 0.5 Am 2 /kg (i.e. 10%) at remanence. - Highlights: • A low-cost portable Hall magnetometer probe has been built. • The Hall magnetometer probe can be attached to any electromagnet. • The Hall probe was calibrated and successfully compared to industry standard magnetometers. • The Hall probe was able to measure iron oxide nanoparticles with different coatings.

  16. Optimization of Cylindrical Hall Thrusters

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Raitses, Yevgeny; Smirnov, Artem; Granstedt, Erik; Fisch, Nathaniel J.

    2007-01-01

    The cylindrical Hall thruster features high ionization efficiency, quiet operation, and ion acceleration in a large volume-to-surface ratio channel with performance comparable with the state-of-the-art annular Hall thrusters. These characteristics were demonstrated in low and medium power ranges. Optimization of miniaturized cylindrical thrusters led to performance improvements in the 50-200W input power range, including plume narrowing, increased thruster efficiency, reliable discharge initiation, and stable operation.

  17. Optimization of Cylindrical Hall Thrusters

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Raitses, Yevgeny; Smirnov, Artem; Granstedt, Erik; Fi, Nathaniel J.

    2007-01-01

    The cylindrical Hall thruster features high ionization efficiency, quiet operation, and ion acceleration in a large volume-to-surface ratio channel with performance comparable with the state-of-the-art annular Hall thrusters. These characteristics were demonstrated in low and medium power ranges. Optimization of miniaturized cylindrical thrusters led to performance improvements in the 50-200W input power range, including plume narrowing, increased thruster efficiency, reliable discharge initiation, and stable operation

  18. Performance enhancement of electronic sensor through mask-less lithography

    KAUST Repository

    Nag, Anindya

    2016-03-30

    The escalating applications of miniaturized sensors have led the microelectronics industry to stay abreast with the precise micro-fabrication technologies. The following article describes a new technique for the fabrication of miniaturized interdigitated capacitive sensors that own highly sensitive and real-time detections capabilities. In standard lithographic procedure, the sensors are fabricated applying different photoresist materials that give rise to the variable characteristic profile of the fabricated product. Single crystal p-doped Silicon wafer was used as a substrate material due to its advantageous properties over Germanium. Heidelberg system was used for the maskless lithographic patterning of the new interdigital sensors on a silicon substrate. The process was carried out in a clean room in the absence of ultraviolet light at a fixed temperature. The fabricated sensors were used for inflammable gas sensing application. Electrochemical Impedance Spectroscopy was applied to read the resistive and capacitive impedance measured by the sensor. The results proclaimed that the fabricated sensors own better performance in LPG detection as compared to its commercial counterparts.

  19. Sustainable Performance in Energy Harvesting - Wireless Sensor Networks

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Fafoutis, Xenofon; Di Mauro, Alessio; Dragoni, Nicola

    2013-01-01

    In this practical demo we illustrate the concept of "sustainable performance" in Energy-Harvesting Wireless Sensor Networks (EH-WSNs). In particular, for different classes of applications and under several energy harvesting scenarios, we show how it is possible to have sustainable performance when...

  20. Performance Evaluation of Five Turbidity Sensors in Three Primary Standards

    Science.gov (United States)

    Snazelle, Teri T.

    2015-10-28

    Open-File Report 2015-1172 is temporarily unavailable.Five commercially available turbidity sensors were evaluated by the U.S. Geological Survey, Hydrologic Instrumentation Facility (HIF) for accuracy and precision in three types of turbidity standards; formazin, StablCal, and AMCO Clear (AMCO–AEPA). The U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) recognizes all three turbidity standards as primary standards, meaning they are acceptable for reporting purposes. The Forrest Technology Systems (FTS) DTS-12, the Hach SOLITAX sc, the Xylem EXO turbidity sensor, the Yellow Springs Instrument (YSI) 6136 turbidity sensor, and the Hydrolab Series 5 self-cleaning turbidity sensor were evaluated to determine if turbidity measurements in the three primary standards are comparable to each other, and to ascertain if the primary standards are truly interchangeable. A formazin 4000 nephelometric turbidity unit (NTU) stock was purchased and dilutions of 40, 100, 400, 800, and 1000 NTU were made fresh the day of testing. StablCal and AMCO Clear (for Hach 2100N) standards with corresponding concentrations were also purchased for the evaluation. Sensor performance was not evaluated in turbidity levels less than 40 NTU due to the unavailability of polymer-bead turbidity standards rated for general use. The percent error was calculated as the true (not absolute) difference between the measured turbidity and the standard value, divided by the standard value.The sensors that demonstrated the best overall performance in the evaluation were the Hach SOLITAX and the Hydrolab Series 5 turbidity sensor when the operating range (0.001–4000 NTU for the SOLITAX and 0.1–3000 NTU for the Hydrolab) was considered in addition to sensor accuracy and precision. The average percent error in the three standards was 3.80 percent for the SOLITAX and -4.46 percent for the Hydrolab. The DTS-12 also demonstrated good accuracy with an average percent error of 2.02 percent and a maximum relative standard

  1. Performance and Facility Background Pressure Characterization Tests of NASAs 12.5-kW Hall Effect Rocket with Magnetic Shielding Thruster

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kamhawi, Hani; Huang, Wensheng; Haag, Thomas; Shastry, Rohit; Thomas, Robert; Yim, John; Herman, Daniel; Williams, George; Myers, James; Hofer, Richard; hide

    2015-01-01

    NASA's Space Technology Mission Directorate (STMD) Solar Electric Propulsion Technology Demonstration Mission (SEP/TDM) project is funding the development of a 12.5-kW Hall thruster system to support future NASA missions. The thruster designated Hall Effect Rocket with Magnetic Shielding (HERMeS) is a 12.5-kW Hall thruster with magnetic shielding incorporating a centrally mounted cathode. HERMeS was designed and modeled by a NASA GRC and JPL team and was fabricated and tested in vacuum facility 5 (VF5) at NASA GRC. Tests at NASA GRC were performed with the Technology Development Unit 1 (TDU1) thruster. TDU1's magnetic shielding topology was confirmed by measurement of anode potential and low electron temperature along the discharge chamber walls. Thermal characterization tests indicated that during full power thruster operation at peak magnetic field strength, the various thruster component temperatures were below prescribed maximum allowable limits. Performance characterization tests demonstrated the thruster's wide throttling range and found that the thruster can achieve a peak thruster efficiency of 63% at 12.5 kW 500 V and can attain a specific impulse of 3,000 s at 12.5 kW and a discharge voltage of 800 V. Facility background pressure variation tests revealed that the performance, operational characteristics, and magnetic shielding effectiveness of the TDU1 design were mostly insensitive to increases in background pressure.

  2. Fabrication of advanced military radiation detector sensor and performance evaluation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kang, Sin Yang

    2010-02-15

    efficiency: 41%). This alpha - particle sensor shows a performance comparable to commercial ones. The beta ray sensor was manufactured using a BC-408 organic plastic scintillator. The main goal of this study was the measurement of beta - ray responses of the PMMA light guide attached to the sensor and the determination of window materials. Finally, the CsI(Tl) scintillator gamma ray sensor manufactured as engineering model and the shielding case was made of duralumin (side plane) and aluminium (window). The performance of the gamma - ray sensor was comparable to commercial high - sensitivity industrial sensors. These three types of scintillation sensors can be used directly as military equipment. And this study helps improving the protection of our country from nuclear threats

  3. Wireless ad hoc and sensor networks management, performance, and applications

    CERN Document Server

    He, Jing

    2013-01-01

    Although wireless sensor networks (WSNs) have been employed across a wide range of applications, there are very few books that emphasize the algorithm description, performance analysis, and applications of network management techniques in WSNs. Filling this need, Wireless Ad Hoc and Sensor Networks: Management, Performance, and Applications summarizes not only traditional and classical network management techniques, but also state-of-the-art techniques in this area. The articles presented are expository, but scholarly in nature, including the appropriate history background, a review of current

  4. Performance of the PHOBOS silicon sensors

    CERN Document Server

    Decowski, M P; Baker, M D; Barton, D S; Betts, R R; Bindel, R; Budzanowski, A; Busza, W; Carroll, A; García, E; George, N; Gulbrandsen, K H; Gushue, S; Halliwell, C; Hamblen, J; Heintzelman, G A; Henderson, C; Holynski, R; Hofman, D J; Holzman, B; Johnson, E; Kane, J L; Katzy, J; Khan, N; Kucewicz, W; Kulinich, P; Lin, W T; Manly, S; McLeod, D; Michalowski, J; Mignerey, A C; Mülmenstädt, J; Nouicer, R; Olszewski, A; Pak, R; Park, I C; Pernegger, H; Reed, C; Remsberg, L P; Reuter, M; Roland, C; Roland, G; Rosenberg, L J; Sarin, P; Sawicki, P; Skulski, W; Steadman, S G; Stephans, G S F; Steinberg, P; Stodulski, M; Sukhanov, A; Tang, J L; Teng, R; Trzupek, A; Vale, C; Nieuwenhuizen, G J; Verdier, R; Wadsworth, B; Wolfs, F L H; Wosiek, B; Wozniak, K; Wuosmaa, A H; Wyslouch, B

    2002-01-01

    The PHOBOS detector is designed to study the physics of Au+Au collisions at the Relativistic Heavy Ion Collider. The detector is almost entirely made of silicon pad detectors and was fully operational during the first year of operation. The detector is described, and key performance characteristics are summarized.

  5. Performance of the PHOBOS silicon sensors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Decowski, M. P.; Back, B. B.; Baker, M. D.; Barton, D. S.; Betts, R. R.; Bindel, R.; Budzanowski, A.; Busza, W.; Carroll, A.; Garcia, E.; George, N.; Gulbrandsen, K.; Gushue, S.; Halliwell, C.; Hamblen, J.; Heintzelman, G. A.; Henderson, C.; Hołyński, R.; Hofman, D. J.; Holzman, B.; Johnson, E.; Kane, J. L.; Katzy, J.; Khan, N.; Kucewicz, W.; Kulinich, P.; Lin, W. T.; Manly, S.; McLeod, D.; Michałowski, J.; Mignerey, A. C.; Mülmenstädt, J.; Nouicer, R.; Olszewski, A.; Pak, R.; Park, I. C.; Pernegger, H.; Reed, C.; Remsberg, L. P.; Reuter, M.; Roland, C.; Roland, G.; Rosenberg, L.; Sarin, P.; Sawicki, P.; Skulski, W.; Steadman, S. G.; Stephans, G. S. F.; Steinberg, P.; Stodulski, M.; Sukhanov, A.; Tang, J.-L.; Teng, R.; Trzupek, A.; Vale, C.; van Nieuwenhuizen, G. J.; Verdier, R.; Wadsworth, B.; Wolfs, F. L. H.; Wosiek, B.; Woźniak, K.; Wuosmaa, A. H.; Wysłouch, B.

    2002-02-01

    The PHOBOS detector is designed to study the physics of Au+Au collisions at the Relativistic Heavy Ion Collider. The detector is almost entirely made of silicon pad detectors and was fully operational during the first year of operation. The detector is described, and key performance characteristics are summarized.

  6. The Performance of Major Plant Items at Calder Hall; Fonctionnement des elements principaux de la centrale de Calder Hall; Kharakteristika osnovnykh uzlov ustanovki v Kolder-Kholle; Rendimiento de los principales elementos de la central de Calder Hall

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Desbruslais, E. L. [United Kingdom Atomic Energy Authority, Seascale, Cumberland (United Kingdom)

    1963-10-15

    For over six years Calder Hall has been operated as a base-load power station and has sustained faults similar to those experienced by conventional power plants. All the faults have occurred in the conventional plant and none in the nuclear reactors themselves. Experience has demonstrated that from a reactor safety viewpoint, reactors and major plant items, together with the Grid connections, must be treated as a whole. No significant changes have been detected which suggest that the reactor pressure vessel or the graphite moderator will limit plant life. Asymmetric temperature distribution exists round the outlet gas ducts and now limits reactor power. The initial fitting of more thermocouples, strain gauges and provision for visual examination at high stress and temperature areas is recommended. The humidriers are no longer used during normal operation and consequently a small increase in reactor power has resulted. Recommendations are made for the frequency of surveys of heat exchangers, main gas ducts and bellow units. A small increase in steam generation has resulted from reducing gas bypassing. Only minor difficulties have been experienced with the centrifugal type of gas circulators. A small loss in production occurred initially because of commutator flash overs on the highly stressed blower drive motors and generators. The provision of duplicate stand-by auxiliaries, together with the interconnection of steam and water systems, has been amply justified. The BCDG equipment has proved extremely satisfactory. Because the channel group sensitivity is higher than necessary, modifications to achieve shorter cycle times at the expense of some sensitivity are being contemplated. The, re-arrangement made to the power supplies for reactor instrumentation and safety circuits is discussed. The grading of alarms and sequence of importance and a ''first up'' feature are recommended. The two-guard-line system has proved adequate and the need for three or more is

  7. Guild Hall retrofit

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1984-08-01

    This report demonstrates the economic viability of an exterior rewrap retrofit performed on a public community facility for the performing arts. This facility originally consisted of two mess halls built by the American army. The exterior retrofit consisted of constructing a super-insulated passageway to link the two halls as well as completely wrapping the facility with six millimetre polyethylene to provide an airtight barrier. The roofs and walls were reinsulated and insulation levels were increased to RSI 10.5 in the ceilings and RSI 7.7 in the walls. The installation of a propane fuelled furnace was also included in the retrofit package. Prior to the renovations and retrofitting, the Guild Hall facility was almost unusable. The demonstration project transformed the cold, drafty buildings into an attractive, comfortable and functional centre for the performing arts. Heating requirements have been reduced to 500 MJ/m {sup 2} of floor space annually compared to a predicted 1,760 MJ/m{sup 2} of floor space based on HOTCAN analysis of the heating requirements without the energy conservation measures. 9 figs., 10 tabs.

  8. Estimating Stair Running Performance Using Inertial Sensors

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lauro V. Ojeda

    2017-11-01

    Full Text Available Stair running, both ascending and descending, is a challenging aerobic exercise that many athletes, recreational runners, and soldiers perform during training. Studying biomechanics of stair running over multiple steps has been limited by the practical challenges presented while using optical-based motion tracking systems. We propose using foot-mounted inertial measurement units (IMUs as a solution as they enable unrestricted motion capture in any environment and without need for external references. In particular, this paper presents methods for estimating foot velocity and trajectory during stair running using foot-mounted IMUs. Computational methods leverage the stationary periods occurring during the stance phase and known stair geometry to estimate foot orientation and trajectory, ultimately used to calculate stride metrics. These calculations, applied to human participant stair running data, reveal performance trends through timing, trajectory, energy, and force stride metrics. We present the results of our analysis of experimental data collected on eleven subjects. Overall, we determine that for either ascending or descending, the stance time is the strongest predictor of speed as shown by its high correlation with stride time.

  9. Cubic mesoporous Ag@CN: a high performance humidity sensor.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tomer, Vijay K; Thangaraj, Nishanthi; Gahlot, Sweta; Kailasam, Kamalakannan

    2016-12-01

    The fabrication of highly responsive, rapid response/recovery and durable relative humidity (%RH) sensors that can precisely monitor humidity levels still remains a considerable challenge for realizing the next generation humidity sensing applications. Herein, we report a remarkably sensitive and rapid %RH sensor having a reversible response using a nanocasting route for synthesizing mesoporous g-CN (commonly known as g-C 3 N 4 ). The 3D replicated cubic mesostructure provides a high surface area thereby increasing the adsorption, transmission of charge carriers and desorption of water molecules across the sensor surfaces. Owing to its unique structure, the mesoporous g-CN functionalized with well dispersed catalytic Ag nanoparticles exhibits excellent sensitivity in the 11-98% RH range while retaining high stability, negligible hysteresis and superior real time %RH detection performances. Compared to conventional resistive sensors based on metal oxides, a rapid response time (3 s) and recovery time (1.4 s) were observed in the 11-98% RH range. Such impressive features originate from the planar morphology of g-CN as well as unique physical affinity and favourable electronic band positions of this material that facilitate water adsorption and charge transportation. Mesoporous g-CN with Ag nanoparticles is demonstrated to provide an effective strategy in designing high performance %RH sensors and show great promise for utilization of mesoporous 2D layered materials in the Internet of Things and next generation humidity sensing applications.

  10. Not your grandfather's concert hall

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cooper, Russell; Malenka, Richard; Griffith, Charles; Friedlander, Steven

    2004-05-01

    The opening of Judy and Arthur Zankel Hall on 12 September 2003, restores Andrew Carnegie's original 1891 concept of having three outstanding auditoriums of different sizes under one roof, and creates a 21st-century venue for music performance and education. With concerts ranging from early music to avant-garde multimedia productions, from jazz to world music, and from solo recitals to chamber music, Zankel Hall expands the breadth and depth of Carnegie Hall's offerings. It allows for the integration of programming across three halls with minifestivals tailored both to the size and strengths of each hall and to the artists and music to be performed. The new flexible space also provides Carnegie Hall with an education center equipped with advanced communications technology. This paper discusses the unique program planned for this facility and how the architects, theatre consultants, and acousticians developed a design that fulfilled the client's expectations and coordinated the construction of the facility under the floor of the main Isaac Stern Auditorium without having to cancel a single performance.

  11. Experimental halls workshop summary

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Thorndike, A.

    1976-01-01

    A brief discussion is given of: (1) pros and cons of open areas as compared with enclosed halls; (2) experimental hall needs of ep, anti p p, and other options; (3) hall for the lepton detector; and, (4) hall for the hadron spectrometer

  12. Experimental halls workshop summary

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Thorndike, A.

    1976-01-01

    On May 26 and 27, 1976, approximately 50 people met for an informal workshop on plans for experimental halls for ISABELLE. Plans as they exist in the May 1976 version of the ISABELLE proposal were presented. Discussions were held on the following four general topics by separate working groups: (1) pros and cons of open areas as compared with enclosed halls; (2) experimental hall needs of ep, anti pp, and other options; (3) hall for the lepton detector; and (4) hall for the hadron spectrometer. The planning for experimental halls at PEP, the hall for the lepton detector, the hadron spectrometer, and open areas are discussed

  13. Satellite Ocean Color Sensor Design Concepts and Performance Requirements

    Science.gov (United States)

    McClain, Charles R.; Meister, Gerhard; Monosmith, Bryan

    2014-01-01

    In late 1978, the National Aeronautics and Space Administration (NASA) launched the Nimbus-7 satellite with the Coastal Zone Color Scanner (CZCS) and several other sensors, all of which provided major advances in Earth remote sensing. The inspiration for the CZCS is usually attributed to an article in Science by Clarke et al. who demonstrated that large changes in open ocean spectral reflectance are correlated to chlorophyll-a concentrations. Chlorophyll-a is the primary photosynthetic pigment in green plants (marine and terrestrial) and is used in estimating primary production, i.e., the amount of carbon fixed into organic matter during photosynthesis. Thus, accurate estimates of global and regional primary production are key to studies of the earth's carbon cycle. Because the investigators used an airborne radiometer, they were able to demonstrate the increased radiance contribution of the atmosphere with altitude that would be a major issue for spaceborne measurements. Since 1978, there has been much progress in satellite ocean color remote sensing such that the technique is well established and is used for climate change science and routine operational environmental monitoring. Also, the science objectives and accompanying methodologies have expanded and evolved through a succession of global missions, e.g., the Ocean Color and Temperature Sensor (OCTS), the Seaviewing Wide Field-of-view Sensor (SeaWiFS), the Moderate Resolution Imaging Spectroradiometer (MODIS), the Medium Resolution Imaging Spectrometer (MERIS), and the Global Imager (GLI). With each advance in science objectives, new and more stringent requirements for sensor capabilities (e.g., spectral coverage) and performance (e.g., signal-to-noise ratio, SNR) are established. The CZCS had four bands for chlorophyll and aerosol corrections. The Ocean Color Imager (OCI) recommended for the NASA Pre-Aerosol, Cloud, and Ocean Ecosystems (PACE) mission includes 5 nanometers hyperspectral coverage from 350 to

  14. Experimental halls workshop summary

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Thorndike, A.

    1976-01-01

    At the experimental halls workshop, discussions were held on: (1) open areas as compared with enclosed halls; (2) the needs of ep, anti pp, and other options; (3) the hall for the lepton detector; and (4) the hall for the hadron spectrometer. The value of different possibilities for the future experimental program was explored. A number of suggestions emerged which will be used as the design of the experimental halls progresses

  15. Atmospheric turbulence and sensor system effects on biometric algorithm performance

    Science.gov (United States)

    Espinola, Richard L.; Leonard, Kevin R.; Byrd, Kenneth A.; Potvin, Guy

    2015-05-01

    Biometric technologies composed of electro-optical/infrared (EO/IR) sensor systems and advanced matching algorithms are being used in various force protection/security and tactical surveillance applications. To date, most of these sensor systems have been widely used in controlled conditions with varying success (e.g., short range, uniform illumination, cooperative subjects). However the limiting conditions of such systems have yet to be fully studied for long range applications and degraded imaging environments. Biometric technologies used for long range applications will invariably suffer from the effects of atmospheric turbulence degradation. Atmospheric turbulence causes blur, distortion and intensity fluctuations that can severely degrade image quality of electro-optic and thermal imaging systems and, for the case of biometrics technology, translate to poor matching algorithm performance. In this paper, we evaluate the effects of atmospheric turbulence and sensor resolution on biometric matching algorithm performance. We use a subset of the Facial Recognition Technology (FERET) database and a commercial algorithm to analyze facial recognition performance on turbulence degraded facial images. The goal of this work is to understand the feasibility of long-range facial recognition in degraded imaging conditions, and the utility of camera parameter trade studies to enable the design of the next generation biometrics sensor systems.

  16. Comparative Noise Performance of Portable Broadband Sensor Emplacements

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sweet, Justin; Arias-Dotson, Eliana; Beaudoin, Bruce; Anderson, Kent

    2015-04-01

    IRIS PASSCAL has supported portable broadband seismic experiments for close to 30 years. During that time we have seen a variety of sensor vaults deployed. The vaults deployed fall into two broad categories, a PASSCAL style vault and a Flexible Array style vault. The PASSCAL vault is constructed of materials available in-county and it is the Principle Investigator (PI) who establishes the actual field deployed design. These vaults generally are a large barrel placed in a ~1 m deep hole. A small pier, decoupled from the barrel, is fashioned in the bottom of the vault (either cement, paving stone or tile) for the sensor placement. The sensor is insulated and protected. Finally the vault is sealed and buried under ~30 cm of soil. The Flexible Array vault is provided to PIs by the EarthScope program, offering a uniform portable vault for these deployments. The vault consists of a 30 cm diameter by 0.75 cm tall piece of plastic sewage pipe buried with ~10 cm of pipe above grade. A rubber membrane covers the bottom and cement was poured into the bottom, coupling the pier to the pipe. The vault is sealed and buried under ~30 cm of soil. Cost, logistics, and the availability of materials in-country are usually the deciding factors for PIs when choosing a vault design and frequently trades are made given available resources. Recently a third type of portable broadband installation, direct burial, is being tested. In this case a sensor designed for shallow, direct burial is installed in a ~20 cm diameter by ~1 m deep posthole. Direct burial installation costs are limited to the time and effort required to dig the posthole and emplace the sensor. Our initial analyses suggest that direct burial sensors perform as well and at times better than sensor in vaults on both horizontal and vertical channels across a range of periods (<1 s to 100 s). Moving towards an instrument pool composed entirely of direct burial sensors (some with integrated digitizers) could yield higher

  17. Enhanced performance of a filter-sensor system.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sasaki, Isao; Josowicz, Mira; Janata, Jirí; Glezer, Ari

    2006-06-01

    In this paper are addressed two important, but seemingly unrelated issues: long term performance of a gas sensing array and performance of an air purification unit. It is shown that when considered together, the system can be regarded as a "smart filter". The enhancement is achieved by periodic differential sampling and measurement of the "upstream" and "downstream" gases of a filter. The correctly functioning filter supplies the "zero gas" from the downstream for the continuous sensor baseline correction. A key element in this scheme is the synthetic jet that delivers well-defined pulses of the two gases. The deterioration of the performance of the "smart filter" can be diagnosed from the response pattern of the sensor. The approach has been demonstrated on removal/sensing of ammonia gas from air.

  18. Wireless sensor network performance metrics for building applications

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jang, W.S. (Department of Civil Engineering Yeungnam University 214-1 Dae-Dong, Gyeongsan-Si Gyeongsangbuk-Do 712-749 South Korea); Healy, W.M. [Building and Fire Research Laboratory, 100 Bureau Drive, Gaithersburg, MD 20899-8632 (United States)

    2010-06-15

    Metrics are investigated to help assess the performance of wireless sensors in buildings. Wireless sensor networks present tremendous opportunities for energy savings and improvement in occupant comfort in buildings by making data about conditions and equipment more readily available. A key barrier to their adoption, however, is the uncertainty among users regarding the reliability of the wireless links through building construction. Tests were carried out that examined three performance metrics as a function of transmitter-receiver separation distance, transmitter power level, and obstruction type. These tests demonstrated, via the packet delivery rate, a clear transition from reliable to unreliable communications at different separation distances. While the packet delivery rate is difficult to measure in actual applications, the received signal strength indication correlated well with the drop in packet delivery rate in the relatively noise-free environment used in these tests. The concept of an equivalent distance was introduced to translate the range of reliability in open field operation to that seen in a typical building, thereby providing wireless system designers a rough estimate of the necessary spacing between sensor nodes in building applications. It is anticipated that the availability of straightforward metrics on the range of wireless sensors in buildings will enable more widespread sensing in buildings for improved control and fault detection. (author)

  19. Performance Analysis of Cluster Formation in Wireless Sensor Networks

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Edgar Romo Montiel

    2017-12-01

    Full Text Available Clustered-based wireless sensor networks have been extensively used in the literature in order to achieve considerable energy consumption reductions. However, two aspects of such systems have been largely overlooked. Namely, the transmission probability used during the cluster formation phase and the way in which cluster heads are selected. Both of these issues have an important impact on the performance of the system. For the former, it is common to consider that sensor nodes in a clustered-based Wireless Sensor Network (WSN use a fixed transmission probability to send control data in order to build the clusters. However, due to the highly variable conditions experienced by these networks, a fixed transmission probability may lead to extra energy consumption. In view of this, three different transmission probability strategies are studied: optimal, fixed and adaptive. In this context, we also investigate cluster head selection schemes, specifically, we consider two intelligent schemes based on the fuzzy C-means and k-medoids algorithms and a random selection with no intelligence. We show that the use of intelligent schemes greatly improves the performance of the system, but their use entails higher complexity and selection delay. The main performance metrics considered in this work are energy consumption, successful transmission probability and cluster formation latency. As an additional feature of this work, we study the effect of errors in the wireless channel and the impact on the performance of the system under the different transmission probability schemes.

  20. Performance Analysis of Cluster Formation in Wireless Sensor Networks.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Montiel, Edgar Romo; Rivero-Angeles, Mario E; Rubino, Gerardo; Molina-Lozano, Heron; Menchaca-Mendez, Rolando; Menchaca-Mendez, Ricardo

    2017-12-13

    Clustered-based wireless sensor networks have been extensively used in the literature in order to achieve considerable energy consumption reductions. However, two aspects of such systems have been largely overlooked. Namely, the transmission probability used during the cluster formation phase and the way in which cluster heads are selected. Both of these issues have an important impact on the performance of the system. For the former, it is common to consider that sensor nodes in a clustered-based Wireless Sensor Network (WSN) use a fixed transmission probability to send control data in order to build the clusters. However, due to the highly variable conditions experienced by these networks, a fixed transmission probability may lead to extra energy consumption. In view of this, three different transmission probability strategies are studied: optimal, fixed and adaptive. In this context, we also investigate cluster head selection schemes, specifically, we consider two intelligent schemes based on the fuzzy C-means and k-medoids algorithms and a random selection with no intelligence. We show that the use of intelligent schemes greatly improves the performance of the system, but their use entails higher complexity and selection delay. The main performance metrics considered in this work are energy consumption, successful transmission probability and cluster formation latency. As an additional feature of this work, we study the effect of errors in the wireless channel and the impact on the performance of the system under the different transmission probability schemes.

  1. Biogeochemical sensor performance in the SOCCOM profiling float array

    Science.gov (United States)

    Johnson, Kenneth S.; Plant, Joshua N.; Coletti, Luke J.; Jannasch, Hans W.; Sakamoto, Carole M.; Riser, Stephen C.; Swift, Dana D.; Williams, Nancy L.; Boss, Emmanuel; Haëntjens, Nils; Talley, Lynne D.; Sarmiento, Jorge L.

    2017-08-01

    The Southern Ocean Carbon and Climate Observations and Modeling (SOCCOM) program has begun deploying a large array of biogeochemical sensors on profiling floats in the Southern Ocean. As of February 2016, 86 floats have been deployed. Here the focus is on 56 floats with quality-controlled and adjusted data that have been in the water at least 6 months. The floats carry oxygen, nitrate, pH, chlorophyll fluorescence, and optical backscatter sensors. The raw data generated by these sensors can suffer from inaccurate initial calibrations and from sensor drift over time. Procedures to correct the data are defined. The initial accuracy of the adjusted concentrations is assessed by comparing the corrected data to laboratory measurements made on samples collected by a hydrographic cast with a rosette sampler at the float deployment station. The long-term accuracy of the corrected data is compared to the GLODAPv2 data set whenever a float made a profile within 20 km of a GLODAPv2 station. Based on these assessments, the fleet average oxygen data are accurate to 1 ± 1%, nitrate to within 0.5 ± 0.5 µmol kg-1, and pH to 0.005 ± 0.007, where the error limit is 1 standard deviation of the fleet data. The bio-optical measurements of chlorophyll fluorescence and optical backscatter are used to estimate chlorophyll a and particulate organic carbon concentration. The particulate organic carbon concentrations inferred from optical backscatter appear accurate to with 35 mg C m-3 or 20%, whichever is larger. Factors affecting the accuracy of the estimated chlorophyll a concentrations are evaluated.Plain Language SummaryThe ocean science community must move toward greater use of autonomous platforms and sensors if we are to extend our knowledge of the effects of climate driven change within the ocean. Essential to this shift in observing strategies is an understanding of the performance that can be obtained from biogeochemical sensors on platforms deployed for years and the

  2. Energy efficient mechanisms for high-performance Wireless Sensor Networks

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alsaify, Baha'adnan

    2009-12-01

    Due to recent advances in microelectronics, the development of low cost, small, and energy efficient devices became possible. Those advances led to the birth of the Wireless Sensor Networks (WSNs). WSNs consist of a large set of sensor nodes equipped with communication capabilities, scattered in the area to monitor. Researchers focus on several aspects of WSNs. Such aspects include the quality of service the WSNs provide (data delivery delay, accuracy of data, etc...), the scalability of the network to contain thousands of sensor nodes (the terms node and sensor node are being used interchangeably), the robustness of the network (allowing the network to work even if a certain percentage of nodes fails), and making the energy consumption in the network as low as possible to prolong the network's lifetime. In this thesis, we present an approach that can be applied to the sensing devices that are scattered in an area for Sensor Networks. This work will use the well-known approach of using a awaking scheduling to extend the network's lifespan. We designed a scheduling algorithm that will reduce the delay's upper bound the reported data will experience, while at the same time keeps the advantages that are offered by the use of the awaking scheduling -- the energy consumption reduction which will lead to the increase in the network's lifetime. The wakeup scheduling is based on the location of the node relative to its neighbors and its distance from the Base Station (the terms Base Station and sink are being used interchangeably). We apply the proposed method to a set of simulated nodes using the "ONE Simulator". We test the performance of this approach with three other approaches -- Direct Routing technique, the well known LEACH algorithm, and a multi-parent scheduling algorithm. We demonstrate a good improvement on the network's quality of service and a reduction of the consumed energy.

  3. Comparative VOCs sensing performance for conducting polymer and porphyrin functionalized carbon nanotubes based sensors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Datta, Kunal; Rushi, Arti; Ghosh, Prasanta; Shirsat, Mahendra

    2018-05-01

    We report sensors for detection of ethyl alcohol, a prominent volatile organic compound (VOC). Single walled carbon nanotubes were selected as main sensing backbone. As efficiency of sensor is dependent upon the choice of sensing materials, the performances of conducting polymer and porphyrin based sensors were compared. Chemiresistive sensing modality was adopted to observe the performance of sensors. It has been found that porphyrin based sensor shows higher affinity towards ethyl alcohol.

  4. Design and Performance of GMR Sensors for the Detection of Magnetic Microbeads in Biosensors

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Rife, J. C; Miller, M. M; Sheehan, P. E; Tamanaha, C. R; Tondra, M; Whitman, L. J

    2003-01-01

    .... Here we describe the design and performance of our current chip with 64 sensor zones, compare its performance with the previous chip design, and discuss a simple analytical model of the sensor micromagnetics...

  5. Performance of social network sensors during Hurricane Sandy.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yury Kryvasheyeu

    Full Text Available Information flow during catastrophic events is a critical aspect of disaster management. Modern communication platforms, in particular online social networks, provide an opportunity to study such flow and derive early-warning sensors, thus improving emergency preparedness and response. Performance of the social networks sensor method, based on topological and behavioral properties derived from the "friendship paradox", is studied here for over 50 million Twitter messages posted before, during, and after Hurricane Sandy. We find that differences in users' network centrality effectively translate into moderate awareness advantage (up to 26 hours; and that geo-location of users within or outside of the hurricane-affected area plays a significant role in determining the scale of such an advantage. Emotional response appears to be universal regardless of the position in the network topology, and displays characteristic, easily detectable patterns, opening a possibility to implement a simple "sentiment sensing" technique that can detect and locate disasters.

  6. Performance of Social Network Sensors during Hurricane Sandy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kryvasheyeu, Yury; Chen, Haohui; Moro, Esteban; Van Hentenryck, Pascal; Cebrian, Manuel

    2015-01-01

    Information flow during catastrophic events is a critical aspect of disaster management. Modern communication platforms, in particular online social networks, provide an opportunity to study such flow and derive early-warning sensors, thus improving emergency preparedness and response. Performance of the social networks sensor method, based on topological and behavioral properties derived from the “friendship paradox”, is studied here for over 50 million Twitter messages posted before, during, and after Hurricane Sandy. We find that differences in users’ network centrality effectively translate into moderate awareness advantage (up to 26 hours); and that geo-location of users within or outside of the hurricane-affected area plays a significant role in determining the scale of such an advantage. Emotional response appears to be universal regardless of the position in the network topology, and displays characteristic, easily detectable patterns, opening a possibility to implement a simple “sentiment sensing” technique that can detect and locate disasters. PMID:25692690

  7. High performance liquid-level sensor based on mPOFBG for aircraft applications

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Marques, C. A. F.; Pospori, A.; Saez-Rodriguez, D.

    2015-01-01

    A high performance liquid-level sensor based on microstructured polymer optical fiber Bragg grating (mPOFBG) array sensors is reported in detail. The sensor sensitivity is found to be 98pm/cm of liquid, enhanced by more than a factor of 9 compared to a reported silica fiber-based sensor....

  8. Handheld, Broadband Electromagnetic UXO Sensor: Cost & Performance Report

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Won, I. J; SanFilipo, Bill; Oren, Alex

    2006-01-01

    The broadband electromagnetic sensor improvement and demonstration undertaken in this project took the prototype GEM-3 and evolved it into an operational sensor with increased bandwidth and dynamic...

  9. Packaging of active fiber composites for improved sensor performance

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Melnykowycz, M; Barbezat, M; Koller, R; Brunner, A J

    2010-01-01

    Active fiber composites (AFC) composed of lead zirconate titanate (PZT) fibers embedded in an epoxy matrix and sandwiched between two interdigitated electrodes provide a thin and flexible smart material device which can act as a sensor or actuator. The thin profiles of AFC make them ideal for integration in glass or carbon fiber composite laminates. However, due to the low tensile limit of the PZT fibers, AFC can fail at strains below the tensile limit of many composites. This makes their use as a component in an active laminate design somewhat undesirable. In the current work, tensile testing of smart laminates composed of AFC integrated in glass fiber laminates was conducted to assess the effectiveness of different packaging strategies for improving AFC sensor performance at high strains relative to the tensile limit of the AFC. AFC were encased in carbon fiber, silicon, and pre-stressed carbon fiber to improve the tensile limit of the AFC when integrated in glass fiber laminates. By laminating AFC with pre-stressed carbon fiber, the tensile limit and strain sensor ability of the AFC were significantly improved. Acoustic emission monitoring was used and the results show that PZT fiber breakage was reduced due to the pre-stressed packaging process

  10. Performance of laser distance sensors for Atlas Micromegas production

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mueller, Ralph; Biebel, Otmar; Bortfeldt, Jonathan; Flierl, Bernhard; Hertenberger, Ralf; Loesel, Philipp; Pree, Elias [LMU Muenchen (Germany); Zibell, Andre [JMU Wuerzburg (Germany)

    2015-07-01

    During the second long LHC shutdown, 2018/19, the precision tracking detectors of the ATLAS muon spectrometer in the inner end caps will be replaced using Micromegas, a planar gas-detector technology. Modules of 2 m{sup 2} area are built in quadruplets from five precisely planar sandwich panels that define the anodes and the cathodes of the four active detector planes. Single plane spatial resolutions below 100 μ m are achievable when the deviation from planarity of the strip-anodes does not exceed 80 μ m RMS over the whole active area and the parallelism of the readout strips is within 30 μ m. In order to measure the dimensional accuracy of each panel, laser distance sensors to be combined with a coordinate measurement system have been investigated. One of them turned out to be capable to measure the planarity of the panels. It has a resolution of 0.3 μ m and a beam spot diameter of ∼50 μ m, which is well below 100 μ m the size of the smallest structures. For monitoring purposes during the construction process a less accurate but cheaper sensor turned out to be sufficient. We report on the performance of the sensors and their applicability to our tasks.

  11. Magnesium Hall Thruster

    Science.gov (United States)

    Szabo, James J.

    2015-01-01

    This Phase II project is developing a magnesium (Mg) Hall effect thruster system that would open the door for in situ resource utilization (ISRU)-based solar system exploration. Magnesium is light and easy to ionize. For a Mars- Earth transfer, the propellant mass savings with respect to a xenon Hall effect thruster (HET) system are enormous. Magnesium also can be combusted in a rocket with carbon dioxide (CO2) or water (H2O), enabling a multimode propulsion system with propellant sharing and ISRU. In the near term, CO2 and H2O would be collected in situ on Mars or the moon. In the far term, Mg itself would be collected from Martian and lunar regolith. In Phase I, an integrated, medium-power (1- to 3-kW) Mg HET system was developed and tested. Controlled, steady operation at constant voltage and power was demonstrated. Preliminary measurements indicate a specific impulse (Isp) greater than 4,000 s was achieved at a discharge potential of 400 V. The feasibility of delivering fluidized Mg powder to a medium- or high-power thruster also was demonstrated. Phase II of the project evaluated the performance of an integrated, highpower Mg Hall thruster system in a relevant space environment. Researchers improved the medium power thruster system and characterized it in detail. Researchers also designed and built a high-power (8- to 20-kW) Mg HET. A fluidized powder feed system supporting the high-power thruster was built and delivered to Busek Company, Inc.

  12. Sensors integration for smartphone navigation: performances and future challenges

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aicardi, I.; Dabove, P.; Lingua, A.; Piras, M.

    2014-08-01

    Nowadays the modern smartphones include several sensors which are usually adopted in geomatic application, as digital camera, GNSS (Global Navigation Satellite System) receivers, inertial platform, RFID and Wi-Fi systems. In this paper the authors would like to testing the performances of internal sensors (Inertial Measurement Unit, IMU) of three modern smartphones (Samsung GalaxyS4, Samsung GalaxyS5 and iPhone4) compared to external mass-market IMU platform in order to verify their accuracy levels, in terms of positioning. Moreover, the Image Based Navigation (IBN) approach is also investigated: this approach can be very useful in hard-urban environment or for indoor positioning, as alternative to GNSS positioning. IBN allows to obtain a sub-metrical accuracy, but a special database of georeferenced images (Image DataBase, IDB) is needed, moreover it is necessary to use dedicated algorithm to resizing the images which are collected by smartphone, in order to share it with the server where is stored the IDB. Moreover, it is necessary to characterize smartphone camera lens in terms of focal length and lens distortions. The authors have developed an innovative method with respect to those available today, which has been tested in a covered area, adopting a special support where all sensors under testing have been installed. Geomatic instrument have been used to define the reference trajectory, with purpose to compare this one, with the path obtained with IBN solution. First results leads to have an horizontal and vertical accuracies better than 60 cm, respect to the reference trajectories. IBN method, sensors, test and result will be described in the paper.

  13. Random Access Performance of Distributed Sensors Attacked by Unknown Jammers

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dae-Kyo Jeong

    2017-11-01

    Full Text Available In this paper, we model and investigate the random access (RA performance of sensor nodes (SN in a wireless sensor network (WSN. In the WSN, a central head sensor (HS collects the information from distributed SNs, and jammers disturb the information transmission primarily by generating interference. In this paper, two jamming attacks are considered: power and code jamming. Power jammers (if they are friendly jammers generate noises and, as a result, degrade the quality of the signal from SNs. Power jamming is equally harmful to all the SNs that are accessing HS and simply induces denial of service (DoS without any need to hack HS or SNs. On the other hand, code jammers mimic legitimate SNs by sending fake signals and thus need to know certain system parameters that are used by the legitimate SNs. As a result of code jamming, HS falsely allocates radio resources to SNs. The code jamming hence increases the failure probability in sending the information messages, as well as misleads the usage of radio resources. In this paper, we present the probabilities of successful preamble transmission with power ramping according to the jammer types and provide the resulting throughput and delay of information transmission by SNs, respectively. The effect of two jamming attacks on the RA performances is compared with numerical investigation. The results show that, compared to RA without jammers, power and code jamming degrade the throughput by up to 30.3% and 40.5%, respectively, while the delay performance by up to 40.1% and 65.6%, respectively.

  14. Investigation of the Effects of Facility Background Pressure on the Performance and Voltage-Current Characteristics of the High Voltage Hall Accelerator

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kamhawi, Hani; Huang, Wensheng; Haag, Thomas; Spektor, Rostislav

    2014-01-01

    The National Aeronautics and Space Administration (NASA) Science Mission Directorate In-Space Propulsion Technology office is sponsoring NASA Glenn Research Center to develop a 4 kW-class Hall thruster propulsion system for implementation in NASA science missions. A study was conducted to assess the impact of varying the facility background pressure on the High Voltage Hall Accelerator (HiVHAc) thruster performance and voltage-current characteristics. This present study evaluated the HiVHAc thruster performance in the lowest attainable background pressure condition at NASA GRC Vacuum Facility 5 to best simulate space-like conditions. Additional tests were performed at selected thruster operating conditions to investigate and elucidate the underlying physics that change during thruster operation at elevated facility background pressure. Tests were performed at background pressure conditions that are three and ten times higher than the lowest realized background pressure. Results indicated that the thruster discharge specific impulse and efficiency increased with elevated facility background pressure. The voltage-current profiles indicated a narrower stable operating region with increased background pressure. Experimental observations of the thruster operation indicated that increasing the facility background pressure shifted the ionization and acceleration zones upstream towards the thruster's anode. Future tests of the HiVHAc thruster are planned at background pressure conditions that are expected to be two to three times lower than what was achieved during this test campaign. These tests will not only assess the impact of reduced facility background pressure on thruster performance, voltage-current characteristics, and plume properties; but will also attempt to quantify the magnitude of the ionization and acceleration zones upstream shifting as a function of increased background pressure.

  15. Network performance of a wireless sensor network for temperature monitoring in vineyards

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Liscano, Ramiro; Jacoub, John Khalil; Dersingh, Anand

    2011-01-01

    Wireless sensor networks (WSNs) are an emerging technology which can be used for outdoor environmental monitoring. This paper presents challenges that arose from the development and deployment of a WSN for environmental monitoring as well as network performance analysis of this network. Different...... components in our sensor network architecture are presented like the physical nodes, the sensor node code, and two messaging protocols; one for collecting sensor and network values and the other for sensor node commands. An information model for sensor nodes to support plug-and-play capabilities in sensor...... networks is also presented....

  16. Planar Hall effect bridge sensors with NiFe/Cu/IrMn stack optimized for self-field magnetic bead detection

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Henriksen, Anders Dahl; Rizzi, Giovanni; Hansen, Mikkel Fougt

    2016-01-01

    , and 30 nm, and 0 ≤ tCu ≤ 0.6 nm. The sensors were characterized by magnetic hysteresis measurements, by measurements of the sensor response vs. applied field, and by measurements of the sensor response to a suspension of magnetic beads magnetized by the sensor self-field due to the sensor bias current....... The exchange bias field was found to decay exponentially with tCu and inversely with tFM. The reduced exchange field for larger values of tFM and tCu resulted in higher sensitivities to both magnetic fields and magnetic beads. We argue that the maximum magnetic bead signal is limited by Joule heating...

  17. Investigation of the Effects of Cathode Flow Fraction and Position on the Performance and Operation of the High Voltage Hall Accelerator

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kamhawi, Hani; Huang, Wensheng; Haag, Thomas

    2014-01-01

    The National Aeronautics and Space Administration (NASA) Science Mission Directorate In- Space Propulsion Technology office is sponsoring NASA Glenn Research Center (GRC) to develop a 4 kW-class Hall thruster propulsion system for implementation in NASA science missions. Tests were performed within NASA GRC Vacuum Facility 5 at background pressure levels that were six times lower than what has previously been attained in other vacuum facilities. A study was conducted to assess the impact of varying the cathode-to-anode flow fraction and cathode position on the performance and operational characteristics of the High Voltage Hall Accelerator (HiVHAc) thruster. In addition, the impact of injecting additional xenon propellant in the vicinity of the cathode was also assessed. Cathode-to-anode flow fraction sensitivity tests were performed for power levels between 1.0 and 3.9 kW. It was found that varying the cathode flow fraction from 5 to approximately 10% of the anode flow resulted in the cathode-to-ground voltage becoming more positive. For an operating condition of 3.8 kW and 500 V, varying the cathode position from a distance of closest approach to 600 mm away did not result in any substantial variation in thrust but resulted in the cathode-to-ground changing from -17 to -4 V. The change in the cathode-to-ground voltage along with visual observations indicated a change in how the cathode plume was coupling to the thruster discharge. Finally, the injection of secondary xenon flow in the vicinity of the cathode had an impact similar to increasing the cathode-to-anode flow fraction, where the cathode-to-ground voltage became more positive and discharge current and thrust increased slightly. Future tests of the HiVHAc thruster are planned with a centrally mounted cathode in order to further assess the impact of cathode position on thruster performance.

  18. Magnetic microbead detection using the planar Hall effect

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ejsing, Louise; Hansen, Mikkel F.; Menon, Aric K.; Ferreira, Hugo A.; Graham, Daniel L.; Freitas, Paulo P.

    2005-01-01

    Magnetic sensors based on the planar Hall effect of exchanged-biased permalloy have been fabricated and characterized. It is demonstrated that the sensors are feasible for detecting just a few commercial 2.0 μm magnetic beads commonly used for bioseparation (Micromer-M, Micromod, Germany) and that the sensor sense current is sufficient to generate a signal from the beads

  19. Pragmatic data fusion uncertainty concerns: Tribute to Dave L. Hall

    CSIR Research Space (South Africa)

    Blasch, E

    2016-07-01

    Full Text Available Over the course of Dave Hall's career, he highlighted various concerns associated with the implementation of data fusion methods. Many of the issues included the role of uncertainty in data fusion, practical implementation of sensor fusion systems...

  20. 77 FR 30016 - Clinical Study Design and Performance of Hospital Glucose Sensors

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-05-21

    ...] Clinical Study Design and Performance of Hospital Glucose Sensors AGENCY: Food and Drug Administration, HHS... Sensors.'' The purpose of this public meeting is to discuss clinical study design considerations and performance metrics for innovative glucose sensors intended to be used in hospital point of care settings...

  1. Performance Issues in High Performance Fortran Implementations of Sensor-Based Applications

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    David R. O'hallaron

    1997-01-01

    Full Text Available Applications that get their inputs from sensors are an important and often overlooked application domain for High Performance Fortran (HPF. Such sensor-based applications typically perform regular operations on dense arrays, and often have latency and through put requirements that can only be achieved with parallel machines. This article describes a study of sensor-based applications, including the fast Fourier transform, synthetic aperture radar imaging, narrowband tracking radar processing, multibaseline stereo imaging, and medical magnetic resonance imaging. The applications are written in a dialect of HPF developed at Carnegie Mellon, and are compiled by the Fx compiler for the Intel Paragon. The main results of the study are that (1 it is possible to realize good performance for realistic sensor-based applications written in HPF and (2 the performance of the applications is determined by the performance of three core operations: independent loops (i.e., loops with no dependences between iterations, reductions, and index permutations. The article discusses the implications for HPF implementations and introduces some simple tests that implementers and users can use to measure the efficiency of the loops, reductions, and index permutations generated by an HPF compiler.

  2. Are Birds Smarter Than Mathematicians? Pigeons (Columba livia) Perform Optimally on a Version of the Monty Hall Dilemma

    Science.gov (United States)

    Herbranson, Walter T.; Schroeder, Julia

    2011-01-01

    The “Monty Hall Dilemma” (MHD) is a well known probability puzzle in which a player tries to guess which of three doors conceals a desirable prize. After an initial choice is made, one of the remaining doors is opened, revealing no prize. The player is then given the option of staying with their initial guess or switching to the other unopened door. Most people opt to stay with their initial guess, despite the fact that switching doubles the probability of winning. A series of experiments investigated whether pigeons (Columba livia), like most humans, would fail to maximize their expected winnings in a version of the MHD. Birds completed multiple trials of a standard MHD, with the three response keys in an operant chamber serving as the three doors and access to mixed grain as the prize. Across experiments, the probability of gaining reinforcement for switching and staying was manipulated, and birds adjusted their probability of switching and staying to approximate the optimal strategy. Replication of the procedure with human participants showed that humans failed to adopt optimal strategies, even with extensive training. PMID:20175592

  3. Are birds smarter than mathematicians? Pigeons (Columba livia) perform optimally on a version of the Monty Hall Dilemma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Herbranson, Walter T; Schroeder, Julia

    2010-02-01

    The "Monty Hall Dilemma" (MHD) is a well known probability puzzle in which a player tries to guess which of three doors conceals a desirable prize. After an initial choice is made, one of the remaining doors is opened, revealing no prize. The player is then given the option of staying with their initial guess or switching to the other unopened door. Most people opt to stay with their initial guess, despite the fact that switching doubles the probability of winning. A series of experiments investigated whether pigeons (Columba livia), like most humans, would fail to maximize their expected winnings in a version of the MHD. Birds completed multiple trials of a standard MHD, with the three response keys in an operant chamber serving as the three doors and access to mixed grain as the prize. Across experiments, the probability of gaining reinforcement for switching and staying was manipulated, and birds adjusted their probability of switching and staying to approximate the optimal strategy. Replication of the procedure with human participants showed that humans failed to adopt optimal strategies, even with extensive training.

  4. Radiosonde pressure sensor performance - Evaluation using tracking radars

    Science.gov (United States)

    Parsons, C. L.; Norcross, G. A.; Brooks, R. L.

    1984-01-01

    The standard balloon-borne radiosonde employed for synoptic meteorology provides vertical profiles of temperature, pressure, and humidity as a function of elapsed time. These parameters are used in the hypsometric equation to calculate the geopotential altitude at each sampling point during the balloon's flight. It is important that the vertical location information be accurate. The present investigation was conducted with the objective to evaluate the altitude determination accuracy of the standard radiosonde throughout the entire balloon profile. The tests included two other commercially available pressure sensors to see if they could provide improved accuracy in the stratosphere. The pressure-measuring performance of standard baroswitches, premium baroswitches, and hypsometers in balloon-borne sondes was correlated with tracking radars. It was found that the standard and premium baroswitches perform well up to about 25 km altitude, while hypsometers provide more reliable data above 25 km.

  5. The Performance Parameters Of Wireless Sensor Networks In Underground Mines

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sinan UGUZ

    2015-08-01

    Full Text Available In recent years underground mines have increasingly remained on the agenda with both difficult working conditions and problems such as collapsed and firedamp explosion in our country and in the world. In terms of life safety of miners and their health mine sites are required to be continuously monitored and controlled. This is difficult to achieve with existing wired systems due to the topography of mine sites. The applications have increased with the development of wireless sensor networks WSN technology in mine sites in recent years. This case has also caused an increase in studies on improving WSN performance. Especially energy efficiency is very important for the WSN hardware with a low energy source. In this study information about things to consider while using WSN technologies in underground mines and studies on their performance has been provided.

  6. On PHY and MAC Performance in Body Sensor Networks

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Higgins Henry

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract This paper presents an empirical investigation on the performance of body implant communication using radio frequency (RF technology. In body implant communication, the electrical properties of the body influence the signal propagation in several ways. We use a Perspex body model (30 cm diameter, 80 cm height and 0.5 cm thickness filled with a liquid that mimics the electrical properties of the basic body tissues. This model is used to observe the effects of body tissue on the RF communication. We observe best performance at 3cm depth inside the liquid. We further present a simulation study of several low-power MAC protocols for an on-body sensor network and discuss the derived results. Also, the traditional preamble-based TMDA protocol is extended towards a beacon-based TDMA protocol in order to avoid preamble collision and to ensure low-power communication.

  7. On PHY and MAC Performance in Body Sensor Networks

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sana Ullah

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available This paper presents an empirical investigation on the performance of body implant communication using radio frequency (RF technology. In body implant communication, the electrical properties of the body influence the signal propagation in several ways. We use a Perspex body model (30 cm diameter, 80 cm height and 0.5 cm thickness filled with a liquid that mimics the electrical properties of the basic body tissues. This model is used to observe the effects of body tissue on the RF communication. We observe best performance at 3cm depth inside the liquid. We further present a simulation study of several low-power MAC protocols for an on-body sensor network and discuss the derived results. Also, the traditional preamble-based TMDA protocol is extended towards a beacon-based TDMA protocol in order to avoid preamble collision and to ensure low-power communication.

  8. Contribution of the study of the Hall Effect. Hall Effect of powder products

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cherville, Jean

    1961-01-01

    This research thesis reports the development of an apparatus aimed at measuring the Hall Effect and the magneto-resistance of powders at room temperature and at the liquid nitrogen temperature. The author also proposes a theoretical contribution to the Hall Effect and reports the calculation of conditions to be met to obtain a correct value for the Hall constant. Results are experimentally verified. The method is then applied to the study of a set of powdered pre-graphitic graphites. The author shows that their Hall coefficient confirms the model already proposed by Mrozowski. The study of the Hall Effect of any kind of powders can thus be performed, and the Hall Effect can therefore be a mean to study mineral and organic compounds, and notably powdered biological molecules [fr

  9. Skyrmions and Hall viscosity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Bom Soo

    2018-05-01

    We discuss the contribution of magnetic Skyrmions to the Hall viscosity and propose a simple way to identify it in experiments. The topological Skyrmion charge density has a distinct signature in the electric Hall conductivity that is identified in existing experimental data. In an electrically neutral system, the Skyrmion charge density is directly related to the thermal Hall conductivity. These results are direct consequences of the field theory Ward identities, which relate various physical quantities based on symmetries and have been previously applied to quantum Hall systems.

  10. Accurate micro Hall effect measurements on scribe line pads

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Østerberg, Frederik Westergaard; Petersen, Dirch Hjorth; Wang, Fei

    2009-01-01

    Hall mobility and sheet carrier density are important parameters to monitor in advanced semiconductor production. If micro Hall effect measurements are done on small pads in scribe lines, these parameters may be measured without using valuable test wafers. We report how Hall mobility can...... be extracted from micro four-point measurements performed on a rectangular pad. The dimension of the investigated pad is 400 × 430 ¿m2, and the probe pitches range from 20 ¿m to 50 ¿m. The Monte Carlo method is used to find the optimal way to perform the Hall measurement and extract Hall mobility most...

  11. Assessing Miniaturized Sensor Performance using Supervised Learning, with Application to Drug and Explosive Detection

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Alstrøm, Tommy Sonne

    of sensors, as the sensors are designed to provide robust and reliable measurements. That means, the sensors are designed to have repeated measurement clusters. Sensor fusion is presented for the sensor based on chemoselective compounds. An array of color changing compounds are handled and in unity they make......This Ph.D. thesis titled “Assessing Miniaturized Sensor Performance using Supervised Learning, with Application to Drug and Explosive Detection” is a part of the strategic research project “Miniaturized sensors for explosives detection in air” funded by the Danish Agency for Science and Technology...... emanated by explosives and drugs, similar to an electronic nose. To evaluate sensor responses a data processing and evaluation pipeline is required. The work presented herein focuses on the feature extraction, feature representation and sensor accuracy. Thus the primary aim of this thesis is twofold...

  12. Hardware performance assessment recommendations and tools for baropodometric sensor systems

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Claudia Giacomozzi

    2010-06-01

    Full Text Available Accurate plantar pressure measurements are mandatory in both clinical and research contexts. Differences in accuracy, precision, reliability of pressure measurement devices (PMDs prevented so far the onset of standardization processes and of reliable reference datasets. The Italian National Institute of Health (ISS approved and conducted a scientific project aimed to design, validate and implement dedicated testing methods for both in-factory and on-the-field PMD assessment. A general-purpose experimental set-up was built, complete and suitable for the assessment of PMDs based on different sensor technology, electronic conditioning and mechanical solutions. Preliminary assessments have been conducted on 5 commercial PMDs. The study lead to the definition of: i an appropriate set of instruments and procedures for PMD technical assessment; ii a minimum set of significant parameters for the technical characterization of the PMD performance; iii some recommendations to both manufacturers and end users for an appropriate use in clinics and in research context

  13. Performance of irradiated CVD diamond micro-strip sensors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Adam, W.; Berdermann, E.; Bergonzo, P.; Bertuccio, G.; Bogani, F.; Borchi, E.; Brambilla, A.; Bruzzi, M.; Colledani, C.; Conway, J.; D'Angelo, P.; Dabrowski, W.; Delpierre, P.; Deneuville, A.; Dulinski, W.; Eijk, B. van; Fallou, A.; Fizzotti, F.; Foulon, F.; Friedl, M.; Gan, K.K.; Gheeraert, E.; Hallewell, G.; Han, S.; Hartjes, F.; Hrubec, J.; Husson, D.; Kagan, H.; Kania, D.; Kaplon, J.; Kass, R.; Koeth, T.; Krammer, M.; Logiudice, A.; Lu, R.; Mac Lynne, L.; Manfredotti, C.; Meier, D.; Mishina, M.; Moroni, L.; Noomen, J.; Oh, A.; Pan, L.S.; Pernicka, M.; Peitz, A.; Perera, L.; Pirollo, S.; Procario, M.; Riester, J.L.; Roe, S.; Rousseau, L.; Rudge, A.; Russ, J.; Sala, S.; Sampietro, M.; Schnetzer, S.; Sciortino, S.; Stelzer, H.; Stone, R.; Suter, B.; Tapper, R.J.; Tesarek, R.; Trischuk, W.; Tromson, D.; Vittone, E.; Walsh, A.M.; Wedenig, R.; Weilhammer, P.; Wetstein, M.; White, C.; Zeuner, W.; Zoeller, M.; Plano, R.; Somalwar, S.V.; Thomson, G.B.

    2002-01-01

    CVD diamond detectors are of interest for charged particle detection and tracking due to their high radiation tolerance. In this article, we present, for the first time, beam test results from recently manufactured CVD diamond strip detectors and their behavior under low doses of electrons from a β-source and the performance before and after intense (>10 15 /cm 2 ) proton- and pion-irradiations. We find that low dose irradiation increase the signal-to-noise ratio (pumping of the signal) and slightly deteriorate the spatial resolution. Intense irradiation with protons 2.2x10 15 p/cm 2 lowers the signal-to-noise ratio slightly. Intense irradiation with pions 2.9x10 15 π/cm 2 lowers the signal-to-noise ratio more. The spatial resolution of the diamond sensors improves after irradiations

  14. Performance of irradiated CVD diamond micro-strip sensors

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Adam, W.; Berdermann, E.; Bergonzo, P.; Bertuccio, G.; Bogani, F.; Borchi, E.; Brambilla, A.; Bruzzi, M.; Colledani, C.; Conway, J.; D' Angelo, P.; Dabrowski, W.; Delpierre, P.; Deneuville, A.; Dulinski, W.; Eijk, B. van; Fallou, A.; Fizzotti, F.; Foulon, F.; Friedl, M.; Gan, K.K.; Gheeraert, E.; Hallewell, G.; Han, S.; Hartjes, F.; Hrubec, J.; Husson, D.; Kagan, H.; Kania, D.; Kaplon, J.; Kass, R.; Koeth, T.; Krammer, M.; Logiudice, A.; Lu, R.; Mac Lynne, L.; Manfredotti, C.; Meier, D. E-mail: dirk.meier@cern.ch; Mishina, M.; Moroni, L.; Noomen, J.; Oh, A.; Pan, L.S.; Pernicka, M.; Peitz, A.; Perera, L.; Pirollo, S.; Procario, M.; Riester, J.L.; Roe, S.; Rousseau, L.; Rudge, A.; Russ, J.; Sala, S.; Sampietro, M.; Schnetzer, S.; Sciortino, S.; Stelzer, H.; Stone, R.; Suter, B.; Tapper, R.J.; Tesarek, R.; Trischuk, W.; Tromson, D.; Vittone, E.; Walsh, A.M.; Wedenig, R.; Weilhammer, P.; Wetstein, M.; White, C.; Zeuner, W.; Zoeller, M.; Plano, R.; Somalwar, S.V.; Thomson, G.B

    2002-01-11

    CVD diamond detectors are of interest for charged particle detection and tracking due to their high radiation tolerance. In this article, we present, for the first time, beam test results from recently manufactured CVD diamond strip detectors and their behavior under low doses of electrons from a {beta}-source and the performance before and after intense (>10{sup 15}/cm{sup 2}) proton- and pion-irradiations. We find that low dose irradiation increase the signal-to-noise ratio (pumping of the signal) and slightly deteriorate the spatial resolution. Intense irradiation with protons 2.2x10{sup 15} p/cm{sup 2} lowers the signal-to-noise ratio slightly. Intense irradiation with pions 2.9x10{sup 15} {pi}/cm{sup 2} lowers the signal-to-noise ratio more. The spatial resolution of the diamond sensors improves after irradiations.

  15. Performance of irradiated CVD diamond micro-strip sensors

    CERN Document Server

    Adam, W; Bergonzo, P; Bertuccio, G; Bogani, F; Borchi, E; Brambilla, A; Bruzzi, Mara; Colledani, C; Conway, J; D'Angelo, P; Dabrowski, W; Delpierre, P A; Deneuville, A; Dulinski, W; van Eijk, B; Fallou, A; Fizzotti, F; Foulon, F; Friedl, M; Gan, K K; Gheeraert, E; Hallewell, G D; Han, S; Hartjes, F G; Hrubec, Josef; Husson, D; Kagan, H; Kania, D R; Kaplon, J; Kass, R; Koeth, T W; Krammer, Manfred; Lo Giudice, A; Lü, R; MacLynne, L; Manfredotti, C; Meier, D; Mishina, M; Moroni, L; Noomen, J; Oh, A; Pan, L S; Pernicka, Manfred; Peitz, A; Perera, L P; Pirollo, S; Procario, M; Riester, J L; Roe, S; Rousseau, L; Rudge, A; Russ, J; Sala, S; Sampietro, M; Schnetzer, S R; Sciortino, S; Stelzer, H; Stone, R; Suter, B; Tapper, R J; Tesarek, R J; Trischuk, W; Tromson, D; Vittone, E; Walsh, A M; Wedenig, R; Weilhammer, Peter; Wetstein, M; White, C; Zeuner, W; Zöller, M

    2002-01-01

    CVD diamond detectors are of interest for charged particle detection and tracking due to their high radiation tolerance. In this article we present, for the first time, beam test results from recently manufactured CVD diamond strip detectors and their behavior under low doses of electrons from a $\\beta$-source and the performance before and after intense ($>10^{15}/{\\rm cm^2}$) proton- and pion-irradiations. We find that low dose irradiations increase the signal-to-noise ratio (pumping of the signal) and slightly deteriorate the spatial resolution. Intense irradiations with protons ($2.2\\times 10^{15}~p/{\\rm cm^2}$) lowers the signal-to-noise ratio slightly. Intense irradiation with pions ($2.9\\times 10^{15}~\\pi/{\\rm cm^2}$) lowers the signal-to-noise ratio more. The spatial resolution of the diamond sensors improves after irradiations.

  16. Performance of irradiated CVD diamond micro-strip sensors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Adam, W.; Berdermann, E.; Bergonzo, P.; Bertuccio, G.; Bogani, F.; Borchi, E.; Brambilla, A.; Bruzzi, M.; Colledani, C.; Conway, J.; D'Angelo, P.; Dabrowski, W.; Delpierre, P.; Deneuville, A.; Dulinski, W.; van Eijk, B.; Fallou, A.; Fizzotti, F.; Foulon, F.; Friedl, M.; Gan, K. K.; Gheeraert, E.; Hallewell, G.; Han, S.; Hartjes, F.; Hrubec, J.; Husson, D.; Kagan, H.; Kania, D.; Kaplon, J.; Kass, R.; Koeth, T.; Krammer, M.; Logiudice, A.; Lu, R.; mac Lynne, L.; Manfredotti, C.; Meier, D.; Mishina, M.; Moroni, L.; Noomen, J.; Oh, A.; Pan, L. S.; Pernicka, M.; Peitz, A.; Perera, L.; Pirollo, S.; Procario, M.; Riester, J. L.; Roe, S.; Rousseau, L.; Rudge, A.; Russ, J.; Sala, S.; Sampietro, M.; Schnetzer, S.; Sciortino, S.; Stelzer, H.; Stone, R.; Suter, B.; Tapper, R. J.; Tesarek, R.; Trischuk, W.; Tromson, D.; Vittone, E.; Walsh, A. M.; Wedenig, R.; Weilhammer, P.; Wetstein, M.; White, C.; Zeuner, W.; Zoeller, M.; Plano, R.; Somalwar, S. V.; Thomson, G. B.

    2002-01-01

    CVD diamond detectors are of interest for charged particle detection and tracking due to their high radiation tolerance. In this article, we present, for the first time, beam test results from recently manufactured CVD diamond strip detectors and their behavior under low doses of electrons from a β-source and the performance before and after intense (>10 15/cm 2) proton- and pion-irradiations. We find that low dose irradiation increase the signal-to-noise ratio (pumping of the signal) and slightly deteriorate the spatial resolution. Intense irradiation with protons 2.2×10 15 p/ cm2 lowers the signal-to-noise ratio slightly. Intense irradiation with pions 2.9×10 15 π/ cm2 lowers the signal-to-noise ratio more. The spatial resolution of the diamond sensors improves after irradiations.

  17. Performance Analysis of Sensor Systems for Space Situational Awareness

    Science.gov (United States)

    Choi, Eun-Jung; Cho, Sungki; Jo, Jung Hyun; Park, Jang-Hyun; Chung, Taejin; Park, Jaewoo; Jeon, Hocheol; Yun, Ami; Lee, Yonghui

    2017-12-01

    With increased human activity in space, the risk of re-entry and collision between space objects is constantly increasing. Hence, the need for space situational awareness (SSA) programs has been acknowledged by many experienced space agencies. Optical and radar sensors, which enable the surveillance and tracking of space objects, are the most important technical components of SSA systems. In particular, combinations of radar systems and optical sensor networks play an outstanding role in SSA programs. At present, Korea operates the optical wide field patrol network (OWL-Net), the only optical system for tracking space objects. However, due to their dependence on weather conditions and observation time, it is not reasonable to use optical systems alone for SSA initiatives, as they have limited operational availability. Therefore, the strategies for developing radar systems should be considered for an efficient SSA system using currently available technology. The purpose of this paper is to analyze the performance of a radar system in detecting and tracking space objects. With the radar system investigated, the minimum sensitivity is defined as detection of a 1-m2 radar cross section (RCS) at an altitude of 2,000 km, with operating frequencies in the L, S, C, X or Ku-band. The results of power budget analysis showed that the maximum detection range of 2,000 km, which includes the low earth orbit (LEO) environment, can be achieved with a transmission power of 900 kW, transmit and receive antenna gains of 40 dB and 43 dB, respectively, a pulse width of 2 ms, and a signal processing gain of 13.3 dB, at a frequency of 1.3 GHz. We defined the key parameters of the radar following a performance analysis of the system. This research can thus provide guidelines for the conceptual design of radar systems for national SSA initiatives.

  18. Development and Performance Evaluation of Optical Sensors for High Temperature Engine Applications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Adamovsky, G.; Varga, D.; Floyd, B.

    2011-01-01

    This paper discusses fiber optic sensors designed and constructed to withstand extreme temperatures of aircraft engine. The paper describes development and performance evaluation of fiber optic Bragg grating based sensors. It also describes the design and presents test results of packaged sensors subjected to temperatures up to 1000 C for prolonged periods of time.

  19. C-Scan Performance Test of Under-Sodium ultrasonic Waveguide Sensor in Sodium

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Joo, Young Sang; Bae, Jin Ho; Kim, Jong Bum

    2011-01-01

    Reactor core and in-vessel structures of a sodium-cooled fast (SFR) are submerged in opaque liquid sodium in the reactor vessel. The ultrasonic inspection techniques should be applied for observing the in-vessel structures under hot liquid sodium. Ultrasonic sensors such as immersion sensors and rod-type waveguide sensors have developed in order to apply under-sodium viewing of the in-vessel structures of SFR. Recently the novel plate-type ultrasonic waveguide sensor has been developed for the versatile application of under-sodium viewing in SFR. In previous studies, the ultrasonic waveguide sensor module was designed and manufactured, and the feasibility study of the ultrasonic waveguide sensor was performed. To improve the performance of the ultrasonic waveguide sensor in the under-sodium application, a new concept of ultrasonic waveguide sensors with a Be coated SS304 plate is suggested for the effective generation of a leaky wave in liquid sodium and the non-dispersive propagation of A 0 -mode Lamb wave in an ultrasonic waveguide sensor. In this study, the C-scan performance of the under-sodium ultrasonic waveguide sensor in sodium has been investigated by the experimental test in sodium. The under-sodium ultrasonic waveguide sensor and the sodium test facility with a glove box system and a sodium tank are designed and manufactured to carry out the performance test of under-sodium ultrasonic waveguide sensor in sodium environment condition

  20. A scanning Hall probe microscope for high resolution magnetic imaging down to 300 mK

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Khotkevych, V. V.; Bending, S. J.; Milosevic, M. V.

    2008-01-01

    We present the design, construction, and performance of a low-temperature scanning Hall probe microscope with submicron lateral resolution and a large scanning range. The detachable microscope head is mounted on the cold flange of a commercial 3 He-refrigerator (Oxford Instruments, Heliox VT-50) and operates between room temperature and 300 mK. It is fitted with a three-axis slip-stick nanopositioner that enables precise in situ adjustment of the probe location within a 6x6x7 mm 3 space. The local magnetic induction at the sample surface is mapped with an easily changeable microfabricated Hall probe [typically GsAs/AlGaAs or AlGaAs/InGaAs/GaAs Hall sensors with integrated scanning tunnel microscopy (STM) tunneling tips] and can achieve minimum detectable fields ≥10 mG/Hz 1/2 . The Hall probe is brought into very close proximity to the sample surface by sensing and controlling tunnel currents at the integrated STM tip. The instrument is capable of simultaneous tunneling and Hall signal acquisition in surface-tracking mode. We illustrate the potential of the system with images of superconducting vortices at the surface of a Nb thin film down to 372 mK, and also of labyrinth magnetic-domain patterns of an yttrium iron garnet film captured at room temperature.

  1. Sensor Selection for Aircraft Engine Performance Estimation and Gas Path Fault Diagnostics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Simon, Donald L.; Rinehart, Aidan W.

    2016-01-01

    This paper presents analytical techniques for aiding system designers in making aircraft engine health management sensor selection decisions. The presented techniques, which are based on linear estimation and probability theory, are tailored for gas turbine engine performance estimation and gas path fault diagnostics applications. They enable quantification of the performance estimation and diagnostic accuracy offered by different candidate sensor suites. For performance estimation, sensor selection metrics are presented for two types of estimators including a Kalman filter and a maximum a posteriori estimator. For each type of performance estimator, sensor selection is based on minimizing the theoretical sum of squared estimation errors in health parameters representing performance deterioration in the major rotating modules of the engine. For gas path fault diagnostics, the sensor selection metric is set up to maximize correct classification rate for a diagnostic strategy that performs fault classification by identifying the fault type that most closely matches the observed measurement signature in a weighted least squares sense. Results from the application of the sensor selection metrics to a linear engine model are presented and discussed. Given a baseline sensor suite and a candidate list of optional sensors, an exhaustive search is performed to determine the optimal sensor suites for performance estimation and fault diagnostics. For any given sensor suite, Monte Carlo simulation results are found to exhibit good agreement with theoretical predictions of estimation and diagnostic accuracies.

  2. Development of a micro-Hall magnetometer and studies of individual Fe-filled carbon nanotubes

    OpenAIRE

    Lipert, Kamil

    2011-01-01

    This work presents Hall magnetometry studies on individual Fe-filled carbon nanotubes (CNT). For this approach high sensitivity micro Hall sensors based on a GaAs/AlGaAs heterostructure with two dimensional electron gas (2DEG) were developed. Electron beam lithography and wet chemical etching were utilized for patterning Hall sensors onto the heterostructure surface. The devices were characterized by means of scanning electron microscopy, atomic force microscopy and transport measurements. In...

  3. Comparison of the performance of intraoral X-ray sensors using objective image quality assessment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hellén-Halme, Kristina; Johansson, Curt; Nilsson, Mats

    2016-05-01

    The main aim of this study was to evaluate the performance of 10 individual sensors of the same make, using objective measures of key image quality parameters. A further aim was to compare 8 brands of sensors. Ten new sensors of 8 different models from 6 manufacturers (i.e., 80 sensors) were included in the study. All sensors were exposed in a standardized way using an X-ray tube voltage of 60 kVp and different exposure times. Sensor response, noise, low-contrast resolution, spatial resolution and uniformity were measured. Individual differences between sensors of the same brand were surprisingly large in some cases. There were clear differences in the characteristics of the different brands of sensors. The largest variations were found for individual sensor response for some of the brands studied. Also, noise level and low contrast resolution showed large variations between brands. Sensors, even of the same brand, vary significantly in their quality. It is thus valuable to establish action levels for the acceptance of newly delivered sensors and to use objective image quality control for commissioning purposes and periodic checks to ensure high performance of individual digital sensors. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  4. Hall probe magnetometer for SSC magnet cables

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cross, R.W.; Goldfarb, R.B.

    1991-01-01

    The authors of this paper constructed a Hall probe magnetometer to measure the magnetization hysteresis loops of Superconducting Super Collider magnet cables. The instrument uses two Hall-effect field sensors to measure the applied field H and the magnetic induction B. Magnetization M is calculated from the difference of the two quantities. The Hall probes are centered coaxially in the bore of a superconducting solenoid with the B probe against the sample's broad surface. An alternative probe arrangement, in which M is measured directly, aligns the sample probe parallel to the field. The authors measured M as a function of H and field cycle rate both with and without a dc transport current. Flux creep as a function of current was measured from the dependence of ac loss on the cycling rate and from the decay of magnetization with time. Transport currents up to 20% of the critical current have minimal effect on magnetization and flux creep

  5. Performance analysis of data retrieval in wireless sensor networks

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Mitici, M.A.

    2015-01-01

    Wireless sensor networks are currently revolutionizing the way we live, work, and interact with the surrounding environment. Due to their ease of deployment, cost effectiveness and versatile functionality, sensors are employed in a wide range of areas such as environmental monitoring, surveillance

  6. Frontside-micromachined planar piezoresistive vibration sensor: Evaluating performance in the low frequency test range

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lan Zhang

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Using a surface piezoresistor diffusion method and front-side only micromachining process, a planar piezoresistive vibration sensor was successfully developed with a simple structure, lower processing cost and fewer packaging difficulties. The vibration sensor had a large sector proof mass attached to a narrow flexure. Optimization of the boron diffusion piezoresistor placed on the edge of the narrow flexure greatly improved the sensitivity. Planar vibration sensors were fabricated and measured in order to analyze the effects of the sensor dimensions on performance, including the values of flexure width and the included angle of the sector. Sensitivities of fabricated planar sensors of 0.09–0.46 mV/V/g were measured up to a test frequency of 60 Hz. The sensor functioned at low voltages (<3 V and currents (<1 mA with a high sensitivity and low drift. At low background noise levels, the sensor had performance comparable to a commercial device.

  7. Frontside-micromachined planar piezoresistive vibration sensor: Evaluating performance in the low frequency test range

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zhang, Lan; Lu, Jian, E-mail: jian-lu@aist.go.jp; Takagi, Hideki; Maeda, Ryutaro [Research Center for Ubiquitous MEMS and Micro Engineering (UMEMSME), National Institute of Advanced Industrial Science and Technology (AIST), Tsukuba, Ibaraki, 305-8564 (Japan)

    2014-01-15

    Using a surface piezoresistor diffusion method and front-side only micromachining process, a planar piezoresistive vibration sensor was successfully developed with a simple structure, lower processing cost and fewer packaging difficulties. The vibration sensor had a large sector proof mass attached to a narrow flexure. Optimization of the boron diffusion piezoresistor placed on the edge of the narrow flexure greatly improved the sensitivity. Planar vibration sensors were fabricated and measured in order to analyze the effects of the sensor dimensions on performance, including the values of flexure width and the included angle of the sector. Sensitivities of fabricated planar sensors of 0.09–0.46 mV/V/g were measured up to a test frequency of 60 Hz. The sensor functioned at low voltages (<3 V) and currents (<1 mA) with a high sensitivity and low drift. At low background noise levels, the sensor had performance comparable to a commercial device.

  8. The effects of two thick film deposition methods on tin dioxide gas sensor performance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bakrania, Smitesh D; Wooldridge, Margaret S

    2009-01-01

    This work demonstrates the variability in performance between SnO(2) thick film gas sensors prepared using two types of film deposition methods. SnO(2) powders were deposited on sensor platforms with and without the use of binders. Three commonly utilized binder recipes were investigated, and a new binder-less deposition procedure was developed and characterized. The binder recipes yielded sensors with poor film uniformity and poor structural integrity, compared to the binder-less deposition method. Sensor performance at a fixed operating temperature of 330 °C for the different film deposition methods was evaluated by exposure to 500 ppm of the target gas carbon monoxide. A consequence of the poor film structure, large variability and poor signal properties were observed with the sensors fabricated using binders. Specifically, the sensors created using the binder recipes yielded sensor responses that varied widely (e.g., S = 5 - 20), often with hysteresis in the sensor signal. Repeatable and high quality performance was observed for the sensors prepared using the binder-less dispersion-drop method with good sensor response upon exposure to 500 ppm CO (S = 4.0) at an operating temperature of 330 °C, low standard deviation to the sensor response (±0.35) and no signal hysteresis.

  9. The Effects of Two Thick Film Deposition Methods on Tin Dioxide Gas Sensor Performance

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Smitesh D. Bakrania

    2009-08-01

    Full Text Available This work demonstrates the variability in performance between SnO2 thick film gas sensors prepared using two types of film deposition methods. SnO2 powders were deposited on sensor platforms with and without the use of binders. Three commonly utilized binder recipes were investigated, and a new binder-less deposition procedure was developed and characterized. The binder recipes yielded sensors with poor film uniformity and poor structural integrity, compared to the binder-less deposition method. Sensor performance at a fixed operating temperature of 330 ºC for the different film deposition methods was evaluated by exposure to 500 ppm of the target gas carbon monoxide. A consequence of the poor film structure, large variability and poor signal properties were observed with the sensors fabricated using binders. Specifically, the sensors created using the binder recipes yielded sensor responses that varied widely (e.g., S = 5 – 20, often with hysteresis in the sensor signal. Repeatable and high quality performance was observed for the sensors prepared using the binder-less dispersion-drop method with good sensor response upon exposure to 500 ppm CO (S = 4.0 at an operating temperature of 330 ºC, low standard deviation to the sensor response (±0.35 and no signal hysteresis.

  10. System and method for improving performance of a fluid sensor for an internal combustion engine

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kubinski, David [Canton, MI; Zawacki, Garry [Livonia, MI

    2009-03-03

    A system and method for improving sensor performance of an on-board vehicle sensor, such as an exhaust gas sensor, while sensing a predetermined substance in a fluid flowing through a pipe include a structure for extending into the pipe and having at least one inlet for receiving fluid flowing through the pipe and at least one outlet generally opposite the at least one inlet, wherein the structure redirects substantially all fluid flowing from the at least one inlet to the sensor to provide a representative sample of the fluid to the sensor before returning the fluid through the at least one outlet.

  11. Performance Analysis of Receive Diversity in Wireless Sensor Networks over GBSBE Models

    OpenAIRE

    Goel, Shivali; Abawajy, Jemal H.; Kim, Tai-hoon

    2010-01-01

    Wireless sensor networks have attracted a lot of attention recently. In this paper, we develop a channel model based on the elliptical model for multipath components involving randomly placed scatterers in the scattering region with sensors deployed on a field. We verify that in a sensor network, the use of receive diversity techniques improves the performance of the system. Extensive performance analysis of the system is carried out for both single and multiple antennas with the applied rece...

  12. Static and cyclic performance evaluation of sensors for human interface pressure measurement.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dabling, Jeffrey G; Filatov, Anton; Wheeler, Jason W

    2012-01-01

    Researchers and clinicians often desire to monitor pressure distributions on soft tissues at interfaces to mechanical devices such as prosthetics, orthotics or shoes. The most common type of sensor used for this type of applications is a Force Sensitive Resistor (FSR) as these are convenient to use and inexpensive. Several other types of sensors exist that may have superior sensing performance but are less ubiquitous or more expensive, such as optical or capacitive sensors. We tested five sensors (two FSRs, one optical, one capacitive and one fluid pressure) in a static drift and cyclic loading configuration. The results show that relative to the important performance characteristics for soft tissue pressure monitoring (i.e. hysteresis, drift), many of the sensors tested have significant limitations. The FSRs exhibited hysteresis, drift and loss of sensitivity under cyclic loading. The capacitive sensor had substantial drift. The optical sensor had some hysteresis and temperature-related drift. The fluid pressure sensor performed well in these tests but is not as flat as the other sensors and is not commercially available. Researchers and clinicians should carefully consider the convenience and performance trade-offs when choosing a sensor for soft-tissue pressure monitoring.

  13. Performance of Radiation Hard Pixel Sensors for the CMS Experiment

    CERN Document Server

    Dorokhov, Andrei

    2005-01-01

    Position sensitive detectors in particle physics experiments are used for the detection of the particles trajectory produced in high energy collisions. To study physics phenomena at high energies the high particle interaction rate is unavoidable, as the number of interesting events falls with the energy and the total number of events is dominated by the soft processes. The position resolution of vertex detectors has to be of few microns in order to distinguish between particle tracks produced in b-quark or tau-decays, because of the short flight path before the decay. The high spatial position resolution and the ability to detect a large number of superimposed track are the key features for tracking detectors. Modern silicon microstrip and pixel detectors with high resolution are currently most suitable devices for the tracking systems of high energy physics experiments. In this work the performance of the sensors designed for the CMS pixel detector are studied and the position resolution is estimated. In the...

  14. Field Performance of ISFET based Deep Ocean pH Sensors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Branham, C. W.; Murphy, D. J.

    2017-12-01

    Historically, ocean pH time series data was acquired from infrequent shipboard grab samples and measured using labor intensive spectrophotometry methods. However, with the introduction of robust and stable ISFET pH sensors for use in ocean applications a paradigm shift in the methods used to acquire long-term pH time series data has occurred. Sea-Bird Scientific played a critical role in the adoption this new technology by commercializing the SeaFET pH sensor and float pH Sensor developed by the MBARI chemical sensor group. Sea-Bird Scientific continues to advance this technology through a concerted effort to improve pH sensor accuracy and reliability by characterizing their performance in the laboratory and field. This presentation will focus on calibration of the ISFET pH sensor, evaluate its analytical performance, and validate performance using recent field data.

  15. Performance evaluation of TDT soil water content and watermark soil water potential sensors

    Science.gov (United States)

    This study evaluated the performance of digitized Time Domain Transmissometry (TDT) soil water content sensors (Acclima, Inc., Meridian, ID) and resistance-based soil water potential sensors (Watermark 200, Irrometer Company, Inc., Riverside, CA) in two soils. The evaluation was performed by compar...

  16. Halls Lake 1990

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — Salt marsh habitats along the shoreline of Halls Lake are threatened by wave erosion, but the reconstruction of barrier islands to reduce this erosion will modify or...

  17. Performance Evaluation of a Routing Protocol in Wireless Sensor Network

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Cheng Kiat Amos, Teo

    2005-01-01

    ... and have topologies engineered. As such, recent research into wireless sensor networks has attracted great interest due to its diversity of applications, ranging in areas such as home, health, environmental and military applications...

  18. Performance of terahertz metamaterials as high-sensitivity sensor

    Science.gov (United States)

    He, Yanan; Zhang, Bo; Shen, Jingling

    2017-09-01

    A high-sensitivity sensor based on the resonant transmission characteristics of terahertz (THz) metamaterials was investigated, with the proposal and fabrication of rectangular bar arrays of THz metamaterials exhibiting a period of 180 μm on a 25 μm thick flexible polyimide. Varying the size of the metamaterial structure revealed that the length of the rectangular unit modulated the resonant frequency, which was verified by both experiment and simulation. The sensing characteristics upon varying the surrounding media in the sample were tested by simulation and experiment. Changing the surrounding medium from that of air to that of alcohol or oil produced resonant frequency redshifts of 80 GHz or 150 GHz, respectively, which indicates that the sensor possessed a high sensitivity of 667 GHz per unit of refractive index. Finally, the influence of the sample substrate thickness on the sensor sensitivity was investigated by simulation. It may be a reference for future sensor design.

  19. Performance enhancement of electronic sensor through mask-less lithography

    KAUST Repository

    Nag, Anindya; Zia, Asif I.; Mukhopadhyay, S. C.; Kosel, Jü rgen

    2016-01-01

    The escalating applications of miniaturized sensors have led the microelectronics industry to stay abreast with the precise micro-fabrication technologies. The following article describes a new technique for the fabrication of miniaturized

  20. The quantum hall effect

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    El-Arabi, N. M.

    1993-01-01

    Transport phenomena in two dimensional semiconductors have revealed unusual properties. In this thesis these systems are considered and discussed. The theories explain the Integral Quantum Hall Effect (IQHE) and the Fractional Quantum Hall Effect (FQHE). The thesis is composed of five chapters. The first and the second chapters lay down the theory of the IQHE, the third and fourth consider the theory of the FQHE. Chapter five deals with the statistics of particles in two dimension. (author). Refs

  1. Hall viscosity of hierarchical quantum Hall states

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fremling, M.; Hansson, T. H.; Suorsa, J.

    2014-03-01

    Using methods based on conformal field theory, we construct model wave functions on a torus with arbitrary flat metric for all chiral states in the abelian quantum Hall hierarchy. These functions have no variational parameters, and they transform under the modular group in the same way as the multicomponent generalizations of the Laughlin wave functions. Assuming the absence of Berry phases upon adiabatic variations of the modular parameter τ, we calculate the quantum Hall viscosity and find it to be in agreement with the formula, given by Read, which relates the viscosity to the average orbital spin of the electrons. For the filling factor ν =2/5 Jain state, which is at the second level in the hierarchy, we compare our model wave function with the numerically obtained ground state of the Coulomb interaction Hamiltonian in the lowest Landau level, and find very good agreement in a large region of the complex τ plane. For the same example, we also numerically compute the Hall viscosity and find good agreement with the analytical result for both the model wave function and the numerically obtained Coulomb wave function. We argue that this supports the notion of a generalized plasma analogy that would ensure that wave functions obtained using the conformal field theory methods do not acquire Berry phases upon adiabatic evolution.

  2. Clustering approaches to improve the performance of low cost air pollution sensors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smith, Katie R; Edwards, Peter M; Evans, Mathew J; Lee, James D; Shaw, Marvin D; Squires, Freya; Wilde, Shona; Lewis, Alastair C

    2017-08-24

    Low cost air pollution sensors have substantial potential for atmospheric research and for the applied control of pollution in the urban environment, including more localized warnings to the public. The current generation of single-chemical gas sensors experience degrees of interference from other co-pollutants and have sensitivity to environmental factors such as temperature, wind speed and supply voltage. There are uncertainties introduced also because of sensor-to-sensor response variability, although this is less well reported. The sensitivity of Metal Oxide Sensors (MOS) to volatile organic compounds (VOCs) changed with relative humidity (RH) by up to a factor of five over the range of 19-90% RH and with an uncertainty in the correction of a factor of two at any given RH. The short-term (second to minute) stabilities of MOS and electrochemical CO sensor responses were reasonable. During more extended use, inter-sensor quantitative comparability was degraded due to unpredictable variability in individual sensor responses (to either measurand or interference or both) drifting over timescales of several hours to days. For timescales longer than a week identical sensors showed slow, often downwards, drifts in their responses which diverged across six CO sensors by up to 30% after two weeks. The measurement derived from the median sensor within clusters of 6, 8 and up to 21 sensors was evaluated against individual sensor performance and external reference values. The clustered approach maintained the cost competitiveness of a sensor device, but the median concentration from the ensemble of sensor signals largely eliminated the randomised hour-to-day response drift seen in individual sensors and excluded the effects of small numbers of poorly performing sensors that drifted significantly over longer time periods. The results demonstrate that for individual sensors to be optimally comparable to one another, and to reference instruments, they would likely require

  3. Sensors

    CERN Document Server

    Pigorsch, Enrico

    1997-01-01

    This is the 5th edition of the Metra Martech Directory "EUROPEAN CENTRES OF EXPERTISE - SENSORS." The entries represent a survey of European sensors development. The new edition contains 425 detailed profiles of companies and research institutions in 22 countries. This is reflected in the diversity of sensors development programmes described, from sensors for physical parameters to biosensors and intelligent sensor systems. We do not claim that all European organisations developing sensors are included, but this is a good cross section from an invited list of participants. If you see gaps or omissions, or would like your organisation to be included, please send details. The data base invites the formation of effective joint ventures by identifying and providing access to specific areas in which organisations offer collaboration. This issue is recognised to be of great importance and most entrants include details of collaboration offered and sought. We hope the directory on Sensors will help you to find the ri...

  4. Design and Performance Analysis of Laser Displacement Sensor Based on Position Sensitive Detector (PSD)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Song, H X; Wang, X D; Ma, L Q; Cai, M Z; Cao, T Z

    2006-01-01

    By using PSD as sensitive element, and laser diode as emitting element, laser displacement sensor based on triangulation method has been widely used. From the point of view of design, sensor and its performance were studied. Two different sensor configurations were described. Determination of the dimension, sensing resolution and comparison of the two different configurations were presented. The factors affecting the performance of the laser displacement sensor were discussed and two methods, which can eliminate the affection of dark current and environment light, are proposed

  5. Weigh-in-Motion Sensor and Controller Operation and Performance Comparison

    Science.gov (United States)

    2018-01-01

    This research project utilized statistical inference and comparison techniques to compare the performance of different Weigh-in-Motion (WIM) sensors. First, we analyzed test-vehicle data to perform an accuracy check of the results reported by the sen...

  6. Real-Time Performance of a Self-Powered Environmental IoT Sensor Network System.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, Fan; Rüdiger, Christoph; Yuce, Mehmet Rasit

    2017-02-01

    Wireless sensor networks (WSNs) play an increasingly important role in monitoring applications in many areas. With the emergence of the Internet-of-Things (IoT), many more lowpower sensors will need to be deployed in various environments to collect and monitor data about environmental factors in real time. Providing power supply to these sensor nodes becomes a critical challenge for realizations of IoT applications as sensor nodes are normally battery-powered and have a limited lifetime. This paper proposes a wireless sensor network that is powered by solar energy harvesting. The sensor network monitors the environmental data with low-power sensor electronics and forms a network using multiple XBee wireless modules. A detailed performance analysis of the network system under solar energy harvesting has been presented. The sensor network system and the proposed energy-harvesting techniques are configured to achieve a continuous energy source for the sensor network. The proposed energy-harvesting system has been successfully designed to enable an energy solution in order to keep sensor nodes active and reliable for a whole day. The paper also outlines some of our experiences in real-time implementation of a sensor network system with energy harvesting.

  7. Real-Time Performance of a Self-Powered Environmental IoT Sensor Network System

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fan Wu

    2017-02-01

    Full Text Available Wireless sensor networks (WSNs play an increasingly important role in monitoring applications in many areas. With the emergence of the Internet-of-Things (IoT, many more lowpower sensors will need to be deployed in various environments to collect and monitor data about environmental factors in real time. Providing power supply to these sensor nodes becomes a critical challenge for realizations of IoT applications as sensor nodes are normally battery-powered and have a limited lifetime. This paper proposes a wireless sensor network that is powered by solar energy harvesting. The sensor network monitors the environmental data with low-power sensor electronics and forms a network using multiple XBee wireless modules. A detailed performance analysis of the network system under solar energy harvesting has been presented. The sensor network system and the proposed energy-harvesting techniques are configured to achieve a continuous energy source for the sensor network. The proposed energy-harvesting system has been successfully designed to enable an energy solution in order to keep sensor nodes active and reliable for a whole day. The paper also outlines some of our experiences in real-time implementation of a sensor network system with energy harvesting.

  8. MEMS actuators and sensors: observations on their performance and selection for purpose

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bell, D. J.; Lu, T. J.; Fleck, N. A.; Spearing, S. M.

    2005-07-01

    This paper presents an exercise in comparing the performance of microelectromechanical systems (MEMS) actuators and sensors as a function of operating principle. Data have been obtained from the literature for the mechanical performance characteristics of actuators, force sensors and displacement sensors. On-chip and off-chip actuators and sensors are each sub-grouped into families, classes and members according to their principle of operation. The performance of MEMS sharing common operating principles is compared with each other and with equivalent macroscopic devices. The data are used to construct performance maps showing the capability of existing actuators and sensors in terms of maximum force and displacement capability, resolution and frequency. These can also be used as a preliminary design tool, as shown in a case study on the design of an on-chip tensile test machine for materials in thin-film form.

  9. Performance of a digital PCO2/SPO2 ear sensor.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kocher, Serge; Rohling, Roman; Tschupp, Andres

    2004-04-01

    For determining the adequacy of ventilation, conventional pulse oximetry should be amended by PaCO2 (= arterial carbon dioxide partial pressure). This study investigates the precision of carbon dioxide measurements of the first digital ear-clip sensor providing continuous non-invasive monitoring of PaCO2, SpO2 (= functional arterial oxygen saturation as estimated with a pulse oximeter) and pulse rate and compares it to two conventional analog oximeters. 30 hypoxemia episodes in 6 adult volunteers were investigated in a standardized protocol. Masimo analog finger sensor, Nellcor analog ear sensor, SenTec digital ear sensor. The difference between PCO2 data (= PaCO2 estimated from the measured PcCO2 based on an algorithm by Severinghaus) (PcCO2 = cutaneous carbon dioxide pressure) and the PaCO2 is clinically unimportant. Therefore, we suggest, the two methods of estimating patient's carbon dioxide status can be used interchangeably. Combined digital SpO2/ PcCO2 ear sensors are very promising to allow for a fast and reliable monitoring of patient's oxygenation, hyper-/hypocapnia and ventilation with one single non-invasive probe. Optimal primary signal processing--amplification and digitalisation within the probe--allow for fast and reliable downstream signal processing algorithms. The resulting short SpO2 response times give the medical staff more time to take appropriate actions.

  10. The Effects of Two Thick Film Deposition Methods on Tin Dioxide Gas Sensor Performance

    OpenAIRE

    Bakrania, Smitesh D.; Wooldridge, Margaret S.

    2009-01-01

    This work demonstrates the variability in performance between SnO2 thick film gas sensors prepared using two types of film deposition methods. SnO2 powders were deposited on sensor platforms with and without the use of binders. Three commonly utilized binder recipes were investigated, and a new binder-less deposition procedure was developed and characterized. The binder recipes yielded sensors with poor film uniformity and poor structural integrity, compared to the binder-less deposition meth...

  11. Porous, Dexamethasone-loaded polyurethane coatings extend performance window of implantable glucose sensors in vivo.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vallejo-Heligon, Suzana G; Brown, Nga L; Reichert, William M; Klitzman, Bruce

    2016-01-01

    Continuous glucose sensors offer the promise of tight glycemic control for insulin dependent diabetics; however, utilization of such systems has been hindered by issues of tissue compatibility. Here we report on the in vivo performance of implanted glucose sensors coated with Dexamethasone-loaded (Dex-loaded) porous coatings employed to mediate the tissue-sensor interface. Two animal studies were conducted to (1) characterize the tissue modifying effects of the porous Dex-loaded coatings deployed on sensor surrogate implants and (2) investigate the effects of the same coatings on the in vivo performance of Medtronic MiniMed SOF-SENSOR™ glucose sensors. The tissue response to implants was evaluated by quantifying macrophage infiltration, blood vessel formation, and collagen density around implants. Sensor function was assessed by measuring changes in sensor sensitivity and time lag, calculating the Mean Absolute Relative Difference (MARD) for each sensor treatment, and performing functional glucose challenge test at relevant time points. Implants treated with porous Dex-loaded coatings diminished inflammation and enhanced vascularization of the tissue surrounding the implants. Functional sensors with Dex-loaded porous coatings showed enhanced sensor sensitivity over a 21-day period when compared to controls. Enhanced sensor sensitivity was accompanied with an increase in sensor signal lag and MARD score. These results indicate that Dex-loaded porous coatings were able to elicit an attenuated tissue response, and that such tissue microenvironment could be conducive towards extending the performance window of glucose sensors in vivo. In the present article, a coating to extend the functionality of implantable glucose sensors in vivo was developed. Our study showed that the delivery of an anti-inflammatory agent with the presentation of micro-sized topographical cues from coatings may lead to improved long-term glucose sensor function in vivo. We believe that

  12. On the timing performance of thin planar silicon sensors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Akchurin, N.; Ciriolo, V.; Currás, E.; Damgov, J.; Fernández, M.; Gallrapp, C.; Gray, L.; Junkes, A.; Mannelli, M.; Martin Kwok, K. H.; Meridiani, P.; Moll, M.; Nourbakhsh, S.; Pigazzini, S.; Scharf, C.; Silva, P.; Steinbrueck, G.; de Fatis, T. Tabarelli; Vila, I.

    2017-07-01

    We report on the signal timing capabilities of thin silicon sensors when traversed by multiple simultaneous minimum ionizing particles (MIP). Three different planar sensors, with depletion thicknesses 133, 211, and 285 μm, have been exposed to high energy muons and electrons at CERN. We describe signal shape and timing resolution measurements as well as the response of these devices as a function of the multiplicity of MIPs. We compare these measurements to simulations where possible. We achieve better than 20 ps timing resolution for signals larger than a few tens of MIPs.

  13. Experimental test of 200 W Hall thruster with titanium wall

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ding, Yongjie; Sun, Hezhi; Peng, Wuji; Xu, Yu; Wei, Liqiu; Li, Hong; Li, Peng; Su, Hongbo; Yu, Daren

    2017-05-01

    We designed a 200 W Hall thruster based on the technology of pushing down a magnetic field with two permanent magnetic rings. Boron nitride (BN) is an important insulating wall material for Hall thrusters. The discharge characteristics of the designed Hall thruster were studied by replacing BN with titanium (Ti). Experimental results show that the designed Hall thruster can discharge stably for a long time under a Ti channel. Experiments were performed to determine whether the channel and cathode are electrically connected. When the channel wall and cathode are insulated, the divergence angle of the plume increases, but the performance of the Hall thruster is improved in terms of thrust, specific impulse, anode efficiency, and thrust-to-power ratio. Ti exhibits a powerful antisputtering capability, a low emanation rate of gas, and a large structural strength, making it a potential candidate wall material in the design of low-power Hall thrusters.

  14. High-Performance Pressure Sensor for Monitoring Mechanical Vibration and Air Pressure

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yancheng Meng

    2018-05-01

    Full Text Available To realize the practical applications of flexible pressure sensors, the high performance (sensitivity and response time as well as more functionalities are highly desired. In this work, we fabricated a piezoresistive pressure sensor based on the micro-structured composites films of multi-walled carbon nanotubes (MWCNTs and poly (dimethylsiloxane (PDMS. In addition, we establish efficient strategies to improve key performance of our pressure sensor. Its sensitivity is improved up to 474.13 kPa−1 by minimizing pressure independent resistance of sensor, and response time is shorten as small as 2 μs by enhancing the elastic modulus of polymer elastomer. Benefiting from the high performance, the functionalities of sensors are successfully extended to the accurate detection of high frequency mechanical vibration (~300 Hz and large range of air pressure (6–101 kPa, both of which are not achieved before.

  15. Prototyping of a highly performant and integrated piezoresistive force sensor for microscale applications

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Komati, Bilal; Agnus, Joël; Clévy, Cédric; Lutz, Philippe

    2014-01-01

    In this paper, the prototyping of a new piezoresistive microforce sensor is presented. An original design taking advantage of both the mechanical and bulk piezoresistive properties of silicon is presented, which enables the easy fabrication of a very small, large-range, high-sensitivity with high integration potential sensor. The sensor is made of two silicon strain gauges for which widespread and known microfabrication processes are used. The strain gauges present a high gauge factor which allows a good sensitivity of this force sensor. The dimensions of this sensor are 700 μm in length, 100 μm in width and 12 μm in thickness. These dimensions make its use convenient with many microscale applications, notably its integration in a microgripper. The fabricated sensor is calibrated using an industrial force sensor. The design, microfabrication process and performances of the fabricated piezoresistive force sensor are innovative thanks to its resolution of 100 nN and its measurement range of 2 mN. This force sensor also presents a high signal-to-noise ratio, typically 50 dB when a 2 mN force is applied at the tip of the force sensor. (paper)

  16. Balloon-borne pressure sensor performance evaluation utilizing tracking radars

    Science.gov (United States)

    Norcross, G. A.; Brooks, R. L.

    1983-01-01

    The pressure sensors on balloon-borne sondes relate the sonde measurements to height above the Earth's surface through the hypsometric equation. It is crucial that sondes used to explore the vertical structure of the atmosphere do not contribute significant height errors to their measurements of atmospheric constituent concentrations and properties. A series of radiosonde flights was conducted. In most cases, each flight consisted of two sondes attached to a single balloon and each flight was tracked by a highly accurate C-band radar. For the first 19 radiosonde flights, the standard aneroid cell baroswitch assembly used was the pressure sensor. The last 26 radiosondes were equipped with a premium grade aneroid cell baroswitch assembly sensor and with a hypsometer. It is shown that both aneroid cell baroswitch sensors become increasingly inaccurate with altitude. The hypsometer radar differences are not strongly dependent upon altitude and it is found that the standard deviation of the differences at 35 km is 0.179 km.

  17. Strategies for Improving the Performance of Sensors Based on Organic Field-Effect Transistors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, Xiaohan; Mao, Shun; Chen, Junhong; Huang, Jia

    2018-04-01

    Organic semiconductors (OSCs) have been extensively studied as sensing channel materials in field-effect transistors due to their unique charge transport properties. Stimulation caused by its environmental conditions can readily change the charge-carrier density and mobility of OSCs. Organic field-effect transistors (OFETs) can act as both signal transducers and signal amplifiers, which greatly simplifies the device structure. Over the past decades, various sensors based on OFETs have been developed, including physical sensors, chemical sensors, biosensors, and integrated sensor arrays with advanced functionalities. However, the performance of OFET-based sensors still needs to be improved to meet the requirements from various practical applications, such as high sensitivity, high selectivity, and rapid response speed. Tailoring molecular structures and micro/nanofilm structures of OSCs is a vital strategy for achieving better sensing performance. Modification of the dielectric layer and the semiconductor/dielectric interface is another approach for improving the sensor performance. Moreover, advanced sensory functionalities have been achieved by developing integrated device arrays. Here, a brief review of strategies used for improving the performance of OFET sensors is presented, which is expected to inspire and provide guidance for the design of future OFET sensors for various specific and practical applications. © 2018 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  18. Performance Evaluation and Community Application of Low-Cost Sensors for Ozone and Nitrogen Dioxide

    Science.gov (United States)

    This study reports on the performance of electrochemical-based low-cost sensors and their use in a community application. CairClip sensors were collocated with federal reference and equivalent methods and operated in a network of sites by citizen scientists (community members) in...

  19. Nitric Oxide Release for Improving Performance of Implantable Chemical Sensors - A Review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cha, Kyoung Ha; Wang, Xuewei; Meyerhoff, Mark E

    2017-12-01

    Over the last three decades, there has been extensive interest in developing in vivo chemical sensors that can provide real-time measurements of blood gases (oxygen, carbon dioxide, and pH), glucose/lactate, and potentially other critical care analytes in the blood of hospitalized patients. However, clot formation with intravascular sensors and foreign body response toward sensors implanted subcutaneously can cause inaccurate analytical results. Further, the risk of bacterial infection from any sensor implanted in the human body is another major concern. To solve these issues, the release of an endogenous gas molecule, nitric oxide (NO), from the surface of such sensors has been investigated owing to NO's ability to inhibit platelet activation/adhesion, foreign body response and bacterial growth. This paper summarizes the importance of NO's therapeutic potential for this application and reviews the publications to date that report on the analytical performance of NO release sensors in laboratory testing and/or during in vivo testing.

  20. Evaluating and improving the performance of thin film force sensors within body and device interfaces.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Likitlersuang, Jirapat; Leineweber, Matthew J; Andrysek, Jan

    2017-10-01

    Thin film force sensors are commonly used within biomechanical systems, and at the interface of the human body and medical and non-medical devices. However, limited information is available about their performance in such applications. The aims of this study were to evaluate and determine ways to improve the performance of thin film (FlexiForce) sensors at the body/device interface. Using a custom apparatus designed to load the sensors under simulated body/device conditions, two aspects were explored relating to sensor calibration and application. The findings revealed accuracy errors of 23.3±17.6% for force measurements at the body/device interface with conventional techniques of sensor calibration and application. Applying a thin rigid disc between the sensor and human body and calibrating the sensor using compliant surfaces was found to substantially reduce measurement errors to 2.9±2.0%. The use of alternative calibration and application procedures is recommended to gain acceptable measurement performance from thin film force sensors in body/device applications. Copyright © 2017 IPEM. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  1. The quantized Hall effect

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Klitzing von, K.

    1989-01-01

    The quantized Hall effect is theoretically explained in detail as are its basic properties. The explanation is completed with the pertinent mathematical relations and illustrative figures. Experimental data are critically assessed obtained by quantum transport measurement in a magnetic field on two-dimensional systems. The results are reported for a MOSFET silicon transistor and for GaAs-Al x Ga 1-x As heterostructures. The application is discussed of the quantized Hall effect in determining the fine structure constant or in implementing the resistance standard. (M.D.). 27 figs., 57 refs

  2. Intrinsic superspin Hall current

    Science.gov (United States)

    Linder, Jacob; Amundsen, Morten; Risinggârd, Vetle

    2017-09-01

    We discover an intrinsic superspin Hall current: an injected charge supercurrent in a Josephson junction containing heavy normal metals and a ferromagnet generates a transverse spin supercurrent. There is no accompanying dissipation of energy, in contrast to the conventional spin Hall effect. The physical origin of the effect is an antisymmetric spin density induced among transverse modes ky near the interface of the superconductor arising due to the coexistence of p -wave and conventional s -wave superconducting correlations with a belonging phase mismatch. Our predictions can be tested in hybrid structures including thin heavy metal layers combined with strong ferromagnets and ordinary s -wave superconductors.

  3. Design and Performance of a Metal-Shielded Piezoelectric Sensor.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sáenz de Inestrillas, Álvaro; Camarena, Francisco; Bou Cabo, Manuel; Barreiro, Julián M; Reig, Antonio

    2017-06-04

    In certain circumstances when acoustic measurements are required in the presence of explosive atmospheres the sensor must be placed inside a Faraday Cage. Piezoelectric active materials are suitable for this purpose as they do not need an electrical power supply, although the metal shielding can considerably reduce sensor sensitivity, which is already low at the acoustic frequency range (<20 kHz). This paper describes a metal-shielded piezoelectric sensor designed to work in the range of frequencies between 1 and 2 kHz and in these environmental conditions. The main idea was to add a thin material layer to the front face of the piezoelectric ceramic in order to force the system to vibrate in flexure mode at low frequencies. The resonant frequency and sensitivity of the system was studied as a function of the radius, thickness, and material of the thin layer. The study includes a comparison of theoretical model, FEM simulation, and real data measured using three aluminum and three steel prototypes of different sizes.

  4. Design and Performance of a Metal-Shielded Piezoelectric Sensor

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Álvaro Sáenz de Inestrillas

    2017-06-01

    Full Text Available In certain circumstances when acoustic measurements are required in the presence of explosive atmospheres the sensor must be placed inside a Faraday Cage. Piezoelectric active materials are suitable for this purpose as they do not need an electrical power supply, although the metal shielding can considerably reduce sensor sensitivity, which is already low at the acoustic frequency range (<20 kHz. This paper describes a metal-shielded piezoelectric sensor designed to work in the range of frequencies between 1 and 2 kHz and in these environmental conditions. The main idea was to add a thin material layer to the front face of the piezoelectric ceramic in order to force the system to vibrate in flexure mode at low frequencies. The resonant frequency and sensitivity of the system was studied as a function of the radius, thickness, and material of the thin layer. The study includes a comparison of theoretical model, FEM simulation, and real data measured using three aluminum and three steel prototypes of different sizes.

  5. Assessing the Performance of a Network of Low Cost Particulate Matter Sensors Deployed in Sacramento, California

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mukherjee, A. D.; Brown, S. G.; McCarthy, M. C.

    2017-12-01

    A new generation of low cost air quality sensors have the potential to provide valuable information on the spatial-temporal variability of air pollution - if the measurements have sufficient quality. This study examined the performance of a particulate matter sensor model, the AirBeam (HabitatMap Inc., Brooklyn, NY), over a three month period in the urban environment of Sacramento, California. Nineteen AirBeam sensors were deployed at a regulatory air monitoring site collocated with meteorology measurements and as a local network over an 80 km2 domain in Sacramento, CA. This study presents the methodology to evaluate the precision, accuracy, and reliability of the sensors over a range of meteorological and aerosol conditions. The sensors demonstrated a robust degree of precision during collocated measurement periods (R2 = 0.98 - 0.99) and a moderate degree of correlation against a Beta Attenuation Monitor PM2.5 monitor (R2 0.6). A normalization correction is applied during the study period so that each AirBeam sensor in the network reports a comparable value. The role of the meteorological environment on the accuracy of the sensor measurements is investigated, along with the possibility of improving the measurements through a meteorology weighted correction. The data quality of the network of sensors is examined, and the spatial variability of particulate matter through the study domain derived from the sensor network is presented.

  6. Hall effect in hopping regime

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Avdonin, A.; Skupiński, P.; Grasza, K.

    2016-01-01

    A simple description of the Hall effect in the hopping regime of conductivity in semiconductors is presented. Expressions for the Hall coefficient and Hall mobility are derived by considering averaged equilibrium electron transport in a single triangle of localization sites in a magnetic field. Dependence of the Hall coefficient is analyzed in a wide range of temperature and magnetic field values. Our theoretical result is applied to our experimental data on temperature dependence of Hall effect and Hall mobility in ZnO. - Highlights: • Expressions for Hall coefficient and mobility for hopping conductivity are derived. • Theoretical result is compared with experimental curves measured on ZnO. • Simultaneous action of free and hopping conduction channels is considered. • Non-linearity of hopping Hall coefficient is predicted.

  7. Hall effect in hopping regime

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Avdonin, A., E-mail: avdonin@ifpan.edu.pl [Institute of Physics, Polish Academy of Sciences, Al. Lotników 32/46, 02-668 Warszawa (Poland); Skupiński, P. [Institute of Physics, Polish Academy of Sciences, Al. Lotników 32/46, 02-668 Warszawa (Poland); Grasza, K. [Institute of Physics, Polish Academy of Sciences, Al. Lotników 32/46, 02-668 Warszawa (Poland); Institute of Electronic Materials Technology, ul. Wólczyńska 133, 01-919 Warszawa (Poland)

    2016-02-15

    A simple description of the Hall effect in the hopping regime of conductivity in semiconductors is presented. Expressions for the Hall coefficient and Hall mobility are derived by considering averaged equilibrium electron transport in a single triangle of localization sites in a magnetic field. Dependence of the Hall coefficient is analyzed in a wide range of temperature and magnetic field values. Our theoretical result is applied to our experimental data on temperature dependence of Hall effect and Hall mobility in ZnO. - Highlights: • Expressions for Hall coefficient and mobility for hopping conductivity are derived. • Theoretical result is compared with experimental curves measured on ZnO. • Simultaneous action of free and hopping conduction channels is considered. • Non-linearity of hopping Hall coefficient is predicted.

  8. Optimization of geometric characteristics to improve sensing performance of MEMS piezoresistive strain sensors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mohammed, Ahmed A S; Moussa, Walied A; Lou, Edmond

    2010-01-01

    In this paper, the design of MEMS piezoresistive strain sensor is described. ANSYS®, finite element analysis (FEA) software, was used as a tool to model the performance of the silicon-based sensor. The incorporation of stress concentration regions (SCRs), to localize stresses, was explored in detail. This methodology employs the structural design of the sensor silicon carrier. Therefore, the induced strain in the sensing chip yielded stress concentration in the vicinity of the SCRs. Hence, this concept was proved to enhance the sensor sensitivity. Another advantage of the SCRs is to reduce the sensor transverse gauge factor, which offered a great opportunity to develop a MEMS sensor with minimal cross sensitivity. Two basic SCR designs were studied. The depth of the SCRs was also investigated. Moreover, FEA simulation is utilized to investigate the effect of the sensing element depth on the sensor sensitivity. Simulation results showed that the sensor sensitivity is independent of the piezoresistors' depth. The microfabrication process flow was introduced to prototype the different sensor designs. The experiments covered operating temperature range from −50 °C to +50 °C. Finally, packaging scheme and bonding adhesive selection were discussed. The experimental results showed good agreement with the FEA simulation results. The findings of this study confirmed the feasibility of introducing SCRs in the sensor silicon carrier to improve the sensor sensitivity while using relatively high doping levels (5 × 10 19 atoms cm −3 ). The fabricated sensors have a gauge factor about three to four times higher compared to conventional thin-foil strain gauges

  9. Performance evaluation of ZnO–CuO hetero junction solid state room temperature ethanol sensor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yu, Ming-Ru; Suyambrakasam, Gobalakrishnan; Wu, Ren-Jang; Chavali, Murthy

    2012-01-01

    Graphical abstract: Sensor response (resistance) curves of time were changed from 150 ppm to 250 ppm alcohol concentration of ZnO–CuO 1:1. The response and recovery times were measured to be 62 and 83 s, respectively. The sensing material ZnO–CuO is a high potential alcohol sensor which provides a simple, rapid and highly sensitive alcohol gas sensor operating at room temperature. Highlights: ► The main advantages of the ethanol sensor are as followings. ► Novel materials ZnO–CuO ethanol sensor. ► The optimized ZnO–CuO hetero contact system. ► A good sensor response and room working temperature (save energy). -- Abstract: A semiconductor ethanol sensor was developed using ZnO–CuO and its performance was evaluated at room temperature. Hetero-junction sensor was made of ZnO–CuO nanoparticles for sensing alcohol at room temperature. Nanoparticles were prepared by hydrothermal method and optimized with different weight ratios. Sensor characteristics were linear for the concentration range of 150–250 ppm. Composite materials of ZnO–CuO were characterized using X-ray diffraction (XRD), temperature-programmed reduction (TPR) and high-resolution transmission electron microscopy (HR-TEM). ZnO–CuO (1:1) material showed maximum sensor response (S = R air /R alcohol ) of 3.32 ± 0.1 toward 200 ppm of alcohol vapor at room temperature. The response and recovery times were measured to be 62 and 83 s, respectively. The linearity R 2 of the sensor response was 0.9026. The sensing materials ZnO–CuO (1:1) provide a simple, rapid and highly sensitive alcohol gas sensor operating at room temperature.

  10. CAS-ATLID (co-alignment sensor of ATLID instrument) thermo-structural design and performance

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moreno, Javier; Serrano, Javier; González, David; Rodríguez, Gemma; Manjón, Andrés.; Vásquez, Eloi; Carretero, Carlos; Martínez, Berta

    2017-11-01

    This paper describes the main thermo-mechanical design features and performances of the Co-Alignment Sensor (CAS) developed by LIDAX and CRISA under ESA program with AIRBUS Defence and Space as industry prime.

  11. Performance Analysis of Receive Diversity in Wireless Sensor Networks over GBSBE Models

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tai-hoon Kim

    2010-12-01

    Full Text Available Wireless sensor networks have attracted a lot of attention recently. In this paper, we develop a channel model based on the elliptical model for multipath components involving randomly placed scatterers in the scattering region with sensors deployed on a field. We verify that in a sensor network, the use of receive diversity techniques improves the performance of the system. Extensive performance analysis of the system is carried out for both single and multiple antennas with the applied receive diversity techniques. Performance analyses based on variations in receiver height, maximum multipath delay and transmit power have been performed considering different numbers of antenna elements present in the receiver array, Our results show that increasing the number of antenna elements for a wireless sensor network does indeed improve the BER rates that can be obtained.

  12. Performance Analysis of Receive Diversity in Wireless Sensor Networks over GBSBE Models

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goel, Shivali; Abawajy, Jemal H.; Kim, Tai-hoon

    2010-01-01

    Wireless sensor networks have attracted a lot of attention recently. In this paper, we develop a channel model based on the elliptical model for multipath components involving randomly placed scatterers in the scattering region with sensors deployed on a field. We verify that in a sensor network, the use of receive diversity techniques improves the performance of the system. Extensive performance analysis of the system is carried out for both single and multiple antennas with the applied receive diversity techniques. Performance analyses based on variations in receiver height, maximum multipath delay and transmit power have been performed considering different numbers of antenna elements present in the receiver array, Our results show that increasing the number of antenna elements for a wireless sensor network does indeed improve the BER rates that can be obtained. PMID:22163510

  13. Performance Tests of a Permeation Sensor for Test Blanket Modules Using Liquid Metal

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Choi, B. G.; Lee, D. W.; Lee, E. H.; Yoon, J. S.; Kim, S. K.; Shin, K. I.; Jin, H. G.

    2013-01-01

    The tritium extraction from a breeder is one of the key technologies and its methods have been investigated. For developing the tritium extraction methods and evaluating the amount of tritium in the system, a reliable and correct sensor is required to measure the hydrogen concentration in liquid metal breeder. There are several researches for developing the sensors in the ITER participants and especially, EU has developed the permeation sensors trying to selecting materials with low Serviette's constant (solubility) and high hydrogen diffusivity coefficient. However, EU's response time is still too long time about tens of minutes to measure the tritium concentration in the online system. We have been performing the preliminary tests with designed and fabricated sensors to solve the late response of sensor. However, we could not continue the tests because of the membrane's oxidation (pure Fe) and the difficulty of welding nonferrous metals. In present study, a permeation sensor made of vacuum flanges with a porous plate inside is proposed not only to eliminate the difficulty of the fabrication but to optimize the performance of sensor. The permeation sensor to measure the hydrogen isotopes in liquid metal breeder has been proposed and evaluated to overcome the limitation of a long response time for various shapes and materials. We found that the previous sensors have limitation; the oxidation problems (pure Fe) and the difficulty in welding (nonferrous metals). Therefore we proposed a permeation sensor with the vacuum flanges filled with porous disks to eliminate the problems. By using the CF flanges, the problem caused by welding is removed. But the permeable response time of sensors took a long time to reach the pressure equivalent

  14. Test Methodologies for Hydrogen Sensor Performance Assessment: Chamber vs. Flow Through Test Apparatus: Preprint

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Buttner, William J [National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL), Golden, CO (United States); Hartmann, Kevin S [National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL), Golden, CO (United States); Schmidt, Kara [National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL), Golden, CO (United States); Cebolla, Rafeal O [Joint Research Centre, Petten, the Netherlands; Weidner, Eveline [Joint Research Centre, Petten, the Netherlands; Bonato, Christian [Joint Research Centre, Petten, the Netherlands

    2017-11-06

    Certification of hydrogen sensors to standards often prescribes using large-volume test chambers [1, 2]. However, feedback from stakeholders such as sensor manufacturers and end-users indicate that chamber test methods are often viewed as too slow and expensive for routine assessment. Flow through test methods potentially are an efficient, cost-effective alternative for sensor performance assessment. A large number of sensors can be simultaneously tested, in series or in parallel, with an appropriate flow through test fixture. The recent development of sensors with response times of less than 1s mandates improvements in equipment and methodology to properly capture the performance of this new generation of fast sensors; flow methods are a viable approach for accurate response and recovery time determinations, but there are potential drawbacks. According to ISO 26142 [1], flow through test methods may not properly simulate ambient applications. In chamber test methods, gas transport to the sensor can be dominated by diffusion which is viewed by some users as mimicking deployment in rooms and other confined spaces. Alternatively, in flow through methods, forced flow transports the gas to the sensing element. The advective flow dynamics may induce changes in the sensor behaviour relative to the quasi-quiescent condition that may prevail in chamber test methods. One goal of the current activity in the JRC and NREL sensor laboratories [3, 4] is to develop a validated flow through apparatus and methods for hydrogen sensor performance testing. In addition to minimizing the impact on sensor behaviour induced by differences in flow dynamics, challenges associated with flow through methods include the ability to control environmental parameters (humidity, pressure and temperature) during the test and changes in the test gas composition induced by chemical reactions with upstream sensors. Guidelines on flow through test apparatus design and protocols for the evaluation of

  15. Evaluation of Smartphone Inertial Sensor Performance for Cross-Platform Mobile Applications

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Anton Kos

    2016-04-01

    Full Text Available Smartphone sensors are being increasingly used in mobile applications. The performance of sensors varies considerably among different smartphone models and the development of a cross-platform mobile application might be a very complex and demanding task. A publicly accessible resource containing real-life-situation smartphone sensor parameters could be of great help for cross-platform developers. To address this issue we have designed and implemented a pilot participatory sensing application for measuring, gathering, and analyzing smartphone sensor parameters. We start with smartphone accelerometer and gyroscope bias and noise parameters. The application database presently includes sensor parameters of more than 60 different smartphone models of different platforms. It is a modest, but important start, offering information on several statistical parameters of the measured smartphone sensors and insights into their performance. The next step, a large-scale cloud-based version of the application, is already planned. The large database of smartphone sensor parameters may prove particularly useful for cross-platform developers. It may also be interesting for individual participants who would be able to check-up and compare their smartphone sensors against a large number of similar or identical models.

  16. A High Performance Sensor for Triaxial Cutting Force Measurement in Turning

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    You Zhao

    2015-04-01

    Full Text Available This paper presents a high performance triaxial cutting force sensor with excellent accuracy, favorable natural frequency and acceptable cross-interference for high speed turning process. Octagonal ring is selected as sensitive element of the designed sensor, which is drawn inspiration from ring theory. A novel structure of two mutual-perpendicular octagonal rings is proposed and three Wheatstone full bridge circuits are specially organized in order to obtain triaxial cutting force components and restrain cross-interference. Firstly, the newly developed sensor is tested in static calibration; test results indicate that the sensor possesses outstanding accuracy in the range of 0.38%–0.83%. Secondly, impacting modal tests are conducted to identify the natural frequencies of the sensor in triaxial directions (i.e., 1147 Hz, 1122 Hz and 2035 Hz, which implies that the devised sensor can be used for cutting force measurement in a high speed lathe when the spindle speed does not exceed 17,205 rev/min in continuous cutting condition. Finally, an application of the sensor in turning process is operated to show its performance for real-time cutting force measurement; the measured cutting forces demonstrate a good accordance with the variation of cutting parameters. Thus, the developed sensor possesses perfect properties and it gains great potential for real-time cutting force measurement in turning.

  17. Evaluation of Smartphone Inertial Sensor Performance for Cross-Platform Mobile Applications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kos, Anton; Tomažič, Sašo; Umek, Anton

    2016-01-01

    Smartphone sensors are being increasingly used in mobile applications. The performance of sensors varies considerably among different smartphone models and the development of a cross-platform mobile application might be a very complex and demanding task. A publicly accessible resource containing real-life-situation smartphone sensor parameters could be of great help for cross-platform developers. To address this issue we have designed and implemented a pilot participatory sensing application for measuring, gathering, and analyzing smartphone sensor parameters. We start with smartphone accelerometer and gyroscope bias and noise parameters. The application database presently includes sensor parameters of more than 60 different smartphone models of different platforms. It is a modest, but important start, offering information on several statistical parameters of the measured smartphone sensors and insights into their performance. The next step, a large-scale cloud-based version of the application, is already planned. The large database of smartphone sensor parameters may prove particularly useful for cross-platform developers. It may also be interesting for individual participants who would be able to check-up and compare their smartphone sensors against a large number of similar or identical models. PMID:27049391

  18. The Monty Hall Dilemma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Granberg, Donald; Brown, Thad A.

    1995-01-01

    Examines people's behavior in the Monty Hall Dilemma (MHD), in which a person must make two decisions to win a prize. In a series of five studies, found that people misapprehend probabilities in the MHD. Discusses the MHD's relation to illusion of control, belief perseverance, and the status quo bias. (RJM)

  19. The Isolde experimental hall

    CERN Multimedia

    Laurent Guiraud

    2000-01-01

    General view of the Isotope-Separator On-Line (ISOLDE) hall. ISOLDE is dedicated to the production of a large variety of radioactive ion beams for many different experiments. Rare isotopes can be produced allowing the study of spectra for neutrino beam production.

  20. Hall Sweet Home

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oguntoyinbo, Lekan

    2011-01-01

    Many urban and commuter universities have their sights set on students who are unlikely to connect with the college and likely to fail unless the right strategies are put in place to help them graduate. In efforts to improve retention rates, commuter colleges are looking to an unusual suspect: residence halls. The author discusses how these…

  1. Anomalous Hall effect

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Nagaosa, N.; Sinova, Jairo; Onoda, S.; MacDonald, A. H.; Ong, N. P.

    2010-01-01

    Roč. 82, č. 2 (2010), s. 1539-1592 ISSN 0034-6861 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z10100521 Keywords : anomalous Hall effect * spintronics Subject RIV: BM - Solid Matter Physics ; Magnetism Impact factor: 51.695, year: 2010

  2. Laurance David Hall.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Coxon, Bruce

    2011-01-01

    An account is given of the life, scientific contributions, and passing of Laurance David Hall (1938-2009), including his early history and education at the University of Bristol, UK, and the synthesis and NMR spectroscopy of carbohydrates and other natural products during ∼20 years of research and teaching at the University of British Columbia in Vancouver, Canada. Lists of graduate students, post-doctoral fellows, and sabbatical visitors are provided for this period. Following a generous endowment by Dr. Herchel Smith, Professor Hall built a new Department of Medicinal Chemistry at Cambridge University, UK, and greatly expanded his researches into the technology and applications of magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) and zero quantum NMR. MRI technology was applied both to medical problems such as the characterization of cartilage degeneration in knee joints, the measurement of ventricular function, lipid localization in animal models of atherosclerosis, paramagnetic metal complexes of polysaccharides as contrast agents, and studies of many other anatomical features, but also to several aspects of materials analysis, including food analyses, process control, and the elucidation of such physical phenomena as the flow of liquids through porous media, defects in concrete, and the visualization of fungal damage to wood. Professor Hall's many publications, patents, lectures, and honors and awards are described, and also his successful effort to keep the Asilomar facility in Pacific Grove, California as the alternating venue for the annual Experimental NMR Conference. Two memorial services for Professor Hall are remembered. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  3. Prospect of quantum anomalous Hall and quantum spin Hall effect in doped kagome lattice Mott insulators.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guterding, Daniel; Jeschke, Harald O; Valentí, Roser

    2016-05-17

    Electronic states with non-trivial topology host a number of novel phenomena with potential for revolutionizing information technology. The quantum anomalous Hall effect provides spin-polarized dissipation-free transport of electrons, while the quantum spin Hall effect in combination with superconductivity has been proposed as the basis for realizing decoherence-free quantum computing. We introduce a new strategy for realizing these effects, namely by hole and electron doping kagome lattice Mott insulators through, for instance, chemical substitution. As an example, we apply this new approach to the natural mineral herbertsmithite. We prove the feasibility of the proposed modifications by performing ab-initio density functional theory calculations and demonstrate the occurrence of the predicted effects using realistic models. Our results herald a new family of quantum anomalous Hall and quantum spin Hall insulators at affordable energy/temperature scales based on kagome lattices of transition metal ions.

  4. Performance of solid electrolyte type oxygen sensor in flowing lead bismuth

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kondo, Masatoshi; Takahashi, Minoru

    2005-01-01

    A solid electrolyte type oxygen sensor for liquid 45%lead-55%bismuth (Pb-Bi) was developed. The performance of the oxygen sensor in the flowing lead-bismuth (Pb-Bi) was investigated. The initial performance of the sensor was not reliable, since the reference fluid of the oxygen saturated bismuth in the sensor cell was not compact initially. The electromotive force (EMF) obtained from the yttria stabilized zirconia (YSZ) cell was the same as that from the magnesia stabilized zirconia (MSZ) cell in the flowing Pb-Bi. The EMF of the sensor in the flowing Pb-Bi was lower than that in the stagnant Pb-Bi. However, the difference was small. The sensor showed repeatability after the long term interruption and the Pb-Bi drain/charge operation. After the performance tests, the corrosion of the sensor cells were investigated metallurgically. The YSZ cell was eroded around the free surface of the flowing Pb-Bi after 3500 hour-exposure in the flowing Pb-Bi. The MSZ cell showed smooth surface without the erosion. Although the YSZ cell worked more stably than the MSZ cell, the mechanical strength of the YSZ cell is weaker than that of the MSZ cell. (author)

  5. 3D printed high performance strain sensors for high temperature applications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rahman, Md Taibur; Moser, Russell; Zbib, Hussein M.; Ramana, C. V.; Panat, Rahul

    2018-01-01

    Realization of high temperature physical measurement sensors, which are needed in many of the current and emerging technologies, is challenging due to the degradation of their electrical stability by drift currents, material oxidation, thermal strain, and creep. In this paper, for the first time, we demonstrate that 3D printed sensors show a metamaterial-like behavior, resulting in superior performance such as high sensitivity, low thermal strain, and enhanced thermal stability. The sensors were fabricated using silver (Ag) nanoparticles (NPs), using an advanced Aerosol Jet based additive printing method followed by thermal sintering. The sensors were tested under cyclic strain up to a temperature of 500 °C and showed a gauge factor of 3.15 ± 0.086, which is about 57% higher than that of those available commercially. The sensor thermal strain was also an order of magnitude lower than that of commercial gages for operation up to a temperature of 500 °C. An analytical model was developed to account for the enhanced performance of such printed sensors based on enhanced lateral contraction of the NP films due to the porosity, a behavior akin to cellular metamaterials. The results demonstrate the potential of 3D printing technology as a pathway to realize highly stable and high-performance sensors for high temperature applications.

  6. Cluster Cooperation in Wireless-Powered Sensor Networks: Modeling and Performance Analysis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chao Zhang

    2017-09-01

    Full Text Available A wireless-powered sensor network (WPSN consisting of one hybrid access point (HAP, a near cluster and the corresponding far cluster is investigated in this paper. These sensors are wireless-powered and they transmit information by consuming the harvested energy from signal ejected by the HAP. Sensors are able to harvest energy as well as store the harvested energy. We propose that if sensors in near cluster do not have their own information to transmit, acting as relays, they can help the sensors in a far cluster to forward information to the HAP in an amplify-and-forward (AF manner. We use a finite Markov chain to model the dynamic variation process of the relay battery, and give a general analyzing model for WPSN with cluster cooperation. Though the model, we deduce the closed-form expression for the outage probability as the metric of this network. Finally, simulation results validate the start point of designing this paper and correctness of theoretical analysis and show how parameters have an effect on system performance. Moreover, it is also known that the outage probability of sensors in far cluster can be drastically reduced without sacrificing the performance of sensors in near cluster if the transmit power of HAP is fairly high. Furthermore, in the aspect of outage performance of far cluster, the proposed scheme significantly outperforms the direct transmission scheme without cooperation.

  7. Cluster Cooperation in Wireless-Powered Sensor Networks: Modeling and Performance Analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Chao; Zhang, Pengcheng; Zhang, Weizhan

    2017-09-27

    A wireless-powered sensor network (WPSN) consisting of one hybrid access point (HAP), a near cluster and the corresponding far cluster is investigated in this paper. These sensors are wireless-powered and they transmit information by consuming the harvested energy from signal ejected by the HAP. Sensors are able to harvest energy as well as store the harvested energy. We propose that if sensors in near cluster do not have their own information to transmit, acting as relays, they can help the sensors in a far cluster to forward information to the HAP in an amplify-and-forward (AF) manner. We use a finite Markov chain to model the dynamic variation process of the relay battery, and give a general analyzing model for WPSN with cluster cooperation. Though the model, we deduce the closed-form expression for the outage probability as the metric of this network. Finally, simulation results validate the start point of designing this paper and correctness of theoretical analysis and show how parameters have an effect on system performance. Moreover, it is also known that the outage probability of sensors in far cluster can be drastically reduced without sacrificing the performance of sensors in near cluster if the transmit power of HAP is fairly high. Furthermore, in the aspect of outage performance of far cluster, the proposed scheme significantly outperforms the direct transmission scheme without cooperation.

  8. Evaluation of Maintenance and EOL Operation Performance of Sensor-Embedded Laptops

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mehmet Talha Dulman

    2018-01-01

    Full Text Available Sensors are commonly employed to monitor products during their life cycles and to remotely and continuously track their usage patterns. Installing sensors into products can help generate useful data related to the conditions of products and their components, and this information can subsequently be used to inform EOL decision-making. As such, embedded sensors can enhance the performance of EOL product processing operations. The information collected by the sensors can also be used to estimate and predict product failures, thereby helping to improve maintenance operations. This paper describes a study in which system maintenance and EOL processes were combined and closed-loop supply chain systems were constructed to analyze the financial contribution that sensors can make to these procedures by using discrete event simulation to model and compare regular systems and sensor-embedded systems. The factors that had an impact on the performance measures, such as disassembly cost, maintenance cost, inspection cost, sales revenues, and profitability, were determined and a design of experiments study was carried out. The experiment results were compared, and pairwise t-tests were executed. The results reveal that sensor-embedded systems are significantly superior to regular systems in terms of the identified performance measures.

  9. Identifying performance gaps in hydrogen safety sensor technology for automotive and stationary applications

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Boon-Brett, L.; Bousek, J.; Black, G.; Moretto, P.; Castello, P.; Huebert, T.; Banach, U.

    2010-01-01

    A market survey has been performed of commercially available hydrogen safety sensors, resulting in a total sample size of 53 sensors from 21 manufacturers. The technical specifications, as provided by the manufacturer, have been collated and are displayed herein as a function of sensor working principle. These specifications comprise measuring range, response and recovery times, ambient temperature, pressure and relative humidity, power consumption and lifetime. These are then compared against known performance targets for both automotive and stationary applications in order to establish in how far current technology satisfies current requirements of sensor end users. Gaps in the performance of hydrogen sensing technologies are thus identified and areas recommended for future research and development. (author)

  10. High performance flexible pH sensor based on polyaniline nanopillar array electrode.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yoon, Jo Hee; Hong, Seok Bok; Yun, Seok-Oh; Lee, Seok Jae; Lee, Tae Jae; Lee, Kyoung G; Choi, Bong Gill

    2017-03-15

    Flexible pH sensor technologies have attracted a great deal of attention in many applications, such as, wearable health care devices and monitors for chemical and biological processes. Here, we fabricated flexible and thin pH sensors using a two electrode configuration comprised of a polyaniline nanopillar (PAN) array working electrode and an Ag/AgCl reference electrode. In order to provide nanostructure, soft lithography using a polymeric blend was employed to create a flexible nanopillar backbone film. Polyaniline-sensing materials were deposited on a patterned-nanopillar array by electrochemical deposition. The pH sensors produced exhibited a near-Nernstian response (∼60.3mV/pH), which was maintained in a bent state. In addition, pH sensors showed other excellent sensor performances in terms of response time, reversibility, repeatability, selectivity, and stability. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  11. Dr. Hall and the work cure.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reed, Kathlyn L

    2005-01-01

    Herbert James Hall, MD (1870-1923), was a pioneer in the systematic and organized study of occupation as therapy for persons with nervous and mental disorders that he called the "work cure." He began his work in 1904 during the early years of the Arts and Crafts Movement in the United States. His primary interest was the disorder neurasthenia, a condition with many symptoms including chronic fatigue, stress, and inability to work or perform everyday tasks. The prevailing treatment of the day was absolute bed rest known as the "rest cure." Hall believed that neurasthenia was not caused by overwork but by faulty living habits that could be corrected through an ordered life schedule and selected occupations. He identified several principles of therapy that are still used today including graded activity and energy conservation. Dr. Adolph Meyer credits Hall for organizing the ideas on the therapeutic use of occupation (Meyer, 1922). Hall also provided the name American Occupational Therapy Association for the professional organization and served as the fourth president. For his many contributions to the profession Hall deserves to be recognized as a major contributor to the development and organization of occupational therapy.

  12. Air temperature gradient in large industrial hall

    Science.gov (United States)

    Karpuk, Michał; Pełech, Aleksander; Przydróżny, Edward; Walaszczyk, Juliusz; Szczęśniak, Sylwia

    2017-11-01

    In the rooms with dominant sensible heat load, volume airflow depends on many factors incl. pre-established temperature difference between exhaust and supply airflow. As the temperature difference is getting higher, airflow volume drops down, consequently, the cost of AHU is reduced. In high industrial halls with air exhaust grids located under the ceiling additional temperature gradient above working zone should be taken into consideration. In this regard, experimental research of the vertical air temperature gradient in high industrial halls were carried out for the case of mixing ventilation system The paper presents the results of air temperature distribution measurements in high technological hall (mechanically ventilated) under significant sensible heat load conditions. The supply airflow was delivered to the hall with the help of the swirl diffusers while exhaust grids were located under the hall ceiling. Basing on the air temperature distribution measurements performed on the seven pre-established levels, air temperature gradient in the area between 2.0 and 7.0 m above the floor was calculated and analysed.

  13. In-Situ Measurement of Hall Thruster Erosion Using a Fiber Optic Regression Probe

    Science.gov (United States)

    Polzin, Kurt; Korman, Valentin

    2009-01-01

    One potential life-limiting mechanism in a Hall thruster is the erosion of the ceramic material comprising the discharge channel. This is especially true for missions that require long thrusting periods and can be problematic for lifetime qualification, especially when attempting to qualify a thruster by analysis rather than a test lasting the full duration of the mission. In addition to lifetime, several analytical and numerical models include electrode erosion as a mechanism contributing to enhanced transport properties. However, there is still a great deal of dispute over the importance of erosion to transport in Hall thrusters. The capability to perform an in-situ measurement of discharge channel erosion is useful in addressing both the lifetime and transport concerns. An in-situ measurement would allow for real-time data regarding the erosion rates at different operating points, providing a quick method for empirically anchoring any analysis geared towards lifetime qualification. Erosion rate data over a thruster s operating envelope would also be useful in the modeling of the detailed physics inside the discharge chamber. There are many different sensors and techniques that have been employed to quantify discharge channel erosion in Hall thrusters. Snapshots of the wear pattern can be obtained at regular shutdown intervals using laser profilometry. Many non-intrusive techniques of varying complexity and sensitivity have been employed to detect the time-varying presence of erosion products in the thruster plume. These include the use quartz crystal microbalances, emission spectroscopy, laser induced flourescence, and cavity ring-down spectroscopy. While these techniques can provide a very accurate picture of the level of eroded material in the thruster plume, it is more difficult to use them to determine the location from which the material was eroded. Furthermore, none of the methods cited provide a true in-situ measure of erosion at the channel surface while

  14. Spin Hall effects

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sinova, Jairo; Valenzuela, Sergio O.; Wunderlich, J.; Back, C. H.; Jungwirth, T.

    2015-10-01

    Spin Hall effects are a collection of relativistic spin-orbit coupling phenomena in which electrical currents can generate transverse spin currents and vice versa. Despite being observed only a decade ago, these effects are already ubiquitous within spintronics, as standard spin-current generators and detectors. Here the theoretical and experimental results that have established this subfield of spintronics are reviewed. The focus is on the results that have converged to give us the current understanding of the phenomena, which has evolved from a qualitative to a more quantitative measurement of spin currents and their associated spin accumulation. Within the experimental framework, optical-, transport-, and magnetization-dynamics-based measurements are reviewed and linked to both phenomenological and microscopic theories of the effect. Within the theoretical framework, the basic mechanisms in both the extrinsic and intrinsic regimes are reviewed, which are linked to the mechanisms present in their closely related phenomenon in ferromagnets, the anomalous Hall effect. Also reviewed is the connection to the phenomenological treatment based on spin-diffusion equations applicable to certain regimes, as well as the spin-pumping theory of spin generation used in many measurements of the spin Hall angle. A further connection to the spin-current-generating spin Hall effect to the inverse spin galvanic effect is given, in which an electrical current induces a nonequilibrium spin polarization. This effect often accompanies the spin Hall effect since they share common microscopic origins. Both can exhibit the same symmetries when present in structures comprising ferromagnetic and nonmagnetic layers through their induced current-driven spin torques or induced voltages. Although a short chronological overview of the evolution of the spin Hall effect field and the resolution of some early controversies is given, the main body of this review is structured from a pedagogical

  15. Assessing the Performance of Sensor Fusion Methods: Application to Magnetic-Inertial-Based Human Body Tracking.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ligorio, Gabriele; Bergamini, Elena; Pasciuto, Ilaria; Vannozzi, Giuseppe; Cappozzo, Aurelio; Sabatini, Angelo Maria

    2016-01-26

    Information from complementary and redundant sensors are often combined within sensor fusion algorithms to obtain a single accurate observation of the system at hand. However, measurements from each sensor are characterized by uncertainties. When multiple data are fused, it is often unclear how all these uncertainties interact and influence the overall performance of the sensor fusion algorithm. To address this issue, a benchmarking procedure is presented, where simulated and real data are combined in different scenarios in order to quantify how each sensor's uncertainties influence the accuracy of the final result. The proposed procedure was applied to the estimation of the pelvis orientation using a waist-worn magnetic-inertial measurement unit. Ground-truth data were obtained from a stereophotogrammetric system and used to obtain simulated data. Two Kalman-based sensor fusion algorithms were submitted to the proposed benchmarking procedure. For the considered application, gyroscope uncertainties proved to be the main error source in orientation estimation accuracy for both tested algorithms. Moreover, although different performances were obtained using simulated data, these differences became negligible when real data were considered. The outcome of this evaluation may be useful both to improve the design of new sensor fusion methods and to drive the algorithm tuning process.

  16. Photodiode area effect on performance of X-ray CMOS active pixel sensors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, M. S.; Kim, Y.; Kim, G.; Lim, K. T.; Cho, G.; Kim, D.

    2018-02-01

    Compared to conventional TFT-based X-ray imaging devices, CMOS-based X-ray imaging sensors are considered next generation because they can be manufactured in very small pixel pitches and can acquire high-speed images. In addition, CMOS-based sensors have the advantage of integration of various functional circuits within the sensor. The image quality can also be improved by the high fill-factor in large pixels. If the size of the subject is small, the size of the pixel must be reduced as a consequence. In addition, the fill factor must be reduced to aggregate various functional circuits within the pixel. In this study, 3T-APS (active pixel sensor) with photodiodes of four different sizes were fabricated and evaluated. It is well known that a larger photodiode leads to improved overall performance. Nonetheless, if the size of the photodiode is > 1000 μm2, the degree to which the sensor performance increases as the photodiode size increases, is reduced. As a result, considering the fill factor, pixel-pitch > 32 μm is not necessary to achieve high-efficiency image quality. In addition, poor image quality is to be expected unless special sensor-design techniques are included for sensors with a pixel pitch of 25 μm or less.

  17. Performance analysis of routing strategies for wireless sensor networks

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Raúl Aquino-Santos

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available Este trabajo presenta el análisis de funcionamiento de estrategias de enrutamiento de fuente, de la trayectoria más corta, jerárquica y geográfica, las cuales son tres de las estrategias más comúnmente implementadas para redes ad hoc y de sensores. Enrutamiento de fuente se seleccionó debido a que no requiere un mantenimiento topológico costoso, mientras el enrutamiento de la trayectoria más corta fue elegido por su simplicidad en el descubrimiento de la ruta y la estrategia de enrutamiento jerárquica y geográfica fue seleccionada debido a que utiliza información de un sistema de posicionamiento global (GPS. Muchas aplicaciones actuales requieren el conocimiento preciso de la posición física, particularmente en las áreas de salud, militar, agricultura, robótica y monitoreo estructural y ambiental. Adicionalmente, la técnica de enrutamiento de trayectoria más corta fue seleccionada por que se emplea en algoritmos de redes de sensores inalámbricos centrados en datos, tales como: Difusión Directa, Enrutamiento por Rumor, Enrutamiento basado en Gradientes y el Estándar ZigBEE. El funcionamiento de estas tres estrategias de enrutamiento se evalúa a través de simulaciones y en términos de latencia, retardo punto a punto, tasa de entrega de paquetes, sobre procesamiento de enrutamiento, sobre procesamiento general y la carga de enrutamiento.

  18. Integrated multi sensors and camera video sequence application for performance monitoring in archery

    Science.gov (United States)

    Taha, Zahari; Arif Mat-Jizat, Jessnor; Amirul Abdullah, Muhammad; Muazu Musa, Rabiu; Razali Abdullah, Mohamad; Fauzi Ibrahim, Mohamad; Hanafiah Shaharudin, Mohd Ali

    2018-03-01

    This paper explains the development of a comprehensive archery performance monitoring software which consisted of three camera views and five body sensors. The five body sensors evaluate biomechanical related variables of flexor and extensor muscle activity, heart rate, postural sway and bow movement during archery performance. The three camera views with the five body sensors are integrated into a single computer application which enables the user to view all the data in a single user interface. The five body sensors’ data are displayed in a numerical and graphical form in real-time. The information transmitted by the body sensors are computed with an embedded algorithm that automatically transforms the summary of the athlete’s biomechanical performance and displays in the application interface. This performance will be later compared to the pre-computed psycho-fitness performance from the prefilled data into the application. All the data; camera views, body sensors; performance-computations; are recorded for further analysis by a sports scientist. Our developed application serves as a powerful tool for assisting the coach and athletes to observe and identify any wrong technique employ during training which gives room for correction and re-evaluation to improve overall performance in the sport of archery.

  19. Performance Characteristics and Temperature Compensation Method of Fluid Property Sensor Based on Tuning-Fork Technology

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yuan Chen

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Fluid property sensor (FPS based on tuning-fork technology is applied to the measurement of the contaminant level of lubricant oil. The measuring principle of FPS sensor is derived and proved together with its resolution. The performance characteristics of the FPS sensor, such as sensitivity coefficient, resolution, and quality factor, are analyzed. A temperature compensation method is proposed to eliminate the temperature-dependence of the measuring parameters, and its validity is investigated by numerical simulation of sensitivity, oscillating frequency, and dielectric constant. The values of purification efficiency obtained using microwave and without microwave are compared experimentally.

  20. Enhanced performance in capacitive force sensors using carbon nanotube/polydimethylsiloxane nanocomposites with high dielectric properties

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jang, Hyeyoung; Yoon, Hyungsuk; Ko, Youngpyo; Choi, Jaeyoo; Lee, Sang-Soo; Jeon, Insu; Kim, Jong-Ho; Kim, Heesuk

    2016-03-01

    Force sensors have attracted tremendous attention owing to their applications in various fields such as touch screens, robots, smart scales, and wearable devices. The force sensors reported so far have been mainly focused on high sensitivity based on delicate microstructured materials, resulting in low reproducibility and high fabrication cost that are limitations for wide applications. As an alternative, we demonstrate a novel capacitive-type force sensor with enhanced performance owing to the increased dielectric properties of elastomers and simple sensor structure. We rationally design dielectric elastomers based on alkylamine modified-multi-walled carbon nanotube (MWCNT)/polydimethylsiloxane (PDMS) composites, which have a higher dielectric constant than pure PDMS. The alkylamine-MWCNTs show excellent dispersion in a PDMS matrix, thus leading to enhanced and reliable dielectric properties of the composites. A force sensor array fabricated with alkylamine-MWCNT/PDMS composites presents an enhanced response due to the higher dielectric constant of the composites than that of pure PDMS. This study is the first to report enhanced performance of capacitive force sensors by modulating the dielectric properties of elastomers. We believe that the disclosed strategy to improve the sensor performance by increasing the dielectric properties of elastomers has great potential in the development of capacitive force sensor arrays that respond to various input forces.Force sensors have attracted tremendous attention owing to their applications in various fields such as touch screens, robots, smart scales, and wearable devices. The force sensors reported so far have been mainly focused on high sensitivity based on delicate microstructured materials, resulting in low reproducibility and high fabrication cost that are limitations for wide applications. As an alternative, we demonstrate a novel capacitive-type force sensor with enhanced performance owing to the increased

  1. Performance of a novel micro force vector sensor and outlook into its biomedical applications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Meiss, Thorsten; Rossner, Tim; Minamisava Faria, Carlos; Völlmeke, Stefan; Opitz, Thomas; Werthschützky, Roland

    2011-05-01

    For the HapCath system, which provides haptic feedback of the forces acting on a guide wire's tip during vascular catheterization, very small piezoresistive force sensors of 200•200•640μm3 have been developed. This paper focuses on the characterization of the measurement performance and on possible new applications. Besides the determination of the dynamic measurement performance, special focus is put onto the results of the 3- component force vector calibration. This article addresses special advantageous characteristics of the sensor, but also the limits of applicability will be addressed. As for the special characteristics of the sensor, the second part of the article demonstrates new applications which can be opened up with the novel force sensor, like automatic navigation of medical or biological instruments without impacting surrounding tissue, surface roughness evaluation in biomedical systems, needle insertion with tactile or higher level feedback, or even building tactile hairs for artificial organisms.

  2. Identify and Quantify the Mechanistic Sources of Sensor Performance Variation Between Individual Sensors SN1 and SN2

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Diaz, Aaron A. [Pacific Northwest National Lab. (PNNL), Richland, WA (United States); Baldwin, David L. [Pacific Northwest National Lab. (PNNL), Richland, WA (United States); Cinson, Anthony D. [Pacific Northwest National Lab. (PNNL), Richland, WA (United States); Jones, Anthony M. [Pacific Northwest National Lab. (PNNL), Richland, WA (United States); Larche, Michael R. [Pacific Northwest National Lab. (PNNL), Richland, WA (United States); Mathews, Royce [Pacific Northwest National Lab. (PNNL), Richland, WA (United States); Mullen, Crystal A. [Pacific Northwest National Lab. (PNNL), Richland, WA (United States); Pardini, Allan F. [Pacific Northwest National Lab. (PNNL), Richland, WA (United States); Posakony, Gerald J. [Pacific Northwest National Lab. (PNNL), Richland, WA (United States); Prowant, Matthew S. [Pacific Northwest National Lab. (PNNL), Richland, WA (United States); Hartman, Trenton S. [Pacific Northwest National Lab. (PNNL), Richland, WA (United States); Edwards, Matthew K. [Pacific Northwest National Lab. (PNNL), Richland, WA (United States)

    2014-08-06

    This Technical Letter Report satisfies the M3AR-14PN2301022 milestone, and is focused on identifying and quantifying the mechanistic sources of sensor performance variation between individual 22-element, linear phased-array sensor prototypes, SN1 and SN2. This effort constitutes an iterative evolution that supports the longer term goal of producing and demonstrating a pre-manufacturing prototype ultrasonic probe that possesses the fundamental performance characteristics necessary to enable the development of a high-temperature sodium-cooled fast reactor inspection system. The scope of the work for this portion of the PNNL effort conducted in FY14 includes performing a comparative evaluation and assessment of the performance characteristics of the SN1 and SN2 22 element PA-UT probes manufactured at PNNL. Key transducer performance parameters, such as sound field dimensions, resolution capabilities, frequency response, and bandwidth are used as a metric for the comparative evaluation and assessment of the SN1 and SN2 engineering test units.

  3. Acoustics in rock and pop music halls

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Larsen, Niels Werner; Thompson, Eric Robert; Gade, Anders Christian

    2007-01-01

    The existing body of literature regarding the acoustic design of concert halls has focused almost exclusively on classical music, although there are many more performances of rhythmic music, including rock and pop. Objective measurements were made of the acoustics of twenty rock music venues...... in Denmark and a questionnaire was used in a subjective assessment of those venues with professional rock musicians and sound engineers. Correlations between the objective and subjective results lead, among others, to a recommendation for reverberation time as a function of hall volume. Since the bass...

  4. Proton knock-out in Hall A

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jager, K. de

    2003-01-01

    Proton knock-out is studied in a broad program in Hall A at Jefferson Lab. The first experiment performed in Hall A studied the 16 O(e,e'p) reaction. Since then proton knock-out experiments have studied a variety of aspects of that reaction, from single-nucleon properties to its mechanism, such as final-state interactions and two-body currents, in nuclei from 2 H to 16 O. In this review the accomplishments of this program will be summarized and an outlook given of expected future results. (orig.)

  5. Design and performance of an integrated ground and space sensor web for monitoring active volcanoes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lahusen, Richard; Song, Wenzhan; Kedar, Sharon; Shirazi, Behrooz; Chien, Steve; Doubleday, Joshua; Davies, Ashley; Webb, Frank; Dzurisin, Dan; Pallister, John

    2010-05-01

    An interdisciplinary team of computer, earth and space scientists collaborated to develop a sensor web system for rapid deployment at active volcanoes. The primary goals of this Optimized Autonomous Space In situ Sensorweb (OASIS) are to: 1) integrate complementary space and in situ (ground-based) elements into an interactive, autonomous sensor web; 2) advance sensor web power and communication resource management technology; and 3) enable scalability for seamless addition sensors and other satellites into the sensor web. This three-year project began with a rigorous multidisciplinary interchange that resulted in definition of system requirements to guide the design of the OASIS network and to achieve the stated project goals. Based on those guidelines, we have developed fully self-contained in situ nodes that integrate GPS, seismic, infrasonic and lightning (ash) detection sensors. The nodes in the wireless sensor network are linked to the ground control center through a mesh network that is highly optimized for remote geophysical monitoring. OASIS also features an autonomous bidirectional interaction between ground nodes and instruments on the EO-1 space platform through continuous analysis and messaging capabilities at the command and control center. Data from both the in situ sensors and satellite-borne hyperspectral imaging sensors stream into a common database for real-time visualization and analysis by earth scientists. We have successfully completed a field deployment of 15 nodes within the crater and on the flanks of Mount St. Helens, Washington. The demonstration that sensor web technology facilitates rapid network deployments and that we can achieve real-time continuous data acquisition. We are now optimizing component performance and improving user interaction for additional deployments at erupting volcanoes in 2010.

  6. A Wireless Sensor Network for Structural Health Monitoring: Performance and Experience

    OpenAIRE

    Paek, Jeongyeup; Chintalapudi, Krishna; Caffrey, John; Govindan, Ramesh; Masri, Sami

    2005-01-01

    While sensor network research has made significant strides in the past few years, the literature has relatively few examples of papers that have evaluated and validated a complete experimental system. In this paper we discuss our deployment experiences and evaluate the performance of a multi-hop wireless data acquisition system (called Wisden) for structural health monitoring (SHM) on a large seismic test structure used by civil engineers. Our experiments indicate that, with the latest sensor...

  7. Planar Hall Sensor for Influenza Immunoassay

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ejsing, Louise Wellendorph

    2006-01-01

    følsomt kan detektere magnetiske nanokugler. Indledende biodetektionsforsøg rettet mod detektion af influenza-virus blev udført i samarbejde med Statens Serum-Institut. Det blev demonstreret, at sensorerne har et stort potentiale til biodetektion men også at den uspecifikke binding af magnetiske kugler...

  8. Paired Hall states

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Greiter, M.

    1992-01-01

    This dissertation contains a collection of individual articles on various topics. Their significance in the corresponding field as well as connections between them are emphasized in a general and comprehensive introduction. In the first article, the author explores the consequences for macroscopic effective Lagrangians of assuming that the momentum density is proportional to the flow of conserved current. The universal corrections obtained for the macroscopic Lagrangian of a superconductor describe the London Hall effect, and provide a fully consistent derivation of it. In the second article, a heuristic principle is proposed for quantized Hall states: the existence and incompressibility of fractionally quantized Hall states is explained by an argument based on an adiabatic localization of magnetic flux, the process of trading uniform flux for an equal amount of fictitious flux attached to the particles. This principle is exactly implemented in the third article. For a certain class of model Hamiltonians, the author obtains Laughlin's Jastrow type wave functions explicitly from a filled Landau level, by smooth extrapolation in quantum statistics. The generalization of this analysis to the torus geometry shows that theorems restricting the possibilities of quantum statistics on closed surfaces are circumvented in the presence of a magnetic field. In the last article, the existence is proposed of a novel incompressible quantum liquid, a paired Hall state, at a half filled Landau level. This state arises adiabatically from free fermions in zero magnetic field, and reduces to a state previously proposed by Halperin in the limit of tightly bound pairs. It supports unusual excitations, including neutral fermions and charge e/4 anyons with statistical parameter θ = π/8

  9. Quantum critical Hall exponents

    CERN Document Server

    Lütken, C A

    2014-01-01

    We investigate a finite size "double scaling" hypothesis using data from an experiment on a quantum Hall system with short range disorder [1-3]. For Hall bars of width w at temperature T the scaling form is w(-mu)T(-kappa), where the critical exponent mu approximate to 0.23 we extract from the data is comparable to the multi-fractal exponent alpha(0) - 2 obtained from the Chalker-Coddington (CC) model [4]. We also use the data to find the approximate location (in the resistivity plane) of seven quantum critical points, all of which closely agree with the predictions derived long ago from the modular symmetry of a toroidal sigma-model with m matter fields [5]. The value nu(8) = 2.60513 ... of the localisation exponent obtained from the m = 8 model is in excellent agreement with the best available numerical value nu(num) = 2.607 +/- 0.004 derived from the CC-model [6]. Existing experimental data appear to favour the m = 9 model, suggesting that the quantum Hall system is not in the same universality class as th...

  10. REMOTE, a Wireless Sensor Network Based System to Monitor Rowing Performance

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jordi Llosa

    2009-09-01

    Full Text Available In this paper, we take a hard look at the performance of REMOTE, a sensor network based application that provides a detailed picture of a boat movement, individual rower performance, or his/her performance compared with other crew members. The application analyzes data gathered with a WSN strategically deployed over a boat to obtain information on the boat and oar movements. Functionalities of REMOTE are compared to those of RowX [1] outdoor instrument, a commercial wired sensor instrument designed for similar purposes. This study demonstrates that with smart geometrical configuration of the sensors, rotation and translation of the oars and boat can be obtained. Three different tests are performed: laboratory calibration allows us to become familiar with the accelerometer readings and validate the theory, ergometer tests which help us to set the acquisition parameters, and on boat tests shows the application potential of this technologies in sports.

  11. REMOTE, a Wireless Sensor Network Based System to Monitor Rowing Performance

    Science.gov (United States)

    Llosa, Jordi; Vilajosana, Ignasi; Vilajosana, Xavier; Navarro, Nacho; Suriñach, Emma; Marquès, Joan Manuel

    2009-01-01

    In this paper, we take a hard look at the performance of REMOTE, a sensor network based application that provides a detailed picture of a boat movement, individual rower performance, or his/her performance compared with other crew members. The application analyzes data gathered with a WSN strategically deployed over a boat to obtain information on the boat and oar movements. Functionalities of REMOTE are compared to those of RowX [1] outdoor instrument, a commercial wired sensor instrument designed for similar purposes. This study demonstrates that with smart geometrical configuration of the sensors, rotation and translation of the oars and boat can be obtained. Three different tests are performed: laboratory calibration allows us to become familiar with the accelerometer readings and validate the theory, ergometer tests which help us to set the acquisition parameters, and on boat tests shows the application potential of this technologies in sports. PMID:22423204

  12. The role of film composition and nanostructuration on the polyphenol sensor performance

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cibely Silva Martin

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available The recent advances in the supramolecular control in nanostructured films have improved the performance of organic-based devices. However, the effect of different supramolecular arrangement on the sensor or biosensor performance is poorly studied yet. In this paper, we show the role of the composition and nanostructuration of the films on the impedance and voltammetric-based sensor performance to catechol detection. The films here studied were composed by a perylene derivative (PTCD-NH2 and a metallic phthalocyanine (FePc, using Langmuir-Blodgett (LB and physical vapor deposition (PVD techniques. The deposition technique and intrinsic properties of compounds showed influence on electrical and electrocatalytic responses. The PVD PTCD-NH2 shows the best sensor performance to the detection of catechol. Quantification of catechol contents in mate tea samples was also evaluated, and the results showed good agreement compared with Folin-Ciocalteu standard method for polyphenol detection.

  13. Enhanced performance of microfluidic soft pressure sensors with embedded solid microspheres

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shin, Hee-Sup; Ryu, Jaiyoung; Majidi, Carmel; Park, Yong-Lae

    2016-02-01

    The cross-sectional geometry of an embedded microchannel influences the electromechanical response of a soft microfluidic sensor to applied surface pressure. When a pressure is exerted on the surface of the sensor deforming the soft structure, the cross-sectional area of the embedded channel filled with a conductive fluid decreases, increasing the channel’s electrical resistance. This electromechanical coupling can be tuned by adding solid microspheres into the channel. In order to determine the influence of microspheres, we use both analytic and computational methods to predict the pressure responses of soft microfluidic sensors with two different channel cross-sections: a square and an equilateral triangular. The analytical models were derived from contact mechanics in which microspheres were regarded as spherical indenters, and finite element analysis (FEA) was used for simulation. For experimental validation, sensor samples with the two different channel cross-sections were prepared and tested. For comparison, the sensor samples were tested both with and without microspheres. All three results from the analytical models, the FEA simulations, and the experiments showed reasonable agreement confirming that the multi-material soft structure significantly improved its pressure response in terms of both linearity and sensitivity. The embedded solid particles enhanced the performance of soft sensors while maintaining their flexible and stretchable mechanical characteristic. We also provide analytical and experimental analyses of hysteresis of microfluidic soft sensors considering a resistive force to the shape recovery of the polymer structure by the embedded viscous fluid.

  14. Evaluating the performance of low cost chemical sensors for air pollution research.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lewis, Alastair C; Lee, James D; Edwards, Peter M; Shaw, Marvin D; Evans, Mat J; Moller, Sarah J; Smith, Katie R; Buckley, Jack W; Ellis, Matthew; Gillot, Stefan R; White, Andrew

    2016-07-18

    Low cost pollution sensors have been widely publicized, in principle offering increased information on the distribution of air pollution and a democratization of air quality measurements to amateur users. We report a laboratory study of commonly-used electrochemical sensors and quantify a number of cross-interferences with other atmospheric chemicals, some of which become significant at typical suburban air pollution concentrations. We highlight that artefact signals from co-sampled pollutants such as CO2 can be greater than the electrochemical sensor signal generated by the measurand. We subsequently tested in ambient air, over a period of three weeks, twenty identical commercial sensor packages alongside standard measurements and report on the degree of agreement between references and sensors. We then explore potential experimental approaches to improve sensor performance, enhancing outputs from qualitative to quantitative, focusing on low cost VOC photoionization sensors. Careful signal handling, for example, was seen to improve limits of detection by one order of magnitude. The quantity, magnitude and complexity of analytical interferences that must be characterised to convert a signal into a quantitative observation, with known uncertainties, make standard individual parameter regression inappropriate. We show that one potential solution to this problem is the application of supervised machine learning approaches such as boosted regression trees and Gaussian processes emulation.

  15. Fabrication and Performance of All-Solid-State Chloride Sensors in Synthetic Concrete Pore Solutions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hongwei Deng

    2010-11-01

    Full Text Available One type of all-solid-state chloride sensor was fabricated using a MnO2 electrode and a Ag/AgCl electrode. The potentiometric response of the sensor to chloride in synthetic concrete pore solutions was systematically studied, and the polarization performance was also evaluated. The results show a good linear relationship between the potential reading of the sensor and the logarithm of chloride activity (concentration ranges from 0.05 to 5.0 M, and the potential value remains stable with increasing immersion time. The existence of K+, Ca2+, Na+ and SO42− ions have little influence on the potentiometric response of the sensor to chloride, but the pH has a significant influence on the potential value of the sensor at low chloride concentration. The potential reading of the sensor increases linearly with the solution temperature over the range from 5 to 45 °C. Meanwhile, an excellent polarization behavior is proven by galvanostatic and potentiodynamic tests. All of the results reveal that the developed sensor has a great potential for monitoring chloride ions in concrete environments.

  16. Fabrication and performance of all-solid-state chloride sensors in synthetic concrete pore solutions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gao, Xiaojian; Zhang, Jian; Yang, Yingzi; Deng, Hongwei

    2010-01-01

    One type of all-solid-state chloride sensor was fabricated using a MnO(2) electrode and a Ag/AgCl electrode. The potentiometric response of the sensor to chloride in synthetic concrete pore solutions was systematically studied, and the polarization performance was also evaluated. The results show a good linear relationship between the potential reading of the sensor and the logarithm of chloride activity (concentration ranges from 0.05 to 5.0 M), and the potential value remains stable with increasing immersion time. The existence of K(+), Ca(2+), Na(+) and SO(4) (2-) ions have little influence on the potentiometric response of the sensor to chloride, but the pH has a significant influence on the potential value of the sensor at low chloride concentration. The potential reading of the sensor increases linearly with the solution temperature over the range from 5 to 45 °C. Meanwhile, an excellent polarization behavior is proven by galvanostatic and potentiodynamic tests. All of the results reveal that the developed sensor has a great potential for monitoring chloride ions in concrete environments.

  17. Topological Hall and Spin Hall Effects in Disordered Skyrmionic Textures

    OpenAIRE

    N'diaye, P. B.; Akosa, C. A.; Manchon, A.

    2016-01-01

    We carry out a throughout study of the topological Hall and topological spin Hall effects in disordered skyrmionic systems: the dimensionless (spin) Hall angles are evaluated across the energy band structure in the multiprobe Landauer-B\\"uttiker formalism and their link to the effective magnetic field emerging from the real space topology of the spin texture is highlighted. We discuss these results for an optimal skyrmion size and for various sizes of the sample and found that the adiabatic a...

  18. Performance of UWB Array-Based Radar Sensor in a Multi-Sensor Vehicle-Based Suit for Landmine Detection

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Yarovoy, A.; Savelyev, T.; Zhuge, X.; Aubry, P.; Ligthart, L.; Schavemaker, J.G.M.; Tettelaar, P.; Breejen, E. de

    2008-01-01

    In this paper, integration of an UWB array-based timedomain radar sensor in a vehicle-mounted multi-sensor system for landmine detection is described. Dedicated real-time signal processing algorithms are developed to compute the radar sensor confidence map which is used for sensor fusion.

  19. Sensor

    OpenAIRE

    Gleeson, Helen; Dierking, Ingo; Grieve, Bruce; Woodyatt, Christopher; Brimicombe, Paul

    2015-01-01

    An electrical temperature sensor (10) comprises a liquid crystalline material (12). First and second electrically conductive contacts (14), (16), having a spaced relationship there between, contact the liquid crystalline material (12). An electric property measuring device is electrically connected to the first and second contacts (14), (16) and is arranged to measure an electric property of the liquid crystalline material (12). The liquid crystalline material (12) has a transition temperatur...

  20. Scintillating-Glass-Fiber neutron sensors, their application and performance for plutonium detection and monitoring

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Seymour, R.S.; Richardson, B.; Morichi, M.; Bliss, M.; Craig, R.A.; Sunberg, D.S.

    1998-01-01

    Most neutron detection sensors presently employ 3 He gas-filled detectors. Despite their excellent performance and widespread use, there are significant limitations to this technology. A significant alternative neutron sensor utilizing neutron-active material incorporated into a glass scintillator is presented that offers novel commercial sensors not possible or practical with gas tube technology. The scintillating optical fiber permits sensors with a multitude of sizes ranging from devices of a single fiber of 150μm to sensors with tens of thousands of fibers with areas as large as 5m 2 depending on the neutron flux to be measured. A second significant advantage is the use of high-speed electronics that allow a greater dynamic range, not possible with gas detectors. These sensors are flexible, conformable and less sensitive to vibration that optimizes the source-to-detector geometry and provides robust performance in field applications. The glass-fibers are sensitive to both gamma rays and neutrons. However the coincidence electronics are optimized for neutron to gamma ray discrimination allowing very sensitive measurements with a low false-alarm rate. Applications include SNM surveillance, material control and accountability (MC and A), safeguard inspections, Pu health physics / bioassay and environmental characterization. (author)

  1. A Small Modular Laboratory Hall Effect Thruster

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Ty Davis

    Electric propulsion technologies promise to revolutionize access to space, opening the door for mission concepts unfeasible by traditional propulsion methods alone. The Hall effect thruster is a relatively high thrust, moderate specific impulse electric propulsion device that belongs to the class of electrostatic thrusters. Hall effect thrusters benefit from an extensive flight history, and offer significant performance and cost advantages when compared to other forms of electric propulsion. Ongoing research on these devices includes the investigation of mechanisms that tend to decrease overall thruster efficiency, as well as the development of new techniques to extend operational lifetimes. This thesis is primarily concerned with the design and construction of a Small Modular Laboratory Hall Effect Thruster (SMLHET), and its operation on argon propellant gas. Particular attention was addressed at low-cost, modular design principles, that would facilitate simple replacement and modification of key thruster parts such as the magnetic circuit and discharge channel. This capability is intended to facilitate future studies of device physics such as anomalous electron transport and magnetic shielding of the channel walls, that have an impact on thruster performance and life. Preliminary results demonstrate SMLHET running on argon in a manner characteristic of Hall effect thrusters, additionally a power balance method was utilized to estimate thruster performance. It is expected that future thruster studies utilizing heavier though more expensive gases like xenon or krypton, will observe increased efficiency and stability.

  2. Analyses of performance of novel sensors with different coatings for detection of Lipopolysaccharide

    KAUST Repository

    Mohd. Syaifudin, A. R.

    2011-10-01

    Interdigital sensors have been widely used for non-destructive applications. New types of planar interdigital sensors have been fabricated with different coating materials to assess the response to Lipopolysaccharide, LPS. All the coatings were selected and optimized to be stable in water, as the measurements take place in water media. Moreover, the coatings have been designed to have available carboxylic or amine functional groups. The use of these functional groups is a widely used technique to specifically binding of biomolecules. The coated sensors were then immobilized with Polymyxin B(PmB) which has the specific binding properties to LPS. This paper will highlight the fabrication process and initial investigations on the sensors\\' performance based on Impedance Spectroscopy. © 2011 IEEE.

  3. High performance flexible pH sensor based on carboxyl-functionalized and DEP aligned SWNTs

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Liu, Lu; Shao, Jinyou; Li, Xiangming; Zhao, Qiang; Nie, Bangbang; Xu, Chuan; Ding, Haitao

    2016-01-01

    Highlights: • The flexible chemiresistive pH sensor based on two-terminal microsensors eliminating the need for a reference electrode, is simple in structure and can be fabricated on a variety of substrates such as PET, PI and PVC. • SWNTs as an ideal one dimensional material are carboxyl-functionalized to make the pH sensor show high sensitivity and outstanding flexibility for practical applications. • DEP technique is used to manipulate and position SWNTs into appropriate locations and desired formations to improve the metal-nanotube interface and highly rapid detection of pH value, resulting in better overall device performance. • Mechanical bendability of the pH sensor, which arises from the combination of flexible PET substrates and SWNTs, offer a significant improvement for applications that are difficult or impossible to achieve with traditional sensors on rigid substrates. - Abstract: The detection and control of the pH is very important in many biomedical and chemical reaction processes. A miniaturized flexible pH sensor that is light weight, robust, and conformable is very important in many applications, such as multifunctional lab-on-a-chip systems or wearable biomedical devices. In this work, we demonstrate a flexible chemiresistive pH sensor based on dielectrophoresis (DEP) aligned carboxyl-functionalized single-walled carbon nanotubes (SWNTs). Decorated carboxyl groups can react with hydrogen (H"+) and hydroxide (OH"−) ions, enabling the sensor to be capable of sensing the pH. DEP is used to deposit well-organized and highly aligned SWNTs in desired locations, which improves the metal-nanotube interface and highly rapid detection of the pH, resulting in better overall device performance. When pH buffer solutions are dropped onto such SWNTs, the H"+ and OH"− ions caninteract with the carboxyl groups and affect the generation of holes and electrons in the SWNTs, leading to resistance variations in the SWNTs. The results shows that the

  4. High performance flexible pH sensor based on carboxyl-functionalized and DEP aligned SWNTs

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Liu, Lu; Shao, Jinyou, E-mail: jyshao@mail.xjtu.edu.cn; Li, Xiangming; Zhao, Qiang; Nie, Bangbang; Xu, Chuan; Ding, Haitao

    2016-11-15

    Highlights: • The flexible chemiresistive pH sensor based on two-terminal microsensors eliminating the need for a reference electrode, is simple in structure and can be fabricated on a variety of substrates such as PET, PI and PVC. • SWNTs as an ideal one dimensional material are carboxyl-functionalized to make the pH sensor show high sensitivity and outstanding flexibility for practical applications. • DEP technique is used to manipulate and position SWNTs into appropriate locations and desired formations to improve the metal-nanotube interface and highly rapid detection of pH value, resulting in better overall device performance. • Mechanical bendability of the pH sensor, which arises from the combination of flexible PET substrates and SWNTs, offer a significant improvement for applications that are difficult or impossible to achieve with traditional sensors on rigid substrates. - Abstract: The detection and control of the pH is very important in many biomedical and chemical reaction processes. A miniaturized flexible pH sensor that is light weight, robust, and conformable is very important in many applications, such as multifunctional lab-on-a-chip systems or wearable biomedical devices. In this work, we demonstrate a flexible chemiresistive pH sensor based on dielectrophoresis (DEP) aligned carboxyl-functionalized single-walled carbon nanotubes (SWNTs). Decorated carboxyl groups can react with hydrogen (H{sup +}) and hydroxide (OH{sup −}) ions, enabling the sensor to be capable of sensing the pH. DEP is used to deposit well-organized and highly aligned SWNTs in desired locations, which improves the metal-nanotube interface and highly rapid detection of the pH, resulting in better overall device performance. When pH buffer solutions are dropped onto such SWNTs, the H{sup +} and OH{sup −} ions caninteract with the carboxyl groups and affect the generation of holes and electrons in the SWNTs, leading to resistance variations in the SWNTs. The results

  5. Quantum hall effect. A perspective

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Aoki, Hideo

    2006-01-01

    Novel concepts and phenomena are emerging recently in the physics of quantum Hall effect. This article gives an overview, which starts from the fractional quantum Hall system viewed as an extremely strongly correlated system, and move on to present various phenomena involving internal degrees of freedom (spin and layer), non-equilibrium and optical properties, and finally the spinoff to anomalous Hall effect and the rotating Bose-Einstein condensate. (author)

  6. Improving the Performance of Semiconductor Sensor Devices Using Surface Functionalization

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rohrbaugh, Nathaniel W.

    As production and understanding of III-nitride growth has progressed, this class of material has been used for its semiconducting properties in the fields of computer processing, microelectronics, and LEDs. As understanding of materials properties has advanced, devices were fabricated to be sensitive to environmental surroundings such as pH, gas, or ionic concentration. Simultaneously the world of pharmaceuticals and environmental science has come to the age where the use of wearable devices and active environmental sensing can not only help us learn more about our surroundings, but help save lives. At the crossroads of these two fields work has been done in marrying the high stability and electrical properties of the III-nitrides with the needs of a growing sensor field for various environments and stimuli. Device architecture can only get one so far, and thus the need for well understood surface functionalization techniques has arisen in the field of III-nitride environmental sensing. Many existing schemes for functionalization involve chemistries that may be unfriendly to a biological environment, unstable in solution, or expensive to produce. One possible solution to these issues is the work presented here, which highlights a surface modification scheme utilizing phosphonic acid based chemistry and biomolecular attachment. This dissertation presents a set of studies and experiments quantifying and analyzing the response behaviors of AlGaN/GaN field effect transistor (FET) devices via their interfacial electronic properties. Additional investigation was done on the modification of these surfaces, effects of stressful environmental conditions, and the utility of the phosphonic acid surface treatments. Signals of AlGaN/GaN FETs were measured as IDrain values and in the earliest study an average signal increase of 96.43% was observed when surfaces were incubated in a solution of a known recognition peptide sequence (SVSVGMKPSPRP). This work showed that even without

  7. Energy spectrum, dissipation, and spatial structures in reduced Hall magnetohydrodynamic

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Martin, L. N.; Dmitruk, P. [Departamento de Fisica, Facultad de Ciencias Exactas y Naturales, Universidad de Buenos Aires and IFIBA, CONICET, Ciudad Universitaria, 1428 Buenos Aires (Argentina); Gomez, D. O. [Departamento de Fisica, Facultad de Ciencias Exactas y Naturales, Universidad de Buenos Aires and IFIBA, CONICET, Ciudad Universitaria, 1428 Buenos Aires (Argentina); Instituto de Astronomia y Fisica del Espacio, CONICET, Buenos Aires (Argentina)

    2012-05-15

    We analyze the effect of the Hall term in the magnetohydrodynamic turbulence under a strong externally supported magnetic field, seeing how this changes the energy cascade, the characteristic scales of the flow, and the dynamics of global magnitudes, with particular interest in the dissipation. Numerical simulations of freely evolving three-dimensional reduced magnetohydrodynamics are performed, for different values of the Hall parameter (the ratio of the ion skin depth to the macroscopic scale of the turbulence) controlling the impact of the Hall term. The Hall effect modifies the transfer of energy across scales, slowing down the transfer of energy from the large scales up to the Hall scale (ion skin depth) and carrying faster the energy from the Hall scale to smaller scales. The final outcome is an effective shift of the dissipation scale to larger scales but also a development of smaller scales. Current sheets (fundamental structures for energy dissipation) are affected in two ways by increasing the Hall effect, with a widening but at the same time generating an internal structure within them. In the case where the Hall term is sufficiently intense, the current sheet is fully delocalized. The effect appears to reduce impulsive effects in the flow, making it less intermittent.

  8. Performance evaluation of spatial vector routing protocol for wireless sensor networks

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Baloch, J.; Jokhio, I.

    2012-01-01

    WSNs (Wireless Sensor Networks) is an emerging area of research. Researchers worldwide are working on the issues faced by sensor nodes. Communication has been a major issue in wireless networks and the problem is manifolds in WSN s because of the limited resources. The routing protocol in such networks plays a pivotal role, as an effective routing protocol could significantly reduce the energy consumed in transmitting and receiving data packets throughout a network. In this paper the performance of SVR (Spatial Vector Routing) an energy efficient, location aware routing protocol is compared with the existing location aware protocols. The results from the simulation trials show the performance of SVR. (author)

  9. Performance Evaluation of Spatial Vector Routing Protocol for Wireless Sensor Networks

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Javed Ali Baloch

    2012-10-01

    Full Text Available WSNs (Wireless Sensor Networks is an emerging area of research. Researchers worldwide are working on the issues faced by sensor nodes. Communication has been a major issue in wireless networks and the problem is manifolds in WSNs because of the limited resources. The routing protocol in such networks plays a pivotal role, as an effective routing protocol could significantly reduce the energy consumed in transmitting and receiving data packets throughout a network. In this paper the performance of SVR (Spatial Vector Routing an energy efficient, location aware routing protocol is compared with the existing location aware protocols. The results from the simulation trials show the performance of SVR.

  10. Miniature robust five-dimensional fingertip force/torque sensor with high performance

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Liang, Qiaokang; Huang, Xiuxiang; Li, Zhongyang; Zhang, Dan; Ge, Yunjian

    2011-01-01

    This paper proposes an innovative design and investigation for a five-dimensional fingertip force/torque sensor with a dual annular diaphragm. This sensor can be applied to a robot hand to measure forces along the X-, Y- and Z-axes (F x , F y and F z ) and moments about the X- and Y-axes (M x and M y ) simultaneously. Particularly, the details of the sensing principle, the structural design and the overload protection mechanism are presented. Afterward, based on the design of experiments approach provided by the software ANSYS®, a finite element analysis and an optimization design are performed. These are performed with the objective of achieving both high sensitivity and stiffness of the sensor. Furthermore, static and dynamic calibrations based on the neural network method are carried out. Finally, an application of the developed sensor on a dexterous robot hand is demonstrated. The results of calibration experiments and the application show that the developed sensor possesses high performance and robustness

  11. Integration of nanostructured materials with MEMS microhotplate platforms to enhance chemical sensor performance

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Benkstein, Kurt D.; Martinez, Carlos J.; Li, Guofeng; Meier, Douglas C.; Montgomery, Christopher B.; Semancik, Steve

    2006-01-01

    The development of miniaturized chemical sensors is an increasingly active area of research. Such devices, particularly when they feature low mass and low power budgets, can impact a broad range of applications including industrial process monitoring, building security and extraterrestrial exploration. Nanostructured materials, because of their high surface area, can provide critical enhancements in the performance of chemical microsensors. We have worked to integrate nanomaterial films with MEMS (microelectromechanical systems) microhotplate platforms developed at the National Institute of Standards and Technology in order to gain the benefits of both the materials and the platforms in high-performance chemical sensor arrays. Here, we describe our success in overcoming the challenges of integration and the benefits that we have achieved with regard to the critical sensor performance characteristics of sensor response, speed, stability and selectivity. Nanostructured metal oxide sensing films were locally deposited onto microhotplates via chemical vapor deposition and microcapillary pipetting, and conductive polymer nanoparticle films were deposited via electrophoretic patterning. All films were characterized by scanning electron microscopy and evaluated as conductometric gas sensors

  12. Spin Hall effect transistor

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Wunderlich, Joerg; Park, B.G.; Irvine, A.C.; Zarbo, Liviu; Rozkotová, E.; Němec, P.; Novák, Vít; Sinova, Jairo; Jungwirth, Tomáš

    2010-01-01

    Roč. 330, č. 6012 (2010), s. 1801-1804 ISSN 0036-8075 R&D Projects: GA AV ČR KAN400100652; GA MŠk LC510 EU Projects: European Commission(XE) 215368 - SemiSpinNet Grant - others:AV ČR(CZ) AP0801 Program:Akademická prémie - Praemium Academiae Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z10100521 Keywords : spin Hall effect * spintronics * spin transistor Subject RIV: BM - Solid Matter Physics ; Magnetism Impact factor: 31.364, year: 2010

  13. Systematic study of packaging designs on the performance of CMOS thermoresistive micro calorimetric flow sensors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Xu, Wei; Gao, Bo; Xu, Kun; Lee, Yi-Kuen; Pan, Liang; Chiu, Yi

    2017-01-01

    We systematically study the effect of two packaging configurations for the CMOS thermoresistive micro calorimetric flow (TMCF) sensors: S-type with the sensor chip protrusion-mounted on the flow channel wall and E-type with the sensor chip flush-mounted on the flow channel wall. Although the experimental results indicated that the sensitivity of the S-type was increased by more than 30%; the corresponding flow range as compared to the E-type was dramatically reduced by 60% from 0–11 m s −1 to 0–4.5 m s −1 . Comprehensive 2D CFD simulation and in-house developed 3D numerical simulations based on the gas-kinetic scheme were applied to study the flow separation of these two packaging designs with the major parameters. Indeed, the S-type design with the large protrusion would change the local convective heat transfer of the TMCF sensor and dramatically decrease the sensors’ performance. In addition, parametric CFD simulations of the packaging designs provide inspiration to propose a novel general flow regime map (FRM), i.e. normalized protrusion d * versus reduced chip Reynolds number Re * , where the critical boundary curve for the flow separation of TMCF sensors was determined at different channel aspect ratios. The proposed FRM can be a useful guideline for the packaging design and manufacturing of different micro thermal flow sensors. (paper)

  14. Energy-efficient ZigBee-based wireless sensor network for track bicycle performance monitoring.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gharghan, Sadik K; Nordin, Rosdiadee; Ismail, Mahamod

    2014-08-22

    In a wireless sensor network (WSN), saving power is a vital requirement. In this paper, a simple point-to-point bike WSN was considered. The data of bike parameters, speed and cadence, were monitored and transmitted via a wireless communication based on the ZigBee protocol. Since the bike parameters are monitored and transmitted on every bike wheel rotation, this means the sensor node does not sleep for a long time, causing power consumption to rise. Therefore, a newly proposed algorithm, known as the Redundancy and Converged Data (RCD) algorithm, was implemented for this application to put the sensor node into sleep mode while maintaining the performance measurements. This is achieved by minimizing the data packets transmitted as much as possible and fusing the data of speed and cadence by utilizing the correlation measurements between them to minimize the number of sensor nodes in the network to one node, which results in reduced power consumption, cost, and size, in addition to simpler hardware implementation. Execution of the proposed RCD algorithm shows that this approach can reduce the current consumption to 1.69 mA, and save 95% of the sensor node energy. Also, the comparison results with different wireless standard technologies demonstrate minimal current consumption in the sensor node.

  15. Performance studies of an IR fiber optic sensor for chlorinated hydrocarbons in water

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Goebel, R.; Krska, R.; Neal, S.; Kellner, R.

    1994-01-01

    Chlorinated hydrocarbons (CHCs) were monitored using a recently presented infrared fiber-optic physico-chemical sensor consisting of an MIR transparent, polymer coated, silver halide fiber coupled to a commercial FTIR spectrometer. The aim of this study was to test the performance of this new fiber optic sensing device with respect to temperature dependence, simultaneous detection of several CHCs, sensitivity and dynamic response behavior. In addition the diffusion process of the CHCs into the polymer was analyzed in order to better understand and evaluate the obtained results. During the investigation of the temperature dependence of the sensor response to real trend could be observed in the temperature range of 0 to 22 C. The dynamic response of the sensor is in the minute range when experiencing an increase in concentration of the analyte while with a decrease in concentration, the response is relatively slow. The sensor enabled the detection of 10 environmentally relevant CHCs at concentrations of 1 to 50 ppm. The simulation of the experimental diffusion data revealed Fick's 1st law diffusion for CHCs into the polymer layers. Finally the sensing device was validated with head spacegas chromatography (HSGC) analyses and showed good agreement with these already established methods. This work shows the great potential of IR fiber optic sensors as early warning systems for a variety of CHCs in water (''threshold alarm sensor'') (orig.)

  16. SnO2 Nanostructure as Pollutant Gas Sensors: Synthesis, Sensing Performances, and Mechanism

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Brian Yuliarto

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available A significant amount of pollutants is produced from factories and motor vehicles in the form of gas. Their negative impact on the environment is well known; therefore detection with effective gas sensors is important as part of pollution prevention efforts. Gas sensors use a metal oxide semiconductor, specifically SnO2 nanostructures. This semiconductor is interesting and worthy of further investigation because of its many uses, for example, as lithium battery electrode, energy storage, catalyst, and transistor, and has potential as a gas sensor. In addition, there has to be a discussion of the use of SnO2 as a pollutant gas sensor especially for waste products such as CO, CO2, SO2, and NOx. In this paper, the development of the fabrication of SnO2 nanostructures synthesis will be described as it relates to the performances as pollutant gas sensors. In addition, the functionalization of SnO2 as a gas sensor is extensively discussed with respect to the theory of gas adsorption, the surface features of SnO2, the band gap theory, and electron transfer.

  17. Energy-Efficient ZigBee-Based Wireless Sensor Network for Track Bicycle Performance Monitoring

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sadik K. Gharghan

    2014-08-01

    Full Text Available In a wireless sensor network (WSN, saving power is a vital requirement. In this paper, a simple point-to-point bike WSN was considered. The data of bike parameters, speed and cadence, were monitored and transmitted via a wireless communication based on the ZigBee protocol. Since the bike parameters are monitored and transmitted on every bike wheel rotation, this means the sensor node does not sleep for a long time, causing power consumption to rise. Therefore, a newly proposed algorithm, known as the Redundancy and Converged Data (RCD algorithm, was implemented for this application to put the sensor node into sleep mode while maintaining the performance measurements. This is achieved by minimizing the data packets transmitted as much as possible and fusing the data of speed and cadence by utilizing the correlation measurements between them to minimize the number of sensor nodes in the network to one node, which results in reduced power consumption, cost, and size, in addition to simpler hardware implementation. Execution of the proposed RCD algorithm shows that this approach can reduce the current consumption to 1.69 mA, and save 95% of the sensor node energy. Also, the comparison results with different wireless standard technologies demonstrate minimal current consumption in the sensor node.

  18. On the Performance of the Underwater Acoustic Sensor Networks

    Science.gov (United States)

    2015-05-01

    performance of UWSN. 5.1 Hardware and Software Details 5.1.1 Equipment Our experimental model consisted of an indoor swimming pool , two pairs...UWSN has many constraints mainly due to limited capacity, propagation loss, as well as power limitation since in underwater environment solar energy ...since in underwater environment solar energy cannot be used to recharge batteries. In our approach, we estimate the number of operating receivers

  19. Data for a pre-performance test of self-developed electronic tongue sensors

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Laura Isabell Immohr

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available This article presents data, which can be applied for a pre-performance test of self-developed electronic tongue sensors. Contained data is related to the research article “Impact of Sodium Lauryl Sulfate in oral liquids on E-Tongue Measurements” (http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.ijpharm.2016.10.045; (L.I. Immohr, R. Turner, M. Pein-Hackelbusch, 2016 [1]. Sensor responses were obtained from 10 subsequent measurements and four different concentrations of quinine hydrochloride by electronic tongue (TS-5000Z, Insent Inc., Atsugi-Shi, Japan measurements. Based on the data for the pre-performance testing, which were calculated based on the fluctuation range of the sensor responses around the median, stability criteria and required preconditions cycles were defined.

  20. An Analysis of Network and Sensor Performance Within IEEE 802.X Wireless MESH Networks in the Tactical Network Topology (TNT)

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Davis, Joseph A., Sr

    2005-01-01

    .... Specifically, this thesis will attempt establish the foundation for the development of wireless MESH "network health" models by examining the performance of sensors operating within a MESH network...

  1. Performance of the ALIBAVA portable readout system with irradiated and non-irradiated microstrip silicon sensors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Marco-Hernadez, R.

    2009-01-01

    A readout system for microstrip silicon sensors has been developed as a result of collaboration among the University of Liverpool, the CNM of Barcelona and the IFIC of Valencia. The name of this collaboration is ALIBAVA and it is integrated in the RD50 Collaboration. This system is able to measure the collected charge in one or two microstrip silicon sensors by reading out all the channels of the sensor(s), up to 256, as an analogue measurement. The system uses two Beetle chips to read out the detector(s). The Beetle chip is an analogue pipelined readout chip used in the LHCb experiment. The system can operate either with non-irradiated and irradiated sensors as well as with n-type and p-type microstrip silicon sensors. Heavily irradiated sensors will be used at the SLHC, so this system is being to research the performance of microstrip silicon sensors in conditions as similar as possible to the SLHC operating conditions. The system has two main parts: a hardware part and a software part. The hardware part acquires the sensor signals either from external trigger inputs, in case of a radioactive source setup is used, or from a synchronised trigger output generated by the system, if a laser setup is used. This acquired data is sent by USB to be stored in a PC for a further processing. The hardware is a dual board based system. The daughterboard is a small board intended for containing two Beetle readout chips as well as fan-ins and detector support to interface the sensors. The motherboard is intended to process the data, to control the whole hardware and to communicate with the software by USB. The software controls the system and processes the data acquired from the sensors in order to store it in an adequate format file. The main characteristics of the system will be described. Results of measurements acquired with n-type and p-type irradiated and non-irradiated detectors using both the laser and the radioactive source setup will be also presented and discussed

  2. Inertial Sensor Technology for Elite Swimming Performance Analysis: A Systematic Review

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mooney, Robert; Corley, Gavin; Godfrey, Alan; Quinlan, Leo R; ÓLaighin, Gearóid

    2015-01-01

    Technical evaluation of swimming performance is an essential factor of elite athletic preparation. Novel methods of analysis, incorporating body worn inertial sensors (i.e., Microelectromechanical systems, or MEMS, accelerometers and gyroscopes), have received much attention recently from both research and commercial communities as an alternative to video-based approaches. This technology may allow for improved analysis of stroke mechanics, race performance and energy expenditure, as well as real-time feedback to the coach, potentially enabling more efficient, competitive and quantitative coaching. The aim of this paper is to provide a systematic review of the literature related to the use of inertial sensors for the technical analysis of swimming performance. This paper focuses on providing an evaluation of the accuracy of different feature detection algorithms described in the literature for the analysis of different phases of swimming, specifically starts, turns and free-swimming. The consequences associated with different sensor attachment locations are also considered for both single and multiple sensor configurations. Additional information such as this should help practitioners to select the most appropriate systems and methods for extracting the key performance related parameters that are important to them for analysing their swimmers’ performance and may serve to inform both applied and research practices. PMID:26712760

  3. Parameter Selection and Performance Comparison of Particle Swarm Optimization in Sensor Networks Localization.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cui, Huanqing; Shu, Minglei; Song, Min; Wang, Yinglong

    2017-03-01

    Localization is a key technology in wireless sensor networks. Faced with the challenges of the sensors' memory, computational constraints, and limited energy, particle swarm optimization has been widely applied in the localization of wireless sensor networks, demonstrating better performance than other optimization methods. In particle swarm optimization-based localization algorithms, the variants and parameters should be chosen elaborately to achieve the best performance. However, there is a lack of guidance on how to choose these variants and parameters. Further, there is no comprehensive performance comparison among particle swarm optimization algorithms. The main contribution of this paper is three-fold. First, it surveys the popular particle swarm optimization variants and particle swarm optimization-based localization algorithms for wireless sensor networks. Secondly, it presents parameter selection of nine particle swarm optimization variants and six types of swarm topologies by extensive simulations. Thirdly, it comprehensively compares the performance of these algorithms. The results show that the particle swarm optimization with constriction coefficient using ring topology outperforms other variants and swarm topologies, and it performs better than the second-order cone programming algorithm.

  4. Information-Theoretic Performance Analysis of Sensor Networks via Markov Modeling of Time Series Data.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Yue; Jha, Devesh K; Ray, Asok; Wettergren, Thomas A; Yue Li; Jha, Devesh K; Ray, Asok; Wettergren, Thomas A; Wettergren, Thomas A; Li, Yue; Ray, Asok; Jha, Devesh K

    2018-06-01

    This paper presents information-theoretic performance analysis of passive sensor networks for detection of moving targets. The proposed method falls largely under the category of data-level information fusion in sensor networks. To this end, a measure of information contribution for sensors is formulated in a symbolic dynamics framework. The network information state is approximately represented as the largest principal component of the time series collected across the network. To quantify each sensor's contribution for generation of the information content, Markov machine models as well as x-Markov (pronounced as cross-Markov) machine models, conditioned on the network information state, are constructed; the difference between the conditional entropies of these machines is then treated as an approximate measure of information contribution by the respective sensors. The x-Markov models represent the conditional temporal statistics given the network information state. The proposed method has been validated on experimental data collected from a local area network of passive sensors for target detection, where the statistical characteristics of environmental disturbances are similar to those of the target signal in the sense of time scale and texture. A distinctive feature of the proposed algorithm is that the network decisions are independent of the behavior and identity of the individual sensors, which is desirable from computational perspectives. Results are presented to demonstrate the proposed method's efficacy to correctly identify the presence of a target with very low false-alarm rates. The performance of the underlying algorithm is compared with that of a recent data-driven, feature-level information fusion algorithm. It is shown that the proposed algorithm outperforms the other algorithm.

  5. A Study on the Performance of Low Cost MEMS Sensors in Strong Motion Studies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tanırcan, Gulum; Alçık, Hakan; Kaya, Yavuz; Beyen, Kemal

    2017-04-01

    Recent advances in sensors have helped the growth of local networks. In recent years, many Micro Electro Mechanical System (MEMS)-based accelerometers have been successfully used in seismology and earthquake engineering projects. This is basically due to the increased precision obtained in these downsized instruments. Moreover, they are cheaper alternatives to force-balance type accelerometers. In Turkey, though MEMS-based accelerometers have been used in various individual applications such as magnitude and location determination of earthquakes, structural health monitoring, earthquake early warning systems, MEMS-based strong motion networks are not currently available in other populated areas of the country. Motivation of this study comes from the fact that, if MEMS sensors are qualified to record strong motion parameters of large earthquakes, a dense network can be formed in an affordable price at highly populated areas. The goals of this study are 1) to test the performance of MEMS sensors, which are available in the inventory of the Institute through shake table tests, and 2) to setup a small scale network for observing online data transfer speed to a trusted in-house routine. In order to evaluate the suitability of sensors in strong motion related studies, MEMS sensors and a reference sensor are tested under excitations of sweeping waves as well as scaled earthquake recordings. Amplitude response and correlation coefficients versus frequencies are compared. As for earthquake recordings, comparisons are carried out in terms of strong motion(SM) parameters (PGA, PGV, AI, CAV) and elastic response of structures (Sa). Furthermore, this paper also focuses on sensitivity and selectivity for sensor performances in time-frequency domain to compare different sensing characteristics and analyzes the basic strong motion parameters that influence the design majors. Results show that the cheapest MEMS sensors under investigation are able to record the mid

  6. Quantum Hall Electron Nematics

    Science.gov (United States)

    MacDonald, Allan

    In 2D electron systems hosted by crystals with hexagonal symmetry, electron nematic phases with spontaneously broken C3 symmetry are expected to occur in the quantum Hall regime when triplets of Landau levels associated with three different Fermi surface pockets are partially filled. The broken symmetry state is driven by intravalley Coulombic exchange interactions that favor spontaneously polarized valley occupations. I will discuss three different examples of 2D electron systems in which this type of broken symmetry state is expected to occur: i) the SnTe (111) surface, ii) the Bi (111) surface. and iii) unbalanced bilayer graphene. This type of quantum Hall electron nematic state has so far been confirmed only in the Bi (111) case, in which the anisotropic quasiparticle wavefunctions of the broken symmetry state were directly imaged. In the SnTe case the nematic state phase boundary is controlled by a competition between intravalley Coulomb interactions and intervalley scattering processes that increase in relative strength with magnetic field. An in-plane Zeeman field alters the phase diagram by lifting the three-fold Landau level degeneracy, yielding a ground state energy with 2 π/3 periodicity as a function of Zeeman-field orientation angle. I will comment on the possibility of observing similar states in the absence of a magnetic field. Supported by DOE Division of Materials Sciences and Engineering Grant DE-FG03-02ER45958.

  7. The ISOLDE hall

    CERN Multimedia

    Maximilien Brice

    2002-01-01

    Since 1992, after its move from the 600 MeV SC, ISOLDE is a customer of the Booster (then 1 GeV, now 1.4 GeV). The intense Booster beam (some 3E13 protons per pulse) is directed onto a target, from which a mixture of isotopes emanates. After ionization and electrostatic acceleration to 60 keV, they enter one of the 2 spectrometers (General Purpose Separator: GPS, and High Resolution Separator: HRS) from which the selected ions are directed to the experiments. The photos show: the REX-ISOLDE post accelerator; the mini-ball experiment; an overview of the ISOLDE hall. In the picture (_12) of the hall, the separators are behind the wall. From either of them, beams can be directed into any of the many beamlines towards the experiments, some of which are visible in the foreground. The elevated cubicle at the left is EBIS (Electron Beam Ion Source), which acts as a charge-state multiplier for the REX facility. The ions are further mass analzyzed and passed on to the linac which accelerates them to higher energies. T...

  8. Performance Evaluation of Radiation Sensors for the Solar Energy Sector

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Laurent Vuilleumier

    2017-11-01

    Full Text Available Rotating Shadowband Irradiometers (RSI and SPN1 Sunshine Pyranometers allow determining the diffuse and direct components of solar radiation without sun trackers; they can be deployed in networks for continuous field operation with modest maintenance. Their performances are evaluated here by analyzing their errors with respect to well characterized references. The analysis is based on 1‑minute data recorded over a 15‑month period at the Payerne BSRN station in Switzerland. The analysis was applied both to the whole dataset and data subsets reflecting particular conditions to allow a better understanding of how instrument performance depends on such conditions.The overall performance for measuring global horizontal irradiance (GHI is satisfactory with deviations compatible with an expanded uncertainty of ±25 Wm−2 (±10 %. For diffuse horizontal irradiance (DfHI, RSIs exhibited errors on the order of ±20 Wm−2 (±13 % with some of them being affected by small systematic negative biases on the order of −5 Wm−2 (median. SPN1s underestimate DfHI by about −10 Wm−2 (median with a relatively large range of the expanded error distribution between −45 Wm−2 and 20 Wm−2 (−35 % to 13 %. For direct normal irradiance (DNI, the extended error range for RSIs is on the order of ±40 Wm−2 (±5–6 % with some instruments presenting no bias while others are affected by median biases up to −15 Wm−2. SPN1s exhibit a relatively large median bias of 40 Wm−2, and an extended range of the error distribution between −45 Wm−2 and 125 Wm−2 (−6 % to 19 %. Typical errors on the integrated yearly energy per unit surface area are on the order of a few percent or less (< 5 % for RSI with negligible errors on DNI for some RSI instruments. SPN1 integrated errors are negligible for GHI, but on the order of −8 % for DfHI, and between 9 % and 11 % for DNI.For RSIs, GHI and DfHI errors showed

  9. The Dream Comes True in the Golden Hall

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    JianZhong; ChenJianguo

    2004-01-01

    Nanjing Traditional Music Ensemble has long dreamed of performing in Vienna's Golden Hall.Now the dream has come true.the whole troupe felt so exciting that they did not even sleep well during the flight.

  10. A modified analytical model to study the sensing performance of a flexible capacitive tactile sensor array

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Liang, Guanhao; Wang, Yancheng; Mei, Deqing; Xi, Kailun; Chen, Zichen

    2015-01-01

    This paper presents a modified analytical model to study the sensing performance of a flexible capacitive tactile sensor array, which utilizes solid polydimethylsiloxane (PDMS) film as the dielectric layer. To predict the deformation of the sensing unit and capacitance changes, each sensing unit is simplified into a three-layer plate structure and divided into central, edge and corner regions. The plate structure and the three regions are studied by the general and modified models, respectively. For experimental validation, the capacitive tactile sensor array with 8  ×  8 (= 64) sensing units is fabricated. Experiments are conducted by measuring the capacitance changes versus applied external forces and compared with the general and modified models’ predictions. For the developed tactile sensor array, the sensitivity predicted by the modified analytical model is 1.25%/N, only 0.8% discrepancy from the experimental measurement. Results demonstrate that the modified analytical model can accurately predict the sensing performance of the sensor array and could be utilized for model-based optimal capacitive tactile sensor array design. (paper)

  11. Extraordinary Hall-effect in colloidal magnetic nanoparticle films

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ben Gur, Leah; Tirosh, Einat [School of Chemistry, Raymond and Beverly Sackler Faculty of Exact Sciences, Tel Aviv University, Tel Aviv 6997801 (Israel); Segal, Amir [School of Physics, Raymond and Beverly Sackler Faculty of Exact Sciences, Tel Aviv University, Tel Aviv 6997801 (Israel); Markovich, Gil, E-mail: gilmar@post.tau.ac.il [School of Chemistry, Raymond and Beverly Sackler Faculty of Exact Sciences, Tel Aviv University, Tel Aviv 6997801 (Israel); Gerber, Alexander, E-mail: gerber@post.tau.ac.il [School of Physics, Raymond and Beverly Sackler Faculty of Exact Sciences, Tel Aviv University, Tel Aviv 6997801 (Israel)

    2017-03-15

    Colloidal nickel nanoparticles (NPs) coated with polyvinylpyrrolidone (PVP) were synthesized. The nanoparticle dispersions were deposited on substrates and dried under mild heating to form conductive films. The films exhibited very small coercivity, nearly metallic conductivity, and a significant extraordinary Hall effect signal. This method could be useful for preparing simple, printed magnetic field sensors with the advantage of relatively high sensitivity around zero magnetic field, in contrast to magnetoresistive sensors, which have maximal field sensitivity away from zero magnetic field. - Highlights: • Ni nanoparticle ink capable of forming conductive films on drying. • The Ni nanoparticle films exhibit significant extraordinary Hall effect. • This system could be used for preparing printed magnetic field sensors integrated in 3D printed structures.

  12. Strategies for a better performance of RPL under mobility in wireless sensor networks

    Science.gov (United States)

    Latib, Z. A.; Jamil, A.; Alduais, N. A. M.; Abdullah, J.; Audah, L. H. M.; Alias, R.

    2017-09-01

    A Wireless Sensor Network (WSN) is usually stationary, which the network comprises of static nodes. The increase demand for mobility in various applications such as environmental monitoring, medical, home automation, and military, raises the question how IPv6 Routing Protocol for Low-Power and Lossy Networks (RPL) would perform under these mobility applications. This paper aims to understand performance of RPL and come out with strategies for a better performance of RPL in mobility scenarios. Because of this, this paper evaluates the performance of the RPL protocol under three different scenarios: sink and sensor nodes are static, static sink and mobile sensor nodes, and sink and sensor nodes are mobile. The network scenarios are implemented in Cooja simulator. A WSN consists of 25 sensor nodes and one sink node is configured in the simulation environment. The simulation is varied over different packet rates and ContikiMAC's Clear Channel Assessment (CCA) rate. As the performance metric, RPL is evaluated in term of packet delivery ratio (PDR), power consumption and packet rates. The simulation results show RPL provides a poor PDR in the mobility scenarios when compared to the static scenario. In addition, RPL consumes more power and increases duty-cycle rate to support mobility when compared to the static scenario. Based on the findings, we suggest three strategies for a better performance of RPL in mobility scenarios. First, RPL should operates at a lower packet rates when implemented in the mobility scenarios. Second, RPL should be implemented with a higher duty-cycle rate. Lastly, the sink node should be positioned as much as possible in the center of the mobile network.

  13. Cross Deployment Networking and Systematic Performance Analysis of Underwater Wireless Sensor Networks

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zhengxian Wei

    2017-07-01

    Full Text Available Underwater wireless sensor networks (UWSNs have become a new hot research area. However, due to the work dynamics and harsh ocean environment, how to obtain an UWSN with the best systematic performance while deploying as few sensor nodes as possible and setting up self-adaptive networking is an urgent problem that needs to be solved. Consequently, sensor deployment, networking, and performance calculation of UWSNs are challenging issues, hence the study in this paper centers on this topic and three relevant methods and models are put forward. Firstly, the normal body-centered cubic lattice to cross body-centered cubic lattice (CBCL has been improved, and a deployment process and topology generation method are built. Then most importantly, a cross deployment networking method (CDNM for UWSNs suitable for the underwater environment is proposed. Furthermore, a systematic quar-performance calculation model (SQPCM is proposed from an integrated perspective, in which the systematic performance of a UWSN includes coverage, connectivity, durability and rapid-reactivity. Besides, measurement models are established based on the relationship between systematic performance and influencing parameters. Finally, the influencing parameters are divided into three types, namely, constraint parameters, device performance and networking parameters. Based on these, a networking parameters adjustment method (NPAM for optimized systematic performance of UWSNs has been presented. The simulation results demonstrate that the approach proposed in this paper is feasible and efficient in networking and performance calculation of UWSNs.

  14. Sensor performance as a function of sampling (d) and optical blur (Fλ)

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bijl, P.; Hogervorst, M.A.

    2009-01-01

    Detector sampling and optical blur are two major factors affecting Target Acquisition (TA) performance with modern EO and IR systems. In order to quantify their relative significance, we simulated five realistic LWIR and MWIR sensors from very under-sampled (detector pitch d >> diffraction blur Fλ)

  15. Atmospheric refraction effects on optical-infrared sensor performance in a littoral-maritime environment

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Fritz, P.; Moerman, M.M.; Jong, A.N.; Leeuw, G. de; Winkel, H.

    2004-01-01

    During a number of transmission experiments over littoral waters, quantitative measurements of atmospheric refraction phenomena were carried out to determine the range performance of optical–IR sensors. Examples of distortion and intensity gain generated by spatial variations of the atmospheric

  16. [High-Performance Active Pixel X-Ray Sensors for X-Ray Astronomy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bautz, Mark; Suntharalingam, Vyshnavi

    2005-01-01

    The subject grants support development of High-Performance Active Pixel Sensors for X-ray Astronomy at the Massachusetts Institute of Technology (MIT) Center for Space Research and at MIT's Lincoln Laboratory. This memo reports our progress in the second year of the project, from April, 2004 through the present.

  17. Performance Evaluation of a Cluster-Based Service Discovery Protocol for Heterogeneous Wireless Sensor Networks

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Marin Perianu, Raluca; Scholten, Johan; Havinga, Paul J.M.; Hartel, Pieter H.

    2006-01-01

    Abstract—This paper evaluates the performance in terms of resource consumption of a service discovery protocol proposed for heterogeneous Wireless Sensor Networks (WSNs). The protocol is based on a clustering structure, which facilitates the construction of a distributed directory. Nodes with higher

  18. Energy consumption of sport halls

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1983-01-01

    The energy consumption of Finland's sports halls (ball games halls, ice hockey halls and swimming halls) represent approximately 1% of that of the country's whole building stock. In the light of the facts revealed by the energy study the potential energy saving rate in sports halls is 15-25%. The total savings would be something like FIM 30-40 million per annum, of which about a half would be achieved without energy-economic investments only by changing utilization habits and by automatic control measures. The energy-economic investments are for the most part connected with ventilation and their repayment period is from one to five years. On the basis of the energy study the following specific consumption are presented as target values: swimming halls: heat (kWh/m*H3/a)100, electricity (kWh/m*H3/a)35, water (l/m*H3/a)1000 icehockey halls (warm): heat (kWh/m*H3/a)25, electricity (kWh/m*H3/a)15, water (l/m*H3/a)200, ball games halls (multi-purpose halls): heat (kWh/m*H3/a)30, electricity (kWh/m*H3/a)25, water (l/m*H3/a)130. In the study the following points proved to be the central areas of energy saving in sports halls: 1. Flexible regulation of the temperature in sports spaces on the basis of the sport in question. 2. The ventilation of swimming halls should be adjusted in such a way that the humidity of the hall air would comply with the limit humidity curve determined by the quality of structures and the temperature of the outdoor air. 3. An ice skating hall is an establishment producing condensing energy from 8 to 9 months a year worth of approx. 100.000-150.000 Finnmarks. The development of the recovery of condensing energy has become more important. 4. The ventilation of ball games halls may account for over 50% of the energy consumption of the whole building. Therefore special attention should be paid to the optimatization of ventilation as a whole.

  19. Enhanced gas sensing performance of TiO2 functionalized magneto-optical SPR sensors

    OpenAIRE

    Manera, Maria Grazia; Montagna, G.; Ferreiro-Vila, Elías; González-García, Lola; Sánchez-Valencia, J.R.; González-Elipe, Agustín R.; Cebollada, Alfonso; García-Martín, José Miguel; García-Martín, Antonio; Armelles Reig, Gaspar; Rella, Roberto

    2011-01-01

    Porous TiO2 thin films deposited by glancing angle deposition are used as sensing layers to monitor their sensing capabilities towards Volatile Organic Compounds both in a standard Surface Plasmon Resonance (SPR) sensor and in Magneto-Optical Surface Plasmon Resonance (MO-SPR) configuration in order to compare their sensing performances. Here our results on the enhanced sensing capability of these TiO2 functionalized MO-SPR sensors with Au/Co/Au transducers with respect to traditional SPR gas...

  20. Electric Field Guided Assembly of One-Dimensional Nanostructures for High Performance Sensors

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wing Kam Liu

    2012-05-01

    Full Text Available Various nanowire or nanotube-based devices have been demonstrated to fulfill the anticipated future demands on sensors. To fabricate such devices, electric field-based methods have demonstrated a great potential to integrate one-dimensional nanostructures into various forms. This review paper discusses theoretical and experimental aspects of the working principles, the assembled structures, and the unique functions associated with electric field-based assembly. The challenges and opportunities of the assembly methods are addressed in conjunction with future directions toward high performance sensors.

  1. Modeling and Validation of Performance Limitations for the Optimal Design of Interferometric and Intensity-Modulated Fiber Optic Displacement Sensors

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Moro, Erik A. [Los Alamos National Laboratory

    2012-06-07

    -modulated interferometric sensor depends on an appropriate performance function (e.g., desired displacement range, accuracy, robustness, etc.). In this dissertation, the performance limitations of a bundled differential intensity-modulated displacement sensor are analyzed, where the bundling configuration has been designed to optimize performance. The performance limitations of a white light Fabry-Perot displacement sensor are also analyzed. Both these sensors are non-contacting, but they have access to different regions of the performance-space. Further, both these sensors have different degrees of sensitivity to experimental uncertainty. Made in conjunction with careful analysis, the decision of which sensor to deploy need not be an uninformed one.

  2. Performance of semiconductor radiation sensors for simple and low-cost radiation detector

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tanimura, Yoshihiko; Birumachi, Atsushi; Yoshida, Makoto; Watanabe, Tamaki

    2008-01-01

    In order to develop a simple but reliable radiation detector for the general public, photon detection performances of radiation sensors have been studied in photon calibration fields and by Monte Carlo simulations. A silicon p-i-n photodiode and a CdTe detector were selected for the low cost sensors. Their energy responses to ambient dose equivalent H * (10) were evaluated over the energy range from 60 keV to 2 MeV. The response of the CdTe decreases markedly with increasing photon energy. On the other hand, the photodiode has the advantage of almost flat response above 150 keV. The sensitivities of these sensors are 4 to 6 cpm for the natural radiation. Detection limits of the radiation level are low enough to know the extreme increase of radiation due to emergency situations of nuclear power plants, fuel treatment facilities and so on. (author)

  3. The Performance Analysis of AN Indoor Mobile Mapping System with Rgb-D Sensor

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tsai, G. J.; Chiang, K. W.; Chu, C. H.; Chen, Y. L.; El-Sheimy, N.; Habib, A.

    2015-08-01

    Over the years, Mobile Mapping Systems (MMSs) have been widely applied to urban mapping, path management and monitoring and cyber city, etc. The key concept of mobile mapping is based on positioning technology and photogrammetry. In order to achieve the integration, multi-sensor integrated mapping technology has clearly established. In recent years, the robotic technology has been rapidly developed. The other mapping technology that is on the basis of low-cost sensor has generally used in robotic system, it is known as the Simultaneous Localization and Mapping (SLAM). The objective of this study is developed a prototype of indoor MMS for mobile mapping applications, especially to reduce the costs and enhance the efficiency of data collection and validation of direct georeferenced (DG) performance. The proposed indoor MMS is composed of a tactical grade Inertial Measurement Unit (IMU), the Kinect RGB-D sensor and light detection, ranging (LIDAR) and robot. In summary, this paper designs the payload for indoor MMS to generate the floor plan. In first session, it concentrates on comparing the different positioning algorithms in the indoor environment. Next, the indoor plans are generated by two sensors, Kinect RGB-D sensor LIDAR on robot. Moreover, the generated floor plan will compare with the known plan for both validation and verification.

  4. THE PERFORMANCE ANALYSIS OF AN INDOOR MOBILE MAPPING SYSTEM WITH RGB-D SENSOR

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    G. J. Tsai

    2015-08-01

    Full Text Available Over the years, Mobile Mapping Systems (MMSs have been widely applied to urban mapping, path management and monitoring and cyber city, etc. The key concept of mobile mapping is based on positioning technology and photogrammetry. In order to achieve the integration, multi-sensor integrated mapping technology has clearly established. In recent years, the robotic technology has been rapidly developed. The other mapping technology that is on the basis of low-cost sensor has generally used in robotic system, it is known as the Simultaneous Localization and Mapping (SLAM. The objective of this study is developed a prototype of indoor MMS for mobile mapping applications, especially to reduce the costs and enhance the efficiency of data collection and validation of direct georeferenced (DG performance. The proposed indoor MMS is composed of a tactical grade Inertial Measurement Unit (IMU, the Kinect RGB-D sensor and light detection, ranging (LIDAR and robot. In summary, this paper designs the payload for indoor MMS to generate the floor plan. In first session, it concentrates on comparing the different positioning algorithms in the indoor environment. Next, the indoor plans are generated by two sensors, Kinect RGB-D sensor LIDAR on robot. Moreover, the generated floor plan will compare with the known plan for both validation and verification.

  5. Determination of intrinsic spin Hall angle in Pt

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wang, Yi; Deorani, Praveen; Qiu, Xuepeng; Kwon, Jae Hyun; Yang, Hyunsoo, E-mail: eleyang@nus.edu.sg [Department of Electrical and Computer Engineering, National University of Singapore, 117576 (Singapore)

    2014-10-13

    The spin Hall angle in Pt is evaluated in Pt/NiFe bilayers by spin torque ferromagnetic resonance measurements and is found to increase with increasing the NiFe thickness. To extract the intrinsic spin Hall angle in Pt by estimating the total spin current injected into NiFe from Pt, the NiFe thickness dependent measurements are performed and the spin diffusion in the NiFe layer is taken into account. The intrinsic spin Hall angle of Pt is determined to be 0.068 at room temperature and is found to be almost constant in the temperature range of 13–300 K.

  6. Determination of intrinsic spin Hall angle in Pt

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wang, Yi; Deorani, Praveen; Qiu, Xuepeng; Kwon, Jae Hyun; Yang, Hyunsoo

    2014-01-01

    The spin Hall angle in Pt is evaluated in Pt/NiFe bilayers by spin torque ferromagnetic resonance measurements and is found to increase with increasing the NiFe thickness. To extract the intrinsic spin Hall angle in Pt by estimating the total spin current injected into NiFe from Pt, the NiFe thickness dependent measurements are performed and the spin diffusion in the NiFe layer is taken into account. The intrinsic spin Hall angle of Pt is determined to be 0.068 at room temperature and is found to be almost constant in the temperature range of 13–300 K.

  7. On Hall current fluid

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Shen, M.C.; Ebel, D.

    1987-01-01

    In this paper some new results concerning magnetohydrodynamic (MHD) equations with the Hall current (HC) term in the Ohm's law are presented. For the cylindrical pinch of a compressible HC fluid, it is found that for large time and long wave length the solution to the governing equations exhibits the behavior of solitons as in the case of an ideal MHD model. In some special cases, the HC model appears to be better posed. An open question is whether a simple toroidal equilibrium of an HC fluid with resistivity and viscosity exists. The answer to this question is affirmative if the prescribed velocity on the boundary has a small norm. Furthermore, the equilibrium is also linearly and nonlinearly stable

  8. Farm Hall: The Play

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cassidy, David C.

    2013-03-01

    It's July 1945. Germany is in defeat and the atomic bombs are on their way to Japan. Under the direction of Samuel Goudsmit, the Allies are holding some of the top German nuclear scientists-among them Heisenberg, Hahn, and Gerlach-captive in Farm Hall, an English country manor near Cambridge, England. As secret microphones record their conversations, the scientists are unaware of why they are being held or for how long. Thinking themselves far ahead of the Allies, how will they react to the news of the atomic bombs? How will these famous scientists explain to themselves and to the world their failure to achieve even a chain reaction? How will they come to terms with the horror of the Third Reich, their work for such a regime, and their behavior during that period? This one-act play is based upon the transcripts of their conversations as well as the author's historical work on the subject.

  9. Quantum Hall effect

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Joynt, R.J.

    1982-01-01

    A general investigation of the electronic structure of two dimensional systems is undertaken with a view towards understanding the quantum Hall effect. The work is limited to the case of a strong perpendicular magnetic field, with a disordered potential and an externally applied electric field. The electrons are treated as noninteracting. First, the scattering theory of the system is worked out. The surprising result is found that a wavepacket will reform after scattering from an isolated potential. Also it will tend to be accelerated in the neighborhood of the scatterer if the potential has bound states. Fredholm theory can then be used to show that the extended states carry an additional current which compensates for the zero current of the bound states. Together, these give the quantized conductance. The complementary case of a smooth random potential is treated by a path-integral approach which exploits the analogies to the classical equations of motion. The Green's function can be calculated approximately, which gives the general character of both the bound and extended states. Also the ratio of these two types of states can be computed for a given potential. The charge density is uniform in first approximation, and the Hall conductance is quantized. Higher-order corrections for more rapidly fluctuating potential are calculated. The most general conditions under which the conductance is quantized are discussed. Because of the peculiar scattering properties of the system, numerical solution of the Schroedinger equation is of interest, both to confirm the analytical results, and for pedagogical reasons. The stability and convergence problems inherent in the computer solution of the problem are analyzed. Results for some model scattering potentials are presented

  10. Hall current effects in dynamic magnetic reconnection solutions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Craig, I.J.D.; Heerikhuisen, J.; Watson, P.G.

    2003-01-01

    The impact of Hall current contributions on flow driven planar magnetic merging solutions is discussed. The Hall current is important if the dimensionless Hall parameter (or normalized ion skin depth) satisfies c H >η, where η is the inverse Lundquist number for the plasma. A dynamic analysis of the problem shows, however, that the Hall current initially manifests itself, not by modifying the planar reconnection field, but by inducing a non-reconnecting perpendicular 'separator' component in the magnetic field. Only if the stronger condition c H 2 >η is satisfied can Hall currents be expected to affect the planar merging. These analytic predictions are then tested by performing a series of numerical experiments in periodic geometry, using the full system of planar magnetohydrodynamic (MHD) equations. The numerical results confirm that the nature of the merging changes dramatically when the Hall coupling satisfies c H 2 >η. In line with the analytic treatment of sheared reconnection, the coupling provided by the Hall term leads to the emergence of multiple current layers that can enhance the global Ohmic dissipation at the expense of the reconnection rate. However, the details of the dissipation depend critically on the symmetries of the simulation, and when the merging is 'head-on' (i.e., comprises fourfold symmetry) the reconnection rate can be enhanced

  11. Graphene and the universality of the quantum Hall effect

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Tzalenchuk, A.; Janssen, T. J.B.M.; Kazakova, O.

    2013-01-01

    The quantum Hall effect allows the standard for resistance to be defined in terms of the elementary charge and Planck's constant alone. The effect comprises the quantization of the Hall resistance in two-dimensional electron systems in rational fractions of RK=h/e2=25812.8074434(84) Ω (Mohr P. J....... the unconventional quantum Hall effect and then present in detail the route, which led to the most precise quantum Hall resistance universality test ever performed.......The quantum Hall effect allows the standard for resistance to be defined in terms of the elementary charge and Planck's constant alone. The effect comprises the quantization of the Hall resistance in two-dimensional electron systems in rational fractions of RK=h/e2=25812.8074434(84) Ω (Mohr P. J....... et al., Rev. Mod. Phys., 84 (2012) 1527), the resistance quantum. Despite 30 years of research into the quantum Hall effect, the level of precision necessary for metrology, a few parts per billion, has been achieved only in silicon and III-V heterostructure devices. In this lecture we show...

  12. Performance Evaluation of Fabry-Perot Temperature Sensors in Nuclear Power Plant Measurements

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Liu Hanying; Miller, Don W.; Talnagi, Joseph W.

    2003-01-01

    The Fiso Fabry-Perot fiber-optic temperature sensor was selected for performance evaluation and for potential application in nuclear power plants because of its unique interferometric sensing mechanism and data-processing technique, and its commercial availability. It employs a Fizeau interferometer and a charge-coupled device array to locate the position of the maximum interference fringe intensity, which is directly related to the environmental temperature. Consequently, the basic sensing mechanism is independent of the absolute transmitted light intensity, which is the most likely parameter to be affected by external harsh environments such as nuclear irradiation, high pressure/temperature, and cyclical vibration.This paper reports research on the performance of two Fiso Fabry-Perot temperature sensors in environmental conditions expected in nuclear power plants during both normal and abnormal (i.e., accident) conditions. The environmental conditions simulated in this paper include gamma-only ( 60 Co) irradiation, pressure/temperature environmental transient, and mixed neutron/gamma field, respectively.The first sensor exhibited no failure or degradation in performance during and following gamma-only irradiation in which a total dose of 15 kGy was delivered at a dose rate of 2.5 kGy/h. Following gamma irradiation, this sensor was then tested for 10.75 days in a thermohydraulic environment prescribed by the Institute of Electrical and Electronics Engineers IEEE323-1983. Intermittent behavior was observed throughout the latter portions of this test, and degradation in performance occurred after the test. Visual evaluation after opening the sensor head indicated that the internal welding methodology was the primary contributor to the observed behavior during this test. Further consultation with the vendor shows that the robustness and reliability of Fiso sensors can be substantially improved by modifying the internal welding methods.The second Fiso temperature

  13. Hall Effect Gyrators and Circulators

    Science.gov (United States)

    Viola, Giovanni; DiVincenzo, David P.

    2014-04-01

    The electronic circulator and its close relative the gyrator are invaluable tools for noise management and signal routing in the current generation of low-temperature microwave systems for the implementation of new quantum technologies. The current implementation of these devices using the Faraday effect is satisfactory but requires a bulky structure whose physical dimension is close to the microwave wavelength employed. The Hall effect is an alternative nonreciprocal effect that can also be used to produce desired device functionality. We review earlier efforts to use an Ohmically contacted four-terminal Hall bar, explaining why this approach leads to unacceptably high device loss. We find that capacitive coupling to such a Hall conductor has much greater promise for achieving good circulator and gyrator functionality. We formulate a classical Ohm-Hall analysis for calculating the properties of such a device, and show how this classical theory simplifies remarkably in the limiting case of the Hall angle approaching 90°. In this limit, we find that either a four-terminal or a three-terminal capacitive device can give excellent circulator behavior, with device dimensions far smaller than the ac wavelength. An experiment is proposed to achieve GHz-band gyration in millimeter (and smaller) scale structures employing either semiconductor heterostructure or graphene Hall conductors. An inductively coupled scheme for realizing a Hall gyrator is also analyzed.

  14. Energy Efficient Clustering Protocol to Enhance Performance of Heterogeneous Wireless Sensor Network: EECPEP-HWSN

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Santosh V. Purkar

    2018-01-01

    Full Text Available Heterogeneous wireless sensor network (HWSN fulfills the requirements of researchers in the design of real life application to resolve the issues of unattended problem. But, the main constraint faced by researchers is the energy source available with sensor nodes. To prolong the life of sensor nodes and thus HWSN, it is necessary to design energy efficient operational schemes. One of the most suitable approaches to enhance energy efficiency is the clustering scheme, which enhances the performance parameters of WSN. A novel solution proposed in this article is to design an energy efficient clustering protocol for HWSN, to enhance performance parameters by EECPEP-HWSN. The proposed protocol is designed with three level nodes namely normal, advanced, and super, respectively. In the clustering process, for selection of cluster head we consider different parameters available with sensor nodes at run time that is, initial energy, hop count, and residual energy. This protocol enhances the energy efficiency of HWSN and hence improves energy remaining in the network, stability, lifetime, and hence throughput. It has been found that the proposed protocol outperforms than existing well-known LEACH, DEEC, and SEP with about 188, 150, and 141 percent respectively.

  15. Performance of light sources and radiation sensors under low gravity realized by parabolic airplane flights

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hirai, Hiroaki; Kitaya, Yoshiaki; Hirai, Takehiro

    A fundamental study was conducted to establish an experimental system for space farming. Since to ensure optimal light for plant cultivation in space is of grave importance, this study examined the performance of light sources and radiation sensors under microgravity conditions created during the parabolic airplane flight. Three kinds of light sources, a halogen bulb, a fluorescent tube, and blue and red LEDs, and ten models of radiation sensors available in the market were used for the experiment. Surface temperature of the light sources, output signals from the radiation sensors, spectroscopic characteristics were measured at the gravity levels of 0.01, 1.0 and 1.8 G for 20 seconds each during parabolic airplane flights. As a result, the performance of the halogen lamp was affected the most by the gravity level among the three light sources. Under the microgravity conditions which do not raise heat convection, the temperature of the halogen lamp rose and the output of the radiation sensors increased. Spectral distributions of the halogen lamp indicated that peak wavelength appeared the highest at the level of 0.01G, which contributed to the increase in light intensity. In the case of red and blue LEDs, which are promising light sources in space farming, the temperature of both LED chips rose but irradiance from red LED increased and that from blue LED decreased under microgravity conditions due to the different thermal characteristics.

  16. Parameter Selection and Performance Comparison of Particle Swarm Optimization in Sensor Networks Localization

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Huanqing Cui

    2017-03-01

    Full Text Available Localization is a key technology in wireless sensor networks. Faced with the challenges of the sensors’ memory, computational constraints, and limited energy, particle swarm optimization has been widely applied in the localization of wireless sensor networks, demonstrating better performance than other optimization methods. In particle swarm optimization-based localization algorithms, the variants and parameters should be chosen elaborately to achieve the best performance. However, there is a lack of guidance on how to choose these variants and parameters. Further, there is no comprehensive performance comparison among particle swarm optimization algorithms. The main contribution of this paper is three-fold. First, it surveys the popular particle swarm optimization variants and particle swarm optimization-based localization algorithms for wireless sensor networks. Secondly, it presents parameter selection of nine particle swarm optimization variants and six types of swarm topologies by extensive simulations. Thirdly, it comprehensively compares the performance of these algorithms. The results show that the particle swarm optimization with constriction coefficient using ring topology outperforms other variants and swarm topologies, and it performs better than the second-order cone programming algorithm.

  17. A software package for evaluating the performance of a star sensor operation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sarpotdar, Mayuresh; Mathew, Joice; Sreejith, A. G.; Nirmal, K.; Ambily, S.; Prakash, Ajin; Safonova, Margarita; Murthy, Jayant

    2017-02-01

    We have developed a low-cost off-the-shelf component star sensor ( StarSense) for use in minisatellites and CubeSats to determine the attitude of a satellite in orbit. StarSense is an imaging camera with a limiting magnitude of 6.5, which extracts information from star patterns it records in the images. The star sensor implements a centroiding algorithm to find centroids of the stars in the image, a Geometric Voting algorithm for star pattern identification, and a QUEST algorithm for attitude quaternion calculation. Here, we describe the software package to evaluate the performance of these algorithms as a star sensor single operating system. We simulate the ideal case where sky background and instrument errors are omitted, and a more realistic case where noise and camera parameters are added to the simulated images. We evaluate such performance parameters of the algorithms as attitude accuracy, calculation time, required memory, star catalog size, sky coverage, etc., and estimate the errors introduced by each algorithm. This software package is written for use in MATLAB. The testing is parametrized for different hardware parameters, such as the focal length of the imaging setup, the field of view (FOV) of the camera, angle measurement accuracy, distortion effects, etc., and therefore, can be applied to evaluate the performance of such algorithms in any star sensor. For its hardware implementation on our StarSense, we are currently porting the codes in form of functions written in C. This is done keeping in view its easy implementation on any star sensor electronics hardware.

  18. Sensor Performance Requirements for the Retrieval of Atmospheric Aerosols by Airborne Optical Remote Sensing

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Klaus I. Itten

    2008-03-01

    Full Text Available This study explores performance requirements for the retrieval of the atmospheric aerosol optical depth (AOD by airborne optical remote sensing instruments. Independent of any retrieval techniques, the calculated AOD retrieval requirements are compared with the expected performance parameters of the upcoming hyperspectral sensor APEX at the reference wavelength of 550nm. The AOD accuracy requirements are defined to be capable of resolving transmittance differences of 0.01 to 0.04 according to the demands of atmospheric corrections for remote sensing applications. For the purposes of this analysis, the signal at the sensor level is simulated by radiation transfer equations. The resulting radiances are translated into the AOD retrieval sensitivity (Δτλaer and compared to the available measuring sensitivity of the sensor (NE ΔLλsensor. This is done for multiple signal-to-noise ratios (SNR and surface reflectance values. It is shown that an SNR of 100 is adequate for AOD retrieval at 550nm under typical remote sensing conditions and a surface reflectance of 10% or less. Such dark surfaces require the lowest SNR values and therefore offer the best sensitivity for measuring AOD. Brighter surfaces with up to 30% reflectance require an SNR of around 300. It is shown that AOD retrieval for targets above 50% surface reflectance is more problematic with the current sensor performance as it may require an SNR larger than 1000. In general, feasibility is proven for the analyzed cases under simulated conditions.

  19. Topological Hall and spin Hall effects in disordered skyrmionic textures

    KAUST Repository

    Ndiaye, Papa Birame; Akosa, Collins Ashu; Manchon, Aurelien

    2017-01-01

    We carry out a thorough study of the topological Hall and topological spin Hall effects in disordered skyrmionic systems: the dimensionless (spin) Hall angles are evaluated across the energy-band structure in the multiprobe Landauer-Büttiker formalism and their link to the effective magnetic field emerging from the real-space topology of the spin texture is highlighted. We discuss these results for an optimal skyrmion size and for various sizes of the sample and find that the adiabatic approximation still holds for large skyrmions as well as for nanoskyrmions. Finally, we test the robustness of the topological signals against disorder strength and show that the topological Hall effect is highly sensitive to momentum scattering.

  20. Topological Hall and spin Hall effects in disordered skyrmionic textures

    KAUST Repository

    Ndiaye, Papa Birame

    2017-02-24

    We carry out a thorough study of the topological Hall and topological spin Hall effects in disordered skyrmionic systems: the dimensionless (spin) Hall angles are evaluated across the energy-band structure in the multiprobe Landauer-Büttiker formalism and their link to the effective magnetic field emerging from the real-space topology of the spin texture is highlighted. We discuss these results for an optimal skyrmion size and for various sizes of the sample and find that the adiabatic approximation still holds for large skyrmions as well as for nanoskyrmions. Finally, we test the robustness of the topological signals against disorder strength and show that the topological Hall effect is highly sensitive to momentum scattering.

  1. Tuning giant anomalous Hall resistance ratio in perpendicular Hall balance

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zhang, J. Y.; Yang, G. [Department of Materials Physics and Chemistry, University of Science and Technology Beijing, Beijing 100083 (China); State Key Laboratory of Magnetism, Beijing National Laboratory for Condensed Matter Physics, Institute of Physics, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Beijing 100190 (China); Wang, S. G., E-mail: sgwang@iphy.ac.cn, E-mail: ghyu@mater.ustb.edu.cn [State Key Laboratory of Magnetism, Beijing National Laboratory for Condensed Matter Physics, Institute of Physics, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Beijing 100190 (China); Liu, J. L. [State Key Laboratory of Magnetism, Beijing National Laboratory for Condensed Matter Physics, Institute of Physics, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Beijing 100190 (China); Department of Physics, Beijing University of Aeronautics and Astronautics, Beijing 100191 (China); Wang, R. M. [Department of Physics, Beijing University of Aeronautics and Astronautics, Beijing 100191 (China); Amsellem, E.; Kohn, A. [Department of Materials Engineering, Ilse Katz Institute for Nanoscale Science and Technology, Ben-Gurion University of the Negev, Beer-Sheva 84105 (Israel); Yu, G. H., E-mail: sgwang@iphy.ac.cn, E-mail: ghyu@mater.ustb.edu.cn [Department of Materials Physics and Chemistry, University of Science and Technology Beijing, Beijing 100083 (China)

    2015-04-13

    Anomalous Hall effect at room temperature in perpendicular Hall balance with a core structure of [Pt/Co]{sub 4}/NiO/[Co/Pt]{sub 4} has been tuned by functional CoO layers, where [Pt/Co]{sub 4} multilayers exhibit perpendicular magnetic anisotropy. A giant Hall resistance ratio up to 69 900% and saturation Hall resistance (R{sub S}{sup P}) up to 2590 mΩ were obtained in CoO/[Pt/Co]{sub 4}/NiO/[Co/Pt]{sub 4}/CoO system, which is 302% and 146% larger than that in the structure without CoO layers, respectively. Transmission electron microscopy shows highly textured [Co/Pt]{sub 4} multilayers and oxide layers with local epitaxial relations, indicating that the crystallographic structure has significant influence on spin dependent transport properties.

  2. Highly curved image sensors: a practical approach for improved optical performance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guenter, Brian; Joshi, Neel; Stoakley, Richard; Keefe, Andrew; Geary, Kevin; Freeman, Ryan; Hundley, Jake; Patterson, Pamela; Hammon, David; Herrera, Guillermo; Sherman, Elena; Nowak, Andrew; Schubert, Randall; Brewer, Peter; Yang, Louis; Mott, Russell; McKnight, Geoff

    2017-06-12

    The significant optical and size benefits of using a curved focal surface for imaging systems have been well studied yet never brought to market for lack of a high-quality, mass-producible, curved image sensor. In this work we demonstrate that commercial silicon CMOS image sensors can be thinned and formed into accurate, highly curved optical surfaces with undiminished functionality. Our key development is a pneumatic forming process that avoids rigid mechanical constraints and suppresses wrinkling instabilities. A combination of forming-mold design, pressure membrane elastic properties, and controlled friction forces enables us to gradually contact the die at the corners and smoothly press the sensor into a spherical shape. Allowing the die to slide into the concave target shape enables a threefold increase in the spherical curvature over prior approaches having mechanical constraints that resist deformation, and create a high-stress, stretch-dominated state. Our process creates a bridge between the high precision and low-cost but planar CMOS process, and ideal non-planar component shapes such as spherical imagers for improved optical systems. We demonstrate these curved sensors in prototype cameras with custom lenses, measuring exceptional resolution of 3220 line-widths per picture height at an aperture of f/1.2 and nearly 100% relative illumination across the field. Though we use a 1/2.3" format image sensor in this report, we also show this process is generally compatible with many state of the art imaging sensor formats. By example, we report photogrammetry test data for an APS-C sized silicon die formed to a 30° subtended spherical angle. These gains in sharpness and relative illumination enable a new generation of ultra-high performance, manufacturable, digital imaging systems for scientific, industrial, and artistic use.

  3. A Performance Study of LEACH and Direct Diffusion Routing Protocols in Wireless Sensor Network

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fakher, S.; Sharshar, K.; Moawad, M.I.; Shokair, M.

    2016-01-01

    The Wireless Sensor Network (WSN) is composed of a large number of sensor nodes with limited computation communication, and battery facilities. One of the common applications of this network is environment monitoring through sensing motion, measuring temperature, humidity and radiation. One of the basic activities in WSN is data gathering which represents a great challenge. Many routing protocols are proposed for that network to collect and aggregate the data. The most popular ones are hierarchy and data centric routing protocols. The main goal of this study is to identify the most preferable routing protocol, to be used in each mobility model. This paper studies the performance of LEACH (Low Energy Adaptive Clustering Hierarchy) from hierarchy routing protocol and direct diffusion from data centric routing protocol which is not clarified until now. Moreover, a comparison between LEACH and direct diffusion protocol using NS2 simulator will be made, and an analysis of these protocols will be conducted. The comparison includes packet delivery ratio, throughput, average energy ratio, average delay, network lifetime, and routing overhead. The performance is evaluated by varying the number of sensor nodes under three mobility models Reference Point Group Mobility Model (RPGM), Manhattan and random waypoint mobility model. Simulation results show that LEACH routing protocol has a good performance in RPGM and Manhattan than random waypoint mobility model. Direct diffusion has a good performance in random waypoint mobility model than in RPGM and Manhattan mobility model

  4. Problems of radiation protection and their solution in afterloading therapy performed in a X-ray deep therapy chamber of the Radiological Clinic of the Martin-Luther-University Halle

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rauh, G.

    1982-01-01

    The Radiological Clinic of the Martin-Luther-University Halle got the first afterloading therapy unit DECATRON in December 1973. After preceding physical measurements the first patient was irradiated in August 1974. At this time there was no experience with the afterloading therapy in the GDR. The afterloading therapy was performed in a former X-ray deep therapy chamber. The occuring problems of radiation protection are considered and the ways of solution are described. Radiation protection calculations were carried out, values of local dose measurements are given, interpreted and compared with the values of personal dosimetry. Also the terms 'incorporated activity' and 'threading out activity' ('effective activity') are discussed, which led to differences in dose measurements formerly. The special situation required to discuss radiation protection problems of X-ray deep therapy simultaneously. (author)

  5. Anomalous Hall effect

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nagaosa, Naoto; Sinova, Jairo; Onoda, Shigeki; MacDonald, A. H.; Ong, N. P.

    2010-04-01

    The anomalous Hall effect (AHE) occurs in solids with broken time-reversal symmetry, typically in a ferromagnetic phase, as a consequence of spin-orbit coupling. Experimental and theoretical studies of the AHE are reviewed, focusing on recent developments that have provided a more complete framework for understanding this subtle phenomenon and have, in many instances, replaced controversy by clarity. Synergy between experimental and theoretical works, both playing a crucial role, has been at the heart of these advances. On the theoretical front, the adoption of the Berry-phase concepts has established a link between the AHE and the topological nature of the Hall currents. On the experimental front, new experimental studies of the AHE in transition metals, transition-metal oxides, spinels, pyrochlores, and metallic dilute magnetic semiconductors have established systematic trends. These two developments, in concert with first-principles electronic structure calculations, strongly favor the dominance of an intrinsic Berry-phase-related AHE mechanism in metallic ferromagnets with moderate conductivity. The intrinsic AHE can be expressed in terms of the Berry-phase curvatures and it is therefore an intrinsic quantum-mechanical property of a perfect crystal. An extrinsic mechanism, skew scattering from disorder, tends to dominate the AHE in highly conductive ferromagnets. The full modern semiclassical treatment of the AHE is reviewed which incorporates an anomalous contribution to wave-packet group velocity due to momentum-space Berry curvatures and correctly combines the roles of intrinsic and extrinsic (skew-scattering and side-jump) scattering-related mechanisms. In addition, more rigorous quantum-mechanical treatments based on the Kubo and Keldysh formalisms are reviewed, taking into account multiband effects, and demonstrate the equivalence of all three linear response theories in the metallic regime. Building on results from recent experiment and theory, a

  6. Gauge invariance and fractional quantized Hall effect

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tao, R.; Wu, Y.S.

    1984-01-01

    It is shown that gauge invariance arguments imply the possibility of fractional quantized Hall effect; the Hall conductance is accurately quantized to a rational value. The ground state of a system showing the fractional quantized Hall effect must be degenerate; the non-degenerate ground state can only produce the integral quantized Hall effect. 12 references

  7. Impact of Physical Deformation on Electrical Performance of Paper-Based Sensors

    KAUST Repository

    Nassar, Joanna M.

    2017-01-23

    We report on investigation of the mechanical properties of paper electronics (printed and made out of paper). One key objective of such paper electronics is to achieve ultraflexibility. Therefore, it is important to understand electrical functionality and reliability of paper electronics under various physical (mechanical) deformations. Here, we show the general mechanical properties of the cellulose paper used and its electrical behavior under applied strain, tackling the main effects that need to be identified when building paper-based systems, from product performance and stability perspective. An overview of the stress-strain behavior of silver ink on paper is discussed, and then, we tackle a more specific analysis of the performance variations of paper sensors made with recyclable household materials when exposed to various mechanical conditions of tensile and compressive bending. This paper is important for developing stable wearable sensors for incorporation into Internet of Everything applications.

  8. Development and Performance Verification of Fiber Optic Temperature Sensors in High Temperature Engine Environments

    Science.gov (United States)

    Adamovsky, Grigory; Mackey, Jeffrey R.; Kren, Lawrence A.; Floyd, Bertram M.; Elam, Kristie A.; Martinez, Martel

    2014-01-01

    A High Temperature Fiber Optic Sensor (HTFOS) has been developed at NASA Glenn Research Center for aircraft engine applications. After fabrication and preliminary in-house performance evaluation, the HTFOS was tested in an engine environment at NASA Armstrong Flight Research Center. The engine tests enabled the performance of the HTFOS in real engine environments to be evaluated along with the ability of the sensor to respond to changes in the engine's operating condition. Data were collected prior, during, and after each test in order to observe the change in temperature from ambient to each of the various test point levels. An adequate amount of data was collected and analyzed to satisfy the research team that HTFOS operates properly while the engine was running. Temperature measurements made by HTFOS while the engine was running agreed with those anticipated.

  9. Performance Evaluation of an Indoor Positioning Scheme Using Infrared Motion Sensors

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Changqiang Jing

    2014-10-01

    Full Text Available Internet of Things (IoT for Smart Environments (SE is a new scenario that collects useful information and provides convenient services to humans via sensing and wireless communications. Infra-Red (IR motion sensors have recently been widely used for indoor lighting because they allow the system to detect whether a human is inside or outside the sensors’ range. In this paper, the performance of a position estimation scheme based on IR motion sensor is evaluated in an indoor SE. The experimental results show that we can track the dynamic position of a pedestrian in straight moving model as well as two dimensional models. Experimental results also show that higher performance in accuracy and dynamic tracking in real indoor environment can be achieved without other devices.

  10. "Hall mees" Linnateatris / Triin Sinissaar

    Index Scriptorium Estoniae

    Sinissaar, Triin

    1999-01-01

    Tallinn Linnateatri ja Raadioteatri ühislavastus "Hall mees" Gill Adamsi näidendi järgi, lavastaja Eero Spriit, osades Helene Vannari ja Väino Laes, kunstnik Kustav - Agu Püüman. Esietendus 22. okt

  11. Performance, Calibration and Stability of the Mars InSight Mission Pressure Sensor

    Science.gov (United States)

    Banfield, Don; Banerdt, Bruce; Hurst, Ken; Grinblat, Jonny; murray, alex; Carpenter, Scott

    2017-10-01

    The NASA Mars InSight Discovery Mission is primarily aimed at understanding the seismic environment at Mars and in turn the interior structure of the planet. To this end, it carries a set of very sensitive seismometers to characterize fine ground movements from quakes, impacts and tides. However, to remove atmospheric perturbations that would otherwise corrupt the seismic signals, InSight also carries a pressure sensor of unprecedented sensitivity and frequency response for a Mars mission.The instrument is based on a commercial spacecraft pressure sensor built by the Tavis Corporation. Tavis heritage transducers have provided pressure measurements on several interplanetary missions, starting with a similar application on the Viking Landers. The sensor developed for the Insight mission is their most sensitive device. That same sensitivity was the root of the challenges faced in the design and development for Insight. It uses inductive sensing of a deformable membrane, and includes an internal temperature sensor to compensate for temperature effects in its overall response.The technical requirement on the pressure sensor performance is 0.01(f/0.1)^(-2/3) Pa/sqrt(Hz) between 0.01 and 0.1 Hz, and 0.01 Pa/sqrt(Hz) between 0.1 and 1 Hz. The actual noise spectrum is about 0.01(f/0.3)^(-2/3) Pa/sqrt(Hz) between 0.01 and 1 Hz, and its frequency response (including inlet plumbing) has good response up to about 10 Hz Nyquist (it will be sampled at 20 Hz).Achieving the required sensitivity proved to be a difficult engineering challenge, which necessitated extensive experimentation and prototyping of the electronics design. In addition, a late discovery of the introduction of noise by the signal processing chain into the measurement stream forced a last-minute change in the instrument’s firmware.The flight unit has been calibrated twice, separated by a time span of about 2 years due to the delay in launching the InSight mission. This has the benefit of allowing a direct

  12. Preparation of a Highly Conductive Seed Layer for Calcium Sensor Fabrication with Enhanced Sensing Performance

    KAUST Repository

    Ahmad, Rafiq

    2018-03-16

    The seed layer plays a crucial role in achieving high electrical conductivity and ensuring higher performance of devices. In this study, we report fabrication of a solution-gated field-effect transistor (FET) sensor based on zinc oxide nanorods (ZnO NRs) modified iron oxide nanoparticles (α-FeO NPs) grown on a highly conductive sandwich-like seed layer (ZnO seed layer/Ag nanowires/ZnO seed layer). The sandwich-like seed layer and ZnO NRs modification with α-FeO NPs provide excellent conductivity and prevent possible ZnO NRs surface damage from low pH enzyme immobilization, respectively. The highly conductive solution-gated FET sensor employed the calmodulin (CaM) immobilization on the surface of α-FeO-ZnO NRs for selective detection of calcium ions (Ca). The solution-gated FET sensor exhibited a substantial change in conductance upon introduction of different concentrations of Ca and showed high sensitivity (416.8 μA cm mM) and wide linear range (0.01-3.0 mM). In addition, the total Ca concentration in water and serum samples was also measured. Compared to the analytically obtained data, our sensor was found to measure Ca in the water and serum samples accurately, suggesting a potential alternative for Ca determination in water and serum samples, specifically used for drinking/irrigation and clinical analysis.

  13. Comparative Performance of PLZT and PVDF Pyroelectric Sensors Used to the Thermal Characterization of Liquid Samples

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gemima Lara Hernandez

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Among the photothermal methods, the photopyroelectric (PPE technique is a suitable method to determine thermal properties of different kinds of samples ranging from solids to liquids and gases. Polyvinylidene difluoride (PVDF is one of the most frequently used pyroelectric sensors in PPE technique but has the disadvantage that it can be easily deformed by the sample weight. This deformation could add a piezoelectric effect to the thermal parameters assessment; also PVDF has a narrow temperature operation range when compared with ceramic pyroelectric sensors. In order to minimize possible piezoelectric effects due to sensor deformation, a ceramic of lanthanum modified lead zirconate (PLZT was used as pyroelectric sensor in the PPE technique. Then, thermal diffusivity of some liquid samples was measured, by using the PPE configuration that denominated the thermal wave resonator cavity (TWRC, with a PLZT ceramic as pyroelectric detector. The performance obtained with the proposed ceramic in the TWRC configuration was compared with that obtained with PVDF by using the same configuration.

  14. The performance of a fiber optic displacement sensor for different types of probes and targets

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yasin, M; Harun, S W; Abdul-Rashid, H A; Kusminarto; Karyono; Ahmad, H

    2008-01-01

    A simple fiber optic displacement sensor is presented using a multimode plastic bundled fiber and the intensity modulation technique. The performance of the sensor is compared for different types of probes and targets. The probe with the largest receiving core diameter demonstrates the highest linearity range, and increasing the number of receiving cores increases the sensitivity of the sensor. With a stainless steel target and the concentric bundled fiber with 16 receiving fibers as a probe, the sensitivity of the sensor is found to be 0.0220 mV/μm over 150 to 550 μm range and – 0.0061 mV/μm over 1100 to 2000 μm range. The target with a higher reflectivity shows a higher sensitivity. The linearity range for the front slope is almost similar for all targets tested. However, for the back slope, lower reflectivity objects have a relatively higher linearity range with the highest range of 1600 μm being obtained using plastic and aluminum targets. The simplicity of the design, high degree of sensitivity, dynamic range, non-contact measurement and low cost of the fabrication make it suitable for applications in industries for position control and micro displacement measurement in the hazardous regions

  15. Progress in sensor performance testing, modeling and range prediction using the TOD method: an overview

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bijl, Piet; Hogervorst, Maarten A.; Toet, Alexander

    2017-05-01

    The Triangle Orientation Discrimination (TOD) methodology includes i) a widely applicable, accurate end-to-end EO/IR sensor test, ii) an image-based sensor system model and iii) a Target Acquisition (TA) range model. The method has been extensively validated against TA field performance for a wide variety of well- and under-sampled imagers, systems with advanced image processing techniques such as dynamic super resolution and local adaptive contrast enhancement, and sensors showing smear or noise drift, for both static and dynamic test stimuli and as a function of target contrast. Recently, significant progress has been made in various directions. Dedicated visual and NIR test charts for lab and field testing are available and thermal test benches are on the market. Automated sensor testing using an objective synthetic human observer is within reach. Both an analytical and an image-based TOD model have recently been developed and are being implemented in the European Target Acquisition model ECOMOS and in the EOSTAR TDA. Further, the methodology is being applied for design optimization of high-end security camera systems. Finally, results from a recent perception study suggest that DRI ranges for real targets can be predicted by replacing the relevant distinctive target features by TOD test patterns of the same characteristic size and contrast, enabling a new TA modeling approach. This paper provides an overview.

  16. Performance Analysis of a Noncontact Plastic Fiber Optical Fiber Displacement Sensor with Compensation of Target Reflectivity

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Daniele Tosi

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available An inexpensive fiber-based noncontact distance sensor specific for monitoring short-range displacements in micromachining applications is presented. To keep the overall costs low, the sensor uses plastic optical fibers and an intensiometric approach based on the received light intensity after the reflection from the target whose displacement has to be measured. A suitable target reflectivity compensation technique is implemented to mitigate the effects due to target surface nonuniformity or ageing. The performances of the sensor are first evaluated for different fiber configurations and target reflectivity profiles and positions using a numerical method based on Monte Carlo simulations. Then, experimental validations on a configuration designed to work up to 1.5 mm have been conducted. The results have confirmed the validity of the proposed sensor architecture, which demonstrated excellent compensation capabilities, with errors below 0.04 mm in the (0-1 mm range regardless the color and misalignment of the target.

  17. Design and Performance Analysis of an Intrinsically Safe Ultrasonic Ranging Sensor.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Hongjuan; Wang, Yu; Zhang, Xu; Wang, Dong; Jin, Baoquan

    2016-06-13

    In flammable or explosive environments, an ultrasonic sensor for distance measurement poses an important engineering safety challenge, because the driving circuit uses an intermediate frequency transformer as an impedance transformation element, in which the produced heat or spark is available for ignition. In this paper, an intrinsically safe ultrasonic ranging sensor is designed and implemented. The waterproof piezoelectric transducer with integrated transceiver is chosen as an energy transducing element. Then a novel transducer driving circuit is designed based on an impedance matching method considering safety spark parameters to replace an intermediate frequency transformer. Then, an energy limiting circuit is developed to achieve dual levels of over-voltage and over-current protection. The detail calculation and evaluation are executed and the electrical characteristics are analyzed to verify the intrinsic safety of the driving circuit. Finally, an experimental platform of the ultrasonic ranging sensor system is constructed, which involves short-circuit protection. Experimental results show that the proposed ultrasonic ranging sensor is excellent in both ranging performance and intrinsic safety.

  18. Carbon materials-functionalized tin dioxide nanoparticles toward robust, high-performance nitrogen dioxide gas sensor.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Rui; Liu, Xiupeng; Zhou, Tingting; Wang, Lili; Zhang, Tong

    2018-08-15

    Carbon (C) materials, which process excellent electrical conductivity and high carrier mobility, are promising sensing materials as active units for gas sensors. However, structural agglomeration caused by chemical processes results in a small resistance change and low sensing response. To address the above issues, structure-derived carbon-coated tin dioxide (SnO 2 ) nanoparticles having distinct core-shell morphology with a 3D net-like structure and highly uniform size are prepared by careful synthesis and fine structural design. The optimum carbon-coated SnO 2 nanoparticles (SnO 2 /C)-based gas sensor exhibits a low working temperature, excellent selectivity and fast response-recovery properties. In addition, the SnO 2 /C-based gas sensor can maintain a sensitivity to nitrogen dioxide (NO 2 ) of 3 after being cycled 4 times at 140 °C for, suggesting its good long-term stability. The structural integrity, good synergistic properties, and high gas-sensing performance of SnO 2 /C render it a promising sensing material for advanced gas sensors. Copyright © 2018 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  19. Sheldon-Hall syndrome

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bamshad Michael J

    2009-03-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Sheldon-Hall syndrome (SHS is a rare multiple congenital contracture syndrome characterized by contractures of the distal joints of the limbs, triangular face, downslanting palpebral fissures, small mouth, and high arched palate. Epidemiological data for the prevalence of SHS are not available, but less than 100 cases have been reported in the literature. Other common clinical features of SHS include prominent nasolabial folds, high arched palate, attached earlobes, mild cervical webbing, short stature, severe camptodactyly, ulnar deviation, and vertical talus and/or talipes equinovarus. Typically, the contractures are most severe at birth and non-progressive. SHS is inherited in an autosomal dominant pattern but about half the cases are sporadic. Mutations in either MYH3, TNNI2, or TNNT3 have been found in about 50% of cases. These genes encode proteins of the contractile apparatus of fast twitch skeletal muscle fibers. The diagnosis of SHS is based on clinical criteria. Mutation analysis is useful to distinguish SHS from arthrogryposis syndromes with similar features (e.g. distal arthrogryposis 1 and Freeman-Sheldon syndrome. Prenatal diagnosis by ultrasonography is feasible at 18–24 weeks of gestation. If the family history is positive and the mutation is known in the family, prenatal molecular genetic diagnosis is possible. There is no specific therapy for SHS. However, patients benefit from early intervention with occupational and physical therapy, serial casting, and/or surgery. Life expectancy and cognitive abilities are normal.

  20. A Novel AHRS Inertial Sensor-Based Algorithm for Wheelchair Propulsion Performance Analysis

    OpenAIRE

    Jonathan Bruce Shepherd; Tomohito Wada; David Rowlands; Daniel Arthur James

    2016-01-01

    With the increasing rise of professionalism in sport, athletes, teams, and coaches are looking to technology to monitor performance in both games and training in order to find a competitive advantage. The use of inertial sensors has been proposed as a cost effective and adaptable measurement device for monitoring wheelchair kinematics; however, the outcomes are dependent on the reliability of the processing algorithms. Though there are a variety of algorithms that have been proposed to monito...

  1. Anode sheath in Hall thrusters

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dorf, L.; Semenov, V.; Raitses, Y.

    2003-01-01

    A set of hydrodynamic equations is used to describe quasineutral plasma in ionization and acceleration regions of a Hall thruster. The electron distribution function and Poisson equation are invoked for description of a near-anode region. Numerical solutions suggest that steady-state operation of a Hall thruster can be achieved at different anode sheath regimes. It is shown that the anode sheath depends on the thruster operating conditions, namely the discharge voltage and the mass flow rate

  2. Theory of spin Hall effect

    OpenAIRE

    Chudnovsky, Eugene M.

    2007-01-01

    An extension of Drude model is proposed that accounts for spin and spin-orbit interaction of charge carriers. Spin currents appear due to combined action of the external electric field, crystal field and scattering of charge carriers. The expression for spin Hall conductivity is derived for metals and semiconductors that is independent of the scattering mechanism. In cubic metals, spin Hall conductivity $\\sigma_s$ and charge conductivity $\\sigma_c$ are related through $\\sigma_s = [2 \\pi \\hbar...

  3. Performance Analysis of the Ironless Inductive Position Sensor in the Large Hadron Collider Collimators Environment

    CERN Document Server

    Danisi, Alessandro; Losito, Roberto

    2015-01-01

    The Ironless Inductive Position Sensor (I2PS) has been introduced as a valid alternative to Linear Variable Differential Transformers (LVDTs) when external magnetic fields are present. Potential applications of this linear position sensor can be found in critical systems such as nuclear plants, tokamaks, satellites and particle accelerators. This paper analyzes the performance of the I2PS in the harsh environment of the collimators of the Large Hadron Collider (LHC), where position uncertainties of less than 20 μm are demanded in the presence of nuclear radiation and external magnetic fields. The I2PS has been targeted for installation for LHC Run 2, in order to solve the magnetic interference problem which standard LVDTs are experiencing. The paper describes in detail the chain of systems which belong to the new I2PS measurement task, their impact on the sensor performance and their possible further optimization. The I2PS performance is analyzed evaluating the position uncertainty (on 30 s), the magnetic im...

  4. Suitable reverberation time for halls for rock and pop music

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Adelman-Larsen, Niels Werner; Thompson, Eric Robert; Gade, Anders Christian

    2010-01-01

    The existing body of literature regarding the acoustic design of concert halls has focused almost exclusively on classical music, although there are many more performances of popular music, including rock and pop. Objective measurements were made of the acoustics of 20 rock music venues in Denmark....... The best-rated halls in the study have reverberation times that are approximately frequency independent from 0.6 to 1.2 s for hall volumes from 1000 to 6000 m3. The worst rated halls in the study had significantly higher reverberation times in the 63 and 125 Hz bands. Since most audiences at rock concerts...... are standing, absorption coefficients were measured with a standing audience from 63 Hz to 4 kHz. These measurements showed that a standing audience absorbs about five times as much energy in mid-/high-frequency bands as in low-frequency bands....

  5. Precision of single-engage micro Hall effect measurements

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Henrichsen, Henrik Hartmann; Hansen, Ole; Kjær, Daniel

    2014-01-01

    Recently a novel microscale Hall effect measurement technique has been developed to extract sheet resistance (RS), Hall sheet carrier density (NHS) and Hall mobility (μH) from collinear micro 4-point probe measurements in the vicinity of an insulating boundary [1]. The technique measures in less...... than a minute directly the local transport properties, which enables in-line production monitoring on scribe line test pads [2]. To increase measurement speed and reliability, a method in which 4-point measurements are performed using two different electrode pitches has been developed [3......]. In this study we calculate the measurement error on RS, NHS and μH resulting from electrode position errors, probe placement, sample size and Hall signal magnitude. We show the relationship between measurement precision and electrode pitch, which is important when down-scaling the micro 4-point probe to fit...

  6. Sensor data storage performance: SQL or NoSQL, physical or virtual

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Veen, J.S. van der; Waaij, B.D. van der; Meijer, R.J.

    2012-01-01

    Sensors are used to monitor certain aspects of the physical or virtual world and databases are typically used to store the data that these sensors provide. The use of sensors is increasing, which leads to an increasing demand on sensor data storage platforms. Some sensor monitoring applications need

  7. Performance of solid-state sensors for continuous, real-time measurement of soil CO2 concentrations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Recent advances in sensor technology provide a robust capability for continuous measurement of soil gases. The performance of solid-state CO2 sensors (Model GMM220 series, Vaisala, Finland) was evaluated in laboratory, greenhouse, and irrigated wheat (Triticum aestivum L.). In ambient CO2 concentrat...

  8. Microwave bonding of MWNTs and fabrication of a low-cost, high-performance polymer pressure sensor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gau, C; Chen, H T; Ko, H S

    2010-01-01

    This paper describes the fabrication of a simple, low-cost pressure sensor that can be readily mass produced. Microwave-induced heating is used to bond a multiwall carbon nanotube (MWNT) network to a poly(ethylene terephthalate) substrate that serves as a pressure diaphragm. The MWNT network can be patterned with a damascene process and used as the sensor material. The pressure diaphragm with the MWNT network can be bonded with any flexible substrate pre-drilled with a cavity that allows a deflection of the diaphragm. Design and fabrication considerations for the sensor are discussed and its performance is demonstrated and evaluated. The sensor is thermally stable and has a much higher sensitivity and gauge factor than polysilicon sensors. In addition to the simple fabrication process, the sensor can be widely applied and integrated into microfluidic systems or biochips where pressure information is required.

  9. Evaluation of the performance of irradiated silicon strip sensors for the forward detector of the ATLAS Inner Tracker Upgrade

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mori, R., E-mail: riccardo.mori@physik.uni-freiburg.de [Physikalisches Institut, Universität Freiburg, Hermann-Herder-Str. 3, D-79104 Freiburg (Germany); Allport, P.P.; Baca, M.; Broughton, J.; Chisholm, A.; Nikolopoulos, K.; Pyatt, S.; Thomas, J.P.; Wilson, J.A. [School of Physics and Astronomy, University of Birmingham, Birmingham B15 2TT (United Kingdom); Kierstead, J.; Kuczewski, P.; Lynn, D. [Brookhaven National Laboratory, Physics Department and Instrumentation Division, Upton, NY 11973-5000 (United States); Arratia-Munoz, M.I.; Hommels, L.B.A. [Cavendish Laboratory, University of Cambridge, JJ Thomson Avenue, Cambridge CB3 0HE (United Kingdom); Ullan, M.; Fleta, C.; Fernandez-Tejero, J. [Centro Nacional de Microelectronica (IMB-CNM, CSIC), Campus UAB-Bellaterra, 08193 Barcelona (Spain); Bloch, I.; Gregor, I.M.; Lohwasser, K. [DESY, Notkestrasse 85, 22607 Hambrug (Germany); and others

    2016-09-21

    The upgrade to the High-Luminosity LHC foreseen in about ten years represents a great challenge for the ATLAS inner tracker and the silicon strip sensors in the forward region. Several strip sensor designs were developed by the ATLAS collaboration and fabricated by Hamamatsu in order to maintain enough performance in terms of charge collection efficiency and its uniformity throughout the active region. Of particular attention, in the case of a stereo-strip sensor, is the area near the sensor edge where shorter strips were ganged to the complete ones. In this work the electrical and charge collection test results on irradiated miniature sensors with forward geometry are presented. Results from charge collection efficiency measurements show that at the maximum expected fluence, the collected charge is roughly halved with respect to the one obtained prior to irradiation. Laser measurements show a good signal uniformity over the sensor. Ganged strips have a similar efficiency as standard strips.

  10. A Survey on Optimal Signal Processing Techniques Applied to Improve the Performance of Mechanical Sensors in Automotive Applications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hernandez, Wilmar

    2007-01-01

    In this paper a survey on recent applications of optimal signal processing techniques to improve the performance of mechanical sensors is made. Here, a comparison between classical filters and optimal filters for automotive sensors is made, and the current state of the art of the application of robust and optimal control and signal processing techniques to the design of the intelligent (or smart) sensors that today's cars need is presented through several experimental results that show that the fusion of intelligent sensors and optimal signal processing techniques is the clear way to go. However, the switch between the traditional methods of designing automotive sensors and the new ones cannot be done overnight because there are some open research issues that have to be solved. This paper draws attention to one of the open research issues and tries to arouse researcher's interest in the fusion of intelligent sensors and optimal signal processing techniques.

  11. Iodine Hall Thruster

    Science.gov (United States)

    Szabo, James

    2015-01-01

    Iodine enables dramatic mass and cost savings for lunar and Mars cargo missions, including Earth escape and near-Earth space maneuvers. The demonstrated throttling ability of iodine is important for a singular thruster that might be called upon to propel a spacecraft from Earth to Mars or Venus. The ability to throttle efficiently is even more important for missions beyond Mars. In the Phase I project, Busek Company, Inc., tested an existing Hall thruster, the BHT-8000, on iodine propellant. The thruster was fed by a high-flow iodine feed system and supported by an existing Busek hollow cathode flowing xenon gas. The Phase I propellant feed system was evolved from a previously demonstrated laboratory feed system. Throttling of the thruster between 2 and 11 kW at 200 to 600 V was demonstrated. Testing showed that the efficiency of iodine fueled BHT-8000 is the same as with xenon, with iodine delivering a slightly higher thrust-to-power (T/P) ratio. In Phase II, a complete iodine-fueled system was developed, including the thruster, hollow cathode, and iodine propellant feed system. The nominal power of the Phase II system is 8 kW; however, it can be deeply throttled as well as clustered to much higher power levels. The technology also can be scaled to greater than 100 kW per thruster to support megawatt-class missions. The target thruster efficiency for the full-scale system is 65 percent at high specific impulse (Isp) (approximately 3,000 s) and 60 percent at high thrust (Isp approximately 2,000 s).

  12. Performance Analysis of the Microsoft Kinect Sensor for 2D Simultaneous Localization and Mapping (SLAM Techniques

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kamarulzaman Kamarudin

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available This paper presents a performance analysis of two open-source, laser scanner-based Simultaneous Localization and Mapping (SLAM techniques (i.e., Gmapping and Hector SLAM using a Microsoft Kinect to replace the laser sensor. Furthermore, the paper proposes a new system integration approach whereby a Linux virtual machine is used to run the open source SLAM algorithms. The experiments were conducted in two different environments; a small room with no features and a typical office corridor with desks and chairs. Using the data logged from real-time experiments, each SLAM technique was simulated and tested with different parameter settings. The results show that the system is able to achieve real time SLAM operation. The system implementation offers a simple and reliable way to compare the performance of Windows-based SLAM algorithm with the algorithms typically implemented in a Robot Operating System (ROS. The results also indicate that certain modifications to the default laser scanner-based parameters are able to improve the map accuracy. However, the limited field of view and range of Kinect’s depth sensor often causes the map to be inaccurate, especially in featureless areas, therefore the Kinect sensor is not a direct replacement for a laser scanner, but rather offers a feasible alternative for 2D SLAM tasks.

  13. Performance of RVGui sensor and Kodak Ektaspeed Plus film for proximal caries detection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abreu, M; Mol, A; Ludlow, J B

    2001-03-01

    A high-resolution charge-coupled device was used to compare the diagnostic performances obtained with Trophy's new RVGui sensor and Kodak Ektaspeed Plus film with respect to caries detection. Three acquisition modes of the Trophy RVGui sensor were compared with Kodak Ektaspeed Plus film. Images of the proximal surfaces of 40 extracted posterior teeth were evaluated by 6 observers. The presence or absence of caries was scored by means of a 5-point confidence scale. The actual caries status of each surface was determined through ground-section histology. Responses were evaluated by means of receiver operating characteristic analysis. Areas under receiver operating characteristic curves (A(Z)) were assessed through analysis of variance. The mean A(Z) scores were 0.85 for film, 0.84 for the high-resolution caries mode, and 0.82 for both the low resolution caries mode and the high-resolution periodontal mode. These differences were not statistically significant (P =.70). The differences among observers also were not statistically significant (P =.23). The performance of the RVGui sensor in high- and low-resolution modes for proximal caries detection is comparable to that of Ektaspeed Plus film.

  14. A single sensor and single actuator approach to performance tailoring over a prescribed frequency band.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Jiqiang

    2016-03-01

    Restricted sensing and actuation control represents an important area of research that has been overlooked in most of the design methodologies. In many practical control engineering problems, it is necessitated to implement the design through a single sensor and single actuator for multivariate performance variables. In this paper, a novel approach is proposed for the solution to the single sensor and single actuator control problem where performance over any prescribed frequency band can also be tailored. The results are obtained for the broad band control design based on the formulation for discrete frequency control. It is shown that the single sensor and single actuator control problem over a frequency band can be cast into a Nevanlinna-Pick interpolation problem. An optimal controller can then be obtained via the convex optimization over LMIs. Even remarkable is that robustness issues can also be tackled in this framework. A numerical example is provided for the broad band attenuation of rotor blade vibration to illustrate the proposed design procedures. Copyright © 2016 ISA. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  15. Effects of Surfactants on the Performance of CeO2 Humidity Sensor

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chunjie Wang

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Nanosized CeO2 powders were synthesized via hydrothermal method with different types of surfactants (polyethylene glycol (PEG, cetyltrimethylammonium bromide (CTAB, and sodium dodecylbenzenesulfonate (SDBS. X-ray diffraction, Raman spectroscopy, and transmission electron microscopy were utilized to characterize the phase structures and morphologies of the products. The sample with CTAB as surfactant (CeO2-C has the largest specific surface area and the smallest particle size among these three samples. The humidity sensor fabricated by CeO2-C shows higher performance than those used CeO2-P and CeO2-S. The impedance of the CeO2-C sensor decreases by about five orders of magnitude with relative humidity (RH changing from 15.7 to 95%. The response and recovery time are 7 and 7 s, respectively. These results indicate that the performance of CeO2 humidity sensors can be improved effectively by the addition of cationic surfactant.

  16. Performance Analysis of AODV Routing Protocol for Wireless Sensor Network based Smart Metering

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Farooq, Hasan; Jung, Low Tang

    2013-01-01

    Today no one can deny the need for Smart Grid and it is being considered as of utmost importance to upgrade outdated electric infrastructure to cope with the ever increasing electric load demand. Wireless Sensor Network (WSN) is considered a promising candidate for internetworking of smart meters with the gateway using mesh topology. This paper investigates the performance of AODV routing protocol for WSN based smart metering deployment. Three case studies are presented to analyze its performance based on four metrics of (i) Packet Delivery Ratio, (ii) Average Energy Consumption of Nodes (iii) Average End-End Delay and (iv) Normalized Routing Load.

  17. Post annealing performance evaluation of printable interdigital capacitive sensors by principal component analysis

    KAUST Repository

    Zia, Asif Iqbal

    2015-06-01

    The surface roughness of thin-film gold electrodes induces instability in impedance spectroscopy measurements of capacitive interdigital printable sensors. Post-fabrication thermodynamic annealing was carried out at temperatures ranging from 30 °C to 210 °C in a vacuum oven and the variation in surface morphology of thin-film gold electrodes was observed by scanning electron microscopy. Impedance spectra obtained at different temperatures were translated into equivalent circuit models by applying complex nonlinear least square curve-fitting algorithm. Principal component analysis was applied to deduce the classification of the parameters affected due to the annealing process and to evaluate the performance stability using mathematical model. Physics of the thermodynamic annealing was discussed based on the surface activation energies. The post anneal testing of the sensors validated the achieved stability in impedance measurement. © 2001-2012 IEEE.

  18. A Novel AHRS Inertial Sensor-Based Algorithm for Wheelchair Propulsion Performance Analysis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jonathan Bruce Shepherd

    2016-08-01

    Full Text Available With the increasing rise of professionalism in sport, athletes, teams, and coaches are looking to technology to monitor performance in both games and training in order to find a competitive advantage. The use of inertial sensors has been proposed as a cost effective and adaptable measurement device for monitoring wheelchair kinematics; however, the outcomes are dependent on the reliability of the processing algorithms. Though there are a variety of algorithms that have been proposed to monitor wheelchair propulsion in court sports, they all have limitations. Through experimental testing, we have shown the Attitude and Heading Reference System (AHRS-based algorithm to be a suitable and reliable candidate algorithm for estimating velocity, distance, and approximating trajectory. The proposed algorithm is computationally inexpensive, agnostic of wheel camber, not sensitive to sensor placement, and can be embedded for real-time implementations. The research is conducted under Griffith University Ethics (GU Ref No: 2016/294.

  19. Nanotechnology: A Tool for Improved Performance on Electrochemical Screen-Printed (BioSensors

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Elena Jubete

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available Screen-printing technology is a low-cost process, widely used in electronics production, especially in the fabrication of disposable electrodes for (biosensor applications. The pastes used for deposition of the successive layers are based on a polymeric binder with metallic dispersions or graphite, and can also contain functional materials such as cofactors, stabilizers and mediators. More recently metal nanoparticles, nanowires and carbon nanotubes have also been included either in these pastes or as a later stage on the working electrode. This review will summarize the use of nanomaterials to improve the electrochemical sensing capability of screen-printed sensors. It will cover mainly disposable sensors and biosensors for biomedical interest and toxicity monitoring, compiling recent examples where several types of metallic and carbon-based nanostructures are responsible for enhancing the performance of these devices.

  20. Post annealing performance evaluation of printable interdigital capacitive sensors by principal component analysis

    KAUST Repository

    Zia, Asif Iqbal; Mukhopadhyay, Subhas Chandra; Yu, Paklam; Al-Bahadly, Ibrahim H.; Gooneratne, Chinthaka Pasan; Kosel, Jü rgen

    2015-01-01

    The surface roughness of thin-film gold electrodes induces instability in impedance spectroscopy measurements of capacitive interdigital printable sensors. Post-fabrication thermodynamic annealing was carried out at temperatures ranging from 30 °C to 210 °C in a vacuum oven and the variation in surface morphology of thin-film gold electrodes was observed by scanning electron microscopy. Impedance spectra obtained at different temperatures were translated into equivalent circuit models by applying complex nonlinear least square curve-fitting algorithm. Principal component analysis was applied to deduce the classification of the parameters affected due to the annealing process and to evaluate the performance stability using mathematical model. Physics of the thermodynamic annealing was discussed based on the surface activation energies. The post anneal testing of the sensors validated the achieved stability in impedance measurement. © 2001-2012 IEEE.

  1. Anode Fall Formation in a Hall Thruster

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dorf, Leonid A.; Raitses, Yevgeny F.; Smirnov, Artem N.; Fisch, Nathaniel J.

    2004-01-01

    As was reported in our previous work, accurate, nondisturbing near-anode measurements of the plasma density, electron temperature, and plasma potential performed with biased and emissive probes allowed the first experimental identification of both electron-repelling (negative anode fall) and electron-attracting (positive anode fall) anode sheaths in Hall thrusters. An interesting new phenomenon revealed by the probe measurements is that the anode fall changes from positive to negative upon removal of the dielectric coating, which appears on the anode surface during the course of Hall thruster operation. As reported in the present work, energy dispersion spectroscopy analysis of the chemical composition of the anode dielectric coating indicates that the coating layer consists essentially of an oxide of the anode material (stainless steel). However, it is still unclear how oxygen gets into the thruster channel. Most importantly, possible mechanisms of anode fall formation in a Hall thruster with a clean and a coated anodes are analyzed in this work; practical implication of understanding the general structure of the electron-attracting anode sheath in the case of a coated anode is also discussed

  2. Thermoelectric generator experimental performance testing for wireless sensor network application in smart buildings

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Al Musleh Mohamed

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available In order to make a conventional building more efficient or smarter, systems feedbacks are essential. Such feedbacks can include real-time or logged data from various systems, such as temperature, humidity, lighting and CO2 levels. This is only possible by the use of a network of sensors which report to the building management system. Conventional sensors are limited due to wiring and infrastructure requirements. Wireless Sensor Networks (WSN however, eliminates the wiring limitations but still in certain cases require periodical battery changes and maintenance. A suitable solution for WSN limitations is to use different types of ambient energy harvesters to power battery-less sensors or alternatively to charge existing batteries so as to reduce their changing requirements. Such systems are already in place using various energy harvesting techniques. Thermoelectric Generators (TEG are one of them where the temperature gradient is used to generate electricity which is conditioned and used for WSN powering applications. Researchers in this field often face difficulty in estimating the TEG output at the low-temperature difference as manufacturers’ datasheets and performance data are not following the same standards and in most cases cover the high-temperature difference (more than 200C°. This is sufficient for industrial applications but not for WSN systems in the built environment where the temperature difference is much smaller (1-20C° is covered in this study. This paper presents a TEG experimental test setup using a temperature controlled hotplate in order to provide accurate TEG performance data at the low-temperature difference range.

  3. Rigorous Performance Evaluation of Smartphone GNSS/IMU Sensors for ITS Applications

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vassilis Gikas

    2016-08-01

    Full Text Available With the rapid growth in smartphone technologies and improvement in their navigation sensors, an increasing amount of location information is now available, opening the road to the provision of new Intelligent Transportation System (ITS services. Current smartphone devices embody miniaturized Global Navigation Satellite System (GNSS, Inertial Measurement Unit (IMU and other sensors capable of providing user position, velocity and attitude. However, it is hard to characterize their actual positioning and navigation performance capabilities due to the disparate sensor and software technologies adopted among manufacturers and the high influence of environmental conditions, and therefore, a unified certification process is missing. This paper presents the analysis results obtained from the assessment of two modern smartphones regarding their positioning accuracy (i.e., precision and trueness capabilities (i.e., potential and limitations based on a practical but rigorous methodological approach. Our investigation relies on the results of several vehicle tracking (i.e., cruising and maneuvering tests realized through comparing smartphone obtained trajectories and kinematic parameters to those derived using a high-end GNSS/IMU system and advanced filtering techniques. Performance testing is undertaken for the HTC One S (Android and iPhone 5s (iOS. Our findings indicate that the deviation of the smartphone locations from ground truth (trueness deteriorates by a factor of two in obscured environments compared to those derived in open sky conditions. Moreover, it appears that iPhone 5s produces relatively smaller and less dispersed error values compared to those computed for HTC One S. Also, the navigation solution of the HTC One S appears to adapt faster to changes in environmental conditions, suggesting a somewhat different data filtering approach for the iPhone 5s. Testing the accuracy of the accelerometer and gyroscope sensors for a number of

  4. A performance study of unmanned aerial vehicle-based sensor networks under cyber attack

    Science.gov (United States)

    Puchaty, Ethan M.

    In UAV-based sensor networks, an emerging area of interest is the performance of these networks under cyber attack. This study seeks to evaluate the performance trade-offs from a System-of-Systems (SoS) perspective between various UAV communications architecture options in the context two missions: tracking ballistic missiles and tracking insurgents. An agent-based discrete event simulation is used to model a sensor communication network consisting of UAVs, military communications satellites, ground relay stations, and a mission control center. Network susceptibility to cyber attack is modeled with probabilistic failures and induced data variability, with performance metrics focusing on information availability, latency, and trustworthiness. Results demonstrated that using UAVs as routers increased network availability with a minimal latency penalty and communications satellite networks were best for long distance operations. Redundancy in the number of links between communication nodes helped mitigate cyber-caused link failures and add robustness in cases of induced data variability by an adversary. However, when failures were not independent, redundancy and UAV routing were detrimental in some cases to network performance. Sensitivity studies indicated that long cyber-caused downtimes and increasing failure dependencies resulted in build-ups of failures and caused significant degradations in network performance.

  5. Nanofabrication of magnetic scanned-probe microscope sensors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chong, B.K.

    2001-10-01

    This thesis presents the development of novel magnetic sensor combined with Atomic Force Microscope probe (AFM) using conventional semiconductor processing techniques and Electron Beam Lithography (EBL). The fabrication of these magnetic sensors was performed on a common micromachined silicon substrate using a generic batch fabrication technique. Sub-micron Hall bar for Scanning Hall probe Microscopy (SHPM) and electromagnetic force coil magnet for Scanning Electromagnetic Force Microscopy (eMFM) were designed and constructed at the apex of Silicon attractive mode cantilever probes. The process demonstrates good control over sensor parameters. Results indicated controllability of Hall bar junction sizes (spatial resolution) to below 100nm and Coil diameter sizes to below 500nm with minimum sizes down to 50nm and 270nm respectively. The process has shown its flexibility to accommodate different material systems. The same technology was used to fabricate multiple devices such as double Hall bars on a tip as well as a small electro-magnet coil probe co-defined with the Hall probe to form a magnetic imaging / modification probe. A conventional Non-Contact mode AFM employing heterodyne interferometry and in-house built electronics was modified for SHPM and eMFM. These probes had been scanned over a commercial computer hard disk. These microscopes showed the capability of resolving magnetic bits and topographic information independently and simultaneously. All scanning experiments were carried out under ambient conditions. The experiments required no extra preparation to be done to the specimen before imaging and measurements were carried out under ambient conditions. These probes offer the prospect of direct magnetic field measurement, non- invasiveness, very close proximity, possible local manipulation, better control over the tip- specimen interaction distance and topographic imaging. It is hoped that these magnetic microscope probes will be of great interest and

  6. Embedded Sensors and Controls to Improve Component Performance and Reliability -- Loop-scale Testbed Design Report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Melin, Alexander M. [Oak Ridge National Lab. (ORNL), Oak Ridge, TN (United States); Kisner, Roger A. [Oak Ridge National Lab. (ORNL), Oak Ridge, TN (United States)

    2016-09-01

    Embedded instrumentation and control systems that can operate in extreme environments are challenging to design and operate. Extreme environments limit the options for sensors and actuators and degrade their performance. Because sensors and actuators are necessary for feedback control, these limitations mean that designing embedded instrumentation and control systems for the challenging environments of nuclear reactors requires advanced technical solutions that are not available commercially. This report details the development of testbed that will be used for cross-cutting embedded instrumentation and control research for nuclear power applications. This research is funded by the Department of Energy's Nuclear Energy Enabling Technology program's Advanced Sensors and Instrumentation topic. The design goal of the loop-scale testbed is to build a low temperature pump that utilizes magnetic bearing that will be incorporated into a water loop to test control system performance and self-sensing techniques. Specifically, this testbed will be used to analyze control system performance in response to nonlinear and cross-coupling fluid effects between the shaft axes of motion, rotordynamics and gyroscopic effects, and impeller disturbances. This testbed will also be used to characterize the performance losses when using self-sensing position measurement techniques. Active magnetic bearings are a technology that can reduce failures and maintenance costs in nuclear power plants. They are particularly relevant to liquid salt reactors that operate at high temperatures (700 C). Pumps used in the extreme environment of liquid salt reactors provide many engineering challenges that can be overcome with magnetic bearings and their associated embedded instrumentation and control. This report will give details of the mechanical design and electromagnetic design of the loop-scale embedded instrumentation and control testbed.

  7. Assessment of modern smartphone sensors performance on vehicle localization in urban environments

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lazarou, Theodoros; Danezis, Chris

    2017-09-01

    The advent of Global Navigation Satellite Systems (GNSS) initiated a revolution in Positioning, Navigation and Timing (PNT) applications. Besides the enormous impact on geospatial data acquisition and reality capture, satellite navigation has penetrated everyday life, a fact which is proved by the increasing degree of human reliance on GNSS-enabled smart devices to perform casual activities. Nevertheless, GNSS does not perform well in all cases. Specifically, in GNSS-challenging environments, such as urban canyons or forested areas, navigation performance may be significantly degraded or even nullified. Consequently, positioning is achieved by combining GNSS with additional heterogeneous information or sensors, such as inertial sensors. To date, most smartphones are equipped with at least accelerometers and gyroscopes, besides GNSS chipsets. In the frame of this research, difficult localization scenarios were investigated to assess the performance of these low-cost inertial sensors with respect to higher grade GNSS and IMU systems. Four state-of-the-art smartphones were mounted on a specifically designed on-purpose build platform along with reference equipment. The platform was installed on top of a vehicle, which was driven by a predefined trajectory that included several GNSS-challenging parts. Consequently, positioning and inertial readings were acquired by smartphones and compared to the information collected by the reference equipment. The results indicated that although the smartphone GNSS receivers have increased sensitivity, they were unable to produce an acceptable solution for more than 30% of the driven course. However, all smartphones managed to identify, up to a satisfactory degree, distinct driving features, such as curves or bumps.

  8. A film bulk acoustic resonator-based high-performance pressure sensor integrated with temperature control system

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zhang, Mengying; Zhao, Zhan; Du, Lidong; Fang, Zhen

    2017-01-01

    This paper presented a high-performance pressure sensor based on a film bulk acoustic resonator (FBAR). The support film of the FBAR chip was made of silicon nitride and the part under the resonator area was etched to enhance the sensitivity and improve the linearity of the pressure sensor. A micro resistor temperature sensor and a micro resistor heater were integrated in the chip to monitor and control the operating temperature. The sensor chip was fabricated, and packaged in an oscillator circuit for differential pressure detection. When the detected pressure ranged from  −100 hPa to 600 hPa, the sensitivity of the improved FBAR pressure sensor was  −0.967 kHz hPa −1 , namely  −0.69 ppm hPa −1 , which was 19% higher than that of existing sensors with a complete support film. The nonlinearity of the improved sensor was less than  ±0.35%, while that of the existing sensor was  ±5%. To eliminate measurement errors from humidity, the temperature control system integrated in the sensor chip controlled the temperature of the resonator up to 75 °C, with accuracy of  ±0.015 °C and power of 20 mW. (paper)

  9. A High-Performance Portable Transient Electro-Magnetic Sensor for Unexploded Ordnance Detection

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Haofeng Wang

    2017-11-01

    Full Text Available Portable transient electromagnetic (TEM systems can be well adapted to various terrains, including mountainous, woodland, and other complex terrains. They are widely used for the detection of unexploded ordnance (UXO. As the core component of the portable TEM system, the sensor is constructed with a transmitting coil and a receiving coil. Based on the primary field of the transmitting coil and internal noise of the receiving coil, the design and testing of such a sensor is described in detail. Results indicate that the primary field of the transmitting coil depends on the diameter, mass, and power of the coil. A higher mass–power product and a larger diameter causes a stronger primary field. Reducing the number of turns and increasing the clamp voltage reduces the switch-off time of the transmitting current effectively. Increasing the cross-section of the wire reduces the power consumption, but greatly increases the coil’s weight. The study of the receiving coil shows that the internal noise of the sensor is dominated by the thermal noise of the damping resistor. Reducing the bandwidth of the system and increasing the size of the coil reduces the internal noise effectively. The cross-sectional area and the distance between the sections of the coil have little effect on the internal noise. A less damped state can effectively reduce signal distortion. Finally, a portable TEM sensor with both a transmitting coil (constructed with a diameter, number of turns, and transmitting current of 0.5 m, 30, and 5 A, respectively and a receiving coil (constructed with a length and resonant frequency of 5.6 cm and 50 kHz, respectively was built. The agreement between experimental and calculated results confirms the theory used in the sensor design. The responses of an 82 mm mortar shell at different distances were measured and inverted by the differential evolution (DE algorithm to verify system performance. Results show that the sensor designed in this

  10. A High-Performance Portable Transient Electro-Magnetic Sensor for Unexploded Ordnance Detection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Haofeng; Chen, Shudong; Zhang, Shuang; Yuan, Zhiwen; Zhang, Haiyang; Fang, Dong; Zhu, Jun

    2017-11-17

    Portable transient electromagnetic (TEM) systems can be well adapted to various terrains, including mountainous, woodland, and other complex terrains. They are widely used for the detection of unexploded ordnance (UXO). As the core component of the portable TEM system, the sensor is constructed with a transmitting coil and a receiving coil. Based on the primary field of the transmitting coil and internal noise of the receiving coil, the design and testing of such a sensor is described in detail. Results indicate that the primary field of the transmitting coil depends on the diameter, mass, and power of the coil. A higher mass-power product and a larger diameter causes a stronger primary field. Reducing the number of turns and increasing the clamp voltage reduces the switch-off time of the transmitting current effectively. Increasing the cross-section of the wire reduces the power consumption, but greatly increases the coil's weight. The study of the receiving coil shows that the internal noise of the sensor is dominated by the thermal noise of the damping resistor. Reducing the bandwidth of the system and increasing the size of the coil reduces the internal noise effectively. The cross-sectional area and the distance between the sections of the coil have little effect on the internal noise. A less damped state can effectively reduce signal distortion. Finally, a portable TEM sensor with both a transmitting coil (constructed with a diameter, number of turns, and transmitting current of 0.5 m, 30, and 5 A, respectively) and a receiving coil (constructed with a length and resonant frequency of 5.6 cm and 50 kHz, respectively) was built. The agreement between experimental and calculated results confirms the theory used in the sensor design. The responses of an 82 mm mortar shell at different distances were measured and inverted by the differential evolution (DE) algorithm to verify system performance. Results show that the sensor designed in this study can not only

  11. A Performance Evaluation Model for Mobile Ad Hoc Networks and Sensor Networks

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Heng LUO

    2014-03-01

    Full Text Available Potential applications in areas such as military sites and disaster relief fields that are characterized by absence of prefixed infrastructure justify the development of mobile ad hoc networks (MANETs and wireless sensor networks (WSNs. However, unfavorable wireless links and dynamic topology are still challenging, leading to the proposal of a collection of routing protocols for MANETs and WSNs. Nevertheless the performance of algorithms may vary with deployment scenario due to the application dependent philosophy behind algorithms. In this paper, the performance evaluation problem for MANETs and WSNs is investigated and a novel performance ranking model, termed AHP-SAW, is proposed. For simplicity but without loss of generality, the performance of two routing protocols DSDV and DSR are studies based on which ranking results are provided. Extensive simulations show that an overall 37.2 %, at most, gain may be achieved based on the AHP-SAW model.

  12. Inductive Sensor Performance in Partial Discharges and Noise Separation by Means of Spectral Power Ratios

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jorge Alfredo Ardila-Rey

    2014-02-01

    Full Text Available Partial discharge (PD detection is a standardized technique to qualify electrical insulation in machines and power cables. Several techniques that analyze the waveform of the pulses have been proposed to discriminate noise from PD activity. Among them, spectral power ratio representation shows great flexibility in the separation of the sources of PD. Mapping spectral power ratios in two-dimensional plots leads to clusters of points which group pulses with similar characteristics. The position in the map depends on the nature of the partial discharge, the setup and the frequency response of the sensors. If these clusters are clearly separated, the subsequent task of identifying the source of the discharge is straightforward so the distance between clusters can be a figure of merit to suggest the best option for PD recognition. In this paper, two inductive sensors with different frequency responses to pulsed signals, a high frequency current transformer and an inductive loop sensor, are analyzed to test their performance in detecting and separating the sources of partial discharges.

  13. 3D CAPTURING PERFORMANCES OF LOW-COST RANGE SENSORS FOR MASS-MARKET APPLICATIONS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    G. Guidi

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available Since the advent of the first Kinect as motion controller device for the Microsoft XBOX platform (November 2010, several similar active and low-cost range sensing devices have been introduced on the mass-market for several purposes, including gesture based interfaces, 3D multimedia interaction, robot navigation, finger tracking, 3D body scanning for garment design and proximity sensors for automotive. However, given their capability to generate a real time stream of range images, these has been used in some projects also as general purpose range devices, with performances that for some applications might be satisfying. This paper shows the working principle of the various devices, analyzing them in terms of systematic errors and random errors for exploring the applicability of them in standard 3D capturing problems. Five actual devices have been tested featuring three different technologies: i Kinect V1 by Microsoft, Structure Sensor by Occipital, and Xtion PRO by ASUS, all based on different implementations of the Primesense sensor; ii F200 by Intel/Creative, implementing the Realsense pattern projection technology; Kinect V2 by Microsoft, equipped with the Canesta TOF Camera. A critical analysis of the results tries first of all to compare them, and secondarily to focus the range of applications for which such devices could actually work as a viable solution.

  14. PERFORMANCE EVALUATION OF sUAS EQUIPPED WITH VELODYNE HDL-32E LiDAR SENSOR

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    G. Jozkow

    2017-08-01

    Full Text Available The Velodyne HDL-32E laser scanner is used more frequently as main mapping sensor in small commercial UASs. However, there is still little information about the actual accuracy of point clouds collected with such UASs. This work evaluates empirically the accuracy of the point cloud collected with such UAS. Accuracy assessment was conducted in four aspects: impact of sensors on theoretical point cloud accuracy, trajectory reconstruction quality, and internal and absolute point cloud accuracies. Theoretical point cloud accuracy was evaluated by calculating 3D position error knowing errors of used sensors. The quality of trajectory reconstruction was assessed by comparing position and attitude differences from forward and reverse EKF solution. Internal and absolute accuracies were evaluated by fitting planes to 8 point cloud samples extracted for planar surfaces. In addition, the absolute accuracy was also determined by calculating point 3D distances between LiDAR UAS and reference TLS point clouds. Test data consisted of point clouds collected in two separate flights performed over the same area. Executed experiments showed that in tested UAS, the trajectory reconstruction, especially attitude, has significant impact on point cloud accuracy. Estimated absolute accuracy of point clouds collected during both test flights was better than 10 cm, thus investigated UAS fits mapping-grade category.

  15. Performance Evaluation of sUAS Equipped with Velodyne HDL-32E LiDAR Sensor

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jozkow, G.; Wieczorek, P.; Karpina, M.; Walicka, A.; Borkowski, A.

    2017-08-01

    The Velodyne HDL-32E laser scanner is used more frequently as main mapping sensor in small commercial UASs. However, there is still little information about the actual accuracy of point clouds collected with such UASs. This work evaluates empirically the accuracy of the point cloud collected with such UAS. Accuracy assessment was conducted in four aspects: impact of sensors on theoretical point cloud accuracy, trajectory reconstruction quality, and internal and absolute point cloud accuracies. Theoretical point cloud accuracy was evaluated by calculating 3D position error knowing errors of used sensors. The quality of trajectory reconstruction was assessed by comparing position and attitude differences from forward and reverse EKF solution. Internal and absolute accuracies were evaluated by fitting planes to 8 point cloud samples extracted for planar surfaces. In addition, the absolute accuracy was also determined by calculating point 3D distances between LiDAR UAS and reference TLS point clouds. Test data consisted of point clouds collected in two separate flights performed over the same area. Executed experiments showed that in tested UAS, the trajectory reconstruction, especially attitude, has significant impact on point cloud accuracy. Estimated absolute accuracy of point clouds collected during both test flights was better than 10 cm, thus investigated UAS fits mapping-grade category.

  16. Four-dimensional Hall mechanics as a particle on CP3

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bellucci, Stefano; Casteill, Pierre-Yves; Nersessian, Armen

    2003-01-01

    In order to establish an explicit connection between four-dimensional Hall effect on S 4 and six-dimensional Hall effect on CP 3 , we perform the Hamiltonian reduction of a particle moving on CP 3 in a constant magnetic field to the four-dimensional Hall mechanics (i.e., a-bar particle on S 4 in a SU(2) instanton field). This reduction corresponds to fixing the isospin of the latter system

  17. Magnetoresistivity and Hall resistivity of a YBCO thin film in a tilted magnetic field

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Amirfeiz, M.; Cimberle, M. R.; Ferdeghini, C.; Giannini, E.; Grassano, G.; Marre', D.; Putti, M.; Siri, A. S.

    1997-01-01

    In this paper they present magnetoresistivity and Hall effect measurements performed on a YBCO epitaxial film as a function of the angle θ between the external magnetic field and the a-b planes. The resistivity and Hall effect measurements are analyzed in term of the general scaling approach proposed by Blatter and coworkers; the Hall conductivity data are examined to separate the contributions due to vortices and quasi particles

  18. ac spin-Hall effect

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Entin-Wohlman, O.

    2005-01-01

    Full Text:The spin-Hall effect is described. The Rashba and Dresselhaus spin-orbit interactions are both shown to yield the low temperature spin-Hall effect for strongly localized electrons coupled to phonons. A frequency-dependent electric field E(ω) generates a spin-polarization current, normal to E, due to interference of hopping paths. At zero temperature the corresponding spin-Hall conductivity is real and is proportional to ω 2 . At non-zero temperatures the coupling to the phonons yields an imaginary term proportional to ω. The interference also yields persistent spin currents at thermal equilibrium, at E = 0. The contributions from the Dresselhaus and Rashba interactions to the interference oppose each other

  19. Large Size High Performance Transparent Amorphous Silicon Sensors for Laser Beam Position Detection and Monitoring

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Calderon, A.; Martinez Rivero, C.; Matorras, F.; Rodrigo, T.; Sobron, M.; Vila, I.; Virto; Alberdi, J.; Arce, P.; Barcala, J. M.; Calvo, E.; Ferrando, A.; Josa, M. I.; Luque, J. M.; Molinero, A.; Navarrete, J.; Oller, J. C.; Kohler, C.; Lutz, B.; Schubert, M. B.

    2006-09-04

    We present the measured performance of a new generation of semitransparente amorphous silicon position detectors. They have a large sensitive area (30 x 30 mm2) and show good properties such as a high response (about 20 mA/W), an intinsic position resolution better than 3 m, a spatial point reconstruction precision better than 10 m, deflection angles smaller than 10 rad and a transmission power in the visible and NIR higher than 70%. In addition, multipoint alignment monitoring, using up to five sensors lined along a light path of about 5 meters, can be achieved with a resolution better than 20m. (Author)

  20. Large Size High Performance Transparent Amorphous Silicon Sensors for Laser Beam Position Detection and Monitoring

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Calderon, A.; Martinez Rivero, C.; Matorras, F.; Rodrigo, T.; Sobron, M.; Vila, I.; Virto; Alberdi, J.; Arce, P.; Barcala, J. M.; Calvo, E.; Ferrando, A.; Josa, M. I.; Luque, J. M.; Molinero, A.; Navarrete, J.; Oller, J. C.; Kohler, C.; Lutz, B.; Schubert, M. B.

    2006-01-01

    We present the measured performance of a new generation of semitransparente amorphous silicon position detectors. They have a large sensitive area (30 x 30 mm2) and show good properties such as a high response (about 20 mA/W), an intinsic position resolution better than 3 m, a spatial point reconstruction precision better than 10 m, deflection angles smaller than 10 rad and a transmission power in the visible and NIR higher than 70%. In addition, multipoint alignment monitoring, using up to five sensors lined along a light path of about 5 meters, can be achieved with a resolution better than 20m. (Author)

  1. Performance of a novel wafer scale CMOS active pixel sensor for bio-medical imaging

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Esposito, M; Evans, P M; Wells, K; Anaxagoras, T; Konstantinidis, A C; Zheng, Y; Speller, R D; Allinson, N M

    2014-01-01

    Recently CMOS active pixels sensors (APSs) have become a valuable alternative to amorphous silicon and selenium flat panel imagers (FPIs) in bio-medical imaging applications. CMOS APSs can now be scaled up to the standard 20 cm diameter wafer size by means of a reticle stitching block process. However, despite wafer scale CMOS APS being monolithic, sources of non-uniformity of response and regional variations can persist representing a significant challenge for wafer scale sensor response. Non-uniformity of stitched sensors can arise from a number of factors related to the manufacturing process, including variation of amplification, variation between readout components, wafer defects and process variations across the wafer due to manufacturing processes. This paper reports on an investigation into the spatial non-uniformity and regional variations of a wafer scale stitched CMOS APS. For the first time a per-pixel analysis of the electro-optical performance of a wafer CMOS APS is presented, to address inhomogeneity issues arising from the stitching techniques used to manufacture wafer scale sensors. A complete model of the signal generation in the pixel array has been provided and proved capable of accounting for noise and gain variations across the pixel array. This novel analysis leads to readout noise and conversion gain being evaluated at pixel level, stitching block level and in regions of interest, resulting in a coefficient of variation ⩽1.9%. The uniformity of the image quality performance has been further investigated in a typical x-ray application, i.e. mammography, showing a uniformity in terms of CNR among the highest when compared with mammography detectors commonly used in clinical practice. Finally, in order to compare the detection capability of this novel APS with the technology currently used (i.e. FPIs), theoretical evaluation of the detection quantum efficiency (DQE) at zero-frequency has been performed, resulting in a higher DQE for this

  2. Decontamination of digital image sensors and assessment of electron microscope performance in a BSL-3 containment

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Michael B. Sherman

    2015-05-01

    Full Text Available A unique biological safety level (BSL-3 cryo-electron microscopy facility with a 200 keV high-end cryo-electron microscope has been commissioned at the University of Texas Medical Branch (UTMB to study the structure of viruses and bacteria classified as select agents. We developed a microscope decontamination protocol based on chlorine dioxide gas with a continuous flow system. In this paper we report on testing digital camera sensors (both CCD and CMOS direct detector in a BSL-3 environment, and microscope performance after chlorine dioxide (ClO2 decontamination cycles.

  3. Performance of a novel wafer scale CMOS active pixel sensor for bio-medical imaging.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Esposito, M; Anaxagoras, T; Konstantinidis, A C; Zheng, Y; Speller, R D; Evans, P M; Allinson, N M; Wells, K

    2014-07-07

    Recently CMOS active pixels sensors (APSs) have become a valuable alternative to amorphous silicon and selenium flat panel imagers (FPIs) in bio-medical imaging applications. CMOS APSs can now be scaled up to the standard 20 cm diameter wafer size by means of a reticle stitching block process. However, despite wafer scale CMOS APS being monolithic, sources of non-uniformity of response and regional variations can persist representing a significant challenge for wafer scale sensor response. Non-uniformity of stitched sensors can arise from a number of factors related to the manufacturing process, including variation of amplification, variation between readout components, wafer defects and process variations across the wafer due to manufacturing processes. This paper reports on an investigation into the spatial non-uniformity and regional variations of a wafer scale stitched CMOS APS. For the first time a per-pixel analysis of the electro-optical performance of a wafer CMOS APS is presented, to address inhomogeneity issues arising from the stitching techniques used to manufacture wafer scale sensors. A complete model of the signal generation in the pixel array has been provided and proved capable of accounting for noise and gain variations across the pixel array. This novel analysis leads to readout noise and conversion gain being evaluated at pixel level, stitching block level and in regions of interest, resulting in a coefficient of variation ⩽1.9%. The uniformity of the image quality performance has been further investigated in a typical x-ray application, i.e. mammography, showing a uniformity in terms of CNR among the highest when compared with mammography detectors commonly used in clinical practice. Finally, in order to compare the detection capability of this novel APS with the technology currently used (i.e. FPIs), theoretical evaluation of the detection quantum efficiency (DQE) at zero-frequency has been performed, resulting in a higher DQE for this

  4. Torsion pendulum for the performance test of the inertial sensor for ASTROD-I

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zhou, Z B; Gao, S W; Luo, J

    2005-01-01

    A torsion pendulum facility for a ground-based performance test of the inertial sensor for ASTROD-1 has been constructed. The twist motion of the test mass is monitored and servo-controlled. The sensitivity of the electrostatic servo-controlled actuator is calibrated based on the elastic torque of the torsion fibre, and the torque resolution of the servo-controlled torsion pendulum comes to 2 x 10 -11 N m Hz -1/2 from 1 mHz to 0.1 Hz, which is likely limited by the seismic noise, electronic noise and the cross coupling between the translation and twist modes

  5. Performance characterization of VGCF/epoxy nanocomposite sensors under static load cycles and in static structural health monitoring

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hu, Bin; Hu, Ning; Cai, Yindi; Furukawa, Manabu; Matsushita, Makoto; Yuan, Weifeng; Cai, Yong; Yan, Cheng

    2013-01-01

    Compared to conventional metal-foil strain gauges, nanocomposite piezoresistive strain sensors have demonstrated high strain sensitivity and have been attracting increasing attention in recent years. To fulfil their ultimate success, the performance of vapor growth carbon fiber (VGCF)/epoxy nanocomposite strain sensors subjected to static cyclic loads was evaluated in this work. A strain-equivalent quantity (resistance change ratio) in cantilever beams with intentionally induced notches in bending was evaluated using the conventional metal-foil strain gauges and the VGCF/epoxy nanocomposite sensors. Compared to the metal-foil strain gauges, the nanocomposite sensors are much more sensitive to even slight structural damage. Therefore, it was confirmed that the signal stability, reproducibility, and durability of these nanocomposite sensors are very promising, leading to the present endeavor to apply them for static structural health monitoring. (paper)

  6. Sensors vs. experts - a performance comparison of sensor-based fall risk assessment vs. conventional assessment in a sample of geriatric patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marschollek, Michael; Rehwald, Anja; Wolf, Klaus-Hendrik; Gietzelt, Matthias; Nemitz, Gerhard; zu Schwabedissen, Hubertus Meyer; Schulze, Mareike

    2011-06-28

    Fall events contribute significantly to mortality, morbidity and costs in our ageing population. In order to identify persons at risk and to target preventive measures, many scores and assessment tools have been developed. These often require expertise and are costly to implement. Recent research investigates the use of wearable inertial sensors to provide objective data on motion features which can be used to assess individual fall risk automatically. So far it is unknown how well this new method performs in comparison with conventional fall risk assessment tools. The aim of our research is to compare the predictive performance of our new sensor-based method with conventional and established methods, based on prospective data. In a first study phase, 119 inpatients of a geriatric clinic took part in motion measurements using a wireless triaxial accelerometer during a Timed Up&Go (TUG) test and a 20 m walk. Furthermore, the St. Thomas Risk Assessment Tool in Falling Elderly Inpatients (STRATIFY) was performed, and the multidisciplinary geriatric care team estimated the patients' fall risk. In a second follow-up phase of the study, 46 of the participants were interviewed after one year, including a fall and activity assessment. The predictive performances of the TUG, the STRATIFY and team scores are compared. Furthermore, two automatically induced logistic regression models based on conventional clinical and assessment data (CONV) as well as sensor data (SENSOR) are matched. Among the risk assessment scores, the geriatric team score (sensitivity 56%, specificity 80%) outperforms STRATIFY and TUG. The induced logistic regression models CONV and SENSOR achieve similar performance values (sensitivity 68%/58%, specificity 74%/78%, AUC 0.74/0.72, +LR 2.64/2.61). Both models are able to identify more persons at risk than the simple scores. Sensor-based objective measurements of motion parameters in geriatric patients can be used to assess individual fall risk, and our

  7. Extraction of bowing parameters from violin performance combining motion capture and sensors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schoonderwaldt, E; Demoucron, M

    2009-11-01

    A method is described for measurement of a complete set of bowing parameters in violin performance. Optical motion capture was combined with sensors for accurate measurement of the main bowing parameters (bow position, bow velocity, bow acceleration, bow-bridge distance, and bow force) as well as secondary control parameters (skewness, inclination, and tilt of the bow). In addition, other performance features (moments of on/off in bow-string contact, string played, and bowing direction) were extracted. Detailed descriptions of the calculations of the bowing parameters, features, and calibrations are given. The described system is capable of measuring all bowing parameters without disturbing the player, allowing for detailed studies of musically relevant aspects of bow control and coordination of bowing parameters in bowed-string instrument performance.

  8. Effect of Sensors on the Reliability and Control Performance of Power Circuits in the Web of Things (WoT

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sungwoo Bae

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available In order to realize a true WoT environment, a reliable power circuit is required to ensure interconnections among a range of WoT devices. This paper presents research on sensors and their effects on the reliability and response characteristics of power circuits in WoT devices. The presented research can be used in various power circuit applications, such as energy harvesting interfaces, photovoltaic systems, and battery management systems for the WoT devices. As power circuits rely on the feedback from voltage/current sensors, the system performance is likely to be affected by the sensor failure rates, sensor dynamic characteristics, and their interface circuits. This study investigated how the operational availability of the power circuits is affected by the sensor failure rates by performing a quantitative reliability analysis. In the analysis process, this paper also includes the effects of various reconstruction and estimation techniques used in power processing circuits (e.g., energy harvesting circuits and photovoltaic systems. This paper also reports how the transient control performance of power circuits is affected by sensor interface circuits. With the frequency domain stability analysis and circuit simulation, it was verified that the interface circuit dynamics may affect the transient response characteristics of power circuits. The verification results in this paper showed that the reliability and control performance of the power circuits can be affected by the sensor types, fault tolerant approaches against sensor failures, and the response characteristics of the sensor interfaces. The analysis results were also verified by experiments using a power circuit prototype.

  9. Spin disorder effect in anomalous Hall effect in MnGa

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mendonça, A. P. A.; Varalda, J.; Schreiner, W. H.; Mosca, D. H.

    2017-12-01

    We report on resistivity and Hall effect in MnGa thin films grown by molecular beam epitaxy on GaAs substrates. Highly (1 1 1)-textured MnGa film with L10 structure exhibits hard magnetic properties with coercivities as high as 20 kOe and spin disorder mechanisms contributing to the Hall conductivity at room temperature. Density functional theory calculations were performed to determine the intrinsic Berry curvature in the momentum space with chiral spin structure that results in an anomalous Hall conductivity of 127 (Ωcm)-1 comparable to that measured at low temperature. In addition to residual and side-jump contributions, which are enhanced by thermal activation, both anomalous Hall conductivity and Hall angle increase between 100 K and room temperature. The present results reinforce the potential of Mn-Ga system for developing Hall effect-based spintronic devices.

  10. The fractional quantum Hall effect goes organic

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Smet, Jurgen

    2000-01-01

    Physicists have been fascinated by the behaviour of two-dimensional electron gases for the past two decades. All of these experiments were performed on inorganic semiconductor devices, most of them based on gallium arsenide. Indeed, until recently it was thought that the subtle effects that arise due to electron-electron interactions in these devices required levels of purity that could not be achieved in other material systems. However, Hendrik Schoen, Christian Kloc and Bertram Batlogg of Bell Laboratories in the US have now observed the fractional quantum Hall effect - the most dramatic signature of electron-electron interactions - in two organic semiconductors. (U.K.)

  11. Performance Analysis of Motion-Sensor Behavior for User Authentication on Smartphones

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chao Shen

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available The growing trend of using smartphones as personal computing platforms to access and store private information has stressed the demand for secure and usable authentication mechanisms. This paper investigates the feasibility and applicability of using motion-sensor behavior data for user authentication on smartphones. For each sample of the passcode, sensory data from motion sensors are analyzed to extract descriptive and intensive features for accurate and fine-grained characterization of users’ passcode-input actions. One-class learning methods are applied to the feature space for performing user authentication. Analyses are conducted using data from 48 participants with 129,621 passcode samples across various operational scenarios and different types of smartphones. Extensive experiments are included to examine the efficacy of the proposed approach, which achieves a false-rejection rate of 6.85% and a false-acceptance rate of 5.01%. Additional experiments on usability with respect to passcode length, sensitivity with respect to training sample size, scalability with respect to number of users, and flexibility with respect to screen size were provided to further explore the effectiveness and practicability. The results suggest that sensory data could provide useful authentication information, and this level of performance approaches sufficiency for two-factor authentication on smartphones. Our dataset is publicly available to facilitate future research.

  12. Performance Analysis of Motion-Sensor Behavior for User Authentication on Smartphones.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shen, Chao; Yu, Tianwen; Yuan, Sheng; Li, Yunpeng; Guan, Xiaohong

    2016-03-09

    The growing trend of using smartphones as personal computing platforms to access and store private information has stressed the demand for secure and usable authentication mechanisms. This paper investigates the feasibility and applicability of using motion-sensor behavior data for user authentication on smartphones. For each sample of the passcode, sensory data from motion sensors are analyzed to extract descriptive and intensive features for accurate and fine-grained characterization of users' passcode-input actions. One-class learning methods are applied to the feature space for performing user authentication. Analyses are conducted using data from 48 participants with 129,621 passcode samples across various operational scenarios and different types of smartphones. Extensive experiments are included to examine the efficacy of the proposed approach, which achieves a false-rejection rate of 6.85% and a false-acceptance rate of 5.01%. Additional experiments on usability with respect to passcode length, sensitivity with respect to training sample size, scalability with respect to number of users, and flexibility with respect to screen size were provided to further explore the effectiveness and practicability. The results suggest that sensory data could provide useful authentication information, and this level of performance approaches sufficiency for two-factor authentication on smartphones. Our dataset is publicly available to facilitate future research.

  13. Grading smart sensors: Performance assessment and ranking using familiar scores like A+ to D-

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kessel, Ronald T.

    2005-03-01

    Starting with the supposition that the product of smart sensors - whether autonomous, networked, or fused - is in all cases information, it is shown here using information theory how a metric Q, ranging between 0 and 100%, can be derived to assess the quality of the information provided. The analogy with student grades is immediately evident and elaborated. As with student grades, numerical percentages suggest more precision than can be justified, so a conversion to letter grades A+ to D- is desirable. Owing to the close analogy with familiar academic grades, moreover, the new grade is a measure of effectiveness (MOE) that commanders and decision makers should immediately appreciate and find quite natural, even if they do not care to follow the methodology behind the performance test, as they focus on higher-level strategic matters of sensor deployment or procurement. The metric is illustrated by translating three specialist performance tests - the Receiver Operating Characteristic (ROC) curve, the Constant False Alarm Rate (CFAR) approach, and confusion matrices - into letter grades for use then by strategists. Actual military and security systems are included among the examples.

  14. Performance Analysis of Motion-Sensor Behavior for User Authentication on Smartphones

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shen, Chao; Yu, Tianwen; Yuan, Sheng; Li, Yunpeng; Guan, Xiaohong

    2016-01-01

    The growing trend of using smartphones as personal computing platforms to access and store private information has stressed the demand for secure and usable authentication mechanisms. This paper investigates the feasibility and applicability of using motion-sensor behavior data for user authentication on smartphones. For each sample of the passcode, sensory data from motion sensors are analyzed to extract descriptive and intensive features for accurate and fine-grained characterization of users’ passcode-input actions. One-class learning methods are applied to the feature space for performing user authentication. Analyses are conducted using data from 48 participants with 129,621 passcode samples across various operational scenarios and different types of smartphones. Extensive experiments are included to examine the efficacy of the proposed approach, which achieves a false-rejection rate of 6.85% and a false-acceptance rate of 5.01%. Additional experiments on usability with respect to passcode length, sensitivity with respect to training sample size, scalability with respect to number of users, and flexibility with respect to screen size were provided to further explore the effectiveness and practicability. The results suggest that sensory data could provide useful authentication information, and this level of performance approaches sufficiency for two-factor authentication on smartphones. Our dataset is publicly available to facilitate future research. PMID:27005626

  15. Real-time distributed fiber optic sensor for security systems: Performance, event classification and nuisance mitigation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mahmoud, Seedahmed S.; Visagathilagar, Yuvaraja; Katsifolis, Jim

    2012-09-01

    The success of any perimeter intrusion detection system depends on three important performance parameters: the probability of detection (POD), the nuisance alarm rate (NAR), and the false alarm rate (FAR). The most fundamental parameter, POD, is normally related to a number of factors such as the event of interest, the sensitivity of the sensor, the installation quality of the system, and the reliability of the sensing equipment. The suppression of nuisance alarms without degrading sensitivity in fiber optic intrusion detection systems is key to maintaining acceptable performance. Signal processing algorithms that maintain the POD and eliminate nuisance alarms are crucial for achieving this. In this paper, a robust event classification system using supervised neural networks together with a level crossings (LCs) based feature extraction algorithm is presented for the detection and recognition of intrusion and non-intrusion events in a fence-based fiber-optic intrusion detection system. A level crossings algorithm is also used with a dynamic threshold to suppress torrential rain-induced nuisance alarms in a fence system. Results show that rain-induced nuisance alarms can be suppressed for rainfall rates in excess of 100 mm/hr with the simultaneous detection of intrusion events. The use of a level crossing based detection and novel classification algorithm is also presented for a buried pipeline fiber optic intrusion detection system for the suppression of nuisance events and discrimination of intrusion events. The sensor employed for both types of systems is a distributed bidirectional fiber-optic Mach-Zehnder (MZ) interferometer.

  16. Calibration of automatic performance measures - speed and volume data: volume 2, evaluation of the accuracy of approach volume counts and speeds collected by microwave sensors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2016-05-01

    This study evaluated the accuracy of approach volumes and free flow approach speeds collected by the Wavetronix : SmartSensor Advance sensor for the Signal Performance Metrics system of the Utah Department of Transportation (UDOT), : using the field ...

  17. ATLAS Assembly Hall Open Day

    CERN Multimedia

    Patrice Loiez

    2004-01-01

    To mark the 50th Anniversary of the founding of CERN, a day of tours, displays and presentations was held in October 2004. The assembly halls for the experiments that were waiting to be installed on the LHC, such as ATLAS shown here, were transformed into display areas and cafés.

  18. Universal intrinsic spin Hall effect

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Sinova, J.; Culcer, D.; Sinitsyn, N. A.; Niu, Q.; Jungwirth, Tomáš; MacDonald, A. H.

    2004-01-01

    Roč. 92, č. 12 (2004), 126603/1-126603/4 ISSN 0031-9007 R&D Projects: GA ČR GA202/02/0912 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z1010914 Keywords : semiconductor quantum wells * spin-orbit interaction * spin Hall effect Subject RIV: BM - Solid Matter Physics ; Magnetism Impact factor: 7.218, year: 2004

  19. Spin Hall effect for anyons

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dhar, S.; Basu, B.; Ghosh, Subir

    2007-01-01

    We explain the intrinsic spin Hall effect from generic anyon dynamics in the presence of external electromagnetic field. The free anyon is represented as a spinning particle with an underlying non-commutative configuration space. The Berry curvature plays a major role in the analysis

  20. High performance architecture design for large scale fibre-optic sensor arrays using distributed EDFAs and hybrid TDM/DWDM

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liao, Yi; Austin, Ed; Nash, Philip J.; Kingsley, Stuart A.; Richardson, David J.

    2013-09-01

    A distributed amplified dense wavelength division multiplexing (DWDM) array architecture is presented for interferometric fibre-optic sensor array systems. This architecture employs a distributed erbium-doped fibre amplifier (EDFA) scheme to decrease the array insertion loss, and employs time division multiplexing (TDM) at each wavelength to increase the number of sensors that can be supported. The first experimental demonstration of this system is reported including results which show the potential for multiplexing and interrogating up to 4096 sensors using a single telemetry fibre pair with good system performance. The number can be increased to 8192 by using dual pump sources.

  1. The Other Hall Effect: College Board Physics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sheppard, Keith; Gunning, Amanda M.

    2013-01-01

    Edwin Herbert Hall (1855-1938), discoverer of the Hall effect, was one of the first winners of the AAPT Oersted Medal for his contributions to the teaching of physics. While Hall's role in establishing laboratory work in high schools is widely acknowledged, his position as chair of the physics section of the Committee on College Entrance…

  2. Simulation-Driven Development and Optimization of a High-Performance Six-Dimensional Wrist Force/Torque Sensor

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Qiaokang LIANG

    2010-05-01

    Full Text Available This paper describes the Simulation-Driven Development and Optimization (SDDO of a six-dimensional force/torque sensor with high performance. By the implementation of the SDDO, the developed sensor possesses high performance such as high sensitivity, linearity, stiffness and repeatability simultaneously, which is hard for tranditional force/torque sensor. Integrated approach provided by software ANSYS was used to streamline and speed up the process chain and thereby to deliver results significantly faster than traditional approaches. The result of calibration experiment possesses some impressive characters, therefore the developed fore/torque sensor can be usefully used in industry and the methods of design can also be used to develop industrial product.

  3. Simulation and performance evaluation of fiber optic sensor for detection of hepatic malignancies in human liver tissues

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sharma, Anuj K.; Gupta, Jyoti; Basu, Rikmantra

    2018-01-01

    A fiber optic sensor is proposed for the identification of healthy and cancerous liver tissues through determination of their corresponding refractive index values. Existing experimental results describing variation of complex refractive index of liver tissues in near infrared (NIR) spectral region are considered for theoretical calculations. The intensity interrogation method with chalcogenide fiber is considered. The sensor's performance is closely analyzed in terms of its sensitivity at multiple operating wavelengths falling in NIR region. Operating at shorter NIR wavelengths leads to greater sensitivity. The effect of design parameters (sensing region length and fiber core diameter), different launching conditions, and fiber glass materials on sensor's performance is examined. The proposed sensor has the potential to provide high sensitivity of liver tissue detection.

  4. A novel simulation method to evaluate the collection performance of a monolithic active pixel sensor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fu Min; Tang Zhen'an

    2011-01-01

    A novel simulation method is presented in this paper to evaluate the collection performance of monolithic active pixel sensor (MAPS) devices for minimum ionizing particle tracking. A simplified 3D matrix pixel structure is built using the computer aided design software Sentaurus. The virtual device is then divided into hundreds of parts and an independent customized X photon model is involved in each part to simulate the conditions under 55 Fe radiation. After data processing and analysis, charge collection efficiency, collection time and diffusion conditions can be estimated in detail. In order to verify the reliability of the method, comparisons are made between the simulations and experiments. Although there are some defects, it can be concluded that the proposed idea is a feasible method for the evaluation of the MAPS collection performance. (authors)

  5. Backthinned TDI CCD image sensor design and performance for the Pleiades high resolution Earth observation satellites

    Science.gov (United States)

    Materne, A.; Bardoux, A.; Geoffray, H.; Tournier, T.; Kubik, P.; Morris, D.; Wallace, I.; Renard, C.

    2017-11-01

    The PLEIADES-HR Earth observing satellites, under CNES development, combine a 0.7m resolution panchromatic channel, and a multispectral channel allowing a 2.8 m resolution, in 4 spectral bands. The 2 satellites will be placed on a sun-synchronous orbit at an altitude of 695 km. The camera operates in push broom mode, providing images across a 20 km swath. This paper focuses on the specifications, design and performance of the TDI detectors developed by e2v technologies under CNES contract for the panchromatic channel. Design drivers, derived from the mission and satellite requirements, architecture of the sensor and measurement results for key performances of the first prototypes are presented.

  6. Transparent conducting films of hierarchically nanostructured polyaniline networks on flexible substrates for high-performance gas sensors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bai, Shouli; Sun, Chaozheng; Wan, Pengbo; Wang, Cheng; Luo, Ruixian; Li, Yaping; Liu, Junfeng; Sun, Xiaoming

    2015-01-21

    Transparent chemical gas sensors are assembled from a transparent conducting film of hierarchically nanostructured polyaniline (PANI) networks fabricated on a flexible PET substrate, by coating silver nanowires (Ag NWs) followed by the in situ polymerization of aniline near the sacrificial Ag NW template. The sensor exhibits enhanced gas sensing performance at room temperature in both sensitivity and selectivity to NH3 compared to pure PANI film. © 2014 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  7. Exercise Performance Measurement with Smartphone Embedded Sensor for Well-Being Management

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chung-Tse Liu

    2016-10-01

    Full Text Available Regular physical activity reduces the risk of many diseases and improves physical and mental health. However, physical inactivity is widespread globally. Improving physical activity levels is a global concern in well-being management. Exercise performance measurement systems have the potential to improve physical activity by providing feedback and motivation to users. We propose an exercise performance measurement system for well-being management that is based on the accumulated activity effective index (AAEI and incorporates a smartphone-embedded sensor. The proposed system generates a numeric index that is based on users’ exercise performance: their level of physical activity and number of days spent exercising. The AAEI presents a clear number that can serve as a useful feedback and goal-setting tool. We implemented the exercise performance measurement system by using a smartphone and conducted experiments to assess the feasibility of the system and investigated the user experience. We recruited 17 participants for validating the feasibility of the measurement system and a total of 35 participants for investigating the user experience. The exercise performance measurement system showed an overall precision of 88% in activity level estimation. Users provided positive feedback about their experience with the exercise performance measurement system. The proposed system is feasible and has a positive effective on well-being management.

  8. Analyses of performance of novel sensors with different coatings for detection of Lipopolysaccharide

    KAUST Repository

    Mohd. Syaifudin, A. R.; Mukhopadhyay, Subhas Chandra; Yu, Paklam; Matias, Ignacio R.; Goicoechea, J.; Kosel, Jü rgen; Gooneratne, Chinthaka Pasan

    2011-01-01

    Interdigital sensors have been widely used for non-destructive applications. New types of planar interdigital sensors have been fabricated with different coating materials to assess the response to Lipopolysaccharide, LPS. All the coatings were

  9. Hall effect in the normal phase of the organic superconductor (TMTSF)2PF6

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Moser, J.; Cooper, J.R.; Jerome, D.

    2000-01-01

    We report accurate Hall effect measurements performed in the normal phase of the quasi-one-dimensional organic conductor (TMTSF)(2)PF(6) at ambient pressure. The Hall coefficient is found to be strongly temperature dependent all the way from 300 K down to the spin density wave onset arising aroun...

  10. Performance Comparison of Reputation Assessment Techniques Based on Self-Organizing Maps in Wireless Sensor Networks

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sabrina Sicari

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Many solutions based on machine learning techniques have been proposed in literature aimed at detecting and promptly counteracting various kinds of malicious attack (data violation, clone, sybil, neglect, greed, and DoS attacks, which frequently affect Wireless Sensor Networks (WSNs. Besides recognizing the corrupted or violated information, also the attackers should be identified, in order to activate the proper countermeasures for preserving network’s resources and to mitigate their malicious effects. To this end, techniques adopting Self-Organizing Maps (SOM for intrusion detection in WSN were revealed to represent a valuable and effective solution to the problem. In this paper, the mechanism, namely, Good Network (GoNe, which is based on SOM and is able to assess the reliability of the sensor nodes, is compared with another relevant and similar work existing in literature. Extensive performance simulations, in terms of nodes’ classification, attacks’ identification, data accuracy, energy consumption, and signalling overhead, have been carried out in order to demonstrate the better feasibility and efficiency of the proposed solution in WSN field.

  11. A high-performance lab-on-a-chip liquid sensor employing surface acoustic wave resonance

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kustanovich, K.; Yantchev, V.; Kirejev, V.; Jeffries, G. D. M.; Lobovkina, T.; Jesorka, A.

    2017-11-01

    We demonstrate herein a new concept for lab-on-a-chip in-liquid sensing, through integration of surface acoustic wave resonance (SAR) in a one-port configuration with a soft polymer microfluidic delivery system. In this concept, the reflective gratings of a one-port surface acoustic wave (SAW) resonator are employed as mass loading-sensing elements, while the SAW transducer is protected from the measurement environment. We describe the design, fabrication, implementation, and characterization using liquid medium. The sensor operates at a frequency of 185 MHz and has demonstrated a comparable sensitivity to other SAW in-liquid sensors, while offering quality factor (Q) value in water of about 250, low impedance and fairly low susceptibility to viscous damping. For proof of principle, sensing performance was evaluated by means of binding 40 nm neutravidin-coated SiO2 nanoparticles to a biotin-labeled lipid bilayer deposited over the reflectors. Frequency shifts were determined for every step of the affinity assay. Demonstration of this integrated technology highlights the potential of SAR technology for in-liquid sensing.

  12. Performance Evaluation of Beacon-Enabled Mode for IEEE 802.15.4 Wireless Sensor Network

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. Udin Harun Al Rasyid

    2013-12-01

    Full Text Available IEEE 802.15.5 standard support structure of star and peer-to-peer network formation. Strating from these, the cluster tree network can be built as a special case of peer-to-peer network to increse coverage area. In this paper, we provide an performance evaluation of beacon- enabled mode for IEEE 802.15.4 wireless sensor network on star and cluster topology in order to get the maximum result to apply the appropriate topology model as needed. We conduct analysis on each topology model by using the numbers of nodes from 10 nodes to 100 nodes to analyze throughput, delay, energy consumption, and probability success packet by using NS2 simulator. The simulation results show that the throughput and the probability of success packet of cluster topology are higher than that of star topology, and the energy consumption of cluster topology is lesser than that of star topology. However, cluster topology increases the delay more than star topology. Keywords: IEEE 802.15.4, wireless sensor network, beacon-enabled mode, topology, csma/ca

  13. Studies on Gas Sensing Performance of Cr-doped Indium Oxide Thick Film Sensors

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    D. N. Chavan

    2011-02-01

    Full Text Available A series of In1-xCrxO3 composites, with x ranging from 0.01 to 0.5wt% were prepared by mechanochemically starting from InCl3 and CrO3. Structural and micro structural characteristics of the sample were investigated by XRD, SEM with EDAX. Thick films of pure Indium Oxide and composites were prepared by standard screen printing technique. The gas sensitivity of these thick films was tested for various gases. The pure Indium Oxide thick film (x=0 shows maximum sensitivity to ethanol vapour (80 ppm at 350 oC, but composite-A (x=0.01 thick film shows maximum sensitivity to H2S gas (40 ppm at 250 oC, composite-B (x=0.1 thick film shows higher sensitivity to NH3 gas (80 ppm at 250 oC and composite-C (x=0.5 thick film shows maximum sensitivity to Cl2 gas (80 ppm at 350 oC. A systematic study of gas sensing performance of the sensors indicates the key role played by concentration variation of Cr doped species. The sensitivity, selectivity and recovery time of the sensor were measured and presented.

  14. A Detailed Look at the Performance Characteristics of the Lightning Imaging Sensor

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Daile; Cummins, Kenneth L.; Bitzer, Phillip; Koshak, William J.

    2018-01-01

    The Lightning Imaging Sensor (LIS) on board the Tropical Rainfall Measuring Mission (TRMM) effectively reached its end of life on April 15, 2015 after 17+ years of observation. Given the wealth of information in the archived LIS lightning data, and growing use of optical observations of lightning from space throughout the world, it is still of importance to better understand LIS calibration and performance characteristics. In this work, we continue our efforts to quantify the optical characteristics of the LIS pixel array, and to further characterize the detection efficiency and location accuracy of LIS. The LIS pixel array was partitioned into four quadrants, each having its own signal amplifier and digital conversion hardware. In addition, the sensor optics resulted in a decreasing sensitivity with increasing displacement from the center of the array. These engineering limitations resulted in differences in the optical emissions detected across the pixel array. Our work to date has shown a 20% increase in the count of the lightning events detected in one of the LIS quadrants, because of a lower detection threshold. In this study, we will discuss our work in progress on these limitations, and their potential impact on the group- and flash-level parameters.

  15. Performance Evaluation of Wireless Sensor Networks for Event-Detection with Shadowing-Induced Radio Irregularities

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Giuseppe De Marco

    2007-01-01

    Full Text Available In this paper, we study a particular application of wireless sensor networks for event-detection and tracking. In this kind of application, the transport of data is simplified, and guaranteeing a minimum number of packets at the monitoring node is the only constraint on the performance of the sensor network. This minimum number of packets is called event-reliability. Contrary to other studies on the subject, here we consider the behavior of such a network in presence of a realistic radio model, such as the shadowing of the radio signal. With this setting, we extend our previous analysis of the event-reliability approach for the transport of data. In particular, both regular and random networks are considered. The contribute of this work is to show via simulations that, in the presence of randomness or irregularities in the radio channel, the event-reliability can be jeopardized, that is the constraint on the minimum number of packets at the sink node could not be satisfied.

  16. High-Performance Motion Estimation for Image Sensors with Video Compression

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Weizhi Xu

    2015-08-01

    Full Text Available It is important to reduce the time cost of video compression for image sensors in video sensor network. Motion estimation (ME is the most time-consuming part in video compression. Previous work on ME exploited intra-frame data reuse in a reference frame to improve the time efficiency but neglected inter-frame data reuse. We propose a novel inter-frame data reuse scheme which can exploit both intra-frame and inter-frame data reuse for ME in video compression (VC-ME. Pixels of reconstructed frames are kept on-chip until they are used by the next current frame to avoid off-chip memory access. On-chip buffers with smart schedules of data access are designed to perform the new data reuse scheme. Three levels of the proposed inter-frame data reuse scheme are presented and analyzed. They give different choices with tradeoff between off-chip bandwidth requirement and on-chip memory size. All three levels have better data reuse efficiency than their intra-frame counterparts, so off-chip memory traffic is reduced effectively. Comparing the new inter-frame data reuse scheme with the traditional intra-frame data reuse scheme, the memory traffic can be reduced by 50% for VC-ME.

  17. Embedded Sensors and Controls to Improve Component Performance and Reliability -- Bench-scale Testbed Design Report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Melin, Alexander M. [Oak Ridge National Lab. (ORNL), Oak Ridge, TN (United States); Kisner, Roger A. [Oak Ridge National Lab. (ORNL), Oak Ridge, TN (United States); Drira, Anis [Oak Ridge National Lab. (ORNL), Oak Ridge, TN (United States); Reed, Frederick K. [Oak Ridge National Lab. (ORNL), Oak Ridge, TN (United States)

    2015-09-01

    Embedded instrumentation and control systems that can operate in extreme environments are challenging due to restrictions on sensors and materials. As a part of the Department of Energy's Nuclear Energy Enabling Technology cross-cutting technology development programs Advanced Sensors and Instrumentation topic, this report details the design of a bench-scale embedded instrumentation and control testbed. The design goal of the bench-scale testbed is to build a re-configurable system that can rapidly deploy and test advanced control algorithms in a hardware in the loop setup. The bench-scale testbed will be designed as a fluid pump analog that uses active magnetic bearings to support the shaft. The testbed represents an application that would improve the efficiency and performance of high temperature (700 C) pumps for liquid salt reactors that operate in an extreme environment and provide many engineering challenges that can be overcome with embedded instrumentation and control. This report will give details of the mechanical design, electromagnetic design, geometry optimization, power electronics design, and initial control system design.

  18. The Design of High Performance, Low Power Triple-Track Magnetic Sensor Chip

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Junning Chen

    2013-07-01

    Full Text Available This paper presents a design of a high performance and low power consumption triple-track magnetic sensor chip which was fabricated in TSMC 0.35 μm CMOS process. This chip is able to simultaneously sense, decode and read out the information stored in triple-track magnetic cards. A reference voltage generating circuit, a low-cost filter circuit, a power-on reset circuit, an RC oscillator, and a pre-decoding circuit are utilized as the basic modules. The triple-track magnetic sensor chip has four states, i.e., reset, sleep, swiping card and data read-out. In sleep state, the internal RC oscillator is closed, which means that the digital part does not operate to optimize energy consumption. In order to improve decoding accuracy and expand the sensing range of the signal, two kinds of circuit are put forward, naming offset correction circuit, and tracking circuit. With these two circuits, the sensing function of this chip can be more efficiently and accurately. We simulated these circuit modules with TSMC technology library. The results showed that these modules worked well within wide range input signal. Based on these results, the layout and tape-out were carried out. The measurement results showed that the chip do function well within a wide swipe speed range, which achieved the design target.

  19. Comparison of sensor systems designed using multizone, zonal, and CFD data for protection of indoor environments

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chen, Y. Lisa; Wen, Jin [Civil, Architectural, and Environmental Engineering, Drexel University, Philadelphia, PA 19104 (United States)

    2010-04-15

    Sensors that detect chemical and biological warfare agents can offer early warning of dangerous contaminants. However, current sensor system design is mostly by intuition and experience rather than by systematic design. To develop a sensor system design methodology, the proper selection of an indoor airflow model is needed. Various indoor airflow models exist in the literature, from complex computational fluid dynamics (CFD) to simpler approaches such as multizone and zonal models. Airflow models provide the contaminant concentration data, to which an optimization method can be applied to design sensor systems. The authors utilized a subzonal modeling approach when using a multizone model and were the first to utilize a zonal model for systematic sensor system design. The objective of the study was to examine whether or not data from a simpler airflow model could be used to design sensor systems capable of performing just as well as those designed using data from more complex CFD models. Three test environments, a small office, a large hall, and an office suite were examined. Results showed that when a unique sensor system design was not needed, sensor systems designed using data from simpler airflow models could perform just as well as those designed using CFD data. Further, only for the small office did the common engineering sensor system design practice of placing a sensor at the exhaust result in sensor system performance that was equivalent to one designed using CFD data. (author)

  20. Fiber Fabry-Perot Force Sensor with Small Volume and High Performance for Assessing Fretting Damage of Steam Generator Tubes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huang, Peijian; Wang, Ning; Li, Junying; Zhu, Yong; Zhang, Jie

    2017-12-13

    Measuring the radial collision force between the steam generator tube (SGT) and the tube support plate (TSP) is essential to assess the fretting damage of the SGT. In order to measure the radial collision force, a novel miniaturized force sensor based on fiber Fabry-Perot (F-P) was designed, and the principle and characteristics of the sensor were analyzed in detail. Then, the F-P force sensor was successfully fabricated and calibrated, and the overall dimensions of the encapsulated fiber F-P sensor were 17 mm × 5 mm × 3 mm (L × W × H). The sensor works well in humid, high pressure (10 MPa), high temperature (350 °C), and vibration (40 kHz) environments. Finally, the F-P force sensors were installed in a 1:1 steam generator test loop, and the radial collision force signals between the SGT and the TSP were obtained. The experiments indicated that the F-P sensor with small volume and high performance could help in assessing the fretting damage of the steam generator tubes.

  1. Achievable Performance and Effective Interrogator Design for SAW RFID Sensor Tags

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barton Richard J.

    2012-01-01

    current generation tags limits the performance in a cluttered sensing environment. That is, as more SAW-based sensors are added to the environment, numerous tag responses are superimposed at the receiver and decoding all or even a subset of the telemetry becomes increasingly difficult. Background clutter generated by reflectors other than the sensors themselves is also a problem, as is multipath interference and signal distortion, but the limiting factor in many remote sensing applications can be expected to be tag mutual interference. This problem may be greatly mitigated by proper design of the SAW tag waveform, but that remains an open research problem, and in the meantime, several other related questions remain to be answered including: (1) What are the fundamental relationships between tag parameters such as bit-rate, time-bandwidth-product, SNR, and achievable collision resolution? (2) What are the differences in optimal or near-optimal interrogator designs between noise-limited environments and interference-limited environments? (3) What are the performance characteristics of different interrogator designs in term of parameters such as transmitter power level, range, and number of interfering tags? In this paper, we will present the results of a research effort aimed at providing at least partial answers to all of these questions.

  2. Characterizations and performance evaluations of thin film interdigital sensors for Gram-negative bacteria detection

    KAUST Repository

    Mohd. Syaifudin, A. R.

    2011-11-01

    Thin film interdigital sensors have been designed and fabricated. The sensors were fabricated using different substrates and using different fabrication technology. The initial design was fabricated on glass slide and fabricated using IDT (Intergrated Device Technology). The new sensors were fabricated on silicon/silicon dioxide wafer. All sensors were coated with APTES, a cross-linker bind to certain bio-molecules and then were immobilized with Polymyxin B, a specific bio-molecules that bind to endotoxin (Lipopolysaccharide, LPS). Sensors were tested for different concentrations of LPS. The impedance characteristics were presented using Impedance Spectroscopy method. A principle component analysis (PCA) was used for better data classification method. © 2011 IEEE.

  3. Performance of Different Sensors for Monitoring of the Vibration Generated during Thermosonic Non-destructive Testing

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kang, Bu Byoung [Korea Railroad Research Institute, Uiwang (Korea, Republic of)

    2011-04-15

    Vibration monitoring is required for reliable thermosonic testing to decide whether sufficient vibration is achieved in each test for the detection of cracks. From a practical point of view, a cheaper and convenient monitoring method is better for the application to real tests. Therefore, the performance of different sensors for vibration monitoring was investigated and compared in this study to find a convenient and acceptable measurement method for thermosonics. Velocity measured by a laser vibrometer and strain provide an equivalent HI when measured at the same position. The microphone can provide a cheaper vibration monitoring device than the laser and the heating index calculated by a microphone signal shows similar characteristics to that calculated from velocity measured by the laser vibrometer. The microphone frequency response shows that it underestimates high frequency components but it is applicable to practical tests because it gives a conservative value of HI

  4. Overview of NASA Iodine Hall Thruster Propulsion System Development

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smith, Timothy D.; Kamhawi, Hani; Hickman, Tyler; Haag, Thomas; Dankanich, John; Polzin, Kurt; Byrne, Lawrence; Szabo, James

    2016-01-01

    NASA is continuing to invest in advancing Hall thruster technologies for implementation in commercial and government missions. The most recent focus has been on increasing the power level for large-scale exploration applications. However, there has also been a similar push to examine applications of electric propulsion for small spacecraft in the range of 300 kg or less. There have been several recent iodine Hall propulsion system development activities performed by the team of the NASA Glenn Research Center, the NASA Marshall Space Flight Center, and Busek Co. Inc. In particular, the work focused on qualification of the Busek 200-W BHT-200-I and development of the 600-W BHT-600-I systems. This paper discusses the current status of iodine Hall propulsion system developments along with supporting technology development efforts.

  5. FTR: Performance-Aware and Energy-Efficient Communication Protocol for Integrating Sensor Networks into the Internet

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sinung Suakanto

    2014-11-01

    Full Text Available Integrating sensor networks into the Internet brings many advantages. For example, users can monitor or control the state of the sensors remotely without visiting the field. Some researchers have proposed methods using a REST-based web service or HTTP to establish communication between sensors and server via the Internet. Unfortunately, as we know, HTTP is a best-effort service. In some cases this means that if the number of sensors increases the end-to-end Quality of Service will decrease. The end-to-end network delay increases, as well as the failure rate of data sending caused by HTTP timeouts. In this paper, we propose Finite Time Response (FTR HTTP as a communication protocol suitable for integrating sensor networks into the Internet. We have defined a cross-layer approach that coordinates between the application layer and the physical layer to control not only performance but also energy efficiency. The HTTP request-response delay measured at the application layer is used as the decision factor at the physical layer to control the active and sleep periods. We also propose a forced-sleep period as a control mechanism to guarantee average performance for all nodes. The experimental results have shown that FTR has the ability to maintain better performance, indicated by a lower average response time and a lower average timeout experience. Optimization is still needed to gain better performance and better energy efficiency while also considering the average value of the update time.

  6. Hall effect in noncommutative coordinates

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dayi, Oemer F.; Jellal, Ahmed

    2002-01-01

    We consider electrons in uniform external magnetic and electric fields which move on a plane whose coordinates are noncommuting. Spectrum and eigenfunctions of the related Hamiltonian are obtained. We derive the electric current whose expectation value gives the Hall effect in terms of an effective magnetic field. We present a receipt to find the action which can be utilized in path integrals for noncommuting coordinates. In terms of this action we calculate the related Aharonov-Bohm phase and show that it also yields the same effective magnetic field. When magnetic field is strong enough this phase becomes independent of magnetic field. Measurement of it may give some hints on spatial noncommutativity. The noncommutativity parameter θ can be tuned such that electrons moving in noncommutative coordinates are interpreted as either leading to the fractional quantum Hall effect or composite fermions in the usual coordinates

  7. General vibration monitoring: Experimental hall

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jendrzejczyk, J.A.; Wambsganss, M.W.; Smith, R.K.

    1993-01-01

    The reported vibration data were generated from measurements made on the experimental hall floor on December 2, 1992. At the time of the measurements, the ESRF hydrolevel was set-up in the Early Assembly Area (EAA) of the experimental hall and was being used to measure static displacement (settlement) of the floor. The vibration measurement area was on and adjacent to the EAA, in the vicinity of the ESRF hydrolevel test which was in progress. This report summarizes the objectives, instrumentation, measurement locations, observations, and conclusions, and provides selected results in the form of RMS vs. time plots, and power spectral densities from which frequency information can be derived. Measured response amplitudes were within the vibration criteria established for the APS

  8. Thermal Annealing Effect on Structural, Morphological, and Sensor Performance of PANI-Ag-Fe Based Electrochemical E. coli Sensor for Environmental Monitoring

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Norshafadzila Mohammad Naim

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available PANI-Ag-Fe nanocomposite thin films based electrochemical E. coli sensor was developed with thermal annealing. PANI-Ag-Fe nanocomposite thin films were prepared by oxidative polymerization of aniline and the reduction process of Ag-Fe bimetallic compound with the presence of nitric acid and PVA. The films were deposited on glass substrate using spin-coating technique before they were annealed at 300°C. The films were characterized using XRD, UV-Vis spectroscopy, and FESEM to study the structural and morphological properties. The electrochemical sensor performance was conducted using I-V measurement electrochemical impedance spectroscopy (EIS. The sensitivity upon the presence of E. coli was measured in clean water and E. coli solution. From XRD analysis, the crystallite sizes were found to become larger for the samples after annealing. UV-Vis absorption bands for samples before and after annealing show maximum absorbance peaks at around 422 nm–424 nm and 426 nm–464 nm, respectively. FESEM images show the diameter size for nanospherical Ag-Fe alloy particles increases after annealing. The sensor performance of PANI-Ag-Fe nanocomposite thin films upon E. coli cells in liquid medium indicates the sensitivity increases after annealing.

  9. Design and Performance Evaluation of Sensors and Actuators for Advanced Optical Systems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Clark, Natalie

    2011-01-01

    Current state-of-the-art commercial sensors and actuators do not meet many of NASA s next generation spacecraft and instrument needs. Nor do they satisfy the DoD needs for satellite missions, especially micro/nano satellite missions. In an effort to develop advanced optical devices and instruments that meet mission requirements, NASA Langley recently completed construction of a new cleanroom housing equipment capable of fabricating high performance active optic and adaptive optic technologies including deformable mirrors, reconfigurable lenses (both refractive and diffractive), spectrometers, spectro-polarimeters, tunable filters and many other active optic devices. In addition to performance, these advanced optic technologies offer advantages in speed, size, weight, power consumption, and radiation tolerance. The active optic devices described in this paper rely on birefringent liquid crystal materials to alter either the phase or the polarization of the incoming light. Design considerations and performance evaluation results for various NASA applications are presented. Applications presented will include large space telescopes, optical communications, spacecraft windows, coronagraphs, and star trackers. Keywords: Photonics, Adaptive Optics, Tunable Filters, MEMs., MOEMs, Coronagraph, Star Tracker

  10. Performance analysis and enhancement for visible light communication using CMOS sensors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guan, Weipeng; Wu, Yuxiang; Xie, Canyu; Fang, Liangtao; Liu, Xiaowei; Chen, Yingcong

    2018-03-01

    Complementary Metal-Oxide-Semiconductor (CMOS) sensors are widely used in mobile-phone and cameras. Hence, it is attractive if these camera can be used as the receivers of visible light communication (VLC). Using the rolling shutter mechanism can increase the data rate of VLC based on CMOS camera, and different techniques have been proposed to improve the demodulation of the rolling shutter mechanism. However, these techniques are too complexity. In this work, we demonstrate and analyze the performance of the VLC link using CMOS camera for different LED luminaires for the first time in our knowledge. Experimental evaluation to compare their bit-error-rate (BER) performances and demodulation are also performed, and it can be summarized that just need to change the LED luminaire with more uniformity light output, the blooming effect would not exist; which not only can reduce the complexity of the demodulation but also enhance the communication quality. In addition, we propose and demonstrate to use contrast limited adaptive histogram equalization to extend the transmission distance and mitigate the influence of the background noise. And the experimental results show that the BER can be decreased by an order of magnitude by using the proposed method.

  11. A SURVEY ON MULTICAST ROUTING PROTOCOLS FOR PERFORMANCE EVALUATION IN WIRELESS SENSOR NETWORK

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. Suruliandi

    2015-03-01

    Full Text Available Multicast is a process used to transfer same message to multiple receivers at the same time. This paper presents the simulation and analysis of the performance of six different multicast routing protocols for Wireless Sensor Network (WSN. They are On Demand Multicast Routing Protocol (ODMRP, Protocol for Unified Multicasting through Announcement (PUMA, Multicast Adhoc On demand Distance Vector Protocol (MAODV, Overlay Boruvka-based Adhoc Multicast Protocol (OBAMP, Application Layer Multicast Algorithm (ALMA and enhanced version of ALMA (ALMA-H for WSN. Among them, ODMRP, MAODV and PUMA are reactive protocols while OBAMP, ALMA and ALMA-H are proactive protocols. This paper compares the performance of these protocols with common parameters such as Throughput, Reliability, End-to-End delay and Packet Delivery Ratio (PDR with increasing the numbers of nodes and increasing the speed of the nodes. The main objective of this work is to select the efficient multicast routing protocol for WSN among six multicast routing protocol based on relative strength and weakness of each protocol. The summary of above six multicast routing protocols is presented with a table of different performance characteristics. Experimental result shows that ODMRP attains higher throughput, reliability and higher packet delivery ratio than other multicast routing protocol, while incurring far less end-to-end delay.

  12. High-performance integrated field-effect transistor-based sensors

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Adzhri, R., E-mail: adzhri@gmail.com [Institute of Nano Electronic Engineering (INEE), Universiti Malaysia Perlis (UniMAP), Kangar, Perlis (Malaysia); Md Arshad, M.K., E-mail: mohd.khairuddin@unimap.edu.my [Institute of Nano Electronic Engineering (INEE), Universiti Malaysia Perlis (UniMAP), Kangar, Perlis (Malaysia); School of Microelectronic Engineering (SoME), Universiti Malaysia Perlis (UniMAP), Kangar, Perlis (Malaysia); Gopinath, Subash C.B., E-mail: subash@unimap.edu.my [Institute of Nano Electronic Engineering (INEE), Universiti Malaysia Perlis (UniMAP), Kangar, Perlis (Malaysia); School of Bioprocess Engineering (SBE), Universiti Malaysia Perlis (UniMAP), Arau, Perlis (Malaysia); Ruslinda, A.R., E-mail: ruslinda@unimap.edu.my [Institute of Nano Electronic Engineering (INEE), Universiti Malaysia Perlis (UniMAP), Kangar, Perlis (Malaysia); Fathil, M.F.M., E-mail: faris.fathil@gmail.com [Institute of Nano Electronic Engineering (INEE), Universiti Malaysia Perlis (UniMAP), Kangar, Perlis (Malaysia); Ayub, R.M., E-mail: ramzan@unimap.edu.my [Institute of Nano Electronic Engineering (INEE), Universiti Malaysia Perlis (UniMAP), Kangar, Perlis (Malaysia); Nor, M. Nuzaihan Mohd, E-mail: m.nuzaihan@unimap.edu.my [Institute of Nano Electronic Engineering (INEE), Universiti Malaysia Perlis (UniMAP), Kangar, Perlis (Malaysia); Voon, C.H., E-mail: chvoon@unimap.edu.my [Institute of Nano Electronic Engineering (INEE), Universiti Malaysia Perlis (UniMAP), Kangar, Perlis (Malaysia)

    2016-04-21

    Field-effect transistors (FETs) have succeeded in modern electronics in an era of computers and hand-held applications. Currently, considerable attention has been paid to direct electrical measurements, which work by monitoring changes in intrinsic electrical properties. Further, FET-based sensing systems drastically reduce cost, are compatible with CMOS technology, and ease down-stream applications. Current technologies for sensing applications rely on time-consuming strategies and processes and can only be performed under recommended conditions. To overcome these obstacles, an overview is presented here in which we specifically focus on high-performance FET-based sensor integration with nano-sized materials, which requires understanding the interaction of surface materials with the surrounding environment. Therefore, we present strategies, material depositions, device structures and other characteristics involved in FET-based devices. Special attention was given to silicon and polyaniline nanowires and graphene, which have attracted much interest due to their remarkable properties in sensing applications. - Highlights: • Performance of FET-based biosensors for the detection of biomolecules is presented. • Silicon nanowire, polyaniline and graphene are the highlighted nanoscaled materials as sensing transducers. • The importance of surface material interaction with the surrounding environment is discussed. • Different device structure architectures for ease in fabrication and high sensitivity of sensing are presented.

  13. High-performance integrated field-effect transistor-based sensors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Adzhri, R.; Md Arshad, M.K.; Gopinath, Subash C.B.; Ruslinda, A.R.; Fathil, M.F.M.; Ayub, R.M.; Nor, M. Nuzaihan Mohd; Voon, C.H.

    2016-01-01

    Field-effect transistors (FETs) have succeeded in modern electronics in an era of computers and hand-held applications. Currently, considerable attention has been paid to direct electrical measurements, which work by monitoring changes in intrinsic electrical properties. Further, FET-based sensing systems drastically reduce cost, are compatible with CMOS technology, and ease down-stream applications. Current technologies for sensing applications rely on time-consuming strategies and processes and can only be performed under recommended conditions. To overcome these obstacles, an overview is presented here in which we specifically focus on high-performance FET-based sensor integration with nano-sized materials, which requires understanding the interaction of surface materials with the surrounding environment. Therefore, we present strategies, material depositions, device structures and other characteristics involved in FET-based devices. Special attention was given to silicon and polyaniline nanowires and graphene, which have attracted much interest due to their remarkable properties in sensing applications. - Highlights: • Performance of FET-based biosensors for the detection of biomolecules is presented. • Silicon nanowire, polyaniline and graphene are the highlighted nanoscaled materials as sensing transducers. • The importance of surface material interaction with the surrounding environment is discussed. • Different device structure architectures for ease in fabrication and high sensitivity of sensing are presented.

  14. Modeling the energy performance of event-driven wireless sensor network by using static sink and mobile sink.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Jiehui; Salim, Mariam B; Matsumoto, Mitsuji

    2010-01-01

    Wireless Sensor Networks (WSNs) designed for mission-critical applications suffer from limited sensing capacities, particularly fast energy depletion. Regarding this, mobile sinks can be used to balance the energy consumption in WSNs, but the frequent location updates of the mobile sinks can lead to data collisions and rapid energy consumption for some specific sensors. This paper explores an optimal barrier coverage based sensor deployment for event driven WSNs where a dual-sink model was designed to evaluate the energy performance of not only static sensors, but Static Sink (SS) and Mobile Sinks (MSs) simultaneously, based on parameters such as sensor transmission range r and the velocity of the mobile sink v, etc. Moreover, a MS mobility model was developed to enable SS and MSs to effectively collaborate, while achieving spatiotemporal energy performance efficiency by using the knowledge of the cumulative density function (cdf), Poisson process and M/G/1 queue. The simulation results verified that the improved energy performance of the whole network was demonstrated clearly and our eDSA algorithm is more efficient than the static-sink model, reducing energy consumption approximately in half. Moreover, we demonstrate that our results are robust to realistic sensing models and also validate the correctness of our results through extensive simulations.

  15. Modeling the Energy Performance of Event-Driven Wireless Sensor Network by Using Static Sink and Mobile Sink

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Jiehui; Salim, Mariam B.; Matsumoto, Mitsuji

    2010-01-01

    Wireless Sensor Networks (WSNs) designed for mission-critical applications suffer from limited sensing capacities, particularly fast energy depletion. Regarding this, mobile sinks can be used to balance the energy consumption in WSNs, but the frequent location updates of the mobile sinks can lead to data collisions and rapid energy consumption for some specific sensors. This paper explores an optimal barrier coverage based sensor deployment for event driven WSNs where a dual-sink model was designed to evaluate the energy performance of not only static sensors, but Static Sink (SS) and Mobile Sinks (MSs) simultaneously, based on parameters such as sensor transmission range r and the velocity of the mobile sink v, etc. Moreover, a MS mobility model was developed to enable SS and MSs to effectively collaborate, while achieving spatiotemporal energy performance efficiency by using the knowledge of the cumulative density function (cdf), Poisson process and M/G/1 queue. The simulation results verified that the improved energy performance of the whole network was demonstrated clearly and our eDSA algorithm is more efficient than the static-sink model, reducing energy consumption approximately in half. Moreover, we demonstrate that our results are robust to realistic sensing models and also validate the correctness of our results through extensive simulations. PMID:22163503

  16. A Survey on Optimal Signal Processing Techniques Applied to Improve the Performance of Mechanical Sensors in Automotive Applications

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wilmar Hernandez

    2007-01-01

    Full Text Available In this paper a survey on recent applications of optimal signal processing techniques to improve the performance of mechanical sensors is made. Here, a comparison between classical filters and optimal filters for automotive sensors is made, and the current state of the art of the application of robust and optimal control and signal processing techniques to the design of the intelligent (or smart sensors that today’s cars need is presented through several experimental results that show that the fusion of intelligent sensors and optimal signal processing techniques is the clear way to go. However, the switch between the traditional methods of designing automotive sensors and the new ones cannot be done overnight because there are some open research issues that have to be solved. This paper draws attention to one of the open research issues and tries to arouse researcher’s interest in the fusion of intelligent sensors and optimal signal processing techniques.

  17. In-vitro performance of the Enlite Sensor in various glucose concentrations during hypobaric and hyperbaric conditions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Adolfsson, Peter; Ornhagen, Hans; Eriksson, Bengt M; Gautham, Raghavendhar; Jendle, Johan

    2012-11-01

    There is a need for reliable methods of glucose measurement in different environmental conditions. The objective of this in vitro study was to evaluate the performance of the Enlite® Sensor when connected to either the iPro™ Continuous Glucose Monitor recording device or the Guardian® REAL-Time transmitting device, in hypobaric and hyperbaric conditions. Sixteen sensors connected to eight iPro devices and eight Guardian REAL-Time devices were immersed in three beakers containing separate glucose concentrations: 52, 88, and 207 mg/dl (2.9, 4.9, and 11.3 mmol/liter). Two different pressure tests were conducted: a hypobaric test, corresponding to maximum 18000 ft/5500 m height, and a hyperbaric test, corresponding to maximum 100 ft/30 m depth. The linearity of the sensor signals in the different conditions was evaluated. The sensors worked continuously, and the sensor signals were collected without interruption at all pressures tested. When comparing the input signals for glucose (ISIGs) and the different glucose concentrations during altered pressure, linearity (R(2)) of 0.98 was found. During the hypobaric test, significant differences (p hyperbaric test, no differences were found. The Enlite Sensors connected to either the iPro or the Guardian REAL-Time device provided values continuously. In hyperbaric conditions, no significant differences were seen during changes in ambient pressure; however, during hypobaric conditions, the ISIG was significantly different in the low and high glucose concentrations. © 2012 Diabetes Technology Society.

  18. L'effet Hall Quantique

    Science.gov (United States)

    Samson, Thomas

    Nous proposons une methode permettant d'obtenir une expression pour la conductivite de Hall de structures electroniques bidimensionnelles et nous examinons celle -ci a la limite d'une temperature nulle dans le but de verifier l'effet Hall quantique. Nous allons nous interesser essentiellement a l'effet Hall quantique entier et aux effets fractionnaires inferieurs a un. Le systeme considere est forme d'un gaz d'electrons en interaction faible avec les impuretes de l'echantillon. Le modele du gaz d'electrons consiste en un gaz bidimensionnel d'electrons sans spin expose perpendiculairement a un champ magnetique uniforme. Ce dernier est decrit par le potentiel vecteur vec{rm A} defini dans la jauge de Dingle ou jauge symetrique. Conformement au formalisme de la seconde quantification, l'hamiltonien de ce gaz est represente dans la base des etats a un-corps de Dingle |n,m> et exprime ainsi en terme des operateurs de creation et d'annihilation correspondants a_sp{ rm n m}{dag} et a _{rm n m}. Nous supposons de plus que les electrons du niveau fondamental de Dingle interagissent entre eux via le potentiel coulombien. La methode utilisee fait appel a une equation mai tresse a N-corps, de nature quantique et statistique, et verifiant le second principe de la thermodynamique. A partir de celle-ci, nous obtenons un systeme d'equations differentielles appele hierarchie d'equations quantique dont la resolution nous permet de determiner une equation a un-corps, dite de Boltzmann quantique, et dictant l'evolution de la moyenne statistique de l'operateur non-diagonal a _sp{rm n m}{dag } a_{rm n}, _{rm m}, sous l'action du champ electrique applique vec{rm E}(t). C'est sa solution Tr(p(t) a _sp{rm n m}{dag} a_{rm n},_ {rm m}), qui definit la relation de convolution entre la densite courant de Hall vec{rm J}_{rm H }(t) et le champ electrique vec {rm E}(t) dont la transformee de Laplace-Fourier du noyau nous fournit l'expression de la conductivite de Hall desiree. Pour une valeur de

  19. Performance of a Fast Binary Readout CMOS Active Pixel Sensor Chip Designed for Charged Particle Detection

    Science.gov (United States)

    Deerli, Yavuz; Besanon, Marc; Besson, Auguste; Claus, Gilles; Deptuch, Grzegorz; Dulinski, Wojciech; Fourches, Nicolas; Goffe, Mathieu; Himmi, Abdelkader; Li, Yan; Lutz, Pierre; Orsini, Fabienne; Szelezniak, Michal

    2006-12-01

    We report on the performance of the MIMOSA8 (HiMAPS1) chip. The chip is a 128times32 pixels array where 24 columns have discriminated binary outputs and eight columns analog test outputs. Offset correction techniques are used extensively in this chip to overcome process related mismatches. The array is divided in four blocks of pixels with different conversion factors and is controlled by a serially programmable sequencer. MIMOSA8 is a representative of the CMOS sensors development option considered as a promising candidate for the Vertex Detector of the future International Linear Collider (ILC). The readout technique, implemented on the chip, combines high spatial resolution capabilities with high processing readout speed. Data acquisition, providing control of the chip and signal buffering and linked to a VME system, was made on the eight analog outputs. Analog data, without and with a 55Fe X-ray source, were acquired and processed using off-line analysis software. From the reconstruction of pixel clusters, built around a central pixel, we deduce that the charge spread is limited to the closest 25 pixels and almost all the available charge is collected. The position of the total charge collection peak (and subsequently the charge-to-voltage conversion factor) stays unaffected when the clock frequency is increased even up to 150 MHz (13.6 mus readout time per frame). The discriminators, placed in the readout chain, have proved to be fully functional. Beam tests have been made with high energy electrons at DESY (Germany) to study detection efficiency. The results prove that MIMOSA8 is the first and fastest successful monolithic active pixel sensor with on-chip signal discrimination for detection of MIPs

  20. Using a body sensor network to measure the effect of fatigue on stair climbing performance

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bergmann, Jeroen H M; Smith, Ian C H; Mayagoitia, Ruth E

    2012-01-01

    In terms of self-rated health, the most important activities of daily living are those involving mobility. Of these activities stair climbing is regarded as the most strenuous. A loss of stair climbing ability with age is normally associated with a loss of muscle strength and power, while other factors that influence muscle function, such as fatigue, are often not taken into account. So far no research has been published on how long-lasting fatigue affects activities of daily living, despite the fact that it has been repeatedly proven, in laboratory settings, to influence muscle force production over long periods of time. Technological advances in body sensor networks (BSNs) now provide a method to measure performance during complex real-life situations. In this study the use of a BSN was explored to investigate the effects of long-lasting fatigue on stair climbing performance in 20 healthy adults. Stair climbing performance was measured before and after a fatiguing protocol using a BSN. Performance was defined by temporal and spatial parameters. Long-lasting fatigue was successfully induced in all participants using an exercise protocol. The BSN showed that post-exercise fatigue did not influence stair climbing times (p > 0.2) and no meaningful changes in joint angles were found. No effect on overall stair climbing performance was found, despite a clear presence of long-lasting fatigue. This study shows that physiological paradigms can be further explored using BSNs. Ecological validity of lab-based measurements can be increased by combining them with BSNs. (paper)

  1. Performance Evaluation of Proximal Sensors for Soil Assessment in Smallholder Farms in Embu County, Kenya

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kristin Piikki

    2016-11-01

    Full Text Available Four proximal soil sensors were tested at four smallholder farms in Embu County, Kenya: a portable X-ray fluorescence sensor (PXRF, a mobile phone application for soil color determination by photography, a dual-depth electromagnetic induction (EMI sensor, and a LED-based soil optical reflectance sensor. Measurements were made at 32–43 locations at each site. Topsoil samples were analyzed for plant-available nutrients (N, P, K, Mg, Ca, S, B, Mn, Zn, Cu, and Fe, pH, total nitrogen (TN and total carbon (TC, soil texture, cation exchange capacity (CEC, and exchangeable aluminum (Al. Multivariate prediction models of each of the lab-analyzed soil properties were parameterized for 576 sensor-variable combinations. Prediction models for K, N, Ca and S, B, Zn, Mn, Fe, TC, Al, and CEC met the setup criteria for functional, robust, and accurate models. The PXRF sensor was the sensor most often included in successful models. We concluded that the combination of a PXRF and a portable soil reflectance sensor is a promising combination of handheld soil sensors for the development of in situ soil assessments as a field-based alternative or complement to laboratory measurements.

  2. Performance Evaluation of Page Migration Scheme for NVRAM-Based Wireless Sensor Nodes

    OpenAIRE

    Ryu, Yeonseung

    2013-01-01

    A wireless sensor network consists of low-powered and multifunctional sensor nodes. Since each sensor node is operated by a battery, the energy management has become one of the critical design challenges in wireless sensor networks. Some recent studies have shown that DRAM-based main memory spends a significant portion of the total system power. In this paper, we studied a buffer management scheme for hybrid main memory that combines low-power nonvolatile RAM (NVRAM) and DRAM in order to redu...

  3. Single Photon Counting Performance and Noise Analysis of CMOS SPAD-Based Image Sensors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dutton, Neale A. W.; Gyongy, Istvan; Parmesan, Luca; Henderson, Robert K.

    2016-01-01

    SPAD-based solid state CMOS image sensors utilising analogue integrators have attained deep sub-electron read noise (DSERN) permitting single photon counting (SPC) imaging. A new method is proposed to determine the read noise in DSERN image sensors by evaluating the peak separation and width (PSW) of single photon peaks in a photon counting histogram (PCH). The technique is used to identify and analyse cumulative noise in analogue integrating SPC SPAD-based pixels. The DSERN of our SPAD image sensor is exploited to confirm recent multi-photon threshold quanta image sensor (QIS) theory. Finally, various single and multiple photon spatio-temporal oversampling techniques are reviewed. PMID:27447643

  4. The Global Seismographic Network (GSN): Deployment of Next Generation VBB Borehole Sensors and Improving Overall Network Noise Performance

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hafner, K.; Davis, P.; Wilson, D.; Sumy, D.

    2017-12-01

    The Global Seismographic Network (GSN) recently received delivery of the next generation Very Broadband (VBB) borehole sensors purchased through funding from the DOE. Deployment of these sensors will be underway during the end of summer and fall of 2017 and they will eventually replace the aging KS54000 sensors at approximately one-third of the GSN network stations. We will present the latest methods of deploying these sensors in the existing deep boreholes. To achieve lower noise performance at some sites, emplacement in shallow boreholes might result in lower noise performance for the existing site conditions. In some cases shallow borehole installations may be adapted to vault stations (which make up two thirds of the network), as a means of reducing tilt-induced signals on the horizontal components. The GSN is creating a prioritized list of equipment upgrades at selected stations with the ultimate goal of optimizing overall network data availability and noise performance. For an overview of the performance of the current GSN relative to selected set of metrics, we are utilizing data quality metrics and Probability Density Functions (PDFs)) generated by the IRIS Data Management Centers' (DMC) MUSTANG (Modular Utility for Statistical Knowledge Gathering) and LASSO (Latest Assessment of Seismic Station Observations) tools. We will present our metric analysis of GSN performance in 2016, and show the improvements at GSN sites resulting from recent instrumentation and infrastructure upgrades.

  5. USING DISTANCE SENSORS TO PERFORM COLLISION AVOIDANCE MANEUVRES ON UAV APPLICATIONS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. Raimundo

    2017-08-01

    Full Text Available The Unmanned Aerial Vehicles (UAV and its applications are growing for both civilian and military purposes. The operability of an UAV proved that some tasks and operations can be done easily and at a good cost-efficiency ratio. Nowadays, an UAV can perform autonomous missions. It is very useful to certain UAV applications, such as meteorology, vigilance systems, agriculture, environment mapping and search and rescue operations. One of the biggest problems that an UAV faces is the possibility of collision with other objects in the flight area. To avoid this, an algorithm was developed and implemented in order to prevent UAV collision with other objects. “Sense and Avoid” algorithm was developed as a system for UAVs to avoid objects in collision course. This algorithm uses a Light Detection and Ranging (LiDAR, to detect objects facing the UAV in mid-flights. This light sensor is connected to an on-board hardware, Pixhawk’s flight controller, which interfaces its communications with another hardware: Raspberry Pi. Communications between Ground Control Station and UAV are made via Wi-Fi or cellular third or fourth generation (3G/4G. Some tests were made in order to evaluate the “Sense and Avoid” algorithm’s overall performance. These tests were done in two different environments: A 3D simulated environment and a real outdoor environment. Both modes worked successfully on a simulated 3D environment, and “Brake” mode on a real outdoor, proving its concepts.

  6. PERFORMANCE ASSESSMENT OF INTEGRATED SENSOR ORIENTATION WITH A LOW-COST GNSS RECEIVER

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. Rehak

    2017-08-01

    Full Text Available Mapping with Micro Aerial Vehicles (MAVs whose weight does not exceed 5 kg is gaining importance in applications such as corridor mapping, road and pipeline inspections, or mapping of large areas with homogeneous surface structure, e.g. forest or agricultural fields. In these challenging scenarios, integrated sensor orientation (ISO improves effectiveness and accuracy. Furthermore, in block geometry configurations, this mode of operation allows mapping without ground control points (GCPs. Accurate camera positions are traditionally determined by carrier-phase GNSS (Global Navigation Satellite System positioning. However, such mode of positioning has strong requirements on receiver’s and antenna’s performance. In this article, we present a mapping project in which we employ a single-frequency, low-cost (< $100 GNSS receiver on a MAV. The performance of the low-cost receiver is assessed by comparing its trajectory with a reference trajectory obtained by a survey-grade, multi-frequency GNSS receiver. In addition, the camera positions derived from these two trajectories are used as observations in bundle adjustment (BA projects and mapping accuracy is evaluated at check points (ChP. Several BA scenarios are considered with absolute and relative aerial position control. Additionally, the presented experiments show the possibility of BA to determine a camera-antenna spatial offset, so-called lever-arm.

  7. High performance supercapacitor and non-enzymatic hydrogen peroxide sensor based on tellurium nanoparticles

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. Manikandan

    2017-04-01

    Full Text Available Tellurium nanoparticles (Te Nps were synthesized by wet chemical method and characterized by XRD, Raman, FESEM, TEM, XPS, UV–Vis and FL. The Nps were coated on graphite foil and Glassy carbon electrode to prepare the electrodes for supercapacitor and biosensor applications. The supercapacitor performance is evaluated in 2 M KOH electrolyte by both Cyclic Voltammetry (CV and galvanostatic charge-discharge method. From charge-discharge method, Te Nps show a specific capacitance of 586 F/g at 2 mA/cm2 and 100 F/g at 30 mA/cm2 as well as an excellent cycle life (100% after 1000 cycles. In addition, the H2O2 sensor performance of Te Nps modified glassy carbon electrode is checked by CV and Chronoamperometry (CA in phosphate buffer solution (PBS. In the linear range of 0.67 to 8.04 μM of hydrogen peroxide (H2O2, Te NPs show a high sensitivity of 0.83 mA mM−1 cm−2 with a correlation coefficient of 0.995. The detection limit is 0.3 μM with a response time less than 5 s. Keywords: Tellurium nanoparticles, Supercapacitor, Biosensor, Hydrogen peroxide

  8. Harvested Energy Prediction Schemes for Wireless Sensor Networks: Performance Evaluation and Enhancements

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Muhammad

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available We review harvested energy prediction schemes to be used in wireless sensor networks and explore the relative merits of landmark solutions. We propose enhancements to the well-known Profile-Energy (Pro-Energy model, the so-called Improved Profile-Energy (IPro-Energy, and compare its performance with Accurate Solar Irradiance Prediction Model (ASIM, Pro-Energy, and Weather Conditioned Moving Average (WCMA. The performance metrics considered are the prediction accuracy and the execution time which measure the implementation complexity. In addition, the effectiveness of the considered models, when integrated in an energy management scheme, is also investigated in terms of the achieved throughput and the energy consumption. Both solar irradiance and wind power datasets are used for the evaluation study. Our results indicate that the proposed IPro-Energy scheme outperforms the other candidate models in terms of the prediction accuracy achieved by up to 78% for short term predictions and 50% for medium term prediction horizons. For long term predictions, its prediction accuracy is comparable to the Pro-Energy model but outperforms the other models by up to 64%. In addition, the IPro scheme is able to achieve the highest throughput when integrated in the developed energy management scheme. Finally, the ASIM scheme reports the smallest implementation complexity.

  9. Performance comparison of Rayleigh and STW modes on quartz crystal for strain sensor application

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fu, Chen; Lee, Ki Jung; Lee, Keekeun; Yang, Sang Sik, E-mail: ssyang@ajou.ac.kr [Department of Electrical and Computer Engineering, Ajou University, Suwon 442-749 (Korea, Republic of); Eun, Kyongtae; Choa, Sung-Hoon [Nano-IT Fusion Program, Seoul National University of Science and Technology, Seoul 139-743 (Korea, Republic of)

    2016-07-14

    In this study, we compare two kinds of strain sensors based on Rayleigh wave and surface transverse wave (STW) modes, respectively. First, we perform a strain-and-stress analysis using the finite element method, and we consider the contribution to a surface acoustic wave (SAW) velocity shift. Prior to fabrication, we use a coupling-of-modes model to simulate and optimize two-port SAW resonators for both modes. We use a network analyzer to measure and characterize the two devices. Further, we perform an experiment using a strain-testing system with a tapered cross-section cantilever beam. The experimental results show that the ratio of the frequency shift to the strain for the Rayleigh wave mode is −1.124 ppm/με in the parallel direction and 0.109 ppm/με in the perpendicular direction, while the corresponding values for the STW mode are 0.680 ppm/με and 0.189 ppm/με, respectively.

  10. Using Distance Sensors to Perform Collision Avoidance Maneuvres on Uav Applications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Raimundo, A.; Peres, D.; Santos, N.; Sebastião, P.; Souto, N.

    2017-08-01

    The Unmanned Aerial Vehicles (UAV) and its applications are growing for both civilian and military purposes. The operability of an UAV proved that some tasks and operations can be done easily and at a good cost-efficiency ratio. Nowadays, an UAV can perform autonomous missions. It is very useful to certain UAV applications, such as meteorology, vigilance systems, agriculture, environment mapping and search and rescue operations. One of the biggest problems that an UAV faces is the possibility of collision with other objects in the flight area. To avoid this, an algorithm was developed and implemented in order to prevent UAV collision with other objects. "Sense and Avoid" algorithm was developed as a system for UAVs to avoid objects in collision course. This algorithm uses a Light Detection and Ranging (LiDAR), to detect objects facing the UAV in mid-flights. This light sensor is connected to an on-board hardware, Pixhawk's flight controller, which interfaces its communications with another hardware: Raspberry Pi. Communications between Ground Control Station and UAV are made via Wi-Fi or cellular third or fourth generation (3G/4G). Some tests were made in order to evaluate the "Sense and Avoid" algorithm's overall performance. These tests were done in two different environments: A 3D simulated environment and a real outdoor environment. Both modes worked successfully on a simulated 3D environment, and "Brake" mode on a real outdoor, proving its concepts.

  11. Spin Hall effect by surface roughness

    KAUST Repository

    Zhou, Lingjun

    2015-01-08

    The spin Hall and its inverse effects, driven by the spin orbit interaction, provide an interconversion mechanism between spin and charge currents. Since the spin Hall effect generates and manipulates spin current electrically, to achieve a large effect is becoming an important topic in both academia and industries. So far, materials with heavy elements carrying a strong spin orbit interaction, provide the only option. We propose here a new mechanism, using the surface roughness in ultrathin films, to enhance the spin Hall effect without heavy elements. Our analysis based on Cu and Al thin films suggests that surface roughness is capable of driving a spin Hall angle that is comparable to that in bulk Au. We also demonstrate that the spin Hall effect induced by surface roughness subscribes only to the side-jump contribution but not the skew scattering. The paradigm proposed in this paper provides the second, not if only, alternative to generate a sizable spin Hall effect.

  12. Tunneling Anomalous and Spin Hall Effects.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Matos-Abiague, A; Fabian, J

    2015-07-31

    We predict, theoretically, the existence of the anomalous Hall effect when a tunneling current flows through a tunnel junction in which only one of the electrodes is magnetic. The interfacial spin-orbit coupling present in the barrier region induces a spin-dependent momentum filtering in the directions perpendicular to the tunneling current, resulting in a skew tunneling even in the absence of impurities. This produces an anomalous Hall conductance and spin Hall currents in the nonmagnetic electrode when a bias voltage is applied across the tunneling heterojunction. If the barrier is composed of a noncentrosymmetric material, the anomalous Hall conductance and spin Hall currents become anisotropic with respect to both the magnetization and crystallographic directions, allowing us to separate this interfacial phenomenon from the bulk anomalous and spin Hall contributions. The proposed effect should be useful for proving and quantifying the interfacial spin-orbit fields in metallic and metal-semiconductor systems.

  13. An evaluation of krypton propellant in Hall thrusters

    Science.gov (United States)

    Linnell, Jesse Allen

    Due to its high specific impulse and low price, krypton has long sparked interest as an alternate Hall thruster propellant. Unfortunately at the moment, krypton's relatively poor performance precludes it as a legitimate option. This thesis presents a detailed investigation into krypton operation in Hall thrusters. These findings suggest that the performance gap can be decreased to 4% and krypton can finally become a realistic propellant option. Although krypton has demonstrated superior specific impulse, the xenon-krypton absolute efficiency gap ranges between 2 and 15%. A phenomenological performance model indicates that the main contributors to the efficiency gap are propellant utilization and beam divergence. Propellant utilization and beam divergence have relative efficiency deficits of 5 and 8%, respectively. A detailed characterization of internal phenomena is conducted to better understand the xenon-krypton efficiency gap. Krypton's large beam divergence is found to be related to a defocusing equipotential structure and a weaker magnetic field topology. Ionization processes are shown to be linked to the Hall current, the magnetic mirror topology, and the perpendicular gradient of the magnetic field. Several thruster design and operational suggestions are made to optimize krypton efficiency. Krypton performance is optimized for discharge voltages above 500 V and flow rates corresponding to an a greater than 0.015 mg/(mm-s), where alpha is a function of flow rate and discharge channel dimensions (alpha = m˙alphab/Ach). Performance can be further improved by increasing channel length or decreasing channel width for a given flow rate. Also, several magnetic field design suggestions are made to enhance ionization and beam focusing. Several findings are presented that improve the understanding of general Hall thruster physics. Excellent agreement is shown between equipotential lines and magnetic field lines. The trim coil is shown to enhance beam focusing

  14. Development of methods and means to improve a performance of microprocessor shock sensors for car alarms

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    S. A. Vasyukov

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Existing shock sensors for car protection using the sensitive elements (SE of piezoelectric, microphone and electromagnetic types and the analogue circuitry of signal processing, have a number of essential shortcomings:- piezoelectric sensitive elements have no characteristics repeatability that complicates their use in mass production;- microphone sensors are structurally complicated and demand difficult information signal processing;- sensitive elements of electromagnetic sensors demand individual control (a specified clearance to be set between a magnet and the coil.Use of analogue elements (resistors, capacitors in the amplifier and filter circuits reduces temporary and temperature stability of characteristics. An adjustment of the sensor operating zones via variable resistors on a printed circuit is extremely inconvenient and doesn't allow to change quickly the sensor sensitivity depending on an external situation (for example, to increase quickly an operating zone of the sensor with an alarm system of a key fob when securing a car in the country or in the woods, or to reduce it in the street with heavy traffic streams.An analogue circuit–based sensor design disables its automatic adaptation to such external impacts as a rain, a stream passing by cars, etc.The article considers how to solve some of above problems while designing the two-zone digital shock sensors with a SE of electromagnetic type. It shows the SE design developed by the authors as a module containing the coil and a magnet, secured on the coil axis in a silicone extension. The circuitry solution and algorithms of signals processing allowed authors to realize a remote control of the prevention and alarm zones (with 16 gradation of sensitivity. The algorithm of self-adaptation to the repeating external impacts is proposed. The developed method to form the basic levels of digital comparators for each gradation of sensitivity enables the sensor to have the straight

  15. Desempenho de rede de sensores sem fio em casa de vegetação Performance of wireless sensor network in a greenhouse

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Barbara Teruel

    2012-12-01

    Full Text Available A potência de sinal é um importante parâmetro a ser considerado em um projeto de implantação de rede de sensores sem fio no meio agrícola. Este trabalho tem como objetivo coletar dados de qualidade de sinal transmitido entre uma estação base e um nó sensor situado no interior de uma casa de vegetação, localizada no campo experimental da Faculdade de Engenharia Agrícola - UNICAMP, com o auxílio de ferramentas computacionais. Após a implantação do nó sensor foram realizados experimentos com vista a se verificar alcance e qualidade do sinal de acordo com sua potência. Através desses ensaios foi possível concluir que uma potência de sinal com valor de -12,2 dBm é suficiente para manter a transmissão entre a estação base e nó sensor. Testes também foram realizados com uma potência de sinal de -9,2 dBm e mostraram que a rede possuía qualidade classificada "muito alta" porém, através do teste de duração da bateria, nota-se que existe economia de energia ao se utilizar a potência de sinal de -12,2 dBm. Foi avaliada a influência que o valor da potência de sinal tem sobre a qualidade do sinal de transmissão e recepção, o gasto de bateria e o alcance do sinal.The signal strength is an important parameter to be considered in a project to establish network of wireless sensors in an agricultural environment. This work aims to collect quality data signals transmitted between a base station and a sensor node located inside a greenhouse, which is an experimental field located in the College of Agricultural Engineering - UNICAMP, with the help of computational tools. After sensor node deployment, experiments were performed in order to check range and signal quality. Through these experiments, it was concluded that a radiofrequency power value of -12.2 dBm is sufficient to maintain transmissions between base station and the sensor. Tests were also performed to a radiofrequency power of -9.2 dBm, and showed that the network

  16. Observation of the Zero Hall Plateau in a Quantum Anomalous Hall Insulator

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Feng, Yang; Feng, Xiao; Ou, Yunbo; Wang, Jing; Liu, Chang; Zhang, Liguo; Zhao, Dongyang; Jiang, Gaoyuan; Zhang, Shou-Cheng; He, Ke; Ma, Xucun; Xue, Qi-Kun; Wang, Yayu

    2015-09-16

    We report experimental investigations on the quantum phase transition between the two opposite Hall plateaus of a quantum anomalous Hall insulator. We observe a well-defined plateau with zero Hall conductivity over a range of magnetic field around coercivity when the magnetization reverses. The features of the zero Hall plateau are shown to be closely related to that of the quantum anomalous Hall effect, but its temperature evolution exhibits a significant difference from the network model for a conventional quantum Hall plateau transition. We propose that the chiral edge states residing at the magnetic domain boundaries, which are unique to a quantum anomalous Hall insulator, are responsible for the novel features of the zero Hall plateau.

  17. Performance of a carbon monoxide sensor based on zirconia-doped ceria

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Noriya Izu

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available Resistive-type carbon monoxide sensors were fabricated using zirconia-doped ceria, and their sensing properties were evaluated and compared with equivalent devices based on non-doped ceria. The response of both sensor types was found to increase with decreasing temperature, while the response at 450 °C of a sensor fired at 950 °C was greater than that of a sensor fired at 1100 °C. When fired at 950 °C, however, the response at 450 °C of a sensor created using zirconia-doped ceria was slightly less than that of a sensor constructed from non-doped ceria. Multivariate analysis confirmed that the response of both sensor types is proportional to the resistance raised to the power of about 0.5, and inversely proportional to the particle size raised to a power of about 0.8. The sensor response time can be considered almost the same regardless of whether zirconia doping is used or not.

  18. Performance of a wireless sensor network for crop monitoring and irrigation control

    Science.gov (United States)

    Robust automatic irrigation scheduling has been demonstrated using wired sensors and sensor network systems with subsurface drip and moving irrigation systems. However, there are limited studies that report on crop yield and water use efficiency resulting from the use of wireless networks to automat...

  19. Field performance of three real-time moisture sensors in sandy loam and clay loam soils

    Science.gov (United States)

    The study was conducted to evaluate HydraProbe (HyP), Campbell Time Domain Reflectometry (TDR) and Watermarks (WM) moisture sensors for their ability to estimate water content based on calibrated neutron probe measurements. The three sensors were in-situ tested under natural weather conditions over ...

  20. Actuator and sensor selection for an active vehicle suspension aimed at robust performance

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Wal, van de M.M.J.; Philips, P.P.H.H.; Jager, de A.G.

    1998-01-01

    A recently presented method for actuator and sensor selection for linear control systems is applied and evaluated for an active vehicle suspension control problem. The aim is to eliminate the actuator/sensor combinations for which no controller exists that achieves a specified level of robust

  1. Design Parameter Optimization of a Silicon-Based Grating Waveguide for Performance Improvement in Biochemical Sensor Application.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hong, Yoo-Seung; Cho, Chun-Hyung; Sung, Hyuk-Kee

    2018-03-05

    We performed numerical analysis and design parameter optimization of a silicon-based grating waveguide refractive index (RI) sensor. The performance of the grating waveguide RI sensor was determined by the full-width at half-maximum (FWHM) and the shift in the resonance wavelength in the transmission spectrum. The transmission extinction, a major figure-of-merit of an RI sensor that reflects both FWHM and resonance shift performance, could be significantly improved by the proper determination of three major grating waveguide parameters: duty ratio, grating period, and etching depth. We analyzed the transmission characteristics of the grating waveguide under various design parameter conditions using a finite-difference time domain method. We achieved a transmission extinction improvement of >26 dB under a given bioenvironmental target change by the proper choice of the design procedure and parameters. This design procedure and choice of appropriate parameters would enable the widespread application of silicon-based grating waveguide in high-performance RI biochemical sensor.

  2. Implementation and Performance of a GPS/INS Tightly Coupled Assisted PLL Architecture Using MEMS Inertial Sensors

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Youssef Tawk

    2014-02-01

    Full Text Available The use of global navigation satellite system receivers for navigation still presents many challenges in urban canyon and indoor environments, where satellite availability is typically reduced and received signals are attenuated. To improve the navigation performance in such environments, several enhancement methods can be implemented. For instance, external aid provided through coupling with other sensors has proven to contribute substantially to enhancing navigation performance and robustness. Within this context, coupling a very simple GPS receiver with an Inertial Navigation System (INS based on low-cost micro-electro-mechanical systems (MEMS inertial sensors is considered in this paper. In particular, we propose a GPS/INS Tightly Coupled Assisted PLL (TCAPLL architecture, and present most of the associated challenges that need to be addressed when dealing with very-low-performance MEMS inertial sensors. In addition, we propose a data monitoring system in charge of checking the quality of the measurement flow in the architecture. The implementation of the TCAPLL is discussed in detail, and its performance under different scenarios is assessed. Finally, the architecture is evaluated through a test campaign using a vehicle that is driven in urban environments, with the purpose of highlighting the pros and cons of combining MEMS inertial sensors with GPS over GPS alone.

  3. Implementation and Performance of a GPS/INS Tightly Coupled Assisted PLL Architecture Using MEMS Inertial Sensors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tawk, Youssef; Tomé, Phillip; Botteron, Cyril; Stebler, Yannick; Farine, Pierre-André

    2014-01-01

    The use of global navigation satellite system receivers for navigation still presents many challenges in urban canyon and indoor environments, where satellite availability is typically reduced and received signals are attenuated. To improve the navigation performance in such environments, several enhancement methods can be implemented. For instance, external aid provided through coupling with other sensors has proven to contribute substantially to enhancing navigation performance and robustness. Within this context, coupling a very simple GPS receiver with an Inertial Navigation System (INS) based on low-cost micro-electro-mechanical systems (MEMS) inertial sensors is considered in this paper. In particular, we propose a GPS/INS Tightly Coupled Assisted PLL (TCAPLL) architecture, and present most of the associated challenges that need to be addressed when dealing with very-low-performance MEMS inertial sensors. In addition, we propose a data monitoring system in charge of checking the quality of the measurement flow in the architecture. The implementation of the TCAPLL is discussed in detail, and its performance under different scenarios is assessed. Finally, the architecture is evaluated through a test campaign using a vehicle that is driven in urban environments, with the purpose of highlighting the pros and cons of combining MEMS inertial sensors with GPS over GPS alone. PMID:24569773

  4. The Modification of Fuel Cell-Based Breath Alcohol Sensor Materials to Improve Water Retention of Sensing Performance

    Science.gov (United States)

    Allan, Jesse

    Fuel cell based breath alcohol sensors (BrASs) are one of the most important tools used by law enforcement today. The ability to screen potentially intoxicated subjects with the ease, speed, and flexibility the BrAS can provide is unmatched by any other device of its kind. While these devices are used globally, they all suffer from a common deficiency: reliance on water. The ability of the fuel cell sensor to manage water content is one of the greatest fundamental challenges facing this technology today. In order to evaluate the fuel cell sensor device, a methodology was required that would allow in-house sensor testing to be coupled with a diagnostic testing method to not only test materials sensing performance, but also determine why a sensor behaved how it did. To do this, a next-generation fuel cell was designed specifically for sensor testing along with a test station that allowed for rapid response and sensor characteristics of a given material. The fuel cell was designed to allow in-situ testing of a membrane electrode assembly (MEA) of interest using cyclic voltammetry and electrochemical impedance spectroscopy. The in-house design was validated against a commercial cell to provide feedback on how materials in the in-house cell would behave in a commercial designed unit. The results showed that our cell with a commercial MEA behaved identically to a commercial cell with the same MEA. Following validation of our cell, common membrane materials were investigated to identify their suitability in a senor role. The materials chosen were designed for power generating devices, so they provided a benchmark to identify which properties would be important for sensor operation. It was found that while the Nafion membrane and sulfonated poly (ether ether ketone) did show performance increases over the commercial MEA, the thin characteristics of these membranes limited performance in drier conditions. From these results, it was determined that thicker membrane materials

  5. Fabrications and Performance of Wireless LC Pressure Sensors through LTCC Technology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lin, Lin; Ma, Mingsheng; Zhang, Faqiang; Liu, Feng; Liu, Zhifu; Li, Yongxiang

    2018-01-25

    This paper presents a kind of passive wireless pressure sensor comprised of a planar spiral inductor and a cavity parallel plate capacitor fabricated through low-temperature co-fired ceramic (LTCC) technology. The LTCC material with a low Young's modulus of ~65 GPa prepared by our laboratory was used to obtain high sensitivity. A three-step lamination process was applied to construct a high quality cavity structure without using any sacrificial materials. The effects of the thickness of the sensing membranes on the sensitivity and detection range of the pressure sensors were investigated. The sensor with a 148 μm sensing membrane showed the highest sensitivity of 3.76 kHz/kPa, and the sensor with a 432 μm sensing membrane presented a high detection limit of 2660 kPa. The tunable sensitivity and detection limit of the wireless pressure sensors can meet the requirements of different scenes.

  6. Anomalous Hall effect in polycrystalline Ni films

    KAUST Repository

    Guo, Zaibing

    2012-02-01

    We systematically studied the anomalous Hall effect in a series of polycrystalline Ni films with thickness ranging from 4 to 200 nm. It is found that both the longitudinal and anomalous Hall resistivity increased greatly as film thickness decreased. This enhancement should be related to the surface scattering. In the ultrathin films (46 nm thick), weak localization corrections to anomalous Hall conductivity were studied. The granular model, taking into account the dominated intergranular tunneling, has been employed to explain this phenomenon, which can explain the weak dependence of anomalous Hall resistivity on longitudinal resistivity as well. © 2011 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  7. Performance of irradiated thin n-in-p planar pixel sensors for the ATLAS Inner Tracker upgrade

    Science.gov (United States)

    Savić, N.; Beyer, J.; Hiti, B.; Kramberger, G.; La Rosa, A.; Macchiolo, A.; Mandić, I.; Nisius, R.; Petek, M.

    2017-12-01

    The ATLAS collaboration will replace its tracking detector with new all silicon pixel and strip systems. This will allow to cope with the higher radiation and occupancy levels expected after the 5-fold increase in the luminosity of the LHC accelerator complex (HL-LHC). In the new tracking detector (ITk) pixel modules with increased granularity will implement to maintain the occupancy with a higher track density. In addition, both sensors and read-out chips composing the hybrid modules will be produced employing more radiation hard technologies with respect to the present pixel detector. Due to their outstanding performance in terms of radiation hardness, thin n-in-p sensors are promising candidates to instrument a section of the new pixel system. Recently produced and developed sensors of new designs will be presented. To test the sensors before interconnection to chips, a punch-through biasing structure was implemented. Its design was optimized to decrease the possible tracking efficiency losses observed. After irradiation, they were caused by the punch-through biasing structure. A sensor compatible with the ATLAS FE-I4 chip with a pixel size of 50×250 μm2, subdivided into smaller pixel implants of 30×30 μm2 size was designed to investigate the performance of the 50×50 μm2 pixel cells foreseen for the HL-LHC. Results on sensor performance of 50×250 and 50×50 μm2 pixel cells in terms of efficiency, charge collection and electric field properties are obtained with beam tests and the Transient Current Technique.

  8. Fundamental piezo-Hall coefficients of single crystal p-type 3C-SiC for arbitrary crystallographic orientation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Qamar, Afzaal; Dao, Dzung Viet; Phan, Hoang-Phuong; Dinh, Toan; Dimitrijev, Sima

    2016-08-01

    Piezo-Hall effect in a single crystal p-type 3C-SiC, grown by LPCVD process, has been characterized for various crystallographic orientations. The quantified values of the piezo-Hall effect in heavily doped p-type 3C-SiC(100) and 3C-SiC(111) for different crystallographic orientations were used to obtain the fundamental piezo-Hall coefficients, P 12 = ( 5.3 ± 0.4 ) × 10 - 11 Pa - 1 , P 11 = ( - 2.6 ± 0.6 ) × 10 - 11 Pa - 1 , and P 44 = ( 11.42 ± 0.6 ) × 10 - 11 Pa - 1 . Unlike the piezoresistive effect, the piezo-Hall effect for (100) and (111) planes is found to be independent of the angle of rotation of the device within the crystal plane. The values of fundamental piezo-Hall coefficients obtained in this study can be used to predict the piezo-Hall coefficients in any crystal orientation which is very important for designing of 3C-SiC Hall sensors to minimize the piezo-Hall effect for stable magnetic field sensitivity.

  9. Maintaining High Quality Network Performance at the GSN: Sensor Installation Methods, New VBB Borehole Sensors and Data Quality Assessment from MUSTANG

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hafner, Katrin

    2017-04-01

    The goal of the Global Seismographic Network (GSN) is to provide the highest possible data quality and dynamic recording range in support of scientific needs. Considerable effort is made at each GSN seismic station site to achieve the lowest noise performance possible under local conditions. We continue to strive for higher data quality with a combination of new sensors and improved installation techniques. Most seismometers are installed either in 100 m deep steel-cased boreholes or in vaults tunneled underground. A few vaults are built at the surface or on the foundation of a building. All vault installations have a concrete pier, mechanically isolated from the floor, upon which the seismometers are placed. Many sites are now nearly 30 years old, and the GSN is investing in civil works at several stations to keep them in good condition or make critical repairs. Using GSN data from inception to the present, we will present analyses that demonstrate how successful these sensor installation strategies have been and describe ongoing experiments at GSN testing facilities to evaluate the best, most cost effective strategy to modernize existing GSN facilities. To improve sensor performance at some vault sites, we will employ new sensor installation strategies. Years of experience operating the GSN and the USArray Transportable Array, along with focused testing of emplacement strategies, show that the vulnerability of a sensor's horizontal components to tilt can be mitigated if the sensor package is buried at even shallow depth. At selected vault installations, shallow boreholes will be drilled to accommodate recently developed borehole VBB sensor models. The incremental cost of modern VBB instruments over standard BB models is small, and we expect to be able to preserve the GSN's crucial very broad bandwidth while improving noise performance and reliability using this strategy. A crucial link in making GSN station data available to the scientific community is the IRIS

  10. Temperature Gradient in Hall Thrusters

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Staack, D.; Raitses, Y.; Fisch, N.J.

    2003-01-01

    Plasma potentials and electron temperatures were deduced from emissive and cold floating probe measurements in a 2 kW Hall thruster, operated in the discharge voltage range of 200-400 V. An almost linear dependence of the electron temperature on the plasma potential was observed in the acceleration region of the thruster both inside and outside the thruster. This result calls into question whether secondary electron emission from the ceramic channel walls plays a significant role in electron energy balance. The proportionality factor between the axial electron temperature gradient and the electric field is significantly smaller than might be expected by models employing Ohmic heating of electrons

  11. Performance of the Multi-Radar Multi-Sensor System over the Lower Colorado River, Texas

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bayabil, H. K.; Sharif, H. O.; Fares, A.; Awal, R.; Risch, E.

    2017-12-01

    Recently observed increases in intensities and frequencies of climate extremes (e.g., floods, dam failure, and overtopping of river banks) necessitate the development of effective disaster prevention and mitigation strategies. Hydrologic models can be useful tools in predicting such events at different spatial and temporal scales. However, accuracy and prediction capability of such models are often constrained by the availability of high-quality representative hydro-meteorological data (e.g., precipitation) that are required to calibrate and validate such models. Improved technologies and products such as the Multi-Radar Multi-Sensor (MRMS) system that allows gathering and transmission of vast meteorological data have been developed to provide such data needs. While the MRMS data are available with high spatial and temporal resolutions (1 km and 15 min, respectively), its accuracy in estimating precipitation is yet to be fully investigated. Therefore, the main objective of this study is to evaluate the performance of the MRMS system in effectively capturing precipitation over the Lower Colorado River, Texas using observations from a dense rain gauge network. In addition, effects of spatial and temporal aggregation scales on the performance of the MRMS system were evaluated. Point scale comparisons were made at 215 gauging locations using rain gauges and MRMS data from May 2015. Moreover, the effects of temporal and spatial data aggregation scales (30, 45, 60, 75, 90, 105, and 120 min) and (4 to 50 km), respectively on the performance of the MRMS system were tested. Overall, the MRMS system (at 15 min temporal resolution) captured precipitation reasonably well, with an average R2 value of 0.65 and RMSE of 0.5 mm. In addition, spatial and temporal data aggregations resulted in increases in R2 values. However, reduction in RMSE was achieved only with an increase in spatial aggregations.

  12. The performance of a piezoelectric-sensor-based SHM system under a combined cryogenic temperature and vibration environment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Qing, Xinlin P; Beard, Shawn J; Kumar, Amrita; Sullivan, Kevin; Aguilar, Robert; Merchant, Munir; Taniguchi, Mike

    2008-01-01

    A series of tests have been conducted to determine the survivability and functionality of a piezoelectric-sensor-based active structural health monitoring (SHM) SMART Tape system under the operating conditions of typical liquid rocket engines such as cryogenic temperature and vibration loads. The performance of different piezoelectric sensors and a low temperature adhesive under cryogenic temperature was first investigated. The active SHM system for liquid rocket engines was exposed to flight vibration and shock environments on a simulated large booster LOX-H 2 engine propellant duct conditioned to cryogenic temperatures to evaluate the physical robustness of the built-in sensor network as well as operational survivability and functionality. Test results demonstrated that the developed SMART Tape system can withstand operational levels of vibration and shock energy on a representative rocket engine duct assembly, and is functional under the combined cryogenic temperature and vibration environment

  13. Performance of Edgeless Silicon Pixel Sensors on p-type substrate for the ATLAS High-Luminosity Upgrade

    CERN Document Server

    INSPIRE-00052711; Boscardin, Maurizio; Bosisio, Luciano; Calderini, Giovanni; Chauveau, Jacques; Ducourthial, Audrey; Giacomini, Gabriele; Marchiori, Giovanni; Zorzi, Nicola

    2016-01-01

    In view of the LHC upgrade phases towards the High Luminosity LHC (HL-LHC), the ATLAS experiment plans to upgrade the Inner Detector with an all-silicon system. The n-on-p silicon technology is a promising candidate to achieve a large area instrumented with pixel sensors, since it is radiation hard and cost effective. The paper reports on the performance of novel n-on-p edgeless planar pixel sensors produced by FBK-CMM, making use of the active trench for the reduction of the dead area at the periphery of the device. After discussing the sensor technology an overview of the first beam test results will be given.

  14. Cathode Effects in Cylindrical Hall Thrusters

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Granstedt, E.M.; Raitses, Y.; Fisch, N. J.

    2008-09-12

    Stable operation of a cylindrical Hall thruster (CHT) has been achieved using a hot wire cathode, which functions as a controllable electron emission source. It is shown that as the electron emission from the cathode increases with wire heating, the discharge current increases, the plasma plume angle reduces, and the ion energy distribution function shifts toward higher energies. The observed effect of cathode electron emission on thruster parameters extends and clarifies performance improvements previously obtained for the overrun discharge current regime of the same type of thruster, but using a hollow cathode-neutralizer. Once thruster discharge current saturates with wire heating, further filament heating does not affect other discharge parameters. The saturated values of thruster discharge parameters can be further enhanced by optimal placement of the cathode wire with respect to the magnetic field.

  15. A comparative performance evaluation of intrusion detection techniques for hierarchical wireless sensor networks

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    H.H. Soliman

    2012-11-01

    Full Text Available An explosive growth in the field of wireless sensor networks (WSNs has been achieved in the past few years. Due to its important wide range of applications especially military applications, environments monitoring, health care application, home automation, etc., they are exposed to security threats. Intrusion detection system (IDS is one of the major and efficient defensive methods against attacks in WSN. Therefore, developing IDS for WSN have attracted much attention recently and thus, there are many publications proposing new IDS techniques or enhancement to the existing ones. This paper evaluates and compares the most prominent anomaly-based IDS systems for hierarchical WSNs and identifying their strengths and weaknesses. For each IDS, the architecture and the related functionality are briefly introduced, discussed, and compared, focusing on both the operational strengths and weakness. In addition, a comparison of the studied IDSs is carried out using a set of critical evaluation metrics that are divided into two groups; the first one related to performance and the second related to security. Finally based on the carried evaluation and comparison, a set of design principles are concluded, which have to be addressed and satisfied in future research of designing and implementing IDS for WSNs.

  16. Friendly-Sharing: Improving the Performance of City Sensoring through Contact-Based Messaging Applications.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Herrera-Tapia, Jorge; Hernández-Orallo, Enrique; Tomás, Andrés; Manzoni, Pietro; Tavares Calafate, Carlos; Cano, Juan-Carlos

    2016-09-18

    Regular citizens equipped with smart devices are being increasingly used as "sensors" by Smart Cities applications. Using contacts among users, data in the form of messages is obtained and shared. Contact-based messaging applications are based on establishing a short-range communication directly between mobile devices, and on storing the messages in these devices for subsequent delivery to cloud-based services. An effective way to increase the number of messages that can be shared is to increase the contact duration. We thus introduce the Friendly-Sharing diffusion approach, where, during a contact, the users are aware of the time needed to interchange the messages stored in their buffers, and they can thus decide to wait more time in order to increase the message sharing probability. The performance of this approach is anyway closely related to the size of the buffer in the device. We therefore compare various policies either for the message selection at forwarding times and for message dropping when the buffer is full. We evaluate our proposal with a modified version of the Opportunistic Networking Environment (ONE) simulator and using real human mobility traces.

  17. Average Throughput Performance of Myopic Policy in Energy Harvesting Wireless Sensor Networks.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gul, Omer Melih; Demirekler, Mubeccel

    2017-09-26

    This paper considers a single-hop wireless sensor network where a fusion center collects data from M energy harvesting wireless sensors. The harvested energy is stored losslessly in an infinite-capacity battery at each sensor. In each time slot, the fusion center schedules K sensors for data transmission over K orthogonal channels. The fusion center does not have direct knowledge on the battery states of sensors, or the statistics of their energy harvesting processes. The fusion center only has information of the outcomes of previous transmission attempts. It is assumed that the sensors are data backlogged, there is no battery leakage and the communication is error-free. An energy harvesting sensor can transmit data to the fusion center whenever being scheduled only if it has enough energy for data transmission. We investigate average throughput of Round-Robin type myopic policy both analytically and numerically under an average reward (throughput) criterion. We show that Round-Robin type myopic policy achieves optimality for some class of energy harvesting processes although it is suboptimal for a broad class of energy harvesting processes.

  18. Effect of Inductive Coil Shape on Sensing Performance of Linear Displacement Sensor Using Thin Inductive Coil and Pattern Guide

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hiroyuki Wakiwaka

    2011-11-01

    Full Text Available This paper discusses the effect of inductive coil shape on the sensing performance of a linear displacement sensor. The linear displacement sensor consists of a thin type inductive coil with a thin pattern guide, thus being suitable for tiny space applications. The position can be detected by measuring the inductance of the inductive coil. At each position due to the change in inductive coil area facing the pattern guide the value of inductance is different. Therefore, the objective of this research is to study various inductive coil pattern shapes and to propose the pattern that can achieve good sensing performance. Various shapes of meander, triangular type meander, square and circle shape with different turn number of inductive coils are examined in this study. The inductance is measured with the sensor sensitivity and linearity as a performance evaluation parameter of the sensor. In conclusion, each inductive coil shape has its own advantages and disadvantages. For instance, the circle shape inductive coil produces high sensitivity with a low linearity response. Meanwhile, the square shape inductive coil has a medium sensitivity with higher linearity.

  19. Development of an environmental chamber for evaluating the performance of low-cost air quality sensors under controlled conditions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Papapostolou, Vasileios; Zhang, Hang; Feenstra, Brandon J.; Polidori, Andrea

    2017-12-01

    A state-of-the-art integrated chamber system has been developed for evaluating the performance of low-cost air quality sensors. The system contains two professional grade chamber enclosures. A 1.3 m3 stainless-steel outer chamber and a 0.11 m3 Teflon-coated stainless-steel inner chamber are used to create controlled aerosol and gaseous atmospheres, respectively. Both chambers are temperature and relative humidity controlled with capability to generate a wide range of environmental conditions. The system is equipped with an integrated zero-air system, an ozone and two aerosol generation systems, a dynamic dilution calibrator, certified gas cylinders, an array of Federal Reference Method (FRM), Federal Equivalent Method (FEM), and Best Available Technology (BAT) reference instruments and an automated control and sequencing software. Our experiments have demonstrated that the chamber system is capable of generating stable and reproducible aerosol and gas concentrations at low, medium, and high levels. This paper discusses the development of the chamber system along with the methods used to quantitatively evaluate sensor performance. Considering that a significant number of academic and research institutions, government agencies, public and private institutions, and individuals are becoming interested in developing and using low-cost air quality sensors, it is important to standardize the procedures used to evaluate their performance. The information discussed herein provides a roadmap for entities who are interested in characterizing air quality sensors in a rigorous, systematic and reproducible manner.

  20. Overcoming urban GPS navigation challenges through the use of MEMS inertial sensors and proper verification of navigation system performance

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vinande, Eric T.

    This research proposes several means to overcome challenges in the urban environment to ground vehicle global positioning system (GPS) receiver navigation performance through the integration of external sensor information. The effects of narrowband radio frequency interference and signal attenuation, both common in the urban environment, are examined with respect to receiver signal tracking processes. Low-cost microelectromechanical systems (MEMS) inertial sensors, suitable for the consumer market, are the focus of receiver augmentation as they provide an independent measure of motion and are independent of vehicle systems. A method for estimating the mounting angles of an inertial sensor cluster utilizing typical urban driving maneuvers is developed and is able to provide angular measurements within two degrees of truth. The integration of GPS and MEMS inertial sensors is developed utilizing a full state navigation filter. Appropriate statistical methods are developed to evaluate the urban environment navigation improvement due to the addition of MEMS inertial sensors. A receiver evaluation metric that combines accuracy, availability, and maximum error measurements is presented and evaluated over several drive tests. Following a description of proper drive test techniques, record and playback systems are evaluated as the optimal way of testing multiple receivers and/or integrated navigation systems in the urban environment as they simplify vehicle testing requirements.