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Sample records for hall mobility measurements

  1. New approach for measuring the microwave Hall mobility of semiconductors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Murthy, D. V. B.; Subramanian, V.; Murthy, V. R. K.

    2006-01-01

    Measurement of Hall mobility in semiconductor samples using bimodal cavity method gives distinct advantages due to noncontact nature as well as the provision to measure anisotropic mobility. But the measurement approaches followed till now have a disadvantage of having high error values primarily due to the problem in evaluating the calibration constant of the whole experimental arrangement. This article brings out a new approach that removes such disadvantage and presents the calibration constant with 1% accuracy. The overall error in the carrier mobility values is within 5%

  2. Two-frequency method for measuring Hall emf in high-resistive materials with charge-carrier low mobility

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Aleksandrov, A.L.; Vedeneev, A.S.; Gulyaev, I.B.; Zhdan, A.G.

    1982-01-01

    A facility for measuring Hall emf in high-resistive materials with low mobility of charge carriers by the two-frequency method using digital synchronous integration is described. The facility permits to detect the minimum Hall emf approxamatety equat to 5 μV at approximatety equal to 1 T Ohm of the investigated.sample resistance during the measuring time of approximately equal to 2000 s. Sensitivity by Hall mobility makes up >= 0.01 cm 2 /Vxs at the same measuring time. Measuring results of the Hall emf on GaAs monocrystals, CdSe films and island film of gold are presented

  3. Accurate micro Hall effect measurements on scribe line pads

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Østerberg, Frederik Westergaard; Petersen, Dirch Hjorth; Wang, Fei

    2009-01-01

    Hall mobility and sheet carrier density are important parameters to monitor in advanced semiconductor production. If micro Hall effect measurements are done on small pads in scribe lines, these parameters may be measured without using valuable test wafers. We report how Hall mobility can...... be extracted from micro four-point measurements performed on a rectangular pad. The dimension of the investigated pad is 400 × 430 ¿m2, and the probe pitches range from 20 ¿m to 50 ¿m. The Monte Carlo method is used to find the optimal way to perform the Hall measurement and extract Hall mobility most...

  4. Home built equipment for measuring Hall coefficient and charge carrier concentration, mobility and resistivity

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Borup, Kasper Andersen; Christensen, Mogens; Blichfeld, Anders Bank

    2011-01-01

    der Pauw method. The commercial availability of these systems is limited and they are usually not optimized for measurements on samples which show properties characteristic of thermoelectric materials. We give an assessment of the reliability of the measurements and a comparison with a commercial...

  5. Investigation of carrier density and mobility in microcrystalline silicon alloys using Hall effect and thermopower measurements; Untersuchung der Ladungstraegerkonzentration und -beweglichkeit in mikrokristallinen Siliziumlegierungen mit Hall-Effekt und Thermokraft

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sellmer, Christian

    2012-08-31

    The electronic properties of amorphous and microcrystalline silicon layers in thin-film solar cells significantly affect the efficiency of solar cells. An important property of the individual layer is the electronic transport, which is described by the variables conductivity, photoconductivity, mobility, and carrier concentration. In the past, individual characterization methods were typically used to determine the electronic properties. Using the combination of Hall effect, conductivity, and thermoelectric power measurements additional variables can be derived, such as the effective density of states at the valence and conduction band edge, making a more detailed description of the material possible. To systematically study the electronic properties - in particular carrier mobility and carrier concentration - various series of silicon films are prepared for this work including microcrystalline silicon layers of different doping and crystallinity and a series of silicon films where the Fermi level is moved by irradiation with high energy electrons on one and the same sample. The results show that the transition from amorphous to microcrystalline transport is relatively abrupt. If the electron transport takes place in only amorphous regions, it is marked by the sign anomaly of the Hall effect. If a continuous crystalline path exists, the electronic properties are dominated by the crystalline volume fraction. The results of the measurements of silicon layers are compared with those of microcrystalline silicon carbide samples. Silicon carbide is especially interesting for future applications in thin-film solar cells due to high transparency and high conductivity. It is shown that the effective density of states at the valence and conduction band edge as a function of temperature in p- and n-type microcrystalline silicon and silicon carbide samples largely coincide with those of crystalline silicon or silicon carbide. A square root shaped profile of the density of

  6. Precision of single-engage micro Hall effect measurements

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Henrichsen, Henrik Hartmann; Hansen, Ole; Kjær, Daniel

    2014-01-01

    Recently a novel microscale Hall effect measurement technique has been developed to extract sheet resistance (RS), Hall sheet carrier density (NHS) and Hall mobility (μH) from collinear micro 4-point probe measurements in the vicinity of an insulating boundary [1]. The technique measures in less...... than a minute directly the local transport properties, which enables in-line production monitoring on scribe line test pads [2]. To increase measurement speed and reliability, a method in which 4-point measurements are performed using two different electrode pitches has been developed [3......]. In this study we calculate the measurement error on RS, NHS and μH resulting from electrode position errors, probe placement, sample size and Hall signal magnitude. We show the relationship between measurement precision and electrode pitch, which is important when down-scaling the micro 4-point probe to fit...

  7. Hall measurements and grain-size effects in polycrystalline silicon

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ghosh, A.K.; Rose, A.; Maruska, H.P.; Eustace, D.J.; Feng, T.

    1980-01-01

    The effects of grain size on Hall measurements in polycrystalline silicon are analyzed and interpreted, with some modifications, using the model proposed by Bube. This modified model predicts that the measured effective Hall voltage is composed of components originating from the bulk and space-charge regions. For materials with large grain sizes, the carrier concentration is independent of the intergrain boundary barrier, whereas the mobility is dependent on it. However, for small grains, both the carrier density and mobility depend on the barrier. These predictions are consistent with experimental results of mm-size Wacker and μm-size neutron-transmutation-doped polycrystalline silicon

  8. Nondestructive hall coefficient measurements using ACPD techniques

    Science.gov (United States)

    Velicheti, Dheeraj; Nagy, Peter B.; Hassan, Waled

    2018-04-01

    Hall coefficient measurements offer great opportunities as well as major challenges for nondestructive materials characterization. The Hall effect is produced by the magnetic Lorentz force acting on moving charge carriers in the presence of an applied magnetic field. The magnetic perturbation gives rise to a Hall current that is normal to the conduction current but does not directly perturb the electric potential distribution. Therefore, Hall coefficient measurements usually exploit the so-called transverse galvanomagnetic potential drop effect that arises when the Hall current is intercepted by the boundaries of the specimen and thereby produce a measurable potential drop. In contrast, no Hall potential is produced in a large plate in the presence of a uniform normal field at quasi-static low frequencies. In other words, conventional Hall coefficient measurements are inherently destructive since they require cutting the material under tests. This study investigated the feasibility of using alternating current potential drop (ACPD) techniques for nondestructive Hall coefficient measurements in plates. Specifically, the directional four-point square-electrode configuration is investigated with superimposed external magnetic field. Two methods are suggested to make Hall coefficient measurements in large plates without destructive machining. At low frequencies, constraining the bias magnetic field can replace constraining the dimensions of the specimen, which is inherently destructive. For example, when a cylindrical permanent magnet is used to provide the bias magnetic field, the peak Hall voltage is produced when the diameter of the magnet is equal to the diagonal of the square ACPD probe. Although this method is less effective than cutting the specimen to a finite size, the loss of sensitivity is less than one order of magnitude even at very low frequencies. In contrast, at sufficiently high inspection frequencies the magnetic field of the Hall current induces a

  9. Hole mobilities and the effective Hall factor in p-type GaAs

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wenzel, M.; Irmer, G.; Monecke, J.; Siegel, W.

    1997-06-01

    We prove the effective Hall factor in p-GaAs to be larger than values discussed in the literature up to now. The scattering rates for the relevant scattering mechanisms in p-GaAs have been recalculated after critical testing the existing models. These calculations allow to deduce theoretical drift and theoretical Hall mobilities as functions of temperature which can be compared with measured data. Theoretical Hall factors in the heavy and light hole bands and an effective Hall factor result. The calculated room temperature values of the drift mobility and of the effective Hall factor are 118 cm2/V s and 3.6, respectively. The fitted acoustic deformation potential E1=7.9 eV and the fitted optical coupling constant DK=1.24×1011 eV/m are close to values published before. It is shown that the measured strong dependence of the Hall mobility on the Hall concentration is not mainly caused by scattering by ionized impurities but by the dependence of the effective Hall factor on the hole concentration.

  10. A system for pulse Hall effect measurements

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Orzechowski, T.; Kupczak, R.

    1975-01-01

    Measuring system for fast Hall-voltage changes in an n-type germanium sample irradiated at liquid nitrogen temperature with a high-energy electron-beam from the Van de Graaff accelerator is described. (author)

  11. Measurement of the Hall effect in semiconductors at supersonic frequencies

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Putyato, I.V.; Sukhanov, S.; Lezhnev, N.B.

    1978-01-01

    A new method of measuring the Hall effect in variable magnetic fields at super-high frequencies using slotted line is proposed. The method is applied to the measurement of the Hall effect in n-InSb samples. It is shown that the level of output signal of samples reduces with the increasing the charge carrier concentration and with decreasing the mobility. But the range of quadratic part of the dependence of the output signal power on the control current increases. It is stated that the output signal of samples does not depend on the magnetic field frequency in the range of 4-7.3 GHz

  12. Measurement of the Hall effect in semiconductors at supersonic frequencies

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Putyato, I V; Sukhanov, S; Lezhnev, N B [AN Tadzhikskoj SSR, Khorog. Pamirskij Biologicheskij Inst.

    1978-01-01

    A new method of measuring the Hall effect in variable magnetic fields at super-high frequencies using slotted line is proposed. The method is applied to the measurement of the Hall effect in n-InSb samples. It is shown that the level of output signal of samples reduces with the increasing the charge carrier concentration and with decreasing the mobility. But the range of quadratic part of the dependence of the output signal power on the control current increases. It is stated that the output signal of samples does not depend on the magnetic field frequency in the range of 4-7.3 GHz.

  13. Fast micro Hall effect measurements on small pads

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Østerberg, Frederik Westergaard; Petersen, Dirch Hjorth; Nielsen, Peter F.

    2011-01-01

    Sheet resistance, carrier mobility, and sheet carrier density are important parameters in semiconductor production, and it is therefore important to be able to rapidly and accurately measure these parameters even on small samples or pads. The interpretation of four-point probe measurements on small...... pads is non-trivial. In this paper we discuss how conformal mapping can be used to evaluate theoretically expected measurement values on small pads. Theoretical values calculated from analytical mappings of simple geometries are compared to the values found from the numerical conformal mapping...... of a square onto the infinite half-plane, where well-established solutions are known. Hall effect measurements are performed to show, experimentally, that it is possible to measure Hall mobility in less than one minute on squares as small as 7070 lm2 with a deviation of 66.5% on a 1r level from accurate...

  14. High temperature hall effect measurement system design, measurement and analysis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Berkun, Isil

    A reliable knowledge of the transport properties of semiconductor materials is essential for the development and understanding of a number of electronic devices. In this thesis, the work on developing a Hall Effect measurement system with software based data acqui- sition and control for a temperature range of 300K-700K will be described. A system was developed for high temperature measurements of materials including single crystal diamond, poly-crystalline diamond, and thermoelectric compounds. An added capability for monitor- ing the current versus voltage behavior of the contacts was used for studying the influence of ohmic and non-ohmic contacts on Hall Effect measurements. The system has been primar- ily used for testing the transport properties of boron-doped single crystal diamond (SCD) deposited in a microwave plasma-assisted chemical vapor deposition (MPCVD) reactor [1]. Diamond has several outstanding properties that are of high interest for its development as an electronic material. These include a relatively wide band gap of 5.5 (eV), high thermal conductivity, high mobility, high saturation velocity, and a high breakdown voltage. For a temperature range of 300K-700K, IV curves, Hall mobilities and carrier concentrations are shown. Temperature dependent Hall effect measurements have shown carrier concentrations from below 1017cm --3 to approximately 1021 cm--3 with mobilities ranging from 763( cm2/V s) to 0.15(cm 2/V s) respectively. Simulation results have shown the effects of single and mixed carrier models, activation energies, effective mass and doping concentrations. These studies have been helpful in the development of single crystal diamond for diode applications. Reference materials of Ge and GaAs were used to test the Hall Effect system. The system was also used to characterize polycrystalline diamond deposited on glass for electrochemical applications, and Mg2(Si,Sn) compounds which are promising candidates of low-cost, light weight and non

  15. Empirical electron cross-field mobility in a Hall effect thruster

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Garrigues, L.; Perez-Luna, J.; Lo, J.; Hagelaar, G. J. M.; Boeuf, J. P.; Mazouffre, S.

    2009-01-01

    Electron transport across the magnetic field in Hall effect thrusters is still an open question. Models have so far assumed 1/B 2 or 1/B scaling laws for the 'anomalous' electron mobility, adjusted to reproduce the integrated performance parameters of the thruster. We show that models based on such mobility laws predict very different ion velocity distribution functions (IVDF) than measured by laser induced fluorescence (LIF). A fixed spatial mobility profile, obtained by analysis of improved LIF measurements, leads to much better model predictions of thruster performance and IVDF than 1/B 2 or 1/B mobility laws for discharge voltages in the 500-700 V range.

  16. Electrical resistivity, Hall coefficient and electronic mobility in indium antimonide at different magnetic fields and temperatures

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jee, Madan; Prasad, Vijay; Singh, Amita

    1995-01-01

    The electrical resistivity, Hall coefficient and electronic mobility of n-type and p-type crystals of indium antimonide have been measured from 25 degC-100 degC temperature range. It has been found by this measurement that indium antimonide is a compound semiconductor with a high mobility 10 6 cm 2 /V.S. The Hall coefficient R H was measured as a function of magnetic field strength H for a number of samples of both p and n-type using fields up to 12 kilo gauss. The Hall coefficient R h decreases with increasing magnetic fields as well as with increase in temperature of the sample. The electric field is more effective on samples with high mobilities and consequently the deviations from linearity are manifested at comparatively low values of the electric field. The measurement of R H in weak and strong magnetic fields makes it possible to determine the separate concentration of heavy and light holes. Measured values of Hall coefficient and electrical resistivity show that there is a little variation of ρ and R h with temperatures as well as with magnetic fields. (author). 12 refs., 5 tabs

  17. Automated Micro Hall Effect measurements

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Petersen, Dirch Hjorth; Henrichsen, Henrik Hartmann; Lin, Rong

    2014-01-01

    With increasing complexity of processes and variety of materials used for semiconductor devices, stringent control of the electronic properties is becoming ever more relevant. Collinear micro four-point probe (M4PP) based measurement systems have become high-end metrology methods for characteriza......With increasing complexity of processes and variety of materials used for semiconductor devices, stringent control of the electronic properties is becoming ever more relevant. Collinear micro four-point probe (M4PP) based measurement systems have become high-end metrology methods...

  18. Hall mobility of free charge carriers in highly compensated p-Germanium

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gavrilyuk, V.Yi.; Kirnas, Yi.G.; Balakyin, V.D.

    2000-01-01

    Hall mobility of free charge carriers in initial detectors Ge (Ga) is studied. It is established that an increase in the compensation factor results in the enlargement of Hall mobility in germanium highly compensated by introduction of Li ions during their drift in an electrical field

  19. Thickness dependence of Hall mobility of HWE grown PbTe films

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Vaya, P.R.; Majhi, J.; Gopalam, B.S.V.; Dattatreyan, C.

    1985-01-01

    Thin epitaxial n-PbTe films of various thicknesses are grown on KCl substrates by hot wall epitaxy (HWE) technique. The X-ray, SEM and TEM studies of these films revealed their single crystalline nature. The Hall mobility (μ/sub H/) of these films is measured by Van der Pauw technique and compared with the numerically calculated values of PbTe. It is observed that μ/sub H/ very strongly depends on thickness for thin films but becomes independent of film thickness beyond 5 μm approaching its bulk value. The constant value of Hall coefficient in the temperature range 77 to 300 K show the extrinsic nature of these films. It is also noticed that the rate of increase of mobility with decreasing temperature becomes higher with film thickness. The diffused scattering mobility due to the size effect is calculated and compared with experimental data. A large discrepancy observed between these two is explained on the basis of the residual mobility contribution. The residual mobility is attributed to overall scattering due to grain boundaries, dislocations, defects, cleavage steps, and other surface effects. (author)

  20. Magnetic Measurements of the Background Field in the Undulator Hall

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fisher, Andrew

    2010-01-01

    The steel present in the construction of the undulator hall facility has the potential for changing the ambient fields present in the undulator hall. This note describes a measurement done to make a comparison between the fields in the hall and in the Magnetic Measurement Facility. In order for the undulators to have the proper tuning, the background magnetic field in the Undulator Hall should agree with the background field in the Magnetic Measurements Facility within .5 gauss. In order to verify that this was the case measurements were taken along the length of the undulator hall, and the point measurements were compared to the mean field which was measured on the MMF test bench.

  1. Hall mobility maps for 4H-silicon carbide by Monte Carlo simulations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Woźny, J; Lisik, Z; Podgórski, J

    2014-01-01

    The Monte Carlo Single Particle approach was used to analyze electron transport in 4H-SiC taking into account the influence of the magnetic field. Within the numerical approach it was possible to evaluate electron Hall mobility and the Hall factor for the wide range of donor concentrations and temperatures varying from 300 K up to 700 K

  2. All Optical Measurement Proposed for the Photovoltaic Hall Effect

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Oka, Takashi; Aoki, Hideo

    2011-01-01

    We propose an all optical way to measure the recently proposed p hotovoltaic Hall effect , i.e., a Hall effect induced by a circularly polarized light in the absence of static magnetic fields. This is done in a pump-probe experiment with the Faraday rotation angle being the probe. The Floquet extended Kubo formula for photo-induced optical response is formulated and the ac-Hall conductivity is calculated. We also point out the possibility of observing the effect in two layered graphene, three-dimensional graphite, and more generally in multi-band systems such as materials described by the dp-model.

  3. Hall probe for measuring high currents in superconducting coils

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ferendeci, A.M.

    1986-01-01

    Constructional details of a compact Hall probe for measuring high currents in superconducting coils are given. The Hall probe is easy to assemble and can be inserted or removed from the system without breaking the superconducting loop. Upper current limit of the probe can be increased by using larger magnetic core material. Shielding becomes necessary if the probe holder is to be placed near large current dependent magnetic fields

  4. Hall effect measurement for precise sheet resistance and thickness evaluation of Ruthenium thin films using non-equidistant four-point probes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Frederik Westergaard Østerberg

    2018-05-01

    Full Text Available We present a new micro Hall effect measurement method using non-equidistant electrodes. We show theoretically and verify experimentally that it is advantageous to use non-equidistant electrodes for samples with low Hall sheet resistance. We demonstrate the new method by experiments where Hall sheet carrier densities and Hall mobilities of Ruthenium thin films (3-30 nm are determined. The measurements show that it is possible to measure Hall mobilities as low as 1 cm2V−1s−1 with a relative standard deviation of 2-3%. We show a linear relation between measured Hall sheet carrier density and film thickness. Thus, the method can be used to monitor thickness variations of ultra-thin metal films.

  5. Hall effect in hopping regime

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Avdonin, A.; Skupiński, P.; Grasza, K.

    2016-01-01

    A simple description of the Hall effect in the hopping regime of conductivity in semiconductors is presented. Expressions for the Hall coefficient and Hall mobility are derived by considering averaged equilibrium electron transport in a single triangle of localization sites in a magnetic field. Dependence of the Hall coefficient is analyzed in a wide range of temperature and magnetic field values. Our theoretical result is applied to our experimental data on temperature dependence of Hall effect and Hall mobility in ZnO. - Highlights: • Expressions for Hall coefficient and mobility for hopping conductivity are derived. • Theoretical result is compared with experimental curves measured on ZnO. • Simultaneous action of free and hopping conduction channels is considered. • Non-linearity of hopping Hall coefficient is predicted.

  6. Hall effect in hopping regime

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Avdonin, A., E-mail: avdonin@ifpan.edu.pl [Institute of Physics, Polish Academy of Sciences, Al. Lotników 32/46, 02-668 Warszawa (Poland); Skupiński, P. [Institute of Physics, Polish Academy of Sciences, Al. Lotników 32/46, 02-668 Warszawa (Poland); Grasza, K. [Institute of Physics, Polish Academy of Sciences, Al. Lotników 32/46, 02-668 Warszawa (Poland); Institute of Electronic Materials Technology, ul. Wólczyńska 133, 01-919 Warszawa (Poland)

    2016-02-15

    A simple description of the Hall effect in the hopping regime of conductivity in semiconductors is presented. Expressions for the Hall coefficient and Hall mobility are derived by considering averaged equilibrium electron transport in a single triangle of localization sites in a magnetic field. Dependence of the Hall coefficient is analyzed in a wide range of temperature and magnetic field values. Our theoretical result is applied to our experimental data on temperature dependence of Hall effect and Hall mobility in ZnO. - Highlights: • Expressions for Hall coefficient and mobility for hopping conductivity are derived. • Theoretical result is compared with experimental curves measured on ZnO. • Simultaneous action of free and hopping conduction channels is considered. • Non-linearity of hopping Hall coefficient is predicted.

  7. Power Dependence of the Electron Mobility Profile in a Hall Thruster

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jorns, Benjamin A.; Hofery, Richard H.; Mikellides, Ioannis G.

    2014-01-01

    The electron mobility profile is estimated in a 4.5 kW commercial Hall thruster as a function of discharge power. Internal measurements of plasma potential and electron temperature are made in the thruster channel with a high-speed translating probe. These measurements are presented for a range of throttling conditions from 150 - 400 V and 0.6 - 4.5 kW. The fluid-based solver, Hall2De, is used in conjunction with these internal plasma parameters to estimate the anomalous collision frequency profile at fixed voltage, 300 V, and three power levels. It is found that the anomalous collision frequency profile does not change significantly upstream of the location of the magnetic field peak but that the extent and magnitude of the anomalous collision frequency downstream of the magnetic peak does change with thruster power. These results are discussed in the context of developing phenomenological models for how the collision frequency profile depends on thruster operating conditions.

  8. Field effect in the quantum Hall regime of a high mobility graphene wire

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Barraud, C., E-mail: cbarraud@phys.ethz.ch, E-mail: clement.barraud@univ-paris-diderot.fr; Choi, T.; Ihn, T.; Ensslin, K. [Solid State Physics Laboratory, ETH Zürich, CH-8093 Zürich (Switzerland); Butti, P.; Shorubalko, I. [Swiss Federal Laboratories of Materials Science and Technologies, EMPA Elect. Metrol. Reliabil. Lab., CH-8600 Dübendorf (Switzerland); Taniguchi, T.; Watanabe, K. [National Institute for Materials Science, 1-1 Namiki, Tsukuba 305-0044 (Japan)

    2014-08-21

    In graphene-based electronic devices like in transistors, the field effect applied thanks to a gate electrode allows tuning the charge density in the graphene layer and passing continuously from the electron to the hole doped regime across the Dirac point. Homogeneous doping is crucial to understand electrical measurements and for the operation of future graphene-based electronic devices. However, recently theoretical and experimental studies highlighted the role of the electrostatic edge due to fringing electrostatic field lines at the graphene edges [P. Silvestrov and K. Efetov, Phys. Rev. B 77, 155436 (2008); F. T. Vasko and I. V. Zozoulenko, Appl. Phys. Lett. 97, 092115 (2010)]. This effect originates from the particular geometric design of the samples. A direct consequence is a charge accumulation at the graphene edges giving a value for the density, which deviates from the simple picture of a plate capacitor and also varies along the width of the graphene sample. Entering the quantum Hall regime would, in principle, allow probing this accumulation thanks to the extreme sensitivity of this quantum effect to charge density and the charge distribution. Moreover, the presence of an additional and counter-propagating edge channel has been predicted [P. Silvestrov and K. Efetov, Phys. Rev. B 77, 155436 (2008)] giving a fundamental aspect to this technological issue. In this article, we investigate this effect by tuning a high mobility graphene wire into the quantum Hall regime in which charge carriers probe the electrostatic potential at high magnetic field close to the edges. We observe a slight deviation to the linear shift of the quantum Hall plateaus with magnetic field and we study its evolution for different filling factors, which correspond to different probed regions in real space. We discuss the possible origins of this effect including an increase of the charge density towards the edges.

  9. Can ensemble condition in a hall be improved and measured?

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Gade, Anders Christian

    1988-01-01

    of the ceiling reflectors; and (c) changing the position of the orchestra on the platform. These variables were then tested in full scale experiments in the hall including subjective evaluation by the orchestra in order to verify their effects under practical conditions. New objective parameters, which showed......In collaboration with the Danish Broadcasting Corporation an extensive series of experiments has been carried out in The Danish Radio Concert Hall with the practical purpose of trying to improve the ensemble conditions on the platform for the resident symphony orchestra. First, a series...... very high correlations with the subjective data, also made it possible to compare the improvements with conditions as recently measured in famous European Halls. Besides providing the needed results, the experiments also shed some light on how musicians change their criteria for judging acoustic...

  10. Structural Mobility, Exchange Mobility and Subgroup Consistent Mobility Measurement – US–German Mobility Measurements Revisited

    OpenAIRE

    C. SCHLUTER; D. VAN DE GAER

    2008-01-01

    We formalize the concept of structural mobility and use the framework of subgroup consistent mobility measurement to derive a relative and an absolute measure of mobility that is increasing both in upward structural mobility and exchange mobility. In our empirical illustration, we contribute substantively to the ongoing debate about mobility rankings between the USA and Germany.

  11. Micro-four-point Probe Hall effect Measurement method

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Petersen, Dirch Hjorth; Hansen, Ole; Lin, Rong

    2008-01-01

    barriers and with a magnetic field applied normal to the plane of the sheet. Based on this potential, analytical expressions for the measured four-point resistance in presence of a magnetic field are derived for several simple sample geometries. We show how the sheet resistance and Hall effect...

  12. Angular Magnetoresistance and Hall Measurements in New Dirac Material, ZrSiS

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ali, Mazhar; Schoop, Leslie; Lotsch, Bettina; Parkin, Stuart

    Dirac and Weyl materials have shot to the forefront of condensed matter research in the last few years. Recently, the square-net material, ZrSiS, was theorized and experimentally shown (via ARPES) to host several highly dispersive Dirac cones, including the first Dirac cone demanded by non-symmorphic symmetry in a Si square net. Here we report the magnetoresistance and Hall Effect measurements in this compound. ZrSiS samples with RRR = 40 were found to have MR values up to 6000% at 2 K, be predominantly p-type with a carrier concentration of ~8 x 1019 cm-3 and mobility ~8500 cm2/Vs. Angular magnetoresistance measurements reveal a peculiar behavior with multiple local maxima, depending on field strength, indicating of a sensitive and sensitive Fermi surface. SdH oscillations analysis confirms Hall and angular magnetoresistance measurements. These results, in the context of the theoretical and ARPES results, will be discussed.

  13. Sensitivity of resistive and Hall measurements to local inhomogeneities

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Koon, Daniel W.; Wang, Fei; Petersen, Dirch Hjorth

    2014-01-01

    We derive exact, analytic expressions for the sensitivity of sheet resistance and Hall sheet resistance measurements to local inhomogeneities for the cases of nonzero magnetic fields, strong perturbations, and perturbations over a finite area, extending our earlier results on weak perturbations. ...... simulations on both a linear four-point probe array on a large circular disc and a van der Pauw square geometry. Furthermore, the results also agree well with Náhlík et al. published experimental results for physical holes in a circular copper foil disc.......We derive exact, analytic expressions for the sensitivity of sheet resistance and Hall sheet resistance measurements to local inhomogeneities for the cases of nonzero magnetic fields, strong perturbations, and perturbations over a finite area, extending our earlier results on weak perturbations. We...

  14. Admittance measurements in the quantum Hall effect regime

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hernández, C., E-mail: carlos.hernandezr@unimilitar.edu.co [Departamento de Física, Universidad Militar Nueva Granada, Carrera 11 # 101-80, Bogotá D.C. (Colombia); Laboratorio de Magnetismo, Departamento de Física, Universidad de los Andes, A.A. 4976, Bogotá D.C. (Colombia); Consejo, C.; Chaubet, C. [Laboratoire Charles Coulomb L2C, Université Montpellier II, Pl. E. Bataillon, 34095 Montpellier Cedex 5 (France)

    2014-11-15

    In this work we present an admittance study of a two-dimensional electron gas (2DEG) in the quantum Hall effect (QHE) regime. We have studied several Hall bars in different contacts configurations in the frequency range 100 Hz–1 MHz. Our interpretation is based on the Landauer–Büttiker theory and takes into account both the capacitance and the topology of the coaxial cables which are connected to the sample holder. We show that we always observe losses through the capacitive impedance of the coaxial cables, except in the two contacts configuration in which the cable capacitance does not influence the admittance measurement of the sample. In this case, we measure the electrochemical capacitance of the 2DEG and show its dependence with the filling factor ν.

  15. Measured Early Lateral Energy Fractions in Concert Halls and Opera Houses

    Science.gov (United States)

    BARRON, M.

    2000-04-01

    In the 30 years since early lateral reflections were first suggested as important for concert halls, spatial impression and source broadening have become almost universally accepted as essential characteristics of halls with good acoustics. Two objective measures of source broadening have been proposed. Measured values of the best defined of these measures, the early lateral energy fraction (LF), are considered here. Results from two independent measurement surveys are discussed. Comparisons of LF values by hall show a significant link between hall mean LF and hall width. There is however considerable overlap between measured LF values in different halls so the relevance of describing halls by their mean early lateral energy fraction values is questionable. The behaviour of LF values within auditoria is discussed for different concert hall plan forms and within opera houses. A measure of source broadening including sound level is proposed and results considered in the context of auditorium design.

  16. Measuring Mobile Phone Use

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Boase, Jeff; Ling, Richard

    2013-01-01

    In this paper we examine how well two types of self-report measures adequately operationalize frequency of mobile phone use by comparing them to server log data. Our self-report measures of voice and SMS text messaging activity are drawn from a nationally representative survey of adults living...

  17. Electronic properties of {mu}c-Si:H layers investigated with Hall measurements

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bronger, T

    2007-02-28

    In the present work, the electronic properties of thin layers of PECVD-grown {mu}c-Si:H have been examined using the Hall effect. The main focus was on the mobility of the carriers because this is a crucial limiting factor for the electronic quality of this material, however, the density of free carriers as well as the conductivity were also determined. In order to get a picture as comprehensive as possible, a sample matrix was studied consisting of samples with different n-type doping levels and different crystallinities. Additionally, doped samples with artificially implanted defects which could be annealed gradually were investigated. All measurements have been made temperature-dependently. During the work, a new computer control and analysis program was developed from scratch for the Hall setup. It allows for high automation as well as comprehensive error estimation, both of which being very important for high ohmic samples. All samples showed a thermally activated mobility and carrier concentration, however, there is no single activation energy. Instead, all Arrhenius plots exhibited a more or less pronounced convex curvature. This curvature was identified with the parallel connection of a broad distribution of barriers in the material, which are limiting to the transport and are overcome by thermoionic emission. From this, the model of normally distributed barriers (NDB) was derived, mathematically investigated, and successfully applied to the experimental data of this work and (for not too highly doped samples) of other works. As a significant validation of the NDB model, the relative room-temperature mobility values could be calculated just from the Arrhenius slopes and curvatures. A very important dependence turned out to be mobility versus carrier concentration. In particular the annealed sample showed a clear {mu} {proportional_to} n{sup 1/2} behaviour, which could be backed with the sample matrix. Additionally, Hall measurements on HWCVD-grown {mu

  18. Photo-conductivity and Hall mobility of holes at polypyrrole-diamond interface

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Čermák, Jan; Rezek, Bohuslav; Hubík, Pavel; Mareš, Jiří J.; Kromka, Alexander; Fejfar, Antonín

    2010-01-01

    Roč. 19, 2-3 (2010), s. 174-177 ISSN 0925-9635 R&D Projects: GA ČR GD202/09/H041; GA MŠk(CZ) LC06040; GA AV ČR KAN400100701; GA MŠk LC510 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z10100521 Keywords : diamond * Hall mobility * charge transport * polypyrrole Subject RIV: BM - Solid Matter Physics ; Magnetism Impact factor: 1.825, year: 2010

  19. Hall effect mobility for SiC MOSFETs with increasing dose of nitrogen implantation into channel region

    Science.gov (United States)

    Noguchi, Munetaka; Iwamatsu, Toshiaki; Amishiro, Hiroyuki; Watanabe, Hiroshi; Kita, Koji; Yamakawa, Satoshi

    2018-04-01

    The Hall effect mobilityHall) of the Si-face 4H-SiC metal–oxide–semiconductor field effect transistor (MOSFET) with a nitrogen (N)-implanted channel region was investigated by increasing the N dose. The μHall in the channel region was systematically examined regarding channel structures, that is, the surface and buried channels. It was experimentally demonstrated that increasing the N dose results in an improvement in μHall in the channel region due to the formation of the buried channel. However, further increase in N dose was found to decrease the μHall in the channel region, owing to the decrease in the electron mobility in the N-implanted bulk region.

  20. Hall mobility reduction in single-crystalline silicon gradually compensated by thermal donors activation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Veirman, J.; Dubois, S.; Enjalbert, N.; Garandet, J. P.; Heslinga, D. R.; Lemiti, M.

    2010-06-01

    This letter focuses on the variation of the Hall majority carrier mobility with the dopant compensation level in purely Boron-doped Czochralski grown silicon single crystals. Compensation was varied continuously at the sample scale via a step by step activation of the oxygen-based thermal donors. At room temperature, we show a strong drop in mobility for high compensation levels in both p- and n-type Si. Mobility models taking into account carrier scattering on ionized impurities and phonons could not reproduce this drop. We conclude that a specific effect of compensation must be taken into account to explain the observed behaviour. We qualitatively discuss physical mechanisms susceptible to reduce mobility in highly compensated Si.

  1. Sensitivity of resistive and Hall measurements to local inhomogeneities

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Koon, Daniel W.; Wang, Fei; Petersen, Dirch Hjorth

    2013-01-01

    We derive exact, analytic expressions for the sensitivity of resistive and Hall measurements to local inhomogeneities in a specimen's material properties in the combined linear limit of a weak perturbation over an infinitesimal area in a small magnetic field. We apply these expressions both to four-point...... probe measurements on an infinite plane and to symmetric, circular van der Pauw discs, obtaining functions consistent with published results. These new expressions speed up calculation of the sensitivity for a specimen of arbitrary shape to little more than the solution of two Laplace equation boundary......-value problems of the order of N3 calculations, rather than N2 problems of total order N5, and in a few cases produces an analytic expression for the sensitivity. These functions provide an intuitive, visual explanation of how, for example, measurements can predict the wrong carrier type in n-type ZnO....

  2. Hall effect measurements on proton-irradiated ROSE samples

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Biggeri, U.; Bruzzi, M.; Borchi, E.

    1997-01-01

    Bulk samples obtained from two wafers of a silicon monocrystal material produced by Float-Zone refinement have been analyzed using the four-point probe method. One of the wafers comes from an oxygenated ingot; two sets of pure and oxygenated samples have been irradiated with 24 GeV/c protons in the fluence range from 10 13 p/cm 2 to 2x10 14 p/cm 2 . Van der Pauw resistivity and Hall coefficient have been measured before and after irradiation as a function of the temperature. A thermal treatment (30 minutes at 100C) has been performed to accelerate the reverse annealing effect in the irradiated silicon. The irradiated samples show the same exponential dependence of the resistivity and of the Hall coefficient on the temperature from 370K to 100K, corresponding to the presence of radiation-induced deep energy levels around 0.6-0.7eV in the silicon gap. The free carrier concentrations (n, p) have been evaluated in the investigated fluence range. The inversion of the conductivity type from n to p occurred respectively at 7x10 13 p/cm 2 and at 4x10 13 p/cm 2 before and after the annealing treatment, for both the two sets. Only slight differences have been detected between the pure and oxygenated samples

  3. Equivalence of donor and acceptor fits of temperature dependent Hall carrier density and Hall mobility data: Case of ZnO

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Brochen, Stéphane; Feuillet, Guy; Pernot, Julien

    2014-01-01

    In this work, statistical formulations of the temperature dependence of ionized and neutral impurity concentrations in a semiconductor, needed in the charge balance equation and for carrier scattering calculations, have been developed. These formulations have been used in order to elucidate a confusing situation, appearing when compensating acceptor (donor) levels are located sufficiently close to the conduction (valence) band to be thermally ionized and thereby to emit (capture) an electron to (from) the conduction (valence) band. In this work, the temperature dependent Hall carrier density and Hall mobility data adjustments are performed in an attempt to distinguish the presence of a deep acceptor or a deep donor level, coexisting with a shallower donor level and located near the conduction band. Unfortunately, the present statistical developments, applied to an n-type hydrothermal ZnO sample, lead in both cases to consistent descriptions of experimental Hall carrier density and mobility data and thus do not allow to determine the nature, donor or acceptor, of the deep level. This demonstration shows that the emission of an electron in the conduction band, generally assigned to a (0/+1) donor transition from a donor level cannot be applied systematically and could also be attributed to a (−1/0) donor transition from an acceptor level. More generally, this result can be extended for any semiconductor and also for deep donor levels located close to the valence band (acceptor transition)

  4. Theoretical calculation of the Hall mobility of InNxAs1−x alloys when ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    These ternary alloys are used for manufacturing infrared detectors, gas sensors and the ... of carrier concentration, the temperature dependence of Hall mobility was ..... [17] T D Veal, L F J Piper, P H Jefferson, I Mahboob, C F McConville, ...

  5. Comparisons of auditorium acoustics measurements as a function of location in halls (A)

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bradley, J. S.; Gade, Anders Christian; Siebein, G W

    1993-01-01

    In a measurement tour of nine U.S. concert halls measurements were made at 30 or more combinations of source and receiver position in each hall. Each of the three measurement teams (the University of Florida, the Danish Technical University, and the National Research Council of Canada) made paral....... The measurement results were also used to examine the influence of different measurement equipment and measurement procedures on the within hall variations of the various acoustical quantities. [Work partially supported by the Concert Hall Research Group.]...... parallel measurements of a number of modern room acoustics quantities using different equipment and measurement procedures. These results are compared on a seat-by-seat basis and the differences are explained in terms of earlier systematic studies of the effects of measurement procedure details...

  6. Charge carrier coherence and Hall effect in organic semiconductors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yi, H. T.; Gartstein, Y. N.; Podzorov, V.

    2016-01-01

    Hall effect measurements are important for elucidating the fundamental charge transport mechanisms and intrinsic mobility in organic semiconductors. However, Hall effect studies frequently reveal an unconventional behavior that cannot be readily explained with the simple band-semiconductor Hall effect model. Here, we develop an analytical model of Hall effect in organic field-effect transistors in a regime of coexisting band and hopping carriers. The model, which is supported by the experiments, is based on a partial Hall voltage compensation effect, occurring because hopping carriers respond to the transverse Hall electric field and drift in the direction opposite to the Lorentz force acting on band carriers. We show that this can lead in particular to an underdeveloped Hall effect observed in organic semiconductors with substantial off-diagonal thermal disorder. Our model captures the main features of Hall effect in a variety of organic semiconductors and provides an analytical description of Hall mobility, carrier density and carrier coherence factor. PMID:27025354

  7. Charge carrier coherence and Hall effect in organic semiconductors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yi, H T; Gartstein, Y N; Podzorov, V

    2016-03-30

    Hall effect measurements are important for elucidating the fundamental charge transport mechanisms and intrinsic mobility in organic semiconductors. However, Hall effect studies frequently reveal an unconventional behavior that cannot be readily explained with the simple band-semiconductor Hall effect model. Here, we develop an analytical model of Hall effect in organic field-effect transistors in a regime of coexisting band and hopping carriers. The model, which is supported by the experiments, is based on a partial Hall voltage compensation effect, occurring because hopping carriers respond to the transverse Hall electric field and drift in the direction opposite to the Lorentz force acting on band carriers. We show that this can lead in particular to an underdeveloped Hall effect observed in organic semiconductors with substantial off-diagonal thermal disorder. Our model captures the main features of Hall effect in a variety of organic semiconductors and provides an analytical description of Hall mobility, carrier density and carrier coherence factor.

  8. Contactless measurement of alternating current conductance in quantum Hall structures

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Drichko, I. L.; Diakonov, A. M.; Malysh, V. A.; Smirnov, I. Yu.; Ilyinskaya, N. D.; Usikova, A. A. [A. F. Ioffe Physical-Technical Institute of the Russian Academy of Sciences, 194021 St. Petersburg (Russian Federation); Galperin, Y. M. [Department of Physics, University of Oslo, P.O. Box 1048 Blindern, 0316 Oslo (Norway); A. F. Ioffe Physical-Technical Institute of the Russian Academy of Sciences, 194021 St. Petersburg (Russian Federation); Kummer, M.; Känel, H. von [Laboratorium für Festkörperphysik ETH Zürich, CH-8093 Zürich (Switzerland)

    2014-10-21

    We report a procedure to determine the frequency-dependent conductance of quantum Hall structures in a broad frequency domain. The procedure is based on the combination of two known probeless methods—acoustic spectroscopy and microwave spectroscopy. By using the acoustic spectroscopy, we study the low-frequency attenuation and phase shift of a surface acoustic wave in a piezoelectric crystal in the vicinity of the electron (hole) layer. The electronic contribution is resolved using its dependence on a transverse magnetic field. At high frequencies, we study the attenuation of an electromagnetic wave in a coplanar waveguide. To quantitatively calibrate these data, we use the fact that in the quantum-Hall-effect regime the conductance at the maxima of its magnetic field dependence is determined by extended states. Therefore, it should be frequency independent in a broad frequency domain. The procedure is verified by studies of a well-characterized p-SiGe/Ge/SiGe heterostructure.

  9. Magnetic field and temperature dependent measurements of hall coefficient in thermal evaporated Tin-Doped Cadmium Oxide Thin films

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hamadi, O.; Shakir, N.; Mohammed, F.

    2010-01-01

    CdO:Sn thin films are deposited onto glass substrates by thermal evaporation under vacuum. The studied films are polycrystalline and have an NaCl structure. The Hall effect is studied for films with different thickness as substrates are maintained at different temperatures. The temperature dependence of the Hall mobility is also investigated. (authors)

  10. Measurement of Safety Factor Using Hall Probes on CASTOR Tokamak

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Kovařík, Karel; Ďuran, Ivan; Bolshakova, I.; Holyaka, R.; Erashok, V.

    2006-01-01

    Roč. 56, suppl.B (2006), s. 104-110 ISSN 0011-4626. [Symposium on Plasma Physics and Technology/22nd./. Praha, 26.6.2006-29.6.2006] R&D Projects: GA AV ČR(CZ) KJB100430504 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z20430508 Keywords : Plasma * tokamak * safety factor * hall probe Subject RIV: BL - Plasma and Gas Discharge Physics Impact factor: 0.568, year: 2006

  11. Some aspects of achieving an ultimate accuracy during insertion device magnetic measurements by a Hall probe

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Vasserman, I. B.; Xu, J. Z.; Strelnikov, N. O.

    2013-01-01

    An extensive test of a new Senis 2-axis Hall probe was done at the Advanced Photon Source using the Undulator A device and calibration system. This new probe has clear advantages compared with previously used Bell and Sentron Hall probes: very stable zero offset (less than the noise of 0.026 G) and compensated planar Hall effect. It can be used with proper calibration even for first and second field integral measurements. A comparison with reference measurements by long stretched coil shows that the difference in the first field integral measurement results for a 2.4-m-long Undulator A device is between 17 G cm for the best of four Hall probes used for the test and 51 G cm for the worst of them for all gap ranges from 10.5 mm to 150 mm.

  12. Study of carrier concentration in single InP nanowires by luminescence and Hall measurements

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lindgren, David; Hultin, Olof; Heurlin, Magnus; Storm, Kristian; Borgström, Magnus T; Samuelson, Lars; Gustafsson, Anders

    2015-01-01

    The free electron carrier concentrations in single InP core–shell nanowires are determined by micro-photoluminescence, cathodoluminescence (CL) and Hall effect measurements. The results from luminescence measurements were obtained by solving the Fermi–Dirac integral, as well as by analyzing the peak full width at half maximum (FWHM). Furthermore, the platform used for Hall effect measurements, combined with spot mode CL spectroscopy, is used to determine the carrier concentrations at specific positions along single nanowires. The results obtained via luminescence measurements provide an accurate and rapid feedback technique for the epitaxial development of doping incorporation in nanowires. The technique has been employed on several series of samples in which growth parameters, such as V/III-ratio, temperature and dopant flows, were investigated in an optimization procedure. The correlation between the Hall effect and luminescence measurements for extracting the carrier concentration of different samples were in excellent agreement. (paper)

  13. Stacked bilayer phosphorene: strain-induced quantum spin Hall state and optical measurement

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Tian; Lin, Jia-He; Yu, Yan-Mei; Chen, Xiang-Rong; Liu, Wu-Ming

    2015-01-01

    Bilayer phosphorene attracted considerable interest, giving a potential application in nanoelectronics owing to its natural bandgap and high carrier mobility. However, very little is known regarding the possible usefulness in spintronics as a quantum spin Hall (QSH) state of material characterized by a bulk energy gap and gapless spin-filtered edge states. Here, we report a strain-induced topological phase transition from normal to QSH state in bilayer phosphorene, accompanied by band-inversion that changes number from 0 to 1, which is highly dependent on interlayer stacking. When the bottom layer is shifted by 1/2 unit-cell along zigzag/armchair direction with respect to the top layer, the maximum topological bandgap 92.5 meV is sufficiently large to realize QSH effect even at room-temperature. An optical measurement of QSH effect is therefore suggested in view of the wide optical absorption spectrum extending to far infra-red, making bilayer phosphorene a promising candidate for opto-spintronic devices. PMID:26370771

  14. Comparing Hall Effect and Field Effect Measurements on the Same Single Nanowire.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hultin, Olof; Otnes, Gaute; Borgström, Magnus T; Björk, Mikael; Samuelson, Lars; Storm, Kristian

    2016-01-13

    We compare and discuss the two most commonly used electrical characterization techniques for nanowires (NWs). In a novel single-NW device, we combine Hall effect and back-gated and top-gated field effect measurements and quantify the carrier concentrations in a series of sulfur-doped InP NWs. The carrier concentrations from Hall effect and field effect measurements are found to correlate well when using the analysis methods described in this work. This shows that NWs can be accurately characterized with available electrical methods, an important result toward better understanding of semiconductor NW doping.

  15. Photo-Hall measurements on phosphorus-doped n-type CVD diamond at low temperatures

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Remeš, Zdeněk; Kalish, R.; Uzan-Saguy, C.; Baskin, E.; Nesládek, M.; Koizumi, S.

    2003-01-01

    Roč. 199, č. 1 (2003), s. 82-86 ISSN 0031-8965 EU Projects: European Commission(XE) HPRN-CT-1999-00139 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z1010914 Keywords : photo-Hall measurements * CVD diamonnd * phosphorus doped Subject RIV: BM - Solid Matter Physics ; Magnetism Impact factor: 0.950, year: 2003

  16. ExB Measurements of a 200 W Xenon Hall Thruster (Preprint)

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Ekholm, Jared M; Hargus, Jr, William A

    2007-01-01

    Angularly resolved ion species fractions of Xe+1, Xe+2, and Xe+3 in a low power xenon Hall thruster Busek BHT-200 plume were measured using an ExB probe under a variety of thruster operating conditions and background pressures...

  17. Mobile Instruments Measure Atmospheric Pollutants

    Science.gov (United States)

    2009-01-01

    As a part of NASA's active research of the Earth s atmosphere, which has included missions such as the Atmospheric Laboratory of Applications and Science (ATLAS, launched in 1992) and the Total Ozone Mapping Spectrometer (TOMS, launched on the Earth Probe satellite in 1996), the Agency also performs ground-based air pollution research. The ability to measure trace amounts of airborne pollutants precisely and quickly is important for determining natural patterns and human effects on global warming and air pollution, but until recent advances in field-grade spectroscopic instrumentation, this rapid, accurate data collection was limited and extremely difficult. In order to understand causes of climate change and airborne pollution, NASA has supported the development of compact, low power, rapid response instruments operating in the mid-infrared "molecular fingerprint" portion of the electromagnetic spectrum. These instruments, which measure atmospheric trace gases and airborne particles, can be deployed in mobile laboratories - customized ground vehicles, typically - to map distributions of pollutants in real time. The instruments must be rugged enough to operate rapidly and accurately, despite frequent jostling that can misalign, damage, or disconnect sensitive components. By measuring quickly while moving through an environment, a mobile laboratory can correlate data and geographic points, revealing patterns in the environment s pollutants. Rapid pollutant measurements also enable direct determination of pollutant sources and sinks (mechanisms that remove greenhouse gases and pollutants), providing information critical to understanding and managing atmospheric greenhouse gas and air pollutant concentrations.

  18. Mobility and reliability performance measurement.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-06-01

    This project grew out of the fact that mobility was identified early on as one of the key performance focus areas of NCDOTs : strategic transformation effort. The Transformation Management Team (TMT) established a TMT Mobility Workstream Team : in...

  19. Measurement of erosion rate by absorption spectroscopy in a Hall thruster

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yamamoto, Naoji; Yokota, Shigeru; Matsui, Makoto; Komurasaki, Kimiya; Arakawa, Yoshihiro

    2005-01-01

    The erosion rate of a Hall thruster was estimated with the objective of building a real-time erosion rate monitoring system using a 1 kW class anode layer type Hall thruster. This system aids the understanding of the tradeoff between lifetime and performance. To estimate the flux of the sputtered wall material, the number density of the sputtered iron was measured by laser absorption spectroscopy using an absorption line from ground atomic iron at 371.9935 nm. An ultravioletAl x In y Ga (1-x-y) N diode laser was used as the probe. The estimated number density of iron was 1.1x10 16 m -3 , which is reasonable when compared with that measured by duration erosion tests. The relation between estimated erosion rate and magnetic flux density also agreed with that measured by duration erosion tests

  20. Thermoluminescence measurements of neutron streaming through JET Torus Hall ducts

    OpenAIRE

    Obryk, Barbara; Batistoni, Paola; Conroy, Sean; Syme, Brian D.; Popovichev, Sergey; Stamatelatos, Ion E.; Vasilopoulou, Theodora; Bilski, Paweł; Contributors, JET EFDA

    2014-01-01

    Thermoluminescence detectors (TLD) were used for dose measurements at JET. Several hundreds of LiF detectors of various types, standard LiF:Mg,Ti and highly sensitive LiF:Mg,Cu,P were produced. LiF detectors consisting of natural lithium are sensitive to slow neutrons, their response to neutrons being enhanced by 6Li-enriched lithium or suppressed by using lithium consisting entirely of 7Li. Pairs of 6LiF/7LiF detectors allow distinguishing between neutron/non-neutron components of a radiatio...

  1. QMM Project. A proposal for field map measurement of the six HRS Quadrupoles in Hall A, CEBAF

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fonvieille, H.; Quemener, G.; Vernin, P.

    1993-12-01

    The proposed measurements of the magnetic field maps of the six HRS quadrupoles in Hall A at CEBAF is summarized. The basis of the measurement using rotating coils and a preliminary design of the apparatus are presented. (author)

  2. Calibration of Hall sensor array for critical current measurement of YBCO tape with ferromagnetic substrate

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zhu, Yunpeng; Wang, Gang; Liu, Liyuan; Yang, Xinsheng; Zhao, Yong

    2015-01-01

    Abstract : HAS (Hall sensor array) is a powerful tool to detect the uniformity of HTS (high temperature superconductor) tape through mapping the distribution of remanent or shielding field along the surface of the tape. However, measurement of HTS tape with ferromagnetic parts by HSA is still an issue because the ferromagnetic substrate has influence on the magnetic field around the HTS layer. In this work, a continuous HSA system has been designed to measure the critical current of the YBCO tape with ferromagnetic substrate. The relationship between the remanent field and critical current was calibrated by the finite element method. The result showed that the HSA is an effective method for evaluating the critical current of the HTS tape with ferromagnetic substrate. - Highlight: • A continuous Hall sensor array system has been designed. • The inhomogeneity of YBCO tape with ferromagnetic substrate can be detected by HAS. • Finite element method is an effective method for calibrating the remanent field.

  3. Calibration of Hall sensor array for critical current measurement of YBCO tape with ferromagnetic substrate

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zhu, Yunpeng; Wang, Gang; Liu, Liyuan [Key laboratory of Magnetic levitation Technologies and Maglev Trains (Ministry of Education), Superconductor and New Energy R& D Center, Mail Stop 165#, Southwest Jiaotong University, Chengdu, 610031 (China); Yang, Xinsheng, E-mail: xsyang@swjtu.edu.cn [Key laboratory of Magnetic levitation Technologies and Maglev Trains (Ministry of Education), Superconductor and New Energy R& D Center, Mail Stop 165#, Southwest Jiaotong University, Chengdu, 610031 (China); Zhao, Yong [Key laboratory of Magnetic levitation Technologies and Maglev Trains (Ministry of Education), Superconductor and New Energy R& D Center, Mail Stop 165#, Southwest Jiaotong University, Chengdu, 610031 (China); Superconductivity Research Group, School of Materials Science and Engineering, University of New South Wale, Sydney 2052, NSW (Australia)

    2015-12-15

    Abstract : HAS (Hall sensor array) is a powerful tool to detect the uniformity of HTS (high temperature superconductor) tape through mapping the distribution of remanent or shielding field along the surface of the tape. However, measurement of HTS tape with ferromagnetic parts by HSA is still an issue because the ferromagnetic substrate has influence on the magnetic field around the HTS layer. In this work, a continuous HSA system has been designed to measure the critical current of the YBCO tape with ferromagnetic substrate. The relationship between the remanent field and critical current was calibrated by the finite element method. The result showed that the HSA is an effective method for evaluating the critical current of the HTS tape with ferromagnetic substrate. - Highlight: • A continuous Hall sensor array system has been designed. • The inhomogeneity of YBCO tape with ferromagnetic substrate can be detected by HAS. • Finite element method is an effective method for calibrating the remanent field.

  4. Ultraviolet laser crystallized ZnO:Al films on sapphire with high Hall mobility for simultaneous enhancement of conductivity and transparency

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nian, Qiong; Zhang, Martin Y.; Schwartz, Bradley D.; Cheng, Gary J.

    2014-01-01

    One of the most challenging issues in transparent conductive oxides (TCOs) is to improve their conductivity without compromising transparency. High conductivity in TCO films often comes from a high carrier concentration, which is detrimental to transparency due to free carrier absorption. Here we show that UV laser crystallization (UVLC) of aluminum-doped ZnO (AZO) films prepared by pulsed laser deposition on sapphire results in much higher Hall mobility, allowing relaxation of the constraints of the conductivity/transparency trade-off. X-ray diffraction patterns and morphological characterizations show grain growth and crystallinity enhancement during UVLC, resulting in less film internal imperfections. Optoelectronic measurements show that UVLC dramatically improves the electron mobility, while the carrier concentration decreases which in turn simultaneously increases conductivity and transparency. AZO films under optimized UVLC achieve the highest electron mobility of 79 cm 2 /V s at a low carrier concentration of 7.9 × 10 +19  cm −3 . This is realized by a laser crystallization induced decrease of both grain boundary density and electron trap density at grain boundaries. The infrared (IR) to mid-IR range transmittance spectrum shows UVLC significantly enhances the AZO film transparency without compromising conductivity.

  5. Measurement of the Hall scattering factor in 4H SiC epilayers from 40 K to 290 K and up to magnetic fields of nine Tesla

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rutsch, G. [Pittsburgh Univ., PA (United States). Dept. of Physics and Astronomy]|[Dept. of Electrical Engineering, Univ. of Pittsburgh, PA (United States); Devaty, R.P.; Choyke, W.J. [Pittsburgh Univ., PA (United States). Dept. of Physics and Astronomy; Langer, D.W. [Dept. of Electrical Engineering, Univ. of Pittsburgh, PA (United States); Rowland, L.B. [Northrop Grumman Science and Technology Center, Pittsburgh, PA (United States)

    1998-06-01

    In order to accurately extract material properties from temperature dependent Hall measurements, it is necessary to know the Hall scattering factor (r{sub H}), among other material properties. We present measurements of the Hall scattering factor on nitrogen doped 4H SiC epitaxial layers from 40 K to room temperature in magnetic fields up to 9 Tesla. The measured effective Hall scattering factor varies from 0.91 to 1.21. (orig.) 6 refs.

  6. Magnetically filtered Faraday probe for measuring the ion current density profile of a Hall thruster

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rovey, Joshua L.; Walker, Mitchell L.R.; Gallimore, Alec D.; Peterson, Peter Y.

    2006-01-01

    The ability of a magnetically filtered Faraday probe (MFFP) to obtain the ion current density profile of a Hall thruster is investigated. The MFFP is designed to eliminate the collection of low-energy, charge-exchange (CEX) ions by using a variable magnetic field as an ion filter. In this study, a MFFP, Faraday probe with a reduced acceptance angle (BFP), and nude Faraday probe are used to measure the ion current density profile of a 5 kW Hall thruster operating over the range of 300-500 V and 5-10 mg/s. The probes are evaluated on a xenon propellant Hall thruster in the University of Michigan Large Vacuum Test Facility at operating pressures within the range of 4.4x10 -4 Pa Xe (3.3x10 -6 Torr Xe) to 1.1x10 -3 Pa Xe (8.4x10 -6 Torr Xe) in order to study the ability of the Faraday probe designs to filter out CEX ions. Detailed examination of the results shows that the nude probe measures a greater ion current density profile than both the MFFP and BFP over the range of angular positions investigated for each operating condition. The differences between the current density profiles obtained by each probe are attributed to the ion filtering systems employed. Analysis of the results shows that the MFFP, operating at a +5 A solenoid current, provides the best agreement with flight-test data and across operating pressures

  7. Internal plasma potential measurements of a Hall thruster using xenon and krypton propellant

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Linnell, Jesse A.; Gallimore, Alec D.

    2006-01-01

    For krypton to become a realistic option for Hall thruster operation, it is necessary to understand the performance gap between xenon and krypton and what can be done to reduce it. A floating emissive probe is used with the Plasmadynamics and Electric Propulsion Laboratory's High-speed Axial Reciprocating Probe system to map the internal plasma potential structure of the NASA-173Mv1 Hall thruster [R. R. Hofer, R. S. Jankovsky, and A. D. Gallimore, J. Propulsion Power 22, 721 (2006); and ibid.22, 732 (2006)] using xenon and krypton propellant. Measurements are taken for both propellants at discharge voltages of 500 and 600 V. Electron temperatures and electric fields are also reported. The acceleration zone and equipotential lines are found to be strongly linked to the magnetic-field lines. The electrostatic plasma lens of the NASA-173Mv1 Hall thruster strongly focuses the xenon ions toward the center of the discharge channel, whereas the krypton ions are defocused. Krypton is also found to have a longer acceleration zone than the xenon cases. These results explain the large beam divergence observed with krypton operation. Krypton and xenon have similar maximum electron temperatures and similar lengths of the high electron temperature zone, although the high electron temperature zone is located farther downstream in the krypton case

  8. Hall effect measurements of high-quality M n3CuN thin films and the electronic structure

    Science.gov (United States)

    Matsumoto, Toshiki; Hatano, Takafumi; Urata, Takahiro; Iida, Kazumasa; Takenaka, Koshi; Ikuta, Hiroshi

    2017-11-01

    The physical properties of M n3CuN were studied using thin films. We found that an annealing process was very effective to improve the film quality, the key of which was the use of Ti that prevented the formation of oxide impurities. Using these high-quality thin films, we found strong strain dependence for the ferromagnetic transition temperature (TC) and a sign change of the Hall coefficient at TC. The analysis of Hall coefficient data revealed a sizable decrease of hole concentration and a large increase of electron mobility below TC, which is discussed in relation to the electronic structure of this material.

  9. Hall mobilities in GaN{sub x}As{sub 1-x}

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Olea, Javier; Gonzalez-Diaz, German [Dpto. de Fisica Aplicada III, Facultad de Ciencias Fisicas, Universidad Complutense de Madrid, Madrid 28040 (Spain); Yu, Kin Man; Walukiewicz, Wladek [Materials Sciences Division, Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory, 1 Cyclotron Road, Berkeley, CA 94720-8197 (United States)

    2010-07-15

    In this work we report a systematic study of the electron and hole mobilities of GaN{sub x}As{sub 1-x} alloys with different dopants (Zn, Te) and carrier concentrations (10{sup 17}-10{sup 19} cm{sup -3}). We found a very slight reduction of the hole mobility in p-GaN{sub x}As{sub 1-x} compared to p-GaAs, indicating that for small N contents ({proportional_to}1.6%) the valence band is not affected by the N incorporation. In a striking contrast, incorporation of even small amounts of N leads to an abrupt reduction of the electron mobility in n-GaN{sub x}As{sub 1-x}. We further show that the processes that limit the mobility in GaN{sub x}As{sub 1-x} can be explained by the band broadening and the random field scatterings. Considering these two scattering mechanisms we calculated the dependence of electron mobilities on electron concentration as well as on N composition in GaN{sub x}As{sub 1-x}. The calculations agree reasonably well with experiment data of maximum electron mobilities with alloy composition. (copyright 2010 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH and Co. KGaA, Weinheim) (orig.)

  10. Accurate measurement of the electron beam polarization in JLab Hall A using Compton polarimetry

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Escoffier, S.; Bertin, P.Y.; Brossard, M.; Burtin, E.; Cavata, C.; Colombel, N.; Jager, C.W. de; Delbart, A.; Lhuillier, D.; Marie, F.; Mitchell, J.; Neyret, D.; Pussieux, T.

    2005-01-01

    A major advance in accurate electron beam polarization measurement has been achieved at Jlab Hall A with a Compton polarimeter based on a Fabry-Perot cavity photon beam amplifier. At an electron energy of 4.6GeV and a beam current of 40μA, a total relative uncertainty of 1.5% is typically achieved within 40min of data taking. Under the same conditions monitoring of the polarization is accurate at a level of 1%. These unprecedented results make Compton polarimetry an essential tool for modern parity-violation experiments, which require very accurate electron beam polarization measurements

  11. Two-band analysis of hole mobility and Hall factor for heavily carbon-doped p-type GaAs

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, B. W.; Majerfeld, A.

    1996-02-01

    We solve a pair of Boltzmann transport equations based on an interacting two-isotropic-band model in a general way first to get transport parameters corresponding to the relaxation time. We present a simple method to calculate effective relaxation times, separately for each band, which compensate for the inherent deficiencies in using the relaxation time concept for polar optical-phonon scattering. Formulas for calculating momentum relaxation times in the two-band model are presented for all the major scattering mechanisms of p-type GaAs for simple, practical mobility calculations. In the newly proposed theoretical framework, first-principles calculations for the Hall mobility and Hall factor of p-type GaAs at room temperature are carried out with no adjustable parameters in order to obtain direct comparisons between the theory and recently available experimental results. In the calculations, the light-hole-band nonparabolicity is taken into account on the average by the use of energy-dependent effective mass obtained from the kṡp method and valence-band anisotropy is taken partly into account by the use the Wiley's overlap function.. The calculated Hall mobilities show a good agreement with our experimental data for carbon-doped p-GaAs samples in the range of degenerate hole densities. The calculated Hall factors show rH=1.25-1.75 over hole densities of 2×1017-1×1020 cm-3.

  12. In-Situ Measurement of Hall Thruster Erosion Using a Fiber Optic Regression Probe

    Science.gov (United States)

    Polzin, Kurt; Korman, Valentin

    2009-01-01

    One potential life-limiting mechanism in a Hall thruster is the erosion of the ceramic material comprising the discharge channel. This is especially true for missions that require long thrusting periods and can be problematic for lifetime qualification, especially when attempting to qualify a thruster by analysis rather than a test lasting the full duration of the mission. In addition to lifetime, several analytical and numerical models include electrode erosion as a mechanism contributing to enhanced transport properties. However, there is still a great deal of dispute over the importance of erosion to transport in Hall thrusters. The capability to perform an in-situ measurement of discharge channel erosion is useful in addressing both the lifetime and transport concerns. An in-situ measurement would allow for real-time data regarding the erosion rates at different operating points, providing a quick method for empirically anchoring any analysis geared towards lifetime qualification. Erosion rate data over a thruster s operating envelope would also be useful in the modeling of the detailed physics inside the discharge chamber. There are many different sensors and techniques that have been employed to quantify discharge channel erosion in Hall thrusters. Snapshots of the wear pattern can be obtained at regular shutdown intervals using laser profilometry. Many non-intrusive techniques of varying complexity and sensitivity have been employed to detect the time-varying presence of erosion products in the thruster plume. These include the use quartz crystal microbalances, emission spectroscopy, laser induced flourescence, and cavity ring-down spectroscopy. While these techniques can provide a very accurate picture of the level of eroded material in the thruster plume, it is more difficult to use them to determine the location from which the material was eroded. Furthermore, none of the methods cited provide a true in-situ measure of erosion at the channel surface while

  13. Measuring the local mobility of graphene on semiconductors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhong, Haijian; Liu, Zhenghui; Wang, Jianfeng; Pan, Anlian; Xu, Gengzhao; Xu, Ke

    2018-04-01

    Mobility is an important parameter to gauge the performance of graphene devices, which is usually measured by FET or Hall methods relying on the use of insulating substrates. However, these methods are not applicable for the case of graphene on semiconductors, because some current will inevitably cross their junctions and flow through the semiconductors except directly traversing the graphene surface. Here we demonstrate a method for measuring the local mobility of graphene on gallium nitrides combining Kelvin probe force microscopy (KPFM) and conductive atomic force microscopy (C-AFM). The carrier density related to Fermi level shifts in graphene can be acquired from KPFM. The local mobility of graphene is calculated from the carrier mean free path available from the effective contact area, which can be fitted from the local I-V curves in graphene/GaN junctions by C-AFM. Our method can be used to investigate an arbitrary region in graphene and also be applied to other semiconductor substrates and do not introduce damages. These results will benefit recent topical application researches for graphene integration in various semiconductor devices.

  14. Mobile measurement system for wind turbines

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kildemoes Moeller, T.

    1997-06-01

    The aim of this project `Udviklingsafproevning af smaa moellevinger` has been to develop a mobile measurement system for wind turbines. The following report describes the measurement system. The project has been financed by the Danish Ministry of Energy. (au)

  15. Current Driven Instabilities and Anomalous Mobility in Hall-effect Thrusters

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tran, Jonathan; Eckhardt, Daniel; Martin, Robert

    2017-10-01

    Due to the extreme cost of fully resolving the Debye length and plasma frequency, hybrid plasma simulations utilizing kinetic ions and quasi-steady state fluid electrons have long been the principle workhorse methodology for Hall-effect thruster (HET) modeling. Plasma turbulence and the resulting anomalous electron transport in HETs is a promising candidate for developing predictive models for the observed anomalous transport. In this work, we investigate the implementation of an anomalous electron cross field transport model for hybrid HET simulations such a HPHall. A theory for anomalous transport in HETs and current driven instabilities has been recently studied by Lafleur et al. This work has shown collective electron-wave scattering due to large amplitude azimuthal fluctuations of the electric field. We will further adapt the previous results for related current driven instabilities to electric propulsion relevant mass ratios and conduct a preliminary study of resolving this instability with a modified hybrid (fluid electron and kinetic ion) simulation with the hope of integration with established hybrid HET simulations. This work is supported by the Air Force Office of Scientific Research award FA9950-17RQCOR465.

  16. Defects characterization of arsenic implanted silicon by AC Hall effect measurements

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jaouen, H.; Ghibaudo, G.; Christofides, C.

    1986-01-01

    AC and DC Hall effects measurements as a function of temperature (77 - 300K) and frequency (1Hz - 100KHz) have been performed to characterize implanted Silicon films. This technique enables the determination of the annihilation processes of defects in such layers as a function of temperature of isochronal annealings (300/sup 0/C to 1100/sup 0/C during 1 hour). The experimental results are discussed with respect to proper transport models based on short and long range disorder considerations in order to find out the features of defects and inhomogeneities arising from implantation and their thermal annihilation after isochronal annealing

  17. A cavity ring-down spectroscopy sensor for real-time Hall thruster erosion measurements

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lee, B. C.; Huang, W.; Tao, L.; Yamamoto, N.; Yalin, A. P.; Gallimore, A. D.

    2014-01-01

    A continuous-wave cavity ring-down spectroscopy sensor for real-time measurements of sputtered boron from Hall thrusters has been developed. The sensor uses a continuous-wave frequency-quadrupled diode laser at 250 nm to probe ground state atomic boron sputtered from the boron nitride insulating channel. Validation results from a controlled setup using an ion beam and target showed good agreement with a simple finite-element model. Application of the sensor for measurements of two Hall thrusters, the H6 and SPT-70, is described. The H6 was tested at power levels ranging from 1.5 to 10 kW. Peak boron densities of 10 ± 2 × 10 14 m −3 were measured in the thruster plume, and the estimated eroded channel volume agreed within a factor of 2 of profilometry. The SPT-70 was tested at 600 and 660 W, yielding peak boron densities of 7.2 ± 1.1 × 10 14 m −3 , and the estimated erosion rate agreed within ∼20% of profilometry. Technical challenges associated with operating a high-finesse cavity in the presence of energetic plasma are also discussed

  18. Security Measures to Protect Mobile Agents

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dadhich, Piyanka; Govil, M. C.; Dutta, Kamlesh

    2010-11-01

    The security issues of mobile agent systems have embarrassed its widespread implementation. Mobile agents that move around the network are not safe because the remote hosts that accommodate the agents initiates all kinds of attacks. These hosts try to analyze the agent's decision logic and their accumulated data. So, mobile agent security is the most challenging unsolved problems. The paper analyzes various security measures deeply. Security especially the attacks performed by hosts to the visiting mobile agent (the malicious hosts problem) is a major obstacle that prevents mobile agent technology from being widely adopted. Being the running environment for mobile agent, the host has full control over them and could easily perform many kinds of attacks against them.

  19. Measurement of Blood Pressure Using an Arterial Pulsimeter Equipped with a Hall Device

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jong-Gu Choi

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available To measure precise blood pressure (BP and pulse rate without using a cuff, we have developed an arterial pulsimeter consisting of a small, portable apparatus incorporating a Hall device. Regression analysis of the pulse wave measured during testing of the arterial pulsimeter was conducted using two equations of the BP algorithm. The estimated values of BP obtained by the cuffless arterial pulsimeter over 5 s were compared with values obtained using electronic or liquid mercury BP meters. The standard deviation between the estimated values and the measured values for systolic and diastolic BP were 8.3 and 4.9, respectively, which are close to the range of values of the BP International Standard. Detailed analysis of the pulse wave measured by the cuffless radial artery pulsimeter by detecting changes in the magnetic field can be used to develop a new diagnostic algorithm for BP, which can be applied to new medical apparatus such as the radial artery pulsimeter.

  20. Hall-effect measurements of metalorganic vapor-phase epitaxy-grown p-type homoepitaxial GaN layers with various Mg concentrations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Horita, Masahiro; Takashima, Shinya; Tanaka, Ryo; Matsuyama, Hideaki; Ueno, Katsunori; Edo, Masaharu; Takahashi, Tokio; Shimizu, Mitsuaki; Suda, Jun

    2017-03-01

    Mg-doped p-type gallium nitride (GaN) layers with doping concentrations in the range from 6.5 × 1016 cm-3 (lightly doped) to 3.8 × 1019 cm-3 (heavily doped) were investigated by Hall-effect measurement for the analysis of hole concentration and mobility. p-GaN was homoepitaxially grown on a GaN free-standing substrate by metalorganic vapor-phase epitaxy. The threading dislocation density of p-GaN was 4 × 106 cm-2 measured by cathodoluminescence mapping. Hall-effect measurements of p-GaN were carried out at a temperature in the range from 130 to 450 K. For the lightly doped p-GaN, the acceptor concentration of 7.0 × 1016 cm-3 and the donor concentration of 3.2 × 1016 cm-3 were obtained, where the compensation ratio was 46%. We also obtained the depth of the Mg acceptor level to be 220 meV. The hole mobilities of 86, 31, 14 cm2 V-1 s-1 at 200, 300, 400 K, respectively, were observed in the lightly doped p-GaN.

  1. Hall Measurements on Carbon Nanotube Paper Modified With Electroless Deposited Platinum

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Iwuoha Emmanuel

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Carbon nanotube paper, sometimes referred to as bucky paper, is a random arrangement of carbon nanotubes meshed into a single robust structure, which can be manipulated with relative ease. Multi-walled carbon nanotubes were used to make the nanotube paper, and were subsequently modified with platinum using an electroless deposition method based on substrate enhanced electroless deposition. This involves the use of a sacrificial metal substrate that undergoes electro-dissolution while the platinum metal deposits out of solution onto the nanotube paper via a galvanic displacement reaction. The samples were characterized using SEM/EDS, and Hall-effect measurements. The SEM/EDS analysis clearly revealed deposits of platinum (Pt distributed over the nanotube paper surface, and the qualitative elemental analysis revealed co-deposition of other elements from the metal substrates used. When stainless steel was used as sacrificial metal a large degree of Pt contamination with various other metals was observed. Whereas when pure sacrificial metals were used bimetallic Pt clusters resulted. The co-deposition of a bimetallic system upon carbon nanotubes was a function of the metal type and the time of exposure. Hall-effect measurements revealed some interesting fluctuations in sheet carrier density and the dominant carrier switched from N- to P-type when Pt was deposited onto the nanotube paper. Perspectives on the use of the nanotube paper as a replacement to traditional carbon cloth in water electrolysis systems are also discussed.

  2. Design and development of a 3 axis magnetic field measurement facility using Hall probe

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sahoo, Shantonu; Bhattacharyya, Sumantra; Chaddha, Niraj; Mishra, Santosh Kr.; Nandy, Partha P.; Nandi, Chinmay; Bhole, Rajendra B.; Pal, Sarbajit; Pal, Gautam

    2015-01-01

    A 3-axis drive system has been designed and developed in-house to measure the magnetic field with positional accuracy of 0.2 mm in a volume of 1.5 x 1.3 x 0.15 cubic-meter. Hall sensor based magnetometer is used to measure the magnetic field with a precision of 100 μT(1 Gauss). The drive of each axis has linear guide and zero backlash ball screw combination to achieve accurate movement of the hall probe with positional repeatability of +/- 0.2 micron per 50 mm. The hardware and software, also developed in-house, facilitate precise probe positioning and sophisticated visualization of field map. Dedicated microcontroller based motor controllers and encoder read-out cards for each axis have been developed. The facility is integrated with a rich touch-screen based intelligent GUI for automated scanning and data acquisition. This facility can be used for accurate magnetic field mapping of big dipole magnets, solenoids, etc. The facility has been tested successfully to characterize a Dipole Magnet designed for Radioactive Ion Beam (RIB) facility. (author)

  3. A novel approach for simultaneous measurements of Hall effect and magnetoresistance effect in solid and liquid state of gallium and mercury metals

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ogita, M.; Nakao, M.; Singh, C.D.; Mogi, I.; Awaji, S.

    2004-01-01

    An AC-DC method has been proposed for simultaneous measurements of Hall effect and magnetoresistance effect in solid and liquid state of Ga and Hg metals. In low magnetic field Hall signal in solid state is proportional to magnetic field B, while in liquid state Hall signal is affected by magnetoresistance effect. It has been found that magnetoresistance has a B 2 dependence on magnetic field and affects the Hall signal. In high magnetic field, the Hall effect in liquid state is affected by a very large magnetoresistance effect compared in solid state. The magnetoresistance effect in liquid state is higher than solid state

  4. Mobile equipment for measurement of gamma radiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2009-01-01

    NRPA has several systems to perform mobile measurements. One of the systems consists of detectors mounted on the roof of a car. Mobile systems can be used to map the radioactive contamination of large areas in a short time, to the reference measurements and to search for sources astray. The systems can be mounted on the vehicle or used in a helicopter or airplane. (AG)

  5. The magnetic flux leakage measurement by the hall sensor in the longitudinal magnetic field

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Joo, Gwang Tae; Son, Dae Rok; Han, Jung Hee; Park, Jae Hyung

    1998-01-01

    This paper is concerned with magnetic leakage flux measurement using by the hall sensor in the longitudinal magnetic field of the feromagnetic specimen. For detection sensitivity by the hall probe according to various depth of the subsurface defects, the specimen are prepared by six drilled holes of 0.5 mm φ from 1 mm depth to 4 mm depth in the carbon steel plate(10 x 35 x 265 mm). When the specimen applied by various frequency(2 - 9 Hz) of the AC through synthesizer and power amplifier in the yoke, the signals of the magnetic flux leakage using lack-in amplifier and synthesizer are decreased linearly with defect depth at 2 Hz, but these signals are decreased suddenly with defect depth from the surface and obscured with increasing frequency. And, when the specimen applied range of 1 Amp. to 5 Amp. by DC power supply in the yoke, the signals of the magnetic flux leakage through DVM decreased linearly with defect depth up to 2.5 mm depth and change slightly defect depth above 2.5 mm depth from the surface, but its signals appeared predominately.

  6. The Inner Structure of Collisionless Magnetic Reconnection: The Electron-Frame Dissipation Measure and Hall Fields

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zenitani, Seiji; Hesse, Michael; Klimas, Alex; Black, Carrie; Kuznetsova, Masha

    2011-01-01

    It was recently proposed that the electron-frame dissipation measure, the energy transfer from the electromagnetic field to plasmas in the electron s rest frame, identifies the dissipation region of collisionless magnetic reconnection [Zenitani et al., Phys. Rev. Lett. 106, 195003 (2011)]. The measure is further applied to the electron-scale structures of antiparallel reconnection, by using two-dimensional particle-in-cell simulations. The size of the central dissipation region is controlled by the electron-ion mass ratio, suggesting that electron physics is essential. A narrow electron jet extends along the outflow direction until it reaches an electron shock. The jet region appears to be anti-dissipative. At the shock, electron heating is relevant to a magnetic cavity signature. The results are summarized to a unified picture of the single dissipation region in a Hall magnetic geometry.

  7. The inner structure of collisionless magnetic reconnection: The electron-frame dissipation measure and Hall fields

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zenitani, Seiji; Hesse, Michael; Klimas, Alex; Black, Carrie; Kuznetsova, Masha

    2011-01-01

    It was recently proposed that the electron-frame dissipation measure, the energy transfer from the electromagnetic field to plasmas in the electron's rest frame, identifies the dissipation region of collisionless magnetic reconnection [Zenitani et al., Phys. Rev. Lett. 106, 195003 (2011)]. The measure is further applied to the electron-scale structures of antiparallel reconnection, by using two-dimensional particle-in-cell simulations. The size of the central dissipation region is controlled by the electron-ion mass ratio, suggesting that electron physics is essential. A narrow electron jet extends along the outflow direction until it reaches an electron shock. The jet region appears to be anti-dissipative. At the shock, electron heating is relevant to a magnetic cavity signature. The results are summarized to a unified picture of the single dissipation region in a Hall magnetic geometry.

  8. The inner structure of collisionless magnetic reconnection: The electron-frame dissipation measure and Hall fields

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zenitani, Seiji; Hesse, Michael; Klimas, Alex; Black, Carrie; Kuznetsova, Masha [NASA Goddard Space Flight Center, Greenbelt, Maryland 20771 (United States)

    2011-12-15

    It was recently proposed that the electron-frame dissipation measure, the energy transfer from the electromagnetic field to plasmas in the electron's rest frame, identifies the dissipation region of collisionless magnetic reconnection [Zenitani et al., Phys. Rev. Lett. 106, 195003 (2011)]. The measure is further applied to the electron-scale structures of antiparallel reconnection, by using two-dimensional particle-in-cell simulations. The size of the central dissipation region is controlled by the electron-ion mass ratio, suggesting that electron physics is essential. A narrow electron jet extends along the outflow direction until it reaches an electron shock. The jet region appears to be anti-dissipative. At the shock, electron heating is relevant to a magnetic cavity signature. The results are summarized to a unified picture of the single dissipation region in a Hall magnetic geometry.

  9. INFORMATION SECURITY IN MOBILE MODULAR MEASURING SYSTEMS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. N. Tkhishev

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available A special aspect of aircraft test is carrying out both flight evaluation and ground operation evaluation in a structure of flying aids and special tools equipment. The specific of flight and sea tests involve metering in offshore zone, which excludes the possibility of fixed geodetically related measuring tools. In this regard, the specific role is acquired by shipbased measurement systems, in particular the mobile modular measuring systems. Information processed in the mobile modular measurement systems is a critical resource having a high level of confidentiality. When carrying out their functions, it should be implemented a proper information control of the mobile modular measurement systems to ensure their protection from the risk of data leakage, modification or loss, i.e. to ensure a certain level of information security. Due to the specific of their application it is difficult to solve the problems of information security in such complexes. The intruder model, the threat model, the security requirements generated for fixed informatization objects are not applicable to mobile systems. It was concluded that the advanced mobile modular measuring systems designed for flight experiments monitoring and control should be created due to necessary information protection measures and means. The article contains a diagram of security requirements formation, starting with the data envelopment analysis and ending with the practical implementation. The information security probabilistic model applied to mobile modular measurement systems is developed. The list of current security threats based on the environment and specific of the mobile measurement system functioning is examined. The probabilistic model of the information security evaluation is given. The problems of vulnerabilities transformation of designed information system into the security targets with the subsequent formation of the functional and trust requirements list are examined.

  10. Neutron flux measurement by mobile detectors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Verchain, M.

    1987-01-01

    Various incore instrumentation systems and their technological evolution are first reviewed. Then, for 1300 MWe PWR nuclear power plant, temperature and neutron flux measurement are described. Mobile fission chambers, with their large measuring range and accurate location allow a good knowledge of the core. Other incore measures are possible because of flux detector thimble tubes inserted in the reactor core [fr

  11. Cryogenic microsize Hall sensors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kvitkovic, J.; Polak, M.

    1993-01-01

    Hall sensors have a variety of applications in magnetic field measurements. The active area of the Hall sensor does not play an important role in measuring of homogeneous magnetic field. Actually Hall sensors are widely used to measure profiles of magnetic fields produced by magnetization currents in samples of HTC superconductors, as well as of LTC ones. Similar techniques are used to measure magnetization of both HTC and LTC superconductors. In these cases Hall sensor operates in highly inhomogeneous magnetic fields. Because of that, Hall sensors with very small active area are required. We developed and tested Hall sensors with active area 100 μm x 100 μm - type M and 50 μm x 50 μm - type V. Here we report on the most imporant parameters of these units, as well as on their properties as differential magnetometer. (orig.)

  12. Measurements of Hk and Ms in thin magnetic films by the angular dependence of the planar Hall effect

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vatskicheva, M.; Vatskichev, L.

    1987-11-01

    It is shown that the angular dependences of the planar Hall effect measured with infinite magnetic field and with magnetic field H⩾ Hk have an intersection point and this fact is enough for measuring the anisotropy field Hk applying the method presented by Pastor, Ferreiro and Torres in J. Magn. Magn. Mat. 53 (1986) 349, 62 (1986) 101. The scaling of the Hall tension U proportional to M2s in mV/Am -1 gives a possibility for calculating the Ms-values of the films. These assumptions are verified for NiFe- and NiFeGe films with a uniaxial magnetic anisotropy.

  13. Growth parameter investigation of Al0.25Ga0.75N/GaN/AlN heterostructures with Hall effect measurements

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lisesivdin, S B; Demirezen, S; Kasap, M; Ozcelik, S; Caliskan, M D; Ozbay, E; Yildiz, A

    2008-01-01

    Hall effect measurements on unintentionally doped Al 0.25 Ga 0.75 N/GaN/AlN heterostructures grown by metal organic chemical vapor deposition (MOCVD) were carried out as a function of temperature (20–300 K) and magnetic field (0–1.4 T). Magnetic-field-dependent Hall data are analyzed using the quantitative mobility spectrum analysis (QMSA) technique. The QMSA technique successfully separated electrons in the 2D electron gas (2DEG) at the Al 0.25 Ga 0.75 N/GaN interface from other 2D and 3D conduction mechanisms of the samples. 2DEG mobilities, carrier densities and conductivities of the investigated samples are compared at room temperature and low temperature (20 K). For a detailed investigation of the 2DEG-related growth parameters, the scattering analyses of the extracted 2DEG were carried out for all of the samples. Using the results of the scattering analyses, the relation between the growth and scattering parameters was investigated. Increments in the interface roughness (IFR) are reported with the increased GaN buffer growth temperatures. In addition, a linear relation between the deformation potential and interface roughness (IFR) scattering is pointed out for the investigated samples, which may lead to a better understanding of the mechanism of IFR scattering

  14. Proposed measurement of tagged deep inelastic scattering in Hall A of Jefferson lab

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Montgomery, Rachel [Univ. of Glasgow, Scotland (United Kingdom); Annand, John [Univ. of Glasgow, Scotland (United Kingdom); Dutta, Dipangkar [Mississippi State Univ., Mississippi State, MS (United States); Keppel, Cynthia E. [Thomas Jefferson National Accelerator Facility (TJNAF), Newport News, VA (United States); King, Paul [The Ohio State Univ., Columbus, OH (United States). Dept of Physics; Wojtsekhowski, Bogdan [Thomas Jefferson National Accelerator Facility (TJNAF), Newport News, VA (United States); Zhang, Jixie [Univ. of Virginia, Charlottesville, VA (United States)

    2017-03-01

    A tagged deep inelastic scattering (TDIS) experiment is planned for Hall A of Jefferson Lab, which will probe the mesonic content of the nucleon directly. Low momentum recoiling (and spectator) protons will be measured in coincidence with electrons scattered in a deep inelastic regime from hydrogen (and deuterium) targets, covering kinematics of 8 < W2 < 18 GeV2, 1 < Q2 < 3 (GeV/c)2 and 0:05 < x < 0:2. The tagging technique will help identify scattering from partons in the meson cloud and provide access to the pion structure function via the Sullivan process. The experiment will yield the first TDIS results in the valence regime, for both proton and neutron targets. We present here an overview of the experiment.

  15. Observation of Spin Hall Effect in Photon Tunneling via Weak Measurements

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhou, Xinxing; Ling, Xiaohui; Zhang, Zhiyou; Luo, Hailu; Wen, Shuangchun

    2014-01-01

    Photonic spin Hall effect (SHE) manifesting itself as spin-dependent splitting escapes detection in previous photon tunneling experiments due to the fact that the induced beam centroid shift is restricted to a fraction of wavelength. In this work, we report on the first observation of this tiny effect in photon tunneling via weak measurements based on preselection and postselection technique on the spin states. We find that the spin-dependent splitting is even larger than the potential barrier thickness when spin-polarized photons tunneling through a potential barrier. This photonic SHE is attributed to spin-redirection Berry phase which can be described as a consequence of the spin-orbit coupling. These findings provide new insight into photon tunneling effect and thereby offer the possibility of developing spin-based nanophotonic applications. PMID:25487043

  16. Observation of spin Hall effect in photon tunneling via weak measurements.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhou, Xinxing; Ling, Xiaohui; Zhang, Zhiyou; Luo, Hailu; Wen, Shuangchun

    2014-12-09

    Photonic spin Hall effect (SHE) manifesting itself as spin-dependent splitting escapes detection in previous photon tunneling experiments due to the fact that the induced beam centroid shift is restricted to a fraction of wavelength. In this work, we report on the first observation of this tiny effect in photon tunneling via weak measurements based on preselection and postselection technique on the spin states. We find that the spin-dependent splitting is even larger than the potential barrier thickness when spin-polarized photons tunneling through a potential barrier. This photonic SHE is attributed to spin-redirection Berry phase which can be described as a consequence of the spin-orbit coupling. These findings provide new insight into photon tunneling effect and thereby offer the possibility of developing spin-based nanophotonic applications.

  17. Entropic measures of individual mobility patterns

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gallotti, Riccardo; Bazzani, Armando; Rambaldi, Sandro; Esposti, Mirko Degli

    2013-01-01

    Understanding human mobility from a microscopic point of view may represent a fundamental breakthrough for the development of a statistical physics for cognitive systems and it can shed light on the applicability of macroscopic statistical laws for social systems. Even if the complexity of individual behaviors prevents a true microscopic approach, the introduction of mesoscopic models allows the study of the dynamical properties for the non-stationary states of the considered system. We propose to compute various entropy measures of the individual mobility patterns obtained from GPS data that record the movements of private vehicles in the Florence district, in order to point out new features of human mobility related to the use of time and space and to define the dynamical properties of a stochastic model that could generate similar patterns. Moreover, we can relate the predictability properties of human mobility to the distribution of time passed between two successive trips. Our analysis suggests the existence of a hierarchical structure in the mobility patterns which divides the performed activities into three different categories, according to the time cost, with different information contents. We show that a Markov process defined by using the individual mobility network is not able to reproduce this hierarchy, which seems the consequence of different strategies in the activity choice. Our results could contribute to the development of governance policies for a sustainable mobility in modern cities. (paper)

  18. The Use of Tracer Gas Measurements in Detection and Solution of Indoor Air Quality Problems in a Danish Town Hall

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Brohus, Henrik; Hyldgård, Carl-Erik

    A Danish town hall with substantial complaints of poor indoor air quality is examined. This paper describes ·the use of traGer gas measurements which form an important part in the detection and solution of the problems. Investigations are carried out both in the field and in the laboratory using...

  19. Laser Induced Fluorescence Measurements in a Hall Thruster Plume as a Function of Background Pressure

    Science.gov (United States)

    Spektor, R.; Tighe, W. G.; Kamhawi, H.

    2016-01-01

    A set of Laser Induced Fluorescence (LIF) measurements in the near-field region of the NASA- 173M Hall thruster plume is presented at four background pressure conditions varying from 9.4 x 10(exp -6) torr to 3.3 x 10(exp -5) torr. The xenon ion velocity distribution function was measured simultaneously along the axial and radial directions. An ultimate exhaust velocity of 19.6+/-0.25 km/s achieved at a distance of 20 mm was measured, and that value was not sensitive to pressure. On the other hand, the ion axial velocity at the thruster exit was strongly influenced by pressure, indicating that the accelerating electric field moved inward with increased pressure. The shift in electric field corresponded to an increase in measured thrust. Pressure had a minor effect on the radial component of ion velocity, mainly affecting ions exiting close to the channel inner wall. At that radial location the radial component of ion velocity was approximately 1000 m/s greater at the lowest pressure than at the highest pressure. A reduction of the inner magnet coil current by 0.6 A resulted in a lower axial ion velocity at the channel exit while the radial component of ion velocity at the channel inner wall location increased by 1300 m/s, and at the channel outer wall location the radial ion velocity remained unaffected. The ultimate exhaust velocity was not significantly affected by the inner magnet current.

  20. Video quality measure for mobile IPTV service

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Wonjun; Kim, Changick

    2008-08-01

    Mobile IPTV is a multimedia service based on wireless networks with interactivity and mobility. Under mobile IPTV scenarios, people can watch various contents whenever they want and even deliver their request to service providers through the network. However, the frequent change of the wireless channel bandwidth may hinder the quality of service. In this paper, we propose an objective video quality measure (VQM) for mobile IPTV services, which is focused on the jitter measurement. Jitter is the result of frame repetition during the delay and one of the most severe impairments in the video transmission via mobile channels. We first employ YUV color space to compute the duration and occurrences of jitter and the motion activity. Then the VQM is modeled by the combination of these three factors and the result of subjective assessment. Since the proposed VQM is based on no-reference (NR) model, it can be applied for real-time applications. Experimental results show that the proposed VQM highly correlates to subjective evaluation.

  1. A Measurement of GE^n at High Momentum Transfer in Hall A

    Science.gov (United States)

    Feuerbach, Robert J.; Wojtsekhowski, Bogdan

    2006-10-01

    A precision measurement of the electric form-factor of the neutron, GE^n, at Q^2 up to 3.5 GeV^2 was recently completed in Hall A at the Thomas Jefferson National Accelerator Facility(Jefferson Lab). The ratio GE^n/GM^n was measured through the beam-target asymmetry A of electrons quasi-elastically scattered off neutrons in the reaction ^3He(e,e' n). The experiment took advantage of recent developments of the electron beam and target, as well as two detectors new to Jefferson Lab. The measurement used the accelerator's 100% duty-cycle high-polarization (typically 84%) electron beam and a new, hybrid optically-pumped polarized ^3He target which achieved polarizations above 50%. A medium acceptance (80msr) open-geometry magnetic spectrometer (BigBite) detected the scattered electron, while a new neutron detector was constructed to observe the released neutron. An overview of the experiment and the experimental motivation will be discussed, in particular the large range of predictions from modern calculations for GE^n at this relatively high Q^2. Finally, the analysis progress and preliminary results will be presented.

  2. Resistivity and Hall-effect measurements on LaAlO{sub 3}/SrTiO{sub 3-δ} heterostructures

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sleem, Ahmed [Institut fuer Festkoerperphysik, Karlsruher Institut fuer Technologie, Karlsruhe (Germany); Fakultaet fuer Physik, Karlsruher Institut fuer Technologie, Karlsruhe (Germany); Fuchs, Dirk; Schneider, Rudolf [Institut fuer Festkoerperphysik, Karlsruher Institut fuer Technologie, Karlsruhe (Germany); Mueller, Philipp; Gerthsen, Dagmar [Laboratorium fuer Elektronenmikroskopie, Karlsruher Institut fuer Technologie, Karlsruhe (Germany); Loehneysen, Hilbert von [Institut fuer Festkoerperphysik, Karlsruher Institut fuer Technologie, Karlsruhe (Germany); Physikalisches Institut, Karlsruher Institut fuer Technologie, Karlsruhe (Germany)

    2013-07-01

    The influence of the oxygen partial pressure p(O{sub 2}) during film deposition on the transport properties of LaAlO{sub 3}/SrTiO{sub 3-δ} heterostructures was analyzed by resistivity and Hall-effect measurements. To this end, thin films of LaAlO{sub 3} were grown epitaxially by pulsed laser deposition on TiO{sub 2} terminated <001> oriented SrTiO{sub 3} substrates at different oxygen partial pressure p(O{sub 2}), i.e., 10{sup -3} mbar≥p(O{sub 2})≥10{sup -5} mbar. Electrical contacts to the interface were prepared by argon ion-etching and subsequent filling by sputtering of Pt pads. Resistivity measurements were carried out in Van-der-Pauw geometry for 4.2 K≤T≤300 K. The charge carrier concentration, n{sub e}, and mobility, μ{sub e}, were deduced from the Hall-constant, R{sub H}, and conductivity, σ, at room temperature and 4.2 K. With decreasing p(O{sub 2}) the resistivity changes from an insulating/semi-conductive to a metallic behavior. Experimental results with respect to the sheet resistance R{sub S}, n{sub e}, and μ{sub e} versus p(O{sub 2}) are presented and discussed.

  3. Laser-Induced Fluorescence Measurements within a Laboratory Hall Thruster (Postprint)

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Hargus, Jr., W. A; Cappelli, M. A

    1999-01-01

    In this paper, we describe the results of a study of laser induced fluorescence velocimetry of ionic xenon in the plume and interior acceleration channel of a laboratory Hall type thruster operating...

  4. Measurement of sheath thickness by lining out grooves in the Hall-type stationary plasma thrusters

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yu Daren; Wu Zhiwen; Ning Zhongxi; Wang Xiaogang

    2007-01-01

    Using grooves created along the axial direction of the discharge channel, a method for measuring sheath thickness in Hall-type stationary plasma thrusters has been developed. By distorting the wall surface using these grooves, it is possible to numerically study the effect of the wall surface on the sheath and near wall conductivity. Monte Carlo method is applied to calculate the electron temperature variation with different groove depths. The electron dynamic process in the plasma is described by a test particle method with the electron randomly entering the sheath from the discharge channel and being reflected back. Numerical results show that the reflected electron temperature is hardly affected by the wall surface if the groove depth is much less than the sheath thickness. On the other hand, the reflected electron temperature increases if the groove depth is much greater than the sheath thickness. The reflected electron temperature has a sharp jump when the depth of groove is on the order of the sheath thickness. The simulation is repeated with different sheath thicknesses and the results are the same. Therefore, a diagnosis mean of the sheath thickness can be developed based on the method. Also the simulation results are in accord with the experimental data. Besides, the measurement method may be applicable to other plasma device with similar orthogonal steady state electrical and magnetic fields

  5. NKS MOMS. Final report. [Mobile Measurement Systems

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nilssen, J. [Norwegian Radiation Protection Authority (NRPA) (Norway); Aage, H.K. [Danish Emergency Management Agency (DEMA) (Denmark); Palsson, S.E. [Icelandic Radiation Safety Authority (IRSA) (Iceland)

    2013-02-15

    Mobile car-borne measurement systems are an important asset in early phase emergency response in all Nordic countries. However, through the development of the systems in the different countries, there are considerable differences between the systems developed. This complicates Nordic cooperation and mutual assistance in emergency situations. This project aimed to facilitate harmonization of mobile measurement systems between the Nordic countries. The project focused on harmonizing data formats, information exchange and measurement strategies. Although the work done was funded by each member, the project established a good platform for cooperation which will hopefully continue beyond the scope of the project. A two-day seminar was held in May 2012, where all participants presented the current status (equipment, methods used etc.), in addition to invited speakers presenting development within the field of mobile detection and in situ measurements. Exchange of experiences and information on different measurement systems and practises in use was an important part of the seminar. The seminar was followed up by a small workshop during the REFOX exercise in Lund, Sweden, September 2012. Exchange of measurement data from the exercise was facilitated through a workspace proveded by NRPA as part of the MOMS project. The work done in this project will be presented at the NordEx12 seminar in March 2013. (Author)

  6. Measuring ionizing radiation with a mobile device

    Science.gov (United States)

    Michelsburg, Matthias; Fehrenbach, Thomas; Puente León, Fernando

    2012-02-01

    In cases of nuclear disasters it is desirable to know one's personal exposure to radioactivity and the related health risk. Usually, Geiger-Mueller tubes are used to assess the situation. Equipping everyone with such a device in a short period of time is very expensive. We propose a method to detect ionizing radiation using the integrated camera of a mobile consumer device, e.g., a cell phone. In emergency cases, millions of existing mobile devices could then be used to monitor the exposure of its owners. In combination with internet access and GPS, measured data can be collected by a central server to get an overview of the situation. During a measurement, the CMOS sensor of a mobile device is shielded from surrounding light by an attachment in front of the lens or an internal shutter. The high-energy radiation produces free electrons on the sensor chip resulting in an image signal. By image analysis by means of the mobile device, signal components due to incident ionizing radiation are separated from the sensor noise. With radioactive sources present significant increases in detected pixels can be seen. Furthermore, the cell phone application can make a preliminary estimate on the collected dose of an individual and the associated health risks.

  7. Study of the motion of electrons in non polar classical liquids. Measurement of Hall effect and f.i.r. search for low energy traps. Progress report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1981-01-01

    Progress is reported on experiments aimed at the measurement of the Hall mobility of injected electrons in classical non polar insulating liquids and the optical absorption associated with electrons captured by shallow traps in the liquefied rare gases. Theoretical work aimed at a better understanding of the trapping kinetics of electrons by SF 6 and O 2 dissolved in rare gas liquids was also carried out. Its conclusion is that the electric field dependence of the trapping probability can be explained, basically without adjustable parameters, by considering the Poole-Frenkel-Schotky ionization of the excited state of the traps. From the analysis of published data on the motion of electrons in liquid ethane it is tentatively concluded that at low temperatures the trapping of electrons in the liquid involves a Jahn-Teller like distortion of a single ethane molecule while at higher temperatures it is necessary to consider a small molecular cluster, possibly made up of 2 molecules

  8. Measuring the homogeneity of Bi(2223)/Ag tapes by four-probe method and a Hall probe array

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kovac, P.

    1999-01-01

    The nature of the BSCCO compound and application of the powder-in-tube technique usually lead to non-uniform quality across and/or along the ceramic fibres and finally to variations in the critical current and its irregular distribution in the Bi(2223)/Ag tape. Therefore, the gliding four-probe method and contactless field monitoring measurements have been used for homogeneity studies. The gliding potential contacts moved along the tape surface and a sensitive system based on an integrated Hall probe array containing 16 or 19 in-line probes supported by PC-compatible electronics with software allowed us to make a comparison of contact and contactless measurements at any elements of Bi(2223)/Ag sample. The results of both methods show very good correlation and the possibility of using a sensitive Hall probe array for monitoring the final quality of Bi(2223)/Ag tapes. (author)

  9. Prediction of liquid metal alloy radiant properties from measurements of the Hall coefficient and the direct current resistivity

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Havstad, M.A.; Qiu, T.

    1995-04-01

    The thermal radiative properties of high temperature solid and liquid metal alloys are particularly useful to research and development efforts in laser cladding and machining, electron beam welding and laser isotope separation. However the cost, complexity, and difficulty of measuring these properties have forced the use of crude estimates from the Hagen-Rubens relation, the Drude relations, or extrapolation from low temperature or otherwise flawed data (e.g., oxidized). The authors have found in this work that published values for the Hall coefficient and the electrical resistivity of liquid metal alloys can provide useful estimates of the reflectance and emittance of some groups of binary liquid metal and high temperature solid alloys. The estimation method computes the Drude free electron parameters, and thence the optical constants and the radiant properties from the dependence of the Hall coefficient and direct current resistivity on alloy composition (the Hall coefficient gives the free electron density and the resistivity gives the average time between collisions). They find that predictions of the radiant properties of molten cerium-copper alloy, which use the measured variations in the Hall coefficient and resistivity (both highly nonlinear) as a function of alloy fraction (rather than linear combinations of the values of the pure elements) yield a good comparison to published measurements of the variation of the normal spectral emittance (a different but also nonlinear function) of cerium-copper alloy at the single wavelength available for comparison, 0.645 μm. The success of the approach in the visible range is particularly notable because one expects a Drude based approach to improve with increasing wavelength from the visible into the infrared. Details of the estimation method, the comparison between the calculation and the measured emittance, and a discussion of what groups of elements may also provide agreement is given

  10. Magnetic Measuring Instrumentation with Radiation-Resistant Hall Sensors for Fusion Reactors: Experience of Testing at JET

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Bolshakova, I.; Quercia, A.; Coccorese, V.; Murari, A.; Holyaka, R.; Ďuran, Ivan; Viererbl, L.; Konopleva, R.; Yerashok, V.

    2012-01-01

    Roč. 59, č. 4 (2012), s. 1224-1231 ISSN 0018-9499. [International Conference on Advancements in Nuclear Instrumentation, Measurement Methods and their Applications. Ghent, 06.06.2011-09.06.2011] R&D Projects: GA ČR GAP205/10/2055 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z20430508 Keywords : plasma * tokamak * JET * Hall probes * radiation resistance Subject RIV: BL - Plasma and Gas Discharge Physics Impact factor: 1.219, year: 2012

  11. Magnetically Filtered Faraday Probe for Measuring the Ion Current Density Profile of a Hall Thruster

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Rovey, Joshua L; Walker, Mitchell L. R; Gallimore, Alec D; Peterson, Peter Y

    2006-01-01

    .../s. The probes are evaluated on a xenon propellant Hall thruster in the University of Michigan Large Vacuum Test Facility at operating pressures within the range of 4.4 x 10(-4) Pa Xe (3.3 x 10(-6) Torr Xe) to 1.1 10(-3) Pa Xe (8.4 x 10(-6) Torr Xe...

  12. Mobile Radiological Laboratories Intercomparison Measurements - Chernobyl

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Martincic, R.; Glavic-Cindro, D.; Korun, M.; Pucelj, B.; Vodenik, B.

    2001-01-01

    Full text: In last decade different institutions in European countries have organised periodic intercomparison exercises of mobile radiological laboratories to improve the preparedness of emergency monitoring teams. The 12th Regular Workshop on Mobile Radiological Laboratories was held in Exclusion Zone of the Chernobyl NPP, Ukraine from September 13 to September 18, 1999 under the acronym MORAL-12. The European Centre of Technological Safety (TESEC), Kiev, Ukraine and J. Stefan Institute, Ljubljana, Slovenia organised Intercomparison Measurements 99 jointly under the auspices of the International Atomic Energy Agency (IAEA). Nineteen teams from 9 countries and IAEA participated in the Workshop. Six field and personal and equipment contamination control exercises were prepared and conducted at two measuring sites with very different ambient dose rate levels. The Workshop pointed out that such exercises are very valuable for rapid, efficient and harmonised emergency response in case of nuclear or radiological emergency. The teams had an opportunity to test their ability to perform field measurements in the contaminated environment, and to report results on the spot, as well as to test their emergency preparedness and persistence. They gained new experiences for fieldwork under stress conditions. An overview and results of these intercomparison measurements are presented and lessons learned are discussed. (author)

  13. Resistivity and Hall voltage in gold thin films deposited on mica at room temperature

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bahamondes, Sebastián; Donoso, Sebastián; Ibañez-Landeta, Antonio; Flores, Marcos [Departamento de Física, Facultad de Ciencias Físicas y Matemáticas, Universidad de Chile, Av. Blanco Encalada 2008, Santiago (Chile); Henriquez, Ricardo, E-mail: ricardo.henriquez@usm.cl [Departamento de Física, Universidad Técnica Federico Santa María, Av. España 1680, Valparaiso 2390123 (Chile)

    2015-03-30

    Highlights: • We determined the 4 K thickness dependence of resistivity for a family of gold thin films. • We determined the thickness dependence of resistivity during the growth process. • Both behaviors are well represented by the Mayadas–Shatzkes theory. • We determined Hall tangent and Hall resistance at 4 K and up to 4.5 T. • Hall mobility is always higher than the drift mobility. - Abstract: We report the thickness dependence of the resistivity measured at 4 K of gold films grown onto mica at room temperature (RT), for thickness ranging from 8 to 100 nm. This dependence was compared to the one obtained for a sample during its growth process at RT. Both behaviors are well represented by the Mayadas–Shatzkes theory. Using this model, we found comparable contributions of electron surface and electron grain boundary scattering to the resistivity at 4 K. Hall effect measurements were performed using a variable transverse magnetic field up to 4.5 T. Hall tangent and Hall resistance exhibit a linear dependence on the magnetic field. For this magnetic field range, the Hall mobility is always larger than the drift mobility. This result is explained through the presence of the above-mentioned scattering mechanisms acting on the galvanomagnetic coefficients. In addition, we report the temperature dependence of the resistivity between 4 and 70 K.

  14. Advanced laboratory for testing plasma thrusters and Hall thruster measurement campaign

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Szelecka Agnieszka

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available Plasma engines are used for space propulsion as an alternative to chemical thrusters. Due to the high exhaust velocity of the propellant, they are more efficient for long-distance interplanetary space missions than their conventional counterparts. An advanced laboratory of plasma space propulsion (PlaNS at the Institute of Plasma Physics and Laser Microfusion (IPPLM specializes in designing and testing various electric propulsion devices. Inside of a special vacuum chamber with three performance pumps, an environment similar to the one that prevails in space is created. An innovative Micro Pulsed Plasma Thruster (LμPPT with liquid propellant was built at the laboratory. Now it is used to test the second prototype of Hall effect thruster (HET operating on krypton propellant. Meantime, an improved prototype of krypton Hall thruster is constructed.

  15. Microscopic measurement of penetration depth in YBa2Cu3O7-δ thin films by scanning Hall probe microscopy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Oral, A.; Bending, S.J.; Humphreys, R.G.; Henini, M.

    1997-01-01

    We have used a low noise scanning Hall probe microscope to measure the penetration depth microscopically in a YBa 2 Cu 3 O 7-δ thin film as a function of temperature. The instrument has high magnetic field (approx. 2.9x10 -8 T Hz -1/2 at 77 K) and spatial resolution (approx. 0.85 μm). Magnetic field profiles of single vortices in the superconducting film have been successfully measured and the microscopic penetration depth of the superconductor has been extracted. We find surprisingly large variations in values of λ for different vortices within the scanning field. (author)

  16. Unified Hall-Petch description of nano-grain nickel hardness, flow stress and strain rate sensitivity measurements

    Science.gov (United States)

    Armstrong, R. W.; Balasubramanian, N.

    2017-08-01

    It is shown that: (i) nano-grain nickel flow stress and hardness data at ambient temperature follow a Hall-Petch (H-P) relation over a wide range of grain size; and (ii) accompanying flow stress and strain rate sensitivity measurements follow an analogous H-P relationship for the reciprocal "activation volume", (1/v*) = (1/A*b) where A* is activation area. Higher temperature flow stress measurements show a greater than expected reduction both in the H-P kɛ and in v*. The results are connected with smaller nano-grain size (tested at very low imposed strain rates.

  17. An orientation measurement method based on Hall-effect sensors for permanent magnet spherical actuators with 3D magnet array.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yan, Liang; Zhu, Bo; Jiao, Zongxia; Chen, Chin-Yin; Chen, I-Ming

    2014-10-24

    An orientation measurement method based on Hall-effect sensors is proposed for permanent magnet (PM) spherical actuators with three-dimensional (3D) magnet array. As there is no contact between the measurement system and the rotor, this method could effectively avoid friction torque and additional inertial moment existing in conventional approaches. Curved surface fitting method based on exponential approximation is proposed to formulate the magnetic field distribution in 3D space. The comparison with conventional modeling method shows that it helps to improve the model accuracy. The Hall-effect sensors are distributed around the rotor with PM poles to detect the flux density at different points, and thus the rotor orientation can be computed from the measured results and analytical models. Experiments have been conducted on the developed research prototype of the spherical actuator to validate the accuracy of the analytical equations relating the rotor orientation and the value of magnetic flux density. The experimental results show that the proposed method can measure the rotor orientation precisely, and the measurement accuracy could be improved by the novel 3D magnet array. The study result could be used for real-time motion control of PM spherical actuators.

  18. Application in measurements of SKODA-OZES mobile measuring system

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Grof, V.; Drab, F.; Icha, K.

    A mobile digital measuring system was built at SKODA - Energeticke strojirenstvi based on digital information system CIS 3000 with the ADT 4100 computer. The system can operate in the BCS or in the RTE-C mode. Two programs are briefly described written for the purpose of measurements. The following applications of the system were tried: testing the reactivity meter on the reactor model, demonstration measurement of the temperature of the medium and display of values on the monitor, measurement of the temperature of the lid of the pressure vessel of the WWER-440 reactor during overlaying and measurement and the adaptive control of band thickness on a KVARTO 200 rolling mill. The measurement system is expected to be used in nuclear power plants and experimental reactors. (M.D.)

  19. Carrier mobilities in microcrystalline silicon films

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bronger, T.; Carius, R.

    2007-01-01

    For a better understanding of electronic transport mechanisms in thin-film silicon solar cell quality films, we have investigated the Hall mobility for electrons in microcrystalline/amorphous silicon over a range of crystallinities and doping concentrations. We find that Hall mobility increases with increasing doping concentration in accordance with earlier measurements. With increasing amorphous fraction, the measured mobility decreases suggesting a negative influence of the additional disorder. The results suggest a differential mobility model in which mobility depends on the energy level of the carriers that contribute to the electrical current

  20. Temperature dependence of collapse of quantized hall resistance

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tanaka, Hiroyasu; Kawashima, Hironori; Iizuka, Hisamitsu; Fukuda, Hideaki; Kawaji, Shinji

    2006-01-01

    Similarity is observed in the deviation of Hall resistance from the quantized value with the increase in the source-drain current I SD in our butterfly-type Hall bars and in the Hall bars used by Jeanneret et al., while changes in the diagonal resistivity ρ xx with I SD are significantly different between these Hall bars. The temperature dependence of the critical Hall electric field F cr (T) for the collapse of R H (4) measured in these Hall bars is approximated using F cr (T) = F cr (0)(1 - (T/T cr ) 2 ). Here, the critical Hall electric field at zero temperature depends on the magnetic field B as F cr (0) ∝ B 3/2 . Theoretical considerations are given on F cr (T) on the basis of a temperature-dependent mobility edge model and a schema of temperature-dependent inter-Landau level tunneling probability arising from the Fermi distribution function. The former does not fit in with the I SD dependence of activation energy in ρ xx . (author)

  1. Hall A

    Data.gov (United States)

    Federal Laboratory Consortium — The instrumentation in Hall A at the Thomas Jefferson National Accelerator Facility was designed to study electroand photo-induced reactions at very high luminosity...

  2. Hall C

    Data.gov (United States)

    Federal Laboratory Consortium — Hall C's initial complement of equipment (shown in the figure), includes two general-purpose magnetic spectrometers. The High Momentum Spectrometer (HMS) has a large...

  3. Reference intervals of spinal mobility measures in normal individuals: the mobility study

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Ramiro, Sofia; van Tubergen, Astrid; Stolwijk, Carmen; van der Heijde, Desiree; Royston, Patrick; Landewe, Robert

    2015-01-01

    Objectives To establish reference intervals (RIs) for spinal mobility measures as recommended for patients with axial spondyloarthritis, and to determine the effect of age, height and gender on spinal mobility, in normal individuals. Methods A cross-sectional study (MOBILITY) was conducted among

  4. Measurement of local critical currents in TFA-MOD processed coated conductors by use of scanning Hall-probe microscopy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Shiohara, K.; Higashikawa, K.; Kawaguchi, T.; Inoue, M.; Kiss, T.; Yoshizumi, M.; Izumi, T.

    2011-01-01

    We have investigated 2-dimensional distribution of critical current density. We have measured TFA-MOD processed YBCO coated conductor. We used scanning Hall-probe microscopy. These provided information is useful for fabrication process of coated conductor. We have carried out 2-dimensional (2D) measurement of local critical current in a Trifluoroacetates-Metal Organic Deposition (TFA-MOD) processed YBCO coated conductor using scanning Hall-probe microscopy. Recently, remarkable R and D accomplishments on the fabrication processes of coated conductors have been conducted extensively and reported. The TFA-MOD process has been expected as an attractive process to produce coated conductors with high performance at a low production cost due to a simple process using non-vacuum equipments. On the other hand, enhancement of critical currents and homogenization of the critical current distribution in the coated conductors are definitely very important for practical applications. According to our measurements, we can detect positions and spatial distribution of defects in the conductor. This kind of information will be very helpful for the improvement of the TFA-MOD process and for the design of the conductor intended for practical electric power device applications.

  5. Experimental measurement of magnetic field null in the vacuum chamber of KTM tokamak based on matrix of 2D Hall sensors

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Shapovalov, G.; Chektybayev, B., E-mail: chektybaev@nnc.kz; Sadykov, A.; Skakov, M.; Kupishev, E.

    2016-11-15

    Experimental technique of measurement of magnetic field null region inside of the KTM tokamak vacuum chamber has been developed. Square matrix of 36 2D Hall sensors, which used in the technique, allows carrying out direct measurements of poloidal magnetic field dynamics in the vacuum chamber. To better measuring accuracy, Hall sensor’s matrix was calibrated with commercial Helmholtz coils and in situ measurement of defined magnetic field from poloidal and toroidal coils. Standard KTM Data-Acquisition System has been used to collect data from Hall sensors. Experimental results of measurement of magnetic field null in the vacuum chamber of KTM are shown in the paper. Additionally results of the magnetic field null reconstruction from signals of inductive total flux loops are shown in the paper.

  6. Engagement in Digital Lecture Halls: A Study of Student Course Engagement and Mobile Device Use during Lecture

    Science.gov (United States)

    Witecki, Gwendolyn; Nonnecke, Blair

    2015-01-01

    Universities have experienced increases in technology ownership and usage amongst students entering undergraduate programs. Almost all students report owning a mobile phone and many students view laptops and tablets as educational tools, though they also report using them for nonacademic activities during lectures. We explored the relationship…

  7. On the determination of the carrier concentration in large-grain polycrystalline InP, GaAs, and GaP by Hall effect measurements

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Siegel, W.; Kuehnel, G.; Schneider, H.A.

    1985-01-01

    Hall and conductivity measurements are performed in a wide temperature region on large-grain polycrystalline samples of n-InP, n- and p-GaAs as well as n- and p-GaP. The feasibility of Hall measurements at a given temperature depends mainly on the height PHI/sub B/ of the grain boundary potential barriers and on the average grain size. Measurements at room temperature are possible on large-grain material (average grain size 0.2 to 1 mm) for PHI/sub B/ <= 0.4 eV. For greater barrier heights elevated temperatures are necessary. If the Hall coefficient is measurable than it yields an effective carrier concentration for the polycrystalline sample which agrees well with the carrier concentration in the bulk of the grains. (author)

  8. Measurement of the nucleation and domain depinning field in a single Co/Pt multilayer dot by Anomalous Hall effect

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Delalande, M.; Vries, J. de; Abelmann, L.; Lodder, J.C.

    2012-01-01

    Co/Pt multilayer dots with perpendicular anisotropy and with diameters of 250 and 350 nm were fabricated on top of a Hall cross configuration. The angular dependence of the magnetic reversal of the individual dot was investigated by Anomalous Hall effect measurements. At near in-plane angles (85° with the magnetic easy axis) the dot switches partially into a stable two-domain state. This allows for separate analysis of the angular dependence of both the field required for nucleation of a reversed domain, and the field required for depinning of the domain wall. The angular dependence of the depinning field fits accurately to a 1/cos(θ) behavior, whereas the angular dependence of the nucleation field shows a minimum close to 45°. The latter dependency can be accurately fitted to the modified Kondorsky model proposed by Schumacher . - Highlights: ► Reversal takes place by nucleation and subsequent propagation of a domain wall. ► The domain wall can be trapped in the dot at near in-plane field angles. ► Angular dependence of depinning is accurately predicted by the Kondorsky model. ► Angular dependence of nucleation can be fitted to a modified Kondorksy model.

  9. Engagement in Digital Lecture Halls: A Study of Student Course Engagement and Mobile Device use During Lecture

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gwendolyn Witecki

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Universities have experienced increases in technology ownership and usage amongst students entering undergraduate programs. Almost all students report owning a mobile phone and many students view laptops and tablets as educational tools, though they also report using them for non-academic activities during lectures. We explored the relationship between student course engagement and the use of smartphones, laptops, cell phones, and tablets during lecture. Undergraduate students responded to an online survey asking about both course engagement and mobile device habits. Results show that smartphone use was most strongly related to lowered course engagement and while laptop use was related to lowered engagement, it was to a lesser extent. In contrast, overall engagement of students using tablets or cell phones was not significantly different than those who did not.

  10. Mobile source air toxics mitigation measures.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-10-01

    In accordance with the Federal Highway Administration (FHWA) Interim Guidance Update on Mobile Source Air Toxic Analysis in NEPA Documents (September 30, 2009), transportation projects subject to the National Environmental Policy Act (NEPA) mus...

  11. Performance measures for public transit mobility management.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-12-01

    "Mobility management is an innovative approach for managing and delivering coordinated public : transportation services that embraces the full family of public transit options. At a national level, there are : currently no industry recognized perform...

  12. Investigating Call Drops with Field Measurements on Commercial Mobile Phones

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Messina, Alessandro; Caragea, Gabriel; Compta, Pol Torres

    2013-01-01

    can be done per day. In this paper we present a new methodology to investigate call drops by using mobile phones to do the measurements following the concept of citizen sensing. Therefore, a mobile application for Android is made that collects all necessary data and dumps the measurement results...

  13. The Hall coefficient: a tool for characterizing graphene field effect transistors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wehrfritz, Peter; Seyller, Thomas

    2014-01-01

    Graphene field effect transistors are considered as a candidate for future high-frequency applications. For their realization, the optimal combination of substrate, graphene preparation, and insulator deposition and composition is required. This optimization must be based on an in-depth characterization of the obtained graphene insulator metal (GIM) stack. Hall effect measurements are frequently employed to study such systems, thereby focussing primarily on the charge carrier mobility. In this work we show how an analysis of the sheet Hall coefficient can reveal further important properties of the GIM stack, like, e.g., the interface trap density and the spacial charge inhomogeneity. To that end, we provide an extensive description of the GIM diode, which leads to an accurate calculation of the sheet Hall coefficient dependent on temperature and gate voltage. The gate dependent inverse sheet Hall coefficient is discussed in detail before we introduce the concept of an equivalent temperature, which is a measure of the spacial charge inhomogeneity. In order to test the concept, we apply it to evaluate already measured Hall data taken from the literature. This evaluation allows us to determine the Drude mobility, even at the charge neutrality point, which is inaccessible with a simple one band Hall mobility analysis, and to shed light on the spacial charge inhomogeneity. The formalism is easily adaptable and provides experimentalists a powerful tool for the characterization of their graphene field effect devices. (paper)

  14. Design and Realization of a Three Degrees of Freedom Displacement Measurement System Composed of Hall Sensors Based on Magnetic Field Fitting by an Elliptic Function

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bo Zhao

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available This paper presents the design and realization of a three degrees of freedom (DOFs displacement measurement system composed of Hall sensors, which is built for the XYθz displacement measurement of the short stroke stage of the reticle stage of lithography. The measurement system consists of three pairs of permanent magnets mounted on the same plane on the short stroke stage along the Y, Y, X directions, and three single axis Hall sensors correspondingly mounted on the frame of the reticle stage. The emphasis is placed on the decoupling and magnetic field fitting of the three DOFs measurement system. The model of the measurement system is illustrated, and the XY positions and θZ rotation of the short stroke stage can be obtained by decoupling the sensor outputs. A magnetic field fitting by an elliptic function-based compensation method is proposed. The practical field intensity of a permanent magnet at a certain plane height can be substituted for the output voltage of a Hall sensors, which can be expressed by the elliptic function through experimental data as the crucial issue to calculate the three DOFs displacement. Experimental results of the Hall sensor displacement measurement system are presented to validate the proposed three DOFs measurement system.

  15. The quantized Hall effect

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Klitzing von, K.

    1989-01-01

    The quantized Hall effect is theoretically explained in detail as are its basic properties. The explanation is completed with the pertinent mathematical relations and illustrative figures. Experimental data are critically assessed obtained by quantum transport measurement in a magnetic field on two-dimensional systems. The results are reported for a MOSFET silicon transistor and for GaAs-Al x Ga 1-x As heterostructures. The application is discussed of the quantized Hall effect in determining the fine structure constant or in implementing the resistance standard. (M.D.). 27 figs., 57 refs

  16. Mobile Handset Performance Evaluation Using Radiation Pattern Measurements

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nielsen, Jesper Ødum; Pedersen, Gert Frølund

    2006-01-01

    The mean effective gain is an attractive performance measure of mobile handsets, since it incorporates both directional and polarization properties of the handset and environment. In this work the mean effective gain is computed from measured spherical radiation patterns of five different mobile...... pattern is reduced. Furthermore, the frequency dependence of the mean effective gain is investigated, and a method is proposed for reducing the required number of measurements on different frequencies....

  17. The Hall effect in the organic conductor TTF–TCNQ: choice of geometry for accurate measurements of a highly anisotropic system

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Tafra, E; Čulo, M; Basletić, M

    2012-01-01

    We have measured the Hall effect on recently synthesized single crystals of the quasi-one-dimensional organic conductor TTF–TCNQ (tetrathiafulvalene–tetracyanoquinodimethane), a well known charge transfer complex that has two kinds of conductive stacks: the donor (TTF) and the acceptor (TCNQ) cha...

  18. The electrical properties of indium oxide thin films. In-situ Hall effect measurements to investigate the influence of point defects and grain boundaries; Die elektrischen Eigenschaften von Indiumoxid-Duennschichten. In-situ Hall-Effekt-Messungen zur Aufklaerung des Einflusses von Punktdefekten und Korngrenzen

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Frischbier, Mareike

    2015-08-15

    Despite the wide application of indium oxide as transparent conducting material, basic mechanisms of its high conductivity are not understood yet. However, indium is scarce and the development of alternative materials for indium oxide is necessary. This requires a detailed understanding of the conductivity mechanisms. The electrical conductivity of undoped and doped indium oxide is given by defects. Thus, the influence of point defects and grain boundaries in sputtered indium oxide thin films is investigated here. This dissertation contributes to a more profound understanding of the conductivity mechanisms of indium oxide: grain boundary scattering is identified as the most important limiting scattering mechanism and the influence of doping elements on this property is shown. Dominant point defects in oxide materials are commonly investigated in literature by conductivity relaxation measurements depending on oxygen partial pressure. Usually, carrier mobility is assumed to be constant when analysing the results. However, this assumption is incorrect and can lead to a misinterpretation of data. Therefore, relaxation measurements are conducted as part of this dissertation to directly measure charge carrier concentration and mobility for the first time. For this purpose, a new experimental setup has been developed which enables measuring the Hall effect in-situ depending on oxygen partial pressure, temperature and total pressure. Relaxation measurements are conducted as part of this dissertation to show that charge carrier mobility is not constant, but strongly depends on carrier concentration. Further measurements verify that the scattering of charge carriers at grain boundaries is one main reason. In addition, the influence of deposition parameters of the sputter deposition process and doping (dopant element and concentration) on carrier concentration and mobility at room temperature is studied. The experimental results show that the doping elements influence both

  19. 3D shape measurement system developed on mobile platform

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, Zhoujie; Chang, Meng; Shi, Bowen; Zhang, Qican

    2017-02-01

    Three-dimensional (3-D) shape measurement technology based on structured light has become one hot research field inspired by the increasing requirements. Many methods have been implemented and applied in the industry applications, but most of their equipments are large and complex, cannot be portable. Meanwhile, the popularity of the smart mobile terminals, such as smart phones, provides a platform for the miniaturization and portability of this technology. The measurement system based on phase-shift algorithm and Gray-code pattern under the Android platform on a mobile phone is mainly studied and developed, and it has been encapsulated into a mobile phone application in order to reconstruct 3-D shape data in the employed smart phone easily and quickly. The experimental results of two measured object are given in this paper and demonstrate the application we developed in the mobile platform is effective.

  20. Low-temperature mobility measurements on CMOS devices

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hairpetian, A.; Gitlin, D.; Viswanathan, C.R.

    1989-01-01

    The surface channel mobility of carriers in eta- and rho-MOS transistors fabricated in a CMOS process was accurately determined at low temperatures down to 5 Κ. The mobility was obtained by an accurate measurement of the inversion charge density using a split C-V technique and the conductance at low drain voltages. The split C-V technique was validated at all temperatures using a one-dimensional Poisson solver (MOSCAP), which was modified for low-temperature application. The mobility dependence on the perpendicular electric field for different substrate bias values appears to have different temperature dependence for eta- and rho-channel devices. The electron mobility increases with a decrease in temperature at all gate voltages. On the other hand, the hole mobility exhibits a different temperature behavior depending upon whether the gate voltage corresponds to strong inversion or is near threshold

  1. Fault Detection and Diagnosis In Hall-Héroult Cells Based on Individual Anode Current Measurements Using Dynamic Kernel PCA

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yao, Yuchen; Bao, Jie; Skyllas-Kazacos, Maria; Welch, Barry J.; Akhmetov, Sergey

    2018-04-01

    Individual anode current signals in aluminum reduction cells provide localized cell conditions in the vicinity of each anode, which contain more information than the conventionally measured cell voltage and line current. One common use of this measurement is to identify process faults that can cause significant changes in the anode current signals. While this method is simple and direct, it ignores the interactions between anode currents and other important process variables. This paper presents an approach that applies multivariate statistical analysis techniques to individual anode currents and other process operating data, for the detection and diagnosis of local process abnormalities in aluminum reduction cells. Specifically, since the Hall-Héroult process is time-varying with its process variables dynamically and nonlinearly correlated, dynamic kernel principal component analysis with moving windows is used. The cell is discretized into a number of subsystems, with each subsystem representing one anode and cell conditions in its vicinity. The fault associated with each subsystem is identified based on multivariate statistical control charts. The results show that the proposed approach is able to not only effectively pinpoint the problematic areas in the cell, but also assess the effect of the fault on different parts of the cell.

  2. Intrinsic spin and momentum relaxation in organic single-crystalline semiconductors probed by ESR and Hall measurements

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tsurumi, Junto; Häusermann, Roger; Watanabe, Shun; Mitsui, Chikahiko; Okamoto, Toshihiro; Matsui, Hiroyuki; Takeya, Jun

    Spin and charge momentum relaxation mechanism has been argued among organic semiconductors with various methods, devices, and materials. However, little is known in organic single-crystalline semiconductors because it has been hard to obtain an ideal organic crystal with an excellent crystallinity and controllability required for accurate measurements. By using more than 1-inch sized single crystals which are fabricated via contentious edge-casting method developed by our group, we have successfully demonstrated a simultaneous determination of spin and momentum relaxation time for gate-induced charges of 3,11-didecyldinaphtho[2,3- d:2',3'- d']benzo[1,2- b:4,5- b']dithiophene, by combining electron spin resonance (ESR) and Hall effect measurements. The obtained temperature dependences of spin and momentum relaxation times are in good agreement in terms of power law with a factor of approximately -2. It is concluded that Elliott-Yafet spin relaxation mechanism can be dominant at room temperature regime (200 - 300 K). Probing characteristic time scales such as spin-lattice, spin-spin, and momentum relaxation times, demonstrated in the present work, would be a powerful tool to elucidate fundamental spin and charge transport mechanisms. We acknowledge the New Energy and Industrial Technology Developing Organization (NEDO) for financial support.

  3. Statistical relations among architectural features and objective acoustical measurements of concert halls

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Gade, Anders Christian; Siebein, G. W.; Chiang, W.

    1993-01-01

    as for entire rooms. Measurements data from all three teams were used in the models to assess the sensitivity of the models to expect variations in measurements. The results were compared to the previous work of Barron, Gade, and Hook among others. [Work supported by the National Science Foundation and Concert...

  4. Defining energy vulnerability in mobility. Measuring energy vulnerability in mobility. Acting against energy vulnerability in mobility. Discussing energy vulnerability in mobility. Task no. 4

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jouffe, Yves; Massot, Marie-Helene; Noble, Cyprien

    2015-01-01

    Extensive expansion of urban areas generates transportation needs and energy expenses for mobility. Households already impacted by fuel poverty also suffer from energy vulnerability in their mobility. This report was prepared in the framework of the study of fuel poverty in France in the light of several indicators from existing inquiries, databases and modeling tools. The report is organised in 4 parts dealing with: the definition of energy vulnerability in mobility, its measurement, the possible remedial actions, and the discussions about energy vulnerability in mobility through working group meetings, respectively

  5. Correlation Measurements on Small Mobile Devices

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Yanakiev, Boyan Radkov; Nielsen, Jesper Ødum; Christensen, Morten

    2012-01-01

    Here, analysis of the antenna correlation at the design stage is done, with focus on measurement techniques. Various theoretical definitions of correlations are used with the corresponding measured data required. The problems related to the coaxial measurement cables, when calculating correlation...

  6. Energy consumption of sport halls

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1983-01-01

    The energy consumption of Finland's sports halls (ball games halls, ice hockey halls and swimming halls) represent approximately 1% of that of the country's whole building stock. In the light of the facts revealed by the energy study the potential energy saving rate in sports halls is 15-25%. The total savings would be something like FIM 30-40 million per annum, of which about a half would be achieved without energy-economic investments only by changing utilization habits and by automatic control measures. The energy-economic investments are for the most part connected with ventilation and their repayment period is from one to five years. On the basis of the energy study the following specific consumption are presented as target values: swimming halls: heat (kWh/m*H3/a)100, electricity (kWh/m*H3/a)35, water (l/m*H3/a)1000 icehockey halls (warm): heat (kWh/m*H3/a)25, electricity (kWh/m*H3/a)15, water (l/m*H3/a)200, ball games halls (multi-purpose halls): heat (kWh/m*H3/a)30, electricity (kWh/m*H3/a)25, water (l/m*H3/a)130. In the study the following points proved to be the central areas of energy saving in sports halls: 1. Flexible regulation of the temperature in sports spaces on the basis of the sport in question. 2. The ventilation of swimming halls should be adjusted in such a way that the humidity of the hall air would comply with the limit humidity curve determined by the quality of structures and the temperature of the outdoor air. 3. An ice skating hall is an establishment producing condensing energy from 8 to 9 months a year worth of approx. 100.000-150.000 Finnmarks. The development of the recovery of condensing energy has become more important. 4. The ventilation of ball games halls may account for over 50% of the energy consumption of the whole building. Therefore special attention should be paid to the optimatization of ventilation as a whole.

  7. Developing a comprehensive measure of mobility: mobility over varied environments scale (MOVES).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hirsch, Jana A; Winters, Meghan; Sims-Gould, Joanie; Clarke, Philippa J; Ste-Marie, Nathalie; Ashe, Maureen; McKay, Heather A

    2017-05-25

    While recent work emphasizes the multi-dimensionality of mobility, no current measure incorporates multiple domains of mobility. Using existing conceptual frameworks we identified four domains of mobility (physical, cognitive, social, transportation) to create a "Mobility Over Varied Environments Scale" (MOVES). We then assessed expected patterns of MOVES in the Canadian population. An expert panel identified survey items within each MOVES domain from the Canadian Community Health Survey- Healthy Aging Cycle (2008-2009) for 28,555 (weighted population n = 12,805,067) adults (≥45 years). We refined MOVES using principal components analysis and Cronbach's alpha and weighted items so each domain was 10 points. Expected mobility trends, as assessed by average MOVES, were examined by sociodemographic and health factors, and by province, using Analysis of Variance (ANOVA). MOVES ranged from 0 to 40, where 0 represents individuals who are immobile and 40 those who are fully mobile. Mean MOVES was 29.58 (95% confidence interval (CI) 29.49, 29.67) (10th percentile: 24.17 (95% CI 23.96, 24.38), 90th percentile: 34.70 (CI 34.55, 34.85)). MOVES scores were lower for older, female, and non-white Canadians with worse health and lower socioeconomic status. MOVES was also lower for those who live in less urban areas. MOVES is a holistic measure of mobility for characterizing older adult mobility across populations. Future work should examine individual or neighborhood predictors of MOVES and its relationship to broader health outcomes. MOVES holds utility for research, surveillance, evaluation, and interventions around the broad factors influencing mobility in older adults.

  8. Using Radiation Pattern Measurements for Mobile Handset Performance Evaluation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nielsen, Jesper Ødum; Pedersen, Gert Frølund

    2005-01-01

    The mean effective gain (MEG) is an attractive performance measure of mobile handsets, since it incorporates both directional and polarization properties of the handset and environment. In this work the MEG is computed from measured spherical radiation patterns of five different mobile handsets...... values obtained for different orientations of the handsets in the environments. For practical measurements it is important to minimize the measurement time. The paper includes a study of the variation in MEG when the number of samples in the spherical radiation pattern is reduced. Furthermore...

  9. Laurance David Hall.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Coxon, Bruce

    2011-01-01

    An account is given of the life, scientific contributions, and passing of Laurance David Hall (1938-2009), including his early history and education at the University of Bristol, UK, and the synthesis and NMR spectroscopy of carbohydrates and other natural products during ∼20 years of research and teaching at the University of British Columbia in Vancouver, Canada. Lists of graduate students, post-doctoral fellows, and sabbatical visitors are provided for this period. Following a generous endowment by Dr. Herchel Smith, Professor Hall built a new Department of Medicinal Chemistry at Cambridge University, UK, and greatly expanded his researches into the technology and applications of magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) and zero quantum NMR. MRI technology was applied both to medical problems such as the characterization of cartilage degeneration in knee joints, the measurement of ventricular function, lipid localization in animal models of atherosclerosis, paramagnetic metal complexes of polysaccharides as contrast agents, and studies of many other anatomical features, but also to several aspects of materials analysis, including food analyses, process control, and the elucidation of such physical phenomena as the flow of liquids through porous media, defects in concrete, and the visualization of fungal damage to wood. Professor Hall's many publications, patents, lectures, and honors and awards are described, and also his successful effort to keep the Asilomar facility in Pacific Grove, California as the alternating venue for the annual Experimental NMR Conference. Two memorial services for Professor Hall are remembered. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  10. Time and space-correlated plasma potential measurements in the near field of a coaxial Hall plasma discharge

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Smith, A. W.; Cappelli, M. A.

    2009-01-01

    Space- and time-correlated measurements of floating and plasma potential are made in the near field, external flow cathode region of a coaxial Hall plasma discharge using an emissive probe synchronized to quasicoherent fluctuations in discharge current. The luminous axial feature frequently observed in the near field of operating plasma accelerators is found to be concomitant with a spike in the plasma potential (and electron temperature). The structure of the plasma potential allows for multiple avenues for back-streaming ions to accelerate toward the discharge front pole and may pull some classes of ions toward the central axis. The fluctuations in plasma properties exhibit a complex structure at frequencies on the order of the so-called 'breathing mode' ionization instability often seen in these types of discharges. Most notably, the plasma potential appears to fluctuate in a helical fashion, resembling tilted drift waves rotating about the central axis. A simple analysis of these waves draws attention to the possible role that they may play in driving anomalous cross-field electron transport in the near field region.

  11. Measurement of in-plane magnetic relaxation in RE-123 coated conductors by use of scanning Hall probe microscopy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Shiohara, K.; Higashikawa, K.; Inoue, M.; Kiss, T.; Iijima, Y.; Saitoh, T.; Yoshizumi, M.; Izumi, T.

    2013-01-01

    Highlights: ► We have investigated electric field criterion of in-plane critical current density. ► We could measure magnetic relaxation in a remanent state. ► The SHPM results show good agreement with the measurements by the 4-probe method. -- Abstract: We have investigated electric field criterion of in-plane critical current density in a coated conductor characterized by scanning Hall-probe microscopy (SHPM). From remanent field distribution and its relaxation measurements, we could obtain critical current distribution and induced electric field simultaneously by considering the Biot-Savart law and the Faraday’s law, respectively. These results lead us to evaluate a distribution of local critical current density and the corresponding criterion of electric field. As a result, it was found that the electric field criterion for the SHPM analysis was several orders lower than that used in the conventional 4-probe resistive method. However, the data point obtained by the SHPM shows good agreement with E–J curve analytically extended from the measurements by the 4-probe method. This means that we could characterize in-plane distribution of critical current density in a coated conductor at an electric field criterion quantitatively by this method in a nondestructive manner. These findings will be very important information since the uniformity of local critical current density in a coated conductor at extremely low electric fields is a key issue (1) especially for DC applications, (2) for quality control of coated conductors, and (3) for the standardization of the characterization of critical current among different methods

  12. Effect of Al/N ratio during nucleation layer growth on Hall mobility and buffer leakage of molecular-beam epitaxy grown AlGaN/GaN heterostructures

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Storm, D.F.; Katzer, D.S.; Binari, S.C.; Shanabrook, B.V.; Zhou Lin; Smith, David J.

    2004-01-01

    AlGaN/GaN high electron mobility transistor structures have been grown by plasma-assisted molecular beam epitaxy on semi-insulating 4H-SiC utilizing an AlN nucleation layer. The electron Hall mobility of these structures increases from 1050 cm 2 /V s to greater than 1450 cm 2 /V s when the Al/N flux ratio during the growth of the nucleation layer is increased from 0.90 to 1.07. Buffer leakage currents increase abruptly by nearly three orders of magnitude when the Al/N ratio increases from below to above unity. Transmission electron microscopy indicates that high buffer leakage is correlated with the presence of stacking faults in the nucleation layer and cubic phase GaN in the buffer, while low mobilities are correlated with high dislocation densities

  13. Aspirated capacitor measurements of air conductivity and ion mobility spectra

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Aplin, K.L.

    2005-01-01

    Measurements of ions in atmospheric air are used to investigate atmospheric electricity and particulate pollution. Commonly studied ion parameters are (1) air conductivity, related to the total ion number concentration, and (2) the ion mobility spectrum, which varies with atmospheric composition. The physical principles of air ion instrumentation are long established. A recent development is the computerized aspirated capacitor, which measures ions from (a) the current of charged particles at a sensing electrode, and (b) the rate of charge exchange with an electrode at a known initial potential, relaxing to a lower potential. As the voltage decays, only ions of higher and higher mobility are collected by the central electrode and contribute to the further decay of the voltage. This enables extension of the classical theory to calculate ion mobility spectra by inverting voltage decay time series. In indoor air, ion mobility spectra determined from both the voltage decay inversion, and an established voltage switching technique, were compared and shown to be of similar shape. Air conductivities calculated by integration were: 5.3±2.5 and 2.7±1.1 fSm -1 , respectively, with conductivity determined to be 3 fSm -1 by direct measurement at a constant voltage. Applications of the relaxation potential inversion method include air ion mobility spectrum retrieval from historical data, and computation of ion mobility spectra in planetary atmospheres

  14. Phantoms for Radiation Measurements of Mobile Phones

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Pedersen, Gert Frølund

    2001-01-01

    Measurements of radiation efficiency for a handheld phone equipped with a patch and a helical antenna operated near the human user have been performed. Both measurements include a simple head plus hand phantom and live persons are considered. The position of the hand on the phone is found...... to be the main reason for the large variation in radiation efficiency among persons. The tilt angle of the phone and the distance between the head and phone only play a minor role...

  15. A Model and Measure of Mobile Communication Competence

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bakke, Emil

    2010-01-01

    This article deals with two studies that develop a measure and model of mobile communication competence (MCC). The first study examines the dimensionality of the measure by conducting an exploratory factor analysis on 350 students at a large university in the midwestern United States. Results identified six constructs across 24 items: willingness…

  16. New methods for mobility performance measurement in wheelchair basketball

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van der Slikke, R.M.A.; Berger, MAM; Bregman, DJJ; Veeger, H.E.J.

    2016-01-01

    Increased professionalism in wheelchair sports demand a more precise and quantitative measure of individual wheelchair mobility performance, to allow it to be an evaluation measure of wheelchair setting or training optimization. This research describes the application of an inertial sensor based

  17. Study on Posture Estimation Using Delayed Measurements for Mobile Robots

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2005-01-01

    When associating data from various sensors to estimate the posture of mobile robots, a crucial problem to be solved is that there may be some delayed measurements. Furthermore, the general multi-sensor data fusion algorithm is a Kalman filter. In order to handle the problem concerning delayed measurements, this paper investigates a Kalman filter modified to account for the delays. Based on the interpolating measurement, a fusion system is applied to estimate the posture of a mobile robot which fuses the data from the encoder and laser global position system using the extended Kalman filter algorithm. Finally, the posture estimation experiment of the mobile robot is given whose result verifies the feasibility and efficiency of the algorithm.

  18. Intercomparison Measurements Exercises of Mobile Radiological Laboratories (invited paper)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Martincic, R.

    2000-01-01

    After the reactor accident in Chernobyl, the importance of mobile radiological laboratories became evident and in situ gamma spectrometry became a common method for the rapid detection of gamma emitters in the environment. Since then different institutions in European countries have organised periodic intercomparison exercises of mobile radiological laboratories to improve the measurement methods and the preparedness of emergency monitoring teams. The general objectives of these workshops are to promote the knowledge and to exchange the experiences of emergency monitoring teams that use mobile radiological laboratories, as well as to foster the international harmonisation of emergency monitoring procedures and cooperation among teams. Finally, the results of intercomparison measurements have shown that such exercises are mandatory for rapid, efficient and correct environmental monitoring in nuclear or radiological emergencies. An overview of these intercomparison measurements is given, results from the 1999 intercomparison workshop are presented and lessons learned are discussed. (author)

  19. Wavefront measurement of plastic lenses for mobile-phone applications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huang, Li-Ting; Cheng, Yuan-Chieh; Wang, Chung-Yen; Wang, Pei-Jen

    2016-08-01

    In camera lenses for mobile-phone applications, all lens elements have been designed with aspheric surfaces because of the requirements in minimal total track length of the lenses. Due to the diffraction-limited optics design with precision assembly procedures, element inspection and lens performance measurement have become cumbersome in the production of mobile-phone cameras. Recently, wavefront measurements based on Shack-Hartmann sensors have been successfully implemented on injection-molded plastic lens with aspheric surfaces. However, the applications of wavefront measurement on small-sized plastic lenses have yet to be studied both theoretically and experimentally. In this paper, both an in-house-built and a commercial wavefront measurement system configured on two optics structures have been investigated with measurement of wavefront aberrations on two lens elements from a mobile-phone camera. First, the wet-cell method has been employed for verifications of aberrations due to residual birefringence in an injection-molded lens. Then, two lens elements of a mobile-phone camera with large positive and negative power have been measured with aberrations expressed in Zernike polynomial to illustrate the effectiveness in wavefront measurement for troubleshooting defects in optical performance.

  20. Spin Hall effects

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sinova, Jairo; Valenzuela, Sergio O.; Wunderlich, J.; Back, C. H.; Jungwirth, T.

    2015-10-01

    Spin Hall effects are a collection of relativistic spin-orbit coupling phenomena in which electrical currents can generate transverse spin currents and vice versa. Despite being observed only a decade ago, these effects are already ubiquitous within spintronics, as standard spin-current generators and detectors. Here the theoretical and experimental results that have established this subfield of spintronics are reviewed. The focus is on the results that have converged to give us the current understanding of the phenomena, which has evolved from a qualitative to a more quantitative measurement of spin currents and their associated spin accumulation. Within the experimental framework, optical-, transport-, and magnetization-dynamics-based measurements are reviewed and linked to both phenomenological and microscopic theories of the effect. Within the theoretical framework, the basic mechanisms in both the extrinsic and intrinsic regimes are reviewed, which are linked to the mechanisms present in their closely related phenomenon in ferromagnets, the anomalous Hall effect. Also reviewed is the connection to the phenomenological treatment based on spin-diffusion equations applicable to certain regimes, as well as the spin-pumping theory of spin generation used in many measurements of the spin Hall angle. A further connection to the spin-current-generating spin Hall effect to the inverse spin galvanic effect is given, in which an electrical current induces a nonequilibrium spin polarization. This effect often accompanies the spin Hall effect since they share common microscopic origins. Both can exhibit the same symmetries when present in structures comprising ferromagnetic and nonmagnetic layers through their induced current-driven spin torques or induced voltages. Although a short chronological overview of the evolution of the spin Hall effect field and the resolution of some early controversies is given, the main body of this review is structured from a pedagogical

  1. Mobile Phones and Outdoor Advertising: Measurable Advertising

    OpenAIRE

    Quercia, Daniele; Di Lorenzo, Giusy; Calabrese, Francesco; Ratti, Carlo

    2011-01-01

    Television and newspapers sit at the top of many agency marketing plans, while outdoor advertising stays at the bottom. The reason for this is that it’s difficult to account for who views a billboard, so there is no way of consistently determining the effectiveness of outdoor advertising. As a result, agencies do not consider the medium and allocate their money elsewhere. To change this situation, one needs to create new credible audience measurements for the outdoor marketing industry. He...

  2. Study of radiation defects by in-situ measurements of the Hall effect in narrow-gap semiconductors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Favre, J.

    1990-01-01

    Semiconducting compounds of II-VI, III-V and IV-VI groups were irradiated in liquid hydrogen by high energy (0.7 to 2.7 MeV) electrons. The Hall coefficient and resistivity variations were measured in situ during irradiation. The doping by irradiation induced defects is of p-type in III-V group compounds, while n-type doping occurs in II-VI and IV-VI group materials. A semiconductor to insulator or reverse transition was observed under irradiation when the chemical potential crossed the band edges. In IV-VI group compounds the two successive transitions take place in initially p-type samples. A metastable behaviour, characteristic to strong compensation, appears in the vicinity of those semiconductor - insulator transitions in IV-VI compounds. The slope of free carrier concentration vs. fluence variation was analyzed. It was compared to defect creation rates, calculated in the framework of a cascade model. The charge state of created defects was deduced in this way. - In IV-VI group compounds, the presence of localized levels degenerated with the conduction band and, in PbTe, of additional defect associated levels in the forbidden gap, was demonstrated. Those results are consistent with the saturation of electron concentration increase at high fluence as well as with the analysis of annealing experiments. - In Hg 1-x Cd x Te compounds, the analysis of electron concentration versus fluence increase indicates that only mercury Frenkel pairs are electrically active. The variation with cadmium content of the defect associated level energy was deduced from the saturation values of the electron concentration [fr

  3. Hall effect measurements of Frenkel defect clustering in aluminium during high-dose reactor irradiation at 4.6 K

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Boening, K.; Mauer, W.; Pfaendner, K.; Rosner, P.

    1976-01-01

    The low-field Hall coefficient R 0 of irradiated aluminium at 4.6 K is independent of the Frenkel defect (FD) concentration, however sensitively dependent of their configuration. Since measurement of R 0 is not too difficult, rather extensive investigations of FD clustering during irradiation can be performed, but only qualitative interpretations are possible. Several pure Al samples have been irradiated with reactor neutrons at 4.6 K up to very high doses phit resp. resistivity increments Δrho 0 (maximum 91% of extrapolated saturation value Δrho 0 sup(sat) approximately 980 nΩcm). The main results are 1.FD clustering within a single displacement cascade is not a very strong effect in Al, since the R 0 values are essentially the same after reactor and after electron irradiation. Rough cascade averages are: volume Vsub(c) approximately 2.1 x 10 5 at.vol. and FD concentration csub(c) approximately 1100 ppm. 2. There is practically no dose-dependent FD clustering up to Δrho 0 approximately 350 nΩcm, since R 0 remains essentially constant there. It follows that dose-dependent FD clustering can only occur for high-order overlap of cascade volumes. The differential dose curve dΔrho 0 /dphit is perfectly linear in Δrho 0 as long as R 0 = const. 3. For Δrho 0 > 350 nΩcm FD clustering becomes increasingly important and R 0 changes strongly. Surprisingly dR 0 /dphit approximately const whence there is a constant rate of cluster size increase in spite of the vanishing rate of FD production, evidence of the continuous regrouping of the lattice and its defects. (author)

  4. Experimental halls workshop summary

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Thorndike, A.

    1976-01-01

    A brief discussion is given of: (1) pros and cons of open areas as compared with enclosed halls; (2) experimental hall needs of ep, anti p p, and other options; (3) hall for the lepton detector; and, (4) hall for the hadron spectrometer

  5. Measurement of acetates in air using differential ion mobility spectrometer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Szczurek, Andrzej; Maciejewska, Monika; Zajiczek, Żaneta; Maziejuk, Mirosław

    2017-11-01

    Volatile organic compounds are one of the most important group of air pollutants. Potential health and environmental problems resulting from their emission prompted the requirement for monitoring these species. It motivates development of new measurement techniques which are fast, cost effective, reliable and field deployable. One of novel approaches is ion mobility spectrometry. It dwells on ion separation in electric field, based on differences in ion mobility. Many variants of this method are developed. In this wok, differential ion mobility spectrometry (DMS) was considered in respect of acetate measurements in air. It was demonstrated that DMS offers linear response to methyl, ethyl, propyl and butyl acetate in concentration range from 0.3 ppm to 7 ppm. Positive ions spectrum has to be utilised for this purpose. We showed that fragments of DMS spectrum which secure linearity are compound-specific. The obtained results are promising from the application point of view.

  6. Experimental halls workshop summary

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Thorndike, A.

    1976-01-01

    On May 26 and 27, 1976, approximately 50 people met for an informal workshop on plans for experimental halls for ISABELLE. Plans as they exist in the May 1976 version of the ISABELLE proposal were presented. Discussions were held on the following four general topics by separate working groups: (1) pros and cons of open areas as compared with enclosed halls; (2) experimental hall needs of ep, anti pp, and other options; (3) hall for the lepton detector; and (4) hall for the hadron spectrometer. The planning for experimental halls at PEP, the hall for the lepton detector, the hadron spectrometer, and open areas are discussed

  7. Experimental halls workshop summary

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Thorndike, A.

    1976-01-01

    At the experimental halls workshop, discussions were held on: (1) open areas as compared with enclosed halls; (2) the needs of ep, anti pp, and other options; (3) the hall for the lepton detector; and (4) the hall for the hadron spectrometer. The value of different possibilities for the future experimental program was explored. A number of suggestions emerged which will be used as the design of the experimental halls progresses

  8. Development of Mobile Measurement Method Series OTM 33

    Science.gov (United States)

    Starting in 2006, the United States Environmental Protection Agency has explored use of mobile instrumented vehicles for a variety of air quality assessment applications under its Geospatial Measurement of Air Pollution (GMAP) program. GMAP systems utilize next generation, fast-r...

  9. Exposure measuring techniques for wide band mobile radio-communications

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Trinchero, S.; Benedetto, A.; Anglesio, L.; D'Amore, G.; Trinchero, D.

    2004-01-01

    The paper illustrates the limits and performances of different experimental monitoring techniques, which are applied to digitally modulated radiofrequency electromagnetic fields used for mobile telecommunications. Different experimental set-ups have been developed, verified and applied for the analysis and characterisation of wide band probes and narrow band measuring procedures. (authors)

  10. Measurement error in mobile source air pollution exposure estimates due to residential mobility during pregnancy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pennington, Audrey Flak; Strickland, Matthew J; Klein, Mitchel; Zhai, Xinxin; Russell, Armistead G; Hansen, Craig; Darrow, Lyndsey A

    2017-09-01

    Prenatal air pollution exposure is frequently estimated using maternal residential location at the time of delivery as a proxy for residence during pregnancy. We describe residential mobility during pregnancy among 19,951 children from the Kaiser Air Pollution and Pediatric Asthma Study, quantify measurement error in spatially resolved estimates of prenatal exposure to mobile source fine particulate matter (PM 2.5 ) due to ignoring this mobility, and simulate the impact of this error on estimates of epidemiologic associations. Two exposure estimates were compared, one calculated using complete residential histories during pregnancy (weighted average based on time spent at each address) and the second calculated using only residence at birth. Estimates were computed using annual averages of primary PM 2.5 from traffic emissions modeled using a Research LINE-source dispersion model for near-surface releases (RLINE) at 250 m resolution. In this cohort, 18.6% of children were born to mothers who moved at least once during pregnancy. Mobile source PM 2.5 exposure estimates calculated using complete residential histories during pregnancy and only residence at birth were highly correlated (r S >0.9). Simulations indicated that ignoring residential mobility resulted in modest bias of epidemiologic associations toward the null, but varied by maternal characteristics and prenatal exposure windows of interest (ranging from -2% to -10% bias).

  11. Experimental ion mobility measurements in Ne-N2

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cortez, A.F.V.; Encarnação, P.M.C.C.; Santos, F.P.; Borges, F.I.G.M.; Conde, C.A.N.; Veenhof, R.; Neves, P.N.B.

    2016-01-01

    Data on ion mobility is important to improve the performance of large volume gaseous detectors, such as the ALICE TPC or in the NEXT experiment. In the present work the method, experimental setup and results for the ion mobility measurements in Ne-N 2 mixtures are presented. The results for this mixture show the presence of two peaks for different gas ratios of Ne-N 2 , low reduced electric fields, E / N , 10–20 Td (2.4–4.8 kV·cm −1 ·bar −1 ), low pressures 6–8 Torr (8–10.6 mbar) and at room temperature.

  12. Experimental ion mobility measurements in Xe-CO2

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cortez, A. F. V.; Santos, M. A. G.; Veenhof, R.; Patra, R. N.; Neves, P. N. B.; Santos, F. P.; Borges, F. I. G. M.; Conde, C. A. N.

    2017-06-01

    Data on ion mobility is important to improve the performance of large volume gaseous detectors. In the present work the method, experimental setup and results for the ion mobility measurements in Xe-CO2 mixtures are presented. The results for this mixture show the presence of only one peak for all gas ratios of Xe-CO2, low reduced electric fields, E/N, 10-25 Td (2.4-6.1 kV·cm-1·bar-1), low pressures 6-8 Torr (8-10.6 mbar), at room temperature.

  13. Guild Hall retrofit

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1984-08-01

    This report demonstrates the economic viability of an exterior rewrap retrofit performed on a public community facility for the performing arts. This facility originally consisted of two mess halls built by the American army. The exterior retrofit consisted of constructing a super-insulated passageway to link the two halls as well as completely wrapping the facility with six millimetre polyethylene to provide an airtight barrier. The roofs and walls were reinsulated and insulation levels were increased to RSI 10.5 in the ceilings and RSI 7.7 in the walls. The installation of a propane fuelled furnace was also included in the retrofit package. Prior to the renovations and retrofitting, the Guild Hall facility was almost unusable. The demonstration project transformed the cold, drafty buildings into an attractive, comfortable and functional centre for the performing arts. Heating requirements have been reduced to 500 MJ/m {sup 2} of floor space annually compared to a predicted 1,760 MJ/m{sup 2} of floor space based on HOTCAN analysis of the heating requirements without the energy conservation measures. 9 figs., 10 tabs.

  14. Quantized Hall conductance as a topological invariant

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Niu, Q.; Thouless, Ds.J.; Wu, Y.S.

    1984-10-01

    Whenever the Fermi level lies in a gap (or mobility gap) the bulk Hall conductance can be expressed in a topologically invariant form showing the quantization explicitly. The new formulation generalizes the earlier result by TKNN to the situation where many body interaction and substrate disorder are also present. When applying to the fractional quantized Hall effect we draw the conclusion that there must be a symmetry breaking in the many body ground state. The possibility of writing the fractionally quantized Hall conductance as a topological invariant is also carefully discussed. 19 references

  15. Innovative Mobile Smart Photonic Dimensional, Color and Spectral Measurement Engineering

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hofmann, Dr Dietrich, Prof; Dittrich (B. Eng. , Paul-Gerald; Höfner (B. Eng. , Dieter; Kraus, Daniel

    2015-02-01

    Aim of the paper is the demonstration of a paradigm shift in dimensional, color and spectral measurements in industry, biology/medicine, farming/environmental protection and security, as well as in education and training: Measurement engineering and quality assurance become mobile, modular and smart. Smartpads, smartphones and smartwatches (smartcomps) in combination with innovative hardware apps (hwapps) and conventional software apps (swapps) are fundamental enablers for the transformation from conventional stationary working places towards innovative mobile working places with in-field measurements and point-of-care (POC) diagnostics. Furthermore mobile open online courses (MOOCs) are transforming the study habits. Practical examples for the application of innovative photonic micro dimensiometers, colorimeters and spectrometers will be given. The innovative approach opens so far untapped enormous markets for measurement science, engineering, applications, education and training. These innovative working conditions will be fast accepted due to their convenience, reliability and affordability. A highly visible advantage of smartcomps is the huge number of their real distribution, their worldwide connectivity via Internet and cloud services, the standardized interfaces like USB and HDMI and the experienced capabilities of their users for practical operations, obtained with their private smartcomps.

  16. Innovative Mobile Smart Photonic Dimensional, Color and Spectral Measurement Engineering

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hofmann, Dietrich; Dittrich, Paul-Gerald; Höfner, Dieter; Kraus, Daniel

    2015-01-01

    Aim of the paper is the demonstration of a paradigm shift in dimensional, color and spectral measurements in industry, biology/medicine, farming/environmental protection and security, as well as in education and training: Measurement engineering and quality assurance become mobile, modular and smart. Smartpads, smartphones and smartwatches (smartcomps) in combination with innovative hardware apps (hwapps) and conventional software apps (swapps) are fundamental enablers for the transformation from conventional stationary working places towards innovative mobile working places with in-field measurements and point-of-care (POC) diagnostics. Furthermore mobile open online courses (MOOCs) are transforming the study habits. Practical examples for the application of innovative photonic micro dimensiometers, colorimeters and spectrometers will be given. The innovative approach opens so far untapped enormous markets for measurement science, engineering, applications, education and training. These innovative working conditions will be fast accepted due to their convenience, reliability and affordability. A highly visible advantage of smartcomps is the huge number of their real distribution, their worldwide connectivity via Internet and cloud services, the standardized interfaces like USB and HDMI and the experienced capabilities of their users for practical operations, obtained with their private smartcomps

  17. Hall devices improve electric motor efficiency

    Science.gov (United States)

    Haeussermann, W.

    1979-01-01

    Efficiency of electric motors and generators is reduced by radial magnetic forces created by symmetric fields within device. Forces are sensed and counteracted by Hall devices on excitation or control windings. Hall generators directly measure and provide compensating control of anu asymmetry, eliminating additional measurements needed for calibration feedback control loop.

  18. In Situ Hall Effect Monitoring of Vacuum Annealing of In2O3:H Thin Films

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hans F. Wardenga

    2015-02-01

    Full Text Available Hydrogen doped In2O3 thin films were prepared by room temperature sputter deposition with the addition of H2O to the sputter gas. By subsequent vacuum annealing, the films obtain high mobility up to 90 cm2/Vs. The films were analyzed in situ by X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS and ex situ by X-ray diffraction (XRD, optical transmission and Hall effect measurements. Furthermore, we present results from in situ Hall effect measurements during vacuum annealing of In2O3:H films, revealing distinct dependence of carrier concentration and mobility with time at different annealing temperatures. We suggest hydrogen passivation of grain boundaries as the main reason for the high mobility obtained with In2O3:H films.

  19. Testing competing measures of profitability for mobile resources.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barrette, Maryse; Wu, Gi-Mick; Brodeur, Jacques; Giraldeau, Luc-Alain; Boivin, Guy

    2009-01-01

    Optimal diet theory often fails to predict a forager's diet choice when prey are mobile. Because they escape or defend themselves, mobile prey are likely to increase the forager's handling time, thereby decreasing its fitness gain rate. Many animals have been shown to select their prey so as to maximize either their fitness gain or their fitness gain rate. However, no study has yet compared directly these two measures of profitability by generating testable predictions about the choice of the forager. Under laboratory conditions, we compared these two measures of profitability, using the aphid parasitoid Aphidius colemani and its host, Myzus persicae. Fitness gain was calculated for parasitoids developing in each host instar by measuring life-history traits such as developmental time, sex ratio and fecundity. Fitness gain rate was estimated by dividing fitness gain by handling time, the time required to subdue the host. Fourth instar aphids provided the best fitness gain to parasitoids, whereas second instar aphids were the most profitable in terms of fitness gain rate. Host choice tests showed that A. colemani females preferred second instar hosts, suggesting that their decision maximizes fitness gain rate over fitness gain. Our results indicate that fitness gain rate is a reliable predictor of animal's choice for foragers exploiting resources that impose additional time cost due to their mobility.

  20. Direct measurement of the field from a magnetic recording head using an InAs Hall sensor on a contact write/read tester

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gokemeijer, N.J.; Clinton, T.W.; Crawford, T.M.; Johnson, Mark

    2005-01-01

    At 1 Tbit/in 2 areal density magnetic recording dimensions, reliable magnetic field metrology does not exist. One technique to map the spatial profile of the magnetic field of a write head is to use a contact read/write tester. A magnetic recording head is brought into contact with a Hall sensor, and is subsequently scanned with nm resolution. For a 300 nm track width longitudinal recording head, the magnetic field of the head was mapped. Measurements include the down track field gradient and cross-track field profile and the current-field transfer curve. These results suggest this technique offers a viable write field metrology

  1. Scanning tunneling microscopy measurements of the spin Hall effect in tungsten films by using iron-coated tungsten tips

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ting Xie

    2018-05-01

    Full Text Available Scanning tunneling microscopy experiments using iron-coated tungsten tips and current-carrying tungsten films have been conducted. An asymmetry of the tunneling current with respect to the change of the direction of the bias current through a tungsten film has been observed. It is argued that this asymmetry is a manifestation of the spin Hall effect in the current-carrying tungsten film. Nanoscale variations of this asymmetry across the tungsten film have been studied by using the scanning tunneling microscopy technique.

  2. Scanning tunneling microscopy measurements of the spin Hall effect in tungsten films by using iron-coated tungsten tips

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xie, Ting; Dreyer, Michael; Bowen, David; Hinkel, Dan; Butera, R. E.; Krafft, Charles; Mayergoyz, Isaak

    2018-05-01

    Scanning tunneling microscopy experiments using iron-coated tungsten tips and current-carrying tungsten films have been conducted. An asymmetry of the tunneling current with respect to the change of the direction of the bias current through a tungsten film has been observed. It is argued that this asymmetry is a manifestation of the spin Hall effect in the current-carrying tungsten film. Nanoscale variations of this asymmetry across the tungsten film have been studied by using the scanning tunneling microscopy technique.

  3. Measuring Ethnic Preferences in Bosnia and Herzegovina with Mobile Advertising.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nisser, Annerose; Weidmann, Nils B

    2016-01-01

    We present a field experiment that uses geo-referenced smartphone advertisements to measure ethnic preferences at a highly disaggregated level. Different types of banners advertising a vote matching tool are randomly displayed to mobile Internet users in Bosnia and Herzegovina, while recording their spatial coordinates. Differences in the response (click) rate to different ethnic cues on these banners are used to measure temporal and spatial variation in ethnic preferences among the population of Bosnia and Herzegovina. Our study lays out the theoretical and practical underpinnings of this technology and discusses its potential for future applications, but also highlights limitations of this approach.

  4. Measuring Ethnic Preferences in Bosnia and Herzegovina with Mobile Advertising.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Annerose Nisser

    Full Text Available We present a field experiment that uses geo-referenced smartphone advertisements to measure ethnic preferences at a highly disaggregated level. Different types of banners advertising a vote matching tool are randomly displayed to mobile Internet users in Bosnia and Herzegovina, while recording their spatial coordinates. Differences in the response (click rate to different ethnic cues on these banners are used to measure temporal and spatial variation in ethnic preferences among the population of Bosnia and Herzegovina. Our study lays out the theoretical and practical underpinnings of this technology and discusses its potential for future applications, but also highlights limitations of this approach.

  5. Measuring Ethnic Preferences in Bosnia and Herzegovina with Mobile Advertising

    Science.gov (United States)

    Weidmann, Nils B.

    2016-01-01

    We present a field experiment that uses geo-referenced smartphone advertisements to measure ethnic preferences at a highly disaggregated level. Different types of banners advertising a vote matching tool are randomly displayed to mobile Internet users in Bosnia and Herzegovina, while recording their spatial coordinates. Differences in the response (click) rate to different ethnic cues on these banners are used to measure temporal and spatial variation in ethnic preferences among the population of Bosnia and Herzegovina. Our study lays out the theoretical and practical underpinnings of this technology and discusses its potential for future applications, but also highlights limitations of this approach. PMID:28005924

  6. Experimental ion mobility measurements in Xe-CH4

    Science.gov (United States)

    Perdigoto, J. M. C.; Cortez, A. F. V.; Veenhof, R.; Neves, P. N. B.; Santos, F. P.; Borges, F. I. G. M.; Conde, C. A. N.

    2017-09-01

    Data on ion mobility is important to improve the performance of large volume gaseous detectors. In the present work, the method, experimental setup and results for the ion mobility measurements in Xe-CH4 mixtures are presented. The results for this mixture show the presence of two distinct groups of ions. The nature of the ions depend on the mixture ratio since they are originated by both Xe and CH4. The results here presented were obtained for low reduced electric fields, E/N, 10-25 Td (2.4-6.1 kV ṡ cm-1 ṡ bar-1), at low pressure (8 Torr) (10.6 mbar), and at room temperature.

  7. Experimental ion mobility measurements in Xe-CF4 mixtures

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cortez, A. F. V.; Kaja, M. A.; Escada, J.; Santos, M. A. G.; Veenhof, R.; Neves, P. N. B.; Santos, F. P.; Borges, F. I. G. M.; Conde, C. A. N.

    2018-04-01

    In this paper we present the results of the ion mobility measurements made in gaseous mixtures of xenon with carbon tetrafluoride (Xe-CF4) for pressures ranging from 6 to 10 Torr (8-10.6 mbar) and for low reduced electric fields in the 10 to 25 Td range (2.4-6.1 kVṡcm‑1ṡbar‑1), at room temperature. The time-of-arrival spectra revealed one or two peaks depending on the gas relative abundances, which were attributed to CF3+ and to Xe2+ ions. However, for Xe concentrations above 60%, only one peak remains (Xe2+). The reduced mobilities obtained from the peak centroid of the time-of-arrival spectra are presented for Xe concentrations in the 5%-95% range.

  8. Feasibility study of experiments to measure inclusive reactions at large x/sub F/ in ISABELLE's small-angle hall

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Aronson, S.; Danby, G.; Foley, K.; Paige, F.; Thorndike, A.; Engelmann, R.; McCarthy, R.; Pope, B.

    1978-01-01

    As a way of testing current ideas on the construction of experimental halls at ISABELLE, a particular class of experiments suggested for the small-angle (or 2 o' clock) hall, p + p → p + X and p + p → c + X, c not equal to p is examined. The result of this examination is that inclusive single-particle experiments are feasible over a suitable kinematic range without the use of previously proposed special insertion quadrupoles. The forward single-arm spectrometer is housed in a separate tunnel of modest transverse dimension. The extraction of scattered particles (theta greater than or equal to 1 mrad) into the spectrometer is accomplished with Lambertson septa and current sheet septa. Provision is made for overlap with the kinematic region covered by ISR and Fermilab experiments. The physics objectives of such experiments are reviewed first. Then the general layout of the apparatus is described, with special emphasis on the extraction system and the spectrometer. A guess at how this experiment would fit into the overall small-angle physics program is presented. 5 figures

  9. Feasibility study of experiments to measure inclusive reactions at large x/sub F/ in ISABELLE's small-angle hall

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Aronson, S.; Danby, G.; Foley, K.; Paige, F.; Thorndike, A.; Engelmann, R.; McCarthy, R.; Pope, B.

    1979-01-01

    As a way of testing current ideas on the construction of experimental halls at ISABELLE, a particular class of experiments suggested for the small-angle (or 2 o'clock) hall are examined: p + p → p + X, and p + p → c + X, c is not = p. Somewhat more detail has been incorporated than in previous summer study and summer workshop treatments of these experiments. Briefly, the result of this examination is that inclusive single-particle experiments are feasible over a suitable kinematic range without the use of previously proposed special insertion quadrupoles. The forward single-arm spectrometer is housed in a separate tunnel of modest transverse dimension. The extraction of scattered particles (theta > approx. 1 mrad) into the spectrometer is accomplished with Lambertson septa and current sheet septa. Provision is made for overlap with the kinematic region covered by ISR and Fermilab experiments. Section II is a review of the physics objectives of such experiments. Section III describes the general layout of the apparatus, with the extraction system and the spectrometer discussed in more detail in Sections IV and V respectively. A guess at how this experiment would fit into the overall small-angle physics program is presented in Section VI

  10. Mobile platform of altitude measurement based on a smartphone

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roszkowski, Paweł; Kowalczyk, Marcin

    2016-09-01

    The article presents a low cost, fully - functional meter of altitude and pressure changes in a form of mobile application controlled by Android OS (operating system). The measurements are possible due to pressure sensor inserted in majority of latest modern mobile phones, which are known as smartphones. Using their computing capabilities and other equipment components like GPS receiver in connection with data from the sensor enabled authors to create a sophisticated handheld measuring platform with many unique features. One of them is a drawing altitude maps mode in which user can create maps of altitude changes just by moving around examined area. Another one is a convenient mode for altitude measurement. It is also extended with analysis tools which provide a possibility to compare measured values by displaying the data in a form of plots. The platform consists of external backup server, where the user can secure all gathered data. Moreover, the results of measurement's accuracy examination process which was executed after building the solution were shown. At the end, the realized meter of altitude was compared to other popular altimeters, which are available on the market currently.

  11. A method of reconstructing the spatial measurement network by mobile measurement transmitter for shipbuilding

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Guo, Siyang; Lin, Jiarui; Yang, Linghui; Ren, Yongjie; Guo, Yin

    2017-01-01

    The workshop Measurement Position System (wMPS) is a distributed measurement system which is suitable for the large-scale metrology. However, there are some inevitable measurement problems in the shipbuilding industry, such as the restriction by obstacles and limited measurement range. To deal with these factors, this paper presents a method of reconstructing the spatial measurement network by mobile transmitter. A high-precision coordinate control network with more than six target points is established. The mobile measuring transmitter can be added into the measurement network using this coordinate control network with the spatial resection method. This method reconstructs the measurement network and broadens the measurement scope efficiently. To verify this method, two comparison experiments are designed with the laser tracker as the reference. The results demonstrate that the accuracy of point-to-point length is better than 0.4mm and the accuracy of coordinate measurement is better than 0.6mm. (paper)

  12. Measurement campaign on connectivity of mesh networks formed by mobile devices

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Pietrarca, Beatrice; Sasso, Giovanni; Perrucci, Gian Paolo

    2007-01-01

    This paper reports the results of a measurement campaign on the connectivity level of mobile devices using Bluetooth (BT) to form cooperative mobile mesh networks. Such mobile mesh networks composed of mobile devices are the basis for any peer-to-peer communication like wireless grids or social...

  13. Magnesium Hall Thruster

    Science.gov (United States)

    Szabo, James J.

    2015-01-01

    This Phase II project is developing a magnesium (Mg) Hall effect thruster system that would open the door for in situ resource utilization (ISRU)-based solar system exploration. Magnesium is light and easy to ionize. For a Mars- Earth transfer, the propellant mass savings with respect to a xenon Hall effect thruster (HET) system are enormous. Magnesium also can be combusted in a rocket with carbon dioxide (CO2) or water (H2O), enabling a multimode propulsion system with propellant sharing and ISRU. In the near term, CO2 and H2O would be collected in situ on Mars or the moon. In the far term, Mg itself would be collected from Martian and lunar regolith. In Phase I, an integrated, medium-power (1- to 3-kW) Mg HET system was developed and tested. Controlled, steady operation at constant voltage and power was demonstrated. Preliminary measurements indicate a specific impulse (Isp) greater than 4,000 s was achieved at a discharge potential of 400 V. The feasibility of delivering fluidized Mg powder to a medium- or high-power thruster also was demonstrated. Phase II of the project evaluated the performance of an integrated, highpower Mg Hall thruster system in a relevant space environment. Researchers improved the medium power thruster system and characterized it in detail. Researchers also designed and built a high-power (8- to 20-kW) Mg HET. A fluidized powder feed system supporting the high-power thruster was built and delivered to Busek Company, Inc.

  14. Measuring economic activity in China with mobile big data

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lei Dong

    2017-11-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Emerging trends in the use of smartphones, online mapping applications, and social media, in addition to the geo-located data they generate, provide opportunities to trace users’ socio-economic activities in an unprecedentedly granular and direct fashion and have triggered a revolution in empirical research. These vast mobile data offer new perspectives and approaches to measure economic dynamics, and they are broadening the social science and economics fields. In this paper, we explore the potential for using mobile data to measure economic activity in China from a bottom-up view. First, we build indices for gauging employment and consumer trends based on billions of geo-positioning data. Second, we advance the estimation of offline store foot traffic via location search data derived from Baidu Maps, which is then applied to predict Apple’s revenues in China and to accurately detect box-office fraud. Third, we construct consumption indicators to track trends in various service sector industries and verify them with several existing indicators. To the best of our knowledge, this is the first study to measure the world’s second-largest economy by mining such unprecedentedly large-scale and fine-granular spatial-temporal data. In this way, our research provides new approaches and insights into measuring economic activity.

  15. Development of a mobile robot for remote radiation measurement

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sarkar, Ushnish; Saini, Surendra Singh; Swaroop, Tumapala Teja; Sreejith, P.; Kumar, Ravinder; Ray, Debasish Datta

    2016-01-01

    Remote measurement of radiation using mobile robots is recommended in nuclear installations. For this purpose various robots have been developed that carry a radiation sensor. However since the robot has to go very near to the source of radiation, the life of the robot's components is compromised due to high level of absorbed dose. It was earlier managed to increase the life expectancy of remote radiation measurement robots by allowing the sensor to be placed on an extendable telescopic assembly; analogous to a health physicist taking measurements using a Teletector. The first prototype developed had stair climbing capabilities but it was found to be over dimensioned for various potential applications. A significant use of such robots is in taking measurements at nuclear reprocessing facilities having narrow cluttered pathways. This required development of a new version of the robot capable of negotiating the narrow pathways of such facilities. This paper describes the different aspects of the development of the mobile robot system with flexible radiation sensing capabilities

  16. The infrared Hall effect in YBCO: Temperature and frequency dependence of Hall scattering

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Grayson, M.; Cerne, J.; Drew, H.D.; Schmadel, D.C.; Hughes, R.; Preston, J.S.; Kung, P.J.; Vale, L.

    1999-01-01

    The authors measure the Hall angle, θ H , in YBCO films in the far- and mid-infrared to determine the temperature and frequency dependence of the Hall scattering. Using novel modulation techniques they measure both the Faraday rotation and ellipticity induced by these films in high magnetic fields to deduce the complex conductivity tensor. They observe a strong temperature dependence of the mid-infrared Hall conductivity in sharp contrast to the weak dependence of the longitudinal conductivity. By fitting the frequency dependent normal state Hall angle to a Lorentzian θ H (ω) = ω H /(γ H minus iω) they find the Hall frequency, ω H , is nearly independent of temperature. The Hall scattering rate, γ H , is consistent with γ H ∼ T 2 up to 200 K and is remarkably independent of IR frequency suggesting non-Fermi liquid behavior

  17. The Aeroflex: A Bicycle for Mobile Air Quality Measurements

    Science.gov (United States)

    Elen, Bart; Peters, Jan; Van Poppel, Martine; Bleux, Nico; Theunis, Jan; Reggente, Matteo; Standaert, Arnout

    2013-01-01

    Fixed air quality stations have limitations when used to assess people's real life exposure to air pollutants. Their spatial coverage is too limited to capture the spatial variability in, e.g., an urban or industrial environment. Complementary mobile air quality measurements can be used as an additional tool to fill this void. In this publication we present the Aeroflex, a bicycle for mobile air quality monitoring. The Aeroflex is equipped with compact air quality measurement devices to monitor ultrafine particle number counts, particulate mass and black carbon concentrations at a high resolution (up to 1 second). Each measurement is automatically linked to its geographical location and time of acquisition using GPS and Internet time. Furthermore, the Aeroflex is equipped with automated data transmission, data pre-processing and data visualization. The Aeroflex is designed with adaptability, reliability and user friendliness in mind. Over the past years, the Aeroflex has been successfully used for high resolution air quality mapping, exposure assessment and hot spot identification. PMID:23262484

  18. Single-Image Distance Measurement by a Smart Mobile Device.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Shangwen; Fang, Xianyong; Shen, Jianbing; Wang, Linbo; Shao, Ling

    2017-12-01

    Existing distance measurement methods either require multiple images and special photographing poses or only measure the height with a special view configuration. We propose a novel image-based method that can measure various types of distance from single image captured by a smart mobile device. The embedded accelerometer is used to determine the view orientation of the device. Consequently, pixels can be back-projected to the ground, thanks to the efficient calibration method using two known distances. Then the distance in pixel is transformed to a real distance in centimeter with a linear model parameterized by the magnification ratio. Various types of distance specified in the image can be computed accordingly. Experimental results demonstrate the effectiveness of the proposed method.

  19. Measuring Mobility Limitations in Children with Cerebral Palsy: Interrater and Intrarater Reliability of a Mobility Questionnaire (MobQues)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Van Ravesteyn, Nicolien T.; Dallmeijer, Annet J.; Scholtes, Vanessa A.; Roorda, Leo D.; Becher, Jules G.

    2010-01-01

    Aim: The objective of this study was to assess the reliability of a mobility questionnaire (MobQues) that was developed to measure the mobility limitations of children with cerebral palsy (CP) as rated by their parents. A clinical version of the questionnaire, consisting of 47 items (MobQues47), is available, as well as a research version with 28…

  20. Measuring Mobility Limitations in Children with Cerebral Palsy: Content and Construct Validity of a Mobility Questionnaire (MobQues)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Van Ravesteyn, Nicolien T.; Scholtes, Vanessa A.; Becher, Jules G.; Roorda, Leo D.; Verschuren, Olaf; Dallmeijer, Annet J.

    2010-01-01

    Aim: The objective of this study was to assess the validity of a mobility questionnaire (MobQues) that was developed to measure parent-reported mobility limitations in children with cerebral palsy (CP). Method: The parents of 439 children with CP (256 males and 183 females; age range 2-18y; Gross Motor Function Classification System [GMFCS] levels…

  1. Toward a Common Language for Measuring Patient Mobility in the Hospital: Reliability and Construct Validity of Interprofessional Mobility Measures.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hoyer, Erik H; Young, Daniel L; Klein, Lisa M; Kreif, Julie; Shumock, Kara; Hiser, Stephanie; Friedman, Michael; Lavezza, Annette; Jette, Alan; Chan, Kitty S; Needham, Dale M

    2018-02-01

    The lack of common language among interprofessional inpatient clinical teams is an important barrier to achieving inpatient mobilization. In The Johns Hopkins Hospital, the Activity Measure for Post-Acute Care (AM-PAC) Inpatient Mobility Short Form (IMSF), also called "6-Clicks," and the Johns Hopkins Highest Level of Mobility (JH-HLM) are part of routine clinical practice. The measurement characteristics of these tools when used by both nurses and physical therapists for interprofessional communication or assessment are unknown. The purposes of this study were to evaluate the reliability and minimal detectable change of AM-PAC IMSF and JH-HLM when completed by nurses and physical therapists and to evaluate the construct validity of both measures when used by nurses. A prospective evaluation of a convenience sample was used. The test-retest reliability and the interrater reliability of AM-PAC IMSF and JH-HLM for inpatients in the neuroscience department (n = 118) of an academic medical center were evaluated. Each participant was independently scored twice by a team of 2 nurses and 1 physical therapist; a total of 4 physical therapists and 8 nurses participated in reliability testing. In a separate inpatient study protocol (n = 69), construct validity was evaluated via an assessment of convergent validity with other measures of function (grip strength, Katz Activities of Daily Living Scale, 2-minute walk test, 5-times sit-to-stand test) used by 5 nurses. The test-retest reliability values (intraclass correlation coefficients) for physical therapists and nurses were 0.91 and 0.97, respectively, for AM-PAC IMSF and 0.94 and 0.95, respectively, for JH-HLM. The interrater reliability values (intraclass correlation coefficients) between physical therapists and nurses were 0.96 for AM-PAC IMSF and 0.99 for JH-HLM. Construct validity (Spearman correlations) ranged from 0.25 between JH-HLM and right-hand grip strength to 0.80 between AM-PAC IMSF and the Katz Activities of

  2. Estimates of CO2 traffic emissions from mobile concentration measurements

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maness, H. L.; Thurlow, M. E.; McDonald, B. C.; Harley, R. A.

    2015-03-01

    We present data from a new mobile system intended to aid in the design of upcoming urban CO2-monitoring networks. Our collected data include GPS probe data, video-derived traffic density, and accurate CO2 concentration measurements. The method described here is economical, scalable, and self-contained, allowing for potential future deployment in locations without existing traffic infrastructure or vehicle fleet information. Using a test data set collected on California Highway 24 over a 2 week period, we observe that on-road CO2 concentrations are elevated by a factor of 2 in congestion compared to free-flow conditions. This result is found to be consistent with a model including vehicle-induced turbulence and standard engine physics. In contrast to surface concentrations, surface emissions are found to be relatively insensitive to congestion. We next use our model for CO2 concentration together with our data to independently derive vehicle emission rate parameters. Parameters scaling the leading four emission rate terms are found to be within 25% of those expected for a typical passenger car fleet, enabling us to derive instantaneous emission rates directly from our data that compare generally favorably to predictive models presented in the literature. The present results highlight the importance of high spatial and temporal resolution traffic data for interpreting on- and near-road concentration measurements. Future work will focus on transport and the integration of mobile platforms into existing stationary network designs.

  3. Terahertz optical-Hall effect for multiple valley band materials: n-type silicon

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kuehne, P.; Hofmann, T.; Herzinger, C.M.; Schubert, M.

    2011-01-01

    The optical-Hall effect comprises generalized ellipsometry at long wavelengths on samples with free-charge carriers placed within external magnetic fields. Measurement of the anisotropic magneto-optic response allows for the determination of the free-charge carrier properties including spatial anisotropy. In this work we employ the optical-Hall effect at terahertz frequencies for analysis of free-charge carrier properties in multiple valley band materials, for which the optical free-charge carrier contributions originate from multiple Brillouin-zone conduction or valence band minima or maxima, respectively. We investigate exemplarily the room temperature optical-Hall effect in low phosphorous-doped n-type silicon where free electrons are located in six equivalent conduction-band minima near the X-point. We simultaneously determine their free-charge carrier concentration, mobility, and longitudinal and transverse effective mass parameters.

  4. General vibration monitoring: Experimental hall

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jendrzejczyk, J.A.; Wambsganss, M.W.; Smith, R.K.

    1993-01-01

    The reported vibration data were generated from measurements made on the experimental hall floor on December 2, 1992. At the time of the measurements, the ESRF hydrolevel was set-up in the Early Assembly Area (EAA) of the experimental hall and was being used to measure static displacement (settlement) of the floor. The vibration measurement area was on and adjacent to the EAA, in the vicinity of the ESRF hydrolevel test which was in progress. This report summarizes the objectives, instrumentation, measurement locations, observations, and conclusions, and provides selected results in the form of RMS vs. time plots, and power spectral densities from which frequency information can be derived. Measured response amplitudes were within the vibration criteria established for the APS

  5. Contribution of the study of the Hall Effect. Hall Effect of powder products

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cherville, Jean

    1961-01-01

    This research thesis reports the development of an apparatus aimed at measuring the Hall Effect and the magneto-resistance of powders at room temperature and at the liquid nitrogen temperature. The author also proposes a theoretical contribution to the Hall Effect and reports the calculation of conditions to be met to obtain a correct value for the Hall constant. Results are experimentally verified. The method is then applied to the study of a set of powdered pre-graphitic graphites. The author shows that their Hall coefficient confirms the model already proposed by Mrozowski. The study of the Hall Effect of any kind of powders can thus be performed, and the Hall Effect can therefore be a mean to study mineral and organic compounds, and notably powdered biological molecules [fr

  6. Considerations for the Development of Work Zone Mobility Performance Measures and Thresholds for Virginia Freeways.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2014-02-01

    "The Federal Highway Administration has been encouraging states to improve their monitoring and tracking of the : mobility impacts of work zones. The use of mobility performance measures will enable agencies to assess better the : contribution of wor...

  7. Measuring sustainable accessibility potential using the mobility infrastructure's network configuration

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Gil, J.; Read, S.

    2012-01-01

    This paper is an exploration into the analysis of public transport networks using space syntax approaches combined with concepts of sustainable accessibility. Present urban development policy aims to achieve sustainable mobility patterns, shifting mobility to soft transportation modes such as

  8. Temperature dependence of ballistic mobility in a metamorphic InGaAs/InAlAs high electron mobility transistor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lee, Jongkyong; Gang, Suhyun; Jo, Yongcheol; Kim, Jongmin; Woo, Hyeonseok; Han, Jaeseok; Kim, Hyungsang; Im, Hyunsik

    2014-01-01

    We have investigated the temperature dependence of ballistic mobility in a 100 nm-long InGaAs/InAlAs metamorphic high-electron-mobility transistor designed for millimeter-wavelength RF applications. To extract the temperature dependence of quasi-ballistic mobility, our experiment involves measurements of the effective mobility in the low-bias linear region of the transistor and of the collision-dominated Hall mobility using a gated Hall bar of the same epitaxial structure. The data measured from the experiment are consistent with that of modeled ballistic mobility based on ballistic transport theory. These results advance the understanding of ballistic transport in various transistors with a nano-scale channel length that is comparable to the carrier's mean free path in the channel.

  9. Skyrmions and Hall viscosity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Bom Soo

    2018-05-01

    We discuss the contribution of magnetic Skyrmions to the Hall viscosity and propose a simple way to identify it in experiments. The topological Skyrmion charge density has a distinct signature in the electric Hall conductivity that is identified in existing experimental data. In an electrically neutral system, the Skyrmion charge density is directly related to the thermal Hall conductivity. These results are direct consequences of the field theory Ward identities, which relate various physical quantities based on symmetries and have been previously applied to quantum Hall systems.

  10. Hall Sensor Output Signal Fault-Detection & Safety Implementation Logic

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lee SangHun

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Recently BLDC motors have been popular in various industrial applications and electric mobility. Recently BLDC motors have been popular in various industrial applications and electric mobility. In most brushless direct current (BLDC motor drives, there are three hall sensors as a position reference. Low resolution hall effect sensor is popularly used to estimate the rotor position because of its good comprehensive performance such as low cost, high reliability and sufficient precision. Various possible faults may happen in a hall effect sensor. This paper presents a fault-tolerant operation method that allows the control of a BLDC motor with one faulty hall sensor and presents the hall sensor output fault-tolerant control strategy. The situations considered are when the output from a hall sensor stays continuously at low or high levels, or a short-time pulse appears on a hall sensor signal. For fault detection, identification of a faulty signal and generating a substitute signal, this method only needs the information from the hall sensors. There are a few research work on hall effect sensor failure of BLDC motor. The conventional fault diagnosis methods are signal analysis, model based analysis and knowledge based analysis. The proposed method is signal based analysis using a compensation signal for reconfiguration and therefore fault diagnosis can be fast. The proposed method is validated to execute the simulation using PSIM.

  11. Quality and noise measurements in mobile phone video capture

    Science.gov (United States)

    Petrescu, Doina; Pincenti, John

    2011-02-01

    The quality of videos captured with mobile phones has become increasingly important particularly since resolutions and formats have reached a level that rivals the capabilities available in the digital camcorder market, and since many mobile phones now allow direct playback on large HDTVs. The video quality is determined by the combined quality of the individual parts of the imaging system including the image sensor, the digital color processing, and the video compression, each of which has been studied independently. In this work, we study the combined effect of these elements on the overall video quality. We do this by evaluating the capture under various lighting, color processing, and video compression conditions. First, we measure full reference quality metrics between encoder input and the reconstructed sequence, where the encoder input changes with light and color processing modifications. Second, we introduce a system model which includes all elements that affect video quality, including a low light additive noise model, ISP color processing, as well as the video encoder. Our experiments show that in low light conditions and for certain choices of color processing the system level visual quality may not improve when the encoder becomes more capable or the compression ratio is reduced.

  12. NOAA Mobile Laboratory Measures Oil and Gas Emissions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kofler, J. D.; Petron, G.; Dube, W. P.; Edwards, P. M.; Brown, S. S.; Geiger, F.; Patrick, L.; Crepinsek, S.; Chen, H.; Miller, B. R.; Montzka, S. A.; Lang, P. M.; Newberger, T.; Higgs, J. A.; Sweeney, C.; Guenther, D.; Karion, A.; Wolter, S.; Williams, J.; Jordan, A.; Tans, P. P.; Schnell, R. C.

    2012-12-01

    A van capable of continuous real time measurements of CH4 , CO2, CO, Water Vapor, Ozone, NO, NO2, Volatile Organic Compounds VOCs including aromatics and other traces gases was driven in the oil and gas fields of the Uintah Basin in northeastern Utah. Compressor Stations, processing plants, oil and gas well heads. Separators, condensate tanks, evaporation pond disposal facilities, holding tanks, hydraulic fracturing sites, gas pipelines and more were studied using the van. The mobile measurements provide a powerful tool to get to the source of the emissions and reveal the unique chemical signature of each of the stages and components of oil and gas production as well as the overall basin and background gas concentrations. In addition to a suite of gas analyzers, the van includes a meteorological system (temperature, humidity, and wind speed and direction), GPS tracking, flask sampling system and a batter power system. Aspects of the vans hardware, sampling methods and operations are discussed along with a few highlights of the measurements.

  13. Mobilities

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    to social networks, personal identities, and our relationship to the built environment. The omnipresence of mobilities within everyday life, high politics, technology, and tourism (to mention but a few) all point to a key insight harnessed by the ‘mobilities turn’. Namely that mobilities is much more than......The world is on the move. This is a widespread understanding by many inhabitants of contemporary society across the Globe. But what does it actually mean? During over one decade the ‘mobilities turn’ within the social sciences have provided a new set of insights into the repercussions of mobilities...... and environmental degradation. The spaces and territories marked by mobilities as well as the sites marked by the bypassing of such are explored. Moreover, the architectural and technological dimensions to infrastructures and sites of mobilities will be included as well as the issues of power, social exclusion...

  14. How Sensitive is Intergenerational Earnings Mobility to Different Measures?

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hussain, Mohammad Azhar; D. Munk, Martin; Bonke, Jens

    2008-01-01

    The article provides various estimates of intergenerational earnings mobility based on Danish administrative register information. The aim is to calculate how sensitive the results are to different earning periods, age brackets, and earning components enabling the most accurate cross country comp...... find that intergenerational earnings mobility from father to son in Denmark is on the same level as in Sweden, Norway, and Finland, whereas the intergenerational earnings mobility in all the Nordic countries is found higher than in the UK and USA....

  15. Mobile Communication Devices, Ambient Noise, and Acoustic Voice Measures.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maryn, Youri; Ysenbaert, Femke; Zarowski, Andrzej; Vanspauwen, Robby

    2017-03-01

    The ability to move with mobile communication devices (MCDs; ie, smartphones and tablet computers) may induce differences in microphone-to-mouth positioning and use in noise-packed environments, and thus influence reliability of acoustic voice measurements. This study investigated differences in various acoustic voice measures between six recording equipments in backgrounds with low and increasing noise levels. One chain of continuous speech and sustained vowel from 50 subjects with voice disorders (all separated by silence intervals) was radiated and re-recorded in an anechoic chamber with five MCDs and one high-quality recording system. These recordings were acquired in one condition without ambient noise and in four conditions with increased ambient noise. A total of 10 acoustic voice markers were obtained in the program Praat. Differences between MCDs and noise condition were assessed with Friedman repeated-measures test and posthoc Wilcoxon signed-rank tests, both for related samples, after Bonferroni correction. (1) Except median fundamental frequency and seven nonsignificant differences, MCD samples have significantly higher acoustic markers than clinical reference samples in minimal environmental noise. (2) Except median fundamental frequency, jitter local, and jitter rap, all acoustic measures on samples recorded with the reference system experienced significant influence from room noise levels. Fundamental frequency is resistant to recording system, environmental noise, and their combination. All other measures, however, were impacted by both recording system and noise condition, and especially by their combination, often already in the reference/baseline condition without added ambient noise. Caution is therefore warranted regarding implementation of MCDs as clinical recording tools, particularly when applied for treatment outcomes assessments. Copyright © 2017 The Voice Foundation. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  16. A Study on the Measuring of Consumers’ Perception towards the Mobile Marketing Campaigns in Air Transportation

    OpenAIRE

    Ozlem Atalik; Fatma Selin Sak; Eren Sezgen

    2015-01-01

    A widespread usage of mobile devices in our age creates a new marketing channel for the corporations to reach the consumers in an effective way. Being effective, personalized marketing tool, mobile marketing attracts the aviation sector, whose aim is to create an environment for the users so that they can require any product and service or pay and learn about them with their mobile devices from anywhere they want. Accordingly, the purpose of this study is to measure the mobile technology usag...

  17. The effect of metallization contact resistance on the measurement of the field effect mobility of long-channel unannealed amorphous In–Zn–O thin film transistors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lee, Sunghwan; Park, Hongsik; Paine, David C.

    2012-01-01

    The effect of contact resistance on the measurement of the field effect mobility of compositionally homogeneous channel indium zinc oxide (IZO)/IZO metallization thin film transistors (TFTs) is reported. The TFTs studied in this work operate in depletion mode as n-channel field effect devices with a field effect mobility calculated in the linear regime (μ FE ) of 20 ± 1.9 cm 2 /Vs and similar of 18 ± 1.3 cm 2 /Vs when calculated in the saturation regime (μ FE sat ). These values, however, significantly underestimate the channel mobility since a large part of the applied drain voltage is dropped across the source/drain contact interface. The transmission line method was employed to characterize the contact resistance and it was found that the conducting-IZO/semiconducting-IZO channel contact is highly resistive (specific contact resistance, ρ C > 100 Ωcm 2 ) and, further, this contact resistance is modulated with applied gate voltage. Accounting for the contact resistance (which is large and modulated by gate voltage), the corrected μ FE is shown to be 39 ± 2.6 cm 2 /Vs which is consistent with Hall mobility measurements of high carrier density IZO.

  18. Low temperature hall effect investigation of conducting polymer-carbon nanotubes composite network.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bahrami, Afarin; Talib, Zainal Abidin; Yunus, Wan Mahmood Mat; Behzad, Kasra; M Abdi, Mahnaz; Din, Fasih Ud

    2012-11-14

    Polypyrrole (PPy) and polypyrrole-carboxylic functionalized multi wall carbon nanotube composites (PPy/f-MWCNT) were synthesized by in situ chemical oxidative polymerization of pyrrole on the carbon nanotubes (CNTs). The structure of the resulting complex nanotubes was characterized by transmission electron microscopy (TEM) and X-ray diffraction (XRD). The effects of f-MWCNT concentration on the electrical properties of the resulting composites were studied at temperatures between 100 K and 300 K. The Hall mobility and Hall coefficient of PPy and PPy/f-MWCNT composite samples with different concentrations of f-MWCNT were measured using the van der Pauw technique. The mobility decreased slightly with increasing temperature, while the conductivity was dominated by the gradually increasing carrier density.

  19. Land-mobile satellite excess path loss measurements

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hess, G. C.

    1980-05-01

    An experiment conducted with the ATS-6 satellite to determine the additional path loss over free-space loss experienced by land-mobile communication links is described. This excess path loss is measured as a function of 1) local environment, 2) vehicle heading, 3) link frequency, 4) satellite elevation angle, and 5) street side. A statistical description of excess loss developed from the data shows that the first two parameters dominate. Excess path loss on the order of 25 dB is typical in urban situations, but decreases to under 10 dB in suburban/rural areas. Spaced antenna selection diversity is found to provide only a slight decrease (4 dB, typically) in the urban excess path loss observed. Level crossing rates are depressed in satellite links relative to those of Rayleigh-faded terrestrial links, but increases in average fade durations tend to offset that advantage. The measurements show that the excess path loss difference between 860-MHz links and 1550-MHz links is generally negligible.

  20. Mobile system for on-road measurements of air pollutants

    Science.gov (United States)

    Katulski, Ryszard J.; Namieśnik, Jacek; Sadowski, Jarosław; Stefański, Jacek; Szymańska, Krystyna; Wardencki, Waldemar

    2010-04-01

    The paper presents a prototype of a mobile monitoring system for measuring the levels of the main traffic air pollutants (C6H6, NO2, NOx, CO, and CO2,) in cities. The novelty of the proposed system lies in the fact that it can be utilized to monitor emissions from urban traffic along roads and areas where traditional monitoring stations cannot be placed. In the proposed system, the monitoring device can be mounted on any moving vehicle (such as a car, bus, or truck) rather than be attached to a dedicated van, as most systems of this kind found in literature are. Analyzers used in this system are small portable structures that contain an electronic instrument to measure, record, and transmit relevant data on concentrations of the pollutants to a website. The model outcome for carbon monoxide obtained in functional tests in real conditions is also presented here. Data on temporal changes of carbon monoxide concentration are compared against meteorological parameters and speed of the vehicle. Spatial interpolation techniques are applied to obtain a nonplanar visualization of carbon monoxide and benzene concentrations in the main arteries of a city.

  1. Development and Validation of Mobile Learning Acceptance Measure

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sharma, Sujeet Kumar; Sarrab, Mohamed; Al-Shihi, Hafedh

    2017-01-01

    The growth of Smartphone usage, increased acceptance of electronic learning (E-learning), the availability of high reliability mobile networks and need for flexibility in learning have resulted in the growth of mobile learning (M-learning). This has led to a tremendous interest in the acceptance behaviors related to M-learning users among the…

  2. Positron mobility measurements and their relevance to defect and impurity studies in semiconductors and insulators

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Beling, C.D.; Simpson, R.I.; Stewart, M.G.; Wang, Y.Y.; Fung, S.; Wai, J.C.H.; Sun, T.N.

    1987-01-01

    Positron mobility measurements and their relevance to the study of defects and impurities in semiconductors and insulators are discussed. Since the short lifetime of the positron in condensed matter renders conventional mobility techniques unsuitable, positron mobility measurements rely on the observation of annihilation photons and of vacuum emission. Measurements utilising Doppler shift, angular correlation, profile shift and diffusion to surfaces are surveyed. New methods which observe the electric field drift of positrons by lifetime spectroscopy or vacuum emission are discussed. Lifetime measurements in Fe doped InP give a positron mobility, μ + = (15 ± 5) cm 2 V -1 s -1 at 77 K. (author)

  3. EKONOMİK ÖZGÜRLÜKLERDEKİ YAKINSAMANIN HALDANE-HALL YAKLAŞIMI İLE ÖLÇÜMÜ (THE MEASUREMENT OF CONVERGENCE OF ECONOMIC FREEDOMS WITH HALDANE-HALL APPROACH

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Merter AKINCI

    2014-04-01

    Full Text Available ÖZ: Son otuz yıldan bu yana yaşanan en önemli gelişmelerden biri, hızlanan küreselleşme hareketleri kapsamında liberal iktisadi düşünce ve politikaların dünya genelinde yayılması olmuştur. Özellikle neo-liberal hareketler ile birlikte iktisadi bakımdan kapsamı genişletilen özgürlükçü akımlar, toplumsal yapılanma tarafından vazgeçilmez bir unsur olmuş ve ekonomik serbesti, refah gücünün artırılabilmesi amacıyla makro iktisadi gelişmelerin ana eksenini oluşturmuştur. Dolayısıyla bu çalışmada, gelişmekte olan ve azgelişmiş ülkelerin gelişmiş ülkelere ekonomik özgürlükler bakımından yaklaşıp yaklaşmadıkları yeni bir yöntem olan Haldane-Hall Yakınsama Analizi ile incelenmiştir. Haldane-Hall yakınsama analizi sonuçları; Arjantin, Belarus, Bolivya, Bulgaristan, Çin, Ekvador, Mısır, El Salvador, Hindistan, Meksika, Papua Yeni Gine, Romanya, Senegal, Tayland ve Türkiye’deki ekonomik özgürlük süreçlerinin gelişmiş ülkelere yakınsadığını; buna karşın Kongo Cumhuriyeti, Gana, Irak, Ürdün, Libya, Moldova, Fas, Sudan, Svaziland, Vietnam, Yemen, Bangladeş, Burkina Faso, Çad, Demokratik Kongo Cumhuriyeti, Gambiya, Gine, Madagaskar, Mali, Mozambik, Sierra Leone ve Uganda’da ise ekonomik özgürlükler bakımından ıraksama olgusunun gündeme geldiğini ortaya koymuştur. Anahtar Kelimeler: Ekonomik Özgürlükler, Yakınsama, Haldane-Hall Yaklaşımı. ABSTRACT: One of the most important developments in the last thirty years is the expansion of liberal economic thought and policies in terms of accelerating globalization movements. Libertarian movements the scope of which has been extended with regards to economics and especially neo-liberal movements became an irreplaceable element of social set-up and their economic liberation formed the main core of the developments of macroeconomics with the aim of increasing the welfare level. In this study, therefore, whether

  4. Identifying Usability and Productivity Dimensions for Measuring the Success of Mobile Business Services

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Maiju Vuolle

    2008-01-01

    Full Text Available This paper reviews existing measures used for evaluating the usability of information systems and those used for evaluating the level of the productivity of a company. We discuss the usefulness of the existing measures in the mobile business context, where both mobility and work-context pose specific demands for the mobile business services. The review showed that the existing measures rarely consider the great contextual variation caused by the mobility of the services and the demands this poses on usability; which, in turn, affects productivity. To build a measurement tool that better meets the requirements of mobile business services, we completed case studies on two mobile business services, one used in passenger transport and the other in construction sites. Based on the understanding gained from the case studies, we propose a list of dimensions and items addressing both usability and productivity aspects that work as the basis for a multidisciplinary measurement tool.

  5. Scanning vector Hall probe microscope

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Fedor, J.; Cambel, V.; Gregušová, D.; Hanzelka, Pavel; Dérer, J.; Volko, J.

    2003-01-01

    Roč. 74, č. 12 (2003), s. 5105 - 5110 ISSN 0034-6748 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z2065902 Keywords : VHPM * Hall sensor * Helium cryostat Subject RIV: JB - Sensors, Measurment, Regulation Impact factor: 1.343, year: 2003 http://web. ebscohost .com/ehost/pdf?vid=8&hid=115&sid=a7c0555a-21f4-4932-b1c6-a308ac4dd50b%40sessionmgr2

  6. Calculation of radiative corrections to virtual compton scattering - absolute measurement of the energy of Jefferson Lab. electron beam (hall A) by a magnetic method: arc project

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Marchand, D.

    1998-11-01

    This thesis presents the radiative corrections to the virtual compton scattering and the magnetic method adopted in the Hall A at Jefferson Laboratory, to measure the electrons beam energy with an accuracy of 10 4 . The virtual compton scattering experiments allow the access to the generalised polarizabilities of the protons. The extraction of these polarizabilities is obtained by the experimental and theoretical cross sections comparison. That's why the systematic errors and the radiative effects of the experiments have to be controlled very seriously. In this scope, a whole calculation of the internal radiative corrections has been realised in the framework of the quantum electrodynamic. The method of the dimensional regularisation has been used to the treatment of the ultraviolet and infra-red divergences. The absolute measure method of the energy, takes into account the magnetic deviation, made up of eight identical dipoles. The energy is determined from the deviation angle calculation of the beam and the measure of the magnetic field integral along the deviation

  7. Associations between quantitative mobility measures derived from components of conventional mobility testing and Parkinsonian gait in older adults.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Aron S Buchman

    Full Text Available OBJECTIVE: To provide objective measures which characterize mobility in older adults assessed in the community setting and to examine the extent to which these measures are associated with parkinsonian gait. METHODS: During conventional mobility testing in the community-setting, 351 ambulatory non-demented Memory and Aging Project participants wore a belt with a whole body sensor that recorded both acceleration and angular velocity in 3 directions. We used measures derived from these recordings to quantify 5 subtasks including a walking, b transition from sit to stand, c transition from stand to sit, d turning and e standing posture. Parkinsonian gait and other mild parkinsonian signs were assessed with a modified version of the original Unified Parkinson's Disease Rating Scale (mUPDRS. RESULTS: In a series of separate regression models which adjusted for age and sex, all 5 mobility subtask measures were associated with parkinsonian gait and accounted for 2% to 32% of its variance. When all 5 subtask measures were considered in a single model, backward elimination showed that measures of walking sit to stand and turning showed independent associations with parkinsonian gait and together accounted for more than 35% of its variance. Cross-validation using data from a 2(nd group of 258 older adults showed similar results. In similar analyses, only walking was associated with bradykinesia and sway with tremor. INTERPRETATION: Quantitative mobility subtask measures vary in their associations with parkinsonian gait scores and other parkinsonian signs in older adults. Quantifying the different facets of mobility has the potential to facilitate the clinical characterization and understanding the biologic basis for impaired mobility in older adults.

  8. Associations between Quantitative Mobility Measures Derived from Components of Conventional Mobility Testing and Parkinsonian Gait in Older Adults

    Science.gov (United States)

    Buchman, Aron S.; Leurgans, Sue E.; Weiss, Aner; VanderHorst, Veronique; Mirelman, Anat; Dawe, Robert; Barnes, Lisa L.; Wilson, Robert S.; Hausdorff, Jeffrey M.; Bennett, David A.

    2014-01-01

    Objective To provide objective measures which characterize mobility in older adults assessed in the community setting and to examine the extent to which these measures are associated with parkinsonian gait. Methods During conventional mobility testing in the community-setting, 351 ambulatory non-demented Memory and Aging Project participants wore a belt with a whole body sensor that recorded both acceleration and angular velocity in 3 directions. We used measures derived from these recordings to quantify 5 subtasks including a) walking, b) transition from sit to stand, c) transition from stand to sit, d) turning and e) standing posture. Parkinsonian gait and other mild parkinsonian signs were assessed with a modified version of the original Unified Parkinson’s Disease Rating Scale (mUPDRS). Results In a series of separate regression models which adjusted for age and sex, all 5 mobility subtask measures were associated with parkinsonian gait and accounted for 2% to 32% of its variance. When all 5 subtask measures were considered in a single model, backward elimination showed that measures of walking sit to stand and turning showed independent associations with parkinsonian gait and together accounted for more than 35% of its variance. Cross-validation using data from a 2nd group of 258 older adults showed similar results. In similar analyses, only walking was associated with bradykinesia and sway with tremor. Interpretation Quantitative mobility subtask measures vary in their associations with parkinsonian gait scores and other parkinsonian signs in older adults. Quantifying the different facets of mobility has the potential to facilitate the clinical characterization and understanding the biologic basis for impaired mobility in older adults. PMID:24465997

  9. Cross-field Mobility in a Pure Electron Plasma

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fossum, E.C.; King, L.B.

    2006-01-01

    An electron trapping apparatus was constructed in order to study electron dynamics in the defining electric and magnetic field of a Hall-effect thruster. The approach presented here decouples the cross-field mobility from plasma effects by conducting measurements on a pure electron plasma in a highly controlled environment. Dielectric walls are removed completely eliminating all wall effect; thus, electrons are confined solely by a radial magnetic field and a crossed, independently-controlled, axial electric field that induces the closed-drift azimuthal Hall current. Electron trajectories and cross-field mobility were examined in response to electric and magnetic field strength and background neutral density

  10. Halls Lake 1990

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — Salt marsh habitats along the shoreline of Halls Lake are threatened by wave erosion, but the reconstruction of barrier islands to reduce this erosion will modify or...

  11. The quantum hall effect

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    El-Arabi, N. M.

    1993-01-01

    Transport phenomena in two dimensional semiconductors have revealed unusual properties. In this thesis these systems are considered and discussed. The theories explain the Integral Quantum Hall Effect (IQHE) and the Fractional Quantum Hall Effect (FQHE). The thesis is composed of five chapters. The first and the second chapters lay down the theory of the IQHE, the third and fourth consider the theory of the FQHE. Chapter five deals with the statistics of particles in two dimension. (author). Refs

  12. Hall effect in noncommutative coordinates

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dayi, Oemer F.; Jellal, Ahmed

    2002-01-01

    We consider electrons in uniform external magnetic and electric fields which move on a plane whose coordinates are noncommuting. Spectrum and eigenfunctions of the related Hamiltonian are obtained. We derive the electric current whose expectation value gives the Hall effect in terms of an effective magnetic field. We present a receipt to find the action which can be utilized in path integrals for noncommuting coordinates. In terms of this action we calculate the related Aharonov-Bohm phase and show that it also yields the same effective magnetic field. When magnetic field is strong enough this phase becomes independent of magnetic field. Measurement of it may give some hints on spatial noncommutativity. The noncommutativity parameter θ can be tuned such that electrons moving in noncommutative coordinates are interpreted as either leading to the fractional quantum Hall effect or composite fermions in the usual coordinates

  13. Hall viscosity of hierarchical quantum Hall states

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fremling, M.; Hansson, T. H.; Suorsa, J.

    2014-03-01

    Using methods based on conformal field theory, we construct model wave functions on a torus with arbitrary flat metric for all chiral states in the abelian quantum Hall hierarchy. These functions have no variational parameters, and they transform under the modular group in the same way as the multicomponent generalizations of the Laughlin wave functions. Assuming the absence of Berry phases upon adiabatic variations of the modular parameter τ, we calculate the quantum Hall viscosity and find it to be in agreement with the formula, given by Read, which relates the viscosity to the average orbital spin of the electrons. For the filling factor ν =2/5 Jain state, which is at the second level in the hierarchy, we compare our model wave function with the numerically obtained ground state of the Coulomb interaction Hamiltonian in the lowest Landau level, and find very good agreement in a large region of the complex τ plane. For the same example, we also numerically compute the Hall viscosity and find good agreement with the analytical result for both the model wave function and the numerically obtained Coulomb wave function. We argue that this supports the notion of a generalized plasma analogy that would ensure that wave functions obtained using the conformal field theory methods do not acquire Berry phases upon adiabatic evolution.

  14. Elementary theory of quantum Hall effect

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Keshav N. Shrivastava

    2008-04-01

    Full Text Available The Hall effect is the generation of a current perpendicular to both the direction of the applied electric as well as magnetic field in a metal or in a semiconductor. It is used to determine the concentration of electrons. The quantum Hall effect with integer quantization was discovered by von Klitzing and fractionally charged states were found by Tsui, Stormer and Gossard. Robert Laughlin explained the quantization of Hall current by using “flux quantization” and introduced incompressibility to obtain the fractional charge. We have developed the theory of the quantum Hall effect by using the theory of angular momentum. Our predicted fractions are in accord with those measured. We emphasize our explanation of the observed phenomena. We use spin to explain the fractional charge and hence we discover spin-charge locking.

  15. Comparison of mobility extraction methods based on field-effect measurements for graphene

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hua Zhong

    2015-05-01

    Full Text Available Carrier mobility extraction methods for graphene based on field-effect measurements are explored and compared according to theoretical analysis and experimental results. A group of graphene devices with different channel lengths were fabricated and measured, and carrier mobility is extracted from those electrical transfer curves using three different methods. Accuracy and applicability of those methods were compared. Transfer length method (TLM can obtain accurate density dependent mobility and contact resistance at relative high carrier density based on data from a group of devices, and then can act as a standard method to verify other methods. As two of the most popular methods, direct transconductance method (DTM and fitting method (FTM can extract mobility easily based on transfer curve of a sole graphene device. DTM offers an underestimated mobility at any carrier density owing to the neglect of contact resistances, and the accuracy can be improved through fabricating field-effect transistors with long channel and good contacts. FTM assumes a constant mobility independent on carrier density, and then can obtain mobility, contact resistance and residual density stimulations through fitting a transfer curve. However, FTM tends to obtain a mobility value near Dirac point and then overestimates carrier mobility of graphene. Comparing with the DTM and FTM, TLM could offer a much more accurate and carrier density dependent mobility, that reflects the complete properties of graphene carrier mobility.

  16. Chip-Based Measurements of Brownian Relaxation of Magnetic Beads Using a Planar Hall Effect Magnetic Field Sensor

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Østerberg, Frederik Westergaard; Dalslet, Bjarke Thomas; Snakenborg, Detlef

    2010-01-01

    using only the self-field arising from the bias current applied to the sensors as excitation field. We present measurements on a suspension of magnetic beads with a nominal diameter of 250 nm vs. temperature and find that the observations are consistent with the Cole-Cole model for Brownian relaxation...... with a constant hydrodynamic bead diameter when the temperature dependence of the viscosity of water is taken into account. These measurements demonstrate the feasibility of performing measurements of the Brownian relaxation response in a lab-on-a-chip system and constitute the first step towards an integrated...... biosensor based on the detection of the dynamic response of magnetic beads....

  17. Mobility assessment of a rural population in the Netherlands using GPS measurements

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Klous, Gijs; Smit, Lidwien A. M.; Borlée, Floor; Coutinho, Roel A.; Kretzschmar, Mirjam E. E.; Heederik, Dick J. J.; Huss, Anke

    2017-01-01

    The home address is a common spatial proxy for exposure assessment in epidemiological studies but mobility may introduce exposure misclassification. Mobility can be assessed using self-reports or objectively measured using GPS logging but self-reports may not assess the same information as measured

  18. Measuring the post-adoption customer perception of mobile banking services.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yu, Tai-Kuei; Fang, Kwoting

    2009-02-01

    With liberalization and internalization in the financial market and progress in information technology, banks face dual competitive pressures to provide service quality and administrative efficiency. That these recent developments are fueled by technology might misleadingly suggest that the adoption of mobile banking is largely based on technological criteria. The purpose of this study is to establish a better measurement model for postadoption user perception of mobile banking services. Based on 458 valid responses of mobile banking users, the results show that the instrument, consisting of 21 items and 6 factors, is a reliable, valid, and useful measurement for assessing the postadoption perception of mobile banking.

  19. Measuring mobile patient safety information system success: an empirical study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jen, Wen-Yuan; Chao, Chia-Cheng

    2008-10-01

    The Health Risk Reminders and Surveillance (HRRS) system was designed to deliver critical abnormal test results of severely ill patients from Laboratory, Radiology, and Pathology departments to physicians within 5 min using cell phone text messages. This paper explores the success of the HRRS system. This study employed an augmented version of the DeLone and McLean IS success model. Seven variables (system quality, information quality, system use, user satisfaction, mobile healthcare anxiety, impact on the individual and impact on the organization) were used to evaluate the success of the HRRS system. The interrelationships between the seven variables were hypothesized and the hypotheses were empirically tested. The results indicate that the information quality of the HRRS system is positively associated with both system use and user satisfaction. In addition, system use is positively associated with user satisfaction, which is also positively associated with mobile healthcare anxiety. Moreover, results indicate that impact on the individual is positively associated with both user satisfaction and mobile healthcare anxiety. Finally, the impact of the organization is positively associated with impact on the individual. The results of the study provide an expanded understanding of the factors that contribute to mobile patient safety information system (IS) success. Implications of the relationship between system use and physician mobile healthcare anxiety are discussed.

  20. Quadrupole magnetic mapping of the high resolution spectrometers of Thomas Jefferson National Accelerator Laboratory, Hall A. (Q.M.M. project: Quadrupole Magnetic Measurement)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Quemener, Gilles

    1997-01-01

    This thesis describes the magnetic measurements that have been performed on the superconducting quadrupoles of the High Resolution Spectrometers of TJNAF, Hall A (USA), which are designed to measure particle momentum up to 4 GeV.c -1 with a σp/p = 10 -4 resolution. The mapping method is based on rotating coil technique, the originality being a segmentation of the probe along the quad axis. Together with an accurate magnet modelling, the measurement of the flux variations through the set of rotating coils allows to determine the magnetic field at each point. We use the 3D field formalism, i.e., the Fourier-Bessel expansion of the field obtained by solving the Laplace equation. We describe the QMM method and then the apparatus consisting in two probes of length 1.6 m and 3.2 m built to map the three quadrupoles Q1, Q2, Q3. Data processing uses Fourier analysis. The mapping of the Electron Arm took place in situ in 1996. A first set of results concerns integral measurements including the properties of excitation cycle of the magnets (saturation and hysteresis). Second set of results in terms of local field yields the 3D field maps of the quadrupoles. After having applied corrections to the data we obtain a local field accuracy of 5 Gauss on each component, i.e. an uncertainty of 5.10 -4 relative to the quadrupole central field. We use SNAKE ray-tracing code with the implementation of QMM field maps and obtain preliminary results on HRS optics. (author)

  1. Hall probe magnetometer for SSC magnet cables

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cross, R.W.; Goldfarb, R.B.

    1991-01-01

    The authors of this paper constructed a Hall probe magnetometer to measure the magnetization hysteresis loops of Superconducting Super Collider magnet cables. The instrument uses two Hall-effect field sensors to measure the applied field H and the magnetic induction B. Magnetization M is calculated from the difference of the two quantities. The Hall probes are centered coaxially in the bore of a superconducting solenoid with the B probe against the sample's broad surface. An alternative probe arrangement, in which M is measured directly, aligns the sample probe parallel to the field. The authors measured M as a function of H and field cycle rate both with and without a dc transport current. Flux creep as a function of current was measured from the dependence of ac loss on the cycling rate and from the decay of magnetization with time. Transport currents up to 20% of the critical current have minimal effect on magnetization and flux creep

  2. Markets and policy measures in the evolution of electric mobility

    CERN Document Server

    Hülsmann, Michael

    2016-01-01

    This edited monograph collects theoretical, empirical and political contributions from different fields, focusing on the commercial launch of electric mobility, and intending to shed more light on the complexity of supply and demand. It is an ongoing discussion, both in the public as well as in academia, whether or not electric mobility is capable of gaining a considerable market share in the near future. The target audience primarily comprises researchers and practitioners in the field, but the book may also be beneficial for graduate students.

  3. Positron mobility in thermally grown SiO2 measured by Doppler broadening technique

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kong, Y.; Leung, T.C.; Asoka-Kumar, P.; Nielsen, B.; Lynn, K.G.

    1991-01-01

    The positron mobility in thermally grown SiO 2 is deduced from Doppler broadening lineshape data on a metal-oxide-semiconductor sample for positrons implanted into the oxide layer. The fitted mobility is ∼13(10)x10 -3 cm 2 /s V. This value is between that of the electron and hole mobilities in the same system and is two orders of magnitude smaller than the previous estimate from positron measurements

  4. Comparison of Various Similarity Measures for Average Image Hash in Mobile Phone Application

    Science.gov (United States)

    Farisa Chaerul Haviana, Sam; Taufik, Muhammad

    2017-04-01

    One of the main issue in Content Based Image Retrieval (CIBR) is similarity measures for resulting image hashes. The main key challenge is to find the most benefits distance or similarity measures for calculating the similarity in term of speed and computing costs, specially under limited computing capabilities device like mobile phone. This study we utilize twelve most common and popular distance or similarity measures technique implemented in mobile phone application, to be compared and studied. The results show that all similarity measures implemented in this study was perform equally under mobile phone application. This gives more possibilities for method combinations to be implemented for image retrieval.

  5. Enhancing Hole Mobility in III-V Semiconductors

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-05-21

    offset, and the identification of the dominant scattering mechanism. Section V reports on gated Hall bar measure- ments and mobility results. Finally, the...achieved using the AlAsxSb1x barrier (approach B) as compared to AlyGa1ySb barrier (approach A), which was also expected from the bulk band lineup in

  6. Identifying an outcome measure to assess the impact of Mobility Dogs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mudge, Suzie; Rewi, Dallas; Channon, Alexis

    2017-01-01

    Mobility Dogs® trains dogs to work with people with physical disabilities to increase independence, confidence, self-esteem and participation. Mobility Dogs® seeks to critically evaluate and improve its services as it grows. This study aimed to identify and implement a standardised outcome measure into practice at Mobility Dogs®. Based on the Consolidated Framework for Implementation Research and guided by a steering group of key stakeholders, a three-phase approach was developed to identify and assess an outcome measure. The steering group highlighted the organisation's specific needs, selected participation as the assessment domain and identified core utility requirements of the measure. A comprehensive review of evidence was undertaken to identify and rank potential measures according to the specified needs. Of the seven participation outcome measures that met inclusion criteria, the three highest ranked measures were critically evaluated by the steering group to determine suitability against the organisation's needs. The Impact on Participation and Autonomy (IPA) was selected for implementation into practice at Mobility Dogs®. Use of the IPA is an important first step for Mobility Dogs® to test the benefits of trained service dogs. This process could be replicated by other service dog organisations to identify outcome measures to assess their own services. Implications for Rehabilitation Service dogs (such as Mobility Dogs® in New Zealand) assist people living with physical impairments by performing tasks, however there is limited evidence on outcomes. The process for selecting an appropriate outcome measure for Mobility Dogs® involving partnership between Mobility Dogs® personnel and academics was an effective way to steer the project by determining important properties of the measure, before a search of the literature was undertaken. While the IPA was selected as the most appropriate outcome measure for use at Mobility Dogs®, it was the process that

  7. Pitfalls and Security Measures for the Mobile EMR System in Medical Facilities

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yeo, Kiho; Lee, Keehyuck; Kim, Jong-Min; Kim, Tae-Hun; Choi, Yong-Hoon; Jeong, Woo-Jin; Hwang, Hee; Baek, Rong Min

    2012-01-01

    Objectives The goal of this paper is to examine the security measures that should be reviewed by medical facilities that are trying to implement mobile Electronic Medical Record (EMR) systems designed for hospitals. Methods The study of the security requirements for a mobile EMR system is divided into legal considerations and sectional security investigations. Legal considerations were examined with regard to remote medical services, patients' personal information and EMR, medical devices, the establishment of mobile systems, and mobile applications. For the 4 sectional security investigations, the mobile security level SL-3 from the Smartphone Security Standards of the National Intelligence Service (NIS) was used. Results From a compliance perspective, legal considerations for various laws and guidelines of mobile EMR were executed according to the model of the legal considerations. To correspond to the SL-3, separation of DMZ and wireless network is needed. Mobile access servers must be located in only the smartphone DMZ. Furthermore, security measures like 24-hour security control, WIPS, VPN, MDM, and ISMS for each section are needed to establish a secure mobile EMR system. Conclusions This paper suggested a direction for applying regulatory measures to strengthen the security of a mobile EMR system in accordance with the standard security requirements presented by the Smartphone Security Guideline of the NIS. A future study on the materialization of these suggestions after their application at actual medical facilities can be used as an illustrative case to determine the degree to which theory and reality correspond with one another. PMID:22844648

  8. Pitfalls and Security Measures for the Mobile EMR System in Medical Facilities.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yeo, Kiho; Lee, Keehyuck; Kim, Jong-Min; Kim, Tae-Hun; Choi, Yong-Hoon; Jeong, Woo-Jin; Hwang, Hee; Baek, Rong Min; Yoo, Sooyoung

    2012-06-01

    The goal of this paper is to examine the security measures that should be reviewed by medical facilities that are trying to implement mobile Electronic Medical Record (EMR) systems designed for hospitals. The study of the security requirements for a mobile EMR system is divided into legal considerations and sectional security investigations. Legal considerations were examined with regard to remote medical services, patients' personal information and EMR, medical devices, the establishment of mobile systems, and mobile applications. For the 4 sectional security investigations, the mobile security level SL-3 from the Smartphone Security Standards of the National Intelligence Service (NIS) was used. From a compliance perspective, legal considerations for various laws and guidelines of mobile EMR were executed according to the model of the legal considerations. To correspond to the SL-3, separation of DMZ and wireless network is needed. Mobile access servers must be located in only the smartphone DMZ. Furthermore, security measures like 24-hour security control, WIPS, VPN, MDM, and ISMS for each section are needed to establish a secure mobile EMR system. This paper suggested a direction for applying regulatory measures to strengthen the security of a mobile EMR system in accordance with the standard security requirements presented by the Smartphone Security Guideline of the NIS. A future study on the materialization of these suggestions after their application at actual medical facilities can be used as an illustrative case to determine the degree to which theory and reality correspond with one another.

  9. Improved process control, lowered costs and reduced risks through the use of non-destructive mobility and sheet carrier density measurements on GaAs and GaN wafers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nguyen, D.; Hogan, K.; Blew, A.; Cordes, M.

    2004-12-01

    Improved process control, lowered costs and reduced risks can be realized through the use of non-destructive mobility and sheet charge density measurements during the fabrication of GaAs and GaN wafers. The results from this microwave-based technique are shown to agree with destructive van der Pauw Hall testing results to within ±5%. In addition, it has the ability to map wafer uniformity and provide separated 2DEG data for thick cap or multi-layered structures. As a result, this technique provides an efficient and cost-effective alternative to current process control metrology methods, while providing the user with important process control data.

  10. Comparison of diffusion charging and mobility-based methods for measurement of aerosol agglomerate surface area.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ku, Bon Ki; Kulkarni, Pramod

    2012-05-01

    We compare different approaches to measure surface area of aerosol agglomerates. The objective was to compare field methods, such as mobility and diffusion charging based approaches, with laboratory approach, such as Brunauer, Emmett, Teller (BET) method used for bulk powder samples. To allow intercomparison of various surface area measurements, we defined 'geometric surface area' of agglomerates (assuming agglomerates are made up of ideal spheres), and compared various surface area measurements to the geometric surface area. Four different approaches for measuring surface area of agglomerate particles in the size range of 60-350 nm were compared using (i) diffusion charging-based sensors from three different manufacturers, (ii) mobility diameter of an agglomerate, (iii) mobility diameter of an agglomerate assuming a linear chain morphology with uniform primary particle size, and (iv) surface area estimation based on tandem mobility-mass measurement and microscopy. Our results indicate that the tandem mobility-mass measurement, which can be applied directly to airborne particles unlike the BET method, agrees well with the BET method. It was also shown that the three diffusion charging-based surface area measurements of silver agglomerates were similar within a factor of 2 and were lower than those obtained from the tandem mobility-mass and microscopy method by a factor of 3-10 in the size range studied. Surface area estimated using the mobility diameter depended on the structure or morphology of the agglomerate with significant underestimation at high fractal dimensions approaching 3.

  11. Mobile measurement techniques for local and micro-scale studies in urban and topo-climatology

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Seidel, Jochen

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available Technical development during the last two decades has brought new potential and new applications for ­mobile measurements. In this paper, we present six case studies where mobile measurement devices were used to acquire data for meteorological and climatological research. Three case studies deal with ground-based mobile measurements – on buses for urban climate measurements and on a vessel on a lake – and three with airborne platforms – on a cable car and on an unmanned aerial vehicle for vertical soundings and on a tethered balloon sonde for cloud physics. For each study, we describe the measurement set-up and address the potential and drawbacks of these applications. At the end, we discuss general aspects related to mobile observations especially concerning the time and space dimension of measurements.

  12. Does Occupational Mobility Influence Health among Working Women? Comparing Objective and Subjective Measures of Work Trajectories

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wilkinson, Lindsay R.; Shippee, Tetyana P.; Ferraro, Kenneth F.

    2012-01-01

    Occupational mobility is highly valued in American society, but is it consequential to women's health? Previous studies have yielded inconsistent results, but most measured occupational mobility by identifying transitions across occupational categories. Drawing from cumulative inequality theory, this study (1) compares objective and subjective…

  13. Mobility assessment of a rural population in the Netherlands using GPS measurements

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Klous, Gijs; Smit, Lidwien A M; Borlée, Floor; Coutinho, Roel A; Kretzschmar, Mirjam E. E.; Heederik, Dick J J; Huss, Anke

    2017-01-01

    BACKGROUND: The home address is a common spatial proxy for exposure assessment in epidemiological studies but mobility may introduce exposure misclassification. Mobility can be assessed using self-reports or objectively measured using GPS logging but self-reports may not assess the same information

  14. Mobility assessment of a rural population in the Netherlands using GPS measurements.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Klous, G.; Smit, L.A.M.; Borlée, F.; Coutinho, R.A.; Kretzschmar, M.E.E.; Huss, A.

    2017-01-01

    Background: The home address is a common spatial proxy for exposure assessment in epidemiological studies but mobility may introduce exposure misclassification. Mobility can be assessed using self-reports or objectively measured using GPS logging but self-reports may not assess the same information

  15. Temperature dependences of the electrical conductivity and Hall coefficient of indium telluride single crystals

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hussein, S.A.

    1989-01-01

    Conductivity type, carrier concentration and carrier mobility of InTe samples grown by Bridgman technique were determined by the Hall effect and electrical conductivity measurements. The study was performed in the temperature range 150-480 K. Two samples with different growth rate were used in the investigation. The samples under test were P-type conducting, in accordance with previous measurements of undoped material. The Hall coefficient was found to be isotropic yielding room temperature hole concentration in the range 10 15 -10 16 cm -3 . The hole mobilities of InTe samples were in the range 1.17 x 10 3 -2.06 x 10 3 cm 2 /V · sec at room temperature. The band-gap of InTe determined from Hall coefficient studies has been obtained equal to 0.34 eV. The scattering mechanism was checked, and the electrical properties were found to be sensitive to the crystal growth rate. (author)

  16. Intrinsic superspin Hall current

    Science.gov (United States)

    Linder, Jacob; Amundsen, Morten; Risinggârd, Vetle

    2017-09-01

    We discover an intrinsic superspin Hall current: an injected charge supercurrent in a Josephson junction containing heavy normal metals and a ferromagnet generates a transverse spin supercurrent. There is no accompanying dissipation of energy, in contrast to the conventional spin Hall effect. The physical origin of the effect is an antisymmetric spin density induced among transverse modes ky near the interface of the superconductor arising due to the coexistence of p -wave and conventional s -wave superconducting correlations with a belonging phase mismatch. Our predictions can be tested in hybrid structures including thin heavy metal layers combined with strong ferromagnets and ordinary s -wave superconductors.

  17. Measurements of bridges' vibration characteristics using a mobile phone

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Z. M. C. Pravia

    Full Text Available ABSTRACTThis research presents an alternative way to perform a bridge inspection, which considers the dynamics parameters from the structure. It shows an experimental phase with use of a mobile phone to extract the accelerations answers from two concrete bridges, from those records is feasible to obtain natural frequencies using the Fast Fourier Transform (FFT.Numerical models with uses finite element model (FEM allow to determine the natural frequencies from the two concrete bridges and compare with the experimental phase of each one. The final results shows it's possible to use mobiles phones to extract vibration answers from concrete bridges and define the structural behavior of bridges from natural frequencies, this procedure could be used to evaluate bridges with lower costs.

  18. Performance Measurement for Mobile Forensic Data Acquisition in Firefox OS

    OpenAIRE

    Mohd Najwadi Yusoff; Ramlan Mahmod; Mohd Taufik Abdullah; Ali Dehghantanha

    2015-01-01

    Mozilla Corporation has recently released a Linux-based open source operating system, namely Firefox OS. The arrival of this Firefox OS has created new challenges, concentrations and opportunities for digital investigators. Currently, Firefox OS is still not fully supported by most of the existing mobile forensic tools. Even when the phone is detected as Android, only pictures from removable memory was able to be captured. Furthermore, the internal data acquisition is still not working. There...

  19. Measurement of power and energy consumption of a competition-mobile-robot

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tsung Tsing-Tshih

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Power and energy consumption are the two most important factors for successful operation; they also play important roles in performance identification. The measurement of power and energy consumption is a common test in the development process of a competition mobile robot. If the power of a competition mobile robot is not sufficient, the running time in the competition will be too long and winning the competition will not be possible. Thus, the power and energy consumption are basic and important measurement parameters for a competition mobile robot. In this paper, five types of hand-made competition mobile robots are successfully developed and their performances are measured. From the measurements, their powers and energy consumptions are evaluated and analyzed, respectively. The test results show large differences in the powers and energy consumptions of the five models, even though the same motors were used. The design and construction of the competition mobile robot are the key parameters that cause these huge differences. It is possible to develop the measurement techniques for power and energy consumption, quickly and precisely, to determine how to modify a competition mobile robot rapidly and efficiently to a condition optimal for a mobile robot competition.

  20. Lead Halide Perovskites as Charge Generation Layers for Electron Mobility Measurement in Organic Semiconductors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Love, John A; Feuerstein, Markus; Wolff, Christian M; Facchetti, Antonio; Neher, Dieter

    2017-12-06

    Hybrid lead halide perovskites are introduced as charge generation layers (CGLs) for the accurate determination of electron mobilities in thin organic semiconductors. Such hybrid perovskites have become a widely studied photovoltaic material in their own right, for their high efficiencies, ease of processing from solution, strong absorption, and efficient photogeneration of charge. Time-of-flight (ToF) measurements on bilayer samples consisting of the perovskite CGL and an organic semiconductor layer of different thickness are shown to be determined by the carrier motion through the organic material, consistent with the much higher charge carrier mobility in the perovskite. Together with the efficient photon-to-electron conversion in the perovskite, this high mobility imbalance enables electron-only mobility measurement on relatively thin application-relevant organic films, which would not be possible with traditional ToF measurements. This architecture enables electron-selective mobility measurements in single components as well as bulk-heterojunction films as demonstrated in the prototypical polymer/fullerene blends. To further demonstrate the potential of this approach, electron mobilities were measured as a function of electric field and temperature in an only 127 nm thick layer of a prototypical electron-transporting perylene diimide-based polymer, and found to be consistent with an exponential trap distribution of ca. 60 meV. Our study furthermore highlights the importance of high mobility charge transporting layers when designing perovskite solar cells.

  1. Developing and validating an instrument for measuring mobile computing self-efficacy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Yi-Shun; Wang, Hsiu-Yuan

    2008-08-01

    IT-related self-efficacy has been found to have a critical influence on system use. However, traditional measures of computer self-efficacy and Internet-related self-efficacy are perceived to be inapplicable in the context of mobile computing and commerce because they are targeted primarily at either desktop computer or wire-based technology contexts. Based on previous research, this study develops and validates a multidimensional instrument for measuring mobile computing self-efficacy (MCSE). This empirically validated instrument will be useful to researchers in developing and testing the theories of mobile user behavior, and to practitioners in assessing the mobile computing self-efficacy of users and promoting the use of mobile commerce systems.

  2. Temperature Gradient in Hall Thrusters

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Staack, D.; Raitses, Y.; Fisch, N.J.

    2003-01-01

    Plasma potentials and electron temperatures were deduced from emissive and cold floating probe measurements in a 2 kW Hall thruster, operated in the discharge voltage range of 200-400 V. An almost linear dependence of the electron temperature on the plasma potential was observed in the acceleration region of the thruster both inside and outside the thruster. This result calls into question whether secondary electron emission from the ceramic channel walls plays a significant role in electron energy balance. The proportionality factor between the axial electron temperature gradient and the electric field is significantly smaller than might be expected by models employing Ohmic heating of electrons

  3. The Monty Hall Dilemma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Granberg, Donald; Brown, Thad A.

    1995-01-01

    Examines people's behavior in the Monty Hall Dilemma (MHD), in which a person must make two decisions to win a prize. In a series of five studies, found that people misapprehend probabilities in the MHD. Discusses the MHD's relation to illusion of control, belief perseverance, and the status quo bias. (RJM)

  4. The Isolde experimental hall

    CERN Multimedia

    Laurent Guiraud

    2000-01-01

    General view of the Isotope-Separator On-Line (ISOLDE) hall. ISOLDE is dedicated to the production of a large variety of radioactive ion beams for many different experiments. Rare isotopes can be produced allowing the study of spectra for neutrino beam production.

  5. Hall Sweet Home

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oguntoyinbo, Lekan

    2011-01-01

    Many urban and commuter universities have their sights set on students who are unlikely to connect with the college and likely to fail unless the right strategies are put in place to help them graduate. In efforts to improve retention rates, commuter colleges are looking to an unusual suspect: residence halls. The author discusses how these…

  6. Anomalous Hall effect

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Nagaosa, N.; Sinova, Jairo; Onoda, S.; MacDonald, A. H.; Ong, N. P.

    2010-01-01

    Roč. 82, č. 2 (2010), s. 1539-1592 ISSN 0034-6861 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z10100521 Keywords : anomalous Hall effect * spintronics Subject RIV: BM - Solid Matter Physics ; Magnetism Impact factor: 51.695, year: 2010

  7. Developments in Scanning Hall Probe Microscopy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chouinard, Taras; Chu, Ricky; David, Nigel; Broun, David

    2009-05-01

    Low temperature scanning Hall probe microscopy is a sensitive means of imaging magnetic structures with high spatial resolution and magnetic flux sensitivity approaching that of a Superconducting Quantum Interference Device. We have developed a scanning Hall probe microscope with novel features, including highly reliable coarse positioning, in situ optimization of sensor-sample alignment and capacitive transducers for linear, long range positioning measurement. This has been motivated by the need to reposition accurately above fabricated nanostructures such as small superconducting rings. Details of the design and performance will be presented as well as recent progress towards time-resolved measurements with sub nanosecond resolution.

  8. Air temperature gradient in large industrial hall

    Science.gov (United States)

    Karpuk, Michał; Pełech, Aleksander; Przydróżny, Edward; Walaszczyk, Juliusz; Szczęśniak, Sylwia

    2017-11-01

    In the rooms with dominant sensible heat load, volume airflow depends on many factors incl. pre-established temperature difference between exhaust and supply airflow. As the temperature difference is getting higher, airflow volume drops down, consequently, the cost of AHU is reduced. In high industrial halls with air exhaust grids located under the ceiling additional temperature gradient above working zone should be taken into consideration. In this regard, experimental research of the vertical air temperature gradient in high industrial halls were carried out for the case of mixing ventilation system The paper presents the results of air temperature distribution measurements in high technological hall (mechanically ventilated) under significant sensible heat load conditions. The supply airflow was delivered to the hall with the help of the swirl diffusers while exhaust grids were located under the hall ceiling. Basing on the air temperature distribution measurements performed on the seven pre-established levels, air temperature gradient in the area between 2.0 and 7.0 m above the floor was calculated and analysed.

  9. Transportation management center data capture for performance and mobility measures guidebook.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-03-01

    The Guide to Transportation Management Center (TMC) Data Capture for Performance and Mobility Measures is a two-volume document consisting of this summary Guidebook and a Reference Manual. These documents provide technical guidance and recommended pr...

  10. Transportation management center data capture for performance and mobility measures reference manual.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-03-01

    The Guide to Transportation Management Center (TMC) Data Capture for Performance and Mobility Measures is a two-volume document consisting of a summary Guidebook and this Reference Manual. These documents provide technical guidance and recommended pr...

  11. Magnetoresistance and Hall resistivity of semimetal WTe2 ultrathin flakes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Luo, Xin; Fang, Chi; Wan, Caihua; Cai, Jialin; Liu, Yong; Han, Xiufeng; Lu, Zhihong; Shi, Wenhua; Xiong, Rui; Zeng, Zhongming

    2017-04-07

    This article reports the characterization of WTe 2 thin flake magnetoresistance and Hall resistivity. We found it does not exhibit magnetoresistance saturation when subject to high fields, in a manner similar to their bulk characteristics. The linearity of Hall resistivity in our devices confirms the compensation of electrons and holes. By relating experimental results to a classic two-band model, the lower magnetoresistance values in our samples is demonstrated to be caused by decreased carrier mobility. The dependence of mobility on temperature indicates the main role of optical phonon scattering at high temperatures. Our results provide more detailed information on carrier behavior and scattering mechanisms in WTe 2 thin films.

  12. Mobility assessment of a rural population in the Netherlands using GPS measurements.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Klous, Gijs; Smit, Lidwien A M; Borlée, Floor; Coutinho, Roel A; Kretzschmar, Mirjam E E; Heederik, Dick J J; Huss, Anke

    2017-08-09

    The home address is a common spatial proxy for exposure assessment in epidemiological studies but mobility may introduce exposure misclassification. Mobility can be assessed using self-reports or objectively measured using GPS logging but self-reports may not assess the same information as measured mobility. We aimed to assess mobility patterns of a rural population in the Netherlands using GPS measurements and self-reports and to compare GPS measured to self-reported data, and to evaluate correlates of differences in mobility patterns. In total 870 participants filled in a questionnaire regarding their transport modes and carried a GPS-logger for 7 consecutive days. Transport modes were assigned to GPS-tracks based on speed patterns. Correlates of measured mobility data were evaluated using multiple linear regression. We calculated walking, biking and motorised transport durations based on GPS and self-reported data and compared outcomes. We used Cohen's kappa analyses to compare categorised self-reported and GPS measured data for time spent outdoors. Self-reported time spent walking and biking was strongly overestimated when compared to GPS measurements. Participants estimated their time spent in motorised transport accurately. Several variables were associated with differences in mobility patterns, we found for instance that obese people (BMI > 30 kg/m 2 ) spent less time in non-motorised transport (GMR 0.69-0.74) and people with COPD tended to travel longer distances from home in motorised transport (GMR 1.42-1.51). If time spent walking outdoors and biking is relevant for the exposure to environmental factors, then relying on the home address as a proxy for exposure location may introduce misclassification. In addition, this misclassification is potentially differential, and specific groups of people will show stronger misclassification of exposure than others. Performing GPS measurements and identifying explanatory factors of mobility patterns may assist

  13. Mobile equipment for measurement of gamma radiation; Mobilt maaleutstyr for maaling av gammastraaling

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    2009-07-01

    NRPA has several systems to perform mobile measurements. One of the systems consists of detectors mounted on the roof of a car. Mobile systems can be used to map the radioactive contamination of large areas in a short time, to the reference measurements and to search for sources astray. The systems can be mounted on the vehicle or used in a helicopter or airplane. (AG)

  14. Applying the Rasch Model to Measure Mobility of Women: A Comparative Analysis of Mobility of Informal Workers in Fisheries in Kerala, India.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Menon, Nikhila

    2016-01-01

    Mobility or freedom and ability to move is gendered in many cultural contexts. In this paper I analyse mobility associated with work from the capability approach perspective of Sen. This is an empirical paper which uses the Rasch Rating Scale Model (RSM) to construct the measure of mobility of women for the first time in the development studies discourse. I construct a measure of mobility (latent trait) of women workers engaged in two types of informal work, namely, peeling work and fish vending, in fisheries in the cultural context of India. The scale measure enables first, to test the unidimensionality of my construct of mobility of women and second, to analyse the domains of mobility of women workers. The comparative analysis of the scale of permissibility of mobility constructed using the RSM for the informal women workers shows that women face constraints on mobility in social and personal spaces in the socially advanced state of Kerala in India. Work mobility does not expand the real freedoms, hence work mobility can be termed as bounded capability which is a capability limited or bounded by either the social, cultural and gender norms or a combination of all of these. Therefore at the macro level, growth in informal employment in sectors like fisheries which improve mobility of women through work mobility does not necessarily expand the capability sets by contributing to greater freedoms and transformational mobility. This paper has a significant methodological contribution in that it uses an innovative method for the measurement of mobility of women in the development studies discipline.

  15. Radionuclide measuring systems and improved methods of evaluation for the measurement of wear in stationary and mobile systems

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lausch, W.

    1976-01-01

    A newly developped flow through measuring unit makes it possible to perform continuous wear measurements on stationary and mobile systems. It was specifically designed for measurements on engine components of passenger cars. For tests of long duration an oil sampling technique was developed. Fully automated measurements are achieved with a sampling device suitable for both stationary and mobile systems. For systems with oil consumption a mathematical model provides for the necessary connection of the loss of wear particles through oil consumption. In certain cases an empirical graphical method can achieve nearly the same results. (orig.) [de

  16. On the use of mobile phones and wearable microphones for noise exposure measurements: Calibration and measurement accuracy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dumoulin, Romain

    Despite the fact that noise-induced hearing loss remains the number one occupational disease in developed countries, individual noise exposure levels are still rarely known and infrequently tracked. Indeed, efforts to standardize noise exposure levels present disadvantages such as costly instrumentation and difficulties associated with on site implementation. Given their advanced technical capabilities and widespread daily usage, mobile phones could be used to measure noise levels and make noise monitoring more accessible. However, the use of mobile phones for measuring noise exposure is currently limited due to the lack of formal procedures for their calibration and challenges regarding the measurement procedure. Our research investigated the calibration of mobile phone-based solutions for measuring noise exposure using a mobile phone's built-in microphones and wearable external microphones. The proposed calibration approach integrated corrections that took into account microphone placement error. The corrections were of two types: frequency-dependent, using a digital filter and noise level-dependent, based on the difference between the C-weighted noise level minus A-weighted noise level of the noise measured by the phone. The electro-acoustical limitations and measurement calibration procedure of the mobile phone were investigated. The study also sought to quantify the effect of noise exposure characteristics on the accuracy of calibrated mobile phone measurements. Measurements were carried out in reverberant and semi-anechoic chambers with several mobiles phone units of the same model, two types of external devices (an earpiece and a headset with an in-line microphone) and an acoustical test fixture (ATF). The proposed calibration approach significantly improved the accuracy of the noise level measurements in diffuse and free fields, with better results in the diffuse field and with ATF positions causing little or no acoustic shadowing. Several sources of errors

  17. Acoustics in rock and pop music halls

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Larsen, Niels Werner; Thompson, Eric Robert; Gade, Anders Christian

    2007-01-01

    The existing body of literature regarding the acoustic design of concert halls has focused almost exclusively on classical music, although there are many more performances of rhythmic music, including rock and pop. Objective measurements were made of the acoustics of twenty rock music venues...... in Denmark and a questionnaire was used in a subjective assessment of those venues with professional rock musicians and sound engineers. Correlations between the objective and subjective results lead, among others, to a recommendation for reverberation time as a function of hall volume. Since the bass...

  18. Understanding and Interrupting Hegemonic Projects in Education: Learning from Stuart Hall

    Science.gov (United States)

    Apple, Michael W.

    2015-01-01

    Stuart Hall had a significant impact on critical analyses of rightist mobilizations in education. This is very visible in my own work, for example, in such volumes as "Official Knowledge" (2014) and "Educating the 'Right' Way" (2006). After describing an important series of lectures that Stuart Hall gave at the Havens Center…

  19. Paired Hall states

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Greiter, M.

    1992-01-01

    This dissertation contains a collection of individual articles on various topics. Their significance in the corresponding field as well as connections between them are emphasized in a general and comprehensive introduction. In the first article, the author explores the consequences for macroscopic effective Lagrangians of assuming that the momentum density is proportional to the flow of conserved current. The universal corrections obtained for the macroscopic Lagrangian of a superconductor describe the London Hall effect, and provide a fully consistent derivation of it. In the second article, a heuristic principle is proposed for quantized Hall states: the existence and incompressibility of fractionally quantized Hall states is explained by an argument based on an adiabatic localization of magnetic flux, the process of trading uniform flux for an equal amount of fictitious flux attached to the particles. This principle is exactly implemented in the third article. For a certain class of model Hamiltonians, the author obtains Laughlin's Jastrow type wave functions explicitly from a filled Landau level, by smooth extrapolation in quantum statistics. The generalization of this analysis to the torus geometry shows that theorems restricting the possibilities of quantum statistics on closed surfaces are circumvented in the presence of a magnetic field. In the last article, the existence is proposed of a novel incompressible quantum liquid, a paired Hall state, at a half filled Landau level. This state arises adiabatically from free fermions in zero magnetic field, and reduces to a state previously proposed by Halperin in the limit of tightly bound pairs. It supports unusual excitations, including neutral fermions and charge e/4 anyons with statistical parameter θ = π/8

  20. Topological honeycomb magnon Hall effect: A calculation of thermal Hall conductivity of magnetic spin excitations

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Owerre, S. A., E-mail: solomon@aims.ac.za [African Institute for Mathematical Sciences, 6 Melrose Road, Muizenberg, Cape Town 7945, South Africa and Perimeter Institute for Theoretical Physics, 31 Caroline St. N., Waterloo, Ontario N2L 2Y5 (Canada)

    2016-07-28

    Quite recently, the magnon Hall effect of spin excitations has been observed experimentally on the kagome and pyrochlore lattices. The thermal Hall conductivity κ{sup xy} changes sign as a function of magnetic field or temperature on the kagome lattice, and κ{sup xy} changes sign upon reversing the sign of the magnetic field on the pyrochlore lattice. Motivated by these recent exciting experimental observations, we theoretically propose a simple realization of the magnon Hall effect in a two-band model on the honeycomb lattice. The magnon Hall effect of spin excitations arises in the usual way via the breaking of inversion symmetry of the lattice, however, by a next-nearest-neighbour Dzyaloshinsky-Moriya interaction. We find that κ{sup xy} has a fixed sign for all parameter regimes considered. These results are in contrast to the Lieb, kagome, and pyrochlore lattices. We further show that the low-temperature dependence on the magnon Hall conductivity follows a T{sup 2} law, as opposed to the kagome and pyrochlore lattices. These results suggest an experimental procedure to measure thermal Hall conductivity within a class of 2D honeycomb quantum magnets and ultracold atoms trapped in a honeycomb optical lattice.

  1. Nondestructive measurement of the mobility in semiconductors by means of the microwave Faraday effect

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Musil, F.; Zacek, F.; Buerger, A.; Karlovsky, J.

    1976-01-01

    The measurement is described of electron mobility in semiconducting plates placed between two cylindrical antennas with diameter d approximately equal to 0.75lambda 0 by means of the microwave Faraday effect. This system makes it possible (i) to measure the Faraday rotation in semiconductina plates of arbitrary transverse dimensions, greater or at least equal to the diameter of dielectric antennas, (ii) to evaluate the unknown value of the charge carrier mobility from the measured rotation in an unbounded solid state plasma slab approximation. The measurement of Faraday rotation in n-type Ge plates is reported. The comparison of the experimental data with the theory shows good agreement. (author)

  2. Quantum critical Hall exponents

    CERN Document Server

    Lütken, C A

    2014-01-01

    We investigate a finite size "double scaling" hypothesis using data from an experiment on a quantum Hall system with short range disorder [1-3]. For Hall bars of width w at temperature T the scaling form is w(-mu)T(-kappa), where the critical exponent mu approximate to 0.23 we extract from the data is comparable to the multi-fractal exponent alpha(0) - 2 obtained from the Chalker-Coddington (CC) model [4]. We also use the data to find the approximate location (in the resistivity plane) of seven quantum critical points, all of which closely agree with the predictions derived long ago from the modular symmetry of a toroidal sigma-model with m matter fields [5]. The value nu(8) = 2.60513 ... of the localisation exponent obtained from the m = 8 model is in excellent agreement with the best available numerical value nu(num) = 2.607 +/- 0.004 derived from the CC-model [6]. Existing experimental data appear to favour the m = 9 model, suggesting that the quantum Hall system is not in the same universality class as th...

  3. Measuring Problematic Mobile Phone Use: Development and Preliminary Psychometric Properties of the PUMP Scale

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lisa J. Merlo

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available This study aimed to develop and assess the psychometric properties of an English language measure of problematic mobile phone use. Participants were recruited from a university campus, health science center, and other public locations. The sample included 244 individuals (68.4% female aged 18–75. Results supported a unidimensional factor structure for the 20-item self-report Problematic Use of Mobile Phones (PUMP Scale. Internal consistency was excellent (α=0.94. Strong correlations (r=.76, P<.001 were found between the PUMP Scale and an existing scale of cellular phone dependency that was validated in Asia, as well as items assessing frequency and intensity of mobile phone use. Results provide preliminary support for the use of the PUMP Scale to measure problematic use of mobile phones.

  4. Construction of Time-Stamped Mobility Map for Path Tracking via Smith-Waterman Measurement Matching

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mu Zhou

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Path tracking in wireless and mobile environments is a fundamental technology for ubiquitous location-based services (LBSs. In particular, it is very challenging to develop highly accurate and cost-efficient tracking systems applied to the anonymous areas where the floor plans are not available for security and privacy reasons. This paper proposes a novel path tracking approach for large Wi-Fi areas based on the time-stamped unlabeled mobility map which is constructed from Smith-Waterman received signal strength (RSS measurement matching. Instead of conventional location fingerprinting, we construct mobility map with the technique of dimension reduction from the raw measurement space into a low-dimensional embedded manifold. The feasibility of our proposed approach is verified by the real-world experiments in the HKUST campus Wi-Fi networks, sMobileNet. The experimental results prove that our approach is adaptive and capable of achieving an adequate precision level in path tracking.

  5. Evaluation efficiency for mobile as discharge measurement device for partially filled circular channel

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    I.M.H. Rashwan

    2013-06-01

    Full Text Available Discharge measurement is an important step in engineering applications such as sewerage system, irrigation and drainage system. Mobile flume is a simple and low-cost discharge measuring device constructed of two pieces of pipes, one installed vertically inside the other. The circular mobile flume depends on the concept of developing a contracted zone to have a control section. To evaluate the efficiency of this type of device mathematical and experimental studies are presented. Specific energy, discharge and Froude number equations are used to develop mathematical model. Experimental work is carried out to measure the discharge values corresponding to the specific energy values. The experimental data is used to evaluate the mobile flume as a device to measure discharge. A new equation for the discharge coefficient is presented. This equation can be used to determined accurate discharge with knowing the contraction ratio and measured specific energy.

  6. A Tool for Appraising Mobility Environment with a Percept Based Index Measure

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    AbdulMajeed Olaremi Shittu

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available Diverse methods, approaches and models have been employed in explaining mobility in both the urban and human context. However, there has been the ever-present drawback premised on data unavailability, “dyrtiness” or scantiness. More so, the techniques and parameters used, does not provide clues about mobility complexities engendered by attributes of “mobility environments”, as a result, determinants of mobility complexities are hardly fully described. To narrow the gap, it is conjectured that systematic evaluation of traveler perception of “mobility environments”, may provide hints about the degree to which specified spatial units enhance or hinder mobility, by rating such environment with a perception based index construct we hope will help improve assessments of “mobility environments”. This need is underscored by the necessity to explore alternative decision support tools, for mobility evaluations, especially where it may be implausible to apply advanced, high end, data hungry models of mobility evaluation. The method involved a two-pronged survey of transport professionals and randomly selected travelers. The professionals helped with “mobility environment” attributes identification and selection of contextually relevant ones from a list of potential attributes of influence, extracted from relevant literature using the Delphi method. Randomly selected travelers were in turn presented with the short listed attributes for rating on a five point Likert scale. Ratings were then used to determine attribute rankings and their commensurate index equivalents, as a basis for classification. Travelers indicated that a high activity mix, high road and pedestrian network density are good mobility enhancing qualities a city should possess. However, aggregate indexing indicated that enhancing development characteristics, mode characteristics, travel and economic attributes, are the most important for the study area. The measures are

  7. MIMO channel measurements using optical links on small mobile terminals

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Yanakiev, Boyan; Nielsen, Jesper Ødum; Pedersen, Gert Frølund

    2010-01-01

    This paper looks at a novel measurement device for propagation channel measurements using a fiber optic link. Although the idea of using optical links is not new, most of the developments in the area are either too big [5], short range [6] or suitable for anechoic chamber only [7]. The device...... presented here is specifically designed to fit in a very small volume and is optimized for low power consumption (runs on small battery), thus imitating the phone electronics. It can be used for anechoic chamber measurements, however it is designed for long range channel sounding measurements....

  8. Room acoustic properties of concert halls

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Gade, Anders Christian

    1996-01-01

    A large database of values of various room acoustic parameters has provided the basis for statistical analyses of how and how much the acoustic properties of concert halls are influenced by their size, shape, and absorption area (as deduced from measured reverberation time). The data have been...

  9. Measuring Problematic Mobile Phone Use: Development and Preliminary Psychometric Properties of the PUMP Scale

    OpenAIRE

    Merlo, Lisa J.; Stone, Amanda M.; Bibbey, Alex

    2013-01-01

    This study aimed to develop and assess the psychometric properties of an English language measure of problematic mobile phone use. Participants were recruited from a university campus, health science center, and other public locations. The sample included 244 individuals (68.4% female) aged 18–75. Results supported a unidimensional factor structure for the 20-item self-report Problematic Use of Mobile Phones (PUMP) Scale. Internal consistency was excellent (α = 0.94). Strong correlations (r =...

  10. Husbandry Emissions Estimation: Fusion of Mobile Surface and Airborne Remote Sensing and Mobile Surface In Situ Measurements

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leifer, I.; Hall, J. L.; Melton, C.; Tratt, D. M.; Chang, C. S.; Buckland, K. N.; Frash, J.; Leen, J. B.; Van Damme, M.; Clarisse, L.

    2017-12-01

    Emissions of methane and ammonia from intensive animal husbandry are important drivers of climate and photochemical and aerosol pollution. Husbandry emission estimates are somewhat uncertain because of their dependence on practices, temperature, micro-climate, and other factors, leading to variations in emission factors up to an order-of-magnitude. Mobile in situ measurements are increasingly being applied to derive trace gas emissions by Gaussian plume inversion; however, inversion with incomplete information can lead to erroneous emissions and incorrect source location. Mobile in situ concentration and wind data and mobile remote sensing column data from the Chino Dairy Complex in the Los Angeles Basin were collected near simultaneously (within 1-10 s, depending on speed) while transecting plumes, approximately orthogonal to winds. This analysis included airborne remote sensing trace gas information. MISTIR collected vertical column FTIR data simultaneously with in situ concentration data acquired by the AMOG-Surveyor while both vehicles traveled in convoy. The column measurements are insensitive to the turbulence characterization needed in Gaussian plume inversion of concentration data and thus provide a flux reference for evaluating in situ data inversions. Four different approaches were used on inversions for a single dairy, and also for the aggregate dairy complex plume. Approaches were based on differing levels of "knowledge" used in the inversion from solely the in situ platform and a single gas to a combination of information from all platforms and multiple gases. Derived dairy complex fluxes differed significantly from those estimated by other studies of the Chino complex. Analysis of long term satellite data showed that this most likely results from seasonality effects, highlighting the pitfalls of applying annualized extensions of flux measurements to a single campaign instantiation.

  11. Hall effect and photoconductivity lifetime studies of gallium nitride, indium nitride, and mercury cadmium telluride

    Science.gov (United States)

    Swartz, Craig H.

    A deep understanding of both carrier recombination and transport is necessary for semiconductor engineering, particularly in defining the ultimate limits of performance for a given device before spending the resources to perfect its fabrication. Hall effect measurements utilizing a variable magnetic field are necessary to discriminate between conduction in epitaxial layers and conduction originating at the surface or at an interfacial layer. For thick hydride vapor phase epitaxy (HVPE) grown GaN, variable field Hall measurements revealed the presence of small but significant lower mobility surface and interface electrons which would otherwise lead to errors in interpreting the electrical properties. In addition, QMSA analysis of the measurements indicates that thick GaN samples contain a large spread in electron mobility values, most likely with depth. For molecular beam epitaxial InN, it was found that electrical measurements are affected by surface charge conduction, as well as the non-uniformity of mobility and carrier concentration with depth. Both of these effects mask the surprisingly high quality of the material close to the surface. Photoconductance lifetime and variable-magnetic-field Hall and transient measurements were performed on a series of undoped, In-doped and As-doped HgCdTe grown by MBE and MOCVD. N-type layers often significantly influence the interpretation of the electrical measurements. Even the best Low Wavelength Infrared (LWIR) n-type material still appears to be dominated by defect-related recombination, as intrinsic lifetimes calculated with full band structure can be well above those measured. Mid-Wavelength Infrared (MWIR) lifetimes increase somewhat with carrier concentration, as if the n-type doping process were passivating Schockley-Read-Hall (SRH) defects. P-type MWIR films lie mainly below the predicted values, and their relationship between concentration and lifetime is essentially unchanged by growth technique, indicating that a

  12. Topological Hall and Spin Hall Effects in Disordered Skyrmionic Textures

    OpenAIRE

    N'diaye, P. B.; Akosa, C. A.; Manchon, A.

    2016-01-01

    We carry out a throughout study of the topological Hall and topological spin Hall effects in disordered skyrmionic systems: the dimensionless (spin) Hall angles are evaluated across the energy band structure in the multiprobe Landauer-B\\"uttiker formalism and their link to the effective magnetic field emerging from the real space topology of the spin texture is highlighted. We discuss these results for an optimal skyrmion size and for various sizes of the sample and found that the adiabatic a...

  13. Field effect measurements on charge carrier mobilities in various polymer-fullerene blend compositions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hauff, Elizabeth von; Parisi, Juergen; Dyakonov, Vladimir

    2006-01-01

    In this study we investigated materials typically used in polymer photovoltaics. Field effect measurements were performed in order to determine the hole mobilities in the conjugated polymer poly(3-hexylthiophene) (P3HT) and the electron mobilities in the methanofullerene[6,6]-phenyl C 61 -butyric acid methyl ester (PCBM), and, particularly, in the polymer-fullerene composite blends. Regarding the pure films, electron mobilities in PCBM were found to be in the 10 -2 cm 2 /Vs range, and hole mobilities in P3HT were found to be in the 10 -3 cm2/Vs range. In the PCBM:P3HT blends, it was found that varying the PCBM content in PCBM:P3HT blends led to a steep increase in electron mobility with increasing PCBM content, while the hole mobility was found to slightly decrease with the increasing PCBM concentration. In 2:1 PCBM:P3HT tempered blends, the charge carrier mobilities were found to be roughly balanced, at 10 -3 cm 2 /Vs. For improved electron transport in the blends, tempering was found to be crucial

  14. Energy and Power Measurements for Network Coding in the Context of Green Mobile Clouds

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Paramanathan, Achuthan; Pedersen, Morten Videbæk; Roetter, Daniel Enrique Lucani

    2013-01-01

    results for inter-session network coding in Open-Mesh routers underline that the energy invested in performing network coding pays off by dramatically reducing the total energy for the transmission of data over wireless links. We also show measurements for intra-session network coding in three different......This paper presents an in-depth power and energy measurement campaign for inter- and intra-session network coding enabled communication in mobile clouds. The measurements are carried out on different commercial platforms with focus on routers and mobile phones with different CPU capabilities. Our...

  15. Characterization of GaAs and hetero-structures of GaAs-(AlGa)As films, by Hall effect

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Diniz, R.P.

    1989-08-01

    Hall effect measurements were performed on a series of semiconductor gallium arsenide (GaAs) films, intentionally or unitentionally doped, grown by molecular beam epitaxy (MBE). These measurements made possible both the evaluation of the films quality and the calibration of the dopants (Si and Be) effusion cells on the growing machine. Measurements on modulation doped single interface heterostructures also grown by MBE followed. The two dimensional electron gas in the heterostructures shows low temperature high mobility. The application of a strong magnetic field perpendicular to the plane of the gas eliminated its degrees of freedom completely and permitted the observation of Schubnikov-deHaas oscillations and integer quantum Hall effect. During the work we have deviced and developed apparatus in order to make ohmic contacts and perform litography to semiconductors. (author) [pt

  16. A sensorless method for measuring the point mobility of mechanical structures

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boulandet, R.; Michau, M.; Herzog, P.; Micheau, P.; Berry, A.

    2016-09-01

    This paper presents a convenient and cost-effective experimental tool for measuring the mobility characteristics of a mechanical structure. The objective is to demonstrate that the point mobility measurement can be performed using only an electrodynamic inertial exciter. Unlike previous work based on voice coil actuators, no load cell or accelerometer is needed. Instead, it is theoretically shown that the mobility characteristics of the structure can be estimated from variations in the electrical input impedance of the actuator fixed onto it, provided that the electromechanical parameters of the actuator are known. The proof of concept is made experimentally using a cheap commercially available actuator on a simply supported plate, leading to a good dynamic range from 100 Hz to 1 kHz. The methodology to assess the basic parameters of the actuator is also given. Measured data are compared to a standard shaker testing and the strengths and weaknesses of the sensorless mobility measuring device are discussed. It is believed that this sensorless mobility measuring device can be a convenient experimental tool to determine the dynamic characteristics of a wide range of mechanical structures.

  17. Hall Effect Influence on a Highly Conducting Fluid

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Witalis, E A

    1966-11-15

    The properties of an incompressible perfect fluid exhibiting Hall effect is investigated in the limit of infinite electrical conductivity and mobility. The magnetic field strength and the fluid velocity are found to obey the equations B = {mu}{rho}/{sigma} x curlV and V -{mu}/({sigma}{mu}{sub 0}) x curlB (MKS units) where {rho}, {sigma} and {mu} denote mass density, conductivity and charge carrier mobility. Some physical interpretations and applications are given.

  18. Hall Effect Influence on a Highly Conducting Fluid

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Witalis, E.A.

    1966-11-01

    The properties of an incompressible perfect fluid exhibiting Hall effect is investigated in the limit of infinite electrical conductivity and mobility. The magnetic field strength and the fluid velocity are found to obey the equations B = μρ/σ x curlV and V -μ/(σμ 0 ) x curlB (MKS units) where ρ, σ and μ denote mass density, conductivity and charge carrier mobility. Some physical interpretations and applications are given

  19. Electron and hole drift mobility measurements on methylammonium lead iodide perovskite solar cells

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Maynard, Brian; Long, Qi; Schiff, Eric A. [Department of Physics, Syracuse University, Syracuse, New York 13244 (United States); Yang, Mengjin; Zhu, Kai [National Renewable Energy Laboratory, Golden, Colorado 80401 (United States); Kottokkaran, Ranjith; Abbas, Hisham; Dalal, Vikram L. [Iowa State University, Ames, Iowa 50011 (United States)

    2016-04-25

    We report nanosecond domain time-of-flight measurements of electron and hole photocarriers in methylammonium lead iodide perovskite solar cells. The mobilities ranged from 0.06 to 1.4 cm{sup 2}/Vs at room temperature, but there is little systematic difference between the two carriers. We also find that the drift mobilities are dispersive (time-dependent). The dispersion parameters are in the range of 0.4–0.7, and they imply that terahertz domain mobilities will be much larger than nanosecond domain mobilities. The temperature-dependences of the dispersion parameters are consistent with confinement of electron and hole transport to fractal-like spatial networks within nanoseconds of their photogeneration.

  20. Measurement of negative ion mobilities in O2 and O3 mixtures at atmospheric pressure

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Itoh, H.; Norimoto, K.; Hayashi, T.

    1998-01-01

    Mobility measurements of negative molecular oxygen ions in pure oxygen and in an oxygen-ozone mixture are reported. A cascaded gap consisting of an ion drift gap and an ion detection gap was used in the experiment. The ion detection gap was formed by a positive point and a grounded plane electrode was operated at atmospheric pressure. The zero field mobility of negative molecular oxygen ions was determined to be 2.07+-0.02 cm 2 /V.s. A somewhat higher value of oxygen mobility was found at higher electric field/pressure ratios; this is presumed to be due to negative ozone ions. When changing the electric field/pressure ratio the mobility of negative oxygen ions in oxygen-ozone mixtures becomes smaller than that in pure oxygen; this is probably due to the cumulative effect of other particles produced by silent discharges. (J.U.)

  1. Quantum hall effect. A perspective

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Aoki, Hideo

    2006-01-01

    Novel concepts and phenomena are emerging recently in the physics of quantum Hall effect. This article gives an overview, which starts from the fractional quantum Hall system viewed as an extremely strongly correlated system, and move on to present various phenomena involving internal degrees of freedom (spin and layer), non-equilibrium and optical properties, and finally the spinoff to anomalous Hall effect and the rotating Bose-Einstein condensate. (author)

  2. Development of an Algorithm for Heart Rate Measurement Using a Mobile Phone Camera

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    D. A. Laure

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Nowadays there exist many different ways to measure a person’s heart rate. One of them assumes the usage of a mobile phone built-in camera. This method is easy to use and does not require any additional skills or special devices for heart rate measurement. It requires only a mobile cellphone with a built-in camera and a flash. The main idea of the method is to detect changes in finger skin color that occur due to blood pulsation. The measurement process is simple: the user covers the camera lens with a finger and the application on the mobile phone starts catching and analyzing frames from the camera. Heart rate can be calculated by analyzing average red component values of frames taken by the mobile cellphone camera that contain images of an area of the skin.In this paper the authors review the existing algorithms for heart rate measurement with the help of a mobile phone camera and propose their own algorithm which is more efficient than the reviewed algorithms.

  3. Determination of grain boundary mobility during recrystallization by statistical evaluation of electron backscatter diffraction measurements

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Basu, I.; Chen, M.; Loeck, M.; Al-Samman, T.; Molodov, D.A.

    2016-01-01

    One of the key aspects influencing microstructural design pathways in metallic systems is grain boundary motion. The present work introduces a method by means of which direct measurement of grain boundary mobility vs. misorientation dependence is made possible. The technique utilizes datasets acquired by means of serial electron backscatter diffraction (EBSD) measurements. The experimental EBSD measurements are collectively analyzed, whereby datasets were used to obtain grain boundary mobility and grain aspect ratio with respect to grain boundary misorientation. The proposed method is further validated using cellular automata (CA) simulations. Single crystal aluminium was cold rolled and scratched in order to nucleate random orientations. Subsequent annealing at 300 °C resulted in grains growing, in the direction normal to the scratch, into a single deformed orientation. Growth selection was observed, wherein the boundaries with misorientations close to Σ7 CSL orientation relationship (38° 〈111〉) migrated considerably faster. The obtained boundary mobility distribution exhibited a non-monotonic behavior with a maximum corresponding to misorientation of 38° ± 2° about 〈111〉 axes ± 4°, which was 10–100 times higher than the mobility values of random high angle boundaries. Correlation with the grain aspect ratio values indicated a strong growth anisotropy displayed by the fast growing grains. The observations have been discussed in terms of the influence of grain boundary character on grain boundary motion during recrystallization. - Highlights: • Statistical microstructure method to measure grain boundary mobility during recrystallization • Method implementation independent of material or crystal structure • Mobility of the Σ7 boundaries in 5N Al was calculated as 4.7 × 10"–"8 m"4/J ⋅ s. • Pronounced growth selection in the recrystallizing nuclei in Al • Boundary mobility values during recrystallization 2–3 orders of magnitude

  4. Measuring Digital Signage ROI : A combination of Digital Signage and Mobile Advertising as a method for measuring Digtal Signage ROI

    OpenAIRE

    Helander, Fredrik

    2010-01-01

    Marketing has changed a lot the past decade. New modern marketing channels have been developed and marketing have become more effective. This has affected the expectations advertisers have on advertising channels. One thing advertisers increasingly expect is to be able to efficiently measure the result of advertising, the ROI. A method for measuring ROI of digital signage is in focus in this study. The measurement is enabled by a combination of digital signage and mobile advertising. First a ...

  5. Spin Hall effect transistor

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Wunderlich, Joerg; Park, B.G.; Irvine, A.C.; Zarbo, Liviu; Rozkotová, E.; Němec, P.; Novák, Vít; Sinova, Jairo; Jungwirth, Tomáš

    2010-01-01

    Roč. 330, č. 6012 (2010), s. 1801-1804 ISSN 0036-8075 R&D Projects: GA AV ČR KAN400100652; GA MŠk LC510 EU Projects: European Commission(XE) 215368 - SemiSpinNet Grant - others:AV ČR(CZ) AP0801 Program:Akademická prémie - Praemium Academiae Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z10100521 Keywords : spin Hall effect * spintronics * spin transistor Subject RIV: BM - Solid Matter Physics ; Magnetism Impact factor: 31.364, year: 2010

  6. Spin Hall effect on a noncommutative space

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ma Kai; Dulat, Sayipjamal

    2011-01-01

    We study the spin-orbital interaction and the spin Hall effect of an electron moving on a noncommutative space under the influence of a vector potential A(vector sign). On a noncommutative space, we find that the commutator between the vector potential A(vector sign) and the electric potential V 1 (r(vector sign)) of the lattice induces a new term, which can be treated as an effective electric field, and the spin Hall conductivity obtains some correction. On a noncommutative space, the spin current and spin Hall conductivity have distinct values in different directions, and depend explicitly on the noncommutative parameter. Once this spin Hall conductivity in different directions can be measured experimentally with a high level of accuracy, the data can then be used to impose bounds on the value of the space noncommutativity parameter. We have also defined a new parameter, σ=ρθ (ρ is the electron concentration, θ is the noncommutativity parameter), which can be measured experimentally. Our approach is based on the Foldy-Wouthuysen transformation, which gives a general Hamiltonian of a nonrelativistic electron moving on a noncommutative space.

  7. Fabrication of MTF measurement system for a mobile phone lens using multi-square objects

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hong, Sung Mok; Jo, Jae Heung; Lee, Hoi Youn; Yang, Ho Soon; Lee, Yun Woo; Lee, In Won

    2007-12-01

    The mobile phone market grows rapidly and the performance estimation about camera module is required. Accordingly, we fabricate the MTF measurement system for a mobile phone lens having extremely small diameter and large f-number. The objective lens with the magnification of X20 for MTF measurement for high resolution lens and a detector of CCD that is pixel size of 7.4 um are adapted to the system. Also, the CCD is translated by using a linear motor to reduce measurement errors. The measurement lens is placed at the most suitable imaging point by a precise auto-focusing motor. The measuring equipment which we developed for off-axis MTF measurement of a mobile phone lens used the multi-square objects. The square objects of measuring equipment are arranged a unit in the on-axis and total 12 units (0.3 field: 4 units, 0.5 field: 4 units, 0.7 field: 4 units) in the off-axis. When the measurement is started, the linear motors of signal detection part are transferred from on-axis to off-axis. And a detected signals from the each square objects are used for MTF measurement. System driver and MTF measure are using application program that developed us. This software can be measure the on-axis and the off-axis sequentially. In addition to that it did optimization of motor transfer for measurement time shortening.

  8. Results form RESUME 95. Measurements with mobile equipment

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lidstroem, K.; Ulvsand, T.; Aagren, G. [National Defence Research Establisment, Div. of Ionising Radiation and Fallout, Umeaa (Sweden)

    1997-12-31

    This paper presents the results obtained during the NKS, (EKO-3), Exercise Resume-95 by a group from the Division of Ionising Radiation and Fallout, FOA, Umeaa, Sweden. Field gamma measurements were performed in two areas with a HPGe-detector (p-type, 50% relative efficiency) mounted vertically 1 m above the ground or horizontally in a car. One of the areas was an airfield, Vesivehmaa, where 19 measurements were done. The calculated Cs-137 activity was 52.1 {+-} 4.5 kBq/m{sup 2} assuming a two slice distribution model with a homogenous density and activity distribution in each slice. The report contains also the results from a task which included the finding, classification and estimation of the activity of hidden sources within two 10{sup *} 10 m-areas. (au).

  9. Results form RESUME 95. Measurements with mobile equipment

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lidstroem, K; Ulvsand, T; Aagren, G [National Defence Research Establisment, Div. of Ionising Radiation and Fallout, Umeaa (Sweden)

    1998-12-31

    This paper presents the results obtained during the NKS, (EKO-3), Exercise Resume-95 by a group from the Division of Ionising Radiation and Fallout, FOA, Umeaa, Sweden. Field gamma measurements were performed in two areas with a HPGe-detector (p-type, 50% relative efficiency) mounted vertically 1 m above the ground or horizontally in a car. One of the areas was an airfield, Vesivehmaa, where 19 measurements were done. The calculated Cs-137 activity was 52.1 {+-} 4.5 kBq/m{sup 2} assuming a two slice distribution model with a homogenous density and activity distribution in each slice. The report contains also the results from a task which included the finding, classification and estimation of the activity of hidden sources within two 10{sup *} 10 m-areas. (au).

  10. Measurement of mobility profile in ion-implanted silicon layers using electroreflection spectroscopy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Galiev, G.B.; Kapaev, V.V.; Mokerov, V.G.

    1986-01-01

    The possibility is shown of the application of the low field linearized electroreflection spectroscopy for the measurement of profiles of carriers mobilities μ(x) simultaneously with the concentration profiles N(x) in thin ion-implanted silicon layers. The μ(χ) value is determined from the calibration curve of the dependence of the phenomenological broadening parameter γ on the mobility for uniformly doped samples. The results are presented for the measurements of the profiles μ(x) for boron- and arsenic-implanted silicon

  11. Measuring the power consumption of social media applications on a mobile device

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dunia, A. I. M.; Suherman; Rambe, A. H.; Fauzi, R.

    2018-03-01

    As fully connected social media applications become popular and require all time connection, the power consumption on mobile device battery increases significantly. As power supplied by a battery is limited, social media application should be designed to be less power consuming. This paper reports the power consumption measurement of social media running on a mobile device. Experimental circuit was developed by using a microcontroller measuring an android smartphone on a 802.11 controlled network. The experiment results show that whatsapp consumes the power less than others in stand by and chat. While other states are dominated by line. The blackberry consumes the power the worst.

  12. Time measurements with a mobile device using sound

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wisman, Raymond F.; Spahn, Gabriel; Forinash, Kyle

    2018-05-01

    Data collection is a fundamental skill in science education, one that students generally practice in a controlled setting using equipment only available in the classroom laboratory. However, using smartphones with their built-in sensors and often free apps, many fundamental experiments can be performed outside the laboratory. Taking advantage of these tools often require creative approaches to data collection and exploring alternative strategies for experimental procedures. As examples, we present several experiments using smartphones and apps that record and analyze sound to measure a variety of physical properties.

  13. Determination of intrinsic spin Hall angle in Pt

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wang, Yi; Deorani, Praveen; Qiu, Xuepeng; Kwon, Jae Hyun; Yang, Hyunsoo, E-mail: eleyang@nus.edu.sg [Department of Electrical and Computer Engineering, National University of Singapore, 117576 (Singapore)

    2014-10-13

    The spin Hall angle in Pt is evaluated in Pt/NiFe bilayers by spin torque ferromagnetic resonance measurements and is found to increase with increasing the NiFe thickness. To extract the intrinsic spin Hall angle in Pt by estimating the total spin current injected into NiFe from Pt, the NiFe thickness dependent measurements are performed and the spin diffusion in the NiFe layer is taken into account. The intrinsic spin Hall angle of Pt is determined to be 0.068 at room temperature and is found to be almost constant in the temperature range of 13–300 K.

  14. Determination of intrinsic spin Hall angle in Pt

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wang, Yi; Deorani, Praveen; Qiu, Xuepeng; Kwon, Jae Hyun; Yang, Hyunsoo

    2014-01-01

    The spin Hall angle in Pt is evaluated in Pt/NiFe bilayers by spin torque ferromagnetic resonance measurements and is found to increase with increasing the NiFe thickness. To extract the intrinsic spin Hall angle in Pt by estimating the total spin current injected into NiFe from Pt, the NiFe thickness dependent measurements are performed and the spin diffusion in the NiFe layer is taken into account. The intrinsic spin Hall angle of Pt is determined to be 0.068 at room temperature and is found to be almost constant in the temperature range of 13–300 K.

  15. Five years of NO2 Mobile-DOAS measurements in Europe: an overview

    Science.gov (United States)

    Merlaud, Alexis; Fayt, Caroline; Pinardi, Gaia; Tack, Frederik; Hendrick, François; Le Roux, Anabel-Lise; Constantin, Daniel-Eduard; Voiculescu, Mirela; Shaiganfar, Reza; Wagner, Thomas; Van Roozendael, Michel

    2014-05-01

    Since the CINDI campaign held in the Netherlands in July 2009, BIRA-IASB has been operating a car-based mobile-DOAS system, primarily dedicated to tropospheric NO2 measurements. The instrument is based on two similar compact spectrometers and records scattered light spectra simultaneously in the zenith direction and 30° above the horizon, following the MAX-DOAS approach. After CINDI, Mobile-DOAS measurements were performed on a routine basis between March 2010 and August 2011, mostly across Belgium, but also in Luxembourg, France, and Germany. From 2011, another BIRA-IASB mobile-DOAS instrument, using a single zenith channel, was operated in Romania through a collaboration with the University of Galati. In June 2013, these two mobile-DOAS instruments took part in the MADCAT campaign in Mainz, Germany, together with the MPIC mobile-DOAS system, based on a mini MAX-DOAS. We describe the BIRA-IASB instruments, our strategy to retrieve the NO2 tropospheric column, and the large database that was constituted. The latter is particularly interesting for its size: it covers some 500 hours of measurements and 20 000 km, including rural, periurban and urban areas with different air quality conditions. A 2011 cloud-free subset of the measurements is compared with OMI data. We also present preliminary results of an intercomparison between the three mobile-DOAS instruments operated during MADCAT. The high spatial frequency of the measurements (around 100 m) makes them valuable to study the NO2 horizontal gradients in polluted areas. This has implications in the context of air quality satellite validation studies, in which the variability of NO2 inside a satellite pixel must be taken into account.

  16. Quantum Hall Electron Nematics

    Science.gov (United States)

    MacDonald, Allan

    In 2D electron systems hosted by crystals with hexagonal symmetry, electron nematic phases with spontaneously broken C3 symmetry are expected to occur in the quantum Hall regime when triplets of Landau levels associated with three different Fermi surface pockets are partially filled. The broken symmetry state is driven by intravalley Coulombic exchange interactions that favor spontaneously polarized valley occupations. I will discuss three different examples of 2D electron systems in which this type of broken symmetry state is expected to occur: i) the SnTe (111) surface, ii) the Bi (111) surface. and iii) unbalanced bilayer graphene. This type of quantum Hall electron nematic state has so far been confirmed only in the Bi (111) case, in which the anisotropic quasiparticle wavefunctions of the broken symmetry state were directly imaged. In the SnTe case the nematic state phase boundary is controlled by a competition between intravalley Coulomb interactions and intervalley scattering processes that increase in relative strength with magnetic field. An in-plane Zeeman field alters the phase diagram by lifting the three-fold Landau level degeneracy, yielding a ground state energy with 2 π/3 periodicity as a function of Zeeman-field orientation angle. I will comment on the possibility of observing similar states in the absence of a magnetic field. Supported by DOE Division of Materials Sciences and Engineering Grant DE-FG03-02ER45958.

  17. The ISOLDE hall

    CERN Multimedia

    Maximilien Brice

    2002-01-01

    Since 1992, after its move from the 600 MeV SC, ISOLDE is a customer of the Booster (then 1 GeV, now 1.4 GeV). The intense Booster beam (some 3E13 protons per pulse) is directed onto a target, from which a mixture of isotopes emanates. After ionization and electrostatic acceleration to 60 keV, they enter one of the 2 spectrometers (General Purpose Separator: GPS, and High Resolution Separator: HRS) from which the selected ions are directed to the experiments. The photos show: the REX-ISOLDE post accelerator; the mini-ball experiment; an overview of the ISOLDE hall. In the picture (_12) of the hall, the separators are behind the wall. From either of them, beams can be directed into any of the many beamlines towards the experiments, some of which are visible in the foreground. The elevated cubicle at the left is EBIS (Electron Beam Ion Source), which acts as a charge-state multiplier for the REX facility. The ions are further mass analzyzed and passed on to the linac which accelerates them to higher energies. T...

  18. Hall Effect and transient surface photovoltage (SPV study of Cu3BiS3 thin films

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    F. Mesa

    2014-03-01

    Full Text Available Here, we present the electrical properties of the compound Cu3BiS3 deposited by co-evaporation. This new compound may have the properties necessary to be used as an absorbent layer in solar cells. The samples were characterized by Hall effect and transient surface photovoltage (SPV measurements. Using Hall effect measurements, we found that the concentration of n charge carriers is in the order of 1016 cm-3 irrespective of the Cu/Bi mass ratio. We also found that the mobility of this compound (μ in the order of 4 cm2 V-1s-1 varies according to the transport mechanisms that govern it and are dependent on temperature. Based on the SPV, we found a high density of surface defects, which can be passivated by superimposing a buffer layer over the Cu3BiS3 compound.

  19. Photographic measurement of head and cervical posture when viewing mobile phone: a pilot study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guan, Xiaofei; Fan, Guoxin; Wu, Xinbo; Zeng, Ying; Su, Hang; Gu, Guangfei; Zhou, Qi; Gu, Xin; Zhang, Hailong; He, Shisheng

    2015-12-01

    With the dramatic growth of mobile phone usage, concerns have been raised with regard to the adverse health effects of mobile phone on spinal posture. The aim of this study was to determine the head and cervical postures by photogrammetry when viewing the mobile phone screen, compared with those in neutral standing posture. A total of 186 subjects (81 females and 105 males) aged from 17 to 31 years old participated in this study. Subjects were instructed to stand neutrally and using mobile phone as in daily life. Using a photographic method, the sagittal head and cervical postures were assessed by head tilt angle, neck tilt angle, forward head shift and gaze angle. The photographic method showed a high intra-rater and inter-rater reliability in measuring the sagittal posture of cervical spine and gaze angle (ICCs ranged from 0.80 to 0.99). When looking at mobile phone, the head tilt angle significantly increased (from 74.55° to 95.22°, p = 0.000) and the neck angle decreased (from 54.68° to 38.77°, p = 0.000). The forward head posture was also confirmed by the significantly increased head shift (from 10.90 to 13.85 cm, p = 0.000). The posture assumed in mobile phone use was significantly correlated with neutral posture (p phone use. Compared to neutral standing, subjects display a more forward head posture when viewing the mobile phone screen, which is correlated with neutral posture, gaze angle and gender. Future studies will be needed to investigate a dose-response relationship between mobile phone use and assumed posture.

  20. Mobile Phones Democratize and Cultivate Next-Generation Imaging, Diagnostics and Measurement Tools

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ozcan, Aydogan

    2014-01-01

    In this article, I discuss some of the emerging applications and the future opportunities and challenges created by the use of mobile phones and their embedded components for the development of next-generation imaging, sensing, diagnostics and measurement tools. The massive volume of mobile phone users, which has now reached ~7 billion, drives the rapid improvements of the hardware, software and high-end imaging and sensing technologies embedded in our phones, transforming the mobile phone into a cost-effective and yet extremely powerful platform to run e.g., biomedical tests and perform scientific measurements that would normally require advanced laboratory instruments. This rapidly evolving and continuing trend will help us transform how medicine, engineering and sciences are practiced and taught globally. PMID:24647550

  1. Drift tube measurements of mobilities and longitudinal diffusion coefficients of ions in gases

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chelf, R.D.

    1982-01-01

    The zero-field mobilities of Br - and NH 4+ in O 2 were determined as a function of gas temperature in a high pressure drift tube mass spectrometer. The mobilities and longitudinal diffusion coefficients of the ion-gas combinations Br - in Ne and Kr, Li + in Xe, and Tl/ + in Kr and Xe were determined as a function of E/N, where E is the electric field strength and N is the gas number density in a low pressure drift tube mass spectrometer. The measured longitudinal diffusion coefficients were used for a test and comparison of the generalized Einstein relations of Viehland-Mason and Waldman-Mason theories. The measured mobilities of Br - in Kr and Tl/ + in Kr were used in an iterative-inversion scheme from which the ion-neutral interaction potentials were determined

  2. Characterizing Information Processing With a Mobile Device: Measurement of Simple and Choice Reaction Time.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Burke, Daniel; Linder, Susan; Hirsch, Joshua; Dey, Tanujit; Kana, Daniel; Ringenbach, Shannon; Schindler, David; Alberts, Jay

    2017-10-01

    Information processing is typically evaluated using simple reaction time (SRT) and choice reaction time (CRT) paradigms in which a specific response is initiated following a given stimulus. The measurement of reaction time (RT) has evolved from monitoring the timing of mechanical switches to computerized paradigms. The proliferation of mobile devices with touch screens makes them a natural next technological approach to assess information processing. The aims of this study were to determine the validity and reliability of using of a mobile device (Apple iPad or iTouch) to accurately measure RT. Sixty healthy young adults completed SRT and CRT tasks using a traditional test platform and mobile platforms on two occasions. The SRT was similar across test modality: 300, 287, and 280 milliseconds (ms) for the traditional, iPad, and iTouch, respectively. The CRT was similar within mobile devices, though slightly faster on the traditional: 359, 408, and 384 ms for traditional, iPad, and iTouch, respectively. Intraclass correlation coefficients ranged from 0.79 to 0.85 for SRT and from 0.75 to 0.83 for CRT. The similarity and reliability of SRT across platforms and consistency of SRT and CRT across test conditions indicate that mobile devices provide the next generation of assessment platforms for information processing.

  3. Thermoelectric and Hall-effect studies in hydrogenerated nickel foils

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rani, R.; Nigam, A.N.

    1978-01-01

    Thermo e.m.f. and Hall constant of hydrogenerated nickel foils have been measured. Termo e.m.f. shows a sign reversal which is not due to the change in sign of the charge carriers, as indicated by the Hall-effect measurements. To account for the sign reversal of thermo e.m.f., it is found necessary to take into account the surface states of chemisorbed hydrogen on nickel

  4. Scanning vector Hall probe microscopy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cambel, V.; Gregusova, D.; Fedor, J.; Kudela, R.; Bending, S.J.

    2004-01-01

    We have developed a scanning vector Hall probe microscope for mapping magnetic field vector over magnetic samples. The microscope is based on a micromachined Hall sensor and the cryostat with scanning system. The vector Hall sensor active area is ∼5x5 μm 2 . It is realized by patterning three Hall probes on the tilted faces of GaAs pyramids. Data from these 'tilted' Hall probes are used to reconstruct the full magnetic field vector. The scanning area of the microscope is 5x5 mm 2 , space resolution 2.5 μm, field resolution ∼1 μT Hz -1/2 at temperatures 10-300 K

  5. A note on acoustic measurements of turbulence, suspended sediment, and bed forms in mobile bed experiments

    Science.gov (United States)

    One of the challenges of hydraulic experimentation is designing experiments that are complex enough to capture relevant processes while retaining the simplicity necessary for useful, accurate measurements. The intricacy of the interactions between turbulent flows and mobile beds in rivers and stream...

  6. Development of a wireless blood pressure measuring device with smart mobile device.

    Science.gov (United States)

    İlhan, İlhan; Yıldız, İbrahim; Kayrak, Mehmet

    2016-03-01

    Today, smart mobile devices (telephones and tablets) are very commonly used due to their powerful hardware and useful features. According to an eMarketer report, in 2014 there were 1.76 billion smartphone users (excluding users of tablets) in the world; it is predicted that this number will rise by 15.9% to 2.04 billion in 2015. It is thought that these devices can be used successfully in biomedical applications. A wireless blood pressure measuring device used together with a smart mobile device was developed in this study. By means of an interface developed for smart mobile devices with Android and iOS operating systems, a smart mobile device was used both as an indicator and as a control device. The cuff communicating with this device through Bluetooth was designed to measure blood pressure via the arm. A digital filter was used on the cuff instead of the traditional analog signal processing and filtering circuit. The newly developed blood pressure measuring device was tested on 18 patients and 20 healthy individuals of different ages under a physician's supervision. When the test results were compared with the measurements made using a sphygmomanometer, it was shown that an average 93.52% accuracy in sick individuals and 94.53% accuracy in healthy individuals could be achieved with the new device. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  7. Assessment of elevator rope using Hall Sensor

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lee, Jong O; Yoon, Woon Ha; Son, Young Ho; Kim, Jung Woo [Korea Institute of Machinery and Materials, Daejeon (Korea, Republic of); Lee, Jong Ku [Pukyung National University, Pusan (Korea, Republic of)

    2003-07-01

    Defect detection of wire rope for an elevator was investigated through the measurement of magnetic flux leakage. The types of defect usually found in wire rope categorized such as inner and outer wire breakage and wear. The specimens that has artificial defects were magnetized via permanent magnet, and measurement of magnetic flux leakage on the defects was performed with Hall sensor. In wire broken model, a defect smaller than 0.4 mm and 1 mm in depth on outer and inner wire rope, respectively, could be detected well. In wear model, smaller defect could not be detected clearly, however, appearance of changing of total magnetic flux during magnetic pole of the sensor passing through a defect 0.2 mm in depth at 4 mm or above width could make possible to detect it. From the results, the measurement via Hall sensor might be useful tool for defect detection of wire rope.

  8. Assesment of elevator rope using hall sensor

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lee, Jong O; Yoon, Woon Ha; Son, Young Ho [Korea Institute of Machinery and Materials, Daejeon (Korea, Republic of); Kim, Jung Woo; Lee, Jong Ku [Pukyong National University, Pusan (Korea, Republic of)

    2003-05-15

    Defect detection of wire rope for an elevator was investigated through the measurement of magnetic flux leakage. The types of defect usually found in wire rope categorized such as inner and outer wire breakage and wear. The specimens that has artificial defects were magnetized via permanent magnet, and measurement of magnetic flux leakage on the defects was performed with Hall sensor. In wire broken model, a defect smaller than 0.4mm and 1mm in depth on outer and inner wire rope, respectively, could be detected well. In wear model, smaller defect could not be detected clearly, however, appearance of changing of total magnetic flux during magnetic pole of the sensor passing through a defect 0.2mm in depth at 4mm or above width could make possible to detect it. From the results, the measurement via Hall sensor might be useful tool for defect detection of wire rope.

  9. Assessment of elevator rope using Hall Sensor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lee, Jong O; Yoon, Woon Ha; Son, Young Ho; Kim, Jung Woo; Lee, Jong Ku

    2003-01-01

    Defect detection of wire rope for an elevator was investigated through the measurement of magnetic flux leakage. The types of defect usually found in wire rope categorized such as inner and outer wire breakage and wear. The specimens that has artificial defects were magnetized via permanent magnet, and measurement of magnetic flux leakage on the defects was performed with Hall sensor. In wire broken model, a defect smaller than 0.4 mm and 1 mm in depth on outer and inner wire rope, respectively, could be detected well. In wear model, smaller defect could not be detected clearly, however, appearance of changing of total magnetic flux during magnetic pole of the sensor passing through a defect 0.2 mm in depth at 4 mm or above width could make possible to detect it. From the results, the measurement via Hall sensor might be useful tool for defect detection of wire rope.

  10. Assesment of elevator rope using hall sensor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lee, Jong O; Yoon, Woon Ha; Son, Young Ho; Kim, Jung Woo; Lee, Jong Ku

    2003-01-01

    Defect detection of wire rope for an elevator was investigated through the measurement of magnetic flux leakage. The types of defect usually found in wire rope categorized such as inner and outer wire breakage and wear. The specimens that has artificial defects were magnetized via permanent magnet, and measurement of magnetic flux leakage on the defects was performed with Hall sensor. In wire broken model, a defect smaller than 0.4mm and 1mm in depth on outer and inner wire rope, respectively, could be detected well. In wear model, smaller defect could not be detected clearly, however, appearance of changing of total magnetic flux during magnetic pole of the sensor passing through a defect 0.2mm in depth at 4mm or above width could make possible to detect it. From the results, the measurement via Hall sensor might be useful tool for defect detection of wire rope.

  11. Nobel Prize in physics 1985: Quantum Hall effect

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Herrmann, R.

    1986-01-01

    The conditions (like very strong magnetic fields, ultralow temperatures, and occurrence of a two-dimensional electron gas in microelectronic structures) for the measurement of the quantum Hall effect are explained. Two possible measuring methods are described. Measuring results for p-Si-MOSFET, GaAs/AlGaAs heterojuntions and grain boundaries in InSb crystals are reported. Differences between normal (integer) and fractional quantum Hall effect are discussed. One of the important consequences is that by means of the quantum Hall effect the value h/e 2 can be determined with very high accuracy. In 1985 Klaus von Klitzing was awarded the Nobel Prize for his work on the quantum Hall effect

  12. Suitable reverberation time for halls for rock and pop music

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Adelman-Larsen, Niels Werner; Thompson, Eric Robert; Gade, Anders Christian

    2010-01-01

    The existing body of literature regarding the acoustic design of concert halls has focused almost exclusively on classical music, although there are many more performances of popular music, including rock and pop. Objective measurements were made of the acoustics of 20 rock music venues in Denmark....... The best-rated halls in the study have reverberation times that are approximately frequency independent from 0.6 to 1.2 s for hall volumes from 1000 to 6000 m3. The worst rated halls in the study had significantly higher reverberation times in the 63 and 125 Hz bands. Since most audiences at rock concerts...... are standing, absorption coefficients were measured with a standing audience from 63 Hz to 4 kHz. These measurements showed that a standing audience absorbs about five times as much energy in mid-/high-frequency bands as in low-frequency bands....

  13. On Hall current fluid

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Shen, M.C.; Ebel, D.

    1987-01-01

    In this paper some new results concerning magnetohydrodynamic (MHD) equations with the Hall current (HC) term in the Ohm's law are presented. For the cylindrical pinch of a compressible HC fluid, it is found that for large time and long wave length the solution to the governing equations exhibits the behavior of solitons as in the case of an ideal MHD model. In some special cases, the HC model appears to be better posed. An open question is whether a simple toroidal equilibrium of an HC fluid with resistivity and viscosity exists. The answer to this question is affirmative if the prescribed velocity on the boundary has a small norm. Furthermore, the equilibrium is also linearly and nonlinearly stable

  14. Farm Hall: The Play

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cassidy, David C.

    2013-03-01

    It's July 1945. Germany is in defeat and the atomic bombs are on their way to Japan. Under the direction of Samuel Goudsmit, the Allies are holding some of the top German nuclear scientists-among them Heisenberg, Hahn, and Gerlach-captive in Farm Hall, an English country manor near Cambridge, England. As secret microphones record their conversations, the scientists are unaware of why they are being held or for how long. Thinking themselves far ahead of the Allies, how will they react to the news of the atomic bombs? How will these famous scientists explain to themselves and to the world their failure to achieve even a chain reaction? How will they come to terms with the horror of the Third Reich, their work for such a regime, and their behavior during that period? This one-act play is based upon the transcripts of their conversations as well as the author's historical work on the subject.

  15. Quantum Hall effect

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Joynt, R.J.

    1982-01-01

    A general investigation of the electronic structure of two dimensional systems is undertaken with a view towards understanding the quantum Hall effect. The work is limited to the case of a strong perpendicular magnetic field, with a disordered potential and an externally applied electric field. The electrons are treated as noninteracting. First, the scattering theory of the system is worked out. The surprising result is found that a wavepacket will reform after scattering from an isolated potential. Also it will tend to be accelerated in the neighborhood of the scatterer if the potential has bound states. Fredholm theory can then be used to show that the extended states carry an additional current which compensates for the zero current of the bound states. Together, these give the quantized conductance. The complementary case of a smooth random potential is treated by a path-integral approach which exploits the analogies to the classical equations of motion. The Green's function can be calculated approximately, which gives the general character of both the bound and extended states. Also the ratio of these two types of states can be computed for a given potential. The charge density is uniform in first approximation, and the Hall conductance is quantized. Higher-order corrections for more rapidly fluctuating potential are calculated. The most general conditions under which the conductance is quantized are discussed. Because of the peculiar scattering properties of the system, numerical solution of the Schroedinger equation is of interest, both to confirm the analytical results, and for pedagogical reasons. The stability and convergence problems inherent in the computer solution of the problem are analyzed. Results for some model scattering potentials are presented

  16. Anomalous Hall effect in Fe/Gd bilayers

    KAUST Repository

    Xu, W. J.; Zhang, Bei; Liu, Z. X.; Wang, Z.; Li, W.; Wu, Z. B.; Yu, R. H.; Zhang, Xixiang

    2010-01-01

    Non-monotonic dependence of anomalous Hall resistivity on temperature and magnetization, including a sign change, was observed in Fe/Gd bilayers. To understand the intriguing observations, we fabricated the Fe/Gd bilayers and single layers of Fe and Gd simultaneously. The temperature and field dependences of longitudinal resistivity, Hall resistivity and magnetization in these films have also been carefully measured. The analysis of these data reveals that these intriguing features are due to the opposite signs of Hall resistivity/or spin polarization and different Curie temperatures of Fe and Gd single-layer films. Copyright (C) EPLA, 2010

  17. Acoustic investigations of concert halls for rock music

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Adelman-Larsen, Niels Werner; Thompson, Eric Robert; Gade, Anders Christian

    2007-01-01

    Objective measurement data and subjective evaluations have been collected from 20 small-/medium-sized halls in Denmark used for amplified rhythmic music concerts (pop, rock, jazz). The purpose of the study was to obtain knowledge about optimum acoustic conditions for this type of hall. The study...... is motivated by the fact that most concert tickets sold in Denmark relate to concerts within these genres in this kind of venue. The subjective evaluations were carried out by professional musicians and sound engineers who responded on the basis of their experiences working in these (and other) halls. From...

  18. Anomalous Hall effect in Fe/Gd bilayers

    KAUST Repository

    Xu, W. J.

    2010-04-01

    Non-monotonic dependence of anomalous Hall resistivity on temperature and magnetization, including a sign change, was observed in Fe/Gd bilayers. To understand the intriguing observations, we fabricated the Fe/Gd bilayers and single layers of Fe and Gd simultaneously. The temperature and field dependences of longitudinal resistivity, Hall resistivity and magnetization in these films have also been carefully measured. The analysis of these data reveals that these intriguing features are due to the opposite signs of Hall resistivity/or spin polarization and different Curie temperatures of Fe and Gd single-layer films. Copyright (C) EPLA, 2010

  19. Door and window image-based measurement using a mobile device

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ma, Guangyao; Janakaraj, Manishankar; Agam, Gady

    2015-03-01

    We present a system for door and window image-based measurement using an Android mobile device. In this system a user takes an image of a door or window that needs to be measured and using interaction measures specific dimensions of the object. The existing object is removed from the image and a 3D model of a replacement is rendered onto the image. The visualization provides a 3D model with which the user can interact. When tested on a mobile Android platform with an 8MP camera we obtain an average measurement error of roughly 0.5%. This error rate is stable across a range of view angles, distances from the object, and image resolutions. The main advantages of our mobile device application for image measurement include measuring objects for which physical access is not readily available, documenting in a precise manner the locations in the scene where the measurements were taken, and visualizing a new object with custom selections inside the original view.

  20. Accurate on-chip measurement of the Seebeck coefficient of high mobility small molecule organic semiconductors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Warwick, C. N.; Venkateshvaran, D.; Sirringhaus, H.

    2015-09-01

    We present measurements of the Seebeck coefficient in two high mobility organic small molecules, 2,7-dioctyl[1]benzothieno[3,2-b][1]benzothiophene (C8-BTBT) and 2,9-didecyl-dinaphtho[2,3-b:2',3'-f]thieno[3,2-b]thiophene (C10-DNTT). The measurements are performed in a field effect transistor structure with high field effect mobilities of approximately 3 cm2/V s. This allows us to observe both the charge concentration and temperature dependence of the Seebeck coefficient. We find a strong logarithmic dependence upon charge concentration and a temperature dependence within the measurement uncertainty. Despite performing the measurements on highly polycrystalline evaporated films, we see an agreement in the Seebeck coefficient with modelled values from Shi et al. [Chem. Mater. 26, 2669 (2014)] at high charge concentrations. We attribute deviations from the model at lower charge concentrations to charge trapping.

  1. Mobile robot trajectory tracking using noisy RSS measurements: an RFID approach.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miah, M Suruz; Gueaieb, Wail

    2014-03-01

    Most RF beacons-based mobile robot navigation techniques rely on approximating line-of-sight (LOS) distances between the beacons and the robot. This is mostly performed using the robot's received signal strength (RSS) measurements from the beacons. However, accurate mapping between the RSS measurements and the LOS distance is almost impossible to achieve in reverberant environments. This paper presents a partially-observed feedback controller for a wheeled mobile robot where the feedback signal is in the form of noisy RSS measurements emitted from radio frequency identification (RFID) tags. The proposed controller requires neither an accurate mapping between the LOS distance and the RSS measurements, nor the linearization of the robot model. The controller performance is demonstrated through numerical simulations and real-time experiments. ©2013 Published by ISA. All rights reserved.

  2. Accurate on-chip measurement of the Seebeck coefficient of high mobility small molecule organic semiconductors

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    C. N. Warwick

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available We present measurements of the Seebeck coefficient in two high mobility organic small molecules, 2,7-dioctyl[1]benzothieno[3,2-b][1]benzothiophene (C8-BTBT and 2,9-didecyl-dinaphtho[2,3-b:2′,3′-f]thieno[3,2-b]thiophene (C10-DNTT. The measurements are performed in a field effect transistor structure with high field effect mobilities of approximately 3 cm2/V s. This allows us to observe both the charge concentration and temperature dependence of the Seebeck coefficient. We find a strong logarithmic dependence upon charge concentration and a temperature dependence within the measurement uncertainty. Despite performing the measurements on highly polycrystalline evaporated films, we see an agreement in the Seebeck coefficient with modelled values from Shi et al. [Chem. Mater. 26, 2669 (2014] at high charge concentrations. We attribute deviations from the model at lower charge concentrations to charge trapping.

  3. Electron attachment rate constant measurement by photoemission electron attachment ion mobility spectrometry (PE-EA-IMS)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Su, Desheng; Niu, Wenqi; Liu, Sheng; Shen, Chengyin; Huang, Chaoqun; Wang, Hongmei; Jiang, Haihe; Chu, Yannan

    2012-01-01

    Photoemission electron attachment ion mobility spectrometry (PE-EA-IMS), with a source of photoelectrons induced by vacuum ultraviolet radiation on a metal surface, has been developed to study electron attachment reaction at atmospheric pressure using nitrogen as the buffer gas. Based on the negative ion mobility spectra, the rate constants for electron attachment to tetrachloromethane and chloroform were measured at ambient temperature as a function of the average electron energy in the range from 0.29 to 0.96 eV. The experimental results are in good agreement with the data reported in the literature. - Highlights: ► Photoemission electron attachment ion mobility spectrometry (PE-EA-IMS) was developed to study electron attachment reaction. ► The rate constants of electron attachment to CCl 4 and CHCl 3 were determined. ► The present experimental results are in good agreement with the previously reported data.

  4. Reliability of the Q Force; a mobile instrument for measuring isometric quadriceps muscle strength

    OpenAIRE

    Schans, van der, C.P.; Zijlstra, W.; Regterschot, G.R.H.; Krijnen, W.P.; Douma, K.W.; Slager, G.E.C.

    2016-01-01

    BACKGROUND: The ability to generate muscle strength is a pre-requisite for all human movement. Decreased quadriceps muscle strength is frequently observed in older adults and is associated with a decreased performance and activity limitations. To quantify the quadriceps muscle strength and to monitor changes over time, instruments and procedures with a sufficient reliability are needed. The Q Force is an innovative mobile muscle strength measurement instrument suitable to measure in various d...

  5. Radiation Measurement from Mobile Base Stations at a University Campus in Malaysia

    OpenAIRE

    Md. R. Islam; Othman O. Khalifa; Liakot Ali; Amir Azli; Mohd Zulkarnain

    2006-01-01

    The tremendous growth of telecommunication industry results the number of hand phone users increases everyday. In order to support the growing number of users, the mobile base stations can be seen in almost everywhere. This scenario has created uncomfortable feelings to the people that they may be affected by the radiations from antennas. A measurement was done at student hostels and office premises near to base stations in International Islamic University Malaysia, Gombak campus. Measured va...

  6. Spontaneous Hall effect in a chiral p-wave superconductor

    Science.gov (United States)

    Furusaki, Akira; Matsumoto, Masashige; Sigrist, Manfred

    2001-08-01

    In a chiral superconductor with broken time-reversal symmetry a ``spontaneous Hall effect'' may be observed. We analyze this phenomenon by taking into account the surface properties of a chiral superconductor. We identify two main contributions to the spontaneous Hall effect. One contribution originates from the Bernoulli (or Lorentz) force due to spontaneous currents running along the surfaces of the superconductor. The other contribution has a topological origin and is related to the intrinsic angular momentum of Cooper pairs. The latter can be described in terms of a Chern-Simons-like term in the low-energy field theory of the superconductor and has some similarities with the quantum Hall effect. The spontaneous Hall effect in a chiral superconductor is, however, nonuniversal. Our analysis is based on three approaches to the problem: a self-consistent solution of the Bogoliubov-de Gennes equation, a generalized Ginzburg-Landau theory, and a hydrodynamic formulation. All three methods consistently lead to the same conclusion that the spontaneous Hall resistance of a two-dimensional superconducting Hall bar is of order h/(ekFλ)2, where kF is the Fermi wave vector and λ is the London penetration depth; the Hall resistance is substantially suppressed from a quantum unit of resistance. Experimental issues in measuring this effect are briefly discussed.

  7. Hall Effect Gyrators and Circulators

    Science.gov (United States)

    Viola, Giovanni; DiVincenzo, David P.

    2014-04-01

    The electronic circulator and its close relative the gyrator are invaluable tools for noise management and signal routing in the current generation of low-temperature microwave systems for the implementation of new quantum technologies. The current implementation of these devices using the Faraday effect is satisfactory but requires a bulky structure whose physical dimension is close to the microwave wavelength employed. The Hall effect is an alternative nonreciprocal effect that can also be used to produce desired device functionality. We review earlier efforts to use an Ohmically contacted four-terminal Hall bar, explaining why this approach leads to unacceptably high device loss. We find that capacitive coupling to such a Hall conductor has much greater promise for achieving good circulator and gyrator functionality. We formulate a classical Ohm-Hall analysis for calculating the properties of such a device, and show how this classical theory simplifies remarkably in the limiting case of the Hall angle approaching 90°. In this limit, we find that either a four-terminal or a three-terminal capacitive device can give excellent circulator behavior, with device dimensions far smaller than the ac wavelength. An experiment is proposed to achieve GHz-band gyration in millimeter (and smaller) scale structures employing either semiconductor heterostructure or graphene Hall conductors. An inductively coupled scheme for realizing a Hall gyrator is also analyzed.

  8. Measurement of the drift mobilities and the mobility-lifetime products of charge carriers in a CdZnTe crystal by using a transient pulse technique

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cho, H Y; Kwon, Y K; Lee, C S; Lee, J H; Moon, J Y

    2011-01-01

    In this work we present results on the measurement of the drift mobility and the mobility-lifetime product of charge carriers in a 16-pixellated CdZnTe detector. For the determination of an interaction position based on the pulse rise-time method in a CZT detector, it is necessary to characterize the transport properties governed by drift mobility and lifetime for electrons and holes. In order to extract the transport properties of an electron and a hole, we bombarded 5.5-MeV alpha particles from a 241 Am source and 81-keV gamma rays emitted from a 133 Ba source on the negatively biased contact of the CZT detector. A time-of-flight (TOF) method was used to measure the electron drift mobility at room temperature whose value turned out to be 906.4 cm 2 /Vc s. With the Hecht's equation, the electron mobility-lifetime product was also determined from the bias-dependent alpha response and was equal to (9.88 ± 2.33) x 10 -3 cm 2 /V. On the other hand, the hole mobility-lifetime product was evaluated by a model based on the average charge collection efficiency which accounts for the absorption probability with a given photon energy. By using a single parameter fitting of the model, we obtained the hole mobility-lifetime product of (8.28 ± 0.17) x 10 -4 cm 2 /V.

  9. Topological Hall and spin Hall effects in disordered skyrmionic textures

    KAUST Repository

    Ndiaye, Papa Birame; Akosa, Collins Ashu; Manchon, Aurelien

    2017-01-01

    We carry out a thorough study of the topological Hall and topological spin Hall effects in disordered skyrmionic systems: the dimensionless (spin) Hall angles are evaluated across the energy-band structure in the multiprobe Landauer-Büttiker formalism and their link to the effective magnetic field emerging from the real-space topology of the spin texture is highlighted. We discuss these results for an optimal skyrmion size and for various sizes of the sample and find that the adiabatic approximation still holds for large skyrmions as well as for nanoskyrmions. Finally, we test the robustness of the topological signals against disorder strength and show that the topological Hall effect is highly sensitive to momentum scattering.

  10. Topological Hall and spin Hall effects in disordered skyrmionic textures

    KAUST Repository

    Ndiaye, Papa Birame

    2017-02-24

    We carry out a thorough study of the topological Hall and topological spin Hall effects in disordered skyrmionic systems: the dimensionless (spin) Hall angles are evaluated across the energy-band structure in the multiprobe Landauer-Büttiker formalism and their link to the effective magnetic field emerging from the real-space topology of the spin texture is highlighted. We discuss these results for an optimal skyrmion size and for various sizes of the sample and find that the adiabatic approximation still holds for large skyrmions as well as for nanoskyrmions. Finally, we test the robustness of the topological signals against disorder strength and show that the topological Hall effect is highly sensitive to momentum scattering.

  11. Tuning giant anomalous Hall resistance ratio in perpendicular Hall balance

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zhang, J. Y.; Yang, G. [Department of Materials Physics and Chemistry, University of Science and Technology Beijing, Beijing 100083 (China); State Key Laboratory of Magnetism, Beijing National Laboratory for Condensed Matter Physics, Institute of Physics, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Beijing 100190 (China); Wang, S. G., E-mail: sgwang@iphy.ac.cn, E-mail: ghyu@mater.ustb.edu.cn [State Key Laboratory of Magnetism, Beijing National Laboratory for Condensed Matter Physics, Institute of Physics, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Beijing 100190 (China); Liu, J. L. [State Key Laboratory of Magnetism, Beijing National Laboratory for Condensed Matter Physics, Institute of Physics, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Beijing 100190 (China); Department of Physics, Beijing University of Aeronautics and Astronautics, Beijing 100191 (China); Wang, R. M. [Department of Physics, Beijing University of Aeronautics and Astronautics, Beijing 100191 (China); Amsellem, E.; Kohn, A. [Department of Materials Engineering, Ilse Katz Institute for Nanoscale Science and Technology, Ben-Gurion University of the Negev, Beer-Sheva 84105 (Israel); Yu, G. H., E-mail: sgwang@iphy.ac.cn, E-mail: ghyu@mater.ustb.edu.cn [Department of Materials Physics and Chemistry, University of Science and Technology Beijing, Beijing 100083 (China)

    2015-04-13

    Anomalous Hall effect at room temperature in perpendicular Hall balance with a core structure of [Pt/Co]{sub 4}/NiO/[Co/Pt]{sub 4} has been tuned by functional CoO layers, where [Pt/Co]{sub 4} multilayers exhibit perpendicular magnetic anisotropy. A giant Hall resistance ratio up to 69 900% and saturation Hall resistance (R{sub S}{sup P}) up to 2590 mΩ were obtained in CoO/[Pt/Co]{sub 4}/NiO/[Co/Pt]{sub 4}/CoO system, which is 302% and 146% larger than that in the structure without CoO layers, respectively. Transmission electron microscopy shows highly textured [Co/Pt]{sub 4} multilayers and oxide layers with local epitaxial relations, indicating that the crystallographic structure has significant influence on spin dependent transport properties.

  12. The operation cutoff frequency of high electron mobility transistor measured by terahertz method

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zhu, Y. M.; Zhuang, S. L.

    2014-01-01

    Commonly, the cutoff frequency of high electron mobility transistor (HEMT) can be measured by vector network analyzer (VNA), which can only measure the sample exactly in low frequency region. In this paper, we propose a method to evaluate the cutoff frequency of HEMT by terahertz (THz) technique. One example shows the cutoff frequency of our HEMT is measured at ∼95.30 GHz, which is reasonable agreement with that estimated by VNA. It is proved THz technology a potential candidate for the substitution of VNA for the measurement of high-speed devices even up to several THz.

  13. Thales: an instrument to measure the low field magnetophoretic mobility of microscopic objects

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hackett, S L; St Pierre, T G

    2005-01-01

    An instrument, Thales, was designed and constructed to measure the induce motion of magnetic microspheres in a low magnetic field strength environment. Results show that Thales can be used to precisely measure the speed of microspheres (± 0.08 μm.s -1 ). We evaluated the motion of magnetic microspheres induced by an inhomogeneous magnetic field, and developed models for the microsphere magnetophoretic mobility, a parameter determining the speed attained by the microsphere in a given static low strength magnetic field environment. The data suggested that the magnetic material was located at the surfaces of the microspheres rather than being distributed evenly through the microspheres. With suitable calibration microspheres, Thales will be capable of directly measuring the low field magnetophoretic mobility of microscopic objects

  14. Oxygen diffusion process in a Ba{sub 0.96}La{sub 0.04}SnO{sub 3} thin film on SrTiO{sub 3}(001) substrate as investigated by time-dependent Hall effect measurements

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lee, Woong-Jhae; Kim, Hyung Joon; Sohn, Egon; Kim, Tai Hoon [Department of Physics and Astronomy, Center for Novel States of Complex Materials Research, Seoul National University, Seoul, 151-747 (Korea, Republic of); Kim, Hoon Min; Char, Kookrin [Institute of Applied Physics, Seoul National University, Seoul, 151-747 (Korea, Republic of); Kim, Jin Hyeok [Department of Materials Science and Engineering, Chonnam National University, Gwangju, 500-757 (Korea, Republic of); Kim, Kee Hoon [Department of Physics and Astronomy, Center for Novel States of Complex Materials Research, Seoul National University, Seoul, 151-747 (Korea, Republic of); Institute of Applied Physics, Seoul National University, Seoul, 151-747 (Korea, Republic of)

    2015-07-15

    We investigate the oxygen diffusion phenomena in a Ba{sub 0.96}La{sub 0.04}SnO{sub 3} (BLSO) thin film on SrTiO{sub 3}(001) substrate by measurements of time-dependent Hall effect at high temperatures around 500 C under different gas atmosphere. Under the Ar (O{sub 2}) atmosphere, carrier density (n) and electrical conductivity (σ) are increased (decreased) while electron mobility (μ) is slightly reduced (enhanced). This observation supports that although both n and μ are affected by the oxygen diffusion process, the change of n is a major factor of determining σ in the BLSO film. Detailed analyses of the time-dependent n exhibit fast and slow dynamics that possibly correspond to the oxygen exchange reaction at the surface and oxygen diffusion into the BLSO grains, respectively. Fitting the time dependence of n reveals that the chemical diffusion coefficient of oxygen in the BLSO grains becomes ∝10{sup -16} cm{sup 2} s{sup -1}. This coefficient marks the lowest value among perovskite oxides around 500 C, directly proving excellent thermal stability of oxygen in BLSO. The present results support that the donor-doped BaSnO{sub 3} system could be useful for realizing transparent semiconductor devices at high temperatures. (copyright 2015 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH and Co. KGaA, Weinheim)

  15. Anomalous Hall effect

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nagaosa, Naoto; Sinova, Jairo; Onoda, Shigeki; MacDonald, A. H.; Ong, N. P.

    2010-04-01

    The anomalous Hall effect (AHE) occurs in solids with broken time-reversal symmetry, typically in a ferromagnetic phase, as a consequence of spin-orbit coupling. Experimental and theoretical studies of the AHE are reviewed, focusing on recent developments that have provided a more complete framework for understanding this subtle phenomenon and have, in many instances, replaced controversy by clarity. Synergy between experimental and theoretical works, both playing a crucial role, has been at the heart of these advances. On the theoretical front, the adoption of the Berry-phase concepts has established a link between the AHE and the topological nature of the Hall currents. On the experimental front, new experimental studies of the AHE in transition metals, transition-metal oxides, spinels, pyrochlores, and metallic dilute magnetic semiconductors have established systematic trends. These two developments, in concert with first-principles electronic structure calculations, strongly favor the dominance of an intrinsic Berry-phase-related AHE mechanism in metallic ferromagnets with moderate conductivity. The intrinsic AHE can be expressed in terms of the Berry-phase curvatures and it is therefore an intrinsic quantum-mechanical property of a perfect crystal. An extrinsic mechanism, skew scattering from disorder, tends to dominate the AHE in highly conductive ferromagnets. The full modern semiclassical treatment of the AHE is reviewed which incorporates an anomalous contribution to wave-packet group velocity due to momentum-space Berry curvatures and correctly combines the roles of intrinsic and extrinsic (skew-scattering and side-jump) scattering-related mechanisms. In addition, more rigorous quantum-mechanical treatments based on the Kubo and Keldysh formalisms are reviewed, taking into account multiband effects, and demonstrate the equivalence of all three linear response theories in the metallic regime. Building on results from recent experiment and theory, a

  16. Ion mobilities in diatomic gases: measurement versus prediction with non-specular scattering models.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Larriba, Carlos; Hogan, Christopher J

    2013-05-16

    Ion/electrical mobility measurements of nanoparticles and polyatomic ions are typically linked to particle/ion physical properties through either application of the Stokes-Millikan relationship or comparison to mobilities predicted from polyatomic models, which assume that gas molecules scatter specularly and elastically from rigid structural models. However, there is a discrepancy between these approaches; when specular, elastic scattering models (i.e., elastic-hard-sphere scattering, EHSS) are applied to polyatomic models of nanometer-scale ions with finite-sized impinging gas molecules, predictions are in substantial disagreement with the Stokes-Millikan equation. To rectify this discrepancy, we developed and tested a new approach for mobility calculations using polyatomic models in which non-specular (diffuse) and inelastic gas-molecule scattering is considered. Two distinct semiempirical models of gas-molecule scattering from particle surfaces were considered. In the first, which has been traditionally invoked in the study of aerosol nanoparticles, 91% of collisions are diffuse and thermally accommodating, and 9% are specular and elastic. In the second, all collisions are considered to be diffuse and accommodating, but the average speed of the gas molecules reemitted from a particle surface is 8% lower than the mean thermal speed at the particle temperature. Both scattering models attempt to mimic exchange between translational, vibrational, and rotational modes of energy during collision, as would be expected during collision between a nonmonoatomic gas molecule and a nonfrozen particle surface. The mobility calculation procedure was applied considering both hard-sphere potentials between gas molecules and the atoms within a particle and the long-range ion-induced dipole (polarization) potential. Predictions were compared to previous measurements in air near room temperature of multiply charged poly(ethylene glycol) (PEG) ions, which range in morphology from

  17. G. Stanley Hall, Child Study, and the American Public.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Young, Jacy L

    2016-01-01

    In the final decades of the 19th century psychologist Granville Stanley Hall was among the most prominent pedagogical experts in the nation. The author explores Hall's carefully crafted persona as an educational expert, and his engagements with the American public, from 1880 to 1900, arguably the height of his influence. Drawing from accounts of Hall's lecture circuit in the popular press, a map of his talks across the nation is constructed to assess the geographic scope of his influence. These talks to educators on the psychology underlying childhood and pedagogy, and his views and research on child life more generally, were regularly discussed in newspapers and popular periodicals. The venues in which Hall's ideas were disseminated, discussed, and in some cases, dismissed are described. His efforts to mobilize popular support for, and assistance with, his research endeavors in child study are also discussed. Such efforts were controversial both within the burgeoning field of psychology and among the public. Through his various involvements in pedagogy, and concerted efforts to engage with the American public, Hall helped establish psychology's relevance to parenting and educational practices.

  18. Planar Hall effect bridge magnetic field sensors

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Henriksen, A.D.; Dalslet, Bjarke Thomas; Skieller, D.H.

    2010-01-01

    Until now, the planar Hall effect has been studied in samples with cross-shaped Hall geometry. We demonstrate theoretically and experimentally that the planar Hall effect can be observed for an exchange-biased ferromagnetic material in a Wheatstone bridge topology and that the sensor signal can...... Hall effect bridge sensors....

  19. Gauge invariance and fractional quantized Hall effect

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tao, R.; Wu, Y.S.

    1984-01-01

    It is shown that gauge invariance arguments imply the possibility of fractional quantized Hall effect; the Hall conductance is accurately quantized to a rational value. The ground state of a system showing the fractional quantized Hall effect must be degenerate; the non-degenerate ground state can only produce the integral quantized Hall effect. 12 references

  20. Systematic measurement of fast neutron background fluctuations in an urban area using a mobile detection system

    Science.gov (United States)

    Iyengar, A.; Beach, M.; Newby, R. J.; Fabris, L.; Heilbronn, L. H.; Hayward, J. P.

    2015-02-01

    Neutron background measurements using a mobile trailer-based system were conducted in Knoxville, Tennessee, USA. The 0.5 m2 system, consisting of eight EJ-301 liquid scintillation detectors, was used to collect neutron background measurements in order to better understand the systematic variations in background that depend solely on the street-level measurement position in a downtown area. Data was collected along 5 different streets, and the measurements were found to be repeatable. Using 10-min measurements, the fractional uncertainty in each measured data point was rates measured away from downtown Knoxville, a reduction in background count rates ranging from 10% to 50% was observed in the downtown area, sometimes varying substantially over distances of tens of meters. These reductions are attributed to the net shielding of the cosmic ray neutron flux by adjacent buildings. For reference, the building structure as observed at street level is quantified in part here by a measured angle-of-open-sky metric.

  1. "Hall mees" Linnateatris / Triin Sinissaar

    Index Scriptorium Estoniae

    Sinissaar, Triin

    1999-01-01

    Tallinn Linnateatri ja Raadioteatri ühislavastus "Hall mees" Gill Adamsi näidendi järgi, lavastaja Eero Spriit, osades Helene Vannari ja Väino Laes, kunstnik Kustav - Agu Püüman. Esietendus 22. okt

  2. Accurate Extraction of Charge Carrier Mobility in 4-Probe Field-Effect Transistors

    KAUST Repository

    Choi, Hyun Ho; Rodionov, Yaroslav I.; Paterson, Alexandra F.; Panidi, Julianna; Saranin, Danila; Kharlamov, Nikolai; Didenko, Sergei I.; Anthopoulos, Thomas D.; Cho, Kilwon; Podzorov, Vitaly

    2018-01-01

    Charge carrier mobility is an important characteristic of organic field-effect transistors (OFETs) and other semiconductor devices. However, accurate mobility determination in FETs is frequently compromised by issues related to Schottky-barrier contact resistance, that can be efficiently addressed by measurements in 4-probe/Hall-bar contact geometry. Here, it is shown that this technique, widely used in materials science, can still lead to significant mobility overestimation due to longitudinal channel shunting caused by voltage probes in 4-probe structures. This effect is investigated numerically and experimentally in specially designed multiterminal OFETs based on optimized novel organic-semiconductor blends and bulk single crystals. Numerical simulations reveal that 4-probe FETs with long but narrow channels and wide voltage probes are especially prone to channel shunting, that can lead to mobilities overestimated by as much as 350%. In addition, the first Hall effect measurements in blended OFETs are reported and how Hall mobility can be affected by channel shunting is shown. As a solution to this problem, a numerical correction factor is introduced that can be used to obtain much more accurate experimental mobilities. This methodology is relevant to characterization of a variety of materials, including organic semiconductors, inorganic oxides, monolayer materials, as well as carbon nanotube and semiconductor nanocrystal arrays.

  3. Accurate Extraction of Charge Carrier Mobility in 4-Probe Field-Effect Transistors

    KAUST Repository

    Choi, Hyun Ho

    2018-04-30

    Charge carrier mobility is an important characteristic of organic field-effect transistors (OFETs) and other semiconductor devices. However, accurate mobility determination in FETs is frequently compromised by issues related to Schottky-barrier contact resistance, that can be efficiently addressed by measurements in 4-probe/Hall-bar contact geometry. Here, it is shown that this technique, widely used in materials science, can still lead to significant mobility overestimation due to longitudinal channel shunting caused by voltage probes in 4-probe structures. This effect is investigated numerically and experimentally in specially designed multiterminal OFETs based on optimized novel organic-semiconductor blends and bulk single crystals. Numerical simulations reveal that 4-probe FETs with long but narrow channels and wide voltage probes are especially prone to channel shunting, that can lead to mobilities overestimated by as much as 350%. In addition, the first Hall effect measurements in blended OFETs are reported and how Hall mobility can be affected by channel shunting is shown. As a solution to this problem, a numerical correction factor is introduced that can be used to obtain much more accurate experimental mobilities. This methodology is relevant to characterization of a variety of materials, including organic semiconductors, inorganic oxides, monolayer materials, as well as carbon nanotube and semiconductor nanocrystal arrays.

  4. Sheldon-Hall syndrome

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bamshad Michael J

    2009-03-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Sheldon-Hall syndrome (SHS is a rare multiple congenital contracture syndrome characterized by contractures of the distal joints of the limbs, triangular face, downslanting palpebral fissures, small mouth, and high arched palate. Epidemiological data for the prevalence of SHS are not available, but less than 100 cases have been reported in the literature. Other common clinical features of SHS include prominent nasolabial folds, high arched palate, attached earlobes, mild cervical webbing, short stature, severe camptodactyly, ulnar deviation, and vertical talus and/or talipes equinovarus. Typically, the contractures are most severe at birth and non-progressive. SHS is inherited in an autosomal dominant pattern but about half the cases are sporadic. Mutations in either MYH3, TNNI2, or TNNT3 have been found in about 50% of cases. These genes encode proteins of the contractile apparatus of fast twitch skeletal muscle fibers. The diagnosis of SHS is based on clinical criteria. Mutation analysis is useful to distinguish SHS from arthrogryposis syndromes with similar features (e.g. distal arthrogryposis 1 and Freeman-Sheldon syndrome. Prenatal diagnosis by ultrasonography is feasible at 18–24 weeks of gestation. If the family history is positive and the mutation is known in the family, prenatal molecular genetic diagnosis is possible. There is no specific therapy for SHS. However, patients benefit from early intervention with occupational and physical therapy, serial casting, and/or surgery. Life expectancy and cognitive abilities are normal.

  5. Anode sheath in Hall thrusters

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dorf, L.; Semenov, V.; Raitses, Y.

    2003-01-01

    A set of hydrodynamic equations is used to describe quasineutral plasma in ionization and acceleration regions of a Hall thruster. The electron distribution function and Poisson equation are invoked for description of a near-anode region. Numerical solutions suggest that steady-state operation of a Hall thruster can be achieved at different anode sheath regimes. It is shown that the anode sheath depends on the thruster operating conditions, namely the discharge voltage and the mass flow rate

  6. Theory of spin Hall effect

    OpenAIRE

    Chudnovsky, Eugene M.

    2007-01-01

    An extension of Drude model is proposed that accounts for spin and spin-orbit interaction of charge carriers. Spin currents appear due to combined action of the external electric field, crystal field and scattering of charge carriers. The expression for spin Hall conductivity is derived for metals and semiconductors that is independent of the scattering mechanism. In cubic metals, spin Hall conductivity $\\sigma_s$ and charge conductivity $\\sigma_c$ are related through $\\sigma_s = [2 \\pi \\hbar...

  7. Optimization of Cylindrical Hall Thrusters

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Raitses, Yevgeny; Smirnov, Artem; Granstedt, Erik; Fisch, Nathaniel J.

    2007-01-01

    The cylindrical Hall thruster features high ionization efficiency, quiet operation, and ion acceleration in a large volume-to-surface ratio channel with performance comparable with the state-of-the-art annular Hall thrusters. These characteristics were demonstrated in low and medium power ranges. Optimization of miniaturized cylindrical thrusters led to performance improvements in the 50-200W input power range, including plume narrowing, increased thruster efficiency, reliable discharge initiation, and stable operation.

  8. Optimization of Cylindrical Hall Thrusters

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Raitses, Yevgeny; Smirnov, Artem; Granstedt, Erik; Fi, Nathaniel J.

    2007-01-01

    The cylindrical Hall thruster features high ionization efficiency, quiet operation, and ion acceleration in a large volume-to-surface ratio channel with performance comparable with the state-of-the-art annular Hall thrusters. These characteristics were demonstrated in low and medium power ranges. Optimization of miniaturized cylindrical thrusters led to performance improvements in the 50-200W input power range, including plume narrowing, increased thruster efficiency, reliable discharge initiation, and stable operation

  9. In-situ measurement of environment radioactivity by mobile nuclear field laboratory (MNFL)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gopalani, Deepak; Mathur, A.P.; Rawat, D.K.; Barala, S.S.; Singhal, K.P.; Singh, G.P.; Samant, R.P.

    2008-01-01

    In-situ measurement of environment radioactivity is useful tool for determine the unusual increase of radioactivity at any place due to any nuclear eventuality take place. A mobile nuclear field laboratory has been designed and developed for in-situ measurement of environment radioactivity at any desired location. This vehicle is equipped with different monitoring and analysis instruments. These equipment can be operated while vehicle is moving. The measured data can be stored in computer. This vehicle has the space for storage of various environmental matrices of affected area and these can analysis in laboratory. (author)

  10. Measurement of Electromagnetic Shielding Effectiveness of Woven Fabrics Containing Metallic Yarns by Mobile Devices

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Erhan Kenan ÇEVEN

    2016-10-01

    Full Text Available In this study, we introduce an alternative method to evaluate the electromagnetic shielding effectiveness (EMSE of woven fabrics containing metal wires. For experimental measurements, hybrid silk viscose yarns containing metal wires were first produced. Conductive test fabrics were then produced using the hybrid weft yarns and polyester warp yarns. The produced fabrics were separated in two parts and laminated together after rotating one fabric by 90 degrees to create a grid structure. The laminated fabrics were then folded by several times to create multiple layers such as 2,4,8,12,16. The EMSE of the multiple layered fabrics was measured over GSM signals received by a mobile device. For EMSE evaluation, the mobile device was placed between the laminated fabrics. The EMSE values of the fabrics were then calculated in accordance with the power variations of GSM signals.

  11. Measurements of ion mobility in argon and neon based gas mixtures

    CERN Document Server

    INSPIRE-00507268

    2017-01-01

    As gaseous detectors are operated at high rates of primary ionisation, ions created in the detector have a considerable impact on the performance of the detector. The upgraded ALICE Time Projection Chamber (TPC) will operate during LHC Run$\\,3$ with a substantial space charge density of positive ions in the drift volume. In order to properly simulate such space charges, knowledge of the ion mobility $K$ is necessary. To this end, a small gaseous detector was constructed and the ion mobility of various gas mixtures was measured. To validate the corresponding signal analysis, simulations were performed. Results are shown for several argon and neon based mixtures with different $\\textrm{CO}_2$ fractions. A decrease of $K$ was measured for increasing water content.

  12. Not your grandfather's concert hall

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cooper, Russell; Malenka, Richard; Griffith, Charles; Friedlander, Steven

    2004-05-01

    The opening of Judy and Arthur Zankel Hall on 12 September 2003, restores Andrew Carnegie's original 1891 concept of having three outstanding auditoriums of different sizes under one roof, and creates a 21st-century venue for music performance and education. With concerts ranging from early music to avant-garde multimedia productions, from jazz to world music, and from solo recitals to chamber music, Zankel Hall expands the breadth and depth of Carnegie Hall's offerings. It allows for the integration of programming across three halls with minifestivals tailored both to the size and strengths of each hall and to the artists and music to be performed. The new flexible space also provides Carnegie Hall with an education center equipped with advanced communications technology. This paper discusses the unique program planned for this facility and how the architects, theatre consultants, and acousticians developed a design that fulfilled the client's expectations and coordinated the construction of the facility under the floor of the main Isaac Stern Auditorium without having to cancel a single performance.

  13. Anode Fall Formation in a Hall Thruster

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dorf, Leonid A.; Raitses, Yevgeny F.; Smirnov, Artem N.; Fisch, Nathaniel J.

    2004-01-01

    As was reported in our previous work, accurate, nondisturbing near-anode measurements of the plasma density, electron temperature, and plasma potential performed with biased and emissive probes allowed the first experimental identification of both electron-repelling (negative anode fall) and electron-attracting (positive anode fall) anode sheaths in Hall thrusters. An interesting new phenomenon revealed by the probe measurements is that the anode fall changes from positive to negative upon removal of the dielectric coating, which appears on the anode surface during the course of Hall thruster operation. As reported in the present work, energy dispersion spectroscopy analysis of the chemical composition of the anode dielectric coating indicates that the coating layer consists essentially of an oxide of the anode material (stainless steel). However, it is still unclear how oxygen gets into the thruster channel. Most importantly, possible mechanisms of anode fall formation in a Hall thruster with a clean and a coated anodes are analyzed in this work; practical implication of understanding the general structure of the electron-attracting anode sheath in the case of a coated anode is also discussed

  14. The Measurement of Low Frequency Magnetic Field of Two Kinds of GSM900 Mobile Phone

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mehri Kaviani Moghadam

    2008-06-01

    Full Text Available Introduction:  The  use  of  mobile  communication  systems  has  dramatically  increased  over  the  past  decade. Although many studies have been performed to determine the effect of radio frequency (RF but  less attention has been paid to the possible biological impact of exposure to extremely low frequency  (ELF components.   The objective of this study is two folds. One is to design the equipments needed for the measurement of  the ELF fields of two types of GSM900 mobile phone. Secondly, use a protocol suitable for an accurate  assessment of the ELF fields.  Materials  and Methods:  First  a  home-made  search  coil  was  provided  and  calibrated precisely  under  several experiments. Using Fast Fourier Transform, the power spectrum density of the induced voltage in  the search coil was analyzed and the amplitudes of 217 Hz and its harmonics were extracted and then the  distribution of magnetic field in the back side of mobile phones was determined.  Results: The values of B-field on the back side of the two kinds of GSM mobile phone were different.  They  were  between  50  to  160  µT in  Nokia  3310  and  14  to  30  µT in  Nokia  8310.  Considering  the  difference between the amplitudes of frequency components at 217 Hz and its harmonics in the two kinds  of mobile phone, a range of magnetic flux density at different times in a five day period was measured.  Discussion and Conclusion: These findings emphasize the need for considering the distribution of low  frequency magnetic field from mobile phone when biological effects of magnetic fields are studied. To  determine  the  intensity  windowing  effect,  one  must  consider  the  physical  characteristics  of  the  fundamental  frequency  component  wave  (217  Hz  and  its  harmonics  produced  by  the  mobile  phone  similar to the one generated under a real situation.

  15. Magnetoresistivity and Hall resistivity of a YBCO thin film in a tilted magnetic field

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Amirfeiz, M.; Cimberle, M. R.; Ferdeghini, C.; Giannini, E.; Grassano, G.; Marre', D.; Putti, M.; Siri, A. S.

    1997-01-01

    In this paper they present magnetoresistivity and Hall effect measurements performed on a YBCO epitaxial film as a function of the angle θ between the external magnetic field and the a-b planes. The resistivity and Hall effect measurements are analyzed in term of the general scaling approach proposed by Blatter and coworkers; the Hall conductivity data are examined to separate the contributions due to vortices and quasi particles

  16. Quantification of Outdoor Mobility by Use of Accelerometer-Measured Physical Behaviour

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kristin Taraldsen

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Hip fractures in older persons are associated with both low levels of daily physical activity and loss of outdoor mobility. The aim was to investigate if accelerometer-based measures of physical behaviour can be used to determine if people undertake outdoor walking and to provide reference values for physical behaviour outcomes related to outdoor mobility. Older persons (n=245, ≥70 years, one year after hip fracture, participated. Six objective measures of physical behaviour collected by an activity monitor were compared with self-reported outdoor mobility assessed with the Nottingham Extended ADL scale. All measures of time and length in upright periods were significantly lower in participants who reported not walking outdoors (p<0.001. A set of cut-off points for the different physical behaviour variables was generated. Maximum length of upright events discriminated best between groups, with 31 minutes as a threshold to determine if a person is more likely to report that they walk outdoors (sensitivity: 0.805, specificity: 0.704, and AUC: 0.871 or 41 minutes or more to determine if a person is more likely to report outdoor walking on their own (AUC: 0.891. Physical behaviour variables from activity monitoring can provide information about patterns of physical behaviour related to outdoor activity performance.

  17. Dual-wavelength photo-Hall effect spectroscopy of deep levels in high resistive CdZnTe with negative differential photoconductivity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Musiienko, A.; Grill, R.; Moravec, P.; Korcsmáros, G.; Rejhon, M.; Pekárek, J.; Elhadidy, H.; Šedivý, L.; Vasylchenko, I.

    2018-04-01

    Photo-Hall effect spectroscopy was used in the study of deep levels in high resistive CdZnTe. The monochromator excitation in the photon energy range 0.65-1.77 eV was complemented by a laser diode high-intensity excitation at selected photon energies. A single sample characterized by multiple unusual features like negative differential photoconductivity and anomalous depression of electron mobility was chosen for the detailed study involving measurements at both the steady and dynamic regimes. We revealed that the Hall mobility and photoconductivity can be both enhanced and suppressed by an additional illumination at certain photon energies. The anomalous mobility decrease was explained by an excitation of the inhomogeneously distributed deep level at the energy Ev + 1.0 eV, thus enhancing potential non-uniformities. The appearance of negative differential photoconductivity was interpreted by an intensified electron occupancy of that level by a direct valence band-to-level excitation. Modified Shockley-Read-Hall theory was used for fitting experimental results by a model comprising five deep levels. Properties of the deep levels and their impact on the device performance were deduced.

  18. Iodine Hall Thruster

    Science.gov (United States)

    Szabo, James

    2015-01-01

    Iodine enables dramatic mass and cost savings for lunar and Mars cargo missions, including Earth escape and near-Earth space maneuvers. The demonstrated throttling ability of iodine is important for a singular thruster that might be called upon to propel a spacecraft from Earth to Mars or Venus. The ability to throttle efficiently is even more important for missions beyond Mars. In the Phase I project, Busek Company, Inc., tested an existing Hall thruster, the BHT-8000, on iodine propellant. The thruster was fed by a high-flow iodine feed system and supported by an existing Busek hollow cathode flowing xenon gas. The Phase I propellant feed system was evolved from a previously demonstrated laboratory feed system. Throttling of the thruster between 2 and 11 kW at 200 to 600 V was demonstrated. Testing showed that the efficiency of iodine fueled BHT-8000 is the same as with xenon, with iodine delivering a slightly higher thrust-to-power (T/P) ratio. In Phase II, a complete iodine-fueled system was developed, including the thruster, hollow cathode, and iodine propellant feed system. The nominal power of the Phase II system is 8 kW; however, it can be deeply throttled as well as clustered to much higher power levels. The technology also can be scaled to greater than 100 kW per thruster to support megawatt-class missions. The target thruster efficiency for the full-scale system is 65 percent at high specific impulse (Isp) (approximately 3,000 s) and 60 percent at high thrust (Isp approximately 2,000 s).

  19. Mobile CARS - IRS Instrument for Simultaneous Spectroscopic Measurement of Multiple Properties in Gaseous Flows

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bivolaru, Daniel; Lee, Joseph W.; Jones, Stephen B.; Tedder, Sarah A.; Danehy, Paul M.; Weikl, M. C.; Magnotti, G.; Cutler, Andrew D.

    2007-01-01

    This paper describes a measurement system based on the dual-pump coherent anti-Stokes Raman spectroscopy (CARS) and interferometric Rayleigh scattering (IRS) methods. The IRS measurement is performed simultaneously with the CARS measurement using a common green laser beam as a narrow-band light source. The mobile CARS-IRS instrument is designed for the use both in laboratories as well as in ground-based combustion test facilities. Furthermore, it is designed to be easily transported between laboratory and test facility. It performs single-point spatially and temporally resolved simultaneous measurements of temperature, species mole fraction of N2, O2, and H2, and two-components of velocity. A mobile laser system can be placed inside or outside the test facility, while a beam receiving and monitoring system is placed near the measurement location. Measurements in a laboratory small-scale Mach 1.6 H2-air combustion-heated supersonic jet were performed to test the capability of the system. Final setup and pretests of a larger scale reacting jet are ongoing at NASA Langley Research Center s Direct Connect Supersonic Combustor Test Facility (DCSCTF).

  20. The detection and measurement of the electrical mobility size distributions associated with radon decay products

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fei, Lin.

    1996-04-01

    The potential risk of lung cancer has evoked interest in the properties of radon decay products. There are two forms of this progeny: either attached to ambient aerosols, or still in the status of ions/molecules/small clusters. This ''unattached'' activity would give a higher dose per unit of airborne activity than the ''attached'' progeny that are rather poorly deposited. In this thesis, a system for determining unattached radon decay products electrical mobility size distribution by measuring their electrical mobilities was developed, based on the fact that about 88% of 218 Po atoms have unit charge at the end of their recoil after decay from 222 Rn, while the remainder are neutral. Essential part of the setup is the radon-aerosol chamber with the Circular Electrical Mobility Spectrometer (CEMS) inside. CEMS is used for sampling and classifying the charged radioactive clusters produced in the chamber. An alpha- sensitive plastic, CR-39 disk, is placed in CEMS as an inlaid disk electrode and the alpha particle detector. CEMS showed good performance in fine inactive particles' classification. If it also works well for radon decay products, it can offer a convenient size distribution measurement for radioactive ultrafine particles. However, the experiments did not obtain an acceptable resolution. Suggestions are made for solving this problem

  1. Quality assessment of graphene: Continuity, uniformity,and accuracy of mobility measurements

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    David M.A.Mackenzie; Timothy J.Booth; Lene Gammelgaard; Johanna Zultak; Bjarke S.Jessen; Peter Bφggild; Dirch H.Petersen; Jonas D.Buron; Patrick R.Whelan; José M.Caridad; Martin Bjergfelt; Birong Luo; Abhay Shivayogimath; Anne L.Smitshuysen; Joachim D.Thomsen

    2017-01-01

    With the increasing availability of large-area graphene,the ability to rapidly and accurately assess the quality of the electrical properties has become critically important.For practical applications,spatial variability in carrier density and carrier mobility must be controlled and minimized.We present a simple framework for assessing the quality and homogeneity of large-area graphene devices.The field effect in both exfoliated graphene devices encapsulated in hexagonal boron nitride and chemical vapor-deposited (CVD) devices was measured in dual current-voltage configurations and used to derive a single,gate-dependent effective shape factor,β,for each device.β is a sensitive indicator of spatial homogeneity that can be obtained from samples of arbitrary shape.All 50 devices investigated in this study show a variation (up to tenfold) inβ as a function of the gate bias.Finite element simulations suggest that spatial doping inhomogeneity,rather than mobility inhomogeneity,is the primary cause of the gate dependence ofβ,and that measurable variations ofβ can be caused by doping variations as small as 1010 cm-2.Our results suggest that local variations in the position of the Dirac point alter the current flow and thus the effective sample shape as a function of the gate bias.We also found that such variations lead to systematic errors in carrier mobility calculations,which can be revealed by inspecting the correspondingβ factor.

  2. Mobile TDR for geo-referenced measurement of soil water content and electrical conductivity

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Thomsen, Anton; Schelde, Kirsten; Drøscher, Per

    2007-01-01

    The development of site-specific crop management is constrained by the availability of sensors for monitoring important soil and crop related conditions. A mobile time-domain reflectometry (TDR) unit for geo-referenced soil measurements has been developed and used for detailed mapping of soil wat...... analysis of the soil water measurements, recommendations are made with respect to sampling strategies. Depending on the variability of a given area, between 15 and 30 ha can be mapped with respect to soil moisture and electrical conductivity with sufficient detail within 8 h...

  3. A mobility spectrometer for measurement of initial properties of 218Po

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Strydom, R.; Leuschner, A.H.; Stoker, P.H.

    1990-01-01

    This paper describes the development of a mobility spectrometer with adequate resolution to study the clustering processes (in ion-induced nucleation) that may occur. The first results of measurements of pure water clustering around 218 Po ions using the spectrometer are presented. It is found that the radius of the ion increases with relative humidity. The results are compared with predictions of two representations of the clustering theory. The theory qualitatively explains the results obtained, but there are considerable differences between the experimental measurements and the theoretical predictions, as well as between the two representations of the theory. (author)

  4. Determination of the Hall Thruster Operating Regimes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    L. Dorf; V. Semenov; Y. Raitses; N.J. Fisch

    2002-04-01

    A quasi one-dimensional (1-D) steady-state model of the Hall thruster is presented. For the same discharge voltage two operating regimes are possible -- with and without the anode sheath. For given mass flow rate, magnetic field profile and discharge voltage a unique solution can be constructed, assuming that the thruster operates in one of the regimes. However, we show that for a given temperature profile the applied discharge voltage uniquely determines the operating regime: for discharge voltages greater than a certain value, the sheath disappears. That result is obtained over a wide range of incoming neutral velocities, channel lengths and widths, and cathode plane locations. It is also shown that a good correlation between the quasi 1-D model and experimental results can be achieved by selecting an appropriate electron mobility and temperature profile

  5. Real time chromametry measurement for food quality detection using mobile device

    Science.gov (United States)

    Witjaksono, Gunawan; Mohamad Hussin, Nur Haziqah Farah Binti; Abdelkreem Saeed Rabih, Almur; Alfa, Sagir

    2017-09-01

    Freshness of the food is the main factor in determining the quality and safety of the consumed food and hence consumers satisfaction. Current technologies for food quality determination depend on colour changing labels to indicate the freshness level, which is subjective to human eyes. The goal of this paper is to design and develop chromatic algorithm based on RGB colour reading and correlation with pH values for real time determination of freshness level of shrimp. The results show that the developed algorithm is able to measure, analyse and display the freshness level of food directly on the screen of a mobile app technology. The mobile app is developed on Android platform and is tested in the shrimp freshness range by stating whether it is “fresh, good or spoiled”.

  6. Application of mobile computers in a measuring system supporting examination of posture diseases

    Science.gov (United States)

    Piekarski, Jacek; Klimiec, Ewa; Zaraska, Wiesław

    2013-07-01

    Measuring system designed and manufactured by the authors and based on mobile computers (smartphones and tablets) working as data recorders has been invented to support diagnosis of orthopedic, especially feet, diseases. The basic idea is to examine a patient in his natural environment, during the usual activities (such as walking or running). The paper describes the proposed system with sensors manufactured from piezoelectric film (PVDF film) and placed in the shoe insole. The mechanical reliability of PVDF film is excellent, though elimination of the pyroelectric effect is required. A possible solution of the problem and the test results are presented in the paper. Data recording is based on wireless transmission to a mobile device used as a data logger.

  7. Dual mobility hip arthroplasty wear measurement: Experimental accuracy assessment using radiostereometric analysis (RSA).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pineau, V; Lebel, B; Gouzy, S; Dutheil, J-J; Vielpeau, C

    2010-10-01

    The use of dual mobility cups is an effective method to prevent dislocations. However, the specific design of these implants can raise the suspicion of increased wear and subsequent periprosthetic osteolysis. Using radiostereometric analysis (RSA), migration of the femoral head inside the cup of a dual mobility implant can be defined to apprehend polyethylene wear rate. The study aimed to establish the precision of RSA measurement of femoral head migration in the cup of a dual mobility implant, and its intra- and interobserver variability. A total hip prosthesis phantom was implanted and placed under weight loading conditions in a simulator. Model-based RSA measurement of implant penetration involved specially machined polyethylene liners with increasing concentric wear (no wear, then 0.25, 0.5 and 0.75mm). Three examiners, blinded to the level of wear, analyzed (10 times) the radiostereometric films of the four liners. There was one experienced, one trained, and one inexperienced examiner. Statistical analysis measured the accuracy, precision, and intra- and interobserver variability by calculating Root Mean Square Error (RMSE), Concordance Correlation Coefficient (CCC), Intra Class correlation Coefficient (ICC), and Bland-Altman plots. Our protocol, that used a simple geometric model rather than the manufacturer's CAD files, showed precision of 0.072mm and accuracy of 0.034mm, comparable with machining tolerances with low variability. Correlation between wear measurement and true value was excellent with a CCC of 0.9772. Intraobserver reproducibility was very good with an ICC of 0.9856, 0.9883 and 0.9842, respectively for examiners 1, 2 and 3. Interobserver reproducibility was excellent with a CCC of 0.9818 between examiners 2 and 1, and 0.9713 between examiners 3 and 1. Quantification of wear is indispensable for the surveillance of dual mobility implants. This in vitro study validates our measurement method. Our results, and comparison with other studies using

  8. Development of a micro-Hall magnetometer and studies of individual Fe-filled carbon nanotubes

    OpenAIRE

    Lipert, Kamil

    2011-01-01

    This work presents Hall magnetometry studies on individual Fe-filled carbon nanotubes (CNT). For this approach high sensitivity micro Hall sensors based on a GaAs/AlGaAs heterostructure with two dimensional electron gas (2DEG) were developed. Electron beam lithography and wet chemical etching were utilized for patterning Hall sensors onto the heterostructure surface. The devices were characterized by means of scanning electron microscopy, atomic force microscopy and transport measurements. In...

  9. Removing traffic emissions from CO2 time series measured at a tall tower using mobile measurements and transport modeling

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schmidt, Andres; Rella, Chris W.; Göckede, Mathias; Hanson, Chad; Yang, Zhenlin; Law, Beverly E.

    2014-11-01

    In recent years, measurements of atmospheric carbon dioxide with high precision and accuracy have become increasingly important for climate change research, in particular to inform terrestrial biosphere models. Anthropogenic carbon dioxide emissions from fossil fuel burning have long been recognized to contribute a significant portion of the carbon dioxide in the atmosphere. Here, we present an approach to remove the traffic related carbon dioxide emissions from mole fractions measured at a tall tower by using the corresponding carbon monoxide measurements in combination with footprint analyses and transport modeling. This technique improves the suitability of the CO2 data to be used in inverse modeling approaches of atmosphere-biosphere exchange that do not account for non-biotic portions of CO2. In our study region in Oregon, road traffic emissions are the biggest source of anthropogenic carbon dioxide and carbon monoxide. A three-day mobile campaign covering 1700 km of roads in northwestern Oregon was performed during summer of 2012 using a laser-based Cavity Ring-Down Spectrometer. The mobile measurements incorporated different roads including main highways, urban streets, and back-roads, largely within the typical footprint of a tall CO/CO2 observation tower in Oregon's Willamette Valley. For the first time, traffic related CO:CO2 emission ratios were measured directly at the sources during an on-road campaign under a variety of different driving conditions. An average emission ratio of 7.43 (±1.80) ppb CO per ppm CO2 was obtained for the study region and applied to separate the traffic related portion of CO2 from the mole fraction time series. The road traffic related portion of the CO2 mole fractions measured at the tower site reached maximum values ranging from 9.8 to 12 ppm, depending on the height above the surface, during summer 2012.

  10. Measuring Gas Concentration and Wind Intensity in a Turbulent Wind Tunnel with a Mobile Robot

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dani Martínez

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available This paper presents the measurement of gas concentration and wind intensity performed with a mobile robot in a custom turbulent wind tunnel designed for experimentation with customizable wind and gas leak sources. This paper presents the representation in different information layers of the measurements obtained in the turbulent wind tunnel under different controlled environmental conditions in order to describe the plume of the gas and wind intensities inside the experimentation chamber. The information layers have been generated from the measurements gathered by individual onboard gas and wind sensors carried out by an autonomous mobile robot. On the one hand, the assumption was that the size and cost of these specialized sensors do not allow the creation of a net of sensors or other measurement alternatives based on the simultaneous use of several sensors, and on the other hand, the assumption is that the information layers created will have application on the development and test of automatic gas source location procedures based on reactive or nonreactive algorithms.

  11. Reduction of hysteresis for carbon nanotube mobility measurements using pulsed characterization

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Estrada, David; Dutta, Sumit; Liao, Albert; Pop, Eric

    2010-01-01

    We describe a pulsed measurement technique for suppressing hysteresis for carbon nanotube (CNT) device measurements in air, vacuum, and over a wide temperature range (80-453 K). Varying the gate pulse width and duty cycle probes the relaxation times associated with charge trapping near the CNT, found to be up to the 0.1-10 s range. Longer off times between voltage pulses enable consistent, hysteresis-free measurements of CNT mobility. A tunneling front model for charge trapping and relaxation is also described, suggesting trap depths up to 4-8 nm for CNTs on SiO 2 . Pulsed measurements will also be applicable for other nanoscale devices such as graphene, nanowires, or molecular electronics, and could enable probing trap relaxation times in a variety of material system interfaces.

  12. A mobile TEPC-based system to measure the contributions to H*(10) at flight altitudes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wissmann, F.; Langner, F.; Roth, J.; Schrewe, U.

    2004-01-01

    A very promising method to measure the ambient dose equivalent H* (10) at flight altitudes is to use Tissue Equivalent Proportional Counters (TEPC). The measured quantity is the lineal energy, y, which can be converted into equivalent dose as a good estimate of H* (10). According to the lineal energy transfer (LET) spectra one may even extract information about the composition of the radiation field. A new system was developed by adding a surrounding coincidence detector (CACS: Coincidence/Anti-Coincidence Shield) that allows one to identify the primary particle, which deposits energy in the TEPC, as neutral or charged. The entire system was calibrated in the neutron and high-energy photon reference fields at PTB. One of the results of these measurements is, the use of low- and high-LET calibration factors when performing measurements in mixed radiation fields. The TEPC/CACS system is now operated on-board aircraft as a fixed or mobile dosimetry system. (authors)

  13. Output power distributions of mobile radio base stations based on network measurements

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Colombi, D; Thors, B; Persson, T; Törnevik, C; Wirén, N; Larsson, L-E

    2013-01-01

    In this work output power distributions of mobile radio base stations have been analyzed for 2G and 3G telecommunication systems. The approach is based on measurements in selected networks using performance surveillance tools part of the network Operational Support System (OSS). For the 3G network considered, direct measurements of output power levels were possible, while for the 2G networks, output power levels were estimated from measurements of traffic volumes. Both voice and data services were included in the investigation. Measurements were conducted for large geographical areas, to ensure good overall statistics, as well as for smaller areas to investigate the impact of different environments. For high traffic hours, the 90th percentile of the averaged output power was found to be below 65% and 45% of the available output power for the 2G and 3G systems, respectively.

  14. Output power distributions of mobile radio base stations based on network measurements

    Science.gov (United States)

    Colombi, D.; Thors, B.; Persson, T.; Wirén, N.; Larsson, L.-E.; Törnevik, C.

    2013-04-01

    In this work output power distributions of mobile radio base stations have been analyzed for 2G and 3G telecommunication systems. The approach is based on measurements in selected networks using performance surveillance tools part of the network Operational Support System (OSS). For the 3G network considered, direct measurements of output power levels were possible, while for the 2G networks, output power levels were estimated from measurements of traffic volumes. Both voice and data services were included in the investigation. Measurements were conducted for large geographical areas, to ensure good overall statistics, as well as for smaller areas to investigate the impact of different environments. For high traffic hours, the 90th percentile of the averaged output power was found to be below 65% and 45% of the available output power for the 2G and 3G systems, respectively.

  15. Experimental ion mobility measurements in Xe-C2H6

    Science.gov (United States)

    Perdigoto, J. M. C.; Cortez, A. F. V.; Veenhof, R.; Neves, P. N. B.; Santos, F. P.; Borges, F. I. G. M.; Conde, C. A. N.

    2017-10-01

    In this paper we present the results of the ion mobility measurements made in gaseous mixtures of xenon (Xe) with ethane (C2H6) for pressures ranging from 6 to 10 Torr (8-10.6 mbar) and for low reduced electric fields in the 10 Td to 25 Td range (2.4-6.1 kVṡcm-1ṡ bar-1), at room temperature. The time of arrival spectra revealed two peaks throughout the entire range studied which were attributed to ion species with 3-carbons (C3H5+, C3H6+ C3H8+ and C3H9+) and with 4-carbons (C4H7+, C4H9+ and C4H10+). Besides these, and for Xe concentrations above 70%, a bump starts to appear at the right side of the main peak for reduced electric fields higher than 20 Td, which was attributed to the resonant charge transfer of C2H6+ to C2H6 that affects the mobility of its ion products (C3H8+ and C3H9+). The time of arrival spectra for Xe concentrations of 20%, 50%, 70% and 90% are presented, together with the reduced mobilities as a function of the Xe concentration calculated from the peaks observed for the low reduced electric fields and pressures studied.

  16. The measurement of the chemically mobile fraction of lead in soil using isotopic dilution analysis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kirchhoff, J.; Brand, J.; Schuettelkopf, H.

    1992-12-01

    The chemically available fraction of lead in eight soils measured by isotopic dilution analysis using 212 Pb ranged from 7 to 16% of the total content of lead in soil. The soluble fractions achieved values up to 63% of the total content in 1 M NH 4 NO 3 , 1 M MgCl 2 and 0.05 M DTPA solutions. Increasing the contact time between water and soil, the water-soil ratio from 1:1 to 5:1 and increasing the temperature of the soil-water suspension raised the chemically available fraction in soil. Comparing various soil parameters and the mobile fraction of lead, only pH shows a significant correlation. The amphoteric character of lead causes a minimum of mobility about pH 6; pH-values below are responsible for the higher mobility of lead as Pb 2+ , at pH-values above 6 soluble hydroxy and humic acid complexes are formed. (orig.) [de

  17. ac spin-Hall effect

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Entin-Wohlman, O.

    2005-01-01

    Full Text:The spin-Hall effect is described. The Rashba and Dresselhaus spin-orbit interactions are both shown to yield the low temperature spin-Hall effect for strongly localized electrons coupled to phonons. A frequency-dependent electric field E(ω) generates a spin-polarization current, normal to E, due to interference of hopping paths. At zero temperature the corresponding spin-Hall conductivity is real and is proportional to ω 2 . At non-zero temperatures the coupling to the phonons yields an imaginary term proportional to ω. The interference also yields persistent spin currents at thermal equilibrium, at E = 0. The contributions from the Dresselhaus and Rashba interactions to the interference oppose each other

  18. In vivo determination of tooth mobility after fixed orthodontic appliance therapy with a novel intraoral measurement device.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Konermann, Anna; Al-Malat, R; Skupin, J; Keilig, L; Dirk, C; Karanis, R; Bourauel, C; Jäger, A

    2017-05-01

    Valid measurement systems recording tooth mobility upon displacement within the subtle range of physiological strains are missing. Here, we introduce a novel in vivo measurement device and demonstrate a first clinical application by monitoring tooth mobility changes during retention after fixed multibracket appliance therapy. Tooth mobility was measured in vivo on 21 patients (11 female, 10 male; mean age 16.1 ± 3.1 years) by displacing the upper first incisor 0.2 mm lingually for 0.2, 0.5, 1, 2, 5, and 10 s with the novel intraoral device. Measurements were recorded directly after, as much as 2, 7, and 14 days and up to 6 months after appliance debonding. Device performance was precise and valid in clinical use. Data revealed significant interindividual varying tooth mobility, which was very high during the first 2 days after appliance removal. After 1 week, mobility values decreased, but were generally higher upon short loadings compared to long ones. After 3 months, tooth mobility was significantly lower than directly after debonding. Interestingly, males exhibited significantly less mobility than females. Our work is the first using an in vivo measurement device capable of performing and recording tooth displacements within this delicate range and in such precision. Furthermore, our findings elucidate tooth mobility changes after multibracket treatment, giving important information for retention periods. Establishment of this novel measurement device in clinical use is an important improvement when approaching the complexity of tooth mobility in vivo regarding different issues like orthodontics, periodontal disease, or bruxism.

  19. The Reliability of a Novel Mobile 3-dimensional Wound Measurement Device.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Anghel, Ersilia L; Kumar, Anagha; Bigham, Thomas E; Maselli, Kathryn M; Steinberg, John S; Evans, Karen K; Kim, Paul J; Attinger, Christopher E

    2016-11-01

    Objective assessment of wound dimensions is essential for tracking progression and determining treatment effectiveness. A reliability study was designed to establish intrarater and interrater reliability of a novel mobile 3-dimensional wound measurement (3DWM) device. Forty-five wounds were assessed by 2 raters using a 3DWM device to obtain length, width, area, depth, and volume measurements. Wounds were also measured manually, using a disposable ruler and digital planimetry. The intraclass correlation coefficient (ICC) was used to establish intrarater and interrater reliability. High levels of intrarater and interrater agreement were observed for area, length, and width; ICC = 0.998, 0.977, 0.955 and 0.999, 0.997, 0.995, respectively. Moderate levels of intrarater (ICC = 0.888) and interrater (ICC = 0.696) agreement were observed for volume. Lastly, depth yielded an intrarater ICC of 0.360 and an interrater ICC of 0.649. Measures from the 3DWM device were highly correlated with those obtained from scaled photography for length, width, and area (ρ = 0.997, 0.988, 0.997, P device yielded correlations of ρ = 0.990, 0.987, 0.996 with P device was found to be highly reliable for measuring wound areas for a range of wound sizes and types as compared to manual measurement and digital planimetry. The depth and therefore volume measurement using the 3DWM device was found to have a lower ICC, but volume ICC alone was moderate. Overall, this device offers a mobile option for objective wound measurement in the clinical setting.

  20. Measuring the lateral charge-carrier mobility in metal-insulator-semiconductor capacitors via Kelvin-probe.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Milotti, Valeria; Pietsch, Manuel; Strunk, Karl-Philipp; Melzer, Christian

    2018-01-01

    We report a Kelvin-probe method to investigate the lateral charge-transport properties of semiconductors, most notably the charge-carrier mobility. The method is based on successive charging and discharging of a pre-biased metal-insulator-semiconductor stack by an alternating voltage applied to one edge of a laterally confined semiconductor layer. The charge carriers spreading along the insulator-semiconductor interface are directly measured by a Kelvin-probe, following the time evolution of the surface potential. A model is presented, describing the device response for arbitrary applied biases allowing the extraction of the lateral charge-carrier mobility from experimentally measured surface potentials. The method is tested using the organic semiconductor poly(3-hexylthiophene), and the extracted mobilities are validated through current voltage measurements on respective field-effect transistors. Our widely applicable approach enables robust measurements of the lateral charge-carrier mobility in semiconductors with weak impact from the utilized contact materials.

  1. Measuring the lateral charge-carrier mobility in metal-insulator-semiconductor capacitors via Kelvin-probe

    Science.gov (United States)

    Milotti, Valeria; Pietsch, Manuel; Strunk, Karl-Philipp; Melzer, Christian

    2018-01-01

    We report a Kelvin-probe method to investigate the lateral charge-transport properties of semiconductors, most notably the charge-carrier mobility. The method is based on successive charging and discharging of a pre-biased metal-insulator-semiconductor stack by an alternating voltage applied to one edge of a laterally confined semiconductor layer. The charge carriers spreading along the insulator-semiconductor interface are directly measured by a Kelvin-probe, following the time evolution of the surface potential. A model is presented, describing the device response for arbitrary applied biases allowing the extraction of the lateral charge-carrier mobility from experimentally measured surface potentials. The method is tested using the organic semiconductor poly(3-hexylthiophene), and the extracted mobilities are validated through current voltage measurements on respective field-effect transistors. Our widely applicable approach enables robust measurements of the lateral charge-carrier mobility in semiconductors with weak impact from the utilized contact materials.

  2. Measurements of the electrophoretic mobility with a new laser Doppler cytopherometer (Lazypher) and critical evaluation of the electrophorese mobility-test (EMT)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hoffmann, W.

    1982-01-01

    The new developed Laser Doppler Cytopherometer (Lazypher) allows the exact and objective measurement of the electrophoretic mobility of particles. Comparative experiments with the Free Flow Cell Electrophoresis instrument of Hannig showed identical results. The impression that the electrophoretic Mobility Test (EMT) is not valid for cancer diagnosis has been substantiated. But in its present form with the new instrument (Lazypher) possible improvements, e.g. isolation of lymphocytes, purification of antigens or indicator particles, can be estimated objectively for their value for the test system. (orig.) [de

  3. A novel mobile phone application to assess nutrition environment measures in low- and middle-income countries.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kanter, Rebecca; Alvey, Jeniece; Fuentes, Deborah

    2014-09-01

    Consumer nutrition environment measures are important to understanding the food environment, which affects individual dietary intake. A nutrition environment measures survey for supermarkets (NEMS-S) has been designed on paper for use in Guatemala. However, a paper survey is not an inconspicuous data collection method. To design, pilot test, and validate the Guatemala NEMS-S in the form of a mobile phone application (mobile app). CommCare, a free and open-source software application, was used to design the NEMS-S for Guatemala in the form of a mobile app. Two raters tested the mobile app in a single Guatemalan supermarket. Both the interrater and the test-retest reliability of the mobile app were determined using percent agreement and Cohen's kappa score and compared with the interrater and test-retest reliability of the paper version. Interrater reliability was very high between the paper survey and the mobile app (Cohen's kappa > 0.90). Test-retest reliability ranged from kappa 0.78 to 0.91. Between two certified NEMS-S raters, survey completion time using the mobile app was 5 minutes less than that with the paper form (35 vs. 40 minutes). The NEMS-S mobile app provides for more rapid data collection, with equivalent reliability and validity to the NEMS-S paper version, with advantages over a paper-based survey of multiple language capability and concomitant data entry.

  4. Mobile mini-DOAS measurement of the outflow of NO2 and HCHO from Mexico City

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    L. Molina

    2009-08-01

    Full Text Available We here present the results from mobile measurements using two ground-based zenith viewing Differential Optical Absorption Spectroscopy (DOAS instruments. The measurement was performed in a cross-section of the plume from the Mexico City Metropolitan Area (MCMA on 10 March 2006 as part of the MILAGRO field campaign. The two instruments operated in the UV and the visible wavelength region respectively and have been used to derive the differential vertical columns of HCHO and NO2 above the measurement route. This is the first time the mobile mini-DOAS instrument has been able to measure HCHO, one of the chemically most important and interesting gases in the polluted urban atmosphere. Using a mass-averaged wind speed and wind direction from the WRF model the instantaneous flux of HCHO and NO2 has been calculated from the measurements and the results are compared to the CAMx chemical model. The calculated flux through the measured cross-section was 1.9 (1.5–2.2 kg/s of HCHO and 4.4 (4.0–5.0 kg/s of NO2 using the UV instrument and 3.66 (3.63–3.73 kg/s of NO2 using the visible light instrument. The modeled values from CAMx for the outflow of both NO2 and HCHO, 1.1 and 3.6 kg/s, respectively, show a reasonable agreement with the measurement derived fluxes.

  5. Dynamic Axle Load of an Automotive Vehicle When Driven on a Mobile Measurement Platform

    OpenAIRE

    Jagiełowicz-Ryznar C.

    2014-01-01

    An analysis of the dynamic axle load of an automotive vehicle (AV) when it is driven on a mobile measurement platform is presented in this paper. During the ride, the time characteristic of the dynamic force N(t), acting on the axle, was recorded. The effect of the vehicle axle mass on the maximum dynamic force value and the dynamic coefficient were studied. On this basis it was attempted to calculate the total vehicle’s weight. Conclusions concerning the dynamic loads of the vehicle axles in...

  6. Mobile LiDAR Measurement for Aerosol Investigation in South-Central Hebei, China

    Science.gov (United States)

    qin, kai; Wu, Lixin; Zheng, Yunhui; Wong Man, Sing; Wang, Runfeng; Hu, Mingyu; Lang, Hongmei; Wang, Luyao; Bai, Yang; Rao, Lanlan

    2016-04-01

    With the rapid industrialization and urbanization in China during the last decades, the increasing anthropogenic pollutant emissions have significantly caused serious air pollution problems which are adversely influencing public health. Hebei is one of the most air polluted provinces in China. In January 2013, an extremely severe and persistent haze episode with record-breaking PM2.5 outbreak affecting hundreds of millions of people occurred over eastern and northern China. During that haze episode, 7 of the top 10 most polluted cities in China were located in the Hebei Province according to the report of China's Ministry of Environmental Protection. To investigate and the spatial difference and to characterize the vertical distribution of aerosol in different regions of south-central Hebei, mobile measurements were carried out using a mini micro pulse LiDAR system (model: MiniMPL) in March 2014. The mobile LiDAR kit consisting of a MiniMPL, a vibration reduction mount, a power inverter, a Windows surface tablet and a GPS receiver were mounted in a car watching though the sunroof opening. For comparison, a fixed measurement using a traditional micro pulse LiDAR system (model: MPL-4B) was conducted simultaneously in Shijiazhuang, the capital of Hebei Province. The equipped car was driven from downtown Shijiazhuang by way of suburban and rural area to downtown Cangzhou, Handan, and Baoding respectively at almost stable speed around 100Km per hour along different routes which counted in total more than 1000Km. The results can be summarized as: 1) the spatial distribution of total aerosol optical depth along the measurement routes in south-central Hebei was controlled by local terrain and population in general, with high values in downtown and suburban in the plain areas, and low values in rural areas along Taihang mountain to the west and Yan mountain to the north; 2) obviously high AODs were obtained at roads crossing points, inside densely populated area and nearby

  7. Orphan Sources and Fresh Fallout: Virtual Exercise in Mobile Measurement (ORPEX)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dowdall, M. (Norwegian Radiation Protection Authority, OEsteraas (Norway)); Smethurst, M.A. (Univ. of Exeter and Avalonia Geophysics, Cornwall Campus, Penryn (United Kingdom)); Andersson, K. (Technical Univ. of Denmark. Risoe National Lab. for Sustainable Energy, Roskilde (Denmark)); Aage, H.K. (Danish Emergency Management Agency, Birkeroed (Denmark)); Palsson, S.E. (Icelandic Radiation Protection Institute, Reykjavik (Iceland))

    2011-10-15

    In recent years carborne gamma spectrometry has expanded from its role as a geological survey platform to serving as a useful asset in the field of emergency response to radiological and nuclear situations. Its two main applications are searching for orphan sources and for surveying in the aftermath of an accident involving the release of radioactive materials. Despite this expansion, the opportunities for gaining practical experience in the field are limited by cost considerations and practicability. These limitations are exacerbated by the fact that data generated and displayed in the field differ significantly from gamma spectral data generated in a laboratory environment. As a means of exercising existing emergency measuring/surveying capability and introducing carborne measurements to a larger group, a virtual exercise was devised. The exercise ORPEX (Orphan Sources and Fresh Fallout Virtual Exercise in Mobile Measurement) featured two typical emergency scenarios in which carborne measuring systems might be deployed: firstly a search for multiple orphan sources and secondly surveying to delineate patchy fallout from a local release point. In the first scenario, synthetic spectral data were generated for imaginary point sources and inserted into genuine carborne measurements from in the Trondheim area of Norway. Participants were presented with a typical software tool and data in a range of typical formats and asked to report the source locations and isotopes within a time limit. In the second scenario, synthetic spectral data representing fallout from a local fire involving radioactive material were added to real carborne data from the Trondheim area. Participants were asked to produce maps that identify and characterise the regions of contamination within the same time limit. Fourteen individual organisations from seven different countries supplied results. Results from participants indicate that for strong sources of isotopes with simple spectra featuring

  8. Orphan Sources and Fresh Fallout: Virtual Exercise in Mobile Measurement (ORPEX)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dowdall, M.; Smethurst, M.A.; Andersson, K.; Aage, H.K.; Palsson, S.E.

    2011-10-01

    In recent years carborne gamma spectrometry has expanded from its role as a geological survey platform to serving as a useful asset in the field of emergency response to radiological and nuclear situations. Its two main applications are searching for orphan sources and for surveying in the aftermath of an accident involving the release of radioactive materials. Despite this expansion, the opportunities for gaining practical experience in the field are limited by cost considerations and practicability. These limitations are exacerbated by the fact that data generated and displayed in the field differ significantly from gamma spectral data generated in a laboratory environment. As a means of exercising existing emergency measuring/surveying capability and introducing carborne measurements to a larger group, a virtual exercise was devised. The exercise ORPEX (Orphan Sources and Fresh Fallout Virtual Exercise in Mobile Measurement) featured two typical emergency scenarios in which carborne measuring systems might be deployed: firstly a search for multiple orphan sources and secondly surveying to delineate patchy fallout from a local release point. In the first scenario, synthetic spectral data were generated for imaginary point sources and inserted into genuine carborne measurements from in the Trondheim area of Norway. Participants were presented with a typical software tool and data in a range of typical formats and asked to report the source locations and isotopes within a time limit. In the second scenario, synthetic spectral data representing fallout from a local fire involving radioactive material were added to real carborne data from the Trondheim area. Participants were asked to produce maps that identify and characterise the regions of contamination within the same time limit. Fourteen individual organisations from seven different countries supplied results. Results from participants indicate that for strong sources of isotopes with simple spectra featuring

  9. An evaluation of krypton propellant in Hall thrusters

    Science.gov (United States)

    Linnell, Jesse Allen

    , ionization processes, and electron dynamics. Electron mobility and the Hall parameter are studied and compared to different mobility models. Azimuthal electron current is studied using a fluid and particle drift approach. Analyses of several magnetic field features are conducted and simple tools are suggested for the development of future Hall thrusters. These findings have strong implications for future Hall thruster design, lifetimes, and modeling.

  10. Spin disorder effect in anomalous Hall effect in MnGa

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mendonça, A. P. A.; Varalda, J.; Schreiner, W. H.; Mosca, D. H.

    2017-12-01

    We report on resistivity and Hall effect in MnGa thin films grown by molecular beam epitaxy on GaAs substrates. Highly (1 1 1)-textured MnGa film with L10 structure exhibits hard magnetic properties with coercivities as high as 20 kOe and spin disorder mechanisms contributing to the Hall conductivity at room temperature. Density functional theory calculations were performed to determine the intrinsic Berry curvature in the momentum space with chiral spin structure that results in an anomalous Hall conductivity of 127 (Ωcm)-1 comparable to that measured at low temperature. In addition to residual and side-jump contributions, which are enhanced by thermal activation, both anomalous Hall conductivity and Hall angle increase between 100 K and room temperature. The present results reinforce the potential of Mn-Ga system for developing Hall effect-based spintronic devices.

  11. Temperature-dependent Hall effect studies of ZnO thin films grown by metalorganic chemical vapour deposition

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Roro, K T; Dangbegnon, J K; Sivaraya, S; Westraadt, J E; Neethling, J H; Leitch, A W R; Botha, J R; Kassier, G H

    2008-01-01

    The electrical properties of zinc oxide (ZnO) thin films of various thicknesses (0.3–4.4 µm) grown by metalorganic chemical vapour deposition on glass substrates have been studied by using temperature-dependent Hall-effect (TDH) measurements in the 18–300 K range. The high quality of the layers has been confirmed with x-ray diffraction, transmission electron microscopy, scanning electron microscopy and photoluminescence techniques. TDH measurements indicate the presence of a degenerate layer which significantly influences the low-temperature data. It is found that the measured mobility generally increases with increasing layer thickness, reaching a value of 120 cm 2 V −1 s −1 at room temperature for the 4.4 µm thick sample. The lateral grain size of the layers is also found to increase with thickness indicating a clear correlation between the size of the surface grains and the electrical properties of corresponding films. Theoretical fits to the Hall data suggest that the bulk conduction of the layers is dominated by a weakly compensated donor with activation energy in the 33–41 meV range and concentration of the order of 10 17 cm −3 , as well as a total acceptor concentration of mid-10 15 cm −3 . Grain boundary scattering is found to be an important limiting factor of the mobility throughout the temperature range considered

  12. Over 600 mobile base station measurements in Buenos Aires City, how far are general public limits?

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Aguirre, Anibal; Dalmas Di Giovanni, Norberto; Garcia Diaz, Javier; Douthat, Analia; Munoz, Claudio; Saint Nom, Roxana

    2008-01-01

    Full text: The general public worries about non ionizing radiation (NIR), produced by mobile base station aren't new, mainly in big cities like Buenos Aires where the amount of antennas of wide communication services (mobile, data links, FM Broadcasting, TV and others), are so considerable. Buenos Aires City has 3 million inhabitants in a surface of 203 km 2 and has about 700 mobile base stations between macro and micro cells. When public demand arrived to local government authorities, the first logical step was to promote a big measurement campaign to do a radiation map of the city. This measurement campaign has been done for two measurement teams, one with CITEFA NIR specialists and the other with ITBA NIR specialists, during 6 months. Local NRI measurement guidelines established that has to be taken between 12 and 16 points around NRI source in a 50 m or 100 m radius, depending on the neighbourhood buildings features (buildings located in the centre of the city aren't the same as a quiet house district). The obtained measured values had to be compared with Argentinean exposure limits, which are the same that ICNIRP limits. With over 7500 measured points in the entire city with wide band instruments (200 kHz-40 GHz), we have started our analysis. This information has been used by local authorities to upgrade a radiation map that can be consulted on the local government internet site. We have compared the obtained values with some international general public exposure limits. From this comparison we found that over 90% of measured points were under general public ICNIRP cell phone frequency limits, but the surprise was that, about 80% of them were below Russian limits (6 V/m) that are the strictest of the world. According to the obtained results and to provide a conclusion we could say that, if in a big city with a very high NIR sources density, we find a majority of lower limits values, this situation will be better in a little town with few NIR sources. However

  13. Quantum Hall effect and hopping conductivity in n-InGaAs/InAlAs nanoheterostructures

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gudina, S. V., E-mail: svpopova@imp.uran.ru; Arapov, Yu. G.; Saveliev, A. P.; Neverov, V. N.; Podgornykh, S. M.; Shelushinina, N. G.; Yakunin, M. V. [Russian Academy of Sciences, Mikheev Institute of Metal Physics, Ural Branch (Russian Federation); Vasil’evskii, I. S.; Vinichenko, A. N. [National Research Nuclear University MEPhI (Russian Federation)

    2016-12-15

    The longitudinal and Hall magnetoresistances are measured in the quantum Hall effect regime in the n-InGaAs/InAlAs heterostructures at temperatures of T = (1.8–30) K in magnetic fields up to B = 9 T. Temperature-induced transport in the region of the longitudinal resistance minima, corresponding to the plateau regions at Hall resistance, is investigated within the framework of the concept of hopping conductivity in a strongly localized electron system. The analysis of variable-range hopping conductivity in the region of the second, third, and fourth plateau of the quantum Hall effect provides the possibility of determining the localization length exponent.

  14. Using Adobe Flash Lite on mobile phones for psychological research: Reaction time measurement reliability and interdevice variability.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reimers, Stian; Stewart, Neil

    2008-11-01

    Mobile telephones have significant potential for use in psychological research, possessing unique characteristics-not least their ubiquity--that may make them useful tools for psychologists. We examined whether it is possible to measure reaction times (RTs) accurately using Adobe Flash Lite on mobile phones. We ran simple and choice RT experiments on two widely available mobile phones, a Nokia 6110 Navigator and a Sony Ericsson W810i, using a wireless application protocol (WAP) connection to access the Internet from the devices. RTs were compared within subjects with those obtained using a Linux-based millisecond-accurate measurement system. Results show that measured RTs were significantly longer on mobile devices, and that overall RTs and distribution of RTs varied across devices.

  15. Systematic measurement of fast neutron background fluctuations in an urban area using a mobile detection system

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Iyengar, A.; Beach, M.; Newby, R.J.; Fabris, L.; Heilbronn, L.H.; Hayward, J.P.

    2015-01-01

    Neutron background measurements using a mobile trailer-based system were conducted in Knoxville, Tennessee, USA. The 0.5 m 2 system, consisting of eight EJ-301 liquid scintillation detectors, was used to collect neutron background measurements in order to better understand the systematic variations in background that depend solely on the street-level measurement position in a downtown area. Data was collected along 5 different streets, and the measurements were found to be repeatable. Using 10-min measurements, the fractional uncertainty in each measured data point was <2%. Compared with fast neutron background count rates measured away from downtown Knoxville, a reduction in background count rates ranging from 10% to 50% was observed in the downtown area, sometimes varying substantially over distances of tens of meters. These reductions are attributed to the net shielding of the cosmic ray neutron flux by adjacent buildings. For reference, the building structure as observed at street level is quantified in part here by a measured angle-of-open-sky metric

  16. Systematic measurement of fast neutron background fluctuations in an urban area using a mobile detection system

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Iyengar, A., E-mail: aiyengar@utk.edu [Department of Nuclear and Radiological Engineering, University of Tennessee, Knoxville, TN (United States); Beach, M. [Department of Nuclear and Radiological Engineering, University of Tennessee, Knoxville, TN (United States); Newby, R.J.; Fabris, L. [Oak Ridge National Laboratory, Oak Ridge, TN (United States); Heilbronn, L.H. [Department of Nuclear and Radiological Engineering, University of Tennessee, Knoxville, TN (United States); Hayward, J.P. [Department of Nuclear and Radiological Engineering, University of Tennessee, Knoxville, TN (United States); Oak Ridge National Laboratory, Oak Ridge, TN (United States)

    2015-02-11

    Neutron background measurements using a mobile trailer-based system were conducted in Knoxville, Tennessee, USA. The 0.5 m{sup 2} system, consisting of eight EJ-301 liquid scintillation detectors, was used to collect neutron background measurements in order to better understand the systematic variations in background that depend solely on the street-level measurement position in a downtown area. Data was collected along 5 different streets, and the measurements were found to be repeatable. Using 10-min measurements, the fractional uncertainty in each measured data point was <2%. Compared with fast neutron background count rates measured away from downtown Knoxville, a reduction in background count rates ranging from 10% to 50% was observed in the downtown area, sometimes varying substantially over distances of tens of meters. These reductions are attributed to the net shielding of the cosmic ray neutron flux by adjacent buildings. For reference, the building structure as observed at street level is quantified in part here by a measured angle-of-open-sky metric.

  17. A Compton polarimeter for CEBAF Hall A

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bardin, G; Cavata, C; Frois, B; Juillard, M; Kerhoas, S; Languillat, J C; Legoff, J M; Mangeot, P; Martino, J; Platchkov, S; Rebourgeard, P; Vernin, P; Veyssiere, C; CEBAF Hall A Collaboration

    1994-09-01

    The physic program at CEBAF Hall A includes several experiments using 4 GeV polarized electron beam: parity violation in electron elastic scattering from proton and {sup 4}He, electric form factor of the proton by recoil polarization, neutron spin structure function at low Q{sup 2}. Some of these experiments will need beam polarization measurement and monitoring with an accuracy close to 4%, for beam currents ranging from 100 nA to 100 microA. A project of a Compton Polarimeter that will meet these requirements is presented. It will comprise four dipoles and a symmetric cavity consisting of two identical mirrors. 1 fig., 10 refs.

  18. Acoustic damping of air ducts. Fundamentals, hall room and real room measurements; Telefoniedaempfung von Luftdurchlaessen Grundlagen, Hallraum- und Realraum-Messungen

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wolters, T. [TROX GmbH, Neukirchen-Vluyn (Germany). Forschung und Entwicklung

    2006-07-01

    The methods and concepts of airborne noise measurement and damping are presented. Data for different types of air ducts according to DIN EN ISO7235 are presented in diagrams. Air ducts of similar geometries have similar damping characteristics. The standard measurements are compared with the producers' data, showing that there is no correlation between the measurements and the producers' data. The conclusion is drawn that measuring procedures must be standardized. Structure-borne noise transmission in pipelines is investigated in two real conference rooms. The effectiveness of sound damping measures was illustrated. In cooperation with the Fraunhofer Institute of Constructional Physics (IBPL), calculation methods using existing component characteristics were investigated. Some examples show rather good agreement between calculations and measurements. (orig.)

  19. ATLAS Assembly Hall Open Day

    CERN Multimedia

    Patrice Loiez

    2004-01-01

    To mark the 50th Anniversary of the founding of CERN, a day of tours, displays and presentations was held in October 2004. The assembly halls for the experiments that were waiting to be installed on the LHC, such as ATLAS shown here, were transformed into display areas and cafés.

  20. Universal intrinsic spin Hall effect

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Sinova, J.; Culcer, D.; Sinitsyn, N. A.; Niu, Q.; Jungwirth, Tomáš; MacDonald, A. H.

    2004-01-01

    Roč. 92, č. 12 (2004), 126603/1-126603/4 ISSN 0031-9007 R&D Projects: GA ČR GA202/02/0912 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z1010914 Keywords : semiconductor quantum wells * spin-orbit interaction * spin Hall effect Subject RIV: BM - Solid Matter Physics ; Magnetism Impact factor: 7.218, year: 2004

  1. Spin Hall effect for anyons

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dhar, S.; Basu, B.; Ghosh, Subir

    2007-01-01

    We explain the intrinsic spin Hall effect from generic anyon dynamics in the presence of external electromagnetic field. The free anyon is represented as a spinning particle with an underlying non-commutative configuration space. The Berry curvature plays a major role in the analysis

  2. Temperature dependent mobility measurements of alkali earth ions in superfluid helium

    Science.gov (United States)

    Putlitz, Gisbert Zu; Baumann, I.; Foerste, M.; Jungmann, K.; Riediger, O.; Tabbert, B.; Wiebe, J.; Zühlke, C.

    1998-05-01

    Mobility measurements of impurity ions in superfluid helium are reported. Alkali earth ions were produced with a laser sputtering technique and were drawn inside the liquid by an electric field. The experiments were carried out in the temperature region from 1.27 up to 1.66 K. The temperature dependence of the mobility of Be^+-ions (measured here for the first time) differs from that of the other alkali earth ions Mg^+, Ca^+, Sr^+ and Ba^+, but behaves similar to that of He^+ (M. Foerste, H. Günther, O. Riediger, J. Wiebe, G. zu Putlitz, Z. Phys. B) 104, 317 (1997). Theories of Atkins (A. Atkins, Phys. Rev.) 116, 1339 (1959) and Cole (M.W. Cole, R.A. Bachmann Phys. Rev. B) 15, 1388 (1977) predict a different defect structure for He^+ and the alkali earth ions: the helium ion is assumed to form a snowball like structure whereas for the alkali earth ions a bubble structure is assumed. If the temperature dependence is a characteristic feature for the different structures, then it seems likely that the Be^+ ion builds a snowball like structure.

  3. Noncontact measurement of electrostatic fields: Verification of modeled potentials within ion mobility spectrometer drift tube designs

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Scott, Jill R.; Tremblay, Paul L.

    2007-01-01

    The heart of an ion mobility spectrometer is the drift region where ion separation occurs. While the electrostatic potentials within a drift tube design can be modeled, no method for independently validating the electrostatic field has previously been reported. Two basic drift tube designs were modeled using SIMION 7.0 to reveal the expected electrostatic fields: (1) A traditional alternating set of electrodes and insulators and (2) a truly linear drift tube. One version of the alternating electrode/insulator drift tube and two versions of linear drift tubes were then fabricated. The stacked alternating electrodes/insulators were connected through a resistor network to generate the electrostatic gradient in the drift tube. The two linear drift tube designs consisted of two types of resistive drift tubes with one tube consisting of a resistive coating within an insulating tube and the other tube composed of resistive ferrites. The electrostatic fields within each type of drift tube were then evaluated by a noncontact method using a Kelvin-Zisman type electrostatic voltmeter and probe (results for alternative measurement methods provided in supplementary material). The experimental results were then compared with the electrostatic fields predicted by SIMION. Both the modeling and experimental measurements reveal that the electrostatic fields within a stacked ion mobility spectrometer drift tube are only pseudo-linear, while the electrostatic fields within a resistive drift tube approach perfect linearity

  4. The Other Hall Effect: College Board Physics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sheppard, Keith; Gunning, Amanda M.

    2013-01-01

    Edwin Herbert Hall (1855-1938), discoverer of the Hall effect, was one of the first winners of the AAPT Oersted Medal for his contributions to the teaching of physics. While Hall's role in establishing laboratory work in high schools is widely acknowledged, his position as chair of the physics section of the Committee on College Entrance…

  5. An instantaneous spatiotemporal model to predict a bicyclist's Black Carbon exposure based on mobile noise measurements

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dekoninck, Luc; Botteldooren, Dick; Int Panis, Luc

    2013-11-01

    Several studies have shown that a significant amount of daily air pollution exposure, in particular Black Carbon (BC), is inhaled during trips. Assessing this contribution to exposure remains difficult because on the one hand local air pollution maps lack spatio-temporal resolution, at the other hand direct measurement of particulate matter concentration remains expensive. This paper proposes to use in-traffic noise measurements in combination with geographical and meteorological information for predicting BC exposure during commuting trips. Mobile noise measurements are cheaper and easier to perform than mobile air pollution measurements and can easily be used in participatory sensing campaigns. The uniqueness of the proposed model lies in the choice of noise indicators that goes beyond the traditional overall A-weighted noise level used in previous work. Noise and BC exposures are both related to the traffic intensity but also to traffic speed and traffic dynamics. Inspired by theoretical knowledge on the emission of noise and BC, the low frequency engine related noise and the difference between high frequency and low frequency noise that indicates the traffic speed, are introduced in the model. In addition, it is shown that splitting BC in a local and a background component significantly improves the model. The coefficients of the proposed model are extracted from 200 commuter bicycle trips. The predicted average exposure over a single trip correlates with measurements with a Pearson coefficient of 0.78 using only four parameters: the low frequency noise level, wind speed, the difference between high and low frequency noise and a street canyon index expressing local air pollution dispersion properties.

  6. Rapid characterization of agglomerate aerosols by in situ mass-mobility measurements.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Scheckman, Jacob H; McMurry, Peter H; Pratsinis, Sotiris E

    2009-07-21

    Transport and physical/chemical properties of nanoparticle agglomerates depend on primary particle size and agglomerate structure (size, fractal dimension, and dynamic shape factor). This research reports on in situ techniques for measuring such properties. Nanoparticle agglomerates of silica were generated by oxidizing hexamethyldisiloxane in a methane/oxygen diffusion flame. Upon leaving the flame, agglomerates of known electrical mobility size were selected with a differential mobility analyzer (DMA), and their mass was measured with an aerosol particle mass analyzer (APM), resulting in their mass fractal dimension, D(f), and dynamic shape factor, chi. Scanning and transmission electron microscopy (SEM/TEM) images were used to determine primary particle diameter and to qualitatively investigate agglomerate morphology. The DMA-APM measurements were reproducible within 5%, as determined by multiple measurements on different days under the same flame conditions. The effects of flame process variables (oxygen flow rate and mass production rate) on particle characteristics (D(f), and chi) were determined. All generated particles were fractal-like agglomerates with average primary particle diameters of 12-93 nm and D(f) = 1.7-2.4. Increasing the oxygen flow rate decreased primary particle size and D(f), while it increased chi. Increasing the production rate increased the agglomerate and primary particle sizes, and decreased chi without affecting D(f). The effects of oxygen flow rate and particle production rate on primary particle size reported here are in agreement with ex situ measurements in the literature, while the effect of process variables on agglomerate shape (chi) is demonstrated for the first time to our knowledge.

  7. Mobilities Mobilities

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    César Pompeyo

    2011-12-01

    Full Text Available Urry, John (2007 Mobilities.Oxford: Polity Press.Urry, John (2007 Mobilities.Oxford: Polity Press.John Urry (1946-, profesor en la Universidad de Lancaster, es un sociólogo de sobra conocido y altamente reputado en el panorama internacional de las ciencias sociales. Su dilatada carrera, aparentemente dispersa y diversificada, ha seguido senderos bastante bien definidos dejando tras de sí un catálogo extenso de obras sociológicas de primer nivel. Sus primeros trabajos se centraban en el campo de la teoría social y la filosofía de las ciencias sociales o de la sociología del poder [...

  8. Characterising thermal resistances and capacitances of GaN high-electron-mobility transistors through dynamic electrothermal measurements

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Wei, Wei; Mikkelsen, Jan H.; Jensen, Ole Kiel

    2014-01-01

    This study presents a method to characterise thermal resistances and capacitances of GaN high-electron-mobility transistors (HEMTs) through dynamic electrothermal measurements. A measured relation between RF gain and the channel temperature (Tc) is formed and used for indirect measurements...

  9. Admittance of multiterminal quantum Hall conductors at kilohertz frequencies

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hernández, C.; Consejo, C.; Chaubet, C.; Degiovanni, P.

    2014-01-01

    We present an experimental study of the low frequency admittance of quantum Hall conductors in the [100 Hz, 1 MHz] frequency range. We show that the frequency dependence of the admittance of the sample strongly depends on the topology of the contacts connections. Our experimental results are well explained within the Christen and Büttiker approach for finite frequency transport in quantum Hall edge channels taking into account the influence of the coaxial cables capacitance. In the Hall bar geometry, we demonstrate that there exists a configuration in which the cable capacitance does not influence the admittance measurement of the sample. In this case, we measure the electrochemical capacitance of the sample and observe its dependence on the filling factor

  10. Admittance of multiterminal quantum Hall conductors at kilohertz frequencies

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hernández, C. [Departamento de Física, Universidad Militar Nueva Granada, Carrera 11 101-80 Bogotá D.C. (Colombia); Consejo, C.; Chaubet, C., E-mail: christophe.chaubet@univ-montp2.fr [Université Montpellier 2, Laboratoire Charles Coulomb UMR5221, F-34095 Montpellier, France and CNRS, Laboratoire Charles Coulomb UMR5221, F-34095 Montpellier (France); Degiovanni, P. [Université de Lyon, Fédération de Physique Andrée Marie Ampère, CNRS, Laboratoire de Physique de l' Ecole Normale Supérieure de Lyon, 46 allée d' Italie, 69364 Lyon Cedex 07 (France)

    2014-03-28

    We present an experimental study of the low frequency admittance of quantum Hall conductors in the [100 Hz, 1 MHz] frequency range. We show that the frequency dependence of the admittance of the sample strongly depends on the topology of the contacts connections. Our experimental results are well explained within the Christen and Büttiker approach for finite frequency transport in quantum Hall edge channels taking into account the influence of the coaxial cables capacitance. In the Hall bar geometry, we demonstrate that there exists a configuration in which the cable capacitance does not influence the admittance measurement of the sample. In this case, we measure the electrochemical capacitance of the sample and observe its dependence on the filling factor.

  11. Measurement of negative ion mobility in O2 at high pressures using a point plate gap as an ion detector

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Okuyama, Y; Kimura, T; Suzuki, S; Itoh, H

    2012-01-01

    This paper describes the experimental results for negative ion mobility in O 2 at 0.5-2.0 atm. The ion mobility is observed using a high-pressure ion drift tube with a positive corona gap (Geiger counter), which is constructed from a point plate gap and acts as a negative ion detector. The variation of waveforms in the burst pulse is observed by varying the voltage applied to the ion detector to find the optimum voltage that must be applied across the ion detector in O 2 . This is investigated carefully to ensure the precise determination of mobility. The distortion of the electric field near the mesh electrode, which operates as the cathode of the ion detector and as the anode of the ion drift gap, is then examined to determine the optimum applied voltage to suppress its effect on the measurement of mobility. The mobility is subsequently measured at a reduced electric field intensity of 2.83 × 10 -3 to 2.83. The observed mobility of 2.31 ± 0.03 cm 2 V -1 s -1 in O 2 is concluded to be that of O 2 - . This value is also obtained in experiments over a wide range of gas pressures (0.5-2.0 atm) and drift lengths (1.00-9.00 cm). The mobilities of O 3 - and O - are also obtained experimentally. (paper)

  12. Mobile Measurements of Methane Using High-Speed Open-Path Technology

    Science.gov (United States)

    Burba, G. G.; Anderson, T.; Ediger, K.; von Fischer, J.; Gioli, B.; Ham, J. M.; Hupp, J. R.; Kohnert, K.; Levy, P. E.; Polidori, A.; Pikelnaya, O.; Price, E.; Sachs, T.; Serafimovich, A.; Zondlo, M. A.; Zulueta, R. C.

    2016-12-01

    Methane plays a critical role in the radiation balance, chemistry of the atmosphere, and air quality. The major anthropogenic sources of CH4 include oil and gas development sites, natural gas distribution networks, landfill emissions, and agricultural production. The majority of oil and gas and urban CH4 emission occurs via variable-rate point sources or diffused spots in topographically challenging terrains (e.g., street tunnels, elevated locations at water treatment plants, vents, etc.). Locating and measuring such CH4 emissions is challenging when using traditional micrometeorological techniques, and requires development of novel approaches. Landfill CH4 emissions traditionally assessed at monthly or longer time intervals are subject to large uncertainties because of the snapshot nature of the measurements and the barometric pumping phenomenon. The majority of agricultural and natural CH4 production occurs in areas with little infrastructure or easily available grid power (e.g., rice fields, arctic and boreal wetlands, tropical mangroves, etc.). A lightweight, high-speed, high-resolution, open-path technology was recently developed for eddy covariance measurements of CH4 flux, with power consumption 30-150 times below other available technologies. It was designed to run on solar panels or a small generator and be placed in the middle of the methane-producing ecosystem without a need for grid power. Lately, this instrumentation has been utilized increasingly more frequently outside of the traditional use on stationary flux towers. These novel approaches include measurements from various moving platforms, such as cars, aircraft, and ships. Projects included mapping of concentrations and vertical profiles, leak detection and quantification, mobile emission detection from natural gas-powered cars, soil CH4 flux surveys, etc. This presentation will describe key projects utilizing the novel lightweight low-power high-resolution open-path technology, and will highlight

  13. Decoupling single nanowire mobilities limited by surface scattering and bulk impurity scattering

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Khanal, D. R.; Levander, A. X.; Wu, J.; Yu, K. M.; Liliental-Weber, Z.; Walukiewicz, W.; Grandal, J.; Sanchez-Garcia, M. A.; Calleja, E.

    2011-01-01

    We demonstrate the isolation of two free carrier scattering mechanisms as a function of radial band bending in InN nanowires via universal mobility analysis, where effective carrier mobility is measured as a function of effective electric field in a nanowire field-effect transistor. Our results show that Coulomb scattering limits effective mobility at most effective fields, while surface roughness scattering only limits mobility under very high internal electric fields. High-energy α particle irradiation is used to vary the ionized donor concentration, and the observed decrease in mobility and increase in donor concentration are compared to Hall effect results of high-quality InN thin films. Our results show that for nanowires with relatively high doping and large diameters, controlling Coulomb scattering from ionized dopants should be given precedence over surface engineering when seeking to maximize nanowire mobility.

  14. Comparison of the performance of three ion mobility spectrometers for measurement of biogenic amines

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Karpas, Zeev; Guamán, Ana V.; Pardo, Antonio; Marco, Santiago

    2013-01-01

    Graphical abstract: The response to different amounts of TMA (in μg) that were placed in a headspace vial as a function of time for the VG-Test (top) and the GDA (bottom). Note that the ratio [TMA/(TMA + TEP)] (top) and [TMA/(TMA + RIP)] (bottom) and the clearance time increase with the amount of TMA deposited in the vial. Highlights: ► First comparison of performance of IMS devices. ► Gas-phase ion chemistry affected by operational parameters. ► Limits of detection quite similar despite differences in devices. ► LODs determined in controlled continuous flow and in headspace vapor. ► Exponential dilution of headspace studies. - Abstract: The performance of three different types of ion mobility spectrometer (IMS) devices: GDA2 with a radioactive ion source (Airsense, Germany), UV-IMS with a photo-ionization source (G.A.S. Germany) and VG-Test with a corona discharge source (3QBD, Israel) was studied. The gas-phase ion chemistry in the IMS devices affected the species formed and their measured reduced mobility values. The sensitivity and limit of detection for trimethylamine (TMA), putrescine and cadaverine were compared by continuous monitoring of a stream of air with a given concentration of the analyte and by measurement of headspace vapors of TMA in a sealed vial. Preprocessing of the mobility spectra and the effectiveness of multivariate curve resolution techniques (MCR-LASSO) improved the accuracy of the measurements by correcting baseline effects and adjusting for variations in drift time as well as enhancing the signal to noise ratio and deconvolution of the complex data matrix to their pure components. The limit of detection for measurement of the biogenic amines by the three IMS devices was between 0.1 and 1.2 ppm (for TMA with the VG-Test and GDA, respectively) and between 0.2 and 0.7 ppm for putrescine and cadaverine with all three devices. Considering the uncertainty in the LOD determination there is almost no statistically significant

  15. Hall effect in the normal phase of the organic superconductor (TMTSF)2PF6

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Moser, J.; Cooper, J.R.; Jerome, D.

    2000-01-01

    We report accurate Hall effect measurements performed in the normal phase of the quasi-one-dimensional organic conductor (TMTSF)(2)PF(6) at ambient pressure. The Hall coefficient is found to be strongly temperature dependent all the way from 300 K down to the spin density wave onset arising aroun...

  16. Experimental Verification of the Hall Effect during Magnetic Reconnection in a Laboratory Plasma

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yang Ren; Masaaki Yamada; Stefan Gerhardt; Hantao Ji; Russell Kulsrud; Aleksey Kuritsyn

    2005-01-01

    In this letter we report a clear and unambiguous observation of the out-of-plane quadrupole magnetic field suggested by numerical simulations in the reconnecting current sheet in the Magnetic Reconnection Experiment (MRX). Measurements show that the Hall effect is large in collisionless regime and becomes small as the collisionality increases, indicating that the Hall effect plays an important role in collisionless reconnection

  17. High contributions of vehicular emissions to ammonia in three European cities derived from mobile measurements

    Science.gov (United States)

    Elser, Miriam; El-Haddad, Imad; Maasikmets, Marek; Bozzetti, Carlo; Wolf, Robert; Ciarelli, Giancarlo; Slowik, Jay G.; Richter, Rene; Teinemaa, Erik; Hüglin, Christoph; Baltensperger, Urs; Prévôt, André S. H.

    2018-02-01

    Ambient ammonia (NH3) measurements were performed with a mobile platform in three European cities: Zurich (Switzerland), Tartu (Estonia) and Tallinn (Estonia) deploying an NH3 analyzer based on cavity ring-down spectroscopy. A heated inlet line along with an auxiliary flow was used to minimize NH3 adsorption onto the inlet walls. In addition, a detailed characterization of the response and recovery times of the measurement system was used to deconvolve the true NH3 signal from the remaining adsorption-induced hysteresis. Parallel measurements with an aerosol mass spectrometer were used to correct the observed NH3 for the contribution of ammonium nitrate, which completely evaporated in the heated line at the chosen temperature, in contrast to ammonium sulfate. In this way a quantitative measurement of ambient gaseous NH3 was achieved with sufficient time resolution to enable measurement of NH3 point sources with a mobile sampling platform. The NH3 analyzer and the aerosol mass spectrometer were complemented by an aethalometer and various gas-phase analyzers to enable a complete characterization of the sources of air pollution, including the spatial distributions and the regional background concentrations and urban increments of all measured components. Although at all three locations similar increment levels of organic aerosols were attributed to biomass burning and traffic, traffic emissions clearly dominated the city enhancements of NH3, equivalent black carbon (eBC) and carbon dioxide (CO2). Urban increments of 3.4, 1.8 and 3.0 ppb of NH3 were measured in the traffic areas in Zurich, Tartu and Tallinn, respectively, representing an enhancement of 36.6, 38.3 and 93.8% over the average background concentrations. Measurements in areas strongly influenced by traffic emissions (including tunnel drives) were used to estimate emission factors (EF) for the traffic-related pollutants. The obtained median EFs range between 136.8-415.1 mg kg-1 fuel for NH3, 157.1-734.8 mg

  18. A highly sensitive CMOS digital Hall sensor for low magnetic field applications.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xu, Yue; Pan, Hong-Bin; He, Shu-Zhuan; Li, Li

    2012-01-01

    Integrated CMOS Hall sensors have been widely used to measure magnetic fields. However, they are difficult to work with in a low magnetic field environment due to their low sensitivity and large offset. This paper describes a highly sensitive digital Hall sensor fabricated in 0.18 μm high voltage CMOS technology for low field applications. The sensor consists of a switched cross-shaped Hall plate and a novel signal conditioner. It effectively eliminates offset and low frequency 1/f noise by applying a dynamic quadrature offset cancellation technique. The measured results show the optimal Hall plate achieves a high current related sensitivity of about 310 V/AT. The whole sensor has a remarkable ability to measure a minimum ± 2 mT magnetic field and output a digital Hall signal in a wide temperature range from -40 °C to 120 °C.

  19. German version of the Community Balance and Mobility Scale : Translation and evaluation of measurement properties.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gordt, Katharina; Mikolaizak, A Stefanie; Nerz, Corinna; Barz, Carolin; Gerhardy, Thomas; Weber, Michaela; Becker, Clemens; Schwenk, Michael

    2018-02-12

    Tools to detect subtle balance deficits in high-functioning community-dwelling older adults are lacking. The Community Balance and Mobility Scale (CBM) is a valuable tool to measure balance deficits in this group; however, it is not yet available in the German language. The aim was 1) to translate and cross-culturally adapt the CBM into the German language and 2) to investigate the measurement properties of the German CBM (G-CBM). The original CBM was translated into the German language according to established guidelines. A total of 51 older adults (mean age 69.9 ± 7.1 years) were recruited to measure construct validity by comparing the G‑CBM against standardized balance and/or mobility assessments including the Fullerton Advanced Balance Scale (FAB), Berg Balance Scale (BBS), 3 m Tandem Walk (3MTW), 8 Level Balance Scale (8LBS), 30 s Chair Stand Test (30CST), Timed Up and Go (TUG) test, gait speed, and the Falls Efficacy Scale International (FES-I). Intrarater and interrater reliability and internal consistency reliability were estimated using intraclass correlations (ICC) and Cronbach's alpha, respectively. Ceiling effects were calculated as the percentage of the sample scoring the maximum score. The G‑CBM correlated excellently with FAB and BBS (ρ = 0.78-0.85; P balance deficits in older high-functioning adults. The absence of ceiling effects emphasizes the use of this scale in this cohort. The G‑CBM can now be utilized in clinical practice.

  20. Coastal zone environment measurements at Sakhalin Island using autonomous mobile robotic system

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tyugin, Dmitry; Kurkin, Andrey; Zaytsev, Andrey; Zeziulin, Denis; Makarov, Vladimir

    2017-04-01

    To perform continuous complex measurements of environment characteristics in coastal zones autonomous mobile robotic system was built. The main advantage of such system in comparison to manual measurements is an ability to quickly change location of the equipment and start measurements. AMRS allows to transport a set of sensors and appropriate power source for long distances. The equipment installed on the AMRS includes: a modern high-tech ship's radar «Micran» for sea waves measurements, multiparameter platform WXT 520 for weather monitoring, high precision GPS/GLONASS receiver OS-203 for georeferencing, laser scanner platform based on two Sick LMS-511 scanners which can provide 3D distance measurements in up to 80 meters on the AMRS route and rugged designed quad-core fanless computer Matrix MXE-5400 for data collecting and recording. The equipment is controlled by high performance modular software developed specially for the AMRS. During the summer 2016 the experiment was conducted. Measurements took place at the coastal zone of Sakhalin Island (Russia). The measuring system of AMRS was started in automatic mode controlled by the software. As result a lot of data was collected and processed to database. It consists of continuous measurements of the coastal zone including different weather conditions. The most interesting for investigation is a period of three-point storm detected on June, 2, 2016. Further work will relate to data processing of measured environment characteristics and numerical models verification based on the collected data. The presented results of research obtained by the support of the Russian president's scholarship for young scientists and graduate students №SP-193.2015.5

  1. A mobile detector for measurements of the atmospheric muon flux in underground sites

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mitrica, Bogdan, E-mail: mitrica@nipne.ro [Horia Hulubei National Institute for Physics and Nuclear Engineering, P.O.B. MG-6, 077125 Magurele (Romania); Margineanu, Romul; Stoica, Sabin; Petcu, Mirel; Brancus, Iliana [Horia Hulubei National Institute for Physics and Nuclear Engineering, P.O.B. MG-6, 077125 Magurele (Romania); Jipa, Alexandru; Lazanu, Ionel; Sima, Octavian [Department of Physics, University of Bucharest, P.O.B. MG-11 (Romania); Haungs, Andreas; Rebel, Heinigerd [Institut fur Kernphysik, Karlsruhe Institute of Technology - Campus North, 76021 Karlsruhe (Germany); Petre, Marian; Toma, Gabriel; Saftoiu, Alexandra; Stanca, Denis; Apostu, Ana; Gomoiu, Claudia [Horia Hulubei National Institute for Physics and Nuclear Engineering, P.O.B. MG-6, 077125 Magurele (Romania)

    2011-10-21

    Muons comprise an important contribution of the natural radiation dose in air (approx. 30 nSv/h of a total dose rate of 65-130 nSv/h), as well as in underground sites even when the flux and relative contribution are significantly reduced. The flux of muons observed underground can be used as an estimator for the depth in mwe (meter water equivalent) of the underground site. The water equivalent depth is important information to devise physics experiments feasible for a specific site. A mobile detector for performing measurements of the muon flux was developed in IFIN-HH, Bucharest. Consisting of two scintillator plates (approx. 0.9 m{sup 2}) which measure in coincidence, the detector is installed on a van which facilitates measurements at different locations at the surface or underground. The detector was used to determine muon fluxes at different sites in Romania. In particular, data were taken and the values of meter water equivalents were assessed for several locations at the salt mine in Slanic-Prahova, Romania. The measurements have been performed in two different galleries of the Slanic mine at different depths. In order to test the stability of the method, also measurements of the muon flux at the surface at different elevations were performed. The results were compared with predictions of Monte-Carlo simulations using the CORSIKA and MUSIC codes.

  2. A mobile detector for measurements of the atmospheric muon flux in underground sites

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mitrica, Bogdan; Margineanu, Romul; Stoica, Sabin; Petcu, Mirel; Brancus, Iliana; Jipa, Alexandru; Lazanu, Ionel; Sima, Octavian; Haungs, Andreas; Rebel, Heinigerd; Petre, Marian; Toma, Gabriel; Saftoiu, Alexandra; Stanca, Denis; Apostu, Ana; Gomoiu, Claudia

    2011-01-01

    Muons comprise an important contribution of the natural radiation dose in air (approx. 30 nSv/h of a total dose rate of 65-130 nSv/h), as well as in underground sites even when the flux and relative contribution are significantly reduced. The flux of muons observed underground can be used as an estimator for the depth in mwe (meter water equivalent) of the underground site. The water equivalent depth is important information to devise physics experiments feasible for a specific site. A mobile detector for performing measurements of the muon flux was developed in IFIN-HH, Bucharest. Consisting of two scintillator plates (approx. 0.9 m 2 ) which measure in coincidence, the detector is installed on a van which facilitates measurements at different locations at the surface or underground. The detector was used to determine muon fluxes at different sites in Romania. In particular, data were taken and the values of meter water equivalents were assessed for several locations at the salt mine in Slanic-Prahova, Romania. The measurements have been performed in two different galleries of the Slanic mine at different depths. In order to test the stability of the method, also measurements of the muon flux at the surface at different elevations were performed. The results were compared with predictions of Monte-Carlo simulations using the CORSIKA and MUSIC codes.

  3. Cylindrical Hall Thrusters with Permanent Magnets

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Raitses, Yevgeny; Merino, Enrique; Fisch, Nathaniel J.

    2010-01-01

    The use of permanent magnets instead of electromagnet coils for low power Hall thrusters can offer a significant reduction of both the total electric power consumption and the thruster mass. Two permanent magnet versions of the miniaturized cylindrical Hall thruster (CHT) of different overall dimensions were operated in the power range of 50W-300 W. The discharge and plasma plume measurements revealed that the CHT thrusters with permanent magnets and electromagnet coils operate rather differently. In particular, the angular ion current density distribution from the permanent magnet thrusters has an unusual halo shape, with a majority of high energy ions flowing at large angles with respect to the thruster centerline. Differences in the magnetic field topology outside the thruster channel and in the vicinity of the channel exit are likely responsible for the differences in the plume characteristics measured for the CHTs with electromagnets and permanent magnets. It is shown that the presence of the reversing-direction or cusp-type magnetic field configuration inside the thruster channel without a strong axial magnetic field outside the thruster channel does not lead to the halo plasma plume from the CHT.

  4. Study of radiation exposure rate on the measurement points in Kartini reactor hall as based to determine operation safety parameters (KBO)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mahrus Salam; Elisabeth Supriyatni; Fajar Panuntun

    2016-01-01

    In the operation of nuclear facility there are safety parameters, which is the value of the conservatively maximum limit to ensure that all of the uncertainty in the analysis of facility operations safety have been considered, such as uncertainty of measurement, response time and uncertainty calculation tool, and is get a long to others value of normal operating condition limits, in other words, there are still allowed or permitted. Calculation of the radiation exposure rate on five measurement points (50 cm above the water surface of reactor pool, above interim storage (bulk shielding), reactor deck, thermal column and sub critical facility) and to be compared to the operation safety parameters (KBO) of Kartini reactor. The exposure rate value is obtained by calculating the source term of radioactivity on the core, attenuation resulting from the radiation shielding and measurement distance. From the calculation obtained that the value of gamma exposure rate of 50 cm above the water surface of reactor pool is 96.91 mR/hr (KBO<100 mR/hr), on the deck of Bulk Shielding amounted to 1.70 mR/h (KBO<2.5 mR/hr), on the reactor deck amounted to 5.73 mR/hr (KBO<10 mR/hr), on the Thermal Column amounted to 2.73 mR/hr (KBO<10 mR/hr) and on the sub critical facility amounted to 1.148 mR/hr (KBO<2.5 mR/hr). The value of gamma exposure rate at 5 locations measurements are still less than the operation safety parameters (KBO), it means that the reactor is safe to be operated. (author)

  5. Exposure Research Going Mobile: A Smartphone-Based Measurement of Media Exposure to Political Information in a Convergent Media Environment

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ohme, J.; Albaek, E.; H. de Vreese, C.

    2016-01-01

    platform modes. The study furthermore confirms limitations of mere usage time measurements of social media platforms in effects research and explores a range of actual content types that citizens encounter in social networks. It recommends more frequent use of mobile exposure measurements and argues...... for a content-related assessment of social media use in effects research. © 2016 Taylor & Francis.......In today’s convergent media environment, media exposure becomes increasingly channel-independent and social media-bound, and media content is more frequently accessed on mobile devices. This calls for new approaches to measuring media exposure. This study applies an innovative approach to survey (n...

  6. Ground based mobile isotopic methane measurements in the Front Range, Colorado

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vaughn, B. H.; Rella, C.; Petron, G.; Sherwood, O.; Mielke-Maday, I.; Schwietzke, S.

    2014-12-01

    Increased development of unconventional oil and gas resources in North America has given rise to attempts to monitor and quantify fugitive emissions of methane from the industry. Emission estimates of methane from oil and gas basins can vary significantly from one study to another as well as from EPA or State estimates. New efforts are aimed at reconciling bottom-up, or inventory-based, emission estimates of methane with top-down estimates based on atmospheric measurements from aircraft, towers, mobile ground-based vehicles, and atmospheric models. Attributing airborne measurements of regional methane fluxes to specific sources is informed by ground-based measurements of methane. Stable isotopic measurements (δ13C) of methane help distinguish between emissions from the O&G industry, Confined Animal Feed Operations (CAFO), and landfills, but analytical challenges typically limit meaningful isotopic measurements to individual point sampling. We are developing a toolbox to use δ13CH4 measurements to assess the partitioning of methane emissions for regions with multiple methane sources. The method was applied to the Denver-Julesberg Basin. Here we present data from continuous isotopic measurements obtained over a wide geographic area by using MegaCore, a 1500 ft. tube that is constantly filled with sample air while driving, then subsequently analyzed at slower rates using cavity ring down spectroscopy (CRDS). Pressure, flow and calibration are tightly controlled allowing precise attribution of methane enhancements to their point of collection. Comparisons with point measurements are needed to confirm regional values and further constrain flux estimates and models. This effort was made in conjunction with several major field campaigns in the Colorado Front Range in July-August 2014, including FRAPPÉ (Front Range Air Pollution and Photochemistry Experiment), DISCOVER-AQ, and the Air Water Gas NSF Sustainability Research Network at the University of Colorado.

  7. The quantum Hall effect in quantum dot systems

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Beltukov, Y M; Greshnov, A A

    2014-01-01

    It is proposed to use quantum dots in order to increase the temperatures suitable for observation of the integer quantum Hall effect. A simple estimation using Fock-Darwin spectrum of a quantum dot shows that good part of carriers localized in quantum dots generate the intervals of plateaus robust against elevated temperatures. Numerical calculations employing local trigonometric basis and highly efficient kernel polynomial method adopted for computing the Hall conductivity reveal that quantum dots may enhance peak temperature for the effect by an order of magnitude, possibly above 77 K. Requirements to potentials, quality and arrangement of the quantum dots essential for practical realization of such enhancement are indicated. Comparison of our theoretical results with the quantum Hall measurements in InAs quantum dot systems from two experimental groups is also given

  8. Impact of external conditions on energy consumption in industrial halls

    Science.gov (United States)

    Żabnieńśka-Góra, Alina

    2017-11-01

    The energy demand for heating the halls buildings is high. The impact on this may have the technology of production, building construction and technology requirements (HVAC systems). The isolation of the external partitions, the location of the object in relation to the surrounding buildings and the degree of the interior insolation (windows and skylights) are important in the context of energy consumption. The article discusses the impact of external conditions, wind and sunlight on energy demand in the industrial hall. The building model was prepared in IDA ICE 4.0 simulation software. Model validation was done based on measurements taken in the analyzed building.

  9. Effect of Anode Dielectric Coating on Hall Thruster Operation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dorf, L.; Raitses, Y.; Fisch, N.J.; Semenov, V.

    2003-01-01

    An interesting phenomenon observed in the near-anode region of a Hall thruster is that the anode fall changes from positive to negative upon removal of the dielectric coating, which is produced on the anode surface during the normal course of Hall thruster operation. The anode fall might affect the thruster lifetime and acceleration efficiency. The effect of the anode coating on the anode fall is studied experimentally using both biased and emissive probes. Measurements of discharge current oscillations indicate that thruster operation is more stable with the coated anode

  10. Reliability of the Q Force; a mobile instrument for measuring isometric quadriceps muscle strength.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Douma, K W; Regterschot, G R H; Krijnen, W P; Slager, G E C; van der Schans, C P; Zijlstra, W

    2016-01-01

    The ability to generate muscle strength is a pre-requisite for all human movement. Decreased quadriceps muscle strength is frequently observed in older adults and is associated with a decreased performance and activity limitations. To quantify the quadriceps muscle strength and to monitor changes over time, instruments and procedures with a sufficient reliability are needed. The Q Force is an innovative mobile muscle strength measurement instrument suitable to measure in various degrees of extension. Measurements between 110 and 130° extension present the highest values and the most significant increase after training. The objective of this study is to determine the test-retest reliability of muscle strength measurements by the Q Force in older adults in 110° extension. Forty-one healthy older adults, 13 males and 28 females were included in the study. Mean (SD) age was 81.9 (4.89) years. Isometric muscle strength of the Quadriceps muscle was assessed with the Q Force at 110° of knee extension. Participants were measured at two sessions with a three to eight day interval between sessions. To determine relative reliability, the intraclass correlation coefficient (ICC) was calculated. To determine absolute reliability, Bland and Altman Limits of Agreement (LOA) were calculated and t-tests were performed. Relative reliability of the Q Force is good to excellent as all ICC coefficients are higher than 0.75. Generally a large 95 % LOA, reflecting only moderate absolute reliability, is found as exemplified for the peak torque left leg of -18.6 N to 33.8 N and the right leg of -9.2 N to 26.4 N was between 15.7 and 23.6 Newton representing 25.2 % to 39.9 % of the size of the mean. Small systematic differences in mean were found between measurement session 1 and 2. The present study shows that the Q Force has excellent relative test-retest reliability, but limited absolute test-retest reliability. Since the Q Force is relatively cheap and mobile it is suitable for

  11. Measurement of sound velocity made easy using harmonic resonant frequencies with everyday mobile technology

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hirth, Michael; Kuhn, Jochen; Müller, Andreas

    2015-02-01

    Recent articles about smartphone experiments have described their applications as experimental tools in different physical contexts.1-4 They have established that smartphones facilitate experimental setups, thanks to the small size and diverse functions of mobile devices, in comparison to setups with computer-based measurements. In the experiment described in this article, the experimental setup is reduced to a minimum. The objective of the experiment is to determine the speed of sound with a high degree of accuracy using everyday tools. An article published recently proposes a time-of-flight method where sound or acoustic pulses are reflected at the ends of an open tube.5 In contrast, the following experiment idea is based on the harmonic resonant frequencies of such a tube, simultaneously triggered by a noise signal.

  12. Investigation of Service Quality of Measurement Reference Points for the Internet Services on Mobile Networks

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lipenbergs, E.; Bobrovs, Vj.; Ivanovs, G.

    2016-10-01

    To ensure that end-users and consumers have access to comprehensive, comparable and user-friendly information regarding the Internet access service quality, it is necessary to implement and regularly renew a set of legislative regulatory acts and to provide monitoring of the quality of Internet access services regarding the current European Regulatory Framework. The actual situation regarding the quality of service monitoring solutions in different European countries depends on national regulatory initiatives and public awareness. The service monitoring solutions are implemented using different measurement methodologies and tools. The paper investigates the practical implementations for developing a harmonising approach to quality monitoring in order to obtain objective information on the quality of Internet access services on mobile networks.

  13. Mobile Launch Platform Vehicle Assembly Area (SWMU 056) Biosparge Expansion Interim Measures Work Plan

    Science.gov (United States)

    Burcham, Michael S.; Daprato, Rebecca C.

    2016-01-01

    This document presents the design details for an Interim Measure (IM) Work Plan (IMWP) for the Mobile Launch Platform/Vehicle Assembly Building (MLPV) Area, located at the John F. Kennedy Space Center (KSC), Florida. The MLPV Area has been designated Solid Waste Management Unit Number 056 (SWMU 056) under KSC's Resource Conservation and Recovery Act (RCRA) Corrective Action Program. This report was prepared by Geosyntec Consultants (Geosyntec) for the National Aeronautics and Space Administration (NASA) under contract number NNK09CA02B and NNK12CA13B, project control number ENV1642. The Advanced Data Package (ADP) presentation covering the elements of this IMWP report received KSC Remediation Team (KSCRT) approval at the December 2015 Team Meeting; the meeting minutes are included in Appendix A.

  14. Application of a system for measuring foot plantar pressure for evaluation of human mobility

    Science.gov (United States)

    Klimiec, Ewa; Jasiewicz, Barbara; Zaraska, Krzysztof; Piekarski, Jacek; Guzdek, Piotr; Kołaszczyński, Grzegorz

    2016-11-01

    The paper presents evaluation of human mobility by gait analysis, carried out in natural conditions (outside laboratory). Foot plantar pressure is measured using a shoe insole with 8 sensors placed in different anatomical zones of the foot, and placed inside a sports footwear. Polarized PVDF foil is used as a sensor material. A wireless transmission system is used to transmit voltage values to the computer. Due to linear relationship between force and transducer voltage, energy released during walking in arbitrary units can be calculated as integral of the square of transducer voltage over time. Gait measurements have been done over the next few days on healthy person during normal walking and slow walking. Performed measurements allow determination of walking speed (number of steps per second), gait rhythm and manner of walking (applying force to inside versus outside part of the sole). It is found that switching from normal to slow walk increases gait energy by 25% while the pressure distribution across the anatomical regions of the foot remains unchanged. The results will be used for developing a programme for evaluation of patients with cardiac failure and future integration of actimetry with pulse and spirometry measurements.

  15. Mid-IR spectrometer for mobile, real-time urban NO2 measurements

    Science.gov (United States)

    Morten Hundt, P.; Müller, Michael; Mangold, Markus; Tuzson, Béla; Scheidegger, Philipp; Looser, Herbert; Hüglin, Christoph; Emmenegger, Lukas

    2018-05-01

    Detailed knowledge about the urban NO2 concentration field is a key element for obtaining accurate pollution maps and individual exposure estimates. These are required for improving the understanding of the impact of ambient NO2 on human health and for related air quality measures. However, city-scale NO2 concentration maps with high spatio-temporal resolution are still lacking, mainly due to the difficulty of accurate measurement of NO2 at the required sub-ppb level precision. We contribute to close this gap through the development of a compact instrument based on mid-infrared laser absorption spectroscopy. Leveraging recent advances in infrared laser and detection technology and a novel circular absorption cell, we demonstrate the feasibility and robustness of this technique for demanding mobile applications. A fully autonomous quantum cascade laser absorption spectrometer (QCLAS) has been successfully deployed on a tram, performing long-term and real-time concentration measurements of NO2 in the city of Zurich (Switzerland). For ambient NO2 concentrations, the instrument demonstrated a precision of 0.23 ppb at one second time resolution and of 0.03 ppb after 200 s averaging. Whilst the combined uncertainty estimated for the retrieved spectroscopic values was less than 5 %, laboratory intercomparison measurements with standard CLD instruments revealed a systematic NO2 wall loss of about 10 % within the laser spectrometer. For the field campaign, the QCLAS has been referenced to a CLD using urban atmospheric air, despite the potential cross sensitivity of CLD to other nitrogen containing compounds. However, this approach allowed a direct comparison and continuous validation of the spectroscopic data to measurements at regulatory air quality monitoring (AQM) stations along the tram-line. The analysis of the recorded high-resolution time series allowed us to gain more detailed insights into the spatio-temporal concentration distribution of NO2 in an urban

  16. Planar Hall effect sensor for magnetic micro- and nanobead detection

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ejsing, Louise Wellendorph; Hansen, Mikkel Fougt; Menon, Aric Kumaran

    2004-01-01

    Magnetic bead sensors based on the planar Hall effect in thin films of exchange-biased permalloy have been fabricated and characterized. Typical sensitivities are 3 muV/Oe mA. The sensor response to an applied magnetic field has been measured without and with coatings of commercially available 2 ...

  17. Harmonisation of nanoparticle concentration measurements using GRIMM and TSI scanning mobility particle sizers

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Joshi, Manish; Sapra, B. K.; Khan, Arshad; Tripathi, S. N.; Shamjad, P. M.; Gupta, Tarun; Mayya, Y. S.

    2012-01-01

    Regional studies focusing on the role of atmospheric nanoparticles in climate change have gained impetus in the last decade. Several multi-institutional studies involving measurement of nanoparticles with several kinds of instruments are on the rise. It is important to harmonize these measurements as the instruments may work on different techniques or principles and are developed by different manufacturers. Scanning mobility particle sizers (SMPS) are often used to measure size distribution of nanoparticles in the airborne phase. Two such commercially available instruments namely, GRIMM and TSI-SMPS have been compared for ambient and laboratory generated conditions. A stand-alone condensation particle counter (CPC) of TSI make was used as a reference for particle concentration measurements. The consistency of the results in terms of mean size and geometric standard deviation was seen to be excellent for both the SMPSs, with GRIMM always showing slightly (approximately 10 %) lower mean size. The integrated number concentration from GRIMM-SMPS was seen to be closer to stand-alone reference CPC compared to TSI-SMPS, for an ambient overnight comparison. However, a concentration-dependent response, i.e. the variations between the two instruments increasing with the concentration, was observed and possible reasons for this have been suggested. A separate experiment was performed for studying the modifying effect of diffusion dryer and sheath air dryer on the measured aerosol size spectra. A significant hygroscopic growth was noted when diffusion dryer was attached to one of the SMPS. The introduction of sheath air dryer in GRIMM-SMPS produced a significant shift towards lower mean size. These results have been compared and discussed with the recent inter-comparison results to strengthen and harmonize the measurement protocols.

  18. Harmonisation of nanoparticle concentration measurements using GRIMM and TSI scanning mobility particle sizers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Joshi, Manish; Sapra, B. K.; Khan, Arshad; Tripathi, S. N.; Shamjad, P. M.; Gupta, Tarun; Mayya, Y. S.

    2012-12-01

    Regional studies focusing on the role of atmospheric nanoparticles in climate change have gained impetus in the last decade. Several multi-institutional studies involving measurement of nanoparticles with several kinds of instruments are on the rise. It is important to harmonize these measurements as the instruments may work on different techniques or principles and are developed by different manufacturers. Scanning mobility particle sizers (SMPS) are often used to measure size distribution of nanoparticles in the airborne phase. Two such commercially available instruments namely, GRIMM and TSI-SMPS have been compared for ambient and laboratory generated conditions. A stand-alone condensation particle counter (CPC) of TSI make was used as a reference for particle concentration measurements. The consistency of the results in terms of mean size and geometric standard deviation was seen to be excellent for both the SMPSs, with GRIMM always showing slightly (approximately 10 %) lower mean size. The integrated number concentration from GRIMM-SMPS was seen to be closer to stand-alone reference CPC compared to TSI-SMPS, for an ambient overnight comparison. However, a concentration-dependent response, i.e. the variations between the two instruments increasing with the concentration, was observed and possible reasons for this have been suggested. A separate experiment was performed for studying the modifying effect of diffusion dryer and sheath air dryer on the measured aerosol size spectra. A significant hygroscopic growth was noted when diffusion dryer was attached to one of the SMPS. The introduction of sheath air dryer in GRIMM-SMPS produced a significant shift towards lower mean size. These results have been compared and discussed with the recent inter-comparison results to strengthen and harmonize the measurement protocols.

  19. Mobile on-line working radioaerosol-measuring systems in Baden-Wuerttemberg

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Aures, R.; Wenzel, H.

    1998-01-01

    In Baden-Wuerttemberg eight on-line measuring radioaerosol monitoring stations are successfully working since a lot of years. These monitoring stations spread over the whole country give only a rough overview of the radiological situation in the environment after an event like the Chernobyl accident. But it is expensive to increase the number of the monitoring stations in this network. This is why the 'Landesanstalt fuer Umweltschutz Baden-Wuerttemberg' (LfU) got the order from the 'Ministerium fuer Umwelt und Verkehr Baden-Wuerttemberg' to conceive a mobile on-line working radioaerosol-measuring system for environmental measurements (MORAM). The LfU had made the plans and a company built up the first prototype. In action the MORAM should send every time automatically data of radioactivity in the air and datas of meteorology from its position to the controlling center in Karlsruhe. The MORAM works by remote control, needs little servicing and is independent from main connection. In case of a nuclear event several MORAMs could be used as a local monitoring network or they could increase the number of the radioaerosol monitoring stations for a certain time. Normally, the MORAMs will be storaged and are always ready for action. All the tests with the prototype 1 are finished in the meantime and the result of the tests is a new improved prototype 2, which can be used in the emergency case. This prototype was given to the LfU. (orig.) [de

  20. Measuring of foot plantar pressure—possible applications in quantitative analysis of human body mobility

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Klimiec, E; Piekarski, J; Zaraska, K; Guzdek, P; Kołaszczyński, G; Jasiewicz, B

    2017-01-01

    The paper presents an evaluation of human mobility by gait analysis, carried out in natural conditions (outside of the laboratory). Foot plantar pressure is measured using a shoe insole with 8 sensors placed in different anatomical zones of the foot, and placed inside a sports shoe. Polarized polyvinylidene fluoride (PVDF) foil is used as a sensor material. A wireless transmission system is used to transmit voltage values to the computer. Miniaturization was the priority during the design of the system. Due to the linear relationship between force and transducer voltage, energy and power released during walking in arbitrary units can be calculated as an integral of the square of the transducer voltage over time. Gait measurements were carried out over several days on healthy persons during normal walking and slow walking. The performed measurements allowed for the determination of walking speed (number of steps per second), gait rhythm and manner of walking (applying force to inside versus outside part of the sole). It was found that switching from normal to slow walk increases gait energy by 25% while the pressure distribution across the anatomical regions of the foot remains unchanged. The results will be used to develop a programme for the evaluation of patients with orthopedic diseases or even with cardiac failures, for an estimation of the results of health recovery and training efficiency in many sports activities. (paper)

  1. Localization of Non-Linearly Modeled Autonomous Mobile Robots Using Out-of-Sequence Measurements

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jesus M. de la Cruz

    2012-02-01

    Full Text Available This paper presents a state of the art of the estimation algorithms dealing with Out-of-Sequence (OOS measurements for non-linearly modeled systems. The state of the art includes a critical analysis of the algorithm properties that takes into account the applicability of these techniques to autonomous mobile robot navigation based on the fusion of the measurements provided, delayed and OOS, by multiple sensors. Besides, it shows a representative example of the use of one of the most computationally efficient approaches in the localization module of the control software of a real robot (which has non-linear dynamics, and linear and non-linear sensors and compares its performance against other approaches. The simulated results obtained with the selected OOS algorithm shows the computational requirements that each sensor of the robot imposes to it. The real experiments show how the inclusion of the selected OOS algorithm in the control software lets the robot successfully navigate in spite of receiving many OOS measurements. Finally, the comparison highlights that not only is the selected OOS algorithm among the best performing ones of the comparison, but it also has the lowest computational and memory cost.

  2. L'effet Hall Quantique

    Science.gov (United States)

    Samson, Thomas

    Nous proposons une methode permettant d'obtenir une expression pour la conductivite de Hall de structures electroniques bidimensionnelles et nous examinons celle -ci a la limite d'une temperature nulle dans le but de verifier l'effet Hall quantique. Nous allons nous interesser essentiellement a l'effet Hall quantique entier et aux effets fractionnaires inferieurs a un. Le systeme considere est forme d'un gaz d'electrons en interaction faible avec les impuretes de l'echantillon. Le modele du gaz d'electrons consiste en un gaz bidimensionnel d'electrons sans spin expose perpendiculairement a un champ magnetique uniforme. Ce dernier est decrit par le potentiel vecteur vec{rm A} defini dans la jauge de Dingle ou jauge symetrique. Conformement au formalisme de la seconde quantification, l'hamiltonien de ce gaz est represente dans la base des etats a un-corps de Dingle |n,m> et exprime ainsi en terme des operateurs de creation et d'annihilation correspondants a_sp{ rm n m}{dag} et a _{rm n m}. Nous supposons de plus que les electrons du niveau fondamental de Dingle interagissent entre eux via le potentiel coulombien. La methode utilisee fait appel a une equation mai tresse a N-corps, de nature quantique et statistique, et verifiant le second principe de la thermodynamique. A partir de celle-ci, nous obtenons un systeme d'equations differentielles appele hierarchie d'equations quantique dont la resolution nous permet de determiner une equation a un-corps, dite de Boltzmann quantique, et dictant l'evolution de la moyenne statistique de l'operateur non-diagonal a _sp{rm n m}{dag } a_{rm n}, _{rm m}, sous l'action du champ electrique applique vec{rm E}(t). C'est sa solution Tr(p(t) a _sp{rm n m}{dag} a_{rm n},_ {rm m}), qui definit la relation de convolution entre la densite courant de Hall vec{rm J}_{rm H }(t) et le champ electrique vec {rm E}(t) dont la transformee de Laplace-Fourier du noyau nous fournit l'expression de la conductivite de Hall desiree. Pour une valeur de

  3. The system for automatic dose rate measurements by mobile groups in field

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Drabova, D.; Filgas, R.; Cespirova, I.; Ejemova, M.

    1998-01-01

    The comparison of characteristics between a pressurized ionization chamber, plastic scintillator and proportional counter is given. Based on requirements and comparison of properties of various probes, the system for automatic dose rate measurement and integration of geographic co-ordinates in field was designed and tested.The system consists of proportional counter. This is so-called intelligent probe can be easily connected to a personal computer. The probe measures in the energy range 30 keV - 1.3 MeV with reasonable energy and angular response, it can measure the dose rate in the range 50 nSv/h - 1 Sv/h with the typical efficiency 9.5 imp/s/μSv/h. The probe is fixed in the holder placed on the front mask of a car. For the simultaneous determination of geographical co-ordinates the personal GPS navigator Garmin 95 is used. Both devices are controlled by a notebook via two serial ports. The second serial port that is not quite common in notebook can be easily realised by a PCMCIA card. The notebook is used in the field by a mobile group can be transmitted to the assessment centre by the cellular GSM phone. The system Nokia 2110 connected to notebook by PCMCIA card is used. The whole system is powered up from the car battery. The system is controlled by specially developed software. The software was developed in the FoxPro 2.5 environment and works under MS-DOS 6.22. It has no problems to work in Windows 95 DOS window. The results of dose rate measurements obtained during route monitoring are stored in files. They can be displayed on a graphic screen, presenting the geographical distribution of the dose rate values colour coded on a map and the time sequence of the measured data. (authors)

  4. Measurement and comparison of skin dose using OneDose MOSFET and Mobile MOSFET for patients with acute lymphoblastic leukemia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mattar, Essam H; Hammad, Lina F; Al-Mohammed, Huda I

    2011-07-01

    Total body irradiation is a protocol used to treat acute lymphoblastic leukemia in patients prior to bone marrow transplant. It is involved in the treatment of the whole body using a large radiation field with extended source-skin distance. Therefore measuring and monitoring the skin dose during the treatment is important. Two kinds of metal oxide semiconductor field effect transistor (OneDose MOSFET and mobile MOSEFT) dosimeter are used during the treatment delivery to measure the skin dose to specific points and compare it with the target prescribed dose. The objective of this study was to compare the variation of skin dose in patients with acute lymphatic leukemia (ALL) treated with total body irradiation (TBI) using OneDose MOSFET detectors and Mobile MOSFET, and then compare both results with the target prescribed dose. The measurements involved 32 patient's (16 males, 16 females), aged between 14-30 years, with an average age of 22.41 years. One-Dose MOSFET and Mobile MOSFET dosimetry were performed at 10 different anatomical sites on every patient. The results showed there was no variation between skin dose measured with OneDose MOSFET and Mobile MOSFET in all patients. Furthermore, the results showed for every anatomical site selected there was no significant difference in the dose delivered using either OneDose MOSFET detector or Mobile MOSFET as compared to the prescribed dose. The study concludes that One-Dose MOSFET detectors and Mobile MOSFET both give a direct read-out immediately after the treatment; therefore both detectors are suitable options when measuring skin dose for total body irradiation treatment.

  5. Mobile measurement of methane emissions from natural gas developments in northeastern British Columbia, Canada

    Science.gov (United States)

    Atherton, Emmaline; Risk, David; Fougère, Chelsea; Lavoie, Martin; Marshall, Alex; Werring, John; Williams, James P.; Minions, Christina

    2017-10-01

    -up estimates of 78 000 t of methane for all oil and gas sector sources in British Columbia. Current bottom-up methods for estimating methane emissions do not normally calculate the fraction of emitting oil and gas infrastructure with thorough on-ground measurements. However, this study demonstrates that mobile surveys could provide a more accurate representation of the number of emission sources in an oil and gas development. This study presents the first mobile collection of methane emissions from oil and gas infrastructure in British Columbia, and these results can be used to inform policy development in an era of methane emission reduction efforts.

  6. Spin Hall effect by surface roughness

    KAUST Repository

    Zhou, Lingjun

    2015-01-08

    The spin Hall and its inverse effects, driven by the spin orbit interaction, provide an interconversion mechanism between spin and charge currents. Since the spin Hall effect generates and manipulates spin current electrically, to achieve a large effect is becoming an important topic in both academia and industries. So far, materials with heavy elements carrying a strong spin orbit interaction, provide the only option. We propose here a new mechanism, using the surface roughness in ultrathin films, to enhance the spin Hall effect without heavy elements. Our analysis based on Cu and Al thin films suggests that surface roughness is capable of driving a spin Hall angle that is comparable to that in bulk Au. We also demonstrate that the spin Hall effect induced by surface roughness subscribes only to the side-jump contribution but not the skew scattering. The paradigm proposed in this paper provides the second, not if only, alternative to generate a sizable spin Hall effect.

  7. Tunneling Anomalous and Spin Hall Effects.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Matos-Abiague, A; Fabian, J

    2015-07-31

    We predict, theoretically, the existence of the anomalous Hall effect when a tunneling current flows through a tunnel junction in which only one of the electrodes is magnetic. The interfacial spin-orbit coupling present in the barrier region induces a spin-dependent momentum filtering in the directions perpendicular to the tunneling current, resulting in a skew tunneling even in the absence of impurities. This produces an anomalous Hall conductance and spin Hall currents in the nonmagnetic electrode when a bias voltage is applied across the tunneling heterojunction. If the barrier is composed of a noncentrosymmetric material, the anomalous Hall conductance and spin Hall currents become anisotropic with respect to both the magnetization and crystallographic directions, allowing us to separate this interfacial phenomenon from the bulk anomalous and spin Hall contributions. The proposed effect should be useful for proving and quantifying the interfacial spin-orbit fields in metallic and metal-semiconductor systems.

  8. Measurement and analysis of radiofrequency radiations from some mobile phone base stations in Ghana

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Amoako, J. K.; Fletcher, J. J.; Darko, E. O.

    2009-01-01

    A survey of the radiofrequency electromagnetic radiation at public access points in the vicinity of 50 cellular phone base stations has been carried out. The primary objective was to measure and analyse the electromagnetic field strength levels emitted by antennae installed and operated by the Ghana Telecommunications Company. On all the sites measurements were made using a hand-held spectrum analyser to determine the electric field level with the 900 and 1800 MHz frequency bands. The results indicated that power densities at public access points varied from as low as 0.01 μW m -2 to as high as 10 μW m -2 for the frequency of 900 MHz. At a transmission frequency of 1800 MHz, the variation of power densities is from 0.01 to 100 μW m -2 . The results were found to be in compliant with the International Commission on Non-ionizing Radiological Protection guidance level but were 20 times higher than the results generally obtained for such a practice elsewhere. There is therefore a need to re-assess the situation to ensure reduction in the present level as an increase in mobile phone usage is envisaged within the next few years. (authors)

  9. Measurement and analysis of radiofrequency radiations from some mobile phone base stations in Ghana.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Amoako, J K; Fletcher, J J; Darko, E O

    2009-08-01

    A survey of the radiofrequency electromagnetic radiation at public access points in the vicinity of 50 cellular phone base stations has been carried out. The primary objective was to measure and analyse the electromagnetic field strength levels emitted by antennae installed and operated by the Ghana Telecommunications Company. On all the sites measurements were made using a hand-held spectrum analyser to determine the electric field level with the 900 and 1800 MHz frequency bands. The results indicated that power densities at public access points varied from as low as 0.01 microW m(-2) to as high as 10 microW m(-2) for the frequency of 900 MHz. At a transmission frequency of 1800 MHz, the variation of power densities is from 0.01 to 100 microW m(-2). The results were found to be in compliant with the International Commission on Non-ionizing Radiological Protection guidance level but were 20 times higher than the results generally obtained for such a practice elsewhere. There is therefore a need to re-assess the situation to ensure reduction in the present level as an increase in mobile phone usage is envisaged within the next few years.

  10. Effective Social Relationship Measurement and Cluster Based Routing in Mobile Opportunistic Networks †

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zeng, Feng; Zhao, Nan; Li, Wenjia

    2017-01-01

    In mobile opportunistic networks, the social relationship among nodes has an important impact on data transmission efficiency. Motivated by the strong share ability of “circles of friends” in communication networks such as Facebook, Twitter, Wechat and so on, we take a real-life example to show that social relationships among nodes consist of explicit and implicit parts. The explicit part comes from direct contact among nodes, and the implicit part can be measured through the “circles of friends”. We present the definitions of explicit and implicit social relationships between two nodes, adaptive weights of explicit and implicit parts are given according to the contact feature of nodes, and the distributed mechanism is designed to construct the “circles of friends” of nodes, which is used for the calculation of the implicit part of social relationship between nodes. Based on effective measurement of social relationships, we propose a social-based clustering and routing scheme, in which each node selects the nodes with close social relationships to form a local cluster, and the self-control method is used to keep all cluster members always having close relationships with each other. A cluster-based message forwarding mechanism is designed for opportunistic routing, in which each node only forwards the copy of the message to nodes with the destination node as a member of the local cluster. Simulation results show that the proposed social-based clustering and routing outperforms the other classic routing algorithms. PMID:28498309

  11. Effective Social Relationship Measurement and Cluster Based Routing in Mobile Opportunistic Networks.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zeng, Feng; Zhao, Nan; Li, Wenjia

    2017-05-12

    In mobile opportunistic networks, the social relationship among nodes has an important impact on data transmission efficiency. Motivated by the strong share ability of "circles of friends" in communication networks such as Facebook, Twitter, Wechat and so on, we take a real-life example to show that social relationships among nodes consist of explicit and implicit parts. The explicit part comes from direct contact among nodes, and the implicit part can be measured through the "circles of friends". We present the definitions of explicit and implicit social relationships between two nodes, adaptive weights of explicit and implicit parts are given according to the contact feature of nodes, and the distributed mechanism is designed to construct the "circles of friends" of nodes, which is used for the calculation of the implicit part of social relationship between nodes. Based on effective measurement of social relationships, we propose a social-based clustering and routing scheme, in which each node selects the nodes with close social relationships to form a local cluster, and the self-control method is used to keep all cluster members always having close relationships with each other. A cluster-based message forwarding mechanism is designed for opportunistic routing, in which each node only forwards the copy of the message to nodes with the destination node as a member of the local cluster. Simulation results show that the proposed social-based clustering and routing outperforms the other classic routing algorithms.

  12. Enabling Mobile Communications for the Needy: Affordability Methodology, and Approaches to Requalify Universal Service Measures

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Louis-Francois PAU

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available This paper links communications and media usage to social and household economics boundaries. It highlights that in present day society, communications and media are a necessity, but not always affordable, and that they furthermore open up for addictive behaviors which raise additional financial and social risks. A simple and efficient methodology compatible with state-of-the-art social and communications business statistics is developed, which produces the residual communications and media affordability budget and ultimately the value-at-risk in terms of usage and tariffs. Sensitivity analysis provides precious information on bottom-up communications and media adoption on the basis of affordability. This approach differs from the regulated but often ineffective Universal service obligation, which instead of catering for individual needs mostly addresses macro-measures helping geographical access coverage (e.g. in rural areas. It is proposed to requalify the Universal service obligations on operators into concrete measures, allowing, with unchanged funding, the needy to adopt mobile services based on their affordability constraints by bridging the gap to a standard tariff. Case data are surveyed from various countries. ICT policy recommendations are made to support widespread and socially responsible communications access.

  13. Latest on Mobile Methane Measurements with Fast Open-Path Technology: Experiences, Opportunities & Perspectives

    Science.gov (United States)

    Burba, George; Anderson, Tyler; Ediger, Kevin; von Fischer, Joseph; Gioli, Beniamino; Ham, Jay; Hupp, Jason; Kohnert, Katrin; Larmanou, Eric; Levy, Peter; Polidori, Andrea; Pikelnaya, Olga; Price, Eric; Sachs, Torsten; Serafimovich, Andrei; Zondlo, Mark; Zulueta, Rommel

    2016-04-01

    allowing eddy covariance measurements of methane flux with power consumption 30-150 times below other available technologies. The instrumentation was designed to run on solar panels or a small generator, and could be placed in the middle of the methane-producing ecosystem without a need for grid power. This significantly expanded the methane flux measurement coverage in permafrost regions, wetlands, rice fields and landfills. In the past few years, this instrumentation has been utilized increasingly more frequently outside of the traditional use at stationary flux towers. The novel approaches included measurements from various moving platforms, such as cars, aircraft, and ships. Projects included mapping of concentrations and vertical profiles, leak detection and quantification, mobile emission detection from natural gas cars, soil methane flux surveys, etc. This presentation will describe key developmental steps in the lightweight low-power high-resolution open-path technology, the instrument principles and key elements of the design, and will highlight several novel approaches where such instrumentation was used in mobile deployments in urban and natural environments.

  14. Performance Comparison of Cross-Like Hall Plates with Different Covering Layers

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fei Lyu

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available This paper studies the effects of the covering layers on the performance of a cross-like Hall plate. Three different structures of a cross-like Hall plate in various sizes are designed and analyzed. The Hall plate sensitivity and offset are characterized using a self-built measurement system. The effect of the P-type region over the active area on the current-related sensitivity is studied for different Hall plate designs. In addition, the correlation between the P-type covering layer and offset is analyzed. The best structure out of three designs is determined. Besides, a modified eight-resistor circuit model for the Hall plate is presented with improved accuracy by taking the offset into account.

  15. Experimental Studies of Anode Sheath Phenomena in a Hall Thruster Discharge

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dorf, L.; Raitses, Y.; Fisch, N.J.

    2004-01-01

    Both electron-repelling and electron-attracting anode sheaths in a Hall thruster were characterized by measuring the plasma potential with biased and emissive probes [L. Dorf, Y. Raitses, V. Semenov, and N.J. Fisch, Appl. Phys. Let. 84 (2004) 1070]. In the present work, two-dimensional structures of the plasma potential, electron temperature, and plasma density in the near-anode region of a Hall thruster with clean and dielectrically coated anodes are identified. Possible mechanisms of anode sheath formation in a Hall thruster are analyzed. The path for current closure to the anode appears to be the determining factor in the anode sheath formation process. The main conclusion of this work is that the anode sheath formation in Hall thrusters differs essentially from that in the other gas discharge devices, like a glow discharge or a hollow anode, because the Hall thruster utilizes long electron residence times to ionize rather than high neutral pressures

  16. Observation of the Zero Hall Plateau in a Quantum Anomalous Hall Insulator

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Feng, Yang; Feng, Xiao; Ou, Yunbo; Wang, Jing; Liu, Chang; Zhang, Liguo; Zhao, Dongyang; Jiang, Gaoyuan; Zhang, Shou-Cheng; He, Ke; Ma, Xucun; Xue, Qi-Kun; Wang, Yayu

    2015-09-16

    We report experimental investigations on the quantum phase transition between the two opposite Hall plateaus of a quantum anomalous Hall insulator. We observe a well-defined plateau with zero Hall conductivity over a range of magnetic field around coercivity when the magnetization reverses. The features of the zero Hall plateau are shown to be closely related to that of the quantum anomalous Hall effect, but its temperature evolution exhibits a significant difference from the network model for a conventional quantum Hall plateau transition. We propose that the chiral edge states residing at the magnetic domain boundaries, which are unique to a quantum anomalous Hall insulator, are responsible for the novel features of the zero Hall plateau.

  17. Relasphone—Mobile and Participative In Situ Forest Biomass Measurements Supporting Satellite Image Mapping

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Matthieu Molinier

    2016-10-01

    Full Text Available Due to the high cost of traditional forest plot measurements, the availability of up-to-date in situ forest inventory data has been a bottleneck for remote sensing image analysis in support of the important global forest biomass mapping. Capitalizing on the proliferation of smartphones, citizen science is a promising approach to increase spatial and temporal coverages of in situ forest observations in a cost-effective way. Digital cameras can be used as a relascope device to measure basal area, a forest density variable that is closely related to biomass. In this paper, we present the Relasphone mobile application with extensive accuracy assessment in two mixed forest sites from different biomes. Basal area measurements in Finland (boreal zone were in good agreement with reference forest inventory plot data on pine ( R 2 = 0 . 75 , R M S E = 5 . 33 m 2 /ha, spruce ( R 2 = 0 . 75 , R M S E = 6 . 73 m 2 /ha and birch ( R 2 = 0 . 71 , R M S E = 4 . 98 m 2 /ha, with total relative R M S E ( % = 29 . 66 % . In Durango, Mexico (temperate zone, Relasphone stem volume measurements were best for pine ( R 2 = 0 . 88 , R M S E = 32 . 46 m 3 /ha and total stem volume ( R 2 = 0 . 87 , R M S E = 35 . 21 m 3 /ha. Relasphone data were then successfully utilized as the only reference data in combination with optical satellite images to produce biomass maps. The Relasphone concept has been validated for future use by citizens in other locations.

  18. Anomalous Hall effect in polycrystalline Ni films

    KAUST Repository

    Guo, Zaibing

    2012-02-01

    We systematically studied the anomalous Hall effect in a series of polycrystalline Ni films with thickness ranging from 4 to 200 nm. It is found that both the longitudinal and anomalous Hall resistivity increased greatly as film thickness decreased. This enhancement should be related to the surface scattering. In the ultrathin films (46 nm thick), weak localization corrections to anomalous Hall conductivity were studied. The granular model, taking into account the dominated intergranular tunneling, has been employed to explain this phenomenon, which can explain the weak dependence of anomalous Hall resistivity on longitudinal resistivity as well. © 2011 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  19. Single-position Hall effect measurements

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    2014-01-01

    A method for determining a distance (Y) between a first position on and an electrical boundary (34) of a test sample by a multi-point probe comprising four contact elements, comprising: contacting the test sample with the four contact elements (20,22,24,26) at the first position, applying a magne...

  20. Mini array of quantum Hall devices based on epitaxial graphene

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Novikov, S.; Lebedeva, N.; Hämäläinen, J.; Iisakka, I.; Immonen, P.; Manninen, A. J.; Satrapinski, A.

    2016-01-01

    Series connection of four quantum Hall effect (QHE) devices based on epitaxial graphene films was studied for realization of a quantum resistance standard with an up-scaled value. The tested devices showed quantum Hall plateaux R H,2 at a filling factor v = 2 starting from a relatively low magnetic field (between 4 T and 5 T) when the temperature was 1.5 K. The precision measurements of quantized Hall resistance of four QHE devices connected by triple series connections and external bonding wires were done at B = 7 T and T = 1.5 K using a commercial precision resistance bridge with 50 μA current through the QHE device. The results showed that the deviation of the quantized Hall resistance of the series connection of four graphene-based QHE devices from the expected value of 4×R H,2  = 2 h/e 2 was smaller than the relative standard uncertainty of the measurement (<1 × 10 −7 ) limited by the used resistance bridge.

  1. Microminiature Hall probes based on n-InSb(Sn)/i-GaAs heterostructure for pulsed magnetic field applications up to 52 T

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mironov, O.A.; Myronov, M.; Durov, S.; Drachenko, O.; Leotin, J

    2004-04-30

    Microminiature Hall probes with sensitive area down to 33x115 {mu}m and based on n-InSb/i-GaAs optimized Sn-doped MBE-grown heterostructures are reported. The 'metallurgical' thicknesses of the n-InSb epilayers lie in the range d{sup m}=1.1-10.5 {mu}m giving room-temperature mobilities of (9-15)x10{sup 3} cm{sup 2}/Vs with carrier densities of (0.96-2.56)x10{sup 18} cm{sup -3}. Characterization of the devices was performed by magnetotransport measurements in quasi-static and pulsed magnetic fields. In the temperature range 1.1-300 K and in magnetic fields up to 12 T (static) and up to 52 T (pulsed, {tau}=120 mS), transport measurements yield remarkable linearity of the Hall voltage up to 52 T and sensitivity, as well as demonstrating the high-temperature stability of the Hall voltage, the offset voltage and the device resistivity. No significant effect of the high current up to 150 mA on either the sensitivity or the resistivity is observed.

  2. Surface mobility and structural transitions of poly(n-alkyl methacrylates) probed by dynamic contact angle measurements

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van Damme, H.S.; Hogt, A.H.; Feijen, Jan

    1986-01-01

    Dynamic contact angles and contact-angle hysteresis of a series of poly(n-alkyl methacrylates) (PAMA) were investigated using the Wilhelmy plate technique. The mobility of polymer surface chains, segments, and side groups affected the measured contact angles and their hysteresis. A model is

  3. Measuring personal exposure from 900MHz mobile phone base stations in Australia and Belgium using a novel personal distributed exposimeter

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bhatt, Chhavi Raj; Thielens, Arno; Redmayne, Mary; Abramson, Michael J; Billah, Baki; Sim, Malcolm R; Vermeulen, Roel; Martens, Luc; Joseph, Wout; Benke, Geza

    2016-01-01

    The aims of this study were to: i) measure personal exposure in the Global System for Mobile communications (GSM) 900MHz downlink (DL) frequency band with two systems of exposimeters, a personal distributed exposimeter (PDE) and a pair of ExpoM-RFs, ii) compare the GSM 900MHz DL exposures across

  4. Exposure research going mobile: A smartphone-based measurement of media exposure to political information in a convergent media environment

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Ohme, J.; Albæk, E.; de Vreese, C.H.

    2016-01-01

    In today’s convergent media environment, media exposure becomes increasingly channel-independent and social media-bound, and media content is more frequently accessed on mobile devices. This calls for new approaches to measuring media exposure. This study applies an innovative approach to survey (n

  5. A review of the quantum Hall effects in MgZnO/ZnO heterostructures

    Science.gov (United States)

    Falson, Joseph; Kawasaki, Masashi

    2018-05-01

    This review visits recent experimental efforts on high mobility two-dimensional electron systems (2DES) hosted at the Mg x Zn1-x O/ZnO heterointerface. We begin with the growth of these samples, and highlight the key characteristics of ozone-assisted molecular beam epitaxy required for their production. The transport characteristics of these structures are found to rival that of traditional semiconductor material systems, as signified by the high electron mobility (μ > 1000 000 cm2 Vs‑1) and rich quantum Hall features. Owing to a large effective mass and small dielectric constant, interaction effects are an order of magnitude stronger in comparison with the well studied GaAs-based 2DES. The strong correlation physics results in robust Fermi-liquid renormalization of the effective mass and spin susceptibility of carriers, which in turn dictates the parameter space for the quantum Hall effect. Finally, we explore the quantum Hall effect with a particular emphasis on the spin degree of freedom of carriers, and how their large spin splitting allows control of the ground states encountered at ultra-low temperatures within the fractional quantum Hall regime. We discuss in detail the physics of even-denominator fractional quantum Hall states, whose observation and underlying character remain elusive and exotic.

  6. RELIABILITY OF ANKLE-FOOT MORPHOLOGY, MOBILITY, STRENGTH, AND MOTOR PERFORMANCE MEASURES.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fraser, John J; Koldenhoven, Rachel M; Saliba, Susan A; Hertel, Jay

    2017-12-01

    Assessment of foot posture, morphology, intersegmental mobility, strength and motor control of the ankle-foot complex are commonly used clinically, but measurement properties of many assessments are unclear. To determine test-retest and inter-rater reliability, standard error of measurement, and minimal detectable change of morphology, joint excursion and play, strength, and motor control of the ankle-foot complex. Reliability study. 24 healthy, recreationally-active young adults without history of ankle-foot injury were assessed by two clinicians on two occasions, three to ten days apart. Measurement properties were assessed for foot morphology (foot posture index, total and truncated length, width, arch height), joint excursion (weight-bearing dorsiflexion, rearfoot and hallux goniometry, forefoot inclinometry, 1 st metatarsal displacement) and joint play, strength (handheld dynamometry), and motor control rating during intrinsic foot muscle (IFM) exercises. Clinician order was randomized using a Latin Square. The clinicians performed independent examinations and did not confer on the findings for the duration of the study. Test-retest and inter-tester reliability and agreement was assessed using intraclass correlation coefficients (ICC 2,k ) and weighted kappa ( K w ). Test-retest reliability ICC were as follows: morphology: .80-1.00, joint excursion: .58-.97, joint play: -.67-.84, strength: .67-.92, IFM motor rating: K W -.01-.71. Inter-rater reliability ICC were as follows: morphology: .81-1.00, joint excursion: .32-.97, joint play: -1.06-1.00, strength: .53-.90, and IFM motor rating: K w .02-.56. Measures of ankle-foot posture, morphology, joint excursion, and strength demonstrated fair to excellent test-retest and inter-rater reliability. Test-retest reliability for rating of perceived difficulty and motor performance was good to excellent for short-foot, toe-spread-out, and hallux exercises and poor to fair for lesser toe extension. Joint play measures had

  7. Night Sky Brightness Measurement by the Public through a Mobile Phone App

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kamegai, Kazuhisa; Tsukada, Ken; Inoue, Hiroki

    2015-08-01

    The darkness of night sky is important naturally for astronomy researchers, and also for the public people. Particularly, it is meaningful for those who begin to have an interest in gazing stars. Some previous studies suggest that light pollution may affect human health and ecosystem in various ways. Furthermore, it causes a lot of waste of electric energy for lighting.In Japan, the night sky brightness had been measured by Ministry of Environment for a few decades. Recently some global efforts have been also conducted. However the number of measured position is limited because the measurement needs some apparatus and takes long time.Here we show a result of quick and easy measurements of night sky brightness by the public people through a mobile phone app. The measurements were conducted in cooperation between some members of the Tenpla project and a weather forecasting company. The app has been developed by the company and has been installed by over 6.5 million people, which allow us to get a large number of data. Our purposes are (1) making map of night sky brightness all over Japan and (2) providing an opportunity to enjoy gazing star for those who are not usually interested in astronomy.As an interactive function of the app, we put a questionnaire of four choices in which we ask users how many stars are visible in a part of the constellation of Orion. When users answer the question, we get the answer and the position where they are. Depending on the answer, we can roughly recognize the sky brightness of the position.We opened the measurements for several nights. As a result, we could get 4000 - 5000 data all over the country per night. The map of each night is a snapshot of sky brightness of the night including effect of the weather. For example we can recognize that the sky is getting darker as a function of distance from the metropolitan area of Tokyo. We will show the detail results in the presentation.

  8. 50 KW Class Krypton Hall Thruster Performance

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jacobson, David T.; Manzella, David H.

    2003-01-01

    The performance of a 50-kilowatt-class Hall thruster designed for operation on xenon propellant was measured using kryton propellant. The thruster was operated at discharge power levels ranging from 6.4 to 72.5 kilowatts. The device produced thrust ranging from 0.3 to 2.5 newtons. The thruster was operated at discharge voltages between 250 and 1000 volts. At the highest anode mass flow rate and discharge voltage and assuming a 100 percent singly charged condition, the discharge specific impulse approached the theoretical value. Discharge specific impulse of 4500 seconds was demonstrated at a discharge voltage of 1000 volts. The peak discharge efficiency was 64 percent at 650 volts.

  9. Photonic spin Hall effect at metasurfaces.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yin, Xiaobo; Ye, Ziliang; Rho, Junsuk; Wang, Yuan; Zhang, Xiang

    2013-03-22

    The spin Hall effect (SHE) of light is very weak because of the extremely small photon momentum and spin-orbit interaction. Here, we report a strong photonic SHE resulting in a measured large splitting of polarized light at metasurfaces. The rapidly varying phase discontinuities along a metasurface, breaking the axial symmetry of the system, enable the direct observation of large transverse motion of circularly polarized light, even at normal incidence. The strong spin-orbit interaction deviates the polarized light from the trajectory prescribed by the ordinary Fermat principle. Such a strong and broadband photonic SHE may provide a route for exploiting the spin and orbit angular momentum of light for information processing and communication.

  10. 75 FR 7467 - Gary E. Hall and Rita C. Hall; Notice of Application Accepted for Filing With the Commision...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-02-19

    ... Rita C. Hall; Notice of Application Accepted for Filing With the Commision, Soliciting Motions To.... Project No.: 13652-000. c. Date filed: January 11, 2010. d. Applicant: Gary E. Hall and Rita C. Hall. e... Policies Act of 1978, 16 U.S.C. 2705, 2708. h. Applicant Contact: Mr. Gary E. Hall and Ms. Rita C. Hall, P...

  11. Development of Standardized Mobile Tracer Correlation Approach for Large Area Emission Measurements (DRAFT UNDER EPA REVIEW)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Foster-wittig, T. A.; Thoma, E.; Green, R.; Hater, G.; Swan, N.; Chanton, J.

    2013-12-01

    Improved understanding of air emissions from large area sources such as landfills, waste water ponds, open-source processing, and agricultural operations is a topic of increasing environmental importance. In many cases, the size of the area source, coupled with spatial-heterogeneity, make direct (on-site) emission assessment difficult; methane emissions, from landfills for example, can be particularly complex [Thoma et al, 2009]. Recently, whole-facility (remote) measurement approaches based on tracer correlation have been utilized [Scheutz et al, 2011]. The approach uses a mobile platform to simultaneously measure a metered-release of a conservative gas (the tracer) along with the target compound (methane in the case of landfills). The known-rate tracer release provides a measure of atmospheric dispersion at the downwind observing location allowing the area source emission to be determined by a ratio calculation [Green et al, 2010]. Although powerful in concept, the approach has been somewhat limited to research applications due to the complexities and cost of the high-sensitivity measurement equipment required to quantify the part-per billion levels of tracer and target gas at kilometer-scale distances. The advent of compact, robust, and easy to use near-infrared optical measurement systems (such as cavity ring down spectroscopy) allow the tracer correlation approach to be investigated for wider use. Over the last several years, Waste Management Inc., the U.S. EPA, and collaborators have conducted method evaluation activities to determine the viability of a standardized approach through execution of a large number of field measurement trials at U.S. landfills. As opposed to previous studies [Scheutz et al, 2011] conducted at night (optimal plume transport conditions), the current work evaluated realistic use-scenarios; these scenarios include execution by non-scientist personnel, daylight operation, and full range of atmospheric condition (all plume transport

  12. Instrument response measurements of ion mobility spectrometers in situ: maintaining optimal system performance of fielded systems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wallis, Eric; Griffin, Todd M.; Popkie, Norm, Jr.; Eagan, Michael A.; McAtee, Robert F.; Vrazel, Danet; McKinly, Jim

    2005-05-01

    Ion Mobility Spectroscopy (IMS) is the most widespread detection technique in use by the military for the detection of chemical warfare agents, explosives, and other threat agents. Moreover, its role in homeland security and force protection has expanded due, in part, to its good sensitivity, low power, lightweight, and reasonable cost. With the increased use of IMS systems as continuous monitors, it becomes necessary to develop tools and methodologies to ensure optimal performance over a wide range of conditions and extended periods of time. Namely, instrument calibration is needed to ensure proper sensitivity and to correct for matrix or environmental effects. We have developed methodologies to deal with the semi-quantitative nature of IMS and allow us to generate response curves that allow a gauge of instrument performance and maintenance requirements. This instrumentation communicates to the IMS systems via a software interface that was developed in-house. The software measures system response, logs information to a database, and generates the response curves. This paper will discuss the instrumentation, software, data collected, and initial results from fielded systems.

  13. Ethical implications of location and accelerometer measurement in health research studies with mobile sensing devices.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fuller, Daniel; Shareck, Martine; Stanley, Kevin

    2017-10-01

    Quantification of individual behaviours using mobile sensing devices, including physical activity and spatial location, is a rapidly growing field in both academic research and the corporate world. In this case study, we summarize the literature examining the ethical aspects of mobile sensing and argue that a robust discussion about the ethical implications of mobile sensing for research purposes has not occurred sufficiently in the literature. Based on our literature summary and guided by basic ethical principles set out in Canadian, US, and International Ethics documents we propose four areas where further discussion should occur: consent, privacy and confidentiality, mitigating risk, and consideration of vulnerable populations. We argue that ongoing consent is crucial for participants to be aware of the precision and volume of data that is collected with mobile sensing devices. Related to privacy we discuss that participants may not agree that anonymized data is sufficient for privacy and confidentiality when mobile sensing data are collected. There has been some discussion about mitigating risk in the literature. We highlight that the researchers' obligations toward mitigating risks that are not directly related to the study purpose are unclear and require considerable discussion. Finally, using mobile sensing devices to study vulnerable populations requires careful consideration, particularly with respect to balancing research needs with participant burden. Based on our discussion, we identify a broad set of unanswered questions about the ethics of mobile sensing that should be addressed by the research community. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  14. Hall magnetohydrodynamics of neutral layers

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Huba, J.D.; Rudakov, L.I.

    2003-01-01

    New analytical and numerical results of the dynamics of inhomogeneous, reversed field current layers in the Hall limit (i.e., characteristic length scales < or approx. the ion inertial length) are presented. Specifically, the two- and three-dimensional evolution of a current layer that supports a reversed field plasma configuration and has a density gradient along the current direction is studied. The two-dimensional study demonstrates that a density inhomogeneity along the current direction can dramatically redistribute the magnetic field and plasma via magnetic shock-like or rarefaction waves. The relative direction between the density gradient and current flow plays a critical role in the evolution of the current sheet. One important result is that the current sheet can become very thin rapidly when the density gradient is directed opposite to the current. The three-dimensional study uses the same plasma and field configuration as the two-dimensional study but is also initialized with a magnetic field perturbation localized along the current channel upstream of the plasma inhomogeneity. The perturbation induces a magnetic wave structure that propagates in the direction of the electron drift (i.e., opposite to the current). The propagating wave structure is a Hall phenomenon associated with magnetic field curvature. The interaction between the propagating wave structure and the evolving current layer can lead to rapid magnetic field line reconnection. The results are applied to laboratory and space plasma processes

  15. High precision micro-scale Hall Effect characterization method using in-line micro four-point probes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Petersen, Dirch Hjorth; Hansen, Ole; Lin, Rong

    2008-01-01

    Accurate characterization of ultra shallow junctions (USJ) is important in order to understand the principles of junction formation and to develop the appropriate implant and annealing technologies. We investigate the capabilities of a new micro-scale Hall effect measurement method where Hall...... effect is measured with collinear micro four-point probes (M4PP). We derive the sensitivity to electrode position errors and describe a position error suppression method to enable rapid reliable Hall effect measurements with just two measurement points. We show with both Monte Carlo simulations...... and experimental measurements, that the repeatability of a micro-scale Hall effect measurement is better than 1 %. We demonstrate the ability to spatially resolve Hall effect on micro-scale by characterization of an USJ with a single laser stripe anneal. The micro sheet resistance variations resulting from...

  16. Investigations of the drift mobility of carriers and density of states in nanocrystalline CdS thin films

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Singh, Baljinder [Department of Physics, Kurukshetra University, Kurukshetra 136119 (India); Department of Physics, Panjab University, Chandigarh 160014 (India); Singh, Janpreet; Kaur, Jagdish [Department of Physics, Panjab University, Chandigarh 160014 (India); Moudgil, R.K. [Department of Physics, Kurukshetra University, Kurukshetra 136119 (India); Tripathi, S.K., E-mail: surya@pu.ac.in [Department of Physics, Panjab University, Chandigarh 160014 (India)

    2016-06-01

    Nanocrystalline Cadmium Sulfide (nc-CdS) thin films have been prepared on well-cleaned glass substrate at room temperature (300 K) by thermal evaporation technique using inert gas condensation (IGC) method. X-ray diffraction (XRD) analysis reveals that the films crystallize in hexagonal structure with preferred orientation along [002] direction. Scanning electron microscope (SEM) and Transmission electron microscope (TEM) studies reveal that grains are spherical in shape and uniformly distributed over the glass substrates. The optical band gap of the film is estimated from the transmittance spectra. Electrical parameters such as Hall coefficient, carrier type, carrier concentration, resistivity and mobility are determined using Hall measurements at 300 K. Transit time and mobility are estimated from Time of Flight (TOF) transient photocurrent technique in gap cell configuration. The measured values of electron drift mobility from TOF and Hall measurements are of the same order. Constant Photocurrent Method in ac-mode (ac-CPM) is used to measure the absorption spectra in low absorption region. By applying derivative method, we have converted the measured absorption data into a density of states (DOS) distribution in the lower part of the energy gap. The value of Urbach energy, steepness parameter and density of defect states have been calculated from the absorption and DOS spectra.

  17. Novel assay to measure the plasmid mobilizing potential of mixed microbial communities

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Klümper, Uli; Droumpali, Ariadni; Dechesne, Arnaud

    2014-01-01

    Mobilizable plasmids lack necessary genes for complete conjugation and are therefore non-self-transmissible. Instead, they rely on the conjugation system of conjugal plasmids to be horizontally transferred to new recipients. While community permissiveness, the fraction of a mixed microbial...... community that can receive self-transmissible conjugal plasmids, has been studied, the intrinsic ability of a community to mobilize plasmids that lack conjugation systems is unexplored. Here, we present a novel framework and experimental method to estimate the mobilization potential of mixed communities. We...... of the donors receiving the conjugal plasmid in the first step. Further work is needed to establish how plasmid mobilization potential varies within and across microbial communities....

  18. Kinematic Analysis of Mobile Manipulator for Measurement and Maintenance in Dangerous Environment

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    CUI Genqun; LI Chunshu; ZHANG Minglu

    2006-01-01

    This paper studies the kinematic modeling of a mobile manipulator that consists of 5-DOF manipulator and an autonomous wheeled mobile platform. Then an artificial neural network to realize the coordination motion between manipulator and mobile platform is developed. On the basis of the task specifications, the algorithm determines the appropriate control variables to respond to the well tracking trajectory. The control strategy employed for either subsystem is achieved by using a robust supervised controller. A learning paradigm is used to produce the required reference variables for an overall cooperative behavior of the system. Simulation results are presented to show the effectiveness of this approach.

  19. Measuring Participants' Attitudes Toward Mobile Device Conference Applications in Continuing Medical Education: Validation of an Instrument.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wittich, Christopher M; Wang, Amy T; Fiala, Justin A; Mauck, Karen F; Mandrekar, Jayawant N; Ratelle, John T; Beckman, Thomas J

    2016-01-01

    Mobile device applications (apps) may enhance live CME courses. We aimed to (1) validate a measure of participant attitudes toward using a conference app and (2) determine associations between participant characteristics and attitudes toward CME apps with conference app usage. We conducted a cross-sectional validation study of participants at the Mayo Clinic Selected Topics in Internal Medicine Course. A conference app was developed that included presentation slides, note-taking features, search functions, social networking with other attendees, and access to presenter information. The CME app attitudes survey instrument (CMEAPP-10) was designed to determine participant attitudes toward conference apps. Of the 602 participants, 498 (82.7%) returned surveys. Factor analysis revealed a two-dimensional model for CMEAPP-10 scores (Cronbach α, 0.97). Mean (SD) CMEAPP-10 scores (maximum possible score of five) were higher for women than for men (4.06 [0.91] versus 3.85 [0.92]; P = .04). CMEAPP-10 scores (mean [SD]) were significantly associated (P = .02) with previous app usage as follows: less than once per month, 3.73 (1.05); monthly, 3.41 (1.16); weekly, 4.03 (0.69); and daily or more, 4.06 (0.89). Scores were unrelated to participant age, specialty, practice characteristics, or previous app use. This is the first validated measure of attitudes toward CME apps among course participants. App usage was higher among younger participants who had previously used educational or professional apps. Additionally, attitudes were more favorable among women and those who had previously used apps. These findings have important implications regarding efforts to engage participants with portable and accessible technology.

  20. Electromagnetic fields from base stations for cellular mobile telephones. Measurements around base stations in the Oslo area

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hannevik, Merete

    2000-01-01

    Measurements of radio frequent radiation from base station antennas for cellular mobile telephony have been performed. Measurements were performed inside the buildings in the area just behind or below antennas mounted on the wall or rooftop on buildings and on the ground below tower-mounted antennas. Except from the area 2-3 meters just in front of the antennas the electrical field levels were well below the international guidelines. (Author)