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Sample records for half-life kinetic energy

  1. Fission properties of einsteinium and fermium. [Half-life, kinetic energy release, mass division, prompt neutron emission

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hoffman, D.C.

    1978-01-01

    The systematics of the low energy fission of the fermium isotopes is studied considering half-lives, masss division, kinetic-energy release, and accompanying prompt neutron emission. It is shown that the low energy fission of the fermium isotopes is a microcosm of the fission process, exhibiting a wide range of half lives, mass and kinetic energy distributions and varying neutron emission. The trends in the fermium isotopes are considered. 23 references. (JFP)

  2. Kinetic modeling and half life study on bioremediation of crude oil dispersed by Corexit 9500

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zahed, Mohammad Ali [School of Civil Engineering, Universiti Sains Malaysia, Engineering Campus, 14300 Nibong Tebal, Penang (Malaysia); Aziz, Hamidi Abdul, E-mail: cehamidi@eng.usm.my [School of Civil Engineering, Universiti Sains Malaysia, Engineering Campus, 14300 Nibong Tebal, Penang (Malaysia); Isa, Mohamed Hasnain [Civil Engineering Department, Universiti Teknologi PETRONAS, 31750 Tronoh, Perak (Malaysia); Mohajeri, Leila; Mohajeri, Soraya [School of Civil Engineering, Universiti Sains Malaysia, Engineering Campus, 14300 Nibong Tebal, Penang (Malaysia); Kutty, Shamsul Rahman Mohamed [Civil Engineering Department, Universiti Teknologi PETRONAS, 31750 Tronoh, Perak (Malaysia)

    2011-01-30

    Hydrocarbon pollution in marine ecosystems occurs mainly by accidental oil spills, deliberate discharge of ballast waters from oil tankers and bilge waste discharges; causing site pollution and serious adverse effects on aquatic environments as well as human health. A large number of petroleum hydrocarbons are biodegradable, thus bioremediation has become an important method for the restoration of oil polluted areas. In this research, a series of natural attenuation, crude oil (CO) and dispersed crude oil (DCO) bioremediation experiments of artificially crude oil contaminated seawater was carried out. Bacterial consortiums were identified as Acinetobacter, Alcaligenes, Bacillus, Pseudomonas and Vibrio. First order kinetics described the biodegradation of crude oil. Under abiotic conditions, oil removal was 19.9% while a maximum of 31.8% total petroleum hydrocarbons (TPH) removal was obtained in natural attenuation experiment. All DCO bioreactors demonstrated higher and faster removal than CO bioreactors. Half life times were 28, 32, 38 and 58 days for DCO and 31, 40, 50 and 75 days for CO with oil concentrations of 100, 500, 1000 and 2000 mg/L, respectively. The effectiveness of Corexit 9500 dispersant was monitored in the 45 day study; the results indicated that it improved the crude oil biodegradation rate.

  3. In vitro digestion kinetics of excipients for lipid-based drug delivery and introduction of a relative lipolysis half life.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arnold, Yvonne E; Imanidis, Georgios; Kuentz, Martin

    2012-10-01

    Lipid-based drug delivery systems are widely used for enhancing the solubility of poorly water soluble drugs in the gastro-intestinal tract. Following oral intake, lipid systems undergo digestion in the stomach as well as the intestine. Lipolysis is here a complex process at the oil/water interface, influenced by numerous factors. To study the digestibility of nine excipients often used in lipid-based drug delivery systems. In addition, we introduced a mathematical model to describe in vitro lipolysis kinetics. A relative lipolysis half life was defined using the reference excipient medium-chain triglycerides. Using pH-stat equipment, the NaOH consumption was determined in an in vitro lipolysis assay. We identified two classes of excipients. Some additives were partially hydrolysed, whereas other excipients displayed complete lipolysis. For the latter class, a simplified mathematical model provided a good first approximation of initial lipolysis kinetics. Digestion characterization of excipients is important for the development of lipid-based delivery systems. The applied kinetic model and the concept of a relative lipolysis half life seemed to be promising tools for comparing in vitro lipolysis results.

  4. KINETIC MODELLING AND HALF LIFE STUDY OF ADSORPTIVE BIOREMEDIATION OF SOIL ARTIFICIALLY CONTAMINATED WITH BONNY LIGHT CRUDE OIL

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Samuel Enahoro Agarry

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available In this study, comparative potential effects of commercial activated carbon (CAC and plantain peel-derived biochar (PPBC of different particle sizes and dosage to stimulate petroleum hydrocarbon biodegradation in soil were investigated. Microcosms containing soil were spiked with weathered Bonny light crude oil (WBLCO (10% w/w and amended with different particle sizes (0.02, 0.07 and 0.48 mm and dosage (20, 30 and 40 g of CAC and PPBC, respectively. The bioremediation experiments were carried out for a period of 28 days under laboratory conditions. The results showed that there was a positive relationship between the rate of petroleum hydrocarbons reduction and presence of the CAC and PPBC in crude oil contaminated soil microcosms. The WBLCO biodegradation data fitted well to the first-order kinetic model. The model revealed that WBLCO contaminated-soil microcosms amended with CAC and PPBC had higher biodegradation rate constants (k as well as lower half-life times (t1/2 than unamended soil (natural attenuation remediation system. The rate constants increased while half-life times decreased with decreased particle size and increased dosage of amendment agents. ANOVA statistical analysis revealed that WBLCO biodegradation in soil was significantly (p = 0.05 influenced by the addition of CAC and biochar amendment agents, respectively. However, Tukey’s post hoc test (at p = 0.05 showed that there was no significant difference in the bioremediation efficiency of CAC and PPBC. Thus, amendment of soils with biochar has the potential to be an inexpensive, efficient, environmentally friendly and relatively novel strategy to mitigate organic compound-contaminated soil.

  5. Half Life Measurements in {sup 155}Gd

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Malmskog, S.G.

    1966-08-15

    In the literature there exists a definite difference for the half life of the 86.5 keV level in Gd depending on whether {sup 155}Eu or {sup 155}Tb sources have been used. Using a good energy resolution electron-electron coincidence spectrometer and a {sup 155}Eu source, a half life of 6.48 {+-} 0.26 nsec was obtained for the 86.5 keV level. This is in agreement with the values previously measured with {sup 155}Tb sources. The half life of the 105.4 keV level was measured to be 1.12 {+-} 0.05 nsec.

  6. Ligand-substitution mode capillary electrophoretic reactor: extending capillary electrophoretic reactor toward measurement of slow dissociation kinetics with a half-life of hours.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Iki, Nobuhiko; Takahashi, Mariko; Takahashi, Toru; Hoshino, Hitoshi

    2009-09-15

    A method employing capillary electrophoresis (CE) was developed to determine the rate constant of the very slow spontaneous dissociation of a complex species. The method uses a CE reactor (CER) to electrophoretically separate components from a complex zone and, thus, spontaneously dissociate a complex. The dissociation is accelerated by ligand substitution (LS) involving a competing ligand added to the electrophoretic buffer. The LS-CER method is validated using the dissociation of a Ti(IV)-catechin complex and EDTA as a competing ligand. There is good agreement between the spontaneous dissociation rate constant (k(d) = (1.64 +/- 0.63) x 10(-4) s(-1)) and the rate constant obtained by a conventional batchwise LS reaction (k(d) = (1.43 +/- 0.04) x 10(-4) s(-1)). Furthermore, the usefulness of the method is demonstrated using a Ti(IV)-tiron complex, for which k(d) = (0.51 +/- 0.43) x 10(-4) s(-1), corresponding to a half-life (t(1/2)) of 3.8 h. Notably, a single run of LS-CER for the Ti(IV) complex is completed within 40 min, implying that LS-CER requires a considerably shorter measurement time (roughly equal to t(1/2)) than conventional CER. LS-CER can be widely applied to determine the spontaneous dissociation rates of inorganic diagnostic and therapeutic reagents as well as of biomolecular complexes.

  7. Unified description of the proton, alpha, cluster decays and spontaneously fissions half- life

    CERN Document Server

    Mavrodiev, Strachimir Cht

    2016-01-01

    Some time ago the possibility of classical (without Gamow tunneling) universal description of radioactive nuclei decay was demonstrated. Such possibility is basis on the classical interpretation of Bohmian Psi-field reality in Bohmian-Chetaev mechanics and the hypothesis for the presence of dissipative forces, generated from the Gryzinski translational precession of the charged particles spin, in Langevin- Kramers diffusion mechanism. In this paper is present an unified model of proton, alpha decay, cluster radioactivity and spontaneous fission half-life as explicit function which depends on the total decay energy and kinetic energy, the number of protons and neutrons of daughter product, the number of protons and neutrons of mother nuclei and from a set) unknown digital parameters. The Half- lifes of the 573 nuclei taken from NuDat database together with the recent experimental data from Oganessian provide a basis for discovering the explicit form of the Kramers solution of Langevin type equation in a framew...

  8. Half-life of {sup 44}Ti

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ahmad, I.; Kutschera, W.; Castagnoli, G. [Instituto di Cosmogeofisica, Torino (Italy); Paul, M. [Hebrew Univ., Jerusalem (Israel)

    1995-08-01

    The measurement of the {sup 44}Ti half-life, started 3 years ago, is still continuing. The goal of this measurement is to determine the half-life of {sup 44}Ti, which is {approximately}52 y, to a precision of {approximately}5%. An accurate value of this half-life is of interest to cosmologists who need it to determine the production of heavy elements in supernova. Three sets of samples - a pure 200-nCi {sup 44}Ti sample, a pure 300-nCi {sup 60}Co source, and a mixed {sup 44}Ti-{sup 60}Co source of similar strength - were prepared and their spectra are being measured with Ge spectrometers at Argonne, Torino and Jerusalem. Each sample is counted for a period of 2 days, at approximate intervals of 4 months. The room background is also measured for the same length of time. We hope to start data analysis at the end of summer and obtain a value for the {sup 44}Ti half-life.

  9. Half-life of 51Mn

    Science.gov (United States)

    Graves, Stephen A.; Ellison, Paul A.; Valdovinos, Hector F.; Barnhart, Todd E.; Nickles, Robert J.; Engle, Jonathan W.

    2017-07-01

    The half-life of 51Mn was measured by serial gamma spectrometry of the 511-keV annihilation photon following decay by β+ emission. Data were collected every 100 seconds for 100,000-230,000 seconds within each measurement (n =4 ). The 511-keV incidence rate was calculated from the 511-keV spectral peak area and count duration, corrected for detector dead time and radioactive decay. Least-squares regression analysis was used to determine the half-life of 51Mn while accounting for the presence of background contaminants, notably 55Co. The result was 45.59 ±0.07 min, which is the highest precision measurement to date and disagrees with the current Nuclear Data Sheets value by over 6 σ .

  10. Half-life of samarium-147

    CERN Document Server

    Kinoshita, N; Nakanishi, T

    2003-01-01

    The alpha-decay half-life of sup 1 sup 4 sup 7 Sm has been reevaluated. Known amounts of natural Sm and an alpha-emitter standard ( sup 2 sup 1 sup 0 Po, sup 2 sup 3 sup 8 U, or sup 2 sup 4 sup 1 Am) were mixed well to prepare thin sources for the simultaneous counting of sup 1 sup 4 sup 7 Sm and the alpha-emitter standard by means of an alpha-spectrometer using a silicon surface barrier detector. The alpha-disintegration rate of known amounts of sup 1 sup 4 sup 7 Sm was determined by reference to the alpha activity of the standard. The source preparation and counting were repeated to establish the reproducibility of the present half-life determination, and supplementary alpha spectrometry was carried out by a liquid-scintillation spectrometer. The arithmetic mean of the experimental half-life values was obtained to be (1.17 +- 0.02) x 10 sup 1 sup 1 y. This value is about 10% longer than the currently adopted value, (1.06 +- 0.02) x 10 sup 1 sup 1 y, and the possible factors for this difference are discussed...

  11. The half-life of 18F.

    Science.gov (United States)

    García-Toraño, Eduardo; Medina, Virginia Peyrés; Ibarra, Miguel Roteta

    2010-01-01

    The half-life of the positron-emitter (18)F has been measured by following the decay rate with three systems: ionization chambers, Ge detectors and coincidence with fast scintillators. The decay rate was measured for periods of time up to 9 half-lives. The combination of the results obtained with the three measuring systems gives a value of T(1/2)=1.82871 (18)h, in good agreement with recommended data and with an estimated uncertainty lower than any other previously reported value. Copyright 2009 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  12. Half-life of 31Si

    CERN Document Server

    D'Agostino, Giancarlo; Mana, Giovanni; Oddone, Massimo

    2016-01-01

    Half-life values are widely used in nuclear chemistry to model the exponential decay of the quantified radionuclides. The analysis of existing data reveals a general lack of information on the performed experiments and an almost complete absence of uncertainty budgets. This is the situation for 31Si, the radionuclide produced via neutron capture reaction recently used to quantify trace amounts of 30Si in a sample of the silicon material highly enriched in 28Si and used for the determination of the Avogadro constant. In order to improve the quality of the now recommended 157.36(26) min value, we carried out repeated observations of the 31Si decay rate via gamma-ray spectrometry measurements. This paper reports the result we obtained, including details of the experiment and the evaluation of the uncertainty.

  13. Using gamma distribution to determine half-life of rotenone, applied in freshwater

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rohan, Maheswaran, E-mail: mrohan@aut.ac.nz [Department of Biostatistics and Epidemiology, Auckland University of Technology, Auckland (New Zealand); Fairweather, Alastair; Grainger, Natasha [Science and Capability, Department of Conservation, Hamilton (New Zealand)

    2015-09-15

    Following the use of rotenone to eradicate invasive pest fish, a dynamic first-order kinetic model is usually used to determine the half-life and rate at which rotenone dissipated from the treated waterbody. In this study, we investigate the use of a stochastic gamma model for determining the half-life and rate at which rotenone dissipates from waterbodies. The first-order kinetic and gamma models produced similar values for the half-life (4.45 days and 5.33 days respectively) and days to complete dissipation (51.2 days and 52.48 days respectively). However, the gamma model fitted the data better and was more flexible than the first-order kinetic model, allowing us to use covariates and to predict a possible range for the half-life of rotenone. These benefits are particularly important when examining the influence that different environmental factors have on rotenone dissipation and when trying to predict the rate at which rotenone will dissipate during future operations. We therefore recommend that in future the gamma distribution model is used when calculating the half-life of rotenone in preference to the dynamic first-order kinetics model. - Highlights: • We investigated the use of the gamma model to calculate the half-life of rotenone. • Physical and environmental variables can be incorporated into the model. • A method for calculating the range around a mean half-life is presented. • The model is more flexible than the traditionally used first-order kinetic model.

  14. Update of NIST half-life results corrected for ionization chamber source-holder instability.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Unterweger, M P; Fitzgerald, R

    2014-05-01

    As reported at the ICRM 2011, it was discovered that the source holder used for calibrations in the NIST 4πγ ionization chamber (IC) was not stable. This has affected a large number of half-life measurement results previously reported and used in compilations of nuclear data. Corrections have been made on all of the half-life data based on the assumption that the changes to the ionization chamber response were gradual. The corrections are energy dependent and therefore radionuclide specific. This presentation will review our results and present the recommended changes in half-life values and/or uncertainties.

  15. Stable isotope turnover and half-life in animal tissues: a literature synthesis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vander Zanden, M Jake; Clayton, Murray K; Moody, Eric K; Solomon, Christopher T; Weidel, Brian C

    2015-01-01

    Stable isotopes of carbon, nitrogen, and sulfur are used as ecological tracers for a variety of applications, such as studies of animal migrations, energy sources, and food web pathways. Yet uncertainty relating to the time period integrated by isotopic measurement of animal tissues can confound the interpretation of isotopic data. There have been a large number of experimental isotopic diet shift studies aimed at quantifying animal tissue isotopic turnover rate λ (%·day(-1), often expressed as isotopic half-life, ln(2)/λ, days). Yet no studies have evaluated or summarized the many individual half-life estimates in an effort to both seek broad-scale patterns and characterize the degree of variability. Here, we collect previously published half-life estimates, examine how half-life is related to body size, and test for tissue- and taxa-varying allometric relationships. Half-life generally increases with animal body mass, and is longer in muscle and blood compared to plasma and internal organs. Half-life was longest in ecotherms, followed by mammals, and finally birds. For ectotherms, different taxa-tissue combinations had similar allometric slopes that generally matched predictions of metabolic theory. Half-life for ectotherms can be approximated as: ln (half-life) = 0.22*ln (body mass) + group-specific intercept; n = 261, plife can be approximated using simple allometric relationships for some taxa and tissue types, there is also a high degree of unexplained variation in our models. Our study highlights several strong and general patterns, though accurate prediction of isotopic half-life from readily available variables such as animal body mass remains elusive.

  16. Standard Operating Procedure for Using the NAFTA Guidance to Calculate Representative Half-life Values and Characterizing Pesticide Degradation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Results of the degradation kinetics project and describes a general approach for calculating and selecting representative half-life values from soil and aquatic transformation studies for risk assessment and exposure modeling purposes.

  17. Dimensional enhancement of kinetic energies

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Schleich, W.P.; Dahl, Jens Peder

    2002-01-01

    Simple thermodynamics considers kinetic energy to be an extensive variable which is proportional to the number N of particles. We present a quantum state of N noninteracting particles for which the kinetic energy increases quadratically with N. This enhancement effect is tied to the quantum centr...

  18. Calculation of half-life for 79Se decay

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2006-01-01

    The half-life for 79Se decay is calculated by using the Logf1ut systematics method. Based on the data analysis and comparison with experimental data the 79Se half-life is recommended. The scheme for 79Se decay is also shown and the radiation data are calculated in the text.

  19. Measurement of the half-life of sup 7 sup 9 Se with PX-AMS

    CERN Document Server

    He Ming; Jiang Shan; Diao Li Jun; Wu Shao Yon; Li Chun Shen

    2002-01-01

    The half-life of sup 7 sup 9 Se has been re-measured with projectile X-rays detection (PXD) in accelerator mass spectrometry after a new PXD system had been set up in China Institute of Atomic Energy (CIAE). The PXD technique has been used for separation of sup 7 sup 9 Se from its isobar, sup 7 sup 9 Br. The detection efficiency of sup 7 sup 9 Se K subalpha X-rays is obtained from that of sup 8 sup 0 Se after energy correction. The atom number of sup 7 sup 9 Se in each sample is deduced from the measured ratios of sup 7 sup 9 Se/Se. From the measured decay rates of each sample, the half-life is deduced to be (2.80+-0.36)x10 sup 5 a. In order to check the reliability of the result of sup 7 sup 9 Se half-life, the sup 7 sup 5 Se half-life is also measured with PX-AMS method. The measured half-life of sup 7 sup 5 Se is in good agreement with well-known literature value.

  20. PEPlife: A Repository of the Half-life of Peptides

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mathur, Deepika; Prakash, Satya; Anand, Priya; Kaur, Harpreet; Agrawal, Piyush; Mehta, Ayesha; Kumar, Rajesh; Singh, Sandeep; Raghava, Gajendra P. S.

    2016-11-01

    Short half-life is one of the key challenges in the field of therapeutic peptides. Various studies have reported enhancement in the stability of peptides using methods like chemical modifications, D-amino acid substitution, cyclization, replacement of labile aminos acids, etc. In order to study this scattered data, there is a pressing need for a repository dedicated to the half-life of peptides. To fill this lacuna, we have developed PEPlife (http://crdd.osdd.net/raghava/peplife), a manually curated resource of experimentally determined half-life of peptides. PEPlife contains 2229 entries covering 1193 unique peptides. Each entry provides detailed information of the peptide, like its name, sequence, half-life, modifications, the experimental assay for determining half-life, biological nature and activity of the peptide. We also maintain SMILES and structures of peptides. We have incorporated web-based modules to offer user-friendly data searching and browsing in the database. PEPlife integrates numerous tools to perform various types of analysis such as BLAST, Smith-Waterman algorithm, GGSEARCH, Jalview and MUSTANG. PEPlife would augment the understanding of different factors that affect the half-life of peptides like modifications, sequence, length, route of delivery of the peptide, etc. We anticipate that PEPlife will be useful for the researchers working in the area of peptide-based therapeutics.

  1. Superconductivity by kinetic energy saving?

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Van der Marel, D; Molegraaf, HJA; Presura, C; Santoso, [No Value; Hewson, AC; Zlatic,

    2003-01-01

    A brief introduction is given in the generic microscopic framework of superconductivity. The consequences for the temperature dependence of the kinetic energy, and the correlation energy are discussed for two cases: The BCS scenario and the non-Fermi liquid scenario. A quantitative comparison is mad

  2. Superconductivity by kinetic energy saving?

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Van der Marel, D; Molegraaf, HJA; Presura, C; Santoso, [No Value; Hewson, AC; Zlatic,

    2003-01-01

    A brief introduction is given in the generic microscopic framework of superconductivity. The consequences for the temperature dependence of the kinetic energy, and the correlation energy are discussed for two cases: The BCS scenario and the non-Fermi liquid scenario. A quantitative comparison is

  3. Superconductivity by kinetic energy saving?

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Van der Marel, D; Molegraaf, HJA; Presura, C; Santoso, [No Value; Hewson, AC; Zlatic,

    2003-01-01

    A brief introduction is given in the generic microscopic framework of superconductivity. The consequences for the temperature dependence of the kinetic energy, and the correlation energy are discussed for two cases: The BCS scenario and the non-Fermi liquid scenario. A quantitative comparison is mad

  4. Beta Decay Half-Life of 84Mo

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stoker, J. B.; Mantica, P. F.; Bazin, D.; Bickley, A.; Becerril, A.; Crawford, H.; Cruse, K.; Estrade, A.; Mosby, M.; Guess, C. J.; Hitt, G. W.; Lorusso, G.; Matos, M.; Meharchand, R.; Minamisono, K.; Montes, F.; Pereira, J.; Perdikakis, G.; Pinter, J. S.; Schatz, H.; Vredevoogd, J.; Zegers, R. G. T.

    2008-10-01

    The β-decay half-life ^84Mo governs leakage out of the Zr-Nb cycle, a high temperature rp-process endpoint in x-ray binaries [1]. Treatment of the background and the poor statistics accumulated during the previous half-life measurement leave questions about statistical and systematic errors. We have remeasured the half-life of ^84Mo using a concerted setup of the NSCL β-Counting System [3] and 16 detectors from the Segmented Germanium Array [4]. We will report the half-life for ^84Mo, deduced using 40 times the previous sample size. The application of the NSCL RF Fragment Separator to remove unwanted isotopes, and hence reduce background for the half-life measurement, will also be discussed. [1] H. Schatz et al., Phys. Rep. 294, 167 1998 [2] P. Kienle et al., Prog. Part. Nuc. Phys. 46, 73 2001 [3] J. Prisciandaro et al., NIM A 505, 140 2003 [4] W. Mueller et al., NIM A 466, 492 2001 [5] D. Gorelov et al. PAC 2005, Knoxville, TN, May 16-20

  5. Determination of the {sup 151}Sm half-life

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Be, Marie-Martine; Cassette, Philippe [CEA, LIST, Gif sur Yvette (France). LNE-Laboratoire National Henri Becquerel; Isnard, Helene [CEA-LANIE, Gif sur Yvette (France); and others

    2015-07-01

    New measurements have been undertaken to determine the half-life of {sup 151}Sm. A pure {sup 151}Sm solution was obtained after chemical separation from a samarium solution resulting from the dissolution of an irradiated samarium sample. The concentration of {sup 151}Sm in the solution was measured by mass spectrometry, combined with the isotope dilution technique. The activity of the solution was measured by liquid scintillation counting by six European laboratories as part of an international comparison. These combined results lead to a half-life of T{sub 1/2} = 94.6(6)a.

  6. 89Rb半衰期测量%Half-life Measurement of 89 Rb

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    郭晓清; 袁大庆; 徐利军; 陈克胜; 吴永乐; 郑艳明; 姚顺和

    2013-01-01

    89 Rb is an important fission product used for monitoring possible release of fission products from fuel element .The half-life is one of important nuclear parameters . The half-life of 89 Rb was determined using reference source method with two sets of HPGe detectors by place-relay way .In reference source method ,the ratio of net full-energy peak areas from the measure nuclide and the reference source was used to avoid the count correction caused by dead time and pileup .For the very short half-life of 89 Rb , the half-life iterative method was used in data analysis and the translation method was used in data unification .Finally ,the measured half-life of 89 Rb is (14.41 ± 0.04) min .%89 Rb是重要的裂变产物核素,半衰期是其一项非常重要的核参数。本文采用参考源法,运用双HPGe探头距离接续测定了89 Rb的半衰期。参考源法利用待测源和参考源的γ射线全能峰之比消除了测量过程中死时间和脉冲堆积带来的计数修正影响。由于89 Rb半衰期较短,数据分析运用了半衰期迭代法,并用平移法归一探头测量数据,最终实验测得89 Rb半衰期为(14.41±0.04) min。

  7. Half-life predictions for decay modes of superheavy nuclei

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Duarte, S.B.; Tavares, O.A.P. [Centro Brasileiro de Pesquisas Fisicas (CBPF), Rio de Janeiro, RJ (Brazil); Goncalves, M. [Instituto de Radioprotecao e Dosimetria (IRD), Rio de Janeiro, RJ (Brazil); Rodriguez, O.; Guzman, F. [Instituto Superior de Ciencias e Tecnologia Nucleares (InSTEC), La Habana (Cuba); Barbosa, T.N.; Garcia, F.; Dimarco, A. [Universidade Estadual de Santa Cruz, Ilheus, BA (Brazil). Dept. de Ciencias Exatas e Tecnologicas

    2004-09-01

    We applied the Effective Liquid Drop Model (ELDM) to predict the alpha-decay, cluster emission and cold fission half-life-values of nuclei in the region of Superheavy Elements (SHE). The present calculations have been made in the region of the ZN-plane defined by 155 <=N <=220 and 110<=Z<=135. Shell effects are included via the Q-value of the corresponding decay case. We report the results of a systematic calculation of the half-life for the three nuclear decay modes in a region of the ZN-plane where superheavy elements are expected to be found. Results have shown that, among the decay modes investigated here, the alpha decay is the dominant one. i.e, the decay mode of smallest half-lives. Half-life predictions for alpha decay, cluster emission and cold fission for the isotopic family of the most recent SHE detected of Z=115 and for the isotopic family of the already consolidated SHE of Z=111 are presented. (author)

  8. Superior serum half life of albumin tagged TNF ligands

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mueller, Nicole [Division of Molecular Internal Medicine, Department of Internal Medicine II, University Hospital Wuerzburg, Roentgenring 11, 97070 Wuerzburg (Germany); Schneider, Britta; Pfizenmaier, Klaus [Institute of Cell Biology and Immunology, University of Stuttgart, Allmandring 31, 70569 Stuttgart (Germany); Wajant, Harald, E-mail: harald.wajant@mail.uni-wuerzburg.de [Division of Molecular Internal Medicine, Department of Internal Medicine II, University Hospital Wuerzburg, Roentgenring 11, 97070 Wuerzburg (Germany)

    2010-06-11

    Due to their immune stimulating and apoptosis inducing properties, ligands of the TNF family attract increasing interest as therapeutic proteins. A general limitation of in vivo applications of recombinant soluble TNF ligands is their notoriously rapid clearance from circulation. To improve the serum half life of the TNF family members TNF, TWEAK and TRAIL, we genetically fused soluble variants of these molecules to human serum albumin (HSA). The serum albumin-TNF ligand fusion proteins were found to be of similar bioactivity as the corresponding HSA-less counterparts. Upon intravenous injection (i.v.), serum half life of HSA-TNF ligand fusion proteins, as determined by ELISA, was around 15 h as compared to approximately 1 h for all of the recombinant control TNF ligands without HSA domain. Moreover, serum samples collected 6 or 24 h after i.v. injection still contained high TNF ligand bioactivity, demonstrating that there is only limited degradation/inactivation of circulating HSA-TNF ligand fusion proteins in vivo. In a xenotransplantation model, significantly less of the HSA-TRAIL fusion protein compared to the respective control TRAIL protein was required to achieve inhibition of tumor growth indicating that the increased half life of HSA-TNF ligand fusion proteins translates into better therapeutic action in vivo. In conclusion, our data suggest that genetic fusion to serum albumin is a powerful and generally applicable mean to improve bioavailability and in vivo activity of TNF ligands.

  9. Kinetic energy equations for the average-passage equation system

    Science.gov (United States)

    Johnson, Richard W.; Adamczyk, John J.

    1989-01-01

    Important kinetic energy equations derived from the average-passage equation sets are documented, with a view to their interrelationships. These kinetic equations may be used for closing the average-passage equations. The turbulent kinetic energy transport equation used is formed by subtracting the mean kinetic energy equation from the averaged total instantaneous kinetic energy equation. The aperiodic kinetic energy equation, averaged steady kinetic energy equation, averaged unsteady kinetic energy equation, and periodic kinetic energy equation, are also treated.

  10. Kinetic energy equations for the average-passage equation system

    Science.gov (United States)

    Johnson, Richard W.; Adamczyk, John J.

    1989-01-01

    Important kinetic energy equations derived from the average-passage equation sets are documented, with a view to their interrelationships. These kinetic equations may be used for closing the average-passage equations. The turbulent kinetic energy transport equation used is formed by subtracting the mean kinetic energy equation from the averaged total instantaneous kinetic energy equation. The aperiodic kinetic energy equation, averaged steady kinetic energy equation, averaged unsteady kinetic energy equation, and periodic kinetic energy equation, are also treated.

  11. Classical kinetic energy, quantum fluctuation terms and kinetic-energy functionals

    OpenAIRE

    Hamilton, I. P.; Mosna, Ricardo A.; Site, L. Delle

    2006-01-01

    We employ a recently formulated dequantization procedure to obtain an exact expression for the kinetic energy which is applicable to all kinetic-energy functionals. We express the kinetic energy of an N-electron system as the sum of an N-electron classical kinetic energy and an N-electron purely quantum kinetic energy arising from the quantum fluctuations that turn the classical momentum into the quantum momentum. This leads to an interesting analogy with Nelson's stochastic approach to quant...

  12. The half-life of {sup 18}F

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Garcia-Torano, Eduardo, E-mail: e.garciatorano@ciemat.e [Ciemat, Laboratorio de Metrologia de Radiaciones Ionizantes, Avda. Complutense 22, Madrid 28040 (Spain); Medina, Virginia Peyres; Roteta Ibarra, Miguel [Ciemat, Laboratorio de Metrologia de Radiaciones Ionizantes, Avda. Complutense 22, Madrid 28040 (Spain)

    2010-07-15

    The half-life of the positron-emitter {sup 18}F has been measured by following the decay rate with three systems: ionization chambers, Ge detectors and coincidence with fast scintillators. The decay rate was measured for periods of time up to 9 half-lives. The combination of the results obtained with the three measuring systems gives a value of T{sub 1/2}=1.82871 (18) h, in good agreement with recommended data and with an estimated uncertainty lower than any other previously reported value.

  13. Experimental determination of the {sup 233}U half-life

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pomme, S.; Altzitzoglou, T.; Van Ammel, R.; Sibbens, G.; Eykens, R.; Richter, S.; Camps, J. [European Commission, Joint Research Centre, Institute for Reference Materials and Measurements, Geel (Belgium); Kossert, K.; Janben, H. [Physikalisch-Technische Bundesanstalt (PTB), Braunschweig (Germany); Garcia-Torano, E.; Duran, T. [CIEMAT, Lab. de Metrologia de Radiaciones Ionizantes, Madrid (Spain); Jaubert, F. [CEA Saclay, LNE-LNHB, Lab. National Henri Becquerel 91 - Gif-sur-Yvette (France)

    2009-10-15

    The half-life of {sup 233}U was determined by a specific activity method, in the frame of an international collaboration project of four metrology institutes. A purified, highly enriched {sup 233}U solution was prepared with certified concentration of uranium isotopes. The isotopic composition of the uranium material was determined by thermal ionization mass spectrometry. The ingrowth of daughter nuclides was calculated and confirmed by {alpha}-particle and {gamma}-ray spectrometry measurements. Quantitative sources were prepared from aliquots of the {sup 233}U solution and their disintegration rate was determined by means of {alpha}-particle counting at a defined small solid angle, liquid-scintillation counting and 4{pi} counting in a pressurized proportional counter and in a CsI(Tl) sandwich spectrometer. A half-life value of 1.5867(14) * 10{sup 5} a was obtained, in which the relative standard uncertainty amounts to 0.09%. The result is lower than the currently recommended value of 1.592(2) * 10{sup 5} a and a new best estimate of T(1/2)({sup 233}U) = 1.5903(13) * 10{sup 5} a was calculated from a partially weighted mean of a set of published data. (authors)

  14. PEGylation of antibody fragments for half-life extension.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jevševar, Simona; Kusterle, Mateja; Kenig, Maja

    2012-01-01

    Antibody fragments (Fab's) represent important structure for creating new therapeutics. Compared to full antibodies Fab' fragments possess certain advantages, including higher mobility and tissue penetration, ability to bind antigen monovalently and lack of fragment crystallizable (Fc) region-mediated functions such as antibody-dependent cell mediated cytotoxicity (ADCC) or complement-dependent cytotoxicity (CDC). The main drawback for the use of Fab's in clinical applications is associated with their short half-life in vivo, which is a consequence of no longer having the Fc region. To exert meaningful clinical effects, the half-life of Fab's need to be extended, which has been achieved by postproduction chemical attachment of polyethylene glycol (PEG) chain to protein using PEGylation technology. The most suitable approach employs PEG-maleimide attachment to cysteines, either to the free hinge cysteine or to C-terminal cysteines involved in interchain disulfide linkage of the heavy and light chain. Hence, protocols for mono-PEGylation of Fab via free cysteine in the hinge region and di-PEGylation of Fab via interchain disulfide bridge are provided in this chapter.

  15. Kinetic energy driven pairing in cuprate superconductors

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Maier, TA; Jarrell, M; Macridin, A; Slezak, C

    2004-01-01

    Pairing occurs in conventional superconductors through a reduction of the electronic potential energy accompanied by an increase in kinetic energy. In the underdoped cuprates, optical experiments show that pairing is driven by a reduction of the electronic kinetic energy. Using the dynamical cluster

  16. A Calorimetric Determination of the Half Life of Polonium-210 (Final Report)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Eichelberger, J. F.; Jordan, K. C.; Orr, S. R.; Parks, J. R.

    1953-02-10

    Six determinations have been made of the half life of polonium with four different steady-state, resistance-bridge calorimeters and five different samples of polonium. These six values of the half life have been weighted and combined to give a grand-mean value of the half life of 138.4005 + - 0.0051 days.

  17. Semi-empirical formula for spontaneous fission half life time

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Santhosh, K.P., E-mail: drkpsanthosh@gmail.co [School of Pure and Applied Physics, Kannur University, Payyanur Campus 670 327 (India); Biju, R.K.; Sahadevan, Sabina [P G Department of Physics and Research Centre, Payyanur College, Payyanur 670 327 (India)

    2010-01-15

    A new semi-empirical formula is proposed for determining the spontaneous fission half lives, which works well for the mass region from {sup 232}Th to {sup 286}114. The computed spontaneous fission half life times are also compared with other semi-empirical formula predictions. The alpha decay half lives are systematically computed for heavy and super heavy region with proton numbers varying from 90<=Z<=122 using Coulomb and Proximity Potential Model. The comparison between computed alpha decay half lives and the present spontaneous fission semi-empirical formula predictions of even-even isotopes with Z=90-122 are studied. It is found that in super heavy region the isotopes {sup 270-274}Ds, {sup 272-278}112, {sup 272-282}114, {sup 274-292}116, {sup 276-298}118, {sup 276-308}120 and {sup 278-314}122 will survive fission and can be synthesized and identified via alpha decay.

  18. 63Ni, its half-life and standardization: revisited.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Collé, R; Zimmerman, B E; Cassette, P; Laureano-Perez, L

    2008-01-01

    Recent liquid scintillation (LS) measurements at the National Institute of Standards and Technology (NIST) and at the Laboratoire National Henri Becquerel (LNHB) on a standardized (63)Ni solution that has been tracked for nearly 40 years have resulted in several important findings: (i) a (63)Ni half-life value of 101.2 +/- 1.5 a has been determined with the present decay data. This value is consistent with a previous specific activity determination and with an earlier value from decay measurements; and it appears to be more satisfactory than a recent data evaluator's recommended value of 98.7 a. (ii) All solution standards of (63)Ni as disseminated by NIST for the past 38(+) years are internally consistent with past and recent standardizations. (iii) Primary LS standardizations of (63)Ni by the triple-to-double coincidence ratio (TDCR) method and by CIEMAT/NIST (3)H-standard efficiency tracing (CNET) appear to be comparable, although the latter methodology is believed to be inherently inferior. (iv) There is excellent measurement agreement between NIST and LNHB for (63)Ni primary standardizations.

  19. How ambiguous is the local kinetic energy?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Anderson, James S M; Ayers, Paul W; Hernandez, Juan I Rodriguez

    2010-08-26

    The local kinetic energy and the closely related local electronic stress tensor are commonly used to elucidate chemical bonding patterns, especially for covalent bonds. We use three different approaches-transformation properties of the stress tensor, quasiprobability distributions, and the virial theorem from density-functional theory-to clarify the inherent ambiguity in these quantities, discussing the implications for analyses based on the local kinetic energy and stress tensor. An expansive-but not universal-family of local kinetic energy forms that includes the most common choices and is suitable for both chemical-bonding and atoms-in-molecule analysis is derived. A family of local electronic stress tensors is also derived. Several local kinetic energy functions that are mathematically justified, but unlikely to be conceptually useful, are derived. The implications of these forms for atoms-in-molecule analysis are discussed.

  20. Nanostructured energy devices equilibrium concepts and kinetics

    CERN Document Server

    Bisquert, Juan

    2014-01-01

    Due to the pressing needs of society, low cost materials for energy devices have experienced an outstanding development in recent times. In this highly multidisciplinary area, chemistry, material science, physics, and electrochemistry meet to develop new materials and devices that perform required energy conversion and storage processes with high efficiency, adequate capabilities for required applications, and low production cost. Nanostructured Energy Devices: Equilibrium Concepts and Kinetics introduces the main physicochemical principles that govern the operation of energy devices. It inclu

  1. Q value and half-life of double-electron capture in Os-184

    CERN Document Server

    Smorra, C; Beyer, T; Blaum, K; Block, M; Düllmann, Ch E; Eberhardt, K; Eibach, M; Eliseev, S; Langanke, K; Martinez-Pinedo, G; Nagy, Sz; Nörtershäuser, W; Renisch, D; Shabaev, V M; Tupitsyn, I I; Zubova, N A

    2012-01-01

    Os-184 has been excluded as a promising candidate for the search of neutrinoless double-electron capture. High-precision mass measurements with the Penning-trap mass spectrometer TRIGA-TRAP resulted in a marginal resonant enhancement with = -8.89(58) keV excess energy to the 1322.152(22) keV 0+ excited state in W-184. State-of-the-art energy density functional calculations are applied for the evaluation of the nuclear matrix elements to the excited states predicting a strong suppression due to the large deformation of mother and daughter states. The half-life of the transition in Os-184 exceeds T_{1/2} > 1.3 10^{29} years for an effective neutrino mass of 1 eV.

  2. Effect of parent and daughter deformation on half-life time in exotic decay

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    K P Santhosh; Antony Joseph

    2002-10-01

    Taking Coulomb and proximity potential as interacting barrier for post-scission region we calculated half-life time for different modes of exotic decay treating parent and fragments as spheres and these values are compared with experimental data. We studied the effect of deformation of parent and daughter on half-life time treating emitted cluster as spherical. When deformations are included half-life time values are found to decrease, though slightly. It is found that parent deformation alone will not produce appreciable change in half-life time since it affects relatively small pre-scission part of the barrier.

  3. Effect of parent and daughter deformation on half-life time in exotic decay

    CERN Document Server

    Santhosh, K P

    2002-01-01

    Taking Coulomb and proximity potential as interacting barrier for post-scission region we calculated half-life time for different modes of exotic decay treating parent and fragments as spheres and these values are compared with experimental data. We studied the effect of deformation of parent and daughter on half-life time treating emitted cluster as spherical. When deformations are included half-life time values are found to decrease, though slightly. It is found that parent deformation alone will not produce appreciable change in half-life time since it affects relatively small pre-scission part of the barrier. (author)

  4. Turbulence kinetic energy equation for dilute suspensions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abou-Arab, T. W.; Roco, M. C.

    1989-01-01

    A multiphase turbulence closure model is presented which employs one transport equation, namely the turbulence kinetic energy equation. The proposed form of this equation is different from the earlier formulations in some aspects. The power spectrum of the carrier fluid is divided into two regions, which interact in different ways and at different rates with the suspended particles as a function of the particle-eddy size ratio and density ratio. The length scale is described algebraically. A mass/time averaging procedure for the momentum and kinetic energy equations is adopted. The resulting turbulence correlations are modeled under less retrictive assumptions comparative to previous work. The closures for the momentum and kinetic energy equations are given. Comparisons of the predictions with experimental results on liquid-solid jet and gas-solid pipe flow show satisfactory agreement.

  5. Concepts of radial and angular kinetic energies

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Dahl, Jens Peder; Schleich, W.P.

    2002-01-01

    We consider a general central-field system in D dimensions and show that the division of the kinetic energy into radial and angular parts proceeds differently in the wave-function picture and the Weyl-Wigner phase-space picture, Thus, the radial and angular kinetic energies are different quantiti...... in the two pictures, containing different physical information, but the relation between them is well defined. We discuss this relation and illustrate its nature by examples referring to a free particle and to a ground-state hydrogen atom....

  6. Precision measurement of the half-life and the decay branches of Ga-62

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Canchel, G; Blank, B; Chartier, N; Delalee, F; Dendooven, P; Dossat, C; Giovinazzo, J; Huikari, J; Lalleman, AS; Jimenez, MJL; Madec, [No Value; Pedroza, JL; Penttila, H

    2005-01-01

    In an experiment performed at the Accelerator Laboratory of the University of Jyvaskyla, the beta-decay half-life of Ga-62 has been studied with high precision rising the IGISOL technique. A half-life of T-1/2 = 116.09(17) ms was nieasured. Using beta-gamma coincidences, the gamma intensity of the 9

  7. Static and dynamic half-life and lifetime molecular turnover of enzymes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miyawaki, Osato; Kanazawa, Tsukasa; Maruyama, Chika; Dozen, Michiko

    2017-01-01

    The static half-life of an enzyme is the half-life of a free enzyme not working without substrate and the dynamic half-life is that of an active enzyme working with plenty amount of substrate. These two half-lives were measured and compared for glucoamylase (GA) and β-galactosidase (BG). The dynamic half-life was much longer than the static half-life by one to three orders of magnitude for both enzymes. For BG, the half-life of the enzyme physically entrapped in a membrane reactor was also measured. In this case also, the half-life of BG in the membrane reactor was much longer than the free enzyme without substrate. These results suggest the large difference in stabilities between the free enzyme and the enzyme-substrate complex. This may be related to the natural enzyme metabolism. According to the difference in half-life, the lifetime molecular turnover (LMT), which is the number of product molecules produced by a single molecule of enzyme until it loses its activity completely, was much higher by one to four orders of magnitude for the active enzyme than the free enzyme. The concept of LMT, proposed here, will be important in bioreactor operations with or without immobilization. Copyright © 2016 The Society for Biotechnology, Japan. Published by Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  8. Electric Vehicles Mileage Extender Kinetic Energy Storage

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jivkov, Venelin; Draganov, Vutko; Stoyanova, Yana

    2015-03-01

    The proposed paper considers small urban vehicles with electric hybrid propulsion systems. Energy demands are examined on the basis of European drive cycle (NEUDC) and on an energy recuperation coefficient and are formulated for description of cycle energy transfers. Numerical simulation results show real possibilities for increasing in achievable vehicle mileage at the same energy levels of a main energy source - the electric battery. Kinetic energy storage (KES), as proposed to be used as an energy buffer and different structural schemes of the hybrid propulsion system are commented. Minimum energy levels for primary (the electric battery) and secondary (KES) sources are evaluated. A strategy for reduced power flows control is examined, and its impact on achievable vehicle mileage is investigated. Results show an additional increase in simulated mileage at the same initial energy levels.

  9. Filamentary and hierarchical pictures - Kinetic energy criterion

    Science.gov (United States)

    Klypin, Anatoly A.; Melott, Adrian L.

    1992-01-01

    We present a new criterion for formation of second-generation filaments. The criterion called the kinetic energy ratio, KR, is based on comparison of peculiar velocities at different scales. We suggest that the clumpiness of the distribution in some cases might be less important than the 'coldness' or 'hotness' of the flow for formation of coherent structures. The kinetic energy ratio is analogous to the Mach number except for one essential difference. If at some scale KR is greater than 1, as estimated at the linear stage, then when fluctuations of this scale reach nonlinearity, the objects they produce must be anisotropic ('filamentary'). In the case of power-law initial spectra the kinetic ratio criterion suggests that the border line is the power-spectrum with the slope n = -1.

  10. Label-free Fab and Fc affinity/avidity profiling of the antibody complex half-life for polyclonal and monoclonal efficacy screening.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Read, Thomas; Olkhov, Rouslan V; Williamson, E Diane; Shaw, Andrew M

    2015-09-01

    A unified approach to affinity screening for Fab and Fc interactions of an antibody for its antigen and FcγR receptor has been developed. An antigen array is used for the Fab affinity and cross-reactivity screening and protein A/G proxy is the FcγR receptor. The affinities are derived using a simple 1:1 binding model with a consistent error analysis. The association and dissociation kinetics are measured over optimised times for accurate determination. The Fab/Fc affinities are derived for ten antibodies: mAb-actin (mouse), pAb-BSA (sheep), pAb-collagen V (rabbit), pAb-CRP (goat), mAb-F1 (mouse), mAbs (mouse) 7.3, 12.3, 29.3, 36.3 and 46.3 raised against LcrV in Yersinia pestis. The rate of the dissociation of antigen-antibody complexes relates directly to their immunological function as does the Fc-FcγR complex and a new half-life plot has been defined with a Fab/Fc half-life range of 17-470 min. The upper half-life value points to surface avidity. Two antibodies that are protective as an immunotherapy define a Fab half-life >250 min and an Fc half-life >50 min as characteristics of ideal interactions which can form the basis of an antibody screen for immunotherapy.

  11. Kinetic energy transfer during the tennis serve

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    C.L. de Subijana

    2010-12-01

    Full Text Available Several studies have established the pattern used in the over arm hitting and throwing movements, however to date there has not been one which statistically expresses the Kinetic Link Principle of the tennis serve. The main goals of this study were: first to investigate the kinetic energy transmission pattern using a complete mechanical body model and second, to create a tool which could help evaluating the individual technique of a tennis player. This tool was a statistical procedure which expressed the individual technique of a player as a mathematical function. Fourteen and twelve flat tennis serves of two top tennis players landing in an aiming area were recorded with two synchronized video cameras at 125 Hz. The experimental technique was 3D photogrammetry. A 28 points body model with five solid-rigid (the pelvis, the thorax, the upper arms and the racquet was built. The kinetic energies from the body segments were considered the biomechanical parameters. The mean speeds of the balls were 41.9 m/s (150.9 km/hr and 38.1 m/s (137.2 km/hr. A Kinetic Sequential Action Muscle principle based on the kinetic energy transfer was probed statistically by mean a correlation analysis [3]. This pattern showed the existence of a proximal to distal sequence of kinetic energy maximums. A significant (p<0.05 discriminant function for each player could predict the category of the serve (“good” or “bad” in the 78.6% and 100% of the cases. This function facilitated the understanding of the individual technique of a tennis player showing that this could be a tool for the tennis training complementary to the qualitative (observational analysis.

  12. Aircraft Measurements of Atmospheric Kinetic Energy Spectra

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lundtang Petersen, Erik; Lilly, D. K.

    1983-01-01

    Wind velocity data obtained from a jet airliner are used to construct kinetic energy spectra over the range of wavelengths from 2.5 to 2500 km. The spectra exhibit an approximate -5/3 slope for wavelengths of less than about 150 km, steepening to about -2.2 at larger scales. These results support...

  13. Aircraft Measurements of Atmospheric Kinetic Energy Spectra

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lundtang Petersen, Erik; Lilly, D. K.

    1983-01-01

    Wind velocity data obtained from a jet airliner are used to construct kinetic energy spectra over the range of wavelengths from 2.5 to 2500 km. The spectra exhibit an approximate -5/3 slope for wavelengths of less than about 150 km, steepening to about -2.2 at larger scales. These results support...

  14. PASylation of Murine Leptin Leads to Extended Plasma Half-Life and Enhanced in Vivo Efficacy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Morath, Volker; Bolze, Florian; Schlapschy, Martin; Schneider, Sarah; Sedlmayer, Ferdinand; Seyfarth, Katrin; Klingenspor, Martin; Skerra, Arne

    2015-05-04

    Leptin plays a central role in the control of energy homeostasis and appetite and, thus, has attracted attention for therapeutic approaches in spite of its limited pharmacological activity owing to the very short circulation in the body. To improve drug delivery and prolong plasma half-life, we have fused murine leptin with Pro/Ala/Ser (PAS) polypeptides of up to 600 residues, which adopt random coil conformation with expanded hydrodynamic volume in solution and, consequently, retard kidney filtration in a similar manner as polyethylene glycol (PEG). Relative to unmodified leptin, size exclusion chromatography and dynamic light scattering revealed an approximately 21-fold increase in apparent size and a much larger molecular diameter of around 18 nm for PAS(600)-leptin. High receptor-binding activity for all PASylated leptin versions was confirmed in BIAcore measurements and cell-based dual-luciferase assays. Pharmacokinetic studies in mice revealed a much extended plasma half-life after ip injection, from 26 min for the unmodified leptin to 19.6 h for the PAS(600) fusion. In vivo activity was investigated after single ip injection of equimolar doses of each leptin version. Strongly increased and prolonged hypothalamic STAT3 phosphorylation was detected for PAS(600)-leptin. Also, a reduction in daily food intake by up to 60% as well as loss in body weight of >10% lasting for >5 days was observed, whereas unmodified leptin was merely effective for 1 day. Notably, application of a PASylated superactive mouse leptin antagonist (SMLA) led to the opposite effects. Thus, PASylated leptin not only provides a promising reagent to study its physiological role in vivo but also may offer a superior drug candidate for clinical therapy.

  15. Energy transfer and kinetics in mechanochemistry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Zhiliang; Lu, Shengyong; Mao, Qiongjing; Buekens, Alfons; Wang, Yuting; Yan, Jianhua

    2017-09-13

    Mechanochemistry (MC) exerts extraordinary degradation and decomposition effects on many chlorinated, brominated, and even fluorinated persistent organic pollutants (POPs). However, its application is still limited by inadequate study of its reaction kinetic aspects. In the present work, the ball motion and energy transfer in planetary ball mill are investigated in some detail. Almost all milling parameters are summarised in a single factor-total effective impact energy. Furthermore, the MC kinetic between calcium oxide/Al and hexachlorobenzene is well established and modelled. The results indicate that total effective impact energy and reagent ratio are the two factors sufficient for describing the MC degradation degree of POPs. The reaction rate constant only depends on the chemical properties of reactants, so it could be used as an important index to appraise the quality of MC additives. This model successfully predicts the reaction rate for different operating conditions, indicating that it could be suitably applied for conducting MC reactions in other reactors.

  16. Estimation of the Biological Half-Life of Methylmercury Using a Population Toxicokinetic Model

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Seongil Jo

    2015-07-01

    Full Text Available Methylmercury is well known for causing adverse health effects in the brain and nervous system. Estimating the elimination constant derived from the biological half-life of methylmercury in the blood or hair is an important part of calculating guidelines for methylmercury intake. Thus, this study was conducted to estimate the biological half-life of methylmercury in Korean adults. We used a one-compartment model with a direct relationship between methylmercury concentrations in the blood and daily dietary intake of methylmercury. We quantified the between-person variability of the methylmercury half-life in the population, and informative priors were used to estimate the parameters in the model. The population half-life of methylmercury was estimated to be 80.2 ± 8.6 days. The population mean of the methylmercury half-life was 81.6 ± 8.4 days for men and 78.9 ± 8.6 days for women. The standard deviation of the half-life was estimated at 25.0 ± 8.6 days. Using the direct relationship between methylmercury concentrations in blood and methylmercury intake, the biological half-life in this study was estimated to be longer than indicated by the earlier studies that have been used to set guideline values.

  17. A New Value of 93Zr Half-Life

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2008-01-01

    <正>93Zr is a long-lived pure β emitter with energies of 60.6 keV (97.5%) and 91.4 keV (2.5%). It is produced by both nuclear fission and neutron capture of 92Zr. 93Zr has considerable attention because of its

  18. Determination of (137)Cs half-life with an ionization chamber.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Juget, Frédéric; Nedjadi, Youcef; Buchillier, Thierry; Bochud, François; Bailat, Claude

    2016-12-01

    The half-life of (137)Cs was measured with an ionization chamber by following the decay of 5 sources over a 30 years period between 1983 and 2013. The ratio between the ionization chamber current for the cesium sources and (226)Ra source was used for the half-life calculation. The value found for the (137)Cs half-life is 10,955.2±10.7 days, where the uncertainty evaluation combines type A and B for one standard deviation.

  19. Measurement of the two neutrino double beta decay half-life of Zr-96 and search for associated neutrinoless processes with the NEMO-3 detector

    CERN Document Server

    Argyriades, J; Augier, C; Baker, J; Barabash, A S; Bongrand, M; Broudin-Bay, G; Brudanin, V B; Caffrey, A J; Chapon, A; Chauveau, E; Daraktchieva, Z; Durand, D; Egorov, V G; Fatemi-Ghomi, N; Flack, R; Freshville, A; Guillon, B; Hubert, Ph; Jullian, S; Kauer, M; King, S; Kochetov, O I; Konovalov, S I; Kovalenko, V E; Lalanne, D; Lang, K; Lemiere, Y; Lutter, G; Mamedov, F; Marquet, Ch; Martín-Albo, J; Mauger, F; Nachab, A; Nasteva, I; Nemchenok, I B; Nova, F; Novella, P; Ohsumi, H; Pahlka, R B; Perrot, F; Piquemal, F; Reyss, J L; Ricol, J S; Saakyan, R; Sarazin, X; Simard, L; Shitov, Yu A; Smolnikov, A A; Snow, S; Söldner-Rembold, S; Stekl, I; Sutton, C S; Szklarz, G; Thomas, J; Timkin, V V; Tretyak, V I; Tretyak, Vl I; Umatov, V I; Vàla, L; Vanyushin, I A; Vasiliev, V A; Vorobel, V; Vylov, Ts

    2009-01-01

    Using 1221 days of data from the NEMO-3 detector, the measurement of Zr-96 2vbb decay half-life is [2.35 +/- 0.14(stat) +/- 0.19(syst)] x 10^19 yr. Different characteristics of the final state electrons have been studied, such as the energy sum, individual electron energy, and angular distribution. The 2v nuclear matrix element is extracted using the measured 2vbb half-life and is 0.049 +/- 0.003. A 90% CL limit is set on the 0vbb decay half-life of > 9.2 x 10^21 yr corresponding to a limit on the effective Majorana neutrino mass < 7.2 - 19.5 eV. Limits on other mechanisms of 0vbb decay have also been set.

  20. Influence of sex and age on the biological half-life of cadmium in mice

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Taguchi, T. (Kochi Medical School, Nangoku-shi, Japan); Suzuki, S.

    1981-02-01

    The influence of age on the whole-body biological half-life of /sup 109/Cd was studied in male mice following ip injection. The influence of sex on whole-body and organ retention was ascertained after sc injection. The whole-body biological half-life of /sup 109/Cd of the older mice was more than twice that of the younger mice, and that of the female mice was longer than that of the males. These differences demonstrate a biological difference between males and females with respect to whole-body half-life of /sup 109/Cd. The effects of age and sex on the biological half-life of Cd in mice are assessed quantitatively.

  1. Estimation of turbulent kinetic energy dissipation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Huey-Long; Hondzo, Miki; Rao, A. Ramachandra

    2001-06-01

    The kinetic energy dissipation rate is one of the key intrinsic fluid flow parameters in environmental fluid dynamics. In an indirect method the kinetic energy dissipation rate is estimated from the Batchelor spectrum. Because the Batchelor spectrum has a significant difference between the highest and lowest spectral values, the spectral bias in the periodogram causes the lower spectral values at higher frequencies to increase. Consequently, the accuracy in fitting the Batchelor spectrum is affected. In this study, the multitaper spectral estimation method is compared to conventional methods in estimating the synthetic temperature gradient spectra. It is shown in the results that the multitaper spectra have less bias than the Hamming window smoothed spectra and the periodogram in estimating the synthetic temperature gradient spectra. The results of fitting the Batchelor spectrum based on four error functions are compared. When the theoretical noise spectrum is available and delineated at the intersection of the estimated spectrum, the fitting results of the kinetic energy dissipation rate corresponding to the four error functions do not have significant differences. However, when the noise spectrum is unknown and part of the Batchelor spectrum overlaps the region where the noise spectrum dominates, the weighted chi-square distributed error function has the best fitting results.

  2. Half-life of Si-32 from tandem-accelerator mass spectrometry

    Science.gov (United States)

    Elmore, D.; Anantaraman, N.; Fulbright, H. W.; Gove, H. E.; Nishiizumi, K.; Murrell, M. T.; Honda, M.; Hans, H. S.

    1980-01-01

    A newly developed mass-spectrometry technique employing a tandem Van de Graaff accelerator together with a special beam-transport system and heavy-ion detector has been used to determine the half-life of Si-32. The result obtained, 108 plus or minus 18 yr, disagrees with the accepted value of 330 plus or minus 40 yr. The implications of the new half-life of Si-32, which is used for dating studies, are discussed.

  3. Dependence of the half-life of 221Fr on the implantation environment

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Olaizola, B.; Fraile, L.M.; Riisager, Karsten

    2010-01-01

    The possible dependence of the half-life of 221Fr on the solid-state environment has been investigated by the simultaneous measurement of implanted 221Fr ions in an insulator (Si) and a metallic substrate (Au) at the ISOLDE facility at CERN. Our results indicate that, if existing, the difference...... in half-life does not follow a systematic trend and it is well below 1%...

  4. Investigation of the Kinetic Energy Characterization of Advanced Ceramics

    Science.gov (United States)

    2015-04-01

    ARL-TR-7263 ● APR 2015 US Army Research Laboratory Investigation of the Kinetic Energy Characterization of Advanced Ceramics ...Kinetic Energy Characterization of Advanced Ceramics by Tyrone L Jones Weapons and Materials Research Directorate, ARL...Kinetic Energy Characterization of Advanced Ceramics 5a. CONTRACT NUMBER 5b. GRANT NUMBER 5c. PROGRAM ELEMENT NUMBER 6. AUTHOR(S) Tyrone L

  5. Kinetic energy recovery systems in motor vehicles

    Science.gov (United States)

    Śliwiński, C.

    2016-09-01

    The article draws attention to the increasing environmental pollution caused by the development of vehicle transport and motorization. Different types of design solutions used in vehicles for the reduction of fuel consumption, and thereby emission of toxic gasses into the atmosphere, were specified. Historical design solutions concerning energy recovery devices in mechanical vehicles which used flywheels to accumulate kinetic energy were shown. Developmental tendencies in the area of vehicle manufacturing in the form of hybrid electric and electric devices were discussed. Furthermore, designs of energy recovery devices with electrical energy storage from the vehicle braking and shock absorbing systems were presented. A mechanical energy storing device using a flywheel operating under vacuum was presented, as were advantages and disadvantages of both systems, the limitations they impose on individual constructions and safety issues. The paper also discusses a design concept of an energy recovery device in mechanical vehicles which uses torsion springs as the main components of energy accumulation during braking. The desirability of a cooperation of both the mechanical- and electrical energy recovery devices was indicated.

  6. A note on the maintenance of the atmospheric kinetic energy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, T.-C.; Lee, Y.-H.

    1982-01-01

    The winter simulations of the GLAS climate model and the NCAR community climate model are used to examine the maintenance of the atmospheric kinetic energy. It is found that the kinetic energy is generated in the lower latitudes south of the maximum westerlies, transported northward and then, destroyed in the midlatitudes north of the maximum westerlies. Therefore, the atmospheric kinetic energy is maintained by the counterbalance between the divergence (convergence) of kinetic energy flux and generation (destruction) of kinetic energy in lower (middle) latitudes.

  7. A note on the maintenance of the atmospheric kinetic energy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, T.-C.; Lee, Y.-H.

    1982-01-01

    The winter simulations of the GLAS climate model and the NCAR community climate model are used to examine the maintenance of the atmospheric kinetic energy. It is found that the kinetic energy is generated in the lower latitudes south of the maximum westerlies, transported northward and then, destroyed in the midlatitudes north of the maximum westerlies. Therefore, the atmospheric kinetic energy is maintained by the counterbalance between the divergence (convergence) of kinetic energy flux and generation (destruction) of kinetic energy in lower (middle) latitudes.

  8. Variation in absorption and half-life of hydrocortisone influence plasma cortisol concentrations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hindmarsh, Peter C; Charmandari, Evangelia

    2015-04-01

    Hydrocortisone therapy should be individualized in congenital adrenal hyperplasia (CAH) patients to avoid over and under replacement. We have assessed how differences in absorption and half-life of cortisol influence glucocorticoid exposure. Forty-eight patients (21 M) aged between 6·1 and 20·3 years with CAH due to CYP21A2 deficiency were studied. Each patient underwent a 24-h plasma cortisol profile with the morning dose used to calculate absorption parameters along with an intravenous (IV) hydrocortisone (15 mg/m(2) body surface area) bolus assessment of half-life. Parameters derived were maximum plasma concentration (Cmax ), time of maximum plasma concentration (tmax ), time to attaining plasma cortisol concentration cortisol. Mean half-life was 76·5 ± 5·2 (range 40-225·3) min, Cmax 780·7 ± 61·6 nmol/l and tmax 66·7 (range 20-118) min. Time taken to a plasma cortisol concentration less than 100 nmol/l was 289 (range 140-540) min. Those with a fast half-life and slow tmax took longest to reach a plasma cortisol concentration less than 100 nmol/l (380 ± 34·6 min), compared to those with a slow half-life and fast tmax (298 ± 34·8 min) and those with a fast half-life and fast tmax (249·5 ± 14·4 min) (One-way anovaF = 4·52; P = 0·009). Both rate of absorption and half-life of cortisol in the circulation play important roles in determining overall exposure to oral glucocorticoid. Dose regimens need to incorporate estimates of these parameters into determining the optimum dosing schedule for individuals. © 2014 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  9. Designing of peptides with desired half-life in intestine-like environment

    KAUST Repository

    Sharma, Arun

    2014-08-20

    Background: In past, a number of peptides have been reported to possess highly diverse properties ranging from cell penetrating, tumor homing, anticancer, anti-hypertensive, antiviral to antimicrobials. Owing to their excellent specificity, low-toxicity, rich chemical diversity and availability from natural sources, FDA has successfully approved a number of peptide-based drugs and several are in various stages of drug development. Though peptides are proven good drug candidates, their usage is still hindered mainly because of their high susceptibility towards proteases degradation. We have developed an in silico method to predict the half-life of peptides in intestine-like environment and to design better peptides having optimized physicochemical properties and half-life.Results: In this study, we have used 10mer (HL10) and 16mer (HL16) peptides dataset to develop prediction models for peptide half-life in intestine-like environment. First, SVM based models were developed on HL10 dataset which achieved maximum correlation R/R2 of 0.57/0.32, 0.68/0.46, and 0.69/0.47 using amino acid, dipeptide and tripeptide composition, respectively. Secondly, models developed on HL16 dataset showed maximum R/R2 of 0.91/0.82, 0.90/0.39, and 0.90/0.31 using amino acid, dipeptide and tripeptide composition, respectively. Furthermore, models that were developed on selected features, achieved a correlation (R) of 0.70 and 0.98 on HL10 and HL16 dataset, respectively. Preliminary analysis suggests the role of charged residue and amino acid size in peptide half-life/stability. Based on above models, we have developed a web server named HLP (Half Life Prediction), for predicting and designing peptides with desired half-life. The web server provides three facilities; i) half-life prediction, ii) physicochemical properties calculation and iii) designing mutant peptides.Conclusion: In summary, this study describes a web server \\'HLP\\' that has been developed for assisting scientific

  10. Partitioning kinetic energy during freewheeling wheelchair maneuvers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Medola, Fausto O; Dao, Phuc V; Caspall, Jayme J; Sprigle, Stephen

    2014-03-01

    This paper describes a systematic method to partition the kinetic energy (KE) of a free-wheeling wheelchair. An ultralightweight rigid frame wheelchair was instrumented with two axle-mounted encoders and data acquisition equipment to accurately measure the velocity of the drive wheels. A mathematical model was created combining physical specifications and geometry of the wheelchair and its components. Two able-bodied subjects propelled the wheelchair over four courses that involved straight and turning maneuvers at differing speeds. The KE of the wheelchair was divided into three components: translational, rotational, and turning energy. This technique was sensitive to the changing contributions of the three energy components across maneuvers. Translational energy represented the major component of total KE in all maneuvers except a zero radius turn in which turning energy was dominant. Both translational and rotational energies are directly related to wheelchair speed. Partitioning KE offers a useful means of investigating the dynamics of a moving wheelchair. The described technique permits analysis of KE imparted to the wheelchair during maneuvers involving changes in speed and direction, which are most representative of mobility in everyday life. This technique can be used to study the effort required to maneuver different types and configurations of wheelchairs.

  11. On Kinetics Modeling of Vibrational Energy Transfer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gilmore, John O.; Sharma, Surendra P.; Cavolowsky, John A. (Technical Monitor)

    1996-01-01

    Two models of vibrational energy exchange are compared at equilibrium to the elementary vibrational exchange reaction for a binary mixture. The first model, non-linear in the species vibrational energies, was derived by Schwartz, Slawsky, and Herzfeld (SSH) by considering the detailed kinetics of vibrational energy levels. This model recovers the result demanded at equilibrium by the elementary reaction. The second model is more recent, and is gaining use in certain areas of computational fluid dynamics. This model, linear in the species vibrational energies, is shown not to recover the required equilibrium result. Further, this more recent model is inconsistent with its suggested rate constants in that those rate constants were inferred from measurements by using the SSH model to reduce the data. The non-linear versus linear nature of these two models can lead to significant differences in vibrational energy coupling. Use of the contemporary model may lead to significant misconceptions, especially when integrated in computer codes considering multiple energy coupling mechanisms.

  12. Re-measurement of the half-life of sup 7 sup 9 Se

    CERN Document Server

    Jiang Song Sheng; Diao Li Jun; Li Chun Shen; GouJingRu; Wu Shao Yon

    2002-01-01

    A new attempt has been made for the re-measurement of the half-life of sup 7 sup 9 Se. We made two major improvements over our earlier sup 7 sup 9 Se half-life determination (Nucl. Instr. and Meth. B 123 (1997) 403). Firstly, the half-life of sup 7 sup 9 Se was measured relative to the precisely known half-life of sup 7 sup 5 Se, rather than an absolute measurement of sup 7 sup 9 Se/Se. Secondly, the Projectile X-ray Detection technique was used for the separation of sup 7 sup 9 Se from its isobar, sup 7 sup 9 Br, rather than measuring sup 8 sup 1 Br for the deduction of sup 7 sup 9 Br interference, and this technique was also used for separation of sup 7 sup 5 Se and its isobar, sup 7 sup 5 As. A detailed description of the sample preparations, experimental setup and measurements are given. The re-measured half-life of sup 7 sup 9 Se was (2.95+-0.38)x10 sup 5 a, about a factor of 3 lower than the previous value, 1.1x10 sup 6 a. The problems in the previous measurement are discussed.

  13. Kinetic energy decomposition scheme based on information theory.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Imamura, Yutaka; Suzuki, Jun; Nakai, Hiromi

    2013-12-15

    We proposed a novel kinetic energy decomposition analysis based on information theory. Since the Hirshfeld partitioning for electron densities can be formulated in terms of Kullback-Leibler information deficiency in information theory, a similar partitioning for kinetic energy densities was newly proposed. The numerical assessments confirm that the current kinetic energy decomposition scheme provides reasonable chemical pictures for ionic and covalent molecules, and can also estimate atomic energies using a correction with viral ratios.

  14. Determination of the half-life of 213Fr with high precision

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fisichella, M.; Musumarra, A.; Farinon, F.; Nociforo, C.; Del Zoppo, A.; Figuera, P.; La Cognata, M.; Pellegriti, M. G.; Scuderi, V.; Torresi, D.; Strano, E.

    2013-07-01

    High-precision measurement of half-life and Qα value of neutral and highly charged α emitters is a major subject of investigation currently. In this framework, we recently pushed half-life measurements of neutral emitters to a precision of a few per mil. This result was achieved by using different techniques and apparatuses at Istituto Nazionale di Fisica Nucleare Laboratori Nazionali del Sud (INFN-LNS) and GSI Darmstadt. Here we report on 213Fr half-life determination [T1/2(213Fr) = 34.14±0.06 s] at INFN-LNS, detailing the measurement protocol used. Direct comparison with the accepted value in the literature shows a discrepancy of more than three sigma. We propose this new value as a reference, discussing previous experiments.

  15. 18F half-life measurement using a high-purity germanium detector.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Han, Jubong; Lee, K B; Park, T S; Lee, J M; Oh, P J; Lee, S H; Kang, Y S; Ahn, J K

    2012-11-01

    The half-life of (18)F has been measured using HPGe detectors with a (137)Cs reference source. The counting ratio of 511 keV γ-rays from (18)F to 622 keV γ-rays from (137)Cs was fitted for the half-life with a weighted least-square method. Uncertainties due to the systematic effects arising from the measurement of a high activity (18)F source were studied in detail. The half-life of (18)F was found to be (109.72±0.19) min. The result is in a good agreement with the recommended value of (109.728±0.019) min evaluated at the Laborotaire National Henri Becquerel (LNHB).

  16. β-decay half-life of V50 calculated by the shell model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Haaranen, M.; Srivastava, P. C.; Suhonen, J.; Zuber, K.

    2014-10-01

    In this work we survey the detectability of the β- channel of 2350V leading to the first excited 2+ state in 2450Cr. The electron-capture (EC) half-life corresponding to the transition of 2350V to the first excited 2+ state in 2250Ti had been measured earlier. Both of the mentioned transitions are 4th-forbidden non-unique. We have performed calculations of all the involved wave functions by using the nuclear shell model with the GXPF1A interaction in the full f-p shell. The computed half-life of the EC branch is in good agreement with the measured one. The predicted half-life for the β- branch is in the range ≈2×1019 yr whereas the present experimental lower limit is 1.5×1018 yr. We discuss also the experimental lay-out needed to detect the β--branch decay.

  17. Three-Laboratory Measurement of the {sup 44}Ti Half-Life

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ahmad, I.; Fischer, S.M.; Kutschera, W.; Paul, M. [Physics Division, Argonne National Laboratory, Argonne, Illinois 60439 (United States); Bonino, G.; Bonino, G.; Castagnoli, G.C.; Castagnoli, G.C. [Dipartimento di Fisica Generale dell`Universita, Via P. Giuria 1, I-10125 Torino (Italy); Kutschera, W. [Institut fuer Radiumforschung und Kernphysik der Universitaet Wien, Boltzmanngasse 3, A-1090 Vienna (Austria); Paul, M. [Racah Institute of Physics, Hebrew University, Jerusalem, Israel 91904] [University of Chicago, Chicago, Illinois 60637 (United States)

    1998-03-01

    We report on a measurement of the {sup 44}Ti half-life aimed at lowering existing systematic uncertainties in this value, which is important to astrophysics. The half-life was measured by following the decay of {sup 44}Ti relative to {sup 60}Co for about 5yr and the measurements were performed independently in three laboratories{emdash}Argonne, Jerusalem, and Torino. We suggest to combine our result, 59.0{plus_minus}0.6yr, with the one from the accompanying Letter by G{umlt o}rres {ital et al.,} 60.3{plus_minus}1.3yr, to obtain a current {open_quotes}best value{close_quotes} for the half-life of {sup 44}Ti of 59.2{plus_minus}0.6 yr (1{sigma} error). {copyright} {ital 1998} {ital The American Physical Society}

  18. $\\beta$-Decay Half-Life of the $rp$-Process Waiting Point Nuclide $^{84}$Mo

    CERN Document Server

    Stoker, J B; Bazin, D; Becerril, A; Berryman, J S; Crawford, H L; Estrade, A; Guess, C J; Hitt, G W; Lorusso, G; Matos, M; Minamisono, K; Montes, F; Pereira, J; Perdikakis, G; Schatz, H; Smith, K; Zegers, R G T

    2009-01-01

    A half-life of 2.2 $\\pm$ 0.2 s has been deduced for the ground-state $\\beta$ decay of $^{84}$Mo, more than 1$\\sigma$ shorter than the previously adopted value. $^{84}$Mo is an even-even N = Z nucleus lying on the proton dripline, created during explosive hydrogen burning in Type I X-ray bursts in the rapid proton capture ($rp$) process. The effect of the measured half-life on $rp$-process reaction flow is explored. Implications on theoretical treatments of nuclear deformation in $^{84}$Mo are also discussed.

  19. Experimental Studies on Turbulence Kinetic Energy in Confined Vortex Flows

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    L.Yan; G.H.Vatistas; 等

    2000-01-01

    Turbulence kinetic energies in confined vortex flows have been studied.The studies were based on the experiments performed in a vortex chamber,In the experiments,a Laser Doppler Anemometry(LDA) was used to perform flow measurements inside the vortex chamber,which provided the data for the kinetic energy analysis.The studies concentrated on the influences of the contraction ratio and the inlet air flow rate on the kinetic energy,and analyzed the characteristics of the kinetic energy in the confined vortex flows,including the distributions of the tangential component,radial component and total turbulence kinetic energy,In the paper,both the experimental techniques and the experimental results were presented.Based on a similarity analyis and the experimental data,an empirical scaling formula was proposed so that the tangential component of the turbulence kinetic energy was dependent only on the parameter of the contraction ratio.

  20. Safety and Efficacy of BAY 94-9027, a Prolonged-Half-Life Factor VIII

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Reding, M T; Ng, H J; Poulsen, Lone Hvitfeldt

    2016-01-01

    BACKGROUND: BAY 94-9027 is a B-domain-deleted prolonged-half-life recombinant factor VIII (FVIII) conjugates in a site-specific manner with polyethylene glycol. OBJECTIVE: Assess efficacy and safety of BAY 94-9027 for prophylaxis and treatment of bleeds in patients with severe hemophilia A PATIEN...

  1. Study on Radiochemical Separation and Measurement of Half-life of ~(88)Kr

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2011-01-01

    88Kr is one of the important gaseous fission products for determining the burn up of nuclear fuel with a short half-life, high fission yield and high branch ratio of γ-ray. Due to the more uncertainty of evaluated data and rare experimented data,

  2. Cascade of kinetic energy in three-dimensional compressible turbulence.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Jianchun; Yang, Yantao; Shi, Yipeng; Xiao, Zuoli; He, X T; Chen, Shiyi

    2013-05-24

    The conservative cascade of kinetic energy is established using both Fourier analysis and a new exact physical-space flux relation in a simulated compressible turbulence. The subgrid scale (SGS) kinetic energy flux of the compressive mode is found to be significantly larger than that of the solenoidal mode in the inertial range, which is the main physical origin for the occurrence of Kolmogorov's -5/3 scaling of the energy spectrum in compressible turbulence. The perfect antiparallel alignment between the large-scale strain and the SGS stress leads to highly efficient kinetic energy transfer in shock regions, which is a distinctive feature of shock structures in comparison with vortex structures. The rescaled probability distribution functions of SGS kinetic energy flux collapse in the inertial range, indicating a statistical self-similarity of kinetic energy cascades.

  3. A new value for the half-life of {sup 10}Be by Heavy-Ion Elastic Recoil Detection and liquid scintillation counting

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Korschinek, G., E-mail: Gunther.Korschinek@ph.tum.d [Physik Department, Technische Universitaet Muenchen, D-85748 Garching (Germany); Bergmaier, A. [Universitaet der Bundeswehr Muenchen, Fakultaet fuer Luft- und Raumfahrttechnik, Institut fuer Angewandte Physik und Messtechnik LRT2, Werner-Heisenberg-Weg 39, D-85577 Neubiberg (Germany); Faestermann, T. [Physik Department, Technische Universitaet Muenchen, D-85748 Garching (Germany); Gerstmann, U.C. [Helmholtz Zentrum Muenchen, German Research Center for Environmental Health, Institute of Radiation Protection, Ingolstaedter Landstr. 1, D-85764 Neuherberg (Germany); Knie, K.; Rugel, G. [Physik Department, Technische Universitaet Muenchen, D-85748 Garching (Germany); Wallner, A. [VERA Laboratory, Faculty of Physics, University of Vienna, Waehringer Strasse 17, A-1090 Wien (Austria); Dillmann, I. [Physik Department, Technische Universitaet Muenchen, D-85748 Garching (Germany); Dollinger, G. [Universitaet der Bundeswehr Muenchen, Fakultaet fuer Luft- und Raumfahrttechnik, Institut fuer Angewandte Physik und Messtechnik LRT2, Werner-Heisenberg-Weg 39, D-85577 Neubiberg (Germany); Lierse von Gostomski, Ch. [Lehrstuhl fuer Radiochemie, Technische Universitaet Muenchen, D-85748 Garching (Germany); Kossert, K. [Physikalisch-Technische Bundesanstalt, Braunschweig (Germany); Maiti, M.; Poutivtsev, M. [Physik Department, Technische Universitaet Muenchen, D-85748 Garching (Germany); Remmert, A. [Lehrstuhl fuer Radiochemie, Technische Universitaet Muenchen, D-85748 Garching (Germany)

    2010-01-15

    The importance of {sup 10}Be in different applications of accelerator mass spectrometry (AMS) is well-known. In this context the half-life of {sup 10}Be has a crucial impact, and an accurate and precise determination of the half-life is a prerequisite for many of the applications of {sup 10}Be in cosmic-ray and earth science research. Recently, the value of the {sup 10}Be half-life has been the centre of much debate. In order to overcome uncertainties inherent in previous determinations, we introduced a new method of high accuracy and precision. An aliquot of our highly enriched {sup 10}Be master solution was serially diluted with increasing well-known masses of {sup 9}Be. We then determined the initial {sup 10}Be concentration by least square fit to the series of measurements of the resultant {sup 10}Be/{sup 9}Be ratio. In order to minimize uncertainties because of mass bias which plague other low-energy mass spectrometric methods, we used for the first time Heavy-Ion Elastic Recoil Detection (HI-ERD) for the determination of the {sup 10}Be/{sup 9}Be isotopic ratios, a technique which does not suffer from difficult to control mass fractionation. The specific activity of the master solution was measured by means of accurate liquid scintillation counting (LSC). The resultant combination of the {sup 10}Be concentration and activity yields a {sup 10}Be half-life of T{sub 1/2} = 1.388 +- 0.018 (1 s, 1.30%) Ma. In a parallel but independent study (Chmeleff et al. ), found a value of 1.386 +- 0.016 (1.15%) Ma. Our recommended weighted mean and mean standard error for the new value for {sup 10}Be half-life based on these two independent measurements is 1.387 +- 0.012 (0.87%) Ma.

  4. High-resolution kinetic energy distributions via doppler shift measurements

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xu, Z.; Koplitz, B.; Buelow, S.; Baugh, D.; Wittig, C.

    1986-07-01

    In photolysis/probe experiments using pulsed sources, time delay produces both spatial and directional bias in the fragment distributions, thus enabling well-resolved kinetic energy distributions to be obtained from Doppler shift measurements. Data are presented for H-atoms detected using two-photon ionization, and high S/N and laser-limited kinetic energy resolution are demonstrated.

  5. Determination of kinetic energy applied by center pivot sprinklers

    Science.gov (United States)

    The kinetic energy of discrete drops impacting a bare soil surface is generally observed to lead to a drastic reduction in water infiltration rate due to soil surface seal formation. Under center pivot sprinkler irrigation, kinetic energy transferred to the soil prior to crop canopy development can...

  6. Droplet Kinetic Energy from Center-Pivot Sprinklers

    Science.gov (United States)

    The kinetic energy of discrete water drops impacting a bare soil surface is generally observed to lead to a drastic reduction in water infiltration rate due to soil surface seal formation. Under center-pivot sprinkler irrigation, kinetic energy transferred to the soil prior to crop canopy developmen...

  7. The Kinetic Energy of a Rotating Figure Skater.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Wei R.; Troelstra, Arne A.

    1998-01-01

    When a rotating figure skater's fully extended arms are pulled back toward the torso, the angular velocity is noticeably increased and the kinetic energy of the skater can also be shown to increase. Discusses the change of the kinetic energy during such a process, and the work necessary for such an increase is derived using a dynamic equilibrium…

  8. Preliminary study on mechanics-based rainfall kinetic energy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yuan Jiuqin Ms.

    2014-09-01

    Full Text Available A raindrop impact power observation system was employed to observe the real-time raindrop impact power during a rainfall event and to analyze the corresponding rainfall characteristics. The experiments were conducted at different simulated rainfall intensities. As rainfall intensity increased, the observed impact power increased linearly indicating the power observation system would be satisfactory for characterizing rainfall erosivity. Momentum is the product of mass and velocity (Momentum=MV, which is related to the observed impact power value. Since there is no significant difference between momentum and impact power, observed impact power can represent momentum for different rainfall intensities. The relationship between momentum and the observed impact power provides a convenient way to calculate rainfall kinetic energy. The value of rainfall kinetic energy based on the observed impact power was higher than the classic rainfall kinetic energy. The rainfall impact power based kinetic energy and the classic rainfall kinetic energy showed linear correlation, which indicates that the raindrop impact power observation system can characterize rainfall kinetic energy. The article establishes a preliminary way to calculate rainfall kinetic energy by using the real-time observed momentum, providing a foundation for replacing the traditional methods for estimating kinetic energy of rainstorms.

  9. Zero kinetic energy photoelectron spectroscopy of pyrene.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Jie; Han, Fangyuan; Kong, Wei

    2010-10-28

    We report zero kinetic energy photoelectron (ZEKE) spectroscopy of pyrene via resonantly enhanced multiphoton ionization. Our analysis centers on the symmetry of the first electronically excited state (S(1)), its vibrational modes, and the vibration of the ground cationic state (D(0)). From comparisons between the observed vibrational frequencies and those from ab initio calculations at the configuration interaction singles level using the 6-311G (d,p) basis set, and based on other previous experimental and theoretical reports, we confirm the (1)B(2u) symmetry for the S(1) state. This assignment represents a reversal in the energy order of the two closely spaced electronically excited states from our theoretical calculation, and extensive configuration interactions are attributed to this result. Among the observed vibrational levels of the S(1) state, three are results of vibronic coupling due to the nearby second electronically excited state. The ZEKE spectroscopy obtained via the vibronic levels of the S(1) state reveals similar modes for the cation as those of the intermediate state. Although we believe that the ground ionic state can be considered a single electron configuration, the agreement between theoretical and experimental frequencies for the cation is limited. This result is somewhat surprising based on our previous work on cata-condensed polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons and small substituted aromatic compounds. Although a relatively small molecule, pyrene demonstrates its nonrigidity via several out-of-plane bending modes corresponding to corrugation of the molecular plane. The adiabatic ionization potential of neutral pyrene is determined to be 59 888 ± 7 cm(-1).

  10. A half-life the divided life of Bruno Pontecorvo, physicist or spy

    CERN Document Server

    Close, Frank

    2015-01-01

    Bruno Pontecorvo dedicated his career to hunting for the Higgs boson of his day: the neutrino, a nearly massless particle considered essential to the process of nuclear fission. His work on the Manhattan project under Enrico Fermi confirmed his reputation as a brilliant physicist and helped usher in the nuclear age. He should have won a Nobel Prize, but late in the summer of 1950 he vanished. At the height of the Cold War, Pontecorvo had disappeared behind the Iron Curtain. In Half-Life, physicist and historian Frank Close offers a heretofore untold history of Pontecorvo’s life, based on unprecedented access to his friends, family, and colleagues. With all the elements of a Cold War thriller—classified atomic research, an infamous double agent, a kidnapping by Soviet operatives—Half-Life is a history of particle physics at perhaps its most powerful: when it created the bomb.

  11. Half-life extended factor VIII for the treatment of hemophilia A.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tiede, A

    2015-06-01

    Prophylactic infusion of factor VIII (FVIII) prevents joint bleeding and other hemorrhages in patients with hemophilia A. Conventional FVIII concentrates have a short half-life, with an average of about 12 h in adults, ranging in individual patients between 6 and 24 h, and even shorter in younger children. Therefore, effective prophylaxis requires frequent intravenous injection, usually three times per week or every other day. Several technologies are currently under investigation to extend the half-life of FVIII, including Fc fusion (Eloctate, Elocta, efmoroctocog alfa), addition of polyethylene glycol (turoctocog alfa pegol [N8-GP], BAY 94-9027, BAX 855), and a single-chain construct (CSL627). This review summarizes characteristics of products in clinical development and discusses their potential benefits.

  12. Half-life and inner penetrability in the cold fission of {sup 248}Cm

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kunhikrishnan, P.V. [Sree Narayana College, Department of Physics, Kannur (India); Santhosh, K.P. [Kannur University, School of Pure and Applied Physics, Payyanur (India); Joseph, Antony [University of Calicut, Department of Physics, Malappuram, Kerala (India)

    2012-06-15

    Using the Coulomb and proximity potential model (CPPM) with the nuclear surface tension improved by Reisdorf, the various fragmentations in the cold fission of {sup 248}Cm are studied as a cluster decay process within a fission model. The computed half-life values are compared with the values reported by Sandulescu et al. using the double-folding M3Y nuclear-nuclear potential model and are in agreement with CPPM values. The diffuseness width used in the proximity potential is found to be sensitive to the half-life. The inner penetrability is computed based on the formalism of Poenaru et al. (J. Phys. G: Nucl. Part. Phys. 17, 443 (1991)) and found that in the cold fission the contribution of the inner part (overlap region) of the barrier is significant compared to cluster decays. The variation of the inner penetrability with fragment mass is studied which emphasizes the fact that cold fission is an extension of cluster decay. (orig.)

  13. Precision half-life measurement of the 4-fold forbidden β decay of V50

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dombrowski, H.; Neumaier, S.; Zuber, K.

    2011-05-01

    A sensitive search of the 4-fold forbidden nonunique decay of V50 has been performed. A total mass measuring time product of 186 kg d has been accumulated. A reliable half-life value with the highest precision so far of (2.29±0.25)×1017 years of the electron capture decay of V50 into the first excited state of Ti50 could be obtained. A photon emission line following the β decay into the first excited state of Cr50 could not be observed, resulting in a lower limit on the half-life of the β-decay branch of 1.7×1018 years. This is not in good agreement with a claimed observation of this decay branch published in 1989.

  14. Theoretical half-life for beta decay of {sup 96}Zr

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Heiskanen, H; Mustonen, M T; Suhonen, J [Department of Physics, University of Jyvaeskylae, PO Box 35, FIN-40351, Jyvaeskylae (Finland)

    2007-05-15

    Highly forbidden {beta}{sup -} decay of the 0{sup +} ground state of {sup 96}Zr is studied. Partial half-lives to the lowest 6{sup +}, 5{sup +} and 4{sup +} states of {sup 96}Nb have been computed using the proton-neutron quasiparticle random-phase approximation (pnQRPA) with realistic two-body interactions in a large single-particle space. We find that the decay is dominated by the unique fourth-forbidden transition to the 5{sup +} state with the half-life 2.4 x 10{sup 20} y. This half-life is an order of magnitude longer than the one measured for the double beta decay of {sup 96}Zr.

  15. Precise Half-Life Measurement of the Superallowed beta emitter 10C

    CERN Document Server

    Iacob, V E; Golovko, V; Goodwin, J; Nica, N; Park, H I; Trache, L; Tribble, R E

    2007-01-01

    The half-life of 10C has been measured to be 19.310(4)s, a result with 0.02% precision, which is a factor of three improvement over the best previous result. Since 10C is the lightest superallowed 0+ --> 0+ beta emitter, its ft value has the greatest weight in setting an upper limit on the possible presence of scalar currents.

  16. Discussions about whether radioactive half life can be changed by mechanic motion

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2009-01-01

    In this essay, some discussions and comments about the paper entitled "Can the decay rate of 32P be changed by mechanic motion?" (Ding et al., Science in China Series B:Chemistry (Chinese version), 2008, 38(11):1035-1037) are given. It was strongly suggested that its experimental methods, data calculations and conclusion should be reconsidered. After the data were recalculated, the new results supported that the chiral mechanic motion could induce the changes of radioactive half life.

  17. The half-life and exposure of cefuroxime varied in newborn infants after a Caesarean section

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Zachariassen, G.; Hyldig, N.; Joergensen, J.S.

    2016-01-01

    in normal adults and seemed to clear within 24 hours. The median area under the concentration–time curve was 65.0 hour μg/mL (range 31.7–162.4). Conclusion: We found that the cefuroxime half-life after a Caesarean section varied among infants and was longer than in normal adults but cleared within 24 hours....... Exposure to cefuroxime in newborn infants may influence the gut microbiota and should be investigated further....

  18. 209Tl half-life and gamma-ray measurements of radionuclides belonging to the (4 n + 1) decay chain

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ardisson, G.; Barci, V.; El Samad, O.

    1994-01-01

    Gamma-ray spectra of radiochemically separated 221Fr, 213Bi and 209Tl sources were measured using coaxial and planar HPGe detectors. The energies and emission probabilities of eight new gamma-ray transitions were observed in the decay of 209Tl; a half-life of (2.161±0.007) min was measured. Twenty-two gamma-rays have been attributed to the β-decay of 213Bi, of which 17 are new with respect to previous studies. The 213Po level scheme was determined using γ-γ coincidence measurements: eight excited states are proposed of which six are new. Preliminary measurements of the α-decay of 221Fr revealed the existence of 18 gamma-ray transitions of which eight are reported for the first time.

  19. On Conversions between Potential and Kinetic Energy in the Atmospher

    OpenAIRE

    White, Robert M.; Saltzman, Barry

    2011-01-01

    From a consideration of the large-scale horizontal variations of individual pressure change and 500 mb temperature in a mid-latitude sector of the Northern Hemisphere, computations are made of the required mean conversion of potential energy into the kinetic energy of the horizontal wind systems. The order of magnitude of the estimate obtained is in agreement with that obtained by Brunt from considerations of the frictional dissipation of kinetic energy. In addition, the role of organized ove...

  20. Measurement of the Two-Neutrino Double Beta Decay Half-life of $^{130}$Te with the CUORE-0 Experiment

    CERN Document Server

    Alduino, C; Artusa, D R; Avignone, F T; Azzolini, O; Banks, T I; Bari, G; Beeman, J W; Bellini, F; Bersani, A; Biassoni, M; Branca, A; Brofferio, C; Bucci, C; Camacho, A; Caminata, A; Canonica, L; Cao, X G; Capelli, S; Cappelli, L; Carbone, L; Cardani, L; Carniti, P; Casali, N; Cassina, L; Chiesa, D; Chott, N; Clemenza, M; Copello, S; Cosmelli, C; Cremonesi, O; Creswick, R J; Cushman, J S; D'Addabbo, A; Dafinei, I; Davis, C J; Dell'Oro, S; Deninno, M M; Di Domizio, S; Di Vacri, M L; Drobizhev, A; Fang, D Q; Faverzani, M; Fernandes, G; Ferri, E; Ferroni, F; Fiorini, E; Franceschi, M A; Freedman, S J; Fujikawa, B K; Giachero, A; Gironi, L; Giuliani, A; Gladstone, L; Gorla, P; Gotti, C; Gutierrez, T D; Haller, E E; Han, K; Hansen, E; Heeger, K M; Hennings-Yeomans, R; Hickerson, K P; Huang, H Z; Kadel, R; Keppel, G; Kolomensky, Yu G; Leder, A; Ligi, C; Lim, K E; Liu, X; Ma, Y G; Maino, M; Marini, L; Martinez, M; Maruyama, R H; Mei, Y; Moggi, N; Morganti, S; Mosteiro, P J; Napolitano, T; Nones, C; Norman, E B; Nucciotti, A; O'Donnell, T; Orio, F; Ouellet, J L; Pagliarone, C E; Pallavicini, M; Palmieri, V; Pattavina, L; Pavan, M; Pessina, G; Pettinacci, V; Piperno, G; Pira, C; Pirro, S; Pozzi, S; Previtali, E; Rosenfeld, C; Rusconi, C; Sangiorgio, S; Santone, D; Scielzo, N D; Singh, V; Sisti, M; Smith, A R; Taffarello, L; Tenconi, M; Terranova, F; Tomei, C; Trentalange, S; Vignati, M; Wagaarachchi, S L; Wang, B S; Wang, H W; Wilson, J; Winslow, L A; Wise, T; Woodcraft, A; Zanotti, L; Zhang, G Q; Zhu, B X; Zimmermann, S; Zucchelli, S

    2016-01-01

    We report on the measurement of the two-neutrino double beta decay half-life of $^{130}$Te with the CUORE-0 detector. From an exposure of 33.4 kg$\\cdot$y of TeO$_2$, the half-life is determined to be $T_{1/2}^{2\

  1. Measurement of the half-life of the two-neutrino double beta decay of Ge-76 with the Gerda experiment

    CERN Document Server

    Agostini, M; Andreotti, E; Bakalyarov, A M; Balata, M; Barabanov, I; Heider, M Barnabe; Barros, N; Baudis, L; Bauer, C; Becerici-Schmidt, N; Bellotti, E; Belogurov, S; Belyaev, S T; Benato, G; Bettini, A; Bezrukov, L; Bode, T; Brudanin, V; Brugnera, R; Budjas, D; Caldwell, A; Cattadori, C; Chernogorov, A; Cossavella, F; Demidova, E V; Denisov, A; Domula, A; Egorov, V; Falkenstein, R; Ferella, A D; Freund, K; Froborg, F; Frodyma, N; Gangapshev, A; Garfagnini, A; Gazzana, S; Grambayr, P; Gurentsov, V; Gusev, K; Guthikonda, K K; Hampel, W; Hegai, A; Heisel, M; Hemmer, S; Heusser, G; Hofmann, W; Hult, M; Inzhechik, L V; Ioannucci, L; Csathy, J Janicsko; Jochum, J; Junker, M; Kianovsky, S; Kirpichnikov, I V; Kirsch, A; Klimenko, A; Knoepfle, K T; Kochetov, O; Kornoukhov, V N; Kusminov, V; Laubenstein, M; Lazzaro, A; Lebedev, V I; Lehnert, B; Liao, H Y; Lindner, M; Lippi, I; Liu, X; Lubashevskiy, A; Lubsandorzhiev, B; Lutter, G; Machado, A A; Majorovits, B; Maneschg, W; Nemchenok, I; Nisi, S; O'Shaughnessy, C; Pandola, L; Pelczar, K; Peraro, L; Pullia, A; Riboldi, S; Ritter, F; Sada, C; Salathe, M; Schmitt, C; Schoenert, S; Schreiner, J; Schulz, O; Schwingenheuer, B; Shevchik, E; Shirchenko, M; Simgen, H; Smolnikov, A; Stanco, L; Strecker, H; Tarka, M; Ur, C A; Vasenko, A A; Volynets, O; von Sturm, K; Walter, M; Wegmann, A; Wojcik, M; Yanovich, E; Zavarise, P; Zhitnikov, I; Zhukov, S V; Zinatulina, D; Zuber, K; Zuzel, G

    2012-01-01

    The primary goal of the GERmanium Detector Array (Gerda) experiment at the Laboratori Nazionali del Gran Sasso of INFN is the search for the neutrinoless double beta decay of Ge-76. High-purity germanium detectors made from material enriched in Ge-76 are operated directly immersed in liquid argon, allowing for a substantial reduction of the background with respect to predecessor experiments. The first 5.04 kg yr of data collected in Phase I of the experiment have been analyzed to measure the half-life of the neutrino-accompanied double beta decay of Ge-76. The observed spectrum in the energy range between 600 and 1800 keV is dominated by the double beta decay of Ge-76. The half-life extracted from Gerda data is T(1/2) = (1.84 +0.14 -0.10) 10^{21} yr.

  2. Spectral kinetic energy transfer in turbulent premixed reacting flows.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Towery, C A Z; Poludnenko, A Y; Urzay, J; O'Brien, J; Ihme, M; Hamlington, P E

    2016-05-01

    Spectral kinetic energy transfer by advective processes in turbulent premixed reacting flows is examined using data from a direct numerical simulation of a statistically planar turbulent premixed flame. Two-dimensional turbulence kinetic-energy spectra conditioned on the planar-averaged reactant mass fraction are computed through the flame brush and variations in the spectra are connected to terms in the spectral kinetic energy transport equation. Conditional kinetic energy spectra show that turbulent small-scale motions are suppressed in the burnt combustion products, while the energy content of the mean flow increases. An analysis of spectral kinetic energy transfer further indicates that, contrary to the net down-scale transfer of energy found in the unburnt reactants, advective processes transfer energy from small to large scales in the flame brush close to the products. Triadic interactions calculated through the flame brush show that this net up-scale transfer of energy occurs primarily at spatial scales near the laminar flame thermal width. The present results thus indicate that advective processes in premixed reacting flows contribute to energy backscatter near the scale of the flame.

  3. Kinetic Energy-Based Temperature Computation in Non-Equilibrium Molecular Dynamics Simulation

    OpenAIRE

    Liu, Bin; Xu, Ran; He, Xiaoqiao

    2009-01-01

    The average kinetic energy is widely used to characterize temperature in molecular dynamics (MD) simulation. In this letter, the applicability of three types of average kinetic energy as measures of temperature is investigated, i.e., the total kinetic energy, kinetic energy without the centroid translation part, and thermal disturbance kinetic energy. Our MD simulations indicate that definitions of temperature based on the kinetic energy including rigid translational or rotational motion may ...

  4. A novel method to determine the half-life of 32Si

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schnabel, C.; Beer, J.; Clausen, H. B.

    2009-04-01

    A novel method using high-resolution 10Be concentrations to correct 32Si data from independently dated depth profiles is presented. It is demonstrated that by correcting 32Si deposition rates for temporal changes based on production rate fluctuations the derived half-life of 32Si agrees with half-life determinations based on physical measurements of artificial samples. Currently, the half-life of 32Si is not accurately known. Moreover, results from physical measurements of artificial samples yielded much shorter half-lives (100-172 yr) than results based on depth profiles. For depth profiles most results were between 250 and 300 yr (Clausen, 1973), with the exception of a relatively recent work on a varved lake sediment which resulted in 178 yr (Nijampurkar et al., 1998). Using high-resolution 10Be concentrations from the Dye3 ice-core each data point of the Northern hemisphere ice-core 32Si concentrations is corrected for temporal variations in deposition rate. This means that we assume that temporal variations in 32Si and 10Be deposition are identical instead of using the assumption of constant deposition rates that resulted in the long half-lives. In the case of the varved lake sediment, 32Si/Si ratios are corrected in the same way as 32Si concentrations for the ice cores. We present our results that half-lives of longer than 180 yr can be ruled out for 32Si and propose using 10Be and 32Si concentrations from the same samples of independently dated profiles as a new method to apply 32Si for dating purposes. Preliminary results have been presented at the QRA meeting in Glasgow 2006 {schnabel et al., 2006]. HB Clausen, Journal of Glaciology 12 (1973) 411. VN Nijampurkar et al., Earth and Planetary Science Letters 163 (1998) 191. C. Schnabel, J. Beer, HB Clausen, QRA annual discussion meeting Glasgow, 2006.

  5. On the Linearly-Balanced Kinetic Energy Spectrum

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lu, Huei,-Iin; Robertson, F. R.

    1999-01-01

    It is well known that the earth's atmospheric motion can generally be characterized by the two dimensional quasi-geostrophic approximation, in which the constraints on global integrals of kinetic energy, entrophy and potential vorticity play very important roles in redistributing the wave energy among different scales of motion. Assuming the hypothesis of Kolmogrov's local isotropy, derived a -3 power law of the equilibrium two-dimensional kinetic energy spectrum that entails constant vorticity and zero energy flows from the energy-containing wave number up to the viscous cutoff. In his three dimensional quasi-geostrophic theory, showed that the spectrum function of the vertical scale turbulence - expressible in terms of the available potential energy - possesses the same power law as the two dimensional kinetic energy spectrum. As the slope of kinetic energy spectrum in the inertial range is theoretically related to the predictability of the synoptic scales (Lorenz, 1969), many general circulation models includes a horizontal diffusion to provide reasonable kinetic energy spectra, although the actual power law exhibited in the atmospheric general circulation is controversial. Note that in either the atmospheric modeling or the observational analyses, the proper choice of wave number Index to represent the turbulence scale Is the degree of the Legendre polynomial.

  6. Determination of the half-life of sup 1 sup 0 sup 5 sup m Rh

    CERN Document Server

    Kronenberg, A K; Weber, R; Esterlund, R A; Patzelt, P

    1998-01-01

    Following a fast chemical separation of Ru isotopes from a fission-product mixture, sup 1 sup 0 sup 5 sup m Rh was periodically extracted from its precursor (4.44-h sup 1 sup 0 sup 5 Ru) for measurements of its half-life. The new value for the T sub 1 sub / sub 2 of sup 1 sup 0 sup 5 sup m Rh of (43.0+-0.3) s resolves the long-standing conflict in the literature between the two earlier measured values of 45 and 30 s.

  7. The Half Life of the 53 keV Level in {sup 197}Pt

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Malmskog, S.G.

    1967-02-15

    The half life of the recently proposed 53 keV level in {sup 197}Pt has been measured to 18.5 {+-} 1.5 nsec using the delayed coincidence technique. This level, which is identified with the f{sub 5/2} single particle state, decays directly to the p{sub 1/2} ground state in {sup 197}Pt. The reduced E2 transition probability for this 53 keV transition has been deduced and compared with the results obtained for the corresponding transitions in other Pt, Hg, and Pb isotopes and with the theoretical predictions by Sorensen and by Wahlborn and Martinson.

  8. Calculation of the Aluminosilicate Half-Life Formation Time in the 2H Evaporator

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fondeur, F.F.

    2000-09-21

    The 2H Evaporator contains large quantities of aluminosilicate solids deposited on internal fixtures. The proposed cleaning operations will dissolve the solids in nitric acid. Operations will then neutralize the waste prior to transfer to a waste tank. Combining recent calculations of heat transfer for the 2H Evaporator cleaning operations and laboratory experiments for dissolution of solid samples from the pot, the authors estimated the re-formation rate for aluminosilicates during cooling. The results indicate a half-life formation of 17 hours when evaporator solution cools from 60 degrees C and 9 hours when cooled from 90 degrees C.

  9. Precise Half-Life Measurement of the Superallowed Beta+ Emitter 46V

    CERN Document Server

    Park, H I; Iacob, V E; Chen, L; Goodwin, J; Nica, N; Simmons, E; Trache, L; Tribble, R E

    2011-01-01

    The half-life of 46V has been measured to be 422.66(6) ms, which is a factor of two more precise than the best previous measurement. Our result is also consistent with the previous measurements, with no repeat of the disagreement recently encountered with Q_{EC} values measured for the same transition. The Ft value for the 46V superallowed transition, incorporating all world data, is determined to be 3074.1(26) s, a result consistent with the average Ft value of 3072.08(79) s established from the 13 best-known superallowed transitions.

  10. The evolution of drug-resistant malaria: the role of drug elimination half-life.

    OpenAIRE

    Hastings, Ian M.; Watkins, William M; White, Nicholas J

    2002-01-01

    This paper seeks to define and quantify the influence of drug elimination half-life on the evolution of antimalarial drug resistance. There are assumed to be three general classes of susceptibility of the malaria parasite Plasmodium falciparum to a drug: Res0, the original, susceptible wildtype; Res1, a group of intermediate levels of susceptibility that are more tolerant of the drug but still cleared by treatment; and Res2, which is completely resistant to the drug. Res1 and Res2 resistance ...

  11. Measurement of the half-life of sup 1 sup 7 sup 6 Lu

    CERN Document Server

    Nir-El, Y

    1998-01-01

    The half-life of sup 1 sup 7 sup 6 Lu was determined by measuring the disintegration rate of a solution of lutetium oxide, using a calibrated HPGe detector, and found to be (3.69+-0.02)x10 sup 1 sup 0 y. It is recommended that the current adopted value be calculated from the grouping of three published values since 1983, including our value, the weighted mean of which is (3.73+-0.01)x10 sup 1 sup 0 y.

  12. Gamma-spectrometric determination of the sup 8 sup 9 Sr isotope half-life

    CERN Document Server

    Popov, Y S; Markushin, M N; Kupriyanov, V N; Timofeev, G A

    2002-01-01

    Using the method of semiconductor [Ge(Li)-detector] gamma-spectroscopy by the results of measurements of 913 keV ( sup 8 sup 9 Sr) gamma-line intensity for 6000 h, using as internal reference the 661.7 keV ( sup 1 sup 3 sup 7 Cs) gamma-line, the value of sup 8 sup 9 Sr isotope half-life has been calculated, which proved to be 1208+-9 h or 50.34+-0.37 days. Error is provided for confidential probability P = 0.95

  13. Perfluorooctane Sulfonate Plasma Half-Life Determination and Long-Term Tissue Distribution in Beef Cattle (Bos taurus).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lupton, Sara J; Dearfield, Kerry L; Johnston, John J; Wagner, Sarah; Huwe, Janice K

    2015-12-30

    Perfluorooctane sulfonate (PFOS) is used in consumer products as a surfactant and is found in industrial and consumer waste, which ends up in wastewater treatment plants (WWTPs). PFOS does not breakdown during WWTP processes and accumulates in the biosolids. Common practices include application of biosolids to pastures and croplands used for feed, and as a result, animals such as beef cattle are exposed to PFOS. To determine plasma and tissue depletion kinetics in cattle, 2 steers and 4 heifers were dosed with PFOS at 0.098 mg/kg body weight and 9.1 mg/kg, respectively. Plasma depletion half-lives for steers and heifers were 120 ± 4.1 and 106 ± 23.1 days, respectively. Specific tissue depletion half-lives ranged from 36 to 385 days for intraperitoneal fat, back fat, muscle, liver, bone, and kidney. These data indicate that PFOS in beef cattle has a sufficiently long depletion half-life to permit accumulation in edible tissues.

  14. Pile-up corrections for high-precision superallowed {beta} decay half-life measurements via {gamma}-ray photopeak counting

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Grinyer, G.F. [Department of Physics, University of Guelph, Guelph, Ont, N1G 2W1 (Canada)], E-mail: ggrinyer@physics.uoguelph.ca; Svensson, C.E.; Andreoiu, C. [Department of Physics, University of Guelph, Guelph, Ont, N1G 2W1 (Canada); Andreyev, A.N. [TRIUMF, 4004 Wesbrook Mall, Vancouver, BC, V6T 2A3 (Canada); Austin, R.A.E. [Department of Astronomy and Physics, St. Mary' s University, Halifax, NS, B3H 3C3 (Canada); Ball, G.C. [TRIUMF, 4004 Wesbrook Mall, Vancouver, BC, V6T 2A3 (Canada); Bandyopadhyay, D. [Department of Physics, University of Guelph, Guelph, Ont, N1G 2W1 (Canada); Chakrawarthy, R.S. [TRIUMF, 4004 Wesbrook Mall, Vancouver, BC, V6T 2A3 (Canada); Finlay, P. [Department of Physics, University of Guelph, Guelph, Ont, N1G 2W1 (Canada); Garrett, P.E. [Department of Physics, University of Guelph, Guelph, Ont, Canada N1G 2W1 (Canada); TRIUMF, 4004 Wesbrook Mall, Vancouver, BC, V6T 2A3 (Canada); Hackman, G. [TRIUMF, 4004 Wesbrook Mall, Vancouver, BC, V6T 2A3 (Canada); Hyland, B. [Department of Physics, University of Guelph, Guelph, Ont, N1G 2W1 (Canada); Kulp, W.D. [School of Physics, Georgia Institute of Technology, Atlanta, GA 30332 0430 (United States); Leach, K.G. [Department of Physics, University of Guelph, Guelph, Ont, N1G 2W1 (Canada); Leslie, J.R. [Department of Physics, Queen' s University, Kingston, Ont., K7L 3N6 (Canada); Morton, A.C.; Pearson, C.J. [TRIUMF, 4004 Wesbrook Mall, Vancouver, BC, V6T 2A3 (Canada); Phillips, A.A. [Department of Physics, University of Guelph, Guelph, Ont, N1G 2W1 (Canada); Sarazin, F. [Department of Physics, Colorado School of Mines, Golden, CO 80401 (United States); Schumaker, M.A. [Department of Physics, University of Guelph, Guelph, Ont, N1G 2W1 (Canada)] (and others)

    2007-09-11

    A general technique that corrects {gamma}-ray gated {beta} decay-curve data for detector pulse pile-up is presented. The method includes corrections for non-zero time-resolution and energy-threshold effects in addition to a special treatment of saturating events due to cosmic rays. This technique is verified through a Monte Carlo simulation and experimental data using radioactive beams of {sup 26}Na implanted at the center of the 8{pi}{gamma}-ray spectrometer at the ISAC facility at TRIUMF in Vancouver, Canada. The {beta}-decay half-life of {sup 26}Na obtained from counting 1809-keV {gamma}-ray photopeaks emitted by the daughter {sup 26}Mg was determined to be T{sub 1/2}=1.07167{+-}0.00055s following a 27{sigma} correction for detector pulse pile-up. This result is in excellent agreement with the result of a previous measurement that employed direct {beta} counting and demonstrates the feasibility of high-precision {beta}-decay half-life measurements through the use of high-purity germanium {gamma}-ray detectors. The technique presented here, while motivated by superallowed-Fermi {beta} decay studies, is general and can be used for all half-life determinations (e.g. {alpha}-, {beta}-, X-ray, fission) in which a {gamma}-ray photopeak is used to select the decays of a particular isotope.

  15. Study of the dependence of 198Au half-life on source geometry

    CERN Document Server

    Lindstrom, R M; Buncher, J B; Greene, G L; Jenkins, J H; Krause, D E; Mattes, J J; Yue, A; 10.1016/j.nima.2010.06.270

    2010-01-01

    We report the results of an experiment to determine whether the half-life of \\Au{198} depends on the shape of the source. This study was motivated by recent suggestions that nuclear decay rates may be affected by solar activity, perhaps arising from solar neutrinos. If this were the case then the $\\beta$-decay rates, or half-lives, of a thin foil sample and a spherical sample of gold of the same mass and activity could be different. We find for \\Au{198}, $(T_{1/2})_{\\rm foil}/(T_{1/2})_{\\rm sphere} = 0.999 \\pm 0.002$, where $T_{1/2}$ is the mean half-life. The maximum neutrino flux at the sample in our experiments was several times greater than the flux of solar neutrinos at the surface of the Earth. We show that this increase in flux leads to a significant improvement in the limits that can be inferred on a possible solar contribution to nuclear decays.

  16. Changing Paradigm of Hemophilia Management: Extended Half-Life Factor Concentrates and Gene Therapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kumar, Riten; Dunn, Amy; Carcao, Manuel

    2016-02-01

    Management of hemophilia has evolved significantly in the last century-from recognition of the causative mechanism in the 1950s to commercially available clotting factor concentrates in the 1960s. Availability of lyophilized concentrates in the 1970s set the stage for home-based therapy, followed by introduction of virally attenuated plasma-derived, and then recombinant factor concentrates in the 1980s and 1990s, respectively. The subsequent years saw a paradigm shift in treatment goals from on-demand therapy to prophylactic factor replacement starting at an early age, to prevent hemarthrosis becoming the standard of care for patients with severe hemophilia. In the developed world, the increasing use of home-based prophylactic regimens has significantly improved the quality of life, and life expectancy of patients with severe hemophilia. Seminal developments in the past 5 years, including the commercial availability of extended half-life factor concentrates and the publication of successful results of gene therapy for patients with hemophilia B, promise to further revolutionize hemophilia care over the next few decades. In this review, we summarize the evolution of management for hemophilia, with a focus on extended half-life factor concentrates and gene therapy. Thieme Medical Publishers 333 Seventh Avenue, New York, NY 10001, USA.

  17. Half-life determination for {sup 108}Ag and {sup 110}Ag

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zahn, Guilherme S.; Genezini, Frederico A. [Instituto de Pesquisas Energéticas e Nucleares - IPEN-CNEN/SP, P.O. Box 11049, São Paulo, 05422-970 (Brazil)

    2014-11-11

    In this work, the half-life of the short-lived silver radionuclides {sup 108}Ag and {sup 110}Ag were measured by following the activity of samples after they were irradiated in the IEA-R1 reactor. The results were then fitted using a non-paralizable dead time correction to the regular exponential decay and the individual half-life values obtained were then analyzed using both the Normalized Residuals and the Rajeval techniques, in order to reach the most exact and precise final values. To check the validity of dead-time correction, a second correction method was also employed by means of counting a long-lived {sup 60}Co radioactive source together with the samples as a livetime chronometer. The final half-live values obtained using both dead-time correction methods were in good agreement, showing that the correction was properly assessed. The results obtained are partially compatible with the literature values, but with a lower uncertainty, and allow a discussion on the last ENSDF compilations' values.

  18. HALO--a Java framework for precise transcript half-life determination.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Friedel, Caroline C; Kaufmann, Stefanie; Dölken, Lars; Zimmer, Ralf

    2010-05-01

    Recent improvements in experimental technologies now allow measurements of de novo transcription and/or RNA decay at whole transcriptome level and determination of precise transcript half-lives. Such transcript half-lives provide important insights into the regulation of biological processes and the relative contributions of RNA decay and de novo transcription to differential gene expression. In this article, we present HALO (Half-life Organizer), the first software for the precise determination of transcript half-lives from measurements of RNA de novo transcription or decay determined with microarrays or RNA-seq. In addition, methods for quality control, filtering and normalization are supplied. HALO provides a graphical user interface, command-line tools and a well-documented Java application programming interface (API). Thus, it can be used both by biologists to determine transcript half-lives fast and reliably with the provided user interfaces as well as software developers integrating transcript half-life analysis into other gene expression profiling pipelines. Source code, executables and documentation are available at http://www.bio.ifi.lmu.de/software/halo.

  19. High-Precision Half-life Measurements for the Superallowed β+ Emitter 14O

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Laffoley A. T.

    2014-03-01

    Full Text Available The half-life of 14O, a superallowed Fermi β+ emitter, has been determined via simultaneous γ and β counting experiments at TRIUMF’s Isotope Separator and Accelerator facility. Following the implantation of 14O samples at the center of the 8π spectrometer, a γ counting measurement was performed by detecting the 2313 keV γ-rays emitted from the first excited state of the daughter 14N using 20 high-purity germanium (HPGe detectors. A simultaneous β counting experiment was performed using a fast plastic scintillator positioned directly behind the implantation site. The results, T½(γ = 70:632 ± 0:094 s and T½(β = 70:610 ± 0:030 s, are consistent with one another and, together with eight previous measurements, establish a new average for the 14O half-life of T½ = 70:619 ± 0:011 s with a reduced χ2 of 0.99.

  20. Protein HESylation for half-life extension: synthesis, characterization and pharmacokinetics of HESylated anakinra.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liebner, Robert; Mathaes, Roman; Meyer, Martin; Hey, Thomas; Winter, Gerhard; Besheer, Ahmed

    2014-07-01

    Half-life extension (HLE) is becoming an essential component of the industrial development of small-sized therapeutic peptides and proteins. HESylation(®) is a HLE technology based on coupling drug molecules to the biodegradable hydroxyethyl starch (HES). In this study, we report on the synthesis, characterization and pharmacokinetics of HESylated anakinra, where anakinra was conjugated to propionaldehyde-HES using reductive amination, leading to a monoHESylated protein. Characterization using size exclusion chromatography and dynamic light scattering confirmed conjugation and the increase in molecular size, while Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy showed that the secondary structure of the conjugate was not affected by coupling. Meanwhile, microcalorimetry and aggregation studies showed a significant increase in protein stability. Surface plasmon resonance and microscale thermophoresis showed that the conjugate retained its nanomolar affinity, and finally, the pharmacokinetics of the HESylated protein exhibited a 6.5-fold increase in the half-life, and a 45-fold increase in the AUC. These results indicate that HESylation(®) is a promising HLE technology.

  1. Determination of half-life and photon emission probabilities of (65)Zn.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Luca, Aurelian; Amiot, Marie-Noëlle; Morel, Jean

    2003-05-01

    A (65) Zn radioactive solution standardized by an absolute measurement method at Laboratoire National Henri Becquerel (LNHB), was sent to Bureau International des Poids et Mesures (BIPM), in order to include the results in their database. The activity value determined at BIPM was in good agreement with that stated by LNHB (the difference was 0.3%). Additional measurements of (65) Zn activity and half-life were also carried out, by using a 4pigamma ionization chamber; the half-life value proposed by this work: 244.15 (10) days, is consistent to others reported in the literature. The spectra analysis was performed by gamma-ray spectrometry with high-purity germanium detectors, with the aim to improve the accuracy of the photon emission probabilities values of this nuclide. The determined photon emission probabilities are 0.498 for the 1115 ke V gamma-ray, 0.347 and 0.0479 for the X-rays Cu-K(alpha) and Cu-K(beta); the associated uncertainties are 0.4%, 0.9% and 1.1%, respectively.

  2. Isolation of human anti-serum albumin Fab antibodies with an extended serum-half life.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kang, Hyeon-Ju; Kim, Hye-Jin; Cha, Sang-Hoon

    2016-01-01

    The serum albumin (SA) has been exploited to generate long-acting biotherapeutics by taking advantage of the FcRn-mediated recycling mechanism in a direct or an indirect way. Since Fab fragments have been proven to be clinically safe for human usage, we assumed that human anti-SA Fab antibodies could have a great potential as a carrier molecule to extend the serum half-life of therapeutic proteins. We, herein, had attempted to isolate anti-SA Fab antibodies from HuDVFab-8L antibody library via a phage display technology, and identified eight discrete human Fab antibodies. One of the Fab antibodies, SL335, showed the strongest binding reactivity to human SA with nM range of affinity at both pH 6 and pH 7.4, and cross-reacted to SAs from various species including rat, mouse, canine and monkey. The in vivo pharmacokinetic assay using a rat model indicated that SL335 has approximately 10 fold longer serum half-life and 26 to 44-fold increase in AUC0 → ∞ compared to the negative control Fab molecule in both intravenous and subcutaneous administrations. Knowing that Fabs have proven to be safe in clinics for a long time, SL335 seems to have a great potential in generating long-acting protein drugs by tagging effector molecules with either chemical conjugation or genetic fusion.

  3. Estimating the biological half-life for radionuclides in homoeothermic vertebrates: a simplified allometric approach

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Beresford, N.A. [Lancaster Environment Centre, NERC Centre for Ecology and Hydrology, Lancaster (United Kingdom); Vives i Batlle, J. [Belgian Nuclear Research Centre, Mol (Belgium)

    2013-11-15

    The application of allometric, or mass-dependent, relationships within radioecology has increased with the evolution of models to predict the exposure of organisms other than man. Allometry presents a method of addressing the lack of empirical data on radionuclide transfer and metabolism for the many radionuclide-species combinations which may need to be considered. However, sufficient data across a range of species with different masses are required to establish allometric relationships and this is not always available. Here, an alternative allometric approach to predict the biological half-life of radionuclides in homoeothermic vertebrates which does not require such data is derived. Biological half-life values are predicted for four radionuclides and compared to available data for a range of species. All predictions were within a factor of five of the observed values when the model was parameterised appropriate to the feeding strategy of each species. This is an encouraging level of agreement given that the allometric models are intended to provide broad approximations rather than exact values. However, reasons why some radionuclides deviate from what would be anticipated from Kleiber's law need to be determined to allow a more complete exploitation of the potential of allometric extrapolation within radioecological models. (orig.)

  4. Renormalizing the kinetic energy operator in elementary quantum mechanics

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Coutinho, F A B [Faculdade de Medicina, Universidade de Sao Paulo e LIM 01-HCFMUSP, 05405-000 Sao Paulo (Brazil); Amaku, M [Faculdade de Medicina Veterinaria e Zootecnia, Universidade de Sao Paulo, 05508-970 Sao Paulo (Brazil)], E-mail: coutinho@dim.fm.usp.br

    2009-09-15

    In this paper, we consider solutions to the three-dimensional Schroedinger equation of the form {psi}(r) = u(r)/r, where u(0) {ne} 0. The expectation value of the kinetic energy operator for such wavefunctions diverges. We show that it is possible to introduce a potential energy with an expectation value that also diverges, exactly cancelling the kinetic energy divergence. This renormalization procedure produces a self-adjoint Hamiltonian. We solve some problems with this new Hamiltonian to illustrate its usefulness.

  5. Renormalizing the Kinetic Energy Operator in Elementary Quantum Mechanics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Coutinho, F. A. B.; Amaku, M.

    2009-01-01

    In this paper, we consider solutions to the three-dimensional Schrodinger equation of the form [psi](r) = u(r)/r, where u(0) [is not equal to] 0. The expectation value of the kinetic energy operator for such wavefunctions diverges. We show that it is possible to introduce a potential energy with an expectation value that also diverges, exactly…

  6. Abnormal Kinetic Energy of Charged Dust Particles in Plasmas

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Norman, G.; Stegailov, V.; Timofeev, A.

    A mechanism of the increase of the average kinetic energy of charged dust particles in gas discharge plasmas is suggested. Particle charge fluctuation is the reason for the appearance of forced resonance, which heals vertical oscillations. The energy transfer from vertical oscillations to the

  7. Renormalizing the Kinetic Energy Operator in Elementary Quantum Mechanics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Coutinho, F. A. B.; Amaku, M.

    2009-01-01

    In this paper, we consider solutions to the three-dimensional Schrodinger equation of the form [psi](r) = u(r)/r, where u(0) [is not equal to] 0. The expectation value of the kinetic energy operator for such wavefunctions diverges. We show that it is possible to introduce a potential energy with an expectation value that also diverges, exactly…

  8. Abnormal Kinetic Energy of Charged Dust Particles in Plasmas

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Norman, G.; Stegailov, V.; Timofeev, A.

    2010-01-01

    A mechanism of the increase of the average kinetic energy of charged dust particles in gas discharge plasmas is suggested. Particle charge fluctuation is the reason for the appearance of forced resonance, which heals vertical oscillations. The energy transfer from vertical oscillations to the horizo

  9. Macro and Micro Scale Electromagnetic Kinetic Energy Harvesting Generators

    CERN Document Server

    Beeby, S -P; Torah, R -N; Koukharenko, E; Roberts, S; O'Donnell, T; Roy, S

    2007-01-01

    This paper is concerned with generators that harvest electrical energy from the kinetic energy present in the sensor nodes environment. These generators have the potential to replace or augment battery power which has a limited lifetime and requires periodic replacement which limits the placement and application of the sensor node.

  10. Precision measurement of the half-life of $^{109}$In in large and small lattice environments

    CERN Multimedia

    We propose to undertake high precision measurements of the half-life of $^{109}$In in large and small lattice environments to study the effect of compression on the electron capture nuclear decay rate. Such studies are of general interest having implications in many areas ranging from astrophysics to geophysics. At present, very little data is available on the change of electron capture decay rate under compression and the available data seems to indicate that the observed increase of the electron capture decay rate under compression is much greater than the predictions of the best available density functional calculations as obtained from TB-LMTO or WIEN2K codes. The proposed experiment should generate more data thus clarifying the experimental situation.

  11. Development of a time-variable nuclear pulser for half life measurements

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zahn, Guilherme S.; Domienikan, Claudio; Carvalhaes, Roberto P. M.; Genezini, Frederico A. [Instituto de Pesquisas Energeticas e Nucleares - IPEN-CNEN/SP. P.O. Box 11049, Sao Paulo, 05422-970 (Brazil)

    2013-05-06

    In this work a time-variable pulser system with an exponentially-decaying pulse frequency is presented, which was developed using the low-cost, open-source Arduino microcontroler plataform. In this system, the microcontroller produces a TTL signal in the selected rate and a pulse shaper board adjusts it to be entered in an amplifier as a conventional pulser signal; both the decay constant and the initial pulse rate can be adjusted using a user-friendly control software, and the pulse amplitude can be adjusted using a potentiometer in the pulse shaper board. The pulser was tested using several combinations of initial pulse rate and decay constant, and the results show that the system is stable and reliable, and is suitable to be used in half-life measurements.

  12. Half-life of each dioxin and PCB congener in the human body

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ogura, Isamura [National Institute of Advanced Industrial Science and Technology, Tsukuba (Japan)

    2004-09-15

    It is well known that dioxin and PCB congeners accumulate in the human body. For assessing their toxicological risk, it is important to know the half-life of each congener in the human body. This study summarizes the overall half-lives of congeners in humans as reported in the literature, and compares them with the half-lives due to fecal and sebum excretions, as estimated by data on the concentrations of congeners in feces and sebum in the literature. In addition, the overall half-lives of congeners for the general Japanese population were estimated from the data on dietary intakes and concentrations in the human body reported by the municipalities.

  13. Liposomal Formulation of Bevasizuamb for Intravitreal Administration: Increased Half-Life, Decreased Side Effects

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Siamak Zarei Ghanavati

    2008-05-01

    Full Text Available Intravitreal injection is the common method for treatment of the posterior segment eye diseases. The advantage of intravitreal injection is achieving the desired concentration of drug inside the eye and reduction of drug side effects. Unfortunately, repeated intravitreal injections can cause several ocular complications including; vitreous hemorrhage, endophthalmitis, retinal detachment and cataract. For this reason, it seems the usage of sustained release drug delivery systems is helpful. Bevacizumab (Avastin®, antivascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF monoclonal antibody, is used for the treatment of different ocular diseases such as neovascular age-related macular degeneration, neovascular glaucoma, diabetic retinopathy, retinal vein occlusions, etc. For reduction of drug side effects and improvement of drug half-life after intravitreal administration, we suggest preparation of liposomal bevacizumab as novel drug delivery system and comparison of this new formulation with conventional formulation in the market.

  14. Precise Half-Life Measurement of the Superallowed Beta+ Emitter 26Si

    CERN Document Server

    Iacob, V E; Banu, A; Chen, L; Golovko, V V; Goodwin, J; Horvat, V; Nica, N; Park, H I; Trache, L; Tribble, R E

    2010-01-01

    We have measured the half-life of the superallowed 0+ -to- 0+ beta+ emitter 26Si to be 2245.3(7) ms. We used pure sources of 26Si and employed a high-efficiency gas counter, which was sensitive to positrons from both this nuclide and its daughter 26mAl. The data were analyzed as a linked parent-daughter decay. To contribute meaningfully to any test of the unitarity of the Cabibbo-Kobayashi-Maskawa (CKM) matrix, the ft value of a superallowed transition must be determined to a precision of 0.1% or better. With a precision of 0.03% the present result is more than sufficient to be compatable with that requirement. Only the branching ratio now remains to be measured precisely before a +/-0.1% ft value can be obtained for the superallowed transition from 26Si.

  15. Half-life measurement of neutron-rich isotope 237Th

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2001-01-01

    60 MeV/u 18O ions were used to bombard natural uranium targets, and the heavy neutron-rich isotope 237Th was produced via multi-nucleon transfer reaction and dissipative fragmentation of the heavy target. A relatively fast radiochcmical procedure was used to separate thorium from the mixture of uranium and complex reaction products. The chemically separated thorium fractions were studied by the γ-ray spectroscopic method. The behaviors of the growth and decay of 853.7 and 865.0 keV γ rays of 237pa decay were observed. Thc half-life of 237Th was determined to be 4.69±0.60 min.

  16. The antitumor agent 3-bromopyruvate has a short half-life at physiological conditions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Glick, Matthew; Biddle, Perry; Jantzi, Josh; Weaver, Samantha; Schirch, Doug

    2014-09-12

    Clinical research is currently exploring the validity of the anti-tumor candidate 3-bromopyruvate (3-BP) as a novel treatment for several types of cancer. However, recent publications have overlooked rarely-cited earlier work about the instability of 3-BP and its decay to 3-hydroxypyruvate (3-HP) which have obvious implications for its mechanism of action against tumors, how it is administered, and for precautions when preparing solutions of 3-BP. This study found the first-order decay rate of 3-BP at physiological temperature and pH has a half-life of only 77 min. Lower buffer pH decreases the decay rate, while choice of buffer and concentration do not affect it. A method for preparing more stable solutions is also reported.

  17. ORIGEN-S Decay Data Library and Half-Life Uncertainties

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hermann, O.W.

    1998-01-01

    The results of an extensive update of the decay data of the ORIGEN-S library are presented in this report. The updated decay data were provided for both the ORIGEN-S and ORIGEN2 libraries in the same project. A complete edit of the decay data plus the available half-life uncertainties are included in Appendix A. A detailed description of the types of data contained in the library, the format of the library, and the data sources are also presented. Approximately 24% of the library nuclides are stable, 66% were updated from ENDF/B-VI, about 8% were updated from ENSDF, and the remaining 2% were not updated. Appendix B presents a listing of percentage changes in decay heat from the old to the updated library for all nuclides containing a difference exceeding 1% in any parameter.

  18. Precise half-life values for two neutrino double beta decay

    CERN Document Server

    Barabash, A S

    2010-01-01

    All existing "positive" results on two neutrino double beta decay in different nuclei were analyzed. Using the procedure recommended by the Particle Data Group, weighted average values for half-lives of $^{48}$Ca, $^{76}$Ge, $^{82}$Se, $^{96}$Zr, $^{100}$Mo, $^{100}$Mo - $^{100}$Ru ($0^+_1$), $^{116}$Cd, $^{130}$Te, $^{150}$Nd, $^{150}$Nd - $^{150}$Sm($0^+_1$) and $^{238}$U were obtained. Existing geochemical data were analyzed and recommended values for half-lives of $^{128}$Te, $^{130}$Te and $^{130}$Ba are proposed. Given the measured half-life values, nuclear matrix elements were calculated. I recommend the use of these results as the most currently reliable values for the half-lives and nuclear matrix elements.

  19. Average and recommended half-life values for two neutrino double beta decay

    CERN Document Server

    Barabash, A S

    2015-01-01

    All existing positive results on two neutrino double beta decay in different nuclei were analyzed. Using the procedure recommended by the Particle Data Group, weighted average values for half-lives of $^{48}$Ca, $^{76}$Ge, $^{82}$Se, $^{96}$Zr, $^{100}$Mo, $^{100}$Mo - $^{100}$Ru ($0^+_1$), $^{116}$Cd, $^{130}$Te, $^{136}$Xe, $^{150}$Nd, $^{150}$Nd - $^{150}$Sm ($0^+_1$) and $^{238}$U were obtained. Existing geochemical data were analyzed and recommended values for half-lives of $^{128}$Te, and $^{130}$Ba are proposed. Given the measured half-life values, nuclear matrix elements were calculated using latest (more reliable and precise) values for phase space factor. Finally, previous results (PRC 81 (2010) 035501) were up-dated and results for $^{136}$Xe were added.

  20. Precise half-life measurements for $^{38}$Ca and $^{39}$Ca

    CERN Document Server

    Blank, B; Demonchy, C-E; Borge, M J G; Matea, I; Munoz, F; Huikari, J; Dominguez-Reyes, R; Plaisir, C; Sturm, S; Canchel, G; Delahaye, P; Audirac, L; Fraile, L M; Serani, L; Lunney, D; Pedroza, J-L; Bey, A; Souin, J; Hui, Tran Trong; Delalee, F; Tengblad, O; Wenander, F

    2010-01-01

    The half-lives of Ca-38 and Ca-39 have been measured at ISOLDE of CERN. The REXTRAP facility was used to prepare ultra-clean samples of radioactive nuclei for precision decay spectroscopy. Ca-38 is one of the T-z = -1, 0(+). 0(+) beta-emitting nuclides used to determine the vector coupling constant of the weak interaction and the V-ud quark-mixing matrix element. The result obtained, T-1/2 = 443.8(19) ms, is four times more precise than the average of previous measurements. For Ca-39, a half-life of T-1/2 = 860.7(10) ms is obtained, a result in agreement with the average value from the literature.

  1. Alpha-decay half-life semiempirical relationships with self-improving parameters

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Poenaru, D.N.; Ivascu, M.; Mazilu, D. (Institutul Central de Fizica, Bucharest (Romania))

    1982-03-01

    From the alpha decay Q-values, the partial half-life T is estimated by using five semiempirical relationships. The parameters of these formulae have been obtained from a fit with a given set of experimental data on four groups of alpha emitters: even-even, even-odd, odd-even and odd-odd. For each nuclide only the strongest transition is considered and the data are automatically sorted into the four groups mentioned above. There are three options: one can use either the present set of parameter values, a new one given as input data, or new values computed by using a better set of experimental data (more accurate or more complete). For each group of nuclides, up to 8 (or 9) families of curves could be plotted, optionally, with the line printer.

  2. Reaction wheels for kinetic energy storage

    Science.gov (United States)

    Studer, P. A.

    1984-01-01

    In contrast to all existing reaction wheel implementations, an order of magnitude increase in speed can be obtained efficiently if power to the actuators can be recovered. This allows a combined attitude control-energy storage system to be developed with structure mounted reaction wheels. The feasibility of combining reaction wheels with energy storage wwheels is demonstrated. The power required for control torques is a function of wheel speed but this energy is not dissipated; it is stored in the wheel. The I(2)R loss resulting from a given torque is shown to be constant, independent of the design speed of the motor. What remains, in order to efficiently use high speed wheels (essential for energy storage) for control purposes, is to reduce rotational losses to acceptable levels. Progress was made in permanent magnet motor design for high speed operation. Variable field motors offer more control flexibility and efficiency over a broader speed range.

  3. The quantum mechanics based on a general kinetic energy

    CERN Document Server

    Wei, Yuchuan

    2016-01-01

    In this paper, we introduce the Schrodinger equation with a general kinetic energy operator. The conservation law is proved and the probability continuity equation is deducted in a general sense. Examples with a Hermitian kinetic energy operator include the standard Schrodinger equation, the relativistic Schrodinger equation, the fractional Schrodinger equation, the Dirac equation, and the deformed Schrodinger equation. We reveal that the Klein-Gordon equation has a hidden non-Hermitian kinetic energy operator. The probability continuity equation with sources indicates that there exists a different way of probability transportation, which is probability teleportation. An average formula is deducted from the relativistic Schrodinger equation, the Dirac equation, and the K-G equation.

  4. Kinetic energy recovery and power management for hybrid electric vehicles

    OpenAIRE

    P. Suntharalingam

    2011-01-01

    The major contribution of the work presented in this thesis is a thorough investigation of the constraints on regenerative braking and kinetic energy recovery enhancement for electric/hybrid electric vehicles during braking. Regenerative braking systems provide an opportunity to recycle the braking energy, which is otherwise dissipated as heat in the brake pads. However, braking energy harnessing is a relatively new concept in the automotive sector which still requires further research and de...

  5. A Note on Kinetic Energy, Dissipation and Enstrophy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, Jie-Zhi; Zhou, Ye; Fan, Meng

    1998-01-01

    The dissipation rate of a Newtonian fluid with constant shear viscosity can be shown to include three constituents: dilatation, vorticity, and surface strain. The last one is found to make no contributions to the change of kinetic energy. These dissipation constituents arc used to identify typical compact turbulent flow structures at high Reynolds numbers. The incompressible version of the simplified kinetic-energy equation is then cast to a novel form, which is free from the work rate done by surface stresses but in which the full dissipation re-enters.

  6. Energy landscapes, folding mechanisms, and kinetics of RNA tetraloop hairpins.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chakraborty, Debayan; Collepardo-Guevara, Rosana; Wales, David J

    2014-12-31

    RNA hairpins play a pivotal role in a diverse range of cellular functions, and are integral components of ribozymes, mRNA, and riboswitches. However, the mechanistic and kinetic details of RNA hairpin folding, which are key determinants of most of its biological functions, are poorly understood. In this work, we use the discrete path sampling (DPS) approach to explore the energy landscapes of two RNA tetraloop hairpins, and provide insights into their folding mechanisms and kinetics in atomistic detail. Our results show that the potential energy landscapes have a distinct funnel-like bias toward the folded hairpin state, consistent with efficient structure-seeking properties. Mechanistic and kinetic information is analyzed in terms of kinetic transition networks. We find microsecond folding times, consistent with temperature jump experiments, for hairpin folding initiated from relatively compact unfolded states. This process is essentially driven by an initial collapse, followed by rapid zippering of the helix stem in the final phase. Much lower folding rates are predicted when the folding is initiated from extended chains, which undergo longer excursions on the energy landscape before nucleation events can occur. Our work therefore explains recent experiments and coarse-grained simulations, where the folding kinetics exhibit precisely this dependency on the initial conditions.

  7. Evaluating rainfall kinetic energy - intensity relationships with observed disdrometric data

    Science.gov (United States)

    Angulo-Martinez, Marta; Begueria, Santiago; Latorre, Borja

    2016-04-01

    Rainfall kinetic energy is required for determining erosivity, the ability of rainfall to detach soil particles and initiate erosion. Its determination relay on the use of disdrometers, i.e. devices capable of measuring the drop size distribution and velocity of falling raindrops. In the absence of such devices, rainfall kinetic energy is usually estimated with empirical expressions relating rainfall energy and intensity. We evaluated the performance of 14 rainfall energy equations in estimating one-minute rainfall energy and event total energy, in comparison with observed data from 821 rainfall episodes (more than 100 thousand one-minute observations) by means of an optical disdrometer. In addition, two sources of bias when using such relationships were evaluated: i) the influence of using theoretical terminal raindrop fall velocities instead of measured values; and ii) the influence of time aggregation (rainfall intensity data every 5-, 10-, 15-, 30-, and 60-minutes). Empirical relationships did a relatively good job when complete events were considered (R2 > 0.82), but offered poorer results for within-event (one-minute resolution) variation. Also, systematic biases where large for many equations. When raindrop size distribution was known, estimating the terminal fall velocities by empirical laws produced good results even at fine time resolution. The influence of time aggregation was very high in the estimated kinetic energy, although linear scaling may allow empirical correction. This results stress the importance of considering all these effects when rainfall energy needs to be estimated from more standard precipitation records. , and recommends the use of disdrometer data to locally determine rainfall kinetic energy.

  8. The eddy kinetic energy budget in the Red Sea

    KAUST Repository

    Zhan, Peng

    2016-06-09

    The budget of eddy kinetic energy (EKE) in the Red Sea, including the sources, redistributions and sink, is examined using a high-resolution eddy-resolving ocean circulation model. A pronounced seasonally varying EKE is identified, with its maximum intensity occurring in winter, and the strongest EKE is captured mainly in the central and northern basins within the upper 200 m. Eddies acquire kinetic energy from conversion of eddy available potential energy (EPE), from transfer of mean kinetic energy (MKE), and from direct generation due to time-varying (turbulent) wind stress, the first of which contributes predominantly to the majority of the EKE. The EPE-to-EKE conversion occurs almost in the entire basin, while the MKE-to-EKE transfer appears mainly along the shelf boundary of the basin (200 miso-bath) where high horizontal shear interacts with topography. The EKE generated by the turbulent wind stress is relatively small and limited to the southern basin. All these processes are intensified during winter, when the rate of energy conversion is about four to five times larger than that in summer. The EKE is redistributed by the vertical and horizontal divergence of energy flux and the advection of the mean flow. As a main sink of EKE, dissipation processes is ubiquitously found in the basin. The seasonal variability of these energy conversion terms can explain the significant seasonality of eddy activities in the Red Sea. This article is protected by copyright. All rights reserved.

  9. The eddy kinetic energy budget in the Red Sea

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhan, Peng; Subramanian, Aneesh C.; Yao, Fengchao; Kartadikaria, Aditya R.; Guo, Daquan; Hoteit, Ibrahim

    2016-07-01

    The budget of eddy kinetic energy (EKE) in the Red Sea, including the sources, redistributions, and sink, is examined using a high'resolution eddy-resolving ocean circulation model. A pronounced seasonally varying EKE is identified, with its maximum intensity occurring in winter, and the strongest EKE is captured mainly in the central and northern basins within the upper 200 m. Eddies acquire kinetic energy from conversion of eddy available potential energy (EPE), from transfer of mean kinetic energy (MKE), and from direct generation due to time-varying (turbulent) wind stress, the first of which contributes predominantly to the majority of the EKE. The EPE-to-EKE conversion occurs almost in the entire basin, while the MKE-to-EKE transfer appears mainly along the shelf boundary of the basin (200 m isobath) where high horizontal shear interacts with topography. The EKE generated by the turbulent wind stress is relatively small and limited to the southern basin. All these processes are intensified during winter, when the rate of energy conversion is about 4-5 times larger than that in summer. The EKE is redistributed by the vertical and horizontal divergence of energy flux and the advection of the mean flow. As a main sink of EKE, dissipation processes is ubiquitously found in the basin. The seasonal variability of these energy conversion terms can explain the significant seasonality of eddy activities in the Red Sea.

  10. Kinetic-energy functionals studied by surface calculations

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Vitos, Levente; Skriver, Hans Lomholt; Kollár, J.

    1998-01-01

    The self-consistent jellium model of metal surfaces is used to study the accuracy of a number of semilocal kinetic-energy functionals for independent particles. It is shown that the poor accuracy exhibited by the gradient expansion approximation and most of the semiempirical functionals in the low...

  11. Local kinetic-energy density of the Airy gas

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Vitos, Levente; Johansson, B.; Kollár, J.

    2000-01-01

    The Airy gas model is used to derive an expression for the local kinetic energy in the linear potential approximation. The expression contains an explicit Laplacian term 2/5((h) over bar(2)/2m)del(mu)(2)(r) that, according to jellium surface calculations, must be a universal feature of any accura...

  12. Mass, Momentum and Kinetic Energy of a Relativistic Particle

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zanchini, Enzo

    2010-01-01

    A rigorous definition of mass in special relativity, proposed in a recent paper, is recalled and employed to obtain simple and rigorous deductions of the expressions of momentum and kinetic energy for a relativistic particle. The whole logical framework appears as the natural extension of the classical one. Only the first, second and third laws of…

  13. Unified Technical Concepts. Module 7: Potential and Kinetic Energy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Technical Education Research Center, Waco, TX.

    This concept module on potential and kinetic energy is one of thirteen modules that provide a flexible, laboratory-based physics instructional package designed to meet the specialized needs of students in two-year, postsecondary technical schools. Each of the thirteen concept modules discusses a single physics concept and how it is applied to each…

  14. Momentum and Kinetic Energy: Confusable Concepts in Secondary School Physics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bryce, T. G. K.; MacMillan, K.

    2009-01-01

    Researchers and practitioners alike express concerns about the conceptual difficulties associated with the concepts of momentum and kinetic energy currently taught in school physics. This article presents an in-depth analysis of the treatment given to them in 44 published textbooks written for UK secondary school certificate courses. This is set…

  15. A drive system for the Pirouette kinetic energy storage system

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Proud, N.J.; Kelsall, D.R. [International Energy Systems Ltd., Wigan (United Kingdom); Alexander, T.M. [Heenan Drives Ltd., Worcester (United Kingdom)

    1996-12-31

    Pirouette is a heavy cylindrical flywheel of wound carbon-fibre composite rotated at high speeds to store kinetic energy. To transfer energy in and out of the flywheel requires an integrated motor/generator coupled to suitable power electronics. This paper looks at the aspects of the design for a drive system that can operate the machine with the desired performance characteristics over its defined working range. (author)

  16. On the kinetic energy of the divergent and nondivergent flow in the atmosphere

    OpenAIRE

    Chen, Tsing-Chang; Wiin-Nielsen, Aksel C.

    2011-01-01

    The kinetic energy of horizontal flow in a hydrostatic atmosphere is divided into the kinetic energies of its divergent and nondivergent components. The law of conversion between these two energies for large-scale flows in the atmosphere is derived and discussed using balanced and unbalanced models of circulations in the atmosphere. It is shown that the total potential energy is converted into the kinetic energy of the divergent flow which, in turn, is converted into the kinetic energy of the...

  17. Measurement of the 135Cs half-life with accelerator mass spectrometry and inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry

    Science.gov (United States)

    MacDonald, C. M.; Cornett, R. J.; Charles, C. R. J.; Zhao, X. L.; Kieser, W. E.

    2016-01-01

    The isotope 135Cs is quoted as having a half-life of 2.3 Myr. However, there are three published values ranging from 1.8 to 3 Myr. This research reviews previous measurements and reports a new measurement of the half-life using newly developed accelerator mass spectrometry (AMS) and inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry (ICPMS) techniques along with β and γ radiometric analysis. The half-life was determined to be (1.6 ±0.6 ) ×106 yr by AMS and (1.3 ±0.2 ) ×106 yr by ICPMS with 95% confidence. The two values agree with each other but differ from the accepted value by ˜40 % .

  18. Towards a Measurement of the Half-Life of {sup 60}Fe for Stellar and Early Solar System Models

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ostdiek, K.; Anderson, T.; Bauder, W.; Bowers, M.; Collon, P.; Dressler, R.; Greene, J.; Kutschera, W.; Lu, W.; Paul, M.

    2015-10-15

    Radioisotopes, produced in stars and ejected into the Interstellar Medium, are important for constraining stellar and early Solar System (ESS) models. In particular, the half-life of the radioisotope, Fe-60, can have an impact on calculations for the timing for ESS events, the distance to nearby Supernovae, and the brightness of individual, non-steady-state Fe gamma ray sources in the Galaxy. A half-life measurement has been undertaken at the University of Notre Dame and measurements of the Fe-60/Fe-56 concentration of our samples using Accelerator Mass Spectrometry has begun. This result will be coupled with an activity measurement of the isomeric decay in Co-60, which is the decay product of Fe. Preliminary half-life estimates of (2.53 +/- 0.24) x 10(6) years seem to confirm the recent measurement by Rugel et al. (2009). (C) 2015 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  19. Half-life of the electron-capture decay of 97Ru: Precision measurement shows no temperature dependence

    CERN Document Server

    Goodwin, J R; Iacob, V E; Hardy, J C; 10.1103/PhysRevC.80.045501

    2009-01-01

    We have measured the half-life of the electron-capture (ec) decay of 97Ru in a metallic environment, both at low temperature (19K), and also at room temperature. We find the half-lives at both temperatures to be the same within 0.1%. This demonstrates that a recent claim that the ec decay half-life for 7Be changes by $0.9% +/- 0.2% under similar circumstances certainly cannot be generalized to other ec decays. Our results for the half-life of 97Ru, 2.8370(14)d at room temperature and 2.8382(14)d at 19K, are consistent with, but much more precise than, previous room-temperature measurements. In addition, we have also measured the half-lives of the beta-emitters 103Ru and 105Rh at both temperatures, and found them also to be unchanged.

  20. Towards a measurement of the half-life of {sup 60}Fe for stellar and early Solar System models

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ostdiek, K.; Anderson, T. [University of Notre Dame, Notre Dame, IN 46556 (United States); Bauder, W. [University of Notre Dame, Notre Dame, IN 46556 (United States); Argonne National Laboratory, 9700 South Cass Avenue, Lemont, IL 60439 (United States); Bowers, M.; Collon, P. [University of Notre Dame, Notre Dame, IN 46556 (United States); Dressler, R. [Paul Scherrer Institute – Laboratory for Radiochemistry and Environmental Chemistry, 5232 Villigen (Switzerland); Greene, J. [Argonne National Laboratory, 9700 South Cass Avenue, Lemont, IL 60439 (United States); Kutschera, W. [Vienna Environmental Research Accelerator Laboratory, Waehringer Strasse 17, 1090 Vienna (Austria); Lu, W. [University of Notre Dame, Notre Dame, IN 46556 (United States); Paul, M. [Racah Institute of Physics, Hebrew University, Jerusalem 91904 (Israel); Robertson, D. [University of Notre Dame, Notre Dame, IN 46556 (United States); Schumann, D. [Paul Scherrer Institute – Laboratory for Radiochemistry and Environmental Chemistry, 5232 Villigen (Switzerland); Skulski, M. [University of Notre Dame, Notre Dame, IN 46556 (United States); Wallner, A. [The Australian National University, Canberra, ACT 0200 (Australia)

    2015-10-15

    Radioisotopes, produced in stars and ejected into the Interstellar Medium, are important for constraining stellar and early Solar System (ESS) models. In particular, the half-life of the radioisotope, {sup 60}Fe, can have an impact on calculations for the timing for ESS events, the distance to nearby Supernovae, and the brightness of individual, non-steady-state {sup 60}Fe gamma ray sources in the Galaxy. A half-life measurement has been undertaken at the University of Notre Dame and measurements of the {sup 60}Fe/{sup 56}Fe concentration of our samples using Accelerator Mass Spectrometry has begun. This result will be coupled with an activity measurement of the isomeric decay in {sup 60}Co, which is the decay product of {sup 60}Fe. Preliminary half-life estimates of (2.53 ± 0.24) × 10{sup 6} years seem to confirm the recent measurement by Rugel et al. (2009).

  1. New evaluation of alpha decay half-life of {sup 190}Pt isotope for the Pt-Os dating system

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tavares, O.A.P.; Medeiros, E.L. [Centro Brasileiro de Pesquisas Fisicas (CBPF), Rio de Janeiro, RJ (Brazil); Terranova, M.L. [Universita degli Studi di Roma Tor Vergata (Italy). Dipt. di Scienze e Tecnologie Chimiche; Istituto Nazionale di Fisica Nucleare (INFN), Rome (Italy)

    2005-08-15

    A semiempirical model based on the quantum mechanical tunnelling mechanism of alpha emission from nuclei has been used to evaluate the half-life of the Pt isotopes. For the important naturally occurring {sup 190}Pt isotope, the radiogenic parent in the {sup 190} Pt {yields} {sup 186}Os dating system, the model yielded a half-life value of (3.7{+-} 0.3) versus 10{sup 11} y. This is comparable to (3.2{+-}0.1) versus 10{sup 11} y which was obtained in the last direct counting experiment to measure the alpha activity of {sup 190}Pt (Tavares and Terranova, Rad. Measurem. 27 (1997) 19). A literature survey of available alpha decay half-life values for {sup 190}Pt isotope is also reported. The significant discrepancies found between data obtained by direct counting, indirect geological methods and different calculation models are analysed and discussed. (author)

  2. A shorter 146Sm half-life measured and implications for 146Sm-142Nd chronology in the solar system.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kinoshita, N; Paul, M; Kashiv, Y; Collon, P; Deibel, C M; DiGiovine, B; Greene, J P; Henderson, D J; Jiang, C L; Marley, S T; Nakanishi, T; Pardo, R C; Rehm, K E; Robertson, D; Scott, R; Schmitt, C; Tang, X D; Vondrasek, R; Yokoyama, A

    2012-03-30

    The extinct p-process nuclide (146)Sm serves as an astrophysical and geochemical chronometer through measurements of isotopic anomalies of its α-decay daughter (142)Nd. Based on analyses of (146)Sm/(147)Sm α-activity and atom ratios, we determined the half-life of (146)Sm to be 68 ± 7 (1σ) million years, which is shorter than the currently used value of 103 ± 5 million years. This half-life value implies a higher initial (146)Sm abundance in the early solar system, ((146)Sm/(144)Sm)(0) = 0.0094 ± 0.0005 (2σ), than previously estimated. Terrestrial, lunar, and martian planetary silicate mantle differentiation events dated with (146)Sm-(142)Nd converge to a shorter time span and in general to earlier times, due to the combined effect of the new (146)Sm half-life and ((146)Sm/(144)Sm)(0) values.

  3. Movement Complexity and Neuromechanical Factors Affect the Entropic Half-Life of Myoelectric Signals

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Emma F. Hodson-Tole

    2017-09-01

    Full Text Available Appropriate neuromuscular functioning is essential for survival and features underpinning motor control are present in myoelectric signals recorded from skeletal muscles. One approach to quantify control processes related to function is to assess signal variability using measures such as Sample Entropy. Here we developed a theoretical framework to simulate the effect of variability in burst duration, activation duty cycle, and intensity on the Entropic Half-Life (EnHL in myoelectric signals. EnHLs were predicted to be <40 ms, and to vary with fluctuations in myoelectric signal amplitude and activation duty cycle. Comparison with myoelectic data from rats walking and running at a range of speeds and inclines confirmed the range of EnHLs, however, the direction of EnHL change in response to altered locomotor demand was not correctly predicted. The discrepancy reflected different associations between the ratio of the standard deviation and mean signal intensity (Ist:It¯ and duty factor in simulated and physiological data, likely reflecting additional information in the signals from the physiological data (e.g., quiescent phase content; variation in action potential shapes. EnHL could have significant value as a novel marker of neuromuscular responses to alterations in perceived locomotor task complexity and intensity.

  4. The half-life of Ascaris lumbricoides prevalence in Japanese school children.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kurosawa, Carmen Miwa; Ito, Takehiko; Takaki, Jiro; Wang, Bin-Ling; Wang, Da-Hong; Takigawa, Tomoko; Ogino, Keiki

    2008-10-01

    In the present study, we examined the dynamic of school-health-based parasite control and the related socio-economic influences. This is an ecological study based on data from 46 prefectures in Japan. The exponential decay of Ascaris lumbricoides prevalence was calculated by iterative least-squares method. Pearson's correlation and multiple linear regression model analysis were performed to assess the associations between the prevalence of Ascaris lumbricoides in Japanese school children and socio-economic variables such as the prefecture income per capita, the percentage of primary industry, the population density per 1 km2, the diffusion rate of population under water supply, and the percentage of upper secondary school enrollment. The results indicated that the parasite carrier rate was higher in younger students. The half-life of Ascaris lumbricoides prevalence was approximately 3 years with significant variation among prefectures. Multiple regression analyses showed that the decrease of infection in elementary and lower secondary school children had a significant positive association with primary industry and a significant negative association with prefecture income per capita. The school-health-based parasite intervention differs by prefecture and has changed over time according to the respective prefectural stage of economic development.

  5. Kinetics with deactivation of methylcyclohexane dehydrogenation for hydrogen energy storage

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Maria, G.; Marin, A.; Wyss, C.; Mueller, S.; Newson, E. [Paul Scherrer Inst. (PSI), Villigen (Switzerland)

    1997-06-01

    The methylcyclohexane dehydrogenation step to recycle toluene and release hydrogen is being studied as part of a hydrogen energy storage project. The reaction is performed catalytically in a fixed bed reactor, and the efficiency of this step significantly determines overall system economics. The fresh catalyst kinetics and the deactivation of the catalyst by coke play an important role in the process analysis. The main reaction kinetics were determined from isothermal experiments using a parameter sensitivity analysis for model discrimination. An activation energy for the main reaction of 220{+-}11 kJ/mol was obtained from a two-parameter model. From non-isothermal deactivation in PC-controlled integral reactors, an activation energy for deactivation of 160 kJ/mol was estimated. A model for catalyst coke content of 3-17 weight% was compared with experimental data. (author) 3 figs., 6 refs.

  6. Systems engineering analysis of kinetic energy weapon concepts

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Senglaub, M.

    1996-06-01

    This study examines, from a systems engineering design perspective, the potential of kinetic energy weapons being used in the role of a conventional strategic weapon. Within the Department of Energy (DOE) complex, strategic weapon experience falls predominantly in the nuclear weapons arena. The techniques developed over the years may not be the most suitable methodologies for use in a new design/development arena. For this reason a more fundamental approach was pursued with the objective of developing an information base from which design decisions might be made concerning the conventional strategic weapon system concepts. The study examined (1) a number of generic missions, (2) the effects of a number of damage mechanisms from a physics perspective, (3) measures of effectiveness (MOE`s), and (4) a design envelope for kinetic energy weapon concepts. With the base of information a cut at developing a set of high-level system requirements was made, and a number of concepts were assessed against these requirements.

  7. Systems engineering analysis of kinetic energy weapon concepts

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Senglaub, M.

    1996-06-01

    This study examines, from a systems engineering design perspective, the potential of kinetic energy weapons being used in the role of a conventional strategic weapon. Within the Department of Energy (DOE) complex, strategic weapon experience falls predominantly in the nuclear weapons arena. The techniques developed over the years may not be the most suitable methodologies for use in a new design/development arena. For this reason a more fundamental approach was pursued with the objective of developing an information base from which design decisions might be made concerning the conventional strategic weapon system concepts. The study examined (1) a number of generic missions, (2) the effects of a number of damage mechanisms from a physics perspective, (3) measures of effectiveness (MOE`s), and (4) a design envelope for kinetic energy weapon concepts. With the base of information a cut at developing a set of high-level system requirements was made, and a number of concepts were assessed against these requirements.

  8. High-precision half-life and branching-ratio measurements for superallowed Fermi β+ emitters at TRIUMF – ISAC

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Laffoley A. T.

    2014-03-01

    Full Text Available A program of high-precision half-life and branching-ratio measurements for superallowed Fermi β emitters is being carried out at TRIUMF’s Isotope Separator and Accelerator (ISAC radioactive ion beam facility. Recent half-life measurements for the superallowed decays of 14O, 18Ne, and 26Alm, as well as branching-ratio measurements for 26Alm and 74Rb are reported. These results provide demanding tests of the Standard Model and the theoretical isospin symmetry breaking (ISB corrections in superallowed Fermi β decays.

  9. β-decay half-life of the rp-process waiting-point nuclide Mo84

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stoker, J. B.; Mantica, P. F.; Bazin, D.; Becerril, A.; Berryman, J. S.; Crawford, H. L.; Estrade, A.; Guess, C. J.; Hitt, G. W.; Lorusso, G.; Matos, M.; Minamisono, K.; Montes, F.; Pereira, J.; Perdikakis, G.; Schatz, H.; Smith, K.; Zegers, R. G. T.

    2009-01-01

    A half-life of 2.2 ± 0.2 s has been deduced for the ground-state β decay of Mo84, more than 1σ shorter than the previously adopted value. Mo84 is an even-even N=Z nucleus lying on the proton dripline, created during explosive hydrogen burning in type I x-ray bursts in the rapid proton capture (rp) process. The effect of the measured half-life on rp-process reaction flow is explored. Implications on theoretical treatments of nuclear deformation in Mo84 are also discussed.

  10. Measurement of the Double Beta Decay Half-life of 130Te with the NEMO-3 Detector

    CERN Document Server

    Arnold, R; Baker, J; Barabash, A S; Basharina-Freshville, A; Blondel, S; Bongrand, M; Broudin-Bay, G; Brudanin, V; Caffrey, A J; Chapon, A; Chauveau, E; Durand, D; Egorov, V; Flack, R; Garrido, X; Grozier, J; Guillon, B; Hubert, Ph; Jackson, C M; Jullian, S; Kauer, M; Klimenko, A; Kochetov, O; Konovalov, S I; Kovalenko, V; Lalanne, D; Lamhamdi, T; Lang, K; Liptak, Z; Lutter, G; Mamedov, F; Marquet, Ch; Martin-Albo, J; Mauger, F; Mott, J; Nachab, A; Nemchenok, I; Nguyen, C H; Nova, F; Novella, P; Ohsumi, H; Pahlka, R B; Perrot, F; Piquemal, F; Reyss, J L; Richards, B; Ricol, J S; Saakyan, R; Sarazin, X; Shitov, Yu; Simard, L; Šimkovic, F; Smolnikov, A; Söldner-Rembold, S; Štekl, I; Suhonen, J; Sutton, C S; Szklarz, G; Thomas, J; Timkin, V; Torre, S; Tretyak, V I; Umatov, V; Vála, L; Vanyushin, I; Vasiliev, V; Vorobel, V; Vylov, T; Zukauskas, A

    2011-01-01

    This Letter reports results from the NEMO-3 experiment based on an exposure of 1275 days with 661g of 130Te in the form of enriched and natural tellurium foils. With this data set the double beta decay rate of 130Te is found to be non-zero with a significance of 7.7 standard deviations and the half-life is measured to be T1/2 = (7.0 +/- 0.9(stat) +/- 1.1(syst)) x 10^{20} yr. This represents the most precise measurement of this half-life yet published and the first real-time observation of this decay.

  11. Covalent bonding: the fundamental role of the kinetic energy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bacskay, George B; Nordholm, Sture

    2013-08-22

    This work addresses the continuing disagreement between two prevalent schools of thought concerning the mechanism of covalent bonding. According to Hellmann, Ruedenberg, and Kutzelnigg, a lowering of the kinetic energy associated with electron delocalization is the key stabilization mechanism. The opposing view of Slater, Feynman, and Bader has maintained that the source of stabilization is electrostatic potential energy lowering due to electron density redistribution to binding regions between nuclei. Despite the large body of accurate quantum chemical work on a range of molecules, the debate concerning the origin of bonding continues unabated, even for H2(+), the simplest of covalently bound molecules. We therefore present here a detailed study of H2(+), including its formation, that uses a sequence of computational methods designed to reveal the relevant contributing mechanisms as well as the spatial density distributions of the kinetic and potential energy contributions. We find that the electrostatic mechanism fails to provide real insight or explanation of bonding, while the kinetic energy mechanism is sound and accurate but complex or even paradoxical to those preferring the apparent simplicity of the electrostatic model. We further argue that the underlying mechanism of bonding is in fact of dynamical character, and analyses that focus on energy do not reveal the origin of covalent bonding in full clarity.

  12. Programmable energy landscapes for kinetic control of DNA strand displacement.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Machinek, Robert R F; Ouldridge, Thomas E; Haley, Natalie E C; Bath, Jonathan; Turberfield, Andrew J

    2014-11-10

    DNA is used to construct synthetic systems that sense, actuate, move and compute. The operation of many dynamic DNA devices depends on toehold-mediated strand displacement, by which one DNA strand displaces another from a duplex. Kinetic control of strand displacement is particularly important in autonomous molecular machinery and molecular computation, in which non-equilibrium systems are controlled through rates of competing processes. Here, we introduce a new method based on the creation of mismatched base pairs as kinetic barriers to strand displacement. Reaction rate constants can be tuned across three orders of magnitude by altering the position of such a defect without significantly changing the stabilities of reactants or products. By modelling reaction free-energy landscapes, we explore the mechanistic basis of this control mechanism. We also demonstrate that oxDNA, a coarse-grained model of DNA, is capable of accurately predicting and explaining the impact of mismatches on displacement kinetics.

  13. Turbulent Kinetic Energy in the Energy Balance of a Solar Flare.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kontar, E P; Perez, J E; Harra, L K; Kuznetsov, A A; Emslie, A G; Jeffrey, N L S; Bian, N H; Dennis, B R

    2017-04-14

    The energy released in solar flares derives from a reconfiguration of magnetic fields to a lower energy state, and is manifested in several forms, including bulk kinetic energy of the coronal mass ejection, acceleration of electrons and ions, and enhanced thermal energy that is ultimately radiated away across the electromagnetic spectrum from optical to x rays. Using an unprecedented set of coordinated observations, from a suite of instruments, we here report on a hitherto largely overlooked energy component-the kinetic energy associated with small-scale turbulent mass motions. We show that the spatial location of, and timing of the peak in, turbulent kinetic energy together provide persuasive evidence that turbulent energy may play a key role in the transfer of energy in solar flares. Although the kinetic energy of turbulent motions accounts, at any given time, for only ∼(0.5-1)% of the energy released, its relatively rapid (∼1-10  s) energization and dissipation causes the associated throughput of energy (i.e., power) to rival that of major components of the released energy in solar flares, and thus presumably in other astrophysical acceleration sites.

  14. Effects of directed and kinetic energy weapons on spacecraft

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fraas, A P

    1986-12-01

    The characteristics of the various directed energy beams are reviewed, and their damaging effects on typical materials are examined for a wide range of energy pulse intensities and durations. Representative cases are surveyed, and charts are presented to indicate regions in which damage to spacecraft structures, particularly radiators for power plants, would be likely. The effects of kinetic energy weapons, such as bird-shot, are similarly examined. The charts are then applied to evaluate the effectiveness of various measures designed to reduce the vulnerability of spacecraft components, particularly nuclear electric power plants.

  15. Possible explanation of the atmospheric kinetic and potential energy spectra.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vallgren, Andreas; Deusebio, Enrico; Lindborg, Erik

    2011-12-23

    We hypothesize that the observed wave number spectra of kinetic and potential energy in the atmosphere can be explained by assuming that there are two related cascade processes emanating from the same large-scale energy source, a downscale cascade of potential enstrophy, giving rise to the k(-3) spectrum at synoptic scales and a downscale energy cascade giving rise to the k(-5/3) spectrum at mesoscales. The amount of energy which is going into the downscale energy cascade is determined by the rate of system rotation, with negligible energy going downscale in the limit of very fast rotation. We present a set of simulations of a system with strong rotation and stratification, supporting these hypotheses and showing good agreement with observations.

  16. Reaction Path Optimization with Holonomic Constraints and Kinetic Energy Potentials.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brokaw, Jason B; Haas, Kevin R; Chu, Jhih-Wei

    2009-08-11

    Two methods are developed to enhance the stability, efficiency, and robustness of reaction path optimization using a chain of replicas. First, distances between replicas are kept equal during path optimization via holonomic constraints. Finding a reaction path is, thus, transformed into a constrained optimization problem. This approach avoids force projections for finding minimum energy paths (MEPs), and fast-converging schemes such as quasi-Newton methods can be readily applied. Second, we define a new objective function - the total Hamiltonian - for reaction path optimization, by combining the kinetic energy potential of each replica with its potential energy function. Minimizing the total Hamiltonian of a chain determines a minimum Hamiltonian path (MHP). If the distances between replicas are kept equal and a consistent force constant is used, then the kinetic energy potentials of all replicas have the same value. The MHP in this case is the most probable isokinetic path. Our results indicate that low-temperature kinetic energy potentials (optimization and can significantly reduce the required steps of minimization by 2-3 times without causing noticeable differences between a MHP and MEP. These methods are applied to three test cases, the C7eq-to-Cax isomerization of an alanine dipeptide, the (4)C1-to-(1)C4 transition of an α-d-glucopyranose, and the helix-to-sheet transition of a GNNQQNY heptapeptide. By applying the methods developed in this work, convergence of reaction path optimization can be achieved for these complex transitions, involving full atomic details and a large number of replicas (>100). For the case of helix-to-sheet transition, we identify pathways whose energy barriers are consistent with experimental measurements. Further, we develop a method based on the work energy theorem to quantify the accuracy of reaction paths and to determine whether the atoms used to define a path are enough to provide quantitative estimation of energy barriers.

  17. Rotational and divergent kinetic energy in the mesoscale model ALADIN

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    V. Blažica

    2013-03-01

    Full Text Available Kinetic energy spectra from the mesoscale numerical weather prediction (NWP model ALADIN with horizontal resolution 4.4 km are split into divergent and rotational components which are then compared at horizontal scales below 300 km and various vertical levels. It is shown that about 50% of kinetic energy in the free troposphere in ALADIN is divergent energy. The percentage increases towards 70% near the surface and in the upper troposphere towards 100 hPa. The maximal percentage of divergent energy is found at stratospheric levels around 100 hPa and at scales below 100 km which are not represented by the global models. At all levels, the divergent energy spectra are characterised by shallower slopes than the rotational energy spectra, and the difference increases as horizontal scales become larger. A very similar vertical distribution of divergent energy is obtained by using the standard ALADIN approach for the computation of spectra based on the extension zone and by applying detrending approach commonly used in mesoscale NWP community.

  18. Estimation of biological half-life of tritium in coastal region of India.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Singh, Vishwanath P; Pai, R K; Veerender, D D; Vishnu, M S; Vijayan, P; Managanvi, S S; Badiger, N M; Bhat, H R

    2010-12-01

    The present study estimates biological half-life (BHL) of tritium by analysing routine bioassay samples of radiation workers. During 2007-2009 year, 72,100 urine bioassay samples of the workers were analysed by liquid scintillation counting technique for internal dose monitoring for tritium. Two hundred and two subjects were taken for study with minimum 3 μCiL(-1) tritium uptake in their body fluid. The BHL of tritium of subjects ranges from 1 to 16 d with an average of 8.19 d. Human data indicate that the biological retention time ranges from 4 to 18 d with an average of 10 d. The seasonal variations of the BHL of tritium are 3.09 ± 1.48, 6.87 ± 0.58 and 5.73 ± 0.76 d (mean ± SD) for summer, winter and rainy seasons, respectively, for free water tritium in the coastal region of Karnataka, India, which shows that the BHL in summer is twice that of the winter season. Also three subjects showed the BHL of 101.73-121.09 d, which reveals that organically bound tritium is present with low tritium uptake also. The BHL of tritium for all age group of workers is observed independent of age and is shorter during April to May. The distribution of cumulative probability vs. BHL of tritium shows lognormal distribution with a geometric mean of 9.11 d and geometric standard deviation of 1.77 d. The study of the subjects is fit for two-compartment model and also an average BHL of tritium is found similar to earlier studies.

  19. Nonequilibrium electron energy-loss kinetics in metal clusters

    CERN Document Server

    Guillon, C; Fatti, N D; Vallee, F

    2003-01-01

    Ultrafast energy exchanges of a non-Fermi electron gas with the lattice are investigated in silver clusters with sizes ranging from 4 to 26 nm using a femtosecond pump-probe technique. The results yield evidence for a cluster-size-dependent slowing down of the short-time energy losses of the electron gas when it is strongly athermal. A constant rate is eventually reached after a few hundred femtoseconds, consistent with the electron gas internal thermalization kinetics, this behaviour reflecting evolution from an individual to a collective electron-lattice type of coupling. The timescale of this transient regime is reduced in small nanoparticles, in agreement with speeding up of the electron-electron interactions with size reduction. The experimental results are in quantitative agreement with numerical simulations of the electron kinetics.

  20. Extending the Serum Half-Life of G-CSF via Fusion with the Domain III of Human Serum Albumin

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shuqiang Zhao

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Protein fusion technology is one of the most commonly used methods to extend the half-life of therapeutic proteins. In this study, in order to prolong the half-life of Granulocyte colony stimulating factor (G-CSF, the domain III of human serum albumin (3DHSA was genetically fused to the N-terminal of G-CSF. The 3DHSA-G-CSF fusion gene was cloned into pPICZαA along with the open reading frame of the α-factor signal under the control of the AOX1 promoter. The recombinant expression vector was transformed into Pichia pastoris GS115, and the recombinant strains were screened by SDS-PAGE. As expected, the 3DHSA-G-CSF showed high binding affinity with HSA antibody and G-CSF antibody, and the natural N-terminal of 3DHSA was detected by N-terminal sequencing. The bioactivity and pharmacokinetic studies of 3DHSA-G-CSF were respectively determined using neutropenia model mice and human G-CSF ELISA kit. The results demonstrated that 3DHSA-G-CSF has the ability to increase the peripheral white blood cell (WBC counts of neutropenia model mice, and the half-life of 3DHSA-G-CSF is longer than that of native G-CSF. In conclusion, 3DHSA can be used to extend the half-life of G-CSF.

  1. Precise measurement of the 222Rn half-life: A probe to monitor the stability of radioactivity

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    E. Bellotti

    2015-04-01

    Full Text Available We give the results of a study on the 222Rn decay we performed in the Gran Sasso Laboratory (LNGS by detecting the gamma rays from the radon progeny. The motivation was to monitor the stability of radioactivity measuring several times per year the half-life of a short lifetime (days source instead of measuring over a long period the activity of a long lifetime (tens or hundreds of years source. In particular, we give a possible reason of the large periodical fluctuations in the count rate of the gamma rays due to radon inside a closed canister which has been described in literature and which has been attributed to a possible influence of a component in the solar irradiation affecting the nuclear decay rates. We then provide the result of four half-life measurements we performed underground at LNGS in the period from May 2014 to January 2015 with radon diffused into olive oil. Briefly, we did not measure any change of the 222Rn half-life with a 8⋅10−5 precision. Finally, we provide the most precise value for the 222Rn half-life: 3.82146(16stat(4syst days.

  2. Brief report : enzyme inducers reduce elimination half-life after a single dose of nevirapine in healthy women

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    L'homme, R.F.A.; Dijkema, T.; Ven, A.J.A.M. van der; Burger, D.M.

    2006-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: Single-dose nevirapine (SD-NVP) to prevent mother-to-child transmission (MTCT) of HIV is associated with development of NVP resistance, probably because of its long half-life in combination with a low genetic barrier to resistance. The objective of this study was to find enzyme inducers t

  3. Screening and ranking of POPs for global half-life: QSAR approaches for prioritization based on molecular structure.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gramatica, Paola; Papa, Ester

    2007-04-15

    Persistence in the environment is an important criterion in prioritizing hazardous chemicals and in identifying new persistent organic pollutants (POPs). Degradation half-life in various compartments is among the more commonly used criteria for studying environmental persistence, but the limited availability of experimental data or reliable estimates is a serious problem. Available half-life data for degradation in air, water, sediment, and soil, for a set of 250 organic POP-type chemicals, were combined in a multivariate approach by principal component analysis to obtain a ranking of the studied organic pollutants according to their relative overall half-life. A global half-life index (GHLI) applicable for POP screening purposes is proposed. The reliability of this index was verified in comparison with multimedia model results. This global index was then modeled as a cumulative end-point using a QSAR approach based on few theoretical molecular descriptors, and a simple and robust regression model externally validated for its predictive ability was derived. The application of this model could allow a fast preliminary identification and prioritization of not yet known POPs, just from the knowledge of their molecular structure. This model can be applied a priori also in the chemical design of safer and alternative non-POP compounds.

  4. Energy dissipation in magnetic null points at kinetic scales

    OpenAIRE

    Olshevsky, Vyacheslav; Divin, Andrey; Eriksson, Elin; Markidis, Stefano; Lapenta, Giovanni

    2015-01-01

    We use kinetic particle-in-cell and MHD simulations supported by an observational data set to investigate magnetic reconnection in clusters of null points in space plasma. The magnetic configuration under investigation is driven by fast adiabatic flux rope compression that dissipates almost half of the initial magnetic field energy. In this phase powerful currents are excited producing secondary instabilities, and the system is brought into a state of "intermittent turbulence" within a few io...

  5. Soliton tunneling with sub-barrier kinetic energies

    CERN Document Server

    González, J A; Guerrero, L E

    1999-01-01

    We investigate (theoretically and numerically) the dynamics of a soliton moving in an asymmetrical potential well with a finite barrier. For large values of the width of the well, the width of the barrier and/or the height of the barrier, the soliton behaves classically. On the other hand, we obtain the conditions for the existence of soliton tunneling with sub-barrier kinetic energies. We apply these results to the study of soliton propagation in disordered systems.

  6. Casimir rack and pinion as a miniaturized kinetic energy harvester.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miri, MirFaez; Etesami, Zahra

    2016-08-01

    We study a nanoscale machine composed of a rack and a pinion with no contact, but intermeshed via the lateral Casimir force. We adopt a simple model for the random velocity of the rack subject to external random forces, namely, a dichotomous noise with zero mean value. We show that the pinion, even when it experiences random thermal torque, can do work against a load. The device thus converts the kinetic energy of the random motions of the rack into useful work.

  7. Neutron Generation and Kinetic Energy of Expanding Laser Plasmas

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    HUANG Yong-Sheng; WANG Nai-Yan; DUAN Xiao-Jiao; LAN Xiao-Fei; TAN Zhi-Xin; TANG Xiu-Zhang; HE Ye-Xi

    2007-01-01

    We investigate the kinetic energy of expanding plasma of a solid target heated by a ultra-short and ultra-intense laser pulse and the efficiency of energy coupling between the ultra-intense laser pulse and the solid target, in order to increase the utilization ratio of laser energy and to raise the neutron generation farther. Some new ideas about improving the energy utilization by head-on collisions between the expanding plasmas are proposed. The significance is the raise of generation of shorter duration neutron, of the order of picoseconds, which allows for an increase of energy resolution in time-of-flight experiments and also for the investigation of the dynamics of nuclear processes with high temporal resolution.

  8. A study of the kinetic energy generation with general circulation models

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, T.-C.; Lee, Y.-H.

    1983-01-01

    The history data of winter simulation by the GLAS climate model and the NCAR community climate model are used to examine the generation of atmospheric kinetic energy. The contrast between the geographic distributions of the generation of kinetic energy and divergence of kinetic energy flux shows that kinetic energy is generated in the upstream side of jets, transported to the downstream side and destroyed there. The contributions from the time-mean and transient modes to the counterbalance between generation of kinetic energy and divergence of kinetic energy flux are also investigated. It is observed that the kinetic energy generated by the time-mean mode is essentially redistributed by the time-mean flow, while that generated by the transient flow is mainly responsible for the maintenance of the kinetic energy of the entire atmospheric flow.

  9. A Fab-Selective Immunoglobulin-Binding Domain from Streptococcal Protein G with Improved Half-Life Extension Properties.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Felix Unverdorben

    Full Text Available Half-life extension strategies have gained increasing interest to improve the pharmacokinetic and pharmacodynamic properties of protein therapeutics. Recently, we established an immunoglobulin-binding domain (IgBD from streptococcal protein G (SpGC3 as module for half-life extension. SpGC3 is capable of binding to the Fc region as well as the CH1 domain of Fab arms under neutral and acidic conditions.Using site-directed mutagenesis, we generated a Fab-selective mutant (SpGC3Fab to avoid possible interference with the FcRn-mediated recycling process and improved its affinity for mouse and human IgG by site-directed mutagenesis and phage display selections. In mice, this affinity-improved mutant (SpGC3FabRR conferred prolonged plasma half-lives compared with SpGC3Fab when fused to small recombinant antibody fragments, such as single-chain Fv (scFv and bispecific single-chain diabody (scDb. Hence, the SpGC3FabRR domain seems to be a suitable fusion partner for the half-life extension of small recombinant therapeutics.The half-life extension properties of SpGC3 can be retained by restricting binding to the Fab fragment of serum immunoglobulins and can be improved by increasing binding activity. The modified SpGC3 module should be suitable to extend the half-life of therapeutic proteins and, thus to improve therapeutic activity.

  10. Maximum kinetic energy considerations in proton stereotactic radiosurgery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sengbusch, Evan R; Mackie, Thomas R

    2011-04-12

    The purpose of this study was to determine the maximum proton kinetic energy required to treat a given percentage of patients eligible for stereotactic radiosurgery (SRS) with coplanar arc-based proton therapy, contingent upon the number and location of gantry angles used. Treatment plans from 100 consecutive patients treated with SRS at the University of Wisconsin Carbone Cancer Center between June of 2007 and March of 2010 were analyzed. For each target volume within each patient, in-house software was used to place proton pencil beam spots over the distal surface of the target volume from 51 equally-spaced gantry angles of up to 360°. For each beam spot, the radiological path length from the surface of the patient to the distal boundary of the target was then calculated along a ray from the gantry location to the location of the beam spot. This data was used to generate a maximum proton energy requirement for each patient as a function of the arc length that would be spanned by the gantry angles used in a given treatment. If only a single treatment angle is required, 100% of the patients included in the study could be treated by a proton beam with a maximum kinetic energy of 118 MeV. As the length of the treatment arc is increased to 90°, 180°, 270°, and 360°, the maximum energy requirement increases to 127, 145, 156, and 179 MeV, respectively. A very high percentage of SRS patients could be treated at relatively low proton energies if the gantry angles used in the treatment plan do not span a large treatment arc. Maximum proton kinetic energy requirements increase linearly with size of the treatment arc.

  11. Enhanced propagation of rainfall kinetic energy in the UK

    Science.gov (United States)

    Diodato, Nazzareno; Bellocchi, Gianni

    2017-08-01

    A gridded 0.25° reconstruction of rainfall kinetic energy (RKE) over the UK, on the basis of pluviometric observations and reanalysis back to 1765, shows that autumn RKE doubled in 1991-2013 (˜2 MJ m-2) compared to 1948-1990 (˜1 MJ m-2). A shift eastward is underway, which includes southern and northern portions of the country. Analyzing the long-running England and Wales precipitation series, we conclude that it is likely that increased precipitation amounts associated with more frequent convective storms created conditions for higher energy events.

  12. Determination of kinetic energy release from metastable peak widths

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Petersen, Allan Christian; Sølling, Theis I.

    2017-01-01

    The kinetic energy that is released upon bond rupture is often represented as T1/2. A value that is derived from the FWHM of a fragment peak by the use of two different conversion formulas. The choice of formula depends on whether the peak is recorded by scanning a magnetic sector...... that are obtained from magnet scans compared to the peaks that are obtained by scanning an electrostatic analyzer. The E scans (MIKE experiments) give rise to the same values for both of the employed mass spectrometers. The results are explained in terms of energy defocusing when the reactions take place too far...

  13. Effective Half-Life of Caesium-137 in Various Environmental Media at the Savannah River Site

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Paller, M. H.; Jannik, G. T.; Baker, R. A.

    2014-05-01

    During the operational history of the Savannah River Site (SRS), many different radionuclides have been released from site facilities into the SRS environment. However, only a relatively small number of pathways, most importantly 137Cs in fish and deer, have contributed significantly to doses and risks to the public. The “effective” half-lives (Te) of 137Cs (which include both physical decay and environmental dispersion) in Savannah River floodplain soil and vegetation and in fish and white-tailed deer from the SRS were estimated using long-term monitoring data. For 1974–2011, the Tes of 137Cs in Savannah River floodplain soil and vegetation were 17.0 years (95% CI = 14.2–19.9) and 13.4 years (95% CI = 10.8–16.0), respectively. These Tes were greater than in a previous study that used data collected only through 2005 as a likely result of changes in the flood regime of the Savannah River. Field analyses of 137Cs concentrations in deer collected during yearly controlled hunts at the SRS indicated an overall Te of 15.9 years (95% CI = 12.3–19.6) for 1965–2011; however, the Te for 1990–2011 was significantly shorter (11.8 years, 95% CI = 4.8–18.8) due to an increase in the rate of 137Cs removal. The shortest Tes were for fish in SRS streams and the Savannah River (3.5–9.0 years), where dilution and dispersal resulted in rapid 137Cs removal. Long-term data show that Tes are significantly shorter than the physical half-life of 137Cs in the SRS environment but that they can change over time. Therefore, it is desirable have a long period of record for calculating Tes and risky to extrapolate Tes beyond this period unless the processes governing 137Cs removal are clearly understood.

  14. Budgets of divergent and rotational kinetic energy during two periods of intense convection

    Science.gov (United States)

    Buechler, D. E.; Fuelberg, H. E.

    1986-01-01

    The derivations of the energy budget equations for divergent and rotational components of kinetic energy are provided. The intense convection periods studied are: (1) synoptic scale data of 3 or 6 hour intervals and (2) mesoalphascale data every 3 hours. Composite energies and averaged budgets for the periods are presented; the effects of random data errors on derived energy parameters is investigated. The divergent kinetic energy and rotational kinetic energy budgets are compared; good correlation of the data is observed. The kinetic energies and budget terms increase with convective development; however, the conversion of the divergent and rotational energies are opposite.

  15. Momentum and Kinetic Energy Before the Tackle in Rugby Union

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sharief Hendricks, David Karpul, Mike Lambert

    2014-09-01

    Full Text Available Understanding the physical demands of a tackle in match situations is important for safe and effective training, developing equipment and research. Physical components such as momentum and kinetic energy, and it relationship to tackle outcome is not known. The aim of this study was to compare momenta between ball-carrier and tackler, level of play (elite, university and junior and position (forwards vs. backs, and describe the relationship between ball-carrier and tackler mass, velocity and momentum and the tackle outcome. Also, report on the ball-carrier and tackler kinetic energy before contact and the estimated magnitude of impact (energy distributed between ball-carrier and tackler upon contact. Velocity over 0.5 seconds before contact was determined using a 2-dimensional scaled version of the field generated from a computer alogorithm. Body masses of players were obtained from their player profiles. Momentum and kinetic energy were subsequently calculated for 60 tackle events. Ball-carriers were heavier than the tacklers (ball-carrier 100 ± 14 kg vs. tackler 93 ± 11 kg, d = 0.52, p = 0.0041, n = 60. Ball-carriers as forwards had a significantly higher momentum than backs (forwards 563 ± 226 Kg.m.s-1 n = 31 vs. backs 438 ± 135 Kg.m.s-1, d = 0.63, p = 0.0012, n = 29. Tacklers dominated 57% of tackles and ball-carriers dominated 43% of tackles. Despite the ball-carrier having a mass advantage before contact more frequently than the tackler, momentum advantage and tackle dominance between the ball-carrier and tackler was proportionally similar. These findings may reflect a characteristic of the modern game of rugby where efficiently heavier players (particularly forwards are tactically predetermined to carry the ball in contact.

  16. Momentum and kinetic energy before the tackle in rugby union.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hendricks, Sharief; Karpul, David; Lambert, Mike

    2014-09-01

    Understanding the physical demands of a tackle in match situations is important for safe and effective training, developing equipment and research. Physical components such as momentum and kinetic energy, and it relationship to tackle outcome is not known. The aim of this study was to compare momenta between ball-carrier and tackler, level of play (elite, university and junior) and position (forwards vs. backs), and describe the relationship between ball-carrier and tackler mass, velocity and momentum and the tackle outcome. Also, report on the ball-carrier and tackler kinetic energy before contact and the estimated magnitude of impact (energy distributed between ball-carrier and tackler upon contact). Velocity over 0.5 seconds before contact was determined using a 2-dimensional scaled version of the field generated from a computer alogorithm. Body masses of players were obtained from their player profiles. Momentum and kinetic energy were subsequently calculated for 60 tackle events. Ball-carriers were heavier than the tacklers (ball-carrier 100 ± 14 kg vs. tackler 93 ± 11 kg, d = 0.52, p = 0.0041, n = 60). Ball-carriers as forwards had a significantly higher momentum than backs (forwards 563 ± 226 Kg(.)m(.)s(-1) n = 31 vs. backs 438 ± 135 Kg(.)m(.)s(-1), d = 0.63, p = 0.0012, n = 29). Tacklers dominated 57% of tackles and ball-carriers dominated 43% of tackles. Despite the ball-carrier having a mass advantage before contact more frequently than the tackler, momentum advantage and tackle dominance between the ball-carrier and tackler was proportionally similar. These findings may reflect a characteristic of the modern game of rugby where efficiently heavier players (particularly forwards) are tactically predetermined to carry the ball in contact. Key PointsFirst study to quantify momentum, kinetic energy, and magnitude of impact in rugby tackles across different levels in matches without a device attached to a player.Physical components alone, of either ball

  17. Energy dissipation in magnetic null points at kinetic scales

    CERN Document Server

    Olshevsky, Vyacheslav; Eriksson, Elin; Markidis, Stefano; Lapenta, Giovanni

    2015-01-01

    We use kinetic particle-in-cell and magnetohydrodynamic simulations supported by an observational dataset to investigate magnetic reconnection in clusters of null points in space plasma. The magnetic configuration under investigation is driven by fast adiabatic flux rope compression that dissipates almost half of the initial magnetic field energy. In this phase powerful currents are excited producing secondary instabilities, and the system is brought into a state of `intermittent turbulence' within a few ion gyro-periods. Reconnection events are distributed all over the simulation domain and energy dissipation is rather volume-filling. Numerous spiral null points interconnected via their spines form null lines embedded into magnetic flux ropes; null point pairs demonstrate the signatures of torsional spine reconnection. However, energy dissipation mainly happens in the shear layers formed by adjacent flux ropes with oppositely directed currents. In these regions radial null pairs are spontaneously emerging an...

  18. Flywheels for Low-Speed Kinetic Energy Storage Systems

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Portnov, G.; Cruz, I.; Arias, F.; Fiffe, R. P.

    2003-07-01

    A brief overview of different steel disc-type flywheels is presented. It contents the analysis of relationship between stress-state and kinetic energy of rotating body, comparison of the main characteristics of flywheels and description of their optimization procedures. It is shown that profiles of the discs calculated on a basis of plane stress-state assumption may be considered only as a starting point for its further improvement using 3-D approach. The aim of the review is to provide a designer for a insight into problem of shaping of steel flywheels. (Author) 19 refs.

  19. Modeling the turbulent kinetic energy equation for compressible, homogeneous turbulence

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aupoix, B.; Blaisdell, G. A.; Reynolds, William C.; Zeman, Otto

    1990-01-01

    The turbulent kinetic energy transport equation, which is the basis of turbulence models, is investigated for homogeneous, compressible turbulence using direct numerical simulations performed at CTR. It is shown that the partition between dilatational and solenoidal modes is very sensitive to initial conditions for isotropic decaying turbulence but not for sheared flows. The importance of the dilatational dissipation and of the pressure-dilatation term is evidenced from simulations and a transport equation is proposed to evaluate the pressure-dilatation term evolution. This transport equation seems to work well for sheared flows but does not account for initial condition sensitivity in isotropic decay. An improved model is proposed.

  20. Molecular partitioning based on the kinetic energy density

    Science.gov (United States)

    Noorizadeh, Siamak

    2016-05-01

    Molecular partitioning based on the kinetic energy density is performed to a number of chemical species, which show non-nuclear attractors (NNA) in their gradient maps of the electron density. It is found that NNAs are removed using this molecular partitioning and although the virial theorem is not valid for all of the basins obtained in the being used AIM, all of the atoms obtained using the new approach obey this theorem. A comparison is also made between some atomic topological parameters which are obtained from the new partitioning approach and those calculated based on the electron density partitioning.

  1. The functional half-life of an mRNA depends on the ribosome spacing in an early coding region

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Pedersen, Margit; Nissen, Søren; Mitarai, Namiko

    2011-01-01

    supported the model. We thus suggest that translation-rate-mediated differences in the spacing between ribosomes in this early coding region is a parameter that determines the mRNAs functional half-life. We present a model that is in accordance with many earlier observations and that allows a prediction...... codons. When comparing the ribosome spacing at various segments of the mRNA to its functional half-life, we found a clear correlation between the functional mRNA half-life and the ribosome spacing in the mRNA region approximately between codon 20 and codon 45. From this finding, we predicted that inserts......Bacterial mRNAs are translated by closely spaced ribosomes and degraded from the 5'-end, with half-lives of around 2 min at 37 °C in most cases. Ribosome-free or "naked" mRNA is known to be readily degraded, but the initial event that inactivates the mRNA functionally has not been fully described...

  2. Precise measurement of the 222Rn half-life: a probe to monitor the stability of radioactivity

    CERN Document Server

    Bellotti, E; Di Carlo, G; Laubenstein, M; Menegazzo, R

    2015-01-01

    We give the results of a study on the 222Rn decay we performed in the Gran Sasso Laboratory (LNGS) by detecting the gamma rays from the radon progeny. The motivation was to monitor the stability of radioactivity measuring several times per year the half-life of a short lifetime (days) source instead of measuring over a long period the activity of a long lifetime (tens or hundreds of years) source. In particular, we give the reason of the large periodical fluctuations in the count rate of the gamma rays due to radon inside a closed canister which has been described in literature and which has been attributed to a possible influence of a component in the solar irradiation affecting the nuclear decay rates. We then provide the result of four half-life measurements we performed underground at LNGS in the period from May 2014 to January 2015 with radon diffused into olive oil. Briefly, we did not measure any change of the 222Rn half-life with a 8*10^-5 precision. Finally, we provide the most precise value for the ...

  3. Activity measurement of 60Fe through the decay of 60mCo and confirmation of its half-life

    CERN Document Server

    Ostdiek, Karen; Bauder, William; Bowers, Matthew; Clark, Adam; Collon, Philippe; Dressler, Rugard; Greene, John; Kutschera, Walter; Lu, Wenting; Nelson, Austin; Paul, Michael; Robertson, Daniel; Schumann, Dorothea; Skulski, Michael

    2016-01-01

    The half-life of the neutron-rich nuclide, $^{60}\\text{Fe}$ has been in dispute in recent years. A measurement in 2009 published a value of $(2.62 \\pm 0.04)\\times10^{6}$ years, almost twice that of the previously accepted value from 1984 of $(1.49 \\pm 0.27)\\times10^{6}$ years. This longer half-life was confirmed in 2015 by a new measurement, resulting in a value of $(2.50 \\pm 0.12)\\times10^{6}$ years. All three half-life measurements used the grow-in of the $\\gamma$-ray lines in $^{60}\\text{Ni}$ from the decay of the ground state of $^{60\\text{g}}\\text{Co}$ (t$_{1/2}$=5.27 years) to determine the activity of a sample with a known number of $^{60}\\text{Fe}$ atoms. In contrast, the work presented here measured the $^{60}\\text{Fe}$ activity directly with the 58.6 keV $\\gamma$-ray line from the short-lived isomeric state of $^{60\\text{m}}\\text{Co}$ (t$_{1/2}$=10.5 minutes), thus being independent of any possible contamination from long-lived $^{60\\text{g}}\\text{Co}$. A fraction of the material from the 2015 exper...

  4. Role of ligand-dependent GR phosphorylation and half-life in determination of ligand-specific transcriptional activity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Avenant, Chanel; Ronacher, Katharina; Stubsrud, Elisabeth; Louw, Ann; Hapgood, Janet P

    2010-10-07

    A central question in glucocorticoid mechanism of action via the glucocorticoid receptor (GR) is what determines ligand-selective transcriptional responses. Using a panel of 12 GR ligands, we show that the extent of GR phosphorylation at S226 and S211, GR half-life and transcriptional response, occur in a ligand-selective manner. While GR phosphorylation at S226 was shown to inhibit maximal transcription efficacy, phosphorylation at S211 is required for maximal transactivation, but not for transrepression efficacy. Both ligand-selective GR phosphorylation and half-life correlated with efficacy for transactivation and transrepression. For both expressed and endogenous GR, in two different cell lines, agonists resulted in the greatest extent of phosphorylation and the greatest extent of GR downregulation, suggesting a link between these functions. However, using phosphorylation-deficient GR mutants we established that phosphorylation of the GR at S226 or S211 does not determine the rank order of ligand-selective GR transactivation. These results are consistent with a model whereby ligand-selective GR phosphorylation and half-life are a consequence of upstream events, such as ligand-specific GR conformations, which are maintained in the phosphorylation mutants.

  5. The conservative cascade of kinetic energy in compressible turbulence

    CERN Document Server

    Aluie, Hussein; Li, Hui

    2011-01-01

    The physical nature of compressible turbulence is of fundamental importance in a variety of astrophysical settings. We present the first direct evidence that mean kinetic energy cascades conservatively beyond a transitional "conversion" scale-range despite not being an invariant of the compressible flow dynamics. We use high-resolution three-dimensional simulations of compressible hydrodynamic turbulence on $512^3$ and $1024^3$ grids. We probe regimes of forced steady-state isothermal flows and of unforced decaying ideal gas flows. The key quantity we measure is pressure dilatation cospectrum, $E^{PD}(k)$, where we provide the first numerical evidence that it decays at a rate faster than $k^{-1}$ as a function of wavenumber. This is sufficient to imply that mean pressure dilatation acts primarily at large-scales and that kinetic and internal energy budgets statistically decouple beyond a transitional scale-range. Our results suggest that an extension of Kolmogorov's inertial-range theory to compressible turbu...

  6. Kinetic Energy of Tornadoes in the United States.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fricker, Tyler; Elsner, James B

    2015-01-01

    Tornadoes can cause catastrophic destruction. Here total kinetic energy (TKE) as a metric of destruction is computed from the fraction of the tornado path experiencing various damage levels and a characteristic wind speed for each level. The fraction of the path is obtained from a model developed for the Nuclear Regulatory Commission that combines theory with empirical data. TKE is validated as a useful metric by comparing it to other indexes and loss indicators. Half of all tornadoes have TKE exceeding 62.1 GJ and a quarter have TKE exceeding 383.2 GJ. One percent of the tornadoes have TKE exceeding 31.9 TJ. April has more energy than May with fewer tornadoes; March has more energy than June with half as many tornadoes. September has the least energy but November and December have the fewest tornadoes. Alabama ranks number one in terms of tornado energy with 2.48 PJ over the period 2007-2013. TKE can be used to help better understand the changing nature of tornado activity.

  7. KINETICS OF NON-ISOTHERMAL CRYSTALLIZATION OF POLY (ETHYLENE TEREPHTHALATE) MODIFIED BY POLY (ETHYLENE GLYCOL)

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    ZHANG Zhiying; WU Shizhen; DU Yinghua; CAO Zhenlin

    1991-01-01

    The non-isothermal crystallization kinetics of poly(ethylene terephthalate) (PET) modified by poly (ethlene glycol) (PEG) were determined by DSC. The dual linear regression method was used to evaluate the relationship between the reciprocal of t1/2 ( the half life of crystallization ) and the appropriate temperature variable. The parameters such as the activation energy (Ed) for transport,the equilibrium melting temperature (T0m),the nucleation parameter (ψ),the maximum crystallization temperature (Tc, max ) , and the kinetic crystallizability (G) for the copolyesters were obtained. The influence of the PEG content in PET chains on the parameters characterizing crystallization kinetics and crystallization thermodynamics was discussed.

  8. A Rolling Pendulum Bob: Conservation of Energy and Partitioning of Kinetic Energy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Helrich, Carl; Lehman, Thomas

    1979-01-01

    Describes a pendulum in which the spherical bob can roll on a track of the same arc as it swings when suspended by a cord. Comparison of the motion in the two mentioned cases shows the effect of rotational kinetic energy when the bob rolls. (GA)

  9. ENERGY DISSIPATION IN MAGNETIC NULL POINTS AT KINETIC SCALES

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Olshevsky, Vyacheslav; Lapenta, Giovanni [Centre for Mathematical Plasma Astrophysics (CmPA), KU Leuven (Belgium); Divin, Andrey [Department of Physics, St. Petersburg State University (Russian Federation); Eriksson, Elin [Swedish Institute of Space Physics, Uppsala Division, Uppsala (Sweden); Markidis, Stefano, E-mail: sya@mao.kiev.ua [High Performance Computing and Visualization (HPCViz), KTH Royal Institute of Technology, Stockholm (Sweden)

    2015-07-10

    We use kinetic particle-in-cell and MHD simulations supported by an observational data set to investigate magnetic reconnection in clusters of null points in space plasma. The magnetic configuration under investigation is driven by fast adiabatic flux rope compression that dissipates almost half of the initial magnetic field energy. In this phase powerful currents are excited producing secondary instabilities, and the system is brought into a state of “intermittent turbulence” within a few ion gyro-periods. Reconnection events are distributed all over the simulation domain and energy dissipation is rather volume-filling. Numerous spiral null points interconnected via their spines form null lines embedded into magnetic flux ropes; null point pairs demonstrate the signatures of torsional spine reconnection. However, energy dissipation mainly happens in the shear layers formed by adjacent flux ropes with oppositely directed currents. In these regions radial null pairs are spontaneously emerging and vanishing, associated with electron streams and small-scale current sheets. The number of spiral nulls in the simulation outweighs the number of radial nulls by a factor of 5–10, in accordance with Cluster observations in the Earth's magnetosheath. Twisted magnetic fields with embedded spiral null points might indicate the regions of major energy dissipation for future space missions such as the Magnetospheric Multiscale Mission.

  10. Energy Dissipation in Magnetic Null Points at Kinetic Scales

    Science.gov (United States)

    Olshevsky, Vyacheslav; Divin, Andrey; Eriksson, Elin; Markidis, Stefano; Lapenta, Giovanni

    2015-07-01

    We use kinetic particle-in-cell and MHD simulations supported by an observational data set to investigate magnetic reconnection in clusters of null points in space plasma. The magnetic configuration under investigation is driven by fast adiabatic flux rope compression that dissipates almost half of the initial magnetic field energy. In this phase powerful currents are excited producing secondary instabilities, and the system is brought into a state of “intermittent turbulence” within a few ion gyro-periods. Reconnection events are distributed all over the simulation domain and energy dissipation is rather volume-filling. Numerous spiral null points interconnected via their spines form null lines embedded into magnetic flux ropes; null point pairs demonstrate the signatures of torsional spine reconnection. However, energy dissipation mainly happens in the shear layers formed by adjacent flux ropes with oppositely directed currents. In these regions radial null pairs are spontaneously emerging and vanishing, associated with electron streams and small-scale current sheets. The number of spiral nulls in the simulation outweighs the number of radial nulls by a factor of 5-10, in accordance with Cluster observations in the Earth's magnetosheath. Twisted magnetic fields with embedded spiral null points might indicate the regions of major energy dissipation for future space missions such as the Magnetospheric Multiscale Mission.

  11. A comparison of observed and numerically predicted eddy kinetic energy budgets for a developing extratropical cyclone

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dare, P. M.; Smith, P. J.

    1983-01-01

    The eddy kinetic energy budget is calculated for a 48-hour forecast of an intense occluding winter cyclone associated with a strong well-developed jet stream. The model output consists of the initialized (1200 GMT January 9, 1975) and the 12, 24, 36, and 48 hour forecast fields from the Drexel/NCAR Limited Area Mesoscale Prediction System (LAMPS) model. The LAMPS forecast compares well with observations for the first 24 hours, but then overdevelops the low-level cyclone while inadequately developing the upper-air wave and jet. Eddy kinetic energy was found to be concentrated in the upper-troposphere with maxima flanking the primary trough. The increases in kinetic energy were found to be due to an excess of the primary source term of kinetic energy content, which is the horizontal flux of eddy kinetic energy over the primary sinks, and the generation and dissipation of eddy kinetic energy.

  12. Innovative methodology for intercomparison of radionuclide calibrators using short half-life in situ prepared radioactive sources

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Oliveira, P. A. [Centro de Investigação do Instituto Português de Oncologia do Porto Francisco Gentil, EPE, Porto, Portugal and Departamento de Física e Astronomia, Faculdade de Ciências da Universidade do Porto (Portugal); Santos, J. A. M., E-mail: joao.santos@ipoporto.min-saude.pt [Centro de Investigação do Instituto Português de Oncologia do Porto Francisco Gentil, EPE, Porto (Portugal); Serviço de Física Médica do Instituto Português de Oncologia do Porto Francisco Gentil, EPE, Porto (Portugal); Serviço de Medicina Nuclear do Instituto Português de Oncologia do Porto Francisco Gentil, EPE, Porto (Portugal); Instituto de Ciências Biomédicas Abel Salazar, Universidade do Porto, Porto (Portugal)

    2014-07-15

    Purpose: An original radionuclide calibrator method for activity determination is presented. The method could be used for intercomparison surveys for short half-life radioactive sources used in Nuclear Medicine, such as{sup 99m}Tc or most positron emission tomography radiopharmaceuticals. Methods: By evaluation of the resulting net optical density (netOD) using a standardized scanning method of irradiated Gafchromic XRQA2 film, a comparison of the netOD measurement with a previously determined calibration curve can be made and the difference between the tested radionuclide calibrator and a radionuclide calibrator used as reference device can be calculated. To estimate the total expected measurement uncertainties, a careful analysis of the methodology, for the case of{sup 99m}Tc, was performed: reproducibility determination, scanning conditions, and possible fadeout effects. Since every factor of the activity measurement procedure can influence the final result, the method also evaluates correct syringe positioning inside the radionuclide calibrator. Results: As an alternative to using a calibrated source sent to the surveyed site, which requires a relatively long half-life of the nuclide, or sending a portable calibrated radionuclide calibrator, the proposed method uses a source preparedin situ. An indirect activity determination is achieved by the irradiation of a radiochromic film using {sup 99m}Tc under strictly controlled conditions, and cumulated activity calculation from the initial activity and total irradiation time. The irradiated Gafchromic film and the irradiator, without the source, can then be sent to a National Metrology Institute for evaluation of the results. Conclusions: The methodology described in this paper showed to have a good potential for accurate (3%) radionuclide calibrators intercomparison studies for{sup 99m}Tc between Nuclear Medicine centers without source transfer and can easily be adapted to other short half-life radionuclides.

  13. Phenobarbital administration every eight hours: improvement of seizure management in idiopathic epileptic dogs with decreased phenobarbital elimination half-life.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stabile, F; Barnett, C R; De Risio, L

    2017-02-18

    Estimated prevalence of canine idiopathic epilepsy is 0.6 per cent in the first-opinion canine population in the UK. Phenobarbital monotherapy has been reported to reduce/eradicate seizure activity in 60-93 per cent of idiopathic epileptic dogs (IEDs). The objective of this study was to evaluate safety and efficacy of the administration of phenobarbital orally every eight hours in IEDs with phenobarbital elimination half-life less than 20 hours. Medical records of 10 IEDs in which steady state trough serum phenobarbital levels were within the reference range and phenobarbital elimination half-life had become less than 20 hours following prolonged administration every 12 hours were reviewed. Side effects and seizure frequency when phenobarbital was administered every 12 hours or 8 hours were compared. In all dogs the side effects of the antiepileptic medication treatment improved. When phenobarbital was administered every eight hours, 9/10 dogs experienced improvement in seizure frequency and 8/10 dogs maintained seizure freedom for a period three times longer than the longest interictal interval period previously recorded. Reduction in the severity and number of clusters of seizures was recorded in one of the remaining two dogs. The administration of phenobarbital orally every eight hours in IEDs with decreased phenobarbital elimination half-life appears safe and can improve seizure management. The results of this study were presented in abstract form (poster) for the 28th symposium of the European Society of Veterinary Neurology - European College of Veterinary Neurology (ESVN), September 18-19, 2015, Amsterdam, Netherlands. British Veterinary Association.

  14. Mass independent kinetic energy reducing inlet system for vacuum environment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reilly, Peter T. A. [Knoxville, TN

    2010-12-14

    A particle inlet system comprises a first chamber having a limiting orifice for an incoming gas stream and a micrometer controlled expansion slit. Lateral components of the momentum of the particles are substantially cancelled due to symmetry of the configuration once the laminar flow converges at the expansion slit. The particles and flow into a second chamber, which is maintained at a lower pressure than the first chamber, and then moves into a third chamber including multipole guides for electromagnetically confining the particle. The vertical momentum of the particles descending through the center of the third chamber is minimized as an upward stream of gases reduces the downward momentum of the particles. The translational kinetic energy of the particles is near-zero irrespective of the mass of the particles at an exit opening of the third chamber, which may be advantageously employed to provide enhanced mass resolution in mass spectrometry.

  15. Utilization of rotor kinetic energy storage for hybrid vehicles

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hsu, John S.

    2011-05-03

    A power system for a motor vehicle having an internal combustion engine, the power system comprises an electric machine (12) further comprising a first excitation source (47), a permanent magnet rotor (28) and a magnetic coupling rotor (26) spaced from the permanent magnet rotor and at least one second excitation source (43), the magnetic coupling rotor (26) also including a flywheel having an inertial mass to store kinetic energy during an initial acceleration to an operating speed; and wherein the first excitation source is electrically connected to the second excitation source for power cycling such that the flywheel rotor (26) exerts torque on the permanent magnet rotor (28) to assist braking and acceleration of the permanent magnet rotor (28) and consequently, the vehicle. An axial gap machine and a radial gap machine are disclosed and methods of the invention are also disclosed.

  16. Experimental evidence of the decrease of kinetic energy of hadrons in passing through atomic nuclei

    Science.gov (United States)

    Strugalski, Z.

    1985-01-01

    Hadrons with kinetic energies higher than the pion production threshold lose their kinetic energies monotonically in traversing atomic nuclei, due to the strong interactions in nuclear matter. This phenomenon is a crude analogy to the energy loss of charged particles in their passage through materials. Experimental evidence is presented.

  17. Functional derivative of the kinetic energy functional for spherically symmetric systems.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nagy, Á

    2011-07-28

    Ensemble non-interacting kinetic energy functional is constructed for spherically symmetric systems. The differential virial theorem is derived for the ensemble. A first-order differential equation for the functional derivative of the ensemble non-interacting kinetic energy functional and the ensemble Pauli potential is presented. This equation can be solved and a special case of the solution provides the original non-interacting kinetic energy of the density functional theory.

  18. Determination of the 10Be half-life by multicollector ICP-MS and liquid scintillation counting

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chmeleff, Jérôme; von Blanckenburg, Friedhelm; Kossert, Karsten; Jakob, Dieter

    2010-01-01

    A new method was designed and used for determining the half-life of the isotope 10Be. The method is based on (1) accurate 10Be/ 9Be measurements of 9Be-spiked solutions of a 10Be-rich master solution using multicollector ICP mass spectrometry (MC-ICP-MS) and (2) liquid scintillation counting (LSC) using the CIEMAT/NIST method for determining the activity concentrations of the solutions whose 10Be concentrations were determined by mass spectrometry. Important requirements for the success of this approach (a) was the previous coating of glass ampoules filled for counting experiments with 9Be, thereby reducing the risk of the adsorptive loss of 10Be; (b) the removal of Boron from solutions to be measured by MC-ICP-MS by cation chromatography without the introduction of mass fractionation and (c) the accurate determination of the mass bias of 10Be/ 9Be measurements by ICP-MS which are always affected by the space-charge effect. The mass bias factor was determined to be 1.1862 ± 0.071 for 10Be/ 9Be from careful fitting and error propagation of ratios of measured Li, B, Si, Cr, Fe, Cu, Sr, Nd, Hf, Tl and U standard solutions of known composition under the same measurement conditions. Employing this factor, an absolute 10Be/ 9Be ratio of 1.464 ± 0.014 was determined for a first dilution of the 10Be-rich master solution. This solution is now available as an absolute Be ratio standard in AMS measurements. Finally, a half-life of (1.386 ± 0.016) My (standard uncertainty) was calculated. This value is much more precise than previous estimates and was derived from a fully independent set of experiments. In a parallel, fully independent study using the same master solution, Korschinek et al. [35] have determined a half-life of (1.388 ± 0.018) My. The combined half-life and uncertainty amounts to (1.387 ± 0.012) My. We suggest the use of this value in nuclear studies and in studies that make use of cosmogenic 10Be in environmental and geologic samples.

  19. Energy scavenging strain absorber: application to kinetic dielectric elastomer generator

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jean-Mistral, C.; Beaune, M.; Vu-Cong, T.; Sylvestre, A.

    2014-03-01

    Dielectric elastomer generators (DEGs) are light, compliant, silent energy scavengers. They can easily be incorporated into clothing where they could scavenge energy from the human kinetic movements for biomedical applications. Nevertheless, scavengers based on dielectric elastomers are soft electrostatic generators requiring a high voltage source to polarize them and high external strain, which constitutes the two major disadvantages of these transducers. We propose here a complete structure made up of a strain absorber, a DEG and a simple electronic power circuit. This new structure looks like a patch, can be attached on human's wear and located on the chest, knee, elbow… Our original strain absorber, inspired from a sailing boat winch, is able to heighten the external available strain with a minimal factor of 2. The DEG is made of silicone Danfoss Polypower and it has a total area of 6cm per 2.5cm sustaining a maximal strain of 50% at 1Hz. A complete electromechanical analytical model was developed for the DEG associated to this strain absorber. With a poling voltage of 800V, a scavenged energy of 0.57mJ per cycle is achieved with our complete structure. The performance of the DEG can further be improved by enhancing the imposed strain, by designing a stack structure, by using a dielectric elastomer with high dielectric permittivity.

  20. The main beam correction term in kinetic energy release from metastable peaks.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Petersen, Allan Christian

    2017-08-26

    The correction term for the precursor ion signal width in determination of kinetic energy release is reviewed and the correction term is formally derived. The derived correction term differs from the traditionally applied term. An experimental finding substantiates the inaccuracy in the latter. The application of the 'T-value' to study kinetic energy release is found preferable to kinetic energy release distributions when the metastable peaks are slim and simple Gaussians. For electronically predissociated systems a 'borderline zero' kinetic energy release can be directly interpreted in terms of reaction dynamics with strong curvature in the reaction coordinate. This article is protected by copyright. All rights reserved.

  1. Analytical expression for the α-decay half-life and understanding the data including very long life-times and superheavy nuclei

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sahu, Basudeb

    2008-10-01

    An analytically solvable composite potential that can closely reproduce the combined potential of an α+nucleus system consisting of attractive nuclear and repulsive electrostatic potentials is developed. The exact s-wave solution of the Schrödinger equation with this potential in the interior region and the outside Coulomb wave function are used to give a heuristic expression for the width or half-life of the quasibound state at the accurately determined resonance energy, called the Q value of the decaying system. By using the fact that for a relatively low resonance energy, the quasibound state wave function is quite similar to the bound state wave function where the amplitude of the wave function in the interaction region is very large as compared to the amplitude outside, the resonance energy could easily be calculated from the variation of relative probability densities of inside and outside waves as a function of energy. By considering recent α-decay systems, the applicability of the model is demonstrated with excellent explanations being found for the experimental data of Q values and half-lives of a vast range of masses including superheavy nuclei and nuclei with very long lifetimes (of order 1022 s). Throughout the application, by simply varying the value of a single potential parameter describing the flatness of the barrier, we obtain successful results in cases with as many as 70 pairs of α+daughter nucleus systems.

  2. Measurement of the half-life of 198Au in a non-metal: High-precision measurement shows no host-material dependence

    CERN Document Server

    Goodwin, J R; Iacob, V E; Dibidad, A; Hardy, J C

    2010-01-01

    We have measured the half-life of the beta decay of 198Au to be 2.6948(9) d, with the nuclide sited in an insulating environment. Comparing this result with the half-life we measured previously with a metallic environment, we find the half-lives in both environments to be the same within 0.04%, thus contradicting a prediction that screening from a "plasma" of quasi-free electrons in a metal increases the half-life by as much as 7%.

  3. Understanding the Pulsar High Energy Emission: Macroscopic and Kinetic Models

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kalapotharakos, Constantinos; Brambilla, Gabriele; Timokhin, Andrey; Kust Harding, Alice; Kazanas, Demos

    2017-08-01

    Pulsars are extraordinary objects powered by the rotation of magnetic fields of order 10^8, 10^12G anchored onto neutron stars and rotating with periods 10^(-3)-10s. These fields mediate the conversion of their rotational energy into MHD winds and at the same time accelerate particles to energies sufficiently high to produce GeV photons. Fermi, since its launch in 2008, has established several trends among the observed gamma-ray pulsar properties playing a catalytic role in the current modeling of the high energy emission in pulsar magnetospheres. We judiciously use the guidance provided by the Fermi data to yield meaningful constraints on the macroscopic parameters of our global dissipative pulsar magnetosphere models. Our FIDO (Force-Free Inside, Dissipative Outside) models indicate that the dissipative regions lie outside the light cylinder near the equatorial current sheet. Our models reproduce the light-curve phenomenology while a detailed comparison of the model spectral properties with those observed by Fermi reveals the dependence of the macroscopic conductivity parameter on the spin-down rate providing a unique insight into the understanding of the physical mechanisms behind the high-energy emission in pulsar magnetospheres. Finally, we further exploit these important results by building self-consistent 3D global kinetic particle-in-cell (PIC) models which, eventually, provide the dependence of the macroscopic parameter behavior (e.g. conductivity) on the microphysical properties (e.g. particle multiplicities, particle injection rates). Our PIC models provide field structures and particle distributions that are not only consistent with each other but also able to reproduce a broad range of the observed gamma-ray phenomenology (light curves and spectral properties) of both young and millisecond pulsars.

  4. Photocatalytic degradation of carbofuran by TiO2-coated activated carbon: Model for kinetic, electrical energy per order and economic analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vishnuganth, M A; Remya, Neelancherry; Kumar, Mathava; Selvaraju, N

    2016-10-01

    The photocatalytic removal of carbofuran (CBF) from aqueous solution in the presence of granular activated carbon supported TiO2 (GAC-TiO2) catalyst was investigated under batch-mode experiments. The presence of GAC enhanced the photocatalytic efficiency of the TiO2 catalyst. Experiments were conducted at different concentrations of CBF to clarify the dependence of apparent rate constant (kapp) in the pseudo first-order kinetics on CBF photodegradation. The general relationship between the adsorption equilibrium constant (K) and reaction rate constant (kr) were explained by using the modified Langmuir-Hinshelwood (L-H) model. From the observed kinetics, it was observed that the surface reaction was the rate limiting step in the GAC-TiO2 catalyzed photodegradation of CBF. The values of K and kr for this pseudo first-order reaction were found to be 0.1942 L  mg(-1) and 1.51 mg L(-1) min(-1), respectively. In addition, the dependence of kapp on the half-life time was determined by calculating the electrical energy per order experimentally (EEO experimental) and also by modeling (EEO model). The batch-mode experimental outcomes revealed the possibility of 100% CBF removal (under optimized conditions and at an initial concentration of 50 mg L(-1) and 100 mg L(-1)) at a contact time of 90 min and 120 min, respectively. Both L-H kinetic model and EEO model fitted well with the batch-mode experimental data and also elucidated successfully the phenomena of photocatalytic degradation in the presence of GAC-TiO2 catalyst. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  5. Dual Constant Domain-Fab: A novel strategy to improve half-life and potency of a Met therapeutic antibody.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cignetto, Simona; Modica, Chiara; Chiriaco, Cristina; Fontani, Lara; Milla, Paola; Michieli, Paolo; Comoglio, Paolo M; Vigna, Elisa

    2016-06-01

    The kinase receptor encoded by the Met oncogene is a sensible target for cancer therapy. The chimeric monovalent Fab fragment of the DN30 monoclonal antibody (MvDN30) has an odd mechanism of action, based on cell surface removal of Met via activation of specific plasma membrane proteases. However, the short half-life of the Fab, due to its low molecular weight, is a severe limitation for the deployment in therapy. This issue was addressed by increasing the Fab molecular weight above the glomerular filtration threshold through the duplication of the constant domains, in tandem (DCD-1) or reciprocally swapped (DCD-2). The two newly engineered molecules showed biochemical properties comparable to the original MvDN30 in vitro, acting as full Met antagonists, impairing Met phosphorylation and activation of downstream signaling pathways. As a consequence, Met-mediated biological responses were inhibited, including anchorage-dependent and -independent cell growth. In vivo DCD-1 and DCD-2 showed a pharmacokinetic profile significantly improved over the original MvDN30, doubling the circulating half-life and reducing the clearance. In pre-clinical models of cancer, generated by injection of tumor cells or implant of patient-derived samples, systemic administration of the engineered molecules inhibited the growth of Met-addicted tumors.

  6. Shorter 146Sm half-life and revised 146Sm-142Nd ages of planetary mantle differentiation

    CERN Document Server

    Kinoshita, N; Kashiv, Y; Collon, P; Deibel, C M; DiGiovine, B; Greene, J P; Henderson, D J; Jiang, C L; Marley, S T; Nakanishi, T; Pardo, R C; Rehm, K E; Robertson, D; Scott, R; Schmitt, C; Tang, X D; Vondrasek, R; Yokoyama, A

    2011-01-01

    The extinct short-lived nuclide 146Sm, synthesized in stellar events by the p-process, serves as both an astrophysical and geochemical chronometer through measurements of isotopic anomalies of its alpha-decay daughter 142Nd. Evidence of live 146Sm, quantitatively established for the early Solar System, constrains the time between p-process nucleosynthesis and condensation of the first solid materials. Samarium-146 is used also to date silicate mantle differentiation events in a number of planetary bodies, including Earth. We performed a new measurement of the 146Sm half-life and our result, t = 68\\pm7 (1sigma) million year (Ma), is significantly shorter than the value currently used for 146Sm-142Nd chronology (103\\pm5 Ma). We show here that the shorter 146Sm half-life value implies a higher initial Solar System ratio, (146Sm/144Sm)_0 = 0.0094\\pm0.0005 (2sigma), than the recently derived value 0.0085\\pm0.0007, or that used in most studies 0.008\\pm0.001. Planetary differentiation processes dated by 146Sm-142Nd ...

  7. RNA folding pathways and kinetics using 2D energy landscapes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Senter, Evan; Dotu, Ivan; Clote, Peter

    2015-01-01

    RNA folding pathways play an important role in various biological processes, such as (i) the hok/sok (host-killing/suppression of killing) system in E. coli to check for sufficient plasmid copy number, (ii) the conformational switch in spliced leader (SL) RNA from Leptomonas collosoma, which controls trans splicing of a portion of the '5 exon, and (iii) riboswitches--portions of the 5' untranslated region of messenger RNA that regulate genes by allostery. Since RNA folding pathways are determined by the energy landscape, we describe a novel algorithm, FFTbor2D, which computes the 2D projection of the energy landscape for a given RNA sequence. Given two metastable secondary structures A, B for a given RNA sequence, FFTbor2D computes the Boltzmann probability p(x, y) = Z(x,y)/Z that a secondary structure has base pair distance x from A and distance y from B. Using polynomial interpolationwith the fast Fourier transform,we compute p(x, y) in O(n(5)) time and O(n(2)) space, which is an improvement over an earlier method, which runs in O(n(7)) time and O(n(4)) space. FFTbor2D has potential applications in synthetic biology, where one might wish to design bistable switches having target metastable structures A, B with favorable pathway kinetics. By inverting the transition probability matrix determined from FFTbor2D output, we show that L. collosoma spliced leader RNA has larger mean first passage time from A to B on the 2D energy landscape, than 97.145% of 20,000 sequences, each having metastable structures A, B. Source code and binaries are freely available for download at http://bioinformatics.bc.edu/clotelab/FFTbor2D. The program FFTbor2D is implemented in C++, with optional OpenMP parallelization primitives.

  8. Droplet kinetic energy of moving spray-plate center-pivot irrigation sprinklers

    Science.gov (United States)

    The kinetic energy of discrete water drops impacting a bare soil surface generally leads to a drastic reduction in water infiltration rate due to formation of a seal on the soil surface. Under center-pivot sprinkler irrigation, kinetic energy transferred to the soil prior to crop canopy development ...

  9. A calculation of internal kinetic energy and polarizability of compressed argon from the statistical atom model

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Seldam, C.A. ten; Groot, S.R. de

    From Jensen's and Gombás' modification of the statistical Thomas-Fermi atom model, a theory for compressed atoms is developed by changing the boundary conditions. Internal kinetic energy and polarizability of argon are calculated as functions of pressure. At 1000 atm. an internal kinetic energy of

  10. Characterizing droplet kinetic energy applied by moving spray-plate center pivot irrigation sprinklers

    Science.gov (United States)

    The kinetic energy of discrete drops impacting a bare soil surface is generally observed to lead to a drastic reduction in water infiltration rate due to soil surface seal formation. Under center pivot sprinkler irrigation, kinetic energy transferred to the soil prior to crop canopy development can...

  11. A Comparison of Kinetic Energy and Momentum in Special Relativity and Classical Mechanics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Riggs, Peter J.

    2016-01-01

    Kinetic energy and momentum are indispensable dynamical quantities in both the special theory of relativity and in classical mechanics. Although momentum and kinetic energy are central to understanding dynamics, the differences between their relativistic and classical notions have not always received adequate treatment in undergraduate teaching.…

  12. A Comparison of Kinetic Energy and Momentum in Special Relativity and Classical Mechanics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Riggs, Peter J.

    2016-01-01

    Kinetic energy and momentum are indispensable dynamical quantities in both the special theory of relativity and in classical mechanics. Although momentum and kinetic energy are central to understanding dynamics, the differences between their relativistic and classical notions have not always received adequate treatment in undergraduate teaching.…

  13. Direct Deposition Effect on the Distribution of Radiocesium in Persimmon Trees and the Effective Half-life

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tagami, Keiko; Uchida, Shigeo [National Institute of Radiological Sciences, Anagawa 4-9-1, Inage-ku, Chiba 263-7444 (Japan)

    2014-07-01

    Radiocesium ({sup 137}Cs) concentrations in persimmon tree tissues collected at Chiba, about 220 km south from Fukushima Daiichi nuclear power plant (FDNPP), were measured to obtain half-life of radiocesium in the trees. Persimmon (Diospyros kaki) is a deciduous tree and bears edible fruits in autumn. There were no leaves when the sampling area was received the radioactive fallout in March 2011 due to the FDNPP accident; the amount of {sup 137}Cs radioactivity in this area was ca. 13 kBq/m{sup 3} Both {sup 137}Cs and {sup 134}Cs were found in the newly emerged shoots of the persimmon trees collected at 26 April 2011 mainly due to foliar uptake. The concentrations were 1.1 kBq/kg-dry for {sup 137}Cs and 1.3 kBq/kg-dry for {sup 134}Cs. After that, continuous sampling of leaves, branches and fruits of the persimmon trees had been carried out for two years. Immediately after the collection, samples were transferred to our laboratory and weighed to obtain fresh weight. Leaf samples were usually separated into two portions; one portion was washed with tap water to remove dust from the surface and the other portion was not treated. For fruit samples, if it is possible, fruit flesh, peal and non-edible part were separated. All the samples were oven-dried at 80 deg. C for three days at least. Each dried sample was chopped into fine pieces, mixed well, and then transferred into plastic vessels separately. Radioactivity concentration was measured by a Ge-detecting system (Seiko EG and G Ortec) using 3000-40000 s counting intervals. By August 14, 2013, about 140 samples were collected from the trees; about 60 samples were leaves (both washed and untreated). Radiocesium concentrations in tree leaves decreased with time, and the effective half-life was about 190 d; the value was similar to those in branches (160 d for new branches, and 250 d for 1-2 y.o. branches) and fruits (250 d for fruit flesh and 230 d for peals). Thus we concluded that the half-life of radiocesium in

  14. The mysteriously variable half-life of dissolved organic matter in aquatic ecosystems: artefact or insight?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Evans, Chris; Fovet, Ophelie; Jones, Tim; Jones, Davey; Moldan, Filip; Futter, Martyn

    2016-04-01

    Dissolved organic matter (DOM) fluxes from land to water represent an important loss term in the terrestrial carbon balance, a major pathway in the global carbon cycle, a significant influence on aquatic light, nutrient and energy regimes, and an important concern for drinking water production. Although freshwaters are now recognised as zones of active carbon cycling, rather than passive conduits for carbon transport, evidence regarding the magnitude of, and controls on, DOM cycling in aquatic systems is incomplete and in some cases seemingly contradictory, with DOM 'half-lives' ranging from a few days to many years. Bringing together experimental, isotopic, catchment mass balance and modelling data, we suggest that apparently conflicting results can be reconciled through understanding of differences in: i) the terrestrial sources of DOM within heterogeneous landscapes, and consequent differences in its reactivity and stoichiometry; ii) experimental methodologies (i.e. which reactions are actually being measured), and iii) the extent of prior transformation of DOM upstream of the point of study. We argue that rapid photo-degradation, particularly of peat-derived DOM, is a key process in headwaters, whilst apparently slow DOM turnover in downstream, agriculturally-influenced lakes and rivers can partly be explained by the offsetting effect of in situ DOM production. This production appears to be strongly constrained by nutrient supply, thus linking DOM turnover and composition to the supply of inorganic nutrient inputs from diffuse agricultural pollution, and also providing a possible mechanistic link between aquatic DOM production and terrestrial DOM breakdown via the mineralisation and re-assimilation of organic nutrients. A more complete conceptual understanding of these interlinked processes will provide an improved understanding of the sources and fate of aquatic DOM, its role in the global carbon cycle, and the impact of anthropogenic activities, for example

  15. Neutron emission effects on final fragments mass and kinetic energy distribution from low energy fission of 34U

    Science.gov (United States)

    Montoya, M.; Rojas, J.; Lobato, I.

    2008-12-01

    The kinetic energy distribution as a function of mass of final fragments (m) from low energy fission of $^{234}U$, measured with the Lohengrin spectrometer by Belhafaf et al. presents a peak around m=108 and another around m = 122. The authors attribute the first peak to the evaporation of a large number of neutrons around the corresponding mass number; and the second peak to the distribution of the primary fragment kinetic energy. Nevertheless, the theoretical calculations related to primary distribution made by Faust et al. do not result in a peak around m = 122. In order to clarify this apparent controversy, we have made a numerical experiment in which the masses and the kinetic energy of final fragments are calculated, assuming an initial distribution of the kinetic energy without peaks on the standard deviation as function of fragment mass. As a result we obtain a pronounced peak on the standard deviation of the kinetic energy distribution around m = 109, a depletion from m = 121 to m = 129, and an small peak around m = 122, which is not as big as the measured by Belhafaf et al. Our simulation also reproduces the experimental results on the yield of the final mass, the average number of emitted neutrons as a function of the provisional mass (calculated from the values of the final kinetic energy of the complementary fragments) and the average value of fragment kinetic energy as a function of the final mass.

  16. Laplacian-level density functionals for the kinetic energy density and exchange-correlation energy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Perdew, John P.; Constantin, Lucian A.

    2007-04-01

    We construct a Laplacian-level meta-generalized-gradient-approximation (meta-GGA) for the noninteracting (Kohn-Sham orbital) positive kinetic energy density τ of an electronic ground state of density n . This meta-GGA is designed to recover the fourth-order gradient expansion τGE4 in the appropriate slowly varying limit and the von Weizsäcker expression τW=∣∇n∣2/(8n) in the rapidly varying limit. It is constrained to satisfy the rigorous lower bound τW(r)⩽τ(r) . Our meta-GGA is typically a strong improvement over the gradient expansion of τ for atoms, spherical jellium clusters, jellium surfaces, the Airy gas, Hooke’s atom, one-electron Gaussian density, quasi-two-dimensional electron gas, and nonuniformly scaled hydrogen atom. We also construct a Laplacian-level meta-GGA for exchange and correlation by employing our approximate τ in the Tao-Perdew-Staroverov-Scuseria (TPSS) meta-GGA density functional. The Laplacian-level TPSS gives almost the same exchange-correlation enhancement factors and energies as the full TPSS, suggesting that τ and ∇2n carry about the same information beyond that carried by n and ∇n . Our kinetic energy density integrates to an orbital-free kinetic energy functional that is about as accurate as the fourth-order gradient expansion for many real densities (with noticeable improvement in molecular atomization energies), but considerably more accurate for rapidly varying ones.

  17. Turbulent Cells in Stars: I. Fluctuations in Kinetic Energy

    CERN Document Server

    Arnett, W David

    2010-01-01

    Three-dimensional (3D) hydrodynamic simulations of shell oxygen burning (Meakin and Arnett 2007) exhibit bursty, recurrent fluctuations in turbulent kinetic energy. These are shown to be due to a general instability of the convective cell, requiring only a localized source of heating or cooling. Such fluctuations are shown to be suppressed in simulations of stellar evolution which use mixing-length theory (MLT). Quantitatively similar behavior occurs in the model of a convective roll (cell) of (Lorenz 1963), which is known to have a strange attractor that gives rise to chaotic fluctuations in time. Study of simulations suggests that the Lorenz convective roll may approximate the behavior of a cell in the large scale convective flow. Other flow patterns are also of interest (Chandrasekhar 1961); here we examine some implications of this simplest case, which is not a unique solution, but may be representative. A direct derivation of the Lorenz equations from the general fluid-dynamic equations for stars is pres...

  18. Numeric kinetic energy operators for molecules in polyspherical coordinates.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sadri, Keyvan; Lauvergnat, David; Gatti, Fabien; Meyer, Hans-Dieter

    2012-06-21

    Generalized curvilinear coordinates, as, e.g., polyspherical coordinates, are in general better adapted to the resolution of the nuclear Schrödinger equation than rectilinear ones like the normal mode coordinates. However, analytical expressions of the kinetic energy operators (KEOs) for molecular systems in polyspherical coordinates may be prohibitively complicated for large systems. In this paper we propose a method to generate a KEO numerically and bring it to a form practicable for dynamical calculations. To examine the new method we calculated vibrational spectra and eigenenergies for nitrous acid (HONO) and compare it with results obtained with an exact analytical KEO derived previously [F. Richter, P. Rosmus, F. Gatti, and H.-D. Meyer, J. Chem. Phys. 120, 6072 (2004)]. In a second example we calculated π → π* photoabsorption spectrum and eigenenergies of ethene (C(2)H(4)) and compared it with previous work [M. R. Brill, F. Gatti, D. Lauvergnat, and H.-D. Meyer, Chem. Phys. 338, 186 (2007)]. In this ethene study the dimensionality was reduced from 12 to 6 by freezing six internal coordinates. Results for both molecules show that the proposed method for obtaining an approximate KEO is reliable for dynamical calculations. The error in eigenenergies was found to be below 1 cm(-1) for most states calculated.

  19. pH-selective mutagenesis of protein-protein interfaces: in silico design of therapeutic antibodies with prolonged half-life.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Spassov, Velin Z; Yan, Lisa

    2013-04-01

    Understanding the effects of mutation on pH-dependent protein binding affinity is important in protein design, especially in the area of protein therapeutics. We propose a novel method for fast in silico mutagenesis of protein-protein complexes to calculate the effect of mutation as a function of pH. The free energy differences between the wild type and mutants are evaluated from a molecular mechanics model, combined with calculations of the equilibria of proton binding. The predicted pH-dependent energy profiles demonstrate excellent agreement with experimentally measured pH-dependency of the effect of mutations on the dissociation constants for the complex of turkey ovomucoid third domain (OMTKY3) and proteinase B. The virtual scanning mutagenesis identifies all hotspots responsible for pH-dependent binding of immunoglobulin G (IgG) to neonatal Fc receptor (FcRn) and the results support the current understanding of the salvage mechanism of the antibody by FcRn based on pH-selective binding. The method can be used to select mutations that change the pH-dependent binding profiles of proteins and guide the time consuming and expensive protein engineering experiments. As an application of this method, we propose a computational strategy to search for mutations that can alter the pH-dependent binding behavior of IgG to FcRn with the aim of improving the half-life of therapeutic antibodies in the target organism.

  20. The half-life of the 1437 keV 11/2 sup - state in sup 97 Mo

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kostova, L.G.; Andrejtscheff, W.; Kostov, L.K. (Bylgarska Akademiya na Naukite, Sofia (Bulgaria). Inst. za Yadrena Izsledvaniya i Yadrena Energetika); Funke, L.; Will, E. (Zentralinstitut fuer Kernforschung, Rossendorf (Germany)); Vdovin, A.I. (Joint Inst. for Nuclear Research, Dubna (Russia))

    1992-05-01

    Using the ({alpha}, n) reaction, the half-life of the first 11/2{sup -} level in {sup 97}Mo has been determined as T{sub 1/2}(1437.0 keV)=2.5{+-}0.3 ns by means of the pulsed beam method. The experimentally obtained B(M2) value between the h{sub 11/2} and g{sub 7/2} configurations in {sup 97}Mo has been satisfactorily described within the quasiparticle-phonon model using g{sub s}{sup eff}=0.6 g{sub s}{sup free} c{sub s}. Similar calculations and comparisons with experimental data have been performed also for {sup 95,99}Mo as well as for {sup 99}Ru and {sup 101}Pd. (orig.).

  1. The functional half-life of an mRNA depends on the ribosome spacing in an early coding region

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Pedersen, Margit; Nissen, Søren; Mitarai, Namiko;

    2011-01-01

    . Here, we characterize a determinant of the functional stability of an mRNA, which is located in the early coding region. Using literature values for the mRNA half-lives of variant lacZ mRNAs in Escherichia coli, we modeled how the ribosome spacing is affected by the translation rate of the individual...... of slowly translated codons before codon 20 or after codon 45 should shorten or prolong, respectively, the functional mRNA half-life by altering the ribosome density in the important region. These predictions were tested on eight new lacZ variants, and their experimentally determined mRNA half-lives all...

  2. An Advance in Prescription Opioid Vaccines: Overdose Mortality Reduction and Extraordinary Alteration of Drug Half-Life.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kimishima, Atsushi; Wenthur, Cody J; Zhou, Bin; Janda, Kim D

    2017-01-20

    Prescription opioids (POs) such as oxycodone and hydrocodone are highly effective medications for pain management, yet they also present a substantial risk for abuse and addiction. The consumption of POs has been escalating worldwide, resulting in tens of thousands of deaths due to overdose each year. Pharmacokinetic strategies based upon vaccination present an attractive avenue to suppress PO abuse. Herein, the preparation of two active PO vaccines is described that were found to elicit high-affinity antiopioid antibodies through a structurally congruent drug-hapten design. Administration of these vaccines resulted in a significant blockade of opioid analgesic activity, along with an unprecedented increase in drug serum half-life and protection against lethal overdose.

  3. From the Kinetic Energy Recovery System to the Thermo-Hydraulic Hybrid Motor Vehicle

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cristescu, Corneliu; Drumea, Petrin; Guta, Dragos; Dumitrescu, Catalin

    2011-12-01

    The paper presents some theoretical and experimental results obtained by the Hydraulics and Pneumatics Research Institute INOE 2000-IHP with its partners, regarding the creating of one hydraulic system able to recovering the kinetic energy of the motor vehicles, in the braking phases, and use this recovered energy in the starting and accelerating phases. Also, in the article is presented a testing stand, which was especially designed for testing the hydraulic system for recovery the kinetic energy. Through mounting of the kinetic energy recovering hydraulic system, on one motor vehicle, this vehicle became a thermo-hydraulic hybrid vehicle. Therefore, the dynamic behavior was analyzed for the whole hybrid motor vehicle, which includes the energy recovery system. The theoretical and experimental results demonstrate the possible performances of the hybrid vehicle and that the kinetic energy recovery hydraulic systems are good means to increase energy efficiency of the road motor vehicles and to decrease of the fuel consumption.

  4. Kinetic energy management in road traffic injury prevention: a call for action

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Davoud Khorasani-Zavareh

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract: By virtue of their variability, mass and speed have important roles in transferring energies during a crash incidence (kinetic energy. The sum of kinetic energy is important in determining an injury severity and that is equal to one half of the vehicle mass multiplied by the square of the vehicle speed. To meet the Vision Zero policy (a traffic safety policy prevention activities should be focused on vehicle speed management. Understanding the role of kinetic energy will help to develop measures to reduce the generation, distribution, and effects of this energy during a road traffic crash. Road traffic injury preventive activities necessitate Kinetic energy management to improve road user safety.

  5. Kinetic energy management in road traffic injury prevention: a call for action.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Khorasani-Zavareh, Davoud; Bigdeli, Maryam; Saadat, Soheil; Mohammadi, Reza

    2015-01-01

    By virtue of their variability, mass and speed have important roles in transferring energies during a crash incidence (kinetic energy). The sum of kinetic energy is important in determining an injury severity and that is equal to one half of the vehicle mass multiplied by the square of the vehicle speed. To meet the Vision Zero policy (a traffic safety policy) prevention activities should be focused on vehicle speed management. Understanding the role of kinetic energy will help to develop measures to reduce the generation, distribution, and effects of this energy during a road traffic crash. Road traffic injury preventive activities necessitate Kinetic energy management to improve road user safety. © 2015 KUMS, All rights reserved.

  6. A Preliminary Study of the Potential to Kinetic Energy Conversion Process in the Stratosphere

    OpenAIRE

    White, Robert M.; Nolan, George F.

    2011-01-01

    The potential to kinetic energy conversion process in the lower stratosphere associated with the vertical exchange of warm and cold air is evaluated using adiabatically derived vertical velocities for the North American region for a five-day period. Preliminary results suggest the possibility that on the average the kinetic energy of stratospheric motions may not result from a conversion of potential energy within the stratosphere by this process. The further implication is that stratospheric...

  7. Spectral study of wintertime kinetic energy of the Northern Hemisphere in the troposphere

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, H. N.; Zhao, Z.; Kao, S. K.

    1983-01-01

    Characteristics of the kinetic energy of wind fields at various pressure levels were analyzed, and significant wavenumbers in the wavenumber-frequency domain were identified. The nonlinear interaction terms of the kinetic energy equation were examined, and the distribution of the kinetic energy at the 850 mb, 500 mb, and 200 mb levels was calculated. A 5 deg latitude-longitude square grid was used, with NMC data for the 1975-1976 winter in the 20-60 deg N at 500 mb and 20-85 deg N for the 200 mb and 850 mb levels. The kinetic energy distribution was determined to be geography-dependent, with wavenumbers 6-9 westerly waves in the midfrequency range contributing significantly to kinetic energy maxima over the North Pacific and the east coast of North America. The contribution of the nonlinear interactions of these waves, which correspond to the longitudinal convergence of the kinetic energy flux, was found to be larger than the meridional convergence of the kinetic energy flux, and to occur mainly between 30-50 deg N. The nonlinear interactions were a negative contribution over the North Pacific at the 200 mb level.

  8. Bidirectional Energy Cascades and the Origin of Kinetic Alfvenic and Whistler Turbulence in the Solar Wind

    Science.gov (United States)

    Che, H.; Goldstein, M. L.; Vinas, A. F.

    2014-01-01

    The observed steep kinetic scale turbulence spectrum in the solar wind raises the question of how that turbulence originates. Observations of keV energetic electrons during solar quiet time suggest them as a possible source of free energy to drive kinetic turbulence. Using particle-in-cell simulations, we explore how the free energy released by an electron two-stream instability drives Weibel-like electromagnetic waves that excite wave-wave interactions. Consequently, both kinetic Alfvénic and whistler turbulence are excited that evolve through inverse and forward magnetic energy cascades.

  9. Kinetic energy release of diatomic and linear triatomic molecules in intense femtosecond laser fields

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Chen Jian-Xin; Ma Ri; Ren Hai-Zhen; Li Xia; Wu Cheng-Yin; Yang Hong; Gong Qi-Huang

    2004-01-01

    @@ The kinetic energy release of fragment ions produced by the interaction of femtosecond laser pulse radiation with diatomic and linear triatomic molecules N2, CO, CO2 and CS2 is investigated. In the case of linear polarization, angles at which the kinetic energy release of ions has the maximum value are different from the alignment of molecules though the kinetic energy release of fragment atomic ions depends on the angle between the laser polarization vector and the detection axis of the time-of-flight.

  10. The role of latent heat in kinetic energy conversions of South Pacific cyclones

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kann, Deirdre M.; Vincent, Dayton G.

    1986-01-01

    The four-dimensional behavior of cyclone systems in the South Pacific Convergence Zone (SPCZ) is analyzed. Three cyclone systems, which occurred during the period from January 10-16, 1979, are examined using the data collected during the first special observing period of the FGGE. The effects of latent heating on the life cycles of the cyclones are investigated. Particular attention is given to the conversions of eddy available potential energy to eddy kinetic energy and of mean kinetic energy to eddy kinetic energy. The net radiation profile, sensible heat flux, total field of vertical motion, and latent heat component were computed. The life cycles of the cyclones are described. It is observed that the latent heating component accounts for nearly all the conversion in the three cyclones, and latent heating within the SPCZ is the major source of eddy kinetic energy for the cyclones.

  11. The mass angular scattering power method for determining the kinetic energies of clinical electron beams

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Blais, N.; Podgorsak, E.B. (Montreal General Hospital, PQ (Canada). Dept. of Medical Physics)

    1992-10-01

    A method for determining the kinetic energy of clinical electron beams is described, based on the measurement in air of the spatial spread of a pencil electron beam which is produced from the broad clinical electron beam. As predicted by the Fermi-Eyges theory, the dose distribution measured in air on a plane, perpendicular to the incident direction of the initial pencil electron beam, is Gaussian. The square of its spatial spread is related to the mass angular scattering power which in turn is related to the kinetic energy of the electron beam. The measured spatial spread may thus be used to determine the mass angular scattering power, which is then used to determine the kinetic energy of the electron beam from the known relationship between mass angular scattering power and kinetic energy. Energies obtained with the mass angular scattering power method agree with those obtained with the electron range method. (author).

  12. The role of latent heat in kinetic energy conversions of South Pacific cyclones

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kann, Deirdre M.; Vincent, Dayton G.

    1986-01-01

    The four-dimensional behavior of cyclone systems in the South Pacific Convergence Zone (SPCZ) is analyzed. Three cyclone systems, which occurred during the period from January 10-16, 1979, are examined using the data collected during the first special observing period of the FGGE. The effects of latent heating on the life cycles of the cyclones are investigated. Particular attention is given to the conversions of eddy available potential energy to eddy kinetic energy and of mean kinetic energy to eddy kinetic energy. The net radiation profile, sensible heat flux, total field of vertical motion, and latent heat component were computed. The life cycles of the cyclones are described. It is observed that the latent heating component accounts for nearly all the conversion in the three cyclones, and latent heating within the SPCZ is the major source of eddy kinetic energy for the cyclones.

  13. Comparison of serum immunoglobulin G half-life in dairy calves fed colostrum, colostrum replacer or administered with intravenous bovine plasma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Murphy, Jacob M; Hagey, Jill V; Chigerwe, Munashe

    2014-04-15

    In calves, passive immunity of immunoglobulins can be acquired through ingestion of colostrum or colostrum replacers. Plasma can been used to supplement immunoglobulins in healthy or sick calves. Serum half-life of colostral derived immuglobulin G (IgG) is estimated to be 20 days. Half-life of IgG is important in determining response to antigens and timing of vaccination in calves. To date studies evaluating half-life of colostrum replacer or plasma derived IgG are lacking. The objectives of this study were to compare the serum half-life of IgG derived from colostrum, colostrum replacer and plasma in dairy calves reared up to 35 days of age. Thirty Jersey calves were randomly assigned to receive colostrum or colostrum replacer by oroesophageal tubing or plasma by intravenous administration. Serum samples were collected at 2, 5, 7, 10, 14, 21, 28 and 35 days. Serum IgG concentrations were determined by radial immunodiffusion. The results indicated that half-life for IgG in colostrum fed (28.5 days) or plasma transfused calves (27.3 days) was longer than colostrum replacer fed calves (19.1 days). Further studies are required to evaluate pathogen specific immunoglobulins in order to recommend vaccination timing in calves fed colostrum replacers.

  14. On the Equipartition of Kinetic Energy in an Ideal Gas Mixture

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peliti, L.

    2007-01-01

    A refinement of an argument due to Maxwell for the equipartition of translational kinetic energy in a mixture of ideal gases with different masses is proposed. The argument is elementary, yet it may work as an illustration of the role of symmetry and independence postulates in kinetic theory. (Contains 1 figure.)

  15. Energy Conservation Tests of a Coupled Kinetic-kinetic Plasma-neutral Transport Code

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Stotler, D. P.; Chang, C. S.; Ku, S. H.; Lang, J.; Park, G.

    2012-08-29

    A Monte Carlo neutral transport routine, based on DEGAS2, has been coupled to the guiding center ion-electron-neutral neoclassical PIC code XGC0 to provide a realistic treatment of neutral atoms and molecules in the tokamak edge plasma. The DEGAS2 routine allows detailed atomic physics and plasma-material interaction processes to be incorporated into these simulations. The spatial pro le of the neutral particle source used in the DEGAS2 routine is determined from the uxes of XGC0 ions to the material surfaces. The kinetic-kinetic plasma-neutral transport capability is demonstrated with example pedestal fueling simulations.

  16. Determining the band gap and mean kinetic energy of atoms from reflection electron energy loss spectra

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Vos, M. [Atomic and Molecular Physics Laboratories, Research School of Physics and Engineering, Australian National University, Canberra ACT (Australia); Marmitt, G. G. [Atomic and Molecular Physics Laboratories, Research School of Physics and Engineering, Australian National University, Canberra ACT (Australia); Instituto de Fisica da Universidade Federal do Rio Grande do Sul, Avenida Bento Goncalves 9500, 91501-970 Porto Alegre, RS (Brazil); Finkelstein, Y. [Nuclear Research Center — Negev, Beer-Sheva 84190 (Israel); Moreh, R. [Physics Department, Ben-Gurion University of the Negev, Beer-Sheva 84105 (Israel)

    2015-09-14

    Reflection electron energy loss spectra from some insulating materials (CaCO{sub 3}, Li{sub 2}CO{sub 3}, and SiO{sub 2}) taken at relatively high incoming electron energies (5–40 keV) are analyzed. Here, one is bulk sensitive and a well-defined onset of inelastic excitations is observed from which one can infer the value of the band gap. An estimate of the band gap was obtained by fitting the spectra with a procedure that includes the recoil shift and recoil broadening affecting these measurements. The width of the elastic peak is directly connected to the mean kinetic energy of the atom in the material (Doppler broadening). The experimentally obtained mean kinetic energies of the O, C, Li, Ca, and Si atoms are compared with the calculated ones, and good agreement is found, especially if the effect of multiple scattering is taken into account. It is demonstrated experimentally that the onset of the inelastic excitation is also affected by Doppler broadening. Aided by this understanding, we can obtain a good fit of the elastic peak and the onset of inelastic excitations. For SiO{sub 2}, good agreement is obtained with the well-established value of the band gap (8.9 eV) only if it is assumed that the intensity near the edge scales as (E − E{sub gap}){sup 1.5}. For CaCO{sub 3}, the band gap obtained here (7 eV) is about 1 eV larger than the previous experimental value, whereas the value for Li{sub 2}CO{sub 3} (7.5 eV) is the first experimental estimate.

  17. Kinetic study and mechanism of Niclosamide degradation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zaazaa, Hala E.; Abdelrahman, Maha M.; Ali, Nouruddin W.; Magdy, Maimana A.; Abdelkawy, M.

    2014-11-01

    A spectrophotometric kinetic study of Niclosamide alkaline degradation as a function of drug concentration, alkaline concentration and temperature has been established utilizing double divisor-ratio spectra spectrophotometric method. The developed method allowed determination of Niclosamide in presence of its alkaline degradation products; namely; 2-chloro-4-nitro aniline (DEG I) and 5-chloro salicylic acid (DEG II) with characterization of its degradation mechanism. It was found that degradation kinetic of Niclosamide followed pseudo-first order under the established experimental conditions with a degradation rate constant (k) of 0.0829 mol/h and half life (t1/2) of 8.35 h. The overall degradation rate constant as a function of the temperature under the given conditions obeyed Arrhenius equation where the activation energy was calculated to be 3.41 kcal/mol.

  18. Accurate measurements of {sup 129}I concentration by isotope dilution using MC-ICPMS for half-life determination

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Isnard, Helene; Nonell, Anthony; Marie, Mylene [Commissariat a l' Energie Atomique et aux Energies alternatives (CEA), Gif Sur Yvette (France). DEN, DPC, SEARS, LANIE; Chartier, Frederic [Commissariat a l' Energie Atomique et aux Energies alternatives (CEA), Gif Sur Yvette (France). DEN, DPC

    2016-05-01

    Determining the {sup 129}I concentration, a long-lived radionuclide present in spent nuclear fuel, is a major issue for nuclear waste disposal purpose. {sup 129}I also has to be measured in numerous environmental, nuclear and biological samples. To be able to accurately determine the {sup 129}I concentration, an analytical method based on the use of a multicollector-inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometer (MC-ICPMS) combined with an isotope dilution technique using an {sup 127}I spike, was developed. First, the influence of different media (HNO{sub 3}, NaOH and TMAH) on natural {sup 127}I signal intensity and stability and on memory effects was studied. Then an analytical procedure was developed by taking into account the correction of blanks and interferences. Tellurium was chosen for instrumental mass bias correction, as no certified standards with suitable {sup 127}I/{sup 129}I ratio are available. Finally, the results, reproducibility and uncertainties obtained for the {sup 129}I concentration determined by isotope dilution with a {sup 127}I spike are presented and discussed. The final expanded relative uncertainty obtained for the iodine-129 concentration was lower than 0.7% (k = 1). This precise {sup 129}I determination in association with further activity measurements of this nuclide on the same sample will render it possible to determine a new value of the {sup 129}I half-life with a reduced uncertainty (0.76%, k = 1).

  19. Degradation and half-life of DNA present in biomass from a genetically-modified organism during land application.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Halter, Mathew C; Zahn, James A

    2017-02-01

    White biotechnology has made a positive impact on the chemical industry by providing safer, more efficient chemical manufacturing processes that have reduced the use of toxic chemicals, harsh reaction conditions, and expensive metal catalysts, which has improved alignment with the principles of Green Chemistry. The genetically-modified (GM) biocatalysts that are utilized in these processes are typically separated from high-value products and then recycled, or eliminated. Elimination routes include disposal in sanitary landfills, incineration, use as a fuel, animal feed, or reuse as an agricultural soil amendment or other value-added products. Elimination routes that have the potential to impact the food chain or environment have been more heavily scrutinized for the fate and persistence of biological products. In this study, we developed and optimized a method for monitoring the degradation of strain-specific DNA markers from a genetically-modified organism (GMO) used for the commercial production of 1,3-propanediol. Laboratory and field tests showed that a marker for heterologous DNA in the GM organism was no longer detectable by end-point polymerase chain reaction (PCR) after 14 days. The half-life of heterologous DNA was increased by 17% (from 42.4 to 49.7 h) after sterilization of the soil from a field plot, which indicated that abiotic factors were important in degradation of DNA under field conditions. There was no evidence for horizontal transfer of DNA target sequences from the GMO to viable organisms present in the soil.

  20. Plasma half-life and organ uptake ratio of radiolabeled glandular kallikrein in control and nephrectomized rats

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nishimura, K.; Iwata, T.; Kokubu, T.

    1986-01-01

    The purified rat urinary kallikrein was radiolabeled by lactoperoxidase method and by chloramine T method. Plasma half-life of radiolabeled kallikrein was 5.06 +/- 0.59 (n = 5) min in control rats and 5.24 +/- 0.42 (n = 5) min in nephrectomized rats. There was no difference between two groups. From autoradiogram, main metabolic organs of radiolabeled kallikrein were liver, kidney and spleen. Total uptake of radiolabeled kallikrein in ech organ was the highest in liver (73.2%). The uptake per g tissue of radiolabeled kallikrein in each organ was high in liver (33.0%), kidney (31.4%) and spleen (21.1%). These results suggest that the active kallikrein is metabolized mainly in the liver, and kidney is not so an important organ to metabolize or to eliminate the active kallikrein in plasma. In order to clarify the mode of existence of active kallikrein in plasma, the following experiment was done by using disc gel electrophoresis. Radioactive profile of radiolabeled kallikrein showed one peak (Rf = 1.0), but radiolabeled kallikrein mixed with rat plasma showed two peaks, that is small peak (Rf = 1.0), and main peak (RF = 0.5). The most of radiolabeled kallikrein was bound to plasma protein and only five per cent was in free form. Furthermore, the binding of radiolabeled kallikrein to plasma protein was interfered by the addition of active kallikrein. These results suggest the possibility of existence of kallikrein binding protein in plasma.

  1. Anisotropy of the field-induced kinetic energy density in Bi2212

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Peña, J.P., E-mail: jullypaola@if.ufrgs.br [Instituto de Física, Universidade Federal do Rio Grande do Sul, Av. Bento Gonçalves 9500, C.P. 15051, 91501-970 Porto Alegre, RS (Brazil); Silva, R.R. da [Instituto de Física Gleb Wataghin, Universidade Estadual de Campinas, Rua Sérgio Buarque de Holanda 777, C.P. 13083-970 Campinas, SP (Brazil); Pureur, P. [Instituto de Física, Universidade Federal do Rio Grande do Sul, Av. Bento Gonçalves 9500, C.P. 15051, 91501-970 Porto Alegre, RS (Brazil)

    2014-01-15

    We present an experimental study of the in-field kinetic energy density in two Bi{sub 2}Sr{sub 2}CaCu{sub 2}O{sub 8+δ} single crystals. The kinetic energy density is determined from magnetization measurements performed above the irreversibility line. Anisotropy effects are observed when an external magnetic field is applied in the direction perpendicular or parallel to the superconducting Cu–O{sub 2} planes. When the field is applied parallel to the c-axis, the most relevant contribution to the kinetic energy comes from the Abrikosov vortices. At low fields, an additional term related to granularity is also observed. A kink in the kinetic energy density associated to the decoupling of the superconducting layers is identified when the field is applied parallel to the ab planes.

  2. New Ro-Vibrational Kinetic Energy Operators using Polyspherical Coordinates for Polyatomic Molecules

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schwenke, David W.; Kwak, Dochan (Technical Monitor)

    2002-01-01

    We illustrate how one can easily derive kinetic energy operators for polyatomic molecules using polyspherical coordinates with very general choices for z-axis embeddings arid angles used to specify relative orientations of internal vectors. Computer algebra is not required.

  3. Kinetic energy distribution of OH+ from water fragmentation by electron impact

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ferreira, Natalia; Sigaud, L.; Montenegro, E. C.

    2017-07-01

    The release of the highly reactive radical OH+ from the fragmentation of water by electron impact is made mostly through the OH++H0 channel. This channel ejects suprathermal OH+ ions with a kinetic energy distribution whose details are unexplored so far due to the difficulty in experimentally characterizing ions ejected with very low kinetic energy without another charged partner. These ions are studied here using the delayed extraction time-of-flight technique (DETOF). The structures and substructures in the kinetic energy distribution of OH+ associated with both single and double ionization are identified qualitatively and quantitatively. A comparison with the kinetic energy distribution of the complementary channel OH0+H+ , also originating from vacancies in the 1 b2 orbital, shows marked differences between the two, mainly regarding the relative role between the fragmentation involving the H2O+ ground state or via transitions to repulsive states.

  4. The distribution of eddy kinetic and potential energies in the global ocean

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    FERRARI, RAFFAELE; WUNSCH, CARL

    2010-01-01

    .... The nature of the dominant kinetic energy reservoir, that of the balanced variablity, is then found to be indistinguishable in the observations from a sum of barotropic and first baroclinic ordinary...

  5. Turbulent kinetic energy balance measurements in the wake of a low-pressure turbine blade

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sideridis, A. [Laboratory of Fluid Mechanics and Turbomachinery, Department of Mechanical Engineering, Aristotle University of Thessaloniki, 54124 Thessaloniki (Greece); Yakinthos, K., E-mail: kyros@eng.auth.g [Laboratory of Fluid Mechanics and Turbomachinery, Department of Mechanical Engineering, Aristotle University of Thessaloniki, 54124 Thessaloniki (Greece); Goulas, A. [Laboratory of Fluid Mechanics and Turbomachinery, Department of Mechanical Engineering, Aristotle University of Thessaloniki, 54124 Thessaloniki (Greece)

    2011-02-15

    The turbulent kinetic energy budget in the wake generated by a high lift, low-pressure two-dimensional blade cascade of the T106 profile was investigated experimentally using hot-wire anemometry. The purpose of this study is to examine the transport mechanism of the turbulent kinetic energy and provide validation data for turbulence modeling. Point measurements were conducted on a high spatial resolution, two-dimensional grid that allowed precise derivative calculations. Positioning of the probe was achieved using a high accuracy traversing mechanism. The turbulent kinetic energy (TKE) convection, production, viscous diffusion and turbulent diffusion were all obtained directly from experimental measurements. Dissipation and pressure diffusion were calculated indirectly using techniques presented and validated by previous investigators. Results for all terms of the turbulent kinetic energy budget are presented and discussed in detail in the present work.

  6. Development of an idealised downstream cyclone: Eulerian and Lagrangian perspective on the kinetic energy

    OpenAIRE

    Papritz, Lukas; Schemm, Sebastian

    2013-01-01

    In this idealised modelling study, the development of a downstream cyclone, which closely follows the life-cycle of a Shapiro-Keyser cyclone, is addressed from a quasi-geostrophic kinetic energy perspective. To this end a simulation of a dry, highly idealised, dispersive baroclinic wave, developing a primary and a downstream cyclone, is performed. Kinetic energy and processes contributing to its tendency – in particular baroclinic conversion and ageostrophic geopotential fluxes – are investig...

  7. First measurements on how pressure affects the half-life of 22Na: Comparison to theory and analog to 40K

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, K. K.; Nelson, R. O.; Rundberg, R.; Steinle-Neumann, G.

    2007-12-01

    Radioactive decay plays a central role in planetary sciences as appropriate decay schemes are used to date geological and astronomical processes and radioactivity provides an important source of heat in planetary bodies, both in their early history during accretion and differentiation and also over geological times. The most important isotopes that currently heat the Earth are 40K, 232Th, 235U and 238U. As radioactive decay is a nuclear process it is considered to be insensitive to external factors such as pressure or chemical environment. This has been shown to be true for α, β+ and β- processes, however, electron capture decay is dependent on the electron charge density at the nucleus of a compound, which is sensitive to the external environment. Using high-resolution Ge gamma-ray detectors to make relative measurements with 137Cs and the positron decay of 22Na, we measure how pressure affects the half-life of 22Na due to electron-capture decay. Our systematics look favorable for observing this small effect. We will compare our preliminary measurements with complementary ab-initio all-electron computations using the linearized augmented plane wave method (LAPW). Using 22Na as an analog for 40K, our results suggest that the pressure effect for 40K, combined with the opposing effects of high temperatures, will have little, discernible effect on the heat production in the deep Earth as our predicted changes are smaller than the uncertainties in the total decay constant for 40K. This work was supported in part by the Carnegie/DOE Alliance Center (CDAC), through the Stewardship Science Academic Alliances Program of the U.S. Department of Energy. The LANSCE facility is operated, and portions of this work were performed, by Los Alamos National Security, LLC, funded by the U.S. Department of Energy under Contract No. DE-AC52- 06NA25396.

  8. Limiting Energy Dissipation Induces Glassy Kinetics in Single-Cell High-Precision Responses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Das, Jayajit

    2016-03-08

    Single cells often generate precise responses by involving dissipative out-of-thermodynamic-equilibrium processes in signaling networks. The available free energy to fuel these processes could become limited depending on the metabolic state of an individual cell. How does limiting dissipation affect the kinetics of high-precision responses in single cells? I address this question in the context of a kinetic proofreading scheme used in a simple model of early-time T cell signaling. Using exact analytical calculations and numerical simulations, I show that limiting dissipation qualitatively changes the kinetics in single cells marked by emergence of slow kinetics, large cell-to-cell variations of copy numbers, temporally correlated stochastic events (dynamic facilitation), and ergodicity breaking. Thus, constraints in energy dissipation, in addition to negatively affecting ligand discrimination in T cells, can create a fundamental difficulty in determining single-cell kinetics from cell-population results. Copyright © 2016 Biophysical Society. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  9. Kinetic Energy Corrections for Slip-Stick Behavior in Brittle Adhesives

    Science.gov (United States)

    Macon, David J.; Anderson, Greg L.; McCool, Alex (Technical Monitor)

    2001-01-01

    Fracture mechanics is the study of the failure of a body that contains a flaw. In the energy balance approach to fracture mechanics, contributions from the external work and elastic strain energy are accounted for but rarely are corrections for the kinetic energy given. Under slip-stick conditions, part of the external work is expended as kinetic energy. The magnitude of this kinetic energy depends upon the shape of the crack. A specimen with a blunt crack will fail at a high load and the crack will catastrophically travel through the material until the kinetic energy is dissipated. Material with a sharp crack will fail at a lower load but will still be catastrophic in nature. A kinetic term is incorporated into the energy balance approach. This term accounts for the velocity of the crack after failure and how far the crack travels before arresting. This correction makes the shape of the initiation crack irrelevant. When applied to data generated by tapered double cantilever beam specimens under slip-stick conditions, the scatter in the measured critical strain energy release rate is significantly reduced.

  10. High-energy interactions in Kinetic Inductance Detectors arrays

    CERN Document Server

    D'Addabbo, A; Goupy, J; Benoit, A; Bourrion, O; Catalano, A; Macias-Perez, J F; Monfardini, A

    2015-01-01

    The impacts of Cosmic Rays on the detectors are a key problem for space-based missions. We are studying the effects of such interactions on arrays of Kinetic Inductance Detectors (KID), in order to adapt this technology for use on board of satellites. Before proposing a new technology such as the Kinetic Inductance Detectors for a space-based mission, the problem of the Cosmic Rays that hit the detectors during in-flight operation has to be studied in detail. We present here several tests carried out with KID exposed to radioactive sources, which we use to reproduce the physical interactions induced by primary Cosmic Rays, and we report the results obtained adopting different solutions in terms of substrate materials and array geometries. We conclude by outlining the main guidelines to follow for fabricating KID for space-based applications.

  11. Use of short half-life cosmogenic isotopes to quantify sediment mixing and transport in karst conduits

    Science.gov (United States)

    Paylor, R.

    2011-12-01

    Particulate inorganic carbon (PIC) transport and flux in karst aquifers is poorly understood. Methods to quantify PIC flux are needed in order to account for total inorganic carbon removal (chemical plus mechanical) from karst settings. Quantifying PIC flux will allow more accurate calculations of landscape denudation and global carbon sink processes. The study concentrates on the critical processes of the suspended sediment component of mass flux - surface soil/stored sediment mixing, transport rates and distance, and sediment storage times. The primary objective of the study is to describe transport and mixing with the resolution of single storm-flow events. To quantify the transport processes, short half-life cosmogenic isotopes are utilized. The isotopes 7Be (t1/2 = 53d) and 210Pb (t1/2 = 22y) are the primary isotopes measured, and other potential isotopes such as 137Cs and 241Am are investigated. The study location is at Mammoth Cave National Park within the Logsdon River watershed. The Logsdon River conduit is continuously traversable underground for two kilometers. Background levels and input concentrations of isotopes are determined from soil samples taken at random locations in the catchment area, and suspended sediment collected from the primary sinking stream during a storm event. Suspended sediment was also collected from the downstream end of the conduit during the storm event. After the storm flow receded, fine sediment samples were taken from the cave stream at regular intervals to determine transport distances and mixing ratios along the conduit. Samples were analyzed with a Canberra Industries gamma ray spectrometer, counted for 24 hours to increase detection of low radionuclide activities. The measured activity levels of radionuclides in the samples were adjusted for decay from time of sampling using standard decay curves. The results of the study show that surface sediment mixing, transport and storage in karst conduits is a dynamic but

  12. Kinetic and Available Potential Energy Transport during the Stratospheric Sudden Warming in January 2009

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    ZUO Qunjie; GAO Shouting; L(U) Daren

    2012-01-01

    The local features of transient kinetic energy and available potential energy were investigated using ECMWF (European Centre for Medium-Range Weather Forecasts) Interim Reanalysis data for the stratospheric sudden warming (SSW) event of January 2009.The Western Europe high plays important roles in the propagation of the energy from North America to Eurasian.When the Western Europe high appeared and shifted eastward,energy conversions increased and energy propagated from North America to Eurasian as a form of interaction energy flow.The baroclinic conversion between transient-eddy kinetic energy (Ke)and transient-eddy available potential energy (Ae) and the horizontal advection of geopotential height were approximately one order of magnitude less than Ke and Ae generation terms.So,these terms were less important to this SSW event.

  13. Half-life of Re184 populated by the (γ,n) reaction from laser Compton scattering γ rays at the electron storage ring NewSUBARU

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hayakawa, T.; Miyamoto, S.; Hayashi, Y.; Kawase, K.; Horikawa, K.; Chiba, S.; Nakanishi, K.; Hashimoto, H.; Ohta, T.; Kando, M.; Mochizuki, T.; Kajino, T.; Fujiwara, M.

    2006-12-01

    We report a half-life of the ground state of Re184 populated by the Re185(γ,n)Re184 reaction from laser Compton scattering γ rays generated through relativistic engineering. The γ rays are provided at the electron storage ring NewSUBARU. The previous experiment using deuteron-induced reactions has yielded a recommended half-life of the 3- ground state of Re184 of 38.0±0.5 d, including a possible contribution from the 8+ isomer (T1/2=169±8 d) of Re184 since the presence of the isomer was not known at that time. In contrast, the (γ,n) reaction has an advantage to selectively populate the ground state because this reaction does not bring large angular momentum. The measured half-life of 35.4±0.7 d is shorter than the previous half-life by about 7%. This difference is crucial for applications using the activation method.

  14. Database for mRNA half-life of 19 977 genes obtained by DNA microarray analysis of pluripotent and differentiating mouse embryonic stem cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sharova, Lioudmila V; Sharov, Alexei A; Nedorezov, Timur; Piao, Yulan; Shaik, Nabeebi; Ko, Minoru S H

    2009-02-01

    Degradation of mRNA is one of the key processes that control the steady-state level of gene expression. However, the rate of mRNA decay for the majority of genes is not known. We successfully obtained the rate of mRNA decay for 19 977 non-redundant genes by microarray analysis of RNA samples obtained from mouse embryonic stem (ES) cells. Median estimated half-life was 7.1 h and only genes, including Prdm1, Myc, Gadd45 g, Foxa2, Hes5 and Trib1, showed half-life less than 1 h. In general, mRNA species with short half-life were enriched among genes with regulatory functions (transcription factors), whereas mRNA species with long half-life were enriched among genes related to metabolism and structure (extracellular matrix, cytoskeleton). The stability of mRNAs correlated more significantly with the structural features of genes than the function of genes: mRNA stability showed the most significant positive correlation with the number of exon junctions per open reading frame length, and negative correlation with the presence of PUF-binding motifs and AU-rich elements in 3'-untranslated region (UTR) and CpG di-nucleotides in the 5'-UTR. The mRNA decay rates presented in this report are the largest data set for mammals and the first for ES cells.

  15. Database for mRNA Half-Life of 19 977 Genes Obtained by DNA Microarray Analysis of Pluripotent and Differentiating Mouse Embryonic Stem Cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sharova, Lioudmila V.; Sharov, Alexei A.; Nedorezov, Timur; Piao, Yulan; Shaik, Nabeebi; Ko, Minoru S.H.

    2009-01-01

    Degradation of mRNA is one of the key processes that control the steady-state level of gene expression. However, the rate of mRNA decay for the majority of genes is not known. We successfully obtained the rate of mRNA decay for 19 977 non-redundant genes by microarray analysis of RNA samples obtained from mouse embryonic stem (ES) cells. Median estimated half-life was 7.1 h and only <100 genes, including Prdm1, Myc, Gadd45 g, Foxa2, Hes5 and Trib1, showed half-life less than 1 h. In general, mRNA species with short half-life were enriched among genes with regulatory functions (transcription factors), whereas mRNA species with long half-life were enriched among genes related to metabolism and structure (extracellular matrix, cytoskeleton). The stability of mRNAs correlated more significantly with the structural features of genes than the function of genes: mRNA stability showed the most significant positive correlation with the number of exon junctions per open reading frame length, and negative correlation with the presence of PUF-binding motifs and AU-rich elements in 3′-untranslated region (UTR) and CpG di-nucleotides in the 5′-UTR. The mRNA decay rates presented in this report are the largest data set for mammals and the first for ES cells. PMID:19001483

  16. Half-life and rational drug use of paclitaxel%紫杉醇的半衰期与合理用药

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    陈素虹

    2015-01-01

    In this article,the author mainly discusses the relationship of paclitaxel drug metabolism in human body and its half-life to promote its rational drug use.Refer to the relevant medical literature at home and abroad in recent years,we have induction and summary.The relationship of paclitaxel half-life and pesticide effect is analyzed.The paclitaxel half-life can determine the metabolism degree of the drug in the body,so drug half-life plays a critical role in the process of rational drug use.%本文主要对紫杉醇药物在人体内的代谢与其半衰期的关系进行探讨,以促进其合理用药。笔者参阅近几年来国内外的相关医学文献,进行归纳、总结,分析紫杉醇半衰期与药效之间的关系。根据紫杉醇的半衰期可以判定药物在人体内的代谢程度,因此药物半衰期在合理用药的过程中发挥着至关重要的作用。

  17. Platelet half-life in patients with primary hyperlipoproteinemia type IIa, IIb, and IV according to Fredrickson with and without clinical signs of atherosclerosis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jaeger, E.; Sinzinger, H.; Widhalm, K.; Kaliman, J.; Hoefer, R. (Vienna Univ. (Austria). 2. Medizinische Klinik; Ludwig Boltzmann-Institut fuer Nuklearmedizin, Vienna (Austria); Vienna Univ. (Austria). Kinderklinik; Vienna Univ. (Austria). Kardiologische Klinik)

    1982-09-01

    It is generally accepted that platelet half-life is shortened in atherosclerotic vascular diseases. Concerning changes due to hyperlipoproteinemia (HLP), however, there exist only few data. Therefore, we examined the platelet-half life in 60 patients with recently discovered HLP type IIa, IIb and IV according to Fredrickson before treatment in comparison to 60 controls. 33 of the HLP-patients had no clinical symptoms of angiopathy. 27 patients suffered from peripheral vascular disease or from coronary heart disease as verified by angiography. The labelling of autologous platelets was performed with 100..mu..Ci of /sup 111/Indium-oxine-sulfate at 37/sup 0/C for 5 minutes. The mean labelling efficiency was 90%, the recovery after 2 hours about 70%. Serum lipoproteins were estimated by means of ultracentrifugation and polyanionprecipitation according to Lipid Research Clinic Methods. In the patients with HLP platelet half-life was significantly shortened in comparison to the control group (p < 0.01). These changes were most pronounced in patients with HLP-type IIa and with atherosclerotic lesions, respectively. In patients with HLP-type IIa a very close correlation could be demonstrated between platelet half-life and LDL-cholesterol (r = -0.72; p < 0.001) as well as total cholesterol (r = -0.73; p < 0.001). These data prove that in HLP in-vivo platelet function as measured by platelet survival is significantly influenced even before the occurrence of clinically relevant symptoms of atherosclerosis.

  18. 基于下载量的期刊半衰期实证研究%Empirical Research on Half-life Period of Journals Based on Downloads

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    许新军

    2014-01-01

    针对期刊网络老化速度研究较为薄弱的状况,以CNKI为数据源,通过对图书馆学情报学期刊下载量半衰期的实证分析研究,解读了下载量半衰期的特点,剖析了其与其它期刊评价指标的区别与联系。结果显示:期刊下载量半衰期明显小于被引半衰期和引用半衰期,与被引半衰期之间存在显著的相关性;与期刊其它计量指标相比有其特质与独立性;开展期刊下载量半衰期研究,有利于突破老化研究中引文分析的藩篱,提升期刊评价的时效性,拓展考察范围及促进期刊出版机构主动缩短网络版与印刷版之间的出版时滞,对期刊整体影响力的提升将产生积极影响。%Aimed at the unsubstantial research on aging speed of network periodicals and taking CNKI as data source, the paper interprets the characteristics of half-life period of downloads, and analyses its differences and relations with other periodical evaluation indexes through the empirical analysis research on half-life period of downloads as to library &information science periodicals. The result shows that half-life period of journal downloads are much smaller than cited half-life period and citation half-life period, and there is significant correlation with the cited half-life period among them as well;but compared with other periodical evaluation indexes, there exist its own traits and independence; it avails for the research of half-life periodical downloads to break through barriers in the study of aging citation analysis, to improve the timeliness of periodical evaluation and expand the scope of inspection, and also to promote periodical publishing organizations to take the initiative shortening of the delay between online and print publication, which will have a positive impact on the promotion of overall journal influence.

  19. Fast renal trapping of porcine Luteinizing Hormone (pLH shown by 123I-scintigraphic imaging in rats explains its short circulatory half-life

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Locatelli Alain

    2003-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Sugar moieties of gonadotropins play no primary role in receptor binding but they strongly affect their circulatory half-life and consequently their in vivo biopotencies. In order to relate more precisely hepatic trapping of these glycoproteic hormones with their circulatory half-life, we undertook a comparative study of the distribution and elimination of porcine LH (pLH and equine CG (eCG which exhibit respectively a short and a long half-life. This was done first by following half-lives of pLH in piglets with hepatic portal circulation shunted or not. It was expected that such a shunt would enhance the short half-life of pLH. Subsequently, scintigraphic imaging of both 123I-pLH and 123I-eCG was performed in intact rats to compare their routes and rates of distribution and elimination. Methods Native pLH or eCG was injected to normal piglets and pLH was tested in liver-shunted anæsthetized piglet. Blood samples were recovered sequentially over one hour time and the hormone concentrations were determined by a specific ELISA method. Scintigraphic imaging of 123I-pLH and 123I-eCG was performed in rats using a OPTI-CGR gamma camera. Results In liver-shunted piglets, the half-life of pLH was found to be as short as in intact piglets (5 min. In the rat, the half-life of pLH was also found to be very short (3–6 min and 123I-pLH was found to accumulate in high quantity in less than 10 min post injection at the level of kidneys but not in the liver. 123I-eCG didn't accumulate in any organ in the rats during the first hour, plasma concentrations of this gonadotropin being still elevated (80% at this time. Conclusion In both the porcine and rat species, the liver is not responsible for the rapid elimination of pLH from the circulation compared to eCG. Our scintigraphic experiments suggest that the very short circulatory half-life of LH is due to rapid renal trapping.

  20. Modeling on the Effect of Coal Loads on Kinetic Energy of Balls for Ball Mills

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yan Bai

    2015-07-01

    Full Text Available This paper presents a solution for the detection and control of coal loads that is more accurate and convenient than those currently used. To date, no research has addressed the use of a grinding medium as the controlled parameter. To improve the accuracy of the coal load detection based on the kinetic energy of balls in a tubular ball mill, a Discrete Element Method (DEM model for ball kinematics based on coal loads is proposed. The operating process for a ball mill and the ball motion, as influenced by the coal quality and the coal load, was analyzed carefully. The relationship between the operating efficiency of a coal pulverizing system, coal loads, and the balls’ kinetic energy was obtained. Origin and Matlab were utilized to draw the variation of parameters with increasing coal loads in the projectile and cascading motion states. The parameters include the balls’ real-time kinetic energy, the friction energy consumption, and the mill’s total work. Meanwhile, a method of balanced adjacent degree and a physical experiment were proposed to verify the considerable effect of the balls’ kinetic energy on coal loads. The model and experiment results indicate that a coal load control method based on the balls’ kinetic energy is therefore feasible for the optimized operation of a coal pulverizing system.

  1. Effect of kinetic energy on the doping efficiency of cesium cations into superfluid helium droplets.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Lei; Zhang, Jie; Freund, William M; Kong, Wei

    2015-07-28

    We present an experimental investigation of the effect of kinetic energy on the ion doping efficiency of superfluid helium droplets using cesium cations from a thermionic emission source. The kinetic energy of Cs(+) is controlled by the bias voltage of a collection grid collinearly arranged with the droplet beam. Efficient doping from ions with kinetic energies from 20 eV up to 480 V has been observed in different sized helium droplets. The relative ion doping efficiency is determined by both the kinetic energy of the ions and the average size of the droplet beam. At a fixed source temperature, the number of doped droplets increases with increasing grid voltage, while the relative ion doping efficiency decreases. This result implies that not all ions are captured upon encountering with a sufficiently large droplet, a deviation from the near unity doping efficiency for closed shell neutral molecules. We propose that this drop in ion doping efficiency with kinetic energy is related to the limited deceleration rate inside a helium droplet. When the source temperature changes from 14 K to 17 K, the relative ion doping efficiency decreases rapidly, perhaps due to the lack of viable sized droplets. The size distribution of the Cs(+)-doped droplet beam can be measured by deflection and by energy filtering. The observed doped droplet size is about 5 × 10(6) helium atoms when the source temperature is between 14 K and 17 K.

  2. Effect of kinetic energy on the doping efficiency of cesium cations into superfluid helium droplets

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chen, Lei; Zhang, Jie; Freund, William M.; Kong, Wei, E-mail: wei.kong@oregonstate.edu [Department of Chemistry, Oregon State University, Corvallis, Oregon 97331 (United States)

    2015-07-28

    We present an experimental investigation of the effect of kinetic energy on the ion doping efficiency of superfluid helium droplets using cesium cations from a thermionic emission source. The kinetic energy of Cs{sup +} is controlled by the bias voltage of a collection grid collinearly arranged with the droplet beam. Efficient doping from ions with kinetic energies from 20 eV up to 480 V has been observed in different sized helium droplets. The relative ion doping efficiency is determined by both the kinetic energy of the ions and the average size of the droplet beam. At a fixed source temperature, the number of doped droplets increases with increasing grid voltage, while the relative ion doping efficiency decreases. This result implies that not all ions are captured upon encountering with a sufficiently large droplet, a deviation from the near unity doping efficiency for closed shell neutral molecules. We propose that this drop in ion doping efficiency with kinetic energy is related to the limited deceleration rate inside a helium droplet. When the source temperature changes from 14 K to 17 K, the relative ion doping efficiency decreases rapidly, perhaps due to the lack of viable sized droplets. The size distribution of the Cs{sup +}-doped droplet beam can be measured by deflection and by energy filtering. The observed doped droplet size is about 5 × 10{sup 6} helium atoms when the source temperature is between 14 K and 17 K.

  3. Improved in vivo anti-tumor effects of IgA-Her2 antibodies through half-life extension and serum exposure enhancement by FcRn targeting.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Meyer, Saskia; Nederend, Maaike; Jansen, J H Marco; Reiding, Karli R; Jacobino, Shamir R; Meeldijk, Jan; Bovenschen, Niels; Wuhrer, Manfred; Valerius, Thomas; Ubink, Ruud; Boross, Peter; Rouwendal, Gerard; Leusen, Jeanette H W

    2016-01-01

    Antibody therapy is a validated treatment approach for several malignancies. All currently clinically applied therapeutic antibodies (Abs) are of the IgG isotype. However, not all patients respond to this therapy and relapses can occur. IgA represents an alternative isotype for antibody therapy that engages FcαRI expressing myeloid effector cells, such as neutrophils and monocytes. IgA Abs have been shown to effectively kill tumor cells both in vitro and in vivo. However, due to the short half-life of IgA Abs in mice, daily injections are required to reach an effect comparable to IgG Abs. The relatively long half-life of IgG Abs and serum albumin arises from their capability of interacting with the neonatal Fc receptor (FcRn). As IgA Abs lack a binding site for FcRn, we generated IgA Abs with the variable regions of the Her2-specific Ab trastuzumab and attached an albumin-binding domain (ABD) to the heavy or light chain (HCABD/LCABD) to extend their serum half-life. These modified Abs were able to bind albumin from different species in vitro. Furthermore, tumor cell lysis of IgA-Her2-LCABD Abs in vitro was similar to unmodified IgA-Her2 Abs. Pharmacokinetic studies in mice revealed that the serum exposure and half-life of the modified IgA-Her2 Abs was extended. In a xenograft mouse model, the modified IgA1 Abs exhibited a slightly, but significantly, improved anti-tumor response compared to the unmodified Ab. In conclusion, empowering IgA Abs with albumin-binding capacity results in in vitro and in vivo functional Abs with an enhanced exposure and prolonged half-life.

  4. Biodegradation kinetics at low concentrations (

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Toräng, Lars; Albrechtsen, Hans-Jørgen; Nyholm, Niels

    2000-01-01

    Aerobic biodegradation of 2,4-dichlorophenoxyacetic acid (2,4-D) was studied in groundwater added sediment fines. At concentrations at or below 1 mu g/L of 2,4-D degradation kinetic was of true first order without significant growth of specific degraders and with half-life for mineralization...

  5. A kinetic energy analysis of the meso beta-scale severe storm environment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fuelberg, H. E.; Printy, M. F.

    1984-01-01

    Analyses are performed of the meso beta-scale (20-200 km wavelengths and several hours to one-day periods) severe storm kinetic energy balance on the fifth day of the AVE SESAME campaign of May 1979. A 24-hr interval covering the antecedent, active and post-convective outbreak activity over Oklahoma are considered. Use is made of the kinetic energy budget equation (KEBE) for a finite volume in an isobaric coordinate system. Rawindsonde data with 75 km resolution were treated. The KEBE model covered changes in kinetic energy due to the cross contour flows, horizontal and vertical components of flux divergence, and volumic mass changes on synoptic and subsynoptic scales. The greatest variability was concentrated above 400 mb height and over the most intense storm activity. Energy was generated at the highest rates in divergence and decreased the most in convection. The meso beta-scale lacked sufficient resolution for analyzing mesoscale activity.

  6. Experimental free energy measurements of kinetic molecular states using fluctuation theorems

    CERN Document Server

    Alemany, Anna; Junier, Ivan; Ritort, Felix; 10.1038/nphys2375

    2013-01-01

    Recent advances in non-equilibrium statistical mechanics and single molecule technologies make it possible to extract free energy differences from irreversible work measurements in pulling experiments. To date, free energy recovery has been focused on native or equilibrium molecular states, whereas free energy measurements of kinetic states (i.e. finite lifetime states that are generated dynamically and are metastable) have remained unexplored. Kinetic states can play an important role in various domains of physics, such as nanotechnology or condensed matter physics. In biophysics, there are many examples where they determine the fate of molecular reactions: protein and peptide-nucleic acid binding, specific cation binding, antigen-antibody interactions, transient states in enzymatic reactions or the formation of transient intermediates and non-native structures in molecular folders. Here we demonstrate that it is possible to obtain free energies of kinetic states by applying extended fluctuation relations. T...

  7. Relativistic Momentum and Kinetic Energy, and E = mc[superscript 2

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hu, Ben Yu-Kuang

    2009-01-01

    Based on relativistic velocity addition and the conservation of momentum and energy, I present simple derivations of the expressions for the relativistic momentum and kinetic energy of a particle, and for the formula E = mc[superscript 2]. (Contains 5 footnotes and 2 figures.)

  8. Measurement of the Kinetic Energy of a Body by Means of a Deformation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Perez, Pedro J.; And Others

    1996-01-01

    Describes a technique that measures the deformation produced in a plastic material by a falling ball in order to compute the ball's kinetic energy. Varying the parameters produces accurate results and gives students a good understanding of the measurement of energy. Combines various mechanical concepts that students have learned separately in…

  9. Role of kinetic energy of impinging molecules in the α-sexithiophene growth

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Tonezzer, M.; Rigo, E.; Gottardi, S.; Bettotti, P.; Pavesi, L.; Iannotta, S.; Toccoli, T.

    2011-01-01

    We report on the α-sexithiophene sub-monolayer growth with supersonic molecular beam deposition by investigating how the kinetic energy of the impinging molecules influences the growth on substrates with different surface wettabilities and temperatures. The results show that the energy of the

  10. A novel approach to kinetic energy release distribution and charge state distribution measurements

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lee, Kaidee [National Synchrotron Radiation Research Center, Hsinchu 30077, Taiwan (China)]. E-mail: lee@nsrrc.org.tw

    2005-06-15

    When a swarm of ions are accelerated by a pulsed electric field for a common duration before entering an electrostatically dispersive energy analyzer, they will be sorted according to their charge-to-mass ratio q/m. In other words, the apparent kinetic energy upon which an ion will be registered in an apparent 'energy' spectrum thus obtained is proportional to its q/m ratio. For ions of a fixed mass m, the apparent energy spectrum becomes a charge state distribution spectrum. For ions of a fixed charge q, the apparent energy spectrum becomes a mass spectrum. In essence, an energy analyzer becomes both a charge sorter and a mass spectrometer when operated in this mode. In addition, when applied to the detection of photofragment ions, this technique will be able to yield information on the kinetic energy release distribution of the underlying dissociation events.

  11. Kinetics of energy transfer processes in C-phycocyanin complexes

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    赵井泉; 李晔

    1999-01-01

    The antenna system of algae for photosynthesis is a functional entity composed of various phycobiliproteins and the linker polypeptides. Up to now, high-resolution crystal structure data have been available only for the isolated phycobiliproteins. To have an understanding of the functional connection between different phycobiliproteins, it is necessary to study the complexes composed of different phycobiliproteins. The energy transfer processes in C-phycocyanin complexes were studied through computer simulation because it is difficult to be studied by conventional experimental methods. The main pathways of energy flow and the dynamic property of the energy transfer were obtained. A fast transfer process between two neighboring disks was observed through analyzing the distribution curves of excitation energy over time. According to the definition of the time constants for energy transfer in time-resolved spectrum techniques, for a complex with three C-phycoeyanin hexamer disks, a fluorescence-rising comp

  12. The propagation of kinetic energy across scales in turbulent flows

    CERN Document Server

    Cardesa, José I; Dong, Siwei; Jiménez, Javier

    2015-01-01

    A temporal study of energy transfer across length scales is performed in 3D numerical simulations of homogeneous shear flow and isotropic turbulence, at Reynolds numbers in the range $Re_{\\lambda}=107-384$. The average time taken by perturbations in the energy flux to travel between scales is measured and shown to be additive, as inferred from the agreement between the total travel time from a given scale to the smallest dissipative motions, and the time estimated from successive jumps through intermediate scales. Our data suggests that the propagation of disturbances in the energy flux is independent of the forcing and that it defines a `velocity' that determines the energy flux itself. These results support that the cascade is, on average, a scale-local process where energy is continuously transmitted from one scale to the next in order of decreasing size.

  13. Refinements on the age-dependent half-life model for estimating child body burdens of polychlorodibenzodioxins and dibenzofurans.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kerger, Brent D; Leung, Hon-Wing; Scott, Paul K; Paustenbach, Dennis J

    2007-04-01

    We modified our prior age-dependent half-life model to characterize the range of child (ages 0-7) body burdens associated with dietary and environmental exposure to polychlorodibenzodioxins and furans (PCDD/Fs). Several exposure scenarios were evaluated. Infants were assumed to be either breast-fed or formula-fed from birth to 6 months of age. They then received intakes of PCDD/Fs through age 7 from foods based on weighted means estimates [JECFA, 2001. Joint FAO/WHO Committee on Food Additives. Fifty-seventh meeting, Rome, June 5-14 , 2001, pp. 24-40], and with or without exposures (ingestion and dermal) to urban residential soils at 1ppb TCDD toxic equivalents (TEQ). A one-compartment (adipose volume) toxicokinetic model for TCDD described by Kreuzer [Kreuzer, P.F., Csanady, Gy.A., et al., 1997. 2,3,7,8-Tetrachlorodibenzo-p-dioxin (TCDD) and congeners in infants. A toxicokinetic model of human lifetime body burden by TCDD with special emphasis on its uptake by nutrition. Arch. Toxicol. 71, 383-400] was expanded to include the key non-TCDD congeners in human breast milk and adipose tissues, and two model parameter refinements were examined: (1) use of updated and more detailed age-correlated body fat mass data [CDC, 2000. Centers for Disease Control. CDC Growth Charts: United States. Advance Data from Vital and Health Statistics of the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, National Center for Health Statistics, Number 314, December 2000]; (2) use of breast milk PCDD/F concentration data from sampling completed in 2000-2003 [Wittsiepe, J., Fürst, P., et al., 2004. PCDD/F and dioxin-like PCB in human blood and milk from German mothers. Organohalogen Compd. 66, 2865-2872]. The updated body fat mass data nearly halved the predicted peak body burden for breast-feeding and lowered the time-weighted average (TWA) body burdens from ages 0-7 by 30-40% for breast-fed and formula-fed infants. Combined use of the updated breast milk PCDD/F concentration and body fat

  14. Estimation of the kinetic energy dissipation in fall-arrest system and manikin during fall impact.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, John Z; Powers, John R; Harris, James R; Pan, Christopher S

    2011-04-01

    Fall-arrest systems (FASs) have been widely applied to provide a safe stop during fall incidents for occupational activities. The mechanical interaction and kinetic energy exchange between the human body and the fall-arrest system during fall impact is one of the most important factors in FAS ergonomic design. In the current study, we developed a systematic approach to evaluate the energy dissipated in the energy absorbing lanyard (EAL) and in the harness/manikin during fall impact. The kinematics of the manikin and EAL during the impact were derived using the arrest-force time histories that were measured experimentally. We applied the proposed method to analyse the experimental data of drop tests at heights of 1.83 and 3.35 m. Our preliminary results indicate that approximately 84-92% of the kinetic energy is dissipated in the EAL system and the remainder is dissipated in the harness/manikin during fall impact. The proposed approach would be useful for the ergonomic design and performance evaluation of an FAS. STATEMENT OF RELEVANCE: Mechanical interaction, especially kinetic energy exchange, between the human body and the fall-arrest system during fall impact is one of the most important factors in the ergonomic design of a fall-arrest system. In the current study, we propose an approach to quantify the kinetic energy dissipated in the energy absorbing lanyard and in the harness/body system during fall impact.

  15. Kinetic energy offsets for multicharged ions from an electron beam ion source.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kulkarni, D D; Ahl, C D; Shore, A M; Miller, A J; Harriss, J E; Sosolik, C E; Marler, J P

    2017-08-01

    Using a retarding field analyzer, we have measured offsets between the nominal and measured kinetic energy of multicharged ions extracted from an electron beam ion source (EBIS). By varying source parameters, a shift in ion kinetic energy was attributed to the trapping potential produced by the space charge of the electron beam within the EBIS. The space charge of the electron beam depends on its charge density, which in turn depends on the amount of negative charge (electron beam current) and its velocity (electron beam energy). The electron beam current and electron beam energy were both varied to obtain electron beams of varying space charge and these were related to the observed kinetic energy offsets for Ar(4+) and Ar(8+) ion beams. Knowledge of these offsets is important for studies that seek to utilize slow, i.e., low kinetic energy, multicharged ions to exploit their high potential energies for processes such as surface modification. In addition, we show that these offsets can be utilized to estimate the effective radius of the electron beam inside the trap.

  16. Self-powered water splitting using flowing kinetic energy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tang, Wei; Han, Yu; Han, Chang Bao; Gao, Cai Zhen; Cao, Xia; Wang, Zhong Lin

    2015-01-14

    By utilizing a water-flow-driven triboelectric nanogenerator, a fully self-powered water-splitting process is demonstrated using the electricity converted from a water flow without additional energy costs. Considering the extremely low costs, the demonstrated approach is universally applicable and practically usable for future water electrolysis, which may initiate a research direction in the field of triboelectrolysis and possibly impacts energy science in general. © 2014 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  17. Exact kinetic energy enables accurate evaluation of weak interactions by the FDE-vdW method.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sinha, Debalina; Pavanello, Michele

    2015-08-28

    The correlation energy of interaction is an elusive and sought-after interaction between molecular systems. By partitioning the response function of the system into subsystem contributions, the Frozen Density Embedding (FDE)-vdW method provides a computationally amenable nonlocal correlation functional based on the adiabatic connection fluctuation dissipation theorem applied to subsystem density functional theory. In reproducing potential energy surfaces of weakly interacting dimers, we show that FDE-vdW, either employing semilocal or exact nonadditive kinetic energy functionals, is in quantitative agreement with high-accuracy coupled cluster calculations (overall mean unsigned error of 0.5 kcal/mol). When employing the exact kinetic energy (which we term the Kohn-Sham (KS)-vdW method), the binding energies are generally closer to the benchmark, and the energy surfaces are also smoother.

  18. Exact kinetic energy enables accurate evaluation of weak interactions by the FDE-vdW method

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sinha, Debalina; Pavanello, Michele, E-mail: m.pavanello@rutgers.edu [Department of Chemistry, Rutgers University, Newark, New Jersey 07102 (United States)

    2015-08-28

    The correlation energy of interaction is an elusive and sought-after interaction between molecular systems. By partitioning the response function of the system into subsystem contributions, the Frozen Density Embedding (FDE)-vdW method provides a computationally amenable nonlocal correlation functional based on the adiabatic connection fluctuation dissipation theorem applied to subsystem density functional theory. In reproducing potential energy surfaces of weakly interacting dimers, we show that FDE-vdW, either employing semilocal or exact nonadditive kinetic energy functionals, is in quantitative agreement with high-accuracy coupled cluster calculations (overall mean unsigned error of 0.5 kcal/mol). When employing the exact kinetic energy (which we term the Kohn-Sham (KS)-vdW method), the binding energies are generally closer to the benchmark, and the energy surfaces are also smoother.

  19. Numerical simulation and decomposition of kinetic energy in the Central Mediterranean: insight on mesoscale circulation and energy conversion

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    R. Sorgente

    2011-08-01

    Full Text Available The spatial and temporal variability of eddy and mean kinetic energy of the Central Mediterranean region has been investigated, from January 2008 to December 2010, by mean of a numerical simulation mainly to quantify the mesoscale dynamics and their relationships with physical forcing. In order to understand the energy redistribution processes, the baroclinic energy conversion has been analysed, suggesting hypotheses about the drivers of the mesoscale activity in this area. The ocean model used is based on the Princeton Ocean Model implemented at 1/32° horizontal resolution. Surface momentum and buoyancy fluxes are interactively computed by mean of standard bulk formulae using predicted model Sea Surface Temperature and atmospheric variables provided by the European Centre for Medium Range Weather Forecast operational analyses. At its lateral boundaries the model is one-way nested within the Mediterranean Forecasting System operational products.

    The model domain has been subdivided in four sub-regions: Sardinia channel and southern Tyrrhenian Sea, Sicily channel, eastern Tunisian shelf and Libyan Sea. Temporal evolution of eddy and mean kinetic energy has been analysed, on each of the four sub-regions, showing different behaviours. On annual scales and within the first 5 m depth, the eddy kinetic energy represents approximately the 60 % of the total kinetic energy over the whole domain, confirming the strong mesoscale nature of the surface current flows in this area. The analyses show that the model well reproduces the path and the temporal behaviour of the main known sub-basin circulation features. New mesoscale structures have been also identified, from numerical results and direct observations, for the first time as the Pantelleria Vortex and the Medina Gyre.

    The classical kinetic energy decomposition (eddy and mean allowed to depict and to quantify the permanent and fluctuating parts of the circulation in the region, and

  20. The kinetic and available potential energy budget of a winter extratropical cyclone system

    OpenAIRE

    SMITH, PHILLIP J.; DARE, PATRICIA M.

    2011-01-01

    The energy budget of an extratropical cyclone system which traversed North America and intensified through the period 9–11 January 1975 is presented. The objectives of the study are (1) to document the complete energy budget of a significant winter cyclone event, and (2) to comment on the significance of latent heat release (LHR) in the cyclone's evolution. Results reveal an overall increase in both kinetic (K) and available potential energy (A). K increases are accounted for by boundary flux...

  1. Electron-lattice energy exchange in metal nanoparticles. Quantum-kinetic and classical approaches

    OpenAIRE

    Tomchuk, Petro; Bilotsky, Yevgen

    2014-01-01

    We obtained the electron-lattice energy transfer constant in metal nanoparticles (MN), in quantum-mechanical and classical approach using the deformation potential Bardeen-Shockley and found the changes of the electron-lattice energy exchange (due to the finite size MN) in the quantum kinetic approach caused by the discrete phonon spectrum. The condition when the discrete phonon spectrum could be observed via the electron-phonon energy exchange has been obtained. It was shown that the classic...

  2. Connecting the kinetics and energy landscape of tRNA translocation on the ribosome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Whitford, Paul C; Blanchard, Scott C; Cate, Jamie H D; Sanbonmatsu, Karissa Y

    2013-01-01

    Functional rearrangements in biomolecular assemblies result from diffusion across an underlying energy landscape. While bulk kinetic measurements rely on discrete state-like approximations to the energy landscape, single-molecule methods can project the free energy onto specific coordinates. With measures of the diffusion, one may establish a quantitative bridge between state-like kinetic measurements and the continuous energy landscape. We used an all-atom molecular dynamics simulation of the 70S ribosome (2.1 million atoms; 1.3 microseconds) to provide this bridge for specific conformational events associated with the process of tRNA translocation. Starting from a pre-translocation configuration, we identified sets of residues that collectively undergo rotary rearrangements implicated in ribosome function. Estimates of the diffusion coefficients along these collective coordinates for translocation were then used to interconvert between experimental rates and measures of the energy landscape. This analysis, in conjunction with previously reported experimental rates of translocation, provides an upper-bound estimate of the free-energy barriers associated with translocation. While this analysis was performed for a particular kinetic scheme of translocation, the quantitative framework is general and may be applied to energetic and kinetic descriptions that include any number of intermediates and transition states.

  3. Properties of the kinetic energy budgets in wall-bounded turbulent flows

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhou, Ang; Klewicki, Joseph

    2016-08-01

    Available high-quality numerical simulation data are used to investigate and characterize the kinetic energy budgets for fully developed turbulent flow in pipes and channels, and in the zero-pressure gradient turbulent boundary layer. The mean kinetic energy equation in these flows is empirically and analytically shown to respectively exhibit the same four-layer leading-order balance structure as the mean momentum equation. This property of the mean kinetic energy budget provides guidance on how to group terms in the more complicated turbulence and total kinetic energy budgets. Under the suggested grouping, the turbulence budget shows either a two- or three-layer structure (depending on channel or pipe versus boundary layer flow), while the total kinetic energy budget exhibits a clear four-layer structure. These layers, however, differ in position and size and exhibit variations with friction Reynolds number (δ+) that are distinct from the layer structure associated with the mean dynamics. The present analyses indicate that each of the four layers is characterized by a predominance of a reduced set of the grouped terms in the governing equation. The width of the third layer is mathematically reasoned to scale like δ+-√{δ+} at finite Reynolds numbers. In the boundary layer the upper bounds of both the second and third layers convincingly merge under this normalization, as does the width of the third layer. This normalization also seems to be valid for the width of the third layer in pipes and channels, but only for δ+>1000 . The leading-order balances in the total kinetic energy budget are shown to arise from a nontrivial interweaving of the mean and turbulence budget contributions with distance from the wall.

  4. Neutron emission effects on final fragments mass and kinetic energy distribution from low energy fission of {sup 234}U

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Montoya, M.; Rojas, J. [Instituto Peruano de Energia Nuclear, Av. Canada 1470, Lima 41 (Peru); Lobato, I. [Facultad de Ciencias, Universidad Nacional de Ingenieria, Av. Tupac Amaru 210, Apartado Postal 31-139, Lima (Peru)]. e-mail: mmontoya@ipen.gob.pe

    2008-07-01

    The standard deviation of the final kinetic energy distribution ({sigma}{sub e}) as a function of mass of final fragments (m) from low energy fission of {sup 234}U, measured with the Lohengrin spectrometer by Belhafaf et al., presents a peak around m = 109 and another around m = 122. The authors attribute the first peak to the evaporation of a large number of neutrons around the corresponding mass number, i.e. there is no peak on the standard deviation of the primary kinetic energy distribution ({sigma}{sub E}) as a function of primary fragment mass (A). The second peak is attributed to a real peak on {sigma}{sub E}(A). However, theoretical calculations related to primary distributions made by H.R. Faust and Z. Bao do not suggest any peak on {sigma}{sub E}(A). In order to clarify this apparent controversy, we have made a numerical experiment in which the masses and the kinetic energy of final fragments are calculated, assuming an initial distribution of the kinetic energy without structures on the standard deviation as function of fragment mass. As a result we obtain a pronounced peak on {sigma}{sub e} (m) curve around m = 109, a depletion from m = 121 to m = 129, and an small peak around m = 122, which is not as great as that measured by Belhafaf et al. Our simulation also reproduces the experimental results on the yield of the final mass Y(m), the average number of emitted neutrons as a function of the provisional mass (calculated from the values of the final kinetic energy of the complementary fragments) and the average value of fragment kinetic energy as a function of the final mass. From our results we conclude that there are no peaks on the {sigma}{sub E} (A) curve, and the observed peaks on {sigma}{sub e} (m) are due to the emitted neutron multiplicity and the variation of the average fragment kinetic energy as a function of primary fragment mass. (Author)

  5. [Responses of biological soil crust to and its relief effect on raindrop kinetic energy].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Qin, Ning-qiang; Zhao, Yun-ge

    2011-09-01

    Based on the field investigation and by the method of simulated single-drop rain, this paper studied the responses of different types of biological soil crusts (biocrusts) in the wind-water erosion interleaving region of Loess Plateau to and their relief effect on the kinetic energy of raindrops. The responses of the biocrusts to raindrop kinetic energy had close relations with their biological composition. The cyanobacteria-dominated biocrusts with a thickness of 1 cm and the moss-dominated biocrusts with the coverage of 80% could resist in 0.99 J and 75.56 J of cumulative rain drop kinetic energy, respectively, and the potential resistance of the biocrusts with the same biological compositions was relative to the biomass of the biological compositions, i.e., the larger the biomass, the higher the resistance. As the chlorophyll a content of cyanobacteria- dominated biocrusts (which characterizes the cyanobacterial biomass) increased from 3.32 to 3.73 microg x g(-1), the resistance of the biocrusts against the cumulative raindrop kinetic energy increased from 0.99 to 2.17 J; when the moss biomass in the moss- dominated biocrusts increased from 2.03 to 4.73 g x dm(-2), the resistance of the crusts increased from 6.08 to 75.56 J. During the succession of the biocrusts, their responses to the raindrop kinetic energy presented an "S" pattern. No significant differences in the resistance against raindrop cumulative kinetic energy were observed between the cyanobacteria-dominated biocrusts with variable biomass, but the resistance of moss-dominated biocrusts increased significantly as their biomass per unit area increased. The resistance of moss-dominated biocrusts increased linearly when their biomass increased from 2.03 g x dm(-2) to 4.73 g x dm(-2). The moss-dominated biocrusts could resist in 62.03 J of raindrop kinetic energy when their biomass was up to 3.70 g x dm(-2). Biocrusts had obvious effects in relieving raindrop kinetic energy, and the relief effect

  6. The Kinetic Energy of Hydrocarbons as a Function of Electron Density and Convolutional Neural Networks

    CERN Document Server

    Yao, Kun

    2015-01-01

    We demonstrate a convolutional neural network trained to reproduce the Kohn-Sham kinetic energy of hydrocarbons from electron density. The output of the network is used as a non-local correction to the conventional local and semi-local kinetic functionals. We show that this approximation qualitatively reproduces Kohn-Sham potential energy surfaces when used with conventional exchange correlation functionals. Numerical noise inherited from the non-linearity of the neural network is identified as the major challenge for the model. Finally we examine the features in the density learned by the neural network to anticipate the prospects of generalizing these models.

  7. Energy-Driven Kinetic Monte Carlo Method and Its Application in Fullerene Coalescence.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ding, Feng; Yakobson, Boris I

    2014-09-04

    Mimicking the conventional barrier-based kinetic Monte Carlo simulation, an energy-driven kinetic Monte Carlo (EDKMC) method was developed to study the structural transformation of carbon nanomaterials. The new method is many orders magnitude faster than standard molecular dynamics or Monte Marlo (MC) simulations and thus allows us to explore rare events within a reasonable computational time. As an example, the temperature dependence of fullerene coalescence was studied. The simulation, for the first time, revealed that short capped single-walled carbon nanotubes (SWNTs) appear as low-energy metastable structures during the structural evolution.

  8. Theoretical study of atoms by the electronic kinetic energy density and stress tensor density

    CERN Document Server

    Nozaki, Hiroo; Tachibana, Akitomo

    2016-01-01

    We analyze the electronic structure of atoms in the first, second and third periods using the electronic kinetic energy density and stress tensor density, which are local quantities motivated by quantum field theoretic consideration, specifically the rigged quantum electrodynamics. We compute the zero surfaces of the electronic kinetic energy density, which we call the electronic interfaces, of the atoms. We find that their sizes exhibit clear periodicity and are comparable to the conventional atomic and ionic radii. We also compute the electronic stress tensor density and its divergence, tension density, of the atoms, and discuss how their electronic structures are characterized by them.

  9. On the possibility of kinetic energy density evaluation from the experimental electron-density distribution

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Abramov, Yu.A. [National Inst. for Research in Inorganic Materials, Tsukuba, Ibaraki (Japan)

    1997-05-01

    A simple new approach for the evaluation of the electronic kinetic energy density, G(r), from the experimental (multipole-fitted) electron density is proposed. It allows a quantitative and semi-quantitative description of the G(r) behavior at the bond critical points of compounds with closed-shell and shared interactions, respectively. This can provide information on the values of the kinetic electron energy densities at the bond critical points, which appears to be useful for quantum-topological studies of chemical interactions using experimental electron densities. (orig.).

  10. Theoretical Study of Lithium Ionic Conductors by Electronic Stress Tensor Density and Electronic Kinetic Energy Density

    CERN Document Server

    Nozaki, Hiroo; Ichikawa, Kazuhide; Watanabe, Taku; Aihara, Yuichi; Tachibana, Akitomo

    2016-01-01

    We analyze the electronic structure of lithium ionic conductors, ${\\rm Li_3PO_4}$ and ${\\rm Li_3PS_4}$, using the electronic stress tensor density and kinetic energy density with special focus on the ionic bonds among them. We find that, as long as we examine the pattern of the eigenvalues of the electronic stress tensor density, we cannot distinguish between the ionic bonds and bonds among metalloid atoms. We then show that they can be distinguished by looking at the morphology of the electronic interface, the zero surface of the electronic kinetic energy density.

  11. On the estimation of cooperativity in ion channel kinetics: activation free energy and kinetic mechanism of Shaker K+ channel.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Banerjee, Kinshuk; Das, Biswajit; Gangopadhyay, Gautam

    2013-04-28

    In this paper, we have explored generic criteria of cooperative behavior in ion channel kinetics treating it on the same footing with multistate receptor-ligand binding in a compact theoretical framework. We have shown that the characterization of cooperativity of ion channels in terms of the Hill coefficient violates the standard Hill criteria defined for allosteric cooperativity of ligand binding. To resolve the issue, an alternative measure of cooperativity is proposed here in terms of the cooperativity index that sets a unified criteria for both the systems. More importantly, for ion channel this index can be very useful to describe the cooperative kinetics as it can be readily determined from the experimentally measured ionic current combined with theoretical modelling. We have analyzed the correlation between the voltage value and slope of the voltage-activation curve at the half-activation point and consequently determined the standard free energy of activation of the ion channel using two well-established mechanisms of cooperativity, namely, Koshland-Nemethy-Filmer (KNF) and Monod-Wyman-Changeux (MWC) models. Comparison of the theoretical results for both the models with appropriate experimental data of mutational perturbation of Shaker K(+) channel supports the experimental fact that the KNF model is more suitable to describe the cooperative behavior of this class of ion channels, whereas the performance of the MWC model is unsatisfactory. We have also estimated the mechanistic performance through standard free energy of channel activation for both the models and proposed a possible functional disadvantage in the MWC scheme.

  12. Bio-kinetic energy harvesting using electroactive polymers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Slade, Jeremiah R.; Bowman, Jeremy; Kornbluh, Roy

    2012-06-01

    In hybrid vehicles, electric motors are used on each wheel to not only propel the car but also to decelerate the car by acting as generators. In the case of the human body, muscles spend about half of their time acting as a brake, absorbing energy, or doing what is known as negative work. Using dielectric elastomers it is possible to use the "braking" phases of walking to generate power without restricting or fatiguing the Warfighter. Infoscitex and SRI have developed and demonstrated methods for using electroactive polymers (EAPs) to tap into the negative work generated at the knee during the deceleration phase of the human gait cycle and convert it into electrical power that can be used to support wearable information systems, including display and communication technologies. The specific class of EAP that has been selected for these applications is termed dielectric elastomers. Because dielectric elastomers dissipate very little mechanical energy into heat, greater amounts of energy can be converted into electricity than by any other method. The long term vision of this concept is to have EAP energy harvesting cells located in components of the Warfighter ensemble, such as the boot uppers, knee pads and eventually even the clothing itself. By properly locating EAPs at these sites it will be possible to not only harvest power from the negative work phase but to actually reduce the amount of work done by the Warfighter's muscles during this phase, thereby reducing fatigue and minimizing the forces transmitted to the joints.

  13. Influence of the Richtmyer-Meshkov instability on the kinetic energy spectrum.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Weber, Christopher R. (University of Wisconsin-Madison, Madison, WI)

    2010-09-01

    The fluctuating kinetic energy spectrum in the region near the Richtmyer-Meshkov instability (RMI) is experimentally investigated using particle image velocimetry (PIV). The velocity field is measured at a high spatial resolution in the light gas to observe the effects of turbulence production and dissipation. It is found that the RMI acts as a source of turbulence production near the unstable interface, where energy is transferred from the scales of the perturbation to smaller scales until dissipation. The interface also has an effect on the kinetic energy spectrum farther away by means of the distorted reflected shock wave. The energy spectrum far from the interface initially has a higher energy content than that of similar experiments with a flat interface. These differences are quick to disappear as dissipation dominates the flow far from the interface.

  14. Magnetic to magnetic and kinetic to magnetic energy transfers at the top of the Earth's core

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huguet, Ludovic; Amit, Hagay; Alboussière, Thierry

    2016-11-01

    We develop the theory for the magnetic to magnetic and kinetic to magnetic energy transfer between different spherical harmonic degrees due to the interaction of fluid flow and radial magnetic field at the top of the Earth's core. We show that non-zero secular variation of the total magnetic energy could be significant and may provide evidence for the existence of stretching secular variation, which suggests the existence of radial motions at the top of the Earth's core-whole core convection or MAC waves. However, the uncertainties of the small scales of the geomagnetic field prevent a definite conclusion. Combining core field and flow models we calculate the detailed magnetic to magnetic and kinetic to magnetic energy transfer matrices. The magnetic to magnetic energy transfer shows a complex behaviour with local and non-local transfers. The spectra of magnetic to magnetic energy transfers show clear maxima and minima, suggesting an energy cascade. The kinetic to magnetic energy transfers, which are much weaker due to the weak poloidal flow, are either local or non-local between degree one and higher degrees. The patterns observed in the matrices resemble energy transfer patterns that are typically found in 3-D MHD numerical simulations.

  15. An Estimation of Turbulent Kinetic Energy and Energy Dissipation Rate Based on Atmospheric Boundary Layer Similarity Theory

    Science.gov (United States)

    Han, Jongil; Arya, S. Pal; Shaohua, Shen; Lin, Yuh-Lang; Proctor, Fred H. (Technical Monitor)

    2000-01-01

    Algorithms are developed to extract atmospheric boundary layer profiles for turbulence kinetic energy (TKE) and energy dissipation rate (EDR), with data from a meteorological tower as input. The profiles are based on similarity theory and scalings for the atmospheric boundary layer. The calculated profiles of EDR and TKE are required to match the observed values at 5 and 40 m. The algorithms are coded for operational use and yield plausible profiles over the diurnal variation of the atmospheric boundary layer.

  16. Measurement of the two-neutrino double-beta decay half-life of {sup 130}Te with the CUORE-0 experiment

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Alduino, C.; Avignone, F.T.; Chott, N.; Creswick, R.J.; Rosenfeld, C.; Wilson, J. [University of South Carolina, Department of Physics and Astronomy, Columbia, SC (United States); Alfonso, K.; Hickerson, K.P.; Huang, H.Z.; Liu, X.; Trentalange, S.; Zhu, B.X. [University of California, Department of Physics and Astronomy, Los Angeles, CA (United States); Artusa, D.R. [University of South Carolina, Department of Physics and Astronomy, Columbia, SC (United States); INFN-Laboratori Nazionali del Gran Sasso, Assergi, L' Aquila (Italy); Azzolini, O.; Camacho, A.; Keppel, G.; Palmieri, V.; Pira, C. [INFN-Laboratori Nazionali di Legnaro, Legnaro, Padova (Italy); Banks, T.I.; Drobizhev, A.; Freedman, S.J.; Hennings-Yeomans, R.; O' Donnell, T.; Wagaarachchi, S.L. [University of California, Department of Physics, Berkeley, CA (United States); Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory, Nuclear Science Division, Berkeley, CA (United States); Bari, G.; Deninno, M.M. [INFN-Sezione di Bologna, Bologna (Italy); Beeman, J.W. [Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory, Materials Science Division, Berkeley, CA (United States); Bellini, F.; Cardani, L.; Casali, N.; Cosmelli, C.; Ferroni, F. [Sapienza Universita di Roma, Dipartimento di Fisica, Rome (Italy); INFN-Sezione di Roma, Rome (Italy); Bersani, A.; Caminata, A. [INFN-Sezione di Genova, Genova (Italy); Biassoni, M.; Carbone, L.; Cremonesi, O.; Ferri, E.; Giachero, A.; Pessina, G.; Previtali, E.; Rusconi, C. [INFN-Sezione di Milano Bicocca, Milan (Italy); Brofferio, C.; Capelli, S.; Carniti, P.; Cassina, L.; Chiesa, D.; Clemenza, M.; Faverzani, M.; Fiorini, E.; Gironi, L.; Gotti, C.; Maino, M.; Nucciotti, A.; Pavan, M.; Pozzi, S.; Sisti, M.; Terranova, F.; Zanotti, L. [Universita di Milano-Bicocca, Dipartimento di Fisica, Milan (Italy); INFN-Sezione di Milano Bicocca, Milan (Italy); Bucci, C.; Cappelli, L.; D' Addabbo, A.; Di Vacri, M.L.; Gorla, P.; Pattavina, L.; Pirro, S. [INFN-Laboratori Nazionali del Gran Sasso, Assergi, L' Aquila (Italy); Canonica, L. [INFN-Laboratori Nazionali del Gran Sasso, Assergi, L' Aquila (Italy); Massachusetts Institute of Technology, Cambridge, MA (United States); Cao, X.G.; Fang, D.Q.; Ma, Y.G.; Wang, H.W.; Zhang, G.Q. [Chinese Academy of Sciences, Shanghai Institute of Applied Physics, Shanghai (China); Copello, S.; Di Domizio, S.; Fernandes, G.; Marini, L.; Pallavicini, M. [INFN-Sezione di Genova, Genova (Italy); Universita di Genova, Dipartimento di Fisica, Genova (Italy); Cushman, J.S.; Davis, C.J.; Heeger, K.M.; Lim, K.E.; Maruyama, R.H. [Yale University, Department of Physics, New Haven, CT (United States); Dafinei, I.; Morganti, S.; Mosteiro, P.J.; Orio, F.; Pettinacci, V.; Tomei, C.; Vignati, M. [INFN-Sezione di Roma, Rome (Italy); Dell' Oro, S. [INFN-Laboratori Nazionali del Gran Sasso, Assergi, L' Aquila (Italy); INFN-Gran Sasso Science Institute, L' Aquila (Italy); Feintzeig, J.; Fujikawa, B.K.; Mei, Y.; Smith, A.R. [Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory, Nuclear Science Division, Berkeley, CA (United States); Franceschi, M.A.; Ligi, C.; Napolitano, T.; Piperno, G. [INFN-Laboratori Nazionali di Frascati, Frascati, Rome (Italy); Giuliani, A.; Tenconi, M. [Universite Paris-Saclay, CSNSM, Univ. Paris-Sud, CNRS/IN2P3, Orsay (France); Gladstone, L.; Leder, A.; Winslow, L.A. [Massachusetts Institute of Technology, Cambridge, MA (United States); Gutierrez, T.D. [California Polytechnic State University, Physics Department, San Luis Obispo, CA (United States); Haller, E.E. [Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory, Materials Science Division, Berkeley, CA (United States); University of California, Department of Materials Science and Engineering, Berkeley, CA (United States); Han, K. [Yale University, Department of Physics, New Haven, CT (United States); Shanghai Jiao Tong University, Department of Physics and Astronomy, Shanghai (China); Hansen, E. [University of California, Department of Physics and Astronomy, Los Angeles, CA (United States); Massachusetts Institute of Technology, Cambridge, MA (United States); Kadel, R. [Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory, Physics Division, Berkeley, CA (United States); Kolomensky, Yu.G. [University of California, Department of Physics, Berkeley, CA (United States); Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory, Nuclear Science Division, Berkeley, CA (United States); Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory, Physics Division, Berkeley, CA (United States); Martinez, M. [Sapienza Universita di Roma, Dipartimento di Fisica, Rome (Italy); INFN-Sezione di Roma, Rome (Italy); Universidad de Zaragoza, Laboratorio de Fisica Nuclear y Astroparticulas, Zaragoza (Spain); Moggi, N. [INFN-Sezione di Bologna, Bologna (Italy); Alma Mater Studiorum-Universita di Bologna, Dipartimento di Scienze per la Qualita della Vita, Bologna (Italy); Nones, C. [Service de Physique des Particules, CEA/Saclay, Gif-sur-Yvette (France); Norman, E.B.; Wang, B.S. [Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory, Livermore, CA (United States); University of California, Department of Nuclear Engineering, Berkeley, CA (United States); Ouellet, J.L. [University of California, Department of Physics, Berkeley, CA (United States); Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory, Nuclear Science Division, Berkeley, CA (United States); Massachusetts Institute of Technology, Cambridge, MA (United States); Pagliarone, C.E. [INFN-Laboratori Nazionali del Gran Sasso, Assergi, L' Aquila (Italy); Universita degli Studi di Cassino e del Lazio Meridionale, Dipartimento di Ingegneria Civile e Meccanica, Cassino (Italy); Sangiorgio, S.; Scielzo, N.D. [Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory, Livermore, CA (United States); Santone, D. [INFN-Laboratori Nazionali del Gran Sasso, Assergi, L' Aquila (Italy); Universita dell' Aquila, Dipartimento di Scienze Fisiche e Chimiche, L' Aquila (Italy); Singh, V. [University of California, Department of Physics, Berkeley, CA (US); Taffarello, L. [INFN-Sezione di Padova, Padova (IT); Wise, T. [Yale University, Department of Physics, New Haven, CT (US); University of Wisconsin, Department of Physics, Madison, WI (US); Woodcraft, A. [University of Edinburgh, SUPA, Institute for Astronomy, Edinburgh (GB); Zimmermann, S. [Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory, Engineering Division, Berkeley, CA (US); Zucchelli, S. [INFN-Sezione di Bologna, Bologna (IT); Alma Mater Studiorum-Universita di Bologna, Dipartimento di Fisica e Astronomia, Bologna (IT)

    2017-01-15

    We report on the measurement of the two-neutrino double-beta decay half-life of {sup 130}Te with the CUORE-0 detector. From an exposure of 33.4 kg year of TeO{sub 2}, the half-life is determined to be T{sub 1/2}{sup 2ν} = [8.2 ± 0.2 (stat.) ± 0.6 (syst.)] x 10{sup 20} year. This result is obtained after a detailed reconstruction of the sources responsible for the CUORE-0 counting rate, with a specific study of those contributing to the {sup 130}Te neutrinoless double-beta decay region of interest. (orig.)

  17. Measurement of the two-neutrino double-beta decay half-life of $^{130}$ Te with the CUORE-0 experiment

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Alduino, C.; Alfonso, K.; Artusa, D. R.; Avignone, F. T.; Azzolini, O.; Banks, T. I.; Bari, G.; Beeman, J. W.; Bellini, F.; Bersani, A.; Biassoni, M.; Brofferio, C.; Bucci, C.; Camacho, A.; Caminata, A.; Canonica, L.; Cao, X. G.; Capelli, S.; Cappelli, L.; Carbone, L.; Cardani, L.; Carniti, P.; Casali, N.; Cassina, L.; Chiesa, D.; Chott, N.; Clemenza, M.; Copello, S.; Cosmelli, C.; Cremonesi, O.; Creswick, R. J.; Cushman, J. S.; D’Addabbo, A.; Dafinei, I.; Davis, C. J.; Dell’Oro, S.; Deninno, M. M.; Di Domizio, S.; Di Vacri, M. L.; Drobizhev, A.; Fang, D. Q.; Faverzani, M.; Feintzeig, J.; Fernandes, G.; Ferri, E.; Ferroni, F.; Fiorini, E.; Franceschi, M. A.; Freedman, S. J.; Fujikawa, B. K.; Giachero, A.; Gironi, L.; Giuliani, A.; Gladstone, L.; Gorla, P.; Gotti, C.; Gutierrez, T. D.; Haller, E. E.; Han, K.; Hansen, E.; Heeger, K. M.; Hennings-Yeomans, R.; Hickerson, K. P.; Huang, H. Z.; Kadel, R.; Keppel, G.; Kolomensky, Yu. G.; Leder, A.; Ligi, C.; Lim, K. E.; Liu, X.; Ma, Y. G.; Maino, M.; Marini, L.; Martinez, M.; Maruyama, R. H.; Mei, Y.; Moggi, N.; Morganti, S.; Mosteiro, P. J.; Napolitano, T.; Nones, C.; Norman, E. B.; Nucciotti, A.; O’Donnell, T.; Orio, F.; Ouellet, J. L.; Pagliarone, C. E.; Pallavicini, M.; Palmieri, V.; Pattavina, L.; Pavan, M.; Pessina, G.; Pettinacci, V.; Piperno, G.; Pira, C.; Pirro, S.; Pozzi, S.; Previtali, E.; Rosenfeld, C.; Rusconi, C.; Sangiorgio, S.; Santone, D.; Scielzo, N. D.; Singh, V.; Sisti, M.; Smith, A. R.; Taffarello, L.; Tenconi, M.; Terranova, F.; Tomei, C.; Trentalange, S.; Vignati, M.; Wagaarachchi, S. L.; Wang, B. S.; Wang, H. W.; Wilson, J.; Winslow, L. A.; Wise, T.; Woodcraft, A.; Zanotti, L.; Zhang, G. Q.; Zhu, B. X.; Zimmermann, S.; Zucchelli, S.

    2017-01-01

    We report on the measurement of the two-neutrino double-beta decay half-life of 130 Te with the CUORE-0 detector. From an exposure of 33.4 kg year of TeO 22 , the half-life is determined to be T$2ν\\atop{1/2}$ = [8.2 ± 0.2 (stat.) ± 0.6 (syst.)] ×× 10 20 year. This result is obtained after a detailed reconstruction of the sources responsible for the CUORE-0 counting rate, with a specific study of those contributing to the 130130 Te neutrinoless double-beta decay region of interest.

  18. Energy transfer and dual cascade in kinetic magnetized plasma turbulence.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Plunk, G G; Tatsuno, T

    2011-04-22

    The question of how nonlinear interactions redistribute the energy of fluctuations across available degrees of freedom is of fundamental importance in the study of turbulence and transport in magnetized weakly collisional plasmas, ranging from space settings to fusion devices. In this Letter, we present a theory for the dual cascade found in such plasmas, which predicts a range of new behavior that distinguishes this cascade from that of neutral fluid turbulence. These phenomena are explained in terms of the constrained nature of spectral transfer in nonlinear gyrokinetics. Accompanying this theory are the first observations of these phenomena, obtained via direct numerical simulations using the gyrokinetic code AstroGK. The basic mechanisms that are found provide a framework for understanding the turbulent energy transfer that couples scales both locally and nonlocally.

  19. I-Xe systematics of the impact plume produced chondrules from the CB carbonaceous chondrites: Implications for the half-life value of 129I and absolute age normalization of 129I-129Xe chronometer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pravdivtseva, O.; Meshik, A.; Hohenberg, C. M.; Krot, A. N.

    2017-03-01

    0.6 Ma value for 129I half-life. The slopes of I-Xe - Pb-Pb correlation lines plotted for different sets of samples for Shallowater normalization are always ⩽1. Assuming uranium half-life values are correct; this restricts the half-life of 129I to ⩽15.7 Ma.

  20. Energy dynamics and current sheet structure in fluid and kinetic simulations of decaying magnetohydrodynamic turbulence

    CERN Document Server

    Makwana, K D; Li, H; Daughton, W; Cattaneo, F

    2014-01-01

    Simulations of decaying magnetohydrodynamic (MHD) turbulence are performed with a fluid and a kinetic code. The initial condition is an ensemble of long-wavelength, counter-propagating, shear-Alfv\\'{e}n waves, which interfere and rapidly generate strong MHD turbulence. The total energy is conserved and the rate of turbulent energy decay is very similar in both codes, although the fluid code has numerical dissipation whereas the kinetic code has kinetic dissipation. The inertial range power spectrum index is similar in both the codes. The fluid code shows a perpendicular wavenumber spectral slope of $k_{\\perp}^{-1.3}$. The kinetic code shows a spectral slope of $k_{\\perp}^{-1.5}$ for smaller simulation domain, and $k_{\\perp}^{-1.3}$ for larger domain. We estimate that collisionless damping mechanisms in the kinetic code can account for the dissipation of the observed nonlinear energy cascade. Current sheets are geometrically characterized. Their lengths and widths are in good agreement between the two codes. T...

  1. A novel exendin-4 human serum albumin fusion protein, E2HSA, with an extended half-life and good glucoregulatory effect in healthy rhesus monkeys

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zhang, Ling; Wang, Lin; Meng, Zhiyun; Gan, Hui; Gu, Ruolan; Wu, Zhuona; Gao, Lei; Zhu, Xiaoxia; Sun, Wenzhong; Li, Jian; Zheng, Ying; Dou, Guifang, E-mail: douguifang@vip.163.com

    2014-03-07

    Highlights: • E2HSA has an extended half-life and good plasma stability. • E2HSA could improve glucose-dependent insulin secretion. • E2HSA has excellent glucoregulatory effects in vivo. • E2HSA could potentially be used as a new long-acting GLP-1 receptor agonist for type 2 diabetes management. - Abstract: Glucagon-like peptide-1 (GLP-1) has attracted considerable research interest in terms of the treatment of type 2 diabetes due to their multiple glucoregulatory functions. However, the short half-life, rapid inactivation by dipeptidyl peptidase-IV (DPP-IV) and excretion, limits the therapeutic potential of the native incretin hormone. Therefore, efforts are being made to develop the long-acting incretin mimetics via modifying its structure. Here we report a novel recombinant exendin-4 human serum albumin fusion protein E2HSA with HSA molecule extends their circulatory half-life in vivo while still retaining exendin-4 biological activity and therapeutic properties. In vitro comparisons of E2HSA and exendin-4 showed similar insulinotropic activity on rat pancreatic islets and GLP-1R-dependent biological activity on RIN-m5F cells, although E2HSA was less potent than exendin-4. E2HSA had a terminal elimation half-life of approximate 54 h in healthy rhesus monkeys. Furthermore, E2HSA could reduce postprandial glucose excursion and control fasting glucose level, dose-dependent suppress food intake. Improvement in glucose-dependent insulin secretion and control serum glucose excursions were observed during hyperglycemic clamp test (18 h) and oral glucose tolerance test (42 h) respectively. Thus the improved physiological characterization of E2HSA make it a new potent anti-diabetic drug for type 2 diabetes therapy.

  2. Nicotinic stimulation modulates tyrosine hydroxylase mRNA half-life and protein binding to the 3'UTR in a manner that requires transcription.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roe, David F; Craviso, Gale L; Waymire, Jack C

    2004-01-05

    Tyrosine hydroxylase (TH) expression increases in adrenal chromaffin cells treated with the nicotinic agonist, dimethylphenylpiperazinium (DMPP; 1 microM). We are using this response as a model of the changes in TH level that occur during increased cholinergic neural activity. Here we report a 4-fold increase in TH mRNA half-life in DMPP-treated cells chromaffin cells that is apparent when using a pulse-chase analysis to measure TH mRNA half-life. No increase is apparent using actinomycin D to measure half-life, indicating a requirement for ongoing transcription. Characterization of protein binding to the TH 3'UTR responsible for stabilization using labeled TH 3'UTR probes and electro-mobility shift assays shows the presence of two complexes both of which are increased by DMPP-treatment. The faster migrating complex (FMC) increases 2.5-fold and the slower migrating complex (SMC) increases 1.5-fold. Both changes are prevented by actinomycin D. Characterization of the protein binding to the TH UTR probes indicates SMC is disrupted by polyribonucleotides, poly (A) and poly (U), while binding to FMC is reduced by poly (CU). Separation of UV crosslinked RNA-protein complexes on SDS polyacrylamide gels shows FMC to contain a single protein whereas SMC contains three proteins. Northwesterns yielded similar results. Comparison of DMPP-induced protein binding with the poly C binding protein (PCBP) involved in hypoxia induced rat PC12 TH mRNA stability indicates none of the bovine UTR binding proteins are the PCBP. Thus, nicotinic stimulation produces a transcription-dependent increase in TH mRNA half-life that is mediated by previously unrecognized TH mRNA binding proteins.

  3. Biological half-life of radioactive cesium in Japanese rockfish Sebastes cheni contaminated by the Fukushima Daiichi nuclear power plant accident.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Matsumoto, Akira; Shigeoka, Yu; Arakawa, Hisayuki; Hirakawa, Naoto; Morioka, Yoshiaki; Mizuno, Takuji

    2015-12-01

    Since the Fukushima accident in March 2011 the concentration of radioactive cesium in Japanese rockfish (Sebastes cheni) has been decreasing slower than other fish species. The aim of this study was therefore to investigate the possibility of slow elimination rate (i.e., relatively longer Tb) as one of the reasons for the slow decrease in (137)Cs concentrations in Japanese rockfish (S. cheni). To do this, we reared twenty-three individuals of this species for a period of about 1 year, during which time we measured the (137)Cs concentrations and γ-ray spectra 14 times by using a high-efficiency NaI(Tl) scintillator. We then examined the relationship between the (137)Cs concentrations and the total length of each individual. We estimated the biological half-life (Tb, day) for each individual using the total number of (137)Cs counts in the energy region, and examined the effects of total length and (137)Cs concentration on Tb by generalized linear model (GLM). We also examined the effect of sex, total length, seawater temperature, and the (137)Cs concentration of seawater on temporal changes in the (137)Cs count reduction rate by GLM. There was no clear relationship between the corrected whole-body (137)Cs concentrations and the total length in females, however there was a significant positive correlation between these two variables in males. The difference between males and females may be attributable to variation in the degree of dilution because of variable growth of individuals, and suggests that the (137)Cs concentrations of small individuals may be greatly diluted because of faster growth. However, there was no significant difference in Tb between sexes. The mean Tb (±SD) in all individuals was 269 (±39) days; this Tb value is 2.7-5.4 times longer than past Tb values (marine fish: 50-100 days), and is thought to be one of the reasons for the slower decrease in (137)Cs concentrations in this species than other fish species on the coast of Fukushima. The GLM

  4. Kinetic reconstruction of the free-energy landscape.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wedekind, Jan; Reguera, David

    2008-09-04

    We present a new general method to trace back a lot of valuable information from direct simulations and experiments of activated processes. In particular, it allows the reconstruction of the free-energy landscape for an arbitrary reaction coordinate directly from the out-of-equilibrium dynamics of the process. We demonstrate the power of this concept by its application to a molecular dynamics simulation of nucleation of a Lennard-Jones vapor. The same method can be also applied to Brownian dynamics and stochastic simulations.

  5. Abstract composition rule for relativistic kinetic energy in the thermodynamical limit

    CERN Document Server

    Biro, T S

    2008-01-01

    We demonstrate by simple mathematical considerations that a power-law tailed distribution in the kinetic energy of relativistic particles can be a limiting distribution seen in relativistic heavy ion experiments. We prove that the infinite repetition of an arbitrary composition rule on an infinitesimal amount leads to a rule with a formal logarithm. As a consequence the stationary distribution of energy in the thermodynamical limit follows the composed function of the Boltzmann-Gibbs exponential with this formal logarithm. In particular, interactions described as solely functions of the relative four-momentum squared lead to kinetic energy distributions of the Tsallis-Pareto (cut power-law) form in the high energy limit.

  6. Kinetic-energy matrix elements for atomic Hylleraas-CI wave functions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Harris, Frank E

    2016-05-28

    Hylleraas-CI is a superposition-of-configurations method in which each configuration is constructed from a Slater-type orbital (STO) product to which is appended (linearly) at most one interelectron distance rij. Computations of the kinetic energy for atoms by this method have been difficult due to the lack of formulas expressing these matrix elements for general angular momentum in terms of overlap and potential-energy integrals. It is shown here that a strategic application of angular-momentum theory, including the use of vector spherical harmonics, enables the reduction of all atomic kinetic-energy integrals to overlap and potential-energy matrix elements. The new formulas are validated by showing that they yield correct results for a large number of integrals published by other investigators.

  7. Kinetic energies to analyze the experimental auger electron spectra by density functional theory calculations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Endo, Kazunaka

    2016-02-01

    In the Auger electron spectra (AES) simulations, we define theoretical modified kinetic energies of AES in the density functional theory (DFT) calculations. The modified kinetic energies correspond to two final-state holes at the ground state and at the transition-state in DFT calculations, respectively. This method is applied to simulate Auger electron spectra (AES) of 2nd periodic atom (Li, Be, B, C, N, O, F)-involving substances (LiF, beryllium, boron, graphite, GaN, SiO2, PTFE) by deMon DFT calculations using the model molecules of the unit cell. Experimental KVV (valence band electrons can fill K-shell core holes or be emitted during KVV-type transitions) AES of the (Li, O) atoms in the substances agree considerably well with simulation of AES obtained with the maximum kinetic energies of the atoms, while, for AES of LiF, and PTFE substance, the experimental F KVV AES is almost in accordance with the spectra from the transitionstate kinetic energy calculations.

  8. Employing Magnetic Levitation to Monitor Reaction Kinetics and Measure Activation Energy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Benz, Lauren; Cesafsky, Karen E.; Le, Tran; Park, Aileen; Malicky, David

    2012-01-01

    This article describes a simple and inexpensive undergraduate-level kinetics experiment that uses magnetic levitation to monitor the progress and determine the activation energy of a condensation reaction on a polymeric solid support. The method employs a cuvette filled with a paramagnetic solution positioned between two strong magnets. The…

  9. Kinetic energy and added mass of hydrodynamically interacting gas bubbles in liquid

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kok, Jacobus B.W.

    1988-01-01

    By averaging the basic equations on microscale, expressions are derived for the effective added mass density and the kinetic energy density of a mixture of liquid and gas bubbles. Due to hydrodynamic interaction between the bubbles there appears to be a difference between the effective added mass

  10. Dissociation of CO induced by He2+ ions : I. Fragmentation and kinetic energy release spectra

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bliek, FW; de Jong, MC; Hoekstra, R; Morgenstern, R

    1997-01-01

    The dissociation of COq+ ions (q less than or equal to 3) produced in collisions of keV amu(-1) He2+ ions with CO has been studied by time-of-flight measurements. Both singles and coincidence time-of-flight techniques have been used to determine the kinetic energy release of the dissociating CO mole

  11. Measurement of the Turbulence Kinetic Energy Budget of a Turbulent Planar Wake Flow in Pressure Gradients

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Xiao-Feng; Thomas, Flint O.; Nelson, Robert C.

    2001-01-01

    Turbulence kinetic energy (TKE) is a very important quantity for turbulence modeling and the budget of this quantity in its transport equation can provide insight into the flow physics. Turbulence kinetic energy budget measurements were conducted for a symmetric turbulent wake flow subjected to constant zero, favorable and adverse pressure gradients in year-three of research effort. The purpose of this study is to clarify the flow physics issues underlying the demonstrated influence of pressure gradient on wake development and provide experimental support for turbulence modeling. To ensure the reliability of these notoriously difficult measurements, the experimental procedure was carefully designed on the basis of an uncertainty analysis. Four different approaches, based on an isotropic turbulence assumption, a locally axisymmetric homogeneous turbulence assumption, a semi-isotropy assumption and a forced balance of the TKE equation, were applied for the estimate of the dissipation term. The pressure transport term is obtained from a forced balance of the turbulence kinetic energy equation. This report will present the results of the turbulence kinetic energy budget measurement and discuss their implication on the development of strained turbulent wakes.

  12. Similarity between turbulent kinetic energy and temperature spectra in the near-wall region

    Science.gov (United States)

    Antonia, R. A.; Kim, J.

    1991-01-01

    The similarity between turbulent kinetic energy and temperature spectra, previously confirmed using experimental data in various turbulent shear flows, is validated in the near-wall region using direct numerical simulation data in a fully developed turbulent channel flow. The dependence of this similarity on the molecular Prandtl number is also examined.

  13. Employing Magnetic Levitation to Monitor Reaction Kinetics and Measure Activation Energy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Benz, Lauren; Cesafsky, Karen E.; Le, Tran; Park, Aileen; Malicky, David

    2012-01-01

    This article describes a simple and inexpensive undergraduate-level kinetics experiment that uses magnetic levitation to monitor the progress and determine the activation energy of a condensation reaction on a polymeric solid support. The method employs a cuvette filled with a paramagnetic solution positioned between two strong magnets. The…

  14. Dissociation of CO induced by He2+ ions : I. Fragmentation and kinetic energy release spectra

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bliek, FW; de Jong, MC; Hoekstra, R; Morgenstern, R

    1997-01-01

    The dissociation of COq+ ions (q less than or equal to 3) produced in collisions of keV amu(-1) He2+ ions with CO has been studied by time-of-flight measurements. Both singles and coincidence time-of-flight techniques have been used to determine the kinetic energy release of the dissociating CO

  15. Releasable Kinetic Energy-Based Inertial Control of a DFIG Wind Power Plant

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lee, Jinsik; Muljadi, Eduard; Sørensen, Poul Ejnar

    2016-01-01

    Wind turbine generators (WTGs) in a wind power plant (WPP) contain different levels of releasable kinetic energy (KE) because of the wake effects. This paper proposes a releasable KE-based inertial control scheme for a doubly fed induction generator (DFIG) WPP that differentiates the contributions...

  16. A Kinetic Study of Marginal Soil Energy Plant Helianthus annuus Stalk Pyrolysis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Huaxiao Yan

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available The pyrolytic characteristics and kinetics of new marginal soil energy plant Helianthus annuus stalk were investigated using thermogravimetric (TG method from 50 to 800°C in an inert argon atmosphere at different heating rates of 5, 10, 20, and 30°C min−1. The kinetic parameters of activation energy and pre-exponential factor were deduced by Popescu, Flynn-Wall-Ozawa (FWO, and Kissinger-Akahira-Sunose (KAS methods, respectively. The results showed that three stages appeared in the thermal degradation process. The primary devolatilization stage of H. annuus stalk can be described by the Avrami-Erofeev function (n=4. The average activation energy of H. annuus stalk was only 142.9 kJ mol−1. There were minor kinetic compensation effects between the pre-exponential factor and the activation energy. The results suggest that H. annuus stalk is suitable for pyrolysis, and more importantly, the experimental results and kinetic parameters provided useful information for the design of pyrolytic processing system using H. annuus stalk as feedstock.

  17. Evaluation of the Kinetic Energy Approach for Modeling Turbulent Fluxes in Stratocumulus

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Lenderink, G.; Holtslag, A.A.M.

    2000-01-01

    The modeling of vertical mixing by a turbulence scheme on the basis of prognostic turbulent kinetic energy (E) and a diagnostic length scale (l ) is investigated with particular emphasis on the representation of entrainment. The behavior of this E–l scheme is evaluated for a stratocumulus case obser

  18. Constrained Parmeterization of Reduced Density Approximation of Kinetic Energy Functionals

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chakraborty, Debajit; Trickey, Samuel; Karasiev, Valentin

    2014-03-01

    Evaluation of forces in ab initio MD is greatly accelerated by orbital-free DFT, especially at finite temperature. The recent achievement of a fully non-empirical constraint-based generalized gradient (GGA) functional for the Kohn-Sham KE Ts [ n ] brings to light the inherent limitations of GGAs. This motivates inclusion of higher-order derivatives in the form of reduced derivative approximation (RDA) functionals. That, in turn, requires new functional forms and design criteria. RDA functionals are constrained further to produce a positive-definite, non-singular Pauli potential. We focus on designing a non-empirical constraint-based meta-GGA functional with certain combinations of higher-order derivatives which avoid nuclear-site singularities to a specified order of gradient expansion. Here we report progress on this agenda. Work supported by U.S. Dept. of Energy, grant DE-SC0002139.

  19. FLYWHEEL BASED KINETIC ENERGY RECOVERY SYSTEMS (KERS INTEGRATED IN VEHICLES

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    THOMAS MATHEWS

    2013-09-01

    Full Text Available Today, many hybrid electric vehicles have been developed in order to reduce the consumption of fossil fuels; unfortunately these vehicles require electrochemical batteries to store energy, with high costs as well as poor conversion efficiencies. By integrating flywheel hybrid systems, these drawbacks can be overcome and can potentially replace battery powered hybrid vehicles cost effectively. The paper will explain the engineering, mechanics of the flywheel system and it’s working in detail. Each component of the flywheel-based kineticenergy recovery system will also be described. The advantages of this technology over the electric hybrids will be elucidated carefully. The latest advancements in the field, the potential future and scope of the flywheelhybrid will be assessed.

  20. Kinetic energies of fragment ions produced by dissociative photoionization of NO

    Science.gov (United States)

    Samson, J. A. R.; Angel, G. C.; Rstgi, O. P.

    1985-01-01

    The kinetic energies of ions produced by dissociative photoionization of NO have been measured at the discrete resonance lines of He (584A) and Ne (736A), and with undispersed synchrotron radiation. O sup + ions were identified with energies from 0 to approximately 0.5 eV and two groups of N sup + ions one with energy of 0.36 eV and another with energies between 0.9 and 1.5 eV, apparently produced by predissociation of the C sup 3 P 1 and B'1 sigma states respectively.

  1. Development of an idealised downstream cyclone: Eulerian and Lagrangian perspective on the kinetic energy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lukas Papritz

    2013-03-01

    Full Text Available In this idealised modelling study, the development of a downstream cyclone, which closely follows the life-cycle of a Shapiro-Keyser cyclone, is addressed from a quasi-geostrophic kinetic energy perspective. To this end a simulation of a dry, highly idealised, dispersive baroclinic wave, developing a primary and a downstream cyclone, is performed. Kinetic energy and processes contributing to its tendency – in particular baroclinic conversion and ageostrophic geopotential fluxes – are investigated in three dimensions both in an Eulerian and a Lagrangian framework from the genesis of the downstream cyclone as an upper-level kinetic energy centre, over frontal fracture to the fully developed cyclone showing the characteristic T-bone surface frontal structure, with a strong low-level jet along the bent-back front. Initially the downstream cyclone grows by the convergence of ageostrophic geopotential fluxes from the primary cyclone, but as vertical motions intensify this process is replaced by baroclinic conversion in the warm sector. We show that kinetic energy released in the warm sector is radiated away at all levels by ageostrophic geopotential fluxes: in the upper troposphere they are directed downstream, while in the lower troposphere they radiate kinetic energy to the rear of the cyclone. Thereby, vertical ageostrophic geopotential fluxes, their location and divergence, are identified to play a major role in the intensification of the cyclone in the lower troposphere and for the formation of the low-level jet. Low-level rearward ageostrophic geopotential fluxes converging along the bent-back front are shown to be a general characteristic of an eastward propagating baroclinic wave.

  2. A new exact quantum mechanical rovibrational kinetic energy operator for penta-atomic systems in internal coordinates

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    陈光巨; 李玉学

    1999-01-01

    The concrete molecule-fixed (MF) kinetic energy operator for penta-atomic molecules is expressed in terms of the parameterδ, the matrix element G?, and angular momentum operator (?). The applications of the operator are also discussed. Finally, a general compact form of kinetic energy operator suitable for calculating the rovibrational spectra of polyatomie molecules is presented.

  3. Measurement of turbulent spatial structure and kinetic energy spectrum by exact temporal-to-spatial mapping

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Buchhave, Preben; Velte, Clara Marika

    2017-01-01

    and spatial structure functions in a way that completely bypasses the need for Taylor’s hypothesis. The spatial statistics agree with the classical counterparts, such as the total kinetic energy spectrum, at least for spatial extents up to the Taylor microscale. The requirements for applying the method......We present a method for converting a time record of turbulent velocity measured at a point in a flow to a spatial velocity record consisting of consecutive convection elements. The spatial record allows computation of dynamic statistical moments such as turbulent kinetic wavenumber spectra...

  4. Redistribution of carbonyl stretch mode energy in isolated and solvated N-methylacetamide: kinetic energy spectral density analyses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jeon, Jonggu; Cho, Minhaeng

    2011-12-07

    The vibrational energy transfer from the excited carbonyl stretch mode in N-deuterated N-methylacetamide (NMA-d), both in isolation and in a heavy water cluster, is studied with nonequilibrium molecular dynamics (NEMD) simulations, employing a quantum mechanical/molecular mechanical (QM∕MM) force field at the semiempirical PM3 level. The nonequilibrium ensemble of vibrationally excited NMA-d is prepared by perturbing the positions and velocities of the carbonyl C and O atoms and its NEMD trajectories are obtained with a leap-frog algorithm properly modified for the initial perturbation. In addition to the time-domain analysis of the kinetic and potential energies, a novel method for the spectral analysis of the atomic kinetic energies is developed, in terms of the spectral density of kinetic energy, which provides the time-dependent changes of the frequency-resolved kinetic energies without the complications of normal mode analysis at every MD time step. Due to the QM description of the solute electronic structure, the couplings among the normal modes are captured more realistically than with classical force fields. The energy transfer in the isolated NMA-d is found to proceed first from the carbonyl bond to other modes with time scales of 3 ps or less, and then among the other modes over 3-21 ps. In the solvated NMA-d, most of the excess energy is first transferred to other intramolecular modes within 5 ps, which is subsequently dissipated to solvent with 7-19 ps time scales. The contribution of the direct energy transfer from the carbonyl bond to solvent was only 5% with ~7 ps time scale. Solvent reorganization that leads to destabilization of the electrostatic interactions is found to be crucial in the long time relaxation of the excess energy, while the water intramolecular modes do not contribute significantly. Detailed mode-specific energy transfer pathways are deduced for the isolated and solvated NMA-d and they show that the energy transfer in NMA-d is a

  5. Statistical properties of kinetic and total energy densities in reverberant spaces

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jacobsen, Finn; Molares, Alfonso Rodriguez

    2010-01-01

    . With the advent of a three-dimensional particle velocity transducer, it has become somewhat easier to measure total rather than only potential energy density in a sound field. This paper examines the ensemble statistics of kinetic and total sound energy densities in reverberant enclosures theoretically......Many acoustical measurements, e.g., measurement of sound power and transmission loss, rely on determining the total sound energy in a reverberation room. The total energy is usually approximated by measuring the mean-square pressure (i.e., the potential energy density) at a number of discrete...... positions. The idea of measuring the total energy density instead of the potential energy density on the assumption that the former quantity varies less with position than the latter goes back to the 1930s. However, the phenomenon was not analyzed until the late 1970s and then only for the region of high...

  6. Energy deposition by heavy ions: additivity of kinetic and potential energy contributions in hillock formation on CaF2.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Y Y; Grygiel, C; Dufour, C; Sun, J R; Wang, Z G; Zhao, Y T; Xiao, G Q; Cheng, R; Zhou, X M; Ren, J R; Liu, S D; Lei, Y; Sun, Y B; Ritter, R; Gruber, E; Cassimi, A; Monnet, I; Bouffard, S; Aumayr, F; Toulemonde, M

    2014-07-18

    Modification of surface and bulk properties of solids by irradiation with ion beams is a widely used technique with many applications in material science. In this study, we show that nano-hillocks on CaF2 crystal surfaces can be formed by individual impact of medium energy (3 and 5 MeV) highly charged ions (Xe(22+) to Xe(30+)) as well as swift (kinetic energies between 12 and 58 MeV) heavy xenon ions. For very slow highly charged ions the appearance of hillocks is known to be linked to a threshold in potential energy (Ep) while for swift heavy ions a minimum electronic energy loss per unit length (Se) is necessary. With our results we bridge the gap between these two extreme cases and demonstrate, that with increasing energy deposition via Se the Ep-threshold for hillock production can be lowered substantially. Surprisingly, both mechanisms of energy deposition in the target surface seem to contribute in an additive way, which can be visualized in a phase diagram. We show that the inelastic thermal spike model, originally developed to describe such material modifications for swift heavy ions, can be extended to the case where both kinetic and potential energies are deposited into the surface.

  7. Kinetic Energy of Hydrocarbons as a Function of Electron Density and Convolutional Neural Networks.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yao, Kun; Parkhill, John

    2016-03-01

    We demonstrate a convolutional neural network trained to reproduce the Kohn-Sham kinetic energy of hydrocarbons from an input electron density. The output of the network is used as a nonlocal correction to conventional local and semilocal kinetic functionals. We show that this approximation qualitatively reproduces Kohn-Sham potential energy surfaces when used with conventional exchange correlation functionals. The density which minimizes the total energy given by the functional is examined in detail. We identify several avenues to improve on this exploratory work, by reducing numerical noise and changing the structure of our functional. Finally we examine the features in the density learned by the neural network to anticipate the prospects of generalizing these models.

  8. Accurate Reference Data for the Non-Additive Non-Interacting Kinetic Energy in Covalent Bonds

    CERN Document Server

    Nafziger, Jonathan; Wasserman, Adam

    2016-01-01

    The non-additive non-interacting kinetic energy is calculated exactly for fragments of H$_2$, Li$_2$, Be$_2$, C$_2$, N$_2$, F$_2$, and Na$_2$ within partition density-functional theory. The resulting fragments are uniquely determined and their sum reproduces the Kohn-Sham molecular density of the corresponding XC functional. We compare the use of fractional orbital occupation to the usual PDFT ensemble method for treating the fragment energies and densities. We also compare Thomas-Fermi and von Weiz{\\"a}cker approximate kinetic energy functionals to the numerically exact solution and find significant regions where the von Weiz{\\"a}cker solution is nearly exact.

  9. Buoyant production and consumption of turbulence kinetic energy in cloud-topped mixed layers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Randall, D. A.

    1984-01-01

    It is pointed out that studies of the entraining planetary boundary layer (PBL) have generally emphasized the role of buoyancy fluxes in driving entrainment. The buoyancy flux is proportional to the rate of conversion of the potential energy of the mean flow into the kinetic energy of the turbulence. It is not unusual for conversion to proceed in both directions simultaneously. This occurs, for instance, in both clear and cloudy convective mixed layers which are capped by inversions. A partitioning of the net conversion into positive parts, generating turbulence kinetic energy (TKE), and negative parts (TKE-consuming), would make it possible to include the positive part in the gross production rate, and closure would be achieved. Three different approaches to partitioning have been proposed. The present investigation is concerned with a comparison of the three partitioning theories. Particular attention is given to the cloud-topped mixed layer because in this case the differences between two partitioning approaches are most apparent.

  10. Decrypting the charge-resolved kinetic-energy spectrum in the Coulomb explosion of argon clusters

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rajeev, R.; Rishad, K. P. M.; Trivikram, T. Madhu; Narayanan, V.; Brabec, T.; Krishnamurthy, M.

    2012-02-01

    Ion emissions from clusters in intense ultrashort laser fields have been studied predominantly using time-of-flight (TOF) spectroscopy so far. Assuming atomic ion emission, arrival time signal is converted to a charge-integrated kinetic-energy spectrum. We present here a Thomson parabola spectrum that decrypts the charge-integrated energy distribution to the charge-resolved kinetic-energy spectra (CRKES). TOF measurements compare well with the spectrum generated by encrypting back the CRKES. A quantitative measure of ionization probabilities of Ar36000 clusters to varied charge states at 7×1015 W cm-2 is compared with three-dimensional microscopic particle-in-cell simulations. A good agreement between these detailed measurements and the simulations shows the possibility for the retrieval of charge distribution within a nanocluster.

  11. Rock Cutting Depth Model Based on Kinetic Energy of Abrasive Waterjet

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oh, Tae-Min; Cho, Gye-Chun

    2016-03-01

    Abrasive waterjets are widely used in the fields of civil and mechanical engineering for cutting a great variety of hard materials including rocks, metals, and other materials. Cutting depth is an important index to estimate operating time and cost, but it is very difficult to predict because there are a number of influential variables (e.g., energy, geometry, material, and nozzle system parameters). In this study, the cutting depth is correlated to the maximum kinetic energy expressed in terms of energy (i.e., water pressure, water flow rate, abrasive feed rate, and traverse speed), geometry (i.e., standoff distance), material (i.e., α and β), and nozzle system parameters (i.e., nozzle size, shape, and jet diffusion level). The maximum kinetic energy cutting depth model is verified with experimental test data that are obtained using one type of hard granite specimen for various parameters. The results show a unique curve for a specific rock type in a power function between cutting depth and maximum kinetic energy. The cutting depth model developed here can be very useful for estimating the process time when cutting rock using an abrasive waterjet.

  12. Kinetic energy of throughfall in a highly diverse forest ecosystem in the humid subtropics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Geißler, Christian; Kühn, Peter; Scholten, Thomas

    2010-05-01

    After decades of research it is generally accepted that vegetation is a key factor in controlling soil erosion. Therefore, in ecosystems where erosion is a serious problem, afforestation is a common measure against erosion. Most of the studies in the last decades focused on agricultural systems and less attention was paid to natural systems. To understand the mechanisms preventing soil erosion in natural systems the processes have to be studied in detail and gradually. The first step and central research question is on how the canopies of the tree layer alter the properties of rainfall and generate throughfall. Kinetic energy is a widely used parameter to estimate the erosion potential of open field rainfall and throughfall. In the past, numerous studies have shown that vegetation of a certain height enhances the kinetic energy under the canopy (Chapman 1948, Mosley 1982, Vis 1986, Hall & Calder 1993, Nanko et al. 2006, Nanko et al. 2008) in relation to open field rainfall. This is mainly due to a shift in the drop size distribution to less but larger drops possessing a higher amount of kinetic energy. In vital forest ecosystems lower vegetation (shrubs, herbs) as well as a continuous litter layer protects the forest soil from the impact of large drops. The influence of biodiversity, specific forest stands or single species in this process system is still in discussion. In the present study calibrated splash cups (after Ellison 1947, Geißler et al. under review) have been used to detect differences in kinetic energy on the scale of specific species and on the scale of forest stands of contrasting age and biodiversity in a natural forest ecosystem. The splash cups have been calibrated experimentally using a laser disdrometer. The results show that the kinetic energy of throughfall produced by the tree layer increases with the age of the specific forest stand. The average throughfall kinetic energy (J m-2) is about 2.6 times higher in forests than under open field

  13. Statistical model of a flexible inextensible polymer chain: The effect of kinetic energy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pergamenshchik, V M; Vozniak, A B

    2017-01-01

    Because of the holonomic constraints, the kinetic energy contribution in the partition function of an inextensible polymer chain is difficult to find, and it has been systematically ignored. We present the first thermodynamic calculation incorporating the kinetic energy of an inextensible polymer chain with the bending energy. To explore the effect of the translation-rotation degrees of freedom, we propose and solve a statistical model of a fully flexible chain of N+1 linked beads which, in the limit of smooth bending, is equivalent to the well-known wormlike chain model. The partition function with the kinetic and bending energies and correlations between orientations of any pair of links and velocities of any pair of beads are found. This solution is precise in the limits of small and large rigidity-to-temperature ratio b/T. The last exact solution is essential as even very "harmless" approximation results in loss of the important effects when the chain is very rigid. For very high b/T, the orientations of different links become fully correlated. Nevertheless, the chain does not go over into a hard rod even in the limit b/T→∞: While the velocity correlation length diverges, the correlations themselves remain weak and tend to the value ∝T/(N+1). The N dependence of the partition function is essentially determined by the kinetic energy contribution. We demonstrate that to obtain the correct energy and entropy in a constrained system, the T derivative of the partition function has to be applied before integration over the constraint-setting variable.

  14. Statistical model of a flexible inextensible polymer chain: The effect of kinetic energy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pergamenshchik, V. M.; Vozniak, A. B.

    2017-01-01

    Because of the holonomic constraints, the kinetic energy contribution in the partition function of an inextensible polymer chain is difficult to find, and it has been systematically ignored. We present the first thermodynamic calculation incorporating the kinetic energy of an inextensible polymer chain with the bending energy. To explore the effect of the translation-rotation degrees of freedom, we propose and solve a statistical model of a fully flexible chain of N +1 linked beads which, in the limit of smooth bending, is equivalent to the well-known wormlike chain model. The partition function with the kinetic and bending energies and correlations between orientations of any pair of links and velocities of any pair of beads are found. This solution is precise in the limits of small and large rigidity-to-temperature ratio b /T . The last exact solution is essential as even very "harmless" approximation results in loss of the important effects when the chain is very rigid. For very high b /T , the orientations of different links become fully correlated. Nevertheless, the chain does not go over into a hard rod even in the limit b /T →∞ : While the velocity correlation length diverges, the correlations themselves remain weak and tend to the value ∝T /(N +1 ). The N dependence of the partition function is essentially determined by the kinetic energy contribution. We demonstrate that to obtain the correct energy and entropy in a constrained system, the T derivative of the partition function has to be applied before integration over the constraint-setting variable.

  15. Proton kinetic effects and turbulent energy cascade rate in the solar wind.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Osman, K T; Matthaeus, W H; Kiyani, K H; Hnat, B; Chapman, S C

    2013-11-15

    The first observed connection between kinetic instabilities driven by proton temperature anisotropy and estimated energy cascade rates in the turbulent solar wind is reported using measurements from the Wind spacecraft at 1 AU. We find enhanced cascade rates are concentrated along the boundaries of the (β∥, T⊥/T∥) plane, which includes regions theoretically unstable to the mirror and firehose instabilities. A strong correlation is observed between the estimated cascade rate and kinetic effects such as temperature anisotropy and plasma heating, resulting in protons 5-6 times hotter and 70%-90% more anisotropic than under typical isotropic plasma conditions. These results offer new insights into kinetic processes in a turbulent regime.

  16. Proton Kinetic Effects and Turbulent Energy Cascade Rate in the Solar Wind

    Science.gov (United States)

    Osman, K.; Matthaeus, W. H.; Kiyani, K. H.; Hnat, B.; Chapman, S. C.

    2013-12-01

    The first observed connection between kinetic instabilities driven by proton temperature anisotropy and estimated energy cascade rates in the turbulent solar wind is reported using measurements from the Wind spacecraft at 1 AU. We find enhanced cascade rates are concentrated along the boundaries of the (β‖,T⊥/T‖)-plane, which includes regions theoretically unstable to the mirror and firehose instabilities. A strong correlation is observed between the estimated cascade rates and kinetic effects such as temperature anisotropy and plasma heating, resulting in protons 5-6 times hotter and 70-90% more anisotropic than under typical isotropic plasma conditions. These results offer new insights into kinetic processes in a turbulent regime.

  17. Proton Kinetic Effects and Turbulent Energy Cascade Rate in the Solar Wind

    CERN Document Server

    Osman, Kareem T; Kiyani, Khurom H; Hnat, Bogdan; Chapman, Sandra C

    2013-01-01

    The first observed connection between kinetic instabilities driven by proton temperature anisotropy and estimated energy cascade rates in the turbulent solar wind is reported using measurements from the Wind spacecraft at 1 AU. We find enhanced cascade rates are concentrated along the boundaries of the ($\\beta_{\\parallel}$, $T_{\\perp}/T_{\\parallel}$)-plane, which includes regions theoretically unstable to the mirror and firehose instabilities. A strong correlation is observed between the estimated cascade rate and kinetic effects such as temperature anisotropy and plasma heating, resulting in protons 5-6 times hotter and 70-90% more anisotropic than under typical isotropic plasma conditions. These results offer new insights into kinetic processes in a turbulent regime.

  18. Kinetic energy from supernova feedback in high-resolution galaxy simulations

    CERN Document Server

    Simpson, Christine M; Hummels, Cameron; Ostriker, Jeremiah P

    2014-01-01

    We describe a new method for adding a prescribed amount of kinetic energy to simulated gas modeled on a cartesian grid by directly altering grid cells' mass and velocity in a distributed fashion. The method is explored in the context of supernova feedback in high-resolution hydrodynamic simulations of galaxy formation. In idealized tests at varying background densities and resolutions, we show convergence in behavior between models with different initial kinetic energy fractions at low densities and/or at high resolutions. We find that in high density media ($\\gtrsim$ 50 cm$^{-3}$) with coarse resolution ($\\gtrsim 4$ pc per cell), results are sensitive to the initial fraction of kinetic energy due to the early rapid cooling of thermal energy. We describe and test a resolution dependent scheme for adjusting this fraction that approximately replicates our high-resolution tests. We apply the method to a prompt supernova feedback model, meant to mimic Type II supernovae, in a cosmological simulation of a $10^9$ M...

  19. Anomalous kinetic energy of a system of dust particles in a gas discharge plasma

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Norman, G. E., E-mail: norman@ihed.ras.ru; Stegailov, V. V., E-mail: stegailov@gmail.com; Timofeev, A. V., E-mail: timofeevalvl@gmail.com [Russian Academy of Sciences, Joint Institute for High Temperatures (Russian Federation)

    2011-11-15

    The system of equations of motion of dust particles in a near-electrode layer of a gas discharge has been formulated taking into account fluctuations of the charge of a dust particle and the features of the nearelectrode layer of the discharge. The molecular dynamics simulation of the system of dust particles has been carried out. Performing a theoretical analysis of the simulation results, a mechanism of increasing the average kinetic energy of dust particles in the gas discharge plasma has been proposed. According to this mechanism, the heating of the vertical oscillations of dust particles is initiated by induced oscillations generated by fluctuations of the charge of dust particles, and the energy transfer from vertical to horizontal oscillations can be based on the parametric resonance phenomenon. The combination of the parametric and induced resonances makes it possible to explain an anomalously high kinetic energy of dust particles. The estimate of the frequency, amplitude, and kinetic energy of dust particles are close to the respective experimental values.

  20. Clinical utility and patient perspectives on the use of extended half-life rFIXFc in the management of hemophilia B

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Miguelino MG

    2014-08-01

    Full Text Available Maricel G Miguelino, Jerry S Powell Division of Hematology and Oncology, University of California Davis Medical Center, Sacramento, CA, USA Abstract: Hemophilia B is an X-linked genetic disease caused by mutation of the gene for coagulation protein factor IX (FIX, with an incidence of approximately once every 30,000 male births in all populations and ethnic groups. When severe, the disease leads to spontaneous life threatening bleeding episodes. When untreated, most patients die from bleeding complications before 25 years of age. Current therapy requires frequent intravenous infusions of therapeutic recombinant or plasma-derived protein concentrates containing FIX. Most patients administer the infusions at home every few days, and must limit their physical activities to avoid abnormal bleeding when the FIX activity levels are below normal. After completing the pivotal Phase III clinical trial, a new therapeutic FIX preparation that has been engineered for an extended half-life in circulation, received regulatory approval in March 2014 in Canada and the US. This new FIX represents a major therapeutic advance for patients with hemophilia B. The half-life is prolonged due to fusion of the native FIX molecule with the normal constant region of immunoglobulin G. This fusion molecule then follows the normal immunoglobulin recirculation pathways through endothelial cells, resulting in prolonged times in circulation. In the clinical trials, over 150 patients successfully used eftrenonacog alfa regularly for more than 1 year to prevent spontaneous bleeding, to successfully treat any bleeding episodes, and to provide effective coagulation for major surgery. All infusions were well tolerated and effective, with no inhibitors detected and no safety concerns. This promising therapy should allow patients to use fewer infusions to maintain appropriate FIX activity levels in all clinical settings. Keywords: factor IX, hemophilia B, prophylaxis, genetic

  1. On the ultrafast kinetics of the energy and electron transfer reactions in photosystem I

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Slavov, Chavdar Lyubomirov

    2009-07-09

    The subject of the current work is one of the main participants in the light-dependent phase of oxygenic photosynthesis, Photosystem I (PS I). This complex carries an immense number of cofactors: chlorophylls (Chl), carotenoids, quinones, etc, which together with the protein entity exhibit several exceptional properties. First, PS I has an ultrafast light energy trapping kinetics with a nearly 100% quantum efficiency. Secondly, both of the electron transfer branches in the reaction center are suggested to be active. Thirdly, there are some so called 'red' Chls in the antenna system of PS I, absorbing light with longer wavelengths than the reaction center. These 'red' Chls significantly modify the trapping kinetics of PS I. The purpose of this thesis is to obtain better understanding of the above-mentioned, specific features of PS I. This will not merely cast more light on the mechanisms of energy and electron transfer in the complex, but also will contribute to the future developments of optimized artificial light-harvesting systems. In the current work, a number of PS I complexes isolated from different organisms (Thermosynechococcus elongatus, Chlamydomonas reinhardtii, Arabidopsis thaliana) and possessing distinctive features (different macroorganisation, monomers, trimers, monomers with a semibelt of peripheral antenna attached; presence of 'red' Chls) is investigated. The studies are primarily focused on the electron transfer kinetics in each of the cofactor branches in the PS I reaction center, as well as on the effect of the antenna size and the presence of 'red' Chls on the trapping kinetics of PS I. These aspects are explored with the help of several ultrafast optical spectroscopy methods: (i) time-resolved fluorescence ? single photon counting and synchroscan streak camera; and (ii) ultrafast transient absorption. Physically meaningful information about the molecular mechanisms of the energy trapping in PS I is

  2. Phase field model for strong anisotropy of kinetic and highly anisotropic interfacial energy

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    ZHANG Guo-wei; HOU Hua; CHENG Jun

    2006-01-01

    A phase-field model was established for simulating pure materials, which was calculated effectively and taken into account the strong anisotropy of kinetic and highly anisotropic interfacial energy. The anisotropy (strong kinetic and highly interfacial energy) of various degrees was simulated with numerical calculation. During a variety of interfacial anisotropy coefficient, equilibrium crystal shape varies from smoothness to corner. There has a critical value during the course of the transformation. When the anisotropy coefficenct is lower than the critical value, the growth velocity v increases monotonically with the increase of it. Whereas the anisotropy coefficent is higher than the critical value, the growth velocity decreases with the increases of it. During a variety of degree of supercooling, the growth velocity is under control from thermal diffusion to kinetics. Under the control of thermal diffusion, the growth velocity increases with the increase of degree of supercooling and tip radius R decreases with the increase of temperature. Under the control of kinetics, with the increase of degree of supercooling both V and R, which can not fit the traditional microcosmic theory.

  3. New limits on Beyond Standard Model physics from a measurement of the half-life of the T=1/2 mirror decay of 19Ne

    CERN Document Server

    Broussard, L; Boswell, M S; Crowell, A S; Dendooven, P; Howell, C R; Kidd, M F; Jungmann, K; Kruithof, W L; Onderwater, C J G; Pattie, R W; Shidling, P D; Sohani, M; van der Hoek, D J; Rogachevskiy, A; Traykov, E; Versolato, O O; Willmann, L; Wilschut, H W; Young, A R

    2013-01-01

    The 1/2+ -> 1/2+ superallowed mixed mirror decay of 19Ne to 19F is excellently suited for high-precision studies of the weak interaction. However, there is some disagreement on the value of the half-life. In a new measurement we have determined this quantity to be T_{1/2} = 17.2832 +/- 0.0051_{(stat)} +/- 0.0066_{(sys)} seconds, which differs from the previous world average by 3 standard deviations. The impact of this measurement on limits for physics beyond the standard model such as the presence of tensor currents is discussed.

  4. Measurement of the Double-Beta Decay Half-Life and Search for the Neutrinoless Double-Beta Decay of $^{48}{\\rm Ca}$ with the NEMO-3 Detector

    CERN Document Server

    :,; Augier, C; Bakalyarov, A M; Baker, J D; Barabash, A S; Basharina-Freshville, A; Blondel, S; Blot, S; Bongrand, M; Brudanin, V; Busto, J; Caffrey, A J; Calvez, S; Cascella, M; Cerna, C; Cesar, J P; Chapon, A; Chauveau, E; Chopra, A; Duchesneau, D; Durand, D; Egorov, V; Eurin, G; Evans, J J; Fajt, L; Filosofov, D; Flack, R; Garrido, X; Gómez, H; Guillon, B; Guzowski, P; Hodák, R; Huber, A; Hubert, P; Hugon, C; Jullian, S; Klimenko, A; Kochetov, O; Konovalov, S I; Kovalenko, V; Lalanne, D; Lang, K; Lebedev, V I; Lemière, Y; Noblet, T Le; Liptak, Z; Liu, X R; Loaiza, P; Lutter, G; Mamedov, F; Marquet, C; Mauger, F; Morgan, B; Mott, J; Nemchenok, I; Nomachi, M; Nova, F; Nowacki, F; Ohsumi, H; Pahlka, R B; Perrot, F; Piquemal, F; Povinec, P; Přidal, P; Ramachers, Y A; Remoto, A; Reyss, J L; Richards, B; Riddle, C L; Rukhadze, E; Rukhadze, N I; Saakyan, R; Salazar, R; Sarazin, X; Shitov, Yu; Simard, L; Šimkovic, F; Smetana, A; Smolek, K; Smolnikov, A; Söldner-Rembold, S; Soulé, B; Štekl, I; Suhonen, J; Sutton, C S; Szklarz, G; Thomas, J; Timkin, V; Torre, S; Tretyak, Vl I; Tretyak, V I; Umatov, V I; Vanushin, I; Vilela, C; Vorobel, V; Waters, D; Zhukov, S V; Žukauskas, A

    2016-01-01

    The NEMO-3 experiment at the Modane Underground Laboratory has investigated the double-$\\beta$ decay of $^{48}{\\rm Ca}$. Using $5.25$\\,yr of data recorded with a $6.99\\,{\\rm g}$ sample of $^{48}{\\rm Ca}$, approximately $150$ double-$\\beta$ decay candidate events have been selected with a signal-to-background ratio greater than $3$. The half-life for the two-neutrino double-$\\beta$ decay of $^{48}{\\rm Ca}$ has been measured to be \\mbox{$T^{2\

  5. Hierarchical expansion of the kinetic energy operator in curvilinear coordinates for the vibrational self-consistent field method.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Strobusch, D; Scheurer, Ch

    2011-09-28

    A new hierarchical expansion of the kinetic energy operator in curvilinear coordinates is presented and modified vibrational self-consistent field (VSCF) equations are derived including all kinematic effects within the mean field approximation. The new concept for the kinetic energy operator is based on many-body expansions for all G matrix elements and its determinant. As a test application VSCF computations were performed on the H(2)O(2) molecule using an analytic potential (PCPSDE) and different hierarchical approximations for the kinetic energy operator. The results indicate that coordinate-dependent reduced masses account for the largest part of the kinetic energy. Neither kinematic couplings nor derivatives of the G matrix nor its determinant had significant effects on the VSCF energies. Only the zero-point value of the pseudopotential yields an offset to absolute energies which, however, is irrelevant for spectroscopic problems.

  6. Effect of heating rate and kinetic model selection on activation energy of nonisothermal crystallization of amorphous felodipine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chattoraj, Sayantan; Bhugra, Chandan; Li, Zheng Jane; Sun, Changquan Calvin

    2014-12-01

    The nonisothermal crystallization kinetics of amorphous materials is routinely analyzed by statistically fitting the crystallization data to kinetic models. In this work, we systematically evaluate how the model-dependent crystallization kinetics is impacted by variations in the heating rate and the selection of the kinetic model, two key factors that can lead to significant differences in the crystallization activation energy (Ea ) of an amorphous material. Using amorphous felodipine, we show that the Ea decreases with increase in the heating rate, irrespective of the kinetic model evaluated in this work. The model that best describes the crystallization phenomenon cannot be identified readily through the statistical fitting approach because several kinetic models yield comparable R(2) . Here, we propose an alternate paired model-fitting model-free (PMFMF) approach for identifying the most suitable kinetic model, where Ea obtained from model-dependent kinetics is compared with those obtained from model-free kinetics. The most suitable kinetic model is identified as the one that yields Ea values comparable with the model-free kinetics. Through this PMFMF approach, nucleation and growth is identified as the main mechanism that controls the crystallization kinetics of felodipine. Using this PMFMF approach, we further demonstrate that crystallization mechanism from amorphous phase varies with heating rate. © 2014 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. and the American Pharmacists Association.

  7. Budget of Turbulent Kinetic Energy in a Shock Wave Boundary-Layer Interaction

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vyas, Manan A.; Waindim, Mbu; Gaitonde, Datta V.

    2016-01-01

    Implicit large-eddy simulation (ILES) of a shock wave/boundary-layer interaction (SBLI) was performed. Quantities present in the exact equation of the turbulent kinetic energy transport were accumulated and used to calculate terms like production, dissipation, molecular diffusion, and turbulent transport. The present results for a turbulent boundary layer were validated by comparison with direct numerical simulation data. It was found that a longer development domain was necessary for the boundary layer to reach an equilibrium state and a finer mesh resolution would improve the predictions. In spite of these findings, trends of the present budget match closely with that of the direct numerical simulation. Budgets for the SBLI region are presented at key axial stations. These budgets showed interesting dynamics as the incoming boundary layer transforms and the terms of the turbulent kinetic energy budget change behavior within the interaction region.

  8. libKEDF: An accelerated library of kinetic energy density functionals.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dieterich, Johannes M; Witt, William C; Carter, Emily A

    2017-06-30

    Kinetic energy density functionals (KEDFs) approximate the kinetic energy of a system of electrons directly from its electron density. They are used in electronic structure methods that lack direct access to orbitals, for example, orbital-free density functional theory (OFDFT) and certain embedding schemes. In this contribution, we introduce libKEDF, an accelerated library of modern KEDF implementations that emphasizes nonlocal KEDFs. We discuss implementation details and assess the performance of the KEDF implementations for large numbers of atoms. We show that using libKEDF, a single computing node or (GPU) accelerator can provide easy computational access to mesoscale chemical and materials science phenomena using OFDFT algorithms. © 2017 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. © 2017 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  9. Traumatic thrombosis of internal carotid artery sustained by transfer of kinetic energy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kalcioglu, Mahmut Tayyar; Celbis, Osman; Mizrak, Bulent; Firat, Yezdan; Selimoglu, Erol

    2012-06-01

    A 31-year-old male patient with a fatal thrombosis of the internal carotid artery caused by gun shot injury was presented in this case report. The patient was referred to the hospital with a diffuse edema on his left cheek. On otolaryngologic examination, there was a bullet entrance hole at the left mandibular corpus. No exit hole could be found. The finding from his axial computed tomography of neck and paranasal sinuses was normal. On neurological examination, a dense right hemiparesis was observed. In his cerebral angiogram, left common carotid artery was totally obliterated. Diffuse ischemia was observed in the left cerebral hemisphere. Despite intensive interventions, the patient died 4 days after the accident. In the autopsy, a large thrombosis was obtained in the left common carotid artery. This case emphasizes a fatal kinetic energy effect in vascular structures. It is stressed that a gun shot injury could be fatal with its indirect kinetic energy effects at subacute phase.

  10. The genetic code and its optimization for kinetic energy conservation in polypeptide chains.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guilloux, Antonin; Jestin, Jean-Luc

    2012-08-01

    Why is the genetic code the way it is? Concepts from fields as diverse as molecular evolution, classical chemistry, biochemistry and metabolism have been used to define selection pressures most likely to be involved in the shaping of the genetic code. Here minimization of kinetic energy disturbances during protein evolution by mutation allows an optimization of the genetic code to be highlighted. The quadratic forms corresponding to the kinetic energy term are considered over the field of rational numbers. Arguments are given to support the introduction of notions from basic number theory within this context. The observations found to be consistent with this minimization are statistically significant. The genetic code may well have been optimized according to energetic criteria so as to improve folding and dynamic properties of polypeptide chains. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  11. How to measure kinetic energy of the heavy quark inside B mesons?

    CERN Document Server

    Bigi, Ikaros I; Shifman, M; Uraltsev, N; Vainshtein, A I

    1994-01-01

    We discuss how one can determine the average kinetic energy of the heavy quark inside heavy mesons from differential distributions in B decays. A new, so-called third, sum rule for the b\\rightarrow c transition is derived in the small velocity (SV) limit. Using this sum rule and the existing data on the momentum dependence in the B\\rightarrow D^* transition (the slope of the Isgur-Wise function) we obtain a new lower bound on the parameter \\mu_\\pi^2 = (2M_B)^{-1}\\langle B |\\bar b (i\\vec{D})^2 b |B\\rangle proportional to the average kinetic energy of b quark inside B meson. The existing data suggest \\mu_\\pi^2 > 0.4~GeV^2 and (from the ``optical'' sum rule) \\overline{\\Lambda} > 500 MeV, albeit with some numerical uncertainties.

  12. The onset of sediment transport in vegetated channels predicted by turbulent kinetic energy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, J. Q.; Chung, H.; Nepf, H. M.

    2016-11-01

    This laboratory study advances our understanding of sediment transport in vegetated regions, by describing the impact of stem density on the critical velocity, Ucrit, at which sediment motion is initiated. Sparse emergent vegetation was modeled with rigid cylinders arranged in staggered arrays of different stem densities. The sediment transport rate, Qs, was measured over a range of current speeds using digital imaging, and the critical velocity was selected as the condition at which the magnitude of Qs crossed the noise threshold. For both grain sizes considered here (0.6-0.85 mm and 1.7-2 mm), Ucrit decreased with increasing stem density. This dependence can be explained by a threshold condition based on turbulent kinetic energy, kt, suggesting that near-bed turbulence intensity may be a more important control than bed shear stress on the initiation of sediment motion. The turbulent kinetic energy model unified the bare bed and vegetated channel measurements.

  13. Turbulent Kinetic Energy Spectra of Solar Convection from NST Observations and Realistic MHD Simulations

    CERN Document Server

    Kitiashvili, I N; Goode, P R; Kosovichev, A G; Lele, S K; Mansour, N N; Wray, A A; Yurchyshyn, V B

    2012-01-01

    Turbulent properties of the quiet Sun represent the basic state of surface conditions, and a background for various processes of solar activity. Therefore understanding of properties and dynamics of this `basic' state is important for investigation of more complex phenomena, formation and development of observed phenomena in the photosphere and atmosphere. For characterization of the turbulent properties we compare kinetic energy spectra on granular and sub-granular scales obtained from infrared TiO observations with the New Solar Telescope (Big Bear Solar Observatory) and from 3D radiative MHD numerical simulations ('SolarBox' code). We find that the numerical simulations require a high spatial resolution with 10 - 25 km grid-step in order to reproduce the inertial (Kolmogorov) turbulence range. The observational data require an averaging procedure to remove noise and potential instrumental artifacts. The resulting kinetic energy spectra show a good agreement between the simulations and observations, opening...

  14. Analysis of atmospheric flow over a surface protrusion using the turbulence kinetic energy equation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Frost, W.; Harper, W. L.; Fichtl, G. H.

    1975-01-01

    Atmospheric flow fields resulting from a semi-elliptical surface obstruction in an otherwise horizontally homogeneous statistically stationary flow are modelled with the boundary-layer/Boussinesq-approximation of the governing equation of fluid mechanics. The turbulence kinetic energy equation is used to determine the dissipative effects of turbulent shear on the mean flow. Mean-flow results are compared with those given in a previous paper where the same problem was attacked using a Prandtl mixing-length hypothesis. Iso-lines of turbulence kinetic energy and turbulence intensity are plotted in the plane of the flow. They highlight regions of high turbulence intensity in the stagnation zone and sharp gradients in intensity along the transition from adverse to favourable pressure gradient.

  15. Some Properties of the Kinetic Energy Flux and Dissipation in Turbulent Stellar Convection Zones

    CERN Document Server

    Meakin, Casey

    2010-01-01

    We investigate simulated turbulent flow within thermally driven stellar convection zones. Different driving sources are studied, including cooling at the top of the convectively unstable region, as occurs in surface convection zones; and heating at the base by nuclear burning. The transport of enthalpy and kinetic energy, and the distribution of turbulent kinetic energy dissipation are studied. We emphasize the importance of global constraints on shaping the quasi-steady flow characteristics, and present an analysis of turbulent convection which is posed as a boundary value problem that can be easily incorporated into standard stellar evolution codes for deep, efficient convection. Direct comparison is made between the theoretical analysis and the simulated flow and very good agreement is found. Some common assumptions traditionally used to treat quasi-steady turbulent flow in stellar models are briefly discussed. The importance and proper treatment of convective boundaries are indicated.

  16. The kinetic energy operator for distance-dependent effective nuclear masses: Derivation for a triatomic molecule.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Khoma, Mykhaylo; Jaquet, Ralph

    2017-09-21

    The kinetic energy operator for triatomic molecules with coordinate or distance-dependent nuclear masses has been derived. By combination of the chain rule method and the analysis of infinitesimal variations of molecular coordinates, a simple and general technique for the construction of the kinetic energy operator has been proposed. The asymptotic properties of the Hamiltonian have been investigated with respect to the ratio of the electron and proton mass. We have demonstrated that an ad hoc introduction of distance (and direction) dependent nuclear masses in Cartesian coordinates preserves the total rotational invariance of the problem. With the help of Wigner rotation functions, an effective Hamiltonian for nuclear motion can be derived. In the derivation, we have focused on the effective trinuclear Hamiltonian. All necessary matrix elements are given in closed analytical form. Preliminary results for the influence of non-adiabaticity on vibrational band origins are presented for H3(+).

  17. Kinetic Energy Release in Fragmentation Processes following Electron Emission: A time dependent approach

    CERN Document Server

    Chiang, Ying-Chih; Meyer, Hans-Dieter; Cederbaum, Lorenz S

    2012-01-01

    A time-dependent approach for the kinetic energy release (KER) spectrum is developed for a fragmentation of a diatomic molecule after an electronic decay process, e.g. Auger process. It allows one to simulate the time-resolved spectra and provides more insight into the molecular dynamics than the time-independent approach. Detailed analysis of the time-resolved emitted electron and KER spectra sheds light on the interrelation between wave packet dynamics and spectra.

  18. Energy resolution and efficiency of phonon-mediated Kinetic Inductance Detectors for light detection

    OpenAIRE

    Cardani, L; Colantoni, I.; Cruciani, A.; Di Domizio, S.; Vignati, M.; Bellini, F.; Casali, N.; Castellano, M. G.; Coppolecchia, A.; Cosmelli, C.; Tomei, C.

    2015-01-01

    The development of sensitive cryogenic light detectors is of primary interest for bolometric experiments searching for rare events like dark matter interactions or neutrino-less double beta decay. Thanks to their good energy resolution and the natural multiplexed read-out, Kinetic Inductance Detectors (KIDs) are particularly suitable for this purpose. To efficiently couple KIDs-based light detectors to the large crystals used by the most advanced bolometric detectors, active surfaces of sever...

  19. Initiation and Modification of Reaction by Energy Addition: Kinetic and Transport Phenomena

    Science.gov (United States)

    1993-10-01

    MODIFICATION OF REACTION BY ENERGY ADDITION: KINETIC AND TRANSPORT PHENOMENA by Francis E. Fendell and Mau-Song Chou Center for Propulsion Technology...TA - A2 L AUHOWAC - F49620-90-C-0070 Francis E. Fendell and Mau-Song Chou 7. PEMOS101IG ORGANIZATION NAME(S AND...a gaseous mixture is more pertinent for the supersonic-combustor applications of interest to the Air Force (compare Figs. 1 and 2) (Carrier, Fendell

  20. Revisiting the density scaling of the non-interacting kinetic energy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Borgoo, Alex; Teale, Andrew M; Tozer, David J

    2014-07-28

    Scaling relations play an important role in the understanding and development of approximate functionals in density functional theory. Recently, a number of these relationships have been redefined in terms of the Kohn-Sham orbitals [Calderín, Phys. Rev. A: At., Mol., Opt. Phys., 2013, 86, 032510]. For density scaling the author proposed a procedure involving a multiplicative scaling of the Kohn-Sham orbitals whilst keeping their occupation numbers fixed. In the present work, the differences between this scaling with fixed occupation numbers and that of previous studies, where the particle number change implied by the scaling was accommodated through the use of the grand canonical ensemble, are examined. We introduce the terms orbital and ensemble density scaling for these approaches, respectively. The natural ambiguity of the density scaling of the non-interacting kinetic energy functional is examined and the ancillary definitions implicit in each approach are highlighted and compared. As a consequence of these differences, Calderín recovered a homogeneity of degree 1 for the non-interacting kinetic energy functional under orbital scaling, contrasting recent work by the present authors [J. Chem. Phys., 2012, 136, 034101] where the functional was found to be inhomogeneous under ensemble density scaling. Furthermore, we show that the orbital scaling result follows directly from the linearity and the single-particle nature of the kinetic energy operator. The inhomogeneity of the non-interacting kinetic energy functional under ensemble density scaling can be quantified by defining an effective homogeneity. This quantity is shown to recover the homogeneity values for important approximate forms that are exact for limiting cases such as the uniform electron gas and one-electron systems. We argue that the ensemble density scaling provides more insight into the development of new functional forms.

  1. Electrochemical oxidation of COD from real textile wastewaters: Kinetic study and energy consumption.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zou, Jiaxiu; Peng, Xiaolan; Li, Miao; Xiong, Ying; Wang, Bing; Dong, Faqin; Wang, Bin

    2017-03-01

    In the present study, the electrochemical oxidation of real wastewaters discharged by textile industry was carried out using a boron-doped diamond (BDD) anode. The effect of operational variables, such as applied current density (20-100 mA·cm(-2)), NaCl concentration added to the real wastewaters (0-3 g·L(-1)), and pH value (2.0-10.0), on the kinetics of COD oxidation and on the energy consumption was carefully investigated. The obtained experimental results could be well matched with a proposed kinetic model, in which the indirect oxidation mediated by electrogenerated strong oxidants would be described through a pseudo-first-order kinetic constant k. Values of k exhibited a linear increase with increasing applied current density and decreasing pH value, and an exponential increase with NaCl concentration. Furthermore, high oxidation kinetics resulted in low specific energy consumption, but this conclusion was not suitable to the results obtained under different applied current density. Under the optimum operational conditions, it only took 3 h to complete remove the COD in the real textile wastewaters and the specific energy consumption could be as low as 11.12 kWh·kg(-1) COD. The obtained results, low energy consumption and short electrolysis time, allowed to conclude that the electrochemical oxidation based on BDD anodes would have practical industrial application for the treatment of real textile wastewater. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  2. Kinetic Energy Distribution of H(2p) Atoms from Dissociative Excitation of H2

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ajello, Joseph M.; Ahmed, Syed M.; Kanik, Isik; Multari, Rosalie

    1995-01-01

    The kinetic energy distribution of H(2p) atoms resulting from electron impact dissociation of H2 has been measured for the first time with uv spectroscopy. A high resolution uv spectrometer was used for the measurement of the H Lyman-alpha emission line profiles at 20 and 100 eV electron impact energies. Analysis of the deconvolved 100 eV line profile reveals the existence of a narrow line peak and a broad pedestal base. Slow H(2p) atoms with peak energy near 80 meV produce the peak profile, which is nearly independent of impact energy. The wings of H Lyman-alpha arise from dissociative excitation of a series of doubly excited Q(sub 1) and Q(sub 2) states, which define the core orbitals. The fast atom energy distribution peaks at 4 eV.

  3. Quasiperiodic energy dependence of exciton relaxation kinetics in the sexithiophene crystal.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Petelenz, Piotr; Zak, Emil

    2014-10-16

    Femtosecond kinetics of fluorescence rise in the sexithiophene crystal is studied on a microscopic model of intraband relaxation, where exciton energy is assumed to be dissipated by phonon-accompanied scattering, with the rates calculated earlier. The temporal evolution of the exciton population is described by a set of kinetic equations, solved numerically to yield the population buildup at the band bottom. Not only the time scale but also the shape of the rise curves is found to be unusually sensitive to excitation energy, exhibiting unique quasiperiodic dependence thereon, which is rationalized in terms of the underlying model. Further simulations demonstrate that the main conclusions are robust with respect to experimental factors such as finite temperature and inherent spectral broadening of the exciting pulse, while the calculated fluorescence rise times are found to be in excellent agreement with experimental data available to date. As the rise profiles are composed of a number of exponential contributions, which varies with excitation energy, the common practice of characterizing the population buildup in the emitting state by a single value of relaxation time turns out to be an oversimplification. New experiments giving further insight into the kinetics and mechanism of intraband exciton relaxation are suggested.

  4. Kinetic Energy and Angular Distributions of He and Ar Atoms Evaporating from Liquid Dodecane.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Patel, Enamul-Hasan; Williams, Mark A; Koehler, Sven P K

    2017-01-12

    We report both kinetic energy and angular distributions for He and Ar atoms evaporating from C12H26. All results were obtained by performing molecular dynamics simulations of liquid C12H26 with around 10-20 noble gas atoms dissolved in the liquid and by subsequently following the trajectories of the noble gas atoms after evaporation from the liquid. Whereas He evaporates with a kinetic energy distribution of (1.05 ± 0.03) × 2RT (corrected for the geometry used in experiments: (1.08 ± 0.03) × 2RT, experimentally obtained value: (1.14 ± 0.01) × 2RT), Ar displays a kinetic energy distribution that better matches a Maxwell-Boltzmann distribution at the temperature of the liquid ((0.99 ± 0.04) × 2RT). This behavior is also reflected in the angular distributions, which are close to a cosine distribution for Ar but slightly narrower, especially for faster atoms, in the case of He. This behavior of He is most likely due to the weak interaction potential between He and the liquid hydrocarbon.

  5. Measuring kinetic energy changes in the mesoscale with low acquisition rates

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Roldán, É. [ICFO–Institut de Ciències Fotòniques, Mediterranean Technology Park, Av. Carl Friedrich Gauss 3, 08860 Castelldefels (Barcelona) (Spain); GISC–Grupo Interdisciplinar de Sistemas Complejos, Madrid (Spain); Martínez, I. A.; Rica, R. A., E-mail: rul@ugr.es [ICFO–Institut de Ciències Fotòniques, Mediterranean Technology Park, Av. Carl Friedrich Gauss 3, 08860 Castelldefels (Barcelona) (Spain); Dinis, L. [GISC–Grupo Interdisciplinar de Sistemas Complejos, Madrid (Spain); Departamento de Física Atómica, Molecular y Nuclear, Universidad Complutense de Madrid, 28040 Madrid (Spain)

    2014-06-09

    We report on the measurement of the average kinetic energy changes in isothermal and non-isothermal quasistatic processes in the mesoscale, realized with a Brownian particle trapped with optical tweezers. Our estimation of the kinetic energy change allows to access to the full energetic description of the Brownian particle. Kinetic energy estimates are obtained from measurements of the mean square velocity of the trapped bead sampled at frequencies several orders of magnitude smaller than the momentum relaxation frequency. The velocity is tuned applying a noisy electric field that modulates the amplitude of the fluctuations of the position and velocity of the Brownian particle, whose motion is equivalent to that of a particle in a higher temperature reservoir. Additionally, we show that the dependence of the variance of the time-averaged velocity on the sampling frequency can be used to quantify properties of the electrophoretic mobility of a charged colloid. Our method could be applied to detect temperature gradients in inhomogeneous media and to characterize the complete thermodynamics of biological motors and of artificial micro and nanoscopic heat engines.

  6. 裂变产物94Y和95Y半衰期的测定%Half-life determination of fission products 94Y and95Y

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    王世联; 白涛; 师全林; 张小林; 凡金龙; 李奇; 刘杰; 卢嘉春; 常永福

    2009-01-01

    用脉冲反应堆热中子辐照浓缩235U溶液靶,经快速放射化学分离纯化出94Y和95Y溶液,稀释并制备放射性浓度依次相差~10倍的3个测量源.将测量源放置在井式HPGe探测器井内,采用质量归一法测得94Y和95Y的半衰期分别为(19.16±0.05)min和(10.36±0.03)min.%Solutions of enriched235U were irradiated in thermal-neutron flux producedby apulsed reactor,and 94Yand 95Y werc separated chemically from the fission products immediately.The purified solution of 94Y and 95Y is diluted aboutten timgs in sequence to three concentration solutions.Three Sources were prepared with the solutions.The sources are measured,from the lower concentration to higher onc,with a well-type HPGe detector to determine the half-life of94Y and95Y.The determined half-life results arg(19.16±0.05)min and(10.35±0.04)min for94Y and 95Y respectively.

  7. Results of a search for daily and annual variations of the Po-214 half-life at the two year observation period

    CERN Document Server

    Alexeyev, E N; Gangapshev, A M; Kazalov, V V; Kuzminov, V V; Panasenko, S I; Ratkevich, S S

    2015-01-01

    The brief description of installation TAU-2 intended for long-term monitoring of the half-life value $\\tau$ ($\\tau_{1/2}$) of the $^{214}$Po is presented. The methods of measurement and processing of collected data are reported. The results of analysis of time series values $\\tau$ with different time step are presented. Total of measurement time was equal to 590 days. Averaged value of the $^{214}$Po half-life was obtained $\\tau=163.46\\pm0.04$ $\\mu$s. The annual variation with an amplitude $A=(8.9\\pm2.3)\\cdot10^{-4}$, solar-daily variation with an amplitude $A_{So}=(7.5\\pm1.2)\\cdot10^{-4}$, lunar-daily variation with an amplitude $A_L=(6.9\\pm2.0)\\cdot10^{-4}$ and sidereal-daily variation with an amplitude $A_S=(7.2\\pm1.2)\\cdot10^{-4}$ were found in a series of $\\tau$ values. The maximal values of amplitude are observed at the moments when the projections of the installation Earth location velocity vectors toward the source of possible variation achieve its maximal magnitudes.

  8. Differential regulation of p21 (waf1) protein half-life by DNA damage and Nutlin-3 in p53 wild-type tumors and its therapeutic implications.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chang, Li-Ju; Eastman, Alan

    2012-09-01

    DNA damage induces the canonical p53 pathway including elevation of p21 (waf1) resulting in arrest of cell cycle progression. This can protect cells from subsequent Chk1 inhibition. Some p53 wild-type cancer cells such as HCT116 and U2OS exhibit attenuated p21 (waf1) induction upon DNA damage due to translational inhibition, and are incapable of maintaining arrest upon Chk1 inhibition. The purpose of this study was to determine whether this attenuated p21 (waf1) induction also occurred with the non-DNA damaging agent Nutlin-3 which induces p53 by disrupting binding to its negative regulator MDM2. We find that Nutlin-3 circumvented the attenuated induction of p21 (waf1) protein by increasing its half-life which led to G 1 and G 2 arrest in both cell lines. Interestingly, the p21 (waf1) protein half-life remained short on Nutlin-3 in p53 wild-type MCF10A cells; these cells achieve high p21 (waf1) levels through transcriptional upregulation. Consequently, all three p53 wild-type cells but not p53 mutant MDA-MB-231 cancer cells were protected from subsequent incubation with a combination of DNA damage plus a checkpoint inhibitor.

  9. Esculetin Downregulates the Expression of AML1-ETO and C-Kit in Kasumi-1 Cell Line by Decreasing Half-Life of mRNA.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sawney, Sharad; Arora, Rashi; Aggarwal, Kamal K; Saluja, Daman

    2015-01-01

    One of the most frequent genetic aberrations in acute myeloid leukemia (AML) is chromosomal translocation between AML1/RUNX1 on chromosome 21 and ETO gene on chromosome 8 resulting in the expression of chimeric oncogene AML1-ETO. Although patients with t(8;21) translocation have good prognosis, 5-year survival is observed only in 50% of the cases. AML1-ETO translocation is usually accompanied by overexpression of mutant C-Kit, a tyrosine kinase, which contributes to uncontrolled proliferation of premature blood cells leading to relapse and poor prognosis. We illustrate the potential use of esculetin on leukemic cell line, Kasumi-1, bearing t(8;21) translocation and mutated C-Kit gene. Esculetin decreases the expression of AML1-ETO at both protein and transcript level within 24 hours of treatment. Half-life of AML1-ETO mRNA was reduced from 7 hours to 1.5 hours. Similarly half-life of C-Kit mRNA was reduced to 2 hours from 5 hours in esculetin treated cells. Esculetin also perturbed the expression of ectopically expressed AML1-ETO in U937 cells. The decreased expression of AML1-ETO chimeric gene was associated with increased expression of LAT1 and RUNX3 genes, targets of AML1. We envisage that discovery of a drug candidate which could target both these mutated genes would be a considerable breakthrough for future application.

  10. Esculetin Downregulates the Expression of AML1-ETO and C-Kit in Kasumi-1 Cell Line by Decreasing Half-Life of mRNA

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sharad Sawney

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available One of the most frequent genetic aberrations in acute myeloid leukemia (AML is chromosomal translocation between AML1/RUNX1 on chromosome 21 and ETO gene on chromosome 8 resulting in the expression of chimeric oncogene AML1-ETO. Although patients with t(8;21 translocation have good prognosis, 5-year survival is observed only in 50% of the cases. AML1-ETO translocation is usually accompanied by overexpression of mutant C-Kit, a tyrosine kinase, which contributes to uncontrolled proliferation of premature blood cells leading to relapse and poor prognosis. We illustrate the potential use of esculetin on leukemic cell line, Kasumi-1, bearing t(8;21 translocation and mutated C-Kit gene. Esculetin decreases the expression of AML1-ETO at both protein and transcript level within 24 hours of treatment. Half-life of AML1-ETO mRNA was reduced from 7 hours to 1.5 hours. Similarly half-life of C-Kit mRNA was reduced to 2 hours from 5 hours in esculetin treated cells. Esculetin also perturbed the expression of ectopically expressed AML1-ETO in U937 cells. The decreased expression of AML1-ETO chimeric gene was associated with increased expression of LAT1 and RUNX3 genes, targets of AML1. We envisage that discovery of a drug candidate which could target both these mutated genes would be a considerable breakthrough for future application.

  11. New AMS method to measure the atom ratio {sup 146}Sm/{sup 147}Sm for a half-life determination of {sup 146}Sm

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kinoshita, N. [Tandem Accelerator Complex, Research Facility Center for Science and Technology, University of Tsukuba (Japan); Paul, M., E-mail: paul@vms.huji.ac.il [Racah Institute of Physics, Hebrew University, Jerusalem 91904 (Israel); Alcorta, M. [Physics Division, Argonne National Laboratory, Argonne, IL 60439 (United States); Bowers, M.; Collon, P. [Department of Physics, University of Notre Dame, Notre Dame, IN 46556-5670 (United States); Deibel, C.M. [Physics Division, Argonne National Laboratory, Argonne, IL 60439 (United States); Joint Institute for Nuclear Astrophysics, Michigan State University, East Lansing, MI 46624 (United States); DiGiovine, B. [Physics Division, Argonne National Laboratory, Argonne, IL 60439 (United States); Goriely, S. [Universite Libre de Bruxelles, CP-226, Brussels 1050 (Belgium); Greene, J.P.; Henderson, D.J.; Jiang, C.L. [Physics Division, Argonne National Laboratory, Argonne, IL 60439 (United States); Kashiv, Y. [Department of Physics, University of Notre Dame, Notre Dame, IN 46556-5670 (United States); Kay, B.P.; Lee, H.Y.; Marley, S.T. [Physics Division, Argonne National Laboratory, Argonne, IL 60439 (United States); Nakanishi, T. [Faculty of Chemistry, Institute of Science and Engineering, Kanazawa University (Japan); Pardo, R.C.; Patel, N.; Rehm, K.E. [Physics Division, Argonne National Laboratory, Argonne, IL 60439 (United States); Robertson, D. [Department of Physics, University of Notre Dame, Notre Dame, IN 46556-5670 (United States); and others

    2013-01-15

    The extinct p-process nuclide {sup 146}Sm (t{sub 1/2} = 103 {+-} 5 Myr) is known to have been present in the Early-Solar System and has been proposed as an astrophysical chronometer. {sup 146}Sm is also intensely used to date meteorite and planetary differentiation processes, enhancing the importance of an accurate knowledge of the {sup 146}Sm half-life. We are engaged in a new determination of the {sup 146}Sm half-life in which the {sup 146}Sm/{sup 147}Sm atom ratio is determined by accelerator mass spectrometry at the ATLAS facility of Argonne National Laboratory. In order to reduce systematic errors in the AMS determination of the {sup 146}Sm/{sup 147}Sm ratios (in the range of 10{sup -7}-10{sup -9}), {sup 146}Sm and {sup 147}Sm ions were alternately counted in the same detector in the focal plane of a gas-filled magnet, respectively in continuous-wave and attenuated mode. Quantitative attenuation is obtained with the 12 MHz pulsed and ns-bunched ATLAS beam by chopping beam pulses with an RF sweeper in a ratio (digitally determined) down to 1:10{sup 6}. The experiments and preliminary results are discussed.

  12. Bidirectional energy cascades and the origin of kinetic Alfvénic and whistler turbulence in the solar wind.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Che, H; Goldstein, M L; Viñas, A F

    2014-02-14

    The observed steep kinetic scale turbulence spectrum in the solar wind raises the question of how that turbulence originates. Observations of keV energetic electrons during solar quiet time suggest them as a possible source of free energy to drive kinetic turbulence. Using particle-in-cell simulations, we explore how the free energy released by an electron two-stream instability drives Weibel-like electromagnetic waves that excite wave-wave interactions. Consequently, both kinetic Alfvénic and whistler turbulence are excited that evolve through inverse and forward magnetic energy cascades.

  13. Monte-Carlo simulation for fragment mass and kinetic energy distributions from neutron induced fission of 235U

    CERN Document Server

    Montoya, M; Rojas, J

    2007-01-01

    The mass and kinetic energy distribution of nuclear fragments from thermal neutron induced fission of 235U have been studied using a Monte-Carlo simulation. Besides reproducing the pronounced broadening on the standard deviation of the final fragment kinetic energy distribution $\\sigma_{e}(m)$ around the mass number m = 109, our simulation also produces a second broadening around m = 125, that is in agreement with the experimental data obtained by Belhafaf et al. These results are consequence of the characteristics of the neutron emission, the variation in the primary fragment mean kinetic energy and the yield as a function of the mass.

  14. Notepad-like triboelectric generator for efficiently harvesting low-velocity motion energy by interconversion between kinetic energy and elastic potential energy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Guanlin; Leng, Qiang; Lian, Jiawei; Guo, Hengyu; Yi, Xi; Hu, Chenguo

    2015-01-21

    Great attention has been paid to nanogenerators that harvest energy from ambient environments lately. In order to give considerable output current, most nanogenerators require high-velocity motion that in most cases can hardly be provided in our daily life. Here we report a notepad-like triboelectric generator (NTEG), which uses simple notepad-like structure to generate elastic deformation so as to turn a low-velocity kinetic energy into high-velocity kinetic energy through the conversion of elastic potential energy. Therefore, the NTEG can achieve high current output under low-velocity motion, which completely distinguishes it from tribogenerators previously reported. The factors that may affect the output performance are explored, including the number of slices, active length of slice, press speed, and vertical displacement. In addition, the working mechanism is systematically studied, indicating that the efficiency of the generator can be greatly enhanced by interconversion between kinetic energy and elastic potential energy. The short-circuit current, the open-circuit voltage, and power density are 205 μA and 470 V and 9.86 W/m(2), respectively, which is powerful enough to light up hundreds of light-emitting diodes (LEDs) and charge a commercial capacitor. Besides, NTEGs have been successfully applied to a self-powered door monitor.

  15. Kinetic energy partition method applied to ground state helium-like atoms.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Yu-Hsin; Chao, Sheng D

    2017-03-28

    We have used the recently developed kinetic energy partition (KEP) method to solve the quantum eigenvalue problems for helium-like atoms and obtain precise ground state energies and wave-functions. The key to treating properly the electron-electron (repulsive) Coulomb potential energies for the KEP method to be applied is to introduce a "negative mass" term into the partitioned kinetic energy. A Hartree-like product wave-function from the subsystem wave-functions is used to form the initial trial function, and the variational search for the optimized adiabatic parameters leads to a precise ground state energy. This new approach sheds new light on the all-important problem of solving many-electron Schrödinger equations and hopefully opens a new way to predictive quantum chemistry. The results presented here give very promising evidence that an effective one-electron model can be used to represent a many-electron system, in the spirit of density functional theory.

  16. When and how does a prominence-like jet gain kinetic energy?

    CERN Document Server

    Liu, Jiajia; Liu, Rui; Zhang, Quanhao; Liu, Kai; Shen, Chenglong; Wang, S

    2014-01-01

    Jet, a considerable amount of plasma being ejected from chromosphere or lower corona into higher corona, is a common phenomenon. Usually a jet is triggered by a brightening or a flare, which provides the first driving force to push plasma upward. In this process, magnetic reconnection is thought to be the mechanism to convert magnetic energy into thermal, non-thermal and kinetic energies. However, most jets could reach an unusual high altitude and end much later than the end of its associated flare. This fact implies that there is another way to continuously transfer magnetic energy into kinetic energy even after the reconnection. The whole picture described above is well known in the community, but how and how much magnetic energy is released through the way other than the reconnection is still unclear. Here, through studying a prominence-like jet observed by SDO/AIA and STEREO-A/EUVI, we find that the continuous relaxation of the post-reconnection magnetic field structure is an important process for a jet t...

  17. Quantitative Förster resonance energy transfer analysis for kinetic determinations of SUMO-specific protease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Yan; Song, Yang; Madahar, Vipul; Liao, Jiayu

    2012-03-01

    Förster resonance energy transfer (FRET) technology has been widely used in biological and biomedical research, and it is a very powerful tool for elucidating protein interactions in either dynamic or steady state. SUMOylation (the process of SUMO [small ubiquitin-like modifier] conjugation to substrates) is an important posttranslational protein modification with critical roles in multiple biological processes. Conjugating SUMO to substrates requires an enzymatic cascade. Sentrin/SUMO-specific proteases (SENPs) act as an endopeptidase to process the pre-SUMO or as an isopeptidase to deconjugate SUMO from its substrate. To fully understand the roles of SENPs in the SUMOylation cycle, it is critical to understand their kinetics. Here, we report a novel development of a quantitative FRET-based protease assay for SENP1 kinetic parameter determination. The assay is based on the quantitative analysis of the FRET signal from the total fluorescent signal at acceptor emission wavelength, which consists of three components: donor (CyPet-SUMO1) emission, acceptor (YPet) emission, and FRET signal during the digestion process. Subsequently, we developed novel theoretical and experimental procedures to determine the kinetic parameters, k(cat), K(M), and catalytic efficiency (k(cat)/K(M)) of catalytic domain SENP1 toward pre-SUMO1. Importantly, the general principles of this quantitative FRET-based protease kinetic determination can be applied to other proteases. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  18. Coarse Molecular Dynamics of a Peptide Fragment Free Energy, Kinetics, and Long-Time Dynamics Computations

    CERN Document Server

    Hummer, G; Hummer, Gerhard; Kevrekidis, Ioannis G.

    2002-01-01

    We present a ``coarse molecular dynamics'' approach and apply it to studying the kinetics and thermodynamics of a peptide fragment dissolved in water. Short bursts of appropriately initialized simulations are used to infer the deterministic and stochastic components of the peptide motion parametrized by an appropriate set of coarse variables. Techniques from traditional numerical analysis (Newton-Raphson, coarse projective integration) are thus enabled; these techniques help analyze important features of the free-energy landscape (coarse transition states, eigenvalues and eigenvectors, transition rates, etc.). Reverse integration of (irreversible) expected coarse variables backward in time can assist escape from free energy minima and trace low-dimensional free energy surfaces. To illustrate the ``coarse molecular dynamics'' approach, we combine multiple short (0.5-ps) replica simulations to map the free energy surface of the ``alanine dipeptide'' in water, and to determine the ~ 1/(1000 ps) rate of interconv...

  19. Enzymatic Kinetic Isotope Effects from Path-Integral Free Energy Perturbation Theory.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gao, J

    2016-01-01

    Path-integral free energy perturbation (PI-FEP) theory is presented to directly determine the ratio of quantum mechanical partition functions of different isotopologs in a single simulation. Furthermore, a double averaging strategy is used to carry out the practical simulation, separating the quantum mechanical path integral exactly into two separate calculations, one corresponding to a classical molecular dynamics simulation of the centroid coordinates, and another involving free-particle path-integral sampling over the classical, centroid positions. An integrated centroid path-integral free energy perturbation and umbrella sampling (PI-FEP/UM, or simply, PI-FEP) method along with bisection sampling was summarized, which provides an accurate and fast convergent method for computing kinetic isotope effects for chemical reactions in solution and in enzymes. The PI-FEP method is illustrated by a number of applications, to highlight the computational precision and accuracy, the rule of geometrical mean in kinetic isotope effects, enhanced nuclear quantum effects in enzyme catalysis, and protein dynamics on temperature dependence of kinetic isotope effects.

  20. Sensitivity Analysis on the Half-Life of Trichloroethylene and the Distribution Coefficient at the Paducah Gaseous Diffusion Plant

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kopp, Joshua D [Univ of KY, Dept of Civil Engineering

    2007-06-01

    To determine the future extent of the TCE contamination plume at PGDP, a groundwater and solute transport model has been developed by the Department of Energy (DOE). The model used to perform these calculations is MODFLOWT which is an enhanced groundwater transport model developed by the United States Geological Survey (USGS). MODFLOWT models groundwater movement as well as the transport of species that are subject to adsorption and decay by using a finite difference method (Duffield et al 2001). A significant limitation of MODFLOWT is that it requires large amounts of data. This data can be difficult and expensive to obtain. MODFLOWT also requires excessive computational time to perform one simulation. It is desirable to have a model that can predict the spatial extent of the contaminant plume without as much required data and that does not require excessive computational times. The purpose of this study is to develop and alternative model to MODFLOWT that can produce similar results for possible use in a companion management model. The alternative model used in this study is an artificial neural network (ANN).

  1. Kinetic energy distribution of multiply charged ions in Coulomb explosion of Xe clusters.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Heidenreich, Andreas; Jortner, Joshua

    2011-02-21

    We report on the calculations of kinetic energy distribution (KED) functions of multiply charged, high-energy ions in Coulomb explosion (CE) of an assembly of elemental Xe(n) clusters (average size (n) = 200-2171) driven by ultra-intense, near-infrared, Gaussian laser fields (peak intensities 10(15) - 4 × 10(16) W cm(-2), pulse lengths 65-230 fs). In this cluster size and pulse parameter domain, outer ionization is incomplete∕vertical, incomplete∕nonvertical, or complete∕nonvertical, with CE occurring in the presence of nanoplasma electrons. The KEDs were obtained from double averaging of single-trajectory molecular dynamics simulation ion kinetic energies. The KEDs were doubly averaged over a log-normal cluster size distribution and over the laser intensity distribution of a spatial Gaussian beam, which constitutes either a two-dimensional (2D) or a three-dimensional (3D) profile, with the 3D profile (when the cluster beam radius is larger than the Rayleigh length) usually being experimentally realized. The general features of the doubly averaged KEDs manifest the smearing out of the structure corresponding to the distribution of ion charges, a marked increase of the KEDs at very low energies due to the contribution from the persistent nanoplasma, a distortion of the KEDs and of the average energies toward lower energy values, and the appearance of long low-intensity high-energy tails caused by the admixture of contributions from large clusters by size averaging. The doubly averaged simulation results account reasonably well (within 30%) for the experimental data for the cluster-size dependence of the CE energetics and for its dependence on the laser pulse parameters, as well as for the anisotropy in the angular distribution of the energies of the Xe(q+) ions. Possible applications of this computational study include a control of the ion kinetic energies by the choice of the laser intensity profile (2D∕3D) in the laser-cluster interaction volume.

  2. Simple Method Obtaining Analytical Expressions of Particle and Kinetic-Energy Densities for One-Dimensional Confined Fermi Gases

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    YANG XiaoXue; WU Ying

    2002-01-01

    We develop a simple approach to obtain explicitly exact analytical expressions of particle and kinetic-energy densities for noninteracting Fermi gases in one-dimensional harmonic confinement, and in one-dimensional boxconfinement as well.

  3. Enhanced von Weizsäcker Wang-Govind-Carter kinetic energy density functional for semiconductors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shin, Ilgyou; Carter, Emily A.

    2014-05-01

    We propose a new form of orbital-free (OF) kinetic energy density functional (KEDF) for semiconductors that is based on the Wang-Govind-Carter (WGC99) nonlocal KEDF. We enhance within the latter the semi-local von Weizsäcker KEDF term, which is exact for a single orbital. The enhancement factor we introduce is related to the extent to which the electron density is localized. The accuracy of the new KEDF is benchmarked against Kohn-Sham density functional theory (KSDFT) by comparing predicted energy differences between phases, equilibrium volumes, and bulk moduli for various semiconductors, along with metal-insulator phase transition pressures. We also compare point defect and (100) surface energies in silicon for a broad test of its applicability. This new KEDF accurately reproduces the exact non-interacting kinetic energy of KSDFT with only one additional adjustable parameter beyond the three parameters in the WGC99 KEDF; it exhibits good transferability between semiconducting to metallic silicon phases and between various III-V semiconductors without parameter adjustment. Overall, this KEDF is more accurate than previously proposed OF KEDFs (e.g., the Huang-Carter (HC) KEDF) for semiconductors, while the computational efficiency remains at the level of the WGC99 KEDF (several hundred times faster than the HC KEDF). This accurate, fast, and transferable new KEDF holds considerable promise for large-scale OFDFT simulations of metallic through semiconducting materials.

  4. Enhanced von Weizsäcker Wang-Govind-Carter kinetic energy density functional for semiconductors

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Shin, Ilgyou [Department of Chemistry, Princeton University, Princeton, New Jersey 08544-1009 (United States); Carter, Emily A., E-mail: eac@princeton.edu [Department of Mechanical and Aerospace Engineering, Program in Applied and Computational Mathematics, and Andlinger Center for Energy and the Environment, Princeton University, Princeton, New Jersey 08544-5263 (United States)

    2014-05-14

    We propose a new form of orbital-free (OF) kinetic energy density functional (KEDF) for semiconductors that is based on the Wang-Govind-Carter (WGC99) nonlocal KEDF. We enhance within the latter the semi-local von Weizsäcker KEDF term, which is exact for a single orbital. The enhancement factor we introduce is related to the extent to which the electron density is localized. The accuracy of the new KEDF is benchmarked against Kohn-Sham density functional theory (KSDFT) by comparing predicted energy differences between phases, equilibrium volumes, and bulk moduli for various semiconductors, along with metal-insulator phase transition pressures. We also compare point defect and (100) surface energies in silicon for a broad test of its applicability. This new KEDF accurately reproduces the exact non-interacting kinetic energy of KSDFT with only one additional adjustable parameter beyond the three parameters in the WGC99 KEDF; it exhibits good transferability between semiconducting to metallic silicon phases and between various III-V semiconductors without parameter adjustment. Overall, this KEDF is more accurate than previously proposed OF KEDFs (e.g., the Huang-Carter (HC) KEDF) for semiconductors, while the computational efficiency remains at the level of the WGC99 KEDF (several hundred times faster than the HC KEDF). This accurate, fast, and transferable new KEDF holds considerable promise for large-scale OFDFT simulations of metallic through semiconducting materials.

  5. Visualizing the large-$Z$ scaling of the kinetic energy density of atoms

    CERN Document Server

    Cancio, Antonio C

    2016-01-01

    The scaling of neutral atoms to large $Z$, combining periodicity with a gradual trend to homogeneity, is a fundamental probe of density functional theory, one that has driven recent advances in understanding both the kinetic and exchange-correlation energies. Although research focus is normally upon the scaling of energies, insights can also be gained from energy densities. We visualize the scaling of the positive-definite kinetic energy density (KED) in closed-shell atoms, in comparison to invariant quantities based upon the gradient and Laplacian of the density. We notice a striking fit of the KED within the core of any atom to a gradient expansion using both the gradient and the Laplacian, appearing as an asymptotic limit around which the KED oscillates. The gradient expansion is qualitatively different from that derived from first principles for a slowly-varying electron gas and is correlated with a nonzero Pauli contribution to the KED near the nucleus. We propose and explore orbital-free meta-GGA models...

  6. Comparison of CME masses and kinetic energies near the Sun and in the inner heliosphere

    Science.gov (United States)

    Webb, D. F.; Howard, R. A.; Jackson, B. V.

    1995-01-01

    Masses have now been determined for many of the CMEs observed in the inner heliosphere by the HELIOS 1 and 2 zodiacal light photometers. The speed of the brightest material of each CME has also been measured so that, for events having both mass and speed determinations, the kinetic energies of the CMEs are estimated. We compare the masses and kinetic energies of the individual CMEs measured in the inner heliosphere by HELIOS and near the Sun from observations by the SOLWIND (1979-1983) and SMM coronagraphs (1980). Where feasible we also compare the speeds of the same CMEs. We find that the HELIOS masses and energies tend to be somewhat larger by factors of 2-5 than those derived from the coronagraph data. We also compare the distribution of the masses and energies of the HELIOS and coronagraph CMEs over the solar cycle. These results provide an important baseline for observations of CMEs from coronagraphs, from the ISEE-3/ICE, WIND and Ulysses spacecraft and in the future from SOHO.

  7. Kinetic study of solid waste pyrolysis using distributed activation energy model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bhavanam, Anjireddy; Sastry, R C

    2015-02-01

    The pyrolysis characteristics of municipal solid waste, agricultural residues such as ground nut shell, cotton husk and their blends are investigated using non-isothermal thermogravimetric analysis (TGA) with in a temperature range of 30-900 °C at different heating rates of 10 °C, 30 °C and 50 °C/min in inert atmosphere. From the thermograms obtained from TGA, it is observed that the maximum rate of degradation occurred in the second stage of the pyrolysis process for all the solid wastes. The distributed activation energy model (DAEM) is used to study the pyrolysis kinetics of the solid wastes. The kinetic parameters E (activation energy), k0 (frequency factor) are calculated from this model. It is found that the range of activation energies for agricultural residues are lower than the municipal solid waste. The activation energies for the municipal solid waste pyrolysis process drastically decreased with addition of agricultural residues. The proposed DAEM is successfully validated with TGA experimental data. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  8. Distinct dissociation kinetics between ion pairs: Solvent-coordinate free-energy landscape analysis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yonetani, Yoshiteru

    2015-07-01

    Different ion pairs exhibit different dissociation kinetics; however, while the nature of this process is vital for understanding various molecular systems, the underlying mechanism remains unclear. In this study, to examine the origin of different kinetic rate constants for this process, molecular dynamics simulations were conducted for LiCl, NaCl, KCl, and CsCl in water. The results showed substantial differences in dissociation rate constant, following the trend kLiCl constants arose predominantly from the variation in solvent-state distribution between the ion pairs. The formation of a water-bridging configuration, in which the water molecule binds to an anion and a cation simultaneously, was identified as a key step in this process: water-bridge formation lowers the related dissociation free-energy barrier, thereby increasing the probability of ion-pair dissociation. Consequently, a higher probability of water-bridge formation leads to a higher ion-pair dissociation rate.

  9. Statistical rate theory and kinetic energy-resolved ion chemistry: theory and applications.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Armentrout, P B; Ervin, Kent M; Rodgers, M T

    2008-10-16

    Ion chemistry, first discovered 100 years ago, has profitably been coupled with statistical rate theories, developed about 80 years ago and refined since. In this overview, the application of statistical rate theory to the analysis of kinetic-energy-dependent collision-induced dissociation (CID) reactions is reviewed. This procedure accounts for and quantifies the kinetic shifts that are observed as systems increase in size. The statistical approach developed allows straightforward extension to systems undergoing competitive or sequential dissociations. Such methods can also be applied to the reverse of the CID process, association reactions, as well as to quantitative analysis of ligand exchange processes. Examples of each of these types of reactions are provided and the literature surveyed for successful applications of this statistical approach to provide quantitative thermochemical information. Such applications include metal-ligand complexes, metal clusters, proton-bound complexes, organic intermediates, biological systems, saturated organometallic complexes, and hydrated and solvated species.

  10. Statistical properties of kinetic and total energy densities in reverberant spaces.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jacobsen, Finn; Molares, Alfonso Rodríguez

    2010-04-01

    Many acoustical measurements, e.g., measurement of sound power and transmission loss, rely on determining the total sound energy in a reverberation room. The total energy is usually approximated by measuring the mean-square pressure (i.e., the potential energy density) at a number of discrete positions. The idea of measuring the total energy density instead of the potential energy density on the assumption that the former quantity varies less with position than the latter goes back to the 1930s. However, the phenomenon was not analyzed until the late 1970s and then only for the region of high modal overlap, and this analysis has never been published. Moreover, until fairly recently, measurement of the total sound energy density required an elaborate experimental arrangement based on finite-difference approximations using at least four amplitude and phase matched pressure microphones. With the advent of a three-dimensional particle velocity transducer, it has become somewhat easier to measure total rather than only potential energy density in a sound field. This paper examines the ensemble statistics of kinetic and total sound energy densities in reverberant enclosures theoretically, experimentally, and numerically.

  11. An experimental-finite element analysis on the kinetic energy absorption capacity of polyvinyl alcohol sponge.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Karimi, Alireza; Navidbakhsh, Mahdi; Razaghi, Reza

    2014-06-01

    Polyvinyl alcohol (PVA) sponge is in widespread use for biomedical and tissue engineering applications owing to its biocompatibility, availability, relative cheapness, and excellent mechanical properties. This study reports a novel concept of design in energy absorbing materials which consist in the use of PVA sponge as an alternative reinforcement material to enhance the energy loss of impact loads. An experimental study is carried out to measure the mechanical properties of the PVA sponge under uniaxial loading. The kinetic energy absorption capacity of the PVA sponge is computed by a hexahedral finite element (FE) model of the steel ball and bullet through the LS-DYNA code under impact load at three different thicknesses (5, 10, 15mm). The results show that a higher sponge thickness invokes a higher energy loss of the steel ball and bullet. The highest energy loss of the steel ball and bullet is observed for the thickest sponge with 160 and 35J, respectively. The most common type of traumatic brain injury in which the head subject to impact load causes the brain to move within the skull and consequently brain hemorrhaging. These results suggest the application of the PVA sponge as a great kinetic energy absorber material compared to commonly used expanded polystyrene foams (EPS) to absorb most of the impact energy and reduces the transmitted load. The results might have implications not only for understanding of the mechanical properties of PVA sponge but also for use as an alternative reinforcement material in helmet and packaging material design. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  12. Large Eddy Simulation of SGS Turbulent Kinetic Energy and SGS Turbulent Dissipation in a Backward-Facing Step Turbulent Flow

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    王兵; 张会强; 王希麟

    2004-01-01

    The instantaneous and time-averaged statistic characteristics of the sub-grid scale (SGS) turbulent kinetic energy and SGS dissipation in a backward-facing step turbulent flow have been studied bylarge eddy simulation. The SGS turbulent kinetic energy and SGS turbulent dissipation vary in different flow regions and decrease with the flow developing spatially. The fluid molecular dissipation shares about 14% to 28% of the whole dissipation.

  13. Investigation of temperature effect on half-life periods of long-lived isomer sup 1 sup 8 sup 0 sup m Hf and sup 8 sup 7 sup m Sr

    CERN Document Server

    Alpatov, V G; Davydov, A V; Isaev, Y N; Kartashov, G R; Korotkov, M M; Samojlov, V M

    2001-01-01

    The experiments on measuring the half-life periods of the sup 1 sup 8 sup 0 sup m Hf and sup 8 sup 7 sup m Sr long-lived isomers at the room temperature and at 77 K with application of the HfO sub 2 , Sr(NO sub 3) sub 2 and SrCO sub 3 massive samples are described. The isomer states of the corresponding nuclei were formed by the samples irradiation through neutrons from the Pu-Be source. According to the Vysotski theory and other authors the surrounding of the gamma-active nuclei by a large number of the same nuclei in the basic state should lead to the T sub 1 sub / sub 2 growth due to distortion of the zero electromagnetic vacuum oscillations near the nuclear energy level value. Decrease in the sample temperature leads to the narrowing of the gamma-lines, especially for the Moessbauer low-energy transitions, which increases the resonance effect on the zero oscillations spectrum. Increase in the T sub 1 sub / sub 2 by 2.99 +- 0.87% was observed by cooling the sup 1 sup 8 sup 0 sup m Hf isomer sample, in the ...

  14. Sensory Agreement Guides Kinetic Energy Optimization of Arm Movements during Object Manipulation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Farshchiansadegh, Ali; Melendez-Calderon, Alejandro; Ranganathan, Rajiv; Murphey, Todd D; Mussa-Ivaldi, Ferdinando A

    2016-04-01

    The laws of physics establish the energetic efficiency of our movements. In some cases, like locomotion, the mechanics of the body dominate in determining the energetically optimal course of action. In other tasks, such as manipulation, energetic costs depend critically upon the variable properties of objects in the environment. Can the brain identify and follow energy-optimal motions when these motions require moving along unfamiliar trajectories? What feedback information is required for such optimal behavior to occur? To answer these questions, we asked participants to move their dominant hand between different positions while holding a virtual mechanical system with complex dynamics (a planar double pendulum). In this task, trajectories of minimum kinetic energy were along curvilinear paths. Our findings demonstrate that participants were capable of finding the energy-optimal paths, but only when provided with veridical visual and haptic information pertaining to the object, lacking which the trajectories were executed along rectilinear paths.

  15. The analysis and kinetic energy balance of an upper-level wind maximum during intense convection

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fuelberg, H. E.; Jedlovec, G. J.

    1982-01-01

    The purpose of this paper is to analyze the formation and maintenance of the upper-level wind maximum which formed between 1800 and 2100 GMT, April 10, 1979, during the AVE-SESAME I period, when intense storms and tornadoes were experienced (the Red River Valley tornado outbreak). Radiosonde stations participating in AVE-SESAME I are plotted (centered on Oklahoma). National Meteorological Center radar summaries near the times of maximum convective activity are mapped, and height and isotach plots are given, where the formation of an upper-level wind maximum over Oklahoma is the most significant feature at 300 mb. The energy balance of the storm region is seen to change dramatically as the wind maximum forms. During much of its lifetime, the upper-level wind maximum is maintained by ageostrophic flow that produces cross-contour generation of kinetic energy and by the upward transport of midtropospheric energy. Two possible mechanisms for the ageostrophic flow are considered.

  16. Potential to kinetic energy conversion in wave number domain for the Southern Hemisphere

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huang, H.-J.; Vincent, D. G.

    1984-01-01

    Preliminary results of a wave number study conducted for the South Pacific Convergence Zone (SPCZ) using FGGE data for the period January 10-27, 1979 are reported. In particular, three variables (geomagnetic height, z, vertical p-velocity, omega, and temperature, T) and one energy conversion quantity, omega-alpha (where alpha is the specific volume), are shown. It is demonstrated that wave number 4 plays an important role in the conversion from available potential energy to kinetic energy in the Southern Hemisphere tropics, particularly in the vicinity of the SPCZ. It is therefore suggested that the development and movement of wave number 4 waves be carefully monitored in making forecasts for the South Pacific region.

  17. Sensory Agreement Guides Kinetic Energy Optimization of Arm Movements during Object Manipulation.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ali Farshchiansadegh

    2016-04-01

    Full Text Available The laws of physics establish the energetic efficiency of our movements. In some cases, like locomotion, the mechanics of the body dominate in determining the energetically optimal course of action. In other tasks, such as manipulation, energetic costs depend critically upon the variable properties of objects in the environment. Can the brain identify and follow energy-optimal motions when these motions require moving along unfamiliar trajectories? What feedback information is required for such optimal behavior to occur? To answer these questions, we asked participants to move their dominant hand between different positions while holding a virtual mechanical system with complex dynamics (a planar double pendulum. In this task, trajectories of minimum kinetic energy were along curvilinear paths. Our findings demonstrate that participants were capable of finding the energy-optimal paths, but only when provided with veridical visual and haptic information pertaining to the object, lacking which the trajectories were executed along rectilinear paths.

  18. Sensory Agreement Guides Kinetic Energy Optimization of Arm Movements during Object Manipulation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Farshchiansadegh, Ali; Melendez-Calderon, Alejandro; Ranganathan, Rajiv; Murphey, Todd D.; Mussa-Ivaldi, Ferdinando A.

    2016-01-01

    The laws of physics establish the energetic efficiency of our movements. In some cases, like locomotion, the mechanics of the body dominate in determining the energetically optimal course of action. In other tasks, such as manipulation, energetic costs depend critically upon the variable properties of objects in the environment. Can the brain identify and follow energy-optimal motions when these motions require moving along unfamiliar trajectories? What feedback information is required for such optimal behavior to occur? To answer these questions, we asked participants to move their dominant hand between different positions while holding a virtual mechanical system with complex dynamics (a planar double pendulum). In this task, trajectories of minimum kinetic energy were along curvilinear paths. Our findings demonstrate that participants were capable of finding the energy-optimal paths, but only when provided with veridical visual and haptic information pertaining to the object, lacking which the trajectories were executed along rectilinear paths. PMID:27035587

  19. Potential to kinetic energy conversion in wave number domain for the Southern Hemisphere

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huang, H.-J.; Vincent, D. G.

    1984-01-01

    Preliminary results of a wave number study conducted for the South Pacific Convergence Zone (SPCZ) using FGGE data for the period January 10-27, 1979 are reported. In particular, three variables (geomagnetic height, z, vertical p-velocity, omega, and temperature, T) and one energy conversion quantity, omega-alpha (where alpha is the specific volume), are shown. It is demonstrated that wave number 4 plays an important role in the conversion from available potential energy to kinetic energy in the Southern Hemisphere tropics, particularly in the vicinity of the SPCZ. It is therefore suggested that the development and movement of wave number 4 waves be carefully monitored in making forecasts for the South Pacific region.

  20. THE FIRST ISOLATION OF AMERICIUM IN THE FORM OF PURE COMPOUNDS - THE SPECIFIC ALPHA-ACTIVITY AND HALF-LIFE OF Am241

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cunningham, B.B.; Asprey, L.B.

    1950-07-20

    The microgram scale isolation and preparation of pure compounds of americium is described. Data are presented to show that the alpha-half-life of the isotope Am{sup 241} is 490 {+-} 14 years. The absorption spectrum of Am(III) in 1M nitric acid in the range 3500-8000 mu is given. The wave lengths of 10 of the most prominent lines in the copper spark emission spectrum of americium are given to the nearest 0.01 {angstrom}. Evidence is presented to show that the potential for the Am(III)-Am(IV) couple in acid solution is more negative than -2v and that the potential for the Am(II)-Am(III) couple is more positive than +0.9v.

  1. The effective and environmental half-life of {sup 137}Cs at Coral Islands at the former US nuclear test site

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Robison, William L. E-mail: robison1@llnl.gov; Conrado, Cynthia L.; Bogen, Kenneth T.; Stoker, A. Carol

    2003-07-01

    The United States (US) conducted nuclear weapons testing from 1946 to 1958 at Bikini and Enewetak Atolls in the northern Marshall Islands. Based on previous detailed dose assessments for Bikini, Enewetak, Rongelap, and Utirik Atolls over a period of 28 years, cesium-137 ({sup 137}Cs) at Bikini Atoll contributes about 85-89% of the total estimated dose through the terrestrial food chain as a result of uptake of {sup 137}Cs by food crops. The estimated integral 30, 50, and 70-year doses were based on the radiological decay of {sup 137}Cs (30-year half-life) and other radionuclides. However, there is a continuing inventory of {sup 137}Cs and {sup 90}Sr in the fresh water portion of the groundwater at all contaminated atolls even though the turnover rate of the fresh groundwater is about 5 years. This is evidence that a portion of the soluble fraction of {sup 137}Cs and {sup 90}Sr inventory in the soil is lost by transport to groundwater when rainfall is heavy enough to cause recharge of the lens, resulting in loss of {sup 137}Cs from the soil column and root zone of the plants. This loss is in addition to that caused by radioactive decay. The effective rate of loss was determined by two methods: (1) indirectly, from time-dependent studies of the {sup 137}Cs concentration in leaves of Pisonia grandis, Guettarda specosia, Tournefortia argentea (also called Messerschmidia), Scaevola taccada, and fruit from Pandanus and coconut trees (Cocos nucifera L.), and (2) more directly, by evaluating the {sup 137}Cs/{sup 90}Sr ratios at Bikini Atoll. The mean (and its lower and upper 95% confidence limits) for effective half-life and for environmental-loss half-life (ELH) based on all the trees studied on Rongelap, Bikini, and Enewetak Atolls are 8.5 years (8.0 years, 9.8 years), and 12 years (11 years, 15 years), respectively. The ELH based on the {sup 137}Cs/{sup 90}Sr ratios in soil in 1987 relative to the{sup 137}Cs/{sup 90}Sr ratios at the time of deposition in 1954 is less

  2. Distributions of available potential and kinetic energy budget quantities associated with wintertime cyclone activity along the eastern coasts of Asia and North America

    OpenAIRE

    ZAPOTOCNY, JOHN V.

    2011-01-01

    Available potential energy and kinetic energy budget quantities are examined during a two-week period of the Global Weather Experiment (GWE) winter season (14–28 February 1979) for regions encompassing the cyclogenetically active eastern coasts of Asia and North America. Twice daily values of vertically integrated available potential energy generation, kinetic energy generation, and kinetic energy boundary flux are produced using gridded isentropic data derived from the National Meteorologica...

  3. Orthogonal assembly of a designed ankyrin repeat protein-cytotoxin conjugate with a clickable serum albumin module for half-life extension.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Simon, Manuel; Frey, Raphael; Zangemeister-Wittke, Uwe; Plückthun, Andreas

    2013-11-20

    The generation of drug conjugates for safe and effective tumor targeting requires binding proteins tolerant to functionalization by rational engineering. Here, we show that Designed Ankyrin Repeat Proteins (DARPins), a novel class of binding proteins not derived from antibodies, can be used as building blocks for facile orthogonal assembly of bioconjugates for tumor targeting with tailored properties. DARPin Ec1, which targets the Epithelial Cell Adhesion Molecule (EpCAM), was genetically modified with a C-terminal cysteine for conjugation of the small molecule cytotoxin monomethylauristatin F (MMAF). In addition, it was N-terminally functionalized by metabolic introduction of the non-natural amino acid azidohomoalanine to enable linkage of site-specifically dibenzocyclooctyne-modified mouse serum albumin (MSA) for half-life extension using Cu(I)-free click chemistry. The conjugate MSA-Ec1-MMAF was assembled to obtain high yields of a pure and stable drug conjugate as confirmed by various analytical methods and in functional assays. The orthogonality of the assembly led to a defined reaction product and preserved the functional properties of all modules, including EpCAM-specific binding and internalization, FcRn binding mediated by MSA, and cytotoxic potency. Linkage of MMAF to the DARPin increased receptor-specific uptake of the drug while decreasing nonspecific uptake, and further coupling of the conjugate to MSA enhanced this effect. In mice, albumin conjugation increased the serum half-life from 11 min to 17.4 h, resulting in a more than 22-fold increase in the area-under-the-curve (AUC). Our data demonstrate the promise of the DARPin format for facile modular assembly of drug conjugates with improved pharmacokinetic performance for tumor targeting.

  4. Numerical investigation of kinetic energy dynamics during autoignition of n-heptane/air mixture

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lucena Kreppel Paes, Paulo; Brasseur, James; Xuan, Yuan

    2015-11-01

    Many engineering applications involve complex turbulent reacting flows, where nonlinear, multi-scale turbulence-combustion couplings are important. Direct representation of turbulent reacting flow dynamics is associated with prohibitive computational costs, which makes it necessary to employ turbulent combustion models to account for the effects of unresolved scales on resolved scales. Classical turbulence models are extensively employed in reacting flow simulations. However, they rely on assumptions about the energy cascade, which are valid for incompressible, isothermal homogeneous isotropic turbulence. A better understanding of the turbulence-combustion interactions is required for the development of more accurate, physics-based sub-grid-scale models for turbulent reacting flows. In order to investigate the effects of reaction-induced density, viscosity, and pressure variations on the turbulent kinetic energy, Direct Numerical Simulation (DNS) of autoignition of partially-premixed, lean n-heptane/air mixture in three-dimensional homogeneous isotropic turbulence has been performed. This configuration represents standard operating conditions of Homogeneous-Charge Compression-Ignition (HCCI) engines. The differences in the turbulent kinetic energy balance between the present turbulent reacting flow and incompressible, isothermal homogeneous isotropic turbulence are highlighted at different stages during the autoignition process.

  5. Microwave treatment of dairy manure for resource recovery: Reaction kinetics and energy analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Srinivasan, Asha; Liao, Ping H; Lo, Kwang V

    2016-12-01

    A newly designed continuous-flow 915 MHz microwave wastewater treatment system was used to demonstrate the effectiveness of the microwave enhanced advanced oxidation process (MW/H2O2-AOP) for treating dairy manure. After the treatment, about 84% of total phosphorus and 45% of total chemical oxygen demand were solubilized with the highest H2O2 dosage (0.4% H2O2 per %TS). The reaction kinetics of soluble chemical oxygen demand revealed activation energy to be in the range of 5-22 kJ mole(-1). The energy required by the processes was approximately 0.16 kWh per liter of dairy manure heated. A higher H2O2 dosage used in the system had a better process performance in terms of solids solubilization, reaction kinetics, and energy consumption. Cost-benefit analysis for a farm-scale MW/H2O2-AOP treatment system was also presented. The results obtained from this study would provide the basic knowledge for designing an effective farm-scale dairy manure treatment system.

  6. Asymptotic domination of cold relativistic MHD winds by kinetic energy flux

    Science.gov (United States)

    Begelman, Mitchell C.; Li, Zhi-Yun

    1994-01-01

    We study the conditions which lead to the conversion of most Poynting flux into kinetic energy flux in cold, relativistic hydromagnetic winds. It is shown that plasma acceleration along a precisely radial flow is extremely inefficient due to the near cancellation of the toroidal magnetic pressure and tension forces. However, if the flux tubes in a flow diverge even slightly faster than radially, the fast magnetosonic point moves inward from infinity to a few times the light cylinder radius. Once the flow becomes supermagnetosonic, further divergence of the flux tubes beyond the fast point can accelerate the flow via the 'magnetic nozzle' effect, thereby further converting Poynting flux to kinetic energy flux. We show that the Grad-Shafranov equation admits a generic family of kinetic energy-dominated asymptotic wind solutions with finite total magnetic flux. The Poynting flux in these solutions vanishes logarithmically with distance. The way in which the flux surfaces are nested within the flow depends only on the ratio of angular velocity to poliodal 4-velocity as a function of magnetic flux. Radial variations in flow structure can be expressed in terms of a pressure boundary condition on the outermost flux surface, provided that no external toriodal field surrounds the flow. For a special case, we show explicitly how the flux surfaces merge gradually to their asymptotes. For flows confined by an external medium of pressure decreasing to zero at infinity we show that, depending on how fast the ambient pressure declines, the final flow state could be either a collimated jet or a wind that fills the entire space. We discuss the astrophysical implications of our results for jets from active galactic nuclei and for free pulsar winds such as that believed to power the Crab Nebula.

  7. Fragment Excitation and Moments of Kinetic Energy Distributions in Nuclear Fission

    Science.gov (United States)

    Faust, Herbert R.

    2004-02-01

    The Random Excitation Model (REX-M) in nuclear fission is formulated with the level density formula from the Fermi-gas model. It is assumed that excitation of fission fragments is totally determined by a temperature calculated from the reaction Q-value. From this assumption fragment excitation, moments of kinetic energy distributions, and neutron evaporation are calculated. It is shown that the measured distributions and the neutron evaporation characteristics are in good agreement with the model calculations. Finally we extend the REX-model to describe aspects of ternary fission.

  8. Calculating kinetics parameters and reactivity changes with continuous-energy Monte Carlo

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kiedrowski, Brian C [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Brown, Forrest B [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Wilson, Paul [UNIV. WISCONSIN

    2009-01-01

    The iterated fission probability interpretation of the adjoint flux forms the basis for a method to perform adjoint weighting of tally scores in continuous-energy Monte Carlo k-eigenvalue calculations. Applying this approach, adjoint-weighted tallies are developed for two applications: calculating point reactor kinetics parameters and estimating changes in reactivity from perturbations. Calculations are performed in the widely-used production code, MCNP, and the results of both applications are compared with discrete ordinates calculations, experimental measurements, and other Monte Carlo calculations.

  9. Effect of mean velocity shear on the dissipation rate of turbulent kinetic energy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yoshizawa, Akira; Liou, Meng-Sing

    1992-01-01

    The dissipation rate of turbulent kinetic energy in incompressible turbulence is investigated using a two-scale DIA. The dissipation rate is shown to consist of two parts; one corresponds to the dissipation rate used in the current turbulence models of eddy-viscosity type, and another comes from the viscous effect that is closely connected with mean velocity shear. This result can elucidate the physical meaning of the dissipation rate used in the current turbulence models and explain part of the discrepancy in the near-wall dissipation rates between the current turbulence models and direct numerical simulation of the Navier-Stokes equation.

  10. Surface-catalyzed recombination into excited electronic, vibrational, rotational, and kinetic energy states: A review

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kofsky, I. L.; Barrett, J. L.

    1985-01-01

    Laboratory experiments in which recombined CO, CO2, D2O, OH, N2, H2, and O2 molecules desorb from surfaces in excited internal and translational states are briefly reviewed. Unequilibrated distributions predominate from the principally catalytic metal substrates so far investigated. Mean kinetic energies have been observed up to approx. 3x, and in some cases less than, wall-thermal; the velocity distributions generally vary with emission angle, with non-Lambertian particle fluxes. The excitation state populations are found to depend on surface impurities, in an as yet unexplained way.

  11. Numerical simulations of gun-launched kinetic energy projectiles subjected to asymmetric projectile base pressure

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rabern, D.A.

    1991-01-01

    Three-dimensional numerical simulations were performed to determine the effect of an asymmetric base pressure on kinetic energy projectiles during launch. A matrix of simulations was performed in two separate launch environments. One launch environment represented a severe lateral load environment, while the other represented a nonsevere lateral load environment based on the gun tube straightness. The orientation of the asymmetric pressure field, its duration, the projectile's initial position, and the tube straightness were altered to determine the effects of each parameter. The pressure asymmetry translates down the launch tube to exit parameters and is washed out by tube profile. Results from the matrix of simulations are presented.

  12. Numerical simulations of gun-launched kinetic energy projectiles subjected to asymmetric projectile base pressure

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rabern, D.A.

    1991-12-31

    Three-dimensional numerical simulations were performed to determine the effect of an asymmetric base pressure on kinetic energy projectiles during launch. A matrix of simulations was performed in two separate launch environments. One launch environment represented a severe lateral load environment, while the other represented a nonsevere lateral load environment based on the gun tube straightness. The orientation of the asymmetric pressure field, its duration, the projectile`s initial position, and the tube straightness were altered to determine the effects of each parameter. The pressure asymmetry translates down the launch tube to exit parameters and is washed out by tube profile. Results from the matrix of simulations are presented.

  13. Observed and Simulated Power Spectra of Kinetic and Magnetic Energy retrieved with 2D inversions

    CERN Document Server

    Danilovic, S; van Noort, M; Cameron, R

    2016-01-01

    We try to retrieve the power spectra with certainty to the highest spatial frequencies allowed by current instrumentation. For this, we use 2D inversion code that were able to recover information up to the instrumental diffraction limit. The retrieved power spectra have shallow slopes extending further down to much smaller scales than found before. They seem not to show any power law. The observed slopes at subgranular scales agree with those obtained from recent local dynamo simulations. Small differences are found for vertical component of kinetic energy that suggest that observations suffer from an instrumental effect that is not taken into account.

  14. Calculated half-lives and kinetic energies for spontaneous emission of heavy ions from nuclei

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Poenaru, D.N.; Greiner, W.; Depta, K.; Ivascu, M.; Mazilu, D.; Sandulescu, A.

    1986-05-01

    The most probable decays by spontaneous emission of heavy ions are listed for nuclides with Z = 47--106 and total half-lives>1 ..mu..sec. Partial half-lives, branching ratios relative to ..cap alpha.. decay, kinetic energies, and Q values are estimated by using the analytical superasymmetric fission model, a semiempirical formula for those ..cap alpha..-decay lifetimes which have not been measured, and the new Wapstra--Audi mass tables. Numerous ''stable'' nuclides with Z>40 are found to be metastable with respect to the new decay modes. The current experimental status is briefly reviewed.

  15. Kinetic energy releases of small amino acids upon interaction with keV ions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bari, S.; Alvarado, F.; Postma, J.; Sobocinski, P.; Hoekstra, R.; Schlatholter, T. [Groningen Univ., KVI Atomic Physics (Netherlands); Schlatholter, T. [Universites P. et M. Curie and D. Diderot, INSP, CNRS UMR 75-88, 75 - Paris (France)

    2009-01-15

    In chromatin, DNA is tightly packed into one complex together with histone and non-histone proteins. These proteins are known to protect the DNA against indirect and to some extent even direct radiation damage. Radiation action upon amino acids is thus one of the primary steps in biological radiation action. In this paper we investigate the ionization and fragmentation of the gas-phase amino acids glycine, alanine and valine upon interaction with keV {alpha}-particles. High resolution coincidence time-of-flight mass spectrometry is used to determine the dominant fragmentation channels as well as fragment kinetic energies. (authors)

  16. Kinetic energy releases of small amino acids upon interaction with keV ions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bari, S.; Alvarado, F.; Postma, J.; Sobocinski, P.; Hoekstra, R.; Schlathölter, T.

    2009-01-01

    In chromatin, DNA is tightly packed into one complex together with histone and non-histone proteins. These proteins are known to protect the DNA against indirect and to some extent even direct radiation damage. Radiation action upon amino acids is thus one of the primary steps in biological radiation action. In this paper we investigate the ionization and fragmentation of the gas-phase amino acids glycine, alanine and valine upon interaction with keV α-particles. High resolution coincidence time-of-flight mass spectrometry is used to determine the dominant fragmentation channels as well as fragment kinetic energies.

  17. Graph-based analysis of kinetics on multidimensional potential-energy surfaces.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Okushima, T; Niiyama, T; Ikeda, K S; Shimizu, Y

    2009-09-01

    The aim of this paper is twofold: one is to give a detailed description of an alternative graph-based analysis method, which we call saddle connectivity graph, for analyzing the global topography and the dynamical properties of many-dimensional potential-energy landscapes and the other is to give examples of applications of this method in the analysis of the kinetics of realistic systems. A Dijkstra-type shortest path algorithm is proposed to extract dynamically dominant transition pathways by kinetically defining transition costs. The applicability of this approach is first confirmed by an illustrative example of a low-dimensional random potential. We then show that a coarse-graining procedure tailored for saddle connectivity graphs can be used to obtain the kinetic properties of 13- and 38-atom Lennard-Jones clusters. The coarse-graining method not only reduces the complexity of the graphs, but also, with iterative use, reveals a self-similar hierarchical structure in these clusters. We also propose that the self-similarity is common to many-atom Lennard-Jones clusters.

  18. On energy balance and the structure of radiated waves in kinetics of crystalline defects

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sharma, Basant Lal

    2016-11-01

    Traveling waves, with well-known closed form expressions, in the context of the defects kinetics in crystals are excavated further with respect to their inherent structure of oscillatory components. These are associated with, so called, Frenkel-Kontorova model with a piecewise quadratic substrate potential, corresponding to the symmetric as well as asymmetric energy wells of the substrate, displacive phase transitions in bistable chains, and brittle fracture in triangular lattice strips under mode III conditions. The paper demonstrates that the power expended theorem holds so that the sum of rate of working and the rate of total energy flux into a control strip moving steadily with the defect equals the rate of energy sinking into the defect, in the sense of N.F. Mott. In the conservative case of the Frenkel-Kontorova model with asymmetric energy wells, this leads to an alternative expression for the mobility in terms of the energy flux through radiated lattice waves. An application of the same to the case of martensitic phase boundary and a crack, propagating uniformly in bistable chains and triangular lattice strips, respectively, is also provided and the energy release is expressed in terms of the radiated energy flux directly. The equivalence between the well-known expressions and their alternative is established via an elementary identity, which is stated and proved in the paper as the zero lemma. An intimate connection between the three distinct types of defects is, thus, revealed in the framework of energy balance, via a structural similarity between the corresponding variants of the 'zero' lemma containing the information about radiated energy flux. An extension to the dissipative models, in the presence of linear viscous damping, is detailed and analog of the zero lemma is proved. The analysis is relevant to the dynamics of dislocations, brittle cracks, and martensitic phase boundaries, besides possible applications to analogous physical contexts which are

  19. Mass yields and kinetic energy of fragments from fission of highly-excited nuclei with A≲220

    Science.gov (United States)

    Denisov, V. Yu.; Margitych, T. O.; Sedykh, I. Yu.

    2017-02-01

    It is shown that the potential energy surface of the two separated fragments has the saddle point, which takes place at small distance between the surfaces of well-deformed fragments. The height of this two-body saddle point is larger than the height of one-body fission barrier for nuclei with A ≲ 220. The mass yields of the fission fragments, which are appearing at the fission of nuclei with A ≲ 220, are related to the number of states of the two-fragment systems at the two-body saddle points. The characteristics of kinetic energy of fragments are described by using the trajectory motion equations with the dissipation terms. The Gaussian distribution of the final kinetic energy around the classical value of this energy induced by the stochastic fluctuations is taken into account at an evaluation of the total kinetic energy distributions of the fission fragments.

  20. Minimal Model of Quantum Kinetic Clusters for the Energy-Transfer Network of a Light-Harvesting Protein Complex.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, Jianlan; Tang, Zhoufei; Gong, Zhihao; Cao, Jianshu; Mukamel, Shaul

    2015-04-02

    The energy absorbed in a light-harvesting protein complex is often transferred collectively through aggregated chromophore clusters. For population evolution of chromophores, the time-integrated effective rate matrix allows us to construct quantum kinetic clusters quantitatively and determine the reduced cluster-cluster transfer rates systematically, thus defining a minimal model of energy-transfer kinetics. For Fenna-Matthews-Olson (FMO) and light-havrvesting complex II (LCHII) monomers, quantum Markovian kinetics of clusters can accurately reproduce the overall energy-transfer process in the long-time scale. The dominant energy-transfer pathways are identified in the picture of aggregated clusters. The chromophores distributed extensively in various clusters can assist a fast and long-range energy transfer.

  1. Design and kinetic analysis of piezoelectric energy harvesters with self-adjusting resonant frequency

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yu-Jen, Wang; Tsung-Yi, Chuang; Jui-Hsin, Yu

    2017-09-01

    Vibration-based energy harvesters have been developed as power sources for wireless sensor networks. Because the vibration frequency of the environment is varied with surrounding conditions, how to design an adaptive energy harvester is a practical topic. This paper proposes a design for a piezoelectric energy harvester possessing the ability to self-adjust its resonant frequency in rotational environments. The effective length of a trapezoidal cantilever is extended by centrifugal force from a rotating wheel to vary its area moment of inertia. The analytical solution for the natural frequency of the piezoelectric energy harvester was derived from the parameter design process, which could specify a structure approaching resonance at any wheel rotating frequency. The kinetic equation and electrical damping induced by power generation were derived from a Lagrange method and a mechanical-electrical coupling model, respectively. An energy harvester with adequate parameters can generate power at a wide range of car speeds. The output power of an experimental prototype composed of piezoelectric thin films and connected to a 3.3 MΩ external resistor was approximately 70-140 μW at wheel speeds ranging from 200 to 700 RPM. These results demonstrate that the proposed piezoelectric energy harvester can be applied as a power source for the wireless tire pressure monitoring sensor.

  2. Maximum proton kinetic energy and patient-generated neutron fluence considerations in proton beam arc delivery radiation therapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sengbusch, E; Pérez-Andújar, A; DeLuca, P M; Mackie, T R

    2009-02-01

    Several compact proton accelerator systems for use in proton therapy have recently been proposed. Of paramount importance to the development of such an accelerator system is the maximum kinetic energy of protons, immediately prior to entry into the patient, that must be reached by the treatment system. The commonly used value for the maximum kinetic energy required for a medical proton accelerator is 250 MeV, but it has not been demonstrated that this energy is indeed necessary to treat all or most patients eligible for proton therapy. This article quantifies the maximum kinetic energy of protons, immediately prior to entry into the patient, necessary to treat a given percentage of patients with rotational proton therapy, and examines the impact of this energy threshold on the cost and feasibility of a compact, gantry-mounted proton accelerator treatment system. One hundred randomized treatment plans from patients treated with IMRT were analyzed. The maximum radiological pathlength from the surface of the patient to the distal edge of the treatment volume was obtained for 180 degrees continuous arc proton therapy and for 180 degrees split arc proton therapy (two 90 degrees arcs) using CT# profiles from the Pinnacle (Philips Medical Systems, Madison, WI) treatment planning system. In each case, the maximum kinetic energy of protons, immediately prior to entry into the patient, that would be necessary to treat the patient was calculated using proton range tables for various media. In addition, Monte Carlo simulations were performed to quantify neutron production in a water phantom representing a patient as a function of the maximum proton kinetic energy achievable by a proton treatment system. Protons with a kinetic energy of 240 MeV, immediately prior to entry into the patient, were needed to treat 100% of patients in this study. However, it was shown that 90% of patients could be treated at 198 MeV, and 95% of patients could be treated at 207 MeV. Decreasing the

  3. Buprenorphine kinetics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bullingham, R E; McQuay, H J; Moore, A; Bennett, M R

    1980-11-01

    Buprenorphine kinetics was determined in surgical patients using radioimmunoassay. Buprenorphine was measured in the plasma of 24 patients who had received 0.3 mg buprenorphine intraoperatively. After 3 hr 10 of these patients then received a further 0.3 mg buprenorphine intravenously for postoperative pain relief, and 11 patients were given 0.3 mg intramuscularly; again, plasma levels were measured for 3 hr. The data fitted closely to a triexponential decay curve. There was a very fast initial phase, with a half-life (t1/2) of 2 min. The terminal t1/2 was slow, approximately 3 hr. Comparison of the kinetics of the same patient, awake and anesthetized, showed that the clearance was significantly lower in the anesthetized state. A notable feature of the drug given intramuscularly is rapid systemic availability, so that peaks are obtained in 2 to 5 min, and in 10 min the resulting levels are the same as for the intravenous and intramuscular routes.

  4. Kinetic modeling and energy efficiency of UV/H₂O₂ treatment of iodinated trihalomethanes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xiao, Yongjun; Zhang, Lifeng; Yue, Junqi; Webster, Richard D; Lim, Teik-Thye

    2015-05-15

    Photodegradation of I-THMs including CHCl2I and CHI3 by the UV/H2O2 system was investigated in this study. CHCl2I and CHI3 react rapidly with hydroxyl radical (OH) produced by the UV/H2O2 system, with second-order rate constants of 8.0 × 10(9) and 8.9 × 10(9) M(-1) s(-1), respectively. A fraction of CHCl2I could be completely mineralized within 15 min and the remaining fraction was mainly converted to formic acid (HCO2H). Cl(-) and I(-) were identified as the predominant end-products. No ClO3(-) was observed during the photodegradation process, while IO3(-) was detected but at less than 2% of the total liberated iodine species at the end of the reaction. The effects of pH, H2O2 dose, and matrix species such as humic acid (HA), HCO3(-), SO4(2-), Cl(-), NO3(-) on the photodegradation kinetics were evaluated. The steady-state kinetic model has been proven to successfully predict the destruction of CHCl2I and CHI3 by UV/H2O2 in different water matrices. On this basis, the kinetic model combined with electrical energy per order (EE/O) concept was applied to evaluate the efficiency of the photodegradation process and to optimize the H2O2 dose for different scenarios. The optimal H2O2 doses in deionized (DI) water, model natural water, and surface water are estimated at 5, 12, and 16 mg L(-1), respectively, which correspond to the lowest total energy consumption (EE/Ototal) of 0.2, 0.31, and 0.45 kWhm(-3)order(-1). Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  5. Electronic coherence and the kinetics of inter-complex energy transfer in light-harvesting systems.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huo, Pengfei; Miller, Thomas F

    2015-12-14

    We apply real-time path-integral dynamics simulations to characterize the role of electronic coherence in inter-complex excitation energy transfer (EET) processes. The analysis is performed using a system-bath model that exhibits the essential features of light-harvesting networks, including strong intra-complex electronic coupling and weak inter-complex coupling. Strong intra-complex coupling is known to generate both static and dynamic electron coherences, which delocalize the exciton over multiple chromophores and potentially influence the inter-complex EET dynamics. With numerical results from partial linearized density matrix (PLDM) real-time path-integral calculations, it is found that both static and dynamic coherence are correlated with the rate of inter-complex EET. To distinguish the impact of these two types of intra-complex coherence on the rate of inter-complex EET, we use Multi-Chromophore Förster Resonance Energy Transfer (MC-FRET) theory to map the original parameterization of the system-bath model to an alternative parameterization for which the effects of static coherence are preserved while the effects of dynamic coherence are largely eliminated. It is then shown that both parameterizations of the model (i.e., the original that supports dynamic coherence and the alternative that eliminates it), exhibit nearly identical EET kinetics and population dynamics over a wide range of parameters. These observations are found to hold for cases in which either the EET donor or acceptor is a dimeric complex and for cases in which the dimeric complex is either symmetric or asymmetric. The results from this study suggest that dynamic coherence plays only a minor role in the actual kinetics of inter-complex EET, whereas static coherence largely governs the kinetics of incoherent inter-complex EET in light-harvesting networks.

  6. Kinetic and geometric isotope effects originating from different adsorption potential energy surfaces: cyclohexane on Rh(111).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Koitaya, Takanori; Shimizu, Sumera; Mukai, Kozo; Yoshimoto, Shinya; Yoshinobu, Jun

    2012-06-07

    Novel isotope effects were observed in desorption kinetics and adsorption geometry of cyclohexane on Rh(111) by the use of infrared reflection absorption spectroscopy, temperature programmed desorption, photoelectron spectroscopy, and spot-profile-analysis low energy electron diffraction. The desorption energy of deuterated cyclohexane (C(6)D(12)) is lower than that of C(6)H(12). In addition, the work function change by adsorbed C(6)D(12) is smaller than that by adsorbed C(6)H(12). These results indicate that C(6)D(12) has a shallower adsorption potential than C(6)H(12) (vertical geometric isotope effect). The lateral geometric isotope effect was also observed in the two-dimensional cyclohexane superstructures as a result of the different repulsive interaction between interfacial dipoles. The observed isotope effects should be ascribed to the quantum nature of hydrogen involved in the C-H···metal interaction.

  7. Enhancing Understanding of High Energy Density Plasmas Using Fluid Modeling with Kinetic Closures

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hansen, David; Held, Eric; Srinivasan, Bhuvana; Masti, Robert; King, Jake

    2016-10-01

    This work seeks to understand possible stabilization mechanisms of the early-time electrothermal instability in the evolution of the Rayleigh-Taylor instability in MagLIF (Magnetized Liner Inertial Fusion) experiments. Such mechanisms may include electron thermal conduction, viscosity, and large magnetic fields. Experiments have shown that the high-energy density plasmas from wire-array implosions require physics modelling that goes well beyond simple models such as ideal MHD. The plan is to develop a multi-fluid extended-MHD model that includes kinetic closures for thermal conductivity, resistivity, and viscosity using codes that are easily available to the wider research community. Such an effort would provide the community with a well-benchmarked tool capable of advanced modeling of high-energy-density plasmas.

  8. Electron energy distribution functions for modelling the plasma kinetics in dielectric barrier discharges

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Carman, R.J. [Department of Physics, Division of Information and Communications Sciences, Macquarie University, Sydney, NSW (Australia)). E-mail: rcarman@physics.mq.edu.au; Mildren, R.P. [Centre for Lasers and Applications, Division of Information and Communications Sciences, Macquarie University, Sydney, NSW (Australia)

    2000-10-07

    In modelling the plasma kinetics in dielectric barrier discharges (DBDs), the electron energy conservation equation is often included in the rate equation analysis (rather than utilizing the local-field approximation) with the assumption that the electron energy distribution function (EEDF) has a Maxwellian profile. We show that adopting a Maxwellian EEDF leads to a serious overestimate of the calculated ionization/excitation rate coefficients and the electron mobility for typical plasma conditions in a xenon DBD. Alternative EEDF profiles are trialed (Druyvesteyn, bi-Maxwellian and bi-Druyvesteyn) and benchmarked against EEDFs obtained from solving the steady-state Boltzmann equation. A bi-Druyvesteyn EEDF is shown to be more inherently accurate for modelling simulations of xenon DBDs. (author)

  9. Entanglement of helicity and energy in kinetic Alfven wave/whistler turbulence

    CERN Document Server

    Galtier, S

    2014-01-01

    The role of magnetic helicity is investigated in kinetic Alfv\\'en wave and oblique whistler turbulence in presence of a relatively intense external magnetic field $b_0 {\\bf e_\\parallel}$. In this situation, turbulence is strongly anisotropic and the fluid equations describing both regimes are the reduced electron magnetohydrodynamics (REMHD) whose derivation, originally made from the gyrokinetic theory, is also obtained here from compressible Hall MHD. We use the asymptotic equations derived by Galtier \\& Bhattacharjee (2003) to study the REMHD dynamics in the weak turbulence regime. The analysis is focused on the magnetic helicity equation for which we obtain the exact solutions: they correspond to the entanglement relation, $n+\\tilde n = -6$, where $n$ and $\\tilde n$ are the power law indices of the perpendicular (to ${\\bf b_0}$) wave number magnetic energy and helicity spectra respectively. Therefore, the spectra derived in the past from the energy equation only, namely $n=-2.5$ and $\\tilde n = - 3.5$,...

  10. Elimination of the Translational Kinetic Energy Contamination in pre-Born-Oppenheimer Calculations

    CERN Document Server

    Simmen, Benjamin; Reiher, Markus

    2012-01-01

    In this paper we present a simple strategy for the elimination of the translational kinetic energy contamination of the total energy in pre-Born--Oppenheimer calculations carried out in laboratory-fixed Cartesian coordinates (LFCCs). The simple expressions for the coordinates and the operators are thus preserved throughout the calculations, while the mathematical form and the parametrisation of the basis functions are chosen so that the translational and rotational invariances are respected. The basis functions are constructed using explicitly correlated Gaussian functions (ECGs) and the global vector representation. First, we observe that it is not possible to parametrise the ECGs so that the system is at rest in LFCCs and at the same time the basis functions are square-integrable with a non-vanishing norm. Then, we work out a practical strategy to circumvent this problem by making use of the properties of the linear transformation between the LFCCs and translationally invariant and center-of-mass Cartesian ...

  11. Current redistribution and generation of kinetic energy in the stagnated Z pinch.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ivanov, V V; Anderson, A A; Papp, D; Astanovitskiy, A L; Talbot, B R; Chittenden, J P; Niasse, N

    2013-07-01

    The structure of magnetic fields was investigated in stagnated wire-array Z pinches using a Faraday rotation diagnostic at the wavelength of 266 nm. The distribution of current in the pinch and trailing material was reconstructed. A significant part of current can switch from the main pinch to the trailing plasma preheated by x-ray radiation of the pinch. Secondary implosions of trailing plasma generate kinetic energy and provide enhanced heating and radiation of plasma at stagnation. Hot spots in wire-array Z pinches also provide enhanced radiation of the Z pinch. A collapse of a single hot spot radiates 1%-3% of x-ray energy of the Z pinch with a total contribution of hot spots of 10%-30%.

  12. Unified dark energy and dust dark matter dual to quadratic purely kinetic K-essence

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guendelman, Eduardo; Nissimov, Emil; Pacheva, Svetlana

    2016-02-01

    We consider a modified gravity plus single scalar-field model, where the scalar Lagrangian couples symmetrically both to the standard Riemannian volume-form (spacetime integration measure density) given by the square root of the determinant of the Riemannian metric, as well as to another non-Riemannian volume-form in terms of an auxiliary maximal-rank antisymmetric tensor gauge field. As shown in a previous paper, the pertinent scalar-field dynamics provides an exact unified description of both dark energy via dynamical generation of a cosmological constant, and dark matter as a "dust" fluid with geodesic flow as a result of a hidden Noether symmetry. Here we extend the discussion by considering a non-trivial modification of the purely gravitational action in the form of f(R) = R - α R^2 generalized gravity. Upon deriving the corresponding "Einstein-frame" effective action of the latter modified gravity-scalar-field theory we find explicit duality (in the sense of weak versus strong coupling) between the original model of unified dynamical dark energy and dust fluid dark matter, on one hand, and a specific quadratic purely kinetic "k-essence" gravity-matter model with special dependence of its coupling constants on only two independent parameters, on the other hand. The canonical Hamiltonian treatment and Wheeler-DeWitt quantization of the dual purely kinetic "k-essence" gravity-matter model is also briefly discussed.

  13. Energy Transfer Kinetics in Photosynthesis as an Inspiration for Improving Organic Solar Cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nganou, Collins; Lackner, Gerhard; Teschome, Bezu; Deen, M Jamal; Adir, Noam; Pouhe, David; Lupascu, Doru C; Mkandawire, Martin

    2017-06-07

    Clues to designing highly efficient organic solar cells may lie in understanding the architecture of light-harvesting systems and exciton energy transfer (EET) processes in very efficient photosynthetic organisms. Here, we compare the kinetics of excitation energy tunnelling from the intact phycobilisome (PBS) light-harvesting antenna system to the reaction center in photosystem II in intact cells of the cyanobacterium Acaryochloris marina with the charge transfer after conversion of photons into photocurrent in vertically aligned carbon nanotube (va-CNT) organic solar cells with poly(3-hexyl)thiophene (P3HT) as the pigment. We find that the kinetics in electron hole creation following excitation at 600 nm in both PBS and va-CNT solar cells to be 450 and 500 fs, respectively. The EET process has a 3 and 14 ps pathway in the PBS, while in va-CNT solar cell devices, the charge trapping in the CNT takes 11 and 258 ps. We show that the main hindrance to efficiency of va-CNT organic solar cells is the slow migration of the charges after exciton formation.

  14. A kinetic energy model of two-vehicle crash injury severity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sobhani, Amir; Young, William; Logan, David; Bahrololoom, Sareh

    2011-05-01

    An important part of any model of vehicle crashes is the development of a procedure to estimate crash injury severity. After reviewing existing models of crash severity, this paper outlines the development of a modelling approach aimed at measuring the injury severity of people in two-vehicle road crashes. This model can be incorporated into a discrete event traffic simulation model, using simulation model outputs as its input. The model can then serve as an integral part of a simulation model estimating the crash potential of components of the traffic system. The model is developed using Newtonian Mechanics and Generalised Linear Regression. The factors contributing to the speed change (ΔV(s)) of a subject vehicle are identified using the law of conservation of momentum. A Log-Gamma regression model is fitted to measure speed change (ΔV(s)) of the subject vehicle based on the identified crash characteristics. The kinetic energy applied to the subject vehicle is calculated by the model, which in turn uses a Log-Gamma Regression Model to estimate the Injury Severity Score of the crash from the calculated kinetic energy, crash impact type, presence of airbag and/or seat belt and occupant age. Copyright © 2010 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  15. Kinetic energy density and agglomerate abrasion rate during blending of agglomerates into powders.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Willemsz, Tofan A; Hooijmaijers, Ricardo; Rubingh, Carina M; Tran, Thanh N; Frijlink, Henderik W; Vromans, Herman; van der Voort Maarschalk, Kees

    2012-01-23

    Problems related to the blending of a cohesive powder with a free flowing bulk powder are frequently encountered in the pharmaceutical industry. The cohesive powder often forms lumps or agglomerates which are not dispersed during the mixing process and are therefore detrimental to blend uniformity. Achieving sufficient blend uniformity requires that the blending conditions are able to break up agglomerates, which is often an abrasion process. This study was based on the assumption that the abrasion rate of agglomerates determines the required blending time. It is shown that the kinetic energy density of the moving powder bed is a relevant parameter which correlates with the abrasion rate of agglomerates. However, aspects related to the strength of agglomerates should also be considered. For this reason the Stokes abrasion number (St(Abr)) has been defined. This parameter describes the ratio between the kinetic energy density of the moving powder bed and the work of fracture of the agglomerate. The St(Abr) number is shown to predict the abrasion potential of agglomerates in the dry-mixing process. It appeared possible to include effects of filler particle size and impeller rotational rate into this concept. A clear relationship between abrasion rate of agglomerates and the value of St(Abr) was demonstrated. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  16. Fully-kinetic simulations of the Rayleigh-Taylor instability in high-energy-density plasmas

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alves, E. Paulo; Mori, Warren B.; Fiuza, Frederico

    2016-10-01

    The Rayleigh-Taylor instability (RTI) in high-energy-density (HED) plasmas is a central problem in a wide range of scenarios. It dictates, for instance, the dynamics of supernovae in astrophysical plasmas, and is also recognized as a critical challenge to achieving ignition in inertial confinement fusion. In some of these conditions the Larmor radius or Coulomb mean free path (m.f.p.) is finite, allowing kinetic effects to become important, and it is not fully clear how the development of the RTI deviates from standard hydrodynamic behavior. In order to obtain an accurate description of the RTI in these HED conditions it is essential to capture the self-consistent interplay between collisional and collisionless plasma processes, and the role of self-generated electric and magnetic fields. We have explored the dynamics of the RTI in HED plasma conditions using first-principles particle-in-cell simulations combined with Monte Carlo binary collisions. Our simulations capture the role of kinetic diffusion as well as the self-generated electric (e.g. space-charge) and magnetic (e.g. Biermann battery) fields on the growth rate and nonlinear evolution of the RTI for different plasma conditions. We will discuss how different collisional m.f.p. relative to the collisionless plasma skin depth affect the RTI development. This work was supported by the DOE Office of Science, Fusion Energy Science (FWP 100182).

  17. Quantifying Turbulent Kinetic Energy in an Aortic Coarctation with Large Eddy Simulation and Magnetic Resonance Imaging

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lantz, Jonas; Ebbers, Tino; Karlsson, Matts

    2012-11-01

    In this study, turbulent kinetic energy (TKE) in an aortic coarctation was studied using both a numerical technique (large eddy simulation, LES) and in vivo measurements using magnetic resonance imaging (MRI). High levels of TKE are undesirable, as kinetic energy is extracted from the mean flow to feed the turbulent fluctuations. The patient underwent surgery to widen the coarctation, and the flow before and after surgery was computed and compared to MRI measurements. The resolution of the MRI was about 7 × 7 voxels in axial cross-section while 50x50 mesh cells with increased resolution near the walls was used in the LES simulation. In general, the numerical simulations and MRI measurements showed that the aortic arch had no or very low levels of TKE, while elevated values were found downstream the coarctation. It was also found that TKE levels after surgery were lowered, indicating that the diameter of the constriction was increased enough to decrease turbulence effects. In conclusion, both the numerical simulation and MRI measurements gave very similar results, thereby validating the simulations and suggesting that MRI measured TKE can be used as an initial estimation in clinical practice, while LES results can be used for detailed quantification and further research of aortic flows.

  18. Kinetic analysis and energy efficiency of phenol degradation in a plasma-photocatalysis system.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Hui-juan; Chen, Xiao-yang

    2011-02-28

    Combination of two kinds of advanced oxidation processes (AOPs) is an effective approach to control wastewater pollution. In this research, a pulsed discharge plasma system with multi-point-to-plate electrode and an immobilized TiO(2) photocatalysis system is coupled to oxidize target pollutant in aqueous solution. Kinetic analysis (pseudo-first order kinetic constant, k) and energy efficiency (energy yield value at 50% phenol conversion, G(50)) of phenol oxidation in different reaction systems (plasma alone and plasma-photocatalysis) are reviewed to account for the synergistic mechanism of plasma and photocatalysis. The experimental results show that higher k and G(50) of phenol oxidation can be obtained in the plasma-photocatalysis system under the conditions of different gas bubbling varieties, initial solution pH and radical scavenger addition. Moreover, the investigation tested hydroxyl radical (OH) is the most important species for phenol removal in the synergistic system of plasma-photocatalysis as well as in the plasma alone system.

  19. On the evaluation of the non-interacting kinetic energy in density functional theory.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peach, Michael J G; Griffiths, David G J; Tozer, David J

    2012-04-14

    The utility of both an orbital-free and a single-orbital expression for computing the non-interacting kinetic energy in density functional theory is investigated for simple atomic systems. The accuracy of both expressions is governed by the extent to which the Kohn-Sham equation is solved for the given exchange-correlation functional and so special attention is paid to the influence of finite Gaussian basis sets. The orbital-free expression is a statement of the virial theorem and its accuracy is quantified. The accuracy of the single-orbital expression is sensitive to the choice of Kohn-Sham orbital. The use of particularly compact orbitals is problematic because the failure to solve the Kohn-Sham equation exactly in regions where the orbital has decayed to near-zero leads to unphysical behaviour in regions that contribute to the kinetic energy, rendering it inaccurate. This problem is particularly severe for core orbitals, which would otherwise appear attractive due to their formally nodeless nature. The most accurate results from the single-orbital expression are obtained using the relatively diffuse, highest occupied orbitals, although special care is required at orbital nodes.

  20. Microscopic distribution functions, structure, and kinetic energy of liquid and solid neon: quantum Monte Carlo simulations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Neumann, Martin; Zoppi, Marco

    2002-03-01

    We have performed extensive path integral Monte Carlo simulations of liquid and solid neon, in order to derive the kinetic energy as well as the single-particle and pair distribution functions of neon atoms in the condensed phases. From the single-particle distribution function n(r) one can derive the momentum distribution and thus obtain an independent estimate of the kinetic energy. The simulations have been carried out using mostly the semiempirical HFD-C2 pair potential by Aziz et al. [R. A. Aziz, W. J. Meath, and A. R. Allnatt, Chem. Phys. 79, 295 (1983)], but, in a few cases, we have also used the Lennard-Jones potential. The differences between the potentials, as measured by the properties investigated, are not very large, especially when compared with the actual precision of the experimental data. The simulation results have been compared with all the experimental information that is available from neutron scattering. The overall agreement with the experiments is very good.

  1. NIST high throughput variable kinetic energy hard X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy facility

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Weiland, C., E-mail: cweiland@bnl.gov [National Institute of Standards and Technology, Gaithersburg, MD 20899 (United States); Rumaiz, A.K. [National Synchrotron Light Source, Brookhaven National Laboratory, Upton, NY 11973 (United States); Lysaght, P. [SEMATECH, 257 Fuller Road, Albany, NY 12203 (United States); Karlin, B.; Woicik, J.C.; Fischer, D. [National Institute of Standards and Technology, Gaithersburg, MD 20899 (United States)

    2013-10-15

    Highlights: •High throughput HAPXES beamline provides beam energies between 2.1 and 6 keV. •Recent results in depth profiling of materials for next-generation CMOS. •Facility ideal or measurement of energy level alignment at buried interfaces. •Approved beamline NSLS II will provide wider energy range and X-ray flux. -- Abstract: We present an overview of the National Institute of Standards and Technology beamline X24A at the National Synchrotron Light Source at Brookhaven National Lab and recent work performed at the facility. The beamline is equipped for HAXPES measurements, with an energy range from 2.1 to 6 keV with Si(1 1 1) crystals. Recent measurements performed at the beamline include non-destructive depth dependent variable kinetic energy measurements of dielectric and semiconductor films and interfaces for microelectronics applications, band alignment at buried interfaces, and the electronic structure of bulk-like materials. The design and operation of the current beamline will be discussed, as well as the future NIST beamline at NSLS II.

  2. Effective atomic numbers, electron densities and kinetic energy released in matter of vitamins for photon interaction

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shantappa, A.; Hanagodimath, S. M.

    2014-01-01

    Effective atomic numbers, electron densities of some vitamins (Retinol, Riboflavin, Niacin, Biotin, Folic acid, Cobalamin, Phylloquinone and Flavonoids) composed of C, H, O, N, Co, P and S have been calculated for total and partial photon interactions by the direct method for energy range 1 keV-100 GeV by using WinXCOM and kinetic energy released in matter (Kerma) relative to air is calculated in energy range of 1 keV-20 MeV. Change in effective atomic number and electron density with energy is calculated for all photon interactions. Variation of photon mass attenuation coefficients with energy are shown graphically only for total photon interaction. It is observed that change in mass attenuation coefficient with composition of different chemicals is very large below 100 keV and moderate between 100 keV and 10 MeV and negligible above 10 MeV. Behaviour of vitamins is almost indistinguishable except biotin and cobalamin because of large range of atomic numbers from 1(H) to 16 (S) and 1(H) to 27(Co) respectively. K a value shows a peak due to the photoelectric effect around K-absorption edge of high- Z constituent of compound for biotin and cobalamin.

  3. Effect of landing height on frontal plane kinematics, kinetics and energy dissipation at lower extremity joints.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yeow, C H; Lee, P V S; Goh, J C H

    2009-08-25

    Lack of the necessary magnitude of energy dissipation by lower extremity joint muscles may be implicated in elevated impact stresses present during landing from greater heights. These increased stresses are experienced by supporting tissues like cartilage, ligaments and bones, thus aggravating injury risk. This study sought to investigate frontal plane kinematics, kinetics and energetics of lower extremity joints during landing from different heights. Eighteen male recreational athletes were instructed to perform drop-landing tasks from 0.3- to 0.6-m heights. Force plates and motion-capture system were used to capture ground reaction force and kinematics data, respectively. Joint moment was calculated using inverse dynamics. Joint power was computed as a product of joint moment and angular velocity. Work was defined as joint power integrated over time. Hip and knee joints delivered significantly greater joint power and eccentric work (pheights. Substantial increase (pwork was noted at the hip joint in response to increasing landing height. Knee and hip joints acted as key contributors to total energy dissipation in the frontal plane with increase in peak ground reaction force (GRF). The hip joint was the top contributor to energy absorption, which indicated a hip-dominant strategy in the frontal plane in response to peak GRF during landing. Future studies should investigate joint motions that can maximize energy dissipation or reduce the need for energy dissipation in the frontal plane at the various joints, and to evaluate their effects on the attenuation of lower extremity injury risk during landing.

  4. 2D-3D Transition for Cationic and Anionic Gold Clusters: A Kinetic Energy Density Functional Study

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ferrighi, Lara; Hammer, Bjørk; Madsen, Georg

    2009-01-01

    gradient enhancement. Moreover, we show how MGGAs, in contrast to generalize gradient approximations with smaller gradient enhancements, avoid overestimating the bond energies by combining the information contained in the reduced gradient and the kinetic energy. This allows MGGAs to treat differently...

  5. Kinetic energy release of dissociating CO3+ ions produced in collisions of multiply charged ions with CO

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Schlatholter, T; Hoekstra, R; Morgenstern, R

    1997-01-01

    We investigate fragmentation of CO molecules by collisions of He2+ ions at energies between 2 and 11 keV/amu by means of a reflectron time-of-flight (TOF) spectrometer. The kinetic-energy-release (KER) in the center of mass system of the molecule can be determined from the flight times of these

  6. Monte Carlo Simulation to relate primary and final fragments mass and kinetic energy distribution from low energy fission of $^{234}U$

    CERN Document Server

    Montoya, M; Lobato, I

    2008-01-01

    The kinetic energy distribution as a function of mass of final fragments (m) from low energy fission of $^{234}U$, measured with the Lohengrin spectrometer by Belhafaf et al. presents a peak around m=108 and another around m = 122. The authors attribute the first peak to the evaporation of a large number of neutrons around the corresponding mass number; and the second peak to the distribution of the primary fragment kinetic energy. Nevertheless, the theoretical calculations related to primary distribution made by Faust et al. do not result in a peak around m = 122. In order to clarify this apparent controversy, we have made a numerical experiment in which the masses and the kinetic energy of final fragments are calculated, assuming an initial distribution of the kinetic energy without peaks on the standard deviation as function of fragment mass. As a result we obtain a pronounced peak on the standard deviation of the kinetic energy distribution around m = 109, a depletion from m = 121 to m = 129, and an small...

  7. In vitro evaluation of flow patterns and turbulent kinetic energy in trans-catheter aortic valve prostheses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Giese, Daniel; Weiss, Kilian; Baeßler, Bettina; Madershahian, Navid; Choi, Yeong-Hoon; Maintz, David; Bunck, Alexander C

    2017-09-18

    The objective of the current work was to evaluate flow and turbulent kinetic energy in different transcatheter aortic valve implants using highly undersampled time-resolved multi-point 3-directional phase-contrast measurements (4D Flow MRI) in an in vitro setup. A pulsatile flow setup was used with a compliant tubing mimicking a stiff left ventricular outflow tract and ascending aorta. Five different implants were measured using a highly undersampled multi-point 4D Flow MRI sequence. Velocities and turbulent kinetic energy values were analysed and compared. Strong variations of turbulent kinetic energy distributions between the valves were observed. Maximum turbulent kinetic energy values ranged from 100 to over 500 J/m(3) while through-plane velocities were similar between all valves. Highly accelerated 4D Flow MRI for the measurement of velocities and turbulent kinetic energy values allowed for the assessment of hemodynamic parameters in five different implant models. The presented setup, measurement protocol and analysis methods provides an efficient approach to compare different valve implants and could aid future novel valve designs.

  8. Theoretical analysis of ion kinetic energies and DLC film deposition by CH4+Ar (He) dielectric barrier discharge plasmas

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Liu Yan-Hong; Zhang Jia-Liang; Ma Teng-Cai; Li Jian; Liu Dong-Ping

    2007-01-01

    The kinetic energy of ions in dielectric barrier discharge plasmas are analysed theoretically using the model of binary collisions between ions and gas molecules. Langevin equation for ions in other gases, Blanc law for ions in mixed gases, and the two-temperature model for ions at higher reduced field are used to determine the ion mobility. The kinetic energies of ions in CH4 + Ar(He) dielectric barrier discharge plasma at a fixed total gas pressure and various Ar (He)concentrations are calculated. It is found that with increasing Ar (He) concentration in CH4 + Ar (He) from 20% to 83%,the CH4+ kinetic energy increases from 69.6 (43.9) to 92.1 (128.5)eV, while the Ar+ (He+) kinetic energy decreases from 97 (145.2) to 78.8 (75.5)eV. The increase of CH4+ kinetic energy is responsible for the increase of hardness of diamond-like carbon films deposited by CH4 + Ar (He) dielectric barrier discharge without bias voltage over substrates.

  9. LES and Proper Orthogonal Decomposition analysis of vertical entrainment of kinetic energy in large wind farms (Invited)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Meneveau, C. V.; VerHulst, C.

    2013-12-01

    Vertical entrainment of kinetic energy has been shown to be an important limiting factor in the performance of very large wind turbine arrays. Given high Reynolds numbers and domain sizes on the order of kilometers, we rely on wall-modeled Large Eddy Simulation (LES) to predict flow within large wind farm. We use Proper Orthogonal Decomposition (POD) to identify energetically important large-scale structures in the flow. The primary large-scale structures are found to be streamwise counter-rotating vortices located above the height of the wind turbines. The contribution of each flow structure to the kinetic energy entrainment is quantified. Surprisingly, fewer flow structures (POD modes) contribute to the vertical kinetic energy flux than to the kinetic energy in the flow, for which the POD analysis is optimal. While the general characteristics of the flow structures are robust, the net kinetic energy entrainment to the turbines depends on the orientation of the wind turbines in the array. The various modes' contributions to variability and intermittency is also quantified. The POD analysis is performed for aligned and staggered wind turbine arrays as well as for atmospheric flow without wind turbines. This research is supported by a NSF Graduate Fellowship and by the WINDINSPIRE project, funded through NSF-OISE 1243482.

  10. Energy analyses and drying kinetics of chamomile leaves in microwave-convective dryer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ali Motevali

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available Drying characteristics and energy aspects as well as mathematical modeling of thin layer drying kinetics of chamomile in a microwave-convective dryer are reported in this article. Drying experiments were carried out at 8 microwave power levels (200–900 W, air temperature of 50 °C, and air velocity of 0.5 m/s. Increasing the microwave output power from 200 to 900 W, decreased the drying time from 40 to 10 min. The drying process took place in the falling rate period. The Midilli et al. model showed the best fit to the experimental drying data. Moisture diffusivity values increase with decreasing moisture content down to 1.70 (kg water kg−1 dry matter but decrease with a further decrease in moisture content from 1.72 to 0.96 (kg water kg−1 dry matter. The average values of Deff increased with microwave power from 5.46 to 39.63 × 10−8 (m2 s−1. Energy consumption increased and energy efficiency decreased with moisture content of chamomile samples. Average specific energy consumption, energy efficiency and energy loss varied in the range 18.93–28.15 MJ kg−1 water, 8.25–13.07% and 16.79–26.01 MJ kg−1 water, respectively, while the best energy results were obtained at 400 W, 50 °C and 0.5 m s−1.

  11. An efficient method for energy levels calculation using full symmetry and exact kinetic energy operator: Tetrahedral molecules

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nikitin, A. V., E-mail: avn@lts.iao.ru [Laboratory of Theoretical Spectroscopy, V.E. Zuev Institute of Atmospheric Optics, SB RAS, 1, Academician Zuev square, 634021 Tomsk (Russian Federation); Tomsk State University, 36 Lenin Avenue, 634050 Tomsk (Russian Federation); Rey, M.; Tyuterev, Vl. G. [Groupe de Spectrométrie Moléculaire et Atmosphérique, UMR CNRS 7331, Université de Reims, U.F.R. Sciences, B.P. 1039, 51687 Cedex 2 Reims (France)

    2015-03-07

    A simultaneous use of the full molecular symmetry and of an exact kinetic energy operator (KEO) is of key importance for accurate predictions of vibrational levels at a high energy range from a potential energy surface (PES). An efficient method that permits a fast convergence of variational calculations would allow iterative optimization of the PES parameters using experimental data. In this work, we propose such a method applied to tetrahedral AB{sub 4} molecules for which a use of high symmetry is crucial for vibrational calculations. A symmetry-adapted contracted angular basis set for six redundant angles is introduced. Simple formulas using this basis set for explicit calculation of the angular matrix elements of KEO and PES are reported. The symmetric form (six redundant angles) of vibrational KEO without the sin(q){sup −2} type singularity is derived. The efficient recursive algorithm based on the tensorial formalism is used for the calculation of vibrational matrix elements. A good basis set convergence for the calculations of vibrational levels of the CH{sub 4} molecule is demonstrated.

  12. An efficient method for energy levels calculation using full symmetry and exact kinetic energy operator: tetrahedral molecules.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nikitin, A V; Rey, M; Tyuterev, Vl G

    2015-03-07

    A simultaneous use of the full molecular symmetry and of an exact kinetic energy operator (KEO) is of key importance for accurate predictions of vibrational levels at a high energy range from a potential energy surface (PES). An efficient method that permits a fast convergence of variational calculations would allow iterative optimization of the PES parameters using experimental data. In this work, we propose such a method applied to tetrahedral AB4 molecules for which a use of high symmetry is crucial for vibrational calculations. A symmetry-adapted contracted angular basis set for six redundant angles is introduced. Simple formulas using this basis set for explicit calculation of the angular matrix elements of KEO and PES are reported. The symmetric form (six redundant angles) of vibrational KEO without the sin(q)(-2) type singularity is derived. The efficient recursive algorithm based on the tensorial formalism is used for the calculation of vibrational matrix elements. A good basis set convergence for the calculations of vibrational levels of the CH4 molecule is demonstrated.

  13. Metabolically stable bradykinin B2 receptor agonists enhance transvascular drug delivery into malignant brain tumors by increasing drug half-life

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Glen Daniel

    2009-05-01

    -lysine-bradykinin and labradimil increased the blood half-life of Gd-DTPA sufficiently enough to increase significantly the tumor tissue Gd-DTPA area under the time-concentration curve. Conclusion Metabolically stable bradykinin B2 receptor agonists, methionine-lysine-bradykinin and labradimil, enhance the transvascular delivery of small chemotherapy drugs across the BBTB of malignant gliomas by increasing the blood half-life of the co-infused drug. The selectivity of the increase in drug delivery into the malignant glioma tissue, but not into normal brain tissue or skeletal muscle tissue, is due to the inherent porous nature of the BBTB of malignant glioma microvasculature.

  14. Controlling drug delivery kinetics from mesoporous titania thin films by pore size and surface energy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Karlsson, Johan; Atefyekta, Saba; Andersson, Martin

    2015-01-01

    The osseointegration capacity of bone-anchoring implants can be improved by the use of drugs that are administrated by an inbuilt drug delivery system. However, to attain superior control of drug delivery and to have the ability to administer drugs of varying size, including proteins, further material development of drug carriers is needed. Mesoporous materials have shown great potential in drug delivery applications to provide and maintain a drug concentration within the therapeutic window for the desired period of time. Moreover, drug delivery from coatings consisting of mesoporous titania has shown to be promising to improve healing of bone-anchoring implants. Here we report on how the delivery of an osteoporosis drug, alendronate, can be controlled by altering pore size and surface energy of mesoporous titania thin films. The pore size was varied from 3.4 nm to 7.2 nm by the use of different structure-directing templates and addition of a swelling agent. The surface energy was also altered by grafting dimethylsilane to the pore walls. The drug uptake and release profiles were monitored in situ using quartz crystal microbalance with dissipation (QCM-D) and it was shown that both pore size and surface energy had a profound effect on both the adsorption and release kinetics of alendronate. The QCM-D data provided evidence that the drug delivery from mesoporous titania films is controlled by a binding-diffusion mechanism. The yielded knowledge of release kinetics is crucial in order to improve the in vivo tissue response associated to therapeutic treatments.

  15. Enhancing the prediction of turbulent kinetic energy in the marine atmospheric boundary layer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Foreman, R. J.; Emeis, S.

    2010-09-01

    A recent study by Shaikh and Siddiqui (2010) has shown definitively that the turbulent structure of boundary layer flows over water is fundamentally different compared with that over a smooth surface and with that over a solid wavy surface whose wave amplitude is similar to that of dynamically wind-generated waves. In light of this new information, the constants of the Mellor-Yamada boundary layer model, which are based on laboratory data over solid walls, are re-evaluated to suit the turbulent dynamics of a dynamic, wavy surface. The constants are based on the principal that the enhanced turbulent production in the vicinity of waves is redistributed among the normal stress components by virtue of the enhanced pressure-velocity covariances also found in the vicinity of waves. There is then a feedback mechanism whereby enhanced normal stresses modify the dynamic surface. The net effect of this is that in the marine boundary layer, one can expect an enhancement of turbulent kinetic energy due to the enhancement of normal stresses at the expense of shear stresses. The constants in the Mellor-Yamada-Janjic planetary boundary layer scheme within the Weather Research and Forecasting (WRF) model are changed to fit this principal. Simulations are then performed and compared with data (wind speed and turbulent kinetic energy) from the FINO1 platform in the North Sea. It is found that while predictions of the wind speed are barely changed, the magnitude of the tke error (RMS) is reduced by up to 50%. This is expected to be practically relevant for the estimation of blade fatigue of wind energy converters, where the tke is an important parameter in this assessment. It could also be relevant for pollution dispersion in marine boundary layers.

  16. Kinetic selection vs. free energy of DNA base pairing in control of polymerase fidelity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oertell, Keriann; Harcourt, Emily M; Mohsen, Michael G; Petruska, John; Kool, Eric T; Goodman, Myron F

    2016-04-19

    What is the free energy source enabling high-fidelity DNA polymerases (pols) to favor incorporation of correct over incorrect base pairs by 10(3)- to 10(4)-fold, corresponding to free energy differences of ΔΔGinc∼ 5.5-7 kcal/mol? Standard ΔΔG° values (∼0.3 kcal/mol) calculated from melting temperature measurements comparing matched vs. mismatched base pairs at duplex DNA termini are far too low to explain pol accuracy. Earlier analyses suggested that pol active-site steric constraints can amplify DNA free energy differences at the transition state (kinetic selection). A recent paper [Olson et al. (2013)J Am Chem Soc135:1205-1208] used Vent pol to catalyze incorporations in the presence of inorganic pyrophosphate intended to equilibrate forward (polymerization) and backward (pyrophosphorolysis) reactions. A steady-state leveling off of incorporation profiles at long reaction times was interpreted as reaching equilibrium between polymerization and pyrophosphorolysis, yielding apparent ΔG° = -RTlnKeq, indicating ΔΔG° of 3.5-7 kcal/mol, sufficient to account for pol accuracy without need of kinetic selection. Here we perform experiments to measure and account for pyrophosphorolysis explicitly. We show that forward and reverse reactions attain steady states far from equilibrium for wrong incorporations such as G opposite T. Therefore,[Formula: see text]values obtained from such steady-state evaluations ofKeqare not dependent on DNA properties alone, but depend largely on constraints imposed on right and wrong substrates in the polymerase active site.

  17. Total kinetic energy release in the fast neutron-induced fission of $^{235}$U

    CERN Document Server

    Yanez, R; King, J; Barrett, J S; Fotiades, N; Lee, H Y

    2015-01-01

    We have measured the total kinetic energy (TKE) release for the $^{235}$U(n,f) reaction for $E_{n}$=2-100 MeV using the 2E method with an array of Si PIN diode detectors. The neutron energies were determined by time of flight measurements using the white spectrum neutron beam at the LANSCE facility. (To calibrate the apparatus, the TKE release for $^{235}$U(n$_{th}$,f) was also measured using a thermal neutron beam from the OSU TRIGA reactor). The TKE decreases non-linearly from 169.0 MeV to 161.4 MeV for $E_{n}$=2-90 MeV. The standard deviation of the TKE distribution is constant from $E_{n}$=20-90 MeV. Comparison of the data with the multi-modal fission model of Brosa indicates the TKE decrease is a consequence of the growth of symmetric fission and the corresponding decrease of asymmetric fission with increasing neutron energy. The average TKE associated with the Brosa superlong, standard I and standard II modes for a given mass is independent of neutron energy.

  18. Proton transfer pathways, energy landscape, and kinetics in creatine-water systems.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ivchenko, Olga; Whittleston, Chris S; Carr, Joanne M; Imhof, Petra; Goerke, Steffen; Bachert, Peter; Wales, David J

    2014-02-27

    We study the exchange processes of the metabolite creatine, which is present in both tumorous and normal tissues and has NH2 and NH groups that can transfer protons to water. Creatine produces chemical exchange saturation transfer (CEST) contrast in magnetic resonance imaging (MRI). The proton transfer pathway from zwitterionic creatine to water is examined using a kinetic transition network constructed from the discrete path sampling approach and an approximate quantum-chemical energy function, employing the self-consistent-charge density-functional tight-binding (SCC-DFTB) method. The resulting potential energy surface is visualized by constructing disconnectivity graphs. The energy landscape consists of two distinct regions corresponding to the zwitterionic creatine structures and deprotonated creatine. The activation energy that characterizes the proton transfer from the creatine NH2 group to water was determined from an Arrhenius fit of rate constants as a function of temperature, obtained from harmonic transition state theory. The result is in reasonable agreement with values obtained in water exchange spectroscopy (WEX) experiments.

  19. Covalent bonds are created by the drive of electron waves to lower their kinetic energy through expansion.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schmidt, Michael W; Ivanic, Joseph; Ruedenberg, Klaus

    2014-05-28

    An analysis based on the variation principle shows that in the molecules H2 (+), H2, B2, C2, N2, O2, F2, covalent bonding is driven by the attenuation of the kinetic energy that results from the delocalization of the electronic wave function. For molecular geometries around the equilibrium distance, two features of the wave function contribute to this delocalization: (i) Superposition of atomic orbitals extends the electronic wave function from one atom to two or more atoms; (ii) intra-atomic contraction of the atomic orbitals further increases the inter-atomic delocalization. The inter-atomic kinetic energy lowering that (perhaps counter-intuitively) is a consequence of the intra-atomic contractions drives these contractions (which per se would increase the energy). Since the contractions necessarily encompass both, the intra-atomic kinetic and potential energy changes (which add to a positive total), the fact that the intra-atomic potential energy change renders the total potential binding energy negative does not alter the fact that it is the kinetic delocalization energy that drives the bond formation.

  20. Hybrid Kinetic-Fluid Electromagnetic Simulations of Imploding High Energy Density Plasmas for IFE

    Science.gov (United States)

    Welch, Dale; Rose, Dave; Thoma, Carsten; Genoni, Thomas; Bruner, Nichelle; Clark, Robert; Stygar, William; Leeper, Ramon

    2011-10-01

    A new simulation technique is being developed to study high current and moderate density-radius product (ρR) z-pinch plasmas relevant to Inertial Fusion Energy (IFE). Fully kinetic, collisional, and electromagnetic simulations of the time evolution of up to 40-MA current (deuterium and DT) z-pinches, but with relatively low ρR, have yielded new insights into the mechanisms of neutron production. At fusion relevant conditions (ρR > 0.01 gm/cm2) , however, this technique requires a prohibitively large number of cells and particles. A new hybrid implicit technique has been developed that accurately describes high-density and magnetized imploding plasmas. The technique adapts a recently published algorithm, that enables accurate descriptions of highly magnetized particle orbits, to high density plasmas and also makes use of an improved kinetic particle remap technique. We will discuss the new technique, stable range of operation, and application to an IFE relevant z-pinch design at 60 MA. Work supported by Sandia National Laboratories.

  1. New limit for the half-life of double beta decay of $^{94}$Zr to the first excited state of $^{94}$Mo

    CERN Document Server

    Dokania, N; Gupta, G; Pal, S; Pillay, R G; Rath, P K; Tretyak, V I; Garai, A; Krishnamoorthy, H; Ghosh, C; Raina, P K; Bhushan, K G

    2016-01-01

    Double Beta Decay is a phenomenon of fundamental interest for particle physics and the study of these transitions to the excited states is of relevance to the calculation of Nuclear Transition Matrix Element for the process. In the present work, double beta decay of $^{94}$Zr to the $2^{+}_{1}$ excited state of $^{94}$Mo at 871.1 keV is studied using a low background $\\sim$ 250 cm$^3$ HPGe detector. No evidence of this decay was found with a 232 g.y exposure of natural Zirconium. The lower half-life limit obtained for the double beta decay of $\\rm^{94}Zr$ to the $2^{+}_{1}$ excited state of $\\rm^{94}Mo$ is $T_{1/2} > 6.1 \\times 10^{19}$ y at 90\\% C.L. ($T_{1/2} > 2.0 \\times 10^{20}$ y at 68\\% C.L.), a significant improvement by an order of magnitude over the existing experimental limit at 68\\% C.L.

  2. Precision measurement of the half-life and branching ratio of the T=1/2 mirror $\\beta$-decay of $^{37}$K

    CERN Multimedia

    We propose to study the T=1/2 mirror $\\beta$-decay of $^{37}$K. Nuclear mirror $\\beta$-decay is a competitive means to test the electroweak model by means of the high-precision measurement of V$_{ud}$ element of the CKM quark mixing matrix. One key ingredient to obtain V$_{ud}$ is the force of the transition, Ft, which has to be determined with a relative precision below 10$^{−3}$. This quantity is related to the half-life T$_{1/2}$ of the decaying nucleus, the branching ratio BR for this decay and the mass difference between the mother and daughter nucleus (Q value). Another important feature is the mixing ratio $\\rho$ between the Fermi and the Gamow-Teller character of the transition. In most cases, $\\rho$ is the major contributor to the uncertainty on Ft. Available data concerning T$_{1/2}$ and BR of $^{37}$K suffer from a lack of precision that will be easily reduced by a dedicated experiment.

  3. Neutron activation of natural materials in a PWR spectrum: feedback on {sup 116m}In relative γ emission intensities and half-life

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gruel, Adrien; Geslot, Benoit; Di Salvo, Jacques; Blaise, Patrick; Girard, Jean-Michel; Destouches, Christophe [CEA, DEN, SPEx, Cadarache, F-13108 St Paul lez Durance (France)

    2015-07-01

    During the MAESTRO program, carried out between 2011 and 2014 in MINERVE zero power reactor, common Gen-II and Gen-III light water reactor materials were irradiated. For some of these materials, the decay of their activation products was also measured by γ spectrometry. Initially devoted to the measurement of the integral capture cross section by activation and reactivity-oscillation method, these results can also provide useful information on decay data of various radionuclides. This approach of this experiment led to a common roadmap shared by the Experimental Physics Section and the Henri Becquerel National Laboratory to improve decay data in nuclear data libraries. Results discussed in this paper concern the relative emission intensities of the main γ rays of {sup 116m}In. Six irradiations of samples with various physical forms of {sup nat}In were carried out. Measurements were analyzed using decay data from several evaluations and it is shown that γ ray activities are not consistent. Analyses were carried out to provide new relative γ emission intensities from these measurements. The {sup 116m}In half-life has also been measured and shows a good agreement with existing values. Finally, an overview of the foreseen results on additional decay data from the MAESTRO program is given. (authors)

  4. Upregulation of the mammalian X chromosome is associated with enhanced transcription initiation, MOF-mediated H4K16 acetylation, and longer RNA half-life

    Science.gov (United States)

    Deng, Xinxian; Berletch, Joel B.; Ma, Wenxiu; Nguyen, Di Kim; Noble, William S.; Shendure, Jay; Disteche, Christine M.

    2013-01-01

    SUMMARY X upregulation in mammals increases levels of expressed X-linked transcripts to compensate for autosomal bi-allelic expression. Here, we present molecular mechanisms that enhance X expression at transcriptional and posttranscriptional levels. Active mouse X-linked promoters are enriched in the initiation form of RNA polymerase II (PolII-S5p) and in specific histone marks including H4K16ac and histone variant H2AZ. The H4K16 acetyltransferase MOF, known to mediate the Drosophila X upregulation, is also enriched on the mammalian X. Depletion of MOF or MSL1 in mouse ES cells causes a specific decrease in PolII-S5p and in expression of a subset of X-linked genes. Analyses of RNA half-life datasets show increased stability of mammalian X-linked transcripts. Both ancestral X-linked genes, defined as those conserved on chicken autosomes, and newly acquired X-linked genes are upregulated by similar mechanisms but to a different extent, suggesting that subsets of genes are distinctly regulated dependent on their evolutionary history. PMID:23523075

  5. Precision measurement of the half-life and the $\\beta$-decay Q value of the superallowed 0$^{+}\\rightarrow$ 0$^{+}\\beta$-decay of $^{38}$Ca

    CERN Multimedia

    2002-01-01

    We propose to study the $\\beta$-decay of $^{38}$Ca. In a first instance, we intend to perform a high-precision study of the half-life of this nucleus as well as a measurement of its $\\beta$-decay Q-value with ISOLTRAP. At a later stage, we propose to study its decay branches to determine the super-allowed branching ratio with high precision. These measurements are essential to improve our understanding of the theoretical corrections (in particular the $\\delta$c correction factor) needed to calculate the universal Ft value from the ft value determined for individual nuclei. For this nucleus, the correction factor is predicted to increase significantly as compared to the nine well-studied nuclei between $^{10}$C and $^{54}$Co and the model calculations used to determine the corrections, in particular the shell-model calculations, are well under control in this mass region. Therefore, the T$_{Z}$= -1 nuclei between A=18 and A=38 are ideal test cases for the correction factors which limit today the precision on t...

  6. The effects of divergent and nondivergent winds on the kinetic energy budget of a mid-latitude cyclone - A case study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, T.-C.; Alpert, J. C.; Schlatter, T. W.

    1978-01-01

    The magnitude of the divergent component of the wind is relatively small compared to that of the nondivergent component in large-scale atmospheric flows; nevertheless, it plays an important role in the case of explosive cyclogenesis examined here. The kinetic energy budget for the life cycle of an intense, developing cyclone over North America is calculated. The principal kinetic energy source is the net horizontal transport across the boundaries of the region enclosing the cyclone. By investigating the relative importance of the divergent and nondivergent wind components in the kinetic energy budget, it was found, as expected, that neglecting the divergent wind component in calculating the magnitude of the kinetic energy is of little consequence, but that the horizontal flux convergence and generation of kinetic energy depend crucially upon the divergent component. Modification of the divergent wind component can result in significant changes in the kinetic energy budget of the synoptic system.

  7. Direct measurements of quantum kinetic energy tensor in stable and metastable water near the triple point: an experimental benchmark

    CERN Document Server

    Andreani, Carla; Senesi, Roberto

    2016-01-01

    This study presents the first direct and quantitative measurements of the nuclear momentum distribution anisotropy and the quantum kinetic energy tensor in stable and metastable (supercooled) water near its triple point using Deep Inelastic Neutron Scattering (DINS). From the experimental spectra accurate lineshapes of the hydrogen momentum distributions are derived using an anisotropic Gaussian and a model independent framework. The experimental results, benchmarked with those obtained for the solid phase, provide the state of the art directional values of the hydrogen mean kinetic energy in metastable water. The determinations of the direction kinetic energies in the supercooled phase, benchmarked with ice at the same temperature, provide accurate and quantitative measurements of these dynamical observables in metastable and stable phases, {i.e.} key insight in the physical mechanisms of the hydrogen quantum state in both disordered and polycrystalline systems. The remarkable findings of this study establis...

  8. Characterization of the relation between energy landscape and the time evolution of complex materials using kinetic ART

    Science.gov (United States)

    N'tsouaglo, Kokou; Joly, Jean-Francois; Beland, Laurent; Brommer, Peter; Mousseau, Normand

    2013-03-01

    In the last two decades, there has been a considerable interest in the development of accelerated numerical methods for sampling the energy landscape of complex materials. Many of these methods are based on the kinetic Monte Carlo (KMC) algorithm introduced 40 years ago. This is the case of kinetic ART, for example, which uses a very efficient transition-state searching method, ART nouveau, coupled with a topological tool, NAUTY, to offer an off-lattice KMC method with on-the-fly catalog building to study complex systems, such as ion-bombarded and amorphous materials, on timescales of a second or more. Looking at two systems, vacancy aggregation in Fe and energy relaxation in ion-bombarded c-Si, we characterize the changes in the energy landscape and the relation to its time evolution with kinetic ART and its correspondence with the well-known Bell-Evans-Polanyi principle used in chemistry.

  9. A new method for the derivation of exact vibration-rotational kinetic energy operator in internal coordinates

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    陈光巨; 刘若庄

    1997-01-01

    An efficient angular momentum method is presented and used to derive analytic expressions for the vibration-rotational kinetic energy operator of polyatomic molecules.The vibration-rotational kinetic energy operator is expressed in terms of the total angular momentum operator J,the angular momentum operator J and the momentum operator p conjugate to Z in the molecule-fixed frame Not only the method of derivation is simpler than that in the previous work,but also the expressions ot the kinetic energy operators arc more compact.Particularly,the operator is easily applied to different vibrational or rovibrational problems of the polyatomic molecules by variations of matrix elements Gn of a mass-dependent constant symmetric matrix

  10. Note: Proton microbeam formation with continuously variable kinetic energy using a compact system for three-dimensional proton beam writing

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ohkubo, T., E-mail: ohkubo.takeru@jaea.go.jp; Ishii, Y. [Department of Advanced Radiation Technology, Takasaki Advanced Radiation Research Institute, Japan Atomic Energy Agency, 1233 Watanuki-machi, Takasaki, Gunma 370-1292 (Japan)

    2015-03-15

    A compact focused gaseous ion beam system has been developed to form proton microbeams of a few hundreds of keV with a penetration depth of micrometer range in 3-dimensional proton beam writing. Proton microbeams with kinetic energies of 100-140 keV were experimentally formed on the same point at a constant ratio of the kinetic energy of the object side to that of the image side. The experimental results indicate that the beam diameters were measured to be almost constant at approximately 6 μm at the same point with the kinetic energy range. These characteristics of the system were experimentally and numerically demonstrated to be maintained as long as the ratio was constant.

  11. Research on Half-life Measuring Index of Chinese Psychology Science Based on Bibliometrics%基于文献计量学的我国心理学学科半衰期分析

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    张艳琼

    2014-01-01

    文章对心理学学科文献的引用和被引情况进行统计分析,通过学科文献被引半衰期和引用半衰期指标及其相关影响因素的分析,发现:心理学学科引用半衰期明显长于被引半衰期;心理学学科非常注重参考和借鉴国外的研究成果,但引用外文文献的时效相对滞后,说明我国心理学研究落后于国际水平;基础心理学半衰期最长,发展与教育心理学半衰期最短,比较符合偏理论的学科半衰期较长,偏应用的学科半衰期较短的规律。%This paper makes a statistical analysis of research papers' citation. Through analyzing the indexes of half- life of literature and the reference factors, it is found that citing half-life is longer than cited half-life in psychology. It is important to take reference of foreign research achievements in psychology, but the cited foreign papers are lagging, which shows psychology in China lags behind international level. The half-life of basic psychology is longest, while the half-life of development and education psychology is shortest, which shows the rule that half-life of discipline that focus more on theory is longer than the discipline that focus more on application.

  12. Energy resolution and efficiency of phonon-mediated kinetic inductance detectors for light detection

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cardani, L.; Colantoni, I.; Cruciani, A.; Di Domizio, S.; Vignati, M.; Bellini, F.; Casali, N.; Castellano, M. G.; Coppolecchia, A.; Cosmelli, C.; Tomei, C.

    2015-08-01

    The development of sensitive cryogenic light detectors is of primary interest for bolometric experiments searching for rare events like dark matter interactions or neutrino-less double beta decay. Thanks to their good energy resolution and the natural multiplexed read-out, Kinetic Inductance Detectors (KIDs) are particularly suitable for this purpose. To efficiently couple KIDs-based light detectors to the large crystals used by the most advanced bolometric detectors, active surfaces of several cm2 are needed. For this reason, we are developing phonon-mediated detectors. In this paper, we present the results obtained with a prototype consisting of four 40 nm thick aluminum resonators patterned on a 2 × 2 cm2 silicon chip, and calibrated with optical pulses and X-rays. The detector features a noise resolution σE = 154 ± 7 eV and an (18 ± 2)% efficiency.

  13. Importance of the Kinetic Energy Density for Band Gap Calculations in Solids with Density Functional Theory.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tran, Fabien; Blaha, Peter

    2017-05-04

    Recently, exchange-correlation potentials in density functional theory were developed with the goal of providing improved band gaps in solids. Among them, the semilocal potentials are particularly interesting for large systems since they lead to calculations that are much faster than with hybrid functionals or methods like GW. We present an exhaustive comparison of semilocal exchange-correlation potentials for band gap calculations on a large test set of solids, and particular attention is paid to the potential HLE16 proposed by Verma and Truhlar. It is shown that the most accurate potential is the modified Becke-Johnson potential, which, most noticeably, is much more accurate than all other semilocal potentials for strongly correlated systems. This can be attributed to its additional dependence on the kinetic energy density. It is also shown that the modified Becke-Johnson potential is at least as accurate as the hybrid functionals and more reliable for solids with large band gaps.

  14. Design of specially adapted reactive coordinates to economically compute potential and kinetic energy operators including geometry relaxation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thallmair, Sebastian; Roos, Matthias K; de Vivie-Riedle, Regina

    2016-06-21

    Quantum dynamics simulations require prior knowledge of the potential energy surface as well as the kinetic energy operator. Typically, they are evaluated in a low-dimensional subspace of the full configuration space of the molecule as its dimensionality increases proportional to the number of atoms. This entails the challenge to find the most suitable subspace. We present an approach to design specially adapted reactive coordinates spanning this subspace. In addition to the essential geometric changes, these coordinates take into account the relaxation of the non-reactive coordinates without the necessity of performing geometry optimizations at each grid point. The method is demonstrated for an ultrafast photoinduced bond cleavage in a commonly used organic precursor for the generation of electrophiles. The potential energy surfaces for the reaction as well as the Wilson G-matrix as part of the kinetic energy operator are shown for a complex chemical reaction, both including the relaxation of the non-reactive coordinates on equal footing. A microscopic interpretation of the shape of the G-matrix elements allows to analyze the impact of the non-reactive coordinates on the kinetic energy operator. Additionally, we compare quantum dynamics simulations with and without the relaxation of the non-reactive coordinates included in the kinetic energy operator to demonstrate its influence.

  15. Design of specially adapted reactive coordinates to economically compute potential and kinetic energy operators including geometry relaxation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thallmair, Sebastian; Roos, Matthias K.; de Vivie-Riedle, Regina

    2016-06-01

    Quantum dynamics simulations require prior knowledge of the potential energy surface as well as the kinetic energy operator. Typically, they are evaluated in a low-dimensional subspace of the full configuration space of the molecule as its dimensionality increases proportional to the number of atoms. This entails the challenge to find the most suitable subspace. We present an approach to design specially adapted reactive coordinates spanning this subspace. In addition to the essential geometric changes, these coordinates take into account the relaxation of the non-reactive coordinates without the necessity of performing geometry optimizations at each grid point. The method is demonstrated for an ultrafast photoinduced bond cleavage in a commonly used organic precursor for the generation of electrophiles. The potential energy surfaces for the reaction as well as the Wilson G-matrix as part of the kinetic energy operator are shown for a complex chemical reaction, both including the relaxation of the non-reactive coordinates on equal footing. A microscopic interpretation of the shape of the G-matrix elements allows to analyze the impact of the non-reactive coordinates on the kinetic energy operator. Additionally, we compare quantum dynamics simulations with and without the relaxation of the non-reactive coordinates included in the kinetic energy operator to demonstrate its influence.

  16. Unified dark energy and dust dark matter dual to quadratic purely kinetic K-essence

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Guendelman, Eduardo [Ben-Gurion University of the Negev, Department of Physics, Beersheba (Israel); Nissimov, Emil; Pacheva, Svetlana [Institute for Nuclear Research and Nuclear Energy, Sofia (Bulgaria)

    2016-02-15

    We consider a modified gravity plus single scalar-field model, where the scalar Lagrangian couples symmetrically both to the standard Riemannian volume-form (spacetime integration measure density) given by the square root of the determinant of the Riemannian metric, as well as to another non-Riemannian volume-form in terms of an auxiliary maximal-rank antisymmetric tensor gauge field. As shown in a previous paper, the pertinent scalar-field dynamics provides an exact unified description of both dark energy via dynamical generation of a cosmological constant, and dark matter as a ''dust'' fluid with geodesic flow as a result of a hidden Noether symmetry. Here we extend the discussion by considering a non-trivial modification of the purely gravitational action in the form of f(R) = R -αR{sup 2} generalized gravity. Upon deriving the corresponding ''Einstein-frame'' effective action of the latter modified gravity-scalar-field theory we find explicit duality (in the sense of weak versus strong coupling) between the original model of unified dynamical dark energy and dust fluid dark matter, on one hand, and a specific quadratic purely kinetic ''k-essence'' gravity-matter model with special dependence of its coupling constants on only two independent parameters, on the other hand. The canonical Hamiltonian treatment and Wheeler-DeWitt quantization of the dual purely kinetic ''k-essence'' gravity-matter model is also briefly discussed. (orig.)

  17. A Study of Variations in Atmospheric Turbulence Kinetic Energy on a Sandy Beach

    Science.gov (United States)

    Koscinski, J. S.; MacMahan, J. H.; Wang, Q.; Thornton, E. B.

    2016-12-01

    A 6-m high, meteorological tower consisting six evenly spaced ultrasonic anemometers and temperature-relative humidity sensors was deployed at the high tide line on sandy, wave-dissipative, meso-tidal beach in southern Monterey Bay, CA in October 2015. The micro-meteorology study focus is to explore the momentum fluxes and turbulent kinetic energy influenced by the interaction between an intensive wave-breaking surf zone and a sandy beach associated with onshore & cross-shore winds, diurnal heating, and differences in ocean-air temperatures. The tower was deployed for approximately 1-month and experienced diurnal wind variations and synoptic storm events with winds measuring up to 10 m/s and an air temperature range of 5-28 oC. This beach environment was found to be primarily unstable in thermal stratification indicating that the air temperature is colder than underlying surface, either the ocean or the sandy beach. The drag coefficient was found to be dependent upon the atmospheric stability. Direct-estimates of atmospheric stability were obtained with the sonic anemometer. The direct estimates are a ratio of w*/u*, where the w*, vertically scaled buoyancy velocity, is greater than u*, horizontally scaled friction velocity. Hypotheses for the enhanced buoyancy are 1) diurnal heating of the sandy beach, 2) warmer ocean temperatures relative to air temperatures, and 3) the wave breaking within the surf zone. Further exploration into these hypotheses is conducted by using vertical tower sensor pairs for estimating the temporal variability of the mechanical shear production and buoyancy production terms in turbulent kinetic energy budget. These results are part of the Coastal Land Air Sea Interaction (CLASI) experiment.

  18. Dynamic kinetic energy potential for orbital-free density functional theory.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Neuhauser, Daniel; Pistinner, Shlomo; Coomar, Arunima; Zhang, Xu; Lu, Gang

    2011-04-14

    A dynamic kinetic energy potential (DKEP) is developed for time-dependent orbital-free (TDOF) density function theory applications. This potential is constructed to affect only the dynamical (ω ≠ 0) response of an orbital-free electronic system. It aims at making the orbital-free simulation respond in the same way as that of a noninteracting homogenous electron gas (HEG), as required by a correct kinetic energy, therefore enabling extension of the success of orbital-free density functional theory in the static case (e.g., for embedding and description of processes in bulk materials) to dynamic processes. The potential is constructed by expansions of terms, each of which necessitates only simple time evolution (concurrent with the TDOF evolution) and a spatial convolution at each time-step. With 14 such terms a good fit is obtained to the response of the HEG at a large range of frequencies, wavevectors, and densities. The method is demonstrated for simple jellium spheres, approximating Na(9)(+) and Na(65)(+) clusters. It is applicable both to small and large (even ultralarge) excitations and the results converge (i.e., do not blow up) as a function of time. An extension to iterative frequency-resolved extraction is briefly outlined, as well as possibly numerically simpler expansions. The approach could also be extended to fit, instead of the HEG susceptibility, either an experimental susceptibility or a theoretically derived one for a non-HEG system. The DKEP potential should be a powerful tool for embedding a dynamical system described by a more accurate method (such as time-dependent density functional theory, TDDFT) in a large background described by TDOF with a DKEP potential. The type of expansions used and envisioned should be useful for other approaches, such as memory functionals in TDDFT. Finally, an appendix details the formal connection between TDOF and TDDFT.

  19. Total kinetic energy release in the fast neutron-induced fission of $^{235}$U

    CERN Document Server

    Yanez, R; King, J; Barrett, J S; Fotiades, N; Lee, H Y

    2016-01-01

    We have measured the total kinetic energy (TKE) release for the $^{235}$U(n,f) reaction for $E_{n}$=2-100 MeV using the 2E method with an array of Si PIN diode detectors. The neutron energies were determined by time of flight measurements using the white spectrum neutron beam at the LANSCE facility. To benchmark the TKE measurement, the TKE release for $^{235}$U(n$_{th}$,f) was also measured using a thermal neutron beam from the Oregon State University TRIGA reactor, giving pre-neutron emission $E^*_{TKE}=170.7\\pm0.4$ MeV in good agreement with known values. Our measurements are thus absolute measurements. The TKE in $^{235}$U(n,f) decreases non-linearly from 169.0 MeV to 161.4 MeV for $E_{n}$=2-90 MeV. Comparison of the data with the multi-modal fission model of Brosa indicates the TKE decrease is a consequence of the growth of symmetric fission and the corresponding decrease of asymmetric fission with increasing neutron energy. The average TKE associated with the Brosa superlong, standard I and standard II ...

  20. Kinetic theory of binary particles with unequal mean velocities and non-equipartition energies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Yanpei; Mei, Yifeng; Wang, Wei

    2017-03-01

    The hydrodynamic conservation equations and constitutive relations for a binary granular mixture composed of smooth, nearly elastic spheres with non-equipartition energies and different mean velocities are derived. This research is aimed to build three-dimensional kinetic theory to characterize the behaviors of two species of particles suffering different forces. The standard Enskog method is employed assuming a Maxwell velocity distribution for each species of particles. The collision components of the stress tensor and the other parameters are calculated from the zeroth- and first-order approximation. Our results demonstrate that three factors, namely the differences between two granular masses, temperatures and mean velocities all play important roles in the stress-strain relation of the binary mixture, indicating that the assumption of energy equipartition and the same mean velocity may not be acceptable. The collision frequency and the solid viscosity increase monotonously with each granular temperature. The zeroth-order approximation to the energy dissipation varies greatly with the mean velocities of both species of spheres, reaching its peak value at the maximum of their relative velocity.