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Sample records for hairpin rna constructs

  1. High-throughput construction of intron-containing hairpin RNA vectors for RNAi in plants.

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    Pu Yan

    Full Text Available With the wide use of double-stranded RNA interference (RNAi for the analysis of gene function in plants, a high-throughput system for making hairpin RNA (hpRNA constructs is in great demand. Here, we describe a novel restriction-ligation approach that provides a simple but efficient construction of intron-containing hpRNA (ihpRNA vectors. The system takes advantage of the type IIs restriction enzyme BsaI and our new plant RNAi vector pRNAi-GG based on the Golden Gate (GG cloning. This method requires only a single PCR product of the gene of interest flanked with BsaI recognition sequence, which can then be cloned into pRNAi-GG at both sense and antisense orientations simultaneously to form ihpRNA construct. The process, completed in one tube with one restriction-ligation step, produced a recombinant ihpRNA with high efficiency and zero background. We demonstrate the utility of the ihpRNA constructs generated with pRNAi-GG vector for the effective silencing of various individual endogenous and exogenous marker genes as well as two genes simultaneously. This method provides a novel and high-throughput platform for large-scale analysis of plant functional genomics.

  2. Constructing multi-resolution Markov State Models (MSMs) to elucidate RNA hairpin folding mechanisms.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huang, Xuhui; Yao, Yuan; Bowman, Gregory R; Sun, Jian; Guibas, Leonidas J; Carlsson, Gunnar; Pande, Vijay S

    2010-01-01

    Simulating biologically relevant timescales at atomic resolution is a challenging task since typical atomistic simulations are at least two orders of magnitude shorter. Markov State Models (MSMs) provide one means of overcoming this gap without sacrificing atomic resolution by extracting long time dynamics from short simulations. MSMs coarse grain space by dividing conformational space into long-lived, or metastable, states. This is equivalent to coarse graining time by integrating out fast motions within metastable states. By varying the degree of coarse graining one can vary the resolution of an MSM; therefore, MSMs are inherently multi-resolution. Here we introduce a new algorithm Super-level-set Hierarchical Clustering (SHC), to our knowledge, the first algorithm focused on constructing MSMs at multiple resolutions. The key insight of this algorithm is to generate a set of super levels covering different density regions of phase space, then cluster each super level separately, and finally recombine this information into a single MSM. SHC is able to produce MSMs at different resolutions using different super density level sets. To demonstrate the power of this algorithm we apply it to a small RNA hairpin, generating MSMs at four different resolutions. We validate these MSMs by showing that they are able to reproduce the original simulation data. Furthermore, long time folding dynamics are extracted from these models. The results show that there are no metastable on-pathway intermediate states. Instead, the folded state serves as a hub directly connected to multiple unfolded/misfolded states which are separated from each other by large free energy barriers.

  3. General combinatorics of RNA hairpins and cloverleaves.

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    Liao, Bo; Wang, Tian-ming

    2003-01-01

    For an abstract single-strand RNA, a combinatorial analysis is given for two important structures, hairpins and cloverleaves. The total number of hairpins and cloverleaves of a given length with minimal hairpin loop length m(m > 0) and with minimal stack length l(l > 0) is computed, under the assumption that all base pairs can occur.

  4. Hairpins under tension: RNA versus DNA.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bercy, Mathilde; Bockelmann, Ulrich

    2015-11-16

    We use optical tweezers to control the folding and unfolding of individual DNA and RNA hairpins by force. Four hairpin molecules are studied in comparison: two DNA and two RNA ones. We observe that the conformational dynamics is slower for the RNA hairpins than for their DNA counterparts. Our results indicate that structures made of RNA are dynamically more stable. This difference might contribute to the fact that DNA and RNA play fundamentally different biological roles in spite of chemical similarity. © The Author(s) 2015. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of Nucleic Acids Research.

  5. Antisense and short hairpin RNA (shRNA) constructs targeting PIN (Protein Inhibitor of NOS) ameliorate aging-related erectile dysfunction in the rat.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Magee, Thomas R; Kovanecz, Istvan; Davila, Hugo H; Ferrini, Monica G; Cantini, Liliana; Vernet, Dolores; Zuniga, Freddi I; Rajfer, Jacob; Gonzalez-Cadavid, Nestor F

    2007-05-01

    Over-expression of penile neuronal nitric oxide synthase (PnNOS) from a plasmid ameliorates aging-related erectile dysfunction (ED), whereas over-expression of the protein inhibitor of NOS (PIN), that binds to nNOS, increases ED. To improve this form of gene therapy for ED by comparing the electrical field response of short hairpin RNA (shRNA) for PIN with that of antisense PIN RNA. Both shRNA and antisense RNA gene therapy vectors increased intracavernosal pressure in aged rats. PIN small interfering RNA (siRNA), and plasmid constructs for cytomegalovirus promoter plasmid vector (pCMV-PIN), pCMV-PIN antisense RNA, pSilencer2.1-U6-PIN-shRNA; and pSilencer2.1-U6-randomer-shRNA were prepared and validated by transfection into HEK293 cells, determining the effects on PIN expression by Western blot. Plasmid constructs were then injected, followed by electroporation, into the penile corpora cavernosa of aged (20-month-old) Fisher 344 rats and, 1 month later, the erectile response was measured by intracavernosal pressure increase following electrical field stimulation (EFS) of the cavernosal nerve. PIN was estimated in penile tissue by Western blot and real-time reverse transcriptase-polymerase chain reaction. Cyclic guanosine monophosphate (cGMP) measurements were conducted by competitive enzyme immunoassay (EIA). Immunohistofluorescence detected PIN in corporal tissue sections. In cell culture, PIN siRNA and plasmid-expressed pU6-PIN-shRNA effectively reduced PIN expression from pCMV-PIN. pSilencer2.1-U6-PIN-shRNA corrected the impaired erectile response to EFS in aged rats and raised it above the value for young rats, more efficiently than pCMV-PIN antisense RNA. PIN mRNA expression in the penis was decreased by >70% by the shRNA but remained unaffected by the antisense RNA, whereas PIN protein expression was reduced in both cases, particularly in the dorsal nerve. PIN antisense increased cGMP concentration in treated tissue by twofold. pSilencer2.1-U6-PIN-shRNA gene

  6. Design and Construction of Shrimp Antiviral DNA Vaccines Expressing Long and Short Hairpins for Protection by RNA Interference.

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    Chaudhari, Aparna; Pathakota, Gireesh-Babu; Annam, Pavan-Kumar

    2016-01-01

    DNA vaccines present the aquaculture industry with an effective and economically viable method of controlling viral pathogens that drastically affect productivity. Since specific immune response is rudimentary in invertebrates, the presence of RNA interference (RNAi) pathway in shrimps provides a promising new approach to vaccination. Plasmid DNA vaccines that express short or long double stranded RNA in vivo have shown protection against viral diseases. The design, construction and considerations for preparing such vaccines are discussed.

  7. Cisplatin Targeting of Bacterial Ribosomal RNA Hairpins

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    Gayani N. P. Dedduwa-Mudalige

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available Cisplatin is a clinically important chemotherapeutic agent known to target purine bases in nucleic acids. In addition to major deoxyribonucleic acid (DNA intrastrand cross-links, cisplatin also forms stable adducts with many types of ribonucleic acid (RNA including siRNA, spliceosomal RNAs, tRNA, and rRNA. All of these RNAs play vital roles in the cell, such as catalysis of protein synthesis by rRNA, and therefore serve as potential drug targets. This work focused on platination of two highly conserved RNA hairpins from E. coli ribosomes, namely pseudouridine-modified helix 69 from 23S rRNA and the 790 loop of helix 24 from 16S rRNA. RNase T1 probing, MALDI mass spectrometry, and dimethyl sulfate mapping revealed platination at GpG sites. Chemical probing results also showed platination-induced RNA structural changes. These findings reveal solvent and structural accessibility of sites within bacterial RNA secondary structures that are functionally significant and therefore viable targets for cisplatin as well as other classes of small molecules. Identifying target preferences at the nucleotide level, as well as determining cisplatin-induced RNA conformational changes, is important for the design of more potent drug molecules. Furthermore, the knowledge gained through studies of RNA-targeting by cisplatin is applicable to a broad range of organisms from bacteria to human.

  8. Agrobacterium tumefaciens-mediated transformation of poinsettia, Euphorbia pulcherrima, with virus-derived hairpin RNA constructs confers resistance to Poinsettia mosaic virus.

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    Clarke, Jihong Liu; Spetz, Carl; Haugslien, Sissel; Xing, Shaochen; Dees, Merete W; Moe, Roar; Blystad, Dag-Ragnar

    2008-06-01

    Agrobacterium-mediated transformation for poinsettia (Euphorbia pulcherrima Willd. Ex Klotzsch) is reported here for the first time. Internode stem explants of poinsettia cv. Millenium were transformed by Agrobacterium tumefaciens, strain LBA 4404, harbouring virus-derived hairpin (hp) RNA gene constructs to induce RNA silencing-mediated resistance to Poinsettia mosaic virus (PnMV). Prior to transformation, an efficient somatic embryogenesis system was developed for poinsettia cv. Millenium in which about 75% of the explants produced somatic embryos. In 5 experiments utilizing 868 explants, 18 independent transgenic lines were generated. An average transformation frequency of 2.1% (range 1.2-3.5%) was revealed. Stable integration of transgenes into the poinsettia nuclear genome was confirmed by PCR and Southern blot analysis. Both single- and multiple-copy transgene integration into the poinsettia genome were found among transformants. Transgenic poinsettia plants showing resistance to mechanical inoculation of PnMV were detected by double antibody sandwich enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (DAS-ELISA). Northern blot analysis of low molecular weight RNA revealed that transgene-derived small interfering (si) RNA molecules were detected among the poinsettia transformants prior to inoculation. The Agrobacterium-mediated transformation methodology developed in the current study should facilitate improvement of this ornamental plant with enhanced disease resistance, quality improvement and desirable colour alteration. Because poinsettia is a non-food, non-feed plant and is not propagated through sexual reproduction, this is likely to be more acceptable even in areas where genetically modified crops are currently not cultivated.

  9. Analysis of the Tomato spotted wilt virus ambisense S RNA-encoded hairpin structure in translation.

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    Christina Geerts-Dimitriadou

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: The intergenic region (IR of ambisense RNA segments from animal- and plant-infecting (-RNA viruses functions as a bidirectional transcription terminator. The IR sequence of the Tomato spotted wilt virus (TSWV ambisense S RNA contains stretches that are highly rich in A-residues and U-residues and is predicted to fold into a stable hairpin structure. The presence of this hairpin structure sequence in the 3' untranslated region (UTR of TSWV mRNAs implies a possible role in translation. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: To analyse the role of the predicted hairpin structure in translation, various Renilla luciferase constructs containing modified 3' and/or 5' UTR sequences of the TSWV S RNA encoded nucleocapsid (N gene were analyzed for expression. While good luciferase expression levels were obtained from constructs containing the 5' UTR and the 3' UTR, luciferase expression was lost when the hairpin structure sequence was removed from the 3' UTR. Constructs that only lacked the 5' UTR, still rendered good expression levels. When in addition the entire 3' UTR was exchanged for that of the S RNA encoded non-structural (NSs gene transcript, containing the complementary hairpin folding sequence, the loss of luciferase expression could only be recovered by providing the 5' UTR sequence of the NSs transcript. Luciferase activity remained unaltered when the hairpin structure sequence was swapped for the analogous one from Tomato yellow ring virus, another distinct tospovirus. The addition of N and NSs proteins further increased luciferase expression levels from hairpin structure containing constructs. CONCLUSIONS/SIGNIFICANCE: The results suggest a role for the predicted hairpin structure in translation in concert with the viral N and NSs proteins. The presence of stretches highly rich in A-residues does not rule out a concerted action with a poly(A-tail-binding protein. A common transcription termination and translation strategy for plant

  10. Short hairpin RNA expression for enhancing the resistance of ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    The approach opens the door of RNAi technology as a wide range of strategies that offer a technically simpler, cheaper, and quicker gene-knockdown by recombinant shRNA for future genetics in silkworm Bm and other related species. Key words: RNA interference (RNAi), Silkworm Bombyx mori (Bm) cell line, short hairpin ...

  11. Energy landscapes, folding mechanisms, and kinetics of RNA tetraloop hairpins.

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    Chakraborty, Debayan; Collepardo-Guevara, Rosana; Wales, David J

    2014-12-31

    RNA hairpins play a pivotal role in a diverse range of cellular functions, and are integral components of ribozymes, mRNA, and riboswitches. However, the mechanistic and kinetic details of RNA hairpin folding, which are key determinants of most of its biological functions, are poorly understood. In this work, we use the discrete path sampling (DPS) approach to explore the energy landscapes of two RNA tetraloop hairpins, and provide insights into their folding mechanisms and kinetics in atomistic detail. Our results show that the potential energy landscapes have a distinct funnel-like bias toward the folded hairpin state, consistent with efficient structure-seeking properties. Mechanistic and kinetic information is analyzed in terms of kinetic transition networks. We find microsecond folding times, consistent with temperature jump experiments, for hairpin folding initiated from relatively compact unfolded states. This process is essentially driven by an initial collapse, followed by rapid zippering of the helix stem in the final phase. Much lower folding rates are predicted when the folding is initiated from extended chains, which undergo longer excursions on the energy landscape before nucleation events can occur. Our work therefore explains recent experiments and coarse-grained simulations, where the folding kinetics exhibit precisely this dependency on the initial conditions.

  12. Efficacy Analysis of Combinatorial siRNAs against HIV Derived from One Double Hairpin RNA Precursor.

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    Liu, Chang; Liang, Zhipin; Kong, Xiaohong

    2017-01-01

    Combinatorial small interfering RNA duplexes (siRNAs) have the potential to be a gene therapy against HIV-1, and some studies have reported that transient combinatorial siRNA expression represses HIV replication, but the effects of long-term siRNA expression on HIV replication have not been studied in detail. In this study, HIV-1 replication under the influence of stable combinatorial siRNA expression from a single RNA transcript was analyzed. First, a series of cassettes encoding short hairpin RNA (shRNA)/long hairpin RNA (lhRNA)/double long hairpins (dlhRNA) was constructed and subjected to an analysis of inhibitory efficacy. Next, an optimized dlhRNA encoding cassette was selected and inserted into lentiviral delivery vector FG12. Transient dlhRNA expression reduced replication of HIV-1 in TZM-bl cells and CD4+ T cells successfully. HIV-1 susceptible TZM-bl cells were transducted with the dlhRNA expressing lentiviral vector and sorted by fluorescence-activated cell sorting to obtain stable dlhRNA expressing cells. The generation of four anti-HIV siRNAs in these dlhRNA expressing cells was verified by stem-loop RT-PCR assay. dlhRNA expression did not activate a non-specific interferon response. The dlhRNA expressing cells were also challenged with HIV-1 NL4-3, which revealed that stable expression of combinatorial siRNAs repressed HIV-1 replication for 8 days, after which HIV-1 overcame the inhibitory effect of siRNA expression by expressing mutant versions of RNAi targets. The results of this evaluation of the long-term inhibitory effects of combinatorial siRNAs against HIV-1 provide a reference for researchers who utilize combinatorial RNA interference against HIV-1 or other error-prone viruses.

  13. Selective gene silencing by viral delivery of short hairpin RNA

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    Sliva Katja

    2010-09-01

    Full Text Available Abstract RNA interference (RNAi technology has not only become a powerful tool for functional genomics, but also allows rapid drug target discovery and in vitro validation of these targets in cell culture. Furthermore, RNAi represents a promising novel therapeutic option for treating human diseases, in particular cancer. Selective gene silencing by RNAi can be achieved essentially by two nucleic acid based methods: i cytoplasmic delivery of short double-stranded (ds interfering RNA oligonucleotides (siRNA, where the gene silencing effect is only transient in nature, and possibly not suitable for all applications; or ii nuclear delivery of gene expression cassettes that express short hairpin RNA (shRNA, which are processed like endogenous interfering RNA and lead to stable gene down-regulation. Both processes involve the use of nucleic acid based drugs, which are highly charged and do not cross cell membranes by free diffusion. Therefore, in vivo delivery of RNAi therapeutics must use technology that enables the RNAi therapeutic to traverse biological membrane barriers in vivo. Viruses and the vectors derived from them carry out precisely this task and have become a major delivery system for shRNA. Here, we summarize and compare different currently used viral delivery systems, give examples of in vivo applications, and indicate trends for new developments, such as replicating viruses for shRNA delivery to cancer cells.

  14. Hairpin RNA Targeting Multiple Viral Genes Confers Strong Resistance to Rice Black-Streaked Dwarf Virus

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    Fangquan Wang

    2016-05-01

    Full Text Available Rice black-streaked dwarf virus (RBSDV belongs to the genus Fijivirus in the family of Reoviridae and causes severe yield loss in rice-producing areas in Asia. RNA silencing, as a natural defence mechanism against plant viruses, has been successfully exploited for engineering virus resistance in plants, including rice. In this study, we generated transgenic rice lines harbouring a hairpin RNA (hpRNA construct targeting four RBSDV genes, S1, S2, S6 and S10, encoding the RNA-dependent RNA polymerase, the putative core protein, the RNA silencing suppressor and the outer capsid protein, respectively. Both field nursery and artificial inoculation assays of three generations of the transgenic lines showed that they had strong resistance to RBSDV infection. The RBSDV resistance in the segregating transgenic populations correlated perfectly with the presence of the hpRNA transgene. Furthermore, the hpRNA transgene was expressed in the highly resistant transgenic lines, giving rise to abundant levels of 21–24 nt small interfering RNA (siRNA. By small RNA deep sequencing, the RBSDV-resistant transgenic lines detected siRNAs from all four viral gene sequences in the hpRNA transgene, indicating that the whole chimeric fusion sequence can be efficiently processed by Dicer into siRNAs. Taken together, our results suggest that long hpRNA targeting multiple viral genes can be used to generate stable and durable virus resistance in rice, as well as other plant species.

  15. Agroinfiltration-based expression of hairpin RNA in soybean plants for RNA interference against Tetranychus urticae.

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    Dubey, Vimal Kumar; Lee, Ung Gyu; Kwon, Deok Ho; Lee, Si Hyeock

    2017-10-01

    The coatomer subunit alpha (COPA) and aquaporin 9 (AQ9) genes from the two-spotted spider mite, Tetranychus urticae, were previously determined to exhibit RNA interference (RNAi)-based lethality when their double-stranded RNAs were systemically delivered via multi-unit chambers (Kwon et al., 2016 [8]). In current study, the hairpin RNAs of the COPA and AQ9 were transiently expressed in soybean plants by agroinfiltration. When T. urticae was fed with the soybean plants agroinfiltrated with the COPA and AQ9 hairpin RNA cassettes, the cumulative mortality increased significantly at 6days post-infestation. Quantitative PCR analysis revealed that the transcript level of both COPA and AQ9 was significantly reduced in T. urticae after 2days post-infestation, thereby confirming that the significant increases in mortality resulted from the knockdown of COPA and AQ9 transcripts. Our findings demonstrate the utility of COPA and AQ9 as potential genes for plant host-mediated RNAi control of T. urticae. In addition, we proved the usefulness of agroinfiltration as a rapid validation tool for confirming the RNAi-based lethality of target genes against arthropod pests before producing transgenic plants as agroinfiltration requires less time and skill to validate transgene function. Furthermore, these findings prove the concept that hairpin RNA expressed in plant hosts can also induce RNAi and eventually kill T. urticae, a sap-sucking pest. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  16. Predicting 3D Structure, Flexibility, and Stability of RNA Hairpins in Monovalent and Divalent Ion Solutions

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    Shi, Ya-Zhou; Jin, Lei; Wang, Feng-Hua; Zhu, Xiao-Long; Tan, Zhi-Jie

    2015-01-01

    A full understanding of RNA-mediated biology would require the knowledge of three-dimensional (3D) structures, structural flexibility, and stability of RNAs. To predict RNA 3D structures and stability, we have previously proposed a three-bead coarse-grained predictive model with implicit salt/solvent potentials. In this study, we further develop the model by improving the implicit-salt electrostatic potential and including a sequence-dependent coaxial stacking potential to enable the model to simulate RNA 3D structure folding in divalent/monovalent ion solutions. The model presented here can predict 3D structures of RNA hairpins with bulges/internal loops (RNA hairpins with bulge loops of different lengths at several divalent/monovalent ion conditions. In addition, the model successfully predicts the stability of RNA hairpins with various loops/stems in divalent/monovalent ion solutions. PMID:26682822

  17. Delivery of Short Hairpin RNA Sequences by Using a Replication-Competent Avian Retroviral Vector

    OpenAIRE

    Bromberg-White, Jennifer L.; Webb, Craig P; Patacsil, Veronique S.; Miranti, Cindy K.; Williams, Bart O.; Holmen, Sheri L.

    2004-01-01

    While recent studies have demonstrated that retroviral vectors can be used to stably express short hairpin RNA (shRNA) to inhibit gene expression, these studies have utilized replication-defective retroviruses. We describe the creation of a replication-competent, Gateway-compatible retroviral vector capable of expressing shRNA that inhibits the expression of specific genes.

  18. Delivery of short hairpin RNA sequences by using a replication-competent avian retroviral vector.

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    Bromberg-White, Jennifer L; Webb, Craig P; Patacsil, Veronique S; Miranti, Cindy K; Williams, Bart O; Holmen, Sheri L

    2004-05-01

    While recent studies have demonstrated that retroviral vectors can be used to stably express short hairpin RNA (shRNA) to inhibit gene expression, these studies have utilized replication-defective retroviruses. We describe the creation of a replication-competent, Gateway-compatible retroviral vector capable of expressing shRNA that inhibits the expression of specific genes.

  19. Selective gene silencing by viral delivery of short hairpin RNA

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Sliva, Katja; Schnierle, Barbara S

    2010-01-01

    ...: i) cytoplasmic delivery of short double-stranded (ds) interfering RNA oligonucleotides (siRNA), where the gene silencing effect is only transient in nature, and possibly not suitable for all applications; or ii...

  20. Opening of the TAR hairpin in the HIV-1 genome causes aberrant RNA dimerization and packaging

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    Das Atze T

    2012-07-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The TAR hairpin is present at both the 5′ and 3′ end of the HIV-1 RNA genome. The 5′ element binds the viral Tat protein and is essential for Tat-mediated activation of transcription. We recently observed that complete TAR deletion is allowed in the context of an HIV-1 variant that does not depend on this Tat-TAR axis for transcription. Mutations that open the 5′ stem-loop structure did however affect the leader RNA conformation and resulted in a severe replication defect. In this study, we set out to analyze which step of the HIV-1 replication cycle is affected by this conformational change of the leader RNA. Results We demonstrate that opening the 5′ TAR structure through a deletion in either side of the stem region caused aberrant dimerization and reduced packaging of the unspliced viral RNA genome. In contrast, truncation of the TAR hairpin through deletions in both sides of the stem did not affect RNA dimer formation and packaging. Conclusions These results demonstrate that, although the TAR hairpin is not essential for RNA dimerization and packaging, mutations in TAR can significantly affect these processes through misfolding of the relevant RNA signals.

  1. Structural fidelity and NMR relaxation analysis in a prototype RNA hairpin.

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    Giambaşu, George M; York, Darrin M; Case, David A

    2015-05-01

    RNA hairpins are widespread and very stable motifs that contribute decisively to RNA folding and biological function. The GTP1G2C3A4C5U6U7C8G9G10U11G12C13C14 construct (with a central UUCG tetraloop) has been extensively studied by solution NMR, and offers and excellent opportunity to evaluate the structure and dynamical description afforded by molecular dynamics (MD) simulations. Here, we compare average structural parameters and NMR relaxation rates estimated from a series of multiple independent explicit solvent MD simulations using the two most recent RNA AMBER force fields (ff99 and ff10). Predicted overall tumbling times are ∼20% faster than those inferred from analysis of NMR data and follow the same trend when temperature and ionic strength is varied. The Watson-Crick stem and the "canonical" UUCG loop structure are maintained in most simulations including the characteristic syn conformation along the glycosidic bond of G9, although some key hydrogen bonds in the loop are partially disrupted. Our analysis pinpoints G9-G10 backbone conformations as a locus of discrepancies between experiment and simulation. In general the results for the more recent force-field parameters (ff10) are closer to experiment than those for the older ones (ff99). This work provides a comprehensive and detailed comparison of state of the art MD simulations against a wide variety of solution NMR measurements. © 2015 Giambaşu et al.; Published by Cold Spring Harbor Laboratory Press for the RNA Society.

  2. ncRNAclassifier: a tool for detection and classification of transposable element sequences in RNA hairpins

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    Tempel Sébastien

    2012-09-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Inverted repeat genes encode precursor RNAs characterized by hairpin structures. These RNA hairpins are then metabolized by biosynthetic pathways to produce functional small RNAs. In eukaryotic genomes, short non-autonomous transposable elements can have similar size and hairpin structures as non-coding precursor RNAs. This resemblance leads to problems annotating small RNAs. Results We mapped all microRNA precursors from miRBASE to several genomes and studied the repetition and dispersion of the corresponding loci. We then searched for repetitive elements overlapping these loci. We developed an automatic method called ncRNAclassifier to classify pre-ncRNAs according to their relationship with transposable elements (TEs. We showed that there is a correlation between the number of scattered occurrences of ncRNA precursor candidates and the presence of TEs. We applied ncRNAclassifier on six chordate genomes and report our findings. Among the 1,426 human and 721 mouse pre-miRNAs of miRBase, we identified 235 and 68 mis-annotated pre-miRNAs respectively corresponding completely to TEs. Conclusions We provide a tool enabling the identification of repetitive elements in precursor ncRNA sequences. ncRNAclassifier is available at http://EvryRNA.ibisc.univ-evry.fr.

  3. Co-expression of Argonaute2 enhances short hairpin RNA-induced RNA interference in Xenopus CNS neurons in vivo

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    Chih-ming Chen

    2009-07-01

    Full Text Available RNA interference (RNAi is an evolutionarily conserved mechanism for sequence-specific gene silencing. Recent advances in our understanding of RNAi machinery make it possible to reduce protein expression by introducing short hairpin RNA (shRNA into cells of many systems, however, the efficacy of RNAi-mediated protein knockdown can be quite variable, especially in intact animals, and this limits its application. We built adaptable molecular tools, pSilencer (pSi and pReporter (pRe constructs, to evaluate the impact of different promoters, shRNA structures and overexpression of Ago2, the key enzyme in the RNA-induced silencing complex (RISC, on the efficiency of RNAi. The magnitude of RNAi knockdown was evaluated in cultured cells and intact animals by comparing fluorescence intensity levels of GFP, the RNAi target, relative to mCherry, which was not targeted. Co-expression of human Ago2 with shRNA significantly enhanced efficiency of GFP knockdown in cell lines and in neurons of intact Xenopus tadpoles. Human H1- and U6-promotors alone or the U6-promotor with an enhancer element were equally effective at driving GFP knockdown. shRNA derived from the microRNA-30 design (shRNAmir30 enhanced the efficiency of GFP knockdown. Expressing pSi containing Ago2 with shRNA increased knockdown efficiency of an endogenous neuronal protein, the GluR2 subunit of the AMPA receptor, functionally accessed by recording AMPA receptor-mediated spontaneous synaptic currents in Xenopus CNS neurons. Our data suggest that co-expression of Ago2 and shRNA is a simple method to enhance RNAi in intact animals. While morpholino antisense knockdown is effective in Xenopus and Zebrafish, a principle advantage of the RNAi method is the possibility of spatial and temporal control of protein knockdown by use of cell type specific and regulatable pol II promoters to drive shRNA and Ago2. This should extend the application of RNAi to study gene function of intact brain circuits.

  4. Is TNF-a-targeted short hairpin RNA (shRNA) a novel potential therapeutic tool in psoriasis treatment?

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Stenderup, Karin; Jakobsen, Maria; Rosada, Cecilia

    2008-01-01

    the efficiency of targeting TNF-a with specific short hairpin RNA (shRNA) and explores its potential in treating psoriasis. ShRNAs targeting human TNF-α mRNA were generated. Their efficiency in down-regulating TNF-a protein expression was evaluated using a Renilla luciferase screening-assay and a transient co......-transfection assay. The expression cassette encoding the most efficient TNF-a shRNA was inserted into a lentiviral vector, allowing proficient gene delivery. The lentiviral vector is integrated into the host genome and establishes life-long infection and persistent shRNA expression. The lentiviral vector expressing...

  5. Inhibition of HIV Replication by Cyclic and Hairpin PNAs Targeting the HIV-1 TAR RNA Loop

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    Gregory Upert

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Human immunodeficiency virus-1 (HIV-1 replication and gene expression entails specific interaction of the viral protein Tat with its transactivation responsive element (TAR, to form a highly stable stem-bulge-loop structure. Previously, we described triphenylphosphonium (TPP cation-based vectors that efficiently deliver nucleotide analogs (PNAs into the cytoplasm of cells. In particular, we showed that the TPP conjugate of a linear 16-mer PNA targeting the apical stem-loop region of TAR impedes Tat-mediated transactivation of the HIV-1 LTR in vitro and also in cell culture systems. In this communication, we conjugated TPP to cyclic and hairpin PNAs targeting the loop region of HIV-1 TAR and evaluated their antiviral efficacy in a cell culture system. We found that TPP-cyclic PNAs containing only 8 residues, showed higher antiviral potency compared to hairpin PNAs of 12 or 16 residues. We further noted that the TPP-conjugates of the 8-mer cyclic PNA as well as the 16-mer linear PNA displayed similar antiviral efficacy. However, cyclic PNAs were shown to be highly specific to their target sequences. This communication emphasizes on the importance of small constrained cyclic PNAs over both linear and hairpin structures for targeting biologically relevant RNA hairpins.

  6. Human Ku70 protein binds hairpin RNA and double stranded DNA through two different sites.

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    Anisenko, Andrey N; Knyazhanskaya, Ekaterina S; Zatsepin, Timofey S; Gottikh, Marina B

    2017-01-01

    Human protein Ku usually functions in the cell as a complex of two subunits, Ku70 and Ku80. The Ku heterodimer plays a key role in the non-homologous end joining DNA repair pathway by specifically recognizing the DNA ends at the site of the lesion. The binding of the Ku heterodimer to DNA has been well-studied, and its interactions with RNA have been also described. However, Ku70 subunit is known to have independent DNA binding capability, which is less characterized. RNA binding properties of Ku70 have not been yet specially studied. We have prepared recombinant full-length Ku70 and a set of its truncated mutants in E. coli, and studied their interactions with nucleic acids of various structures: linear single- and double-stranded DNA and RNA, as well as closed circular DNA and hairpin RNA. Ku70 has demonstrated a high affinity binding to double stranded DNA and hairpin RNA with a certain structure only. Interestingly, in contrast to the Ku heterodimer, Ku70 is found to interact with closed circular DNA. We also show for the first time that Ku70 employs two different sites for DNA and RNA binding. The double-stranded DNA is recognized by the C-terminal part of Ku70 including SAP domain as it has been earlier demonstrated, whereas hairpin RNA binding is provided by amino acids 251-438. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier B.V. and Société Française de Biochimie et Biologie Moléculaire (SFBBM). All rights reserved.

  7. High-stearic and High-oleic cottonseed oils produced by hairpin RNA-mediated post-transcriptional gene silencing.

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    Liu, Qing; Singh, Surinder P; Green, Allan G

    2002-08-01

    We have genetically modified the fatty acid composition of cottonseed oil using the recently developed technique of hairpin RNA-mediated gene silencing to down-regulate the seed expression of two key fatty acid desaturase genes, ghSAD-1-encoding stearoyl-acyl-carrier protein Delta 9-desaturase and ghFAD2-1-encoding oleoyl-phosphatidylcholine omega 6-desaturase. Hairpin RNA-encoding gene constructs (HP) targeted against either ghSAD-1 or ghFAD2-1 were transformed into cotton (Gossypium hirsutum cv Coker 315). The resulting down-regulation of the ghSAD-1 gene substantially increased stearic acid from the normal levels of 2% to 3% up to as high as 40%, and silencing of the ghFAD2-1 gene resulted in greatly elevated oleic acid content, up to 77% compared with about 15% in seeds of untransformed plants. In addition, palmitic acid was significantly lowered in both high-stearic and high-oleic lines. Similar fatty acid composition phenotypes were also achieved by transformation with conventional antisense constructs targeted against the same genes, but at much lower frequencies than were achieved with the HP constructs. By intercrossing the high-stearic and high-oleic genotypes, it was possible to simultaneously down-regulate both ghSAD-1 and ghFAD2-1 to the same degree as observed in the individually silenced parental lines, demonstrating for the first time, to our knowledge, that duplex RNA-induced posttranslational gene silencing in independent genes can be stacked without any diminution in the degree of silencing. The silencing of ghSAD-1 and/or ghFAD2-1 to various degrees enables the development of cottonseed oils having novel combinations of palmitic, stearic, oleic, and linoleic contents that can be used in margarines and deep frying without hydrogenation and also potentially in high-value confectionery applications.

  8. Optimization of Critical Hairpin Features Allows miRNA-based Gene Knockdown Upon Single-copy Transduction

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    Renier Myburgh

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Gene knockdown using micro RNA (miRNA-based vector constructs is likely to become a prominent gene therapy approach. It was the aim of this study to improve the efficiency of gene knockdown through optimizing the structure of miRNA mimics. Knockdown of two target genes was analyzed: CCR5 and green fluorescent protein. We describe here a novel and optimized miRNA mimic design called mirGE comprising a lower stem length of 13 base pairs (bp, positioning of the targeting strand on the 5′ side of the miRNA, together with nucleotide mismatches in upper stem positions 1 and 12 placed on the passenger strand. Our mirGE proved superior to miR-30 in four aspects: yield of targeting strand incorporation into RNA-induced silencing complex (RISC; incorporation into RISC of correct targeting strand; precision of cleavage by Drosha; and ratio of targeting strand over passenger strand. A triple mirGE hairpin cassette targeting CCR5 was constructed. It allowed CCR5 knockdown with an efficiency of over 90% upon single-copy transduction. Importantly, single-copy expression of this construct rendered transduced target cells, including primary human macrophages, resistant to infection with a CCR5-tropic strain of HIV. Our results provide new insights for a better knockdown efficiency of constructs containing miRNA. Our results also provide the proof-of-principle that cells can be rendered HIV resistant through single-copy vector transduction, rendering this approach more compatible with clinical applications.

  9. Water isotope effect on the thermostability of a polio viral RNA hairpin: A metadynamics study

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    Pathak, Arup K.; Bandyopadhyay, Tusar

    2017-04-01

    Oral polio vaccine is considered to be the most thermolabile of all the common childhood vaccines. Despite heavy water (D2O) having been known for a long time to stabilise attenuated viral RNA against thermodegradation, the molecular underpinnings of its mechanism of action are still lacking. Whereas, understanding the basis of D2O action is an important step that might reform the way other thermolabile drugs are stored and could possibly minimize the cold chain problem. Here using a combination of parallel tempering and well-tempered metadynamics simulation in light water (H2O) and in D2O, we have fully described the free energy surface associated with the folding/unfolding of a RNA hairpin containing a non-canonical basepair motif, which is conserved within the 3'-untranslated region of poliovirus-like enteroviruses. Simulations reveal that in heavy water (D2O) there is a considerable increase of the stability of the folded basin as monitored through an intramolecular hydrogen bond (HB), size, shape, and flexibility of RNA structures. This translates into a higher melting temperature in D2O by 41 K when compared with light water (H2O). We have explored the hydration dynamics of the RNA, hydration shell around the RNA surface, and spatial dependence of RNA-solvent collective HB dynamics in the two water systems. Simulation in heavy water clearly showed that D2O strengthens the HB network in the solvent, lengthens inter-residue water-bridge lifetime, and weakens dynamical coupling of the hairpin to its solvation environment, which enhances the rigidity of solvent exposed sites of the native configurations. The results might suggest that like other added osmoprotectants, D2O can act as a thermostabilizer when used as a solvent.

  10. Analysis of secondary structural elements in human microRNA hairpin precursors.

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    Liu, Biao; Childs-Disney, Jessica L; Znosko, Brent M; Wang, Dan; Fallahi, Mohammad; Gallo, Steven M; Disney, Matthew D

    2016-03-01

    MicroRNAs (miRNAs) regulate gene expression by targeting complementary mRNAs for destruction or translational repression. Aberrant expression of miRNAs has been associated with various diseases including cancer, thus making them interesting therapeutic targets. The composite of secondary structural elements that comprise miRNAs could aid the design of small molecules that modulate their function. We analyzed the secondary structural elements, or motifs, present in all human miRNA hairpin precursors and compared them to highly expressed human RNAs with known structures and other RNAs from various organisms. Amongst human miRNAs, there are 3808 are unique motifs, many residing in processing sites. Further, we identified motifs in miRNAs that are not present in other highly expressed human RNAs, desirable targets for small molecules. MiRNA motifs were incorporated into a searchable database that is freely available. We also analyzed the most frequently occurring bulges and internal loops for each RNA class and found that the smallest loops possible prevail. However, the distribution of loops and the preferred closing base pairs were unique to each class. Collectively, we have completed a broad survey of motifs found in human miRNA precursors, highly expressed human RNAs, and RNAs from other organisms. Interestingly, unique motifs were identified in human miRNA processing sites, binding to which could inhibit miRNA maturation and hence function.

  11. Origins of biological function in DNA and RNA hairpin loop motifs from replica exchange molecular dynamics simulation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Swadling, Jacob B; Ishii, Kunihiko; Tahara, Tahei; Kitao, Akio

    2018-01-31

    Deoxyribonucleic acid (DNA) and ribonucleic acid (RNA) have remarkably similar chemical structures, but despite this, they play significantly different roles in modern biology. In this article, we explore the possible conformations of DNA and RNA hairpins to better understand the fundamental differences in structure formation and stability. We use large parallel temperature replica exchange molecular dynamics ensembles to sample the full conformational landscape of these hairpin molecules so that we can identify the stable structures formed by the hairpin sequence. Our simulations show RNA adopts a narrower distribution of folded structures compared to DNA at room temperature, which forms both hairpins and many unfolded conformations. RNA is capable of forming twice as many hydrogen bonds than DNA which results in a higher melting temperature. We see that local chemical differences lead to emergent molecular properties such as increased persistence length in RNA that is weakly temperature dependant. These discoveries provide fundamental insight into how RNA forms complex folded tertiary structures which confer enzymatic-like function in ribozymes, whereas DNA retains structural motifs in order to facilitate function such as translation of sequence.

  12. Hairpin RNA derived from viral NIa gene confers immunity to wheat streak mosaic virus infection in transgenic wheat plants.

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    Fahim, Muhammad; Ayala-Navarrete, Ligia; Millar, Anthony A; Larkin, Philip J

    2010-09-01

    Wheat streak mosaic virus (WSMV), vectored by Wheat curl mite, has been of great economic importance in the Great Plains of the United States and Canada. Recently, the virus has been identified in Australia, where it has spread quickly to all major wheat growing areas. The difficulties in finding adequate natural resistance in wheat prompted us to develop transgenic resistance based on RNA interference (RNAi). An RNAi construct was designed to target the nuclear inclusion protein 'a' (NIa) gene of WSMV. Wheat was stably cotransformed with two plasmids: pStargate-NIa expressing hairpin RNA (hpRNA) including WSMV sequence and pCMneoSTLS2 with the nptII selectable marker. When T(1) progeny were assayed against WSMV, ten of sixteen families showed complete resistance in transgenic segregants. The resistance was classified as immunity by four criteria: no disease symptoms were produced; ELISA readings were as in uninoculated plants; viral sequences could not be detected by RT-PCR from leaf extracts; and leaf extracts failed to give infections in susceptible plants when used in test-inoculation experiments. Southern blot hybridization analysis indicated hpRNA transgene integrated into the wheat genome. Moreover, accumulation of small RNAs derived from the hpRNA transgene sequence positively correlated with immunity. We also showed that the selectable marker gene nptII segregated independently of the hpRNA transgene in some transgenics, and therefore demonstrated that it is possible using these techniques, to produce marker-free WSMV immune transgenic plants. This is the first report of immunity in wheat to WSMV using a spliceable intron hpRNA strategy.

  13. Suppression of Retinal Neovascularization by Lentivirus-Mediated Netrin-1 Small Hairpin RNA

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xu, Huizhuo; Liu, Jiaolian; Xiong, Siqi; Le, Yun-zheng; Xia, Xiaobo

    2012-01-01

    Objectives The function of netrin-1 in pathological angiogenesis and its role in retinal neovascularization were investigated in the retinas of oxygen-induced retinopathy (OIR) mice by inhibition of netrin-1. Methods Expression of netrin-1 mRNA and protein in the retinas of OIR mice was analyzed by quantitative RT-PCR and immunoblotting. Inhibition of retinal neovascularization was achieved by lentivirus-mediated netrin-1 small hairpin RNA (shRNA) infection. Retinal neovascularization was examined by fluorescein angiography and quantification of preretinal neovascular nuclei in retinal sections. Results Both mRNA and protein expression of netrin-1 were significantly upregulated in postnatal day 17 OIR mouse retinas. Treatment of OIR mice with specific lentivirus-mediated netrin-1 shRNA dramatically reduced neovascular outgrowth into the inner limiting membrane. Neovascular tufts and nonperfused areas were also reduced. Conclusions High expression of netrin-1 was detected in the retina under ischemic conditions and played a significant role in pathological retinal angiogenesis. Therefore, netrin-1 represents a potential therapeutic target for diabetic retinopathy, retinopathy of prematurity and other ocular neovascular diseases. PMID:22122983

  14. Thermodynamics and kinetics of RNA tertiary structure formation in the junctionless hairpin ribozyme.

    Science.gov (United States)

    White, Neil A; Hoogstraten, Charles G

    2017-09-01

    The hairpin ribozyme consists of two RNA internal loops that interact to form the catalytically active structure. This docking transition is a rare example of intermolecular formation of RNA tertiary structure without coupling to helix annealing. We have used temperature-dependent surface plasmon resonance (SPR) to characterize the thermodynamics and kinetics of RNA tertiary structure formation for the junctionless form of the ribozyme, in which loops A and B reside on separate molecules. We find docking to be strongly enthalpy-driven and to be accompanied by substantial activation barriers for association and dissociation, consistent with the structural reorganization of both internal loops upon complex formation. Comparisons with the parallel analysis of a ribozyme variant carrying a 2'-O-methyl modification at the self-cleavage site and with published data in other systems reveal a surprising diversity of thermodynamic signatures, emphasizing the delicate balance of contributions to the free energy of formation of RNA tertiary structure. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  15. Hepatitis B virus inhibition in mice by lentiviral vector mediated short hairpin RNA

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    Wang Xuehao

    2009-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Chronic hepatitis B virus (HBV infection is an important cause of cirrhosis and hepatocellular carcinoma. The major challenges for current therapies are the low efficacy of current drugs and the occurrence of drug resistant HBV mutations. RNA interference (RNAi of virus-specific genes offers the possibility of developing a new anti-HBV therapy. Recent reports have shown that lentiviral vectors based on HIV-1 are promising gene delivery vehicles due to their ability to integrate transgenes into non-dividing cells. Herein, a lentivirus-based RNAi system was developed to drive expression and delivery of HBV-specific short hairpin RNA (shRNA in a mouse model for HBV replication. Methods Hepatitis B surface antigen (HBsAg and hepatitis B e antigen (HBeAg in the sera of the mice were analyzed by quantitative sandwich enzyme linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA technique, hepatitis B core antigen (HBcAg and HBsAg in the livers of the mice were detected by immunohistochemical assay, HBV DNA and HBV mRNA were measured by fluorogenic quantitative polymerase chain reaction (FQ-PCR and quantitative real-time PCR respectively. Results Co-injection of HBV plasmids together with the lentivirus targeting HBV shRNA induced an RNAi response. Secreted HBsAg was reduced by 89% in mouse serum, and HBeAg was also significantly inhibited, immunohistochemical detection of HBcAg or HBsAg in the liver tissues also revealed substantial reduction. Lentiviral mediated shRNA caused a significant suppression in the levels of viral mRNA and DNA synthesis compared to the control group. Conclusion Lentivirus-based RNAi can be used to suppress HBV replication in vivo, it might become a potential therapeutic strategy for treating HBV and other viral infections.

  16. Function and anatomy of plant siRNA pools derived from hairpin transgenes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lee Kevin AW

    2007-11-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background RNA interference results in specific gene silencing by small-interfering RNAs (siRNAs. Synthetic siRNAs provide a powerful tool for manipulating gene expression but high cost suggests that novel siRNA production methods are desirable. Strong evolutionary conservation of siRNA structure suggested that siRNAs will retain cross-species function and that transgenic plants expressing heterologous siRNAs might serve as useful siRNA bioreactors. Here we report a detailed evaluation of the above proposition and present evidence regarding structural features of siRNAs extracted from plants. Results Testing the gene silencing capacity of plant-derived siRNAs in mammalian cells proved to be very challenging and required partial siRNA purification and design of a highly sensitive assay. Using the above assay we found that plant-derived siRNAs are ineffective for gene silencing in mammalian cells. Plant-derived siRNAs are almost exclusively double-stranded and most likely comprise a mixture of bona fide siRNAs and aberrant partially complementary duplexes. We also provide indirect evidence that plant-derived siRNAs may contain a hitherto undetected physiological modification, distinct from 3' terminal 2-O-methylation. Conclusion siRNAs produced from plant hairpin transgenes and extracted from plants are ineffective for gene silencing in mammalian cells. Thus our findings establish that a previous claim that transgenic plants offer a cost-effective, scalable and sustainable source of siRNAs is unwarranted. Our results also indicate that the presence of aberrant siRNA duplexes and possibly a plant-specific siRNA modification, compromises the gene silencing capacity of plant-derived siRNAs in mammalian cells.

  17. Short Hairpin RNA Suppression of Thymidylate Synthase Produces DNA Mismatches and Results in Excellent Radiosensitization

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Flanagan, Sheryl A., E-mail: sflan@umich.edu [Department of Pharmacology, University of Michigan Medical Center, Ann Arbor, Michigan (United States); Cooper, Kristin S. [Department of Pharmacology, University of Michigan Medical Center, Ann Arbor, Michigan (United States); Mannava, Sudha; Nikiforov, Mikhail A. [Department of Cell Stress Biology, Roswell Park Cancer Institute, Buffalo, New York (United States); Shewach, Donna S. [Department of Pharmacology, University of Michigan Medical Center, Ann Arbor, Michigan (United States)

    2012-12-01

    Purpose: To determine the effect of short hairpin ribonucleic acid (shRNA)-mediated suppression of thymidylate synthase (TS) on cytotoxicity and radiosensitization and the mechanism by which these events occur. Methods and Materials: shRNA suppression of TS was compared with 5-fluoro-2 Prime -deoxyuridine (FdUrd) inactivation of TS with or without ionizing radiation in HCT116 and HT29 colon cancer cells. Cytotoxicity and radiosensitization were measured by clonogenic assay. Cell cycle effects were measured by flow cytometry. The effects of FdUrd or shRNA suppression of TS on dNTP deoxynucleotide triphosphate imbalances and consequent nucleotide misincorporations into deoxyribonucleic acid (DNA) were analyzed by high-pressure liquid chromatography and as pSP189 plasmid mutations, respectively. Results: TS shRNA produced profound ({>=}90%) and prolonged ({>=}8 days) suppression of TS in HCT116 and HT29 cells, whereas FdUrd increased TS expression. TS shRNA also produced more specific and prolonged effects on dNTPs deoxynucleotide triphosphates compared with FdUrd. TS shRNA suppression allowed accumulation of cells in S-phase, although its effects were not as long-lasting as those of FdUrd. Both treatments resulted in phosphorylation of Chk1. TS shRNA alone was less cytotoxic than FdUrd but was equally effective as FdUrd in eliciting radiosensitization (radiation enhancement ratio: TS shRNA, 1.5-1.7; FdUrd, 1.4-1.6). TS shRNA and FdUrd produced a similar increase in the number and type of pSP189 mutations. Conclusions: TS shRNA produced less cytotoxicity than FdUrd but was equally effective at radiosensitizing tumor cells. Thus, the inhibitory effect of FdUrd on TS alone is sufficient to elicit radiosensitization with FdUrd, but it only partially explains FdUrd-mediated cytotoxicity and cell cycle inhibition. The increase in DNA mismatches after TS shRNA or FdUrd supports a causal and sufficient role for the depletion of dTTP thymidine triphosphate and consequent DNA

  18. A hairpin within YAP mRNA 3′UTR functions in regulation at post-transcription level

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gao, Yuen; Wang, Yuan; Feng, Jinyan; Feng, Guoxing; Zheng, Minying; Yang, Zhe; Xiao, Zelin; Lu, Zhanping [State Key Laboratory of Medicinal Chemical Biology, Department of Cancer Research, College of Life Sciences, Nankai University, Tianjin 300071 (China); Ye, Lihong [State Key Laboratory of Medicinal Chemical Biology, Department of Biochemistry, College of Life Sciences, Nankai University, Tianjin 300071 (China); Zhang, Xiaodong, E-mail: zhangxd@nankai.edu.cn [State Key Laboratory of Medicinal Chemical Biology, Department of Cancer Research, College of Life Sciences, Nankai University, Tianjin 300071 (China)

    2015-04-03

    The central dogma of gene expression is that DNA is transcribed into messenger RNAs, which in turn serve as the template for protein synthesis. Recently, it has been reported that mRNAs display regulatory roles that rely on their ability to compete for microRNA binding, independent of their protein-coding function. However, the regulatory mechanism of mRNAs remains poorly understood. Here, we report that a hairpin within YAP mRNA 3′untranslated region (3′UTR) functions in regulation at post-transcription level through generating endogenous siRNAs (esiRNAs). Bioinformatics analysis for secondary structure showed that YAP mRNA displayed a hairpin structure (termed standard hairpin, S-hairpin) within its 3′UTR. Surprisingly, we observed that the overexpression of S-hairpin derived from YAP 3′UTR (YAP-sh) increased the luciferase reporter activities of transcriptional factor NF-κB and AP-1 in 293T cells. Moreover, we identified that a fragment from YAP-sh, an esiRNA, was able to target mRNA 3′UTR of NF2 (a member of Hippo-signaling pathway) and YAP mRNA 3′UTR itself in hepatoma cells. Thus, we conclude that the YAP-sh within YAP mRNA 3′UTR may serve as a novel regulatory element, which functions in regulation at post-transcription level. Our finding provides new insights into the mechanism of mRNAs in regulatory function. - Highlights: • An S-hairpin within YAP mRNA 3′UTR possesses regulatory function. • YAP-sh acts as a regulatory element for YAP at post-transcription level. • YAP-sh-3p20, an esiRNA derived from YAP-sh, targets mRNAs of YAP and NF2. • YAP-sh-3p20 depresses the proliferation of HepG2 cells in vitro.

  19. An optimized lentiviral vector system for conditional RNAi and efficient cloning of microRNA embedded short hairpin RNA libraries.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Adams, Felix F; Heckl, Dirk; Hoffmann, Thomas; Talbot, Steven R; Kloos, Arnold; Thol, Felicitas; Heuser, Michael; Zuber, Johannes; Schambach, Axel; Schwarzer, Adrian

    2017-09-01

    RNA interference (RNAi) and CRISPR-Cas9-based screening systems have emerged as powerful and complementary tools to unravel genetic dependencies through systematic gain- and loss-of-function studies. In recent years, a series of technical advances helped to enhance the performance of virally delivered RNAi. For instance, the incorporation of short hairpin RNAs (shRNAs) into endogenous microRNA contexts (shRNAmiRs) allows the use of Tet-regulated promoters for synchronous onset of gene knockdown and precise interrogation of gene dosage effects. However, remaining challenges include lack of efficient cloning strategies, inconsistent knockdown potencies and leaky expression. Here, we present a simple, one-step cloning approach for rapid and efficient cloning of miR-30 shRNAmiR libraries. We combined a human miR-30 backbone retaining native flanking sequences with an optimized all-in-one lentiviral vector system for conditional RNAi to generate a versatile toolbox characterized by higher doxycycline sensitivity, reduced leakiness and enhanced titer. Furthermore, refinement of existing shRNA design rules resulted in substantially improved prediction of powerful shRNAs. Our approach was validated by accurate quantification of the knockdown potency of over 250 single shRNAmiRs. To facilitate access and use by the scientific community, an online tool was developed for the automated design of refined shRNA-coding oligonucleotides ready for cloning into our system. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  20. Inhibition of human immunodeficiency virus type 1 by RNA interference using long-hairpin RNA

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Konstantinova, P.; de Vries, W.; Haasnoot, J.; ter Brake, O.; de Haan, P.; Berkhout, B.

    2006-01-01

    Inhibition of virus replication by means of RNA interference has been reported for several important human pathogens, including human immunodeficiency virus type 1 (HIV-1). RNA interference against these pathogens has been accomplished by introduction of virus-specific synthetic small interfering

  1. Lentivirus-delivered short hairpin RNA targeting SNAIL inhibits HepG2 cell growth.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Jing; Jiang, Gang; Liu, Shihai; Liu, Zimin; Pan, Huazheng; Yao, Ruyong; Liang, Jun

    2013-09-01

    Hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC) is the third leading cause of cancer-related mortality worldwide, and the highest incidence rates are reported in East Asia. We previously showed that SNAIL is upregulated in HCC tissues. In the present study, we aimed to investigate RNA interference-mediated targeting of SNAIL on the growth of HepG2 cells. We constructed three RNA interference plasmids targeting the SNAIL gene and selected the most efficient shRNA expression cassette. After the lentivirus (LV)-SNAIL small interfering (si)RNA vector was transfected into the HepG2 cell line, cell proliferation was measured using the MTT assay. E-cadherin mRNA and protein expression levels were examined by quantitative PCR and western blotting, respectively. We successfully constructed an LV-SNAIL siRNA lentiviral vector and demonstrated that it suppressed the expression of the SNAIL gene in HepG2 cells. RNA interference of SNAIL by the LV-SNAIL siRNA construct significantly inhibited the growth of HepG2 cells, in addition to significantly increasing E-cadherin mRNA and protein expression. Our findings strongly suggest that SNAIL and E-cadherin play a significant role in HCC progression, and exhibit a negative correlation. Furthermore, the expression of E-cadherin may be responsible for the reduced proliferation and survival of HepG2 cells. Thus, the SNAIL signaling pathway may provide a novel therapeutic target for the treatment of HCC.

  2. Analysis of the A-U rich hairpin from the intergenic region of tospovirus S RNA as target and inducer of RNA silencing.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marcio Hedil

    Full Text Available Earlier work indicated that Tomato spotted wilt virus (TSWV messenger transcripts, and not the (antigenomic RNAs, are targeted by the RNA silencing machinery. Here, the predicted AU-rich hairpin (HP structure encoded by the intergenic region (IGR of the TSWV S RNA, and present at the 3' end of viral mRNAs, was analyzed as a target and inducer for RNA silencing. Virus-derived siRNAs (vsiRNAs purified from virus infected plants were found to derive from all three genomic RNA segments but predominantly the ambisense M and S RNAs. Further profiling on the S RNA sequence revealed that vsiRNAs were found from almost the entire S RNA sequence, except the IGR from where hardly any vsiRNAs were found. Similar profiles were observed with the distantly related Tomato yellow ring tospovirus (TYRV. Dicer cleavage assays using Drosophila melanogaster (Dm embryo extracts showed that synthetic transcripts of the IGR-HP region were recognized as substrate for Dicer. Transient agroinfiltration assays of a GFP-sensor construct containing the IGR-HP sequence at its 3' UTR (GFP-HP did not show more rapid/strong silencing and profiling of the corresponding siRNAs, generated outside the context of a viral infection, still revealed relatively low levels of IGR-HP-derived siRNAs. These data support the idea that the IGR-HP is a weak inducer of RNA silencing and only plays a minor role in the amplification of a strong antiviral RNAi response.

  3. [Down-regulation of human intercellular adhesion molecule-1 expression in MCF-7 cells infected by lentiviral short hairpin RNA interference vectors].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Di, Dalin; Chen, Lei; Wang, Lina; Wang, Chengdong; Ju, Jiyu

    2015-08-01

    To construct lentiviral interference vectors of human intercellular adhesion molecule-1 (ICAM-1), then infect human breast cancer MCF-7 cells and identify the interference effects. Three short hairpin RNA (shRNA) interference sequences targeting human ICAM-1 gene (ICAM-1 shRNA1, ICAM-1 shRNA2 and ICAM-1 shRNA3) and a negative control sequence (NS) were designed, synthesized and cloned into the pLKO.1-SP6-PGK-GFP vector. After DNA sequencing, three plasmid-based lentiviral packaging system (vector plasmid-psPAX2-pMD2.G) was used to transfect HEK293T cells to package lentiviruses. The supernatants containing viruses were harvested to detect the viral titer. Human MCF-7 breast cancer cells were infected with the lentiviruses and the interference efficiency was detected by real-time quantitative PCR (qRT-PCR) and Western blotting. PCR showed that the designed sequences were successfully inserted into the pLKO.1-SP6-PGK-GFP vector and DNA sequencing results were correct. The qRT-PCR and Western blotting showed that the mRNA and protein expression levels of ICAM-1 in the infected MCF-7 cells decreased significantly in the ICAM-1 shRNA3 group. Lentiviral interference vectors of human ICAM-1 were constructed successfully and the expression of ICAM-1 in MCF-7 cells was down-regulated by ICAM-1 shRNA.

  4. [Targeting hTERT gene influenced the viability on hMSCs by small hairpin RNA].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cheng, Jie; Tao, Ze-Zhang; Xiao, Bo-Kui; Duan, Hong-Gang; Chen, Shi-ming

    2006-09-01

    To observe the effect of shRNA by targeting human telomerase reverse transcriptase (hTERT) mRNA in the human mesenchymal stem cells (hMSCs) lines and explore the safety of RNAi by targeting hTERT mRNA in clinical application. According to the strategy of RNAi, which determined the specific base sequences to design shRNA plasmid. Plasmid shRNA1 involved in fluorescein gene and homologous to hTERT were designed. control shRNA2-a random sequences heterogeneous to mankind's gene were also constructed. METAFECTENE was used as the transfection reagent. The experiment was divided into 4 groups: A (shRNA1), B (shRNA2), C (metafectene) and D (normal culture medium ). At 24h, fluorescence expression was detected by confocal microscopy after administration of plasmid. At 24h, 48h and 72h cells viability were determined using the MTT assay. At 48h, the morphological change were examined by HE stain. At 48h, hTERT mRNA were detected by reverse transcription polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR) and the telomerase activity of hMSCs were examined by PCR ELISA. Many cells gave out green fluorescent after treated by shRNA1 and shRNA2. It was observed that the viability of hMSCs hadn't change after treatment with different methods within 72h (P > 0.05). Cells, morphology and density had not change after treated by different factor. All cells didn't express hTERT mRNA and the telomere activity of hMSCs was negative. The results suggest that shRNA plasmid directed against hTERT can not influence the viability on hMSCs. The treatment with RNA interference may be a safety strategy for gene therapy in vivo.

  5. Double-loop hairpin probe and doxorubicin-loaded gold nanoparticles for the ultrasensitive electrochemical sensing of microRNA.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tao, Yiyi; Yin, Dan; Jin, Mingchao; Fang, Jie; Dai, Tao; Li, Yi; Li, Yuxia; Pu, Qinli; Xie, Guoming

    2017-10-15

    An electrochemical microRNA (miRNA) analysis platform by combining double-loop hairpin probe (DHP) and doxorubicin-loaded gold nanoparticles (AuNPs@Dox) for ultrasensitive miRNA detection is proposed. Firstly, we here report a DHP that is simultaneously engineered to incorporate a miRNA recognition sequence, an output segment and output's complementary fragment. The important aspect of this hairpin probe is that it would not be degraded by duplex specific nuclease (DSN) and circumvents elaborately chemical modification disadvantages encountered by classic molecular beacon. For the DHP-based DSN signal amplification system, DHP hybridizes with target miRNA to form DNA-miRNA heteroduplexes, and the DSN can hydrolyze the DNA in the heteroduplexes structure selectively, while released target miRNA strand can initiate another cycle resulting in a significant signal amplification and the accumulated output segments could be responsible for strand displacement on the electrode directly. Furthermore, a great deal of doxorubicin (Dox) are loaded on the gold nanoparticles (AuNPs) to fabricate the AuNPs@Dox biocomposites that could magnify the electrochemical signal and enable the ultrasensitive analysis of miRNA. As a result, the miRNA was capable of being detected in a limit of 0.17pM and other kinds of miRNA were discriminated facilely by this method. The described DHP as a toolbox and the nano-biocomposites as a novel signal material would not only promote the design of electrochemical biosensors but also open a good way to promote the establishment of test method in malignant tumors. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  6. Lentivirus-mediated short hairpin RNA interference targeting TNF-alpha in macrophages inhibits particle-induced inflammation and osteolysis in vitro and in vivo.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Qin, Chu-Qiang; Huang, Dong-Sheng; Zhang, Chi; Song, Bin; Huang, Jian-Bin; Ding, Yue

    2016-10-18

    Aseptic loosening is a significant impediment to joint implant longevity. Prosthetic wear particles are postulated to play a central role in the onset and progression of periprosthetic osteolysis, leading to aseptic loosening of the prosthesis. We investigated the inhibitory effects of a lentivirus-mediated short hairpin RNA that targets the TNF-alpha gene on the particle-induced inflammatory and osteolytic changes via macrophages both in vitro and in vivo. An siRNA sequence targeting the mouse TNF-alpha gene from four candidates, transcribed in vitro, was screened and identified. A lentivirus vector expressing short hairpin RNA (shRNA) was then constructed in order to facilitate efficient expression of TNF-alpha-siRNA. Lentivirus-mediated shRNA was transduced into cells of the mouse macrophage line RAW 264.7. Ceramic and titanium particles were introduced 24 h after lentivirus transduction to stimulate cells. TNF-alpha expression, represented by both mRNA and protein levels, was quantified with real-time PCR and ELISA at all time intervals. Lentivirus-mediated shRNA suspension was locally administered into the murine calvarial model, followed by local injection of particles. A multi-slice spiral CT scan was used to evaluate the osteolysis of the calvaria by detecting the width of the cranial sutures. Macrophages developed pseudopods when co-cultured with particles. Lentivirus-mediated shRNA was shown to effectively inhibit the expression of TNF-alpha at both the mRNA and protein levels in RAW 264.7. The multi-slice spiral CT scan showed that the lentivirus-mediated shRNA significantly suppressed osteolysis of mouse calvaria. Our investigation highlighted the results that lentivirus-mediated shRNA targeting the TNF-alpha gene successfully inhibited particle-induced inflammatory and osteolytic changes both in vitro and in vivo. Therefore, lentivirus-mediated gene therapy may provide a novel therapeutic approach to aseptic joint loosening.

  7. Virus-derived transgenes expressing hairpin RNA give immunity to Tobacco mosaic virus and Cucumber mosaic virus

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Liu Yong

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background An effective method for obtaining resistant transgenic plants is to induce RNA silencing by expressing virus-derived dsRNA in plants and this method has been successfully implemented for the generation of different plant lines resistant to many plant viruses. Results Inverted repeats of the partial Tobacco mosaic virus (TMV movement protein (MP gene and the partial Cucumber mosaic virus (CMV replication protein (Rep gene were introduced into the plant expression vector and the recombinant plasmids were transformed into Agrobacterium tumefaciens. Agrobacterium-mediated transformation was carried out and three transgenic tobacco lines (MP16-17-3, MP16-17-29 and MP16-17-58 immune to TMV infection and three transgenic tobacco lines (Rep15-1-1, Rep15-1-7 and Rep15-1-32 immune to CMV infection were obtained. Virus inoculation assays showed that the resistance of these transgenic plants could inherit and keep stable in T4 progeny. The low temperature (15℃ did not influence the resistance of transgenic plants. There was no significant correlation between the resistance and the copy number of the transgene. CMV infection could not break the resistance to TMV in the transgenic tobacco plants expressing TMV hairpin MP RNA. Conclusions We have demonstrated that transgenic tobacco plants expressed partial TMV movement gene and partial CMV replicase gene in the form of an intermolecular intron-hairpin RNA exhibited complete resistance to TMV or CMV infection.

  8. Thermodynamic matchers for the construction of the cuckoo RNA family.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reinkensmeier, Jan; Giegerich, Robert

    2015-01-01

    RNA family models describe classes of functionally related, non-coding RNAs based on sequence and structure conservation. The most important method for modeling RNA families is the use of covariance models, which are stochastic models that serve in the discovery of yet unknown, homologous RNAs. However, the performance of covariance models in finding remote homologs is poor for RNA families with high sequence conservation, while for families with high structure but low sequence conservation, these models are difficult to built in the first place. A complementary approach to RNA family modeling involves the use of thermodynamic matchers. Thermodynamic matchers are RNA folding programs, based on the established thermodynamic model, but tailored to a specific structural motif. As thermodynamic matchers focus on structure and folding energy, they unfold their potential in discovering homologs, when high structure conservation is paired with low sequence conservation. In contrast to covariance models, construction of thermodynamic matchers does not require an input alignment, but requires human design decisions and experimentation, and hence, model construction is more laborious. Here we report a case study on an RNA family that was constructed by means of thermodynamic matchers. It starts from a set of known but structurally different members of the same RNA family. The consensus secondary structure of this family consists of 2 to 4 adjacent hairpins. Each hairpin loop carries the same motif, CCUCCUCCC, while the stems show high variability in their nucleotide content. The present study describes (1) a novel approach for the integration of the structurally varying family into a single RNA family model by means of the thermodynamic matcher methodology, and (2) provides the results of homology searches that were conducted with this model in a wide spectrum of bacterial species.

  9. Design and cloning strategies for constructing shRNA expression vectors

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    McIntyre Glen J

    2006-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Short hairpin RNA (shRNA encoded within an expression vector has proven an effective means of harnessing the RNA interference (RNAi pathway in mammalian cells. A survey of the literature revealed that shRNA vector construction can be hindered by high mutation rates and the ensuing sequencing is often problematic. Current options for constructing shRNA vectors include the use of annealed complementary oligonucleotides (74 % of surveyed studies, a PCR approach using hairpin containing primers (22 % and primer extension of hairpin templates (4 %. Results We considered primer extension the most attractive method in terms of cost. However, in initial experiments we encountered a mutation frequency of 50 % compared to a reported 20 – 40 % for other strategies. By modifying the technique to be an isothermal reaction using the DNA polymerase Phi29, we reduced the error rate to 10 %, making primer extension the most efficient and cost-effective approach tested. We also found that inclusion of a restriction site in the loop could be exploited for confirming construct integrity by automated sequencing, while maintaining intended gene suppression. Conclusion In this study we detail simple improvements for constructing and sequencing shRNA that overcome current limitations. We also compare the advantages of our solutions against proposed alternatives. Our technical modifications will be of tangible benefit to researchers looking for a more efficient and reliable shRNA construction process.

  10. Neutrophils are Essential in Short Hairpin RNA of Indoleamine 2,3- Dioxygenase Mediated-antitumor Efficiency

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kuan-Ting Liu

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Indoleamine 2,3-dioxygenase (IDO is a rate limiting enzyme in tryptophan-degrading pathways and IDO activity results in immune suppression. Targeting IDO is a strategy of cancer immunotherapies. Our previous studies demonstrate that delivery of short hairpin against IDO (IDO shRNA suppresses tumor growth and increases neutrophils infiltration into tumor. Neutrophils reveal antitumorigenic “N1” or protumorigenic “N2” phenotype in tumor microenvironment. However, the function of IDO shRNA-induced neutrophils is not clear. The LLC1 lung cancer model was used to investigate the role of these neutrophils. Intramuscular injection of IDO shRNA or IDO inhibitor treatment delayed tumor growth and both treatments increased neutrophil infiltration in tumor. Enriched tumor-infiltrating neutrophils expressed both high level of tumor necrosis factor-α and tumor necrosis factor-β (N1 and N2 associated molecules, respectively. In addition, IDO shRNA treatment induced interferon-γ and tryptophan transfer RNA expression in splenocytes. Systematic depletion of neutrophils abolished the IDO shRNA-induced therapeutic effect but did not affect the effect of IDO inhibitor. The levels of interferon-γ and tumor necrosis factor-α were suppressed in IDO shRNA treatment splenocytes after neutrophils depletion. In conclusion, these tumor-infiltrating neutrophils show antitumorigenic phenotype in spleen after IDO shRNA treatment in a murine lung cancer model.

  11. Break in the Heat Capacity Change at 303 K for Complex Binding of Netropsin to AATT Containing Hairpin DNA Constructs

    Science.gov (United States)

    Freyer, Matthew W.; Buscaglia, Robert; Hollingsworth, Amy; Ramos, Joseph; Blynn, Meredith; Pratt, Rachael; Wilson, W. David; Lewis, Edwin A.

    2007-01-01

    Studies performed in our laboratory demonstrated the formation of two thermodynamically distinct complexes on binding of netropsin to a number of hairpin-forming DNA sequences containing AATT-binding regions. These two complexes were proposed to differ only by a bridging water molecule between the drug and the DNA in the lower affinity complex. A temperature-dependent isothermal titration calorimetry (ITC)-binding study was performed using one of these constructs (a 20-mer hairpin of sequence 5′-CGAATTCGTCTCCGAATTCG) and netropsin. This study demonstrated a break in the heat capacity change for the formation of the complex containing the bridging water molecule at ∼303 K. In the plot of the binding enthalpy change versus temperature, the slope (ΔCp) was −0.67 kcal mol−1 K−1 steeper after the break at 303 K. Because of the relatively low melting temperature of the 20-mer hairpin (341 K (68°C)), the enthalpy change for complex formation might have included some energy of refolding of the partially denatured hairpin, giving the suggestion of a larger ΔCp. Studies done on the binding of netropsin to similar constructs, a 24-mer and a 28-mer, with added GC basepairs in the hairpin stem to increase thermal stability, exhibit the same nonlinearity in ΔCp over the temperature range of from 275 to 333 K. The slopes (ΔCp) were −0.69 and −0.64 kcal mol−1 K−1 steeper after 303 K for the 24-mer and 28-mer, respectively. This observation strengthens the argument regarding the presence of a bridging water molecule in the lower affinity netropsin/DNA complex. The ΔCp data seem to infer that because the break in the heat capacity change function for the lower affinity binding occurs at the isoequilibrium temperature for water, water may be included or trapped in the complex. The fact that this break does not occur in the heat capacity change function for formation of the higher affinity complex can similarly be taken as evidence that water is not included in

  12. Differential RNAi responses of Nicotiana benthamiana individuals transformed with a hairpin-inducing construct during Plum pox virus challenge.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Montes, Christian; Castro, Álvaro; Barba, Paola; Rubio, Julia; Sánchez, Evelyn; Carvajal, Denisse; Aguirre, Carlos; Tapia, Eduardo; DelÍ Orto, Paola; Decroocq, Veronique; Prieto, Humberto

    2014-10-01

    Gene silencing and large-scale small RNA analysis can be used to develop RNA interference (RNAi)-based resistance strategies for Plum pox virus (PPV), a high impact disease of Prunus spp. In this study, a pPPViRNA hairpin-inducing vector harboring two silencing motif-rich regions of the PPV coat protein (CP) gene was evaluated in transgenic Nicotiana benthamiana (NB) plants. Wild-type NB plants infected with a chimeric PPV virus (PPV::GFP) exhibited affected leaves with mosaic chlorosis congruent to GFP fluorescence at 21 day post-inoculation; transgenic lines depicted a range of phenotypes from fully resistant to susceptible. ELISA values and GFP fluorescence intensities were used to select transgenic-resistant (TG-R) and transgenic-susceptible (TG-S) lines for further characterization of small interfering RNAs (siRNAs) by large-scale small RNA sequencing. In infected TG-S and untransformed (WT) plants, the observed siRNAs were nearly exclusively 21- and 22-nt siRNAs that targeted the whole PPV::GFP genome; 24-nt siRNAs were absent in these individuals. Challenged TG-R plants accumulated a full set of 21- to 24-nt siRNAs that were primarily associated with the selected motif-rich regions, indicating that a trans-acting siRNAs process prevented viral multiplication. BLAST analysis identified 13 common siRNA clusters targeting the CP gene. 21-nt siRNA sequences were associated with the 22-nt siRNAs and the scarce 23- and 24-nt molecules in TG-S plants and with most of the observed 22-, 23-, and 24-nt siRNAs in TG-R individuals. These results validate the use of a multi-hot spot silencing vector against PPV and elucidate the molecules by which hairpin-inducing vectors initiate RNAi in vivo.

  13. A Conserved Target Site in HIV-1 Gag RNA is Accessible to Inhibition by Both an HDV Ribozyme and a Short Hairpin RNA

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Robert J Scarborough

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Antisense-based molecules targeting HIV-1 RNA have the potential to be used as part of gene or drug therapy to treat HIV-1 infection. In this study, HIV-1 RNA was screened to identify more conserved and accessible target sites for ribozymes based on the hepatitis delta virus motif. Using a quantitative screen for effects on HIV-1 production, we identified a ribozyme targeting a highly conserved site in the Gag coding sequence with improved inhibitory potential compared to our previously described candidates targeting the overlapping Tat/Rev coding sequence. We also demonstrate that this target site is highly accessible to short hairpin directed RNA interference, suggesting that it may be available for the binding of antisense RNAs with different modes of action. We provide evidence that this target site is structurally conserved in diverse viral strains and that it is sufficiently different from the human transcriptome to limit off-target effects from antisense therapies. We also show that the modified hepatitis delta virus ribozyme is more sensitive to a mismatch in its target site compared to the short hairpin RNA. Overall, our results validate the potential of a new target site in HIV-1 RNA to be used for the development of antisense therapies.

  14. Short hairpin RNA-mediated inhibition of HSV-1 gene expression and function during HSV-1 infection in Vero cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Yuan-yuan; Deng, Hai-ying; Yang, Guang; Jiang, Wen-lin; Grossin, Laurent; Yang, Zhan-qiu

    2008-08-01

    To evaluate the efficiency of 3 short hairpin RNA (shRNA) interfering with the herpes simplex virus type 1 (HSV-1) gene coding glycoprotein D (gD) for inhibiting the gD expression and virus replication in vitro. Vero cells were selected for an in vitro model of infection. Three shRNA sequences (shRNAgD1, -gD2, and -gD3) targeting specifically the gD gene of HSV-1 were selected for evaluating the antiviral effects. The antiviral effects of shRNA in the cells infected with HSV-1 were evaluated by cytopathic effect (CPE) observations and plaque assays. The transcription level of viral RNA and the gD expression were studied by RT-PCR, Western blotting, and flow cytometry. With the 3 shRNA at a final concentration of 120 nmol/L, a significant inhibition of CPE in the HSV-1-infected cells was observed. The ED50 of shRNA-gD1, gD2, and gD3 were 48.74+/-2.57, 57.13+/-3.24, and 114.64+/-5.12 nmol/L, respectively. The gD gene decreased significantly after viral infection in the Vero cells pretreated with shRNA compared to the virus group. The expressions of the gD protein, determined by Western blotting and flow cytometry, were also drastically decreased in shRNA-transfected cells. Exogenous shRNA molecules can suppress the HSV-1 gD expression. They are inhibitors of HSV replication during infection in Vero cells.

  15. Host-induced post-transcriptional hairpin RNA-mediated gene silencing of vital fungal genes confers efficient resistance against Fusarium wilt in banana.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ghag, Siddhesh B; Shekhawat, Upendra K S; Ganapathi, Thumballi R

    2014-06-01

    Fusarium wilt, caused by Fusarium oxysporum f. sp. cubense (Foc), is among the most destructive diseases of banana (Musa spp.). Because no credible control measures are available, development of resistant cultivars through genetic engineering is the only option. We investigated whether intron hairpin RNA (ihpRNA)-mediated expression of small interfering RNAs (siRNAs) targeted against vital fungal genes (velvet and Fusarium transcription factor 1) in transgenic banana could achieve effective resistance against Foc. Partial sequences of these two genes were assembled as ihpRNAs in suitable binary vectors (ihpRNA-VEL and ihpRNA-FTF1) and transformed into embryogenic cell suspensions of banana cv. Rasthali by Agrobacterium-mediated genetic transformation. Eleven transformed lines derived from ihpRNA-VEL and twelve lines derived from ihpRNA-FTF1 were found to be free of external and internal symptoms of Foc after 6-week-long greenhouse bioassays. The five selected transgenic lines for each construct continued to resist Foc at 8 months postinoculation. Presence of specific siRNAs derived from the two ihpRNAs in transgenic banana plants was confirmed by Northern blotting and Illumina sequencing of small RNAs derived from the transgenic banana plants. The present study represents an important effort in proving that host-induced post-transcriptional ihpRNA-mediated gene silencing of vital fungal genes can confer efficient resistance against debilitating pathogens in crop plants. © 2014 Society for Experimental Biology, Association of Applied Biologists and John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  16. Hairpin DNA probe with 5'-TCC/CCC-3' overhangs for the creation of silver nanoclusters and miRNA assay.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xia, Xiaodong; Hao, Yuanqiang; Hu, Shengqiang; Wang, Jianxiu

    2014-01-15

    A facile strategy for the assay of target miRNA using fluorescent silver nanoclusters (AgNCs) has been described. Due to the preferable interaction between cytosine residues and Ag(+), a short cytosine-rich oligonucleotide (ODN) with only six bases 5'-TCCCCC-3' served as an efficient scaffold for the creation of the AgNCs. The AgNCs displayed a bright red emission when excited at 545nm. Such ODN base-stabilized AgNCs have been exploited for miRNA sensing. Overhangs of TCC at the 5' end (5'-TCC) and CCC at the 3' end (CCC-3') (denoted as 5'-TCC/CCC-3') appended to the hairpin ODN probe which also contains recognition sequences for target miRNA were included. Interestingly, the AgNCs/hairpin ODN probe showed similar spectral properties as that templated by 5'-TCCCCC-3'. The formation of the hairpin ODN probe/miRNA duplex separated the 5'-TCC/CCC-3' overhangs, thus disturbing the optical property or structure of the AgNCs. As a result, fluorescence quenching of the AgNCs/hairpin ODN probe was obtained, which allows for facile determination of target miRNA. The proposed method is simple and cost-effective, holding great promise for clinical applications. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  17. Expression of self-complementary hairpin RNA under the control of the rolC promoter confers systemic disease resistance to plum pox virus without preventing local infection

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Spena Angelo

    2003-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Homology-dependent selective degradation of RNA, or post-transcriptional gene silencing (PTGS, is involved in several biological phenomena, including adaptative defense mechanisms against plant viruses. Small interfering RNAs mediate the selective degradation of target RNA by guiding a multicomponent RNAse. Expression of self-complementary hairpin RNAs within two complementary regions separated by an intron elicits PTGS with high efficiency. Plum pox virus (PPV is the etiological agent of sharka disease in Drupaceae, although it can also be transmitted to herbaceous species (e.g. Nicotiana benthamiana. Once inside the plant, PPV is transmitted via plasmodesmata from cell to cell, and at longer distances, via phloem. The rolC promoter drives expression in phloem cells. RolC expression is absent in both epidermal and mesophyll cells. The aim of the present study was to confer systemic disease resistance without preventing local viral infection. Results In the ihprolC-PP197 gene (intron hair pin rolC PPV 197, a 197 bp sequence homologous to the PPV RNA genome (from base 134 to 330 was placed as two inverted repeats separated by the DNA sequence of the rolA intron. This hairpin construct is under the control of the rolC promoter.N. benthamiana plants transgenic for the ihprolC-PP197 gene contain siRNAs homologous to the 197 bp sequence. The transgenic progeny of ihprolC-PP197 plants are resistant to PPV systemic infection. Local infection is unaffected. Most (80% transgenic plants are virus free and symptomless. Some plants (20% contain virus in uninoculated apical leaves; however they show only mild symptoms of leaf mottling. PPV systemic resistance cosegregates with the ihprolC-PP197 transgene and was observed in progeny plants of all independent transgenic lines analyzed. SiRNAs of 23–25 nt homologous to the PPV sequence used in the ihprolC-PP197 construct were detected in transgenic plants before and after inoculation

  18. Hairpin RNA-mediated silencing of Plum pox virus P1 and HC-Pro genes for efficient and predictable resistance to the virus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Di Nicola-Negri, Elisa; Brunetti, Angela; Tavazza, Mario; Ilardi, Vincenza

    2005-12-01

    We report the application of the hairpin-mediated RNA silencing technology for obtaining resistance to Plum pox virus (PPV) infection in Nicotiana benthamiana plants. Four sequences, covering the P1 and silencing suppressor HC-Pro genes of an Italian PPV M isolate, were introduced into N. benthamiana plants as two inverted repeats separated by an intron sequence under the transcriptional control of the Cauliflower Mosaic Virus 35S promoter. In a leaf disk infection assay, 38 out of 40 T0 transgenic plants were resistant to PPV infection. Eight lines, 2 for each construct, randomly selected among the 38 resistant plants were further analysed. Two hundred forty eight out of 253 T1 transgenic plants were resistant to local and systemic PPV infection. All transgenic single locus lines were completely resistant. These data indicate that the RNA silencing of PPV P1/HCPro sequences results in an efficient and predictable PPV resistance, which may be utilized in obtaining stone fruit plants resistant to the devastating Sharka disease.

  19. Hairpin DNA-Templated Silver Nanoclusters as Novel Beacons in Strand Displacement Amplification for MicroRNA Detection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Jingpu; Li, Chao; Zhi, Xiao; Ramón, Gabriel Alfranca; Liu, Yanlei; Zhang, Chunlei; Pan, Fei; Cui, Daxiang

    2016-01-19

    MicroRNA (miRNA) biomarkers display great potential for cancer diagnosis and prognosis. The development of rapid and specific methods for miRNA detection has become a hotspot. Herein, hairpin DNA-templated silver nanoclusters (AgNCs/HpDNA) were prepared and integrated into strand-displacement amplification (SDA) as a novel beacon for miRNA detection. The light-up platform was established based on guanine (G)-rich fluorescence enhancement that essentially converted the excitation/emission pair of AgNCs/HpDNAs from a shorter wavelength to a longer wavelength, and then achieved fluorescent enhancement at longer wavelength. On the basis of the validation of the method, the single and duplex detection were conducted in two plasma biomarkers (miR-16-5p and miR-19b-3p) for the diagnosis of gastric cancer. The probe (AgNCs/RED 16(7s)C) utilized for miR-16-5p detection adopted a better conformation with high specificity to recognize single-base mismatches by producing dramatically opposite signals (increase or decrease at 580 nm ex/640 nm em) while the probe (AgNCs/GRE 19b(5s)C) for miR-19b-3p generated dual signals (increase at 490 nm ex/570 nm em and decrease at 430 nm ex/530 nm em) with bright fluorescence in one reaction during the amplification, but unexpectedly was partially digested. This is for the first time to allow the generation of enhanced fluorescent AgNCs and the target recognition integrated into a single process, which offers great opportunity for specific miRNA detection in an easy and rapid way.

  20. Efficient inhibition of intraperitoneal ovarian cancer growth in nude mice by liposomal delivery of short hairpin RNA against STAT3.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jiang, Qingyuan; Dai, Lei; Cheng, Lin; Chen, Xiaolei; Li, Yiming; Zhang, Shuang; Su, Xiaolan; Zhao, Xia; Wei, Yuquan; Deng, Hongxin

    2013-03-01

    Signal transducer and activator of transcription 3 (STAT3) plays an important role in the tumor formation, prognosis and chemoresistance of ovarian cancer. Our goal was to investigate the effect of silencing STAT3 on ovarian cancer cell apoptosis, proliferation, angiogenesis and expression of key targets in vitro and in vivo. The ovarian cancer cell lines A2780CP and A2780s were used. STAT3 was knocked down by the plasmid-based short hairpin RNA (shRNA) expression system. In vitro, a colony formation assay and Hoechst staining were used to examine cell proliferation and apoptosis. The expression level of STAT3 and apoptosis-related proteins were determined by Western blot. The A2780CP intraperitoneal model was used to evaluate the effect of shSTAT3 on tumor growth in mice. Proliferation, apoptosis, and angiogenesis in tumor tissues were measured by proliferating cell nuclear antigen, TUNEL and CD31 immunostaining, respectively. Treatment with shSTAT3 resulted in apoptosis and inhibition of cell proliferation in vitro. Western blot analysis demonstrated that shSTAT3 induced the expression of cleaved caspase-3 and reduced the expression of survivin, Bcl-2 and vascular endothelial growth factor. In vivo, the tumor weight was reduced to 13.46% of 5% glucose by shSTAT3/lipoplexes (P ovarian cancer gene therapy and the combination of gene therapy with chemotherapy. © 2012 The Authors. Journal of Obstetrics and Gynaecology Research © 2012 Japan Society of Obstetrics and Gynecology.

  1. Downregulation of human epidermal growth factor receptor 2 by short hairpin RNA increases chemosensitivity of human ovarian cancer cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ma, Li Shan; Yan, Q I; Huang, Yongfang; Zhao, Wenxia; Zhu, Y U

    2015-05-01

    The aim of the current study was to investigate the suppressive effects of pSilencer T7-human epidermal growth factor receptor 2 (HER2)-short hairpin RNA (shRNA) recombinant plasmids on human SKOV3 ovarian cancer cell growth and sensitivity to carboplatin (CBP). Three different pairs of shRNAs (shRNAa, shRNAb and shRNAc), targeting the HER2 gene, were selected and transfected into human SKOV3 cells, respectively. The expression levels of HER2 were then detected by immunohistochemical (IHC), semi-quantitative reverse transcription-polymerase chain reaction and western blot analyses. In addition, cell cycle and cell growth were investigated using cell counting kit-8 (CCK-8). The results of the IHC and western blot analyses revealed that shRNAb significantly inhibited HER2 protein expression in SKOV3 cells. shRNAb exhibited an improved effect on HER2 expression compared with shRNAa (Povarian cancer cells in vitro and induced chemotherapeutic sensitivity to CBP.

  2. Enhanced Oncolytic Activities of the Telomerase-Specific Replication-Competent Adenovirus Expressing Short-Hairpin RNA against Dicer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Machitani, Mitsuhiro; Sakurai, Fuminori; Wakabayashi, Keisaku; Tachibana, Masashi; Fujiwara, Toshiyoshi; Mizuguchi, Hiroyuki

    2017-01-01

    Oncolytic viruses have been receiving much attention as potential agents for cancer treatment. Among the various types of oncolytic viruses, the telomerase-specific replication-competent adenovirus (TRAD), which carries the tumor-specific promoter-driven E1 gene expression cassette, exhibits efficient antitumor effects. The development of a novel TRAD that shows higher replication efficiency and antitumor activity would be highly beneficial for safer and more efficient cancer therapy. We recently demonstrated that the endoribonuclease Dicer significantly inhibits the replication of wild-type adenovirus (Ad) via the processing of viral-associated (VA)-RNAs, which are Ad-encoded small noncoding RNAs, and that the knockdown of Dicer leads to enhanced VA-RNA expression and Ad replication after infection with wild-type Ad. Based on these findings, we herein developed a novel TRAD expressing short-hairpin RNA against Dicer (shDicer; TRAD-shDicer). After infection, TRAD-shDicer efficiently induced the knockdown of Dicer. TRAD-shDicer showed significantly higher replication efficiency and tumor cell lysis activity compared with the conventional TRAD in tumor cells. The Dicer expression levels and viabilities of normal cells were not altered by infection with TRAD-shDicer. These results indicate that TRAD-shDicer is a potent antitumor reagent by virtue of its enhanced oncolytic activity. Mol Cancer Ther; 16(1); 251-9. ©2016 AACR. ©2016 American Association for Cancer Research.

  3. Determination of low-energy structures of a small RNA hairpin using ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    2012-06-25

    Jun 25, 2012 ... In this method, the history of the simulation is used to increase the probability of states less visited in the ... structure of RNA has a long history due to the pioneering works of Zucker and Nussinov, among .... of the MC scheme to generate a proper statistical mechanical ensemble. However, here we have ...

  4. Determination of low-energy structures of a small RNA hairpin using ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    The energy landscape of RNA is known to be extremely rugged, and hence finding low-energy structures starting from a random structure is a challenging task for any optimization algorithm. In the current work, we have investigated the ability of one Monte Carlo–based optimization algorithm, Temperature Basin Paving, ...

  5. Exploring the effects of temperature and pressure on the structure and stability of a small RNA hairpin.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schuabb, Caroline; Pataraia, Salome; Berghaus, Melanie; Winter, Roland

    2017-12-01

    RNAs perform multiple vital roles within cells, including catalyzing biological reactions and expression of proteins. Small RNA hairpins (sRNAh) are the smallest functional entities of nucleic acids and are involved in various important biological functions such as ligand binding and tertiary folding initiation of proteins. We investigated the conformational and free energy landscape of the sRNAh gcUUCGgc over a wide range of temperatures and pressures using fluorescence resonance energy transfer, Fourier-transform infrared and UV/Vis spectroscopy as well as small-angle X-ray scattering on the unlabeled and/or fluorescently labeled sRNAh. The sRNAh shows a broad melting profile with continuous increase of unpaired conformations up to about 60°C. However, the sRNAh structure might not be fully unfolded at temperatures as high as 90°C and still comprise various partially unfolded compact conformations. Pressure up to 400MPa has a small effect on the base pairing and base stacking interactions of the sRNAh, indicating small conformational perturbations, only, which might originate from minor changes in packing and hydration of the RNA molecule upon compression. Pressurization at 70°C, i.e. at a temperature above the melting transition, has no significant effect on the conformational ensemble of the sRNAh, i.e., it does not promote formation of new native stem connections after thermal denaturation. Finally, we noticed that Cy3/Cy5 labeling of the sRNAh changes, probably via stacking interactions between the fluorescent dyes and the nucleotide rings, the stability of the sRNAh, thereby rendering FRET analysis of the conformational dynamics of such small RNA structure inappropriate. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  6. Revisiting GNRA and UNCG folds: U-turns versus Z-turns in RNA hairpin loops.

    Science.gov (United States)

    D'Ascenzo, Luigi; Leonarski, Filip; Vicens, Quentin; Auffinger, Pascal

    2017-03-01

    When thinking about RNA three-dimensional structures, coming across GNRA and UNCG tetraloops is perceived as a boon since their folds have been extensively described. Nevertheless, analyzing loop conformations within RNA and RNP structures led us to uncover several instances of GNRA and UNCG loops that do not fold as expected. We noticed that when a GNRA does not assume its "natural" fold, it adopts the one we typically associate with a UNCG sequence. The same folding interconversion may occur for loops with UNCG sequences, for instance within tRNA anticodon loops. Hence, we show that some structured tetranucleotide sequences starting with G or U can adopt either of these folds. The underlying structural basis that defines these two fold types is the mutually exclusive stacking of a backbone oxygen on either the first (in GNRA) or the last nucleobase (in UNCG), generating an oxygen-π contact. We thereby propose to refrain from using sequences to distinguish between loop conformations. Instead, we suggest using descriptors such as U-turn (for "GNRA-type" folds) and a newly described Z-turn (for "UNCG-type" folds). Because tetraloops adopt for the largest part only two (inter)convertible turns, we are better able to interpret from a structural perspective loop interchangeability occurring in ribosomes and viral RNA. In this respect, we propose a general view on the inclination for a given sequence to adopt (or not) a specific fold. We also suggest how long-noncoding RNAs may adopt discrete but transient structures, which are therefore hard to predict. © 2017 D'Ascenzo et al.; Published by Cold Spring Harbor Laboratory Press for the RNA Society.

  7. RNA editing independently occurs at three mir-376a-1 sites and may compromise the stability of the microRNA hairpin.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gallego, Alicia; Hartasánchez, Diego A; Brasó-Vives, Marina; Garcia-Ramallo, Eva; Lopez-Valenzuela, Maria; Baena, Neus; Guitart, Miriam; Fernández-Bellon, Hugo; Kondova, Ivanela; Bontrop, Ronald; Kawahara, Yukio; Espinosa-Parrilla, Yolanda

    2017-09-10

    RNA editing is being recognized as an important post-transcriptional mechanism that may have crucial roles in introducing genetic variation and phenotypic diversity. Despite microRNA editing recurrence, defining its biological relevance is still under extended debate. To better understand microRNA editing function and regulation we performed an exhaustive characterization of the A-to-I site-specific patterns in mir-376a-1, a mammalian microRNA which RNA editing is involved in the regulation of development and in disease. Thorough an integrative approach based on high-throughput small RNA sequencing, Sanger sequencing and computer simulations we explored mir-376a-1 editing in samples from various individuals and primate species including human placenta and macaque, gorilla, chimpanzee and human brain cortex. We observed that mir-376a-1 editing is a common phenomenon in the mature and primary microRNA molecules and it is more frequently detected in brain than in placenta. Primary mir-376a-1 is edited at three positions, -1, +4 and +44. Editing frequency estimations and in silico simulations indicated that editing was not equally recurrent along the three mir-376a-1 sites, nevertheless no epistatic interactions among them were observed. Particularly, the +4 site, located in the seed region of the mature miR-376a-5p, reached the highest editing frequency in all samples. Secondary structure predictions revealed that the +4 position was the one that conferred the highest stability to the mir-376a-1 hairpin. We suggest that molecular stability might partially explain the editing recurrence observed in certain microRNAs and that editing events conferring new functional regulatory roles in particular tissues and species could have been conserved along evolution, as it might be the case of mir-376a-1 in primate brain cortex. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  8. Short Hairpin RNA Silencing of PHD-2 Improves Neovascularization and Functional Outcomes in Diabetic Wounds and Ischemic Limbs.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kevin J Paik

    Full Text Available The transcription factor hypoxia-inducible factor 1-alpha (HIF-1α is responsible for the downstream expression of over 60 genes that regulate cell survival and metabolism in hypoxic conditions as well as those that enhance angiogenesis to alleviate hypoxia. However, under normoxic conditions, HIF-1α is hydroxylated by prolyl hydroxylase 2, and subsequently degraded, with a biological half-life of less than five minutes. Here we investigated the therapeutic potential of inhibiting HIF-1α degradation through short hairpin RNA silencing of PHD-2 in the setting of diabetic wounds and limb ischemia. Treatment of diabetic mouse fibroblasts with shPHD-2 in vitro resulted in decreased levels of PHD-2 transcript demonstrated by qRT-PCR, higher levels of HIF-1α as measured by western blot, and higher expression of the downstream angiogenic genes SDF-1 and VEGFα, as measured by qRT-PCR. In vivo, shPHD-2 accelerated healing of full thickness excisional wounds in diabetic mice compared to shScr control, (14.33 ± 0.45 days vs. 19 ± 0.33 days and was associated with an increased vascular density. Delivery of shPHD-2 also resulted in improved perfusion of ischemic hind limbs compared to shScr, prevention of distal digit tip necrosis, and increased survival of muscle tissue. Knockdown of PHD-2 through shRNA treatment has the potential to stimulate angiogenesis through overexpression of HIF-1α and upregulation of pro-angiogenic genes downstream of HIF-1α, and may represent a viable, non-viral approach to gene therapy for ischemia related applications.

  9. Citrus psorosis virus coat protein-derived hairpin construct confers stable transgenic resistance in citrus against psorosis A and B syndromes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    De Francesco, A; Costa, N; García, M L

    2017-04-01

    Citrus psorosis virus (CPsV) is the causal agent of psorosis, a serious and widespread citrus disease. Two syndromes of psorosis, PsA and PsB, have been described. PsB is the most aggressive and rampant form. Previously, we obtained Pineapple sweet orange plants transformed with a hairpin construct derived from the CPsV coat protein gene (ihpCP). Some of these plants were resistant to CPsV 90-1-1, a PsA isolate homologous to the transgene. In this study, we found that expression of the ihpCP transgene and siRNA production in lines ihpCP-10 and -15 were stable with time and propagation. In particular, line ihpCP-15 has been resistant for more than 2 years, even after re-inoculation. The ihpCP plants were also resistant against a heterologous CPsV isolate that causes severe PsB syndrome. Line ihpCP-15 manifested complete resistance while line ihpCP-10 was tolerant to the virus, although with variable behaviour, showing delay and attenuation in PsB symptoms. These lines are promising for a biotech product aimed at eradicating psorosis.

  10. Identification of an miRNA candidate reflects the possible significance of transcribed microsatellites in the hairpin precursors of black pepper.

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    Joy, Nisha; Soniya, Eppurathu Vasudevan

    2012-06-01

    Plant miRNAs (18-24nt) are generated by the RNase III-type Dicer endonuclease from the endogenous hairpin precursors ('pre-miRNAs') with significant regulatory functions. The transcribed regions display a higher frequency of microsatellites, when compared to other regions of the genomic DNA. Simple sequence repeats (SSRs) resulting from replication slippage occurring in transcripts affect the expression of genes. The available experimental evidence for the incidence of SSRs in the miRNA precursors is limited. Considering the potential significance of SSRs in the miRNA genes, we carried out a preliminary analysis to verify the presence of SSRs in the pri-miRNAs of black pepper (Piper nigrum L.). We isolated a (CT) dinucleotide SSR bearing transcript using SMART strategy. The transcript was predicted to be a 'pri-miRNA candidate' with Dicer sites based on miRNA prediction tools and MFOLD structural predictions. The presence of this 'miRNA candidate' was confirmed by real-time TaqMan assays. The upstream sequence of the 'miRNA candidate' by genome walking when subjected to PlantCARE showed the presence of certain promoter elements, and the deduced amino acid showed significant similarity with NAP1 gene, which affects the transcription of many genes. Moreover the hairpin-like precursor overlapped the neighbouring NAP1 gene. In silico analysis revealed distinct putative functions for the 'miRNA candidate', of which majority were related to growth. Hence, we assume that this 'miRNA candidate' may get activated during transcription of NAP gene, thereby regulating the expression of many genes involved in developmental processes.

  11. Highly-sensitive microRNA detection based on bio-bar-code assay and catalytic hairpin assembly two-stage amplification.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tang, Songsong; Gu, Yuan; Lu, Huiting; Dong, Haifeng; Zhang, Kai; Dai, Wenhao; Meng, Xiangdan; Yang, Fan; Zhang, Xueji

    2018-04-03

    Herein, a highly-sensitive microRNA (miRNA) detection strategy was developed by combining bio-bar-code assay (BBA) with catalytic hairpin assembly (CHA). In the proposed system, two nanoprobes of magnetic nanoparticles functionalized with DNA probes (MNPs-DNA) and gold nanoparticles with numerous barcode DNA (AuNPs-DNA) were designed. In the presence of target miRNA, the MNP-DNA and AuNP-DNA hybridized with target miRNA to form a "sandwich" structure. After "sandwich" structures were separated from the solution by the magnetic field and dehybridized by high temperature, the barcode DNA sequences were released by dissolving AuNPs. The released barcode DNA sequences triggered the toehold strand displacement assembly of two hairpin probes, leading to recycle of barcode DNA sequences and producing numerous fluorescent CHA products for miRNA detection. Under the optimal experimental conditions, the proposed two-stage amplification system could sensitively detect target miRNA ranging from 10 pM to 10 aM with a limit of detection (LOD) down to 97.9 zM. It displayed good capability to discriminate single base and three bases mismatch due to the unique sandwich structure. Notably, it presented good feasibility for selective multiplexed detection of various combinations of synthetic miRNA sequences and miRNAs extracted from different cell lysates, which were in agreement with the traditional polymerase chain reaction analysis. The two-stage amplification strategy may be significant implication in the biological detection and clinical diagnosis. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  12. High-throughput sequencing as an effective approach in profiling small RNAs derived from a hairpin RNA expression vector in woody plants.

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    Zhao, Dongyan; Song, Guo-Qing

    2014-11-01

    Hairpin RNA (hpRNA)-mediated gene silencing has proved to be an efficient approach to develop virus-resistant transgenic plants. To characterize small RNA molecules (sRNAs) derived from an hpRNA expression vector in transgenic cherry rootstock plants, we conducted small RNA sequencing of (1) a transgenic rootstock containing an inverted repeat of the partial coat protein of Prunus necrotic ring spot virus (PNRSV-hpRNA); (2) a nontransgenic rootstock; and (3) a PNRSV-infected sweet cherry plant. Analysis of the PNRSV sRNA pools indicated that 24-nt (nucleotide) small interfering RNAs (siRNAs) were the most prevalent sRNAs in the transgenic rootstock whereas the most abundant sRNAs in the PNRSV-infected nontransgenic rootstock were 21-nt siRNAs. In addition, the 24-nt siRNAs of the PNRSV-hpRNA were more abundant on the sense strand than those on the antisense strand in the transgenic rootstock. In contrast, preference in generating PNRSV sRNAs, ranging from 19-nt to 30-nt for sense and antisense strands, was not distinct in the PNRSV-infected nontransgenic sweet cherry. Taken together, this is the first report on profiling hpRNA-derived sRNAs in woody plants using high-throughput sequencing technology, which is an efficient way to verify the presence/absence, the abundance, and the sequence features of certain sRNAs. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  13. Inhibition of cervical cancer cell growth in vitro and in vivo with lentiviral-vector delivered short hairpin RNA targeting human papillomavirus E6 and E7 oncogenes.

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    Gu, W; Putral, L; Hengst, K; Minto, K; Saunders, N A; Leggatt, G; McMillan, N A J

    2006-11-01

    In this study, we investigated the suppressive effect of a short hairpin RNA delivered by a lentiviral vector (LV-shRNA) against human papillomavirus (HPV) type 18 E6 on the expression of the oncogenes E6 and E7 in cervical cancer HeLa cells both in vitro and in vivo. The LV-shRNA effectively delivered the shRNA to HeLa cells and lead to a dose-dependent reduction of E7 protein and the stabilization of E6 target proteins, p53 and p21. Low-dose infection of HeLa cells with LV-shRNA caused reduced cell growth and the induction of senescence, whereas a high-dose infection resulted in specific cell death via apoptosis. Transplant of HeLa cells infected with a low dose of LV-shRNA into Rag-/- mice significantly reduced the tumor weight, whereas transplant of cells infected with a high dose resulted in a complete loss of tumor growth. Systemic delivery of LV-shRNA into mice with established HeLa cell lung metastases led to a significant reduction in the number of tumor nodules. Our data collectively suggest that lentiviral delivery is an effective way to achieve stable suppression of E6/E7 oncogene expression and induce inhibition of tumor growth both in vitro and in vivo. These results encourage further investigation of this form of RNA interference as a promising treatment for cervical cancer.

  14. The role of positively charged amino acids and electrostatic interactions in the complex of U1A protein and U1 hairpin II RNA.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Law, Michael J; Linde, Michael E; Chambers, Eric J; Oubridge, Chris; Katsamba, Phinikoula S; Nilsson, Lennart; Haworth, Ian S; Laird-Offringa, Ite A

    2006-01-01

    Previous kinetic investigations of the N-terminal RNA recognition motif (RRM) domain of spliceosomal protein U1A, interacting with its RNA target U1 hairpin II, provided experimental evidence for a 'lure and lock' model of binding in which electrostatic interactions first guide the RNA to the protein, and close range interactions then lock the two molecules together. To further investigate the 'lure' step, here we examined the electrostatic roles of two sets of positively charged amino acids in U1A that do not make hydrogen bonds to the RNA: Lys20, Lys22 and Lys23 close to the RNA-binding site, and Arg7, Lys60 and Arg70, located on 'top' of the RRM domain, away from the RNA. Surface plasmon resonance-based kinetic studies, supplemented with salt dependence experiments and molecular dynamics simulation, indicate that Lys20 predominantly plays a role in association, while nearby residues Lys22 and Lys23 appear to be at least as important for complex stability. In contrast, kinetic analyses of residues away from the RNA indicate that they have a minimal effect on association and stability. Thus, well-positioned positively charged residues can be important for both initial complex formation and complex maintenance, illustrating the multiple roles of electrostatic interactions in protein-RNA complexes.

  15. Efficient Gene Suppression in Dorsal Root Ganglia and Spinal Cord Using Adeno-Associated Virus Vectors Encoding Short-Hairpin RNA.

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    Enomoto, Mitsuhiro; Hirai, Takashi; Kaburagi, Hidetoshi; Yokota, Takanori

    2016-01-01

    RNA interference is a powerful tool used to induce loss-of-function phenotypes through post-transcriptional gene silencing. Small interfering RNA (siRNA) molecules have been used to target the central nervous system (CNS) and are expected to have clinical utility against refractory neurodegenerative diseases. However, siRNA is characterized by low transduction efficiency, insufficient inhibition of gene expression, and short duration of therapeutic effects, and is thus not ideal for treatment of neural tissues and diseases. To address these problems, viral delivery of short-hairpin RNA (shRNA) expression cassettes that support more efficient and long-lasting transduction into target tissues is expected to be a promising delivery tool. Various types of gene therapy vectors have been developed, such as adenovirus, adeno-associated virus (AAV), herpes simplex virus and lentivirus; however, AAV is particularly advantageous because of its relative lack of immunogenicity and lack of chromosomal integration. In human clinical trials, recombinant AAV vectors are relatively safe and well-tolerated. In particular, serotype 9 of AAV (AAV9) vectors show the highest tropism for neural tissue and can cross the blood-brain barrier, and we have shown that intrathecal delivery of AAV9 yields relatively high gene transduction into dorsal root ganglia or spinal cord. This chapter describes how to successfully use AAV vectors encoding shRNA in vivo, particularly for RNA interference in the central and peripheral nervous system.

  16. Gene silencing of NR2B-containing NMDA receptor by intrathecal injection of short hairpin RNA reduces formalin-induced nociception in C57BL/6 mouse.

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    Zhang, Rao-Xiang; Yan, Xue-Bin; Gu, Yong-Hong; Huang, Dong; Gan, Li; Han, Rui; Huang, Li-Hua

    2013-09-01

    Spinal NR2B-containing N-methyl-D-aspartate receptors (NR2B) play a critical role in the formation of central sensitization and persistent pain. Previous studies show that gene silencing of the spinal NR2B subunit by small interfering RNA (siRNA) could alleviate nociception in animals. The siRNA is a 19- to 23-nt RNA duplex, which can be synthesized in vitro or derived from short hairpin RNAs (shRNAs). In the present study, we investigated whether intrathecal injection of shRNAs targeting NR2B (GRIN2B shRNA) could affect nociception on formalin-induced pain in mice. Our results showed that intrathecal injection of GRIN2B shRNA could decrease NR2B mRNA and protein expression levels and hence effectively relieve formalin-induced nociception in mice, suggesting that intrathecal delivery of GRIN2B shRNA can be an efficient way to silence the target gene and provide new insights into the treatment of chronic pain.

  17. Identification of short hairpin RNA targeting foot-and-mouth disease virus with transgenic bovine fetal epithelium cells.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hongmei Wang

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Although it is known that RNA interference (RNAi targeting viral genes protects experimental animals, such as mice, from the challenge of Foot-and-mouth disease virus (FMDV, it has not been previously investigated whether shRNAs targeting FMDV in transgenic dairy cattle or primary transgenic bovine epithelium cells will confer resistance against FMDV challenge. PRINCIPAL FINDING: Here we constructed three recombinant lentiviral vectors containing shRNA against VP2 (RNAi-VP2, VP3 (RNAi-VP3, or VP4 (RNAi-VP4 of FMDV, and found that all of them strongly suppressed the transient expression of a FLAG-tagged viral gene fusion protein in 293T cells. In BHK-21 cells, RNAi-VP4 was found to be more potent in inhibition of viral replication than the others with over 98% inhibition of viral replication. Therefore, recombinant lentiviral vector RNAi-VP4 was transfected into bovine fetal fibroblast cells to generate transgenic nuclear donor cells. With subsequent somatic cell cloning, we generated forty transgenic blastocysts, and then transferred them to 20 synchronized recipient cows. Three transgenic bovine fetuses were obtained after pregnant period of 4 months, and integration into chromosome in cloned fetuses was confirmed by Southern hybridization. The primary tongue epithelium cells of transgenic fetuses were isolated and inoculated with 100 TCID(50 of FMDV, and it was observed that shRNA significantly suppressed viral RNA synthesis and inhibited over 91% of viral replication after inoculation of FMDV for 48 h. CONCLUSION: RNAi-VP4 targeting viral VP4 gene appears to prevent primary epithelium cells of transgenic bovine fetus from FMDV infection, and it could be a candidate shRNA used for cultivation of transgenic cattle against FMDV.

  18. Short hairpin RNA targeting 2B gene of coxsackievirus B3 exhibits potential antiviral effects both in vitro and in vivo

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    Yao Hailan

    2012-08-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Coxsackievirus B3 is an important infectious agent of viral myocarditis, pancreatitis and aseptic meningitis, but there are no specific antiviral therapeutic reagents in clinical use. RNA interference-based technology has been developed to prevent the viral infection. Methods To evaluate the impact of RNA interference on viral replication, cytopathogenicity and animal survival, short hairpin RNAs targeting the viral 2B region (shRNA-2B expressed by a recombinant vector (pGCL-2B or a recombinant lentivirus (Lenti-2B were tansfected in HeLa cells or transduced in mice infected with CVB3. Results ShRNA-2B exhibited a significant effect on inhibition of viral production in HeLa cells. Furthermore, shRNA-2B improved mouse survival rate, reduced the viral tissues titers and attenuated tissue damage compared with those of the shRNA-NC treated control group. Lenti-2B displayed more effective role in inhibition of viral replication than pGCL-2B in vivo. Conclusions Coxsackievirus B3 2B is an effective target of gene silencing against coxsackievirus B3 infection, suggesting that shRNA-2B is a potential agent for further development into a treatment for enterviral diseases.

  19. Metschnikowia Species Share a Pool of Diverse rRNA Genes Differing in Regions That Determine Hairpin-Loop Structures and Evolve by Reticulation.

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    Matthias Sipiczki

    Full Text Available Modern taxonomy of yeasts is mainly based on phylogenetic analysis of conserved DNA and protein sequences. By far the most frequently used sequences are those of the repeats of the chromosomal rDNA array. It is generally accepted that the rDNA repeats of a genome have identical sequences due to the phenomenon of sequence homogenisation and can thus be used for identification and barcoding of species. Here we show that the rDNA arrays of the type strains of Metschnikowia andauensis and M. fructicola are not homogenised. Both have arrays consisting of diverse repeats that differ from each other in the D1/D2 domains by up to 18 and 25 substitutions. The variable sites are concentrated in two regions that correspond to back-folding stretches of hairpin loops in the predicted secondary structure of the RNA molecules. The substitutions do not alter significantly the overall hairpin-loop structure due to wobble base pairing at sites of C-T transitions and compensatory mutations in the complementary strand of the hairpin stem. The phylogenetic and network analyses of the cloned sequences revealed that the repeats had not evolved in a vertical tree-like way but reticulation might have shaped the rDNA arrays of both strains. The neighbour-net analysis of all cloned sequences of the type strains and the database sequences of different strains further showed that these species share a continuous pool of diverse repeats that appear to evolve by reticulate evolution.

  20. Criteria for effective design, construction, and gene knockdown by shRNA vectors

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    Lich John D

    2006-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background RNA interference (RNAi technology is a powerful methodology recently developed for the specific knockdown of targeted genes. RNAi is most commonly achieved either transiently by transfection of small interfering (si RNA oligonucleotides, or stably using short hairpin (sh RNA expressed from a DNA vector or virus. Much controversy has surrounded the development of rules for the design of effective siRNA oligonucleotides; and whether these rules apply to shRNA is not well characterized. Results To determine whether published algorithms for siRNA oligonucleotide design apply to shRNA, we constructed 27 shRNAs from 11 human genes expressed stably using retroviral vectors. We demonstrate an efficient method for preparing wild-type and mutant control shRNA vectors simultaneously using oligonucleotide hybrids. We show that sequencing through shRNA vectors can be problematic due to the intrinsic secondary structure of the hairpin, and we determine a strategy for effective sequencing by using a combination of modified BigDye chemistries and DNA relaxing agents. The efficacy of knockdown for the 27 shRNA vectors was evaluated against six published algorithms for siRNA oligonucleotide design. Our results show that none of the scoring algorithms can explain a significant percentage of variance in shRNA knockdown efficacy as assessed by linear regression analysis or ROC curve analysis. Application of a modification based on the stability of the 6 central bases of each shRNA provides fair-to-good predictions of knockdown efficacy for three of the algorithms. Analysis of an independent set of data from 38 shRNAs pooled from previous publications confirms these findings. Conclusion The use of mixed oligonucleotide pairs provides a time and cost efficient method of producing wild type and mutant control shRNA vectors. The addition to sequencing reactions of a combination of mixed dITP/dGTP chemistries and DNA relaxing agents enables read

  1. Short hairpin RNA library-based functional screening identified ribosomal protein L31 that modulates prostate cancer cell growth via p53 pathway.

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    Yojiro Maruyama

    Full Text Available Androgen receptor is a primary transcription factor involved in the proliferation of prostate cancer cells. Thus, hormone therapy using antiandrogens, such as bicalutamide, is a first-line treatment for the disease. Although hormone therapy initially reduces the tumor burden, many patients eventually relapse, developing tumors with acquired endocrine resistance. Elucidation of the molecular mechanisms underlying endocrine resistance is therefore a fundamental issue for the understanding and development of alternative therapeutics for advanced prostate cancer. In the present study, we performed short hairpin RNA (shRNA-mediated functional screening to identify genes involved in bicalutamide-mediated effects on LNCaP prostate cancer cells. Among such candidate genes selected by screening using volcano plot analysis, ribosomal protein L31 (RPL31 was found to be essential for cell proliferation and cell-cycle progression in bicalutamide-resistant LNCaP (BicR cells, based on small interfering RNA (siRNA-mediated knockdown experiments. Of note, RPL31 mRNA is more abundantly expressed in BicR cells than in parental LNCaP cells, and clinical data from ONCOMINE and The Cancer Genome Altas showed that RPL31 is overexpressed in prostate carcinomas compared with benign prostate tissues. Intriguingly, protein levels of the tumor suppressor p53 and its targets, p21 and MDM2, were increased in LNCaP and BicR cells treated with RPL31 siRNA. We observed decreased degradation of p53 protein after RPL31 knockdown. Moreover, the suppression of growth and cell cycle upon RPL31 knockdown was partially recovered with p53 siRNA treatment. These results suggest that RPL31 is involved in bicalutamide-resistant growth of prostate cancer cells. The shRNA-mediated functional screen in this study provides new insight into the molecular mechanisms and therapeutic targets of advanced prostate cancer.

  2. Short hairpin RNA library-based functional screening identified ribosomal protein L31 that modulates prostate cancer cell growth via p53 pathway.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maruyama, Yojiro; Miyazaki, Toshiaki; Ikeda, Kazuhiro; Okumura, Toshiyuki; Sato, Wataru; Horie-Inoue, Kuniko; Okamoto, Koji; Takeda, Satoru; Inoue, Satoshi

    2014-01-01

    Androgen receptor is a primary transcription factor involved in the proliferation of prostate cancer cells. Thus, hormone therapy using antiandrogens, such as bicalutamide, is a first-line treatment for the disease. Although hormone therapy initially reduces the tumor burden, many patients eventually relapse, developing tumors with acquired endocrine resistance. Elucidation of the molecular mechanisms underlying endocrine resistance is therefore a fundamental issue for the understanding and development of alternative therapeutics for advanced prostate cancer. In the present study, we performed short hairpin RNA (shRNA)-mediated functional screening to identify genes involved in bicalutamide-mediated effects on LNCaP prostate cancer cells. Among such candidate genes selected by screening using volcano plot analysis, ribosomal protein L31 (RPL31) was found to be essential for cell proliferation and cell-cycle progression in bicalutamide-resistant LNCaP (BicR) cells, based on small interfering RNA (siRNA)-mediated knockdown experiments. Of note, RPL31 mRNA is more abundantly expressed in BicR cells than in parental LNCaP cells, and clinical data from ONCOMINE and The Cancer Genome Altas showed that RPL31 is overexpressed in prostate carcinomas compared with benign prostate tissues. Intriguingly, protein levels of the tumor suppressor p53 and its targets, p21 and MDM2, were increased in LNCaP and BicR cells treated with RPL31 siRNA. We observed decreased degradation of p53 protein after RPL31 knockdown. Moreover, the suppression of growth and cell cycle upon RPL31 knockdown was partially recovered with p53 siRNA treatment. These results suggest that RPL31 is involved in bicalutamide-resistant growth of prostate cancer cells. The shRNA-mediated functional screen in this study provides new insight into the molecular mechanisms and therapeutic targets of advanced prostate cancer.

  3. Using adenovirus armed short hairpin RNA targeting transforming growth factor β1 inhibits melanoma growth and metastasis in an ex vivo animal model.

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    Tai, Kuo-Feng; Wang, Chien-Hsing

    2013-12-01

    The transforming growth factor β (TGF-β) is the key molecule implicated in impaired immune function in human patients with malignant melanoma. TGF-β can promote tumor growth, invasion, and metastasis in advanced stages of melanoma. Blocking these tumor-promoting effects of TGF-β provides a potentially important therapeutic strategy for the treatment of melanoma. In this study, we used an adenovirus-based shRNA expression system and successfully constructed Ad/TGF-β1-RNA interference (RNAi) which mediated the RNAi for TGF-β1 gene silencing. We examined the effects of TGF-β1 protein knockdown by RNAi on the growth and metastasis of melanoma in C57BL/6 mice induced by the B16F0 cell line. The TGF-β1 hairpin oligonucleotide was cloned into adenoviral vector. The resulting recombinant adenoviruses infected murine melanoma cell line, B16F0, and designated as B16F0/TGF-β1-RNAi cells. The blank adenoviral vector also infected B16F0 cells and designed as B16F0/vector-control cells served as a control. TGF-β1 expression was reduced in B16F0/TGF-β1-RNAi cells compared with B16F0 cells and B16F0/vector-control cells. Three million wild-type B16F0 cells, B16F0/vector-control cells, and B16F0/TGF-β1-RNAi cells were injected subcutaneously into the right flanks of adult female syngeneic mice C57BL/6. The tumor sizes were 756.09 (65.35), 798.48 (78.77), and 203.55 (24.56) mm at the 14th day in the mice receiving B16F0 cells, B16F0/vector-control cells, and B16F0/TGFβ1-RNAi cells, respectively. The P value was less than 0.01 by 1-way analysis of variance. TGF-β1 knockdown in B16F0 cells enhanced the infiltration of CD4 and CD8 T cells in the tumor regions. C57BL/6 mice were evaluated for pulmonary metastasis after tail vein injection of 2 million B16F0 cells, B16F0/vector-control cells, and B16F0/TGF-β1-RNAi cells. The pulmonary metastasis also reduced significantly on days 14 day and 21 in mice injected with B16F0/TGF-β1-RNAi tumors. The blood vessel density of the

  4. Preclinical safety and efficacy of an anti–HIV-1 lentiviral vector containing a short hairpin RNA to CCR5 and the C46 fusion inhibitor

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    Orit Wolstein

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Gene transfer has therapeutic potential for treating HIV-1 infection by generating cells that are resistant to the virus. We have engineered a novel self-inactivating lentiviral vector, LVsh5/C46, using two viral-entry inhibitors to block early steps of HIV-1 cycle. The LVsh5/C46 vector encodes a short hairpin RNA (shRNA for downregulation of CCR5, in combination with the HIV-1 fusion inhibitor, C46. We demonstrate here the effective delivery of LVsh5/C46 to human T cell lines, peripheral blood mononuclear cells, primary CD4+ T lymphocytes, and CD34+ hematopoietic stem/progenitor cells (HSPC. CCR5-targeted shRNA (sh5 and C46 peptide were stably expressed in the target cells and were able to effectively protect gene-modified cells against infection with CCR5- and CXCR4-tropic strains of HIV-1. LVsh5/C46 treatment was nontoxic as assessed by cell growth and viability, was noninflammatory, and had no adverse effect on HSPC differentiation. LVsh5/C46 could be produced at a scale sufficient for clinical development and resulted in active viral particles with very low mutagenic potential and the absence of replication-competent lentivirus. Based on these in vitro results, plus additional in vivo safety and efficacy data, LVsh5/C46 is now being tested in a phase 1/2 clinical trial for the treatment of HIV-1 disease.

  5. Real-time imaging of VCAM-1 mRNA in TNF-α activated retinal microvascular endothelial cells using antisense hairpin-DNA functionalized gold nanoparticles.

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    Uddin, Md Imam; Jayagopal, Ashwath; Wong, Alexis; McCollum, Gary W; Wright, David W; Penn, John S

    2018-01-01

    Vascular cell adhesion molecule 1 (VCAM-1) is an important inflammatory biomarker correlating with retinal disease progression. Thus, detection of VCAM-1 mRNA expression levels at an early disease stage could be an important predictive biomarker to assess the risk of disease progression and monitoring treatment response. We have developed VCAM-1 targeted antisense hairpin DNA-functionalized gold nanoparticles (AS-VCAM-1 hAuNP) for the real time detection of VCAM-1 mRNA expression levels in retinal endothelial cells. The AS-VCAM-1 hAuNP fluorescence enhancement clearly visualized the TNF-α induced cellular VCAM-1 mRNA levels with high signal to noise ratios compared to normal serum treated cells. The scrambled hAuNP probes were minimally detectable under same image acquisition conditions. Intracellular hAuNPs were detected using transmission electron microscopy (TEM) analysis of the intact cells. In addition, the AS-VCAM-1 hAuNP probes exhibited no acute toxicity to the retinal microvascular endothelial cells as measured by live-dead assay. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  6. Transformation of Mexican lime with an intron-hairpin construct expressing untranslatable versions of the genes coding for the three silencing suppressors of Citrus tristeza virus confers complete resistance to the virus.

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    Soler, Nuria; Plomer, Montserrat; Fagoaga, Carmen; Moreno, Pedro; Navarro, Luis; Flores, Ricardo; Peña, Leandro

    2012-06-01

    Citrus tristeza virus (CTV), the causal agent of the most devastating viral disease of citrus, has evolved three silencing suppressor proteins acting at intra- (p23 and p20) and/or intercellular level (p20 and p25) to overcome host antiviral defence. Previously, we showed that Mexican lime transformed with an intron-hairpin construct including part of the gene p23 and the adjacent 3' untranslated region displays partial resistance to CTV, with a fraction of the propagations from some transgenic lines remaining uninfected. Here, we transformed Mexican lime with an intron-hairpin vector carrying full-length, untranslatable versions of the genes p25, p20 and p23 from CTV strain T36 to silence the expression of these critical genes in CTV-infected cells. Three transgenic lines presented complete resistance to viral infection, with all their propagations remaining symptomless and virus-free after graft inoculation with CTV-T36, either in the nontransgenic rootstock or in the transgenic scion. Accumulation of transgene-derived siRNAs was necessary but not sufficient for CTV resistance. Inoculation with a divergent CTV strain led to partially breaking the resistance, thus showing the role of sequence identity in the underlying mechanism. Our results are a step forward to developing transgenic resistance to CTV and also show that targeting simultaneously by RNA interference (RNAi) the three viral silencing suppressors appears critical for this purpose, although the involvement of concurrent RNAi mechanisms cannot be excluded. © 2012 The Authors. Plant Biotechnology Journal © 2012 Society for Experimental Biology, Association of Applied Biologists and Blackwell Publishing Ltd.

  7. Short hairpin ribonucleic acid constructs targeting insulin-like growth factor binding protein-3 ameliorates diabetes mellitus-related erectile dysfunction in rats.

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    Yang, Zhonghua; Zhou, Zhangyan; Wang, Xinghuan; Peng, Mou; Zhou, Haihong; Meng, Zhe; Chen, Dong; Wang, Yongzhi

    2013-02-01

    To investigate the expression of insulin-like growth factor binding protein-3 (IGFBP-3) in penile cavernous of streptozotocin (STZ)-induced DM rats and whether downregulation of IGFBP-3 by intracavernosal injection of short hairpin ribonucleic acid (shRNA) targeting IGFBP-3 could improve the erectile function in DM rats. Diabetes was induced in rats by intraperitoneal injection of STZ, and the expression of IGFBP-3 in the penile tissue of adult normal and DM male rats was assayed using reverse transcriptase-polymerase chain reaction and Western blot. Next, shRNA-targeting IGFBP-3 and a scramble sequence were injected into the penile corpora cavernosa of DM rats. At 12 weeks after shRNA-IGFBP-3 administration, the intracavernous pressure in response to electrical stimulation of the cavernous nerves was evaluated. The expression of IGFBP-3 was assayed by Western blot. The concentration of cyclic guanosine monophosphate in the corpus cavernosum was assayed by enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay. At 12 week after intraperitoneal administration of STZ, IGFBP-3 expression had increased in the penis of the DM rat (P injection, intracavernosal pressure was significantly increased in response to cavernous nerve stimulation (P cavernous tissue (P cavernous tissue. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  8. Plasmids expressing interleukin-10 short hairpin RNA mediate IL-10 knockdown and enhance tumor necrosis factor alpha and interferon gamma expressions in response to porcine reproductive and respiratory syndrome virus.

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    Charerntantanakul, Wasin; Kasinrerk, Watchara

    2012-04-15

    Porcine reproductive and respiratory syndrome virus (PRRSV) has been suggested to exploit interleukin-10 (IL-10) to suppress immune defense of infected pigs. The present study constructed plasmids encoding selected short hairpin RNA specific to porcine IL-10 mRNA (pIL-10sh) to knockdown IL-10 transcription and investigated the suppressive effect of PRRSV-induced IL-10 on various immune marker expressions. Naïve blood monocytes from eight PRRSV-seronegative pigs were transfected with pIL-10sh and pNeg (plasmid vector) prior to PRRSV inoculation and subsequent lipopolysaccharide (LPS) stimulation. The mRNA expressions of IL-10, IL-1β, IL-12p40, tumor necrosis factor alpha (TNFα), interferon gamma (IFNγ), transforming growth factor beta (TGFβ), CD80, and CD86 were evaluated by real-time PCR. The IL-10, TNFα, and IFNγ protein productions were determined by ELISA. Compared with non-transfected monocyte control, transfection with selected pIL-10sh (pIL-10sh1), but not other pIL-10sh nor pNeg, significantly reduced IL-10 expression and significantly enhanced TNFα and IFNγ expressions. Slight increases in IL-1β, IL-12p40, CD80, and CD86 expressions were also observed. Neither pIL-10sh1 nor pNeg transfection affected TGFβ expression. Our results indicate that PRRSV does exploit IL-10 to suppress the expressions of pro-inflammatory cytokines, mainly TNFα and IFNγ, and co-stimulatory molecules, CD80 and CD86. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  9. Post-transcriptional silencing of the SGE1 gene induced by a dsRNA hairpin in Fusarium oxysporum f. sp cubense, the causal agent of Panama disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fernandes, J S; Angelo, P C S; Cruz, J C; Santos, J M M; Sousa, N R; Silva, G F

    2016-04-04

    Fusarium oxysporum f. sp cubense (Foc), the causal agent of Panama disease, is responsible for economic losses in banana crops worldwide. The identification of genes that effectively act on pathogenicity and/or virulence may contribute to the development of different strategies for disease control and the production of resistant plants. The objective of the current study was to analyze the importance of SGE1 gene expression in Foc virulence through post-transcriptional silencing using a double-stranded RNA hairpin. Thirteen transformants were selected based on different morphological characteristics, and sporulation in these transformants was significantly reduced by approximately 95% (P < 0.05) compared to that of the wild-type strain. The relative SGE1 expression levels in the transformant strains were reduced by 27 to 47% compared to those in the wild-type strain. A pathogenicity analysis revealed that the transformants were able to reach the rhizomes and pseudostems of the inoculated banana plants. However, the transformants induced initial disease symptoms in the banana plants approximately 10 days later than that by the wild-type Foc, and initial disease symptoms persisted even at 45 days after inoculation. These results indicate that the SGE1 gene is directly involved in the virulence of Foc. Therefore, SGE1 may be a potential candidate for host-induced gene silencing in banana plants.

  10. Tomato transgenic plants expressing hairpin construct of a nematode protease gene conferred enhanced resistance to root-knot nematodes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dutta, Tushar K; Papolu, Pradeep K; Banakar, Prakash; Choudhary, Divya; Sirohi, Anil; Rao, Uma

    2015-01-01

    Root-knot nematodes (Meloidogyne incognita) cause substantial yield losses in vegetables worldwide, and are difficult to manage. Continuous withdrawal of environmentally-harmful nematicides from the global market warrants the need for novel nematode management strategies. Utility of host-delivered RNAi has been demonstrated in several plants (Arabidopsis, tobacco, and soybean) that exhibited resistance against root-knot and cyst nematodes. Herein, a M. incognita-specific protease gene, cathepsin L cysteine proteinase (Mi-cpl-1), was targeted to generate tomato transgenic lines to evaluate the genetically modified nematode resistance. In vitro knockdown of Mi-cpl-1 gene led to the reduced attraction and penetration of M. incognita in tomato, suggesting the involvement of Mi-cpl-1 in nematode parasitism. Transgenic expression of the RNAi construct of Mi-cpl-1 gene resulted in 60-80% reduction in infection and multiplication of M. incognita in tomato. Evidence for in vitro and in vivo silencing of Mi-cpl-1 was confirmed by expression analysis using quantitative PCR. Our study demonstrates that Mi-cpl-1 plays crucial role during plant-nematode interaction and plant-mediated downregulation of this gene elicits detrimental effect on M. incognita development, reinforcing the potential of RNAi technology for management of phytonematodes in crop plants.

  11. Tomato transgenic plants expressing hairpin construct of a nematode protease gene conferred enhanced resistance to root-knot nematodes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tushar Kanti Dutta

    2015-04-01

    Full Text Available Root-knot nematodes (Meloidogyne incognita cause substantial yield losses in vegetables worldwide, and are difficult to manage. Continuous withdrawal of environmentally-harmful nematicides from the global market warrants the need for novel nematode management strategies. Utility of host-delivered RNAi has been demonstrated in several plants (Arabidopsis, tobacco and soybean that exhibited resistance against root-knot and cyst nematodes. Herein, a M. incognita-specific protease gene, cathepsin L cysteine proteinase (Mi-cpl-1, was targeted to generate tomato transgenic lines to evaluate the genetically modified nematode resistance. In vitro knockdown of Mi-cpl-1 gene led to the reduced attraction and penetration of M. incognita in tomato, suggesting the involvement of Mi-cpl-1 in nematode parasitism. Transgenic expression of the RNAi construct of Mi-cpl-1 gene resulted in 60-80% reduction in infection and multiplication of M. incognita in tomato. Evidence for in vitro and in vivo silencing of Mi-cpl-1 was confirmed by expression analysis using quantitative PCR. Our study demonstrates that Mi-cpl-1 plays crucial role during plant-nematode interaction and plant-mediated downregulation of this gene elicits detrimental effect on M. incognita development, reinforcing the potential of RNAi technology for management of phytonematodes in crop plants.

  12. Construction of lentiviral shRNA expression vector targeting ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    The optimal interfering target was then selected, while the titer of lentiviral packing PLD2-shRNA was 3.47 × 104 TU/ml and the virus was successfully packaged. PCR and sequencing analyses revealed that lentiviral shRNA vectors of three targeting PLD2 gene were successfully constructed. Key words: RNA interference ...

  13. Novel constructs for efficient cloning of sRNA-encoding DNA and uniform silencing of plant genes employing artificial trans-acting small interfering RNA.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baykal, Ulku; Liu, Hua; Chen, Xinlu; Nguyen, Henry T; Zhang, Zhanyuan J

    2016-10-01

    TAS atasiRNA-producing region swapping used one-step, high efficiency, and high fidelity directional TC-cloning. Uniform silencing was achieved without lethality using miRNA trigger- TAS overexpression fusion cassettes to generate 21-nt atasiRNA. Plant transgenic technologies are very important for basic plant research and biotechnology. Artificial trans-acting small interfering RNA (atasiRNA) represents an attractive platform with certain advantages over other silencing approaches, such as hairpin RNA, artificial microRNA (amiRNA), and virus-induced gene silencing (VIGS). In this study, we developed two types of constructs for atasiRNA-mediated gene silencing in plants. To functionally validate our constructs, we chose TAS1a as a test model. Type 1 constructs had miR173-precursor sequence fused with TAS1a locus driven by single promoter-terminator cassette, which simplified the expression cassette and resulted in uniform gene silencing. Type 2 constructs contained two separate cassettes for miR173 and TAS1a co-expression. The constructs in each type were further improved by deploying the XcmI-based TC-cloning system for highly efficient directional cloning of short DNA fragments encoding atasiRNAs into TAS1a locus. The effectiveness of the constructs was demonstrated by cloning an atasiRNA DNA into the TC site of engineered TAS1a and silencing of CHLORINA 42 (CH42) gene in Arabidopsis. Our results show that the directional TC-cloning of the atasiRNA DNA into the engineered TAS1a is highly efficient and the miR173-TAS1a fusion system provides an attractive alternative to achieve moderate but more uniform gene silencing without lethality, as compared to conventional two separate cassettes for miR173 and TAS locus co-expression system. The design principles described here should be applicable to other TAS loci such as TAS1b, TAS1c, TAS2, or TAS3, and cloning of amiRNA into amiRNA stem-loop.

  14. Hairpin Ribozyme Genes Curtail Alcohol Drinking: from Rational Design to in vivo Effects in the Rat

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Amalia Sapag

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Ribozyme genes were designed to reduce voluntary alcohol drinking in a rat model of alcohol dependence. Acetaldehyde generated from alcohol in the liver is metabolized by the mitochondrial aldehyde dehydrogenase (ALDH2 such that diminishing ALDH2 activity leads to the aversive effects of blood acetaldehyde upon alcohol intake. A stepwise approach was followed to design genes encoding ribozymes targeted to the rat ALDH2 mRNA. In vitro studies of accessibility to oligonucleotides identified suitable target sites in the mRNA, one of which fulfilled hammerhead and hairpin ribozyme requirements (CGGUC. Ribozyme genes delivered in plasmid constructs were tested in rat cells in culture. While the hairpin ribozyme reduced ALDH2 activity 56% by cleavage and blockade (P < 0.0001, the hammerhead ribozyme elicited minor effects by blockade. The hairpin ribozyme was tested in vivo by adenoviral gene delivery to UChB alcohol drinker rats. Ethanol intake was curtailed 47% for 34 days (P < 0.0001, while blood acetaldehyde more than doubled upon ethanol administration and ALDH2 activity dropped 25% in liver homogenates, not affecting other ALDH isoforms. Thus, hairpin ribozymes targeted to 16 nt in the ALDH2 mRNA provide durable and specific effects in vivo, representing an improvement on previous work and encouraging development of gene therapy for alcoholism.

  15. Targeted gene silencing in the model mushroom Coprinopsis cinerea (Coprinus cinereus) by expression of homologous hairpin RNAs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wälti, Martin A; Villalba, Cristina; Buser, Reto M; Grünler, Anke; Aebi, Markus; Künzler, Markus

    2006-04-01

    The ink cap Coprinopsis cinerea is a model organism for studying fruiting body (mushroom) formation in homobasidiomycetes. Mutant screens and expression studies have implicated a number of genes in this developmental process. Functional analysis of these genes, however, is hampered by the lack of reliable reverse genetics tools for C. cinerea. Here, we report the applicability of gene targeting by RNA silencing for this organism. Efficient silencing of both an introduced GFP expression cassette and the endogenous cgl1 and cgl2 isogenes was achieved by expression of homologous hairpin RNAs. In latter case, silencing was the result of a hairpin construct containing solely cgl2 sequences, demonstrating the possibility of simultaneous silencing of whole gene families by a single construct. Expression of the hairpin RNAs reduced the mRNA levels of the target genes by at least 90%, as determined by quantitative real-time PCR. The reduced mRNA levels were accompanied by cytosine methylation of transcribed and nontranscribed DNA at both silencing and target loci in the case of constitutive high-level expression of the hairpin RNA but not in the case of transient expression. These results suggest the presence of both posttranscriptional and transcriptional gene silencing mechanisms in C. cinerea and demonstrate the applicability of targeted gene silencing as a powerful reverse genetics approach in this organism.

  16. Dicer-independent processing of short hairpin RNAs

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Liu, Ying Poi; Schopman, Nick C. T.; Berkhout, Ben

    2013-01-01

    Short hairpin RNAs (shRNAs) are widely used to induce RNA interference (RNAi). We tested a variety of shRNAs that differed in stem length and terminal loop size and revealed strikingly different RNAi activities and shRNA-processing patterns. Interestingly, we identified a specific shRNA design that

  17. Long-Term Suppression of Hepatitis B Virus Replication by Short Hairpin RNA Expression Using the Scaffold/Matrix Attachment Region-Based Replicating Vector System pEPI-1▿

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jenke, Andreas C. W.; Wilhelm, Andreas D.; Orth, Valerie; Lipps, Hans Joachim; Protzer, Ulrike; Wirth, Stefan

    2008-01-01

    Since the emergence of viral resistance of hepatitis B virus (HBV) during treatment is becoming an important issue even with newer drugs, there is a need for alternative treatment options such as, for example, RNA interference (RNAi) technology. While short-term suppression of HBV replication is easily achieved with small interfering RNA oligonucleotides, this is not the case for long-term suppression due to the lack of an optimal vector system. Based on the nonviral scaffold/matrix attachment region (S/MAR)-based vector system pEPI-1, which is free of common side effects and is stably retained as an episome even in the absence of selection, we designed a short hairpin RNA (shRNA) expression vector called pEPI-RNAi for HBV suppression. HBV-replicating HepG2.2.15 cells were transfected with pEPI-RNAi, and the intracellular status of the plasmid was followed by PCR and Southern analysis. HBV replication was measured on the DNA, RNA, and protein level. HBV RNA expression was reduced by almost 85% 3 months posttransfection with pEPI-RNAi. At 8 months posttransfection in the absence of antibiotic selection pressure, the suppression level was still 70% and the vector was retained as an episome. The reduction of total intracellular HBV DNA at this point was 77%, showing a marked suppression of HBV DNA replication. At a comparable level, secretion of viral antigens, as well as progeny HBV virions, was inhibited. The S/MAR-based vector system pEPI-1 allows long-term suppression of HBV replication by the expression of suitable shRNAs. Due to its unique properties compared to commonly used vectors, it provides an interesting option for the treatment of chronically HBV-infected individuals. PMID:18474581

  18. Short-hairpin RNA-induced suppression of adenine nucleotide translocase-2 in breast cancer cells restores their susceptibility to TRAIL-induced apoptosis by activating JNK and modulating TRAIL receptor expression

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kim Chul-Woo

    2010-09-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Tumor necrosis factor (TNF-related apoptosis-inducing ligand (TRAIL; apo2 ligand induces apoptosis in cancer cells but has little effect on normal cells. However, many cancer cell types are resistant to TRAIL-induced apoptosis, limiting the clinical utility of TRAIL as an anti-cancer agent. We previously reported that the suppression of adenine nucleotide translocase-2 (ANT2 by short-hairpin RNA (shRNA induces apoptosis of breast cancer cells, which frequently express high levels of ANT2. In the present study, we examined the effect of RNA shRNA-induced suppression of ANT2 on the resistance of breast cancer cells to TRAIL-induced apoptosis in vitro and in vivo. Results ANT2 shRNA treatment sensitized MCF7, T47 D, and BT474 cells to TRAIL-induced apoptosis by up-regulating the expression of TRAIL death receptors 4 and 5 (DR4 and DR5 and down-regulating the TRAIL decoy receptor 2 (DcR2. In MCF7 cells, ANT2 knockdown activated the stress kinase c-Jun N-terminal kinase (JNK, subsequently stabilizing and increasing the transcriptional activity of p53 by phosphorylating it at Thr81; it also enhanced the expression and activity of DNA methyltransferase 1 (DNMT1. ANT2 shRNA-induced overexpression of DR4/DR5 and TRAIL sensitization were blocked by a p53 inhibitor, suggesting that p53 activation plays an important role in the transcriptional up-regulation of DR4/DR5. However, ANT2 knockdown also up-regulated DR4/DR5 in the p53-mutant cell lines BT474 and T47 D. In MCF7 cells, ANT2 shRNA treatment led to DcR2 promoter methylation and concomitant down-regulation of DcR2 expression, consistent with the observed activation of DNMT1. Treatment of the cells with a demethylating agent or JNK inhibitor prevented the ANT2 shRNA-induced down-regulation of DcR2 and activation of both p53 and DNMT1. In in vivo experiments using nude mice, ANT2 shRNA caused TRAIL-resistant MCF7 xenografts to undergo TRAIL-induced cell death, up-regulated DR4/DR5

  19. Constructing Prediction Models from Expression Profiles for Large Scale lncRNA-miRNA Interaction Profiling.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huang, Yu-An; Chan, Keith C C; You, Zhu-Hong

    2017-10-23

    The interaction of miRNA and lncRNA is known to be important for gene regulations. However, not many computational approaches have been developed to analyse known interactions and predict the unknown ones. Given that there are now more evidences that suggest that lncRNA-miRNA interactions are closely related to their relative expression levels in the form of a titration mechanism, we analyzed the patterns in large-scale expression profiles of known lncRNA-miRNA interactions. From these uncovered patterns, we noticed that lncRNAs tend to interact collaboratively with miRNAs of similar expression profiles, and vice versa. By representing known interaction between lncRNA and miRNA as a bipartite graph, we propose here a technique, called EPLMI, to construct a prediction model from such a graph. EPLMI performs its tasks based on the assumption that lncRNAs that are highly similar to each other tend to have similar interaction or non-interaction patterns with miRNAs and vice versa. The effectiveness of the prediction model so constructed has been evaluated using the latest dataset of lncRNA-miRNA interactions. The results show that the prediction model can achieve AUCs of 0.8522 and 0.8447±0.0017 based on LOOCV and 5-fold cross validation. Using this model, we show that lncRNA-miRNA interactions can be reliably predicted. We also show that we can use it to select the most likely lncRNA targets that specific miRNAs would interact with. We believe that the prediction models discovered by EPLMI can yield great insights for further research on ceRNA regulation network. To the best of our knowledge, EPLMI is the first technique that is developed for large-scale lncRNA-miRNA interaction profiling. Matlab codes and dataset are available at https://github.com/yahuang1991polyu/EPLMI/. yu-an.huang@connect.polyu.hk. Supplementary data are available at Bioinformatics online.

  20. Tumor-targeting magnetic lipoplex delivery of short hairpin RNA suppresses IGF-1R overexpression of lung adenocarcinoma A549 cells in vitro and in vivo

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wang, Chunmao; Ding, Chao; Kong, Minjian [Department of Cardiothoracic Surgery, Second Affiliated Hospital, School of Medicine, Zhejiang University, Hangzhou 310009 (China); Dong, Aiqiang, E-mail: dr_dongaiqiang@sina.com [Department of Cardiothoracic Surgery, Second Affiliated Hospital, School of Medicine, Zhejiang University, Hangzhou 310009 (China); Qian, Jianfang; Jiang, Daming; Shen, Zhonghua [Department of Cardiothoracic Surgery, Second Affiliated Hospital, School of Medicine, Zhejiang University, Hangzhou 310009 (China)

    2011-07-08

    Highlights: {yields} We compared lipofection with magnetofection about difference of transfection efficiency on delivery a therapeutic gene in vitro and in vivo. {yields} We investigated the difference of shRNA induced by magnetofection and lipofection into A549 cell and subcutaneous tumor to knockdown IGF-1R overexpressed in A549 cell and A549 tumor. {yields} We investigated in vivo shRNA silenced IGF-1R overexpression 24, 48, and 72 h after shRNA intravenous injection into tumor-bearing mice by way of magnetofection and lipofection. {yields} Our results showed that magnetofection could achieve therapeutic gene targeted delivery into special site, which contributed to targeted gene therapy of lung cancers. -- Abstract: Liposomal magnetofection potentiates gene transfection by applying a magnetic field to concentrate magnetic lipoplexes onto target cells. Magnetic lipoplexes are self-assembling ternary complexes of cationic lipids with plasmid DNA associated with superparamagnetic iron oxide nanoparticles (SPIONs). Type1insulin-like growth factor receptor (IGF-1R), an important oncogene, is frequently overexpressed in lung cancer and mediates cancer cell proliferation and tumor growth. In this study, we evaluated the transfection efficiency (percentage of transfected cells) and therapeutic potential (potency of IGF-1R knockdown) of liposomal magnetofection of plasmids expressing GFP and shRNAs targeting IGF-1R (pGFPshIGF-1Rs) in A549 cells and in tumor-bearing mice as compared to lipofection using Lipofectamine 2000. Liposomal magnetofection provided a threefold improvement in transgene expression over lipofection and transfected up to 64.1% of A549 cells in vitro. In vitro, IGF-1R specific-shRNA transfected by lipofection inhibited IGF-1R protein by 56.1 {+-} 6% and by liposomal magnetofection by 85.1 {+-} 3%. In vivo delivery efficiency of the pGFPshIGF-1R plasmid into the tumor was significantly higher in the liposomal magnetofection group than in the

  1. Localized surface plasmon resonance-mediated fluorescence signals in plasmonic nanoparticle-quantum dot hybrids for ultrasensitive Zika virus RNA detection via hairpin hybridization assays.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Adegoke, Oluwasesan; Morita, Masahiro; Kato, Tatsuya; Ito, Masahito; Suzuki, Tetsuro; Park, Enoch Y

    2017-08-15

    The current epidemic caused by the Zika virus (ZIKV) and the devastating effects of this virus on fetal development, which result in an increased incidence of congenital microcephaly symptoms, have prompted the World Health Organization (WHO) to declare the ZIKV a public health issue of global concern. Efficient probes that offer high detection sensitivity and specificity are urgently required to aid in the point-of-care treatment of the virus. In this study, we show that localized surface plasmon resonance (LSPR) signals from plasmonic nanoparticles (NPs) can be used to mediate the fluorescence signal from semiconductor quantum dot (Qdot) nanocrystals in a molecular beacon (MB) biosensor probe for ZIKV RNA detection. Four different plasmonic NPs functionalized with 3-mercaptopropionic acid (MPA), namely MPA-AgNPs, MPA-AuNPs, core/shell (CS) Au/AgNPs, and alloyed AuAgNPs, were synthesized and conjugated to L-glutathione-capped CdSeS alloyed Qdots to form the respective LSPR-mediated fluorescence nanohybrid. The concept of the plasmonic NP-Qdot-MB biosensor involves using LSPR from the plasmonic NPs to mediate a fluorescence signal to the Qdots, triggered by the hybridization of the target ZIKV RNA with the DNA loop sequence of the MB. The extent of the fluorescence enhancement based on ZIKV RNA detection was proportional to the LSPR-mediated fluorescence signal. The limits of detection (LODs) of the nanohybrids were as follows: alloyed AuAgNP-Qdot646-MB (1.7 copies/mL)) > CS Au/AgNP-Qdot646-MB (LOD =2.4 copies/mL) > AuNP-Qdot646-MB (LOD =2.9 copies/mL) > AgNP-Qdot646-MB (LOD =7.6 copies/mL). The LSPR-mediated fluorescence signal was stronger for the bimetallic plasmonic NP-Qdots than the single metallic plasmonic NP-Qdots. The plasmonic NP-Qdot-MB biosensor probes exhibited excellent selectivity toward ZIKV RNA and could serve as potential diagnostic probes for the point-of care detection of the virus. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  2. Design of extended short hairpin RNAs for HIV-1 inhibition

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Liu, Ying Poi; Haasnoot, Joost; Berkhout, Ben

    2007-01-01

    RNA interference (RNAi) targeted towards viral mRNAs is widely used to block virus replication in mammalian cells. The specific antiviral RNAi response can be induced via transfection of synthetic small interfering RNAs (siRNAs) or via intracellular expression of short hairpin RNAs (shRNAs). For

  3. Neuron-specific RNA interference using lentiviral vectors

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nielsen, Troels Tolstrup; Marion, Ingrid van; Hasholt, Lis

    2009-01-01

    transcriptional initiation and termination. Recently, pol II promoters have been used to construct vectors for RNA interference (RNAi). By embedding the shRNA into a micro RNA-context (miRNA) the endogenous miRNA processing machinery is exploited to achieve the mature synthetic miRNA (smiRNA), thereby expanding......BACKGROUND: Viral vectors have been used in several different settings for the delivery of small hairpin (sh) RNAs. However, most vectors have utilized ubiquitously-expressing polymerase (pol) III promoters to drive expression of the hairpin as a result of the strict requirement for precise...... the possible promoter choices and eventually allowing cell type specific down-regulation of target genes. METHODS: In the present study, we constructed lentiviral vectors expressing smiRNAs under the control of pol II promoters to knockdown gene expression in cell culture and in the brain. RESULTS: We...

  4. Application of short hairpin RNAs (shRNAs) to study gene function in ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Yomi

    2010-12-29

    Dec 29, 2010 ... effect involve small interfering RNA (siRNA) and short hairpin RNA (shRNA). In various applications,. RNAi has been used to create model systems, to identify novel molecular targets, to study gene function in a genome-wide fashion, and to create new avenues for clinical therapeutics. This article reviews ...

  5. Characterisation and application of a bovine U6 promoter for expression of short hairpin RNAs

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dalrymple Brian P

    2005-05-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The use of small interfering RNA (siRNA molecules in animals to achieve double-stranded RNA-mediated interference (RNAi has recently emerged as a powerful method of sequence-specific gene knockdown. As DNA-based expression of short hairpin RNA (shRNA for RNAi may offer some advantages over chemical and in vitro synthesised siRNA, a number of vectors for expression of shRNA have been developed. These often feature polymerase III (pol. III promoters of either mouse or human origin. Results To develop a shRNA expression vector specifically for bovine RNAi applications, we identified and characterised a novel bovine U6 small nuclear RNA (snRNA promoter from bovine sequence data. This promoter is the putative bovine homologue of the human U6-8 snRNA promoter, and features a number of functional sequence elements that are characteristic of these types of pol. III promoters. A PCR based cloning strategy was used to incorporate this promoter sequence into plasmid vectors along with shRNA sequences for RNAi. The promoter was then used to express shRNAs, which resulted in the efficient knockdown of an exogenous reporter gene and an endogenous bovine gene. Conclusion We have mined data from the bovine genome sequencing project to identify a functional bovine U6 promoter and used the promoter sequence to construct a shRNA expression vector. The use of this native bovine promoter in shRNA expression is an important component of our future development of RNAi therapeutic and transgenic applications in bovine species.

  6. Construction of siRNA/miRNA expression vectors based on a one-step PCR process

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xu Jun

    2009-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background RNA interference (RNAi has become a powerful means for silencing target gene expression in mammalian cells and is envisioned to be useful in therapeutic approaches to human disease. In recent years, high-throughput, genome-wide screening of siRNA/miRNA libraries has emerged as a desirable approach. Current methods for constructing siRNA/miRNA expression vectors require the synthesis of long oligonucleotides, which is costly and suffers from mutation problems. Results Here we report an ingenious method to solve traditional problems associated with construction of siRNA/miRNA expression vectors. We synthesized shorter primers (E. coli and converted to functional vectors in vivo via homologous recombination. The positive clones could be easily screened under UV light. Using this method we successfully constructed over 500 functional siRNA/miRNA expression vectors. Sequencing of the vectors confirmed a high accuracy rate. Conclusion This novel, convenient, low-cost and highly efficient approach may be useful for high-throughput assays of RNAi libraries.

  7. Thermodynamic matchers for the construction of the cuckoo RNA family

    OpenAIRE

    Reinkensmeier, Jan; Giegerich, Robert

    2015-01-01

    RNA family models describe classes of functionally related, non-coding RNAs based on sequence and structure conservation. The most important method for modeling RNA families is the use of covariance models, which are stochastic models that serve in the discovery of yet unknown, homologous RNAs. However, the performance of covariance models in finding remote homologs is poor for RNA families with high sequence conservation, while for families with high structure but low sequence conservation, ...

  8. Construction of RNA nanocages by re-engineering the packaging RNA of Phi29 bacteriophage

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hao, Chenhui; Li, Xiang; Tian, Cheng; Jiang, Wen; Wang, Guansong; Mao, Chengde

    2014-05-01

    RNA nanotechnology promises rational design of RNA nanostructures with wide array of structural diversities and functionalities. Such nanostructures could be used in applications such as small interfering RNA delivery and organization of in vivo chemical reactions. Though having impressive development in recent years, RNA nanotechnology is still quite limited and its programmability and complexity could not rival the degree of its closely related cousin: DNA nanotechnology. Novel strategies are needed for programmed RNA self-assembly. Here, we have assembled RNA nanocages by re-engineering a natural, biological RNA motif: the packaging RNA of phi29 bacteriophage. The resulting RNA nanostructures have been thoroughly characterized by gel electrophoresis, cryogenic electron microscopy imaging and dynamic light scattering.

  9. A construct with fluorescent indicators for conditional expression of miRNA

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xia Xugang

    2008-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Transgenic RNAi holds promise as a simple, low-cost, and fast method for reverse genetics in mammals. It may be particularly useful for producing animal models for hypomorphic gene function. Inducible RNAi that permits spatially and temporally controllable gene silencing in vivo will enhance the power of transgenic RNAi approach. Furthermore, because microRNA (miRNA targeting specific genes can be expressed simultaneously with protein coding genes, incorporation of fluorescent marker proteins can simplify the screening and analysis of transgenic RNAi animals. Results We sought to optimally express a miRNA simultaneously with a fluorescent marker. We compared two construct designs. One expressed a red fluorescent protein (RFP and a miRNA placed in its 3' untranslated region (UTR. The other expressed the same RFP and miRNA, but the precursor miRNA (pre-miRNA coding sequence was placed in an intron that was inserted into the 3'-UTR. We found that the two constructs expressed comparable levels of miRNA. However, the intron-containing construct expressed a significantly higher level of RFP than the intron-less construct. Further experiments indicate that the 3'-UTR intron enhances RFP expression by its intrinsic gene-expression-enhancing activity and by eliminating the inhibitory effect of the pre-miRNA on the expression of RFP. Based on these findings, we incorporated the intron-embedded pre-miRNA design into a conditional expression construct that employed the Cre-loxP system. This construct initially expressed EGFP gene, which was flanked by loxP sites. After exposure to Cre recombinase, the transgene stopped EGFP expression and began expression of RFP and a miRNA, which silenced the expression of specific cellular genes. Conclusion We have designed and tested a conditional miRNA-expression construct and showed that this construct expresses both the marker genes strongly and can silence the target gene efficiently upon Cre

  10. An Enterovirus-Like RNA Construct for Colon Cancer Suicide Gene Therapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rasekhian, Mahsa; Teimoori-Toolabi, Ladan; Amini, Safieh; Azadmanesh, Kayhan

    2015-01-01

    In gene therapy, the use of RNA molecules as therapeutic agents has shown advantages over plasmid DNA, including higher levels of safety. However, transient nature of RNA has been a major obstacle in application of RNA in gene therapy. Here, we used the internal ribosomal entry site of encephalomyocarditis virus and the 3' non-translated region of Poliovirus to design an enterovirus-like RNA for the expression of a reporter gene (enhanced green fluorescent protein) and a suicide gene (thymidine kinase of herpes simplex virus). The expression of these genes was evaluated by flow cytometry and cytotoxicity assay in human colorectal adenocarcinoma cell line (SW480). We then armed RNA molecules with a target sequence for hsa-miR-143 to regulate their expression by microRNA (miRNA) mimics. The results showed effective expression of both genes by Entrovirus-like RNA constructs. The data also showed that the restoration of hsa-miR-143 expression in SW480 leads to a significant translation repression of the introduced reporter and suicide genes. Collectively, our data suggest the potential use of Entrovirus-like RNA molecules in suicide gene therapy. Additionally, as a consequence of the possible downregulated miRNA expression in cancerous tissues, a decreased expression of gene therapy constructs armed with target sequences for such miRNA in cancer tissue is expected.

  11. Modeling the mechanism of CLN025 beta-hairpin formation

    Science.gov (United States)

    McKiernan, Keri A.; Husic, Brooke E.; Pande, Vijay S.

    2017-09-01

    Beta-hairpins are substructures found in proteins that can lend insight into more complex systems. Furthermore, the folding of beta-hairpins is a valuable test case for benchmarking experimental and theoretical methods. Here, we simulate the folding of CLN025, a miniprotein with a beta-hairpin structure, at its experimental melting temperature using a range of state-of-the-art protein force fields. We construct Markov state models in order to examine the thermodynamics, kinetics, mechanism, and rate-determining step of folding. Mechanistically, we find the folding process is rate-limited by the formation of the turn region hydrogen bonds, which occurs following the downhill hydrophobic collapse of the extended denatured protein. These results are presented in the context of established and contradictory theories of the beta-hairpin folding process. Furthermore, our analysis suggests that the AMBER-FB15 force field, at this temperature, best describes the characteristics of the full experimental CLN025 conformational ensemble, while the AMBER ff99SB-ILDN and CHARMM22* force fields display a tendency to overstabilize the native state.

  12. Role of the DIS hairpin in replication of human immunodeficiency virus type 1

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Berkhout, B.; van Wamel, J. L.

    1996-01-01

    The virion-associated genome of human immunodeficiency virus type 1 consists of a noncovalently linked dimer of two identical, unspliced RNA molecules. A hairpin structure within the untranslated leader transcript is postulated to play a role in RNA dimerization through base pairing of the

  13. Construction of conditional lentivirus-mediated shRNA vector targeting the human Mirk gene and identification of RNAi efficiency in rhabdomyosarcoma RD cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhao, Boming; Yang, Cao; Yang, Shuhua; Gao, Yong; Wang, Jing

    2013-10-01

    Rhabdomyosarcoma is the most common malignant soft tissue tumor in children. It has been demonstrated that Mirk as an activated protein kinase is overexpressed in rhabdomyosarcoma cells, which may be correlated with tumorigenesis. The aim of the present study was to explore the possibility of Mirk gene as a therapeutic target for the treatment of rhabdomyosarcoma, and the use of RNA interference in a temporally and spatially restricted manner to study the function of the target gene would be highly beneficial. To address this problem, a conditional lentivirus-mediated short hairpin RNA targeting human Mirk gene was constructed and employed to reduce endogenous Mirk expression in the rhabdomyosarcoma RD cell line in vitro. The expression of Mirk shRNA in RD cells transduced with this recombinant vector could be tracked with the expression of red fluorescent protein by the administration of doxycycline. A stable transgenic RD line was generated by transducing RD lines with the packaging viral particles. Quantitative PCR and western blot analysis indicated that the mRNA and protein levels of Mirk in the transgenic RD cells were significantly lower compared to those in the controls. In addition, the increasing apoptosis of RD cells induced by silencing of the Mirk gene was also observed. Overall, the results demonstrated that this recombinant vector-based RNAi expression system is an efficient approach to knockdown Mirk gene expression in the rhabdomyosarcoma RD cell line, which could, thereby, provide both a protocol to study the role of Mirk gene in tumor cells and a safer gene therapy in the clinic.

  14. Thermodynamic examination of 1- to 5-nt purine bulge loops in RNA and DNA constructs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Strom, Shane; Shiskova, Evgenia; Hahm, Yaeeun; Grover, Neena

    2015-07-01

    Bulge loops are common features of RNA structures that are involved in the formation of RNA tertiary structures and are often sites for interactions with proteins and ions. Minimal thermodynamic data currently exist on the bulge size and sequence effects. Using thermal denaturation methods, thermodynamic properties of 1- to 5-nt adenine and guanine bulge loop constructs were examined in 10 mM MgCl(2) or 1 M KCl. The [Formula: see text] loop parameters for 1- to 5-nt purine bulge loops in RNA constructs were between 3.07 and 5.31 kcal/mol in 1 M KCl buffer. In 10 mM magnesium ions, the ΔΔG° values relative to 1 M KCl were 0.47-2.06 kcal/mol more favorable for the RNA bulge loops. The [Formula: see text] loop parameters for 1- to 5-nt purine bulge loops in DNA constructs were between 4.54 and 5.89 kcal/mol. Only 4- and 5-nt guanine constructs showed significant change in stability for the DNA constructs in magnesium ions. A linear correlation is seen between the size of the bulge loop and its stability. New prediction models are proposed for 1- to 5-nt purine bulge loops in RNA and DNA in 1 M KCl. We show that a significant stabilization is seen for small bulge loops in RNA in the presence of magnesium ions. A prediction model is also proposed for 1- to 5-nt purine bulge loop RNA constructs in 10 mM magnesium chloride. © 2015 Strom et al.; Published by Cold Spring Harbor Laboratory Press for the RNA Society.

  15. Simplified methods for the construction of RNA and DNA virus infectious clones.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nagata, Tatsuya; Inoue-Nagata, Alice Kazuko

    2015-01-01

    Infectious virus clones are one of the most powerful tools in plant pathology, molecular biology, and biotechnology. The construction of infectious clones of RNA and DNA viruses, however, usually requires laborious cloning and subcloning steps. In addition, instability of the RNA virus genome is frequently reported after its introduction into the vector and transference to Escherichia coli. These difficulties hamper the cloning procedures, making it tedious and cumbersome. This chapter describes two protocols for a simple construction of infectious viruses, an RNA virus, the tobamovirus Pepper mild mottle virus, and a DNA virus, a bipartite begomovirus. For this purpose, the strategy of overlap-extension PCR was used for the construction of infectious tobamovirus clone and of rolling circle amplification (RCA) for the construction of a dimeric form of the begomovirus clone.

  16. The impact of transcriptional tuning on in vitro integrated rRNA transcription and ribosome construction

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fritz, Brian R.; Jewett, Michael C.

    2014-01-01

    In vitro ribosome construction could enable studies of ribosome assembly and function, provide a route toward constructing minimal cells for synthetic biology, and permit the construction of ribosome variants with new functions. Toward these long-term goals, we recently reported on an integrated, one-pot ribosomal RNA synthesis (rRNA), ribosome assembly, and translation technology (termed iSAT) for the construction of Escherichia coli ribosomes in crude ribosome-free S150 extracts. Here, we aimed to improve the activity of iSAT through transcriptional tuning. Specifically, we increased transcriptional efficiency through 3′ modifications to the rRNA gene sequences, optimized plasmid and polymerase concentrations, and demonstrated the use of a T7-promoted rRNA operon for stoichiometrically balanced rRNA synthesis and native rRNA processing. Our modifications produced a 45-fold improvement in iSAT protein synthesis activity, enabling synthesis of 429 ± 15 nmol/l green fluorescent protein in 6 h batch reactions. Further, we show that the translational activity of ribosomes purified from iSAT reactions is about 20% the activity of native ribosomes purified directly from E. coli cells. Looking forward, we believe iSAT will enable unique studies to unravel the systems biology of ribosome biogenesis and open the way to new methods for making and studying ribosomal variants. PMID:24792158

  17. Small RNA Library Construction for Exosomal RNA from Biological Samples for the Ion Torrent PGM™ and Ion S5™ System.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cheng, Lesley; Hill, Andrew F

    2017-01-01

    Next-generation deep sequencing (NGS) technology represents a powerful and innovative approach to profile small RNA. Currently, there are a number of large-scale and benchtop sequencing platforms available on the market. Although each platform is relatively straightforward to operate, constructing cDNA libraries can be the most difficult part of the NGS workflow. Constructing quality libraries is essential to obtaining a successful sequencing run of high-quality reads and coverage. The quality and yield of RNA affect hybridization and ligation of sequencing adapters. In the field of biomarker discovery, there has been an interest in profiling exosomal RNA from biological fluids. However, very little RNA yield is obtained when extracting RNA from exosomes, thus making library construction difficult. Here, this protocol describes an optimized protocol for constructing small RNA libraries from low yields of RNA, in particular, extracted from exosomes isolated from biological fluids.

  18. Thermodynamic examination of 1- to 5-nt purine bulge loops in RNA and DNA constructs

    Science.gov (United States)

    Strom, Shane; Shiskova, Evgenia; Hahm, Yaeeun

    2015-01-01

    Bulge loops are common features of RNA structures that are involved in the formation of RNA tertiary structures and are often sites for interactions with proteins and ions. Minimal thermodynamic data currently exist on the bulge size and sequence effects. Using thermal denaturation methods, thermodynamic properties of 1- to 5-nt adenine and guanine bulge loop constructs were examined in 10 mM MgCl2 or 1 M KCl. The ΔG37∘ loop parameters for 1- to 5-nt purine bulge loops in RNA constructs were between 3.07 and 5.31 kcal/mol in 1 M KCl buffer. In 10 mM magnesium ions, the ΔΔG° values relative to 1 M KCl were 0.47–2.06 kcal/mol more favorable for the RNA bulge loops. The ΔG37∘ loop parameters for 1- to 5-nt purine bulge loops in DNA constructs were between 4.54 and 5.89 kcal/mol. Only 4- and 5-nt guanine constructs showed significant change in stability for the DNA constructs in magnesium ions. A linear correlation is seen between the size of the bulge loop and its stability. New prediction models are proposed for 1- to 5-nt purine bulge loops in RNA and DNA in 1 M KCl. We show that a significant stabilization is seen for small bulge loops in RNA in the presence of magnesium ions. A prediction model is also proposed for 1- to 5-nt purine bulge loop RNA constructs in 10 mM magnesium chloride. PMID:26022248

  19. Construction of microRNA functional families by a mixture model of position weight matrices.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rhee, Je-Keun; Shin, Soo-Yong; Zhang, Byoung-Tak

    2013-01-01

    MicroRNAs (miRNAs) are small regulatory molecules that repress the translational processes of their target genes by binding to their 3' untranslated regions (3' UTRs). Because the target genes are predominantly determined by their sequence complementarity to the miRNA seed regions (nucleotides 2-7) which are evolutionarily conserved, it is inferred that the target relationships and functions of the miRNA family members are conserved across many species. Therefore, detecting the relevant miRNA families with confidence would help to clarify the conserved miRNA functions, and elucidate miRNA-mediated biological processes. We present a mixture model of position weight matrices for constructing miRNA functional families. This model systematically finds not only evolutionarily conserved miRNA family members but also functionally related miRNAs, as it simultaneously generates position weight matrices representing the conserved sequences. Using mammalian miRNA sequences, in our experiments, we identified potential miRNA groups characterized by similar sequence patterns that have common functions. We validated our results using score measures and by the analysis of the conserved targets. Our method would provide a way to comprehensively identify conserved miRNA functions.

  20. In vitro repair of DNA hairpins containing various numbers of CAG/CTG trinucleotide repeats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Tianyi; Huang, Jian; Gu, Liya; Li, Guo-Min

    2012-02-01

    Expansion of CAG/CTG trinucleotide repeats (TNRs) in humans is associated with a number of neurological and neurodegenerative disorders including Huntington's disease. Increasing evidence suggests that formation of a stable DNA hairpin within CAG/CTG repeats during DNA metabolism leads to TNR instability. However, the molecular mechanism by which cells recognize and repair CAG/CTG hairpins is largely unknown. Recent studies have identified a novel DNA repair pathway specifically removing (CAG)(n)/(CTG)(n) hairpins, which is considered a major mechanism responsible for TNR instability. The hairpin repair (HPR) system targets the repeat tracts for incisions in the nicked strand in an error-free manner. To determine the substrate spectrum of the HPR system and its ability to process smaller hairpins, which may be the intermediates for CAG/CTG expansions, we constructed a series of CAG/CTG hairpin heteroduplexes containing different numbers of repeats (from 5 to 25) and examined their repair in human nuclear extracts. We show here that although repair efficiencies differ slightly among these substrates, removal of the individual hairpin structures all involve endonucleolytic incisions within the repeat tracts in the nicked DNA strand. Analysis of the repair intermediates defined specific incision sites for each substrate, which were all located within the repeat regions. Mismatch repair proteins are not required for, nor do they inhibit, the processing of smaller hairpin structures. These results suggest that the HPR system ensures CAG/CTG stability primarily by removing various sizes of (CAG)(n)/(CTG)(n) hairpin structures during DNA metabolism. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  1. Asymmetric structure of five and six membered DNA hairpin loops

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baumann, U.; Chang, S.

    1995-01-01

    The tertiary structure of nucleic acid hairpins was elucidated by means of the accessibility of the single-strand-specific nuclease from mung bean. This molecular probe has proven especially useful in determining details of the structural arrangement of the nucleotides within a loop. In this study 3'-labeling is introduced to complement previously used 5'-labeling in order to assess and to exclude possible artifacts of the method. Both labeling procedures result in mutually consistent cleavage patterns. Therefore, methodological artifacts can be excluded and the potential of the nuclease as structural probe is increased. DNA hairpins with five and six membered loops reveal an asymmetric loop structure with a sharp bend of the phosphate-ribose backbone between the second and third nucleotide on the 3'-side of a loop. These hairpin structures differ from smaller loops with 3 or 4 members, which reveal this type of bend between the first and second 3' nucleotide, and resemble with respect to the asymmetry anticodon loops of tRNA.

  2. [Construction and identification of a RNA interference plasmid for rat BNIP3 gene].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Ming; Zhang, Xing-mei; Li, Bo-xing; Sun, Hong-yu; Li, Xiao-wen; Gao, Tian-ming

    2010-11-01

    To construct a RNA interfering plasmid targeting rat Bcl-2/E1B-19K-interacting protein 3 (BNIP3) and assess its effect on exogenous BNIP3 expression in HEK293 cells. The miRNA sequences were designed using Invitrogen BLOCK-iT RNAi Designer and synthesized into double-strand oligonucleotides, which were cloned into the pcDNATM6.2-GW/EmGFP-miR vector, followed by transformation of the product into competent Top10 E. coli cells. After expansion of the transformed bacteria, the plasmid was extracted and sequenced before its co-transfection with pEGFP-C3- rBNIP3 plasmid into HEK293 cells. The interference effect of the constructed plasmid on BNIP3 mRNA and protein expression were detected by real-time PCR and Western blotting. The sequencing result indicated that the interfering plasmid targeting rat BNIP3 was constructed correctly. After transfection into HEK293 cells, the interfering plasmid significantly inhibited exogenous BNIP3 mRNA and protein expressions. The RNA interfering plasmid targeting rat BNIP3 has been constructed successfully, which provides a useful tool for studying the function of BNIP3.

  3. Construction and characterization of recombinant Japanese encephalitis virus carrying brainspecific miRNA target sequences

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wen-yuan CAO

    2014-08-01

    Full Text Available Objective To construct the recombinant Japanese encephalitis virus ( JEV carrying brain-specific miRNA targeting sequences. Methods The target sequences of brain-specific miR-124 and miR-125 were introduced into the infectious cDNA clone of JEV to generate recombinant plasmids based on reverse genetics technology. The recombinant plasmids were linearized with Xho Ⅰ and served as templates of transcription with SP6 RNA polymerase to generate infectious viral RNA. The RNA transcripts were then transfected into BHK-21 cells, and the supernatant was obtained after incubated at 37℃, 5% CO2 for 3 days. The cytopathic changes of BHK-21 cells inoculated with the supernatant were observed after one passage. The rescued viruses carrying miRNA target sequences were validated by RT-PCR, standard plaque forming test on BHK-21 cells and growth curves analysis. Results Two recombinant viruses carrying miR-124 or miR-125 target sequence were rescued, respectively. The insertion of miRNA target sequences was confirmed by DNA sequencing. The rescued viruses yielded similar plaque morphology and replication efficiency compared with wild type JEV. Conclusion The recombinant JEV containing brain-specific miRNA target sequences can be obtained by reverse genetics technique, which could be used in further studies of miRNA-mediated tissue-specific attenuation mechanism of JEV. DOI: 10.11855/j.issn.0577-7402.2014.06.01

  4. An automated method for efficient, accurate and reproducible construction of RNA-seq libraries.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tsompana, Maria; Valiyaparambil, Sujith; Bard, Jonathan; Marzullo, Brandon; Nowak, Norma; Buck, Michael Joseph

    2015-04-03

    Integration of RNA-seq expression data with knowledge on chromatin accessibility, histone modifications, DNA methylation, and transcription factor binding has been instrumental for the unveiling of cell-specific local and long-range regulatory patterns, facilitating further investigation on the underlying rules of transcription regulation at an individual and allele-specific level. However, full genome transcriptome characterization has been partially limited by the complexity and increased time-requirements of available RNA-seq library construction protocols. Use of the SX-8G IP-Star® Compact System significantly reduces the hands-on time for RNA-seq library synthesis, adenylation, and adaptor ligation providing with high quality RNA-seq libraries tailored for Illumina high-throughput next-generation sequencing. Generated data exhibits high technical reproducibility compared to data from RNA-seq libraries synthesized manually for the same samples. Obtained results are consistent regardless the researcher, day of the experiment, and experimental run. Overall, the SX-8G IP-Star® Compact System proves an efficient, fast and reliable tool for the construction of next-generation RNA-seq libraries especially for trancriptome-based annotation of larger genomes.

  5. Design, Construction, and Validation of Artificial MicroRNA Vectors Using Agrobacterium-Mediated Transient Expression System.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bhagwat, Basdeo; Chi, Ming; Han, Dianwei; Tang, Haifeng; Tang, Guiliang; Xiang, Yu

    2016-01-01

    Artificial microRNA (amiRNA) technology utilizes microRNA (miRNA) biogenesis pathway to produce artificially selected small RNAs using miRNA gene backbone. It provides a feasible strategy for inducing loss of gene function, and has been applied in functional genomics study, improvement of crop quality and plant virus disease resistance. A big challenge in amiRNA applications is the unpredictability of silencing efficacy of the designed amiRNAs and not all constructed amiRNA candidates would be expressed effectively in plant cells. We and others found that high efficiency and specificity in RNA silencing can be achieved by designing amiRNAs with perfect or almost perfect sequence complementarity to their targets. In addition, we recently demonstrated that Agrobacterium-mediated transient expression system can be used to validate amiRNA constructs, which provides a simple, rapid and effective method to select highly expressible amiRNA candidates for stable genetic transformation. Here, we describe the methods for design of amiRNA candidates with perfect or almost perfect base-pairing to the target gene or gene groups, incorporation of amiRNA candidates in miR168a gene backbone by one step inverse PCR amplification, construction of plant amiRNA expression vectors, and assay of transient expression of amiRNAs in Nicotiana benthamiana through agro-infiltration, small RNA extraction, and amiRNA Northern blot.

  6. Efficient construction of an inverted minimal H1 promoter driven siRNA expression cassette: facilitation of promoter and siRNA sequence exchange.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hoorig Nassanian

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: RNA interference (RNAi, mediated by small interfering RNA (siRNA, is an effective method used to silence gene expression at the post-transcriptional level. Upon introduction into target cells, siRNAs incorporate into the RNA-induced silencing complex (RISC. The antisense strand of the siRNA duplex then "guides" the RISC to the homologous mRNA, leading to target degradation and gene silencing. In recent years, various vector-based siRNA expression systems have been developed which utilize opposing polymerase III promoters to independently drive expression of the sense and antisense strands of the siRNA duplex from the same template. PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: We show here the use of a ligase chain reaction (LCR to develop a new vector system called pInv-H1 in which a DNA sequence encoding a specific siRNA is placed between two inverted minimal human H1 promoters (approximately 100 bp each. Expression of functional siRNAs from this construct has led to efficient silencing of both reporter and endogenous genes. Furthermore, the inverted H1 promoter-siRNA expression cassette was used to generate a retrovirus vector capable of transducing and silencing expression of the targeted protein by>80% in target cells. CONCLUSIONS: The unique design of this construct allows for the efficient exchange of siRNA sequences by the directional cloning of short oligonucleotides via asymmetric restriction sites. This provides a convenient way to test the functionality of different siRNA sequences. Delivery of the siRNA cassette by retroviral transduction suggests that a single copy of the siRNA expression cassette efficiently knocks down gene expression at the protein level. We note that this vector system can potentially be used to generate a random siRNA library. The flexibility of the ligase chain reaction suggests that additional control elements can easily be introduced into this siRNA expression cassette.

  7. BNYVV-derived dsRNA confers resistance to rhizomania disease of sugar beet as evidenced by a novel transgenic hairy root approach

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Pavli, R.; Panopoulos, N.J.; Goldbach, R.W.; Skaracis, G.N.

    2010-01-01

    Agrobacterium rhizogenes-transformed sugar beet hairy roots, expressing dsRNA from the Beet necrotic yellow vein virus replicase gene, were used as a novel approach to assess the efficacy of three intron-hairpin constructs at conferring resistance to rhizomania disease. Genetically engineered roots

  8. Mapping the universe of RNA tetraloop folds

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bottaro, Sandro; Lindorff-Larsen, Kresten

    2017-01-01

    We report a map of RNA tetraloop conformations constructed by calculating pairwise distances among all experimentally determined four-nucleotide hairpin loops. Tetraloops with similar structures are clustered together and, as expected, the two largest clusters are the canonical GNRA and UNCG folds...... that are peculiar to specific positions in ribosomal RNAs and that are stabilized by tertiary interactions. In our RNA tetraloop database we find a significant number of non-GNRA and non-UNCG sequences adopting the canonical GNRA and UNCG folds. Conversely, we find a significant number of GNRA and UNCG sequences...

  9. Short hairpin-loop-structured oligodeoxynucleotides reduce HSV-1 replication

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Heinrich Jochen

    2009-04-01

    Full Text Available Abstract The Herpes simplex virus (HSV is known as an infectious agent and widespread in the human population. The symptoms of HSV infections can range from mild to life threatening, especially in immune-compromised individuals. HSV infections are commonly treated with the guanosine analogue Aciclovir, but reports of resistance are increasing. Efforts are made to establish single-stranded antisense oligodeoxynucleotides (as and small interfering ribonucleic acids (siRNAs for antiviral treatment. Recently, another class of short interfering nucleic acids, partially double-stranded hairpin loop-structured 54 mer oligodeoxynucleotides (ODNs, was shown to allow hydrolysis of HIV RNA by binding to the viral RNA. This leads to a substrate for the viral RNase H. To assess the potential of such ODNs for inhibition of HSV-1 replication, five partially double-stranded ODNs were designed based on the sequences of known siRNAs against HSV-1 with antiviral activity. Three of them are directed against early and two against leaky late genes. Primary human lung fibroblasts, MRC-5, and African green monkey kidney cells, Vero, were transfected with ODNs and subsequently infected. The effect on HSV-1 replication was determined by analyzing the virus titer in cell culture supernatants by quantitative PCR and plaque assays. An inhibitory effect was observed with all five selected ODNs, with two cases showing statistical significance in both cell types. The observed effect was sequence-specific and dose dependent. In one case the ODN was more efficient than a previously described siRNA directed against the same target site in the mRNA of UL5, a component of the helicase/primase complex. HSV-1 virions and ODNs can be applied simultaneously without transfection reagent, but at a 50-fold higher concentration to Vero cells with similar efficiencies. The results underline the potential of partially double-stranded hairpin loop-structured ODNs as antiviral agents.

  10. Conditionally replicating adenoviruses expressing short hairpin RNAs silence the expression of a target gene in cancer cells.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Carette, J.E.; Overmeer, R.M.; Schagen, F.H.E.; Alemany, R; Barski, OA; Gerritsen, W.R.; Beusechem-Kaptein, van V.W.

    2004-01-01

    RNA interference (RNAi) is a posttranscriptional silencing mechanism triggered by double-stranded RNA that was recently shown to function in mammalian cells. Expression of cancer-associated genes was knocked down by expressing short hairpin RNAs (shRNAs) in cancer cells. By virtue of its excellent

  11. The 5' spreading of small RNAs in Dictyostelium discoideum depends on the RNA-dependent RNA polymerase RrpC and on the dicer-related nuclease DrnB.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Stephan Wiegand

    Full Text Available RNA interference (RNAi is a gene-regulatory mechanism in eukarya that is based on the presence of double stranded RNA and that can act on both, the transcription or post-transcriptional level. In many species, RNA-dependent RNA polymerases (RdRPs are required for RNAi. To study the function of the three RdRPs in the amoeba Dictyostelium discoideum, we have deleted the encoding genes rrpA, rrpB and rrpC in all possible combinations. In these strains, expression of either antisense or hairpin RNA constructs against the transgene lacZ resulted in a 50% reduced β-Galactosidase activity. Northern blots surprisingly revealed unchanged lacZ mRNA levels, indicative of post-transcriptional regulation. Only in rrpC knock out strains, low levels of β-gal small interfering RNAs (siRNAs could be detected in antisense RNA expressing strains. In contrast to this, and at considerably higher levels, all hairpin RNA expressing strains featured β-gal siRNAs. Spreading of the silencing signal to mRNA sequences 5' of the original hairpin trigger was observed in all strains, except when the rrpC gene or that of the dicer-related nuclease DrnB was deleted. Thus, our data indicate that transitivity of an RNA silencing signal exists in D. discoideum and that it requires the two enzymes RrpC and DrnB.

  12. Single-molecule observations of RNA-RNA kissing interactions in a DNA nanostructure.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Takeuchi, Yosuke; Endo, Masayuki; Suzuki, Yuki; Hidaka, Kumi; Durand, Guillaume; Dausse, Eric; Toulmé, Jean-Jacques; Sugiyama, Hiroshi

    2016-01-01

    RNA molecules uniquely form a complex through specific hairpin loops, called a kissing complex. The kissing complex is widely investigated and used for the construction of RNA nanostructures. Molecular switches have also been created by combining a kissing loop and a ligand-binding aptamer to control the interactions of RNA molecules. In this study, we incorporated two kinds of RNA molecules into a DNA origami structure and used atomic force microscopy to observe their ligand-responsive interactions at the single-molecule level. We used a designed RNA aptamer called GTPswitch, which has a guanosine triphosphate (GTP) responsive domain and can bind to the target RNA hairpin named Aptakiss in the presence of GTP. We observed shape changes of the DNA/RNA strands in the DNA origami, which are induced by the GTPswitch, into two different shapes in the absence and presence of GTP, respectively. We also found that the switching function in the nanospace could be improved by using a cover strand over the kissing loop of the GTPswitch or by deleting one base from this kissing loop. These newly designed ligand-responsive aptamers can be used for the controlled assembly of the various DNA and RNA nanostructures.

  13. Assembly PCR oligo maker: a tool for designing oligodeoxynucleotides for constructing long DNA molecules for RNA production

    OpenAIRE

    Rydzanicz, Roman; Zhao, X. Sharon; Johnson, Philip E.

    2005-01-01

    We describe a computer program, Assembly PCR Oligo Maker, created to automate the design of oligodeoxynucleotides for the PCR-based construction of long DNA molecules. This program is freely available at and has been specifically designed to aid in the construction of DNA molecules that are to be used for the production of RNA molecules by in vitro synthesis with T7 RNA polymerase. The input for Assembly PCR Oligo Maker is either the desired DNA sequence to be made or an RNA sequence. If RNA ...

  14. Efficient inhibition of HIV-1 replication by an artificial polycistronic miRNA construct

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zhang Tao

    2012-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background RNA interference (RNAi has been used as a promising approach to inhibit human immunodeficiency virus type 1 (HIV-1 replication for both in vitro and in vivo animal models. However, HIV-1 escape mutants after RNAi treatment have been reported. Expressing multiple small interfering RNAs (siRNAs against conserved viral sequences can serve as a genetic barrier for viral escape, and optimization of the efficiency of this process was the aim of this study. Results An artificial polycistronic transcript driven by a CMV promoter was designed to inhibit HIV-1 replication. The artificial polycistronic transcript contained two pre-miR-30a backbones and one pre-miR-155 backbone, which are linked by a sequence derived from antisense RNA sequence targeting the HIV-1 env gene. Our results demonstrated that this artificial polycistronic transcript simultaneously expresses three anti-HIV siRNAs and efficiently inhibits HIV-1 replication. In addition, the biosafety of MT-4 cells expressing this polycistronic miRNA transcript was evaluated, and no apparent impacts on cell proliferation rate, interferon response, and interruption of native miRNA processing were observed. Conclusions The strategy described here to generate an artificial polycistronic transcript to inhibit viral replication provided an opportunity to select and optimize many factors to yield highly efficient constructs expressing multiple siRNAs against viral infection.

  15. Construction of an Artificial MicroRNA Expression Vector for Simultaneous Inhibition of Multiple Genes in Mammalian Cells

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    Deyin Guo

    2009-05-01

    Full Text Available Recently, artificial microRNA (amiRNA has become a promising RNA interference (RNAi technology. Here, we describe a flexible and reliable method for constructing both single- and multi-amiRNA expression vectors. Two universal primers, together with two specific primers carrying the encoding sequence of amiRNA were designed and utilized to synthesize the functional amiRNA cassette through a one-step PCR. With appropriate restriction sites, the synthesized amiRNA cassettes can be cloned into any site of different destination vectors. Using the method, we constructed both single- and multi-amiRNA expression vectors to target three reporter genes, which code firefly luciferase (Fluc, enhanced green fluorescent protein (EGFP and β-galactosidase (LacZ, respectively. The expressions of three genes were all specifically inhibited by either the corresponding single- or the multi-amiRNA expression vector in 293T cells. And the RNAi efficiency of each amiRNA produced by both single- and multi-amiRNA expression vectors was comparable.

  16. An improved method for RNA isolation and cDNA library construction from immature seeds of Jatropha curcas L

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    Kaur Jatinder

    2010-05-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background RNA quality and quantity is sometimes unsuitable for cDNA library construction, from plant seeds rich in oil, polysaccharides and other secondary metabolites. Seeds of jatropha (Jatropha curcas L. are rich in fatty acids/lipids, storage proteins, polysaccharides, and a number of other secondary metabolites that could either bind and/or co-precipitate with RNA, making it unsuitable for downstream applications. Existing RNA isolation methods and commercial kits often fail to deliver high-quality total RNA from immature jatropha seeds for poly(A+ RNA purification and cDNA synthesis. Findings A protocol has been developed for isolating good quality total RNA from immature jatropha seeds, whereby a combination of the CTAB based RNA extraction method and a silica column of a commercial plant RNA extraction kit is used. The extraction time was reduced from two days to about 3 hours and the RNA was suitable for poly(A+ RNA purification, cDNA synthesis, cDNA library construction, RT-PCR, and Northern hybridization. Based on sequence information from selected clones and amplified PCR product, the cDNA library seems to be a good source of full-length jatropha genes. The method was equally effective for isolating RNA from mustard and rice seeds. Conclusions This is a simple CTAB + silica column method to extract high quality RNA from oil rich immature jatropha seeds that is suitable for several downstream applications. This method takes less time for RNA extraction and is equally effective for other tissues where the quality and quantity of RNA is highly interfered by the presence of fatty acids, polysaccharides and polyphenols.

  17. Construction and analysis of cardiac hypertrophy-associated lncRNA-mRNA network based on competitive endogenous RNA reveal functional lncRNAs in cardiac hypertrophy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Song, Chao; Zhang, Jian; Liu, Yan; Pan, Hao; Qi, Han-Ping; Cao, Yong-Gang; Zhao, Jian-Mei; Li, Shang; Guo, Jing; Sun, Hong-Li; Li, Chun-Quan

    2016-03-08

    Cardiac hypertrophy (CH) could increase cardiac after-load and lead to heart failure. Recent studies have suggested that long non-coding RNA (lncRNA) played a crucial role in the process of the cardiac hypertrophy, such as Mhrt, TERMINATOR. Some studies have further found a new interacting mechanism, competitive endogenous RNA (ceRNA), of which lncRNA could interact with micro-RNAs (miRNA) and indirectly interact with mRNAs through competing interactions. However, the mechanism of ceRNA regulated by lncRNA in the CH remained unclear. In our study, we generated a global triple network containing mRNA, miRNA and lncRNA, and extracted a CH related lncRNA-mRNA network (CHLMN) through integrating the data from starbase, miRanda database and gene expression profile. Based on the ceRNA mechanism, we analyzed the characters of CHLMN and found that 3 lncRNAs (SLC26A4-AS1, RP11-344E13.3 and MAGI1-IT1) were high related to CH. We further performed cluster module analysis and random walk with restart for the CHLMN, finally 14 lncRNAs had been discovered as the potential CH related disease genes. Our results showed that lncRNA played an important role in the CH and could shed new light to the understanding underlying mechanisms of the CH.

  18. Non-specific binding of Na+ and Mg2+ to RNA determined by force spectroscopy methods

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bizarro, C. V.; Alemany, A.; Ritort, F.

    2012-01-01

    RNA duplex stability depends strongly on ionic conditions, and inside cells RNAs are exposed to both monovalent and multivalent ions. Despite recent advances, we do not have general methods to quantitatively account for the effects of monovalent and multivalent ions on RNA stability, and the thermodynamic parameters for secondary structure prediction have only been derived at 1M [Na+]. Here, by mechanically unfolding and folding a 20 bp RNA hairpin using optical tweezers, we study the RNA thermodynamics and kinetics at different monovalent and mixed monovalent/Mg2+ salt conditions. We measure the unfolding and folding rupture forces and apply Kramers theory to extract accurate information about the hairpin free energy landscape under tension at a wide range of ionic conditions. We obtain non-specific corrections for the free energy of formation of the RNA hairpin and measure how the distance of the transition state to the folded state changes with force and ionic strength. We experimentally validate the Tightly Bound Ion model and obtain values for the persistence length of ssRNA. Finally, we test the approximate rule by which the non-specific binding affinity of divalent cations at a given concentration is equivalent to that of monovalent cations taken at 100-fold concentration for small molecular constructs. PMID:22492710

  19. Optimization and comparison of knockdown efficacy between polymerase II expressed shRNA and artificial miRNA targeting luciferase and Apolipoprotein B100

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Maczuga Piotr

    2012-07-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Controlling and limiting the expression of short hairpin RNA (shRNA by using constitutive or tissue-specific polymerase II (pol II expression can be a promising strategy to avoid RNAi toxicity. However, to date detailed studies on requirements for effective pol II shRNA expression and processing are not available. We investigated the optimal structural configuration of shRNA molecules, namely: hairpin location, stem length and termination signal required for effective pol II expression and compared it with an alternative strategy of avoiding toxicity by using artificial microRNA (miRNA scaffolds. Results Highly effective shRNAs targeting luciferase (shLuc or Apolipoprotein B100 (shApoB1 and shApoB2 were placed under the control of the pol II CMV promoter and expressed at +5 or +6 nucleotides (nt with reference to the transcription start site (TSS. Different transcription termination signals (TTS, namely minimal polyadenylation (pA, poly T (T5 and U1 were also used. All pol II- expressed shRNA variants induced mild inhibition of Luciferase reporters carrying specific targets and none of them showed comparable efficacy to their polymerase III-expressed H1-shRNA controls, regardless of hairpin position and termination signal used. Extending hairpin stem length from 20 basepairs (bp to 21, 25 or 29 bp yielded only slight improvement in the overall efficacy. When shLuc, shApoB1 and shApoB2 were placed in an artificial miRNA scaffold, two out of three were as potent as the H1-shRNA controls. Quantification of small interfering RNA (siRNA molecules showed that the artificial miRNA constructs expressed less molecules than H1-shRNAs and that CMV-shRNA expressed the lowest amount of siRNA molecules suggesting that RNAi processing in this case is least effective. Furthermore, CMV-miApoB1 and CMV-miApoB2 were as effective as the corresponding H1-shApoB1 and H1-shApoB2 in inhibiting endogenous ApoB mRNA. Conclusion Our results demonstrate

  20. How hairpin vortices emerge from exact invariant solutions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schneider, Tobias M.; Farano, Mirko; de Palma, Pietro; Robinet, Jean-Christoph; Cherubini, Stefania

    2017-11-01

    Hairpin vortices are among the most commonly observed flow structures in wall-bounded shear flows. However, within the dynamical system approach to turbulence, those structures have not yet been described. They are not captured by known exact invariant solutions of the Navier-Stokes equations nor have other state-space structures supporting hairpins been identified. We show that hairpin structures are observed along an optimally growing trajectory leaving a well known exact traveling wave solution of plane Poiseuille flow. The perturbation triggering hairpins does not correspond to an unstable mode of the exact traveling wave but lies in the stable manifold where non-normality causes strong transient amplification.

  1. Construction of an miRNA-Regulated Pathway Network Reveals Candidate Biomarkers for Postmenopausal Osteoporosis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Min Shao

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available We aimed to identify risk pathways for postmenopausal osteoporosis (PMOP via establishing an microRNAs- (miRNA- regulated pathway network (MRPN. Firstly, we identified differential pathways through calculating gene- and pathway-level statistics based on the accumulated normal samples using the individual pathway aberrance score (iPAS. Significant pathways based on differentially expressed genes (DEGs using DAVID were extracted, followed by identifying the common pathways between iPAS and DAVID methods. Next, miRNAs prediction was implemented via calculating TargetScore values with precomputed input (log fold change (FC, TargetScan context score (TSCS, and probabilities of conserved targeting (PCT. An MRPN construction was constructed using the common genes in the common pathways and the predicted miRNAs. Using false discovery rate (FDR < 0.05, 279 differential pathways were identified. Using the criteria of FDR < 0.05 and log⁡FC≥2, 39 DEGs were retrieved, and these DEGs were enriched in 64 significant pathways identified by DAVID. Overall, 27 pathways were the common ones between two methods. Importantly, MAPK signaling pathway and PI3K-Akt signaling pathway were the first and second significantly enriched ones, respectively. These 27 common pathways separated PMOP from controls with the accuracy of 0.912. MAPK signaling pathway and PI3K/Akt signaling pathway might play crucial roles in PMOP.

  2. A Toolbox for Herpesvirus miRNA Research: Construction of a Complete Set of KSHV miRNA Deletion Mutants

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vaibhav Jain

    2016-02-01

    Full Text Available Kaposi’s sarcoma-associated herpesvirus (KSHV encodes 12 viral microRNAs (miRNAs that are expressed during latency. Research into KSHV miRNA function has suffered from a lack of genetic systems to study viral miRNA mutations in the context of the viral genome. We used the Escherichia coli Red recombination system together with a new bacmid background, BAC16, to create mutants for all known KSHV miRNAs. The specific miRNA deletions or mutations and the integrity of the bacmids have been strictly quality controlled using PCR, restriction digestion, and sequencing. In addition, stable viral producer cell lines based on iSLK cells have been created for wildtype KSHV, for 12 individual miRNA knock-out mutants (ΔmiR-K12-1 through -12, and for mutants deleted for 10 of 12 (ΔmiR-cluster or all 12 miRNAs (ΔmiR-all. NGS, in combination with SureSelect technology, was employed to sequence the entire latent genome within all producer cell lines. qPCR assays were used to verify the expression of the remaining viral miRNAs in a subset of mutants. Induction of the lytic cycle leads to efficient production of progeny viruses that have been used to infect endothelial cells. Wt BAC16 and miR mutant iSLK producer cell lines are now available to the research community.

  3. Assembly PCR oligo maker: a tool for designing oligodeoxynucleotides for constructing long DNA molecules for RNA production.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rydzanicz, Roman; Zhao, X Sharon; Johnson, Philip E

    2005-07-01

    We describe a computer program, Assembly PCR Oligo Maker, created to automate the design of oligodeoxynucleotides for the PCR-based construction of long DNA molecules. This program is freely available at http://publish.yorku.ca/~pjohnson/AssemblyPCRoligomaker.html and has been specifically designed to aid in the construction of DNA molecules that are to be used for the production of RNA molecules by in vitro synthesis with T7 RNA polymerase. The input for Assembly PCR Oligo Maker is either the desired DNA sequence to be made or an RNA sequence. If RNA is the input, the program first determines the DNA sequence necessary to produce the desired RNA molecule. The program then determines the sequences of all the oligodeoxynucleotides necessary for a two-step assembly PCR-based synthesis of the desired DNA molecule. The oligodeoxynucleotide sequences outputted are designed to have a uniform melt temperature and are checked for regions of overlap outside of the desired priming regions necessary for the PCR reaction. The validity of the program was verified experimentally by synthesizing a 191-nt long DNA molecule using the DNA sequences suggested by the program.

  4. The impact of RNA sequence library construction protocols on transcriptomic profiling of leukemia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kumar, Ashwini; Kankainen, Matti; Parsons, Alun; Kallioniemi, Olli; Mattila, Pirkko; Heckman, Caroline A

    2017-08-17

    RNA sequencing (RNA-seq) has become an indispensable tool to identify disease associated transcriptional profiles and determine the molecular underpinnings of diseases. However, the broad adaptation of the methodology into the clinic is still hampered by inconsistent results from different RNA-seq protocols and involves further evaluation of its analytical reliability using patient samples. Here, we applied two commonly used RNA-seq library preparation protocols to samples from acute leukemia patients to understand how poly-A-tailed mRNA selection (PA) and ribo-depletion (RD) based RNA-seq library preparation protocols affect gene fusion detection, variant calling, and gene expression profiling. Overall, the protocols produced similar results with consistent outcomes. Nevertheless, the PA protocol was more efficient in quantifying expression of leukemia marker genes and showed better performance in the expression-based classification of leukemia. Independent qRT-PCR experiments verified that the PA protocol better represented total RNA compared to the RD protocol. In contrast, the RD protocol detected a higher number of non-coding RNA features and had better alignment efficiency. The RD protocol also recovered more known fusion-gene events, although variability was seen in fusion gene predictions. The overall findings provide a framework for the use of RNA-seq in a precision medicine setting with limited number of samples and suggest that selection of the library preparation protocol should be based on the objectives of the analysis.

  5. Construction of differential mRNA-lncRNA crosstalk networks based on ceRNA hypothesis uncover key roles of lncRNAs implicated in esophageal squamous cell carcinoma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Shuang; Ning, Qianqian; Zhang, Guobin; Sun, Hong; Wang, Zhen; Li, Yixue

    2016-12-27

    Increasing evidence has indicated that lncRNAs acting as competing endogenous RNAs (ceRNAs) play crucial roles in tumorigenesis, metastasis and diagnosis of cancer. However, the function of lncRNAs as ceRNAs involved in esophageal squamous cell carcinoma (ESCC) is still largely unknown. In this study, clinical implications of two intrinsic subtypes of ESCC were identified based on expression profiles of lncRNA and mRNA. ESCC subtype-specific differential co-expression networks between mRNAs and lncRNAs were constructed to reveal dynamic changes of their crosstalks mediated by miRNAs during tumorigenesis. Several well-known cancer-associated lncRNAs as the hubs of the two networks were firstly proposed in ESCC. Based on the ceRNA mechanism, we illustrated that the"loss" of miR-186-mediated PVT1-mRNA and miR-26b-mediated LINC00240-mRNA crosstalks were related to the two ESCC subtypes respectively. In addition, crosstalks between LINC00152 and EGFR, LINC00240 and LOX gene family were identified, which were associated with the function of "response to wounding" and "extracellular matrix-receptor interaction". Furthermore, functional cooperation of multiple lncRNAs was discovered in the two differential mRNA-lncRNA crosstalk networks. These together systematically uncovered the roles of lncRNAs as ceRNAs implicated in ESCC.

  6. Characterization of conserved bases in 4.5S RNA of Escherichia coli by construction of new F' factors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peterson, James M; Phillips, Gregory J

    2008-12-01

    To more clearly understand the function of conserved bases of 4.5S RNA, the product of the essential ffs gene of Escherichia coli, and to address conflicting results reported in other studies, we have developed a new genetic system to characterize ffs mutants. Multiple ffs alleles were generated by altering positions that correspond to the region of the RNA molecule that interacts directly with Ffh in assembly of the signal recognition particle. To facilitate characterization of the ffs mutations with minimal manipulation, recombineering was used to construct new F' factors to easily move each allele into different genetic backgrounds for expression in single copy. In combination with plasmids that expressed ffs in multiple copy numbers, the F' factors provided an accurate assessment of the ability of the different 4.5S RNA mutants to function in vivo. Consistent with structural analysis of the signal recognition particle (SRP), highly conserved bases in 4.5S RNA are important for binding Ffh. Despite the high degree of conservation, however, only a single base (C62) was indispensable for RNA function under all conditions tested. To quantify the interaction between 4.5S RNA and Ffh, an assay was developed to measure the ability of mutant 4.5S RNA molecules to copurify with Ffh. Defects in Ffh binding correlated with loss of SRP-dependent protein localization. Real-time quantitative PCR was also used to measure the levels of wild-type and mutant 4.5S RNA expressed in vivo. These results clarify inconsistencies from prior studies and yielded a convenient method to study the function of multiple alleles.

  7. Linear programming model to construct phylogenetic network for 16S rRNA sequences of photosynthetic organisms and influenza viruses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mathur, Rinku; Adlakha, Neeru

    2014-06-01

    Phylogenetic trees give the information about the vertical relationships of ancestors and descendants but phylogenetic networks are used to visualize the horizontal relationships among the different organisms. In order to predict reticulate events there is a need to construct phylogenetic networks. Here, a Linear Programming (LP) model has been developed for the construction of phylogenetic network. The model is validated by using data sets of chloroplast of 16S rRNA sequences of photosynthetic organisms and Influenza A/H5N1 viruses. Results obtained are in agreement with those obtained by earlier researchers.

  8. Shapes of interacting RNA complexes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Fu, Benjamin Mingming; Reidys, Christian

    2014-01-01

    Shapes of interacting RNA complexes are studied using a filtration via their topological genus. A shape of an RNA complex is obtained by (iteratively) collapsing stacks and eliminating hairpin loops.This shape-projection preserves the topological core of the RNA complex and for fixed topological...... genus there are only finitely many such shapes. Our main result is a new bijection that relates the shapes of RNA complexes with shapes of RNA structures. This allows to compute the shape polynomial of RNA complexes via the shape polynomial of RNA structures. We furthermore present a linear time uniform...... sampling algorithm for shapes of RNA complexes of fixed topological genus....

  9. In silico miRNA prediction in metazoan genomes: balancing between sensitivity and specificity

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fiers Mark WJE

    2009-04-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background MicroRNAs (miRNAs, short ~21-nucleotide RNA molecules, play an important role in post-transcriptional regulation of gene expression. The number of known miRNA hairpins registered in the miRBase database is rapidly increasing, but recent reports suggest that many miRNAs with restricted temporal or tissue-specific expression remain undiscovered. Various strategies for in silico miRNA identification have been proposed to facilitate miRNA discovery. Notably support vector machine (SVM methods have recently gained popularity. However, a drawback of these methods is that they do not provide insight into the biological properties of miRNA sequences. Results We here propose a new strategy for miRNA hairpin prediction in which the likelihood that a genomic hairpin is a true miRNA hairpin is evaluated based on statistical distributions of observed biological variation of properties (descriptors of known miRNA hairpins. These distributions are transformed into a single and continuous outcome classifier called the L score. Using a dataset of known miRNA hairpins from the miRBase database and an exhaustive set of genomic hairpins identified in the genome of Caenorhabditis elegans, a subset of 18 most informative descriptors was selected after detailed analysis of correlation among and discriminative power of individual descriptors. We show that the majority of previously identified miRNA hairpins have high L scores, that the method outperforms miRNA prediction by threshold filtering and that it is more transparent than SVM classifiers. Conclusion The L score is applicable as a prediction classifier with high sensitivity for novel miRNA hairpins. The L-score approach can be used to rank and select interesting miRNA hairpin candidates for downstream experimental analysis when coupled to a genome-wide set of in silico-identified hairpins or to facilitate the analysis of large sets of putative miRNA hairpin loci obtained in deep

  10. [Apoptosis of glioma cell line U251 induced by small interfering RNA targeting survivin].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xu, Ru-xiang; Tu, Yan-yang; Jiang, Xiao-dan; Feng, Jiang-nan; Huang, Jun

    2006-04-01

    To construct recombinant expression vectors of small interfering RNA (siRNA) targeting survivin and investigate apoptosis of glioma cell line U251 mediated by the survivin-targeting siRNA. According to the sequence of the coding region of survivin gene, two strings of 19 nucleotides of inverted sequence flanking the loop sequence of two complementary 9-base oligonucleotides were designed and synthesized to form hairpin construct as the DNA templates for the target siRNA. The siRNA templates were cloned into siRNA expression vector pGenesil-1, and the resulted vector pGenesil-1/survivin was transfected into U251 cells using Metafectene following the standard protocols. Real-time PCR and Western blotting were performed to evaluate survivin gene silencing induced by siRNA transfection at the RNA and protein levels, respectively. Flow cytometry analysis with Annexin-V/PI double staining was used to determine the cell apoptosis. Real-time RT-PCR and Western blotting revealed significantly lowered survivin expression at both RNA and protein levels in transfected U251 cells, which exhibited a significantly higher apoptosis rate after transfection as shown by flow cytometry analysis. RNA interference mediated by the siRNA expression vector pGenesi-l/survivin can significantly reduce survivin expression and induce remarkable apoptosis in U251 cells.

  11. Electron neutral collision frequency measurement with the hairpin resonator probe

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peterson, David J.; Kraus, Philip; Chua, Thai Cheng; Larson, Lynda; Shannon, Steven C.

    2017-09-01

    Electron neutral collision frequency is measured using both grounded and floating hairpin resonator probes in a 27 MHz parallel plate capacitively coupled plasma. Operating conditions are 0.1-2 Torr (13.3-267 Pa) in Ar, He, and Ar-He gas mixtures. The method treats the hairpin probe as a two wire transmission line immersed in a dielectric medium. Measurements are obtained using a pressure and sheath correction process by sweeping over assumed collision frequencies in order to obtain the measured collision frequency. Results are compared to hybrid plasma equipment module simulations and show good agreement.

  12. Construction of RNA standards for high-resolution automatic product analysis in quantitative competitive RT-PCR.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Repp, R; Borkhardt, A; Gossen, R; Kreuder, J; Hammermann, J; Lampert, F

    1995-07-01

    The exponential character of PCR amplification may compromise quantitative assays because it multiplies minor sample-to-sample variations. To overcome these problems, several authors have used recombinant standard DNA or RNA molecules to be spiked into the samples in a dilution series of known copy numbers before co-amplification by PCR. To obtain an equal efficacy of reverse transcription and PCR amplification, standard and template molecules should be highly homologous. However, the limited resolution of commonly used agarose gel electrophoresis requires rather large differences in size and nucleotide sequence to separate both molecules from each other after PCR. Due to a much higher resolution, automatic post-PCR analyzing systems based on laser-induced fluorescence may help to overcome these difficulties. For using the capabilities of these systems in quantitative competitive RT-PCR, we developed a protocol to construct recombinant RNA standard molecules that only differ from the target sequence by a small deletion of 8 nucleotides. It is based on PCR-induced mutagenesis and solid-phase in vitro transcription. This protocol was applied to quantify multidrug resistance gene (MDRI) mRNA in malignant cells, but it can easily be adapted to any gene of interest.

  13. micro-RNA screening and prediction model construction for diagnosis of salt-sensitive essential hypertension.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Qi, Han; Liu, Zheng; Liu, Bin; Cao, Han; Sun, Weiping; Yan, Yuxiang; Zhang, Ling

    2017-04-01

    Commonly used tests for diagnosis of salt-sensitive hypertension (SSH) are complex and time-consuming, so new methods are required. Many studies have demonstrated roles for miRNAs in hypertension; however, the diagnostic value of miRNAs has yet to be determined for human SSH. In this study, we examined miRNA expression profiles by initial high-throughput miRNA sequencing of samples from patients with salt-sensitive and salt-resistant hypertension (SSH and SRH, respectively; n = 6, both groups), followed by validation by quantitative real-time polymerase chain reaction (qRT-PCR) in a larger cohort (n = 91). We also evaluated differences in baseline characteristics (e.g., age, sex, body mass index, consumption of specific foods) between the SSH and SRH groups. Of 36 miRNAs identified as differentially expressed between SSH and SRH groups by RNA-Seq, 8 were analyzed by qRT-PCR. There were significant differences in the expression levels of hsa-miR-361-5p and hsa-miR-362-5p between the 2 groups (P = .023 and.049, respectively). In addition, there were significant differences in sauce and poultry consumption between the 2 groups (P = .004 and.001, respectively). The areas under the curve (AUC) determined by receptor operating characteristic (ROC) analysis for hsa-miR-361-5p and all 8 miRNAs were 0.793 (95% CI, 0.698-0.888; sensitivity = 73.9%, specificity = 74.4%; P SSH.

  14. The haloarchaeal MCM proteins: bioinformatic analysis and targeted mutagenesis of the β7-β8 and β9-β10 hairpin loops and conserved zinc binding domain cysteines

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tatjana P Kristensen

    2014-03-01

    Full Text Available The hexameric MCM complex is the catalytic core of the replicative helicase in eukaryotic and archaeal cells. Here we describe the first in vivo analysis of archaeal MCM protein structure and function relationships using the genetically tractable haloarchaeon Haloferax volcanii as a model system. Hfx. volcanii encodes a single MCM protein that is part of the previously identified core group of haloarchaeal MCM proteins. Three structural features of the N-terminal domain of the Hfx. volcanii MCM protein were targeted for mutagenesis: the β7-β8 and β9-β10 β-hairpin loops and putative zinc binding domain. Five strains carrying single point mutations in the β7-β8 β-hairpin loop were constructed, none of which displayed impaired cell growth under normal conditions or when treated with the DNA damaging agent mitomycin C. However, short sequence deletions within the β7-β8 β-hairpin were not tolerated and neither was replacement of the highly conserved residue glutamate 187 with alanine. Six strains carrying paired alanine substitutions within the β9-β10 β-hairpin loop were constructed, leading to the conclusion that no individual amino acid within that hairpin loop is absolutely required for MCM function, although one of the mutant strains displays greatly enhanced sensitivity to mitomycin C. Deletions of two or four amino acids from the β9-β10 β-hairpin were tolerated but mutants carrying larger deletions were inviable. Similarly, it was not possible to construct mutants in which any of the conserved zinc binding cysteines was replaced with alanine, underlining the likely importance of zinc binding for MCM function. The results of these studies demonstrate the feasibility of using Hfx. volcanii as a model system for reverse genetic analysis of archaeal MCM protein function and provide important confirmation of the in vivo importance of conserved structural features identified by previous bioinformatic, biochemical and structural

  15. Whirlwinds and hairpins in the atmospheric surface layer

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Oncley, Steven P.; Hartogensis, O.K.; Tong, Chenning

    2016-01-01

    Vortices in the atmospheric surface layer are characterized using observations at unprecedented resolution from a fixed array of 31 turbulence sensors. During the day, these vortices likely are dust devils, though no visual observations are available for confirmation. At night, hairpin vortices

  16. The Plastid Genome in Cladophorales Green Algae Is Encoded by Hairpin Chromosomes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Del Cortona, Andrea; Leliaert, Frederik; Bogaert, Kenny A; Turmel, Monique; Boedeker, Christian; Janouškovec, Jan; Lopez-Bautista, Juan M; Verbruggen, Heroen; Vandepoele, Klaas; De Clerck, Olivier

    2017-12-18

    Virtually all plastid (chloroplast) genomes are circular double-stranded DNA molecules, typically between 100 and 200 kb in size and encoding circa 80-250 genes. Exceptions to this universal plastid genome architecture are very few and include the dinoflagellates, where genes are located on DNA minicircles. Here we report on the highly deviant chloroplast genome of Cladophorales green algae, which is entirely fragmented into hairpin chromosomes. Short- and long-read high-throughput sequencing of DNA and RNA demonstrated that the chloroplast genes of Boodlea composita are encoded on 1- to 7-kb DNA contigs with an exceptionally high GC content, each containing a long inverted repeat with one or two protein-coding genes and conserved non-coding regions putatively involved in replication and/or expression. We propose that these contigs correspond to linear single-stranded DNA molecules that fold onto themselves to form hairpin chromosomes. The Boodlea chloroplast genes are highly divergent from their corresponding orthologs, and display an alternative genetic code. The origin of this highly deviant chloroplast genome most likely occurred before the emergence of the Cladophorales, and coincided with an elevated transfer of chloroplast genes to the nucleus. A chloroplast genome that is composed only of linear DNA molecules is unprecedented among eukaryotes, and highlights unexpected variation in plastid genome architecture. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  17. Tat-dependent production of an HIV-1 TAR-encoded miRNA-like small RNA

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Harwig, Alex; Jongejan, Aldo; van Kampen, Antoine H. C.; Berkhout, Ben; Das, Atze T.

    2016-01-01

    Evidence is accumulating that retroviruses can produce microRNAs (miRNAs). To prevent cleavage of their RNA genome, retroviruses have to use an alternative RNA source as miRNA precursor. The transacting responsive (TAR) hairpin structure in HIV-1 RNA has been suggested as source for miRNAs, but how

  18. Construction

    Science.gov (United States)

    2002-01-01

    San Juan, PR Tren Urbano Subway Project, San Juan, PR U.S. Army South, San Juan, PR U.S. Coast Guard Housing Project, San Juan, PR U.S. Coast Guard...construction?, Foresight/CRISP Workshop on Nanotechnology, Royal Society of Arts . Cheltenham, England: 2001, p.5. 56 Concrete Proposals, Economist, July 24

  19. Comparative analysis of RNA silencing suppression activities between viral suppressors and an endogenous plant RNA-dependent RNA polymerase.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yoon, Ju-Yeon; Han, Kyoung-Sik; Park, Han-Yong; Choi, Seung-Kook

    2012-06-01

    RNA silencing is an evolutionarily conserved system that functions as an antiviral mechanism in eukaryotes, including higher plants. To counteract this, several plant viruses express silencing suppressors that inhibit RNA silencing in host plants. Here, we show that both 2b protein from peanut stunt virus (PSV) and a hairpin construct (designated hp-RDR6) that silences endogenous RNA-dependent RNA polymerase 6 (RDR6) strongly suppress RNA silencing. The Agrobacterium infiltration system was used to demonstrate that both PSV 2b and hp-RDR6 suppressed local RNA silencing as strongly as helper component (HC-Pro) from potato virus Y (PVY) and P19 from tomato bush stunt virus (TBSV). The 2b protein from PSV eliminated the small-interfering RNAs (siRNAs) associated with RNA silencing and prevented systemic silencing, similar to 2b protein from cucumber mosaic virus (CMV). On the other hand, hp-RDR6 suppressed RNA silencing by inhibiting the generation of secondary siRNAs. The small coat protein (SCP) of squash mosaic virus (SqMV) also displayed weak suppression activity of RNA silencing. Agrobacterium-mediated gene transfer was used to investigate whether viral silencing suppressors or hp-RDR6 enhanced accumulations of green fluorescence protein (GFP) and β-glucuronidase (GUS) as markers of expression in leaf tissues of Nicotina benthamiana. Expression of both GFP and GUS was significantly enhanced in the presence of PSV 2b or CMV 2b, compared to no suppression or the weak SqMV SCP suppressor. Co-expression with hp-RDR6 also significantly increased the expression of GFP and GUS to levels similar to those induced by PVY HC-Pro and TBSV P19.

  20. The construction of a recombinant cDNA library representative of the poly(A)+ mRNA population from normal human lymphocytes.

    OpenAIRE

    Woods, D; Crampton, J; Clarke, B; Williamson, R

    1980-01-01

    A recombinant library has been constructed using the plasmid pAT153 and double stranded cDNA prepared from normal human lymphocyte poly(A)+ RNA. Transformation conditions were optimized to yield approximately 200,000 recombinants per microgram of double stranded cDNA. Statistical analysis as well as sequence complexity analysis of the inserted sequences indicates that the cDNA library is representative of > 99% of the poly(A)+ RNA present in the normal human lymphocyte.

  1. Effect of secondary structure on the thermodynamics and kinetics of PNA hybridization to DNA hairpins

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kushon, S A; Jordan, J P; Seifert, J L

    2001-01-01

    structures in both target and probe molecules are shown to depress the melting temperatures and free energies of the probe-target duplexes. Kinetic analysis of hybridization yields reaction rates that are up to 160-fold slower than hybridization between two unstructured strands. The thermodynamic and kinetic......-DNA and DNA-DNA duplexes can be formed with these target hairpins, even when the melting temperatures for the resulting duplexes are up to 50 degrees C lower than that of the hairpin target. Both hairpin/single-stranded and hairpin/hairpin interactions are considered in the scope of these studies. Secondary...

  2. Pressure modulates the self-cleavage step of the hairpin ribozyme

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schuabb, Caroline; Kumar, Narendra; Pataraia, Salome; Marx, Dominik; Winter, Roland

    2017-03-01

    The ability of certain RNAs, denoted as ribozymes, to not only store genetic information but also catalyse chemical reactions gave support to the RNA world hypothesis as a putative step in the development of early life on Earth. This, however, might have evolved under extreme environmental conditions, including the deep sea with pressures in the kbar regime. Here we study pressure-induced effects on the self-cleavage of hairpin ribozyme by following structural changes in real-time. Our results suggest that compression of the ribozyme leads to an accelerated transesterification reaction, being the self-cleavage step, although the overall process is retarded in the high-pressure regime. The results reveal that favourable interactions between the reaction site and neighbouring nucleobases are strengthened under pressure, resulting therefore in an accelerated self-cleavage step upon compression. These results suggest that properly engineered ribozymes may also act as piezophilic biocatalysts in addition to their hitherto known properties.

  3. Pressure modulates the self-cleavage step of the hairpin ribozyme

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schuabb, Caroline; Kumar, Narendra; Pataraia, Salome; Marx, Dominik; Winter, Roland

    2017-01-01

    The ability of certain RNAs, denoted as ribozymes, to not only store genetic information but also catalyse chemical reactions gave support to the RNA world hypothesis as a putative step in the development of early life on Earth. This, however, might have evolved under extreme environmental conditions, including the deep sea with pressures in the kbar regime. Here we study pressure-induced effects on the self-cleavage of hairpin ribozyme by following structural changes in real-time. Our results suggest that compression of the ribozyme leads to an accelerated transesterification reaction, being the self-cleavage step, although the overall process is retarded in the high-pressure regime. The results reveal that favourable interactions between the reaction site and neighbouring nucleobases are strengthened under pressure, resulting therefore in an accelerated self-cleavage step upon compression. These results suggest that properly engineered ribozymes may also act as piezophilic biocatalysts in addition to their hitherto known properties. PMID:28358002

  4. Synthetic Tet-inducible small hairpin RNAs targeting hTERT or Bcl-2 inhibit malignant phenotypes of bladder cancer T24 and 5637 cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lin, Junhao; Liu, Yuchen; Zhan, Yonghao; Zhuang, Chengle; Liu, Li; Fu, Xing; Xu, Wen; Li, Jianfa; Chen, Mingwei; Cai, Zhiming; Huang, Weiren

    2016-03-01

    Small hairpin RNA (shRNA) can inhibit the malignant phenotypes of tumor cell through ribonucleic acid interference (RNAi). However, it is hardly to be regulated and it may induce few phenotypic changes. Here, we build a type of tetracycline (Tet)-inducible vectors which can achieve regulatable expression of shRNA in a time-dependent manner by using synthetic biology approach. In order to prove the effectiveness of this device, we chose hTERT and Bcl-2 as target genes and test the utility of the device on 5637 and T24 cell lines. The experiments show that the Tet-inducible small hairpin RNA can effectively suppress their target genes and generate anti-cancer effects on both 5637 and T24 cell lines. The device we build not only can inhibit proliferation but also can induce apoptosis and suppress migration of the bladder cancer cell lines 5637 and T24. The Tet-inducible small hairpin RNAs may provide a novel strategy for the treatment of human bladder cancer in the future.

  5. The efficiency of RNA interference for conferring stable resistance to Plum Pox Virus

    Science.gov (United States)

    Plum transformed with an intron hairpin RNA CP (ihRNA-CP) were resistant to PPV infection through the specific process of RNA silencing involving both small interfering -RNA interfering (siRNA) and a methylated virus transgene. This recognition process specifically targeted the triggered PPV genome...

  6. Optimization and comparison of different methods for RNA isolation for cDNA library construction from the reindeer lichen Cladonia rangiferina

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lim Kean-Jin

    2009-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The reindeer lichen is the product of a mutualistic relationship between a fungus and an algae. Lichen demonstrate a remarkable capacity to tolerate dehydration. This tolerance is driven by a variety of biochemical processes and the accumulation of specific secondary metabolites that may be of relevance to the pharmaceutical, biotechnology and agriculture industries. These protective metabolites hinder in vitro enzymatic reactions required in cDNA synthesis. Along with the low concentrations of RNA present within lichen tissues, the process of creating a cDNA library is technically challenging. Findings An evaluation of existing commercial and published protocols for RNA extraction from plant or fungal tissues has been performed and experimental conditions have been optimised to balance the need for the highest quality total ribonucleotides and the constraints of budget, time and human resources. Conclusion We present a protocol that balances inexpensive RNA extraction methods with commercial RNA clean-up kits to yield sufficient RNA for cDNA library construction. Evaluation of the protocol and the construction of, and sampling from, a cDNA library is used to demonstrate the suitability of the RNA extraction method for expressed sequence tag production.

  7. A low-cost library construction protocol and data analysis pipeline for Illumina-based strand-specific multiplex RNA-seq.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Lin; Si, Yaqing; Dedow, Lauren K; Shao, Ying; Liu, Peng; Brutnell, Thomas P

    2011-01-01

    The emergence of NextGen sequencing technology has generated much interest in the exploration of transcriptomes. Currently, Illumina Inc. (San Diego, CA) provides one of the most widely utilized sequencing platforms for gene expression analysis. While Illumina reagents and protocols perform adequately in RNA-sequencing (RNA-seq), alternative reagents and protocols promise a higher throughput at a much lower cost. We have developed a low-cost and robust protocol to produce Illumina-compatible (GAIIx and HiSeq2000 platforms) RNA-seq libraries by combining several recent improvements. First, we designed balanced adapter sequences for multiplexing of samples; second, dUTP incorporation in 2(nd) strand synthesis was used to enforce strand-specificity; third, we simplified RNA purification, fragmentation and library size-selection steps thus drastically reducing the time and increasing throughput of library construction; fourth, we included an RNA spike-in control for validation and normalization purposes. To streamline informatics analysis for the community, we established a pipeline within the iPlant Collaborative. These scripts are easily customized to meet specific research needs and improve on existing informatics and statistical treatments of RNA-seq data. In particular, we apply significance tests for determining differential gene expression and intron retention events. To demonstrate the potential of both the library-construction protocol and data-analysis pipeline, we characterized the transcriptome of the rice leaf. Our data supports novel gene models and can be used to improve current rice genome annotation. Additionally, using the rice transcriptome data, we compared different methods of calculating gene expression and discuss the advantages of a strand-specific approach to detect bona-fide anti-sense transcripts and to detect intron retention events. Our results demonstrate the potential of this low cost and robust method for RNA-seq library construction and

  8. A systematic analysis of the effect of target RNA structure on RNA interference

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Westerhout, Ellen M.; Berkhout, Ben

    2007-01-01

    RNAi efficiency is influenced by local RNA structure of the target sequence. We studied this structure-based resistance in detail by targeting a perfect RNA hairpin and subsequently destabilized its tight structure by mutation, thereby gradually exposing the target sequence. Although the tightest

  9. Extraction of high quality of RNA and construction of a suppression subtractive hybridization (SSH) library from chestnut rose (Rosa roxburghii Tratt).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xu, Qiang; Wen, Xiaopeng; Tao, Nengguo; Hu, Zhiyong; Yue, Hailin; Deng, Xiuxin

    2006-04-01

    Chestnut rose (Rosa roxburghii Tratt) is a rare fruit crop of promising economical importance in fruit and ornamental exploitation in China. Isolation of high quality RNA from chestnut rose is difficult due to its high levels of polyphenols, polysaccharides and other compounds, but a modified CTAB extraction procedure without phenol gave satisfactory results. High concentrations of PVP (2%, w/v), CTAB (2%, w/v) and beta-mercaptoethanol (4%, v/v) were used in the extraction buffer to improve RNA quality. The average yield was about 200 microg RNA g(-1) fresh leaves. The isolated RNA was of sufficient quality for construction of suppression subtraction hybridization (SSH) library, which allowed the isolation of several pathogen-induced defense genes.

  10. [Construction a lentiviral vector for RNA interference of glutathione peroxidase 2 gene and its effect on HepG2 cell apoptosis].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cao, Jiangping; Tang, Liujun; Zhang, Jianhong; Zhan, Yiqun; Yang, Xiaoming; Ge, Changhui

    2015-06-01

    To construct a RNA interference lentiviral vector for human glutathione peroxidase 2 (GPX2) gene and observe the effect of GPX2 knockdown on cell apoptosis. The sequence of the small interfering RNA (siRNA) for GPX2 interference was inserted into the pSicoR vector. HepG2 cells were infected by the packaged si-GPX2 lentivirus and the expression of GPX2 in the infected cells was detected by both RT-PCR and Western blotting. Changes of cell apoptosis following the infection were analyzed by flow cytometry. The lentiviral particles pSicoR-GPX2 were successfully packaged. The expression of GPX2 in the infected cells was obviously down-regulated at both RNA and protein levels. GPX2 knockdown caused increased apoptosis rate, increased Bax expression and lowered Bcl-2 expression in HepG2 cells. We have successfully constructed the lentiviral vector for RNA interference of human GPX2 gene.

  11. Structure of an RNA dimer of a regulatory element from human thymidylate synthase mRNA

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dibrov, Sergey; McLean, Jaime; Hermann, Thomas (UCSD)

    2011-09-27

    A sequence around the start codon of the mRNA of human thymidylate synthase (TS) folds into a secondary-structure motif in which the initiation site is sequestered in a metastable hairpin. Binding of the protein to its own mRNA at the hairpin prevents the production of TS through a translation-repression feedback mechanism. Stabilization of the mRNA hairpin by other ligands has been proposed as a strategy to reduce TS levels in anticancer therapy. Rapidly proliferating cells require high TS activity to maintain the production of thymidine as a building block for DNA synthesis. The crystal structure of a model oligonucleotide (TS1) that represents the TS-binding site of the mRNA has been determined. While fluorescence studies showed that the TS1 RNA preferentially adopts a hairpin structure in solution, even at high RNA concentrations, an asymmetric dimer of two hybridized TS1 strands was obtained in the crystal. The TS1 dimer contains an unusual S-turn motif that also occurs in the 'off' state of the human ribosomal decoding site RNA.

  12. Identify Beta-Hairpin Motifs with Quadratic Discriminant Algorithm Based on the Chemical Shifts.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Feng YongE

    Full Text Available Successful prediction of the beta-hairpin motif will be helpful for understanding the of the fold recognition. Some algorithms have been proposed for the prediction of beta-hairpin motifs. However, the parameters used by these methods were primarily based on the amino acid sequences. Here, we proposed a novel model for predicting beta-hairpin structure based on the chemical shift. Firstly, we analyzed the statistical distribution of chemical shifts of six nuclei in not beta-hairpin and beta-hairpin motifs. Secondly, we used these chemical shifts as features combined with three algorithms to predict beta-hairpin structure. Finally, we achieved the best prediction, namely sensitivity of 92%, the specificity of 94% with 0.85 of Mathew's correlation coefficient using quadratic discriminant analysis algorithm, which is clearly superior to the same method for the prediction of beta-hairpin structure from 20 amino acid compositions in the three-fold cross-validation. Our finding showed that the chemical shift is an effective parameter for beta-hairpin prediction, suggesting the quadratic discriminant analysis is a powerful algorithm for the prediction of beta-hairpin.

  13. Structure and Dynamics of RNA Repeat Expansions That Cause Huntington's Disease and Myotonic Dystrophy Type 1.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Jonathan L; VanEtten, Damian M; Fountain, Matthew A; Yildirim, Ilyas; Disney, Matthew D

    2017-07-11

    RNA repeat expansions cause a host of incurable, genetically defined diseases. The most common class of RNA repeats consists of trinucleotide repeats. These long, repeating transcripts fold into hairpins containing 1 × 1 internal loops that can mediate disease via a variety of mechanism(s) in which RNA is the central player. Two of these disorders are Huntington's disease and myotonic dystrophy type 1, which are caused by r(CAG) and r(CUG) repeats, respectively. We report the structures of two RNA constructs containing three copies of a r(CAG) [r(3×CAG)] or r(CUG) [r(3×CUG)] motif that were modeled with nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy and simulated annealing with restrained molecular dynamics. The 1 × 1 internal loops of r(3×CAG) are stabilized by one-hydrogen bond (cis Watson-Crick/Watson-Crick) AA pairs, while those of r(3×CUG) prefer one- or two-hydrogen bond (cis Watson-Crick/Watson-Crick) UU pairs. Assigned chemical shifts for the residues depended on the identity of neighbors or next nearest neighbors. Additional insights into the dynamics of these RNA constructs were gained by molecular dynamics simulations and a discrete path sampling method. Results indicate that the global structures of the RNA are A-form and that the loop regions are dynamic. The results will be useful for understanding the dynamic trajectory of these RNA repeats but also may aid in the development of therapeutics.

  14. Inhibitors of MyD88-dependent proinflammatory cytokine production identified utilizing a novel RNA interference screening approach.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    John S Cho

    2009-09-01

    Full Text Available The events required to initiate host defenses against invading pathogens involve complex signaling cascades comprised of numerous adaptor molecules, kinases, and transcriptional elements, ultimately leading to the production of proinflammatory cytokines, such as tumor necrosis factor alpha (TNF-alpha. How these signaling cascades are regulated, and the proteins and regulatory elements participating are still poorly understood.We report here the development a completely random short-hairpin RNA (shRNA library coupled with a novel forward genetic screening strategy to identify inhibitors of Toll-like receptor (TLR dependent proinflammatory responses. We developed a murine macrophage reporter cell line stably transfected with a construct expressing diphtheria toxin-A (DT-A under the control of the TNF-alpha-promoter. Stimulation of the reporter cell line with the TLR ligand lipopolysaccharide (LPS resulted in DT-A induced cell death, which could be prevented by the addition of an shRNA targeting the TLR adaptor molecule MyD88. Utilizing this cell line, we screened a completely random lentiviral short hairpin RNA (shRNA library for sequences that inhibited TLR-mediated TNF-alpha production. Recovery of shRNA sequences from surviving cells led to the identification of unique shRNA sequences that significantly inhibited TLR4-dependent TNF-alpha gene expression. Furthermore, these shRNA sequences specifically blocked TLR2 but not TLR3-dependent TNF-alpha production.Thus, we describe the generation of novel tools to facilitate large-scale forward genetic screens in mammalian cells and the identification of potent shRNA inhibitors of TLR2 and TLR4- dependent proinflammatory responses.

  15. Four-base codon mediated mRNA display to construct peptide libraries that contain multiple nonnatural amino acids

    Science.gov (United States)

    Muranaka, Norihito; Hohsaka, Takahiro; Sisido, Masahiko

    2006-01-01

    In vitro selection and directed evolution of peptides from mRNA display are powerful strategies to find novel peptide ligands that bind to target biomolecules. In this study, we expanded the mRNA display method to include multiple nonnatural amino acids by introducing three different four-base codons at a randomly selected single position on the mRNA. Another nonnatural amino acid may be introduced by suppressing an amber codon that may appear from a (NNK)n nucleotide sequence on the mRNA. The mRNA display was expressed in an Escherichia coli in vitro translation system in the presence of three types of tRNAs carrying different four-base anticodons and a tRNA carrying an amber anticodon, the tRNAs being chemically aminoacylated with different nonnatural amino acids. The complexity of the starting mRNA-displayed peptide library was estimated to be 1.1 × 1012 molecules. The effectiveness of the four-base codon mediated mRNA display method was demonstrated in the selection of biocytin-containing peptides on streptavidin-coated beads. Moreover, a novel streptavidin-binding nonnatural peptide containing benzoylphenylalanine was obtained from the nonnatural peptide library. The nonnatural peptide library from the four-base codon mediated mRNA display provides much wider functional and structural diversity than conventional peptide libraries that are constituted from 20 naturally occurring amino acids. PMID:16397292

  16. Targeting of human interleukin-12B by small hairpin RNAs in xenografted psoriatic skin

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jakobsen Maria

    2011-02-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Psoriasis is a chronic inflammatory skin disorder that shows as erythematous and scaly lesions. The pathogenesis of psoriasis is driven by a dysregulation of the immune system which leads to an altered cytokine production. Proinflammatory cytokines that are up-regulated in psoriasis include tumor necrosis factor alpha (TNFα, interleukin-12 (IL-12, and IL-23 for which monoclonal antibodies have already been approved for clinical use. We have previously documented the therapeutic applicability of targeting TNFα mRNA for RNA interference-mediated down-regulation by anti-TNFα small hairpin RNAs (shRNAs delivered by lentiviral vectors to xenografted psoriatic skin. The present report aims at targeting mRNA encoding the shared p40 subunit (IL-12B of IL-12 and IL-23 by cellular transduction with lentiviral vectors encoding anti-IL12B shRNAs. Methods Effective anti-IL12B shRNAs are identified among a panel of shRNAs by potency measurements in cultured cells. The efficiency and persistency of lentiviral gene delivery to xenografted human skin are investigated by bioluminescence analysis of skin treated with lentiviral vectors encoding the luciferase gene. shRNA-expressing lentiviral vectors are intradermally injected in xenografted psoriatic skin and the effects of the treatment evaluated by clinical psoriasis scoring, by measurements of epidermal thickness, and IL-12B mRNA levels. Results Potent and persistent transgene expression following a single intradermal injection of lentiviral vectors in xenografted human skin is reported. Stable IL-12B mRNA knockdown and reduced epidermal thickness are achieved three weeks after treatment of xenografted psoriatic skin with lentivirus-encoded anti-IL12B shRNAs. These findings mimick the results obtained with anti-TNFα shRNAs but, in contrast to anti-TNFα treatment, anti-IL12B shRNAs do not ameliorate the psoriatic phenotype as evaluated by semi-quantitative clinical scoring and by

  17. The Role of XPG in Processing (CAG)n/(CTG)n DNA Hairpins.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hou, Caixia; Zhang, Tianyi; Tian, Lei; Huang, Jian; Gu, Liya; Li, Guo-Min

    2011-03-09

    During DNA replication or repair, disease-associated (CAG)n/(CTG)n expansion can result from formation of hairpin structures in the repeat tract of the newly synthesized or nicked DNA strand. Recent studies identified a nick-directed (CAG)n/(CTG)n hairpin repair (HPR) system that removes (CAG)n/(CTG)n hairpins from human cells via endonucleolytic incisions. Because the process is highly similar to the mechanism by which XPG and XPF endonucleases remove bulky DNA lesions during nucleotide excision repair, we assessed the potential role of XPG in conducting (CAG)n/(CTG)n HPR. To determine if the XPG endonuclease is involved in (CAG)n/(CTG)n hairpin removal, two XPG-deficient cell lines (GM16024 and AG08802) were examined for their ability to process (CAG)n/(CTG)n hairpins in vitro. We demonstrated that the GM16024 cell line processes all hairpin substrates as efficiently as HeLa cells, and that the AG08802 cell line is partially defective in HPR. Analysis of repair intermediates revealed that nuclear extracts from both XPG-deficient lines remove CAG/CTG hairpins via incisions, but the incision products are distinct from those generated in HeLa extracts. We also show that purified recombinant XPG protein greatly stimulates HPR in XPG-deficient extracts by promoting an incision 5' to the hairpin. Our results strongly suggest that 1) human cells possess multiple pathways to remove (CAG)n/(CTG)n hairpins located in newly synthesized (or nicked) DNA strand; and 2) XPG, although not essential for (CAG)n/(CTG)n hairpin removal, stimulates HPR by facilitating a 5' incision to the hairpin. This study reveals a novel role for XPG in genome-maintenance and implicates XPG in diseases caused by trinucleotide repeat expansion.

  18. Counterion and polythymidine loop-length-dependent folding and thermodynamic stability of DNA hairpins reveal the unusual counterion-dependent stability of tetraloop hairpins.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nayak, Rajesh K; Van Orden, Alan

    2013-11-14

    Stem-loop DNA hairpins containing a 5-base-pair (bp) stem and single-stranded polythymidine loop were investigated using thermodynamic melting analysis and stopped-flow kinetics. These studies revealed the thermodynamic stability and folding kinetics as a function of loop length and counterion concentration. Our results show the unusually high thermodynamic stability for tetraloop or 4 poly(dT) loop hairpin as compared with longer loop length hairpins. Furthermore, this exceptional stability is highly counterion-dependent. For example, in the higher counterion concentration regime of 50 mM NaCl and above, the tetraloop hairpin displays enhanced stability as compared with longer loop length hairpins. However, at lower counterion concentration of 25 mM NaCl and below, the thermal stability of tetraloop hairpin is consistent with the longer loop hairpins. The enhanced stability of tetraloop hairpins at higher counterion concentration can be explained on the basis of the combined entropic effect of loop closure as well as base stacking in the loop regions. The stability of longer loop length hairpins at all counterion concentrations as well as tetraloop hairpin at lower counterion concentration can be explained on the basis of entropic effect of loop closure alone. The thermodynamic parameters at lower and higher counterion concentrations were determined to quantify the enhanced stability of base-stacking effects occurring at higher counterion concentrations. For example, for 100 mM NaCl, excess Gibbs energy and enthalpy due to base stacking within the tetraloops were measured to be -1.2 ± 0.14 and -3.28 ± 0.32 kcal/mol, respectively, whereas, no excess of Gibbs energy and enthalpy was observed for 0, 5, 10, and 25 mM NaCl. These findings suggest significant base-stacking interactions occurring in the loop region of the tetraloop hairpins at higher counterion concentration and less significant base-stacking interactions in the lower counterion concentration regime

  19. Identifying novel sequence variants of RNA 3D motifs

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zirbel, Craig L.; Roll, James; Sweeney, Blake A.; Petrov, Anton I.; Pirrung, Meg; Leontis, Neocles B.

    2015-01-01

    Predicting RNA 3D structure from sequence is a major challenge in biophysics. An important sub-goal is accurately identifying recurrent 3D motifs from RNA internal and hairpin loop sequences extracted from secondary structure (2D) diagrams. We have developed and validated new probabilistic models for 3D motif sequences based on hybrid Stochastic Context-Free Grammars and Markov Random Fields (SCFG/MRF). The SCFG/MRF models are constructed using atomic-resolution RNA 3D structures. To parameterize each model, we use all instances of each motif found in the RNA 3D Motif Atlas and annotations of pairwise nucleotide interactions generated by the FR3D software. Isostericity relations between non-Watson–Crick basepairs are used in scoring sequence variants. SCFG techniques model nested pairs and insertions, while MRF ideas handle crossing interactions and base triples. We use test sets of randomly-generated sequences to set acceptance and rejection thresholds for each motif group and thus control the false positive rate. Validation was carried out by comparing results for four motif groups to RMDetect. The software developed for sequence scoring (JAR3D) is structured to automatically incorporate new motifs as they accumulate in the RNA 3D Motif Atlas when new structures are solved and is available free for download. PMID:26130723

  20. Resources for the Comprehensive Discovery of Functional RNA Elements.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sundararaman, Balaji; Zhan, Lijun; Blue, Steven M; Stanton, Rebecca; Elkins, Keri; Olson, Sara; Wei, Xintao; Van Nostrand, Eric L; Pratt, Gabriel A; Huelga, Stephanie C; Smalec, Brendan M; Wang, Xiaofeng; Hong, Eurie L; Davidson, Jean M; Lécuyer, Eric; Graveley, Brenton R; Yeo, Gene W

    2016-03-17

    Transcriptome-wide maps of RNA binding protein (RBP)-RNA interactions by immunoprecipitation (IP)-based methods such as RNA IP (RIP) and crosslinking and IP (CLIP) are key starting points for evaluating the molecular roles of the thousands of human RBPs. A significant bottleneck to the application of these methods in diverse cell lines, tissues, and developmental stages is the availability of validated IP-quality antibodies. Using IP followed by immunoblot assays, we have developed a validated repository of 438 commercially available antibodies that interrogate 365 unique RBPs. In parallel, 362 short-hairpin RNA (shRNA) constructs against 276 unique RBPs were also used to confirm specificity of these antibodies. These antibodies can characterize subcellular RBP localization. With the burgeoning interest in the roles of RBPs in cancer, neurobiology, and development, these resources are invaluable to the broad scientific community. Detailed information about these resources is publicly available at the ENCODE portal (https://www.encodeproject.org/). Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  1. Design of a new hairpin DNAzyme: The activity controlled by TMPyP ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    The catalytic activity of the 10-23 hairpin DNAzyme decreased and even inactivated due to the enhanced stability of G-quadruplex structure by TMPyP4 molecules. This DNAzyme is controllable to cleavage substrate and has some potential significance in gene therapy. Key words: 10-23 DNAzyme, hairpin DNAzyme, ...

  2. An infinitely expandable cloning strategy plus repeat-proof PCR for working with multiple shRNA.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Glen John McIntyre

    Full Text Available Vector construction with restriction enzymes (REs typically involves the ligation of a digested donor fragment (insert to a reciprocally digested recipient fragment (vector backbone. Creating a suitable cloning plan becomes increasingly difficult for complex strategies requiring repeated insertions such as constructing multiple short hairpin RNA (shRNA expression vectors for RNA interference (RNAi studies. The problem lies in the reduced availability of suitable RE recognition sites with an increasing number of cloning events and or vector size. This report details a technically simple, directional cloning solution using REs with compatible cohesive ends that are repeatedly destroyed and simultaneously re-introduced with each round of cloning. Donor fragments can be made by PCR or sub-cloned from pre-existing vectors and inserted ad infinitum in any combination. The design incorporates several cloning cores in order to be compatible with as many donor sequences as possible. We show that joining sub-combinations made in parallel is more time-efficient than sequential construction (of one cassette at a time for any combination of 4 or more insertions. Screening for the successful construction of combinations using Taq polymerase based PCR became increasingly difficult with increasing number of repeated sequence elements. A Pfu polymerase based PCR was developed and successfully used to amplify combinations of up to eleven consecutive hairpin expression cassettes. The identified PCR conditions can be beneficial to others working with multiple shRNA or other repeated sequences, and the infinitely expandable cloning strategy serves as a general solution applicable to many cloning scenarios.

  3. General combinatorics of RNA secondary structure.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liao, Bo; Wang, Tian-ming

    2004-09-01

    The total number of RNA secondary structures of a given length with minimal hairpin loop length m(m>0) and with minimal stack length l(l>0) is computed, under the assumption that all base pairs can occur. Asymptotics are derived from the determination of recurrence relations of decomposition properties.

  4. The Deinococcus-Thermus phylum and the effect of rRNA composition on phylogenetic tree construction

    Science.gov (United States)

    Weisburg, W. G.; Giovannoni, S. J.; Woese, C. R.

    1989-01-01

    Through comparative analysis of 16S ribosomal RNA sequences, it can be shown that two seemingly dissimilar types of eubacteria Deinococcus and the ubiquitous hot spring organism Thermus are distantly but specifically related to one another. This confirms an earlier report based upon 16S rRNA oligonucleotide cataloging studies (Hensel et al., 1986). Their two lineages form a distinctive grouping within the eubacteria that deserved the taxonomic status of a phylum. The (partial) sequence of T. aquaticus rRNA appears relatively close to those of other thermophilic eubacteria. e.g. Thermotoga maritima and Thermomicrobium roseum. However, this closeness does not reflect a true evolutionary closeness; rather it is due to a "thermophilic convergence", the result of unusually high G+C composition in the rRNAs of thermophilic bacteria. Unless such compositional biases are taken into account, the branching order and root of phylogenetic trees can be incorrectly inferred.

  5. Lingo-1 inhibited by RNA interference promotes functional recovery of experimental autoimmune encephalomyelitis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Chun-Juan; Qu, Chuan-Qiang; Zhang, Jie; Fu, Pei-Cai; Guo, Shou-Gang; Tang, Rong-Hua

    2014-12-01

    Lingo-1 is a negative regulator of myelination. Repairment of demyelinating diseases, such as multiple sclerosis (MS)/experimental autoimmune encephalomyelitis (EAE), requires activation of the myelination program. In this study, we observed the effect of RNA interference on Lingo-1 expression, and the impact of Lingo-1 suppression on functional recovery and myelination/remyelination in EAE mice. Lentiviral vectors encoding Lingo-1 short hairpin RNA (LV/Lingo-1-shRNA) were constructed to inhibit Lingo-1 expression. LV/Lingo-1-shRNA of different titers were transferred into myelin oligodendrocyte glycoprotein-induced EAE mice by intracerebroventricular (ICV) injection. Meanwhile, lentiviral vectors carrying nonsense gene sequence (LVCON053) were used as negative control. The Lingo-1 expression was detected and locomotor function was evaluated at different time points (on days 1,3,7,14,21, and 30 after ICV injection). Myelination was investigated by luxol fast blue (LFB) staining.LV/Lingo-1-shRNA administration via ICV injection could efficiently down-regulate the Lingo-1 mRNA and protein expression in EAE mice on days 7,14,21, and 30 (P RNA interference is, therefore, a promising approach for the treatment of demyelinating diseases, such as MS/EAE. © 2014 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  6. Sequence-dependent unfolding kinetics of DNA hairpins studied by nanopore force spectroscopy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Renner, Stephan; Bessonov, Andrey; Gerland, Ulrich; Simmel, Friedrich C

    2010-11-17

    Nanopore force spectroscopy is used to study the unzipping kinetics of two DNA hairpin molecules with a 12 base pair long stem containing two contiguous stretches of six GC and six AT base pairs in interchanged order. Even though the thermodynamic stabilities of the two structures are nearly the same, they differ greatly in their unzipping kinetics. When the GC segment has to be broken before the AT segment, the unfolding rate is orders of magnitude smaller than in the opposite case. We also investigated hairpins with stem regions consisting only of AT or GC base pairs. The pure AT hairpins translocate much faster than the other hairpins, whereas the pure GC hairpins translocate on similar timescales to the hairpins with only an initial GC segment. For each hairpin, nanopore force spectroscopy is performed for different loading rates and the resulting unzipping distributions are mathematically transformed to a master curve that yields the unfolding rate as a function of applied voltage. This is compared with a stochastic model of the unfolding process for the two sequences for different voltages. The results can be rationalized in terms of the different natures of the free energy landscapes for the unfolding process.

  7. Sequence-dependent unfolding kinetics of DNA hairpins studied by nanopore force spectroscopy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Renner, Stephan; Bessonov, Andrey; Simmel, Friedrich C [Lehrstuhl fuer Bioelektronik, Physik-Department, Technische Universitaet Muenchen, D-85748 Garching (Germany); Gerland, Ulrich [Arnold Sommerfeld Center for Theoretical Physics and Center for NanoScience, Department fuer Physik, Ludwig-Maximilians-Universitaet Muenchen, D-80333 Muenchen (Germany)

    2010-11-17

    Nanopore force spectroscopy is used to study the unzipping kinetics of two DNA hairpin molecules with a 12 base pair long stem containing two contiguous stretches of six GC and six AT base pairs in interchanged order. Even though the thermodynamic stabilities of the two structures are nearly the same, they differ greatly in their unzipping kinetics. When the GC segment has to be broken before the AT segment, the unfolding rate is orders of magnitude smaller than in the opposite case. We also investigated hairpins with stem regions consisting only of AT or GC base pairs. The pure AT hairpins translocate much faster than the other hairpins, whereas the pure GC hairpins translocate on similar timescales to the hairpins with only an initial GC segment. For each hairpin, nanopore force spectroscopy is performed for different loading rates and the resulting unzipping distributions are mathematically transformed to a master curve that yields the unfolding rate as a function of applied voltage. This is compared with a stochastic model of the unfolding process for the two sequences for different voltages. The results can be rationalized in terms of the different natures of the free energy landscapes for the unfolding process.

  8. Mapping the Universe of RNA Tetraloop Folds.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bottaro, Sandro; Lindorff-Larsen, Kresten

    2017-07-25

    We report a map of RNA tetraloop conformations constructed by calculating pairwise distances among all experimentally determined four-nucleotide hairpin loops. Tetraloops with similar structures are clustered together and, as expected, the two largest clusters are the canonical GNRA and UNCG folds. We identify clusters corresponding to known tetraloop folds such as GGUG, RNYA, AGNN, and CUUG. These clusters are represented in a simple two-dimensional projection that recapitulates the relationship among the different folds. The cluster analysis also identifies 20 novel tetraloop folds that are peculiar to specific positions in ribosomal RNAs and that are stabilized by tertiary interactions. In our RNA tetraloop database we find a significant number of non-GNRA and non-UNCG sequences adopting the canonical GNRA and UNCG folds. Conversely, we find a significant number of GNRA and UNCG sequences adopting non-GNRA and non-UNCG folds. Our analysis demonstrates that there is not a simple one-to-one, but rather a many-to-many mapping between tetraloop sequence and tetraloop fold. Copyright © 2017 Biophysical Society. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  9. Detailed study of DNA hairpin dynamics using single-molecule fluorescence assisted by DNA origami.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tsukanov, Roman; Tomov, Toma E; Masoud, Rula; Drory, Hagai; Plavner, Noa; Liber, Miran; Nir, Eyal

    2013-10-10

    The dynamics of two DNA hairpins (5'-TCGCCT-A31-AGGCGA-3' and 5'-TCGCCG-A31-CGGCGA-3') were studied using immobilization-based and diffusion-based single-molecule fluorescence techniques. The techniques enabled separated and detailed investigation of the states and of the transition reactions. Only two states, open and closed, were identified from analysis of the FRET histograms; metastable states with lifetimes longer than the technique resolution (0.3 ms) were not observed. The opening and closing reaction rates were determined directly from the FRET time trajectories, and the Gibbs free energies of these states and of the transition state were calculated using the Kramer theory. The rates, which are undoubtedly of transitions between the fully closed and the fully open states and ranged from 2 to 90 s(-1), were lower (∼10-fold) than the rates previously determined from fluorescence correlation spectroscopy. The heights of the barriers for closing were almost identical for the two hairpins. The barrier for opening the hairpin with the stronger stem was higher (4.3 kJ/mol) than that for the hairpin with the weaker stem, in very good agreement with the difference in stability calculated by the nearest-neighbor method. The barrier for closing the hairpin decreased (∼8 kJ/mol) and the barrier for opening increased (∼4 kJ/mol) with increasing NaCl concentration (10-100 mM), indicating that higher ionic strength stabilizes the folded state with respect to the transition state and stabilizes the transition state relative to the unfolded state. The very good agreements in the dynamics measured for free hairpins, for hairpins anchored to origami, and for hairpins anchored to the coverslip and the very good agreement between the two single-molecule techniques demonstrate that neither the origami nor the coverslip influence the hairpin dynamics, supporting a previous demonstration that origami can serve as a platform for biophysical investigations.

  10. Automated classification of RNA 3D motifs and the RNA 3D Motif Atlas

    Science.gov (United States)

    Petrov, Anton I.; Zirbel, Craig L.; Leontis, Neocles B.

    2013-01-01

    The analysis of atomic-resolution RNA three-dimensional (3D) structures reveals that many internal and hairpin loops are modular, recurrent, and structured by conserved non-Watson–Crick base pairs. Structurally similar loops define RNA 3D motifs that are conserved in homologous RNA molecules, but can also occur at nonhomologous sites in diverse RNAs, and which often vary in sequence. To further our understanding of RNA motif structure and sequence variability and to provide a useful resource for structure modeling and prediction, we present a new method for automated classification of internal and hairpin loop RNA 3D motifs and a new online database called the RNA 3D Motif Atlas. To classify the motif instances, a representative set of internal and hairpin loops is automatically extracted from a nonredundant list of RNA-containing PDB files. Their structures are compared geometrically, all-against-all, using the FR3D program suite. The loops are clustered into motif groups, taking into account geometric similarity and structural annotations and making allowance for a variable number of bulged bases. The automated procedure that we have implemented identifies all hairpin and internal loop motifs previously described in the literature. All motif instances and motif groups are assigned unique and stable identifiers and are made available in the RNA 3D Motif Atlas (http://rna.bgsu.edu/motifs), which is automatically updated every four weeks. The RNA 3D Motif Atlas provides an interactive user interface for exploring motif diversity and tools for programmatic data access. PMID:23970545

  11. An shRNA barcode screen provides insight into cancer cell vulnerability to MDM2 inhibitors

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bernards, R.A.; Brummelkamp, T.R.; Fabius, A.W.M.; Mullenders, J.; Madiredjo, M.; Velds, A.; Kerkhoven, R.M.; Beijersbergen, R.L.

    The identification of the cellular targets of small molecules with anticancer activity is crucial to their further development as drug candidates. Here, we present the application of a large-scale RNA interference–based short hairpin RNA (shRNA) barcode screen to gain insight in the mechanism of

  12. Lentiviral vector design for multiple shRNA expression and durable HIV-1 inhibition

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    ter Brake, Olivier; 't Hooft, Karen; Liu, Ying Poi; Centlivre, Mireille; von Eije, Karin Jasmijn; Berkhout, Ben

    2008-01-01

    Human immunodeficiency virus type 1 (HIV-1) replication in T cells can be inhibited by RNA interference (RNAi) through short hairpin RNA (shRNA) expression from a lentiviral vector. However, for the development of a durable RNAi-based gene therapy against HIV-1, multiple shRNAs need to be expressed

  13. Quantum chemical studies of nucleic acids: can we construct a bridge to the RNA structural biology and bioinformatics communities?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Šponer, Jiří; Šponer, Judit E; Petrov, Anton I; Leontis, Neocles B

    2010-12-09

    In this feature article, we provide a side-by-side introduction for two research fields: quantum chemical calculations of molecular interaction in nucleic acids and RNA structural bioinformatics. Our main aim is to demonstrate that these research areas, while largely separated in contemporary literature, have substantial potential to complement each other that could significantly contribute to our understanding of the exciting world of nucleic acids. We identify research questions amenable to the combined application of modern ab initio methods and bioinformatics analysis of experimental structures while also assessing the limitations of these approaches. The ultimate aim is to attain valuable physicochemical insights regarding the nature of the fundamental molecular interactions and how they shape RNA structures, dynamics, function, and evolution.

  14. Intermolecular interaction between a branching ribozyme and associated homing endonuclease mRNA

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Birgisdottir, Asa B; Nielsen, Henrik; Beckert, Bertrand

    2011-01-01

    Abstract RNA tertiary interactions involving docking of GNRA (N; any base; R; purine) hairpin loops into helical stem structures on other regions of the same RNA are one of the most common RNA tertiary interactions. In this study, we investigated a tertiary association between a GAAA hairpin......-like motif (UCUAAG-CAAGA) found within the HEG P1. The biological role of this interaction appears to be linked to the homing endonuclease expression by promoting post-cleavage release of the lariat capped mRNA. These findings add to our understanding of how protein-coding genes embedded in nuclear ribosomal...

  15. DNA hairpins promote temperature controlled cargo encapsulation in a truncated octahedral nanocage structure family

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Franch, Oskar; Iacovelli, Federico; Falconi, Mattia

    2016-01-01

    In the present study we investigate the mechanism behind temperature controlled cargo uptake using a truncated octahedral DNA cage scaffold functionalized with one, two, three or four hairpin forming DNA strands inserted in one corner of the structure. This investigation was inspired by our...... previous demonstration of temperature controlled reversible encapsulation of the cargo enzyme, horseradish peroxidase, in the cage with four hairpin forming strands. However, in this previous study the mechanism of cargo uptake was not directly addressed (Juul, et al., Temperature-Controlled Encapsulation...... and Release of an Active Enzyme in the Cavity of a Self-Assembled DNA Nanocage, ACS Nano, 2013, 7, 9724–9734). In the present study we use a combination of molecular dynamics simulations and in vitro analyses to unravel the mechanism of cargo uptake in hairpin containing DNA cages. We find that two hairpin...

  16. Rapid Construction of Complex Plant RNA Virus Infectious cDNA Clones for Agroinfection Using a Yeast-E. coli-Agrobacterium Shuttle Vector.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sun, Kai; Zhao, Danyang; Liu, Yong; Huang, Changjun; Zhang, Wei; Li, Zhenghe

    2017-11-07

    The availability of infectious full-length clone is indispensable for reverse genetics studies of virus biology, pathology and construction of viral vectors. However, for RNA viruses with large genome sizes or those exhibiting inherent cloning difficulties, procedure to generate biologically active circular DNA (cDNA) clones can be time-consuming or technically challenging. Here we have constructed a yeast- Escherichia coli - Agrobacterium shuttle vector that enables highly efficient homologous recombination in yeast for assembly of Agrobacterium compatible plant virus clones. Using this vector, we show that infectious cDNA clones of a plant negative-stranded RNA virus, sonchus yellow net rhabdovirus, can be rapidly assembled. In addition, one-step assembly of infectious clones of potato virus Y in yeast, either with or without intron, was readily achieved from as many as eight overlapping DNA fragments. More importantly, the recovered yeast plasmids can be transformed directly into Agrobacterium for inoculation, thereby obviating the E. coli cloning steps and associated toxicity issues. This method is rapid, highly efficient and cost-effective and should be readily applicable to a broad range of plant viruses.

  17. Rapid Construction of Complex Plant RNA Virus Infectious cDNA Clones for Agroinfection Using a Yeast-E. coli-Agrobacterium Shuttle Vector

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kai Sun

    2017-11-01

    Full Text Available The availability of infectious full-length clone is indispensable for reverse genetics studies of virus biology, pathology and construction of viral vectors. However, for RNA viruses with large genome sizes or those exhibiting inherent cloning difficulties, procedure to generate biologically active complementary DNA (cDNA clones can be time-consuming or technically challenging. Here we have constructed a yeast-Escherichia coli-Agrobacterium shuttle vector that enables highly efficient homologous recombination in yeast for assembly of Agrobacterium compatible plant virus clones. Using this vector, we show that infectious cDNA clones of a plant negative-stranded RNA virus, sonchus yellow net rhabdovirus, can be rapidly assembled. In addition, one-step assembly of infectious clones of potato virus Y in yeast, either with or without intron, was readily achieved from as many as eight overlapping DNA fragments. More importantly, the recovered yeast plasmids can be transformed directly into Agrobacterium for inoculation, thereby obviating the E. coli cloning steps and associated toxicity issues. This method is rapid, highly efficient and cost-effective and should be readily applicable to a broad range of plant viruses.

  18. Construction of a lncRNA-mediated feed-forward loop network reveals global topological features and prognostic motifs in human cancers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ning, Shangwei; Gao, Yue; Wang, Peng; Li, Xiang; Zhi, Hui; Zhang, Yan; Liu, Yue; Zhang, Jizhou; Guo, Maoni; Han, Dong; Li, Xia

    2016-07-19

    Long non-coding RNAs (lncRNAs), transcription factors and microRNAs can form lncRNA-mediated feed-forward loops (L-FFLs), which are functional network motifs that regulate a wide range of biological processes, such as development and carcinogenesis. However, L-FFL network motifs have not been systematically identified, and their roles in human cancers are largely unknown. In this study, we computationally integrated data from multiple sources to construct a global L-FFL network for six types of human cancer and characterized the topological features of the network. Our approach revealed several dysregulated L-FFL motifs common across different cancers or specific to particular cancers. We also found that L-FFL motifs can take part in other types of regulatory networks, such as mRNA-mediated FFLs and ceRNA networks, and form the more complex networks in human cancers. In addition, survival analyses further indicated that L-FFL motifs could potentially serve as prognostic biomarkers. Collectively, this study elucidated the roles of L-FFL motifs in human cancers, which could be beneficial for understanding cancer pathogenesis and treatment.

  19. Different Fluorophore Labeling Strategies and Designs Affect Millisecond Kinetics of DNA Hairpins

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Andreas Hartmann

    2014-09-01

    Full Text Available Changes in molecular conformations are one of the major driving forces of complex biological processes. Many studies based on single-molecule techniques have shed light on conformational dynamics and contributed to a better understanding of living matter. In particular, single-molecule FRET experiments have revealed unprecedented information at various time scales varying from milliseconds to seconds. The choice and the attachment of fluorophores is a pivotal requirement for single-molecule FRET experiments. One particularly well-studied millisecond conformational change is the opening and closing of DNA hairpin structures. In this study, we addressed the influence of base- and terminal-labeled fluorophores as well as the fluorophore DNA interactions on the extracted kinetic information of the DNA hairpin. Gibbs free energies varied from ∆G0 = −3.6 kJ/mol to ∆G0 = −0.2 kJ/mol for the identical DNA hairpin modifying only the labeling scheme and design of the DNA sample. In general, the base-labeled DNA hairpin is significantly destabilized compared to the terminal-labeled DNA hairpin and fluorophore DNA interactions additionally stabilize the closed state of the DNA hairpin. Careful controls and variations of fluorophore attachment chemistry are essential for a mostly undisturbed measurement of the underlying energy landscape of biomolecules.

  20. Thermodynamic, structural and fluorescent characteristics of DNA hairpins containing functionalized pyrrolo-2'-deoxycytidines.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jahnz-Wechmann, Zofia; Lisowiec-Wachnicka, Jolanta; Framski, Grzegorz; Kosman, Joanna; Boryski, Jerzy; Pasternak, Anna

    2017-04-01

    Herein, we present comprehensive physicochemical and structural analysis of various DNA hairpins modified with pyrrolo-2'-deoxycytidine (Py-dC) derivatives. The introduction of modified Py-dC in most cases causes minor decrease of hairpin thermodynamic stability. The energetically unfavorable effect is more pronounced when modified residue is present within hairpin loop. Our studies indicate that thermodynamic effects induced by all Py-dC derivatives are net results of increased stacking interactions caused by larger surface of pyrrolo-2'-deoxycytidine aromatic ring and unfavorable effect implied by the presence of additional side chains. The CD spectra of all modified hairpins are similar to unmodified hairpin indicating that the presence of Py-dC derivatives does not disrupt the secondary structure of DNA. Interestingly, the presence of various side chains can increase fluorescent discrimination of paired and unpaired regions of DNA. The fluorescence observed for hairpins modified within loop is significantly quenched when Py-dC derivative is present in the stem region. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  1. Novel guanidinylated bioresponsive poly(amidoamine)s designed for short hairpin RNA delivery

    OpenAIRE

    Yu J; Zhang J.; Xing H; Sun Y; Yang Z; Yang T; Cai C; Zhao X; Yang L.; Ding P

    2016-01-01

    Jiankun Yu,1 Jinmin Zhang,1 Haonan Xing,1 Yanping Sun,1 Zhen Yang,1 Tianzhi Yang,2 Cuifang Cai,1 Xiaoyun Zhao,3 Li Yang,1 Pingtian Ding1 1School of Pharmacy, Shenyang Pharmaceutical University, Shenyang, China; 2Department of Basic Pharmaceutical Sciences, School of Pharmacy, Husson University, Bangor, ME, USA; 3Department of Microbiology and Cell Biology, School of Life Science and Biopharmaceutics, Shenyang Pharmaceutical University, Shenyang, China Abstract: Two different disulfide (SS)-...

  2. Extensive Molecular Dynamics Simulations Show That Canonical G8 and Protonated A38H+ Forms Are Most Consistent with Crystal Structures of Hairpin Ribozyme

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mlýnský, Vojtěch; Banáš, Pavel; Hollas, Daniel; Réblová, Kamila; Walter, Nils G.; Šponer, Jiří; Otyepka, Michal

    2010-01-01

    The hairpin ribozyme is a prominent member of the group of small catalytic RNAs (RNA enzymes or ribozymes) because it does not require metal ions to achieve catalysis. Biochemical and structural data have implicated guanine 8 (G8) and adenine 38 (A38) as catalytic participants in cleavage and ligation catalyzed by the hairpin ribozyme, yet their exact role in catalysis remains disputed. To gain insight into dynamics in the active site of a minimal self-cleaving hairpin ribozyme, we have performed extensive classical, explicit-solvent molecular dynamics (MD) simulations on timescales of 50-150 ns. Starting from the available X-ray crystal structures, we investigated the structural impact of the protonation states of G8 and A38, and the inactivating A−1(2′-methoxy) substitution employed in crystallography. Our simulations reveal that a canonical G8 agrees well with the crystal structures while a deprotonated G8 profoundly distorts the active site. Thus MD simulations do not support a straightforward participation of the deprotonated G8 in catalysis. By comparison, the G8 enol tautomer is structurally well tolerated, causing only local rearrangements in the active site. Furthermore, a protonated A38H+ is more consistent with the crystallography data than a canonical A38. The simulations thus support the notion that A38H+ is the dominant form in the crystals, grown at pH 6. In most simulations, the canonical A38 departs from the scissile phosphate and substantially perturbs the structures of active site and S-turn. Yet, we occasionally also observe formation of a stable A−1(2′-OH)…A38(N1) hydrogen bond, which documents the ability of the ribozyme to form this hydrogen bond, consistent with a potential role of A38 as general base catalyst. The presence of this hydrogen bond is, however, incompatible with the expected in-line attack angle necessary for self-cleavage, requiring a rapid transition of the deprotonated 2′-oxyanion to a position more favorable for

  3. Extensive molecular dynamics simulations showing that canonical G8 and protonated A38H+ forms are most consistent with crystal structures of hairpin ribozyme.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mlýnský, Vojtech; Banás, Pavel; Hollas, Daniel; Réblová, Kamila; Walter, Nils G; Sponer, Jirí; Otyepka, Michal

    2010-05-20

    The hairpin ribozyme is a prominent member of the group of small catalytic RNAs (RNA enzymes or ribozymes) because it does not require metal ions to achieve catalysis. Biochemical and structural data have implicated guanine 8 (G8) and adenine 38 (A38) as catalytic participants in cleavage and ligation catalyzed by the hairpin ribozyme, yet their exact role in catalysis remains disputed. To gain insight into dynamics in the active site of a minimal self-cleaving hairpin ribozyme, we have performed extensive classical, explicit-solvent molecular dynamics (MD) simulations on time scales of 50-150 ns. Starting from the available X-ray crystal structures, we investigated the structural impact of the protonation states of G8 and A38, and the inactivating A-1(2'-methoxy) substitution employed in crystallography. Our simulations reveal that a canonical G8 agrees well with the crystal structures while a deprotonated G8 profoundly distorts the active site. Thus MD simulations do not support a straightforward participation of the deprotonated G8 in catalysis. By comparison, the G8 enol tautomer is structurally well tolerated, causing only local rearrangements in the active site. Furthermore, a protonated A38H(+) is more consistent with the crystallography data than a canonical A38. The simulations thus support the notion that A38H(+) is the dominant form in the crystals, grown at pH 6. In most simulations, the canonical A38 departs from the scissile phosphate and substantially perturbs the structures of the active site and S-turn. Yet, we occasionally also observe formation of a stable A-1(2'-OH)...A38(N1) hydrogen bond, which documents the ability of the ribozyme to form this hydrogen bond, consistent with a potential role of A38 as general base catalyst. The presence of this hydrogen bond is, however, incompatible with the expected in-line attack angle necessary for self-cleavage, requiring a rapid transition of the deprotonated 2'-oxyanion to a position more favorable for

  4. SNP identification from RNA sequencing and linkage map construction of rubber tree for anchoring the draft genome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shearman, Jeremy R; Sangsrakru, Duangjai; Jomchai, Nukoon; Ruang-Areerate, Panthita; Sonthirod, Chutima; Naktang, Chaiwat; Theerawattanasuk, Kanikar; Tragoonrung, Somvong; Tangphatsornruang, Sithichoke

    2015-01-01

    Hevea brasiliensis, or rubber tree, is an important crop species that accounts for the majority of natural latex production. The rubber tree nuclear genome consists of 18 chromosomes and is roughly 2.15 Gb. The current rubber tree reference genome assembly consists of 1,150,326 scaffolds ranging from 200 to 531,465 bp and totalling 1.1 Gb. Only 143 scaffolds, totalling 7.6 Mb, have been placed into linkage groups. We have performed RNA-seq on 6 varieties of rubber tree to identify SNPs and InDels and used this information to perform target sequence enrichment and high throughput sequencing to genotype a set of SNPs in 149 rubber tree offspring from a cross between RRIM 600 and RRII 105 rubber tree varieties. We used this information to generate a linkage map allowing for the anchoring of 24,424 contigs from 3,009 scaffolds, totalling 115 Mb or 10.4% of the published sequence, into 18 linkage groups. Each linkage group contains between 319 and 1367 SNPs, or 60 to 194 non-redundant marker positions, and ranges from 156 to 336 cM in length. This linkage map includes 20,143 of the 69,300 predicted genes from rubber tree and will be useful for mapping studies and improving the reference genome assembly.

  5. Pol II-expressed shRNA knocks down Sod2 gene expression and causes phenotypes of the gene knockout in mice.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xu-Gang Xia

    2006-01-01

    Full Text Available RNA interference (RNAi has been used increasingly for reverse genetics in invertebrates and mammalian cells, and has the potential to become an alternative to gene knockout technology in mammals. Thus far, only RNA polymerase III (Pol III-expressed short hairpin RNA (shRNA has been used to make shRNA-expressing transgenic mice. However, widespread knockdown and induction of phenotypes of gene knockout in postnatal mice have not been demonstrated. Previous studies have shown that Pol II synthesizes micro RNAs (miRNAs-the endogenous shRNAs that carry out gene silencing function. To achieve efficient gene knockdown in mammals and to generate phenotypes of gene knockout, we designed a construct in which a Pol II (ubiquitin C promoter drove the expression of an shRNA with a structure that mimics human miRNA miR-30a. Two transgenic lines showed widespread and sustained shRNA expression, and efficient knockdown of the target gene Sod2. These mice were viable but with phenotypes of SOD2 deficiency. Bigenic heterozygous mice generated by crossing these two lines showed nearly undetectable target gene expression and phenotypes consistent with the target gene knockout, including slow growth, fatty liver, dilated cardiomyopathy, and premature death. This approach opens the door of RNAi to a wide array of well-established Pol II transgenic strategies and offers a technically simpler, cheaper, and quicker alternative to gene knockout by homologous recombination for reverse genetics in mice and other mammalian species.

  6. Conformational flexibility in the RNA stem-loop structures formed by CAG repeats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guo, Pei; Chan, Ho Yin Edwin; Lam, Sik Lok

    2017-06-01

    The expansion of CAG repeats has been found to be associated with at least nine human genetic disorders. In these disorders, the full-length expanded CAG RNA transcripts are cleaved into small CAG-repeated RNAs which are cytotoxic and known to be capable of forming hairpins. To better understand the RNA pathogenic mechanism, in this study we have performed high-resolution nuclear magnetic resonance structural investigations on the RNA hairpins formed by CAG repeats. Our results show the formation of a type III AGCA tetraloop and reveal the effect of stem rigidity on the loop conformational flexibility. © 2017 Federation of European Biochemical Societies.

  7. Exploring the free energy landscape of a model β-hairpin peptide and its isoform.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Narayanan, Chitra; Dias, Cristiano L

    2014-10-01

    Secondary structural transitions from α-helix to β-sheet conformations are observed in several misfolding diseases including Alzheimer's and Parkinson's. Determining factors contributing favorably to the formation of each of these secondary structures is therefore essential to better understand these disease states. β-hairpin peptides form basic components of anti-parallel β-sheets and are suitable model systems for characterizing the fundamental forces stabilizing β-sheets in fibrillar structures. In this study, we explore the free energy landscape of the model β-hairpin peptide GB1 and its E2 isoform that preferentially adopts α-helical conformations at ambient conditions. Umbrella sampling simulations using all-atom models and explicit solvent are performed over a large range of end-to-end distances. Our results show the strong preference of GB1 and the E2 isoform for β-hairpin and α-helical conformations, respectively, consistent with previous studies. We show that the unfolded states of GB1 are largely populated by misfolded β-hairpin structures which differ from each other in the position of the β-turn. We discuss the energetic factors contributing favorably to the formation of α-helix and β-hairpin conformations in these peptides and highlight the energetic role of hydrogen bonds and non-bonded interactions. © 2014 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  8. Relationship between hydrophobic interactions and secondary structure stability for Trpzip beta-hairpin peptides.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Takekiyo, Takahiro; Wu, Ling; Yoshimura, Yukihiro; Shimizu, Akio; Keiderling, Timothy A

    2009-02-24

    The temperature-induced beta-hairpin stabilities of selected mutations of the Trpzip1 peptide, SWTWEGNKWTWK (WWWW), have been investigated by electronic circular dichroism (CD), Raman, and FT-IR spectroscopies. The tryptophan (Trp) residues in the original Trpzip1 sequence were systematically substituted with tyrosine (Tyr) in different positions to test the impact of Trp interactions on the beta-hairpin structure and stability. The CD intensity at approximately 228 nm, which arises from Trp-Trp interactions (tertiary structure), and the amide I' IR absorbance at approximately 1635 cm(-1) (secondary structure) have been measured over a range of temperatures to investigate the impact of Tyr substitution on beta-hairpin thermal stability in Trpzip peptides. Mutation from Trp to Tyr in the Trpzip1 sequence reduces the extent of beta-hairpin structure and monotonically decreases the beta-hairpin stability of Trpzip1 mutant peptides with an increasing number of Tyr substitutions. Substituted Trpzip peptides with just one pair of Trp-Trp interactions close to either the terminal residues (WYYW) or the turn (YWWY) have similar stabilities. Comparison of conformational transitions monitored by CD and IR reveals them to have multistate behavior in which the temperature-induced disruption of the Trp-Trp interaction (tertiary structure) occurs at a lower temperature than the unfolding of the secondary structure.

  9. Proliferating cell nuclear antigen prevents trinucleotide repeat expansions by promoting repeat deletion and hairpin removal

    Science.gov (United States)

    Beaver, Jill M.; Lai, Yanhao; Rolle, Shantell J.; Liu, Yuan

    2017-01-01

    DNA base lesions and base excision repair (BER) within trinucleotide repeat (TNR) tracts modulate repeat instability through the coordination among the key BER enzymes DNA polymerase β, flap endonuclease 1 (FEN1) and DNA ligase I (LIG I). However, it remains unknown whether BER cofactors can also alter TNR stability. In this study, we discovered that proliferating cell nuclear antigen (PCNA), a cofactor of BER, promoted CAG repeat deletion and removal of a CAG repeat hairpin during BER in a duplex CAG repeat tract and CAG hairpin loop, respectively. We showed that PCNA stimulated LIG I activity on a nick across a small template loop during BER in a duplex (CAG)20 repeat tract promoting small repeat deletions. Surprisingly, we found that during BER in a hairpin loop, PCNA promoted reannealing of the upstream flap of a double-flap intermediate, thereby facilitating the formation of a downstream flap and stimulating FEN1 cleavage activity and hairpin removal. Our results indicate that PCNA plays a critical role in preventing CAG repeat expansions by modulating the structures of dynamic DNA via cooperation with BER enzymes. We provide the first evidence that PCNA prevents CAG repeat expansions during BER by promoting CAG repeat deletion and removal of a TNR hairpin. PMID:27793507

  10. Inhibition of cervical cancer cell growth by human papillomavirus virus-like particles packaged with human papillomavirus oncoprotein short hairpin RNAs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bousarghin, Latifa; Touze, Antoine; Gaud, Guillaume; Iochmann, Sophie; Alvarez, Eva; Reverdiau, Pascale; Gaitan, Julien; Jourdan, Marie-Lise; Sizaret, Pierre-Yves; Coursaget, Pierre L

    2009-02-01

    Overexpression of human papillomavirus (HPV E6 and HPV E7) oncogenes in human cervical cells results in the development of cancer, and E6 and E7 proteins are therefore targets for preventing cervical cancer progression. Here, we describe the silencing of E6 and E7 expression in cervical carcinoma cells by RNA interference. In order to increase the efficacy of the RNA interference, HPV pseudovirions coding for a short hairpin RNA (shRNA) sequence were produced. The results indicated the degradation of E6 and E7 mRNAs when shRNA against E6 or E7 were delivered by pseudovirions in HPV-positive cells (CaSki and TC1 cells). E6 silencing resulted in the accumulation of cellular p53 and reduced cell viability. More significant cell death was observed when E7 expression was suppressed. Silencing E6 and E7 and the consequences for cancer cell growth were also investigated in vivo in mice using the capacity of murine TC1 cells expressing HPV-16 E6 and E7 oncogenes to induce fast-growing tumors. Treatment with lentiviruses and HPV virus-like particle vectors coding for an E7 shRNA sequence both resulted in dramatic inhibition of tumor growth. These results show the ability of pseudovirion-delivered shRNA to produce specific gene suppression and provide an effective means of reducing HPV-positive tumor growth.

  11. Predicting RNA pseudoknot folding thermodynamics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cao, Song; Chen, Shi-Jie

    2006-01-01

    Based on the experimentally determined atomic coordinates for RNA helices and the self-avoiding walks of the P (phosphate) and C4 (carbon) atoms in the diamond lattice for the polynucleotide loop conformations, we derive a set of conformational entropy parameters for RNA pseudoknots. Based on the entropy parameters, we develop a folding thermodynamics model that enables us to compute the sequence-specific RNA pseudoknot folding free energy landscape and thermodynamics. The model is validated through extensive experimental tests both for the native structures and for the folding thermodynamics. The model predicts strong sequence-dependent helix-loop competitions in the pseudoknot stability and the resultant conformational switches between different hairpin and pseudoknot structures. For instance, for the pseudoknot domain of human telomerase RNA, a native-like and a misfolded hairpin intermediates are found to coexist on the (equilibrium) folding pathways, and the interplay between the stabilities of these intermediates causes the conformational switch that may underlie a human telomerase disease. PMID:16709732

  12. In silico miRNA prediction in metazoan genomes: balancing between sensitivity and specificity

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Burgt, van der A.; Fiers, M.W.E.J.; Nap, J.P.H.; Ham, van R.C.H.J.

    2009-01-01

    Background - MicroRNAs (miRNAs), short ~21-nucleotide RNA molecules, play an important role in post-transcriptional regulation of gene expression. The number of known miRNA hairpins registered in the miRBase database is rapidly increasing, but recent reports suggest that many miRNAs with restricted

  13. Linear Chromosome-generating System of Agrobacterium tumefaciens C58: Protelomerase Generates and Protects Hairpin Ends

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Huang, Wai Mun; DaGloria, Jeanne; Fox, Heather; Ruan, Qiurong; Tillou, John; Shi, Ke; Aihara, Hideki; Aron, John; Casjens, Sherwood (Utah); (UMM)

    2012-09-05

    Agrobacterium tumefaciens C58, the pathogenic bacteria that causes crown gall disease in plants, harbors one circular and one linear chromosome and two circular plasmids. The telomeres of its unusual linear chromosome are covalently closed hairpins. The circular and linear chromosomes co-segregate and are stably maintained in the organism. We have determined the sequence of the two ends of the linear chromosome thus completing the previously published genome sequence of A. tumefaciens C58. We found that the telomeres carry nearly identical 25-bp sequences at the hairpin ends that are related by dyad symmetry. We further showed that its Atu2523 gene encodes a protelomerase (resolvase) and that the purified enzyme can generate the linear chromosomal closed hairpin ends in a sequence-specific manner. Agrobacterium protelomerase, whose presence is apparently limited to biovar 1 strains, acts via a cleavage-and-religation mechanism by making a pair of transient staggered nicks invariably at 6-bp spacing as the reaction intermediate. The enzyme can be significantly shortened at both the N and C termini and still maintain its enzymatic activity. Although the full-length enzyme can uniquely bind to its product telomeres, the N-terminal truncations cannot. The target site can also be shortened from the native 50-bp inverted repeat to 26 bp; thus, the Agrobacterium hairpin-generating system represents the most compact activity of all hairpin linear chromosome- and plasmid-generating systems to date. The biochemical analyses of the protelomerase reactions further revealed that the tip of the hairpin telomere may be unusually polymorphically capable of accommodating any nucleotide.

  14. Suppression of lamin A/C by short hairpin RNAs promotes adipocyte lineage commitment in mesenchymal progenitor cell line, ROB-C26.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Naito, Masako; Omoteyama, Kazuki; Mikami, Yoshikazu; Takagi, Minoru; Takahashi, Tomihisa

    2012-02-01

    Lamin A/C gene encodes a nuclear membrane protein, and mutations in this gene are associated with diverse degenerative diseases that are linked to premature aging. While lamin A/C is involved in the regulation of tissue homeostasis, the distinct expression patterns are poorly understood in the mesenchymal cells differentiating into adipocytes. Here, we examined the expression of lamin A/C in a rat mesenchymal progenitor cell-line, ROB-C26 (C26). Immunocytochemical analysis showed that lamin A/C was transiently down-regulated in immature adipocytes, but its expression increased with terminal differentiation. To elucidate the role of lamin A/C expression on mesenchymal cell differentiation, lamin A/C expression was suppressed using short hairpin RNA (shRNA) molecules in C26 cells. In the absence of adipogenic stimuli, lamin A/C shRNA decreased alkaline phosphatase (ALP) activity, but induced preadipocyte factor -1 (Pref-1) mRNA expression. In the presence of adipogenic stimuli, lamin A/C knockdown promotes adipocytes differentiation, as assessed by the detection of an increase in Oil Red O staining. RT-PCR analysis showed that lamin A/C shRNA resulted in increased mRNA expression of PPARγ2 and aP2 during adipocyte differentiation. These results suggest that decreased lamin A/C expression levels not only suppress osteoblast phenotypes but also promote adipocyte differentiation in C26 cells.

  15. Dynamic stepwise opening of integron attC DNA hairpins by SSB prevents toxicity and ensures functionality.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grieb, Maj Svea; Nivina, Aleksandra; Cheeseman, Bevan L; Hartmann, Andreas; Mazel, Didier; Schlierf, Michael

    2017-10-13

    Biologically functional DNA hairpins are found in archaea, prokaryotes and eukaryotes, playing essential roles in various DNA transactions. However, during DNA replication, hairpin formation can stall the polymerase and is therefore prevented by the single-stranded DNA binding protein (SSB). Here, we address the question how hairpins maintain their functional secondary structure despite SSB's presence. As a model hairpin, we used the recombinogenic form of the attC site, essential for capturing antibiotic-resistance genes in the integrons of bacteria. We found that attC hairpins have a conserved high GC-content near their apical loop that creates a dynamic equilibrium between attC fully opened by SSB and a partially structured attC-6-SSB complex. This complex is recognized by the recombinase IntI, which extrudes the hairpin upon binding while displacing SSB. We anticipate that this intriguing regulation mechanism using a base pair distribution to balance hairpin structure formation and genetic stability is key to the dissemination of antibiotic resistance genes among bacteria and might be conserved among other functional hairpins. © The Author(s) 2017. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of Nucleic Acids Research.

  16. Thermodynamics of RNA folding in a conserved ribosomal RNA domain.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Laing, L G; Draper, D E

    1994-04-15

    A small, 58 nt domain of the large subunit ribosomal RNA (Escherichia coli sequence 1051 to 1108) is a highly conserved junction of three helices whose secondary structure has been established by phylogenetic comparisons. To detect any contributions of additional tertiary interactions, the thermal denaturation of the rRNA domain was followed by either UV hyperchromicity or calorimetry in buffers containing a wide range of Mg2+ concentrations. Several smaller fragments corresponding to two different hairpin stem-loop structures within the domain were also synthesized and melted for comparison with the larger molecule. A model of the secondary structure unfolding was devised, based on measured enthalpies and melting temperatures of the component hairpins and tabulated parameters of base-pair stacking and loop closure. The model closely simulates the observed melting data when three additional factors are included: two parameters to account for coaxial stackings within a junction of helices, and a set of undefined "tertiary" interactions that unfolds before the secondary structure and is preferentially stabilized by Mg2+. A critical feature of this model is a conserved pair, U1082/A1086, that is within the junction loop and hypothesized to stack with an adjacent helix. The model correctly predicts the effects of disrupting this pair in a U1086 sequence variant. Although the set of "tertiary" interactions contributes a significant fraction of the RNA unfolding enthalpy (delta H approximately 25 kcal/mol, out of 180 kcal/mol total), its overall stability is marginal at 37 degrees C.

  17. Cationic modified nucleic acids for use in DNA hairpins and parallel triplexes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bomholt, Niels; Filichev, Vyacheslav V; Pedersen, Erik Bjerregaard

    2011-01-01

    Non-nucleosidic DNA monomers comprising partially protonated amines at low pH have been designed and synthesized. The modifications were incorporated into DNA oligonucleotides via standard DNA phosphoramidite synthesis. The ability of cationic modifications to stabilize palindromic DNA hairpins a...

  18. Hairpin structures formed by alpha satellite DNA of human centromeres are cleaved by human topoisomerase IIα

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jonstrup, Anette Thyssen; Thomsen, Tina; Wang, Yong; Knudsen, Birgitta R.; Koch, Jørn; Andersen, Anni H.

    2008-01-01

    Although centromere function has been conserved through evolution, apparently no interspecies consensus DNA sequence exists. Instead, centromere DNA may be interconnected through the formation of certain DNA structures creating topological binding sites for centromeric proteins. DNA topoisomerase II is a protein, which is located at centromeres, and enzymatic topoisomerase II activity correlates with centromere activity in human cells. It is therefore possible that topoisomerase II recognizes and interacts with the alpha satellite DNA of human centromeres through an interaction with potential DNA structures formed solely at active centromeres. In the present study, human topoisomerase IIα-mediated cleavage at centromeric DNA sequences was examined in vitro. The investigation has revealed that the enzyme recognizes and cleaves a specific hairpin structure formed by alpha satellite DNA. The topoisomerase introduces a single-stranded break at the hairpin loop in a reaction, where DNA ligation is partly uncoupled from the cleavage reaction. A mutational analysis has revealed, which features of the hairpin are required for topoisomerease IIα-mediated cleavage. Based on this a model is discussed, where topoisomerase II interacts with two hairpins as a mediator of centromere cohesion. PMID:18824478

  19. Active site labeling of G8 in the hairpin ribozyme: implications for structure and mechanism.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thomas, Jason M; Perrin, David M

    2006-12-27

    There is mounting evidence that suggests that general acid/base catalysis is operative in the hairpin ribozyme, with analogy to the protein enzyme RNaseA. Nevertheless, the extent of general base catalysis as well as the identity of the specific chemical groups responsible remains the subject of some controversy. An affinity label has previously been used to alkylate histidine 12 (His12), the active general base in RNaseA. To date, no such experiment has been applied to a ribozyme. We have synthesized the analogous affinity label for the hairpin ribozyme with an electrophilic 2'-bromoacetamide group in lieu of the 2'-hydroxyl (2'OH) at the substrate cleavage site and show that guanosine 8 (G8) of the hairpin ribozyme is specifically alkylated, most likely at the N1 position. This evidence strongly implicates N1 of G8 in active site chemistry. By direct analogy to RNase A, these findings could be consistent with the hypothesis that deprotonated G8 residue functions as a general base in the hairpin ribozyme. Other mechanistic possibilities for N1 of G8 such as indirect general base catalysis mediated by a water molecule or transition state stabilization could also be consistent with our findings.

  20. Kinetic pathways of β-hairpin (un)folding in explicit solvent

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bolhuis, P.G.

    2005-01-01

    We examine the dynamical (un)folding pathways of the C-terminal β-hairpin of protein G-B1 at room temperature in explicit solvent, by employing transition path sampling algorithms. The path ensembles contain information on the folding kinetics, including solvent motion. We determine the transition

  1. A Short Sequence Motif in the 5 ' Leader of the HIV-1 Genome Modulates Extended RNA Dimer Formation and Virus Replication

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van Bel, N.; Das, A.T.; Cornelissen, M.; Abbink, G.E.M.; Berkhout, B.

    2014-01-01

    The 5' leader of the HIV-1 RNA genome encodes signals that control various steps in the replication cycle, including the dimerization initiation signal (DIS) that triggers RNA dimerization. The DIS folds a hairpin structure with a palindromic sequence in the loop that allows RNA dimerization via

  2. A short sequence motif in the 5' leader of the HIV-1 genome modulates extended RNA dimer formation and virus replication

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van Bel, Nikki; Das, Atze T.; Cornelissen, Marion; Abbink, Truus E. M.; Berkhout, Ben

    2014-01-01

    The 5' leader of the HIV-1 RNA genome encodes signals that control various steps in the replication cycle, including the dimerization initiation signal (DIS) that triggers RNA dimerization. The DIS folds a hairpin structure with a palindromic sequence in the loop that allows RNA dimerization via

  3. Dietary MicroRNA Database (DMD): An Archive Database and Analytic Tool for Food-Borne microRNAs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chiang, Kevin; Shu, Jiang; Zempleni, Janos; Cui, Juan

    2015-01-01

    With the advent of high throughput technology, a huge amount of microRNA information has been added to the growing body of knowledge for non-coding RNAs. Here we present the Dietary MicroRNA Databases (DMD), the first repository for archiving and analyzing the published and novel microRNAs discovered in dietary resources. Currently there are fifteen types of dietary species, such as apple, grape, cow milk, and cow fat, included in the database originating from 9 plant and 5 animal species. Annotation for each entry, a mature microRNA indexed as DM0000*, covers information of the mature sequences, genome locations, hairpin structures of parental pre-microRNAs, cross-species sequence comparison, disease relevance, and the experimentally validated gene targets. Furthermore, a few functional analyses including target prediction, pathway enrichment and gene network construction have been integrated into the system, which enable users to generate functional insights through viewing the functional pathways and building protein-protein interaction networks associated with each microRNA. Another unique feature of DMD is that it provides a feature generator where a total of 411 descriptive attributes can be calculated for any given microRNAs based on their sequences and structures. DMD would be particularly useful for research groups studying microRNA regulation from a nutrition point of view. The database can be accessed at http://sbbi.unl.edu/dmd/.

  4. RNA recognition by the DNA end-binding Ku heterodimer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dalby, Andrew B; Goodrich, Karen J; Pfingsten, Jennifer S; Cech, Thomas R

    2013-06-01

    Most nucleic acid-binding proteins selectively bind either DNA or RNA, but not both nucleic acids. The Saccharomyces cerevisiae Ku heterodimer is unusual in that it has two very different biologically relevant binding modes: (1) Ku is a sequence-nonspecific double-stranded DNA end-binding protein with prominent roles in nonhomologous end-joining and telomeric capping, and (2) Ku associates with a specific stem-loop of TLC1, the RNA subunit of budding yeast telomerase, and is necessary for proper nuclear localization of this ribonucleoprotein enzyme. TLC1 RNA-binding and dsDNA-binding are mutually exclusive, so they may be mediated by the same site on Ku. Although dsDNA binding by Ku is well studied, much less is known about what features of an RNA hairpin enable specific recognition by Ku. To address this question, we localized the Ku-binding site of the TLC1 hairpin with single-nucleotide resolution using phosphorothioate footprinting, used chemical modification to identify an unpredicted motif within the hairpin secondary structure, and carried out mutagenesis of the stem-loop to ascertain the critical elements within the RNA that permit Ku binding. Finally, we provide evidence that the Ku-binding site is present in additional budding yeast telomerase RNAs and discuss the possibility that RNA binding is a conserved function of the Ku heterodimer.

  5. The RNA interference revolution

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    G. Lenz

    2005-12-01

    Full Text Available The discovery of double-stranded RNA-mediated gene silencing has rapidly led to its use as a method of choice for blocking a gene, and has turned it into one of the most discussed topics in cell biology. Although still in its infancy, the field of RNA interference has already produced a vast array of results, mainly in Caenorhabditis elegans, but recently also in mammalian systems. Micro-RNAs are short hairpins of RNA capable of blocking translation, which are transcribed from genomic DNA and are implicated in several aspects from development to cell signaling. The present review discusses the main methods used for gene silencing in cell culture and animal models, including the selection of target sequences, delivery methods and strategies for a successful silencing. Expected developments are briefly discussed, ranging from reverse genetics to therapeutics. Thus, the development of the new paradigm of RNA-mediated gene silencing has produced two important advances: knowledge of a basic cellular mechanism present in the majority of eukaryotic cells and access to a potent and specific new method for gene silencing.

  6. Bleomycin Can Cleave an Oncogenic Noncoding RNA.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Angelbello, Alicia J; Disney, Matthew D

    2018-01-04

    Noncoding RNAs are pervasive in cells and contribute to diseases such as cancer. A question in biomedical research is whether noncoding RNAs are targets of medicines. Bleomycin is a natural product that cleaves DNA; however, it is known to cleave RNA in vitro. Herein, an in-depth analysis of the RNA cleavage preferences of bleomycin A5 is presented. Bleomycin A5 prefers to cleave RNAs with stretches of AU base pairs. Based on these preferences and bioinformatic analysis, the microRNA-10b hairpin precursor was identified as a potential substrate for bleomycin A5. Both in vitro and cellular experiments demonstrated cleavage. Importantly, chemical cleavage by bleomycin A5 in the microRNA-10b hairpin precursors occurred near the Drosha and Dicer enzymatic processing sites and led to destruction of the microRNA. Evidently, oncogenic noncoding RNAs can be considered targets of cancer medicines and might elicit their pharmacological effects by targeting noncoding RNA. © 2018 Wiley-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  7. Combined hairpin-antisense compositions and methods for modulating expression

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shanklin, John; Nguyen, Tam Huu

    2015-11-24

    A nucleotide construct comprising a nucleotide sequence that forms a stem and a loop, wherein the loop comprises a nucleotide sequence that modulates expression of a target, wherein the stem comprises a nucleotide sequence that modulates expression of a target, and wherein the target modulated by the nucleotide sequence in the loop and the target modulated by the nucleotide sequence in the stem may be the same or different. Vectors, methods of regulating target expression, methods of providing a cell, and methods of treating conditions comprising the nucleotide sequence are also disclosed.

  8. A molecularly cloned, live-attenuated japanese encephalitis vaccine SA14-14-2 virus: a conserved single amino acid in the ij Hairpin of the Viral E glycoprotein determines neurovirulence in mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yun, Sang-Im; Song, Byung-Hak; Kim, Jin-Kyoung; Yun, Gil-Nam; Lee, Eun-Young; Li, Long; Kuhn, Richard J; Rossmann, Michael G; Morrey, John D; Lee, Young-Min

    2014-07-01

    Japanese encephalitis virus (JEV), a mosquito-borne flavivirus that causes fatal neurological disease in humans, is one of the most important emerging pathogens of public health significance. JEV represents the JE serogroup, which also includes West Nile, Murray Valley encephalitis, and St. Louis encephalitis viruses. Within this serogroup, JEV is a vaccine-preventable pathogen, but the molecular basis of its neurovirulence remains unknown. Here, we constructed an infectious cDNA of the most widely used live-attenuated JE vaccine, SA14-14-2, and rescued from the cDNA a molecularly cloned virus, SA14-14-2MCV, which displayed in vitro growth properties and in vivo attenuation phenotypes identical to those of its parent, SA14-14-2. To elucidate the molecular mechanism of neurovirulence, we selected three independent, highly neurovirulent variants (LD50, 1.5×105 PFU) by serial intracerebral passage in mice. Complete genome sequence comparison revealed a total of eight point mutations, with a common single G1708→A substitution replacing a Gly with Glu at position 244 of the viral E glycoprotein. Using our infectious SA14-14-2 cDNA technology, we showed that this single Gly-to-Glu change at E-244 is sufficient to confer lethal neurovirulence in mice, including rapid development of viral spread and tissue inflammation in the central nervous system. Comprehensive site-directed mutagenesis of E-244, coupled with homology-based structure modeling, demonstrated a novel essential regulatory role in JEV neurovirulence for E-244, within the ij hairpin of the E dimerization domain. In both mouse and human neuronal cells, we further showed that the E-244 mutation altered JEV infectivity in vitro, in direct correlation with the level of neurovirulence in vivo, but had no significant impact on viral RNA replication. Our results provide a crucial step toward developing novel therapeutic and preventive strategies against JEV and possibly other encephalitic flaviviruses.

  9. Diversity of DIS, SD and psi hairpins in HIV-1 isolates of group M: in silico study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zarudnaya, M I; Potyahaylo, A L; Kolomiets, I N; Hovorun, D M

    2007-01-01

    The primary sequence and secondary structure of the region encompassing DIS, SD and psi hairpins in HIV-1 genomic RNAs have been analyzed for 731 group M isolates from NCBI database. The secondary structures have been predicted by the m fold program (M. Zuker). Though the primary sequence of the region studied was found to be highly heterogeneous, this region is folded into DIS, SD and psi hairpins (DIS-, SD- and psi-like hairpins) in 96% of the isolates studied. The phylogenetic analysis showed that the most frequent variants of DIS hairpin (DIS(Lai), DIS(Mal) and DIS(C)) tolerate certain base changes. Particularly, base changes at stem position 23 occur 5 and 33 times more frequently in DIS(Lai) than in DIS(Mal) and DIS(C), respectively, while A insertion at the 5'end of apical loop is tolerated in DIS(Mal) and DIS(C) but not in DIS(Lai). We have revealed that the bottom base pair substitution G-C --> A-U in SD hairpin is highly specific for subtype D isolates. All variants of DIS, SD and psi hairpins found in our database are discussed, systematized and presented in schemes of hypothetical transitions between variants via a single base change. Most variants of DIS and psi hairpins were found to adopt several conformations.

  10. Long Non-Coding RNAs (lncRNAs) of Sea Cucumber: Large-Scale Prediction, Expression Profiling, Non-Coding Network Construction, and lncRNA-microRNA-Gene Interaction Analysis of lncRNAs in Apostichopus japonicus and Holothuria glaberrima During LPS Challenge and Radial Organ Complex Regeneration.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mu, Chuang; Wang, Ruijia; Li, Tianqi; Li, Yuqiang; Tian, Meilin; Jiao, Wenqian; Huang, Xiaoting; Zhang, Lingling; Hu, Xiaoli; Wang, Shi; Bao, Zhenmin

    2016-08-01

    Long non-coding RNA (lncRNA) structurally resembles mRNA but cannot be translated into protein. Although the systematic identification and characterization of lncRNAs have been increasingly reported in model species, information concerning non-model species is still lacking. Here, we report the first systematic identification and characterization of lncRNAs in two sea cucumber species: (1) Apostichopus japonicus during lipopolysaccharide (LPS) challenge and in heathy tissues and (2) Holothuria glaberrima during radial organ complex regeneration, using RNA-seq datasets and bioinformatics analysis. We identified A. japonicus and H. glaberrima lncRNAs that were differentially expressed during LPS challenge and radial organ complex regeneration, respectively. Notably, the predicted lncRNA-microRNA-gene trinities revealed that, in addition to targeting protein-coding transcripts, miRNAs might also target lncRNAs, thereby participating in a potential novel layer of regulatory interactions among non-coding RNA classes in echinoderms. Furthermore, the constructed coding-non-coding network implied the potential involvement of lncRNA-gene interactions during the regulation of several important genes (e.g., Toll-like receptor 1 [TLR1] and transglutaminase-1 [TGM1]) in response to LPS challenge and radial organ complex regeneration in sea cucumbers. Overall, this pioneer systematic identification, annotation, and characterization of lncRNAs in echinoderm pave the way for similar studies and future genetic, genomic, and evolutionary research in non-model species.

  11. The Werner syndrome protein promotes CAG/CTG repeat stability by resolving large (CAG)(n)/(CTG)(n) hairpins.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chan, Nelson L S; Hou, Caixia; Zhang, Tianyi; Yuan, Fenghua; Machwe, Amrita; Huang, Jian; Orren, David K; Gu, Liya; Li, Guo-Min

    2012-08-31

    Expansion of CAG/CTG repeats causes certain neurological and neurodegenerative disorders, and the formation and subsequent persistence of stable DNA hairpins within these repeats are believed to contribute to CAG/CTG repeat instability. Human cells possess a DNA hairpin repair (HPR) pathway, which removes various (CAG)(n) and (CTG)(n) hairpins in a nick-directed and strand-specific manner. Interestingly, this HPR system processes a (CTG)(n) hairpin on the template DNA strand much less efficiently than a (CAG)(n) hairpin on the same strand (Hou, C., Chan, N. L., Gu, L., and Li, G. M. (2009) Incision-dependent and error-free repair of (CAG)(n)/(CTG)(n) hairpins in human cell extracts. Nat. Struct. Mol. Biol. 16, 869-875), suggesting the involvement of an additional component for (CTG)(n) HPR. To identify this activity, a functional in vitro HPR assay was used to screen partially purified HeLa nuclear fractions for their ability to stimulate (CTG)(n) HPR. We demonstrate here that the stimulating activity is the Werner syndrome protein (WRN). Although WRN contains both a 3'→5' helicase activity and a 3'→5' exonuclease activity, the stimulating activity was found to be the helicase activity, as a WRN helicase mutant failed to enhance (CTG)(n) HPR. Consistently, WRN efficiently unwound large (CTG)(n) hairpins and promoted DNA polymerase δ-catalyzed DNA synthesis using a (CTG)(n) hairpin as a template. We, therefore, conclude that WRN stimulates (CTG)(n) HPR on the template DNA strand by resolving the hairpin so that it can be efficiently used as a template for repair or replicative synthesis.

  12. The Werner Syndrome Protein Promotes CAG/CTG Repeat Stability by Resolving Large (CAG)n/(CTG)n Hairpins*

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chan, Nelson L. S.; Hou, Caixia; Zhang, Tianyi; Yuan, Fenghua; Machwe, Amrita; Huang, Jian; Orren, David K.; Gu, Liya; Li, Guo-Min

    2012-01-01

    Expansion of CAG/CTG repeats causes certain neurological and neurodegenerative disorders, and the formation and subsequent persistence of stable DNA hairpins within these repeats are believed to contribute to CAG/CTG repeat instability. Human cells possess a DNA hairpin repair (HPR) pathway, which removes various (CAG)n and (CTG)n hairpins in a nick-directed and strand-specific manner. Interestingly, this HPR system processes a (CTG)n hairpin on the template DNA strand much less efficiently than a (CAG)n hairpin on the same strand (Hou, C., Chan, N. L., Gu, L., and Li, G. M. (2009) Incision-dependent and error-free repair of (CAG)n/(CTG)n hairpins in human cell extracts. Nat. Struct. Mol. Biol. 16, 869–875), suggesting the involvement of an additional component for (CTG)n HPR. To identify this activity, a functional in vitro HPR assay was used to screen partially purified HeLa nuclear fractions for their ability to stimulate (CTG)n HPR. We demonstrate here that the stimulating activity is the Werner syndrome protein (WRN). Although WRN contains both a 3′→5′ helicase activity and a 3′→5′ exonuclease activity, the stimulating activity was found to be the helicase activity, as a WRN helicase mutant failed to enhance (CTG)n HPR. Consistently, WRN efficiently unwound large (CTG)n hairpins and promoted DNA polymerase δ-catalyzed DNA synthesis using a (CTG)n hairpin as a template. We, therefore, conclude that WRN stimulates (CTG)n HPR on the template DNA strand by resolving the hairpin so that it can be efficiently used as a template for repair or replicative synthesis. PMID:22787159

  13. Design of an Optimized Wilms’ Tumor 1 (WT1 mRNA Construct for Enhanced WT1 Expression and Improved Immunogenicity In Vitro and In Vivo

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Daphné Benteyn

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Tumor antigen–encoding mRNA for dendritic cell (DC-based vaccination has gained increasing popularity in recent years. Within this context, two main strategies have entered the clinical trial stage: the use of mRNA for ex vivo antigen loading of DCs and the direct application of mRNA as a source of antigen for DCs in vivo. DCs transfected with mRNA-encoding Wilms’ tumor 1 (WT1 protein have shown promising clinical results. Using a stepwise approach, we re-engineered a WT1 cDNA-carrying transcription vector to improve the translational characteristics and immunogenicity of the transcribed mRNA. Different modifications were performed: (i the WT1 sequence was flanked by the lysosomal targeting sequence of dendritic cell lysosomal-associated membrane protein to enhance cytoplasmic expression; (ii the nuclear localization sequence (NLS of WT1 was deleted to promote shuttling from the nucleus to the cytoplasm; (iii the WT1 DNA sequence was optimized in silico to improve translational efficiency; and (iv this WT1 sequence was cloned into an optimized RNA transcription vector. DCs electroporated with this optimized mRNA showed an improved ability to stimulate WT1-specific T-cell immunity. Furthermore, in a murine model, we were able to show the safety, immunogenicity, and therapeutic activity of this optimized mRNA. This work is relevant for the future development of improved mRNA-based vaccine strategies K.

  14. DNA hairpins as temperature switches, thermometers and ionic detectors

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jonstrup, Anette Thyssen; Fredsøe, Jacob Christian; Andersen, Anni Hangaard

    2013-01-01

    Temperature is of major importance in most branches of science and technology as well as in everyday life, and with the miniaturization of electronic devices and the increasing ability to make research into small-scale systems, a specific need for very small thermostats and thermometers has been ...... temperature switches and thermometers, which can be built into electronic systems. DNA based sensors are at the same time applicable as ion detectors to monitor the chemical environment of a specific system.......Temperature is of major importance in most branches of science and technology as well as in everyday life, and with the miniaturization of electronic devices and the increasing ability to make research into small-scale systems, a specific need for very small thermostats and thermometers has been...... created. Here we describe how DNA molecules can be used as nanoscale sensors to meet these requirements. We illustrate how the hybridization kinetics between bases in DNA molecules combined with conformational changes of the DNA backbone can be exploited in the construction of simple but versatile...

  15. Lentiviral vectors encoding short hairpin RNAs efficiently transduce and knockdown LINGO-1 but induce an interferon response and cytotoxicity in central nervous system neurones.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hutson, Thomas H; Foster, Edmund; Dawes, John M; Hindges, Robert; Yáñez-Muñoz, Rafael J; Moon, Lawrence D F

    2012-05-01

    Knocking down neuronal LINGO-1 using short hairpin RNAs (shRNAs) might enhance axon regeneration in the central nervous system (CNS). Integration-deficient lentiviral vectors have great potential as a therapeutic delivery system for CNS injuries. However, recent studies have revealed that shRNAs can induce an interferon response resulting in off-target effects and cytotoxicity. CNS neurones were transduced with integration-deficient lentiviral vectors in vitro. The transcriptional effect of shRNA expression was analysed using quantitative real time-polymerase chain reaction and northern blots were used to assess shRNA production. Integration-deficient lentiviral vectors efficiently transduced CNS neurones and knocked down LINGO-1 mRNA in vitro. However, an increase in cell death was observed when lentiviral vectors encoding an shRNA were applied or when high vector concentrations were used. We demonstrate that high doses of vector or the use of vectors encoding shRNAs can induce an up-regulation of interferon-stimulated genes (2',5'-oligoadenylate synthase 1 and protein kinase R although not myxovirus resistance 1) and a down-regulation of off-target genes (including p75(NTR) and Nogo receptor 1). Furthermore, the northern blot demonstrated that these negative consequences occur even when lentiviral vectors express low levels of shRNAs. Taken together, these results may explain why neurite outgrowth was not enhanced on an inhibitory substrate following transduction with lentiviral vectors encoding an shRNA targeting LINGO-1. These findings highlight the importance of including appropriate controls to verify silencing specificity and the requirement to check for an interferon response when conducting RNA interference experiments. However, the potential benefits that RNA interference and viral vectors offer to gene-based therapies to CNS injuries cannot be overlooked and demand further investigation. Copyright © 2012 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  16. RNA Sequencing Analysis of Salivary Extracellular RNA.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Majem, Blanca; Li, Feng; Sun, Jie; Wong, David T W

    2017-01-01

    Salivary biomarkers for disease detection, diagnostic and prognostic assessments have become increasingly well established in recent years. In this chapter we explain the current leading technology that has been used to characterize salivary non-coding RNAs (ncRNAs) from the extracellular RNA (exRNA) fraction: HiSeq from Illumina® platform for RNA sequencing. Therefore, the chapter is divided into two main sections regarding the type of the library constructed (small and long ncRNA libraries), from saliva collection, RNA extraction and quantification to cDNA library generation and corresponding QCs. Using these invaluable technical tools, one can identify thousands of ncRNA species in saliva. These methods indicate that salivary exRNA provides an efficient medium for biomarker discovery of oral and systemic diseases.

  17. Enhancement of ovarian cancer chemotherapy by delivery of multidrug-resistance gene small interfering RNA using tumor targeting Salmonella.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Deng, Jiaqi; Guo, Yi; Jiang, Zhongmin; Yang, Min; Li, Huaifang; Wang, Jianjun

    2015-04-01

    The aim of this study was to observe the effect of attenuated Salmonella typhi as a tumor-targeting delivery vector for multidrug-resistance gene (MDR1) small interfering RNA (siRNA). The cisplatin (DDP)-resistant ovarian cancer cell line SKOV-3/DDP was established by treatment with gradually increasing concentrations of cisplatin. MDR1 siRNA expression plasmid containing short hairpin RNA (shRNA) of MDR1 gene was constructed and transformed into attenuated Salmonella typhi strain  SL7207. SKOV-3/DDP cells were incubated with recombinant Salmonella and then subjected to analysis of MDR1 expression by real-time polymerase chain reaction and Western blot. SKOV-3/DDP tumor-bearing mice were established by subcutaneously injecting BALB/c nude mice with SKOV-3/DDP cells, and were orally inoculated with Salmonella carrying MDR1 siRNA plasmid and simultaneously injected intraperitoneally with cisplatin. Tumor growth and mouse survival were observed. Compared with parental cell line, the DDP-resistant SKOV-3/DDP cells expressed a much higher level of MDR1. The expression of MDR1 in SKOV-3/DDP cells infected with the Salmonella strain bearing MDR1 siRNA plasmid in vitro was detected to be downregulated and DDP tolerance of these cells was reversed. Tumor-bearing nude mice that were orally receiving recombinant Salmonella experienced a slow tumor growth and became more sensitive to DDP. Attenuated Salmonella typhi may represent a promising vector for in vivo administration of RNA interference therapy against malignant tumors. © 2014 The Authors. Journal of Obstetrics and Gynaecology Research © 2014 Japan Society of Obstetrics and Gynecology.

  18. "Off-on" electrochemical hairpin-DNA-based genosensor for cancer diagnostics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Farjami, Elaheh; Clima, Lilia; Gothelf, Kurt; Ferapontova, Elena E

    2011-03-01

    A simple and robust "off-on" signaling genosensor platform with improved selectivity for single-nucleotide polymorphism (SNP) detection based on the electronic DNA hairpin molecular beacons has been developed. The DNA beacons were immobilized onto gold electrodes in their folded states through the alkanethiol linker at the 3'-end, while the 5'-end was labeled with a methylene blue (MB) redox probe. A typical "on-off" change of the electrochemical signal was observed upon hybridization of the 27-33 nucleotide (nt) long hairpin DNA to the target DNA, in agreement with all the hitherto published data. Truncation of the DNA hairpin beacons down to 20 nts provided improved genosensor selectivity for SNP and allowed switching of the electrochemical genosensor response from the on-off to the off-on mode. Switching was consistent with the variation in the mechanism of the electron transfer reaction between the electrode and the MB redox label, for the folded beacon being characteristic of the electrochemistry of adsorbed species, while for the "open" duplex structure being formally controlled by the diffusion of the redox label within the adsorbate layer. The relative current intensities of both processes were governed by the length of the formed DNA duplex, potential scan rate, and apparent diffusion coefficient of the redox species. The off-on genosensor design used for detection of a cancer biomarker TP53 gene sequence favored discrimination between the healthy and SNP-containing DNA sequences, which was particularly pronounced at short hybridization times.

  19. 2-Aminopurine hairpin probes for the detection of ultraviolet-induced DNA damage

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    El-Yazbi, Amira F. [Department of Chemistry, University of Alberta, Edmonton, AB T6G 2G2 (Canada); Loppnow, Glen R., E-mail: glen.loppnow@ualberta.ca [Department of Chemistry, University of Alberta, Edmonton, AB T6G 2G2 (Canada)

    2012-05-13

    Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Molecular beacon with 2AP bases detects DNA damage in a simple mix-and-read assay. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Molecular beacons with 2AP bases detect damage at a 17.2 nM limit of detection. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer The 2AP molecular beacon is linear over a 0-3.5 {mu}M concentration range for damage. - Abstract: Nucleic acid exposure to radiation and chemical insults leads to damage and disease. Thus, detection and understanding DNA damage is important for elucidating molecular mechanisms of disease. However, current methods of DNA damage detection are either time-consuming, destroy the sample, or are too specific to be used for generic detection of damage. In this paper, we develop a fluorescence sensor of 2-aminopurine (2AP), a fluorescent analogue of adenine, incorporated in the loop of a hairpin probe for the quantification of ultraviolet (UV) C-induced nucleic acid damage. Our results show that the selectivity of the 2AP hairpin probe to UV-induced nucleic acid damage is comparable to molecular beacon (MB) probes of DNA damage. The calibration curve for the 2AP hairpin probe shows good linearity (R{sup 2} = 0.98) with a limit of detection of 17.2 nM. This probe is a simple, fast and economic fluorescence sensor for the quantification of UV-induced damage in DNA.

  20. Construction and Biological Evaluation of a Novel Integrin ανβ3-Specific Carrier for Targeted siRNA Delivery In Vitro

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xueqi Chen

    2017-02-01

    Full Text Available (1 Background: The great potential of RNA interference (RNAi-based gene therapy is premised on the effective delivery of small interfering RNAs (siRNAs to target tissues and cells. Hence, we aimed at developing and examining a novel integrin αvβ3-specific delivery carrier for targeted transfection of siRNA to malignant tumor cells; (2 Methods: Arginine-glycine-aspartate motif (RGD was adopted as a tissue target for specific recognition of integrin αvβ3. To enable siRNA binding, a chimeric peptide was synthesized by adding nonamer arginine residues (9R at the carboxy terminus of cyclic-RGD dimer, designated as c(RGD2-9R. The efficiency of 9R peptide transferring siRNA was biologically evaluated in vitro by flow cytometry, confocal microscopy, and Western blot; (3 Results: An optimal 10:1 molar ratio of c(RGD2-9R to siRNA was confirmed by the electrophoresis on agarose gels. Both the flow cytometry and confocal microscopy results testified that transfection of c(RGD2-9R as an siRNA delivery carrier was obviously higher than the naked-siRNA group. The results of Western blot demonstrated that these 9R peptides were able to transduce siRNA to HepG2 cells in vitro, resulting in efficient gene silencing; and (4 Conclusion: The chimeric peptide of c(RGD2-9R can be developed as an effective siRNA delivery carrier and shows potential as a new strategy for RNAi-based gene therapy.

  1. Conformational dynamics of DNA hairpins at millisecond resolution obtained from analysis of single-molecule FRET histograms.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tsukanov, Roman; Tomov, Toma E; Berger, Yaron; Liber, Miran; Nir, Eyal

    2013-12-19

    Here we provide high resolution study of DNA hairpin dynamics achieved by probability distribution analysis (PDA) of diffusion-based single-molecule Förster resonance energy transfer (sm-FRET) histograms. The opening and closing rates of three hairpins both free and attached to DNA origami were determined. The agreement with rates previously obtained using the total internal reflection (TIRF) technique and between free hairpins and hairpins attached to origami validated the PDA and demonstrated that the origami had no influence on the hairpin dynamics. From comparison of rates of four DNA hairpins, differing only in stem sequence, and from comparison with rates calculated using nearest-neighbor method and standard transition state theory, we conclude that the unfolding reaction resembles that of melting of DNA duplex with a corresponding sequence and that the folding reaction depends on counterion concentration and not on stem sequence. Our validation and demonstration of the PDA method will encourage its implementation in future high-resolution dynamic studies of freely diffusing biomolecules.

  2. Evolution of microRNA in primates.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McCreight, Jennifer C; Schneider, Sean E; Wilburn, Damien B; Swanson, Willie J

    2017-01-01

    MicroRNA play an important role in post-transcriptional regulation of most transcripts in the human genome, but their evolution across the primate lineage is largely uncharacterized. A particular miRNA can have one to thousands of messenger RNA targets, establishing the potential for a small change in sequence or overall miRNA structure to have profound phenotypic effects. However, the majority of non-human primate miRNA is predicted solely by homology to the human genome and lacks experimental validation. In the present study, we sequenced thirteen species representing a wide range of the primate phylogeny. Hundreds of miRNA were validated, and the number of species with experimentally validated miRNA was tripled. These species include a sister taxon to humans (bonobo) and basal primates (aye-aye, mouse lemur, galago). Consistent with previous studies, we found the seed region and mature miRNA to be highly conserved across primates, with overall structural conservation of the pre-miRNA hairpin. However, there were a number of interesting exceptions, including a seed shift due to structural changes in miR-501. We also identified an increase in the number of miR-320 paralogs throughout primate evolution. Many of these non-conserved miRNA appear to regulate neuronal processes, illustrating the importance of investigating miRNA to learn more about human evolution.

  3. Evolution of microRNA in primates.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jennifer C McCreight

    Full Text Available MicroRNA play an important role in post-transcriptional regulation of most transcripts in the human genome, but their evolution across the primate lineage is largely uncharacterized. A particular miRNA can have one to thousands of messenger RNA targets, establishing the potential for a small change in sequence or overall miRNA structure to have profound phenotypic effects. However, the majority of non-human primate miRNA is predicted solely by homology to the human genome and lacks experimental validation. In the present study, we sequenced thirteen species representing a wide range of the primate phylogeny. Hundreds of miRNA were validated, and the number of species with experimentally validated miRNA was tripled. These species include a sister taxon to humans (bonobo and basal primates (aye-aye, mouse lemur, galago. Consistent with previous studies, we found the seed region and mature miRNA to be highly conserved across primates, with overall structural conservation of the pre-miRNA hairpin. However, there were a number of interesting exceptions, including a seed shift due to structural changes in miR-501. We also identified an increase in the number of miR-320 paralogs throughout primate evolution. Many of these non-conserved miRNA appear to regulate neuronal processes, illustrating the importance of investigating miRNA to learn more about human evolution.

  4. Coordinated processing of 3' slipped (CAG)n/(CTG)n hairpins by DNA polymerases β and δ preferentially induces repeat expansions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chan, Nelson L S; Guo, Jinzhen; Zhang, Tianyi; Mao, Guogen; Hou, Caixia; Yuan, Fenghua; Huang, Jian; Zhang, Yanbin; Wu, Jianxin; Gu, Liya; Li, Guo-Min

    2013-05-24

    Expansion of CAG/CTG trinucleotide repeats causes certain familial neurological disorders. Hairpin formation in the nascent strand during DNA synthesis is considered a major path for CAG/CTG repeat expansion. However, the underlying mechanism is unclear. We show here that removal or retention of a nascent strand hairpin during DNA synthesis depends on hairpin structures and types of DNA polymerases. Polymerase (pol) δ alone removes the 3'-slipped hairpin using its 3'-5' proofreading activity when the hairpin contains no immediate 3' complementary sequences. However, in the presence of pol β, pol δ preferentially facilitates hairpin retention regardless of hairpin structures. In this reaction, pol β incorporates several nucleotides to the hairpin 3'-end, which serves as an effective primer for the continuous DNA synthesis by pol δ, thereby leading to hairpin retention and repeat expansion. These findings strongly suggest that coordinated processing of 3'-slipped (CAG)n/(CTG)n hairpins by polymerases δ and β on during DNA synthesis induces CAG/CTG repeat expansions.

  5. Coordinated Processing of 3′ Slipped (CAG)n/(CTG)n Hairpins by DNA Polymerases β and δ Preferentially Induces Repeat Expansions*

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chan, Nelson L. S.; Guo, Jinzhen; Zhang, Tianyi; Mao, Guogen; Hou, Caixia; Yuan, Fenghua; Huang, Jian; Zhang, Yanbin; Wu, Jianxin; Gu, Liya; Li, Guo-Min

    2013-01-01

    Expansion of CAG/CTG trinucleotide repeats causes certain familial neurological disorders. Hairpin formation in the nascent strand during DNA synthesis is considered a major path for CAG/CTG repeat expansion. However, the underlying mechanism is unclear. We show here that removal or retention of a nascent strand hairpin during DNA synthesis depends on hairpin structures and types of DNA polymerases. Polymerase (pol) δ alone removes the 3′-slipped hairpin using its 3′-5′ proofreading activity when the hairpin contains no immediate 3′ complementary sequences. However, in the presence of pol β, pol δ preferentially facilitates hairpin retention regardless of hairpin structures. In this reaction, pol β incorporates several nucleotides to the hairpin 3′-end, which serves as an effective primer for the continuous DNA synthesis by pol δ, thereby leading to hairpin retention and repeat expansion. These findings strongly suggest that coordinated processing of 3′-slipped (CAG)n/(CTG)n hairpins by polymerases δ and β on during DNA synthesis induces CAG/CTG repeat expansions. PMID:23585564

  6. BrAD-seq: Breath Adapter Directional sequencing: a streamlined, ultra-simple and fast library preparation protocol for strand specific mRNA library construction.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Brad Thomas Townsley

    2015-05-01

    Full Text Available Next Generation Sequencing (NGS is driving rapid advancement in biological understanding and RNA-sequencing (RNA-seq has become an indispensable tool for biology and medicine. There is a growing need for access to these technologies although preparation of NGS libraries remains a bottleneck to wider adoption. Here we report a novel method for the production of strand specific RNA-seq libraries utilizing inherent properties of double-stranded cDNA to capture and incorporate a sequencing adapter. Breath Adapter Directional sequencing (BrAD-seq reduces sample handling and requires far fewer enzymatic steps than most available methods to produce high quality strand-specific RNA-seq libraries. The method we present is optimized for 3-prime Digital Gene Expression (DGE libraries and can easily extend to full transcript coverage shotgun (SHO type strand-specific libraries and is modularized to accommodate a diversity of RNA and DNA input materials. BrAD-seq offers a highly streamlined and inexpensive option for RNA-seq libraries.

  7. Resistance of Cloned 1F5 Chimeric Anti-CD20 Antibody Heavy-Chain Gene to DNA Polymerase due to a Predicted Hairpin Structure

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fatemeh Khademi

    2016-11-01

    Full Text Available Background: Formation of secondary structure such as DNA hairpins or loops may influence molecular genetics methods and PCR based approaches necessary for genetic engineering, in addition to gene regulation. Materials and Methods: A polymerase chain reaction with splice overlap extension (SOE-PCR was used to create fully synthetic 1F5 chimeric anti-CD20 heavy- and light-chain genes. The chimeric genes were cloned into the pCR-Blunt II-TOPO vector following by cloning into the pBudCE4.1 expression vector. Prediction of secondary structure was performed with the Vienna RNAfold webserver. PCR and sequencing across the predicted secondary structure of chimeric 1F5 heavy-chain gene was performed with multiple protocols for standard and GC-rich templates. Results: In our attempt to design vectors aimed to generate mouse-human chimeric antibody against CD20 (1F5, we found that the coding sequence of 1F5 chimeric heavy-chain gene constructed by SOE-PCR was resistant to polymerase during both PCR and sequencing reactions. Furthermore, we were also unable to analysis some positive transformants by restriction enzyme digestion. Encountering such difficulties to identify the cloned anti-CD20 chimeric heavy-chain gene, we found that the chimeric heavy-chain sequence is highly GC-rich and predicted to form a stable secondary structure. Conclusion: In conclusion, for the first time, we reported several difficulties with production of therapeutic chimeric 1F5 anti-CD20 antibody due to a predicted hairpin cluster correlates with barriers to PCR, sequencing and possibly restriction analysis. Our findings provide a probable note for researchers experiencing technical difficulties with construction of chimeric anti-CD20 antibody 1F5 gene vectors and also with other genes and molecular biology techniques requiring PCR-based method or restriction enzyme analysis. 

  8. Fluorescence-based characterization of genetically encoded peptides that fold in live cells: progress toward a generic hairpin scaffold

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cheng, Zihao; Campbell, Robert E.

    2007-02-01

    Binding proteins suitable for expression and high affinity molecular recognition in the cytoplasm or nucleus of live cells have numerous applications in the biological sciences. In an effort to add a new minimal motif to the growing repertoire of validated non-immunoglobulin binding proteins, we have undertaken the development of a generic protein scaffold based on a single β-hairpin that can fold efficiently in the cytoplasm. We have developed a method, based on the measurement of fluorescence resonance energy transfer (FRET) between a genetically fused cyan fluorescent protein (CFP) and yellow fluorescent protein (YFP), that allows the structural stability of recombinant β-hairpin peptides to be rapidly assessed both in vitro and in vivo. We have previously reported the validation of this method when applied to a 16mer tryptophan zipper β-hairpin. We now describe the use of this method to evaluate the potential of a designed 20mer β-hairpin peptide with a 3rd Trp/Trp cross-strand pair to function as a generic protein scaffold. Quantitative analysis of the FRET efficiency, resistance to proteolysis (assayed by loss of FRET), and circular dichroism spectra revealed that the 20mer peptide is significantly more tolerant of destabilizing mutations than the 16mer peptide. Furthermore, we experimentally demonstrate that the in vitro determined β-hairpin stabilities are well correlated with in vivo β-hairpin stabilities as determined by FRET measurements of colonies of live bacteria expressing the recombinant peptides flanked by CFP and YFP. Finally, we report on our progress to develop highly folded 24mer and 28mer β-hairpin peptides through the use of fluorescence-based library screening.

  9. RNA interference suppressing PLCE1 gene expression decreases invasive power of human bladder cancer T24 cell line.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ou, Liping; Guo, Yongcan; Luo, Chunli; Wu, Xiaohou; Zhao, Yi; Cai, Xiaozhong

    2010-07-15

    Mutational activation of the ras proto-oncogenes is frequently found in cancers. The phospholipase C epsilon gene (PLCE1) encodes a novel ras-related protein (R-Ras) effector mediating the effects of R-Ras on the actin cytoskeleton and membrane protrusion, because R-Ras is coprecipitated with the PLCE1 protein and can increase its activity. The nature of downstream signaling pathways from Ras involved in bladder cancer remains poorly understood. We aimed to construct a small hairpin RNA (shRNA) expression plasmid against the PLCE1 gene and to observe the inhibition of human bladder carcinoma cell T24 migration by RNA interference suppressing the expression of PLCE1. Two PLCE1 plasmids (P1 and P2) were constructed and inserted into T24 cells. Reverse transcriptase-polymerase chain reaction and Western blot analyses were performed to investigate inhibition of PLCE1 expression after plasmid transfection. Invasive power of the T24 cell line was measured before and after transfection by a membrane invasion culture system (transwell chamber), gelatin enzymography, and immunocytochemistry of cells. The RT-PCR analysis of BCL2 mRNA levels among different groups of T24 cell line indicated that expression of BCL2 mRNA was lower in the two positive plasmid-transfected cell groups than in the blank control or HK-A groups. Silencing of PLCE1 might downregulate the level of MMP and BCL2 gene expression, decreasing the invasive power of bladder cancer T24 cells and thus inhibiting tumor development. Copyright (c) 2010 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  10. Using Nucleofection of siRNA Constructs for Knockdown of Primary Cilia in P19.CL6 Cancer Stem Cell Differentiation into Cardiomyocytes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Clement, Christian Alexandro; Larsen, Lars Allan; Christensen, Søren Tvorup

    2009-01-01

    cardiogenesis. By knocking down the formation of the primary cilium by nucleofection of plasmid DNA with siRNA sequences against genes essential in ciliogenesis (IFT88 and IFT20) we block hedgehog (Hh) signaling in P19.CL6 cells as well as the differentiation of the cells into beating cardiomyocytes (Clement et...

  11. Incision-dependent and error-free repair of (CAG)(n)/(CTG)(n) hairpins in human cell extracts.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hou, Caixia; Chan, Nelson L S; Gu, Liya; Li, Guo-Min

    2009-08-01

    Expansion of CAG/CTG trinucleotide repeats is associated with certain familial neurological disorders, including Huntington's disease. Increasing evidence suggests that formation of a stable DNA hairpin within CAG/CTG repeats during DNA metabolism contributes to their expansion. However, the molecular mechanism(s) by which cells remove CAG/CTG hairpins remain unknown. Here we demonstrate that human cell extracts can catalyze error-free repair of CAG/CTG hairpins in a nick-directed manner. The repair system specifically targets CAG/CTG tracts for incisions in the nicked DNA strand, followed by DNA resynthesis using the continuous strand as a template, thereby ensuring CAG/CTG stability. Proliferating cell nuclear antigen (PCNA) is required for the incision step of the hairpin removal, which uses distinct endonuclease activities for individual CAG/CTG hairpins depending on their strand locations and/or secondary structures. We discuss the implications of these data for understanding the etiology of neurological diseases and trinucleotide repeat instability.

  12. Exploring TAR–RNA aptamer loop–loop interaction by X-ray crystallography, UV spectroscopy and surface plasmon resonance

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lebars, Isabelle; Legrand, Pierre; Aimé, Ahissan; Pinaud, Noël; Fribourg, Sébastien; Di Primo, Carmelo

    2008-01-01

    In HIV-1, trans-activation of transcription of the viral genome is regulated by an imperfect hairpin, the trans-activating responsive (TAR) RNA element, located at the 5′ untranslated end of all viral transcripts. TAR acts as a binding site for viral and cellular proteins. In an attempt to identify RNA ligands that would interfere with the virus life-cycle by interacting with TAR, an in vitro selection was previously carried out. RNA hairpins that formed kissing-loop dimers with TAR were selected [Ducongé F. and Toulmé JJ (1999) RNA, 5:1605–1614]. We describe here the crystal structure of TAR bound to a high-affinity RNA aptamer. The two hairpins form a kissing complex and interact through six Watson–Crick base pairs. The complex adopts an overall conformation with an inter-helix angle of 28.1°, thus contrasting with previously reported solution and modelling studies. Structural analysis reveals that inter-backbone hydrogen bonds between ribose 2′ hydroxyl and phosphate oxygens at the stem-loop junctions can be formed. Thermal denaturation and surface plasmon resonance experiments with chemically modified 2′-O-methyl incorporated into both hairpins at key positions, clearly demonstrate the involvement of this intermolecular network of hydrogen bonds in complex stability. PMID:18996893

  13. In Vitro Selection of a DNAzyme Cooperatively Binding Two Lanthanide Ions for RNA Cleavage.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huang, Po-Jung Jimmy; Vazin, Mahsa; Liu, Juewen

    2016-05-03

    Trivalent lanthanide ions (Ln(3+)) were recently employed to select RNA-cleaving DNAzymes, and three new DNAzymes have been reported so far. In this work, dysprosium (Dy(3+)) was used with a library containing 50 random nucleotides. After six rounds of in vitro selection, a new DNAzyme named Dy10a was obtained and characterized. Dy10a has a bulged hairpin structure cleaving a RNA/DNA chimeric substrate. Dy10a is highly active in the presence of the five Ln(3+) ions in the middle of the lanthanide series (Sm(3+), Eu(3+), Gd(3+), Tb(3+), and Dy(3+)), while its activity descends on the two sides. The cleavage rate reaches 0.6 min(-1) at pH 6 with just 200 nM Sm(3+), which is the fastest among all known Ln(3+)-dependent enzymes. Dy10a binds two Ln(3+) ions cooperatively. When a phosphorothioate (PS) modification is introduced at the cleavage junction, the activity decreases by >2500-fold for both the Rp and Sp diastereomers, and thiophilic Cd(2+) cannot rescue the activity. The pH-rate profile has a slope of 0.37 between pH 4.2 and 5.2, and the slope was even lower at higher pH. On the basis of these data, a model of metal binding is proposed. Finally, a catalytic beacon sensor that can detect Ho(3+) down to 1.7 nM is constructed.

  14. Downregulation of CD147 expression by RNA interference inhibits HT29 cell proliferation, invasion and tumorigenicity in vitro and in vivo.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Rui; Pan, Yuqin; He, Bangshun; Xu, Yeqiong; Gao, Tianyi; Song, Guoqi; Sun, Huiling; Deng, Qiwen; Wang, Shukui

    2013-12-01

    We investigated the effect of CD147 silencing on HT29 cell proliferation and invasion. We constructed a novel short hairpin RNA (shRNA) expression vector pYr-mir30-shRNA. The plasmid was transferred to HT29 cells. The expression of CD147, MCT1 (lactate transporters monocarboxylate transporter 1) and MCT4 (lactate transporters monocarboxylate transporter 4) were monitored by quantitative PCR and western blotting, respectively. The MMP-2 (matrix metalloproteinase-2) and MMP-9 (matrix metalloproteinase-9) activities were determined by gelatin zymography assay, while the intracellular lactate concentration was determined by the lactic acid assay kit. WST-8 assay was used to determine the HT29 cell proliferation and the chemosensitivity. Invasion assay was used to determine the invasion of HT29 cells. In addition, we established a colorectal cancer model, and detected CD147 expression in vivo. The results showed that the expression of CD147 and MCT1 was significantly reduced at both mRNA and protein levels, and also the activity of MMP-2 and MMP-9 was reduced. The proliferation and invasion were decreased, but chemosensitivity to cisplatin was increased. In vivo, the CD147 expression was also significantly decreased, and reduced the tumor growth after CD147 gene silencing. The results demonstrated that silencing of CD147 expression inhibited the proliferation and invasion, suggesting CD147 silencing might be an adjuvant gene therapy strategy to chemotherapy.

  15. Data on the construction of a recombinant HEK293 cell line overexpressing hERG potassium channel and examining the presence of hERG mRNA and protein expression.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Teah, Yi Fan; Abduraman, Muhammad Asyraf; Amanah, Azimah; Adenan, Mohd Ilham; Fariza Sulaiman, Shaida; Tan, Mei Lan

    2017-10-01

    The data presented in this article are related to the research article entitled "The effects of deoxyelephantopin on the cardiac delayed rectifier potassium channel current (IKr) and human ether-a-go-go-related gene (hERG) expression" (Y.F. Teah, M.A. Abduraman, A. Amanah, M.I. Adenan, S.F. Sulaiman, M.L. Tan) [1], which the possible hERG blocking properties of deoxyelephantopin were investigated. This article describes the construction of human embryonic kidney 293 (HEK293) cells overexpressing HERG potassium channel and verification of the presence of hERG mRNA and protein expression in this recombinant cell line.

  16. RNA topology

    OpenAIRE

    Frank-Kamenetskii, Maxim D.

    2013-01-01

    A new variety on non-coding RNA has been discovered by several groups: circular RNA (circRNA). This discovery raises intriguing questions about the possibility of the existence of knotted RNA molecules and the existence of a new class of enzymes changing RNA topology, RNA topoisomerases.

  17. A facile lentiviral vector system for expression of doxycycline-inducible shRNAs: knockdown of the pre-miRNA processing enzyme Drosha

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Aagaard, Lars; Amarzguioui, Mohammed; Sun, Guihua

    2007-01-01

    Drosha. Drosha is the core catalytic component of the "microprocessor complex" and cleaves the primary microRNA (miRNA) transcripts into their pre-miRNA hairpin intermediates. We anticipate that our vector will facilitate functional studies of miRNA biogenesis.......RNA interference (RNAi) is a powerful genetic tool for loss-of-function studies in mammalian cells and is also considered a potentially powerful therapeutic modality for the treatment of a variety of human diseases. During the past 3 years a number of systems for conditional RNAi have been...... developed that allow controlled expression of short hairpin RNA (shRNA) triggers of RNAi. The simplest strategy relies on tet-operable polymerase III–promoted shRNAs and co-expression of the tetracycline regulatory protein, TetR. In this study we have combined these features into a single lentiviral vector...

  18. The influenza hemagglutinin fusion domain is an amphipathic helical hairpin that functions by inducing membrane curvature.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smrt, Sean T; Draney, Adrian W; Lorieau, Justin L

    2015-01-02

    The highly conserved N-terminal 23 residues of the hemagglutinin glycoprotein, known as the fusion peptide domain (HAfp23), is vital to the membrane fusion and infection mechanism of the influenza virus. HAfp23 has a helical hairpin structure consisting of two tightly packed amphiphilic helices that rest on the membrane surface. We demonstrate that HAfp23 is a new class of amphipathic helix that functions by leveraging the negative curvature induced by two tightly packed helices on membranes. The helical hairpin structure has an inverted wedge shape characteristic of negative curvature lipids, with a bulky hydrophobic region and a relatively small hydrophilic head region. The F3G mutation reduces this inverted wedge shape by reducing the volume of its hydrophobic base. We show that despite maintaining identical backbone structures and dynamics as the wild type HAfp23, the F3G mutant has an attenuated fusion activity that is correlated to its reduced ability to induce negative membrane curvature. The inverted wedge shape of HAfp23 is likely to play a crucial role in the initial stages of membrane fusion by stabilizing negative curvature in the fusion stalk. © 2015 by The American Society for Biochemistry and Molecular Biology, Inc.

  19. β-Hairpin of Islet Amyloid Polypeptide Bound to an Aggregation Inhibitor.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mirecka, Ewa A; Feuerstein, Sophie; Gremer, Lothar; Schröder, Gunnar F; Stoldt, Matthias; Willbold, Dieter; Hoyer, Wolfgang

    2016-09-19

    In type 2 diabetes, the formation of islet amyloid consisting of islet amyloid polypeptide (IAPP) is associated with reduction in β-cell mass and contributes to the failure of islet cell transplantation. Rational design of inhibitors of IAPP amyloid formation has therapeutic potential, but is hampered by the lack of structural information on inhibitor complexes of the conformationally flexible, aggregation-prone IAPP. Here we characterize a β-hairpin conformation of IAPP in complex with the engineered binding protein β-wrapin HI18. The β-strands correspond to two amyloidogenic motifs, 12-LANFLVH-18 and 22-NFGAILS-28, which are connected by a turn established around Ser-20. Besides backbone hydrogen bonding, the IAPP:HI18 interaction surface is dominated by non-polar contacts involving hydrophobic side chains of the IAPP β-strands. Apart from monomers, HI18 binds oligomers and fibrils and inhibits IAPP aggregation and toxicity at low substoichiometric concentrations. The IAPP β-hairpin can serve as a molecular recognition motif enabling control of IAPP aggregation.

  20. Grooved nanowires from self-assembling hairpin molecules for solar cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tevis, Ian D; Tsai, Wei-Wen; Palmer, Liam C; Aytun, Taner; Stupp, Samuel I

    2012-03-27

    One of the challenges facing bulk heterojunction organic solar cells is obtaining organized films during the phase separation of intimately mixed donor and acceptor components. We report here on the use of hairpin-shaped sexithiophene molecules to generate by self-assembly grooved nanowires as the donor component in bulk heterojunction solar cells. Photovoltaic devices were fabricated via spin-casting to produce by solvent evaporation a percolating network of self-assembled nanowires and fullerene acceptors. Thermal annealing was found to increase power conversion efficiencies by promoting domain growth while still maintaining this percolating network of nanostructures. The benefits of self-assembly and grooved nanowires were examined by building devices from a soluble sexithiophene derivative that does not form one-dimensional structures. In these systems, excessive phase separation caused by thermal annealing leads to the formation of defects and lower device efficiencies. We propose that the unique hairpin shape of the self-assembling molecules allows the nanowires as they form to interact well with the fullerenes in receptor-ligand type configurations at the heterojunction of the two domains, thus enhancing device efficiencies by 23%. © 2012 American Chemical Society

  1. Towards Antiviral shRNAs Based on the AgoshRNA Design.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ying Poi Liu

    Full Text Available RNA interference (RNAi can be induced by intracellular expression of a short hairpin RNA (shRNA. Processing of the shRNA requires the RNaseIII-like Dicer enzyme to remove the loop and to release the biologically active small interfering RNA (siRNA. Dicer is also involved in microRNA (miRNA processing to liberate the mature miRNA duplex, but recent studies indicate that miR-451 is not processed by Dicer. Instead, this miRNA is processed by the Argonaute 2 (Ago2 protein, which also executes the subsequent cleavage of a complementary mRNA target. Interestingly, shRNAs that structurally resemble miR-451 can also be processed by Ago2 instead of Dicer. The key determinant of these "AgoshRNA" molecules is a relatively short basepaired stem, which avoids Dicer recognition and consequently allows alternative processing by Ago2. AgoshRNA processing yields a single active RNA strand, whereas standard shRNAs produce a duplex with guide and passenger strands and the latter may cause adverse off-target effects. In this study, we converted previously tested active anti-HIV-1 shRNA molecules into AgoshRNA. We tested several designs that could potentially improve AgoshRNA activity, including extension of the complementarity between the guide strand and the mRNA target and reduction of the thermodynamic stability of the hairpins. We demonstrate that active AgoshRNAs can be generated. However, the RNAi activity is reduced compared to the matching shRNAs. Despite reduced RNAi activity, comparison of an active AgoshRNA and the matching shRNA in a sensitive cell toxicity assay revealed that the AgoshRNA is much less toxic.

  2. DNA aptamer generation by ExSELEX using genetic alphabet expansion with a mini-hairpin DNA stabilization method.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hirao, Ichiro; Kimoto, Michiko; Lee, Kyung Hyun

    2017-09-13

    A novel aptamer generation method to greatly augment the affinity and stability of DNA aptamers was developed by genetic alphabet expansion combined with mini-hairpin DNA technology. The genetic alphabet expansion increases the physicochemical and structural diversities of DNA aptamers by introducing extra components, unnatural bases, as a fifth base, allowing for the enhancement of DNA aptamer affinities. Furthermore, the mini-hairpin DNA technology stabilizes DNA aptamers against nuclease digestion and thermal denaturation, by introducing an extraordinarily stable mini-hairpin DNA containing a GCGAAGC sequence. This novel method provides stabilized high-affinity DNA aptamers for diagnostic and therapeutic applications. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. and Société Française de Biochimie et Biologie Moléculaire (SFBBM). All rights reserved.

  3. Betaalpha-hairpin clamps brace betaalphabeta modules and can make substantive contributions to the stability of TIM barrel proteins.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xiaoyan Yang

    Full Text Available Non-local hydrogen bonding interactions between main chain amide hydrogen atoms and polar side chain acceptors that bracket consecutive betaalpha or alphabeta elements of secondary structure in alphaTS from E. coli, a TIM barrel protein, have previously been found to contribute 4-6 kcal mol(-1 to the stability of the native conformation. Experimental analysis of similar betaalpha-hairpin clamps in a homologous pair of TIM barrel proteins of low sequence identity, IGPS from S. solfataricus and E. coli, reveals that this dramatic enhancement of stability is not unique to alphaTS. A survey of 71 TIM barrel proteins demonstrates a 4-fold symmetry for the placement of betaalpha-hairpin clamps, bracing the fundamental betaalphabeta building block and defining its register in the (betaalpha(8 motif. The preferred sequences and locations of betaalpha-hairpin clamps will enhance structure prediction algorithms and provide a strategy for engineering stability in TIM barrel proteins.

  4. Effects of RNA interference-mediated NRP-1 silencing on the proliferation and apoptosis of breast cancer cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Han, Zhengxiang; Jiang, Guan; Zhang, Yingying; Xu, Jie; Chen, Chong; Zhang, Lansheng; Xu, Zhenyuan; Du, Xiuping

    2015-07-01

    Lentiviral expression vectors carrying human NRP-1 short hairpin RNA (shRNA) were constructed and selected to present highly efficient NRP-1/shRNA interference sequences, in order to investigate the effects of RNA interference (RNAi)-mediated NRP-1 silencing on the biological activities of breast cancer cells. Three pairs of human NRP-1 targeted specific interference sequences and one pair of non-specific control sequences were designed, synthesized and subcloned into pLB lentiviral vectors, which were further identified by polymerase chain reaction (PCR) and sequencing. Recombinant and lentiviral packaging plasmids were co-transfected into 293FT cell lines in order to produce lentiviral particles and to infect breast cancer cells with high NRP-1 expression. Flow cytometry was used to sort green fluorescent protein-positive cells. Fluorescence quantitative-reverse transcription-PCR and western blot analysis were employed to identify the interference silencing sequence with the most efficient silencing profile. A cell counting kit-8 assay and an Annexin V-propidium iodide method in combination with flow cytometry were used to examine the effects of RNA interference-mediated NRP-1 gene silencing on cell proliferation, apoptosis and sensitivity to chemotherapy. The recombinant lentiviral plasmid pLB-NRP-1/shRNA was constructed successfully, as confirmed by PCR and sequencing. After the infection of recombinant lentiviral plasmids, the expression profiles of NRP-1 mRNA, and proteins of MCF-7 and SK-BR-3 cell-specific interference group (pLB-NRP-1/shRNA3) were significantly lower than that of the control group (Pinterference group (pLB-NRP-1/shRNA3) showed lower optical density values and higher apoptotic rates at 48, 72 and 96 h; these differences were statistically significant (Pinterference groups compared with the control group (Pinterference sequences were selected. Furthermore, RNA interference (RNAi)-mediated NRP-1 silencing may induce proliferation suppression

  5. Small RNA deep sequencing reveals role for Arabidopsis thaliana RNA-dependent RNA polymerases in viral siRNA biogenesis.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xiaopeng Qi

    Full Text Available RNA silencing functions as an important antiviral defense mechanism in a broad range of eukaryotes. In plants, biogenesis of several classes of endogenous small interfering RNAs (siRNAs requires RNA-dependent RNA Polymerase (RDR activities. Members of the RDR family proteins, including RDR1and RDR6, have also been implicated in antiviral defense, although a direct role for RDRs in viral siRNA biogenesis has yet to be demonstrated. Using a crucifer-infecting strain of Tobacco Mosaic Virus (TMV-Cg and Arabidopsis thaliana as a model system, we analyzed the viral small RNA profile in wild-type plants as well as rdr mutants by applying small RNA deep sequencing technology. Over 100,000 TMV-Cg-specific small RNA reads, mostly of 21- (78.4% and 22-nucleotide (12.9% in size and originating predominately (79.9% from the genomic sense RNA strand, were captured at an early infection stage, yielding the first high-resolution small RNA map for a plant virus. The TMV-Cg genome harbored multiple, highly reproducible small RNA-generating hot spots that corresponded to regions with no apparent local hairpin-forming capacity. Significantly, both the rdr1 and rdr6 mutants exhibited globally reduced levels of viral small RNA production as well as reduced strand bias in viral small RNA population, revealing an important role for these host RDRs in viral siRNA biogenesis. In addition, an informatics analysis showed that a large set of host genes could be potentially targeted by TMV-Cg-derived siRNAs for posttranscriptional silencing. Two of such predicted host targets, which encode a cleavage and polyadenylation specificity factor (CPSF30 and an unknown protein similar to translocon-associated protein alpha (TRAP alpha, respectively, yielded a positive result in cleavage validation by 5'RACE assays. Our data raised the interesting possibility for viral siRNA-mediated virus-host interactions that may contribute to viral pathogenicity and host specificity.

  6. RNA interference of caveolin-1 via lentiviral vector inhibits growth of hypopharyngeal squamous cell carcinoma FaDu cells In Vitro and In Vivo.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhao, Xuening; Ma, Chao; Cai, Xiaolan; Lei, Dapeng; Liu, Dayu; Xu, Fenglei; Jin, Tong; Liu, Jun; Pan, Xinliang

    2011-01-01

    To investigate the effects of caveolin-1 (CAV1) on the growth of hypopharyngeal squamous cell carcinoma (HSCC) FaDu cells in vitro and in vivo. A CAV1-RNAi-lentivirus construct was transfected into FaDu cells and expression of caveolin-1 was tested by RT-PCR and western blotting analysis. Cell apoptosis was analyzed by transferase-medisated dUTP nick-end labeling (TUNEL) assay. Tumor inhibition effects were investigated by injecting rCAV1-RNAi-lentivirus construct into tumors created with FaDu cells in the HSCC mouse model, with the empty-vector lentivirus as a control. CAV1 expression in xenografts was tested by RT-PCR and immunohistochemistry. RT-PCR and western blot analysis demonstrated successful construction of the CAV1-RNAi-lentivirus construct producing small hairpin RNA. The average weights and volumes of tumor in mice treated with CAV1-RNAi-lentivirus were lower than in mice with control treatment (P < 0.05). RT-PCR revealed weak positive expression of CAV1 in CAV1-construct-treated xenografts and immunohistochemistry confirmed lower CAV1 expression than in controls.(P < 0.05). In addition, downregulation of CAV1 increased cell apoptosis in vitro. The growth of HSCCs could be inhibited by recombinant CAV1-RNAi-lentivirus in vitro and in vivo.

  7. Construction of METHFR shRNA/5-fluorouracil co-loaded folate-targeted chitosan polymeric nanoparticles and its anti-carcinoma effect on gastric cells growth

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Xin, Lin, E-mail: xiinlin@163.com; Fan, Ji-Chang; Le, Yi-Guan; Zeng, Fei; Cheng, Hua; Hu, Xiao-yun; Cao, Jia-Qing [The Second Affiliated Hospital of Nanchang University, Department of General Surgery (China)

    2016-05-15

    PEGylated and folate-targeted chitosan polymeric nanoparticles (FPNs) for the treatment of gastric carcinoma were prepared successfully. OQC-anchored folate conjugates were synthesized and used in assembling FPNs nano-system for enhancing intracellular uptake against folate receptor overexpressing cancer cells. The results indicated that folate-targeted chitosan polymeric nanoparticles (CPNs) can reverse drug-resistant SGC-7901 cells of 5-fluorouracil (5-FU) compared with non-targeted CPNs. Increased therapeutic efficiency of 5-FU/METHFR shRNA co-loaded PNs were also tested in SGC-7901 cells and compaed with 5-FU or METHFR shRNA in solution, which was associated with increased cell inhibition function for single drug group and synergistic effects of 5-FU and METHFR shRNA at 2.0 µg/mL FPNs concentration. In addition, the cell accumulation levels of 5-FU in SGC-7901 cells was time dependent for these nanoparticles. FPNs (effective diameter: 83.2 ± 1.1 nm; polydispersity index: 0.193) could significantly boost cellular accumulation of 5-FU and overcome the drug efflux mechanism of MDR than 5-FU-loaded NPNs and 5-FU in solution. In conclusion, ligand-targeted PNs can be used as a potentially effective drug delivery system.

  8. Expression of the proto-oncogene Pokemon in colorectal cancer--inhibitory effects of an siRNA.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhao, Gan-Ting; Yang, Li-Juan; Li, Xi-Xia; Cui, Hui-Lin; Guo, Rui

    2013-01-01

    This study aimed to investigate expression of the proto-oncogene POK erythroid myeloid ontogenic factor (Pokemon) in colorectal cancer (CRC), and assess inhibitory effects of a small interference RNA (siRNA) expression vector in SW480 and SW620 cells. Semi-quantitative reverse transcription-polymerase chain reaction (PCR) and immunohistochemistry were performed to determine mRNA and protein expression levels of Pokemon in CRC tissues. Indirect immunofluorescence staining was applied to investigate the location of Pokemon in SW480 and SW620 cells. The siRNA expression vectors that were constructed to express a short hairpin RNA against Pokemon were transfected to the SW480 and SW620 cells with a liposome. Expression levels of Pokemon mRNA and protein were examined by real-time quantitative-fluorescent PCR and western blot analysis. The effects of Pokemon silencing on proliferation of SW480 and SW620 cells were evaluated with reference to growth curves with MTT assays. The mRNA expression level of Pokemon in tumor tissues (0.845 ± 0.344) was significantly higher than that in adjacent tumor specimens (0.321 ± 0.197). The positive expression ratio of Pokemon protein in CRC (87.0%) was significantly higher than that in the adjacent tissues (19.6%). Strong fluorescence staining of Pokemon protein was observed in the cytoplasm of the SW480 and SW620 cells. The inhibition ratios of Pokemon mRNA and protein in the SW480 cells were 83.1% and 73.5% at 48 and 72 h, respectively, compared with those of the negative control cells with the siRNA. In the SW620 cells, the inhibition ratios of Pokemon mRNA and protein were 76.3% and 68.7% at 48 and 72 h, respectively. MTT showed that Pokemon gene silencing inhibited the proliferation of SW480 and SW620 cells. Overexpression of Pokemon in CRC may have a function in carcinogenesis and progression. siRNA expression vectors could effectively inhibit mRNA and protein expression of Pokemon in SW480 and SW620 cells, thereby reducing

  9. Transient β-hairpin formation in α-synuclein monomer revealed by coarse-grained molecular dynamics simulation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yu, Hang; Ma, Wen [Beckman Institute for Advanced Science and Technology, University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign, Urbana, Illinois 61801 (United States); Center for Biophysics and Computational Biology, University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign, Urbana, Illinois 61801 (United States); Han, Wei [Beckman Institute for Advanced Science and Technology, University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign, Urbana, Illinois 61801 (United States); Department of Physics, University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign, Urbana, Illinois 61801 (United States); Schulten, Klaus, E-mail: kschulte@ks.uiuc.edu [Beckman Institute for Advanced Science and Technology, University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign, Urbana, Illinois 61801 (United States); Center for Biophysics and Computational Biology, University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign, Urbana, Illinois 61801 (United States); Department of Physics, University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign, Urbana, Illinois 61801 (United States)

    2015-12-28

    Parkinson’s disease, originating from the intrinsically disordered peptide α-synuclein, is a common neurodegenerative disorder that affects more than 5% of the population above age 85. It remains unclear how α-synuclein monomers undergo conformational changes leading to aggregation and formation of fibrils characteristic for the disease. In the present study, we perform molecular dynamics simulations (over 180 μs in aggregated time) using a hybrid-resolution model, Proteins with Atomic details in Coarse-grained Environment (PACE), to characterize in atomic detail structural ensembles of wild type and mutant monomeric α-synuclein in aqueous solution. The simulations reproduce structural properties of α-synuclein characterized in experiments, such as secondary structure content, long-range contacts, chemical shifts, and {sup 3}J(H{sub N}H{sub C{sub α}})-coupling constants. Most notably, the simulations reveal that a short fragment encompassing region 38-53, adjacent to the non-amyloid-β component region, exhibits a high probability of forming a β-hairpin; this fragment, when isolated from the remainder of α-synuclein, fluctuates frequently into its β-hairpin conformation. Two disease-prone mutations, namely, A30P and A53T, significantly accelerate the formation of a β-hairpin in the stated fragment. We conclude that the formation of a β-hairpin in region 38-53 is a key event during α-synuclein aggregation. We predict further that the G47V mutation impedes the formation of a turn in the β-hairpin and slows down β-hairpin formation, thereby retarding α-synuclein aggregation.

  10. Swinger RNA self-hybridization and mitochondrial non-canonical swinger transcription, transcription systematically exchanging nucleotides.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Seligmann, Hervé

    2016-06-21

    Stem-loop hairpins punctuate mitochondrial post-transcriptional processing. Regulation of mitochondrial swinger transcription, transcription producing RNAs matching the mitogenome only assuming systematic exchanges between nucleotides (23 bijective transformations along 9 symmetric exchanges XY, e.g. AG, and 14 asymmetric exchanges X>Y>Z>X, e.g. A>G>C>A) remains unknown. Does swinger RNA self-hybridization regulate swinger, as regular, transcription? Groups of 8 swinger transformations share canonical self-hybridization properties within each group, group 0 includes identity (regular) transcription. The human mitogenome has more stem-loop hairpins than randomized sequences for all groups. Group 2 transformations reveal complementarity of the light strand replication origin (OL) loop and a neighboring tRNA gene, detecting the longtime presumed OL/tRNA homology. Non-canonical G=U pairings in hairpins increases with swinger RNA detection. These results confirm biological relevancy of swinger-transformed DNA/RNA, independently of, and in combination with, previously detected swinger DNA/RNA and swinger peptides. Swinger-transformed mitogenomes include unsuspected multilayered information. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  11. On the origin of the decrease in stability of the DNA hairpin d(GCGAAGC) on complexation with aromatic drugs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kostjukov, V V; Lantushenko, A O; Davies, D B; Evstigneev, M P

    2007-08-01

    Molecular dynamics simulations of drug-DNA complexes have been carried out in order to explain the experimentally observed decrease in thermal stability of the DNA hairpin d(GCGAAGC) on binding the aromatic drug molecules, daunomycin, ethidium bromide, novantrone and proflavine. This complexation behavior is in contrast to the stabilizing effect of the same aromatic drug molecules on DNA duplexes. Analysis of the energy parameters and the hydration properties of the complexes shows that the main factor correlating with the decrease in melting temperatures of the drug-hairpin complexes is the number of water bridges, with a reduction of at least 40% on ligand binding.

  12. Discovery, adaptation and transcriptional activity of two tick promoters: Construction of a dual luciferase reporter system for optimization of RNA interference in Rhipicephalus (Boophilus) microplus cell lines

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dual luciferase reporter systems are valuable tools for functional genomic studies, but have not previously been developed for use in tick cell culture. We evaluated expression of available luciferase constructs in tick cell cultures derived from Rhipicephalus (Boophilus) microplus, an important vec...

  13. The construction and characterization of the bi-directional promoter between pp38 gene and 1.8-kb mRNA transcripts of Marek's disease viruses

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ding Jiabo

    2009-11-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Marek's disease virus (MDV has a bi-directional promoter between pp38 gene and 1.8-kb mRNA transcripts. By sequencing for the promoters from 8 different strains (CVI988, 814, GA, JM, Md5, G2, RB1B and 648A, it is found, comparing with the other 7 MDV strains, CVI988 has a 5-bp (from -628 to -632 deletion in this region, which caused a Sp1 site destroyed. In order to analysis the activity of the promoter, the complete bi-directional promoters from GA and CVI988 were, respectively, cloned into pCAT-Basic vector in both directions for the recombinants pPGA(pp38-CAT, pPGA(1.8 kb-CAT, pPCVI(pp38-CAT and pPCVI(1.8 kb-CAT. The complete promoter of GA was divided into two single-direction promoters from the replication of MDV genomic DNA, and cloned into pCAT-Basic for pdPGA(pp38-CAT and pdPGA(1.8 kb-CAT as well. The above 6 recombinants were then transfected into chicken embryo fibroblasts (CEFs infected with MDV, and the activity of chloramphenicol acetyltransferase (CAT was measured from the lysed CEFs 48 h post transfection. Results The results showed the activity of the divided promoters was decreased on both directions. In 1.8-kb mRNA direction, it is nearly down to 2.4% (19/781 of the whole promoter, while it keeps 65% (34/52 activity in pp38 direction. The deletion of Sp1 site in CVI988 causes the 20% activity decreased, and has little influence in pp38 direction. Conclusion The present study confirmed their result, and the promoter for the 1.8-kb mRNA transcripts is a much stronger promoter than that in the orientation for pp38.

  14. Molecular dynamics simulations of certain mutant peptide models from stapylococcal nuclease reveal that initial hydrophobic collapse associated with turn propensity drive β-hairpin folding

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Shukla, Rashmi Tambe; Kumar, Naveen; Sasidhar, Yellamraju

    2013-01-01

    An important nucleation event during the folding of staphylococcal nuclease involves the formation of a β-hairpin by the sequence 21DTVKLMYKGQPMTFR35. Earlier studies show that the turn sequence ‘YKGQP’ has an important role in the folding of this β-hairpin. To understand the active or passive

  15. Impaired MicroRNA Processing Facilitates Breast Cancer Cell Invasion by Upregulating Urokinase-Type Plasminogen Activator Expression

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Noh, Hyangsoon; Hong, Sungguan; Dong, Zheng; Pan, Zhixing K; Jing, Qing; Huang, Shuang

    2011-01-01

    ...) expression in breast cancer cells. Short hairpin RNAs specific for Drosha, DGCR8, and Dicer, key components of miRNA processing machinery, were introduced into 2 breast cancer cell lines with high uPA expression and 2 lines with poor uPA expression...

  16. Lentivirus mediated shRNA interference targeting MAT2B induces growth-inhibition and apoptosis in hepatocelluar carcinoma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Qun; Liu, Quan-Yan; Liu, Zhi-Su; Qian, Qun; Sun, Quan; Pan, Ding-Yu

    2008-08-07

    To investigate the effects of lentivirus vector mediated short hairpin RNA interference targeting methionine adenosyltransferase 2beta gene (LV-shMAT2B) on hepatocelluar carcinoma (HCC) cells. We constructed four plasmids of RNA interference targeting the MAT2B gene. After LV-shMAT2B was transfected with L-02 cells and two kinds of HCC cells, cell viability and proliferation were measured with MTT and [3H]thymidine assays respectively. Flow cytometry was used to assess cell apoptosis. The level of S-adenosyl methionine (SAMe) in HepG2 cells was evaluated. The expressions of cyclin D1, cyclin D2, bcl-x(L) and bcl-x(S) were detected with western blot. We constructed LV-shMAT2B successfully. LV-shMAT2B was safe for human normal liver cells. LV-shMAT2B caused dramatic reduction in proliferation compared with controls in HCC cells Bel-7402 (P = 0.054) and HepG2 (P = 0.031). Flow cytometry analysis showed that cell apoptosis caused by LV-shMAT2B was greater in HCC cells Bel-7402 and HepG2 than in control induced by scrambled siRNA (P = 0.047), but apoptosis rates in L-02 induced by LV-shMAT2B and scrambled siRNA respectively had no significant difference. Moreover, LV-shMAT2B significantly suppressed expression of MAT2B leading to growth-inhibition effect on HCC cells by down-regulating cyclin D1. Apoptosis induced by LV-shMAT2B was involved in down-regulating bcl-x(L) and up- regulating bcl-x(S). LV-shMAT2B can induce cell apoptosis and growth-inhibition in HCC cells. MAT2B may be a therapy target in HCC in the future.

  17. Insights into reticulate evolution in Machaerantherinae (Asteraceae: Astereae): 5S ribosomal RNA spacer variation, estimating support for incongruence, and constructing reticulate phylogenies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Morgan, David R; Korn, Randi-Lynn; Mugleston, Spencer L

    2009-05-01

    Although reticulate evolution has been a frequent occurrence during the history of plants, determining how it has contributed to plant evolution will require analyzing many nuclear loci and developing effective analytical methods. The objective of this study was to make progress toward meeting these requirements in the evolutionarily complex subtribe Machaerantherinae. The 5S ribosomal RNA (rRNA) spacer was investigated to characterize its structure and variation. Analysis of the spacer supported relationships that were mostly the same as those supported by ITS and ETS sequence data. Two methods were used to estimate support for 11 occurrences of incongruence between 5S/ITS/ETS and cpDNA data sets. The five best-supported incongruences were proposed to have had reticulate evolutionary histories. For Arida blepharophylla, Xanthisma rhizomatum, and Pyrrocoma, 5S and ITS/ETS evidence supported the same or similar relationships, indicating that these two regions of the nuclear genome were descended from the same ancestor or from two closely related ancestors, with cpDNA coming from a more distantly related ancestor. The 5S and ITS/ETS evidence disagreed on the relationships of Arida riparia, suggesting that its ITS/ETS region came from one ancestor and its 5S region and cpDNA from a different ancestor.

  18. Synthetic, structural mimetics of the β-hairpin flap of HIV-1 protease inhibit enzyme function.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chauhan, Jay; Chen, Shen-En; Fenstermacher, Katherine J; Naser-Tavakolian, Aurash; Reingewertz, Tali; Salmo, Rosene; Lee, Christian; Williams, Emori; Raje, Mithun; Sundberg, Eric; DeStefano, Jeffrey J; Freire, Ernesto; Fletcher, Steven

    2015-11-01

    Small-molecule mimetics of the β-hairpin flap of HIV-1 protease (HIV-1 PR) were designed based on a 1,4-benzodiazepine scaffold as a strategy to interfere with the flap-flap protein-protein interaction, which functions as a gated mechanism to control access to the active site. Michaelis-Menten kinetics suggested our small-molecules are competitive inhibitors, which indicates the mode of inhibition is through binding the active site or sterically blocking access to the active site and preventing flap closure, as designed. More generally, a new bioactive scaffold for HIV-1PR inhibition has been discovered, with the most potent compound inhibiting the protease with a modest K(i) of 11 μM. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  19. Structural classification of the amide I sites of a beta-hairpin with isotope label 2DIR spectroscopy

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Roy, Santanu; Jansen, Thomas L. C.; Knoester, Jasper

    2010-01-01

    We present a theoretical study of the possibility to use isotope label two-dimensional infrared (2DIR) spectroscopy to obtain site specific structural information in trpzip2. This small beta-hairpin peptide was designed as a model system for studying protein folding in beta-sheet structures. In

  20. Structure of the antimicrobial beta-hairpin peptide protegrin-1 in a DLPC lipid bilayer investigated by molecular dynamics simulation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Khandelia, Himanshu; Kaznessis, Yiannis N

    2007-01-01

    All atom molecular dynamics simulations of the 18-residue beta-hairpin antimicrobial peptide protegrin-1 (PG-1, RGGRLCYCRRRFCVCVGR-NH(2)) in a fully hydrated dilauroylphosphatidylcholine (DLPC) lipid bilayer have been implemented. The goal of the reported work is to investigate the structure of t...

  1. Long inverted repeat transiently stalls DNA replication by forming hairpin structures on both leading and lagging strands.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lai, Pey Jiun; Lim, Chew Theng; Le, Hang Phuong; Katayama, Tsutomu; Leach, David R F; Furukohri, Asako; Maki, Hisaji

    2016-02-01

    Long inverted repeats (LIRs), often found in eukaryotic genomes, are unstable in Escherichia coli where they are recognized by the SbcCD (the bacterial Mre11/Rad50 homologue), an endonuclease/exonuclease capable of cleaving hairpin DNA. It has long been postulated that LIRs form hairpin structures exclusively on the lagging-strand template during DNA replication, and SbcCD cleaves these hairpin-containing lagging strands to generate DNA double-strand breaks. Using a reconstituted oriC plasmid DNA replication system, we have examined how a replication fork behaves when it meets a LIR on DNA. We have shown that leading-strand synthesis stalls transiently within the upstream half of the LIR. Pausing of lagging-strand synthesis at the LIR was not clearly observed, but the pattern of priming sites for Okazaki fragment synthesis was altered within the downstream half of the LIR. We have found that the LIR on a replicating plasmid was cleaved by SbcCD with almost equal frequency on both the leading- and lagging-strand templates. These data strongly suggest that the LIR is readily converted to a cruciform DNA, before the arrival of the fork, creating SbcCD-sensitive hairpin structures on both leading and lagging strands. We propose a model for the replication-dependent extrusion of LIRs to form cruciform structures that transiently impede replication fork movement. © 2016 The Molecular Biology Society of Japan and John Wiley & Sons Australia, Ltd.

  2. Melting of a beta-hairpin peptide using isotope-edited 2D IR spectroscopy and simulations.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Smith, A.W.; Lessing, J.; Ganim, Z.; Peng, C.S.; Tokmakoff, A.; Roy, S.; Jansen, T.L.Th.A.; Knoester, J.

    2010-01-01

    Isotope-edited two-dimensional infrared spectroscopy has been used to characterize the conformational heterogeneity of the beta-hairpin peptide TrpZip2 (TZ2) across its thermal unfolding transition. Four isotopologues were synthesized to probe hydrogen bonding and solvent exposure of the beta-turn

  3. Melting of a beta-Hairpin Peptide Using Isotope-Edited 2D IR Spectroscopy and Simulations

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Smith, Adam W.; Lessing, Joshua; Ganim, Ziad; Peng, Chunte Sam; Tokmakoff, Andrei; Roy, Santanu; Jansen, Thomas L. C.; Knoester, Jasper

    2010-01-01

    Isotope-edited two-dimensional infrared spectroscopy has been used! to characterize the conformational heterogeneity of the beta-hairpin peptide TrpZip2 (17.2) across its thermal unfolding transition Four isotopologues were synthesized to probe hydrogen bonding and solvent exposure of the beta-turn

  4. Combinatorial pattern discovery approach for the folding trajectory analysis of a beta-hairpin.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Laxmi Parida

    2005-06-01

    Full Text Available The study of protein folding mechanisms continues to be one of the most challenging problems in computational biology. Currently, the protein folding mechanism is often characterized by calculating the free energy landscape versus various reaction coordinates, such as the fraction of native contacts, the radius of gyration, RMSD from the native structure, and so on. In this paper, we present a combinatorial pattern discovery approach toward understanding the global state changes during the folding process. This is a first step toward an unsupervised (and perhaps eventually automated approach toward identification of global states. The approach is based on computing biclusters (or patterned clusters-each cluster is a combination of various reaction coordinates, and its signature pattern facilitates the computation of the Z-score for the cluster. For this discovery process, we present an algorithm of time complexity c in RO((N + nm log n, where N is the size of the output patterns and (n x m is the size of the input with n time frames and m reaction coordinates. To date, this is the best time complexity for this problem. We next apply this to a beta-hairpin folding trajectory and demonstrate that this approach extracts crucial information about protein folding intermediate states and mechanism. We make three observations about the approach: (1 The method recovers states previously obtained by visually analyzing free energy surfaces. (2 It also succeeds in extracting meaningful patterns and structures that had been overlooked in previous works, which provides a better understanding of the folding mechanism of the beta-hairpin. These new patterns also interconnect various states in existing free energy surfaces versus different reaction coordinates. (3 The approach does not require calculating the free energy values, yet it offers an analysis comparable to, and sometimes better than, the methods that use free energy landscapes, thus validating the

  5. Combinatorial Pattern Discovery Approach for the Folding Trajectory Analysis of a beta-Hairpin.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    2005-06-01

    Full Text Available The study of protein folding mechanisms continues to be one of the most challenging problems in computational biology. Currently, the protein folding mechanism is often characterized by calculating the free energy landscape versus various reaction coordinates, such as the fraction of native contacts, the radius of gyration, RMSD from the native structure, and so on. In this paper, we present a combinatorial pattern discovery approach toward understanding the global state changes during the folding process. This is a first step toward an unsupervised (and perhaps eventually automated approach toward identification of global states. The approach is based on computing biclusters (or patterned clusters-each cluster is a combination of various reaction coordinates, and its signature pattern facilitates the computation of the Z-score for the cluster. For this discovery process, we present an algorithm of time complexity cinRO((N + nm log n, where N is the size of the output patterns and (n x m is the size of the input with n time frames and m reaction coordinates. To date, this is the best time complexity for this problem. We next apply this to a beta-hairpin folding trajectory and demonstrate that this approach extracts crucial information about protein folding intermediate states and mechanism. We make three observations about the approach: (1 The method recovers states previously obtained by visually analyzing free energy surfaces. (2 It also succeeds in extracting meaningful patterns and structures that had been overlooked in previous works, which provides a better understanding of the folding mechanism of the beta-hairpin. These new patterns also interconnect various states in existing free energy surfaces versus different reaction coordinates. (3 The approach does not require calculating the free energy values, yet it offers an analysis comparable to, and sometimes better than, the methods that use free energy landscapes, thus validating the

  6. Tomato transgenic plants expressing hairpin construct of a nematode protease gene conferred enhanced resistance to root-knot nematodes

    OpenAIRE

    Dutta, Tushar K.; Papolu, Pradeep K.; Banakar, Prakash; Choudhary, Divya; Sirohi, Anil; Rao, Uma

    2015-01-01

    Root-knot nematodes (Meloidogyne incognita) cause substantial yield losses in vegetables worldwide, and are difficult to manage. Continuous withdrawal of environmentally-harmful nematicides from the global market warrants the need for novel nematode management strategies. Utility of host-delivered RNAi has been demonstrated in several plants (Arabidopsis, tobacco, and soybean) that exhibited resistance against root-knot and cyst nematodes. Herein, a M. incognita-specific protease gene, cathep...

  7. Tomato transgenic plants expressing hairpin construct of a nematode protease gene conferred enhanced resistance to root-knot nematodes

    OpenAIRE

    Tushar Kanti Dutta

    2015-01-01

    Root-knot nematodes (Meloidogyne incognita) cause substantial yield losses in vegetables worldwide, and are difficult to manage. Continuous withdrawal of environmentally-harmful nematicides from the global market warrants the need for novel nematode management strategies. Utility of host-delivered RNAi has been demonstrated in several plants (Arabidopsis, tobacco and soybean) that exhibited resistance against root-knot and cyst nematodes. Herein, a M. incognita-specific protease gene, catheps...

  8. Structure-Function Model for Kissing Loop Interactions That Initiate Dimerization of Ty1 RNA

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Eric R. Gamache

    2017-04-01

    Full Text Available The genomic RNA of the retrotransposon Ty1 is packaged as a dimer into virus-like particles. The 5′ terminus of Ty1 RNA harbors cis-acting sequences required for translation initiation, packaging and initiation of reverse transcription (TIPIRT. To identify RNA motifs involved in dimerization and packaging, a structural model of the TIPIRT domain in vitro was developed from single-nucleotide resolution RNA structural data. In general agreement with previous models, the first 326 nucleotides of Ty1 RNA form a pseudoknot with a 7-bp stem (S1, a 1-nucleotide interhelical loop and an 8-bp stem (S2 that delineate two long, structured loops. Nucleotide substitutions that disrupt either pseudoknot stem greatly reduced helper-Ty1-mediated retrotransposition of a mini-Ty1, but only mutations in S2 destabilized mini-Ty1 RNA in cis and helper-Ty1 RNA in trans. Nested in different loops of the pseudoknot are two hairpins with complementary 7-nucleotide motifs at their apices. Nucleotide substitutions in either motif also reduced retrotransposition and destabilized mini- and helper-Ty1 RNA. Compensatory mutations that restore base-pairing in the S2 stem or between the hairpins rescued retrotransposition and RNA stability in cis and trans. These data inform a model whereby a Ty1 RNA kissing complex with two intermolecular kissing-loop interactions initiates dimerization and packaging.

  9. Electrochemical detection of the amino-substituted naphthalene compounds based on intercalative interaction with hairpin DNA by electrochemical impedance spectroscopy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liang, Gang; Li, Tao; Li, Xiaohong; Liu, Xinhui

    2013-10-15

    The amino-substituted naphthalene compounds, such as 1,8-diaminonaphthalene (1,8-DANAP), 2,3-diaminonaphthalene (2,3-DANAP), 1,5-diaminonaphthalene (1,5-DANAP), 1-naphthylamine (1-NAP) and 2-naphthylamine (2-NAP), were investigated by electrochemical impedance spectroscopy (EIS), which was based on the interaction with hairpin DNA immobilized on the gold electrodes. Upon hairpin DNA interacting with the target chemicals, the charge transfer resistance (RCT) of the hairpin DNA films was significantly decreased and the charge transfer resistance change (ΔR(CT)) decreased in a sequence of ΔR(CT) (1,8-DANAP)>ΔR(CT) (2,3-DANAP)>ΔR(CT) (1,5-DANAP)>ΔR(CT) (1-NAP)>ΔR(CT) (2-NAP). The ΔR(CT) changes were due to the difference in the binding constant (K(SV)) of the target chemicals to DNA. In addition, the interaction mechanism was further explored using 1,8-DANAP as a model analyte by fluorescence spectra, Raman spectroscopy, differential pulse voltammetry (DPV) and EIS, correspondingly. The results demonstrated that the amino-substituted naphthalene compounds intercalated into "stem" appearing in the hairpin DNA. Moreover, the hairpin DNA sensor exhibited high sensitivity to the amino-substituted naphthalene compounds with the detection limit of nano-mole, and maintained high selectivity over other selected environmental pollutants. Finally, the DNA sensor was challenged in natural water sample with a recovery of 96-102%, which offered a platform for prospective future development of a simple, rapid, sensitive and low-cost assay for the detection of target aromatic amine pollutants. Crown Copyright © 2013. Published by Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  10. RNA self-assembly and RNA nanotechnology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grabow, Wade W; Jaeger, Luc

    2014-06-17

    CONSPECTUS: Nanotechnology's central goal involves the direct control of matter at the molecular nanometer scale to build nanofactories, nanomachines, and other devices for potential applications including electronics, alternative fuels, and medicine. In this regard, the nascent use of nucleic acids as a material to coordinate the precise arrangements of specific molecules marked an important milestone in the relatively recent history of nanotechnology. While DNA served as the pioneer building material in nucleic acid nanotechnology, RNA continues to emerge as viable alternative material with its own distinct advantages for nanoconstruction. Several complementary assembly strategies have been used to build a diverse set of RNA nanostructures having unique structural attributes and the ability to self-assemble in a highly programmable and controlled manner. Of the different strategies, the architectonics approach uniquely endeavors to understand integrated structural RNA architectures through the arrangement of their characteristic structural building blocks. Viewed through this lens, it becomes apparent that nature routinely uses thermodynamically stable, recurrent modular motifs from natural RNA molecules to generate unique and more complex programmable structures. With the design principles found in natural structures, a number of synthetic RNAs have been constructed. The synthetic nanostructures constructed to date have provided, in addition to affording essential insights into RNA design, important platforms to characterize and validate the structural self-folding and assembly properties of RNA modules or building blocks. Furthermore, RNA nanoparticles have shown great promise for applications in nanomedicine and RNA-based therapeutics. Nevertheless, the synthetic RNA architectures achieved thus far consist largely of static, rigid particles that are still far from matching the structural and functional complexity of natural responsive structural elements such

  11. A dual-colored ratiometric-fluorescent oligonucleotide probe for the detection of human telomerase RNA in cell extracts.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ning, Dianhua; He, Changtian; Liu, Zhengjie; Liu, Cui; Wu, Qilong; Zhao, TingTing; Liu, Renyong

    2017-05-21

    Human telomerase RNA (hTR), which is one component of telomerase, was deemed to be a biomarker to monitor tumor cells due to its different expression levels in tumor cells and normal somatic cells. Thus far, plentiful fluorescent probes have been designed to investigate nucleic acids. However, most of them are limited since they are time-consuming, require professional operators and even result in false positive signals in the cellular environment. Herein, we report a dual-colored ratiometric-fluorescent oligonucleotide probe to achieve the reliable detection of human telomerase RNA in cell extracts. The probe is constructed using a dual-labeled fluorescent oligonucleotide hybridized with target-complemented Dabcyl-labeled oligonucleotide. In the presence of the target, the dual-labeled fluorescent oligonucleotide translates into a hairpin structure, which leads to the generation of the fluorescence resonance energy transfer (FRET) phenomenon under UV excitation. Compared to conventional methods, this strategy could effectively avoid false positive signals, and it not only possesses the advantages of simplicity and high specificity but also has the merits of signal stability and distinguishable color variation. Moreover, the quantitative assay of hTR would have a far-reaching impact on the telomerase mechanism and even tumor diagnosis research.

  12. The Me31B DEAD-box helicase localizes to postsynaptic foci and regulates expression of a CaMKII reporter mRNA in dendrites of Drosophila olfactory projection neurons

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jens Hillebrand

    2010-11-01

    Full Text Available mRNP granules at adult central synapses are postulated to regulate local mRNA translation and synapse plasticity. However, they are very poorly characterized in vivo. Here, in Drosophila olfactory synapses, we present early observations and characterization of candidate synaptic mRNP particles, one of which contains a widely conserved, DEAD-box helicase, Me31B. In Drosophila, Me31B is required for translational repression of maternal and miRNA-target mRNAs. A role in neuronal translational control is primarily suggested by Me31B’s localization, in cultured primary neurons, to neuritic mRNP granules that contain: i various translational regulators; ii CaMKII mRNA; and iii several P-body markers including the mRNA hydrolases, Dcp1 and Pcm/Xrn-1. In adult neurons, Me31B localizes to P-body like cytoplasmic foci/particles in neuronal soma. In addition it is present to synaptic foci that may lack RNA degradative enzymes and localize predominantly to dendritic elements of olfactory sensory and projection neurons. MARCM clones of projection-neurons mutant for Me31B show loss of both Me31B and Dcp1-positive dendritic puncta, suggesting potential interactions between these granule types. In projection neurons, expression of validated hairpin-RNAi constructs against Me31B causes visible knockdown of endogenous protein, as assessed by the brightness and number of Me31B puncta. Knockdown of Me31B also causes a substantial elevation in observed levels of a translational reporter of CaMKII, a postsynaptic protein whose mRNA has been shown to be localized to projection neuron dendrites and to be translationally regulated, at least in part through the miRNA pathway. Thus, neuronal Me31B is present in dendritic particles in vivo and is required for repression of a translationally regulated synaptic mRNA.

  13. Sequence-specific DNA alkylation and transcriptional inhibition by long-chain hairpin pyrrole-imidazole polyamide-chlorambucil conjugates targeting CAG/CTG trinucleotide repeats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Asamitsu, Sefan; Kawamoto, Yusuke; Hashiya, Fumitaka; Hashiya, Kaori; Yamamoto, Makoto; Kizaki, Seiichiro; Bando, Toshikazu; Sugiyama, Hiroshi

    2014-09-01

    Introducing novel building blocks to solid-phase peptide synthesis, we readily synthesized long-chain hairpin pyrrole-imidazole (PI) polyamide-chlorambucil conjugates 3 and 4 via the introduction of an amino group into a GABA (γ-turn) contained in 3, to target CAG/CTG repeat sequences, which are associated with various hereditary disorders. A high-resolution denaturing polyacrylamide sequencing gel revealed sequence-specific alkylation both strands at the N3 of adenines or guanines in CAG/CTG repeats by conjugates 3 and 4, with 11bp recognition. In vitro transcription assays using conjugate 4 revealed that specific alkylation inhibited the progression of RNA polymerase at the alkylating sites. Chiral substitution of the γ-turn with an amino group resulted in higher binding affinity observed in SPR assays. These assays suggest that conjugates 4 with 11bp recognition has the potential to cause specific DNA damage and transcriptional inhibition at the alkylating sites. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  14. Data on the construction of a recombinant HEK293 cell line overexpressing hERG potassium channel and examining the presence of hERG mRNA and protein expression

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yi Fan Teah

    2017-10-01

    Full Text Available The data presented in this article are related to the research article entitled “The effects of deoxyelephantopin on the cardiac delayed rectifier potassium channel current (IKr and human ether-a-go-go-related gene (hERG expression” (Y.F. Teah, M.A. Abduraman, A. Amanah, M.I. Adenan, S.F. Sulaiman, M.L. Tan [1], which the possible hERG blocking properties of deoxyelephantopin were investigated. This article describes the construction of human embryonic kidney 293 (HEK293 cells overexpressing HERG potassium channel and verification of the presence of hERG mRNA and protein expression in this recombinant cell line.

  15. A Responsive "Nano String Light" for Highly Efficient mRNA Imaging in Living Cells via Accelerated DNA Cascade Reaction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ren, Kewei; Xu, Yifan; Liu, Ying; Yang, Min; Ju, Huangxian

    2017-12-20

    Nonenzymatic DNA catalytic amplification strategies have greatly benefited bioanalysis. However, long period incubation is usually required due to its relatively low reaction rate and efficiency, which limits its in vivo application. Here we design a responsive DNA nano string light (DNSL) by interval hybridization of modified hairpin DNA probe pairs to a DNA nanowire generated by rolling circle amplification and realize accelerated DNA cascade reaction (DCR) for fast and highly efficient mRNA imaging in living cells. Target mRNA initiates interval hybridization of two paired hairpin probes sequentially along the DNA nanowire and results in instant lighting up of the whole DNA nanowire with high signal gain due to the fast opening of all the self-quenched hairpins. The reaction time is about 6.7 times shorter compared with a regular DNA cascade reaction due to the acceleration based on domino effect. The cell delivery is achieved by modifying one of the hairpin probes with folic acid, and this intracellular imaging strategy is verified using human HeLa cells and intracellular survivin mRNA with a series of suppressed expressions as model, which provides a useful platform for fast and highly efficient detection of low-abundance nucleic acids in living cells.

  16. MicroRNA prediction using a fixed-order Markov model based on the secondary structure pattern.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wei Shen

    Full Text Available Predicting miRNAs is an arduous task, due to the diversity of the precursors and complexity of enzyme processes. Although several prediction approaches have reached impressive performances, few of them could achieve a full-function recognition of mature miRNA directly from the candidate hairpins across species. Therefore, researchers continue to seek a more powerful model close to biological recognition to miRNA structure. In this report, we describe a novel miRNA prediction algorithm, known as FOMmiR, using a fixed-order Markov model based on the secondary structural pattern. For a training dataset containing 809 human pre-miRNAs and 6441 human pseudo-miRNA hairpins, the model's parameters were defined and evaluated. The results showed that FOMmiR reached 91% accuracy on the human dataset through 5-fold cross-validation. Moreover, for the independent test datasets, the FOMmiR presented an outstanding prediction in human and other species including vertebrates, Drosophila, worms and viruses, even plants, in contrast to the well-known algorithms and models. Especially, the FOMmiR was not only able to distinguish the miRNA precursors from the hairpins, but also locate the position and strand of the mature miRNA. Therefore, this study provides a new generation of miRNA prediction algorithm, which successfully realizes a full-function recognition of the mature miRNAs directly from the hairpin sequences. And it presents a new understanding of the biological recognition based on the strongest signal's location detected by FOMmiR, which might be closely associated with the enzyme cleavage mechanism during the miRNA maturation.

  17. Microprocessor Activity Controls Differential miRNA Biogenesis In Vivo

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Thomas Conrad

    2014-10-01

    Full Text Available In miRNA biogenesis, pri-miRNA transcripts are converted into pre-miRNA hairpins. The in vivo properties of this process remain enigmatic. Here, we determine in vivo transcriptome-wide pri-miRNA processing using next-generation sequencing of chromatin-associated pri-miRNAs. We identify a distinctive Microprocessor signature in the transcriptome profile from which efficiency of the endogenous processing event can be accurately quantified. This analysis reveals differential susceptibility to Microprocessor cleavage as a key regulatory step in miRNA biogenesis. Processing is highly variable among pri-miRNAs and a better predictor of miRNA abundance than primary transcription itself. Processing is also largely stable across three cell lines, suggesting a major contribution of sequence determinants. On the basis of differential processing efficiencies, we define functionality for short sequence features adjacent to the pre-miRNA hairpin. In conclusion, we identify Microprocessor as the main hub for diversified miRNA output and suggest a role for uncoupling miRNA biogenesis from host gene expression.

  18. Integrated sequence-structure motifs suffice to identify microRNA precursors.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xiuqin Liu

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Upwards of 1200 miRNA loci have hitherto been annotated in the human genome. The specific features defining a miRNA precursor and deciding its recognition and subsequent processing are not yet exhaustively described and miRNA loci can thus not be computationally identified with sufficient confidence. RESULTS: We rendered pre-miRNA and non-pre-miRNA hairpins as strings of integrated sequence-structure information, and used the software Teiresias to identify sequence-structure motifs (ss-motifs of variable length in these data sets. Using only ss-motifs as features in a Support Vector Machine (SVM algorithm for pre-miRNA identification achieved 99.2% specificity and 97.6% sensitivity on a human test data set, which is comparable to previously published algorithms employing combinations of sequence-structure and additional features. Further analysis of the ss-motif information contents revealed strongly significant deviations from those of the respective training sets, revealing important potential clues as to how the sequence and structural information of RNA hairpins are utilized by the miRNA processing apparatus. CONCLUSION: Integrated sequence-structure motifs of variable length apparently capture nearly all information required to distinguish miRNA precursors from other stem-loop structures.

  19. Species-independent MicroRNA Gene Discovery

    KAUST Repository

    Kamanu, Timothy K.

    2012-12-01

    MicroRNA (miRNA) are a class of small endogenous non-coding RNA that are mainly negative transcriptional and post-transcriptional regulators in both plants and animals. Recent studies have shown that miRNA are involved in different types of cancer and other incurable diseases such as autism and Alzheimer’s. Functional miRNAs are excised from hairpin-like sequences that are known as miRNA genes. There are about 21,000 known miRNA genes, most of which have been determined using experimental methods. miRNA genes are classified into different groups (miRNA families). This study reports about 19,000 unknown miRNA genes in nine species whereby approximately 15,300 predictions were computationally validated to contain at least one experimentally verified functional miRNA product. The predictions are based on a novel computational strategy which relies on miRNA family groupings and exploits the physics and geometry of miRNA genes to unveil the hidden palindromic signals and symmetries in miRNA gene sequences. Unlike conventional computational miRNA gene discovery methods, the algorithm developed here is species-independent: it allows prediction at higher accuracy and resolution from arbitrary RNA/DNA sequences in any species and thus enables examination of repeat-prone genomic regions which are thought to be non-informative or ’junk’ sequences. The information non-redundancy of uni-directional RNA sequences compared to information redundancy of bi-directional DNA is demonstrated, a fact that is overlooked by most pattern discovery algorithms. A novel method for computing upstream and downstream miRNA gene boundaries based on mathematical/statistical functions is suggested, as well as cutoffs for annotation of miRNA genes in different miRNA families. Another tool is proposed to allow hypotheses generation and visualization of data matrices, intra- and inter-species chromosomal distribution of miRNA genes or miRNA families. Our results indicate that: miRNA and miRNA

  20. Individual effects of the copia and gypsy enhancer and insulator on chromatin marks, eRNA synthesis, and binding of insulator proteins in transfected genetic constructs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fedoseeva, Daria M; Kretova, Olga V; Gorbacheva, Maria A; Tchurikov, Nickolai A

    2018-01-30

    Enhancers and insulators are involved in the regulation of gene expression, but the basic underlying mechanisms of action of these elements are unknown. We analyzed the individual effects of the enhancer and the insulator from Drosophila mobile elements copia [enh(copia)] and gypsy using transfected genetic constructs in S2 cells. This system excludes the influence of genomic cis regulatory elements. The enhancer-induced synthesis of 350-1050-nt-long enhancer RNAs (eRNAs) and H3K4me3 and H3K18ac marks, mainly in the region located about 300bp downstream of the enhancer. Insertion of the insulator between the enhancer and the promoter reduced these effects. We also observed the binding of dCTCF to the enhancer and to gypsy insulator. Our data indicate that a single gypsy insulator interacts with both the enhancer and the promoter, while two copies of the gypsy insulator preferentially interact with each other. Our results suggest the formation of chromatin loops that are shaped by the enhancer and the insulator. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  1. RNA secondary structure prediction using soft computing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ray, Shubhra Sankar; Pal, Sankar K

    2013-01-01

    Prediction of RNA structure is invaluable in creating new drugs and understanding genetic diseases. Several deterministic algorithms and soft computing-based techniques have been developed for more than a decade to determine the structure from a known RNA sequence. Soft computing gained importance with the need to get approximate solutions for RNA sequences by considering the issues related with kinetic effects, cotranscriptional folding, and estimation of certain energy parameters. A brief description of some of the soft computing-based techniques, developed for RNA secondary structure prediction, is presented along with their relevance. The basic concepts of RNA and its different structural elements like helix, bulge, hairpin loop, internal loop, and multiloop are described. These are followed by different methodologies, employing genetic algorithms, artificial neural networks, and fuzzy logic. The role of various metaheuristics, like simulated annealing, particle swarm optimization, ant colony optimization, and tabu search is also discussed. A relative comparison among different techniques, in predicting 12 known RNA secondary structures, is presented, as an example. Future challenging issues are then mentioned.

  2. Energy profile and secondary structure impact shRNA efficacy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zeng Xiao

    2009-07-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background RNA interference (RNAi is a cellular mechanism in which a short/small double stranded RNA induces the degradation of its sequence specific target mRNA, leading to specific gene silencing. Since its discovery, RNAi has become a powerful biological technique for gene function studies and drug discovery. The very first requirement of applying RNAi is to design functional small interfering RNA (siRNA that can uniquely induce the degradation of the targeted mRNA. It has been shown that many functional synthetic siRNAs share some common characteristics, such as GC content limitation and free energy preferences at both terminals, etc. Results Our three-phase algorithm was developed to design siRNA on a whole-genome scale based on those identified characteristics of functional siRNA. When this algorithm was applied to design short hairpin RNA (shRNA, the validated success rate of shRNAs was over 70%, which was almost double the rate reported for TRC library. This indicates that the designs of siRNA and shRNA may share the same concerns. Further analysis of the shRNA dataset of 444 designs reveals that the high free energy states of the two terminals have the largest positive impact on the shRNA efficacy. Enforcing these energy characteristics of both terminals can further improve the shRNA design success rate to 83.1%. We also found that functional shRNAs have less probability for their 3' terminals to be involved in mRNA secondary structure formation. Conclusion Functional shRNAs prefer high free energy states at both terminals. High free energy states of the two terminals were found to be the largest positive impact factor on shRNA efficacy. In addition, the accessibility of the 3' terminal is another key factor to shRNA efficacy.

  3. Absence of reptation in the high-temperature folding of the trpzip2 beta-hairpin peptide.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pitera, Jed W; Haque, Imran; Swope, William C

    2006-04-14

    We have carried out extensive all atom explicit solvent simulations of the high-temperature folding and unfolding of the trpzip2 beta-hairpin peptide and examined the resulting trajectories for evidence of folding via a reptation mechanism. Over 300 microcanonical simulations of 10 ns each were initiated from a Boltzmann ensemble of conformations at 425 K. Though we observed numerous folding and unfolding events, no evidence of reptation was found. The diffusional dynamics of the peptide are orders of magnitude faster than any observed reptation-like motion. Our data suggest that the dominant mechanisms for beta-hairpin folding under these conditions are hydrophobic collapse and turn formation, and that rearrangements occur via significant expansion of the polypeptide chain.

  4. Reversal of pathology in CHMP2B-mediated frontotemporal dementia patient cells using RNA interference

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nielsen, Troels Tolstrup; Mizielinska, Sarah; Hasholt, Lis

    2012-01-01

    role in the pathogenesis of the disease. METHODS: In the present study, we used lentiviral vectors to efficiently knockdown CHMP2B by delivering microRNA embedded small hairpin RNAs. RESULTS: We show that CHMP2B can be efficiently knocked down in patient fibroblasts using an RNA interference approach...... and that the knockdown causes reversal of the abnormal endosomal phenotype observed in patient fibroblasts. CONCLUSIONS: This is the first description of a treatment that reverses the cellular pathology caused by mutant CHMP2B and suggests that RNA interference might be a feasible therapeutic strategy. Furthermore...

  5. Comparison of Cytotoxic Activity in Leukemic Lineages Reveals Important Features of β-Hairpin Antimicrobial Peptides.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Buri, Marcus V; Torquato, Heron F Vieira; Barros, Carlos Castilho; Ide, Jaime S; Miranda, Antonio; Paredes-Gamero, Edgar J

    2017-07-01

    Several reports described different modes of cell death triggered by antimicrobial peptides (AMPs) due to direct effects on membrane disruption, and more recently by apoptosis and necrosis-like patterns. Cytotoxic curves of four β-hairpin AMPs (gomesin, protegrin, tachyplesin, and polyphemusin) were obtained from several human leukemic lineages and normal monocytes and Two cell lines were then selected based on their cytotoxic sensitivity. One was sensitive to AMPs (K562) and the other resistant (KG-1) and their effect compared between these lineages. Thus, these lineages were chosen to further investigate biological features related with their cytotoxicities to AMPs. Stimulation with AMPs produced cell death, with activation of caspase-3, in K562 lineage. Increase on the fluidity of plasmatic membrane by reducing cholesterol potentiated cytotoxicity of AMPs in both lineages. Quantification of internal and external gomesin binding to the cellular membrane of both K562 and KG-1 cells showed that more peptide is accumulated inside of K562 cells. Additionally, evaluation of multi-drug resistant pumps activity showed that KG-1 has more activity than K562 lineage. A comparison of intrinsic gene patterns showed great differences between K562 and KG-1, but stimulation with gomesin promoted few changes in gene expression patterns. Differences in internalization process through the plasma membrane, multidrug resistance pumps activity, and gene expression pattern are important features to AMPs regulated cell death. J. Cell. Biochem. 118: 1764-1773, 2017. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  6. The effect of active fluctuations on the dynamics of particles, motors and hairpins

    CERN Document Server

    Vandebroek, Hans

    2016-01-01

    Inspired by recent experiments on the dynamics of particles and polymers in artificial cytoskeletons and in cells, we introduce a modified Langevin equation for a particle in an environment that is a viscoelastic medium and that is brought out of equilibrium by the action of active fluctuations caused by molecular motors. We show that within such a model, the motion of a free particle crosses over from superdiffusive to subdiffusive as observed for tracer particles in an {\\it in vitro} cytoskeleton or in a cell. We investigate the dynamics of a particle confined by a harmonic potential as a simple model for the motion of the tethered head of kinesin-1. We find that the probability that the head is close to its binding site on the microtubule can be enhanced by a factor of two due to active forces. Finally, we study the dynamics of a particle in a double well potential as a model for the dynamics of DNA-hairpins. We show that the active forces effectively lower the potential barrier between the two minima and ...

  7. Millimeter-wave GaAs stepped-impedance hairpin resonator filters using surface micromachining

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cho, Ju-Hyun; Yun, Tae-Soon; Baek, Tae-Jong; Ko, Back-Seok; Shin, Dong-Hoon; Lee, Jong-Chul

    2005-05-01

    In this paper, microstrip stepped-impedance hairpin resonator (SIR) low-pass filter (LPF) and slow-wave band-pass filter (BPF) using dielectric supported air-gapped microstrip line (DAML) of surface micromachining on GaAs substrate are proposed. The DAML structure, which is a new low-loss micromachining transmission line, is useful for the integration of MEMS and/or MMIC components. Design parameters for the proposed SIR low-pass and slow-wave band-pass filters are derived based on stepped-impedance theory. The proposed slow-wave BPF is designed to produce a passband of 10% at the fundamental frequency of 60 GHz. and a new SIR LPF with aperture and IDC (inter-digital capacitor) is designed for 3-dB cutoff frequency of 33 GHz. The measurement results of the BPF filter and LPF filter agree well with simulation results. These filters are useful for many millimeter-wave system applications.

  8. Buckwheat trypsin inhibitor with helical hairpin structure belongs to a new family of plant defence peptides.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oparin, Peter B; Mineev, Konstantin S; Dunaevsky, Yakov E; Arseniev, Alexander S; Belozersky, Mikhail A; Grishin, Eugene V; Egorov, Tsezi A; Vassilevski, Alexander A

    2012-08-15

    A new peptide trypsin inhibitor named BWI-2c was obtained from buckwheat (Fagopyrum esculentum) seeds by sequential affinity, ion exchange and reversed-phase chromatography. The peptide was sequenced and found to contain 41 amino acid residues, with four cysteine residues involved in two intramolecular disulfide bonds. Recombinant BWI-2c identical to the natural peptide was produced in Escherichia coli in a form of a cleavable fusion with thioredoxin. The 3D (three-dimensional) structure of the peptide in solution was determined by NMR spectroscopy, revealing two antiparallel α-helices stapled by disulfide bonds. Together with VhTI, a trypsin inhibitor from veronica (Veronica hederifolia), BWI-2c represents a new family of protease inhibitors with an unusual α-helical hairpin fold. The linker sequence between the helices represents the so-called trypsin inhibitory loop responsible for direct binding to the active site of the enzyme that cleaves BWI-2c at the functionally important residue Arg(19). The inhibition constant was determined for BWI-2c against trypsin (1.7×10(-1)0 M), and the peptide was tested on other enzymes, including those from various insect digestive systems, revealing high selectivity to trypsin-like proteases. Structural similarity shared by BWI-2c, VhTI and several other plant defence peptides leads to the acknowledgement of a new widespread family of plant peptides termed α-hairpinins.

  9. Probing the Unfolded Configurations of a β-Hairpin Using Sketch-Map.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ardevol, Albert; Tribello, Gareth A; Ceriotti, Michele; Parrinello, Michele

    2015-03-10

    This work examines the conformational ensemble involved in β-hairpin folding by means of advanced molecular dynamics simulations and dimensionality reduction. A fully atomistic description of the protein and the surrounding solvent molecules is used, and this complex energy landscape is sampled by means of parallel tempering metadynamics simulations. The ensemble of configurations explored is analyzed using the recently proposed sketch-map algorithm. Further simulations allow us to probe how mutations affect the structures adopted by this protein. We find that many of the configurations adopted by a mutant are the same as those adopted by the wild-type protein. Furthermore, certain mutations destabilize secondary-structure-containing configurations by preventing the formation of hydrogen bonds or by promoting the formation of new intramolecular contacts. Our analysis demonstrates that machine-learning techniques can be used to study the energy landscapes of complex molecules and that the visualizations that are generated in this way provide a natural basis for examining how the stabilities of particular configurations of the molecule are affected by factors such as temperature or structural mutations.

  10. Anticancer β-hairpin peptides: membrane-induced folding triggers activity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sinthuvanich, Chomdao; Veiga, Ana Salomé; Gupta, Kshitij; Gaspar, Diana; Blumenthal, Robert; Schneider, Joel P

    2012-04-11

    Several cationic antimicrobial peptides (AMPs) have recently been shown to display anticancer activity via a mechanism that usually entails the disruption of cancer cell membranes. In this work, we designed an 18-residue anticancer peptide, SVS-1, whose mechanism of action is designed to take advantage of the aberrant lipid composition presented on the outer leaflet of cancer cell membranes, which makes the surface of these cells electronegative relative to the surface of noncancerous cells. SVS-1 is designed to remain unfolded and inactive in aqueous solution but to preferentially fold at the surface of cancer cells, adopting an amphiphilic β-hairpin structure capable of membrane disruption. Membrane-induced folding is driven by electrostatic interaction between the peptide and the negatively charged membrane surface of cancer cells. SVS-1 is active against a variety of cancer cell lines such as A549 (lung carcinoma), KB (epidermal carcinoma), MCF-7 (breast carcinoma), and MDA-MB-436 (breast carcinoma). However, the cytotoxicity toward noncancerous cells having typical membrane compositions, such as HUVEC and erythrocytes, is low. CD spectroscopy, appropriately designed peptide controls, cell-based studies, liposome leakage assays, and electron microscopy support the intended mechanism of action, which leads to preferential killing of cancerous cells. © 2012 American Chemical Society

  11. The unfolded ensemble and folding mechanism of the C-terminal GB1 beta-hairpin.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bonomi, Massimiliano; Branduardi, Davide; Gervasio, Francesco L; Parrinello, Michele

    2008-10-22

    In this work, we shed new light on a much-studied case of beta-hairpin folding by means of advanced molecular dynamics simulations. A fully atomistic description of the protein and the solvent molecule is used, together with metadynamics, to accelerate the sampling and estimate free-energy landscapes. This is achieved using the path collective variables approach, which provides an adaptive description of the mechanism under study. We discover that the folding mechanism is a multiscale process where the turn region conformation leads to two different energy pathways that are connected by elongated structures. The former displays a stable 2:4 native-like structure in which an optimal hydrophobic packing and hydrogen bond pattern leads to 8 kcal/mol of stabilization. The latter shows a less-structured 3:5 beta-sheet, where hydrogen bonds and hydrophobic packing provide only 2.5 kcal/mol of stability. This perspective is fully consistent with experimental evidence that shows this to be a prototypical two-state folder, while it redefines the nature of the unfolded state.

  12. Biological Applications of Designed Hairpin Peptides: As Antimicrobials and as Inhibitors of Amyloidogenesis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sivanesam, Kalkena

    More than 40 diseases have been associated with the misfolding of peptides (or proteins) that form fibrils with a very specific morphology. These peptides classified as amyloidogenic peptides have been implicated in the development of Alzheimer's Disease, Parkinson's Disease, Type II Diabetes, Hungtinton's Disease etc. To date, these diseases have no cure, only therapies that can ameliorate the symptoms to a degree. Inhibition of the amyloidogenesis of these peptides has been proposed as a possible treatment option. While small molecules have been heavily tested as inhibitors of amyloidogenesis, peptides have emerged as potential inhibitors. In this work, the ability of a set of designed hairpin peptides to inhibit the amyloidogenesis of two different systems, alpha-synuclein (implicated in Parkinson's Disease) and human amylin (implicated in Type II Diabetes) is tested. Using circular dichroism and thioflavin T fluorescence, the ability of these peptides to inhibit amyloidogenesis is tested. The binding loci of these inhibitors to alpha-synuclein are also explored. The use of peptides as antimicrobials on the other hand is not a novel concept. However, most antimicrobial peptides, both natural and designed, rely heavily on covalent stabilizations in order to maintain secondary structure. In this study, non-covalent stabilizations are applied to a couple of natural as well as designed antimicrobials in order to study the effects of secondary structure stabilization on biological activity.

  13. Functional involvement of G8 in the hairpin ribozyme cleavage mechanism

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pinard, Robert; Hampel, Ken J.; Heckman, Joyce E.; Lambert, Dominic; Chan, Philip A.; Major, Francois; Burke, John M.

    2001-01-01

    The catalytic determinants for the cleavage and ligation reactions mediated by the hairpin ribozyme are integral to the polyribonucleotide chain. We describe experiments that place G8, a critical guanosine, at the active site, and point to an essential role in catalysis. Cross-linking and modeling show that formation of a catalytic complex is accompanied by a conformational change in which N1 and O6 of G8 become closely apposed to the scissile phosphodiester. UV cross-linking, hydroxyl-radical footprinting and native gel electrophoresis indicate that G8 variants inhibit the reaction at a step following domain association, and that the tertiary structure of the inactive complex is not measurably altered. Rate–pH profiles and fluorescence spectroscopy show that protonation at the N1 position of G8 is required for catalysis, and that modification of O6 can inhibit the reaction. Kinetic solvent isotope analysis suggests that two protons are transferred during the rate-limiting step, consistent with rate-limiting cleavage chemistry involving concerted deprotonation of the attacking 2′-OH and protonation of the 5′-O leaving group. We propose mechanistic models that are consistent with these data, including some that invoke a novel keto–enol tautomerization. PMID:11707414

  14. Integrating DNA structure switch with branched hairpins for the detection of uracil-DNA glycosylase activity and inhibitor screening.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhu, Jing; Hao, Qijie; Liu, Yi; Guo, Zhaohui; Rustam, Buayxigul; Jiang, Wei

    2018-03-01

    The detection of uracil-DNA glycosylase (UDG) activity is pivotal for its biochemical studies and the development of drugs for UDG-related diseases. Here, we explored an integrated DNA structure switch for high sensitive detection of UDG activity. The DNA structure switch containing two branched hairpins was employed to recognize UDG enzyme and generate fluorescent signal. Under the action of UDG, one branched hairpin was impelled folding into a close conformation after the excision of the single uracil. This reconfigured hairpin could immediately initiate the polymerization/nicking amplification reaction of another branched hairpin accompanying with the release of numerous G-quadruplexes (G4s). In the absence of UDG, the DNA structure switch kept its original configuration, and thus the subsequent polymerization/nicking reaction was inhibited, resulting in the release of few G4 strands. In this work, Thioflavin T was used as signal reporter to target G4s. By integrating the DNA structure switch, the quick response and high sensitivity for UDG determination was achieved and a low detection limit of 0.0001U/mL was obtained, which was superior to the most fluorescent methods for UDG assay. The repeatability of the as-proposed strategy was demonstrated under the concentration of 0.02U/mL and 0.002U/mL, the relative standard deviation obtained from 5 successive samples were 1.7% and 2.8%, respectively. The integrated DNA structure switch strategy proposed here has the potential application for the study of mechanism and function of UDG enzyme and the screening the inhibitors as potential drugs and biochemical tools. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  15. Site-specific relaxation kinetics of a tryptophan zipper hairpin peptide using temperature-jump IR spectroscopy and isotopic labeling.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hauser, Karin; Krejtschi, Carsten; Huang, Rong; Wu, Ling; Keiderling, Timothy A

    2008-03-12

    Two antiparallel beta-strands connected by a turn make beta-hairpins an ideal model system to analyze the interactions and dynamics of beta-sheets. Site-specific conformational dynamics were studied by temperature-jump IR spectroscopy and isotopic labeling in a model based on the tryptophan zipper peptide, Trpzip2, developed by Cochran et al. (Proc. Natl. Acad. Sci. U.S.A. 2001, 98, 5578). The modified Trpzip2C peptides have nearly identical equilibrium spectral behavior as Trpzip2 showing that they also form well-characterized beta-hairpin conformations in aqueous solution. Selective introduction of 13C=O groups on opposite strands lead to distinguishable cross-strand coupling of the labeled residues as monitored in the amide I' band. These frequency patterns reflect theoretical predictions, and the coupled 13C=O band loses intensity with increase in temperature and unfolding of the hairpin. Thermal relaxation kinetics were analyzed for unlabeled and cross-strand isotopically labeled variants. T-jumps of approximately 10 degrees C induce relaxation times of a few microseconds that decrease with increase of the peptide temperature. Differences in kinetic behavior for the loss of beta-strand and gain of disordered structure can be used to distinguish localized structure dynamics by comparison of nonlabeled and labeled amide I' components. Analysis of the data supports multistate dynamic and equilibrium behavior, but because of this process it is not possible to clearly define a folding and unfolding rate. Nonetheless, site-specific relaxation kinetics could be seen to be consistent with a hydrophobic collapse hypothesis for hairpin folding.

  16. Mutational analysis of an archaeal minichromosome maintenance protein exterior hairpin reveals critical residues for helicase activity and DNA binding

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Brewster Aaron S

    2010-08-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The mini-chromosome maintenance protein (MCM complex is an essential replicative helicase for DNA replication in Archaea and Eukaryotes. While the eukaryotic complex consists of six homologous proteins (MCM2-7, the archaeon Sulfolobus solfataricus has only one MCM protein (ssoMCM, six subunits of which form a homohexamer. We have recently reported a 4.35Å crystal structure of the near full-length ssoMCM. The structure reveals a total of four β-hairpins per subunit, three of which are located within the main channel or side channels of the ssoMCM hexamer model generated based on the symmetry of the N-terminal Methanothermobacter thermautotrophicus (mtMCM structure. The fourth β-hairpin, however, is located on the exterior of the hexamer, near the exit of the putative side channels and next to the ATP binding pocket. Results In order to better understand this hairpin's role in DNA binding and helicase activity, we performed a detailed mutational and biochemical analysis of nine residues on this exterior β-hairpin (EXT-hp. We examined the activities of the mutants related to their helicase function, including hexamerization, ATPase, DNA binding and helicase activities. The assays showed that some of the residues on this EXT-hp play a role for DNA binding as well as for helicase activity. Conclusions These results implicate several current theories regarding helicase activity by this critical hexameric enzyme. As the data suggest that EXT-hp is involved in DNA binding, the results reported here imply that the EXT-hp located near the exterior exit of the side channels may play a role in contacting DNA substrate in a manner that affects DNA unwinding.

  17. Structure of Hepatitis C Virus Polymerase in Complex with Primer-Template RNA

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mosley, Ralph T.; Edwards, Thomas E.; Murakami, Eisuke; Lam, Angela M.; Grice, Rena L.; Du, Jinfa; Sofia, Michael J.; Furman, Philip A.; Otto, Michael J. (Pharmasset); (Emerald)

    2012-08-01

    The replication of the hepatitis C viral (HCV) genome is accomplished by the NS5B RNA-dependent RNA polymerase (RdRp), for which mechanistic understanding and structure-guided drug design efforts have been hampered by its propensity to crystallize in a closed, polymerization-incompetent state. The removal of an autoinhibitory {beta}-hairpin loop from genotype 2a HCV NS5B increases de novo RNA synthesis by >100-fold, promotes RNA binding, and facilitated the determination of the first crystallographic structures of HCV polymerase in complex with RNA primer-template pairs. These crystal structures demonstrate the structural realignment required for primer-template recognition and elongation, provide new insights into HCV RNA synthesis at the molecular level, and may prove useful in the structure-based design of novel antiviral compounds. Additionally, our approach for obtaining the RNA primer-template-bound structure of HCV polymerase may be generally applicable to solving RNA-bound complexes for other viral RdRps that contain similar regulatory {beta}-hairpin loops, including bovine viral diarrhea virus, dengue virus, and West Nile virus.

  18. Single-molecule RNA observation in vivo reveals dynamics of co-transcriptional splicing

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ferguson, M. L.; Coulon, A.; de Turris, V.; Palangat, M.; Chow, C. C.; Singer, R. H.; Larson, D. R.

    2013-03-01

    The synthesis of pre-mRNA and the splicing of that pre-mRNA to form completed transcripts requires coordination between two large multi-subunit complexes (the transcription elongation complex and the spliceosome). How this coordination occurs in vivo is unknown. Here we report the first experimental observation of transcription and splicing occurring at the same gene in living cells. By utilizing the PP7/MS2 fluorescent RNA reporter system, we can directly observe two distinct regions of the nascent RNA, allowing us to measure the rise and fall time of the intron and exon of a reporter gene stably integrated into a human cell line. The reporter gene consists of a beta globin gene where we have inserted a 24 RNA hairpin cassette into the intron/exon. Upon synthesis, the RNA hairpins are tightly bound by fluorescently-labeled PP7/MS2 bacteriophage coat proteins. After gene induction, a single locus of active transcription in the nucleus shows fluorescence intensity changes characteristic of the synthesis and excision of the intron/exon. Using fluctuation analysis, we determine the elongation rate to be 1.5 kb/min. From the temporal cross correlation function, we determine that splicing of this gene must be co-transcriptional with a splicing time of ~100 seconds before termination and a ~200 second pause at termination. We propose that dual-color RNA imaging may be extended to investigate other mechanisms of transcription, gene regulation, and RNA processing.

  19. Oligodeoxynucleotide binding to (CTG) · (CAG) microsatellite repeats inhibits replication fork stalling, hairpin formation, and genome instability.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Guoqi; Chen, Xiaomi; Leffak, Michael

    2013-02-01

    (CTG)(n) · (CAG)(n) trinucleotide repeat (TNR) expansion in the 3' untranslated region of the dystrophia myotonica protein kinase (DMPK) gene causes myotonic dystrophy type 1. However, a direct link between TNR instability, the formation of noncanonical (CTG)(n) · (CAG)(n) structures, and replication stress has not been demonstrated. In a human cell model, we found that (CTG)(45) · (CAG)(45) causes local replication fork stalling, DNA hairpin formation, and TNR instability. Oligodeoxynucleotides (ODNs) complementary to the (CTG)(45) · (CAG)(45) lagging-strand template eliminated DNA hairpin formation on leading- and lagging-strand templates and relieved fork stalling. Prolonged cell culture, emetine inhibition of lagging-strand synthesis, or slowing of DNA synthesis by low-dose aphidicolin induced (CTG)(45) · (CAG)(45) expansions and contractions. ODNs targeting the lagging-strand template blocked the time-dependent or emetine-induced instability but did not eliminate aphidicolin-induced instability. These results show directly that TNR replication stalling, replication stress, hairpin formation, and instability are mechanistically linked in vivo.

  20. RNA genetics

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Domingo, E. (Instituto de Biologia Molecular, Facultad de Ciencias, Universidad Autonoma de Madrid, Canto Blanco, Madrid (ES)); Holland, J.J. (California Univ., San Diego, La Jolla, CA (USA). Dept. of Biology); Ahlquist, P. (Wisconsin Univ., Madison, WI (USA). Dept. of Plant Pathology)

    1988-01-01

    This book contains the proceedings on RNA gentics: Variability of RNA genomes, Volume III. Topics covered include: High error rate, population equilibrium, and evolution of RNA replication systems; Influenza viruses; High rate of nutation and evolution; and Sequence space and quasi species distribution.

  1. Highly activated RNA silencing via strong induction of dicer by one virus can interfere with the replication of an unrelated virus

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chiba, Sotaro; Suzuki, Nobuhiro

    2015-01-01

    Viruses often coinfect single host organisms in nature. Depending on the combination of viruses in such coinfections, the interplay between them may be synergistic, apparently neutral with no effect on each other, or antagonistic. RNA silencing is responsible for many cases of interference or cross-protection between viruses, but such antagonistic interactions are usually restricted to closely related strains of the same viral species. In this study, we present an unprecedented example of RNA silencing-mediated one-way interference between unrelated viruses in a filamentous model fungus, Cryphonectria parasitica. The replication of Rosellinia necatrix victorivirus 1 (RnVV1; Totiviridae) was strongly impaired by coinfection with the prototypic member of the genus Mycoreovirus (MyRV1) or a mutant of the prototype hypovirus (Cryphonectria hypovirus 1, CHV1) lacking the RNA silencing suppressor (CHV1-Δp69). This interference was associated with marked transcriptional induction of key genes in antiviral RNA silencing, dicer-like 2 (dcl2) and argonaute-like 2 (agl2), following MyRV1 or CHV1-Δp69 infection. Interestingly, the inhibition of RnVV1 replication was reproduced when the levels of dcl2 and agl2 transcripts were elevated by transgenic expression of a hairpin construct of an endogenous C. parasitica gene. Disruption of dcl2 completely abolished the interference, whereas that of agl2 did not always lead to its abolishment, suggesting more crucial roles of dcl2 in antiviral defense. Taken altogether, these results demonstrated the susceptible nature of RnVV1 to the antiviral silencing in C. parasitica activated by distinct viruses or transgene-derived double-stranded RNAs and provide insight into the potential for broad-spectrum virus control mediated by RNA silencing. PMID:26283371

  2. Packaging HIV- or FIV-based lentivector expression constructs and transduction of VSV-G pseudotyped viral particles.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mendenhall, Amy; Lesnik, Jacob; Mukherjee, Chandreyee; Antes, Travis; Sengupta, Ranjita

    2012-04-08

    As with standard plasmid vectors, it is possible to transfect lentivectors in plasmid form into cells with low-to-medium efficiency to obtain transient expression of effectors. Packaging lentiviral expression constructs into pseudoviral particles, however, enables up to 100% transduction, even with difficult-to-transfect cells, such as primary, stem, and differentiated cells. Moreover, the lentiviral delivery does not produce the specific cellular responses typically associated with chemical transfections, such as cell death resulting from toxicity of the transfection reagent. When transduced into target cells, the lentiviral construct integrates into genomic DNA and provides stable expression of the small hairpin RNA (shRNA), cDNA, microRNA or reporter gene. Target cells stably expressing the effector molecule can be isolated using a selectable marker contained in the expression vector construct such as puromycin or GFP. After pseudoviral particles infect target cells, they cannot replicate within target cells because the viral structural genes are absent and the long terminal repeats (LTRs) are designed to be self-inactivating upon transduction. There are three main components necessary for efficient lentiviral packaging. 1. The lentiviral expression vector that contains some of the genetic elements required for packaging, stable integration of the viral expression construct into genomic DNA, and expression of the effector or reporter. 2. The lentiviral packaging plasmids that provide the proteins essential for transcription and packaging of an RNA copy of the expression construct into recombinant pseudoviral particles. This protocol uses the pPACK plasmids (SBI) that encode for gag, pol, and rev from the HIV or FIV genome and Vesicular Stomatitis Virus g protein (VSV-G) for the viral coat protein. 3. 293TN producer cells (derived from HEK293 cells) that express the SV40 large T antigen, which is required for high-titer lentiviral production and a neomycin

  3. Binding of HIV-1 gp41-directed neutralizing and non-neutralizing fragment antibody binding domain (Fab and single chain variable fragment (ScFv antibodies to the ectodomain of gp41 in the pre-hairpin and six-helix bundle conformations.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    John M Louis

    Full Text Available We previously reported a series of antibodies, in fragment antigen binding domain (Fab formats, selected from a human non-immune phage library, directed against the internal trimeric coiled-coil of the N-heptad repeat (N-HR of HIV-1 gp41. Broadly neutralizing antibodies from that series bind to both the fully exposed N-HR trimer, representing the pre-hairpin intermediate state of gp41, and to partially-exposed N-HR helices within the context of the gp41 six-helix bundle. While the affinities of the Fabs for pre-hairpin intermediate mimetics vary by only 2 to 20-fold between neutralizing and non-neutralizing antibodies, differences in inhibition of viral entry exceed three orders of magnitude. Here we compare the binding of neutralizing (8066 and non-neutralizing (8062 antibodies, differing in only four positions within the CDR-H2 binding loop, in Fab and single chain variable fragment (ScFv formats, to several pre-hairpin intermediate and six-helix bundle constructs of gp41. Residues 56 and 58 of the mini-antibodies are shown to be crucial for neutralization activity. There is a large differential (≥ 150-fold in binding affinity between neutralizing and non-neutralizing antibodies to the six-helix bundle of gp41 and binding to the six-helix bundle does not involve displacement of the outer C-terminal helices of the bundle. The binding stoichiometry is one six-helix bundle to one Fab or three ScFvs. We postulate that neutralization by the 8066 antibody is achieved by binding to a continuum of states along the fusion pathway from the pre-hairpin intermediate all the way to the formation of the six-helix bundle, but prior to irreversible fusion between viral and cellular membranes.

  4. Expression and Functional Role of Reprogramming-Related Long Noncoding RNA (lincRNA-ROR) in Glioma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Feng, Shiyu; Yao, Jie; Chen, Yang; Geng, Peiliang; Zhang, Haibo; Ma, Xiaodong; Zhao, Jing; Yu, Xinguang

    2015-07-01

    The objective of the study was to investigate the expression and function of reprogramming-related long noncoding RNA (lincRNA-ROR) in glioma and glioma stem cells (GSCs). With real-time quantitative PCR, we analyzed lincRNA-ROR expression levels in 26 primary glioma patients and the expression correlation of lincRNA-ROR with SOX11 and KLF4. To explore its functional role, gain- and loss-of-function studies were performed to assess the effect of lincRNA-ROR on cell proliferation, expression rate of GSCs marker CD133, and glioma stem sphere-forming ability in vitro. We found that the lincRNA-ROR expression was significantly lower in glioma tissues than in adjacent normal tissues. Knockdown of lincRNA-ROR expression by small hairpin RNA (shRNA) significantly elevated the cell proliferation and enhanced the CD133 expression rate and glioma stem sphere-forming ability in U87 cells, while overexpression of lincRNA-ROR in U87 cells showed the opposite effect. Moreover, we found that the expression of lincRNA-ROR was negatively correlated with stem cell factor KLF4 and the "up- and down-regulation" of lincRNA-ROR resulted in inverse modulation of KLF4 messenger RNA (mRNA) expression. Our results suggest that the reprogramming-related lincRNA-ROR may serve as a novel tumor suppressor gene in glioma, which can inhibit the proliferation of cancer cell and self-renewal of GSCs, partly by inhibiting the KLF4 expression. Further research about lincRNA-ROR may provide a novel biomarker and therapeutic target of glioma for cancer clinic in future.

  5. Nonequilibrium thermodynamics of single DNA hairpins in a dual-trap optical tweezers setup

    Science.gov (United States)

    Crivellari, M. Ribezzi; Huguet, J. M.; Ritort, F.

    2011-03-01

    We use two counter propagating laser beams to create a dual trap optical tweezers setup which is free from cross interference between the beams and provides great instrumental stability. This setup works by direct measurement of light momentum, separately for each trap, and is based on the Minitweezers design [1]. The dual trap setup has many applications: it can be used to study the force-dependent unfolding kinetics of single molecules and to address fundamental problems in nonequilibrium thermodynamics of small systems [2]. Recent progress in statistical physics has shown the importance of considering large energy deviations in the beahvior of systems that are driven out-of-equilibrium by time-dependent forces. Prominent examples are nonequilibrium work relations (e.g. the Jarzynski equality [3]) and fluctuation theorems. By repeated measurement of the irreversible work the Jarzynski equality allows us to recover the free energy difference between two thermodynamic states, AF, by taking exponential averages of the work W done by the external agent on the system, e-βΔF = transformations. This implies that mechanical work must be measured in the proper reference that is solidary with the thermal bath for these relations to hold. We have carried out repeated mechanical unfolding/folding cycles on short (20 bp) DNA hairpins and measured work distributions in the dual-trap setup along this process. Our aim is to check under which experimental conditions we can discern the non-invariance property of fluctuation relations thereby establishing the correct operative definition of the work in our setting. This study may help to identify and quantify potential violations of the fluctuation relations.

  6. Effect of DNA hairpin loops on the twist of planar DNA origami tiles.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Zhe; Wang, Lei; Yan, Hao; Liu, Yan

    2012-01-31

    The development of scaffolded DNA origami, a technique in which a long single-stranded viral genome is folded into arbitrary shapes by hundreds of short synthetic oligonucleotides, represents an important milestone in DNA nanotechnology. Recent findings have revealed that two-dimensional (2D) DNA origami structures based on the original design parameters adopt a global twist with respect to the tile plane, which may be because the conformation of the constituent DNA (10.67 bp/turn) deviates from the natural B-type helical twist (10.4 bp/turn). Here we aim to characterize the effects of DNA hairpin loops on the overall curvature of the tile and explore their ability to control, and ultimately eliminate any unwanted curvature. A series of dumbbell-shaped DNA loops were selectively displayed on the surface of DNA origami tiles with the expectation that repulsive interactions among the neighboring dumbbell loops and between the loops and the DNA origami tile would influence the structural features of the underlying tiles. A systematic, atomic force microscopy (AFM) study of how the number and position of the DNA loops influenced the global twist of the structure was performed, and several structural models to explain the results were proposed. The observations unambiguously revealed that the first generation of rectangular shaped origami tiles adopt a conformation in which the upper right (corner 2) and bottom left (corner 4) corners bend upward out of the plane, causing linear superstructures attached by these corners to form twisted ribbons. Our experimental observations are consistent with the twist model predicted by the DNA mechanical property simulation software CanDo. Through the systematic design and organization of various numbers of dumbbell loops on both surfaces of the tile, a nearly planar rectangular origami tile was achieved. © 2011 American Chemical Society

  7. Aromatic interactions in model peptide β-hairpins: ring current effects on proton chemical shifts.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rajagopal, Appavu; Aravinda, Subrayashastry; Raghothama, Srinivasarao; Shamala, Narayanaswamy; Balaram, Padmanabhan

    2012-01-01

    Crystal structures of eight peptide β-hairpins in the sequence Boc-Leu-Phe-Val-Xxx-Yyy-Leu-Phe-Val-OMe revealed that the Phe(2) and Phe(7) aromatic rings are in close spacial proximity, with the centroid-centroid distance (R(cen)) of 4.4-5.4 Å between the two phenyl rings. Proton NMR spectra in chloroform and methanol solution reveal a significant upfield shift of the Phe(7) C(δ,δ') H(2) protons (6.65-7.04 ppm). Specific assignments of the aromatic protons have been carried out in the peptide Boc-Leu-Phe-Val-(D)Pro-(L)Pro-Leu-Phe-Val-OMe (6). The anticipated ring current shifts have been estimated from the aromatic ring geometrics observed in crystals for all eight peptides. Only one of the C(δ,δ') H proton lies in the shielding zone with rapid ring flipping, resulting in averaging between the two extreme chemical shifts. An approximate estimate of the population of conformations, which resemble crystal state orientation, may be obtained. Key nuclear Overhauser effects (NOEs) between facing Phe side chains provide support for close similarity between the solid state and solution conformation. Temperature dependence of aromatic ring proton chemical shift and line widths for peptide 6 (Boc-Leu-Phe-Val-(D)Pro-(L)Pro-Leu-Phe-Val-OMe) and the control peptide Boc-Leu-Val-Val-(D)Pro-Gly-Leu-Phe-Val-OMe establish an enhanced barrier to ring flipping when the two Phe rings are in proximity. Modeling studies suggest that small, conformational adjustment about C(α)-C(β) (χ(1) ) and C(β)-C(γ) (χ(2) ) bonds of both the Phe residues may be required in order to permit unhindered, uncorrelated flipping of both the Phe rings. The maintenance of the specific aromatic ring orientation in organic solvents provides evidence for significant stabilizing interaction. Copyright © 2012 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  8. Polypurine Reverse Hoogsteen Hairpins as a Gene Silencing Tool for Cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ciudad, Carlos J; Rodríguez, Laura; Villalobos, Xenia; Félix, Alex J; Noé, Véronica

    2017-01-01

    Polypurine reverse Hoogsteen (PPRH) molecules are DNA hairpins formed by two polypurine strands running in an antiparallel orientation and containing no nucleotide modifications. The two strands, linked by a pentathymidine loop, are bound through intramolecular reverse Hoogsteen bonds. Then, PPRHs can bind by Watson-Crick bonds to their corresponding polypyrimidine target in the dsDNA provoking a displacement of the polypurine strand of the duplex. We described the effect and mechanisms of action of PPRHs in cells using PPRHs designed against the template and coding strands of the dhfr gene. The proof of principle of PPRHs as a therapeutic tool was established using a PPRH against survivin in a xenograft prostate cancer tumor model. To improve the PPRHs effect, the influence of the length was studied obtaining a higher efficiency with longer molecules. To decrease the possible offtarget effect, when a purine interruption is found in the pyrimidine target, the PPRH sequence should contain both strands of the complementary base opposite to the interruption. Furthermore, the stability of PPRHs is higher than that of siRNAs, as evidenced by the longer halflife of the former in different types of serum and in PC3 cells. PPRHs do not induce the levels of the transcription factors nor the proinflammatory cytokines involved in the Toll-like Receptor pathway and they do not trigger the formation of the inflammasome complex. PPRHs can be used as therapeutic tools to target genes related to cancer progression, resistance to drugs or immunotherapy approaches. Copyright© Bentham Science Publishers; For any queries, please email at epub@benthamscience.org.

  9. Computational prediction of miRNA genes from small RNA sequencing data

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wenjing eKang

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Next-generation sequencing now for the first time allows researchers to gauge the depth and variation of entire transcriptomes. However, now as rare transcripts can be detected that are present in cells at single copies, more advanced computational tools are needed to accurately annotate and profile them. miRNAs are 22 nucleotide small RNAs (sRNAs that post-transcriptionally reduce the output of protein coding genes. They have established roles in numerous biological processes, including cancers and other diseases. During miRNA biogenesis, the sRNAs are sequentially cleaved from precursor molecules that have a characteristic hairpin RNA structure. The vast majority of new miRNA genes that are discovered are mined from small RNA sequencing (sRNA-seq, which can detect more than a billion RNAs in a single run. However, given that many of the detected RNAs are degradation products from all types of transcripts, the accurate identification of miRNAs remain a non-trivial computational problem. Here we review the tools available to predict animal miRNAs from sRNA sequencing data. We present tools for generalist and specialist use cases, including prediction from massively pooled data or in species without reference genome. We also present wet-lab methods used to validate predicted miRNAs, and approaches to computationally benchmark prediction accuracy. For each tool, we reference validation experiments and benchmarking efforts. Last, we discuss the future of the field.

  10. Deep Sequence Analysis of AgoshRNA Processing Reveals 3’ A Addition and Trimming

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alex Harwig

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available The RNA interference (RNAi pathway, in which microprocessor and Dicer collaborate to process microRNAs (miRNA, was recently expanded by the description of alternative processing routes. In one of these noncanonical pathways, Dicer action is replaced by the Argonaute2 (Ago2 slicer function. It was recently shown that the stem-length of precursor-miRNA or short hairpin RNA (shRNA molecules is a major determinant for Dicer versus Ago2 processing. Here we present the results of a deep sequence study on the processing of shRNAs with different stem length and a top G·U wobble base pair (bp. This analysis revealed some unexpected properties of these so-called AgoshRNA molecules that are processed by Ago2 instead of Dicer. First, we confirmed the gradual shift from Dicer to Ago2 processing upon shortening of the hairpin length. Second, hairpins with a stem larger than 19 base pair are inefficiently cleaved by Ago2 and we noticed a shift in the cleavage site. Third, the introduction of a top G·U bp in a regular shRNA can promote Ago2-cleavage, which coincides with a loss of Ago2-loading of the Dicer-cleaved 3’ strand. Fourth, the Ago2-processed AgoshRNAs acquire a short 3’ tail of 1–3 A-nucleotides (nt and we present evidence that this product is subsequently trimmed by the poly(A-specific ribonuclease (PARN.

  11. Assembly of Therapeutic pRNA-siRNA Nanoparticles Using Bipartite Approach

    OpenAIRE

    Shu, Yi; Cinier, Mathieu; Fox, Sejal R.; Ben-Johnathan, Nira; Guo, Peixuan

    2011-01-01

    The 117-nucleotide (nt) RNA, called the packaging RNA (pRNA) of bacteriophage phi29 DNA packaging motor, has been shown to be an efficient vector for the construction of RNA nanoparticles for the delivery of small interfering RNA (siRNA) into specific cancer or viral-infected cells. Currently, chemical synthesis of 117-nt RNA is not feasible commercially. In addition, labeling at specific locations on pRNA requires the understanding of its modular organization. Here, we report multiple approa...

  12. Application of short hairpin RNAs (shRNAs) to study gene function in ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    , especially for silencing gene expression. RNA interference (RNAi) is a natural process through which expression of a targeted gene can be knocked down with high specificity and selectivity. Methods of mediating the RNAi effect involve small ...

  13. Integration of Expressed Sequence Tag Data Flanking Predicted RNA Secondary Structures Facilitates Novel Non-Coding RNA Discovery

    Science.gov (United States)

    Krzyzanowski, Paul M.; Price, Feodor D.; Muro, Enrique M.; Rudnicki, Michael A.; Andrade-Navarro, Miguel A.

    2011-01-01

    Many computational methods have been used to predict novel non-coding RNAs (ncRNAs), but none, to our knowledge, have explicitly investigated the impact of integrating existing cDNA-based Expressed Sequence Tag (EST) data that flank structural RNA predictions. To determine whether flanking EST data can assist in microRNA (miRNA) prediction, we identified genomic sites encoding putative miRNAs by combining functional RNA predictions with flanking ESTs data in a model consistent with miRNAs undergoing cleavage during maturation. In both human and mouse genomes, we observed that the inclusion of flanking ESTs adjacent to and not overlapping predicted miRNAs significantly improved the performance of various methods of miRNA prediction, including direct high-throughput sequencing of small RNA libraries. We analyzed the expression of hundreds of miRNAs predicted to be expressed during myogenic differentiation using a customized microarray and identified several known and predicted myogenic miRNA hairpins. Our results indicate that integrating ESTs flanking structural RNA predictions improves the quality of cleaved miRNA predictions and suggest that this strategy can be used to predict other non-coding RNAs undergoing cleavage during maturation. PMID:21698286

  14. Suppression of hepatitis B virus antigen production and replication by wild-type HBV dependently replicating HBV shRNA vectors in vitro and in vivo.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Baosheng; Sun, Shuo; Li, Minran; Cheng, Xin; Li, Haijun; Kang, Fubiao; Kang, Jiwen; Dörnbrack, Katharina; Nassal, Michael; Sun, Dianxing

    2016-10-01

    Chronic infection with hepatitis B virus (HBV), a small DNA virus that replicates by reverse transcription of a pregenomic (pg) RNA precursor, greatly increases the risk for terminal liver disease. RNA interference (RNAi) based therapy approaches have shown potential to overcome the limited efficacy of current treatments. However, synthetic siRNAs as well as small hairpin (sh) RNAs expressed from non-integrating vectors require repeated applications; integrating vectors suffer from safety concerns. We pursue a new concept by which HBV itself is engineered into a conditionally replicating, wild-type HBV dependent anti-HBV shRNA vector. Beyond sharing HBV's hepatocyte tropism, such a vector would be self-renewing, but only as long as wild-type HBV is present. Here, we realized several important aspects of this concept. We identified two distinct regions in the 3.2 kb HBV genome which tolerate replacement by shRNA expression cassettes without compromising reverse transcription when complemented in vitro by HBV helper constructs or by wild-type HBV; a representative HBV shRNA vector was infectious in cell culture. The vector-encoded shRNAs were active, including on HBV as target. A dual anti-HBV shRNA vector delivered into HBV transgenic mice, which are not susceptible to HBV infection, by a chimeric adenovirus-HBV shuttle reduced serum hepatitis B surface antigen (HBsAg) up to ∼4-fold, and virus particles up to ∼20-fold. Importantly, a fraction of the circulating particles contained vector-derived DNA, indicating successful complementation in vivo. These data encourage further investigations to prove antiviral efficacy and the predicted self-limiting vector spread in a small animal HBV infection model. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  15. Facile conversion of ATP-binding RNA aptamer to quencher-free molecular aptamer beacon.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Park, Yoojin; Nim-Anussornkul, Duangrat; Vilaivan, Tirayut; Morii, Takashi; Kim, Byeang Hyean

    2018-01-15

    We have developed RNA-based quencher-free molecular aptamer beacons (RNA-based QF-MABs) for the detection of ATP, taking advantage of the conformational changes associated with ATP binding to the ATP-binding RNA aptamer. The RNA aptamer, with its well-defined structure, was readily converted to the fluorescence sensors by incorporating a fluorophore into the loop region of the hairpin structure. These RNA-based QF-MABs exhibited fluorescence signals in the presence of ATP relative to their low background signals in the absence of ATP. The fluorescence emission intensity increased upon formation of a RNA-based QF-MAB·ATP complex. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  16. A proteomic study of TAR-RNA binding protein (TRBP-associated factors

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chi Ya-Hui

    2011-02-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The human TAR RNA-binding protein, TRBP, was first identified and cloned based on its high affinity binding to the small hairpin trans-activation responsive (TAR RNA of HIV-1. TRBP has more recently been found to be a constituent of the RNA-induced silencing complex (RISC serving as a Dicer co-factor in the processing of the ~70 nucleotide pre-microRNAs(miRNAs to 21-25 nucleotide mature miRNAs. Findings Using co-immunoprecipitation and protein-identification by mass spectrometry, we characterized intracellular proteins that complex with TRBP. These interacting proteins include those that have been described to act in protein synthesis, RNA modifications and processing, DNA transcription, and cell proliferation. Conclusions Our findings provide a proteome of factors that may cooperate with TRBP in activities such as miRNA processing and in RNA interference by the RISC complex.

  17. The evidence for a microRNA product of human DROSHA gene.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mechtler, Peter; Johnson, Sydney; Slabodkin, Hannah; Cohanim, Amir B; Brodsky, Leonid; Kandel, Eugene S

    2017-11-02

    MicroRNAs are short RNA molecules that regulate function and stability of a large subset of eukaryotic mRNAs. In the main pathway of microRNA biogenesis, a short "hairpin" is excised from a primary transcript by ribonuclease DROSHA, followed by additional nucleolytic processing by DICER and inclusion of the mature microRNA into the RNA-induced silencing complex. We report that a microRNA-like molecule is encoded by human DROSHA gene within a predicted stem-loop element of the respective transcript. This putative mature microRNA is complementary to DROSHA transcript variant 1 and can attenuate expression of the corresponding protein. The findings suggest a possibility for a negative feedback loop, wherein DROSHA processes its own transcript and produces an inhibitor of its own biosynthesis.

  18. Using in-cell SHAPE-Seq and simulations to probe structure-function design principles of RNA transcriptional regulators.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Takahashi, Melissa K; Watters, Kyle E; Gasper, Paul M; Abbott, Timothy R; Carlson, Paul D; Chen, Alan A; Lucks, Julius B

    2016-06-01

    Antisense RNA-mediated transcriptional regulators are powerful tools for controlling gene expression and creating synthetic gene networks. RNA transcriptional repressors derived from natural mechanisms called attenuators are particularly versatile, though their mechanistic complexity has made them difficult to engineer. Here we identify a new structure-function design principle for attenuators that enables the forward engineering of new RNA transcriptional repressors. Using in-cell SHAPE-Seq to characterize the structures of attenuator variants within Escherichia coli, we show that attenuator hairpins that facilitate interaction with antisense RNAs require interior loops for proper function. Molecular dynamics simulations of these attenuator variants suggest these interior loops impart structural flexibility. We further observe hairpin flexibility in the cellular structures of natural RNA mechanisms that use antisense RNA interactions to repress translation, confirming earlier results from in vitro studies. Finally, we design new transcriptional attenuators in silico using an interior loop as a structural requirement and show that they function as desired in vivo. This work establishes interior loops as an important structural element for designing synthetic RNA gene regulators. We anticipate that the coupling of experimental measurement of cellular RNA structure and function with computational modeling will enable rapid discovery of structure-function design principles for a diverse array of natural and synthetic RNA regulators. © 2016 Takahashi et al.; Published by Cold Spring Harbor Laboratory Press for the RNA Society.

  19. Artificial MiRNA Knockdown of Platelet Glycoprotein lbα: A Tool for Platelet Gene Silencing.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tim Thijs

    Full Text Available In recent years, candidate genes and proteins implicated in platelet function have been identified by various genomic approaches. To elucidate their exact role, we aimed to develop a method to apply miRNA interference in platelet progenitor cells by using GPIbα as a proof-of-concept target protein. After in silico and in vitro screening of siRNAs targeting GPIbα (siGPIBAs, we developed artificial miRNAs (miGPIBAs, which were tested in CHO cells stably expressing GPIb-IX complex and megakaryoblastic DAMI cells. Introduction of siGPIBAs in CHO GPIb-IX cells resulted in 44 to 75% and up to 80% knockdown of GPIbα expression using single or combined siRNAs, respectively. Conversion of siGPIBAs to miGPIBAs resulted in reduced silencing efficiency, which could however be circumvented by tandem integration of two hairpins targeting different regions of GPIBA mRNA where 72% GPIbα knockdown was achieved. CHO GPIb-IX cells transfected with the miGPIBA construct displayed a significant decrease in their ability to aggregate characterized by lower aggregate numbers and size compared to control CHO GPIb-IX cells. More importantly, we successfully silenced GPIbα in differentiating megakaryoblastic DAMI cells that exhibited morphological changes associated with actin organization. In conclusion, we here report the successful use of miRNA technology to silence a platelet protein in megakaryoblastic cells and demonstrate its usefulness in functional assays. Hence, we believe that artificial miRNAs are suitable tools to unravel the role of a protein of interest in stem cells, megakaryocytes and platelets, thereby expanding their application to novel fields of basic and translational research.

  20. Identification of Subtype Specific miRNA-mRNA Functional Regulatory Modules in Matched miRNA-mRNA Expression Data: Multiple Myeloma as a Case

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yunpeng Zhang

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Identification of miRNA-mRNA modules is an important step to elucidate their combinatorial effect on the pathogenesis and mechanisms underlying complex diseases. Current identification methods primarily are based upon miRNA-target information and matched miRNA and mRNA expression profiles. However, for heterogeneous diseases, the miRNA-mRNA regulatory mechanisms may differ between subtypes, leading to differences in clinical behavior. In order to explore the pathogenesis of each subtype, it is important to identify subtype specific miRNA-mRNA modules. In this study, we integrated the Ping-Pong algorithm and multiobjective genetic algorithm to identify subtype specific miRNA-mRNA functional regulatory modules (MFRMs through integrative analysis of three biological data sets: GO biological processes, miRNA target information, and matched miRNA and mRNA expression data. We applied our method on a heterogeneous disease, multiple myeloma (MM, to identify MM subtype specific MFRMs. The constructed miRNA-mRNA regulatory networks provide modular outlook at subtype specific miRNA-mRNA interactions. Furthermore, clustering analysis demonstrated that heterogeneous MFRMs were able to separate corresponding MM subtypes. These subtype specific MFRMs may aid in the further elucidation of the pathogenesis of each subtype and may serve to guide MM subtype diagnosis and treatment.

  1. Gene knockdown by ihpRNA-triggering in the ectomycorrhizal basidiomycete fungus Laccaria bicolor

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kemppainen, Minna J

    2010-01-01

    Ectomycorrhiza (ECM) is a mutualistic association between fungi and the roots of the vast majority of trees. These include numerous ecologically and economically relevant species and the participating fungal symbionts are predominantly filamentous basidiomycetes. In natural ecosystems the plant nutrient uptake from soil takes place via the extraradical mycelia of these ECM mycosimbionts as a trade for plant photosyntates. The symbiotic phase in the life cycle of ECM basidiomycetes is the dikaryotic hyphae. Therefore, studies on symbiotic relevant gene functions require the inactivation of both gene copies in these dikaryotic fungi. RNA silencing is a eukaryotic sequence homology-dependent degradation of target RNAs which is believed to have evolved as a protection mechanism against invading nucleic acids. In different eukaryotic organisms, including fungi, the RNA silencing pathway can be artificially triggered to target and degrade gene transcripts of interest, resulting in gene knock-down. Most importantly, RNA silencing can act at the cytosolic level affecting mRNAs originating from several gene copies and different nuclei thus offering an efficient means of altering gene expression in dikaryotic organisms. Therefore, the pHg/pSILBAγ silencing vector was constructed for efficient RNA silencing triggering in the model mycorrhizal fungus Laccaria bicolor. This cloning vector carries the Agaricus bisporus gpdII-promoter, two multiple cloning sites separated by a L. bicolor nitrate reductase intron and the Aspergillus nidulans trpC terminator. pSILBAγ allows an easy two-step PCR-cloning of hairpin sequences to be expressed in basidiomycetes. With one further cloning step into pHg, a pCAMBIA1300-based binary vector carrying a hygromycin resistance cassette, makes the pHg/pSILBAγ plasmid compatible with Agrobacterium-mediated transformation. The pHg/pSILBAγ-system results in predominantly single integrations of RNA silencing triggering T-DNAs in the fungal genome

  2. Design of Effective Primary MicroRNA Mimics With Different Basal Stem Conformations

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fiona T van den Berg

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Primary microRNA (pri-miRNA mimics are important mediators of effective gene silencing and are well suited for sustained therapeutic applications. Pri-miRNA mimics are processed in the endogenous miRNA biogenesis pathway, where elements of the secondary RNA structure are crucial for efficient miRNA production. Cleavage of the pri-miRNA to a precursor miRNA (pre-miRNA by Drosha-DGCR8 typically occurs adjacent to a basal stem of ≃11 bp. However, a number of pri-miRNA structures are expected to contain slightly shorter or longer basal stems, which may be further disrupted in predicted folding of the expressed pri-miRNA sequence. We investigated the function and processing of natural and exogenous RNA guides from pri-miRNAs with various basal stems (9–13 bp, where a canonical hairpin was predicted to be well or poorly maintained in predicted structures of the expressed sequence. We have shown that RNA guides can be effectively derived from pri-miRNAs with various basal stem conformations, while predicted guide region stability can explain the function of pri-miRNA mimics, in agreement with previously proposed design principles. This study provides insight for the design of effective mimics based on naturally occurring pri-miRNAs and has identified several novel scaffolds suitable for use in gene silencing applications.

  3. Dendritic structure DNA for specific metal ion biosensor based on catalytic hairpin assembly and a sensitive synergistic amplification strategy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhao, Jianmin; Jing, Pei; Xue, Shuyan; Xu, Wenju

    2017-01-15

    In this work, a sensitive electrochemical biosensing to Pb(2+) was proposed based on the high specificity of DNAzymes to Pb(2+). The response signal was efficiently amplified by the catalytic hairpin assembly induced by strand replacement reaction and the formation of dendritic structure DNA (DSDNA) by layer-by-layer assembly. Firstly, in the presence of Pb(2+), the substrate strand (S1) of the Pb(2+)-specific DNAzymes was specifically cleaved by Pb(2+). Secondly, one of the two fragments (rS1) introduced into the electrode surface was hybridized with a hairpin DNA (H1) and further replaced by another hairpin DNA (H2) by the hybridization reaction of H1 with H2. The released rS1 then induced the next hybridization with H1. After repeated cycles, the catalytic recycling assembly of H2 with H1 was completed. Thirdly, two bioconjugates of Pt@Pd nanocages (Pt@PdNCs) labeled with DNA S3/S4 and electroactive toluidine blue (Tb) (Tb-S3-Pt@PdNCs and Tb-S4-Pt@PdNCs) were captured onto the resultant electrode surface through the hybridization of S3 and H2, S3 and S4, resulting in the formation of DSDNA triggered by layer-by-layer assembly. This formed DSDNA greatly facilitated the immobilization of manganese(III) meso-tetrakis (4-N-methylpyridiniumyl)-porphyrin (MnTMPyP) as mimicking enzyme. Under the synergistic catalysis of Pt@PdNCs and MnTMPyP to H2O2 reduction, the effective signal amplification of the developed Pb(2+) biosensor was achieved. As a result, the sensitive detection of the proposed electrochemical strategy for Pb(2+) was greatly improved in the range of 0.1pM-200nM with a detection limit of 0.033pM. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  4. The mitochondrial genomes of sponges provide evidence for multiple invasions by Repetitive Hairpin-forming Elements (RHE

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lavrov Dennis V

    2009-12-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The mitochondrial (mt genomes of sponges possess a variety of features, which appear to be intermediate between those of Eumetazoa and non-metazoan opisthokonts. Among these features is the presence of long intergenic regions, which are common in other eukaryotes, but generally absent in Eumetazoa. Here we analyse poriferan mitochondrial intergenic regions, paying particular attention to repetitive sequences within them. In this context we introduce the mitochondrial genome of Ircinia strobilina (Lamarck, 1816; Demospongiae: Dictyoceratida and compare it with mtDNA of other sponges. Results Mt genomes of dictyoceratid sponges are identical in gene order and content but display major differences in size and organization of intergenic regions. An even higher degree of diversity in the structure of intergenic regions was found among different orders of demosponges. One interesting observation made from such comparisons was of what appears to be recurrent invasions of sponge mitochondrial genomes by repetitive hairpin-forming elements, which cause large genome size differences even among closely related taxa. These repetitive hairpin-forming elements are structurally and compositionally divergent and display a scattered distribution throughout various groups of demosponges. Conclusion Large intergenic regions of poriferan mt genomes are targets for insertions of repetitive hairpin- forming elements, similar to the ones found in non-metazoan opisthokonts. Such elements were likely present in some lineages early in animal mitochondrial genome evolution but were subsequently lost during the reduction of intergenic regions, which occurred in the Eumetazoa lineage after the split of Porifera. Porifera acquired their elements in several independent events. Patterns of their intra-genomic dispersal can be seen in the mt genome of Vaceletia sp.

  5. The mitochondrial genomes of sponges provide evidence for multiple invasions by Repetitive Hairpin-forming Elements (RHE)

    Science.gov (United States)

    2009-01-01

    Background The mitochondrial (mt) genomes of sponges possess a variety of features, which appear to be intermediate between those of Eumetazoa and non-metazoan opisthokonts. Among these features is the presence of long intergenic regions, which are common in other eukaryotes, but generally absent in Eumetazoa. Here we analyse poriferan mitochondrial intergenic regions, paying particular attention to repetitive sequences within them. In this context we introduce the mitochondrial genome of Ircinia strobilina (Lamarck, 1816; Demospongiae: Dictyoceratida) and compare it with mtDNA of other sponges. Results Mt genomes of dictyoceratid sponges are identical in gene order and content but display major differences in size and organization of intergenic regions. An even higher degree of diversity in the structure of intergenic regions was found among different orders of demosponges. One interesting observation made from such comparisons was of what appears to be recurrent invasions of sponge mitochondrial genomes by repetitive hairpin-forming elements, which cause large genome size differences even among closely related taxa. These repetitive hairpin-forming elements are structurally and compositionally divergent and display a scattered distribution throughout various groups of demosponges. Conclusion Large intergenic regions of poriferan mt genomes are targets for insertions of repetitive hairpin- forming elements, similar to the ones found in non-metazoan opisthokonts. Such elements were likely present in some lineages early in animal mitochondrial genome evolution but were subsequently lost during the reduction of intergenic regions, which occurred in the Eumetazoa lineage after the split of Porifera. Porifera acquired their elements in several independent events. Patterns of their intra-genomic dispersal can be seen in the mt genome of Vaceletia sp. PMID:20003196

  6. Targeting chitinase gene of Helicoverpa armigera by host-induced RNA interference confers insect resistance in tobacco and tomato.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mamta; Reddy, K R K; Rajam, M V

    2016-02-01

    Helicoverpa armigera Hübner (Lepidoptera: Noctuidae) is a devastating agricultural insect pest with broad spectrum of host range, causing million dollars crop loss annually. Limitations in the present conventional and transgenic approaches have made it crucial to develop sustainable and environmental friendly methods for crop improvement. In the present study, host-induced RNA interference (HI-RNAi) approach was used to develop H. armigera resistant tobacco and tomato plants. Chitinase (HaCHI) gene, critically required for insect molting and metamorphosis was selected as a potential target. Hair-pin RNAi construct was prepared from the conserved off-target free partial HaCHI gene sequence and was used to generate several HaCHI-RNAi tobacco and tomato plants. Northern hybridization confirmed the production of HaCHI gene-specific siRNAs in HaCHI-RNAi tobacco and tomato lines. Continuous feeding on leaves of RNAi lines drastically reduced the target gene transcripts and consequently, affected the overall growth and survival of H. armigera. Various developmental deformities were also manifested in H. armigera larvae after feeding on the leaves of RNAi lines. These results demonstrated the role of chitinase in insect development and potential of HI-RNAi for effective management of H. armigera.

  7. Molecular Beacons: Powerful Tools for Imaging RNA in Living Cells

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    Ricardo Monroy-Contreras

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Recent advances in RNA functional studies highlights the pivotal role of these molecules in cell physiology. Diverse methods have been implemented to measure the expression levels of various RNA species, using either purified RNA or fixed cells. Despite the fact that fixed cells offer the possibility to observe the spatial distribution of RNA, assays with capability to real-time monitoring RNA transport into living cells are needed to further understand the role of RNA dynamics in cellular functions. Molecular beacons (MBs are stem-loop hairpin-structured oligonucleotides equipped with a fluorescence quencher at one end and a fluorescent dye (also called reporter or fluorophore at the opposite end. This structure permits that MB in the absence of their target complementary sequence do not fluoresce. Upon binding to targets, MBs emit fluorescence, due to the spatial separation of the quencher and the reporter. Molecular beacons are promising probes for the development of RNA imaging techniques; nevertheless much work remains to be done in order to obtain a robust technology for imaging various RNA molecules together in real time and in living cells. The present work concentrates on the different requirements needed to use successfully MB for cellular studies, summarizing recent advances in this area.

  8. Synthetic Pre-miRNA-Based shRNA as Potent RNAi Triggers

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    Kazuya Terasawa

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available RNA interference (RNAi is a powerful tool for studying gene function owing to the ease with which it can selectively silence genes of interest, and it has also attracted attention because of its potential for therapeutic applications. Chemically synthesized small interfering RNAs (siRNAs and DNA vector-based short hairpin RNAs (shRNAs are now widely used as RNAi triggers. In contrast to expressed shRNAs, the use of synthetic shRNAs is limited. Here we designed shRNAs modeled on a precursor microRNA (pre-miRNA and evaluated their biological activity. We demonstrated that chemically synthetic pre-miRNA-based shRNAs have more potent RNAi activity than their corresponding siRNAs and found that their antisense strands are more efficiently incorporated into the RNA-induced silencing complex. Although greater off-target effects and interferon responses were induced by shRNAs than by their corresponding siRNAs, these effects could be overcome by simply using a lower concentration or by optimizing and chemically modifying shRNAs similar to synthetic siRNAs. These are challenges for the future.

  9. RNA oxidation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kjaer, L. K.; Cejvanovic, V.; Henriken, T.

    2015-01-01

    RNA modification has attracted increasing interest as it is realized that epitranscriptomics is important in disease development. In type 2 diabetes we have suggested that high urinary excretion of 8-oxo-2'-Guanosine (8oxoGuo), as a measure of global RNA oxidation, is associated with poor survival.......9 significant hazard ratio for death compared with the quartile with the lowest 8oxoGuo excretion when adjusted for age, sex, BMI, smoker status, s-HbA1c, urine protein excretion and s-cholesterol. We conclude that it is now established that RNA oxidation is an independent risk factor for death in type 2...... diabetes. In agreement with our previous finding, DNA oxidation did not show any prognostic value. RNA oxidation represents oxidative stress intracellularly, presumably predominantly in the cytosol. The mechanism of RNA oxidation is not clear, but hypothesized to result from mitochondrial dysfunction...

  10. Enhanced Host-Parasite Resistance Based on Down-Regulation of Phelipanche aegyptiaca Target Genes Is Likely by Mobile Small RNA

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    Neeraj K. Dubey

    2017-09-01

    Full Text Available RNA silencing refers to diverse mechanisms that control gene expression at transcriptional and post-transcriptional levels which can also be used in parasitic pathogens of plants that Broomrapes (Orobanche/Phelipanche spp. are holoparasitic plants that subsist on the roots of a variety of agricultural crops and cause severe negative effects on the yield and yield quality of those crops. Effective methods for controlling parasitic weeds are scarce, with only a few known cases of genetic resistance. In the current study, we suggest an improved strategy for the control of parasitic weeds based on trans-specific gene-silencing of three parasite genes at once. We used two strategies to express dsRNA containing selected sequences of three Phelipanche aegyptiaca genes PaACS, PaM6PR, and PaPrx1 (pma: transient expression using Tobacco rattle virus (TRV:pma as a virus-induced gene-silencing vector and stable expression in transgenic tomato Solanum lycopersicum (Mill. plants harboring a hairpin construct (pBINPLUS35:pma. siRNA-mediated transgene-silencing (20–24 nt was detected in the host plants. Our results demonstrate that the quantities of PaACS and PaM6PR transcripts from P. aegyptiaca tubercles grown on transgenic tomato or on TRV-infected Nicotiana benthamiana plants were significantly reduced. However, only partial reductions in the quantity of PaPrx1 transcripts were observed in the parasite tubercles grown on tomato and on N. benthamiana plants. Concomitant with the suppression of the target genes, there were significant decreases in the number and weight of the parasite tubercles that grew on the host plants, in both the transient and the stable experimental systems. The results of the work carried out using both strategies point to the movement of mobile exogenous siRNA from the host to the parasite, leading to the impaired expression of essential parasite target genes.

  11. Classification of real and pseudo microRNA precursors using local structure-sequence features and support vector machine

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Liu Guo-Ping

    2005-12-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background MicroRNAs (miRNAs are a group of short (~22 nt non-coding RNAs that play important regulatory roles. MiRNA precursors (pre-miRNAs are characterized by their hairpin structures. However, a large amount of similar hairpins can be folded in many genomes. Almost all current methods for computational prediction of miRNAs use comparative genomic approaches to identify putative pre-miRNAs from candidate hairpins. Ab initio method for distinguishing pre-miRNAs from sequence segments with pre-miRNA-like hairpin structures is lacking. Being able to classify real vs. pseudo pre-miRNAs is important both for understanding of the nature of miRNAs and for developing ab initio prediction methods that can discovery new miRNAs without known homology. Results A set of novel features of local contiguous structure-sequence information is proposed for distinguishing the hairpins of real pre-miRNAs and pseudo pre-miRNAs. Support vector machine (SVM is applied on these features to classify real vs. pseudo pre-miRNAs, achieving about 90% accuracy on human data. Remarkably, the SVM classifier built on human data can correctly identify up to 90% of the pre-miRNAs from other species, including plants and virus, without utilizing any comparative genomics information. Conclusion The local structure-sequence features reflect discriminative and conserved characteristics of miRNAs, and the successful ab initio classification of real and pseudo pre-miRNAs opens a new approach for discovering new miRNAs.

  12. RNA interference-based resistance in transgenic tomato plants against Tomato yellow leaf curl virus-Oman (TYLCV-OM) and its associated betasatellite.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ammara, Um e; Mansoor, Shahid; Saeed, Muhammad; Amin, Imran; Briddon, Rob W; Al-Sadi, Abdullah Mohammed

    2015-03-04

    Tomato yellow leaf curl virus (TYLCV), a monopartite begomovirus (family Geminiviridae) is responsible for heavy yield losses for tomato production around the globe. In Oman at least five distinct begomoviruses cause disease in tomato, including TYLCV. Unusually, TYLCV infections in Oman are sometimes associated with a betasatellite (Tomato leaf curl betasatellite [ToLCB]; a symptom modulating satellite). RNA interference (RNAi) can be used to develop resistance against begomoviruses at either the transcriptional or post-transcriptional levels. A hairpin RNAi (hpRNAi) construct to express double-stranded RNA homologous to sequences of the intergenic region, coat protein gene, V2 gene and replication-associated gene of Tomato yellow leaf curl virus-Oman (TYLCV-OM) was produced. Initially, transient expression of the hpRNAi construct at the site of virus inoculation was shown to reduce the number of plants developing symptoms when inoculated with either TYLCV-OM or TYLCV-OM with ToLCB-OM to Nicotiana benthamiana or tomato. Solanum lycopersicum L. cv. Pusa Ruby was transformed with the hpRNAi construct and nine confirmed transgenic lines were obtained and challenged with TYLCV-OM and ToLCB-OM by Agrobacterium-mediated inoculation. For all but one line, for which all plants remained symptomless, inoculation with TYLCV-OM led to a proportion (≤25%) of tomato plants developing symptoms of infection. For inoculation with TYLCV-OM and ToLCB-OM all lines showed a proportion of plants (≤45%) symptomatic. However, for all infected transgenic plants the symptoms were milder and virus titre in plants was lower than in infected non-transgenic tomato plants. These results show that RNAi can be used to develop resistance against geminiviruses in tomato. The resistance in this case is not immunity but does reduce the severity of infections and virus titer. Also, the betasatellite may compromise resistance, increasing the proportion of plants which ultimately show symptoms.

  13. Using in-cell SHAPE-Seq and simulations to probe structure–function design principles of RNA transcriptional regulators

    Science.gov (United States)

    Takahashi, Melissa K.; Watters, Kyle E.; Gasper, Paul M.; Abbott, Timothy R.; Carlson, Paul D.; Chen, Alan A.

    2016-01-01

    Antisense RNA-mediated transcriptional regulators are powerful tools for controlling gene expression and creating synthetic gene networks. RNA transcriptional repressors derived from natural mechanisms called attenuators are particularly versatile, though their mechanistic complexity has made them difficult to engineer. Here we identify a new structure–function design principle for attenuators that enables the forward engineering of new RNA transcriptional repressors. Using in-cell SHAPE-Seq to characterize the structures of attenuator variants within Escherichia coli, we show that attenuator hairpins that facilitate interaction with antisense RNAs require interior loops for proper function. Molecular dynamics simulations of these attenuator variants suggest these interior loops impart structural flexibility. We further observe hairpin flexibility in the cellular structures of natural RNA mechanisms that use antisense RNA interactions to repress translation, confirming earlier results from in vitro studies. Finally, we design new transcriptional attenuators in silico using an interior loop as a structural requirement and show that they function as desired in vivo. This work establishes interior loops as an important structural element for designing synthetic RNA gene regulators. We anticipate that the coupling of experimental measurement of cellular RNA structure and function with computational modeling will enable rapid discovery of structure–function design principles for a diverse array of natural and synthetic RNA regulators. PMID:27103533

  14. Quenching of the electrochemiluminescence of RU-complex tagged shared-stem hairpin probes by graphene oxide and its application to quantitative turn-on detection of DNA.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huang, Xiang; Huang, Xiaopeng; Zhang, An; Zhuo, Bangrong; Lu, Fushen; Chen, Yaowen; Gao, Wenhua

    2015-08-15

    Efficient and stable quenching of electrochemiluminescence (ECL) of tris(2,2'-bipyridine)-ruthenium(II) (Ru(bpy)3(2+))/tri-n-propylamine (TPrA) system by graphene oxide (GO) at the glassy carbon electrode (GCE) was reported. For figuring out the possible reasons of the quenching mechanism, the electrochemical and ECL performance of GO, different reduction degree of reduced graphene oxide (RGOs) and polymer wrapped GO modified GCEs were systematacially investigated. The results demonstrated that the oxygen-containing groups and poor electrical conductivity of GO, along with the distance between GO and Ru(bpy)3(2+) was suggested as the reasons for quenching ECL. On the basis of this essential quenching mechanism, a novel "signal on" ECL DNA biosensor for ultrasensitive detection of specific DNA sequence was constructed by self-assembling the ECL probe of thiolated shared-stem hairpin DNA (SH-DNA) tagged with Ru complex (Ru(bpy)3(2+) derivatives) on the surface of GO/gold nanoparticles (AuNPs) modified GCE. The ECL probe sequences have their ECL signal efficiently quenched when they are self-assembled on the surface of GO unless they hybridizes with their target DNA (t-DNA) sequence. The designed ECL biosensor exhibited excellent stability and reproducibility, outstanding selectivity, and an extremely sensitive response to t-DNA in a wide linear range of 100 aM-10 pM with a low detection limit of 65 aM. Our findings and the design of biosensing switch would open a new avenue in the application of GO based ECL quenching strategy for ultrasensitive bioassays. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  15. Development of 1,1'-oxalyldiimidazole chemiluminescent biosensor using the combination of graphene oxide and hairpin aptamer and its application.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kwun, Joonsuh; Yun, Soyong; Park, Lucienne; Lee, Ji Hoon

    2014-02-01

    Highly sensitive biosensor with 1,1'-oxalyldiimidazole chemiluminescence (ODI-CL) detection was developed to rapidly quantify Vibrio (V) parahaemolyticus without time-consuming procedures such as multiple long-incubations and washings. When V. parahaemolyticus in Tris-HCl (pH 7) and hairpin DNA aptamer conjugated with TEX615 in DNA free deionized water were consecutively added in PBS buffer (pH 7.4) containing graphene oxides (GOs), V. parahaemolyticus and GOs bind competitively to hairpin DNA aptamer conjugated with TEX615 during 10 min of incubation at room temperature. Brightness of light immediately emitted with the addition of ODI-CL reagents (e.g., ODI, H2O2) after the incubation was dependent on the concentration of V. parahaemolyticus in a sample. The dynamic range of linear calibration curve for the quantification of V. parahaemolyticus in a sample was from 4375 to 70,000 cells/ml. The limit of detection (LOD = background + 3 × standard deviation, 2230 cells/ml) of the biosensor operated with good accuracy, precision, and recovery was lower than those of conventional assay methods such as time-consuming and expensive enzyme-linked immunosorbent assays. © 2013 Published by Elsevier B.V.

  16. HTS dual-band bandpass filters using stub-loaded hair-pin resonators for mobile communication systems

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sekiya, N., E-mail: nsekiya@yamanashi.ac.jp; Sugiyama, S.

    2014-09-15

    Highlights: • We have developed a HTS five-pole dual-band bandpass filter using stub-loaded hair-pin resonators. • The proposed dual-band BPF can independently control of the center frequency. • Flexibly adjustment of the bandwidth can be achieved by the H-shaped waveguide. • The proposed BPF is evaluated by simulation and measurement with good agreement. - Abstract: A HTS dual-band bandpass filter is developed to obtain sharp-cut off characteristics for mobile communication systems. The filter is composed of five stub-loaded hair-pin resonators with H-shaped waveguides between them. The main advantage of the proposed filter is to allow independent control of the center frequency of the first and second bands. The bandwidths can be flexibly adjusted using the H-shaped waveguide. An electromagnetic simulator was used to design and analyze the filter, which have a 3.5-GHz center frequency and a 70-MHz (2%) bandwidth for the first band and a 5.0-GHz center frequency and a 100-MHz (2%) bandwidth for the second band. The filter was fabricated using YBa{sub 2}Cu{sub 3}O{sub y} thin film on an Al{sub 2}O{sub 3} substrate. Ground plane was fabricated using Au thin film. The measured frequency responses of the filter tally well with the simulated ones.

  17. Selective microRNA-Offset RNA expression in human embryonic stem cells.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Suvi Asikainen

    Full Text Available Small RNA molecules, including microRNAs (miRNAs, play critical roles in regulating pluripotency, proliferation and differentiation of embryonic stem cells. miRNA-offset RNAs (moRNAs are similar in length to miRNAs, align to miRNA precursor (pre-miRNA loci and are therefore believed to derive from processing of the pre-miRNA hairpin sequence. Recent next generation sequencing (NGS studies have reported the presence of moRNAs in human neurons and cancer cells and in several tissues in mouse, including pluripotent stem cells. In order to gain additional knowledge about human moRNAs and their putative development-related expression, we applied NGS of small RNAs in human embryonic stem cells (hESCs and fibroblasts. We found that certain moRNA isoforms are notably expressed in hESCs from loci coding for stem cell-selective or cancer-related miRNA clusters. In contrast, we observed only sparse moRNAs in fibroblasts. Consistent with earlier findings, most of the observed moRNAs derived from conserved loci and their expression did not appear to correlate with the expression of the adjacent miRNAs. We provide here the first report of moRNAs in hESCs, and their expression profile in comparison to fibroblasts. Moreover, we expand the repertoire of hESC miRNAs. These findings provide an expansion on the known repertoire of small non-coding RNA contents in hESCs.

  18. Chimira: analysis of small RNA sequencing data and microRNA modifications.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vitsios, Dimitrios M; Enright, Anton J

    2015-10-15

    Chimira is a web-based system for microRNA (miRNA) analysis from small RNA-Seq data. Sequences are automatically cleaned, trimmed, size selected and mapped directly to miRNA hairpin sequences. This generates count-based miRNA expression data for subsequent statistical analysis. Moreover, it is capable of identifying epi-transcriptomic modifications in the input sequences. Supported modification types include multiple types of 3'-modifications (e.g. uridylation, adenylation), 5'-modifications and also internal modifications or variation (ADAR editing or single nucleotide polymorphisms). Besides cleaning and mapping of input sequences to miRNAs, Chimira provides a simple and intuitive set of tools for the analysis and interpretation of the results (see also Supplementary Material). These allow the visual study of the differential expression between two specific samples or sets of samples, the identification of the most highly expressed miRNAs within sample pairs (or sets of samples) and also the projection of the modification profile for specific miRNAs across all samples. Other tools have already been published in the past for various types of small RNA-Seq analysis, such as UEA workbench, seqBuster, MAGI, OASIS and CAP-miRSeq, CPSS for modifications identification. A comprehensive comparison of Chimira with each of these tools is provided in the Supplementary Material. Chimira outperforms all of these tools in total execution speed and aims to facilitate simple, fast and reliable analysis of small RNA-Seq data allowing also, for the first time, identification of global microRNA modification profiles in a simple intuitive interface. Chimira has been developed as a web application and it is accessible here: http://www.ebi.ac.uk/research/enright/software/chimira. aje@ebi.ac.uk Supplementary data are available at Bioinformatics online. © The Author 2015. Published by Oxford University Press.

  19. RNA splicing is responsive to MBNL1 dose.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sonali P Jog

    Full Text Available Myotonic dystrophy (DM1 is a highly variable, multi-system disorder resulting from the expansion of an untranslated CTG tract in DMPK. In DM1 expanded CUG repeat RNAs form hairpin secondary structures that bind and aberrantly sequester the RNA splice regulator, MBNL1. RNA splice defects resulting as a consequence of MBNL1 depletion have been shown to play a key role in the development of DM1 pathology. In patient populations, both the number and severity of DM1 symptoms increase broadly as a function of CTG tract length. However significant variability in the DM1 phenotype is observed in patients encoding similar CTG repeat numbers. Here we demonstrate that a gradual decrease in MBNL1 levels results both in the expansion of the repertoire of splice defects and an increase in the severity of the splice alterations. Thus, MBNL1 loss does not have an all or none outcome but rather shows a graded effect on the number and severity of the ensuing splice defects. Our results suggest that once a critical threshold is reached, relatively small dose variations of free MBNL1 levels, which may reflect modest changes in the size of the CUG tract or the extent of hairpin secondary structure formation, can significantly alter the number and severity of splice abnormalities and thus contribute to the phenotype variability observed in DM1 patients.

  20. A-to-I RNA editing independent of ADARs in filamentous fungi.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Chenfang; Xu, Jin-Rong; Liu, Huiquan

    2016-10-02

    ADAR mediated A-to-I RNA editing is thought to be unique to animals and occurs mainly in the non-coding regions. Recently filamentous fungi such as Fusarium graminearum were found to lack orthologs of animal ADARs but have stage-specific A-to-I editing during sexual reproduction. Unlike animals, majority of editing sites are in the coding regions and often result in missense and stop loss changes in fungi. Furthermore, whereas As in RNA stems are targeted by animal ADARs, RNA editing in fungi preferentially targets As in hairpin loops, implying that fungal RNA editing involves mechanisms related to editing of the anticodon loop by ADATs. Identification and characterization of fungal adenosine deaminases and their stage-specific co-factors may be helpful to understand the evolution of human ADARs. Fungi also can be used to study biological functions of missense and stop loss RNA editing events in eukaryotic organisms.

  1. Constructed Wetlands

    Science.gov (United States)

    these systems can improve water quality, engineers and scientists construct systems that replicate the functions of natural wetlands. Constructed wetlands are treatment systems that use natural processes

  2. Origins and Early Evolution of the tRNA Molecule

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Koji Tamura

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available Modern transfer RNAs (tRNAs are composed of ~76 nucleotides and play an important role as “adaptor” molecules that mediate the translation of information from messenger RNAs (mRNAs. Many studies suggest that the contemporary full-length tRNA was formed by the ligation of half-sized hairpin-like RNAs. A minihelix (a coaxial stack of the acceptor stem on the T-stem of tRNA can function both in aminoacylation by aminoacyl tRNA synthetases and in peptide bond formation on the ribosome, indicating that it may be a vestige of the ancestral tRNA. The universal CCA-3′ terminus of tRNA is also a typical characteristic of the molecule. “Why CCA?” is the fundamental unanswered question, but several findings give a comprehensive picture of its origin. Here, the origins and early evolution of tRNA are discussed in terms of various perspectives, including nucleotide ligation, chiral selectivity of amino acids, genetic code evolution, and the organization of the ribosomal peptidyl transferase center (PTC. The proto-tRNA molecules may have evolved not only as adaptors but also as contributors to the composition of the ribosome.

  3. RNA Origami

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sparvath, Steffen Lynge

    for biosensorer,  der kan spore enten microRNA’er eller små molekyler, eksemplificeret ved S-adenosylmethionin (SAM). Slutteligt indikerer foreløbige resultater, at apta-FRET SAM sensoren kan udtrykkes i Escherichia coli-celler, hvilket viser, at RNA-origami arkitekturen muliggør cotransskriptionel foldning af...... fra en enkelt RNA-streng, og udfører en lang række komplekse cellulære funktioner. Mange af funktionerne er blevet udnyttet til at skabe funktionelle RNA-baserede nanoapparater, men den nuværende litteratur giver kun få eksempler på cotranskriptionel produktion af RNA-nanostrukturer. I 2014...... introducerede vores gruppe den enkeltstrengede RNA-origami metode, der giver mulighed for cotranscriptional foldning af veldefinerede nanostrukturer, og er en central del af arbejdet præsenteret heri. Denne ph.d.-afhandling udforsker potentielle anvendelser af RNA-origami nanostrukturer, som nanomedicin eller...

  4. Designing synthetic RNA for delivery by nanoparticles

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jedrzejczyk, Dominika; Gendaszewska-Darmach, Edyta; Pawlowska, Roza; Chworos, Arkadiusz

    2017-03-01

    The rapid development of synthetic biology and nanobiotechnology has led to the construction of various synthetic RNA nanoparticles of different functionalities and potential applications. As they occur naturally, nucleic acids are an attractive construction material for biocompatible nanoscaffold and nanomachine design. In this review, we provide an overview of the types of RNA and nucleic acid’s nanoparticle design, with the focus on relevant nanostructures utilized for gene-expression regulation in cellular models. Structural analysis and modeling is addressed along with the tools available for RNA structural prediction. The functionalization of RNA-based nanoparticles leading to prospective applications of such constructs in potential therapies is shown. The route from the nanoparticle design and modeling through synthesis and functionalization to cellular application is also described. For a better understanding of the fate of targeted RNA after delivery, an overview of RNA processing inside the cell is also provided.

  5. Evolutionarily conserved roles of the dicer helicase domain in regulating RNA interference processing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kidwell, Mary Anne; Chan, Jessica M; Doudna, Jennifer A

    2014-10-10

    The enzyme Dicer generates 21-25 nucleotide RNAs that target specific mRNAs for silencing during RNA interference and related pathways. Although their active sites and RNA binding regions are functionally conserved, the helicase domains have distinct activities in the context of different Dicer enzymes. To examine the evolutionary origins of Dicer helicase functions, we investigated two related Dicer enzymes from the thermophilic fungus Sporotrichum thermophile. RNA cleavage assays showed that S. thermophile Dicer-1 (StDicer-1) can process hairpin precursor microRNAs, whereas StDicer-2 can only cleave linear double-stranded RNAs. Furthermore, only StDicer-2 possesses robust ATP hydrolytic activity in the presence of double-stranded RNA. Deletion of the StDicer-2 helicase domain increases both StDicer-2 cleavage activity and affinity for hairpin RNA. Notably, both StDicer-1 and StDicer-2 could complement the distantly related yeast Schizosaccharomyces pombe lacking its endogenous Dicer gene but only in their full-length forms, underscoring the importance of the helicase domain. These results suggest an in vivo regulatory function for the helicase domain that may be conserved from fungi to humans. © 2014 by The American Society for Biochemistry and Molecular Biology, Inc.

  6. Systematically frameshifting by deletion of every 4th or 4th and 5th nucleotides during mitochondrial transcription: RNA self-hybridization regulates delRNA expression.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Seligmann, Hervé

    2016-01-01

    In mitochondria, secondary structures punctuate post-transcriptional RNA processing. Recently described transcripts match the human mitogenome after systematic deletions of every 4th, respectively every 4th and 5th nucleotides, called delRNAs. Here I explore predicted stem-loop hairpin formation by delRNAs, and their associations with delRNA transcription and detected peptides matching their translation. Despite missing 25, respectively 40% of the nucleotides in the original sequence, del-transformed sequences form significantly more secondary structures than corresponding randomly shuffled sequences, indicating biological function, independently of, and in combination with, previously detected delRNA and thereof translated peptides. Self-hybridization decreases delRNA abundances, indicating downregulation. Systematic deletions of the human mitogenome reveal new, unsuspected coding and structural informations. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  7. Identifying the preferred RNA motifs and chemotypes that interact by probing millions of combinations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tran, Tuan; Disney, Matthew D

    2012-01-01

    RNA is an important therapeutic target but information about RNA-ligand interactions is limited. Here, we report a screening method that probes over 3,000,000 combinations of RNA motif-small molecule interactions to identify the privileged RNA structures and chemical spaces that interact. Specifically, a small molecule library biased for binding RNA was probed for binding to over 70,000 unique RNA motifs in a high throughput solution-based screen. The RNA motifs that specifically bind each small molecule were identified by microarray-based selection. In this library-versus-library or multidimensional combinatorial screening approach, hairpin loops (among a variety of RNA motifs) were the preferred RNA motif space that binds small molecules. Furthermore, it was shown that indole, 2-phenyl indole, 2-phenyl benzimidazole and pyridinium chemotypes allow for specific recognition of RNA motifs. As targeting RNA with small molecules is an extremely challenging area, these studies provide new information on RNA-ligand interactions that has many potential uses.

  8. Sequence-non-specific effects generated by various types of RNA interference triggers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Olejniczak, Marta; Urbanek, Martyna O; Jaworska, Edyta; Witucki, Lukasz; Szczesniak, Michal W; Makalowska, Izabela; Krzyzosiak, Wlodzimierz J

    2016-02-01

    RNA interference triggers such as short interfering RNA (siRNA) or genetically encoded short hairpin RNA (shRNA) and artificial miRNA (sh-miR) are widely used to silence the expression of specific genes. In addition to silencing selected targets, RNAi reagents may induce various side effects, including immune responses. To determine the molecular markers of immune response activation when using RNAi reagents, we analyzed the results of experiments gathered in the RNAimmuno (v 2.0) and GEO Profiles databases. To better characterize and compare cellular responses to various RNAi reagents in one experimental system, we designed a reagent series in corresponding siRNA, D-siRNA, shRNA and sh-miR forms. To exclude sequence-specific effects the reagents targeted 3 different transcripts (Luc, ATXN3 and HTT). We demonstrate that RNAi reagents induce a broad variety of sequence-non-specific effects, including the deregulation of cellular miRNA levels. Typical siRNAs are weak stimulators of interferon response but may saturate the miRNA biogenesis pathway, leading to the downregulation of highly expressed miRNAs, whereas plasmid-based reagents induce known markers of immune response and may alter miRNA levels and their isomiR composition. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  9. Construction management

    CERN Document Server

    Pellicer, Eugenio; Teixeira, José C; Moura, Helder P; Catalá, Joaquín

    2014-01-01

    The management of construction projects is a wide ranging and challenging discipline in an increasingly international industry, facing continual challenges and demands for improvements in safety, in quality and cost control, and in the avoidance of contractual disputes. Construction Management grew out of a Leonardo da Vinci project to develop a series of Common Learning Outcomes for European Managers in Construction. Financed by the European Union, the project aimed to develop a library of basic materials for developing construction management skills for use in a pan-European context. Focused exclusively on the management of the construction phase of a building project from the contractor's point of view, Construction Management covers the complete range of topics of which mastery is required by the construction management professional for the effective delivery of new construction projects. With the continued internationalisation of the construction industry, Construction Management will be required rea...

  10. Mutation in the β-hairpin of the Bordetella pertussis adenylate cyclase toxin modulates N-lobe conformation in calmodulin

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Springer, Tzvia I.; Goebel, Erich; Hariraju, Dinesh [Department of Microbiology, Miami University, Oxford, OH 45056 (United States); Finley, Natosha L., E-mail: finleynl@miamioh.edu [Department of Microbiology, Miami University, Oxford, OH 45056 (United States); Cell, Molecular, and Structural Biology Program, Miami University, Oxford, OH 45056 (United States)

    2014-10-10

    Highlights: • Bordetella pertussis adenylate cyclase toxin modulates bi-lobal structure of CaM. • The structure and stability of the complex rely on intermolecular associations. • A novel mode of CaM-dependent activation of the adenylate cyclase toxin is proposed. - Abstract: Bordetella pertussis, causative agent of whooping cough, produces an adenylate cyclase toxin (CyaA) that is an important virulence factor. In the host cell, the adenylate cyclase domain of CyaA (CyaA-ACD) is activated upon association with calmodulin (CaM), an EF-hand protein comprised of N- and C-lobes (N-CaM and C-CaM, respectively) connected by a flexible tether. Maximal CyaA-ACD activation is achieved through its binding to both lobes of intact CaM, but the structural mechanisms remain unclear. No high-resolution structure of the intact CaM/CyaA-ACD complex is available, but crystal structures of isolated C-CaM bound to CyaA-ACD shed light on the molecular mechanism by which this lobe activates the toxin. Previous studies using molecular modeling, biochemical, and biophysical experiments demonstrate that CyaA-ACD’s β-hairpin participates in site-specific interactions with N-CaM. In this study, we utilize nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) spectroscopy to probe the molecular association between intact CaM and CyaA-ACD. Our results indicate binding of CyaA-ACD to CaM induces large conformational perturbations mapping to C-CaM, while substantially smaller structural changes are localized primarily to helices I, II, and IV, and the metal-binding sites in N-CaM. Site-specific mutations in CyaA-ACD’s β-hairpin structurally modulate N-CaM, resulting in conformational perturbations in metal binding sites I and II, while no significant structural modifications are observed in C-CaM. Moreover, dynamic light scattering (DLS) analysis reveals that mutation of the β-hairpin results in a decreased hydrodynamic radius (R{sub h}) and reduced thermal stability in the mutant complex. Taken

  11. An RNA toolbox for single-molecule force spectroscopy studies

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Vilfan, I.D.; Kamping, W.; Van den Hout, M.; Candelli, A.; Hage, S.; Dekker, N.H.

    2007-01-01

    Precise, controllable single-molecule force spectroscopy studies of RNA and RNA-dependent processes have recently shed new light on the dynamics and pathways of RNA folding and RNAenzyme interactions. A crucial component of this research is the design and assembly of an appropriate RNA construct.

  12. Construction of a Telefocus Gun for Gas Electron Diffraction Experiments

    Science.gov (United States)

    Taguchi, Masami; Iijima, Takao

    1984-07-01

    A Steigerwald-type telefocus gun was constructed and the optimum design of the electrodes was determined by examining the relation between the design parameters and the characteristics of the electron beam. By the use of a pointed filament of rhenium welded onto a tungsten hairpin filament, a beam cross-section of 0.7 mm in diameter and a beam current of up to 45 μA at a focal length of 600 mm were attained. The current density distribution in the least cross-section of the beam was also examined.

  13. Functional stabilization of an RNA recognition motif by a noncanonical N-terminal expansion.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Netter, Catharina; Weber, Gert; Benecke, Heike; Wahl, Markus C

    2009-07-01

    RNA recognition motifs (RRMs) constitute versatile macromolecular interaction platforms. They are found in many components of spliceosomes, in which they mediate RNA and protein interactions by diverse molecular strategies. The human U11/U12-65K protein of the minor spliceosome employs a C-terminal RRM to bind hairpin III of the U12 small nuclear RNA (snRNA). This interaction comprises one side of a molecular bridge between the U11 and U12 small nuclear ribonucleoprotein particles (snRNPs) and is reminiscent of the binding of the N-terminal RRMs in the major spliceosomal U1A and U2B'' proteins to hairpins in their cognate snRNAs. Here we show by mutagenesis and electrophoretic mobility shift assays that the beta-sheet surface and a neighboring loop of 65K C-terminal RRM are involved in RNA binding, as previously seen in canonical RRMs like the N-terminal RRMs of the U1A and U2B'' proteins. However, unlike U1A and U2B'', some 30 residues N-terminal of the 65K C-terminal RRM core are additionally required for stable U12 snRNA binding. The crystal structure of the expanded 65K C-terminal RRM revealed that the N-terminal tail adopts an alpha-helical conformation and wraps around the protein toward the face opposite the RNA-binding platform. Point mutations in this part of the protein had only minor effects on RNA affinity. Removal of the N-terminal extension significantly decreased the thermal stability of the 65K C-terminal RRM. These results demonstrate that the 65K C-terminal RRM is augmented by an N-terminal element that confers stability to the domain, and thereby facilitates stable RNA binding.

  14. A test of AMBER force fields in predicting the secondary structure of α-helical and β-hairpin peptides

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gao, Ya; Zhang, Chaomin; Wang, Xianwei; Zhu, Tong

    2017-07-01

    We tested the ability of some current AMBER force fields, namely, AMBER03, AMBER99SB, AMBER99SB-ildn, AMBER99SB-nmr, AMBER12SB, AMBER14SB, and AMBER14ipq, with implicit solvent model in reproducing the folding behavior of two peptides by REMD simulations. AMBER99SB-nmr force field provides the most reliable performance. After a novel polarized hydrogen bond charge model is considered, the α-helix successfully folded to its native state, while the further folding of the β-hairpin is not observed. This study strongly suggests that polarization effect and correct torsional term are important to investigate dynamic and conformational properties of peptides with different secondary structures.

  15. Modeling the thermal unfolding 2DIR spectra of a β-hairpin peptide based on the implicit solvent MD simulation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, Tianmin; Yang, Lijiang; Zhang, Ruiting; Shao, Qiang; Zhuang, Wei

    2013-07-25

    We simulated the equilibrium isotope-edited FTIR and 2DIR spectra of a β-hairpin peptide trpzip2 at a series of temperatures. The simulation was based on the configuration distributions generated using the GB(OBC) implicit solvent model and the integrated tempering sampling (ITS) technique. A soaking procedure was adapted to generate the peptide in explicit solvent configurations for the spectroscopy calculations. The nonlinear exciton propagation (NEP) method was then used to calculate the spectra. Agreeing with the experiments, the intensities and ellipticities of the isotope-shifted peaks in our simulated signals have the site-specific temperature dependences, which suggest the inhomogeneous local thermal stabilities along the peptide chain. Our simulation thus proposes a cost-effective means to understand a peptide's conformational change and related IR spectra across its thermal unfolding transition.

  16. Design of a small molecule against an oncogenic noncoding RNA.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Velagapudi, Sai Pradeep; Cameron, Michael D; Haga, Christopher L; Rosenberg, Laura H; Lafitte, Marie; Duckett, Derek R; Phinney, Donald G; Disney, Matthew D

    2016-05-24

    The design of precision, preclinical therapeutics from sequence is difficult, but advances in this area, particularly those focused on rational design, could quickly transform the sequence of disease-causing gene products into lead modalities. Herein, we describe the use of Inforna, a computational approach that enables the rational design of small molecules targeting RNA to quickly provide a potent modulator of oncogenic microRNA-96 (miR-96). We mined the secondary structure of primary microRNA-96 (pri-miR-96) hairpin precursor against a database of RNA motif-small molecule interactions, which identified modules that bound RNA motifs nearby and in the Drosha processing site. Precise linking of these modules together provided Targaprimir-96 (3), which selectively modulates miR-96 production in cancer cells and triggers apoptosis. Importantly, the compound is ineffective on healthy breast cells, and exogenous overexpression of pri-miR-96 reduced compound potency in breast cancer cells. Chemical Cross-Linking and Isolation by Pull-Down (Chem-CLIP), a small-molecule RNA target validation approach, shows that 3 directly engages pri-miR-96 in breast cancer cells. In vivo, 3 has a favorable pharmacokinetic profile and decreases tumor burden in a mouse model of triple-negative breast cancer. Thus, rational design can quickly produce precision, in vivo bioactive lead small molecules against hard-to-treat cancers by targeting oncogenic noncoding RNAs, advancing a disease-to-gene-to-drug paradigm.

  17. Analysis of mRNA recognition by human thymidylate synthase.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brunn, Nicholas D; Dibrov, Sergey M; Kao, Melody B; Ghassemian, Majid; Hermann, Thomas

    2014-12-23

    Expression of hTS (human thymidylate synthase), a key enzyme in thymidine biosynthesis, is regulated on the translational level through a feedback mechanism that is rarely found in eukaryotes. At low substrate concentrations, the ligand-free enzyme binds to its own mRNA and stabilizes a hairpin structure that sequesters the start codon. When in complex with dUMP (2'-deoxyuridine-5'-monophosphate) and a THF (tetrahydrofolate) cofactor, the enzyme adopts a conformation that is unable to bind and repress expression of mRNA. Here, we have used a combination of X-ray crystallography, RNA mutagenesis and site-specific cross-linking studies to investigate the molecular recognition of TS mRNA by the hTS enzyme. The interacting mRNA region was narrowed to the start codon and immediately flanking sequences. In the hTS enzyme, a helix-loop-helix domain on the protein surface was identified as the putative RNA-binding site.

  18. Investigating the role of chain and linker length on the catalytic activity of an H 2 production catalyst containing a β-hairpin peptide

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Reback, Matthew L.; Ginovska, Bojana; Buchko, Garry W.; Dutta, Arnab; Priyadarshani, Nilusha; Kier, Brandon L.; Helm, Monte L.; Raugei, Simone; Shaw, Wendy J.

    2016-06-02

    Building on our recent report of an active H2 production catalyst [Ni(PPh2NProp-peptide)2]2+ (Prop=para-phenylpropionic acid, peptide (R10)=WIpPRWTGPR-NH2, p=D-proline, and P2N=1-aza-3,6-diphosphacycloheptane) that contains structured -hairpin peptides, here we investigate how H2 production is effected by: (1) the length of the hairpin (eight or ten residues) and (2) limiting the flexibility between the peptide and the core complex by altering the length of the linker: para-phenylpropionic acid (three carbons) or para-benzoic acid (one carbon). Reduction of the peptide chain length from ten to eight residues increases or maintains the catalytic current for H2 production for all complexes, suggesting a non-productive steric interaction at longer peptide lengths. While the structure of the hairpin appears largely intact for the complexes, NMR data are consistent with differences in dynamic behavior which may contribute to the observed differences in catalytic activity. Molecular dynamics simulations demonstrate that complexes with a one-carbon linker have the desired effect of restricting the motion of the hairpin relative to the complex; however, the catalytic currents are significantly reduced compared to complexes containing a three-carbon linker as a result of the electron withdrawing nature of the -COOH group. These results demonstrate the complexity and interrelated nature of the outer coordination sphere on catalysis.

  19. The A-type ATP synthase subunit K of Methanopyrus kandleri is deduced from its sequence to form a monomeric rotor comprising 13 hairpin domains

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Lolkema, JS; Boekema, EJ

    2003-01-01

    The ntpK gene of the archaeon Methanopyrus kandleri encodes the equivalent of the c subunit of ATP synthase. The gene product contains 1021 residues and consists of 13 homologous domains, each one corresponding to a single helical hairpin. The amino acid sequence of the domains is highly conserved,

  20. shRNA-seq data analysis with edgeR [v1; ref status: indexed, http://f1000r.es/38s

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zhiyin Dai

    2014-04-01

    Full Text Available Pooled short hairpin RNA sequencing (shRNA-seq screens are becoming increasingly popular in functional genomics research, and there is a need to establish optimal analysis tools to handle such data. Our open-source shRNA processing pipeline in edgeR provides a complete analysis solution for shRNA-seq screen data, that begins with the raw sequence reads and ends with a ranked lists of candidate shRNAs for downstream biological validation. We first summarize the raw data contained in a fastq file into a matrix of counts (samples in the columns, hairpins in the rows with options for allowing mismatches and small shifts in hairpin position. Diagnostic plots, normalization and differential representation analysis can then be performed using established methods to prioritize results in a statistically rigorous way, with the choice of either the classic exact testing methodology or a generalized linear modelling that can handle complex experimental designs. A detailed users’ guide that demonstrates how to analyze screen data in edgeR along with a point-and-click implementation of this workflow in Galaxy are also provided. The edgeR package is freely available from http://www.bioconductor.org.

  1. Spatiotemporal evolution of hairpin eddies, Reynolds stress, and polymer torque in polymer drag-reduced turbulent channel flows.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Kyoungyoun; Sureshkumar, Radhakrishna

    2013-06-01

    To study the influence of dynamic interactions between turbulent vortical structures and polymer stress on turbulent friction drag reduction, a series of simulations of channel flow is performed. We obtain self-consistent evolution of an initial eddy in the presence of polymer stresses by utilizing the finitely extensible nonlinear elastic-Peterlin (FENE-P) model. The initial eddy is extracted by the conditional averages for the second quadrant event from fully turbulent Newtonian flow, and the initial polymer conformation fields are given by the solutions of the FENE-P model equations corresponding to the mean shear flow in the Newtonian case. At a relatively low Weissenberg number We(τ) (=50), defined as the ratio of the polymer relaxation time to the wall time scale, the generation of new vortices is inhibited by polymer-induced countertorques. Thus fewer vortices are generated in the buffer layer. However, the head of the primary hairpin is unaffected by the polymer stress. At larger We(τ) values (≥100), the hairpin head becomes weaker and vortex autogeneration and Reynolds stress growth are almost entirely suppressed. The temporal evolution of the vortex strength and polymer torque magnitude reveals that polymer extension by the vortical motion results in a polymer torque that increases in magnitude with time until a maximum value is reached over a time scale comparable to the polymer relaxation time. The polymer torque retards the vortical motion and Reynolds stress production, which in turn weakens flow-induced chain extension and torque itself. An analysis of the vortex time scales reveals that with increasing We(τ), vortical motions associated with a broader range of time scales are affected by the polymer stress. This is qualitatively consistent with Lumley's time criterion for the onset of drag reduction.

  2. Usability Constructs

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hertzum, Morten; Clemmesen, Torkil; Hornbæk, Kasper Anders Søren

    2007-01-01

    Whereas research on usability predominantly employs universal definitions of the aspects that comprise usability, people experience their use of information systems through personal constructs. Based on 48 repertory-grid interviews, this study investigates how such personal constructs are affecte...

  3. Accelerated construction

    Science.gov (United States)

    2004-01-01

    Accelerated Construction Technology Transfer (ACTT) is a strategic process that uses various innovative techniques, strategies, and technologies to minimize actual construction time, while enhancing quality and safety on today's large, complex multip...

  4. miRge - A Multiplexed Method of Processing Small RNA-Seq Data to Determine MicroRNA Entropy.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alexander S Baras

    Full Text Available Small RNA RNA-seq for microRNAs (miRNAs is a rapidly developing field where opportunities still exist to create better bioinformatics tools to process these large datasets and generate new, useful analyses. We built miRge to be a fast, smart small RNA-seq solution to process samples in a highly multiplexed fashion. miRge employs a Bayesian alignment approach, whereby reads are sequentially aligned against customized mature miRNA, hairpin miRNA, noncoding RNA and mRNA sequence libraries. miRNAs are summarized at the level of raw reads in addition to reads per million (RPM. Reads for all other RNA species (tRNA, rRNA, snoRNA, mRNA are provided, which is useful for identifying potential contaminants and optimizing small RNA purification strategies. miRge was designed to optimally identify miRNA isomiRs and employs an entropy based statistical measurement to identify differential production of isomiRs. This allowed us to identify decreasing entropy in isomiRs as stem cells mature into retinal pigment epithelial cells. Conversely, we show that pancreatic tumor miRNAs have similar entropy to matched normal pancreatic tissues. In a head-to-head comparison with other miRNA analysis tools (miRExpress 2.0, sRNAbench, omiRAs, miRDeep2, Chimira, UEA small RNA Workbench, miRge was faster (4 to 32-fold and was among the top-two methods in maximally aligning miRNAs reads per sample. Moreover, miRge has no inherent limits to its multiplexing. miRge was capable of simultaneously analyzing 100 small RNA-Seq samples in 52 minutes, providing an integrated analysis of miRNA expression across all samples. As miRge was designed for analysis of single as well as multiple samples, miRge is an ideal tool for high and low-throughput users. miRge is freely available at http://atlas.pathology.jhu.edu/baras/miRge.html.

  5. MutSβ promotes trinucleotide repeat expansion by recruiting DNA polymerase β to nascent (CAG)n or (CTG)n hairpins for error-prone DNA synthesis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guo, Jinzhen; Gu, Liya; Leffak, Michael; Li, Guo-Min

    2016-07-01

    Expansion of (CAG)•(CTG) repeats causes a number of familial neurodegenerative disorders. Although the underlying mechanism remains largely unknown, components involved in DNA mismatch repair, particularly mismatch recognition protein MutSβ (a MSH2-MSH3 heterodimer), are implicated in (CAG)•(CTG) repeat expansion. In addition to recognizing small insertion-deletion loop-outs, MutSβ also specifically binds DNA hairpin imperfect heteroduplexes formed within (CAG)n•(CTG)n sequences. However, whether or not and how MutSβ binding triggers expansion of (CAG)•(CTG) repeats remain unknown. We show here that purified recombinant MutSβ physically interacts with DNA polymerase β (Polβ) and stimulates Polβ-catalyzed (CAG)n or (CTG)n hairpin retention. Consistent with these in vitro observations, MutSβ and Polβ interact with each other in vivo, and colocalize at (CAG)•(CTG) repeats during DNA replication. Our data support a model for error-prone processing of (CAG)n or (CTG)n hairpins by MutSβ and Polβ during DNA replication and/or repair: MutSβ recognizes (CAG)n or (CTG)n hairpins formed in the nascent DNA strand, and recruits Polβ to the complex, which then utilizes the hairpin as a primer for extension, leading to (CAG)•(CTG) repeat expansion. This study provides a novel mechanism for trinucleotide repeat expansion in both dividing and non-dividing cells.

  6. Bottom-up design of small molecules that stimulate exon 10 skipping in mutant MAPT pre-mRNA.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Luo, Yiling; Disney, Matthew D

    2014-09-22

    One challenge in chemical biology is to develop small molecules that control cellular protein content. The amount and identity of proteins are influenced by the RNAs that encode them; thus, protein content in a cell could be affected by targeting mRNA. However, RNA has been traditionally difficult to target with small molecules. In this report, we describe controlling the protein products of the mutated microtubule-associated protein tau (MAPT) mature mRNA with a small molecule. MAPT mutations in exon 10 are associated with inherited frontotemporal dementia and Parkinsonism linked to chromosome 17 (FTDP-17), an incurable disease that is directly caused by increased inclusion of exon 10 in MAPT mRNA. Recent studies have shown that mutations within a hairpin at the MAPT exon 10-intron junction decrease the thermodynamic stability of the RNA, increasing binding to U1 snRNP and thus exon 10 inclusion. Therefore, we designed small molecules that bind and stabilize a mutant MAPT by using Inforna, a computational approach based on information about RNA-small-molecule interactions. The optimal compound selectively bound the mutant MAPT hairpin and thermodynamically stabilized its folding, facilitating exon 10 exclusion. © 2014 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  7. RNA under tension: Folding Landscapes, Kinetic partitioning Mechanism, and Molecular Tensegrity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lin, Jong-Chin; Hyeon, Changbong; Thirumalai, D

    2012-11-19

    Non-coding RNA sequences play a great role in controlling a number of cellular functions, thus raising the need to understand their complex conformational dynamics in quantitative detail. In this perspective, we first show that single molecule pulling when combined with with theory and simulations can be used to quantitatively explore the folding landscape of nucleic acid hairpins, and riboswitches with tertiary interactions. Applications to riboswitches, which are non-coding RNA elements that control gene expression by undergoing dynamical conformational changes in response to binding of metabolites, lead to an organization principle that assembly of RNA is determined by the stability of isolated helices. We also point out the limitations of single molecule pulling experiments, with molecular extension as the only accessible parameter, in extracting key parameters of the folding landscapes of RNA molecules.

  8. Sequence-controlled RNA self-processing: computational design, biochemical analysis, and visualization by AFM.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Petkovic, Sonja; Badelt, Stefan; Block, Stephan; Flamm, Christoph; Delcea, Mihaela; Hofacker, Ivo; Müller, Sabine

    2015-07-01

    Reversible chemistry allowing for assembly and disassembly of molecular entities is important for biological self-organization. Thus, ribozymes that support both cleavage and formation of phosphodiester bonds may have contributed to the emergence of functional diversity and increasing complexity of regulatory RNAs in early life. We have previously engineered a variant of the hairpin ribozyme that shows how ribozymes may have circularized or extended their own length by forming concatemers. Using the Vienna RNA package, we now optimized this hairpin ribozyme variant and selected four different RNA sequences that were expected to circularize more efficiently or form longer concatemers upon transcription. (Two-dimensional) PAGE analysis confirms that (i) all four selected ribozymes are catalytically active and (ii) high yields of cyclic species are obtained. AFM imaging in combination with RNA structure prediction enabled us to calculate the distributions of monomers and self-concatenated dimers and trimers. Our results show that computationally optimized molecules do form reasonable amounts of trimers, which has not been observed for the original system so far, and we demonstrate that the combination of theoretical prediction, biochemical and physical analysis is a promising approach toward accurate prediction of ribozyme behavior and design of ribozymes with predefined functions. © 2015 Petkovic et al.; Published by Cold Spring Harbor Laboratory Press for the RNA Society.

  9. Short ROSE-like RNA thermometers control IbpA synthesis in Pseudomonas species.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Stefanie S Krajewski

    Full Text Available The bacterial small heat shock protein IbpA protects client proteins from aggregation. Due to redundancy in the cellular chaperone network, deletion of the ibpA gene often leads to only a mild or no phenotypic defect. In this study, we show that a Pseudomonas putida ibpA deletion mutant has a severe growth defect under heat stress conditions and reduced survival during recovery revealing a critical role of IbpA in heat tolerance. Transcription of the ibpA gene depends on the alternative heat shock sigma factor σ(32. Production of IbpA protein only at heat shock temperatures suggested additional translational control. We conducted a comprehensive structural and functional analysis of the 5' untranslated regions of the ibpA genes from P. putida and Pseudomonas aeruginosa. Both contain a ROSE-type RNA thermometer that is substantially shorter and simpler than previously reported ROSE elements. Comprised of two hairpin structures only, they inhibit translation at low temperature and permit translation initiation after a temperature upshift. Both elements regulate reporter gene expression in Escherichia coli and ribosome binding in vitro in a temperature-dependent manner. Structure probing revealed local melting of the second hairpin whereas the first hairpin remained unaffected. High sequence and structure conservation of pseudomonal ibpA untranslated regions and their ability to confer thermoregulation in vivo suggest that short ROSE-like thermometers are commonly used to control IbpA synthesis in Pseudomonas species.

  10. The ribosome uses two active mechanisms to unwind messenger RNA during translation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Qu, Xiaohui; Wen, Jin-Der; Lancaster, Laura; Noller, Harry F; Bustamante, Carlos; Tinoco, Ignacio

    2011-07-06

    The ribosome translates the genetic information encoded in messenger RNA into protein. Folded structures in the coding region of an mRNA represent a kinetic barrier that lowers the peptide elongation rate, as the ribosome must disrupt structures it encounters in the mRNA at its entry site to allow translocation to the next codon. Such structures are exploited by the cell to create diverse strategies for translation regulation, such as programmed frameshifting, the modulation of protein expression levels, ribosome localization and co-translational protein folding. Although strand separation activity is inherent to the ribosome, requiring no exogenous helicases, its mechanism is still unknown. Here, using a single-molecule optical tweezers assay on mRNA hairpins, we find that the translation rate of identical codons at the decoding centre is greatly influenced by the GC content of folded structures at the mRNA entry site. Furthermore, force applied to the ends of the hairpin to favour its unfolding significantly speeds translation. Quantitative analysis of the force dependence of its helicase activity reveals that the ribosome, unlike previously studied helicases, uses two distinct active mechanisms to unwind mRNA structure: it destabilizes the helical junction at the mRNA entry site by biasing its thermal fluctuations towards the open state, increasing the probability of the ribosome translocating unhindered; and it mechanically pulls apart the mRNA single strands of the closed junction during the conformational changes that accompany ribosome translocation. The second of these mechanisms ensures a minimal basal rate of translation in the cell; specialized, mechanically stable structures are required to stall the ribosome temporarily. Our results establish a quantitative mechanical basis for understanding the mechanism of regulation of the elongation rate of translation by structured mRNAs. ©2011 Macmillan Publishers Limited. All rights reserved

  11. A novel hairpin library-based approach to identify NBS-LRR genes required for effector-triggered hypersensitive response in Nicotiana benthamiana.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brendolise, Cyril; Montefiori, Mirco; Dinis, Romain; Peeters, Nemo; Storey, Roy D; Rikkerink, Erik H

    2017-01-01

    PTI and ETI are the two major defence mechanisms in plants. ETI is triggered by the detection of pathogen effectors, or their activity, in the plant cell and most of the time involves internal receptors known as resistance (R) genes. An increasing number of R genes responsible for recognition of specific effectors have been characterised over the years; however, methods to identify R genes are often challenging and cannot always be translated to crop plants. We present a novel method to identify R genes responsible for the recognition of specific effectors that trigger a hypersensitive response (HR) in Nicotiana benthamiana. This method is based on the genome-wide identification of most of the potential R genes of N. benthamiana and a systematic silencing of these potential R genes in a simple transient expression assay. A hairpin-RNAi library was constructed covering 345 R gene candidates of N. benthamiana. This library was then validated using several previously described R genes. Our approach indeed confirmed that Prf, NRC2a/b and NRC3 are required for the HR that is mediated in N. benthamiana by Pto/avrPto (prf, NRC2a/b and NRC3) and by Cf4/avr4 (NRC2a/b and NRC3). We also confirmed that NRG1, in association with N, is required for the Tobacco Mosaic Virus (TMV)-mediated HR in N. benthamiana. We present a novel approach combining bioinformatics, multiple-gene silencing and transient expression assay screening to rapidly identify one-to-one relationships between pathogen effectors and host R genes in N. benthamiana. This approach allowed the identification of previously described R genes responsible for detection of avirulence determinants from Pseudomonas, Cladosporium and TMV, demonstrating that the method could be applied to any effectors/proteins originating from a broad range of plant pathogens that trigger an HR in N. benthamiana. Moreover, with the increasing availability of genome sequences from model and crop plants and pathogens, this approach could be

  12. A quasi-cyclic RNA nano-scale molecular object constructed using kink turns† †Electronic supplementary information (ESI) available: PDF file comprising eight figures and three tables of data. See DOI: 10.1039/c6nr05186c Click here for additional data file.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huang, Lin

    2016-01-01

    k-Turns are widespread RNA architectural elements that mediate tertiary interactions. We describe a double-kink-turn motif comprising two inverted k-turns that forms a tight horse-shoe structure that can assemble into a variety of shapes by coaxial association of helical ends. Using X-ray crystallography we show that these assemble with two (dumbell), three (triangle) and four units (square), with or without bound protein, within the crystal lattice. In addition, exchange of a single basepair can almost double the pore radius or shape of a molecular assembly. On the basis of this analysis we synthesized a 114 nt self-complementary RNA containing six k-turns. The crystal structure of this species shows that it forms a quasi-cyclic triangular object. These are randomly disposed about the three-fold axis in the crystal lattice, generating a circular RNA of quasi D 3 symmetry with a shape reminiscent of that of a cyclohexane molecule in its chair conformation. This work demonstrates that the k-turn is a powerful building block in the construction of nano-scale molecular objects, and illustrates why k-turns are widely used in natural RNA molecules to organize long-range architecture and mediate tertiary contacts. PMID:27506301

  13. Developmental regulation of RNA processing by Rbfox proteins.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Conboy, John G

    2017-03-01

    The Rbfox genes encode an ancient family of sequence-specific RNA binding proteins (RBPs) that are critical developmental regulators in multiple tissues including skeletal muscle, cardiac muscle, and brain. The hallmark of Rbfox proteins is a single high-affinity RRM domain, highly conserved from insects to humans, that binds preferentially to UGCAUG motifs at diverse regulatory sites in pre-mRNA introns, mRNA 3'UTRs, and pre-miRNAs hairpin structures. Versatile regulatory circuits operate on Rbfox pre-mRNA and mRNA to ensure proper expression of Rbfox1 protein isoforms, which then act on the broader transcriptome to regulate alternative splicing networks, mRNA stability and translation, and microRNA processing. Complex Rbfox expression is encoded in large genes encompassing multiple promoters and alternative splicing options that govern spatiotemporal expression of structurally distinct and tissue-specific protein isoforms with different classes of RNA targets. Nuclear Rbfox1 is a candidate master regulator that binds intronic UGCAUG elements to impact splicing efficiency of target alternative exons, many in transcripts for other splicing regulators. Tissue-specificity of Rbfox-mediated alternative splicing is executed by combinatorial regulation through the integrated activity of Rbfox proteins and synergistic or antagonistic splicing factors. Studies in animal models show that Rbfox1-related genes are critical for diverse developmental processes including germ cell differentiation and memory in Drosophila, neuronal migration and function in mouse brain, myoblast fusion and skeletal muscle function, and normal heart function. Finally, genetic and biochemical evidence suggest that aberrations in Rbfox-regulated circuitry are risk factors for multiple human disorders, especially neurodevelopmental disorders including epilepsy and autism, and cardiac hypertrophy. WIREs RNA 2017, 8:e1398. doi: 10.1002/wrna.1398 For further resources related to this article, please

  14. Adenovirus vectors lacking virus-associated RNA expression enhance shRNA activity to suppress hepatitis C virus replication

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pei, Zheng; Shi, Guoli; Kondo, Saki; Ito, Masahiko; Maekawa, Aya; Suzuki, Mariko; Saito, Izumu; Suzuki, Tetsuro; Kanegae, Yumi

    2013-12-01

    First-generation adenovirus vectors (FG AdVs) expressing short-hairpin RNA (shRNA) effectively downregulate the expressions of target genes. However, this vector, in fact, expresses not only the transgene product, but also virus-associated RNAs (VA RNAs) that disturb cellular RNAi machinery. We have established a production method for VA-deleted AdVs lacking expression of VA RNAs. Here, we showed that the highest shRNA activity was obtained when the shRNA was inserted not at the popularly used E1 site, but at the E4 site. We then compared the activities of shRNAs against hepatitis C virus (HCV) expressed from VA-deleted AdVs or conventional AdVs. The VA-deleted AdVs inhibited HCV production much more efficiently. Therefore, VA-deleted AdVs were more effective than the currently used AdVs for shRNA downregulation, probably because of the lack of competition between VA RNAs and the shRNAs. These VA-deleted AdVs might enable more effective gene therapies for chronic hepatitis C.

  15. Defining RNA-Small Molecule Affinity Landscapes Enables Design of a Small Molecule Inhibitor of an Oncogenic Noncoding RNA.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Velagapudi, Sai Pradeep; Luo, Yiling; Tran, Tuan; Haniff, Hafeez S; Nakai, Yoshio; Fallahi, Mohammad; Martinez, Gustavo J; Childs-Disney, Jessica L; Disney, Matthew D

    2017-03-22

    RNA drug targets are pervasive in cells, but methods to design small molecules that target them are sparse. Herein, we report a general approach to score the affinity and selectivity of RNA motif-small molecule interactions identified via selection. Named High Throughput Structure-Activity Relationships Through Sequencing (HiT-StARTS), HiT-StARTS is statistical in nature and compares input nucleic acid sequences to selected library members that bind a ligand via high throughput sequencing. The approach allowed facile definition of the fitness landscape of hundreds of thousands of RNA motif-small molecule binding partners. These results were mined against folded RNAs in the human transcriptome and identified an avid interaction between a small molecule and the Dicer nuclease-processing site in the oncogenic microRNA (miR)-18a hairpin precursor, which is a member of the miR-17-92 cluster. Application of the small molecule, Targapremir-18a, to prostate cancer cells inhibited production of miR-18a from the cluster, de-repressed serine/threonine protein kinase 4 protein (STK4), and triggered apoptosis. Profiling the cellular targets of Targapremir-18a via Chemical Cross-Linking and Isolation by Pull Down (Chem-CLIP), a covalent small molecule-RNA cellular profiling approach, and other studies showed specific binding of the compound to the miR-18a precursor, revealing broadly applicable factors that govern small molecule drugging of noncoding RNAs.

  16. Processing of nuclear viroids in vivo: an interplay between RNA conformations.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    María-Eugenia Gas

    2007-11-01

    Full Text Available Replication of viroids, small non-protein-coding plant pathogenic RNAs, entails reiterative transcription of their incoming single-stranded circular genomes, to which the (+ polarity is arbitrarily assigned, cleavage of the oligomeric strands of one or both polarities to unit-length, and ligation to circular RNAs. While cleavage in chloroplastic viroids (family Avsunviroidae is mediated by hammerhead ribozymes, where and how cleavage of oligomeric (+ RNAs of nuclear viroids (family Pospiviroidae occurs in vivo remains controversial. Previous in vitro data indicated that a hairpin capped by a GAAA tetraloop is the RNA motif directing cleavage and a loop E motif ligation. Here we have re-examined this question in vivo, taking advantage of earlier findings showing that dimeric viroid (+ RNAs of the family Pospiviroidae transgenically expressed in Arabidopsis thaliana are processed correctly. Using this methodology, we have mapped the processing site of three members of this family at equivalent positions of the hairpin I/double-stranded structure that the upper strand and flanking nucleotides of the central conserved region (CCR can form. More specifically, from the effects of 16 mutations on Citrus exocortis viroid expressed transgenically in A. thaliana, we conclude that the substrate for in vivo cleavage is the conserved double-stranded structure, with hairpin I potentially facilitating the adoption of this structure, whereas ligation is determined by loop E and flanking nucleotides of the two CCR strands. These results have deep implications on the underlying mechanism of both processing reactions, which are most likely catalyzed by enzymes different from those generally assumed: cleavage by a member of the RNase III family, and ligation by an RNA ligase distinct from the only one characterized so far in plants, thus predicting the existence of at least a second plant RNA ligase.

  17. The intrinsically disordered N-terminal arm of the brome mosaic virus coat protein specifically recognizes the RNA motif that directs the initiation of viral RNA replication.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jacobs, Alexander; Hoover, Haley; Smith, Edward; Clemmer, David E; Kim, Chul-Hyun; Kao, C Cheng

    2018-01-09

    In the brome mosaic virus (BMV) virion, the coat protein (CP) selectively contacts the RNA motifs that regulate translation and RNA replication (Hoover et al., 2016. J. Virol. 90, 7748). We hypothesize that the unstructured N-terminal arm (NTA) of the BMV CP can specifically recognize RNA motifs. Using ion mobility spectrometry-mass spectrometry, we demonstrate that peptides containing the NTA of the CP were found to preferentially bind to an RNA hairpin motif that directs the initiation of BMV RNA synthesis. RNA binding causes the peptide to change from heterogeneous structures to a single family of structures. Fluorescence anisotropy, fluorescence quenching and size exclusion chromatography experiments all confirm that the NTA can specific recognize the RNA motif. The peptide introduced into plants along with BMV virion increased accumulation of the BMV CP and accelerated the rate of minus-strand RNA synthesis. The intrinsically disordered BMV NTA could thus specifically recognize BMV RNAs to affect viral infection. © The Author(s) 2017. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of Nucleic Acids Research.

  18. Use of bacterially expressed dsRNA to downregulate Entamoeba histolytica gene expression.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Solis, Carlos F; Santi-Rocca, Julien; Perdomo, Doranda; Weber, Christian; Guillén, Nancy

    2009-12-23

    Modern RNA interference (RNAi) methodologies using small interfering RNA (siRNA) oligonucleotide duplexes or episomally synthesized hairpin RNA are valuable tools for the analysis of gene function in the protozoan parasite Entamoeba histolytica. However, these approaches still require time-consuming procedures including transfection and drug selection, or costly synthetic molecules. Here we report an efficient and handy alternative for E. histolytica gene down-regulation mediated by bacterial double-stranded RNA (dsRNA) targeting parasite genes. The Escherichia coli strain HT115 which is unable to degrade dsRNA, was genetically engineered to produce high quantities of long dsRNA segments targeting the genes that encode E. histolytica beta-tubulin and virulence factor KERP1. Trophozoites cultured in vitro were directly fed with dsRNA-expressing bacteria or soaked with purified dsRNA. Both dsRNA delivery methods resulted in significant reduction of protein expression. In vitro host cell-parasite assays showed that efficient downregulation of kerp1 gene expression mediated by bacterial dsRNA resulted in significant reduction of parasite adhesion and lytic capabilities, thus supporting a major role for KERP1 in the pathogenic process. Furthermore, treatment of trophozoites cultured in microtiter plates, with a repertoire of eighty-five distinct bacterial dsRNA segments targeting E. histolytica genes with unknown function, led to the identification of three genes potentially involved in the growth of the parasite. Our results showed that the use of bacterial dsRNA is a powerful method for the study of gene function in E. histolytica. This dsRNA delivery method is also technically suitable for the study of a large number of genes, thus opening interesting perspectives for the identification of novel drug and vaccine targets.

  19. Use of bacterially expressed dsRNA to downregulate Entamoeba histolytica gene expression.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Carlos F Solis

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Modern RNA interference (RNAi methodologies using small interfering RNA (siRNA oligonucleotide duplexes or episomally synthesized hairpin RNA are valuable tools for the analysis of gene function in the protozoan parasite Entamoeba histolytica. However, these approaches still require time-consuming procedures including transfection and drug selection, or costly synthetic molecules. PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: Here we report an efficient and handy alternative for E. histolytica gene down-regulation mediated by bacterial double-stranded RNA (dsRNA targeting parasite genes. The Escherichia coli strain HT115 which is unable to degrade dsRNA, was genetically engineered to produce high quantities of long dsRNA segments targeting the genes that encode E. histolytica beta-tubulin and virulence factor KERP1. Trophozoites cultured in vitro were directly fed with dsRNA-expressing bacteria or soaked with purified dsRNA. Both dsRNA delivery methods resulted in significant reduction of protein expression. In vitro host cell-parasite assays showed that efficient downregulation of kerp1 gene expression mediated by bacterial dsRNA resulted in significant reduction of parasite adhesion and lytic capabilities, thus supporting a major role for KERP1 in the pathogenic process. Furthermore, treatment of trophozoites cultured in microtiter plates, with a repertoire of eighty-five distinct bacterial dsRNA segments targeting E. histolytica genes with unknown function, led to the identification of three genes potentially involved in the growth of the parasite. CONCLUSIONS: Our results showed that the use of bacterial dsRNA is a powerful method for the study of gene function in E. histolytica. This dsRNA delivery method is also technically suitable for the study of a large number of genes, thus opening interesting perspectives for the identification of novel drug and vaccine targets.

  20. Overview of methods in RNA nanotechnology: synthesis, purification, and characterization of RNA nanoparticles.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Haque, Farzin; Guo, Peixuan

    2015-01-01

    RNA nanotechnology encompasses the use of RNA as a construction material to build homogeneous nanostructures by bottom-up self-assembly with defined size, structure, and stoichiometry; this pioneering concept demonstrated in 1998 (Guo et al., Molecular Cell 2:149-155, 1998; featured in Cell) has emerged as a new field that also involves materials engineering and synthetic structural biology (Guo, Nature Nanotechnology 5:833-842, 2010). The field of RNA nanotechnology has skyrocketed over the last few years, as evidenced by the burst of publications in prominent journals on RNA nanostructures and their applications in nanomedicine and nanotechnology. Rapid advances in RNA chemistry, RNA biophysics, and RNA biology have created new opportunities for translating basic science into clinical practice. RNA nanotechnology holds considerable promise in this regard. Increased evidence also suggests that substantial part of the 98.5 % of human genome (Lander et al. Nature 409:860-921, 2001) that used to be called "junk DNA" actually codes for noncoding RNA. As we understand more on how RNA structures are related to function, we can fabricate synthetic RNA nanoparticles for the diagnosis and treatment of diseases. This chapter provides a brief overview of the field regarding the design, construction, purification, and characterization of RNA nanoparticles for diverse applications in nanotechnology and nanomedicince.

  1. Construction Management.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abbott, James F.

    This article provides a detailed discussion of a team approach to building that involves a construction manager, an architect, and a contractor. Bidding methods are outlined; the major components in construction management -- value engineering and fast track scheduling -- and the use of performance specifications are discussed. The construction…

  2. Superstring construction

    CERN Document Server

    1989-01-01

    The book includes a selection of papers on the construction of superstring theories, mainly written during the years 1984-1987. It covers ten-dimensional supersymmetric and non-supersymmetric strings, four-dimensional heterotic strings and four-dimensional type-II strings. An introduction to more recent developments in conformal field theory in relation to string construction is provided.

  3. ' CONSTRUCTION INDUSTRY

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    CONSTRUCTION INDUSTRY. N. Aniekwu. Civil Engineering Department,. University of Benin,. Benin City. Nigeria. ABSTRACT. This paper deals with safety in the Nigerian construction industry. Three aspects of safety were identified as paramount in the study and include accident causations, accident prevention and the.

  4. Both strands of siRNA have potential to guide posttranscriptional gene silencing in mammalian cells.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jun-Xia Wei

    Full Text Available Despite the widespread application of RNA interference (RNAi as a research tool for diverse purposes, the key step of strand selection of siRNAs during the formation of RNA-induced silencing complex (RISC remains poorly understood. Here, using siRNAs targeted to the complementary region of Survivin and the effector protease receptor 1 (EPR-1, we show that both strands of the siRNA duplex can find their target mRNA and are equally eligible for assembly into Argonaute 2 (Ago2 of RISC in HEK293 cells. Transfection of the synthetic siRNA duplexes with different thermodynamic profiles or short hairpin RNA (shRNA vectors that generate double-stranded RNAs (dsRNAs, permitting processing specifically from either the 5' or 3' end of the incipient siRNA, results in the degradation of the respective target mRNAs of either strand of the siRNA duplex with comparable efficiencies. Thus, while most RNAi reactions may follow the thermodynamic asymmetry rule in strand selection, our study suggests an exceptional mode for certain siRNAs in which both strands of the duplex are competent in sponsoring RNAi, and implies additional factors that might dictate the RNAi targets.

  5. Self-assembly of free-standing RNA membranes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Han, Daehoon; Park, Yongkuk; Kim, Hyejin; Lee, Jong Bum

    2014-07-01

    RNA has emerged as a promising material for nanostructure and microstructure engineering. Although rare, some macroscopic RNA structures have also been constructed using lipid or polymer materials. Here, we report the first example of an enzymatically generated RNA membrane. This robust and free-standing RNA membrane has a macroscopic structure and is generated without any polymer support or complexation. Our RNA membrane is fabricated following two sequential processes, complementary rolling circle transcription and evaporation-induced self-assembly, and its structural and functional properties are rationally controlled by adjusting RNA base pairing. In this study, three types of RNA membranes are fabricated and are used to demonstrate potential applications.

  6. Inverse folding of RNA pseudoknot structures.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gao, James Zm; Li, Linda Ym; Reidys, Christian M

    2010-06-23

    RNA exhibits a variety of structural configurations. Here we consider a structure to be tantamount to the noncrossing Watson-Crick and G-U-base pairings (secondary structure) and additional cross-serial base pairs. These interactions are called pseudoknots and are observed across the whole spectrum of RNA functionalities. In the context of studying natural RNA structures, searching for new ribozymes and designing artificial RNA, it is of interest to find RNA sequences folding into a specific structure and to analyze their induced neutral networks. Since the established inverse folding algorithms, RNAinverse, RNA-SSD as well as INFO-RNA are limited to RNA secondary structures, we present in this paper the inverse folding algorithm Inv which can deal with 3-noncrossing, canonical pseudoknot structures. In this paper we present the inverse folding algorithm Inv. We give a detailed analysis of Inv, including pseudocodes. We show that Inv allows to design in particular 3-noncrossing nonplanar RNA pseudoknot 3-noncrossing RNA structures-a class which is difficult to construct via dynamic programming routines. Inv is freely available at http://www.combinatorics.cn/cbpc/inv.html. The algorithm Inv extends inverse folding capabilities to RNA pseudoknot structures. In comparison with RNAinverse it uses new ideas, for instance by considering sets of competing structures. As a result, Inv is not only able to find novel sequences even for RNA secondary structures, it does so in the context of competing structures that potentially exhibit cross-serial interactions.

  7. Sequence-controlled RNA self-processing: computational design, biochemical analysis, and visualization by AFM

    Science.gov (United States)

    Petkovic, Sonja; Badelt, Stefan; Flamm, Christoph; Delcea, Mihaela

    2015-01-01

    Reversible chemistry allowing for assembly and disassembly of molecular entities is important for biological self-organization. Thus, ribozymes that support both cleavage and formation of phosphodiester bonds may have contributed to the emergence of functional diversity and increasing complexity of regulatory RNAs in early life. We have previously engineered a variant of the hairpin ribozyme that shows how ribozymes may have circularized or extended their own length by forming concatemers. Using the Vienna RNA package, we now optimized this hairpin ribozyme variant and selected four different RNA sequences that were expected to circularize more efficiently or form longer concatemers upon transcription. (Two-dimensional) PAGE analysis confirms that (i) all four selected ribozymes are catalytically active and (ii) high yields of cyclic species are obtained. AFM imaging in combination with RNA structure prediction enabled us to calculate the distributions of monomers and self-concatenated dimers and trimers. Our results show that computationally optimized molecules do form reasonable amounts of trimers, which has not been observed for the original system so far, and we demonstrate that the combination of theoretical prediction, biochemical and physical analysis is a promising approach toward accurate prediction of ribozyme behavior and design of ribozymes with predefined functions. PMID:25999318

  8. Analysis of ribosomal RNA transcription termination and 3' end processing in Leishmania amazonensis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abreu-Blanco, María Teresa; Ramírez, José Luís; Pinto-Santini, Delia María; Papadopoulou, Barbara; Guevara, Palmira

    2010-02-01

    The control of gene expression in the human parasite Leishmania occurs mainly at the post-transcriptional level. Nevertheless, basic cell processes such as ribosome biogenesis seem to be conserved. Mature ribosomal RNAs (rRNAs) are synthesized from typical RNA polymerase I (Pol I) promoters and processed by pathways analogous to other eukaryotes. To further understand Pol I transcription control in these parasites, we have analyzed transcription termination and processing of the rDNA in Leishmania amazonensis. 3'-end S1 mapping of rRNA precursors identified three termini, one corresponding to the mature 28S rRNA and two to the rDNA intergenic spacer (IGS), termed T1 and T2, for precursors which are 185 and 576 nucleotides longer, respectively. Both T1 and T2 are associated with conserved G + C rich elements that have the potential to form hairpin structures and T-rich clusters. We found that two fragments of 423 bp and 233 bp, flanking sites T1 and T2 respectively when placed upstream of the green fluorescent protein gene (GFP), negatively affected the Pol I-driven transcription of this gene, which suggests the presence of a transcription terminator element in these regions. Deletion analysis pointed to a CCCTTTT heptamer as part of the putative terminator and suggested that the hairpins are processing signals.

  9. Recombination analysis and structure prediction show correlation between breakpoint clusters and RNA hairpins in the pol gene of human immunodeficiency virus type 1 unique recombinant forms

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Galli, Andrea; Lai, Alessia; Corvasce, Stefano

    2008-01-01

    Recombination is recognized as a primary force in human immunodeficiency virus type 1 (HIV-1) evolution, increasing viral diversity through reshuffling of genomic portions. The strand-switching activity of reverse transcriptase is required to complete HIV-1 replication and can occur randomly thro...

  10. Fast and quantitative differentiation of single-base mismatched DNA by initial reaction rate of catalytic hairpin assembly.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Chenxi; Li, Yixin; Xu, Xiao; Wang, Xinyi; Chen, Yang; Yang, Xiaoda; Liu, Feng; Li, Na

    2014-10-15

    The widely used catalytic hairpin assembly (CHA) amplification strategy generally needs several hours to accomplish one measurement based on the prevailingly used maximum intensity detection mode, making it less practical for assays where high throughput or speed is desired. To make the best use of the kinetic specificity of toehold domain for circuit reaction initiation, we developed a mathematical model and proposed an initial reaction rate detection mode to quantitatively differentiate the single-base mismatch. Using the kinetic mode, assay time can be reduced substantially to 10 min for one measurement with the comparable sensitivity and single-base mismatch differentiating ability as were obtained by the maximum intensity detection mode. This initial reaction rate based approach not only provided a fast and quantitative differentiation of single-base mismatch, but also helped in-depth understanding of the CHA system, which will be beneficial to the design of highly sensitive and specific toehold-mediated hybridization reactions. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  11. Catalytic Hairpin Assembly Actuated DNA Nanotweezer for Logic Gate Building and Sensitive Enzyme-Free Biosensing of MicroRNAs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Dandan; Cheng, Wei; Li, Yujian; Xu, YongJie; Li, Xinmin; Yin, Yibing; Ju, Huangxian; Ding, Shijia

    2016-08-02

    A target-switched DNA nanotweezer is designed for AND logic gate operation and enzyme-free detection of microRNAs (miRNAs) by catalytic hairpin assembly (CHA) and proximity-dependent DNAzyme formation. The double crossover motif-based nanotweezer consists of an arched structure as the set strand for target inputs and two split G-rich DNAs at the termini of two arms for signal output. Upon a CHA, a small amount of binary target inputs can switch numerous open nanotweezers to a closed state, which leads to the formation of proximity-dependent DNAzyme in the presence of hemin to produce a highly sensitive biosensing system. The binary target inputs can be used for successful building of AND logic gate, which is validated by polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis, surface plasmon resonance and the biosensing signal. The developed biosensing system shows a linear response of the output chemiluminescence signal to input binary miRNAs with a detection limit of 30 fM. It can be used for miRNAs analysis in complex sample matrix. This system provides a simple and reusable platform for logic gate operation and enzyme-free, highly sensitive, and specific multianalysis of miRNAs.

  12. Tetraphenylethylene Foldamers with Double Hairpin-Turn Linkers, TNT-Binding Mode and Detection of Highly Diluted TNT Vapor.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xiong, Jia-Bin; Feng, Hai-Tao; Wang, Jin-Hua; Zhang, Chun; Li, Bao; Zheng, Yan-Song

    2018-02-06

    Tetraphenylethylene (TPE) foldamers with double hairpin-turn linkers showing an aggregation-induced emission (AIE) effect have been synthesized for the first time. A crystal structure of a foldamer-TNT complex has been obtained, enabling unprecedented direct observation of the interactions between TNT molecules and the chromophores of the foldamer. Instead of π-π stacking interactions, which have often been considered to be the key mechanism in the binding of TNT by chromophoric receptors, strong n-π interactions between the nitro groups of TNT and the aromatic rings of the foldamer have been found. Exceptionally, by addition of 1 % NaF to a suspension of the foldamer in H 2 O/THF (95:5), the fluorescence quenching efficiency by TNT vapor significantly increased from about 20 % to more than 90 %. Even after diluting TNT-saturated air at 25 °C by a factor of 2×10 4 , an obvious quenching response was observed, indicating that ultratrace TNT vapor (down to 3.4 fg per mL of air) could be detected. © 2018 Wiley-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  13. Controllable self-assembly of RNA dendrimers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sharma, Ashwani; Haque, Farzin; Pi, Fengmei; Shlyakhtenko, Lyudmila S; Evers, B Mark; Guo, Peixuan

    2016-04-01

    We report programmable self-assembly of branched, 3D globular, monodisperse and nanoscale sized dendrimers using RNA as building blocks. The central core and repeating units of the RNA dendrimer are derivatives of the ultrastable three-way junction (3WJ) motif from the bacteriophage phi29 motor pRNA. RNA dendrimers were constructed by step-wise self-assembly of modular 3WJ building blocks initiating with a single 3WJ core (Generation-0) with overhanging sticky end and proceeding in a radial manner in layers up to Generation-4. The final constructs were generated under control without any structural defects in high yield and purity, as demonstrated by gel electrophoresis and AFM imaging. Upon incorporation of folate on the peripheral branches of the RNA dendrimers, the resulting constructs showed high binding and internalization into cancer cells. RNA dendrimers are envisioned to have a major impact in targeting, disease therapy, molecular diagnostics and bioelectronics in the near future. Dendrimers are gaining importance as a carrier platform for diagnosis and therapeutics. The authors here reported building of their dendrimer molecules using RNA as building blocks. The addition of folate also allowed recognition and subsequent binding to tumor cells. This new construct may prove to be useful in many clinical settings. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  14. New perspectives on the diversification of the RNA interference system: insights from comparative genomics and small RNA sequencing

    Science.gov (United States)

    Burroughs, Alexander Maxwell; Ando, Yoshinari; Aravind, L

    2014-01-01

    Our understanding of the pervasive involvement of small RNAs in regulating diverse biological processes has been greatly augmented by recent application of deep-sequencing technologies to small RNA across diverse eukaryotes. We review the currently-known small RNA classes and place them in context of the reconstructed evolutionary history of the RNAi protein machinery. This synthesis indicates the earliest versions of eukaryotic RNAi systems likely utilized small RNA processed from three types of precursors: 1) sense-antisense transcriptional products, 2) genome-encoded, imperfectly-complementary hairpin sequences, and 3) larger non-coding RNA precursor sequences. Structural dissection of PIWI proteins along with recent discovery of novel families (including Med13 of the Mediator complex) suggest that emergence of a distinct architecture with the N-terminal domains (also occurring separately fused to endoDNases in prokaryotes) formed via duplication of an ancestral unit was key to their recruitment as primary RNAi effectors and use of small RNAs of certain preferred lengths. Prokaryotic PIWI proteins are typically components of several RNA-directed DNA restriction or CRISPR/Cas systems. However, eukaryotic versions appear to have emerged from a subset that evolved RNA-directed RNA interference. They were recruited alongside RNaseIII domains and RdRP domains, also from prokaryotic systems, to form the core eukaryotic RNAi system. Like certain regulatory systems, RNAi diversified into two distinct but linked arms concomitant with eukaryotic nucleo-cytoplasmic compartmentalization. Subsequent elaboration of RNAi proceeded via diversification of the core protein machinery through lineage-specific expansions and recruitment of new components from prokaryotes (nucleases and small RNA-modifying enzymes), allowing for diversification of associating small RNAs. PMID:24311560

  15. The art of editing RNA structural alignments

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Andersen, Ebbe Sloth

    2014-01-01

    Manual editing of RNA structural alignments may be considered more art than science, since it still requires an expert biologist to take multiple levels of information into account and be slightly creative when constructing high-quality alignments. Even though the task is rather tedious, it is re......Manual editing of RNA structural alignments may be considered more art than science, since it still requires an expert biologist to take multiple levels of information into account and be slightly creative when constructing high-quality alignments. Even though the task is rather tedious......, it is rewarded by great insight into the evolution of structure and function of your favorite RNA molecule. In this chapter I will review the methods and considerations that go into constructing RNA structural alignments at the secondary and tertiary structure level; introduce software, databases, and algorithms...

  16. Differential requirement of Srs2 helicase and Rad51 displacement activities in replication of hairpin-forming CAG/CTG repeats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nguyen, Jennifer H G; Viterbo, David; Anand, Ranjith P; Verra, Lauren; Sloan, Laura; Richard, Guy-Franck; Freudenreich, Catherine H

    2017-05-05

    Trinucleotide repeats are a source of genome instability, causing replication fork stalling, chromosome fragility, and impaired repair. Specialized helicases play an important role in unwinding DNA structures to maintain genome stability. The Srs2 helicase unwinds DNA hairpins, facilitates replication, and prevents repeat instability and fragility. However, since Srs2 is a multifunctional protein with helicase activity and the ability to displace Rad51 recombinase, it was unclear which functions were required for its various protective roles. Here, using SRS2 separation-of-function alleles, we show that in the absence of Srs2 recruitment to PCNA or in helicase-deficient mutants, breakage at a CAG/CTG repeat increases. We conclude that Srs2 interaction with PCNA allows the helicase activity to unwind fork-blocking CAG/CTG hairpin structures to prevent breaks. Independently of PCNA binding, Srs2 also displaces Rad51 from nascent strands to prevent recombination-dependent repeat expansions and contractions. By 2D gel electrophoresis, we detect two different kinds of structured intermediates or joint molecules (JMs). Some JMs are Rad51-independent and exhibit properties of reversed forks, including being processed by the Exo1 nuclease. In addition, in a helicase-deficient mutant, Rad51-dependent JMs are detected, probably corresponding to recombination between sisters. These results clarify the many roles of Srs2 in facilitating replication through fork-blocking hairpin lesions. © The Author(s) 2017. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of Nucleic Acids Research.

  17. New families of human regulatory RNA structures identified by comparative analysis of vertebrate genomes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Parker, Brian John; Moltke, Ida; Roth, Adam

    2011-01-01

    a comparative method, EvoFam, for genome-wide identification of families of regulatory RNA structures, based on primary sequence and secondary structure similarity. We apply EvoFam to a 41-way genomic vertebrate alignment. Genome-wide, we identify 220 human, high-confidence families outside protein...... identify tens of new families supported by strong evolutionary evidence and other statistical evidence, such as GO term enrichments. For some of these, detailed analysis has led to the formulation of specific functional hypotheses. Examples include two hypothesized auto-regulatory feedback mechanisms: one...... involving six long hairpins in the 3'-UTR of MAT2A, a key metabolic gene that produces the primary human methyl donor S-adenosylmethionine; the other involving a tRNA-like structure in the intron of the tRNA maturation gene POP1. We experimentally validate the predicted MAT2A structures. Finally, we...

  18. Role of RNA interference in plant improvement

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jagtap, Umesh Balkrishna; Gurav, Ranjit Gajanan; Bapat, Vishwas Anant

    2011-06-01

    Research to alter crops for their better performance involving modern technology is underway in numerous plants, and achievements in transgenic plants are impacting crop improvements in unparalleled ways. Striking progress has been made using genetic engineering technology over the past two decades in manipulating genes from diverse and exotic sources, and inserting them into crop plants for inducing desirable characteristics. RNA interference (RNAi) has recently been identified as a natural mechanism for regulation of gene expression in all higher organisms from plants to humans and promises greater accuracy and precision to plant improvement. The expression of any gene can be down-regulated in a highly explicit manner exclusive of affecting the expression of any other gene by using RNAi technologies. Additional research in this field has been focused on a number of other areas including microRNAs, hairpin RNA, and promoter methylation. Manipulating new RNAi pathways, which generate small RNA molecules to amend gene expression in crops, can produce new quality traits and having better potentiality of protection against abiotic and biotic stresses. Nutritional improvement, change in morphology, or enhanced secondary metabolite synthesis are some of the other advantages of RNAi technology. In addition to its roles in regulating gene expression, RNAi is also used as a natural defense mechanism against molecular parasites such as jumping genes and viral genetic elements that affect genome stability. Even though much advancement has been made on the field of RNAi over the preceding few years, the full prospective of RNAi for crop improvement remains to be fully realized. The intricacy of RNAi pathway, the molecular machineries, and how it relates to plant development are still to be explained.

  19. SCOR: Structural Classification of RNA, version 2.0.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tamura, Makio; Hendrix, Donna K; Klosterman, Peter S; Schimmelman, Nancy R B; Brenner, Steven E; Holbrook, Stephen R

    2004-01-01

    SCOR, the Structural Classification of RNA (http://scor.lbl.gov), is a database designed to provide a comprehensive perspective and understanding of RNA motif three-dimensional structure, function, tertiary interactions and their relationships. SCOR 2.0 represents a major expansion and introduces a new classification organization. The new version represents the classification as a Directed Acyclic Graph (DAG), which allows a classification node to have multiple parents, in contrast to the strictly hierarchical classification used in SCOR 1.2. SCOR 2.0 supports three types of query terms in the updated search engine: PDB or NDB identifier, nucleotide sequence and keyword. We also provide parseable XML files for all information. This new release contains 511 RNA entries from the PDB as of 15 May 2003. A total of 5880 secondary structural elements are classified: 2104 hairpin loops and 3776 internal loops. RNA motifs reported in the literature, such as 'Kink turn' and 'GNRA loops', are now incorporated into the structural classification along with definitions and descriptions.

  20. SCOR: Structural classification of RNA, Version 2.0

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tamura, Makio; Hendrix, Donna K.; Klosterman, Peter

    2003-10-03

    SCOR (http://scor.lbl.gov), the Structural Classification of RNA, is a database designed to provide a comprehensive perspective and understanding of RNA motif three-dimensional structure, function, tertiary interactions, and their relationships. SCOR 2.0 represents a major expansion and introduces a wholly new classification system. The new version represents the classification as a Directed Acyclic Graph (DAG), which allows a classification node to have multiple parents, in contrast to the strictly hierarchical classification used in SCOR 1.2. SCOR 2.0 supports three types of query terms in the updated search engine: PDB or NDB identifier, nucleotide sequence, and keyword. We also provide parseable XML files for all information. This new release contains 511RNA entries from the PDB as of 15 May 2003. A total of 5,880 secondary structural elements are classified; 2,104 hairpin loops and 3,776 internal loops. RNA motifs reported in the literature, such as ''Kinkturn'' and ''GNRA loops,'' are now incorporated into the structural classification along with definitions and descriptions.

  1. A smart ZnO@polydopamine-nucleic acid nanosystem for ultrasensitive live cell mRNA imaging by the target-triggered intracellular self-assembly of active DNAzyme nanostructures.

    Science.gov (United States)

    He, Dinggeng; He, Xing; Yang, Xue; Li, Hung-Wing

    2017-04-01

    Efficient strategies for the ultrasensitive imaging of gene expression in living cells are essential in chemistry and cell biology. Here, we report a novel and efficient enzyme-free dual signal amplification strategy for live cell mRNA imaging by using a smart nucleic acid hairpin-based nanosystem. This nanosystem consists of a ZnO nanoparticle core, an interlayer of polydopamine and an outer layer of four hairpin DNA (hpDNA) probes. Such a core-shell nanosystem facilitates the cellular uptake of molecular hairpin payloads, protects them from nuclease digestion, and delivers them into the cytoplasm by the acid-triggered dissolution of the ZnO core. In the presence of target mRNA, the released hpDNA probes self-assemble via HCR into wire-shaped active DNAzymes that catalyze the generation of a fluorescence signal. The target-initiated HCR events and DNAzyme cascades offer efficient dual amplification and enable the ultrasensitive detection of mRNA with a femtomolar detection limit. Live cell assays show an intense fluorescence response from a tumor-related biomarker survivin mRNA only in tumor cells untreated with a survivin expression repressor YM155, but not in normal cells. The developed nanosystem provides a potential platform for the amplified imaging of low-abundance disease-related biomarkers in live cells.

  2. Modelling Constructs

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kindler, Ekkart

    2009-01-01

    , these notations have been extended in order to increase expressiveness and to be more competitive. This resulted in an increasing number of notations and formalisms for modelling business processes and in an increase of the different modelling constructs provided by modelling notations, which makes it difficult...... to compare modelling notations and to make transformations between them. One of the reasons is that, in each notation, the new concepts are introduced in a different way by extending the already existing constructs. In this chapter, we go the opposite direction: We show that it is possible to add most...... constructs and how they can be combined with more advanced constructs. Second, it will help combining different modelling notations with each other. Note that, though we introduce a notation for blocks in this chapter, we are not so much interested in promoting this notation here. The notation should just...

  3. RAID: a comprehensive resource for human RNA-associated (RNA-RNA/RNA-protein) interaction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Xiaomeng; Wu, Deng; Chen, Liqun; Li, Xiang; Yang, Jinxurong; Fan, Dandan; Dong, Tingting; Liu, Mingyue; Tan, Puwen; Xu, Jintian; Yi, Ying; Wang, Yuting; Zou, Hua; Hu, Yongfei; Fan, Kaili; Kang, Juanjuan; Huang, Yan; Miao, Zhengqiang; Bi, Miaoman; Jin, Nana; Li, Kongning; Li, Xia; Xu, Jianzhen; Wang, Dong

    2014-07-01

    Transcriptomic analyses have revealed an unexpected complexity in the eukaryote transcriptome, which includes not only protein-coding transcripts but also an expanding catalog of noncoding RNAs (ncRNAs). Diverse coding and noncoding RNAs (ncRNAs) perform functions through interaction with each other in various cellular processes. In this project, we have developed RAID (http://www.rna-society.org/raid), an RNA-associated (RNA-RNA/RNA-protein) interaction database. RAID intends to provide the scientific community with all-in-one resources for efficient browsing and extraction of the RNA-associated interactions in human. This version of RAID contains more than 6100 RNA-associated interactions obtained by manually reviewing more than 2100 published papers, including 4493 RNA-RNA interactions and 1619 RNA-protein interactions. Each entry contains detailed information on an RNA-associated interaction, including RAID ID, RNA/protein symbol, RNA/protein categories, validated method, expressing tissue, literature references (Pubmed IDs), and detailed functional description. Users can query, browse, analyze, and manipulate RNA-associated (RNA-RNA/RNA-protein) interaction. RAID provides a comprehensive resource of human RNA-associated (RNA-RNA/RNA-protein) interaction network. Furthermore, this resource will help in uncovering the generic organizing principles of cellular function network. © 2014 Zhang et al.; Published by Cold Spring Harbor Laboratory Press for the RNA Society.

  4. Triggering of RNA interference with RNA-RNA, RNA-DNA, and DNA-RNA nanoparticles.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Afonin, Kirill A; Viard, Mathias; Kagiampakis, Ioannis; Case, Christopher L; Dobrovolskaia, Marina A; Hofmann, Jen; Vrzak, Ashlee; Kireeva, Maria; Kasprzak, Wojciech K; KewalRamani, Vineet N; Shapiro, Bruce A

    2015-01-27

    Control over cellular delivery of different functionalities and their synchronized activation is a challenging task. We report several RNA and RNA/DNA-based nanoparticles designed to conditionally activate the RNA interference in various human cells. These nanoparticles allow precise control over their formulation, stability in blood serum, and activation of multiple functionalities. Importantly, interferon and pro-inflammatory cytokine activation assays indicate the significantly lower responses for DNA nanoparticles compared to the RNA counterparts, suggesting greater potential of these molecules for therapeutic use.

  5. SHAPE analysis of the htrA RNA thermometer from Salmonella enterica.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Choi, Edric K; Ulanowicz, Kelsey A; Nguyen, Yen Anh H; Frandsen, Jane K; Mitton-Fry, Rachel M

    2017-10-01

    RNA thermometers regulate expression of some genes involved in virulence of pathogenic bacteria such as Yersinia, Neisseria, and Salmonella They often function through temperature-dependent conformational changes that alter accessibility of the ribosome-binding site. The 5'-untranslated region (UTR) of the htrA mRNA from Salmonella enterica contains a very short RNA thermometer. We have systematically characterized the structure and dynamics of this thermometer at single-nucleotide resolution using SHAPE (selective 2'-hydroxyl acylation analyzed by primer extension) assays. Our results confirm that the htrA thermometer adopts the predicted hairpin conformation at low temperatures, with conformational change occurring over a physiological temperature regime. Detailed SHAPE melting curves for individual nucleotides suggest that the thermometer unfolds in a cooperative fashion, with nucleotides from both upper and lower portions of the stem gaining flexibility at a common transition temperature. Intriguingly, analysis of an extended htrA 5' UTR sequence revealed not only the presence of the RNA thermometer, but also an additional, stable upstream structure. We generated and analyzed point mutants of the htrA thermometer, revealing elements that modulate its stability, allowing the hairpin to melt under the slightly elevated temperatures experienced during the infection of a warm-blooded host. This work sheds light on structure-function relationships in htrA and related thermometers, and it also illustrates the utility of SHAPE assays for detailed study of RNA thermometer systems. © 2017 Choi et al.; Published by Cold Spring Harbor Laboratory Press for the RNA Society.

  6. Expression of a novel non-coding mitochondrial RNA in human proliferating cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Villegas, Jaime; Burzio, Veronica; Villota, Claudio; Landerer, Eduardo; Martinez, Ronny; Santander, Marcela; Martinez, Rodrigo; Pinto, Rodrigo; Vera, María I.; Boccardo, Enrique; Villa, Luisa L.; Burzio, Luis O.

    2007-01-01

    Previously, we reported the presence in mouse cells of a mitochondrial RNA which contains an inverted repeat (IR) of 121 nucleotides (nt) covalently linked to the 5′ end of the mitochondrial 16S RNA (16S mtrRNA). Here, we report the structure of an equivalent transcript of 2374 nt which is over-expressed in human proliferating cells but not in resting cells. The transcript contains a hairpin structure comprising an IR of 815 nt linked to the 5′ end of the 16S mtrRNA and forming a long double-stranded structure or stem and a loop of 40 nt. The stem is resistant to RNase A and can be detected and isolated after digestion with the enzyme. This novel transcript is a non-coding RNA (ncRNA) and several evidences suggest that the transcript is synthesized in mitochondria. The expression of this transcript can be induced in resting lymphocytes stimulated with phytohaemagglutinin (PHA). Moreover, aphidicolin treatment of DU145 cells reversibly blocks proliferation and expression of the transcript. If the drug is removed, the cells re-assume proliferation and over-express the ncmtRNA. These results suggest that the expression of the ncmtRNA correlates with the replicative state of the cell and it may play a role in cell proliferation. PMID:17962305

  7. The impact of CRISPR repeat sequence on structures of a Cas6 protein-RNA complex

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wang, Ruiying; Zheng, Han; Preamplume, Gan; Shao, Yaming; Li, Hong [FSU

    2012-03-15

    The repeat-associated mysterious proteins (RAMPs) comprise the most abundant family of proteins involved in prokaryotic immunity against invading genetic elements conferred by the clustered regularly interspaced short palindromic repeat (CRISPR) system. Cas6 is one of the first characterized RAMP proteins and is a key enzyme required for CRISPR RNA maturation. Despite a strong structural homology with other RAMP proteins that bind hairpin RNA, Cas6 distinctly recognizes single-stranded RNA. Previous structural and biochemical studies show that Cas6 captures the 5' end while cleaving the 3' end of the CRISPR RNA. Here, we describe three structures and complementary biochemical analysis of a noncatalytic Cas6 homolog from Pyrococcus horikoshii bound to CRISPR repeat RNA of different sequences. Our study confirms the specificity of the Cas6 protein for single-stranded RNA and further reveals the importance of the bases at Positions 5-7 in Cas6-RNA interactions. Substitutions of these bases result in structural changes in the protein-RNA complex including its oligomerization state.

  8. Combinatorics of RNA Secondary Structures with Base Triples.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Müller, Robert; Nebel, Markus E

    2015-07-01

    The structure of RNA has been the subject of intense research over the last decades due to its importance for the correct functioning of RNA molecules in biological processes. Hence, a large number of models for RNA folding and corresponding algorithms for structure prediction have been developed. However, previous models often only consider base pairs, although every base is capable of up to three edge-to-edge interactions with other bases. Recently, Höner zu Siederdissen et al. presented an extended model of RNA secondary structure, including base triples together with a folding algorithm-the first thermodynamics-based algorithm that allows the prediction of secondary structures with base triples. In this article, we investigate the search space processed by this new algorithm, that is, the combinatorics of extended RNA secondary structures with base triples. We present generalized definitions for structural motifs like hairpins, stems, bulges, or interior loops occurring in structures with base triples. Furthermore, we prove precise asymptotic results for the number of different structures (size of search space) and expectations for various parameters associated with structural motifs (typical shape of folding). Our analysis shows that the asymptotic number of secondary structures of size n increases exponentially to [Formula: see text] compared to the classic model by Stein and Waterman for which [Formula: see text] structures exist. A comparison with the classic model reveals large deviations in the expected structural appearance, too. The inclusion of base triples constitutes a significant refinement of the combinatorial model of RNA secondary structure, which, by our findings, is quantitatively characterized. Our results are of special theoretical interest, because a closer look at the numbers involved suggests that extended RNA secondary structures constitute a new combinatorial class not bijective with any other combinatorial objects studied so far.

  9. Construction safety

    CERN Document Server

    Li, Rita Yi Man

    2013-01-01

    A close-to-ideal blend of suburb and city, speedy construction of towers of Babylon, the sparkling proportion of glass and steel buildings’ facade at night showcase the wisdom of humans. They also witness the footsteps, sweats and tears of architects and engineers. Unfortunately, these signatures of human civilizations are swathed in towering figures of construction accidents. Fretting about these on sites, different countries adopt different measures on sites. This book firstly sketches the construction accidents on sites, followed by a review on safety measures in some of the developing countries such as Bermuda, Egypt, Kuwait and China; as well as developed countries, for example, the United States, France and Singapore. It also highlights the enormous compensation costs with the courts’ experiences in the United Kingdom and Hong Kong.

  10. Interaction of the tylosin-resistance methyltransferase RlmA II at its rRNA target differs from the orthologue RlmA I

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Douthwaite, Stephen; Jakobsen, Lene; Yoshizawa, Satoko

    2008-01-01

    of Gram-positive bacteria, including the tylosin-producer Streptomyces fradiae and the pathogen Streptococcus pneumoniae. Recombinant S. pneumoniae RlmA(II) was purified and shown to retain its activity and specificity in vitro when tested on unmethylated 23 S rRNA substrates. RlmA(II) makes multiple......RlmA(II) methylates the N1-position of nucleotide G748 in hairpin 35 of 23 S rRNA. The resultant methyl group extends into the peptide channel of the 50 S ribosomal subunit and confers resistance to tylosin and other mycinosylated macrolide antibiotics. Methylation at G748 occurs in several groups...

  11. Extracellular RNA Communication (ExRNA)

    Data.gov (United States)

    Federal Laboratory Consortium — Until recently, scientists believed RNA worked mostly inside the cell that produced it. Some types of RNA help translate genes into proteins that are necessary for...

  12. Construction work

    CERN Multimedia

    2004-01-01

    Construction work on building 179 will start on the 16th February 2004 and continue until November 2004. The road between buildings 179 and 158 will temporarily become a one way street from Route Democrite towards building 7. The parking places between buildings 179 and 7 will become obsolete. The ISOLDE collaboration would like to apologize for any inconveniences.

  13. MatureBayes: a probabilistic algorithm for identifying the mature miRNA within novel precursors.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Katerina Gkirtzou

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: MicroRNAs (miRNAs are small, single stranded RNAs with a key role in post-transcriptional regulation of thousands of genes across numerous species. While several computational methods are currently available for identifying miRNA genes, accurate prediction of the mature miRNA remains a challenge. Existing approaches fall short in predicting the location of mature miRNAs but also in finding the functional strand(s of miRNA precursors. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: Here, we present a computational tool that incorporates a Naive Bayes classifier to identify mature miRNA candidates based on sequence and secondary structure information of their miRNA precursors. We take into account both positive (true mature miRNAs and negative (same-size non-mature miRNA sequences examples to optimize sensitivity as well as specificity. Our method can accurately predict the start position of experimentally verified mature miRNAs for both human and mouse, achieving a significantly larger (often double performance accuracy compared with two existing methods. Moreover, the method exhibits a very high generalization performance on miRNAs from two other organisms. More importantly, our method provides direct evidence about the features of miRNA precursors which may determine the location of the mature miRNA. We find that the triplet of positions 7, 8 and 9 from the mature miRNA end towards the closest hairpin have the largest discriminatory power, are relatively conserved in terms of sequence composition (mostly contain a Uracil and are located within or in very close proximity to the hairpin loop, suggesting the existence of a possible recognition site for Dicer and associated proteins. CONCLUSIONS: This work describes a novel algorithm for identifying the start position of mature miRNA(s produced by miRNA precursors. Our tool has significantly better (often double performance than two existing approaches and provides new insights about the potential use

  14. DNA Sequencing Research Group (DSRG): Evaluation of RNA Amplification Kits at Subnanogram Input Amounts of Total RNA for RNA-Seq

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nicolet, Charles; Paulson, Ariel; Shanker, Savita; Beckloff, N.; Bintzler, D.; Bivens, N. J.; Davis, R. R.; Donnelly, R. J.; Edenberg, H. J.; Gillaspy, A. F.; Grove, D.; Jafari, N.; Kerley-Hamilton, J. S.; Lashley, K.; Lyons, R. H.; Peak, A.; Perera, A.; Thimmapuram, J.; Wang, L.; Wright, C. L.; Alekseyev, Y.

    2013-01-01

    Multiple recent publications on RNA-Seq have demonstrated the power of next generation sequencing technologies in whole transcriptome analysis. The vendor specific protocols used for RNA library construction typically require at least 100ng of total RNA. However, under certain conditions such as single cells, stem cells, difficult to isolate cell types, or fractionated cancer cells, only a small amount of material is available. In these cases, effective transcriptome profiling requires amplification of subnanogram amounts of RNA. Several RNA amplification kits are available for amplification prior to library construction and next generation sequencing but these kits have not been comprehensively field evaluated for accuracy and performance of RNA-Seq for picogram amounts of RNA. This study conducted by the DNA Sequencing Research Group (DSRG) focuses on the evaluation of amplification kits for RNA-Seq. Four commercial amplification kits were chosen: Ovation v2 (NuGEN Technologies), SMARTer (Clontech), Seqplex (Sigma Aldrich), and Super-AMP (Miltenyi Biotech). Starting material was 5ng, 500pg and 50pg of human total reference RNA (Clontech) spiked with Ambion ERCC control mix (Life Technologies) following the manufacturer's protocol. Each kit was tested at 3 different sites to assess reproducibility. Total RNA and ERCC RNA spike-in control mixes from the same lots were sent to 12 ABRF lab sites for amplification and cDNA generation. Ideally, this would have resulted in 36 different amplified samples, 3 from each input RNA. Libraries were constructed at one site from the amplified cDNAs using the TruSeq RNA library preparation kit on the Tecan Freedom EVO Liquid Handling Robot. As an unamplified control, ribosomal depletion and PolyA selection were performed separately using 5ng, 100ng and 1ug of total RNA prior to library construction. All libraries were pooled and sequenced using the Illumina HiSeq platform. An overview of the study and the results will be

  15. 2'-O-[(4-CF3-triazol-1-yl)methyl] Uridine - A Sensitive (19)F NMR Sensor for the Detection of RNA Secondary Structures.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Granqvist, Lotta; Virta, Pasi

    2015-08-21

    A sensitive uridine-derived sensor (viz., 2'-O-[(4-CF3-triazol-1-yl)methyl]uridine, 1) for (19)F NMR spectroscopic monitoring of RNA secondary structures is described. The applicability of 1 is demonstrated by monitoring the thermal denaturation of the following double and triple helical RNA models: (1) a miR 215 hairpin, (2) a poly U-A*U triple helix RNA (bearing two C-G*C(H+) interrupts), and (3) a polyadenylated nuclear-nuclear retention element complex. In these RNA models, the (19)F NMR shift of the 2'-O-(CF3-triazolylmethyl) group shows high sensitivity to secondary structural arrangements. Moreover, 1 favors the desired N-conformation, and its effect on both RNA duplex and triplex stabilities is marginal.

  16. The use of artificial microRNA technology to control gene expression in Arabidopsis thaliana.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eamens, Andrew L; McHale, Marcus; Waterhouse, Peter M

    2014-01-01

    In plants, double-stranded RNA (dsRNA) is an effective trigger of RNA silencing, and several classes of endogenous small RNA (sRNA), processed from dsRNA substrates by DICER-like (DCL) endonucleases, are essential in controlling gene expression. One such sRNA class, the microRNAs (miRNAs) control the expression of closely related genes to regulate all aspects of plant development, including the determination of leaf shape, leaf polarity, flowering time, and floral identity. A single miRNA sRNA silencing signal is processed from a long precursor transcript of nonprotein-coding RNA, termed the primary miRNA (pri-miRNA). A region of the pri-miRNA is partially self-complementary allowing the transcript to fold back onto itself to form a stem-loop structure of imperfectly dsRNA. Artificial miRNA (amiRNA) technology uses endogenous pri-miRNAs, in which the miRNA and miRNA* (passenger strand of the miRNA duplex) sequences have been replaced with corresponding amiRNA/amiRNA* sequences that direct highly efficient RNA silencing of the targeted gene. Here, we describe the rules for amiRNA design, as well as outline the PCR and bacterial cloning procedures involved in the construction of an amiRNA plant expression vector to control target gene expression in Arabidopsis thaliana.

  17. Convection-enhanced delivery of AAV2-PrPshRNA in prion-infected mice.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Misol Ahn

    Full Text Available Prion disease is caused by a single pathogenic protein (PrPSc, an abnormal conformer of the normal cellular prion protein PrPC. Depletion of PrPC in prion knockout mice makes them resistant to prion disease. Thus, gene silencing of the Prnp gene is a promising effective therapeutic approach. Here, we examined adeno-associated virus vector type 2 encoding a short hairpin RNA targeting Prnp mRNA (AAV2-PrP-shRNA to suppress PrPC expression both in vitro and in vivo. AAV2-PrP-shRNA treatment suppressed PrP levels and prevented dendritic degeneration in RML-infected brain aggregate cultures. Infusion of AAV2-PrP-shRNA-eGFP into the thalamus of CD-1 mice showed that eGFP was transported to the cerebral cortex via anterograde transport and the overall PrPC levels were reduced by ∼ 70% within 4 weeks. For therapeutic purposes, we treated RML-infected CD-1 mice with AAV2-PrP-shRNA beginning at 50 days post inoculation. Although AAV2-PrP-shRNA focally suppressed PrPSc formation in the thalamic infusion site by ∼ 75%, it did not suppress PrPSc formation efficiently in other regions of the brain. Survival of mice was not extended compared to the untreated controls. Global suppression of PrPC in the brain is required for successful therapy of prion diseases.

  18. Exact calculation of loop formation probability identifies folding motifs in RNA secondary structures.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sloma, Michael F; Mathews, David H

    2016-12-01

    RNA secondary structure prediction is widely used to analyze RNA sequences. In an RNA partition function calculation, free energy nearest neighbor parameters are used in a dynamic programming algorithm to estimate statistical properties of the secondary structure ensemble. Previously, partition functions have largely been used to estimate the probability that a given pair of nucleotides form a base pair, the conditional stacking probability, the accessibility to binding of a continuous stretch of nucleotides, or a representative sample of RNA structures. Here it is demonstrated that an RNA partition function can also be used to calculate the exact probability of formation of hairpin loops, internal loops, bulge loops, or multibranch loops at a given position. This calculation can also be used to estimate the probability of formation of specific helices. Benchmarking on a set of RNA sequences with known secondary structures indicated that loops that were calculated to be more probable were more likely to be present in the known structure than less probable loops. Furthermore, highly probable loops are more likely to be in the known structure than the set of loops predicted in the lowest free energy structures. © 2016 Sloma and Mathews; Published by Cold Spring Harbor Laboratory Press for the RNA Society.

  19. Local injection of lentivirus encoding LINGO-1-shRNA promotes functional recovery in rats with complete spinal cord transection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cen, Jingsheng; Wu, Hongfu; Wang, Jue; Ren, Xianyue; Zhang, Hongwu; Wang, Jingnan; Wan, Yong; Deng, Yubin

    2013-09-01

    We used a complete spinal cord transection model and locomotor function, histological, and immunohistochemical examinations to evaluate the effects of local injection of lentivirus/LINGO-1-short hairpin RNA (VL) on rats with spinal cord injury (SCI). To demonstrate the neuroregenerative and neuroprotective effects of LINGO-1 RNAi on complete transection SCI rats. LINGO-1 has been reported as a negative regulator of axonal sprouting and its antagonist was determined to improve functional outcomes in SCI rats. However, it has not been assessed whether blockade of LINGO-1 mediated by lentivirus vectors could stimulate neural recovery after SCI. Complete spinal cord transection was made at T10 level. Suspension of lentivirus vectors encoding LINGO-1-short hairpin RNA was injected into the lesion gap. Controls received control vectors in the same manner and the sham group was subjected to laminectomy only. The Basso-Beattie-Bresnahan scale and surface righting reflex test were used to evaluate functional outcomes. Finally, the spinal cords were harvested for histological and immunohistochemical analysis. The treatment with VL improved Basso-Beattie-Bresnahan scores and surface righting reflex after SCI. Tissue repair was facilitated and the cavity area was significantly decreased in VL-treated animals. More sprouting and myelinated nerve fibers were detected within the injured site in the VL group as compared with the control. In addition, the number of survival neurons and oligodendrocytes around the epicenter was notably higher under the VL condition. Local injection of lentivirus/LINGO-1-short hairpin RNA after complete transection of spinal cord resulted in meaningful histological and functional outcomes in rats. The mechanism of VL protection may be related to its promotion of axonal sprouting, remyelination, and cell survival.

  20. Highly sensitive MicroRNA 146a detection using a gold nanoparticle-based CTG repeat probing system and isothermal amplification.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Le, Binh Huy; Seo, Young Jun

    2018-01-25

    We have developed a gold nanoparticle (AuNP)-based CTG repeat probing system displaying high quenching capability and combined it with isothermal amplification for the detection of miRNA 146a. This method of using a AuNP-based CTG repeat probing system with isothermal amplification allowed the highly sensitive (14 aM) and selective detection of miRNA 146a. A AuNP-based CTG repeat probing system having a hairpin structure and a dT F fluorophore exhibited highly efficient quenching because the CTG repeat-based stable hairpin structure imposed a close distance between the AuNP and the dT F residue. A small amount of miRNA 146a induced multiple copies of the CAG repeat sequence during rolling circle amplification; the AuNP-based CTG repeat probing system then bound to the complementary multiple-copy CAG repeat sequence, thereby inducing a structural change from a hairpin to a linear structure with amplified fluorescence. This AuNP-based CTG probing system combined with isothermal amplification could also discriminate target miRNA 146a from one- and two-base-mismatched miRNAs (ORN 1 and ORN 2, respectively). This simple AuNP-based CTG probing system, combined with isothermal amplification to induce a highly sensitive change in fluorescence, allows the detection of miRNA 146a with high sensitivity (14 aM) and selectivity. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  1. Advances in targeted delivery of small interfering RNA using simple bioconjugates

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nielsen, Christoffer; Kjems, Jørgen; Sorensen, Kristine Rothaus

    2014-01-01

    Introduction: Development of drugs based on RNA interference by small interfering RNA (siRNA) has been progressing slowly due to a number of challenges associated with the in vivo behavior of siRNA. A central problem is controlling siRNA delivery to specific cell types. Here, we review existing...... literature on one type of strategy for solving the issue of cell-specific delivery of siRNA, namely delivering the siRNA as part of simple bioconjugate constructs. Areas covered: This review presents current experience from strategies aimed at targeting siRNA to specific cell types, by associating the siRNA...... with a targeting moiety, in a simple bioconjugate construct. We discuss the use of different types of targeting moieties, as well as the different conjugation strategies employed for preparing these bioconjugate constructs that deliver the siRNA to target cells. We focus especially on the in-built or passive...

  2. Conformation-Specific Infrared and Ultraviolet Spectroscopy of Cold [YAPAA+H]^{+} and [YGPAA+H]^{+} Ions: a Stereochemical "twist" on the β-HAIRPIN Turn

    Science.gov (United States)

    DeBlase, Andrew F.; Harrilal, Christopher P.; Lawler, John T.; Burke, Nicole L.; McLuckey, Scott A.; Zwier, Timothy S.

    2017-06-01

    Incorporation of the unnatural D-proline (^{D}P) stereoisomer into a polypeptide sequence is a typical strategy to encourage formation of β-hairpin loops because natural sequences are often unstructured in solution. Using conformation-specific IR and UV spectroscopy of cold (10 K) gas-phase ions, we probe the inherent conformational preferences of the ^{D}P and ^{L}P diastereomers in the protonated peptide [YAPAA+H]^{+}, where only intramolecular interactions are possible. Consistent with the solution phase studies, one of the conformers of [YADPAA+H]^{+} is folded into a charge-stabilized β-hairpin turn. However, a second predominant conformer family containing two sequential γ-turns is also identified, with similar energetic stability. A single conformational isomer of the ^{L}P diastereomer, [YALPAA+H]^{+}, is found and assigned to a structure that is not the anticipated "mirror image" β-turn. Instead, the ^{L}P stereo center promotes a cis alanine-proline amide bond. The assigned structures contain clues that the preference of the ^{D}P diastereomer to support a trans-amide bond and the proclivity of ^{L}P for a cis-amide bond is sterically driven and can be reversed by substituting glycine for alanine in position 2, forming [YGLPAA+H]^{+}. These results provide a basis for understanding the residue-specific and stereo-specific alterations in the potential energy surface that underlie these changing preferences, providing insights to the origin of β-hairpin formation.

  3. Probing for DNA damage with β-hairpins: Similarities in incision efficiencies of bulky DNA adducts by prokaryotic and human nucleotide excision repair systems in vitro

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Yang; Reeves, Dara; Kropachev, Konstantin; Cai, Yuqin; Ding, Shuang; Kolbanovskiy, Marina; Kolbanovskiy, Alexander; Bolton, Judith L.; Broyde, Suse; Van Houten, Bennett; Geacintov, Nicholas E.

    2011-01-01

    Nucleotide excision repair (NER) is an important prokaryotic and eukaryotic defense mechanism that removes a large variety of structurally distinct lesions in cellular DNA. While the proteins involved are completely different, the mode of action of these two repair systems is similar, involving a cut-and-patch mechanism in which an oligonucleotide sequence containing the lesion is excised. The prokaryotic and eukaryotic NER damage-recognition factors have common structural features of β-hairpin intrusion between the two DNA strands at the site of the lesion. In the present study, we explored the hypothesis that this common β-hairpin intrusion motif is mirrored in parallel NER incision efficiencies in the two systems. We have utilized human HeLa cell extracts and the prokaryotic UvrABC proteins to determine their relative NER incision efficiencies. We report here comparisons of relative NER efficiencies with a set of stereoisomeric DNA lesions derived from metabolites of benzo[a]pyrene and equine estrogens in different sequence contexts, utilizing 21 samples. We found a general qualitative trend towards similar relative NER incision efficiencies for ~ 65% of these substrates; the other cases deviate mostly by ~ 30% or less from a perfect correlation, although several more distant outliers are also evident. This resemblance is consistent with the hypothesis that lesion recognition through β-hairpin insertion, a common feature of the two systems, is facilitated by local thermodynamic destabilization induced by the lesions in both cases. In the case of the UvrABC system, varying the nature of the UvrC endonuclease, while maintaining the same UvrA/B proteins, can markedly affect the relative incision efficiencies. These observations suggest that, in addition to recognition involving the initial modified duplexes, downstream events involving UvrC can also play a role in distinguishing and processing different lesions in prokaryotic NER. PMID:21741328

  4. MiRFinder: an improved approach and software implementation for genome-wide fast microRNA precursor scans

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Li Kui

    2007-09-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background MicroRNAs (miRNAs are recognized as one of the most important families of non-coding RNAs that serve as important sequence-specific post-transcriptional regulators of gene expression. Identification of miRNAs is an important requirement for understanding the mechanisms of post-transcriptional regulation. Hundreds of miRNAs have been identified by direct cloning and computational approaches in several species. However, there are still many miRNAs that remain to be identified due to lack of either sequence features or robust algorithms to efficiently identify them. Results We have evaluated features valuable for pre-miRNA prediction, such as the local secondary structure differences of the stem region of miRNA and non-miRNA hairpins. We have also established correlations between different types of mutations and the secondary structures of pre-miRNAs. Utilizing these features and combining some improvements of the current pre-miRNA prediction methods, we implemented a computational learning method SVM (support vector machine to build a high throughput and good performance computational pre-miRNA prediction tool called MiRFinder. The tool was designed for genome-wise, pair-wise sequences from two related species. The method built into the tool consisted of two major steps: 1 genome wide search for hairpin candidates and 2 exclusion of the non-robust structures based on analysis of 18 parameters by the SVM method. Results from applying the tool for chicken/human and D. melanogaster/D. pseudoobscura pair-wise genome alignments showed that the tool can be used for genome wide pre-miRNA predictions. Conclusion The MiRFinder can be a good alternative to current miRNA discovery software. This tool is available at http://www.bioinformatics.org/mirfinder/.

  5. Discrimination of the expression of paralogous microRNA precursors that share the same major mature form.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Minghua; Wang, Weiping; Zhang, Ping; Xiao, Juanjuan; Wang, Jianguo; Huang, Chaoqun

    2014-01-01

    MicroRNAs (miRNAs) are a class of small non-coding RNAs generated from endogenous transcripts that form hairpin structures. The hairpin precursor is processed into two mature miRNAs that form major/minor duplexes. Mature miRNAs regulate gene expression by cleaving mRNA or repressing protein translation. Numerous miRNAs have been discovered via deep sequencing. Many miRNAs are produced from multiple genome sites. These miRNAs are grouped into paralogous families of miRNAs that generate the same major mature form within organisms. Currently, no method of distinguishing the expression of these miRNAs is available. In the present study, strategies were developed to discriminate and quantify the expression of paralogous miRNA precursors. First, paralogous miRNA precursors that were differentially expressed in tissues were identified through analysis of the coexpression scores of their major and minor forms based on deep sequencing data. Then the precursors were identified by monitoring the expression of their host gene or minor form using real-time PCR. Finally, precursors were identified by assessing the expression of clusters of miRNA members. These approaches were used to distinguish miR-128-1 and miR-128-2 as well as miR-194-1 and miR-194-2. The mechanism of transcription related to the differential expression of miR-194-1 and miR-194-2 was also investigated. This is the first report to distinguish paralogous miRNA copies by analyzing the expression of major-minor pairs, the host gene, and miRNA clusters. Discriminating paralogous precursors can provide useful information for investigating the mechanisms that regulate miRNA gene expression under different physiological and pathological conditions.

  6. Discrimination of the expression of paralogous microRNA precursors that share the same major mature form.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Minghua Wang

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: MicroRNAs (miRNAs are a class of small non-coding RNAs generated from endogenous transcripts that form hairpin structures. The hairpin precursor is processed into two mature miRNAs that form major/minor duplexes. Mature miRNAs regulate gene expression by cleaving mRNA or repressing protein translation. Numerous miRNAs have been discovered via deep sequencing. Many miRNAs are produced from multiple genome sites. These miRNAs are grouped into paralogous families of miRNAs that generate the same major mature form within organisms. Currently, no method of distinguishing the expression of these miRNAs is available. RESULTS: In the present study, strategies were developed to discriminate and quantify the expression of paralogous miRNA precursors. First, paralogous miRNA precursors that were differentially expressed in tissues were identified through analysis of the coexpression scores of their major and minor forms based on deep sequencing data. Then the precursors were identified by monitoring the expression of their host gene or minor form using real-time PCR. Finally, precursors were identified by assessing the expression of clusters of miRNA members. These approaches were used to distinguish miR-128-1 and miR-128-2 as well as miR-194-1 and miR-194-2. The mechanism of transcription related to the differential expression of miR-194-1 and miR-194-2 was also investigated. CONCLUSION: This is the first report to distinguish paralogous miRNA copies by analyzing the expression of major-minor pairs, the host gene, and miRNA clusters. Discriminating paralogous precursors can provide useful information for investigating the mechanisms that regulate miRNA gene expression under different physiological and pathological conditions.

  7. Rapid NMR screening of RNA secondary structure and binding

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Helmling, Christina; Keyhani, Sara; Sochor, Florian; Fürtig, Boris; Hengesbach, Martin; Schwalbe, Harald, E-mail: schwalbe@nmr.uni-frankfurt.de [Johann Wolfgang Goethe-Universität, Institut für Organische Chemie und Chemische Biologie, Center for Biomolecular Magnetic Resonance (BMRZ) (Germany)

    2015-09-15

    Determination of RNA secondary structures by NMR spectroscopy is a useful tool e.g. to elucidate RNA folding space or functional aspects of regulatory RNA elements. However, current approaches of RNA synthesis and preparation are usually time-consuming and do not provide analysis with single nucleotide precision when applied for a large number of different RNA sequences. Here, we significantly improve the yield and 3′ end homogeneity of RNA preparation by in vitro transcription. Further, by establishing a native purification procedure with increased throughput, we provide a shortcut to study several RNA constructs simultaneously. We show that this approach yields μmol quantities of RNA with purities comparable to PAGE purification, while avoiding denaturation of the RNA.

  8. Prediction of viral microRNA precursors based on human microRNA precursor sequence and structural features.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kumar, Shiva; Ansari, Faraz A; Scaria, Vinod

    2009-08-20

    MicroRNAs (small approximately 22 nucleotide long non-coding endogenous RNAs) have recently attracted immense attention as critical regulators of gene expression in multi-cellular eukaryotes, especially in humans. Recent studies have proved that viruses also express microRNAs, which are thought to contribute to the intricate mechanisms of host-pathogen interactions. Computational predictions have greatly accelerated the discovery of microRNAs. However, most of these widely used tools are dependent on structural features and sequence conservation which limits their use in discovering novel virus expressed microRNAs and non-conserved eukaryotic microRNAs. In this work an efficient prediction method is developed based on the hypothesis that sequence and structure features which discriminate between host microRNA precursor hairpins and pseudo microRNAs are shared by viral microRNA as they depend on host machinery for the processing of microRNA precursors. The proposed method has been found to be more efficient than recently reported ab-initio methods for predicting viral microRNAs and microRNAs expressed by mammals.

  9. A single-stranded architecture for cotranscriptional folding of RNA nanostructures

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Geary, Cody; Rothemund, Paul; Andersen, Ebbe Sloth

    2014-01-01

    . We introduce an architecture for designing artificial RNA structures that fold from a single strand, in which arrays of antiparallel RNA helices are precisely organized by RNA tertiary motifs and a new type of crossover pattern. We constructed RNA tiles that assemble into hexagonal lattices...

  10. Genome-wide A-to-I RNA editing in fungi independent of ADAR enzymes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Huiquan; Wang, Qinhu; He, Yi; Chen, Lingfeng; Hao, Chaofeng; Jiang, Cong; Li, Yang; Dai, Yafeng; Kang, Zhensheng; Xu, Jin-Rong

    2016-01-01

    Yeasts and filamentous fungi do not have adenosine deaminase acting on RNA (ADAR) orthologs and are believed to lack A-to-I RNA editing, which is the most prevalent editing of mRNA in animals. However, during this study with the PUK1 (FGRRES_01058) pseudokinase gene important for sexual reproduction in Fusarium graminearum, we found that two tandem stop codons, UA1831GUA1834G, in its kinase domain were changed to UG1831GUG1834G by RNA editing in perithecia. To confirm A-to-I editing of PUK1 transcripts, strand-specific RNA-seq data were generated with RNA isolated from conidia, hyphae, and perithecia. PUK1 was almost specifically expressed in perithecia, and 90% of transcripts were edited to UG1831GUG1834G. Genome-wide analysis identified 26,056 perithecium-specific A-to-I editing sites. Unlike those in animals, 70.5% of A-to-I editing sites in F. graminearum occur in coding regions, and more than two-thirds of them result in amino acid changes, including editing of 69 PUK1-like pseudogenes with stop codons in ORFs. PUK1 orthologs and other pseudogenes also displayed stage-specific expression and editing in Neurospora crassa and F. verticillioides. Furthermore, F. graminearum differs from animals in the sequence preference and structure selectivity of A-to-I editing sites. Whereas A's embedded in RNA stems are targeted by ADARs, RNA editing in F. graminearum preferentially targets A's in hairpin loops, which is similar to the anticodon loop of tRNA targeted by adenosine deaminases acting on tRNA (ADATs). Overall, our results showed that A-to-I RNA editing occurs specifically during sexual reproduction and mainly in the coding regions in filamentous ascomycetes, involving adenosine deamination mechanisms distinct from metazoan ADARs. PMID:26934920

  11. RNA interactions in the 5' region of the HIV-1 genome

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Damgaard, Christian Kroun; Andersen, Ebbe Sloth; Knudsen, Bjarne

    2004-01-01

    The untranslated leader of the dimeric HIV-1 RNA genome is folded into a complex structure that plays multiple and essential roles in the viral replication cycle. Here, we have investigated secondary and tertiary structural elements within the 5' 744 nucleotides of the HIV-1 genome using a combin......The untranslated leader of the dimeric HIV-1 RNA genome is folded into a complex structure that plays multiple and essential roles in the viral replication cycle. Here, we have investigated secondary and tertiary structural elements within the 5' 744 nucleotides of the HIV-1 genome using...... region and we demonstrate that this feature is highly conserved in distantly related human and animal retroviruses. To obtain information about tertiary interactions we applied an intramolecular UV-crosslinking strategy and identified a novel tertiary interaction within the PBS hairpin structure....

  12. Identification and classification of conserved RNA secondary structures in the human genome

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Pedersen, Jakob Skou; Bejerano, Gill; Siepel, Adam

    2006-01-01

    selenocysteine insertion sites, RNA editing hairpins, RNAs involved in transcript auto regulation, and many folds that form singletons or small functional RNA families of completely unknown function. While the rate of false positives in the overall set is difficult to estimate and is likely to be substantial......The discoveries of microRNAs and riboswitches, among others, have shown functional RNAs to be biologically more important and genomically more prevalent than previously anticipated. We have developed a general comparative genomics method based on phylogenetic stochastic context-free grammars...... for identifying functional RNAs encoded in the human genome and used it to survey an eight-way genome-wide alignment of the human, chimpanzee, mouse, rat, dog, chicken, zebra-fish, and puffer-fish genomes for deeply conserved functional RNAs. At a loose threshold for acceptance, this search resulted in a set...

  13. Structural profiles of human miRNA families from pairwise clustering

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kaczkowski, Bogumil; Þórarinsson, Elfar; Reiche, Kristin

    2009-01-01

    of obtained clusters by WAR. As a result, the common secondary structure was successfully determined for four FOLDALIGN clusters: the RF00027 structural family of the Rfam database and three clusters with previously undescribed consensus structures. Availability: http://genome.ku.dk/resources/mirclust......MicroRNAs (miRNAs) are a group of small, approximately 21 nt long, riboregulators inhibiting gene expression at a post-transcriptional level. Their most distinctive structural feature is the foldback hairpin of their precursor pre-miRNAs. Even though each pre-miRNA deposited in miRBase has its...... secondary structure already predicted, little is known about the patterns of structural conservation among pre-miRNAs. We address this issue by clustering the human pre-miRNA sequences based on pairwise, sequence and secondary structure alignment using FOLDALIGN, followed by global multiple alignment...

  14. A probabilistic model of RNA conformational space

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Frellsen, Jes; Moltke, Ida; Thiim, Martin

    2009-01-01

    The increasing importance of non-coding RNA in biology and medicine has led to a growing interest in the problem of RNA 3-D structure prediction. As is the case for proteins, RNA 3-D structure prediction methods require two key ingredients: an accurate energy function and a conformational sampling...... procedure. Both are only partly solved problems. Here, we focus on the problem of conformational sampling. The current state of the art solution is based on fragment assembly methods, which construct plausible conformations by stringing together short fragments obtained from experimental structures. However...... efficient sampling of RNA conformations in continuous space, and with associated probabilities. We show that the model captures several key features of RNA structure, such as its rotameric nature and the distribution of the helix lengths. Furthermore, the model readily generates native-like 3-D...

  15. Constructing Catalonia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bill Philips

    2009-07-01

    Full Text Available Catalonia, in common with other nations, has long been concerned with the question of identity and difference. Its problematic relationship with Spain has led to an emphasis on differentiating itself from its larger neighbour (if we are to accept, as most Spaniards do not, that Catalonia is not Spain, a situation complicated by the loss of the Spanish colonies of Cuba and The Philippines in 1898, and the Spanish Civil War and subsequent dictatorship from 1936 to 1976. Beginning in the late nineteenth century, the construction of a Catalan identity followed a similar route to that taken by other European nations such as England, Ireland and, indeed, Spain, including an emphasis on rural values, activities and the countryside, and the conversion of specifically local traditions into national past times. It is only in the last ten years or so that this model of Catalan identity has been recognised for what it is – a model constructed and encouraged for and by specific nationalist political interests. Ironically, Catalonia’s identity abroad has also been constructed and manipulated for political purposes, but from quite a different perspective. Orwell’s /Homage to Catalonia/ (1938 narrates an extremely blinkered version of the Spanish Civil War which has achieved iconic status as a result of cold war politics. Subsequent portrayals of the Spanish Civil War – Valentine Cunningham’s /The Penguin Book of Spanish Civil War Verse/ (ed., Penguin, 1980, or Ken Loach’s 1995 film /Land and Freedom/ base their arguments unquestioningly on /Homage to Catalonia/, perpetuating a view of the nation’s recent history that is both reductive and inaccurate

  16. Constructing dialogues

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bundgaard, Charlotte

    2017-01-01

    The concept of montage is proposed as a driver for establishing heterogeneous, open and dynamic new-industrial architecture. Drawing parallels between the intense industrialization that occurred in Denmark in the 1960s and current scenarios of IT-based production methods, montage is unfolded both...... as an aesthetic strategy and a technical procedure, taking inspiration from both visual arts and architecture. Montage is presented as a means of creating active, architectural interactions - material as well as in terms of meaning - not only in the realm of industrialization but also in the intersection between...... industrial production methods and on-site, craft-based fields of construction....

  17. Constructing History

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jørgensen, Michael Riber

    2010-01-01

    The Icelandic sagas can be read and interpreted in many ways. This article examines the sagas both as literary expressions of a longstanding oral tradition and as part of a collective and cultural memory. The focus in the first part is on people and places in the sagas as ‘realms of memory’: things...... that help construct a common past and a common identity. The second part of the article explores the role of the sagas in medieval Iceland as ‘key myths’ that explain the origin and uniqueness of a society, and as moral and legal role models legitimizing the current social order....

  18. The first successful observation of in-cell NMR signals of DNA and RNA in living human cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yamaoki, Yudai; Kiyoishi, Ayaka; Miyake, Masayuki; Kano, Fumi; Murata, Masayuki; Nagata, Takashi; Katahira, Masato

    2018-01-31

    In order to understand intracellular biological events, information on the structure, dynamics and interaction of proteins and nucleic acids in living cells is of crucial importance. In-cell NMR is a promising method to obtain this information. Although NMR signals of proteins in human cells have been reported, those of nucleic acids were reported only in Xenopus laevis oocytes, i.e., not in human cells. Here, DNA and RNA were introduced into human cells by means of pore formation by bacterial toxin streptolysin O and subsequent resealing. Then, NMR signals of DNA and RNA were successfully observed for the first time in living human cells. The observed signals directly suggested the formation of DNA and RNA hairpin structures in living human cells.

  19. Predicting siRNA efficacy based on multiple selective siRNA representations and their combination at score level

    Science.gov (United States)

    He, Fei; Han, Ye; Gong, Jianting; Song, Jiazhi; Wang, Han; Li, Yanwen

    2017-03-01

    Small interfering RNAs (siRNAs) may induce to targeted gene knockdown, and the gene silencing effectiveness relies on the efficacy of the siRNA. Therefore, the task of this paper is to construct an effective siRNA prediction method. In our work, we try to describe siRNA from both quantitative and qualitative aspects. For quantitative analyses, we form four groups of effective features, including nucleotide frequencies, thermodynamic stability profile, thermodynamic of siRNA-mRNA interaction, and mRNA related features, as a new mixed representation, in which thermodynamic of siRNA-mRNA interaction is introduced to siRNA efficacy prediction for the first time to our best knowledge. And then an F-score based feature selection is employed to investigate the contribution of each feature and remove the weak relevant features. Meanwhile, we encode the siRNA sequence and existed empirical design rules as a qualitative siRNA representation. These two kinds of siRNA representations are combined to predict siRNA efficacy by supported Vector Regression (SVR) at score level. The experimental results indicate that our method may select the features with powerful discriminative ability and make the two kinds of siRNA representations work at full capacity. The prediction results also demonstrate that our method can outperform other popular siRNA efficacy prediction algorithms.

  20. Diverse Gene-Silencing Mechanisms with Distinct Requirements for RNA Polymerase Subunits in Zea mays

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sloan, Amy E.; Sidorenko, Lyudmila; McGinnis, Karen M.

    2014-01-01

    In Zea mays, transcriptional regulation of the b1 (booster1) gene requires a distal enhancer and MEDIATOR OF PARAMUTATION1 (MOP1), MOP2, and MOP3 proteins orthologous to Arabidopsis components of the RNA-dependent DNA methylation pathway. We compared the genetic requirements for MOP1, MOP2, and MOP3 for endogenous gene silencing by two hairpin transgenes with inverted repeats of the a1 (anthocyaninless1) gene promoter (a1pIR) and the b1 gene enhancer (b1IR), respectively. The a1pIR transgene induced silencing of endogenous A1 in mop1-1 and mop3-1, but not in Mop2-1 homozygous plants. This finding suggests that transgene-derived small interfering RNAs (siRNAs) circumvented the requirement for MOP1, a predicted RNA-dependent RNA polymerase, and MOP3, the predicted largest subunit of RNA polymerase IV (Pol IV). Because the Arabidopsis protein orthologous to MOP2 is the second largest subunit of Pol IV and V, our results may indicate that hairpin-induced siRNAs cannot bypass the requirement for the predicted scaffolding activity of Pol V. In contrast to a1pIR, the b1IR transgene silenced endogenous B1 in all three homozygous mutant genotypes—mop1-1, Mop2-1, and mop3-1—suggesting that transgene mediated b1 silencing did not involve MOP2-containing Pol V complexes. Based on the combined results for a1, b1, and three previously described loci, we propose a speculative hypothesis of locus-specific deployment of Pol II, MOP2-containing Pol V, or alternative versions of Pol V with second largest subunits other than MOP2 to explain the mechanistic differences in silencing at specific loci, including one example associated with paramutation. PMID:25164883

  1. An Improved microRNA Annotation of the Canine Genome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Penso-Dolfin, Luca; Swofford, Ross; Johnson, Jeremy; Alföldi, Jessica; Lindblad-Toh, Kerstin; Swarbreck, David; Moxon, Simon; Di Palma, Federica

    2016-01-01

    The domestic dog, Canis familiaris, is a valuable model for studying human diseases. The publication of the latest Canine genome build and annotation, CanFam3.1 provides an opportunity to enhance our understanding of gene regulation across tissues in the dog model system. In this study, we used the latest dog genome assembly and small RNA sequencing data from 9 different dog tissues to predict novel miRNAs in the dog genome, as well as to annotate conserved miRNAs from the miRBase database that were missing from the current dog annotation. We used both miRCat and miRDeep2 algorithms to computationally predict miRNA loci. The resulting, putative hairpin sequences were analysed in order to discard false positives, based on predicted secondary structures and patterns of small RNA read alignments. Results were further divided into high and low confidence miRNAs, using the same criteria. We generated tissue specific expression profiles for the resulting set of 811 loci: 720 conserved miRNAs, (207 of which had not been previously annotated in the dog genome) and 91 novel miRNA loci. Comparative analyses revealed 8 putative homologues of some novel miRNA in ferret, and one in microbat. All miRNAs were also classified into the genic and intergenic categories, based on the Ensembl RefSeq gene annotation for CanFam3.1. This additionally allowed us to identify four previously undescribed MiRtrons among our total set of miRNAs. We additionally annotated piRNAs, using proTRAC on the same input data. We thus identified 263 putative clusters, most of which (211 clusters) were found to be expressed in testis. Our results represent an important improvement of the dog genome annotation, paving the way to further research on the evolution of gene regulation, as well as on the contribution of post-transcriptional regulation to pathological conditions.

  2. Modular Organization of the NusA- and NusG-Stimulated RNA Polymerase Pause Signal That Participates in the Bacillus subtilis trp Operon Attenuation Mechanism.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mondal, Smarajit; Yakhnin, Alexander V; Babitzke, Paul

    2017-07-15

    The Bacillus subtilis trpEDCFBA operon is regulated by a transcription attenuation mechanism in which tryptophan-activated TRAP binds to the nascent transcript and blocks the formation of an antiterminator structure such that the formation of an overlapping intrinsic terminator causes termination in the 5' untranslated region (5' UTR). In the absence of bound TRAP, the antiterminator forms and transcription continues into the trp genes. RNA polymerase pauses at positions U107 and U144 in the 5' UTR. The general transcription elongation factors NusA and NusG stimulate pausing at both positions. NusG-stimulated pausing at U144 requires sequence-specific contacts with a T tract in the nontemplate DNA (ntDNA) strand within the paused transcription bubble. Pausing at U144 participates in a trpE translation repression mechanism. Since U107 just precedes the critical overlap between the antiterminator and terminator structures, pausing at this position is thought to participate in attenuation. Here we carried out in vitro pausing and termination experiments to identify components of the U107 pause signal and to determine whether pausing affects the termination efficiency in the 5' UTR. We determined that the U107 and U144 pause signals are organized in a modular fashion containing distinct RNA hairpin, U-tract, and T-tract components. NusA-stimulated pausing was affected by hairpin strength and the U-tract sequence, whereas NusG-stimulated pausing was affected by hairpin strength and the T-tract sequence. We also determined that pausing at U107 results in increased TRAP-dependent termination in the 5' UTR, implying that NusA- and NusG-stimulated pausing participates in the trp operon attenuation mechanism by providing additional time for TRAP binding.IMPORTANCE The expression of several bacterial operons is controlled by regulated termination in the 5' untranslated region (5' UTR). Transcription attenuation is defined as situations in which the binding of a regulatory

  3. Combinatorics of RNA-RNA interaction

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Li, Thomas J X; Reidys, Christian

    2012-01-01

    RNA-RNA binding is an important phenomenon observed for many classes of non-coding RNAs and plays a crucial role in a number of regulatory processes. Recently several MFE folding algorithms for predicting the joint structure of two interacting RNA molecules have been proposed. Here joint structure...... means that in a diagram representation the intramolecular bonds of each partner are pseudoknot-free, that the intermolecular binding pairs are noncrossing, and that there is no so-called "zigzag" configuration. This paper presents the combinatorics of RNA interaction structures including...

  4. Computational prediction and experimental validation of Ciona intestinalis microRNA genes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pasquinelli Amy E

    2007-11-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background This study reports the first collection of validated microRNA genes in the sea squirt, Ciona intestinalis. MicroRNAs are processed from hairpin precursors to ~22 nucleotide RNAs that base pair to target mRNAs and inhibit expression. As a member of the subphylum Urochordata (Tunicata whose larval form has a notochord, the sea squirt is situated at the emergence of vertebrates, and therefore may provide information about the evolution of molecular regulators of early development. Results In this study, computational methods were used to predict 14 microRNA gene families in Ciona intestinalis. The microRNA prediction algorithm utilizes configurable microRNA sequence conservation and stem-loop specificity parameters, grouping by miRNA family, and phylogenetic conservation to the related species, Ciona savignyi. The expression for 8, out of 9 attempted, of the putative microRNAs in the adult tissue of Ciona intestinalis was validated by Northern blot analyses. Additionally, a target prediction algorithm was implemented, which identified a high confidence list of 240 potential target genes. Over half of the predicted targets can be grouped into the gene ontology categories of metabolism, transport, regulation of transcription, and cell signaling. Conclusion The computational techniques implemented in this study can be applied to other organisms and serve to increase the understanding of the origins of non-coding RNAs, embryological and cellular developmental pathways, and the mechanisms for microRNA-controlled gene regulatory networks.

  5. DSSR: an integrated software tool for dissecting the spatial structure of RNA.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lu, Xiang-Jun; Bussemaker, Harmen J; Olson, Wilma K

    2015-12-02

    Insight into the three-dimensional architecture of RNA is essential for understanding its cellular functions. However, even the classic transfer RNA structure contains features that are overlooked by existing bioinformatics tools. Here we present DSSR (Dissecting the Spatial Structure of RNA), an integrated and automated tool for analyzing and annotating RNA tertiary structures. The software identifies canonical and noncanonical base pairs, including those with modified nucleotides, in any tautomeric or protonation state. DSSR detects higher-order coplanar base associations, termed multiplets. It finds arrays of stacked pairs, classifies them by base-pair identity and backbone connectivity, and distinguishes a stem of covalently connected canonical pairs from a helix of stacked pairs of arbitrary type/linkage. DSSR identifies coaxial stacking of multiple stems within a single helix and lists isolated canonical pairs that lie outside of a stem. The program characterizes 'closed' loops of various types (hairpin, bulge, internal, and junction loops) and pseudoknots of arbitrary complexity. Notably, DSSR employs isolated pairs and the ends of stems, whether pseudoknotted or not, to define junction loops. This new, inclusive definition provides a novel perspective on the spatial organization of RNA. Tests on all nucleic acid structures in the Protein Data Bank confirm the efficiency and robustness of the software, and applications to representative RNA molecules illustrate its unique features. DSSR and related materials are freely available at http://x3dna.org/. © The Author(s) 2015. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of Nucleic Acids Research.

  6. A genome-wide analysis of the RNA-guided silencing pathway in coffee reveals insights into its regulatory mechanisms.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Christiane Noronha Fernandes-Brum

    Full Text Available microRNAs (miRNAs are derived from self-complementary hairpin structures, while small-interfering RNAs (siRNAs are derived from double-stranded RNA (dsRNA or hairpin precursors. The core mechanism of sRNA production involves DICER-like (DCL in processing the smallRNAs (sRNAs and ARGONAUTE (AGO as effectors of silencing, and siRNA biogenesis also involves action of RNA-Dependent RNA Polymerase (RDR, Pol IV and Pol V in biogenesis. Several other proteins interact with the core proteins to guide sRNA biogenesis, action, and turnover. We aimed to unravel the components and functions of the RNA-guided silencing pathway in a non-model plant species of worldwide economic relevance. The sRNA-guided silencing complex members have been identified in the Coffea canephora genome, and they have been characterized at the structural, functional, and evolutionary levels by computational analyses. Eleven AGO proteins, nine DCL proteins (which include a DCL1-like protein that was not previously annotated, and eight RDR proteins were identified. Another 48 proteins implicated in smallRNA (sRNA pathways were also identified. Furthermore, we identified 235 miRNA precursors and 317 mature miRNAs from 113 MIR families, and we characterized ccp-MIR156, ccp-MIR172, and ccp-MIR390. Target prediction and gene ontology analyses of 2239 putative targets showed that significant pathways in coffee are targeted by miRNAs. We provide evidence of the expansion of the loci related to sRNA pathways, insights into the activities of these proteins by domain and catalytic site analyses, and gene expression analysis. The number of MIR loci and their targeted pathways highlight the importance of miRNAs in coffee. We identified several roles of sRNAs in C. canephora, which offers substantial insight into better understanding the transcriptional and post-transcriptional regulation of this major crop.

  7. A genome-wide analysis of the RNA-guided silencing pathway in coffee reveals insights into its regulatory mechanisms

    Science.gov (United States)

    Noronha Fernandes-Brum, Christiane; Marinho Rezende, Pâmela; Cherubino Ribeiro, Thales Henrique; Ricon de Oliveira, Raphael; Cunha de Sousa Cardoso, Thaís; Rodrigues do Amaral, Laurence; de Souza Gomes, Matheus

    2017-01-01

    microRNAs (miRNAs) are derived from self-complementary hairpin structures, while small-interfering RNAs (siRNAs) are derived from double-stranded RNA (dsRNA) or hairpin precursors. The core mechanism of sRNA production involves DICER-like (DCL) in processing the smallRNAs (sRNAs) and ARGONAUTE (AGO) as effectors of silencing, and siRNA biogenesis also involves action of RNA-Dependent RNA Polymerase (RDR), Pol IV and Pol V in biogenesis. Several other proteins interact with the core proteins to guide sRNA biogenesis, action, and turnover. We aimed to unravel the components and fu