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Sample records for hagfish myxine glutinosa

  1. Ventilation and oxygen consumption in the hagfish, Myxine glutinosa L

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    STEFFENSEN, JF; JOHANSEN, K; SINDBERG, CD

    1984-01-01

    Ventilation was measured directly in the hagfish, Myxine glutinosa L., by means of an electro-magnetic blood flowmeter. Ventilatory flow and frequency increased from 0.86 ± 0.27 mlmin-, and 18.2 ± 5.1min-, respectively, at 7°C to 1.70 ± 0.20 mlmin-, and 70.1 ± 9.5min- at 15 C. Standard oxygen...

  2. Distribution of immunoreactive adenohypophysial cell types in the pituitaries of the Atlantic and the Pacific hagfish, Myxine glutinosa and Eptatretus burgeri.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nozaki, Masumi; Oshima, Yasuo; Miki, Makoto; Shimotani, Toyokazu; Kawauchi, Hiroshi; Sower, Stacia A

    2005-09-01

    The hagfish is considered the most primitive vertebrate known, living or extinct. It remains an enigma whether adenohypophysial hormones similar to those of more advanced vertebrates are present in the hagfish pituitary gland or not. The present study aimed to detect immunoreactive adenohypophysial hormones in the hagfish pituitary gland, using antisera to tetrapod and fish adenohypophysial hormones as immunohistochemical probes. For this purpose, two species of hagfish, the Atlantic hagfish, Myxine glutinosa, and the Pacific hagfish, Eptatretus burgeri, were used. In both species, three different types of immunoreactive cells were detected in the adenohypophysis. (1) The first type of cells was gonadotropin (GTH)-like cells which were stained by antisera to LH-related GTHs, such as ovine LHbeta, human LHbeta, bullfrog LH, salmon LHbeta and sturgeon LHbeta in both species of hagfish. (2) The second type of cells that were detected was growth hormone (GH)/prolactin (PRL)-like cells. In M. glutinosa the cells were stained by antisera to salmon GH, salmon PRL, sturgeon GH, sturgeon PRL, blue shark GH, and lamprey GH. In E. burgeri the cells were only stained by anti-human GH and anti-sturgeon PRL. (3) The last type of cells was adrenocorticotropin (ACTH)-like cells. These cells were stained by antisera to lamprey ACTH and human beta-endorphin. In both species of hagfish, GTH-like cells were relatively abundant, and were distributed throughout the adenohypophysis, whereas GH/PRL-like and ACTH-like cells were few in number in the adenohypophysis. Based on these findings, we suggest that hagfish may have retained ancestral characteristics of key anterior pituitary hormones.

  3. The mitochondrial DNA molecule of the hagfish (Myxine glutinosa) and vertebrate phylogeny.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rasmussen, A S; Janke, A; Arnason, U

    1998-04-01

    The vertebrates are traditionally classified into two distinct groups, Agnatha (jawless vertebrates) and Gnathostomata (jawed vertebrates). Extant agnathans are represented by hagfishes (Myxiniformes) and lampreys (Petromyzontiformes), frequently grouped together within the Cyclostomata. Whereas the recognition of the Gnathostomata as a clade is commonly acknowledged, a consensus has not been reached regarding whether or not Cyclostomata represents a clade. In the present study we have used newly established sequences of the protein-coding genes of the mitochondrial DNA molecule of the hagfish to explore agnathan and gnathostome relationships. The phylogenetic analysis of Pisces, using echinoderms as outgroup, placed the hagfish as a sister group of Vertebrata sensu stricto, i.e., the lamprey and the gnathostomes. The phylogenetic analysis of the Gnathostomata identified a basal divergence between gnathostome fishes and a branch leading to birds and mammals, i.e., between "Anamnia" and Amniota. The lungfish has a basal position among gnathostome fishes with the teleosts as the most recently evolving lineage. The findings portray a hitherto unrecognized polarity in the evolution of bony fishes. The presently established relationships are incompatible with previous molecular studies.

  4. Taxonomy Icon Data: Atlantic hagfish [Taxonomy Icon

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available L.png Myxine_glutinosa_NL.png Myxine_glutinosa_S.png Myxine_glutinosa_NS.png http://biosciencedbc.jp/taxonomy..._icon/icon.cgi?i=Myxine+glutinosa&t=L http://biosciencedbc.jp/taxonomy_icon/icon.cgi?i=Myxine+glutinosa&t=N...L http://biosciencedbc.jp/taxonomy_icon/icon.cgi?i=Myxine+glutinosa&t=S http://biosciencedbc.jp/taxonomy_icon/icon.cgi?i=Myxine+glutinosa&t=NS ...

  5. Hagfish Houdinis: biomechanics and behavior of squeezing through small openings.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Freedman, Calli R; Fudge, Douglas S

    2017-03-01

    Hagfishes are able to squeeze through small openings to gain entry to crevices, burrows, hagfish traps and carcasses, but little is known about how they do this, or what the limits of this ability are. The purpose of this study was to describe this ability, and to investigate possible mechanisms by which it is accomplished. We investigated the hypothesis that the passive movement of blood within a hagfish's flaccid subcutaneous sinus allows it to squeeze through narrow apertures that it would not be able to if it were turgid. To test this hypothesis, we analyzed videos of Atlantic hagfish (Myxine glutinosa) and Pacific hagfish (Eptatretus stoutii) moving through narrow apertures in the lab. We measured changes in body width as the animals moved through these openings and documented the behaviors associated with this ability. We found that hagfishes are able to pass through narrow slits that are less than one half the width of their bodies. Our results are consistent with the idea that a flaccid subcutaneous sinus allows hagfish to squeeze through narrow apertures by facilitating a rapid redistribution of venous blood. In addition, we describe nine distinct behaviors associated with this ability, including a form of non-undulatory locomotion also seen in snakes and lampreys. Our results illuminate a behavior that may be a critical component of the hagfish niche, as a result of its likely importance in feeding and avoiding predators. © 2017. Published by The Company of Biologists Ltd.

  6. Estimate of the parameters for a ring-shaped {open_quotes}myxine{close_quotes} for galatea thermonuclear reactors

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Morozov, A.I.; Khripunov, V.I.

    1992-07-01

    The parameters of an autonomous ring-shaped myxine are estimated in connection with the conditions for an energy-producing thermonuclear reactor operating with DT and D{sup 3}He reactions. 11 refs., 3 figs. 1 tab.

  7. Hypothalamic-Pituitary-Gonadal Endocrine System in the Hagfish

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    Masumi eNozaki

    2013-12-01

    Full Text Available The hypothalamic-pituitary system is considered to be a seminal event that emerged prior to or during the differentiation of the ancestral agnathans (jawless vertebrates. Hagfishes as one of the only two extant members of the class of agnathans are considered the most primitive vertebrate known, living or extinct. Accordingly, studies on their reproduction are important for understanding the evolution and phylogenetic aspects of the vertebrate reproductive endocrine system. In gnathostomes (jawed vertebrates, the hormones of the hypothalamus and pituitary have been extensively studied and shown to have well-defined roles in the control of reproduction. In hagfish, it was thought that they did not have the same neuroendocrine control of reproduction as gnathostomes, since it was not clear whether the hagfish pituitary gland contained tropic hormones of any kind. This review highlights the recent findings of the hypothalamic-pituitary-gonadal endocrine system in the hagfish. In contrast to gnathostomes that have two gonadotropins (GTH: luteinizing hormone and follicle-stimulating hormone, only one pituitary GTH has been identified in the hagfish. Immunohistochemical and functional studies confirmed that this hagfish GTH was significantly correlated with the developmental stages of the gonads and showed the presence of a steroid (estradiol feedback system at the hypothalamic-pituitary levels. Moreover, while the identity of hypothalamic gonadotropin releasing hormone (GnRH has not been determined, immunoreactive (ir GnRH has been shown in the hagfish brain including seasonal changes of ir-GnRH corresponding to gonadal reproductive stages. In addition, a hagfish PQRFamide peptide was identified and shown to stimulate the expression of hagfish GTH mRNA in the hagfish pituitary. These findings provide evidence that there are neuroendocrine-pituitary hormones that share common structure and functional features compared to later evolved vertebrates.

  8. Gill ultrastructure of the Pacific hagfish Eptatretus stouti.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mallatt, J; Paulsen, C

    1986-10-01

    At the gross anatomical level, hagfish gills show unusual features not seen in any other fish gills. Our study was undertaken to determine if peculiarities also characterize the microscopic anatomy and ultrastructure of hagfish gills. To the contrary, branchial respiratory lamellae of Pacific hagfish were found to resemble the lamellae of lampreys, elasmobranchs, and teleosts, often down to the finest subcellular details. As in other fish, hagfish lamellae are lined by epithelium containing pavement cells with organelles indicative of a secretory function, basal cells showing undifferentiated cell features, and branchial ionocytes. The ionocytes are identical to chloride cells of teleosts in cytostructure, distribution, and abundance. There are pillar and marginal capillaries in hagfish gill lamellae. Pillar cells contain bundles of 5-nm microfilaments, and they associate with collagen columns as in other fish. Hagfish pillar cells do exhibit odd features, however: They cluster (groups of up to nine were seen), and their extracellular collagen columns are rarer than in other fish gills (averaging only two columns per three pillar cells). Other special features of hagfish gills are the following: lipid droplets and smooth endoplasmic reticulum are well developed in all cell types; pavement cells secrete a lipomucous product (stains with periodic acid-Schiff, Alcian blue, and Sudan black B); and goblet cells are absent. The presence of "chloride cells" in hagfish is puzzling, as hagfish body fluids are iso-osmotic to seawater and there is no need to osmoregulate for sodium chloride; the ionocytes contain carbonic anhydrase, suggesting a function in acid/base regulation.

  9. Non-parsimonious evolution of hagfish Dlx genes

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    Fujimoto Satoko

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The number of members of the Dlx gene family increased during the two rounds of whole-genome duplication that occurred in the common ancestor of the vertebrates. Because the Dlx genes are involved in the development of the cranial skeleton, brain, and sensory organs, their expression patterns have been analysed in various organisms in the context of evolutionary developmental biology. Six Dlx genes have been isolated in the lampreys, a group of living jawless vertebrates (cyclostomes, and their expression patterns analysed. However, little is known about the Dlx genes in the hagfish, the other cyclostome group, mainly because the embryological analysis of this animal is difficult. Results To identify the hagfish Dlx genes and describe their expression patterns, we cloned the cDNA from embryos of the Japanese inshore hagfish Eptatretus burgeri. Our results show that the hagfish has at least six Dlx genes and one pseudogene. In a phylogenetic analysis, the hagfish Dlx genes and those of the lampreys tended to be excluded from the clade of the gnathostome Dlx genes. In several cases, the lamprey Dlx genes clustered with the clade consisting of two hagfish genes, suggesting that independent gene duplications have occurred in the hagfish lineage. Analysis of the expression of these genes showed distinctive overlapping expression patterns in the cranial mesenchymal cells and the inner ear. Conclusions Independent duplication, pseudogenization, and loss of the Dlx genes probably occurred in the hagfish lineage after its split from the other vertebrate lineages. This pattern is reminiscent of the non-parsimonious evolution of its morphological traits, including its inner ear and vertebrae, which indicate that this group is an early-branching lineage that diverged before those characters evolved.

  10. Structure and Function of Lactate Dehydrogenase from Hagfish

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    Mitsumasa Okada

    2010-03-01

    Full Text Available The lactate dehydrogenases (LDHs in hagfish have been estimated to be the prototype of those in higher vertebrates. The effects of high hydrostatic pressure from 0.1 to 100 MPa on LDH activities from three hagfishes were examined. The LDH activities of Eptatretus burgeri, living at 45–60 m, were completely lost at 5 MPa. In contrast, LDH-A and -B in Eptatretus okinoseanus maintained 70% of their activities even at 100 MPa. These results show that the deeper the habitat, the higher the tolerance to pressure. To elucidate the molecular mechanisms for adaptation to high pressure, we compared the amino acid sequences and three-dimensional structures of LDHs in these hagfish. There were differences in six amino acids (6, 10, 20, 156, 269, and 341. These amino acidresidues are likely to contribute to the stability of the E. okinoseanus LDH under high-pressure conditions. The amino acids responsible for the pressure tolerance of hagfish are the same in both human and hagfish LDHs, and one substitution that occurred as an adaptation during evolution is coincident with that observed in a human disease. Mutation of these amino acids can cause anomalies that may be implicated in the development of human diseases.

  11. Rehmannia glutinosa: review of botany, chemistry and pharmacology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Ru-Xue; Li, Mao-Xing; Jia, Zheng-Ping

    2008-05-08

    Rehmannia glutinosa, a widely used traditional Chinese herb, belongs to the family of Scrophulariaceae, and is taken to nourish Yin and invigorate the kidney in traditional Chinese medicine (TCM) and has a very high medicinal value. In recent decades, a great number of chemical and pharmacological studies have been done on Rehmannia glutinosa. More than 70 compounds including iridoids, saccharides, amino acid, inorganic ions, as well as other trace elements have been found in the herb. Studies show that Rehmannia glutinosa and its active principles possess wide pharmacological actions on the blood system, immune system, endocrine system, cardiovascular system and the nervous system. Currently, the effective monomeric compounds or active parts have been screened for the pharmacological activity of Rehmannia glutinosa and the highest quality scientific data is delivered to support the further application and exploitation for new drug development.

  12. A new species of hagfish (Myxinidae: Eptatretus) from Papua New Guinea.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fernholm, B; Mincarone, M M

    2010-09-01

    A new species of seven-gilled hagfish Eptatretus astrolabium (Myxinidae) is described from a 400 mm total length female trapped 1 km east from Planet Rock, Astrolabe Bay, Papua New Guinea, at c. 500 m depth. This is the first hagfish species reported from the waters around New Guinea. It can be distinguished from other hagfishes by a combination of characters including seven pairs of gill apertures, three-cusp multicusps on the anterior and posterior rows of cusps, 10 posterior unicusps, 52 total cusps, 18-19 prebranchial pores, five branchial pores, 48-49 trunk pores, 83-84 total pores and no nasal-sinus papillae. © 2010 The Authors. Journal compilation © 2010 The Fisheries Society of the British Isles.

  13. FMRF-amide-like immunoreactivity in brain and pituitary of the hagfish Eptatretus burgeri (Cyclostomata)

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jirikowski, G; Erhart, G; Grimmelikhuijzen, C J

    1984-01-01

    Paraffin sections of brain and pituitary of the hagfish Eptatretus burgeri were immunostained with an antiserum to FMRF-amide. Immunoreactivity was visible in a large number of neurons in the posterior part of the ventromedial hypothalamus and in long neuronal processes extending cranially from...... the hypothalamus to the olfactory system and caudally to the medulla oblongata. FMRF-amide-like immunoreactivity was also found in cells of the adenohypophysis. These observations suggest that the hagfish possesses a brain FMRF-amide-like transmitter system and pituitary cells containing FMRF-amide-like material...

  14. Evidence for independent Hox gene duplications in the hagfish lineage: a PCR-based gene inventory of Eptatretus stoutii.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stadler, Peter F; Fried, Claudia; Prohaska, Sonja J; Bailey, Wendy J; Misof, Bernhard Y; Ruddle, Frank H; Wagner, Günter P

    2004-09-01

    Hox genes code for transcription factors that play a major role in the development of all animal phyla. In invertebrates these genes usually occur as tightly linked cluster, with a few exceptions where the clusters have been dissolved. Only in vertebrates multiple clusters have been demonstrated which arose by duplication from a single ancestral cluster. This history of Hox cluster duplications, in particular during the early elaboration of the vertebrate body plan, is still poorly understood. In this paper we report the results of a PCR survey on genomic DNA of the pacific hagfish Eptatretus stoutii. Hagfishes are one of two clades of recent jawless fishes that are an offshoot of the early radiation of jawless vertebrates. Our data provide evidence for at least 33 distinct Hox genes in the hagfish genome, which is most compatible with the hypothesis of multiple Hox clusters. The largest number, seven, of distinct homeobox fragments could be assigned to paralog group 9, which could imply that the hagfish has more than four clusters. Quartet mapping reveals that within each paralog group the hagfish sequences are statistically more closely related to gnathostome Hox genes than with either amphioxus or lamprey genes. These results support two assumptions about the history of Hox genes: (1) The association of hagfish homeobox sequences with gnathostome sequences suggests that at least one Hox cluster duplication event happened in the stem of vertebrates, i.e., prior to the most recent common ancestor of jawed and jawless vertebrates. (2) The high number of paralog group 9 sequences in hagfish and the phylogenetic position of hagfish suggests that the hagfish lineage underwent additional independent Hox cluster/-gene duplication events.

  15. Retinofugal and retinopetal projections in the Pacific hagfish, Eptatretus stouti (Myxinoidea).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wicht, H; Northcutt, R G

    1990-01-01

    The retinofugal and retinopetal connections of the Pacific hagfish were determined using the fluorescent compound DiI as an in vitro tracer. The retinofugal connections were found to be bilateral and to reach preoptic, thalamic and pretectal, as well as tectal, targets. No distinct basal optic root was found. A retinopetal projection in hagfishes is described here for the first time. It originates from two cells groups in the rostral mesencephalic tegmentum. These retinal connections in hagfishes are compared to the organization of the visual system in the second Recent group of jawless fishes, the lampreys. Both visual systems are similar in the number and location of the targets of retinal fibers. Furthermore, there is a striking similarity in the retinopetal systems. Major differences are found in the organization of the optic tract. These observations allow the identification of some cell groups not previously recognized in myxinoid brains or interpreted differently. Finally, the findings are discussed in relation to visually guided behavior in hagfishes.

  16. Morphometics and gonadal development of the hagfish Eptatretus cirrhatus in New Zealand.

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    Frederic H Martini

    Full Text Available Hagfishes have been the target of commercial fisheries in many areas of the world, with the catch processed for leather and for human consumption. A fishery has been operating in New Zealand waters for the last six years, harvesting the bearded hagfish, Eptatretus cirrhatus. The fishery has thus far been unregulated. Based on samples collected dockside over a two-year period, this report expands the morphometric database for this species, provides information on the size and weight of the harvested animals, determines the sizes at the onset of gonadal development and the minimum sizes at sexual maturation for males and females, and indicates that E. cirrhatus, like most other hagfish species, has no specific breeding season. Although females appear in the population at smaller sizes, the sex ratio for mature animals is 1:1 and the sizes of the largest males and females are comparable. The changes observed in sex ratio as a function of TL suggest differences in the timing and rates of gonadal development in females versus males rather than protogyny. Based on the size of the eggs, the number of eggs per female, the proportion of the population that contains large eggs, and the number of postovulatory females, it is clear that E. cirrhatus, like other hagfish species, are potentially vulnerable to overexploitation.

  17. Telencephalic connections in the Pacific hagfish (Eptatretus stouti), with special reference to the thalamopallial system.

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    Wicht, H; Northcutt, R G

    1998-06-01

    The pallium of hagfishes (myxinoids) is unique: It consists of a superficial "cortical" mantle of gray matter which is subdivided into several layers and fields, but it is not clear whether or how these subdivisions can be compared to those of other craniates, i.e., lampreys and gnathostomes. The pallium of hagfishes receives extensive secondary olfactory projections (Wicht and Northcutt [1993] J. Comp. Neurol. 337:529-542), but there are no experimental data on its nonolfactory connections. We therefore investigated the pallial and dorsal thalamic connections of the Pacific hagfish. Injections of tracers into the pallium labeled many cells bilaterally in the olfactory bulbs. Other pallial afferents arise from the contralateral pallium, the dorsal thalamic nuclei, the preoptic region, and the posterior tubercular nuclei. Descending pallial efferents reach the preoptic region, the dorsal thalamus, and the mesencephalic tectum but not the motor or premotor centers of the brainstem. Injections of tracers into the dorsal thalamus confirmed the presence of reciprocal thalamopallial connections. In addition, these injections revealed that there is no "preferred" pallial target for the ascending thalamic fibers; instead, ascending thalamic and secondary olfactory projections overlap throughout the pallium. The mesencephalic tectum and tegmentum, which receive afferents from a variety of sensory sources, are interconnected with the dorsal thalamus; thus, ascending nonolfactory sensory information may reach myxinoid pallia via a tectal-thalamic-telencephalic route. A comparative analysis of pallial organization reveals that the subdivisions of the pallium in gnathostomes (i.e., medial, dorsal, and lateral pallia) cannot be recognized with certainty in hagfishes.

  18. Gelation of Soy Milk with Hagfish Exudate Creates a Flocculated and Fibrous Emulsion- and Particle Gel.

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    Lukas Böni

    Full Text Available Hagfish slime is an ultra dilute, elastic and cohesive hydrogel that deploys within milliseconds in cold seawater from a glandularly secreted exudate. The slime is made of long keratin-like fibers and mucin-like glycoproteins that span a network which entraps water and acts as a defense mechanism against predators. Unlike other hydrogels, the slime only confines water physically and is very susceptible to mechanical stress, which makes it unsuitable for many processing operations and potential applications. Despite its huge potential, little work has been done to improve and functionalize the properties of this hydrogel. To address this shortcoming, hagfish exudate was mixed with a soy protein isolate suspension (4% w/v and with a soy emulsion (commercial soy milk to form a more stable structure and combine the functionalities of a suspension and emulsion with those of the hydrogel. Hagfish exudate interacted strongly with the soy systems, showing a markedly increased viscoelasticity and water retention. Hagfish mucin was found to induce a depletion and bridging mechanism, which caused the emulsion and suspension to flocculate, making "soy slime", a cohesive and cold-set emulsion- and particle gel. The flocculation network increases viscoelasticity and substantially contributes to liquid retention by entrapping liquid in the additional confinements between aggregated particles and protein fibers. Because the mucin-induced flocculation resembles the salt- or acid-induced flocculation in tofu curd production, the soy slime was cooked for comparison. The cooked soy slime was similar to conventional cooked tofu, but possessed a long-range cohesiveness from the fibers. The fibrous, cold-set, and curd-like structure of the soy slime represents a novel way for a cold coagulation and fiber incorporation into a suspension or emulsion. This mechanism could be used to efficiently gel functionalized emulsions or produce novel tofu-like structured food

  19. Effects of growth conditions and processing on Rehmannia glutinosa using fingerprint strategy

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Chang, W.T.; Thissen, U.; Ehlert, K.A.; Koek, M.M.; Jellema, R.H.; Hankemeier, T.; Greef, J. van der; Wang, M.

    2006-01-01

    Metabolite profiling in combination with multivariate statistics is a sophisticated method for quality assessment of natural products. For the development of a quality control strategy in Traditional Chinese Medicine (TCM), we have measured the metabolite fingerprints of Rehmannia glutinosa by

  20. The forebrain of the Pacific hagfish: a cladistic reconstruction of the ancestral craniate forebrain.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wicht, H; Northcutt, R G

    1992-01-01

    The forebrain of the Pacific hagfish is described with regard to its morphology, cytoarchitecture, and secondary olfactory projections. The forebrain ventricular system is greatly reduced in adult hagfishes, although vestiges of ventricular structures can still be recognized. In order to clarify topographical relationships within the forebrain, we provide a three-dimensional reconstruction of the ventricular system, including the vestigial portions. Topography and embryology lead us to conclude that the 'primordium hippocampi' of previous authors is a diencephalic structure. For topographical and hodological reasons, we interpret the 'area basalis' of previous authors to be part of the preoptic region, and we identify a part of the so-called 'nucleus olfactorius anterior' as the homologue of the striatum. The laminated pallium is dominated by secondary olfactory projections and shows a high degree of regional cytoarchitectural specialization, as does the entire forebrain. In all, 42 cell groups are identified in the forebrain of hagfishes (compared to only about 25 in lampreys, for example). This surprisingly high degree of cytoarchitectural complexity prompted us to re-examine the phylogenetic history of craniate brains with this complexity in mind. In this paper we use cladistic methodology to reconstruct a morphotype, and we conclude that the forebrains of the earliest craniates may have been more complex than previously believed. This reconstruction includes hypotheses regarding the general morphology, secondary olfactory system, and visual system, as well as the relative sizes of major divisions of the forebrain in the earliest craniates.

  1. Secondary olfactory projections and pallial topography in the Pacific hagfish, Eptatretus stouti.

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    Wicht, H; Northcutt, R G

    1993-11-22

    The extent of the secondary olfactory projections shows great variation among different groups of craniates. Gnathostomes typically display restricted secondary olfactory projections, whereas lampreys have more extensive projections. Any attempt to determine the phylogenetic polarity of these characters, that is, to decide which is primitive and which is derived, requires an investigation of the secondary olfactory system in the sister group of lampreys and gnathostomes, the hagfishes. Therefore the secondary olfactory projections of the Pacific hagfish, Eptatretus stouti, were traced with the use of horseradish peroxidase and the lipophilic fluorescent tracing compound DiI. The projections are bilateral and massive to all pallial areas and the septum, moderate to the striatum, and relatively weak to the preoptic and infundibular regions of the hypothalamus, reaching caudally to the diencephalic-mesencephalic boundary. Afferents to the olfactory bulb arise from the pallium, the preoptic area, and the ventral thalamus. We compare the secondary olfactory projections in hagfishes with those in lampreys and in gnathostomes, and we conclude that the presence of extensive secondary olfactory projections is a primitive character of craniate brains.

  2. [Construction and analysis of suppression subtractive cDNA libraries of continuous monoculture Rehmannia glutinosa].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Zhongyi; Fan, Huamin; Yang, Yanhui; Li, Mingjie; Li, Juan; Xu, Haixia; Chen, Junying; Chen, Xinjian

    2011-02-01

    To explore the molecular mechanism of continuous monoculture problem by constructing the cDNA libraries of continuous monoculture Rehmannia glutinosa. To use the suppression subtractive hybridization (SSH) technique to construct the forward and reverse subtractive cDNA libraries of continuous monoculture R. glutinosa to adopt blue-white colony screening and PCR to detect the positive clones which would be sequenced and analyzed by bioinformatics. The subtracted cDNA libraries of continuous monoculture R. glutinosa. were successfully constructed, and the result showed that the forward and reverse subtracted libraries obtained 300 positive clones, respectively. The forward and reverse libraries got different ESTs, and produced 232 (forward library) and 214 (reverse library) unique ESTs by sequencing. Based on homology search of BLASTX and BLASTN in NCBI, 200 and 195 of unique ESTs were homologous to known genes in the forward and reverse libraries, respectively. Categories of orthologous group (COG) showed that the forward and reverse libraries got 60 and 61 ESTs with the corresponding gene annotation, involving 21 metabolic pathways. The information of differential expression genes in continuous monoculture R. glutinosa, and their functional annotation of differentially expressed genes indicate that continuous monoculture has a profound effect on expression of the genes in R. glutinosa. Furthermore, the research analyzed several key genes in response to replant problem, which provided a foundation for revealing the molecular mechanism of continuous monoculture R. glutinosa.

  3. Cuphea glutinosa (Lythraceae en sierras del sistema de Tandilia: Morfología y Ambiente Cuphea glutinosa (Lythraceae in Tandilia system hills: morphology and environment

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    Cristina Yagueddú

    2006-12-01

    Full Text Available Cuphea glutinosa Cham. et Schlecht. es una especie conocida por sus propiedades diuréticas e hipotensoras. Sin embargo, no hay antecedentes sobre las relaciones de esta especie con el ambiente. Los objetivos del presente trabajo fueron determinar la cobertura de C. glutinosa y de la flora acompañante, estudiar su morfología y arquitectura en diferentes condiciones ambientales, y analizar las características de algunos suelos en donde crece. Se trabajó en tres sierras del Sistema de Tandilia. Sierra Bachicha, con la menor perturbación antrópica, presentó la menor cobertura de C. glutinosa, con la mayor riqueza específica y diversidad. Sierra de los Padres, con la mayor perturbación antrópica, presentó la mayor cobertura de C. glutinosa y la menor riqueza y diversidad. Se observaron variaciones morfológicas en sitios con baja luminosidad manifestadas en alargamiento de tallos, aumento del tamaño de lámina foliar, disminución de su grosor y de la densidad de pelos. C. glutinosa se presentó en suelos con diferentes características en cuanto a profundidad, granulometría y propiedades químicas. Este estudio revela que esta especie presenta plasticidad fenotípica y puede prosperar en diferentes condiciones ambientales. Sin embargo, la especie estudiada fue más abundante y vigorosa en sitios abiertos, con baja altura de la vegetación y alta perturbación antrópica.Cuphea glutinosa Cham. et Schlecht. is known by its diuretic and hypotensive properties. However, there are no studies of the relations of this species with the environment where it grows. The objectives of the present work were to determine the cover of C. glutinosa and its associated flora, to analyze themorphology and architecture in different environmental conditions and to characterize some soils where it grew. The study was carried out in three hills of the Tandilia System. Sierra Bachicha, slightly disturbed, presented the lowest cover of C. glutinosa , but the

  4. [Correlation of Allelopathy of Rehmannia glutinosa Root Exudates and Their Phenolic Acids Contents].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Bao; Li, Xuan-zhen; Feng, Fa-jie; Gu, Li; Zhang, Jun-yi; Zhang, Liu-ji; Zhang, Zhong-yi

    2015-04-01

    To study the allelopathic potential of Rehmannia glutinosa root exudates in different growth stages and dynamic change of phenolic acids contents, in order to reveal the correlation between phenolic acids and allelbpathy effect of Rehmannia glutinosa. Root exudates of Rehmannia glutinosa in different growth stages were obtained by a new instrument which was used to collect the root exudates of xerophytes. After that, bioassay was applied to estimate allelopathy effect of the root exudates. HPLC was used to determine the contents of five phenolic acids (coumaric acid, 4-hydroxybenzoic acid, vanillic acid, syringic acid and ferulic acid) which were reported to relate to allelopathy effect. Correlation of bioassay data and HPLC data were also analyzed. The germination rate of radish after soaking by root exudates of different growth stages of Rehmannia glutinosa was 97. 89%, 92. 38%, 89. 52%, 85. 71%, 85. 71%, 84. 76% and 83. 81%, respectively, which indicated a decline trend. And significant differences were shown from previous enlargement stage compared with the contrast. The bud length after soaking by root exudates was 5. 68, 5. 76, 5. 91, 5. 65, 5. 41, 5. 28 and 5. 11 cm, separately, which increased slightly before decreasing gradually. Previous enlargement stage was also the initial period when significant differences were shown. Five phenolic acids were detected in root exudates by HPLC, while the change of their contents and the allelopathy effect of root exudates did not perform a similar trend. Correlation analysis indicated the five phenolic acids did not have significant relevance (r = - 0. 666 - 0. 590) with germination rate and bud length of radish except the negative correlation (r = -0. 833, P allelopathy effect of Rehmannia glutinosa is performed from previous enlargement stage and enhanced with its growth. Syringic acid is a probable dominant allelochemical of Rehmannia glutinosa.

  5. Decontamination of organochlorine pesticides residue and heavy metal in Rehmannia glutinosa Libosch by SFE.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhao, Chunjie; Bai, Lu; Ou, Yingfu; Li, Dan; Xin, Chunhong

    2009-01-01

    A method involving the simultaneous extraction and decontamination of 12 organochlorine pesticides (OCPs) and seven heavy metals (HM) from Rehmannia glutinosa Libosch was established using supercritical fluid extraction (SFE). A gas chromatography (GC) method with electron capture detection was employed for the determination of the OCPs. The quantitative determination of active constituents (iridoid glycoside and catalpol) in Rehmannia glutinosa Libosch was detected by high-performance liquid chromatography (HPLC). An atomic absorption spectrometry (AAS) was designed for the determination of seven HM, including lead (Pb), cadmium (Cd), copper (Cu), iron (Fe), zinc (Zn), arsenic (As), and mercury (Hg) in Rehmannia glutinosa Libosch. Recovery of the determination of the 12 organochlorine pesticides in Rehmannia glutinosa Libosch sample was 85.9%-101.4% by GC, and relative standard deviation (RSD) was 1.9%-6.0%. Catalpol determination with HPLC in a Rehmannia glutinosa Libosch sample was 0.2486 and 0.2559 mg/mL before and after decontaminating OCPs by SFE, respectively. Those were 0.2486 and 0.2632 mg/mL before and after decontaminating HM by SFE, respectively. After a series of experiments to optimize the final SFE, the following conditions were used to determine the OCPs: pure CO(2), extraction pressure of 15 Mpa, extraction temperature of 60 degrees C, extraction time of 30 min, flow rate at 35 kg/h, and the final SFE conditions of HM was pure CO(2), extraction pressure of 18 Mpa, extraction temperature of 50 degrees C, extraction time of 20 min, modifier at 2.5 mL/50 g. The SFE was used to remove the 12 OCP residues and seven HM residues from Rehmannia glutinosa Libosch with less residue left and negligible loss of the active constituent catalpol.

  6. Histochemical analyses of hepatic architecture of the hagfish with special attention to periportal biliary structures.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Umezu, Arisa; Kametani, Harunobu; Akai, Yusuke; Koike, Toru; Shiojiri, Nobuyoshi

    2012-07-01

    The hagfish liver was histochemically examined with special attention to biliary structures around the portal veins. Hepatocytes were organized into tubular structures surrounded by sinusoids. Biliary ductule structures, which resemble the ductal plates transiently appearing in mammalian liver development, were observed around the portal veins, but they did not appear around central veins. Thus, the hagfish liver demonstrates the same basic structure as the mammalian liver; that is, a vascular system from portal to central veins via sinusoids, and portal triad structures consisting of portal veins, hepatic arteries, and intrahepatic bile ducts. The epithelial cells of the ductal platelike structures strongly expressed cytokeratin, had some lectin-binding sites, and were delineated by the basal lamina, which was reactive for periodic acid-Schiff (PAS) staining and Iectin histochemistry. The lumina of the ductal plate-like structures were comparatively small and heterogeneous in diameter around the portal veins, suggesting that the biliary structures may not be efficient for bile secretion. The epithelial cells of the gall bladder had a simple columnar shape and were a PAS-positive cytoplasm. Those of bile ducts near the hilus, including extrahepatic and hepatic ducts, were simple columnar or cuboidal cells, and had large lumina. The cytoplasm in these cells was PAS-positive. These phenotypes with the expression of lectin-binding sites were clearly different from those of the ductal plate-like structures in the liver proper, suggesting that the extrahepatic and intrahepatic biliary structures may have different developmental origins.

  7. Antiparasitic activities of acridone alkaloids from Swinglea glutinosa (Bl.) Merr

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Santos, Djalma A.P. dos; Vieira, Paulo C.; Silva, M. Fatima das G.F. da; Fernandes, Joao B. [Universidade Federal de Sao Carlos, SP (Brazil). Dept. de Quimica; Rattray, Lauren; Croft, Simon L. [London School of Hygiene and Tropical Medicine, London (United Kingdom). Dept. of Infectious and Tropical Diseases

    2009-07-01

    Eleven acridone alkaloids isolated from Swinglea glutinosa (Bl.) Merr. were examined for in vitro activity against chloroquine-sensitive Plasmodium falciparum 3D7, Trypanosoma brucei rhodesiense STIB900 and Leishmania donovani L82. An assay with KB cells was developed in order to compare in vitro toxicity of alkaloids with the selective action on the parasites. Nine of the compounds had IC{sub 50} values ranging from 0.3 to 11.6 {mu}M against P. falciparum. In contrast, a small number of compounds showed significant activity against T. brucei rhodesiense and none had activity against L. donovani. Among the alkaloids three had IC{sub 50} < 1.0 {mu}M against P. falciparum, whereas against T. b. rhodesiense five had IC{sub 50} < 10 {mu}M. The characterization of the acridone alkaloids, 1,3,5-trihydroxy-4-methoxy-10-methyl-2,8-bis(3-methylbut-2-enyl)acridin-9 (10H)-one (1), 2,3-dihydro-4,9-dihydroxy-2-(2-hydroxypropan-2-yl)-11-methoxy-10-methylfuro [3,2-b] acridin-5(10H)-one (2) and 3,4-dihydro-3,5,8-trihydroxy-6-methoxy-2,2,7-trimethyl-2Hpyrano[ 2,3-a]acridin-12(7H)-one (3), is discussed, as well as the structure-activity relationship of all compounds assayed. Isolation and spectral data of alkaloids 1-3 are described for the first time although their cytotoxicities to cancer cells have been described before. (author)

  8. An immunohistochemical study of the telencephalon and the diencephalon in a Myxinoid jawless fish, the Pacific hagfish, Eptatretus stouti.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wicht, H; Northcutt, R G

    1994-01-01

    The forebrain of adult hagfishes (jawless craniates, Myxinoidea) displays a unique morphology. The forebrain is thick-walled and well-differentiated cytoarchitecturally but lacks a well-developed ventricular system, and there is a pronounced compression of the entire brain along the longitudinal axis. This combination of characters obscures the boundaries between the major subdivisions of the forebrain; thus, some elementary morphological issues, such as the location of the pallial-subpallial and the telencephalic-diencephalic boundaries, have remained a matter of dispute over the past 100 years. In an attempt to resolve some of these issues, we investigated the chemoarchitecture of the forebrain of the Pacific hagfish, Eptatretus stouti. Because a number of previous studies of other craniates, mainly gnathostomes, have shown that the spatial distribution of some neuroactive substances and enzymes mirrors the main subdivisions of the forebrain, we localized acetylcholinesterase, enkephalins, substance P, tyrosine hydroxylase, and alpha-melanocyte stimulating hormone by means of histochemistry. Surprisingly, our data show that there are very limited chemoarchitectural similarities shared by hagfishes and other craniates. Some striking similarities occur in the organization of the catecholaminergic systems. Hagfishes, as well as other craniates, possess catecholaminergic cell groups at the ventral junction of the mesencephalon and diencephalon that give rise to a catecholaminergic innervation of the basal forebrain. The distribution of all other substances examined is dissimilar to that found in other craniates. In particular, there are many neurons positive for acetylcholinesterase in the pallium; the subpallium contains relatively small amounts of neuroactive peptides; and the highest densities of structures positive for neuroactive peptides and acetylcholinesterase occur in the central prosencephalic nucleus. Therefore, a comparative chemoarchitectural analysis

  9. Traditional processing strongly affects metabolite composition by hydrolysis in Rehmannia glutinosa roots

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Chang, W.T.; Choi, Y.H.; Heijden, R. van der; Lee, M.S.; Lin, M.K.; Kong, H.; Kim, H.K.; Verpoorte, R.; Hankemeier, T.; Greef, J. van der; Wang, M.

    2011-01-01

    The processing of biological raw materials is considered to have an important role in the therapeutic application in Traditional Chinese Medicine. The root of Rehmannia glutinosa has to be processed by nine cycles of rice wine immersing, steaming and drying before using in clinical applications. In

  10. Coiling and maturation of a high-performance fibre in hagfish slime gland thread cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Winegard, Timothy; Herr, Julia; Mena, Carlos; Lee, Betty; Dinov, Ivo; Bird, Deborah; Bernards, Mark; Hobel, Sam; van Valkenburgh, Blaire; Toga, Arthur; Fudge, Douglas

    2014-04-01

    The defensive slime of hagfishes contains thousands of intermediate filament protein threads that are manufactured within specialized gland thread cells. The material properties of these threads rival those of spider dragline silks, which makes them an ideal model for biomimetic efforts to produce sustainable protein materials, yet how the thread is produced and organized within the cell is not well understood. Here we show how changes in nuclear morphology, size and position can explain the three-dimensional pattern of thread coiling in gland thread cells, and how the ultrastructure of the thread changes as very young thread cells develop into large cells with fully mature coiled threads. Our model provides an explanation for the complex process of thread assembly and organization that has fascinated and perplexed biologists for over a century, and provides valuable insights for the quest to manufacture high-performance biomimetic protein materials.

  11. Comparative metaproteomic analysis on consecutively Rehmannia glutinosa-monocultured rhizosphere soil.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Linkun Wu

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: The consecutive monoculture for most of medicinal plants, such as Rehmannia glutinosa, results in a significant reduction in the yield and quality. There is an urgent need to study for the sustainable development of Chinese herbaceous medicine. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: Comparative metaproteomics of rhizosphere soil was developed and used to analyze the underlying mechanism of the consecutive monoculture problems of R. glutinosa. The 2D-gel patterns of protein spots for the soil samples showed a strong matrix dependency. Among the spots, 103 spots with high resolution and repeatability were randomly selected and successfully identified by MALDI TOF-TOF MS for a rhizosphere soil metaproteomic profile analysis. These proteins originating from plants and microorganisms play important roles in nutrient cycles and energy flow in rhizospheric soil ecosystem. They function in protein, nucleotide and secondary metabolisms, signal transduction and resistance. Comparative metaproteomics analysis revealed 33 differentially expressed protein spots in rhizosphere soil in response to increasing years of monoculture. Among them, plant proteins related to carbon and nitrogen metabolism and stress response, were mostly up-regulated except a down-regulated protein (glutathione S-transferase involving detoxification. The phenylalanine ammonia-lyase was believed to participate in the phenylpropanoid metabolism as shown with a considerable increase in total phenolic acid content with increasing years of monoculture. Microbial proteins related to protein metabolism and cell wall biosynthesis, were up-regulated except a down-regulated protein (geranylgeranyl pyrophosphate synthase functioning in diterpenoid synthesis. The results suggest that the consecutive monoculture of R. glutinosa changes the soil microbial ecology due to the exudates accumulation, as a result, the nutrient cycles are affected, leading to the retardation of plant growth and

  12. Effect of Cultivation Methods on Wood Static Bending Properties in Alnus Glutinosa

    OpenAIRE

    Majid Kiaei

    2014-01-01

    This study was carried out to determine radial variation of wood density, modulus of elasticity (MOE), modulus of rupture (MOR) and stress at elastic limit in plantation and natural alder (Alnus glutinosa) forests in north of Iran. Testing samples were taken at breast height of the stem and at three radial positions (10, 50 and 90 % of radius) for both cultivation methods (natural and plantation forests) to determine wood mechanical strength properties according to the ASTM standard. Analysis...

  13. Dried Root of Rehmannia glutinosa Prevents Bone Loss in Ovariectomized Rats

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dong Wook Lim

    2013-05-01

    Full Text Available Dried root of Rehmannia glutinosa is a kidney-tonifying herbal medicine with a long history of safe use in traditional folk medicine for the treatment of joint diseases. This study was conducted to investigate prevention of bone loss by a standardized dried root of R. glutinosa in an ovariectomized (OVX rat model of osteoporosis. The OVX groups were divided into five groups treated with distilled water, 17β-estradiol (E2 10 µg/kg, once daily, i.p and dried root of R. glutinosa extracts (DRGE 30, 100, and 300 mg/kg, twice daily, p.o for eight weeks. We measured the body, organs, and uterus weights, and femur and lumbar vertebrae bone mineral density (BMD, serum alkaline phosphatase (ALP, estradiol levels. The treatments with DRGE 300 mg/kg significantly inhibited BMD decrease in the femur and lumbar (17.5% and 16.4%, p < 0.05, respectively by OVX without affecting the body, organs, and uterus weights. Also, serum ALP level in the DRGE 300 mg/kg treated group was significantly decreased, but the estradiol level did not change in serum of the DRGE 300 mg/kg treated group. These results show that DRGE is able to prevent OVX-induced bone loss without influencing hormones such as estrogen.

  14. [Effect of substrate of edible mushroom on continuously cropping obstacle of Rehmannia glutinosa].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ru, Rui-Hong; Li, Xuan-Zhen; Hunag, Xiao-Shu; Gao, Feng; Wang, Jian-Ming; Li, Ben-Yin; Zhang, Zhong-Yi

    2014-08-01

    The continuous cultivation of Rehmannia glutinosa causes the accumulation of phenolic acids in soil. It is supposed to be the reason of the so called "continuously cropping obstacle". In this study, phenolic acids (hydroxybenzoic acid, vanillic acid, eugenol, vanillin and ferulic acid) were degraded by the extracta of all the tested spent mushroom substrate (SMS) and the maximal degradation rate was 75.3%, contributed by extraction of SMS of Pleurotus eryngii. Pot experiment indicated that hydroxybenzoic acid and vanillin in soil were also degraded effectively by SMS of P. eryngii. The employment of SMS enhanced ecophysiology index to near the normal levels, such as crown width, leaves number, leaf length, leaf width and height. At the same time, the fresh and dry weight and total catalpol concentration of tuberous root weight of R. glutinosa was increased to 2.70, 3.66, 2.25 times by employment of SMS, respectively. The increase of bacteria, fungi and actinomycetes numbers in rhizosphere soil were observed after the employment of SMS by microbial counts. The employment of SMS also enhanced the enzyme activity in soils, such as sucrase, cellulase, phosphalase, urease and catelase. These results indicated that the employment of SMS alleviated the continuously cropping obstacle of R. glutinosa in some extent.

  15. Transcriptome Analysis Reveals Putative Genes Involved in Iridoid Biosynthesis in Rehmannia glutinosa

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xianen Li

    2012-10-01

    Full Text Available Rehmannia glutinosa, one of the most widely used herbal medicines in the Orient, is rich in biologically active iridoids. Despite their medicinal importance, no molecular information about the iridoid biosynthesis in this plant is presently available. To explore the transcriptome of R. glutinosa and investigate genes involved in iridoid biosynthesis, we used massively parallel pyrosequencing on the 454 GS FLX Titanium platform to generate a substantial EST dataset. Based on sequence similarity searches against the public sequence databases, the sequences were first annotated and then subjected to Gene Ontology (GO and Kyoto Encyclopedia of Genes and Genomes (KEGG based analysis. Bioinformatic analysis indicated that the 454 assembly contained a set of genes putatively involved in iridoid biosynthesis. Significantly, homologues of the secoiridoid pathway genes that were only identified in terpenoid indole alkaloid producing plants were also identified, whose presence implied that route II iridoids and route I iridoids share common enzyme steps in the early stage of biosynthesis. The gene expression patterns of four prenyltransferase transcripts were analyzed using qRT-PCR, which shed light on their putative functions in tissues of R. glutinosa. The data explored in this study will provide valuable information for further studies concerning iridoid biosynthesis.

  16. Antimicrobial and cytotoxic activity of Alnus glutinosa (L. Gaertn., A. incana (L. Moench, and A. viridis (Chaix DC. extracts

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sabina Dahija

    2016-07-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: The objective of the present study was to evaluate the antimicrobial and cytotoxic activities of water extracts of leaves and barks from Alnus glutinosa (L. Gaertn., A. incana (L. Moench, and A. viridis (Chaix DC.Methods: The antimicrobial activities of extracts were tested against gram-negative and gram-positive bacteria as well as yeast strains by the agar diffusion method. The cell viability was determined by the Trypan blue dye exclusion method.Results: The largest diameters of inhibition zone (DIZ were recorded with Staphylococcus aureus ATCC 6538 and Bacillus subtilis 168M. The highest percentage of cell viability was observed with water bark extracts of A. glutinosa (97.46%.Conclusions: Potential antimicrobial properties of A. glutinosa, A. incana, and A. viridis demonstrated in this study, as well as their low levels of toxicity, make them an interesting subject for further studies.

  17. A new flavonol glucoside from the aerial parts of Sida glutinosa.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Das, Niranjan; Achari, Basudev; Harigaya, Yoshihiro; Dinda, Biswanath

    2011-10-01

    Phytochemical investigation on the dried aerial parts of Sida glutinosa has led to the isolation of a new flavonol glucoside, glutinoside (1), along with seven known compounds, 24(28)-dehydromakisterone A (2), 1,2,3,9-tetrahydropyrrolo[2,1-b]-quinazolin-3-amine (3), docosanoic acid, 1-triacontanol, campesterol, stigmasterol, and β-sitosterol. The structures of these compounds were elucidated by means of extensive spectroscopic techniques as well as GC/MS analysis (for sterols) and comparison with the literature data. All these seven known compounds are reported from this plant for the first time.

  18. The main features of the craniate mitochondrial DNA between the ND1 and the COI genes were established in the common ancestor with the lancelet.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Delarbre, C; Barriel, V; Tillier, S; Janvier, P; Gachelin, G

    1997-08-01

    We have cloned the mitochondrial DNA fragment extending from tRNA-Leu to the cytochrome oxidase subunit 1 (COI) genes of Branchiostoma lanceolatum, Myxine glutinosa, Lampetra fluviatilis, and Scyliorhinus caniculus and have determined their respective gene sequences and organization. In all four species, this region contains the ND1 and ND2 genes and the genes coding eight tRNAs, namely, tRNA-Ile, -Gln, -Met, -Trp, -Ala, -Asn, -Cys, and -Tyr. The gene order is the same in the hagfish, lamprey and dogfish. In the lancelet, the location of the tRNA genes is slightly different. The mitochondrial code of Myxine, Lampetra, and Scyliorhinus is identical to that of vertebrates. The code used by the lancelet is the same with the exception of AGA (a stop codon in vertebrates), which codes for glycine in the lancelet. From the comparison of the four maps with already published ones for other species, we propose that the main features of the craniate mtDNA between the ND1 and COI genes were established in the common ancestor to cephalochordates and vertebrates more than 400 MYA. The origin of replication of the light-strand (Ori-L), usually located between the tRNA-Asn and tRNA-Cys genes in vertebrates, was not found in the lancelet, hagfish, or lamprey (Lampetra). In contrast, it was found in the dogfish. Thus the position of Ori-L was established for the first time in the common ancestor to the Chondrichthyes and Osteichthyes and remained present in all later-emerging vertebrates.

  19. Effects of lipid and urea extraction on δ15N values of deep-sea sharks and hagfish: Can mathematical correction factors be generated?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Churchill, Diana A.; Heithaus, Michael R.; Dean Grubbs, R.

    2015-05-01

    Stable isotope analysis is broadly employed to investigate diverse ecological questions. In order to make appropriate comparisons among multiple taxa, however, it is necessary to standardize values to account for interspecific differences in factors that affect isotopic ratios. For example, varying concentrations of soluble nitrogen compounds, such as urea or trimethylamine oxide, can affect the analysis and interpretation of δ15N values of sharks or hagfish. The goal of this study was to assess the effects of a standard chloroform/methanol extraction on the stable isotope values of muscle tissue obtained from 10 species of sharks and three species of hagfish collected from poorly-known deep-water (>200 m) communities. We detected significant differences in δ15N, %N, and C:N values as a result of extractions in 8 of 10 shark and all three hagfish species. We observed increased δ15N values, but shifts in %N and C:N values were not unidirectional. Mathematical normalizations for δ15N values were successfully created for four shark and two hagfish species. However, they were not successful for two shark species. Therefore, performing extractions of all samples is recommended.

  20. Handed behavior in hagfish--an ancient vertebrate lineage--and a survey of lateralized behaviors in other invertebrate chordates and elongate vertebrates.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miyashita, Tetsuto; Palmer, A Richard

    2014-04-01

    Hagfish represent an ancient lineage of boneless and jawless vertebrates. Among several curious behaviors they exhibit, solitary individuals in one dominant genus of hagfish (Eptatretus spp.) regularly rest in a tightly coiled posture. We present the first systematic treatment of this distinctive behavior. Individual northeastern Pacific hagfish (E. stoutii) exhibited significant handedness (preferred orientation of coiling). However, right-coiling and left-coiling individuals were equally common in the population. Individual hagfish likely develop a preference for one direction by repeating the preceding coiling direction. We also revisit classical accounts of chordate natural history and compare the coiling behavior of Eptatretus with other handed or lateralized behaviors in non-vertebrate chordates, lampreys, and derived vertebrates with elongate bodies. Handed behaviors occur in many of these groups, but they likely evolved independently. In contrast to vertebrates, morphological asymmetries may bias lateralized larval behaviors toward one side in cephalochordates and tunicates. As a consequence, no known handed behavior can be inferred to have existed in the common ancestor of vertebrates.

  1. Dynamic transcriptional profiling provides insights into tuberous root development in Rehmannia glutinosa

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Peng eSun

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available Rehmannia glutinosa, a herb of the Scrophulariaceae family, is widely cultivated in the Northern part of China. The tuberous root has well known medicinal properties; however, yield and quality are threatened by abiotic and biotic stresses. Understanding the molecular process of tuberous root development may help identify novel targets for its control. In the present study, we used Illumina sequencing and de novo assembly strategies to obtain a reference transcriptome that is relevant to tuberous root development. We then conducted RNA-seq quantification analysis to determine gene expression profiles of the adventitious root (AR, thickening adventitious root (TAR, and the developing tuberous root (DTR. Expression profiling identified a total of 6,974 differentially expressed unigenes during root developmental. Bioinformatics analysis and gene expression profiling revealed changes in phenylpropanoid biosynthesis, starch and sucrose metabolism, and plant hormone biosynthesis during root development. Moreover, we identified and allocated putative functions to the genes involved in tuberous root development, including genes related to major carbohydrate metabolism, hormone metabolism, and transcription regulation. The present study provides the initial description of gene expression profiles of AR, TAR, and DTR, which facilitates identification of genes of interest. Moreover, our work provides insights into the molecular mechanisms underlying tuberous root development and may assist in the design and development of improved breeding schemes for different R. glutinosa varieties through genetic manipulation.

  2. Plant-microbe rhizosphere interactions mediated by Rehmannia glutinosa root exudates under consecutive monoculture

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, Linkun; Wang, Juanying; Huang, Weimin; Wu, Hongmiao; Chen, Jun; Yang, Yanqiu; Zhang, Zhongyi; Lin, Wenxiong

    2015-10-01

    Under consecutive monoculture, the biomass and quality of Rehmannia glutinosa declines significantly. Consecutive monoculture of R. glutinosa in a four-year field trial led to significant growth inhibition. Most phenolic acids in root exudates had cumulative effects over time under sterile conditions, but these effects were not observed in the rhizosphere under monoculture conditions. It suggested soil microbes might be involved in the degradation and conversion of phenolic acids from the monocultured plants. T-RFLP and qPCR analysis demonstrated differences in both soil bacterial and fungal communities during monoculture. Prolonged monoculture significantly increased levels of Fusarium oxysporum, but decreased levels of Pseudomonas spp. Abundance of beneficial Pseudomonas spp. with antagonistic activity against F. oxysporum was lower in extended monoculture soils. Phenolic acid mixture at a ratio similar to that found in the rhizosphere could promote mycelial growth, sporulation, and toxin (3-Acetyldeoxynivalenol, 15-O-Acetyl-4-deoxynivalenol) production of pathogenic F. oxysporum while inhibiting growth of the beneficial Pseudomonas sp. W12. This study demonstrates that extended monoculture can alter the microbial community of the rhizosphere, leading to relatively fewer beneficial microorganisms and relatively more pathogenic and toxin-producing microorganisms, which is mediated by the root exudates.

  3. Plant-microbe rhizosphere interactions mediated by Rehmannia glutinosa root exudates under consecutive monoculture.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, Linkun; Wang, Juanying; Huang, Weimin; Wu, Hongmiao; Chen, Jun; Yang, Yanqiu; Zhang, Zhongyi; Lin, Wenxiong

    2015-10-30

    Under consecutive monoculture, the biomass and quality of Rehmannia glutinosa declines significantly. Consecutive monoculture of R. glutinosa in a four-year field trial led to significant growth inhibition. Most phenolic acids in root exudates had cumulative effects over time under sterile conditions, but these effects were not observed in the rhizosphere under monoculture conditions. It suggested soil microbes might be involved in the degradation and conversion of phenolic acids from the monocultured plants. T-RFLP and qPCR analysis demonstrated differences in both soil bacterial and fungal communities during monoculture. Prolonged monoculture significantly increased levels of Fusarium oxysporum, but decreased levels of Pseudomonas spp. Abundance of beneficial Pseudomonas spp. with antagonistic activity against F. oxysporum was lower in extended monoculture soils. Phenolic acid mixture at a ratio similar to that found in the rhizosphere could promote mycelial growth, sporulation, and toxin (3-Acetyldeoxynivalenol, 15-O-Acetyl-4-deoxynivalenol) production of pathogenic F. oxysporum while inhibiting growth of the beneficial Pseudomonas sp. W12. This study demonstrates that extended monoculture can alter the microbial community of the rhizosphere, leading to relatively fewer beneficial microorganisms and relatively more pathogenic and toxin-producing microorganisms, which is mediated by the root exudates.

  4. De invloed van auxine, tryptofaan en enige anorganische zouten op de infectie van Nicotiana glutinosa met tabaksmozaiekvirus

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Liem, A.S.N.

    1963-01-01

    The number of necrotic spots arising on leaves of Nicotiana glutinosa after inoculation with tobacco mosaic virus was less than in controls without additives, if the water in which the leaves floated hadβ-indoleacetic acid (IAA),α-naphthylacetic acid (NAA) or 2,4-dichlorophenoxyacetic acid

  5. Pulicaria glutinosa Extract: A Toolbox to Synthesize Highly Reduced Graphene Oxide-Silver Nanocomposites

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Abdulhadi H. Al-Marri

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available A green, one-step approach for the preparation of graphene/Ag nanocomposites (PE-HRG-Ag via simultaneous reduction of both graphene oxide (GRO and silver ions using Pulicaria glutinosa plant extract (PE as reducing agent is reported. The plant extract functionalizes the surfaces of highly reduced graphene oxide (HRG which helps in conjugating the Ag NPs to HRG. Increasing amounts of Ag precursor enhanced the density of Ag nanoparticles (NPs on HRG. The preparation of PE-HRG-Ag nanocomposite is monitored by using ultraviolet–visible (UV-Vis spectroscopy, powder X-ray diffraction (XRD, and energy dispersive X-ray (EDX. The as-prepared PE-HRG-Ag nanocomposities display excellent surface-enhanced Raman scattering (SERS activity, and significantly increased the intensities of the Raman signal of graphene.

  6. Un Myxinoïde (Craniata, Hyperotreti) dans le Konservat-Lagerstätte Carbonifère supérieur de Montceau-les-Mines (Allier, France)A hagfish (Craniata, Hyperotreti) from the Late Carboniferous Konservat-Lagerstätte of Montceau-les-Mines (Allier, France)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Poplin, Cécile; Sotty, Daniel; Janvier, Philippe

    2001-03-01

    Several fossils from the Late Carboniferous of Montceau-les-Mines, France, are referred to a new taxon of fossil hagfish. Two specimens display impressions of two pairs of tooth rows that are strikingly similar in shape and organization to the horny teeth of modern hagfish. In addition, by its slender body shape, this new taxon is more suggestive of modern hagfish than the only previously known fossil form from the Carboniferous of the USA. Living hagfish being exclusively marine, this discovery raises the question of the reputedly freshwater environment of the Montceau-les-Mines 'Konservat-Lagerstätte'.

  7. An immunocytochemical investigation of glial morphology in the Pacific hagfish: radial and astrocyte-like glia have the same phylogenetic age.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wicht, H; Derouiche, A; Korf, H W

    1994-09-01

    This study attempts to reconstruct the early phylogenetic history of macroglial cells among craniates. Since glia does not fossilize, such a reconstruction must be based on a cladistic comparison of glial characters in the Recent craniate taxa (hagfishes, lampreys, and gnathostomes); however, there are only few data on glial morphology and none on glial immunocytochemistry in hagfishes. Therefore, we investigated the presence and localization of various macroglia-specific epitopes in the brain and spinal cord of the Pacific hagfish, Eptatretus stouti (Myxinoidea) by means of immunocytochemistry. Antibodies directed against S100-protein and vimentin showed no cross reactivity. Antibodies directed against glial fibrillary acidic protein and glutamine synthetase labelled various glial structures. Glial fibrillary acidic protein-like immunoreactivity was observed in ependymal cells with radially oriented processes in some regions. However, throughout the entire CNS, labelling of non-ependymal cells and their processes prevailed. The processes of these cells made occasional vascular contacts and they also made contacts with neuronal perikarya. Glutamine synthetase-like immunoreactivity was also found in some processes with radial orientation and in ependymal cells; but the antibody stained mainly non-ependymal cells which gave rise to a felt-like meshwork of interdigitating fine and very fine processes penetrating the neuropil of the entire brain. Additionally, there was labelling in the walls of blood vessels and in processes enwrapping individual neurons. The occurrence of glial fibrillary acidic protein- and glutamine synthetase-like immunoreactivity in non-ependymal glial elements in the brain of hagfishes and the relative scarcity of labelling in radial glial elements necessitates a re-interpretation of the evolutionary history of glial cells. Non-ependymal macroglia with immunocytochemical and morphological characters resembling typical (mammalian) astrocytes

  8. Expression pattern of two collagen type 2 alpha1 genes in the Japanese inshore hagfish (Eptatretus burgeri) with special reference to the evolution of cartilaginous tissue.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ota, Kinya G; Kuratani, Shigeru

    2010-03-15

    Collagen type 2 alpha1 (Col2A1) protein is a major component of the cartilaginous extracellular matrix (ECM) in vertebrates. Over the past two decades, the evolutionary origin of Col2A1 has been studied at the biochemical and molecular levels in extant jawless vertebrates (hagfishes and lampreys). Although these studies have contributed to our understanding of ECM protein evolution, the expression profile of the Col2A1 gene in hagfishes has not been fully described. We have performed molecular cloning and analyzed the gene expression pattern of the Col2A1 gene in the Japanese inshore hagfish (Eptatretus burgeri). We succeeded in isolating two Col2A1 genes, EbCol2A1A and EbCol2A1B, in which EbCol2A1A was expressed in the noncartilaginous connective tissues whereas EbCol2A1B was detected in some cartilaginous elements. Based on these results, we discuss the evolutionary history of Col2A1 genes in early vertebrates.

  9. Identification and Characterization of 40 Isolated Rehmannia glutinosa MYB Family Genes and Their Expression Profiles in Response to Shading and Continuous Cropping.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Fengqing; Suo, Yanfei; Wei, He; Li, Mingjie; Xie, Caixia; Wang, Lina; Chen, Xinjian; Zhang, Zhongyi

    2015-07-02

    The v-myb avian myeloblastosis viral oncogene homolog (MYB) superfamily constitutes one of the most abundant groups of transcription factors (TFs) described in plants. To date, little is known about the MYB genes in Rehmannia glutinosa. Forty unique MYB genes with full-length cDNA sequences were isolated. These 40 genes were grouped into five categories, one R1R2R3-MYB, four TRFL MYBs, four SMH MYBs, 25 R2R3-MYBs, and six MYB-related members. The MYB DNA-binding domain (DBD) sequence composition was conserved among proteins of the same subgroup. As expected, most of the closely related members in the phylogenetic tree exhibited common motifs. Additionally, the gene structure and motifs of the R. glutinosa MYB genes were analyzed. MYB gene expression was analyzed in the leaf and the tuberous root under two abiotic stress conditions. Expression profiles showed that most R. glutinosa MYB genes were expressed in the leaf and the tuberous root, suggesting that MYB genes are involved in various physiological and developmental processes in R. glutinosa. Seven MYB genes were up-regulated in response to shading in at least one tissue. Two MYB genes showed increased expression and 13 MYB genes showed decreased expression in the tuberous root under continuous cropping. This investigation is the first comprehensive study of the MYB gene family in R. glutinosa.

  10. Effects of Rehmannia glutinosa polysaccharide b on T-lymphocytes in mice bearing sarcoma 180.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, L Z; Feng, X W; Zhou, J H

    1995-07-01

    To study immuno-antitumor action mechanism of RGP-b. RGP-b (Rehmannia glutinosa polysaccaride b) is a new component isolated from the herb, had an average molecular mass of 160 kDa and 5 kinds of monosaccharides as acid-splitting products. Its HPLC showed a main sharp peak at 162 kDa. The kinetic effects of RGP-b on IL-2 secretion, cytotoxic T-lymphocyte (CTL) activities and L3T4+, lyt-2+ T-lymphocyte subset in mice bearing S180 were observed. RGP-b 10 or 20 mg kg-1 ip obviously attenuated the decrease of CTL cytotoxity caused by excessive tumor growth on d 9 after the administration, but only partly ameliorated the descent of IL-2. Its effect on lyt-2+ subset was quite parallel with that on CTL cytotoxity. RGP-b kept the ratio of L3T4+ to lyt-2+ subset lower than that of control. Improving the production of lyt-2+ CTL and its cytotoxity were an essential immuno-antitumor mechanisms of RGP-b.

  11. Agrobacterium-mediated viral vector-amplified transient gene expression in Nicotiana glutinosa plant tissue culture.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Collens, Jason I; Mason, Hugh S; Curtis, Wayne R

    2007-01-01

    A viral vector based on the bean yellow dwarf virus was investigated for its potential to increase transient gene expression. An intron-containing GUS reporter gene and the cis-acting viral regulatory elements were incorporated in the viral vector and could be complemented by the viral replication-associated proteins provided on a secondary vector. All vectors were delivered to Nicotiana glutinosa plant cell suspension or hairy root cultures via auxotrophic Agrobacterium tumefaciens. Cell culture generated greater yield of reporter gene expression than did root culture, as a result of the limitation imposed on roots to express the protein only in surface tissue containing actively dividing cells. Reporter gene expression increased for cell culture when the reporter gene construct was co-delivered with the construct supplying both viral replication associated proteins (REP and REPA); gene expression decreased when the construct supplying only the viral REP protein was co-delivered. Reporter protein expression increased from 0.091% for the reporter construct alone to 0.22% total soluble protein (% TSP) when the viral Rep-supplying vector was co-delivered with the reporter gene construct. Reporter protein was generated 3 days after the initiation of bacterial co-culture, providing for rapid generation of heterologous protein in cell culture.

  12. Past and present distribution of Myxas glutinosa (O.F. Müller, 1774 in the waterbodies of the Urals and Siberia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Maxim V. Vinarski

    2013-04-01

    Full Text Available The distribution of the glutinous snail, Myxas glutinosa (O.F. Müller, 1774 in the waterbodies of the Urals and Western Siberia has been assessed on the basis of the literary and authors’ own data. This species belongs to the rarest among the Euro-Siberian freshwater snails, and the Ural-Siberian region is the eastern part of its range. The first records of M. glutinosa in this area date back to 1889 but to the date only 48 trustworthy findings of the species in this region are known. The map of these findings is provided. Currently, M. glutinosa is extremely rare in Siberia though in the South Uralian waterbodies its abundance is still relatively high. Possible causes of decline of the glutinous snail are briefly discussed. It is shown that this species may tolerate (to some extent water pollution, salinity and other factors that were invoked to explain its global decline.

  13. Elicitation of hypersensitive responses in Nicotiana glutinosa by the suppressor of RNA silencing protein P0 from poleroviruses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Ken-Der; Empleo, Roman; Nguyen, Tan Tri V; Moffett, Peter; Sacco, Melanie Ann

    2015-06-01

    Plant disease resistance (R) proteins that confer resistance to viruses recognize viral gene products with diverse functions, including viral suppressors of RNA silencing (VSRs). The P0 protein from poleroviruses is a VSR that targets the ARGONAUTE1 (AGO1) protein for degradation, thereby disrupting RNA silencing and antiviral defences. Here, we report resistance against poleroviruses in Nicotiana glutinosa directed against Turnip yellows virus (TuYV) and Potato leafroll virus (PLRV). The P0 proteins from TuYV (P0(T) (u) ), PLRV (P0(PL) ) and Cucurbit aphid-borne yellows virus (P0(CA) ) were found to elicit a hypersensitive response (HR) in N. glutinosa accession TW59, whereas other accessions recognized P0(PL) only. Genetic analysis showed that recognition of P0(T) (u) by a resistance gene designated RPO1 (Resistance to POleroviruses 1) is inherited as a dominant allele. Expression of P0 from a Potato virus X (PVX) expression vector transferred recognition to the recombinant virus on plants expressing RPO1, supporting P0 as the unique Polerovirus factor eliciting resistance. The induction of HR required a functional P0 protein, as P0(T) (u) mutants with substitutions in the F-box motif that abolished VSR activity were unable to elicit HR. We surmised that the broad P0 recognition seen in TW59 and the requirement for the F-box protein motif could indicate detection of P0-induced AGO1 degradation and disruption of RNA silencing; however, other viral silencing suppressors, including the PVX P25 that also causes AGO1 degradation, failed to elicit HR in N. glutinosa. Investigation of P0 elicitation of RPO1 could provide insight into P0 activities within the cell that trigger resistance. © 2014 BSPP AND JOHN WILEY & SONS LTD.

  14. Detection of Met-enkephalin and Leu-enkephalin in the brain of the hagfish, Eptatretus stouti, and the lamprey, Petromyzon marinus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dores, R M; Gorbman, A

    1990-03-01

    Acid extracts of the brain of the pacific hagfish, Eptatretus stouti, and the marine lamprey, Petromyzon marinus, were each fractionated by gel filtration chromatography and aliquots of column fractions were screened with radioimmunoassays (RIAs) specific for pro-dynorphin-related end products and for pro-enkephalin-related end products. Only pro-enkephalin-related immunoreactive forms were detected. The enkephalin-sized immunoreactive material, isolated for each species, was separately fractionated by reverse-phase high-performance liquid chromatography (HPLC). Aliquots of column fractions were screened with RIAs specific for Met-enkephalin, Leu-enkephalin, Met-enkephalin-Arg-Phe, and Met-enkephalin-Arg-Gly-Leu. In the hagfish brain, immunoreactive forms with the same retention times as synthetic Met-enkephalin and Leu-enkephalin were detected in a ratio of approximately 2:1. In addition, an immunoreactive form was detected with the Met-enkephalin-Arg-Phe-specific RIA. This form had the same chromatographic properties as synthetic Met-enkephalin-Arg-Phe. Analyses with the Met-enkephalin-Arg-Gly-Leu RIA were negative. HPLC analysis of the lamprey enkephalin-related material revealed the presence of authentic Met-enkaphalin and Leu-enkephalin in a molar ratio of 3:1. C-terminally extended forms of Met-enkaphalin were not detected in the lamprey extracts. Collectively these observations indicate that pro-enkephalin-related opioid peptides are present in the brain of cyclostomes.

  15. N2 fixation and cycling in Alnus glutinosa, Betula pendula and Fagus sylvatica woodland exposed to free air CO2 enrichment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Millett, Jonathan; Godbold, Douglas; Smith, Andrew R; Grant, Helen

    2012-06-01

    We measured the effect of elevated atmospheric CO(2) on atmospheric nitrogen (N(2)) fixation in the tree species Alnus glutinosa growing in monoculture or in mixture with the non-N(2)-fixing tree species Betula pendula and Fagus sylvatica. We addressed the hypotheses that (1) N(2) fixation in A. glutinosa will increase in response to increased atmospheric CO(2) concentrations, when growing in monoculture, (2) the impact of elevated CO(2) on N(2) fixation in A. glutinosa is the same in mixture and in monoculture and (3) the impacts of elevated CO(2) on N cycling will be evident by a decrease in leaf δ(15)N and by the soil-leaf enrichment factor (EF), and that these impacts will not differ between mixed and single species stands. Trees were grown in a forest plantation on former agricultural fields for four growing seasons, after which the trees were on average 3.8 m tall and canopy closure had occurred. Atmospheric CO(2) concentrations were maintained at either ambient or elevated (by 200 ppm) concentrations using a free-air CO(2) enrichment (FACE) system. Leaf δ(15)N was measured and used to estimate the amount (N(dfa)) and proportion (%N(dfa)) of N derived from atmospheric fixation. On average, 62% of the N in A. glutinosa leaves was from fixation. The %N(dfa) and N(dfa) for A. glutinosa trees in monoculture did not increase under elevated CO(2), despite higher growth rates. However, N(2) fixation did increase for trees growing in mixture, despite the absence of significant growth stimulation. There was evidence that fixed N(2) was transferred from A. glutinosa to F. sylvatica and B. pendula, but no evidence that this affected their CO(2) response. The results of this study show that N(2) fixation in A. glutinosa may be higher in a future elevated CO(2) world, but that this effect will only occur where the trees are growing in mixed species stands.

  16. Ecological features of flowers and the amount of pollen released in Corylus avellana (L. and Alnus glutinosa (L. Gaertn.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Krystyna Piotrowska

    2012-12-01

    Full Text Available Hazel and alder bloom as one of the first plants in climatic conditions of Poland. In the present study, detailed observations were made of the structure of flowers of Corylus avellana L. and Alnus glutinosa (L. Gaertn. Pollen yield of the abovementioned species was determined. The number of pollen grains in the theca, anther, flower and inflorescence was calculated. A comparison was made of the number of pollen grains of these taxa recorded during the atmospheric pollen seasons analysed over a period of 8 years in the conditions of Lublin. The study demonstrates that pollen yield of the common hazel inflorescence was 66 mg, whereas for black alder it was 120 mg. It was found that the number of pollen grains produced by the alder inflorescence was 2.2 times higher than by the hazel inflorescence. The atmospheric pollen season of the studied plant taxa was recorded at similar dates, but alder pollen was in much larger concentrations.

  17. Comparison of antioxidant and antimicrobial activities of extracts obtained from Salvia glutinosa L. and Salvia officinalis L.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Veličković Dragan T.

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Antioxidant and antimicrobial activities as well as total phenols and flavonoids contents of Salvia glutinosa L. (glutinous sage and Salvia officinalis L. (sage extracts were studied. Methanol and aqueous ethanol (70% v/v were used for extraction of bioactive compounds, both in the presence and the absence of ultrasound, from herb and the spent plant material remaining after the essential oil hydrodistillation. The ratio of plant material to extracting solvent was 1:10 g/ml. Antioxidant and antimicrobial activities of the extracts were found to depend on the type of plant material and the extraction conditions. The plant materials from which essential oil had been recovered were proven to be valuable raw materials for making various herbal preparations.

  18. Caracterización agronómica de una accesión de Swinglea glutinosa (Blanco Merr, (Rutaceae

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rafael jiménez Villasuso

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available La familia Rutaceae abarca un gran número de géneros y especies. De ellos, Citrus, Poncirus y Fortunella son los géneros más explotados comercialmente a nivel mundial, sin embargo, hay otros menos abordados, como el género Swinglea que posee una sola especie: S. glutinosa (Blanco Merr. Con el objetivo de caracterizar desde el punto de vista agronómico esta especie por su de importancia como recurso genético y posterior utilización como patrón en la producción citrícola. Se evaluaron las características físico-químicas de los frutos. Para ello se analizaron las variables: masa, diámetro y altura del fruto, número y masa de las semillas, sólidos solubles totales, acidez, índice de madurez, contenido de vitamina C y algunos caracteres cualitativos de la morfología del árbol como: estructura del árbol, formas del fruto, de las hojas y la semilla. Los resultados obtenidos mostraron que es un árbol rustico, adaptándose bien a nuestras condiciones, además presenta un alto número de semillas por fruto. Los resultados obtenidos mostraron que es un árbol rustico, adaptándose bien a nuestras condiciones, además presenta un alto número de semillas por fruto, lo cual es de gran importancia a la hora de seleccionar un patrón para su introducción a la práctica productiva. Agronomic characterization of an accession of Swinglea glutinosa (Blanco Merr, (Rutaceae

  19. Transcriptome Analysis of Salicylic Acid Treatment in Rehmannia glutinosa Hairy Roots Using RNA-seq Technique for Identification of Genes Involved in Acteoside Biosynthesis

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    Fengqing Wang

    2017-05-01

    Full Text Available Rehmannia glutinosa is a common bulk medicinal material that has been widely used in China due to its active ingredients. Acteoside, one of the ingredients, has antioxidant, antinephritic, anti-inflammatory, hepatoprotective, immunomodulatory, and neuroprotective effects, is usually selected as a quality-control component for R. glutinosa herb in the Chinese Pharmacopeia. The acteoside biosynthesis pathway in R. glutinosa has not yet been clearly established. Herein, we describe the establishment of a genetic transformation system for R. glutinosa mediated by Agrobacterium rhizogenes. We screened the optimal elicitors that markedly increased acteoside accumulation in R. glutinosa hairy roots. We found that acteoside accumulation dramatically increased with the addition of salicylic acid (SA; the optimal SA dose was 25 μmol/L for hairy roots. RNA-seq was applied to analyze the transcriptomic changes in hairy roots treated with SA for 24 h in comparison with an untreated control. A total of 3,716, 4,018, and 2,715 differentially expressed transcripts (DETs were identified in 0 h-vs.-12 h, 0 h-vs.-24 h, and 12 h-vs.-24 h libraries, respectively. KEGG pathway-based analysis revealed that 127 DETs were enriched in “phenylpropanoid biosynthesis.” Of 219 putative unigenes involved in acteoside biosynthesis, 54 were found to be up-regulated at at least one of the time points after SA treatment. Selected candidate genes were analyzed by quantitative real-time PCR (qRT-PCR in hairy roots with SA, methyl jasmonate (MeJA, AgNO3 (Ag+, and putrescine (Put treatment. All genes investigated were up-regulated by SA treatment, and most candidate genes were weakly increased by MeJA to some degree. Furthermore, transcription abundance of eight candidate genes in tuberous roots of the high-acteoside-content (HA cultivar QH were higher than those of the low-acteoside-content (LA cultivar Wen 85-5. These results will pave the way for understanding the molecular

  20. Treatment of primary chronic glomerulonephritis with Rehmannia glutinosa acteosides in combination with the angiotensin receptor blocker irbesartan: a randomized controlled trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Qiu, HongYu; Fu, Ping; Fan, WenXing; Zuo, Chuan; Feng, Ping; Shi, Peng; Cao, Lina; Liu, Fang; Zhou, Li; Chen, Feng; Zhong, Hui; Gou, ZhongPing; Liang, YaPing; Shi, Mei

    2014-01-01

    This study aims to assess the efficacy and safety of Rehmannia glutinosa acteosides used in combination with the angiotensin receptor blocker irbesartan to treat primary chronic glomerulonephritis. A total of 479 patients diagnosed with primary chronic glomerulonephritis were recruited from outpatient clinics and were randomly assigned to the treatment group (Rehmannia glutinosa acteosides, two 200-mg capsules, bid; and irbesartan, one 150-mg tablet, qd) or the control group (irbesartan, one 150-mg tablet, qd). The primary outcome was 24-h urinary protein. Secondary outcome measures included blood pressure, estimated glomerular filtration rate, erythrocyturia, serum alanine aminotransferase, aspartate transaminase and electrolytes. After 8 weeks of treatment, the treatment group showed a mean reduction in 24-h proteinuria of 36.42% compared to baseline, which was significantly higher than the mean reduction from baseline of 27.97% in the control group (P = 0.0278).Adverse drug reactions occurred at a similarly low rate in the treatment group (0.4%) and control group (1.2%, P = 0.3724). In the treatment of chronic glomerulonephritis, the combination of Rehmannia glutinosa acteosides and irbesartan can reduce proteinuria more effectively than irbesartan alone. Copyright © 2013 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  1. Ecotoxicological effects evoked in hydrophytes by leachates of invasive Acer negundo and autochthonous Alnus glutinosa fallen off leaves during their microbial decomposition.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Krevš, Alina; Darginavičienė, Jūratė; Gylytė, Brigita; Grigutytė, Reda; Jurkonienė, Sigita; Karitonas, Rolandas; Kučinskienė, Alė; Pakalnis, Romas; Sadauskas, Kazys; Vitkus, Rimantas; Manusadžianas, Levonas

    2013-02-01

    Throughout 90-day biodegradation under microaerobic conditions, invasive to Lithuania species boxelder maple (Acer negundo) leaves lost 1.5-fold more biomass than that of autochthonous black alder (Alnus glutinosa), releasing higher contents of N(tot), ammonium and generating higher BOD(7). Boxelder maple leaf leachates were characterized by higher total bacterial numbers and colony numbers of heterotrophic and cellulose-decomposing bacteria than those of black alder. The higher toxicity of A. negundo aqueous extracts and leachates to charophyte cell (Nitellopsis obtusa), the inhabitant of clean lakes, were manifested at mortality and membrane depolarization levels, while the effect on H(+)-ATPase activity in membrane preparations from the same algae was stronger in case of A. glutinosa. Duckweed (Lemna minor), a bioindicator of eutrophic waters, was more sensitive to leaf leachates of A. glutinosa. Fallen leaves and leaf litter leachates from invasive and native species of trees, which enter water body, affect differently microbial biodestruction and aquatic vegetation in freshwater systems. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  2. Transcriptome/degradome-wide identification of R. glutinosa miRNAs and their targets: the role of miRNA activity in the replanting disease.

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    Ming Jie Li

    Full Text Available Rehmannia glutinosa, a traditional Chinese medicine herb, is unable to grow normally in a soil where the same species has recently been cultivated. The biological basis of this so called "replanting disease" is unknown, but it may involve the action of microRNAs (miRNAs, which are known to be important regulators of plant growth and development. High throughput Solexa/Illumina sequencing was used to generate a transcript library of the R. glutinosa transcriptome and degradome in order to identify possible miRNAs and their targets implicated in the replanting disease. A total of 87,665 unigenes and 589 miRNA families (17 of which have not been identified in plants to date was identified from the libraries made from a first year (FP and a second year (SP crop. A comparison between the FP and SP miRNAs showed that the abundance of eight of the novel and 295 of the known miRNA families differed between the FP and SP plants. Sequencing of the degradome sampled from FP and SP plants led to the identification of 165 transcript targets of 85 of the differentially abundant miRNA families. The interaction of some of these miRNAs with their target(s is likely to form an important part of the molecular basis of the replanting disease of R. glutinosa.

  3. Caracterización agronómica una accesión de Swinglea glutinosa (Blanco Merr, (Rutaceae

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    Rafael Jiménez Villasuso

    2015-05-01

    Full Text Available RESUMEN La familia Rutaceae abarca un gran número de géneros y especies. De ellos, Citrus, Poncirus y Fortunella son los géneros más explotados comercialmente a nivel mundial, sin embargo, hay otros menos abordados, como el género Swinglea que posee una sola especie: S. glutinosa (Blanco Merr. Con el objetivo de caracterizar desde el punto de vista agronómico esta especie por su de importancia como recurso genético y posterior utilización como patrón en la producción citrícola. Se evaluaron las características físico-químicas de los frutos. Para ello se analizaron las variables: masa, diámetro y altura del fruto, número y masa de las semillas, sólidos solubles totales, acidez, índice de madurez, contenido de vitamina C y algunos caracteres cualitativos de la morfología del árbol como: estructura del árbol, formas del fruto, de las hojas y la semilla. Los resultados obtenidos mostraron que es un árbol rustico, adaptándose bien a nuestras condiciones, además presenta un alto número de semillas por fruto. Los resultados obtenidos mostraron que es un árbol rustico, adaptándose bien a nuestras condiciones, además presenta un alto número de semillas por fruto, lo cual es de gran importancia a la hora de seleccionar un patrón para su introducción a la práctica productiva. Agronomic characterization of an accession of Swinglea glutinosa (Blanco Merr, (Rutaceae ABSTRACT The Rutaceae family includes a large number of genera and species. Of these, Citrus, Poncirus and Fortunella are the genres most worldwide exploited commercially, but there are other less discussed, such as gender Swinglea having a single species: S. glutinosa (Blanco Merr. In order to characterize from an agricultural point of view this kind of importance as their genetic resource and subsequent use as a standard in citrus production. The physicochemical characteristics of the fruits were evaluated. mass, diameter and height of fruit number and seed mass

  4. Effect of probiotic bacteria-fermented medicinal plants (Gynura procumbens, Rehmannia glutinosa, Scutellaria baicalensis) as performance enhancers in growing pigs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jeong, Jin Suk; Kim, In Ho

    2015-06-01

    This study was conducted to investigate the effect of dietary supplementation of mixed fermented medicinal plants (FMP) obtained from exudates of Gynura procumbens, Rehmannia glutinosa and Scutellaria baicalensis fermented with Lactobacillus plantarum, Saccharomyces cerevisiae and Bacillus licheniformis, respectively, on growth performance in growing pigs in order to assess the feasibility of using FMP as an alternative to antibiotic growth promoters (AGP), such as tiamulin. A total of 150 growing pigs (body wieght 25.50 ± 2.50 kg) were used in a 6 weeks experiment and randomly divided into five groups with six replicates of five growing pigs each. The treatments were NC (basal diet), basal diet with 33 ppm tiamulin (PC), basal diet with FMP 0.05% (FMP 0.05), basal diet with FMP 0.1% (FMP 0.1) and basal diet with FMP 0.2% (FMP 0.2). Overall, body weight gain, feed conversion rate, the digestibility of dry matter and gross energy, noxious gas emission all improved with FMP supplementation as compared to NC. Taken together, these results suggest the feasibility of using FMP as an alternative to AGP for enhancing the growth performance, nutrient digestibility and excreta noxious gas emission of growing pigs. © 2014 Japanese Society of Animal Science.

  5. Study of the effect of essential oil of Salvia glutinosa L. on microbial biofilm formation by clinical isolates of Acinetobacter baumannii

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tutar, Uǧur

    2016-04-01

    Acinetobacter baumannii is becoming a serious concern in the treatment of infections that can develop resistance to many antibiotics. This persistence may be explained by its capacity to form biofilms. In our study, the essential oil (EO) of the Salvia glutinosa plant, was obtained through the hydrodistillation method. Antimicrobial and antibiofilm activities of the EO on the 20 multi-drug resistant (MDR) A.baumannii isolates were researched. Broth microdilution methods were applied for the determination of the antimicrobial activity. For the determined antibiofilm activity, the Minimal Biofilm Inhibition Concentration (MBIC) test was implemented with the microtiter plate method. Photometric assay was applied for the identification of the antioxidant capacity and colorimetric assay was used to specify the cytotoxicity of the EO of S. glutinosa on L929 cells. In our study, Minimal Inhibition Concentration (MIC) and Minimal Bactericidal Concentration (MBC) values between 1.25-2.5 µl/mL and 5-10 µl/mL respectively. MBIC value of the EO was found as 0.3-2.5 µl/mL. IC50= = 24.4±0.66 µl/mL was found as the antioxidant capacity of the EO. At 25%, 12.5% and 6.25% EO concentrations, no cytotoxicity appeared for the fibroblast cells in terms of the cytotoxic activities (p>0.05). According to the findings obtained in our study, antibiofilm, antimicrobial and antioxidant activities of the S. glutinosa EO seem remarkable. These findings seem promising for the development of potential phytotherapeutic agents in the treatment of the multi-drug resistance (MDR) A.baumannii infections.

  6. Temperature dependence of sound wave propagation in as a diagnostic tools for healthy and rotten black alder (Alnus glutinosa (L.) Gaertn.) tree trunks

    OpenAIRE

    Orzechowski, Michał; Budniak, Piotr

    2013-01-01

    The aim of this study was to determine how thermal conditions affect the speed of sound wave propagation, in trunks of living alder Alnus glutinosa (L.) Gaertn. trees. This method in practiced when diagnosing the presence of intern.al decay in standing trees. Field work was carried out four times at different temperatures (+13°C, +3°C, -7°C and -16°C) using an lmpulse Hammer. There was a significant correlation between the thermal conditions and the speed of sound wave propaga...

  7. Rock Tea extract (Jasonia glutinosa) relaxes rat aortic smooth muscle by inhibition of L-type Ca(2+) channels.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Valero, Marta Sofía; Oliván-Viguera, Aida; Garrido, Irene; Langa, Elisa; Berzosa, César; López, Víctor; Gómez-Rincón, Carlota; Murillo, María Divina; Köhler, Ralf

    2015-12-01

    In traditional herbal medicine, Rock Tea (Jasonia glutinosa) is known for its prophylactic and therapeutic value in various disorders including arterial hypertension. However, the mechanism by which Rock Tea exerts blood pressure-lowering actions has not been elucidated yet. Our aim was to demonstrate vasorelaxing effects of Rock Tea extract and to reveal its possible action mechanism. Isometric myography was conducted on high-K+-precontracted rings from rat thoracic aorta and tested extracts at concentrations of 0.5-5 mg/ml. Whole-cell patch-clamp experiments were performed in rat aortic vascular smooth muscle cells (line A7r5) to determine blocking effects on L-type Ca(2+) channels. Rock Tea extract relaxed the aorta contracted by high [K+] concentration dependently with an EC50 of ≈2.4 mg/ml and produced ≈75 % relaxation at the highest concentration tested. The L-type Ca(2+) channel blocker, verapamil (10(-6) M), had similar effects. Rock Tea extract had no effect in nominally Ca(2+)-free high-K(+) buffer but significantly inhibited contractions to re-addition of Ca(2+). Rock Tea extract inhibited the contractions induced by the L-type Ca(2+) channel activator Bay K 8644 (10(-5) M) and by phenylephrine (10(-6) M). Rock Tea extract and Y-27632 (10(-6) M), Rho-kinase inhibitor, had similar effects and the respective effects were not additive. Patch-clamp experiments demonstrated that Rock Tea extract (2.5 mg/ml) virtually abolished L-type Ca(2+) currents in A7r5. We conclude that Rock Tea extract produced vasorelaxation of rat aorta and that this relaxant effect is mediated by inhibition of L-type Ca(2+) channels. Rock Tea extracts may be of phytomedicinal value for prevention and adjuvant treatment of hypertension and other cardiovascular diseases.

  8. The effect of some cultivation conditions on properties of leaves of the container-produced species Alnus glutinosa (L. Gaertn

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    Aleš Jezdinský

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Plants differ in their reactions to unfavourable environmental conditions and the effect of the acting factors directly and indirectly results in changes in a number of plants organs. The leaves are vegetative organs and as such they are completely exposed to external conditions. Most markedly these conditions affect the assimilative organs. The objective of the present study was to evaluate the effect of four substrates and two sites differing in light intensity on the leaf morphology of the model plant species Alnus glutinosa (L. Gaertn. The used substrates were the commercial peat-bark substrate (RKS II, sand and bark substrate. With these substrates the soil conditioner TerraCottem was applied at a rate of 5 g per one litre of the substrate. The experimental plants were grown in 2-litre containers. The focus of evaluations of the individual treatments was on some leaf properties. TerraCottem showed that it had a positive effect also on the leaf area ratio and on leaf efficiency. The number of leaves varied. The effect of the substrate and of the light intensity was identical; the latter parameter was strongly correlated with leaf weight. The shape of the leaves (leaf length/width ratio and the SLA index responded to the different light intensities. Other parameters were calculated from the results of the measured values which specified in greater detail the effect of the year, media, hydro absorbent and light. Treatments A3 (1 697.60 mm2 and a conrol (1 708.10 mm2 had the smallest leave area. These two treatmens significantly statistically differed frome those in the shade location. In the 2005 year the highest values were measured at the treatment B1 (41.22 m2.kg−1. Next year the values of the SLA were similar.

  9. In vivo anti-Trypanosoma cruzi activity of hydro-ethanolic extract and isolated active principles from Aristeguietia glutinosa and mechanism of action studies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Varela, Javier; Serna, Elva; Torres, Susana; Yaluff, Gloria; de Bilbao, Ninfa I Vera; Miño, Patricio; Chiriboga, Ximena; Cerecetto, Hugo; González, Mercedes

    2014-06-23

    The currently available treatments for Chagas disease show limited therapeutic potential and are associated with serious side effects. Attempting to find alternative drugs isolated from Nature as agents against Trypanosoma cruzi has been our goal. Recently, we have demonstrated the in vitro anti-T. cruzi activities of two secondary metabolites isolated from the hydro-ethanolic extract of the aerial parts of Aristeguietia glutinosa (Lam.), (family Asteraceae). These active principles displayed poor hemolytic activity, low toxicity against murine macrophages, and absence of mutagenicity. Herein, proof of concept in vivo studies of the whole hydro-ethanolic extract of the aerial parts of Aristeguietia glutinosa and of the most active component isolated from the hydro-ethanolic extract, i.e., (+)-15-hydroxy-7-labden-17-al, was done in a murine acute model of Chagas disease. Both treatments caused a decrease in the animals' parasitemia. Metabolomic mechanism of action studies were done by 1H-NMR, both on the extract and on the active compounds, examining the effects of the metabolites both on membrane sterol biosynthesis and mitochondrial dehydrogenases, whereby we found that one of the metabolites inhibited the activity of the parasite mitochondrial dehydrogenases and the other inhibited the biosynthesis of parasite membrane sterols. The results are interesting in the context of popular use of plants for the treatment of Chagas disease.

  10. In Vivo Anti-Trypanosoma cruzi Activity of Hydro-Ethanolic Extract and Isolated Active Principles from Aristeguietia glutinosa and Mechanism of Action Studies

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    Javier Varela

    2014-06-01

    Full Text Available The currently available treatments for Chagas disease show limited therapeutic potential and are associated with serious side effects. Attempting to find alternative drugs isolated from Nature as agents against Trypanosoma cruzi has been our goal. Recently, we have demonstrated the in vitro anti-T. cruzi activities of two secondary metabolites isolated from the hydro-ethanolic extract of the aerial parts of Aristeguietia glutinosa (Lam., (family Asteraceae. These active principles displayed poor hemolytic activity, low toxicity against murine macrophages, and absence of mutagenicity. Herein, proof of concept in vivo studies of the whole hydro-ethanolic extract of the aerial parts of Aristeguietia glutinosa and of the most active component isolated from the hydro-ethanolic extract, i.e., (+-15-hydroxy-7-labden-17-al, was done in a murine acute model of Chagas disease. Both treatments caused a decrease in the animals’ parasitemia. Metabolomic mechanism of action studies were done by 1H-NMR, both on the extract and on the active compounds, examining the effects of the metabolites both on membrane sterol biosynthesis and mitochondrial dehydrogenases, whereby we found that one of the metabolites inhibited the activity of the parasite mitochondrial dehydrogenases and the other inhibited the biosynthesis of parasite membrane sterols. The results are interesting in the context of popular use of plants for the treatment of Chagas disease.

  11. Rehmannia glutinosa (Gaertn.) DC. polysaccharide ameliorates hyperglycemia, hyperlipemia and vascular inflammation in streptozotocin-induced diabetic mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhou, Jun; Xu, Gang; Yan, Junyan; Li, Kaicheng; Bai, Zhaoshuai; Cheng, Weinan; Huang, Kaixun

    2015-04-22

    Rehmannia glutinosa (Gaertn.) DC. (RG) has been widely used as traditional Chinese herbal medicine for treatment of diabetes and its complications. The polysaccharide fraction of RG has been proposed to possess hypoglycemic effect by intraperitoneal administration, however, the mechanisms responsible for the hypoglycemic effect of RG polysaccharide (RGP) remain poorly understood. Here we studied the anti-hyperglycemic and anti-hyperlipidemic effect of oral administration of a purified RGP and its underlying mechanisms in streptozotocin (STZ)-induced diabetic mice. The preliminary structure of RGP was determined by GC and FT-IR. Mice were injected with STZ to induce type 1 diabetes. RGP at doses of 20, 40 and 80 mg/kg/day was orally administered to mice for 4 weeks, and metformin was used as positive control. After 4 weeks, the blood biochemical parameters, the pancreatic insulin contents, in vitro insulin secretion, the hepatic glycogen contents and mRNA expression of phosphoenolpyruvate carboxyl kinase (PEPCK) were assayed. RGP was composed of rhamnose, arabinose, mannose, glucose and galactose in the molar ratio of 1.00:1.26:0.73:16.45:30.40 with the average molecular weight of 63.5 kDa. RGP administration significantly decreased the blood levels of glucose, total cholesterol, triglycerides, low density lipoprotein-cholesterol, and increased the blood levels of high density lipoprotein-cholesterol and insulin in diabetic mice, concurrent with increases in body weights and pancreatic insulin contents. The in vitro study revealed that RGP significantly enhanced both basal and glucose-stimulated insulin secretions, as well as islet insulin contents in the pancreatic islets of diabetic mice. Moreover, RGP reversed the increased mRNA expression of PEPCK and the reduced glycogen contents in the liver of diabetic mice. Furthermore, RGP exhibited potent anti-inflammatory and anti-oxidative activities, as evidenced by the decreased blood levels of TNF-α, IL-6, monocyte

  12. Estudio morfoanatómico de la semilla y de las reservas protéicas y lipídicas en tejidos cotiledonales de Cuphea Glutinosa (Lythraceae Morphoanatomical study of seed and lipid and protein reserves in cotyledonal tissues of Cuphea glutinosa (Lythraceae

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    Francisco Jose Cardinali

    2010-06-01

    Full Text Available El objetivo del presente trabajo fue estudiar el tamano y la distribución de cuerpos grasos y proteicos en tejidos cotiledonales de semillas maduras de Cuphea glutinosa Cham et Schltdl., recolectadas en Sierra de los Padres, Sistema de Tandilia, Buenos Aires, Argentina. El tamano de los cuerpos proteicos fue variable en los distintos tejidos cotiledonales, en tanto que los cuerpos lipídicos mantuvieron una gran uniformidad en todos ellos. Cuphea glutinosa almacena sus reservas proteicas fundamentalmente en el mesofilo, ya que si bien la epidermis presenta cuerpos proteicos, los mismos se encuentran en bajo número y son de muy pequeno tamano. En cuanto a la reserva lipídica, se acumula en los tres tejidos estudiados, pero alrededor del 50% se halla en la epidermis cotiledonal y el resto está distribuída en ambos parénquimas. Esto significaría que al momento de movilizar las grandes reservas compartimentalizadas en los cotiledones, los tres tejidos se verían fuertemente comprometidos para una adecuada provisión de energía durante la germinación.The objective of the present work was to study the size and distribution of lipid and protein bodies in Cuphea glutinosa mature seeds collected in Sierra de los Padres, Tandilia system hills, Buenos Aires, Argentine. The protein bodies' size was variable in the different cotyledonal tissues, while the lipid bodies were largely uniform. Protein storage was observed mainly in the mesophyll tissues, although the epidermis also showed protein bodies of small size and in a low number. Lipid reserves were present in the three tissues, but around 50% was found in the cotyledonal epidermis while the rest was located in both parenchymas. This means that at the moment of moving the cotyledonal reserves, the three tissues were strongly involved providing an adequate amount of energy during germination.

  13. Comparison of {sup 226}Ra nuclide from soil by three woody species Betula pendula, Sambucus nigra and Alnus glutinosa during the vegetation period

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    Soudek, Petr; Petrova, Sarka; Benesova, Dagmar [Laboratory of Plant Biotechnologies, Joint Laboratory of Institute of Experimental Botany AS CR and Crop Research Institute, Rozvojova 263, 165 02 Prague 6 (Czech Republic); Tykva, Richard [Department of Radioisotopes, Institute of Organic Chemistry and Biochemistry AS CR, Flemingovo nam. 2, 166 10 Prague 6 (Czech Republic); Vankova, Radomira [Laboratory of Hormonal Regulations in Plants, Institute of Experimental Botany AS CR, Rozvojova 263, 165 02 Prague 6 (Czech Republic); Vanek, Tomas [Laboratory of Plant Biotechnologies, Joint Laboratory of Institute of Experimental Botany AS CR and Crop Research Institute, Rozvojova 263, 165 02 Prague 6 (Czech Republic)], E-mail: vanek@ueb.cas.cz

    2007-09-15

    The uptake of {sup 226}Ra from the contaminated soil was compared in three woody species: alder (Alnus glutinosa), birch (Betula pendula) and elder (Sambucus nigra). The {sup 226}Ra activities increased during the vegetation periods (in 2003, 2004 and 2005) both in the leaves and flowers + seeds. The highest accumulation was found in birch, reaching 0.41 Bq/g DW in the leaves (at the end of the vegetation period in 2003). The lowest {sup 226}Ra accumulation was determined in alder. The extent of {sup 226}Ra accumulation in the leaves of woody species demonstrates that these pioneer woody species can be used as remediation alternative to the use of herbs, provided that the removal of fallen leaves could be achieved in the end of vegetation period.

  14. Analysis of integrated multiple 'omics' datasets reveals the mechanisms of initiation and determination in the formation of tuberous roots in Rehmannia glutinosa.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Mingjie; Yang, Yanhui; Li, Xinyu; Gu, Li; Wang, Fengji; Feng, Fajie; Tian, Yunhe; Wang, Fengqing; Wang, Xiaoran; Lin, Wenxiong; Chen, Xinjian; Zhang, Zhongyi

    2015-09-01

    All tuberous roots in Rehmannia glutinosa originate from the expansion of fibrous roots (FRs), but not all FRs can successfully transform into tuberous roots. This study identified differentially expressed genes and proteins associated with the expansion of FRs, by comparing the tuberous root at expansion stages (initiated tuberous root, ITRs) and FRs at the seedling stage (initiated FRs, IFRs). The role of miRNAs in the expansion of FRs was also explored using the sRNA transcriptome and degradome to identify miRNAs and their target genes that were differentially expressed between ITRs and FRs at the mature stage (unexpanded FRs, UFRs, which are unable to expand into ITRs). A total of 6032 genes and 450 proteins were differentially expressed between ITRs and IFRs. Integrated analyses of these data revealed several genes and proteins involved in light signalling, hormone response, and signal transduction that might participate in the induction of tuberous root formation. Several genes related to cell division and cell wall metabolism were involved in initiating the expansion of IFRs. Of 135 miRNAs differentially expressed between ITRs and UFRs, there were 27 miRNAs whose targets were specifically identified in the degradome. Analysis of target genes showed that several miRNAs specifically expressed in UFRs were involved in the degradation of key genes required for the formation of tuberous roots. As far as could be ascertained, this is the first time that the miRNAs that control the transition of FRs to tuberous roots in R. glutinosa have been identified. This comprehensive analysis of 'omics' data sheds new light on the mechanisms involved in the regulation of tuberous roots formation. © The Author 2015. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of the Society for Experimental Biology. All rights reserved. For permissions, please email: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  15. Evaluation of Four Different Analytical Tools to Determine the Regional Origin of Gastrodia elata and Rehmannia glutinosa on the Basis of Metabolomics Study

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    Dong-Kyu Lee

    2014-05-01

    Full Text Available Chemical profiles of medicinal plants could be dissimilar depending on the cultivation environments, which may influence their therapeutic efficacy. Accordingly, the regional origin of the medicinal plants should be authenticated for correct evaluation of their medicinal and market values. Metabolomics has been found very useful for discriminating the origin of many plants. Choosing the adequate analytical tool can be an essential procedure because different chemical profiles with different detection ranges will be produced according to the choice. In this study, four analytical tools, Fourier transform near‑infrared spectroscopy (FT-NIR, 1H-nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy (1H‑NMR, liquid chromatography-mass spectrometry (LC-MS, and gas chromatography-mass spectroscopy (GC-MS were applied in parallel to the same samples of two popular medicinal plants (Gastrodia elata and Rehmannia glutinosa cultivated either in Korea or China. The classification abilities of four discriminant models for each plant were evaluated based on the misclassification rate and Q2 obtained from principal component analysis (PCA and orthogonal projection to latent structures-discriminant analysis (OPLS‑DA, respectively. 1H-NMR and LC-MS, which were the best techniques for G. elata and R. glutinosa, respectively, were generally preferable for origin discrimination over the others. Reasoned by integrating all the results, 1H-NMR is the most prominent technique for discriminating the origins of two plants. Nonetheless, this study suggests that preliminary screening is essential to determine the most suitable analytical tool and statistical method, which will ensure the dependability of metabolomics-based discrimination.

  16. Comparación del "Tabog" (Swinglea glutinosa Merr con el limón "rugoso" (Citrus jambhiri Swingle y la mandarina "Cleopatra" (C. reticulata Swingle como porta-injerto para la lima acida ''Tahiti" (C. aurantifolia Swingle

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    Restrepo C. Orlando

    1987-09-01

    Full Text Available At the C.N.I.-I.C.A. Palmira, fruit trees program the influence of "Tabog" Swinglea glutinosa was evaluated as rootstock for acid lime "Tahiti" Citrus aurantifolia, taking into account the following aspects: development and productivility of the trees quality and growth of fruits, demands of nutriments, and resistance or susceptibility to pest and disease; comparing its behavior with the commercial rootstocks rough, lemon C. jambhiri and mandarina, "Cleopatra" C. reticulata.En el C.N.l. Palmira del Instituto Colombiano Agropecuario (lCA, se evaluó la influencia del "Tabog" Swinglea glutinosa como porta-injerto para la lima "Tahiti " Citrus aurantifolia, teniendo en cuenta los siguientes aspectos: desarrollo y productividad del árbol, calidad y desarrollo de los frutos, exigencias de nutrimentos, resistencia o susceptibilidad a plagas y enfermedades; comparando su comportamiento con los porta-injertos comerciales limón "Rugoso" C. jambhiri y la mandarina "Cleopatra " C. reticulata.

  17. Efficacy of aqueous extracts of black alder (Alnus glutinosa GAERTN. and black elderberry (Sambucus nigra L. in reducing the occurrence of Phyllotreta spp., some lepidopteran pests and diamondback moth parasitoids on white cabbage

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    Jankowska Beata

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available The insecticidal and antifeedant effects of aqueous extracts from two common plants (black alder Alnus glutinosa and black elderberry Sambucus nigra on the occurrence of flea beetles (Phyllotreta spp., as well as lepidopteran pests like the diamondback moth Plutella xylostella, small white butterfly Pieris rapae, large white butterfly Pieris brassicae, cabbage moth Mamestra brassicae and the Plutella xylostella parasitoid complex were investigated on white cabbage in 2008-2009. Aqueous extracts of black elderberry Sambucus nigra significantly reduced numbers of flea beetles Phyllotreta spp., eggs of Pieris rapae and P. brassicae, and larvae and pupae of Plutella xylostella on the cabbage. The aqueous extract of Alnus glutinosa was less effective. Parasitoids had the greatest impact on reducing numbers of diamondback moth: the dominant species was Diadegma fenestralis. The smallest number of parasitoids was reared from pupae collected from plots where the cabbages had been sprayed with the Sambucus nigra extract.

  18. Evaluación de la Actividad Antifúngica In Vitro de Emulsiones de Marco (Ambrosia Arborescens Mill) y Matico (Aristeguietia Glutinosa Lam) sobre Hongos Patógenos causantes de la Dermatomicosis

    OpenAIRE

    Dávila Molina, Clara Gisela; Pazos Gambarroti, Lourdes Angélica

    2015-01-01

    The pharmaceutical and cosmetic industries in Ecuador are interested in developing natural products, for that reason in this study was considered the evaluation of antifungal activity in vitro of natural ingredients as Marco (Ambrosia arborescens Mill) and Matico (Aristeguietia glutinosa Lam) in cosmetic formulations. Three types of cosmetic formulation were considered: cream, lotion, gel, via two experimental designs for analyzing the preliminary stability before of the evaluation of antifun...

  19. Cloning and analysis of expression patterns and transcriptional regulation of RghBNG in response to plant growth regulators and abiotic stresses in Rehmannia glutinosa.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhou, Yanqing; Zhang, Yonghua; Wei, Jun; Zhang, Yu; Li, Jingyun; Wang, Wanshen; Duan, Hongying; Chen, Juanjuan

    2015-01-01

    RghBNG, a gene of unknown function, was cloned from Rehmannia glutinosa by reverse transcription PCR and rapid amplification of cDNA ends. The full-length cDNA of RghBNG was 548 bp with a282-bp open reading frame. It encoded a polypeptide of 93 amino acids with a predicted molecular weight of 10.5 kDa and a theoretical isoelectric point of 9.25. Bioinformatics analysis indicated that RghBNG had no homology to any known plant genes, whereas the RghBNG polypeptide was highly similar to other plant proteins and possessed one conserved B12D protein family functional domain. Phylogenetic analysis revealed that RghBNG encoded for a dicot protein. RghBNG spatial and temporal expression patterns and responses to abiotic stresses and plant growth regulators were investigated by qRT-PCR. RghBNG transcripts were detected in roots, stems, leaves, petals, receptacles, stamens and pistils with the highest and lowest levels respectively observed in petals and leaves of mature plants. Additionally, RghBNG transcripts were detected at three developmental stages of roots, stems and leaves; the highest levels were observed in roots at seedling stage; Transcript levels changed to varying degrees in different tissues and stages; We also studied the effects of abiotic stress and plant growth regulators in roots and leaves. RghBNG expression was significantly increased (p growth, development and response to plant growth regulators and abiotic stresses.

  20. Alder and the Golden Fleece: high diversity of Frankia and ectomycorrhizal fungi revealed from Alnus glutinosa subsp. barbata roots close to a Tertiary and glacial refugium

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    Melanie Roy

    2017-07-01

    Full Text Available Background Recent climatic history has strongly impacted plant populations, but little is known about its effect on microbes. Alders, which host few and specific symbionts, have high genetic diversity in glacial refugia. Here, we tested the prediction that communities of root symbionts survived in refugia with their host populations. We expected to detect endemic symbionts and a higher species richness in refugia as compared to recolonized areas. Methods We sampled ectomycorrhizal (EM root tips and the nitrogen-fixing actinomycete Frankia communities in eight sites colonized by Alnus glutinosa subsp. barbata close to the Caucasus in Georgia. Three sites were located in the Colchis, one major Eurasian climatic refugia for Arcto-Tertiary flora and alders, and five sites were located in the recolonized zone. Endemic symbionts and plant ITS variants were detected by comparing sequences to published data from Europe and another Tertiary refugium, the Hyrcanian forest. Species richness and community structure were compared between sites from refugia and recolonized areas for each symbionts. Results For both symbionts, most MOTUs present in Georgia had been found previously elsewhere in Europe. Three endemic Frankia strains were detected in the Colchis vs two in the recolonized zone, and the five endemic EM fungi were detected only in the recolonized zone. Frankia species richness was higher in the Colchis while the contrary was observed for EM fungi. Moreover, the genetic diversity of one alder specialist Alnicola xanthophylla was particularly high in the recolonized zone. The EM communities occurring in the Colchis and the Hyrcanian forests shared closely related endemic species. Discussion The Colchis did not have the highest alpha diversity and more endemic species, suggesting that our hypothesis based on alder biogeography may not apply to alder’s symbionts. Our study in the Caucasus brings new clues to understand symbioses biogeography and

  1. Alder and the Golden Fleece: high diversity of Frankia and ectomycorrhizal fungi revealed from Alnus glutinosa subsp. barbata roots close to a Tertiary and glacial refugium.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roy, Melanie; Pozzi, Adrien C; Gareil, Raphaëlle; Nagati, Melissande; Manzi, Sophie; Nouioui, Imen; Sharikadze, Nino; Jargeat, Patricia; Gryta, Hervé; Moreau, Pierre-Arthur; Fernandez, Maria P; Gardes, Monique

    2017-01-01

    Recent climatic history has strongly impacted plant populations, but little is known about its effect on microbes. Alders, which host few and specific symbionts, have high genetic diversity in glacial refugia. Here, we tested the prediction that communities of root symbionts survived in refugia with their host populations. We expected to detect endemic symbionts and a higher species richness in refugia as compared to recolonized areas. We sampled ectomycorrhizal (EM) root tips and the nitrogen-fixing actinomycete Frankia communities in eight sites colonized by Alnus glutinosa subsp. barbata close to the Caucasus in Georgia. Three sites were located in the Colchis, one major Eurasian climatic refugia for Arcto-Tertiary flora and alders, and five sites were located in the recolonized zone. Endemic symbionts and plant ITS variants were detected by comparing sequences to published data from Europe and another Tertiary refugium, the Hyrcanian forest. Species richness and community structure were compared between sites from refugia and recolonized areas for each symbionts. For both symbionts, most MOTUs present in Georgia had been found previously elsewhere in Europe. Three endemic Frankia strains were detected in the Colchis vs two in the recolonized zone, and the five endemic EM fungi were detected only in the recolonized zone. Frankia species richness was higher in the Colchis while the contrary was observed for EM fungi. Moreover, the genetic diversity of one alder specialist Alnicola xanthophylla was particularly high in the recolonized zone. The EM communities occurring in the Colchis and the Hyrcanian forests shared closely related endemic species. The Colchis did not have the highest alpha diversity and more endemic species, suggesting that our hypothesis based on alder biogeography may not apply to alder's symbionts. Our study in the Caucasus brings new clues to understand symbioses biogeography and their survival in Tertiary and ice-age refugia, and reveals

  2. Selective in vitro and in silico butyrylcholinesterase inhibitory activity of diterpenes and rosmarinic acid isolated from Perovskia atriplicifolia Benth. and Salvia glutinosa L.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Senol, F Sezer; Ślusarczyk, Sylwester; Matkowski, Adam; Pérez-Garrido, Alfonso; Girón-Rodríguez, Francisco; Cerón-Carrasco, José P; den-Haan, Helena; Peña-García, Jorge; Pérez-Sánchez, Horacio; Domaradzki, Krzysztof; Orhan, Ilkay Erdogan

    2017-01-01

    Cholinesterase inhibition is one of the most treatment strategies against Alzheimer's disease (AD) where metal accumulation is also strongly associated with pathology of the disease. In the current study, we assessed inhibitory effect against acetyl- (AChE) and butyrylcholinesterase (BChE) and metal-chelating capacity of twelve diterpenes: arucadiol, miltirone, tanshinone IIa, 1-oxomiltirone, cryptotanshinone, 1,2-didehydromiltirone, 1,2-didehydrotanshinone IIa, 1β-hydroxycryptotanshinone, 15,16-dihydrotanshinone, tanshinone I, isotanshinone II, 1(S)-hydroxytanshinone IIa, and rosmarinic acid, isolated from Perovskia atriplicifolia and Salvia glutinosa. The compounds were tested at 10 μg/mL using ELISA microtiter assays against AChE and BChE. QSAR and molecular docking studies have been also performed on the active compounds. All of the compounds showed higher [e.g., IC50 = 1.12 ± 0.07 μg/mL for 1,2-didehydromiltirone, IC50 = 1.15 ± 0.07 μg/mL for cryptotanshinone, IC50 = 1.20 ± 0.03 μg/mL for arucadiol, etc.)] or closer [1,2-didehydrotanshinone IIa (IC50 = 5.98 ± 0.49 μg/mL) and 1(S)-hydroxytanshinone IIa (IC50 = 5.71 ± 0.27 μg/mL)] inhibition against BChE as compared to that of galanthamine (IC50 = 12.56 ± 0.37 μg/mL), whereas only 15,16-dihydrotanshinone moderately inhibited AChE (65.17 ± 1.39%). 1,2-Didehydrotanshinone IIa (48.94 ± 0.26%) and 1(S)-hydroxytanshinone IIa (47.18 ± 5.10%) possessed the highest metal-chelation capacity. The present study affords an evidence for the fact that selective BChE inhibitors should be further investigated as promising candidate molecules for AD therapy. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  3. X-Ray Microanalytic Concentration Measurements in Unsectioned Specimens: a Technique and its Application to Zinc, Manganese, and Iron Enriched Mechanical Structures of Organisms from Three Phyla

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schofield, Robert M. S.

    A method for measuring concentrations of minor elements in microscopic volumes of heterogeneous, unsectioned biological specimens using an ion microprobe is developed. The element quantity is obtained from PIXE (Proton Induced X-ray Emission) and the total quantity of material is derived from STIM (Scanning Transmission Ion Microscopy) energy loss measurements. Sources of error, including changes in x-ray production cross section with proton energy and absorption of induced x-rays, are discussed and a method of calculating the total measurement uncertainty, typically about 25% here, is developed. The measurement accuracy is shown to be improved for symmetric specimens, and a method of using the bremsstrahlung background to correct for x-ray attenuation within irregular specimens is developed. Methods for measuring local concentrations in internal features are also discussed. With this technique, scorpions were found to contain cuticular accumulations of one or more heavy metals (manganese up to 5% of dry weight, iron up to 8%, zinc up to 24%) in the chelicera, pedipalp denticles, tarsal claws, and stingers; different region soften contained different metals. The stingers are argued to be of particular interest because they are not homologous to legs. Similar accumulations were found in spiders, some other chelicerates and crustaceans. Previous reports of manganese and zinc accumulations in insect and worm mouth parts were augmented with local concentration measurements and with the detection of other enrichment features (such as 6% iron in the paragnaths of the worm Nereis vexillosa). Zinc accumulations (up to only 0.1%) were also found in the tips of the teeth of a hagfish, Myxine + glutinosa. X-ray images of several of these features are presented. It is argued that the extreme magnitude of some concentration values suggests that some metals are incorporated in unusual biominerals rather than organically bound. Results of x-ray diffractometry and Vickers

  4. Novel N-benzoyltyramines of Swinglea glutinosa (Rutaceae); Novas N-benzoiltiraminas de Swinglea glutinosa (Rutaceae).

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cerqueira, Cristovam do Nascimento; Santos, Djalma A.P. dos; Malaquias, Karla da Silva; Lima, Murilo Marinho de Castro; Silva, Maria Fatima das Gracas Fernandes da; Fernandes, Joao Batista; Vieira, Paulo Cezar, E-mail: dmfs@ufscar.br [Universidade Federal de Sao Carlos (UFSCAR), SP (Brazil). Dept. de Quimica

    2012-07-01

    Phytochemical studies of the leaves and fruits have led to the identification of the known amides (E)-N-methyl-cinnamamide, N-benzoyltyramine, N-benzoyl-O-geranyl tyramine, N-benzoyl-O-(4-acetoxyl)-geranyl tyramine, in addition to the new N-{l_brace}2-[4-(butoxyl-3-one)phenyl]ethyl{r_brace}benzamide, N-{l_brace}2-[4-(2,3-dihydroxy-2-methyl-butoxylanal)phenyl]ethyl{r_brace}benzamide, N-{l_brace}2-[4-(2,3-dihydroxy-2-methyl-butoxyloic) phenyl]ethyl{r_brace}benzamide, N-benzoyl-O-(4-acetoxyl-6,7-epoxy)-geranyltyramine, N-benzoyl-O-(4-acetoxyl-6,7-dihydroxy)-geranyltyramine and N-benzoyl-O-(6-acetoxyl-4,7-dihydroxy)-geranyltyramine. The isolated compounds clearly point to Swinglea phytochemical affinities with other Aurantioideae species. (author)

  5. Effect of aqueous extracts of black alder (Alnus glutinosa (LINNAEUS, 1753 GAERTNER, 1791 and elder (Sambucus nigra LINNAEUS, 1753 on the occurrence of Brevicoryne brassicae LINNAEUS, 1758 (Hemiptera, Aphidoidea, its parasitoid Diaeretiella rapae (M’INTOSH, 1855 (Hymenoptera, Ichneumonoidea and predatory Syrphidae on white cabbage

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jankowska Beata

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available The insecticidal and antifeedant effects of aqueous extracts from two common plants (black alder Alnus glutinosa and elder Sambucus nigra on the occurrence of Brevicoryne brassicae, its parasitoid Diaeretiella rapae and predatory Syrphidae on white cabbage were investigated in 2008-2009. Both extracts reduced the number of cabbage aphids, although the Sambucus nigra extract proved to have a better effect. Differences were seen both in the numbers of winged aphids settling on plants and in the overall numbers of aphids on plants during the entire season. There were no significant differences in the degree of parasitization by Diaeretiella rapae in the three experimental combinations. Eight species of Syrphidae were found in the Brevicoryne brassicae colonies: Episyrphus balteatus, Sphaerophoria scripta, S. rueppelli, S. menthastri, Eupeodes corollae, Scaeva pyrastri, Scaeva selenitica and Syrphus vitripennis. The dominant species was Episyrphus balteatus. The largest numbers of syrphid larvae and pupae were collected from cabbage aphid colonies on the control plants. Smaller numbers were recorded on the plot where the cabbages were sprayed with the Sambucus nigra extract. The results of this study indicate that botanical insecticides based on S. nigra have the potential to be incorporated into control programmes for the cabbage aphid.

  6. Green synthesis of silver nanoparticles mediated by Pulicaria glutinosa extract

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Khan, Mujeeb; Khan, Merajuddin; Adil, Syed Farooq; Tahir, Muhammad Nawaz; Tremel, Wolfgang; Alkhathlan, Hamad Z; Al-Warthan, Abdulrahman; Siddiqui, Mohammed Rafiq H

    2013-01-01

    The green synthesis of metallic nanoparticles (NPs) has attracted tremendous attention in recent years because these protocols are low cost and more environmentally friendly than standard methods of synthesis...

  7. EKSTRAKSI DAN STABILITAS ZAT PEWARNA ALAM DARI KATUL BERAS KETAN HITAM (Oryza sativa glutinosa* EXTRACTION AND STABILITY OF NATURAL COLORANT FROM RED GLUTINOUS RICE BRAN (Oryza sativa glutinosa*

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tirza Hanum1

    2000-04-01

    Full Text Available Three extraction methods were studied to isolate natural colorant from red glutinous rice bran. Stability of extracts in relation to processing conditions and in the model beverages was determined at room temperature. Identifications of anthocyanidins was performed using reversed phase HPLC. Extraction method using acidified methanol solvent showed the highest yield (260,24 28,64 mg/100g. HPLC patern indicated the presence of six major anthocyanidins, two of them were identified as apigenidin and apigenin. Stability of anthocyanin colorant was higher in a lower acid condition and was reduced to the lowest value of 49,4, 65,4, 40,8 and 36,6% by high temperature, UV light, sunlight, and the presence of oxidator agent. respectively. Retention of antocyanin in tanin and ascorbic acid added into the model beverages was lower than in protein containing beverage or control.

  8. Importance of mechanics and kinematics in determining the stiffness contribution of the vertebral column during body-caudal-fin swimming in fishes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nowroozi, Bryan N; Brainerd, Elizabeth L

    2014-02-01

    Whole-body stiffness in fishes has important consequences for swimming mode, speed and efficiency, but the contribution of vertebral column stiffness to whole-body stiffness is unclear. In our opinion, this lack of clarity is due in part to the lack of studies that have measured both in vitro mechanical properties of the vertebral column as well as in vivo vertebral kinematics in the same species. Some lack of clarity may also come from real variation in the mechanical role of the vertebral column across species. Previous studies, based on either mechanics or kinematics alone, suggest species-specific variation in vertebral column locomotor function that ranges from highly stiff regimes that contribute greatly to whole-body stiffness, and potentially act as a spring, to highly compliant regimes that only prohibit excessive flexion of the intervertebral joints. We review data collected in combined investigations of both mechanics and kinematics of three species, Myxine glutinosa, Acipenser transmontanus, and Morone saxatilis, to illustrate how mechanical testing within the context of the in vivo kinematics more clearly distinguishes the role of the vertebral column in each species. In addition, we identify species for which kinematic data are available, but mechanical data are lacking. We encourage further investigation of these species to fill these mechanical data gaps. Finally, we hope these future combined analyses will identify certain morphological, mechanical, or kinematic parameters that might be associated with certain vertebral column functional regimes with respect to body stiffness. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier GmbH. All rights reserved.

  9. Extraction And Stability Of Natural Colorant From Red Glutinous Rice Bran (Oryza Sativa Glutinosa

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tirza Hanum

    2001-04-01

    Full Text Available Three extraction methods were studied to isolate natural colorant from red glutinous rice bran. Stability of extracts in relation to processing conditions and in the model beverages was determined at room temperature. Identifications of anthocyanidins was performed using reversed phase HPLC. Extraction method using acidified methanol solvent showed the highest yield (260,24+28,64 mg/100g. HPLC patern indicated the presence of six major anthocyanidins, two of them were identified as apigenidin and apigenin. Stability of anthocyanin colorant was higher in a lower acid condition and was reduced to the lowest value of 49,4, 65,4, 40,8 and 36,6% by high temperature, UV light, sunlight, and the presence of oxidator agent. respectively. Retention of antocyanin in tanin and ascorbic acid added into the model beverages was lower than in protein containing beverage or control.

  10. A new megastigmane diglycoside from Litsea glutinosa (Lour.) C. B. Rob

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wang, Yun-Song; Huang, Rong; Zhang, Hong-Bing; Yang, Jing-Hua, E-mail: yangjh@ynu.edu.cn [Key Laboratory of Medicinal Chemistry for Natural Resource, Ministry of Education, School of Chemical Science and Technology, Yunnan University (China); Liao, Zhen [Yunnan Academy of Tobacco Science (China); Li, Yan [State Key Laboratory of Phytochemistry and Plant Resources in West China, Kunming Institute of Botany, Chinese Academy of Sciences (China)

    2011-09-15

    Phytochemical study on the leaves and twigs of afforded the new megastigmane diglycoside (6S, 7E, 9R)-6, 9-dihydroxy-4, 7-megastigmadien-3-one-9-O-[{alpha}-L-arabinofuranosyl-(1 ->6)]- {beta}-D-glucopyranoside (1), along with glycosides (6S, 7E, 9R)-roseoside (2), (7'R, 8'R)- 3, 5'-dimethoxy-9, 9'-dihydroxy-4, 7'-epoxylignan 4'-b-D-glucopyranoside (3), (7'R, 8'S)- dihydrodehydrodiconifenyl alcohol 9'-O-{beta}-D-xylopyranoside (4) and pinoresinol 3-O-{beta}-Dglucopyranoside (5). Their structures were established on the basis of extensive spectroscopic and chemical methods. Compounds 2-5 were reported for the first time in this species. Compound 1 was evaluated for cytotoxic activities against human tumor cell lines (myeloid leukemia HL-60, hepatocellular carcinoma SMMC-7721, lung cancer A-549, breast cancer MCF-7 and colon cancer SW480 cells), for which it was proved to be inactive (IC{sub 50} > 40 {mu}M). (author)

  11. The effect of some cultivation conditions on properties of leaves of the container-produced species Alnus glutinosa (L.) Gaertn

    OpenAIRE

    Aleš Jezdinský; Vojtěch Řezníček

    2011-01-01

    Plants differ in their reactions to unfavourable environmental conditions and the effect of the acting factors directly and indirectly results in changes in a number of plants organs. The leaves are vegetative organs and as such they are completely exposed to external conditions. Most markedly these conditions affect the assimilative organs. The objective of the present study was to evaluate the effect of four substrates and two sites differing in light intensity on the leaf morphology of the...

  12. Tree Age Effects on Fine Root Biomass and Morphology over Chronosequences of Fagus sylvatica, Quercus robur and Alnus glutinosa Stands.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jagodzinski, Andrzej M; Ziółkowski, Jędrzej; Warnkowska, Aleksandra; Prais, Hubert

    2016-01-01

    There are few data on fine root biomass and morphology change in relation to stand age. Based on chronosequences for beech (9-140 years old), oak (11-140 years) and alder (4-76 years old) we aimed to examine how stand age affects fine root biomass and morphology. Soil cores from depths of 0-15 cm and 16-30 cm were used for the study. In contrast to previously published studies that suggested that maximum fine root biomass is reached at the canopy closure stage of stand development, we found almost linear increases of fine root biomass over stand age within the chronosequences. We did not observe any fine root biomass peak in the canopy closure stage. However, we found statistically significant increases of mean fine root biomass for the average individual tree in each chronosequence. Mean fine root biomass (0-30 cm) differed significantly among tree species chronosequences studied and was 4.32 Mg ha(-1), 3.71 Mg ha(-1) and 1.53 Mg ha(-1), for beech, oak and alder stands, respectively. The highest fine root length, surface area, volume and number of fine root tips (0-30 cm soil depth), expressed on a stand area basis, occurred in beech stands, with medium values for oak stands and the lowest for alder stands. In the alder chronosequence all these values increased with stand age, in the beech chronosequence they decreased and in the oak chronosequence they increased until ca. 50 year old stands and then reached steady-state. Our study has proved statistically significant negative relationships between stand age and specific root length (SRL) in 0-30 cm soil depth for beech and oak chronosequences. Mean SRLs for each chronosequence were not significantly different among species for either soil depth studied. The results of this study indicate high fine root plasticity. Although only limited datasets are currently available, these data have provided valuable insight into fine root biomass and morphology of beech, oak and alder stands.

  13. Protective effect of R. glutinosa oligosaccharides against high L-carnitine diet-induced endothelial dysfunction and hepatic injury in mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Wenfeng; Zhang, Ruijun; Guo, Jianjun; Shao, Hongjun; Yang, Xingbin

    2016-04-01

    Current research for the first time demonstrated that endothelial dysfunction and hepatic injury in mice were induced by ingestion of 3% l-carnitine water for consecutive 10 weeks. Interestingly, oral administration of dietary raffinose family oligosaccharides (RFOs) at 400 and 800 mg/kg bw significantly reduced the impact of l-carnitine on the serum total cholesterol, triglycerides, high- and low-density lipoproteins, alanine aminotransferase, aspartate amino-transferase, NO, endothelin-1 and C-reactive protein. Furthermore, l-carnitine-induced elevation of hepatic lipid contents and malonaldehyde formation, and the inhibition of SOD and GSH-Px activities in mice were markedly ameliorated by oral administration of RFOs. Moreover, histopathology of H&E and Oil Red O staining of the liver also confirmed the protective effect of RFOs against hepatic steatosis and oxidative injury induced by high l-carnitine diet in mice. These findings for the first time suggest that RFOs may alleviate endothelial dysfunction and liver injury from ingestion of high l-carnitine diet. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  14. The role of Alnus glutinosa (l.) Gaertner in the secondary succession on wet meadows in the Piné High Plain (North Italy)

    OpenAIRE

    Gafta, Dan; Canullo, Roberto

    2017-01-01

    Four rnain successional stages in the abandoned rnowed meadows belonging to Junco Molinietum association are evidenced by means of a structural study of the colonizing tree species, and especially far the black alder. The graduai decrease in soil humidity and the forrnation of high tufts of Molinia make possible only the vegetative propagation of the black alder and the penetration of rnesophilous tree species. Under the alder wood, corresponding to the third stage of the succession, na...

  15. KARAKTERISTIK FERMENTATIF MEDIUM deMann Rogosa Sharpe (MRS ANTOSIANIN BERAS KETAN HITAM (Oryza sativa var. glutinosa MENGGUNAKAN Pediococcus pentosaceus N11.16

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nanik Suhartatik

    2014-10-01

    fenol medium MRSm+antosianin cenderung lebih tinggi daripada MRSm atau kontrol (MRS. Aktivitas enzim β glukosidase sel bakteri cenderung lebih tinggi pada medium MRSm+antosianin daripada MRSm atau kontrol (MRS. Kata kunci: Antosianin, beras ketan hitam, bakteri asam laktat, antioksidan

  16. Accumulation of heavy metals (cadmium, zinc, and copper) from smelter in forest ecosystems and their uptakes by Shiitake mushroom (Lentinus edodes (Berk) Sing. ) and Nameko mushroom (Pholiota glutinosa Kawamura) through polluted bed logs

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nishimoto, T.; Fujita, K.; Furukawa, H.; Yoshimoto, M.

    1977-12-01

    Mushrooms cultivated on sawdust medium which had been innoculated with heavy metals accumulated the metals increasingly in stems, pileus, gill and spores, in that order. There were strain differences, in accumulation, and highest concentration was found in the first-born fruit body. At 2 ppm, cadmium did not affect yield of the fruiting body. At 20 ppm, however, yield was seriously reduced. Species differences in absorption capacity for heavy metals were noted. Seasonal variations in cadmium and copper accumulation were noted, along with zinc. Cadmium concentration in fruiting bodies increased with increase of cadmium concentration in the growth substrate. 23 figures, 16 tables.

  17. Evolution of a core gene network for skeletogenesis in chordates

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Hecht, Jochen; Stricker, Sigmar; Wiecha, Ulrike; Stiege, Asita; Panopoulou, Georgia; Podsiadlowski, Lars; Poustka, Albert J; Dieterich, Christoph; Ehrich, Siegfried; Suvorova, Julia; Mundlos, Stefan; Seitz, Volkhard

    2008-01-01

    .... To clarify the correlation of Runt gene evolution and the emergence of cartilage and bone in vertebrates, we cloned the Runt genes from hagfish as representative of jawless fish (MgRunxA, MgRunxB...

  18. Lauric acid and 2, 6-ditertbutyl phenol, two major allelochemicals ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Rehmannia glutinosa Libosch, a well known herb for Chinese traditional medicine, and sesame are two main crops in Northwestern Henan, China. It has been known however that, a rotation of these two crops, for example, cultivation of sesame preceeded with R. glutinosa Libosch, leads to decreased yield and poor quality ...

  19. Gonadotropin releasing hormone in the primitive vertebrate family Myxinidae: reproductive neuroanatomy and evolutionary aspects.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sills, Eric Scott; Palermo, Gianpiero D

    2013-01-01

    The family Myxinidae embraces all hagfish species, and occupies an evolutionary niche intermediate between ancestral vertebrates and the gnathostomes (jawed vertebrates). Gonadotropin releasing hormone (GnRH) modulates neuroendocrine activity in vertebrates and works in the context of the hypothalamic-pituitary (H-P) axis. The appearance of this neuroendocrine axis marks one of the most crucial developmental achievements in vertebrate evolution, because it enabled further diversification in general growth, metabolism, osmoregulation and reproduction as jawed vertebrates evolved. GnRH studies in hagfish draw attention because such work may be considered as providing proxy data for similar investigations conducted upon long extinct species. Indeed, the fossil record reveals little anatomical difference between those hagfish living 300 million years ago and their modern descendants. Accordingly, the hagfish can offer important evolutionary lessons as they have some highly unusual characteristics not seen in any other vertebrate; they retain many representative features of an ancestral state from which all vertebrates originated. Indeed, because central control of reproduction is perhaps the most basic function of the vertebrate H-P axis, and given the importance of GnRH in this network, research on GnRH in hagfish can help elucidate the early evolution of the H-P system itself. Like all vertebrates, hagfish have a functional hypothalamic area and a pituitary gland, constituting a basic H-P axis. But what role does GnRH play in the reproductive system of this "living fossil"? How can understanding GnRH in hagfish help advance the knowledge of vertebrate neuroendocrinology? Here, information on neuroendocrine function and the role of GnRH specifically in this very basal vertebrate is reviewed.

  20. Screening of radical scavenging activity of some medicinal and aromatic plant extracts

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Miliauskas, G.; Venskutonis, R.P.; Beek, van T.A.

    2004-01-01

    Extracts of 12 medicinal and aromatic plants were investigated for their radical scavenging activity using DPPH and ABTS assays: Salvia sclarea, Salvia glutinosa, Salvia pratensis, Lavandula angustifolia, Calendula officinalis, Matricaria recutita, Echinacea purpurea, Rhaponticum carthamoides,

  1. Interplanting woody nurse crops promotes differential growth of black walnut saplings

    Science.gov (United States)

    J. O. Dawson; J. W. Van Sambeek

    1993-01-01

    Interplanting black walnut (Juglans nigra) with four different nitrogen fixing, woody nurse crops (Alnus glutinosa, Elaeagnus umbellata, E. angustifolia or Caragana arborescens) increased annual walnut height and stem diameter (dbh) growth overall by as much as 50% and...

  2. 7 CFR 868.212 - Special grades and requirements.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    ... rough rice. Glutinous rough rice shall be special varieties of rice (Oryza sativa L. glutinosa) which... rice shall be special varieties of rice (Oryza sativa L. scented) that have a distinctive and...

  3. 7 CFR 868.263 - Special grades and special grade requirements.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    ... (Oryza sativa L. glutinosa) which contain more than 50 percent chalky kernels. Grade U.S. No. 1 shall... brown rice for processing shall be special varieties of rice (Oryza sativa L. scented) that have a...

  4. 7 CFR 868.315 - Special grades and special grade requirements.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    .... Glutinous milled rice shall be special varieties of rice (Oryza sativa L. glutinosa) which contain more than.... Aromatic milled rice shall be special varieties of rice (Oryza sativa L. scented) that have a distinctive...

  5. Some Medicinal Plants Used in Chinese Medicine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    1960-09-27

    consisting of the following^plants: Panax ginseng C.A.ivio, Lycium chinense Mill«, Cornus officinalis Sieb, et Zucc, Rehmannia glutinosa (Gaertn.) Libosch...aquatica L0, Dioscorea batatas Decne., Rehmannia glutinosa (Gaertn,,; Liboscho, Rachyma cocos Fr. and Cornus officinalis Sieb, et Zucc, Hypertension in...lall« and A. sinensis (Oliv.) Diels of the parsley family, and Salvia miltiorrhiza Bunge of the mint family, A further all-round study of drugs used

  6. Molecular phylogeny of early vertebrates: monophyly of the agnathans as revealed by sequences of 35 genes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Takezaki, Naoko; Figueroa, Felipe; Zaleska-Rutczynska, Zofia; Klein, Jan

    2003-02-01

    Extant vertebrates are divided into three major groups: hagfishes (Hyperotreti, myxinoids), lampreys (Hyperoartia, petromyzontids), and jawed vertebrates (Gnathostomata). The phylogenetic relationships among the groups and within the jawed vertebrates are controversial, for both morphological and molecular studies have rendered themselves to conflicting interpretations. Here, we use the sequences of 35 nuclear protein-encoding genes to provide definitive evidence for the monophyly of the Agnatha (jawless vertebrates, a group encompassing the hagfishes and lampreys). Our analyses also give a strong support for the separation of Chondrichthyes (cartilaginous fishes) before the divergence of Osteichthyes (bony fishes) from the other gnathostomes.

  7. Antimicrobial susceptibility of Prototheca zopfii isolated from bovine intramammary infections.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McDonald, J S; Richard, J L; Anderson, A J

    1984-06-01

    In vitro antimicrobial susceptibility tests were carried out on 48 strains of Prototheca zopfii, an achlorophyllous algae causing refractory mastitis in dairy cows; 27 antimicrobials were evaluated. All strains were susceptible to both myxin and nystatin. In addition, 22 strains were susceptible to amphotericin B, 21 to polymyxin B, and 18 to gentamicin. Only 1 strain was susceptible to kanamycin. All strains were resistant to ampicillin, bacitracin, carbenicillin, cephalothin, chloramphenicol, clotrimazole, cloxacillin, erythromycin, flucytosine, ketoconazole, lincomycin, miconazole, neomycin, nitrofurazone, novobiocin, oleandomycin, penicillin, rifampin, streptomycin, tetracycline, and vancomycin.

  8. Towards understanding the role of insulin in the brain: lessons from insulin-related signaling systems in the invertebrate brain

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Smit, A.B.; van Kesteren, R.E.; Li, K.W.; van Heerikhuizen, H.; van Minnen, J.; Spijker, S.; Geraerts, W.P.M.

    1998-01-01

    Insulin is a molecule that has played a key role in several of the most important landmarks in medical and biological research. It is one of the most extensively studied protein hormones, and its structure and function have been elucidated in many vertebrate species, ranging from man to hagfish and

  9. Towards understanding the role of insulin in the brain: lessons from insulin-related signaling systems in the vertebrate brain.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Smit, A.B.; van Kesteren, R.E.; Li, K.W.; van Minnen, J.; Spijker, S.; van Heerikhuizen, H.; Geraerts, W.P.M.

    1998-01-01

    Insulin is a molecule that has played a key role in several of the most important landmarks in medical and biological research. It is one of the most extensively studied protein hormones, and its structure and function have been elucidated in many vertebrate species, ranging from man to hagfish and

  10. and labeo capensis

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    The dissociation curves of the hagfish, Polistotrema stouti and of the lamprey,. Petromyzon maril1us, were found to be hyperbolic (Manwell 1964 and Wald & Riggs 1951) with n values of 1 (Hill 1910). These fish have monomeric haemoglobins but hyperbolic dissociation curves have also been reported for the bloods of ...

  11. 50 CFR 648.6 - Dealer/processor permits.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-01

    ... 50 Wildlife and Fisheries 8 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Dealer/processor permits. 648.6 Section... Dealer/processor permits. (a) General. (1) All dealers of NE multispecies, monkfish, skates, Atlantic...; Atlantic surf clam and ocean quahog processors; Atlantic hagfish dealers and/or processors, and Atlantic...

  12. Fusion of protoplasts with irradiated micro protoplasts as a tool for radiation hybrid panel in citrus;Fusao de protoplastos com microprotoplastos irradiados como ferramenta para painel hibrido de radiacao em citros

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bona, Claudine Maria de, E-mail: debona@iapar.b [Instituto Agronomico do Parana (IAPAR), Curitiba, PR (Brazil). Centro Administrativo do Governo do Estado; Stelly, David, E-mail: stelly@tamu.ed [Texas A and M University (Tamu), College Station, TX (United States). Dept. of Soil and Crop Sciences; Miller Junior, J. Creighton, E-mail: jcmillerjr@tamu.ed [Texas A and M University (Tamu), College Station, TX (United States). Dept. of Horticultural Sciences; Louzada, Eliezer Silva, E-mail: elouzada@ag.tamu.ed [Texas A and M University, (Tamuk), Weslaco, TX (United States)

    2009-12-15

    The objective of this work was to combine asymmetric somatic hybridization (donor-recipient fusion or gamma fusion) to microprotoplast-mediated chromosome transfer, as a tool to be used for chromosome mapping in Citrus. Swinglea glutinosa micro protoplasts were irradiated either with 50, 70, 100 or 200 gamma rays and fused to cv. Ruby Red grapefruit or Murcott tangor protoplasts. Cell colonies were successfully formed and AFLP analyses confirmed presence of S. glutinosa in both 'Murcott' tangor and 'Ruby Red' grapefruit genomes. (author)

  13. Distribution of creatine, guanidinoacetate and the enzymes for their biosynthesis in the animal kingdom. Implications for phylogeny.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Van Pilsum, J F; Stephens, G C; Taylor, D

    1972-01-01

    1. The distribution of creatine and the creatine-synthesizing enzymes in the animal kingdom has been investigated. Creatine was found in tissues of all vertebrates examined, and in various invertebrates from phyla Annelida, Echinodermata, Hemichordata and Chordata, subphylum Cephalochordata. The activities of the creatine-synthesizing enzymes, arginine-glycine transamidinase and guanidinoacetate methylpherase, were not detected in the hagfish or in any of the invertebrates, including those in which creatine was found, with the exception that transamidinase activities were detected in the amphioxus and salt water clam; however, these activities are considered to be artifacts for reasons mentioned in the text. Additional evidence that the hagfish and various creatine-containing invertebrates could not synthesize creatine was the observation that these animals did not convert one or the other of the likely precursors of creatine (arginine and glycine) into creatine, in vivo. Further, the inability of these animals to synthesize creatine is correlated with the observations that all animals tested were able to abstract creatine from their aqueous environment. 2. The activities of the creatine-synthesizing enzymes were detected in the sea lamprey and in all but a few of the other vertebrates examined. Neither activity could be detected in the sharks and rays (cartilaginous fish), buffalo fish (bony fish) or the snapping turtle. Transamidinase or guanidinoacetate methylpherase activity could not be found in the salamander or garter snake, respectively. 3. The results obtained with the lamprey are in direct contrast with those obtained with the hagfish (both subphylum Agnatha, class Cyclostomata). The lamprey had the ability to synthesize creatine and did not abstract creatine from lake water. The hagfish did not have any apparent ability to synthesize creatine and did abstract creatine from sea water. The present report thus supports the theory that the myxinoid (hagfish

  14. Effects of a traditional chinese medicine based desensitizing gel on ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Background and Objective: Bamboo salt, Calcined oyster, Drynaria fortunei, Indigo naturalis and Rehmannia glutinosa have been the main ingredients of many formulations in Chinese medicine for the treatment of toothache. This study evaluated the effect of a new desensitizing gel on dentin hypersensitivity (DH). Materials ...

  15. Nuevas citas de Asteraceae para la provincia de Catamarca (Argentina New records of Asteraceae for the province of Catamarca (Argentina

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Susana E. Freire

    2011-06-01

    Full Text Available Se mencionan los siguientes nuevos registros de Asteráceas para la provincia de Catamarca, Argentina: Baccharis acaulis, B. boliviensis var. latifolia, B. flexuosa, B. glutinosa var. angustissima, B. stenophylla (Tribu Astereae, Eupatorium patens var. tomentosum (Tribu Eupatorieae, Cosmos bipinnatus, C. peucedanifolius var. peucedanifolius, Helianthus annuus (Tribu Heliantheae, Gamochaeta erythractis, G. longipedicellata, Gnaphalium lacteum, Tessaria integrifolia var. integrifolia (Tribu Inuleae, Chuquiraga ruscifolia (Tribu Mutisieae, Senecio crepidifolius, S. subulatus var. subulatus, Xenophyllum incisum var. incisum (Tribu Senecioneae. Se citan además el hábitat de los taxones y las provincias fitogeográficas que integran. Se propone una nueva combinación, Baccharis glutinosa Pers. var. angustissima (DC. Giuliano.The following Asteraceae are mentioned for the province of Catamarca: Baccharis acaulis, B. boliviensis var. latifolia, B. flexuosa, B. glutinosa var. angustissima, B. stenophylla (Tribe Astereae, Eupatorium patens var. tomentosum (Tribe Eupatorieae, Cosmos bipinnatus, C. peucedanifolius var. peucedanifolius, Helianthus annuus (Tribe Heliantheae, Gamochaeta erythractis, G. longipedicellata, Gnaphalium lacteum, Tessaria integrifolia var. integrifolia (Tribe Inuleae, Chuquiraga ruscifolia (Tribe Mutisieae, Senecio crepidifolius, S. subulatus var. subulatus, Xenophyllum incisum var. incisum (Tribe Senecioneae. The habitat and phytogeographic provinces of the taxa are mentioned. The following new combination is proposed: Baccharis glutinosa Pers. var. angustissima (DC. Giuliano.

  16. Dynamics of culturable soil microbial communities during ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    STORAGESEVER

    2008-10-20

    Oct 20, 2008 ... Shifts in physiological capabilities of the microbiota during the decomposition of leaf litter in a black alder (Alnus glutinosa (Gaertn.) L.) forest. Soil. Biol. Biochem. 33: 921-930. Gallardo A, Munoz F, Merino J (1997). Phosphorus and nitrogen concentrations as rate regulating factors in litter decomposition of.

  17. 16S rRNA as molecular marker in ecology of Frankia

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Hahn, D.

    1990-01-01

    The research described in this thesis focusses on the role of biotic factors encountered with the establishment of the symbiosis between black alder plants ( Alnus glutinosa ) and introduced Frankia strains. A selection of

  18. Hui et al., Afr J Tradit Complement Altern Med. (2015) 12(2):103-113 ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Proff.Adewunmi

    Background and Objective: Bamboo salt, Calcined oyster, Drynaria fortunei, Indigo naturalis and Rehmannia glutinosa have been the main ingredients of many formulations in Chinese medicine for the treatment of toothache. This study evaluated the effect of a new desensitizing gel on dentin hypersensitivity (DH). Materials ...

  19. Antifungal, Acute Toxicity and Mutagenicity Activity of Extracts from ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    The effect of Baccharis glutinosa, Jacquinia macrocarpa, and Krameria erecta extracts was investigated on the growth and the spore germination of Fusarium verticillioides (ATCC 52539). Brine shrimp (Artemia salina) was used to evaluate the potential acute toxicity of the fractions obtained from plant extracts. The butanol ...

  20. Fusion of protoplasts with irradiated microprotoplasts as a tool for radiation hybrid panel in citrus Fusão de protoplastos com microprotoplastos irradiados como ferramenta para painel híbrido de radiação em citros

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Claudine Maria de Bona

    2009-12-01

    Full Text Available The objective of this work was to combine asymmetric somatic hybridization (donor-recipient fusion or gamma fusion to microprotoplast-mediated chromosome transfer, as a tool to be used for chromosome mapping in Citrus. Swinglea glutinosa microprotoplasts were irradiated either with 50, 70, 100 or 200 gamma rays and fused to cv. Ruby Red grapefruit or Murcott tangor protoplasts. Cell colonies were successfully formed and AFLP analyses confirmed presence of S. glutinosa in both 'Murcott' tangor and 'Ruby Red' grapefruit genomes.O objetivo deste trabalho foi combinar hibridação somática assimétrica (fusão doador-recipiente ou fusão gama e transferência cromossômica mediada por microprotoplastos como uma ferramenta para o mapeamento cromossômico em Citrus. Microprotoplastos de Swinglea glutinosa foram irradiados com doses de 50, 70, 100 ou 200 raios gama e fusionados com protoplastos de pomelo cv. Ruby Red ou de tangor Murcott. Houve sucesso na formação de colônias de células, e a análise AFLP confirmou a presença de S. glutinosa nos genomas do tangor 'Murcott' e do pomelo 'Ruby Red'.

  1. Potential of marker-assisted selection for Tobacco mosaic ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    memory

    Tobacco mosaic tobamovirus (TMV) is one of the most destructive virus threatening worldwide tobacco production. Use of host resistance is the best method of control. The N-gene was introgressed into tobacco from Nicotiana glutinosa to confer hypersensitive resistance to TMV. Phenotypic selection of. TMV resistant ...

  2. Potential of marker-assisted selection for Tobacco mosaic ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Tobacco mosaic tobamovirus (TMV) is one of the most destructive virus threatening worldwide tobacco production. Use of host resistance is the best method of control. The N-gene was introgressed into tobacco from Nicotiana glutinosa to confer hypersensitive resistance to TMV. Phenotypic selection of TMV resistant ...

  3. Biological characteristics of tomato mild mottle potyvirus isolated ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    The most susceptible hosts were D. metel, D. stramonium and Nicotiana glutinosa L. However, these isolates differed from the PVY isolate by infecting Datura spp. and Solanum demissum L., while the PVY isolate infected Chenopodium quinoa Wild and Capsicum annuum L. Isolate 277/94 was transmitted non-persistently ...

  4. Distribution and severity of alder phytophthora in Alaska

    Science.gov (United States)

    G.C. Adams; M. Catal; L. Trummer

    2010-01-01

    In Alaska, an unprecedented dieback and mortality of Alnus incana ssp. tenuifolia has occurred which stimulated an effort to determine causal agents of the disease. In Europe, similar dieback and mortality of Alnus incana and Alnus glutinosa has been attributed to root rot by a spectrum...

  5. Spinacia oleracea proteins with antiviral activity against tobacco ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    enoh

    2012-03-29

    Mar 29, 2012 ... Tobacco mosaic virus (TMV) is a devastating microorganism with a global distribution and a wide host range. Protein extracts isolated from Spinacia oleracea (spinach) were examined with bioassay-guide and tested for the resistance to TMV in the Nicotiana glutinosa leaves by local lesion assay.

  6. Study of the system of tuberous root induction in vitro from ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    enoh

    2012-03-19

    Mar 19, 2012 ... This study investigated the induction system of tuberous root in vitro from Rehmannia glutinosa. The roles of plant growth substance, carbohydrates, and minerals were evaluated for induction and development of tuberous root in vitro. The results show that Murashige and Skoog (MS) contributed greatly to ...

  7. Carbon and nitrogen metabolism of free-living Frankia spp. and of Frankia-alnus symbioses

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Blom, J.

    1982-01-01

    The research reported in this thesis deals with the symbiosis of Frankia spp. and Alnus glutinosa. Frankia spp. are actinomycetes giving rise to the formation of nitrogen-fixing nodules on the roots of a number of non-leguminous plants. In these nodules

  8. Spinacia oleracea proteins with antiviral activity against tobacco ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Tobacco mosaic virus (TMV) is a devastating microorganism with a global distribution and a wide host range. Protein extracts isolated from Spinacia oleracea (spinach) were examined with bioassay-guide and tested for the resistance to TMV in the Nicotiana glutinosa leaves by local lesion assay. The results show that the ...

  9. Evaluation of the insecticidal activity of essential oils and their mixtures against Aedes aegypti (Diptera: Culicidae

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Natalia Ríos

    Full Text Available Abstract The search for new insecticides to control dengue fever, chikungunya, and Zika vectors has gained relevance in the past decades. The aim of the present study was to evaluate the larvicidal action of essential oils (EOs from Thymus vulgaris, Salvia officinalis, Lippia origanoides, Eucalyptus globulus, Cymbopogon nardus, Cymbopogon martinii, Lippia alba, Pelargonium graveolens, Turnera diffusa, and Swinglea glutinosa on Aedes (Stegomyia aegypti. The EOs were extracted by microwave-assisted hydrodistillation and characterized by gas chromatography/mass spectrometry (GC/MS. The chemical components of the EOs were identified by linear retention indices and mass spectra. Lethal concentrations (LC50 and LC95 were determined by probit analysis using larvae of Ae. aegypti between the third and the fourth instars. All EOs achieved larvicidal activity at LC50 values lower than 115 mg/L. The lowest LC50 value (45.73 mg/L corresponded to T. vulgaris EO, whereas C. martinii EO showed the highest LC50 (LC50 = 114.65 mg/L. Some EO mixtures showed lower LC50 than oils used individually, such as the mixtures of L. origanoides + S. glutinosa (LC50 = 38.40 mg/L, T. diffusa + S. glutinosa (LC50 = 63.71 mg/L, and L. alba + S. glutinosa (LC50 = 48.87 mg/L. The main compounds of the EOs with highest larvicidal activity were thymol (42% and p-cymene (26.4%.

  10. Plasma thyroid hormones in cyclostomes: do they have a role in regulation of glycemic levels?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Plisetskaya, E; Dickhoff, W W; Gorbman, A

    1983-01-01

    Plasma levels of thyroxine (T4) and triiodothyronine (T3) were measured by radioimmunoassay in intact Pacific lamprey (Entosphenus tridentatus) undergoing the period of natural fasting and in Pacific hagfish (Eptatretus stouti) maintained unfed in the laboratory. Plasma T3 levels in both lamprey and hagfish were always severalfold lower than T4 levels. The influence of thyroid hormones on glycemic level was studied following intraperitoneal injection of T4 or T3 (13-20 micrograms/100 g body wt), as well as after implantation of sealed Silastic capsules containing the goitrogen, 6-propylthiouracil (6-PTU), or after intraperitoneal injections of an antithyroglobulin serum (ATgS) exhibiting both anti-T4 and anti-T3 activities. Measured plasma T4 and T3 levels after hormonal injection were extremely high and could be considered pharmacological. The 6-PTU treatment decreased plasma levels of both T4 and T3 within several weeks. The glycemic levels in lampreys and hagfish after thyroid hormone treatment were lower than in control animals, whereas in animals treated with either 6-PTU or ATgS, hyperglycemic levels prevailed. It is concluded that thyroid hormones, possibly acting with other hormones, may participate in the maintenance of glycemic levels in cyclostomes and that their action is to reduce glycemic levels.

  11. Origins of the descending spinal projections in petromyzontid and myxinoid agnathans.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ronan, M

    1989-03-01

    The origins of the descending spinal pathways in sea lampreys (Petromyzon marinus), silver lampreys (Ichthyomyzon unicuspis), and Pacific hagfish (Eptatretus stouti) were identified by the retrograde transport of horseradish peroxidase (HRP) placed in the rostral spinal cord. In lampreys, the majority of HRP-labeled cells were located along the length of the brainstem reticular formation in the inferior, middle, and superior reticular nuclei of the medulla, mesencephalic tegmentum, and nucleus of the medial longitudinal fasciculus. Labeled reticular cells included the Mauthner and Müller cells. Horseradish-peroxidase-filled cells were also present in the descending trigeminal tract, intermediate and posterior octavomotor nuclei, and a diencephalic cell group, the nucleus of the posterior tubercle. As in lampreys, the reticular formation of the Pacific hagfish was the largest source of descending afferents to the spinal cord. Labeled cells were found in the dorsolateral and ventromedial reticular nuclei, the dorsal tegmentum at the juncture of the medulla and midbrain, and the nucleus of the medial longitudinal fasciculus. Additional medullary cells projecting to the cord were located in the perivagal nucleus, the central gray, and the anterior and posterior magnocellular octavolateralis nuclei. The existence of reticulospinal and possible vestibulo-, trigemino-, and solitary spinal projections in lampreys and hagfishes and the wide distribution of these pathways in jawed vertebrates suggest that they evolved in the common ancestor of gnathostomes and both groups of jawless fishes. However, descending spinal pathways from the cerebellum, red nucleus, and telencephalon appear to be gnathostome characters.

  12. Effects of botanical antifeedants on Melolontha melolontha grub feeding on Scots pine roots

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Skrzecz Iwona

    2014-09-01

    Full Text Available The aim of the study was to evaluate the possibility of using botanic antifeedants to reduce the damage caused by Melolontha spp. grubs. To achieve the objective, the experiments were established in semi-field conditions to estimate the antifeedant activity of rutin, quercetin (flavonoids from buckwheat Fagopyrum esculentum and an extract from black alder Alnus glutinosa leaves against Melolontha melolontha grubs. The grubs were placed individually in the pots with a soil in which 2 year old Pinus sylvestris trees were planted. The pots were put in garden pavilions placed in the open area. Then the soil in the pots were watered with the emulsions of rutin, quercetin, an extract from A. glutinosa leaves, and with pure water-comparative variant. After 4 months, the weight and mortality of grubs were compared, as well as the weight of tree roots in all pots.

  13. The forest melliferous flora in the vicinity of Blace, Serbia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Perišić Snežana

    2004-01-01

    Full Text Available Melliferous plant species in the forests near Blace (South Serbia were investigated in order to estimate the significance, contribution, quality and ecological characteristics of representatives of the apiflora as potential nectar and pollen sources, the elements of bee pasturage. The significance of melliferous plants was determined on the basis of nectar and pollen production intensity, as well as by following blooming periods. According to adaptations to moisture, light, and temperature, melliferous species can be relegated to eight groups and six subgroups. Out of the total number of melliferous species in the investigated area (223, the forest apiflora accounted for 82 species (36,77%. The species with highest nectar and/or pollen production are: Alnus glutinosa, Corylus avellana, Paulownia tomentosa, Picea abies, Prunus tenella, Robinia pseudoacacia, species of the genera Salix, Tilia, and Campanula, Atropa bella-donna, Calamintha officinalis, Glechoma hederacea, Pulmonaria officinalis, Salvia glutinosa and Valeriana officinalis.

  14. Zhodnocení dřevinných výsadeb prováděných při revitalizacích drobných říčních toků

    OpenAIRE

    KELLEROVÁ, Petra

    2015-01-01

    The aim of this thesis is to evaluate the success of woody plantings carried out in order to revitalize small streams. For selected restorations was assessed dendrological composition, establishment, health and care after planting. The most common species planted in the revitalization of small streams is the alder (Alnus glutinosa), a pioneer tree species reinforcing shores, to which it was coupled with flowing water home. Sometimes forming groups with gray alder (Alnus incana) but that does ...

  15. Effects of food source quality on the adults of Melolontha melolontha and M. hippocastani

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Woreta Danuta

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available This paper presents the results of studies on the life span, survival, weight and fecundity of the forest cockchafer (Melolontha hippocastani, Fabricius, 1801 and the common cockchafer (Melolontha melolontha, Linnaeus, 1758 beetle feeding on Alnus glutinosa (L. Gaertn., Betula pendula Roth., Carpinus betulus L., Fagus sylvatica L., Larix decidua Mill., Prunus serotina (Ehr. Borkh., Quercus petraea (Matt. Liebl., Quercus robur L., Robinia pseudoacacia L., Sambucus nigra L. and Sorbus aucuparia L. em. Hedl. The lifespan and weight of beetles as well as female fertility were examined in 2011 and 2013. Specimen for laboratory tests were collected in the field shortly after leaving their overwintering sites in the soil and identical experimental protocols were applied to both examined species. 576 and 432 beetles were tested in 2011 and 2013, respectively. In 2011, beetles were feeding on A. glutinosa, B. pendula, F. sylvatica, L. decidua Q. petraea leaves and on C. betulus, P. serotina, R. pseudoacacia, S. aucuparia and S. nigra in 2013. Both years, beetles feeding on Q. robur leaves were examined as a control. Our results showed that feeding on leaves of Q. robur and Q. petraea had the largest positive impact on the life time, weight and fecundity of the studied beetles. Leaves of F. sylvatica and L. decidua also constituted an adequate food source for the development of M. melolontha. M. hippocastani, however, did not perform as well when feeding on these two tree species. Females of M. melolontha reared on leaves of B. pendula did not lay eggs. The following plant species had a negative impact on the survival and development of the collected specimen and female fertility: A. glutinosa, S. nigra, P. serotina and R. pseudoacacia. Neither beetle species fed on the leaves of A. glutinosa or S. nigra.

  16. Wood-destroying Basidiomycetes, found on the elder woods in the South Urals (Orenburg Oblast, Russia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Maksim A. Safonov

    2014-09-01

    Full Text Available The article shows the results of a study of wood-destroying basidiomycetes on two species of elder trees (Alnus glutinosa, Alnus incan, growing in the South Urals (Orenburg Oblast. The comparative analysis of basidiomycetes on two species of elder trees was conducted. The reasons for structural differences of these complexes are discussed. It is consumed that the reason lies in growth conditions of the trees.

  17. SYNTAXONOMY OF HY GROPHILOUS WOODS OF THE ALNO-QUERCION ROBORIS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    S. BRULLO

    1999-01-01

    Full Text Available A syntaxonomical revision of the hygrophilous woods occurring in marshy places of the flood-plains from SE Europe is given. This vegetation is included in the Alno-Quercion roboris, alliance of the Populetalia albae, which comprises numerous associations characterized by the dominance of hard-wood trees, such as Quercus robur, Fraxinus oxycarpa, Ulmus minor, Alnus glutinosa, etc. For each association the synonyms, nomenclature type, diagnostic species, ecology, structure and chorology are given.

  18. A contribution to the knowledge of biology and harmfulness of Deporaus betulae (L.) (Coleoptera, Attelabidae)

    OpenAIRE

    Jaroslav Urban

    2012-01-01

    The paper deals with the occurrence, development and harmfulness of Deporaus betulae (L.). The majority of field studies was carried out at Training Forest Enterprise (TFE) Masaryk Forest in Křtiny (District Brno-venkov) in 2010 and 2011. In addition to this, the species was studied in detail also in a laboratory. It occurred mostly on Betula pendula and Carpinus betulus. Rarely, the species was found on Alnus glutinosa and Corylus avellana and only sporadically on Fagus sylvatica, Quercus pe...

  19. 16S rRNA as molecular marker in ecology of Frankia

    OpenAIRE

    HAHN, D.

    1990-01-01

    The research described in this thesis focusses on the role of biotic factors encountered with the establishment of the symbiosis between black alder plants ( Alnus glutinosa ) and introduced Frankia strains. A selection of plant clones and Frankia strains that gave optimal nodulation and nitrogen fixation in forestry was made. For this reason nodulation tests with increasing complexity were set up. A...

  20. Distribution of mammalian-like melanopsin in cyclostome retinas exhibiting a different extent of visual functions.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lanfang Sun

    Full Text Available Mammals contain 1 melanopsin (Opn4 gene that is expressed in a subset of retinal ganglion cells to serve as a photopigment involved in non-image-forming vision such as photoentrainment of circadian rhythms. In contrast, most nonmammalian vertebrates possess multiple melanopsins that are distributed in various types of retinal cells; however, their functions remain unclear. We previously found that the lamprey has only 1 type of mammalian-like melanopsin gene, which is similar to that observed in mammals. Here we investigated the molecular properties and localization of melanopsin in the lamprey and other cyclostome hagfish retinas, which contribute to visual functions including image-forming vision and mainly to non-image-forming vision, respectively. We isolated 1 type of mammalian-like melanopsin cDNA from the eyes of each species. We showed that the recombinant lamprey melanopsin was a blue light-sensitive pigment and that both the lamprey and hagfish melanopsins caused light-dependent increases in calcium ion concentration in cultured cells in a manner that was similar to that observed for mammalian melanopsins. We observed that melanopsin was distributed in several types of retinal cells, including horizontal cells and ganglion cells, in the lamprey retina, despite the existence of only 1 melanopsin gene in the lamprey. In contrast, melanopsin was almost specifically distributed to retinal ganglion cells in the hagfish retina. Furthermore, we found that the melanopsin-expressing horizontal cells connected to the rhodopsin-containing short photoreceptor cells in the lamprey. Taken together, our findings suggest that in cyclostomes, the global distribution of melanopsin in retinal cells might not be related to the melanopsin gene number but to the extent of retinal contribution to visual function.

  1. Reconstructing the ancestral vertebrate brain.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sugahara, Fumiaki; Murakami, Yasunori; Pascual-Anaya, Juan; Kuratani, Shigeru

    2017-05-01

    Highly complicated morphologies and sophisticated functions of vertebrate brains have been established through evolution. However, the origin and early evolutionary history of the brain remain elusive, owing to lack of information regarding the brain architecture of extant and fossil species of jawless vertebrates (agnathans). Comparative analyses of the brain of less studied cyclostomes (only extant agnathan group, consisting of lampreys and hagfish) with the well-known sister group of jawed vertebrates (gnathostomes) are the only tools we have available to illustrate the ancestral architecture of the vertebrate brain. Previous developmental studies had shown that the lamprey lacked well-established brain compartments that are present in gnathostomes, such as the medial ganglionic eminence and the rhombic lip. The most accepted scenario suggested that cyclostomes had fewer compartments than that of the gnathostome brain and that gnathostomes thus evolved by a stepwise addition of innovations on its developmental sequence. However, recent studies have revealed that these compartments are present in hagfish embryos, indicating that these brain regions have been acquired before the split of cyclostomes and gnathostomes. By comparing two cyclostome lineages and gnathostomes, it has become possible to speculate about a more complex ancestral state of the brain, excluding derived traits in either of the lineages. In this review, we summarize recent studies on the brain development of the lamprey and hagfish. Then, we attempt to reconstruct the possible brain architecture of the last common ancestor of vertebrates. Finally, we discuss how the developmental plan of the vertebrate brain has been modified independently in different vertebrate lineages. © 2017 Japanese Society of Developmental Biologists.

  2. Do climate and soil influence phenotypic variability in leaf litter, microbial decomposition and shredder consumption?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Graça, M A S; Poquet, J M

    2014-03-01

    We tested the hypothesis that water stress and soil nutrient availability drive leaf-litter quality for decomposers and detritivores by relating chemical and physical leaf-litter properties and decomposability of Alnus glutinosa and Quercus robur, sampled together with edaphic parameters, across wide European climatic gradients. By regressing principal components analysis of leaf traits [N, P, condensed tannins, lignin, specific leaf area (SLA)] against environmental and soil parameters, we found that: (1) In Q. robur the condensed tannin and lignin contents increased and SLA decreased with precipitation, annual range of temperature, and soil N content, whereas leaf P increased with soil P and temperature; (2) In A. glutinosa leaves N, P, and SLA decreased and condensed tannins increased with temperature, annual range of temperature, and decreasing soil P. On the other hand, leaf P and condensed tannins increased and SLA decreased with minimum annual precipitation and towards sites with low temperature. We selected contrasting leaves in terms of quality to test decomposition and invertebrate consumption. There were intraspecific differences in microbial decomposition rates (field, Q. robur) and consumption by shredders (laboratory, A. glutinosa). We conclude that decomposition rates across ecosystems could be partially governed by climate and soil properties, affecting litter quality and therefore decomposers and detritivores. Under scenarios of global warming and increased nutrients, these results suggest we can expect species-specific changes in leaf-litter properties most likely resulting in slow decomposition with increased variance in temperatures and accelerated decomposition with P increase.

  3. Foliar methyl salicylate emissions indicate prolonged aphid infestation on silver birch and black alder.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Blande, James D; Korjus, Minna; Holopainen, Jarmo K

    2010-03-01

    It is well documented that when plants are damaged by insects they respond by emitting a range of volatile organic compounds (VOCs). While there have been numerous reports concerning VOCs induced by chewing herbivores, there are relatively few studies detailing the VOCs induced by aphid feeding. The effects of aphid feeding on VOCs emitted by boreal forest trees have been particularly neglected. Herbivore-induced VOCs have relevance to direct and indirect plant defence and atmospheric chemistry. In this study, we analysed the VOCs emitted by Betula pendula (Roth) and Alnus glutinosa (L.) (Gaertn.) infested by specialist aphid species under laboratory conditions. We also complemented this by collecting VOCs from leaf beetle-damaged saplings under field conditions. In addition to induction of some inducible terpenes, we detected substantial aphid-induced emissions of methyl salicylate (MeSA) in both B. pendula and A. glutinosa. MeSA emission intensity depended on the length of aphid infestation. Feeding by beetles induced emission of (E)-DMNT in both tree species and (E)-beta-ocimene in A. glutinosa but had no effect on MeSA emissions. MeSA has been shown to have aphid-repellent qualities and has been shown recently to have impact on formation of secondary organic aerosols in the atmosphere. We discuss our results in relation to these two phenomena.

  4. Greenhouse seedlings of Alnus showed low host intrageneric specificity and a strong preference for some Tomentella ectomycorrhizal associates.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nouhra, Eduardo; Pastor, Nicolás; Becerra, Alejandra; Sarrionandia Areitio, Estibaliz; Geml, József

    2015-05-01

    Ectomycorrhizal (ECM) fungal associates of Alnus are relatively few in comparison with those associated with other tree hosts. The composition of ECM assemblages associated with Alnus seems to change very little across the Northern Hemisphere. However, Alnus-associated ECM assemblages from the Western United States, Mexico, and Argentina tend to differ from those in eastern North America and Europe, presumably due to their different biogeographic histories. Alnus glutinosa is a northern European species subjected to diverse environmental conditions. To address intrageneric host preference within two distantly related Alnus species (Alnus acuminata and A. glutinosa), we tested the ECM colonization on seedlings of both species inoculated with natural soil from A. acuminata forests. Two tomentelloid ECM fungi from A. acuminata natural soils were determined from the anatomotyping and molecular analysis. Both species colonized A. glutinosa seedlings and presented similar relative abundances. Additional soil sequence data from A. acuminata sites suggest that a variety of tomentelloid taxa occur, including several unidentified Tomentella lineages. Maximum-likelihood and Bayesian inference analyses based on internal transcribed spacer (ITS) sequences from various locations do not reflect associations of taxa based on their biogeographic origin, and clades are in general constituted by sequences from diverse regions, including South America, Mexico, USA, and Europe. Results illustrate the probable role of specific tomentelloid fungi in the early colonization of seedlings in A. acuminata forests as well as their importance in the structure of the ECM propagule community at the sites.

  5. In vitro antioxidant and antiproliferative activities of nine Salvia species.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Loizzo, Monica Rosa; Abouali, Morteza; Salehi, Peyman; Sonboli, Ali; Kanani, Mohammad; Menichini, Francesco; Tundis, Rosa

    2014-01-01

    Supported by a growing increase of scientific research attesting the health properties of salvia species, we have decided to investigate nine Salvia namely Salvia sclarea, Salvia atropatana, Salvia sahendica, Salvia hydrangea, Salvia xanthocheila, Salvia macrosiphon, Salvia glutinosa, Salvia chloroleuca and Salvia ceratophylla species for their antioxidant and antiproliferative activities. In order to correlate the bioactivity with their phytochemical content, the total phenol and total flavonoid contents were also determined. S. ceratophylla exhibited the strongest activity against C32 cells with an IC50 value of 20.8 μg mL(- 1), while S. glutinosa exhibited an IC50 value of 29.5 μg mL(- 1) against ACHN cell line. Interestingly, S. glutinosa displayed also the highest DPPH radical-scavenging activity with an IC50 of 3.2 μg mL(- 1). These species are characterised by the highest total phenol and flavonoid contents. The obtained results suggest that Salvia species are healthy plant foods.

  6. Elevated CO2 and Tree Species Affect Microbial  Activity and Associated Aggregate Stability in Soil  Amended with Litter

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Salwan M. J. Al‐Maliki

    2017-03-01

    Full Text Available (1 Elevated atmospheric CO2 (eCO2 may affect organic inputs to woodland soils with potential consequences for C dynamics and associated aggregation; (2 The Bangor Free Air Concentration Enrichment experiment compared ambient (330 ppmv and elevated (550 ppmv CO2 regimes over four growing seasons (2005–2008 under Alnus glutinosa, Betula pendula and Fagus sylvatica. Litter from the experiment (autumn 2008 and Lumbricus terrestris were added to mesocosm soils. Microbial properties and aggregate stability were investigated in soil and earthworm casts. Soils taken from the field experiment in spring 2009 were also investigated; (3 eCO2 litter had lower N and higher C:N ratios. F. sylvatica and B. pendula litter had lower N and P than A. glutinosa; F. sylvatica had higher cellulose. In mesocosms, eCO2 litter decreased respiration, mineralization constant (respired C:total organic C and soluble carbon in soil but not earthworm casts; microbial‐C and fungal hyphal length differed by species (A. glutinosa = B. pendula > F. sylvatica not CO2 regime. eCO2 increased respiration in field aggregates but increased stability only under F. sylvatica; (4 Lower litter quality under eCO2 may restrict its initial decomposition, affecting C stabilization in aggregates. Later resistant materials may support microbial activity and increase aggregate stability. In woodland, C and soil aggregation dynamics may alter under eCO2, but outcomes may be influenced by tree species and earthworm activity.

  7. Hypoxic vasoconstriction of cyclostome systemic vessels: the antecedent of hypoxic pulmonary vasoconstriction?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Olson, K R; Russell, M J; Forster, M E

    2001-01-01

    Hypoxic vasoconstriction (HV) is an intrinsic response of mammalian pulmonary vascular smooth muscle (VSM). In the present study, HV was examined by myography of vessel rings from three primitive vertebrates: New Zealand hagfish (NZH), Pacific hagfish (PH), and sea lamprey (SL). Hypoxia dilated pre-gill arteries (ventral aorta, afferent branchial) from all species, whereas it contracted systemic arteries [dorsal aorta (DA), efferent branchial, celiacomesenteric]. DA HV was reproducible over several days, and it could be sustained in NZH for 8 h without adverse effects. Tension was proportional to PO(2), and half-maximal HV was obtained at PO(2) (mmHg) of 4.7 +/- 0. 2 (NZH), 0.8 +/- 0.1 (PH), and 10.7 +/- 1.9 (SL). HV did not require preconditioning (preexisting contractile stimulus) and was unaffected by elevated extracellular potassium (200 mM NZH; 80 mM SL); removal of the endothelium (NZH); or inhibitors of cyclooxygenase, lipoxygenase, cytochrome P-450 or antagonists of alpha-adrenergic, muscarinic, nicotinic, purinergic, or serotoninergic receptors. These results show that HV is an intrinsic feature of systemic VSM in cyclostomes and suggest that HV has been in the repertoire of VSM responses, since the origin of vertebrates. The exceptionally hardy HV in cyclostome DA may provide a useful model with which to examine both the phylogeny and mechanisms of this response.

  8. Projections ascending from the spinal cord to the brain in petromyzontid and myxinoid agnathans.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ronan, M; Northcutt, R G

    1990-01-22

    The course of projections ascending through the rostral spinal cord to nuclei in the brains of petromyzontid and myxinoid agnathans was examined with silver staining of anterograde degeneration and horseradish peroxidase histochemistry. As in jawed vertebrates, the ascending spinal projections of lampreys and hagfishes appear to be organized into two major systems, the spinal lemniscal and dorsal column pathways. The spinal lemniscal pathway, extending rostrally along the ventrolateral margin of the spinal and medullary central gray, consists of a spinoreticular and possibly a spinovestibular projection in both aganthan groups. In Pacific hagfish, spinal lemniscal fibers reach the ipsilateral mesencephalic tectum, but no spinal projection to the thalamus was evident. The spinal lemniscus of lampreys ascends to the region of the isthmus and may extend into the mesencephalic tegmentum. Anterograde and retrograde tracing methods indicate that a very small population of cells in the far rostral cord of lampreys may project to the optic tectum and diencephalon; however, spinotectal and spinothalamic projections, if present, are limited in extent. The dorsal column pathway in agnathans, consisting in part of primary spinal afferents, ascends in the dorsal funiculus of the cord. The dorsal column fibers of agnathans, like those of some other anamniotes, continue beyond the spinomedullary junction through the length of the hindbrain, possibly conveying ascending somatosensory input to the sensory nuclei of the alar medulla.

  9. Evolutionary origins of taste buds: phylogenetic analysis of purinergic neurotransmission in epithelial chemosensors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kirino, Masato; Parnes, Jason; Hansen, Anne; Kiyohara, Sadao; Finger, Thomas E.

    2013-01-01

    Taste buds are gustatory endorgans which use an uncommon purinergic signalling system to transmit information to afferent gustatory nerve fibres. In mammals, ATP is a crucial neurotransmitter released by the taste cells to activate the afferent nerve fibres. Taste buds in mammals display a characteristic, highly specific ecto-ATPase (NTPDase2) activity, suggesting a role in inactivation of the neurotransmitter. The purpose of this study was to test whether the presence of markers of purinergic signalling characterize taste buds in anamniote vertebrates and to test whether similar purinergic systems are employed by other exteroceptive chemosensory systems. The species examined include several teleosts, elasmobranchs, lampreys and hagfish, the last of which lacks vertebrate-type taste buds. For comparison, Schreiner organs of hagfish and solitary chemosensory cells (SCCs) of teleosts, both of which are epidermal chemosensory end organs, were also examined because they might be evolutionarily related to taste buds. Ecto-ATPase activity was evident in elongate cells in all fish taste buds, including teleosts, elasmobranchs and lampreys. Neither SCCs nor Schreiner organs show specific ecto-ATPase activity, suggesting that purinergic signalling is not crucial in those systems as it is for taste buds. These findings suggest that the taste system did not originate from SCCs but arose independently in early vertebrates. PMID:23466675

  10. Evolution of the vestibulo-ocular system

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fritzsch, B.

    1998-01-01

    The evolutionary and developmental changes in the eye muscle innervation, the inner ear, and the vestibulo-ocular reflex are examined. Three eye muscle patterns, based on the innervation by distinct ocular motoneurons populations, can be identified: a lamprey, an elasmobranch, and a bony fish/tetrapod pattern. Four distinct patterns of variation in the vestibular system are described: a hagfish pattern, a lamprey pattern, an elasmobranch pattern, and a bony fish/tetrapod pattern. Developmental data suggest an influence of the hindbrain on ear pattern formation, thus potentially allowing a concomitant change of eye muscle innervation and ear variation. The connections between the ear and the vestibular nuclei and between the vestibular nuclei and ocular motoneurons are reviewed, and the role of neurotrophins for pattern specification is discussed. Three patterns are recognized in central projections: a hagfish pattern, a lamprey pattern, and a pattern for jawed vertebrates. Second-order connections show both similarities and differences between distantly related species such as lampreys and mammals. For example, elasmobranchs lack an internuclear system, which is at best poorly developed in lampreys. It is suggested that the vestibulo-ocular system shows only a limited degree of variation because of the pronounced functional constraints imposed on it.

  11. Anatomy of the lamprey ear: morphological evidence for occurrence of horizontal semicircular ducts in the labyrinth of Petromyzon marinus

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maklad, Adel; Reed, Caitlyn; Johnson, Nicholas S.; Fritzsch, Bernd

    2014-01-01

    In jawed (gnathostome) vertebrates, the inner ears have three semicircular canals arranged orthogonally in the three Cartesian planes: one horizontal (lateral) and two vertical canals. They function as detectors for angular acceleration in their respective planes. Living jawless craniates, cyclostomes (hagfish and lamprey) and their fossil records seemingly lack a lateral horizontal canal. The jawless vertebrate hagfish inner ear is described as a torus or doughnut, having one vertical canal, and the jawless vertebrate lamprey having two. These observations on the anatomy of the cyclostome (jawless vertebrate) inner ear have been unchallenged for over a century, and the question of how these jawless vertebrates perceive angular acceleration in the yaw (horizontal) planes has remained open. To provide an answer to this open question we reevaluated the anatomy of the inner ear in the lamprey, using stereoscopic dissection and scanning electron microscopy. The present study reveals a novel observation: the lamprey has two horizontal semicircular ducts in each labyrinth. Furthermore, the horizontal ducts in the lamprey, in contrast to those of jawed vertebrates, are located on the medial surface in the labyrinth rather than on the lateral surface. Our data on the lamprey horizontal duct suggest that the appearance of the horizontal canal characteristic of gnathostomes (lateral) and lampreys (medial) are mutually exclusive and indicate a parallel evolution of both systems, one in cyclostomes and one in gnathostome ancestors.

  12. Manutenção da infectividade de Tymovírus em extratos de plantas Maintenance of infectivity of Tymovirus in plant extracts

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Maria Mércia Barradas

    1992-12-01

    Full Text Available Quatro isolados do vírus do mosaico da berinjela (EMV - "eggplant mosaic virus" - grupo tymovírus foram armazenados a partir de extratos foliares de hospedeiras com sintomas sistêmicos. Os virus EMV-Al (isolado de Abelia, EMV-Sc (isolado da Escócia, -ts (estirpe-padrão e VNBT (vírus da necrose branca do tomateiro, que induzem sintomas em Chenopodium amaranticolor, C. murale, C. quinoa (Família Chenopodiaceae Datura stramonium, Lycopersicon esculentum e Nicotiana glutinosa (Solanaceae, foram conservados em extratos destas plantas, à temperatura ambiente, em geladeira e em congelador. A infectividade dos vírus, em diferentes períodos de armazenamento, foi testada em plantas de datura e glutinosa, para se determinar a longevidade in vitro. Constatou-se que, quando guardados em baixas temperaturas,os extratos preservam por mais tempo a infectividade dos vírus. No caso de datura e glutinosa, por exemplo, resultados positivos foram obtidos até 413 e 282 dias de armazenamento, respectivamente, em congelador. Entretanto, com relação às espécies de Chenopodium testadas, mesmo alguns extratos recém-preparados conduziram a resultados negativos, confirmando a presença de inibidores de infecção viral nestas plantas. Das três espécies, é sugerida a utilização apenas de C.quinoa para o preparo de extratos visando preservar estes vírus e, assim mesmo, por um período relativamente curto (entre 53 e 80 dias. A avaliação geral dos resultados mostra que, para os tymovírus estudados neste trabalho, é possível conservar a infectividade através da técnica de armazenamento de extratos foliares de plantas sistemicamente infectadas.Four isolates of EMV (eggplant mosaic virus - tymovirus group were preserved in crude extracts from systemically-infected plants. EMV-Al (Abelia strain, EMV-Sc (Scottish strain, EMV-ts (type-strain and TWNV (tomato white necrosis virus which induce symptoms in Chenopodium amaranticolor, C. murale, C. quinoa

  13. Effect on tumor necrosis factor-α production and antioxidant ability of black alder, as factors related to its anti-inflammatory properties.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Acero, Nuria; Muñoz-Mingarro, Dolores

    2012-06-01

    Alders exhibit several uses in different areas and also offer some nutritional and medicinal values. The bark and leaves from black alder [Alnus glutinosa (L.) Gaertn] are used in folk medicine for the treatment of inflammatory processes and other health disorders. This study assessed if an extract of A. glutinosa stem bark exhibits some biological properties linked to improving the inflammatory state, which could partly justify its ethnopharmacological use. Therefore, various aspects of antioxidant activity as well as the effect on tumor necrosis factor-α (TNF-α) production were evaluated. The phytochemical study revealed the presence of terpenes, saponins, tannins, flavonoids, and anthraquinones (by high-performance thin-layer chromatography). The betulinic acid content in the extract, determined by reversed-phase high-performance liquid chromatography (validated method), was 0.72±0.027%. In addition, high amounts for total phenols as well as flavonoids were determined. The extract exhibited a 2,2'-diphenylpicrylhydrazyl radical scavenging capacity similar to that of ascorbic acid and had a significant effect on superoxide anion scavenging, superior to that of ascorbic acid. It was also able to protect HeLa cells from induced oxidative stress. In the TNF-α assay, levels of this citokine were depressed by the extract in HL-60 cells. To test the effect of the extract on cell proliferation, a 3-(4,5-dimethylthiazol-2-yl)-2,5-diphenyltetrazolium bromide assay was performed. According to the results, the antioxidant properties displayed by the extract of A. glutinosa stem bark, together with the effect on TNF-α levels, suggest that these activities, linked to a successful reduction in inflammatory processes, may support, in part, its ethnopharmacological use.

  14. A systemic resistance inducing antiviral protein with N-glycosidase activity from Bougainvillea xbuttiana leaves.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Narwal, S; Balasubrahmanyam, A; Sadhna, P; Kapoor, H; Lodha, M L

    2001-06-01

    An antiviral protein from Bougainvillea xbuttiana leaves induced systemic resistance in host plants N. glutinosa and Cyamopsis tetragonoloba against TMV and SRV, respectively which was reversed by actinomycin D, when applied immediately or shortly after antiviral protein treatment. When the inhibitor was applied to the host plant leaves post inoculation, it was effective if applied upto 4 h after virus infection. It also delayed the expression of symptoms in systemic hosts of TMV. The inhibitor showed characteristic N-glycosidase activity on 25S rRNA of tobacco ribosomes, suggesting that it could also be interfering with virus multiplication through ribosome-inactivation process.

  15. Management of Alluvial Forests Included in Natura 2000 91E0* Habitat Type in Maramureş Mountains Nature Park

    OpenAIRE

    Danci Oana

    2015-01-01

    The Natura 2000 habitat type 91E0* Alluvial forests of Alnus glutinosa and Fraxinus excelsior (Alno-Padion, Alnion incanae, Salicion albae) include three subtypes of forests. In the Maramureș Mountains Nature Park (MMNP) the alluvial forests are represented by Alnus incana forest situated on the banks of mountain rivers. Starting from 2007, 70% of the MMNP is also a Natura 2000 site of community interest. In the standard form for the site are listed 18 Natura 2000 habitat types, but that of a...

  16. Reduction By Natural Resin of Water Uptake in Various Wood Species

    OpenAIRE

    Ahmet Ali VAR; ÖKTEM, Erol

    2014-01-01

    Straight and clear sapwood specimens of 3x3x1.5 cm were prepared from spruce ( Picea orientalis L.), pine ( Pinus sylvestris L.), beech ( Fagus orientalis L.), and alder ( Alnus glutinosa Geartn. L.). The specimens were impregnated in solution consisting of 10% natural resin and 90% cellulosic thinner, with dipping for periods of 1/3, 3, and 24 hours. Test and control specimens were soaked in distilled water for periods of 1/4, 1, 4, 16, and of 24 hours. Both tests were carried out under room...

  17. Evaluation of Alnus species and hybrids. [For biomass energy production

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hall, R.B. (Iowa State Univ., Ames, IA (US). Dept. of Forestry); Burgess, D. (Petawawa National Forestry Inst., Chalk River, Ontario (CA))

    1990-01-01

    Trials of a common set of seed lots representing 39 parents and five species of Alnus have been started in four countries: Belgium, Canada, the UK, and the US. Initial results indicate that cold hardiness is a problem in using A. acuminata but that sufficiently hardy A. rubra sources are available. A. glutinosa had the best growth in the nursery, and A. cordata had the best survival under severe moisture-stress conditions. A summary also is given of a workshop on alder improvement that further demonstrates the potential for developing the genus for biomass energy production. (author).

  18. Alisedas salmantinas y zamoranas

    OpenAIRE

    Navarro Andrés, Florentino; González Zapatero, María Ángeles; Gallego Martín, Francisca; Elena Roselló, Juana Ana; Sánchez Anta, María Ángeles; López Blanco, L.

    1986-01-01

    [ES] Se estudian las alisedas meso y supramediterráneas de las provincias administrativas de Salamanca y Zamora. Reconocemos dos asociaciones: Scrophulario scorodoniae —Alnetum glutinosae y Galio broteriani— Alnetum gluíinosae. En el seno de la segunda se describe la subasociación paradiseetosum lusitanicae nova. Para cada sintaxon se comentan diversos aspectos estructurales, ecológicos, dinámicos, corológicos y florísticos. [EN] In this paper we study the alder tree communities in the mes...

  19. Hydrogenase in actinorhizal root nodules and root nodule homogenates.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Benson, D R; Arp, D J; Burris, R H

    1980-04-01

    Hydrogenases were measured in intact actinorhizal root nodules and from disrupted nodules of Alnus glutinosa, Alnus rhombifolia, Alnus rubra, and Myrica pensylvanica. Whole nodules took up H2 in an O2-dependent reaction. Endophyte preparations oxidized H2 through the oxyhydrogen reaction, but rates were enhanced when hydrogen uptake was coupled to artificial electron acceptors. Oxygen inhibited artifical acceptor-dependent H2 uptake. The hydrogenase system from M. pensylvanica had a different pattern of coupling to various electron acceptors than the hydrogenase systems from the alders; only the bayberry system evolved H2 from reduced viologen dyes.

  20. Deep ancestry of programmed genome rearrangement in lampreys.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Timoshevskiy, Vladimir A; Lampman, Ralph T; Hess, Jon E; Porter, Laurie L; Smith, Jeramiah J

    2017-09-01

    In most multicellular organisms, the structure and content of the genome is rigorously maintained over the course of development. However some species have evolved genome biologies that permit, or require, developmentally regulated changes in the physical structure and content of the genome (programmed genome rearrangement: PGR). Relatively few vertebrates are known to undergo PGR, although all agnathans surveyed to date (several hagfish and one lamprey: Petromyzon marinus) show evidence of large scale PGR. To further resolve the ancestry of PGR within vertebrates, we developed probes that allow simultaneous tracking of nearly all sequences eliminated by PGR in P. marinus and a second lamprey species (Entosphenus tridentatus). These comparative analyses reveal conserved subcellular structures (lagging chromatin and micronuclei) associated with PGR and provide the first comparative embryological evidence in support of the idea that PGR represents an ancient and evolutionarily stable strategy for regulating inherent developmental/genetic conflicts between germline and soma. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  1. Evolution and ecology of retinal photoreception in early vertebrates.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Collin, Shaun P

    2010-01-01

    Visual ecology or the relationship between the visual system of an animal and its environment has proven to be a crucial research field for establishing general concepts of adaptation, specialization and evolution. The visual neuroscientist is indeed confronted with a plethora of different visual characteristics, each seemingly optimised for each species' ecological niche, but often without a clear understanding of the evolutionary constraints at play. However, before we are able to fully understand the influence(s) of ecology and phylogeny on visual system design in vertebrates, it is first necessary to understand the basic bauplan of key representatives of each taxa. This review examines photoreception in hagfishes, lampreys, cartilaginous fishes and lungfishes with an eye to their ecology using a range of neurobiological methods including anatomy, microspectrophotometry and molecular genetics. These early vertebrates represent critical stages in evolution and surprisingly possess a level of visual complexity that is almost unrivalled in other vertebrates. 2010 S. Karger AG, Basel.

  2. Comparative analysis of nitrite uptake and hemoglobin-nitrite reactions in erythrocytes: sorting out uptake mechanisms and oxygenation dependencies

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jensen, Frank Bo; Rohde, Sabina

    2010-01-01

    (hagfish and lamprey) anion exchanger-1 (AE1) in the membrane, with the aim to unravel the mechanisms and oxygenation dependencies of nitrite transport. Added nitrite rapidly diffused into the RBCs until equilibrium. The distribution ratio of nitrite across the membrane agreed with that expected from HNO2...... diffusion and AE1-mediated facilitated NO2- diffusion. Participation of HNO2 diffusion was emphasized by rapid transmembrane nitrite equilibration also in the natural AE1 knockouts. Following the equilibration, nitrite was consumed by reacting with Hb, which created a continued inward diffusion controlled....... We propose a model for RBC nitrite uptake that involves both HNO2 diffusion and AE1-mediated transport and which explains both the present and previous (sometimes puzzling) results....

  3. Evolution of a core gene network for skeletogenesis in chordates.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jochen Hecht

    2008-03-01

    Full Text Available The skeleton is one of the most important features for the reconstruction of vertebrate phylogeny but few data are available to understand its molecular origin. In mammals the Runt genes are central regulators of skeletogenesis. Runx2 was shown to be essential for osteoblast differentiation, tooth development, and bone formation. Both Runx2 and Runx3 are essential for chondrocyte maturation. Furthermore, Runx2 directly regulates Indian hedgehog expression, a master coordinator of skeletal development. To clarify the correlation of Runt gene evolution and the emergence of cartilage and bone in vertebrates, we cloned the Runt genes from hagfish as representative of jawless fish (MgRunxA, MgRunxB and from dogfish as representative of jawed cartilaginous fish (ScRunx1-3. According to our phylogenetic reconstruction the stem species of chordates harboured a single Runt gene and thereafter Runt locus duplications occurred during early vertebrate evolution. All newly isolated Runt genes were expressed in cartilage according to quantitative PCR. In situ hybridisation confirmed high MgRunxA expression in hard cartilage of hagfish. In dogfish ScRunx2 and ScRunx3 were expressed in embryonal cartilage whereas all three Runt genes were detected in teeth and placoid scales. In cephalochordates (lancelets Runt, Hedgehog and SoxE were strongly expressed in the gill bars and expression of Runt and Hedgehog was found in endo- as well as ectodermal cells. Furthermore we demonstrate that the lancelet Runt protein binds to Runt binding sites in the lancelet Hedgehog promoter and regulates its activity. Together, these results suggest that Runt and Hedgehog were part of a core gene network for cartilage formation, which was already active in the gill bars of the common ancestor of cephalochordates and vertebrates and diversified after Runt duplications had occurred during vertebrate evolution. The similarities in expression patterns of Runt genes support the view

  4. Vertebrate phylogeny of hydrogen sulfide vasoactivity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dombkowski, Ryan A; Russell, Michael J; Schulman, Alexis A; Doellman, Meredith M; Olson, Kenneth R

    2005-01-01

    Hydrogen sulfide (H(2)S) is a recently identified endogenous vasodilator in mammals. In steelhead/rainbow trout (Oncorhynchus mykiss, Osteichthyes), H(2)S produces both dose-dependent dilation and a unique dose-dependent constriction. In this study, we examined H(2)S vasoactivity in all vertebrate classes to determine whether H(2)S is universally vasoactive and to identify phylogenetic and/or environmental trends. H(2)S was generated from NaHS and examined in unstimulated and precontracted systemic and, when applicable, pulmonary arteries (PA) from Pacific hagfish (Eptatretus stouti, Agnatha), sea lamprey (Petromyzon marinus, Agnatha), sandbar shark (Carcharhinus milberti, Chondrichthyes), marine toad (Bufo marinus, Amphibia), American alligator (Alligator mississippiensis, Reptilia), Pekin duck (Anas platyrhynchos domesticus, Aves), and white rat (Rattus rattus, Mammalia). In otherwise unstimulated vessels, NaHS produced 1) a dose-dependent relaxation in Pacific hagfish dorsal aorta; 2) a dose-dependent contraction in sea lamprey dorsal aorta, marine toad aorta, alligator aorta and PA, duck aorta, and rat thoracic aorta; 3) a threshold relaxation in shark ventral aorta, dorsal aorta, and afferent branchial artery; and 4) a multiphasic contraction-relaxation-contraction in the marine toad PA, duck PA, and rat PA. Precontraction of these vessels with another agonist did not affect the general pattern of NaHS vasoactivity with the exception of the rat aorta, where relaxation was now dominant. These results show that H(2)S is a phylogenetically ancient and versatile vasoregulatory molecule that appears to have been opportunistically engaged to suit both organ-specific and species-specific homeostatic requirements.

  5. Comparative retinal morphology of the platypus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zeiss, Caroline J; Schwab, Ivan R; Murphy, Christopher J; Dubielzig, Richard W

    2011-08-01

    The purpose of this study is to identify evolutionary origin and fate of anatomic features of the duck-billed platypus eye. Eyes from the duck-billed platypus and four key evolutionary basal vertebrates (Pacific hagfish, north hemisphere sea lamprey, and Australian and South American lungfishes) were prepared for light microscopy. In addition to a standard panel of stains, tissues were immunostained against a variety of rod and cone opsins. Finally, published opsin sequences of platypus and several other vertebrate species were aligned and compared with immunohistochemical results. A complete scleral cartilage similar to that seen in birds, reptiles and amphibians encloses the platypus eye. This feature is present in sharks and rays, and in extant relatives of tetrapods, the lungfishes. The choroid lacks a tapetum. The retina is largely avascular and is rod-dominated, with a minority of red- and blue- cone immunoreactive photoreceptors. Like marsupials and many nonmammalian vertebrates, cones contain clear inner segment droplets. Double cones were present, a feature not found in eutherian mammals or marsupials. Evaluation of opsins indicates that red and blue immunoreactive cone opsins, but not rhodopsin, are present in the most basal of the extant species examined, the Pacific hagfish. Rhodopsin appears in the Australian and South American lungfishes, establishing emergence of this pigment in an extant relative of tetrapods. Unlike eyes of eutherian mammals, the platypus eye has retained morphologic features present in early tetrapods such as amphibians and their evolutionarily basal sister group, the lungfishes. These include scleral cartilage, double cones and cone droplets. In the platypus, as in other mammals, rod rhodopsin is the predominant photoreceptor pigment, at expense of the cone system. Copyright © 2011 Wiley-Liss, Inc.

  6. Agnathan VIP, PACAP and their receptors: ancestral origins of today's highly diversified forms.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Stephanie Y L Ng

    Full Text Available VIP and PACAP are pleiotropic peptides belonging to the secretin superfamily of brain-gut peptides and interact specifically with three receptors (VPAC(1, PAC(1 and VPAC(2 from the class II B G protein-coupled receptor family. There is immense interest regarding their molecular evolution which is often described closely alongside gene and/or genome duplications. Despite the wide array of information available in various vertebrates and one invertebrate the tunicate, their evolutionary origins remain unresolved. Through searches of genome databases and molecular cloning techniques, the first lamprey VIP/PACAP ligands and VPAC receptors are identified from the Japanese lamprey. In addition, two VPAC receptors (VPACa/b are identified from inshore hagfish and ligands predicted for sea lamprey. Phylogenetic analyses group these molecules into their respective PHI/VIP, PRP/PACAP and VPAC receptor families and show they resemble ancestral forms. Japanese lamprey VIP/PACAP peptides synthesized were tested with the hagfish VPAC receptors. hfVPACa transduces signal via both adenylyl cylase and phospholipase C pathways, whilst hfVPACb was only able to transduce through the calcium pathway. In contrast to the widespread distribution of VIP/PACAP ligands and receptors in many species, the agnathan PACAP and VPAC receptors were found almost exclusively in the brain. In situ hybridisation further showed their abundance throughout the brain. The range of VIP/PACAP ligands and receptors found are highly useful, providing a glimpse into the evolutionary events both at the structural and functional levels. Though representative of ancestral forms, the VIP/PACAP ligands in particular have retained high sequence conservation indicating the importance of their functions even early in vertebrate evolution. During these nascent stages, only two VPAC receptors are likely responsible for eliciting functions before evolving later into specific subtypes post-Agnatha. We

  7. Diversity and evolutionary history of lettuce necrotic yellows virus in Australia and New Zealand.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Higgins, Colleen M; Chang, Wee-Leong; Khan, Subuhi; Tang, Joe; Elliott, Carol; Dietzgen, Ralf G

    2016-02-01

    Lettuce necrotic yellows virus (LNYV) is the type member of the genus Cytorhabdovirus, family Rhabdoviridae, and causes a severe disease of lettuce (Lactuca sativa L.). This virus has been described as endemic to Australia and New Zealand, with sporadic reports of a similar virus in Europe. Genetic variability studies of plant-infecting rhabdoviruses are scarce. We have extended a previous study on the variability of the LNYV nucleocapsid gene, comparing sequences from isolates sampled from both Australia and New Zealand, as well as analysing symptom expression on Nicotiana glutinosa. Phylogenetic and BEAST analyses confirm separation of LNYV isolates into two subgroups (I and II) and suggest that subgroup I is slightly older than subgroup II. No correlation was observed between isolate subgroup and disease symptoms on N. glutinosa. The origin of LNYV remains unclear; LNYV may have moved between native and weed hosts within Australia or New Zealand before infecting lettuce or may have appeared as a result of at least two incursions, with the first coinciding with the beginning of European agriculture in the region. The apparent extinction of subgroup I in Australia may have been due to less-efficient dispersal than that which has occurred for subgroup II - possibly a consequence of suboptimal interactions with plant and/or insect hosts. Introduction of subgroup II to New Zealand appears to be more recent. More-detailed epidemiological studies using molecular tools are needed to fully understand how LNYV interacts with its hosts and to determine where the virus originated.

  8. Kisaran Inang dan Keragaman Gejala Infeksi Turnip Mosaic Virus

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Eliza Suryati Rusli

    2007-07-01

    Full Text Available The incidence of mosaic disease on vegetable crops in Indonesia has been reported recently. The disease is caused by TuMV which is considered as a new and important virus on caisin and turnip in Indonesia. Field survey has been conducted to determine disease incidence in vegetable growing areas. Symptom variability and host range of TuMV was further studied through mechanical inoculation to cruciferae and solanaceae plants. Observation during field survey has proved that TuMV has infected caisin and turnip in Java and Bali. The highest intensity of mosaic disease i.e. 63,3% occurs in Tumpangan-Malang, followed by Denpasar Selatan and Bandungan-Semarang with the intensity of 30,5% and 19,0% respectively. TuMV infection causes different types of symptoms, such as: wrinkled leaf, blistered leaf, vein banding, vein clearing, leaf distortion and proliferation. The host range of TuMV involves those plants belong to cruciferae (cabbage, broccoli, caisin, turnip, cauliflower, chinese cabbage, pak coy; solanaceae (N. tabacum, N. benthamiana, N. glutinosa; and chenopodiaceae (C. amaranticolor. Furthermore, N. glutinosa can be used as differential host for TuMV isolates.

  9. Phytophthora ilicis as a leaf and stem pathogen of Ilex aquifolium in Mediterranean islands

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bruno SCANU

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Between 2010 and 2013 several English holly trees showing defoliation, leaf and twig blight were found in natural ecosystems in Sardinia and Corsica. A Phytophthora species was consistently isolated from necrotic tissues of leaves and twigs, and bleeding cankers on stems. Isolates obtained were identified as Phytophthora ilicis, on the basis of morphological features, colony patterns and growth rates at different temperatures. Identity was confirmed by sequence analyses of the ITS, β-tubulin and cox1 gene regions. Two different genotypes within P. ilicis were detected. Pathogenicity of P. ilicis isolates was verified by inoculating freshly cut twigs of English holly. Phytophthora ilicis was originally recorded on English holly in western USA, and to date has been found only in cool temperate regions in northern America and, more recently, in Europe. This is the first report of P. ilicis on English holly in the Mediterranean region. Two additional Phytophthora species were isolated from other trees and shrubs species growing together with English holly, including P. bilorbang from Alnus glutinosa leaves and P. pseudosyringae from rhizosphere soil samples of A. glutinosa and Castanea sativa, and from symptomatic leaves of Hedera helix.

  10. Allelopathic effects of juglone on germination and growth of several herbaceous and woody species.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rietveld, W J

    1983-02-01

    Laboratory experiments were conducted to determine juglone sensitivity of 16 species (Trifolium incarnatum, Coronilla varia, Vicia villosa, Lespedeza stipulacea, L. cuneata, Acer ginnala, Caragana arbor-escens, Elaegnus angustifolia, E. umbellata, Lonicera maackii, Quercus alba, Fraxinus americana, Liriodendron tulipifera, Alnus glutinosa, Pinus strobus, andP. sylvestris) being considered for mixed plantings withJugions nigra (black walnut). All species were sensitive to juglone, but seed germination and radicle elongation were less affected than shoot elongation and dry weight accumulation. Seed germination and radicle elongation were affected by juglone in 6 and 11 species, respectively, mainly by the higher concentrations (10(-3) M and 10(-4) M). Shoot elongation and dry weight accumulation of all species were affected by juglone; many species were sensitive to concentrations as low as 10(-6) M. Seedlings of all species were severely wilted and eventually killed by 10(-3) M juglone, and most were chlorotic and severely retarded by 10(-4) M juglone. Seedlings inhibited by 10(-6) M and 10(-5) M juglone did not showany visible signs of injury. Based on the effects on seedling shoot elongation and dry weight accumulation, the five species found to be most sensitive to juglone were:Lonicera maackii, Lespedeza cuneata, Trifolium incarnatum, Alnus glutinosa, and Elaeagnus umbellata.

  11. An improved Cauchy number approach for predicting the drag and reconfiguration of flexible vegetation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Whittaker, Peter; Wilson, Catherine A. M. E.; Aberle, Jochen

    2015-09-01

    An improved model to describe the drag and reconfiguration of flexible riparian vegetation is proposed. The key improvement over previous models is the use of a refined 'vegetative' Cauchy number to explicitly determine the magnitude and rate of the vegetation's reconfiguration. After being derived from dimensional consideration, the model is applied to two experimental data sets. The first contains high-resolution drag force and physical property measurements for twenty-one foliated and defoliated full-scale trees, including specimens of Alnus glutinosa, Populus nigra and Salix alba. The second data set is independent and of a different scale, consisting of drag force and physical property measurements for natural and artificial branches of willow and poplar, under partially and fully submerged flow conditions. Good agreement between the measured and predicted drag forces is observed for both data sets, especially when compared to a more typical 'rigid' approximation, where the effects of reconfiguration are neglected.

  12. The Role of Phytodiversity in Riparian Alder Forests in Supporting the Provision of Ecosystem Services

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mariničová Patrícia

    2016-11-01

    Full Text Available Nature, ecosystems and biodiversity provide human society with many benefits known as ecosystem services. Functional diversity is an important aspect of biodiversity. In this paper, we applied inductive approach to the identification, mapping and evaluation of ecosystem services of the Aegopodio-Alnetum glutinosae community in Tribeč Mts. The results from 2015 show that the alder floodplain forest represents one of the most productive forest ecosystems with seasonal maximum production of 59.03 g m−2, species diversity of N0 = 40 and functional diversity of FD = 10. The forage potential of this community is medium, the melliferous potential is high and the therapeutic potential was estimated as extremely rich in medicinal plants. From the functional groups for providing ecosystem services, woody plants and hemicryptophytes play the most significant role.

  13. AcEST: DK962661 [AcEST

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available 4.3 sp|O04867|GLNA1_ALNGL Glutamine synthetase OS=Alnus glutinosa GN... 31 5.6 sp|Q7T0P6|DFI8B_XENLA Differential...ly expressed in FDCP 8 homolog... 31 5.6 sp|Q6DDJ3|DFI8A_XENLA Differential...ly expressed in FDCP 8 homolog... 31 5.6 sp|Q6DJB3|DEFI8_XENTR Differentially expressed in FDCP 8 homolog......MKLLQMNAKW------GRCPGKATP 99 E LLQ + KW G PG P Sbjct: 129 EQEYTLLQKDVKWPLGWPVGGYPGPQGP 156 >sp|Q7T0P6|DFI8B_XENLA Differential

  14. Post-dispersal seed predation of woody forest species limits recolonization of forest plantations on ex-arable land

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bruun, Hans Henrik; Valtinat, Karin; Kollmann, Johannes

    2010-01-01

    Reforestation of ex-arable land in temperate regions increases the area of potential habitat for forest plants. However, the herbaceous plant layer of these plantations contains fewer forest species than comparable plantations at continuously forested sites. One of the reasons for this might......-generation forest plantations on ex-arable land and re-planted clear-cuts on continuously forested land. There was no recruitment following the experimental sowing of six commonwoody species (Alnus glutinosa, Betula pendula, Frangula alnus, Sambucus nigra, Sorbus aucuparia and Sorbus intermedia). Thus......, the colonization of forest plantations by native shrubs and trees appears to be habitat-limited; the only exception being Rhamnus catharticus, for which poor dispersal ability may be more important. Post-dispersal seed predation of forest shrubs and trees was marked, especially in relatively small and isolated...

  15. Purification and properties of antiviral proteins from the leaves of Bougainvillea xbuttiana.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Narwal, S; Balasubrahmanyam, A; Lodha, M L; Kapoor, H C

    2001-10-01

    A non-phytotoxic, resistance inducing, proteinaceous antiviral principle was purified by ammonium sulphate fractionation, ion exchange chromatography and gel filtration from the leaves of Bougainvillea xbuttiana. It imparted resistance against tobacco mosaic virus (TMV) and sunnhemp rosette virus (SRV) in their respective test hosts viz. Nicotiana glutinosa, N. tabacum var. Samsun NN, and Cyamopsis tetragonoloba, respectively. The purified principle eluted as a single peak upon gel filtration, but exhibited two polypeptides on SDS-PAGE with Mr 28,000 and 24,000. The two polypeptides were found to be highly basic, rich in lysine with pI around 10.0 and 10.5, respectively. Since this principle effected local lesion inhibition in both treated and untreated top leaves of test host, it might be acting in the initial stages of virus infection as a systemic inducer.

  16. [Analysis of hot spots and trend of molecular pharmacognosy research based on project supported by National Natural Science Foundation of 1995-2014].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Jun-Wen; Liu, Yang; Tong, Yuan-Yuan; Yang, Ce; Li, Hai-Yan

    2016-05-01

    This study collected 1995-2014 molecular pharmacognosy study, a total of 595 items, funded by Natural Science Foundation of China (NSFC). TDA and Excel software were used to analyze the data of the projects about general situation, hot spots of research with rank analytic and correlation analytic methods. Supported by NSFC molecular pharmacognosy projects and funding a gradual increase in the number of, the proportion of funds for pharmaceutical research funding tends to be stable; mainly supported by molecular biology methods of genuine medicinal materials, secondary metabolism and Germplasm Resources Research; hot drugs including Radix Salviae Miltiorrhizae, Radix Rehmanniae, Cordyceps sinensis, hot contents including tanshinone biosynthesis, Rehmannia glutinosa continuous cropping obstacle. Copyright© by the Chinese Pharmaceutical Association.

  17. Anatomical and molecular characterization of Lactarius aff. omphaliformis, Russula alnijorullensis and Cortinarius tucumanensis ectomycorrhizae on Alnus acuminata.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Becerra, Alejandra; Beenken, Ludwig; Pritsch, Karin; Daniele, Graciela; Schloter, Michael; Agerer, Reinhard

    2005-01-01

    Ectomycorrhizae (ECM) of Lactarius aff. omphaliformis Romagn., Russula alnijorullensis (Sing.) Sing. and Cortinarius tucumanensis Mos. on Andean alder (Alnus acuminata Kunth) were characterized and identified. The identification of the fungal symbionts was achieved by morpho-anatomical observations of mycorrhizae and by comparison of ITS-RFLP patterns obtained from ECM and fruitbodies. L. aff omphaliformis ECM differed in some morphological details such as ramification and mantle type from ECM of the same species on A. glutinosa. L. aff omphaliformis ECM show an orange to ochre mantle containing latex cells, which stain with sulpho-vanillin, emanating hyphae without clamps. R. alnijorullensis ECM represent a typical Russula-type-ECM, light yellow to pinkish, the outer mantle being composed of triangular latex-filled cells staining with sulpho-vanillin, emanating hyphae without clamps. C. tucumanensis ECM exhibit a white (silvery) to yellowish brown mantle covered with soil particles, emanating hyphae with clamps.

  18. Systematics and biology of the African genus Ferraria (Iridaceae: Irideae

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    P. Goldblatt

    2011-12-01

    Full Text Available Following field and herbarium investigation of the subequatorial African and mainly western southern African Ferraria Burm. ex Mill. (Iridaceae: Iridoideae, a genus of cormous geophytes, we recognize 18 species, eight more than were included in the 1979 account of the genus by M.P. de Vos. One of these, F. ovata, based on Moraea ovata Thunb. (1800, was only discovered to be a species of Ferraria in 2001, and three more are the result of our different view of De Vos’s taxonomy. In tropical Africa, F. glutinosa is recircumscribed to include only mid- to late summer-flowering plants, usually with a single basal leaf and with purple to brown flowers often marked with yellow. A second summer-flowering species, F. candelabrum, includes taller plants with several basal leaves. Spring and early summer-flowering plants lacking foliage leaves and with yellow flowers from central Africa are referred to F. spithamea or F. welwitschii respectively.

  19. Broad taxonomic characterization of Verticillium wilt resistance genes reveals an ancient origin of the tomato Ve1 immune receptor.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Song, Yin; Zhang, Zhao; Seidl, Michael F; Majer, Aljaz; Jakse, Jernej; Javornik, Branka; Thomma, Bart P H J

    2017-02-01

    Plant-pathogenic microbes secrete effector molecules to establish themselves on their hosts, whereas plants use immune receptors to try and intercept such effectors in order to prevent pathogen colonization. The tomato cell surface-localized receptor Ve1 confers race-specific resistance against race 1 strains of the soil-borne vascular wilt fungus Verticillium dahliae which secrete the Ave1 effector. Here, we describe the cloning and characterization of Ve1 homologues from tobacco (Nicotiana glutinosa), potato (Solanum tuberosum), wild eggplant (Solanum torvum) and hop (Humulus lupulus), and demonstrate that particular Ve1 homologues govern resistance against V. dahliae race 1 strains through the recognition of the Ave1 effector. Phylogenetic analysis shows that Ve1 homologues are widely distributed in land plants. Thus, our study suggests an ancient origin of the Ve1 immune receptor in the plant kingdom. © 2016 BSPP AND JOHN WILEY & SONS LTD.

  20. Proteogenomics data for deciphering Frankia coriariae interactions with root exudates from three host plants

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Guylaine Miotello

    2017-10-01

    Full Text Available Frankia coriariae BMG5.1 cells were incubated with root exudates derived from compatible (Coriaria myrtifolia, incompatible (Alnus glutinosa and non-actinorhizal (Cucumis melo host plants. Bacteria cells and their exoproteomes were analyzed by high-throughput proteomics using a Q-Exactive HF high resolution tandem mass spectrometer incorporating an ultra-high-field orbitrap analyzer. MS/MS spectra were assigned with two protein sequence databases derived from the closely-related genomes from strains BMG5.1 andDg1, the Frankia symbiont of Datisca glomerata. The tandem mass spectrometry data accompanying the manuscript describing the database searches and comparative analysis (Ktari et al., 2017, doi.org/10.3389/fmicb.2017.00720 [1] have been deposited to the ProteomeXchange with identifiers PXD005979 (whole cell proteomes and PXD005980 (exoproteome data.

  1. Dietary Preference of Gammarus pulex and Asellus aquaticus during a Laboratory Breeding Programme for Ecotoxicological Studies

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. C. Bloor

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available An investigation was undertaken to establish if Gammarus pulex and Asellus aquaticus preferred a diet of unconditioned, artificially or naturally conditioned alder leaves (Alnus glutinosa. Standardised, 24 hour ex situ feeding assays were undertaken with both species to determine their food preference. The results showed that A. aquaticus ate more leaf material compared to G. pulex (Z 23.909, P 0.001 when exposed to all three test variables. Also, both G. pulex and A. aquaticus demonstrated a preference for naturally conditioned leaves compared to the other two variables, with unconditioned leaves proving the least popular food option for both macroinvertebrates (Z 18.803, <0.001. However, both species ate varying amounts of all the leaf treatments (Z 136.399, <0.001. Subsequently, the author outlined a feeding methodology for natural alder leaf conditioning that could be used during a laboratory breeding programme.

  2. Soil microfungi in two post-mining chronosequences with different vegetation types

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Novakova, A. [Academy of Sciences of the Czech Republic, Ceske Budejovice (Czech Republic). Inst. Soil Biology

    2001-07-01

    Soil microfungi were studied in the Sokolov (Czech Republic) post-mining dumps afforested with Alnus glutinosa and in the Lusatian (Germany) post-mining dumps afforested with Pinus sylvestris or P. nigra. Microfungi were isolated using the soil dilution plate method. Soil microfungi communities of two chronosequences were compared by species composition, frequency of species occurrence, and colony forming units of fungi (CFU-counts). Differences in species occurrence were determined. More species of entomopathogenic microfungi were found from the Sokolov post-mining area in comparison with the Cottbus post-mining area. Absidia glauca, A. cylindrospora, Penicillium glabrum, and P. janthinellum were the most frequently isolated species from the Cottbus post-mining area, while A. glauca, Geomyces pannorum, and Trichoderma koningii predominated at the Sokolov post-mining area.

  3. Freshwater lichens on submerged stones and alder roots in the Polish lowlands

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mariusz Hachułka

    2013-12-01

    Full Text Available The article presents the results of the studies of lichens in streams and spring areas of the escarpment zone of Wzniesienia Łódzkie Heights in Central Poland. The boulders, stones and roots of Alnus glutinosa, situated in 3 inundated zones in the streams: submerged zone, fluvial mesic zone and fluvial xeric zone, were examined in the streams. The studies have shown 23 species connected with these streams. Six species of freshwater lichens: Verrucaria aquatilis, V. hydrela, Hydropunctaria rheitrophila, V. margacea, V. praetermissa and V. madida, occupied stones in 3 different zones. Verrucaria aquatilis and Hydropunctaria rheitrophila colonized also secondary substrates – the bark of alder roots incrusted with sand grains and silt.

  4. Management of Alluvial Forests Included in Natura 2000 91E0* Habitat Type in Maramureş Mountains Nature Park

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Danci Oana

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available The Natura 2000 habitat type 91E0* Alluvial forests of Alnus glutinosa and Fraxinus excelsior (Alno-Padion, Alnion incanae, Salicion albae include three subtypes of forests. In the Maramureș Mountains Nature Park (MMNP the alluvial forests are represented by Alnus incana forest situated on the banks of mountain rivers. Starting from 2007, 70% of the MMNP is also a Natura 2000 site of community interest. In the standard form for the site are listed 18 Natura 2000 habitat types, but that of alluvial forests 91E0* is not listed either due to an error or lack of available research data. Our study seeks to provide information regarding this high conservation value habitat such as: structure, distribution,managementmeasures andmonitoring protocol. The purpose of this paper is to offer a management tool for this conservation value habitat which is also exposed to human impact more than any other priority habitat in MMNP.

  5. The possibilities of the application of some species of sage (Salvia L. as auxiliaries in the treatment of some diseases

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    NATASA D. MITIC

    2003-06-01

    Full Text Available The chemical composition of four essential oils of four species of sage (Salvia officinalis L., Salvia pratensis L., Salvia glutinosa L. and Salvia aethiopis L. are examined by GC-FID and GC-MS analysis. The presence of some components in the essential oil (mono- and sesquiterpene determines the pharmacological effects and therapeutical application of a plant species. Salvia officinalis L. gives the highest yield of oil (1.1 %, while the lowest is in Salvia pratensis L. (0.1 %. The investigations included the determination of the antimicrobic activities of the essential oils by the diffusion method and the oil of Salvia pratensis L. proved to have the highest activity.

  6. Assessment of fly ash-aided phytostabilisation of highly contaminated soils after an 8-year field trial

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pourrut, Bertrand [Universite Lille Nord de France, Lille (France); Groupe ISA, Equipe Sols et Environnement, Laboratoire Genie Civil et geoEnvironnement (LGCgE) Lille Nord de France EA 4515, 48 boulevard Vauban, 59046 Lille Cedex (France); Lopareva-Pohu, Alena [Universite Lille Nord de France, Lille (France); Groupe ISA, Equipe Sols et Environnement, Laboratoire Genie Civil et geoEnvironnement (LGCgE) Lille Nord de France EA 4515, 48 boulevard Vauban, 59046 Lille Cedex (France); Universite du Littoral-Cote d' Opale, Unite de Chimie Environnementale et Interaction sur le Vivant (UCEIV), EA 4492, Maison de la Recherche en Environnement Industriel de Dunkerque 2, avenue Maurice Schumann, 59140 Dunkerque (France); Pruvot, Christelle [Universite Lille Nord de France, Lille (France); Groupe ISA, Equipe Sols et Environnement, Laboratoire Genie Civil et geoEnvironnement (LGCgE) Lille Nord de France EA 4515, 48 boulevard Vauban, 59046 Lille Cedex (France); Garcon, Guillaume; Verdin, Anthony [Universite Lille Nord de France, Lille (France); Universite du Littoral-Cote d' Opale, Unite de Chimie Environnementale et Interaction sur le Vivant (UCEIV), EA 4492, Maison de la Recherche en Environnement Industriel de Dunkerque 2, avenue Maurice Schumann, 59140 Dunkerque (France); Waterlot, Christophe; Bidar, Geraldine [Universite Lille Nord de France, Lille (France); Groupe ISA, Equipe Sols et Environnement, Laboratoire Genie Civil et geoEnvironnement (LGCgE) Lille Nord de France EA 4515, 48 boulevard Vauban, 59046 Lille Cedex (France); Shirali, Pirouz [Universite Lille Nord de France, Lille (France); Universite du Littoral-Cote d' Opale, Unite de Chimie Environnementale et Interaction sur le Vivant (UCEIV), EA 4492, Maison de la Recherche en Environnement Industriel de Dunkerque 2, avenue Maurice Schumann, 59140 Dunkerque (France); and others

    2011-10-01

    Aided phytostabilisation is a cost-efficient technique to manage metal-contaminated areas, particularly in the presence of extensive pollution. Plant establishment and survival in highly metal-contaminated soils are crucial for phytostabilisation success, as metal toxicity for plants is widely reported. A relevant phytostabilisation solution must limit metal transfer through the food chain. Therefore, this study aimed at evaluating the long-term efficiency of aided phytostabilisation on former agricultural soils highly contaminated by cadmium, lead, and zinc. The influence of afforestation and fly ash amendments on reducing metal phytoavailability was investigated as were their effects on plant development. Before being planted with a tree mix, the site was divided into three plots: a reference plot with no amendment, a plot amended with silico-aluminous fly ash and one with sulfo-calcic fly ash. Unlike Salix alba and Quercus robur, Alnus glutinosa, Acer pseudoplatanus and Robinia pseudoacacia grew well on the site and accumulated, overall, quite low concentrations of metals in their leaves and young twigs. This suggests that these three species have an excluder phenotype for Cd, Zn and Pb. After 8 years, metal availability to A. glutinosa, A. pseudoplatanus and R. pseudoacacia, and translocation to their above-ground parts, strongly decreased in fly ash-amended soils. Such decreases fit well together with the depletion of CaCl{sub 2}-extractable metals in amended soils. Although both fly ashes were effective to decrease Cd, Pb and Zn concentrations in above-ground parts of trees, the sulfo-calcic ash was more efficient.

  7. Actinorhizal Alder Phytostabilization Alters Microbial Community Dynamics in Gold Mine Waste Rock from Northern Quebec: A Greenhouse Study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Callender, Katrina L.; Roy, Sébastien; Khasa, Damase P.; Whyte, Lyle G.; Greer, Charles W.

    2016-01-01

    Phytotechnologies are rapidly replacing conventional ex-situ remediation techniques as they have the added benefit of restoring aesthetic value, important in the reclamation of mine sites. Alders are pioneer species that can tolerate and proliferate in nutrient-poor, contaminated environments, largely due to symbiotic root associations with the N2-fixing bacteria, Frankia and ectomycorrhizal (ECM) fungi. In this study, we investigated the growth of two Frankia-inoculated (actinorhizal) alder species, A. crispa and A. glutinosa, in gold mine waste rock from northern Quebec. Alder species had similar survival rates and positively impacted soil quality and physico-chemical properties in similar ways, restoring soil pH to neutrality and reducing extractable metals up to two-fold, while not hyperaccumulating them into above-ground plant biomass. A. glutinosa outperformed A. crispa in terms of growth, as estimated by the seedling volume index (SVI), and root length. Pyrosequencing of the bacterial 16S rRNA gene for bacteria and the ribosomal internal transcribed spacer (ITS) region for fungi provided a comprehensive, direct characterization of microbial communities in gold mine waste rock and fine tailings. Plant- and treatment-specific shifts in soil microbial community compositions were observed in planted mine residues. Shannon diversity and the abundance of microbes involved in key ecosystem processes such as contaminant degradation (Sphingomonas, Sphingobium and Pseudomonas), metal sequestration (Brevundimonas and Caulobacter) and N2-fixation (Azotobacter, Mesorhizobium, Rhizobium and Pseudomonas) increased over time, i.e., as plants established in mine waste rock. Acetate mineralization and most probable number (MPN) assays showed that revegetation positively stimulated both bulk and rhizosphere communities, increasing microbial density (biomass increase of 2 orders of magnitude) and mineralization (five-fold). Genomic techniques proved useful in investigating

  8. Actinorhizal Alder Phytostabilization Alters Microbial Community Dynamics in Gold Mine Waste Rock from Northern Quebec: A Greenhouse Study.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Katrina L Callender

    Full Text Available Phytotechnologies are rapidly replacing conventional ex-situ remediation techniques as they have the added benefit of restoring aesthetic value, important in the reclamation of mine sites. Alders are pioneer species that can tolerate and proliferate in nutrient-poor, contaminated environments, largely due to symbiotic root associations with the N2-fixing bacteria, Frankia and ectomycorrhizal (ECM fungi. In this study, we investigated the growth of two Frankia-inoculated (actinorhizal alder species, A. crispa and A. glutinosa, in gold mine waste rock from northern Quebec. Alder species had similar survival rates and positively impacted soil quality and physico-chemical properties in similar ways, restoring soil pH to neutrality and reducing extractable metals up to two-fold, while not hyperaccumulating them into above-ground plant biomass. A. glutinosa outperformed A. crispa in terms of growth, as estimated by the seedling volume index (SVI, and root length. Pyrosequencing of the bacterial 16S rRNA gene for bacteria and the ribosomal internal transcribed spacer (ITS region for fungi provided a comprehensive, direct characterization of microbial communities in gold mine waste rock and fine tailings. Plant- and treatment-specific shifts in soil microbial community compositions were observed in planted mine residues. Shannon diversity and the abundance of microbes involved in key ecosystem processes such as contaminant degradation (Sphingomonas, Sphingobium and Pseudomonas, metal sequestration (Brevundimonas and Caulobacter and N2-fixation (Azotobacter, Mesorhizobium, Rhizobium and Pseudomonas increased over time, i.e., as plants established in mine waste rock. Acetate mineralization and most probable number (MPN assays showed that revegetation positively stimulated both bulk and rhizosphere communities, increasing microbial density (biomass increase of 2 orders of magnitude and mineralization (five-fold. Genomic techniques proved useful in

  9. The phenological phases of flowering and pollen seasons of spring flowering tree taxa against a background of meteorological conditions in Kraków, Poland

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Danuta Stępalska

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available The aim of the study was to compare phenological observations of pollen seasons of selected early spring trees. Special attention was paid to meteorological conditions which favored or did not favor tree flowering and pollen release. For this reason, we used phenological observation, pollen counts, and meteorological data in five sites in the center of Kraków in the period 2009–2011. Phenological phases (5 of four tree species: Alnus glutinosa, Alnus incana, Corylus avellana, and Betula pendula, were analyzed. It was found that in case of A. glutinosa the pollen season often preceded the flowering period, while for A. incana those two phenomena were more correlated. As regards Corylus avellana, the beginning of the pollen season and phenological phases was simultaneous. However, pollen grains occurred in the air longer, even by a dozen or so days. The phenological phases and pollen seasons of Alnus and Corylus were dependent on meteorological conditions. To give the definition of the relationship between pollen concentration and weather conditions, Spearman rank correlation analysis was applied. High Alnus and Corylus pollen concentrations were found on sunny days with a maximum temperature over 10°C and no precipitation, and when the snow cover was gone. In case of Betula, the phenological phases of the full pollination period usually coincided with the periods of high pollen concentrations. However, Betula pollen sometimes appears earlier and stays in the air longer than the flowering period of local trees in the nearest vicinity. This situation indicates long-distance transport or secondary deposition.

  10. Re-evaluation of the immunological Big Bang.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Flajnik, Martin F

    2014-11-03

    Classically the immunological 'Big Bang' of adaptive immunity was believed to have resulted from the insertion of a transposon into an immunoglobulin superfamily gene member, initiating antigen receptor gene rearrangement via the RAG recombinase in an ancestor of jawed vertebrates. However, the discovery of a second, convergent adaptive immune system in jawless fish, focused on the so-called variable lymphocyte receptors (VLRs), was arguably the most exciting finding of the past decade in immunology and has drastically changed the view of immune origins. The recent report of a new lymphocyte lineage in lampreys, defined by the antigen receptor VLRC, suggests that there were three lymphocyte lineages in the common ancestor of jawless and jawed vertebrates that co-opted different antigen receptor supertypes. The transcriptional control of these lineages during development is predicted to be remarkably similar in both the jawless (agnathan) and jawed (gnathostome) vertebrates, suggesting that an early 'division of labor' among lymphocytes was a driving force in the emergence of adaptive immunity. The recent cartilaginous fish genome project suggests that most effector cytokines and chemokines were also present in these fish, and further studies of the lamprey and hagfish genomes will determine just how explosive the Big Bang actually was. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  11. Design and membrane-disruption mechanism of charge-enriched AMPs exhibiting cell selectivity, high-salt resistance, and anti-biofilm properties.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Han, Hyo Mi; Gopal, Ramamourthy; Park, Yoonkyung

    2016-02-01

    Cationic antimicrobial peptides (AMPs) are essential components of the innate immune system, offering protection against invading pathogenic bacteria. In nature, AMPs serve as antibiotics with broad-spectrum antimicrobial and anti-biofilm properties. However, low effective stability in high-salt environments and physiological instability in biological membranes limit the applicability of naturally occurring AMPs as novel therapeutics. We therefore designed short synthetic cationic peptides by substituting key residues in myxinidin, an AMP derived from the epidermal mucus of hagfish, with lysine (Lys, K), arginine (Arg, R), and tryptophan (Trp, W). The resultant myxinidin analogs exhibited strong antimicrobial activity against both Gram-positive and Gram-negative bacteria, including multidrug-resistant strains, even under high-salt conditions. Moreover, these peptides showed high binding affinity for both lipopolysaccharides and lipoteichoic acids and inhibited biofilm formation by most bacteria, but did not cause significant lysis of human red blood cells and were not cytotoxic to normal human keratinocytes. Circular dichroism analysis revealed that myxinidin and its analogs assumed α-helical or β-sheet structures within artificial liposomes and bacterial membranes. In addition, bacterial killing and membrane permeation experiments demonstrated that the myxinidin analogs permeated through bacterial membranes, leading to cytoplasmic disruption and cell death. Taken together, these findings suggest myxinidin analogs may be promising candidate antibiotic agents for therapeutic application against antibiotic-resistant bacteria.

  12. Importance of Chemolithoautotrophic Production to Mobile Benthic Predators in the Gulf of Mexico

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    Morgan, E.; Macavoy, S.; Carney, R.

    2005-05-01

    The continental slope of the Gulf of Mexico is characterized by substantial hydrocarbon seepage which provides reduced energy sources, both CH4 and H2S, for chemolithoautotrophs existing as endosymbionts within mussels and tubeworms found in dense colonies that provide habitat for an array of endemic and colonial fauna. The extent of trophic export of chemosynthetic biomass to the seep communities and the surrounding benthic communities in the Gulf, however, remains an open question. To elucidate the nutritional associations between seep residents and the surrounding benthos the carbon, nitrogen and sulfur stable isotope values of the hagfish Eptatretus sp., the giant isopod Bathynomus giganteus and the predatory snail Phymorhyncus sp. were interpreted through a three source, dual isotope mixing model. The model was able to assess the contributions of different isotopic signals to a mixture and thus could distinguish between photosynthetic/phytodetritus based sources, methanotrophic sources and thiotrophic sources. Incorporation of chemosynthetic based food sources was minimal on the whole and species specific; however some of the organisms considered in this study did incorporate nutrition from chemolithoautotrophic sources.

  13. A lamprey view on the origins of neuroendocrine regulation of the thyroid axis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sower, Stacia A; Hausken, Krist N

    2017-04-13

    This mini review summarizes the current knowledge of the hypothalamic-pituitary-thyroid (HPT) endocrine system in lampreys, jawless vertebrates. Lampreys and hagfish are the only two extant members of the class of agnathans, the oldest lineage of vertebrates. The high conservation of the hypothalamic-pituitary-gonadal (HPG) axis in lampreys makes the lamprey model highly appropriate for comparative and evolutionary analyses. However, there are still many unknown questions concerning the hypothalamic-pituitary (HP) axis in its regulation of thyroid activities in lampreys. As an example, the hypothalamic and pituitary hormone(s) that regulate the HPT axis have not been confirmed and/or characterized. Similar to gnathostomes (jawed vertebrates), lampreys produce thyroxine (T4) and triiodothyronine (T3) from thyroid follicles that are suggested to be involved in larval development, metamorphosis, and reproduction. The existing data provide evidence of a primitive, overlapping yet functional HPG and HPT endocrine system in lamprey. We hypothesize that lampreys are in an evolutionary intermediate stage of hypothalamic-pituitary development, leading to the emergence of the highly specialized HPG and HPT endocrine axes in jawed vertebrates. Study of the ancient lineage of jawless vertebrates, the agnathans, is key to understanding the origins of the neuroendocrine system in vertebrates. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  14. Tunicates and not cephalochordates are the closest living relatives of vertebrates.

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    Delsuc, Frédéric; Brinkmann, Henner; Chourrout, Daniel; Philippe, Hervé

    2006-02-23

    Tunicates or urochordates (appendicularians, salps and sea squirts), cephalochordates (lancelets) and vertebrates (including lamprey and hagfish) constitute the three extant groups of chordate animals. Traditionally, cephalochordates are considered as the closest living relatives of vertebrates, with tunicates representing the earliest chordate lineage. This view is mainly justified by overall morphological similarities and an apparently increased complexity in cephalochordates and vertebrates relative to tunicates. Despite their critical importance for understanding the origins of vertebrates, phylogenetic studies of chordate relationships have provided equivocal results. Taking advantage of the genome sequencing of the appendicularian Oikopleura dioica, we assembled a phylogenomic data set of 146 nuclear genes (33,800 unambiguously aligned amino acids) from 14 deuterostomes and 24 other slowly evolving species as an outgroup. Here we show that phylogenetic analyses of this data set provide compelling evidence that tunicates, and not cephalochordates, represent the closest living relatives of vertebrates. Chordate monophyly remains uncertain because cephalochordates, albeit with a non-significant statistical support, surprisingly grouped with echinoderms, a hypothesis that needs to be tested with additional data. This new phylogenetic scheme prompts a reappraisal of both morphological and palaeontological data and has important implications for the interpretation of developmental and genomic studies in which tunicates and cephalochordates are used as model animals.

  15. Fish hemoglobins

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    P.C. de Souza

    2007-06-01

    Full Text Available Vertebrate hemoglobin, contained in erythrocytes, is a globular protein with a quaternary structure composed of 4 globin chains (2 alpha and 2 beta and a prosthetic group named heme bound to each one. Having myoglobin as an ancestor, hemoglobin acquired the capacity to respond to chemical stimuli that modulate its function according to tissue requirements for oxygen. Fish are generally submitted to spatial and temporal O2 variations and have developed anatomical, physiological and biochemical strategies to adapt to the changing environmental gas availability. Structurally, most fish hemoglobins are tetrameric; however, those from some species such as lamprey and hagfish dissociate, being monomeric when oxygenated and oligomeric when deoxygenated. Fish blood frequently possesses several hemoglobins; the primary origin of this finding lies in the polymorphism that occurs in the globin loci, an aspect that may occasionally confer advantages to its carriers or even be a harmless evolutionary remnant. On the other hand, the functional properties exhibit different behaviors, ranging from a total absence of responses to allosteric regulation to drastic ones, such as the Root effect.

  16. Antimicrobial peptides at work: interaction of myxinidin and its mutant WMR with lipid bilayers mimicking the P. aeruginosa and E. coli membranes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lombardi, Lucia; Stellato, Marco Ignazio; Oliva, Rosario; Falanga, Annarita; Galdiero, Massimiliano; Petraccone, Luigi; D'Errico, Geradino; de Santis, Augusta; Galdiero, Stefania; Del Vecchio, Pompea

    2017-03-01

    Antimicrobial peptides are promising candidates as future therapeutics in order to face the problem of antibiotic resistance caused by pathogenic bacteria. Myxinidin is a peptide derived from the hagfish mucus displaying activity against a broad range of bacteria. We have focused our studies on the physico-chemical characterization of the interaction of myxinidin and its mutant WMR, which contains a tryptophan residue at the N-terminus and four additional positive charges, with two model biological membranes (DOPE/DOPG 80/20 and DOPE/DOPG/CL 65/23/12), mimicking respectively Escherichia coli and Pseudomonas aeruginosa membrane bilayers. All our results have coherently shown that, although both myxinidin and WMR interact with the two membranes, their effect on membrane microstructure and stability are different. We further have shown that the presence of cardiolipin plays a key role in the WMR-membrane interaction. Particularly, WMR drastically perturbs the DOPE/DOPG/CL membrane stability inducing a segregation of anionic lipids. On the contrary, myxinidin is not able to significantly perturb the DOPE/DOPG/CL bilayer whereas interacts better with the DOPE/DOPG bilayer causing a significant perturbing effect of the lipid acyl chains. These findings are fully consistent with the reported greater antimicrobial activity of WMR against P. aeruginosa compared with myxinidin.

  17. Advantages of long-term multidisciplinary ocean observations for gas hydrate systems - Examples from Ocean Networks Canada

    Science.gov (United States)

    Scherwath, Martin; Riedel, Michael; Roemer, Miriam; Thomsen, Laurenz; Chatzievangelou, Damianos; Juniper, Kim; Heesemann, Martin; Mihaly, Steven

    2017-04-01

    Ocean Networks Canada (ONC) operates permanent ocean observatories around Canada, with two science nodes on gas hydrate sites on its NEPTUNE observatory off Vancouver Island. We present examples of gas hydrates related scientific discoveries that require high power and high data capacity provided by the underwater cabled network. The first example utilizes the seafloor crawler Wally that is operated by Jacobs University in Bremen. Regular live crawler missions allowed a thorough analysis of the benthic activity around the hydrate mounds, where the cabled access makes it possible to drive at a speed dependent on the seafloor turbidity to obtain clear images. Combining these visual data with a variety of co-located environmental monitoring data showed which species reacted to which parameters, for instance that sablefish appear to follow low currents, Juvenile crabs react to oxygen levels or hagfish to chlorophyll. The second example is from gas vent monitoring using a 270 kHz sonar. At least one year of constant monitoring was necessary not only to prove that seafloor gas venting is primarily controlled by the tidal pressure but also to establish months-long phases of different venting intensity. This highlights that ship-based monitoring is less adequate for quantitative analyses of methane release into the ocean, though crucial for extrapolating the observatory results. Note that all these data are freely and openly accessible to the research community through Oceans 2.0, ONC's data portal; see http://www.oceannetworks.ca/DATA-TOOLS.

  18. Unresolved orthology and peculiar coding sequence properties of lamprey genes: the KCNA gene family as test case

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    Kuraku Shigehiro

    2011-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background In understanding the evolutionary process of vertebrates, cyclostomes (hagfishes and lamprey occupy crucial positions. Resolving molecular phylogenetic relationships of cyclostome genes with gnathostomes (jawed vertebrates genes is indispensable in deciphering both the species tree and gene trees. However, molecular phylogenetic analyses, especially those including lamprey genes, have produced highly discordant results between gene families. To efficiently scrutinize this problem using partial genome assemblies of early vertebrates, we focused on the potassium voltage-gated channel, shaker-related (KCNA family, whose members are mostly single-exon. Results Seven sea lamprey KCNA genes as well as six elephant shark genes were identified, and their orthologies to bony vertebrate subgroups were assessed. In contrast to robustly supported orthology of the elephant shark genes to gnathostome subgroups, clear orthology of any sea lamprey gene could not be established. Notably, sea lamprey KCNA sequences displayed unique codon usage pattern and amino acid composition, probably associated with exceptionally high GC-content in their coding regions. This lamprey-specific property of coding sequences was also observed generally for genes outside this gene family. Conclusions Our results suggest that secondary modifications of sequence properties unique to the lamprey lineage may be one of the factors preventing robust orthology assessments of lamprey genes, which deserves further genome-wide validation. The lamprey lineage-specific alteration of protein-coding sequence properties needs to be taken into consideration in tackling the key questions about early vertebrate evolution.

  19. Crystal structure of the lamprey variable lymphocyte receptor C reveals an unusual feature in its N-terminal capping module.

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    Ryo Kanda

    Full Text Available Jawless vertebrates represented by lampreys and hagfish use variable lymphocyte receptors (VLRs as antigen receptors to mount adaptive immune responses. VLRs generate diversity that is comparable to immunoglobulins and T-cell receptors by a gene conversion-like mechanism, which is mediated by cytosine deaminases. Currently, three types of VLRs, VLRA, VLRB, and VLRC, have been identified in lampreys. Crystal structures of VLRA and VLRB in complex with antigens have been reported recently, but no structural information is available for VLRC. Here, we present the first crystal structure of VLRC from the Japanese lamprey (Lethenteron japonicum. Similar to VLRA and VLRB, VLRC forms a typical horseshoe-like solenoid structure with a variable concave surface. Strikingly, its N-terminal cap has a long loop with limited sequence variability that protrudes toward the concave surface, which is the putative antigen-binding surface. Furthermore, as predicted previously, its C-terminal cap lacks a highly variable protruding loop that plays an important role in antigen recognition by lamprey VLRA and VLRB. Recent work suggests that VLRC+ lymphocytes in jawless vertebrates might be akin to γδ T cells in jawed vertebrates. Structural features of lamprey VLRC described here suggest that it may recognize antigens in a unique manner.

  20. Crystal Structure of the Lamprey Variable Lymphocyte Receptor C Reveals an Unusual Feature in Its N-Terminal Capping Module

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kanda, Ryo; Sutoh, Yoichi; Kasamatsu, Jun; Maenaka, Katsumi; Kasahara, Masanori; Ose, Toyoyuki

    2014-01-01

    Jawless vertebrates represented by lampreys and hagfish use variable lymphocyte receptors (VLRs) as antigen receptors to mount adaptive immune responses. VLRs generate diversity that is comparable to immunoglobulins and T-cell receptors by a gene conversion-like mechanism, which is mediated by cytosine deaminases. Currently, three types of VLRs, VLRA, VLRB, and VLRC, have been identified in lampreys. Crystal structures of VLRA and VLRB in complex with antigens have been reported recently, but no structural information is available for VLRC. Here, we present the first crystal structure of VLRC from the Japanese lamprey (Lethenteron japonicum). Similar to VLRA and VLRB, VLRC forms a typical horseshoe-like solenoid structure with a variable concave surface. Strikingly, its N-terminal cap has a long loop with limited sequence variability that protrudes toward the concave surface, which is the putative antigen-binding surface. Furthermore, as predicted previously, its C-terminal cap lacks a highly variable protruding loop that plays an important role in antigen recognition by lamprey VLRA and VLRB. Recent work suggests that VLRC+ lymphocytes in jawless vertebrates might be akin to γδ T cells in jawed vertebrates. Structural features of lamprey VLRC described here suggest that it may recognize antigens in a unique manner. PMID:24465760

  1. The Lamprey: A jawless vertebrate model system for examining origin of the neural crest and other vertebrate traits

    Science.gov (United States)

    Green, Stephen A.; Bronner, Marianne E.

    2014-01-01

    Summary Lampreys are a group of jawless fishes that serve as an important point of comparison for studies of vertebrate evolution. Lampreys and hagfishes are agnathan fishes, the cyclostomes, which sit at a crucial phylogenetic position as the only living sister group of the jawed vertebrates. Comparisons between cyclostomes and jawed vertebrates can help identify shared derived (i.e. synapomorphic) traits that might have been inherited from ancestral early vertebrates, if unlikely to have arisen convergently by chance. One example of a uniquely vertebrate trait is the neural crest, an embryonic tissue that produces many cell types crucial to vertebrate features, such as the craniofacial skeleton, pigmentation of the skin, and much of the peripheral nervous system (Gans and Northcutt, 1983). Invertebrate chordates arguably lack unambiguous neural crest homologs, yet have cells with some similarities, making comparisons with lampreys and jawed vertebrates essential for inferring characteristics of development in early vertebrates, and how they may have evolved from nonvertebrate chordates. Here we review recent research on cyclostome neural crest development, including research on lamprey gene regulatory networks and differentiated neural crest fates. PMID:24560767

  2. (Tele)presenting Secrets from the Deep Southern California Margin

    Science.gov (United States)

    Levin, L. A.; Girguis, P. R.; Brennan, M.; German, C. R.; Raineault, N.; Le, J. T.; Grupe, B.; Gallo, N.; Inderbitzen, K. E.; Tuzun, S.; Wagner, J.

    2016-02-01

    This past summer scientists, students and the public participated through telepresence in 2 weeks of deep-sea exploration via the EV Nautilus, visiting a tremendous diversity of sites found along the southern California continental margin (200-900m). We observed previously unknown cold seeps; new and unexpected assemblages and species distributions; and novel animal behaviors; all under the overarching influence of strong oxygen gradients from the East Pacific oxygen minimum zone (OMZ). The expedition discovered four new methane seep sites, each with distinct biota reflecting varying depth and oxygen levels. OMZ specialists such as lucinid clams, hagfish, and thornyhead fishes coexisted with seep biota (vesicoymid clams) at a 1.4-km long seep off Point Dume (Malibu, CA), forming a blended ecosystem with distinct zonation. A range of habitats (canyons, knolls, mounds) within the OMZ hosted fish, crustacean, echinoderm and cnidarian species with unusual hypoxia tolerance to important roles in environmental management of the deep ocean as disturbance from resource extraction and climate change intensify.

  3. Reevaluation of the Immunological Big Bang: comparisons of two vertebrate adaptive immune systems

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    Flajnik, Martin F.

    2014-01-01

    Classically the immunological ‘Big Bang’ of adaptive immunity was believed to have resulted from the insertion of a transposon into an immunoglobulin superfamily gene member, initiating RAG-based antigen receptor gene rearrangement in an ancestor of jawed vertebrates. However, the discovery of a second, convergent adaptive immune system in jawless fish, focused on the so-called Variable Lymphocyte Receptors (VLR), was arguably the most exciting finding of the past decade in immunology, and has drastically changed the view of immune origins. The recent report of a new lymphocyte lineage in lampreys, defined by the antigen receptor VLRC, suggests that there were three lymphocyte lineages in the common ancestor of jawless and jawed vertebrates that coopted different antigen receptor supertypes. The developmental transcriptional control of these lineages is predicted to be remarkably similar in both the jawless (agnathan) and jawed (gnathostome) systems, suggesting that an early ‘division of labor’ among lymphocytes was a driving force in the emergence of adaptive immunity. The recent cartilaginous fish genome project suggests that most effector cytokines and chemokines were also present, and further studies of the lamprey and hagfish genomes will determine just how explosive the Big Bang actually was. PMID:25517375

  4. The p53–Mdm2 interaction and the E3 ligase activity of Mdm2/Mdm4 are conserved from lampreys to humans

    Science.gov (United States)

    Coffill, Cynthia R.; Lee, Alison P.; Siau, Jia Wei; Chee, Sharon M.; Joseph, Thomas L.; Tan, Yaw Sing; Madhumalar, Arumugam; Tay, Boon-Hui; Brenner, Sydney; Verma, Chandra S.; Ghadessy, Farid J.; Venkatesh, Byrappa; Lane, David P.

    2016-01-01

    The extant jawless vertebrates, represented by lampreys and hagfish, are the oldest group of vertebrates and provide an interesting genomic evolutionary pivot point between invertebrates and jawed vertebrates. Through genome analysis of one of these jawless vertebrates, the Japanese lamprey (Lethenteron japonicum), we identified all three members of the important p53 transcription factor family—Tp53, Tp63, and Tp73—as well as the Mdm2 and Mdm4 genes. These genes and their products are significant cellular regulators in human cancer, and further examination of their roles in this most distant vertebrate relative sheds light on their origin and coevolution. Their important role in response to DNA damage has been highlighted by the discovery of multiple copies of the Tp53 gene in elephants. Expression of lamprey p53, Mdm2, and Mdm4 proteins in mammalian cells reveals that the p53–Mdm2 interaction and the Mdm2/Mdm4 E3 ligase activity existed in the common ancestor of vertebrates and have been conserved for >500 million years of vertebrate evolution. Lamprey Mdm2 degrades human p53 with great efficiency, but this interaction is not blocked by currently available small molecule inhibitors of the human HDM2 protein, suggesting utility of lamprey Mdm2 in the study of the human p53 signaling pathway. PMID:26798135

  5. Comparative phylogenies and host specialization in the alder ectomycorrhizal fungi Alnicola, Alpova and Lactarius (Basidiomycota in Europe

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    Manzi Sophie

    2011-02-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Mycorrhizal fungi form intimate associations with their host plants that constitute their carbon resource and habitat. Alnus spp. (Betulaceae are known to host an exceptional species-poor and specialized ectomycorrhizal (ECM fungal community compared to other tree species, but the host-specificity pattern and its significance in terms of fungal diversification and speciation remain poorly documented. The degree of parallel speciation, host switching, and patterns of biogeography were explored in the historical associations between alders and three ECM taxa of Basidiomycetes: Alnicola (Agaricales, Alpova (Boletales, and Lactarius (Russulales. The aim was to develop an evolutionary framework on host specificity and diversification of Basidiomycetes in this highly specialized plant-fungus symbiosis. Results Sporocarps of Alnicola (220, Lactarius (61 and Alpova (29 were collected from stands of the four European alder species (A. alnobetula including the endemic subsp. suaveolens in Corsica, A. cordata, A. glutinosa, A. incana in Western Europe (mainly in France and Austria, from 1995 to 2009. Specimens were morphologically identified to the species level. From these, 402 sequences of four DNA regions (ITS, rpb2, gpd, and the V9 domain of the mit-SSU rDNA were successfully obtained and analyzed in addition with 89 sequences available in GenBank and UNITE databases. Phylogenetic analyses were conducted on all sequence data sets (individual and combined using maximum likelihood reconstruction and Bayesian inference. Fungal phylogenies are compared and discussed in relation to the host, with a focus on species boundaries by associating taxonomic, systematic and molecular information. Conclusions Patterns of host specificity and phylogenies of Alnicola and Lactarius suggest coevolution as a basal factor of speciation in relation with the subgeneric diversification of Alnus, possibly due to the very selective pressure of the host. A

  6. Two are better than one: combining landscape genomics and common gardens for detecting local adaptation in forest trees.

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    Lepais, Olivier; Bacles, Cecile F

    2014-10-01

    Predicting likely species responses to an alteration of their local environment is key to decision-making in resource management, ecosystem restoration and biodiversity conservation practice in the face of global human-induced habitat disturbance. This is especially true for forest trees which are a dominant life form on Earth and play a central role in supporting diverse communities and structuring a wide range of ecosystems. In Europe, it is expected that most forest tree species will not be able to migrate North fast enough to follow the estimated temperature isocline shift given current predictions for rapid climate warming. In this context, a topical question for forest genetics research is to quantify the ability for tree species to adapt locally to strongly altered environmental conditions (Kremer et al. ). Identifying environmental factors driving local adaptation is, however, a major challenge for evolutionary biology and ecology in general but is particularly difficult in trees given their large individual and population size and long generation time. Empirical evaluation of local adaptation in trees has traditionally relied on fastidious long-term common garden experiments (provenance trials) now supplemented by reference genome sequence analysis for a handful of economically valuable species. However, such resources have been lacking for most tree species despite their ecological importance in supporting whole ecosystems. In this issue of Molecular Ecology, De Kort et al. () provide original and convincing empirical evidence of local adaptation to temperature in black alder, Alnus glutinosa L. Gaertn, a surprisingly understudied keystone species supporting riparian ecosystems. Here, De Kort et al. () use an innovative empirical approach complementing state-of-the-art landscape genomics analysis of A. glutinosa populations sampled in natura across a regional climate gradient with phenotypic trait assessment in a common garden experiment (Fig. ). By

  7. Types and Origins of Debris Found on Maui Shorelines: Implications for Mitigation Policies and Strategies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Blickley, L.; Currie, J. J.; Kaufman, G. D.

    2016-02-01

    Marine debris is an identified concern for coastal areas and is known to accumulate in large quantities in the North Pacific Ocean. The proximity of the Main Hawaiian Islands to these "garbage patches" represents an ongoing concern with little understanding of debris origins or efficacy of current mitigation policies. Debris accumulation surveys were conducted monthly between October 2013 and August 2014 and daily during January 2015 at 3 beaches on Maui's coastline. Debris accumulation rates, loads, and sources varied between sites and were influenced by both environmental and anthropogenic factors. Debris accumulation was strongly influenced by the temporal scale of sampling, with daily surveys showing a significant increase in accumulation rate. Plastics were the most common debris item at each site ranging from local, land-based debris including cigarette butts, straws, and food wrappers, to foreign, ocean-based debris such as oyster spacer tubes and hagfish traps. The results of this study indicate that the passage of a tobacco free beaches bill on Maui has not significantly reduced the amount of tobacco related debris. Alternatively, a ban on plastic grocery bags has eliminated this type of debris from Maui's shorelines, with no bags found at any of the sampling sites. The wide spread origins of collected debris further suggests that mitigation strategies to reduce debris will need to take place across hundreds of local municipalities. The efficacy of marine debris policies furthermore depends on enforcement and implementation strategy, as current results suggest policy enforcement at the producer level affords more effective results than that at the consumer level. Local debris mitigation actions have nevertheless been shown to affect debris loads, and municipalities are therefore encouraged to adopt a holistic combination of policy, community-based debris removal programs, increased public awareness, and ongoing monitoring to address marine debris.

  8. Conserved form and function of the germinal epithelium through 500 million years of vertebrate evolution.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grier, Harry J; Uribe, Mari Carmen; Lo Nostro, Fabiana L; Mims, Steven D; Parenti, Lynne R

    2016-08-01

    The germinal epithelium, i.e., the site of germ cell production in males and females, has maintained a constant form and function throughout 500 million years of vertebrate evolution. The distinguishing characteristic of germinal epithelia among all vertebrates, males, and females, is the presence of germ cells among somatic epithelial cells. The somatic epithelial cells, Sertoli cells in males or follicle (granulosa) cells in females, encompass and isolate germ cells. Morphology of all vertebrate germinal epithelia conforms to the standard definition of an epithelium: epithelial cells are interconnected, border a body surface or lumen, are avascular and are supported by a basement membrane. Variation in morphology of gonads, which develop from the germinal epithelium, is correlated with the evolution of reproductive modes. In hagfishes, lampreys, and elasmobranchs, the germinal epithelia of males produce spermatocysts. A major rearrangement of testis morphology diagnoses osteichthyans: the spermatocysts are arranged in tubules or lobules. In protogynous (female to male) sex reversal in teleost fishes, female germinal epithelial cells (prefollicle cells) and oogonia transform into the first male somatic cells (Sertoli cells) and spermatogonia in the developing testis lobules. This common origin of cell types from the germinal epithelium in fishes with protogynous sex reversal supports the homology of Sertoli cells and follicle cells. Spermatogenesis in amphibians develops within spermatocysts in testis lobules. In amniotes vertebrates, the testis is composed of seminiferous tubules wherein spermatogenesis occurs radially. Emerging research indicates that some mammals do not have lifetime determinate fecundity. The fact emerged that germinal epithelia occur in the gonads of all vertebrates examined herein of both sexes and has the same form and function across all vertebrate taxa. Continued study of the form and function of the germinal epithelium in vertebrates

  9. Evidence for at least six Hox clusters in the Japanese lamprey (Lethenteron japonicum)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mehta, Tarang K.; Ravi, Vydianathan; Yamasaki, Shinichi; Lee, Alison P.; Lian, Michelle M.; Tay, Boon-Hui; Tohari, Sumanty; Yanai, Seiji; Tay, Alice; Brenner, Sydney; Venkatesh, Byrappa

    2013-01-01

    Cyclostomes, comprising jawless vertebrates such as lampreys and hagfishes, are the sister group of living jawed vertebrates (gnathostomes) and hence an important group for understanding the origin and diversity of vertebrates. In vertebrates and other metazoans, Hox genes determine cell fate along the anteroposterior axis of embryos and are implicated in driving morphological diversity. Invertebrates contain a single Hox cluster (either intact or fragmented), whereas elephant shark, coelacanth, and tetrapods contain four Hox clusters owing to two rounds of whole-genome duplication (“1R” and “2R”) during early vertebrate evolution. By contrast, most teleost fishes contain up to eight Hox clusters because of an additional “teleost-specific” genome duplication event. By sequencing bacterial artificial chromosome (BAC) clones and the whole genome, here we provide evidence for at least six Hox clusters in the Japanese lamprey (Lethenteron japonicum). This suggests that the lamprey lineage has experienced an additional genome duplication after 1R and 2R. The relative age of lamprey and human paralogs supports this hypothesis. Compared with gnathostome Hox clusters, lamprey Hox clusters are unusually large. Several conserved noncoding elements (CNEs) were predicted in the Hox clusters of lamprey, elephant shark, and human. Transgenic zebrafish assay indicated the potential of CNEs to function as enhancers. Interestingly, CNEs in individual lamprey Hox clusters are frequently conserved in multiple Hox clusters in elephant shark and human, implying a many-to-many orthology relationship between lamprey and gnathostome Hox clusters. Such a relationship suggests that the first two rounds of genome duplication may have occurred independently in the lamprey and gnathostome lineages. PMID:24043829

  10. Characterization of the Runx Gene Family in a Jawless Vertebrate, the Japanese Lamprey (Lethenteron japonicum)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nah, Giselle Sek Suan; Tay, Boon-Hui; Brenner, Sydney; Osato, Motomi; Venkatesh, Byrappa

    2014-01-01

    The cyclostomes (jawless vertebrates), comprising lampreys and hagfishes, are the sister group of jawed vertebrates (gnathostomes) and are hence an important group for the study of vertebrate evolution. In mammals, three Runx genes, Runx1, Runx2 and Runx3, encode transcription factors that are essential for cell proliferation and differentiation in major developmental pathways such as haematopoiesis, skeletogenesis and neurogenesis and are frequently associated with diseases. We describe here the characterization of Runx gene family members from a cyclostome, the Japanese lamprey (Lethenteron japonicum). The Japanese lamprey contains three Runx genes, RunxA, RunxB, and RunxC. However, phylogenetic and synteny analyses suggest that they are not one-to-one orthologs of gnathostome Runx1, Runx2 and Runx3. The major protein domains and motifs found in gnathostome Runx proteins are highly conserved in the lamprey Runx proteins. Although all gnathostome Runx genes each contain two alternative promoters, P1 (distal) and P2 (proximal), only lamprey RunxB possesses the alternative promoters; lamprey RunxA and RunxC contain only P2 and P1 promoter, respectively. Furthermore, the three lamprey Runx genes give rise to fewer alternative isoforms than the three gnathostome Runx genes. The promoters of the lamprey Runx genes lack the tandem Runx-binding motifs that are highly conserved among the P1 promoters of gnathostome Runx1, Runx2 and Runx3 genes; instead these promoters contain dispersed single Runx-binding motifs. The 3′UTR of lamprey RunxB contains binding sites for miR-27 and miR-130b/301ab, which are conserved in mammalian Runx1 and Runx3, respectively. Overall, the Runx genes in lamprey seem to have experienced a different evolutionary trajectory from that of gnathostome Runx genes which are highly conserved all the way from cartilaginous fishes to mammals. PMID:25405766

  11. Characterization of the Runx gene family in a jawless vertebrate, the Japanese lamprey (Lethenteron japonicum.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Giselle Sek Suan Nah

    Full Text Available The cyclostomes (jawless vertebrates, comprising lampreys and hagfishes, are the sister group of jawed vertebrates (gnathostomes and are hence an important group for the study of vertebrate evolution. In mammals, three Runx genes, Runx1, Runx2 and Runx3, encode transcription factors that are essential for cell proliferation and differentiation in major developmental pathways such as haematopoiesis, skeletogenesis and neurogenesis and are frequently associated with diseases. We describe here the characterization of Runx gene family members from a cyclostome, the Japanese lamprey (Lethenteron japonicum. The Japanese lamprey contains three Runx genes, RunxA, RunxB, and RunxC. However, phylogenetic and synteny analyses suggest that they are not one-to-one orthologs of gnathostome Runx1, Runx2 and Runx3. The major protein domains and motifs found in gnathostome Runx proteins are highly conserved in the lamprey Runx proteins. Although all gnathostome Runx genes each contain two alternative promoters, P1 (distal and P2 (proximal, only lamprey RunxB possesses the alternative promoters; lamprey RunxA and RunxC contain only P2 and P1 promoter, respectively. Furthermore, the three lamprey Runx genes give rise to fewer alternative isoforms than the three gnathostome Runx genes. The promoters of the lamprey Runx genes lack the tandem Runx-binding motifs that are highly conserved among the P1 promoters of gnathostome Runx1, Runx2 and Runx3 genes; instead these promoters contain dispersed single Runx-binding motifs. The 3'UTR of lamprey RunxB contains binding sites for miR-27 and miR-130b/301ab, which are conserved in mammalian Runx1 and Runx3, respectively. Overall, the Runx genes in lamprey seem to have experienced a different evolutionary trajectory from that of gnathostome Runx genes which are highly conserved all the way from cartilaginous fishes to mammals.

  12. Seasonal monitoring of deep-sea megabenthos in Barkley Canyon cold seep by internet operated vehicle (IOV).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Doya, Carolina; Chatzievangelou, Damianos; Bahamon, Nixon; Purser, Autun; De Leo, Fabio C; Juniper, S Kim; Thomsen, Laurenz; Aguzzi, Jacopo

    2017-01-01

    Knowledge of the processes shaping deep-sea benthic communities at seasonal scales in cold-seep environments is incomplete. Cold seeps within highly dynamic regions, such as submarine canyons, where variable current regimes may occur, are particularly understudied. Novel Internet Operated Vehicles (IOVs), such as tracked crawlers, provide new techniques for investigating these ecosystems over prolonged periods. In this study a benthic crawler connected to the NEPTUNE cabled infrastructure operated by Ocean Networks Canada was used to monitor community changes across 60 m2 of a cold-seep area of the Barkley Canyon, North East Pacific, at ~890 m depth within an Oxygen Minimum Zone (OMZ). Short video-transects were run at 4-h intervals during the first week of successive calendar months, over a 14 month period (February 14th 2013 to April 14th 2014). Within each recorded transect video megafauna abundances were computed and changes in environmental conditions concurrently measured. The responses of fauna to environmental conditions as a proxy of seasonality were assessed through analysis of abundances in a total of 438 video-transects (over 92 h of total footage). 7698 fauna individuals from 6 phyla (Cnidaria, Ctenophora, Arthropoda, Echinodermata, Mollusca, and Chordata) were logged and patterns in abundances of the 7 most abundant taxa (i.e. rockfish Sebastidae, sablefish Anoplopoma fimbria, hagfish Eptatretus stoutii, buccinids (Buccinoidea), undefined small crabs, ctenophores Bolinopsis infundibulum, and Scyphomedusa Poralia rufescens) were identified. Patterns in the reproductive behaviour of the grooved tanner crab (Chionnecetes tanneri) were also indicated. Temporal variations in biodiversity and abundance in megabenthic fauna was significantly influenced by variabilities in flow velocity flow direction (up or down canyon), dissolved oxygen concentration and month of study. Also reported here for the first time are transient mass aggregations of grooved tanner

  13. Seasonal monitoring of deep-sea megabenthos in Barkley Canyon cold seep by internet operated vehicle (IOV.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Carolina Doya

    Full Text Available Knowledge of the processes shaping deep-sea benthic communities at seasonal scales in cold-seep environments is incomplete. Cold seeps within highly dynamic regions, such as submarine canyons, where variable current regimes may occur, are particularly understudied. Novel Internet Operated Vehicles (IOVs, such as tracked crawlers, provide new techniques for investigating these ecosystems over prolonged periods. In this study a benthic crawler connected to the NEPTUNE cabled infrastructure operated by Ocean Networks Canada was used to monitor community changes across 60 m2 of a cold-seep area of the Barkley Canyon, North East Pacific, at ~890 m depth within an Oxygen Minimum Zone (OMZ. Short video-transects were run at 4-h intervals during the first week of successive calendar months, over a 14 month period (February 14th 2013 to April 14th 2014. Within each recorded transect video megafauna abundances were computed and changes in environmental conditions concurrently measured. The responses of fauna to environmental conditions as a proxy of seasonality were assessed through analysis of abundances in a total of 438 video-transects (over 92 h of total footage. 7698 fauna individuals from 6 phyla (Cnidaria, Ctenophora, Arthropoda, Echinodermata, Mollusca, and Chordata were logged and patterns in abundances of the 7 most abundant taxa (i.e. rockfish Sebastidae, sablefish Anoplopoma fimbria, hagfish Eptatretus stoutii, buccinids (Buccinoidea, undefined small crabs, ctenophores Bolinopsis infundibulum, and Scyphomedusa Poralia rufescens were identified. Patterns in the reproductive behaviour of the grooved tanner crab (Chionnecetes tanneri were also indicated. Temporal variations in biodiversity and abundance in megabenthic fauna was significantly influenced by variabilities in flow velocity flow direction (up or down canyon, dissolved oxygen concentration and month of study. Also reported here for the first time are transient mass aggregations of

  14. Interspecific variation and plasticity in hemoglobin nitrite reductase activity and its correlation with oxygen affinity in vertebrates.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jensen, Frank B; Kolind, Rasmus A H; Jensen, Natashia S; Montesanti, Gabriella; Wang, Tobias

    2017-04-01

    Deoxygenated hemoglobin (Hb) is a nitrite reductase that reduces naturally occurring nitrite to nitric oxide (NO), supplying physiological relevant NO under hypoxic conditions. The nitrite reductase activity is modulated by the allosteric equilibrium between the R and T structures of Hb that also determines oxygen affinity. In the present study we investigated nitrite reductase activity and O2 affinity in Hbs from ten different vertebrate species under identical conditions to disclose interspecific variations and allow an extended test for a correlation between the rate constant for nitrite reduction and O2 affinity. We also tested plastic changes in Hb properties via addition of T-structure-stabilizing organic phosphates (ATP and GTP). The decay in deoxyHb during its reaction with nitrite was exponential-like in ectotherms (Atlantic hagfish, carp, crucian carp, brown trout, rainbow trout, cane toad, Indian python and red-eared slider turtle), while it was sigmoid in mammals (harbor porpoise and rabbit). Typically, hypoxia-tolerant species showed a faster reaction than intolerant species. Addition of ATP and GTP decreased O2 affinity and slowed the rate of nitrite reduction in a concentration-dependent manner. The initial second order rate constant of the deoxyHb-mediated nitrite reduction showed a strong curvilinear correlation with oxygen affinity among all ectothermic vertebrates, and the relationship also applied to plastic variations of Hb properties via organic phosphates. The relationship predicts high nitrite reductase activity in hypoxic tolerant species with high Hb-O2 affinity and reveals that the decrease in erythrocyte ATP and/or GTP during acclimation to hypoxia in ectotherms increases the erythrocyte NO generating capacity. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  15. Diversity and ancestry of flatworms infecting blood of nontetrapod craniates "fishes".

    Science.gov (United States)

    Orélis-Ribeiro, Raphael; Arias, Cova R; Halanych, Kenneth M; Cribb, Thomas H; Bullard, Stephen A

    2014-01-01

    We herein review all published molecular studies (life history, taxonomy, and phylogeny) and summarize all GenBank sequences and primer sets for the "fish blood flukes". Further, by analysing new and all available sequence data for the partial D1-D2 domains of 28S from 83 blood fluke taxa, we explore the evolutionary expansion of flatworm parasitism in the blood of craniates. Based on this analysis, the blood flukes infecting marine bony fishes (Euteleostei) are monophyletic. The clade comprising the chondrichthyan blood fluke plus the marine euteleost blood flukes is the sister group to tetrapod blood flukes (spirorchiids and schistosomes). The innominate blood fluke cercariae from freshwater gastropods were monophyletic and sister to the clade comprising spirorchiids and schistosomes, but low nodal support indicated that they may represent a distinct blood fluke lineage with phylogenetic affinities also to fish blood flukes. Blood flukes that utilize gastropod intermediate hosts were monophyletic (unidentified gastropod cercariae+tetrapod blood flukes) and those utilizing bivalves and polychaetes were monophyletic (marine fish blood flukes). Low or no taxon sampling among blood flukes of basal fish lineages and primary division freshwater fish lineages are significant data gaps needing closure. We also note that no record of an infection exists in a hagfish (Myxiniformes), lamprey (Petromyzontiformes), or nontetrapod sarcopterygiian, i.e., coelacanth (Coelacanthimorpha) or lungfish (Dipnoi). The present phylogenetic analysis reiterated support for monophyly of Schistosomatidae and paraphyly of spirorchiids, with the blood flukes of freshwater turtles basal to those of marine turtles and schistosomes. © 2014 Elsevier Ltd All rights reserved.

  16. Development and organization of the lamprey telencephalon with special reference to the GABAergic system

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    Manuel A Pombal

    2011-03-01

    Full Text Available Lampreys, together with hagfishes, represent the sister group of gnathostome vertebrates. There is an increasing interest for comparing the forebrain organization observed in lampreys and gnathostomes to shed light on vertebrate brain evolution. Within the prosencephalon, there is now a general agreement on the major subdivisions of the lamprey diencephalon; however, the organization of the telencephalon, and particularly its pallial subdivisions, is still a matter of controversy. In this study, recent progress on the development and organization of the lamprey telencephalon is reviewed, with particular emphasis on the GABA immunoreactive cell populations trying to understand their putative origin. First, we describe some early general cytoarchitectonic events by searching the classical literature as well as our collection of embryonic and prolarval series of hematoxylin-stained sections. Then, we comment on the cell proliferation activity throughout the larval period, followed by a detailed description of the early events on the development of the telencephalic GABAergic system. In this context, lampreys apparently do not possess the same molecularly distinct subdivisions of the gnathostome basal telencephalon because of the absence of a Nkx2.1-expressing domain in the developing subpallium; a fact that has been related to the absence of a medial ganglionic eminence as well as of its derived nucleus in gnathostomes, the pallidum. Therefore, these data raise interesting questions such as whether or not a different mechanism to specify telencephalic GABAergic neurons exists in lampreys or what are their migration pathways. Finally, we summarize the organization of the adult lamprey telencephalon by analyzing the main proposed conceptions, including the available data on the expression pattern of some developmental regulatory genes which are of importance for building its adult shape.

  17. Origin of the response to adrenal and sex steroids: Roles of promiscuity and co-evolution of enzymes and steroid receptors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baker, Michael E; Nelson, David R; Studer, Romain A

    2015-07-01

    Many responses to adrenal and sex steroids are mediated by receptors that belong to the nuclear receptor family of transcription factors. We investigated the co-evolution of these vertebrate steroid receptors and the enzymes that synthesize adrenal and sex steroids through data mining of genomes from cephalochordates [amphioxus], cyclostomes [lampreys, hagfish], chondrichthyes [sharks, rays, skates], actinopterygii [ray-finned fish], sarcopterygii [coelacanths, lungfishes and terrestrial vertebrates]. An ancestor of the estrogen receptor and 3-ketosteroid receptors evolved in amphioxus. A corticoid receptor and a progesterone receptor evolved in cyclostomes, and an androgen receptor evolved in gnathostomes. Amphioxus contains CYP11, CYP17, CYP19, 3β/Δ5-4-HSD and 17β-HSD14, which suffice for the synthesis of estradiol and Δ5-androstenediol. Amphioxus also contains CYP27, which catalyzes the synthesis of 27-hydroxy-cholesterol, another estrogen. Lamprey contains, in addition, CYP21, which catalyzes the synthesis of 11-deoxycortisol. Chondrichthyes contain, in addition, CYP11A, CYP11C, CYP17A1, CYP17A2. Coelacanth also contains CYP11C1, the current descendent from a common ancestor with modern land vertebrate CYP11B genes, which catalyze the synthesis of cortisol, corticosterone and aldosterone. Interestingly, CYP11B2, aldosterone synthase, evolved from separate gene duplications in at least old world monkeys and two suborders of rodents. Sciurognathi (including mice and rats) and Hystricomorpha (including guinea pigs). Thus, steroid receptors and steroidogenic enzymes co-evolved at key transitions in the evolution of vertebrates. Together, this suite of receptors and enzymes through their roles in transcriptional regulation of reproduction, development, homeostasis and the response to stress contributed to the evolutionary diversification of vertebrates. This article is part of a Special Issue entitled 'Steroid/Sterol signaling'. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ltd

  18. Hormones, ionic regulation and kidney function in fishes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Henderson, I W; Hazon, N; Hughes, K

    1985-01-01

    Renal osmoregulatory mechanisms in the context of hormones is considered in three types of fish: the Agnatha, the Chondrichthyes and the Osteichthyes. Particular reference is made to endocrine status and hormonal interplay in renal homeostatic mechanisms. Among Agnatha, hagfishes display atypical osmoregulatory characteristics and their endocrine repertoire is poorly understood. Hormonal actions are unclear although the kidney appears to act as a regulator of extracellular fluid volume. Lampreys show many similarities with teleost fish with respect to osmoregulation, but again their endocrine system requires further definition. Chondricthyean fishes have a number of unique hormones, among them 1-alpha-hydroxycorticosterone from the adrenocortical homologue (interrenal gland). Their complex kidneys have not been extensively studied with respect to hormonal regulation, but a key role is certainly the maintenance of high plasma levels of urea and trimethylamine oxide. The importance of the ratio of these two compounds with respect to urea tolerance is discussed. Evidence is presented and discussed that points to 1-alpha-hydroxycorticosterone playing a role in osmoregulation, although its sites and mechanisms of action are not known. The presence of a non-hypophysial control of interrenal function (a renin-angiotensin system) is indicated. The largest group of fishes, the Teleostei, are considered with respect to renal mechanisms involved in euryhalinity. Highly selective reference is made to the renin-angiotensin system and arginine vasotocin. In fresh water eels a clear negative feedback relationship exists between angiotensin II and arginine vasotocin, while in seawater-adapted animals the interplay is less clear. It is suggested that the observed increases in both arginine vasotocin and angiotensin II in eels adapted to environments hyperosmotic to their extracellular fluid in some way affects the "setting" of the feedback between the two. The possible interactions

  19. Conodont affinity and chordate phylogeny.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Donoghue, P C; Forey, P L; Aldridge, R J

    2000-05-01

    Current information on the conodonts Clydagnathus windsorensis (Globensky) and Promissum pulchrum Kovács-Endrödy, together with the latest interpretations of conodont hard tissues, are reviewed and it is concluded that sufficient evidence exists to justify interpretation of the conodonts on a chordate model. A new phylogenetic analysis is undertaken, consisting of 17 chordate taxa and 103 morphological, physiological and biochemical characters; conodonts are included as a primary taxon. Various experiments with character coding, taxon deletion and the use of constraint trees are carried out. We conclude that conodonts are cladistically more derived than either hagfishes or lampreys because they possess a mineralised dermal skeleton and that they are the most plesiomorphic member of the total group Gnathostomata. We discuss the evolution of the nervous and sensory systems and the skeleton in the context of our optimal phylogenetic tree. There appears to be no simple evolution of free to canal-enclosed neuromasts; organised neuromasts within canals appear to have arisen at least three times from free neuromasts or neuromasts arranged within grooves. The mineralised vertebrate skeleton first appeared as odontodes of dentine or dentine plus enamel in the paraconodont/euconodont feeding apparatus. Bone appeared later, co-ordinate with the development of a dermal skeleton, and it appears to have been primitively acellular. Atubular dentine is more primitive than tubular dentine. However, the subsequent distribution of the different types of dentine (e.g. mesodentine, orthodentine), suggests that these tissue types are homoplastic. The topology of relationships and known stratigraphic ranges of taxa in our phylogeny predict the existence of myxinoids and petromyzontids in the Cambrian.

  20. Rapid scavenging of jellyfish carcasses reveals the importance of gelatinous material to deep-sea food webs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sweetman, Andrew K; Smith, Craig R; Dale, Trine; Jones, Daniel O B

    2014-12-07

    Jellyfish blooms are common in many oceans, and anthropogenic changes appear to have increased their magnitude in some regions. Although mass falls of jellyfish carcasses have been observed recently at the deep seafloor, the dense necrophage aggregations and rapid consumption rates typical for vertebrate carrion have not been documented. This has led to a paradigm of limited energy transfer to higher trophic levels at jelly falls relative to vertebrate organic falls. We show from baited camera deployments in the Norwegian deep sea that dense aggregations of deep-sea scavengers (more than 1000 animals at peak densities) can rapidly form at jellyfish baits and consume entire jellyfish carcasses in 2.5 h. We also show that scavenging rates on jellyfish are not significantly different from fish carrion of similar mass, and reveal that scavenging communities typical for the NE Atlantic bathyal zone, including the Atlantic hagfish, galatheid crabs, decapod shrimp and lyssianasid amphipods, consume both types of carcasses. These rapid jellyfish carrion consumption rates suggest that the contribution of gelatinous material to organic fluxes may be seriously underestimated in some regions, because jelly falls may disappear much more rapidly than previously thought. Our results also demonstrate that the energy contained in gelatinous carrion can be efficiently incorporated into large numbers of deep-sea scavengers and food webs, lessening the expected impacts (e.g. smothering of the seafloor) of enhanced jellyfish production on deep-sea ecosystems and pelagic-benthic coupling. © 2014 The Author(s) Published by the Royal Society. All rights reserved.

  1. Naturalistic Engineering for risk prevention in two slopes in southern Quito

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Anita Argüello

    2013-12-01

    Full Text Available (Received: 2013/11/01 - Accepted: 2013/12/12Naturalistic engineering is a technical-scientific modern science cobining civil, environmental and geotechnical engineerings. It studies and uses building materials, plants, organic and synthetic materials for holding slopes. San Luis de Chillogallo and El Recreo are located in the South of Quito, where two projects for erosion control, containment and environmental recovery, have been implemented. These are pilot interventions that allow applying strategies and capabilities of estimation and reduction of risks from disasters. To implement the works, the ground was shifted, the organic and inorganic matter was wiped out, and unstable parts of the slope were removed, reshaping the slope through land exclusion and relocation. Subsequently, depending on the shape of each slope, specific techniques where designed and implemented. Double Wall Crib and Latin Triangular Branching techniques were used in San Luis de Chillogallo. Live Grating and Latino Triangular Branching techniques were used in El Recreo. Plants such as: Alder, Alnus glutinosa; paper tree, Polylepis sp.; chilca, Baccharis latifolia; lechero Euphorbia lactiflua and Tilo, Tilia platyphyllos; have been used in these projects. These plants are fast growing species and they have adapted successfully on the two slopes intervened.

  2. Catalpol protects synaptic proteins from beta-amyloid induced neuron injury and improves cognitive functions in aged rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xia, Zhiming; Wang, Fengfei; Zhou, Shuang; Zhang, Rui; Wang, Fushun; Huang, Jason H; Wu, Erxi; Zhang, Yongfang; Hu, Yaer

    2017-09-19

    Synapse loss is one of the common factors contributing to cognitive disorders, such as Alzheimer's disease (AD), which is manifested by the impairment of basic cognitive functions including memory processing, perception, problem solving, and language. The current therapies for patients with cognitive disorders are mainly palliative; thus, regimens preventing and/or delaying dementia progression are urgently needed. In this study, we evaluated the effects of catalpol, isolated from traditional Chinese medicine Rehmannia glutinosa, on synaptic plasticity in aged rat models. We found that catalpol markedly improved the cognitive function of aged male Sprague-Dawley rats and simultaneously increased the expression of synaptic proteins (dynamin 1, PSD-95, and synaptophysin) in the cerebral cortex and hippocampus, respectively. In beta-amyloid (Aβ) injured primary rat's cortical neuron, catalpol did not increase the viability of neuron but extended the length of microtubule-associated protein 2 (MAP-2) positive neurites and reversed the suppressive effects on expression of synaptic proteins induced by Aβ. Additionally, the effects of catalpol on stimulating the growth of MAP-2 positive neurites and the expression of synaptic proteins were diminished by a PKC inhibitor, bisindolylmaleimide I, suggesting that PKC may be implicated in catalpol's function of preventing the neurodegeneration induced by Aβ. Altogether, our study indicates that catalpol could be a potential disease-modifying drug for cognitive disorders such as AD.

  3. Morphological variations of genus Alnus in Iran: assessment of five new taxa

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fatemeh Shayanmehr

    2014-04-01

    Full Text Available The genus Alnus has two species in old references of the flora of Iran in which two varieties and one subspecies have been recorded. However, recently, five new taxa have been described and recorded for the flora of Iran. In this study, the herbarium samples were obtained during a widespread sampling from 25 stands, ranged from the most eastern limit of alder dispersion in Golestan to the west of Talish, across the plains and highlands of Hyrcanian forests. After sampling, 28 leaf and female cone morphological traits belonging to 140 alder individuals were measured and analyzed. The results of discriminant analysis showed 11 most important traits in differentiation of the taxa such as leaf angle in apex, blade shape at the base, type of serration, villosity intensity, presence of hairs on the upper surface of leaf and cone shape. In this analysis, 84.3% of recognized individuals were correctly grouped in the related taxon. The maximum disagreement between predicted and recognized groups corresponded to allocation of A. subcordata varieties to villosa and visc versa. Generally, the morphological traits of the two new species including A. dolichocarpa and A. djavanshirii were very similar to that of A. subcordata var. subcordata. While, three sub-species of A. glutinosa were distinguished by the same traits. Finally, the use of DNA barcoding techniques is suggested in order to verify the presence of new taxa in Iran.

  4. Alnus peptides modify membrane porosity and induce the release of nitrogen-rich metabolites from nitrogen-fixing Frankia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carro, Lorena; Pujic, Petar; Alloisio, Nicole; Fournier, Pascale; Boubakri, Hasna; Hay, Anne E; Poly, Franck; François, Philippe; Hocher, Valerie; Mergaert, Peter; Balmand, Severine; Rey, Marjolaine; Heddi, Abdelaziz; Normand, Philippe

    2015-08-01

    Actinorhizal plant growth in pioneer ecosystems depends on the symbiosis with the nitrogen-fixing actinobacterium Frankia cells that are housed in special root organs called nodules. Nitrogen fixation occurs in differentiated Frankia cells known as vesicles. Vesicles lack a pathway for assimilating ammonia beyond the glutamine stage and are supposed to transfer reduced nitrogen to the plant host cells. However, a mechanism for the transfer of nitrogen-fixation products to the plant cells remains elusive. Here, new elements for this metabolic exchange are described. We show that Alnus glutinosa nodules express defensin-like peptides, and one of these, Ag5, was found to target Frankia vesicles. In vitro and in vivo analyses showed that Ag5 induces drastic physiological changes in Frankia, including an increased permeability of vesicle membranes. A significant release of nitrogen-containing metabolites, mainly glutamine and glutamate, was found in N2-fixing cultures treated with Ag5. This work demonstrates that the Ag5 peptide is central for Frankia physiology in nodules and uncovers a novel cellular function for this large and widespread defensin peptide family.

  5. Micromonospora is a normal occupant of actinorhizal nodules.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carro, Lorena; Pujic, Petar; Trujillo, Martha E; Normand, Philippe

    2013-11-01

    Actinorhizal plants have been found in eight genera belonging to three orders (Fagales, Rosales and Cucurbitales). These all bear root nodules inhabited by bacteria identified as the nitrogen-fixing actinobacterium Frankia. These nodules all have a peripheral cortex with enlarged cells filled with Frankia hyphae and vesicles. Isolation in pure culture has been notoriously difficult, due in a large part to the growth of fast-growing contaminants where, it was later found, Frankia was slow-growing. Many of these contaminants, which were later found to be Micromonospora, were obtained from Casuarina and Coriaria. Our study was aimed at determining if Micromonospora were also present in other actinorhizal plants. Nodules from Alnus glutinosa, Alnus viridis, Coriaria myrtifolia, Elaeagnus x ebbingei, Hippophae rhamnoides, Myrica gale and Morella pensylvanica were tested and were all found to contain Micromonospora isolates. These were found to belong to mainly three species: Micromonospora lupini, Micromonospora coriariae and Micromonospora saelicesensis. Micromonospora isolates were found to inhibit some Frankia strains and to be innocuous to other strains.

  6. Citrus leprosis transmission by Brevipalpus yothersi mites through non citrus hosts

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Guillermo León M.

    2017-05-01

    Full Text Available Citrus leprosis virus (C i LV was detected in Colombia at the eastern plains in 2004; it is a threat the disease spreads to other regions of the country. The main vector is Brevipalpus yothersi Baker (formerly identified as Brevipalpus phoenicis. This research determined the viability of B. yothersi to transmit C i LV to citrus plants, after been hosted in non-citrus plants. To virus acquisition, mites spent three days on symptomatic orange (Citrus x sinensis leaves positives to C i LV-C2; then mites were placed on six non-citrus plants (Dieffenbachia sp., Hibiscus rosa-sinensis,Codiaeum variegatum, Swinglea glutinosa, Sida acutaand Stachytarpheta cayennensis. A randomized design with 6 treatments and 4 replicates was carried out. After scheduled time in non-citrus plants, mites were three days relocated on C. x sinensis healthy plants. Leaves of receptor plants, were evaluated to the occurrence or absence of symptoms and collected for RT-PCR tests. B. yothersi mites were able to transmit the C i LV virus over 85 % of Valencia orange plants (Citrus x sinensis L., after feeding from 2-20 days on non-citrus host plants. The first leprosis symptoms on C. x sinensis leaves was confirmed from 14 to 51 days after transmission. The present research work further established that C i LV-C2 is a persistently transmitted virus. The implement quarantine diagnostic measures to prevent spread of CiLV to disease-free zones is suggested.

  7. Wood surface roughness: an impact of wood species, grain direction and grit size

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Justina Vitosytė

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available For the research the samples of ash (Fraxinus excelsior L., birch (Betula L., black alder (Alnus glutinosa L., Scots pine (Pinus Sylvestris L. and spruce (Picea abies L. wood were used with dimensions of 270×215×15 mm. All wood samples were tangentially planed, defect free and kiln dried. Before the research, the average moisture content, wood density, number of annual rings per 1 cm, average width of annual ring and wood surface grain direction were evaluated. Different wood surface roughness of the samples was obtained sanding wood samples in the eccentric sanding stand, using standard open-type sandpaper with different grit size. The arithmetic mean value of the single roughness depths of consecutive sampling lengths parameter Rz of the sanded wood samples were measured in five sectors along the wood grain, across and in the angle of 45°, using a contact stylus profilometer. In total 1800 measurements were done during testing series. Obtained measurement results were processed by digital Gaussian filter according to DIN EN ISO 11562. In the research the dependence of wood surface on wood species, grain direction and grit size of abrasive material was evaluated.DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.5755/j01.ms.21.2.5882

  8. Cytotoxicity Potentials of Eleven Bangladeshi Medicinal Plants

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    Amina Khatun

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Various forms of cancer are rising all over the world, requiring newer therapy. The quest of anticancer drugs both from natural and synthetic sources is the demand of time. In this study, fourteen extracts of different parts of eleven Bangladeshi medicinal plants which have been traditionally used for the treatment of different types of carcinoma, tumor, leprosy, and diseases associated with cancer were evaluated for their cytotoxicity for the first time. Extraction was conceded using methanol. Phytochemical groups like reducing sugars, tannins, saponins, steroids, gums, flavonoids, and alkaloids were tested using standard chromogenic reagents. Plants were evaluated for cytotoxicity by brine shrimp lethality bioassay using Artemia salina comparing with standard anticancer drug vincristine sulphate. All the extracts showed potent to moderate cytotoxicity ranging from LC50 2 to 115 µg/mL. The highest toxicity was shown by Hygrophila spinosa seeds (LC50=2.93 µg/mL and the lowest by Litsea glutinosa leaves (LC50=114.71 µg/mL in comparison with standard vincristine sulphate (LC50=2.04 µg/mL. Among the plants, the plants traditionally used in different cancer and microbial treatments showed highest cytotoxicity. The results support their ethnomedicinal uses and require advanced investigation to elucidate responsible compounds as well as their mode of action.

  9. Evaluación a nivel de laboratorio del efecto de 7 extractos vegetales para el control de Colletotrichum sp agente causal de la antracnosis en el cultivo de tomate de árbol - Evaluación a nivel de laboratorio del efecto de 7 extractos vegetales para el control de Colletotrichum sp agente causal de la antracnosis en el cultivo de tomate de árbol

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Christian Andrei Chacin Zambrano

    2013-08-01

    Full Text Available Was evaluated in the laboratory the effect of seven plant extracts of Neem leaves and fruit (Azadirachta indica leaves of lemon grass (Swinglea glutinosa, leaves of papaya (Carica papaya, Pringamosa leaves (Urtica dioica, eucalyptus leaves (Eucalyptus camaldulensis Dehn fruits of garlic (Allium sativum L. and fruits of pepper (Capsicum annuum in the control of the fungus Colletotrichum sp causal agent of anthracnose in tomato crop tree (Cyphomandra betacea. The pathogen was isolated on PDA medium from tomato fruit tree, the extracts were obtained taking into account the process by (Marin, et. Al 2007, which consists of chopping and blending plant material deposited in plastic bucket, add water ratio 2.5:1 (water: sample processed, vol.: w, subjecting to fermentation for 24 hours. The produto was filtered using sterile gauze and package them for further evaluation. The concentrations of the treatments that worked were 25, 50, 75 and 100% of the infectious agent, determining the degree of inhibition of the pathogen in Petri dishes. The best results were obtained with the application of eucalyptus leaves, since its effect was 100% at all concentrations, without neglecting the fruits of the Neem and garlic with inhibition percentages of 75 and 60% respectively, had a behavior directly proportional to the concentrations used, since the greater the amount of extract the inhibitory effect was better in this case 75% and 100%.

  10. Floral Morphology and Some Other Characteristics of Iso-genomic Alloplasmics of Nicotianatabacum L.

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    Berbec A

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available Cytoplasms of several Nicotiana species - N. amplexicaulis, N. bigelovii, N. debneyi, N. eastii, N. exigua, N. glauca, N. glutinosa, N. goodspeedii, N. knightiana, N. occidentalis, N. plumbaginifolia, N. raimondii, N. suaveolens, N. undulata - were bred into the N. tabacum genomic background of flue cured tobacco cv. Zamojska 4. The collection includes also a cytoplasmic male sterile (cms analogue of cv. Zamojska 4 with mutated cytoplasm of N. tabacum. Some of the alloplasmics were originally obtained in this laboratory (N. amplexicaulis, N. eastii, N. exigua, N. glauca, N. knightiana, N. raimondii. The remaining ones were acquired from other laboratories and backcrossed into Zamojska 4. All alien cytoplasms except that of N. knightiana produced full male sterility in Zamojska 4. The extent of male organ modifications varied from complete absence of stamens (N. suaveolens, N. tabacum to petaloid and stigmatoid structures (most common effect to malformed stamens (N. amplexicaulis, N. glauca to apparently normal stamens (N. raimondii, N. knightiana. The majority of the alloplasmics showed response to tentoxin that was compatible with the cytoplasm donor. The exceptions were those involving N. exigua, N. raimondii, (N. raimondii I, and the cytoplasmic mutant of N. tabacum. There was some variation in growth and morphology among the alloplasmic variants of Zamojska 4. Under field infestation alloplasmics with the cytoplasm of N. plumbaginifoliaand N. eastiishowed symptoms of blue mold whereas the remaining alloplasmics and cv. Zamojska 4 were highly tolerant of that disease.

  11. Identification of miniature inverted-repeat transposable elements (MITEs) and biogenesis of their siRNAs in the Solanaceae: new functional implications for MITEs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kuang, Hanhui; Padmanabhan, Chellappan; Li, Feng; Kamei, Ayako; Bhaskar, Pudota B; Ouyang, Shu; Jiang, Jiming; Buell, C Robin; Baker, Barbara

    2009-01-01

    Small RNAs regulate the genome by guiding transcriptional and post-transcriptional silencing machinery to specific target sequences, including genes and transposable elements (TEs). Although miniature inverted-repeat transposable elements (MITEs) are closely associated with euchromatic genes, the broader functional impact of these short TE insertions in genes is largely unknown. We identified 22 families of MITEs in the Solanaceae (MiS1-MiS22) and found abundant MiS insertions in Solanaceae genomic DNA and expressed sequence tags (EST). Several Solanaceae MITEs generate genome changes that potentially affect gene function and regulation, most notably, a MiS insertion that provides a functionally indispensable alternative exon in the tobacco mosaic virus N resistance gene. We show that MITEs generate small RNAs that are primarily 24 nt in length, as detected by Northern blot hybridization and by sequencing small RNAs of Solanum demissum, Nicotiana glutinosa, and Nicotiana benthamiana. Additionally, we show that stable RNAi lines silencing DICER-LIKE3 (DCL3) in tobacco and RNA-dependent RNA polymerase 2 (RDR2) in potato cause a reduction in 24-nt MITE siRNAs, suggesting that, as in Arabidopsis, TE-derived siRNA biogenesis is DCL3 and RDR2 dependent. We provide evidence that DICER-LIKE4 (DCL4) may also play a role in MITE siRNA generation in the Solanaceae.

  12. Detection and Host Range Study of Virus Associated with Pepper Yellow Leaf Curl Disease

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    SRI SULANDARI

    2006-03-01

    Full Text Available High incidence of Pepper yellow leaf curl virus (PepYLCV was observed in Indonesia since early 2000. Disease incidence in Yogyakarta, Central and West Java reached 100% on Capsicum frutescens, but only 10-35% on C. annuum. As an exception, the disease incidence on C. annuum cv. TM 999 was in the range of 70-100%. The causal agent of the disease, PepYLCV, was detected by polymerase chain reaction. Viral specific DNA fragment of the size ~1600 bp and ~550 bp was amplified from infected plants using two pairs of geminivirus universal primers pAL1v1978/pAL1c715, and pAv494/pAc1048, respectively. The PepYLCV has an intermediate host range including plants belonging to the family of Solanaceae, Leguminosae, and Compositae. The species belonging to the families of Cucurbitaceae, Malvaceae, Chenopodiaceae, and Amaranthaceae were resistant to the virus. Physalis floridana, is very prospective as a propagation host for the geminivirus infecting pepper. Nicotiana spp., cucumber, watermelon, cotton, and Sida sp. could be used as a differential host. Besides, Capsicum frutescens cv. Cakra, tomato, N. benthamiana, N. glutinosa, and Ageratum conyzoides could be used as indicator plants for the geminivirus infecting pepper.

  13. NOTAS CITOTAXONOMJCAS SOBRE MALVACEAS

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    Antonio Krapovickas

    1969-01-01

    Full Text Available Se presentan por primera vez los números cromosómicos de las siguientes especies: Palaua rhombifolia Graham (2n = 10, Sida angustissima St. Hil. (2n = 14, S. hassleri Hochr. (2n = 14, S. lindheimeri A. Gr. (2n = 28, S. glutinosa Cav. (2n = 16, S. dietyocarpa Gris. (2n = 16, S. jussieana DC (2n = 16, S. mieramha St. Hil. (2n = 32, Bastardia bivalvis H. B. K. (2n = 28 Y Malvastrum bicuspidatum (Wats. Rose (2n = 24. Además se dan nuevos recuentos para Sida rhombifolia L. (2n = 14, S. urens L. (2n = 32 y Malvastrum scoparium (L'Her. A. Gray (2n = 24. Se describe el nuevo género Phragmocarpidium, con una especie, P. heringeri Krap., de Brasilia, perteneciente a la tribu Ureneae. Se aclaran las especies de Sidalcea descriptas, por Turczaninof para Chile y Perú, eliminándose este género de la flora sudamericana. Por último se establecen las siguientes novedades taxonómicas: Sida cerradoensis Krap., nov. nom., Modiolastrum pinnatipartitum (St. Hil. et Naud. Krap., Corynabutilon salicifolium (Reiche K¡rap. y Wissadula sessei (Lag. Krap.

  14. Phytochemical composition of fractions isolated from ten Salvia species by supercritical carbon dioxide and pressurized liquid extraction methods.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Šulniūtė, Vaida; Pukalskas, Audrius; Venskutonis, Petras Rimantas

    2017-06-01

    Ten Salvia species, S. amplexicaulis, S. austriaca, S. forsskaolii S. glutinosa, S. nemorosa, S. officinalis, S. pratensis, S. sclarea, S. stepposa and S. verticillata were fractionated using supercritical carbon dioxide and pressurized liquid (ethanol and water) extractions. Fifteen phytochemicals were identified using commercial standards (some other compounds were identified tentatively), 11 of them were quantified by ultra high pressure chromatography (UPLC) with quadruple and time-of-flight mass spectrometry (Q/TOF, TQ-S). Lipophilic CO 2 extracts were rich in tocopherols (2.36-10.07mg/g), while rosmarinic acid was dominating compound (up to 30mg/g) in ethanolic extracts. Apigenin-7-O-β-d-glucuronide, caffeic and carnosic acids were quantitatively important phytochemicals in the majority other Salvia spp. Antioxidatively active constituents were determined by using on-line high-performance liquid chromatography (HPLC) analysis combined with 2,2'-diphenyl-1-picrylhydrazyl (DPPH) assay (HPLC-DPPH). Development of high pressure isolation process and comprehensive characterisation of phytochemicals in Salvia spp. may serve for their wider applications in functional foods and nutraceuticals. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  15. Antihyperglycemic and Antiobesity Effects of JAL2 on db/db Mice

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    In-Seung Lee

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Lonicera japonica Thunb. (LJT and Rehmannia glutinosa Libosch. (RGL have been used traditionally as a herbal medicine in Korean medicine. Using LC/Q-TOF was performed to profile the two herbal medicines and the mixture of LJR and RGL (JAL2, ratio 1 : 1. We performed oral glucose tolerance test (OGTT and plasma GLP-1 and insulin secretion by multiplex assays to investigate antidiabetic effects of LJT, RGL, and JAL2 in db/db mice, the mice model of type 2 diabetes mellitus (T2DM. Also, the antiobesity-related factors such as plasma peptide YY (PYY, triglyceride, total cholesterol, HDL, LDL, and weight of liver, epididymal, and retroperitoneal fat tissue were investigated. Through the multiplex assay, it was found that JAL2 treatment more efficiently attenuated high levels of blood glucose by stimulating GLP-1 secretion and reduced LDL concentration and weight of liver and retroperitoneal fat tissue compared to LJT or RGL treated separately. These results suggest that the JAL2 has antidiabetes and antiobesity effects in T2DM mice model.

  16. Apoptosis inducing ability of silver decorated highly reduced graphene oxide nanocomposites in A549 lung cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Khan, Merajuddin; Khan, Mujeeb; Al-Marri, Abdulhadi H; Al-Warthan, Abdulrahman; Alkhathlan, Hamad Z; Siddiqui, Mohammed Rafiq H; Nayak, Vadithe Lakshma; Kamal, Ahmed; Adil, Syed F

    2016-01-01

    Recently, graphene and graphene-based materials have been increasingly used for various biological applications due to their extraordinary physicochemical properties. Here, we demonstrate the anticancer properties and apoptosis-inducing ability of silver doped highly reduced graphene oxide nanocomposites synthesized by employing green approach. These nano composites (PGE-HRG-Ag) were synthesized by using Pulicaria glutinosa extract (PGE) as a reducing agent and were evaluated for their anticancer properties against various human cancer cell lines with tamoxifen as the reference drug. A correlation between the amount of Ag nanoparticles on the surface of highly reduced graphene oxide (HRG) and the anticancer activity of nanocomposite was observed, wherein an increase in the concentration of Ag nanoparticles on the surface of HRG led to the enhanced anticancer activity of the nanocomposite. The nanocomposite PGE-HRG-Ag-2 exhibited more potent cytotoxicity than standard drug in A549 cells, a human lung cancer cell line. A detailed investigation was undertaken and Fluorescence activated cell sorting (FACS) analysis demonstrated that the nanocomposite PGE-HRG-Ag-2 showed G0/G1 phase cell cycle arrest and induced apoptosis in A549 cells. Studies such as, measurement of mitochondrial membrane potential, generation of reactive oxygen species (ROS) and Annexin V-FITC staining assay suggested that this compound induced apoptosis in human lung cancer cells.

  17. Evaluation of natural products on inhibition of inducible cyclooxygenase (COX-2) and nitric oxide synthase (iNOS) in cultured mouse macrophage cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hong, Chae Hee; Hur, Sun Kyung; Oh, O-Jin; Kim, Sun Sook; Nam, Kyung Ae; Lee, Sang Kook

    2002-11-01

    The inhibitors of prostaglandin biosynthesis and nitric oxide production have been considered as potential anti-inflammatory and cancer chemopreventive agents. In this study, we evaluated approximately 170 methanol extracts of natural products including Korean herbal medicines for the inhibition of prostaglandin E(2) production (for COX-2 inhibitors) and nitric oxide formation (for iNOS inhibitors) in lipopolysaccharide (LPS)-induced mouse macrophages RAW264.7 cells. As a result, several extracts such as Aristolochia debilis, Cinnamomum cassia, Cinnamomum loureirii, Curcuma zedoaria, Eugenia caryophyllata, Pterocarpus santalius, Rehmania glutinosa and Tribulus terrestris showed potent inhibition of COX-2 activity (>80% inhibition at the test concentration of 10 micro g/ml). In addition, the extracts of A. debilis, Caesalpinia sappan, Curcuma longa, C. zedoaria, Daphne genkwa and Morus alba were also considered as potential inhibitors of iNOS activity (>70% inhibition at the test concentration of 10 micro g/ml). These active extracts mediating COX-2 and iNOS inhibitory activities are warranted for further elucidation of active principles for development of new cancer chemopreventive and/or anti-inflammatory agents.

  18. Identification and characterization of a novel geminivirus with a monopartite genome infecting apple trees.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liang, Pengbo; Navarro, Beatriz; Zhang, Zhixiang; Wang, Hongqing; Lu, Meiguang; Xiao, Hong; Wu, Qingfa; Zhou, Xueping; Di Serio, Francesco; Li, Shifang

    2015-08-01

    A novel circular DNA virus sequence has been identified through next-generation sequencing and in silico assembly of small RNAs of 21-24 nt from an apple tree grown in China. The virus genome was cloned using two independent approaches and sequenced. With a size of 2932 nt, it showed the same genomic structure and conserved origin of replication reported for members of the family Geminiviridae. However, the low nucleotide and amino acid sequence identity with known geminiviruses indicated that it was a novel virus, for which the provisional name apple geminivirus (AGV) is proposed. Rolling circle amplification followed by RFLP analyses indicated that AGV was a virus with a monopartite DNA genome. This result was in line with bioassays showing that the cloned viral genome was infectious in several herbaceous plants (Nicotiana bethamiana, Nicotiana glutinosa and Solanum lycopersicum), thus confirming it was complete and biologically active, although no symptoms were observed in these experimental hosts. AGV genome structure and phylogenetic analyses did not support the inclusion of this novel species in any of the established genera in the family Geminiviridae. A survey of 165 apple trees grown in four Chinese provinces showed a prevalence of 7.2% for AGV, confirming its presence in several cultivars and geographical areas in China, although no obvious relationship between virus infection and specific symptoms was found.

  19. Plant virus infections control stomatal development

    Science.gov (United States)

    Murray, Rose R.; Emblow, Mark S. M.; Hetherington, Alistair M.; Foster, Gary D.

    2016-09-01

    Stomata are important regulators of carbon dioxide uptake and transpirational water loss. They also represent points of vulnerability as bacterial and fungal pathogens utilise this natural opening as an entry portal, and thus have an increasingly complex relationship. Unlike the situation with bacterial and fungal pathogens, we know very little about the role of stomata in viral infection. Here we report findings showing that viral infection influences stomatal development in two susceptible host systems (Nicotiana tabacum with TMV (Tobacco mosaic virus), and Arabidopsis thaliana with TVCV (Turnip vein-clearing virus)), but not in resistant host systems (Nicotiana glutinosa and Chenopodium quinoa with TMV). Virus infected plants had significantly lower stomatal indices in systemic leaves of susceptible systems; N. tabacum 9.8% reduction and A. thaliana 12.3% reduction, but not in the resistant hosts. Stomatal density in systemic leaves was also significantly reduced in virus infected A. thaliana by 19.6% but not in N. tabacum or the resistant systems. In addition, transpiration rate was significantly reduced in TMV infected N. tabacum.

  20. Phytotoxicity data safeguard the performance of the recipient plants in leachate irrigation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cheng, C.Y. [Department of Biology, Chinese University of Hong Kong, Shatin, N.T., Hong Kong (China); Chu, L.M. [Department of Biology, Chinese University of Hong Kong, Shatin, N.T., Hong Kong (China)]. E-mail: leemanchu@cuhk.edu.hk

    2007-01-15

    Leachates from an operating and a closed landfill were examined for their phytotoxicity by seed germination/root elongation tests using seeds of Brassica chinensis and Lolium perenne. Their EC50s ranged from 3% to 46% v/v, which varied remarkably with the operating status of the landfills. Seedlings of twelve tree species were grown in pots, which were irrigated with landfill leachate at the EC50 levels, with tap water as control. No tree mortality or growth inhibition was observed after 90 days of leachate application. Chlorophyll fluorescence measurement also showed that plants receiving leachate did not suffer from a decline in photosynthetic efficiency. Litsea glutinosa and Hibiscus tiliaceus had remarkable growth, and other non-N-fixers were not inferior to the N-fixing Acacia auriculiformis. Leachate irrigation improved soil N content, though P deficiency is still a problem. The seed bioassay provided a conservative estimate of the phytotoxicity of landfill leachate. Plants irrigated can be protected from growth inhibition when the leachate irrigation plan is designed with reference to phytotoxicity data. - Irrigated plants could be benefited by leachate when the application rate was determined according to phytotoxicity data.

  1. A Distinct Endogenous Pararetrovirus Family in Nicotiana tomentosiformis, a Diploid Progenitor of Polyploid Tobacco1[w

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gregor, Wolfgang; Mette, M. Florian; Staginnus, Christina; Matzke, Marjori A.; Matzke, Antonius J.M.

    2004-01-01

    A distinct endogenous pararetrovirus (EPRV) family corresponding to a previously unknown virus has been identified in the genome of Nicotiana tomentosiformis, a diploid ancestor of allotetraploid tobacco (Nicotiana tabacum). The putative virus giving rise to N. tomentosiformis EPRVs (NtoEPRVs) is most similar to tobacco vein clearing virus, an episomal form of a normally silent EPRV family in Nicotiana glutinosa; it is also related to a putative virus giving rise to the NsEPRV family in Nicotiana sylvestris (the second diploid progenitor of tobacco) and in the N. sylvestris fraction of the tobacco genome. The copy number of NtoEPRVs is significantly higher in N. tomentosiformis than in tobacco. This suggests that after the polyploidization event, many copies were lost from the polyploid genome or were accumulated specifically in the diploid genome. By contrast, the copy number of NsEPRVs has remained constant in N. sylvestris and tobacco, indicating that changes have occurred preferentially in the NtoEPRV family during evolution of the three Nicotiana species. NtoEPRVs are often flanked by Gypsy retrotransposon-containing plant DNA. Although the mechanisms of NtoEPRV integration, accumulation, and/or elimination are unknown, these processes are possibly linked to retrotransposon activity. PMID:14988473

  2. The presence of cucumber mosaic virus in pot marigold (Calendula officinalis L. in Serbia

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    Milošević Dragana

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available During 2014 a total of 67 pot marigold samples from five different localities in the Province in Vojvodina were collected and analysed for the presence of Cucumber mosaic virus (CMV and Impatiens necrotic spot virus (INSV using commercial double-antibody sandwich (DAS-ELISA kits. CMV was detected serologically in all inspected localities in 67.16% collected samples. None of the analysed samples was positive for INSV. The virus was successfully mechanically transmitted to test plants including Chenopodium amaranticolor, C. quinoa, Datura stramonium, Nicotiana tabacum 'Samsun' and N. glutinosa, as well as pot marigold seedlings, confirming the infectious nature of the disease. The presence of CMV in pot marigold plants was further verified by RT-PCR and sequencing, using the specific primers CMV CPfwd/CMVCPrev that amplify coat protein (CP gene. Phylogenetic analysis based on the CP gene sequences showed clustering of the selected isolates into three subgroups, IA, IB and II, and Serbian CMV isolates from pot marigold belong to subgroup II.

  3. Metabolic activity of tree saps of different origin towards cultured human cells in the light of grade correspondence analysis and multiple regression modeling

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    Artur Wnorowski

    2017-06-01

    Full Text Available Tree saps are nourishing biological media commonly used for beverage and syrup production. Although the nutritional aspect of tree saps is widely acknowledged, the exact relationship between the sap composition, origin, and effect on the metabolic rate of human cells is still elusive. Thus, we collected saps from seven different tree species and conducted composition-activity analysis. Saps from trees of Betulaceae, but not from Salicaceae, Sapindaceae, nor Juglandaceae families, were increasing the metabolic rate of HepG2 cells, as measured using tetrazolium-based assay. Content of glucose, fructose, sucrose, chlorides, nitrates, sulphates, fumarates, malates, and succinates in sap samples varied across different tree species. Grade correspondence analysis clustered trees based on the saps’ chemical footprint indicating its usability in chemotaxonomy. Multiple regression modeling showed that glucose and fumarate present in saps from silver birch (Betula pendula Roth., black alder (Alnus glutinosa Gaertn., and European hornbeam (Carpinus betulus L. are positively affecting the metabolic activity of HepG2 cells.

  4. Research observation: Hydrolyzable and condensed tannins in plants of the northwest

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gonzalez-Hernandez, M. P.; Karchesy, J.; Starkey, Edward E.

    2003-01-01

    Tannins are secondary metabolites that may influence feeding by mammals on plants. We analyzed hydrolyzable and condensed tannins in 30 plant species consumed by livestock and deer, as a preliminary attempt to study their possible implications on browsing and grazing in forest ecosystems. Heathers (Ericaceae) and plants of the Rose (Rosaceae) family had tannins, while forbs, grasses and shrubs other than the heathers did not show astringency properties. We found the highest tannin content of all the species in Rubus sp., with the highest value around 180 mg TAE/g dry weight in spring. Potentilla erecta, Alnus glutinosa and Quercus robur were next with 57 to 44 mg TAE/g dw. Total tannins in heathers ranged from 22 to 36 mg TAE/g dw. Levels of condensed tannins were higher than hydrolyzable for most of the species. Only Betula alba, Calluna vulgaris, Pteridium aquilinum and Vaccinium myrtillus had 100% hydrolyzable tannins. Tannin content of the species changed seasonally with highest values during the growing season, corresponding to late winter or early spring, depending on the species.

  5. Research observation: Hydrolyzable and condensed tannins in plants of northwest Spain forests

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gonzalez-Hernandez, M. P.; Karchesy, J.; Starkey, E.E.

    2003-01-01

    Tannins are secondary metabolites that may influence feeding by mammals on plants. We analyzed hydrolyzable and condensed tannins in 30 plant species consumed by livestock and deer, as a preliminary attempt to study their possible implications on browsing and grazing in forest ecosystems. Heathers (Ericaceae) and plants of the Rose (Rosaceae) family had tannins, while forbs, grasses and shrubs other than the heathers did not show astringency properties. We found the highest tannin content of all the species in Rubus sp., with the highest value around 180 mg TAE/g dry weight in spring. Potentilla erecta, Alnus glutinosa and Quercus robur were next with 57 to 44 mg TAE/g dw. Total tannins in heathers ranged from 22 to 36 mg TAE/g dw. Levels of condensed tannins were higher than hydrolyzable for most of the species. Only Betula alba, Calluna vulgaris, Pteridium aquilinum and Vaccinium myrtillus had 100% hydrolyzable tannins. Tannin content of the species changed seasonally with highest values during the growing season, corresponding to late winter or early spring, depending on the species.

  6. Nuclear glutamine synthetase evolution in Nicotiana: phylogenetics and the origins of allotetraploid and homoploid (diploid) hybrids.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Clarkson, James J; Kelly, Laura J; Leitch, Andrew R; Knapp, Sandra; Chase, Mark W

    2010-04-01

    Interspecies relationships in Nicotiana (Solanaceae) are complex because 40 species are diploid (two sets of chromosomes) and 35 species are allotetraploid (four sets of chromosomes, two from each progenitor diploid species). We sequenced a fragment (containing four introns) of the nuclear gene 'chloroplast-expressed glutamine synthetase' (ncpGS) in 65 species of Nicotiana. Here we present the first phylogenetic analysis based on a low-copy nuclear gene for this well studied and important genus. Diploid species have a single-copy of ncpGS, and allotetraploids as expected have two homeologous copies, each derived from their progenitor diploid. Results were particularly useful for determining the paternal lineage of previously enigmatic taxa (for which our previous analyses had revealed only the maternal progenitors). In particular, we were able to shed light on the origins of the two oldest and largest allotetraploid sections, N. sects. Suaveolentes and Repandae. All homeologues have an intact reading frame and apparently similar rates of divergence, suggesting both remain functional. Difficulties in fitting certain diploid species into the sectional classification of Nicotiana on morphological grounds, coupled with discordance between the ncpGS data and previous trees (i.e. plastid, nuclear ribosomal DNA), indicate a number of homoploid (diploid) hybrids in the genus. We have evidence for Nicotiana glutinosa and Nicotiana linearis being of hybrid origin and patterns of intra-allelic recombination also indicate the possibility of reticulate origins for other diploid species. (c) 2009 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  7. Antidiabetic Effects of Carassius auratus Complex Formula in High Fat Diet Combined Streptozotocin-Induced Diabetic Mice

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    Zhi-Hong Wang

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Carassius auratus complex formula, including Carassius auratus, Rhizoma dioscoreae, Lycium chinense, and Rehmannia glutinosa Libosch, is a combination prescription of traditional Chinese medicine, which has always been used to treat diabetes mellitus in ancient China. In this study, we provided experimental evidence for the use of Carassius auratus complex formula in the treatment of high fat diet combined streptozotocin- (STZ- induced type 2 diabetes. Carassius auratus complex formula aqueous extract was prepared and the effects of it on blood glucose, serum insulin, adipose tissue weight, oral glucose tolerance test (OGTT, total cholesterol, and triglyceride (TG levels in mice were measured. Moreover, adiponectin, TG synthesis related gene expressions, and the inhibitory effect of aldose reductase (AR were performed to evaluate its antidiabetic effects. After the 8-week treatment, blood glucose, insulin levels, and adipose tissue weight were significantly decreased. OGTT and HOMA-IR index showed improved glucose tolerance. It could also lower plasma TG, TC, and liver TG levels. Furthermore, Carassius auratus complex formula could inhibit the activity of AR and restore adiponectin expression in serum. Based on these findings, it is suggested that Carassius auratus complex formula possesses potent anti-diabetic effects on high fat diet combined STZ-induced diabetic mice.

  8. Colour Changes Evaluation of Freshly Cut Alder Veneers Under the Influence of Indoor Sunlight

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    Emilia Adela SALCA

    2011-03-01

    Full Text Available The paper presents an experimental study concerning the colour changes occurred on the surfaces ofblack alder veneers (Alnus glutinosa, obtained from a freshly cut (not treated log, after their exposure tosunlight and darkness, for 1 and 3 months, under indoor conditions.A Chroma Meter Konika Minolta CR-410 device was used for colour measurement.The colorimetric coordinates were recorded before and after the exposure, according to ISO 7724-2.The results highlight a significant decrease of colour lightness, right after the first month of sunlight exposure.The a* and b* colour coordinates showed an increasing tendency with increasing exposure time, whichsignifies a colour darkening under sunlight radiation that penetrates the window glass. Colour differenceswere noticed right after the first month of sunlight exposure, while under darkness conditions, a relativecolour constancy was noticed, the colour changes being less pronounced, but yet perceptible by the humaneye.The study results complete the colorimetric database of veneers used in furniture industry, but theyalso contribute to the rehabilitation of black alder as a wood species with a real potential of use in furnitureindustry.

  9. EFFECTS OF TREE SPECIES, TREE CROWN TYPE AND SEASONS ON SOIL ACIDITY

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    Temel Sarıyıldız

    2004-11-01

    Full Text Available The aim of the present study was to determine the effects of tree species, crown type, seasons and distance from the stem on soil pH. The soil samples (depth of 0-15 and >15 cm were collected from under pine (Pinus sylvestris L., spruce (Picea orientalis L. and alder (Alnus glutinosa L. trees in November 2002, March and June 2003 at distance of 30, 90, 180 and 270 cm from the stem. Highest pH was found under alder trees, whereas lowest pH was found under pine trees. There was a decrease in soil pH from Autumn to Summer for all species. In Autumn and Spring, pine and spruce showed an increase in soil pH from the stem to the distance of 180 cm. After that they showed a decrease, whereas in Summer, they didn’t show any changes with the distances. Alder, however, didn’t show any significant changes between the distances in any season. It was found that the differences in soil pH between species, seasons and the distances from the stem were significantly affected by the changes in pH of organic layer. In conclusion, the results in the present study indicate that tree species, seasons and the distance from the stem are all important factors influencing soil pH, and should be considered together in future studies.

  10. Tree species composition affects the abundance of rowan (Sorbus aucuparia L.) in urban forests in Finland.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hamberg, Leena; Lehvävirta, Susanna; Kotze, D Johan; Heikkinen, Juha

    2015-03-15

    Recent studies have shown a considerable increase in the abundance of rowan (Sorbus aucuparia) saplings in urban forests in Finland, yet the reasons for this increase are not well understood. Here we investigated whether canopy cover or tree species composition, i.e., the basal areas of different tree species in Norway spruce dominated urban forests, affects the abundances of rowan seedlings, saplings and trees. Altogether 24 urban forest patches were investigated. We sampled the number of rowan and other saplings, and calculated the basal areas of trees. We showed that rowan abundance was affected by tree species composition. The basal area of rowan trees (≥ 5 cm in diameter at breast height, dbh) decreased with increasing basal area of Norway spruce, while the cover of rowan seedlings increased with an increase in Norway spruce basal area. However, a decrease in the abundance of birch (Betula pendula) and an increase in the broad-leaved tree group (Acer platanoides, Alnus glutinosa, Alnus incana, Amelanchier spicata, Prunus padus, Quercus robur, Rhamnus frangula and Salix caprea) coincided with a decreasing number of rowans. Furthermore, rowan saplings were scarce in the vicinity of mature rowan trees. Although it seems that tree species composition has an effect on rowan, the relationship between rowan saplings and mature trees is complex, and therefore we conclude that regulating tree species composition is not an easy way to keep rowan thickets under control in urban forests in Finland. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  11. Models to predict the start of the airborne pollen season

    Science.gov (United States)

    Siniscalco, Consolata; Caramiello, Rosanna; Migliavacca, Mirco; Busetto, Lorenzo; Mercalli, Luca; Colombo, Roberto; Richardson, Andrew D.

    2015-07-01

    Aerobiological data can be used as indirect but reliable measures of flowering phenology to analyze the response of plant species to ongoing climate changes. The aims of this study are to evaluate the performance of several phenological models for predicting the pollen start of season (PSS) in seven spring-flowering trees ( Alnus glutinosa, Acer negundo, Carpinus betulus, Platanus occidentalis, Juglans nigra, Alnus viridis, and Castanea sativa) and in two summer-flowering herbaceous species ( Artemisia vulgaris and Ambrosia artemisiifolia) by using a 26-year aerobiological data set collected in Turin (Northern Italy). Data showed a reduced interannual variability of the PSS in the summer-flowering species compared to the spring-flowering ones. Spring warming models with photoperiod limitation performed best for the greater majority of the studied species, while chilling class models were selected only for the early spring flowering species. For Ambrosia and Artemisia, spring warming models were also selected as the best models, indicating that temperature sums are positively related to flowering. However, the poor variance explained by the models suggests that further analyses have to be carried out in order to develop better models for predicting the PSS in these two species. Modeling the pollen season start on a very wide data set provided a new opportunity to highlight the limits of models in elucidating the environmental factors driving the pollen season start when some factors are always fulfilled, as chilling or photoperiod or when the variance is very poor and is not explained by the models.

  12. Biomass models to estimate carbon stocks for hardwood tree species

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ruiz-Peinado, R.; Montero, G.; Rio, M. del

    2012-11-01

    To estimate forest carbon pools from forest inventories it is necessary to have biomass models or biomass expansion factors. In this study, tree biomass models were developed for the main hardwood forest species in Spain: Alnus glutinosa, Castanea sativa, Ceratonia siliqua, Eucalyptus globulus, Fagus sylvatica, Fraxinus angustifolia, Olea europaea var. sylvestris, Populus x euramericana, Quercus canariensis, Quercus faginea, Quercus ilex, Quercus pyrenaica and Quercus suber. Different tree biomass components were considered: stem with bark, branches of different sizes, above and belowground biomass. For each species, a system of equations was fitted using seemingly unrelated regression, fulfilling the additivity property between biomass components. Diameter and total height were explored as independent variables. All models included tree diameter whereas for the majority of species, total height was only considered in the stem biomass models and in some of the branch models. The comparison of the new biomass models with previous models fitted separately for each tree component indicated an improvement in the accuracy of the models. A mean reduction of 20% in the root mean square error and a mean increase in the model efficiency of 7% in comparison with recently published models. So, the fitted models allow estimating more accurately the biomass stock in hardwood species from the Spanish National Forest Inventory data. (Author) 45 refs.

  13. PMC-12, a Prescription of Traditional Korean Medicine, Improves Amyloid β-Induced Cognitive Deficits through Modulation of Neuroinflammation

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    Min Young Park

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available PMC-12 is a prescription used in traditional Korean medicine that consists of a mixture of four herbal medicines, Polygonum multiflorum, Rehmannia glutinosa, Polygala tenuifolia, and Acorus gramineus, which have been reported to have various pharmacological effects on age-related neurological diseases. In the present study, we investigated whether PMC-12 improves cognitive deficits associated with decreased neuroinflammation in an amyloid-β-(Aβ- induced mouse model and exerts the antineuroinflammatory effects in lipopolysaccharide-(LPS- stimulated murine BV2 microglia. Intracerebroventricular injection of Aβ25-35 in mice resulted in impairment in learning and spatial memory, whereas this was reversed by oral administration of PMC-12 (100 and 500 mg/kg/day in dose-dependent manners. Moreover, PMC-12 reduced the increase of Aβ expression and activation of microglia and astrocytes in the Aβ25-35-injected brain. Furthermore, quantitative PCR data showed that inflammatory mediators were significantly decreased by administration of PMC-12 in Aβ-injected brains. Consistent with the in vivo data, PMC-12 significantly reduced the inflammatory mediators in LPS-stimulated BV2 cells without cell toxicity. Moreover, PMC-12 exhibited anti-inflammatory properties via downregulation of ERK, JNK, and p38 MAPK pathways. These findings suggest that the protective effects of PMC-12 may be mediated by its antineuroinflammatory activities, resulting in the attenuation of memory impairment; accordingly, PMC-12 may be useful in the prevention and treatment of AD.

  14. Eight boreal wetlands as sources and sinks for methyl mercury in relation to soil acidity, C/N ratio, and small-scale flooding.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tjerngren, Ida; Meili, Markus; Björn, Erik; Skyllberg, Ulf

    2012-08-07

    Four years of catchment export and wetland input-output mass balances are reported for inorganic Hg (Hg(inorg)), methyl mercury (MeHg), dissolved organic carbon (DOC), and sulfate in eight Swedish boreal wetlands. All wetlands had a history of artificial drainage and seven were subjected to small-scale flooding during the complete study period (two sites) or the two last years (five sites). We used an approach in which specific runoff data determined at hydrological stations situated at a distance from the studied sites were used in the calculation of water and element budgets. All wetlands except one were significant sinks for Hg(inorg). Seven wetlands were consistent sources of MeHg and one (an Alnus glutinosa swamp) was a significant sink. The pattern of MeHg yields was in good agreement with previously determined methylation and demethylation rates in the wetland soils of this study, with a maximum MeHg yield obtained in wetlands with an intermediate soil acidity (pH ∼5.0) and C/N ratio (∼20). We hypothesize that an increased nutrient status from poor to intermediate conditions promotes methylation over demethylation, whereas a further increase in nutrient status and trophy to meso- and eutrophic conditions promotes demethylation over methylation. Small-scale flooding showed no or moderate changes in MeHg yield, maintaining differences among wetlands related to nutrient status.

  15. In Vivo Screening of Traditional Medicinal Plants for Neuroprotective Activity against Aβ42 Cytotoxicity by Using Drosophila Models of Alzheimer's Disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Quan Feng; Lee, Jang Ho; Kim, Young-Mi; Lee, Soojin; Hong, Yoon Ki; Hwang, Soojin; Oh, Youngje; Lee, Kyungho; Yun, Hye Sup; Lee, Im-Soon; Jeon, Songhee; Chin, Young-Won; Koo, Byung-Soo; Cho, Kyoung Sang

    2015-01-01

    Alzheimer's disease (AD) is the most common neurodegenerative disorder, characterized by progressive neuronal loss with amyloid β-peptide (Aβ) plaques. Despite several drugs currently used to treat AD, their beneficial effects on AD progress remains under debate. Here, we established a rapid in vivo screening system using Drosophila AD models to assess the neuroprotective activities of medicinal plants that have been used in traditional Chinese medicine. Among 23 medicinal plants tested, the extracts from five plants, Coriandrum sativum, Nardostachys jatamansi, Polygonum multiflorum (P. multiflorum), Rehmannia glutinosa, and Sorbus commixta (S. commixta), showed protective effects against the Aβ42 neurotoxicity. We further characterized the neuroprotective activity of ethanol extracts from P. multiflorum and S. commixta. Aβ42-expressing flies that we used showed AD neurological phenotypes, such as decreased survival and motility and increased cell death and reactive oxygen species level. However, feeding these flies extracts from P. multiflorum or S. commixta showed strong suppression of such phenotypes. Similar results were observed in human cells, so that the treatment of P. multiflorum and S. commixta extracts increased the viability of Aβ-treated SH-SY5Y cells. Moreover, 2,3,5,4'-tetrahydroxystilbene-2-O-β-D-glucoside, one of the main constituents of P. multiflorum, also showed similar protective activity against Aβ42 cytotoxicity in both Drosophila and human cells. Taken together, our results suggest that both P. multiflorum and S. commixta have therapeutic potential for the treatment of neurodegenerative diseases, such as AD.

  16. Effect of Tree Species and Mycorrhizal Colonization on the Archaeal Population of Boreal Forest Rhizospheres▿

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bomberg, Malin; Timonen, Sari

    2009-01-01

    Group 1.1c Crenarchaeota are the predominating archaeal group in acidic boreal forest soils. In this study, we show that the detection frequency of 1.1c crenarchaeotal 16S rRNA genes in the rhizospheres of the boreal forest trees increased following colonization by the ectomycorrhizal fungus Paxillus involutus. This effect was very clear in the fine roots of Pinus sylvestris, Picea abies, and Betula pendula, the most common forest trees in Finland. The nonmycorrhizal fine roots had a clearly different composition of archaeal 16S rRNA genes in comparison to the mycorrhizal fine roots. In the phylogenetic analysis, the 1.1c crenarchaeotal 16S rRNA gene sequences obtained from the fine roots formed a well-defined cluster separate from the mycorrhizal ones. Alnus glutinosa differed from the other trees by having high diversity and detection levels of Crenarchaeota both on fine roots and on mycorrhizas as well as by harboring a distinct archaeal flora. The similarity of the archaeal populations in rhizospheres of the different tree species was increased upon colonization by the ectomycorrhizal fungus. A minority of the sequences obtained from the mycorrhizas belonged to Euryarchaeota (order Halobacteriales). PMID:18978075

  17. Effects of the fungicide tebuconazole on microbial capacities for litter breakdown in streams.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Artigas, Joan; Majerholc, Joy; Foulquier, Arnaud; Margoum, Christelle; Volat, Bernadette; Neyra, Marc; Pesce, Stéphane

    2012-10-15

    Streams draining agricultural basins are subjected to the input of fungicides which can affect aquatic microbial communities. We analyzed the effect of the fungicide tebuconazole (TBZ) on Alnus glutinosa and Populus nigra litter breakdown by aquatic microorganisms. For six weeks, fungal and bacterial responses were analyzed in indoor stream channels subjected to TBZ-contaminated (33.1±12.4 μg L(-1)) and uncontaminated conditions. Litter breakdown rates decreased in presence of TBZ. The decrease was explained by reductions in microbial biomass development and shifts in community structure. At the same time, TBZ modified the kinetics of β-glucosidase, β-xylosidase and cellobiohydrolase enzymes resulting in lower affinities for cellulose and hemicellulose decomposition in leaves. These alterations were modulated by the litter quality; the greatest structural impairment was observed in Populus whereas Alnus were more affected in terms of leaf breakdown rate. Our results suggest that chronic exposure to TBZ can affect aquatic microbial communities and their capacity to break down leaf litter in streams. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  18. Earthworms drive succession of both plant and Collembola communities in post-mining sites

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mudrák, Ondřej; Uteseny, Karoline; Frouz, Jan

    2016-04-01

    Previous field observations indicated that earthworms promote late-successional plant species and reduce collembolan numbers at post-mining sites in the Sokolov coal mining district (Czech Republic). Here, we established a laboratory pot experiment to test the effect of earthworms (Aporrectodea caliginosa Savigny and Lumbricus rubellus Hoffm.) and litter of low, medium, and high quality (the grass Calamagrostis epigejos, the willow Salix caprea, and the alder Alnus glutinosa, respectively) on late successional plants (grasses Arrhenatherum elatius and Agrostis capillaris, legumes Lotus corniculatus and Trifolium medium, and non-leguminous dicots Centaurea jacea and Plantago lanceolata) in spoil substrate originating from Sokolov post-mining sites and naturally inhabited by abundant numbers of Collembola. The earthworms increased plant biomass, especially that of the large-seeded A. elatius, but reduced the number of plant individuals, mainly that of the small-seeded A. capillaris and both legumes. Litter quality affected plant biomass, which was highest with S. caprea litter, but did not change the number of plant individuals. Litter quality did not modify the effect of earthworms on plants; the effect of litter quality and earthworms was only additive. Species composition of Collembola community was altered by litter quality, but earthworms reduced the number of individuals, increased the number of species, and increased species evenness consistently across the litter qualities. Because the results of this experiment were consistent with the field observations, we conclude that earthworms help drive succession of both plant and Collembola communities on post-mining sites.

  19. Catalpol Inhibited the Proliferation of T24 Human Bladder Cancer Cells by Inducing Apoptosis Through the Blockade of Akt-Mediated Anti-apoptotic Signaling.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jin, Di; Cao, Ming; Mu, Xin; Yang, Guoliang; Xue, Wei; Huang, Yiran; Chen, Haige

    2015-04-01

    Catalpol is an iridoid glucoside extracted from the traditional Chinese medicinal plant called Rehmannia glutinosa, and it is reported to possess a variety of pharmacological activities. The goal of this research was to explore the effect of catalpol on the human bladder cancer cells T24. The cells were treated for different durations with various concentrations of catalpol. Then the viability, mobility, and invasiveness of the cells were determined by MTT assay and flow cytometry, respectively. Catalpol was found to significantly suppress the proliferation, migration, and invasiveness of T24 bladder cancer cells in a dose- and time-dependent manner. The results also revealed that catalpol promoted apoptosis and caused the cell-cycle arrest at G2/M phase. Furthermore, the catalpol-mediated apoptosis was found to involve the modulation of PI3K/Akt pathway and inhibit the expression of anti-apoptotic B cell lymphoma-2 (Bcl-2) family proteins. Also, the expressions of Bcl-2 proapoptotic effectors, Bcl-2-associated X protein, and Bcl-2 associated death promoter were up-regulated in the cells treated with catalpol. The enzymes involved in the ultimate process of apoptosis, active caspase-3 and poly ADP ribose polymerase were elevated, and the latter was observed to be cleaved, indicating that catalpol-accelerated cell apoptosis involved a caspase-dependent pathway. These results suggest that catalpol might serve to be a promising therapeutic agent for the treatment of human bladder cancer.

  20. Middle to Late Holocene vegetation shifts in the NW Transylvanian lowlands (Romania

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    Roxana Grindean

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available The Iaz peat bog, located in northwestern Transylvania at 300 m a.s.l., was cored to study the Middle to Late Holocene vegetation shifts in the area. The pollen record is supported by seven 14C datings. The base of the sequence starts in the Middle Holocene, when the outer woodlands were dominated by Corylus avellana together with other components of the Quercetum mixtum. The local establishment of Carpinus betulus occurred at 5700 cal. yr BP with maximum values at around 4900 cal. yr BP. At 4800 cal. yr BP, Fagus sylvatica became locally established and expanded, possibly as a result of moist climatic conditions and dominated the mesothermophilous woodlands from 4300 cal. yr BP onwards. During the periods of greater moisture, the deciduous forest was overgrown by the hygrophilous Alnus glutinosa belt. Indications of human activities in the area were recorded since 6300 cal. yr BP, when Cerealia and Secale pollen and other ruderal taxa start to appear regularly throughout the sequence. Although intense at times, the anthropogenic factor only played a major role in the vegetation changes during the last 635 years.

  1. Tech-IA floating system introduced in urban wastewater treatment plants in the Veneto region - Italy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mietto, Anna; Borin, Maurizio; Salvato, Michela; Ronco, Paolo; Tadiello, Nicola

    2013-01-01

    The performance of three integrated wetland treatment plants (horizontal sub-surface flow (h-SSF) and floating treatment wetland (FTW) with differentiated primary treatments) designed for treating domestic wastewater was investigated, monitoring total (TN), nitrate (NO3-N), nitrite (NO2-N) and ammonia nitrogen (NH4-N), total (TP) and phosphate phosphorus (PO4-P), chemical (COD) and biological oxygen demand (BOD5), and dissolved oxygen (DO) at the inlet and outlet of each wetland section from February 2011 to June 2012. Sediments settled in the FTW were collected and analyzed. The growth of plants in each system was also monitored, observing their general conditions. The chemical-physical characteristics of the pretreated domestic wastewater depended on the primary treatment installed. During the monitoring period we observed different reduction performance of the wetland sector in the three sites. In general, the wetland systems demonstrated the capacity to reduce TN, COD, BOD5 and Escherichia coli, whereas NO3-N and NH4-N removal was strictly influenced by the chemical conditions, in particular DO concentration, in the h-SSF and FTW. Vegetation (Phragmites australis, Alnus glutinosa and Salix eleagnos) was well established in the h-SSF as well as in the floating elements (Iris pseudacorus), although there were some signs of predation. FTW is a relatively novel wetland system, so the results obtained from this study can pave the way for the application of this technology.

  2. Survival and growth for pubescent birch, pendula birch and common alder growing on farmland areas; Oeverlevnad och tillvaext hos glasbjoerk, vaartbjoerk och klibbal planterade paa aakermark

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Johansson, Tord

    2000-07-01

    Pendula birches (Betula pendula Roth) and pubescent birches (Betula pubescens Ehrh.) were planted on former farmland. Before planting, the ground was harrowed or the ground was sprayed with terbuthylazine. Tree shelters were used as protection against weeds, voles and wild habitat. Birches treated with terbuthylazine showed the lowest survival. Birches growing in tree shelters were tallest and those growing on spots treated with terbuthylazine were smallest. The diameter at 0.1 m did not differ in a statistically significant way between the treatments. In another experiment with different herbicides, common alder (Alnus glutinosa (L.) Gaertn.) and pendula birch (Betula pendula Roth) were planted on former farmland that had been treated with glyphosate, terbuthylazine and propyzamide or after ground had been harrowed or not treated. In the study on herbicide-treated plants, birch had the highest plant survival. Mostly, species treated with glyphosate were thicker than species treated in other ways. Both species appeared sensitive to terbuthylazine, but not to glyphosate. Birch was not sensitive for propyzamide in opposite to alder. Some practical recommendations concerning afforestation of former farmland, especially weeding, are given.

  3. Caracterização de um isolado de Bidens mosaic virus proveniente de alface Characterization of an isolate of Bidens mosaic virus (BiMV from lettuce

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gerson Shinia Suzuki

    2009-09-01

    Full Text Available Em 2004, plantas de alface com sintomas de mosaico coletadas em São Manuel - SP foram analisadas por microscopia eletrônica, constatando-se presença de partículas típicas de potyvirus com 730 nm de comprimento. Após purificação biológica por monolesionais em Chenopodium quinoa, o extrato vegetal foi inoculado em uma série de plantas diferenciadoras, verificando-se que o isolado testado foi capaz de infectar C. quinoa e C. amaranticolor induzindo lesões locais seguidas de mosaico sistêmico. Ervilha (Pisum sativum mostrou-se assintomática, e em diferentes cultivares de alface como Trocadero, White Boston, Regina, Verônica, Lucy Brown, Rafaela, Tainá, Vera e Laurel foi observado o mosaico. A cultivar Gizele foi tolerante ao vírus. O sequenciamento da região codificadora da proteína capsidial revelou maior identidade de aminoácidos (97% deste isolado com o Bidens mosaic virus - BiMV (nº de acesso AY960151. Diferentemente dos isolados de BiMV já descritos, este proveniente de alface não foi capaz de infectar Bidens pilosa, Helianthus annuus, Nicotiana tabacum TNN e N. glutinosa. A ocorrência natural do BiMV em alface, causando sintomas semelhantes aos do LMV e a suscetibilidade de várias das cultivares hoje plantadas, servem como um alerta para a correta diagnose do vírus a campo.In 2004 lettuce plants showing mosaic symptoms collected in São Manuel, SP were analyzed by electron microscopy, and particles with 730 nm typically from potyvirus were observed. After biological purification by monolesionals on Chenopodium quinoa, this isolate was sap inoculated on a host range assay. The virus infected C. quinoa and C. amaranticolor, causing local lesions and systemic mosaic. The virus did not induce symptoms on pea (Pisum sativum, but induced mosaic on the leaves of some lettuce cultivars such as Trocadero, White Boston, Regina, Verônica, Lucy Brown, Rafaela, Tainá, Vera and Laurel. The lettuce cultivar Gizele was tolerant to

  4. Ozone deposition in a mixed forest ecosystem - temporal variation and removal processes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pokorska, Olga; Gruening, Carsten; Goded, Ignacio

    2016-04-01

    Forests are a major sink for tropospheric ozone, however the fate of ozone within the forest canopy is still not well understood. In this study we will present results of 3 years ozone flux measurements at eddy covariance flux tower in Ispra (Northern Italy) over mixed forest ecosystem. The main tree species in this ecosystem are Quercus robur (80%), Alnus glutinosa (10%), Populus alba (5%) and Carpinus betulus (3%). The measurements were carried out continuously from January 2013 till December 2015. Flux measurements at the canopy level with the eddy covariance technique were complemented with measurements of meteorological parameters and measurements of VOCs (Volatile Organic Compounds) using PTR-MS (Proton Transfer Reaction - Mass Spectrometry) during an intensive observation period. Continuous measurements produced a big dataset which allowed us to investigate the controls on ozone fluxes and to do multiyear comparisons. Patterns of ozone concentration, ozone fluxes and ozone deposition velocity over forest canopy will be presented in relation to physiological activity of the trees and time of the year. Current research is mainly aimed at better understanding of the contribution of destruction processes within the canopy. Therefore, the collected data were used to calculate the partitioning of total ozone fluxes between stomatal and non-stomatal sinks. We found that the stomatal uptake contributed less that non-stomatal uptake to the total ozone flux during the growing seasons. In particular, non-stomatal ozone removal by reactions with isoprene and other VOCs will be discussed. We will present contribution and change of individual ozone deposition sinks over the years in response to environmental parameters.

  5. Introduction of Seed Accumulation Index as new approach in soil seed bank classification

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Azam Noraiy

    2013-11-01

    Full Text Available The purpose of this study was the introduction of seed accumulation index as a new approach in the evaluation of soil seed bank consistency in the Populus caspica in Noor reserved forest park. Sampling were made above ground vegetation at peak vegetation cover during June 2010 by systematic- selective method. Soil samples were collected during late June, late November and early February by hammering a hollow metal frame 400 cm2 into two depths with 4 replicate in each sample plot and the species composition of seed bank was determined using seedling emergence method. Results showed that 42.2% of the plants species were classified in transient soil seed bank and only 57.8% species, which were mainly composed of early successional species, were able to produce persistent seed bank. In this case, only 3 tree species including Ficus carica, Morus alba and Alnus glutinosa were able to produce persistent soil seed bank. Chi- square goodness of fit test (χ2= 60.2 in reviewing the independence of SAI index and seed depth distribution model as the two methods of seed bank classification showed that the results of these two methods were not independent and they were applicable together with 99% probability. In this case, conformity and correlation between the two mentioned methods were assessed 85.2% based upon Kappa index and Spearman correlation coefficient. Therefore, it was concluded that seed accumulation index, which namely SAI, could be used as a new approach in soil seed bank classification of forest habitats.

  6. Effects of multiple but low pesticide loads on aquatic fungal communities colonizing leaf litter.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Talk, Anne; Kublik, Susanne; Uksa, Marie; Engel, Marion; Berghahn, Rüdiger; Welzl, Gerhard; Schloter, Michael; Mohr, Silvia

    2016-08-01

    In the first tier risk assessment (RA) of pesticides, risk for aquatic communities is estimated by using results from standard laboratory tests with algae, daphnids and fish for single pesticides such as herbicides, fungicides, and insecticides. However, fungi as key organisms for nutrient cycling in ecosystems as well as multiple pesticide applications are not considered in the RA. In this study, the effects of multiple low pesticide pulses using regulatory acceptable concentrations (RACs) on the dynamics of non-target aquatic fungi were investigated in a study using pond mesocosm. For that, fungi colonizing black alder (Alnus glutinosa) leaves were exposed to multiple, low pulses of 11 different pesticides over a period of 60days using a real farmer's pesticide application protocol for apple cropping. Four pond mesocosms served as treatments and 4 as controls. The composition of fungal communities colonizing the litter material was analyzed using a molecular fingerprinting approach based on the terminal Restriction Fragment Length Polymorphism (t-RFLP) of the fungal Internal Transcribed Spacer (ITS) region of the ribonucleic acid (RNA) gene(s). Our data indicated a clear fluctuation of fungal communities based on the degree of leaf litter degradation. However significant effects of the applied spraying sequence were not observed. Consequently also degradation rates of the litter material were not affected by the treatments. Our results indicate that the nutrient rich environment of the leaf litter material gave fungal communities the possibility to express genes that induce tolerance against the applied pesticides. Thus our data may not be transferred to other fresh water habitats with lower nutrient availability. Copyright © 2016. Published by Elsevier B.V.

  7. Free atmospheric CO2 enrichment increased above ground biomass but did not affect symbiotic N2-fixation and soil carbon dynamics in a mixed deciduous stand in Wales

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. R. Smith

    2011-02-01

    Full Text Available Through increases in net primary production (NPP, elevated CO2 is hypothesized to increase the amount of plant litter entering the soil. The fate of this extra carbon on the forest floor or in mineral soil is currently not clear. Moreover, increased rates of NPP can be maintained only if forests can escape nitrogen limitation. In a Free atmospheric CO2 Enrichment (FACE experiment near Bangor, Wales, 4 ambient and 4 elevated [CO2] plots were planted with patches of Betula pendula, Alnus glutinosa and Fagus sylvatica on a former arable field. After 4 years, biomass averaged for the 3 species was 5497 (se 270 g m−2 in ambient and 6450 (se 130 g m−2 in elevated [CO2] plots, a significant increase of 17% (P = 0.018. During that time, only a shallow L forest floor litter layer had formed due to intensive bioturbation. Total soil C and N contents increased irrespective of treatment and species as a result of afforestation. We could not detect an additional C sink in the soil, nor were soil C stabilization processes affected by elevated [CO2]. We observed a decrease of leaf N content in Betula and Alnus under elevated [CO2], while the soil C/N ratio decreased regardless of CO2 treatment. The ratio of N taken up from the soil and by N2-fixation in Alnus was not affected by elevated [CO2]. We infer that increased nitrogen use efficiency is the mechanism by which increased NPP is sustained under elevated [CO2] at this site.

  8. Integrative therapy decreases the risk of lupus nephritis in patients with systemic lupus erythematosus: A population-based retrospective cohort study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chang, Ching-Mao; Wu, Po-Chang; Chiang, Jen-Huai; Wei, Yau-Huei; Chen, Fang-Pey; Chen, Tzeng-Ji; Pan, Tai-Long; Yen, Hung-Rong; Chang, Hen-Hong

    2017-01-20

    Evidence on alleviating the risk of lupus nephritis by integrative therapy with conventional medicine (CM) and herbal medicine (HM) had not been addressed. We investigated the integrative effect associated the risk by a retrospective Systemic Lupus Erythematosus (SLE) cohort from Taiwan National Health Insurance Research Database (NHIRD). SLE patients with a catastrophic illness certificate (CIC) were retrospectively enrolled from the SLE cohort of the Taiwan NHIRD between 1997 and 2011. The patients were divided into an integrative medicine (IM: integrated CM plus HM) and a non-IM (CM only) group with 1:1 propensity score matching. Cox proportional regression model and the Kaplan-Meier method were conducted to estimate the hazard ratio (HR) for lupus nephritis in the cohort. Among 16,645 newly diagnosed SLE patients holding a CIC (SLE/CIC), 1933 had received HM and 1571 had received no HM treatment. After propensity score matching, there were 273 patients with lupus nephritis-120 in the IM group and 153 in the non-IM group. The adjusted HR (0.68, 95% confidence interval [CI]: 0.54-0.87, plupus nephritis was lower in the IM group than in the non-IM group. The adjusted HR (0.69, 95% CI: 0.54-0.88, plupus nephritis was also lower in the group of patients who had received CM plus HM than in the group that received CM only. The core pattern of HM prescriptions, which were integrated with CM for preventing lupus nephritis, was "Sheng-Di-Huang" (raw Rehmannia glutinosa Libosch.), "Mu-Dan-Pi" (Paeonia suffruticosa Andr.), "Dan-Shan" (Salvia miltiorrhiza Bge.), "Zhi-Bo-Di-Huang-Wan.", and "Chi-Shao" (Paeoniae lactiflorae Rubra). Integrative therapy decreased the risk of lupus nephritis among SLE patients in Taiwan. Further investigation of the pharmacological mechanism and clinical efficacy are warranted. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  9. Sensitivity of laccase activity to the fungicide tebuconazole in decomposing litter.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Artigas, J; Rossi, F; Gerphagnon, M; Mallet, C

    2017-04-15

    The present study investigates the sensitivity of laccase activity to the fungicide tebuconazole (TBZ) in order to seek for new functional toxicity descriptors in aquatic microbial communities associated to decomposing litter. With this aim, we analyzed the sensitivity of laccase from the different microbial components (fungi and bacteria growing separately and in co-existence), as well as that of their corresponding enzyme fractions (cell bound and diffusible), forming microbial communities in Alnus glutinosa leaves. Results show that fungi are pivotal for laccase activity in leaves and that their activity is repressed when they co-exist with bacteria. The sensitivity of laccase activity to the TBZ was only detectable in leaves colonized by fungi separately (Alatospora acuminata populations), but absent in those colonized by bacteria separately and/or mixed fungi plus bacteria. Specifically, the increase of TBZ concentration enhances laccase activity in Alatospora acuminata populations but decreases ergosterol concentration as well as the amount of 18S RNA gene copies. This activity response suggests a detoxification mechanism employed by the fungus in order to reduce TBZ toxicity. Besides, enzyme fractioning showed that laccase activity in the cell bound fraction (76% of the total activity) was sensitive to the fungicide, but not that in the diffusible fraction (24% of total activity). Hence, TBZ would influence laccase activity in the presence of fungal cells but not in enzymes already synthesized in the extracellular space. The present study highlights the importance of the biological complexity level (i. e. population, community, ecosystem) when seeking for appropriate functional ecotoxicity descriptors in aquatic microbial communities. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  10. Using Native Plants in the Reclamation of Areas Affected of Mining Activities in the Rodrigatos River Valley (El Bierzo, Leon, Spain); Aplicacion de Flora Autoctona en la Recuperacion de Zonas Afectadas por la Mineria en el Valle del Rio Rodrigatos (El Bierzo, Leon, Espana).

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Galean, L.; Gamarra, R.; Sainz, H.; Millan, R.

    2010-07-27

    It is difficult for sites affected by mining to be colonized by vegetation and thus they suffer a slow recovery to a healthy ecosystem and, as a result, restoration work is necessary. The aim of this report is to propose a set of native species which are conducive to establishing a stable and self-sufficient plant community that will protect the soil and contribute to the rapid integration into the landscape of the areas affected by mining in the upper basin of the river Rodrigatos in the region of El Bierzo (Leon) An analysis of plant communities was undertaken using the phyto sociological method of Braun-Blanquet in order to subsequently select, using ecological criteria, the most suitable species for revegetation. Plant mapping using ortho photos was also developed in order to identify and delineate the location of the different landscape units. Among candidate species, in the first revegetation phase, we suggest a variety of herbs that are able to fix soils and protect them from erosion; species of the genus Cytisus and Genista in areas of moderate slope and species such as Rumex induratus Boiss and Reuter, Erysimum linifolium (Pourr. Ex Pers .) Jay in steeper areas because of their rooting ability. In later stages, the introduction of tree species characteristic for each formation is recommended. Furthermore, in the riverside areas species such as Carex elata subsp.reuteriana (Boiss.) Lucen and Aedo, Alnus glutinosa (L.) and Salix atrocinerea Brot. are proposed for introduction from the fi rst stage onwards. The species proposed in this study include some not commonly used in restoration, so a subsequent more detailed study would be required in order to assess their degree of suitability for this use. (Author) 65 refs.

  11. Characterization of Tomato spotted wilt virus isolates that overcome the Sw-5 resistance gene in tomato and fitness assays

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jose ARAMBURU

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Resistance-breaking (RB isolates of Tomato spotted wilt virus (TSWV that overcome the resistance conferred by the Sw-5 gene in tomato have had only a limited spread since they were first detected in north-eastern Spain in 2002. Symptom expression, homogeneity, stability and the transmission capacity of RB and non-resistance breaking (NRB isolates were biologically compared. The fitness of both types of isolates infecting tomato plants was determined in competition assays. All TSWV isolates induced similar systemic symptoms in a wide range of plant species, except RB isolates in tomato carrying the Sw-5 resistance gene and pepper carrying the Tsw resistance gene. The mechanical transmission of RB isolates to tomato plants with the Sw-5 gene failed in some trials, although NRB isolates did not differ noticeably in transmission efficiency when tested with the thrips Frankliniella occidentalis. Biological clones from individual local lesions obtained by mechanically inoculating Nicotiana glutinosa in some TSWV field samples showed that they were biologically homogeneous. Mixed infections of RB and wilt-type isolates were not found. The RB isolates were relatively stable because no reversion to NRB isolates was seen after serial passages in susceptible tomato plants. In competition assays between RB and NRB isolates, after serial passages in susceptible tomato plants, the prevalence of a particular isolate was not related to its capacity to overcome Sw-5 gene resistance. The low spread of the RB isolates in Spain does not seem to be related to a loss of fitness in tomato plants or to differences in transmission capacity by thrips, but it could be related to the reduction of the selection pressure of RB isolates as consequence of the gradual replacement of susceptible tomato plants by resistant tomato plants by growers.

  12. Oriental medicine Kyung-Ok-Ko prevents and alleviates dehydroepiandrosterone-induced polycystic ovarian syndrome in rats.

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    Minhee Jang

    Full Text Available Kyung-Ok-Ko (KOK, a traditional herbal prescription composed of Rehmannia glutinosa Liboschitz var. purpurae, Lycium chinense, Aquillaria agallocha, Poria cocos, Panax ginseng, and honey, has been widely used in traditional Oriental medicine as a vitalizing medicine or as the prescription for patients with age-associated disorders such as amnesia and stroke. However, the potential protective value of KOK for the treatment of polycystic ovarian syndrome (PCOS is largely unknown. We investigated whether pre-administration (daily from 2 hours before PCOS induction and post-administration (daily after induction of PCOS of KOK (0.5, 1.0, and 2.0 g/kg/day, p.o. could have a protective effect in a dehydroepiandrosterone (DHEA, s.c.-induced PCOS rat model. Pre-administration of KOK significantly decreased the elevated body weight and ovary weight, elevated size and number of follicular cysts, elevated level of serum glucose, and estradiol after DHEA injection. KOK reduced the elevated percentage of CD8 (+ T lymphocytes in lymph nodes, the elevated mRNA expression of CD11b and CD3 in ovaries, and infiltration of macrophages in ovarian tissue with PCOS. KOK diminished the increased mRNA expression of pro-inflammatory cytokines (IL-1β, IL-6, TNF-α, chemokines (IL-8, MCP-1, and iNOS in the ovaries, and increased the reduced mRNA expression of growth factors (EGF, TGF-β by DHEA injection. Post-administration of KOK also improved the DHEA-induced PCOS-like symptoms, generally similar to those evident from pre-administration of KOK. KOK may effectively prevent and improve DHEA-induced PCOS via anti-inflammatory action, indicating its preventive and therapeutic potential for suppressing PCOS.

  13. Oriental Medicine Kyung-Ok-Ko Prevents and Alleviates Dehydroepiandrosterone-Induced Polycystic Ovarian Syndrome in Rats

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Jin Moo; Bae, Chun-Sik; Kim, Sung-Hoon; Ryu, Jong Hoon; Cho, Ik-Hyun

    2014-01-01

    Kyung-Ok-Ko (KOK), a traditional herbal prescription composed of Rehmannia glutinosa Liboschitz var. purpurae, Lycium chinense, Aquillaria agallocha, Poria cocos, Panax ginseng, and honey, has been widely used in traditional Oriental medicine as a vitalizing medicine or as the prescription for patients with age-associated disorders such as amnesia and stroke. However, the potential protective value of KOK for the treatment of polycystic ovarian syndrome (PCOS) is largely unknown. We investigated whether pre-administration (daily from 2 hours before PCOS induction) and post-administration (daily after induction of PCOS) of KOK (0.5, 1.0, and 2.0 g/kg/day, p.o.) could have a protective effect in a dehydroepiandrosterone (DHEA, s.c.)-induced PCOS rat model. Pre-administration of KOK significantly decreased the elevated body weight and ovary weight, elevated size and number of follicular cysts, elevated level of serum glucose, and estradiol after DHEA injection. KOK reduced the elevated percentage of CD8 (+) T lymphocytes in lymph nodes, the elevated mRNA expression of CD11b and CD3 in ovaries, and infiltration of macrophages in ovarian tissue with PCOS. KOK diminished the increased mRNA expression of pro-inflammatory cytokines (IL-1β, IL-6, TNF-α), chemokines (IL-8, MCP-1), and iNOS in the ovaries, and increased the reduced mRNA expression of growth factors (EGF, TGF-β) by DHEA injection. Post-administration of KOK also improved the DHEA-induced PCOS-like symptoms, generally similar to those evident from pre-administration of KOK. KOK may effectively prevent and improve DHEA-induced PCOS via anti-inflammatory action, indicating its preventive and therapeutic potential for suppressing PCOS. PMID:24520334

  14. Memory Impairment, Dementia, and Alzheimer's Disease in Classical and Contemporary Traditional Chinese Medicine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    May, Brian H; Feng, Mei; Zhou, Iris W; Chang, Su-Yueh; Lu, Shao-Chen; Zhang, Anthony L; Guo, Xin-Feng; Lu, Chuan-Jian; Xue, Charlie C L

    2016-09-01

    To identify and analyze records of the treatment of dementia and memory disorders in the classical Chinese medical literature that were consistent with the signs and symptoms of Alzheimer's disease (AD), with the aim of determining which traditional medicines have histories of use for these disorders. Encyclopedia of Traditional Chinese Medicine (Zhong Hua Yi Dian), a database of more than 1000 classical and premodern Chinese medical books, was systematically searched. Search terms were identified from dictionaries, medical nomenclatures, guidelines, and specialist clinical manuals on aging, neurology, or brain disorders. Inclusion and exclusion criteria were used to identify citations of conditions whose signs and symptoms were consistent with the clinical features of AD. Passages of text identified by these terms were copied to Microsoft Excel spreadsheets, together with the identity of the source book and all relevant information on the disorder and the intervention. Each distinct passage of text was considered a citation. The frequencies of the traditional formulas used as interventions and their constituent ingredients were calculated. The selection criteria identified 1498 citations of dementia and memory impairments derived from 277 different books written from circa 363 to 1945 AD. In 91 of these citations, memory impairment was associated with aging and was broadly consistent with the clinical features of AD. Although the interventions varied in name, Poria cocos, Polygala tenuifolia, Rehmannia glutinosa, Panax ginseng, and Acorus species consistently appeared as ingredients in multiple formulas for memory impairment in the context of aging. Memory impairment in older age was a recognized condition in the classical literature. Many of the traditional medicines frequently used as ingredients in classical formulas for memory impairment consistent with clinical features of AD remain in contemporary use, and experimental studies suggest biological activities

  15. The effect of saprophagous macrofauna on litter decomposition

    Science.gov (United States)

    Frouz, Jan

    2016-04-01

    Previous experiments show that feeding of the larvae of Bibionidae on lef litter cause short term increase of respiration but in long term the decomposition of bibio feces is slower than decomposition of litter from which feces were produced. To understand why excrements of decompose more slowly than leaf litter, we fed Bibio marci larvae the litter of tree species differing in litter quality (Alnus glutinosa, Salix caprea, and Quercus robur) and then measured respiration induced by litter and excrements. We also measured respiration induced by the same litter artificially modified to mimic faunal effects; the litter was modified by grinding, grinding with alkalinization to pH 11, grinding with coating by kaolinite, and grinding with both alkalinization and coating. Decomposition of excrements tended to be slower for willow and was significantly slower for oak and alder than for the corresponding litter. With oak, decomposition was slower for all artificially modified litter than for non-modified litter. The reduction in the decomposition was similar for excrements and for alder and willow litter that was ground, coated, and alkalinized. In alder, a similar reduction was found in ground and alkalinized litter. 13C NMR indicated that gut passage increases aliphatic components and decreases polysaccharides. Pyrolysis indicated that gut passage increases the ratio of guaiacyl to hydroxymethyl derivatives in lignin. Our findings indicate that the decreased decomposition rate of excrements might result from the removal of easily available polysaccharides, the increase in aliphatic components, an increase in the resistant components of lignin, the accumulation of microbial cell walls, and the binding of nitrogen into complexes with aromatic components. Several of these mechanisms are supported or determined by litter alkalinization during gut passage.

  16. Arbuscular-mycorrhizal networks inhibit Eucalyptus tetrodonta seedlings in rain forest soil microcosms.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    David P Janos

    Full Text Available Eucalyptus tetrodonta, a co-dominant tree species of tropical, northern Australian savannas, does not invade adjacent monsoon rain forest unless the forest is burnt intensely. Such facilitation by fire of seedling establishment is known as the "ashbed effect." Because the ashbed effect might involve disruption of common mycorrhizal networks, we hypothesized that in the absence of fire, intact rain forest arbuscular mycorrhizal (AM networks inhibit E. tetrodonta seedlings. Although arbuscular mycorrhizas predominate in the rain forest, common tree species of the northern Australian savannas (including adult E. tetrodonta host ectomycorrhizas. To test our hypothesis, we grew E. tetrodonta and Ceiba pentandra (an AM-responsive species used to confirm treatments separately in microcosms of ambient or methyl-bromide fumigated rain forest soil with or without severing potential mycorrhizal fungus connections to an AM nurse plant, Litsea glutinosa. As expected, C. pentandra formed mycorrhizas in all treatments but had the most root colonization and grew fastest in ambient soil. E. tetrodonta seedlings also formed AM in all treatments, but severing hyphae in fumigated soil produced the least colonization and the best growth. Three of ten E. tetrodonta seedlings in ambient soil with intact network hyphae died. Because foliar chlorosis was symptomatic of iron deficiency, after 130 days we began to fertilize half the E. tetrodonta seedlings in ambient soil with an iron solution. Iron fertilization completely remedied chlorosis and stimulated leaf growth. Our microcosm results suggest that in intact rain forest, common AM networks mediate belowground competition and AM fungi may exacerbate iron deficiency, thereby enhancing resistance to E. tetrodonta invasion. Common AM networks-previously unrecognized as contributors to the ashbed effect-probably help to maintain the rain forest-savanna boundary.

  17. Biology of the blind geobiont scarab beetle genus Chaetonyx Schaum, 1862 (Scarabaeidae: Orphninae with new distribution records of Ch. robustus Schaum, 1862 from Bulgaria

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    DENIS GRADINAROV

    2015-10-01

    Full Text Available Life cycle of the orphnine scarab beetles genus Chaetonyx was recorded for the first time based on the multiyear observations on the populations of its type species, Ch. robustus Schaum, 1862, in riverside habitats at Zemen Gorge region, South-Western Bulgaria. Our observations showed that this geobiont species is common in alluvial soils near Struma River, where it forms large colonies. At the Zemen Gorge, its preferable habitats are sparse riverside forests of Alnus glutinosa L. and Populus nigra L. neighboring grass communities. Larvae, adults and pupae were found up to 50 cm deep with most specimens inhabiting the upper soil layer from 0 to 20 cm deep. The highest recorded density was 89 adults and 581 larvae per 0.25 m2. Oviposition, hatching of the eggs, pupation and emergence of the new adults occur during the summer. Eggs have been found in surface soil layer in July and August, the pupae – mainly in July and August. Larvae of different instars were found in soil during all months of the study period. Adults from the new generation first occur in the beginning of August. In August, September and October adults from different generations can be found together. The main part of the adults seems to die after the reproduction period, and the common lifespan of adults seems to be about a year only. The life cycle of Ch. robustus in investigated habitat seems to be perennial and includes two years as larval stage and one as adult. Tropical Orphninae occupy a number of ecological niches but lack colonial geobiont specialists similar to Chaetonyx.

  18. Leaf mineral nutrient remobilization during leaf senescence and modulation by nutrient deficiency

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maillard, Anne; Diquélou, Sylvain; Billard, Vincent; Laîné, Philippe; Garnica, Maria; Prudent, Marion; Garcia-Mina, José-Maria; Yvin, Jean-Claude; Ourry, Alain

    2015-01-01

    Higher plants have to cope with fluctuating mineral resource availability. However, strategies such as stimulation of root growth, increased transporter activities, and nutrient storage and remobilization have been mostly studied for only a few macronutrients. Leaves of cultivated crops (Zea mays, Brassica napus, Pisum sativum, Triticum aestivum, Hordeum vulgare) and tree species (Quercus robur, Populus nigra, Alnus glutinosa) grown under field conditions were harvested regularly during their life span and analyzed to evaluate the net mobilization of 13 nutrients during leaf senescence. While N was remobilized in all plant species with different efficiencies ranging from 40% (maize) to 90% (wheat), other macronutrients (K–P–S–Mg) were mobilized in most species. Ca and Mn, usually considered as having low phloem mobility were remobilized from leaves in wheat and barley. Leaf content of Cu–Mo–Ni–B–Fe–Zn decreased in some species, as a result of remobilization. Overall, wheat, barley and oak appeared to be the most efficient at remobilization while poplar and maize were the least efficient. Further experiments were performed with rapeseed plants subjected to individual nutrient deficiencies. Compared to field conditions, remobilization from leaves was similar (N–S–Cu) or increased by nutrient deficiency (K–P–Mg) while nutrient deficiency had no effect on Mo–Zn–B–Ca–Mn, which seemed to be non-mobile during leaf senescence under field conditions. However, Ca and Mn were largely mobilized from roots (-97 and -86% of their initial root contents, respectively) to shoots. Differences in remobilization between species and between nutrients are then discussed in relation to a range of putative mechanisms. PMID:26029223

  19. Permanent vegetation quadrats on Olkiluoto island. Establishment and results from the first inventory

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Huhta, A.P.; Korpela, L. [Finnish Forest Research Institute, Helsinki (Finland)

    2006-05-15

    This report describes in detail the vegetation quadrats established inside the permanent, follow-up sample plots (Forest Extensive High-level monitoring plots, FEH) on Olkiluoto Island. During summer 2005 a total of 94 sample plots (a 30 m{sup 2}), each containing eight quadrats (a 1m{sup 2}), were investigated. The total number of sampled quadrats was 752. Seventy of the 94 plots represent coniferous stands: 57 Norway spruce-dominated and 13 Scots pine-dominated stands. Ten of the plots represent deciduous, birch-dominated (Betula spp.) stands, 7 plots common alder-dominated (Alnus glutinosa) stands, and seven plots are mires. The majority of the coniferous tree stands were growing on sites representing various succession stages of the Myrtillus, Vaccinium-Myrtillus and Deschampsia-Myrtillus forest site types. The pine-dominated stands growing on exposed bedrock clearly differed from the other coniferous stands: the vegetation was characterised by the Cladina, Calluna-Cladina and Empetrum-Vaccinium vitis-idaea/Vaccinium Myrtillus forest site types. The deciduous stands were characterized by tall grasses, especially Calamagrostis epigejos, C. purpurea and Deschampsia flexuosa. The vegetation of the deciduous stands dominated by common alder represented grove-like sites and seashore groves. Typical species for mires included Calamagrostis purpurea, Calla palustris, Equisetum sylvaticum, and especially white mosses (Sphagnum spp.). A total of 184 vascular plant species were found growing within the quadrats. Due to the high number of quadrats in these forests, the spruce stands had the highest total number of species, but the birch and alder-dominated forests had the highest average number of species per quadrat. This basic inventory of the permanent vegetation quadrats on Olkiluoto Island provides a sound starting point for future vegetation surveys. Guidelines for future inventories and supplementary sampling are given in the discussion part of this report. (orig.)

  20. UV-irradiation and leaching in water reduce the toxicity of imidacloprid-contaminated leaves to the aquatic leaf-shredding amphipod Gammarus fossarum.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Englert, Dominic; Zubrod, Jochen P; Neubauer, Christoph; Schulz, Ralf; Bundschuh, Mirco

    2018-01-27

    Systemic neonicotinoid insecticides such as imidacloprid are increasingly applied against insect pest infestations on forest trees. However, leaves falling from treated trees may reach nearby surface waters and potentially represent a neonicotinoid exposure source for aquatic invertebrates. Given imidacloprid's susceptibility towards photolysis and high water solubility, it was hypothesized that the leaves' toxicity might be modulated by UV-irradiation during decay on the forest floor, or by leaching and re-mobilization of the insecticide from leaves within the aquatic ecosystem. To test these hypotheses, the amphipod shredder Gammarus fossarum was fed (over 7 d; n = 30) with imidacloprid-contaminated black alder (Alnus glutinosa) leaves that had either been pre-treated (i.e., leached) in water for up to 7 d or UV-irradiated for 1 d (at intensities relevant during autumn in Central Europe) followed by a leaching duration of 1 d. Gammarids' feeding rate, serving as sublethal response variable, was reduced by up to 80% when consuming non-pretreated imidacloprid-contaminated leaves compared to imidacloprid-free leaves. Moreover, both leaching of imidacloprid from leaves (for 7 d) as well as UV-irradiation reduced the leaves' imidacloprid load (by 46 and 90%) thereby mitigating the effects on gammarids' feeding rate to levels comparable to the respective imidacloprid-free controls. Therefore, natural processes, such as UV-irradiation and re-mobilization of foliar insecticide residues in water, might be considered when evaluating the risks systemic insecticide applications in forests might pose for aquatic organisms in nearby streams. Copyright © 2018 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  1. BIODIVERSIDADE FLORESTAL E PAISAGÍSTICA DO TERRITÓRIO MUNICIPAL DE SELLANO - ÚMBRIA - ITÁLIA

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ettore Orsomando

    2007-08-01

    Full Text Available The municipal territory of Sellano, extended for about 86 sq Km, is located in Umbria (Italy, in the central and eastern part of the region, bordering Marches. It is characterized, from a forestal point of view, for the high value of the index of woodiness -more than 60%-, in comparison with 40% of Umbria. The forestal biodiversity is constituted by 7 deciduous natural formations (characterized by Quercus pubescens, Ostrya carpinifolia, Quercus cerris -belonging to the endemic association Carici sylvaticae-Quercetum cerridis, rich in orchids- Quercus cerris and Quercus pubescens, Castanea sativa, Fagus sylvatica and Salix alba and one artificial formation (Pinus nigra and Pinus halepensis reforestations. These woods (high forests or coppices with standards, in good state of conservation, surrounded by grasslands and anthropic areas with human settlements, fields and craft zones, characterize 11 environmental-landscape units in comparison with the 42 units of Umbrian landscapes: high hill slopes with Quercus pubescens or Ostrya carpinifolia woods, sometimes alternated to small Bromus erectus pastures, of secondary origin; mountain slopes with Fagus sylvatica woods and small Bromus erectus pastures, of secondary origin; cliffs with chasmophytic formations; high-hill and submountain slopes, with slight inclination, covered by fersiallitic paleosoils, with mesophilous Quercus cerris woods (Carpinion betuli and Castanea sativa woods of anthropic origin; High hills with Ostrya carpinifolia or Quercus pubescens woods, sometimes alternated to small Brachypodium rupestre pastures, of secondary origin; River valley bottoms with meso-igrophilous Salix alba or Alnus glutinosa woods; tops and slopes with Bromus erectus, Sesleria nitida or Cynosurus cristatus pastures, of secondary origin; forestal plantations (conifer reforestations, agricultural areas of hills with yearly cultivations; urban rural centres of slopes and mounds; cultivated lands of alluvial

  2. Leaf mineral nutrient remobilization during leaf senescence and modulation by nutrient deficiency.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Anne eMaillard

    2015-05-01

    Full Text Available Higher plants have to cope with fluctuating mineral resource availability. However strategies such as stimulation of root growth, increased transporter activities, and nutrient storage and remobilization have been mostly studied for only a few macronutrients. Leaves of cultivated crops (Zea mays, Brassica napus, Pisum sativum, Triticum aestivum, Hordeum vulgare and tree species (Quercus robur, Populus nigra, Alnus glutinosa grown under field conditions were harvested regularly during their life span and analysed to evaluate the net mobilization of 13 nutrients during leaf senescence. While N was remobilized in all plant species with different efficiencies ranging from 40% (maize to 90% (wheat, other macronutrients (K-P-S-Mg were mobilized in most species. Ca and Mn, usually considered as having low phloem mobility were remobilized from leaves in wheat and barley. Leaf content of Cu-Mo-Ni-B-Fe-Zn decreased in some species, as a result of remobilization. Overall, wheat, barley and oak appeared to be the most efficient at remobilization while poplar and maize were the least efficient. Further experiments were performed with rapeseed plants subjected to individual nutrient deficiencies. Compared to field conditions, remobilization from leaves was similar (N-S-Cu or increased by nutrient deficiency (K-P-Mg while nutrient deficiency had no effect on Mo-Zn-B-Ca-Mn, which seemed to be non-mobile during leaf senescence under field conditions. However, Ca and Mn were largely mobilized from roots (-97 and -86% of their initial root contents, respectively to shoots. Differences in remobilization between species and between nutrients are then discussed in relation to a range of putative mechanisms.

  3. Catalpol ameliorates high-fat diet-induced insulin resistance and adipose tissue inflammation by suppressing the JNK and NF-κB pathways

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zhou, Jun, E-mail: hustzhj@hust.edu.cn; Xu, Gang; Ma, Shuai; Li, Fen; Yuan, Miao; Xu, Huibi; Huang, Kaixun

    2015-11-27

    Catalpol, a bioactive component from the root of Rehmannia glutinosa, has been shown to possess hypoglycemic effects in type 2 diabetic animal models, however, the underlying mechanisms remain poorly understood. Here we investigated the effect of catalpol on high-fat diet (HFD)-induced insulin resistance and adipose tissue inflammation in mice. Oral administration of catalpol at 100 mg/kg for 4 weeks had no effect on body weight of HFD-induced obese mice, but it significantly improved fasting glucose and insulin levels, glucose tolerance and insulin tolerance. Moreover, macrophage infiltration into adipose tissue was markedly reduced by catalpol. Intriguingly, catalpol also significantly reduced mRNA expressions of M1 pro-inflammatory cytokines, but increased M2 anti-inflammatory gene expressions in adipose tissue. Concurrently, catalpol significantly suppressed the c-Jun NH2-terminal kinase (JNK) and nuclear factor-kappa B (NF-κB) signaling pathways in adipose tissue. Collectively, these results suggest that catalpol may ameliorate HFD-induced insulin resistance in mice by attenuating adipose tissue inflammation and suppressing the JNK and NF-κB pathways, and thus provide important new insights into the underlying mechanisms of the antidiabetic effect of catalpol. - Highlights: • Catalpol ameliorates high-fat diet (HFD)-induced insulin resistance in mice. • Catalpol reduces adipose tissue macrophage infiltration in HFD-fed mice. • Catalpol regulates M1 and M2 inflammatory gene expression in obese adipose tissue. • Catalpol suppresses the JNK and NF-κB signaling pathways in obese adipose tissue.

  4. Studies on medicinal herbs for cognitive enhancement based on the text mining of Dongeuibogam and preliminary evaluation of its effects.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pak, Malk Eun; Kim, Yu Ri; Kim, Ha Neui; Ahn, Sung Min; Shin, Hwa Kyoung; Baek, Jin Ung; Choi, Byung Tae

    2016-02-17

    In literature on Korean medicine, Dongeuibogam (Treasured Mirror of Eastern Medicine), published in 1613, represents the overall results of the traditional medicines of North-East Asia based on prior medicinal literature of this region. We utilized this medicinal literature by text mining to establish a list of candidate herbs for cognitive enhancement in the elderly and then performed an evaluation of their effects. Text mining was performed for selection of candidate herbs. Cell viability was determined in HT22 hippocampal cells and immunohistochemistry and behavioral analysis was performed in a kainic acid (KA) mice model in order to observe alterations of hippocampal cells and cognition. Twenty four herbs for cognitive enhancement in the elderly were selected by text mining of Dongeuibogam. In HT22 cells, pretreatment with 3 candidate herbs resulted in significantly reduced glutamate-induced cell death. Panax ginseng was the most neuroprotective herb against glutamate-induced cell death. In the hippocampus of a KA mice model, pretreatment with 11 candidate herbs resulted in suppression of caspase-3 expression. Treatment with 7 candidate herbs resulted in significantly enhanced expression levels of phosphorylated cAMP response element binding protein. Number of proliferated cells indicated by BrdU labeling was increased by treatment with 10 candidate herbs. Schisandra chinensis was the most effective herb against cell death and proliferation of progenitor cells and Rehmannia glutinosa in neuroprotection in the hippocampus of a KA mice model. In a KA mice model, we confirmed improved spatial and short memory by treatment with the 3 most effective candidate herbs and these recovered functions were involved in a higher number of newly formed neurons from progenitor cells in the hippocampus. These established herbs and their combinations identified by text-mining technique and evaluation for effectiveness may have value in further experimental and clinical

  5. Plant utilization against digestive system disorder in Southern Assam, India.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Choudhury, Prakash Roy; Choudhury, Manabendra Dutta; Ningthoujam, Sanjoy Singh; Mitra, Abhijit; Nath, Deepa; Talukdar, Anupam Das

    2015-12-04

    Being one of the most common types of life threatening diseases in Southern Assam, India, the digestive system disorders (DSD) have gained much attention in recent decades. Traditional beliefs and inadequate income of mass population result in the use of alternative phytotherapies to treat the diseases. The present paper documents the medicinal knowledge and utilization of plants for treatment of digestive system disorders in Southern Assam, India by Disease Consensus Index (DCI). It also determines the most suitable plant species used to treat digestive system disorders in the study area. The study was based on ethnomedicinal field survey covering a period of 1 year from 2014-2015. The ethnomedicinal information was collected by using semi-structured questionnaires from different traditional Bengali people having knowledge on medicinal plants. Collected data were analyzed by calculating DCI. During the survey, 29 informants were interviewed and a total of 49 plants under 46 genera belonging to 33 families were listed. Data analysis revealed that Litsea glutinosa, Momordica charantia, Andrographis paniculata, Lawsonia inermis, Cleome viscosa, Psidium guajava, Ageratum conyzoides, Cuscuta reflexa, Cynodon dactylon and Carica papaya are the most prominent plants among the people of Southern Assam for treating DSD. This explorative survey emphasizes the need to preserve and document the traditional healing practices for managing DSD inviting for more imminent scientific research on the plants to determine their efficacy as well as safety. With the help of statistical analysis (DCI), we propose 10 priority plants for DSD in present work. Systematic pharmacological study with these plants may contribute significant result. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  6. In situ detection of tree root distribution and biomass by multi-electrode resistivity imaging.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Amato, Mariana; Basso, Bruno; Celano, Giuseppe; Bitella, Giovanni; Morelli, Gianfranco; Rossi, Roberta

    2008-10-01

    Traditional methods for studying tree roots are destructive and labor intensive, but available nondestructive techniques are applicable only to small scale studies or are strongly limited by soil conditions and root size. Soil electrical resistivity measured by geoelectrical methods has the potential to detect belowground plant structures, but quantitative relationships of these measurements with root traits have not been assessed. We tested the ability of two-dimensional (2-D) DC resistivity tomography to detect the spatial variability of roots and to quantify their biomass in a tree stand. A high-resolution resistivity tomogram was generated along a 11.75 m transect under an Alnus glutinosa (L.) Gaertn. stand based on an alpha-Wenner configuration with 48 electrodes spaced 0.25 m apart. Data were processed by a 2-D finite-element inversion algorithm, and corrected for soil temperature. Data acquisition, inversion and imaging were completed in the field within 60 min. Root dry mass per unit soil volume (root mass density, RMD) was measured destructively on soil samples collected to a depth of 1.05 m. Soil sand, silt, clay and organic matter contents, electrical conductivity, water content and pH were measured on a subset of samples. The spatial pattern of soil resistivity closely matched the spatial distribution of RMD. Multiple linear regression showed that only RMD and soil water content were related to soil resistivity along the transect. Regression analysis of RMD against soil resistivity revealed a highly significant logistic relationship (n = 97), which was confirmed on a separate dataset (n = 67), showing that soil resistivity was quantitatively related to belowground tree root biomass. This relationship provides a basis for developing quick nondestructive methods for detecting root distribution and quantifying root biomass, as well as for optimizing sampling strategies for studying root-driven phenomena.

  7. A contribution to the knowledge of biology and harmfulness of Deporaus betulae (L. (Coleoptera, Attelabidae

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    Jaroslav Urban

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available The paper deals with the occurrence, development and harmfulness of Deporaus betulae (L.. The majority of field studies was carried out at Training Forest Enterprise (TFE Masaryk Forest in Křtiny (District Brno-venkov in 2010 and 2011. In addition to this, the species was studied in detail also in a laboratory. It occurred mostly on Betula pendula and Carpinus betulus. Rarely, the species was found on Alnus glutinosa and Corylus avellana and only sporadically on Fagus sylvatica, Quercus petraea, Tilia cordata and T. platyphyllos. In the studied area, larvae and pupae hibernate. Beetles occur on trees from the end of April to the beginning of July, sporadically later. Females lay on average 2.5 (in the laboratory 4.4 eggs into rolls on B. pendula, on C. betulus 2.2 eggs. During two months, they damage on average 5.3 cm2 leaves creating 14 rolls and laying 35 eggs into the rolls. Larvae consume only 1.7 cm2 leaf blade. The development of the species takes three to four months from egg laying to the departure of larvae into soil. On leaves of B. pendula of an average area of 14.2 cm2, females roll up the same area (about 11.2 cm2 as on leaves of C. betulus of an area of 21.7 cm2. Into the rolls, they lay on average the same number of eggs. The average number of eggs in rolls increases with the increased area of B. pendula leaf blade. Trees partly compensate for the reduction of assimilatory area also by the growth of the area of neighbouring undamaged leaves (on average by 12.7 %.

  8. Effects of elevated CO2 on litter chemistry and subsequent invertebrate detritivore feeding responses.

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    Matthew W Dray

    Full Text Available Elevated atmospheric CO2 can change foliar tissue chemistry. This alters leaf litter palatability to macroinvertebrate detritivores with consequences for decomposition, nutrient turnover, and food-web structure. Currently there is no consensus on the link between CO2 enrichment, litter chemistry, and macroinvertebrate-mediated leaf decomposition. To identify any unifying mechanisms, we presented eight invertebrate species from aquatic and terrestrial ecosystems with litter from Alnus glutinosa (common alder or Betula pendula (silver birch trees propagated under ambient (380 ppm or elevated (ambient +200 ppm CO2 concentrations. Alder litter was largely unaffected by CO2 enrichment, but birch litter from leaves grown under elevated CO2 had reduced nitrogen concentrations and greater C/N ratios. Invertebrates were provided individually with either (i two litter discs, one of each CO2 treatment ('choice', or (ii one litter disc of each CO2 treatment alone ('no-choice'. Consumption was recorded. Only Odontocerum albicorne showed a feeding preference in the choice test, consuming more ambient- than elevated-CO2 birch litter. Species' responses to alder were highly idiosyncratic in the no-choice test: Gammarus pulex and O. albicorne consumed more elevated-CO2 than ambient-CO2 litter, indicating compensatory feeding, while Oniscus asellus consumed more of the ambient-CO2 litter. No species responded to CO2 treatment when fed birch litter. Overall, these results show how elevated atmospheric CO2 can alter litter chemistry, affecting invertebrate feeding behaviour in species-specific ways. The data highlight the need for greater species-level information when predicting changes to detrital processing-a key ecosystem function-under atmospheric change.

  9. TALL HERB SPRUCE FORESTS AS CLIMAX COMMUNITIES ON LOWLAND SWAMPS OF BRYANSK POLESIE

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    O. I. Evstigneev

    2017-09-01

    Full Text Available Nettle grey alder forests are a dominant forest type on lowland swamps in the Bryansk Polesie. They are formed as a result of repeated cuttings in the place of tall herb spruce forests. Tall herb spruce forests are very rare communities in the vegetation cover in this area due to clear cutting, melioration and peat extraction. An assessment of the succession status of tall herb spruce forests and nettle grey alder forests was carried out in this paper. The criteria of climax state and succession state of communities, developed for Eastern European forests, were used. These criteria are based on the degree of intensity of the following signs in the community: 1 the completeness of species composition of tree synusia; 2 the ontogenetic structure of tree species cenopopulation; 3 the gap-mosaic stand structure; 4 the diversity of microsites in soil cover; 5 the completeness of species composition and ecological-coenotic diversity of vascular species. We showed that tall herb spruce forest, as opposed to black alder forest, is close to communities of the climax type. This is evidenced by the following features of cenosis: firstly, all tree species in the area that covers the Bryansk Polesie and that are able to grow on lowland swamps are represented in the spruce forest (Alnus glutinosa, Betula pubescens, Fraxinus excelsior, Padus avium, Picea abies, Salix pentandra, Sorbus aucuparia, Ulmus glabra. Secondly, a steady turnover of generations is carried out in the cenopopulations of main edificators (Picea abies and Alnus glutinosa. This is evidenced by the complete and left-sided structure of their ontogenetic spectrum. Thirdly, a system of asynchronously developing gaps (parcels, which are formed on the site of old tree falls, is formed in the community. This ensures the continuous renewal of spruce and alder populations and creates conditions for the regeneration of other tree species. Fourthly, the structure of biogenic microsites has been formed

  10. Landmark discoveries in elucidating the origins of the hypothalamic-pituitary system from the perspective of a basal vertebrate, sea lamprey.

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    Sower, Stacia A

    2017-10-27

    The hypothalamic-pituitary (HP) system, which is specific to vertebrates, is considered to be an evolutionary innovation that emerged prior to or during the differentiation of the ancestral jawless vertebrates (agnathans) leading to the neuroendocrine control of many complex functions. Along with hagfish, lampreys represent the oldest lineage of vertebrates, agnathans (jawless fish). This review will highlight our discoveries of the major components of the lamprey HP axis. Generally, gnathostomes (jawed vertebrates) have one or two hypothalamic gonadotropin-releasing hormones (GnRH) while lampreys have three hypothalamic GnRHs. GnRH(s) regulate reproduction in all vertebrates via the pituitary. In gnathostomes, there are three classical pituitary glycoprotein hormones (luteinizing hormone, LH; follicle stimulating hormone, FSH; and thyrotropin, TSH) interacting specifically with three receptors, LH-R, FSH-R, and TSH-R, respectively. In general, FSH and LH regulate gonadal activity and TSH regulates thyroidal activity. In contrast to gnathostomes, we propose that lampreys only have two heterodimeric pituitary glycoprotein hormones, lamprey glycoprotein hormone (lGpH) and thyrostimulin, and two lamprey glycoprotein hormone receptors (lGpH-R I and -R II). Our existing data also suggest the existence of a primitive, overlapping yet functional hypothalamic-pituitary-gonadal (HPG) and HP-thyroidal (HPT) endocrine systems in lampreys. The study of basal vertebrates provides promising models for understanding the evolution of the hypothalamic-pituitary-thyroidal and gonadal axes in vertebrates. We hypothesize that the glycoprotein hormone/glycoprotein hormone receptor systems emerged as a link between the neuroendocrine and peripheral control levels during the early stages of gnathostome divergence. Our discovery of a functional HPG axis in lamprey has provided important clues for understanding the forces that ensured a common organization of the hypothalamus and pituitary

  11. Was the evolutionary road towards adaptive immunity paved with endothelium?

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    van Niekerk, Gustav; Davis, Tanja; Engelbrecht, Anna-Mart

    2015-09-04

    The characterization of a completely novel adaptive immune system (AIS) in jawless vertebrates (hagfish and lampreys) presents an excellent opportunity for exploring similarities and differences in design principles. It also highlights a somewhat neglected question: Why did vertebrates, representing only 5 % of all animals, evolve a system as complex as an AIS twice, whereas invertebrates failed to do so? A number of theories have been presented in answer to this question. However, these theories either fail to explain why invertebrates would not similarly develop an AIS and are confounded by issues of causality, or have been challenged by more recent findings. Instead of identifying a selective pressure that would drive the development of an AIS, we hypothesise that invertebrates failed to develop an AIS because of the evolutionary constraints imposed by these animals' physiological context. In particular, we argue that a number of vascular innovations in vertebrates allowed the effective implementation of an AIS. A lower blood volume allowed for a higher antibody titer (i.e., less 'diluted' antibody concentration), rendering these immune effectors more cost-effective. In addition, both a high circulatory velocity and the ability of endothelium to coordinate immune cell trafficking promote 'epitope sampling'. Collectively, these innovations allowed the effective implementation of AIS in vertebrates. The hypothesis posits that a number of innovations to the vascular system provided the release from constraints which allowed the implementation of an AIS. However, this hypothesis would be refuted by phylogenetic analysis demonstrating that the AIS preceded these vascular innovations. The hypothesis also suggests that vascular performance would have an impact on the efficacy of an AIS, thus predicting a correlation between the vascular parameters of a species and its relative investment in AIS. The contribution of certain vascular innovations in augmenting immune

  12. Go reconfigure: how fish change shape as they swim and evolve.

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    Long, John H; Porter, Marianne E; Root, Robert G; Liew, Chun Wai

    2010-12-01

    The bodies of fish change shape over propulsive, behavioral, developmental, and evolutionary time scales, a general phenomenon that we call "reconfiguration". Undulatory, postural, and form-reconfiguration can be distinguished, studied independently, and examined in terms of mechanical interactions and evolutionary importance. Using a combination of live, swimming fishes and digital robotic fish that are autonomous and self-propelled, we examined the functional relation between undulatory and postural reconfiguration in forward swimming, backward swimming, and yaw turning. To probe how postural and form reconfiguration interact, the yaw turning of leopard sharks was examined using morphometric and kinematic analyses. To test how undulatory reconfiguration might evolve, the digital robotic fish were subjected to selection for enhanced performance in a simulated ecology in which each individual had to detect and move towards a food source. In addition to the general issue of reconfiguration, these investigations are united by the fact that the dynamics of undulatory and postural reconfigurations are predicted to be determined, in part, by the structural stiffness of the fish's body. Our method defines undulatory reconfiguration as the combined, point-by-point periodic motion of the body, leaving postural reconfiguration as the combined deviations from undulatory reconfiguration. While undulatory reconfiguration appears to be the sole or primary propulsive driver, postural reconfiguration may contribute to propulsion in hagfish and it is correlated with differences in forward, and backward, swimming in lamprey. Form reconfigures over developmental time in leopard sharks in a manner that is consistent with an allometric scaling theory in which structural stiffness of the body is held constant. However, correlation of a form proxy for structural stiffness of the body suggests that body stiffness may scale in order to limit maximum postural reconfiguration during routine

  13. Humans reshaped the floodplain geoecology in NW Europe through intense agricultural impact

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    Broothaerts, N.; Verstraeten, G.; Notebaert, B.; Kasse, C.; Bohncke, S.; Assendelft, R.; Vandenberghe, J.

    2012-04-01

    Floodplain deposition rates have increased markedly under influence of anthropogenic land use throughout the Late Holocene in many Western and Central European catchments. These variations in sedimentation rates have changed the geomorphology and ecology of many floodplains as is shown here for the River Dijle (760 km2) in the Belgian Loess Belt. Based on coring and pollen data, the geomorphology and ecology of the floodplain as well as the regional vegetation has been reconstructed for four different locations within the catchment. The chronology of changes in geoecology was determined through 54 radiocarbon dates. Our data shows that peat growth started at ca 9-10 ka cal BP and reached a thickness between 1 and 3 m. This unit was deposited in a marshy environment where no clear river channel was present. At that time, the floodplain was dominated by a wet alder forest (Alnion glutinosae). Between 2500-500 cal BP, the peat growth stopped and was gradually replaced by a unit dominated with silty to clayey overbank deposits (1-4 m thick). The transition is due to the gradual built-up of levees that laterally expanded over the backswamp areas when the sediment input increased. Afterwards, the entire valley is dominated by clastic sediments and the river system changed towards a single channel meandering river. The floodplain vegetation changed during this transition from a wet alder forest towards a more open vegetation dominated by Poaceae and Cyperaceae. The Late Holocene regional pollen data shows that the changes in the local floodplain geoecology do not coincide with the onset of agricultural activities in the catchment and subsequent soil erosion and sediment transport. Only when agriculture further increased such that sediment delivery crossed a certain threshold, discernible changes in floodplain geoecology occurred. This time lag between the start of human impact in the catchment and the changing floodplain geoecology differs for different sub

  14. Analyzing factors that influence the folk use and phytonomy of 18 medicinal plants in Navarra

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    Calvo María

    2007-04-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background This article analyzes whether the distribution or area of use of 18 medicinal plants is influenced by ecological and cultural factors which might account for their traditional use and/or phytonymy in Navarra. This discussion may be helpful for comparative studies, touching as it does on other ethnopharmacological issues: a which cultural and ecological factors affect the selection of medicinal plants; b substitutions of medicinal plants in popular medicine; c the relation between local nomenclature and uses. To analyze these questions, this paper presents an example of a species used for digestive disorders (tea and camomile: Jasonia glutinosa, J. tuberosa, Sideritis hyssopifolia, Bidens aurea, Chamaemelum nobile, Santolina chamaecyparissus..., high blood pressure (Rhamnus alaternus, Olea europaea... or skin diseases (Hylotelephium maximum, H. telephium, Anagallis arvensis, A. foemina. Methods Fieldwork began on January 2004 and continued until December 2006. During that time we interviewed 505 informants in 218 locations in Navarra. Information was collected using semi-structured ethnobotanical interviews, and we subsequently made maps using Arc-View 8.0 program to determine the area of use of each taxon. Each map was then compared with the bioclimatic and linguistic map of Navarra, using the soil and ethnographic data for the region, and with other ethnobotanical and ethnopharmacological studies carried out in Europe. Results The results clearly show that ecological and cultural factors influence the selection of medicinal plants in this region. Climate and substrate are the most important ecological factors that influence the distribution and abundance of plants, which are the biological factors that affect medicinal plant selection. Conclusion The study of edaphological and climatological factors, on the one hand, and culture, on the other, can help us to understand why a plant is replaced by another one for the same

  15. The past, present and future tasks of Hungarian dendrological research.

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    Bartha, D

    2010-01-01

    Hungarian dendrological research (research of living woody plants) has more than 200 years old history; the first general work by János Keresztély Grossinger was published in 1797. Further basic works in our time yet are: Forest Botany by Lajos Fekete and Sándor Mágócsy-Dietz (1896); and the chorological work, Distribution of trees and shrubs of sylvicultural importance in the region of Hungarian State by Lajos Fekete and Tibor Blattny (1913). A few dendrologists and many botanists have helped to get better knowledge of Hungarian dendroflora. From the point of view of taxonomy, chorology and habitat - which are interested by field botanists - it can be said that knowledge is fairly heterogeneous. There are sufficient information about most of the rare (protected/endangered) woody plants (an about 50 species) and the important adventives, above all invasive trees and shrubs (an about 10 species). From these two groups beyond there are only few taxa which can be said thoroughly worked up and known (e.g. Castanea sativa, Cornus mas, Fraxinus spp., Quercus spp.). List of the dendrotaxa, hardly known in the above-mentioned point of view is rich in species that are important for forestry or horticulture (e.g. Alnus glutinosa, Acer spp., Betula pendula, Corylusavellana and most of Salix spp.), supplemented with other species (e.g. Clematis vitalba, Colutea arborescens, Lonicera xylosteum, Padus avium, Sambucus nigra, Staphylea pinnata, Viburnum spp.).Followings can be asked from our field botanists: i) look for a specialist in cases of critical dendrotaxa; ii) a circumspect identification is necessary - especially in the case of leaves - by right of great number of samples from the adequate part of shoot; iii) keep in view frequent hybridization (e.g. in the case of Betula, Crataegus, Pyrus, Tilia), and frequent appearance of hybrids (e.g. Betula × rhombifolia, Cerasus × eminens, Salix × rubens); iv) appearance of interim forms are usually typical in the cases of

  16. Plant Extract Mediated Eco-Friendly Synthesis of Pd@Graphene Nanocatalyst: An Efficient and Reusable Catalyst for the Suzuki-Miyaura Coupling

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    Mujeeb Khan

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Suzuki-Miyaura coupling reaction catalyzed by the palladium (Pd-based nanomaterials is one of the most versatile methods for the preparation of biaryls. However, use of organic solvents as reaction medium causes a big threat to environment due to the generation of toxic byproducts as waste during the work up of these reactions. Therefore, the use of water as reaction media has attracted tremendous attention due to its environmental, economic, and safety benefits. In this study, we report on the synthesis of green Pd@graphene nanocatalyst based on an in situ functionalization approach which exhibited excellent catalytic activity towards the Suzuki–Miyaura cross-coupling reactions of phenyl halides with phenyl boronic acids under facile conditions in water. The green and environmentally friendly synthesis of Pd@graphene nanocatalyst (PG-HRG-Pd is carried out by simultaneous reduction of graphene oxide (GRO and PdCl2 using Pulicaria glutinosa extract (PGE as reducing and stabilizing agent. The phytomolecules present in the plant extract (PE not only facilitated the reduction of PdCl2, but also helped to stabilize the surface of PG-HRG-Pd nanocatalyst, which significantly enhanced the dispersibility of nanocatalyst in water. The identification of PG-HRG-Pd was established by various spectroscopic and microscopic techniques, including, high-resolution transmission electron microscopy (HRTEM, X-ray diffraction (XRD, ultraviolet–visible spectroscopy (UV-Vis, Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy (FT-IR, and Raman spectroscopy. The as-prepared PG-HRG-Pd nanocatalyst demonstrated excellent catalytic activity towards the Suzuki-Miyaura cross coupling reactions under aqueous, ligand free, and aerobic conditions. Apart from this the reusability of the catalyst was also evaluated and the catalyst yielded excellent results upon reuse for several times with marginal loss of its catalytic performance. Therefore, the method developed for the green

  17. Tomato chocolate spot virus, a member of a new torradovirus species that causes a necrosis-associated disease of tomato in Guatemala.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Batuman, O; Kuo, Y-W; Palmieri, M; Rojas, M R; Gilbertson, R L

    2010-06-01

    Tomatoes in Guatemala have been affected by a new disease, locally known as "mancha de chocolate" (chocolate spot). The disease is characterized by distinct necrotic spots on leaves, stems and petioles that eventually expand and cause a dieback of apical tissues. Samples from symptomatic plants tested negative for infection by tomato spotted wilt virus, tobacco streak virus, tobacco etch virus and other known tomato-infecting viruses. A virus-like agent was sap-transmitted from diseased tissue to Nicotiana benthamiana and, when graft-transmitted to tomato, this agent induced chocolate spot symptoms. This virus-like agent also was sap-transmitted to Datura stramonium and Nicotiana glutinosa, but not to a range of non-solanaceous indicator plants. Icosahedral virions approximately 28-30 nm in diameter were purified from symptomatic N. benthamiana plants. When rub-inoculated onto leaves of N. benthamiana plants, these virions induced symptoms indistinguishable from those in N. benthamiana plants infected with the sap-transmissible virus associated with chocolate spot disease. Tomatoes inoculated with sap or grafted with shoots from N. benthamiana plants infected with purified virions developed typical chocolate spot symptoms, consistent with this virus being the causal agent of the disease. Analysis of nucleic acids associated with purified virions of the chocolate-spot-associated virus, revealed a genome composed of two single-stranded RNAs of approximately 7.5 and approximately 5.1 kb. Sequence analysis of these RNAs revealed a genome organization similar to recently described torradoviruses, a new group of picorna-like viruses causing necrosis-associated diseases of tomatoes in Europe [tomato torrado virus (ToTV)] and Mexico [tomato apex necrosis virus (ToANV) and tomato marchitez virus (ToMarV)]. Thus, the approximately 7.5 kb and approximately 5.1 kb RNAs of the chocolate-spot-associated virus corresponded to the torradovirus RNA1 and RNA2, respectively; however

  18. Virus-vector relationship in the Citrus leprosis pathosystem.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tassi, Aline Daniele; Garita-Salazar, Laura Cristina; Amorim, Lilian; Novelli, Valdenice Moreira; Freitas-Astúa, Juliana; Childers, Carl C; Kitajima, Elliot W

    2017-03-01

    Citrus leprosis has been one of the most destructive diseases of citrus in the Americas. In the last decade important progress has been achieved such as the complete genome sequencing of its main causal agent, Citrus leprosis virus C (CiLV-C), belonging to a new genus Cilevirus. It is transmitted by Brevipalpus yothersi Baker (Acari: Tenuipalpidae), and is characterized by the localized symptoms it induces on the leaves, fruits and stems. It occurs in the American continents from Mexico to Argentina. The virus was until recently considered restricted to Citrus spp. However, it was found naturally infecting other plants species as Swinglea glutinosa Merrill and Commelina benghalensis L., and has been experimentally transmitted by B. yothersi to a large number of plant species. Despite these advances little is known about the virus-vector relationship that is a key to understanding the epidemiology of the disease. Some components of the CiLV-C/B. yothersi relationship were determined using the common bean (Phaseolus vulgaris L. cv. 'IAC Una') as a test plant. They included: (a) the virus acquisition access period was 4 h; (b) the virus inoculation access period was 2 h; (c) the latent period between acquisition and inoculation was 7 h; (d) the period of retention of the virus by a single viruliferous mite was at least 12 days; (d) the percentage of viruliferous individuals from mite colonies on infected tissues ranged from 25 to 60%. The experiments confirmed previous data that all developmental stages of B. yothersi (larva, protonymph and deutonymph, adult female and male) were able to transmit CiLV-C and that transovarial transmission of the virus did not occur. CiLV-C can be acquired from lesions on leaves, fruits and stems by B. yothersi. Based on the distribution of lesions produced by single viruliferous B. yothersi on bean leaves, it is concluded that they tend to feed in restricted areas, usually near the veins. The short latent and transmission periods

  19. Virus diseases in the tobacco fields of Guilan and Western Azerbaijan provinces of Iran.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Khateri, H; Moarrefzadeh, N; Mosahebi, G; Koohi-Habibi, M

    2008-01-01

    Tobacco (Nicotiana tabacum L.) is one of the important industrial plants in Iran. Viruses as an important group of plant pathogens cause many losses on the quality and quantity of tobacco crop. There was few information on the types of plant viruses infecting the tobacco fields of Guilan and almost no information for Western Azerbaijan province. During 2005-2007, leaf samples were taken from symptomatic plants in the growing areas of these two provinces. The observed symptoms on plants in the fields varied from mild mosaics to severe necrosis. The regions of sampling were including Rasht, Bazar-jomeh, Soumae-Sara, Talesh and Astara in Guilan and Ourmia, Sardasht and Ghara-Ziaeddin in Western Azerbaijan. The tobacco types and varieties from which the samples were taken included air-cured burley variety Burley 21 and to a lesser extent, oriental tobacco variety Basma Serres in W. Azerbaijan and flue-cured varieties Coker 347 and Virginia El in Guilan province. Samples were tested by DAS-ELISA method (Clark and Adams, 1977) using the polyclonal antibodies for a set of tobacco viruses. Some samples with positive reactions in DAS-ELISA were inoculated to indicator test plants such as Chenopodium amaranticolor, Datura metel, D. stramonium, Physalis floridana, Nicotiana rustica, N. glutinosa, and tobacco (varieties White burley and Samsun). The results of greenhouse experiments were consistent with serological tests. The following viruses which are listed in order of their overall abundance within the tested samples were detected: Tobacco streak virus (TSV), Tomato spotted wilt virus (TSWV), Tobacco etch virus (TEV), Tobacco ringspot virus (TRSV), Potato virus Y (PVY), Cucumber mosaic virus (CMV) and Tobacco mosaic virus (TMV). In all samples more than one virus infection was detected. The most severe mosaic type symptoms including the deformation and blistering on leaves were mainly seen in the infections by CMV and TMV. The most severe necrotic type symptoms including

  20. Atypical coastal environmental change during Copper Age - Bronze Age transition (Rio de Moinhos, NW Portugal) - preliminary results

    Science.gov (United States)

    Granja, Helena; Danielsen, Randi

    2015-04-01

    The research is part of an ongoing project of geo-archaeology from Rio de Moinhos beach (Esposende, NW Portugal), where an extensive area of dark sedimentary outcrops and a large amount of ceramic remains from a Roman shipwreck are present. The dark sedimentary deposit, presenting tree stumps and roots in life position, partially covers a rocky platform that extends seawards. Over the platform, that presents many pits of sea urchins (infralittoral environment) as well as salt pans (supratidal environment), a marine rusty conglomerate is present in some places. Several hand gauge cores were extracted in the sedimentary deposit whose maximum depth do not exceed 50cm. Samples from cores and outcrops were analysed for grain size, mineralogical composition, pollen and diatom content and radiocarbon dated. This work concerns sediment size analysis, dating and pollen. Tree stumps and roots of Alnus glutinosa dated 6310-6220 cal BP are in the base of the sedimentary sequence that presents a gradual passage from very fine sands to clayey silts, all of them organic and very poorly sorted. Pollen analysis revealed an initial wetland habitat containing Alnus, inundated ca 5645-5585 cal BP due to rising sea level at the time. A brackish lagoon formed at the site presumably protected by a clastic barrier seaward. Similar formations of lagoons are detected all along the Portuguese coast, typically disappearing with time due to sand infilling. In this case, however, the brackish lagoon turned into a fresh water lake ca 4485-4440 cal BP. This may have been a natural development caused by permanent closing of the clastic barrier but human interference cannot be excluded as anthropic activity was detected since formation of the lagoon. The lake seems to have filled in with sand at some point in time subsequent to ca 3750-3725 cal BP, the date of the top lake sediment. However, shipwreck vestiges from the Roman Period presently dispersed over the lake sediment, suggests a later date

  1. Influence of ethnic traditional cultures on genetic diversity of rice landraces under on-farm conservation in southwest China.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Yanjie; Wang, Yanli; Sun, Xiaodong; Caiji, Zhuoma; Yang, Jingbiao; Cui, Di; Cao, Guilan; Ma, Xiaoding; Han, Bing; Xue, Dayuan; Han, Longzhi

    2016-10-27

    Crop genetic resources are important components of biodiversity. However, with the large-scale promotion of mono-cropping, genetic diversity has largely been lost. Ex-situ conservation approaches were widely used to protect traditional crop varieties worldwide. However, this method fails to maintain the dynamic evolutionary processes of crop genetic resources in their original habitats, leading to genetic diversity reduction and even loss of the capacity of resistance to new diseases and pests. Therefore, on-farm conservation has been considered a crucial complement to ex-situ conservation. This study aimed at clarifying the genetic diversity differences between ex-situ conservation and on-farm conservation and to exploring the influence of traditional cultures on genetic diversity of rice landraces under on-farm conservation. The conservation status of rice landrace varieties, including Indica and Japonica, non-glutinous rice (Oryza sativa) and glutinous rice (Oryza sativa var. glutinosa Matsum), was obtained through ethno-biology investigation method in 12 villages of ethnic groups from Guizhou, Yunnan and Guangxi provinces of China. The genetic diversity between 24 pairs of the same rice landraces from different times were compared using simple sequence repeat (SSR) molecular markers technology. The landrace paris studied were collected in 1980 and maintained ex-situ, while 2014 samples were collected on-farm in southwest of China. The results showed that many varieties of rice landraces have been preserved on-farm by local farmers for hundreds or thousands of years. The number of alleles (Na), effective number of alleles (Ne), Nei genetic diversity index (He) and Shannon information index (I) of rice landraces were significantly higher by 12.3-30.4 % under on-farm conservation than under ex-situ conservation. Compared with the ex-situ conservation approach, rice landraces under on-farm conservation programs had more alleles and higher genetic diversity. In

  2. Tomato chocolate spot virus, a member of a new torradovirus species that causes a necrosis-associated disease of tomato in Guatemala

    Science.gov (United States)

    Batuman, O.; Kuo, Y.-W.; Palmieri, M.; Rojas, M. R.

    2010-01-01

    Tomatoes in Guatemala have been affected by a new disease, locally known as “mancha de chocolate” (chocolate spot). The disease is characterized by distinct necrotic spots on leaves, stems and petioles that eventually expand and cause a dieback of apical tissues. Samples from symptomatic plants tested negative for infection by tomato spotted wilt virus, tobacco streak virus, tobacco etch virus and other known tomato-infecting viruses. A virus-like agent was sap-transmitted from diseased tissue to Nicotiana benthamiana and, when graft-transmitted to tomato, this agent induced chocolate spot symptoms. This virus-like agent also was sap-transmitted to Datura stramonium and Nicotiana glutinosa, but not to a range of non-solanaceous indicator plants. Icosahedral virions ~28–30 nm in diameter were purified from symptomatic N. benthamiana plants. When rub-inoculated onto leaves of N. benthamiana plants, these virions induced symptoms indistinguishable from those in N. benthamiana plants infected with the sap-transmissible virus associated with chocolate spot disease. Tomatoes inoculated with sap or grafted with shoots from N. benthamiana plants infected with purified virions developed typical chocolate spot symptoms, consistent with this virus being the causal agent of the disease. Analysis of nucleic acids associated with purified virions of the chocolate-spot-associated virus, revealed a genome composed of two single-stranded RNAs of ~7.5 and ~5.1 kb. Sequence analysis of these RNAs revealed a genome organization similar to recently described torradoviruses, a new group of picorna-like viruses causing necrosis-associated diseases of tomatoes in Europe [tomato torrado virus (ToTV)] and Mexico [tomato apex necrosis virus (ToANV) and tomato marchitez virus (ToMarV)]. Thus, the ~7.5 kb and ~5.1 kb RNAs of the chocolate-spot-associated virus corresponded to the torradovirus RNA1 and RNA2, respectively; however, sequence comparisons revealed 64–83% identities with

  3. Sybr Green- and TaqMan-Based Quantitative PCR Approaches Allow Assessment of the Abundance and Relative Distribution of Frankia Clusters in Soils.

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    Ben Tekaya, Seifeddine; Ganesan, Abirama Sundari; Guerra, Trina; Dawson, Jeffrey O; Forstner, Michael R J; Hahn, Dittmar

    2017-03-01

    The nodule-forming actinobacterial genus Frankia can generally be divided into 4 taxonomic clusters, with clusters 1, 2, and 3 representing nitrogen-fixing strains of different host infection groups and cluster 4 representing atypical, generally non-nitrogen-fixing strains. Recently, quantitative PCR (qPCR)-based quantification methods have been developed for frankiae of clusters 1 and 3; however, similar approaches for clusters 2 and 4 were missing. We amended a database of partial 23S rRNA gene sequences of Frankia strains belonging to clusters 1 and 3 with sequences of frankiae representing clusters 2 and 4. The alignment allowed us to design primers and probes for the specific detection and quantification of these Frankia clusters by either Sybr Green- or TaqMan-based qPCR. Analyses of frankiae in different soils, all obtained from the same region in Illinois, USA, provided similar results, independent of the qPCR method applied, with abundance estimates of 10 × 105 to 15 × 105 cells (g soil)-1 depending on the soil. Diversity was higher in prairie soils (native, restored, and cultivated), with frankiae of all 4 clusters detected and those of cluster 4 dominating, while diversity in soils under Alnus glutinosa, a host plant for cluster 1 frankiae, or Betula nigra, a related nonhost plant, was restricted to cluster 1 and 3 frankiae and generally members of subgroup 1b were dominating. These results indicate that vegetation affects the basic composition of frankiae in soils, with higher diversity in prairie soils compared to much more restricted diversity under some host and nonhost trees.IMPORTANCE Root nodule formation by the actinobacterium Frankia is host plant specific and largely, but not exclusively, correlates with assignments of strains to specific clusters within the genus. Due to the lack of adequate detection and quantification tools, studies on Frankia have been limited to clusters 1 and 3 and generally excluded clusters 2 and 4. We have developed

  4. Impact of shelterbelts of different age on the content of nitrates and phosphates in ground water

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jaskulska, Renata; Wojciech Szajdak, Lech

    2010-05-01

    The investigations were carried out in the Agroecological Landscape Park situated 40 km South-West of Poznań in the upper Obra River watershed, Poland. The arable land constitutes 70%, shelterbelts and small afforestations about 14% and meadows and pastures about 12%. Shelterbelts belong to very efficient biogeochemical barriers. They decrease the migration of chemical compounds between ecosystems. The direction of ground water flow was from the adjoining cultivated field towards shelterbelts. Two shelterbelts of different humus guantity in surface layer soils were investigated. The age and species composition of plant was taken under consideration. The first one is 160-year-old shelterbelt, where predominant species is Robinia pseudoacacia, Quercus rober and Alnus glutinosa and is characterized by a well-developed humus level. The other one is 14-year-old shelterbelt. It includes 13 species of trees (Quercus petrea, Larix deciduas, Pinus silvestri, Populus nigra, Sorbus aucuparia) and reveals a small amount of humus. The soils are minerals, grey-brown podzolic in surface layer soils compound from light loamy sands and weakly loamy sands. The contents of N-NO3-, P-PO4-3, were investigated in the ground water under shelterbelts and adjoining cultivated fields. In addition, cationic sorptive capacity, specific surface areas, TOC were determined in soils. The smallest concentrations of nitrates (3.35 mg×l-1) and phosphates (0.02 mg×l-1) were observed in ground water under the 160-year-old shelterbelt. The physicochemical properties of soils under 160-year-old shelterbelt: specific surface areas (20.3 m2×g-1), cationic sorptive capacity (24.8 cmol(+)×kg-1), TOC (4.3%) was higher than in 14-year-old shelterbelt and in adjoining cultivated fields. The results revealed, that the 160-year-old shelterbelt characterizing developed humus more effectively than 14-year-old shelterbelt decreases the amounts of chemical compounds in ground water and sufficiently fulfils the

  5. Current net ecosystem exchange of CO2 in a young mixed forest: any heritage from the previous ecosystem?

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    Violette, Aurélie; Heinesch, Bernard; Erpicum, Michel; Carnol, Monique; Aubinet, Marc; François, Louis

    2013-04-01

    For 15 years, networks of flux towers have been developed to determine accurate carbon balance with the eddy-covariance method and determine if forests are sink or source of carbon. However, for prediction of the evolution of carbon cycle and climate, major uncertainties remain on the ecosystem respiration (Reco, which includes the respiration of above ground part of trees, roots respiration and mineralization of the soil organic matter), the gross primary productivity (GPP) and their difference, the net ecosystem exchange (NEE) of forests. These uncertainties are consequences of spatial and inter-annual variability, driven by previous and current climatic conditions, as well as by the particular history of the site (management, diseases, etc.). In this study we focus on the carbon cycle in two mixed forests in the Belgian Ardennes. The first site, Vielsalm, is a mature stand mostly composed of beeches (Fagus sylvatica) and douglas fir (Pseudotsuga menziesii) from 80 to 100 years old. The second site, La Robinette, was covered before 1995 with spruces. After an important windfall and a clear cutting, the site was replanted, between 1995 and 2000, with spruces (Piceas abies) and deciduous species (mostly Betula pendula, Aulnus glutinosa and Salix aurita). The challenge here is to highlight how initial conditions can influence the current behavior of the carbon cycle in a growing stand compared to a mature one, where initial conditions are supposed to be forgotten. A modeling approach suits particularly well for sensitivity tests and estimation of the temporal lag between an event and the ecosystem response. We use the forest ecosystem model ASPECTS (Rasse et al., Ecological Modelling 141, 35-52, 2001). This model predicts long-term forest growth by calculating, over time, hourly NEE. It was developed and already validated on the Vielsalm forest. Modelling results are confronted to eddy-covariance data on both sites from 2006 to 2011. The main difference between both

  6. Characterization of Cucumber Mosaic Virus Originating from Cucurbits in Serbia

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    Ana Vučurović

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Cucumber mosaic virus (CMV is considered one of the most economically importantplant viruses and has a worldwide distribution and a very wide host range including plantsfrom family Cucurbitaceae. In Serbia, on cucurbits CMV was detected in single and mixedinfections with Zucchini yellow mosaic virus (ZYMV and Watermelon mosaic virus (WMV. Viruses,including CMV, are constantly present in cucurbit crops, but their frequency changesby year and locality. Surveys and sample collections were conducted in cucurbit crops inthe period from 2008 to 2009 at 15 localities in Vojvodina province, and sample testing wascarried out using the DAS-ELISA method and commercially available antisera for six economicallymost important cucurbit viruses. In 2008, a total of 51 samples were collected from13 cucurbit crops of oilseed pumpkin Olinka variety, squash, and bottle gourd and CMV wasdetected in a total of 55% of tested samples with symptoms of viral infection. The most commoninfectious type was mixed infection with ZYMV and WMV (35.3%, and then mixedinfection with ZYMV (17.7% and WMV (2%. A total of 599 symptomatic samples of oilseedpumpkin Olinka variety, zucchini squash varieties Beogradska and Tosca, squash, and wintersquash were collected in 15 cucurbits crops in 2009. CMV was present in 4.4% of totalcollected samples, in single infections in 1.3%, and in mixed with WMV or ZYMV in 1.3%, and1.8%. Five CMV isolates were obtained by mechanical inoculations of N. glutinosa and oneof them was selected for further biological characterization. Test plants which were describedto be hosts of CMV expressed symptoms characteristic for those caused by CMV afterinoculations by isolate 115-08. CMV specific primers Au1u/Au2d were used to amplify an850 bp fragment using RT-PCR method. Amplified fragment encodes the entire viral coatprotein (CP gene and partial 5’ and 3’ UTRs of two selected CMV isolates. Amplified fragmentswere sequenced and deposited in the NCBI, where

  7. Nota sobre a molestia de virus do fumo denominada faixa das nervuras

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    A. S. Costa

    1942-02-01

    Full Text Available The present paper deals with the virus disease of the tobacco plant recently described by Kramer & Silberschmidt (12 under the name "faixa das nervuras" (veinbanding. New host plants are added to the list of suscepts, as follows : Nicotiana repanda Willd., JV. angustifolia (*, N. Gossey Domin, N. Sanderae Hort. ex. W. Watson, N. glutinosa L., N. longiflora Cav., N. paniculata L., Lycopersicon esculentum Mill., L. pimpinellifolium Mill., and Cyphomandra betacea Sendt. Datura stramonium L., already studied by Kramer & Silberschmidt (12 and Nicotiana glauca Grah., Nicandra physaloides Gaertn., Solanum nodiflorum (**, S. nigrum L., Lactuca sativa L., Brassica oleracea L., Vigna sinensis Endl. var. Black., and Dolichos lablab L., var. purpurens were found not to be susceptible to the virus. (* This species was received with this name from the Division of Tobacco and Plant Nutrition, U.S.D.A. (** One plant of S. nodiflorum out of 22 which were inoculated gave symptoms of veinbanding. However as no backinoculation was made it can not be stated with certainty if it was truly affected by this virus. The symptomatology on tobacco described by the above mentioned authors agrees as a whole with which has been observed that is : clearing of the veins, chlorotic spotting and veinbanding. In addition it is stated that the white necrotic spotting found associated with the disease on certain tobacco varieties, v. g. Sumatra and Turkish must be attributed to the same virus. On potato plants of the varieties President and Green Mountain the virus causes local streak-like symptoms followed by chlorotic mottling of young leaves. Late symptoms take the form of leaf-drop streak. The virus of "faixa das nervuras" is easily transmissible through the sap giving practically 100% of success. The physical properties of the virus are : tolerance to dilution 1:10.000, thermal death point 54°C. and logevity in vitro 72 hours. No vector of the virus is known. The statement of

  8. Metodología para la evaluación del potencial insecticida de especies forestales.

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    Morales Soto León

    2000-06-01

    Full Text Available La diversidad florística de Colombia plantea enormes retos de investigación, con miras a una utilización racional e integral de sus recursos forestales. Las plantas con efectos biocidas utilizables en el control de plagas o enfermedades revisten una singular importancia. El objetivo de este trabajo es plantear una metodología de fácil aplicación, bajo costo y rápidos resultados, que permita acopiar la información necesaria sobre el mayor número de especies con potencial en este sentido. La metodología plantea la siguiente secuencia: selección de las especies vegetales de interés, apoyada en los reportes bibliográficos, conocimiento ancestral y observaciones personales; recolección del material en el campo; preparación del extracto total a partir del material seco; pruebas iniciales con Artemia salina Lech. para detectar actividad biológica, a través de la determinación de la LC50 (las especies con LC50 menores de 1000 ppm se consideran promisorias y ameritan procesos posteriores de fraccionamiento químico, bioensayos con las sustancias más promisorias sobre algún organismo de interés particular y determinación final de los compuestos activos en la planta. La metodología descrita fue empleada en la evaluación del potencial de acción biocida de 5 especies arbóreas o arbustivas, Guarea guidonia (L. Sleumer y Trichia hirta L. (Meliaceae, Machaerium moritzianum Benth. (Fabaceae, Swinglea glutinosa Merrill. (Rutaceae y Mammea americana L. (Clusiaceae. Se utilizó para los bioensayos iniciales el microcrustáceo Artemia salina Leach como indicador del potencial biocida con el fin de seleccionar las dos especies más promisorias a partir de las LC50 obtenidas. Con las dos se realizaron los bioensayos para evaluar la acción fagoinhibidora en la hormiga arriera Atta cephalotes (L., y el posible control de Alconeura sp. (Homoptera: Cicadellidae, insecto chupador que afecta la ceiba verde Pseudobombax septenatum (Jacq. Dugand

  9. The effect of Liuwei Dihuang decoction on PI3K/Akt signaling pathway in liver of type 2 diabetes mellitus (T2DM) rats with insulin resistance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dai, Bing; Wu, Qinxuan; Zeng, Chengxi; Zhang, Jiani; Cao, Luting; Xiao, Zizeng; Yang, Menglin

    2016-11-04

    Liuwei Dihaung decoction (LWDHT) is a well-known classic traditional Chinese medicine formula, consists of six herbs including Rehmannia glutinosa Libosch.(family: Scrophulariaceae), Cornus officinalis Sieb.(family: Cornaceae), Dioscorea opposite Thunb.(family: Dioscoreaceae), Alisma orientale(G. Samuelsson) Juz (family: Alismataceae), Poria cocos (Schw.) Wolf (family: Polyporaceae) and Paeonia suffruticosa Andrews (family: Paeoniaceae). It has been used in the treatment of many types of diseases with signs of deficiency of Yin in the kidneys in China clinically. This study is aimed at investigating the effect of Liuwei dihuang decoction on PI3K/Akt signaling pathway in liver of T2DM rats with insulin resistance. T2DM model was induced in male Sprague-Dawley (SD) rats by high sugar and high fat diets combined with small dose of streptozocin (STZ) injection. The successful T2DM rats were randomly allocated three group--vehicle group, positive control group and Liuwei Dihuang decoction group. After 12-weeks treatment with distilled water, rosiglitazone and LWDHT by intragastric administration respectively, the rats were put to death in batches. The variance of fasting blood glucose (FBG) and fasting insulin (FINS) in serum were determined, the pathological changes of each rats' liver were observed by hematoxylin-eosin (HE) staining, the expression of insulin receptor substrate 2(IRS2), phosphatidylinositol 3-kinase (PI3K) and protein kinas B (Akt) involving the canonical PI3K/Akt signaling pathway were detected by Real-time fluorescent quantitative PCR (RT-PCR), and the expression level of IRS2, PI3K, Akt protein and phosphorylated IRS2, PI3K, Akt protein were evaluated by Western Blot. All the data were analyzed by SPSS 17.0. Four weeks of treatment with LWDHT could significantly decrease the level of FBG and FINS in serum, improve the cellular morphology of liver, kidney, pancreas tissue, and the expression of IRS2, PI3K, Akt mRNA and phosphorylated IRS2, PI3K, Akt

  10. [Sensitization to Castanea sativa pollen and pollinosis in northern Extremadura (Spain)].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cosmes Martín, P M; Moreno Ancillo, A; Domínguez Noche, C; Gutiérrez Vivas, A; Belmonte Soler, J; Roure Nolla, J M

    2005-01-01

    Castanea sativa pollen allergy has generally been considered to be uncommon and clinically insignificant. In our geographical area (Plasencia, Cáceres, Spain) Castanea sativa pollen is a major pollen. To determine the atmospheric fluctuations and prevalence of patients sensitized to Castanea pollen in our region and to compare this sensitization with sensitizations to other pollens. Patients with respiratory symptoms attending our outpatient clinic for the first time in 2003 were studied. The patients underwent skin prick tests with commercial extracts of a battery of inhalants including Castanea sativa pollen. Serologic specific IgE to Castanea sativa pollen was determined using the CAP system (Pharmacia and Upjohn, Uppsala, Sweden). Airborne pollen counts in our city were obtained using Cour collection apparatus over a 4-year period (2000 to 2003). The most predominant pollens detected were (mean of the maximal weekly concentrations over 4 years in pollen grains/m3): Quercus 968, Poacea 660, Olea 325, Platanus 229, Pinus 126, Cupresaceae 117, Plantago 109, Alnus 41, Populus 40, Castanea 32. We studied 346 patients (mean age: 24.1 years). In 210 patients with a diagnosis of pollinosis, the percentages of sensitization were: Dactylis glomerata 80.4%, Olea europea 71.9%, Fraxinus excelsior 68%, Plantago lanceolata 62.8%, Chenopodium album 60.9%, Robinia pseudoacacia 49%, Artemisia vulgaris 43.8%, Platanus acerifolia 36.6%, Parietaria judaica 36.1%, Populus nigra 32.3%, Betula alba 27.6%, Quercus ilex 21.4%, Alnus glutinosa 20.9%, Cupressus arizonica 7.6% and Castanea sativa 7.1%. Fifteen patients were sensitized to Castanea sativa and 14 had seasonal rhinoconjunctivitis and asthma. Ten patients had serum specific IgE to Castanea pollen (maximum value: 17.4 Ku/l). Castanea pollen is present in our area in large amounts from the 23rd to the 28th weeks of the year, with a peak pollen count in the 25th week. The most important allergenic pollens in northern Extremadura

  11. Screening of Hallucinogenic Compounds and Genomic Characterisation of 40 Anatolian Salvia Species.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hatipoglu, Seda Damla; Yalcinkaya, Burhanettin; Akgoz, Muslum; Ozturk, Turan; Goren, Ahmet C; Topcu, Gulacti

    2017-11-01

    Salvia, an important and widely available member of Lamiaceae family. Although comparative analysis on secondary metabolites in several Salvia species from Turkey has been reported, their hallucinogenic chemicals have not been screened thoroughly. This study provides LC-MS/MS analysis of 40 Salvia species for screening their psychoactive constituents of salvinorin A and salvinorin B. 5S-rRNA gene non-coding region of Salvia plants was sequenced, aligned and compared with that sequence of Salvia divinorum plant. Targeted molecules of salvinorin A and salvinorin B were quantified, using LC-MS/MS, from all aerial parts of 40 Salvia species, collected from different parts of Turkey. Regions of 5S-rRNA gene from different species were amplified by polymerase chain reaction and DNA sequences were aligned with Salvia divinorum DNA sequences. Very few of the Salvia species (S. recognita, S. cryptantha and S. glutinosa) contained relatively high levels of salvinorin A (212.86 ± 20.46 μg/g, 51.50 ± 4.95 μg/g and 38.92 ± 3.74 μg/g, respectively). Salvinorin B was also found in Salvia species of S. potentillifolia, S. adenocaulon and S. cryptantha as 2351.99 ± 232.22 μg/g, 768.78 ± 75.90 μg/g and 402.24 ± 39.71 μg/g, respectively. The sequences of 5S-rRNA gene of 40 different Salvia species were presented and it was found that none of the Salvia species in Turkey had similar DNA sequence to Salvia divinorum plant. This is the first report of screening 40 Salvia species in Turkey according to their psychoactive constituents, salvinorin A and salvinorin B and their genomic structures. It is possible that some of these Salvia species may exhibit some psycho activity. Thus, they need to be screened further. Copyright © 2017 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd. Copyright © 2017 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  12. Improving the Flash Flood Frequency Analysis using dendrogeomorphological evidences in the Arenal River crossing Arenas de San Pedro Village (Spanish Central System)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ruiz-Villanueva, V.; Ballesteros, J. A.; Díez-Herrero, A.; Bodoque, J. M.

    2009-04-01

    The flash flood frequency analysis in mountainous catchments presents specific scientific challenges. One of the challenges is the relevant gradient in precipitation intensity with altitude. Another challenge is the lack of information from rainfall or discharge gauge stations or from documentary sources. Dendrogeomorphology studies the response in the wood growth pattern and the botanical signs on the trees affected by geomorphological processes. With regard to the flood frequency, the dendrogeomorphological evidences bring forward valuable infomation about single past events (with annual or even seasonal precision) and their occurrence periodicity. The main macro-evidence that we can find in the tree trunk is a stem scar originated by a wound in the bark of the tree. When the tree grows, this wound remains reflected in the tree ring sequence. The best way to analyze the tree ring sequence is by using a complete section of the trunk, this couldn't be possible unless the tree is cut down. Due to the unfeasibility of cutting down the trees, in Dendrogeomorphology is enough to obtain an increment core, using a Pressler borer. Nevertheless, this study has been based on complete stem sections analysis facilitated for the felling works in the riverine vegetation in the Arenal River, carried out by the Tagus River Water Authority. These felling works have allowed us to obtain sections and to analyze the stump of the tree in situ. On this way, 100 samples of Alnus glutinosa and Fraxinus angustifolia located by the river along the Arenal River crossing Arenas de San Pedro Village (Ávila, northern slopes of the Gredos Mountain Range in the Spanish Central System) have been analyzed. This village is known for its historical problems of flood during extreme events. A meticulous fieldwork has been carried out. Every sample was analyzed locating its geomorphological position, the distance to the riverbed and the height of the stump in which the evidences were observed. Using a

  13. Reação de acessos de Lycopersicon spp. a um isolado de Potato Virus Y (PVYº de tomateiro Reaction of accesses of Lycopersicon spp. to an isolate of Potato Virus Y (PVYº in tomato

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    Silvia Regina Luz Palazzo

    2008-01-01

    Full Text Available Amostras de tomateiro (Lycopersicon esculentum Mill ‘Alambra’ coletadas nas regiões produtoras de Elias Fausto, Monte-Mor e Mogi-Guaçú (SP, com sintomas de amarelecimento foliar generalizado semelhante aqueles causados por vírus foram submetidas à identificação do agente causal, por testes biológicos de transmissão mecânica, pela determinação do círculo de hospedeiras, empregando-se plantas indicadoras e diferenciadoras pertencentes às famílias Chenopodiaceae e Solanaceae pela identificação sorológica por PTA-ELISA do Potato virus Y (PVY, Pepper yellow mosaic virus (PepYMV, Cucumber mosaic virus (CMV, Tomato mosaic virus (ToMV e DAS-ELISA com antissoros policlonais para as espécies Tomato spot wilt vírus (TSWV, Tomato chlorotic spot virus (TCSV, Groundnut ringspot virus (GRSV, Chrysanthemum stem necrosis virus (CSNV e anticorpos monoclonais para as estirpes do PVY comum (PVYº, PVY necrótico (PVY N e PVY clorótico (PVY C. Das amostras coletadas 19 reagiram positivamente, com o PVY em PTA-ELISA e PVYºem DAS-ELISA. Plantas de Chenopodium amaranticolor reagiram com sintoma local e plantas de Nicotiana glutinosa, N. tabacum ‘WB’, N. sylvestris, N.debneyi, N. tabacum ‘Sansun’ reagiram com sintomas de mosaico sistêmico; tomateiros ‘Alambra’ manifestaram sintomas de mosaico-amarelo. Plantas de Datura stramonium, D. metel e C. annuum ‘Magda’ não foram infectadas. A ausência de sintomas em C.annuum ‘Magda’, identificou a presença do PVY patotipo 1 (PVYº1, nas 19 amostras. Como foi identificada a mesma espécie de vírus nas amostras, optou-se pela inoculação do isolado de tomate ‘Alambra’ de Elias Fausto nos dezenove acessos de Lycopersicon spp. do Banco Ativo de Germoplasma (BAG- IAC. O delineamento dos experimentos foi inteiramente casualizado. A reação dos acessos foi avaliada pela manifestação dos sintomas, pelos resultados positivos ou negativos após testes de retro-inoculação e PTA

  14. Avaliação da resistência a tobamovirus em acessos de Capsicum spp. Evaluation of resistance of Capsicum spp. genotypes to tobamovirus

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    Márcia Aparecida Cezar

    2009-02-01

    Full Text Available A resistência em Capsicum spp a tobamovírus é governada pelos genes L¹ a L4. Baseado na capacidade de alguns isolados suplantarem a resistência destes genes, os tobamovírus podem ser classificados nos patótipos P0, P1, P1-2 e P1-2-3. No Brasil, até o momento as três espécies de tobamovírus conhecidas são: Tobacco mosaic virus (TMV, Tomato mosaic virus (ToMV, pertencentes aos patótipos P0 e Pepper mild mottle virus (PMMoV pertencente ao patótipo P1-2, respectivamente e podem infectar pimentas e pimentões. Oitenta e seis genótipos de pimentão e pimenta foram avaliados quanto à resistência a tobamovírus, sendo 62 de Capsicum annuum, 18 de C. baccatum e seis de C. chinense. Oito acessos de C. annuum, seis de C. baccatum e os acessos ICA #39, Pimenta de cheiro e PI 152225 de C. chinense apresentaram reação de hipersensibilidade ao ToMV, enquanto que o acesso Ancho de C. annuum foi considerado tolerante, permanecendo assintomático, porém permitindo a recuperação do vírus quando inoculado em Nicotiana glutinosa. Para o PMMoV patótipo P1,2 foram avaliados os acessos de pimentão e pimenta considerados resistentes ao ToMV. Somente o PI 152225 de C. chinense desencadeou reação de hipersensibilidade ao PMMoV, sendo fonte potencial de resistência para programas de melhoramento a este vírus no Brasil.The resistance of Capsicum spp to tobamoviruses is conferred by the genes series L¹ to L4. Based on the ability of some isolates to overcome the resistance genes, the tobamovirus can be classificated in the pathotypes P0, P1, P1-2 and P1-2-3. In Brazil, at this moment there are three species of tobamovirus: Tobacco mosaic virus (TMV, Tomato mosaic virus (ToMV, belonging to pathotype P0 and Pepper mild mottle virus (PMMoV belonging to pathotype P1-2 respectively, that can infect sweet and hot peppers. Eighty-six genotypes of sweet and hot pepper were evaluated for the resistance to tobamovirus. Eigth genotypes of C. annuum, five

  15. A black alder plantation improves the greenhouse gas balance of a degraded moist peat grassland

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bereswill, Sarah; Hoffmann, Mathias; Huth, Vytas; Popova, Yulia; Zak, Dominik; Augustin, Jürgen

    2017-04-01

    Drained peatlands are among the strongest terrestrial sources of the greenhouse gases (GHG) CO2 and N2O. Therefore, activities of peatland revitalisation through rewetting, often combined with the implementation of peat forming vegetation, aim to restore the GHG sink function that is characteristic for pristine peatlands. Black alder (Alnus glutinosa) naturally occurs in temperate marshes and minerotrophic peatlands (= fens) and is also suitable for paludiculture, the cultivation of biomass on wet or rewetted peatlands. However, only little information exists, if a black alder plantation can reduce the climate impact of restored peatlands. Therefore, we investigated the effect of a newly established black alder plantation on the net GHG balance of a degraded fen in north-eastern Germany during a two-year study (August 2010 - August 2012). We compared the alder plantation (Awet) with an extensively used meadow (Mwet) both characterized by very moist soil conditions and a drier reference meadow (Mdry) characterized by moderately moist soil conditions. CO2, CH4 and N2O fluxes were measured monthly to bi-monthly with the manual closed chamber method. Fluxes were calculated using a modular R script and gap filled to obtain continuous daily fluxes. Awet was a net GHG sink of -4.8 t CO2-eq ha-1 yr-1, Mwet was climate neutral (-0.03 t CO2-eq ha-1 yr-1), and Mdry was a net GHG source of 15.7 t CO2-eq ha-1 yr-1. This was mainly caused by CO2 uptake at the two very moist sites and a high CO2 release at the drier reference site. In addition, Awet was a larger CO2 sink than Mwet, likely caused by an additional CO2 uptake of the alder stand. All sites were significant CH4 sources. Due to inundation following extraordinarily heavy precipitation in summer 2011 remarkable CH4emission peaks were found on all sites which accounted for up to 70 % of the cumulated two-year CH4emissions. However, overall Awet emitted significantly lesser CH4(4.9 g C m-2 yr-1). We assume that the black

  16. Medicinal and local food plants in the south of Alava (Basque Country, Spain).

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    Alarcόn, Rocίo; Pardo-de-Santayana, Manuel; Priestley, Caroline; Morales, Ramón; Heinrich, Michael

    2015-12-24

    subcategories (common uses). The informants recognise and use a total of 184 species from 49 families. During interviews, 5658 individual use-reports were collected relating to three use-categories - as medicines, food and health-food. The two main groups with almost the same number of species each are health-food (75 species) and (locally gathered) food only (73), with medicinal uses only (36) being the smallest group. This highlights the important overlap between food and medicines. Overall, three core families were identified (based on the number of use reports and in the number of species): Asteraceae (25 species), Lamiaceae and Rosaceae (24 each). The most frequently reported species are Jasonia glutinosa, Chamaemelum nobile, Prunus spinosa and Quercus ilex subsp. ballota. The most important general use-subcategories are as raw vegetables (27.43% of the use-reports and including 81 species), infusions (14.74%/42) and gastrointestinal (12.53%/42). Conceptually foods and medicines are clearly distinguished but the intermediate group of health foods is more ambiguous. Food and medicinal uses of plants are culturally closely linked. A wide range of plants are known and many still used. The analysis shows that the Basques use a wide range of species which are typical for Western European cultures. In comparison to other studies in the Mediterranean countries there are many similarities in the uses of different families, species of plants and their use and preparations. Some of these plants are key Mediterranean species, often used for a multitude of uses as food and medicine. Copyright © 2015 The Authors. Published by Elsevier Ireland Ltd.. All rights reserved.

  17. Vegetation cover and land use impacts on soil water repellency in an Urban Park located in Vilnius, Lithuania

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pereira, Paulo; Cerda, Artemi

    2015-04-01

    It is strongly recognized that vegetation cover, land use have important impacts on the degree of soil water repellency (SWR). Soil water repellency is a natural property of soils, but can be induced by natural and anthropogenic disturbances as fire and soil tillage (Doerr et al., 2000; Urbanek et al., 2007; Mataix-Solera et al., 2014). Urban parks are areas where soils have a strong human impact, with implications on their hydrological properties. The aim of this work is to study the impact of different vegetations cover and urban soils impact on SWR and the relation to other soil variables as pH, Electrical Conductivity (EC) and soil organic matter (SOM) in an urban park. The study area is located in Vilnius city (54°.68' N, 25°.25' E). It was collected 15 soil samples under different vegetation cover as Pine (Pinus Sylvestris), Birch (Alnus glutinosa), Penduculate Oak (Quercus robur), Platanus (Platanus orientalis) and other human disturbed areas as forest trails and soils collected from human planted grass. Soils were taken to the laboratory, air-dried at room temperature and sieved with the 3600 (extremely water repellent). The results showed significant differences among the different vegetation cover (Kruskal-Wallis H=20.64, pmanagement scenarios, CGL2013-47862-C2-1-R), funded by the Spanish Ministry of Economy and Competitiveness; Fuegored; RECARE (Preventing and Remediating Degradation of Soils in Europe Through Land Care, FP7-ENV-2013-TWO STAGE), funded by the European Commission; and for the COST action ES1306 (Connecting European connectivity research). References Bisdom, E.B.A., Dekker, L., Schoute, J.F.Th. (1993) Water repellency of sieve fractions from sandy soils and relationships with organic material and soil structure. Geoderma, 56, 105-118. Doerr, S.H., Shakesby, R.A., Walsh, R.P.D. (2000) Soil water repellency: Its causes, characteristics and hydro-geomorphological significance. Earth-Science Reviews, 51, 33-65. Doerr, S.H. (1998) On

  18. Medicinal and local food plants in the south of Alava (Basque Country, Spain)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alarcόn, Rocίo; Pardo-de-Santayana, Manuel; Priestley, Caroline; Morales, Ramón; Heinrich, Michael

    2015-01-01

    three categories were divided in 27 subcategories (common uses). Results and discussion The informants recognise and use a total of 184 species from 49 families. During interviews, 5658 individual use-reports were collected relating to three use-categories – as medicines, food and health-food. The two main groups with almost the same number of species each are health-food (75 species) and (locally gathered) food only (73), with medicinal uses only (36) being the smallest group. This highlights the important overlap between food and medicines. Overall, three core families were identified (based on the number of use reports and in the number of species): Asteraceae (25 species), Lamiaceae and Rosaceae (24 each). The most frequently reported species are Jasonia glutinosa, Chamaemelum nobile, Prunus spinosa and Quercus ilex subsp. ballota. The most important general use-subcategories are as raw vegetables (27.43% of the use-reports and including 81 species), infusions (14.74%/42) and gastrointestinal (12.53%/42). Conceptually foods and medicines are clearly distinguished but the intermediate group of health foods is more ambiguous. Conclusion Food and medicinal uses of plants are culturally closely linked. A wide range of plants are known and many still used. The analysis shows that the Basques use a wide range of species which are typical for Western European cultures. In comparison to other studies in the Mediterranean countries there are many similarities in the uses of different families, species of plants and their use and preparations. Some of these plants are key Mediterranean species, often used for a multitude of uses as food and medicine. PMID:26481607

  19. Improving the flash flood frequency analysis applying dendrogeomorphological evidences

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ruiz-Villanueva, V.; Ballesteros, J. A.; Bodoque, J. M.; Stoffel, M.; Bollschweiler, M.; Díez-Herrero, A.

    2009-09-01

    .) influenced by flash flood events were sampled using an increment borer. For each tree sampled, additional information were recorded including the geographical position (GPS measure), the geomorphological situation based on a detailed geomorphological map, the social position within neighbouring trees, a description of the external disturbances and information on tree diameter, tree height and the position of the cores extracted. 265 cores were collected. In the laboratory, the 265 samples were analyzed using the standard methods: surface preparation, counting of tree rings as well as measuring of ring widths using a digital LINTAB positioning table and TSAP 4.6 software. Increment curves of the disturbed trees were then crossdated with a reference chronology in order to correct faulty tree-ring series derived from disturbed samples and to determine initiation of abrupt growth suppression or release. The age of the trees in this field site is between 50 and 100 years old. In the field most of the trees were tilted (93 %) and showed exposed roots (64 %). In the laboratory, growth suppressions were detected in 165 samples. Based on the number of trees showing disturbances, the intensity of the disturbance and the spatial distribution of the trees in the field, seven well represented events were dated for the last 50 years: 2005, 2000, 1996, 1976, 1973, 1966 and 1963. The second field site was a reach of 2 km length along the Arenal River, where the stream is channelized. Here stumps from previously felled trees could be analyzed directly in the field. 100 Alnus glutinosa (L.) Gaertn. and Fraxinus angustifolia (Vahl.) cross sections were investigated in order to date internal wounds. Different carpenter tools, sanding paper and magnifying glasses were used to count tree rings and to date the wounds in the field. In addition to the dating in the field, 22 cross sections were sampled and analyzed in the laboratory using the standard methods. The age of the trees ranges between 30

  20. population in Slovakia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dravecký Miroslav

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available V rokoch 2011 – 2014 sa realizoval monitoring hniezdnej populácie orla krikľavého (Aquila pomarina v ôsmich chránených vtáčích územiach na Slovensku. U 149 hniezdnych párov z celkových 272 úspešných hniezdení počas 4 hniezdnych sezón vyletelo 277 mláďat. Priemerná reprodukčná úspešnosť predstavovala 0,51 juv./prítomný pár, 0,69 juv./hniezdiaci pár a 1,37 juv./100 km2. V uvedenom období bolo okolo hniezd orlov krikľavých ustanovených celkom 151 ochranných zón, ktoré zabezpečili ochranu 119 hniezdnych teritórií, čo predstavuje cca 17 % hniezdnej populácie orla krikľavého na Slovensku. Testovaním účinnosti ochranných zón sa zistilo, že v hniezdach s vyhlásenou ochrannou zónou je vyššia pravdepodobnosť úspešného odchovania mláďat v porovnaní s hniezdami bez takejto zóny. Pravdepodobnosť, že hniezdenie bude úspešné v hniezdach hniezdiacich párov bez ochrannej zóny bola 48.1% (95% confidence intervals (CIs: 37.4–59.0%, v hniezdach s ochrannou zónou 64.8% (95% CIs: 59.8–69.6%. Medzi 5 najčastejšie využívaných hniezdnych stromov na hniezdenie A. pomarina na Slovensku patrí Picea abies 61× (28,4%, Pinus sylvestris 45× (20,9%, Quercus sp. 36× (16,7%, Fagus sylvatica 25× (11,6% a Abies alba 18× (8,4%. Medzi zriedkavejšie druhy hniezdnych stromov patrí Larix decidua 12× (5,6% a Alnus glutinosa 3× (1,4%, ďalších 11 druhov hniezdnych stromov nedosiahli 1 %. Najvyšší počet hniezdnych stromov (n = 215, tj. 34 hniezd (15,8% sa nachádzal v intervale nadmorskej výšky 401 – 450 m a 29 hniezd (13,5% v intervale 351 – 400 m n. m. Ostatné výškové pásma boli pod hranicou 10%. 54% zistených hniezd (116 hniezd sa nachádza vo výškovom pásme 301 – 600 m n. m., 71 hniezd (33% v pásme 600 – 900 m n. m. Najnižšie situované hniezdo bolo v nadmorskej výške 150 m a najvyššie 950 m, priemer bol 595,01 m. Najvyšší počet hniezd (n = 209 bol na strome

  1. Input and turnover of forest tree litter in the Forsmark and Oskarshamn areas

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mjoefors, Kristina; Johansson, Maj-Britt; Nilsson, Aake [Dept. of Forest Soi ls, Swedish Univ. of Agricultural Sciences (Sweden); Hyvoenen, Riitta [Dept. of Eco logy, Swedish Univ. of Agricultural Sciences (Sweden)

    2007-04-15

    The site investigations reported here were conducted to provide data for the comprehensive descriptive ecosystem model that is being constructed. This report provides estimates of annual inputs of aboveground litter from trees (dry mass and amounts of C and N), litter decomposition rates and changes in organic and inorganic components in litter during decomposition. The study in the Forsmark area comprised two Norway spruce (Picea abies (L.) Karst) stands (sites F1 and F3), and a mixed stand of Norway spruce and alder (Alnus glutinosa (L.) Gaertn.) (site F2). The study in the Oskarshamn area comprised one common oak stand (Quercus robur L.) (site O1), one Scots pine stand (Pinus silvestris L.) (site O2) and one Norway spruce stand (site O3). In the Forsmark area, the aboveground litterfall from trees was of similar magnitude at sites F1 and F2, but considerably lower at site F3. At the former sites the average annual litterfall amounted to 195 and 231 gdw/m{sup 2} respectively, whereas the latter site received only 136 gdw/m{sup 2}. There was also a large variation in annual litterfall between stands in the Oskarshamn area. The spruce stand at site O3 exhibited the highest litterfall (almost 400 gdw/m{sup 2}), followed by the oak stand at site O1 (with almost 300 gdw/m{sup 2}), whereas the pine stand at site O2 had the lowest (less than 150 gdw/m{sup 2}). The proportion of needles/leaves in the total litterfall varied between 65% and 75% for the stands. The amount of carbon (C) returned in aboveground litterfall amounted to between 60 and 110 gdw/m{sup 2}/yr at the forest sites within the Forsmark area. The corresponding range for the sites in the Oskarshamn area was 70 to 190 gdw/m{sup 2}/yr. At sites O1 and O2 in Oskarshamn, about 3.6 gdw/m{sup 2}/yr of nitrogen (N) were returned annually to the forest floor by the aboveground litterfall. This was over four times the N amount deposited in the Scots pine stand in the same area (about 0.8 gdw/m{sup 2}/yr). At the

  2. ANTIMICROBIAL ACTIVITY OF THE SUBSTANCES RECEIVED FROM RAW MATERIALS OF BIRCH FAMILY PLANTS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fedchenkova Yu.A

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available Introduction. In accordance with the last events in Ukraine (considering military operations in anti-terrorist operation in the Luhansk and Donetsk regions the domestic medicine is in great need in preparations with antimicrobial activity. Our attention as the sources of receiving biologically active substances with antimicrobial activity was drawn with birch Betulaceae family plants – hazel ordinary Corylus avellana L. and black alder Alnus glutinosa (L. Gaertn. It is known that in medicine the leaves of hazel ordinary are used as antiseptic, anti-inflammatory, vesselrestorative drug, and the leaves of black alder reveal the antiinflammatory, astringent, wound healing, spasmolytic and choleretic action. However, the drugs with antimicrobial action received from the leaves of these plants are absent on the market of Ukraine. Therefore the studying of antimicrobial activity of this type of raw materials received from hazel ordinary and black alder, for creation of new medicines, is now one of the main directions in pharmacy. For this purpose we have revealed tinctures, spirit, lipophilic and polysacharid fractions received from the leaves of hazel ordinary and black alder. The purpose of our research is studying of antimicrobial activity of revealed substance received from the leaves of black alder and hazel ordinary. Materials and methods. There were being examined tinctures, lipophilic, spirit and polysacharid fractions received from the leaves of hazel ordinary and black alder. The test of antimicrobial effect of substances was carried out by means of serial dilution concerning the following six reference cultures: Staphylococcus aureus ATCC 6538-P, Candida albicans ATCC 885-653, Escherichia coli ATCC 25922, Bacillus subtilis ATCC 6833, Bacillus cereus ATCC 10702, Pseudomonas aeruginosa ATCC 9027, according to the State Pharmacopoeia of Ukraine, in the Department of Microbiology and Immunology of KMAPE. For the experiment there was prepared

  3. بررسی صفات کیفی و تحلیل عملکرد گل همیشه‌بهار (Calendula officinalis L. طی دوره رشد این گیاه در شرایط تنش خشکی

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    مهدی ابراهیمی

    2017-08-01

    Full Text Available مقدمه علیرغم اینکه مطالعات زیادی در زمینه تاثیرات تنش های محیطی بر رشد و عملکرد گیاهان زراعی انجام شده است، اما اطلاعات بسیار کمی در ارتباط با پاسخ گیاهان دارویی به این تنش ها وجود دارد (Amiri Deh Ahmadi et al., 2014. در حالیکه تنش خشکی ممکن است رشد برخی از گیاهان دارویی از جمله گل راعی (Hypericum brasiliense (Nacif de Abreu and Mazzafera, 2005 و چتر گندمی (Bupleurum chinense (Zhu et al., 2009 را کاهش دهد، اما نتایج بسیاری از مطالعات نشان میدهد که خشکی میزان متابولیت های ثانویه در بسیاری از گونه های گیاهی از جمله رهمانیا (Rehmannia glutinosa (Chung et al., 2006 را افزایش میدهد. هر چند گزارشات متناقضی نیز در این زمینه وجود دارد که از آن جمله میتوان به کاهش معنی دار تمامی پارامترهای رشدی و روغن های فرار در نعناء (Mentha piperita L. اشاره کرد (Khorasaninejad et al., 2011. لذا با توجه به اهمیت همیشه بهار بعنوان یک گیاه دارویی مهم در برخی صنایع از جمله داروسازی (Bousselsela et al., 2012، اثرات تنش خشکی بر عملکرد گل و برخی صفات مرتبط با کیفیت گل در دو نوع همیشه بهار در این مطالعه مورد بررسی قرار گرفت. مواد و روش ها اثر تنش خشکی بر کیفیت و کمیت گل همیشه بهار با استفاده از طرح اسپلیت پلات در قالب بلوک های کامل تصادفی با چهار تکرار در دانشکده کشاورزی دانشگاه بیرجند و در سال 1394 مورد مطالعه قرار گرفت. ت