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Sample records for hafnium 161

  1. Metallurgy of zirconium and hafnium

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Baryshnikov, N.V.; Geger, V.Eh.; Denisova, N.D.; Kazajn, A.A.; Kozhemyakin, V.A.; Nekhamkin, L.G.; Rodyakin, V.V.; Tsylov, Yu.A.

    1979-01-01

    Considered are those properties of zirconium and of hafnium, which are of practical interest for the manufacture of these elements. Systematized are the theoretical and the practical data on the procedures for thermal decomposition of zirconia and for obtaining zirconium dioxide and hafnium dioxide by a thermal decomposition of compounds and on the hydrometallurgical methods for extracting zirconium and hafnium. Zirconium and hafnium fluorides and chlorides production procedures are described. Considered are the iodide and the electrolytic methods of refining zirconium and hafnium

  2. SEPARATING HAFNIUM FROM ZIRCONIUM

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lister, B.A.J.; Duncan, J.F.

    1956-08-21

    A dilute aqueous solution of zirconyl chloride which is 1N to 2N in HCl is passed through a column of a cation exchange resin in acid form thereby absorbing both zirconium and associated hafnium impurity in the mesin. The cation exchange material with the absorbate is then eluted with aqueous sulfuric acid of a O.8N to 1.2N strength. The first portion of the eluate contains the zirconium substantially free of hafnium.

  3. Commercial production of metal hafnium and hafnium-based products

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Negodin, D.A.; Shtutsa, M.G.; Akhtonov, S.G.; Il'enko, E.V.; Kobyzev, A.M.

    2012-01-01

    Hafnium possesses a unique complex of physical and chemical properties which allow the application of products on its basis in various industries. Joint Stock Company 'Chepetsky Mechanical Plant' is the single enterprise which produces hafnium on the territory of Russia. The manufacture of metal hafnium with the total content of zirconium and hafnium, at least, 99,8 % of weights is developed at the present time at Joint Stock Company CHMZ. The weight of melted hafnium ingots is up to 1 ton. Manufacture of wide range of products from hafnium is implemented. The plates from a hafnium with thickness of 0.60 mm which are used for emergency control cartridges of VVER-440 reactors are the most critical product. It is shown that ingots and products obtained from metal hafnium correspond to the Russian and international standards for reactor materials in chemical composition, mechanical and corrosion properties.

  4. Zirconium and hafnium

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jones, James V.; Piatak, Nadine M.; Bedinger, George M.; Schulz, Klaus J.; DeYoung,, John H.; Seal, Robert R.; Bradley, Dwight C.

    2017-12-19

    Zirconium and hafnium are corrosion-resistant metals that are widely used in the chemical and nuclear industries. Most zirconium is consumed in the form of the main ore mineral zircon (ZrSiO4, or as zirconium oxide or other zirconium chemicals. Zirconium and hafnium are both refractory lithophile elements that have nearly identical charge, ionic radii, and ionic potentials. As a result, their geochemical behavior is generally similar. Both elements are classified as incompatible because they have physical and crystallochemical properties that exclude them from the crystal lattices of most rock-forming minerals. Zircon and another, less common, ore mineral, baddeleyite (ZrO2), form primarily as accessory minerals in igneous rocks. The presence and abundance of these ore minerals in igneous rocks are largely controlled by the element concentrations in the magma source and by the processes of melt generation and evolution. The world’s largest primary deposits of zirconium and hafnium are associated with alkaline igneous rocks, and, in one locality on the Kola Peninsula of Murmanskaya Oblast, Russia, baddeleyite is recovered as a byproduct of apatite and magnetite mining. Otherwise, there are few primary igneous deposits of zirconium- and hafnium-bearing minerals with economic value at present. The main ore deposits worldwide are heavy-mineral sands produced by the weathering and erosion of preexisting rocks and the concentration of zircon and other economically important heavy minerals, such as ilmenite and rutile (for titanium), chromite (for chromium), and monazite (for rare-earth elements) in sedimentary systems, particularly in coastal environments. In coastal deposits, heavy-mineral enrichment occurs where sediment is repeatedly reworked by wind, waves, currents, and tidal processes. The resulting heavy-mineral-sand deposits, called placers or paleoplacers, preferentially form at relatively low latitudes on passive continental margins and supply 100 percent of

  5. SEPARATION OF HAFNIUM FROM ZIRCONIUM

    Science.gov (United States)

    Overholser, L.B.; Barton, C.J. Sr.; Ramsey, J.W.

    1960-05-31

    The separation of hafnium impurities from zirconium can be accomplished by means of organic solvent extraction. The hafnium-containing zirconium feed material is dissolved in an aqueous chloride solution and the resulting solution is contacted with an organic hexone phase, with at least one of the phases containing thiocyanate. The hafnium is extracted into the organic phase while zirconium remains in the aqueous phase. Further recovery of zirconium is effected by stripping the onganic phase with a hydrochloric acid solution and commingling the resulting strip solution with the aqueous feed solution. Hexone is recovered and recycled by means of scrubbing the onganic phase with a sulfuric acid solution to remove the hafnium, and thiocyanate is recovered and recycled by means of neutralizing the effluent streams to obtain ammonium thiocyanate.

  6. Calorimetric measurements on hafnium titanate

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kandan, R.; Prabhakara Reddy, B.; Panneerselvam, G.; Nagarajan, K.

    2012-01-01

    Owing to its desirable nuclear and mechanical properties such as good absorption cross-section for thermal neutrons (105 barns), hafnium titanate (HfTiO 4 ) finds application as control rods for nuclear reactors. An accurate knowledge of the thermo physical properties of this material is necessary for design of control rod and for modeling its performance. Heat capacity is an important thermodynamic property that determines the temperature dependent variation of all other thermodynamic properties. Hence enthalpy increments of hafnium titanate (HfTiO 4 ) were measured in the temperature range 803-1663 K by employing the method of inverse drop calorimetry using high temperature differential calorimeter

  7. Hafnium carbide formation in oxygen deficient hafnium oxide thin films

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rodenbücher, C. [Forschungszentrum Jülich GmbH, Peter Grünberg Institute (PGI-7), JARA-FIT, 52425 Jülich (Germany); Hildebrandt, E.; Sharath, S. U.; Kurian, J.; Komissinskiy, P.; Alff, L. [Technische Universität Darmstadt, Institute of Materials Science, 64287 Darmstadt (Germany); Szot, K. [Forschungszentrum Jülich GmbH, Peter Grünberg Institute (PGI-7), JARA-FIT, 52425 Jülich (Germany); University of Silesia, A. Chełkowski Institute of Physics, 40-007 Katowice (Poland); Breuer, U. [Forschungszentrum Jülich GmbH, Central Institute for Engineering, Electronics and Analytics (ZEA-3), 52425 Jülich (Germany); Waser, R. [Forschungszentrum Jülich GmbH, Peter Grünberg Institute (PGI-7), JARA-FIT, 52425 Jülich (Germany); RWTH Aachen, Institute of Electronic Materials (IWE 2), 52056 Aachen (Germany)

    2016-06-20

    On highly oxygen deficient thin films of hafnium oxide (hafnia, HfO{sub 2−x}) contaminated with adsorbates of carbon oxides, the formation of hafnium carbide (HfC{sub x}) at the surface during vacuum annealing at temperatures as low as 600 °C is reported. Using X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy the evolution of the HfC{sub x} surface layer related to a transformation from insulating into metallic state is monitored in situ. In contrast, for fully stoichiometric HfO{sub 2} thin films prepared and measured under identical conditions, the formation of HfC{sub x} was not detectable suggesting that the enhanced adsorption of carbon oxides on oxygen deficient films provides a carbon source for the carbide formation. This shows that a high concentration of oxygen vacancies in carbon contaminated hafnia lowers considerably the formation energy of hafnium carbide. Thus, the presence of a sufficient amount of residual carbon in resistive random access memory devices might lead to a similar carbide formation within the conducting filaments due to Joule heating.

  8. Hafnium isotope stratigraphy of ferromanganese crusts

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee; Halliday; Hein; Burton; Christensen; Gunther

    1999-08-13

    A Cenozoic record of hafnium isotopic compositions of central Pacific deep water has been obtained from two ferromanganese crusts. The crusts are separated by more than 3000 kilometers but display similar secular variations. Significant fluctuations in hafnium isotopic composition occurred in the Eocene and Oligocene, possibly related to direct advection from the Indian and Atlantic oceans. Hafnium isotopic compositions have remained approximately uniform for the past 20 million years, probably reflecting increased isolation of the central Pacific. The mechanisms responsible for the increase in (87)Sr/(86)Sr in seawater through the Cenozoic apparently had no effect on central Pacific deep-water hafnium.

  9. Ferroelectricity in undoped hafnium oxide

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Polakowski, Patrick; Müller, Johannes

    2015-01-01

    We report the observation of ferroelectric characteristics in undoped hafnium oxide thin films in a thickness range of 4–20 nm. The undoped films were fabricated using atomic layer deposition (ALD) and embedded into titanium nitride based metal-insulator-metal (MIM) capacitors for electrical evaluation. Structural as well as electrical evidence for the appearance of a ferroelectric phase in pure hafnium oxide was collected with respect to film thickness and thermal budget applied during titanium nitride electrode formation. Using grazing incidence X-Ray diffraction (GIXRD) analysis, we observed an enhanced suppression of the monoclinic phase fraction in favor of an orthorhombic, potentially, ferroelectric phase with decreasing thickness/grain size and for a titanium nitride electrode formation below crystallization temperature. The electrical presence of ferroelectricity was confirmed using polarization measurements. A remanent polarization P r of up to 10 μC cm −2 as well as a read/write endurance of 1.6 × 10 5 cycles was measured for the pure oxide. The experimental results reported here strongly support the intrinsic nature of the ferroelectric phase in hafnium oxide and expand its applicability beyond the doped systems

  10. Study of fine structure of deformed hafnium

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Voskresenskaya, L.A.; Petukhova, A.S.; Kovalev, K.S.

    1978-01-01

    Variations in the hafnium fine structure following the cold plastic deformation have been studied. The fine structure condition has been studied through the harmonic analysis of the profile of the X-ray diffraction line, obtained at the DRON-I installation. Received has been the dependence of the crystal lattice microdistortions value on the deformation extent for hafnium. This dependence is compared with the corresponding one for zirconium. It is found out that at all the deformations the microdistortion distribution is uniform. The microdistortion value grows with the increase in the compression. During the mechanical impact higher microdistortions of the crystal lattice occur in the hafnium rather than in zirconium

  11. Hafnium - material for chemical apparatus engineering

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jennert, D.

    1981-01-01

    This work describes - on the background of available literature - the properties of hafnium in technical quality (DIN-material No. 2.6400) as material for chemical apparatus engineering. The occurence, refining, physical and chemical properties will be described as well as the material behavior. In conclusion, it has been found that there is, at present, sufficient information for the engineering of hafnium which has to be completed by additional investigations for special applications. (orig.) [de

  12. Determination of hafnium by atomic absorption spectrometry

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yoshida, Isao; Kobayashi, Hiroshi; Ueno, Keihei.

    1977-01-01

    Optimum conditions for atomic absorption spectrophotometric determination of hafnium were investigated by use of a Jarrel-Ash AA-1 instrument which was equipped with a premixed gas burner slotted 50 mm in length and 0.4 mm in width. Absorption of hafnium, which was atomized in an nitrous oxide-acetylene flame, was measured on a resonance line at 307.29 nm. The absorption due to hafnium was enhanced in the presence of ammonium fluoride and iron(III) ion, as shown in Figs. 2 and 3, depending on their concentration. The highest absorption was attained by the addition of (0.15 -- 0.3)M ammonium fluoride, 0.07 M of iron(III) ion and 0.05 M of hydrochloric acid. An excess of the additives decreased the absorption. The presence of zirconium, which caused a significant interference in the ordinary analytical methods, did not affect the absorption due to hafnium, if the zirconium concentration is less than 0.2 M. A standard procedure was proposed; A sample containing a few mg of hafnium was dissolved in a 25-ml volumetric flask, and ammonium fluoride, ferric nitrate and hydrochloric acid were added so that the final concentrations were 0.3, 0.07 and 0.05 M, respectively. Atomic absorption was measured on the aqueous solution in a nitrous oxide-acetylene flame and the hafnium content was calculated from the absorbance. Sensitivity was as high as 12.5 μg of Hf/ml/l% absorption. The present method is especially recommendable to the direct determination of hafnium in samples containing zirconium. (auth.)

  13. Titanium(IV), zirconium, hafnium and thorium

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Brown, Paul L.; Ekberg, Christian

    2016-01-01

    Titanium can exist in solution in a number of oxidation states. The titanium(IV) exists in acidic solutions as the oxo-cation, TiO 2+ , rather than Ti 4+ . Zirconium is used in the ceramics industry and in nuclear industry as a cladding material in reactors where its reactivity towards hydrolysis reactions and precipitation of oxides may result in degradation of the cladding. In nature, hafnium is found together with zirconium and as a consequence of the contraction in ionic radii that occurs due to the 4f -electron shell, the ionic radius of hafnium is almost identical to that of zirconium. All isotopes of thorium are radioactive and, as a consequence of it being fertile, thorium is important in the nuclear fuel cycle. The polymeric hydrolysis species that have been reported for thorium are somewhat different to those identified for zirconium and hafnium, although thorium does form the Th 4 (OH) 8 8+ species.

  14. Gravimetric determination of hafnium through its arsenate in carbide and boride of hafnium

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rasulbekova, R.A.; Mamedov, I.A.

    1976-01-01

    A gravimetric method of determining hafnium through hydroarsenate has been recommended. The method differs from the known ones by its simplicity and by the recalculation coefficient which is more than by 50% smaller than that used in preparing a weight form of HfO 2 . Upon development of gravimetric determination of hafnium through hydro-and pyroarsenate, an investigation has been conducted with the aim to find some physico-chemical constants of hafnium hydroarsenate. The weighed amount of hafnium hydroarsenate is dissolved in sulphuric acid (2:5). The precipitate of hafnium hydroarsenate has been studied for recording infrared absorption spectra. Thermographic analysis of the precipitate has been performed. Thermogram reveals endothermal effect at 105 deg C and exothermal at 840 deg C. Water solubility of hafnium has been determined equal to 1.75x10 6 g mol/l. The corresponding solubility product of the precipitate has been calculated which is 2.1x10 -17 . It is shown that the method possesses certain selectivity, sufficient accuracy, and is rather fast. It has been established that determination can be performed in the presence of excess amounts of ions

  15. Method of separating hafnium from zirconium

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Megy, J.A.

    1980-01-01

    English. A new anhydrous method was developed for separating zirconium and hafnium, which gives higher separation factors and is more economical than previous methods. A molten phase, comprising a solution of unseparated zirconium and hafnium and a solvent metal, is first prepared. The molten metal phase is contacted with a fused salt phase which includes a zirconium salt. Zirconium and hafnium separation is effected by mutual displacement with hafnium being transported from the molten metal phase to the fused salt phase, while zirconium is transported from the fused salt phase to the molten metal phase. The solvent metal is less electropositive than zirconium. Zinc was chosen as the solvent metal, from a group which also included cadmium, lead, bismuth, copper, and tin. The fused salt phase cations are more electropositive than zirconium and were selected from a group comprising the alkali elements, the alkaline earth elements, the rare earth elements, and aluminum. A portion of the zirconium in the molten metal phase was oxidized by injecting an oxidizing agent, chlorine, to form zirconium tetrachlorid

  16. Kinetic studies on the hafnium nad deuterium

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bing Wenzeng; Long Xinggui; Zhu Zuliang

    2009-04-01

    Through the method of reaction rate analysis in a constant volume reactor, the time dependence of the pressure drop of the hafnium deuteride formation are studied over a temperature range 573-873 K on a metal hydride thermodynamic and kinetic parameters measuring apparatus. The rate constants of the hafnium deuteride formation, which are 0.0530 s -1 , 0.0452 s -1 , 0.0319 s -1 , 0.0261 s -1 , are calculated at a serial temperatures of 573 K, 673 K, 773 K, 873 K and the initial pressure of 13 kPa. The activation energy of the reaction is (-10.1±1.5) kJ·mol -1 . Comparing the above results with those of titanium deuteride formation on the same measuring apparatus, the kinetic mechanism of the deuteride formation of hafnium and titanium is considered different. It is concluded that the reaction rate of hafnium absorbing deuterium may be controlled by phase transformation and surface oxidation. (authors)

  17. Recovery of hafnium values from loaded extraction solvent

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Abodishish, H.A.

    1989-01-01

    This patent describes an improvement in a process for recovering high purity hafnium hydroxide from a methyl isobutyl ketone organic solvent that is substantially free of sulfate ions and contains hafnium thiocyanate and thiocyanic acid. The improvement comprising reacting the organic solvent with ammonia to produce a reaction product in the form of a methyl isobutyl ketone organic solvent that is substantially free of sulfate ions and contains ammonium thiocyanite solution and hafnium hydroxide; separating the constituents of the reaction product in accordance with their respective specific gravities to produce a hafnium hydroxide sludge as one of the separation products; and removing the liquid component of the sludge to yield a high purity hafnium hydroxide ready for calcination to hafnium oxide

  18. Flotation separation of hafnium(IV) from aqueous solutions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Downey, D.M.; Narick, C.N.; Cohen, T.A.

    1985-01-01

    A simple, rapid method for the separation of hafnium from aqueous solutions was investigated using sup(175+181)Hf tracer. Cationic hafnium complex ions were floated from dilute acid solutions with sodium lauryl sulfate (SLS) and anionic hafnium complexes were floated from basic and oxalic acid solutions with hexadecyltrimethyl ammonium bromide (HTMAB). The conditions necessary for quantitative recovery of the metal and mechanisms of flotation are described. (author)

  19. Flotation separation of hafnium(IV) from aqueous solutions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Downey, D.M.; Narick, C.N.; Cohen, T.A.

    1985-09-01

    A simple, rapid method for the separation of hafnium from aqueous solutions was investigated using sup(175 + 181)Hf tracer. Cationic hafnium complex ions were floated from dilute acid solutions with sodium lauryl sulfate (SLS) and anionic hafnium complexes were floated from basic and oxalic acid solutions with hexadecyltrimethyl ammonium bromide (HTMAB). The conditions necessary for quantitative recovery of the metal and mechanisms of flotation are described. (author). 21 refs.; 5 figs.

  20. Titanium zirconium and hafnium coordination compounds with vanillin thiosemicarbazone

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Konunova, Ts.B.; Kudritskaya, S.A.

    1987-01-01

    Coordination compounds of titanium zirconium and hafnium tetrachlorides with vanillin thiosemicarbazone of MCl 4 x nLig composition, where n=1.5, 4 for titanium and 1, 2, 4 for zirconium and hafnium, are synthesized. Molar conductivity of ethanol solutions is measured; IR spectroscopic and thermochemical investigation are carried out. The supposition about ligand coordination via sulfur and azomethine nitrogen atoms is made. In all cases hafnium forms stable compounds than zirconium

  1. Niobium and hafnium grown on porous membranes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Morant, C.; Marquez, F.; Campo, T.; Sanz, J.M.; Elizalde, E.

    2010-01-01

    In this work we report on a method for fabricating highly ordered nanostructures of niobium and hafnium metals by physical vapour deposition using two different templates: anodized aluminum oxide membranes (AAO) and zirconium onto AAO membranes (Zr/AAO). The growth mechanism of these metal nanostructures is clearly different depending on the material used as a template. A different morphology was obtained by using AAO or Zr/AAO templates: when the metal is deposited onto AAO membranes, nanospheres with ordered hexagonal regularity are obtained; however, when the metal is deposited onto a Zr/AAO template, highly ordered nanocones are formed. The experimental approach described in this work is simple and suitable for synthesizing nanospheres or nanoholes of niobium and hafnium metals in a highly ordered structure.

  2. Joint titrimetric determination of zirconium and hafnium

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Vazquez, Cristina; Botbol, Moises; Bianco de Salas, G.N.; Cornell de Casas, M.I.

    1980-01-01

    A method for the joint titrimetric determination of zirconium and hafnium, which are elements of similar chemical behaviour, is described. The disodic salt of the ethylendiaminetetracetic acid (EDTA) is used for titration, while xilenol orange serves as final point indicator. Prior to titration it is important to evaporate with sulfuric acid, the solution resulting from the zirconium depolymerization process, to adjust the acidity and to eliminate any interferences. The method, that allows the quick and precise determination of zirconium and hafnium in quantities comprised between 0.01 and mg, was applied to the analysis of raw materials and of intermediate and final products in the fabrication of zirconium sponge and zircaloy. (M.E.L.) [es

  3. Molten salt scrubbing of zirconium or hafnium tetrachloride

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lee, E.D.; McLaughlin, D.F.

    1990-01-01

    This patent describes a continuous process for removing impurities of iron or aluminum chloride or both from vaporous zirconium or hafnium chloride or both. It comprises: introducing impure zirconium or hafnium chloride vapor or both into a middle portion of an absorbing column containing a molten salt phase, the molten salt phase absorbing the impurities of iron or aluminum chloride or both to produce chloride vapor stripped of zirconium or hafnium chloride; introducing sodium or potassium chloride or both into a top portion of the column; controlling the top portion of the column to between 300--375 degrees C.; heating a bottom portion of the column to 450--550 degrees C. To vaporize zirconium chloride or hafnium chloride or hafnium and zirconium chloride from the molten salt; withdrawing molten salt substantially free of zirconium and hafnium chloride from the bottom portion of the column; and withdrawing zirconium chloride or hafnium chloride or hafnium and zirconium chloride vapor substantially free of impurities of iron and aluminum chloride from the top of the column

  4. Investigation of ferromagnetism in oxygen deficient hafnium oxide thin films

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hildebrandt, Erwin; Kurian, Jose; Krockenberger, Yoshiharu; Alff, Lambert [Institut fuer Materialwissenschaft, TU Darmstadt (Germany); Suter, Andreas [PSI, Villingen (Switzerland); Wilhelm, Fabrice; Rogalev, Andrei [ESRF, Grenoble (France)

    2008-07-01

    Oxygen deficient thin films of hafnium oxide were grown on single crystal r-cut and c-cut sapphire by reactive molecular beam epitaxy. RF-activated oxygen was used for the in situ oxidation of hafnium oxide thin films. Oxidation conditions were varied substantially in order to create oxygen deficiency in hafnium oxide films intentionally. The films were characterized by X-ray and magnetic measurements. X-ray diffraction studies show an increase in lattice parameter with increasing oxygen deficiency. Oxygen deficient hafnium oxide thin films also showed a decreasing bandgap with increase in oxygen deficiency. The magnetisation studies carried out with SQUID did not show any sign of ferromagnetism in the whole oxygen deficiency range. X-ray magnetic circular dichroism measurements also confirmed the absence of ferromagnetism in oxygen deficient hafnium oxide thin films.

  5. Preparation of hafnium carbide by chemical vapor deposition

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hertz, Dominique.

    1974-01-01

    Hard, adhesive coatings of single-phase hafnium carbide were obtained by chemical vapor reaction in an atmosphere containing hafnium tetrachloride, methane and a large excess of hydrogen. By varying the gas phase composition and temperature the zones of formation of the different solid phases were studied and the growth of elementary hafnium and carbon deposits evaluated separately. The results show that the mechanism of hafnium carbide deposition does not hardly involve phenomene of homogeneous-phase methane decomposition or tetrachloride reduction by hydrogen unless the atmosphere is very rich or very poor in methane with respect to tetrachloride. However, hydrogen acting inversely on these two reactions, affects the stoichiometry of the substance deposited. The methane decomposition reaction is fairly slow, the reaction leading to hafnium carbide deposition is faster and that of tetrachloride reduction by hydrogen is quite fast [fr

  6. Assessing hafnium on hafnia as an oxygen getter

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    O'Hara, Andrew; Demkov, Alexander A.; Bersuker, Gennadi

    2014-01-01

    Hafnium dioxide or hafnia is a wide band gap dielectric used in a range of electronic applications from field effect transistors to resistive memory. In many of these applications, it is important to maintain control over oxygen stoichiometry, which can be realized in practice by using a metal layer, specifically hafnium, to getter oxygen from the adjacent dielectric. In this paper, we employ density functional theory to study the thermodynamic stability of an interface between (100)-oriented monoclinic hafnia and hafnium metal. The nudged elastic band method is used to calculate the energy barrier for migration of oxygen from the oxide to the metal. Our investigation shows that the presence of hafnium lowers the formation energy of oxygen vacancies in hafnia, but more importantly the oxidation of hafnium through the migration of oxygen from hafnia is favored energetically

  7. Properties of filmogen solutions and films of hafnium compounds

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sviridova, A.I.

    1986-01-01

    Study on hafnium hydrolizing compound solutions, used for hafnium oxide homogeneous layer formation, is conducted. In particular, electric conductivity, acidity and refractive index were investigated depending on the sal on ether concentration and the storage time. Oxyhafnium nitrate, hafnium chloride in ethanol, dichlorodiethoxyhafnium, hafnium oxychloride were used as initial compounds. Hydrolysis of hafnium compounds in solution occurs partially; further process occurs in the thin layer on the optical element surface; final decomposition is performed under heat treatment. It is ascertained, that alcoholic-aqueous solutions of inorganic salts can be filmogen only at definite acidity, density and viscosity (1.33-2.5 cp.). It is also ascertained that refractive index values and transmission spectral boundary of coatings, produced from alkoxy compound solutions and from chloride salt solutions, are practically the same. Transmittance boundary in ultraviolet region of spectrum of oxide films produced from nitrate and chloride solutions, varies with the heating temperature increase differently

  8. Analysis of hafnium in zirconium alloys

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kondo, Isao; Sakai, Fumiaki; Ohuchi, Yoshifusa; Nakamura, Hisashi

    1977-01-01

    It is required to analyse alloying components and impurity elements in the acceptance analysis of zirconium alloys as the material for fuel cladding tubes and pressure tubes for advanced thermal reactors. Because of extreme similarity in chemical properties between zirconium and hafnium, about 100 ppm of hafnium is usually contained in zirconium alloys. Zircaloy-2 alloy and 2.5% Nb-zirconium with the addition of hafnium had been prepared as in-house standard samples for rapid analysis. Study was made on fluorescent X-ray analysis and emission spectral analysis to establish the analytical method. By using these in-house standard samples, acceptance analysis was successfully carried out for the fuel cladding tubes for advanced thermal reactors. Sulfuric acid solution was prepared from JAERI-Z 1, 2 and 3, the standard sample for zircaloy-2 prepared by the Analytical Committee on Nuclear Fuel and Reactor Materials, JAERI, and zirconium oxide (Hf 1 ppm/Zr). Standard Hf solution was added to the sulfuric acid solution step by step, to make up a series of the standard oxide samples by the precipitation process. By the use of these standard samples, the development of the analytical method and joint analysis were made by the three-member analytical technique research group including PNC. The analytical precision for the fluorescent X-ray analysis was improved by attaching a metallic yttrium filter to the window of an X-ray tube so as to suppress the effect due to zirconium matrix. The variation factor of the joint analysis was about 10% to show good agreement, and the indication value was determined. (Kobatake, H.)

  9. Primary hafnium metal sponge and other forms, approved standard 1973

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Anon.

    1975-01-01

    A specification is presented covering virgin hafnium metal commonly designated as sponge because of its porous, sponge-like texture; it may also be in other forms such as chunklets. The specification does not cover crystal bar

  10. Investigation of colourless complexes of thorium, hafnium and zirconium

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kiciak, S.; Stefanowicz, T.; Gontarz, H.; Swit, Z.

    1980-01-01

    The investigations conducted in the Institute of General Chemistry of Poznan Technical University in partial cooperation with Kharkhof Technical University related with thorium, hafnium and zirconium complexes are reviewed. (author)

  11. Molten salt extractive distillation process for zirconium-hafnium separation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    McLaughlin, D.F.; Stoltz, R.A.

    1989-01-01

    This patent describes an improvement in a process for zirconium-hafnium separation. It utilizes an extractive distillation column with a mixture of zirconium and hafnium tetrachlorides introduced into a distillation column having a top and bottom with hafnium enriched overheads taken from the top of the column and a molten salt solvent circulated through the column to provide a liquid phase, and with molten salt solvent containing zirconium chloride being taken from the bottom of the distillation column. The improvements comprising: utilizing a molten salt solvent consisting principally of lithium chloride and at least one of sodium, potassium, magnesium and calcium chlorides; stripping of the zirconium chloride taken from the bottom of the distillation column by electrochemically reducing zirconium from the molten salt solvent; and utilizing a pressurized reflux condenser on the top of the column to add the hafnium chloride enriched overheads to the molten salt solvent previously stripped of zirconium chloride

  12. Internal Dosimetry for Inhalation of Hafnium Tritide Aerosols

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Inkret, W.C.T.; Schillaci, M.E.; Boyce, M.K.; Cheng, Y.S.; Efurd, D.W.; Little, T.T.; Miller, G.; Musgrave, J.A.; Wermer, J.R

    2001-07-01

    Metal tritides with low dissolution rates may have residence times in the lungs which are considerably longer than the biological half-time normally associated with tritium in body water, resulting in long-term irradiation of the lungs by low energy {beta} particles and bremsstrahlung X rays. Samples of hafnium tritide were placed in a lung simulant fluid to determine approximate lung dissolution rates. Hafnium hydride samples were analysed for particle size distribution with a scanning electron microscope. Lung simulant data indicated a biological dissolution half-time for hafnium tritide on the order of 10{sup 5}d. Hafnium hydride particle sizes ranged between 2 and 10 {mu}m, corresponding to activity median aerodynamic diameters of 5 to 25 {mu}m. Review of in vitro dissolution data, development of a biokinetic model, and determination of secondary limits for 1 {mu}m AMAD particles are presented and discussed. (author)

  13. New solvent extraction process for zirconium and hafnium

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Takahashi, M.; Katoh, Y.; Miyazaki, H.

    1984-01-01

    The authors' company developed a new solvent extraction process for zirconium and hafnium separation, and started production of zirconium sponge by this new process in September 1979. The process utilizes selective extraction of zirconium oxysulfate using high-molecular alkyl amine, and has the following advantages: 1. This extraction system has a separation factor as high as 10 to 20 for zirconium and hafnium in the range of suitable acid concentration. 2. In the scrubbing section, removal of all the hafnium that coexists with zirconium in the organic solvent can be effectively accomplished by using scrubbing solution containing hafnium-free zirconium sulfate. Consequently, hafnium in the zirconium sponge obtained is reduced to less than 50 ppm. 3. The extractant undergoes no chemical changes but is very stable for a long period. In particular, its solubility in water is small, about 20 ppm maximum, posing no environmental pollution problems such as are often caused by other process raffinates. At the present time, the zirconium and hafnium separation operation is very stable, and zirconium sponge made by this process can be applied satisfactorily to nuclear reactors

  14. Separation process of zirconium and hafnium

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hure, J.; Saint-James, R.

    1955-01-01

    About the separation different processes of zirconium-hafnium, the extraction by solvent in cross-current is the most easily the process usable on an industrial scale. It uses tributyl phosphate as solvent, diluted with white spirit to facilitate the decanting. Some exploratory tests showed that nitric environment seemed the most favorable for extraction; but a lot of other factors intervene in the separation process. We studied the influence of the acidity successively, the NO 3 - ions concentration, the role of the cation coming with NO 3 - , as well as the influence of the concentration of zirconium in the solution on the separation coefficient β = α Zr / α Hf . (M.B.) [fr

  15. The interaction of fast neutrons with hafnium

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Smith, A.B.

    2002-01-01

    Elemental hafnium neutron total cross sections are measured from ∼0.75 to 4.5 MeV in steps of ∼40 keV. Differential neutron elastic-scattering cross sections are measured from ∼4.5 to 10.0 MeV in ∼0.5 MeV steps and at 40 scattering angles distributed between ∼17 and 160 deg. These data are combined with those found in the literature to construct a comprehensive experimental data base which is interpreted in terms of coupled-channels models. Physical characteristics of the resulting potentials are discussed. Comparisons are made with ENDF/B-6 (MAT 7200). A detailed report of this work is given by Smith (Smith, A., 2001. Argonne National Laboratory Report ANL/NDM-153)

  16. High temperature diffusion of hafnium in tungsten and a tungsten-hafnium carbide alloy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ozaki, Y.; Zee, R.H.

    1994-01-01

    Refractory metals and ceramics are used extensively in energy systems due to their high temperature properties. This is particularly important in direct conversion systems where thermal to electric conversion efficiency is a direct function of temperature. Tungsten, which has the highest melting temperature among elemental metals, does not possess sufficient creep resistance at temperature above 1,600 K. Different dispersion strengthened tungsten alloys have been developed to extend the usefulness of tungsten to higher temperatures. One of these alloys, tungsten with 0.4 mole percent of finely dispersed HfC particles (W-HfC), has the optimum properties for high temperature applications. Hafnium carbide is used as the strengthening agent due to its high chemical stability and its compatibility with tungsten. The presence of HfC particles retards the rate of grain growth as well as restricting dislocation motion. Both of which are beneficial for creep resistance. The long term behavior of this alloy depends largely on the evolution of its microstructure which is governed by the diffusion of its constituents. Data on the diffusion of carbon in tungsten and tungsten self-diffusion are available, but no direct measurements have been made on the diffusion of hafnium in tungsten. The only diffusion data available are estimated from a coarsening study and these data are highly unreliable. In this study, the diffusion behavior of hafnium in pure tungsten and in a W-HfC alloy was directly measured by means of Secondary Ion Mass Spectroscopy (SIMS). The selection of the W-HfC alloy is due to its importance in high temperature engineering applications, and its higher recrystallization temperature. The presence of HfC particles in tungsten restricts grain growth resulting in better high temperature creep resistance. The higher recrystallization temperature allows measurements to be made over a wider range of temperatures at a relatively constant grain size

  17. 40 CFR 471.90 - Applicability; description of the zirconium-hafnium forming subcategory.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... zirconium-hafnium forming subcategory. 471.90 Section 471.90 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL... POINT SOURCE CATEGORY Zirconium-Hafnium Forming Subcategory § 471.90 Applicability; description of the zirconium-hafnium forming subcategory. This subpart applies to discharges of pollutants to waters of the...

  18. 40 CFR 421.330 - Applicability: Description of the primary zirconium and hafnium subcategory.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... primary zirconium and hafnium subcategory. 421.330 Section 421.330 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL... CATEGORY Primary Zirconium and Hafnium Subcategory § 421.330 Applicability: Description of the primary zirconium and hafnium subcategory. The provisions of this subpart are applicable to discharges resulting...

  19. Ground-state structures of Hafnium clusters

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ng, Wei Chun; Yoon, Tiem Leong [School of Physics, Universiti Sains Malaysia, 11800 USM, Penang (Malaysia); Lim, Thong Leng [Faculty of Engineering and Technoloty, Multimedia University, Melaca Campus, 75450 Melaka (Malaysia)

    2015-04-24

    Hafnium (Hf) is a very large tetra-valence d-block element which is able to form relatively long covalent bond. Researchers are interested to search for substitution to silicon in the semi-conductor industry. We attempt to obtain the ground-state structures of small Hf clusters at both empirical and density-functional theory (DFT) levels. For calculations at the empirical level, charge-optimized many-body functional potential (COMB) is used. The lowest-energy structures are obtained via a novel global-minimum search algorithm known as parallel tempering Monte-Carlo Basin-Hopping and Genetic Algorithm (PTMBHGA). The virtue of using COMB potential for Hf cluster calculation lies in the fact that by including the charge optimization at the valence shells, we can encourage the formation of proper bond hybridization, and thus getting the correct bond order. The obtained structures are further optimized using DFT to ensure a close proximity to the ground-state.

  20. Hafnium carbide nanocrystal chains for field emitters

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tian, Song; Li, Hejun; Zhang, Yulei; Ren, Jincui; Qiang, Xinfa; Zhang, Shouyang

    2014-01-01

    A hafnium carbide (HfC) nanostructure, i.e., HfC nanocrystal chain, was synthesized by a chemical vapor deposition (CVD) method. X-ray diffractometer, field-emission scanning electron microscope, transmission electron microscope, and energy-dispersive X-ray spectrometer were employed to characterize the product. The synthesized one-dimensional (1D) nanostructures with many faceted octahedral nanocrystals possess diameters of tens of nanometers to 500 nm and lengths of a few microns. The chain-like structures possess a single crystalline structure and preferential growth direction along the [1 0 0] crystal orientation. The growth of the chains occurred through the vapor–liquid–solid process along with a negative-feedback mechanism. The field emission (FE) properties of the HfC nanocrystal chains as the cold cathode emitters were examined. The HfC nanocrystal chains display good FE properties with a low turn-on field of about 3.9 V μm −1 and a high field enhancement factor of 2157, implying potential applications in vacuum microelectronics.

  1. Use of hafnium in control bars of nuclear reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ramirez S, J.R.; Alonso V, G.

    2003-01-01

    Recently the use of hafnium as neutron absorber material in nuclear reactors has been reason of investigation by virtue of that this material has nuclear properties as to the neutrons absorption and structural that can prolong the useful life of the control mechanisms of the nuclear reactors. In this work some of those more significant hafnium properties are presented like nuclear material. Also there are presented calculations carried out with the HELIOS code for fuel cells of uranium oxide and of uranium and plutonium mixed oxides under controlled conditions with conventional bars of boron carbide and also with similar bars to which are substituted the absorbent material by metallic hafnium, the results are presented in this work. (Author)

  2. Analytical study of zirconium and hafnium α-hydroxy carboxylates

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Terra, V.R.

    1991-01-01

    The analytical study of zirconium and hafnium α-hydroxy carboxylates was described. For this purpose dl-mandelic, dl-p-bromo mandelic, dl-2-naphthyl glycolic, and benzilic acids were prepared. These were used in conjunction with glycolic, dl-lactic, dl-2-hydroxy isovaleric, dl-2-hydroxy hexanoic, and dl-2-hydroxy dodecanoic acids in order to synthesize the zirconium(IV) and hafnium(IV) tetrakis(α-hydroxy carboxylates). The compounds were characterized by melting point determination, infrared spectroscopy, thermogravimetric analysis, calcination to oxides and X-ray diffractometry by the powder method. (C.G.C)

  3. High temperature evaporation of titanium, zirconium and hafnium carbides

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gusev, A.I.; Rempel', A.A.

    1991-01-01

    Evaporation of cubic nonstoichiometric carbides of titanium, zirconium and hafnium in a comparatively low-temperature interval (1800-2700) with detailed crystallochemical sample certification is studied. Titanium carbide is characterized by the maximum evaporation rate: at T>2300 K it loses 3% of sample mass during an hour and at T>2400 K titanium carbide evaporation becomes extremely rapid. Zirconium and hafnium carbide evaporation rates are several times lower than titanium carbide evaporation rates at similar temperatures. Partial pressures of metals and carbon over the carbides studied are calculated on the base of evaporation rates

  4. Preparation of complexes of zirconium and hafnium tetrachlorides with phosphorus oxychloride

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    McLaughlin, D.F.

    1989-01-01

    This patent describes an improvement in a method for separating hafnium tetrachloride from zirconium tetrachloride where a complex of zirconium-hafnium tetrachlorides and phosphorus oxychloride is prepared from zirconium-hafnium tetrachlorides and the complex of zirconium-hafnium tetrachlorides and phosphorus oxychloride is introduced into a distillation column, which distillation column has a reboiler connected at the bottom and a reflux condenser connected at the top and where a hafnium tetrachloride enriched stream is taken from the top of the column and a zirconium enriched tetrachloride stream is taken from the bottom of the column. The improvement comprising: prepurifying the zirconium-hafnium tetrachlorides, prior to preparation of the complex and introduction of the complex into a distillation column, to substantially eliminate iron chloride from the zirconium hafnium tetrachlorides, whereby buildup or iron chloride in the distillation column and in the reboiler is substantially eliminated and the column can be operated in a continuous, stable and efficient manner

  5. Separation process of zirconium and hafnium; Procede de separation du zirconium et du hafnium

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hure, J; Saint-James, R [Commissariat a l' Energie Atomique, Saclay (France). Centre d' Etudes Nucleaires

    1955-07-01

    About the separation different processes of zirconium-hafnium, the extraction by solvent in cross-current is the most easily the process usable on an industrial scale. It uses tributyl phosphate as solvent, diluted with white spirit to facilitate the decanting. Some exploratory tests showed that nitric environment seemed the most favorable for extraction; but a lot of other factors intervene in the separation process. We studied the influence of the acidity successively, the NO{sub 3}{sup -} ions concentration, the role of the cation coming with NO{sub 3}{sup -}, as well as the influence of the concentration of zirconium in the solution on the separation coefficient {beta} = {alpha}{sub Zr} / {alpha}{sub Hf}. (M.B.) [French] Des differents procedes de separation zirconium-hafnium, l'extraction par solvant en contre-courant est le procede le plus facilement utilisable a l'echelle industrielle. On utilise comme solvant le phosphate de tributyle, dilue avec du white spirit pour faciliter les decantations. Des essais preliminaires ont montre que le milieu nitrique semblait le plus favorable a l'extraction; mais beaucoup d'autres facteurs interviennent dans le processus de separation. Nous avons etudie successivement l'influence de l'acidite, celle de la concentration en ions NO{sub 3}{sup -}, le role du cation accompagnant NO{sub 3}{sup -}, ainsi que l'influence de la concentration en zirconium de la solution sur le coefficient de separation {beta} = {alpha}{sub Zr} / {alpha}{sub Hf}. (MB)

  6. Separation of zirconium and hafnium using paper distribution chromatography

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lebedeva, G.G.; Viktorova, M.E.

    1981-01-01

    A method is suggested of chromatographic separation of zirconium and hafnium in a CCl 4 -tributyl phosphate system (1:9) containing KCl as a salting-out agent in 5 M HNO 3 at 28-30 deg C. Zr and Hf are deterfmined in articiial mixtures under optimal chromatography conditions using visual colorimetry [ru

  7. X-Ray Photoemission Study of the Oxidation of Hafnium

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chourasia, R.; Hickman, J.L.; Miller, R.L.; Nixon, G.A.; Seabolt, M.A.

    2011-01-01

    About 20 angstrom of hafnium were deposited on silicon substrates using the electron beam evaporation technique. Two types of samples were investigated. In one type, the substrate was kept at the ambient temperature. After the deposition, the substrate temperature was increased to 100, 200, and 300 degree C. In the other type, the substrate temperature was held fixed at some value during the deposition. For this type, the substrate temperatures used were 100, 200, 300, 400, 500, 550, and 600 degree C. The samples were characterized in situ by the technique of X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy. No trace of elemental hafnium is observed in the deposited overlayer. Also, there is no evidence of any chemical reactivity between the overlayer and the silicon substrate over the temperature range used. The hafnium overlayer shows a mixture of the dioxide and the suboxide. The ratio of the suboxide to dioxide is observed to be more in the first type of samples. The spectral data indicate that hafnium has a strong affinity for oxygen. The overlayer gets completely oxidized to form HfO 2 at substrate temperature around 300 degree C for the first type of samples and at substrate temperature greater than 550 degree C for the second type

  8. X-Ray Photoemission Study of the Oxidation of Hafnium

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. R. Chourasia

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available About 20 Å of hafnium were deposited on silicon substrates using the electron beam evaporation technique. Two types of samples were investigated. In one type, the substrate was kept at the ambient temperature. After the deposition, the substrate temperature was increased to 100, 200, and 300∘C. In the other type, the substrate temperature was held fixed at some value during the deposition. For this type, the substrate temperatures used were 100, 200, 300, 400, 500, 550, and 600∘C. The samples were characterized in situ by the technique of X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy. No trace of elemental hafnium is observed in the deposited overlayer. Also, there is no evidence of any chemical reactivity between the overlayer and the silicon substrate over the temperature range used. The hafnium overlayer shows a mixture of the dioxide and the suboxide. The ratio of the suboxide to dioxide is observed to be more in the first type of samples. The spectral data indicate that hafnium has a strong affinity for oxygen. The overlayer gets completely oxidized to form HfO2 at substrate temperature around 300∘C for the first type of samples and at substrate temperature greater than 550∘C for the second type.

  9. Modelling of Zirconium and Hafnium separation using continuous annular chromatography

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Moch-Setyadji; Endang Susiantini

    2014-01-01

    Nuclear degrees of zirconium in the form of a metal alloy is the main material for fuel cladding of NPP. Zirconium is also used as sheathing UO 2 kernel in the form of ZrC as a substitute of SiC in the fuel elements of High Temperature Reactor (HTR). Difficulty separating hafnium from zirconium because it has a lot of similarities in the chemical properties of Zr and Hf. Annular chromatography is a device that can be used for separating of zirconium and hafnium to obtain zirconium nuclear grade. Therefore, it is necessary to construct the mathematical modelling that can describe the separation of zirconium and hafnium in the annular chromatography containing anion resin dowex-1X8. The aim of research is to perform separation simulation by using the equilibrium model and mass transfer coefficient resulted from research. Zr and Hf feed used in this research were 26 and 1 g/l, respectively. Height of resin (L), angular velocity (ω) and the superficial flow rate (uz) was varied to determine the effect of each parameter on the separation of Zr and Hf. By using Kd and Dv values resulted previous research. Simulation results showed that zirconium and hafnium can be separated using a continuous annular chromatography with high resin (long bed) 50 cm, superficial flow rate of 0.001 cm/s, the rotation speed of 0.006 rad/min and 20 cm diameter annular. In these conditions the results obtained zirconium concentration of 10,303.226 g/m 3 and hafnium concentration of 12.324 g/m 3 (ppm). (author)

  10. Hafnium Resonance Parameter Analysis Using Neutron Capture and Transmission Experiments

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    MJ Trbovich; DP Barry; RE Slovacck; Y Danon; RC Block; JA Burke; NJ Drindak; G Leinweber; RV Ballad

    2004-01-01

    The focus of this work is to determine resonance parameters for stable hafnium isotopes in the 0.005-200 eV region, with special emphasis on the overlapping 176 Hf and 178 Hf resonances near 8 eV. The large neutron cross section of hafnium, combined with its corrosion resistance and excellent mechanical properties, make it a useful material for controlling nuclear reactions. Experiments measuring neutron capture and transmission were performed at the Rensselaer Polytechnic Institute (RPI) electron linear accelerator (LINAC) using the time of flight method. 6 Li glass scintillation detectors were used for transmission experiments at flight path lengths of 15 and 25 m. Capture experiments were done using a sixteen section NaI(Tl) multiplicity detector at a flight path length of 25 m. These experiments utilized various thicknesses of metallic and isotopically-enriched liquid samples. The liquid samples were designed to provide information on the 176 Hf and 178 Hf contributions to the 8 eV doublet without saturation. Data analysis was done using the R-matrix Bayesian code SAMMY version M6 beta. SAMMY is able to account for experimental resolution effects for each of the experimental setups at the RPI LINAC, and also can correct for multiple scattering effects in neutron capture yield data. The combined capture and transmission data analysis yielded resonance parameters for all hafnium isotopes from 0.005-200 eV. Resonance integrals were calculated along with errors for each hafnium isotope using the NJOY [1] and INTER [2] codes. The isotopic resonance integrals calculated were significantly different than previously published values; however the calculated elemental hafnium resonance integral changed very little

  11. Electronic properties of hafnium oxide: A contribution from defects and traps

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gritsenko, Vladimir A., E-mail: grits@isp.nsc.ru; Perevalov, Timofey V.; Islamov, Damir R., E-mail: damir@isp.nsc.ru

    2016-02-15

    In the present article, we give a review of modern data and latest achievements pertaining to the study of electronic properties of oxygen vacancies in hafnium oxide. Hafnium oxide is a key dielectric for use in many advanced silicon devices. Oxygen vacancies in hafnium oxide largely determine the electronic properties of the material. We show that the electronic transitions between the states due to oxygen vacancies largely determine the optical absorption and luminescent properties of hafnium oxide. We discuss the role of oxygen vacancies as traps that facilitate charge transport in hafnium oxide films. Also, we demonstrate the fact that the electrical conductivity in hafnium oxide is controlled by the phonon-assisted tunnelling of charge carriers between traps that were identified as oxygen vacancies.

  12. Method of purifying zirconium tetrachloride and hafnium tetrachloride in a vapor stream

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Snyder, T.S.; Stolz, R.A.

    1992-01-01

    This patent describes a method of purifying zirconium tetrachloride and hafnium tetrachloride in a vapor stream from a sand chlorinator in which the silicon and metals present in sand fed to the chlorinator are converted to chlorides at temperatures over about 800 degrees C. It comprises cooling a vapor stream from a sand chlorinator, the vapor stream containing principally silicon tetrachloride, zirconium tetrachloride, and hafnium tetrachloride contaminated with ferric chloride, to a temperature of from about 335 degrees C to about 600 degrees C; flowing the vapor stream through a gaseous diffusion separative barrier to produce a silicon tetrachloride-containing vapor stream concentrated in zirconium tetrachloride and hafnium tetrachloride and a silicon tetrachloride-containing vapor stream depleted in zirconium tetrachloride and hafnium tetrachloride; adsorbing the ferric chloride in the separative barrier; and recovering the silicon tetrachloride stream concentrated in zirconium tetrachloride and hafnium tetrachloride separately from the silicon tetrachloride stream depleted in zirconium tetrachloride and hafnium tetrachloride

  13. Synthesis of Hafnium-Based Ceramic Materials for Ultra-High Temperature Aerospace Applications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Johnson, Sylvia; Feldman, Jay

    2004-01-01

    This project involved the synthesis of hafnium (Hf)-based ceramic powders and Hf-based precursor solutions that were suitable for preparation of Hf-based ceramics. The Hf-based ceramic materials of interest in this project were hafnium carbide (with nominal composition HE) and hafnium dioxide (HfO2). The materials were prepared at Georgia Institute of Technology and then supplied to research collaborators Dr. Sylvia Johnson and Dr. Jay Feldman) at NASA Ames Research Center.

  14. Elaboration and characterisation of yttrium oxide and hafnium oxide powders by the sol-gel process

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hours, T.

    1988-01-01

    The two classical sol-gel processes, colloidal and polymeric are studied for the preparation of yttrium oxide and hafnium oxide high performance powders. In the colloidal process, controlled and reproducible conditions for the preparation of yttrium oxide and hafnium oxide sols from salts or alkoxides are developed and the hydrothermal synthesis monodisperse hafnium oxide colloids is studied. The polymeric process is studied with hafnium ethyl-hexylate, hydrolysis kinetics for controlled preparation of sols and gels is investigated. Each step of preparation is detailed and powders obtained are characterized [fr

  15. Design and fabrication of hafnium tube to control the power of the irradiation test fuel in HANARO

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kim, D. H.; Lee, C. B.; Kim, Y. M.; Yang, Y. S.; Jung, Y. H

    2003-05-01

    For the irradiation test at HANARO, non-instrumentation capsule was manufactured and hafnium tube was used to control LHGR of HANARO. Hafnium tube can control the irradiation condition of HANARO similar to that of commercial reactor. Hafnium tube thickness was determined by the LHGR calculated at OR-4 irradiation hole to be installed the non-instrumented capsule. To fabricate the hafnium tube with hafnium plate, the fabrication method was determined by using the hafnium mechanical properties. And the tensile strength of hafnium was confirmed by tensile test. This report is confirmed the LHGR control at the OR-4 and the Hafnium fabrication for in used which the AFPCAP non-instrumented irradiation capsule.

  16. Pentamethylcyclopentadienyl Zirconium and Hafnium Polyhydride Complexes : Synthesis, Structure, and Reactivity

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Visser, Cindy; Hende, Johannes R. van den; Meetsma, Auke; Hessen, Bart; Teuben, Jan H.

    2001-01-01

    The half-sandwich zirconium and hafnium N,N-dimethylaminopropyl complexes Cp*M[(CH2)3NMe2]Cl2 (Cp* = η5-C5Me5, M = Zr, 1; Hf, 2) and Cp*M[(CH2)3NMe2]2Cl (M = Zr, 3; Hf, 4) were synthesized by mono- or dialkylation of Cp*MCl3 with the corresponding alkyllithium and Grignard reagents. Hydrogenolysis

  17. Separation of zirconium from hafnium by ion exchange

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Felipe, Elaine C.B.; Palhares, Hugo G.; Ladeira, Ana Claudia Q., E-mail: elainecfelipe@yahoo.com.br, E-mail: hugopalhares@gmail.com, E-mail: ana.ladeira@cdtn.br [Centro de Desenvolvimento da Tecnologia Nuclear (CDTN/CNEN-MG), Belo Horizonte, MG (Brazil)

    2013-07-01

    Zirconium and hafnium are two of the most important metals for the nuclear industry. Hafnium occurs in all zirconium ores usually in the range 2 - 3%. However, for the most nuclear industry applications, it is necessary to use a zirconium of extremely pure level. The current work consists in the separation of zirconium and hafnium by the ion exchange method in order to obtain a zirconium concentrate of high purity. The zirconium and hafnium liquors were produced from the leaching of the Zr(OH){sub 4} and Hf(OH){sub 4} with nitric acid for 24 hours. From these two liquors it was prepared one solution containing 7.5 x 10{sup -2} mol L{sup -1} of Zr and 5.8 x 10{sup -3} mol L{sup -1} of Hf with acidity of 1 M. Ion exchange experiments were carried out in batch with the resins Dowex 50WX4, Dowex 50WX8 100, Dowex 50WX8 50, Amberlite IR-120 and Marathon C at constant temperature 28 deg C. Other variables such as, acidity and agitation were kept constant. The data were adjusted to Langmuir equation in order to calculate the maximum loading capacity (q{sub max}) of the resins, the distribution coefficient (K{sub d}) for Zr and Hf and the separation factor (α{sub Hf}{sup Zr} ). The results of maximum loading capacity (q{sub max}) for Zr and Hf, in mmol g{sup -}1, showed that the most suitable resins for columns experiments are: Dowex 50WX4 50 (q{sub max} Z{sub r} = 2.21, Hf = 0.18), Dowex 50WX8 50 (q{sub max} Zr = 1.89, Hf = 0.13) and Amberlite (q{sub max} Zr = 1.64, Hf = 0.12). However, separations factors, α{sub Hf}{sup Zr}, showed that the resins are not selective. (author)

  18. Evolution of the hafnium isotopic composition in the RBMK reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jurkevicius, A.; Remeikis, V.

    2002-01-01

    The isotopic composition of hafnium in the radial neutron flux sensor of the RBMK-1500 reactor, the rates of the neutron absorption on Hf isotopes and the neutron spectrum in the sensor were numerically modeled. The sequence SAS2 (Shielding Analysis Sequence) program from the package SCALE 4.4A and the HELIOS code system were used for calculations. It has been obtained that the overall neutron absorption rates in hafnium for the sensors located in the 2.4 % and 2.6 % enrichment uranium-erbium nuclear fuel assemblies are by 16 % and 19 % lower than in the 2.0 % enrichment uranium nuclear fuel assemblies. The overall neutron absorption rate in hafnium decreases 2.70-2.75 times due to the sensor burnup to 5800 MW d. The sensitivity of the Hf sensors to the thermal neutron flux increases twice due to the nuclear fuel assembly burnup to 3000 MW d. The corrective factors ξ d (I) at the different integral current I of the sensors and ξ td (E) at the different burnup E of the nuclear fuel assemblies were calculated. The obtained dependence ξ d (I) calculated numerically was compared to the experimental one determined by comparing signals of the fresh sensor and the sensor with the integral current I and by processing repeated calibration results of Hf sensors in RBMK-1500 reactors. The relative relationship coefficients K T (T FA ) were found for all RBMK-1500 nuclear fuel types. (author)

  19. Recovery of hafnium radioisotopes from a proton irradiated tantalum target

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Taylor, W.A.; Garcia, J.G.; Hamilton, V.T.; Heaton, R.C.; Jamriska, D.J.; Ott, M.A.; Philips, D.R.; Radzinski, S.D.

    1998-01-01

    The 178m2 Hf nucleus, with its long half-life (31 y) and high-spin isomeric state (16 + ) is desired for new and exotic nuclear physics studies. The Los Alamos Radioisotope Program irradiated a kilogram of natural tantalum at the Los Alamos Meson Physics Facility in early 1981. After fifteen years of decay, this target was ideal for the recovery of 178m2 Hf. There was more than a millicurie of 178m2 Hf produced during this irradiation and there has been a sufficient period of time for most of the other hafnium radioisotopes to decayed away. Traditionally, separation techniques for recovering hafnium isotopes from tantalum targets employ solvent extractions with reagents that are considered hazardous. These techniques are no longer condoned because they generate a mixed-waste (radioactive and hazardous components) that can not be treated for disposal. In this paper we describe a new and unique procedure for the recovery of hafnium radioisotopes from a highly radioactive, proton irradiated, tantalum target using reagents that do not contribute a hazardous waste component. (author)

  20. Zirconium and hafnium in the southeastern Atlantic States

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mertie, J.B.

    1958-01-01

    The principal source of zirconium and hafnium is zircon, though a minor source is baddeleyite, mined only in Brazil. Zircon is an accessory mineral in igneous, metamorphic, and sedimentary rocks, but rarely occurs in hardrock in minable quantities. The principal sources of zircon are therefore alluvial deposits, which are mined in many countries of five continents. The principal commercial deposits in the United States are in Florida, though others exist elsewhere in the southeastern Coastal Plain. The evidence indicates that conditions for the accumulation of workable deposits of heavy minerals were more favorable during the interglacial stages of the Pleistocene epoch than during Recent time. Therefore detrital ores of large volume and high tenor are more likely to be found in the terrace deposits than along the present beaches. Other concentrations of heavy minerals, however, are possible at favored sites close to the Fall Line where the Tuscaloosa formation rests upon the crystalline rocks of the Piedmont province. A score of heavy and semiheavy minerals occur in the detrital deposits of Florida, but the principal salable minerals are ilmenite, leucoxene, rutile, and zircon, though monazite and staurolite are saved at some mining plants. Commercial deposits of heavy minerals are generally required to have a tenor of 4 percent, though ores with a lower tenor can be mined at a profit if the content of monazite is notably high. The percentages of zircon in the concentrates ranges from 10 to 16 percent, and in eastern Florida from 13 to 15 percent. Thus the tenor in zircon of the ore-bearing sands ranges from 0.4 to 0.6 percent. The content of hafnium in zircon is immaterial for many uses, but for some purposes very high or very low tenors in hafnium are required. Alluvial zircon cannot be separated into such varieties, which, if needed, must be obtained from sources in bedrock. It thus becomes necessary to determine the Hf : Zr ratios in zircon from many kinds of

  1. 28 CFR 16.1 - General provisions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... 28 Judicial Administration 1 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false General provisions. 16.1 Section 16.1 Judicial Administration DEPARTMENT OF JUSTICE PRODUCTION OR DISCLOSURE OF MATERIAL OR INFORMATION... administration of the Department of Justice. ...

  2. On the stabilization of niobium(V) solutions by zirconium(IV) and hafnium(IV)

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sørensen, E.; Bjerre, A.B.

    1992-01-01

    Niobium cannot be separated from zirconium or hafnium when these elements occur together in solution with common anions such as chloride and sulphate. This is ascribed to the co-polymerization of niobium(V) and the hydrolysed ionic species of zirconium(IV) and hafnium(IV) to form colloidal...

  3. 7 CFR 1717.161 - Application process.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 11 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Application process. 1717.161 Section 1717.161 Agriculture Regulations of the Department of Agriculture (Continued) RURAL UTILITIES SERVICE, DEPARTMENT OF... Consolidations of Electric Borrowers § 1717.161 Application process. (a) Borrowers are responsible for ensuring...

  4. 7 CFR 1427.161 - Administration.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 10 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Administration. 1427.161 Section 1427.161 Agriculture Regulations of the Department of Agriculture (Continued) COMMODITY CREDIT CORPORATION, DEPARTMENT OF AGRICULTURE LOANS, PURCHASES, AND OTHER OPERATIONS COTTON Recourse Seed Cotton Loans § 1427.161 Administration...

  5. 21 CFR 161.136 - Olympia oysters.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 2 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Olympia oysters. 161.136 Section 161.136 Food and... oysters. Olympia oysters, raw Olympia oysters, shucked Olympia oysters, are of the species Ostrea lurida and conform to the definition and standard of identity prescribed for oysters in § 161.130. ...

  6. 46 CFR 161.012-7 - Construction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 6 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Construction. 161.012-7 Section 161.012-7 Shipping COAST GUARD, DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY (CONTINUED) EQUIPMENT, CONSTRUCTION, AND MATERIALS: SPECIFICATIONS AND APPROVAL ELECTRICAL EQUIPMENT Personal Flotation Device Lights § 161.012-7 Construction. (a...

  7. 46 CFR 161.012-9 - Performance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 6 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Performance. 161.012-9 Section 161.012-9 Shipping COAST GUARD, DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY (CONTINUED) EQUIPMENT, CONSTRUCTION, AND MATERIALS: SPECIFICATIONS AND APPROVAL ELECTRICAL EQUIPMENT Personal Flotation Device Lights § 161.012-9 Performance. (a) If...

  8. Use of X-ray fluorescence analysis for the determination of hafnium in zircalloys

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sato, I.M.; Salvador, V.L.R.; Lordello, A.R.

    1985-01-01

    The determination of hafnium at trace levels (ppm) in the presence of zirconium by X-ray fluorescence technique is presented. The samples were prepared in the form of double-layer pellets, with boric acid as the binding material. The most sensitive first order line of hafnium HfLα (0.157 nm), which is used analyticaly, has approximately 67% overlapping with second order line of zirconium ZrKα 1 , (0.079 nm). As the excitation potencial of zirconium is larger than hafnium, the best condition was selected, so that the interference of zirconium intensity would not be significant in hafnium analytical line. The method allowed the determination of hafnium above 5.0 ppm (LLd = 1.5 ppm) with an accuracy of less than 10%. (Author) [pt

  9. Preparation of complexes of zirconium and hafnium tetrachlorides with phosphorus oxychloride

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Snyder, T.S.; Stoltz, R.A.

    1989-01-01

    This patent describes an improvement in a method for separating hafnium chloride from zirconium chloride using a distillation column, with a hafnium chloride enriched vapor stream taken from the top of the column and a zirconium enriched chloride stream taken from the bottom of the column. The improvement comprising: purifying the zirconium-hafnium chloride in a molten salt purification vessel prior to or after introduction into the distillation column to substantially eliminate iron chloride from the zirconium-hafnium chloride by at least periodically removing iron chloride from the molten salt purification vessel by electrochemically plating iron onto an electrode in the molten salt purification vessel. The molten salt in the molten salt purification vessel consisting essentially of a mixture of chlorides selected from the group consisting of alkali metals, alkaline earth metals, zirconium, hafnium, aluminum, manganese, and zinc

  10. Properties of neutron-rich hafnium high-spin isomers

    CERN Multimedia

    Tungate, G; Walker, P M; Neyens, G; Billowes, J; Flanagan, K; Koester, U H; Litvinov, Y

    It is proposed to study highly-excited multi-quasiparticle isomers in neutron-rich hafnium (Z=72) isotopes. Long half-lives have already been measured for such isomers in the storage ring at GSI, ensuring their accessibility with ISOL production. The present proposal focuses on:\\\\ (i) an on-line experiment to measure isomer properties in $^{183}$Hf and $^{184}$Hf, and\\\\ (ii) an off-line molecular breakup test using REXTRAP, to provide Hf$^{+}$ beams for future laser spectroscopy and greater sensitivity for the future study of more neutron-rich isotopes.

  11. Studies on Optical and Electrical Properties of Hafnium Oxide Nanoparticles

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jayaraman, Venkatachalam; Sagadevan, Suresh; Sudhakar, Rajesh

    2017-07-01

    In this paper, the synthesis and physico-chemical properties of hafnium oxide nanoparticles (HfO2 NPs) are analyzed and reported. The synthesis was carried out by the precipitation route by using hafnium tetrachloride (HfCl4) as precursor material with potassium hydroxide (KOH) dissolved in Millipore water. In the precipitation technique, the chemical reaction is comparatively simple, low-cost and non-toxic compared to other synthetic methods. The synthesized HfO2 NPs were characterized by using powder x-ray diffraction (PXRD), ultraviolet-visible (UV-Vis) spectroscopy, Raman analysis, and high-resolution transmission electron microscopy (HRTEM). The monoclinic structure of the HfO2 NPs was resolved utilizing x-ray diffraction (XRD). The optical properties were studied from the UV-Vis absorption spectrum. The optical band gap of the HfO2NPs was observed to be 5.1 eV. The Raman spectrum shows the presence of HfO2 NPs. The HRTEM image showed that the HfO2 NPs were of spherical shape with an average particle size of around 28 nm. The energy-dispersive x-ray spectroscopy (EDS) spectrum obviously demonstrated the presence of HfO2 NPs. Analysis and studies on the dielectric properties of the HfO2 NPs such as the dielectric constant, the dielectric loss, and alternating current (AC) conductivity were carried out at varying frequencies and temperatures.

  12. Corrosion potentials of hafnium in molten alkaline-earth metal chlorides

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kovalik, O.Yu.; Tkhaj, V.D.

    2000-01-01

    Corrosion potentials of hafnium in molten calcium, strontium and barium chlorides are measured and their temperature dependences are determined. It is stated that the corrosion potential of hafnium becomes more electropositive with an increase of the environment temperature. If the temperature is the same the potential shifts to the interval of more electronegative values in the row of CaCl 2 , SrCl 2 , BaCl 2 which corresponds to a lesser corrosion rate in environments positioned from left to right. the comparison of hafnium corrosion potentials with previously measured values for titanium and zirconium shows that a metal activity decrease results in a more electronegative corrosion potential [ru

  13. Hafnium-Based Contrast Agents for X-ray Computed Tomography.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Berger, Markus; Bauser, Marcus; Frenzel, Thomas; Hilger, Christoph Stephan; Jost, Gregor; Lauria, Silvia; Morgenstern, Bernd; Neis, Christian; Pietsch, Hubertus; Sülzle, Detlev; Hegetschweiler, Kaspar

    2017-05-15

    Heavy-metal-based contrast agents (CAs) offer enhanced X-ray absorption for X-ray computed tomography (CT) compared to the currently used iodinated CAs. We report the discovery of new lanthanide and hafnium azainositol complexes and their optimization with respect to high water solubility and stability. Our efforts culminated in the synthesis of BAY-576, an uncharged hafnium complex with 3:2 stoichiometry and broken complex symmetry. The superior properties of this asymmetrically substituted hafnium CA were demonstrated by a CT angiography study in rabbits that revealed excellent signal contrast enhancement.

  14. Solvent extraction of zirconium and hafnium using MIBK-HSCN-HCL process

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Borges, J.A.L.; Cunha, O.G.C. da

    1985-01-01

    The separation process of zirconium and hafnium, using MIBK as extractant in a set of mixer-settler is described. The chemical analysis was done by X-ray fluorescence and emission spectrography. (Author) [pt

  15. Hafnium as a prospective absorber for VVER-1000 reactors of Ukraine

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Afanas'ev, A.A.; Konotop, Yu.F.; Odejchuk, N.L.

    2000-01-01

    Nuclear-physical parameters of hafnium having in mind its use as an absorber, are considered. Technical aspects of Hf production are exposed. Use of B 4 C/Hf absorber is twice cheaper than a standard one

  16. Spectrofluorimetric determination of hafnium and zirconium with 3,7-dihydroxyflavone

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ito, Takushi; Suzuki, Osamu; Seuzuki, Tetsuo; Murata, Akira

    1986-04-01

    The absorptive and fluorescent characteristics of the hafnium and zirconium complexes of 3-hydroxyflavone and its 12 hydroxy and methoxy derivatives have been studied. The fluorescence of the 1:1 hafnium - 3,7-dihydroxyflavone complex (lambdasub(ex.)397 nm,lambdasub(em.) 465 nm) in 3 M hydrochloric acid has been used to determine 2-40 ng ml/sup -1/ of hafnium. The fluorescence of the 1:1 zirconium - 3,7-dihydroxyflavone complex (lambdasub(ex.) 395 nm, lambda sub(em.) 465 nm) at pH 2.0 in 0.02 M sulphate solution has been used to determine 2-40 ng ml/sup -1/ of zirconium. These methods are very sensitive and can be used for the simultaneous determination of hafnium and zirconium with an error of about 5%.

  17. Electronic structure of pentacene on hafnium studied by ultraviolet photoelectron spectroscopy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kang, Seong Jun; Yi, Yeon Jin; Kim, Chung Yi; Whang, Chung Nam

    2005-01-01

    The electronic structure of pentacene on hafnium, which is a low work function metal, was analyzed by using ultraviolet photoelectron spectroscopy. The energy level alignment was studied by using the onset of the highest occupied molecular orbital level and the shift of the vacuum level of the pentacene layer, which was deposited on a clean hafnium surface in a stepwise manner. The measured onset of the highest occupied molecular orbital energy level was 1.52 eV from the Fermi level of hafnium. The vacuum level was shifted 0.28 eV toward higher binding energy with additional pentacene layers, which means an interfacial dipole exists at the interface between pentacene and hafnium. We confirm that a small electron injection barrier can be achieved by inserting a low work function metal in a pentacene thin-film transistor.

  18. Compositional characterization of hafnium alloy used as control rod material in nuclear reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sharma, P.K.; Bassan, M.K.T.; Avhad, D.K.; Singhal, R.K.

    2014-01-01

    Hafnium (Hf) is a heavy, steel-gray metal in the reactive metals group that is very closely related to zirconium (Zr) and forms a continuous solid-solution at all concentrations of zirconium and hafnium. Hafnium occurs naturally with zirconium at a ratio of approximately 1:50 and is produced exclusively as a co-product of nuclear-grade zirconium. It is used in a variety of applications where few substitutes are available. Thus with its relatively high thermal neutron absorption cross-section, hafnium's biggest application is as control rod material in nuclear reactors. During this work, major (Zirconium (Zr), Cobalt (Co) and Molybdenum (Mo)) and trace ((Iron (Fe), Nickel (Ni) and Titanium (Ti)) elements were measured in the bulk matrices of Hf. These materials are also associated with other impurities such as O, N, H etc.

  19. Evaluation of thermodynamic data on zirconium and hafnium halides and oxyhalides by means of transport experiments

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dittmer, G.; Niemann, U.

    1987-01-01

    A consistent set of thermodynamic data for zirconium and hafnium halides, oxides and oxyhalides was achieved. It was found that formation enthalpies of gaseous compounds could be derived from solubility measurements together with theoretical estimations and a revision of literature data. Free energy functions were calculated employing statistical mechanics. Data for liquid and solid compounds were obtained via sublimation and vaporization data. Chemical equilibria of zirconium and hafnium with halogens are discussed. 51 refs.; 16 figs.; 14 tabs

  20. Investigation of chlorination of zirconium and hafnium and their compounds in discharge from hollow cathode

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ioffe, R.B.; Korovin, Yu.I.

    1978-01-01

    The possibility is investigated of chlorinating various zirconium and hafnium compounds (metal, oxide, carbide) in a hot discharge from a hollow cathode with various chlorinating reagents: copper monochloride, nickel chloride, magnesium chloride, for the purpose of accelerating their entrance into the excitation zone. It has been shown thermodynamically and experimentally that chlorination of metal zirconium and hafnium and their carbides with copper monochloride in hot hollow cathode conditions provides a sharp increase in the intensity of the lines of these elements

  1. Knight shift in scandium and its alloys with hafnium and titanium

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chachkhiani, Z.B.; Chechernikov, V.I.; Martynova, L.F.; Nidel'ko, V.I.; Chachkhiani, L.G.; Georgadze, G.S.

    1981-01-01

    Results of the investigation of NMR on 45 Sc nuclei and magnetic susceptibility of scandium and its solid solutions with titanium and hafnium are presented. It is shown that the existing hybridization of S and d zones in pure scandium and its alloys with titanium and hafnium affects the Knight shift reducing the value of the contact contribution. The temperature behaviour of the Knight shift from the temperature dependence and spin susceptibility of collectivized d electrons [ru

  2. Application of hafnium hydride control rod to large sodium cooled fast breeder reactor

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ikeda, Kazumi, E-mail: kazumi_ikeda@mfbr.mhi.co.jp [Mitsubishi FBR Systems, Inc., 34-17, Jingumae 2-Chome, Shibuya-ku, Tokyo 150-0001 (Japan); Moriwaki, Hiroyuki, E-mail: hiroyuki_moriwaki@mfbr.mhi.co.jp [Mitsubishi FBR Systems, Inc., 34-17, Jingumae 2-Chome, Shibuya-ku, Tokyo 150-0001 (Japan); Ohkubo, Yoshiyuki, E-mail: yoshiyuki_okubo@mfbr.mhi.co.jp [Mitsubishi FBR Systems, Inc., 34-17, Jingumae 2-Chome, Shibuya-ku, Tokyo 150-0001 (Japan); Iwasaki, Tomohiko, E-mail: tomohiko.iwasaki@qse.tohoku.ac.jp [Department of Quantum Science and Energy Engineering, Tohoku University, Aoba, Aramaki, Aoba-ku, Sendai-shi, Miyagi-ken 980-8579 (Japan); Konashi, Kenji, E-mail: konashi@imr.tohoku.ac.jp [Institute for Materials Research, Tohoku University, Narita-cho, Oarai-machi, Higashi-Ibaraki-gun, Ibaraki-ken 311-1313 (Japan)

    2014-10-15

    Highlights: • Application of hafnium hydride control rod to large sodium cooled fast breeder reactor. • This paper treats application of an innovative hafnium hydride control rod to a large sodium cooled fast breeder reactor. • Hydrogen absorption triples the reactivity worth by neutron spectrum shift at H/Hf ratio of 1.3. • Lifetime of the control rod quadruples because produced daughters of hafnium isotopes are absorbers. • Nuclear and thermal hydraulic characteristics of the reactor are as good as or better than B-10 enriched boron carbide. - Abstract: This study treats the feasibility of long-lived hafnium hydride control rod in a large sodium-cooled fast breeder reactor by nuclear and thermal analyses. According to the nuclear calculations, it is found that hydrogen absorption of hafnium triples the reactivity by the neutron spectrum shift at the H/Hf ratio of 1.3, and a hafnium transmutation mechanism that produced daughters are absorbers quadruples the lifetime due to a low incineration rate of absorbing nuclides under irradiation. That is to say, the control rod can function well for a long time because an irradiation of 2400 EFPD reduces the reactivity by only 4%. The calculation also reveals that the hafnium hydride control rod can apply to the reactor in that nuclear and thermal characteristics become as good as or better than 80% B-10 enriched boron carbide. For example, the maximum linear heat rate becomes 3% lower. Owing to the better power distribution, the required flow rate decreases approximately by 1%. Consequently, it is concluded on desk analyses that the long lived hafnium hydride control rod is feasible in the large sodium-cooled fast breeder reactor.

  3. 40 CFR 161.153 - Definitions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 23 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Definitions. 161.153 Section 161.153 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY (CONTINUED) PESTICIDE PROGRAMS DATA REQUIREMENTS..., destroy, repel or mitigate any pest, or that functions as a plant regulator, desiccant, or defoliant...

  4. 22 CFR 161.2 - Policy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... 22 Foreign Relations 1 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Policy. 161.2 Section 161.2 Foreign Relations... environmental review procedures with the Department's decisionmaking process; (d) Invite and facilitate, when appropriate, Federal, State and local governmental authorities and public involvement in decisions which...

  5. 40 CFR 161.60 - Minor uses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 23 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Minor uses. 161.60 Section 161.60 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY (CONTINUED) PESTICIDE PROGRAMS DATA REQUIREMENTS... until it is applied to the major use registrations. (3) EPA will accept extrapolations and regional data...

  6. 33 CFR 161.18 - Reporting requirements.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... 33 Navigation and Navigable Waters 2 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Reporting requirements. 161.18 Section 161.18 Navigation and Navigable Waters COAST GUARD, DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY (CONTINUED... call. H HOTEL Date, time and point of entry system Entry time expressed as in (B) and into the entry...

  7. 16 CFR 1.61 - Injunctions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    ... 16 Commercial Practices 1 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Injunctions. 1.61 Section 1.61 Commercial Practices FEDERAL TRADE COMMISSION ORGANIZATION, PROCEDURES AND RULES OF PRACTICE GENERAL PROCEDURES... believe that it would be to the interest of the public, the Commission will apply to the courts for...

  8. 14 CFR 406.161 - Witness fees.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 4 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Witness fees. 406.161 Section 406.161 Aeronautics and Space COMMERCIAL SPACE TRANSPORTATION, FEDERAL AVIATION ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF... the same fees and mileage expenses as are paid to a witness in a court of the United States in...

  9. Dielectric response and ac conductivity analysis of hafnium oxide nanopowder

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Karahaliou, P K; Xanthopoulos, N; Krontiras, C A; Georga, S N

    2012-01-01

    The dielectric response of hafnium oxide nanopowder was studied in the frequency range of 10 -2 -10 6 MHz and in the temperature range of 20-180 °C. Broadband dielectric spectroscopy was applied and the experimental results were analyzed and discussed using the electric modulus (M*) and alternating current (ac) conductivity formalisms. The analyses of the dc conductivity and electric modulus data revealed the presence of mechanisms which are thermally activated, both with almost the same activation energy of 1.01 eV. A fitting procedure involving the superposition of the thermally activated dc conductivity, the universal dielectric responce and the near constant loss terms has been used to describe the frequency evolution of the real part of the specific electrical conductivity. The conductivity master curve was obtained, suggesting that the time-temperature superposition principle applies for the studied system, thus implying that the conductivity mechanisms are temperature independent.

  10. Amorphous Hafnium-Indium-Zinc Oxide Semiconductor Thin Film Transistors

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sheng-Po Chang

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available We reported on the performance and electrical properties of co-sputtering-processed amorphous hafnium-indium-zinc oxide (α-HfIZO thin film transistors (TFTs. Co-sputtering-processed α-HfIZO thin films have shown an amorphous phase in nature. We could modulate the In, Hf, and Zn components by changing the co-sputtering power. Additionally, the chemical composition of α-HfIZO had a significant effect on reliability, hysteresis, field-effect mobility (μFE, carrier concentration, and subthreshold swing (S of the device. Our results indicated that we could successfully and easily fabricate α-HfIZO TFTs with excellent performance by the co-sputtering process. Co-sputtering-processed α-HfIZO TFTs were fabricated with an on/off current ratio of ~106, higher mobility, and a subthreshold slope as steep as 0.55 V/dec.

  11. Determination of hafnium with the inductively coupled plasma (ICP)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wuensch, G.; Pose, K.

    1985-01-01

    The relative intensities of 198 hafnium lines in the Ar-ICP are listed. Spectral interference tables are given for the 9 analytically best lines, covering the range of +-60 pm around the Hf-lines. They include measured (not calculated) data of the interferent equivalent concentrations (IEC) and the critical concentration ratios (CCR) for 115 lines of all 34 possibly interfering elements. In many cases, these IEC- or CCR-data differ by 1 or 2 orders of magnitude from those calculated from intensities observed in the NBS-copper arc. Since no intense Hf-line is free from spectral interferences, examples are given for the calculation of the most suitable line for a known matrix. (orig.) [de

  12. Separation of zirconium--hafnium by nitride precipitation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Anderson, R.N.; Parlee, N.A.

    1977-01-01

    A method is described for the separation of a light reactive metal (e.g., zirconium) from a heavy reactive metal (e.g., hafnium) by forming insoluble nitrides of the metals in a molten metal solvent (e.g., copper) inert to nitrogen and having a suitable density for the light metal nitride to form a separate phase in the upper portion of the solvent and for the heavy metal nitride to form a separate phase in the lower portion of the solvent. Nitriding is performed by maintaining a nitrogen-containing atmosphere over the bath. The light and heavy metals may be an oxide mixture and carbothermically reduced to metal form in the same bath used for nitriding. The nitrides are then separately removed and decomposed to form the desired separate metals. 16 claims, 1 figure

  13. Systematic investigation of electromagnetic properties of all stable hafnium isotopes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Napiorkowski, T.J.; Choinski, J.; Czosnyka, T.; Iwanicki, J.; Kownacki, J.; Zemlo, L.; Srebrny, J.; Starosta, K.; Boer, J. de.; Gollwitzer, A.; Loewe, M.; Wuerkner, M.; Guenther, C.; Weber, T.; Hagemann, G.; Sletten, G.

    1996-01-01

    In a systematic investigation of the electromagnetic structure of hafnium stable isotopes enriched targets of 176, 177, 178, 179, 180 Hf were Coulomb exciting using: 67 MeV 19 F beam from NBITAL FN Tandem, 125 MeV 32 S beam from MP Tandem in Accelerator Laboratory LMU and TU Munich, 225 MeV 58 Ni beam from NBITAL FN Tandem plus 2 Liniac Boosters complex. Scattered particle-gamma as well as p-γ-γ coincidence were registered. A further simultaneous analysis of Coulomb excitation cross section as a function of scattering angle of 19 F, 32 S, 58 Ni projectiles should be sufficient to deduce reduced probabilities of E2 transitions in ground state band

  14. Synthesis and characterization of hafnium oxide for luminescent applications

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Guzman Mendoza, J.; Aguilar Frutis, M.A.; Flores, G. Alarcon; Garcia Hipolito, M.; Azorin Nieto, J.; Rivera Montalvo, T.; Falcony, C.

    2008-01-01

    Full text: Hafnium oxide (HfO 2 ) is a material with a wide range of possible technological applications because it's chemical and physical properties such as high melting point, high chemical stability, high refraction index, high dielectric constant and hardness near to diamond in the tetragonal phase. The large energy gap and low phonon frequencies of the HfO 2 makes it appropriate as a host matrix for been doped with rare earth activators. Efficient luminescent materials find wide application in electroluminescent flat panel displays; color plasma displays panels, scintillators, cathode ray tubes, fluorescent lamps, lasers, etc. In recent years the study of luminescent materials based on HfO 2 has been intensified. Some groups have studied the optical properties of doped and undoped HfO 2 . In this contribution, Hafnium Oxide (HfO 2 ) films were prepared using the spray pyrolysis deposition technique. The material was synthesized using chlorides as raw materials in deionised water as solvent and deposited on Corning glass substrates at temperatures from 300 deg C to 600 deg C. For substrate temperatures lower than 400 deg C, the deposited films are amorphous, while for substrate temperatures higher than 450 deg C, the monoclinic phase of HfO 2 appears. Scanning electron microscopy with microprobe analysis was use to observe the microstructure and obtain the chemical composition of the films; rough surfaces with spherical particles were appreciated. UV and low energy X Ray radiations were used in order to achieve the thermoluminescent characterization of the films as a function of the deposition temperature

  15. 50 CFR 648.161 - Closures.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-01

    ... Bluefish Fishery § 648.161 Closures. (a) EEZ closure. NMFS shall close the EEZ to fishing for bluefish by... dealer permit holders that no commercial quota is available for landing bluefish in that state. ...

  16. Pyroelectricity of silicon-doped hafnium oxide thin films

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jachalke, Sven; Schenk, Tony; Park, Min Hyuk; Schroeder, Uwe; Mikolajick, Thomas; Stöcker, Hartmut; Mehner, Erik; Meyer, Dirk C.

    2018-04-01

    Ferroelectricity in hafnium oxide thin films is known to be induced by various doping elements and in solid-solution with zirconia. While a wealth of studies is focused on their basic ferroelectric properties and memory applications, thorough studies of the related pyroelectric properties and their application potential are only rarely found. This work investigates the impact of Si doping on the phase composition and ferro- as well as pyroelectric properties of thin film capacitors. Dynamic hysteresis measurements and the field-free Sharp-Garn method were used to correlate the reported orthorhombic phase fractions with the remanent polarization and pyroelectric coefficient. Maximum values of 8.21 µC cm-2 and -46.2 µC K-1 m-2 for remanent polarization and pyroelectric coefficient were found for a Si content of 2.0 at%, respectively. Moreover, temperature-dependent measurements reveal nearly constant values for the pyroelectric coefficient and remanent polarization over the temperature range of 0 ° C to 170 ° C , which make the material a promising candidate for IR sensor and energy conversion applications beyond the commonly discussed use in memory applications.

  17. Hafnium oxide nanoparticles: toward an in vitro predictive biological effect?

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Marill, Julie; Anesary, Naeemunnisa Mohamed; Zhang, Ping; Vivet, Sonia; Borghi, Elsa; Levy, Laurent; Pottier, Agnes

    2014-01-01

    Hafnium oxide, NBTXR3 nanoparticles were designed for high dose energy deposition within cancer cells when exposed to ionizing radiation. The purpose of this study was to assess the possibility of predicting in vitro the biological effect of NBTXR3 nanoparticles when exposed to ionizing radiation. Cellular uptake of NBTXR3 nanoparticles was assessed in a panel of human cancer cell lines (radioresistant and radiosensitive) by transmission electron microscopy. The radioenhancement of NBTXR3 nanoparticles was measured by the clonogenic survival assay. NBTXR3 nanoparticles were taken up by cells in a concentration dependent manner, forming clusters in the cytoplasm. Differential nanoparticle uptake was observed between epithelial and mesenchymal or glioblastoma cell lines. The dose enhancement factor increased with increase NBTXR3 nanoparticle concentration and radiation dose. Beyond a minimum number of clusters per cell, the radioenhancement of NBTXR3 nanoparticles could be estimated from the radiation dose delivered and the radiosensitivity of the cancer cell lines. Our preliminary results suggest a predictable in vitro biological effect of NBTXR3 nanoparticles exposed to ionizing radiation

  18. Studies of high-K isomers in hafnium nuclei

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sletten, G.; Gjoerup, N.L.

    1991-01-01

    K-isomeric states built on high-Ω Nilsson orbitals from deformation-aligned high-j levels near the Fermi surface are found to cluster in the neutron rich Hf, W and Os nuclei. It has been shown that some of the high seniority states of this type have decay properties that indicate strong mixing of configurations and that in Osmium nuclei γ-softness cause strong deviations from the well established K-selection rule. Also in the Hafnium nuclei is the expected forbiddenness in isomeric decays an order of magnitude smaller than expected from the K-selection rule. A new 9 quasiparticle isomer has been discovered in 175 Hf at I=57/2. This isomer has the anomalous decay as the dominant mode. Other lower seniority states are also identified. At spin 35/2 and 45/2 the deformation aligned states become yrast, but the structure of the yrast line to even higher spins is not yet understood. (author)

  19. Luminescent determination of zirconium and hafnium with myricetin

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Talipov, Sh.T.; Zel'tser, L.E.; Morozova, L.A.; Tashkhodzhaev, A.T.

    1978-01-01

    Reaction of formation of 3, 5, 7, 3', 4', 5' - hexaoxiflavone - myricetin complexes with zirconium and hafnium ions has been the basis for development of luminescent method of determining these elements. Optimum conditions for complexing have been determined. For Hf they are : 8-9 HCl concentration, maximum fluorescence wave length (lambda fl.)of 520 nm, wave length of exciting light (lambda el) of 436 nm, for Zr lambda fl = 536nm, lambda el = 436 nm. Stable fluorescence establishes after 25 min. for Zr and after 15 min for Hf in the presence of 40% ethanol. Usage of various camouflage agents has permitted to attain high selectivity of the method. Possibility for determination of Zr with myricetin in the presence of a 10-time excess of Hf, Cr, Cu, 50-time excess of Mo and Ti is shown. Sensitivity of Zr determination is 2.0x10 μg -2 /ml, for Hf it is 9.0x10 μg -3 and mineral waters

  20. Composition and microstructure of zirconium and hafnium germanates obtained by different chemical routes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Utkin, A.V.; Prokip, V.E.; Baklanova, N.I.

    2014-01-01

    The phase composition and morphology of zirconium and hafnium germanates synthesized by ceramic and co-precipitation routes were studied. The products were characterized using high-temperature X-ray diffraction analysis (XRD), Raman spectroscopy, scanning electron microscopy (SEM) and thermal (TG/DTA) analysis. To investigate the phase composition and stoichiometry of compounds the unit cell parameters were refined by full-profile Rietveld XRD analysis. The morphology of products and its evolution during high-temperature treatment was examined by SEM analysis. It was stated that there is the strong dependence of the phase composition and morphology of products on the preparation route. The ceramic route requires a multi-stage high-temperature treatment to obtain zirconium and hafnium germanates of 95% purity or more. Also, there are strong diffusion limitations to obtain hafnium germanate Hf 3 GeO 8 by ceramic route. On the contrary, the co-precipitation route leads to the formation of nanocrystalline single phase germanates of stoichiometric composition at a relatively low temperatures (less than 1000 °C). The results of quantitative XRD analysis showed the hafnium germanates are stoichiometric compounds in contrast to zirconium germanates that form a set of solid solutions. This distinction may be related to the difference in the ion radii of Zr and Hf. - Graphical abstract: The phase composition and morphology of zirconium and hafnium germanates synthesized by ceramic and co-precipitation routes were studied. It was stated that there is the strong dependence of the phase composition and morphology of products on the preparation route. Display Omitted - Highlights: • Zr and Hf germanates were synthesized by ceramic and co-precipitation routes. • The morphology of products depends on the synthesis parameters. • Zirconium germanates forms a set of solid solutions. • Hafnium germanates are stoichiometric compounds

  1. Transition rates in {sup 161}Dy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Berg, V; Malmskog, S G

    1969-06-15

    The decay of {sup 161}Tb has been studied using a high resolution Ge(Li)-detector. Five new transitions were observed and fitted into the earlier proposed decay scheme. The half-life of the 131.8 keV level in {sup 161}Dy was determined in a delayed coincidence measurement to be 145 {+-} 15 psec. The low level scheme in {sup 161}Dy is discussed within a quasi-particle model allowing for Coriolis mixing. Special attention is given to the strongly retarded, K-allowed 131.8 keV E1 transition with a retardation factor F{sub W} > 1.5 x 10{sup 8}.

  2. Bond formation in hafnium atom implantation into SiC induced by high-energy electron irradiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yasuda, H.; Mori, H.; Sakata, T.; Naka, M.; Fujita, H.

    1992-01-01

    Bilayer films of Hf (target atoms)/α-SiC (substrate) were irradiated with 2 MeV electrons in an ultra-high voltage electron microscope (UHVEM), with the electron beam incident on the hafnium layer. As a result of the irradiation, hafnium atoms were implanted into the SiC substrate. Changes in the microstructure and valence electronic states associated with the implantation were studied by a combination of UHVEM and Auger valence electron spectroscopy. The implantation process is summarized as follows. (1) Irradiation with 2 MeV electrons first induces a crystalline-to-amorphous transition in α-SiC. (2) Hafnium atoms which have been knocked-off from the hafnium layer by collision with the 2 MeV electrons are implanted into the resultant amorphous SiC. (3) The implanted hafnium atoms make preferential bonding to carbon atoms. (4) With continued irradiation, the hafnium atoms repeat the displacement along the beam direction and the subsequent bonding with the dangling hybrids of carbon and silicon. The repetition of the displacement and subsequent bonding lead to the deep implantation of hafnium atoms into the SiC substrate. It is concluded that implantation successfully occurs when the bond strength between a constituent atom of a substrate and an injected atom is stronger than that between constituent atoms of a substrate. (Author)

  3. 36 CFR 13.161 - Permit application.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... Section 13.161 Parks, Forests, and Public Property NATIONAL PARK SERVICE, DEPARTMENT OF THE INTERIOR... blueprint, sketch or photograph of the cabin or structure; (d) A map that shows the geographic location of... cabin or structure. All information may be provided orally except the cabin blueprint, sketch or...

  4. 21 CFR 161.130 - Oysters.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... water. Before packing into the containers for shipment or other delivery for consumption the oysters are... FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) FOOD FOR HUMAN CONSUMPTION FISH AND SHELLFISH Requirements for Specific Standardized Fish and Shellfish § 161.130 Oysters. (a...

  5. 46 CFR 161.012-1 - Scope.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-01

    ..., DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY (CONTINUED) EQUIPMENT, CONSTRUCTION, AND MATERIALS: SPECIFICATIONS AND APPROVAL ELECTRICAL EQUIPMENT Personal Flotation Device Lights § 161.012-1 Scope. (a) This subpart... approving personal flotation device lights fitted on Coast Guard approved life preservers, bouyant vests...

  6. 46 CFR 161.012-3 - Definitions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-01

    ... GUARD, DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY (CONTINUED) EQUIPMENT, CONSTRUCTION, AND MATERIALS: SPECIFICATIONS AND APPROVAL ELECTRICAL EQUIPMENT Personal Flotation Device Lights § 161.012-3 Definitions. (a) As used in this subpart, PFD means Coast Guard approved personal flotation device. (b) For the purpose of...

  7. 40 CFR 161.150 - General.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... FOR REGISTRATION OF ANTIMICROBIAL PESTICIDES Product Chemistry Data Requirements § 161.150 General. (a) Applicability. This subpart describes the product chemistry data that are required to support the registration... characteristics must be considered. (iv) Certain data are needed as basic or supportive evidence in initiating or...

  8. 50 CFR 14.161 - Primary enclosures.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-01

    ... Wild Mammals and Birds to the United States Specifications for Other Terrestrial Mammals § 14.161... primary enclosure shall provide adequate space for the animal to stand upright in a normal posture with... lie in a full prone position. Specifications for Birds ...

  9. 27 CFR 17.161 - General.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ....161 Alcohol, Tobacco Products and Firearms ALCOHOL AND TOBACCO TAX AND TRADE BUREAU, DEPARTMENT OF THE... organized to enable appropriate TTB officers to trace each operation or transaction, monitor compliance with... invoices and cost accounting records, are acceptable if they show the required information or are annotated...

  10. Determination of hafnium, molybdenum, and vanadium in niobium and niobium-based alloys by atomic absorption spectrometry

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ide, Kunikazu; Kobayashi, Takeshi; Sudo, Emiko.

    1985-01-01

    The analytical procedure is as follows: Weigh 1 g of a sample and put it into a 100 cm 3 PTFE beaker. Add 5 ml of distilled water and 5 ml of hydrofluoric acid, and then heat the solution on a hot plate, adding 3 ml of nitric acid dropwise. Dilute the solution to 100 cm 3 with distilled water. When hafnium is determined, add 2 g of diammonium titanium hexafluoride ((NH 4 ) 2 TiF 6 )) before dilution. Working standard solutions are prepared by adding the stock standard solutions of hafnium, molybdenum, and vanadium into niobium solutions. When hafnium is determined, add 2 g of (NH 4 ) 2 TiF 6 and the alloying elements in amounts corresponding to those in sample solutions into the working standard solutions. The tolerable amounts of hydrofluoric acid were 2.9 M, 2.1 M, and 3.1 M and those of nitric acid were 1.0 M, 1.6 M, and 1.6 M for hafnium, molybdenum, and vanadium, respectively. It was found that (NH 4 ) 2 TiF 6 greatly increased the sensitivity for hafnium determination. Niobium showed minus effect for hafnium and plus effect for molybdenum and vanadium. The atomic absorption of molybdenum and vanadium were not influenced by the presence of 20 % of each alloying element, while the atomic absorption of hafnium was given plus effect by 20 % of zirconium, iron, cobalt, nickel, manganese, chromium or vanadium and minus effect by 20 % tungsten. The analytical values of hafnium, molybdenum, and vanadium in niobium-based alloys by this method showed a good agreement with those by X-ray fluorescence analysis. The lower limits of determination (S/N=2) were 0.05, 0.001, and 0.002 % and the relative standard deviation were 3, 1, and 1.5 % for hafnium, molybdenum, and vanadium, respectively. (author)

  11. EC/β+ decay of 161Er

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kalinnikov, V.G.; Ibraheem, Y.S.; Stegailov, V.I.

    2004-01-01

    Full text: The study of odd-proton nuclei in rare-earth region has been performed to get more information on the nuclear structure of these nuclei. In the framework of a program at the ISOL complex of YASNAPP-2 at JINR to study the decay of odd-nuclei, 161 Er has been investigated. The experiments have been focused on the 161 Ho level scheme populated in the EC/β + decay of 161 Er for which a few results have been previously reported [1,2]. Spectra of single γ-ray, γ-γ coincidence and internal conversion electrons were measured. There are appreciable disagreements between results of some γ-ray intensities obtained by us and in [2]. The greatest difference was for relative γ-ray intensity of the 11.28 keV, which has reported value I γ ∼ 10 (I γ 211 =1000) in [2], but this leads to an overpopulation of the 211 keV level by 14% of the decay [3]. The relative intensities of transitions with Eγ γ211 =1000). Inaccuracy of Iγ in [2] is probably due to a sudden change in the efficiency curve of their Ge(Li) detector in the low energy region while our HPGe detector feature a much smoother variation in the efficiency curve in this γ-ray energy region. Besides, the levels earlier introduced by us in [4], three new levels in 161 Ho were proposed from γ-γ coincidences at energies 693.2 keV, 859.6 keV, and 957.97 keV. Spins, parities and Nilsson quantum characteristics of some 161 Ho levels were established

  12. Separation of zirconium and hafnium from acompanying elements by paper chromatography in the systems of alcohol-acid

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lebedeva, G.G.; Viktorova, M.E.

    1980-01-01

    Solvents have been chosen and investigated which provide expressed separation of zirconium and hafnium at the analysis of mineral raw materials by paper chromatography. The systems with HNO 3 and HCl containing methyl, ethyl, propyl and butyl alcohols have been studied as mobile phases for separation of zirconium and hafnium. It has been shown that alcohol contents and solvent acidity affect the Rsub(f) value of these elements. The C 2 H 5 OH-5MHCl and C 2 H 5 OH-5MHNO 3 systems are most optimal for pre-concentration of zirconium and hafnium

  13. ENTIRELY AQUEOUS SOLUTION-GEL ROUTE FOR THE PREPARATION OF ZIRCONIUM CARBIDE, HAFNIUM CARBIDE AND THEIR TERNARY CARBIDE POWDERS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zhang Changrui

    2016-07-01

    Full Text Available An entirely aqueous solution-gel route has been developed for the synthesis of zirconium carbide, hafnium carbide and their ternary carbide powders. Zirconium oxychloride (ZrOCl₂.8H₂O, malic acid (MA and ethylene glycol (EG were dissolved in water to form the aqueous zirconium carbide precursor. Afterwards, this aqueous precursor was gelled and transformed into zirconium carbide at a relatively low temperature (1200 °C for achieving an intimate mixing of the intermediate products. Hafnium and the ternary carbide powders were also synthesized via the same aqueous route. All the zirconium, hafnium and ternary carbide powders exhibited a particle size of ∼100 nm.

  14. Plasma spraying of zirconium carbide – hafnium carbide – tungsten cermets

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Brožek, Vlastimil; Ctibor, Pavel; Cheong, D.-I.; Yang, S.-H.

    2009-01-01

    Roč. 9, č. 1 (2009), s. 49-64 ISSN 1335-8987 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z20430508 Keywords : Plasma spraying * cermet coatings * microhardness * zirconium carbide * hafnium carbide * tungsten * water stabilized plasma Subject RIV: JH - Ceramics, Fire-Resistant Materials and Glass

  15. Titanium, zirconium- and hafnium containing initiators in the polymerization of acrylic monomers to ''living'' polymers

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Farnham, W.B.; Hertler, W.R.

    1988-01-01

    This patent describes a process for preparing ''living'' polymer. The process comprises contacting one or more acrylic monomers under polymerizing conditions with a polymerization-initiating amount of a tetra-coordinate organotitanium, organozirconium or organo-hafnium polymerization initiator, and ''living'' polymers produced thereby

  16. Vapor pressure, heat capacities, and phase transitions of tetrakis(tert-butoxy)hafnium

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Fulem, Michal; Růžička, K.

    2011-01-01

    Roč. 311, Dec. (2011), s. 25-29 ISSN 0378-3812 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z10100521 Keywords : tetrakis(tert-butoxy)hafnium * MO precursor * vapor pressure * heat capacity * vaporization enthalpy * enthalpy of fusion Subject RIV: CF - Physical ; Theoretical Chemistry Impact factor: 2.139, year: 2011

  17. Separation of hafnium from zirconium in sulfuric acid solutions using pressurized ion exchange

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hurst, F.J.

    1981-01-01

    High-resolution pressurized ion exchange has been used successfully to study and separate hafnium and zirconium sulfate complexes by chromatographic elution from Dowex 50W-X8 (15 to 25 μm) resin with sulfuric acid solutions. Techniques were developed to continuously monitor the column effluents for zirconium and hafnium by reaction with fluorometric and colorimetric reagents. Since neither reagent was specific for either metal ion, peak patterns were initially identified by using the stable isotopes 90 Zr and 180 Hf as fingerprints of their elution position. Distribution ratios for both zirconium and hafnium decrease as the inverse fourth power of the sulfuric acid concentration below 2N and as the inverse second power at higher acid concentration. The hafnium-to-zirconium separation factor is approximately constant (approx. 8) over the 0.5 to 3N range. Under certain conditions, an unseparated fraction was observed that was not retained by the resin. The amount of this fraction which is thought to be a polymeric hydrolysis product appears to be a function of metal and sulfuric acid concentrations. Conditions are being sought to give the highest zirconium concentration and the lowest acid concentration that can be used as a feed material for commercial scale-up in the continuous annular chromatographic (CAC) unit without formation of the polymer

  18. The corrosion behavior of hafnium in high-temperature-water environments

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rishel, D.M.; Smee, J.D.; Kammenzind, B.F.

    1999-10-01

    The high-temperature-water corrosion performance of hafnium is evaluated. Corrosion kinetic data are used to develop correlations that are a function of time and temperature. The evaluation is based on corrosion tests conducted in out-of-pile autoclaves and in out-of-flux locations of the Advanced Test Reactor (ATR) at temperatures ranging from 288 to 360 C. Similar to the corrosion behavior of unalloyed zirconium, the high-temperature-water corrosion response of hafnium exhibits three corrosion regimes: pretransition, posttransition, and spalling. In the pretransition regime, cubic corrosion kinetics are exhibited, whereas in the posttransition regime, linear corrosion kinetics are exhibited. Because of the scatter in the spalling regime data, it is not reasonable to use a best fit of the data to describe spalling regime corrosion. Data also show that neutron irradiation does not alter the corrosion performance of hafnium. Finally, the data illustrate that the corrosion rate of hafnium is significantly less than that of Zircaloy-2 and Zircaloy-4.

  19. 7 CFR 1260.161 - Establishment and membership.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    ....161 Agriculture Regulations of the Department of Agriculture (Continued) AGRICULTURAL MARKETING SERVICE (MARKETING AGREEMENTS AND ORDERS; MISCELLANEOUS COMMODITIES), DEPARTMENT OF AGRICULTURE BEEF PROMOTION AND RESEARCH Beef Promotion and Research Order Beef Promotion Operating Committee § 1260.161...

  20. 36 CFR 406.161-406.169 - [Reserved

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... 36 Parks, Forests, and Public Property 3 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false [Reserved] 406.161-406.169 Section 406.161-406.169 Parks, Forests, and Public Property AMERICAN BATTLE MONUMENTS COMMISSION... BATTLE MONUMENTS COMMISSION §§ 406.161-406.169 [Reserved] ...

  1. 46 CFR 161.013-11 - Prototype test.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 6 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Prototype test. 161.013-11 Section 161.013-11 Shipping...: SPECIFICATIONS AND APPROVAL ELECTRICAL EQUIPMENT Electric Distress Light for Boats § 161.013-11 Prototype test. (a) Each manufacturer must test a prototype light identical to the lights to be certified prior to...

  2. 40 CFR 161.340 - Toxicology data requirements.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 23 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Toxicology data requirements. 161.340... Toxicology data requirements. (a) Table. Sections 161.100 through 161.102 describe how to use this table to determine the toxicology data requirements and the substance to be tested. Kind of data required (b) Notes...

  3. 28 CFR 39.161-39.169 - [Reserved

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... 28 Judicial Administration 1 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false [Reserved] 39.161-39.169 Section 39.161-39.169 Judicial Administration DEPARTMENT OF JUSTICE ENFORCEMENT OF NONDISCRIMINATION ON THE BASIS OF HANDICAP IN PROGRAMS OR ACTIVITIES CONDUCTED BY THE DEPARTMENT OF JUSTICE §§ 39.161-39.169 [Reserved] ...

  4. 21 CFR 161.170 - Canned Pacific salmon.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 2 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Canned Pacific salmon. 161.170 Section 161.170... § 161.170 Canned Pacific salmon. (a) Identity. (1) Canned Pacific salmon is the food prepared from one... forms of canned Pacific salmon are processed from fish prepared by removing the head, gills, and tail...

  5. 45 CFR 2490.161-2490.169 - [Reserved

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-01

    ... 45 Public Welfare 4 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false [Reserved] 2490.161-2490.169 Section 2490.161-2490.169 Public Welfare Regulations Relating to Public Welfare (Continued) JAMES MADISON MEMORIAL... CONDUCTED BY THE JAMES MADISON MEMORIAL FELLOWSHIP FOUNDATION §§ 2490.161-2490.169 [Reserved] ...

  6. 7 CFR 1789.161 - Conflicts of interest.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 12 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Conflicts of interest. 1789.161 Section 1789.161... Consultant Services Funded by Borrowers-General § 1789.161 Conflicts of interest. The standard for determining organizational conflicts of interest shall be as set forth in the FAR subpart 9.5 (48 CFR part 9...

  7. 49 CFR 28.161-28.169 - [Reserved

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 1 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false [Reserved] 28.161-28.169 Section 28.161-28.169 Transportation Office of the Secretary of Transportation ENFORCEMENT OF NONDISCRIMINATION ON THE BASIS OF HANDICAP IN PROGRAMS OR ACTIVITIES CONDUCTED BY THE DEPARTMENT OF TRANSPORTATION §§ 28.161-28.169 [Reserved] ...

  8. Reinforcement against crack propagation of PWR absorbers by development of boron-carbon-hafnium composites

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Provot, B.; Herter, P.

    2000-01-01

    In order to improve the mechanical behaviour of materials used as neutron absorbers in nuclear reactors, we have developed CERCER or CERMET composites with boron and hafnium. Thus a new composite B 4 C/HfB 2 has been especially studied. We have identified three kinds of degradation under irradiation (thermal gradient, swelling due to fission products and accidental corrosion) that induce imposed deformations cracking phenomena. Mechanical behaviour and crack propagation resistance have been studied by ball-on-three-balls and double torsion tests. A special device was developed to enable crack propagation and associated stress intensity factor measurements. Effects of structure and of a second phase are underline. First results show that these materials present crack initiation and propagation resistance much higher than pure boron carbide or hafnium diboride. We observe R-Curves effects, crack bridging or branching, crack arrests, and toughness increases that we can relate respectively to the composite structures. (author)

  9. Synthesis and characterization of hafnium oxide films for thermo and photoluminescence applications

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Guzman Mendoza, J.; Aguilar Frutis, M.A.; Flores, G. Alarcon; Garcia Hipolito, M.; Maciel Cerda, A.; Azorin Nieto, J.; Rivera Montalvo, T.; Falcony, C.

    2010-01-01

    Hafnium oxide (HfO 2 ) films were deposited by the ultrasonic spray pyrolysis process. The films were synthesized from hafnium chloride as raw material in deionized water as solvent and were deposited on corning glass substrates at temperatures from 300 to 600 deg. C. For substrate temperatures lower than 400 deg. C the deposited films were amorphous, while for substrate temperatures higher than 450 deg. C, the monoclinic phase of HfO 2 appeared. Scanning electron microscopy showed that the film's surface resulted rough with semi-spherical promontories. The films showed a chemical composition close to HfO 2 , with an Hf/O ratio of about 0.5. UV radiation was used in order to achieve the thermoluminescent characterization of the films; the 240 nm wavelength induced the best response. In addition, preliminary photoluminescence spectra, as a function of the deposition temperatures, are shown.

  10. Synthesis and characterization of Ho3+ doped hafnium oxide TLD for radiation dosimeter

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sekar, Nandakumar; Ganesan, Bharanidharan; Sahib, Hajee Reyaz Ali; Aruna, Prakasarao; Ganesan, Singaravelu; Thamilkumar, P.; Rai, R.R.

    2017-01-01

    Cancer is a dreaded disease which is treated by Radiotherapy, Chemotherapy and Surgery. Radiotherapy plays a vital role in treatment of cancer and recently measurements of invivo radiation dosimetric in patient is of great interest due to high dose gradients in advanced technology like IMRT, IGRT etc. Hence, for the last few decades, a great degree of interest has been shown for the hafnium oxide for radiation dosimetric applications, due to its high dielectric constant, wide band gap and better interface properties such as chemical stability, conduction band offset and thermodynamic stability. In the present study, Synthesis and characterization of Ho 3+ doped Hafnium oxide were carried out and its applications towards radiation dosimeter were investigated

  11. Self-cleaning and surface chemical reactions during hafnium dioxide atomic layer deposition on indium arsenide.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Timm, Rainer; Head, Ashley R; Yngman, Sofie; Knutsson, Johan V; Hjort, Martin; McKibbin, Sarah R; Troian, Andrea; Persson, Olof; Urpelainen, Samuli; Knudsen, Jan; Schnadt, Joachim; Mikkelsen, Anders

    2018-04-12

    Atomic layer deposition (ALD) enables the ultrathin high-quality oxide layers that are central to all modern metal-oxide-semiconductor circuits. Crucial to achieving superior device performance are the chemical reactions during the first deposition cycle, which could ultimately result in atomic-scale perfection of the semiconductor-oxide interface. Here, we directly observe the chemical reactions at the surface during the first cycle of hafnium dioxide deposition on indium arsenide under realistic synthesis conditions using photoelectron spectroscopy. We find that the widely used ligand exchange model of the ALD process for the removal of native oxide on the semiconductor and the simultaneous formation of the first hafnium dioxide layer must be significantly revised. Our study provides substantial evidence that the efficiency of the self-cleaning process and the quality of the resulting semiconductor-oxide interface can be controlled by the molecular adsorption process of the ALD precursors, rather than the subsequent oxide formation.

  12. Zirconium and hafnium tetrachloride separation by extractive distillation with molten zinc chloride lead chloride solvent

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    McLaughlin, D.F.; Stoltz, R.A.

    1988-01-01

    In an extractive distillation method for separating hafniuim tetrachloride from zirconium tetrachloride of the type wherein a mixture of zirconium and hafnium tetrachlorides is introduced into an extractive distillation column, which extractive distillation column has a reboiler connected at the bottom and a reflux condenser connected at the top and wherein a molten salt solvent is circulated into the reflux condenser and through the column to provide a liquid phase, and wherein molten salt solvent containing zirconium tetrachloride is taken from the reboiler and run through a stripper to remove zirconium tetrachloride product from the molten salt solvent and the stripped molten salt solvent is returned to the reflux condenser and hafnium tetrachloride enriched vapor is taken as product from the reflux condenser, the improvement is described comprising: the molten salt having a composition of at least 30 mole percent zinc chloride and at least 10 mole percent of lead chloride

  13. Preparation of hafnium metal by calciothermic reduction of HfO2

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sharma, I.G.; Vijay, P.L.; Sehra, J.C.; Sundaram, C.V.

    1975-01-01

    Hafnium metal powder has been produced by the calciothermic reduction of hafnium oxide. The influence of various experimental parameters - such as amount of calcium in excess of stoichiometric requirement, temperature, and time of reduction - on the yield and purity of the metal has been studied. The metal powder obtained by reduction at 960 0 C (two hours) with a calcium excess of 70% analysed 600 ppm of oxygen and 147 ppm of nitrogen. A reduction efficiency of 96% has been achieved under these conditions. The refining of the powder by electron beam melting, fused salt electrolysis, and iodide process has been studied. The oxygen content in the metal could be brought down from 6900 to 148 ppm by electron beam melt-refining. (author)

  14. On-line separation of refractory hafnium and tantalum isotopes at the ISOCELE separator

    CERN Document Server

    Liang, C F; Obert, J; Paris, P; Putaux, J C

    1981-01-01

    By chemical evaporation technique, neutron deficient hafnium nuclei have been on-line separated at the ISOCELE facility, from the isobar rare-earth elements, in the metal-fluoride HfF/sub 3//sup +/ ion form. Half-lives of /sup 162-165/Hf have been measured. Similarly, tantalum has been selectively separated on the TaF/sub 4//sup +/ form. (4 refs) .

  15. Complexonometric determination of hafnium (4) in the presence of europium(3) or tantalum(5)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Oziashvili, E.D.; Ehsakiya, K.E.; Sirakanyan, N.M.

    1986-01-01

    Complexonometric determination of hafnium in the presence of Ta or Eu in samples which can be decomposed by acids, i.e. in double borides has been investigated. Initial solutions are prepared by fusing with K 2 S 2 O 8 excess, the fusion was leached by hot water, H 2 SO L 4 was added and Hf was titrated by complexone 3 in the presence of xylenol orange

  16. Simplified method for gravimetric determination of zirconium or hafnium with α-hydroxy carboxylic acids

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Barbieri, R.S.; Rocha, J.C.; Terra, V.R.; Marques Netto, A.

    1989-01-01

    The conditions for gravimetric determination of zirconium or hafnium by glicoloc acids derivatives were studied by thermogravimetric analysis. The method utilized shownd that after precipitation, washing and drying of precipitates at 150 o C, the resulting solid was weighed in the form of [M (RCH(OH)COO) 4 ] (M = Zr, Hf; R + C 6 H 5 , β-C 10 H 7 , p-BrC 6 H 4 ). (author)

  17. Modified method for zirconium or hafnium gravimetric determination with glycolic acid derivatives

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Barbieri, R.S.; Rocha, J.C.; Terra, V.R.; Marques Neto, A.

    1989-01-01

    The conditions for gravimetric determination of zirconium or hafnium by glicolic acid derivatives were studied by thermogravimetric analysis. The method utilized shown that after precipitation, washing and drying of precipitates at 150 0 C, the resulting solid was weighed in the form of [M{RCH(OH)COO} 4 ] (M = Zr,Hf;R = C 6 H 5 , β-C 10 H 7 ,p-BrC 6 H 4 ). (author) [pt

  18. Electrodeposition in molten salts of metals used in nuclear industry: hafnium and uranium

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Serrano, K.

    1998-01-01

    The aim of this work is to study the electrodeposition in molten salts of metals used in nuclear industry: hafnium and uranium. The experiment is carried out in a molten alkaline halogenide medium in a temperature range between 670 and 750 degrees Celsius. The first part of this work concerns more particularly the electrochemical behaviour of the hafnium and uranium ions in the electrolytic solution. The reduction mechanisms of these ions have been studied by the use of three methods: cyclic voltametry, chrono-potentiometry and square wave voltametry. Results have shown that the process of metal deposition is difficult to explain because secondary reactions (as for instance: adsorption phenomena or cathodic deposit dissolution) occur. The uranium germination has then been studied by modelling of chrono-amperograms. The experiments have shown that the deposition is the result of the initial uranium crystal growth and depends on the electrolyte diffusion. The second part of this work deals with the implementation of hafnium and uranium deposition taking into account the preceding mechanistic studies. Depositions have all been observed by physical methods as for instance scanning electron microscopy. Particular experimental solutions (soluble anode, addition of fluoride ions to the electrolyte) have been used. The obtained deposition of hafnium is smooth and adheres very well to the substrate. The uranium depositions have been implemented with the use of a soluble anode. Uranium is deposited in a dendritic shape to the cathode. It has also been shown that the electro-kinetic parameters (temperature, uranium ions concentration, current density) have not an important influence on the dendritic morphology of the deposition. This morphology could be the consequence of particular convection movements to the surface of the cathode. (O.M.)

  19. Rhodium and Hafnium Influence on the Microstructure, Phase Composition, and Oxidation Resistance of Aluminide Coatings

    OpenAIRE

    Maryana Zagula-Yavorska; Małgorzata Wierzbińska; Jan Sieniawski

    2017-01-01

    A 0.5 μm thick layer of rhodium was deposited on the CMSX 4 superalloy by the electroplating method. The rhodium-coated superalloy was hafnized and aluminized or only aluminized using the Chemical vapour deposition method. A comparison was made of the microstructure, phase composition, and oxidation resistance of three aluminide coatings: nonmodified (a), rhodium-modified (b), and rhodium- and hafnium-modified (c). All three coatings consisted of two layers: the additive layer and the interdi...

  20. Radiation effects on the electrical properties of hafnium oxide based MOS capacitors.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Petrosky, J. C. (Air Force Institute of Technology, Wright-Patterson Air Force Base, OH); McClory, J. W. (Air Force Institute of Technology, Wright-Patterson Air Force Base, OH); Bielejec, Edward Salvador; Foster, J. C. (Air Force Institute of Technology, Wright-Patterson Air Force Base, OH)

    2010-10-01

    Hafnium oxide-based MOS capacitors were investigated to determine electrical property response to radiation environments. In situ capacitance versus voltage measurements were analyzed to identify voltage shifting as a result of changes to trapped charge with increasing dose of gamma, neutron, and ion radiation. In situ measurements required investigation and optimization of capacitor fabrication to include dicing, cleaning, metalization, packaging, and wire bonding. A top metal contact of 200 angstroms of titanium followed by 2800 angstroms of gold allowed for repeatable wire bonding and proper electrical response. Gamma and ion irradiations of atomic layer deposited hafnium oxide on silicon devices both resulted in a midgap voltage shift of no more than 0.2 V toward less positive voltages. This shift indicates recombination of radiation induced positive charge with negative trapped charge in the bulk oxide. Silicon ion irradiation caused interface effects in addition to oxide trap effects that resulted in a flatband voltage shift of approximately 0.6 V also toward less positive voltages. Additionally, no bias dependent voltage shifts with gamma irradiation and strong oxide capacitance room temperature annealing after ion irradiation was observed. These characteristics, in addition to the small voltage shifts observed, demonstrate the radiation hardness of hafnium oxide and its applicability for use in space systems.

  1. On the phase formation of sputtered hafnium oxide and oxynitride films

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sarakinos, K.; Music, D.; Mraz, S.; Baben, M. to; Jiang, K.; Nahif, F.; Braun, A.; Zilkens, C.; Schneider, J. M.; Konstantinidis, S.; Renaux, F.; Cossement, D.; Munnik, F.

    2010-01-01

    Hafnium oxynitride films are deposited from a Hf target employing direct current magnetron sputtering in an Ar-O 2 -N 2 atmosphere. It is shown that the presence of N 2 allows for the stabilization of the transition zone between the metallic and the compound sputtering mode enabling deposition of films at well defined conditions of target coverage by varying the O 2 partial pressure. Plasma analysis reveals that this experimental strategy facilitates control over the flux of the O - ions which are generated on the oxidized target surface and accelerated by the negative target potential toward the growing film. An arrangement that enables film growth without O - ion bombardment is also implemented. Moreover, stabilization of the transition sputtering zone and control of the O - ion flux without N 2 addition is achieved employing high power pulsed magnetron sputtering. Structural characterization of the deposited films unambiguously proves that the phase formation of hafnium oxide and hafnium oxynitride films with the crystal structure of HfO 2 is independent from the O - bombardment conditions. Experimental and theoretical data indicate that the presence of vacancies and/or the substitution of O by N atoms in the nonmetal sublattice favor the formation of the cubic and/or the tetragonal HfO 2 crystal structure at the expense of the monoclinic HfO 2 one.

  2. Correlations between nuclear data and integral slab experiments: the case of hafnium; Correlations entre donnees nucleaires et experiences integrales a plaques: le cas du hafnium

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Palau, J.M

    1999-07-01

    The aim of this work was to evaluate how much integral slab experiments can both reduce discrepancies between experimental results and calculations, and improve the knowledge of hafnium isotopes neutronic parameters by an adapted sensitivity and uncertainty method. A statistical approach, based on the generalized least squares method and perturbation theory, has been incorporated into our calculation system in order to deduce microscopic cross-section adjustments from observed integral measurements on this particular 'mock-up' reactor.In this study it has been established that the correlations between integral parameters and hafnium capture cross-sections enable specific variations in the region of resolved resonances at the level of multigroup and punctual cross-sections recommended data (JEF-2.2 evaluation) to be highlighted. The use of determinist methods together with Monte Carlo- type simulations enabled a depth analysis of the modelling approximations to be carried out. Furthermore, the sensitivity coefficient validation technique employed leads to a reliable assessment of the quality of the new basic nuclear data. In this instance, the adjustments proposed for certain isotope {sup 177}Hf resonance parameters reduce, after error propagation, by 3 to 5 per cent the difference between experimental results and calculations related to this absorbent's efficiency. Beyond this particular application, the qualification methodology integrated in our calculation system should enable other basic sizing parameters to be treated (chemical / geometric data or other unexplored nuclear data) to make technological requirements less stringent. (author)

  3. Correlations between nuclear data and integral slab experiments: the case of hafnium; Correlations entre donnees nucleaires et experiences integrales a plaques: le cas du hafnium

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Palau, J M

    1999-07-01

    The aim of this work was to evaluate how much integral slab experiments can both reduce discrepancies between experimental results and calculations, and improve the knowledge of hafnium isotopes neutronic parameters by an adapted sensitivity and uncertainty method. A statistical approach, based on the generalized least squares method and perturbation theory, has been incorporated into our calculation system in order to deduce microscopic cross-section adjustments from observed integral measurements on this particular 'mock-up' reactor.In this study it has been established that the correlations between integral parameters and hafnium capture cross-sections enable specific variations in the region of resolved resonances at the level of multigroup and punctual cross-sections recommended data (JEF-2.2 evaluation) to be highlighted. The use of determinist methods together with Monte Carlo- type simulations enabled a depth analysis of the modelling approximations to be carried out. Furthermore, the sensitivity coefficient validation technique employed leads to a reliable assessment of the quality of the new basic nuclear data. In this instance, the adjustments proposed for certain isotope {sup 177}Hf resonance parameters reduce, after error propagation, by 3 to 5 per cent the difference between experimental results and calculations related to this absorbent's efficiency. Beyond this particular application, the qualification methodology integrated in our calculation system should enable other basic sizing parameters to be treated (chemical / geometric data or other unexplored nuclear data) to make technological requirements less stringent. (author)

  4. Correlations between nuclear data and results of integral slab experiments. Case of hafnium; Correlations entre donnees nucleaires et experiences integrales a plaques: le cas du hafnium

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Palau, J M

    1997-10-22

    The aim of this thesis was to evaluate how much integral slab experiments can both reduce discrepancies between experimental results and calculations, and improve the knowledge of hafnium isotopes neutronic parameters by an adapted sensitivity and uncertainty method. A statistical approach, based on the generalized least squares method and perturbation theory, has been incorporated into our calculation system in order to deduce microscopic cross-section adjustments from observed integral measurements on this particular `mock-up` reactor. In this study it has been established that the correlations between integral parameters and hafnium capture cross-sections enable specific variations in the region of resolved resonances at the level of multigroup and punctual cross-sections recommended data (JEF-2.2 evaluation) to be highlighted. The use of determinist methods (APOLLO2 code) together with Monte Carlo- type simulations (TRIPOLI4 code) enabled a depth analysis of the modelling approximations to be carried out. Furthermore, the sensitivity coefficient validation technique employed leads to a reliable assessment of the quality of the new basic nuclear data. In this instance, the adjustments proposed for certain isotope {sup 177}Hf resonance parameters reduce, after error propagation, by 3 to 5 per cent the difference between experimental results and calculations related to this absorbent`s efficiency. Beyond this particular application, the qualification methodology integrated in our calculation system should enable other basic sizing parameters to be treated (chemical / geometric data or other unexplored nuclear data) to make technological requirements less stringent. (author) 128 refs.

  5. Development and characterization of ultrathin hafnium titanates as high permittivity gate insulators

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Min

    High permittivity or high-kappa materials are being developed for use as gate insulators for future ultrascaled metal oxide semiconductor field effect transistors (MOSFETs). Hafnium containing compounds are the leading candidates. Due to its moderate permittivity, however, it is difficult to achieve HfO2 gate structures with an EOT well below 1.0 nm. One approach to increase HfO2 permittivity is combining it with a very high-kappa material, such as TiO2. In this thesis, we systematically studied the electrical and physical characteristics of high-kappa hafnium titanates films as gate insulators. A series of HfxTi1-xO2 films with well-controlled composition were deposited using an MOCVD system. The physical properties of the films were analyzed using a variety of characterization techniques. X-ray micro diffraction indicates that the Ti-rich thin film is more immune to crystallization. TEM analysis showed that the thick stoichiometric HfTiO 4 film has an orthorhombic structure and large anisotropic grains. The C-V curves from the devices with the hafnium titanates films displayed relatively low hysteresis. In a certain composition range, the interfacial layer (IL) EOT and permittivity of HfxTi1-x O2 increases linearly with increasing Ti. The charge is negative for HfxTi1-xO2/IL and positive for Si/IL interface, and the magnitude increases as Hf increases. For ultra-thin films (less than 2 nm EOT), the leakage current increases with increasing HE Moreover, the Hf-rich sample has weaker temperature dependence of the current. In the MOSFET devices with the hafnium titanates films, normal transistor characteristics were observed, also electron mobility degradation. Next, we investigated the effects that different pre-deposition surface treatments, including HF dipping, NH3 surface nitridation, and HfO2 deposition, have on the electrical properties of hafnium titanates. Surface nitridation shows stronger effect than the thin HfO2 layer. The nitrided samples displayed a

  6. Low-voltage bendable pentacene thin-film transistor with stainless steel substrate and polystyrene-coated hafnium silicate dielectric.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yun, Dong-Jin; Lee, Seunghyup; Yong, Kijung; Rhee, Shi-Woo

    2012-04-01

    The hafnium silicate and aluminum oxide high-k dielectrics were deposited on stainless steel substrate using atomic layer deposition process and octadecyltrichlorosilane (OTS) and polystyrene (PS) were treated improve crystallinity of pentacene grown on them. Besides, the effects of the pentacene deposition condition on the morphologies, crystallinities and electrical properties of pentacene were characterized. Therefore, the surface treatment condition on dielectric and pentacene deposition conditions were optimized. The pentacene grown on polystyrene coated high-k dielectric at low deposition rate and temperature (0.2-0.3 Å/s and R.T.) showed the largest grain size (0.8-1.0 μm) and highest crystallinity among pentacenes deposited various deposition conditions, and the pentacene TFT with polystyrene coated high-k dielectric showed excellent device-performance. To decrease threshold voltage of pentacene TFT, the polystyrene-thickness on high-k dielectric was controlled using different concentration of polystyrene solution. As the polystyrene-thickness on hafnium silicate decreases, the dielectric constant of polystyrene/hafnium silicate increases, while the crystallinity of pentacene grown on polystyrene/hafnium silicate did not change. Using low-thickness polystyrene coated hafnium silicate dielectric, the high-performance and low voltage operating (pentacene thin film transistor (μ: ~2 cm(2)/(V s), on/off ratio, >1 × 10(4)) and complementary inverter (DC gains, ~20) could be fabricated.

  7. Extraction of zirconium and hafnium thiocyanates by CH3COCH2CH.(CH3)2-HSCN solvent from chloride medium

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Okada, A.T.

    1982-01-01

    A zirconium-hafnium separation process for application in nuclear industry is presented. The extraction of zirconium and hafnium thiocyanates in chloride medium by hexone-HSCN solvent was studied. The extraction process was developed, varying the parameters, such as, concentrations of the metals, the thiocyanate ion, the sulphate ion and free acidity in aqueous phase. (Author) [pt

  8. Solvent extraction of titanium(IV), zirconium(IV) and hafnium(IV) salicylates using liquid ion exchangers

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sundaramurthi, N M; Shinde, V M

    1989-02-01

    A solvent extraction method is proposed for the extraction of quadrivalent titanium, zirconium an hafnium from salicylate media using liquid ion exchangers such as Aliquat 336 and trioctylamine dissolved in xylene. The optimum conditions were evaluated from a critical study of the following: pH, salicylate concentration, amine concentration, diluent and period of equilibration. The method allows the separation of titanium, zirconium and hafnium from binary mixtures containing commonly associated metal ions and is applicable to the analysis of real samples such as BCS-CRM 387 nimonic 901, BCS-CRM 243/4 ferro-titanium, BCS-CRM 307 magnesium alloy and BCS-CRM 388 zircon. Titanium is determined either with hydrogen peroxide or by atomic absorption spectrometry whereas zirconium and hafnium are determined spectrophotometrically with Alizarin Red S and Zylenol Orange, respectively. The results of both separation and analysis are reported. The method is precise, accurate and fast.

  9. Use of hafnium in control bars of nuclear reactors; Uso de hafnio en barras de control de reactores nucleares

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ramirez S, J.R.; Alonso V, G. [ININ, 52045 Ocoyoacac, Estado de Mexico (Mexico)]. e-mail: jrrs@nuclear.inin-mx

    2003-07-01

    Recently the use of hafnium as neutron absorber material in nuclear reactors has been reason of investigation by virtue of that this material has nuclear properties as to the neutrons absorption and structural that can prolong the useful life of the control mechanisms of the nuclear reactors. In this work some of those more significant hafnium properties are presented like nuclear material. Also there are presented calculations carried out with the HELIOS code for fuel cells of uranium oxide and of uranium and plutonium mixed oxides under controlled conditions with conventional bars of boron carbide and also with similar bars to which are substituted the absorbent material by metallic hafnium, the results are presented in this work. (Author)

  10. Strong influence of polymer architecture on the microstructural evolution of hafnium-alkoxide-modified silazanes upon ceramization.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Papendorf, Benjamin; Nonnenmacher, Katharina; Ionescu, Emanuel; Kleebe, Hans-Joachim; Riedel, Ralf

    2011-04-04

    The present study focuses on the synthesis and ceramization of novel hafnium-alkoxide-modified silazanes as well as on their microstructure evolution at high temperatures. The synthesis of hafnia-modified polymer-derived SiCN ceramic nanocomposites is performed via chemical modification of a polysilazane and of a cyclotrisilazane, followed by cross-linking and pyrolysis in argon atmosphere. Spectroscopic investigation (i.e., NMR, FTIR, and Raman) shows that the hafnium alkoxide reacts with the N-H groups of the cyclotrisilazane; in the case of polysilazane, reactions of N-H as well as Si-H groups with the alkoxide are observed. Consequently, scanning and transmission electron microscopy studies reveal that the ceramic nanocomposites obtained from cyclotrisilazane and polysilazane exhibited markedly different microstructures, which is a result of the different reaction pathways of the hafnium alkoxide with cyclotrisilazane and with polysilazane. Furthermore, the two prepared ceramic nanocomposites are unexpectedly found to exhibit extremely different high-temperature behavior with respect to decomposition and crystallization; this essential difference is found to be related to the different distribution of hafnium throughout the ceramic network in the two samples. Thus, the homogeneous distribution of hafnium observed in the polysilazane-derived ceramic leads to an enhanced thermal stability with respect to decomposition, whereas the local enrichment of hafnium within the matrix of the cyclotrisilazane-based sample induces a pronounced decomposition upon annealing at high temperatures. The results indicate that the chemistry and architecture of the precursor has a crucial effect on the microstructure of the resulting ceramic material and consequently on its high-temperature behavior. Copyright © 2011 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  11. Hafnium at subduction zones: isotopic budget of input and output fluxes; L'hafnium dans les zones de subduction: bilan isotopique des flux entrant et sortant

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Marini, J.Ch

    2004-05-15

    Subduction zones are the primary regions of mass exchanges between continental crust and mantle of Earth through sediment subduction toward the earth's mantle and by supply of mantellic magmas to volcanic arcs. We analyze these mass exchanges using Hafnium and Neodymium isotopes. At the Izu-Mariana subduction zone, subducting sediments have Hf and Nd isotopes equivalent to Pacific seawater. Altered oceanic crust has Hf and Nd isotopic compositions equivalent to the isotopic budget of unaltered Pacific oceanic crust. At Luzon and Java subduction zones, arc lavas present Hf isotopic ratios highly radiogenic in comparison to their Nd isotopic ratios. Such compositions of the Luzon and Java arc lavas are controlled by a contamination of their sources by the subducted oceanic sediments. (author)

  12. Atomic layer deposition of calcium oxide and calcium hafnium oxide films using calcium cyclopentadienyl precursor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kukli, Kaupo; Ritala, Mikko; Sajavaara, Timo; Haenninen, Timo; Leskelae, Markku

    2006-01-01

    Calcium oxide and calcium hafnium oxide thin films were grown by atomic layer deposition on borosilicate glass and silicon substrates in the temperature range of 205-300 o C. The calcium oxide films were grown from novel calcium cyclopentadienyl precursor and water. Calcium oxide films possessed refractive index 1.75-1.80. Calcium oxide films grown without Al 2 O 3 capping layer occurred hygroscopic and converted to Ca(OH) 2 after exposure to air. As-deposited CaO films were (200)-oriented. CaO covered with Al 2 O 3 capping layers contained relatively low amounts of hydrogen and re-oriented into (111) direction upon annealing at 900 o C. In order to examine the application of CaO in high-permittivity dielectric layers, mixtures of Ca and Hf oxides were grown by alternate CaO and HfO 2 growth cycles at 230 and 300 o C. HfCl 4 was used as a hafnium precursor. When grown at 230 o C, the films were amorphous with equal amounts of Ca and Hf constituents (15 at.%). These films crystallized upon annealing at 750 o C, showing X-ray diffraction peaks characteristic of hafnium-rich phases such as Ca 2 Hf 7 O 16 or Ca 6 Hf 19 O 44 . At 300 o C, the relative Ca content remained below 8 at.%. The crystallized phase well matched with rhombohedral Ca 2 Hf 7 O 16 . The dielectric films grown on Si(100) substrates possessed effective permittivity values in the range of 12.8-14.2

  13. A study of a production process for hafnium-free zirconium from zircon

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ratanalert, N.

    1985-01-01

    The purpose of this experiment was to extract and purify the zirconium from zircon. The effects of time of extraction and stripping of zirconium, concentration of feed solution, concentration of hydrochloric acid in stripping process, equilibrium curve of extraction of zirconium and hafnium and equilibrium curve of stripping zirconium or scrubbing hafnium were studied from standard zirconium and hafnium. The results, subsequently were applied to the extraction procedures for zirconium from zircon. Minus 100 mesh zircon was fused with sodium hydroxide in the ratio of 1 : 6 at 700 degree C for l hour. After fusion the zirconate was leached with water and dissolved in hot concentrated hydrochloric acid. Zirconyl chloride octahydrate crystallized out when the solution was cooled. An agueons solution of zirconyl chloride was used as the feed to the hexone - thiocyanate solvent extraction process. This was prepared by dissolving zirconyl chloride octahydrate crystal in waster. This zirconium feed solution in 1 M HCl and 1 M N H 4 CNS was extracted with 2.7 m N H 4 CNS in hexone and then stripped with 3.6 M HCl the aqueous phase was got rid of thiocyanate ion by extracting with pure hexone, then the zirconium in aqueous phase was precipitated with sulfuric acid and ammonium hydroxide at pH 1.8 - 2.0 and zirconium oxide was obtained by ignition at 700 degree C. The process could be modified to improve the purity of zirconium by using cation exchange resin to get rid of thiocyanate ion after solvent extraction process

  14. 21 CFR 516.161 - Modifications to indexed drugs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 6 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Modifications to indexed drugs. 516.161 Section 516.161 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) ANIMAL DRUGS, FEEDS, AND RELATED PRODUCTS NEW ANIMAL DRUGS FOR MINOR USE AND MINOR SPECIES Index...

  15. 40 CFR 161.35 - Flexibility of the data requirements.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 23 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Flexibility of the data requirements. 161.35 Section 161.35 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY (CONTINUED) PESTICIDE... periodically to reflect new scientific knowledge, new trends in pesticide development, and new Agency policies...

  16. 7 CFR 1150.161 - Promotion, research and nutrition education.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 9 2010-01-01 2009-01-01 true Promotion, research and nutrition education. 1150.161... MARKETING SERVICE (Marketing Agreements and Orders; Milk), DEPARTMENT OF AGRICULTURE DAIRY PROMOTION PROGRAM Dairy Promotion and Research Order Promotion, Research and Nutrition Education § 1150.161 Promotion...

  17. 33 CFR 161.20 - Position Report (PR).

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... 33 Navigation and Navigable Waters 2 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Position Report (PR). 161.20 Section 161.20 Navigation and Navigable Waters COAST GUARD, DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY (CONTINUED... Report (PR). A vessel must report its name and position: (a) Upon point of entry into a VMRS area; (b) At...

  18. 12 CFR 563.161 - Management and financial policies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    ... 12 Banks and Banking 5 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Management and financial policies. 563.161... ASSOCIATIONS-OPERATIONS Financial Management Policies § 563.161 Management and financial policies. (a)(1) For... corporation must be well managed and operate safely and soundly. Each also must pursue financial policies that...

  19. 21 CFR 161.175 - Frozen raw breaded shrimp.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... additives as defined in section 201(s) of the Federal Food, Drug, and Cosmetic Act; or if they are food... 21 Food and Drugs 2 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Frozen raw breaded shrimp. 161.175 Section 161.175 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) FOOD...

  20. 29 CFR 1910.161 - Fixed extinguishing systems, dry chemical.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... 29 Labor 5 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Fixed extinguishing systems, dry chemical. 1910.161 Section... § 1910.161 Fixed extinguishing systems, dry chemical. (a) Scope and application. This section applies to all fixed extinguishing systems, using dry chemical as the extinguishing agent, installed to meet a...

  1. 24 CFR 982.161 - Conflict of interest.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... 24 Housing and Urban Development 4 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Conflict of interest. 982.161... and PHA Administration of Program § 982.161 Conflict of interest. (a) Neither the PHA nor any of its... prospective interest to the PHA and HUD. (c) The conflict of interest prohibition under this section may be...

  2. 30 CFR 75.161 - Plans for training programs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... 30 Mineral Resources 1 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Plans for training programs. 75.161 Section 75... Provision] § 75.161 Plans for training programs. Each operator must submit to the district manager, of the Coal Mine Safety and Health District in which the mine is located, a program or plan setting forth what...

  3. 12 CFR 410.161-410.169 - [Reserved

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    ... 12 Banks and Banking 4 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false [Reserved] 410.161-410.169 Section 410.161-410.169 Banks and Banking EXPORT-IMPORT BANK OF THE UNITED STATES ENFORCEMENT OF NONDISCRIMINATION ON THE BASIS OF HANDICAP IN PROGRAMS OR ACTIVITIES CONDUCTED BY EXPORT-IMPORT BANK OF THE UNITED STATES §§ 410...

  4. 22 CFR 161.11 - Environmental review and consultation requirements.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... requirements. 161.11 Section 161.11 Foreign Relations DEPARTMENT OF STATE ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION REGULATIONS FOR IMPLEMENTATION OF THE NATIONAL ENVIRONMENTAL POLICY ACT (NEPA) Coordination of Other Requirements... comments. (d) Fish and Wildlife Coordination Act, 16 U.S.C. 661 et seq. (e) Section 309 of the Clean Air...

  5. 27 CFR 1.61 - Use of wine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... 27 Alcohol, Tobacco Products and Firearms 1 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Use of wine. 1.61 Section..., NONINDUSTRIAL USE OF DISTILLED SPIRITS AND WINE, BULK SALES AND BOTTLING OF DISTILLED SPIRITS Nonindustrial Use of Distilled Spirits and Wine Uses Regarded As Industrial § 1.61 Use of wine. The following uses of...

  6. Laser coating of hafnium on Ti6Al4 for biomedical applications

    CSIR Research Space (South Africa)

    Phume, L

    2012-12-01

    Full Text Available Al4V FOR BIOMEDICAL APPLICATIONS Lerato Phume 1, 2, S.L. Pityana 1, 2, C. Meacock 1, A.P.I Popoola 2 1. National Laser Centre, Council for Scientific and Industrial Research, P.O. Box 395, Pretoria, 0001, South Africa 2. Department of Chemical... and Metallurgical Engineering, Tshwane University of Technology, Private Bag X 680, Pretoria, 0001, South Africa (b) (c) (e) To investigate laser surface coating of Ti6Al4V with preplaced Hafnium powder, to determine the influence of the energy density...

  7. Improvement of aging kinetics and precipitate size refinement in Mg–Sn alloys by hafnium additions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Behdad, S. [Department of Mechanical and Materials Engineering, Florida International University, Miami, FL 33174 (United States); Zhou, L. [Department of Materials Science and Engineering and Advanced Materials Processing and Analysis Center, University of Central Florida, Orlando, FL 32816 (United States); Henderson, H.B.; Manuel, M.V. [Department of Materials Science and Engineering, University of Florida, Gainesville, FL 32611 (United States); Sohn, Y. [Department of Materials Science and Engineering and Advanced Materials Processing and Analysis Center, University of Central Florida, Orlando, FL 32816 (United States); Agarwal, A. [Department of Mechanical and Materials Engineering, Florida International University, Miami, FL 33174 (United States); Boesl, B., E-mail: bboesl@fiu.edu [Department of Mechanical and Materials Engineering, Florida International University, Miami, FL 33174 (United States)

    2016-01-10

    Two Mg–Sn alloys were microalloyed by addition of Hafnium and their age-hardening response was studied at 200 °C. Time to reach peak hardness was significantly reduced and improved by Hf addition. TEM study showed Hf clusters in the close vicinity and at the surface of Mg{sub 2}Sn precipitates, which confirms that Hf clusters act as additional nucleation centers for Mg{sub 2}Sn precipitate formation. Our results support the validity of thermokinetic criterion proposed by Mendis for selection of microalloying elements in order to refine precipitate size, accelerate aging kinetics and enhance peak hardness.

  8. Critical evaluation of the determination of zirconium and hafnium by instrumental and radiochemical neutron activation analysis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Burger, Mario; Kraehenbuehl, Urs

    1991-01-01

    Neutron activation analysis (instrument or radiochemical) is suitable for the determination of zirconium and hafnium in samples of geochemical origin only when sufficient attention is paid to inter-fering nuclides. The size of the necessary correction for INAA depends on the composition of the sample; this problem is discussed. The radio-chemical technique which is recommended involves separation of the samples, precipitations and anion-exchange separation. Results are given for various standard reference materials and for meteorites. (author). 12 refs.; 1 fig.; 9 tabs

  9. High temperature thermodynamics of solutions of oxygen in zirconium and hafnium

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Boureau, G.; Gerdanian, P.

    1984-01-01

    The Tian-Calvet microcalorimetric method has been applied to the determination at 1323 Kelvin of ΔH(O 2 ), the partial molar enthalpy of mixing of oxygen in zirconium and in hafnium. No measurable departure from Henry's law has been found for dilute solutions (ratio oxygen over metal smaller than 0.1). For concentrated solutions repulsive interactions are found in agreement with the existence of ordered structures at lower temperatures. The domain of homogeneity of zirconium has been found larger than previously assumed. (author)

  10. Complexing of zirconium and hafnium with ortho-aminobenzoic acid and paraaminobenzoic acid

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Alekseeva, I.I.; Nemzer, I.I.; Yuranova, L.I.; Borisova, V.V.; Prozorovskaya, Z.N.

    1977-01-01

    Formation of complexes between zirconium and hafnium and ortho- and para-aminobenzoic acids has been studied by the kinetic method. It has been found that at pH=1.3-2.0 and concentrations of metals 10 -5 -10 -6 mole complex compounds are formed with composition Me:L=1:2 and 1:1 (Me=Zr, Hf; L=ortho- or para-aminobenzoic acids). Stepwise constants and overall effective constants of complex formation have been calculated

  11. Investigation of interaction of zirconium and hafnium tetrafluorides with strontium fluoride

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ratnikova, I.D.; Korenev, Yu.M.; Novoselova, A.V.

    1980-01-01

    Diagrams of the condensated state of systems SrF 2 -EF 4 have been plotted, where E represents Zr, Hf. In these systems, three intermediate compounds of Sr 3 EF 10 , Sr 2 EF 8 and Sr EF 6 compositions are formed. All those compounds melt incongruently at temperatures of 982, 865 and 750 deg C, respectively - zirconium salt; at temperatures of 1000, 900 and 820 deg C - hafnium salts. Fluoro-metallates of composition 2:1, and 1:1, exist in two polymorphic forms. Tetrafluorides were found to dissolve in strontium fluoride: they form solid solutions having fluorite structure

  12. Near net shape processing of zirconium or hafnium metals and alloys

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Evans, S.C.

    1992-01-01

    This patent describes a process for producing a metal shape. It comprises: plasma arc melting a metal selected from zirconium, hafnium and alloys thereof comprising at least about 90 w/o of these metals to form a liquid pool; pouring the metal form the pool into a mold to form a near net shape; and reducing the metal from its near net shape to a final size while maintaining the metal temperature below the alpha-beta transition temperature throughout the size reducing step

  13. Thermal behaviour of hafnium diethylenetriaminepentaacetate studied using the perturbed angular correlation technique

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chain, Cecilia Y. [Universidad Nacional de La Plata (Argentina). Dept. de Fisica; Consejo Nacional de Investigaciones Cientificas y Tecnicas (CONICET), La Plata (Argentina). IFLP-CCT; Consejo Nacional de Investigaciones Cientificas y Tecnicas, Buenos Aires (Argentina); Rivas, Patricia [Consejo Nacional de Investigaciones Cientificas y Tecnicas (CONICET), La Plata (Argentina). IFLP-CCT; Consejo Nacional de Investigaciones Cientificas y Tecnicas, Buenos Aires (Argentina); Universidad Nacional de La Plata (Argentina). Facultad de Ciencias Agrarias y Forestales; Pasquevich, Alberto F. [Universidad Nacional de La Plata (Argentina). Dept. de Fisica; Consejo Nacional de Investigaciones Cientificas y Tecnicas (CONICET), La Plata (Argentina). IFLP-CCT; Comision de Investigaciones Cientificas de la Provincia de Buenos Aires (CIC-PBA) (Argentina)

    2014-07-01

    Polyaminecarboxilic ligands like diethylenetriaminepentaacetic acid form stable complexes with many heavy metal ions, excelling as cation chelants especially in the field of radiopharmacy. The aim of this work is to characterize, by using the Time Differential Perturbed Angular Correlations (TDPAC) technique, the hyperfine interactions at hafnium sites in hafnium diethylenetriaminepentaacetate and to investigate their evolution as temperature increases. TDPAC results for KHfDTPA.3H{sub 2}O obtained by chemical synthesis yield a well defined and highly asymmetric interaction of quadrupole frequency ω{sub Q} = 141 Mrad/s, which is consistent with the existence of a unique site for the metal in the crystal lattice. The thermal behaviour of the chelate is investigated by means of differential scanning calorimetry and thermogravimetrical analyses revealing that an endothermic dehydration of KHfDTPA.3H{sub 2}O takes place in one step between 80 C and 180 C. The anhydrous KHfDTPA thus arising is characterized by a fully asymmetric and well defined interaction of quadrupole frequency ω{sub Q} = 168 Mrad/s. (orig.)

  14. Rare-earth hafnium oxide materials for magnetohydrodynamic (MHD) generator application

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Marchant, D. D; Bates, J. L.

    1979-01-01

    Several ceramic materials based on rare-earth hafnium oxides have been identified as potential high-temperature electrodes and low-temperature current leadouts for open cycle coal-fired MHD generator channels. The electrode-current leadouts combination must operate at temperatures between 400 and 2000K with an electrical conductivity greater than 10/sup -2/ ohm/sup -1/ cm/sup -1/. The electrodes will be exposed to flowing (linear flow rates up to 100 m/s) potassium seeded coal combustion gases (plasma core temperatures between 2400 to 3200/sup 0/K) and coal slag. During operation the electrodes must conduct direct electric current at densities near 1.5 amp/cm/sup 2/. Consequently, the electrodes must be resistant to electrochemical decompositions and interactions with both the coal slag and potassium salts (e.g., K/sub 2/SO/sub 4/, K/sub 2/CO/sub 3/). The current leadout materials are placed between the hot electrodes and the water-cooled copper structural members and must have electrical conductivities greater than 10/sup -2/ ohm/sup -1/ cm/sup -1/ between 1400 and 400/sup 0/K. The current leadouts must be thermally and electrochemically compatible with the electrode, copper, and potassium salts. Ideally, the electrodes and current leadouts should exhibit minimal ionic conductivity. The fabrication, electrical conductivity, and electrochemical corrosion of rare-earth hafnium oxide materials are discussed. (WHK)

  15. Thermal behaviour of hafnium diethylenetriaminepentaacetate studied using the perturbed angular correlation technique

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chain, Cecilia Y.; Rivas, Patricia

    2014-01-01

    Polyaminecarboxilic ligands like diethylenetriaminepentaacetic acid form stable complexes with many heavy metal ions, excelling as cation chelants especially in the field of radiopharmacy. The aim of this work is to characterize, by using the Time Differential Perturbed Angular Correlations (TDPAC) technique, the hyperfine interactions at hafnium sites in hafnium diethylenetriaminepentaacetate and to investigate their evolution as temperature increases. TDPAC results for KHfDTPA.3H 2 O obtained by chemical synthesis yield a well defined and highly asymmetric interaction of quadrupole frequency ω Q = 141 Mrad/s, which is consistent with the existence of a unique site for the metal in the crystal lattice. The thermal behaviour of the chelate is investigated by means of differential scanning calorimetry and thermogravimetrical analyses revealing that an endothermic dehydration of KHfDTPA.3H 2 O takes place in one step between 80 C and 180 C. The anhydrous KHfDTPA thus arising is characterized by a fully asymmetric and well defined interaction of quadrupole frequency ω Q = 168 Mrad/s. (orig.)

  16. Preparation, structure and properties of hafnium compounds in the system Hf-C-N-O

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Brundiers, G.D.

    1975-08-01

    Highly dense, homogenous and single phase hafnium carbonitride samples (with low oxygen content) were prepared in the whole concentration range of the ternary cubic carbonitrides. Stoichiometric hafnium oxicarbides were also prepared within the range of solubility. The procedure involved the hot pressing of powders of HfC, HfN, Hf, Hf-Oxide and carbon at temperatures of 3,000 0 C and pressures up to 550 kpf/cm 2 using a novel technique. Small single crystals of slightly substoichiometric HfN were also repared. The densification of the powders was studied as a function of the non-metal concentration. Carbonitrides with N/Hf ratio of 0.37 were prepared in a high temperature autoclave operating at medium pressures by the reaction of HfC with nitrogen. All the samples were characterized by density measurements, chemical, X-ray and metallographic analysis and in some cases with the aid of quantitative metallography and microprobe analysis. Typical properties investigated were lattice parameter, thermal expansion, microhardness and electrical resistivity as function of the non-metal content. For specific concentrations extreme values in the properties are attained. With the aid of the valence electron concentration (VEC) parameter, the properties can be correlated with the density of states of electrons at the Fermi level. (orig./HK) [de

  17. Titrimetric determination of thiocyanate in solutions of the hafnium-zirconium separation process

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Vazquez, Cristina; Botbol, Moises; Hernandez, M.H.

    1980-01-01

    The control of the thiocyanate concentration is necessary during the process of separating hafnium from zirconium by the hexone-thiocyanate method. Said control is carried out by titrimetric determination of thiocyanate in aqueous and organic solutions containing hydrochloric acid and ammonium thiocyanate in presence or absence of zirconium and/or hafnium. The method consists in a redox volumetric analysis using a cerium (IV) salt as titrating agent, and ferroine as the final point indicator. Owing to the instability of thiocyanate in an acid medium it is necessary to know previously if the decomposition of solutions with different concentration of ammonium thiocyanate and hydrochloric acid may have an influence upon the analytic results or may even invalidate them. In order to obtain reliable results, it must be taken into account that the stability of the solutions depends on the thiocyanate concentration, the acidity and the time elapsed from the moment the sample is taken until the test is performed. The decomposition process can be slowed down by cooling the solutions. This method allows to control the plant and does not require any special equipment. (M.E.L) [es

  18. Molecular structure, vibrational, HOMO-LUMO, MEP and NBO analysis of hafnium selenite

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yankova, Rumyana; Genieva, Svetlana; Dimitrova, Ginka

    2017-08-01

    In hydrothermal condition hafnium selenite with estimated chemical composition Hf(SeO3)2·n(H2O) was obtained and characterized by powder X-Ray diffraction, IR spectroscopy and thermogravimetrical analysis. The composition of the obtained crystalline phase was established as dihydrate of tetraaqua complex of the hafnium selenite [Hf(SeO3)2(H2O)4]·2H2O. The results of the thermogravimetrical analysis are shown that the two hydrated water molecules are released in the temperature interval 80-110°C, while the four coordinated water molecules - at 210-300°C. By DFT method, with Becke's three parameter exchange-functional combined with gradient-corrected correlation functional of Lee, Yang and Parr and 6-31G(d), 6-311 + G(d,p) basis sets and LANL2DZ for Hf atom were calculated the molecular structure, vibrational frequencies and thermodynamic properties of the structure. The UV-Vis spectra and electronic properties are presented. The energy and oscillator strength calculated by time-dependent density functional theory corresponds well with the experimental ones. Molecular electrostatic potential (MEP) was performed. Mulliken population analysis on atomic charges was also calculated. The stability and intramolecular interactions are interpreted by NBO analysis.

  19. Correlations between nuclear data and results of integral slab experiments. Case of hafnium

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Palau, J.M.

    1997-01-01

    The aim of this thesis was to evaluate how much integral slab experiments can both reduce discrepancies between experimental results and calculations, and improve the knowledge of hafnium isotopes neutronic parameters by an adapted sensitivity and uncertainty method. A statistical approach, based on the generalized least squares method and perturbation theory, has been incorporated into our calculation system in order to deduce microscopic cross-section adjustments from observed integral measurements on this particular 'mock-up' reactor. In this study it has been established that the correlations between integral parameters and hafnium capture cross-sections enable specific variations in the region of resolved resonances at the level of multigroup and punctual cross-sections recommended data (JEF-2.2 evaluation) to be highlighted. The use of determinist methods (APOLLO2 code) together with Monte Carlo- type simulations (TRIPOLI4 code) enabled a depth analysis of the modelling approximations to be carried out. Furthermore, the sensitivity coefficient validation technique employed leads to a reliable assessment of the quality of the new basic nuclear data. In this instance, the adjustments proposed for certain isotope 177 Hf resonance parameters reduce, after error propagation, by 3 to 5 per cent the difference between experimental results and calculations related to this absorbent's efficiency. Beyond this particular application, the qualification methodology integrated in our calculation system should enable other basic sizing parameters to be treated (chemical / geometric data or other unexplored nuclear data) to make technological requirements less stringent. (author)

  20. Correlations between nuclear data and integral slab experiments: the case of hafnium

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Palau, J.M.

    1999-01-01

    The aim of this work was to evaluate how much integral slab experiments can both reduce discrepancies between experimental results and calculations, and improve the knowledge of hafnium isotopes neutronic parameters by an adapted sensitivity and uncertainty method. A statistical approach, based on the generalized least squares method and perturbation theory, has been incorporated into our calculation system in order to deduce microscopic cross-section adjustments from observed integral measurements on this particular 'mock-up' reactor.In this study it has been established that the correlations between integral parameters and hafnium capture cross-sections enable specific variations in the region of resolved resonances at the level of multigroup and punctual cross-sections recommended data (JEF-2.2 evaluation) to be highlighted. The use of determinist methods together with Monte Carlo- type simulations enabled a depth analysis of the modelling approximations to be carried out. Furthermore, the sensitivity coefficient validation technique employed leads to a reliable assessment of the quality of the new basic nuclear data. In this instance, the adjustments proposed for certain isotope 177 Hf resonance parameters reduce, after error propagation, by 3 to 5 per cent the difference between experimental results and calculations related to this absorbent's efficiency. Beyond this particular application, the qualification methodology integrated in our calculation system should enable other basic sizing parameters to be treated (chemical / geometric data or other unexplored nuclear data) to make technological requirements less stringent. (author)

  1. Highly substituted zirconium and hafnium cyclopentadienyl bifunctional β-diketiminate complexes – Synthesis, structure, and catalytic activity towards ethylene polymerization

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Havlík, A.; Lamač, Martin; Pinkas, Jiří; Varga, Vojtěch; Růžička, A.; Olejník, R.; Horáček, Michal

    2015-01-01

    Roč. 786, JUN 2015 (2015), s. 71-80 ISSN 0022-328X R&D Projects: GA ČR GAP106/10/0924 Institutional support: RVO:61388955 Keywords : Zirconium * Hafnium * Cyclopentadienyl Subject RIV: CF - Physical ; Theoretical Chemistry Impact factor: 2.336, year: 2015

  2. Differential perturbed angular correlation: use of physico-chemical study of some hafnium complexes derivates of hydroxy acids and EDTA

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Silveira, J.G. da.

    1981-01-01

    Measures of quadrupolar interaction to nucleus level of the metal, in some hafnium complexes are presented, including the analysis by combustion, microanalysis, infrared spectroscopy and thermogravimetry. The hyperfine interaction parameters, the temperature effects and the thermal neutrons capture effects over the irradiated Hf Y (Y = EDTA) are also studied. (author)

  3. 46 CFR 161.006-1 - Applicable specifications.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-01

    ... Nickel Plus Chromium and Nickel Plus Chromium—161.006-4 You may obtain these standards from The American...) Underwriters' Laboratories, Inc.: Standard for flexible cord and fixture wire, third edition, October, 1935. (b...

  4. 33 CFR 161.4 - Requirement to carry the rules.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... (CONTINUED) PORTS AND WATERWAYS SAFETY VESSEL TRAFFIC MANAGEMENT Vessel Traffic Services General Rules § 161... the Local Notice to Mariners. The VTS User's Manual and the World VTS Guide, an International Maritime...

  5. Eestist osaleb rahvusvahelisel reklaamifestivalil 161 reklaami / Sergo Selder

    Index Scriptorium Estoniae

    Selder, Sergo

    2005-01-01

    Riias toimuvast kuuendast Baltimaade reklaamifestivalist "Kuldne haamer" ("Golden Hammer"). Eestist on esitatud 161 reklaami. Žüriisse kuulub eestlastest Jaanus Vahtra reklaamifirmast Saatchi & Saatchi, kelle Diseli õllereklaam võitis möödunud aastal telereklaamide Kuldhaamri

  6. Physico-chemical characterization of terbium-161-chloride (161TbCl3) radioisotope from irradiated natural gadolinium oxide target

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Azmairit Aziz; Nana Suherman

    2015-01-01

    Currently cancer patients are increasing every year in Indonesia and become the third leading cause of death after heart disease and high blood pressure. Terbium-161 ( 161 Tb) is a low β- emitter (E β - = 0.155 MeV, T 1/2 = 6.9 d) and very similar to 177 Lu in terms of half-life, E β - energy and chemical properties.However, 161 Tb also ejects internal conversion electrons and Auger electrons which can provide a greater therapeutic effect than 177 Lu. Radioisotope of 161 Tb can be produced as a carrier-free for use in labeling of biomolecules as a targeted radiopharmaceutical for cancer therapy. 161 Tb was obtained through 160 Gd(n,γ) 161 Tb nuclear reaction by thermal neutron bombardment on 100 mg of natural gadolinium oxide target in RSG-G.A. Siwabessy at a thermal neutron flux of ~10 14 n.cm -2 .s -1 and followed by radiochemical separation of 161 Tb from Gd isotopes using extraction chromatography method. The physico-chemical characterization of 161 TbCl 3 solution was studied by determination of its radionuclide purity by means of a γ-rays spectrometry with HP-Ge detector coupled to a multichannel analyzer (MCA). Radiochemical purity was determined using paper chromatography and paper electrophoresis methods. The results showed that 161 TbCl 3 radioisotope has a pH of 2, radiochemical purity of 99.64 ± 0.34%, radionuclide purity of 99.69 ± 0.20%, specific activity and radioactive concentration at the end of irradiation (EOI) of 2.26 – 5.31 Ci/mg and 3.84 – 9.03 mCi/mL, respectively. 161 TbCl 3 solution stable for 3 weeks at room temperature with a radiochemical purity of 98.41 ± 0.42%. 161 TbCl 3 solution from irradiated natural gadolinium oxide target has the physico-chemical characteristic that meets the requirements for use as a precursor in preparation of radiopharmaceuticals. (author)

  7. A thermally robust and thickness independent ferroelectric phase in laminated hafnium zirconium oxide

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    S. Riedel

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available Ferroelectric properties in hafnium oxide based thin films have recovered the scaling potential for ferroelectric memories due to their ultra-thin-film- and CMOS-compatibility. However, the variety of physical phenomena connected to ferroelectricity allows a wider range of applications for these materials than ferroelectric memory. Especially mixed HfxZr1-xO2 thin films exhibit a broad compositional range of ferroelectric phase stability and provide the possibility to tailor material properties for multiple applications. Here it is shown that the limited thermal stability and thick-film capability of HfxZr1-xO2 can be overcome by a laminated approach using alumina interlayers.

  8. Surface State Capture Cross-Section at the Interface between Silicon and Hafnium Oxide

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fu-Chien Chiu

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available The interfacial properties between silicon and hafnium oxide (HfO2 are explored by the gated-diode method and the subthreshold measurement. The density of interface-trapped charges, the current induced by surface defect centers, the surface recombination velocity, and the surface state capture cross-section are obtained in this work. Among the interfacial properties, the surface state capture cross-section is approximately constant even if the postdeposition annealing condition is changed. This effective capture cross-section of surface states is about 2.4 × 10−15 cm2, which may be an inherent nature in the HfO2/Si interface.

  9. Thermal expansion studies on Hafnium titanate (HfTiO4)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Panneerselvam, G.; Subramanian, G.G.S.; Antony, M.P.

    2006-01-01

    The lattice thermal expansion characteristics of hafnium titanate (HfTiO 4 ) have been studied by measuring the lattice parameter as a function of temperature by high temperature X-ray diffraction technique (HT-XRD) in the temperature range 298-1973K. Percentage linear thermal expansion and mean linear thermal expansion coefficients were computed from the lattice parameter data. The thermal expansion of HfTiO 4 is highly anisotropic. The expansivity along 'a' axis is large; as compared to the expansivity along 'b' axis which is negative below 1073 K. The percentage linear thermal expansion in the temperature range 298-1973 K along a, b and c axis are 2.74, 0.901 and 1.49 respectively. Thermal expansion values obtained in the present study are in reasonable agreement with the existing thermal expansion data. (author)

  10. Density and surface tension of melts of zirconium and hafnium fluorides with lithium fluoride

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Katyshev, S.F.; Artemov, V.V.; Desyatnik, V.N.

    1988-01-01

    A study was conducted to determine the temperature dependence of the density and surface tension of melts of LiF-ZrF 4 and LiF-HfF 4 . Density and surface tension were determined by the method of maximum pressure in an argon bubble. On the basis of experimental data over the entire concentration range the molar volumes and their relative deviations from the additive molar volumes were calculated for 1100 0 K. The positive deviations of the molar volumes from additivity in the LiF-HfF 4 system (22.45%) were greater than in the LiF-ZrF 4 system (15.75%). This indicated that the reaction with lithium fluoride is intensified with the switch to the hafnium fluoride. Results also demonstrated that the fluorides are surface-active components in the molten mixtures

  11. Extraction of hafnium with chelating agents from aqueous-alcoholic solutions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hala, J.; Prihoda, J.

    1975-01-01

    The extraction was studied of hafnium into solutions of N-benzoyl-N-phenylhydroxylamine, 2-thenoyltrifluoroacetone and di-n-butylphosphoric acid in benzene, toluene, chloroform and tetrachloromethane from aqueous alcoholic solutions with a formal acidity of 2M-HClO 4 . Methyl-, ethyl-, n- and isopropyl- and tert-butyl alcohol were used as organic components in the mixed aqueous-organic phase. In the extraction into N-benzoyl-N-phenylhydroxylamine the presence of the alcohols resulted in synergic effects analogous to the previously described extraction by substituted benzoylpyrazolone. With the other two extractants, the effect of the alcohols was antagonistic, due to the interaction of alcohol or water with the reagent in the organic phase, and to the decrease in the reagent distribution constant. (author)

  12. Interface and oxide traps in high-κ hafnium oxide films

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wong, H.; Zhan, N.; Ng, K.L.; Poon, M.C.; Kok, C.W.

    2004-01-01

    The origins of the interface trap generation and the effects of thermal annealing on the interface and bulk trap distributions are studied in detail. We found that oxidation of the HfO 2 /Si interface, removal of deep trap centers, and crystallization of the as-deposited film will take place during the post-deposition annealing (PDA). These processes will result in the removal of interface traps and deep oxide traps and introduce a large amount of shallow oxide traps at the grain boundaries of the polycrystalline film. Thus, trade-off has to be made in considering the interface trap density and oxide trap density when conducting PDA. In addition, the high interface trap and oxide trap densities of the HfO 2 films suggest that we may have to use the SiO 2 /HfO 2 stack or hafnium silicate structure for better device performance

  13. Wake-up effects in Si-doped hafnium oxide ferroelectric thin films

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zhou, Dayu; Xu, Jin; Li, Qing; Guan, Yan; Cao, Fei; Dong, Xianlin; Müller, Johannes; Schenk, Tony; Schröder, Uwe

    2013-01-01

    Hafnium oxide based ferroelectric thin films have shown potential as a promising alternative material for non-volatile memory applications. This work reports the switching stability of a Si-doped HfO 2 film under bipolar pulsed-field operation. High field cycling causes a “wake-up” in virgin “pinched” polarization hysteresis loops, demonstrated by an enhancement in remanent polarization and a shift of negative coercive voltage. The rate of wake-up is accelerated by either reducing the frequency or increasing the amplitude of the cycling field. We suggest de-pinning of domains due to reduction of the defect concentration at bottom electrode interface as origin of the wake-up

  14. Atom-vacancy ordering and magnetic susceptibility of nonstoichiometric hafnium carbide

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gusev, A.I.; Zyryanova, A.N.

    1999-01-01

    Experimental results on magnetic susceptibility of nonstoichiometric hafnium carbide HfC y (0.6 0.71 , HfC 0.78 and HfC 0.83 in the range of 870-930 K the anomalies are revealed which are associated with superstructure short-range ordering in a non-metallics sublattice. It is shown that a short-range order in HfC 0.71 and HfC 0.78 carbides corresponds to Hf 3 C 2 ordered phase, and in HfC 0.83 carbide - to Hf 6 C 5 ordered phase. HfC 0.78 carbide is found to possesses zero magnetic susceptibility in temperature range 910-980 K [ru

  15. Sub-10 nm low current resistive switching behavior in hafnium oxide stack

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hou, Y., E-mail: houyi@pku.edu.cn, E-mail: lfliu@pku.edu.cn [Institute of Microelectronics, Peking University, 100871 Beijing (China); IMEC, Kapeldreef 75, B-3001 Heverlee (Belgium); Department of Physics and Astronomy, KU Leuven, Celestijnenlaan 200D, B-3001 Heverlee (Belgium); Celano, U.; Xu, Z.; Vandervorst, W. [IMEC, Kapeldreef 75, B-3001 Heverlee (Belgium); Department of Physics and Astronomy, KU Leuven, Celestijnenlaan 200D, B-3001 Heverlee (Belgium); Goux, L.; Fantini, A.; Degraeve, R.; Youssef, A.; Jurczak, M. [IMEC, Kapeldreef 75, B-3001 Heverlee (Belgium); Liu, L., E-mail: houyi@pku.edu.cn, E-mail: lfliu@pku.edu.cn; Cheng, Y.; Kang, J. [Institute of Microelectronics, Peking University, 100871 Beijing (China)

    2016-03-21

    In this letter, a tip-induced cell relying on the conductive atomic force microscope is proposed. It is verified as a referable replica of an integrated resistive random access memory (RRAM) device. On the basis of this cell, the functionality of sub-10 nm resistive switching is confirmed in hafnium oxide stack. Moreover, the low current switching behavior in the sub-10 nm dimension is found to be more pronounced than that of a 50 × 50 nm{sup 2} device. It shows better ON/OFF ratio and low leakage current. The enhanced memory performance is ascribed to a change in the shape of the conductive filament as the device dimensions are reduced to sub-10 nm. Therefore, device downscaling provides a promising approach for the resistance optimization that benefits the RRAM array design.

  16. Solvent extraction of hafnium(IV) by dinonylnaphthalene sulfonic acid from mixed aqueous-organic media

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hala, J.; Piperkovova, H.

    1979-01-01

    The extraction of hafnium(IV) by heptane and toluene solutions of dinonylnaphthalene sulfonic acid (HD) from mixed aqueous-organic solutions has been studied. Alcohols, ketones, carboxylic acids, cyclic ethers, dimethylsulfoxide and dimethylformamide were used as the organic component of the mixed phase. Methanol, ethanol, formic acid and dioxane increased the extractability of Hf(IV) whereas other solvents showed only an antagonistic effect. The results were discussed from the point of view of the changes in micellar structure of HD, and compared with the uptake of Hf(IV) by resinous cation exchangers. The solubilization by HD of alcohols, carboxylic acids and dimethylsulfoxide was demonstrated by using the corresponding 14 C and 35 S labelled compounds. (author)

  17. Study of bulk Hafnium oxide (HfO2) under compression

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pathak, Santanu; Mandal, Guruprasad; Das, Parnika

    2018-04-01

    Hafnium oxide (HfO2) is a technologically important material. This material has K-value of 25 and band gap 5.8 eV. A k value of 25-30 is preferred for a gate dielectric [1]. As it shows good insulating and capacitive properties, HfO2 is being considered as a replacement to SiO2 in microelectronic devices as gate dielectrics. On the other hand because of toughening mechanism due to phase transformation induced by stress field observed in these oxides, HFO2 has been a material of investigations in various configurations for a very long time. However the controversies about phase transition of HfO2 under pressure still exists. High quality synchrotron radiation has been used to study the structural phase transition of HfO2 under pressure.

  18. Separation of hafnium from zirconium in their tetrachloride solution in molten alkali metal chlorides

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Salyulev, A B; Kudyakov, V Ya; Smirnov, M V; Moskalenko, N I [AN SSSR, Sverdlovsk. Inst. Ehlektrokhimii

    1984-08-01

    The coefficient of HfCl/sub 4/ and ZrCl/sub 4/ separation in the process of vapour sublimation from their solutions in molten NaCl, KCl, CsCl, NaCl-KCl and NaCl-CsCl equimolar mixtures is found to vary in the series from approximately 1.10 to approximately 1.22 and practically not to depend on the temperature (in the 600-910 deg) range and concentration (2-25 mol.% ZrCl/sub 4/+HfCl/sub 4/). HfCl/sub 4/ and ZrCl/sub 4/ are shown to form almost perfect solutions with each other, which in their turn form imperfect solutions with molten alkali metal chlorides, with the strength of hafnium complex chloride anions increasing higher than that of zirconium in the series from NaCl to CsCl.

  19. Separation of hafnium from zirconium in their tetrachloride solution in molten alkali metal chlorides

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Salyulev, A.B.; Kudyakov, V.Ya.; Smirnov, M.V.; Moskalenko, N.I.

    1984-01-01

    The coefficient of HfCl 4 and ZrCl 4 separation in the process of vapour sublimation from their solutions in molten NaCl, KCl, CsCl, NaCl-KCl and NaCl-CsCl equimolar mixtures is found to vary in the series from approximately 1.10 to approximately 1.22 and practically not to depend on the temperature (in the 600-910 deg) range and concentration (2-25 mol.% ZrCl 4 +HfCl 4 ). HfCl 4 and ZrCl 4 are shown to form almost perfect solutions with each other, which in their turn form imperfect solutions with molten alkali metal chlorides, with the strength of hafnium complex chloride anions increasing higher than that of zirconium in the series from NaCl to CsCl

  20. Influence of plastic deformation on nitriding of a molybdenum-hafnium alloy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lakhtin, Yu.M.; Kogan, Ya.D.; Shashkov, D.P.; Likhacheva, T.E.

    1982-01-01

    The influence of a preliminary plastic strain on the structure and properties of molybdenum alloy with 0.2 wt.% Hf upon nitriding in the ammonia medium at 900-1200 deg C during 1-6 h is investigated. The study of microhardness distribution across the nitrided layer thickness has shown that with increase of the degree of preliminary plastic strain up to 50 % the nitrided layer hardness decreases and with further reduction growth up to 90 % - increases. Nitriding sharply (hundred times) increases wear resistance of molybdenum alloy with hafnium addition. At the reduction degree 25 % the wear resistance is less than at other values of percentage reduction in area owing to the minimum thickness of the nitride zone. The alloy strained before nitriding by 25 % has shown the best results during heat resistance testing

  1. Hafnium at subduction zones: isotopic budget of input and output fluxes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Marini, J.Ch.

    2004-05-01

    Subduction zones are the primary regions of mass exchanges between continental crust and mantle of Earth through sediment subduction toward the earth's mantle and by supply of mantellic magmas to volcanic arcs. We analyze these mass exchanges using Hafnium and Neodymium isotopes. At the Izu-Mariana subduction zone, subducting sediments have Hf and Nd isotopes equivalent to Pacific seawater. Altered oceanic crust has Hf and Nd isotopic compositions equivalent to the isotopic budget of unaltered Pacific oceanic crust. At Luzon and Java subduction zones, arc lavas present Hf isotopic ratios highly radiogenic in comparison to their Nd isotopic ratios. Such compositions of the Luzon and Java arc lavas are controlled by a contamination of their sources by the subducted oceanic sediments. (author)

  2. Rapid screening of nuclear grade zirconium silicate without separation of hafnium from the bulk matrix

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Venkatesh, Manisha; Sharma, P.K.; Avhad, D.K.; Basu, H.; Singhal, R.K.; Reddy, A.V.R.

    2014-01-01

    Zirconium silicate, also zirconium orthosilicate, (ZrSiO 4 ) is a chemical compound, and occurs in nature as zircon, a silicate mineral. The concentration of Hafnium in nuclear grade Zirconium must be less than 0.2% w/w of Zr. In view of this it must be accurately chemically characterized before issuing a certification for export under non nuclear category. As the chemistry of Zr and Hf is similar, it is difficult to separate Hf by direct wet chemical method. During this work, concentration of Hf in zirconium silicate was measured by Field Portable X-ray Fluorescence (FPXRF) and results obtained were validated by using detailed chemical method. FPXRF spectrometry has become a common analytical technique for on-site screening and fast turnaround analysis of contaminant elements in environmental samples

  3. Extraction of hafnium by 1-phenyl-3-methyl-4-benzoyl-5-pyralozone from aqueous-alcoholic solutions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hala, J.; Prihoda, J.

    1975-01-01

    Extraction of hafnium by 1-phenyl-3-methyl-4-benzoyl-5-pyrazolone (HL) in benzene, toluene, chloroform and tetrachloromethane from aqueous-alcoholic solutions of the formal acidity of 2M-HClO 4 was studied. Methyl, ethyl, n- and isopropyl, tert-butyl and allyl alcohol as well as ethylene glycol monomethyl ether and propylene glycol were used as organic components of the mixed aqueous-organic phase. Their presence in some cases resulted in a synergic increase in the distribution ratio of hafnium. The increase is interpreted using the results of a slope analysis and measurements of the alcohol distribution and the relative permittivity of the organic phase. It is suggested that HfL 4 molecules were solvated by alcohol molecules in the organic phase. At high alcohol concentration synergism changed into antagonism. This was caused by changes in the distribution of HL and its interaction with the alcohol in the organic phase. (author)

  4. Hafnium isotope evidence for a transition in the dynamics of continental growth 3.2 Gyr ago.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Næraa, T; Scherstén, A; Rosing, M T; Kemp, A I S; Hoffmann, J E; Kokfelt, T F; Whitehouse, M J

    2012-05-30

    Earth's lithosphere probably experienced an evolution towards the modern plate tectonic regime, owing to secular changes in mantle temperature. Radiogenic isotope variations are interpreted as evidence for the declining rates of continental crustal growth over time, with some estimates suggesting that over 70% of the present continental crustal reservoir was extracted by the end of the Archaean eon. Patterns of crustal growth and reworking in rocks younger than three billion years (Gyr) are thought to reflect the assembly and break-up of supercontinents by Wilson cycle processes and mark an important change in lithosphere dynamics. In southern West Greenland numerous studies have, however, argued for subduction settings and crust growth by arc accretion back to 3.8 Gyr ago, suggesting that modern-day tectonic regimes operated during the formation of the earliest crustal rock record. Here we report in situ uranium-lead, hafnium and oxygen isotope data from zircons of basement rocks in southern West Greenland across the critical time period during which modern-like tectonic regimes could have initiated. Our data show pronounced differences in the hafnium isotope-time patterns across this interval, requiring changes in the characteristics of the magmatic protolith. The observations suggest that 3.9-3.5-Gyr-old rocks differentiated from a >3.9-Gyr-old source reservoir with a chondritic to slightly depleted hafnium isotope composition. In contrast, rocks formed after 3.2 Gyr ago register the first additions of juvenile depleted material (that is, new mantle-derived crust) since 3.9 Gyr ago, and are characterized by striking shifts in hafnium isotope ratios similar to those shown by Phanerozoic subduction-related orogens. These data suggest a transitional period 3.5-3.2 Gyr ago from an ancient (3.9-3.5 Gyr old) crustal evolutionary regime unlike that of modern plate tectonics to a geodynamic setting after 3.2 Gyr ago that involved juvenile crust generation by plate

  5. Results for heterogeneous poisoning of the critical HTR-test facility KAHTER using absorber elements containing hafnium and boron

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Drueke, V.; Filges, D.; Nabi, R.; Neef, R.D.; Paul, N.; Schaal, H.

    1979-10-01

    Experiments and checking computations for investigating the initial-core poisoning of the pebble bed high temperature reactor are described. Following the example of the THTR-300, THTR absorber elements poisoned with hafnium/boron were added to the THTR fuel- and graphite elements of the KAHTER core. Three different hafnium-boron poisoned core loadings, corresponding to 2.7, 5.3 and 8% reactivity compensation, were used in the experiments. For purposes of comparison, two cores exclusively boron poisoned were also studied. The poisoning of these cores correspond to 2.7 and 8% reactivity compensation. The experiments and checking computations should serve to test the accuracy of the theoretical models and data sets in modeling the reactivity effects of absorber poisoned elements in the THTR. In particular, the applicability of the nuclear data of hafnium and the treatment of resonance calculations should be verified. In addition, to determining critical masses and ksub(eff), special emphasis was placed in the experiments on the exact determination of all reactivity effects. In some cases, repeated loading of a configuration also provided a measure of the reproducibility of ksub(eff). The experiments were checked computationally using the GAMTEREX code package and the program system RSYST. These two computation packages contain different data bases, - although the hafnium data are identical -, and the computing models differ in certain phases of the calculations. Both code systems compute ksub(eff) values to within the present accuracy requirements, whereas the program system RSYST gives better agreement with experimental measurements. (orig.) 891 RW/orig. 892 RDG [de

  6. Hindered El Transitions in Eu155 and Tb161

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Malmskog, Sven G.

    1965-02-01

    The absolute E1 transition probabilities from the 3/2 + (411), 5/2 - (532) and 7/2 - (523) single particle levels in Eu 155 and Tb 161 have been measured by the method of delayed coincidences. This gave half lives of T 1/2 1/2 = (1.38 ± 0.06) ns for the 104.4 and 246 keV levels in Eu 155 . T 1/2 = (0.84 ± 0.04) ns and T 1/2 161 . The result has been compared with the calculations of a single particle in a deformed potential made by Nilsson

  7. Ion-bombardment-induced reduction in vacancies and its enhanced effect on conductivity and reflectivity in hafnium nitride films

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gu, Zhiqing; Wang, Jiafu; Hu, Chaoquan; Zhang, Xiaobo; Dang, Jianchen; Gao, Jing; Zheng, Weitao [Jilin University, School of Materials Science and Engineering, Key Laboratory of Mobile Materials, MOE, and State Key Laboratory of Superhard Materials, Changchun (China); Zhang, Sam [Nanyang Technological University, School of Mechanical and Aerospace Engineering, Singapore (Singapore); Wang, Xiaoyi [Chinese Academy of Sciences, Key Laboratory of Optical System Advanced Manufacturing Technology, Changchun Institute of Optics, Fine Mechanics and Physics, Changchun (China); Chen, Hong [Jilin University, Department of Control Science and Engineering, Changchun (China)

    2016-08-15

    Although the role of ion bombardment on electrical conductivity and optical reflectivity of transition metal nitrides films was reported previously, the results were controversial and the mechanism was not yet well explored. Here, we show that proper ion bombardment, induced by applying the negative bias voltage (V{sub b}), significantly improves the electrical conductivity and optical reflectivity in rocksalt hafnium nitride films regardless of level of stoichiometry (i.e., in both near-stoichiometric HfN{sub 1.04} and over-stoichiometric HfN{sub 1.17} films). The observed improvement arises from the increase in the concentration of free electrons and the relaxation time as a result of reduction in nitrogen and hafnium vacancies in the films. Furthermore, HfN{sub 1.17} films have always much lower electrical conductivity and infrared reflectance than HfN{sub 1.04} films for a given V{sub b}, owing to more hafnium vacancies because of larger composition deviation from HfN exact stoichiometry (N:Hf = 1:1). These new insights are supported by good agreement between experimental results and theoretical calculations. (orig.)

  8. 12 CFR 16.1 - Authority, purpose, and scope.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    ....1 Banks and Banking COMPTROLLER OF THE CURRENCY, DEPARTMENT OF THE TREASURY SECURITIES OFFERING DISCLOSURE RULES § 16.1 Authority, purpose, and scope. (a) Authority. This part is issued under the general... 12 U.S.C. 93a. (b) Purpose. This part sets forth rules governing the offer and sale of securities...

  9. 14 CFR 121.161 - Airplane limitations: Type of route.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 3 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Airplane limitations: Type of route. 121... OPERATING REQUIREMENTS: DOMESTIC, FLAG, AND SUPPLEMENTAL OPERATIONS Aircraft Requirements § 121.161 Airplane... specifications, no certificate holder may operate a turbine-engine-powered airplane over a route that contains a...

  10. 33 CFR 161.12 - Vessel operating requirements.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ....0′ N. extending eastward through the Golden Gate, and the navigable waters of San Francisco Bay and... safety beyond that provided by other means. The bridge-to-bridge navigational frequency, 156.650 MHz (Ch... Measures, and Operating Requirements § 161.12 Vessel operating requirements. (a) Subject to the exigencies...

  11. Nano-scale Radiotherapy-NBTXR3 Hafnium Oxide Nanoparticles as Promising Cancer Therapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Maggiorella, L.; Barouch, G.; Devaux, C.; Pottier, A.; Levy, L.; Deutsch, E.; Bourhis, J.; Borghi, E.

    2011-01-01

    Complete text of publication follows: Background: There is considerable interest in approaches that could improve the therapeutic window of radiotherapy, which represents a crucial modality of treatment in oncology. We present the rationale for designing NBTXR3 nanoparticles activated by radiotherapy and validate the concept. We performed the Monte Carlo calculations for the first time based on the 'local model' simulation that showed a dose enhancement of radiation to tumour cells of approximately nine-fold. NBTXR3 was shown to deposit high energy when the ionizing radiation source is 'on' and to have chemically inert behavior in cellular and subcellular systems demonstrated by very good systemic tolerance, thus decreasing potential health hazards. Material and Methods: We used conventional methods, implemented in different ways, to explore interactions of high Z matter and ionizing radiation with biological systems. In addition, microtomography was performed to explore the nanoparticle volume occupancy inside the tumour and its persistence overtime in mouse tumour models. The antitumour activity of NBTXR3 and tolerance were evaluated in Ewing tumour (A673) and fibrosarcoma (HT1080) using high energy source. Results and Conclusion: We created and developed NBTXR3 nanoparticles with a crystalline hafnium oxide core which provide high electron density structure and inert behavior in biological media. NBTXR3 nanoparticles' characteristics, size, charge and shape, allow for efficient interaction with biological entities, cell membrane binding and cellular uptake. The nanoparticles were shown to form clusters at the subcellular level in tumour models. Of most importance, we show NBTXR3 intra-tumour bioavailability with dispersion of nanoparticles in the three dimensions and persistence within the tumour structure, supporting the use of NBTXR3 as effective antitumour therapeutic agent. Antitumour activity of NBTXR3 showed marked advantage in terms of survival, tumour

  12. Hafnium-doped hydroxyapatite nanoparticles with ionizing radiation for lung cancer treatment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Min-Hua; Hanagata, Nobutaka; Ikoma, Toshiyuki; Huang, Jian-Yuan; Li, Keng-Yuan; Lin, Chun-Pin; Lin, Feng-Huei

    2016-06-01

    Recently, photodynamic therapy (PDT) is one of the new clinical options by generating cytotoxic reactive oxygen species (ROS) to kill cancer cells. However, the optical approach of PDT is limited by tissue penetration depth of visible light. In this study, we propose that a ROS-enhanced nanoparticle, hafnium-doped hydroxyapatite (Hf:HAp), which is a material to yield large quantities of ROS inside the cells when the nanoparticles are bombarded with high penetrating power of ionizing radiation. Hf:HAp nanoparticles are generated by wet chemical precipitation with total doping concentration of 15mol% Hf(4+) relative to Ca(2+) in HAp host material. The results show that the HAp particles could be successfully doped with Hf ions, resulted in the formation of nano-sized rod-like shape and with pH-dependent solubility. The impact of ionizing radiation on Hf:HAp nanoparticles is assessed by using in-vitro and in-vivo model using A549 cell line. The 2',7'-dichlorofluorescein diacetate (DCFH-DA) results reveal that after being exposed to gamma rays, Hf:HAp could significantly lead to the formation of ROS in cells. Both cell viability (WST-1) and cytotoxicity (LDH) assay show the consistent results that A549 lung cancer cell lines are damaged with changes in the cells' ROS level. The in-vivo studies further demonstrate that the tumor growth is inhibited owing to the cells apoptosis when Hf:HAp nanoparticles are bombarded with ionizing radiation. This finding offer a new therapeutic method of interacting with ionizing radiation and demonstrate the potential of Hf:HAp nanoparticles in tumor treatment, such as being used in a palliative treatment after lung surgical procedure. Photodynamic therapy (PDT) is one of the new clinical options by generating cytotoxic reactive oxygen species (ROS) to kill cancer cells. Unfortunately, the approach of PDT is usually limited to the treatment of systemic disease and deeper tumor, due to the limited tissue penetration depth of visible

  13. Characterization of hafnium oxide resistive memory layers deposited on copper by atomic layer deposition

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Briggs, B.D.; Bishop, S.M. [SUNY College of Nanoscale Science and Engineering, 255 Fuller Road, Albany, NY 12203 (United States); Leedy, K.D. [Air Force Research Laboratory, 2241 Avionics Circle, Wright Patterson Air Force Base, Dayton, OH 45433 (United States); Cady, N.C., E-mail: ncady@albany.edu [SUNY College of Nanoscale Science and Engineering, 255 Fuller Road, Albany, NY 12203 (United States)

    2014-07-01

    Hafnium oxide-based resistive memory devices have been fabricated on copper bottom electrodes. The HfO{sub x} active layers in these devices were deposited by atomic layer deposition (ALD) at 250 °C with tetrakis(dimethylamido)hafnium(IV) as the metal precursor and an O{sub 2} plasma as the reactant. Depth profiles of the HfO{sub x} by X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy and secondary ion mass spectroscopy revealed a copper concentration on the order of five atomic percent throughout the HfO{sub x} film. In addition to the Cu doped HfO{sub x}, a thin layer (20 nm) of Cu{sub x}O is present at the surface. This surface layer is believed to have formed during the ALD process, and greatly complicates the analysis of the switching mechanism. The resistive memory structures fabricated from the ALD HfO{sub x} exhibited non-polar resistive switching, independent of the top metal electrode (Ni, Pt, Al, Au). Resistive switching current voltage (I–V) curves were analyzed using Schottky emission and ionic hopping models to gain insight into the physical mechanisms underpinning the device behavior. During the forming process it was determined that, at voltages in excess of 2.5 V, an ionic hopping model is in good agreement with the I–V data. The extracted ion hopping distance ∼ 4 Å was within the range of interatomic spacing of HfO{sub 2} during the forming process consistent with ionic motion of Cu{sup 2+} ions. Lastly the on state I–V data was dominated at larger voltages by Schottky emission with an estimated barrier height of ∼ 0.5 eV and a refractive index of 2.59. The consequence of the Schottky emission analysis indicates the on state resistance to be a product of a Pt/Cu{sub 2}O/Cu filament(s)/Cu{sub 2}O/Cu structure. - Highlights: • HfO{sub 2} was grown via atomic layer deposition at 250 and 100 °C on Cu substrates. • A Cu{sub 2}O surface layer and Cu doping were observed in post-deposition of HfO{sub 2}. • Resistive memory devices were fabricated and

  14. Recoil Induced Room Temperature Stable Frenkel Pairs in a-Hafnium Upon Thermal Neutron Capture

    Science.gov (United States)

    Butz, Tilman; Das, Satyendra K.; Dey, Chandi C.; Ghoshal, Shamik

    2013-11-01

    Ultrapure hafnium metal (110 ppm zirconium) was neutron activated with a thermal neutron flux of 6:6 · 1012 cm-2s-1 in order to obtain 181Hf for subsequent time differential perturbed angular correlation (TDPAC) experiments using the nuclear probe 181Hf(β-) 181Ta. Apart from the expected nuclear quadrupole interaction (NQI) signal for a hexagonal close-packed (hcp) metal, three further discrete NQIs were observed with a few percent fraction each. The TDPAC spectra were recorded for up to 11 half lives with extreme statistical accuracy. The fitted parameters vary slightly within the temperature range between 248 K and 373 K. The signals corresponding to the three additional sites completely disappear after `annealing' at 453 K for one minute. Based on the symmetry of the additional NQIs and their temperature dependencies, they are tentatively attributed to Frenkel pairs produced by recoil due to the emission of a prompt 5:694 MeV -ray following thermal neutron capture and reported by the nuclear probe in three different positions. These Frenkel pairs are stable up to at least 373 K.

  15. The energy landscape of glassy dynamics on the amorphous hafnium diboride surface

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nguyen, Duc; Mallek, Justin; Cloud, Andrew N.; Abelson, John R.; Girolami, Gregory S.; Lyding, Joseph; Gruebele, Martin

    2014-11-01

    Direct visualization of the dynamics of structural glasses and amorphous solids on the sub-nanometer scale provides rich information unavailable from bulk or conventional single molecule techniques. We study the surface of hafnium diboride, a conductive ultrahigh temperature ceramic material that can be grown in amorphous films. Our scanning tunneling movies have a second-to-hour dynamic range and single-point current measurements extend that to the millisecond-to-minute time scale. On the a-HfB2 glass surface, two-state hopping of 1-2 nm diameter cooperatively rearranging regions or "clusters" occurs from sub-milliseconds to hours. We characterize individual clusters in detail through high-resolution (single cluster vertical displacements, we can reconstruct the local free energy landscape of individual clusters, complete with activation barrier height, a reaction coordinate in nanometers, and the shape of the free energy landscape basins between which hopping occurs. The experimental images are consistent with the compact shape of α-relaxors predicted by random first order transition theory, whereas the rapid hopping rate, even taking less confined motion at the surface into account, is consistent with β-relaxations. We make a proposal of how "mixed" features can show up in surface dynamics of glasses.

  16. Characteristics of laser produced plasmas of hafnium and tantalum in the 1-7 nm region

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Bowen; Otsuka, Takamitsu; Sokell, Emma; Dunne, Padraig; O'Sullivan, Gerry; Hara, Hiroyuki; Arai, Goki; Tamura, Toshiki; Ono, Yuichi; Dinh, Thanh-Hung; Higashiguchi, Takeshi

    2017-11-01

    Soft X-ray (SXR) spectra from hafnium and tantalum laser produced plasmas were recorded in the 1-7 nm region using two Nd:YAG lasers with pulse lengths of 170 ps and 10 ns, respectively, operating at a range of power densities. The maximum focused peak power density was 2. 3 × 1014 W cm-2 for 170 ps pulses and 1. 8 × 1012 W cm-2 for 10 ns pulses, respectively. Two intense quasicontinuous intensity bands resulting from n = 4 - n = 4 and n = 4 - n = 5 unresolved transition arrays (UTAs) dominate both sets of experimental spectra. Comparison with calculations performed with the Cowan suite of atomic structure codes as well as consideration of previous experimental and theoretical results aided identification of the most prominent features in the spectra. For the 10 ns spectrum, the highest ion stage that could be identified from the n = 4 - n = 5 arrays were lower than silver-like Hf25+ and Ta26+ (which has a 4 d 104 f ground configuration) indicating that the plasma temperature attained was too low to produce ions with an outermost 4 d subshell, while for the 170 ps plasmas the presence of significantly higher stages was deduced and lines due to 4 d-5 p transitions were clearly evident. Furthermore, we show an enhancement of emission from tantalum using dual laser irradiation, and the effect of pre-pulse durations and delay times between two pulses are demonstrated.

  17. Ferroelectric transistors with monolayer molybdenum disulfide and ultra-thin aluminum-doped hafnium oxide

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yap, Wui Chung; Jiang, Hao; Liu, Jialun; Xia, Qiangfei; Zhu, Wenjuan

    2017-07-01

    In this letter, we demonstrate ferroelectric memory devices with monolayer molybdenum disulfide (MoS2) as the channel material and aluminum (Al)-doped hafnium oxide (HfO2) as the ferroelectric gate dielectric. Metal-ferroelectric-metal capacitors with 16 nm thick Al-doped HfO2 are fabricated, and a remnant polarization of 3 μC/cm2 under a program/erase voltage of 5 V is observed. The capability of potential 10 years data retention was estimated using extrapolation of the experimental data. Ferroelectric transistors based on embedded ferroelectric HfO2 and MoS2 grown by chemical vapor deposition are fabricated. Clockwise hysteresis is observed at low program/erase voltages due to slow bulk traps located near the 2D/dielectric interface, while counterclockwise hysteresis is observed at high program/erase voltages due to ferroelectric polarization. In addition, the endurances of the devices are tested, and the effects associated with ferroelectric materials, such as the wake-up effect and polarization fatigue, are observed. Reliable writing/reading in MoS2/Al-doped HfO2 ferroelectric transistors over 2 × 104 cycles is achieved. This research can potentially lead to advances of two-dimensional (2D) materials in low-power logic and memory applications.

  18. Silicon-doped hafnium oxide anti-ferroelectric thin films for energy storage

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ali, Faizan; Liu, Xiaohua; Zhou, Dayu; Yang, Xirui; Xu, Jin; Schenk, Tony; Müller, Johannes; Schroeder, Uwe; Cao, Fei; Dong, Xianlin

    2017-10-01

    Motivated by the development of ultracompact electronic devices as miniaturized energy autonomous systems, great research efforts have been expended in recent years to develop various types of nano-structural energy storage components. The electrostatic capacitors characterized by high power density are competitive; however, their implementation in practical devices is limited by the low intrinsic energy storage density (ESD) of linear dielectrics like Al2O3. In this work, a detailed experimental investigation of energy storage properties is presented for 10 nm thick silicon-doped hafnium oxide anti-ferroelectric thin films. Owing to high field induced polarization and slim double hysteresis, an extremely large ESD value of 61.2 J/cm3 is achieved at 4.5 MV/cm with a high efficiency of ˜65%. In addition, the ESD and the efficiency exhibit robust thermal stability in 210-400 K temperature range and an excellent endurance up to 109 times of charge/discharge cycling at a very high electric field of 4.0 MV/cm. The superior energy storage performance together with mature technology of integration into 3-D arrays suggests great promise for this recently discovered anti-ferroelectric material to replace the currently adopted Al2O3 in fabrication of nano-structural supercapacitors.

  19. Hafnium Films and Magnetic Shielding for TIME, A mm-Wavelength Spectrometer Array

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hunacek, J.; Bock, J.; Bradford, C. M.; Butler, V.; Chang, T.-C.; Cheng, Y.-T.; Cooray, A.; Crites, A.; Frez, C.; Hailey-Dunsheath, S.; Hoscheit, B.; Kim, D. W.; Li, C.-T.; Marrone, D.; Moncelsi, L.; Shirokoff, E.; Steinbach, B.; Sun, G.; Trumper, I.; Turner, A.; Uzgil, B.; Weber, A.; Zemcov, M.

    2018-04-01

    TIME is a mm-wavelength grating spectrometer array that will map fluctuations of the 157.7-μm emission line of singly ionized carbon ([CII]) during the epoch of reionization (redshift z ˜ 5-9). Sixty transition-edge sensor (TES) bolometers populate the output arc of each of the 32 spectrometers, for a total of 1920 detectors. Each bolometer consists of gold absorber on a ˜ 3 × 3 mm silicon nitride micro-mesh suspended near the corners by 1 × 1 × 500 μm silicon nitride legs targeting a photon-noise-dominated NEP ˜ 1 × 10^{-17} W/√{Hz} . Hafnium films are explored as a lower-T_c alternative to Ti (500 mK) for TIME TESs, allowing thicker support legs for improved yield. Hf T_c is shown to vary between 250 and 450 mK when varying the resident Ar pressure during deposition. Magnetic shielding designs and simulations are presented for the TIME first-stage SQUIDs. Total axial field suppression is predicted to be 5 × 10^7.

  20. Tuning the magnetic properties of pure hafnium by high pressure torsion

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cepeda-Jiménez, C.M.; Beltrán, J.I.; Hernando, A.; García, M.A.; Ynduráin, F.; Zhilyaev, A.; Pérez-Prado, M.T.

    2017-01-01

    This work demonstrates that room temperature (RT) ferromagnetism might be triggered in pure hafnium (Hf), a classic paramagnet, by severe plastic deformation (SPD) via high pressure torsion (HPT). The origin of this phenomenon is elucidated by a combined approach including density functional theory (DFT) calculations and transmission electron microscopy (TEM). In particular, it is shown that the elastic lattice distorsions induced in pure Hf as a consequence of grain refinement down to the nanocrystalline regime by HPT lead to the development of a new monoclinic crystalline structure that exhibits a spontaneous magnetization at RT. DFT calculations are utilized to prove that local stretching of the original pure Hf hexagonal close packed (hcp) lattice along specific pyramidal directions, due to the presence of internal stresses in the deformed nanostructure, may give rise to the emergence of the monoclinic phase, which is endowed with a net magnetic moment. An excellent agreement is found between DFT calculations and experimental TEM observations, which provide a first evidence of the presence of the pure Hf monoclinic crystal lattice. This work shows that SPD may constitute a viable, yet widely unexplored, strategy to tune the magnetic properties and, in particular, to induce RT ferromagnetism in bulk non-magnetic metals.

  1. In-Pile Experiment of a New Hafnium Aluminide Composite Material to Enable Fast Neutron Testing in the Advanced Test Reactor

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Donna Post Guillen; Douglas L. Porter; James R. Parry; Heng Ban

    2010-06-01

    A new hafnium aluminide composite material is being developed as a key component in a Boosted Fast Flux Loop (BFFL) system designed to provide fast neutron flux test capability in the Advanced Test Reactor. An absorber block comprised of hafnium aluminide (Al3Hf) particles (~23% by volume) dispersed in an aluminum matrix can absorb thermal neutrons and transfer heat from the experiment to pressurized water cooling channels. However, the thermophysical properties, such as thermal conductivity, of this material and the effect of irradiation are not known. This paper describes the design of an in-pile experiment to obtain such data to enable design and optimization of the BFFL neutron filter.

  2. Rapid formation of nanocrystalline HfO2 powders from amorphous hafnium hydroxide under ultrasonically assisted hydrothermal treatment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Meskin, Pavel E.; Sharikov, Felix Yu.; Ivanov, Vladimir K.; Churagulov, Bulat R.; Tretyakov, Yury D.

    2007-01-01

    Peculiarities of hafnium hydroxide hydrothermal decomposition were studied by in situ heat flux calorimetry for the first time. It was shown that this process occurs in one exothermal stage (ΔH = -17.95 kJ mol -1 ) at 180-250 deg. C resulting in complete crystallization of amorphous phase with formation of pure monoclinic HfO 2 . It was found that the rate of m-HfO 2 formation can be significantly increased by combining hydrothermal treatment with simultaneous ultrasonic activation

  3. 38 CFR 3.161 - Expedited Claims Adjudication Initiative-Pilot Program.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... Adjudication Initiative-Pilot Program. 3.161 Section 3.161 Pensions, Bonuses, and Veterans' Relief DEPARTMENT... Claims § 3.161 Expedited Claims Adjudication Initiative—Pilot Program. Rules pertaining to the Expedited Claims Adjudication Initiative Pilot Program are set forth in part 20, subpart P, of this chapter...

  4. 33 CFR 161.60 - Vessel Traffic Service Prince William Sound.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... William Sound. 161.60 Section 161.60 Navigation and Navigable Waters COAST GUARD, DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND... Movement Reporting System Areas and Reporting Points § 161.60 Vessel Traffic Service Prince William Sound... Cape Hinchinbrook Light to Schooner Rock Light, comprising that portion of Prince William Sound between...

  5. 40 CFR 161.490 - Wildlife and aquatic organisms data requirements.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 23 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Wildlife and aquatic organisms data... § 161.490 Wildlife and aquatic organisms data requirements. (a) Table. Sections 161.100 through 161.102 describe how to use this table to determine the wildlife and aquatic organisms data requirements and the...

  6. 40 CFR 161.55 - Agricultural vs. non-agricultural pesticides.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... pesticides. 161.55 Section 161.55 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY (CONTINUED) PESTICIDE PROGRAMS DATA REQUIREMENTS FOR REGISTRATION OF ANTIMICROBIAL PESTICIDES General Provisions § 161.55 Agricultural vs. non-agricultural pesticides. Section 25(a)(1) of FIFRA instructs the...

  7. 43 CFR 16.1 - Agreements to dispose of helium in natural gas.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-01

    ... 43 Public Lands: Interior 1 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Agreements to dispose of helium in natural gas. 16.1 Section 16.1 Public Lands: Interior Office of the Secretary of the Interior CONSERVATION OF HELIUM § 16.1 Agreements to dispose of helium in natural gas. (a) Pursuant to his authority and...

  8. 22 CFR 161.10 - Non-Federal applicants for permits.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... 22 Foreign Relations 1 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Non-Federal applicants for permits. 161.10 Section 161.10 Foreign Relations DEPARTMENT OF STATE ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION REGULATIONS FOR IMPLEMENTATION OF THE NATIONAL ENVIRONMENTAL POLICY ACT (NEPA) Coordination of Other Requirements of NEPA § 161...

  9. The energy landscape of glassy dynamics on the amorphous hafnium diboride surface

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nguyen, Duc; Girolami, Gregory S.; Mallek, Justin; Cloud, Andrew N.; Abelson, John R.; Lyding, Joseph; Gruebele, Martin

    2014-01-01

    Direct visualization of the dynamics of structural glasses and amorphous solids on the sub-nanometer scale provides rich information unavailable from bulk or conventional single molecule techniques. We study the surface of hafnium diboride, a conductive ultrahigh temperature ceramic material that can be grown in amorphous films. Our scanning tunneling movies have a second-to-hour dynamic range and single-point current measurements extend that to the millisecond-to-minute time scale. On the a-HfB 2 glass surface, two-state hopping of 1–2 nm diameter cooperatively rearranging regions or “clusters” occurs from sub-milliseconds to hours. We characterize individual clusters in detail through high-resolution (<0.5 nm) imaging, scanning tunneling spectroscopy and voltage modulation, ruling out individual atoms, diffusing adsorbates, or pinned charges as the origin of the observed two-state hopping. Smaller clusters are more likely to hop, larger ones are more likely to be immobile. HfB 2 has a very high bulk glass transition temperature T g , and we observe no three-state hopping or sequential two-state hopping previously seen on lower T g glass surfaces. The electronic density of states of clusters does not change when they hop up or down, allowing us to calibrate an accurate relative z-axis scale. By directly measuring and histogramming single cluster vertical displacements, we can reconstruct the local free energy landscape of individual clusters, complete with activation barrier height, a reaction coordinate in nanometers, and the shape of the free energy landscape basins between which hopping occurs. The experimental images are consistent with the compact shape of α-relaxors predicted by random first order transition theory, whereas the rapid hopping rate, even taking less confined motion at the surface into account, is consistent with β-relaxations. We make a proposal of how “mixed” features can show up in surface dynamics of glasses

  10. Materials properties of hafnium and zirconium silicates: Metal interdiffusion and dopant penetration studies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Quevedo Lopez, Manuel Angel

    Hafnium and Zirconium based gate dielectrics are considered potential candidates to replace SiO2 or SiON as the gate dielectric in CMOS processing. Furthermore, the addition of nitrogen into this pseudo-binary alloy has been shown to improve their thermal stability, electrical properties, and reduce dopant penetration. Because CMOS processing requires high temperature anneals (up to 1050°C), it is important to understand the diffusion properties of any metal associated with the gate dielectric in silicon at these temperatures. In addition, dopant penetration from the doped polysilicon gate into the Si channel at these temperatures must also be studied. Impurity outdiffusion (Hf, Zr) from the dielectric, or dopant (B, As, P) penetration through the dielectric into the channel region would likely result in deleterious effects upon the carrier mobility. In this dissertation extensive thermal stability studies of alternate gate dielectric candidates ZrSixOy and HfSixO y are presented. Dopant penetration studies from doped-polysilicon through HfSixOy and HfSixOyNz are also presented. Rutherford Backscattering Spectroscopy (RBS), Heavy Ion RBS (HI-RBS), X-ray Photoelectron Spectroscopy (XPS), High Resolution Transmission Electron Microscopy (HR-TEM), and Time of Flight and Dynamic Secondary Ion Mass Spectroscopy (ToF-SIMS, D-SIMS) methods were used to characterize these materials. The dopant diffusivity is calculated by modeling of the dopant profiles in the Si substrate. In this disseration is reported that Hf silicate films are more stable than Zr silicate films, from the metal interdiffusion point of view. On the other hand, dopant (B, As, and P) penetration is observed for HfSixO y films. However, the addition of nitrogen to the Hf - Si - O systems improves the dopant penetration properties of the resulting HfSi xOyNz films.

  11. Protective coatings of hafnium dioxide by atomic layer deposition for microelectromechanical systems applications

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Berdova, Maria, E-mail: maria.berdova@aalto.fi [Aalto University, Department of Materials Science and Engineering, 02150, Espoo (Finland); Wiemer, Claudia; Lamperti, Alessio; Tallarida, Grazia; Cianci, Elena [Laboratorio MDM, IMM CNR, Via C. Olivetti 2, 20864, Agrate Brianza, MB (Italy); Lamagna, Luca; Losa, Stefano; Rossini, Silvia; Somaschini, Roberto; Gioveni, Salvatore [STMicroelectronics, Via C. Olivetti 2, 20864, Agrate Brianza, MB (Italy); Fanciulli, Marco [Laboratorio MDM, IMM CNR, Via C. Olivetti 2, 20864, Agrate Brianza, MB (Italy); Università degli studi di Milano Bicocca, Dipartimento di Scienza dei Materiali, 20126, Milano (Italy); Franssila, Sami, E-mail: sami.franssila@aalto.fi [Aalto University, Department of Materials Science and Engineering, 02150, Espoo (Finland)

    2016-04-15

    Graphical abstract: - Highlights: • Atomic layer deposition of HfO{sub 2} from (CpMe){sub 2}Hf(OMe)Me or Hf(NMeEt){sub 4} and ozone for potential applications in microelectromechanical systems. • ALD HfO{sub 2} protects aluminum substrates from degradation in moist environment and at the same time retains good reflectance properties of the underlying material. • The resistance of hafnium dioxide to moist environment is independent of chosen precursors. - Abstract: This work presents the investigation of HfO{sub 2} deposited by atomic layer deposition (ALD) from either HfD-CO4 or TEMAHf and ozone for microelectromechanical systems (MEMS) applications, in particular, for environmental protection of aluminum micromirrors. This work shows that HfO{sub 2} films successfully protect aluminum in moist environment and at the same time retain good reflectance properties of underlying material. In our experimental work, the chemical composition, crystal structure, electronic density and roughness of HfO{sub 2} films remained the same after one week of humidity treatment (relative humidity of 85%, 85 °C). The reflectance properties underwent only minor changes. The observed shift in reflectance was only from 80–90% to 76–85% in 400–800 nm spectral range when coated with ALD HfO{sub 2} films grown with Hf(NMeEt){sub 4} and no shift (remained in the range of 68–83%) for films grown from (CpMe){sub 2}Hf(OMe)Me.

  12. Study of hafnium (IV) oxide nanoparticles synthesized by polymerized complex and polymer precursor derived sol-gel methods

    KAUST Repository

    Ramos-Gonzá lez, R.; Garcí a-Cerda, L. A.; Alshareef, Husam N.; Gnade, Bruce E.; Quevedo-Ló pez, Manuel Angel Quevedo

    2010-01-01

    This work reports the preparation and characterization of hafnium (IV) oxide (HfO2) nanoparticles grown by derived sol-gel routes that involves the formation of an organic polymeric network. A comparison between polymerized complex (PC) and polymer precursor (PP) methods is presented. For the PC method, citric acid (CA) and ethylene glycol (EG) are used as the chelating and polymerizable reagents, respectively. In the case of PP method, poly(acrylic acid) (PAA) is used as the chelating reagent. In both cases, different precursor gels were prepared and the hafnium (IV) chloride (HfCl4) molar ratio was varied from 0.1 to 1.0 for the PC method and from 0.05 to 0.5 for the PP method. In order to obtain the nanoparticles, the precursors were heat treated at 500 and 800 °C. The thermal characterization of the precursor gels was carried out by thermogravimetric analysis (TGA) and the structural and morphological characterization by X-ray diffraction (XRD) and transmission electron microscopy (TEM). The XRD patterns of the samples obtained by both methods shows the formation of HfO2 at 500 °C with monoclinic crystalline phase. The PC method exhibited also the cubic phase. Finally, the HfO2 nanoparticles size (4 to 11 nm) was determined by TEM and XRD patterns. © (2010) Trans Tech Publications.

  13. Study of hafnium (IV) oxide nanoparticles synthesized by polymerized complex and polymer precursor derived sol-gel methods

    KAUST Repository

    Ramos-González, R.

    2010-03-01

    This work reports the preparation and characterization of hafnium (IV) oxide (HfO2) nanoparticles grown by derived sol-gel routes that involves the formation of an organic polymeric network. A comparison between polymerized complex (PC) and polymer precursor (PP) methods is presented. For the PC method, citric acid (CA) and ethylene glycol (EG) are used as the chelating and polymerizable reagents, respectively. In the case of PP method, poly(acrylic acid) (PAA) is used as the chelating reagent. In both cases, different precursor gels were prepared and the hafnium (IV) chloride (HfCl4) molar ratio was varied from 0.1 to 1.0 for the PC method and from 0.05 to 0.5 for the PP method. In order to obtain the nanoparticles, the precursors were heat treated at 500 and 800 °C. The thermal characterization of the precursor gels was carried out by thermogravimetric analysis (TGA) and the structural and morphological characterization by X-ray diffraction (XRD) and transmission electron microscopy (TEM). The XRD patterns of the samples obtained by both methods shows the formation of HfO2 at 500 °C with monoclinic crystalline phase. The PC method exhibited also the cubic phase. Finally, the HfO2 nanoparticles size (4 to 11 nm) was determined by TEM and XRD patterns. © (2010) Trans Tech Publications.

  14. Corrosion resistant surface for vanadium nitride and hafnium nitride layers as function of grain size

    Science.gov (United States)

    Escobar, C. A.; Caicedo, J. C.; Aperador, W.

    2014-01-01

    In this research it was studied vanadium nitride (VN) and hafnium nitride (HfN) film, which were deposited onto silicon (Si (100)) and AISI 4140 steel substrates via r.f. magnetron sputtering technique in Ar/N2 atmosphere with purity at 99.99% for both V and Hf metallic targets. Both films were approximately 1.2±0.1 μm thick. The crystallography structures that were evaluated via X-ray diffraction analysis (XRD) showed preferential orientations in the Bragg planes VN (200) and HfN (111). The chemical compositions for both films were characterized by EDX. Atomic Force Microscopy (AFM) was used to study the morphology; the results reveal grain sizes of 78±2 nm for VN and 58±2 nm for HfN and roughness values of 4.2±0.1 nm for VN and 1.5±0.1 nm for HfN films. The electrochemical performance in VN and HfN films deposited onto steel 4140 were studied by Tafel polarization curves and impedance spectroscopy methods (EIS) under contact with sodium chloride at 3.5 wt% solution, therefore, it was found that the corrosion rate decreased about 95% in VN and 99% for HfN films in relation to uncoated 4140 steel, thus demonstrating, the protecting effect of VN and HfN films under a corrosive environment as function of morphological characteristics (grain size). VN(grain size)=78±2.0 nm, VN(roughness)=4.2±0.1 nm, VN(corrosion rate)=40.87 μmy. HfN(grain size)=58±2.0 nm, HfN(roughness)=1.5±0.1 nm, HfN(corrosion rate)=0.205 μmy. It was possible to analyze that films with larger grain size, can be observed smaller grain boundary thus generating a higher corrosion rate, therefore, in this work it was found that the HfN layer has better corrosion resistance (low corrosion rate) in relation to VN film which presents a larger grain size, indicating that the low grain boundary in (VN films) does not restrict movement of the Cl- ion and in this way the corrosion rate increases dramatically.

  15. Synthesis and characterization of hafnium carbide microcrystal chains with a carbon-rich shell via CVD

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tian, Song; Li, Hejun; Zhang, Yulei; Liu, Sen; Fu, Yangxi; Li, Yixian; Qiang, Xinfa

    2013-01-01

    Graphical abstract: Novel HfC microcrystal chains have been synthesized via a catalyst-assisted chemical vapor deposition process. SEM results show the chains have a periodically changing diameter and a nanoscale sharpening tip. Analysis of TEM/SAED/EELS/EDX data shows the single-crystal chains grow along a [0 0 1] direction and consist of a HfC core and a thin carbon-rich shell with embedded HfC nanocrystallites surrounding the core. This work achieves the controllable preparation of nanoscale HfC sharpening tips for application as a point electron emission source and facilitates the application of HfC ultrafast laser-triggered tips in attosecond science. Highlights: •HfC microcrystal chains were synthesized by a catalyst-assisted CVD. •The chains grow along a [0 0 1] direction and have a periodically changing diameter. •Single-crystal HfC core is sheathed by a thin carbon-rich shell. •A growth mechanism model is proposed to explain the growth of microcrystal chians. •This work achieves the controllable preparation of nanoscale HfC sharpening tips. -- Abstract: Novel hafnium carbide (HfC) microcrystal chains, with a periodically changing diameter and a nanoscale sharpening tip at the chain end, have been synthesized via a catalyst-assisted chemical vapor deposition (CVD) process. The as-synthesized chains with many octahedral microcrystals have diameters of between several hundreds of nm and 6 μm and lengths of ∼500 μm. TEM diffraction studies show that the chains are single-crystalline HfC and preferentially grow along a [0 0 1] crystal orientation. TEM/EELS/EDX analysis proves the chains are composed of a HfC core and a thin (several tens of nm to 100 nm) carbon-rich shell with the embedded HfC nanocrystallites (typically below 10 nm) surrounding the core. The growth mechanism model for the chains based on the vapor–liquid–solid process, the vapor–solid process, and the HfC crystal growth characteristics is discussed

  16. Hafnium in peralkaline and peraluminous boro-aluminosilicate glass, and glass subcomponents: a solubility study

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Davis, Linda L.; Darab, John G.; Qian, Maoxu; Zhao, Donggao; Palenik, Christopher S.; Li, Hong; Strachan, Denis M.; Li, Liyu

    2003-01-01

    A relationship between the solubility of hafnia (HfO2) and the host glass composition was explored by determining the solubility limits of HfO2 in peralkaline and peraluminous borosilicate glasses in the system SiO2-Al2O3-B2O3-Na2O, and in glasses in the system SiO2-Na2O-Al2O3 in air at 1450 C. The only Hf-bearing phase to crystallize in the peralkaline borosilicate melts is hafnia, while in the boron-free melts sodium-hafnium silicates crystallize. All peraluminous borosilicate melts crystallize hafnia, but the slightly peraluminous glasses also have sector-zoned hafnia crystals that contain Al and Si. The more peraluminous borosilicate glasses also crystallize a B-containing mullite. The general morphology of the hafnia crystals changes as peralkalinity (Na2O/(Na2O+Al2O3)) decreases, as expected in melts with increasing viscosity. In all of the glasses with Na2O > Al2O3, the solubility of hafnia is linearly and positively correlated with Na2O/(Na2O + Al2O3) or Na2O - Al2O3 (excess sodium), despite the presence of 5 to 16 mol% B2O3. The solubility of hafnia is higher in the sodium-aluminum borosilicate glasses than in the sodium-aluminosilicate glasses, suggesting that the boron is enhancing the effect that excess sodium has on the incorporation of Hf into the glass structure. The results of this solubility study are compared to other studies of high-valence cation solubility in B-free silicate melts. From this, for peralkaline B-bearing glasses, it is shown that, although the solubility limits are higher, the solution behavior of hafnia is the same as in B-free silicate melts previously studied. By comparison, also, it is shown that in peraluminous melts, there must be a different solution mechanism for hafnia: different than for peralkaline sodium-aluminum borosilicate glasses and different than for B-free silicate melts studied by others

  17. Nano-crystals of cerium–hafnium binary oxide: Their size-dependent structure

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Raitano, Joan M. [Department of Applied Physics and Applied Mathematics, Materials Science and Engineering Program, Columbia University, New York, NY 10027 (United States); Khalid, Syed [National Synchrotron Light Source, Brookhaven National Laboratory, Upton, NY 11973 (United States); Marinkovic, Nebojsa [Chemical Engineering Department, Columbia University, 500 W 120th St, Mudd 801, New York, NY 10027 (United States); Chan, Siu-Wai, E-mail: sc174@columbia.edu [Department of Applied Physics and Applied Mathematics, Materials Science and Engineering Program, Columbia University, New York, NY 10027 (United States)

    2015-09-25

    Highlights: • (1 − x)CeO{sub 2}–xHfO{sub 2} was precipitated (0 < x < 1) and calcined in air. • For x ⩽ 0.14, crystallites ⩽140 nm in size exhibit only the fluorite structure. • This low hafnia solubility is attributable to no auto-reduction (Ce{sup 3+} = 0). • The low solubility is also due to the high temperature required for homogenization. • Coarsening is lessened as Hf{sup 4+} ions slow cation diffusion in these crystallites. - Abstract: Cerium oxide (CeO{sub 2}, “ceria”) and hafnium oxide (HfO{sub 2}, “hafnia”) were aqueously co-precipitated and subsequently calcined to allow for homogenization. The size of the (1−x)CeO{sub 2}–xHfO{sub 2} crystallites, determined by the Scherrer equation, varied from 140 nm for x = 0 to 15 nm for x = 0.73. For x ⩽ 0.14, only cubic structures are visible in X-ray diffractograms, and the lattice parameters are consistent with the values expected for structurally cubic solid solutions of hafnia in ceria. At x = 0.26, tetragonal and monoclinic phases nucleated with the former not being observed in the bulk phase diagram for ceria–hafnia. Therefore, the solubility limit of the cubic structure is between x = 0.14 and x = 0.26 for 40–61 nm crystallites, the sizes of these respective compositions. More specifically, for the 40 nm crystallites of x = 0.26 (1 − x)CeO{sub 2}–xHfO{sub 2}, 15% of the hafnia remains in a structurally cubic solid solution with ceria based on the observed cubic lattice parameter. The compositional domain for the cubic fluorite structure in this study is narrower than other nanostructured (1 − x)CeO{sub 2}–xHfO{sub 2} studies, especially studies with crystallite sizes less than 10 nm, but wider than observed in the bulk and helps to expand the size regime over which the relationship between crystallite size and phase stability is known. The extent of this cubic-structure domain is mainly attributable to the intermediate crystallite size and the roughly zero Ce{sup 3

  18. Preparation of extractive resins for producing terbium-161

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    De la Cruz B, C. C.; Monroy G, F.

    2009-10-01

    This paper presents the development of a methodology for extractive resins preparation to base of HDEHP, which allows to separation of Tb from Gd generating an own technology of preparation of these resins. The study included the extractive resins preparation from 6 different supports: kieselguhr Dg, alumina, red volcanic rock, chiluca, quarry and fluorite; two treatment types of of supports and varied concentrations of HDEHP extractant (di(2-etil hexyl) orthophosphoric acid), in order to determine which resin has improved efficiency of Gd and Tb separation, and radionuclide purity of 161 Tb. Resins were prepared to base of kieselguhr to determine the most appropriate silicon deposition process. Two silicon deposition treatments were realized: treatment I , by contact with silicon deposition solution (dimethyldichlorosilane / heptane 1:30) and treatment II by contact with vapors of dimethyldichlorosilane in vacuum. The extractant retention was carried out to different concentrations of HDEHP / acetone: 1:4, 1:8, 1:15, 1:20, 1:30 and 1:40. According to the results, there is not direct relation of HDEHP concentration used in extractive resins preparation to base of kieselguhr over the efficiency of Gd and Tb separation and of radionuclide purity of 161 Tb. The effect of support in the efficiency of Gd and Tb separation was studied to prepare resins with the supports kieselguhr, alumina, quarry, chiluca, volcanic rock and fluorite, using the silicon deposition treatment II for the supports and a concentration of HDEHP / acetone 1:20, for extractant retention. Only resins based on kieselguhr could separate to Gd from Tb quantitatively, the resin at a concentration of HDEHP / Acetone 1:20 was the best results obtained in Gd and Tb separation, achieving a separation efficiency greater than 90% and a radionuclide purity higher than 99%. (Author)

  19. 26 CFR 1.501(c)(16)-1 - Corporations organized to finance crop operations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... 26 Internal Revenue 7 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 true Corporations organized to finance crop operations. 1.501(c)(16)-1 Section 1.501(c)(16)-1 Internal Revenue INTERNAL REVENUE SERVICE, DEPARTMENT OF THE TREASURY (CONTINUED) INCOME TAX (CONTINUED) INCOME TAXES (CONTINUED) Exempt Organizations § 1.501(c)(16)-1 Corporations organized to finance crop...

  20. A search for long-lived radionuclides produced by fast-neutron irradiations of copper, silver, europium, terbium, and hafnium

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Meadows, J.W.; Smith, D.L.; Ikeda, Y.; Konno, C.

    1990-01-01

    Identical sample packets, each containing samples of elemental copper, silver, europium, terbium, and hafnium, as well as titanium, iron and nickel as dosimeters, have been irradiated in three distinct accelerator neutron fields (at Argonne National Laboratory and Los Alamos National Laboratory in the U.S.A., and Japan Atomic Energy Research Institute, Tokai, Japan) as part of an interlaboratory research collaboration to search for the production of long-lived radionuclides for fusion waste disposal applications. This paper is a progress report on this project. To date, we have detected the following activities, and have obtained preliminary experimental cross section values for several of these: Ag-106m,108m,110m; Eu-150m,152g,154; Tb-158,160; and Hf-175,178m2,179m2,181. (author). 11 refs, 1 fig., 4 tabs

  1. Improved DC performance of AlGaN/GaN high electron mobility transistors using hafnium oxide for surface passivation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Liu, Chang; Chor, Eng Fong; Tan, Leng Seow

    2007-01-01

    Improved DC performance of AlGaN/GaN high electron mobility transistors (HEMTs) have been demonstrated using reactive-sputtered hafnium oxide (HfO 2 ) thin film as the surface passivation layer. Hall data indicate a significant increase in the product of sheet carrier concentration (n s ) and electron mobility (μ n ) in the HfO 2 -passivated HEMTs, compared to the unpassivated HEMTs. This improvement in electron carrier characteristics gives rise to a 22% higher I Dmax and an 18% higher g mmax in HEMTs with HfO 2 passivation relative to the unpassivated devices. On the other hand, I gleak of the HEMTs decreases by nearly one order of magnitude when HfO 2 passivation is applied. In addition, drain current is measured in the subthreshold regime. Compared to the unpassivated HEMTs, HfO 2 -passivated HEMTs exhibit a much smaller off-state I D , indicating better turn-off characteristics

  2. About the structure and stability of complex carbonates of thorium (IV), cerium (IV), zirconium (IV), hafnium (IV)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dervin, Jacqueline

    1972-01-01

    This research thesis addressed the study of complex carbonates of cations of metals belonging to the IV A column, i.e. thorium (IV), zirconium (IV), hafnium (IV), and also cerium (IV) and uranium (VI), and more particularly focused on ionic compounds formed in solution, and also on the influence of concentration and nature of cations on stability and nature of the formed solid. The author first presents methods used in this study, discusses their precision and scope of validity. She reports the study of the formation of different complex ions which have been highlighted in solution, and the determination of their formation constants. She reports the preparation and study of the stability domain of solid complexes. The next part reports the use of thermogravimetric analysis, IR spectrometry, and crystallography for the structural study of these compounds

  3. Tribo-electrochemical characterization of hafnium multilayer systems deposited on nitride/vanadium nitride AISI 4140 steel

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mora, M.; Vera, E.; Aperador, W.

    2016-02-01

    In this work is presented the synergistic behaviour among corrosion/wear (tribocorrosion) of the multilayer coatings hafnium nitride/vanadium nitride [HfN/VN]n. The multilayers were deposited on AISI 4140 steel using the technique of physical vapor deposition PVD magnetron sputtering, the tests were performed using a pin-on-disk tribometer, which has an adapted potentiostat galvanostat with three-electrode electrochemical cell. Tribocorrosive parameters such as: Friction coefficient between the coating and the counter body (100 Cr6 steel ball); Polarization resistance by means of electrochemical impedance spectroscopy technique and corrosion rate by polarization curves were determined. It was observed an increase in the polarization resistance, a decrease in the corrosion rate and a low coefficient of friction in comparison with the substrate, due to an increase on the number of bilayers.

  4. Tribo-electrochemical characterization of hafnium multilayer systems deposited on nitride/vanadium nitride AISI 4140 steel

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mora, M; Vera, E; Aperador, W

    2016-01-01

    In this work is presented the synergistic behaviour among corrosion/wear (tribocorrosion) of the multilayer coatings hafnium nitride/vanadium nitride [HfN/VN]n. The multilayers were deposited on AISI 4140 steel using the technique of physical vapor deposition PVD magnetron sputtering, the tests were performed using a pin-on-disk tribometer, which has an adapted potentiostat galvanostat with three-electrode electrochemical cell. Tribocorrosive parameters such as: Friction coefficient between the coating and the counter body (100 Cr6 steel ball); Polarization resistance by means of electrochemical impedance spectroscopy technique and corrosion rate by polarization curves were determined. It was observed an increase in the polarization resistance, a decrease in the corrosion rate and a low coefficient of friction in comparison with the substrate, due to an increase on the number of bilayers. (paper)

  5. The interfacial orientation relationship of oxide nanoparticles in a hafnium-containing oxide dispersion-strengthened austenitic stainless steel

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Miao, Yinbin, E-mail: miao2@illinois.edu [Department of Nuclear, Plasma and Radiological Engineering, University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign, Urbana, IL 61801 (United States); Mo, Kun [Nuclear Engineering Division, Argonne National Laboratory, Lemont, IL 60493 (United States); Cui, Bai [Department of Mechanical and Materials Engineering, University of Nebraska-Lincoln, Lincoln, NE 68588 (United States); Department of Material Science and Engineering, University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign, Urbana, IL 61801 (United States); Chen, Wei-Ying [Department of Nuclear, Plasma and Radiological Engineering, University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign, Urbana, IL 61801 (United States); Miller, Michael K.; Powers, Kathy A. [Center for Nanophase Materials Sciences, Oak Ridge National Laboratory, Oak Ridge, TN 37830 (United States); McCreary, Virginia; Gross, David [Department of Material Science and Engineering, University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign, Urbana, IL 61801 (United States); Almer, Jonathan [X-ray Science Division, Argonne National Laboratory, Lemont, IL 60493 (United States); Robertson, Ian M. [Department of Material Science and Engineering, University of Wisconsin-Madison, Madison, WA 53706 (United States); Department of Material Science and Engineering, University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign, Urbana, IL 61801 (United States); Stubbins, James F. [Department of Nuclear, Plasma and Radiological Engineering, University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign, Urbana, IL 61801 (United States)

    2015-03-15

    This work reports comprehensive investigations on the orientation relationship of the oxide nanoparticles in a hafnium-containing austenitic oxide dispersion-strengthened 316 stainless steel. The phases of the oxide nanoparticles were determined by a combination of scanning transmission electron microscopy–electron dispersive X-ray spectroscopy, atom probe tomography and synchrotron X-ray diffraction to be complex Y–Ti–Hf–O compounds with similar crystal structures, including bixbyite Y{sub 2}O{sub 3}, fluorite Y{sub 2}O{sub 3}–HfO{sub 2} solid solution and pyrochlore (or fluorite) Y{sub 2}(Ti,Hf){sub 2−x}O{sub 7−x}. High resolution transmission electron microscopy was used to characterize the particle–matrix interfaces. Two different coherency relationships along with one axis-parallel relation between the oxide nanoparticles and the steel matrix were found. The size of the nanoparticles significantly influences the orientation relationship. The results provide insight into the relationship of these nanoparticles with the matrix, which has implications for interpreting material properties as well as responses to radiation. - Highlights: • The oxide nanoparticles in a hafnium-containing austenitic ODS were characterized. • The nanoparticles are Y–Hf–Ti–O enriched phases according to APT and STEM–EDS. • Two coherency and an axis-parallel orientation relationships were found by HR-TEM. • Particle size has a prominent effect on the orientation relationship (OR). • Formation mechanism of the oxide nanoparticles was discussed based on the ORs.

  6. Gpr161 anchoring of PKA consolidates GPCR and cAMP signaling.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bachmann, Verena A; Mayrhofer, Johanna E; Ilouz, Ronit; Tschaikner, Philipp; Raffeiner, Philipp; Röck, Ruth; Courcelles, Mathieu; Apelt, Federico; Lu, Tsan-Wen; Baillie, George S; Thibault, Pierre; Aanstad, Pia; Stelzl, Ulrich; Taylor, Susan S; Stefan, Eduard

    2016-07-12

    Scaffolding proteins organize the information flow from activated G protein-coupled receptors (GPCRs) to intracellular effector cascades both spatially and temporally. By this means, signaling scaffolds, such as A-kinase anchoring proteins (AKAPs), compartmentalize kinase activity and ensure substrate selectivity. Using a phosphoproteomics approach we identified a physical and functional connection between protein kinase A (PKA) and Gpr161 (an orphan GPCR) signaling. We show that Gpr161 functions as a selective high-affinity AKAP for type I PKA regulatory subunits (RI). Using cell-based reporters to map protein-protein interactions, we discovered that RI binds directly and selectively to a hydrophobic protein-protein interaction interface in the cytoplasmic carboxyl-terminal tail of Gpr161. Furthermore, our data demonstrate that a binary complex between Gpr161 and RI promotes the compartmentalization of Gpr161 to the plasma membrane. Moreover, we show that Gpr161, functioning as an AKAP, recruits PKA RI to primary cilia in zebrafish embryos. We also show that Gpr161 is a target of PKA phosphorylation, and that mutation of the PKA phosphorylation site affects ciliary receptor localization. Thus, we propose that Gpr161 is itself an AKAP and that the cAMP-sensing Gpr161:PKA complex acts as cilium-compartmentalized signalosome, a concept that now needs to be considered in the analyzing, interpreting, and pharmaceutical targeting of PKA-associated functions.

  7. 25 CFR 1000.161 - What is a self-governance compact?

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... 25 Indians 2 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false What is a self-governance compact? 1000.161 Section 1000... EDUCATION ACT Negotiation Process for Annual Funding Agreements Negotiating A Self-Governance Compact § 1000.161 What is a self-governance compact? A self-governance compact is an executed document that affirms...

  8. 14 CFR 61.161 - Aeronautical experience: Rotorcraft category and helicopter class rating.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    ... category and helicopter class rating. 61.161 Section 61.161 Aeronautics and Space FEDERAL AVIATION... helicopter class rating. (a) A person who is applying for an airline transport pilot certificate with a rotorcraft category and helicopter class rating, must have at least 1,200 hours of total time as a pilot that...

  9. 49 CFR 173.161 - Chemical kits and first aid kits.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 2 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Chemical kits and first aid kits. 173.161 Section... Class 7 § 173.161 Chemical kits and first aid kits. (a) Chemical kits and First aid kits must conform to... 10 kg. (b) Chemical kits and First aid kits are excepted from the specification packaging...

  10. 21 CFR 161.30 - Declaration of quantity of contents on labels for canned oysters.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... canned oysters. 161.30 Section 161.30 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH....30 Declaration of quantity of contents on labels for canned oysters. (a) For many years packers of canned oysters in the Gulf area of the United States have labeled their output with a declaration of the...

  11. 46 CFR 161.002-15 - Sample extraction smoke detection systems.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 6 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Sample extraction smoke detection systems. 161.002-15..., CONSTRUCTION, AND MATERIALS: SPECIFICATIONS AND APPROVAL ELECTRICAL EQUIPMENT Fire-Protective Systems § 161.002-15 Sample extraction smoke detection systems. The smoke detecting system must consist of a means for...

  12. 28 CFR 35.161 - Telecommunication devices for the deaf (TDD's).

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... 28 Judicial Administration 1 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Telecommunication devices for the deaf (TDD's). 35.161 Section 35.161 Judicial Administration DEPARTMENT OF JUSTICE NONDISCRIMINATION ON THE... devices for the deaf (TDD's). Where a public entity communicates by telephone with applicants and...

  13. 75 FR 61655 - Airworthiness Directives; Piper Aircraft, Inc. Model PA-28-161 Airplanes

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-06

    ...-1006; Directorate Identifier 2009-CE-057-AD] RIN 2120-AA64 Airworthiness Directives; Piper Aircraft... airworthiness directive (AD) for all Piper Aircraft, Inc. (Piper) Model PA-28-161 airplanes equipped with.... Piper Model PA-28-161 airplanes modified by STC No. SA03303AT have a similar unsafe design feature that...

  14. 75 FR 81417 - Airworthiness Directives; Piper Aircraft, Inc. Model PA-28-161 Airplanes

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-12-28

    ... Airworthiness Directives; Piper Aircraft, Inc. Model PA-28-161 Airplanes AGENCY: Federal Aviation Administration... new airworthiness directive (AD): 2010-26-04 Piper Aircraft, Inc: Amendment 39-16543; Docket No. FAA... times may be Airplane approved for this part. Maintenance Manual Piper PA28-161 TAE 125-01, Doc. No...

  15. 21 CFR 150.161 - Artificially sweetened fruit preserves and jams.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 2 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Artificially sweetened fruit preserves and jams. 150.161 Section 150.161 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN... karaya, gum tragacanth, algin (sodium alginate), sodium carboxymethylcellulose (cellulose gum...

  16. 34 CFR 668.161 - Scope and purpose (cash management rules).

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... 34 Education 3 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Scope and purpose (cash management rules). 668.161... POSTSECONDARY EDUCATION, DEPARTMENT OF EDUCATION STUDENT ASSISTANCE GENERAL PROVISIONS Cash Management § 668.161 Scope and purpose (cash management rules). (a) General. (1) This subpart establishes the rules and...

  17. Implantation of titanium, chromium, yttrium, molybdenum, silver, hafnium, tantalum, tungsten and platinum ions generated by a metal vapor vacuum ion source into 440C stainless steel

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sasaki, Jun; Hayashi, Kazunori; Sugiyama, Kenji; Ichiko, Osami; Hashiguchi, Yoshihiro

    1992-01-01

    Titanium, yttrium, molybdenum, silver, chromium, hafnium, tantalum, tungsten and platinum ions generated by a metal vapor vacuum arc (MEVVA) ion source were implanted into 440C stainless steel in the dose region 10 17 ions cm -2 with extraction voltages of up to 70 kV. Glow discharge spectroscopy (GDS), friction coefficient, and Vickers microhardness of the specimens were studied. Grooves made by friction tests were investigated by electron probe microanalysis (EPMA). GDS showed incorporation of carbon in the yttrium, hafnium, tantalum, tungsten and platinum implanted specimens, as well as titanium implanted samples. A large amount of oxygen was observed in the yttrium implanted specimen. The friction coefficient was measured by reciprocating sliding of an unimplanted 440C ball without lubricant at a load of 0.245 N. The friction decreased and achieved a stable state after implantation of titanium, hafnium and tantalum. The friction coefficient of the platinum implanted specimen showed a gradual decrease after several cycles of sliding at high friction coefficient. The yttrium implanted sample exhibited a decreased but slightly unstable friction coefficient. Results from EPMA showed that the implanted elements, which gave decreased friction, remained even after sliding of 200 cycles. Implantation of chromium, molybdenum, silver and tungsten did not provide a decrease in friction and the implants were gone from the wear grooves after the sliding tests. (orig.)

  18. Measurement of 160Tb and 161Tb in nuclear forensics samples

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jiang, J.; Davies, A.V.; Britton, R.E.

    2017-01-01

    160 Tb and 161 Tb are important radionuclides to measure when analysing a Nuclear Forensics sample. An analytical method for the measurement of both 160 Tb and 161 Tb was developed in this study. Terbium was separated and purified using exchange resin and TrisKem LN Resin. The purified fraction containing 160 Tb and 161 Tb was measured by gamma spectrometry and liquid scintillation counting. The counting efficiencies of 160 Tb and 161 Tb were determined using the CIEMAT/NIST efficiency tracing method. The LSC count rate ratio, R160 Tb /R161 Tb , on the reference date was determined by sequential counting and calculated using a custom script based on their half-lives. (author)

  19. Circulating Glucagon 1-61 Regulates Blood Glucose by Increasing Insulin Secretion and Hepatic Glucose Production

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Wewer Albrechtsen, Nicolai J.; Kuhre, Rune E.; Hornburg, Daniel

    2017-01-01

    that PG 1-61 dose-dependently increases levels of cAMP, through the glucagon receptor, and increases insulin secretion and protein levels of enzymes regulating glycogenolysis and gluconeogenesis. In rats, PG 1-61 increases blood glucose and plasma insulin and decreases plasma levels of amino acids in......Glucagon is secreted from pancreatic α cells, and hypersecretion (hyperglucagonemia) contributes to diabetic hyperglycemia. Molecular heterogeneity in hyperglucagonemia is poorly investigated. By screening human plasma using high-resolution-proteomics, we identified several glucagon variants, among...... which proglucagon 1-61 (PG 1-61) appears to be the most abundant form. PG 1-61 is secreted in subjects with obesity, both before and after gastric bypass surgery, with protein and fat as the main drivers for secretion before surgery, but glucose after. Studies in hepatocytes and in β cells demonstrated...

  20. 34 CFR 403.161 - How must funds be used under the Comprehensive Career Guidance and Counseling Programs?

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... Guidance and Counseling Programs? 403.161 Section 403.161 Education Regulations of the Offices of the... the Special Programs? Comprehensive Career Guidance and Counseling Programs § 403.161 How must funds be used under the Comprehensive Career Guidance and Counseling Programs? (a) A State shall use not...

  1. 33 CFR 165.161 - Safety zones: Coast Guard Captain of the Port New York annual fireworks displays.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... of the Port New York annual fireworks displays. 165.161 Section 165.161 Navigation and Navigable... Coast Guard District § 165.161 Safety zones: Coast Guard Captain of the Port New York annual fireworks displays. (a) Safety zones. The following areas are designated safety zones: (1) Bar Beach fireworks...

  2. Mechanistic Studies of Hafnium-Pyridyl Amido-Catalyzed 1-Octene Polymerization and Chain Transfer Using Quench-Labeling Methods.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cueny, Eric S; Johnson, Heather C; Anding, Bernie J; Landis, Clark R

    2017-08-30

    Chromophore quench-labeling applied to 1-octene polymerization as catalyzed by hafnium-pyridyl amido precursors enables quantification of the amount of active catalyst and observation of the molecular weight distribution (MWD) of Hf-bound polymers via UV-GPC analysis. Comparison of the UV-detected MWD with the MWD of the "bulk" (all polymers, from RI-GPC analysis) provides important mechanistic information. The time evolution of the dual-detection GPC data, concentration of active catalyst, and monomer consumption suggests optimal activation conditions for the Hf pre-catalyst in the presence of the activator [Ph 3 C][B(C 6 F 5 ) 4 ]. The chromophore quench-labeling agents do not react with the chain-transfer agent ZnEt 2 under the reaction conditions. Thus, Hf-bound polymeryls are selectively labeled in the presence of zinc-polymeryls. Quench-labeling studies in the presence of ZnEt 2 reveal that ZnEt 2 does not influence the rate of propagation at the Hf center, and chain transfer of Hf-bound polymers to ZnEt 2 is fast and quasi-irreversible. The quench-label techniques represent a means to study commercial polymerization catalysts that operate with high efficiency at low catalyst concentrations without the need for specialized equipment.

  3. An Auger electron spectroscopy study on the anodization process of high-quality thin-film capacitors made of hafnium

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Noya, Atsushi; Sasaki, Katsutaka; Umezawa, Toshiji

    1989-01-01

    Formation process of the anodic oxide film of hafnium for use as a thin-film capacitor has been examined by the current-voltage characteristics of the anodization and the in-depth analysis of formed oxide using Auger electron spectroscopy. It is found that the oxide growth obeys three different rate laws such as the linear rate law at first and next the parabolic rate law during the constant current anodization, and then the reciprocal logarithmic rate law during the constant voltage anodization following after the constant current process. From the Auger electron spectroscopy analysis, it is found that the shape of the compositional depth profile of the grown oxide film varies associating with the rate law of oxidation obeyed. The variation of depth profile correlating with the rate law is discussed with respect to each elementary process such as the transport and/or the reaction of chemical species interpreted from the over-all behavior of anodization process. It is revealed that the stoichiometric film having an interface with sharp transition, which is favorable for obtaining excellent electrical properties of the capacitor, can be obtained under the condition that the phase-boundary reaction is the rate-determining step of the anodization. The constant voltage anodization process also satisfies such circumstances and therefore can be favorable method for preparing highquality thin-film capacitors. (author)

  4. Evaluation and Enhancement of the Oxygen Reduction Reaction Activity on Hafnium Oxide Nanoparticles Assisted by L(+)-lysine

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chisaka, Mitsuharu; Itagaki, Noriaki

    2016-01-01

    Evaluation of the oxygen reduction reaction (ORR) on oxide compounds is difficult owing to the insulating nature of oxides. In this study, various amounts of L(+)-lysine were added to the precursor dispersion for the hydrothermal synthesis of hafnium oxide nanoparticles on reduced graphene oxide sheets (HfO_x–rGO) to coat the HfO_x catalysts with layers of carbon, thereby increasing the conductivity and number of active sites. When the mass ratio of L(+)-lysine to GO, R, was above 26, carbon layers were formed and the amount monotonically increased with increasing R, as noted by cyclic voltammogrametry. X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy and rotating disk electrode analyses revealed that pyrolysis produced ORR-active oxygen defects, whose formation was proposed to involve carbothermal reduction. When 53 ≤ R ≤ 210, HfO_x–rGO contained a similar amount of oxygen defects and ORR activity, as represented by an onset potential of 0.9 V versus the reversible hydrogen electrode in 0.1 mol dm"−"3 H_2SO_4. However, the number of active sites depended on R due to the amount of L(+)-lysine-derived carbon layers that increased both the number of active sites and resistivity towards oxygen diffusion.

  5. IER-297 CED-2: Final Design for Thermal/Epithermal eXperiments with Jemima Plates with Polyethylene and Hafnium

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nelson, A. J. [Lawrence Livermore National Lab. (LLNL), Livermore, CA (United States); Percher, C. M. [Lawrence Livermore National Lab. (LLNL), Livermore, CA (United States); Zywiec, W. J. [Lawrence Livermore National Lab. (LLNL), Livermore, CA (United States); Heinrichs, D. P. [Lawrence Livermore National Lab. (LLNL), Livermore, CA (United States)

    2018-01-11

    This report presents the final design (CED-2) for IER-297, and focuses on 15 critical configurations using highly enriched uranium (HEU) Jemima plates moderated by polyethylene with and without hafnium diluent. The goal of the U.S. Nuclear Criticality Safety Program’s Thermal/Epithermal eXperiments (TEX) is to design and conduct new critical experiments to address high priority nuclear data needs from the nuclear criticality safety and nuclear data communities, with special emphasis on intermediate energy (0.625 eV – 100 keV) assemblies that can be easily modified to include various high priority diluent materials. The TEX (IER 184) CED-1 Report [1], completed in 2012, demonstrated the feasibility of meeting the TEX goals with two existing NCSP fissile assets, plutonium Zero Power Physics Reactor (ZPPR) plates and highly enriched uranium (HEU) Jemima plates. The first set of TEX experiments will focus on using the plutonium ZPPR plates with polyethylene moderator and tantalum diluents.

  6. Trap state passivation improved hot-carrier instability by zirconium-doping in hafnium oxide in a nanoscale n-metal-oxide semiconductor-field effect transistors with high-k/metal gate

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Liu, Hsi-Wen; Tsai, Jyun-Yu; Liu, Kuan-Ju; Lu, Ying-Hsin; Chang, Ting-Chang; Chen, Ching-En; Tseng, Tseung-Yuen; Lin, Chien-Yu; Cheng, Osbert; Huang, Cheng-Tung; Ye, Yi-Han

    2016-01-01

    This work investigates the effect on hot carrier degradation (HCD) of doping zirconium into the hafnium oxide high-k layer in the nanoscale high-k/metal gate n-channel metal-oxide-semiconductor field-effect-transistors. Previous n-metal-oxide semiconductor-field effect transistor studies demonstrated that zirconium-doped hafnium oxide reduces charge trapping and improves positive bias temperature instability. In this work, a clear reduction in HCD is observed with zirconium-doped hafnium oxide because channel hot electron (CHE) trapping in pre-existing high-k bulk defects is the main degradation mechanism. However, this reduced HCD became ineffective at ultra-low temperature, since CHE traps in the deeper bulk defects at ultra-low temperature, while zirconium-doping only passivates shallow bulk defects.

  7. The low-energy β(-) and electron emitter (161)Tb as an alternative to (177)Lu for targeted radionuclide therapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lehenberger, Silvia; Barkhausen, Christoph; Cohrs, Susan; Fischer, Eliane; Grünberg, Jürgen; Hohn, Alexander; Köster, Ulli; Schibli, Roger; Türler, Andreas; Zhernosekov, Konstantin

    2011-08-01

    The low-energy β(-) emitter (161)Tb is very similar to (177)Lu with respect to half-life, beta energy and chemical properties. However, (161)Tb also emits a significant amount of conversion and Auger electrons. Greater therapeutic effect can therefore be expected in comparison to (177)Lu. It also emits low-energy photons that are useful for gamma camera imaging. The (160)Gd(n,γ)(161)Gd→(161)Tb production route was used to produce (161)Tb by neutron irradiation of massive (160)Gd targets (up to 40 mg) in nuclear reactors. A semiautomated procedure based on cation exchange chromatography was developed and applied to isolate no carrier added (n.c.a.) (161)Tb from the bulk of the (160)Gd target and from its stable decay product (161)Dy. (161)Tb was used for radiolabeling DOTA-Tyr3-octreotate; the radiolabeling profile was compared to the commercially available n.c.a. (177)Lu. A (161)Tb Derenzo phantom was imaged using a small-animal single-photon emission computed tomography camera. Up to 15 GBq of (161)Tb was produced by long-term irradiation of Gd targets. Using a cation exchange resin, we obtained 80%-90% of the available (161)Tb with high specific activity, radionuclide and chemical purity and in quantities sufficient for therapeutic applications. The (161)Tb obtained was of the quality required to prepare (161)Tb-DOTA-Tyr3-octreotate. We were able to produce (161)Tb in n.c.a. form by irradiating highly enriched (160)Gd targets; it can be obtained in the quantity and quality required for the preparation of (161)Tb-labeled therapeutic agents. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  8. Circulating Glucagon 1-61 Regulates Blood Glucose by Increasing Insulin Secretion and Hepatic Glucose Production

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nicolai J. Wewer Albrechtsen

    2017-11-01

    Full Text Available Glucagon is secreted from pancreatic α cells, and hypersecretion (hyperglucagonemia contributes to diabetic hyperglycemia. Molecular heterogeneity in hyperglucagonemia is poorly investigated. By screening human plasma using high-resolution-proteomics, we identified several glucagon variants, among which proglucagon 1-61 (PG 1-61 appears to be the most abundant form. PG 1-61 is secreted in subjects with obesity, both before and after gastric bypass surgery, with protein and fat as the main drivers for secretion before surgery, but glucose after. Studies in hepatocytes and in β cells demonstrated that PG 1-61 dose-dependently increases levels of cAMP, through the glucagon receptor, and increases insulin secretion and protein levels of enzymes regulating glycogenolysis and gluconeogenesis. In rats, PG 1-61 increases blood glucose and plasma insulin and decreases plasma levels of amino acids in vivo. We conclude that glucagon variants, such as PG 1-61, may contribute to glucose regulation by stimulating hepatic glucose production and insulin secretion.

  9. George de Hevesy (1885-1966). Discoverer of hafnium, founder of radioanalytical chemistry and X-ray fluorescence analysis and father of nuclear medicine

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Niese, Siegfried

    2017-01-01

    George de Hevesy known as discoverer of hafnium, founder of radioanalytical chemistry and X-ray fluorescence analysis and father of nuclear medicine has done important research work in inorganic, physical and radioanalytical and physiological chemistry as well as in geochemistry, radiation biology and medicine. When he must flee for political reasons from a country he must change his colleagues, his equipments, and the topic of his work. It is extremely surprising that he could receive important results under such circumstances even at an advanced age. (author)

  10. A spanish mineral of zirconium and hafnium. Separation of the two elements by liquid-liquid extraction, using tributyl phosphate as chelating agent

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ruiz Sanchez, F.; Cruz Castillo, F. de la; Fernandez Cellini, R.

    1962-01-01

    The zirconium and Hafnium oxides are obtained from a Spanish mineral of zircon with an average contest of 55% in ZrO 2 -HfO 2 . An alkaline fusion to open the mineral, followed by a purification by crystallization as (Zr O-Hf O)Cl 2 H 2 O or as (Zr-Hf) (SO 4 ) 2 . 4H 2 O, is used. A discussion of the best experimental conditions for opening the mineral and of the purification method is made. (Author) 45 refs

  11. A fast response hafnium selective polymeric membrane electrode based on N,N'-bis(α-methyl-salicylidene)-dipropylenetriamine as a neutral carrier

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rezaei, B.; Meghdadi, S.; Zarandi, R. Fazel

    2008-01-01

    In this study a new hafnium selective sensor was fabricated from polyvinylchloride (PVC) matrix membrane containing neutral carrier N,N'-bis(α-methyl-salicylidene)-dipropylenetriamine (Mesaldpt) as a new ionophore, sodium tetraphenyl borate (NaTPB) as anionic discriminator and dioctyl phthalate (DOP) as plasticizing solvent mediator in tetrahydrofuran solvent. The electrode exhibits Nernstian response for Hf 4+ (Hafnium(IV)) over a wide concentration range (2.0 x 10 -7 to 1.0 x 10 -1 M) with the determination coefficient of 0.9966 and slope of 15.1 ± 0.1 mV decades -1 . The limit of detection is 1.9 x 10 -7 M. The electrode has a fast response time of 18 s and a working pH range of 4-8. The proposed membrane shows excellent discriminating ability towards Hf 4+ ion with regard to several alkali, alkaline earth transition and heavy metal ions. It can be used over a period of 1.5 months with good reproducibility. It is successfully applied for direct determination of Hf 4+ in solutions by standard addition method for real sample analysis

  12. A fast response hafnium selective polymeric membrane electrode based on N,N'-bis({alpha}-methyl-salicylidene)-dipropylenetriamine as a neutral carrier

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rezaei, B. [Department of Chemistry, Isfahan University of Technology, Isfahan 84156-83111 (Iran, Islamic Republic of)], E-mail: rezaei@cc.iut.ac.ir; Meghdadi, S.; Zarandi, R. Fazel [Department of Chemistry, Isfahan University of Technology, Isfahan 84156-83111 (Iran, Islamic Republic of)

    2008-08-30

    In this study a new hafnium selective sensor was fabricated from polyvinylchloride (PVC) matrix membrane containing neutral carrier N,N'-bis({alpha}-methyl-salicylidene)-dipropylenetriamine (Mesaldpt) as a new ionophore, sodium tetraphenyl borate (NaTPB) as anionic discriminator and dioctyl phthalate (DOP) as plasticizing solvent mediator in tetrahydrofuran solvent. The electrode exhibits Nernstian response for Hf{sup 4+} (Hafnium(IV)) over a wide concentration range (2.0 x 10{sup -7} to 1.0 x 10{sup -1} M) with the determination coefficient of 0.9966 and slope of 15.1 {+-} 0.1 mV decades{sup -1}. The limit of detection is 1.9 x 10{sup -7} M. The electrode has a fast response time of 18 s and a working pH range of 4-8. The proposed membrane shows excellent discriminating ability towards Hf{sup 4+} ion with regard to several alkali, alkaline earth transition and heavy metal ions. It can be used over a period of 1.5 months with good reproducibility. It is successfully applied for direct determination of Hf{sup 4+} in solutions by standard addition method for real sample analysis.

  13. Percentages of CD4+CD161+ and CD4−CD8−CD161+ T Cells in the Synovial Fluid Are Correlated with Disease Activity in Rheumatoid Arthritis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jinlin Miao

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Objective. CD161 has been identified as a marker of human IL-17-producing T cells that are implicated in the pathogenesis of rheumatoid arthritis (RA. This study aimed to investigate the potential link between the percentage of CD161+ T cells and disease activity in RA patients. Methods. Peripheral blood (PB from 54 RA patients and 21 healthy controls was evaluated. Paired synovial fluid (SF (n = 17 was analyzed. CD161 expression levels on CD4+, CD8+, and CD4−CD8− T cells were assessed by flow cytometry. Results. The percentage of CD4+CD161+ T cells in RA SF was higher than RA PB, and it was positively correlated with DAS28, erythrocyte sedimentation rate (ESR, and C-reactive protein (CRP. CD4−CD8−CD161+ T cell percentage was decreased in RA PB and was further reduced in RA SF, and its level in SF was inversely correlated with DAS28, ESR, and CRP. However, CD8+CD161+ T cell percentage was neither changed in RA PB and SF nor correlated with disease activity indices. Conclusion. An increased CD4+CD161+ T cell percentage and a decreased CD4−CD8−CD161+ T cell percentage are present in RA SF and are associated with disease activity, and the accumulation of CD4+CD161+ T cells in SF may contribute to the local inflammation of RA.

  14. Energy Storage Analysis of a Mixed R161/MOF-5 Nanoparticle Nanofluid Based on Molecular Simulations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Qiang; Tang, Shengli; Li, Leilei

    2018-05-20

    The thermal properties of refrigerants can be modified by adding porous nanoparticles into them. Here, molecular simulations, including molecular dynamics and grand canonical Monte Carlo, were employed to study the thermal energy storage properties of an R161/MOF-5 nanofluid. The results show that the thermodynamic energy change of MOF-5 nanoparticles is linear to the temperature. The adsorption heat calculated by grand canonical Monte Carlo is close to that calculated by the Clausius⁻Clapeyron equation. Additionally, a negative enhancement of the thermal energy storage capacity of the R161/MOF-5 nanofluid is found near the phase transition area.

  15. CD3+CD8+CD161high Tc17 cells are depleted in HIV-infection

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Gaardbo, Julie Christine; Hartling, Hans Jakob; Thorsteinsson, Kristina

    2012-01-01

    CD8+ Tc17 cells with pro-inflammatory properties have only recently been acknowledged, and Tc17 cells in HIV-infection are undescribed. CD3+CD8+CD161 Tc17 cells and the production of Interleukin-17 were examined in untreated and treated HIV-infected patients, HIV-HCV co-infected patients...... and healthy controls. Depletion of CD3+CD8+CD161 Tc17 cells and diminished production of Interleukin-17 in HIV-infected patients was found. The level of Tc17 cells was associated with the level of the CD4+ count in treated patients....

  16. Evaluation and application of the low energy electron emitter 161Tb

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lehenberger, Silvia M.

    2010-01-01

    The low energy electron emitter 161 Tb was produced n.c.a. in quantities sufficient for therapeutic applications and successfully used for labeling of peptides and antibodies. Furthermore, these compounds have been compared to n.c.a. 177 Lu labeled mAbs via cell experiments, a radionuclide that is already used in clinical nuclear oncology.

  17. 46 CFR 161.002-10 - Automatic fire detecting system control unit.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 6 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Automatic fire detecting system control unit. 161.002-10...-10 Automatic fire detecting system control unit. (a) General. The fire detecting system control unit... and the battery to be charged. (h) Automatic fire detecting system, battery charging and control—(1...

  18. 20 CFR 702.161 - Liens against assets of insurance carriers and employers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... 20 Employees' Benefits 3 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Liens against assets of insurance carriers... AND PROCEDURE General Provisions Liens on Compensation § 702.161 Liens against assets of insurance..., be subrogated to all the rights of the person receiving such payments. The Secretary may institute...

  19. African Journal of Drug & Alcohol Studies, 16(1), 2017 Copyright ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    African Journal of Drug & Alcohol Studies, 16(1), 2017. Copyright © 2017 ... Linear regression showed that males are more likely to abuse alcohol than females. (β= -.17; t = -3.47; ..... gerians through depression, suicide, road traffic accidents ...

  20. 10 CFR 63.161 - Emergency plan for the geologic repository operations area through permanent closure.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    ... Planning Criteria § 63.161 Emergency plan for the geologic repository operations area through permanent... 10 Energy 2 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Emergency plan for the geologic repository operations area... may occur at the geologic repository operations area, at any time before permanent closure and...

  1. 40 CFR 65.161 - Continuous records and monitoring system data handling.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... section. (D) Owners and operators shall retain the current description of the monitoring system as long as... Routing to a Fuel Gas System or a Process § 65.161 Continuous records and monitoring system data handling...) Monitoring system breakdowns, repairs, preventive maintenance, calibration checks, and zero (low-level) and...

  2. 22 CFR 161.12 - Environmental effects abroad of major departmental actions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... 22 Foreign Relations 1 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Environmental effects abroad of major... Requirements of NEPA § 161.12 Environmental effects abroad of major departmental actions. Departmental officials shall analyze actions under their cognizance with due regard for the environmental effects in the...

  3. 9 CFR 161.4 - Suspension or revocation of veterinary accreditation; criminal and civil penalties.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    ... 9 Animals and Animal Products 1 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Suspension or revocation of veterinary... REVOCATION OF SUCH ACCREDITATION § 161.4 Suspension or revocation of veterinary accreditation; criminal and... to practice veterinary medicine in at least one State. (c) Accreditation shall be automatically...

  4. 27 CFR 31.161 - Conversion between metric and U.S. units.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... Wholesale Dealers' Records and Reports § 31.161 Conversion between metric and U.S. units. When liters are... number of cases to be converted, as follows: (a) If the conversion from liters to U.S. units is made... 27 Alcohol, Tobacco Products and Firearms 1 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Conversion between metric...

  5. An Amphiphysin-Like Domain in Fus2p Is Required for Rvs161p Interaction and Cortical Localization

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Richard A. Stein

    2016-02-01

    Full Text Available Cell–cell fusion fulfils essential roles in fertilization, development and tissue repair. In the budding yeast, Saccharomyces cerevisiae, fusion between two haploid cells of opposite mating type generates the diploid zygote. Fus2p is a pheromone-induced protein that regulates cell wall removal during mating. Fus2p shuttles from the nucleus to localize at the shmoo tip, bound to Rvs161p, an amphiphysin. However, Rvs161p independently binds a second amphiphysin, Rvs167p, playing an essential role in endocytosis. To understand the basis of the Fus2p–Rvs161p interaction, we analyzed Fus2p structural domains. A previously described N-terminal domain (NTD is necessary and sufficient to regulate nuclear/cytoplasmic trafficking of Fus2p. The Dbl homology domain (DBH binds GTP-bound Cdc42p; binding is required for cell fusion, but not localization. We identified an approximately 200 amino acid region of Fus2p that is both necessary and sufficient for Rvs161p binding. The Rvs161p binding domain (RBD contains three predicted alpha-helices; structural modeling suggests that the RBD adopts an amphiphysin-like structure. The RBD contains a 13-amino-acid region, conserved with Rvs161p and other amphiphysins, which is essential for binding. Mutations in the RBD, predicted to affect membrane binding, abolish cell fusion without affecting Rvs161p binding. We propose that Fus2p/Rvs161p form a novel heterodimeric amphiphysin required for cell fusion. Rvs161p binding is required but not sufficient for Fus2p localization. Mutations in the C-terminal domain (CTD of Fus2p block localization, but not Rvs161p binding, causing a significant defect in cell fusion. We conclude that the Fus2p CTD mediates an additional, Rvs161p-independent interaction at the shmoo tip.

  6. CD147-mediated chemotaxis of CD4+CD161+ T cells may contribute to local inflammation in rheumatoid arthritis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lv, Minghua; Miao, Jinlin; Zhao, Peng; Luo, Xing; Han, Qing; Wu, Zhenbiao; Zhang, Kui; Zhu, Ping

    2018-01-01

    CD161 is used as a surrogate marker for Th17 cells, which are implicated in the pathogenesis of rheumatoid arthritis (RA). In this study, we evaluated the percentage, clinical significance, and CD98 and CD147 expression of CD4 + CD161 + T cells. The potential role of CD147 and CD98 in cyclophilin A-induced chemotaxis of CD4 + CD161 + T cells was analyzed. Thirty-seven RA patients, 15 paired synovial fluid (SF) of RA, and 22 healthy controls were recruited. The cell populations and surface expression of CD98 and CD147 were analyzed by flow cytometry. Spearman's rank correlation coefficient and multiple linear regression were applied to calculate the correlations. Chemotaxis assay was used to investigate CD4 + CD161 + T cell migration. We found that the percentage of CD4 + CD161 + T cells and their expression of CD147 and CD98 in SF were higher than in the peripheral blood of RA patients. Percentage of SF CD4 + CD161 + T cells was positively correlated with 28-Joint Disease Activity Score (DAS28). CD147 monoclonal antibody (HAb18) attenuated the chemotactic ability of CD4 + CD161 + T cells. An increased CD4 + CD161 + T cell percentage and expression of CD147 and CD98 were shown in RA SF. Percentage of SF CD4 + CD161 + T cells can be used as a predictive marker of disease activity in RA. CD147 block significantly decreased the chemotactic index of CD4 + CD161 + cells induced by cyclophilin A (CypA). These results imply that the accumulation of CD4 + CD161 + T cells in SF and their high expression of CD147 may be associated with CypA-mediated chemotaxis and contribute to local inflammation in RA.

  7. Metallorganic chemical vapor deposition and atomic layer deposition approaches for the growth of hafnium-based thin films from dialkylamide precursors for advanced CMOS gate stack applications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Consiglio, Steven P.

    To continue the rapid progress of the semiconductor industry as described by Moore's Law, the feasibility of new material systems for front end of the line (FEOL) process technologies needs to be investigated, since the currently employed polysilicon/SiO2-based transistor system is reaching its fundamental scaling limits. Revolutionary breakthroughs in complementary-metal-oxide-semiconductor (CMOS) technology were recently announced by Intel Corporation and International Business Machines Corporation (IBM), with both organizations revealing significant progress in the implementation of hafnium-based high-k dielectrics along with metal gates. This announcement was heralded by Gordon Moore as "...the biggest change in transistor technology since the introduction of polysilicon gate MOS transistors in the late 1960s." Accordingly, the study described herein focuses on the growth of Hf-based dielectrics and Hf-based metal gates using chemical vapor-based deposition methods, specifically metallorganic chemical vapor deposition (MOCVD) and atomic layer deposition (ALD). A family of Hf source complexes that has received much attention recently due to their desirable properties for implementation in wafer scale manufacturing is the Hf dialkylamide precursors. These precursors are room temperature liquids and possess sufficient volatility and desirable decomposition characteristics for both MOCVD and ALD processing. Another benefit of using these sources is the existence of chemically compatible Si dialkylamide sources as co-precursors for use in Hf silicate growth. The first part of this study investigates properties of MOCVD-deposited HfO2 and HfSixOy using dimethylamido Hf and Si precursor sources using a customized MOCVD reactor. The second part of this study involves a study of wet and dry surface pre-treatments for ALD growth of HfO2 using tetrakis(ethylmethylamido)hafnium in a wafer scale manufacturing environment. The third part of this study is an investigation of

  8. 28 CFR 0.161 - Acceptance of certain offers by the Deputy Attorney General or Associate Attorney General, as...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... Deputy Attorney General or Associate Attorney General, as appropriate. 0.161 Section 0.161 Judicial... certain offers by the Deputy Attorney General or Associate Attorney General, as appropriate. (a) In all... § 0.160, the Assistant Attorney General concerned shall, when he is of the opinion that the proposed...

  9. 77 FR 28406 - 161st Meeting of the Advisory Council on Employee Welfare and Pension Benefit Plans; Notice of...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-05-14

    ... DEPARTMENT OF LABOR Employee Benefits Security Administration 161st Meeting of the Advisory Council on Employee Welfare and Pension Benefit Plans; Notice of Meeting Pursuant to the authority... 161st open meeting of the Advisory Council on Employee Welfare and Pension Benefit Plans (also known as...

  10. 42 CFR 84.161 - Man test for gases and vapors; Type B and Type BE respirators; test requirements.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-01

    ... 42 Public Health 1 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Man test for gases and vapors; Type B and Type BE respirators; test requirements. 84.161 Section 84.161 Public Health PUBLIC HEALTH SERVICE, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES OCCUPATIONAL SAFETY AND HEALTH RESEARCH AND RELATED ACTIVITIES APPROVAL OF RESPIRATORY PROTECTIVE DEVICES Supplied-Air...

  11. Peripheral blood CD161+ T cells from asthmatic patients are activated during asthma attack and predominantly produce IFN-gamma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    González-Hernández, Y; Pedraza-Sánchez, S; Blandón-Vijil, V; del Río-Navarro, B E; Vaughan, G; Moreno-Lafont, M; Escobar-Gutiérrez, A

    2007-04-01

    In humans, T cells expressing the CD161 molecule NKR-P1A constitute around 20% of the circulating CD3(+) cells and are potentially immunoregulatory in several diseases. Their role in asthma is not well known, but they could participate in asthma attacks. To determinate whether activation of CD161(+) T cells and their cytokine production correlate with clinical status of asthma, we analysed blood samples from asthma attack patients (AAP) and stable asthma patients (SAP) in comparison with healthy non-atopic controls (HC). There was a significant higher baseline expression of CD69 on T cells from AAP and the difference was more notorious on CD161(+) T cells; upregulation of CD69 was observed on both CD161(-) and CD161(+) T cells driven by Dermatophagoides pteronyssinus crude extract, whereas polyclonal stimulation with phorbol 12-myristate 13-acetate plus ionomycin predominantly induced IFN-gamma but no IL-4, IL-5 and IL-13 by CD161(+) T cells in all groups; upon polyclonal stimulation, there were more CD161(+) T cells producing IFN-gamma and less CD161(-) T cells producing this cytokine, contrasting with the opposite results observed in SAP and HC groups. Our results indicate that, during asthma attack, CD161(+) T cells are activated and are able to produce predominantly IFN-gamma but no Th2 cytokines. We hypothesize that during an asthma attack, IFN-gamma produced by CD161(+) T cells could help to reestablish the Th1/Th2 equilibrium. These observations may contribute to the understanding of the immune mechanisms involved in asthma attacks.

  12. 161 | Page

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Fr. Ikenga

    the definition limits the understanding of a region to a country and does not in any way ..... in Nigeria under the Presidential Constitution (London: Sweet & Maxwell, 1983) pp. .... Sani Abacha & 3 Ors. v Chief Gani Fawehinmi.78 In that case, the.

  13. PRODUCTION OF HAFNIUM METAL

    Science.gov (United States)

    Elger, G.W.; Boubel, R.W.

    1963-01-01

    This patent deals with a process of producing pure Hf metal from oxygen- contaminated gaseous Hf chloride. The oxygen compounds in the chioride gas are halogenated by contacting the gas at elevated temperature with Cl/sub 2/ in the presence of C. The Hf chloride, still in gaseous form, is contacted with molten Mg whereby Hf metal is formed and condensed on the Mg. (AEC)

  14. The unpaired spectroscopy of sup 161,162 Er at spins up to 50 Dirac h

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Riley, M.A.; Roberts, J.W.; Alderson, A.; Ali, I.; Cullen, D.M.; Fallon, P.; Forsyth, P.D.; Sharpey-Schafer, J.F. (Liverpool Univ. (UK). Oliver Lodge Lab.); Simpson, J.; Bentley, M.A.; Bruce, A.M. (Science and Engineering Research Council, Daresbury (UK). Daresbury Lab.); Chapman, R.; Lisle, J.C.; Mo, J.N. (Manchester Univ. (UK). Schuster Lab.)

    1990-12-24

    High spin states in {sup 161}Er and {sup 162}Er have been populated using the {sup 130}Te+{sup 36}S reaction at a bombarding energy of 170 MeV. In {sup 161}Er, three rotational bands were extended from I {approx equal} 35{Dirac h} to I {approx equal} 50{Dirac h}. In {sup 162}Er the positive parity yrast band was observed to I=44{Dirac h}. These rotational sequences are compared to a simple unpaired model which was successful in predicting the behaviour of similar high spin data on {sup 159,160}Er. These studies of the light Er isotopes constitute the highest spins observed in normal deformed nuclei and yield direct and specific information on the single-neutron spectrum of states. (orig.).

  15. Hindered El Transitions in Eu{sup 155} and Tb{sup 161}

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Malmskog, Sven G

    1965-02-15

    The absolute E1 transition probabilities from the 3/2{sup +} (411), 5/2{sup -} (532) and 7/2{sup -} (523) single particle levels in Eu{sup 155} and Tb{sup 161} have been measured by the method of delayed coincidences. This gave half lives of T{sub 1/2} < 0.2 ns and T{sub 1/2} = (1.38 {+-} 0.06) ns for the 104.4 and 246 keV levels in Eu{sup 155}. T{sub 1/2} = (0.84 {+-} 0.04) ns and T{sub 1/2} < 0. 2 ns for the 417.6 and 480.6 keV levels in Tb{sup 161}. The result has been compared with the calculations of a single particle in a deformed potential made by Nilsson.

  16. Competitor presence reduces internal attentional focus and improves 16.1km cycling time trial performance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Williams, Emily L; Jones, Hollie S; Andy Sparks, S; Marchant, David C; Midgley, Adrian W; Mc Naughton, Lars R

    2015-07-01

    Whilst the presence of a competitor has been found to improve performance, the mechanisms influencing the change in selected work rates during direct competition have been suggested but not specifically assessed. The aim was to investigate the physiological and psychological influences of a visual avatar competitor during a 16.1-km cycling time trial performance, using trained, competitive cyclists. Randomised cross-over design. Fifteen male cyclists completed four 16.1km cycling time trials on a cycle ergometer, performing two with a visual display of themselves as a simulated avatar (FAM and SELF), one with no visual display (DO), and one with themselves and an opponent as simulated avatars (COMP). Participants were informed the competitive avatar was a similar ability cyclist but it was actually a representation of their fastest previous performance. Increased performance times were evident during COMP (27.8±2.0min) compared to SELF (28.7±1.9min) and DO (28.4±2.3min). Greater power output, speed and heart rate were apparent during COMP trial than SELF (pperformance. Competitive cyclists performed significantly faster during a 16.1-km competitive trial than when performing maximally, without a competitor. The improvement in performance was elicited due to a greater external distraction, deterring perceived exertion. Copyright © 2014 Sports Medicine Australia. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  17. Expression of LLT1 and its receptor CD161 in lung cancer is associated with better clinical outcome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Braud, Véronique M; Biton, Jérôme; Becht, Etienne; Knockaert, Samantha; Mansuet-Lupo, Audrey; Cosson, Estelle; Damotte, Diane; Alifano, Marco; Validire, Pierre; Anjuère, Fabienne; Cremer, Isabelle; Girard, Nicolas; Gossot, Dominique; Seguin-Givelet, Agathe; Dieu-Nosjean, Marie-Caroline; Germain, Claire

    2018-01-01

    Co-stimulatory and inhibitory receptors expressed by immune cells in the tumor microenvironment modulate the immune response and cancer progression. Their expression and regulation are still not fully characterized and a better understanding of these mechanisms is needed to improve current immunotherapies. Our previous work has identified a novel ligand/receptor pair, LLT1/CD161, that modulates immune responses. Here, we extensively characterize its expression in non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC). We show that LLT1 expression is restricted to germinal center (GC) B cells within tertiary lymphoid structures (TLS), representing a new hallmark of the presence of active TLS in the tumor microenvironment. CD161-expressing immune cells are found at the vicinity of these structures, with a global enrichment of NSCLC tumors in CD161 + CD4 + and CD8 + T cells as compared to normal distant lung and peripheral blood. CD161 + CD4 + T cells are more activated and produce Th1-cytokines at a higher frequency than their matched CD161-negative counterparts. Interestingly, CD161 + CD4 + T cells highly express OX40 co-stimulatory receptor, less frequently 4-1BB, and display an activated but not completely exhausted PD-1-positive Tim-3-negative phenotype. Finally, a meta-analysis revealed a positive association of CLEC2D (coding for LLT1) and KLRB1 (coding for CD161) gene expression with favorable outcome in NSCLC, independently of the size of T and B cell infiltrates. These data are consistent with a positive impact of LLT1/CD161 on NSCLC patient survival, and make CD161-expressing CD4 + T cells ideal candidates for efficient anti-tumor recall responses.

  18. Effects of oxygen partial pressure and annealing temperature on the residual stress of hafnium oxide thin-films on silicon using synchrotron-based grazing incidence X-ray diffraction

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Biswas, Debaleen [Saha Institute of Nuclear Physics, 1/AF Bidhannagar, Kolkata 700 064 (India); Sinha, Anil Kumar [ISU, Raja Ramanna Centre for Advanced Technology, Indore 452 013 (India); Homi Bhabha National Institute, BARC, Mumbai 400 094 (India); Chakraborty, Supratic, E-mail: supratic.chakraborty@saha.ac.in [Saha Institute of Nuclear Physics, 1/AF Bidhannagar, Kolkata 700 064 (India)

    2016-10-30

    Highlights: • Residual stress estimation thin hafnium oxide film with thickness of <10 nm. • A mathematical expression is proposed for stress estimation of thin-film using GIXRD. • Residual stress varies with argon content in Ar/O{sub 2} plasma and annealing temperature. • Variation of stress is explained by IL swelling and enhanced structural relaxation. - Abstract: Synchrotron radiation-based grazing incidence X-ray diffraction (GI-XRD) technique is employed here to estimate the residual stress of < 10 nm thin hafnium oxide film deposited on Si (100) substrate at different argon/oxygen ratios using reactive rf sputtering. A decrease in residual stress, tensile in nature, is observed at higher annealing temperature for the samples deposited with increasing argon ratio in the Ar/O{sub 2} plasma. The residual stress of the films deposited at higher p{sub Ar} (Ar:O{sub 2} = 4:1) is also found to be decreased with increasing annealing temperature. But the stress is more or less constant with annealing temperature for the films deposited at lower Ar/O{sub 2} (1:4) ratio. All the above phenomena can be explained on the basis of swelling of the interfacial layer and enhanced structural relaxation in the presence of excess Hf in hafnium oxide film during deposition.

  19. Contribution towards ALD and MOCVD of rare earth oxides and hafnium oxide. From precursor evaluation to process development and thin film characterization

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Xu, Ke

    2013-01-01

    elements for ALD applications. A possible synthesis route is the salt metatheses route. It could be expected that the monodentate guanidine ligand would provide increased reactivity towards water, where the bulky guanidine ligands will shield the RE center providing self-limiting growth behavior. In Chapter 4 and 7, ALD of rare earth oxides and hafnium oxide using corresponding guanidinate precursors are in detail investigated. According to the measurements, these processes are true ALD processes with broad ALD windows, high growth per cycle in the saturated area. Furthermore, the rare earth guanidinate and hafnium guanidinate precursors exhibit matching ALD window in the temperature range of 200 - 225 C. This motivated us to deposite trinary oxide thin films (HfREOx) using corresponding precursor combinations.

  20. Participation of CD161(+) and invariant natural killer T cells in pediatric asthma exacerbations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carpio-Pedroza, Juan C; Vaughan, Gilberto; del Rio-Navarro, Blanca E; del Río-Chivardí, Jaime M; Vergara-Castañeda, Arely; Jiménez-Zamudio, Luis A; Morales-Flores, Amelia; Rodríguez-Moreno, Guadalupe; Ruiz-Tovar, Karina; Fonseca-Coronado, Salvador; Gonçalves Rossi, Livia M; Escobar-Gutiérrez, Alejandro

    2013-01-01

    Asthma has been defined as a disease of chronic airway inflammation in which many cells and cellular products participate with variable degrees of airflow obstruction and hyperresponsiveness that lead to recurrent episodes of wheezing, breathlessness, chest tightness, and coughing. Prominent among these cellular elements are two cell types referred to as the invariant natural killer T (iNKT) cells and a subpopulation of T cells expressing the molecule CD161, which are both thought to play a role in the pathogenesis of asthma. Although the presence of iNKT and other CD161(+) cells in murine models has been associated with asthma, relatively few studies have been performed in the adult patient with asthma that have been often conflicting and even fewer studies are available in children. The present study was performed to investigate the peripheral blood frequencies of iNKT and CD161(+) T cells in children with asthma. A total of 35 children, 19 stable asthmatic patients, 6 who had experienced an asthmatic attack within 24 hours and had not received any treatment, and 10 healthy controls, aged 6-12 years, were enrolled in the study. iNKT and CD161(+) T-cell frequencies in blood were measured together with quantitative levels of IL-4 and interferon (IFN) γ using a cytofluorimetric approach. The results show that iNKT cells are increased in pediatric asthmatic patients undergoing exacerbations of asthma. These cells also produced less IFN-γ and more IL-4 than children with stable asthma and in healthy control children. These results suggest that iNKT cells might participate in the development of the asthmatic exacerbations. The increased production of IL-4 in conjunction with the decrease of IFN-γ may be mechanistically responsible, at least partially, for the heightening of the immunologic response leading to the asthmatic attack in children. Knowledge of these interactive mechanisms involving the iNKT cell and our understanding of its role in the exacerbation of

  1. A 16:1 Serializer ASIC for Data Transmission at 5 Gbps

    CERN Document Server

    Gong, D; The ATLAS collaboration

    2010-01-01

    A high speed, low power 16:1 serializer has been developed with a commercial 0.25 μm silicon-on-sapphire CMOS technology. The serializer operates from 4.0 to 5.7 Gbps. Total jitter is 62 ps and the eye openning of the bathtub curve is 122 ps at bit rate error of 10-12 at 5 Gbps. Power consumption is 463 mW at 5 Gbps. A proton beam test indicates the serializer is suitable for applications in high energy physics experiments.

  2. A 16:1 Serializer ASIC for Data Transmission at 5 Gbps

    CERN Document Server

    Gong, D; The ATLAS collaboration

    2010-01-01

    A high speed, low power 16:1 serializer is developed using a commercial 0.25 μm silicon-on-sapphire CMOS technology. It operates from 4.0 to 5.8 Gbps in the lab test. Its total jitter is measured to be 62 ps and the bathtub scan demonstrates a 122 ps opening at BER of less than 10-12 level at 5 Gbps. The measured power consumption is 507 mW at this data rate. A proton test of this chip is scheduled in June and test results will be discussed when available.

  3. Thermodynamic analysis and experimental investigation of a Solo V161 Stirling cogeneration unit

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rogdakis, E.D.; Antonakos, G.D.; Koronaki, I.P.

    2012-01-01

    In order to investigate the Stirling engine implementation technology, a Solo Stirling Engine V161 cogeneration module has been installed at the Laboratory of Applied Thermodynamics of National Technical University of Athens. A special thermodynamic analysis of the engine's performance has been conducted introducing and utilizing specially designed computing codes along with the thermal balance study of the unit. Measurements were conducted under different operational conditions concerning various heat load stages of the engine, working pressure, as well as electric power production. Analysis of the experimental results has shown that the overall performance of the Stirling unit proved very promising and quite adequate for various areal applications, equally competing with other CHP systems. The performance of the unit experienced significant stability all over the operating range. The power stand ratio 0.35 differentiates Stirling cogeneration units from others that use diverging technologies significantly. The energy savings using a Stirling CHP unit, in respect to the concurrent use of a thermal and an electrical system at the same equivalent power has revealed 36.8%. -- Highlights: ► Thermodynamic analysis of an a-type Stirling engine. ► Development of generated electrical and thermal power of the m-CHP Solo Stirling Unit to engine's load comparison. ► Stirling m-CHP until heat balance analysis. ► Evaluation of the Solo Stirling V161 unit efficiency.

  4. β-decay spectroscopy of neutron-rich 160,161,162Sm isotopes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Patel Z.

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Neutron-rich 160,161,162Sm isotopes have been populated at the RIBF, RIKEN via β first time. β-coincident γ rays were observed in all three isotopes including γ rays from the isomeric decay of 160Sm and 162Sm. The isomers in 160Sm and 162Sm have previously been observed but have been populated via β decay for the first time. The isomeric state in 162Sm is assigned a 4−v72+[ 633 ]⊗v12−[ 521 ]${4^ - }v{{7 \\over 2}^ + }\\left[ {633} \\right] \\otimes v{{1 \\over 2}^ - }\\left[ {521} \\right]$ configuration based on the decay pattern. The level schemes of 160Sm and 162Sm are presented. The ground states in the parent nuclei 160Pm and 162Pm are both assigned a 6−v72+[633]⊗π52−[532]${6^ - }v{{7 \\over 2}^ + }\\left[ {633} \\right] \\otimes \\pi {{5 \\over 2}^ - }\\left[ {532} \\right]$ configuration based on the population of states in the daughter nuclei. Blocked BCS calculations were performed to further investigate the spin-parities of the ground states in 160Pm, 161Pm, and 162Pm, and the isomeric state in 162Sm

  5. Effect of Advanced Plasma Source bias voltage on properties of HfO2 films prepared by plasma ion assisted electron evaporation from metal hafnium

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zhu, Meiping; Yi, Kui; Arhilger, Detlef; Qi, Hongji; Shao, Jianda

    2013-01-01

    HfO 2 films, using metal hafnium as starting material, are deposited by plasma-ion assisted electron evaporation with different Advanced Plasma Source (APS) bias voltages. The refractive index and extinction coefficient are calculated, the chemical state and composition, as well as the stress and aging behavior is investigated. Laser induced damage threshold (LIDT) and damage mechanism are also evaluated and discussed. Optical, structural, mechanical and laser induced damage properties of HfO 2 films are found to be sensitive to APS bias voltage. The film stress can be tuned by varying the APS bias voltage. Damage morphologies indicate the LIDT of the HfO 2 films at 1064 nm and 532 nm are dominated by the nodular-defect density in coatings, while the 355 nm LIDT is dominated by the film absorption. HfO 2 films with higher 1064 nm LIDT than samples evaporated from hafnia are achieved with bias voltage of 100 V. - Highlights: • HfO 2 films are evaporated with different Advanced Plasma Source (APS) bias voltages. • Properties of HfO 2 films are sensitive to APS bias voltage. • With a bias voltage of 100 V, HfO 2 coatings without any stress can be achieved. • Higher 1064 nm laser induced damage threshold is achieved at a bias voltage of 100 V

  6. Design of an Extractive Distillation Column for the Environmentally Benign Separation of Zirconium and Hafnium Tetrachloride for Nuclear Power Reactor Applications

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Le Quang Minh

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available Nuclear power with strengthened safety regulations continues to be used as an important resource in the world for managing atmospheric greenhouse gases and associated climate change. This study examined the environmentally benign separation of zirconium tetrachloride (ZrCl4 and hafnium tetrachloride (HfCl4 for nuclear power reactor applications through extractive distillation using a NaCl-KCl molten salt mixture. The vapor–liquid equilibrium behavior of ZrCl4 and HfCl4 over the molten salt system was correlated with Raoult’s law. The molten salt-based extractive distillation column was designed optimally using a rigorous commercial simulator for the feasible separation of ZrCl4 and HfCl4. The molten salt-based extractive distillation approach has many potential advantages for the commercial separation of ZrCl4 and HfCl4 compared to the conventional distillation because of its milder temperatures and pressure conditions, smaller number of required separation trays in the column, and lower energy requirement for separation, while still taking the advantage of environmentally benign feature by distillation. A heat-pump-assisted configuration was also explored to improve the energy efficiency of the extractive distillation process. The proposed enhanced configuration reduced the energy requirement drastically. Extractive distillation can be a promising option competing with the existing extraction-based separation process for zirconium purification for nuclear power reactor applications.

  7. A silicon doped hafnium oxide ferroelectric p–n–p–n SOI tunneling field–effect transistor with steep subthreshold slope and high switching state current ratio

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Saeid Marjani

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available In this paper, a silicon–on–insulator (SOI p–n–p–n tunneling field–effect transistor (TFET with a silicon doped hafnium oxide (Si:HfO2 ferroelectric gate stack is proposed and investigated via 2D device simulation with a calibrated nonlocal band–to–band tunneling model. Utilization of Si:HfO2 instead of conventional perovskite ferroelectrics such as lead zirconium titanate (PbZrTiO3 and strontium bismuth tantalate (SrBi2Ta2O9 provides compatibility to the CMOS process as well as improved device scalability. By using Si:HfO2 ferroelectric gate stack, the applied gate voltage is effectively amplified that causes increased electric field at the tunneling junction and reduced tunneling barrier width. Compared with the conventional p–n–p–n SOI TFET, the on–state current and switching state current ratio are appreciably increased; and the average subthreshold slope (SS is effectively reduced. The simulation results of Si:HfO2 ferroelectric p–n–p–n SOI TFET show significant improvement in transconductance (∼9.8X enhancement at high overdrive voltage and average subthreshold slope (∼35% enhancement over nine decades of drain current at room temperature, indicating that this device is a promising candidate to strengthen the performance of p–n–p–n and conventional TFET for a switching performance.

  8. L2₁ and XA Ordering Competition in Hafnium-Based Full-Heusler Alloys Hf₂VZ (Z = Al, Ga, In, Tl, Si, Ge, Sn, Pb).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Xiaotian; Cheng, Zhenxiang; Wang, Wenhong

    2017-10-20

    For theoretical designing of full-Heusler based spintroinc materials, people have long believed in the so-called Site Preference Rule (SPR). Very recently, according to the SPR, there are several studies on XA-type Hafnium-based Heusler alloys X₂YZ, i.e., Hf₂VAl, Hf₂CoZ (Z = Ga, In) and Hf₂CrZ (Z = Al, Ga, In). In this work, a series of Hf₂-based Heusler alloys, Hf₂VZ (Z = Al, Ga, In, Tl, Si, Ge, Sn, Pb), were selected as targets to study the site preferences of their atoms by first-principle calculations. It has been found that all of them are likely to exhibit the L2₁-type structure instead of the XA one. Furthermore, we reveal that the high values of spin-polarization of XA-type Hf₂VZ (Z = Al, Ga, In, Tl, Si, Ge, Sn, Pb) alloys have dropped dramatically when they form the L2₁-type structure. Also, we prove that the electronic, magnetic, and physics nature of these alloys are quite different, depending on the L2₁-type or XA-type structures.

  9. A de-novo interstitial microduplication involving 2p16.1-p15 and mirroring 2p16.1-p15 microdeletion syndrome: Clinical and molecular analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mimouni-Bloch, Aviva; Yeshaya, Josepha; Kahana, Sarit; Maya, Idit; Basel-Vanagaite, Lina

    2015-11-01

    Microdeletions of various sizes in the 2p16.1-p15 chromosomal region have been grouped together under the 2p16.1-p15 microdeletion syndrome. Children with this syndrome generally share certain features including microcephaly, developmental delay, facial dysmorphism, urogenital and skeletal abnormalities. We present a child with a de-novo interstitial 1665 kb duplication of 2p16.1-p15. Clinical features of this child are distinct from those of children with the 2p16.1-p15 microdeletion syndrome, specifically the head circumference which is within the normal range and mild intellectual disability with absence of autistic behaviors. Microduplications many times bear milder clinical phenotypes in comparison with corresponding microdeletion syndromes. Indeed, as compared to the microdeletion syndrome patients, the 2p16.1-p15 microduplication seems to have a milder cognitive effect and no effect on other body systems. Limited information available in genetic databases about cases with overlapping duplications indicates that they all have abnormal developmental phenotypes. The involvement of genes in this location including BCL11A, USP34 and PEX13, affecting fundamental developmental processes both within and outside the nervous system may explain the clinical features of the individual described in this report. Copyright © 2015 European Paediatric Neurology Society. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  10. Innate signals overcome acquired TCR signaling pathway regulation and govern the fate of human CD161(hi) CD8α⁺ semi-invariant T cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Turtle, Cameron J; Delrow, Jeff; Joslyn, Rochelle C; Swanson, Hillary M; Basom, Ryan; Tabellini, Laura; Delaney, Colleen; Heimfeld, Shelly; Hansen, John A; Riddell, Stanley R

    2011-09-08

    Type 17 programmed CD161(hi)CD8α(+) T cells contribute to mucosal immunity to bacteria and yeast. In early life, microbial colonization induces proliferation of CD161(hi) cells that is dependent on their expression of a semi-invariant Vα7.2(+) TCR. Although prevalent in adults, CD161(hi)CD8α(+) cells exhibit weak proliferative and cytokine responses to TCR ligation. The mechanisms responsible for the dichotomous response of neonatal and adult CD161(hi) cells, and the signals that enable their effector function, have not been established. We describe acquired regulation of TCR signaling in adult memory CD161(hi)CD8α(+) T cells that is absent in cord CD161(hi) cells and adult CD161(lo) cells. Regulated TCR signaling in CD161(hi) cells was due to profound alterations in TCR signaling pathway gene expression and could be overcome by costimulation through CD28 or innate cytokine receptors, which dictated the fate of their progeny. Costimulation with IL-1β during TCR ligation markedly increased proinflammatory IL-17 production, while IL-12-induced Tc1-like function and restored the response to TCR ligation without costimulation. CD161(hi) cells from umbilical cord blood and granulocyte colony stimulating factor-mobilized leukaphereses differed in frequency and function, suggesting future evaluation of the contribution of CD161(hi) cells in hematopoietic stem cell grafts to transplant outcomes is warranted.

  11. Hard-photon production at $\\sqrt{s}$ = 161 and 172 GeV at LEP

    CERN Document Server

    Acciarri, M; Aguilar-Benítez, M; Ahlen, S P; Alcaraz, J; Alemanni, G; Allaby, James V; Aloisio, A; Alverson, G; Alviggi, M G; Ambrosi, G; Anderhub, H; Andreev, V P; Angelescu, T; Anselmo, F; Arefev, A; Azemoon, T; Aziz, T; Bagnaia, P; Baksay, L; Banerjee, S; Banerjee, Sw; Banicz, K; Barczyk, A; Barillère, R; Barone, L; Bartalini, P; Baschirotto, A; Basile, M; Battiston, R; Bay, A; Becattini, F; Becker, U; Behner, F; Berdugo, J; Berges, P; Bertucci, B; Betev, B L; Bhattacharya, S; Biasini, M; Biland, A; Bilei, G M; Blaising, J J; Blyth, S C; Bobbink, Gerjan J; Böck, R K; Böhm, A; Boldizsar, L; Borgia, B; Bourilkov, D; Bourquin, Maurice; Braccini, S; Branson, J G; Brigljevic, V; Brock, I C; Buffini, A; Buijs, A; Burger, J D; Burger, W J; Busenitz, J K; Button, A M; Cai, X D; Campanelli, M; Capell, M; Cara Romeo, G; Carlino, G; Cartacci, A M; Casaus, J; Castellini, G; Cavallari, F; Cavallo, N; Cecchi, C; Cerrada-Canales, M; Cesaroni, F; Chamizo-Llatas, M; Chang, Y H; Chaturvedi, U K; Chekanov, S V; Chemarin, M; Chen, A; Chen, G; Chen, G M; Chen, H F; Chen, H S; Chéreau, X J; Chiefari, G; Chien, C Y; Cifarelli, Luisa; Cindolo, F; Civinini, C; Clare, I; Clare, R; Cohn, H O; Coignet, G; Colijn, A P; Colino, N; Commichau, V; Costantini, S; Cotorobai, F; de la Cruz, B; Csilling, Akos; Dai, T S; D'Alessandro, R; De Asmundis, R; Degré, A; Deiters, K; Della Volpe, D; Denes, P; De Notaristefani, F; DiBitonto, Daryl; Diemoz, M; Van Dierendonck, D N; Di Lodovico, F; Dionisi, C; Dittmar, Michael; Dominguez, A; Doria, A; Dova, M T; Duchesneau, D; Duinker, P; Durán, I; Dutta, S; Easo, S; Efremenko, Yu V; El-Mamouni, H; Engler, A; Eppling, F J; Erné, F C; Ernenwein, J P; Extermann, Pierre; Fabre, M; Faccini, R; Falciano, S; Favara, A; Fay, J; Fedin, O; Felcini, Marta; Fenyi, B; Ferguson, T; Ferroni, F; Fesefeldt, H S; Fiandrini, E; Field, J H; Filthaut, Frank; Fisher, P H; Fisk, I; Forconi, G; Fredj, L; Freudenreich, Klaus; Furetta, C; Galaktionov, Yu; Ganguli, S N; García-Abia, P; Gau, S S; Gentile, S; Gheordanescu, N; Giagu, S; Goldfarb, S; Goldstein, J; Gong, Z F; Gougas, Andreas; Gratta, Giorgio; Grünewald, M W; Gupta, V K; Gurtu, A; Gutay, L J; Hartmann, B; Hasan, A; Hatzifotiadou, D; Hebbeker, T; Hervé, A; Van Hoek, W C; Hofer, H; Hong, S J; Hoorani, H; Hou, S R; Hu, G; Innocente, Vincenzo; Jenkes, K; Jin, B N; Jones, L W; de Jong, P; Josa-Mutuberria, I; Kasser, A; Khan, R A; Kamrad, D; Kamyshkov, Yu A; Kapustinsky, J S; Karyotakis, Yu; Kaur, M; Kienzle-Focacci, M N; Kim, D; Kim, D H; Kim, J K; Kim, S C; Kim, Y G; Kinnison, W W; Kirkby, A; Kirkby, D; Kirkby, Jasper; Kiss, D; Kittel, E W; Klimentov, A; König, A C; Kopp, A; Korolko, I; Koutsenko, V F; Krämer, R W; Krenz, W; Kunin, A; Ladrón de Guevara, P; Laktineh, I; Landi, G; Lapoint, C; Lassila-Perini, K M; Laurikainen, P; Lebeau, M; Lebedev, A; Lebrun, P; Lecomte, P; Lecoq, P; Le Coultre, P; Le Goff, J M; Leiste, R; Leonardi, E; Levchenko, P M; Li Chuan; Lin, C H; Lin, W T; Linde, Frank L; Lista, L; Liu, Z A; Lohmann, W; Longo, E; Lu, W; Lü, Y S; Lübelsmeyer, K; Luci, C; Luckey, D; Luminari, L; Lustermann, W; Ma Wen Gan; Maity, M; Majumder, G; Malgeri, L; Malinin, A; Maña, C; Mangeol, D J J; Mangla, S; Marchesini, P A; Marin, A; Martin, J P; Marzano, F; Massaro, G G G; McNally, D; McNeil, R R; Mele, S; Merola, L; Meschini, M; Metzger, W J; Von der Mey, M; Mi, Y; Mihul, A; Van Mil, A J W; Mirabelli, G; Mnich, J; Molnár, P; Monteleoni, B; Moore, R; Morganti, S; Moulik, T; Mount, R; Müller, S; Muheim, F; Muijs, A J M; Nahn, S; Napolitano, M; Nessi-Tedaldi, F; Newman, H; Niessen, T; Nippe, A; Nisati, A; Nowak, H; Oh, Yu D; Opitz, H; Organtini, G; Ostonen, R; Palomares, C; Pandoulas, D; Paoletti, S; Paolucci, P; Park, H K; Park, I H; Pascale, G; Passaleva, G; Patricelli, S; Paul, T; Pauluzzi, M; Paus, C; Pauss, Felicitas; Peach, D; Pei, Y J; Pensotti, S; Perret-Gallix, D; Petersen, B; Petrak, S; Pevsner, A; Piccolo, D; Pieri, M; Pinto, J C; Piroué, P A; Pistolesi, E; Plyaskin, V; Pohl, M; Pozhidaev, V; Postema, H; Produit, N; Prokofev, D; Prokofiev, D O; Rahal-Callot, G; Raja, N; Rancoita, P G; Rattaggi, M; Raven, G; Razis, P A; Read, K; Ren, D; Rescigno, M; Reucroft, S; Van Rhee, T; Riemann, S; Riles, K; Robohm, A; Rodin, J; Roe, B P; Romero, L; Rosier-Lees, S; Rosselet, P; Van Rossum, W; Roth, S; Rubio, Juan Antonio; Ruschmeier, D; Rykaczewski, H; Salicio, J; Sánchez, E; Sanders, M P; Sarakinos, M E; Sarkar, S; Sassowsky, M; Schäfer, C; Shchegelskii, V; Schmidt-Kärst, S; Schmitz, D; Schmitz, P; Scholz, N; Schopper, Herwig Franz; Schotanus, D J; Schwenke, J; Schwering, G; Sciacca, C; Sciarrino, D; Servoli, L; Shevchenko, S; Shivarov, N; Shoutko, V; Shukla, J; Shumilov, E; Shvorob, A V; Siedenburg, T; Son, D; Sopczak, André; Smith, B; Spillantini, P; Steuer, M; Stickland, D P; Stone, A; Stone, H; Stoyanov, B; Strässner, A; Strauch, K; Sudhakar, K; Sultanov, G G; Sun, L Z; Susinno, G F; Suter, H; Swain, J D; Tang, X W; Tauscher, Ludwig; Taylor, L; Ting, Samuel C C; Ting, S M; Tonutti, M; Tonwar, S C; Tóth, J; Tully, C; Tuchscherer, H; Tung, K L; Uchida, Y; Ulbricht, J; Uwer, U; Valente, E; Van de Walle, R T; Vesztergombi, G; Vetlitskii, I; Viertel, Gert M; Vivargent, M; Völkert, R; Vogel, H; Vogt, H; Vorobev, I; Vorobyov, A A; Vorvolakos, A; Wadhwa, M; Wallraff, W; Wang, J C; Wang, X L; Wang, Z M; Weber, A; Wittgenstein, F; Wu, S X; Wynhoff, S; Xu, J; Xu, Z Z; Yang, B Z; Yang, C G; Yao, X Y; Ye, J B; Yeh, S C; You, J M; Zalite, A; Zalite, Yu; Zemp, P; Zeng, Y; Zhang, Z; Zhang, Z P; Zhou, B; Zhu, G Y; Zhu, R Y; Zichichi, Antonino; Ziegler, F

    1997-01-01

    We have studied the process $e^+e^-{\\rightarrow}\\rm n {\\gamma}$ $(\\rm n{\\ge}2)$ at centre-of-mass energies of 161.3 GeV and 172.1 GeV. The analysis is based on a sample of events collected by the L3 detector in 1996 corresponding to total integrated luminosities of 10.7 ${\\rm pb^{-1}}$ and 10.1 ${\\rm pb^{-1}}$ respectively. The observed rates of events with two and more photons and the characteristic distributions are in good agreement with the Standard Model expectations. This is used to set lower limits on contact interaction energy scale parameters, on the QED cut-off parameters and on the mass of excited electrons.

  12. Impedance Characterization of the Capacitive field-Effect pH-Sensor Based on a thin-Layer Hafnium Oxide Formed by Atomic Layer Deposition

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Michael LEE

    2014-05-01

    Full Text Available As a sensing element, silicon dioxide (SiO2 has been applied within ion-sensitive field effect transistors (ISFET. However, a requirement of increasing pH-sensitivity and stability has observed an increased number of insulating materials that obtain high-k gate being applied as FETs. The increased high-k gate reduces the required metal oxide layer and, thus, the fabrication of thin hafnium oxide (HfO2 layers by atomic layer deposition (ALD has grown with interest in recent years. This metal oxide presents advantageous characteristics that can be beneficial for the advancements within miniaturization of complementary metal oxide semiconductor (CMOS technology. In this article, we describe a process for fabrication of HfO2 based on ALD by applying water (H2O as the oxygen precursor. As a first, electrochemical impedance spectroscopy (EIS measurements were performed with varying pH (2-10 to demonstrate the sensitivity of HfO2 as a potential pH sensing material. The Nyquist plot demonstrates a high clear shift of the polarization resistance (Rp between pH 6-10 (R2 = 0.9986, Y = 3,054X + 12,100. At acidic conditions (between pH 2-10, the Rp change was small due to the unmodified oxide gate (R2 = 0.9655, Y = 2,104X + 4,250. These preliminary results demonstrate the HfO2 substrate functioned within basic to neutral conditions and establishes a great potential for applying HfO2 as a dielectric material for future pH measuring FET sensors.

  13. Synergistic effect of carbon nanotube as sintering aid and toughening agent in spark plasma sintered molybdenum disilicide-hafnium carbide composite

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mukherjee, Biswajyoti; Asiq Rahman, O.S.; Sribalaji, M [Materials Science and Engineering, Indian Institute of Technology Patna, Bihta Kanpa Road, Bihta, Patna, Bihar 801103 (India); Bakshi, Srinivasa Rao [Department of Metallurgical and Materials Engineering, Indian Institute of Technology Madras, Chennai 600036 (India); Keshri, Anup Kumar, E-mail: anup@iitp.ac.in [Materials Science and Engineering, Indian Institute of Technology Patna, Bihta Kanpa Road, Bihta, Patna, Bihar 801103 (India)

    2016-12-15

    Hafnium carbide (HfC) along with sintering aids was consolidated at a relatively lower temperature i.e. 1600 °C (i.e. T=~0.41 T{sub m}) under a uniaxial load of 50 MPa by spark plasma sintering. Two different sintering aids such as molybdenum disilicide (MoSi{sub 2}) and carbon nanotube (CNT) were added to enhance the densification and lower the extent of grain growth in the sintered pellets. Density of the sintered pellet increased from 96.0±0.8% in HfC +5 wt% MoSi{sub 2} (HM) to 99.0±0.5% with the addition of 2 wt% CNT in HfC+5 wt% MoSi{sub 2} (HMC) at sintering temperature of 1600 °C. Further, the extent of grain growth drastically reduced from 204% in HM to 50% in HMC. Analysis of linear shrinkage during densification revealed that CNT addition increased densification rate and decreased the time required to reach the density of 99.0±0.5% at 1600 °C. Increased densification and lower degree of grain growth could be due to the synergistic effect offered by the CNT, which are as follows: (i) Lubrication effect of CNT, (ii) Lower activation energy for grain boundary diffusion (iii) Reduction in liquid phase sintering temperature and (iv) Grain boundary pinning. Fracture toughness of the sintered HM and HMC composite was obtained using indentation technique. By the addition of 2 wt% CNT in HM, drastic increase of 91% in fracture toughness was seen. This significant improvement in fracture toughness was due to the enhanced densification and relatively lower grain size of HMC. Also crack bridging, crack deflection, crack arrest, CNT and graphene sheet pull-out and swording played major role in toughening of HMC pellet.

  14. Technical Note: A simulation study on the feasibility of radiotherapy dose enhancement with calcium tungstate and hafnium oxide nano- and microparticles.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sherck, Nicholas J; Won, You-Yeon

    2017-12-01

    To assess the radiotherapy dose enhancement (RDE) potential of calcium tungstate (CaWO 4 ) and hafnium oxide (HfO 2 ) nano- and microparticles (NPs). A Monte Carlo simulation study was conducted to gauge their respective RDE potentials relative to that of the broadly studied gold (Au) NP. The study was warranted due to the promising clinical and preclinical studies involving both CaWO 4 and HfO 2 NPs as RDE agents in the treatment of various types of cancers. The study provides a baseline RDE to which future experimental RDE trends can be compared to. All three materials were investigated in silico with the software Penetration and Energy Loss of Positrons and Electrons (PENELOPE 2014) developed by Francesc Salvat and distributed in the United States by the Radiation Safety Information Computational Center (RSICC) at Oak Ridge National Laboratory. The work utilizes the extensively studied Au NP as the "gold standard" for a baseline. The key metric used in the evaluation of the materials was the local dose enhancement factor (DEF loc ). An additional metric used, termed the relative enhancement ratio (RER), evaluates material performance at the same mass concentrations. The results of the study indicate that Au has the strongest RDE potential using the DEF loc metric. HfO 2 and CaWO 4 both underperformed relative to Au with lower DEF loc of 2-3 × and 4-100 ×, respectively. The computational investigation predicts the RDE performance ranking to be: Au > HfO 2 > CaWO 4 . © 2017 American Association of Physicists in Medicine.

  15. Differential Effect of Cytomegalovirus Infection with Age on the Expression of CD57, CD300a, and CD161 on T-Cell Subpopulations

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fakhri Hassouneh

    2017-06-01

    Full Text Available Immunosenescence is a progressive deterioration of the immune system with aging. It affects both innate and adaptive immunity limiting the response to pathogens and to vaccines. As chronic cytomegalovirus (CMV infection is probably one of the major driving forces of immunosenescence, and its persistent infection results in functional and phenotypic changes to the T-cell repertoire, the aim of this study was to analyze the effect of CMV-seropositivity and aging on the expression of CD300a and CD161 inhibitory receptors, along with the expression of CD57 marker on CD4+, CD8+, CD8+CD56+ (NKT-Like and CD4−CD8− (DN T-cell subsets. Our results showed that, regardless of the T-cell subset, CD57−CD161−CD300a+ T-cells expand with age in CMV-seropositive individuals, whereas CD57−CD161+CD300a+ T-cells decrease. Similarly, CD57+CD161−CD300a+ T-cells expand with age in CMV-seropositive individuals in all subsets except in DN cells and CD57−CD161+CD300a− T-cells decrease in all T-cell subsets except in CD4+ T-cells. Besides, in young individuals, CMV latent infection associates with the expansion of CD57+CD161−CD300a+CD4+, CD57−CD161−CD300a+CD4+, CD57+CD161−CD300a+CD8+, CD57−CD161−CD300a+CD8+, CD57+CD161−CD300a+NKT-like, and CD57+CD161−CD300a+DN T-cells. Moreover, in young individuals, CD161 expression on T-cells is not affected by CMV infection. Changes of CD161 expression were only associated with age in the context of CMV latent infection. Besides, CD300a+CD57+CD161+ and CD300a−CD57+CD161+ phenotypes were not found in any of the T-cell subsets studied except in the DN subpopulation, indicating that in the majority of T-cells, CD161 and CD57 do not co-express. Thus, our results show that CMV latent infection impact on the immune system depends on the age of the individual, highlighting the importance of including CMV serology in any study regarding immunosenescence.

  16. CNV-association meta-analysis in 191,161 European adults reveals new loci associated with anthropometric traits

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Macé, Aurélien; Tuke, Marcus A; Deelen, Patrick; Kristiansson, Kati; Mattsson, Hannele; Nõukas, Margit; Sapkota, Yadav; Schick, Ursula; Porcu, Eleonora; Rüeger, Sina; McDaid, Aaron F; Porteous, David; Winkler, Thomas W; Salvi, Erika; Shrine, Nick; Liu, Xueping; Ang, Wei Q; Zhang, Weihua; Feitosa, Mary F; Venturini, Cristina; van der Most, Peter J; Rosengren, Anders; Wood, Andrew R; Beaumont, Robin N; Jones, Samuel E; Ruth, Katherine S; Yaghootkar, Hanieh; Tyrrell, Jessica; Havulinna, Aki S; Boers, Harmen; Mägi, Reedik; Kriebel, Jennifer; Müller-Nurasyid, Martina; Perola, Markus; Nieminen, Markku; Lokki, Marja-Liisa; Kähönen, Mika; Viikari, Jorma S; Geller, Frank; Lahti, Jari; Palotie, Aarno; Koponen, Päivikki; Lundqvist, Annamari; Rissanen, Harri; Bottinger, Erwin P; Afaq, Saima; Wojczynski, Mary K; Lenzini, Petra; Nolte, Ilja M; Sparsø, Thomas; Schupf, Nicole; Christensen, Kaare; Perls, Thomas T; Newman, Anne B; Werge, Thomas; Snieder, Harold; Spector, Timothy D; Chambers, John C; Koskinen, Seppo; Melbye, Mads; Raitakari, Olli T; Lehtimäki, Terho; Tobin, Martin D; Wain, Louise V; Sinisalo, Juha; Peters, Annette; Meitinger, Thomas; Martin, Nicholas G; Wray, Naomi R; Montgomery, Grant W; Medland, Sarah E; Swertz, Morris A; Vartiainen, Erkki; Borodulin, Katja; Männistö, Satu; Murray, Anna; Bochud, Murielle; Jacquemont, Sébastien; Rivadeneira, Fernando; Hansen, Thomas F; Oldehinkel, Albertine J; Mangino, Massimo; Province, Michael A; Deloukas, Panos; Kooner, Jaspal S; Freathy, Rachel M; Pennell, Craig; Feenstra, Bjarke; Strachan, David P; Lettre, Guillaume; Hirschhorn, Joel; Cusi, Daniele; Heid, Iris M; Hayward, Caroline; Männik, Katrin; Beckmann, Jacques S; Loos, Ruth J F; Nyholt, Dale R; Metspalu, Andres; Eriksson, Johan G; Weedon, Michael N; Salomaa, Veikko; Franke, Lude; Reymond, Alexandre; Frayling, Timothy M; Kutalik, Zoltán

    2017-01-01

    There are few examples of robust associations between rare copy number variants (CNVs) and complex continuous human traits. Here we present a large-scale CNV association meta-analysis on anthropometric traits in up to 191,161 adult samples from 26 cohorts. The study reveals five CNV associations at

  17. 25 CFR 161.603 - Can mediation be used in the event of a permit violation or dispute?

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... 25 Indians 1 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Can mediation be used in the event of a permit violation... AND WATER NAVAJO PARTITIONED LANDS GRAZING PERMITS Permit Violations § 161.603 Can mediation be used... to be resolved with the District Grazing Committee through mediation. (a) The District Grazing...

  18. Kui naine tahab olla kangelane : kestvus-perfomance "Äng - 161 km palja rindkerega" / Fideelia-Signe Roots

    Index Scriptorium Estoniae

    Roots, Fideelia-Signe, 1976-

    2014-01-01

    Fideelia-Signe Roots oma aktsioonist tegevuskunstiürituse "Äng" raames, mille käigus kunstnik kõndis jalgsi alasti ülakehaga 161 kilomeetrit Tartust Karepale eesmärgiga testida naise kehakuvandi piire. Kangelase ja superkangelase mõistest

  19. 77 FR 34935 - Foreign-Trade Zone 161; Temporary/Interim Manufacturing Authority; Siemens Energy, Inc., (Wind...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-06-12

    ... DEPARTMENT OF COMMERCE Foreign-Trade Zones Board [Docket T-4-2012] Foreign-Trade Zone 161; Temporary/Interim Manufacturing Authority; Siemens Energy, Inc., (Wind Turbine Nacelles and Hubs); Notice of... temporary/interim manufacturing (T/IM) authority, on behalf of Siemens Energy, Inc., to manufacture wind...

  20. Thermodynamic and kinetic studies in the systems alkali chloride-zinconium (or hafnium) tetrachloride: Part I. Vapour pressure measurements over hexachloro compounds and use of vapour pressure data in fractional decomposition

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ray, H.S.; Bhat, B.G.; Reddy, G.S.; Biswas, A.K.

    1978-01-01

    A molten tin isoteniscope has been used to measure the vapour pressures over ZrCl 4 , HfCl 4 and the hexachlore zirconates (M 2 ZrCl 6 ) and the hexachloro hafnates (M 2 HfCl 6 ) of four alkali metals (M = Na,K,Rb,Cs). The method of preparation of these compounds and the effect of small amounts of residual alkali chlorides on the their vapour pressure are discussed. The pressure-temperature plots are examined in the light of some theoretical postulates. A scheme for separation of hafnium from zirconoium by multistage fractional decomposition of the hexachlore compounds of any alkali metal is described. The scheme, which is analogous to rectification in liquid-vapour systems, employs a countercurrent flow of Zr(Hf)Cl 4 in a gas stream and a moving bed of alkali chlorides. The separation is based on the difference in the dissociation equilibrium for zirconium and hafnium compounds. Stage calculations for such a scheme and the main conclusions of a computational work are presented. (author)

  1. 25 CFR 161.610 - What will BIA do if livestock is not removed when a permit expires or is cancelled?

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... 25 Indians 1 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false What will BIA do if livestock is not removed when a permit expires or is cancelled? 161.610 Section 161.610 Indians BUREAU OF INDIAN AFFAIRS, DEPARTMENT OF... will BIA do if livestock is not removed when a permit expires or is cancelled? If the livestock is not...

  2. A Nonsense Mutation in FAM161A Is a Recurrent Founder Allele in Dutch and Belgian Individuals With Autosomal Recessive Retinitis Pigmentosa

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Van Schil, Kristof; Klevering, B. Jeroen; Leroy, Bart P.; Pott, Jan Willem R.; Bandah-Rozenfeld, Dikla; Zonneveld-Vrieling, Marijke N.; Sharon, Dror; den Hollander, Anneke I.; Cremers, Frans P. M.; De Baere, Elfride; Collin, Rob W. J.; van den Born, L. Ingeborgh

    PURPOSE. To identify mutations in FAM161A underlying autosomal recessive retinitis pigmentosa (arRP) in the Dutch and Belgian populations and to investigate whether common FAM161A-associated phenotypic features could be identified. METHODS. Homozygosity mapping, amplification-refractory mutation

  3. Precursory activity of the 161 ka Kos Plateau Tuff eruption, Aegean Sea (Greece)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Piper, David J. W.; Pe-Piper, Georgia; Lefort, Darren

    2010-08-01

    The Kos Plateau Tuff (KPT) eruption of 161 ka was the largest explosive Quaternary eruption in the eastern Mediterranean. We have discovered an uplifted beach deposit of abraded pumice cobbles, directly overlain by the KPT. The pumice cobbles resemble pumice from the KPT in petrography and composition and differ from Plio-Pleistocene rhyolites on the nearby Kefalos Peninsula. The pumice contains enclaves of basaltic andesite showing chilled lobate margins, suggesting co-existence of two magmas. The deposit provides evidence that the precursory phase of the KPT eruption produced pumice rafts, and defines the paleoshoreline for the KPT, which elsewhere was deposited on land. The beach deposit has been uplifted about 120 m since the KPT eruption, whereas the present marine area south of Kos has subsided several hundred metres, as a result of regional neotectonics. The basaltic andesite is more primitive than other mafic rocks known from the Kos-Nisyros volcanic centre and contains phenocrysts of Fo89 olivine, bytownite, enstatite and diopside. Groundmass amphibole suggests availability of water in the final stages of magma evolution. Geochemical and mineralogical variation in the mafic products of the KPT eruption indicate that fractionation of basaltic magma in a base-of-crust magma chamber was followed by mixing with rhyolitic magma during eruption. Low eruption rates during the precursory activity may have minimised the extent of mixing and preserved the end-member magma types.

  4. Evolution of E 2 transition strength in deformed hafnium isotopes from new measurements on 172Hf,174Hf, and 176Hf

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rudigier, M.; Nomura, K.; Dannhoff, M.; Gerst, R.-B.; Jolie, J.; Saed-Samii, N.; Stegemann, S.; Régis, J.-M.; Robledo, L. M.; Rodríguez-Guzmán, R.; Blazhev, A.; Fransen, Ch.; Warr, N.; Zell, K. O.

    2015-04-01

    Background: The available data for E 2 transition strengths in the region between neutron-deficient hafnium and platinum isotopes are far from complete. More and precise data are needed to enhance the picture of structure evolution in this region and to test state-of-the-art nuclear models. In a simple model, the maximum collectivity is expected at the middle of the major shell. However, for actual nuclei, particularly in heavy-mass regions, which should be highly complex, this picture may no longer be the case, and one should use a more realistic nuclear-structure model. We address this point by studying the spectroscopy of Hf as a representative case. Purpose: We remeasure the 21+ half-lives of 172,174,176Hf, for which there is some disagreement in the literature. The main goal is to measure, for the first time, the half-lives of higher-lying states of the rotational band. The new results are compared to a theoretical calculation for absolute transition strengths. Method: The half-lives were measured using γ -γ and conversion-electron-γ delayed coincidences with the fast timing method. For the determination of half-lives in the picosecond region, the generalized centroid difference method was applied. For the theoretical calculation of the spectroscopic properties, the interacting boson model is employed, whose Hamiltonian is determined based on microscopic energy-density functional calculations. Results: The measured 21+ half-lives disagree with results from earlier γ -γ fast timing measurements, but are in agreement with data from Coulomb excitation experiments and other methods. Half-lives of the 41+ and 61+ states were measured, as well as a lower limit for the 81+ states. Conclusions: This work shows the importance of a mass-dependent effective boson charge in the interacting boson model for the description of E 2 transition rates in chains of nuclei. It encourages further studies of the microscopic origin of this mass dependence. New experimental

  5. Isolation and characterization of fatty acid methyl ester (FAME)-producing Streptomyces sp. S161 from sheep (Ovis aries) faeces.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lu, Y; Wang, J; Deng, Z; Wu, H; Deng, Q; Tan, H; Cao, L

    2013-09-01

    An actinomycete producing oil-like mixtures was isolated and characterized. The strain was isolated from sheep faeces and identified as Streptomyces sp. S161 based on 16S rRNA gene sequence analysis. The strain showed cellulase and xylanase activities. The (1) H nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) spectra of the mixtures showed that the mixtures were composed of fatty acid methyl esters (52·5), triglycerides (13·7) and monoglycerides (9·1) (mol.%). Based on the gas chromatography-mass spectrometry (GC-MS) analysis, the fatty acid methyl esters were mainly composed of C14-C16 long-chain fatty acids. The results indicated that Streptomyces sp. S161 could produce fatty acid methyl esters (FAME) directly from starch. To our knowledge, this is the first isolated strain that can produce biodiesel (FAME) directly from starch. © 2013 The Society for Applied Microbiology.

  6. Disruption of δ-opioid receptor phosphorylation at threonine 161 attenuates morphine tolerance in rats with CFA-induced inflammatory hypersensitivity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Hai-Jing; Xie, Wei-Yan; Hu, Fang; Zhang, Ying; Wang, Jun; Wang, Yun

    2012-04-01

    Our previous study identified Threonine 161 (Thr-161), located in the second intracellular loop of the δ-opioid receptor (DOR), as the only consensus phosphorylation site for cyclin-dependent kinase 5 (Cdk5). The aim of this study was to assess the function of DOR phosphorylation by Cdk5 in complete Freund's adjuvant (CFA)-induced inflammatory pain and morphine tolerance. Dorsal root ganglion (DRG) neurons of rats with CFA-induced inflammatory pain were acutely dissociated and the biotinylation method was used to explore the membrane localization of phosphorylated DOR at Thr-161 (pThr-161-DOR), and paw withdrawal latency was measured after intrathecal delivery of drugs or Tat-peptide, using a radiant heat stimulator in rats with CFA-induced inflammatory pain. Both the total amount and the surface localization of pThr-161-DOR were significantly enhanced in the ipsilateral DRG following CFA injection. Intrathecal delivery of the engineered Tat fusion-interefering peptide corresponding to the second intracellular loop of DOR (Tat-DOR-2L) increased inflammatory hypersensitivity, and inhibited DOR- but not µ-opioid receptor-mediated spinal analgesia in CFA-treated rats. However, intrathecal delivery of Tat-DOR-2L postponed morphine antinociceptive tolerance in rats with CFA-induced inflammatory pain. Phosphorylation of DOR at Thr-161 by Cdk5 attenuates hypersensitivity and potentiates morphine tolerance in rats with CFA-induced inflammatory pain, while disruption of the phosphorylation of DOR at Thr-161 attenuates morphine tolerance.

  7. CD161+ MAIT cells are severely reduced in peripheral blood and lymph nodes of HIV-infected individuals independently of disease progression.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Johanna Maria Eberhard

    Full Text Available Mucosal-associated invariant T (MAIT cells are characterized by the combined expression of the semi-invariant T cell receptor (TCR Vα7.2, the lectin receptor CD161, as well as IL-18R, and play an important role in antibacterial host defense of the gut. The current study characterized CD161(+ MAIT and CD161-TCRVα7.2(+ T cell subsets within a large cohort of HIV patients with emphasis on patients with slow disease progression and elite controllers. Mononuclear cells from blood and lymph node samples as well as plasma from 63 patients and 26 healthy donors were analyzed by multicolor flow cytometry and ELISA for IL-18, sCD14 and sCD163. Additionally, MAIT cells were analyzed after in vitro stimulation with different cytokines and/or fixed E.coli. Reduced numbers of CD161(+ MAIT cells during HIV infection were detectable in the blood and lymph nodes of all patient groups, including elite controllers. CD161+ MAIT cell numbers did not recover even after successful antiretroviral treatment. The loss of CD161(+ MAIT cells was correlated with higher levels of MAIT cell activation; an increased frequency of the CD161-TCRVα7.2(+T cell subset in HIV infection was observed. In vitro stimulation of MAIT cells with IL-18 and IL-12, IL-7 and fixed E.coli also resulted in a rapid and additive reduction of the MAIT cell frequency defined by CD161, IL-18R and CCR6. In summary, the irreversible reduction of the CD161(+ MAIT cell subset seems to be an early event in HIV infection that is independent of later stages of the disease. This loss appears to be at least partially due to the distinctive vulnerability of MAIT cells to the pronounced stimulation by microbial products and cytokines during HIV-infection.

  8. 6-Peroxo-6-zirconium crown and its hafnium analogue embedded in a triangular polyanion: [M6(O2)6(OH)6(gamma-SiW10O36)3]18- (M = Zr, Hf).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bassil, Bassem S; Mal, Sib Sankar; Dickman, Michael H; Kortz, Ulrich; Oelrich, Holger; Walder, Lorenz

    2008-05-28

    We have synthesized and structurally characterized the unprecedented peroxo-zirconium(IV) containing [Zr6(O2)6(OH)6(gamma-SiW10O36)3]18- (1). Polyanion 1 comprises a cyclic 6-peroxo-6-zirconium core stabilized by three decatungstosilicate units. We have also prepared the isostructural hafnium(IV) analogue [Hf6(O2)6(OH)6(gamma-SiW10O36)3]18- (2). We investigated the acid/base and redox properties of 1 by UV-vis spectroscopy and electrochemistry studies. Polyanion 1 represents the first structurally characterized Zr-peroxo POM with side-on, bridging peroxo units. The simple, one-pot synthesis of 1 and 2 involving dropwise addition of aqueous hydrogen peroxide could represent a general procedure for incorporating peroxo groups into a large variety of transition metal and lanthanide containing POMs.

  9. Design and commissioning of a 16.1 MHz multiharmonic buncher for the reaccelerator at NSCL

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alt, Daniel Maloney

    The ReAccelerator (ReA) linear accelerator facility at the National Superconducting Cyclotron Laboratory is a unique resource for the nuclear physics community. The particle fragmentation beam production technique, combined with the ability to stop and then reaccelerate the beam to energies of astrophysical interest, give experimenters an unprecedented range of rare isotopes at energies of nuclear and astrophysical interest. The ReAccelerator also functions as a testbed for technology to be incorporated in the upcoming Facility for Rare Isotope Beams linear accelerator, which will eventually in turn become the beam source for ReA. This prototype nature of the ReAccelerator, however, dictated some design choices which have resulted in a final beam with a time structure that is less than ideal for certain classes of experiments. The cavities and RFQ used in ReA have an operating frequency of 80.5 MHz, which corresponds to a separation between particle bunches at the detectors of 12.4 ns. While this separation is acceptable for many experiments, sensitive time of flight measurements require a greater separation between pulses. As nuclear physics experiments rely on statistics, a solution to increasing bunch separation without simply discarding a large fraction of the beam particles was desired. This document describes the design and construction of such a device, a 16.1 MHz multiharmonic buncher. The first chapter provides backgound information on the NSCL and ReA, and some basic concepts in accelerator physics to lay the groundwork for the project.Next, more specifics are provided on the time structure of accelerated beams, and the experimental motivation for greater separation. The third chapter outlines the basic principles of multiharmonic bunching. In order to evaluate the feasibility of any buncher design, the exact acceptance of the Radiofrequency Quadrupole (RFQ) of the ReAccelerator needed to be empirically measured. Chapter 4 describes the results of that

  10. Completion Report for Well ER-16-1 Corrective Action Unit 99: Rainier Mesa - Shoshone Mountain

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NSTec Environmental Management

    2006-12-01

    Well ER-16-1 was drilled for the U.S. Department of Energy, National Nuclear Security Administration Nevada Site Office, in support of the Nevada Environmental Restoration Project at the Nevada Test Site, Nye County, Nevada. The well was drilled in June and July 2005 as part of a hydrogeologic investigation program for the Rainier Mesa-Shoshone Mountain Corrective Action Unit, Number 99. The overall purpose of the well was to gather subsurface data to better characterize the hydrogeology of the Shoshone Mountain area, especially in the older Tertiary and pre-Tertiary strata. The main 46.99-centimeter hole was drilled to a depth of 702.9 meters and cased with 33.97-centimeter casing to 663.7 meters. The hole diameter was then decreased to 31.1 centimeters, and the well was drilled to total depth of 1,220.7 meters. A completion string set at the depth of 1,162.4 meters consisted of 13.97-centimeter stainless-steel casing, with one continuous slotted interval open to the lower carbonate aquifer. The fluid level in the borehole soon dropped, so the borehole was deepened in July 2006. To deepen the borehole, the slotted section was cemented and a 12.1-centimeter hole was drilled through the bottom of the completion string to the new total depth of 1,391.7 meters, which is 171.0 meters deeper than the original borehole. A string of 6.03-centimeter carbon-steel tubing with one continuous slotted interval at 1,361.8 to 1,381.4 meters, and open to the lower carbonate aquifer, was installed in the well with no gravel packing or cement, to serve as a monitoring string. Data gathered during and shortly after hole construction include composite drill cuttings samples collected every 3 meters (extra cuttings samples were collected from the Paleozoic rocks for paleontological analyses), sidewall core samples from 37 depths, various geophysical logs, and water level measurements. These data indicate that the well penetrated 646.8 meters of Tertiary volcanic rocks and 744.9 meters

  11. Hafnium and neodymium isotopes and REY distribution in the truly dissolved, nanoparticulate/colloidal and suspended loads of rivers in the Amazon Basin, Brazil

    Science.gov (United States)

    Merschel, Gila; Bau, Michael; Schmidt, Katja; Münker, Carsten; Dantas, Elton L.

    2017-09-01

    Radiogenic isotopes in river sediments and river waters have been widely used in provenance studies, as these samples naturally integrate the geology/chemistry of the entire catchment. While the Hf and Nd isotope systems are coupled during igneous processes, they are decoupled during supergene processes at the Earth's surface, which is reflected by the isotope composition of riverine sediments. We present the first data for both Hf and Nd isotope compositions of the dissolved (0.2 μm-filtrates rich in nanoparticles and colloids, NPCs) and the truly dissolved (1 kDa-ultrafiltrates) load of rivers. Hafnium and Nd isotope compositions and concentrations of the Rare Earths and Yttrium (REY) and Hf were determined for suspended particles (>0.2 μm) as well as for the dissolved and the truly dissolved load of the Rio Solimões, the Amazon's largest tributary draining the Andes, and of the Rio Negro, an organic NPC- and particle-rich river draining the rainforest of northern Amazonia. We also analyzed the Nd isotope compositions of suspended sediments and 0.2 μm-filtered water samples from the Amazon River and its tributaries Rio Tapajos, Rio Xingu and Rio Jari. Our novel results clearly show that the decoupling of the Hf and Nd isotope systems is related to incongruent weathering processes on the continent, as this decoupling can already be observed in the different Hf and Nd pools, i.e. in the particulate, the NPC-dominated dissolved and the truly dissolved load of rivers. In the Rio Negro and Rio Solimões, a strong particle size-dependent difference in Hf isotope composition is observed. Values of εHf become more radiogenic as filter poresize decreases, which can be related to the density- and size-dependent distribution of Hf-rich minerals, e.g. zircons, and their absence from the truly dissolved pool. In contrast, the Nd isotope composition of Amazonian river waters reflects that of their catchment geology. Tributaries draining the Precambrian Brazilian and

  12. Zirconium Zr and hafnium Hf

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Busev, A.I.; Tiptsova, V.G.; Ivanov, V.M.

    1978-01-01

    The basic methods for extracting and determining Zr(4) and Hf(4) are described. Diantipyrinemethane and its alkyl homologs selectively extract Zr and Hf from HNO 3 solutions in the presence of nitrates. Zr is selectively extracted with tetraethyldiamide of heptyl phosphoric acid (in benzene) as well as with 2-thenoyltrifluoroacetone (in an acid). The latter reagents is suitable for rapid determination of 95 Zr in a mixture with 95 Nb and other fragments. The complexometric determination of Zr is based on formation of a stable complex of Zr with EDTA. The titration is carried out in the presence of n-sulfobenzene-azo-pyrocatechol, eriochrome black T. The determination is hindered by Hf, fluoride-, phosphate-, oxalate- and tartrate-ions. The method is used for determining Zr in zircon and eudialyte ore. Zr is determined photometrically with the aid of xylenol orange, arsenazo 3 and pyrocatechol violet (in phosphorites). Hf is determined in the presence of Zr photometrically with the aid of xylenol orange or methyl-thymol blue. The method is based on Zr being masked with hydrogen peroxide in the presence of sulfate-ions

  13. Cathodoluminescence of Irradiated Hafnium Dioxide

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-03-01

    Martin and Michael Rhoby for their hard work in fixing assorted problems that cropped up during the course of my thesis work. Emily A. Purcell...Cathodoluminescence Microscopy of Inorganic Solids. New York: Plenum Press, 1990. [13] D. Drouin, A. R. Couture, D. Joly , X. Tastet, V. Aimez and R. Gauvin

  14. Alkali metal hafnium oxide scintillators

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bourret-Courchesne, Edith; Derenzo, Stephen E.; Taylor, Scott Edward

    2018-05-08

    The present invention provides for a composition comprising an inorganic scintillator comprising an alkali metal hafnate, optionally cerium-doped, having the formula A2HfO3:Ce; wherein A is an alkali metal having a valence of 1, such as Li or Na; and the molar percent of cerium is 0% to 100%. The alkali metal hafnate are scintillators and produce a bright luminescence upon irradiation by a suitable radiation.

  15. Similarities and Differences in Pacing Patterns in a 161-km and 101-km Ultra-Distance Road Race.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tan, Philip L S; Tan, Frankie H Y; Bosch, Andrew N

    2016-08-01

    Tan, PLS, Tan, FHY, and Bosch, AN. Similarities and differences in pacing patterns in a 161-km and 101-km ultra-distance road race. J Strength Cond Res 30(8): 2145-2155, 2016-The purpose of this study was to establish and compare the pacing patterns of fast and slow finishers in a tropical ultra-marathon. Data were collected from the Craze Ultra-marathon held on the 22nd and 21st of September in 2012 and 2013, respectively. Finishers of the 161-km (N = 47) and 101-km (N = 120) categories of the race were divided into thirds (groups A-C) by merit of finishing time. Altogether, 17 and 11 split times were recorded for the 161-km and 101-km finishers, respectively, and used to calculate the mean running speed for each distance segment. Running speed for the first segment was normalized to 100, with all subsequent splits adjusted accordingly. Running speed during the last 5 km was calculated against the mean race pace to establish the existence of an end spurt. A reverse J-shaped pacing profile was demonstrated in all groups for both distance categories and only 38% of the finishers executed an end spurt. In the 101-km category, in comparison with groups B and C, group A maintained a significantly more even pace (p = 0.013 and 0.001, respectively) and completed the race at a significantly higher percent of initial starting speed (p = 0.001 and 0.001, respectively). Descriptive data also revealed that the top 5 finishers displayed a "herd-behavior" by staying close to the lead runner in the initial portion of the race. These findings demonstrate that to achieve a more even pace, recreational ultra-runners should adopt a patient sustainable starting speed, with less competitive runners setting realistic performance goals whereas competitive runners with a specific time goal to consider running in packs of similar pace.

  16. Elevated Ratio of Th17 Cell-Derived Th1 Cells (CD161(+)Th1 Cells) to CD161(+)Th17 Cells in Peripheral Blood of Early-Onset Rheumatoid Arthritis Patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kotake, Shigeru; Nanke, Yuki; Yago, Toru; Kawamoto, Manabu; Kobashigawa, Tsuyoshi; Yamanaka, Hisashi

    2016-01-01

    Rheumatoid arthritis (RA) is a chronic inflammatory disease characterized by the destruction of articular cartilage and bone with elevated levels of proinflammatory cytokines. It has been reported that IL-17 and Th17 cells play important roles in the pathogenesis of RA. Recently, plasticity in helper T cells has been demonstrated; Th17 cells can convert to Th1 cells. It remains to be elucidated whether this conversion occurs in the early phase of RA. Here, we tried to identify Th17 cells, Th1 cells, and Th17 cell-derived Th1 cells (CD161(+)Th1 cells) in the peripheral blood of early-onset RA patients. We also evaluated the effect of methotrexate on the ratio of Th17 cells in early-onset RA patients. The ratio of Th17 cell-derived Th1 cells to CD161(+)Th17 cells was elevated in the peripheral blood of early-onset RA patients. In addition, MTX reduced the ratio of Th17 cells but not Th1 cells. These findings suggest that IL-17 and Th17 play important roles in the early phase of RA; thus, anti-IL-17 antibodies should be administered to patients with RA in the early phase.

  17. Alterations of in vivo CA1 network activity in Dp(16)1Yey Down syndrome model mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Raveau, Matthieu; Polygalov, Denis; Boehringer, Roman; Amano, Kenji; Yamakawa, Kazuhiro; McHugh, Thomas J

    2018-02-27

    Down syndrome, the leading genetic cause of intellectual disability, results from an extra-copy of chromosome 21. Mice engineered to model this aneuploidy exhibit Down syndrome-like memory deficits in spatial and contextual tasks. While abnormal neuronal function has been identified in these models, most studies have relied on in vitro measures. Here, using in vivo recording in the Dp(16)1Yey model, we find alterations in the organization of spiking of hippocampal CA1 pyramidal neurons, including deficits in the generation of complex spikes. These changes lead to poorer spatial coding during exploration and less coordinated activity during sharp-wave ripples, events involved in memory consolidation. Further, the density of CA1 inhibitory neurons expressing neuropeptide Y, a population key for the generation of pyramidal cell bursts, were significantly increased in Dp(16)1Yey mice. Our data refine the 'over-suppression' theory of Down syndrome pathophysiology and suggest specific neuronal subtypes involved in hippocampal dysfunction in these model mice. © 2018, Raveau et al.

  18. Overlapping trisomies for human chromosome 21 orthologs produce similar effects on skull and brain morphology of Dp(16)1Yey and Ts65Dn mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Starbuck, John M; Dutka, Tara; Ratliff, Tabetha S; Reeves, Roger H; Richtsmeier, Joan T

    2014-08-01

    Trisomy 21 results in gene-dosage imbalance during embryogenesis and throughout life, ultimately causing multiple anomalies that contribute to the clinical manifestations of Down syndrome. Down syndrome is associated with manifestations of variable severity (e.g., heart anomalies, reduced growth, dental anomalies, shortened life-span). Craniofacial dysmorphology and cognitive dysfunction are consistently observed in all people with Down syndrome. Mouse models are useful for studying the effects of gene-dosage imbalance on development. We investigated quantitative changes in the skull and brain of the Dp(16)1Yey Down syndrome mouse model and compared these mice to Ts65Dn and Ts1Cje mouse models. Three-dimensional micro-computed tomography images of Dp(16)1Yey and euploid mouse crania were morphometrically evaluated. Cerebellar cross-sectional area, Purkinje cell linear density, and granule cell density were evaluated relative to euploid littermates. Skulls of Dp(16)1Yey and Ts65Dn mice displayed similar changes in craniofacial morphology relative to their respective euploid littermates. Trisomy-based differences in brain morphology were also similar in Dp(16)1Yey and Ts65Dn mice. These results validate examination of the genetic basis for craniofacial and brain phenotypes in Dp(16)1Yey mice and suggest that they, like Ts65Dn mice, are valuable tools for modeling the effects of trisomy 21 on development. © 2014 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  19. Novel Neurovascular Protective Agents: Effects of INV-155, INV-157, INV-159, and INV-161 versus Lipoic Acid and Captopril in a Rat Stroke Model

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Barry J. Connell

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Background. Lipoic acid (LA, which has significant antioxidant properties, may also function as a potent neuroprotectant. The synthetic compounds INV-155, INV-157, INV-159, and INV-161 are physiochemical combinations of lipoic acid and captopril. We sought to determine if these compounds have neuroprotective potential following middle cerebral artery occlusion (MCAO in rats. Methods. Male Sprague-Dawley rats were injected intravenously with captopril (1–50 mg/kg 30 minutes prior to MCAO. Blood pressure, heart rate, baroreceptor reflex sensitivity, and infarct size were measured. In addition, dose response effect on infarct size and cardiovascular parameters was determined using INV-155, INV-157, INV-159, and INV-161 and compared to captopril and LA. Results. Pretreatment with captopril and LA at all doses tested was neuroprotective. The compounds INV-159 (0.5–10 mg/kg and INV-161 (1–10 mg/kg produced a significant,dose-dependent decrease in infarct size. In contrast, INV-155 and INV-157 had no effect on infarct size. Conclusions. Combined pretreatment with captopril potentiated the neuroprotective benefit observed following LA alone. Both INV-159 and INV-161 were also neuroprotective. These results suggest that patients taking combinations of captopril and LA, either as combination therapy or in the form of INV-159 or INV-161, may also benefit from significant protection against cerebral infarction.

  20. Pair-Production of W Bosons in $e^+ e^-$ Interactions at $\\sqrt{s}$ = 161 GeV

    CERN Document Server

    Acciarri, M; Aguilar-Benítez, M; Ahlen, S P; Alpat, B; Alcaraz, J; Alemanni, G; Allaby, James V; Aloisio, A; Alverson, G; Alviggi, M G; Ambrosi, G; Anderhub, H; Andreev, V P; Angelescu, T; Anselmo, F; Antreasyan, D; Arefev, A; Azemoon, T; Aziz, T; Bagnaia, P; Baksay, L; Banerjee, S; Banicz, K; Barillère, R; Barone, L; Bartalini, P; Baschirotto, A; Basile, M; Battiston, R; Bay, A; Becattini, F; Becker, U; Behner, F; Berdugo, J; Berges, P; Bertucci, B; Betev, B L; Bhattacharya, S; Biasini, M; Biland, A; Bilei, G M; Blaising, J J; Blyth, S C; Bobbink, Gerjan J; Böck, R K; Böhm, A; Borgia, B; Bourilkov, D; Bourquin, Maurice; Braccini, S; Branson, J G; Brigljevic, V; Brock, I C; Buffini, A; Buijs, A; Burger, J D; Burger, W J; Busenitz, J K; Button, A M; Cai, X D; Campanelli, M; Capell, M; Cara Romeo, G; Caria, M; Carlino, G; Cartacci, A M; Casaus, J; Castellini, G; Cavallari, F; Cavallo, N; Cecchi, C; Cerrada-Canales, M; Cesaroni, F; Chamizo-Llatas, M; Chan, A; Chang, Y H; Chaturvedi, U K; Chekanov, S V; Chemarin, M; Chen, A; Chen, G; Chen, G M; Chen, H F; Chen, H S; Chéreau, X J; Chiefari, G; Chien, C Y; Choi, M T; Cifarelli, Luisa; Cindolo, F; Civinini, C; Clare, I; Clare, R; Cohn, H O; Coignet, G; Colijn, A P; Colino, N; Commichau, V; Costantini, S; Cotorobai, F; de la Cruz, B; Csilling, Akos; Dai, T S; D'Alessandro, R; De Asmundis, R; Degré, A; Deiters, K; Della Volpe, D; Denes, P; De Notaristefani, F; DiBitonto, Daryl; Diemoz, M; Van Dierendonck, D N; Di Lodovico, F; Dionisi, C; Dittmar, Michael; Dominguez, A; Doria, A; Dova, M T; Drago, E; Duchesneau, D; Duinker, P; Durán, I; Dutta, S; Easo, S; Efremenko, Yu V; El-Mamouni, H; Engler, A; Eppling, F J; Erné, F C; Ernenwein, J P; Extermann, Pierre; Fabre, M; Faccini, R; Falciano, S; Favara, A; Fay, J; Fedin, O; Felcini, Marta; Fenyi, B; Ferguson, T; Fernández, D; Ferroni, F; Fesefeldt, H S; Fiandrini, E; Field, J H; Filthaut, Frank; Fisher, P H; Forconi, G; Fredj, L; Freudenreich, Klaus; Furetta, C; Galaktionov, Yu; Ganguli, S N; García-Abia, P; Gau, S S; Gentile, S; Gheordanescu, N; Giagu, S; Goldfarb, S; Goldstein, J; Gong, Z F; Gougas, Andreas; Gratta, Giorgio; Grünewald, M W; Gupta, V K; Gurtu, A; Gutay, L J; Hartmann, B; Hasan, A; Hatzifotiadou, D; Hebbeker, T; Hervé, A; Van Hoek, W C; Hofer, H; Hoorani, H; Hou, S R; Hu, G; Innocente, Vincenzo; Jenkes, K; Jin, B N; Jones, L W; de Jong, P; Josa-Mutuberria, I; Kasser, A; Khan, R A; Kamrad, D; Kamyshkov, Yu A; Kapustinsky, J S; Karyotakis, Yu; Kaur, M; Kienzle-Focacci, M N; Kim, D; Kim, J K; Kim, S C; Kim, Y G; Kinnison, W W; Kirkby, A; Kirkby, D; Kirkby, Jasper; Kiss, D; Kittel, E W; Klimentov, A; König, A C; Korolko, I; Koutsenko, V F; Krämer, R W; Krenz, W; Kunin, A; Ladrón de Guevara, P; Laktineh, I; Landi, G; Lapoint, C; Lassila-Perini, K M; Laurikainen, P; Lebeau, M; Lebedev, A; Lebrun, P; Lecomte, P; Lecoq, P; Le Coultre, P; Lee Jae Sik; Lee, K Y; Le Goff, J M; Leiste, R; Leonardi, E; Levchenko, P M; Li Chuan; Lieb, E H; Lin, W T; Linde, Frank L; Lista, L; Liu, Z A; Lohmann, W; Longo, E; Lu, W; Lü, Y S; Lübelsmeyer, K; Luci, C; Luckey, D; Luminari, L; Lustermann, W; Ma Wen Gan; Maity, M; Majumder, G; Malgeri, L; Malinin, A; Maña, C; Mangeol, D J J; Mangla, S; Marchesini, P A; Marin, A; Martin, J P; Marzano, F; Massaro, G G G; McNally, D; McNeil, R R; Mele, S; Merola, L; Meschini, M; Metzger, W J; Von der Mey, M; Mi, Y; Mihul, A; Van Mil, A J W; Mirabelli, G; Mnich, J; Molnár, P; Monteleoni, B; Moore, R; Morganti, S; Moulik, T; Mount, R; Müller, S; Muheim, F; Muijs, A J M; Nagy, E; Nahn, S; Napolitano, M; Nessi-Tedaldi, F; Newman, H; Niessen, T; Nippe, A; Nisati, A; Nowak, H; Opitz, H; Organtini, G; Ostonen, R; Pandoulas, D; Paoletti, S; Paolucci, P; Park, H K; Pascale, G; Passaleva, G; Patricelli, S; Paul, T; Pauluzzi, M; Paus, C; Pauss, Felicitas; Peach, D; Pei, Y J; Pensotti, S; Perret-Gallix, D; Petersen, B; Petrak, S; Pevsner, A; Piccolo, D; Pieri, M; Pinto, J C; Piroué, P A; Pistolesi, E; Plyaskin, V; Pohl, M; Pozhidaev, V; Postema, H; Produit, N; Prokofev, D; Prokofiev, D O; Rahal-Callot, G; Rancoita, P G; Rattaggi, M; Raven, G; Razis, P A; Read, K; Ren, D; Rescigno, M; Reucroft, S; Van Rhee, T; Riemann, S; Riles, K; Ro, S; Robohm, A; Rodin, J; Rodríguez-Calonge, F J; Roe, B P; Romero, L; Rosier-Lees, S; Rosselet, P; Van Rossum, W; Roth, S; Rubio, Juan Antonio; Rykaczewski, H; Salicio, J; Sánchez, E; Sanders, M P; Santocchia, A; Sarakinos, M E; Sarkar, S; Sassowsky, M; Schäfer, C; Shchegelskii, V; Schmidt-Kärst, S; Schmitz, D; Schmitz, P; Scholz, N; Schopper, Herwig Franz; Schotanus, D J; Schwenke, J; Schwering, G; Sciacca, C; Sciarrino, D; Servoli, L; Shevchenko, S; Shivarov, N; Shoutko, V; Shukla, J; Shumilov, E; Shvorob, A V; Siedenburg, T; Son, D; Sopczak, André; Smith, B; Spillantini, P; Steuer, M; Stickland, D P; Stone, H; Stoyanov, B; Strässner, A; Strauch, K; Sudhakar, K; Sultanov, G G; Sun, L Z; Susinno, G F; Suter, H; Swain, J D; Tang, X W; Tauscher, Ludwig; Taylor, L; Ting, Samuel C C; Ting, S M; Tonutti, M; Tonwar, S C; Tóth, J; Tully, C; Tuchscherer, H; Tung, K L; Uchida, Y; Ulbricht, J; Uwer, U; Valente, E; Van de Walle, R T; Vesztergombi, G; Vetlitskii, I; Viertel, Gert M; Vivargent, M; Völkert, R; Vogel, H; Vogt, H; Vorobev, I; Vorobyov, A A; Vorvolakos, A; Wadhwa, M; Wallraff, W; Wang, J C; Wang, X L; Wang, Z M; Weber, A; Wittgenstein, F; Wu, S X; Wynhoff, S; Xu, J; Xu, Z Z; Yang, B Z; Yang, C G; Yao, X Y; Ye, J B; Yeh, S C; You, J M; Zalite, A; Zalite, Yu; Zemp, P; Zeng, Y; Zhang, Z; Zhang, Z P; Zhou, B; Zhu, G Y; Zhu, R Y; Zichichi, Antonino; Ziegler, F

    1997-01-01

    We report on the measurement of W-boson pair-production with the L3 detector at LEP at a centre-of-mass energy of 161.34~\\GeV. In a data sample corresponding to a total luminosity of 11~pb$^{-1}$, we select four-fermion events with high invariant masses of pairs of hadronic jets or leptons. Combining all final states, the measured total cross section for W-pair production is: $\\SWW = 2.89^{+0.81}_{-0.70}~(stat.)\\pm0.14~(syst.)$~pb. Within the Standard Model, this corresponds to a mass of the W boson of: $\\MW = 80.80^{+0.48}_{-0.42}~(exp.)\\pm 0.03$~(LEP)~\\GeV. Limits on anomalous triple-vector-boson couplings are derived. \\end{abstract}

  1. Measurements of 161 Double Stars With a High-Speed CCD: The Winter/Spring 2017 Observing Program at Brilliant Sky Observatory, Part 2

    Science.gov (United States)

    Harshaw, Richard

    2018-04-01

    In the winter and spring of 2017, an aggressive observing program of measuring close double stars with speckle interferometry and CCD imaging was undertaken at Brilliant Sky Observatory, my observing site in Cave Creek, Arizona. A total of 596 stars were observed, 8 of which were rejected for various reasons, leaving 588 pairs. Of these, 427 were observed and measured with speckle interferometry, while the remaining 161 were measured with a CCD. This paper reports the results of the observations of the 161 CCD cases. A separate paper in this issue will report the speckle measurements of the 427 other pairs.

  2. Anti-L1CAM radioimmunotherapy is more effective with the radiolanthanide terbium-161 compared to lutetium-177 in an ovarian cancer model

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gruenberg, Juergen; Lindenblatt, Dennis; Cohrs, Susan; Fischer, Eliane; Dorrer, Holger; Zhernosekov, Konstantin; Koester, Ulli; Tuerler, Andreas; Schibli, Roger

    2014-01-01

    The L1 cell adhesion molecule (L1CAM) is considered a valuable target for therapeutic intervention in different types of cancer. Recent studies have shown that anti-L1CAM radioimmunotherapy (RIT) with 67 Cu- and 177 Lu-labelled internalising monoclonal antibody (mAb) chCE7 was effective in the treatment of human ovarian cancer xenografts. In this study, we directly compared the therapeutic efficacy of anti-L1CAM RIT against human ovarian cancer under equitoxic conditions with the radiolanthanide 177 Lu and the potential alternative 161 Tb in an ovarian cancer therapy model. Tb was produced by neutron bombardment of enriched 160 Gd targets. 161 Tb and 177 Lu were used for radiolabelling of DOTA-conjugated antibodies. The in vivo behaviour of the radioimmunoconjugates (RICs) was assessed in IGROV1 tumour-bearing nude mice using biodistribution experiments and SPECT/CT imaging. After ascertaining the maximal tolerated doses (MTD) the therapeutic impact of 50 % MTD of 177 Lu- and 161 Tb-DOTA-chCE7 was evaluated in groups of ten mice by monitoring the tumour size of subcutaneous IGROV1 tumours. The average number of DOTA ligands per antibody was 2.5 and maximum specific activities of 600 MBq/mg were achieved under identical radiolabelling conditions. RICs were stable in human plasma for at least 48 h. 177 Lu- and 161 Tb-DOTA-chCE7 showed high tumour uptake (37.8-39.0 %IA/g, 144 h p.i.) with low levels in off-target organs. SPECT/CT images confirmed the biodistribution data. 161 Tb-labelled chCE7 revealed a higher radiotoxicity in nude mice (MTD: 10 MBq) than the 177 Lu-labelled counterpart (MTD: 12 MBq). In a comparative therapy study with equitoxic doses, tumour growth inhibition was better by 82.6 % for the 161 Tb-DOTA-chCE7 than the 177 Lu-DOTA-chCE7 RIT. Our study is the first to show that anti-L1CAM 161 Tb RIT is more effective compared to 177 Lu RIT in ovarian cancer xenografts. These results suggest that 161 Tb is a promising candidate for future clinical

  3. Anti-L1CAM radioimmunotherapy is more effective with the radiolanthanide terbium-161 compared to lutetium-177 in an ovarian cancer model

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gruenberg, Juergen; Lindenblatt, Dennis; Cohrs, Susan; Fischer, Eliane [Paul Scherrer Institute, Center for Radiopharmaceutical Sciences ETH-PSI-USZ, Villigen (Switzerland); Dorrer, Holger [Paul Scherrer Institute, Laboratory of Radiochemistry and Environmental Chemistry, Villigen (Switzerland); Zhernosekov, Konstantin [ITG Isotope Technologies Garching GmbH, Garching (Germany); Koester, Ulli [Institut Laue-Langevin, Grenoble (France); Tuerler, Andreas [Paul Scherrer Institute, Laboratory of Radiochemistry and Environmental Chemistry, Villigen (Switzerland); University of Bern, Department of Chemistry and Biochemistry, Berne (Switzerland); Schibli, Roger [Paul Scherrer Institute, Center for Radiopharmaceutical Sciences ETH-PSI-USZ, Villigen (Switzerland); ETH Zurich, Department of Chemistry and Applied Biosciences, Zurich (Switzerland)

    2014-10-15

    The L1 cell adhesion molecule (L1CAM) is considered a valuable target for therapeutic intervention in different types of cancer. Recent studies have shown that anti-L1CAM radioimmunotherapy (RIT) with {sup 67}Cu- and {sup 177}Lu-labelled internalising monoclonal antibody (mAb) chCE7 was effective in the treatment of human ovarian cancer xenografts. In this study, we directly compared the therapeutic efficacy of anti-L1CAM RIT against human ovarian cancer under equitoxic conditions with the radiolanthanide {sup 177}Lu and the potential alternative {sup 161}Tb in an ovarian cancer therapy model. Tb was produced by neutron bombardment of enriched {sup 160}Gd targets. {sup 161}Tb and {sup 177}Lu were used for radiolabelling of DOTA-conjugated antibodies. The in vivo behaviour of the radioimmunoconjugates (RICs) was assessed in IGROV1 tumour-bearing nude mice using biodistribution experiments and SPECT/CT imaging. After ascertaining the maximal tolerated doses (MTD) the therapeutic impact of 50 % MTD of {sup 177}Lu- and {sup 161}Tb-DOTA-chCE7 was evaluated in groups of ten mice by monitoring the tumour size of subcutaneous IGROV1 tumours. The average number of DOTA ligands per antibody was 2.5 and maximum specific activities of 600 MBq/mg were achieved under identical radiolabelling conditions. RICs were stable in human plasma for at least 48 h. {sup 177}Lu- and {sup 161}Tb-DOTA-chCE7 showed high tumour uptake (37.8-39.0 %IA/g, 144 h p.i.) with low levels in off-target organs. SPECT/CT images confirmed the biodistribution data. {sup 161}Tb-labelled chCE7 revealed a higher radiotoxicity in nude mice (MTD: 10 MBq) than the {sup 177}Lu-labelled counterpart (MTD: 12 MBq). In a comparative therapy study with equitoxic doses, tumour growth inhibition was better by 82.6 % for the {sup 161}Tb-DOTA-chCE7 than the {sup 177}Lu-DOTA-chCE7 RIT. Our study is the first to show that anti-L1CAM {sup 161}Tb RIT is more effective compared to {sup 177}Lu RIT in ovarian cancer xenografts

  4. Cobalt(II), nickel(II), copper(II), zinc(II) and hafnium(IV) complexes of N'-(furan-3-ylmethylene)-2-(4-methoxyphenylamino)acetohydrazide.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Emam, Sanaa M; El-Saied, Fathy A; Abou El-Enein, Saeyda A; El-Shater, Heba A

    2009-03-01

    Cobalt(II), nickel(II), copper(II), zinc(II) and hafnium(IV) complexes of furan-2-carbaldehyde 4-methoxy-N-anilinoacetohydrazone were synthesized and characterized by elemental and thermal (TG and DTA) analyses, IR, UV-vis and (1)H NMR spectra as well as magnetic moment and molar conductivity. Mononuclear complexes are obtained with 1:1 molar ratio except complexes 3 and 9 which are obtained with 1:2 molar ratios. The IR spectra of ligand and metal complexes reveal various modes of chelation. The ligand behaves as a neutral bidentate one and coordination occurs via the carbonyl oxygen atom and azomethine nitrogen atom. The ligand behaves also as a monobasic tridentate one and coordination occurs through the enolic oxygen atom, azomethine nitrogen atom and the oxygen atom of furan ring. Moreover, the ligand behaves as a neutral tridentate and coordination occurs via the carbonyl oxygen, azomethine nitrogen and furan oxygen atoms as well as a monobasic bidentate and coordination occurs via the enolic oxygen atom and azomethine nitrogen atom. The electronic spectra and magnetic moment measurements reveal that all complexes possess octahedral geometry except the copper complex 10 possesses a square planar geometry. The thermal studies showed the type of water molecules involved in metal complexes as well as the thermal decomposition of some metal complexes.

  5. Determination of hafnium at the 10−4% level (relative to zirconium content) using neutron activation analysis, inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry and inductively coupled plasma atomic emission spectrometry

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Smolik, Marek; Polkowska-Motrenko, Halina; Hubicki, Zbigniew; Jakóbik-Kolon, Agata; Danko, Bożena

    2014-01-01

    Graphical abstract: -- Highlights: •We worked out ICP-MS method of Hf determination in Zr and Zr compounds. •We used NAA method as reference one. •We obtained pure zirconium matrix by ion exchange (Diphonix ® resin). •These permit to determine ≥1 × 10 −4 % Hf in Zr sample by ICP MS with good precision and accuracy. -- Abstract: Hafnium at the very low level of 1–8 ppm (in relation to zirconium) was determined in zirconium sulfate solutions (originating from investigations of the separation of ca. 44 ppm Hf from zirconium by means of the ion exchange method) by using three independent methods: inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry (ICP MS), neutron activation analysis (NAA) and inductively coupled plasma atomic emission spectrometry (ICP-AES). The results of NAA and ICP MS determinations were consistent with each other across the entire investigated range (the RSD of both methods did not exceed 38%). The results of ICP-AES determination were more diverse, particularly at less than 5 ppm Hf (RSD was significantly higher: 29–253%). The ion exchange method exploiting Diphonix ® resin proved sufficient efficiency in Zr–Hf separation when the initial concentration ratio of the elements ([Zr] 0 /[Hf] 0 ) ranged from 1200 to ca. 143,000

  6. On the use of polarization modulation in combined interferometry and polarimetry. Corrigendum. 1998 Plasma Phys. Control. Fusion, v. 40 p. 153-161

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Segre, S.E.

    1998-01-01

    Errors in the main text, the appendix and two curves are corrected in this corrigendum to the paper entitled ''On the use of polarization modulation in combined interferometry and polarimetry'', written by S.E. Segre and published in 1998 Plasma Phys. Control. Fusion, v. 40 p. 153-161

  7. CD161+CD4+ T cells are enriched in the liver during chronic hepatitis and associated with co-secretion of IL-22 and Interferon-gamma

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yu-Hoi eKang

    2012-11-01

    Full Text Available Hepatitis C virus infection is a major cause of chronic liver disease. CD4+ T cells play a key role in disease outcome. However, the critical functions and associated phenotypes of intrahepatic CD4+ T cells are not well defined. We have previously shown that CD8+ T cells expressing the C type lectin CD161 are highly enriched in the human liver, especially during chronic hepatitis. These cells are associated with a type 17 differentiation pattern and express cytokines including IL-17A, IL-22 and IFNγ. We therefore analysed expression of CD161 on CD4+ T cells in blood and liver and addressed the relevant phenotype and functional capacity of these populations. We observed marked enrichment of CD161+CD4+ T cells in the liver during chronic hepatitis such that they are the dominant subtype (mean 55% of CD4+ T cells. IL-22 and IL-17 secreting CD4+ cells were readily found in the livers of HCV+ and NASH donors, although not enriched compared to blood. There was, however, specific enrichment of a novel subset of IL-22/IFN-γ dual secretors (p=0.02 compared to blood, a result reconfirmed with direct ex vivo analyses. These data indicate the dominance of CD161+ expressing lymphocyte populations within the hepatic infiltrate, associated with a distinct cytokine profile. Given their documented roles as antiviral and hepatoprotective cytokines respectively, the impact of co-secretion of IFNγ and IL-22 in the liver may be particularly significant.

  8. Single and multi-photon events with missing energy in $e^+ e^-$ collisions at 161 GeV < $\\sqrt{s}$ < 172 GeV

    CERN Document Server

    Acciarri, M; Aguilar-Benítez, M; Ahlen, S P; Alcaraz, J; Alemanni, G; Allaby, James V; Aloisio, A; Alverson, G; Alviggi, M G; Ambrosi, G; Anderhub, H; Andreev, V P; Angelescu, T; Anselmo, F; Arefev, A; Azemoon, T; Aziz, T; Bagnaia, P; Baksay, L; Banerjee, S; Banerjee, Sw; Banicz, K; Barczyk, A; Barillère, R; Barone, L; Bartalini, P; Baschirotto, A; Basile, M; Battiston, R; Bay, A; Becattini, F; Becker, U; Behner, F; Berdugo, J; Berges, P; Bertucci, B; Betev, B L; Bhattacharya, S; Biasini, M; Biland, A; Bilei, G M; Blaising, J J; Blyth, S C; Bobbink, Gerjan J; Böck, R K; Böhm, A; Boldizsar, L; Borgia, B; Bourilkov, D; Bourquin, Maurice; Braccini, S; Branson, J G; Brigljevic, V; Brock, I C; Buffini, A; Buijs, A; Burger, J D; Burger, W J; Busenitz, J K; Button, A M; Cai, X D; Campanelli, M; Capell, M; Cara Romeo, G; Carlino, G; Cartacci, A M; Casaus, J; Castellini, G; Cavallari, F; Cavallo, N; Cecchi, C; Cerrada-Canales, M; Cesaroni, F; Chamizo-Llatas, M; Chang, Y H; Chaturvedi, U K; Chekanov, S V; Chemarin, M; Chen, A; Chen, G; Chen, G M; Chen, H F; Chen, H S; Chéreau, X J; Chiefari, G; Chien, C Y; Cifarelli, Luisa; Cindolo, F; Civinini, C; Clare, I; Clare, R; Cohn, H O; Coignet, G; Colijn, A P; Colino, N; Commichau, V; Costantini, S; Cotorobai, F; de la Cruz, B; Csilling, Akos; Dai, T S; D'Alessandro, R; De Asmundis, R; Degré, A; Deiters, K; Della Volpe, D; Denes, P; De Notaristefani, F; DiBitonto, Daryl; Diemoz, M; Van Dierendonck, D N; Di Lodovico, F; Dionisi, C; Dittmar, Michael; Dominguez, A; Doria, A; Dova, M T; Duchesneau, D; Duinker, P; Durán, I; Dutta, S; Easo, S; Efremenko, Yu V; El-Mamouni, H; Engler, A; Eppling, F J; Erné, F C; Ernenwein, J P; Extermann, Pierre; Fabre, M; Faccini, R; Falciano, S; Favara, A; Fay, J; Fedin, O; Felcini, Marta; Fenyi, B; Ferguson, T; Ferroni, F; Fesefeldt, H S; Fiandrini, E; Field, J H; Filthaut, Frank; Fisher, P H; Fisk, I; Forconi, G; Fredj, L; Freudenreich, Klaus; Furetta, C; Galaktionov, Yu; Ganguli, S N; García-Abia, P; Gau, S S; Gentile, S; Gheordanescu, N; Giagu, S; Goldfarb, S; Goldstein, J; Gong, Z F; Gougas, Andreas; Gratta, Giorgio; Grünewald, M W; Gupta, V K; Gurtu, A; Gutay, L J; Hartmann, B; Hasan, A; Hatzifotiadou, D; Hebbeker, T; Hervé, A; Van Hoek, W C; Hofer, H; Hong, S J; Hoorani, H; Hou, S R; Hu, G; Innocente, Vincenzo; Jenkes, K; Jin, B N; Jones, L W; de Jong, P; Josa-Mutuberria, I; Kasser, A; Khan, R A; Kamrad, D; Kamyshkov, Yu A; Kapustinsky, J S; Karyotakis, Yu; Kaur, M; Kienzle-Focacci, M N; Kim, D; Kim, D H; Kim, J K; Kim, S C; Kim, Y G; Kinnison, W W; Kirkby, A; Kirkby, D; Kirkby, Jasper; Kiss, D; Kittel, E W; Klimentov, A; König, A C; Kopp, A; Korolko, I; Koutsenko, V F; Krämer, R W; Krenz, W; Kunin, A; Ladrón de Guevara, P; Laktineh, I; Landi, G; Lapoint, C; Lassila-Perini, K M; Laurikainen, P; Lebeau, M; Lebedev, A; Lebrun, P; Lecomte, P; Lecoq, P; Le Coultre, P; Le Goff, J M; Leiste, R; Leonardi, E; Levchenko, P M; Li Chuan; Lin, C H; Lin, W T; Linde, Frank L; Lista, L; Liu, Z A; Lohmann, W; Longo, E; Lu, W; Lü, Y S; Lübelsmeyer, K; Luci, C; Luckey, D; Luminari, L; Lustermann, W; Ma Wen Gan; Maity, M; Majumder, G; Malgeri, L; Malinin, A; Maña, C; Mangeol, D J J; Mangla, S; Marchesini, P A; Marin, A; Martin, J P; Marzano, F; Massaro, G G G; McNally, D; McNeil, R R; Mele, S; Merola, L; Meschini, M; Metzger, W J; Von der Mey, M; Mi, Y; Mihul, A; Van Mil, A J W; Mirabelli, G; Mnich, J; Molnár, P; Monteleoni, B; Moore, R; Morganti, S; Moulik, T; Mount, R; Müller, S; Muheim, F; Muijs, A J M; Nahn, S; Napolitano, M; Nessi-Tedaldi, F; Newman, H; Niessen, T; Nippe, A; Nisati, A; Nowak, H; Oh, Yu D; Opitz, H; Organtini, G; Ostonen, R; Palomares, C; Pandoulas, D; Paoletti, S; Paolucci, P; Park, H K; Park, I H; Pascale, G; Passaleva, G; Patricelli, S; Paul, T; Pauluzzi, M; Paus, C; Pauss, Felicitas; Peach, D; Pei, Y J; Pensotti, S; Perret-Gallix, D; Petersen, B; Petrak, S; Pevsner, A; Piccolo, D; Pieri, M; Pinto, J C; Piroué, P A; Pistolesi, E; Plyaskin, V; Pohl, M; Pozhidaev, V; Postema, H; Produit, N; Prokofev, D; Prokofiev, D O; Rahal-Callot, G; Raja, N; Rancoita, P G; Rattaggi, M; Raven, G; Razis, P A; Read, K; Ren, D; Rescigno, M; Reucroft, S; Van Rhee, T; Riemann, S; Riles, K; Robohm, A; Rodin, J; Roe, B P; Romero, L; Rosier-Lees, S; Rosselet, P; Van Rossum, W; Roth, S; Rubio, Juan Antonio; Ruschmeier, D; Rykaczewski, H; Salicio, J; Sánchez, E; Sanders, M P; Sarakinos, M E; Sarkar, S; Sassowsky, M; Schäfer, C; Shchegelskii, V; Schmidt-Kärst, S; Schmitz, D; Schmitz, P; Scholz, N; Schopper, Herwig Franz; Schotanus, D J; Schwenke, J; Schwering, G; Sciacca, C; Sciarrino, D; Servoli, L; Shevchenko, S; Shivarov, N; Shoutko, V; Shukla, J; Shumilov, E; Shvorob, A V; Siedenburg, T; Son, D; Sopczak, André; Smith, B; Spillantini, P; Steuer, M; Stickland, D P; Stone, A; Stone, H; Stoyanov, B; Strässner, A; Strauch, K; Sudhakar, K; Sultanov, G G; Sun, L Z; Susinno, G F; Suter, H; Swain, J D; Tang, X W; Tauscher, Ludwig; Taylor, L; Ting, Samuel C C; Ting, S M; Tonutti, M; Tonwar, S C; Tóth, J; Tully, C; Tuchscherer, H; Tung, K L; Uchida, Y; Ulbricht, J; Uwer, U; Valente, E; Van de Walle, R T; Vesztergombi, G; Vetlitskii, I; Viertel, Gert M; Vivargent, M; Völkert, R; Vogel, H; Vogt, H; Vorobev, I; Vorobyov, A A; Vorvolakos, A; Wadhwa, M; Wallraff, W; Wang, J C; Wang, X L; Wang, Z M; Weber, A; Wittgenstein, F; Wu, S X; Wynhoff, S; Xu, J; Xu, Z Z; Yang, B Z; Yang, C G; Yao, X Y; Ye, J B; Yeh, S C; You, J M; Zalite, A; Zalite, Yu; Zemp, P; Zeng, Y; Zhang, Z; Zhang, Z P; Zhou, B; Zhu, G Y; Zhu, R Y; Zichichi, Antonino; Ziegler, F

    1997-01-01

    A search for single and multi-photon events with missing energy is performed using data collected at centre-of-mass energies between 161 GeV and 172 GeV for a total of 20.9 pb$^{-1}$ of integrated luminosity. The results obtained are used to derive the value for the $\

  9. Direct in vitro and in vivo comparison of {sup 161}Tb and {sup 177}Lu using a tumour-targeting folate conjugate

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mueller, Cristina; Reber, Josefine; Haller, Stephanie [Paul Scherrer Institute, Center for Radiopharmaceutical Sciences ETH-PSI-USZ, Villigen (Switzerland); Dorrer, Holger; Tuerler, Andreas [Paul Scherrer Institute, Laboratory of Radiochemistry and Environmental Chemistry, Villigen (Switzerland); University of Bern, Laboratory of Radiochemistry and Environmental Chemistry, Department of Chemistry and Biochemistry, Bern (Switzerland); Bernhardt, Peter [The Sahlgrenska Academy, University of Gothenburg, Department of Radiation Physics, Gothenburg (Sweden); Sahlgrenska University Hospital, Department of Medical Physics and Medical Bioengeneering, Gothenburg (Sweden); Zhernosekov, Konstantin [Paul Scherrer Institute, Laboratory of Radiochemistry and Environmental Chemistry, Villigen (Switzerland); Schibli, Roger [Paul Scherrer Institute, Center for Radiopharmaceutical Sciences ETH-PSI-USZ, Villigen (Switzerland); ETH Zurich, Department of Chemistry and Applied Biosciences, Zurich (Switzerland)

    2014-03-15

    The radiolanthanide {sup 161}Tb (T{sub 1/2} = 6.90 days, Eβ{sup -}{sub av} = 154 keV) was recently proposed as a potential alternative to {sup 177}Lu (T{sub 1/2} = 6.71 days, Eβ{sup -}{sub av} = 134 keV) due to similar physical decay characteristics but additional conversion and Auger electrons that may enhance the therapeutic efficacy. The goal of this study was to compare {sup 161}Tb and {sup 177}Lu in vitro and in vivo using a tumour-targeted DOTA-folate conjugate (cm09). {sup 161}Tb-cm09 and {sup 177}Lu-cm09 were tested in vitro on folate receptor (FR)-positive KB and IGROV-1 cancer cells using a 3-(4,5-dimethylthiazol-2-yl)-2,5-diphenyltetrazolium bromide (MTT) viability assay. In vivo {sup 161}Tb-cm09 and {sup 177}Lu-cm09 (10 MBq, 0.5 nmol) were investigated in two different tumour mouse models with regard to the biodistribution, the possibility for single photon emission computed tomography (SPECT) imaging and the antitumour efficacy. Potentially undesired side effects were monitored over 6 months by determination of plasma parameters and examination of kidney function with quantitative SPECT using {sup 99m}Tc-dimercaptosuccinic acid (DMSA). To obtain half-maximal inhibition of tumour cell viability a 4.5-fold (KB) and 1.7-fold (IGROV-1) lower radioactivity concentration was required for {sup 161}Tb-cm09 (IC{sub 50} ∝0.014 MBq/ml and ∝2.53 MBq/ml) compared to {sup 177}Lu-cm09 (IC{sub 50} ∝0.063 MBq/ml and ∝4.52 MBq/ml). SPECT imaging visualized tumours of mice with both radioconjugates. However, in therapy studies {sup 161}Tb-cm09 reduced tumour growth more efficiently than {sup 177}Lu-cm09. These findings were in line with the higher absorbed tumour dose for {sup 161}Tb-cm09 (3.3 Gy/MBq) compared to {sup 177}Lu-cm09 (2.4 Gy/MBq). None of the monitored parameters indicated signs of impaired kidney function over the whole time period of investigation after injection of the radiofolates. Compared to {sup 177}Lu-cm09 we demonstrated equal imaging

  10. How Are Substrate Binding and Catalysis Affected by Mutating Glu127 and Arg161 in Prolyl-4-hydroxylase? A QM/MM and MD Study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Timmins, Amy; de Visser, Sam P.

    2017-01-01

    Prolyl-4-hydroxylase is a vital enzyme for human physiology involved in the biosynthesis of 4-hydroxyproline, an essential component for collagen formation. The enzyme performs a unique stereo- and regioselective hydroxylation at the C4 position of proline despite the fact that the C5 hydrogen atoms should be thermodynamically easier to abstract. To gain insight into the mechanism and find the origin of this regioselectivity, we have done a quantum mechanics/molecular mechanics (QM/MM) study on wildtype and mutant structures. In a previous study (Timmins et al., 2017) we identified several active site residues critical for substrate binding and positioning. In particular, the Glu127 and Arg161 were shown to form multiple hydrogen bonding and ion-dipole interactions with substrate and could thereby affect the regio- and stereoselectivity of the reaction. In this work, we decided to test that hypothesis and report a QM/MM and molecular dynamics (MD) study on prolyl-4-hydroxylase and several active site mutants where Glu127 or Arg161 are mutated for Asp, Gln, or Lys. Thus, the R161D and R161Q mutants give very high barriers for hydrogen atom abstraction from any proline C–H bond and therefore will be inactive. The R161K mutant, by contrast, sees the regio- and stereoselectivity of the reaction change but still is expected to hydroxylate proline at room temperature. By contrast, the Glu127 mutants E127D and E127Q show possible changes in regioselectivity with the former being more probable to react compared to the latter. PMID:29170737

  11. The Association of PPARγ Pro12Ala and C161T Polymorphisms with Polycystic Ovary Syndrome and Their Influence on Lipid and Lipoprotein Profiles

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zohreh Rahimi

    2018-05-01

    Full Text Available Background The aim of present study was to clarify the role of the peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor (PPAR γ Pro12Ala and C161T polymorphisms in the pathogenesis of polycystic ovary syndrome (PCOS and their influence on lipid and lipoprotein profiles of patients. Materials and Methods The present cross-sectional study consisted of 50 women with PCOS, who referred to the Kermanshah University of Medical Sciences Clinic between April and October 2015, and 233 unrelated age-matched healthy women from the same region (West Iran. The PPARγ Pro12Ala and PPARγ C161T polymorphisms were gen- otyped using the polymerase chain reaction-restriction fragment length polymorphism method. Fasting blood sugar (FBS, serum triglycerides (TG, cholesterol, low density lipoprotein- cholesterol (LDL-C, high density lipoprotein- cholesterol (HDL-C and estradiol levels were measured. Results The serum level of estradiol was significantly lower in PCOS patients compared to healthy women. The PPARγ Pro12Ala (CG genotype increased the risk of PCOS 2.96-fold. The frequency of the PPARγ T allele (at C161T was 21% in patients and 17.2% in controls with no significant difference (P=0.52. In all studied individuals, the PPARγ CG geno- type was associated with significantly higher levels of TG. However, significantly lower levels of total cholesterol and LDL-C were observed in PPARγ TT individuals compared with those with the CC genotype. Within the PCOS group, the PPARγ CG genotype was significantly associated with lower levels of estradiol compared with the CC genotype. Also, the CG genotype was significantly associated with higher levels of TG when compared with the CC genotype. Conclusion Our study shows that, unlike PPARγ C161T, PPARγ Pro12Ala is associated with the risk of PCOS. Also, we found that the lipid and lipoprotein profiles significantly vary based on PPARγ Pro12Ala and C161T genotypes.

  12. How Are Substrate Binding and Catalysis Affected by Mutating Glu127 and Arg161 in Prolyl-4-hydroxylase? A QM/MM and MD Study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Amy Timmins

    2017-11-01

    Full Text Available Prolyl-4-hydroxylase is a vital enzyme for human physiology involved in the biosynthesis of 4-hydroxyproline, an essential component for collagen formation. The enzyme performs a unique stereo- and regioselective hydroxylation at the C4 position of proline despite the fact that the C5 hydrogen atoms should be thermodynamically easier to abstract. To gain insight into the mechanism and find the origin of this regioselectivity, we have done a quantum mechanics/molecular mechanics (QM/MM study on wildtype and mutant structures. In a previous study (Timmins et al., 2017 we identified several active site residues critical for substrate binding and positioning. In particular, the Glu127 and Arg161 were shown to form multiple hydrogen bonding and ion-dipole interactions with substrate and could thereby affect the regio- and stereoselectivity of the reaction. In this work, we decided to test that hypothesis and report a QM/MM and molecular dynamics (MD study on prolyl-4-hydroxylase and several active site mutants where Glu127 or Arg161 are mutated for Asp, Gln, or Lys. Thus, the R161D and R161Q mutants give very high barriers for hydrogen atom abstraction from any proline C–H bond and therefore will be inactive. The R161K mutant, by contrast, sees the regio- and stereoselectivity of the reaction change but still is expected to hydroxylate proline at room temperature. By contrast, the Glu127 mutants E127D and E127Q show possible changes in regioselectivity with the former being more probable to react compared to the latter.

  13. A spanish mineral of zirconium and hafnium. Separation of the two elements by liquid-liquid extraction, using tributyl phosphate as chelating agent; Beneficio de un mineral espanol de circonio-hafnio. Separacion de ambos elementos por extraccion liquido-liquido, empleando fosfato de tributilo como agente de quelacion

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ruiz Sanchez, F; Cruz Castillo, F. de la; Fernandez Cellini, R

    1962-07-01

    The zirconium and Hafnium oxides are obtained from a Spanish mineral of zircon with an average contest of 55% in ZrO{sub 2}-HfO{sub 2}. An alkaline fusion to open the mineral, followed by a purification by crystallization as (Zr O-Hf O)Cl{sub 2} H{sub 2}O or as (Zr-Hf) (SO{sub 4}){sub 2}. 4H{sub 2}O, is used. A discussion of the best experimental conditions for opening the mineral and of the purification method is made. (Author) 45 refs.

  14. Post-irradiation examination of A1-61 wt % U3Si fuel rods from the NRU reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sears, D.F.; Wang, N.

    1997-09-01

    This paper describes the post-irradiation examination of 4 intact low-enrichment uranium (LEU) fuel rods from the national research universal (NRU) reactor at the Chalk River Laboratories of AECL. The rods were irradiated during the period 1993 through 1995, under typical driver fuel operating conditions in NRU, i.e., nominal D 2 0 coolant inlet temperature 37 degrees C, inlet pressure 654 kPa and mass flow 12.4 L/s. Irradiation exposures ranged from 147 to 251 full-power days, corresponding to 40 to 84 atom % 235 U burnup. The maximum rod power was ∼2 MW, with element linear power ratings up to 68 kW/m. Post-irradiation examinations, conducted in 1997, focused on optical metallography to measure cladding oxide thickness and fuel core and cladding microstructural examinations. The cladding oxide was approximately 24 μm thick at the mid-plane of fuel rods irradiated to 251 full-power days, with small areas up to 34 μm thick on the fins. The cladding retained significant ductility after irradiation, and its microstructure appeared unchanged. Fuel core diametral increases were small (up to 4%) and within the range previously observed on A1-61 wt % U 3 Si fuel irradiated in the NRU reactor. (author)

  15. Central and Eastern European countries between the 16+1 platform and Chinese OBOR - One Belt, One Road - Initiative

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    George Cornel Dumitrescu

    2016-04-01

    Full Text Available This paper aims at analysing the projects and the initiatives of the Central and Eastern European countries that have been finalised, are in progress or will be developed in the near future with the help of the existing or future financial instruments specific to the 16+1 platform and the One Belt, One Road complex program. For our research we selected four countries, namely: Poland, Romania, Serbia and Hungary, the group being relevant from the perspective of the transportation corridors connected to the ”One Belt, One Road” initiative: (1 - Piraeus, Skopje, Belgrade, Budapest, Western Europe; (2 - Suez Canal, Constanta and then Danube, Western Europe, or through Moldova towards Ukraine and Poland; (3 – Constanta, through the Black Sea and Caspian Sea and then the corridors mentioned at the previous point. We based our analysis on the data provided by the National Bureau of Statistics of China, China-CEEC think-tank network and the literature in the field.

  16. CNV-association meta-analysis in 191,161 European adults reveals new loci associated with anthropometric traits

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Macé, Aurélien; Tuke, Marcus A; Deelen, Patrick

    2017-01-01

    There are few examples of robust associations between rare copy number variants (CNVs) and complex continuous human traits. Here we present a large-scale CNV association meta-analysis on anthropometric traits in up to 191,161 adult samples from 26 cohorts. The study reveals five CNV associations......-scale genome-wide meta-analysis of structural variation and find rare CNVs associated with height, weight and BMI with large effect sizes.......)). Burden analysis shows a 0.41 cm decrease in height, a 0.003 increase in waist-to-hip ratio and increase in BMI by 0.14 kg/m(2) for each Mb of total deletion burden (P = 2.5 × 10(-10), 6.0 × 10(-5), and 2.9 × 10(-3)). Our study provides evidence that the same genes (e.g., MC4R, FIBIN, and FMO5) harbor...

  17. Di-Jet Production in Photon-Photon Collisions at $\\sqrt{s}_{ee}$ = 161 and 172 GeV

    CERN Document Server

    Abbiendi, G.; Alexander, G.; Allison, John; Altekamp, N.; Anderson, K.J.; Anderson, S.; Arcelli, S.; Asai, S.; Ashby, S.F.; Axen, D.; Azuelos, G.; Ball, A.H.; Barberio, E.; Barillari, T.; Barlow, Roger J.; Bartoldus, R.; Batley, J.R.; Baumann, S.; Bechtluft, J.; Behnke, T.; Bell, Kenneth Watson; Bella, G.; Bellerive, A.; Bentvelsen, S.; Bethke, S.; Betts, S.; Biebel, O.; Biguzzi, A.; Bird, S.D.; Blobel, V.; Bloodworth, I.J.; Bobinski, M.; Bock, P.; Bohme, J.; Bonacorsi, D.; Boutemeur, M.; Braibant, S.; Bright-Thomas, P.; Brigliadori, L.; Brown, Robert M.; Burckhart, H.J.; Burgard, C.; Burgin, R.; Capiluppi, P.; Carnegie, R.K.; Carter, A.A.; Carter, J.R.; Chang, C.Y.; Charlton, David G.; Chrisman, D.; Ciocca, C.; Clarke, P.E.L.; Clay, E.; Cohen, I.; Conboy, J.E.; Cooke, O.C.; Couyoumtzelis, C.; Coxe, R.L.; Cuffiani, M.; Dado, S.; Dallavalle, G.Marco; Davis, R.; De Jong, S.; del Pozo, L.A.; De Roeck, A.; Desch, K.; Dienes, B.; Dixit, M.S.; Dubbert, J.; Duchovni, E.; Duckeck, G.; Duerdoth, I.P.; Eatough, D.; Estabrooks, P.G.; Etzion, E.; Evans, H.G.; Fabbri, F.; Fanti, M.; Faust, A.A.; Fiedler, F.; Fierro, M.; Fleck, I.; Folman, R.; Furtjes, A.; Futyan, D.I.; Gagnon, P.; Gary, J.W.; Gascon, J.; Gascon-Shotkin, S.M.; Gaycken, G.; Geich-Gimbel, C.; Giacomelli, G.; Giacomelli, P.; Gibson, V.; Gibson, W.R.; Gingrich, D.M.; Glenzinski, D.; Goldberg, J.; Gorn, W.; Grandi, C.; Gross, E.; Grunhaus, J.; Gruwe, M.; Hanson, G.G.; Hansroul, M.; Hapke, M.; Harder, K.; Hargrove, C.K.; Hartmann, C.; Hauschild, M.; Hawkes, C.M.; Hawkings, R.; Hemingway, R.J.; Herndon, M.; Herten, G.; Heuer, R.D.; Hildreth, M.D.; Hill, J.C.; Hillier, S.J.; Hobson, P.R.; Hocker, James Andrew; Homer, R.J.; Honma, A.K.; Horvath, D.; Hossain, K.R.; Howard, R.; Huntemeyer, P.; Igo-Kemenes, P.; Imrie, D.C.; Ishii, K.; Jacob, F.R.; Jawahery, A.; Jeremie, H.; Jimack, M.; Jones, C.R.; Jovanovic, P.; Junk, T.R.; Karlen, D.; Kartvelishvili, V.; Kawagoe, K.; Kawamoto, T.; Kayal, P.I.; Keeler, R.K.; Kellogg, R.G.; Kennedy, B.W.; Klier, A.; Kluth, S.; Kobayashi, T.; Kobel, M.; Koetke, D.S.; Kokott, T.P.; Kolrep, M.; Komamiya, S.; Kowalewski, Robert V.; Kress, T.; Krieger, P.; von Krogh, J.; Kuhl, T.; Kyberd, P.; Lafferty, G.D.; Lanske, D.; Lauber, J.; Lautenschlager, S.R.; Lawson, I.; Layter, J.G.; Lazic, D.; Lee, A.M.; Lellouch, D.; Letts, J.; Levinson, L.; Liebisch, R.; List, B.; Littlewood, C.; Lloyd, A.W.; Lloyd, S.L.; Loebinger, F.K.; Long, G.D.; Losty, M.J.; Ludwig, J.; Lui, D.; Macchiolo, A.; Macpherson, A.; Mader, W.; Mannelli, M.; Marcellini, S.; Markopoulos, C.; Martin, A.J.; Martin, J.P.; Martinez, G.; Mashimo, T.; Mattig, Peter; McDonald, W.John; McKenna, J.; Mckigney, E.A.; McMahon, T.J.; McPherson, R.A.; Meijers, F.; Menke, S.; Merritt, F.S.; Mes, H.; Meyer, J.; Michelini, A.; Mihara, S.; Mikenberg, G.; Miller, D.J.; Mir, R.; Mohr, W.; Montanari, A.; Mori, T.; Nagai, K.; Nakamura, I.; Neal, H.A.; Nellen, B.; Nisius, R.; O'Neale, S.W.; Oakham, F.G.; Odorici, F.; Ogren, H.O.; Oreglia, M.J.; Orito, S.; Palinkas, J.; Pasztor, G.; Pater, J.R.; Patrick, G.N.; Patt, J.; Perez-Ochoa, R.; Petzold, S.; Pfeifenschneider, P.; Pilcher, J.E.; Pinfold, J.; Plane, David E.; Poffenberger, P.; Polok, J.; Przybycien, M.; Rembser, C.; Rick, H.; Robertson, S.; Robins, S.A.; Rodning, N.; Roney, J.M.; Roscoe, K.; Rossi, A.M.; Rozen, Y.; Runge, K.; Runolfsson, O.; Rust, D.R.; Sachs, K.; Saeki, T.; Sahr, O.; Sang, W.M.; Sarkisian, E.K.G.; Sbarra, C.; Schaile, A.D.; Schaile, O.; Scharf, F.; Scharff-Hansen, P.; Schieck, J.; Schmitt, B.; Schmitt, S.; Schoning, A.; Schroder, Matthias; Schumacher, M.; Schwick, C.; Scott, W.G.; Seuster, R.; Shears, T.G.; Shen, B.C.; Shepherd-Themistocleous, C.H.; Sherwood, P.; Siroli, G.P.; Sittler, A.; Skuja, A.; Smith, A.M.; Snow, G.A.; Sobie, R.; Soldner-Rembold, S.; Sproston, M.; Stahl, A.; Stephens, K.; Steuerer, J.; Stoll, K.; Strom, David M.; Strohmer, R.; Surrow, B.; Talbot, S.D.; Tanaka, S.; Taras, P.; Tarem, S.; Teuscher, R.; Thiergen, M.; Thomson, M.A.; von Torne, E.; Torrence, E.; Towers, S.; Trigger, I.; Trocsanyi, Z.; Tsur, E.; Turcot, A.S.; Turner-Watson, M.F.; Van Kooten, Rick J.; Vannerem, P.; Verzocchi, M.; Voss, H.; Wackerle, F.; Wagner, A.; Ward, C.P.; Ward, D.R.; Watkins, P.M.; Watson, A.T.; Watson, N.K.; Wells, P.S.; Wermes, N.; White, J.S.; Wilson, G.W.; Wilson, J.A.; Wyatt, T.R.; Yamashita, S.; Yekutieli, G.; Zacek, V.; Zer-Zion, D.

    1999-01-01

    Di-jet production is studied in collisions of quasi-real photons radiated by the LEP beams at e+e- centre-of-mass energies 161 and 172 GeV. The jets are reconstructed using a cone jet finding algorithm. The angular distributions of direct and double-resolved processes are measured and compared to the predictions of leading order and next-to-leading order perturbative QCD. The jet energy profiles are also studied. The inclusive two-jet cross-section is measured as a function of transverse energy and rapidity and compared to next-to-leading order perturbative QCD calculations. The inclusive two-jet cross-section as a function of rapidity is compared to the prediction of the leading order Monte Carlo generators PYTHIA and PHOJET. The Monte Carlo predictions are calculated with different parametrisations of the parton distributions of the photon. The influence of the `underlying event' has been studied to reduce the model dependence of the predicted jet cross-sections from the Monte Carlo generators.

  18. 16.1% Efficient Hysteresis-Free Mesostructured Perovskite Solar Cells Based on Synergistically Improved ZnO Nanorod Arrays

    KAUST Repository

    Mahmood, Khalid

    2015-06-01

    Significant efficiency improvements are reported in mesoscopic perovskite solar cells based on the development of a low-temperature solution-processed ZnO nanorod (NR) array exhibiting higher NR aspect ratio, enhanced electron density, and substantially reduced work function than conventional ZnO NRs. These features synergistically result in hysteresis-free, scan-independent, and stabilized devices with an efficiency of 16.1%. Electron-rich, nitrogen-doped ZnO (N:ZnO) NR-based electron transporting materials (ETMs) with enhanced electron mobility produced using ammonium acetate show consistently higher efficiencies by one to three power points than undoped ZnO NRs. Additionally, the preferential electrostatic interaction between the -nonpolar facets of N:ZnO and the conjugated polyelectrolyte polyethylenimine (PEI) has been relied on to promote the hydrothermal growth of high aspect ratio NR arrays and substantially improve the infiltration of the perovskite light absorber into the ETM. Using the same interactions, a conformal PEI coating on the electron-rich high aspect ratio N:ZnO NR arrays is -successfully applied, resulting in a favorable work function shift and altogether leading to the significant boost in efficiency from <10% up to >16%. These results largely surpass the state-of-the-art PCE of ZnO-based perovskite solar cells and highlight the benefits of synergistically combining mesoscale control with doping and surface modification. © 2015 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  19. Searches for charginos and neutralinos in $e^+ e^-$ collisions at $\\sqrt{s}$ = 161 and 172 GeV

    CERN Document Server

    Barate, R; Décamp, D; Ghez, P; Goy, C; Lees, J P; Lucotte, A; Minard, M N; Nief, J Y; Pietrzyk, B; Casado, M P; Chmeissani, M; Comas, P; Crespo, J M; Delfino, M C; Fernández, E; Fernández-Bosman, M; Garrido, L; Juste, A; Martínez, M; Merino, G; Miquel, R; Mir, L M; Padilla, C; Park, I C; Pascual, A; Perlas, J A; Riu, I; Sánchez, F; Colaleo, A; Creanza, D; De Palma, M; Gelao, G; Iaselli, Giuseppe; Maggi, G; Maggi, M; Marinelli, N; Nuzzo, S; Ranieri, A; Raso, G; Ruggieri, F; Selvaggi, G; Silvestris, L; Tempesta, P; Tricomi, A; Zito, G; Huang, X; Lin, J; Ouyang, Q; Wang, T; Xie, Y; Xu, R; Xue, S; Zhang, J; Zhang, L; Zhao, W; Abbaneo, D; Alemany, R; Bazarko, A O; Becker, U; Bright-Thomas, P G; Cattaneo, M; Cerutti, F; Dissertori, G; Drevermann, H; Forty, Roger W; Frank, M; Gianotti, F; Hagelberg, R; Hansen, J B; Harvey, J; Janot, P; Jost, B; Kneringer, E; Lehraus, Ivan; Mato, P; Minten, Adolf G; Moneta, L; Pacheco, A; Pusztaszeri, J F; Ranjard, F; Rizzo, G; Rolandi, Luigi; Rousseau, D; Schlatter, W D; Schmitt, M; Schneider, O; Tejessy, W; Teubert, F; Tomalin, I R; Wachsmuth, H W; Wagner, A; Ajaltouni, Ziad J; Barrès, A; Boyer, C; Falvard, A; Ferdi, C; Gay, P; Guicheney, C; Henrard, P; Jousset, J; Michel, B; Monteil, S; Montret, J C; Pallin, D; Perret, P; Podlyski, F; Proriol, J; Rosnet, P; Rossignol, J M; Fearnley, Tom; Hansen, J D; Hansen, J R; Hansen, P H; Nilsson, B S; Rensch, B; Wäänänen, A; Daskalakis, G; Kyriakis, A; Markou, C; Simopoulou, Errietta; Vayaki, Anna; Blondel, A; Brient, J C; Machefert, F P; Rougé, A; Rumpf, M; Valassi, Andrea; Videau, H L; Boccali, T; Focardi, E; Parrini, G; Zachariadou, K; Cavanaugh, R J; Corden, M; Georgiopoulos, C H; Hühn, T; Jaffe, D E; Antonelli, A; Bencivenni, G; Bologna, G; Bossi, F; Campana, P; Capon, G; Casper, David William; Chiarella, V; Felici, G; Laurelli, P; Mannocchi, G; Murtas, F; Murtas, G P; Passalacqua, L; Pepé-Altarelli, M; Curtis, L; Dorris, S J; Halley, A W; Knowles, I G; Lynch, J G; O'Shea, V; Raine, C; Scarr, J M; Smith, K; Teixeira-Dias, P; Thompson, A S; Thomson, E; Thomson, F; Turnbull, R M; Buchmüller, O L; Dhamotharan, S; Geweniger, C; Graefe, G; Hanke, P; Hansper, G; Hepp, V; Kluge, E E; Putzer, A; Sommer, J; Tittel, K; Werner, S; Wunsch, M; Beuselinck, R; Binnie, David M; Cameron, W; Dornan, Peter J; Girone, M; Goodsir, S M; Martin, E B; Morawitz, P; Moutoussi, A; Nash, J; Sedgbeer, J K; Spagnolo, P; Stacey, A M; Williams, M D; Ghete, V M; Girtler, P; Kuhn, D; Rudolph, G; Betteridge, A P; Bowdery, C K; Buck, P G; Colrain, P; Crawford, G; Finch, A J; Foster, F; Hughes, G; Jones, R W L; Sloan, Terence; Whelan, E P; Williams, M I; Giehl, I; Hoffmann, C; Jakobs, K; Kleinknecht, K; Quast, G; Renk, B; Rohne, E; Sander, H G; Van Gemmeren, P; Zeitnitz, C; Aubert, Jean-Jacques; Benchouk, C; Bonissent, A; Bujosa, G; Carr, J; Coyle, P; Diaconu, C A; Ealet, A; Fouchez, D; Konstantinidis, N P; Leroy, O; Motsch, F; Payre, P; Talby, M; Sadouki, A; Thulasidas, M; Tilquin, A; Trabelsi, K; Aleppo, M; Antonelli, M; Ragusa, F; Berlich, R; Blum, Walter; Büscher, V; Dietl, H; Ganis, G; Gotzhein, C; Kroha, H; Lütjens, G; Lutz, Gerhard; Männer, W; Moser, H G; Richter, R H; Rosado-Schlosser, A; Schael, S; Settles, Ronald; Seywerd, H C J; Saint-Denis, R; Stenzel, H; Wiedenmann, W; Wolf, G; Boucrot, J; Callot, O; Chen, S; Davier, M; Duflot, L; Grivaz, J F; Heusse, P; Höcker, A; Jacholkowska, A; Kim, D W; Le Diberder, F R; Lefrançois, J; Lutz, A M; Marumi, M; Schune, M H; Serin, L; Tournefier, E; Veillet, J J; Videau, I; Zerwas, D; Azzurri, P; Bagliesi, G; Bettarini, S; Bozzi, C; Calderini, G; Ciulli, V; Dell'Orso, R; Fantechi, R; Ferrante, I; Giassi, A; Gregorio, A; Ligabue, F; Lusiani, A; Marrocchesi, P S; Messineo, A; Palla, Fabrizio; Sanguinetti, G; Sciabà, A; Sguazzoni, G; Steinberger, Jack; Tenchini, Roberto; Vannini, C; Venturi, A; Verdini, P G; Blair, G A; Bryant, L M; Chambers, J T; Green, M G; Medcalf, T; Perrodo, P; Strong, J A; Von Wimmersperg-Töller, J H; Botterill, David R; Clifft, R W; Edgecock, T R; Haywood, S; Maley, P; Norton, P R; Thompson, J C; Wright, A E; Bloch-Devaux, B; Colas, P; Fabbro, B; Lançon, E; Lemaire, M C; Locci, E; Pérez, P; Rander, J; Renardy, J F; Rosowsky, A; Roussarie, A; Schwindling, J; Trabelsi, A; Vallage, B; Black, S N; Dann, J H; Kim, H Y; Litke, A M; McNeil, M A; Taylor, G; Booth, C N; Brew, C A J; Cartwright, S L; Combley, F; Kelly, M S; Lehto, M H; Reeve, J; Thompson, L F; Affholderbach, K; Böhrer, A; Brandt, S; Cowan, G D; Foss, J; Grupen, Claus; Smolik, L; Stephan, F; Apollonio, M; Bosisio, L; Della Marina, R; Giannini, G; Gobbo, B; Musolino, G; Pütz, J; Rothberg, J E; Wasserbaech, S R; Williams, R W; Armstrong, S R; Charles, E; Elmer, P; Ferguson, D P S; Gao, Y; González, S; Greening, T C; Hayes, O J; Hu, H; Jin, S; McNamara, P A; Nachtman, J M; Nielsen, J; Orejudos, W; Pan, Y B; Saadi, Y; Scott, I J; Walsh, J; Wu Sau Lan; Wu, X; Yamartino, J M; Zobernig, G

    1998-01-01

    The data recorded by the ALEPH detector at centre-of-mass energies of 161, 170, and 172 GeV are analysed for signals of chargino and neutralino production. No evidence of a signal is found, although candidate events consistent with the expectations from Standard Model processes are observed. Limits at 95% C.L. on the production cross sections are derived and bounds on the parameters of the Minimal Supersymmetric Standard Model are set. The lower limit on the mass of the lightest chargino is 85.5 GeV/c^2 for gaugino-like charginos (mu = -500 GeV/c^2), and 85.0 GeV/c^2 for Higgsino-like charginos (M_2 = 500 GeV/c^2), for heavy sneutrinos (M(snu) > 200 GeV/c^2) and tanb = sqrt(2). The effect of light sleptons on chargino and neutralino limits is investigated. The assumptions of a universal slepton mass and a universal gaugino mass are relaxed, allowing less model-dependent limits to be obtained.

  20. Experimental system description for air-water CCFL tests of the 161-rod FLECHT-SEASET test vessel upper plenum

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fogdall, S.P.; Anderson, J.L.

    1983-01-01

    A series of countercurrent flow limiting (CCFL) experiments has been performed by EG and G Idaho, Inc. in the Steam-Air-Water (SAW) test facility at the Idaho National Engineering Laboratory on behalf of the US Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC). Tests were performed in a mockup of the vessel for the 161-Rod Systems Effects Test (SET) facility of the FLECHT-SEASET program, conducted by the Westinghouse Electric Corporation. Westinghouse and the NRC will use the test results to provide a CCFL correlation to predict the flooding behavior in the upper plenum of the SET vessel. This paper presents a description of the experimental system and the test conduct, including data validation and uncertainty analysis. The test objectives centered on experimentally obtaining coefficients in the Wallis correlation for flooding with the specific vessel geometry. The test conditions and vessel configuration are described and the design of the test loop, instrumentation, and data acquisition are discussed. The establishment of a test point and the resultant data are described

  1. Measurement and interpretation of the W-pair cross-section in $e^+ e^-$ interactions at 161 GeV

    CERN Document Server

    Abreu, P; Adye, T; Adzic, P; Ajinenko, I; Alekseev, G D; Alemany, R; Allport, P P; Almehed, S; Amaldi, Ugo; Amato, S; Andreazza, A; Andrieux, M L; Antilogus, P; Apel, W D; Åsman, B; Augustin, J E; Augustinus, A; Baillon, Paul; Bambade, P; Barão, F; Barbi, M S; Bardin, Dimitri Yuri; Barker, G; Baroncelli, A; Bärring, O; Barrio, J A; Bartl, Walter; Bates, M J; Battaglia, Marco; Baubillier, M; Baudot, J; Becks, K H; Begalli, M; Beillière, P; Belokopytov, Yu A; Belous, K S; Benvenuti, Alberto C; Berggren, M; Bertini, D; Bertrand, D; Besançon, M; Bianchi, F; Bigi, M; Bilenky, S M; Billoir, P; Bizouard, M A; Bloch, D; Blume, M; Bolognese, T; Bonesini, M; Bonivento, W; Booth, P S L; Bosio, C; Botner, O; Boudinov, E; Bouquet, B; Bourdarios, C; Bowcock, T J V; Bozzo, M; Branchini, P; Brand, K D; Brenke, T; Brenner, R A; Bricman, C; Brown, R C A; Brückman, P; Brunet, J M; Bugge, L; Buran, T; Burgsmüller, T; Buschmann, P; Cabrera, S; Caccia, M; Calvi, M; Camacho-Rozas, A J; Camporesi, T; Canale, V; Canepa, M; Cankocak, K; Cao, F; Carena, F; Carroll, L; Caso, Carlo; Castillo-Gimenez, M V; Cattai, A; Cavallo, F R; Chabaud, V; Charpentier, P; Chaussard, L; Checchia, P; Chelkov, G A; Chen, M; Chierici, R; Chliapnikov, P V; Chochula, P; Chorowicz, V; Chudoba, J; Cindro, V; Collins, P; Contri, R; Cortina, E; Cosme, G; Cossutti, F; Cowell, J H; Crawley, H B; Crennell, D J; Crosetti, G; Cuevas-Maestro, J; Czellar, S; Dahl-Jensen, Erik; Dahm, J; D'Almagne, B; Dam, M; Damgaard, G; Dauncey, P D; Davenport, Martyn; Da Silva, W; Defoix, C; Deghorain, A; Della Ricca, G; Delpierre, P A; Demaria, N; De Angelis, A; de Boer, Wim; De Brabandere, S; De Clercq, C; La Vaissière, C de; De Lotto, B; De Min, A; De Paula, L S; De Saint-Jean, C; Dijkstra, H; Di Ciaccio, Lucia; Di Diodato, A; Djannati, A; Dolbeau, J; Doroba, K; Dracos, M; Drees, J; Drees, K A; Dris, M; Durand, J D; Edsall, D M; Ehret, R; Eigen, G; Ekelöf, T J C; Ekspong, Gösta; Elsing, M; Engel, J P; Erzen, B; Falk, E; Fanourakis, G K; Fassouliotis, D; Feindt, Michael; Ferrari, P; Ferrer, A; Fichet, S; Filippas-Tassos, A; Firestone, A; Fischer, P A; Föth, H; Fokitis, E; Fontanelli, F; Formenti, F; Franek, B J; Frenkiel, P; Frodesen, A G; Frühwirth, R; Fulda-Quenzer, F; Fuster, J A; Galloni, A; Gamba, D; Gandelman, M; García, C; García, J; Gaspar, C; Gasparini, U; Gavillet, P; Gazis, E N; Gelé, D; Gerber, J P; Gerdyukov, L N; Gokieli, R; Golob, B; Gonçalves, P; Gopal, Gian P; Gorn, L; Górski, M; Guz, Yu; Gracco, Valerio; Graziani, E; Green, C; Grefrath, A; Gris, P; Grosdidier, G; Grzelak, K; Gumenyuk, S A; Gunnarsson, P; Günther, M; Guy, J; Hahn, F; Hahn, S; Hajduk, Z; Hallgren, A; Hamacher, K; Harris, F J; Hedberg, V; Henriques, R P; Hernández, J J; Herquet, P; Herr, H; Hessing, T L; Heuser, J M; Higón, E; Hilke, Hans Jürgen; Hill, T S; Holmgren, S O; Holt, P J; Holthuizen, D J; Hoorelbeke, S; Houlden, M A; Hrubec, Josef; Huet, K; Hultqvist, K; Jackson, J N; Jacobsson, R; Jalocha, P; Janik, R; Jarlskog, C; Jarlskog, G; Jarry, P; Jean-Marie, B; Johansson, E K; Jönsson, L B; Jönsson, P E; Joram, Christian; Juillot, P; Kaiser, M; Kapusta, F; Karafasoulis, K; Karlsson, M; Katsanevas, S; Katsoufis, E C; Keränen, R; Khokhlov, Yu A; Khomenko, B A; Khovanskii, N N; King, B J; Kjaer, N J; Klapp, O; Klein, H; Klovning, A; Kluit, P M; Knoblauch, D; Kokkinias, P; Konoplyannikov, A K; Koratzinos, M; Korcyl, K; Kostyukhin, V; Kourkoumelis, C; Kuznetsov, O; Krammer, Manfred; Kreuter, C; Kronkvist, I J; Krumshtein, Z; Krupinski, W; Kubinec, P; Kucewicz, W; Kurvinen, K L; Lacasta, C; Laktineh, I; Lamsa, J; Lanceri, L; Lane, D W; Langefeld, P; Laugier, J P; Lauhakangas, R; Leder, Gerhard; Ledroit, F; Lefébure, V; Legan, C K; Leisos, A; Leitner, R; Lemonne, J; Lenzen, Georg; Lepeltier, V; Lesiak, T; Libby, J; Liko, D; Lindner, R; Lipniacka, A; Lippi, I; Lörstad, B; Loken, J G; López, J M; Loukas, D; Lutz, P; Lyons, L; MacNaughton, J N; Maehlum, G; Mahon, J R; Maio, A; Malmgren, T G M; Malychev, V; Marco, J; Marco, R P; Maréchal, B; Margoni, M; Marin, J C; Mariotti, C; Markou, A; Martínez-Rivero, C; Martínez-Vidal, F; Martí i García, S; Masik, J; Matorras, F; Matteuzzi, C; Matthiae, Giorgio; Mazzucato, M; McCubbin, M L; McKay, R; McNulty, R; Medbo, J; Merk, M; Meroni, C; Meyer, S; Meyer, W T; Michelotto, M; Migliore, E; Mirabito, L; Mitaroff, Winfried A; Mjörnmark, U; Moa, T; Møller, R; Mönig, K; Monge, M R; Morettini, P; Müller, H; Münich, K; Mulders, M; Mundim, L M; Murray, W J; Muryn, B; Myatt, Gerald; Naraghi, F; Navarria, Francesco Luigi; Navas, S; Nawrocki, K; Negri, P; Neumann, W; Neumeister, N; Nicolaidou, R; Nielsen, B S; Nieuwenhuizen, M; Nikolaenko, V; Niss, P; Nomerotski, A; Normand, Ainsley; Oberschulte-Beckmann, W; Obraztsov, V F; Olshevskii, A G; Onofre, A; Orava, Risto; Orazi, G; Österberg, K; Ouraou, A; Paganini, P; Paganoni, M; Pagès, P; Pain, R; Palka, H; Papadopoulou, T D; Papageorgiou, K; Pape, L; Parkes, C; Parodi, F; Passeri, A; Pegoraro, M; Peralta, L; Pernegger, H; Pernicka, Manfred; Perrotta, A; Petridou, C; Petrolini, A; Phillips, H T; Piana, G; Pierre, F; Pimenta, M; Podobnik, T; Podobrin, O; Pol, M E; Polok, G; Poropat, P; Pozdnyakov, V; Privitera, P; Pukhaeva, N; Pullia, Antonio; Radojicic, D; Ragazzi, S; Rahmani, H; Rames, J; Ratoff, P N; Read, A L; Reale, M; Rebecchi, P; Redaelli, N G; Regler, Meinhard; Reid, D; Reinhardt, R; Renton, P B; Resvanis, L K; Richard, F; Richardson, J; Rídky, J; Rinaudo, G; Ripp, I; Romero, A; Roncagliolo, I; Ronchese, P; Roos, L; Rosenberg, E I; Roudeau, Patrick; Rovelli, T; Ruhlmann-Kleider, V; Ruiz, A; Rybicki, K; Saarikko, H; Sacquin, Yu; Sadovskii, A; Sahr, O; Sajot, G; Salt, J; Sánchez, J; Sannino, M; Schneider, H; Schwickerath, U; Schyns, M A E; Sciolla, G; Scuri, F; Seager, P; Sedykh, Yu; Segar, A M; Seitz, A; Sekulin, R L; Serbelloni, L; Shellard, R C; Siegrist, P; Silvestre, R; Simonetti, S; Simonetto, F; Sissakian, A N; Sitár, B; Skaali, T B; Smadja, G; Smirnov, N; Smirnova, O G; Smith, G R; Sokolov, A; Solovyanov, O; Sosnowski, R; Souza-Santos, D; Spassoff, Tz; Spiriti, E; Sponholz, P; Squarcia, S; Stampfer, D; Stanescu, C; Stanic, S; Stapnes, Steinar; Stavitski, I; Stevenson, K; Stocchi, A; Strauss, J; Strub, R; Stugu, B; Szczekowski, M; Szeptycka, M; Tabarelli de Fatis, T; Tavernet, J P; Terranova, F; Thomas, J; Tilquin, A; Timmermans, J; Tkatchev, L G; Todorov, T; Todorova, S; Toet, D Z; Tomaradze, A G; Tomé, B; Tonazzo, A; Tortora, L; Tranströmer, G; Treille, D; Tristram, G; Trombini, A; Troncon, C; Tsirou, A L; Turluer, M L; Tyapkin, I A; Tyndel, M; Tzamarias, S; Überschär, B; Ullaland, O; Uvarov, V; Valenti, G; Vallazza, E; Van der Velde, C; van Apeldoorn, G W; van Dam, P; Van Doninck, W K; Van Eldik, J; Van Lysebetten, A; Vassilopoulos, N; Vegni, G; Ventura, L; Venus, W A; Verbeure, F; Verlato, M; Vertogradov, L S; Vilanova, D; Vincent, P; Vitale, L; Vlasov, E; Vodopyanov, A S; Vrba, V; Wahlen, H; Walck, C; Waldner, F; Weilhammer, Peter; Weiser, C; Wetherell, Alan M; Wicke, D; Wickens, J H; Wielers, M; Wilkinson, G R; Williams, W S C; Winter, M; Witek, M; Wlodek, T; Woschnagg, K; Yip, K; Yushchenko, O P; Zach, F; Zaitsev, A; Zalewska-Bak, A; Zalewski, Piotr; Zavrtanik, D; Zevgolatakos, E; Zimin, N I; Zito, M; Zontar, D; Zucchelli, G C; Zumerle, G

    1997-01-01

    In 1996 LEP ran at a centre-of-mass energy of 161~GeV, just above the threshold of W-pair production. DELPHI accumulated data corresponding to an integrated luminosity of $9.93 {\\mathrm{~pb^{-1}}}$, and observed 29 events that are considered as candidates for W-pair production. From these, a cross-section for the doubly resonant $e^+e^-\\to\\mathrm{WW}$ process of $3.67~^{+0.97}_{-0.85} \\pm 0.19{\\mathrm{~pb}}$ has been measured. Within the Standard Model, this cross-section corresponds to a mass of the W-boson of ${\\mathrm{80.40~\\pm~0.44~(stat.)~\\pm~0.09~(syst.) ~\\pm 0.03~(LEP)~GeV}}/c^2$. Alternatively, if $m_{\\mathrm{W}}$ is held fixed at its current value determined by other experiments, the observed cross-section is used to obtain limits on trilinear ${\\mathrm{WWV (V \\equiv \\gamma, Z)}}$ couplings.

  2. Is there a gender equity for women farmers? Reflections on public policy and social CONPES 161/2013.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ximena Marin Hermann

    2013-12-01

    Full Text Available Domestic roles ( reproductive and productive Colombian rural women are different and are marked by the dynamics of their own territories , but also developed in the areas of public and private unevenly and unfairly compared to men rural sector. Considering the above, raises feminist economics "care economy" as an effort to validate and make visible the contribution of women to the economy. But this trend can go further, can contribute to the transformation of reproductive and productive roles, encouraging participation and democracy for women. Considering this, the equitable use of the time in the private ( family enters debate. Women no longer want and seek only equality in public but do not want to share your time at home on an unequal footing . Public policies are needed to contribute to these disparities disappear. To this extent it is possible to ask yourself the current Public Policy Of Gender Equity for Women ( SOCIAL CONPES 161/2013 , can guarantee the full enjoyment of the rights of Colombian women applying the principles of equality and non-discrimination? This reflection tries to do, from a gender perspective, an analytical reading of the impact of public policy on the transformation of the reality of the Colombian rural women.

  3. DLEU2, frequently deleted in malignancy, functions as a critical host gene of the cell cycle inhibitory microRNAs miR-15a and miR-16-1

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lerner, Mikael; Harada, Masako; Loven, Jakob; Castro, Juan; Davis, Zadie; Oscier, David; Henriksson, Marie; Sangfelt, Olle; Grander, Dan; Corcoran, Martin M.

    2009-01-01

    The microRNAs miR-15a and miR-16-1 are downregulated in multiple tumor types and are frequently deleted in chronic lymphocytic leukemia (CLL), myeloma and mantle cell lymphoma. Despite their abundance in most cells the transcriptional regulation of miR-15a/16-1 remains unclear. Here we demonstrate that the putative tumor suppressor DLEU2 acts as a host gene of these microRNAs. Mature miR-15a/miR-16-1 are produced in a Drosha-dependent process from DLEU2 and binding of the Myc oncoprotein to two alterative DLEU2 promoters represses both the host gene transcript and levels of mature miR-15a/miR-16-1. In line with a functional role for DLEU2 in the expression of the microRNAs, the miR-15a/miR-16-1 locus is retained in four CLL cases that delete both promoters of this gene and expression analysis indicates that this leads to functional loss of mature miR-15a/16-1. We additionally show that DLEU2 negatively regulates the G1 Cyclins E1 and D1 through miR-15a/miR-16-1 and provide evidence that these oncoproteins are subject to miR-15a/miR-16-1-mediated repression under normal conditions. We also demonstrate that DLEU2 overexpression blocks cellular proliferation and inhibits the colony-forming ability of tumor cell lines in a miR-15a/miR-16-1-dependent way. Together the data illuminate how inactivation of DLEU2 promotes cell proliferation and tumor progression through functional loss of miR-15a/miR-16-1.

  4. An intermediate level of CD161 expression defines a novel activated, inflammatory, and pathogenic subset of CD8+ T cells involved in multiple sclerosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nicol, Bryan; Salou, Marion; Vogel, Isabel; Garcia, Alexandra; Dugast, Emilie; Morille, Jeremy; Kilens, Stéphanie; Charpentier, Eric; Donnart, Audrey; Nedellec, Steven; Jacq-Foucher, Marylène; Le Frère, Fabienne; Wiertlewski, Sandrine; Bourreille, Arnaud; Brouard, Sophie; Michel, Laure; David, Laurent; Gourraud, Pierre-Antoine; Degauque, Nicolas; Nicot, Arnaud B; Berthelot, Laureline; Laplaud, David-Axel

    2018-03-01

    Several lines of evidence support a key role for CD8 + T cells in central nervous system tissue damage of patients with multiple sclerosis. However, the precise phenotype of the circulating CD8 + T cells that may be recruited from the peripheral blood to invade the CNS remains largely undefined to date. It has been suggested that IL-17 secreting CD8 (Tc17) T cells may be involved, and in humans these cells are characterized by the expression of CD161. We focused our study on a unique and recently described subset of CD8 T cells characterized by an intermediate expression of CD161 as its role in neuroinflammation has not been investigated to date. The frequency, phenotype, and function of CD8 + T cells with an intermediate CD161 expression level were characterized ex-vivo, in vitro, and in situ using RNAseq, RT-PCR, flow cytometry, TCR sequencing, and immunohistofluorescence of cells derived from healthy volunteers (n = 61), MS subjects (n = 90), as well as inflammatory (n = 15) and non-inflammatory controls (n = 6). We report here that CD8 + CD161 int T cells present characteristics of effector cells, up-regulate cell-adhesion molecules and have an increased ability to cross the blood-brain barrier and to secrete IL-17, IFNγ, GM-CSF, and IL-22. We further demonstrate that these cells are recruited and enriched in the CNS of MS subjects where they produce IL-17. In the peripheral blood, RNAseq, RT-PCR, high-throughput TCR repertoire analyses, and flow cytometry confirmed an increased effector and transmigration pattern of these cells in MS patients, with the presence of supernumerary clones compared to healthy controls. Our data demonstrate that intermediate levels of CD161 expression identifies activated and effector CD8 + T cells with pathogenic properties that are recruited to MS lesions. This suggests that CD161 may represent a biomarker and a valid target for the treatment of neuroinflammation. Copyright © 2017 The Authors. Published by Elsevier Ltd

  5. Rates of intraoperative complications and conversion to laparotomy during laparoscopic ovariectomy performed by veterinary students: 161 cases (2010-2014).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nylund, Adam M; Drury, Adam; Weir, Heather; Monnet, Eric

    2017-07-01

    OBJECTIVE To assess rates of intraoperative complications and conversion to laparotomy associated with supervised veterinary students performing laparoscopic ovariectomy in dogs. DESIGN Retrospective case series. ANIMALS 161 female shelter dogs for which elective laparoscopic ovariectomy had been performed by supervised senior (fourth-year) veterinary students from 2010 through 2014. PROCEDURES Medical records of all dogs were reviewed and data collected regarding duration of surgery, surgical complications and other characteristics, and whether conversion to laparotomy was required. RESULTS Laparoscopic ovariectomy was performed with a 2-cannula technique and a 10-mm vessel-sealing device for hemostasis in all dogs. A Veress needle was used for initial insufflation in 144 (89.4%) dogs; method of insufflation was not reported for the remaining 17 (10.6%) dogs. Mean ± SD duration of surgery was 114.90 ± 33.40 minutes. Surgical complications, all classified as minor blood loss, occurred in 24 (14.9%) dogs. These included splenic puncture during insertion of the Veress needle (n = 20 [12.4%]) and minor bleeding from the ovarian pedicle (4 [2.5%]). Splenic puncture required no intervention, and ovarian pedicle bleeding required application of the vessel-sealing device an additional time to control the bleeding. Two ovaries were dropped in the abdominal cavity at the time of removal. Both were retrieved without complication. Conversion to laparotomy was not required for any dog. All dogs were discharged from the hospital within 24 hours after surgery. CONCLUSIONS AND CLINICAL RELEVANCE Laparoscopic ovariectomy in dogs was performed safely by closely supervised novice surgeons, with only minor intraoperative complications encountered and no need for conversion to laparotomy.

  6. Epidemiologia e distribuição de lesões extrarrenais de uremia em 161 cães

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Isadora P. Silveira

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available Resumo: Com o objetivo de determinar a epidemiologia e as características morfológicas, incluindo a localização anatômica, das lesões extrarrenais de uremia, bem como determinar as principais lesões do sistema urinário associadas à ocorrência de uremia, foram revisados os protocolos de necropsias de cães realizadas no Laboratório de Patologia Veterinária da Universidade Federal de Santa Maria de janeiro de 1996 a dezembro de 2012 (17 anos. Nesse período foram necropsiados 4.201 cães, sendo que 161 (3,8% apresentaram lesões extrarrenais de uremia. Em 134 cães (83,2% foram descritos sinais clínicos associados à uremia. As lesões extrarrenais mais frequentes, em ordem decrescente, foram: gastrite ulcerativa e hemorrágica (56,5%, mineralização de tecidos moles (55,9%, edema pulmonar (47,2%, estomatite e/ou glossite ulcerativa (30,4%, endocardite/trombose atrial e aórtica (28,6%, hiperplasia das paratireoides (9,3%, osteodistrofia fibrosa (8,1%, anemia (6,2%, laringite ulcerativa (5%, enterite ulcerativa/hemorrágica (3,7%, esofagite fibrinonecrótica (1,9% e pericardite fibrinosa (1.9%. Na maioria dos casos as lesões extrarrenais de uremia foram decorrentes de azotemia prolongada por lesões renais graves, sendo as mais prevalentes a nefrite intersticial e a glomerulonefrite.

  7. Towards a Balanced Synergy of Visions and Interests: Latvia’s Perspectives in 16+1 and Belt and Road Initiatives

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Spruds Andris

    2017-08-01

    Full Text Available The article analyses China’s 16+1 and Belt and Road initiatives from Latvia’s perspective. Although the initiatives provide engagement on a large scale, it is challenging to achieve the task of achieving a synergy between a variety of stakeholders and interests in the context of a diversity of visions and agendas. The strategic dimension of transcontinental initiatives complicates further the building of synergy. Connectivity is an important and promising principle of both initiatives and transcontinental infrastructural linkages are especially high on the agenda. Mutually beneficial progress, however, must yet be achieved. In times of uncertainty, Central and Eastern European countries, including Latvia, are engaged in a balancing process of potential economic benefits and strategic implications of the 16+1 and Belt and Road initiatives.

  8. Search for anomalous production of dilepton events with missing transverse momentum in $e^{+} e^{-}$ collisions at $\\sqrt{s}$ = 161 and 172 GeV

    CERN Document Server

    Ackerstaff, K.; Allison, John; Altekamp, N.; Anderson, K.J.; Anderson, S.; Arcelli, S.; Asai, S.; Axen, D.; Azuelos, G.; Ball, A.H.; Barberio, E.; Barlow, Roger J.; Bartoldus, R.; Batley, J.R.; Baumann, S.; Bechtluft, J.; Beeston, C.; Behnke, T.; Bell, A.N.; Bell, Kenneth Watson; Bella, G.; Bentvelsen, S.; Bethke, S.; Biebel, O.; Biguzzi, A.; Bird, S.D.; Blobel, V.; Bloodworth, I.J.; Bloomer, J.E.; Bobinski, M.; Bock, P.; Bonacorsi, D.; Boutemeur, M.; Bouwens, B.T.; Braibant, S.; Brigliadori, L.; Brown, Robert M.; Burckhart, H.J.; Burgard, C.; Burgin, R.; Capiluppi, P.; Carnegie, R.K.; Carter, A.A.; Carter, J.R.; Chang, C.Y.; Charlton, David G.; Chrisman, D.; Clarke, P.E.L.; Cohen, I.; Conboy, J.E.; Cooke, O.C.; Cuffiani, M.; Dado, S.; Dallapiccola, C.; Dallavalle, G.Marco; Davis, R.; De Jong, S.; del Pozo, L.A.; Desch, K.; Dienes, B.; Dixit, M.S.; do Couto e Silva, E.; Doucet, M.; Duchovni, E.; Duckeck, G.; Duerdoth, I.P.; Eatough, D.; Edwards, J.E.G.; Estabrooks, P.G.; Evans, H.G.; Evans, M.; Fabbri, F.; Fanti, M.; Faust, A.A.; Fiedler, F.; Fierro, M.; Fischer, H.M.; Fleck, I.; Folman, R.; Fong, D.G.; Foucher, M.; Furtjes, A.; Futyan, D.I.; Gagnon, P.; Gary, J.W.; Gascon, J.; Gascon-Shotkin, S.M.; Geddes, N.I.; Geich-Gimbel, C.; Geralis, T.; Giacomelli, G.; Giacomelli, P.; Giacomelli, R.; Gibson, V.; Gibson, W.R.; Gingrich, D.M.; Glenzinski, D.; Goldberg, J.; Goodrick, M.J.; Gorn, W.; Grandi, C.; Gross, E.; Grunhaus, J.; Gruwe, M.; Hajdu, C.; Hanson, G.G.; Hansroul, M.; Hapke, M.; Hargrove, C.K.; Hart, P.A.; Hartmann, C.; Hauschild, M.; Hawkes, C.M.; Hawkings, R.; Hemingway, R.J.; Herndon, M.; Herten, G.; Heuer, R.D.; Hildreth, M.D.; Hill, J.C.; Hillier, S.J.; Hobson, P.R.; Homer, R.J.; Honma, A.K.; Horvath, D.; Hossain, K.R.; Howard, R.; Huntemeyer, P.; Hutchcroft, D.E.; Igo-Kemenes, P.; Imrie, D.C.; Ingram, M.R.; Ishii, K.; Jawahery, A.; Jeffreys, P.W.; Jeremie, H.; Jimack, M.; Joly, A.; Jones, C.R.; Jones, G.; Jones, M.; Jost, U.; Jovanovic, P.; Junk, T.R.; Karlen, D.; Kartvelishvili, V.; Kawagoe, K.; Kawamoto, T.; Kayal, P.I.; Keeler, R.K.; Kellogg, R.G.; Kennedy, B.W.; Kirk, J.; Klier, A.; Kluth, S.; Kobayashi, T.; Kobel, M.; Koetke, D.S.; Kokott, T.P.; Kolrep, M.; Komamiya, S.; Kress, T.; Krieger, P.; von Krogh, J.; Kyberd, P.; Lafferty, G.D.; Lahmann, R.; Lai, W.P.; Lanske, D.; Lauber, J.; Lautenschlager, S.R.; Layter, J.G.; Lazic, D.; Lee, A.M.; Lefebvre, E.; Lellouch, D.; Letts, J.; Levinson, L.; Lloyd, S.L.; Loebinger, F.K.; Long, G.D.; Losty, M.J.; Ludwig, J.; Macchiolo, A.; Macpherson, A.; Mannelli, M.; Marcellini, S.; Markus, C.; Martin, A.J.; Martin, J.P.; Martinez, G.; Mashimo, T.; Mattig, Peter; McDonald, W.John; McKenna, J.; Mckigney, E.A.; McMahon, T.J.; McPherson, R.A.; Meijers, F.; Menke, S.; Merritt, F.S.; Mes, H.; Meyer, J.; Michelini, A.; Mikenberg, G.; Miller, D.J.; Mincer, A.; Mir, R.; Mohr, W.; Montanari, A.; Mori, T.; Morii, M.; Muller, U.; Mihara, S.; Nagai, K.; Nakamura, I.; Neal, H.A.; Nellen, B.; Nisius, R.; O'Neale, S.W.; Oakham, F.G.; Odorici, F.; Ogren, H.O.; Oh, A.; Oldershaw, N.J.; Oreglia, M.J.; Orito, S.; Palinkas, J.; Pasztor, G.; Pater, J.R.; Patrick, G.N.; Patt, J.; Pearce, M.J.; Perez-Ochoa, R.; Petzold, S.; Pfeifenschneider, P.; Pilcher, J.E.; Pinfold, J.; Plane, David E.; Poffenberger, P.; Poli, B.; Posthaus, A.; Rees, D.L.; Rigby, D.; Robertson, S.; Robins, S.A.; Rodning, N.; Roney, J.M.; Rooke, A.; Ros, E.; Rossi, A.M.; Routenburg, P.; Rozen, Y.; Runge, K.; Runolfsson, O.; Ruppel, U.; Rust, D.R.; Rylko, R.; Sachs, K.; Saeki, T.; Sarkisian, E.K.G.; Sbarra, C.; Schaile, A.D.; Schaile, O.; Scharf, F.; Scharff-Hansen, P.; Schenk, P.; Schieck, J.; Schleper, P.; Schmitt, B.; Schmitt, S.; Schoning, A.; Schroder, Matthias; Schultz-Coulon, H.C.; Schumacher, M.; Schwick, C.; Scott, W.G.; Shears, T.G.; Shen, B.C.; Shepherd-Themistocleous, C.H.; Sherwood, P.; Siroli, G.P.; Sittler, A.; Skillman, A.; Skuja, A.; Smith, A.M.; Snow, G.A.; Sobie, R.; Soldner-Rembold, S.; Springer, Robert Wayne; Sproston, M.; Stephens, K.; Steuerer, J.; Stockhausen, B.; Stoll, K.; Strom, David M.; Szymanski, P.; Tafirout, R.; Talbot, S.D.; Tanaka, S.; Taras, P.; Tarem, S.; Teuscher, R.; Thiergen, M.; Thomson, M.A.; von Torne, E.; Towers, S.; Trigger, I.; Trocsanyi, Z.; Tsur, E.; Turcot, A.S.; Turner-Watson, M.F.; Utzat, P.; Van Kooten, Rick J.; Verzocchi, M.; Vikas, P.; Vokurka, E.H.; Voss, H.; Wackerle, F.; Wagner, A.; Ward, C.P.; Ward, D.R.; Watkins, P.M.; Watson, A.T.; Watson, N.K.; Wells, P.S.; Wermes, N.; White, J.S.; Wilkens, B.; Wilson, G.W.; Wilson, J.A.; Wolf, G.; Wyatt, T.R.; Yamashita, S.; Yekutieli, G.; Zacek, V.; Zer-Zion, D.

    1998-01-01

    Events containing a pair of charged leptons and significant missing transverse momentum are selected from a data sample corresponding to a total integrated luminosity of 20.6 pb^-1 at centre-of-mass energies of 161 GeV and 172 GeV. The observed number of events, four at 161 GeV and nine at 172 GeV, is consistent with the number expected from Standard Model processes, predominantly arising from W+W- production with each W decaying leptonically. This topology is also an experimental signature for the pair production of new particles that decay to a charged lepton accompanied by one or more invisible particles. Further event selection criteria are described that optimise the sensitivity to particular new physics channels. No evidence for new phenomena is observed and limits on the production of scalar charged lepton pairs and other new particles are presented.

  9. Magnetic properties of the ternary carbide DyCoC2 studied by magnetization measurements, neutron diffraction and 161Dy Moessbauer spectroscopy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Amanai, H.; Onodera, H.; Ohashi, M.; Matsuo, S.; Yamauchi, H.

    1995-01-01

    The magnetic properties of DyCoC 2 have been investigated by means of magnetization measurements, powder neutron diffraction and 161 Dy Moessbauer spectroscopy. The magnetization versus temperature curves of a single-crystalline sample reveal that the magnetic structure of DyCoC 2 is a simple collinear ferromagnetic one below T C =10.0 K. At 4.2 K, the magnitude of the Dy moment is 8.7(1)μ B , whose direction is defined by an angle of 38.0(5) from the a-axis toward the c-axis. The magnetic structure and the magnitude of the moment are also confirmed by the results of powder neutron diffraction experiments and 161 Dy Moessbauer spectroscopy, respectively. ((orig.))

  10. Efficient UV-emitting X-ray phosphors: octahedral Zr(PO4)6 luminescence centers in potassium hafnium-zirconium phosphates K2Hf1-xZrx(PO4)2 and KHf2(1-x)Zr2x(PO4)3

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Torardi, C.C.; Miao, C.R.; Li, J.

    2003-01-01

    Potassium hafnium-zirconium phosphates, K 2 Hf 1-x Zr x (PO 4 ) 2 and KHf 2(1-x) Zr 2x (PO 4 ) 3 , are broad-band UV-emitting phosphors. At room temperature, they have emission peak maxima at approximately 322 and 305 nm, respectively, under 30 kV peak molybdenum X-ray excitation. Both phosphors demonstrate luminescence efficiencies that make them up to ∼60% as bright as commercially available CaWO 4 Hi-Plus. The solid-state and flux synthesis conditions, and X-ray excited UV luminescence of these two phosphors are discussed. Even though the two compounds have different atomic structures, they contain zirconium in the same active luminescence environment as that found in highly efficient UV-emitting BaHf 1-x Zr x (PO 4 ) 2 . All the three materials have hafnium and zirconium in octahedral coordination via oxygen-atom corner sharing with six separate PO 4 tetrahedra. This octahedral Zr(PO 4 ) 6 moiety appears to be an important structural element for efficient X-ray excited luminescence, as are the edge-sharing octahedral TaO 6 chains for tantalate emission

  11. Search for sleptons in $e^+ e^-$ collisions at centre-of-mass energies of 161 GeV and 172 GeV

    CERN Document Server

    Barate, R; Décamp, D; Ghez, P; Goy, C; Lees, J P; Lucotte, A; Minard, M N; Nief, J Y; Pietrzyk, B; Casado, M P; Chmeissani, M; Comas, P; Crespo, J M; Delfino, M C; Fernández, E; Fernández-Bosman, M; Garrido, L; Juste, A; Martínez, M; Miquel, R; Mir, L M; Orteu, S; Padilla, C; Park, I C; Pascual, A; Perlas, J A; Riu, I; Sánchez, F; Teubert, F; Colaleo, A; Creanza, D; De Palma, M; Gelao, G; Iaselli, Giuseppe; Maggi, G; Maggi, M; Marinelli, N; Nuzzo, S; Ranieri, A; Raso, G; Ruggieri, F; Selvaggi, G; Silvestris, L; Tempesta, P; Tricomi, A; Zito, G; Huang, X; Lin, J; Ouyang, Q; Wang, T; Xie, Y; Xu, R; Xue, S; Zhang, J; Zhang, L; Zhao, W; Abbaneo, D; Alemany, R; Bazarko, A O; Becker, U; Bright-Thomas, P G; Cattaneo, M; Cerutti, F; Dissertori, G; Drevermann, H; Forty, Roger W; Frank, M; Hagelberg, R; Hansen, J B; Harvey, J; Janot, P; Jost, B; Kneringer, E; Knobloch, J; Lehraus, Ivan; Lutters, G; Mato, P; Minten, Adolf G; Moneta, L; Pacheco, A; Pusztaszeri, J F; Ranjard, F; Rizzo, G; Rolandi, Luigi; Rousseau, D; Schlatter, W D; Schmitt, M; Schneider, O; Tejessy, W; Tomalin, I R; Wachsmuth, H W; Wagner, A; Ajaltouni, Ziad J; Barrès, A; Boyer, C; Falvard, A; Ferdi, C; Gay, P; Guicheney, C; Henrard, P; Jousset, J; Michel, B; Monteil, S; Montret, J C; Pallin, D; Perret, P; Podlyski, F; Proriol, J; Rosnet, P; Rossignol, J M; Fearnley, Tom; Hansen, J D; Hansen, J R; Hansen, P H; Nilsson, B S; Rensch, B; Wäänänen, A; Daskalakis, G; Kyriakis, A; Markou, C; Simopoulou, Errietta; Siotis, I; Vayaki, Anna; Blondel, A; Brient, J C; Machefert, F P; Rougé, A; Rumpf, M; Valassi, Andrea; Videau, H L; Focardi, E; Parrini, G; Zachariadou, K; Cavanaugh, R J; Corden, M; Georgiopoulos, C H; Hühn, T; Jaffe, D E; Antonelli, A; Bencivenni, G; Bologna, G; Bossi, F; Campana, P; Capon, G; Casper, David William; Chiarella, V; Felici, G; Laurelli, P; Mannocchi, G; Murtas, F; Murtas, G P; Passalacqua, L; Pepé-Altarelli, M; Curtis, L; Dorris, S J; Halley, A W; Knowles, I G; Lynch, J G; O'Shea, V; Raine, C; Scarr, J M; Smith, K; Teixeira-Dias, P; Thompson, A S; Thomson, E; Thomson, F; Turnbull, R M; Geweniger, C; Graefe, G; Hanke, P; Hansper, G; Hepp, V; Kluge, E E; Putzer, A; Schmidt, M; Sommer, J; Tittel, K; Werner, S; Wunsch, M; Beuselinck, R; Binnie, David M; Cameron, W; Dornan, Peter J; Girone, M; Goodsir, S M; Martin, E B; Morawitz, P; Moutoussi, A; Nash, J; Sedgbeer, J K; Spagnolo, P; Stacey, A M; Williams, M D; Ghete, V M; Girtler, P; Kuhn, D; Rudolph, G; Betteridge, A P; Bowdery, C K; Colrain, P; Crawford, G; Finch, A J; Foster, F; Hughes, G; Jones, R W L; Sloan, Terence; Whelan, E P; Williams, M I; Hoffmann, C; Jakobs, K; Kleinknecht, K; Quast, G; Renk, B; Rohne, E; Sander, H G; Van Gemmeren, P; Zeitnitz, C; Aubert, Jean-Jacques; Benchouk, C; Bonissent, A; Bujosa, G; Calvet, D; Carr, J; Coyle, P; Diaconu, C A; Konstantinidis, N P; Leroy, O; Motsch, F; Payre, P; Talby, M; Sadouki, A; Thulasidas, M; Tilquin, A; Trabelsi, K; Aleppo, M; Ragusa, F; Berlich, R; Blum, Walter; Büscher, V; Dietl, H; Ganis, G; Gotzhein, C; Kroha, H; Lütjens, G; Lutz, Gerhard; Männer, W; Moser, H G; Richter, R H; Rosado-Schlosser, A; Schael, S; Settles, Ronald; Seywerd, H C J; Saint-Denis, R; Stenzel, H; Wiedenmann, W; Wolf, G; Boucrot, J; Callot, O; Chen, S; Cordier, A; Davier, M; Duflot, L; Grivaz, J F; Heusse, P; Höcker, A; Jacholkowska, A; Jacquet, M; Kim, D W; Le Diberder, F R; Lefrançois, J; Lutz, A M; Nikolic, I A; Schune, M H; Serin, L; Simion, S; Tournefier, E; Veillet, J J; Videau, I; Zerwas, D; Azzurri, P; Bagliesi, G; Bettarini, S; Bozzi, C; Calderini, G; Ciulli, V; Dell'Orso, R; Fantechi, R; Ferrante, I; Giassi, A; Gregorio, A; Ligabue, F; Lusiani, A; Marrocchesi, P S; Messineo, A; Palla, Fabrizio; Sanguinetti, G; Sciabà, A; Steinberger, Jack; Tenchini, Roberto; Vannini, C; Venturi, A; Verdini, P G; Blair, G A; Bryant, L M; Chambers, J T; Gao, Y; Green, M G; Medcalf, T; Perrodo, P; Strong, J A; Von Wimmersperg-Töller, J H; Botterill, David R; Clifft, R W; Edgecock, T R; Haywood, S; Maley, P; Norton, P R; Thompson, J C; Wright, A E; Bloch-Devaux, B; Colas, P; Kozanecki, Witold; Lançon, E; Lemaire, M C; Locci, E; Pérez, P; Rander, J; Renardy, J F; Rosowsky, A; Roussarie, A; Schuller, J P; Schwindling, J; Trabelsi, A; Vallage, B; Black, S N; Dann, J H; Kim, H Y; Litke, A M; McNeil, M A; Taylor, G; Booth, C N; Boswell, R; Brew, C A J; Cartwright, S L; Combley, F; Kelly, M S; Lehto, M H; Newton, W M; Reeve, J; Thompson, L F; Affholderbach, K; Böhrer, A; Brandt, S; Cowan, G D; Foss, J; Grupen, Claus; Saraiva, P; Smolik, L; Stephan, F; Apollonio, M; Bosisio, L; Della Marina, R; Giannini, G; Gobbo, B; Musolino, G; Pütz, J; Rothberg, J E; Wasserbaech, S R; Williams, R W; Armstrong, S R; Charles, E; Elmer, P; Ferguson, D P S; González, S; Greening, T C; Hayes, O J; Hu, H; Jin, S; McNamara, P A; Nachtman, J M; Nielsen, J; Orejudos, W; Pan, Y B; Saadi, Y; Scott, I J; Walsh, J; Wu Sau Lan; Wu, X; Yamartino, J M; Zobernig, G

    1997-01-01

    The data recorded by the ALEPH experiment at LEP at centre-of-mass energies of 161 GeV and 172 GeV were analysed to search for sleptons, the supersymmetric partners of leptons. No evidence for the production of these particles was found. The number of candidates observed is consistent with the background expected from four-fermion processes and gammagamma-interactions. Improved mass limits at 95% C.L. are reported.

  12. Search for sleptons in e+e- collisions at centre-of-mass energies of 161 GeV and 172 GeV

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barate, R.; Buskulic, D.; Decamp, D.; Ghez, P.; Goy, C.; Lees, J.-P.; Lucotte, A.; Minard, M.-N.; Nief, J.-Y.; Pietrzyk, B.; Casado, M. P.; Chmeissani, M.; Comas, P.; Crespo, J. M.; Delfino, M.; Fernandez, E.; Fernandez-Bosman, M.; Garrido, Ll.; Juste, A.; Martinez, M.; Miquel, R.; Mir, Ll. M.; Orteu, S.; Padilla, C.; Park, I. C.; Pascual, A.; Perlas, J. A.; Riu, I.; Sanchez, F.; Teubert, F.; Colaleo, A.; Creanza, D.; de Palma, M.; Gelao, G.; Iaselli, G.; Maggi, G.; Maggi, M.; Marinelli, N.; Nuzzo, S.; Ranieri, A.; Raso, G.; Ruggieri, F.; Selvaggi, G.; Silvestris, L.; Tempesta, P.; Tricomi, A.; Zito, G.; Huang, X.; Lin, J.; Ouyang, Q.; Wang, T.; Xie, Y.; Xu, R.; Xue, S.; Zhang, J.; Zhang, L.; Zhao, W.; Abbaneo, D.; Alemany, R.; Bazarko, A. O.; Becker, U.; Bright-Thomas, P.; Cattaneo, M.; Cerutti, F.; Dissertori, G.; Drevermann, H.; Forty, R. W.; Frank, M.; Hagelberg, R.; Hansen, J. B.; Harvey, J.; Janot, P.; Jost, B.; Kneringer, E.; Knobloch, J.; Lehraus, I.; Lutters, G.; Mato, P.; Minten, A.; Moneta, L.; Pacheco, A.; Pusztaszeri, J.-F.; Ranjard, F.; Rizzo, G.; Rolandi, L.; Rousseau, D.; Schlatter, D.; Schmitt, M.; Schneider, O.; Tejessy, W.; Tomalin, I. R.; Wachsmuth, H.; Wagner, A.; Ajaltouni, Z.; Barrès, A.; Boyer, C.; Falvard, A.; Ferdi, C.; Gay, P.; Guicheney, C.; Henrard, P.; Jousset, J.; Michel, B.; Monteil, S.; Montret, J.-C.; Pallin, D.; Perret, P.; Podlyski, F.; Proriol, J.; Rosnet, P.; Rossignol, J.-M.; Fearnley, T.; Hansen, J. D.; Hansen, J. R.; Hansen, P. H.; Nilsson, B. S.; Rensch, B.; Wäänänen, A.; Daskalakis, G.; Kyriakis, A.; Markou, C.; Simopoulou, E.; Vayaki, A.; Blondel, A.; Brient, J. C.; Machefert, F.; Rougé, A.; Rumpf, M.; Valassi, A.; Videau, H.; Focardi, E.; Parrini, G.; Zachariadou, K.; Cavanaugh, R.; Corden, M.; Georgiopoulos, C.; Huehn, T.; Jaffe, D. E.; Antonelli, A.; Bencivenni, G.; Bologna, G.; Bossi, F.; Campana, P.; Capon, G.; Casper, D.; Chiarella, V.; Felici, G.; Laurelli, P.; Mannocchi, G.; Murtas, F.; Murtas, G. P.; Passalacqua, L.; Pepe-Altarelli, M.; Curtis, L.; Dorris, S. J.; Halley, A. W.; Knowles, I. G.; Lynch, J. G.; O'Shea, V.; Raine, C.; Scarr, J. M.; Smith, K.; Teixeira-Dias, P.; Thompson, A. S.; Thomson, E.; Thomson, F.; Turnbull, R. M.; Geweniger, C.; Graefe, G.; Hanke, P.; Hansper, G.; Hepp, V.; Kluge, E. E.; Putzer, A.; Schmidt, M.; Sommer, J.; Tittel, K.; Werner, S.; Wunsch, M.; Beuselinck, R.; Binnie, D. M.; Cameron, W.; Dornan, P. J.; Girone, M.; Goodsir, S.; Martin, E. B.; Morawitz, P.; Moutoussi, A.; Nash, J.; Sedgbeer, J. K.; Spagnolo, P.; Stacey, A. M.; Williams, M. D.; Ghete, V. M.; Girtler, P.; Kuhn, D.; Rudolph, G.; Betteridge, A. P.; Bowdery, C. K.; Colrain, P.; Crawford, G.; Finch, A. J.; Foster, F.; Hughes, G.; Jones, R. W.; Sloan, T.; Whelan, E. P.; Williams, M. I.; Hoffmann, C.; Jakobs, K.; Kleinknecht, K.; Quast, G.; Renk, B.; Rohne, E.; Sander, H.-G.; van Gemmeren, P.; Zeitnitz, C.; Aubert, J. J.; Benchouk, C.; Bonissent, A.; Bujosa, G.; Calvet, D.; Carr, J.; Coyle, P.; Diaconu, C.; Konstantinidis, N.; Leroy, O.; Motsch, F.; Payre, P.; Talby, M.; Sadouki, A.; Thulasidas, M.; Tilquin, A.; Trabelsi, K.; Aleppo, M.; Ragusa, F.; Berlich, R.; Blum, W.; Büscher, V.; Dietl, H.; Ganis, G.; Gotzhein, C.; Kroha, H.; Lütjens, G.; Lutz, G.; Männer, W.; Moser, H.-G.; Richter, R.; Rosado-Schlosser, A.; Schael, S.; Settles, R.; Seywerd, H.; St. Denis, R.; Stenzel, H.; Wiedenmann, W.; Wolf, G.; Boucrot, J.; Callot, O.; Chen, S.; Cordier, A.; Davier, M.; Duflot, L.; Grivaz, J.-F.; Heusse, Ph.; Höcker, A.; Jacholkowska, A.; Jacquet, M.; Kim, D. W.; Le Diberder, F.; Lefrançois, J.; Lutz, A.-M.; Nikolic, I.; Schune, M.-H.; Serin, L.; Simion, S.; Tournefier, E.; Veillet, J.-J.; Videau, I.; Zerwas, D.; Azzurri, P.; Bagliesi, G.; Bettarini, S.; Bozzi, C.; Calderini, G.; Ciulli, V.; dell'Orso, R.; Fantechi, R.; Ferrante, I.; Giassi, A.; Gregorio, A.; Ligabue, F.; Lusiani, A.; Marrocchesi, P. S.; Messineo, A.; Palla, F.; Sanguinetti, G.; Sciabà, A.; Steinberger, J.; Tenchini, R.; Vannini, C.; Venturi, A.; Verdini, P. G.; Blair, G. A.; Bryant, L. M.; Chambers, J. T.; Gao, Y.; Green, M. G.; Medcalf, T.; Perrodo, P.; Strong, J. A.; von Wimmersperg-Toeller, J. H.; Botterill, D. R.; Clifft, R. W.; Edgecock, T. R.; Haywood, S.; Maley, P.; Norton, P. R.; Thompson, J. C.; Wright, A. E.; Bloch-Devaux, B.; Colas, P.; Fabbro, B.; Kozanecki, W.; Lançon, E.; Lemaire, M. C.; Locci, E.; Perez, P.; Rander, J.; Renardy, J.-F.; Rosowsky, A.; Roussarie, A.; Schuller, J.-P.; Schwindling, J.; Trabelsi, A.; Vallage, B.; Black, S. N.; Dann, J. H.; Kim, H. Y.; Litke, A. M.; McNeil, M. A.; Taylor, G.; Booth, C. N.; Boswell, R.; Brew, C. A. J.; Cartwright, S.; Combley, F.; Kelly, M. S.; Lehto, M.; Newton, W. M.; Reeve, J.; Thompson, L. F.; Affholderbach, K.; Böhrer, A.; Brandt, S.; Cowan, G.; Foss, J.; Grupen, C.; Saraiva, P.; Smolik, L.; Stephan, F.; Apollonio, M.; Bosisio, L.; della Marina, R.; Giannini, G.; Gobbo, B.; Musolino, G.; Putz, J.; Rothberg, J.; Wasserbaech, S.; Williams, R. W.; Armstrong, S. R.; Charles, E.; Elmer, P.; Ferguson, D. P. S.; González, S.; Greening, T. C.; Hayes, O. J.; Hu, H.; Jin, S.; McNamara, P. A.; Nachtman, J. M.; Nielsen, J.; Orejudos, W.; Pan, Y. B.; Saadi, Y.; Scott, I. J.; Walsh, J.; Sau, Lan Wu; Wu, X.; Yamartino, J. M.; Zobernig, G.

    1997-02-01

    The data recorded by the ALEPH experiment at LEP at centre-of-mass energies of 161 GeV and 172 GeV were analysed to search for sleptons, the supersymmetric partners of leptons. No evidence for the production of these particles was found. The number of candidates observed is consistent with the background expected from four-fermion processes and yy-interactions. Improved mass limits at 95% C.L. are reported.

  13. T-cell receptor repertoire of human peripheral CD161hiTRAV1-2+ MAIT cells revealed by next generation sequencing and single cell analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Held, Kathrin; Beltrán, Eduardo; Moser, Markus; Hohlfeld, Reinhard; Dornmair, Klaus

    2015-09-01

    Mucosal-associated invariant T (MAIT) cells are a T-cell subset that expresses a conserved TRAV1-2 (Vα7.2) T-cell receptor (TCR) chain and the surface marker CD161. They are involved in the defence against microbes as they recognise small organic molecules of microbial origin that are presented by the non-classical MHC molecule 1 (MR1). MAIT cells express a semi-restricted TCR α chain with TRAV1-2 preferentially linked to TRAJ33, TRAJ12, or TRAJ20 which pairs with a limited set of β chains. To investigate the TCR repertoire of human CD161(hi)TRAV1-2(+) T cells in depth we analysed the α and β chains of this T-cell subset by next generation sequencing. Concomitantly we analysed 132 paired α and β chains from single cells to assess the αβ pairing preferences. We found that the CD161(hi)TRAV1-2(+) TCR repertoire in addition to the typical MAIT TCRs further contains polyclonal elements reminiscent of classical αβ T cells. Copyright © 2015 American Society for Histocompatibility and Immunogenetics. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  14. Measurement of hadron and lepton pair production at 161 GeV < $\\sqrt{s}$ < 172 GeV at LEP

    CERN Document Server

    Acciarri, M; Aguilar-Benítez, M; Ahlen, S P; Alcaraz, J; Alemanni, G; Allaby, James V; Aloisio, A; Alverson, G; Alviggi, M G; Ambrosi, G; Anderhub, H; Andreev, V P; Angelescu, T; Anselmo, F; Arefev, A; Azemoon, T; Aziz, T; Bagnaia, P; Baksay, L; Banerjee, S; Banerjee, Sw; Banicz, K; Barczyk, A; Barillère, R; Barone, L; Bartalini, P; Baschirotto, A; Basile, M; Battiston, R; Bay, A; Becattini, F; Becker, U; Behner, F; Berdugo, J; Berges, P; Bertucci, B; Betev, B L; Bhattacharya, S; Biasini, M; Biland, A; Bilei, G M; Blaising, J J; Blyth, S C; Bobbink, Gerjan J; Böck, R K; Böhm, A; Boldizsar, L; Borgia, B; Bourilkov, D; Bourquin, Maurice; Braccini, S; Branson, J G; Brigljevic, V; Brock, I C; Buffini, A; Buijs, A; Burger, J D; Burger, W J; Busenitz, J K; Button, A M; Cai, X D; Campanelli, M; Capell, M; Cara Romeo, G; Carlino, G; Cartacci, A M; Casaus, J; Castellini, G; Cavallari, F; Cavallo, N; Cecchi, C; Cerrada-Canales, M; Cesaroni, F; Chamizo-Llatas, M; Chang, Y H; Chaturvedi, U K; Chekanov, S V; Chemarin, M; Chen, A; Chen, G; Chen, G M; Chen, H F; Chen, H S; Chéreau, X J; Chiefari, G; Chien, C Y; Cifarelli, Luisa; Cindolo, F; Civinini, C; Clare, I; Clare, R; Cohn, H O; Coignet, G; Colijn, A P; Colino, N; Commichau, V; Costantini, S; Cotorobai, F; de la Cruz, B; Csilling, Akos; Dai, T S; D'Alessandro, R; De Asmundis, R; Degré, A; Deiters, K; Della Volpe, D; Denes, P; De Notaristefani, F; DiBitonto, Daryl; Diemoz, M; Van Dierendonck, D N; Di Lodovico, F; Dionisi, C; Dittmar, Michael; Dominguez, A; Doria, A; Dova, M T; Duchesneau, D; Duinker, P; Durán, I; Dutta, S; Easo, S; Efremenko, Yu V; El-Mamouni, H; Engler, A; Eppling, F J; Erné, F C; Ernenwein, J P; Extermann, Pierre; Fabre, M; Faccini, R; Falciano, S; Favara, A; Fay, J; Fedin, O; Felcini, Marta; Fenyi, B; Ferguson, T; Ferroni, F; Fesefeldt, H S; Fiandrini, E; Field, J H; Filthaut, Frank; Fisher, P H; Fisk, I; Forconi, G; Fredj, L; Freudenreich, Klaus; Furetta, C; Galaktionov, Yu; Ganguli, S N; García-Abia, P; Gau, S S; Gentile, S; Gheordanescu, N; Giagu, S; Goldfarb, S; Goldstein, J; Gong, Z F; Gougas, Andreas; Gratta, Giorgio; Grünewald, M W; Gupta, V K; Gurtu, A; Gutay, L J; Hartmann, B; Hasan, A; Hatzifotiadou, D; Hebbeker, T; Hervé, A; Van Hoek, W C; Hofer, H; Hong, S J; Hoorani, H; Hou, S R; Hu, G; Innocente, Vincenzo; Jenkes, K; Jin, B N; Jones, L W; de Jong, P; Josa-Mutuberria, I; Kasser, A; Khan, R A; Kamrad, D; Kamyshkov, Yu A; Kapustinsky, J S; Karyotakis, Yu; Kaur, M; Kienzle-Focacci, M N; Kim, D; Kim, D H; Kim, J K; Kim, S C; Kim, Y G; Kinnison, W W; Kirkby, A; Kirkby, D; Kirkby, Jasper; Kiss, D; Kittel, E W; Klimentov, A; König, A C; Kopp, A; Korolko, I; Koutsenko, V F; Krämer, R W; Krenz, W; Kunin, A; Ladrón de Guevara, P; Laktineh, I; Landi, G; Lapoint, C; Lassila-Perini, K M; Laurikainen, P; Lebeau, M; Lebedev, A; Lebrun, P; Lecomte, P; Lecoq, P; Le Coultre, P; Le Goff, J M; Leiste, R; Leonardi, E; Levchenko, P M; Li Chuan; Lin, C H; Lin, W T; Linde, Frank L; Lista, L; Liu, Z A; Lohmann, W; Longo, E; Lu, W; Lü, Y S; Lübelsmeyer, K; Luci, C; Luckey, D; Luminari, L; Lustermann, W; Ma Wen Gan; Maity, M; Majumder, G; Malgeri, L; Malinin, A; Maña, C; Mangeol, D J J; Mangla, S; Marchesini, P A; Marin, A; Martin, J P; Marzano, F; Massaro, G G G; McNally, D; McNeil, R R; Mele, S; Merola, L; Meschini, M; Metzger, W J; Von der Mey, M; Mi, Y; Mihul, A; Van Mil, A J W; Mirabelli, G; Mnich, J; Molnár, P; Monteleoni, B; Moore, R; Morganti, S; Moulik, T; Mount, R; Müller, S; Muheim, F; Muijs, A J M; Nahn, S; Napolitano, M; Nessi-Tedaldi, F; Newman, H; Niessen, T; Nippe, A; Nisati, A; Nowak, H; Oh, Yu D; Opitz, H; Organtini, G; Ostonen, R; Palomares, C; Pandoulas, D; Paoletti, S; Paolucci, P; Park, H K; Park, I H; Pascale, G; Passaleva, G; Patricelli, S; Paul, T; Pauluzzi, M; Paus, C; Pauss, Felicitas; Peach, D; Pei, Y J; Pensotti, S; Perret-Gallix, D; Petersen, B; Petrak, S; Pevsner, A; Piccolo, D; Pieri, M; Pinto, J C; Piroué, P A; Pistolesi, E; Plyaskin, V; Pohl, M; Pozhidaev, V; Postema, H; Produit, N; Prokofev, D; Prokofiev, D O; Rahal-Callot, G; Raja, N; Rancoita, P G; Rattaggi, M; Raven, G; Razis, P A; Read, K; Ren, D; Rescigno, M; Reucroft, S; Van Rhee, T; Riemann, S; Riles, K; Robohm, A; Rodin, J; Roe, B P; Romero, L; Rosier-Lees, S; Rosselet, P; Van Rossum, W; Roth, S; Rubio, Juan Antonio; Ruschmeier, D; Rykaczewski, H; Salicio, J; Sánchez, E; Sanders, M P; Sarakinos, M E; Sarkar, S; Sassowsky, M; Sauvage, G; Schäfer, C; Shchegelskii, V; Schmidt-Kärst, S; Schmitz, D; Schmitz, P; Scholz, N; Schopper, Herwig Franz; Schotanus, D J; Schultze, K; Schwenke, J; Schwering, G; Sciacca, C; Sciarrino, D; Servoli, L; Shevchenko, S; Shivarov, N; Shoutko, V; Shukla, J; Shumilov, E; Shvorob, A V; Siedenburg, T; Son, D; Sopczak, André; Smith, B; Spillantini, P; Steuer, M; Stickland, D P; Stone, A; Stone, H; Stoyanov, B; Strässner, A; Strauch, K; Sudhakar, K; Sultanov, G G; Sun, L Z; Susinno, G F; Suter, H; Swain, J D; Tang, X W; Tauscher, Ludwig; Taylor, L; Ting, Samuel C C; Ting, S M; Tonutti, M; Tonwar, S C; Tóth, J; Tully, C; Tuchscherer, H; Tung, K L; Uchida, Y; Ulbricht, J; Uwer, U; Valente, E; Van de Walle, R T; Vesztergombi, G; Vetlitskii, I; Viertel, Gert M; Vivargent, M; Völkert, R; Vogel, H; Vogt, H; Vorobev, I; Vorobyov, A A; Vorvolakos, A; Wadhwa, M; Wallraff, W; Wang, J C; Wang, X L; Wang, Z M; Weber, A; Wittgenstein, F; Wu, S X; Wynhoff, S; Xu, J; Xu, Z Z; Yang, B Z; Yang, C G; Yao, X Y; Ye, J B; Yeh, S C; You, J M; Zalite, A; Zalite, Yu; Zemp, P; Zeng, Y; Zhang, Z; Zhang, Z P; Zhou, B; Zhu, G Y; Zhu, R Y; Zichichi, Antonino; Ziegler, F

    1997-01-01

    We report on measurements of $\\mathrm{e^+e^-}$ annihilation into hadrons and lepton pairs. The data have been taken with the L3 detector at LEP at centre--of--mass energies between 161~$\\mathrm{Ge\\kern -0.12em V}$ and 172~$\\mathrm{Ge\\kern -0.12em V}$. In a data sample corresponding to 21.2~pb$^{-1}$ of integrated luminosity 2728 hadronic and 868 lepton--pair events are selected. The measured cross sections and leptonic forward--backward asymmetries agree well with the Standard Model predictions. \\end{abstract}

  15. Search for the Standard Model Higgs Boson in $e^+ e^-$ Interactions at $161 \\leq \\sqrt{s} \\leq 172$ GeV

    CERN Document Server

    Acciarri, M; Aguilar-Benítez, M; Ahlen, S P; Alcaraz, J; Alemanni, G; Allaby, James V; Aloisio, A; Alverson, G; Alviggi, M G; Ambrosi, G; Anderhub, H; Andreev, V P; Angelescu, T; Anselmo, F; Arefev, A; Azemoon, T; Aziz, T; Bagnaia, P; Baksay, L; Banerjee, S; Banerjee, Sw; Banicz, K; Barczyk, A; Barillère, R; Barone, L; Bartalini, P; Baschirotto, A; Basile, M; Battiston, R; Bay, A; Becattini, F; Becker, U; Behner, F; Berdugo, J; Berges, P; Bertucci, B; Betev, B L; Bhattacharya, S; Biasini, M; Biland, A; Bilei, G M; Blaising, J J; Blyth, S C; Bobbink, Gerjan J; Böck, R K; Böhm, A; Boldizsar, L; Borgia, B; Bourilkov, D; Bourquin, Maurice; Braccini, S; Branson, J G; Brigljevic, V; Brock, I C; Buffini, A; Buijs, A; Burger, J D; Burger, W J; Busenitz, J K; Button, A M; Cai, X D; Campanelli, M; Capell, M; Cara Romeo, G; Carlino, G; Cartacci, A M; Casaus, J; Castellini, G; Cavallari, F; Cavallo, N; Cecchi, C; Cerrada-Canales, M; Cesaroni, F; Chamizo-Llatas, M; Chang, Y H; Chaturvedi, U K; Chekanov, S V; Chemarin, M; Chen, A; Chen, G; Chen, G M; Chen, H F; Chen, H S; Chéreau, X J; Chiefari, G; Chien, C Y; Cifarelli, Luisa; Cindolo, F; Civinini, C; Clare, I; Clare, R; Cohn, H O; Coignet, G; Colijn, A P; Colino, N; Commichau, V; Costantini, S; Cotorobai, F; de la Cruz, B; Csilling, Akos; Dai, T S; D'Alessandro, R; De Asmundis, R; Degré, A; Deiters, K; Della Volpe, D; Denes, P; De Notaristefani, F; DiBitonto, Daryl; Diemoz, M; Van Dierendonck, D N; Di Lodovico, F; Dionisi, C; Dittmar, Michael; Dominguez, A; Doria, A; Dova, M T; Duchesneau, D; Duinker, P; Durán, I; Dutta, S; Easo, S; Efremenko, Yu V; El-Mamouni, H; Engler, A; Eppling, F J; Erné, F C; Ernenwein, J P; Extermann, Pierre; Fabre, M; Faccini, R; Falciano, S; Favara, A; Fay, J; Fedin, O; Felcini, Marta; Fenyi, B; Ferguson, T; Ferroni, F; Fesefeldt, H S; Fiandrini, E; Field, J H; Filthaut, Frank; Fisher, P H; Fisk, I; Forconi, G; Fredj, L; Freudenreich, Klaus; Furetta, C; Galaktionov, Yu; Ganguli, S N; García-Abia, P; Gau, S S; Gentile, S; Gheordanescu, N; Giagu, S; Goldfarb, S; Goldstein, J; Gong, Z F; Gougas, Andreas; Gratta, Giorgio; Grünewald, M W; Gupta, V K; Gurtu, A; Gutay, L J; Hartmann, B; Hasan, A; Hatzifotiadou, D; Hebbeker, T; Hervé, A; Van Hoek, W C; Hofer, H; Hong, S J; Hoorani, H; Hou, S R; Hu, G; Innocente, Vincenzo; Jenkes, K; Jin, B N; Jones, L W; de Jong, P; Josa-Mutuberria, I; Kasser, A; Khan, R A; Kamrad, D; Kamyshkov, Yu A; Kapustinsky, J S; Karyotakis, Yu; Kaur, M; Kienzle-Focacci, M N; Kim, D; Kim, D H; Kim, J K; Kim, S C; Kim, Y G; Kinnison, W W; Kirkby, A; Kirkby, D; Kirkby, Jasper; Kiss, D; Kittel, E W; Klimentov, A; König, A C; Kopp, A; Korolko, I; Koutsenko, V F; Krämer, R W; Krenz, W; Kunin, A; Ladrón de Guevara, P; Laktineh, I; Landi, G; Lapoint, C; Lassila-Perini, K M; Laurikainen, P; Lebeau, M; Lebedev, A; Lebrun, P; Lecomte, P; Lecoq, P; Le Coultre, P; Lee, H J; Le Goff, J M; Leiste, R; Leonardi, E; Levchenko, P M; Li Chuan; Lin, C H; Lin, W T; Linde, Frank L; Lista, L; Liu, Z A; Lohmann, W; Longo, E; Lu, W; Lü, Y S; Lübelsmeyer, K; Luci, C; Luckey, D; Luminari, L; Lustermann, W; Ma Wen Gan; Maity, M; Majumder, G; Malgeri, L; Malinin, A; Maña, C; Mangeol, D J J; Mangla, S; Marchesini, P A; Marin, A; Martin, J P; Marzano, F; Massaro, G G G; McNally, D; McNeil, R R; Mele, S; Merola, L; Meschini, M; Metzger, W J; Von der Mey, M; Mi, Y; Mihul, A; Van Mil, A J W; Mirabelli, G; Mnich, J; Molnár, P; Monteleoni, B; Moore, R; Morganti, S; Moulik, T; Mount, R; Müller, S; Muheim, F; Muijs, A J M; Nahn, S; Napolitano, M; Nessi-Tedaldi, F; Newman, H; Niessen, T; Nippe, A; Nisati, A; Nowak, H; Oh, Yu D; Opitz, H; Organtini, G; Ostonen, R; Palomares, C; Pandoulas, D; Paoletti, S; Paolucci, P; Park, H K; Park, I H; Pascale, G; Passaleva, G; Patricelli, S; Paul, T; Pauluzzi, M; Paus, C; Pauss, Felicitas; Peach, D; Pei, Y J; Pensotti, S; Perret-Gallix, D; Petersen, B; Petrak, S; Pevsner, A; Piccolo, D; Pieri, M; Piroué, P A; Pistolesi, E; Plyaskin, V; Pohl, M; Pozhidaev, V; Postema, H; Produit, N; Prokofev, D; Prokofiev, D O; Rahal-Callot, G; Raja, N; Rancoita, P G; Rattaggi, M; Raven, G; Razis, P A; Read, K; Ren, D; Rescigno, M; Reucroft, S; Van Rhee, T; Riemann, S; Riles, K; Robohm, A; Rodin, J; Roe, B P; Romero, L; Rosier-Lees, S; Rosselet, P; Van Rossum, W; Roth, S; Rubio, Juan Antonio; Ruschmeier, D; Rykaczewski, H; Salicio, J; Sánchez, E; Sanders, M P; Sarakinos, M E; Sarkar, S; Sassowsky, M; Schäfer, C; Shchegelskii, V; Schmidt-Kärst, S; Schmitz, D; Schmitz, P; Schneegans, M; Scholz, N; Schopper, Herwig Franz; Schotanus, D J; Schwenke, J; Schwering, G; Sciacca, C; Sciarrino, D; Servoli, L; Shevchenko, S; Shivarov, N; Shoutko, V; Shukla, J; Shumilov, E; Shvorob, A V; Siedenburg, T; Son, D; Sopczak, André; Smith, B; Spillantini, P; Steuer, M; Stickland, D P; Stone, A; Stone, H; Stoyanov, B; Strässner, A; Strauch, K; Sudhakar, K; Sultanov, G G; Sun, L Z; Susinno, G F; Suter, H; Swain, J D; Tang, X W; Tauscher, Ludwig; Taylor, L; Ting, Samuel C C; Ting, S M; Tonutti, M; Tonwar, S C; Tóth, J; Tully, C; Tuchscherer, H; Tung, K L; Uchida, Y; Ulbricht, J; Uwer, U; Valente, E; Van de Walle, R T; Vesztergombi, G; Vetlitskii, I; Viertel, Gert M; Vivargent, M; Völkert, R; Vogel, H; Vogt, H; Vorobev, I; Vorobyov, A A; Vorvolakos, A; Wadhwa, M; Wallraff, W; Wang, J C; Wang, X L; Wang, Z M; Weber, A; Wittgenstein, F; Wu, S X; Wynhoff, S; Xu, J; Xu, Z Z; Yang, B Z; Yang, C G; Yao, X Y; Ye, J B; Yeh, S C; You, J M; Zalite, A; Zalite, Yu; Zemp, P; Zeng, Y; Zhang, Z; Zhang, Z P; Zhou, B; Zhu, G Y; Zhu, R Y; Zichichi, Antonino; Ziegler, F

    1997-01-01

    A search for the Standard Model Higgs boson has been performed with the L3 detector at LEP. The data sample was collected at three centre-of-mass energies, 161.3, 170.3 and 172.3 GeV with integrated luminosities of 10.8, 1.0 and 9.2 $pb^-1$, respectively. No Higgs signal is observed. In combination with previous data taken at the Z resonance, a lower Higgs mass limit, $M_H > 69.5$ GeV, is obtained at 95\\% confidence level.

  16. Gulf of Mexico Sales 157 and 161: Central and western planning areas final environmental impact statement, Volume I: Sections I through IV.C

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1995-11-01

    This Final Environmental Impact Statement (EIS) covers the proposed 1996 Gulf of Mexico OCS oil and gas lease sales [Central Gulf of Mexico Sale 157 (March 1996) and Western Gulf of Mexico Sale 161 (August 1996)]. This document includes the purpose and background of the proposed actions, the alternatives, the descriptions of the affected environment, and the potential environmental impacts of the proposed actions and alternatives. Proposed mitigating measures and their potential effects are analyzed, in addition to potential cumulative impacts resulting from proposed activities

  17. MicroRNA-15a and -16-1 act via MYB to elevate fetal hemoglobin expression in human trisomy 13

    OpenAIRE

    Sankaran, Vijay G.; Menne, Tobias F.; Šćepanović, Danilo; Vergilio, Jo-Anne; Ji, Peng; Kim, Jinkuk; Thiru, Prathapan; Orkin, Stuart H.; Lander, Eric S.; Lodish, Harvey F.

    2011-01-01

    Many human aneuploidy syndromes have unique phenotypic consequences, but in most instances it is unclear whether these phenotypes are attributable to alterations in the dosage of specific genes. In human trisomy 13, there is delayed switching and persistence of fetal hemoglobin (HbF) and elevation of embryonic hemoglobin in newborns. Using partial trisomy cases, we mapped this trait to chromosomal band 13q14; by examining the genes in this region, two microRNAs, miR-15a and -16-1, appear as t...

  18. Identification of a recombinant inulin fructotransferase (difructose dianhydride III forming) from Arthrobacter sp. 161MFSha2.1 with high specific activity and remarkable thermostability.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Xiao; Yu, Shuhuai; Zhang, Tao; Jiang, Bo; Mu, Wanmeng

    2015-04-08

    Difructose dianhydride III (DFA III) is a functional carbohydrate produced from inulin by inulin fructotransferase (IFTase, EC 4.2.2.18). In this work, an IFTase gene from Arthrobacter sp. 161MFSha2.1 was cloned and expressed in Escherachia coli. The recombinant enzyme was purified by metal affinity chromatography. It showed significant inulin hydrolysis activity, and the produced main product from inulin was determined as DFA III by nuclear magnetic resonance analysis. The molecular mass of the purified protein was calculated to be 43 and 125 kDa by sodium dodecyl sulfate-polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis and gel filtration, respectively, suggesting the native enzyme might be a homotrimer. The recombinant enzyme showed maximal activity as 2391 units/mg at pH 6.5 and 55 °C. It displayed the highest thermostability among previously reported IFTases (DFA III forming) and was stable up to 80 °C for 4 h of incubation. The smallest substrate was determined as nystose. The conversion ratio of inulin to DFA III reached 81% when 100 g/L inulin was catalyzed by 80 nM recombinant enzyme for 20 min at pH 6.5 and 55 °C. All of these data indicated that the IFTase (DFA III forming) from Arthrobacter sp. 161MFSha2.1 had great potential for industrial DFA III production.

  19. Search for Acoplanar Lepton Pair Events in $e^{+}e^{-}$ Collisions at $\\sqrt{s}$ = 161, 172 and 183 GeV

    CERN Document Server

    Abbiendi, G.; Alexander, G.; Allison, John; Altekamp, N.; Anderson, K.J.; Anderson, S.; Arcelli, S.; Asai, S.; Ashby, S.F.; Axen, D.; Azuelos, G.; Ball, A.H.; Barberio, E.; Barlow, Roger J.; Bartoldus, R.; Batley, J.R.; Baumann, S.; Bechtluft, J.; Behnke, T.; Bell, Kenneth Watson; Bella, G.; Bellerive, A.; Bentvelsen, S.; Bethke, S.; Betts, S.; Biebel, O.; Biguzzi, A.; Bird, S.D.; Blobel, V.; Bloodworth, I.J.; Bobinski, M.; Bock, P.; Bohme, J.; Bonacorsi, D.; Boutemeur, M.; Braibant, S.; Bright-Thomas, P.; Brigliadori, L.; Brown, Robert M.; Burckhart, H.J.; Burgard, C.; Burgin, R.; Capiluppi, P.; Carnegie, R.K.; Carter, A.A.; Carter, J.R.; Chang, C.Y.; Charlton, David G.; Chrisman, D.; Ciocca, C.; Clarke, P.E.L.; Clay, E.; Cohen, I.; Conboy, J.E.; Cooke, O.C.; Couyoumtzelis, C.; Coxe, R.L.; Cuffiani, M.; Dado, S.; Dallavalle, G.Marco; Davis, R.; De Jong, S.; del Pozo, L.A.; De Roeck, A.; Desch, K.; Dienes, B.; Dixit, M.S.; Dubbert, J.; Duchovni, E.; Duckeck, G.; Duerdoth, I.P.; Eatough, D.; Estabrooks, P.G.; Etzion, E.; Evans, H.G.; Fabbri, F.; Fanti, M.; Faust, A.A.; Fiedler, F.; Fierro, M.; Fleck, I.; Folman, R.; Furtjes, A.; Futyan, D.I.; Gagnon, P.; Gary, J.W.; Gascon, J.; Gascon-Shotkin, S.M.; Gaycken, G.; Geich-Gimbel, C.; Giacomelli, G.; Giacomelli, P.; Gibson, V.; Gibson, W.R.; Gingrich, D.M.; Glenzinski, D.; Goldberg, J.; Gorn, W.; Grandi, C.; Gross, E.; Grunhaus, J.; Gruwe, M.; Hanson, G.G.; Hansroul, M.; Hapke, M.; Harder, K.; Hargrove, C.K.; Hartmann, C.; Hauschild, M.; Hawkes, C.M.; Hawkings, R.; Hemingway, R.J.; Herndon, M.; Herten, G.; Heuer, R.D.; Hildreth, M.D.; Hill, J.C.; Hillier, S.J.; Hobson, P.R.; Hocker, James Andrew; Homer, R.J.; Honma, A.K.; Horvath, D.; Hossain, K.R.; Howard, R.; Huntemeyer, P.; Igo-Kemenes, P.; Imrie, D.C.; Ishii, K.; Jacob, F.R.; Jawahery, A.; Jeremie, H.; Jimack, M.; Jones, C.R.; Jovanovic, P.; Junk, T.R.; Karlen, D.; Kartvelishvili, V.; Kawagoe, K.; Kawamoto, T.; Kayal, P.I.; Keeler, R.K.; Kellogg, R.G.; Kennedy, B.W.; Klier, A.; Kluth, S.; Kobayashi, T.; Kobel, M.; Koetke, D.S.; Kokott, T.P.; Kolrep, M.; Komamiya, S.; Kowalewski, Robert V.; Kress, T.; Krieger, P.; von Krogh, J.; Kuhl, T.; Kyberd, P.; Lafferty, G.D.; Lanske, D.; Lauber, J.; Lautenschlager, S.R.; Lawson, I.; Layter, J.G.; Lazic, D.; Lee, A.M.; Lellouch, D.; Letts, J.; Levinson, L.; Liebisch, R.; List, B.; Littlewood, C.; Lloyd, A.W.; Lloyd, S.L.; Loebinger, F.K.; Long, G.D.; Losty, M.J.; Ludwig, J.; Lui, D.; Macchiolo, A.; Macpherson, A.; Mader, W.; Mannelli, M.; Marcellini, S.; Markopoulos, C.; Martin, A.J.; Martin, J.P.; Martinez, G.; Mashimo, T.; Mattig, Peter; McDonald, W.John; McKenna, J.; Mckigney, E.A.; McMahon, T.J.; McPherson, R.A.; Meijers, F.; Menke, S.; Merritt, F.S.; Mes, H.; Meyer, J.; Michelini, A.; Mihara, S.; Mikenberg, G.; Miller, D.J.; Mir, R.; Mohr, W.; Montanari, A.; Mori, T.; Nagai, K.; Nakamura, I.; Neal, H.A.; Nellen, B.; Nisius, R.; O'Neale, S.W.; Oakham, F.G.; Odorici, F.; Ogren, H.O.; Oreglia, M.J.; Orito, S.; Palinkas, J.; Pasztor, G.; Pater, J.R.; Patrick, G.N.; Patt, J.; Perez-Ochoa, R.; Petzold, S.; Pfeifenschneider, P.; Pilcher, J.E.; Pinfold, J.; Plane, David E.; Poffenberger, P.; Polok, J.; Przybycien, M.; Rembser, C.; Rick, H.; Robertson, S.; Robins, S.A.; Rodning, N.; Roney, J.M.; Roscoe, K.; Rossi, A.M.; Rozen, Y.; Runge, K.; Runolfsson, O.; Rust, D.R.; Sachs, K.; Saeki, T.; Sahr, O.; Sang, W.M.; Sarkisian, E.K.G.; Sbarra, C.; Schaile, A.D.; Schaile, O.; Scharf, F.; Scharff-Hansen, P.; Schieck, J.; Schmitt, B.; Schmitt, S.; Schoning, A.; Schroder, Matthias; Schumacher, M.; Schwick, C.; Scott, W.G.; Seuster, R.; Shears, T.G.; Shen, B.C.; Shepherd-Themistocleous, C.H.; Sherwood, P.; Siroli, G.P.; Sittler, A.; Skuja, A.; Smith, A.M.; Snow, G.A.; Sobie, R.; Soldner-Rembold, S.; Sproston, M.; Stahl, A.; Stephens, K.; Steuerer, J.; Stoll, K.; Strom, David M.; Strohmer, R.; Surrow, B.; Talbot, S.D.; Tanaka, S.; Taras, P.; Tarem, S.; Teuscher, R.; Thiergen, M.; Thomson, M.A.; von Torne, E.; Torrence, E.; Towers, S.; Trigger, I.; Trocsanyi, Z.; Tsur, E.; Turcot, A.S.; Turner-Watson, M.F.; Van Kooten, Rick J.; Vannerem, P.; Verzocchi, M.; Voss, H.; Wackerle, F.; Wagner, A.; Ward, C.P.; Ward, D.R.; Watkins, P.M.; Watson, A.T.; Watson, N.K.; Wells, P.S.; Wermes, N.; White, J.S.; Wilson, G.W.; Wilson, J.A.; Wyatt, T.R.; Yamashita, S.; Yekutieli, G.; Zacek, V.; Zer-Zion, D.

    2000-01-01

    A selection of di-lepton events with significant missing transverse momentum has been performed using a total data sample of 77.0 pb-1 at e+e- centre-of-mass energies of 161 GeV, 172 GeV and 183 GeV. The observed numbers of events: four at 161 GeV, nine at 172 GeV, and 78 at 183 GeV, are consistent with the numbers expected from Standard Model processes, which arise predominantly from W+W- production with each W decaying leptonically. This topology is an experimental signature also for the pair production of new particles that decay to a charged lepton accompanied by one or more invisible particles. Further event selection criteria are described that optimise the sensitivity to particular new physics channels. No evidence for new phenomena is apparent and model independent limits on the production cross-section times branching ratio squared for various new physics processes are presented. Assuming a 100% branching ratio for the decay of a right-handed charged slepton to a charged lepton and the lightest neutr...

  20. Search for the Standard Model Higgs Boson in $e^+ e^-$ Collisions at $\\sqrt{s}$ = 161-172 GeV

    CERN Document Server

    Ackerstaff, K; Allison, J; Altekamp, N; Anderson, K J; Anderson, S; Arcelli, S; Asai, S; Axen, D A; Azuelos, Georges; Ball, A H; Barberio, E; Barlow, R J; Bartoldus, R; Batley, J Richard; Baumann, S; Bechtluft, J; Beeston, C; Behnke, T; Bell, A N; Bell, K W; Bella, G; Bentvelsen, Stanislaus Cornelius Maria; Bethke, Siegfried; Biebel, O; Biguzzi, A; Bird, S D; Blobel, Volker; Bloodworth, Ian J; Bloomer, J E; Bobinski, M; Bock, P; Bonacorsi, D; Boutemeur, M; Bouwens, B T; Braibant, S; Brigliadori, L; Brown, R M; Burckhart, Helfried J; Burgard, C; Bürgin, R; Capiluppi, P; Carnegie, R K; Carter, A A; Carter, J R; Chang, C Y; Charlton, D G; Chrisman, D; Clarke, P E L; Cohen, I; Conboy, J E; Cooke, O C; Cuffiani, M; Dado, S; Dallapiccola, C; Dallavalle, G M; Davis, R; De Jong, S; del Pozo, L A; Desch, Klaus; Dienes, B; Dixit, M S; do Couto e Silva, E; Doucet, M; Duchovni, E; Duckeck, G; Duerdoth, I P; Eatough, D; Edwards, J E G; Estabrooks, P G; Evans, H G; Evans, M; Fabbri, Franco Luigi; Fanti, M; Faust, A A; Fiedler, F; Fierro, M; Fischer, H M; Fleck, I; Folman, R; Fong, D G; Foucher, M; Fürtjes, A; Futyan, D I; Gagnon, P; Gary, J W; Gascon, J; Gascon-Shotkin, S M; Geddes, N I; Geich-Gimbel, C; Geralis, T; Giacomelli, G; Giacomelli, P; Giacomelli, R; Gibson, V; Gibson, W R; Gingrich, D M; Glenzinski, D A; Goldberg, J; Goodrick, M J; Gorn, W; Grandi, C; Gross, E; Grunhaus, Jacob; Gruwé, M; Hajdu, C; Hanson, G G; Hansroul, M; Hapke, M; Hargrove, C K; Hart, P A; Hartmann, C; Hauschild, M; Hawkes, C M; Hawkings, R; Hemingway, Richard J; Herndon, M; Herten, G; Heuer, R D; Hildreth, M D; Hill, J C; Hillier, S J; Hobson, P R; Homer, R James; Honma, A K; Horváth, D; Hossain, K R; Howard, R; Hüntemeyer, P; Hutchcroft, D E; Igo-Kemenes, P; Imrie, D C; Ingram, M R; Ishii, K; Jawahery, A; Jeffreys, P W; Jeremie, H; Jimack, Martin Paul; Joly, A; Jones, C R; Jones, G; Jones, M; Jost, U; Jovanovic, P; Junk, T R; Karlen, D A; Kartvelishvili, V G; Kawagoe, K; Kawamoto, T; Kayal, P I; Keeler, Richard K; Kellogg, R G; Kennedy, B W; Kirk, J; Klier, A; Kluth, S; Kobayashi, T; Kobel, M; Koetke, D S; Kokott, T P; Kolrep, M; Komamiya, S; Kress, T; Krieger, P; Von Krogh, J; Kyberd, P; Lafferty, G D; Lahmann, R; Lai, W P; Lanske, D; Lauber, J; Lautenschlager, S R; Layter, J G; Lazic, D; Lee, A M; Lefebvre, E; Lellouch, Daniel; Letts, J; Levinson, L; Lloyd, S L; Loebinger, F K; Long, G D; Losty, Michael J; Ludwig, J; Macchiolo, A; MacPherson, A L; Mannelli, M; Marcellini, S; Markus, C; Martin, A J; Martin, J P; Martínez, G; Mashimo, T; Mättig, P; McDonald, W J; McKenna, J A; McKigney, E A; McMahon, T J; McPherson, R A; Meijers, F; Menke, S; Merritt, F S; Mes, H; Meyer, J; Michelini, Aldo; Mikenberg, G; Miller, D J; Mincer, A; Mir, R; Mohr, W; Montanari, A; Mori, T; Morii, M; Müller, U; Mihara, S; Nagai, K; Nakamura, I; Neal, H A; Nellen, B; Nisius, R; O'Neale, S W; Oakham, F G; Odorici, F; Ögren, H O; Oh, A; Oldershaw, N J; Oreglia, M J; Orito, S; Pálinkás, J; Pásztor, G; Pater, J R; Patrick, G N; Patt, J; Pearce, M J; Pérez-Ochoa, R; Petzold, S; Pfeifenschneider, P; Pilcher, J E; Pinfold, J L; Plane, D E; Poffenberger, P R; Poli, B; Posthaus, A; Rees, D L; Rigby, D; Robertson, S; Robins, S A; Rodning, N L; Roney, J M; Rooke, A M; Ros, E; Rossi, A M; Routenburg, P; Rozen, Y; Runge, K; Runólfsson, O; Ruppel, U; Rust, D R; Rylko, R; Sachs, K; Saeki, T; Sarkisyan-Grinbaum, E; Sbarra, C; Schaile, A D; Schaile, O; Scharf, F; Scharff-Hansen, P; Schenk, P; Schieck, J; Schleper, P; Schmitt, B; Schmitt, S; Schöning, A; Schröder, M; Schultz-Coulon, H C; Schumacher, M; Schwick, C; Scott, W G; Shears, T G; Shen, B C; Shepherd-Themistocleous, C H; Sherwood, P; Siroli, G P; Sittler, A; Skillman, A; Skuja, A; Smith, A M; Snow, G A; Sobie, Randall J; Söldner-Rembold, S; Springer, R W; Sproston, M; Stephens, K; Steuerer, J; Stockhausen, B; Stoll, K; Strom, D; Szymanski, P; Tafirout, R; Talbot, S D; Tanaka, S; Taras, P; Tarem, S; Teuscher, R; Thiergen, M; Thomson, M A; Von Törne, E; Towers, S; Trigger, I; Trócsányi, Z L; Tsur, E; Turcot, A S; Turner-Watson, M F; Utzat, P; Van Kooten, R; Verzocchi, M; Vikas, P; Vokurka, E H; Voss, H; Wäckerle, F; Wagner, A; Ward, C P; Ward, D R; Watkins, P M; Watson, A T; Watson, N K; Wells, P S; Wermes, N; White, J S; Wilkens, B; Wilson, G W; Wilson, J A; Wolf, G; Wyatt, T R; Yamashita, S; Yekutieli, G; Zacek, V; Zer-Zion, D

    1998-01-01

    This paper describes a search for the Standard Model Higgs boson using data from e^+e^- collisions collected at center-of-mass energies of 161, 170 and 172 GeV by the OPAL detector at LEP. The data collected at these energies correspond to integrated luminosities of 10.0, 1.0 and 9.4 pb^-1, respectively. The search is sensitive to the main final states from the process in which the Higgs boson is produced in association with a fermion anti-fermion pair, namely four jets, two jets with missing energy, and two jets produced together with a pair of electron, muon or tau leptons. One candidate event is observed, in agreement with the Standard Model background expectation. In combination with previous OPAL searches at center-of-mass energies close to the Z^0 resonance and the revised previous OPAL searches at 161 GeV, we derive a lower limit of 69.4 GeV for the mass of the Standard Model Higgs boson at the 95% confidence level.

  1. Monoclonal antibody 1.6.1 against human MPL receptor allows HSC enrichment of CB and BM CD34(+)CD38(-) populations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Petit Cocault, Laurence; Fleury, Maud; Clay, Denis; Larghero, Jérôme; Vanneaux, Valérie; Souyri, Michèle

    2016-04-01

    Thrombopoietin (TPO) and its receptor Mpl (CD110) play a crucial role in the regulation of hematopoietic stem cells (HSCs). Functional study of Mpl-expressing HSCs has, however, been hampered by the lack of efficient monoclonal antibodies, explaining the very few data available on Mpl(+) HSCs during human embryonic development and after birth. Investigating the main monoclonal antibodies used so far to sort CD110(+) cells from cord blood (CB) and adult bone marrow (BM), we found that only the recent monoclonal antibody 1.6.1 engineered by Immunex Corporation was specific. Using in vitro functional assays, we found that this antibody can be used to sort a CD34(+)CD38(-)CD110(+) population enriched in hematopoietic progenitor stem cells, both in CB and in adult BM. In vivo injection into NSG mice further indicated that the CB CD34(+)CD38(-)CD110(+) population is highly enriched in HSCs compared with both CD34(+)CD38(-)CD110(-) and CD34(+)CD38(-) populations. Together our results validate MAb1.6.1 as an important tool, which has so far been lacking, in the HSC field. Copyright © 2016 ISEH - International Society for Experimental Hematology. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  2. 161Dy Moessbauer spectroscopy of the intermetallic compounds DyNi2Si2, DyNi2Ge2 and DyAg2Si2

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Onodera, Hideya; Murata, Akifumi; Koizuka, Masaaki; Ohashi, Masayoshi; Yamaguchi, Yasuo

    1994-01-01

    161 Dy Moessbauer spectroscopic study has been performed on DyNi 2 Si 2 , DyNi 2 Ge 2 and DyAg 2 Si 2 in order to clarify microscopic properties of antiferromagnets with incommensurate and sinusoidally moment-modulated structure. The experiments were done using the standard 161 Tb Moessbauer sources prepared by neutron irradiation at the Japan Material Testing Reactor. The Moessbauer spectra of DyNi 2 Si 2 are analyzed satisfactorily by a single set of hyperfine parameters, and hence the sinusoidal moment-modulation is considered to be realized through a distribution of spin relaxation rate. The broadened spectra of DyNi 2 Ge 2 are fitted tentatively by three subspectra. It seems for DyNi 2 Ge 2 that the incommensurate arrangement of Dy moments differed in magnitude as well as the distribution of spin relaxation rate originates the moment modulation. The fact that the spectrum of DyAg 2 Si 2 at 3 K consists of two distinct subspectra ensures the complicated antiferromagnetic structure where two kinds of Dy moments differed in magnitude are arranged noncollinearly. (author)

  3. Geophysical Multiphase Flow With Interphase Exchanges - Hydrodynamic and Thermodynamic Models, and Numerical Techniques, Version GMFIX-1.61, Design Document Attachment 1

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dartevelle, S.

    2006-01-01

    Since the multiphase system is made up of a large number of particles, it is impractical to solve the motion of each individual particle; hence GMFIX v1.61 is based upon the Implicit Multi-Field formalism (IMF) which treats all phases in the system as interpenetrating continua. Each instantaneous local point variable (mass, velocity, temperature, pressure, so forth) must be treated to acknowledge the fact that any given arbitrary volume can be shared by different phases at the same time. This treatment may involve, for instance, an averaging or a smoothing process. GMFIX is the geophysical version of MFIX codes developed by NETL and ORNL. MFIX comes after 30 years of continuous developments and improvements from K-FIX codes from LANL. At the time this manuscript was ready for publication (March 2005), some differences exist between the current versions of GMFIX (v. 1.61) and MFIX (v: 1.60) regarding the exact formulation of the energy and momentum equations, the interfacial closures, and the turbulence formulation. Yet both GMFIX and MFIX are being improved, and developed tightly sides by sides

  4. Passive behaviour of zirconium, hafnium and niobium

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hornkjoel, S.

    1990-01-01

    The paper deals mainly with the results of stationary and transient polarization measurements together with capacitance measurements on passive electrodes of Zr, Hf and Nb over the entire pH-scale. The passive current densities are exstremely low, and essentially both pH and potential independent, exept for Nb at high pH. The extrapolated potential of zero inverse capacitance seems to be different from the extrapolated potential of zero film thickness for Zr and Hf, but not for Nb. The potential versus time curves at constant current show a downwards bending for Zr and Hf. It is shown that the pitting potentials of Zr and Hf are dependent of the concentration of halide ions and the type of halide ion, but not on pH. It is also shown that the pitting induction is second-order stimulated by chloride ions and first-order hindered by sulphate ions. Results from electron transfer reactions on passive niobium are reported. 9 refs

  5. Nanomechanical properties of hafnium nitride coating

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chen Yao; Laha, Tapas; Balani, Kantesh; Agarwal, Arvind

    2008-01-01

    Nanomechanical properties of plasma-sprayed HfN coating with and without hot isostatic pressing (HIP) treatment were evaluated using nanoindentation. For HIPed HfN coating, the elastic modulus (E) and yield strength increase whereas the hardness (H), H/E ratio and fraction of the elastic work decrease. HIPed HfN coating shows a larger pile-up around the indent as compared to as-sprayed HfN. HIPing causes densification and improvement in inter-splat bonding which subsequently lead to increase in nanomechanical properties

  6. High-pressure torsion of hafnium

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Edalati, Kaveh; Horita, Zenji; Mine, Yoji

    2010-01-01

    Pure Hf (99.99%) is processed by high-pressure torsion (HPT) under pressures of 4 and 30 GPa to form an ultrafine-grained structure with a gain size of ∼180 nm. X-ray diffraction analysis shows that, unlike Ti and Zr, no ω phase formation is detected after HPT processing even under a pressure of 30 GPa. A hydride formation is detected after straining at the pressure of 4 GPa. The hydride phase decomposes either by application of a higher pressure as 30 GPa or by unloading for prolong time after HPT processing. Microhardness, tensile and bending tests show that a high hardness (360 Hv) and an appreciable ductility (8%) as well as high tensile and bending strength (1.15 and 2.75 GPa, respectively) are achieved following the high-pressure torsion.

  7. Homozygosity mapping reveals new nonsense mutation in the FAM161A gene causing autosomal recessive retinitis pigmentosa in a Palestinian family.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zobor, Ditta; Balousha, Ghassan; Baumann, Britta; Wissinger, Bernd

    2014-01-01

    Retinitis pigmentosa (RP) is a heterogenous group of inherited retinal degenerations caused by mutations in at least 45 genes. Recently, the FAM161A gene was identified as the causative gene for RP28, an autosomal recessive form of RP. We performed a clinical and molecular genetic study of a consanguineous Palestinian family with two three siblings affected with retinitis pigmentosa. DNA samples were collected from the index patient, his father, his affected sister, and two non-affected brothers. DNA sample from the index was subjected to high resolution genome-wide SNP array. Assuming identity-by-descent in this consanguineous family we applied homozygosity mapping to identify disease causing genes. The index patient reported night blindness since the age of 20 years, followed by moderate disease progression with decrease of peripheral vision, the development of photophobia and later on reduced central vision. At the age of 40 his visual acuity was counting fingers (CF) for both eyes, color discrimination was not possible and his visual fields were severely constricted. Funduscopic examination revealed a typical appearance of advanced RP with optic disc pallor, narrowed retinal vessels, bone-spicule like pigmentary changes in the mid-periphery and atrophic changes in the macula. His younger affected brother (37 years) was reported with overall milder symptoms, while the youngest sister (21 years) reported problems only with night vision. Applying high-density SNP arrays we identified several homozygous genomic regions one of which included the recently identified FAM161A gene mutated in RP28-linked autosomal recessive RP. Sequencing analysis revealed the presence of a novel homozygous nonsense mutation, c.1003C>T/p.R335X in the index patient and the affected sister. We identified an RP28-linked RP family in the Palestinian population caused by a novel nonsense mutation in FAM161A. RP in this family shows a typical disease onset with moderate to rapid progression

  8. Search for the standard model Higgs boson in $e^+ e^-$ collisions at $\\sqrt{s}$=161, 170 and 172 GeV

    CERN Document Server

    Barate, R; Décamp, D; Ghez, P; Goy, C; Lees, J P; Lucotte, A; Minard, M N; Nief, J Y; Pietrzyk, B; Casado, M P; Chmeissani, M; Comas, P; Crespo, J M; Delfino, M C; Fernández, E; Fernández-Bosman, M; Garrido, L; Juste, A; Martínez, M; Merino, G; Miquel, R; Mir, L M; Padilla, C; Park, I C; Pascual, A; Perlas, J A; Riu, I; Sánchez, F; Teubert, F; Colaleo, A; Creanza, D; De Palma, M; Gelao, G; Iaselli, Giuseppe; Maggi, G; Maggi, M; Marinelli, N; Nuzzo, S; Ranieri, A; Raso, G; Ruggieri, F; Selvaggi, G; Silvestris, L; Tempesta, P; Tricomi, A; Zito, G; Huang, X; Lin, J; Ouyang, Q; Wang, T; Xie, Y; Xu, R; Xue, S; Zhang, J; Zhang, L; Zhao, W; Abbaneo, D; Alemany, R; Bazarko, A O; Becker, U; Bright-Thomas, P G; Cattaneo, M; Cerutti, F; Dissertori, G; Drevermann, H; Forty, Roger W; Frank, M; Hagelberg, R; Hansen, J B; Harvey, J; Janot, P; Jost, B; Kneringer, E; Knobloch, J; Lehraus, Ivan; Lutters, G; Mato, P; Minten, Adolf G; Moneta, L; Pacheco, A; Pusztaszeri, J F; Ranjard, F; Rizzo, G; Rolandi, Luigi; Rousseau, D; Schlatter, W D; Schmitt, M; Schneider, O; Tejessy, W; Tomalin, I R; Wachsmuth, H W; Wagner, A; Ajaltouni, Ziad J; Barrès, A; Boyer, C; Falvard, A; Ferdi, C; Gay, P; Guicheney, C; Henrard, P; Jousset, J; Michel, B; Monteil, S; Montret, J C; Pallin, D; Perret, P; Podlyski, F; Proriol, J; Rosnet, P; Rossignol, J M; Fearnley, Tom; Hansen, J D; Hansen, J R; Hansen, P H; Nilsson, B S; Rensch, B; Wäänänen, A; Daskalakis, G; Kyriakis, A; Markou, C; Simopoulou, Errietta; Vayaki, Anna; Blondel, A; Brient, J C; Machefert, F P; Rougé, A; Rumpf, M; Valassi, Andrea; Videau, H L; Focardi, E; Parrini, G; Zachariadou, K; Cavanaugh, R J; Corden, M; Georgiopoulos, C H; Hühn, T; Jaffe, D E; Antonelli, A; Bencivenni, G; Bologna, G; Bossi, F; Campana, P; Capon, G; Casper, David William; Chiarella, V; Felici, G; Laurelli, P; Mannocchi, G; Murtas, F; Murtas, G P; Passalacqua, L; Pepé-Altarelli, M; Curtis, L; Dorris, S J; Halley, A W; Knowles, I G; Lynch, J G; O'Shea, V; Raine, C; Scarr, J M; Smith, K; Teixeira-Dias, P; Thompson, A S; Thomson, E; Thomson, F; Turnbull, R M; Buchmüller, O L; Dhamotharan, S; Geweniger, C; Graefe, G; Hanke, P; Hansper, G; Hepp, V; Kluge, E E; Putzer, A; Sommer, J; Tittel, K; Werner, S; Wunsch, M; Beuselinck, R; Binnie, David M; Cameron, W; Dornan, Peter J; Girone, M; Goodsir, S M; Martin, E B; Morawitz, P; Moutoussi, A; Nash, J; Sedgbeer, J K; Spagnolo, P; Stacey, A M; Williams, M D; Ghete, V M; Girtler, P; Kuhn, D; Rudolph, G; Betteridge, A P; Bowdery, C K; Colrain, P; Crawford, G; Finch, A J; Foster, F; Hughes, G; Jones, R W L; Sloan, Terence; Whelan, E P; Williams, M I; Hoffmann, C; Jakobs, K; Kleinknecht, K; Quast, G; Renk, B; Rohne, E; Sander, H G; Van Gemmeren, P; Zeitnitz, C; Aubert, Jean-Jacques; Benchouk, C; Bonissent, A; Bujosa, G; Carr, J; Coyle, P; Diaconu, C A; Ealet, A; Fouchez, D; Konstantinidis, N P; Leroy, O; Motsch, F; Payre, P; Talby, M; Sadouki, A; Thulasidas, M; Tilquin, A; Trabelsi, K; Aleppo, M; Antonelli, M; Ragusa, F; Berlich, R; Blum, Walter; Büscher, V; Dietl, H; Ganis, G; Gotzhein, C; Kroha, H; Lütjens, G; Lutz, Gerhard; Männer, W; Moser, H G; Richter, R H; Rosado-Schlosser, A; Schael, S; Settles, Ronald; Seywerd, H C J; Saint-Denis, R; Stenzel, H; Wiedenmann, W; Wolf, G; Boucrot, J; Callot, O; Chen, S; Cordier, A; Davier, M; Duflot, L; Grivaz, J F; Heusse, P; Höcker, A; Jacholkowska, A; Jacquet, M; Kado, M; Kim, D W; Le Diberder, F R; Lefrançois, J; Lutz, A M; Nikolic, I A; Schune, M H; Serin, L; Simion, S; Tournefier, E; Veillet, J J; Videau, I; Zerwas, D; Azzurri, P; Bagliesi, G; Bettarini, S; Bozzi, C; Calderini, G; Ciulli, V; Dell'Orso, R; Fantechi, R; Ferrante, I; Giassi, A; Gregorio, A; Ligabue, F; Lusiani, A; Marrocchesi, P S; Messineo, A; Palla, Fabrizio; Sanguinetti, G; Sciabà, A; Steinberger, Jack; Tenchini, Roberto; Vannini, C; Venturi, A; Verdini, P G; Blair, G A; Bryant, L M; Chambers, J T; Gao, Y; Green, M G; Medcalf, T; Perrodo, P; Strong, J A; Von Wimmersperg-Töller, J H; Botterill, David R; Clifft, R W; Edgecock, T R; Haywood, S; Maley, P; Norton, P R; Thompson, J C; Wright, A E; Bloch-Devaux, B; Colas, P; Fabbro, B; Kozanecki, Witold; Lançon, E; Lemaire, M C; Locci, E; Pérez, P; Rander, J; Renardy, J F; Rosowsky, A; Roussarie, A; Schuller, J P; Schwindling, J; Trabelsi, A; Vallage, B; Black, S N; Dann, J H; Kim, H Y; Litke, A M; McNeil, M A; Taylor, G; Booth, C N; Boswell, R; Brew, C A J; Cartwright, S L; Combley, F; Kelly, M S; Lehto, M H; Newton, W M; Reeve, J; Thompson, L F; Affholderbach, K; Böhrer, A; Brandt, S; Cowan, G D; Foss, J; Grupen, Claus; Saraiva, P; Smolik, L; Stephan, F; Apollonio, M; Bosisio, L; Della Marina, R; Giannini, G; Gobbo, B; Musolino, G; Pütz, J; Rothberg, J E; Wasserbaech, S R; Williams, R W; Armstrong, S R; Charles, E; Elmer, P; Ferguson, D P S; González, S; Greening, T C; Hayes, O J; Hu, H; Jin, S; McNamara, P A; Nachtman, J M; Nielsen, J; Orejudos, W; Pan, Y B; Saadi, Y; Scott, I J; Walsh, J; Wu Sau Lan; Wu, X; Yamartino, J M; Zobernig, G

    1997-01-01

    The reaction e+e- -> HZ is used to search for the Standard Model Higgs boson. The data sample consists of integrated luminosities of 10.9pb-1 1.1pb-1 and 9.5pb-1 collected by the ALEPH experiment at LEP during 1996, at centre-of-mass energies of 161, 170 and 172GeV, respectively. No candidate events were found, in agreement with the expected background of 0.84 events from all Standard Model processes. This search results in a 95%C.L. lower limit on the Higgs boson mass of 69.4GeV. When combined with earlier ALEPH searches performed at energies at and around the Z peak, this limit increases to 70.7GeV

  9. Searches for supersymmetry in the photon(s) plus missing energy channels at $\\sqrt{s}$ = 161 GeV and 172 GeV

    CERN Document Server

    Barate, R.; Decamp, D.; Ghez, Philippe; Goy, C.; Lees, J.P.; Lucotte, A.; Minard, M.N.; Nief, J.Y.; Pietrzyk, B.; Casado, M.P.; Chmeissani, M.; Comas, P.; Crespo, J.M.; Delfino, M.; Fernandez, E.; Fernandez-Bosman, M.; Garrido, L.; Juste, A.; Martinez, M.; Merino, G.; Miquel, R.; Mir, L.M.; Padilla, C.; Park, I.C.; Pascual, A.; Perlas, J.A.; Riu, I.; Sanchez, F.; Colaleo, A.; Creanza, D.; de Palma, M.; Gelao, G.; Iaselli, G.; Maggi, G.; Maggi, M.; Marinelli, N.; Nuzzo, S.; Ranieri, A.; Raso, G.; Ruggieri, F.; Selvaggi, G.; Silvestris, L.; Tempesta, P.; Tricomi, A.; Zito, G.; Huang, X.; Lin, J.; Ouyang, Q.; Wang, T.; Xie, Y.; Xu, R.; Xue, S.; Zhang, J.; Zhang, L.; Zhao, W.; Abbaneo, D.; Alemany, R.; Bazarko, A.O.; Becker, U.; Bright-Thomas, P.; Cattaneo, M.; Cerutti, F.; Dissertori, G.; Drevermann, H.; Forty, R.W.; Frank, M.; Hagelberg, R.; Hansen, J.B.; Harvey, John; Janot, P.; Jost, B.; Kneringer, E.; Lehraus, I.; Mato, P.; Minten, A.; Moneta, L.; Pacheco, A.; Pusztaszeri, J.F.; Ranjard, F.; Rizzo, G.; Rolandi, Gigi; Rousseau, D.; Schlatter, D.; Schmitt, M.; Schneider, O.; Tejessy, W.; Teubert, F.; Tomalin, I.R.; Wachsmuth, H.; Wagner, A.; Ajaltouni, Z.; Barres, A.; Boyer, C.; Falvard, A.; Ferdi, C.; Gay, P.; Guicheney, C.; Henrard, P.; Jousset, J.; Michel, B.; Monteil, S.; Montret, J.C.; Pallin, D.; Perret, P.; Podlyski, F.; Proriol, J.; Rosnet, P.; Rossignol, J.M.; Fearnley, T.; Hansen, J.D.; Hansen, J.R.; Hansen, P.H.; Nilsson, B.S.; Rensch, B.; Waananen, A.; Daskalakis, G.; Kyriakis, A.; Markou, C.; Simopoulou, E.; Vayaki, A.; Blondel, A.; Brient, J.C.; Machefert, F.; Rouge, A.; Rumpf, M.; Valassi, A.; Videau, H.; Boccali, T.; Focardi, E.; Parrini, G.; Zachariadou, K.; Cavanaugh, R.; Corden, M.; Georgiopoulos, C.; Huehn, T.; Jaffe, D.E.; Antonelli, A.; Bencivenni, G.; Bologna, G.; Bossi, F.; Campana, P.; Capon, G.; Casper, D.; Chiarella, V.; Felici, G.; Laurelli, P.; Mannocchi, G.; Murtas, F.; Murtas, G.P.; Passalacqua, L.; Pepe-Altarelli, M.; Curtis, L.; Dorris, S.J.; Halley, A.W.; Knowles, I.G.; Lynch, J.G.; O'Shea, V.; Raine, C.; Scarr, J.M.; Smith, K.; Teixeira-Dias, P.; Thompson, A.S.; Thomson, Evelyn J.; Thomson, F.; Turnbull, R.M.; Buchmuller, O.; Dhamotharan, S.; Geweniger, C.; Graefe, G.; Hanke, P.; Hansper, G.; Hepp, V.; Kluge, E.E.; Putzer, A.; Sommer, J.; Tittel, K.; Werner, S.; Wunsch, M.; Beuselinck, R.; Binnie, D.M.; Cameron, W.; Dornan, P.J.; Girone, M.; Goodsir, S.; Martin, E.B.; Morawitz, P.; Moutoussi, A.; Nash, J.; Sedgbeer, J.K.; Spagnolo, P.; Stacey, A.M.; Williams, M.D.; Ghete, V.M.; Girtler, P.; Kuhn, D.; Rudolph, G.; Betteridge, A.P.; Bowdery, C.K.; Buck, P.G.; Colrain, P.; Crawford, G.; Finch, A.J.; Foster, F.; Hughes, G.; Jones, R.W.L.; Sloan, T.; Whelan, E.P.; Williams, M.I.; Giehl, I.; Hoffmann, C.; Jakobs, K.; Kleinknecht, K.; Quast, G.; Renk, B.; Rohne, E.; Sander, H.G.; van Gemmeren, P.; Zeitnitz, C.; Aubert, J.J.; Benchouk, C.; Bonissent, A.; Bujosa, G.; Carr, J.; Coyle, P.; Diaconu, C.; Ealet, A.; Fouchez, D.; Konstantinidis, N.; Leroy, O.; Motsch, F.; Payre, P.; Talby, M.; Sadouki, A.; Thulasidas, M.; Tilquin, A.; Trabelsi, K.; Aleppo, M.; Antonelli, M.; Ragusa, F.; Berlich, R.; Blum, W.; Buescher, Volker; Dietl, H.; Ganis, G.; Gotzhein, C.; Kroha, H.; Lutjens, G.; Lutz, G.; Manner, W.; Moser, H.G.; Richter, Robert, 1; Rosado-Schlosser, A.; Schael, S.; Settles, R.; Seywerd, H.; St. Denis, Richard Dante; Stenzel, H.; Wiedenmann, W.; Wolf, G.; Boucrot, J.; Callot, O.; Chen, S.; Cordier, A.; Davier, M.; Duflot, L.; Grivaz, J.F.; Heusse, Ph.; Hocker, Andreas; Jacholkowska, A.; Jacquet, M.; Kim, D.W.; Le Diberder, F.; Lefrancois, J.; Lutz, A.M.; Nikolic, Irina; Schune, M.H.; Serin, L.; Simion, S.; Tournefier, E.; Veillet, J.J.; Videau, I.; Zerwas, D.; Azzurri, P.; Bagliesi, Giuseppe; Bettarini, S.; Bozzi, C.; Calderini, G.; Ciulli, V.; Dell'Orso, R.; Fantechi, R.; Ferrante, I.; Giassi, A.; Gregorio, A.; Ligabue, F.; Lusiani, A.; Marrocchesi, P.S.; Messineo, A.; Palla, F.; Sanguinetti, G.; Sciaba, A.; Sguazzoni, G.; Steinberger, J.; Tenchini, R.; Vannini, C.; Venturi, A.; Verdini, P.G.; Blair, G.A.; Bryant, L.M.; Chambers, J.T.; Gao, Y.; Green, M.G.; Medcalf, T.; Perrodo, P.; Strong, J.A.; von Wimmersperg-Toeller, J.H.; Botterill, D.R.; Clifft, R.W.; Edgecock, T.R.; Haywood, S.; Maley, P.; Norton, P.R.; Thompson, J.C.; Wright, A.E.; Bloch-Devaux, Brigitte; Colas, P.; Fabbro, B.; Kozanecki, W.; Lancon, E.; Lemaire, M.C.; Locci, E.; Perez, P.; Rander, J.; Renardy, J.F.; Rosowsky, A.; Roussarie, A.; Schuller, J.P.; Schwindling, J.; Trabelsi, A.; Vallage, B.; Black, S.N.; Dann, J.H.; Kim, H.Y.; Litke, A.M.; McNeil, M.A.; Taylor, G.; Booth, C.N.; Boswell, R.; Brew, C.A.J.; Cartwright, S.; Combley, F.; Kelly, M.S.; Lehto, M.; Newton, W.M.; Reeve, J.; Thompson, L.F.; Affholderbach, K.; Boehrer, Armin; Brandt, S.; Cowan, G.; Foss, J.; Grupen, C.; Lutters, G.; Saraiva, P.; Smolik, L.; Stephan, F.; Apollonio, M.; Bosisio, L.; Della Marina, R.; Giannini, G.; Gobbo, B.; Musolino, G.; Putz, J.; Rothberg, J.; Wasserbaech, S.; Williams, R.W.; Armstrong, S.R.; Charles, E.; Elmer, P.; Ferguson, D.P.S.; Gonzalez, S.; Greening, T.C.; Hayes, O.J.; Hu, H.; Jin, S.; McNamara, P.A., III; Nachtman, J.M.; Nielsen, J.; Orejudos, W.; Pan, Y.B.; Saadi, Y.; Scott, I.J.; Walsh, J.; Wu, Sau Lan; Wu, X.; Yamartino, J.M.; Zobernig, G.

    1998-01-01

    Searches for supersymmetric particles in channels with one or more photons and missing energy have been performed with data collected by the ALEPH detector at LEP. The data consist of 11.1 \\pb\\ at $\\sqrt{s} = 161 ~\\, \\rm GeV$, 1.1 \\pb\\ at 170 \\gev\\ and 9.5 \\pb\\ at 172 GeV. The \\eenunu\\ cross se ction is measured. The data are in good agreement with predictions based on the Standard Model, and are used to set upper limits on the cross sections for anomalous photon production. These limits are compared to two different SUSY models and used to set limits on the neutralino mass. A limit of 71 \\gevsq\\ at 95\\% C.L. is set on the mass of the lightest neutralin o ($\\tau_{\\chi_{1}^{0}} \\leq $ 3 ns) for the gauge-mediated supersymmetry breaking and LNZ models.

  10. Missing mass spectra in hadronic events from $e^+ e^-$ collisions at $\\sqrt{s}$=161-172 GeV and limits on invisible Higgs decays

    CERN Document Server

    Acciarri, M; Aguilar-Benítez, M; Ahlen, S P; Alcaraz, J; Alemanni, G; Allaby, James V; Aloisio, A; Alverson, G; Alviggi, M G; Ambrosi, G; Anderhub, H; Andreev, V P; Angelescu, T; Anselmo, F; Arefev, A; Azemoon, T; Aziz, T; Bagnaia, P; Baksay, L; Banerjee, S; Banerjee, Sw; Banicz, K; Barczyk, A; Barillère, R; Barone, L; Bartalini, P; Baschirotto, A; Basile, M; Battiston, R; Bay, A; Becattini, F; Becker, U; Behner, F; Berdugo, J; Berges, P; Bertucci, B; Betev, B L; Bhattacharya, S; Biasini, M; Biland, A; Bilei, G M; Blaising, J J; Blyth, S C; Bobbink, Gerjan J; Böck, R K; Böhm, A; Boldizsar, L; Borgia, B; Bourilkov, D; Bourquin, Maurice; Braccini, S; Branson, J G; Brigljevic, V; Brock, I C; Buffini, A; Buijs, A; Burger, J D; Burger, W J; Busenitz, J K; Button, A M; Cai, X D; Campanelli, M; Capell, M; Cara Romeo, G; Carlino, G; Cartacci, A M; Casaus, J; Castellini, G; Cavallari, F; Cavallo, N; Cecchi, C; Cerrada-Canales, M; Cesaroni, F; Chamizo-Llatas, M; Chang, Y H; Chaturvedi, U K; Chekanov, S V; Chemarin, M; Chen, A; Chen, G; Chen, G M; Chen, H F; Chen, H S; Chéreau, X J; Chiefari, G; Chien, C Y; Cifarelli, Luisa; Cindolo, F; Civinini, C; Clare, I; Clare, R; Cohn, H O; Coignet, G; Colijn, A P; Colino, N; Commichau, V; Costantini, S; Cotorobai, F; de la Cruz, B; Csilling, Akos; Dai, T S; Alessandro, R D; De Asmundis, R; Degré, A; Deiters, K; Della Volpe, D; Denes, P; De Notaristefani, F; DiBitonto, Daryl; Diemoz, M; Van Dierendonck, D N; Di Lodovico, F; Dionisi, C; Dittmar, Michael; Dominguez, A; Doria, A; Dova, M T; Duchesneau, D; Duinker, P; Durán, I; Dutta, S; Easo, S; Efremenko, Yu V; El-Mamouni, H; Engler, A; Eppling, F J; Erné, F C; Ernenwein, J P; Extermann, Pierre; Fabre, M; Faccini, R; Falciano, S; Favara, A; Fay, J; Fedin, O; Felcini, Marta; Fenyi, B; Ferguson, T; Ferroni, F; Fesefeldt, H S; Fiandrini, E; Field, J H; Filthaut, Frank; Fisher, P H; Fisk, I; Forconi, G; Fredj, L; Freudenreich, Klaus; Furetta, C; Galaktionov, Yu; Ganguli, S N; García-Abia, P; Gau, S S; Gentile, S; Gheordanescu, N; Giagu, S; Goldfarb, S; Goldstein, J; Gong, Z F; Gougas, Andreas; Gratta, Giorgio; Grünewald, M W; Gupta, V K; Gurtu, A; Gutay, L J; Hartmann, B; Hasan, A; Hatzifotiadou, D; Hebbeker, T; Hervé, A; Van Hoek, W C; Hofer, H; Hong, S J; Hoorani, H; Hou, S R; Hu, G; Innocente, Vincenzo; Jenkes, K; Jin, B N; Jones, L W; de Jong, P; Josa-Mutuberria, I; Kasser, A; Khan, R A; Kamrad, D; Kamyshkov, Yu A; Kapustinsky, J S; Karyotakis, Yu; Kaur, M; Kienzle-Focacci, M N; Kim, D; Kim, D H; Kim, J K; Kim, S C; Kim, Y G; Kinnison, W W; Kirkby, A; Kirkby, D; Kirkby, Jasper; Kiss, D; Kittel, E W; Klimentov, A; König, A C; Kopp, A; Korolko, I; Koutsenko, V F; Krämer, R W; Krenz, W; Kunin, A; Ladrón de Guevara, P; Laktineh, I; Landi, G; Lapoint, C; Lassila-Perini, K M; Laurikainen, P; Lebeau, M; Lebedev, A; Lebrun, P; Lecomte, P; Lecoq, P; Le Coultre, P; Lee, H J; Le Goff, J M; Leiste, R; Leonardi, E; Levchenko, P M; Li Chuan; Lin, C H; Lin, W T; Linde, Frank L; Lista, L; Liu, Z A; Lohmann, W; Longo, E; Lu, W; Lü, Y S; Lübelsmeyer, K; Luci, C; Luckey, D; Luminari, L; Lustermann, W; Ma Wen Gan; Maity, M; Majumder, G; Malgeri, L; Malinin, A; Maña, C; Mangeol, D J J; Mangla, S; Marchesini, P A; Marin, A; Martin, J P; Marzano, F; Massaro, G G G; McNally, D; McNeil, R R; Mele, S; Merola, L; Meschini, M; Metzger, W J; Von der Mey, M; Mi, Y; Mihul, A; Mil, A J W; Milcent, H; Mirabelli, G; Mnich, J; Molnár, P; Monteleoni, B; Moore, R; Morganti, S; Moulik, T; Mount, R; Müller, S; Muheim, F; Muijs, A J M; Nahn, S; Napolitano, M; Nessi-Tedaldi, F; Newman, H; Niessen, T; Nippe, A; Nisati, A; Nowak, H; Oh, Yu D; Opitz, H; Organtini, G; Ostonen, R; Palomares, C; Pandoulas, D; Paoletti, S; Paolucci, P; Park, H K; Park, I H; Pascale, G; Passaleva, G; Patricelli, S; Paul, T; Pauluzzi, M; Paus, C; Pauss, Felicitas; Peach, D; Pei, Y J; Pensotti, S; Perret-Gallix, D; Petersen, B; Petrak, S; Pevsner, A; Piccolo, D; Pieri, M; Piroué, P A; Pistolesi, E; Plyaskin, V; Pohl, M; Pozhidaev, V; Postema, H; Produit, N; Prokofev, D; Prokofiev, D O; Rahal-Callot, G; Raja, N; Rancoita, P G; Rattaggi, M; Raven, G; Razis, P A; Read, K; Ren, D; Rescigno, M; Reucroft, S; Van Rhee, T; Riemann, S; Riles, K; Robohm, A; Rodin, J; Roe, B P; Romero, L; Rosier-Lees, S; Rosselet, P; Van Rossum, W; Roth, S; Rubio, Juan Antonio; Ruschmeier, D; Rykaczewski, H; Salicio, J; Sánchez, E; Sanders, M P; Sarakinos, M E; Sarkar, S; Sassowsky, M; Schäfer, C; Shchegelskii, V; Schmidt-Kärst, S; Schmitz, D; Schmitz, P; Scholz, N; Schopper, Herwig Franz; Schotanus, D J; Schwenke, J; Schwering, G; Sciacca, C; Sciarrino, D; Servoli, L; Shevchenko, S; Shivarov, N; Shoutko, V; Shukla, J; Shumilov, E; Shvorob, A V; Siedenburg, T; Son, D; Sopczak, André; Smith, B; Spillantini, P; Steuer, M; Stickland, D P; Stone, A; Stone, H; Stoyanov, B; Strässner, A; Strauch, K; Sudhakar, K; Sultanov, G G; Sun, L Z; Susinno, G F; Suter, H; Swain, J D; Tang, X W; Tauscher, Ludwig; Taylor, L; Ting, Samuel C C; Ting, S M; Tonutti, M; Tonwar, S C; Tóth, J; Tully, C; Tuchscherer, H; Tung, K L; Uchida, Y; Ulbricht, J; Uwer, U; Valente, E; Van de Walle, R T; Vesztergombi, G; Vetlitskii, I; Viertel, Gert M; Vivargent, M; Völkert, R; Vogel, H; Vogt, H; Vorobev, I; Vorobyov, A A; Vorvolakos, A; Wadhwa, M; Wallraff, W; Wang, J C; Wang, X L; Wang, Z M; Weber, A; Wittgenstein, F; Wu, S X; Wynhoff, S; Xu, J; Xu, Z Z; Yang, B Z; Yang, C G; Yao, X Y; Ye, J B; Yeh, S C; You, J M; Zalite, A; Zalite, Yu; Zemp, P; Zeng, Y; Zhang, Z; Zhang, Z P; Zhou, B; Zhu, G Y; Zhu, R Y; Zichichi, Antonino; Ziegler, F

    1998-01-01

    Events characterised by large hadronic energy and transverse momentum are selected from the data collected by the L3 detector at LEP at centre-of-mass energies between 161 and 172 GeV, corresponding to an integrated luminosity of 21 $\\rm pb^{-1}$. The visible mass and the missing mass distributions of the selected events are consistent with those expected from Standard Model processes. This result is combined with that from data taken at the Z resonance to set an upper limit on the production rate and decay into invisible final states of a non-minimal Higgs boson, as a function of the Higgs mass. Assuming the non-minimal Higgs production cross section to be the same as for the Standard Model Higgs boson and the decay branching fraction into invisible final states to be 100\\%, a Higgs mass lower limit of 69.6 GeV is derived at 95\\% confidence level.

  11. QCD Studies and Determination of $\\alpha_s$ in $e^+ e^-$ collisions at $\\sqrt{s}$ = 161 GeV and 172 GeV

    CERN Document Server

    Acciarri, M; Aguilar-Benítez, M; Ahlen, S P; Alcaraz, J; Alemanni, G; Allaby, James V; Aloisio, A; Alverson, G; Alviggi, M G; Ambrosi, G; Anderhub, H; Andreev, V P; Angelescu, T; Anselmo, F; Arefev, A; Azemoon, T; Aziz, T; Bagnaia, P; Baksay, L; Banerjee, S; Banerjee, Sw; Banicz, K; Barczyk, A; Barillère, R; Barone, L; Bartalini, P; Baschirotto, A; Basile, M; Battiston, R; Bay, A; Becattini, F; Becker, U; Behner, F; Berdugo, J; Berges, P; Bertucci, B; Betev, B L; Bhattacharya, S; Biasini, M; Biland, A; Bilei, G M; Blaising, J J; Blyth, S C; Bobbink, Gerjan J; Böck, R K; Böhm, A; Boldizsar, L; Borgia, B; Bourilkov, D; Bourquin, Maurice; Braccini, S; Branson, J G; Brigljevic, V; Brock, I C; Buffini, A; Buijs, A; Burger, J D; Burger, W J; Busenitz, J K; Button, A M; Cai, X D; Campanelli, M; Capell, M; Cara Romeo, G; Carlino, G; Cartacci, A M; Casaus, J; Castellini, G; Cavallari, F; Cavallo, N; Cecchi, C; Cerrada-Canales, M; Cesaroni, F; Chamizo-Llatas, M; Chang, Y H; Chaturvedi, U K; Chekanov, S V; Chemarin, M; Chen, A; Chen, G; Chen, G M; Chen, H F; Chen, H S; Chéreau, X J; Chiefari, G; Chien, C Y; Cifarelli, Luisa; Cindolo, F; Civinini, C; Clare, I; Clare, R; Cohn, H O; Coignet, G; Colijn, A P; Colino, N; Commichau, V; Costantini, S; Cotorobai, F; de la Cruz, B; Csilling, Akos; Dai, T S; D'Alessandro, R; De Asmundis, R; Degré, A; Deiters, K; Della Volpe, D; Denes, P; De Notaristefani, F; DiBitonto, Daryl; Diemoz, M; Van Dierendonck, D N; Di Lodovico, F; Dionisi, C; Dittmar, Michael; Dominguez, A; Doria, A; Dova, M T; Duchesneau, D; Duinker, P; Durán, I; Dutta, S; Easo, S; Efremenko, Yu V; El-Mamouni, H; Engler, A; Eppling, F J; Erné, F C; Ernenwein, J P; Extermann, Pierre; Fabre, M; Faccini, R; Falciano, S; Favara, A; Fay, J; Fedin, O; Felcini, Marta; Fenyi, B; Ferguson, T; Ferroni, F; Fesefeldt, H S; Fiandrini, E; Field, J H; Filthaut, Frank; Fisher, P H; Fisk, I; Forconi, G; Fredj, L; Freudenreich, Klaus; Furetta, C; Galaktionov, Yu; Ganguli, S N; García-Abia, P; Gau, S S; Gentile, S; Gheordanescu, N; Giagu, S; Goldfarb, S; Goldstein, J; Gong, Z F; Gougas, Andreas; Gratta, Giorgio; Grünewald, M W; Gupta, V K; Gurtu, A; Gutay, L J; Hartmann, B; Hasan, A; Hatzifotiadou, D; Hebbeker, T; Hervé, A; Van Hoek, W C; Hofer, H; Hong, S J; Hoorani, H; Hou, S R; Hu, G; Innocente, Vincenzo; Jenkes, K; Jin, B N; Jones, L W; de Jong, P; Josa-Mutuberria, I; Kasser, A; Khan, R A; Kamrad, D; Kamyshkov, Yu A; Kapustinsky, J S; Karyotakis, Yu; Kaur, M; Kienzle-Focacci, M N; Kim, D; Kim, D H; Kim, J K; Kim, S C; Kim, Y G; Kinnison, W W; Kirkby, A; Kirkby, D; Kirkby, Jasper; Kiss, D; Kittel, E W; Klimentov, A; König, A C; Kopp, A; Korolko, I; Koutsenko, V F; Krämer, R W; Krenz, W; Kunin, A; Ladrón de Guevara, P; Laktineh, I; Landi, G; Lapoint, C; Lassila-Perini, K M; Laurikainen, P; Lebeau, M; Lebedev, A; Lebrun, P; Lecomte, P; Lecoq, P; Le Coultre, P; Le Goff, J M; Leiste, R; Leonardi, E; Levchenko, P M; Li Chuan; Lin, C H; Lin, W T; Linde, Frank L; Lista, L; Liu, Z A; Lohmann, W; Longo, E; Lu, W; Lü, Y S; Lübelsmeyer, K; Luci, C; Luckey, D; Luminari, L; Lustermann, W; Ma Wen Gan; Maity, M; Majumder, G; Malgeri, L; Malinin, A; Maña, C; Mangeol, D J J; Mangla, S; Marchesini, P A; Marin, A; Martin, J P; Marzano, F; Massaro, G G G; McNally, D; McNeil, R R; Mele, S; Merola, L; Meschini, M; Metzger, W J; Von der Mey, M; Mi, Y; Mihul, A; Van Mil, A J W; Mirabelli, G; Mnich, J; Molnár, P; Monteleoni, B; Moore, R; Morganti, S; Moulik, T; Mount, R; Müller, S; Muheim, F; Muijs, A J M; Nahn, S; Napolitano, M; Nessi-Tedaldi, F; Newman, H; Niessen, T; Nippe, A; Nisati, A; Nowak, H; Oh, Yu D; Opitz, H; Organtini, G; Ostonen, R; Palomares, C; Pandoulas, D; Paoletti, S; Paolucci, P; Park, H K; Park, I H; Pascale, G; Passaleva, G; Patricelli, S; Paul, T; Pauluzzi, M; Paus, C; Pauss, Felicitas; Peach, D; Pei, Y J; Pensotti, S; Perret-Gallix, D; Petersen, B; Petrak, S; Pevsner, A; Piccolo, D; Pieri, M; Pinto, J C; Piroué, P A; Pistolesi, E; Plyaskin, V; Pohl, M; Pozhidaev, V; Postema, H; Produit, N; Prokofev, D; Prokofiev, D O; Rahal-Callot, G; Raja, N; Rancoita, P G; Rattaggi, M; Raven, G; Razis, P A; Read, K; Ren, D; Rescigno, M; Reucroft, S; Van Rhee, T; Riemann, S; Riles, K; Robohm, A; Rodin, J; Roe, B P; Romero, L; Rosier-Lees, S; Rosselet, P; Van Rossum, W; Roth, S; Rubio, Juan Antonio; Ruschmeier, D; Rykaczewski, H; Salicio, J; Sánchez, E; Sanders, M P; Sarakinos, M E; Sarkar, S; Sassowsky, M; Schäfer, C; Shchegelskii, V; Schmidt-Kärst, S; Schmitz, D; Schmitz, P; Scholz, N; Schopper, Herwig Franz; Schotanus, D J; Schwenke, J; Schwering, G; Sciacca, C; Sciarrino, D; Servoli, L; Shevchenko, S; Shivarov, N; Shoutko, V; Shukla, J; Shumilov, E; Shvorob, A V; Siedenburg, T; Son, D; Sopczak, André; Smith, B; Spillantini, P; Steuer, M; Stickland, D P; Stone, A; Stone, H; Stoyanov, B; Strässner, A; Strauch, K; Sudhakar, K; Sultanov, G G; Sun, L Z; Susinno, G F; Suter, H; Swain, J D; Tang, X W; Tauscher, Ludwig; Taylor, L; Ting, Samuel C C; Ting, S M; Tonutti, M; Tonwar, S C; Tóth, J; Tully, C; Tuchscherer, H; Tung, K L; Uchida, Y; Ulbricht, J; Uwer, U; Valente, E; Van de Walle, R T; Vesztergombi, G; Vetlitskii, I; Viertel, Gert M; Vivargent, M; Völkert, R; Vogel, H; Vogt, H; Vorobev, I; Vorobyov, A A; Vorvolakos, A; Wadhwa, M; Wallraff, W; Wang, J C; Wang, X L; Wang, Z M; Weber, A; Wittgenstein, F; Wu, S X; Wynhoff, S; Xu, J; Xu, Z Z; Yang, B Z; Yang, C G; Yao, X Y; Ye, J B; Yeh, S C; You, J M; Zalite, A; Zalite, Yu; Zemp, P; Zeng, Y; Zhang, Z; Zhang, Z P; Zhou, B; Zhu, G Y; Zhu, R Y; Zichichi, Antonino; Ziegler, F

    1997-01-01

    We present a study of the structure of hadronic events recorded by the L3 detector at LEP at the center of mass energies of 161 and 172 GeV. The data sample corresponds to an integrated luminosity of 21.25 pb-1 collected during the high energy runs of 1996. The distributions of event shape variables and the energy dependence of their mean values are well reproduced by QCD models. From a comparison of the data with resummed second order QCD calculations, we determine the strong coupling constant at the two energies. Combining with our earlier measurements we find that the strong coupling constant decreases with increasing energy as expected in QCD.

  12. Search for the Higgs boson at center-of-mass energies between 161 and 184 GeV in the 4-jet channel with OPAL

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Toerne, E. von

    1998-07-01

    A search for the Standard Model Higgs boson using data from e + e - collisions collected at center-of-mass energies from 161 to 184 GeV with the OPAL detector at LEP is presented. The search is applied to events in the four-jet-channel, in which the Higgs boson decays into a bb pair and the associated Z 0 decays into quark and anti-quark. The data analyzed corresponds to an integrated luminosity of 75.0 pb -1 . Five candidate events are observed, in agreement with the Standard Model background expectation of 6.61±0.42 (stat.) ±1.72 (syst.) events. A lower limit of 74.0 GeV is derived for the mass of the Standard Model Higgs boson at the 95% confidence level. In combination with OPAL searches in other channels a limit of 86.9 GeV is obtained. (orig.)

  13. Search for the Standard Model Higgs boson in e+e- collisions at sqrt(s)=161, 170 and 172GeV

    Science.gov (United States)

    ALEPH Collaboration; Barate, R.; Buskulic, D.; Decamp, D.; Ghez, P.; Goy, C.; Lees, J.-P.; Lucotte, A.; Minard, M.-N.; Nief, J.-Y.; Pietrzyk, B.; Casado, M. P.; Chmeissani, M.; Comas, P.; Crespo, J. M.; Delfino,, M.; Fernandez, E.; Fernandez-Bosman, M.; Garrido, Ll.; Juste, A.; Martinez, M.; Merino, G.; Miquel, R.; Mir, Ll. M.; Padilla, C.; Park, I. C.; Pascual, A.; Perlas, J. A.; Riu, I.; Sanchez, F.; Teubert, F.; Colaleo, A.; Creanza, D.; de Palma, M.; Gelao, G.; Iaselli, G.; Maggi, G.; Maggi, M.; Marinelli, N.; Nuzzo, S.; Ranieri, A.; Raso, G.; Ruggieri, F.; Selvaggi, G.; Silvestris, L.; Tempesta, P.; Tricomi, A.; Zito, G.; Huang, X.; Lin, J.; Ouyang, Q.; Wang, T.; Xie, Y.; Xu, R.; Xue, S.; Zhang, J.; Zhang, L.; Zhao, W.; Abbaneo, D.; Alemany, R.; Bazarko, A. O.; Becker, U.; Bright-Thomas, P.; Cattaneo, M.; Cerutti, F.; Dissertori, G.; Drevermann, H.; Forty, R. W.; Frank, M.; Hagelberg, R.; Hansen, J. B.; Harvey, J.; Janot, P.; Jost, B.; Kneringer, E.; Knobloch, J.; Lehraus, I.; Lutters, G.; Mato, P.; Minten, A.; Moneta, L.; Pacheco, A.; Pusztaszeri, J.-F.; Ranjard, F.; Rizzo, G.; Rolandi, L.; Rousseau, D.; Schlatter, D.; Schmitt, M.; Schneider, O.; Tejessy, W.; Tomalin, I. R.; Wachsmuth, H.; Wagner, A.; Ajaltouni, Z.; Barrès, A.; Boyer, C.; Falvard, A.; Ferdi, C.; Gay, P.; Guicheney, C.; Henrard, P.; Jousset, J.; Michel, B.; Monteil, S.; Montret, J.-C.; Pallin, D.; Perret, P.; Podlyski, F.; Proriol, J.; Rosnet, P.; Rossignol, J.-M.; Fearnley, T.; Hansen, J. D.; Hansen, J. R.; Hansen, P. H.; Nilsson, B. S.; Rensch, B.; Wäänänen, A.; Daskalakis, G.; Kyriakis, A.; Markou, C.; Simopoulou, E.; Vayaki, A.; Blondel, A.; Brient, J. C.; Machefert, F.; Rougé, A.; Rumpf, M.; Valassi, A.; Videau, H.; Focardi, E.; Parrini, G.; Zachariadou, K.; Cavanaugh, R.; Corden, M.; Georgiopoulos, C.; Huehn, T.; Jaffe, D. E.; Antonelli, A.; Bencivenni, G.; Bologna, G.; Bossi, F.; Campana, P.; Capon, G.; Casper, D.; Chiarella, V.; Felici, G.; Laurelli, P.; Mannocchi, G.; Murtas, F.; Murtas, G. P.; Passalacqua, L.; Pepe-Altarelli, M.; Curtis, L.; Dorris, S. J.; Halley, A. W.; Knowles, I. G.; Lynch, J. G.; O'Shea, V.; Raine, C.; Scarr, J. M.; Smith, K.; Teixeira-Dias, P.; Thompson, A. S.; Thomson, E.; Thomson, F.; Turnbull, R. M.; Buchmüller, O.; Dhamotharan, S.; Geweniger, C.; Graefe, G.; Hanke, P.; Hansper, G.; Hepp, V.; Kluge, E. E.; Putzer, A.; Sommer, J.; Tittel, K.; Werner, S.; Wunsch, M.; Beuselinck, R.; Binnie, D. M.; Cameron, W.; Dornan, P. J.; Girone, M.; Goodsir, S.; Martin, E. B.; Morawitz, P.; Moutoussi, A.; Nash, J.; Sedgbeer, J. K.; Spagnolo, P.; Stacey, A. M.; Williams, M. D.; Ghete, V. M.; Girtler, P.; Kuhn, D.; Rudolph, G.; Betteridge, A. P.; Bowdery, C. K.; Colrain, P.; Crawford, G.; Finch, A. J.; Foster, F.; Hughes, G.; Jones, R. W.; Sloan, T.; Whelan, E. P.; Williams, M. I.; Hoffmann, C.; Jakobs, K.; Kleinknecht, K.; Quast, G.; Renk, B.; Rohne, E.; Sander, H.-G.; van Gemmeren, P.; Zeitnitz, C.; Aubert, J. J.; Benchouk, C.; Bonissent, A.; Bujosa, G.; Carr, J.; Coyle, P.; Diaconu, C.; Ealet, A.; Fouchez, D.; Konstantinidis, N.; Leroy, O.; Motsch, F.; Payre, P.; Talby, M.; Sadouki, A.; Thulasidas, M.; Tilquin, A.; Trabelsi, K.; Aleppo, M.; Antonelli, M.; Ragusa, F.; Berlich, R.; Blum, W.; Büscher, V.; Dietl, H.; Ganis, G.; Gotzhein, C.; Kroha, H.; Lütjens, G.; Lutz, G.; Männer, W.; Moser, H.-G.; Richter, R.; Rosado-Schlosser, A.; Schael, S.; Settles, R.; Seywerd, H.; St. Denis, R.; Stenzel, H.; Wiedenmann, W.; Wolf, G.; Boucrot, J.; Callot, O.; Chen, S.; Cordier, A.; Davier, M.; Duflot, L.; Grivaz, J.-F.; Heusse, Ph.; Höcker, A.; Jacholkowska, A.; Jacquet, M.; Kado, M.; Kim, D. W.; Le Diberder, F.; Lefrançois, J.; Lutz, A.-M.; Nikolic, I.; Schune, M.-H.; Serin, L.; Simion, S.; Tournefier, E.; Veillet, J.-J.; Videau, I.; Zerwas, D.; Azzurri, P.; Bagliesi, G.; Bettarini, S.; Bozzi, C.; Calderini, G.; Ciulli, V.; dell'Orso, R.; Fantechi, R.; Ferrante, I.; Giassi, A.; Gregorio, A.; Ligabue, F.; Lusiani, A.; Marrocchesi, P. S.; Messineo, A.; Palla, F.; Sanguinetti, G.; Sciabà, A.; Steinberger, J.; Tenchini, R.; Vannini, C.; Venturi, A.; Verdini, P. G.; Blair, G. A.; Bryant, L. M.; Chambers, J. T.; Gao, Y.; Green, M. G.; Medcalf, T.; Perrodo, P.; Strong, J. A.; von Wimmersperg-Toeller, J. H.; Botterill, D. R.; Clifft, R. W.; Edgecock, T. R.; Haywood, S.; Maley, P.; Norton, P. R.; Thompson, J. C.; Wright, A. E.; Bloch-Devaux, B.; Colas, P.; Fabbro, B.; Kozanecki, W.; Lançon, E.; Lemaire, M. C.; Locci, E.; Perez, P.; Rander, J.; Renardy, J.-F.; Rosowsky, A.; Roussarie, A.; Schuller, J.-P.; Schwindling, J.; Trabelsi, A.; Vallage, B.; Black, S. N.; Dann, J. H.; Kim, H. Y.; Litke, A. M.; McNeil, M. A.; Taylor, G.; Booth, C. N.; Boswell, R.; Brew, C. A. J.; Cartwright, S.; Combley, F.; Kelly, M. S.; Lehto, M.; Newton, W. M.; Reeve, J.; Thompson, L. F.; Affholderbach, K.; Böhrer, A.; Brandt, S.; Cowan, G.; Foss, J.; Grupen, C.; Saraiva, P.; Smolik, L.; Stephan, F.; Apollonio, M.; Bosisio, L.; della Marina, R.; Giannini, G.; Gobbo, B.; Musolino, G.; Putz, J.; Rothberg, J.; Wasserbaech, S.; Williams, R. W.; Armstrong, S. R.; Charles, E.; Elmer, P.; Ferguson, D. P. S.; González, S.; Greening, T. C.; Hayes, O. J.; Hu, H.; Jin, S.; McNamara, P. A., III; Nachtman, J. M.; Nielsen, J.; Orejudos, W.; Pan, Y. B.; Saadi, Y.; Scott, I. J.; Walsh, J.; Wu, Sau Lan; Wu, X.; Yamartino, J. M.; Zobernig, G.

    1997-10-01

    The reaction e+e--->HZ is used to search for the Standard Model Higgs boson. The data sample consists of integrated luminosities of 10.9pb-1, 1.1pb-1, and 9.5pb-1 collected by the ALEPH experiment at LEP during 1996, at centre-of-mass energies of 161, 170 and 172GeV, respectively. No candidate events were found, in agreement with the expected background of 0.84 events from all Standard Model processes. This search results in a 95% C.L. lower limit on the Higgs boson mass of 69.4GeV/c2. When combined with earlier ALEPH searches performed at energies at and around the Z peak, this limit increases to 70.7GeV/c2.

  14. Wind-tunnel calibration of a combined pitot-static tube and vane-type flow-angularity indicator at Mach numbers of 1.61 and 2.01

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sinclair, Archibald R; Mace, William D

    1956-01-01

    A limited calibration of a combined pitot-static tube and vane-type flow-angularity indicator has been made in the Langley 4- by 4-foot supersonic pressure tunnel at Mach numbers of 1.61 and 2.01. The results indicated that the angle-of-yaw indications were affected by unsymmetric shock effects at low angles of attack.

  15. Interpretation of bathymetric and magnetic data from the easternmost segment of Australian-Antarctic Ridge, 156°-161°E

    Science.gov (United States)

    Choi, H.; Kim, S.; Park, S.

    2013-12-01

    From 2011 to 2013, Korea Polar Research Institute (KOPRI) conducted a series of geophysical and geochemical expeditions on the longest and easternmost segment of Australian-Antarctic Ridge, located at 61°-63°S, and 156°-161°E. This ridge segment plays an important role in constraining the tectonics of the Antarctic plate. Using IBRV ARAON, the detailed bathymetric data and eleven total magnetic profiles were collected. The studied ridge has spread NNW-SSE direction and tends to be shallower to the west and deeper to the east. The western side of the ridge (156°-157.50°E) shows a broad axial high and a plenty of seamounts as an indicative of massive volcanism. Near the center of the ridge (158°-159°E), a seamount chain is formed stretching toward the south from the ridge. Also, the symmetric seafloor fabric is clearly observed at the eastern portion (158.50°-160°E) of the seamount chain. From the topographic change along the ridge axis, the western part of the ridge appears to have a sufficient magma supply. On the contrary, the eastern side of the ridge (160°-161°E) is characterized by axial valley and relatively deeper depth. Nevertheless, the observed total magnetic field anomalies exhibit symmetric patterns across the ridge axis. Although there have not been enough magnetic survey lines, the spreading rates of the ridge are estimated as the half-spreading rate of 37.7 mm/y and 35.3 mm/y for the western portion of the ridge and 42.3 mm/y for the eastern portion. The studied ridge can be categorized as an intermediate spreading ridge, confirming previous studies based on the spreading rate of global ridge system. Here we will present the preliminary results on bathymetric changes along the ridge axis and its relationship with melt supply distribution, and detailed magnetic properties of the ridge constrained by the observed total field anomalies.

  16. Milder clinical and biochemical phenotypes associated with the c.482G>A (p.Arg161Gln) pathogenic variant in cobalamin C disease: Implications for management and screening.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Almannai, Mohammed; Marom, Ronit; Divin, Kristian; Scaglia, Fernando; Sutton, V Reid; Craigen, William J; Lee, Brendan; Burrage, Lindsay C; Graham, Brett H

    2017-09-01

    Cobalamin C disease is a multisystemic disease with variable manifestations and age of onset. Genotype-phenotype correlations are well-recognized in this disorder. Here, we present a large cohort of individuals with cobalamin C disease, several of whom are heterozygous for the c.482G>A pathogenic variant (p.Arg161Gln). We compared clinical characteristics of individuals with this pathogenic variant to those who do not have this variant. To our knowledge, this study represents the largest single cohort of individuals with the c.482G>A (p.Arg161Gln) pathogenic variant. A retrospective chart review of 27 individuals from 21 families with cobalamin C disease who are followed at our facility was conducted. 13 individuals (48%) are compound heterozygous with the c.482G>A (p.Arg161Gln) on one allele and a second pathogenic variant on the other allele. Individuals with the c.482G>A (p.Arg161Gln) pathogenic variant had later onset of symptoms and easier metabolic control. Moreover, they had milder biochemical abnormalities at presentation which likely contributed to the observation that 4 individuals (31%) in this group were missed by newborn screening. The c.482G>A (p.Arg161Gln) pathogenic variant is associated with milder disease. These individuals may not receive a timely diagnosis as they may not be identified on newborn screening or because of unrecognized, late onset symptoms. Despite the milder presentation, significant complications can occur, especially if treatment is delayed. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  17. Search for heavy neutral and charged leptons in $e^+ e^-$ annihilation at $\\sqrt{s}$ = 161 GeV and $\\sqrt{s}$ = 172 GeV

    CERN Document Server

    Acciarri, M; Aguilar-Benítez, M; Ahlen, S P; Alcaraz, J; Alemanni, G; Allaby, James V; Aloisio, A; Alverson, G; Alviggi, M G; Ambrosi, G; Anderhub, H; Andreev, V P; Angelescu, T; Anselmo, F; Arefev, A; Azemoon, T; Aziz, T; Bagnaia, P; Baksay, L; Banerjee, S; Banerjee, Sw; Banicz, K; Barczyk, A; Barillère, R; Barone, L; Bartalini, P; Baschirotto, A; Basile, M; Battiston, R; Bay, A; Becattini, F; Becker, U; Behner, F; Berdugo, J; Berges, P; Bertucci, B; Betev, B L; Bhattacharya, S; Biasini, M; Biland, A; Bilei, G M; Blaising, J J; Blyth, S C; Bobbink, Gerjan J; Böck, R K; Böhm, A; Boldizsar, L; Borgia, B; Bourilkov, D; Bourquin, Maurice; Braccini, S; Branson, J G; Brigljevic, V; Brock, I C; Buffini, A; Buijs, A; Burger, J D; Burger, W J; Busenitz, J K; Button, A M; Cai, X D; Campanelli, M; Capell, M; Cara Romeo, G; Carlino, G; Cartacci, A M; Casaus, J; Castellini, G; Cavallari, F; Cavallo, N; Cecchi, C; Cerrada-Canales, M; Cesaroni, F; Chamizo-Llatas, M; Chang, Y H; Chaturvedi, U K; Chekanov, S V; Chemarin, M; Chen, A; Chen, G; Chen, G M; Chen, H F; Chen, H S; Chéreau, X J; Chiefari, G; Chien, C Y; Cifarelli, Luisa; Cindolo, F; Civinini, C; Clare, I; Clare, R; Cohn, H O; Coignet, G; Colijn, A P; Colino, N; Commichau, V; Costantini, S; Cotorobai, F; de la Cruz, B; Csilling, Akos; Dai, T S; D'Alessandro, R; De Asmundis, R; Degré, A; Deiters, K; Della Volpe, D; Denes, P; De Notaristefani, F; DiBitonto, Daryl; Diemoz, M; Van Dierendonck, D N; Di Lodovico, F; Dionisi, C; Dittmar, Michael; Dominguez, A; Doria, A; Dova, M T; Duchesneau, D; Duinker, P; Durán, I; Dutta, S; Easo, S; Efremenko, Yu V; El-Mamouni, H; Engler, A; Eppling, F J; Erné, F C; Ernenwein, J P; Extermann, Pierre; Fabre, M; Faccini, R; Falciano, S; Favara, A; Fay, J; Fedin, O; Felcini, Marta; Fenyi, B; Ferguson, T; Ferroni, F; Fesefeldt, H S; Fiandrini, E; Field, J H; Filthaut, Frank; Fisher, P H; Fisk, I; Forconi, G; Fredj, L; Freudenreich, Klaus; Furetta, C; Galaktionov, Yu; Ganguli, S N; García-Abia, P; Gau, S S; Gentile, S; Gheordanescu, N; Giagu, S; Goldfarb, S; Goldstein, J; Gong, Z F; Gougas, Andreas; Gratta, Giorgio; Grünewald, M W; Gupta, V K; Gurtu, A; Gutay, L J; Hartmann, B; Hasan, A; Hatzifotiadou, D; Hebbeker, T; Hervé, A; Van Hoek, W C; Hofer, H; Hong, S J; Hoorani, H; Hou, S R; Hu, G; Innocente, Vincenzo; Jenkes, K; Jin, B N; Jones, L W; de Jong, P; Josa-Mutuberria, I; Kasser, A; Khan, R A; Kamrad, D; Kamyshkov, Yu A; Kapustinsky, J S; Karyotakis, Yu; Kaur, M; Kienzle-Focacci, M N; Kim, D; Kim, D H; Kim, J K; Kim, S C; Kim, Y G; Kinnison, W W; Kirkby, A; Kirkby, D; Kirkby, Jasper; Kiss, D; Kittel, E W; Klimentov, A; König, A C; Kopp, A; Korolko, I; Koutsenko, V F; Krämer, R W; Krenz, W; Kunin, A; Ladrón de Guevara, P; Laktineh, I; Landi, G; Lapoint, C; Lassila-Perini, K M; Laurikainen, P; Lebeau, M; Lebedev, A; Lebrun, P; Lecomte, P; Lecoq, P; Le Coultre, P; Le Goff, J M; Leiste, R; Leonardi, E; Levchenko, P M; Li Chuan; Lin, C H; Lin, W T; Linde, Frank L; Lista, L; Liu, Z A; Lohmann, W; Longo, E; Lu, W; Lü, Y S; Lübelsmeyer, K; Luci, C; Luckey, D; Luminari, L; Lustermann, W; Ma Wen Gan; Maity, M; Majumder, G; Malgeri, L; Malinin, A; Maña, C; Mangeol, D J J; Mangla, S; Marchesini, P A; Marin, A; Martin, J P; Marzano, F; Massaro, G G G; McNally, D; McNeil, R R; Mele, S; Merola, L; Meschini, M; Metzger, W J; Von der Mey, M; Mi, Y; Mihul, A; Van Mil, A J W; Mirabelli, G; Mnich, J; Molnár, P; Monteleoni, B; Moore, R; Morganti, S; Moulik, T; Mount, R; Müller, S; Muheim, F; Muijs, A J M; Nahn, S; Napolitano, M; Nessi-Tedaldi, F; Newman, H; Niessen, T; Nippe, A; Nisati, A; Nowak, H; Oh, Yu D; Opitz, H; Organtini, G; Ostonen, R; Palomares, C; Pandoulas, D; Paoletti, S; Paolucci, P; Park, H K; Park, I H; Pascale, G; Passaleva, G; Patricelli, S; Paul, T; Pauluzzi, M; Paus, C; Pauss, Felicitas; Peach, D; Pei, Y J; Pensotti, S; Perret-Gallix, D; Petersen, B; Petrak, S; Pevsner, A; Piccolo, D; Pieri, M; Pinto, J C; Piroué, P A; Pistolesi, E; Plyaskin, V; Pohl, M; Pozhidaev, V; Postema, H; Produit, N; Prokofev, D; Prokofiev, D O; Rahal-Callot, G; Raja, N; Rancoita, P G; Rattaggi, M; Raven, G; Razis, P A; Read, K; Ren, D; Rescigno, M; Reucroft, S; Van Rhee, T; Riemann, S; Riles, K; Robohm, A; Rodin, J; Roe, B P; Romero, L; Rosier-Lees, S; Rosselet, P; Van Rossum, W; Roth, S; Rubio, Juan Antonio; Ruschmeier, D; Rykaczewski, H; Salicio, J; Sánchez, E; Sanders, M P; Sarakinos, M E; Sarkar, S; Sassowsky, M; Schäfer, C; Shchegelskii, V; Schmidt-Kärst, S; Schmitz, D; Schmitz, P; Scholz, N; Schopper, Herwig Franz; Schotanus, D J; Schwenke, J; Schwering, G; Sciacca, C; Sciarrino, D; Servoli, L; Shevchenko, S; Shivarov, N; Shoutko, V; Shukla, J; Shumilov, E; Shvorob, A V; Siedenburg, T; Son, D; Sopczak, André; Smith, B; Spillantini, P; Steuer, M; Stickland, D P; Stone, A; Stone, H; Stoyanov, B; Strässner, A; Strauch, K; Sudhakar, K; Sultanov, G G; Sun, L Z; Susinno, G F; Suter, H; Swain, J D; Tang, X W; Tauscher, Ludwig; Taylor, L; Ting, Samuel C C; Ting, S M; Tonutti, M; Tonwar, S C; Tóth, J; Tully, C; Tuchscherer, H; Tung, K L; Uchida, Y; Ulbricht, J; Uwer, U; Valente, E; Van de Walle, R T; Vesztergombi, G; Vetlitskii, I; Viertel, Gert M; Vivargent, M; Völkert, R; Vogel, H; Vogt, H; Vorobev, I; Vorobyov, A A; Vorvolakos, A; Wadhwa, M; Wallraff, W; Wang, J C; Wang, X L; Wang, Z M; Weber, A; Wittgenstein, F; Wu, S X; Wynhoff, S; Xu, J; Xu, Z Z; Yang, B Z; Yang, C G; Yao, X Y; Ye, J B; Yeh, S C; You, J M; Zalite, A; Zalite, Yu; Zemp, P; Zeng, Y; Zhang, Z; Zhang, Z P; Zhou, B; Zhu, G Y; Zhu, R Y; Zichichi, Antonino; Ziegler, F

    1997-01-01

    A search for unstable neutral and charged heavy leptons as well as for stable charged heavy leptons has been made at center-of-mass energies $\\sqrt{s}$ = 161 GeV and $\\sqrt{s}$ = 172 GeV with the L3 detector at LEP. No evidence for their existence was found. We exclude unstable neutral leptons of Dirac (Majorana) type for masses below 78.0 (66.7), 78.0 (66.7) and 72.2 (58.2) GeV, if the heavy neutrino couples to the electron, muon or tau family, respectively. We exclude unstable charged heavy leptons for masses below 81.0 GeV for a wide mass range of the associated neutral heavy lepton. The production of stable charged heavy leptons with a mass less than 84.2 GeV is also excluded. If the unstable charged heavy lepton decays via mixing into a massless neutrino, we exclude masses below 78.7 GeV.

  18. Search for supersymmetry in the photon(s) plus missing energy channels at sqrt(s)=161 GeV and 172 GeV

    Science.gov (United States)

    ALEPH Collaboration; Barate, R.; Buskulic, D.; Decamp, D.; Ghez, P.; Goy, C.; Lees, J.-P.; Lucotte, A.; Minard, M.-N.; Nief, J.-Y.; Pietrzyk, B.; Casado, M. P.; Chmeissani, M.; Comas, P.; Crespo, J. M.; Delfino, M.; Fernandez, E.; Fernandez-Bosman, M.; Garrido, Ll.; Juste, A.; Martinez, M.; Merino, G.; Miquel, R.; Mir, Ll. M.; Padilla, C.; Park, I. C.; Pascual, A.; Perlas, J. A.; Riu, I.; Sanchez, F.; Colaleo, A.; Creanza, D.; de Palma, M.; Gelao, G.; Iaselli, G.; Maggi, G.; Maggi, M.; Marinelli, N.; Nuzzo, S.; Ranieri, A.; Raso, G.; Ruggieri, F.; Selvaggi, G.; Silvestris, L.; Tempesta, P.; Tricomi, A.; Zito, G.; Huang, X.; Lin, J.; Ouyang, Q.; Wang, T.; Xie, Y.; Xu, R.; Xue, S.; Zhang, J.; Zhang, L.; Zhao, W.; Abbaneo, D.; Alemany, R.; Bazarko, A. O.; Becker, U.; Bright-Thomas, P.; Cattaneo, M.; Cerutti, F.; Dissertori, G.; Drevermann, H.; Forty, R. W.; Frank, M.; Hagelberg, R.; Hansen, J. B.; Harvey, J.; Janot, P.; Jost, B.; Kneringer, E.; Lehraus, I.; Mato, P.; Minten, A.; Moneta, L.; Pacheco, A.; Pusztaszeri, J.-F.; Ranjard, F.; Rizzo, G.; Rolandi, L.; Rousseau, D.; Schlatter, D.; Schmitt, M.; Schneider, O.; Tejessy, W.; Teubert, F.; Tomalin, I. R.; Wachsmuth, H.; Wagner, A.; Ajaltouni, Z.; Barrès, A.; Boyer, C.; Falvard, A.; Ferdi, C.; Gay, P.; Guicheney, C.; Henrard, P.; Jousset, J.; Michel, B.; Monteil, S.; Montret, J.-C.; Pallin, D.; Perret, P.; Podlyski, F.; Proriol, J.; Rosnet, P.; Rossignol, J.-M.; Fearnley, T.; Hansen, J. D.; Hansen, J. R.; Hansen, P. H.; Nilsson, B. S.; Rensch, B.; Wäänänen, A.; Daskalakis, G.; Kyriakis, A.; Markou, C.; Simopoulou, E.; Vayaki, A.; Blondel, A.; Brient, J. C.; Machefert, F.; Rougé, A.; Rumpf, M.; Valassi, A.; Videau, H.; Boccali, T.; Focardi, E.; Parrini, G.; Zachariadou, K.; Cavanaugh, R.; Corden, M.; Georgiopoulos, C.; Huehn, T.; Jaffe, D. E.; Antonelli, A.; Bencivenni, G.; Bologna, G.; Bossi, F.; Campana, P.; Capon, G.; Casper, D.; Chiarella, V.; Felici, G.; Laurelli, P.; Mannocchi, G.; Murtas, F.; Murtas, G. P.; Passalacqua, L.; Pepe-Altarelli, M.; Curtis, L.; Dorris, S. J.; Halley, A. W.; Knowles, I. G.; Lynch, J. G.; O'Shea, V.; Raine, C.; Scarr, J. M.; Smith, K.; Teixeira-Dias, P.; Thompson, A. S.; Thomson, E.; Thomson, F.; Turnbull, R. M.; Buchmüller, O.; Dhamotharan, S.; Geweniger, C.; Graefe, G.; Hanke, P.; Hansper, G.; Hepp, V.; Kluge, E. E.; Putzer, A.; Sommer, J.; Tittel, K.; Werner, S.; Wunsch, M.; Beuselinck, R.; Binnie, D. M.; Cameron, W.; Dornan, P. J.; Girone, M.; Goodsir, S.; Martin, E. B.; Morawitz, P.; Moutoussi, A.; Nash, J.; Sedgbeer, J. K.; Spagnolo, P.; Stacey, A. M.; Williams, M. D.; Ghete, V. M.; Girtler, P.; Kuhn, D.; Rudolph, G.; Betteridge, A. P.; Bowdery, C. K.; Buck, P. G.; Colrain, P.; Crawford, G.; Finch, A. J.; Foster, F.; Hughes, G.; Jones, R. W. L.; Sloan, T.; Whelan, E. P.; Williams, M. I.; Giehl, I.; Hoffmann, C.; Jakobs, K.; Kleinknecht, K.; Quast, G.; Renk, B.; Rohne, E.; Sander, H.-G.; van Gemmeren, P.; Zeitnitz, C.; Aubert, J. J.; Benchouk, C.; Bonissent, A.; Bujosa, G.; Carr, J.; Coyle, P.; Diaconu, C.; Ealet, A.; Fouchez, D.; Konstantinidis, N.; Leroy, O.; Motsch, F.; Payre, P.; Talby, M.; Sadouki, A.; Thulasidas, M.; Tilquin, A.; Trabelsi, K.; Aleppo, M.; Antonelli, M.; Ragusa, F.; Berlich, R.; Blum, W.; Büscher, V.; Dietl, H.; Ganis, G.; Gotzhein, C.; Kroha, H.; Lütjens, G.; Lutz, G.; Männer, W.; Moser, H.-G.; Richter, R.; Rosado-Schlosser, A.; Schael, S.; Settles, R.; Seywerd, H.; St. Denis, R.; Stenzel, H.; Wiedenmann, W.; Wolf, G.; Boucrot, J.; Callot, O.; Chen, S.; Cordier, A.; Davier, M.; Duflot, L.; Grivaz, J.-F.; Heusse, Ph.; Höcker, A.; Jacholkowska, A.; Jacquet, M.; Kim, D. W.; Le Diberder, F.; Lefrançois, J.; Lutz, A.-M.; Nikolic, I.; Schune, M.-H.; Serin, L.; Simion, S.; Tournefier, E.; Veillet, J.-J.; Videau, I.; Zerwas, D.; Azzurri, P.; Bagliesi, G.; Bettarini, S.; Bozzi, C.; Calderini, G.; Ciulli, V.; dell'Orso, R.; Fantechi, R.; Ferrante, I.; Giassi, A.; Gregorio, A.; Ligabue, F.; Lusiani, A.; Marrocchesi, P. S.; Messineo, A.; Palla, F.; Sanguinetti, G.; Sciabà, A.; Sguazzoni, G.; Steinberger, J.; Tenchini, R.; Vannini, C.; Venturi, A.; Verdini, P. G.; Blair, G. A.; Bryant, L. M.; Chambers, J. T.; Gao, Y.; Green, M. G.; Medcalf, T.; Perrodo, P.; Strong, J. A.; von Wimmersperg-Toeller, J. H.; Botterill, D. R.; Clifft, R. W.; Edgecock, T. R.; Haywood, S.; Maley, P.; Norton, P. R.; Thompson, J. C.; Wright, A. E.; Bloch-Devaux, B.; Colas, P.; Fabbro, B.; Kozanecki, W.; Lançon, E.; Lemaire, M. C.; Locci, E.; Perez, P.; Rander, J.; Renardy, J.-F.; Rosowsky, A.; Roussarie, A.; Schuller, J.-P.; Schwindling, J.; Trabelsi, A.; Vallage, B.; Black, S. N.; Dann, J. H.; Kim, H. Y.; Litke, A. M.; McNeil, M. A.; Taylor, G.; Booth, C. N.; Boswell, R.; Brew, C. A. J.; Cartwright, S.; Combley, F.; Kelly, M. S.; Lehto, M.; Newton, W. M.; Reeve, J.; Thompson, L. F.; Affholderbach, K.; Böhrer, A.; Brandt, S.; Cowan, G.; Foss, J.; Grupen, C.; Lutters, G.; Saraiva, P.; Smolik, L.; Stephan, F.; Apollonio, M.; Bosisio, L.; della Marina, R.; Giannini, G.; Gobbo, B.; Musolino, G.; Putz, J.; Rothberg, J.; Wasserbaech, S.; Williams, R. W.; Armstrong, S. R.; Charles, E.; Elmer, P.; Ferguson, D. P. S.; González, S.; Greening, T. C.; Hayes, O. J.; Hu, H.; Jin, S.; McNamara, P. A., III; Nachtman, J. M.; Nielsen, J.; Orejudos, W.; Pan, Y. B.; Saadi, Y.; Scott, I. J.; Walsh, J.; Wu, Sau Lan; Wu, X.; Yamartino, J. M.; Zobernig, G.

    1998-02-01

    Searches for supersymmetric particles in channels with one or more photons and missing energy have been performed with data collected by the ALEPH detector at LEP. The data consist of 11.1 pb-1 at sqrt(s)=161 GeV, 1.1 pb-1 at 170 GeV and 9.5 pb-1 at 172 GeV. The e+e--->νν¯γ(γ) cross section is measured. The data are in good agreement with predictions based on the Standard Model, and are used to set upper limits on the cross sections for anomalous photon production. These limits are compared to two different SUSY models and used to set limits on the neutralino mass. A limit of 71 GeV/c2 at 95% C.L. is set on the mass of the lightest neutralino (τχ10<= 3 ns) for the gauge-mediated supersymmetry breaking and LNZ models. © 1998

  19. Prognostic value of CT findings to predict survival outcomes in patients with pancreatic neuroendocrine neoplasms: a single institutional study of 161 patients

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kim, Dong Wook; Kim, Hyoung Jung; Kim, Kyung Won; Byun, Jae Ho; Kim, So Yeon; Song, Ki Byung; Ramaiya, Nikhil H.; Tirumani, Sree Harsha; Hong, Seung-Mo

    2016-01-01

    To evaluate the prognostic value of CT to predict recurrence-free and overall survival in patients with pancreatic neuroendocrine neoplasms (PanNENs). Between January 2004 and December 2012, 161 consecutive patients who underwent preoperative triphasic CT and surgical resection with curative intent for PanNENs were identified. The tumour consistency, margin, presence of calcification, pancreatic duct dilatation, bile duct dilatation, vascular invasion, and hepatic metastases were evaluated. The tumour size, arterial enhancement ratio, and portal enhancement ratio were measured. The Cox proportional hazard model was used to determine the association between CT features and recurrence-free survival and overall survival. By multivariate analysis, tumour size (>3 cm) (hazard ratio, 3.314; p = 0.006), portal enhancement ratio (≤1.1) (hazard ratio, 2.718; p = 0.006), and hepatic metastases (hazard ratio, 4.374; p = 0.003) were independent significant variables for worse recurrence-free survival. Portal enhancement ratio (≤1.1) (hazard ratio, 5.951; p = 0.001) and hepatic metastases (hazard ratio, 4.122; p = 0.021) were independent significant variables for worse overall survival. Portal enhancement ratio (≤1.1) and hepatic metastases assessed on CT were common independent prognostic factors for worse recurrence-free survival and overall survival in patients with PanNENs. (orig.)

  20. Prognostic value of CT findings to predict survival outcomes in patients with pancreatic neuroendocrine neoplasms: a single institutional study of 161 patients

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kim, Dong Wook; Kim, Hyoung Jung; Kim, Kyung Won; Byun, Jae Ho; Kim, So Yeon [University of Ulsan College of Medicine, Department of Radiology and Research Institute of Radiology, Asan Medical Center, Seoul (Korea, Republic of); Song, Ki Byung [University of Ulsan College of Medicine, Department of Surgery, Asan Medical Center, Seoul (Korea, Republic of); Ramaiya, Nikhil H.; Tirumani, Sree Harsha [Harvard Medical School, Department of Imaging, Dana-Farber Cancer Institute, Brigham and Women' s Hospital, Boston, MA (United States); Hong, Seung-Mo [University of Ulsan College of Medicine, Department of Pathology, Asan Medical Center, Seoul (Korea, Republic of)

    2016-05-15

    To evaluate the prognostic value of CT to predict recurrence-free and overall survival in patients with pancreatic neuroendocrine neoplasms (PanNENs). Between January 2004 and December 2012, 161 consecutive patients who underwent preoperative triphasic CT and surgical resection with curative intent for PanNENs were identified. The tumour consistency, margin, presence of calcification, pancreatic duct dilatation, bile duct dilatation, vascular invasion, and hepatic metastases were evaluated. The tumour size, arterial enhancement ratio, and portal enhancement ratio were measured. The Cox proportional hazard model was used to determine the association between CT features and recurrence-free survival and overall survival. By multivariate analysis, tumour size (>3 cm) (hazard ratio, 3.314; p = 0.006), portal enhancement ratio (≤1.1) (hazard ratio, 2.718; p = 0.006), and hepatic metastases (hazard ratio, 4.374; p = 0.003) were independent significant variables for worse recurrence-free survival. Portal enhancement ratio (≤1.1) (hazard ratio, 5.951; p = 0.001) and hepatic metastases (hazard ratio, 4.122; p = 0.021) were independent significant variables for worse overall survival. Portal enhancement ratio (≤1.1) and hepatic metastases assessed on CT were common independent prognostic factors for worse recurrence-free survival and overall survival in patients with PanNENs. (orig.)

  1. Measurement of the Mass and Width of the W Boson in $e^{+}e^{-}$ Collisions at $\\sqrt{s}$ = 161 - 209 GeV

    CERN Document Server

    Abdallah, J.; Adam, W.; Adzic, P.; Albrecht, T.; Alemany-Fernandez, R.; Allmendinger, T.; Allport, P.P.; Amaldi, U.; Amapane, N.; Amato, Sandra F.; Anashkin, E.; Andreazza, A.; Andringa, Sofia; Anjos, N.; Antilogus, Pierre; Apel, W-D.; Arnoud, Y.; Ask, S.; Asman, B.; Augustin, Jean-Eudes; Augustinus, A.; Baillon, P.; Ballestrero, A.; Bambade, P.; Barbier, R.; Bardin, D.; Barker, G.J.; Baroncelli, Antonio; Battaglia, Marco; Baubillier, M.; Becks, K-H.; Begalli, M.; Behrmann, A.; Ben-Haim, Eli; Benekos, N.; Benvenuti, A.; Berat, C.; Berggren, Mikael; Bertrand, D.; Besancon, Marc; Besson, N.; Bloch, Daniel; Blom, M.; Bluj, Michal; Bonesini, Maurizio; Boonekamp, M.; Booth, PSL; Borisov, G.; Botner, Olga; Bouquet, B.; Bowcock, T.J.V.; Boyko, I.; Bracko, Marko; Brenner, R.; Brodet, E.; Bruckman, P.; Brunet, J.M.; Buschbeck, B.; Buschmann, P.; Calvi, M.; Camporesi, Tiziano; Canale, V.; Carena, F.; Castro, Nuno Filipe; Cavallo, F.; Chapkin, M.; Charpentier, Ph.; Checchia, Paolo; Chierici, R.; Chliapnikov, P.; Chudoba, J.; Chung, Suh-Urk; Cieslik, K.; Collins, P.; Contri, Roberto; Cosme, G.; Cossutti, Fabio; Costa, M.J.; Crennell, D.; Cuevas, Javier; D'Hondt, J.; da Silva, T.; Da Silva, W.; Della Ricca, Giuseppe; De Angelis, Alessandro; De Boer, W.; De Clercq, C.; De Lotto, Barbara; De Maria, N.; De Min, A.; de Paula, L.; Di Ciaccio, L.; Di Simone, A.; Doroba, K.; Duperrin, A.; Eigen, G.; Ekelof, Tord; Ellert, Mattias; Elsing, M.; Espirito Santo, Maria Catarina; Fanourakis, George K.; Feindt, Michael; Fernandez, J.; Ferrer, Antonio; Ferro, F.; Flagmeyer, U.; Foeth, H.; Fokitis, E.; Fulda-Quenzer, F.; Fuster, J.; Gandelman, Miriam; Garcia, C.; Gavillet, Philippe; Gazis, Evangelos; Gomez-Ceballos, G.; Goncalves, P.; Graziani, E.; Grosdidier, G.; Grzelak, K.; Guy, J.; Haag, C.; Hallgren, A.; Hamacher, Klaus; Hamilton, K.; Haug, S.; Hauler, F.; Hedberg, Vincent; Hennecke, M.; Herr, H.; Hoffman, J.; Holmgren, S-O.; Holt, P.J.; Houlden, M.A.; Jackson, John Neil; Jarlskog, Goran; Jarry, P.; Jeans, D.; Johansson, Erik Karl; Jonsson, P.; Joram, C.; Jungermann, L.; Kapusta, Frederic; Katsanevas, S.; Katsoufis, E.; Kernel, Gabrijel; Kerzel, U.; King, B.T.; Kjaer, N.J.; Kluit, Peter; Kokkinias, P.; Kourkoumelis, C.; Kouznetsov, O.; Krumstein, Z.; Kucharczyk, M.; Lamsa, J.; Leder, G.; Ledroit, F.; Leinonen, L.; Leitner, R.; Lemonne, Jacques; Lepeltier, V.; Lesiak, T.; Liebig, W.; Liko, D.; Lipniacka, A.; Lopes, J.H.; Lopez, J.M.; Loukas, D.; Lutz, Pierre; Lyons, Louis; MacNaughton, J.; Malek, A.; Maltezos, S.; Mandl, F.; Marco, J.; Marco, R.; Marechal, B.; Margoni, M.; Marin, J-C.; Mariotti, C.; Markou, A.; Martinez-Rivero, C.; Masik, J.; Mastroyiannopoulos, N.; Matorras, F.; Matteuzzi, C.; Mazzucato, F.; Mazzucato, M.; Nulty, R.Mc; Meroni, C.; Migliore, E.; Mitaroff, W.; Mjoernmark, U.; Moa, T.; Moch, M.; Monge, R.; Montenegro, J.; Moraes, D.; Moreno, S.; Morettini, P.; Muller, Ulrich; Muenich, K.; Mulders, M.; Mundim Filho, Luiz Martins; Murray, W.; Muryn, B.; Myatt, G.; Myklebust, T.; Nassiakou, M.; Navarria, F.; Nawrocki, K.; Nicolaidou, R.; Oblakowska-Mucha, A.; Obraztsov, V.; Olshevski, A.; Onofre, A.; Orava, R.; Osterberg, K.; Ouraou, A.; Oyanguren, A.; Paganoni, M.; Paiano, S.; Palacios, J.P.; Palka, Henryk; Papadopoulou, Th.D.; Pape, L.; Parkes, C.; Parodi, F.; Parzefall, U.; Passeri, A.; Passon, O.; Peralta, L.; Perepelitsa, V.; Perrotta, Andrea; Petrolini, Alessandro; Piedra, Jonatan; Pieri, L.; Pierre, Francois; Pimenta, M.; Piotto, E.; Poireau, V.; Pol, M.E.; Polok, G.; Pozdniakov, V.; Pukhaeva, N.; Pullia, A.; Radojicic, D.; Rames, J.; Read, A.; Rebecchi, P.; Rehn, J.; Reid, D.; Reinhardt, R.; Renton, Peter; Richard, F.; Ridky, Jan; Rivero, M.; Rodriguez, D.; Romero, A.; Ronchese, Paolo; Roudeau, P.; Rovelli, T.; Ruhlmann, Vanina; Ryabtchikov, D.; Sadovsky, A.; Salmi, L.; Salt, J.; Sander, C.; Savoy-Navarro, A.; Schwickerath, U.; Segar, A.; Sekulin, R.; Siebel, Martin; Simard, L.; Sisakian, A.; Smadja, G.; Smirnova, O.; Sokolov, Andrei Valerevich; Sopczak, A.; Sosnowski, R.; Spassov, T.; Stanitzki, M.; Stocchi, A.; Strauss, J.; Stugu, B.; Szczekowski, M.; Szeptycka, M.; Szumlak, T.; Tabarelli de Fatis, T.; Taffard, A.C.; Tegenfeldt, F.; Thomas, J.; Timmermans, Jan; Tkatchev, L.; Tobin, M.; Todorovova, S.; Tome, B.; Tonazzo, A.; Tortosa, P.; Travnicek, Petr; Treille, D.; Tristram, G.; Trochimczuk, M.; Troncon, Clara; Turluer, M-L.; Tyapkin, I.A.; Tyapkin, P.; Tzamarias, S.; Uvarov, V.; Valenti, Giovanni; Van Dam, P.; Van Eldik, J.; van Remortel, N.; Van Vulpen, I.; Vegni, G.; Veloso, Filipe; Venus, W.; Verdier, Patrice; Verzi, V.; Vilanova, D.; Vitale, Lorenzo; Vrba, V.; Wahlen, H.; Washbrook, A.J.; Weiser, C.; Wicke, D.; Wickens, J.; Wilkinson, G.; Winter, M.; Witek, M.; Yushchenko, O.; Zalewska, A.; Zalewski, P.; Zavrtanik, Danilo; Zhuravlov, V.; Zimine, N.I.; Zintchenko, Alexandre

    2008-01-01

    A measurement of the W boson mass and width has been performed by the DELPHI collaboration using the data collected during the full LEP2 programme (1996-2000). The data sample has an integrated luminosity of 660 pb^-1 and was collected over a range of centre-of-mass energies from 161 to 209 GeV. Results are obtained by applying the method of direct reconstruction of the mass of the W from its decay products in both the W+W- -> lvqq and W+W- -> qqqq channels. The W mass result for the combined data set is M_W = 80.336 +/- 0.055 (Stat.) +/- 0.028 (Syst.) +/- 0.025 (FSI) +/- 0.009 (LEP) GeV/c^2, where FSI represents the uncertainty due to final state interaction effects in the qqqq channel, and LEP represents that arising from the knowledge of the collision energy of the accelerator. The combined value for the W width is Gamma_W = 2.404 +/- 0.140 (Stat.) +/- 0.077 (Syst.) +/- 0.065 (FSI) GeV/c^2. These results supersede all values previously published by the DELPHI collaboration. This paper is dedicated to the m...

  2. Cell growth and resistance of Lactococcus lactis subsp. lactis TOMSC161 following freezing, drying and freeze-dried storage are differentially affected by fermentation conditions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Velly, H; Fonseca, F; Passot, S; Delacroix-Buchet, A; Bouix, M

    2014-09-01

    To investigate the effects of fermentation parameters on the cell growth and on the resistance to each step of the freeze-drying process of Lactococcus lactis subsp. lactis TOMSC161, a natural cheese isolate, using a response surface methodology. Cells were cultivated at different temperatures (22, 30 and 38°C) and pH (5·6, 6·2 and 6·8) and were harvested at different growth phases (0, 3 and 6 h of stationary phase). Cultivability and acidification activity losses of Lc. lactis were quantified after freezing, drying, 1 and 3 months of storage at 4 and 25°C. Lactococcus lactis was not damaged by freezing but was sensitive to drying and to ambient temperature storage. Moreover, the fermentation temperature and the harvesting time influenced the drying resistance of Lc. lactis. Lactococcus lactis cells grown in a whey-based medium at 32°C, pH 6·2 and harvested at late stationary phase exhibited both an optimal growth and the highest resistance to freeze-drying and storage. A better insight on the individual and interaction effects of fermentation parameters made it possible the freeze-drying and storage preservation of a sensitive strain of technological interest. Evidence on the particularly damaging effect of the drying step and the high-temperature storage is presented. © 2014 The Society for Applied Microbiology.

  3. Search for Stable Heavy Charged Particles in $e^+ e^-$ Collisions at $\\sqrt{s}$ = 130-136, 161 and 172 GeV

    CERN Document Server

    Abreu, P; Adye, T; Ajinenko, I; Alekseev, G D; Alemany, R; Allport, P P; Almehed, S; Amaldi, Ugo; Amato, S; Andreazza, A; Andrieux, M L; Antilogus, P; Apel, W D; Åsman, B; Augustin, J E; Augustinus, A; Baillon, Paul; Bambade, P; Barão, F; Barbi, M S; Barbiellini, Guido; Bardin, Dimitri Yuri; Barker, G; Baroncelli, A; Bärring, O; Barrio, J A; Bartl, Walter; Bates, M J; Battaglia, Marco; Baubillier, M; Baudot, J; Becks, K H; Begalli, M; Beillière, P; Belokopytov, Yu A; Belous, K S; Benvenuti, Alberto C; Berggren, M; Bertini, D; Bertrand, D; Besançon, M; Bianchi, F; Bigi, M; Bilenky, S M; Billoir, P; Bizouard, M A; Bloch, D; Blume, M; Bolognese, T; Bonesini, M; Bonivento, W; Booth, P S L; Borisov, G; Bosio, C; Botner, O; Boudinov, E; Bouquet, B; Bourdarios, C; Bowcock, T J V; Bozzo, M; Branchini, P; Brand, K D; Brenke, T; Brenner, R A; Bricman, C; Brown, R C A; Brückman, P; Brunet, J M; Bugge, L; Buran, T; Burgsmüller, T; Buschmann, P; Cabrera, S; Caccia, M; Calvi, M; Camacho-Rozas, A J; Camporesi, T; Canale, V; Canepa, M; Cankocak, K; Cao, F; Carena, F; Carroll, L; Caso, Carlo; Castillo-Gimenez, M V; Cattai, A; Cavallo, F R; Chabaud, V; Charpentier, P; Chaussard, L; Checchia, P; Chelkov, G A; Chen, M; Chierici, R; Chliapnikov, P V; Chochula, P; Chorowicz, V; Cindro, V; Collins, P; Contri, R; Cortina, E; Cosme, G; Cossutti, F; Cowell, J H; Crawley, H B; Crennell, D J; Crosetti, G; Cuevas-Maestro, J; Czellar, S; Dahl-Jensen, Erik; Dahm, J; D'Almagne, B; Dam, M; Damgaard, G; Dauncey, P D; Davenport, Martyn; Da Silva, W; Defoix, C; Deghorain, A; Della Ricca, G; Delpierre, P A; Demaria, N; De Angelis, A; de Boer, Wim; De Brabandere, S; De Clercq, C; La Vaissière, C de; De Lotto, B; De Min, A; De Paula, L S; De Saint-Jean, C; Dijkstra, H; Di Ciaccio, Lucia; Di Diodato, A; Djama, F; Djannati, A; Dolbeau, J; Doroba, K; Dracos, M; Drees, J; Drees, K A; Dris, M; Durand, J D; Edsall, D M; Ehret, R; Eigen, G; Ekelöf, T J C; Ekspong, Gösta; Elsing, M; Engel, J P; Erzen, B; Espirito-Santo, M C; Falk, E; Fassouliotis, D; Feindt, Michael; Fenyuk, A; Ferrer, A; Fichet, S; Filippas-Tassos, A; Firestone, A; Fischer, P A; Föth, H; Fokitis, E; Fontanelli, F; Formenti, F; Franek, B J; Frenkiel, P; Fries, D E C; Frodesen, A G; Frühwirth, R; Fulda-Quenzer, F; Fuster, J A; Galloni, A; Gamba, D; Gandelman, M; García, C; García, J; Gaspar, C; Gasparini, U; Gavillet, P; Gazis, E N; Gelé, D; Gerber, J P; Gerdyukov, L N; Gokieli, R; Golob, B; Gopal, Gian P; Gorn, L; Górski, M; Guz, Yu; Gracco, Valerio; Graziani, E; Green, C; Grefrath, A; Gris, P; Grosdidier, G; Grzelak, K; Gumenyuk, S A; Gunnarsson, P; Günther, M; Guy, J; Hahn, F; Hahn, S; Hajduk, Z; Hallgren, A; Hamacher, K; Harris, F J; Hedberg, V; Henriques, R P; Hernández, J J; Herquet, P; Herr, H; Hessing, T L; Heuser, J M; Higón, E; Hilke, Hans Jürgen; Hill, T S; Holmgren, S O; Holt, P J; Holthuizen, D J; Hoorelbeke, S; Houlden, M A; Hrubec, Josef; Huet, K; Hultqvist, K; Jackson, J N; Jacobsson, R; Jalocha, P; Janik, R; Jarlskog, C; Jarlskog, G; Jarry, P; Jean-Marie, B; Johansson, E K; Jönsson, L B; Jönsson, P E; Joram, Christian; Juillot, P; Kaiser, M; Kapusta, F; Karafasoulis, K; Karlsson, M; Karvelas, E; Katsanevas, S; Katsoufis, E C; Keränen, R; Khokhlov, Yu A; Khomenko, B A; Khovanskii, N N; King, B J; Kjaer, N J; Klapp, O; Klein, H; Klovning, A; Kluit, P M; Kokkinias, P; Konoplyannikov, A K; Koratzinos, M; Korcyl, K; Kostyukhin, V; Kourkoumelis, C; Kuznetsov, O; Krammer, Manfred; Kreuter, C; Kronkvist, I J; Krumshtein, Z; Krupinski, W; Kubinec, P; Kucewicz, W; Kurvinen, K L; Lacasta, C; Laktineh, I; Lamsa, J; Lanceri, L; Lane, D W; Langefeld, P; Laugier, J P; Lauhakangas, R; Leder, Gerhard; Ledroit, F; Lefébure, V; Legan, C K; Leitner, R; Lemonne, J; Lenzen, Georg; Lepeltier, V; Lesiak, T; Libby, J; Liko, D; Lindner, R; Lipniacka, A; Lippi, I; Lörstad, B; Loken, J G; López, J M; Loukas, D; Lutz, P; Lyons, L; MacNaughton, J N; Maehlum, G; Mahon, J R; Malmgren, T G M; Malychev, V; Mandl, F; Marco, J; Marco, R P; Maréchal, B; Margoni, M; Marin, J C; Mariotti, C; Markou, A; Martínez-Rivero, C; Martínez-Vidal, F; Martí i García, S; Matorras, F; Matteuzzi, C; Matthiae, Giorgio; Mazzucato, M; McCubbin, M L; McKay, R; McNulty, R; Medbo, J; Merk, M; Meroni, C; Meyer, S; Meyer, W T; Michelotto, M; Migliore, E; Mirabito, L; Mitaroff, Winfried A; Mjörnmark, U; Moa, T; Møller, R; Mönig, K; Monge, M R; Morettini, P; Müller, H; Münich, K; Mulders, M; Mundim, L M; Murray, W J; Muryn, B; Myatt, Gerald; Naraghi, F; Navarria, Francesco Luigi; Navas, S; Nawrocki, K; Negri, P; Némécek, S; Neumann, W; Neumeister, N; Nicolaidou, R; Nielsen, B S; Nieuwenhuizen, M; Nikolaenko, V; Niss, P; Nomerotski, A; Normand, Ainsley; Novák, M; Oberschulte-Beckmann, W; Obraztsov, V F; Olshevskii, A G; Onofre, A; Orava, Risto; Österberg, K; Ouraou, A; Paganini, P; Paganoni, M; Pagès, P; Pain, R; Palka, H; Papadopoulou, T D; Papageorgiou, K; Pape, L; Parkes, C; Parodi, F; Passeri, A; Pegoraro, M; Peralta, L; Pernicka, Manfred; Perrotta, A; Petridou, C; Petrolini, A; Phillips, H T; Piana, G; Pierre, F; Pimenta, M; Podobnik, T; Podobrin, O; Pol, M E; Polok, G; Poropat, P; Pozdnyakov, V; Privitera, P; Pukhaeva, N; Pullia, Antonio; Radojicic, D; Ragazzi, S; Rahmani, H; Rames, J; Ratoff, P N; Read, A L; Reale, M; Rebecchi, P; Redaelli, N G; Regler, Meinhard; Reid, D; Reinhardt, R; Renton, P B; Resvanis, L K; Richard, F; Richardson, J; Rídky, J; Rinaudo, G; Ripp, I; Romero, A; Roncagliolo, I; Ronchese, P; Roos, L; Rosenberg, E I; Roudeau, Patrick; Rovelli, T; Ruhlmann-Kleider, V; Ruiz, A; Rybicki, K; Saarikko, H; Sacquin, Yu; Sadovskii, A; Sahr, O; Sajot, G; Salt, J; Sánchez, J; Sannino, M; Schimmelpfennig, M; Schneider, H; Schwickerath, U; Schyns, M A E; Sciolla, G; Scuri, F; Seager, P; Sedykh, Yu; Segar, A M; Seitz, A; Sekulin, R L; Serbelloni, L; Shellard, R C; Siegrist, P; Silvestre, R; Simonetti, S; Simonetto, F; Sissakian, A N; Sitár, B; Skaali, T B; Smadja, G; Smirnov, N; Smirnova, O G; Smith, G R; Solovyanov, O; Sosnowski, R; Souza-Santos, D; Spassoff, Tz; Spiriti, E; Sponholz, P; Squarcia, S; Stampfer, D; Stanescu, C; Stanic, S; Stapnes, Steinar; Stavitski, I; Stevenson, K; Stocchi, A; Strauss, J; Strub, R; Stugu, B; Szczekowski, M; Szeptycka, M; Tabarelli de Fatis, T; Tavernet, J P; Chernyaev, E; Thomas, J; Tilquin, A; Timmermans, J; Tkatchev, L G; Todorov, T; Todorova, S; Toet, D Z; Tomaradze, A G; Tomé, B; Tonazzo, A; Tortora, L; Tranströmer, G; Treille, D; Tristram, G; Trombini, A; Troncon, C; Tsirou, A L; Turluer, M L; Tyapkin, I A; Tyndel, M; Tzamarias, S; Überschär, B; Ullaland, O; Uvarov, V; Valenti, G; Vallazza, E; Van der Velde, C; van Apeldoorn, G W; van Dam, P; Van Doninck, W K; Van Eldik, J; Van Lysebetten, A; Vassilopoulos, N; Vegni, G; Ventura, L; Venus, W A; Verbeure, F; Verlato, M; Vertogradov, L S; Vilanova, D; Vincent, P; Vitale, L; Vodopyanov, A S; Vrba, V; Wahlen, H; Walck, C; Weierstall, M; Weilhammer, Peter; Weiser, C; Wetherell, Alan M; Wicke, D; Wickens, J H; Wielers, M; Wilkinson, G R; Williams, W S C; Winter, M; Witek, M; Wlodek, T; Woschnagg, K; Yip, K; Yushchenko, O P; Zach, F; Zaitsev, A; Zalewska-Bak, A; Zalewski, Piotr; Zavrtanik, D; Zevgolatakos, E; Zimin, N I; Zito, M; Zontar, D; Zucchelli, G C; Zumerle, G

    1997-01-01

    A search for stable or long-lived heavy charged particles in $e^+e^-$ interactions at energies of 130-136, 161 and 172 GeV has been performed using the data taken by the DELPHI experiment at LEP. The search is based on particle identification provided by the Time Projection Chamber and the Ring Imaging Cherenkov detector. Upper limits at 95\\% confidence level are derived on the cross-section for heavy long-lived pair-produced charge $\\pm e$ and $\\pm 2/3e$ particles in the range of 0.4-2.3 pb for masses from 45 to 84 GeV/$c^2$. Within supersymmetric extensions of the Standard Model, long-lived charginos with masses from 45 to 84 (80)~GeV/$c^2$ for high (low) sneutrino masses can be excluded at 95\\% confidence level. %Mass limits for long-lived sleptons are obtained. %For selectrons no general mass limits can be given. Left-handed (right-handed) long-lived or stable smuons and staus with masses between 45 and 68 (65)~GeV/$c^2$ can be excluded at 95\\% confidence level.

  4. Separation of zirconium and hafnium; Separation du zirconium et de l'hafnium

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Saint-James, D [Commissariat a l' Energie Atomique, Saclay (France).Centre d' Etudes Nucleaires

    1959-07-01

    This account is more chemical than metallurgical in character. The reason for this is that so-called 'nuclear metal' must fulfil standards of purity which only chemical processes can attain. This paper must therefore be considered as a preliminary study, from which the metallurgists can form an idea of the treatments leading to the production of the metal. (author) [French] Cet expose a un caractere chimique plutot que metallurgique. La raison en est que le metal dit 'nucleaire' a des exigences de purete que seuls des processus chimiques peuvent satisfaire. Il faut donc considerer cet expose comme un preliminaire, permettant de donner une idee aux metallurgistes des traitements qui aboutissent a l'elaboration du metal. (auteur)

  5. Common variants on 2p16.1, 6p22.1 and 10q24.32 are associated with schizophrenia in Han Chinese population.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yu, H; Yan, H; Li, J; Li, Z; Zhang, X; Ma, Y; Mei, L; Liu, C; Cai, L; Wang, Q; Zhang, F; Iwata, N; Ikeda, M; Wang, L; Lu, T; Li, M; Xu, H; Wu, X; Liu, B; Yang, J; Li, K; Lv, L; Ma, X; Wang, C; Li, L; Yang, F; Jiang, T; Shi, Y; Li, T; Zhang, D; Yue, W

    2017-07-01

    Many schizophrenia susceptibility loci have been identified through genome-wide association studies (GWASs) in European populations. However, until recently, schizophrenia GWASs in non-European populations were limited to small sample sizes and have yielded few loci associated with schizophrenia. To identify genetic risk variations for schizophrenia in the Han Chinese population, we performed a two-stage GWAS of schizophrenia comprising 4384 cases and 5770 controls, followed by independent replications of 13 single-nucleotide polymorphisms in an additional 4339 schizophrenia cases and 7043 controls of Han Chinese ancestry. Furthermore, we conducted additional analyses based on the results in the discovery stage. The combined analysis confirmed evidence of genome-wide significant associations in the Han Chinese population for three loci, at 2p16.1 (rs1051061, in an exon of VRK2, P=1.14 × 10 -12 , odds ratio (OR)=1.17), 6p22.1 (rs115070292 in an intron of GABBR1, P=4.96 × 10 -10 , OR=0.77) and 10q24.32 (rs10883795 in an intron of AS3MT, P=7.94 × 10 -10 , OR=0.87; rs10883765 at an intron of ARL3, P=3.06 × 10 -9 , OR=0.87). The polygenic risk score based on Psychiatric Genomics Consortium schizophrenia GWAS data modestly predicted case-control status in the Chinese population (Nagelkerke R 2 : 1.7% ~5.7%). Our pathway analysis suggested that neurological biological pathways such as GABAergic signaling, dopaminergic signaling, cell adhesion molecules and myelination pathways are involved in schizophrenia. These findings provide new insights into the pathogenesis of schizophrenia in the Han Chinese population. Further studies are needed to establish the biological context and potential clinical utility of these findings.

  6. The EP4 receptor antagonist, L-161,982, blocks prostaglandin E2-induced signal transduction and cell proliferation in HCA-7 colon cancer cells

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cherukuri, Durga Prasad; Chen, Xiao B.O.; Goulet, Anne-Christine; Young, Robert N.; Han, Yongxin; Heimark, Ronald L.; Regan, John W.; Meuillet, Emmanuelle; Nelson, Mark A.

    2007-01-01

    Accumulating evidence indicates that elevated levels of prostaglandin E 2 (PGE 2 ) can increase intestinal epithelial cell proliferation, and thus play a role in colorectal tumorigenesis. PGE 2 exerts its effects through four G-protein-coupled PGE receptor (EP) subtypes, named the EP1, EP2, EP3, and EP4. Increased phosphorylation of extracellular regulated kinases (ERK1/2) is required for PGE 2 to stimulate cell proliferation of human colon cancer cells. However, the EP receptor(s) that are involved in this process remain unknown. We provide evidence that L-161,982, a selective EP4 receptor antagonist, completely blocks PGE 2 -induced ERK phosphorylation and cell proliferation of HCA-7 cells. In order to identify downstream target genes of ERK1/2 signaling, we found that PGE 2 induces expression of early growth response gene-1 (EGR-1) downstream of ERK1/2 and regulates its expression at the level of transcription. PGE 2 treatment induces phosphorylation of cyclic AMP response element binding protein (CREB) at Ser133 residue and CRE-mediated luciferase activity in HCA-7 cells. Studies with dominant-negative CREB mutant (ACREB) provide clear evidence for the involvement of CREB in PGE 2 driven egr-1 transcription in HCA-7 cells. In conclusion, this study reveals that egr-1 is a target gene of PGE 2 in HCA-7 cells and is regulated via the newly identified EP4/ERK/CREB pathway. Finally our results support the notion that antagonizing EP4 receptors may provide a novel therapeutic approach to the treatment of colon cancer

  7. Decreased frequency of peripheral CD4(+) CD161(+) Th(17) -precursor cells in kidney transplant recipients on long-term therapy with Belatacept.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vondran, Florian Wolfgang Rudolf; Timrott, Kai; Kollrich, Sonja; Klempnauer, Juergen; Schwinzer, Reinhard; Becker, Thomas

    2012-04-01

    Clinical trials have pointed out the promising role of co-stimulation blocker Belatacept for improvement of graft function and avoidance of undesired side-effects associated with calcineurin-inhibitors (CNI). However, due to the worldwide limited availability of appropriate patients, almost no data exist to assess the effects of sustained application of this immunomodulator on the recipient's immune system. The aim of this study was to reveal specific alterations in the composition of immunologic subpopulations potentially involved in development of tolerance or chronic graft rejection following long-term Belatacept therapy. For this, peripheral lymphocyte subsets of kidney recipients treated with Belatacept (n=5; average 7.8years) were determined by flow-cytometry and compared with cells from matched patients on CNI (n=9) and healthy controls (n=10). T cells capable of producing IL-17 and serum levels of soluble CD30 were quantified. Patients on CNI showed a higher frequency of CD4(+) CD161(+) Th(17) -precursors and IL-17-producing CD4(+) T cells than Belatacept patients and controls. Significantly higher serum levels of soluble CD30 were observed in CNI patients, indicating a possible involvement of the CD30/CD30L-system in Th(17) -differentiation. No differences were found concerning CD4(+) CD25(+) CD127(low) FoxP3(+) regulatory T cells. In conclusion, patients on therapy with Belatacept did not show a comparable Th(17) -profile to that seen in individuals with chronic intake of CNI. The distinct effects of Belatacept on Th(17) -immunity might prove beneficial for the long-term outcome following kidney transplantation. © 2012 The Authors. Transplant International © 2012 European Society for Organ Transplantation.

  8. Meat, milk, saturated fatty acids, the Pro12Ala and C161T polymorphisms of the PPARgamma gene and colorectal cancer risk in Japanese.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kuriki, Kiyonori; Hirose, Kaoru; Matsuo, Keitaro; Wakai, Kenji; Ito, Hidemi; Kanemitsu, Yukihide; Hirai, Takashi; Kato, Tomoyuki; Hamajima, Nobuyuki; Takezaki, Toshiro; Suzuki, Takeshi; Saito, Toshiko; Tanaka, Rie; Tajima, Kazuo

    2006-11-01

    The peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor gamma (PPARgamma) gene plays important roles in energy homeostasis. To examine interactions between consumption of foods and fatty acids and the Pro12Ala and C161T (His447His) polymorphisms for colorectal cancer, we performed two case-control studies in Japanese. In study 1, there were 128 colorectal cancer cases and 238 non-cancer controls, and in study 2 there were 257 cases and 771 (age- and sex-matched) non-cancer controls. Assessment of food and nutrients consumption in study 1 was via a nine-item questionnaire, while in study 2 assessment of consumption was according to a more detailed semiquantitative food frequency questionnaire. Consumption of foods and fatty acids was divided into low, moderate and high groups. The overall frequency of the Ala allele was frequencies of the Pro/Pro + C/C and Pro/Pro + (C/T + T/T) genotypes were 70-73% and 20-26%, respectively. Compared with subjects with low meat intake and the Pro/Pro + C/C genotype, those with high meat consumption and the same genotype had a stronger increased risk in study 1 [OR, 2.88; 95% CI, 1.14-7.30; P for trend = 0.02], but a positive association with processed meat consumption was greatest in those with the Pro/Pro + (C/T + T/T) genotype (P for trend = 0.05) in study 2. Likewise, high consumption of saturated fatty acids and milk appeared to confer marginal increased risk and stronger decreased risk, respectively, in those with the Pro/Pro and Pro/Pro + C/C genotypes (OR, 1.35 and 0.65; 95% CI, 0.93-1.96 and 0.43-1.00; P for trend = 0.10 and 0.06). Further large-scale studies are needed to determine colorectal cancer risk according to relationships between the PPARgamma gene polymorphisms and dietary intakes of meat, processed meat, milk and saturated fatty acids in Japanese with very low frequency of the Ala allele.

  9. Hyper-Expression of PD-1 Is Associated with the Levels of Exhausted and Dysfunctional Phenotypes of Circulating CD161++TCR iVα7.2+ Mucosal-Associated Invariant T Cells in Chronic Hepatitis B Virus Infection

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yean K. Yong

    2018-03-01

    Full Text Available Mucosal-associated invariant T (MAIT cells, defined as CD161++TCR iVα7.2+ T cells, play an important role in the innate defense against bacterial infections, and their functionality is impaired in chronic viral infections. Here, we investigated the frequency and functional role of MAIT cells in chronic hepatitis B virus (HBV infection. The peripheral CD3+CD161++TCR iVα7.2+ MAIT cells in chronic HBV-infected patients and healthy controls were phenotypically characterized based on CD57, PD-1, TIM-3, and CTLA-4, as well as HLA-DR and CD38 expression. The frequency of MAIT cells was significantly decreased among chronic HBV-infected individuals as compared to controls. Expression of CD57, PD-1, CTLA-4, as well as HLA-DR and CD38 on MAIT cells was significantly elevated in chronic HBV-infected individuals relative to controls. The percentage of T cell receptor (TCR iVα7.2+ CD161+ MAIT cells did not correlate with HBV viral load but inversely with HLA-DR on CD4+ T cells and MAIT cells and with CD57 on CD8+ T cells suggesting that decrease of MAIT cells may not be attributed to direct infection by HBV but driven by HBV-induced chronic immune activation. The percentage and expression levels of PD-1 as well as CTLA-4 on MAIT cells inversely correlated with plasma HBV-DNA levels, which may suggest either a role for MAIT cells in the control of HBV infection or the effect of HBV replication in the liver on MAIT cell phenotype. We report that decrease of TCR iVα7.2+ MAIT cells in the peripheral blood and their functions were seemingly impaired in chronic HBV-infected patients likely because of the increased expression of PD-1.

  10. The Aerodynamic Characteristics in Pitch of a 1/15-Scale Model of the Grumman F11F-1 Airplane at Mach Numbers of 1.41, 1.61, and 2.01, TED No. NACA DE 390

    Science.gov (United States)

    Driver, Cornelius

    1956-01-01

    Tests have been made in the Langley 4- by 4-foot supersonic pressure tunnel at Mach numbers of 1.41, 1.61, and 2.01 to determine the static longitudinal stability and control characteristics of various arrangements of the Grumman F11F-1 airplane. Tests were made of the complete model and various combinations of its component parts and, in addition, the effects of various body modifications, a revised vertical tail, and wing fences on the longitudinal characteristics were determined. The results indicate that for a horizontal-tail incidence of -10 deg the trim lift coefficient varied from 0.29 at a Mach number of 1.61 to 0.23 at a Mach number of 2.01 with a corresponding decrease in lift-drag trim from 3.72 to 3.15. Stick-position instability was indicated in the low-supersonic-speed range. A photographic-type nose modification resulted in slightly higher values of minimum drag coefficient but did not significantly affect the static stability or lift-curve slope. The minimum drag coefficient for the complete model with the production nose remained essentially constant at 0.047 throughout the Mach number range investigated.

  11. China’s foreign policy towards Central and Eastern Europe: The “16+1” format in the South–South cooperation perspective. Cases of the Czech Republic and Hungary

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bartosz Kowalski

    2017-04-01

    Full Text Available This article discusses the “16+1” format initiated in 2012 as a platform for economic, trade, and cultural cooperation between Central and Eastern Europe (CEE and China. As Chinese authorities claim, the “16+1” initiative is complementary to the “New Silk Road” strategy, being a pragmatic formula without political goals, whose main rationale is to bring mutual benefits to all of its participants (win–win. However, despite the Chinese narratives concerning cooperation with the CEE countries as an economic bridgehead of the “One Road, One Belt” (OBOR initiative, some signs of the political dimension of the project can be noticed. Since at least the 1950s, active participation and promotion of the South–South cooperation has become an important component of China’s foreign relations. Although for Chinese policy makers Sino–South relations have been traditionally defined within the frame of, mostly postcolonial, developing countries of Southeast Asia, Central Asia, Africa, and Latin America, this article tries to examine the “South–South” pattern of China’s diplomacy towards Central and Eastern European states with a focus on the Czech Republic and Hungary.

  12. Meiotic and pedigree segregation analyses in carriers of t(4;8)(p16;p23.1) differing in localization of breakpoint positions at 4p subband 4p16.3 and 4p16.1.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Midro, Alina T; Zollino, Marcella; Wiland, Ewa; Panasiuk, Barbara; Iwanowski, Piotr S; Murdolo, Marina; Śmigiel, Robert; Sąsiadek, Maria; Pilch, Jacek; Kurpisz, Maciej

    2016-02-01

    The purpose of this study was to compare meiotic segregation in sperm cells from two carriers with t(4;8)(p16;p23.1) reciprocal chromosome translocations (RCTs), differing in localization of the breakpoint positions at the 4p subband-namely, 4p16.3 (carrier 1) and 4p16.1 (carrier 2)-and to compare data of the pedigree analyses performed by direct method. Three-color fluorescent in situ hybridization (FISH) on sperm cells and FISH mapping for the evaluation of the breakpoint positions, data from pedigrees, and direct segregation analysis of the pedigrees were performed. Similar proportions of normal/balanced and unbalanced sperm cells were found in both carriers. The most common was an alternate type of segregation (about 52 % and about 48 %, respectively). Unbalanced adjacent I and adjacent II karyotypes were found in similar proportions about 15 %. The direct segregation analysis (following Stengel-Rutkowski) of the pedigree of carriers of t(4;8)(p16.1;p23.1) was performed and results were compared with the data of the pedigree segregation analysis obtained earlier through the indirect method. The probability of live-born progeny with unbalanced karyotype for carriers of t(4;8)(p16.1;p23.1) was moderately high at 18.8 %-comparable to the value obtained using the indirect method for the same carriership, which was 12 %. This was, however, markedly lower than the value of 41.2 % obtained through the pedigree segregation indirect analysis estimated for carriers of t(4;8)(p16.3;p23.1), perhaps due to the unique composition of genes present within the 4p16.1-4p 16.3 region. Revealed differences in pedigree segregation analysis did not correspond to the very similar profile of meiotic segregation patterns presented by carrier 1 and carrier 2. Most probably, such discordances may be due to differences in embryo survival rates arising from different genetic backgrounds.

  13. Effects of the C161T polymorphism in the gene of peroxisome proliferators activated receptor γ on changes of plasma lipid and apolipoprotein ratios induced by a high carbohydrate diet in a healthy Chinese Han young population.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fan, Mei; Gong, Ren Rong; Lin, Jia; Jiang, Zhe; Li, Yuan Hao; Zhang, Rong Rong; Fang, Ding Zhi

    2014-01-01

    Changes in the ratios of plasma lipids and apolipoproteins may be associated with diets and the C161T polymorphism in the gene of peroxisome proliferators activated receptor gamma (PPARgamma). As a result, this study was to investigate the effects of this polymorphism on changes of the ratios induced by a high-carbohydrate (high-CHO) diet. After a washout diet of 54% carbohydrate for 7 days, 56 healthy young adults (22.89 +/- 1.80 years old) were given the high-CHO diet of 70% carbohydrate for 6 days. Height, weight, waist circumference (WC), glucose, triglyceride (TG), total cholesterol (TC), low-density lipoprotein cholesterol (LDL-C), high-density lipoprotein cholesterol (HDL-C), apolipoprotein (apo) AI, and apoB100 at baseline and before and after the high-CHO diet were measured. Body mass index (BMI), TG/HDL-C, log (TG/HDL-C), TC/HDL-C, LDL-C/HDL-C, and apoB100/apoAI were calculated. PPARgamma C161T was detected by a PCR-RFLP method. The relationship between the polymorphism and the ratios were analyzed. The female T carriers had higher BMI and WC than the female CC homozygotes at baseline and before and after the diet, higher glucose, TG/HDL-C and log (TG/HDL-C) before the diet. In males, when compared to the T carriers, the CC homozygotes had higher TG/HDL-C, log (TG/HDL-C) and apoB100/apoAI at baseline and before and after the diet, higher glucose at baseline, higher LDL-C/HDL-C and TC/HDL-C before and after the diet. Compared with those before the high-CHO diet, TC/HDL-C and LDL-C/HDL-C decreased after the diet regardless of gender and the genotypes. Decreased BMI and WC were observed in the male CC homozygotes but only decreased BMI in the female T carriers. Notably, decreased apoB100/apoAI was observed in the male T carriers, while elevated TG/HDL-C and log (TG/HDL-C) in the female CC homozygotes, and reduced glucose in the female T carriers. The results suggest that the interplay of gender, the PPARgamma C161T polymorphism and the high-CHO diet can

  14. DOE responses to the State of New Mexico's comments on ''summary of the results of the evaluation of the WIPP site and preliminary design validation program'' (WIPP-DOE-161)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1983-06-01

    During the 60-day period provided for comments on the ''Summary of the Results of the Evaluation of the WIPP Site and Preliminary Design Validation Program'' (WIPP-DOE-161), written submittals and hearing testimony from about 133 individuals, 7 citizens groups and 6 state agencies were received by the Department of Energy (DOE). Approximately 25% of the public comment submittals were positive statements supporting the WIPP, with the remaining 75% reflecting concern with one or more aspects of the project. A portion of the state's comment package (submitted by the Governor of New Mexico) contained concerns relevant to WIPP which were unrelated to site suitability. Supportive comments formed the majority of the submittals from the New Mexico Environmental Evaluation Group (EEG) which ''...is charged with the responsibility of evaluating the suitability of the site for carrying out the mission of WIPP by analyzing all the reports and other information which form the background to the DOE evaluation of the site''

  15. Photoemission and muon spin relaxation spectroscopy of the iron-based Rb0.77Fe1.61Se2 superconductor: Crucial role of the cigar-shaped Fermi surface

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maletz, J.; Zabolotnyy, V. B.; Evtushinsky, D. V.; Yaresko, A. N.; Kordyuk, A. A.; Shermadini, Z.; Luetkens, H.; Sedlak, K.; Khasanov, R.; Amato, A.; Krzton-Maziopa, A.; Conder, K.; Pomjakushina, E.; Klauss, H.-H.; Rienks, E. D. L.; Büchner, B.; Borisenko, S. V.

    2013-10-01

    In this study, we investigate the electronic and magnetic properties of Rb0.77Fe1.61Se2 (Tc = 32.6 K) in normal and superconducting states by means of photoemission and μSR spectroscopies as well as band-structure calculations. We demonstrate that the unusual behavior of these materials is the result of separation into metallic (˜12%) and insulating (˜88%) phases. Only the former becomes superconducting and has a usual electronic structure of electron-doped FeSe slabs. Our results thus imply that the antiferromagnetic insulating phase is just a by-product of Rb intercalation and its magnetic properties have no direct relation to the superconductivity. Instead, we find that also in this class of iron-based compounds, the key ingredient for superconductivity is a certain proximity of a Van Hove singularity to the Fermi level.

  16. Hafnium isotope ratios of nine GSJ reference samples

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hanyu, Takeshi; Nakai, Shun'ichi; Tatsuta, Riichiro

    2005-01-01

    176 Hf/ 177 Hf ratios of nine geochemical reference rocks from the Geological Survey of Japan, together with BIR-1 and BCR-2, were determined using multi-collector inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry. Our data for BIR-1, BCR-2 and JB-1 are in agreement with those previously reported, demonstrating the appropriateness of the chemical procedure and isotopic measurement employed in this study. The reference rocks have a wide range of 176 Hf/ 177 Hf covering the field defined by various volcanic rocks, such as mid-ocean ridge basalts, ocean island basalts, and subduction related volcanic rocks. They are therefore suitable as rock standards for Hf isotope measurement of geological samples. (author)

  17. Control of the hafnium content in Co samples by SSMS

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lukaszew, R.A.; Cretella, R.F.

    1989-01-01

    The production of 60 Co requires a strict control of the chemical composition of the cobalt before irradiation in order to avoid the activation of some undesirable elements and to constrain the presence of slow neutron poisons. A methodology by SSMS for the survey analysis of metallic Co prior to its irradiation in the nuclear reactor at Embalse (Cdba., Argentina) is described. The low detection limit attained for Hf (below 0.5 ppm) is outlined. The results obtained for some other impurities without a standard reference are compared with atomic emission spectrographic data and show satisfactory agreement. (orig.)

  18. Production of long-lived hafnium isomers in reactor irradiations

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Adam, Jindřich

    -, - (2006), s. 48-56 ISSN 1574-1818 R&D Projects: GA MŠk 1P04LA213 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z10480505 Keywords : production * Hf Subject RIV: BG - Nuclear, Atomic and Molecular Physics, Colliders

  19. Hafnium Isotopic Variations in Central Atlantic Intraplate Volcanism

    Science.gov (United States)

    Geldmacher, J.; Hanan, B. B.; Hoernle, K.; Blichert-Toft, J.

    2008-12-01

    Although one of the geochemically best investigated volcanic regions on Earth, almost no Hf isotopic data have been published from the broad belt of intraplate seamounts and islands in the East Atlantic between 25° and 36° N. This study presents 176Hf/177Hf ratios from 61 representative samples from the Canary, Selvagen and Madeira Islands and nearby large seamounts, encompassing the full range of different evolutionary stages and geochemical endmembers. The majority of samples have mafic, mainly basaltic compositions with Mg-numbers within or near the range of magmas in equilibrium with mantle olivine (68-75). No correlation was found between Mg-number and 176Hf/177Hf ratios in the data set. In comparison to observed Nd isotope variations published for this volcanic province (6 ɛNd units), 176Hf/177Hf ratios span a larger range (14 ɛHf units). Samples from the Madeira archipelago have the most radiogenic compositions (176Hf/177Hfm= 0.283132-0.283335), widely overlapping the field for central Atlantic N-MORB. They form a relatively narrow, elongated trend (stretching over >6 ɛHf units) between a radiogenic MORB-like endmember and a composition located on the Nd-Hf mantle array. In contrast, all Canary Islands samples plot below the mantle array (176Hf/177Hfm = 0.282943-0.283067) and, despite being from an archipelago that stretches over a much larger geographic area, form a much denser cluster with less compositional variation (~4 ɛHf units). All samples from the seamounts NE of the Canaries, proposed to belong to the same Canary hotspot track (e.g. Geldmacher et al., 2001, JVGR 111; Geldmacher et al., 2005, EPSL 237), fall within the Hf isotopic range of this cluster. The cluster largely overlaps the composition of the proposed common mantle endmember 'C' (Hanan and Graham, 1996, Science 272) but spans a space between a more radiogenic (depleted) composition and a HIMU-type endmember. Although samples of Seine and Unicorn seamounts, attributed to the Madeira hotspot track, show less radiogenic Hf and Nd isotope ratios than Madeira, their isotopic compositions lie along an extension of the Madeira trend in plots of Hf versus Sr, Nd, Pb isotopes. The new Hf isotope ratios confirm the existence of at least two geochemically distinct volcanic provinces (Canary and Madeira) in the East Atlantic as previously proposed.

  20. Electric field cycling behavior of ferroelectric hafnium oxide.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schenk, Tony; Schroeder, Uwe; Pešić, Milan; Popovici, Mihaela; Pershin, Yuriy V; Mikolajick, Thomas

    2014-11-26

    HfO2 based ferroelectrics are lead-free, simple binary oxides with nonperovskite structure and low permittivity. They just recently started attracting attention of theoretical groups in the fields of ferroelectric memories and electrostatic supercapacitors. A modified approach of harmonic analysis is introduced for temperature-dependent studies of the field cycling behavior and the underlying defect mechanisms. Activation energies for wake-up and fatigue are extracted. Notably, all values are about 100 meV, which is 1 order of magnitude lower than for conventional ferroelectrics like lead zirconate titanate (PZT). This difference is mainly atttributed to the one to two orders of magnitude higher electric fields used for cycling and to the different surface to volume ratios between the 10 nm thin films in this study and the bulk samples of former measurements or simulations. Moreover, a new, analog-like split-up effect of switching peaks by field cycling is discovered and is explained by a network model based on memcapacitive behavior as a result of defect redistribution.

  1. Elastic and Thermodynamic Properties of Zirconium and Hafnium ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    65

    Here Rh3V is chosen as the parent binary compound and the doping ..... Grüneisen parameter ζ [44] are two key quantities in solid state problems due to their .... The authors wish to thank DRDO (ER & IPR), New Delhi for the financial support.

  2. Electronic structure of hafnium: A Compton profile study

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    To extract the true Compton profile from the raw data, the raw data were cor- rected for ... For the present sample and experimental conditions, the contribution of .... are in better agreement with the simple renormalized free atom calculations for.

  3. Hafnium(IV) complexation with oxalate at variable temperatures

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Friend, Mitchell T.; Wall, Nathalie A. [Washington State Univ., Pullmanm, WA (United States). Dept. of Chemistry

    2017-08-01

    Appropriate management of fission products in the reprocessing of spent nuclear fuel (SNF) is crucial in developing advanced reprocessing schemes. The addition of aqueous phase complexing agents can prevent the co-extraction of these fission products. A solvent extraction technique was used to study the complexation of Hf(IV) - an analog to fission product Zr(IV) - with oxalate at 15, 25, and 35 C in 1 M HClO{sub 4} utilizing a {sup 175+181}Hf radiotracer. The mechanism of the solvent extraction system of 10{sup -5} M Hf(IV) in 1 M HClO{sub 4} to thenoyltrifluoroacetone (TTA) in toluene demonstrated a 4{sup th}-power dependence in both TTA and H{sup +}, with Hf(TTA){sub 4} the only extractable species. The equilibrium constant for the extraction of Hf(TTA){sub 4} was determined to be log K{sub ex}=7.67±0.07 (25±1 C, 1 M HClO{sub 4}). The addition of oxalate to the aqueous phase decreased the distribution ratio, indicating aqueous Hf(IV)-oxalate complex formation. Polynomial fits to the distribution data identified the formation of Hf(ox){sup 2+} and Hf(ox){sub 2(aq)} and their stability constants were measured at 15, 25, and 35 C in 1 M HClO{sub 4}. van't Hoff analysis was used to calculate Δ{sub r}G, Δ{sub r}H, and Δ{sub r}S for these species. Stability constants were observed to increase at higher temperature, an indication that Hf(IV)-oxalate complexation is endothermic and driven by entropy.

  4. Iron(3) chloride interaction with zirconium and hafnium tetrahalides

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Berdonosov, S.; Kharisov, B.I.; Melikhov, I.V.

    1988-01-01

    Using FeCl 3 , labelled with 36 Cl radionuclide, it is shown, that during reaction between FeCl 3 and MCl (M=Zr, Hf) resulting in Cl 2 splitting-off and FeMCl 6 formation, chlorine is splitted from MCl 4 . From the analysis of Moessbauer spectra and visual observations it follows, that reaction between FeCl 3 and MBr 4 starts at 50 deg C temperature, whereupon bromine and FeMCl 3 Br 3 compounds are formed. Considerations about the possible mechanism of reactions between FeCl 3 and MCl 4 or MBr 4 are proposed

  5. Cesium hafnium chloride scintillator coupled with an avalanche photodiode photodetector

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Kurosawa, S.; Kodama, S.; Yokota, Y.; Horiai, T.; Yamaji, A.; Shoji, Y.; Král, Robert; Pejchal, Jan; Ohashi, Y.; Kamada, K.; Nikl, Martin; Yoshikawa, A.

    2017-01-01

    Roč. 12, Feb (2017), s. 1-8, č. článku C02042. ISSN 1748-0221 Grant - others:AV ČR(CZ) JSPS-17-18 Program:Bilaterální spolupráce Institutional support: RVO:68378271 Keywords : gamma detectors * scintillators and scintillating fibres * scintillators * scintillation and light emission processes Subject RIV: BM - Solid Matter Physics ; Magnetism OBOR OECD: Condensed matter physics (including formerly solid state physics, supercond.) Impact factor: 1.220, year: 2016

  6. Spectroscopy of very neutron-deficient hafnium and tungsten isotopes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dracoulis, G D; Fabricius, B; Davidson, P M [Australian National Univ., Canberra, ACT (Australia). Dept. of Nuclear Physics; Macchiavelli, A O; Oliviera, J; Burde, J; Stephens, F; Deleplanque, M A [Lawrence Berkeley Lab., CA (United States)

    1992-08-01

    Level schemes of the very neutron-deficient isotopes {sup 158}Hf and {sup 162}W have been identified, and that for {sup 164}W extended. Alignment of the H{sub 9/2} neutrons is suggested. (author). 12 refs., 7 figs.

  7. Neutron Detection Utilizing Gadolinium Doped Hafnium Oxide Films

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Blasy, Bryan D

    2008-01-01

    ... retains monoclinic local symmetery for all levels of doping. Current as a function of voltage experiments identified the films as having poor diode characteristics with high leakage current in the forward bias region...

  8. Crystal structures of superconducting sodium intercalates of hafnium nitride chloride

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Oro-Sole, J.; Frontera, C.; Beltran-Porter, D.; Lebedev, O.I.; Van Tendeloo, G.; Fuertes, A.

    2006-01-01

    Sodium intercalation compounds of HfNCl have been prepared at room temperature in naphtyl sodium solutions in tetrahydrofuran and their crystal structure has been investigated by Rietveld refinement using X-ray powder diffraction data and high-resolution electron microscopy. The structure of two intercalates with space group R3-bar m and lattice parameters a=3.58131(6)A, c=57.752(6)A, and a=3.58791(8)A, c=29.6785(17)A is reported, corresponding to the stages 2 and 1, respectively, of Na x HfNCl. For the stage 2 phase an ordered model is presented, showing two crystallographically independent [HfNCl] units with an alternation of the Hf-Hf interlayer distance along the c-axis, according with the occupation by sodium atoms of one out of two van der Waals gaps. Both stages 1 and 2 phases are superconducting with critical temperatures between 20 and 24K, they coexist in different samples with proportions depending on the synthesis conditions, and show a variation in c spacing that can be correlated with the sodium stoichiometry. High-resolution electron microscopy images of the host and intercalated samples show bending of the HfNCl bilayers as well as stacking faults in some regions, which coexist in the same crystal with ordered domains

  9. Elastic and thermodynamic properties of zirconium- and hafnium ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    2018-02-02

    Feb 2, 2018 ... ties. The volume optimization curves (both LDA and GGA) for binary Rh3V, Rh3Zr and Rh3Hf compounds are shown in ... the strength of covalent bonding of the given material. ..... Bulk modulus is correlated with binding energy or cohesive energy of atoms, since it is a measure of average atomic bond.

  10. Delitos que Vulneran la Intimidad de las Personas: Análisis crítico del artículo 161-A del Código Penal Chileno

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Regina Ingrid Díaz Tolosa

    2007-01-01

    Full Text Available El artículo 161-A del Código Penal chileno es una muestra de los resultados que se obtienen al legislar materias tan importantes, como lo es la protección penal de la intimidad de las personas, de forma acelerada. La norma en análisis resiste innumerables críticas; su redacción es confusa e imprecisa, lo que conlleva arduas tareas de interpretación. Este trabajo pretende contribuir en esta labor, reflexionando acerca de puntuales problemas asociados a la tipificación de los delitos recogidos en la citada disposición, así respecto al inciso primero se analiza, especialmente, si se penaliza la indiscreción o deslealtad en las comunicaciones y actuaciones privadas, mientras que en cuanto al inciso segundo se medita acerca de si se exige el conocimiento de la obtención subrepticia del material por parte de quien lo difunde. Además, se destaca la necesaria interpretación restrictiva de estos tipos, se analiza el interés público como fundamento de la autorización legal o judicial para ejecutar las conductas tipificadas, y de ¡egeferendae, se indican las ventajas que tendría introducir un elemento subjetivo del tipo distinto del dolo como la finalidad de vulnerar ¡a intimidad de otro, a fin de salvar las incertidumbres que existen en la actual legislaciónThe article 161-A of the Chilean Penal Code is a sample of the results that are obtained when so important matters, like the penal protection of the privacy, are legislated precipitately. The norm in analysis resists innumerable critiques; its draft is confused and vague, giving us an arduous interpretation work. This paper tries to contribute in this analysis, thinking over punctual problems, for example, regarding to the first clause we studied, specially, if the indiscretion or disloyalty is penalized in the communications and private performances, while as for the second clause it is pondered if who diffuse the information must to know about that it was obtained illegally

  11. Moessbauer effect study of hyperfine interaction of /sup 161/Dy and /sup 151/Eu in tungsten bronzes Dysub(0. 18) WO/sub 3/ and Eusub(0. 18) WO/sub 3/

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kisynska, K

    1979-01-01

    The Moessbauer technique was used to investigate the hyperfine interaction of /sup 161/Dy and /sup 151/Eu in cubic rare earth tungsten bronzes: Dysub(0.18)WO/sub 3/ and Eusub(0.18)WO/sub 3/. Well resolved hfs spectrum was obtained at 4.2 K for Dysub(0.18)WO/sub 3/. The effective hf field approximation sufficed to interpret the spectrum. The obtained hyperfine interaction parameters were: -g/sub 0/..beta..sub(N)Hsub(eff)=(805+-19) Mc/s and e/sup 2/qQ/sub 0//4 = (506+-56) Mc/s. These results imply that ground doublet of Dy/sup +3/ ion in bronze is a Kramers doublet Vertical Bar+-15/2> with asymmetrical hyperfine tensor Asub(z) non equal to 0, Asub(x) = Asub(y) = 0 and that local crystalline field at RE metal in tungsten bronze at 4.2 K cannot be cubic. From ME absorption spectra of Eusub(0.18)WO/sub 3/ taken at 4.2 K, 78 K and 300 K the values of quadrupole interaction constants for bronze lattice and its temperature dependence were obtained. These data indicate that a phase transition from the high temperature ideal perovskite structure to a distorted one occurs in RE bronzes and that the distortion concerns the nearest tungsten-oxygen environment of RE ion.

  12. 4p16.1-p15.31 duplication and 4p terminal deletion in a 3-years old Chinese girl: Array-CGH, genotype-phenotype and neurological characterization.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Piccione, Maria; Salzano, Emanuela; Vecchio, Davide; Ferrara, Dante; Malacarne, Michela; Pierluigi, Mauro; Ferrara, Ines; Corsello, Giovanni

    2015-07-01

    Microscopically chromosome rearrangements of the short arm of chromosome 4 include the two known clinical entities: partial trisomy 4p and deletions of the Wolf-Hirschhorn critical regions 1 and 2 (WHSCR-1 and WHSCR-2, respectively), which cause cranio-facial anomalies, congenital malformations and developmental delay/intellectual disability. We report on clinical findings detected in a Chinese patient with a de novo 4p16.1-p15.32 duplication in association with a subtle 4p terminal deletion of 6 Mb in size. This unusual chromosome imbalance resulted in WHS classical phenotype, while clinical manifestations of 4p trisomy were practically absent. This observation suggests the hypothesis that haploinsufficiency of sensitive dosage genes with regulatory function placed in WHS critical region, is more pathogenic than concomitant 4p duplicated segment. Additionally clinical findings in our patient confirm a variable penetrance of major malformations and neurological features in Chinese children despite of WHS critical region's deletion. Copyright © 2015 European Paediatric Neurology Society. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  13. Practice Bulletin No. 161: External Cephalic Version.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2016-02-01

    In the United States, there is a widespread belief that the overall cesarean delivery rate is higher than necessary. Efforts are being directed toward decreasing the number of these procedures, in part by encouraging physicians to make changes in their management practices. Because breech presentations are associated with a high rate of cesarean delivery, there is renewed interest in techniques such as external cephalic version (ECV) and vaginal breech delivery. The purpose of this document is to provide information about ECV by summarizing the relevant evidence presented in published studies and to make recommendations regarding its use in obstetric practice.

  14. 21 CFR 16.1 - Scope.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ....440(e) relating to the retention, recall, and destruction of human cells, tissues, and cellular and... a determination that a device is subject to a repair, replacement, or refund order or that a... standard or has a defect. § 1004.6, relating to plan for repurchase, repair, or replacement of an...

  15. 29 CFR 1952.161 - Developmental schedule.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... standards—July 1973. (e) Development of training program for employers and employees—October 1974. (f) Complete hiring of additional staff—April 1975. (g) Basic training of staff—May 1975. (h) Development of approved Manual MIS—July 1972. (i) Commencement of compliance activities—July 1972. (j) Development of...

  16. 40 CFR 82.161 - Technician certification.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... shall address the subject areas listed in appendix D. (c) Program Approval. Persons may seek approval of... the closed-book certification exam, within 30 days. Programs providing Type I certification using the... percent or higher on the certification exam, no later than 30 days after the program has received the exam...

  17. 7 CFR 932.161 - Reports.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    ... a form provided by the committee, for each week (Sunday through Saturday, or such other 7-day period...; (5) acidified; (6) Spanish olives; (7) Sicilian style olives; (8) Greek style olives; (9) olive oil...

  18. 40 CFR 417.161 - Specialized definitions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... line to maintain minimal product quality. (f) The term BOD7 shall mean the biochemical oxygen demand as... apply to this subpart. (b) The term anhydrous product shall mean the theoretical product that would result if all water were removed from the actual product. (c) The term surfactant shall mean those...

  19. Reference: 161 [Arabidopsis Phenome Database[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available ids, based on thin layer chromatography. The identity of the Ala, Asp, Phe, and T...rp conjugates was verified by gas chromatography-mass spectrometry. Insertional mutations in GH3.1, GH3.2, G

  20. Publications | Page 161 | IDRC - International Development ...

    International Development Research Centre (IDRC) Digital Library (Canada)

    The direction of healthcare service development, particularly at the. ... distance education : sub-project 6; quality assurance models, standards and key performance ... disaster response flood management and recovery, and whether the flood.

  1. 7 CFR 400.161 - Definitions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    ...) Annual Statutory Financial Statement means the annual financial statement of an insurer prepared in accordance with Statutory Accounting Principles and submitted to the state insurance department if required... statement of an insurer prepared in accordance with Statutory Accounting Principles and submitted to the...

  2. 40 CFR 63.161 - Definitions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... process; and/or transformed by chemical reaction into materials that are not organic hazardous air... good engineering judgement and standards, such as ANSI B31-3. In food/medical service means that a... meet written specifications, (2) An exothermic reaction which is a safety hazard, (3) The intended...

  3. Search Results | Page 161 | IDRC - International Development ...

    International Development Research Centre (IDRC) Digital Library (Canada)

    ... Apply Morocco filter · Thailand 35 Apply Thailand filter · Guatemala 33 Apply Guatemala filter .... ICTs for Micro, Small and Medium Enterprise Development in Egypt ... to craft policies for fruitful integration into the global economy and inclusive growth. ... However, poverty is still widespread and the government admits that ...

  4. 40 CFR 61.161 - Definitions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... conditioned to produce molten glass. The unit includes foundations, superstructure and retaining walls, raw... aerosols. Malfunction means any sudden failure of air pollution control equipment or process equipment or... melted by indirect heating. The openings of the vessels are in the outside wall of the furnace and are...

  5. 32_155 - 161_BIO 083 Magashi

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    userpc

    the constituents of volatile matter, long cha branched chain ... drugs have been isolated from natural sourc notably from plant ... retention time (RT), molecular formular, molecular weight .... Agilent. Technology) at Chemistry Department, Bayero.

  6. 21 CFR 161.190 - Canned tuna.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    .... (a) Identity. (1) Canned tuna is the food consisting of processed flesh of fish of the species... deemed to be safe if it is not a food additive as defined in section 201(s) of the Federal Food, Drug, and Cosmetic Act (the act), or if it is a food additive as so defined, it is used in conformity with...

  7. 21 CFR 161.145 - Canned oysters.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... evenly over the meshes of a circular sieve which has been previously weighed. The diameter of the sieve... such quantity is 3 pounds or more. The bottom of the sieve is woven-wire cloth that complies with the specifications for such cloth set forth under “2.38 mm (No. 8)” in “Official Methods of Analysis of the...

  8. 40 CFR 161.20 - Overview.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    .... (1) The primary purpose of this part is to specify the types and minimum amounts of data and...)(7). (2) This part also specifies the types and minimum amounts of data and information the Agency...) Finally, this part specifies the types and minimum amounts of data and information that an applicant for...

  9. Vegetation - Suisun Marsh 2000 [ds161

    Data.gov (United States)

    California Natural Resource Agency — This vegetation mapping project of Suisun Marsh blends ground-based classification, aerial photo interpretation, and GIS editing and processing. The method is based...

  10. 161 Teachers' Continuing Professional Development as Correlates ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    User

    development on universal basic education in Bayelsa State, Nigeria. Using descriptive ... constitutes an enduring career development process which is very crucial in the overall .... affect their roles and their student's production. Accordingly ...

  11. Clean Cities Now Vol. 16.1

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    None

    2012-05-01

    Biannual newsletter for the U.S. Department of Energy's Clean Cities initiative. The newsletter includes feature stories on advanced vehicle deployment, idle reduction, and articles on Clean Cities coalition successes across the country.

  12. El procedimiento de impugnación de disposiciones y resoluciones autonómicas sin rango de ley previsto en el artículo 161.2 CE y en el Título V de la LOTC

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Joan Lluís Pérez Francesch

    2008-01-01

    Full Text Available El objeto del presente trabajo es estudiar el procedimiento de impugnación de disposiciones y resoluciones autonómicas, regulado en el Título V de la LOTC, en desarrollo del art. 161.2 CE. En dicho proceso, el Gobierno goza de la legitimación activa para impugnar cualquier actividad infralegal, normativa o no, de una Comunidad Autónoma, por motivo de una inconstitucionalidad no competencial. Se trata de una impugnación residual de otros procedimientos, como el recurso de inconstitucionalidad o los conflictos positivos de competencia, todos en manos del Gobierno para activarlos. Este ostenta, así, importantes instrumentos para frenar la actividad de las Comunidades Autónomas en su integridad, en una asimetría procesal que dota a los órganos centrales de unos poderes «preventivos» no imprescindibles. De esta manera, se manifiesta una concepción de la organización territorial del Estado español, no deferente con las Comunidades Autónomas. El desarrollo extensivo que se ha realizado del art. 161.2 CE, asignándose al Gobierno central un papel prepotente y asimétrico respecto de los órgano autonómicos, se estudia desde la perspectiva técnico-jurídica del procedimiento jurisdiccional concretado en el Título V de la LOTC y desde el trasfondo político del mismo, que tiene su máxima expresión en el auto que inadmite la impugnación contra el «Plan Ibarretxe » (Auto 135/2004, de 20 de abril. Se estudian todos los casos—realmente variados—en los que se ha realizado una impugnación al amparo del Título V de la LOTC, en los que, sin embargo, destaca la capacidad para suspender la disposición o resolución autonómica por el sólo hecho de iniciarse el procedimiento. Este efecto suspensivo inmediato le aleja de la figura de la medida cautelar. Por otro lado, la impugnación de disposiciones sin rango de ley y de resoluciones, disposiciones o actos autonómicos tiene su campo de acción en el seno de la jurisdicci

  13. Propuesta de acciones que incrementen la incorporación de los adultos mayores al Club de Abuelos del Consultorio Médico161 del Policlínico Raúl Sánchez

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Daniel Labrador Labrador

    2009-12-01

    Full Text Available La realización de este trabajo tiene como propósito lograr un acercamiento a un grupo poblacional que en estos momentos constituye uno de los más numerosos en nuestro país, el adulto mayor. En el trabajo se analizó la situación de salud de la población del consultorio médico161 perteneciente al área de salud del Policlínico Docente Comunitario Raúl Sánchez en Pinar Del Río..Nos posibilitó acercarnos a la realidad social de nuestro entorno, aportando un enriquecimiento espiritual al profundizar en el estudio de las conductas y de poder cooperar para erradicarlas y así modificar estilos de vida y hacer de nuestro medio social un espacio seguro. A través de métodos empíricos se realizó el acercamiento a la población, identificando las causas de uno de los principales problemas de la comunidad (la falta de incorporación de los adultos mayores al círculo de abuelos a través de lluvia de ideas se elaboró un plan de acción con participación intersectorial y comunitaria con el objetivo de que este problema dejara de ser uno de los principales de esta comunidad en el no solo se realizarán actividades físicas también otras donde estarán involucrados en su desarrollo médico, enfermera, representantes comunitarios apoyando al técnico de cultura física que se desempeña en ese consultorio.

  14. Quantitative imaging by pixel-based contrast-enhanced ultrasound reveals a linear relationship between synovial vascular perfusion and the recruitment of pathogenic IL-17A-F+IL-23+ CD161+ CD4+ T helper cells in psoriatic arthritis joints.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fiocco, Ugo; Stramare, Roberto; Martini, Veronica; Coran, Alessandro; Caso, Francesco; Costa, Luisa; Felicetti, Mara; Rizzo, Gaia; Tonietto, Matteo; Scanu, Anna; Oliviero, Francesca; Raffeiner, Bernd; Vezzù, Maristella; Lunardi, Francesca; Scarpa, Raffaele; Sacerdoti, David; Rubaltelli, Leopoldo; Punzi, Leonardo; Doria, Andrea; Grisan, Enrico

    2017-02-01

    To develop quantitative imaging biomarkers of synovial tissue perfusion by pixel-based contrast-enhanced ultrasound (CEUS), we studied the relationship between CEUS synovial vascular perfusion and the frequencies of pathogenic T helper (Th)-17 cells in psoriatic arthritis (PsA) joints. Eight consecutive patients with PsA were enrolled in this study. Gray scale CEUS evaluation was performed on the same joint immediately after joint aspiration, by automatic assessment perfusion data, using a new quantification approach of pixel-based analysis and the gamma-variate model. The set of perfusional parameters considered by the time intensity curve includes the maximum value (peak) of the signal intensity curve, the blood volume index or area under the curve, (BVI, AUC) and the contrast mean transit time (MTT). The direct ex vivo analysis of the frequencies of SF IL17A-F + CD161 + IL23 + CD4 + T cells subsets were quantified by fluorescence-activated cell sorter (FACS). In cross-sectional analyses, when tested for multiple comparison setting, a false discovery rate at 10%, a common pattern of correlations between CEUS Peak, AUC (BVI) and MTT parameters with the IL17A-F + IL23 + - IL17A-F + CD161 + - and IL17A-F + CD161 + IL23 + CD4 + T cells subsets, as well as lack of correlation between both peak and AUC values and both CD4 + T and CD4 + IL23 + T cells, was observed. The pixel-based CEUS assessment is a truly measure synovial inflammation, as a useful tool to develop quantitative imaging biomarker for monitoring target therapeutics in PsA.

  15. Short communication an interferon-γ ELISPOT assay with two cytotoxic T cell epitopes derived from HTLV-1 tax region 161-233 discriminates HTLV-1-associated myelopathy/tropical spastic paraparesis patients from asymptomatic HTLV-1 carriers in a Peruvian population.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Best, Ivan; López, Giovanni; Talledo, Michael; MacNamara, Aidan; Verdonck, Kristien; González, Elsa; Tipismana, Martín; Asquith, Becca; Gotuzzo, Eduardo; Vanham, Guido; Clark, Daniel

    2011-11-01

    HTLV-1-associated myelopathy/tropical spastic paraparesis (HAM/TSP) is a chronic and progressive disorder caused by the human T-lymphotropic virus type 1 (HTLV-1). In HTLV-1 infection, a strong cytotoxic T cell (CTL) response is mounted against the immunodominant protein Tax. Previous studies carried out by our group reported that increased IFN-γ enzyme-linked immunospot (ELISPOT) responses against the region spanning amino acids 161 to 233 of the Tax protein were associated with HAM/TSP and increased HTLV-1 proviral load (PVL). An exploratory study was conducted on 16 subjects with HAM/TSP, 13 asymptomatic carriers (AC), and 10 HTLV-1-seronegative controls (SC) to map the HAM/TSP-associated CTL epitopes within Tax region 161-233. The PVL of the infected subjects was determined and the specific CTL response was evaluated with a 6-h incubation IFN-γ ELISPOT assay using peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMCs) stimulated with 16 individual overlapping peptides covering the Tax region 161-233. Other proinflammatory and Th1/Th2 cytokines were also quantified in the supernatants by a flow cytometry multiplex assay. In addition, a set of human leukocyte antigen (HLA) class I alleles that bind with high affinity to the CTL epitopes of interest was determined using computational tools. Univariate analyses identified an association between ELISPOT responses to two new CTL epitopes, Tax 173-185 and Tax 181-193, and the presence of HAM/TSP as well as an increased PVL. The HLA-A*6801 allele, which is predicted to bind to the Tax 181-193 peptide, was overpresented in the HAM/TSP patients tested.

  16. Results of an investigation to determine local flow characteristics at the air data probe locations using an 0.030-scale model (45-0) of the space shuttle vehicle orbiter configuration 140A/B (modified) in the NASA Ames Research Center unitary plan wind tunnel (OA161, A, B, C), volume 1

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nichols, M. E.

    1976-01-01

    Results are presented of wind tunnel test 0A161 of a 0.030-scale model 45-0 of the configuration 140A/B (modified) space shuttle vehicle orbiter in the NASA Ames Research Center Unitary Plan Wind Tunnel facilities. The purpose of this test was to determine local total and static pressure environments for the air data probe locations and relative effectiveness of alternate flight-test probe configurations. Testing was done in the Mach number range from 0.30 to 3.5. Angle of attack was varied from -8 to 25 degrees while sideslip varied between -8 and 8 degrees.

  17. Separation of magnesium from magnesium chloride and zirconium and/or hafnium subchlorides in the production of zirconium and/or hafnium sponge metal

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Abodishish, H.A.M.; Adams, R.J.; Kearl, S.R.

    1992-01-01

    This patent describes the producing of a refractory metal wherein a sponge refractory metal is produced as an intermediate product by the use of magnesium with the incidental production of magnesium chloride, and wherein residual magnesium is separated from the magnesium chloride and from refractory metal to a vacuum distillation step which fractionally distills the magnesium, the magnesium chloride, and the metal sub-chlorides; the steps of: recovering fractionally distilled vapors of magnesium chloride and metal sub-chlorides from a sponge refractory metal; separately condensing the vapors as separately recovered; and recycling the separately recovered magnesium at a purity of at least about 96%

  18. Combining results of two GC separations partly achieves determination of all cis and trans 16:1, 18:1, 18:2 and 18:3 except CLA isomers of milk fat as demonstrated using Ag-ion SPE fractionation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kramer, John K G; Hernandez, Marta; Cruz-Hernandez, Cristina; Kraft, Jana; Dugan, Michael E R

    2008-03-01

    Milk fat is a complex mixture of geometric and positional isomers of monounsaturated and polyunsaturated, including short-, long- and branch-chain fatty acids (FAs). There has been partial success to resolve this mixture of FAs using different GC temperature programs, or a combination of GC isothermal and temperature programs. To overcome the problem associated with overlapping isomers prior silver-ion separation was recommended. However, this procedure is time consuming and not practical for routine analysis. In addition, previous methods focused mainly on the trans and cis isomers of 18:1. The present method takes advantage of differences in the relative elution times between different types of FAs. The method involved analyzing each milk fat using the same highly polar 100-m capillary column and GC instrument, and conducting two separations using temperature programs that plateau at 175 and 150 degrees C. The relative shift among the geometric and positional isomers at these two temperature settings was enough to permit identification of most of the trans and cis 16:1, 18:1 and 20:1, the c/t-18:2 and the c/c/t-18:3 isomers found in milk fat. The identity of these FAs was confirmed by prior separation of the total fatty acid methyl esters (FAMEs) of milk fat using Ag(+)-SPE columns, and comparing the fractions to the total milk fat. The Ag(+)-SPE technique was modified to obtain pure saturated, trans- and cis-monounsaturated and diunsaturated FAMEs. By combining the results from these two separate GC analyses, knowing the elution order, it was possible to determine most of the geometric and positional isomers of 16:1, 18:1, 20:1, 18:2 and 18:3 without a prior silver-ion separation. Only few minor FAs could not be resolved, notable the conjugated linoleic acid isomers that still required the complimentary Ag(+)-HPLC separation. The two GC temperature programs have been successfully used to routinely analyze most FA isomers in total milk and beef fats in about 200

  19. 161 EVALUATION OF ON-SHORE OIL SPILL REMEDIATION ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    EVALUATION OF ON-SHORE OIL SPILL REMEDIATION OPERATIONS IN. PORT HARCOURT ... study is an attempt to unravel the effectiveness of clean-up exercises undertaken by oil .... Research Design. The study ..... remediation as well as tilling and evacuation of affected soils would certainly be more productive.

  20. 40 CFR 161.640 - Product performance data requirements.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... or indirectly transmit diseases to humans. However, each registrant must ensure through testing that... microbial pests associated with human and animal wastes (1) CR EP* 91-7 Products for treating water systems...

  1. Practice Bulletin No. 161 Summary: External Cephalic Version.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2016-02-01

    In the United States, there is a widespread belief that the overall cesarean delivery rate is higher than necessary. Efforts are being directed toward decreasing the number of these procedures, in part by encouraging physicians to make changes in their management practices. Because breech presentations are associated with a high rate of cesarean delivery, there is renewed interest in techniques such as external cephalic version (ECV) and vaginal breech delivery. The purpose of this document is to provide information about ECV by summarizing the relevant evidence presented in published studies and to make recommendations regarding its use in obstetric practice.

  2. 7 CFR 966.161 - Reapportionment of Committee Membership.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    ... MARKETING SERVICE (Marketing Agreements and Orders; Fruits, Vegetables, Nuts), DEPARTMENT OF AGRICULTURE... alternates. (c) District 3—four members and their alternates. (d) District 4—four members and their...

  3. 40 CFR 161.590 - Nontarget insect data requirements.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... pollinators (4) CR CR CR CR CR CR TEP TEP 141-5 Nontarget insect testing—aquatic insects Acute toxicity to aquatic insects (5) 142-1 Aquatic insect life-cycle study (5) 142-1 Simulated or actual field testing for aquatic insects (5) 142-3 Nontarget insect testing—predators and parasites (5) 143-1thru 143-3 Key: CR...

  4. People’s Republic of China Scientific Abstracts No. 161.

    Science.gov (United States)

    1977-01-21

    campanumaea pilosula 0.5 oz., polygonatum canaliculatum 0.5 oz., soutellaria indica 1 oz., curcumin 0.5 oz., paeonia ruba 0.5 oz. Additional...congregation, increase fibrinogen solubility , prevention of platelet congregation in the small vessels of the myocardium and injury to the myocardium. 17

  5. Publications | Page 161 | CRDI - Centre de recherches pour le ...

    International Development Research Centre (IDRC) Digital Library (Canada)

    African Youth on the Information Highway : Participation and Leadership in ... le marché : Réflexions à la croisée de la science, de la religion et du développement ... Modern and Traditional Irrigation Technologies in the Eastern Mediterranean.

  6. 40 CFR 161.167 - Discussion of formation of impurities.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... present in his product at any time before use at a level equal to or greater than 0.1 percent (1000 ppm... at any time before use at a level equal to or greater than 0.1 percent (1000 ppm) by weight of the...) PESTICIDE PROGRAMS DATA REQUIREMENTS FOR REGISTRATION OF ANTIMICROBIAL PESTICIDES Product Chemistry Data...

  7. Modular forms and special cycles on Shimura curves (AM-161)

    CERN Document Server

    Kudla, Stephen S; Yang, Tonghai

    2006-01-01

    Modular Forms and Special Cycles on Shimura Curves is a thorough study of the generating functions constructed from special cycles, both divisors and zero-cycles, on the arithmetic surface ""M"" attached to a Shimura curve ""M"" over the field of rational numbers. These generating functions are shown to be the q-expansions of modular forms and Siegel modular forms of genus two respectively, valued in the Gillet-Soulé arithmetic Chow groups of ""M"". The two types of generating functions are related via an arithmetic inner product formula. In addition, an analogue of the classical Siegel-Weil

  8. 40 CFR 161.240 - Residue chemistry data requirements.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    .../feed (5), (14) [CR] [CR] [CR] [CR] EP EP 171-4 Meat/milk/poultry/eggs (6), (14) [CR] [CR] [CR] [CR... food/feed are required when detectable residues could concentrate on processing and thus require establishment of a food additive tolerance. (6) Livestock feeding studies are required whenever a pesticide...

  9. 40 CFR 51.161 - Public availability of information.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... REQUIREMENTS FOR PREPARATION, ADOPTION, AND SUBMITTAL OF IMPLEMENTATION PLANS Review of New Sources and... advertisement in the area affected of the location of the source information and analysis specified in paragraph... would conflict with existing requirements for acting on requests for permission to construct or modify...

  10. What we do | Page 161 | IDRC - International Development ...

    International Development Research Centre (IDRC) Digital Library (Canada)

    The burden of disease caused by smoking, and the medical and social costs ... health, social, environmental and economic consequences of tobacco consumption and ... Eastern Africa has experienced more than its fair share of violent conflict ...

  11. Dicty_cDB: CHJ161 [Dicty_cDB

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available *tttxrslfikmptkt*m*i** sw*kmlckdsl**sl*frlw*rf*m*n*t*wfkmlcpfrkttpxxt*km**emptrp*m* s*stwkrmlrccp*tttkmifkmsx...kt*m*sqplw*rmlc*sspr*mfiemstrp*m*s* stwkrmlrccp*tttkmiikmsxkt*m*nqslw*rmlc*k*k*lfnl*rlkl*kkrftlc henctx** F

  12. 161---8 Dec 2009.indd [final version].indd

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    2009-12-08

    Dec 8, 2009 ... United Kingdom population norms, preachers within this sample were ... University of Warwick, .... hand, feeling types make judgements based on subjective, personal values. ... and female Bible College students (Francis, Penson & Jones. 2001) .... link between psychological type preference and choice of.

  13. 40 CFR 161.440 - Spray drift data requirements.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... Nonfood Forestry Domestic outdoor Indoor Test substance Data to support MP Data to support EP Guidelines... organisms expected to be present would be exceeded. The nontarget organisms include humans, domestic animals...

  14. 50 CFR 300.161 - Alternatives and exceptions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-01

    ..., must reflect that number or label. (4) A conveyance (truck, plane, boat, etc.) is not considered a... shipping documents; (2) Fish or shellfish contained in retail consumer packages labeled pursuant to the...

  15. 40 CFR 161.390 - Reentry protection data requirements.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... could cause adverse effects on persons entering treated sites. In the last situation, reentry intervals... crop Nonfood Greenhouse Food crop Nonfood Forestry Domestic outdoor Indoor Test substance Data to... oncogenic effects or other adverse effects as evidenced by subchronic, chronic, and reproduction studies...

  16. 7 CFR 4279.161 - Filing preapplications and applications.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    ... preapplications nor applications will be accepted or processed unless a lender has agreed to finance the proposal... description of collateral, with estimated values, to be offered as security for the loan. (vii) If a corporate...) Current personal and corporate financial statements of any guarantors. (11) A proposed Loan Agreement or a...

  17. 161---8 Dec 2009.indd [final version].indd

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    2009-12-08

    Dec 8, 2009 ... The theory is attractive to practical theologians for two reasons. ... They consider conforming to principles to be of more importance than cultivating harmony. ...... Francis, L.J. & Atkins, P., 2000, Exploring Luke's Gospel: A guide.

  18. 40 CFR 161.540 - Plant protection data requirements.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... phytotoxicity Tier I: Seed germination/seedling emergence (2) R R R TGAI TGAI 122-1 Vegetative vigor (2) R R R TGAI TGAI 122-1 Aquatic plant growth (2) R R R TGAI TGAI 122-2 Tier II: Seed germination/seedling... Nonfood Greenhouse Food crop Nonfood Forestry Domestic outdoor Indoor Test substance Data to support MP...

  19. 161 ETHICAL PROBLEMS OF RAPE AS A SOCIAL CANKERWORM ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    violence that involves intercourse without consent or against someone being willing ... Rape is a global problem with women and children being mostly vulnerable .... allows their wards to spend too much time watching television where sex is ...

  20. A Formal Theory of Perception. Technical Report No. 161.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rottmayer, William Arthur

    An attempt to build a mathematical model of a device that could learn geometry is discussed. The report discusses the background and motivation of the study, the coding problem, the derivation of Suppes "Stimulus-Response Theory of Finite Automata" used in the work in learning theory, and a summary of the technical work. (DB)

  1. 22 CFR 161.7 - Categories of actions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... individuals, and facilitating trade opportunities abroad and U.S. business expansion in foreign markets; (2... documents and delivering retirement checks, social security payments and veterans benefits; (3) Conduct of... international bridges and pipeline (see Executive Order 11423 and the International Bridge Act of 1972 (Pub. L...

  2. Travel Policies in ARL Libraries. SPEC Kit 161.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cramer, Michael D.

    This kit examines the methods and policies currently used to provide travel funding for academic librarians. The results of a survey of Association of Research Libraries (ARL) libraries (n=73) conducted in Fall 1989 are presented as well as examples of travel policies and guidelines submitted by the following respondents: the Universities of…

  3. All projects related to | Page 161 | IDRC - International Development ...

    International Development Research Centre (IDRC) Digital Library (Canada)

    Ecohealth Chair on Human and Animal Health in Protected Ecosystems of Central and Eastern Africa. Project ... Topic: AGRICULTURAL PRODUCTION, ZOONOSES, GENDER ANALYSIS, Disease control, ANTIBIOTICS, ANIMAL DISEASES.

  4. 9 CFR 161.3 - Standards for accredited veterinarian duties.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    ... legally able to practice veterinary medicine. An accredited veterinarian shall perform the functions of an... examine such an animal showing abnormalities, in order to determine whether or not there is clinical... accredited work, an accredited veterinarian shall take such measures of sanitation as are necessary to...

  5. 40 CFR 161.190 - Physical and chemical characteristics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ...) PESTICIDE PROGRAMS DATA REQUIREMENTS FOR REGISTRATION OF ANTIMICROBIAL PESTICIDES Product Chemistry Data...) Basic manufacturers are required to provide the Agency with a sample of each TGAI used to formulate a...

  6. What we do | Page 161 | IDRC - International Development ...

    International Development Research Centre (IDRC) Digital Library (Canada)

    We collaborate with governments, research institutions, and global funders to develop .... Region(s): Americas, Canada, North And Central America, Asia, South And ... This project builds on previous investment in three rounds of a small grants ...

  7. Quantitative microanalysis of hafnium - zirconium system by X-ray fluorescence

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Majid, C.A.; Hussain, M.A.; Saeed, K.

    1986-01-01

    X-ray fluorescence technique has been used for the analysis of Hf in the presence of Zr by developing a method. In this method the spectral interference of Hf lines by Zr is eliminated completely and the Hf detection is accomplished using the most efficient Li line of its L-series. The principle of the method is based on the extinction properties of crystals for some orders of reflection. Ge(III) is used as the analyzing crystal. This method can be used accurately to detect Hf in any concentration of Zr at least from about 20 ppm to 100%. Also no information about the expected range of the analyte sample, is required in advance. (authors)

  8. X-Ray fluorescence of microquantities of hafnium in zirconium by precipitation as thin film

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Vigoda de Leyt, Dora; Caridi, A.F.; Deibe, Jorge

    1988-01-01

    The importance of Zr and Hf in the nuclear industry represents and increasing need for the development of reliable chemical methods to determine Hf traces in Zr matrix. A precipitation method in amoniacal medium was developed. A thin film is obtained where matrix effects are absent or minimized. Hf in the range of 5-70.10 -9 Kg in a 5.10 -6 Kg Zr matrix was studied. Fluorescence Hf Lα and Hf Lβ X-rays are excited by a W-anode tube 17 kV-25mA and 50kV-25mA. Radiation scattered by the tube was used as internal standard. Bartlett criterion was used for the regression analysis. Determination limit was fixed in 5±4. 10 -9 Kg Hf at a 95 % probability. (Author) [es

  9. Hafnium-tungsten chronometry of angrites and the earliest evolution of planetary objects

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Markowski, A.; Quitté, G.; Kleine, T.

    2007-01-01

    Angrites are amongst the oldest basalts in the solar system and their origins are enigmatic, some even proposing the planet Mercury as the parent body (APB). Whatever their exact provenance their chronometry provides insights into early stages of planetary melting and differentiation. We present...... various short-lived chronometers provides evidence that Al, Mn and Hf were homogeneously distributed in the solar nebula, although we cannot rule out the possibility of local small heterogeneities. Contrary to recent proposals, the data are also consistent with the previously determined age of the solar...... for such late melting and core formation are unclear. Quenched angrites are coeval with non-magmatic IAB iron meteorites and CB chondrules at ~ 4562 Ma. However, demonstration of a genetic link between angrite melting and impact events must await the acquisition of still higher resolution chronometry....

  10. Pressure-dependence of the phase transitions and thermal expansion in zirconium and hafnium pyrovanadate

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gallington, Leighanne C.; Hester, Brett R.; Kaplan, Benjamin S. [School of Chemistry and Biochemistry, Georgia Institute of Technology, Atlanta, GA 30332‐0400 (United States); Wilkinson, Angus P., E-mail: angus.wilkinson@chemistry.gatech.edu [School of Chemistry and Biochemistry, Georgia Institute of Technology, Atlanta, GA 30332‐0400 (United States); School of Materials Science and Engineering, Georgia Institute of Technology, Atlanta, GA 30332‐0245 (United States)

    2017-05-15

    Low or negative thermal expansion (NTE) has been previously observed in members of the ZrP{sub 2}O{sub 7} family at temperatures higher than their order-disorder phase transitions. The thermoelastic properties and phase behavior of the low temperature superstructure and high temperature negative thermal expansion phases of ZrV{sub 2}O{sub 7} and HfV{sub 2}O{sub 7} were explored via in situ variable temperature/pressure powder x-ray diffraction measurements. The phase transition temperatures of ZrV{sub 2}O{sub 7} and HfV{sub 2}O{sub 7} exhibited a very strong dependence on pressure (∼700 K GPa), with moderate compression suppressing the formation of their NTE phases below 513 K. Compression also reduced the magnitude of the coefficients of thermal expansion in both the positive and negative thermal expansion phases. Additionally, the high temperature NTE phase of ZrV{sub 2}O{sub 7} was found to be twice as stiff as the low temperature positive thermal expansion superstructure (24 and 12 GPa respectively). - Graphical abstract: The temperature at which ZrV{sub 2}O{sub 7} transforms to a phase displaying negative thermal expansion is strongly pressure dependent. The high temperature form of ZrV{sub 2}O{sub 7} is elastically stiffer than the low temperature form. - Highlights: • The order-disorder phase transition temperatures in ZrV{sub 2}O{sub 7} and HfV{sub 2}O{sub 7} are strongly pressure dependent (∼700 K.GPa). • The high temperature (disordered) phase of ZrV{sub 2}O{sub 7} is much stiffer than the ambient temperature (ordered) phase. • Compression reduces the magnitude of the negative thermal expansion in the high temperature phase of ZrV{sub 2}O{sub 7}.

  11. Interaction of chelate cyclopentadienyl compounds of zirconium and hafnium with bromine

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Brajnina, Eh.M.; Minacheva, M.Kh.

    1975-01-01

    Interaction of bromine with Zr and Hf dibenzoylmethane (DBM) compounds of following type: (DBM) 4 M, CpM(DBM) 3 and Cp 2 M(DBM) 2 leads to the formation of (DBM) 2 MBr 2 , (DBM) 3 MBr and CpZr(DBM) 2 Br in the rations which depend on the conditions of the reaction (Cp=C 5 H 5 )

  12. Investigation of Hafnium oxide/Copper resistive memory for advanced encryption applications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Briggs, Benjamin D.

    The Advanced Encryption Standard (AES) is a widely used encryption algorithm to protect data and communications in today's digital age. Modern AES CMOS implementations require large amounts of dedicated logic and must be tuned for either performance or power consumption. A high throughput, low power, and low die area AES implementation is required in the growing mobile sector. An emerging non-volatile memory device known as resistive memory (ReRAM) is a simple metal-insulator-metal capacitor device structure with the ability to switch between two stable resistance states. Currently, ReRAM is targeted as a non-volatile memory replacement technology to eventually replace flash. Its advantages over flash include ease of fabrication, speed, and lower power consumption. In addition to memory, ReRAM can also be used in advanced logic implementations given its purely resistive behavior. The combination of a new non-volatile memory element ReRAM along with high performance, low power CMOS opens new avenues for logic implementations. This dissertation will cover the design and process implementation of a ReRAM-CMOS hybrid circuit, built using IBM's 10LPe process, for the improvement of hardware AES implementations. Further the device characteristics of ReRAM, specifically the HfO2/Cu memory system, and mechanisms for operation are not fully correlated. Of particular interest to this work is the role of material properties such as the stoichiometry, crystallinity, and doping of the HfO2 layer and their effect on the switching characteristics of resistive memory. Material properties were varied by a combination of atomic layer deposition and reactive sputtering of the HfO2 layer. Several studies will be discussed on how the above mentioned material properties influence switching parameters, and change the underlying physics of device operation.

  13. Influence of the oxygen/argon ratio on the properties of sputtered hafnium oxide

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pereira, L.; Barquinha, P.; Fortunato, E.; Martins, R.

    2005-01-01

    In this work we have focused our attention on the role of the gas mixture (O 2 /Ar) used during HfO 2 thin film processing by r.f. magnetron sputtering, to produce dielectrics with suitable characteristics to be used as gate dielectric. Increasing the O 2 /Ar ratio from 0 to 0.2, the films properties (optical gap, permittivity, resistivity and compactness) are improved. At these conditions, films with a band gap around 5 eV were produced, indicating a good stoichiometry. Also the flat band voltage has a reduction of almost three times indicating also a reduction of the same order on the fixed charge density at the semiconductor-insulator interface. The dielectric constant is around 16 which is very good, since the surface of the silicon where the HfO 2 films were deposited contains a SiO 2 layer of about 3 nm that gives an effective dielectric constant above 20, close to the HfO 2 stoichiometric value (∼25). Further increase on the O 2 /Ar ratio does not produce significant improvements

  14. Structure and Optical Properties of Nanocrystalline Hafnium Oxide Thin Films (PostPrint)

    Science.gov (United States)

    2014-09-01

    sputter-deposition. A large band gap coupled with low absorption provide optical transparency over a broad range in the electromagnetic spectrum; HfO2...k) in the middle of the visible spec- trum, and C influences n(k) to a greater extent in shorter wave - lengths [31]. Note that this principle behind...Approved for publicnanocrystalline HfO2 films crystallize in monoclinic structure. Fur - thermore, increasing Ts results in improved structural order and

  15. The Juvenile Hafnium Isotope Signal as a Record of Supercontinent Cycles

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gardiner, Nicholas J.; Kirkland, Christopher L.; van Kranendonk, Martin J.

    2016-12-01

    Hf isotope ratios measured in igneous zircon are controlled by magmatic source, which may be linked to tectonic setting. Over the 200-500 Myr periodicity of the supercontinent cycle - the principal geological phenomenon controlling prevailing global tectonic style - juvenile Hf signals, i.e. most radiogenic, are typically measured in zircon from granites formed in arc settings (crustal growth), and evolved zircon Hf signals in granites formed in continent-collision settings (crustal reworking). Interrogations of Hf datasets for excursions related to Earth events commonly use the median value, however this may be equivocal due to magma mixing. The most juvenile part of the Hf signal is less influenced by crustal in-mixing, and arguably a more sensitive archive of Earth’s geodynamic state. We analyze the global Hf dataset for this juvenile signal, statistically correlating supercontinent amalgamation intervals with evolved Hf episodes, and breakup leading to re-assembly with juvenile Hf episodes. The juvenile Hf signal is more sensitive to Pangaea and Rodinia assembly, its amplitude increasing with successive cycles to a maximum with Gondwana assembly which may reflect enhanced subduction-erosion. We demonstrate that the juvenile Hf signal carries important information on prevailing global magmatic style, and thus tectonic processes.

  16. As-cast structure refinement of Ti-46Al alloy by hafnium and boron additions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zhang Li

    2009-05-01

    Full Text Available The infl uence of Hf and B on the solidifi cation structure of cast Ti-46Al alloys was investigated. The results show that the coupling effect of Hf and B changes the solidifi cation structure morphology and strongly refi nes the grain size. When the Hf+B contents were increased from 0 + 0.0 to 3 + 0.2, 5 + 0.6 and 7 + 1.0 (in at. %, the solidification structure morphology changed from coarse columnar dendrite to fine columnar dendrite, then to equiaxed dendrite, and further to fi ne near granular grain whilst the average grain size decreased to 20 μm. It is concluded that the columnar dendrite refinement is due to the effect of Hf and B on the decrease of Al diffusion coeffi cient in the melt. The fi ne near granular grain formation is attributed to the combined constitutional supercooling formed by Al and B segregation that is strengthened by Hf and B additions at the solid/liquid interface during solidifi cation, and the TiB2 precipitates acting as heterogeneous nuclei

  17. Metal-Element Compounds of Titanium, Zirconium, and Hafnium as Pyrotechnic Fuels

    Science.gov (United States)

    2015-05-04

    59 Ti3O5 (s, 59.9), K (g, 19.9), N2 (g, 8.2), H2O (g, 5.2), KOH (g, 4.0) TiB2 2868 26 / 74 TiO2 (l, 16.3), Ti2O3 (l, 8.7), KBO2 (g, 56.0), N2 (g...Borate Glasses – Structural Studies with NMR and Raman Spectroscopies. J. Phys. Chem. 100, 16720-16728. 9. Massis, T. M. (1996) New Explosive

  18. Characterization of the superconducting state in hafnium hydride under high pressure

    Science.gov (United States)

    Duda, A. M.; Szewczyk, K. A.; Jarosik, M. W.; Szcześniak, K. M.; Sowińska, M. A.; Szcześniak, D.

    2018-05-01

    The hydrogen-rich compounds at high pressure may exhibit notably high superconducting transition temperatures. In the paper, we have calculated the basic thermodynamic parameters of the superconducting state in two selected phases of HfH2 hydride under high-pressure respectively at 180 GPa for Cmma and 260 GPa for P21 / m . Calculations has been conducted in the framework of the Eliashberg formalism. In particular, we have determined the values of the critical temperature (TC) to be equal to 8 K and 13 K for the Cmma and P21 / m phases, respectively. Moreover, we have estimated other thermodynamic properties such as the order parameter (Δ (T)) , the thermodynamic critical field (HC (T)) , and the specific heat for the normal (CN) and superconducting (CS) state. Finally, we have shown that the characteristic ratios: RΔ = 2 Δ (0) /kBTC and RC = ΔC (TC) /CN (TC) , which are related to the above thermodynamic functions, slightly differ from the predictions of the Bardeen-Cooper-Schrieffer theory due to the strong-coupling and retardation effects.

  19. Structure and property evaluation of a vacuum plasma sprayed nanostructured tungsten-hafnium carbide bulk composite

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rea, K.E.; Viswanathan, V.; Kruize, A.; Hosson, J.Th.M. de; O'Dell, S.; McKechnie, T.; Rajagopalan, S.; Vaidyanathan, R.; Seal, S.

    2008-01-01

    Vacuum plasma spray (VPS) forming of tungsten-based metal matrix nanocomposites (MMCs) has shown to be a cost effective and time saving method for the formation of bulk monolithic nanostructured thermo-mechanical components. Spray drying of powder feedstock appears to have a significant effect on the improved mechanical properties of the bulk nanocomposite. The reported elastic modulus of the nanocomposite nearly doubles due to the presence of HfC nano particulates in the W matrix. High resolution transmission electron microscopy (HRTEM) revealed the retention of nanostructures at the select process conditions and is correlated with the enhanced mechanical properties of the nanocomposite

  20. Spectroscopic and structural investigation of undoped and Er{sup 3+} doped hafnium silicate layers

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Khomenkova, L., E-mail: khomen@ukr.net [CIMAP CEA/CNRS/ENSICAEN/UCBN, 6 Blvd. Maréchal Juin, 14050 Caen Cedex 4 (France); V. Lashkaryov Institute of Semiconductor Physics at NASU, 41 Pr. Nauky, Kyiv 03028 (Ukraine); An, Y.-T. [CIMAP CEA/CNRS/ENSICAEN/UCBN, 6 Blvd. Maréchal Juin, 14050 Caen Cedex 4 (France); Khomenkov, D. [Taras Shevchenko National University of Kyiv, Faculty of Physics, 4 Pr. Hlushkov, Kyiv 03022 (Ukraine); Portier, X.; Labbé, C.; Gourbilleau, F. [CIMAP CEA/CNRS/ENSICAEN/UCBN, 6 Blvd. Maréchal Juin, 14050 Caen Cedex 4 (France)

    2014-11-15

    This paper demonstrates the functionality of radio-frequency magnetron sputtering for the fabrication of undoped and Er-doped Si-rich-HfO{sub 2} films with specific structural and spectroscopic properties. The effect of post-deposition treatment on film properties was investigated by means of Fourier-transform infrared spectroscopy, Raman scattering and photoluminescence methods, as well as Transmission Electron microscopy. It was observed that annealing treatment at 850–1000 °C causes phase separation process and the formation of HfO{sub 2}, SiO{sub 2} and pure Si phases. This process stimulates also an intense light emission in the 700–950-nm spectral range under broad band excitation. The phase separation mechanism as well as the nature of radiative transitions were discussed. Photoluminescence was ascribed to carrier recombination in silicon clusters and host defects. The appearance of silicon clusters was also confirmed by the comparison of luminescent properties of pure HfO{sub 2}, SiO{sub 2}, Si-rich-HfO{sub 2} and Si-rich-SiO{sub 2} films. Additional argument for Si clusters’ formation was obtained under investigation of Er-doped Si-rich HfO{sub 2} films. These latter demonstrated 1.54-µm Er{sup 3+} luminescence under non-resonant excitation originating from an energy transfer from Si clusters towards Er{sup 3+} ions.