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Sample records for haemorrhagic shock cardiopulmonary

  1. Non-haemorrhagic obstetric shock.

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    Thomson, A J; Greer, I A

    2000-02-01

    The causes of non-haemorrhagic obstetric shock (pulmonary thromboembolism, amniotic fluid embolism, acute uterine inversion and sepsis) are uncommon but responsible for the majority of maternal deaths in the developed world. Clinically suspected pulmonary thromboembolism should be treated initially with heparin and objective testing should be performed. If the diagnosis is confirmed, heparin is usually continued until delivery, following which anticoagulation in the puerperium is achieved with either warfarin or heparin. Amniotic fluid embolism is a rare complication of pregnancy, occurring most commonly during labour. The management of amniotic fluid embolism involves maternal oxygenation, the maintenance of cardiac output and blood pressure, and the management of any associated coagulopathy. Acute uterine inversion arises most commonly following mismanagement of the third stage of labour. The shock in uterine inversion is neurogenic in origin, although there may also be profound haemorrhage. The management of this condition includes maternal resuscitation and replacement of the uterus either manually, surgically or by hydrostatic pressure. Genital tract sepsis remains a significant cause of maternal death, the most common predisposing factor being prolonged rupture of the fetal membranes. The management of septic shock in pregnancy includes resuscitation, identification of the source of infection and alteration of the systemic inflammatory response.

  2. Haemorrhagic shock due to spontaneous splenic haemorrhage complicating antiplatelet therapy: endovascular management

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    Garge S Shaileshkumar

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Spontaneous splenic haemorrahge and rupture is a rare but life-threatening condition requiring urgent diagnosis and treatment. Splenic haemorrhage and rupture precipitated by thrombolytic or antiocoagulant therapy has been reported frequently in the literature, but only two cases due to ticlopidine and one case due to salicyclate have been reported. We report the case of a 54-year-old man with haemorrhagic shock due to spontaneous splenic haemorrhage and rupture following dual antiplatelet (aspirin and clopidogrel therapy. He was successfully treated with selective angioembolization of the bleeding branch of the splenic artery.

  3. Survival without sequelae after prolonged cardiopulmonary resuscitation after electric shock.

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    Motawea, Mohamad; Al-Kenany, Al-Sayed; Hosny, Mostafa; Aglan, Omar; Samy, Mohamad; Al-Abd, Mohamed

    2016-03-01

    "Electrical shock is the physiological reaction or injury caused by electric current passing through the human body. It occurs upon contact of a human body part with any source of electricity that causes a sufficient current through the skin, muscles, or hair causing undesirable effects ranging from simple burns to death." Ventricular fibrillation is believed to be the most common cause of death after electrical shock. "The ideal duration of cardiac resuscitation is unknown. Typically prolonged cardiopulmonary resuscitation is associated with poor neurologic outcomes and reduced long term survival. No consensus statement has been made and traditionally efforts are usually terminated after 15-30 minutes." The case under discussion seems worthy of the somewhat detailed description given. It is for a young man who survived after 65 minutes after electrical shock (ES) after prolonged high-quality cardiopulmonary resuscitation (CPR), multiple defibrillations, and artificial ventilation without any sequelae. Early start of adequate chest compressions and close adherence to advanced cardiac life support protocols played a vital role in successful CPR.

  4. The link between intracranial haemorrhage and cardiogenic shock: a case of Takotsubo cardiomyopathy.

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    Caretta, Giorgio; Vizzardi, Enrico; Rovetta, Riccardo; Evaristi, Laura; Quinzani, Filippo; Raddino, Riccardo; Dei Cas, Livio

    2012-06-01

    Myocardial dysfunction occurs frequently during subarachnoid haemorrhage (SAH) and it is often referred to as neurogenic stunned myocardium (NSM). Takotsubo cardiomyopathy (TTC), which can lead to life-threatening acute heart failure, has been considered a possible complication of SAH. Actually, NSM and TTC are believed to share the same pathophysiological mechanisms and are likely a manifestation of the same disease. We report a case of a 64-year-old woman with SAH and cardiogenic shock due to acute left ventricular dysfunction. Echocardiography and ventriculography showed the typical pattern of TTC. Angiography excluded coronary artery disease or coronary spasm. Short-term inotropic support was necessary. Rapid recovery of left ventricular function was observed after 8 days. Acute myocardial dysfunction due to TTC in the setting of SAH may lead to cardiogenic shock which is difficult to treat. Patients with SAH and haemodynamic instability warrant a careful assessment of ventricular function on admission to rule out TTC

  5. Involvement of the histaminergic system in the resuscitating effect of centrally acting leptin in haemorrhagic shock in rats.

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    Jochem, J; Altinbas, B; Yalcin, M; Ottani, A; Giuliani, D; Savci, V; Kasperska-Zajac, A; Guarini, S

    2016-02-01

    Leptin, acting centrally as a neuromodulator, induces the activation of the sympathetic nervous system, which may lead to a pressor action in normotensive animals. In haemorrhagic shock, leptin administered intracerebroventricularly (icv.) evokes the resuscitating effect, with long-lasting rises in mean arterial pressure (MAP) and heart rate (HR), subsequent increase in peripheral blood flows, and a 100% survival at 2 h. Since leptin is able to activate histaminergic neurons, and centrally acting histamine also induces the resuscitating effect with the activation of the sympathetic nervous system, in the present study, we investigated an involvement of the histaminergic system in leptin-evoked cardiovascular effects in haemorrhagic shock. The model of irreversible haemorrhagic shock, with MAP decreased to and stabilised at 20 - 25 mmHg, has been used. Leptin (20 μg) given icv. at 5 min of critical hypotension evoked 181.5% increase in extracellular hypothalamic histamine concentration during the first 10 min after injection. Rises in MAP, HR and renal, mesenteric and hindquarters blood flows induced by leptin were inhibited by icv. pre-treatment with histamine H1 receptor antagonist chlorpheniramine (50 nmol). In contrast, there was no effect of H2, H3 and H4 receptor antagonists ranitidine (25 nmol), VUF 5681 (25 nmol) and JNJ 10191584 (25 nmol), respectively. In conclusion, the histaminergic system is involved in centrally-acting leptin-induced resuscitating effect in haemorrhagic shock in rats.

  6. Effects of ubiquinol with fluid resuscitation following haemorrhagic shock on rat lungs, diaphragm, heart and kidneys.

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    Bennetts, Paul; Shen, Qiuhua; Thimmesch, Amanda R; Diaz, Francisco J; Clancy, Richard L; Pierce, Janet D

    2014-07-01

    Haemorrhagic shock (HS) and fluid resuscitation can lead to increased reactive oxygen species (ROS), contributing to ischaemia-reperfusion injury and organ damage. Ubiquinol is a potent antioxidant that decreases ROS. This study examined the effects of ubiquinol administered with fluid resuscitation following controlled HS. Adult male Sprague-Dawley rats were randomly assigned to treatment [ubiquinol, 1 mg (100 g body weight)(-1)] or control groups. Rats were subjected to 60 min of HS by removing 40% of the total blood volume to a mean arterial pressure ∼45-55 mmHg. The animals were resuscitated with blood and lactated Ringer solution, with or without ubiquinol, and monitored for 120 min. At the end of the experiments, the rats were killed and the lungs, diaphragm, heart and kidneys harvested. Leucocytes were analysed for mitochondrial superoxide at baseline, end of shock and 120 min following fluid resuscitation using MitoSOX Red. Diaphragms were examined for hydrogen peroxide using dihydrofluorescein diacetate and confocal microscopy. The apoptosis in lungs, diaphragm, heart and kidneys was measured using fluorescence microscopy with acridine orange and ethidium bromide. Leucocyte mitochondrial superoxide levels were significantly lower in rats that received ubiquinol than in the control animals. Production of hydrogen peroxide and apoptosis were significantly reduced in the organs of rats treated with ubiquinol. These findings suggest that ubiquinol, administered with fluid resuscitation after HS, attenuates ROS production and apoptosis. Thus, ubiquinol is a potent antioxidant that may be used as a potential treatment to reduce organ injury following haemorrhagic events. © 2014 The Authors. Experimental Physiology © 2014 The Physiological Society.

  7. Volemic Resuscitation in a Patient with Multiple Traumas and Haemorrhagic Shock. Anti-oxidative Therapy Management in Critical Patients. A Case Report

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    Bedreag Ovidiu Horea

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available A patient with multiple traumas is usually found in severe haemorrhagic shock. In 40% of the cases, the patient with multiple traumas and haemorrhagic shock cannot recover due to secondary injuries and complications associated with the shock. In this paper we present the case of a male patient 30 years old, who suffered a car accident. The patient is admitted in our hospital with haemorrhagic shock due to femur fracture, acute cranial-cerebral trauma and severe thoracic trauma with bleeding scalp wound, associated with lethal triad of trauma. The clinical and biological parameters demand massive transfusion with packed red blood cells (PRBCs, fresh frozen plasma (FFP, cryoprecipitate (CRY and colloidal solution (CO sustained with vassopresor for the haemodynamic stabilisation. During his stay in the ICU, the patient benefits from anti-oxidative therapy with Vitamin C, Vitamin E and Vitamin B1. After 14 days the clinical state of the patient improves and he is transferred in Polytrauma Department.

  8. Cardiopulmonary Arrest and Resuscitation in Severe Sepsis and Septic Shock: A Research Model.

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    Chalkias, Athanasios; Spyropoulos, Vaios; Koutsovasilis, Anastasios; Papalois, Apostolos; Kouskouni, Evaggelia; Xanthos, Theodoros

    2015-03-01

    Cardiopulmonary resuscitation in patients with severe sepsis and septic shock is challenging and usually unsuccessful. The aim of the present study is to describe our swine model of cardiac arrest and resuscitation in severe sepsis and septic shock. In this prospective randomized animal study, 10 healthy female Landrace-Large White pigs with an average weight of 20 ± 1 kg (aged 19 - 21 weeks) were the study subjects. Septicemia was induced by an intravenous infusion of a bolus of 20-mL bacterial suspension in 2 min, followed by a continuous infusion during the rest of the experiment. After septic shock was confirmed, the animals were left untreated until cardiac arrest occurred. All animals developed pulseless electrical activity between the fifth and sixth hours of septicemia, whereas five (50%) of 10 animals were successfully resuscitated. Coronary perfusion pressure was statistically significantly different between surviving and nonsurviving animals. We found a statistically significant correlation between mean arterial pressure and unsuccessful resuscitation (P = 0.046), whereas there was no difference in end-tidal carbon dioxide (23.05 ± 1.73 vs. 23.56 ± 1.70; P = 0.735) between animals with return of spontaneous circulation and nonsurviving animals. During the 45-min postresuscitation monitoring, we noted a significant decrease in hemodynamic parameters, although oxygenation indices and lactate clearance were constantly increased (P = 0.001). This successful basic swine model was for the first time developed and may prove extremely useful in future studies on the periarrest period in severe sepsis and septic shock.

  9. Minimal interruption of cardiopulmonary resuscitation for a single shock as mandated by automated external defibrillations does not compromise outcomes in a porcine model of cardiac arrest and resuscitation.

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    Ristagno, Giuseppe; Tang, Wanchun; Russell, James K; Jorgenson, Dawn; Wang, Hao; Sun, Shijie; Weil, Max Harry

    2008-11-01

    Current automated external defibrillations require interruptions in chest compressions to avoid artifacts during electrocardiographic analyses and to minimize the risk of accidental delivery of an electric shock to the rescuer. The earlier three-shock algorithm, with prolonged interruptions of chest compressions, compromised outcomes and increased severity of postresuscitation myocardial dysfunction. In the present study, we investigated the effect of timing of minimal automated external defibrillation-mandated interruptions of chest compressions on cardiopulmonary resuscitation outcomes, using a single-shock algorithm. We hypothesized that an 8-sec interruption of chest compressions for a single shock, as mandated by automated external defibrillations, would not impair initial resuscitation and outcomes of cardiopulmonary resuscitation. Randomized prospective animal study. University affiliated research laboratory. Domestic pigs. In 24 domestic male pigs weighing 41 +/- 2 kg, ventricular fibrillation was induced by left anterior descending coronary artery occlusion and untreated for 7 min. Cardiopulmonary resuscitation, including chest compressions and ventilation with oxygen, was then performed for an interval of 2 min before attempted defibrillation. Animals were randomized into three groups: A) interruption immediately before defibrillation; B) interruption after 1 min of cardiopulmonary resuscitation; or C) no interruption. Chest compressions were delivered with the aid of a mechanical chest compressor at a rate of 100 compressions/min and compression/ventilation ratio of 30:2. Defibrillation was attempted with a single biphasic 150-J shock. Each animal was successfully resuscitated and survived for >72 hr. No differences in the number of shocks before return of spontaneous circulation, frequency of recurrent ventricular fibrillation, duration of cardiopulmonary resuscitation, and severity of postresuscitation myocardial dysfunction were observed. In this

  10. Glibenclamide dose response in patients with septic shock: effects on norepinephrine requirements, cardiopulmonary performance, and global oxygen transport.

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    Morelli, Andrea; Lange, Matthias; Ertmer, Christian; Broeking, Katrin; Van Aken, Hugo; Orecchioni, Alessandra; Rocco, Monica; Bachetoni, Alessandra; Traber, Daniel L; Landoni, Giovanni; Pietropaoli, Paolo; Westphal, Martin

    2007-11-01

    Adenosine triphosphate-sensitive potassium channels are important regulators of arterial vascular smooth muscle tone and are implicated in the pathophysiology of catecholamine tachyphylaxis in septic shock. The present study was designed as a prospective, randomized, double-blinded, clinical pilot study to determine whether different doses of glibenclamide have any effects on norepinephrine requirements, cardiopulmonary hemodynamics, and global oxygen transport in patients with septic shock. We enrolled 30 patients with septic shock requiring invasive hemodynamic monitoring and norepinephrine infusion of 0.5 microg.kg-1.min-1 or greater to maintain MAP between 65 and 75 mmHg. In addition to standard therapy, patients were randomized to receive either 10, 20, or 30 mg of enteral glibenclamide. Systemic hemodynamics, global oxygen transport including arterial lactate concentrations, gas exchange, plasma glucose concentrations, and electrolytes were determined at baseline and after 3, 6, and 12 h after administration of the study drug. Glibenclamide decreased plasma glucose concentrations in a dose-dependent manner but failed to reduce norepinephrine requirements. None of the doses had any effects on cardiopulmonary hemodynamics, global oxygen transport, gas exchange, or electrolytes. These data suggest that oral glibenclamide in doses from 10 to 30 mg fails to counteract arterial hypotension and thus to reduce norepinephrine requirements in catecholamine-dependent human septic shock.

  11. The Stop-Only-While-Shocking algorithm reduces hands-off time by 17% during cardiopulmonary resuscitation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hansen, Lars Koch; Mohammed, Anna; Pedersen, Magnus

    2016-01-01

    INTRODUCTION: Reducing hands-off time during cardiopulmonary resuscitation (CPR) is believed to increase survival after cardiac arrests because of the sustaining of organ perfusion. The aim of our study was to investigate whether charging the defibrillator before rhythm analyses and shock delivery...... significantly reduced hands-off time compared with the European Resuscitation Council (ERC) 2010 CPR guideline algorithm in full-scale cardiac arrest scenarios. METHODS: The study was designed as a full-scale cardiac arrest simulation study including administration of drugs. Participants were randomized...

  12. [Neonatal subgaleal haemorrhage; a potential life-threatening extracranial haemorrhage

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    Fuijkschot, J.; Antonius, T.A.J.; Meijers, P.W.; Vrancken, S.L.A.G.

    2008-01-01

    A female neonate delivered at term developed hypovolemic shock due to a subgaleal haemorrhage, i.e. extracranial bleeding between the galea aponeurotica and the cranial periosteum. The subgaleal haemorrhage was most likely the result of a traumatic vacuum extraction. The patient was treated with lar

  13. The Stop-Only-While-Shocking algorithm reduces hands-off time by 17% during cardiopulmonary resuscitation - a simulation study.

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    Koch Hansen, Lars; Mohammed, Anna; Pedersen, Magnus; Folkestad, Lars; Brodersen, Jacob; Hey, Thomas; Lyhne Christensen, Nicolaj; Carter-Storch, Rasmus; Bendix, Kristoffer; Hansen, Morten R; Brabrand, Mikkel

    2016-12-01

    Reducing hands-off time during cardiopulmonary resuscitation (CPR) is believed to increase survival after cardiac arrests because of the sustaining of organ perfusion. The aim of our study was to investigate whether charging the defibrillator before rhythm analyses and shock delivery significantly reduced hands-off time compared with the European Resuscitation Council (ERC) 2010 CPR guideline algorithm in full-scale cardiac arrest scenarios. The study was designed as a full-scale cardiac arrest simulation study including administration of drugs. Participants were randomized into using the Stop-Only-While-Shocking (SOWS) algorithm or the ERC2010 algorithm. In SOWS, chest compressions were only interrupted for a post-charging rhythm analysis and immediate shock delivery. A Resusci Anne HLR-D manikin and a LIFEPACK 20 defibrillator were used. The manikin recorded time and chest compressions. Sample size was calculated with an α of 0.05 and 80% power showed that we should test four scenarios with each algorithm. Twenty-nine physicians participated in 11 scenarios. Hands-off time was significantly reduced 17% using the SOWS algorithm compared with ERC2010 [22.1% (SD 2.3) hands-off time vs. 26.6% (SD 4.8); P<0.05]. In full-scale cardiac arrest simulations, a minor change consisting of charging the defibrillator before rhythm check reduces hands-off time by 17% compared with ERC2010 guidelines.

  14. Safety and feasibility of sublingual microcirculation assessment in the emergency department for civilian and military patients with traumatic haemorrhagic shock: a prospective cohort study

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    Naumann, David N; Mellis, Clare; Smith, Iain M; Mamuza, Jasna; Skene, Imogen; Harris, Tim; Midwinter, Mark J; Hutchings, Sam D

    2016-01-01

    Objectives Sublingual microcirculatory monitoring for traumatic haemorrhagic shock (THS) may predict clinical outcomes better than traditional blood pressure and cardiac output, but is not usually performed until the patient reaches the intensive care unit (ICU), missing earlier data of potential importance. This pilot study assessed for the first time the feasibility and safety of sublingual video-microscopy for THS in the emergency department (ED), and whether it yields useable data for analysis. Setting A safety and feasibility assessment was undertaken as part of the prospective observational MICROSHOCK study; sublingual video-microscopy was performed at the UK-led Role 3 medical facility at Camp Bastion, Afghanistan, and in the ED in 3 UK Major Trauma Centres. Participants There were 15 casualties (2 military, 13 civilian) who presented with traumatic haemorrhagic shock with a median injury severity score of 26. The median age was 41; the majority (n=12) were male. The most common injury mechanism was road traffic accident. Primary and secondary outcome measures Safety and feasibility were the primary outcomes, as measured by lack of adverse events or clinical interruptions, and successful acquisition and storage of data. The secondary outcome was the quality of acquired video clips according to validated criteria, in order to determine whether useful data could be obtained in this emergency context. Results Video-microscopy was successfully performed and stored for analysis for all patients, yielding 161 video clips. There were no adverse events or episodes where clinical management was affected or interrupted. There were 104 (64.6%) video clips from 14 patients of sufficient quality for analysis. Conclusions Early sublingual microcirculatory monitoring in the ED for patients with THS is safe and feasible, even in a deployed military setting, and yields videos of satisfactory quality in a high proportion of cases. Further investigations of early

  15. Ebola haemorrhagic fever

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    Feldmann, Heinz; Geisbert, Thomas W

    2012-01-01

    Ebola viruses are the causative agents of a severe form of viral haemorrhagic fever in man, designated Ebola haemorrhagic fever, and are endemic in regions of central Africa. The exception is the species Reston Ebola virus, which has not been associated with human disease and is found in the Philippines. Ebola virus constitutes an important local public health threat in Africa, with a worldwide effect through imported infections and through the fear of misuse for biological terrorism. Ebola virus is thought to also have a detrimental effect on the great ape population in Africa. Case-fatality rates of the African species in man are as high as 90%, with no prophylaxis or treatment available. Ebola virus infections are characterised by immune suppression and a systemic inflammatory response that causes impairment of the vascular, coagulation, and immune systems, leading to multiorgan failure and shock, and thus, in some ways, resembling septic shock. PMID:21084112

  16. Intracerebral haemorrhage.

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    Qureshi, Adnan I; Mendelow, A David; Hanley, Daniel F

    2009-05-09

    Intracerebral haemorrhage is an important public health problem leading to high rates of death and disability in adults. Although the number of hospital admissions for intracerebral haemorrhage has increased worldwide in the past 10 years, mortality has not fallen. Results of clinical trials and observational studies suggest that coordinated primary and specialty care is associated with lower mortality than is typical community practice. Development of treatment goals for critical care, and new sequences of care and specialty practice can improve outcome after intracerebral haemorrhage. Specific treatment approaches include early diagnosis and haemostasis, aggressive management of blood pressure, open surgical and minimally invasive surgical techniques to remove clot, techniques to remove intraventricular blood, and management of intracranial pressure. These approaches improve clinical management of patients with intracerebral haemorrhage and promise to reduce mortality and increase functional survival.

  17. Midwives' knowledge and utilization of non-pneumatic anti shock garment in reducing complication of postpartum haemorrhage in selected health care facilities in Bayelsa state Nigeria

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Olayinka A. Onasoga

    2015-08-01

    Full Text Available Background: Non-pneumatic anti-shock garment (NASG is a first-aid lower-body pressure device that reverses hypovolaemic shock and decreases obstetric hemorrhage thereby decreasing maternal morbidity and mortality due to post-partum haemorrhage (PPH.This study assessed the knowledge and utilization of non-pneumatic anti shock garment in the management of postpartum hemorrhage among midwives in selected health care facilities in Bayelsa state. Methods: This is a descriptive cross-sectional study in which a sample size of 112 nurses were selected using purposive sampling technique. The instrument for data collection was questionnaire and data collected were analyzed using descriptive and inferential statistics. Results: The study revealed that majority of the respondents regardless of their educational level had good knowledge of the description, mechanism of action, and uses of NASG. It was also revealed that majority of the respondents do not use NASG in their centers and its application in management of post-partum hemorrhage was not part of the protocols in these centers, which was a clear indication of underutilization of the NASG in the primary health care centers. There was no significant association found between years of working experience of respondents and their utilization of NASG with (X2 = 8.577, df = 2, P = 0.114 as well as between the level of knowledge of midwives and their utilization of the NASG with (X2 = 0.387, df = 1, P = 0.534. Conclusions: It was recommended that non-pneumonic antishock garment should be made available by government and its utilization should be included in all health care centers policy as a management protocol for post-partum hemorrhage. [Int J Reprod Contracept Obstet Gynecol 2015; 4(4.000: 977-981

  18. Haemorrhagic Fevers, Viral

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... is usually applied to disease caused by Arenaviridae (Lassa fever, Junin and Machupo), Bunyaviridae (Crimean-Congo haemorrhagic fever, ... fever Dengue and severe dengue Ebola virus disease Lassa fever Marburg haemorrhagic fever Rift Valley fever Multimedia, features ...

  19. [Definition of shock types].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Adams, H A; Baumann, G; Gänsslen, A; Janssens, U; Knoefel, W; Koch, T; Marx, G; Müller-Werdan, U; Pape, H C; Prange, W; Roesner, D; Standl, T; Teske, W; Werner, G; Zander, R

    2001-11-01

    Definitions of shock types. Hypovolaemic shock is a state of insufficient perfusion of vital organs with consecutive imbalance of oxygen supply and demand due to an intravascular volume deficiency with critically impaired cardiac preload. Subtypes are haemorrhagic shock, hypovolaemic shock in the narrow sense, traumatic-haemorrhagic shock and traumatic-hypovolaemic shock. Cardiac shock is caused by a primary critical cardiac pump failure with consecutive inadequate oxygen supply of the organism. Anaphylactic shock is an acute failure of blood volume distribution (distributive shock) and caused by IgE-dependent, type-I-allergic, classical hypersensibility, or a physically, chemically, or osmotically induced IgE-independent anaphylactoid hypersensibility. The septic shock is a sepsis-induced distribution failure of the circulating blood volume in the sense of a distributive shock. The neurogenic shock is a distributive shock induced by generalized and extensive vasodilatation with consecutive hypovolaemia due to an imbalance of sympathetic and parasympathetic regulation of vascular smooth muscles.

  20. Ebolavirus and Haemorrhagic Syndrome

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    Gerald A. Matua

    2015-05-01

    Full Text Available The Ebola virus is a highly virulent, single-stranded ribonucleic acid virus which affects both humans and apes and has fast become one of the world’s most feared pathogens. The virus induces acute fever and death, with haemorrhagic syndrome occurring in up to 90% of patients. The known species within the genus Ebolavirus are Bundibugyo, Sudan, Zaïre, Reston and Taï Forest. Although endemic in Africa, Ebola has caused worldwide anxiety due to media hype and concerns about its international spread, including through bioterrorism. The high fatality rate is attributed to unavailability of a standard treatment regimen or vaccine. The disease is frightening since it is characterised by rapid immune suppression and systemic inflammatory response, causing multi-organ and system failure, shock and often death. Currently, disease management is largely supportive, with containment efforts geared towards mitigating the spread of the virus. This review describes the classification, morphology, infective process, natural ecology, transmission, epidemic patterns, diagnosis, clinical features and immunology of Ebola, including management and epidemic containment strategies.

  1. [Volume replenishment in haemorrhage: caution advised].

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    Kooter, Albertus J; Zweegman, Sonja; Smulders, Yvo M

    2011-01-01

    Acute haemorrhage is a frequent problem in medicine. Patients with acute bleeding may present with signs of hypotension and reduced organ perfusion. The physician's reflex action is often to treat such patients with intravenous volume replenishment using colloid or cristalloid liquids. Intravenous volume replenishment has, however, a downside: it increases the tendency to bleed and therefore can increase blood loss. Previous clinical observations and experimental animal and human studies addressing volume replenishment in haemorrhagic shock have repeatedly shown that accepting hypotension favourably affects prognosis. However, relevant practice guidelines, such as for gastrointestinal bleeding, usually advise liberal intravenous volume replenishment if hypotension is present. In this article we advocate caution when considering intravenous blood volume adjustment in haemorrhage.

  2. Viral Haemorrhagic Septicaemia Virus

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Olesen, Niels Jørgen; Skall, Helle Frank

    2013-01-01

    This chapter covers the genetics (genotypes and serotypes), clinical signs, host species, transmission, prevalence, diagnosis, control and prevention of viral haemorrhagic septicaemia virus.......This chapter covers the genetics (genotypes and serotypes), clinical signs, host species, transmission, prevalence, diagnosis, control and prevention of viral haemorrhagic septicaemia virus....

  3. Viral Haemorrhagic Septicaemia Virus

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Olesen, Niels Jørgen; Skall, Helle Frank

    2013-01-01

    This chapter covers the genetics (genotypes and serotypes), clinical signs, host species, transmission, prevalence, diagnosis, control and prevention of viral haemorrhagic septicaemia virus.......This chapter covers the genetics (genotypes and serotypes), clinical signs, host species, transmission, prevalence, diagnosis, control and prevention of viral haemorrhagic septicaemia virus....

  4. Therapeutic effect analysis of prehospital first aid in patients with cardiopulmonary arrest caused by e-lectrical shock%电击致心跳呼吸骤停患者院前急救的疗效分析

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    郭云泊

    2015-01-01

    目的:探讨院前急救对电击致心跳呼吸骤停患者救治的意义。方法:选择2002年7月~2014年2月间我市社区健康服务中心收治的因电击伤致心跳呼吸骤停患者85例,探讨院前急救不同因素对复苏成功率、出院存活率的影响。结果:全组心跳呼吸骤停患者经院前急救后,心跳、呼吸恢复者21例(24.7%),患者存活并出院者13例(15.3%)。年龄高于60岁的高电压击伤的复苏成功率、出院存活率有所降低,但与<60岁组与低电压击伤组比较差异无显著性(P >0.05),电击后至行心肺复苏急救的时间<5 min 的患者的复苏成功率、出院存活率最高,且随着施救时间的延长(<5min,5~11min,11~16min,>16min),复苏成功率(58.33%比31.58%比8.00%比0%)、出院存活率(58.33%比15.79%比0%比0%)显著降低(P <0.05或<0.01)。结论:及早进行心肺复苏等院前急救措施,能够有效改善电击致心跳呼吸骤停患者的预后。%Objective:To explore clinical significance of prehospital first aid in treatment of patients with cardiopul-monary arrest caused by electrical shock.Methods:A total of 85 patients with cardiopulmonary arrest caused by e-lectrical shock,who hospitalized in our community health service center from Jul 2002 to Feb 2014,were selected. Influence of different factors of prehospital first aid on success rate of recovery and survival rate were explored.Re-sults:After prehospital first aid,heart beat and respiration recovered in 21 cases (24.7%)and 13 patients (15.3%) survived and discharged in 85 subjects.Success rate of recovery and survival rate on discharge in patients with age ≥60 years and high voltage wound were lower,but without significant difference compared with those of 0.05);for the time from electric shock to cardiopulmonary resuscitation,success rate of recovery and survival rate on discharge were the highest in

  5. Pre-shock chest compression pause effects on termination of ventricular fibrillation/tachycardia and return of organized rhythm within mechanical and manual cardiopulmonary resuscitation

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Olsen, J.A.; Brunborg, C.; Steinberg, M.; Persse, D.; Sterz, F.; Lozano, M., Jr.; Westfall, M.; Travis, D.T.; Lerner, E.B.; Brouwer, M.A.; Wik, L.

    2015-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Shorter manual chest compression pauses prior to defibrillation attempts is reported to improve the defibrillation success rate. Mechanical load-distributing band (LDB-) CPR enables shocks without compression pause. We studied pre-shock pause and termination of ventricular

  6. Prevention of intracerebral haemorrhage.

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    Mitchell, Patrick; Mitra, Dipayan; Gregson, Barbara A; Mendelow, A David

    2007-07-01

    Nontraumatic intracerebral haemorrhages arise from a wide range of causes falling into two broad groups: discreet vascular "ictohaemorrhagic" lesions such as aneurysms, arteriovenous malformations, cavernomas, tumours, and dural fistulae; and more generalised amyloid or hypertension related conditions. It is now possible using family history, associated risk factors and gradient echo MRI to predict cases at high risk of hypertensive or amyloid related haemorrhage. There is considerable potential for prevention of hypertensive haemorrhages by treatment of high risk cases with antihypertensive medication. As yet no effective preventative treatment for amyloid angiopathy related ICH has emerged although a variety of drugs are under investigation. Prevention of haemorrhage from ictohaemorrhagic lesions revolves around removal or obliteration of the lesion. Although there is a wide range of such lesions available treatments come down to three modalities. These are surgical excision, stereotactic radiosurgery and endovascular embolisation.

  7. The need to immobilise the cervical spine during cardiopulmonary resuscitation and electric shock administration in out-of-hospital cardiac arrest.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Desroziers, Milene; Mole, Sophie; Jost, Daniel; Tourtier, Jean-Pierre

    2016-06-13

    In cases of out-of hospital cardiac arrest (OHCA), falling to the ground can cause brain and neck trauma to the patient. We present a case of a man in his mid-60s who suffered from an OHCA resulting in a violent collapse. The patient received immediate cardiopulmonary resuscitation, but his spine was immobilised only after a large frontal haematoma was found. The resuscitation efforts resulted in return of spontaneous circulation and discharge from hospital. After this, doctors performed angioplasty, followed by a cardiopulmonary bypass. Later, CT scan examination reported a displaced and unstable fracture of the 6th vertebra without bone marrow involvement. The patient underwent a second operation. 40 days later, he was able to return home without sequela. This case shows the importance of analysing the circumstances of a fall, considering the possibility of two concomitant diagnoses and prioritising investigations and treatment.

  8. Crimean-Congo Haemorrhagic Fever

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Questions & answers Features Multimedia Contacts Crimean-Congo haemorrhagic fever Fact sheet N°208 January 2013 Key facts ... the principal tick vector. The Crimean-Congo haemorrhagic fever virus in animals and ticks The hosts of ...

  9. Shock

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shock can be caused by any condition that reduces blood flow, including: Heart problems (such as heart attack or heart failure ) Low blood volume (as with heavy bleeding or dehydration ) Changes in blood vessels (as with infection ...

  10. Pulmonary haemorrhage and nephritis

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    1983-04-30

    Apr 30, 1983 ... Treatment was commenced with penicillin and cefamandole and the patient was ..... reports may have described patients not as ill as this woman. Pathological discussion ... only possible with a direct immunofluorescence study, upon which classification of lung ... phages suggesting previous haemorrhage.

  11. [Haemorrhage after thyroid surgery].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Swirta, Jarosław S; Barczyński, Marcin

    2014-01-01

    Haemorrhage after thyroid surgery is rare, but if it occurs it is a life-threatening condition necessitating emergency surgery. The aim of this study was to evaluate prevalence and risk factors of haemorrhage after thyroid surgery. A retrospective analysis was undertaken in a group of 8931 consecutive patients with various thyroid diseases treated in 2004-2013 at our institution. Potential risk factors for postoperative haemorrhage after thyroid surgery were analysed using logistic regression model. Haemorrhage after thyroid operation necessitating emergency surgery occurred in 40 (0.45%) of 8931 patients. None of the patients died within the perioperative period. Bleeding occurred within first 24 hours following surgery in 38 (95%) patients, and in the remaining 2 (5%) patients in more than 24 hours after initial surgery. The following risk factors for bleeding after thyroid operation were identified: male sex (OR 3.618; 1.762-7.430; p or = 70 years (OR 3.052; 1.275-7.304; p = 0.012), surgery for hyperthyroidism (OR 2.873; 1.511-5.462; p = 0.001), smoking (OR 2.855; 1.502-5.428; p = 0.001), subtotal thyroidectomy in contrast to total thyroidectomy or lobectomy (OR 2.853; 1.356-6.004; p=0.006), and thyroid operation undertaken by resident in training in general surgery (OR 2.596; 1.393-4.837; p = 0.003). Haemorrhage after thyroid operation necessitating emergency surgical intervention occurs most frequently within first 24 hour following surgery. Hence, for safety reasons a minimum of 24-hour hospital stay is recommended in all patients with risk factors for postoperative bleeding after thyroid operation. Quality monitoring of thyroid surgery should include also risk factors for postoperative bleeding.

  12. Effect of mild hypothermia on the coagulation with traumatic haemorrhagic shock in rabbits%浅低温对创伤性失血性休克兔凝血功能的影响

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    彭罗根; 吴若; 赵会民

    2015-01-01

    Objective To investigated the mild hypothermia effect on coagulation in rabbits subjected to traumatic and hymorrhagic shock.Methods Twenty rabbits were randomly divided into two groups with ten animals in each group: sham control and mild hypothermia ( group T/H ) , traumatic hymorrhagic shock and mild hypothermia ( group T/HS).Hypothermia was induced by anesthesia induction, with a cold blanket and ice bag.Hemorrhage was induced by bleeding 35% of total blood volume.Capacity for coagulation was measured by thromboelastometry ( TEG ) and then the routine blood, temperature ( T ) , heart rate ( HR ) , shock index ( SI ) , mean arterial pressure ( MAP ) , hemoglobin ( HGB) , respiration ( R) and related physiological indexes were recorded at different time including before shock ( t0 ) , 30 minutes after shock ( t1 ) , 2 hours after hypothermia ( t2 ) , 2 hours after rewarm ( t3 ) .Results ①Baseline parameters were not significantly different among the groups.The survival rates in both groups were 100%.Compared with group T/H, the level of MAP and HGB in group T/HS were significantly lower at t1, t2 and t3 timepoints (all P0.05).The rate of clot formation (Angle) and the coagulationindex ( CI) in the two groups at t1 -t3 timepoints did not change significantly compared with baseline level (all P>0.05).③PLTs in group T/HS were reduced in t1, t2 and t3 timepoints (all P<0.05) and PLTs in t2 and t3 timepoints were significantly lower than that in t1 timepoint (all P<0.05). Conclusion Based on the results of the present study we suggest that mild hypothermia and rewarm can reduce the PLTs, then mild hypothermia can be safely performed after stabilization following the earliest traumatic haemorrhagic shock in rabbits.Mild hypothermia does not significantly effects on the holistic coagulation system in our model.%目的:研究浅低温对创伤性失血性休克凝血功能的影响。方法成年健康雄性新西兰兔20只,按照随机数

  13. Blood transfusion and the anaesthetist: management of massive haemorrhage

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thomas, D; Wee, M; Clyburn, P; Walker, I; Brohi, K; Collins, P; Doughty, H; Isaac, J; Mahoney, PF; Shewry, L

    2010-01-01

    Hospitals must have a major haemorrhage protocol in place and this should include clinical, laboratory and logistic responses. Immediate control of obvious bleeding is of paramount importance (pressure, tourniquet, haemostatic dressings). The major haemorrhage protocol must be mobilised immediately when a massive haemorrhage situation is declared. A fibrinogen 1.5 times normal represents established haemostatic failure and is predictive of microvascular bleeding. Early infusion of fresh frozen plasma (FFP; 15 ml.kg−1) should be used to prevent this occurring if a senior clinician anticipates a massive haemorrhage. Established coagulopathy will require more than 15 ml.kg−1 of FFP to correct. The most effective way to achieve fibrinogen replacement rapidly is by giving fibrinogen concentrate or cryoprecipitate if fibrinogen is unavailable. 1:1:1 red cell:FFP:platelet regimens, as used by the military, are reserved for the most severely traumatised patients. A minimum target platelet count of 75 × 109.l−1 is appropriate in this clinical situation. Group-specific blood can be issued without performing an antibody screen because patients will have minimal circulating antibodies. O negative blood should only be used if blood is needed immediately. In hospitals where the need to treat massive haemorrhage is frequent, the use of locally developed shock packs may be helpful. Standard venous thromboprophylaxis should be commenced as soon as possible after haemostasis has been secured as patients develop a prothrombotic state following massive haemorrhage. PMID:20963925

  14. Expulsive choroidal haemorrhage

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Srinivasan M

    1992-01-01

    Full Text Available Expulsive choroidal haemorrhage is a dramatic and serious complication of cataract surgery that occurred in five patients out of ten thousand consecutive cataract surgeries performed by the author during the year 1989 and 1990. Report about this dreaded complication after cataract surgery are scanty and as far as I can remember I have not seen any report in Indian ophthalmic literature recently. Since cataract surgery forms the major part of intra ocular surgeries performed in our country, I thought it would be appropriate to report about this rare complication which may occur to all of us. Out of five cases 3 were males and 2 were females in the age group ranging between 45-72 years. Two eyes regained vision up to 6/12 after intra operative expulsive haemorrhage. All the eyes were salvaged by doing anterior sclerotomy. Diabetes, hypertension, glaucoma and myopia are the commonest predisposing factors.

  15. Haemorrhage from Pancreatic Pseudocysts Presenting as Upper Gastrointestinal Haemorrhage

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Giuseppe Garcea

    2004-04-01

    Full Text Available Haemorrhage is a rare but frequently fatal complication of pancreatic pseudocysts. The high mortality associated with pancreatic haemorrhage makes prompt and aggressive management essential. Occasionally, haemorrhage may present atypically, leading to delay in its diagnosis and management. This report details a case of pancreatic haemorrhage presenting as an upper gastrointestinal bleed and discusses the subsequent management. When managing patients with pancreatic pseudocysts who present with the stigmata of upper gastrointestinal bleeding, the possibility that the bleeding originates from the pancreas must always be borne in mind.

  16. 七氟醚对感染性休克大鼠全身炎性反应及心肺功能的影响%Effects of sevoflurane on systemic inflammatory response and cardiopulmonary function in septic shock rats

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    胡柳; 景亮

    2009-01-01

    目的 评价七氟醚对感染性休克大鼠全身炎性反应及心肺功能的影响.方法 清洁级SD大鼠32只,体重250~300 g,月龄8~10月,雌雄各半,随机分为4组(n=8):假手术组(S组)仅开腹,不行盲肠结扎穿孔(CLP);感染性休克组(CLP组)采用CLP法建立感染性休克模型;七氟醚I组(SEV1组)感染性休克后1 h时吸入2.4%七氟醚30 min;七氟醚Ⅱ组(SEV2组)感染性休克后3 h时吸入2.4%七氟醚30 min.于感染性休克后1、3、5 h时记录MAP和HR,并采集动脉血样1.5ml,取0.3 ml血样行血气分析,剩余1.2 ml血样检测血浆肿瘤坏死因子α(TNF-α)、白细胞介素1(IL-1)、丙二醛(MDA)及一氧化氮(NO)的浓度.于感染性休克后5 h时测定心功能,记录心脏左心室舒张末期内径(LVEDD)、左心室收缩末期内径(LVESD)、左心室短轴缩短率(LVFS)和心输出量(CO).心功能测定后处死动物,取肺组织,计算肺湿干重比(W/D),测定伊文氏兰(EB)含量;取心、肺、肝、肾组织,检测NF-κB活性.结果 与s组比较,CLP组、SEV1组和SEV2组MAP降低,HR增快,LVEDD、LVESD、LVFS、CO、pH值、PaOz和PaCO2降低,肺W/D、EB含量、血浆TNF-α、IL-1、MDA和NO的浓度增加,心、肺、肝、肾组织的NF-κB活性升高(P0.05).结论 感染性休克后1 h大鼠吸入2.4%七氟醚30 min可抑制全身炎性反应,但抑制程度较低,不足以改善心肺功能.%Objective To investigate the effects of sevoflurane on the systemic inflammatory response and cardiopulmonary function in septic shock rats. Methods Thirty-two SD rats, 8-10 months old, weighing 250-300 g, were randomly divided into 4 groups (n = 8 each): sham operation group (group S), cecal ligation and puncture (CLP) induced septic shock group (group CLP) , sevoflurane I group (group SEV, ) and sevoflurane II group (group SEV,). The abdomen was opened but CLP was not performed in group S. The septic shock was induced by CLP as described by Baker et al. Group SEV, and SEV, inhaled 2

  17. Intracerebral haemorrhage after carotid endarterectomy

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Schroeder, T; Sillesen, H; Boesen, J

    1987-01-01

    Among 662 consecutive carotid endarterectomies eight cases of postoperative ipsilateral intracerebral haemorrhage were identified, occurring into brain areas which, preoperatively were without infarction. As blood pressures across the stenosis were routinely measured during surgery, the internal...

  18. Dengue and dengue haemorrhagic fever: Indian perspective

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    U C Chaturvedi; Rachna Nagar

    2008-11-01

    The relationship of this country with dengue has been long and intense. The first recorded epidemic of clinically dengue-like illness occurred at Madras in 1780 and the dengue virus was isolated for the first time almost simultaneously in Japan and Calcutta in 1943–1944. After the first virologically proved epidemic of dengue fever along the East Coast of India in 1963–1964, it spread to allover the country. The first full-blown epidemic of the severe form of the illness, the dengue haemorrhagic fever/dengue shock syndrome occurred in North India in 1996. Aedes aegypti is the vector for transmission of the disease. Vaccines or antiviral drugs are not available for dengue viruses; the only effective way to prevent epidemic degure fever/dengue haemorrhagic fever (DF/DHF) is to control the mosquito vector, Aedes aegypti and prevent its bite. This country has few virus laboratories and some of them have done excellent work in the area of molecular epidemiology, immunopathology and vaccine development. Selected work done in this country on the problems of dengue is presented here.

  19. Hemorragia postparto Postpartum haemorrhage

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    H. Karlsson

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available La hemorragia postparto es una de las complicaciones obstétricas más temidas y es una de las tres primeras causas de mortalidad materna en el mundo. Universalmente se define como la pérdida hemática superior a 500 ml tras un parto vaginal o a 1.000 ml tras una cesárea. La hemorragia postparto precoz (HPP es aquella que ocurre durante las primeras 24 horas tras el parto y es generalmente la más grave. Las causas de HPP incluyen atonía uterina, traumas/laceraciones, retención de productos de la concepción y alteraciones de la coagulación, siendo la más frecuente la atonía. El diagnóstico es clínico y el tratamiento ha de abarcar unas medidas generales de soporte vital y otras más específicas de carácter etiológico. Afortunadamente, es potencialmente evitable en la mayoría de los casos si se sigue una adecuada estrategia de prevención activa y sistemática en la fase de alumbramiento de todos los partos.Postpartum haemorrhage is one of the most dreaded obstetric complications and one of the three main causes of maternal mortality in the world. It is universally defined as haematic loss above 500 ml following a vaginal delivery or above 1,000 ml following a caesarean. An early postpartum haemorrhage (EPH is one that occurs during the first 24 hours following delivery and is generally the most serious. The causes of EPH include uterine atony, trauma/lacerations, retention of products of conception and alterations of coagulation, with atony being the most frequent. Diagnose is clinical and treatment must include general life support measures and other more specific measures of an etiological character. Fortunately, in the majority of cases it is potentially avoidable if an adequate strategy of active and systematic prevention is followed in the delivery phase of all labors.

  20. Subarachnoid Haemorrhage and Sports

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Liliana Sousa Nanji

    2015-11-01

    Full Text Available Background: Some cases of subarachnoid haemorrhage (SAH have been associated with vigorous physical activity, including sports. Our research aimed to describe the association between SAH and sports and to identify the types of sports that were more frequently found as precipitating factors in a tertiary single-centre SAH register. Methods: We retrieved information from a prospectively collected SAH registry and reviewed discharge notes of acute SAH patients admitted to the Stroke Unit of Hospital de Santa Maria, Lisbon, between 1995 and 2014. Results: Out of 738 patients included in the analysis, 424 (57.5% cases of SAH were preceded by physical activity. Nine cases (1.2% were associated with sports, namely running (2 cases, aerobics (2 cases, cycling, body balance, dance, surf and windsurf. Patients with SAH while practicing sports were younger than controls (average age 43.1 vs. 57.0 years; p = 0.007. In 1 patient, there was a report of trauma to the neck. Patients in the sports group only had Hunt and Hess scale grades 1 (11.1% or 2 (88.9% at admission, while patients in the control group had a wider distribution in severity. Conclusions: Our findings indicate that SAH precipitated by sports is not very frequent and is uncommonly related to trauma. Patients who suffered SAH associated with sports were younger and apparently had a milder clinical presentation.

  1. [Pathophysiology of hemorragic shock].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Copotoiu, R; Cinca, E; Collange, O; Levy, F; Mertes, P-M

    2016-11-01

    This review addresses the pathophysiology of hemorrhagic shock, a condition produced by rapid and significant loss of intravascular volume, which may lead to hemodynamic instability, decreases in oxygen delivery, decreased tissue perfusion, cellular hypoxia, organ damage, and death. The initial neuroendocrine response is mainly a sympathetic activation. Haemorrhagic shock is associated altered microcirculatory permeability and visceral injury. It is also responsible for a complex inflammatory response associated with hemostasis alteration. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Masson SAS. All rights reserved.

  2. Assistência circulatória com bomba centrífuga no choque cardiogênico após cirurgia com extracorpórea Assisted circulation for cardiogenic shock following cardiopulmonary bypass with a centrifugal pump

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Paulo M Pêgo-Fernandes

    1991-08-01

    progressiva de função ventricular, sendo possível a retirada da bomba centrífuga após 60 horas. O paciente faleceu no 35º dia de pós-operatório por complicações respiratórias. Acreditamos que a utilização com maior freqüência e mais precocemente de assistência circulatória, permitirá uma redução da mortalidade global. O uso de ecocardiograma intra-esofágico nos nossos quatro pacientes foi útil na avaliação da evolução da função ventricular, fornecendo subsídios para retirada ou não da assistência.From April to December 1990, four patients were submitted to left ventricular assistance with centrifugal pump, because they presented cardiogenic shock after cardiac surgery, not responsive to intraortic balloon pump and drugs. The first patient had an aneurysm of anterior wall of the left ventricle with ejection fraction of 16% in the pre-operative period. The cardiac surgery was technically successful, but the patient could not be weaned from cardiopulmonary bypass with maximal pharmacological therapy and intra-aortic balloon pump. Then we used Biomedicus centrifugal pump for left ventricular assistance. The patient was assisted for 48 hours. Nowadays, she is in NYHA class II at eleventh post-operative month. The second case was a patient submitted to coronary bypass and mitral valve replacement. At second post-operative day the graft to LAD was occluded, resulting in cardiac arrest. The patient was put again in cardiopulmonary bypass, and could not be weaned. The left ventricle had a myocardial infarction, and the assisted circulation was used as a bridge to cardiac transplantation. After five days, without heart donor, he died due to a large embolus at lung. The third case was a patient with bad left ventricular function, submitted to coronary bypass. The patient could not be weaned of cardiopulmonary bypass. He was put in left assisted circulation for 32 hours. This patient had bleeding diathesis. He died in the fourth post-operative day due to

  3. Cardiac arrest - cardiopulmonary resuscitation

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Basri Lenjani; Besnik Elshani; Nehat Baftiu; Kelmend Pallaska; Kadir Hyseni; Njazi Gashi; Nexhbedin Karemani; Ilaz Bunjaku; Taxhidin Zaimi; Arianit Jakupi

    2014-01-01

    Objective:To investigate application of cardiopulmonary resuscitation(CPR) measures within the golden minutes inEurope.Methods:The material was taken from theUniversityClinical Center ofKosovo -EmergencyCentre inPristina, during the two(2) year period(2010-2011).The collected date belong to the patients with cardiac arrest have been recorded in the patients' log book protocol at the emergency clinic.Results:During the2010 to2011 in the emergency center of theCUCK inPristina have been treated a total of269 patients with cardiac arrest, of whom159 or59.1% have been treated in2010, and110 patients or40.9% in2011.Of the269 patients treated in the emergency centre,93 or34.6% have exited lethally in the emergency centre, and176 or 65.4% have been transferred to other clinics.In the total number of patients with cardiac arrest, males have dominated with186 cases, or69.1%.The average age of patients included in the survey was56.7 year oldSD±16.0 years.Of the269 patients with cardiac arrest, defibrillation has been applied for93 or34.6% of patients.In the outpatient settings defibrillation has been applied for3 or3.2% of patients.Patients were defibrillated with application of one to four shocks. Of27 cases with who have survived cardiac arrest, none of them have suffered cardiac arrest at home,3 or11.1% of them have suffered cardiac arrest on the street, and24 or88.9% of them have suffered cardiac arrest in the hospital.5 out of27 patients survived have ended with neurological impairment.Cardiac arrest cases were present during all days of the week, but frequently most reported cases have been onMonday with32.0% of cases, and onFriday with24.5% of cases. Conclusions:All survivors from cardiac arrest have received appropriate medical assistance within10 min from attack, which implies that if cardiac arrest occurs near an institution health care(with an opportunity to provide the emergent health care) the rate of survival is higher.

  4. Hantavirus cardiopulmonary syndrome successfully treated with high-volume hemofiltration

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bugedo, Guillermo; Florez, Jorge; Ferres, Marcela; Roessler, Eric; Bruhn, Alejandro

    2016-01-01

    Hantavirus cardiopulmonary syndrome has a high mortality rate, and early connection to extracorporeal membrane oxygenation has been suggested to improve outcomes. We report the case of a patient with demonstrated Hantavirus cardiopulmonary syndrome and refractory shock who fulfilled the criteria for extracorporeal membrane oxygenation and responded successfully to high volume continuous hemofiltration. The implementation of high volume continuous hemofiltration along with protective ventilation reversed the shock within a few hours and may have prompted recovery. In patients with Hantavirus cardiopulmonary syndrome, a short course of high volume continuous hemofiltration may help differentiate patients who can be treated with conventional intensive care unit management from those who will require more complex therapies, such as extracorporeal membrane oxygenation. PMID:27410413

  5. Haemorrhagic Colitis Caused by Dasatinib

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nishant Patodi

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Gastrointestinal bleeding appears to be a common adverse event associated with dasatinib therapy. Here we present a case of a 59-year-old man with chronic myeloid leukaemia (CML developing the rarest complication of haemorrhagic colitis with dasatinib therapy which resolved rapidly after treatment withdrawal.

  6. Haemorrhagic Colitis Caused by Dasatinib

    Science.gov (United States)

    Patodi, Nishant; Sagar, Nidhi; Rudzki, Zbigniew; Langman, Gerald; Sharma, Naveen

    2012-01-01

    Gastrointestinal bleeding appears to be a common adverse event associated with dasatinib therapy. Here we present a case of a 59-year-old man with chronic myeloid leukaemia (CML) developing the rarest complication of haemorrhagic colitis with dasatinib therapy which resolved rapidly after treatment withdrawal. PMID:23316400

  7. Takotsubo cardiomyopathy following subarachnoid haemorrhage.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maekawa, Hidetsugu; Hadeishi, Hiromu

    2014-08-01

    A 67-year-old woman was admitted with aneurysmal subarachnoid haemorrhage and a 12-lead ECG showed ST segment elevation. Transthoracic echocardiography confirmed akinesis of the left ventricular mid-apical segment, with an ejection fraction of 26%, features characteristic of takotsubo cardiomyopathy. Five days later, we identified thrombus in the apex of the left ventricle. Sixteen days after onset, the thrombus had disappeared and wall motion improved (ejection fraction 58%) without evidence of cardioembolism. Takotsubo cardiomyopathy is a cause of cardiac dysfunction after stroke, including SAH. It is characterised by transiently depressed contractile function of the left mid and apical ventricle, without obstructive coronary artery disease. Clinicians should suspect takotsubo cardiomyopathy in patients with subarachnoid haemorrhage who have an ECG abnormality. Echocardiography is needed to detect the distinctive regional wall motion abnormality. Despite its severity in the acute phase, takotsubo cardiomyopathy is self-limiting and its management is conservative.

  8. Epidemiology of intracerebral haemorrhage in Livorno district

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Luca Masotti

    2011-08-01

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Intracranial haemorrhage represents the most feared stroke subtype. AIM: To evaluate the burden of intracranial haemorrhage in Tuscany hospitals with special reference to Livorno district. MATERIALS AND METHODS: Data of patients discharged in 2009 from Tuscan and Livorno hospitals with codes ICD-9-CM related to any type of spontaneous intracranial haemorrhage were selected and analyzed. RESULTS: 3,472 patients were discharged from Tuscan hospitals with these diagnoses. Overall mortality was 24.3%. 50% of patients were admitted in Internal Medicine wards. Incidence of intracranial haemorrhage and intracerebral haemorrhage (ICH in population of Livorno district was 64 and 45/100,000 inhabitants/year with related mortality of 36.5% and 39.4%respectively. Intra-hospital mortality of patients admitted in Livorno hospitals for intracranial haemorrhage were 36.7%. 40% of deaths occurred in the first 48 hours. 69.6% of intracranial haemorrhage were ICHs, 16.8% subaracnoideal. Intra-hospital mortality, admissions for intracranial haemorrhage in respect of total admissions and mortality for intracranial haemorrhage in respect to total mortality increased in the last decade. 23% of patients with intracranial haemorrhage and 16% of patients with ICH underwent to surgical procedures. ICHs related to antithrombotic treatment significantly increased in the last years. Mortality in patients on antithrombotic drugs was three times over compared to that in patients not undergone these drugs (43.7% vs 12.8%, p < 0.01. CONCLUSION: There is an increasing trend in frequency, mortality and hospital burden of intracranial haemorrhage and ICH. Efforts aimed at reducing the burden and consequences of this devasting disease are warranted.

  9. Effect of restrictive fluid infusion in the pulmonary contusion patients with haemorrhagic shock%限制性补液在肺挫伤伴失血性休克中的应用效果

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    古孜丽努尔.吐尼亚孜; 余泽鸿; 阿伊提拉汗.艾力

    2012-01-01

    目的 探讨限制性补液在肺挫伤伴失血性休克中的应用效果.方法 2009年1月~2011年1月,某院急诊科收治的肺挫伤伴失血性休克患者62例,依据入院顺序随机分为2组,观察组33例,对照组29例.2组患者均予常规基础治疗,对照组采取充分补液方式,观察组采取限制性补液方式,评价2组临床疗效及预后.结果 观察组平均输液量、治疗后平均动脉压(MAP)、中心静脉压(CVP)均低于对照组;观察组治疗后凝血功能、动脉血气分析结果改善均优于对照组;观察组脱机时间明显短于对照组,ARDS及MODS发生率、死亡率等低于对照组.结论 限制性补液应用于肺挫伤伴失血性休克,可显著改善凝血功能、缓解低氧血症及酸中毒,缩短脱机时间,降低ARDS、MODS发生率及死亡率,值得临床深入研究.%OBJECTIVE To explore the effect of limited fluid resuscitation on pulmonary contusion complicated with hemor-rhagic shock. METHODS From Jan. 2009 to Jan. 2011, 62 cases of patients in the emergency with pulmonary contusion complicated with hemorrhagic shock were divided into two groups according to the hospitalized sequence. The observation group included 33 cases, and the control group included 29 cases. Both groups received routine treatment. The control group received abundant fluid resuscitation and the observation group received limited fluid resuscitation. The clinical effect and prognosis of the two groups were evaluated. RESULTS The mean Infusion, MAP and CVP in the observation group were significantly lower than that in the control group. The improvement condition of coagulation function and arterial blood gas analysis in the observation group were better than that in the control group. The time of getting off the breathing apparatus in the observation group were significantly shorter than that in the control group, and the rates of ARDS, MODS and mortality in the observation group were significantly lower than

  10. Postoperative abdominal complications after cardiopulmonary bypass

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dong Guohua

    2012-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background To summarize the diagnostic and therapeutic experiences on the patients who suffered abdominal complications after cardiovascular surgery with cardiopulmonary bypass(CPB. Methods A total of 2349 consecutive patients submitted to cardiovascular surgery with CPB in our hospital from Jan 2004 to Dec 2010 were involved. The clinical data of any abdominal complication, including its incidence, characters, relative risks, diagnostic measures, medical or surgical management and mortality, was retrospectively analyzed. Results Of all the patients, 33(1.4% developed abdominal complications postoperatively, including 11(33.3% cases of paralytic ileus, 9(27.3% of gastrointestinal haemorrhage, 2(6.1% of gastroduodenal ulcer perforation, 2(6.1% of acute calculus cholecystitis, 3(9.1% of acute acalculus cholecystitis, 4(12.1% of hepatic dysfunction and 2(6.1% of ischemia bowel diseases. Of the 33 patients, 26 (78.8% accepted medical treatment and 7 (21.2% underwent subsequent surgical intervention. There were 5(15.2% deaths in this series, which was significantly higher than the overall mortality (2.7%. Positive history of peptic ulcer, advanced ages, bad heart function, preoperative IABP support, prolonged CPB time, low cardiac output and prolonged mechanical ventilation are the risk factors of abdominal complications. Conclusions Abdominal complications after cardiovascular surgery with CPB have a low incidence but a higher mortality. Early detection and prompt appropriate intervention are essential for the outcome of the patients.

  11. The clinical presentation of preterm cerebellar haemorrhage

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    G.M. Ecury-Goossen (Ginette); J. Dudink (Jeroen); M. Leguin (Maarten); M. Feijen-Roon (Monique); S. Horsch (Sandra); P. Govaert (Paul)

    2010-01-01

    textabstractThe objective of this study was to evaluate clinical symptoms and findings on cranial ultrasound (CUS) in preterm infants with cerebellar haemorrhage through retrospective analysis of all preterm infants with a postnatal CUS or MRI diagnosis of cerebellar haemorrhage admitted in a tertia

  12. Acute recurrent haemorrhage of an intracranial meningioma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bellut, David; Nern, Christian; Burkhardt, Jan-Karl; Könü, Dilek; Bertalanffy, Helmut; Krayenbühl, Niklaus

    2011-07-01

    Meningioma-associated haemorrhages are rare. To our knowledge this is the first report of a patient with an acute two-stage haemorrhage of a benign intracranial meningioma (World Health Organization grade I) verified by cranial CT scan and histopathological examination. Early surgery with complete tumour removal led to a good outcome for the patient. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  13. Ultrasonically detectable cerebellar haemorrhage in preterm infants.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    McCarthy, Lisa Kenyon

    2011-07-01

    To determine the frequency and pattern of cerebellar haemorrhage (CBH) on routine cranial ultrasound (cUS) imaging in infants of ≤32 weeks gestation, and to investigate how extremely preterm infants with CBH differ from those with severe intraventricular haemorrhage (IVH).

  14. Viral haemorrhagic fevers in healthcare settings.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ftika, L; Maltezou, H C

    2013-03-01

    Viral haemorrhagic fevers (VHFs) typically manifest as rapidly progressing acute febrile syndromes with profound haemorrhagic manifestations and very high fatality rates. VHFs that have the potential for human-to-human transmission and onset of large nosocomial outbreaks include Crimean-Congo haemorrhagic fever, Ebola haemorrhagic fever, Marburg haemorrhagic fever and Lassa fever. Nosocomial outbreaks of VHFs are increasingly reported nowadays, which likely reflects the dynamics of emergence of VHFs. Such outbreaks are associated with an enormous impact in terms of human lives and costs for the management of cases, contact tracing and containment. Surveillance, diagnostic capacity, infection control and the overall preparedness level for management of a hospital-based VHF event are very limited in most endemic countries. Diagnostic capacities for VHFs should increase in the field and become affordable. Availability of appropriate protective equipment and education of healthcare workers about safe clinical practices and infection control is the mainstay for the prevention of nosocomial spread of VHFs.

  15. Desmopressin Acetate in Intracranial Haemorrhage

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Thomas Kapapa

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Introduction. The secondary increase in the size of intracranial haematomas as a result of spontaneous haemorrhage or trauma is of particular relevance in the event of prior intake of platelet aggregation inhibitors. We describe the effect of desmopressin acetate as a means of temporarily stabilising the platelet function. Patients and Methods. The platelet function was analysed in 10 patients who had received single (N=4 or multiple (N=6 doses of acetylsalicylic acid and 3 patients (control group who had not taken acetylsalicylic acid. All subjects had suffered intracranial haemorrhage. Analysis was performed before, half an hour and three hours after administration of desmopressin acetate. Statistical analysis was performed by applying a level of significance of P≤0.05. Results. (1 Platelet function returned to normal 30 minutes after administration of desmopressin acetate. (2 The platelet function worsened again after three hours. (3 There were no complications related to electrolytes or fluid balance. Conclusion. Desmopressin acetate can stabilise the platelet function in neurosurgical patients who have received acetylsalicylic acid prior to surgery without causing transfusion-related side effects or a loss of time. The effect is, however, limited and influenced by the frequency of drug intake. Further controls are needed in neurosurgical patients.

  16. Embolization for non-variceal upper gastrointestinal tract haemorrhage: A systematic review

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mirsadraee, S.; Tirukonda, P.; Nicholson, A. [Department of Radiology, Leeds General Infirmary, Leeds (United Kingdom); Everett, S.M. [Department of Gastroenterology, Leeds General Infirmary, Leeds (United Kingdom); McPherson, S.J., E-mail: simon.mcpherson@leedsth.nhs.u [Department of Radiology, Leeds General Infirmary, Leeds (United Kingdom)

    2011-06-15

    Aim: To assess the published evidence on the endovascular treatment of non-variceal upper gastrointestinal haemorrhage. Materials and methods: An Ovid Medline search of published literature was performed (1966-2009). Non-English literature, experimental studies, variceal haemorrhage and case series with fewer than five patients were excluded. The search yielded 1888 abstracts. Thirty-five articles were selected for final analysis. Results: The total number of pooled patients was 927. The technical and clinical success of embolization ranged from 52-100% and 44-100%, respectively. The pooled mean technical/clinical success rate in primary upper gastrointestinal tract haemorrhage (PUGITH) only, trans-papillary haemorrhage (TPH) only, and mixed studies were 84%/67%, 93%/89%, and 93%/64%, respectively. Clinical outcome was adversely affected by multi-organ failure, shock, corticosteroids, transfusion, and coagulopathy. The anatomical source of haemorrhage and procedural variables did not affect the outcome. A successful embolization improved survival by 13.3 times. Retrospective comparison with surgery demonstrated equivalent mortality and clinical success, despite embolization being applied to a more elderly population with a higher prevalence of co-morbidities. Conclusions: Embolization is effective in this very difficult cohort of patients with outcomes similar to surgery.

  17. T cell responses and dengue haemorrhagic fever.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Screaton, Gavin; Mongkolsapaya, Juthathip

    2006-01-01

    The enhancement of severe disease upon secondary infection makes dengue almost unique among infectious pathogens and presents a serious challenge to vaccine design. Several key observations have been made which shed light onto this phenomenon particularly that antibodies can enhance Fc receptor-dependent uptake of virus into macrophages thereby increasing virus replication. Furthermore there seems to be a relationship between the peak virus load and disease severity. However, a second key feature of dengue is that the life-threatening symptoms do not correlate with the period of high viraemia; instead they occur at a time when the virus load is in steep decline. The coincidence of severe disease manifestations with defervescence and virus control suggests that the symptoms may be a consequence of the immune response to the virus rather than virus induced cytopathology. One of the key elements in the immune response to viruses are T cells which can both secrete a host of inflammatory cytokines and also be directly cytotoxic to infected cells. There are a number of experimental models of T cell-induced immunopathology including in responses to viruses. Particularly interesting in this respect are models of RSV-induced immunopathology, which have direct relevance to vaccine design as a formalin-inactivated vaccine to RSV actually enhanced disease in children when they became naturally infected with RSV, an echo of the disease enhancement seen in dengue. We will present an analysis of CD8+ T cell responses to a number of novel T cell epitopes during dengue infection and also analyse the function and cytokine secretion of these cells. We suggest that an exaggerated and partially misdirected T cell response seen in secondary dengue infection may be part of the complex series of events leading to dengue haemorrhagic fever and shock.

  18. Haemostatic management of obstetric haemorrhage.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Collis, R E; Collins, P W

    2015-01-01

    The haemostatic management of major obstetric haemorrhage remains challenging, and current published guidance relies heavily on experience from the non-pregnant population and expert opinion. In recent years, an interest in the implications of relative hypofibrinogenaemia, point-of-care monitoring of coagulation abnormalities, and the potential to give goal-directed therapy to correct coagulopathies, have created the possibility of significantly challenging and changing guidance. There is evidence that the haemostatic impairment in the pregnant population is different from trauma-induced bleeding, and the type and rate of onset of coagulopathies differ depending on the underlying cause. This review examines areas such as possible intervention points, describes evidence for over-transfusion of fresh frozen plasma in some situations and challenges conventional thinking on formulaic management. It also examines the rationale for other therapeutic options, including fibrinogen concentrate and tranexamic acid.

  19. Surgical Craniotomy for Intracerebral Haemorrhage.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mendelow, A David

    2015-01-01

    Craniotomy is probably indicated for patients with superficial spontaneous lobar supratentorial intracerebral haemorrhage (ICH) when the level of consciousness drops below 13 within the first 8 h of the onset of the haemorrhage. Once the level drops below 9, it is probably too late to consider craniotomy for these patients, so clinical vigilance is paramount. While this statement is only backed up by evidence that is moderately strong, meta-analysis of available data suggests that it is true in the rather limited number of patients with ICH. Meta-analyses like this can often predict the results of future prospective randomised controlled trials a decade or more before the trials are completed and published. Countless such examples exist in the literature, as is the case for thrombolysis in patients with myocardial infarction in the last millennium: meta-analysis determined the efficacy more than a decade BEFORE the last trial (ISIS-2) confirmed the benefit of thrombolysis for myocardial infarction. Careful examination of the meta-analysis' Forest plots in this chapter will demonstrate why this statement is made at the outset. Other meta-analyses of surgery for ICH have also indicated that minimal interventional techniques using topical thrombolysis or endoscopy via burrholes or even twist drill aspiration may be particularly successful for the treatment of supratentorial ICH, especially when the clot is deep seated. Ongoing clinical trials (CLEAR III and MISTIE III) should confirm this in the fullness of time. There are 2 exceptions to these generalisations. First, based on trial evidence, aneurysmal ICH is best treated with surgery. Second, cerebellar ICH represents a special case because of the development of hydrocephalus, which may require expeditious drainage as the intracranial pressure rises. The cerebellar clot will then require evacuation, usually via posterior fossa craniectomy, rather than craniotomy. Technical advances suggest that image-guided surgery

  20. Cardiopulmonary bypass in pregnancy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mukul Chandra Kapoor

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Cardiac surgery carried out on cardiopulmonary bypass (CPB in a pregnant woman is associated with poor neonatal outcomes although maternal outcomes are similar to cardiac surgery in non-pregnant women. Most adverse maternal and fetal outcomes from cardiac surgery during pregnancy are attributed to effects of CPB. The CPB is associated with utero-placental hypoperfusion due to a number of factors, which may translate into low fetal cardiac output, hypoxia and even death. Better maternal and fetal outcomes may be achieved by early pre-operative optimization of maternal cardiovascular status, use of perioperative fetal monitoring, optimization of CPB, delivery of a viable fetus before the operation and scheduling cardiac surgery on an elective basis during the second trimester.

  1. Automated cardiopulmonary resuscitation: a case study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Spiro, Jon; Theodosiou, Maria; Doshi, Sagar

    2014-02-01

    Rates of survival after cardiac arrest are low and correlate with the quality of cardiopulmonary resuscitation (CPR). Devices that deliver automated CPR (A-CPR) can provide sustained and effective chest compressions, which are especially useful during patient transfer and while simultaneous invasive procedures are being performed. The use of such devices can also release members of resuscitation teams for other work. This article presents a case study involving a man with acute myocardial infarction complicated by cardiogenic shock and pulmonary oedema. It describes how ED nursing and medical teams worked together to deliver A-CPR, discusses the use of A-CPR devices in a tertiary cardiac centre, and highlights the advantages of using such devices.

  2. Hypopituitarism is uncommon after aneurysmal subarachnoid haemorrhage

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Klose, Marianne; Brennum, Jannick; Poulsgaard, Lars

    2010-01-01

    Aneurysmal subarachnoid haemorrhage (SAH) has recently been reported as a common cause of chronic hypopituitarism, and introduction of routine neuroendocrine screening has been advocated. We aimed at estimating the risk of hypopituitarism after SAH using strict criteria including confirmatory...

  3. Viral haemorrhagic fevers in South Africa

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    particle for some), the haemorrhagic fever (HF)-causing viruses have to be handled .... The filoviruses. The filoviruses, EVD and MVD viruses, are known to cause highly .... attributed to a previously unknown arenavirus, dubbed the Lujo virus.

  4. Ebola haemorrhagic fever among hospitalised children and ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Ebola haemorrhagic fever among hospitalised children and adolescents in nothern Uganda ... African Health Sciences ... Conclusion : Similar to previous Ebola outbreaks, a relative sparing of children in this outbreak was observed. The under ...

  5. European research priorities for intracerebral haemorrhage

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Steiner, Thorsten; Petersson, Jesper; Al-Shahi Salman, Rustam

    2011-01-01

    Over 2 million people are affected by intracerebral haemorrhage (ICH) worldwide every year, one third of them dying within 1 month, and many survivors being left with permanent disability. Unlike most other stroke types, the incidence, morbidity and mortality of ICH have not declined over time...... and disability. The European Research Network on Intracerebral Haemorrhage EURONICH is a multidisciplinary academic research collaboration that has been established to define current research priorities and to conduct large clinical studies on all aspects of ICH....

  6. Feto-maternal haemorrhage in therapeutic abortion

    Science.gov (United States)

    Voigt, J. C.; Britt, R. P.

    1969-01-01

    The incidence of feto-maternal haemorrhage in induced abortion has been studied with the Kleihauer technique. All four methods of termination used were shown to result in such haemorrhages. The incidence below 12 weeks' gestation, however, was very small and there seems to be no reason for offering routine rhesus-immunoglobulin to these women. When it is essential to terminate a pregnancy of 12 weeks' size or more in a rhesus-negative woman immunoglobulin should be given. PMID:4187694

  7. Ebola and Marburg haemorrhagic fever.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rougeron, V; Feldmann, H; Grard, G; Becker, S; Leroy, E M

    2015-03-01

    Ebolaviruses and Marburgviruses (family Filoviridae) are among the most virulent pathogens for humans and great apes causing severe haemorrhagic fever and death within a matter of days. This group of viruses is characterized by a linear, non-segmented, single-stranded RNA genome of negative polarity. The overall burden of filovirus infections is minimal and negligible compared to the devastation caused by malnutrition and other infectious diseases prevalent in Africa such as malaria, dengue or tuberculosis. In this paper, we review the knowledge gained on the eco/epidemiology, the pathogenesis and the disease control measures for Marburg and Ebola viruses developed over the last 15 years. The overall progress is promising given the little attention that these pathogen have achieved in the past; however, more is to come over the next decade given the more recent interest in these pathogens as potential public and animal health concerns. Licensing of therapeutic and prophylactic options may be achievable over the next 5-10 years.

  8. An Emerging Pulmonary Haemorrhagic Syndrome in Dogs: Similar to the Human Leptospiral Pulmonary Haemorrhagic Syndrome?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    R. Klopfleisch

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available Severe pulmonary haemorrhage is a rare necropsy finding in dogs but the leptospiral pulmonary haemorrhagic syndrome (LPHS is a well recognized disease in humans. Here we report a pulmonary haemorrhagic syndrome in dogs that closely resembles the human disease. All 15 dogs had massive, pulmonary haemorrhage affecting all lung lobes while haemorrhage in other organs was minimal. Histologically, pulmonary lesions were characterized by acute, alveolar haemorrhage without identifiable vascular lesions. Seven dogs had mild alveolar wall necrosis with hyaline membranes and minimal intraalveolar fibrin. In addition, eight dogs had acute renal tubular necrosis. Six dogs had a clinical diagnosis of leptospirosis based on renal and hepatic failure, positive microscopic agglutination test (MAT and/or positive blood/urine Leptospira-specific PCR. Leptospira could not be cultured post mortem from the lungs or kidneys. However, Leptospira-specific PCR was positive in lung, liver or kidneys of three dogs. In summary, a novel pulmonary haemorrhagic syndrome was identified in dogs but the mechanism of the massive pulmonary erythrocyte extravasation remains elusive. The lack of a consistent post mortem identification of Leptospira spp. in dogs with pulmonary haemorrhage raise questions as to whether additional factors besides Leptospira may cause this as yet unrecognized entity in dogs.

  9. Extracorporeal cardiopulmonary resuscitation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Steven A. Conrad

    2016-04-01

    Full Text Available ECPR is defined as the rapidly-deployed application of venoarterial extracorporeal membrane oxygenation, in patients with cardiac arrest, during cardiopulmonary resuscitation before the return of ROSC. ECPR is one of the most rapidly growing segments of ECLS, and is becoming more widespread. Consideration for institution of ECPR is given to patients with witnessed arrest, good quality CPR instituted within 5 min of arrest, in whom ROSC does not occur within 15 min, and who can complete cannulation within 30–60 min. Patients from both inpatient and out-of-hospital settings are candidates if they meet these criteria. Deep hypothermic cardiac arrest, such as cold-water drowning, should receive consideration for ECPR even after considerable duration of arrest. Available outcome data are based on retrospective observation studies, some with propensity matching, and suggests a higher chance for survival with ECPR. Published outcomes from ECPR, however, are difficult to interpret, since many centers classify their use of ECLS after ROSC, in addition to ECLS before ROSC, as ECPR. Both children and adults are candidates for ECPR, but the experience in children is weighted heavily toward those with a diagnosis of cardiac disease and arrest occurring within closely monitored units.

  10. Risk of subarachnoid haemorrhage in first degree relatives of patients with subarachnoid haemorrhage

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Gaist, D; Vaeth, M; Tsiropoulos, I

    2000-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: To estimate the risk of occurrence of subarachnoid haemorrhage in first degree relatives (parents, siblings, children) of patients with subarachnoid haemorrhage. DESIGN: Population based cohort study using data from the Danish National Discharge Registry and the Central Person Registry....... SUBJECTS: Incident cases of subarachnoid haemorrhage admitted to hospital from 1977 to 1995 (9367 patients) and their first degree relatives (14 781). MAIN OUTCOME MEASURES: The incidence rate of subarachnoid haemorrhage was determined for the relatives and compared with that of the entire population......, standardised for age, sex, and calendar period. This process was repeated for patients discharged from neurosurgery units, as diagnoses from these wards had high validity (93%). RESULTS: 18 patients had a total of 19 first degree relatives with subarachnoid haemorrhage during the study period, corresponding...

  11. 醋酸林格氏液自体血液回收在失血性休克患者急诊手术中的应用%The application of acetated Ringer's solution and autologous blood transfusion in the patients with acute haemorrhagic shock receiving emergency operation

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    黄陈红; 余艳丽; 周文; 张希洲

    2012-01-01

    目的:探讨醋酸林格氏液自体血液回收在失血性休克患者急诊手术中的应用效果及护理配合要点.方法:对2007-11-2010-11我院失血性休克急诊手术病例119例,随机分成观察组60例和对照组59例,观察组在自体血液回输前应用醋酸林格氏液1000ml,对照组在自体血液回输前应用乳酸林格氏液1000ml,比较术后2h心率、血压及毛细血管充盈时间与24 h红细胞、血红蛋白、血乳酸水平和肝功能的的变化.结果:119例患者手术顺利,无1例患者出现输血反应和其他并发症,术后2h、24 h红细胞(RBC)、血红蛋白(HGB)、血压(BP)比术前明显增高(P<0.05).心率比术前明显降低(P<0.05),毛细血管充盈时间比术前明显缩短(P<0.05).观察组24小时后血乳酸和肝功能与术前无明显差异,对照组血乳酸水平明显增高,肝功能也有较明显的变化,和观察组比较差异有统计学意义(P<0.01).结论:自体血液回收在失血性休克急诊手术中的应用安全有效,节约了血源.醋酸林格氏液在救治低血容量性休克中优于乳酸林格氏液,且对血小板和肝功能具有较好的保护作用.%Objective: To investigate the application and nursing of Acetated Ringer's solution in patients with acute haemorrhagic shock receiving emergency operation. Method: 119 cases of acute hemorrhagic shock patients receiving emergency operation from Nov. 2007 to Nov. 2010 in our hospital were enrolled in this study. They were random divided into two groups; 60 cases of the experimental group (1000 ml Acetated Ringer's solution infused before autologous blood transfusion) and 59 cases of the control group (1000 ml Lactated Ringer's solution infused before autologous blood transfusion). RBC, HGB, HR, BP and capillary refill times at 2 h and the change of red blood cells, hemoglobin, the level of lactic acid in blood and the liver function at 24 h were compared after operation. Result: All patients were

  12. Retinal haemorrhages in vacuum extraction deliveries

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bahgat Mostafa

    1987-01-01

    Full Text Available Two hundred and thirty eight newly born infants were subjected to fundus examination in the first 5 hours of labour then daily till discharge from the hospital then weekly till complete absorption of retinal haemorrhages The 238 infants were 23 delivered by caesarean section, 90 with spontaneous vaginal delivery,45 babies (over3.5 kgm delivered vaginallyand80 delivered by vacuum extraction. It was found that 37.39% of the newborns had retinal haemorrhages. The incidence, type and severity of retinal haemorrhages were related to the extent of obstetric trauma during birth. They were least with caesarean section. (4.35%, more in babies with spontaneous vaginal delivery (20%, more higher in infants over 3.5 kgm birth weight (33.33% and maximum in vacuum extraction deliveries (68.75%. A good correlation was made between the site and duration of cup application, level and rate of increase of negative pressure, the presence and size of cephalhematoma and the incidence and severity of retinal haemorrhages A good choice of cases as well as good control of the technique of vacuum extraction will minimize the incidence and severity of retinal haemorrhages in the new born.

  13. Emergency percutaneous transcatheter embolisation of acute arterial haemorrhage.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Keeling, A N

    2010-09-01

    The purpose of this study was to review indications, source of haemorrhage, method of embolisation and clinical outcome in patients referred to Interventional Radiology for the emergency management of acute arterial haemorrhage.

  14. Ultrasound and necropsy study of periventricular haemorrhage in preterm infants.

    OpenAIRE

    Szymonowicz, W; Schafler, K; Cussen, L J; Yu, V Y

    1984-01-01

    The diagnostic accuracy of cerebral ultrasound for periventricular haemorrhage was determined by comparing this with necropsy findings in 30 preterm neonates of 30 weeks' gestation or less and birthweight under 1500 g. Ultrasound gave an accurate diagnosis of 85% in infants with germinal layer haemorrhage, 92% in intraventricular haemorrhage, and 97% in intracerebral haemorrhage. False positive errors were caused by vascular congestion; false negative errors occurred when the maximum dimensio...

  15. The role of the histaminergic system in the central cardiovascular regulation in haemorrhagic hypotension.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jochem, Jerzy; Kasperska-Zajac, Alicja

    2012-01-01

    The histaminergic system consists of neurons located in tuberomammillary nucleus of the posterior hypothalamus. It affects many functions of the central nervous system, including regulation of the brainstem cardiovascular center. In this paper, we present current review of the literature concerning the role of the histaminergic system in the cardiovascular regulation in haemorrhagic hypotension. Experimental studies demonstrate that in both, normotension and critical hemorrhagic hypotension, histamine, acting as a central neurotransmitter, evokes the pressor effect. Interestingly, increases in mean arterial pressure are significantly higher in hypovolaemic than in normovolaemic animals. Many lines of evidence support the hypothesis that in haemorrhagic shock, the histaminergic system is able to activate neural and humoral compensatory mechanisms involving the sympathetic nervous and renin-angiotensin systems, arginine vasopressin and proopiomelanocortin-derived peptides. We suggest that the histaminergic system could be a new target for treatment of hemorrhagic hypotension.

  16. Quality of life after aneurysmal subarachnoid haemorrhage

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Passier, P.E.C.A.

    2011-01-01

    The general aim of this thesis was to increase our understanding of quality of life (QoL) after aneurysmal subarachnoid haemorrhage (SAH), and the most important determinants of QoL, in order to tailor appropriate rehabilitation programs and thereby enhance their effectiveness. We reviewed the liter

  17. Antithrombotic drugs and subarachnoid haemorrhage risk

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Pottegård, A; García Rodríguez, L A; Poulsen, F R

    2015-01-01

    The study objective was to investigate the relationship between use of antithrombotic drugs and subarachnoid haemorrhage (SAH). We identified patients discharged from Danish neurosurgery units with a first-ever SAH diagnosis in 2000 to 2012 (n=5,834). For each case, we selected 40 age-, sex...

  18. European research priorities for intracerebral haemorrhage

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Steiner, Thorsten; Petersson, Jesper; Al-Shahi Salman, Rustam

    2011-01-01

    Over 2 million people are affected by intracerebral haemorrhage (ICH) worldwide every year, one third of them dying within 1 month, and many survivors being left with permanent disability. Unlike most other stroke types, the incidence, morbidity and mortality of ICH have not declined over time. N...

  19. Steroid treatment in primary intracerebral haemorrhage

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    De Reuck, J; De Bleecker, J; Reyntjens, K

    1989-01-01

    The efficiency of two types of steroid treatment was assessed in primary intracerebral haemorrhages. No significant difference in clinical evolution was observed between 57 cases treated with dexamethasone, 28 cases with methylprednisolone and 44 cases without corticosteroids. In a subgroup of 46 pa

  20. Sanitation of viral haemorrhagic septicaemia (VHS)

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Olesen, Niels Jørgen

    1998-01-01

    A sanitation programme for stamping-out viral haemorrhagic septicaemia (VHS) was implemented in Denmark in 1965. The programme has resulted in a dramatic reduction in the number of infected rainbow trout farms, from approximate to 400 to 26. The programme is carried out on a voluntary basis...

  1. Waldenstrom′s macroglobulinaemia with intracerebral haemorrhage.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Khan G

    2000-07-01

    Full Text Available A 65-year-old male was admitted for evaluation of severe anaemia, recurrent epistaxis, axillary lymphadenopathy, and hepatomegaly. The diagnosis of Waldenstrom′s macroglobulinaemia was made on the basis of clinical and laboratory findings. The patient developed intracerebral haemorrhage without associated hypertension and with normal coagulation profile.

  2. RETINAL HAEMORRHAGE IN PLASMODIUM VIVAX PATIENTS- 2 RARE CASE REPORTS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sangeeta

    2012-12-01

    Full Text Available ABSTRACT: Retinal haemorrhage is commonly detected during opht halmoscopic examination of patients with Plasmodium falciparum infections. Ho wever, it is observed very rarely in Plasmodium vivax infections. Only six cases of reti nal haemorrhage have been reported so far in Plasmodium vivax infections. We review the literatu re and discuss two such cases of retinal haemorrhage that presented at our hospital. It is sug gested that retinal haemorrhage be routinely ruled out in all malaria patients, and Pla smodium vivax infection be considered in patients with unexplained retinal haemorrhage and fev er.

  3. History of the evolution of cardiopulmonary resuscitation

    OpenAIRE

    2013-01-01

    Cardiopulmonary resuscitation (CPR) is as old as humankind. The evolution of CPR represents a combination of human errors and discoveries. Aim: The present study reviews the most important moments in the history of resuscitation, from the first attempts of CPR until now. Methods: The methodology followed included bibliography research from review literature, through databases PubMed, Medline, Scopus, with the use of keywords, such as cardiopulmonary arrest, cardiopulmonary resuscitation, hist...

  4. European research priorities for intracerebral haemorrhage.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Steiner, Thorsten; Petersson, Jesper; Al-Shahi Salman, Rustam; Christensen, Hanne; Cordonnier, Charlotte; Csiba, Laszlo; Harnof, Sagi; Krieger, Derk; Mendelow, David; Molina, Carlos; Montaner, Joan; Overgaard, Karsten; Roine, Risto O; Schmutzhard, Erich; Tatlisumak, Turgut; Toni, Danilo; Stapf, Christian

    2011-01-01

    Over 2 million people are affected by intracerebral haemorrhage (ICH) worldwide every year, one third of them dying within 1 month, and many survivors being left with permanent disability. Unlike most other stroke types, the incidence, morbidity and mortality of ICH have not declined over time. No standardised diagnostic workup for the detection of the various underlying causes of ICH currently exists, and the evidence for medical or surgical therapeutic interventions remains limited. A dedicated European research programme for ICH is needed to identify ways to reduce the burden of ICH-related death and disability. The European Research Network on Intracerebral Haemorrhage EURONICH is a multidisciplinary academic research collaboration that has been established to define current research priorities and to conduct large clinical studies on all aspects of ICH.

  5. Transplacental haemorrhage and maternal iso-immunization

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mehta Daxa

    1979-01-01

    Full Text Available Foetomaternal haemorrhage is one of the important factors influencing maternal iso-immunization. In the present report at-tempt is made to study various aspects of foetomaternal haemor-rhage. While the overall incidence of foetal cell leak was observed in 21.43%, the incidence in the complicated deliveries ranged from. 27.94 to 85.72%. Incidence was not influenced by parity, however ABO compatible deliveries showed slight increase in the incidence (22.56% as compared to ABO incompatible (18.75% deliveries. ABO incompatible foetal cells were eliminated within 24 hours after delivery. Incidence of foetal cell leak was 8.28% in medical termination of pregnancy. Anth-Rh was produced in two out of nine women having foetal cell leak.

  6. [Alveolar haemorrhage following a cannabis water pipe].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moatemri, Z; Zaibi, H; Dabboussi, S; Mhamedi, S; Aichaouia, C; Khadhraoui, M; Cheikh, R

    2016-10-01

    Respiratory toxicity of cannabis is well-known today particularly with the new consumption patterns. We report the case of a 25-year-old man admitted for haemoptysis, with unfavourable outcome and acute respiratory failure. Various explorations concluded to acute respiratory distress syndrome secondary to diffuse alveolar haemorrhage. Etiological assessment was initially negative. Outcome was favourable during hospitalization, authorizing the discharge of our patient. Two days later, alveolar haemorrhage recur, with positive toxicological tests for cannabis and the patient admits smoking cannabis by plastic "bang". We illustrate, through this case, the severity of respiratory complications caused by new methods of using cannabis, particularly with plastic 'bang', hence the need to insist of the importance of supported withdrawal and to inform young people how these techniques are serious.ssss. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Masson SAS. All rights reserved.

  7. 21 CFR 870.4310 - Cardiopulmonary bypass coronary pressure gauge.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Cardiopulmonary bypass coronary pressure gauge... Cardiopulmonary bypass coronary pressure gauge. (a) Identification. A cardiopulmonary bypass coronary pressure... the coronary arteries. (b) Classification. Class II (performance standards). ...

  8. A rare cause of fatal intracranial haemorrhage.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Neligan, A

    2012-01-31

    INTRODUCTION: We report the case of a 53-year-old farmer with a 5-day history of severe headache, photophobia and neck stiffness. Full blood count (platelets 173), coagulation screen were normal throughout. Liver function tests remained normal apart from an elevated gamma-GT (156). CT Brain was normal. CSF analysis showed a WCC of 454\\/mm(3) (60% lymphocytes), elevated CSF protein (1.42 g\\/l) and a normal CSF glucose. He was commenced on IV antibiotics and IV acyclivor and improved. On day 3 of admission, he complained of a sudden severe headache, became unresponsive (GCS 3\\/15). INVESTIGATIONS: CT Brain showed a massive left intraventricular haemorrhage. He died 4 days later. Subsequent serum serology for leptospirosis was positive. A repeat sample taken 4 days post-admission, showed a rising IgM indicating active leptospirosis. Detailed pathological examination confirmed intracerebral haemorrhage with normal cerebral vasculature. CONCLUSION: Leptospirosis is a rare cause of intracerebral haemorrhage even in the absence of coagulopathy.

  9. A systematic review of intensive cardiopulmonary management after spinal cord injury.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Casha, Steven; Christie, Sean

    2011-08-01

    Intensive cardiopulmonary management is frequently undertaken in patients with spinal cord injury (SCI), particularly due to the occurrence of neurogenic shock and ventilatory insufficiency and in an attempt to reduce secondary injury. We undertook a systematic review of the literature to examine the evidence that intensive care management improves outcome after SCI and to attempt to define key parameters for cardiopulmonary support/resuscitation. We review the literature in five areas: management of SCI patients in specialized centers, risk in SCI patients of cardiopulmonary complications, parameters for blood pressure and oxygenation/ventilation support following SCI, risk factors for cardiopulmonary insufficiency requiring ICU care after SCI, and preventative strategies to reduce the risks of cardiopulmonary complications in SCI patients. The literature supports that, in light of the significant incidence of cardiorespiratory complications, SCI patients should be managed in a monitored special care unit. There is weak evidence supporting the maintenance of MAP >85 mmHg for a period extending up to 1 week following SCI.

  10. Mixed venous-arterial CO2 tension gradient after cardiopulmonary bypass.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Takami, Yoshiyuki; Masumoto, Hiroshi

    2005-09-01

    Significant venous hypercarbia has been reported in septic shock and circulatory failure. Cardiopulmonary bypass also impairs systemic and pulmonary blood perfusion. The objective of this study was to determine the clinical significance of the increased venous-arterial CO2 tension gradient resulting from venous hypercarbia after cardiopulmonary bypass. On arrival in the intensive care unit, venous and arterial CO2 tensions were measured in the radial and pulmonary arteries in 140 consecutive patients who had undergone coronary (n = 79), valve (n = 34), aortic (n = 20), and other (n = 7) surgery under cardiopulmonary bypass. The mean venous-arterial CO2 tension gradient was 5.0 +/- 3.3 mm Hg (range, 7.7 to 15.7 mm Hg). By linear regression analysis, the factors that significantly correlated with venous-arterial CO2 tension gradient were bypass duration, aortic crossclamp time, initial arterial lactate level, transpulmonary arteriovenous lactate difference, arterial bicarbonate level, base excess, cardiac index, mixed venous O2 saturation, O2 delivery, O2 consumption, and the peak value of creatine kinase. The venous-arterial CO2 tension gradient may reflect impaired perfusion and anaerobic metabolism induced by cardiopulmonary bypass and could be a simple and useful indicator for patient management after surgery under cardiopulmonary bypass.

  11. Trends in monitoring patients with aneurysmal subarachnoid haemorrhage

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Springborg, J B; Frederiksen, H-J; Eskesen, V

    2005-01-01

    After aneurysmal subarachnoid haemorrhage (SAH), the clinical outcome depends upon the primary haemorrhage and a number of secondary insults in the acute post-haemorrhagic period. Some secondary insults are potentially preventable but prevention requires prompt recognition of cerebral or systemic...... with the conventional monitoring systems, for example intracranial pressure measurements, transcranial Doppler ultrasound and modern neuro-imaging, direct assessment of biochemical markers by intracerebral microdialysis is promising in the advancement of neurointensive care of patients with SAH. A successfully...

  12. Haemorrhage in pregnancy: information given to women in Chiradzulu (Malawi

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    H Kapyepye

    2006-09-01

    Full Text Available Advising women on , haemorrhage in pregnancy could, be viewed, as an integral aspect of maternal health care in M alawi. The WHO (1999 confirmed, that haemorrhage in pregnancy was not only a direct reason for maternal mortality but also a major cause of maternal death. The question on the nature of information that midwives and traditional birth attendants (referred to as TBA’s in the Chiradzulu district in Malawi gave with regard to haemorrhage in pregnancy, therefore arose. Research available focused on the women’s knowledge about the complications of pregnancy but not on the nature of information women received from midwives and TBA’s. This study explored and described the nature of information that was given to rural women in the Chiradzulu district by the midwives and TBA’s regarding haemorrhage in pregnancy. The findings revealed that although both the midwives and TBA’s included important information about haemorrhage in pregnancy, there were deficiencies in some critical areas. Examples of these deficiencies were the definition of haemorrhage in pregnancy; the predisposing factors for antepartum and postpartum haemorrhage and deficiencies in the nature of information on the management and referral of haemorrhaging patients. The findings provided insights into the nature of the information that was provided to the women regarding haemorrhage in pregnancy in the Chiradzulu district in Malawi. Thereafter guidelines were developed for the provision of this information. Finally a follow-up study was recommended after implementation of these guidelines in the district to evaluate the change in the nature of the information communicated to patients regarding haemorrhage by midwives and TBA’s. In this study, haemorrhage during pregnancy referred to the perinatal phase, including antepartum, intrapartum and postpartum haemorrhage.

  13. Bilateral eyelid ecchymosis and subconjunctival haemorrhage manifesting as presenting feature in a case of dengue haemorrhagic fever.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jain, Sparshi; Goswami, Anup; Singh, Nidhi; Kaur, Savleen

    2015-10-01

    We report a case of bilateral eyelid ecchymosis and subconjunctival haemorrhage, a rare presenting feature of dengue haemorrhagic fever. A 17-year-old boy presented to the emergency department with complaints of redness in both eyes and vomiting. He had bilateral eyelid ecchymosis with subconjunctival haemorrhage. Complete blood count revealed a significantly reduced platelet count of 11000/µL suggestive of dengue haemorrhagic fever (DHF). Ocular manifestations were followed by other systemic haemorrhagic manifestations of dengue later on which violates the usual sequence of events of dengue fever. Bilateral eyelid ecchymosis is a rare clinical manifestation and a rare presenting feature of dengue fever and one has to keep high index of suspicion for presence of dengue whenever a case of fever presents with lid ecchymosis/haemorrhage. © The Author(s) 2014.

  14. Multiple dimensions of cardiopulmonary dyspnea

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    HAN Jiang-na; XIONG Chang-ming; YAO Wei; FANG Qiu-hong; ZHU Yuan-jue; CHENG Xian-sheng; Karel P Van de Woestijne

    2011-01-01

    Background The current theory of dyspnea perception presumes a multidimensional conception of dyspnea.However,its validity in patients with cardiopulmonary dyspnea has not been investigated.Methods A respiratory symptom checklist incorporating spontaneously reported descriptors of sensory experiences of breathing discomfort,affective aspects,and behavioral items was administered to 396 patients with asthma,chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD),diffuse parenchymal lung disease,pulmonary vascular disease,chronic heart failure,and medically unexplained dyspnea.Symptom factors measuring different qualitative components of dyspnea were derived by a principal component analysis.The separation of patient groups was achieved by a variance analysis on symptom factors.Results Seven factors appeared to measure three dimensions of dyspnea:sensory (difficulty breathing and phase of respiration,depth and frequency of breathing,urge to breathe,wheeze),affective (chest tightness,anxiety),and behavioral (refraining from physical activity) dimensions.Difficulty breathing and phase of respiration occurred more often in COPD,followed by asthma (R2=0.12).Urge to breathe was unique for patients with medically unexplained dyspnea (R2=0.12).Wheeze occurred most frequently in asthma,followed by COPD and heart failure (R2=0.17).Chest tightness was specifically linked to medically unexplained dyspnea and asthma (R2=0.04).Anxiety characterized medically unexplained dyspnea (R2=0.08).Refraining from physical activity appeared more often in heart failure,pulmonary vascular disease,and COPD (R2=0.15).Conclusions Three dimensions with seven qualitative components of dyspnea appeared in cardiopulmonary disease and the components under each dimension allowed separation of different patient groups.These findings may serve as a validation on the multiple dimensions of cardiopulmonary dyspnea.

  15. History of cardiopulmonary bypass (CPB).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hessel, Eugene A

    2015-06-01

    The development of cardiopulmonary bypass (CPB), thereby permitting open-heart surgery, is one of the most important advances in medicine in the 20th century. Many currently practicing cardiac anesthesiologists, cardiac surgeons, and perfusionists are unaware of how recently it came into use (60 years) and how much the practice of CPB has changed during its short existence. In this paper, the development of CPB and the many changes and progress that has taken place over this brief period of time, making it a remarkably safe endeavor, are reviewed. The many as yet unresolved questions are also identified, which sets the stage for the other papers in this issue of this journal.

  16. Involvement of the histaminergic system in cytidine 5'-diphosphocholine-induced reversal of critical haemorrhagic hypotension in rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jochem, J; Savci, V; Filiz, N; Rybus-Kalinowska, B; Fogel, W A; Yalcin, M

    2010-02-01

    Cytidine 5'-diphosphocholine (CDP-choline) is an endogenously synthesized mononucleotide which exerts a variety of physiological effects by altering central cholinergic transmission. Administered intracerebroventricularly (i.c.v.) or intravenously, it reverses haemorrhagic hypotension in rats, apparently by the activation of central cholinergic receptors. The study was undertaken to investigate the involvement of the central histaminergic system in CDP-choline-mediated reversal of haemorrhagic hypotension. Experiments were carried out in male ketamine/xylazine-anaesthetised Wistar rats subjected to haemorrhagic hypotension of 20-26 mmHg. CDP-choline (2 micromol; i.c.v.) administered at 5 min of critical hypotension produced a long-lasting pressor effect with increases in mean arterial pressure (MAP), heart rate (HR), and renal, hindquarters and mesenteric blood flows, resulting in a 100% survival at 2 h. The action was accompanied by approximately a 26% increase in extracellular histamine concentration at the posterior hypothalamus, as measured by microdialysis. Cardiovascular effects mediated by CDP-choline were almost completely blocked by pretreatment with H(1) receptor antagonist chlorpheniramine (50 nmol; i.c.v.), but not with H(2) receptor blocker ranitidine (25 nmol; icv) or H(3)/H(4) receptor antagonist thioperamide (50 nmol; i.c.v.). In conclusion, the present results show that he central histaminergic system, through the activation of H(1) histaminergic receptors, is involved in CDP-choline-induced resuscitating effect in haemorrhage-shocked rats.

  17. Mechanical compression of coronary artery stents: potential hazard for patients undergoing cardiopulmonary resuscitation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Windecker, S; Maier, W; Eberli, F R; Meier, B; Hess, O M

    2000-12-01

    Mechanical compression of coronary artery stents may be associated with a fatal outcome as the result of refractory myocardial ischemia. We present the history of an 83-yr-old patient, who died owing to hemorrhagic shock 3 days after stent implantation, despite immediate cardiopulmonary resuscitation (CPR). Postmortem examination showed stent compression, probably due to mechanical deformation during CPR. This complication has been reported in two other cases in the literature, suggesting that CPR may be hazardous to patients with coronary artery stents.

  18. Severe Crimean-Congo haemorrhagic fever presented with massive retroperitoneal haemorrhage that recovered without antiviral treatment

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Gharabaghi, Mehrnaz Asadi; Chinikar, Sadegh; Ghiasi, Seyyed Mojtaba

    2011-01-01

    Crimean-Congo haemorrhagic fever (CCHF) is a tickborne viral zoonosis with up to 50% mortality in humans caused by CCHF virus belonging to the genus Nairovirus, family Bunyaviridae. The geographical distribution of CCHF cases corresponds closely with the distribution of principle tick vectors...

  19. Molecular diagnosis of Haemorrhagic Septicaemia - A Review

    OpenAIRE

    Ranjan Rajeev; Panda S.K.; Acharya A.P.; Singh A.P. and Gupta M.K.

    2011-01-01

    Pasteurella multocida is associated with hemorrhagic septicaemia in cattle and buffaloes, pneumonic pasteurellosis in sheep and goats, fowl cholera in poultry, atrophic rhinitis in pigs and snuffles in rabbits. Haemorrhagic septicaemia is caused by Pasteurella multocida type B:2, B:2,5 and B:5 in Asian countries and type E:2 in African countries. Pasteurella multocida have five types of capsular serotype i.e. type A, B, D, E and F. Diagnosis of the disease is mainly based on the clinical sign...

  20. Thalamic haemorrhage vs internal capsule-basal ganglia haemorrhage: clinical profile and predictors of in-hospital mortality

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    García-Eroles Luis

    2007-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background There is a paucity of clinical studies focused specifically on intracerebral haemorrhages of subcortical topography, a subject matter of interest to clinicians involved in stroke management. This single centre, retrospective study was conducted with the following objectives: a to describe the aetiological, clinical and prognostic characteristics of patients with thalamic haemorrhage as compared with that of patients with internal capsule-basal ganglia haemorrhage, and b to identify predictors of in-hospital mortality in patients with thalamic haemorrhage. Methods Forty-seven patients with thalamic haemorrhage were included in the "Sagrat Cor Hospital of Barcelona Stroke Registry" during a period of 17 years. Data from stroke patients are entered in the stroke registry following a standardized protocol with 161 items regarding demographics, risk factors, clinical features, laboratory and neuroimaging data, complications and outcome. The region of the intracranial haemorrhage was identified on computerized tomographic (CT scans and/or magnetic resonance imaging (MRI of the brain. Results Thalamic haemorrhage accounted for 1.4% of all cases of stroke (n = 3420 and 13% of intracerebral haemorrhage (n = 364. Hypertension (53.2%, vascular malformations (6.4%, haematological conditions (4.3% and anticoagulation (2.1% were the main causes of thalamic haemorrhage. In-hospital mortality was 19% (n = 9. Sensory deficit, speech disturbances and lacunar syndrome were significantly associated with thalamic haemorrhage, whereas altered consciousness (odds ratio [OR] = 39.56, intraventricular involvement (OR = 24.74 and age (OR = 1.23, were independent predictors of in-hospital mortality. Conclusion One in 8 patients with acute intracerebral haemorrhage had a thalamic hematoma. Altered consciousness, intraventricular extension of the hematoma and advanced age were determinants of a poor early outcome.

  1. Cerebral abscesses among Danish patients with hereditary haemorrhagic telangiectasia

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kjeldsen, A D; Tørring, P M; Nissen, H;

    2013-01-01

    Hereditary haemorrhagic telangiectasia (HHT) is a dominantly inherited disease characterized by a wide variety of clinical manifestations, including pulmonary arteriovenous malformations (PAVMs), which due to paradoxical embolization may cause cerebral abscess.......Hereditary haemorrhagic telangiectasia (HHT) is a dominantly inherited disease characterized by a wide variety of clinical manifestations, including pulmonary arteriovenous malformations (PAVMs), which due to paradoxical embolization may cause cerebral abscess....

  2. Olivary degeneration after cerebellar or brain stem haemorrhage: MRI

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Uchino, A. (Dept. of Radiology, Kyushu Univ. Hospital, Fukuoka (Japan) Dept. of Radiology, Kyushu Rosai Hospital, Kitakyushu (Japan)); Hasuo, K. (Dept. of Radiology, Kyushu Univ. Hospital, Fukuoka (Japan)); Uchida, K. (Dept. of Radiology, Kyushu Rosai Hospital, Kitakyushu (Japan)); Matsumoto, S. (Dept. of Radiology, Kyushu Univ. Hospital, Fukuoka (Japan)); Tsukamoto, Y. (Dept. of Radiology, Kyushu Rosai Hospital, Kitakyushu (Japan)); Ohno, M. (Dept. of Radiology, Kyushu Rosai Hospital, Kitakyushu (Japan)); Masuda, K. (Dept. of Radiology, Kyushu Univ. Hospital, Fukuoka (Japan))

    1993-05-01

    Magnetic resonance (MR) images of seven patients with olivary degeneration caused by cerebellar or brain stem haemorrhages were reviewed. In four patients with cerebellar haemorrhage, old haematomas were identified as being located in the dentate nucleus; the contralateral inferior olivary nuclei were hyperintense on proton-density- and T2-weighted images. In two patients with pontine haemorrhages, the old haematomas were in the tegmentum and the ipsilateral inferior olivary nuclei, which were hyperintense. In one case of midbrain haemorrhage, the inferior olivary nuclei were hyperintense bilaterally. The briefest interval from the ictus to MRI was 2 months. Hypertrophic olivary nuclei were observed only at least 4 months after the ictus. Olivary degeneration after cerebellar or brain stem haemorrhage should not be confused with ischaemic, neoplastic, or other primary pathological conditions of the medulla. (orig.)

  3. Molecular diagnosis of Haemorrhagic Septicaemia - A Review

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ranjan Rajeev

    2011-08-01

    Full Text Available Pasteurella multocida is associated with hemorrhagic septicaemia in cattle and buffaloes, pneumonic pasteurellosis in sheep and goats, fowl cholera in poultry, atrophic rhinitis in pigs and snuffles in rabbits. Haemorrhagic septicaemia is caused by Pasteurella multocida type B:2, B:2,5 and B:5 in Asian countries and type E:2 in African countries. Pasteurella multocida have five types of capsular serotype i.e. type A, B, D, E and F. Diagnosis of the disease is mainly based on the clinical sign and symptom, post mortem findings. Confirmatory diagnosis is done by isolation and identification of causative agent. A variety of laboratory diagnostic techniques have been developed over the years for pasteurellosis and used routinely in the laboratory. Among these techniques molecular techniques of diagnosis is most important. This technique not only gives diagnosis but it also provides information regarding capsular type of Pasteurella multocida. Techniques which are used for molecular diagnosis of haemorrhagic septicaemia are PCR based diagnosis, Restriction endonuclease analysis (REA, Ribotyping, Colony hybridization assay, Filled alternation gel electrophoresis (FAGE, Detection of Pasteurella multocida by Real Time PCR. Among these techniques real time PCR is most sensitive and specific. [Vet. World 2011; 4(4.000: 189-192

  4. A Reliable Method for Rhythm Analysis during Cardiopulmonary Resuscitation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    U. Ayala

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Interruptions in cardiopulmonary resuscitation (CPR compromise defibrillation success. However, CPR must be interrupted to analyze the rhythm because although current methods for rhythm analysis during CPR have high sensitivity for shockable rhythms, the specificity for nonshockable rhythms is still too low. This paper introduces a new approach to rhythm analysis during CPR that combines two strategies: a state-of-the-art CPR artifact suppression filter and a shock advice algorithm (SAA designed to optimally classify the filtered signal. Emphasis is on designing an algorithm with high specificity. The SAA includes a detector for low electrical activity rhythms to increase the specificity, and a shock/no-shock decision algorithm based on a support vector machine classifier using slope and frequency features. For this study, 1185 shockable and 6482 nonshockable 9-s segments corrupted by CPR artifacts were obtained from 247 patients suffering out-of-hospital cardiac arrest. The segments were split into a training and a test set. For the test set, the sensitivity and specificity for rhythm analysis during CPR were 91.0% and 96.6%, respectively. This new approach shows an important increase in specificity without compromising the sensitivity when compared to previous studies.

  5. A Reliable Method for Rhythm Analysis during Cardiopulmonary Resuscitation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ayala, U.; Irusta, U.; Ruiz, J.; Eftestøl, T.; Kramer-Johansen, J.; Alonso-Atienza, F.; Alonso, E.; González-Otero, D.

    2014-01-01

    Interruptions in cardiopulmonary resuscitation (CPR) compromise defibrillation success. However, CPR must be interrupted to analyze the rhythm because although current methods for rhythm analysis during CPR have high sensitivity for shockable rhythms, the specificity for nonshockable rhythms is still too low. This paper introduces a new approach to rhythm analysis during CPR that combines two strategies: a state-of-the-art CPR artifact suppression filter and a shock advice algorithm (SAA) designed to optimally classify the filtered signal. Emphasis is on designing an algorithm with high specificity. The SAA includes a detector for low electrical activity rhythms to increase the specificity, and a shock/no-shock decision algorithm based on a support vector machine classifier using slope and frequency features. For this study, 1185 shockable and 6482 nonshockable 9-s segments corrupted by CPR artifacts were obtained from 247 patients suffering out-of-hospital cardiac arrest. The segments were split into a training and a test set. For the test set, the sensitivity and specificity for rhythm analysis during CPR were 91.0% and 96.6%, respectively. This new approach shows an important increase in specificity without compromising the sensitivity when compared to previous studies. PMID:24895621

  6. Cardiogenic shock

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shock - cardiogenic ... electrical system of the heart (heart block) Cardiogenic shock occurs when the heart is unable to pump ... orthostatic hypotension) Weak (thready) pulse To diagnose cardiogenic shock, a catheter (tube) may be placed in the ...

  7. Cardiopulmonary Bypass and Oxidative Stress

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mustafa Zakkar

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available The development of the cardiopulmonary bypass (CPB revolutionized cardiac surgery and contributed immensely to improved patients outcomes. CPB is associated with the activation of different coagulation, proinflammatory, survival cascades and altered redox state. Haemolysis, ischaemia, and perfusion injury and neutrophils activation during CPB play a pivotal role in oxidative stress and the associated activation of proinflammatory and proapoptotic signalling pathways which can affect the function and recovery of multiple organs such as the myocardium, lungs, and kidneys and influence clinical outcomes. The administration of agents with antioxidant properties during surgery either intravenously or in the cardioplegia solution may reduce ROS burst and oxidative stress during CPB. Alternatively, the use of modified circuits such as minibypass can modify both proinflammatory responses and oxidative stress.

  8. Cardiopulmonary loading in motocross riding.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Konttinen, Tomi; Häkkinen, Keijo; Kyröläinen, Heikki

    2007-07-01

    The present study was designed to examine physiological responses during motocross riding. Nine Finnish A-level motocross riders performed a 15-min ride at a motocross track and a test of maximal oxygen uptake (VO2max) in the laboratory. Cardiopulmonary strain was measured continuously during the ride as well as in the VO2max test. During the ride, mean VO2 was 32 ml x kg(-1) x min(-1) (s = 4), which was 71% (s = 12) of maximum, while ventilation (V(E)) was 73% (s = 15) of its maximum. The relative VO2 and V(E) values during the riding correlated with successful riding performance (r = 0.80, P motocross causes riders great physical stress. Both aerobic and anaerobic metabolism is required for the isometric and dynamic muscle actions experienced during a ride.

  9. Extracorporeal membrane oxygenation support in post-traumatic cardiopulmonary failure

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lin, Chun-Yu; Tsai, Feng-Chun; Lee, Hsiu-An; Tseng, Yuan-His

    2017-01-01

    Abstract Patients with multiple traumas associated with cardiopulmonary failure have a high mortality rate; however, such patients can be temporarily stabilized using extracorporeal membrane oxygenation (ECMO), providing a bridge to rescue therapy. Using a retrospective study design, we aimed to clarify the prognostic factors of post-traumatic ECMO support. From March 2006 to July 2016, 43 adult patients (mean age, 37.3 ± 15.2 years; 7 females [16.3%]) underwent ECMO because of post-traumatic cardiopulmonary failure. Pre-ECMO demographics, peri-ECMO events, and post-ECMO recoveries were compared between survivors and nonsurvivors. The most common traumatic insult was traffic collision (n = 30, 69.8%), and involved injury areas included the chest (n = 33, 76.7%), head (n = 14, 32.6%), abdomen (n = 21, 48.8%), and fractures (n = 21, 48.8%). Fifteen patients (34.9%) underwent cardiopulmonary resuscitation and 22 (51.2%) received rescue interventions before ECMO deployment. The mean time interval between trauma and ECMO was 90.6 ± 130.1 hours, and the mode of support was venovenous in 26 patients (60.5%). A total of 26 patients (60.5%) were weaned off of ECMO and 22 (51.6%) survived to discharge, with an overall mean support time of 162.9 ± 182.7 hours. A multivariate regression analysis identified 2 significant predictors for in-hospital mortality: an injury severity score (ISS) >30 (odds ratio [OR], 9.48; 95% confidence interval [CI], 1.04–18.47; P = 0.042), and the requirement of renal replacement therapy (RRT) during ECMO (OR, 8.64; 95% CI, 1.73–26.09; P = 0.020). These two factors were also significant for the 1-year survival (ISS >30: 12.5%; ISS ≤30, 48.1%, P = 0.001) (RRT required, 15.0%; RRT not required, 52.2%, P = 0.006). Using ECMO in selected traumatized patients with cardiopulmonary failure can be a salvage therapy. Prompt intervention before shock-impaired systemic organ perfusion and acute

  10. Cardiopulmonary support and extracorporeal membrane oxygenation for cardiac assist.

    Science.gov (United States)

    von Segesser, L K

    1999-08-01

    Use of cardiopulmonary bypass for emergency resuscitation is not new. In fact, John Gibbon proposed this concept for the treatment of severe pulmonary embolism in 1937. Significant progress has been made since, and two main concepts for cardiac assist based on cardiopulmonary bypass have emerged: cardiopulmonary support (CPS) and extracorporeal membrane oxygenation (ECMO). The objective of this review is to summarize the state of the art in these two technologies. Configuration of CPS is now fairly standard. A mobile cart with relatively large wheels allowing for easy transportation carries a centrifugal pump, a back-up battery with a charger, an oxygen cylinder, and a small heating system. Percutaneous cannulation, pump-driven venous return, rapid availability, and transportability are the main characteristics of a CPS system. Cardiocirculatory arrest is a major predictor of mortality despite the use of CPS. In contrast, CPS appears to be a powerful tool for patients in cardiogenic shock before cardiocirculatory arrest, requiring some type of therapeutic procedures, especially repair of anatomically correctable problems or bridging to other mechanical circulatory support systems such as ventricular assist devices. CPS is in general not suitable for long-term applications because of the small-bore cannulas, resulting in significant pressure gradients and eventually hemolysis. In contrast, ECMO can be designed for longer-term circulatory support. This requires large-bore cannulas and specifically designed oxygenators. The latter are either plasma leakage resistent (true membranes) or relatively thrombo-resistant (heparin coated). Both technologies require oxygenator changeovers although the main reason for this is different (clotting for the former, plasma leakage for the latter). Likewise, the tubing within a roller pump has to be displaced and centrifugal pump heads have to be replaced over time. ECMO is certainly the first choice for a circulatory support system

  11. Cardiopulmonary helminths in foxes from the Pyrenees.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Garrido-Castañé, Ignasi; Ortuño, Anna; Marco, Ignasi; Castellà, Joaquim

    2015-12-01

    The present survey was carried out to investigate the prevalence of cardiopulmonary helminths in red foxes in Pyrenees area and to evaluate the role of foxes in the eco-epidemiology of these nematodes. Hearts and entire respiratory tracts were obtained from 87 foxes from Vall d'Aran region, Pyrenees, Catalonia, north-eastern Spain. The cardiopulmonary tracts were dissected, flushed and examined for nematodes using sedimented flushing water. Of the 87 examined foxes, 53 (61%) were positive for cardiopulmonary helminths. The identified nematodes were Crenosoma vulpis (44.8%), Eucoleus aerophilus (29.9%) and Angiostrongylus vasorum (3.4%). Statistical differences were observed only on comparing age and C.vulpis prevalence, with young foxes being more infected than adults. The high prevalence of cardiopulmonary nematodes suggested that red foxes may play an important role in their transmission and maintenance in the studied area.

  12. Successful Resolution of Preretinal Haemorrhage with Intravitreal Ranibizumab

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Baharuddin Noorlaila

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available We would like to report two cases of preretinal haemorrhage from two different aetiology courses of bleeding being treated with intravitreal ranibizumab and its outcome. Our first case was a 39-year-old man with a diagnosis of severe aplastic anaemia that presented with bilateral premacular haemorrhages in both eyes. His right eye vision was 6/45 and it was counting finger in the left eye. He was treated with intravitreal ranibizumab once to the right eye and twice to the left eye. Right eye showed complete resolution of premacular haemorrhage and minimal residual premacular haemorrhage in the left eye at 3 months after initial presentation. Our second case was a 32-year-old healthy teacher that presented with preretinal haemorrhage at superotemporal region extending to macular area in left eye secondary to valsalva retinopathy. Her left vision was counting finger. She was treated with single intravitreal ranibizumab to the left eye. There was significant reduction of premacular haemorrhage and her left eye vision improved to 6/6 at 10 weeks after injection. Both cases had favourable outcome with intravitreal ranibizumab and can be considered as nonsurgical treatment option in treating premacular haemorrhage.

  13. Pulmonary hypertension in hereditary haemorrhagic telangiectasia

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Veronique; MM; Vorselaars; Sebastiaan; Velthuis; Repke; J; Snijder; Jan; Albert; Vos; Johannes; J; Mager; Martijn; C; Post

    2015-01-01

    Hereditary haemorrhagic telangiectasia(HHT) is an autosomal dominant inherited disorder characterised by vascular malformations in predominantly the brain,liverand lungs.Pulmonary hypertension(PH) is increasingly recognised as a severe complication of HHT.PH may be categorised into two distinct types in patients with HHT.Post-capillary PH most often results from a high pulmonary blood flow that accompanies the high cardiac output state associated with liver arteriovenous malformations.Less frequently,the HHT-related gene mutations in ENG or ACVRL1 appear to predispose patients with HHT to develop pre-capillary pulmonary arterial hypertension.Differentiation between both forms of PH by right heart catheterisation is essential,since both entities are associated with severe morbidity and mortality with different treatment options.Therefore all HHT patients should be referred to an HHT centre.

  14. Hyperbaric oxygen treatment for haemorrhagic radiation cystitis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bevers, R.F.M.; Kurth, K.H. [Amsterdam Univ. (Netherlands). Academic Medical Center; Bakker, D.J. [Amsterdam Univ. (Netherlands). Depts. of Urology and Surgery

    1995-09-23

    Radiation-induced severe haemorrhagic cystitis is difficult to treat. Conventional treatments may decrease haematuria but do not affect the radiocystitis itself. Hyperbaric oxygen treatment has been reported to do both. We report the results of a prospective study of hyperbaric oxygen (20 sessions of 100% oxygen inhalation at 3 bar for 90 min in a multiplace hyperbaric chamber) to 40 patients with biopsy-proven radiation cystitis and severe haematuria. Haematuria disappeared completely or improved in 37 patients after treatment. Mean follow-up was 23.1 months (range 1-74); and the recurrence rate was 0.12/year. There were no adverse effects. Hyperbaric oxygen treatment should be considered for patients with severe radiation-induced haematuria. (author).

  15. Filoviral haemorrhagic fevers: A threat to Zambia?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Katendi Changula

    2012-06-01

    Full Text Available Filoviral haemorrhagic fevers (FVHF are caused by agents belonging to Filoviridae family, Ebola and Marburg viruses. They are amongst the most lethal pathogens known to infect humans. Incidence of FVHF outbreaks are increasing, with affected number of patients on the rise. Whilst there has been no report yet of FVHF in Zambia, its proximity to Angola and Democratic Republic of Congo, which have recorded major outbreaks, as well as the open borders, increased trade and annual migration of bats between these countries, puts Zambia at present and increased risk. Previous studies have indicated bats as potential reservoir hosts for filoviruses. An increasing population with an increasing demand for resources has forced incursion into previously uninhabited land, potentially bringing them into contact with unknown pathogens, reservoir hosts and/or amplifying hosts. The recent discovery of a novel arenavirus, Lujo, highlights the potential that every region, including Zambia, has for being the epicentre or primary focus for emerging and re-emerging infections. It is therefore imperative that surveillance for potential emerging infections, such as viral haemorrhagic fevers be instituted. In order to accomplish this surveillance, rapid detection, identification and monitoring of agents in patients and potential reservoirs is needed. International co-operation is the strategy of choice for the surveillance and fight against emerging infections. Due to the extensive area in which filoviral infections can occur, a regional approach to surveillance activities is required, with regional referral centres. There is a need to adopt shared policies for the prevention and control of infectious diseases. There is also need for optimisation of currently available tests and development of new diagnostic tests, in order to have robust, highly sensitive and specific diagnostic tests that can be used even where there are inadequate laboratories and diagnostic services.

  16. Ethical issues in cardiopulmonary resuscitation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Holm, S; Jørgensen, E O

    2001-08-01

    If patients are to benefit from resuscitation, they must regain consciousness and their full faculties. In recent years, we have acquired important information about the natural history of neurological recovery from circulatory arrest. There are clinical tests that predict the outcome, both during ongoing cardiopulmonary resuscitation (CPR) and in the period after restoration of spontaneous circulation. The ability to predict neurological outcome at this stage offers a basis for certain ethical considerations, which are not exclusively centered on "do-not-attempt-resuscitation" (DNAR)- orders. Instead of being forced to make the decision that "I do not want CPR", the patient should be able to decide that "I want resuscitation to be discontinued, if you predict that I will not recover to a level of neurological function that is acceptable to me". Ideally, no competent patient should be given a DNAR-status without his or her consent. No CPR-attempt should be stopped, and no treatment decision for a patient recovering after CPR should be taken without knowing and assessing the available information. Good ethical decision-making requires reliable facts, which we now know are available.

  17. [Cardiopulmonary bypass in cardiac surgery].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baehner, T; Boehm, O; Probst, C; Poetzsch, B; Hoeft, A; Baumgarten, G; Knuefermann, P

    2012-10-01

    Cardiopulmonary bypass (CPB) is a standard procedure in cardiac surgery; however, apart from its therapeutic options a CPB might also initiate systemic and organ-specific complications, such as heart failure, renal and pulmonary dysfunction, impaired coagulation as well as neurological and cognitive dysfunction. The immunological response to the extracorporeal circulation generates systemic inflammation which often meets the definition of systemic inflammatory response syndrome (SIRS). The main inducers of SIRS are contact of blood with the artificial surfaces of the CPB, mechanical stress which affects the blood components and the extensive surgical trauma. Hence, a number of technical and surgical developments aim at reduction of the inflammatory response caused by the CPB. By reason of surgical demands, the majority of cardiothoracic procedures still depend on the use of CPB; however, there is an on-going development of new techniques trying to reduce the surgical trauma and the negative consequences of CPB. Here, minimized systems with biocompatible surfaces have been shown to be effective in attenuating the inflammatory response to CPB. Alternative procedures such as off-pump surgery may help to avoid CPB-associated complications but due to specific limitations will not replace conventional bypass surgery.

  18. Isolated spinal artery aneurysm: a rare culprit of subarachnoid haemorrhage.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sung, Tony H T; Leung, Warren K W; Lai, Bill M H; Khoo, Jennifer L S

    2015-04-01

    Isolated spinal artery aneurysm is a rare lesion which could be accountable for spontaneous spinal subarachnoid haemorrhage. We describe the case of a 74-year-old man presenting with sudden onset of chest pain radiating to the neck and back, with subsequent headache and confusion. Initial computed tomography aortogram revealed incidental finding of subtle acute spinal subarachnoid haemorrhage. A set of computed tomography scans of the brain showed further acute intracranial subarachnoid haemorrhage with posterior predominance, small amount of intraventricular haemorrhage, and absence of intracranial vascular lesions. Subsequent magnetic resonance imaging demonstrated a thrombosed intradural spinal aneurysm with surrounding sentinel clot, which was trapped and excised during surgical exploration. High level of clinical alertness is required in order not to miss this rare but detrimental entity. Its relevant aetiopathological features and implications for clinical management are discussed.

  19. Immediate post-partum haemorrhage: Epidemiological aspects and ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Objective: To identify the causes of post-partum haemorrhage and identify ..... by Massachusetts General Hospital's Maternal, Newborn and Child ... This Lancet series on obesity (at http://www.thelancet.com/series/obesity-2015) exposes the ...

  20. Aspirin-induced post-gingivectomy haemorrhage: a timely reminder.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thomason, J M; Seymour, R A; Murphy, P; Brigham, K M; Jones, P

    1997-02-01

    A case report is described of significant aspirin-induced haemorrhage following a gingivectory procedure in an organ transplant patient. Aspirin-induced platelet impairment secondary to low-dose aspirin was implicated as the cause of the haemorrhage. Haemostasis was eventually achieved after platelet transfusion. The case illustrates the problems that can arise when carrying out gingival surgery on patients medicated with low-dose aspirin.

  1. Fetal germinal matrix and intraventricular haemorrhage diagnosed by MRI

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fukui, K.; Morioka, T.; Nishio, S.; Fukui, M. [Dept. of Neurosurgery, Kyushu Univ., Fukuoka (Japan); Mihara, F. [Dept. of Clinical Radiology, Kyushu Univ., Fukuoka (Japan); Nakayama, H. [Dept. of Paediatrics, Kyushu Univ., Fukuoka (Japan); Tsukimori, K. [Dept. of Obstetrics, Kyushu Univ., Fukuoka (Japan)

    2001-01-01

    Subependymal germinal matrix haemorrhage and intraventricular haemorrhage (GMIVH) is a common complication of delivery in preterm neonates but has rarely been observed in the fetus. We report two cases of GMIVH in fetuses of 36 weeks gestation, clearly demonstrated by antenatal MRI. In both cases progressive ventriculomegaly was observed, and ventriculoperitoneal shunts were placed at 19 and 6 months of age, respectively. Prenatal GMIVH may be a cause of congenital hydrocephalus, for which no aetiology has yet been found. (orig.)

  2. Haemorrhage in a scrotal lymphangioma in a child: A rarity

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rattan Kamal

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available We report here a case of cystic lymphangioma of scrotum presenting as acute scrotum due to haemorrhage. The diagnosis was confirmed on ultrasonography and magnetic resonance imaging and managed successfully by surgical excision. There was past history of bilateral congenital cataract for which the patient had undergone surgery with complete visual recovery. Scrotal cystic lymphangioma complicated by haemorrhage is rare; hence, the case is being reported with a review of literature.

  3. Enhanced gastric mucosal haemostasis after upper gastrointestinal haemorrhage.

    OpenAIRE

    Allison, M C; Fullarton, G M; Brown, I.L.; Crean, G P; McColl, K E

    1991-01-01

    An endoscopic technique for the measurement of gastric mucosal bleeding time has been developed to study gastric haemostasis in patients with acute upper gastrointestinal haemorrhage. The relation of gastric mucosal bleeding time to skin bleeding time and nonsterodial anti-inflammatory drug usage was examined in 61 control patients and in 47 patients presenting with bleeding peptic ulcers or erosions. Gastric mucosal bleeding time was shorter in patients with haemorrhage (median 2 minutes, ra...

  4. Acute gastrointestinal haemorrhage on board a cruise ship in the Antarctic Peninsula.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carron, Mathieu; Globokar, Peter; Sicard, Bruno A

    2016-01-01

    Antarctic tourism on board cruise ships has expanded since the 1990s, essentially in the Antarctic Peninsula. Due to remoteness, medical cases may evolve into life threatening conditions as emergency medical evacuations are challenging. We discuss the case of a young crew member who suddenly fainted with an epigastric pain and abundant rectal bleeding while on board a cruise ship heading to the Deception Island (62°57.6 South, 60°29.5 West), 44 h away from Ushuaia by sea. A medical evacuation was necessary to save the patient whose haemoglobin level rapidly decreased from 11 g/dL to 8.7 g/dL over an 8 h period due to uncontrolled gastrointestinal bleeding. Following discussions between the French, Chilean and Argentinean Medical Top Side Support and Maritime Rescue Authorities and despite poor weather conditions, an emergency medical evacuation by air to Chile was made possible. The evacuation, which was 2 days shorter compared to an evacuation by sea, allowed the patient to reach a hospital facility in time to save his life whereas he decompensated in haemorrhagic shock. As passengers on cruise ships are typically elderly and often following anticoagulant therapies, the risk of bleeding is most important. Facing a gastric haemorrhage, a transfusion is often required. In remote areas, transfusion of fresh whole blood to stabilize a critical patient until he reaches a hospital must be considered.

  5. Successful application of acute cardiopulmonary resuscitation

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Derya ztrk; Erturul Altinbilek; Murat Koyuncu; Bedriye Mge Snmez; ilem altili; Ibrahim Ikzcel; Cemil Kavalci; Glsm Kavalci

    2015-01-01

    Objective: To compare the quality and correct the deficiencies of cardiopulmonary resuscitation (CPR) procedures performed in patients who developed cardiopulmonary cardiopulmonary arrest before or after Emergency Department admission. Methods: This study was conducted on patients who were applied CPR atŞŞişli Etfal Training and Research and Research Hospital, Emergency Department between 01 January 2012 and 31 December 2012. Chi-square and Mann-Whitney U test were used to compare the patients' data. The study data were analyzed in SPSS 18.0 software package. A P value less than 0.05 was considered statistically significant. Results: A total of 155 patients who were applied CPR were included in the analysis. Among the study patients, seventy eight (50.3%) were brought to Emergency Department after developing cardiopulmonary arrest while 77 (49.7%) developed cardiopulmonary arrest at Emergency Department. The mean age of the study population was (66 ± 16) years and 64%of the patients were male. The initial rhythms of the CPR-applied patients were different (P 0.05). The CPR response time was longer in ED (P Conclusions: The scientific data obtained in this study suggest that an early response and therapy improves outcomes in CPR procedure.

  6. Neutralization of haemorrhagic activity of viper venoms by 1-(3-dimethylaminopropyl)-1-(4-fluorophenyl)-3-oxo-1,3-dihydroisobenzofuran-5-carbonitrile.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sunitha, Kabburalli; Hemshekhar, Mahadevappa; Gaonkar, Santosh Laxman; Sebastin Santhosh, Martin; Suresh Kumar, Muthuvel; Basappa; Priya, Babu Shubha; Kemparaju, Kempaiah; Rangappa, Kanchugarakoppal Subbegowda; Nanjunda Swamy, Shivananju; Girish, Kesturu Subbaiah

    2011-10-01

    Viper envenomation undeniably induces brutal local manifestations such as haemorrhage, oedema and necrosis involving massive degradation of extracellular matrix at the bitten region and many a times results in dangerous systemic haemorrhage including pulmonary shock. Snake venom metalloproteases (SVMPs) are being considered to be the primary culprits for the venom-induced haemorrhage. As a consequence, the venom researchers and medical practitioners are in deliberate quest of SVMP inhibitors. In this study, we evaluated the inhibitory effect of 1-(3-dimethylaminopropyl)-1-(4-fluorophenyl)-3-oxo-1,3-dihydroisobenzofuran-5-carbonitrile (DFD) on viper venom-induced haemorrhagic and PLA(2) activities. DFD effectively neutralized the haemorrhagic activity of the medically important viper venoms such as Echis carinatus, Echis ocelatus, Echis carinatus sochureki, Echis carinatus leakeyi and Crotalus atrox in a dose-dependent manner. The histological examinations revealed that the compound DFD effectively neutralizes the basement membrane degradation, and accumulation of inflammatory leucocytes at the site of Echis carinatus venom injection further confirms the inhibition of haemorrhagic activity. In addition, DFD dose dependently inhibited the PLA(2) activities of Crotalus atrox and E. c. leakeyi venoms. According to the docking studies, DFD binds to hydrophobic pocket of SVMP with the ki of 19.26 × 10(-9) (kcal/mol) without chelating Zn(2+) in the active site. It is concluded that the clinically approved inhibitors of haemorrhagins could be used as a potent first-aid agent in snakebite management. Furthermore, a high degree of structural and functional homology between SVMPs and their relatives, the MMPs, suggests that DFD analogues may find immense value in the regulation of multifactorial pathological conditions like inflammation, cancer and wound healing.

  7. Rabbit haemorrhagic disease (RHD and rabbit haemorrhagic disease virus (RHDV: a review

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Abrantes Joana

    2012-02-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Rabbit haemorrhagic disease virus (RHDV is a calicivirus of the genus Lagovirus that causes rabbit haemorrhagic disease (RHD in adult European rabbits (Oryctolagus cuniculus. First described in China in 1984, the virus rapidly spread worldwide and is nowadays considered as endemic in several countries. In Australia and New Zealand where rabbits are pests, RHDV was purposely introduced for rabbit biocontrol. Factors that may have precipitated RHD emergence remain unclear, but non-pathogenic strains seem to pre-date the appearance of the pathogenic strains suggesting a key role for the comprehension of the virus origins. All pathogenic strains are classified within one single serotype, but two subtypes are recognised, RHDV and RHDVa. RHD causes high mortality in both domestic and wild adult animals, with individuals succumbing between 48-72 h post-infection. No other species has been reported to be fatally susceptible to RHD. The disease is characterised by acute necrotising hepatitis, but haemorrhages may also be found in other organs, in particular the lungs, heart, and kidneys due to disseminated intravascular coagulation. Resistance to the disease might be explained in part by genetically determined absence or weak expression of attachment factors, but humoral immunity is also important. Disease control in rabbitries relies mainly on vaccination and biosecurity measures. Such measures are difficult to be implemented in wild populations. More recent research has indicated that RHDV might be used as a molecular tool for therapeutic applications. Although the study of RHDV and RHD has been hampered by the lack of an appropriate cell culture system for the virus, several aspects of the replication, epizootology, epidemiology and evolution have been disclosed. This review provides a broad coverage and description of the current knowledge on the disease and the virus.

  8. Rabbit haemorrhagic disease (RHD) and rabbit haemorrhagic disease virus (RHDV): a review

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-01-01

    Rabbit haemorrhagic disease virus (RHDV) is a calicivirus of the genus Lagovirus that causes rabbit haemorrhagic disease (RHD) in adult European rabbits (Oryctolagus cuniculus). First described in China in 1984, the virus rapidly spread worldwide and is nowadays considered as endemic in several countries. In Australia and New Zealand where rabbits are pests, RHDV was purposely introduced for rabbit biocontrol. Factors that may have precipitated RHD emergence remain unclear, but non-pathogenic strains seem to pre-date the appearance of the pathogenic strains suggesting a key role for the comprehension of the virus origins. All pathogenic strains are classified within one single serotype, but two subtypes are recognised, RHDV and RHDVa. RHD causes high mortality in both domestic and wild adult animals, with individuals succumbing between 48-72 h post-infection. No other species has been reported to be fatally susceptible to RHD. The disease is characterised by acute necrotising hepatitis, but haemorrhages may also be found in other organs, in particular the lungs, heart, and kidneys due to disseminated intravascular coagulation. Resistance to the disease might be explained in part by genetically determined absence or weak expression of attachment factors, but humoral immunity is also important. Disease control in rabbitries relies mainly on vaccination and biosecurity measures. Such measures are difficult to be implemented in wild populations. More recent research has indicated that RHDV might be used as a molecular tool for therapeutic applications. Although the study of RHDV and RHD has been hampered by the lack of an appropriate cell culture system for the virus, several aspects of the replication, epizootology, epidemiology and evolution have been disclosed. This review provides a broad coverage and description of the current knowledge on the disease and the virus. PMID:22325049

  9. Airway management during cardiopulmonary resuscitation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bernhard, Michael; Benger, Jonathan R

    2015-06-01

    This article evaluates the latest scientific evidence regarding airway management during in-hospital and out-of-hospital cardiopulmonary resuscitation (CPR). In the in-hospital setting, observational research suggested that the quality of CPR using 'no flow ratio' as a surrogate marker was improved when advanced airway techniques were used. A registry study demonstrated that an initial failed intubation attempt was associated with an average delay of 3 min in time to return of spontaneous circulation. A prospective observational study showed that the Glide Scope videolaryngoscope was associated with a first-pass success rate of 93%, with no differences between less and more experienced physicians. In the out-of-hospital setting, a registry study suggested that intubation leads to a better outcome compared with supraglottic airway devices. However, no advanced airway devices showed a better outcome than basic airway techniques. An observational study reported that the i-gel supraglottic airway device offers a first-pass insertion success rate of 90%, and was easier to establish than the Portex Soft Seal laryngeal mask airway. Other out-of-hospital observational studies showed that the laryngeal tube offers a lower first-pass insertion success rate than expected, and complications of this device may influence later definitive airway management and the outcome as a whole. Recent studies of airway management during CPR rely mostly on registry and observational designs. Prospective randomized trials are needed to determine the optimal approach to airway management during cardiac arrest, but have not yet been completed.

  10. "Orpheus" cardiopulmonary bypass simulation system.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Morris, Richard W; Pybus, David A

    2007-12-01

    In this paper we describe a high-fidelity perfusion simulation system intended for use in the training and continuing education of perfusionists. The system comprises a hydraulic simulator, an electronic interface unit and a controlling computer with associated real-time computer models. It is designed for use within an actual operating theatre, or within a specialized simulation facility. The hydraulic simulator can be positioned on an operating table and physically connected to the circuit of the institutional heart-lung machine. The institutional monitoring system is used to display the arterial and central venous pressures, the ECG and the nasopharyngeal temperature using appropriate connections. The simulator is able to reproduce the full spectrum of normal and abnormal events that may present during the course of cardiopulmonary bypass. The system incorporates a sophisticated blood gas model that accurately predicts the behavior of a modern, hollow-fiber oxygenator. Output from this model is displayed in the manner of an in-line blood gas electrode and is updated every 500 msecs. The perfusionist is able to administer a wide variety of drugs during a simulation session including: vasoconstrictors (metaraminol, epinephrine and phenylephrine), a vasodilator (sodium nitroprusside), chronotropes (epinephrine and atropine), an inotrope (epinephrine) and modifiers of coagulation (heparin and protamine). Each drug has a pharmacokinetic profile based on a three-compartment model plus an effect compartment. The simulation system has potential roles in the skill training of perfusionists, the development of crisis management protocols, the certification and accreditation of perfusionists and the evaluation of new perfusion equipment and/or techniques.

  11. Recurrent secondary postpartum haemorrhage due to endometritis: requires 18 units blood transfusion

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mamta Sharma

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available Postpartum hemorrhage (PPH represents a serious problem for women and obstetricians. Because of its association with haemorrhagic shock and predisposition to disseminated coagulopathy, it is a leading cause of maternal deaths worldwide. Furthermore, the jeopardy of PPH is rising with the secondary form of PPH occurring between 24 hours and 6 weeks postpartum, when women are already discharged home. The causes of this pathology are severe inflammation (endometritis inherited coagulation disorders, consumptive coagulopathy, and retained products of conceptions. Others are of rare occurrence, such as vessel subinvolution (VSI of the placental implantation site, uterine artery pseudo aneurysm, or trauma. [Int J Reprod Contracept Obstet Gynecol 2016; 5(6.000: 2058-2060

  12. Haemorrhage control in severely injured patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gruen, Russell L; Brohi, Karim; Schreiber, Martin; Balogh, Zsolt J; Pitt, Veronica; Narayan, Mayur; Maier, Ronald V

    2012-09-22

    Most surgeons have adopted damage control surgery for severely injured patients, in which the initial operation is abbreviated after control of bleeding and contamination to allow ongoing resuscitation in the intensive-care unit. Developments in early resuscitation that emphasise rapid control of bleeding, restrictive volume replacement, and prevention or early management of coagulopathy are making definitive surgery during the first operation possible for many patients. Improved topical haemostatic agents and interventional radiology are becoming increasingly useful adjuncts to surgical control of bleeding. Better understanding of trauma-induced coagulopathy is paving the way for the replacement of blind, unguided protocols for blood component therapy with systemic treatments targeting specific deficiencies in coagulation. Similarly, treatments targeting dysregulated inflammatory responses to severe injury are under investigation. As point-of-care diagnostics become more suited to emergency environments, timely targeted intervention for haemorrhage control will result in better patient outcomes and reduced demand for blood products. Our Series paper describes how our understanding of the roles of the microcirculation, inflammation, and coagulation has shaped new and emerging treatment strategies.

  13. Hypovolemic shock

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... thready Tests that may be done include: Blood chemistry, including kidney function tests and those tests looking ... severe shock. Severe hypovolemic shock may lead to death, even with immediate medical attention. Older adults are ...

  14. 21 CFR 868.6175 - Cardiopulmonary emergency cart.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Cardiopulmonary emergency cart. 868.6175 Section... (CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES ANESTHESIOLOGY DEVICES Miscellaneous § 868.6175 Cardiopulmonary emergency cart. (a) Identification. A cardiopulmonary emergency cart is a device intended to store and...

  15. 21 CFR 870.4430 - Cardiopulmonary bypass intracardiac suction control.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Cardiopulmonary bypass intracardiac suction....4430 Cardiopulmonary bypass intracardiac suction control. (a) Identification. A cardiopulmonary bypass intracardiac suction control is a device which provides the vacuum and control for a cardiotomy return sucker...

  16. Impact of Obesity on Cardiopulmonary Disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chandler, Marjorie L

    2016-09-01

    Although there are known detrimental effects of obesity on the heart and lungs, few data exist showing obesity as risk factor for cardiopulmonary disorders in dogs and cats. It is probable that increased abdominal fat is detrimental as it is in humans, and there is evidence of negative effects of increased intrathoracic fat. As well as physical effects of fat, increased inflammatory mediators and neurohormonal effects of obesity likely contribute to cardiopulmonary disorders. Weight loss in overweight individuals improves cardiac parameters and exercise tolerance. Obesity in patients with obstructive airway disorders is recognized to increase disease severity.

  17. Dabigatran ameliorates post-haemorrhagic hydrocephalus development after germinal matrix haemorrhage in neonatal rat pups.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Klebe, Damon; Flores, Jerry J; McBride, Devin W; Krafft, Paul R; Rolland, William B; Lekic, Tim; Zhang, John H

    2016-01-01

    We aim to determine if direct thrombin inhibition by dabigatran will improve long-term brain morphological and neurofunctional outcomes and if potential therapeutic effects are dependent upon reduced PAR-1 stimulation and consequent mTOR activation. Germinal matrix haemorrhage was induced by stereotaxically injecting 0.3 U type VII-S collagenase into the germinal matrix of P7 rat pups. Animals were divided into five groups: sham, vehicle (5% DMSO), dabigatran intraperitoneal, dabigatran intraperitoneal + TFLLR-NH2 (PAR-1 agonist) intranasal, SCH79797 (PAR-1 antagonist) intraperitoneal, and dabigatran intranasal. Neurofunctional outcomes were determined by Morris water maze, rotarod, and foot fault evaluations at three weeks. Brain morphological outcomes were determined by histological Nissl staining at four weeks. Expression levels of p-mTOR/p-p70s6k at three days and vitronectin/fibronectin at 28 days were quantified. Intranasal and intraperitoneal dabigatran promoted long-term neurofunctional recovery, improved brain morphological outcomes, and reduced intracranial pressure at four weeks after GMH. PAR-1 stimulation tended to reverse dabigatran's effects on post-haemorrhagic hydrocephalus development. Dabigatran also reduced expression of short-term p-mTOR and long-term extracellular matrix proteins, which tended to be reversed by PAR-1 agonist co-administration. PAR-1 inhibition alone, however, did not achieve the same therapeutic effects as dabigatran administration.

  18. Chronic haemorrhagic radiation proctitis: A review

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Vishnu Prasad Nelamangala Ramakrishnaiah; Srinivasan Krishnamachari

    2016-01-01

    Chronic haemorrhagic radiation proctitis(CHRP) is a difficult problem faced by the patients following radiation for pelvic malignancy. There is no standardtreatment for this condition, but many methods of treatment are available. The aim of this study was to review the literature to see whether there is an improvement in the available evidence in comparison with previously published systematic reviews in treating patients with CHRP. The Pub Med/Medline database and Google Scholar search was selectively searched. Studies, which treated patients with rectal bleeding due to chronic radiation proctitis or CHRP, were included. Seventy studies were finally selected out of which 14 were randomized controlled clinical trials. Though these studies could not be compared, it could be seen that there was an improvement in the methodology of the studies. There was an objective assessment of symptoms, signs and an objective assessment of outcomes. But, still, there were only a few studies that looked into the quality of life following treatment of CHRP. To increase recruitment to trials, a national registry of cases with established late radiation toxicity would facilitate the further improvement of such studies. Some of the conclusions that could be reached based on the available evidence are 4% formalin should be the first line treatment for patients with CHRP. Formalin and argon plasma coagulation(APC) are equally effective, but formalin is better for severe disease. Refractory patients, not responding to formalin or APC, need to be referred for hyperbaric oxygen therapy or surgery. Radio-frequency ablation is a promising modality that needs to be studied further in randomized trials.

  19. Acute posthypoxic myoclonus after cardiopulmonary resuscitation

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bouwes, Aline; van Poppelen, Daniel; Koelman, Johannes H. T. M.; Kuiper, Michael A.; Zandstra, Durk F.; Weinstein, Henry C.; Tromp, Selma C.; Zandbergen, Eveline G. J.; Tijssen, Marina A. J.; Horn, Janneke

    2012-01-01

    Background: Acute posthypoxic myoclonus (PHM) can occur in patients admitted after cardiopulmonary resuscitation (CPR) and is considered to have a poor prognosis. The origin can be cortical and/or subcortical and this might be an important determinant for treatment options and prognosis. The aim of

  20. Physiological consequences : Cardiopulmonary, vestibular, and sensory aspects

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Welsch, H.; Albery, W.; Banks, R.D.; Bles, W.

    2000-01-01

    Discussing the physiological consequences of enhanced fighter manoeuvrability (EFM), aspects of cardiopulmonary reactions will be seen during high G manoeuvres, especially the combination of negative G-load followed by high G-onset manoeuvres ("push-pull"). The aircraft's capability to reach high al

  1. Association of prophylactic endotracheal intubation in critically ill patients with upper GI bleeding and cardiopulmonary unplanned events.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hayat, Umar; Lee, Peter J; Ullah, Hamid; Sarvepalli, Shashank; Lopez, Rocio; Vargo, John J

    2017-09-01

    Prophylactic endotracheal intubation (PEI) is often advocated to mitigate the risk of cardiopulmonary adverse events in patients presenting with brisk upper GI bleeding (UGIB). However, the benefit of such a measure remains controversial. Our study aimed to compare the incidence of cardiopulmonary unplanned events between critically ill patients with brisk UGIB who underwent endotracheal intubation versus those who did not. Patients aged 18 years or older who presented at Cleveland Clinic between 2011 and 2014 with hematemesis and/or patients with melena with consequential hypovolemic shock were included. The primary outcome was a composite of several cardiopulmonary unplanned events (pneumonia, pulmonary edema, acute respiratory distress syndrome, persistent shock/hypotension after the procedure, arrhythmia, myocardial infarction, and cardiac arrest) occurring within 48 hours of the endoscopic procedure. Propensity score matching was used to match each patient 1:1 in variables that could influence the decision to intubate. These included Glasgow Blatchford Score, Charleston Comorbidity Index, and Acute Physiology and Chronic Health Evaluation scores. Two hundred patients were included in the final analysis. The baseline characteristics, comorbidity scores, and prognostic scores were similar between the 2 groups. The overall cardiopulmonary unplanned event rates were significantly higher in the intubated group compared with the nonintubated group (20% vs 6%, P = .008), which remained significant (P = .012) after adjusting for the presence of esophageal varices. PEI before an EGD for brisk UGIB in critically ill patients is associated with an increased risk of unplanned cardiopulmonary events. The benefits and risks of intubation should be carefully weighed when considering airway protection before an EGD in this group of patients. Copyright © 2017 American Society for Gastrointestinal Endoscopy. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  2. The value of MRI in angiogram-negative intracranial haemorrhage

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Renowden, S.A. (Dept. of Neuroradiology, Radcliffe Infirmary, Oxford (United Kingdom)); Molyneux, A.J. (Dept. of Neuroradiology, Radcliffe Infirmary, Oxford (United Kingdom)); Anslow, P. (Dept. of Neuroradiology, Radcliffe Infirmary, Oxford (United Kingdom)); Byrne, J.V. (Dept. of Neuroradiology, Radcliffe Infirmary, Oxford (United Kingdom))

    1994-08-01

    In one year, cerebral angiograms were performed for intracranial haemorrhage (ICH) on 334 patients. No cause for haemorrhage could be identified in 41 (12 %), 30 of whom had predominantly subarachnoid (SAH) and 11 predominantly parenchymal haemorrhage (PH). These patients were prospectively examined by cranial MRI 1-6 weeks after the ictus. The MRI studies were positive in 7 patients (17 %). In the 30 patients examined after SAH, 2 studies were positive, showing an aneurysm in one case and a brain stem lesion of uncertain aetiology in the other. In those examined after PH, cavernous angiomas were shown in 2, a tumour in 1 and a vascular malformation in another; useful diagnostic information was thus obtained in 36 % of this group. (orig.)

  3. Haemorrhagic cholecystitis: an unusual cause of upper gastrointestinal bleeding.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hicks, Natalie

    2014-01-17

    Haemorrhagic cholecystitis is a rare cause of upper gastrointestinal bleeding and is a difficult diagnosis to make. This case report describes an orthopaedic patient, who developed deranged liver function tests and anaemia after a hemiarthroplasty of the hip. The patient had upper abdominal pain and black stools which clinically appeared to be melaena. An ultrasound scan of the abdomen was inconclusive, and therefore a CT was performed and the potential diagnosis of haemorrhagic cholecystitis was raised. An endoscopic evaluation of the upper gastrointestinal tract showed no evidence of other causes of upper gastrointestinal bleeding. Following an emergency laparotomy and cholecystectomy, she recovered well. This report aims to increase awareness about the uncommon condition of haemorrhagic cholecystitis, and to educate regarding clinical and radiological signs which lead to this diagnosis.

  4. Spontaneous haemorrhage and rupture of third ventricular colloid cyst.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Ogbodo, Elisha

    2012-01-01

    Acute bleeding within a colloid cyst of the third ventricle represents a rare event causing sudden increase in the cyst volume that may lead to acute hydrocephalus and rapid neurological deterioration. We report a case of spontaneous rupture of haemorrhagic third ventricular colloid cyst and its management. A 77-year-old ex-smoker presented with unsteady gait, incontinence and gradually worsening confusion over a 3-week period. Brain CT scan findings were highly suggestive of a third ventricular colloid cyst with intraventricular rupture. He underwent cyst excision and histopathology, which confirmed the radiological diagnosis with evidence of haemorrhage within the cyst. A ventriculo peritoneal shunt was performed for delayed hydrocephalus. Surgical management of these patients must include emergency ventriculostomy followed by prompt surgical removal of the haemorrhagic cyst.

  5. An outbreak of acute haemorrhagic conjunctivitis in Melaka, Malaysia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ghazali, O; Chua, K B; Ng, K P; Hooi, P S; Pallansch, M A; Oberste, M S; Chua, K H; Mak, J W

    2003-10-01

    This paper reports a second outbreak of acute haemorrhagic conjunctivitis due to coxsackievirus A24 in peninsular Malaysia. Between June 2002 and early October 2003, 10,327 patients, comprising 3,261 children and 7,066 adults, were treated for acute conjunctivitis in 11 government health clinics in the Melaka Tengah district of the state of Melaka. The figure grossly underestimates the size of the outbreak; as no patients treated in private clinics in the same district were included. Institution and household surveillance showed that the commonest presenting clinical feature of the illness was eye-discharge (91.2%), followed by foreign body sensation (81.8%), pain (78.3%) and subconjunctival haemorrhage (74.4%). The mean duration of illness was 6.5 and five days for patients with and without subconjunctival haemorrhage respectively.

  6. Neurosurgical management of L-asparaginase induced haemorrhagic stroke.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Ogbodo, Elisha

    2012-01-01

    The authors describe a case of L-asparaginase induced intracranial thrombosis and subsequent haemorrhage in a newly diagnosed 30-year-old man with acute lymphoblastic leukaemia who was successfully managed by surgical intervention. At presentation, he had a Glasgow Coma Score of 7\\/15, was aphasic and had dense right hemiplegia. Neuroimaging revealed an acute anterior left middle cerebral artery infarct with parenchymal haemorrhagic conversion, mass effect and subfalcine herniation. He subsequently underwent left frontal craniotomy and evacuation of large frontal haematoma and decompressive craniectomy for cerebral oedema. Six months postoperatively he underwent titanium cranioplasty. He had made good clinical recovery and is currently mobilising independently with mild occasional episodes of expressive dysphasia, difficulty with fine motor movement on the right side, and has remained seizure free. This is the first documented case of L-asparaginase induced haemorrhagic stroke managed by neurosurgical intervention. The authors emphasise the possible role of surgery in managing chemotherapy induced intracranial complications.

  7. Differences in cognitive and emotional outcomes between patients with perimesencephalic and aneurysmal subarachnoid haemorrhage

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    W. Boerboom (Wendy); M.H. Heijenbrok-Kal (Majanka); L. Khajeh (Ladbon); F. van Kooten (Fop); G.M. Ribbers (Gerard)

    2014-01-01

    textabstractObjectives: To compare cognitive and emotional outcomes between patients with aneurysmal and perimesencephalic subarachnoid haemorrhage and norm scores. Design: First measurement in prospective cohort study. Patients: Sixty-seven patients with subarachnoid haemorrhage, were divided into

  8. Haemorrhagic Lumbar Juxtafacet Cyst with Ligamentum Flavum Involvement

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Finn Ghent

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Juxtafacet cysts are an uncommon cause of radiculopathy. They occur most frequently in the lumbar region, and their distribution across the spine correlates with mobility. Haemorrhagic complications are rare and may occur in the absence of any provocation, although there is some association with anticoagulation and trauma. We present a case of acute radiculopathy due to an L5/S1 juxtafacet cyst with unprovoked haemorrhage which was found to extend into ligamentum flavum. The patient underwent uncomplicated microscope assisted decompression with excellent results. The demographics, presentation, aetiology, and management of juxtafacet cysts are discussed.

  9. Eradication of viral haemorrhagic septicaemia in Danish aquaculture

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Olesen, Niels Jørgen; Skall, Helle Frank; Jensen, Britt Bang

    Eradication of viral haemorrhagic septicaemia in Danish aquaculture Olesen N.J.1, Skall H.F.1, Jensen B.B.2, Henriksen N.H.3, Mellergård S.4, H. Korsholm H.5 1National Veterinary Institute, Technical University of Denmark, Aarhus, Denmark 2Norwegian Veterinary Institute, Oslo, Norway 3Danish...... Aquaculture Association, Silkeborg, Denmark 4Danish Veterinary and Food Administration, Glostrup, Denmark 5Danish Veterinary and Food Administration, Vejle, Denmark Viral haemorrhagic septicaemia (VHS) virus was first isolated in Denmark in 1962, when more than half of the approximately 800 Danish fish farms...

  10. Bacterial endotoxins and liver haemorrhage in the oestrogenised chicken.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Curtis, M J; Pearson, A W; Butler, E J

    1980-11-01

    Hepatic steatosis and haemorrhage in oestrogenised chickens were not associated with any increase in the endotoxin content of the plasma. The haemorrhage was not ameliorated by suppressing enteric bacteria with neomycin or exacerbated by the repeated injection of Escherichia coli O111 endotoxin and there were no relevant changes in plasma enzyme activities that are indicators of liver damage. These results therefore do not support the hypothesis that, as in the choline deficient rat, hepatic steatosis impairs the ability of the oestrogenised chicken to dispose of bacterial endotoxins and that these then damage the liver.

  11. Genetic population structure of marine viral haemorrhagic septicaemia virus (VHSV)

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Snow, M.; Bain, N.; Black, J.

    2004-01-01

    The nucleotide sequences of a specific region of the nucleoprotein gene were compared in order to investigate the genetic population structure of marine viral haemorrhagic septicaemia virus (VHSV). Analysis of the sequence from 128 isolates of diverse geographic and host origin renders this the m......The nucleotide sequences of a specific region of the nucleoprotein gene were compared in order to investigate the genetic population structure of marine viral haemorrhagic septicaemia virus (VHSV). Analysis of the sequence from 128 isolates of diverse geographic and host origin renders...

  12. Perforated ileal duplication cyst with haemorrhagic pseudocyst formation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hwang, Im Kyung; Kim, Bong Soo; Kim, Heung Chul; Lee, In Sun; Hwang, Woo Chul [Department of Radiology, College of Medicine, Hallym University (Korea); Namkung, Sook [Department of Radiology, College of Medicine, Hallym University (Korea); Department of Radiology, Chuncheon Sacred Heart Hospital, 153 Kyo-dong, Chuncheon, Kangwon-do, 200-704 (Korea)

    2003-07-01

    Duplication cysts of the gastrointestinal tract are rare congenital abnormalities. Ectopic gastric mucosa, which can be found in duplications, may cause peptic ulceration, gastrointestinal bleeding or perforation. We report a 1-year-old boy with a perforated ileal duplication cyst with haemorrhagic pseudocyst formation caused by peptic ulceration of the duplication cyst. It presented a snowman-like appearance consisting of a small, thick-walled, true enteric cyst and a large, thin-walled haemorrhagic pseudocyst on US and CT. It is an unusual manifestation of a duplication cyst, which has not been reported in the English language literature. (orig.)

  13. Advances in the diagnosis of shock, its assessment and resuscitation during the Great War.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bullingham, A G P

    2016-07-01

    The Great War of 1914-1918 ushered in a new era of technology on the battlefield resulting in casualties on an unprecedented scale. There had been progress in many related areas of medicine before the outbreak of hostilities but these had not been applied or fully developed in clinical practice. This is particularly true for the management of haemorrhagic shock and resuscitation. This article discusses the history and development of medical treatment of shock and trauma patients during the conflict.

  14. [Cardiogenic shock].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Houegnifioh, Komlanvi Kafui; Gfeller, Etienne; Garcia, Wenceslao; Ribordy, Vincent

    2014-08-13

    Cardiogenic shock, especially when it complicates a myocardial infarction, is still associated with high mortality rate. Emergency department or first care physicians are often the first providers to assess the cardiogenic shock patient, and plays thereby a key role in achieving a timely diagnosis and treatment. This review will detail the actual physiopathology understanding of the cardiogenic shock, its diagnosis and management focusing on the care within the emergency department.

  15. History of the evolution of cardiopulmonary resuscitation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    George Karlis

    2013-04-01

    Full Text Available Cardiopulmonary resuscitation (CPR is as old as humankind. The evolution of CPR represents a combination of human errors and discoveries. Aim: The present study reviews the most important moments in the history of resuscitation, from the first attempts of CPR until now. Methods: The methodology followed included bibliography research from review literature, through databases PubMed, Medline, Scopus, with the use of keywords, such as cardiopulmonary arrest, cardiopulmonary resuscitation, history, evolution and combinations of them. Complementary bibliography was found through the library of the National and Kapodistrian University of Athens. Results: The first historical references on CPR go back to the era of Ancient Egypt (3100 B.C.. Although the technique for mouth to mouth ventilation was known in ancient times, its efficacy was demonstrated just in 1958. The ease and efficacy of chest compressions were demonstrated in 1960. Electrical defibrillation may have begun in 1775, but it was applied to a victim of cardiac arrest in the 1950s. Conclusion: CPR is currently a rapidly evolving field of medical science. According to latest data, there is evidence that high quality chest compressions, prompt defibrillation if applicable and treatment of reversible causes improve Cardiopulmonary resuscitation (CPR is as old as humankind. The evolution of CPR represents a combination of human errors and discoveries. Aim: The present study reviews the most important moments in the history of resuscitation, from the first attempts of CPR until now. Methods: The methodology followed included bibliography research from review literature, through databases PubMed, Medline, Scopus, with the use of keywords, such as cardiopulmonary arrest, cardiopulmonary resuscitation, history, evolution and combinations of them. Complementary bibliography was found through the library of the National and Kapodistrian University of Athens. Results: The first historical references

  16. Emergent cardiopulmonary bypass during pectus excavatum repair

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ryan Craner

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Pectus excavatum is a chest wall deformity that produces significant cardiopulmonary disability and is typically seen in younger patients. Minimally invasive repair of pectus excavatum or Nuss procedure has become a widely accepted technique for adult and pediatric patients. Although it is carried out through a thoracoscopic approach, the procedure is associated with a number of potential intraoperative and post-operative complications. We present a case of cardiac perforation requiring emergent cardiopulmonary bypass in a 29-year-old male with Marfan syndrome and previous mitral valve repair undergoing a Nuss procedure for pectus excavatum. This case illustrates the importance of vigilance and preparation by the surgeons, anesthesia providers as well as the institution to be prepared with resources to handle the possible complications. This includes available cardiac surgical backup, perfusionist support and adequate blood product availability.

  17. Hypopituitarism after subarachnoid haemorrhage, do we know enough?

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    L. Khajeh (Ladbon); K. Blijdorp (Karin); S.J.C.M.M. Neggers (Bas); G.M. Ribbers (Gerard); D.W.J. Dippel (Diederik); F. van Kooten (Fop)

    2014-01-01

    textabstractBackground: Fatigue, slowness, apathy and decrease in level of activity are common long-term complaints after a subarachnoid haemorrhage (SAH). They resemble the symptoms frequently found in patients with endocrine dysfunction. Pituitary dysfunction may be the result of SAH or its compli

  18. Subjective hearing impairment after subarachnoid haemorrhage : Prevalence and risk factors

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Vos, Erik M.; Greebe, Paut; Visser-Meily, J. M Anne|info:eu-repo/dai/nl/180428047; Rinkel, Gabriel J E|info:eu-repo/dai/nl/085712000; Vergouwen, Mervyn D I

    2017-01-01

    Background Sensorineural hearing impairment is a key symptom in patients with superficial siderosis of the central nervous system, a disease caused by chronic or intermittent haemorrhage into the subarachnoid space. We investigated the prevalence and risk factors of subjective hearing impairment

  19. Individual risk assessment for intracranial haemorrhage during thrombolytic therapy

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    M.L. Simoons (Maarten); A.P. Maggioni; G. Knatterud; J.D. Leimberger; P.P.T. de Jaegere (Peter); R.T. van Domburg (Ron); H. Boersma (Eric); M. Grazia Franzosi (M.); R.M. Califf (Robert); R. Schroder; E. Braunwald (Eugene)

    1993-01-01

    textabstractThrombolytic therapy improves outcome in patients with myocardial infarction but is associated with an increased risk of intracranial haemorrhage. For some patients, this risk may outweigh the potential benefits of thrombolytic treatment. Using data from other studies, we developed a mod

  20. Haemorrhage in the labyrinth caused by anticoagulant therapy: case report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Callonnec, F.; Gerardin, E.; Thiebot, J. [Department of Radiology, Rouen University Hospital, 1 rue de Germont, F-76031 Rouen cedex (France); Marie, J.P.; Andrieu Guitrancourt, J. [Department of Otolaryngology, Rouen University Hospital (France); Marsot-Dupuch, K. [Department of Radiology, St. Antoine, Paris University Hospital (France)

    1999-06-01

    We report a patient who experienced a severe vertiginous episode with bilateral tinnitus and progressive right-sided hearing loss. She had Marfan`s disease and was on anticoagulant treatment. The fluid in the labyrinth gave higher signal than cerebrospinal fluid on T1-weighted images, suggesting haemorrhage. The radiological follow-up is discussed. (orig.) With 2 figs., 11 refs.

  1. Eradication of viral haemorrhagic septicaemia in Danish aquaculture

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Olsen, N. J.; Skall, Helle Frank; Jensen, B. B.

    2013-01-01

    Viral haemorrhagic septicaemia (VHS) virus was first isolated in Denmark in 1962, when more than half of the approximately 800 Danish fish farms were considered to be infected. Today, 50 years later, the country obtained status as EU approved VHS free zone. In the years in between very significan...

  2. Intra-arterial nimodipine for cerebral vasospasm after subarachnoid haemorrhage

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bashir, Asma; Andresen, Morten; Bartek, Jiri

    2016-01-01

    Intra-arterial nimodipine (IAN) has shown a promising effect on cerebral vasospasm (CV) after aneurysmal subarachnoid haemorrhage. At our institution, Rigshospitalet, IAN treatment has been used since 2009, but the short- and long-term clinical efficacy of IAN has not yet been assessed. The purpose...

  3. Transfusion practice in major obstetric haemorrhage: lessons from trauma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Saule, I; Hawkins, N

    2012-01-01

    The management of massive haemorrhage with blood products is changing as evidence arrives from civilian and military trauma. Rapid early replacement of coagulation factors and platelets is now becoming central to improving outcome, usually given in higher ratios with respect to red cell units than previously recommended and using empiric transfusion based on clinical rather than laboratory parameters. The management of three cases of major obstetric haemorrhage based on these principles is presented. Packed red blood cells, fresh frozen plasma, platelets and cryoprecipitate were transfused in the ratios 5:2:2:1, 4.5:1:1:1 and 4.5:2:1:1. Each patient had acceptable full blood count and coagulation results after surgery and all made an uneventful recovery. These outcomes support the opinion that major obstetric haemorrhage can be managed in a similar fashion to blood loss in trauma. Recommendations from the Association of Anaesthetists of Great Britain and Ireland, and the UK National Patient Safety Agency should be considered during major obstetric haemorrhage.

  4. Haemorrhage after home birth: audit of decision making and referral

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Smit, M. de; Dijkman, A.; Rijnders, M.; Bustraan, J.; Dillen, J. van; Middeldorp, J.; Havenith, B.; Roosmalen, J. van

    2013-01-01

    In the Netherlands, 20 per cent of women give birth at home. In 0.7 per cent, referral to secondary care because of postpartum haemorrhage (PPH) is indicated. Midwives are regularly trained in managing obstetric emergencies. A postgraduate training programme developed for Dutch community-based midwi

  5. Considerable delay in diagnosis and acute management of subarachnoid haemorrhage

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Larsen, Carl Christian; Eskesen, Vagn; Hauerberg, John

    2010-01-01

    Rebleeding from subarachnoid haemorrhage (SAH) usually occurs within the first six hours after the initial bleeding. Rebleeding can be prevented effectively with tranexamic acid (TXA). Although a broad consensus has evolved that SAH should be treated as an emergency, it is likely that delays do...

  6. Intrauterine balloon tamponade for the control of postpartum haemorrhage.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lohano, Rajni; Haq, Gulfishan; Kazi, Sarah; Sheikh, Saima

    2016-01-01

    To evaluate the effectiveness of balloon temponade in the management of postpartum haemorrhage. The study was conducted at the Dow University of Health Sciences and Civil Hospital Karachi from January to July 18, 2012, and comprised women aged 18-35 years, parity 1-6 and gestational age 31-41 weeks, who developed or were admitted with primary postpartum haemorrhage due to uterine atony in whom medical treatment had failed. SPSS 10 was used to analyse the data. The mean age, parity, gestational age of 139 women was 26.4±4.2 years, 3.4±1.3, 37.81±1.67 respectively. Mean estimated blood loss was 1155.8±350.6 ml, mean systolic blood pressure 90.96±18.1 mmHg, diastolic blood pressure 55±7.5 mmHg and mean pulse was 108.3±10.89 bpm. Balloon tamponade was effective in 126(90.4%) cases. Condom catheter balloon tamponade was an effective means of controlling postpartum haemorrhage. There should be a low threshold for use of balloon tamponade as it is effective, easy to use, easily available, has low complication rate, and an inexpensive modality to manage non-traumatic postpartum haemorrhage, especially in resource-limited settings, and still maintain reproductive ability.

  7. Breathing-Impaired Speech after Brain Haemorrhage: A Case Study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Heselwood, Barry

    2007-01-01

    Results are presented from an auditory and acoustic analysis of the speech of an adult male with impaired prosody and articulation due to brain haemorrhage. They show marked effects on phonation, speech rate and articulator velocity, and a speech rhythm disrupted by "intrusive" stresses. These effects are discussed in relation to the speaker's…

  8. Reentry Shock

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Dorine; Houston

    1998-01-01

    Dear Xiao Lan, You remember the pain of culture and reentry shock; humor me please; let mereview the facts for the sake of the students you are sending here in greater numbers.Culture shock is the emotional pain that people experience when they visit a newcountry and find customs, experiences, smells, and non-verbal communication stylesto be different from their own country.

  9. Survival after in-hospital Cardiopulmonary Resuscitation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M Adib Hajbaghery

    2005-05-01

    Full Text Available Background: During recent years, cardiopulmonary resuscitation (CPR in hospital has received much attention. However, the survival rate of CPR in Iran’s hospitals is unknown. This study was designed to evaluate outcome of in-hospital CPR in Kashan. Methods: A longitudinal case registry study was conducted on all cases of in-hospital CPR during 6 months at 2002. Necessary data including; age, sex, underlying disease, working shift, time from cardiac arrest until initiating of CPR and until defibrillation, duration and result of CPR, frequency of tracheal intubations and time served for it were collected in a checklist. Results: In six months study, 206 cases of cardiopulmonary resuscitation attempted. The survival rate was similar for both sexes. Short-term survival observed in19.9% of cases and only 5.3% survived to discharge. Conclusions: Duration of CPR, time of the first defibrillation, response time and the location of cardiac arrest are the key predictors of survival to hospital discharge and in-hospital CPR strategies require improvement. This study promotes a national study on post CPR survival for accurate data on our performance in attention to chain of survival. KeyWords: Cardiopulmonary Resuscitation (CPR, Survival rate, Iran

  10. A marked increase in gastric fluid volume during cardiopulmonary bypass

    OpenAIRE

    2011-01-01

    Major physiological stress occurs during cardiac surgery with cardiopulmonary bypass. This is related to hypothermia and artificial organ perfusion. Thus, serious gastrointestinal complications, particularly upper gastrointestinal bleeding, sometimes follow cardiac surgery. We have compared the antisecretory effects of a preanesthetic H2 antagonist (roxatidine, cardiopulmonary bypass-H2 group, n = 15) and a proton pump inhibitor (rabeprazole, cardiopulmonary bypass-PPI group, n = 15) in patie...

  11. High incidence of post-tonsillectomy secondary haemorrhage following coblation tonsillectomy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Praveen, C V; Parthiban, Subashini; Terry, R M

    2013-01-01

    To examine the incidence of haemorrhage following tonsillectomy, to explore the usefulness of antibiotic in preventing postoperative haemorrhage and to examine if the haemorrhage depended on the level of expertise of the surgeon. A retrospective review analysing tonsillectomy method, the rate secondary haemorrhage, the grade of operating surgeon. A χ(2) analysis was used to determine the statistical difference between the haemorrhage rates of different tonsillectomy methods. One thousand three hundred and thirty-six tonsillectomies were performed during this period by four different methods: 615 by cold steel dissection, 582 by Coblation, 32 by bipolar dissection and 107 by Helica thermal coagulation. 621 tonsillectomies were performed by Consultant grade and middle grades performed 693 operations. 124 patients (9.3 %) were readmitted with haemorrhage. The secondary haemorrhage requiring surgery for controlling bleeding for cold steel dissection method was 1.5 % compared to 6.7 % for coblation method (P tonsillectomy haemorrhage rate of 5.5 % and middle grades had a rate of 3.7 %. 86.5 % of the patients were already on routine prophylactic oral antibiotics at the time of presentation with haemorrhage needing surgical arrest and 13.5 % were not on antibiotics (P coblation and cold steel dissection methods. Coblation tonsillectomies had an increased need for operative intervention to control secondary haemorrhage. Routine use of antibiotic and expertise of operating surgeon had no bearing on secondary haemorrhage rate.

  12. Postpartum intra-abdominal haemorrhage: Case report

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tubić-Pavlović Aleksandra

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available Introduction. The most frequent cause of gynaecological haemoperitoneum is ruptured ectopic pregnancy. Haemoperitoneum after a normal vaginal delivery is rare and it is associated with high maternal mortality. Case report. A 22-year-old primipara had a normal vaginal delivery. She experinced acute abdominal pain and hypovolemic shock ten hours after the delivery and was referred to our hospital twenty one hours after the delivery. An urgent ultrasound profile was done, which revealed free fluid in pelvis and in the whole abdomen. An immediate laparotomy was done and 2 litres of blood were found within the peritoneal cavity. The uterine wall was intact. We found a haematoma on the anterior wall of rectum and livid colours of broad ligament. The peritoneal cavity was cleaned and revised. Any injury of the spleen or liver was excluded. Discussion and conclusion. Haematoperitoneum after a normal vaginal delivery is rare but life threatening to mothers. It is important to recognize this condition to avoid delay in diagnosis and treatment because of high maternal mortality. Our patient was bleeding from superficial rectal vessels. Only a few cases with undefined aetiologies have been reported in literature.

  13. 产后出血的麻醉管理进展%Advance in the anesthetic management for postpartum haemorrhage

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    鲁显福; 张励才; 曾因明

    2009-01-01

    产后出血的管理需要多学科、团队协作共同应对各种复杂事件.产科麻醉医师作力这个团队的关键成员,应发挥其良好的复苏训练、出血管理和危重病监测治疗的特长.一旦产科医师决定手术治疗产后出血,麻醉医师的首要职责便是关注其各种支持手段.现就围绕产后出血病人的休克诊断、早期液体复苏的争议、麻醉前准备、麻醉方式的选择、血液管理、血细胞回收与监测的进展进行综述.%Management of postpartum haemorrhage requires multidisciplinary co-operation between all specialties involved. The obstetric anesthetist, the key member of this multidisciplinary team, should possess perfect skill in resuscitation and rich experiences in haemorrhage management consummate speciality in monitoring and caring for the critically ill patient. Once surgical intervention in needed to manage postpartum haemorrhage, anesthetist should devote into the case with various supportive measures. The diagnosis of shock, controversies on initial fluid resuscitation, preanesthetic preparation, selection of anesthesia mothods, haematological management, cell salvage and monitoring are discussed and updated in this review.

  14. Are gauge shocks really shocks?

    CERN Document Server

    Alcubierre, M

    2005-01-01

    The existence of gauge pathologies associated with the Bona-Masso family of generalized harmonic slicing conditions is proven for the case of simple 1+1 relativity. It is shown that these gauge pathologies are true shocks in the sense that the characteristic lines associated with the propagation of the gauge cross, which implies that the name ``gauge shock'' usually given to such pathologies is indeed correct. These gauge shocks are associated with places where the spatial hypersurfaces that determine the foliation of spacetime become non-smooth.

  15. Characterizing amide proton transfer imaging in haemorrhage brain lesions using 3T MRI

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jeong, Ha-Kyu [Philips Korea, Seoul (Korea, Republic of); Korea Basic Science Institute, Chungcheongbuk-do (Korea, Republic of); Han, Kyunghwa [Yonsei University College of Medicine, Department of Radiology and Research Institute of Radiological Science, Seodaemun-gu, Seoul (Korea, Republic of); Yonsei University College of Medicine, Yonsei Biomedical Research Institute, Seoul (Korea, Republic of); Zhou, Jinyuan [Johns Hopkins University School of Medicine, Division of MRI Research, Department of Radiology, Baltimore, MD (United States); Zhao, Yansong [Philips Healthcare, MR Clinical Science, Cleveland, OH (United States); Choi, Yoon Seong; Lee, Seung-Koo; Ahn, Sung Soo [Yonsei University College of Medicine, Department of Radiology and Research Institute of Radiological Science, Seodaemun-gu, Seoul (Korea, Republic of)

    2017-04-15

    The aim of this study was to characterize amide proton transfer (APT)-weighted signals in acute and subacute haemorrhage brain lesions of various underlying aetiologies. Twenty-three patients with symptomatic haemorrhage brain lesions including tumorous (n = 16) and non-tumorous lesions (n = 7) were evaluated. APT imaging was performed and analyzed with magnetization transfer ratio asymmetry (MTR{sub asym}). Regions of interest were defined as the enhancing portion (when present), acute or subacute haemorrhage, and normal-appearing white matter based on anatomical MRI. MTR{sub asym} values were compared among groups and components using a linear mixed model. MTR{sub asym} values were 3.68 % in acute haemorrhage, 1.6 % in subacute haemorrhage, 2.65 % in the enhancing portion, and 0.38 % in normal white matter. According to the linear mixed model, the distribution of MTR{sub asym} values among components was not significantly different between tumour and non-tumour groups. MTR{sub asym} in acute haemorrhage was significantly higher than those in the other regions regardless of underlying pathology. Acute haemorrhages showed high MTR{sub asym} regardless of the underlying pathology, whereas subacute haemorrhages showed lower MTR{sub asym} than acute haemorrhages. These results can aid in the interpretation of APT imaging in haemorrhage brain lesions. (orig.)

  16. Haematological, blood gas and acid-base effects of central histamine-induced reversal of critical haemorrhagic hypotension in rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jochem, J

    2001-09-01

    In a rat model of volume-controlled irreversible haemorrhagic shock, which results in a severe metabolic acidosis and the death of all control animals within 30 min., intracerebroventricular injection of histamine (100 nmol) produces a prompt and long-lasting increase in mean arterial pressure and heart rate, with a 100% survival of 2 h after treatment. Histamine action is accompanied by a decrease in haematocrit value, haemoglobin concentration, erythrocyte and platelet count, and an increase in residual blood volume at the end of the experiment (2 h). Cardiovascular effects are also associated with a long-lasting rise in respiratory rate and biphasic blood acid-base changes - initial increase of metabolic acidosis with the decrease in arterial and venous pH, bicarbonate concentration and base excess, followed by almost a complete recovery of blood gas and acid-base parameters to the pre-bleeding values, with normalisation of arterial and venous pH, Pco2 bicarbonate concentration and base excess at the end of experiment. It can be concluded that in the late phase of central histamine-induced reversal of haemorrhagic hypotension there is almost a complete restoration of blood gas and acid-base status due to circulatory and respiratory compensations, while accompanying haematological changes are the result of the haemodilution and the increase in residual blood volume.

  17. Software for interpreting cardiopulmonary exercise tests

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Corry David B

    2007-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Cardiopulmonary exercise testing (CPET has become an important modality for the evaluation and management of patients with a diverse array of medical problems. However, interpreting these tests is often difficult and time consuming, requiring significant expertise. Methods We created a computer software program (XINT that assists in CPET interpretation. The program uses an integrative approach as recommended in the Official Statement of the American Thoracic Society/American College of Chest Physicians (ATS/ACCP on Cardiopulmonary Exercise Testing. In this paper we discuss the principles behind the software. We also provide the detailed logic in an accompanying file (Additional File 1. The actual program and the open source code are also available free over the Internet at http://www.xint.org. For convenience, the required download files can also be accessed from this article. Additional file 1 XINTlogic. This file provides the detailed logic used by the XINT program. The variable names are described in Table 1. The actual source code may also be read directly simply by opening the source code with a text editor. Click here for file Results To test the clinical usefulness of XINT, we present the computer generated interpretations of the case studies discussed in the ATS/ACCP document in another accompanying file (Additional File 2. We believe the interpretations are consistent with the document's criteria and the interpretations given by the expert panel. Additional file 2 XINTinterpretations. These are the XINT generated reports based on the five examples provided in the ATS/ACCP statement on cardiopulmonary exercise testing 1. Click here for file Conclusion Computers have become an integral part of modern life. Peer-reviewed scientific journals are now able to present not just medical concepts and experimental studies, but actual functioning medical interpretive software. This has enormous potential to improve medical

  18. Asymptomatic cardiopulmonary changes caused by adenoid hypertrophy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abdel-Aziz, Mosaad

    2011-07-01

    Adenoid hypertrophy is the most common cause of pediatric upper airway obstruction, and it can lead to cardiopulmonary complications such as pulmonary hypertension, cor pulmonale, and even heart failure. The aim of this study was to detect the asymptomatic cardiopulmonary changes that could happen in children with adenoid hypertrophy.Eighty children with adenoid hypertrophy were included in this study. Chest x-ray was used to assess the cardiothoracic ratio, whereas echocardiography was used for measuring the pulmonary arterial pressures, right ventricular diastolic filling parameters, and right ventricular end-diastolic diameters. All patients underwent adenoidectomy with or without tonsillectomy, and they were subjected again to echocardiographic assessment 6 months after the operation. No patient showed an increase in the cardiothoracic ratio on x-ray. Preoperative echocardiography showed an increase in pulmonary artery pressure (22.7 [SD, 3.8] mm Hg), a decrease in right ventricular diastolic filling parameters (E/A = 1.03 [SD, 0.17]), and an increase in right ventricular end-diastolic diameters (1.89 [SD, 0.19] cm). Postoperatively, pulmonary artery pressure decreased to 17.2 [SD, 2.1] mm Hg, right ventricular diastolic filling (E/A) increased to 1.25 [SD, 0.11], and right ventricular end-diastolic diameters decreased to 1.68 [SD, 0.12] cm. The comparison between preoperative and postoperative results for each individual parameter was statistically significant. Clinically asymptomatic cardiopulmonary changes due to adenoid hypertrophy are not rare. Early diagnosis and treatment of upper airway obstruction can prevent these serious complications. Echocardiographic examination should be recommended for these patients as a part of preoperative preparation to avoid anesthetic complications.

  19. Rehabilitation following intracerebral haemorrhage secondary to extracorporeal membrane oxygenation (ECMO).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kilsby, Amanda; Buddha, Sandeep

    2013-05-24

    Extracorporeal membrane oxygenation (ECMO) was first used in adults with severe respiratory failure in the 1970s. Its use has been steadily increasing since the 1990s after a trial demonstrated improved survival. There are currently seven centres in the UK offering ECMO to adults. Neurological complications are often picked up within the first few days of initiating ECMO. Intracerebral haemorrhage is a well recognised complication and it is the leading cause of death in infants on ECMO and rates of 9-18.9% in adults have been reported. We report a 52-year-old woman admitted in severe type 1 respiratory failure in January 2012. She was transferred to a tertiary centre and suffered bitemporal and right parietal haemorrhages on ECMO in late February. She was repatriated to our unit for rehabilitation in April 2012. Her rehabilitation needs represent the complexity of this patient group with multiple medical, behavioural and physical challenges.

  20. Therapeutic management of Crimean-Congo haemorrhagic fever.

    Science.gov (United States)

    de la Calle-Prieto, Fernando; Martín-Quirós, Alejandro; Trigo, Elena; Mora-Rillo, Marta; Arsuaga, Marta; Díaz-Menéndez, Marta; Arribas, José Ramón

    2017-06-29

    Crimean-Congo haemorrhagic fever has been reported in more than 30 countries in Africa, Asia, the Middle East and Eastern Europe, with an increasing incidence in recent years, especially in Europe. Because no specific treatments have demonstrated efficacy, supportive treatment is essential, as well as the provision of a centre with the appropriate means to guarantee the safety of its healthcare professionals. Laboratory monitoring of thrombocytopenia, severe coagulopathy or liver failure is of critical importance. Patients with Crimean-Congo haemorrhagic fever should be admitted to High Level Isolation Units where appropriate biocontainment procedures can prevent nosocomial transmission through infected fluids or accidents with contaminated material. In case of high-risk exposures, early administration of ribavirin should be considered. Copyright © 2017. Publicado por Elsevier España, S.L.U.

  1. Increased post-operative haemorrhage seen in adult coblation tonsillectomy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Noon, A P; Hargreaves, S

    2003-09-01

    Coblation is a new soft tissue surgical technique that is being used for tonsillectomy. Published results show a significant decrease in the amount of post-operative pain experienced by patients undergoing coblation tonsillectomy. There has been no published work to date on the incidence of post-operative haemorrhage. From August 2001 to November 2002 one surgeon performed 36 coblation tonsillectomies on adults. On another list he performed 29 by his standard method of dissection and bipolar coagulation. Retrospective analysis found a significant increase in the secondary haemorrhage rate in adult patients undergoing coblation tonsillectomy (22.2 vs. 3.4 per cent). At our department coblation tonsillectomy has been abandoned until further work into its safety has been published.

  2. [Clinical relevance of cardiopulmonary reflexes in anesthesiology].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guerri-Guttenberg, R A; Siaba-Serrate, F; Cacheiro, F J

    2013-10-01

    The baroreflex, chemoreflex, pulmonary reflexes, Bezold-Jarisch and Bainbridge reflexes and their interaction with local mechanisms, are a demonstration of the richness of cardiovascular responses that occur in human beings. As well as these, the anesthesiologist must contend with other variables that interact by attenuating or accentuating cardiopulmonary reflexes such as, anesthetic drugs, surgical manipulation, and patient positioning. In the present article we review these reflexes and their clinical relevance in anesthesiology. Copyright © 2012 Sociedad Española de Anestesiología, Reanimación y Terapéutica del Dolor. Published by Elsevier España. All rights reserved.

  3. Cardiopulmonary resuscitation: how far have we come?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Whitcomb, John J; Blackman, Virginia Schmied

    2007-01-01

    In the 43 years since it was first described, cardiopulmonary resuscitation (CPR) has grown from an obscure medical theory to a basic first aid skill taught to adults and is now the near-universal technique used in CPR instruction. This article provides insight into the history of CPR. We explore the phenomenon of sudden cardiac arrest, the historical roots of CPR, current practice data and recommendations, and the society's role in the development of this life-saving technique. We conclude with a review of CPR's economic impact on the healthcare system and the ethical and policy issues surrounding CPR.

  4. Normal values for cardiopulmonary exercise testing in children

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    ten Harkel, A.D.J.; Takken, T.; van Osch-Gevers, M.; Helbing, W.A.

    BACKGROUND: A reference set of data of normal values of newly developed cardiopulmonary parameters of exercise testing in an 8-18-year-old population is lacking. PATIENTS AND METHODS: Cardiopulmonary exercise testing was performed in 175 healthy school children (8-18 years old). Continuous

  5. 21 CFR 870.4240 - Cardiopulmonary bypass heat exchanger.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Cardiopulmonary bypass heat exchanger. 870.4240... bypass heat exchanger. (a) Identification. A cardiopulmonary bypass heat exchanger is a device, consisting of a heat exchange system used in extracorporeal circulation to warm or cool the blood...

  6. Surgical Trial in Lobar Intracerebral Haemorrhage (STICH II Protocol

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rowan Elise N

    2011-05-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Within the spectrum of spontaneous intracerebral haemorrhage there are some patients with large or space occupying haemorrhage who require surgery for neurological deterioration and others with small haematomas who should be managed conservatively. There is equipoise about the management of patients between these two extremes. In particular there is some evidence that patients with lobar haematomas and no intraventricular haemorrhage might benefit from haematoma evacuation. The STICH II study will establish whether a policy of earlier surgical evacuation of the haematoma in selected patients will improve outcome compared to a policy of initial conservative treatment. Methods/Design an international multicentre randomised parallel group trial. Only patients for whom the treating neurosurgeon is in equipoise about the benefits of early craniotomy compared to initial conservative treatment are eligible. All patients must have a CT scan confirming spontaneous lobar intracerebral haemorrhage (≤1 cm from the cortex surface of the brain and 10-100 ml in volume. Any clotting or coagulation problems must be corrected and randomisation must take place within 48 hours of ictus. With 600 patients, the study will be able to demonstrate a 12% benefit from surgery (2p Stratified randomisation is undertaken using a central 24 hour randomisation service accessed by telephone or web. Patients randomised to early surgery should have the operation within 12 hours. Information about the status (Glasgow Coma Score and focal signs of all patients through the first five days of their trial progress is also collected in addition to another CT scan at about five days (+/- 2 days. Outcome is measured at six months via a postal questionnaire to the patient. Primary outcome is death or severe disability defined using a prognosis based 8 point Glasgow Outcome Scale. Secondary outcomes include: Mortality, Rankin, Barthel, EuroQol, and Survival. Trial

  7. Haemorrhagic enteritis seroconversion in turkey breeders: field observations

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Raffaella Ceruti

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available Seroconversion to viral haemorrhagic enteritis (HE was studied in seven flocks of turkey breeders (17.974 birds in total, after 20 weeks of the onset of egg production. They showed no clinical signs, and mortality rate was normal. However, the infection caused a drop in egg production lasting about five weeks (-2.32 eggs laid during this period, but had no effect on hatching parameters.

  8. Nosocomial ventriculitis due to Roseomonas gilardii complicating subarachnoid haemorrhage.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nolan, Jason S; Waites, Ken B

    2005-04-01

    Roseomonas gilardii is a pink-pigmented, non-fermentative, Gram-negative coccobacillus that has been recognized as a rare cause of human infections. We report the first case of ventriculitis caused by R. gilardii in a 54-year-old man with a subarachnoid haemorrhage secondary to a vertebral artery aneurysm; discuss previous reports of this organism as a nosocomial and community-acquired pathogen, laboratory diagnosis, and patient management.

  9. A rare case of Weil's disease with alveolar haemorrhage

    OpenAIRE

    Abhiram Chakrabarti; Manab Nandy; Dipankar Pal; Sudesna Mallik

    2014-01-01

    Leptospirosis, a disease of protean manifestations occurs sporadically throughout the year with a peak seasonal incidence during the rainy season mimicking other febrile viral illness. In the rare case, the disease leads to renal and hepatic involvement with hemorrhage which may be associated with multisystem organ dysfunction in form of pulmonary, cardiac and central nervous system, when it is known as Weil's disease. Rarely haemorrhagic manifestations are assosciated. Early diagnosis is imp...

  10. A Q fever case mimicking crimean-congo haemorrhagic fever

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    O Karabay

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Coxiella burnetii is the bacterium that causes Q fever. Human infection is mainly transmitted from cattle, goats and sheep. The disease is usually self-limited. Pneumonia and hepatitis are the most common clinical manifestations. In this study, we present a case of Q fever from the western part of Turkey mimicking Crimean-Congo haemorrhagic fever (CCHF in terms of clinical and laboratory findings.

  11. Adrenal crisis secondary to bilateral adrenal haemorrhage after hemicolectomy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Anthony Logaraj

    2016-10-01

    Full Text Available Adrenal haemorrhage is a rare cause of adrenal crisis, which requires rapid diagnosis, prompt initiation of parenteral hydrocortisone and haemodynamic monitoring to avoid hypotensive crises. We herein describe a case of bilateral adrenal haemorrhage after hemicolectomy in a 93-year-old female with high-grade colonic adenocarcinoma. This patient’s post-operative recovery was complicated by an acute hypotensive episode, hypoglycaemia and syncope, and subsequent computed tomography (CT scan of the abdomen revealed bilateral adrenal haemorrhage. Given her labile blood pressure, intravenous hydrocortisone was commenced with rapid improvement of blood pressure, which had incompletely responded with fluids. A provisional diagnosis of hypocortisolism was made. Initial heparin-induced thrombocytopenic screen (HITTS was positive, but platelet count and coagulation profile were both normal. The patient suffered a concurrent transient ischaemic attack with no neurological deficits. She was discharged on a reducing dose of oral steroids with normal serum cortisol levels at the time of discharge. She and her family were educated about lifelong steroids and the use of parenteral steroids should a hypoadrenal crisis eventuate.

  12. Assessing Exercise Limitation Using Cardiopulmonary Exercise Testing

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Michael K. Stickland

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available The cardiopulmonary exercise test (CPET is an important physiological investigation that can aid clinicians in their evaluation of exercise intolerance and dyspnea. Maximal oxygen consumption (V˙O2max is the gold-standard measure of aerobic fitness and is determined by the variables that define oxygen delivery in the Fick equation (V˙O2 = cardiac output × arterial-venous O2 content difference. In healthy subjects, of the variables involved in oxygen delivery, it is the limitations of the cardiovascular system that are most responsible for limiting exercise, as ventilation and gas exchange are sufficient to maintain arterial O2 content up to peak exercise. Patients with lung disease can develop a pulmonary limitation to exercise which can contribute to exercise intolerance and dyspnea. In these patients, ventilation may be insufficient for metabolic demand, as demonstrated by an inadequate breathing reserve, expiratory flow limitation, dynamic hyperinflation, and/or retention of arterial CO2. Lung disease patients can also develop gas exchange impairments with exercise as demonstrated by an increased alveolar-to-arterial O2 pressure difference. CPET testing data, when combined with other clinical/investigation studies, can provide the clinician with an objective method to evaluate cardiopulmonary physiology and determination of exercise intolerance.

  13. Pre-Eclampsia Increases the Risk of Postpartum Haemorrhage: A Nationwide Cohort Study in The Netherlands

    OpenAIRE

    Joost F von Schmidt auf Altenstadt; Hukkelhoven, Chantal W. P. M.; Jos van Roosmalen; Bloemenkamp, Kitty W. M.

    2013-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Postpartum haemorrhage is a leading cause of maternal morbidity and mortality worldwide. Identifying risk indicators for postpartum haemorrhage is crucial to predict this life threatening condition. Another major contributor to maternal morbidity and mortality is pre-eclampsia. Previous studies show conflicting results in the association between pre-eclampsia and postpartum haemorrhage. The primary objective of this study was to investigate the association between pre-eclampsia an...

  14. [Neurogenic shock].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Meister, Rafael; Pasquier, Mathieu; Clerc, David; Carron, Pierre-Nicolas

    2014-08-13

    The neurogenic shock is a common complication of spinal cord injury, especially when localized at the cervical level. Characterized by a vasoplegia (hypotension) and bradycardia, the neurogenic shock is secondary to the damage of the sympathetic nervous system. The clinical presentation often includes tetraplegia, with or without respiratory failure. Early treatment aims to minimize the occurrence of secondary spinal cord lesions resulting from systemic ischemic injuries. Medical management consists in a standardized ABCDE approach, in order to stabilize vital functions and immobilize the spine. The hospital care includes performing imaging, further measures of neuro-resuscitation, and coordinated surgical assessment and treatment of any other injury.

  15. Consent for Brain Tissue Donation after Intracerebral Haemorrhage: A Community-Based Study.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Neshika Samarasekera

    Full Text Available Spontaneous intracerebral haemorrhage is a devastating form of stroke and its incidence increases with age. Obtaining brain tissue following intracerebral haemorrhage helps to understand its cause. Given declining autopsy rates worldwide, the feasibility of establishing an autopsy-based collection and its generalisability are uncertain.We used multiple overlapping sources of case ascertainment to identify every adult diagnosed with intracerebral haemorrhage between 1st June 2010-31st May 2012, whilst resident in the Lothian region of Scotland. We sought consent from patients with intracerebral haemorrhage (or their nearest relative if the patient lacked mental capacity to conduct a research autopsy.Of 295 adults with acute intracerebral haemorrhage, 110 (37% could not be approached to consider donation. Of 185 adults/relatives approached, 91 (49% consented to research autopsy. There were no differences in baseline demographic variables or markers of intracerebral haemorrhage severity between consenters and non-consenters. Adults who died and became donors (n = 46 differed from the rest of the cohort (n = 249 by being older (median age 80, IQR 76-86 vs. 75, IQR 65-83, p = 0.002 and having larger haemorrhages (median volume 23 ml, IQR 13-50 vs. 13 ml, IQR 4-40; p = 0.002.Nearly half of those approached consent to brain tissue donation after acute intracerebral haemorrhage. The characteristics of adults who gave consent were comparable to those in an entire community, although those who donate early are older and have larger haemorrhage volumes.

  16. Association of out-of-hospital advanced airway management with outcomes after traumatic brain injury and hemorrhagic shock in the ROC hypertonic saline trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Henry E; Brown, Siobhan P; MacDonald, Russell D; Dowling, Shawn K; Lin, Steve; Davis, Daniel; Schreiber, Martin A; Powell, Judy; van Heest, Rardi; Daya, Mohamud

    2014-03-01

    Prior studies suggest adverse associations between out-of-hospital advanced airway management (AAM) and patient outcomes after major trauma. This secondary analysis of data from the Resuscitation Outcomes Consortium Hypertonic Saline Trial evaluated associations between out-of-hospital AAM and outcomes in patients suffering isolated severe traumatic brain injury (TBI) or haemorrhagic shock. This multicentre study included adults with severe TBI (GCS ≤8) or haemorrhagic shock (SBP ≤70 mm Hg, or (SBP 71-90 mm Hg and heart rate ≥108 bpm)). We compared patients receiving out-of-hospital AAM with those receiving emergency department AAM. We evaluated the associations between airway strategy and patient outcomes (28-day mortality, and 6-month poor neurologic or functional outcome) and airway strategy, adjusting for confounders. Analysis was stratified by (1) patients with isolated severe TBI and (2) patients with haemorrhagic shock with or without severe TBI. Of 2135 patients, we studied 1116 TBI and 528 shock; excluding 491 who died in the field, did not receive AAM or had missing data. In the shock cohort, out-of-hospital AAM was associated with increased 28-day mortality (adjusted OR 5.14; 95% CI 2.42 to 10.90). In TBI, out-of-hospital AAM showed a tendency towards increased 28-day mortality (adjusted OR 1.57; 95% CI 0.93 to 2.64) and 6-month poor functional outcome (1.63; 1.00 to 2.68), but these differences were not statistically significant. Out-of-hospital AAM was associated with poorer 6-month TBI neurologic outcome (1.80; 1.09 to 2.96). Out-of-hospital AAM was associated with increased mortality after haemorrhagic shock. The adverse association between out-of-hospital AAM and injury outcome is most pronounced in patients with haemorrhagic shock.

  17. 21 CFR 870.4210 - Cardiopulmonary bypass vascular catheter, cannula, or tubing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... Devices § 870.4210 Cardiopulmonary bypass vascular catheter, cannula, or tubing. (a) Identification. A cardiopulmonary bypass vascular catheter, cannula, or tubing is a device used in cardiopulmonary surgery to... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Cardiopulmonary bypass vascular catheter,...

  18. Associates of Cardiopulmonary Arrest in the Perihemodialytic Period

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jennifer E. Flythe

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Cardiopulmonary arrest during and proximate to hemodialysis is rare but highly fatal. Studies have examined peridialytic sudden cardiac event risk factors, but no study has considered associates of cardiopulmonary arrests (fatal and nonfatal events including cardiac and respiratory causes. This study was designed to elucidate patient and procedural factors associated with peridialytic cardiopulmonary arrest. Data for this case-control study were taken from the hemodialysis population at Fresenius Medical Care, North America. 924 in-center cardiopulmonary events (cases and 75,538 controls were identified. Cases and controls were 1 : 5 matched on age, sex, race, and diabetes. Predictors of cardiopulmonary arrest were considered for logistic model inclusion. Missed treatments due to hospitalization, lower body mass, coronary artery disease, heart failure, lower albumin and hemoglobin, lower dialysate potassium, higher serum calcium, greater erythropoietin stimulating agent dose, and normalized protein catabolic rate (J-shaped were associated with peridialytic cardiopulmonary arrest. Of these, lower albumin, hemoglobin, and body mass index; higher erythropoietin stimulating agent dose; and greater missed sessions had the strongest associations with outcome. Patient health markers and procedural factors are associated with peridialytic cardiopulmonary arrest. In addition to optimizing nutritional status, it may be prudent to limit exposure to low dialysate potassium (<2 K bath and to use the lowest effective erythropoietin stimulating agent dose.

  19. A marked increase in gastric fluid volume during cardiopulmonary bypass

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hirota, Kazuyoshi; Kudo, Mihoko; Hashimoto, Hiroshi; Kushikata, Tetsuya

    2011-01-01

    Major physiological stress occurs during cardiac surgery with cardiopulmonary bypass. This is related to hypothermia and artificial organ perfusion. Thus, serious gastrointestinal complications, particularly upper gastrointestinal bleeding, sometimes follow cardiac surgery. We have compared the antisecretory effects of a preanesthetic H2 antagonist (roxatidine, cardiopulmonary bypass-H2 group, n = 15) and a proton pump inhibitor (rabeprazole, cardiopulmonary bypass-PPI group, n = 15) in patients undergoing cardiac surgery with cardiopulmonary bypass, and also compared in patients undergoing a off-pump coronary artery bypass graft surgery (off-pump cardiopulmonary bypass-H2 group, n = 15). Gastric pH (5.14 ± 0.61) and gastric fluid volume (13.2 ± 2.4 mL) at the end of surgery in off-pump cardiopulmonary bypass-H2 groups was significantly lower and higher than those in both cardiopulmonary bypass-H2 (6.25 ± 0.54, 51.3 ± 8.0 mL) and cardiopulmonary bypass-PPI (7.29 ± 0.13, 63.5 ± 14.8 mL) groups, respectively although those variables did not differ between groups after the induction of anesthesia. Plasma gastrin (142 ± 7 pg/mL) at the end of surgery and maximal blood lactate levels (1.50 ± 0.61 mM) in off-pump cardiopulmonary bypass-H2 group were also significantly lower than those in both cardiopulmonary bypass-H2 (455 ± 96 pg/mL, 3.97 ± 0.80 mM) and cardiopulmonary bypass-PPI (525 ± 27 pg/mL, 3.15 ± 0.44 mM) groups, respectively. In addition, there was a significant correlation between gastric fluid volume and maximal blood lactate (r = 0.596). In conclusion, cardiopulmonary bypass may cause an increase in gastric fluid volume which neither H2 antagonist nor PPI suppresses. A significant correlation between gastric fluid volume and maximal blood lactate suggests that gastric fluid volume may predict degree of gastrointestinal tract hypoperfusion. PMID:21765601

  20. Strategies for cardiopulmonary exercise testing of pectus excavatum patients

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Moh H. Malek

    2008-01-01

    Full Text Available The purpose of this paper is to provide strategies for cardiopulmonary exercise testing of pectus excavatum patients. Currently, there are no standardized methods for assessing cardiovascular and pulmonary responses in this population; therefore, making comparisons across studies is difficult if not impossible. These strategies are intended for physicians, pulmonary technicians, exercise physiologists, and other healthcare professionals who conduct cardiopulmonary exercise testing on pectus excavatum patients. By using the strategies outlined in this report, comparisons across studies can be made, and the effects of pectus excavatum on cardiopulmonary function can be assessed with greater detail.

  1. Some Medicolegal Aspects of the Russian Cardiopulmonary Resuscitation Protocol

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    V. A. Kuksinsky

    2006-01-01

    Full Text Available The purpose of the study was to analyze the Russian legislation to identify the medicolegal aspects of cardiopulmonary resuscitation, which are most significant for an intensive care anesthesiologist. Statutory acts concerning human health care, including those pertinent to cardiopulmonary resuscitation and those providing for the responsibility of medical workers in some cases were analyzed. A number of discrepancies in various legal acts concerning human death verification and resuscitative measures were identified. The analysis has revealed the aspects of cardiopulmonary resuscitation, which are, from the point of view of legislation, most important for the physician.

  2. Transient Diabetes Insipidus Following Cardiopulmonary Bypass.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ekim, Meral; Ekim, Hasan; Yilmaz, Yunus Keser; Bolat, Ali

    2015-04-01

    Diabetes insipidus (DI) results from inadequate output of Antidiuretic Hormone (ADH) from the pituitary gland (central DI) or the inability of the kidney tubules to respond to ADH (nephrogenic DI). ADH is an octapeptide produced in the supraoptic and paraventricular nuclei of the hypothalamus and stored in the posterior lobe of the pituitary gland. Cardiopulmonary Bypass (CPB) has been shown to cause a six-fold increased circulating ADH levels 12 hours after surgery. However, in some cases, ADH release may be transiently suppressed due to cardioplegia (cardiac standstill) or CPB leading to DI. We present the postoperative course of a 60-year-old man who developed transient DI after CPB. He was successfully treated by applying nasal desmopressin therapy. Relevant biochemical parameters should be monitored closely in patients who produce excessive urine after open heart surgery.

  3. Factor V Leiden and Cardiopulmonary Bypass.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Uppal, Victor; Rosin, Mark; Marcoux, Jo-Anne; Olson, Marnie; Bezaire, Jennifer; Dalshaug, Gregory

    2015-12-01

    We present a case of a patient with factor V Leiden with an antithrombin III activity of 67% who received a successful aortic valve replacement supported by cardiopulmonary bypass (CPB). A safe level of anticoagulation was achieved by monitoring activated clotting time (ACT) and heparin concentration ensuring adequate anticoagulation throughout the procedure. Results from ACT, heparin dose response, heparin protamine titration, and thrombelastography are given. Factor V Leiden patients can be safely anti-coagulated using heparin for CPB procedures when monitored with ACT, heparin protamine titration, and thrombelastography. Postoperative chest tube losses were 360 mL, less than half our institutional average. Anticoagulation for the pre-and post-operative phase is also discussed.

  4. Secondary pseudohypoaldosteronism causing cardiopulmonary arrest and cholelithiasis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kibe, Tetsuya; Sobajima, Takehiro; Yoshimura, Ayumi; Uno, Yuichi; Wada, Naohiro; Ueta, Ikuya

    2014-04-01

    A 4-month-old boy presented with cardiopulmonary arrest on arrival after a brief period of lethargy. Laboratory examination indicated severe hyperkalemia, hyponatremia, metabolic acidosis, and slightly elevated C-reactive protein. Whole body computed tomography identified left-dominant hydronephrosis, hydroureter and cholelithiasis. Despite cardiac arrest >30 min, he was successfully resuscitated and treated with therapeutic hypothermia. Escherichia coli was detected on urine culture. Renal ultrasound showed bilateral hydronephrosis, grade II in the right and grade IV in the left. Retrospective analysis of the blood sample at admission indicated a high level of aldosterone. The patient recovered almost fully with no electrolyte imbalance and normal plasma renin and aldosterone, leading to the diagnosis of secondary pseudohypoaldosteronism associated with bilateral infected hydronephrosis. In this case, cholelithiasis, which may account for chronic dehydration, was a diagnostic clue in the absence of information of pre-existing situations. © 2014 The Authors. Pediatrics International © 2014 Japan Pediatric Society.

  5. Cardiopulmonary resuscitation: a review for clinicians.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Varon, J; Marik, P E; Fromm, R E

    1998-02-01

    Attempts at cardiopulmonary resuscitation (CPR) date from antiquity, but it is only in the last 50 years that a scientifically-based methodology has been developed. External chest compressions is the standard method for managing circulatory arrest, however, numerous alterations of this technique have been proposed in attempts to improve outcome from CPR. Defibrillation is the single most important therapy for the management of ventricular fibrillation or pulseless ventricular tachycardia. Adrenergic agents used to improve myocardial and cerebral perfusion are also the subject of considerable investigation with new agents entering clinical study. This paper reviews the history, current techniques and pharmacotherapy as well as controversial issues in the management of patients with cardiac arrest.

  6. Pre-eclampsia increases the risk of postpartum haemorrhage: a nationwide cohort study in the Netherlands.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Joost F von Schmidt auf Altenstadt

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Postpartum haemorrhage is a leading cause of maternal morbidity and mortality worldwide. Identifying risk indicators for postpartum haemorrhage is crucial to predict this life threatening condition. Another major contributor to maternal morbidity and mortality is pre-eclampsia. Previous studies show conflicting results in the association between pre-eclampsia and postpartum haemorrhage. The primary objective of this study was to investigate the association between pre-eclampsia and postpartum haemorrhage. Our secondary objective was to identify other risk indicators for postpartum haemorrhage in the Netherlands. METHODS: A nationwide cohort was used, containing prospectively collected data of women giving birth after 19 completed weeks of gestation from January 2000 until January 2008 (n =  1,457,576. Data were extracted from the Netherlands Perinatal Registry, covering 96% of all deliveries in the Netherlands. The main outcome measure, postpartum haemorrhage, was defined as blood loss of ≥1000 ml in the 24 hours following delivery. The association between pre-eclampsia and postpartum haemorrhage was investigated with uni- and multivariable logistic regression analyses. RESULTS: Overall prevalence of postpartum haemorrhage was 4.3% and of pre-eclampsia 2.2%. From the 31 560 women with pre-eclampsia 2 347 (7.4% developed postpartum haemorrhage, compared to 60 517 (4.2% from the 1 426 016 women without pre-eclampsia (odds ratio 1.81; 95% CI 1.74 to 1.89. Risk of postpartum haemorrhage in women with pre-eclampsia remained increased after adjusting for confounders (adjusted odds ratio 1.53; 95% CI 1.46 to 1.60. CONCLUSION: Women with pre-eclampsia have a 1.53 fold increased risk for postpartum haemorrhage. Clinicians should be aware of this and use this knowledge in the management of pre-eclampsia and the third stage of labour in order to reach the fifth Millenium Developmental Goal of reducing maternal mortality ratios with 75% by

  7. A Review of the Performance of Artifact Filtering Algorithms for Cardiopulmonary Resuscitation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yushun Gong

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Various filtering strategies have been adopted and investigated to suppress the cardiopulmonary resuscitation (CPR artifact. In this article, two types of artifact removal methods are reviewed: one is the method that removes CPR artifact using only ECG signals, and the other is the method with additional reference signals, such as acceleration, compression depth and transthoracic impedance. After filtering, the signal-to-noise ratio is improved from 0 dB to greater than 2.8 dB, the sensitivity is increased to > 90% as recommended by the American Heart Association, whereas the specificity was far from the recommended 95%, which is considered to be the major drawback of the available artifact removal methods. The overall performance of the adaptive filtering methods with additional reference signal outperforms the methods using only ECG signals. Further research should focus on the refinement of artifact filtering methods and the improvement of shock advice algorithms with the presence of CPR.

  8. Some aspects of the mitochondrial oxidative metabolism in human atrial tissue during cardiopulmonary by-pass.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Corbucci, G G; Gasparetto, A; Antonelli, M; Bufi, M; De Blasi, R A

    1987-01-01

    Following previous research on the hypoxic cell in human circulatory shock, the present work has investigated some mitochondrial oxidative aspects in atrial biopsies taken during cardiopulmonary by-pass. Cardioplegic solution and hypothermia were administered to 10 patients and the atrial samples were collected before and after aortic clamping. The results show a cellular protective effect of cardioplegia and hypothermia on the electron-transport chain, even if the enzymes with high KmO2 appear to be more sensitive to ischaemia. The results suggest a metabolic injury rather than an oxidative damage due to the induced ischaemia, alterations to fatty-acid beta-oxidation being especially notable. Because of the unchanged oxidative capacities, the oxyradical generation and the peroxidative damage appear to be irrelevant in the ischaemic period and during the course of reperfusion. Further studies are needed to elucidate the metabolic damage and the therapeutic implications due to the induced ischaemia in the myocardial cell during the aortic clamping.

  9. Evaluation of coma patients after cardiopulmonary resuscitation

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    SU Ying-ying; YANG Qing-lin; PANG Ying; LV Xiang-ping

    2005-01-01

    Background Coma after cardiopulmonary resuscitation (CPR) is commonly seen in daily clinical practice. How to objectively evaluate brain function after CPR is essential to the following treatment. Coma patients after CPR had been studied prospectively at the Neuro-Intensive Care Unit of Xuanwu Hospital since 2002. In this study, we focused on the topic of how to evaluate the severity of coma after CPR .Methods From April 2002 to November 2004, patients in coma 24 hours after CPR were monitored, the evaluation methods included Glasgow coma score (GCS),brain stem reflection, and spinal reflection. Laboratory evaluation included electroencephalography (EEG),brainstem auditory evoked potential (BAEP), short latency somatosensory evoked potential (SLSEP), and transcranial Doppler (TCD) .Results Twenty-four of 35 patients(68.57%)were in deep coma. The GCS was 3 except for 2 patients;EEG was evaluated not less than grade Ⅳ except for 4 patients, BAEP was evaluated as grade Ⅲ except for 3 patients, and SLSEP was evaluated as grade Ⅲ except for 1 patient.Twenty-four patients died within 1 month and 11 of them(45.83%)were determined as brain death. Glasgow outcome score (GOS) was evaluated as grade Ⅰ. Eleven of the 35 patients survived and their consciousness changed from deep coma to coma vigil. EEG was evaluated as gradeⅠin 5 patients, BAEP and SLSEP were evaluated as grade Ⅰ in 3 patients, and GOS was all evaluated as grade Ⅱ among the 11 patients.Two patients(18.18%)regained consciousness in 35 and 90 days after cardiopulmonary resuscitation and GOS was evaluated as grade Ⅳ and Ⅲ, respectively.Conclusion Combined or continuous evaluation of clinical examinations and laboratory tests can accurately and objectively determine brain function after CPR.

  10. Decompressive Abdominal Laparotomy for Abdominal Compartment Syndrome in an Unengrafted Bone Marrow Recipient with Septic Shock

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Derrick J. N. Dauplaise

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available Objective. To describe a profoundly immunocompromised (panleukopenia child with septic shock who developed abdominal compartment syndrome (ACS and was successfully treated with surgical decompression. Design. Individual case report. Setting. Pediatric intensive care unit of a tertiary children's hospital. Patient. A 32-month-old male with Fanconi anemia who underwent bone marrow transplantation (BMT 5 days prior to developing septic shock secondary to Streptococcus viridans and Escherichia coli ACS developed after massive fluid resuscitation, leading to cardiopulmonary instability. Interventions. Emergent surgical bedside laparotomy and silo placement. Measurements and Main Results. The patient's cardiopulmonary status stabilized after decompressive laparotomy. The abdomen was closed and the patient survived to hospital discharge without cardiac, respiratory, or renal dysfunction. Conclusions. The use of laparotomy and silo placement in an unengrafted BMT patient with ACS and septic shock did not result in additional complications. Surgical intervention for ACS is a reasonable option for high risk, profoundly immunocompromised patients.

  11. A Case of Haemorrhagic Constrictive Pericarditis with Bilateral Pleural Effusions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Islam, Julie; Talebi, Soheila; Cativo, Eder; Mushiyev, Savi; Pekler, Gerald; Visco, Ferdinand

    2016-01-01

    Presentation of pericardial disease is diverse, with the viral aetiology being the most common cause; however, when haemorrhagic pericardial effusion is present, these causes are narrowed to few aetiologies. We present a case of a young female of African descent who presented with diffuse abdominal pain and vomiting. Initial work-up showed pericardial effusion with impending echocardiographic findings of cardiac tamponade and bilateral pleural effusions. Procedures included a left video-assisted thoracoscopic surgery (VATS) with pericardial window. We consider that it is important for all physicians to be aware of not only typical presentation but also atypical and unusual clinical picture of pericardial disease.

  12. Hemorragia en la gestación Haemorrhage in gestation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    I. Gómez Gutiérrez-Solana

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available La hemorragia es una de las causas más frecuentes y potencialmente más graves en la consulta de urgencias durante la gestación. En esta revisión hemos realizado un enfoque global para el manejo de una gestante que acude a urgencias por un sangrado vaginal, y posteriormente de manera más específica el manejo de algunas de las entidades más frecuentes de la hemorragia obstétrica. En cuanto a las hemorragias del primer trimestre se ha hecho mayor hincapié en el manejo del aborto, puesto que otras entidades que también son frecuentes se valoran de manera específica en otros capítulos. En el segundo trimestre se ha realizado una revisión de tres entidades que abarcan el mayor porcentaje de hemorragias en ese periodo, como son la placenta previa, el desprendimiento prematuro de placenta normalmente inserta y la rotura uterina. Hemos valorado en cada una de ellas la etiopatogenia, la actitud diagnóstica y el manejo de la forma más sistemática posible.A haemorrhage is one of the most frequent, and potentially most serious, causes for emergency consultation during gestation. In this review we offer an overall approach to managing a pregnant woman who attends Accidents and Emergencies due to vaginal bleeding and then, in a more specific way, we consider how to manage some of the most frequent entities of the obstetric haemorrhage. With respect to haemorrhages in the second trimester, we give greater attention to how to manage a miscarriage, since other entities that are also frequent receive a specific evaluation in other chapters. In the second trimester three entities account for the greatest percentage of haemorrhages, such as placenta praevia, the premature detachment of the normally inserted placenta and uterine rupture. In each case we have evaluated the etiopathology, diagnostic attitude and management in the most systematic way possible.

  13. A Case of Haemorrhagic Constrictive Pericarditis with Bilateral Pleural Effusions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hans A. Reyes

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Presentation of pericardial disease is diverse, with the viral aetiology being the most common cause; however, when haemorrhagic pericardial effusion is present, these causes are narrowed to few aetiologies. We present a case of a young female of African descent who presented with diffuse abdominal pain and vomiting. Initial work-up showed pericardial effusion with impending echocardiographic findings of cardiac tamponade and bilateral pleural effusions. Procedures included a left video-assisted thoracoscopic surgery (VATS with pericardial window. We consider that it is important for all physicians to be aware of not only typical presentation but also atypical and unusual clinical picture of pericardial disease.

  14. Spatial variation in nitrogen dioxide concentrations and cardiopulmonary hospital admissions

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Dijkema, Marieke B A; van Strien, Robert T; van der Zee, Saskia C; Mallant, Sanne F; Fischer, Paul; Hoek, Gerard; Brunekreef, Bert; Gehring, Ulrike

    2016-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Air pollution episodes are associated with increased cardiopulmonary hospital admissions. Cohort studies showed associations of spatial variation in traffic-related air pollution with respiratory and cardiovascular mortality. Much less is known in particular about associations with cardi

  15. Rodent models of cardiopulmonary bypass: utility in improving perioperative outcomes

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    de Lange, F.

    2008-01-01

    Despite advances in surgical and anesthesia techniques, subtle neurologic injury still remains an important complication after cardiac surgery. Because the causes are multifactorial and complex, research in an appropriate small animal model for cardiopulmonary bypass (CPB) is warranted. This thesis

  16. Family presence during cardiopulmonary resuscitation and invasive procedures in children

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Ferreira, Cristiana Araújo G; Balbino, Flávia Simphronio; Balieiro, Maria Magda F. G; Mandetta, Myriam Aparecida

    2014-01-01

    Objective: To identify literature evidences related to actions to promote family's presence during cardiopulmonary resuscitation and invasive procedures in children hospitalized in pediatric and neonatal critical care units.Data sources...

  17. Predicting the need for blood during cardiopulmonary bypass

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Adele

    from the depot. Supply logistics of banked blood may be problematic during car- ... delivery that occurs on initiation of cardiopulmonary bypass (CPB). In spite of patient ... whole body oxygen consumption, there is a time lapse before stable.

  18. Induction and detection of disturbed homeostasis in cardiopulmonary bypass

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    de Vroege, R; Meerman, FT; Eijsman, L; Wildevuur, WR; Wildevuur, CRH; van Oeveren, W

    2004-01-01

    During cardiopulmonary bypass (CPB) haemodynamic alterations, haemostasis and the inflammatory response are the main causes of homeostatic disruption. Even with CPB procedures of short duration, the homeostasis of a patient is disrupted and, in many cases, requires intensive postoperative treatment

  19. Haemorrhagic acoustic neuroma with features of a vascular malformation. A case report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Benhaiem-Sigaux, N. [Dept. of Pathology, Hopital Henri Mondor, Creteil (France); Ricolfi, F. [Dept. of Neuroradiology, Henri Mondor Hospital, Creteil (France); Torres-Diaz, A.; Keravel, Y. [Dept. of Neurosurgery, Henri Mondo Hospital, Creteil (France); Poirier, J. [Dept. of Histology, Pitie-Salpetriere Hospital, Paris (France)

    1999-10-01

    A 55-year-old man with hearing loss presented with vertigo and vomiting. CT tomography and MRI demonstrated a cerebellopontine angle mass with foci of haemorrhage. An angiomatous tumour, with large abnormal veins adhering to the capsule, was completely removed. Histologically, the tumour was an acoustic neuroma with abnormal vascularisation and limited intratumoral haemorrhage. (orig.)

  20. Management of a delayed post-pancreatoduodenectomy haemorrhage using endovascular techniques

    Science.gov (United States)

    Asai, Kengo; Zaydfudim, Victor; Truty, Mark; Reid-Lombardo, KMarie; Kendrick, Michael; Que, Florencia; Nagorney, David; Andrews, James; Farnell, Michael

    2015-01-01

    Background A delayed post-pancreatoduodenectomy haemorrhage is associated with a significant increase in peri-operative mortality. Endovascular techniques are frequently used for a delayed haemorrhage. However, limited data exists on the short- and long-term outcomes of this approach. A retrospective review over a 10-year period at a quaternary-referral pancreatic centre was performed. Methods Between 2002–2012, 1430 pancreatoduodenectomies were performed, and 32 patients had a delayed haemorrhage (occurring >24 h post-operatively) managed by endovascular techniques. The clinicopathological variables related to a haemorrhage were investigated. Results A total of 42 endovascular procedures were performed at a median of 25 days, with the majority of delayed haemorrhages occurring after 7 days. There were four deaths (13%) with three occurring in patients with a grade C haemorrhage. Seven patients (22%) experienced rebleeding, and two patients developed hepatic abscesses. Conclusion A delayed haemorrhage post-pancreaticoduodenectomy can be managed by endovascular techniques with acceptable morbidity and mortality. Rebleeding and hepatic abscesses may occur and can be managed non-operatively in most cases. The association of a delayed haemorrhage with a pancreatic fistula makes this a challenging clinical problem. PMID:26235930

  1. Haemostatic effect and tissue reactions of methods and agents used for haemorrhage control in apical surgery

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jensen, Simon Storgaard; Yazdi, P M; Hjørting-Hansen, Erik

    2010-01-01

    To compare the haemostatic effect and tissue reactions of different agents and methods used for haemorrhage control in apical surgery.......To compare the haemostatic effect and tissue reactions of different agents and methods used for haemorrhage control in apical surgery....

  2. A composite neurobehavioral test to evaluate acute functional deficits after cerebellar haemorrhage in rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McBride, Devin W; Nowrangi, Derek; Kaur, Harpreet; Wu, Guangyong; Huang, Lei; Lekic, Tim; Tang, Jiping; Zhang, John H

    2017-01-01

    Cerebellar haemorrhage accounts for 5-10% of all intracerebral haemorrhages and leads to severe, long-lasting functional deficits. Currently, there is limited research on this stroke subtype, which may be due to the lack of a suitable composite neuroscoring system specific for cerebellar injury in rodents. The purpose of this study is to develop a comprehensive composite neuroscore test for cerebellar injury using a rat model of cerebellar haemorrhage. Sixty male Sprague-Dawley rats were subjected to either sham surgery or cerebellar haemorrhage. Twenty-four hours post-injury, neurological behaviour was evaluated using 17 cost-effective and easy-to-perform tests, and a composite neuroscore was developed. The composite neuroscore was then used to assess functional recovery over seven days after cerebellar haemorrhage. Differences in the composite neuroscore deficits for the mild and moderate cerebellar haemorrhage models were observed for up to five days post-ictus. Until now, a composite neuroscore for cerebellar injury was not available for rodent studies. Herein, using mild and moderate cerebellar haemorrhage rat models a composite neuroscore for cerebellar injury was developed and used to assess functional deficits after cerebellar haemorrhage. This composite neuroscore may also be useful for other cerebellar injury models.

  3. Surgical trial in intracerebral haemorrhage (S.T.I.C.H).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mendelow, A D

    2000-01-01

    The International Surgical Trial in Intracerebral haemorrhage has been set up to determine the role of surgery in spontaneous supratentorial intracerebral haemorrhage. This is an interim report as the results will remain blinded until all patients have been recruited and followed up.

  4. Surveillance and laboratory detection system of Crimean-Congo haemorrhagic fever in Iran

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Chinikar, S; Goya, M M; Shirzadi, M R

    2008-01-01

    be spread from person to person and is one of the rare haemorrhagic fever viruses able to cause nosocomial outbreaks in hospitals. Crimean-Congo haemorrhagic fever is a public health problem in many regions of the world such as Eastern Europe, Asia, the Middle East and Africa. In addition to clinical...

  5. Characteristics and mechanisms of cardiopulmonary injury caused by mine blasts in shoals: a randomized controlled study in a rabbit model.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gengfen Han

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Because the characteristics of blast waves in water are different from those in air and because kinetic energy is liberated by a pressure wave at the water-air interface, thoracic injuries from mine blasts in shoals may be serious. The aim of the present study was to investigate the characteristics and mechanisms of cardiopulmonary injury caused by mine blasts in shoals. METHODS: To study the characteristics of cardiopulmonary injury, 56 animals were divided randomly into three experimental groups (12 animals in the sham group, 22 animals in the land group and 22 animals in the shoal group. To examine the biomechanics of injury, 20 animals were divided randomly into the land group and the shoal group. In the experimental model, the water surface was at the level of the rabbit's xiphoid process, and paper electric detonators (600 mg RDX were used to simulate mines. Electrocardiography and echocardiography were conducted, and arterial blood gases, serum levels of cardiac troponin I and creatine kinase-MB and other physiologic parameters were measured over a 12-hour period after detonation. Pressures in the thorax and abdomen and the acceleration of the thorax were measured. CONCLUSION: The results indicate that severe cardiopulmonary injury and dysfunction occur following exposure to mine blasts in shoals. Therefore, the mechanisms of cardiopulmonary injury may result from shear waves that produce strain at the water-air interface. Another mechanism of injury includes the propagation of the shock wave from the planta to the thorax, which causes a much higher peak overpressure in the abdomen than in the thorax; as a result, the abdominal organs and diaphragm are thrust into the thorax, damaging the lungs and heart.

  6. Pediatric Cardiopulmonary Resuscitation: Advances in Science, Techniques, and Outcomes

    OpenAIRE

    Topjian, Alexis A.; Berg, Robert A; Nadkarni, Vinay M.

    2008-01-01

    More than 25% of children survive to hospital discharge after in-hospital cardiac arrests, and 5% to 10% survive after out-of-hospital cardiac arrests. This review of pediatric cardiopulmonary resuscitation addresses the epidemiology of pediatric cardiac arrests, mechanisms of coronary blood flow during cardiopulmonary resuscitation, the 4 phases of cardiac arrest resuscitation, appropriate interventions during each phase, special resuscitation circumstances, extracorporeal membrane oxygenati...

  7. Culture Shock

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    宋文玲

    2004-01-01

    Specialists say that it is not easy to get used to life in a new culture.“Culture shock”is the term these specialists use when talking about the feelings that people have in a new environment.There are three stages of culture shock,say the specialists.In the first stage,the newcomers like their new environment,Then when the fresh experience

  8. Shock Waves

    CERN Document Server

    Jiang, Z

    2005-01-01

    The International Symposium on Shock Waves (ISSW) is a well established series of conferences held every two years in a different location. A unique feature of the ISSW is the emphasis on bridging the gap between physicists and engineers working in fields as different as gas dynamics, fluid mechanics and materials sciences. The main results presented at these meetings constitute valuable proceedings that offer anyone working in this field an authoritative and comprehensive source of reference.

  9. Condom Tamponade in the Management of Primary Postpartum Haemorrhage: A Report of three cases in Ghana.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maya, Ernest T; Buntugu, Kennedy A; Aki, Lovelace; Srofenyoh, Emmanuel K

    2015-09-01

    Postpartum haemorrhage is one of the major causes of maternal mortality worldwide. The leading cause of primary postpartum haemorrhage is uterine atony and active management of the third stage of labour with oxytocin is recommended for preventing primary postpartum haemorrhage. Parenteral oxytocin is also the drug of choice for medical management of postpartum haemorrhage secondary to uterine atony. Condom uterine balloon tamponade is .a low cost technique that can be used as a second-line option for treatment. We report retrospectively three cases of primary PPH secondary to uterine atony which were managed successfully with condom tamponade. Condom tamponade is effective in managing post partum haemorrhage secondary to uterine atony and we advocate for the training of all skilled attendants on how to insert the condom tamponade.

  10. Valved or valveless ventriculoperitoneal shunting in the treatment of post-haemorrhagic hydrocephalus

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Andreasen, Trine Hjorslev; Holst, Anders Vedel; Lilja, Alexander

    2016-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Implant infection and obstruction are major complications for ventriculoperitoneal shunts in patients with post-haemorrhagic hydrocephalus. In an effort to (1) reduce the incidence of these complications, (2) reduce the rate of shunt failure and (3) shorten the duration of neurosurgical...... hospitalisation, we have implemented valveless ventriculoperitoneal shunts at our department for adult patients with post-haemorrhagic hydrocephalus and haemorrhagic cerebrospinal fluid at the time of shunt insertion. METHODS: All adult patients (>18 years old) treated for post-haemorrhagic hydrocephalus.......3 %, p = 0.02), but a higher rate of overdrainage (10.3 % vs 2.6 %, p = 0.04). CONCLUSION: The use of a valveless shunting for patients with post-haemorrhagic hydrocephalus results in shorter duration of neurosurgical hospitalisation and lower rate of shunt infection, although these advantages should...

  11. Postinterventional subarachnoid haemorrhage after endovascular stroke treatment with stent retrievers

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nikoubashman, Omid [Uniklinik Aachen, Klinik fuer Diagnostische und Interventionelle Neuroradiologie, Aachen (Germany); Institute for Neuroscience and Medicine 4, Juelich (Germany); Reich, Arno; Jungbluth, Michael [Uniklinik Aachen, Klinik fuer Neurologie, Aachen (Germany); Pjontek, Rastislav; Wiesmann, Martin [Uniklinik Aachen, Klinik fuer Diagnostische und Interventionelle Neuroradiologie, Aachen (Germany)

    2014-12-15

    The purpose of this paper is to investigate the clinical significance of postinterventional subarachnoid hyperdensities (PSH) after endovascular mechanical thrombectomy in acute ischemic stroke. We analysed clinical and radiological data of 113 consecutive patients who received postinterventional CT scans within 4.5 h after mechanical thrombectomy. PSH was present in 27 of 113 patients (24 %). Extravasation of contrast agent was observed during intervention in only 6 of 27 cases (22 %). There was consecutive haemorrhagic transformation in four patients with PSH (p = 0.209, Fisher's exact test). Preinterventional predictors for the occurrence of PSH in our series were a long interval between clinical onset and recanalization (p = 0.028), a long procedure time (p = 0.010), and a high number of recanalization attempts (p = 0.001). PSH had no significant impact on clinical outcome (modified Rankin Scale) at discharge (p = 0.419) or at 3 months (p = 0.396). There were no significant correlations between PSH and thrombectomy devices (Solitaire: p = 0.433, Trevo Pro: p = 0.124). PSH after endovascular mechanical thrombectomy in acute ischemic stroke are likely to occur in complicated cases in which more than one revascularisation attempt is performed. PSH per se do not appear to be associated with an impaired clinical outcome or an elevated risk for consecutive haemorrhage. (orig.)

  12. Recombinant activated factor VII in post partum haemorrhage

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Navneet Magon

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Post-partum haemorrhage (PPH is a life-threatening obstetric complication and the leading cause of maternal death. Any bleeding that results in or could result in haemodynamic instability, if untreated, must be considered as PPH. There is no controversy about the need for prevention and treatment of PPH. The keystone of management of PPH entails first, non-invasive and nonsurgical methods and then invasive and surgical methods. However, mortality remains high. Therefore, new advancements in the treatment are most crucial. One such advancement has been the use of recombinant activated factor VII (rFVIIa in PPH. First used 12 years back in PPH, this universal haemostatic agent has been effectively used in controlling PPH. The best available indicator of rFVIIa efficacy is the arrest of haemorrhage, which is judged by visual evidence and haemodynamic stabilization. It also reduces costs of therapy and the use of blood components in massive PPH. In cases of intractable PPH with no other obvious indications for hysterectomy, administration of rFVIIa should be considered before surgery. We share our experience in a series of cases of PPH, successfully managed using rFVIIa.

  13. Haemorrhagic and thrombotic diatheses in mouse models with thrombocytosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Strassel, Catherine; Kubovcakova, Lucia; Mangin, Pierre H; Ravanat, Catherine; Freund, Monique; Skoda, Radek C; Denis, Cécile V; Dupuis, Arnaud; Herbrecht, Raoul; Gachet, Christian; Lanza, François

    2015-02-01

    We studied haemostasis in two mouse models with thrombocytosis caused by different pathogenic mechanisms. In one strain (Yall;Mpl-/-) thrombocytosis is driven by a misbalance between thrombopoietin and its receptor, whereas in the other strain, thrombocytosis is caused by expressing a human JAK2-V617F transgene (FF1) that depends on activation by Cre-recombinase (VavCre;FF1, MxCre;FF1). Thrombotic responses were increased following some, but not all types of challenges. In a vaso-occlusive thrombotic model following collagen-adrenaline injection we found increased mortality in both strains. Arterial thrombosis, examined after ferric chloride-induced carotid injury, was accelerated but with little impact on maximal thrombus size. In a vena cava stasis model, clots were of similar size as in wild-type controls, but exhibited a different composition with a higher platelet to fibrin ratio. Both thrombocytosis strains displayed increased haemorrhagic tendency in a tail bleeding assay. Yall;Mpl and VavCre;FF1 displayed a lower proportion of the more reactive high-molecular-weight forms of von Willebrand factor in their plasma, mimicking essential thrombocythaemia with very high platelet counts. Bleeding could not be explained by clear defects in platelet activation, which were normal or only weakly decreased. In conclusion, these models of thrombocytosis recapitulate several features of the haemorrhagic and thrombotic diatheses in ET and PV demonstrating potentials but also some limitations to study these major complications.

  14. The role of histology and other risk factors for post-tonsillectomy haemorrhage.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schrock, A; Send, T; Heukamp, L; Gerstner, A O; Bootz, F; Jakob, M

    2009-12-01

    Tonsillectomy is a frequently performed surgical procedure in children and adults. Postoperative bleeding is the most severe complication; however, the factors leading to postoperative haemorrhage are still discussed controversially. 1,522 tonsillectomies were retrospectively reviewed. Histopathological tonsil composition was correlated with the incidence of postoperative haemorrhage. Patient charts were analysed with regard to demographic data, characteristics of postoperative haemorrhage and indication for surgery. Patients with post-tonsillectomy haemorrhage were compared with uneventful cases. Histopathological signs of cryptic tonsillitis and actinomyces infection displayed a statistically significant correlation with the risk of postoperative haemorrhage (P = 0.018 and P = 0.02), but the odds ratio was low (1.9 and 2.0). 7.7% of all patients had postoperative bleeding and 3.5% had to return to theatre for haemostasis. The incidence of haemorrhages within hospitalization (5 postoperative days) was 45% and after discharge 55%, respectively. In 11% of cases bleeding occurred on the fourth or fifth day after surgery. While gender, season of surgery, abscess tonsillectomy "en chaud" in comparison with elective tonsillectomy were not associated with an increased rate of postoperative haemorrhage (P > 0.05), significant more postoperative haemorrhages were detected in the group of adults (P = 0.02). Despite significant correlation of cryptic tonsillitis and actinomyces infection with postoperative haemorrhage, the risk for postoperative bleeding is only slightly elevated and, therefore, the predictive value is low. Because a multifactorial aetiology of post-tonsillectomy haemorrhage has to be assumed, large multicenter studies are necessary to evaluate the significance of different risk factors.

  15. Efficacy of selective arterial embolisation for the treatment of life-threatening post-partum haemorrhage in a large population.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cyril Touboul

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: The objective of this study was to assess efficacy and determine the optimal indication of selective arterial embolisation (SAE in patients with life-threatening post-partum haemorrhage (PPH. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: One hundred and two patients with PPH underwent SAE and were included from January 1998 to January 2002 in our university care center. Embolisation was considered effective when no other surgical procedure was required. Univariate and multivariate statistical analysis were performed. SAE was effective for 73 patients (71.5%, while 29 required surgical procedures. SAE was effective in 88.6% of women with uterine atony that was associated with positive outcome (OR 4.13, 1.35-12.60, whereas caesarean deliveries (OR 0.16, 0.04-0.5 and haemodynamic shock (OR 0.21, 0.07-0.60 were associated with high failure rates, 47.6% and 39.1%, respectively. CONCLUSIONS/SIGNIFICANCE: Success rate for SAE observed in a large population is lower than previously reported. It is most likely to succeed for uterine atony but not recommended in case of haemodynamic shock or after caesarean section.

  16. Possible SARS coronavirus transmission during cardiopulmonary resuscitation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Christian, Michael D; Loutfy, Mona; McDonald, L Clifford; Martinez, Kennth F; Ofner, Mariana; Wong, Tom; Wallington, Tamara; Gold, Wayne L; Mederski, Barbara; Green, Karen; Low, Donald E

    2004-02-01

    Infection of healthcare workers with the severe acute respiratory syndrome-associated coronavirus (SARS-CoV) is thought to occur primarily by either contact or large respiratory droplet transmission. However, infrequent healthcare worker infections occurred despite the use of contact and droplet precautions, particularly during certain aerosol-generating medical procedures. We investigated a possible cluster of SARS-CoV infections in healthcare workers who used contact and droplet precautions during attempted cardiopulmonary resuscitation of a SARS patient. Unlike previously reported instances of transmission during aerosol-generating procedures, the index case-patient was unresponsive, and the intubation procedure was performed quickly and without difficulty. However, before intubation, the patient was ventilated with a bag-valve-mask that may have contributed to aerosolization of SARS-CoV. On the basis of the results of this investigation and previous reports of SARS transmission during aerosol-generating procedures, a systematic approach to the problem is outlined, including the use of the following: 1) administrative controls, 2) environmental engineering controls, 3) personal protective equipment, and 4) quality control.

  17. Conflicting perspectives compromising discussions on cardiopulmonary resuscitation.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Groarke, J

    2010-09-01

    Healthcare professionals, patients and their relatives are expected to discuss resuscitation together. This study aims to identify the differences in the knowledge base and understanding of these parties. Questionnaires examining knowledge and opinion on resuscitation matters were completed during interviews of randomly selected doctors, nurses and the general public. 70% doctors, 24% nurses and 0% of a public group correctly estimated survival to discharge following in-hospital resuscitation attempts. Deficiencies were identified in doctor and nurse knowledge of ethics governing resuscitation decisions. Public opinion often conflicts with ethical guidelines. Public understanding of the nature of cardiopulmonary arrests and resuscitation attempts; and of the implications of a \\'Do Not Attempt Resuscitation (DNAR)\\' order is poor. Television medical dramas are the primary source of resuscitation knowledge. Deficiencies in healthcare professionals\\' knowledge of resuscitation ethics and outcomes may compromise resuscitation decisions. Educational initiatives to address deficiencies are necessary. Parties involved in discussion on resuscitation do not share the same knowledge base reducing the likelihood of meaningful discussion. Public misapprehensions surrounding resuscitation must be identified and corrected during discussion.

  18. The Cardiopulmonary effect of passive movement

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    L. Loram

    2002-02-01

    Full Text Available Eleven articles were reviewed on the cardiopulmonary effects of passive movements. These included two articles on theneurological effects of passive movements. Of the eleven articles, four were considered to have level II evidence in accordance with Sackett’s rules of evidence. There was little consensus regarding the rate or duration of passive movements. There were some suggestions that upper limb movement produces a greater ventilatory response than lower limb movement. There was a statistically significant increase (p< 0.05 in minute ventilation when the movement was done at a rate of 40 repetitions per minute or more, but this change may not be clinically significant. Passive movements were not detrimental to neurosurgical patients with a normal or slightly elevated intracranial pressure, although the values of the intracranial pressure were not stated.  The studies were limited in that eight of the eleven had small sample sizes and most studies were conducted using normal subjects. Further studies with higher levels of evidence need to be  conducted to verify any results reported to date in the literature. Studies that are relevant to clinical practice also need to be conducted in populations such as sedated intensive care patients.

  19. Cardiopulmonary Exercise Test: Background, Applicability and Interpretation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Herdy, Artur Haddad; Ritt, Luiz Eduardo Fonteles; Stein, Ricardo; de Araújo, Claudio Gil Soares; Milani, Mauricio; Meneghelo, Romeu Sérgio; Ferraz, Almir Sérgio; Hossri, Carlos; de Almeida, Antonio Eduardo Monteiro; Fernandes-Silva, Miguel Morita; Serra, Salvador Manoel

    2016-01-01

    Cardiopulmonary exercise test (CPET) has been gaining importance as a method of functional assessment in Brazil and worldwide. In its most frequent applications, CPET consists in applying a gradually increasing intensity exercise until exhaustion or until the appearance of limiting symptoms and/or signs. The following parameters are measured: ventilation; oxygen consumption (VO2); carbon dioxide production (VCO2); and the other variables of conventional exercise testing. In addition, in specific situations, pulse oximetry and flow-volume loops during and after exertion are measured. The CPET provides joint data analysis that allows complete assessment of the cardiovascular, respiratory, muscular and metabolic systems during exertion, being considered gold standard for cardiorespiratory functional assessment.1-6 The CPET allows defining mechanisms related to low functional capacity that can cause symptoms, such as dyspnea, and correlate them with changes in the cardiovascular, pulmonary and skeletal muscle systems. Furthermore, it can be used to provide the prognostic assessment of patients with heart or lung diseases, and in the preoperative period, in addition to aiding in a more careful exercise prescription to healthy subjects, athletes and patients with heart or lung diseases. Similarly to CPET clinical use, its research also increases, with the publication of several scientific contributions from Brazilian researchers in high-impact journals. Therefore, this study aimed at providing a comprehensive review on the applicability of CPET to different clinical situations, in addition to serving as a practical guide for the interpretation of that test. PMID:27982272

  20. Cardiopulmonary exercise testing (CPET) in pulmonary emphysema.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Paoletti, Patrizia; De Filippis, Francesca; Fraioli, Francesco; Cinquanta, Alessandra; Valli, Gabriele; Laveneziana, Pierantonio; Vaccaro, Francesco; Martolini, Dario; Palange, Paolo

    2011-12-15

    In patients affected by chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD), cardiopulmonary response to exercise was never related to the severity of emphysema (E) measured by high resolution computed tomography (HRCT). Sixteen patients (age=65±8 yrs; FEV(1)=54±18%pred; RV=160±28%pred) with moderate to severe E (quantified by lung HRCT as % voxels cycle-ergometer to exhaustion. Oxygen uptake (V˙(O2)), carbon dioxide output (V˙(CO2)), ventilation (V˙(E)), tidal volume (V(T)), and end-tidal P(CO2) (PET(CO2)) derived variables were measured breath-by-breath. The % of E correlated with: (1) the ratio V(Tpeak) (r=0.74; p=0.001); (2) the V˙(E)/V˙(CO2) slope (r=-0.77; p=0.0004); (3) PET(CO2) values at peak exercise (r=0.80; p=0.0001). Also, the %E was strongly predicted by the following exercise equation: %E(EST) = 58.1 + 11.9 × ΔV˙(E)/V˙(CO2) (r=0.94; p1 is typically observed in severe E patients; furthermore, the V˙(E)/V˙(CO2) slope and the PET(CO2peak) values decrease and increase respectively as more as the emphysema is severe.

  1. Localized shocks

    CERN Document Server

    Roberts, Daniel A; Susskind, Leonard

    2014-01-01

    We study products of precursors of spatially local operators, $W_{x_{n}}(t_{n}) ... W_{x_1}(t_1)$, where $W_x(t) = e^{-iHt} W_x e^{iHt}$. Using chaotic spin-chain numerics and gauge/gravity duality, we show that a single precursor fills a spatial region that grows linearly in $t$. In a lattice system, products of such operators can be represented using tensor networks. In gauge/gravity duality, they are related to Einstein-Rosen bridges supported by localized shock waves. We find a geometrical correspondence between these two descriptions, generalizing earlier work in the spatially homogeneous case.

  2. STUDY OF RENAL FUNCTION TESTS IN PATIEN TS OF ACUTE HAEMORRHAGIC STROKE

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Aditya Vardhan

    2015-05-01

    Full Text Available OBJECTIVE: To study renal function tests in patients with acute haemorrhagic stroke and to find association of abnormal renal function with adverse outcome in patients with acute haemorrhagic stroke . MATERIAL AND METHODS: The study was conducted at Darbhanga Medical College & Hospital , Laheriasarai , Darbhanga during the period from January 2012 to September 2013 . This was an observational study . A total of 100 patients presenting with acute haemorrhagic stroke admitted to the hospital or reporting in OPD/Emergency for stroke were included in this study after having taken written informed consent . Cases were selected by random sampling . OBSERVATION: Out of 100 patients with acute haemorrhagic stroke 92 patients had intracerebral haemorrhage and 8 patie nts had subarachnoid haemorrhage . Patients were divided into two groups on the basis of estimated glomerular filtration rate ( eGFR . Group A ( eGFR > 60 ml/min/1 . 73 m 2 BSA comprised of 71% of total stroke patients and group B ( eGFR 98umol/L and 15 ( 68 . 60% patients had blood urea >6 . 8mmol/L . CONCLUSION: This study clearly indicated that renal dysfunction as evidenced by ( a eGFR 98umol/L & c Blood urea >6 . 8mmol/L , are not only an important risk factor for acute haemorrhagic stroke but are also an independent predictor of mortality within 30 days of presentation .

  3. CLINICAL PROFILE OF DENGUE HAEMORRHAGIC FEVER FROM JAN 2009 TO DEC 2009 IN AND AROUND AURANGABAD

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Duthade Mangala

    2013-11-01

    Full Text Available ABSTRACT: In present study 890 serum samples of patients suspected of dengue fever on clinical grounds were received in department of Microbiology. Out of these 249 cases showed thrombocytopenia (platelet count <1 lakh /cumm and were subjected to rapid dengue serological test as well as IgM capture ELISA. 11/ 249 (4% cases were diagnosed as primary dengue infection (only IgM positive by rapid dengue IgG/IgM bispot immunocomb test. There were 123(49% cases with only IgG positive suggesting secondary/past dengue infection. Both IgM and IgG were positive in 24(10% cases. Number of cases negative for both IgM and IgG were 91(37%. IgM positive cases were confirmed by IgM capture ELISA. Classical dengue fever (DF was noted in 168 (67% patients and dengue hemorrhagic fever (DHF in 81(33% cases. Common clinical presentations of DHF were fever 78(96%, body - ache 74(91%, arthralgia 74 (91%, retro - orbital pain 65(80%, abdominal pain 07(09%. Bleeding manifestation were in the form of petechiae, melena, epistaxis, hematuria, hemoptysis, hematemesis, bleeding gums and conjunctival hemorrhages. Out of 81 Dengue haemorrhagic fever (DHF patients 13(16% patients had platelet count between 50,000 and 1 lakh. 68(84% patients had platelet count below 50,000. Majority of these patients 47(58% had platelet below 20000 and were IgG posit ive. Thrombocytopenia correlated well with bleeding manifestations in our patients. In an epidemic setting if the patients present with fever, vomiting, musculoskeletal pain and bleeding along with low platelet count a strong possibility of DHF/ Dengu e shock syndrome (DSS should be kept in mind

  4. Travellers and viral haemorrhagic fevers: what are the risks?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Beeching, Nick J; Fletcher, Tom E; Hill, David R; Thomson, Gail L

    2010-11-01

    Viral haemorrhagic fevers (VHF) are caused by zoonotic viral infections transmitted to humans directly or by ticks or mosquitoes. The overall risk to travellers is conservatively estimated at modern Western hospital settings. However, healthcare-associated transmission of infection has been a major problem in some endemic settings. The potential for healthcare-associated infection and the threats posed by unrecognised or new agents necessitate a high index of suspicion and a standardised risk assessment approach to febrile travellers. Travel-related hantavirus infections are increasingly being reported from Europe and the Americas. This article summarises the epidemiology and reports of travel-related VHF cases in the past 40 years, together with strategies for their recognition, management and prevention.

  5. Hereditary haemorrhagic telangiectasia: a cause of preventable morbidity and mortality.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Brady, A P

    2012-01-31

    Hereditary haemorrhagic telangiectasia (HHT) is an autosomal dominant condition whose effects are mediated through deficient blood vessel formation and regeneration, with multisystem involvement. Patients are usually aware of resulting skin telangiectasia and epistaxis, but are also exposed to dangers posed by occult vascular malformations in other organs. About 15-35% of HHT patients have pulmonary AVMs (PAVMs), 10% have cerebral AVMs (CAVMs), 25-33% suffer significant GI blood loss from GI tract telangiectasia, and an unknown but high percentage have liver involvement. In total, 10% of affected individuals die prematurely or suffer major disability from HHT, largely because of bleeding from CAVMs and PAVMs, or paradoxical embolization through PAVMs. Screening for and early intervention to treat occult PAVMs and CAVMs can largely eliminate these risks, and should be undertaken in a specialist centre. The National HHT Center in The Mercy University Hospital in Cork is the referral centre for HHT screening in Ireland.

  6. A rare case of Weil's disease with alveolar haemorrhage

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chakrabarti, Abhiram; Nandy, Manab; Pal, Dipankar; Mallik, Sudesna

    2014-01-01

    Leptospirosis, a disease of protean manifestations occurs sporadically throughout the year with a peak seasonal incidence during the rainy season mimicking other febrile viral illness. In the rare case, the disease leads to renal and hepatic involvement with hemorrhage which may be associated with multisystem organ dysfunction in form of pulmonary, cardiac and central nervous system, when it is known as Weil's disease. Rarely haemorrhagic manifestations are assosciated. Early diagnosis is important as sometimes the disease may be life threatening. Proper antibiotics results in dramatic improvement. We hereby presented a case that had clinical features of Weil's disease with cough, dyspnoea and haemoptysis. Leptospirosis was detected on ELISA testing. Patient was cured rapidly with antibiotics. PMID:25183149

  7. A rare case of Weil's disease with alveolar haemorrhage

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Abhiram Chakrabarti

    2014-05-01

    Full Text Available Leptospirosis, a disease of protean manifestations occurs sporadically throughout the year with a peak seasonal incidence during the rainy season mimicking other febrile viral illness. In the rare case, the disease leads to renal and hepatic involvement with hemorrhage which may be associated with multisystem organ dysfunction in form of pulmonary, cardiac and central nervous system, when it is known as Weil's disease. Rarely haemorrhagic manifestations are assosciated. Early diagnosis is important as sometimes the disease may be life threatening. Proper antibiotics results in dramatic improvement. We hereby presented a case that had clinical features of Weil's disease with cough, dyspnoea and haemoptysis. Leptospirosis was detected on ELISA testing. Patient was cured rapidly with antibiotics.

  8. Study of foetomaternal outcome of antepartum haemorrhage in pregnancy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Siddhartha Majumder

    2015-12-01

    Conclusions: Educating pregnant mothers about the importance of antenatal care and easy accessibility to quality antenatal services would go a long way in bringing down the maternal and perinatal morbidity and mortality related with antepartum haemorrhage. The morbidity associated with placenta previa can be reduced by detecting the condition in the antenatal period by ultrasound, before it becomes symptomatic. Intensive family planning program and awareness of small family norm helps in decreasing cases of APH in relation with age and parity. Efforts should be made to reduce the rates of operative deliveries, because there is a greater likelihood of placenta previa in a scarred uterus. There is a lot of scope on further research in the field of APH for further reduction in foetal and maternal morbidity and mortality. [Int J Reprod Contracept Obstet Gynecol 2015; 4(6.000: 1936-1939

  9. Pre-emptive treatment with fibrinogen concentrate for postpartum haemorrhage

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Wikkelsø, A J; Edwards, H M; Afshari, A

    2015-01-01

    BACKGROUND: In early postpartum haemorrhage (PPH), a low concentration of fibrinogen is associated with excessive subsequent bleeding and blood transfusion. We hypothesized that pre-emptive treatment with fibrinogen concentrate reduces the need for red blood cell (RBC) transfusion in patients...... with PPH. METHODS: In this investigator-initiated, multicentre, double-blinded, parallel randomized controlled trial, we assigned subjects with severe PPH to a single dose of fibrinogen concentrate or placebo (saline). A dose of 2 g or equivalent was given to all subjects independent of body weight...... and the fibrinogen concentration at inclusion. The primary outcome was RBC transfusion up to 6 weeks postpartum. Secondary outcomes were total blood loss, total amount of blood transfused, occurrence of rebleeding, haemoglobin

  10. A near-miss case of obstetric haemorrhage managed successfully

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Meena N. Satia

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available Functioning of health systems with respect to maternal health were previously audited using indicators like maternal mortality ratio. However, maternal morbidity as a consequence of pregnancy-related complications is not accounted for in these indicators. Thus, the World Health Organization (WHO has formulated a maternal near-miss approach to pregnancy complications for a more thorough evaluation of health care systems across the world. In practical terms, women are said to be maternal near-miss cases when they survive lethal conditions during pregnancy or in the postpartum period. We report one such case of traumatic variety of postpartum haemorrhage subsequent to a lower segment caesarean section with immediate post-operative removal of cervical cerclage threads that resulted in a maternal near-miss case.

  11. The need for repeat angiography in subarachnoid haemorrhage

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Urbach, H.; Solymosi, L. [Department of Neuroradiology, University of Bonn, Sigmund-Freud-Strasse 25, D-53127 Bonn (Germany); Zentner, J. [Department of Neurosurgery, University of Bonn, Sigmund-Freud-Strasse 25, D-53127 Bonn (Germany)

    1998-01-01

    This study was designed to assess the necessity for a second angiogram study in patients in whom initial angiography after primary subarachnoid haemorrhage (SAH) was negative. During a 12-year period, 122 of 694 patients (17.5 %) had negative initial angiograms. CT, available for 98 patients, showed a preponderance of subarachnoid blood in the perimesencephalic cisterns in 50 of 73 patients (68.5 %) in whom blood was visible on CT. Angiography, repeated in 67 patients, revealed an aneurysm in 4 (6 %): 2 had an aneurysm of the anterior communicating artery, 1 of the posterior inferior cerebellar artery, and 1 of the P2 segment of the posterior cerebral artery. CT showed subarachnoid blood in the interpeduncular and ambient cisterns in this last case, and a preponderance of subarachnoid blood outside the perimesencephalic cisterns in the remaining 3 patients. (orig.) With 2 figs., 1 tab., 32 refs.

  12. The role of fibrinogen and haemostatic assessment in postpartum haemorrhage

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Wikkelsø, Anne Juul

    2015-01-01

    Pregnancy is a state of hypercoagulobility that might be an evolutionary way of protecting parturients from exsanguination following child birth. Observational studies suggest an association between a low level of fibrinogen (coagulation factor I) at the start of postpartum haemorrhage (PPH....... Paper III was based on two national Danish registries evaluating the predictability of postpartum blood transfusion. Prediction was found difficult. However, retained placental parts seemed to be the strongest predictor. Since this diagnosis is made very late and often in association with the onset...... of bleeding, tools to perform an early diagnosis is highly warranted. Paper IV includes recommendations of the European Society of Anaesthesiology regarding the use of fibrinogen concentrate in PPH, and is based on very weak (GRADE 2) evidence and low confidence in estimates of effect (GRADE C). Paper V...

  13. Return to theatre in secondary post-tonsillectomy haemorrhage: a comparison of coblation and dissection techniques.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Amir, Ida; Belloso, Antonio; Broomfield, Stephen J; Morar, Pradeep

    2012-02-01

    The aim of this study is to examine the incidence of return to theatre (RTT) for post-operative haemorrhage following coblation and dissection tonsillectomy and to investigate those that required RTT more than 10 days post-surgery. Retrospective review of post-tonsillectomy haemorrhages requiring RTT from April 2005 to March 2009 was conducted. Of 2,541 tonsillectomies performed, 81% were by coblation and 19% by dissection methods. The overall RTT rate was 1.7%. No difference was found in the overall RTT rates for primary and secondary haemorrhage between the two techniques. However, the overall RTT rates for primary and secondary haemorrhage were higher in adults than children (P = 0.0456 and P = 0.0215, respectively). RTT for secondary haemorrhage during the first ten post-operative days occurred in both coblation and dissection tonsillectomy with no significant difference. After the first post-operative week, late secondary bleeding requiring RTT occurred only in the coblation group (P = 0.0676). Four patients required blood transfusion; all were in the coblation group, three of which were required during RTT in the late secondary haemorrhage (after 10 days). The post-operative RTT rates for coblation tonsillectomy did not reveal a change of trend over the 4-year study period. Our RTT rate for secondary haemorrhage is higher than earlier published results. A learning curve could not be identified in RTT for coblation tonsillectomy haemorrhage. Late secondary haemorrhages requiring surgical intervention have only been identified in cases performed by coblation and could potentially be life threatening as 33% (3/9) required blood transfusion. This phenomenon may be explained by a particular physiological healing process associated with coblation.

  14. A risk scoring system for prediction of haemorrhagic stroke.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zodpey, S P; Tiwari, R R

    2005-01-01

    The present pair-matched case control study was carried out at Government Medical College Hospital, Nagpur, India, a tertiary care hospital with the objective to devise and validate a risk scoring system for prediction of hemorrhagic stroke. The study consisted of 166 hospitalized CT scan proved cases of hemorrhagic stroke (ICD 9, 431-432), and a age and sex matched control per case. The controls were selected from patients who attended the study hospital for conditions other than stroke. On conditional multiple logistic regression five risk factors- hypertension (OR = 1.9. 95% Cl = 1.5-2.5). raised scrum total cholesterol (OR = 2.3, 95% Cl = 1.1-4.9). use of anticoagulants and antiplatelet agents (OR = 3.4, 95% Cl =1.1-10.4). past history of transient ischaemic attack (OR = 8.4, 95% Cl = 2.1- 33.6) and alcohol intake (OR = 2.1, 95% Cl = 1.3-3.6) were significant. These factors were ascribed statistical weights (based on regression coefficients) of 6, 8, 12, 21 and 8 respectively. The nonsignificant factors (diabetes mellitus, physical inactivity, obesity, smoking, type A personality, history of claudication, family history of stroke, history of cardiac diseases and oral contraceptive use in females) were not included in the development of scoring system. ROC curve suggested a total score of 21 to be the best cut-off for predicting haemorrhag stroke. At this cut-off the sensitivity, specificity, positive predictivity and Cohen's kappa were 0.74, 0.74, 0.74 and 0.48 respectively. The overall predictive accuracy of this additive risk scoring system (area under ROC curve by Wilcoxon statistic) was 0.79 (95% Cl = 0.73-0.84). Thus to conclude, if substantiated by further validation, this scorincy system can be used to predict haemorrhagic stroke, thereby helping to devise effective risk factor intervention strategy.

  15. Prevention and treatment of variceal haemorrhage in 2017.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brunner, Felix; Berzigotti, Annalisa; Bosch, Jaime

    2017-01-01

    Variceal haemorrhage is a major complication of portal hypertension that still causes high mortality in patients with cirrhosis. Improved knowledge of the pathophysiology of portal hypertension has recently led to a more comprehensive approach to prevent all the complications of this condition. Thus, optimal treatment of portal hypertension requires a strategy that takes into account the clinical stage of the disease and all the major variables that affect the risk of progression to the next stage and death. In patients with compensated liver disease, the correction of factors influencing the progression of fibrosis, in particular aetiologic factors, is now feasible in many cases and should be achieved to prevent the development or progression of gastroesophageal varices and hepatic decompensation. Once gastroesophageal varices have developed, non-selective beta-blockers remain the cornerstone of therapy. Carvedilol provides a greater decrease in portal pressure and is currently indicated as a first-choice therapy for primary prophylaxis. The treatment of acute variceal haemorrhage includes a combination of vasoactive drugs, antibiotics and endoscopic variceal band ligation. In high-risk patients, the early use of transjugular intrahepatic portosystemic shunt (TIPS) lowers the risk of re-bleeding and improves survival. Transjugular intrahepatic portosystemic shunt is the choice for uncontrolled variceal bleeding; a self-expandable metal stent or balloon tamponade can be used as a bridging measure. The combination of non-selective beta-blockers and endoscopic variceal band ligation reduces the risk of recurrent variceal bleeding and improves survival. In these cases, statins seem to further improve survival. Transjugular intrahepatic portosystemic shunt is indicated in patients who rebleed during secondary prophylaxis.

  16. Subarachnoid haemorrhage of unknown origin: clinical and tomographical aspects.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cioffi, F; Pasqualin, A; Cavazzani, P; Da Pian, R

    1989-01-01

    65 patients with negative but technically satisfactory 4 vessel angiography - all admitted to our Department in the years 1976-1983 - were evaluated in the present study. CT scan was undertaken in all cases (in 47 cases within 4 days of haemorrhage). Arterial hypertension was present on admission in 9% of cases. The period of follow-up ranged from 4 to 11 years, with a mean of 5.3 years. The study group was compared to a control group, comprising 760 patients with subarachnoid haemorrhage from ruptured aneurysms, admitted during the same period. Clinical grade on admission (Hunt's classification) was better in patients belonging to the study group. The amount of cisternal deposition on CT scan was less significant than in patients with ruptured aneurysms, and the deposition was often atypical (circumpeduncular, ambiental, and/or tentorial). Clinical deterioration associated with vasospasm was observed in 5% of patients in this study and in 27% of patients in the control group. In patients with a consistent or thick cisternal layer (CT scan "at risk") the incidence of clinical vasospasm was 21%, against 47% in controls. One or more rebleedings occurred in 12% of patients in the study group, against 25% of patients in the control group. A significant ventricular dilatation was observed in 15% of patients in the first group (requiring a shunt in 8%), against 25% of patients in the second group (requiring a shunt in 11%). Final outcome was favourable in 95% of patients in this study group and in 63% of patients in the control group, with a mortality rate of 5% in the first group and 32% in the second group.

  17. Helical CT in the diagnosis of acute lower gastrointestinal haemorrhage

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sabharwal, Rohan [Department of Radiology, Westmead Hospital, Sydney, NSW (Australia); Vladica, Philip [Department of Radiology, Westmead Hospital, Sydney, NSW (Australia)]. E-mail: rpvl@imag.wsahs.nsw.gov.au; Chou, Roger [Department of Radiology, Westmead Hospital, Sydney, NSW (Australia); Law, W. Phillip [Department of Radiology, Westmead Hospital, Sydney, NSW (Australia)

    2006-05-15

    Introduction: A pilot study to evaluate helical computer tomography (CT) as a diagnostic tool for acute lower gastrointestinal tract (GIT) bleeding. CT was compared to conventional angiography (CA) and colonoscopy for the diagnosis and detection of bleeding site in suspected cases of acute lower GIT bleeding. Methods: Seven patients presenting with acute lower GIT bleeding, between June and November 2002, underwent CT examinations. All of these seven patients underwent CA following CT. Emergency colonoscopies were performed on five patients investigated with both CT and CA. Median delay from the most recent episode of hematochezia to CT was two and a half hours, to CA was 3 h, and to colonoscopy was 4 h. None of the patients underwent nuclear medicine (NM) bleeding studies. Results: Haemoglobin drop in all patients was greater than 15 g/L in the first 24 h of presentation. The mean age was 68.86 years (range, 49-83 years). Comparing CT and CA, there were four concordant and three discordant results. Both modalities had concordant findings of two active bleeding sites, one non-bleeding rectal tumour, and one negative case result. In three patients, the source of bleeding was found on CT whereas CA was negative. Emergency colonoscopies performed in all of these three patients confirmed blood in the colon/ileum. Conclusion: Early experience suggests that CT is a safe, convenient and accurate diagnostic tool for acute lower GIT haemorrhage. It raises questions regarding the sensitivity of CA. A new management algorithm for acute lower GIT haemorrhage using CT as the pre-CA screening tool is being proposed based on the preliminary findings. Positive CT will allow directed therapeutic angiography, while negative CT will triage patients into alternative management pathways.

  18. Prospective, randomized trial of the effectiveness and retention of 30-min layperson training for cardiopulmonary resuscitation and automated external defibrillators: The American Airlines Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roppolo, Lynn P; Pepe, Paul E; Campbell, Linda; Ohman, Kimberly; Kulkarni, Himani; Miller, Ronna; Idris, Alison; Bean, Lawrence; Bettes, Thomas N; Idris, Ahamed H

    2007-08-01

    A head-to-head trial was conducted to compare laypersons' long-term retention of life-saving psychomotor and cognitive skills learned in the traditional multi-hour training format for basic cardiopulmonary resuscitation and automated external defibrillator use to those learned in an abbreviated (30 min) course. Laypersons were randomized to either: (1) the traditional multi-hour Heartsaver-Automated External Defibrillator (Heartsaver-AED) group; or (2) the 30-min course group (cardiopulmonary resuscitation, choking, and automated external defibrillator use). Immediately after training, and at 6 months, participants were provided identical individual testing scenarios. In addition to audio-video recordings, computerized recordings of compression rate/depth, ventilation rates, and related pauses were obtained and subsequently rated by blinded reviewers. Performance following 30-min training was either equivalent or superior (p<0.007) to the multi-hour Heartsaver-Automated External Defibrillator training in all measurements, both immediately and 6 months after training. Although retention of certain skills deteriorated over the 6 months among a significant number of participants from both groups, 84% of the 30-min training group still was judged, overall, to perform cardiopulmonary resuscitation adequately. Moreover, 93% still were performing chest compressions adequately and 93% continued to apply the automated external defibrillator and deliver shocks correctly. Using innovative learning techniques, 30-min cardiopulmonary resuscitation and automated external defibrillator training is as effective as traditional multi-hour courses, even after 6 months. Thirty-minute courses should decrease labor intensity, demands on resources, and time commitments for cardiopulmonary resuscitation courses, thus facilitating more widespread and frequent retraining.

  19. Gravity and Development of Cardiopulmonary Reflex

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nagaoka, Shunji; Eno, Yuko; Ohira, Yoshinobu

    Cardio-pulmonary reflex, which our cardiac activity is synchronized to the respiration by autonomic nervous system regulation, is called as "respiratory sinus arrhythmia" and commonly found in adult. The physiological function of the espiratory sinus arrhythmia is considered to maximize the gas exchange during respiration cycle. This respiration induced heart rate variability (RHRV) is only found in mammals and avian showing a remarkable postnatal development, whereas no RHRV in aquatic species such as fish or amphibian. To elucidate our hypothesis that gravity exposure may plays a key role in the postnatal development of RHRV as well as its evolutional origin in these ground animals, we have studied effects of hypergravity (2G) on the postnatal development of RHRV using rat. Pregnant Wister rats were kept in centrifugal cages system for 38 days from 6th days of pregnant mother to have neonates until 23 days old. Electrocardiograph was recorded from the neonates in 2 to 23 days old in 2G group with simultaneous control (1G) group. The RHRV analysis was performed by calculating a component of Fourier power spectral coincide with the respiration frequency. In both groups, averaged resting heart rate gradually increase from 2 to 23 days old. When comparing the heart rate between the two groups, the 2G group indicated significantly lower (240± 8 bpm) than 1G control (326±21 bpm, p¡0.001) in 2 days old, where as no significance in 23 days old. The RHRV of 2 days old neonates in both groups indicated very small magnitude but significantly lower in 2G group than 1G control (p¡0.01). The RHRV gradually increase during the first 2 weeks and then rapid increased to reached 45 fold of magnitude in 1G control, whereas 69 fold in 2G group. The results strongly suggested that the postnatal innervation from respiration to cardiovascular centers was gravity dependent.

  20. Teamwork and leadership in cardiopulmonary resuscitation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hunziker, Sabina; Johansson, Anna C; Tschan, Franziska; Semmer, Norbert K; Rock, Laura; Howell, Michael D; Marsch, Stephan

    2011-06-14

    Despite substantial efforts to make cardiopulmonary resuscitation (CPR) algorithms known to healthcare workers, the outcome of CPR has remained poor during the past decades. Resuscitation teams often deviate from algorithms of CPR. Emerging evidence suggests that in addition to technical skills of individual rescuers, human factors such as teamwork and leadership affect adherence to algorithms and hence the outcome of CPR. This review describes the state of the science linking team interactions to the performance of CPR. Because logistical barriers make controlled measurement of team interaction in the earliest moments of real-life resuscitations challenging, our review focuses mainly on high-fidelity human simulator studies. This technique allows in-depth investigation of complex human interactions using precise and reproducible methods. It also removes variability in the clinical parameters of resuscitation, thus letting researchers study human factors and team interactions without confounding by clinical variability from resuscitation to resuscitation. Research has shown that a prolonged process of team building and poor leadership behavior are associated with significant shortcomings in CPR. Teamwork and leadership training have been shown to improve subsequent team performance during resuscitation and have recently been included in guidelines for advanced life support courses. We propose that further studies on the effects of team interactions on performance of complex medical emergency interventions such as resuscitation are needed. Future efforts to better understand the influence of team factors (e.g., team member status, team hierarchy, handling of human errors), individual factors (e.g., sex differences, perceived stress), and external factors (e.g., equipment, algorithms, institutional characteristics) on team performance in resuscitation situations are critical to improve CPR performance and medical outcomes of patients.

  1. Managing the Inflammatory Response after Cardiopulmonary Bypass : Review of the Studies in Animal Models

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Liguori, Gabriel Romero; Kanas, Alexandre Fligelman; Moreira, Luiz Felipe Pinho

    2014-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: To review studies performed in animal models that evaluated therapeutic interventions to inflammatory response and microcirculatory changes after cardiopulmonary bypass. METHODS: It was used the search strategy ("Cardiopulmonary Bypass" (MeSH)) and ("Microcirculation" (MeSH) or "Inflammat

  2. Complications of cardiopulmonary resuscitation in non-traumatic cases and factors affecting complications

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Umit Kaldırım

    2016-09-01

    It has been shown that during cardiopulmonary resuscitation, severe injuries can occur due to thoracic compression. Only a positive correlation with the duration of cardiopulmonary resuscitation was found in our study.

  3. 21 CFR 870.4270 - Cardiopulmonary bypass cardiotomy suction line blood filter.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Cardiopulmonary bypass cardiotomy suction line... Devices § 870.4270 Cardiopulmonary bypass cardiotomy suction line blood filter. (a) Identification. A cardiopulmonary bypass cardiotomy suction line blood filter is a device used as part of a gas exchange (oxygenator...

  4. 21 CFR 870.4410 - Cardiopulmonary bypass in-line blood gas sensor.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Cardiopulmonary bypass in-line blood gas sensor... Cardiopulmonary bypass in-line blood gas sensor. (a) Identification. A cardiopulmonary bypass in-line blood gas sensor is a transducer that measures the level of gases in the blood. (b) Classification. Class II...

  5. Hereditary haemorrhagic telangiectasia: a population-based study of prevalence and mortality in Danish patients

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kjeldsen, A D; Vase, P; Green, A

    1999-01-01

    Hereditary haemorrhagic telangiectasia (HHT) is a dominantly inherited disease characterized by telangiectatic lesions. The disease manifestations are variable and include epistaxis, gastrointestinal bleeding, pulmonary arteriovenous malformations and cerebral arteriovenous malformations. Early d...

  6. Impaired endothelial function after aneurysmal subarachnoid haemorrhage correlates with arginine:asymmetric dimethylarginine ratio

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bergström, A; Staalsø, J M; Romner, B

    2014-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Endothelial dysfunction might be involved in the development of cerebral vasospasm after aneurysmal subarachnoid haemorrhage (SAH). METHODS: This prospective observational study of 48 SAH subjects and 23 control subjects examined associations between reactive hyperaemia index (RHI...

  7. Successfull management of a life threatening cerebellar haemorrhage following spine surgery - a case report -.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pallud, Johan; Belaïd, Hayat; Aldea, Sorin

    2009-06-01

    Cerebellar haemorrhages are rare life-threatening complications following spine surgery that present challenges for their diagnostic and their therapeutic management. Their patho-physiology remains unclear.We report a case of a life-threatening cerebellar haemorrhage secondary to an occult dural tear following a planned L5-S1 laminectomy. The patient was treated with emergent external ventriculostomy following by a posterior fossa decompressive craniectomy. Cerebellar haemorrhages have to be suspected systematically when unexpected neurological signs occur after spine surgery since their rapid management lead to favourable outcomes. The present imaging findings allow us proposing that cerebellar haemorrhages result primarily from superior cerebellar venous stretching and tearing, and that cerebellar infarction and swelling occur secondarily.

  8. Effect of cardiopulmonary bypass on gastrointestinal perfusion and function.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gaer, J A; Shaw, A D; Wild, R; Swift, R I; Munsch, C M; Smith, P L; Taylor, K M

    1994-02-01

    Gastric mucosal tonometry was used to determine the adequacy of gastrointestinal perfusion in 10 patients undergoing elective myocardial revascularization. Patients were prospectively randomized to receive either pulsatile or nonpulsatile flow during cardiopulmonary bypass. All patients showed a reduction in gastric mucosal perfusion during bypass, manifested by a reduction in the gastric mucosal pH, which occurred independently of variations in the arterial pH. In the group of patients receiving nonpulsatile flow, this reduction was significantly greater (p < 0.05). Cardiopulmonary bypass using nonpulsatile flow is associated with the development of a gastric mucosal acidosis, which may have implications for the development of postoperative complications.

  9. Complications of bystander cardiopulmonary resuscitation for unconscious patients without cardiopulmonary arrest

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yoshihiro Moriwaki

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: Insufficient knowledge of the risks and complications of cardiopulmonary resuscitation (CPR may be an obstructive factor for CPR, however, particularly for patients who are not clearly suffering out of hospital cardiopulmonary arrest (OH-CPA. The object of this study was to clarify the potential complication, the safety of bystander CPR in such cases. Materials and Methods: This study was a population-based observational case series. To be enrolled, patients had to have undergone CPR with chest compressions performed by lay persons, had to be confirmed not to have suffered OHCPA. Complications of bystander CPR were identified from the patients′ medical records and included rib fracture, lung injury, abdominal organ injury, and chest and/or abdominal pain requiring analgesics. In our emergency department, one doctor gathered information while others performed X-ray and blood examinations, electrocardiograms, and chest and abdominal ultrasonography. Results: A total of 26 cases were the subjects. The mean duration of bystander CPR was 6.5 minutes (ranging from 1 to 26. Nine patients died of a causative pathological condition and pneumonia, and the remaining 17 survived to discharge. Three patients suffered from complications (tracheal bleeding, minor gastric mucosal laceration, and chest pain, all of which were minimal and easily treated. No case required special examination or treatment for the complication itself. Conclusion: The risk and frequency of complications due to bystander CPR is thought to be very low. It is reasonable to perform immediate CPR for unconscious victims with inadequate respiration, and to help bystanders perform CPR using the T-CPR system.

  10. Collisionless electrostatic shocks

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Andersen, H.K.; Andersen, S.A.; Jensen, Vagn Orla

    1970-01-01

    An attempt was made in the laboratory to observe the standing collisionless electrostatic shocks in connection with the bow shock of the earth......An attempt was made in the laboratory to observe the standing collisionless electrostatic shocks in connection with the bow shock of the earth...

  11. Acute suprachoroidal haemorrhage post-tenecteplase thrombolysis for myocardial infarction: management considerations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Trikha, Sameer; Lockwood, Alastair; Puvanachandra, Narman; Kirwan, James

    2010-05-13

    We report a case of a 63-year-old man who received intravenous tenecteplase as thrombolytic therapy for an inferior ST elevation myocardial infarction. Three hours later he complained of blurred vision in the right eye and on examination had sustained a suprachoroidal haemorrhage. With conservative treatment the haemorrhage resolved, leading to a normalisation of visual acuity. To the authors' knowledge, no case reports exist of this rare complication following intravenous tenecteplase. We discuss implications for further thrombolysis and anticoagulation.

  12. Acute suprachoroidal haemorrhage post-tenecteplase thrombolysis for myocardial infarction: management considerations

    OpenAIRE

    2010-01-01

    We report a case of a 63-year-old man who received intravenous tenecteplase as thrombolytic therapy for an inferior ST elevation myocardial infarction. Three hours later he complained of blurred vision in the right eye and on examination had sustained a suprachoroidal haemorrhage. With conservative treatment the haemorrhage resolved, leading to a normalisation of visual acuity. To the authors’ knowledge, no case reports exist of this rare complication following intravenous tenecteplase. We di...

  13. Two cases of extrapulmonary onset granulomatosis with polyangiitis which caused diffuse alveolar haemorrhage

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Halide Kaya

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Granulomatosis with polyangiitis (GPA is a rare form of vasculitis. Multidisciplinary therapeutic approach and early diagnosis assume vital importance in management of patients with diffuse alveolar haemorrhage caused by GPA, which is a rare complication. The purpose of this study was to present the diagnostic and therapeutic challenges experienced by clinicians in management of two severe cases of GPA with insidious extrapulmonary manifestations which rapidly progressed into acute kidney injury, alveolar haemorrhage and acute respiratory failure.

  14. Evaluating condom catheter balloon tamponade in non-traumatic postpartum haemorrhage resistant to medical management

    OpenAIRE

    Syed Nawaz Ahmad; Sunita Seth; Shefali Agarwal; Swati Choudhary

    2016-01-01

    Background: Obstetric haemorrhage remains the most important cause of maternal mortality worldwide accounting for 25% of maternal deaths annually. The aim of the study was to evaluate efficacy of a condom catheter assembly for uterine tamponade in the management of non-traumatic postpartum haemorrhage (PPH). Methods: It was a prospective interventional study done in a tertiary care hospital in New Delhi, India. Thirty three women with intractable PPH unresponsive to medical management were...

  15. Infrastructure and clinical practice for the detection and management of trauma-associated haemorrhage and coagulopathy

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Driessen, Annemariek; Schäfer, N; Albrecht, V

    2015-01-01

    PURPOSE: Early detection and management of post-traumatic haemorrhage and coagulopathy have been associated with improved outcomes, but local infrastructures, logistics and clinical strategies may differ. METHODS: To assess local differences in infrastructure, logistics and clinical management...... intake of anticoagulants including "new oral anticoagulants" and platelet inhibitors as an increasing threat to bleeding trauma patients. CONCLUSIONS: This study confirms differences in infrastructure, logistics and clinical practice for the detection and management of trauma-haemorrhage and trauma...

  16. Bakri balloon as a uterus preserving treatment of uncontrollable haemorrhage one month post-partum

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bonnici, Mia; Markauskas, Algirdas; Munk, Torben

    2014-01-01

    In this case Bakri balloon was used to stop haemorrhage one month post-partum. The case introduces the use of this device outside usual indications. A 27-year-old woman was admitted several times with vaginal bleeding after caesarean section. She was treated pharmacologically and with curettage. ....... One month post-partum hysteroscopic removal of placental tissue was done. During this uncontrollable haemorrhage occurred and hysterectomy was considered. An attempt to save the uterus with Bakri balloon was made succesfully....

  17. Patch: platelet transfusion in cerebral haemorrhage: study protocol for a multicentre, randomised, controlled trial

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dijkgraaf Marcel G

    2010-03-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Patients suffering from intracerebral haemorrhage have a poor prognosis, especially if they are using antiplatelet therapy. Currently, no effective acute treatment option for intracerebral haemorrhage exists. Limiting the early growth of intracerebral haemorrhage volume which continues the first hours after admission seems a promising strategy. Because intracerebral haemorrhage patients who are on antiplatelet therapy have been shown to be particularly at risk of early haematoma growth, platelet transfusion may have a beneficial effect. Methods/Design The primary objective is to investigate whether platelet transfusion improves outcome in intracerebral haemorrhage patients who are on antiplatelet treatment. The PATCH study is a prospective, randomised, multi-centre study with open treatment and blind endpoint evaluation. Patients will be randomised to receive platelet transfusion within six hours or standard care. The primary endpoint is functional health after three months. The main secondary endpoints are safety of platelet transfusion and the occurrence of haematoma growth. To detect an absolute poor outcome reduction of 20%, a total of 190 patients will be included. Discussion To our knowledge this is the first randomised controlled trial of platelet transfusion for an acute haemorrhagic disease. Trial registration The Netherlands National Trial Register (NTR1303

  18. Systolic blood pressure contributes to intracerebral haemorrhage after thrombolysis for ischemic stroke.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Perini, Francesco; De Boni, Antonella; Marcon, Michela; Bolgan, Irene; Pellizzari, Michele; Dionisio, Laura Di

    2010-10-15

    The frequency and risk factors for intracerebral haemorrhage (ICH) after ischemic stroke are well-known. ICH frequency is increased by the use of antithrombotic or thrombolytic drugs. Several experimental studies have demonstrated a relationship between ICH and hypertension after fibrinolysis, but the optimal blood pressure levels in patients treated with recombinant tissue plasminogen activator (rTPA) are as yet unknown. We evaluated the role of blood pressure in patients with ischemic stroke treated with rTPA within 3h of symptom onset. We treated 86 consecutive patients admitted to our stroke unit between 2002 and 2008 and prospectively recorded the clinical and instrumental data in our stroke registry. We evaluated haemorrhagic complications by reviewing imaging findings. Blood pressure was recorded before rTPA and at 6, 12, 18, and 32h. Total cerebral haemorrhage occurred in eleven (12.7%) patients, and symptomatic intracerebral haemorrhage occurred in seven (8.1%). We failed to find a correlation between blood pressure levels and stroke severity at admission. High blood pressure levels correlated with a worse outcome. Systolic blood pressure was significantly higher in ICH patients relative to rTPA-treated patients without haemorrhagic complications (p<0.03). This study indicates that rTPA-induced haemorrhage is influenced by systolic blood pressure. More aggressive pharmacological reduction of hypertension during fibrinolysis and the subsequent 32h may reduce this complication. Copyright 2010 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  19. Kinetics of carbon dioxide during cardiopulmonary resuscitation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Wiklund, L; Söderberg, D; Henneberg, S;

    1986-01-01

    CO2 kinetics during CPR was investigated in 15 anesthetized piglets. BP, blood gases, and acid-base balance were monitored through catheters in the carotid artery and a central vein, as well as in cerebrospinal fluid. Cardiac arrest was induced by a transthoracic direct current shock. CPR was begun...... immediately by artificial ventilation and simultaneous external chest compressions. Epinephrine was administered after 8 min of CPR. One group (n = 5) of animals received no buffer treatment while another (n = 5) received an infusion of 75 mmol sodium bicarbonate and a third group (n = 5) received......, bicarbonate and tris-buffer mixture both quickly passed through the blood-brain barrier. When buffer treatment is indicated during CPR, a buffer which does not increase tissue PCO2 may be the drug of choice....

  20. Kinetics of carbon dioxide during cardiopulmonary resuscitation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Wiklund, L; Söderberg, D; Henneberg, S

    1986-01-01

    CO2 kinetics during CPR was investigated in 15 anesthetized piglets. BP, blood gases, and acid-base balance were monitored through catheters in the carotid artery and a central vein, as well as in cerebrospinal fluid. Cardiac arrest was induced by a transthoracic direct current shock. CPR was begun...... immediately by artificial ventilation and simultaneous external chest compressions. Epinephrine was administered after 8 min of CPR. One group (n = 5) of animals received no buffer treatment while another (n = 5) received an infusion of 75 mmol sodium bicarbonate and a third group (n = 5) received...... an equivalent amount of tris-buffer mixture. The results of these experiments, as well as previously described circulatory variables during CPR, were analyzed using a computer model describing the CO2 kinetics of the pig. Our main finding was that PaCO2 was positively correlated to cardiac output during CPR...

  1. Geometrical shock dynamics for magnetohydrodynamic fast shocks

    KAUST Repository

    Mostert, W.

    2016-12-12

    We describe a formulation of two-dimensional geometrical shock dynamics (GSD) suitable for ideal magnetohydrodynamic (MHD) fast shocks under magnetic fields of general strength and orientation. The resulting area–Mach-number–shock-angle relation is then incorporated into a numerical method using pseudospectral differentiation. The MHD-GSD model is verified by comparison with results from nonlinear finite-volume solution of the complete ideal MHD equations applied to a shock implosion flow in the presence of an oblique and spatially varying magnetic field ahead of the shock. Results from application of the MHD-GSD equations to the stability of fast MHD shocks in two dimensions are presented. It is shown that the time to formation of triple points for both perturbed MHD and gas-dynamic shocks increases as (Formula presented.), where (Formula presented.) is a measure of the initial Mach-number perturbation. Symmetry breaking in the MHD case is demonstrated. In cylindrical converging geometry, in the presence of an azimuthal field produced by a line current, the MHD shock behaves in the mean as in Pullin et al. (Phys. Fluids, vol. 26, 2014, 097103), but suffers a greater relative pressure fluctuation along the shock than the gas-dynamic shock. © 2016 Cambridge University Press

  2. The influence of biomaterials on inflammatory responses to cardiopulmonary bypass.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Courtney, J M; Matata, B M; Yin, H Q; Esposito, A; Mahiout, A; Taggart, D P; Lowe, G D

    1996-05-01

    The nature of cardiopulmonary bypass and the complexity of the inflammatory response make the detection and interpretation of a biomaterial influence difficult. However, if mediation of the inflammatory response is considered to be an appropriate clinical goal, alteration to the biomaterial influence merits further investigation.

  3. Cardiopulmonary resuscitation: biomedical and biophysical analysis (Chapter XXX)

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Noordergraaf, G.J; Ottesen, Johnny T.; Scheffer, G.J.

    2004-01-01

    The evolution of the human in caring for others is reflected in the development of cardiopulmonary resuscitation (CPR). Superstition, divine intervention and finally science have contributed to the development of a technique which may allow any person to save another’s life. Fully 50% of the firs...

  4. Gastrointestinal motility during cardiopulmonary bypass : A sonomicrometric study

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Gu, YJ; de Kroon, TL; Elstrodt, JM; Rakhorst, G

    2006-01-01

    Cardiopulmonary bypass (CPB) is known to impair the integrity of the gastrointestinal tract. However, little is known about the movement behavior of the gastrointestinal tract during CPB. This study was aimed to assess the gastrointestinal motility with sonomicrometry, a distance measurement using u

  5. Cardiopulmonary interactions during mechanical ventilation in critically ill patients

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    T.G.V. Cherpanath (Thomas); W.K. Lagrand (Wim); M.J. Schultz (Marcus); A.B.J. Groeneveld (Johan)

    2013-01-01

    textabstractCardiopulmonary interactions induced by mechan-ical ventilation are complex and only partly understood. Ap-plied tidal volumes and/or airway pressures largely mediate changes in right ventricular preload and afterload. Effects on left ventricular function are mostly secondary to changes

  6. QUALITY-OF-LIFE AFTER CARDIOPULMONARY-RESUSCITATION

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    MIRANDA, DR

    Objectives: This study evaluates the influence of Cardiopulmonary Resuscitation (CPR) on the components of quality of life (QOL) of patients after discharge from the hospital. Design: Extracted from a prospective national survey on Dutch intensive care units (ICUs). Setting: Thirty-six ICUs of both

  7. Cardiopulmonary Fitness and Endurance in Children with Developmental Coordination Disorder

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, Sheng K.; Lin, Hsiao-Hui; Li, Yao-Chuen; Tsai, Chia-Liang; Cairney, John

    2010-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to compare cardiopulmonary fitness and endurance in 9-11-year-old children with DCD against a group of typically developing children in Taiwan. The Movement ABC test was used to evaluate the motor abilities of children. Forty-one participants (20 children with DCD and 21 children without DCD) were recruited for this…

  8. Cardiopulmonary resuscitation: biomedical and biophysical analysis (Chapter XXX)

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Noordergraaf, G.J; Ottesen, Johnny T.; Scheffer, G.J.

    2004-01-01

    The evolution of the human in caring for others is reflected in the development of cardiopulmonary resuscitation (CPR). Superstition, divine intervention and finally science have contributed to the development of a technique which may allow any person to save another’s life. Fully 50% of the firs...

  9. Cardiopulmonary effects following endoscopic thoracic sympathectomy for primary hyperhidrosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cruz, Jorge M; Fonseca, Manuel; Pinto, Fausto J; Oliveira, Antonio G; Carvalho, L Silva

    2009-09-01

    Endoscopic thoracic sympathectomy (ETS) is performed for the treatment of primary hyperhidrosis (PH). The second and third sympathetic thoracic ganglions excised in ETS also innervate the heart and lung. In the present work we studied the cardiopulmonary effects of ETS in a group of patients with PH. We performed a prospective study in 38 patients with severe PH. Pulmonary function, echocardiographic assessment of left ventricular function and myocardial contractility and maximal, symptom-limited, incremental exercise tests were evaluated 2 weeks before, and 6 months after ETS. Data were analysed with the paired t-test. Differences were considered significant when p<0.05. In pulmonary function tests, we found a statistically significant decrease forced expiratory flow in small airways and an increase of residual volume, a significant decrease in heart rate and ejection fraction, a significant decrease of 'rest' and 'peak' heart rate, and a significant increase of oxygen pulse (O2 pulse) and oxygen peak uptake (VO2 peak) after ETS (p<0.05). These cardiopulmonary effects observed 6 months after ETS in the treatment of patients with PH are all in normal ranges and are not relevant in cardiopulmonary function. We concluded that ETS in patients with PH is a safe procedure. Patients must be informed about these cardiopulmonary effects before the operation.

  10. Family presence during cardiopulmonary resuscitation and invasive procedures in children

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cristiana Araujo G. Ferreira

    2014-03-01

    Full Text Available Objective: To identify literature evidences related to actions to promote family's presence during cardiopulmonary resuscitation and invasive procedures in children hospitalized in pediatric and neonatal critical care units. Data sources : Integrative literature review in PubMed, SciELO and Lilacs databases, from 2002 to 2012, with the following inclusion criteria: research article in Medicine, or Nursing, published in Portuguese, English or Spanish, using the keywords "family", "invasive procedures", "cardiopulmonary resuscitation", "health staff", and "Pediatrics". Articles that did not refer to the presence of the family in cardiopulmonary resuscitation and invasive procedures were excluded. Therefore, 15 articles were analyzed. Data synthesis : Most articles were published in the United States (80%, in Medicine and Nursing (46%, and were surveys (72% with healthcare team members (67% as participants. From the critical analysis, four themes related to the actions to promote family's presence in invasive procedures and cardiopulmonary resuscitation were obtained: a to develop a sensitizing program for healthcare team; b to educate the healthcare team to include the family in these circumstances; c to develop a written institutional policy; d to ensure the attendance of family's needs. Conclusions: Researches on these issues must be encouraged in order to help healthcare team to modify their practice, implementing the principles of the Patient and Family Centered Care model, especially during critical episodes.

  11. 21 CFR 870.4350 - Cardiopulmonary bypass oxygenator.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Cardiopulmonary bypass oxygenator. 870.4350 Section 870.4350 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES... gases between blood and a gaseous environment to satisfy the gas exchange needs of a patient during...

  12. Necessity of immediate cardiopulmonary resuscitation in trauma emergency

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Luciano Baitello

    2010-08-01

    Full Text Available Abstract The ability to respond quickly and effectively to a cardiac arrest situation rests on nurses being competent in the emergency life-saving procedure of cardiopulmonary resuscitation. The objective of the current study was to evaluate the types of trauma and survival of patients that require immediate cardiopulmonary resuscitation in trauma emergencies. A total of 13301 patients treated as accident victims between July 2004 and December 2006 were evaluated in a prospective study. Patients requiring immediate cardiopulmonary resuscitation at admission were identified. The type of injury and the survival of these patients were evaluated. Of the 65 patients included in the study, 30% had suffered from gunshot wounds, 19% had been run over, 18% had been involved in car crashes, 13% in motor cycle accidents, 9% stabbings, 1% by cycle accidents and 10% other types of accidents including burns, hangings and falls. In only 12 of these patients, immediate resuscitation was successful and procedure such as chest drainage, exploratory laparotomy and interventions in the surgical center were performed. However all patients evolved to death; eight within 24 hours, two between 24 and 48 hours and the other 2 after 48 hours. Immediate cardiopulmonary resuscitation after accidents is a sign of high mortality requiring further studies to review indication and the ethical aspects involved.

  13. [Effects of airborne pollution on cardiopulmonary function of healthy person].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Xiaoli; Song, Xianqiang; Meng, Ziqiang

    2008-07-01

    To understand the effects of airborne pollution on cardiopulmonary function in healthy person. 15 healthy workers were selected from heavily polluted area as the experimental group (EG) and 15 healthy workers were selected from relatively clean area as control group (CG). The blood pressure were measured with sphygmomanometer and the vital capacity (VC) were detected with FHL-II type spirometer at rest status. Cardiopulmonary functions in different exercise states were measured by using the cardiopulmonary exercise testing (CPET). It showed that heart rate of EG was more higher than those of the CG at rest status (P VO2, VO2/kg, O2P and METS in CG were more higher than these indexes in EG (P VO2 max, the results of VO2 max, VO2 max/kg, O2P, METS and DT in CG were more higher than these indexes in EG (P < 0.01), and the recovery of heart rate in EG was slow in comparison with CG. Airborne pollution could have adverse effects on the cardiopulmonary function, reserve ability and function potential. The chronic adverse effects of airborne pollution on the health could be easy to reflect at static state. Therefore CPET could roundly evaluate the damage of airborne pollution to cardiorespiratory function.

  14. Cardiopulmonary fitness is related to disease severity in multiple sclerosis

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Heine, Martin; Wens, Inez; Langeskov-Christensen, Martin; Verschuren, Olaf|info:eu-repo/dai/nl/304819670; Eijnde, Bert O; Kwakkel, Gert; Dalgas, Ulrik

    2015-01-01

    BACKGROUND: In persons with MS (pwMS), a lower cardiopulmonary fitness has been associated with a higher risk for secondary disorders, decreased functional capacity, symptom worsening and reduced health-related quality of life. OBJECTIVE: To investigate the association between disease severity and c

  15. Clinical benefit of steroid use in patients undergoing cardiopulmonary bypass

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Whitlock, Richard P; Chan, Simon; Devereaux, P J;

    2008-01-01

    We sought to establish the efficacy and safety of prophylactic steroids in adult patients undergoing cardiopulmonary bypass (CPB). We performed a meta-analysis of randomized trials reporting the effects of prophylactic steroids on clinical outcomes after CPB. Outcomes examined were mortality...

  16. Latex agglutination test for field diagnosis of haemorrhagic septicaemia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lily Natalia

    2002-10-01

    Full Text Available Pasteurella multocida is bacterial pathogens that cause haemorrhagic septicaemia (HS in cattle and buffaloes. Various tests have been used to differentiate types of P. multocida, as well as to diagnose this specific disease. A latex agglutination test has been developed for the detection of P. multocida B:2 which is the causal agent of HS. This test is a rapid and simple test suitable for local laboratorium to diagnose HS cases in the field. A heat stable antigen consisting of mainly lipopolysaccharide (LPS extract of formalin killed P. multocida 0019 was used to produce specific antibody against P. multocida B:2. The antiboy was then used to sensitise latex particles. Latex agglutination test have been used to screen some P. multocida field isolates and this test have been proven to be specific, simple and easy to be used in detecting P. multocida B:2. The specificity is due to antibodies recognising LPS or LPS protein complexes. Sensitised latex was stable at 4° C for at least12 months. This test should be used as an aid to diagnosis and employed principally to confirm and support clinical and post mortem findings of HS.

  17. Quality of care in the management of major obstetric haemorrhage.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Johnson, S N

    2012-02-01

    Substandard care is reported to occur in a large number of cases of major obstetric haemorrhage (MOH). A prospective audit was carried out by a multidisciplinary team at our hospital over a one year period to assess the quality of care (QOC) delivered to women experiencing MOH. MOH was defined according to criteria outlined in the Scottish Audit of Maternal Morbidity (SAMM). 31 cases were identified yielding an incidence of 3.5\\/1000 deliveries. The predominant causes were uterine atony 11 (35.4%), retained products of conception 6 (19.3%) and placenta praevia\\/accreta 6 (19.3%). Excellent initial resuscitation and monitoring was noted with a high level of senior staff input. Indicators of QOC compared favourably with the SAMM. Areas for improvement were identified. This pilot study demonstrates the feasibility of detailed prospective data collection in MOH in a busy Dublin obstetric unit with a view to developing a national audit. Standardization of definitions allows for international comparisons.

  18. Imaging cerebral haemorrhage with magnetic induction tomography: numerical modelling.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zolgharni, M; Ledger, P D; Armitage, D W; Holder, D S; Griffiths, H

    2009-06-01

    Magnetic induction tomography (MIT) is a new electromagnetic imaging modality which has the potential to image changes in the electrical conductivity of the brain due to different pathologies. In this study the feasibility of detecting haemorrhagic cerebral stroke with a 16-channel MIT system operating at 10 MHz was investigated. The finite-element method combined with a realistic, multi-layer, head model comprising 12 different tissues, was used for the simulations in the commercial FE package, Comsol Multiphysics. The eddy-current problem was solved and the MIT signals computed for strokes of different volumes occurring at different locations in the brain. The results revealed that a large, peripheral stroke (volume 49 cm(3)) produced phase changes that would be detectable with our currently achievable instrumentation phase noise level (17 m degrees ) in 70 (27%) of the 256 exciter/sensor channel combinations. However, reconstructed images showed that a lower noise level than this, of 1 m degrees , was necessary to obtain good visualization of the strokes. The simulated MIT measurements were compared with those from an independent transmission-line-matrix model in order to give confidence in the results.

  19. Endovascular management of delayed post-pancreatectomy haemorrhage

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pottier, Edwige [Beaujon Hospital, University Hospitals Paris Nord Val de Seine, Department of Radiology, Clichy, Hauts-de-Seine (France); Ronot, Maxime; Vilgrain, Valerie [Beaujon Hospital, University Hospitals Paris Nord Val de Seine, Department of Radiology, Clichy, Hauts-de-Seine (France); University Paris Diderot, Paris (France); INSERM U1149, centre de recherche biomedicale Bichat-Beaujon, CRB3, Paris (France); Gaujoux, Sebastien; Cesaretti, Manuela; Barbier, Louise [APHP, University Hospitals Paris Nord Val de Seine, Beaujon, Department of Surgery, Clichy, Hauts-de-Seine (France); Sauvanet, Alain [University Paris Diderot, Paris (France); APHP, University Hospitals Paris Nord Val de Seine, Beaujon, Department of Surgery, Clichy, Hauts-de-Seine (France)

    2016-10-15

    To assess the patient outcome after endovascular treatment of delayed post-pancreatectomy haemorrhage (PPH) as first-line treatment. Between January 2005 and November 2013, all consecutive patients referred for endovascular treatment of PPH were included. Active bleeding, pseudoaneurysms, collections and the involved artery were recorded on pretreatment CT. Endovascular procedures were classified as technical success (source of bleeding identified on angiogram and treated), technical failure (source of bleeding identified but incompletely treated) and abstention (no abnormality identified, no treatment performed). Factors associated with rebleeding were analysed. Sixty-nine patients (53 men) were included (mean 59 years old (32-75)). Pretreatment CT showed 27 (39 %) active bleeding. In 22 (32 %) cases, no involved artery was identified. Technical success, failure and abstention were observed in 48 (70 %), 9 (13 %) and 12 patients (17 %), respectively. Thirty patients (43 %) experienced rebleeding. Rebleeding rates were 29 %, 58 % and 100 % in case of success, abstention and failure (p < 0.001). Treatment failure/abstention was the only factor associated with rebleeding. Overall, 74 % of the patients were successfully treated by endovascular procedure(s) alone. After a first endovascular procedure for PPH, the rebleeding rate is high and depends upon the success of the procedure. Most patients are successfully treated by endovascular approach(es) alone. (orig.)

  20. The International Surgical Trial in Intracerebral Haemorrhage (ISTICH).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mendelow, A D

    2003-01-01

    At the XIth International Brain Oedema Symposium we reported that 208 patients had been randomized in this trial from 65 centres. At the time of submission of this manuscript we have randomized 985 patients from 107 centres including Japan. The trial will continue randomising patients until the end of February 2003. The objective is to determine whether "Early Surgical Intervention" or "Initial Conservative Treatment" is the best option in patients with spontaneous supratentorial Intracerebral haemorrhage (ICH). Patients with trauma, tumours, aneurysms and angiographically proven arteriovenous malformations are excluded. Ascertainment logs from the various centres have revealed substantial variation in the rate of operation for ICH from 2% in Hungary to 90% in Lithuania. The results will remain blinded until all 6 month follow-up information has been obtained. It is anticipated that these results will therefore be known towards the end of 2003. The pooled results have shown that patients with larger Haematomas and depressed consciousness are more likely to end up with a worse outcome.

  1. Haemorrhagic disease of lagomorphs: evidence for a calicivirus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moussa, A; Chasey, D; Lavazza, A; Capucci, L; Smíd, B; Meyers, G; Rossi, C; Thiel, H J; Vlásak, R; Rønsholt, L

    1992-11-01

    Studies on the aetiological agents of rabbit haemorrhagic disease (RHD) and European brown hare syndrome show that the viruses responsible for these infections can be placed in the family Caliciviridae. Established members of this group are vesicular exanthema virus (prototype), San Miguel sea lion virus and feline calcivirus. The human hepatitis E virus and the Norwalk agent may soon be included. The RHD virus genome consists of a positive stranded RNA molecule composed of 7437 nucleotides. A major subgenomic RNA of 2.2 kb, colinear with the 3' end of the genomic RNA, can also be recovered from infected liver tissue, and both RNAs are enclosed within viral capsids formed by a single major protein of approximately 60 kDa. Electron microscopic examination of organ suspensions from diseased animals shows two types of particle; 35-40 nm complete virions have the regularly arranged cup-shaped depressions typical of calcivirus morphology, and 23-25 nm smooth particles resulting from degradation of the outer surface structures of the complete virions.

  2. Dengue fever and dengue haemorrhagic fever in adolescents and adults.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tantawichien, Terapong

    2012-05-01

    Dengue fever (DF) is endemic in tropical and subtropical zones and the prevalence is increasing across South-east Asia, Africa, the Western Pacific and the Americas. In recent years, the spread of unplanned urbanisation, with associated substandard housing, overcrowding and deterioration in water, sewage and waste management systems, has created ideal conditions for increased transmission of the dengue virus in tropical urban centres. While dengue infection has traditionally been considered a paediatric disease, the age distribution of dengue has been rising and more cases have been observed in adolescents and adults. Furthermore, the development of tourism in the tropics has led to an increase in the number of tourists who become infected, most of whom are adults. Symptoms and risk factors for dengue haemorrhagic fever (DHF) and severe dengue differ between children and adults, with co-morbidities and incidence in more elderly patients associated with greater risk of mortality. Treatment options for DF and DHF in adults, as for children, centre round fluid replacement (either orally or intravenously, depending on severity) and antipyretics. Further data are needed on the optimal treatment of adult patients.

  3. ELECTROCARDIOGRAPHIC CHANGES OBSERVED IN HAEMORRHAGIC AND ISCHAEMIC CEREBROVASCULAR DISEASES

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Channappa

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available INTRODUCTION Cardiac abnormalities are relatively common after acute neurologic injury. Disturbances can vary in severity from transient ECG abnormalities to profound myocardial injury and dysfunction. CNS is involved in the generation of cardiac arrhythmias and dysfunction even in an otherwise normal myocardium. AIM To find out proportion of ECG changes observed in ischaemic and haemorrhagic stroke. MATERIALS AND METHODS The Electrocardiographs of 100 patients with acute stroke were studied to find out the types of ECG abnormalities among different types of stroke. RESULTS In our study, the most common ECG abnormalities associated with stroke were prolonged QTc interval, ST-T segment abnormalities, prominent U wave and arrhythmias. Trop-I was positive in 12.8% patients with ECG changes. Statistical significance was found in association with Trop-I positivity and ST depression. CONCLUSION Usually patients with heart disease present with arrhythmias and Ischaemic like ECG changes. But these changes are also seen most often in the patients with presenting with stroke who didn’t have any past history of heart disease. This shows that arrhythmias and ischaemic ECG abnormalities are primarily evolved due to central nervous system disorders.

  4. Haemostatic monitoring during postpartum haemorrhage and implications for management.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Solomon, C; Collis, R E; Collins, P W

    2012-12-01

    Postpartum haemorrhage (PPH) is a major risk factor for maternal morbidity and mortality. PPH has numerous causative factors, which makes its occurrence and severity difficult to predict. Underlying haemostatic imbalances such as consumptive and dilutional coagulopathies may develop during PPH, and can exacerbate bleeding and lead to progression to severe PPH. Monitoring coagulation status in patients with PPH may be crucial for effective haemostatic management, goal-directed therapy, and improved outcomes. However, current PPH management guidelines do not account for the altered baseline coagulation status observed in pregnant patients, and the appropriate transfusion triggers to use in PPH are unknown, due to a lack of high-quality studies specific to this area. In this review, we consider the evidence for the use of standard laboratory-based coagulation tests and point-of-care viscoelastic coagulation monitoring in PPH. Many laboratory-based tests are unsuitable for emergency use due to their long turnaround times, so have limited value for the management of PPH. Emerging evidence suggests that viscoelastic monitoring, using thrombelastography- or thromboelastometry-based tests, may be useful for rapid assessment and for guiding haemostatic therapy during PPH. However, further studies are needed to define the ranges of reference values that should be considered 'normal' in this setting. Improving awareness of the correct application and interpretation of viscoelastic coagulation monitoring techniques may be critical in realizing their emergency diagnostic potential.

  5. Acute ischaemic brain lesions in intracerebral haemorrhage: multicentre cross-sectional magnetic resonance imaging study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gregoire, Simone M; Charidimou, Andreas; Gadapa, Naveen; Dolan, Eamon; Antoun, Nagui; Peeters, Andre; Vandermeeren, Yves; Laloux, Patrice; Baron, Jean-Claude; Jäger, Hans R; Werring, David J

    2011-08-01

    Subclinical acute ischaemic lesions on brain magnetic resonance imaging have recently been described in spontaneous intracerebral haemorrhage, and may be important to understand pathophysiology and guide treatment. The underlying mechanisms are uncertain. We tested the hypothesis that ischaemic lesions are related to magnetic resonance imaging markers of the severity and type of small-vessel disease (hypertensive arteriopathy or cerebral amyloid angiopathy) in a multicentre, cross-sectional study. We studied consecutive patients with intracerebral haemorrhage from four specialist stroke centres, and age-matched stroke service referrals without intracerebral haemorrhage. Acute ischaemic lesions were assessed on magnetic resonance imaging (imaging. White matter changes and cerebral microbleeds were rated with validated scales. We investigated associations between diffusion-weighted imaging lesions, clinical and radiological characteristics. We included 114 patients with intracerebral haemorrhage (39 with clinically probable cerebral amyloid angiopathy) and 47 age-matched controls. The prevalence of diffusion-weighted imaging lesions was 9/39 (23%) in probable cerebral amyloid angiopathy-related intracerebral haemorrhage versus 6/75 (8%) in the remaining patients with intracerebral haemorrhage (P = 0.024); no diffusion-weighted imaging lesions were found in controls. Diffusion-weighted imaging lesions were mainly cortical and were associated with mean white matter change score (odds ratio 1.14 per unit increase, 95% confidence interval 1.02-1.28, P = 0.024) and the presence of strictly lobar cerebral microbleeds (odds ratio 3.85, 95% confidence interval 1.15-12.93, P = 0.029). Acute, subclinical ischaemic brain lesions are frequent but previously underestimated after intracerebral haemorrhage, and are three times more common in cerebral amyloid angiopathy-related intracerebral haemorrhage than in other intracerebral haemorrhage types. Ischaemic brain lesions are

  6. Classification of non-aneurysmal subarachnoid haemorrhage: CT correlation to the clinical outcome

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nayak, S., E-mail: sanjeevnayak@hotmail.co [Department of Neuroradiology, University Hospital of North Staffordshire, North Staffordshire Royal Infirmary, Princes Road, Stoke-on-Trent, Staffordshire, ST4 7LN (United Kingdom); Kunz, A.B.; Kieslinger, K. [University Clinic of Neurology, Paracelsus Medical University Salzburg (Austria); Ladurner, G.; Killer, M. [University Clinic of Neurology, Paracelsus Medical University Salzburg (Austria); Neuroscience Institute, Christian Doppler Clinic, Paracelsus Medical University Salzburg (Austria)

    2010-08-15

    Aim: To propose a new computed tomography (CT)-based classification system for non-aneurysmal subarachnoid haemorrhage (SAH), which predicts patients' discharge clinical outcome and helps to prioritize appropriate patient management. Methods and materials: A 5-year, retrospective, two-centre study was carried out involving 1486 patients presenting with SAH. One hundred and ninety patients with non-aneurysmal SAH were included in the study. Initial cranial CT findings at admission were correlated with the patients' discharge outcomes measured using the Modified Rankin Scale (MRS). A CT-based classification system (type 1-4) was devised based on the topography of the initial haemorrhage pattern. Results: Seventy-five percent of the patients had type 1 haemorrhage and all these patients had a good clinical outcome with a discharge MRS of {<=}1. Eight percent of the patients presented with type 2 haemorrhage, 62% of which were discharged with MRS of {<=}1 and 12% of patients had MRS 3 or 4. Type 3 haemorrhage was found in 10%, of which 16% had good clinical outcome, but 53% had moderate to severe disability (MRS 3 and 4) and 5% were discharged with severe disability (MRS 5). Six percent of patients presented with type 4 haemorrhage of which 42% of the patients had moderate to severe disability (MRS 3 and 4), 42% had severe disability and one-sixth of the patients died. Highly significant differences were found between type 1(1a and 1b) and type 2 (p = 0.003); type 2 and type 3 (p = 0.002); type 3 and type 4 (p = 0.001). Conclusion: Haemorrhages of the type 1 category are usually benign and do not warrant an extensive battery of clinical and radiological investigations. Type 2 haemorrhages have a varying prognosis and need to be investigated and managed along similar lines as that of an aneurysmal haemorrhage with emphasis towards radiological investigation. Type 3 and type 4 haemorrhages need to be extensively investigated to find an underlying cause.

  7. Intracranial haemorrhage: an incidental finding at magnetic resonance imaging in a cohort of late preterm and term infants

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sirgiovanni, Ida; Groppo, Michela; Bassi, Laura; Passera, Sofia; Schiavolin, Paola; Fumagalli, Monica; Mosca, Fabio [Universita degli Studi di Milano, Neonatal Intensive Care Unit, Department of Clinical Science and Community Health, Fondazione IRCCS Ca' Granda Ospedale Maggiore Policlinico, Milan (Italy); Avignone, Sabrina; Cinnante, Claudia; Triulzi, Fabio [Universita degli Studi di Milano, Department of Neuroradiology, Fondazione IRCCS Ca' Granda Ospedale Maggiore Policlinico, Milan (Italy); Lista, Gianluca [V. Buzzi Children' s Hospital, ICP, Neonatal Intensive Care Unit, Milan (Italy)

    2014-03-15

    Intracranial haemorrhage (ICH) in term newborns has been increasingly recognised but the occurrence in late preterm infants and the clinical presentation are still unclear. To investigate the appearance of intracranial haemorrhage at MRI in a cohort of infants born at 34 weeks' gestation or more and to correlate MRI findings with neonatal symptoms. We retrospectively reviewed neonatal brain MRI scans performed during a 3-year period. We included neonates ≥34 weeks' gestation with intracranial haemorrhage and compared findings with those in babies without intracranial haemorrhage. Babies were classified into three groups according to haemorrhage location: (1) infratentorial, (2) infra- and supratentorial, (3) infra- and supratentorial + parenchymal involvement. Intracranial haemorrhage was observed in 36/240 babies (15%). All of these 36 had subdural haemorrhage. Sixteen babies were included in group 1; 16 in group 2; 4 in group 3. All infants in groups 1 and 2 were asymptomatic except one who was affected by intraventricular haemorrhage grade 3. Among the infants in group 3, who had intracranial haemorrhage with parenchymal involvement, three of the four (75%) presented with acute neurological symptoms. Uncomplicated spontaneous vaginal delivery was reported in 20/36 neonates (56%), vacuum extraction in 4 (11%) and caesarean section in 12 (33%). Babies with intracranial haemorrhage had significantly higher gestational age (38 ± 2 weeks vs. 37 ± 2 weeks) and birth weight (3,097 ± 485 g vs. 2,803 ± 741 g) compared to babies without intracranial haemorrhage and were more likely to be delivered vaginally than by caesarian section. Mild intracranial haemorrhage (groups 1 and 2) is relatively common in late preterm and term infants, although it mostly represents an incidental finding in clinically asymptomatic babies; early neurological symptoms appear to be related to parenchymal involvement. (orig.)

  8. Radiative Shock Waves In Emerging Shocks

    Science.gov (United States)

    Drake, R. Paul; Doss, F.; Visco, A.

    2011-05-01

    In laboratory experiments we produce radiative shock waves having dense, thin shells. These shocks are similar to shocks emerging from optically thick environments in astrophysics in that they are strongly radiative with optically thick shocked layers and optically thin or intermediate downstream layers through which radiation readily escapes. Examples include shocks breaking out of a Type II supernova (SN) and the radiative reverse shock during the early phases of the SN remnant produced by a red supergiant star. We produce these shocks by driving a low-Z plasma piston (Be) at > 100 km/s into Xe gas at 1.1 atm. pressure. The shocked Xe collapses to > 20 times its initial density. Measurements of structure by radiography and temperature by several methods confirm that the shock wave is strongly radiative. We observe small-scale perturbations in the post-shock layer, modulating the shock and material interfaces. We describe a variation of the Vishniac instability theory of decelerating shocks and an analysis of associated scaling relations to account for the growth of these perturbations, identify how they scale to astrophysical systems such as SN 1993J, and consider possible future experiments. Collaborators in this work have included H.F. Robey, J.P. Hughes, C.C. Kuranz, C.M. Huntington, S.H. Glenzer, T. Doeppner, D.H. Froula, M.J. Grosskopf, and D.C. Marion ________________________________ * Supported by the US DOE NNSA under the Predictive Sci. Academic Alliance Program by grant DE-FC52-08NA28616, the Stewardship Sci. Academic Alliances program by grant DE-FG52-04NA00064, and the Nat. Laser User Facility by grant DE-FG03-00SF22021.

  9. Recommendations for the management of intracranial haemorrhage - part I: spontaneous intracerebral haemorrhage. The European Stroke Initiative Writing Committee and the Writing Committee for the EUSI Executive Committee.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Steiner, Thorsten; Kaste, Markku; Katse, Markku; Forsting, Michael; Mendelow, David; Kwiecinski, Hubert; Szikora, Istvan; Juvela, Seppo; Marchel, Andrzej; Chapot, René; Cognard, Christophe; Unterberg, Andreas; Hacke, Werner

    2006-01-01

    This article represents the recommendations for the management of spontaneous intracerebral haemorrhage of the European Stroke Initiative (EUSI). These recommendations are endorsed by the 3 European societies which are represented in the EUSI: the European Stroke Council, the European Neurological Society and the European Federation of Neurological Societies.

  10. Postpartum Pyomyoma, a Rare Complication of Sepsis Associated with Chorioamnionitis and Massive Postpartum Haemorrhage Treated with an Intrauterine Balloon

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mandeep Kaler

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available We report the successful treatment of a postpartum pyomyoma, a rare but serious complication of uterine leiomyomata in a 28-year-old primigravida. The patient was treated for an Escherichia Coli (E. Coli urinary tract infection (UTI at 16 weeks of gestation. She had asymptomatic short cervical length on ultrasound scan at 20 weeks that was managed conservatively due to the presence of further UTI and received antibiotics. She was known to have a left sided intramural leiomyoma. She presented with abdominal pain and vaginal bleeding at 23+1 weeks of gestation and the next day she had spontaneous vaginal delivery and collapsed with E. Coli septic shock, massive postpartum haemorrhage, and disseminated intravascular coagulation and was successfully treated with oxytocic drugs, a Rusch intrauterine balloon, and intravenous antibiotics. Eleven days postnatally she re-presented with systemic sepsis and was treated for retained products of conception. Sepsis persisted and investigations showed a postpartum pyomyoma that was initially managed with intravenous antibiotics to avoid surgery. Ultimately she required laparotomy, drainage of pyomyoma, and myomectomy. Postoperative recovery was good and the patient had a successful pregnancy two years later.

  11. Earlier application of percutaneous cardiopulmonary support rescues patients from severe cardiopulmonary failure using the APACHE III scoring system.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Song, Suk-Won; Yang, Hong-Suk; Lee, Sak; Youn, Young-Nam; Yoo, Kyung-Jong

    2009-12-01

    Percutaneous cardiopulmonary support (PCPS) is a widely accepted treatment for severe cardiopulmonary failure. This system, which uses a percutaneous approach and autopriming devices, can be rapidly applied in emergency situations. We sought to identify the risk factors that could help predict in-hospital mortality, and to assess its outcomes in survivors. During a 2-yr period, 50 patients underwent PCPS for the treatment of severe cardiopulmonary failure, and of those, 22 (44%) were classified as survivors and 28 (56%) as non-survivors. We compared the 2 groups for risk factors of in-hospital mortality and to establish proper PCPS timing. Twenty patients underwent PCPS for acute myocardial infarction, 20 for severe cardiopulmonary failure after cardiac surgery, 7 for acute respiratory distress syndrome, and 3 for acute myocarditis. Multivariate analysis showed that an acute physiology, age, and chronic health evaluation (APACHE) III score >or=50 prior to PCPS was the only significant predictor of in-hospital mortality (P=0.001). Overall 18-month survival was 42.2%. Cox analysis showed patients with APACHE III scores >or=50 had a poor prognosis (P=0.001). Earlier application of PCPS, and other preemptive strategies designed to optimize high-risk patients, may improve patient outcomes. Identifying patients with high APACHE scores at the beginning of PCPS may predict in-hospital mortality. Survivors, particularly those with higher APACHE scores, may require more frequent follow-up to improve overall survival.

  12. Fluid therapy monitoring for dengue haemorrhagic fever and other pathologies

    OpenAIRE

    Josà Rubens Costa Lima

    2014-01-01

    Dengue patients that were prematurely hydrated to prevent a dengue hemorrhagic fever (DHF) shock were investigated. These patients had complications and died in strong clinical and epidemiological association with progressive anemias, not caused by hemorrhages, and without presenting laboratorial proof of the specific natural sign of DHF, the hemoconcentration. It was demonstrated that the association between dengue and anemias in Fortaleza is not natural. Further investigation of admitted pa...

  13. Risk factors of post partum haemorrhage in Indonesia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rabea Pangerti Jekti

    2012-07-01

    Full Text Available Latar belakang: Perdarahan post-partum (PPH merupakan salah satu trias klasik penyebab kematian ibu. Studi ini mengevaluasi beberapa faktor risiko PPH, khususnya riwayat antenatal, natal, dan post-natal.Metode: Analisis menggunakan sebagian data dari studi potong lintang Riset Kesehatan Dasar (Riskedas 2010. Subjek yang dipakai unuk analisis ini ialah wanita yang menikah berumur  13-49 tahun dan melahirkan anak terakhir antara 1 Januari 2005 sampai 31 Juli 2010. Perdarahan post-partum berdasarkan konfi rmasi petugas kesehatan tentang telah terjadinya perdarahan dua atau lebih kain (masing-masing 1,5 m selama proses persalinan.Hasil: Pada analisis ini terdpat 601 subjek yang mengalami PPH dan 19.583 subjek tidak mengalami PPH. Eklamsia meningkatkan risiko PPH 3,5 kali (95% interval kepercayaan (CI = 2,53–4,69, ketuban pecah dini meningkatkan risiko PPH 2,2 kali (95% CI = 1,69-2,83, placenta previa meningkatkan risiko PPH 2,1  kali (95% CI = 1,29-3,31. Dibandingkan kehamilan aterm, wanita dengan kehamilan prematur berisiko PPH 82% lebih tinggi (95% CI = 1,33–2,49, sedangkan yang dengan kehamilan post-term berisiko PPH 72% lebih tinggi (95% CI = 1,16–2,57.  Dibandingkan wanita dengan paritas 1-2, risiko PPH pada wanita yang berparitas 3-5 dan 6 atau lebih berturut-turut adalah 24% dan 81% lebih tinggi.Kesimpulan: Eklampsia merupakan faktor risiko PPH terkuat. Placenta previa, ketuban pecah dini, kehamilan prematur atau post-term, serta paritas yang tinggi juga meningkatkan risiko PPH. (Health Science Indones 2011;2:66-70.Abstract Background: Post-partum haemorrhage (PPH is one of the classic triad of causes of maternal death. This analysis aimed to evaluate several risk factors of PPH.Methods: This analysis using a cross-sectional Basic Health Research (Riskesdas 2010 data. For this analysis, the subjects consisted of married women aged 13-49 years, who gave birth of their last child between January 1, 2005 and August 2010

  14. Chronic hypopituitarism is uncommon in survivors of aneurysmal subarachnoid haemorrhage.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hannon, M J; Behan, L A; O'Brien, M M; Tormey, W; Javadpour, M; Sherlock, M; Thompson, C J

    2015-01-01

    The incidence of hypopituitarism after aneurysmal subarachnoid haemorrhage (SAH) is unclear from the conflicting reports in the literature. As routine neuroendocrine screening for hypopituitarism for all patients would be costly and logistically difficult, there is a need for precise data on the frequency of hypopituitarism and on factors which might predict the later development of pituitary dysfunction. We aimed to: (i) Establish the incidence of long-term hypopituitarism in patients with aneurysmal SAH. (ii) Determine whether data from patients' acute admission with SAH could predict the occurrence of long-term hypopituitarism. One hundred patients were studied prospectively from the time of presentation with acute SAH. Plasma cortisol, plasma sodium and a variety of clinical and haemodynamic parameters were sequentially measured for the first 12 days of their acute admission. Forty-one patients then underwent dynamic pituitary testing at median 15 months following SAH (range 7-30 months), with insulin tolerance test (ITT) or, if contraindicated, a glucagon stimulation test (GST) plus short synacthen test (SST). If symptoms of cranial diabetes insipidus (CDI) were present, a water deprivation test was also performed. Forty-one patients attended for follow-up dynamic pituitary testing. Although 14 of 100 had acute glucocorticoid deficiency immediately following SAH, only two of 41 had long-term adrenocorticotrophic hormone (ACTH) deficiency and four of 41 had growth hormone (GH) deficiency. None were hypothyroid or gonadotrophin deficient. None had chronic CDI or hyponatraemia. There was no association between acute glucocorticoid deficiency, acute CDI or acute hyponatraemia and long-term pituitary dysfunction. Both anterior and posterior hypopituitarism are very uncommon following SAH and are not predicted by acute clinical, haemodynamic or endocrinological parameters. Routine neuroendocrine screening is not justified in SAH patients. © 2014 John Wiley & Sons

  15. Focal laminar cortical infarcts following aneurysmal subarachnoid haemorrhage

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Weidauer, Stefan; Lanfermann, Heinrich; Zanella, Friedhelm [University of Frankfurt, Institute of Neuroradiology, Frankfurt (Germany); Vatter, Hartmut; Beck, Juergen; Raabe, Andreas; Seifert, Volker [University of Frankfurt, Department of Neurosurgery, Frankfurt (Germany)

    2008-01-15

    The aim of this prospective study was to analyse small band-like cortical infarcts after subarachnoid haemorrhage (SAH) using magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) with reference to additional digital subtraction angiography (DSA). In a 5-year period between January 2002 and January 2007 10 out of 188 patients with aneurysmal SAH were evaluated (one patient Hunt and Hess grade I, one patient grade II, four patients grade III, two patients grade IV, and two patients grade V). The imaging protocol included serially performed MRI with diffusion- and perfusion-weighted images (DWI/PWI) at three time points after aneurysm treatment, and cerebral vasospasm (CVS) was analysed on follow-up DSA on day 7{+-}3 after SAH. The lesions were located in the frontal lobe (n=10), in the insular cortex (n=3) and in the parietal lobe (n=1). The band-like infarcts occurred after a mean time interval of 5.8 days (range 3-10 days) and showed unexceptional adjacent thick sulcal clots. Seven out of ten patients with cortical infarcts had no or mild CVS, and in the remaining three patients DSA disclosed moderate (n=2) or severe (n=1) CVS. The infarct pattern after aneurysmal SAH includes cortical band-like lesions. In contrast to territorial infarcts or lacunar infarcts in the white matter which develop as a result of moderate or severe proximal and/or distal vasospasm visible on angiography, the cortical band-like lesions adjacent to sulcal clots may also develop without evidence of macroscopic vasospasm, implying a vasospastic reaction of the most distal superficial and intraparenchymal vessels. (orig.)

  16. Intracranial haemorrhage among a population of haemophilic patients in Brazil.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Antunes, S V; Vicari, P; Cavalheiro, S; Bordin, J O

    2003-09-01

    Intracranial haemorrhage (ICH) is a common cause of morbidity and mortality in haemophilic patients. The overall incidence of ICH has been reported to range from 2.2% to 7.5% in patients with haemophilia. From 1987 to 2001, 401 haemophilic patients from the Serviço de Hemofilia, Disciplina de Hematologia e Hemoterapia, Universidade Federal de São Paulo were evaluated. The episodes of ICH were documented by CT scan and the anatomic location, clinical presentation, relationship to trauma and clinical factors, including the presence of HIV infection and the presence of inhibitor, were reviewed. Among 401 haemophilic patients, 45 ICH episodes in 35 (8.7%) patients with age ranging from 4 days to 49 years (mean 10.6 years) were observed. A history of recent trauma was documented in 24 (53.3%) cases. Seventeen (37.8%) episodes occurred in more than one site of bleeding, 12 (26.7%) were subdural, seven (15.5%) subarachnoid, four (8.9%) epidural, two (4.4%) intracerebral and one (2.2%) intraventricular. The most frequent symptoms were headache and drowsiness. All patients were submitted to replacement therapy and neurosurgical intervention was performed in eight (17.8%) patients. Despite the treatment, three (8.6%) haemophilia A patients died due to the ICH event and three presented late sequelae. The most important aspect of ICH management is the early replacement therapy in haemophilic patients. This prompt treatment will increase the chances of a better prognosis. Another impact measure consists in the administration of the deficient coagulation factor after every head trauma, even when considered minor.

  17. DIFFUSIVE SHOCK ACCELERATION AT COSMOLOGICAL SHOCK WAVES

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kang, Hyesung [Department of Earth Sciences, Pusan National University, Pusan 609-735 (Korea, Republic of); Ryu, Dongsu, E-mail: kang@uju.es.pusan.ac.kr, E-mail: ryu@canopus.cnu.ac.kr [Department of Astronomy and Space Science, Chungnam National University, Daejeon 305-764 (Korea, Republic of)

    2013-02-10

    We reexamine nonlinear diffusive shock acceleration (DSA) at cosmological shocks in the large-scale structure of the universe, incorporating wave-particle interactions that are expected to operate in collisionless shocks. Adopting simple phenomenological models for magnetic field amplification (MFA) by cosmic-ray (CR) streaming instabilities and Alfvenic drift, we perform kinetic DSA simulations for a wide range of sonic and Alfvenic Mach numbers and evaluate the CR injection fraction and acceleration efficiency. In our DSA model, the CR acceleration efficiency is determined mainly by the sonic Mach number M{sub s} , while the MFA factor depends on the Alfvenic Mach number and the degree of shock modification by CRs. We show that at strong CR modified shocks, if scattering centers drift with an effective Alfven speed in the amplified magnetic field, the CR energy spectrum is steepened and the acceleration efficiency is reduced significantly, compared to the cases without such effects. As a result, the postshock CR pressure saturates roughly at {approx}20% of the shock ram pressure for strong shocks with M{sub s} {approx}> 10. In the test-particle regime (M{sub s} {approx}< 3), it is expected that the magnetic field is not amplified and the Alfvenic drift effects are insignificant, although relevant plasma physical processes at low Mach number shocks remain largely uncertain.

  18. Cardiopulmonary Exercise Test: Background, Applicability and Interpretation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Herdy, Artur Haddad; Ritt, Luiz Eduardo Fonteles; Stein, Ricardo; Araújo, Claudio Gil Soares de; Milani, Mauricio; Meneghelo, Romeu Sérgio; Ferraz, Almir Sérgio; Hossri, Carlos; Almeida, Antonio Eduardo Monteiro de; Fernandes-Silva, Miguel Morita; Serra, Salvador Manoel

    2016-11-01

    Cardiopulmonary exercise test (CPET) has been gaining importance as a method of functional assessment in Brazil and worldwide. In its most frequent applications, CPET consists in applying a gradually increasing intensity exercise until exhaustion or until the appearance of limiting symptoms and/or signs. The following parameters are measured: ventilation; oxygen consumption (VO2); carbon dioxide production (VCO2); and the other variables of conventional exercise testing. In addition, in specific situations, pulse oximetry and flow-volume loops during and after exertion are measured. The CPET provides joint data analysis that allows complete assessment of the cardiovascular, respiratory, muscular and metabolic systems during exertion, being considered gold standard for cardiorespiratory functional assessment.1-6 The CPET allows defining mechanisms related to low functional capacity that can cause symptoms, such as dyspnea, and correlate them with changes in the cardiovascular, pulmonary and skeletal muscle systems. Furthermore, it can be used to provide the prognostic assessment of patients with heart or lung diseases, and in the preoperative period, in addition to aiding in a more careful exercise prescription to healthy subjects, athletes and patients with heart or lung diseases. Similarly to CPET clinical use, its research also increases, with the publication of several scientific contributions from Brazilian researchers in high-impact journals. Therefore, this study aimed at providing a comprehensive review on the applicability of CPET to different clinical situations, in addition to serving as a practical guide for the interpretation of that test. Resumo O teste cardiopulmonar de exercício (TCPE) vem ganhando importância crescente como método de avaliação funcional tanto no Brasil quanto no Mundo. Nas suas aplicações mais frequentes, o teste consiste em submeter o indivíduo a um exercício de intensidade gradativamente crescente até a exaustão ou o

  19. Streptococcal toxic shock syndrome

    OpenAIRE

    Gvozdenović Ljiljana; Pasternak Janko; Milovanović Stanislav; Ivanov Dejan; Milić Saša

    2010-01-01

    Introduction. Streptococcal toxic shock syndrome is now recognized as a toxin-mediated, multisystem illness. It is characterized by an early onset of shock with multiorgan failure and continues to be associated with high morbidity and mortality, caused by group A Streptococcus pyogenes. The symptoms for staphylococcal and streptococcal toxic shock syndrome are similar. Streptococcal toxic shock syndrome was not well described until 1993, when children who had suffered from varicella pre...

  20. Biomass shock pretreatment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Holtzapple, Mark T.; Madison, Maxine Jones; Ramirez, Rocio Sierra; Deimund, Mark A.; Falls, Matthew; Dunkelman, John J.

    2014-07-01

    Methods and apparatus for treating biomass that may include introducing a biomass to a chamber; exposing the biomass in the chamber to a shock event to produce a shocked biomass; and transferring the shocked biomass from the chamber. In some aspects, the method may include pretreating the biomass with a chemical before introducing the biomass to the chamber and/or after transferring shocked biomass from the chamber.

  1. Effects of hypothermia on blood endogenous endotoxin levels during cardiopulmonary bypass.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gerçekoglu, H; Tarim, O; Agar, I; Korukçu, A; Karabulut, H; Soydemir, H; Sokullu, O; Toklu, H; Johansson, C B; Yigiter, B; Kopman, E

    1997-01-01

    Endotoxin activates white blood cells and complement and produces a spectrum of clinical syndromes ranging from fever to septic shock. Although production of endogenous endotoxemia during cardiopulmonary bypass (CPB) has recently been reported, the role of hypothermia on endotoxemia is not clear. In this study, we evaluated the effects of moderate (24-28 degrees C) and mild (32-34 degrees C) hypothermia on blood endotoxin levels. The study population consisted of 20 patients who underwent coronary artery bypass grafting (CABG) with CPB. Moderate systemic hypothermia was applied during aortic cross-clamping in ten patients (group 1) and mild hypothermia in the remaining ten patients (group 2). The mean rectal temperatures were 26.8 +/- 1.2 degrees C in group 1 and 33.8 +/- 0.8 degrees C in group 2. The blood samples for endotoxin level measurements were obtained before CPB, during aortic cross-clamping, immediately after the release of the cross-clamp, 20 minutes after the release of the cross-clamp, after CPB, and 2 hours postoperatively. There were no endotoxins in any of the samples before CPB, but it was detected after CPB in both groups. The endotoxin levels were significantly higher in group 1 than in group 2. The present study suggests that when hypothermia is the technique of choice, the deleterious effects of endotoxemia on patients with comorbidity must be considered.

  2. Neuroprotective Strategies during Cardiac Surgery with Cardiopulmonary Bypass

    Science.gov (United States)

    Salameh, Aida; Dhein, Stefan; Dähnert, Ingo; Klein, Norbert

    2016-01-01

    Aortocoronary bypass or valve surgery usually require cardiac arrest using cardioplegic solutions. Although, in principle, in a number of cases beating heart surgery (so-called off-pump technique) is possible, aortic or valve surgery or correction of congenital heart diseases mostly require cardiopulmonary arrest. During this condition, the heart-lung machine also named cardiopulmonary bypass (CPB) has to take over the circulation. It is noteworthy that the invention of a machine bypassing the heart and lungs enabled complex cardiac operations, but possible negative effects of the CPB on other organs, especially the brain, cannot be neglected. Thus, neuroprotection during CPB is still a matter of great interest. In this review, we will describe the impact of CPB on the brain and focus on pharmacological and non-pharmacological strategies to protect the brain. PMID:27879647

  3. [Virtual educational proposal in cardiopulmonary resuscitation for the neonate care].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gonçalves, Gilciane Ribeiro; Peres, Heloisa Helena Ciqueto; Rodrigues, Rita de Cássia; Tronchin, Daisy Maria Rizatto; Pereira, Irene Mari

    2010-06-01

    The purpose of this study was to develop an educational proposal using virtual multimedia resources, to innovate, stimulate and diversify areas of communication and interaction, facilitating nurses' autonomous and reflexive process of teaching and learning. This is an applied research, following the cyclical and interactive phases of designing, planning, developing and implementing. The educational proposal was developed on the TelEduc platform, using specific tools for content organization and communication between students and administrator. The teaching modules were on the following themes: Module 1--Fundamentals of the heart anatomy and physiology in newborns; Module 2--Risk factors for the occurrence of cardiorespiratory arrest in newborns; Module 3--Planning nursing care; Module 4--Medications used in cardiopulmonary arrests in newborns; and Module 5--Cardiorespiratory arrest care in newborns. This study may contribute to innovating teaching in nursing from a virtual educational proposal on the important issue of newborn cardiopulmonary resuscitation care.

  4. Dobutamine for inotropic support during emergence from cardiopulmonary bypass.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tinker, J H; Tarhan, S; White, R D; Pluth, J R; Barnhorst, D A

    1976-04-01

    Dobutamine, a recently introduced derivative of dopamine, is reported to retain inotropic properties with less pronounced chronotropic and arrhythmogenic effects than isoproterenol. The drug was evaluated in two doses, 5 mug/kg/min and 10 mug/kg/min, in two groups of ten patients each, during emergence from cardiopulmonary bypass. A third group of five patients was studied similarly with isoproterenol, 0.02 mug/kg/min. Cardiac index increased 16 and 28 per cent eith the two doses of dobutamine, respectively, and 9 per cent with isoproterenol. Heart rate, in contrast, increased 6 and 15 per cent with dobutamine (not significant) and 44 per cent with isoproterenol (significant). Dobutamine seemed to associated with fewer arrhythmias than isoproterenol. It is concluded that dobutamine, 5-10 mug/kg/min, is suitable for use during emergence from cardiopulmonary bypass and may possess advantages over isoproterenol.

  5. Role of cardiopulmonary mechanoreceptors in the postural regulation of renin

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sanchez, R.A.; Marco, E.J.; Oliveri, C.; Otero, F.J.; Degrossi, O.; Moledo, L.I.; Julius, S.

    1987-04-01

    To change the stretch on cardiopulmonary mechanoreceptors, large shifts of blood in the capacity space were elicited by tilting and by exerting positive lower body pressure in the tilted position. Twelve volunteers underwent invasive hemodynamic studies and in 10 other subjects cardiac size was determined by radionuclide cardiography. In all 22 subjects tilting caused the expected increase of renin, which was abolished by lower body compression. Decompression caused renin to increase again. Right atrial pressure in invasive studies and end-systolic and end-diastolic counts in noninvasive studies showed a significant and strong negative correlation with renin and norepinephrine levels. Thus, the degree of stretch of the cardiopulmonary mechanoreceptors is a major determinant of reflex regulation of renin release in humans.

  6. Adrenal haemorrhage with cholestasis and adrenal crisis in a newborn of a diabetic mother.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Koklu, Esad; Kurtoglu, Selim; Akcakus, Mustafa; Koklu, Selmin

    2007-03-01

    The large hyperaemic foetal adrenal gland is vulnerable to vascular damage. This may occur in the neonatal period as a consequence of difficult labour, or its aetiology may not be apparent. The spectrum of presentation is considerable, ranging from asymptomatic to severe life-threatening intra-abdominal haemorrhage. The presentation of adrenal insufficiency may be delayed but the regenerative capacity of the adrenal is great, and most adrenal haemorrhage is not associated with significantly impaired function. Some reports showed that cholestatic hepatopathy with congenital hypopituitarism reversed by hydrocortisone treatment is considered in the context of the endocrine syndrome, probably as a consequence of the adrenal failure. We describe a case of bilateral adrenal haemorrhage with hepatitis syndrome and persistent hypoglycaemia in a newborn male with striking features of neonatal cholestasis and adrenal crisis.

  7. Chronic Myeloid Leukaemia Presenting as Bilateral Retinal Haemorrhages with Multiple Retinal Infiltrates.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rane, Priyanka Ramkrishna; Barot, Rakesh K; Gohel, Devadatta Jayantilal; Bhagat, Nupur

    2016-05-01

    Chronic Myeloid Leukaemia (CML) causes retinopathy manifesting as venous dilation and tortuosity, perivascular sheathing, retinal haemorrhages, microaneurysms, cotton-wool spots and optic nerve infiltration. Retina is the most commonly involved intraocular structure in CML. However, retinal involvement is a rare form of presentation of CML and few cases have been reported. We report a case of CML presenting as unilateral sudden visual loss. Fundus showed multiple white centered retinal haemorrhages in both eyes with unilateral macular oedema. Blood work-up showed raised WBC count, high platelet count and low Haemoglobin. Cytological analysis of bone marrow biopsy confirmed Philadelphia chromosome. After a course of Imatinib, visual acuity improved and haemorrhages resolved with normalization of macular thickness. In our case, patient presented early, leading to early detection producing better visual prognosis. This highlights the importance of detailed hematological work up in patients with retinal involvement to rule out leukaemic retinopathy.

  8. Clinical Practice Guidelines for Cardiopulmonary and Cerebral Resuscitation.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Victor Rene Navarro Machado

    2009-03-01

    Full Text Available Clinical Practice Guidelines for Cardiopulmonary and Cerebral Resuscitation. It is the group of procedures that should be accomplished to restore circulation and ventilation in a patient with cardiac arrest, including actions to reintegrate upper neurological functions after restoring cardiac function. This document includes a review of concepts, aetiology and updates the main clinical aspects related with diagnosis and treatment aimed at the post-resuscitation syndrome. It includes assessment guidelines focused on the most important aspects to be accomplished.

  9. Estimation of cerebral blood flow during cardiopulmonary resuscitation in humans

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Christensen, S F; Stadeager, Carsten Preben; Siemkowicz, E

    1990-01-01

    /kg/min). The cortical CBF was found between 14 and 211 ml 100 g-1.min-1 with mean 42 ml 100 g-1.min-1 and mean white matter CBF equal to 27 ml 100 g-1.min-1. It is suggested that the external cardiac massage in humans may be of poor efficacy in terms of brain revival. Cortical CBF after long-lasting cardiopulmonary...

  10. Family presence during cardiopulmonary resuscitation and invasive procedures in children

    OpenAIRE

    Ferreira, Cristiana Araujo G.; Flavia Simphronio Balbino; Balieiro,Maria Magda F. G.; Myriam Aparecida Mandetta

    2014-01-01

    Objective:To identify literature evidences related to actions to promote family's presence during cardiopulmonary resuscitation and invasive procedures in children hospitalized in pediatric and neonatal critical care units.Data sources : Integrative literature review in PubMed, SciELO and Lilacs databases, from 2002 to 2012, with the following inclusion criteria: research article in Medicine, or Nursing, published in Portuguese, English or Spanish, using the keywords family, invasive procedur...

  11. Simulating radiative shocks in nozzle shock tubes

    Science.gov (United States)

    van der Holst, B.; Tóth, G.; Sokolov, I. V.; Daldorff, L. K. S.; Powell, K. G.; Drake, R. P.

    2012-06-01

    We use the recently developed Center for Radiative Shock Hydrodynamics (CRASH) code to numerically simulate laser-driven radiative shock experiments. These shocks are launched by an ablated beryllium disk and are driven down xenon-filled plastic tubes. The simulations are initialized by the two-dimensional version of the Lagrangian Hyades code which is used to evaluate the laser energy deposition during the first 1.1 ns. Later times are calculated with the CRASH code. CRASH solves for the multi-material hydrodynamics with separate electron and ion temperatures on an Eulerian block-adaptive-mesh and includes a multi-group flux-limited radiation diffusion and electron thermal heat conduction. The goal of the present paper is to demonstrate the capability to simulate radiative shocks of essentially three-dimensional experimental configurations, such as circular and elliptical nozzles. We show that the compound shock structure of the primary and wall shock is captured and verify that the shock properties are consistent with order-of-magnitude estimates. The synthetic radiographs produced can be used for comparison with future nozzle experiments at high-energy-density laser facilities.

  12. Simulating radiative shocks in nozzle shock tubes

    CERN Document Server

    van der Holst, B; Sokolov, I V; Daldorff, L K S; Powell, K G; Drake, R P

    2011-01-01

    We use the recently developed Center for Radiative Shock Hydrodynamics (CRASH) code to numerically simulate laser-driven radiative shock experiments. These shocks are launched by an ablated beryllium disk and are driven down xenon-filled plastic tubes. The simulations are initialized by the two-dimensional version of the Lagrangian Hyades code which is used to evaluate the laser energy deposition during the first 1.1ns. The later times are calculated with the CRASH code. This code solves for the multi-material hydrodynamics with separate electron and ion temperatures on an Eulerian block-adaptive-mesh and includes a multi-group flux-limited radiation diffusion and electron thermal heat conduction. The goal of the present paper is to demonstrate the capability to simulate radiative shocks of essentially three-dimensional experimental configurations, such as circular and elliptical nozzles. We show that the compound shock structure of the primary and wall shock is captured and verify that the shock properties a...

  13. Comparative distribution of petechial haemorrhages as a function of aircraft cockpit geometry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Whinnery, J E

    1987-07-01

    One of the stresses to which aircrew are subjected in a modern highly manoeuvrable military aircraft is produced by high-speed turns; the resultant elevated G forces may cause petechial haemorrhages, particularly in the lower limbs. Since an aeroplane is an inconvenient laboratory, the mechanisms responsible for these haemorrhages are best investigated by elevated G forces produced in a human centrifuge on the ground, where a similar stress produces the same kind of haemorrhage. Such physical stimuli are in effect a modification of the normal terrestrial gravitational force (a force which under normal conditions is assumed to be +1 G) acting in a + Gz (head to foot) direction. The distribution of petechial haemorrhages is determined by a number of factors, including cockpit configuration. Differences in the distribution of petechial haemorrhages in the F-15 and F-16 aircraft (12 degrees tilt-back seat and 30 degrees tilt-back seat with elevation of the heel, respectively) lend an insight into those body areas where there is inadequate protection. The phenomenon usually begins to develop in healthy individuals at approximately +5 Gz (head to foot), with virtually everyone having petechial haemorrhages at +9 Gz. The kinetics of +Gz -induced petechiasis is interesting, because individuals develop an acclimatized resistance to these formations, whose exact aetiology is unknown; whether or not the petechiae are due to rupture of susceptible capillaries or to diapedesis is also unknown. Stasis and pooling of blood in the lower limbs play a specific role in the petechial formation; it is not only the +Gz stress, but also the protective equipment and techniques which determine the extent and magnitude of the petechiasis.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS)

  14. Endoglin, a TGF-β binding protein of endothelial cells, is the gene for hereditary haemorrhagic telangiectasia type 1

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    K.A. McAllister (K.); K.M. Grogg (K.); D.W. Johnson (D.); C.J. Gallione (C.); P.J. Baldwin (Peter); C.E. Jackson (C.); E.A. Helmbold (E.); D.S. Markel (D.); W. McKinnon; J.R. Murrell (Jill); J.A. McCormick (James); M.A. Pericak-Vance (Margaret); P. Heutink (Peter); B.A. Oostra (Ben); T. Haitjema (T.); C.J.J. Westerman (C. J J); M.E. Porteous (Mary); A.E. Guttmacher (A.); M. Letarte (M.); D.A. Marchuk (D.)

    1994-01-01

    textabstractHereditary haemorrhagic telangiectasia (HHT) is an autosomal dominant disorder characterized by multisystemic vascular dysplasia and recurrent haemorrhage. Linkage for some families has been established to chromosome 9q33−q34. In the present study, endoglin, a transforming growth factor

  15. Epistaxis and other haemorrhagic events associated with the smoking cessation medicine varenicline : a case series from two national pharmacovigilance centres

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Harrison-Woolrych, Mira; Harmark, Linda; Tan, Ming; Maggo, Simran; van Grootheest, Kees

    2012-01-01

    Purpose To present a case series of haemorrhagic events associated with varenicline identified from the New Zealand (NZ) and Netherlands national pharmacovigilance centres and propose a possible mechanism for these adverse events. Methods Reports of epistaxis and other haemorrhagic events (in all sy

  16. Prevalence of pulmonary arteriovenous malformations (PAVMs) and occurrence of neurological symptoms in patients with hereditary haemorrhagic telangiectasia (HHT)

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kjeldsen, A D; Oxhøj, H; Andersen, P E;

    2000-01-01

    Hereditary haemorrhagic telangiectasia (HHT) is a dominantly inherited disease. HHT is characterized by a wide variety of clinical manifestations, including pulmonary arteriovenous malformations (PAVMs) and neurological symptoms.......Hereditary haemorrhagic telangiectasia (HHT) is a dominantly inherited disease. HHT is characterized by a wide variety of clinical manifestations, including pulmonary arteriovenous malformations (PAVMs) and neurological symptoms....

  17. Toll-like receptor-4 agonist in post-haemorrhage pneumonia: role of dendritic and natural killer cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roquilly, Antoine; Broquet, Alexis; Jacqueline, Cedric; Gautreau, Laetitia; Segain, Jean Pierre; de Coppet, Pierre; Caillon, Jocelyne; Altare, Frédéric; Josien, Regis; Asehnoune, Karim

    2013-11-01

    Haemorrhage-induced immunosuppression has been linked to nosocomial infections. We assessed the impact of monophosphoryl lipid A, a Toll/interleukin-1 receptor-domain-containing adaptor protein inducing interferon-biased Toll-like receptor-4 agonist currently used as a vaccine adjuvant in humans, on post-haemorrhage susceptibility to infection. We used a mouse model of post-haemorrhage pneumonia induced by methicillin-susceptible Staphylococcus aureus. Monophosphoryl lipid A was administered intravenously after haemorrhage and before pneumonia onset. Haemorrhage altered survival rate, increased lung damage (neutrophil accumulation, oedema and cytokine release) and altered the functions of dendritic and natural killer cells. Here, we show that monophosphoryl lipid A decreased systemic dissemination of S. aureus and dampened inflammatory lung lesions. Monophosphoryl lipid A partially restored the capacity for antigen presentation and the transcriptional activity in dendritic cells. Monophosphoryl lipid A did not restore the interferon-γ mRNA but prevented interleukin-10 mRNA overexpression in natural killer cells compared with untreated mice. Ex vivo monophosphoryl lipid A-stimulated dendritic cells or natural killer cells harvested from haemorrhaged animals were adoptively transferred into mice undergoing post-haemorrhage pneumonia. Stimulated dendritic cells (but not stimulated natural killer cells) improved the survival rate compared with mice left untreated. In vivo depletion of natural killer cells decreased survival rate of monophosphoryl lipid A-treated mice. Dendritic and natural killer cells are critically involved in the beneficial effects of monophosphoryl lipid A within post-haemorrhage pneumonia.

  18. Hormonal and metabolic responses of fetal lamb during cardiopulmonary bypass

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    苏肇伉; 周成斌; 张海波; 祝忠群

    2003-01-01

    Objective To study the hormonal and metabolic responses of fetal lamb during cardiopulmonary bypass.Methods Six pregnant ewes underwent fetal cardiopulmonary bypasses with artificial oxygenators and roller pumps for 30 minutes, which maintained the blood gas value at the fetal physiological level. The fetal blood pressure, heart rate, pH value and blood lactate levels were monitored. The levels of catecholamine, cortisol and insulin were measured pre-bypass and then again 30 minutes later. The blood glucose and free fatty acid levels were monitored continuously during the bypass. Fetal hepatic PAS staining was also carried out.Results There were no changes before and during the bypass in fetal blood pressure, heart rate and blood gas. However, pH values decreased and blood lactate levels increased (P<0.05). The fetal catecholamine and cortisol levels increased significantly (P<0.01), while the levels of insulin did not change. The blood glucose and free fatty acid levels increased at the beginning of the bypass (P<0.01), and then gradually slowed down during the bypass. The fetal hepatic PAS staining showed that hepatic glycogen was consumed in large amounts. After 30 minutes of bypass, the fetal lamb would not survive more than 1 hour.Conclusion The fetal lamb has a strong negative reaction to cardiopulmonary bypass.

  19. Cardiopulmonary resuscitation and contrast media reactions in a radiology department

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    O' Neill, John M.; McBride, Kieran D

    2001-04-01

    AIM: To assess current knowledge and training in the management of contrast media reactions and cardiopulmonary resuscitation within a radiology department. MATERIALS AND METHODS: The standard of knowledge about the management of contrast media reactions and cardiopulmonary resuscitation among radiologists, radiographers and nurses were audited using a two-section questionnaire. Our results were compared against nationally accepted standards. Repeat audits were undertaken over a 28-month period. Three full audit cycles were completed. RESULTS: The initial audit confirmed that although a voluntary training programme was in place, knowledge of cardiopulmonary resuscitation techniques were below acceptable levels (set at 70%) for all staff members. The mean score for radiologists was 50%. Immediate changes instituted included retraining courses, the distribution of standard guidelines and the composition and distribution of two separate information handouts. Initial improvements were complemented by new wallcharts, which were distributed throughout the department, a series of lectures on management of contrast reactions and regular reviews with feedback to staff. In the third and final audit all staff groups had surpassed the required standard. CONCLUSION: Knowledge of contrast media reactions and resuscitation needs constant updating. Revision of skills requires a prescriptive programme; visual display of advice is a constant reminder. It is our contention all radiology departmental staff should consider it a personal duty to maintain their resuscitation skills at appropriate standards. O'Neill, J.M., McBride, K.D.(2001). Clinical Radiology 00, 000-000.

  20. Predictive values for cardiopulmonary exercise testing in sedentary Chinese adults.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ong, Kian Chung; Loo, Chian Min; Ong, Yong Yau; Chan, Siew Pang; Earnest, Arul; Saw, Seang Mei

    2002-09-01

    Normative data for cardiopulmonary exercise testing (CPET) may vary among subjects of different races. The objectives of the present study were to: (i) establish normal standards for cardiopulmonary responses during incremental cycle ergometer testing in order to derive predictive equations for clinically useful variables during CPET of Chinese subjects; and (ii) determine the validity of existing prediction equations of maximal exercise performance for use in our local Chinese population. The maximal and submaximal cardiopulmonary responses were analysed for 95 healthy sedentary adult Chinese subjects (48 men and 47 women; aged 20-70 years) who underwent CPET using a cycle ergometer and an incremental work-rate protocol until symptom limitation. Measurements, at maximal exercise, of oxygen uptake (VO2(max)), power output and heart rate were regressed on age, height, weight and gender. The predictive equations for these exercise parameters performed better than those published previously in out-sample predictive accuracy. Comparison with previous studies also showed that prediction equations of VO2(max) derived from studies based predominantly or exclusively on Caucasian populations overestimated the actual values for our subjects. Previously established prediction equations for maximal exercise performance during CPET based on non-Chinese populations may not be applicable to Chinese subjects in our population.

  1. Cardiopulmonary Exercise Capacity and Preoperative Markers of Inflammation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pervez Sultan

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Explanatory mechanisms for the association between poor exercise capacity and infections following surgery are underexplored. We hypothesized that aerobic fitness—assessed by cardiopulmonary exercise testing (CPET—would be associated with circulating inflammatory markers, as quantified by the neutrophil-lymphocyte ratio (NLR and monocyte subsets. The association between cardiopulmonary reserve and inflammation was tested by multivariable regression analysis with covariates including anaerobic threshold (AT and malignancy. In a first cohort of 240 colorectal patients, AT was identified as the sole factor associated with higher NLR (P=0.03 and absolute and relative lymphopenia (P=0.01. Preoperative leukocyte subsets and monocyte CD14+ expression (downregulated by endotoxin and indicative of chronic inflammation were also assessed in two further cohorts of age-matched elective gastrointestinal and orthopaedic surgical patients. Monocyte CD14+ expression was lower in gastrointestinal patients (n=43 compared to age-matched orthopaedic patients (n=31. The circulating CD14+CD16− monocyte subset was reduced in patients with low cardiopulmonary reserve. Poor exercise capacity in patients without a diagnosis of heart failure is independently associated with markers of inflammation. These observations suggest that preoperative inflammation associated with impaired cardiorespiratory performance may contribute to the pathophysiology of postoperative outcome.

  2. Uncontrolled haemorrhage in pelvic fractures-Can the inevitable be avoided?

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Rajesh Thiyam; Rajesh Lalchandani; Sambit Satyaprakash; Neeraj Godara

    2016-01-01

    Pelvic fractures carry a considerable risk for morbidity and mortality.Half or more of the early deaths in these patients have been attributed directly to haemorrhage.The transfusional requirements are four times higher for open pelvic fractures compared with a similar group of closed pelvic fractures.The loss of the tamponade effect by disruption of the pelvic soft tissues and the energy imparted play a central role in this potentially life threatening situation.We reported a case of open pelvic fracture in which persistent haemorrhage was stopped by giving recombinant activated coagulation factor Ⅶa as our last resort.

  3. Trade practices are main factors involved in the transmission of viral haemorrhagic septicaemia

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Reichert, M.; Matras, M.; Skall, Helle Frank;

    2013-01-01

    Viral haemorrhagic septicaemia (VHS), caused by the novirhabdovirus viral haemorrhagic septicaemia virus (VHSV), causes significant economic problems to European rainbow trout, Oncorhynchus mykiss (Walbaum), production. The virus isolates can be divided into four distinct genotypes with additional...... outbreaks in the southern part of Poland, while Pol II isolates predominantly were sampled in the north of Poland, although it seems that they have been transmitted to other parts of the country. Molecular epidemiology was used for characterization of transmission pathways. This study shows that a main...... cause of virus transmission appears to be movement of fish. At least in Polish circumstances trading practices appear to have significant impact on spreading of VHSV infection....

  4. Progressive post traumatic tearing of an arachnoid cyst membrane resulting in intracystic and subdural haemorrhage.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pascoe, Heather M; Phal, Pramit M; King, James A J

    2015-05-01

    We report the case of a 43-year-old man with a middle cranial fossa arachnoid cyst who presented post trauma with neurological symptoms. The initial CT scan of the brain did not detect acute changes in the arachnoid cyst but subsequent imaging revealed abnormalities which progressed over time. Arachnoid cysts are usually a benign and incidental finding. Rare complications such as intracystic haemorrhage and subdural haemorrhage can occur. It is important to be aware of these complications so that patients with arachnoid cysts are appropriately investigated when presenting with neurological symptoms.

  5. Identifying potential virulence determinants in viral haemorrhagic septicaemia virus (VHSV) for rainbow trout

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Campbell, Scott; Collet, Bertrand; Einer-Jensen, Katja

    2009-01-01

    We identified viral haemorrhagic septicaemia virus (VHSV) isolates classified within Genotype Ib which are genetically similar (>99.4% glycoprotein amino acid identity) yet, based on their isolation history, were suspected to differ in virulence in juvenile rainbow trout. The virulence of an isol......We identified viral haemorrhagic septicaemia virus (VHSV) isolates classified within Genotype Ib which are genetically similar (>99.4% glycoprotein amino acid identity) yet, based on their isolation history, were suspected to differ in virulence in juvenile rainbow trout. The virulence...... the same experimental infection routes (...

  6. Practical management for urgent reversal of oral anticoagulation in patients with acute intracerebral haemorrhage

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Davide Imberti

    2011-08-01

    Full Text Available In case of intracerebral haemorrhage (ICH during oral anticoagulant therapy (OAT it is mandatory to obtain the fast and complete normalisation of haemostasis, in order to minimise the risk of haematoma enlargement. Furthermore, if neurosurgery is requested, the immediate correction of haemostatic balance allows the execution of emergency intervention, thus reducing the risk of intra- and post-surgical haemorrhagic complications. Currently prothrombin complex concentrate (PCC in combination with vitamin K represents the gold standard treatment for patients with ICH during OAT. This treatment should be preferred to the administration of fresh frozen plasma (FFP in order to guarantee a fast and almost immediate normalisation of blood coagulation.

  7. Novel bivalent vectored vaccine for control of myxomatosis and rabbit haemorrhagic disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Spibey, N; McCabe, V J; Greenwood, N M; Jack, S C; Sutton, D; van der Waart, L

    2012-03-24

    A novel, recombinant myxoma virus-rabbit haemorrhagic disease virus (RHDV) vaccine has been developed for the prevention of myxomatosis and rabbit haemorrhagic disease (RHD). A number of laboratory studies are described illustrating the safety and efficacy of the vaccine following subcutaneous administration in laboratory rabbits from four weeks of age onwards. In these studies, both vaccinated and unvaccinated control rabbits were challenged using pathogenic strains of RHD and myxoma viruses, and 100 per cent of the vaccinated rabbits were protected against both myxomatosis and RHD.

  8. Calcific haemorrhagic bursitis anterior to the knee mimicking a soft tissue sarcoma: report of two cases

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Stahnke, M.; Davies, A.M. [Department of Radiology, Royal Orthopaedic Hospital, Woodlands, B31 2AP, Northfield, Birmingham (United Kingdom); Mangham, D.C. [Department of Pathology, Royal Orthopaedic Hospital, Woodlands, B31 2AP, Northfield, Birmingham (United Kingdom)

    2004-06-01

    We describe the radiological and pathological findings of two cases of calcific haemorrhagic bursitis, one involving the superficial infrapatellar bursa and the other the prepatellar bursa. It was the presence of dystrophic calcification within the lesion that suggested a mineralizing soft tissue sarcoma such as synovial sarcoma. As the radiographic and MR features of the two conditions can be similar but the appropriate management very different, rare calcifying haemorrhagic bursitis needs to be included in the differential diagnosis of masses adjacent to the knee joint showing calcification. (orig.)

  9. When Shock Waves Collide

    CERN Document Server

    Hartigan, P; Frank, A; Hansen, E; Yirak, K; Liao, A S; Graham, P; Wilde, B; Blue, B; Martinez, D; Rosen, P; Farley, D; Paguio, R

    2016-01-01

    Supersonic outflows from objects as varied as stellar jets, massive stars and novae often exhibit multiple shock waves that overlap one another. When the intersection angle between two shock waves exceeds a critical value, the system reconfigures its geometry to create a normal shock known as a Mach stem where the shocks meet. Mach stems are important for interpreting emission-line images of shocked gas because a normal shock produces higher postshock temperatures and therefore a higher-excitation spectrum than an oblique one does. In this paper we summarize the results of a series of numerical simulations and laboratory experiments designed to quantify how Mach stems behave in supersonic plasmas that are the norm in astrophysical flows. The experiments test analytical predictions for critical angles where Mach stems should form, and quantify how Mach stems grow and decay as intersection angles between the incident shock and a surface change. While small Mach stems are destroyed by surface irregularities and ...

  10. Modern recommendations on children’s baseline cardiopulmonary resuscitation (BLS 2010

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    R.F. Tepaev

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available The main reason for children’s and adolescents’ mortality in Russia is external causes, such as injuries, poisonings, drownings and road traffic collisions. Many of the external causes may be prevented. Besides, the popularization of modern baseline cardiopulmonary resuscitation methods is one the methods of mortality reduction in children on the pre-hospital stage. The article gives children’s baseline cardiopulmonary resuscitation basics recommended by the American Heart Association.Key words: cardiopulmonary resuscitation, children, adolescents.

  11. Interhospital Transport of Children Undergoing Cardiopulmonary Resuscitation: A Practical and Ethical Dilemma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Noje, Corina; Fishe, Jennifer N; Costabile, Philomena M; Klein, Bruce L; Hunt, Elizabeth A; Pronovost, Peter J

    2017-10-01

    To discuss risks and benefits of interhospital transport of children in cardiac arrest undergoing cardiopulmonary resuscitation. Narrative review. Not applicable. Transporting children in cardiac arrest with ongoing cardiopulmonary resuscitation between hospitals is potentially lifesaving if it enables access to resources such as extracorporeal support, but may risk transport personnel safety. Research is needed to optimize outcomes of patients transported with ongoing cardiopulmonary resuscitation and reduce risks to the staff caring for them.

  12. Management of Anesthesia under Extracorporeal Cardiopulmonary Support in an Infant with Severe Subglottic Stenosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Soeda, Rie; Taniguchi, Fumika; Sawada, Maiko; Hamaoka, Saeko; Shibasaki, Masayuki; Nakajima, Yasufumi; Hashimoto, Satoru; Sawa, Teiji; Nakayama, Yoshinobu

    2016-01-01

    A 4-month-old female infant who weighed 3.57 kg with severe subglottic stenosis underwent tracheostomy under extracorporeal cardiopulmonary support. First, we set up extracorporeal cardiopulmonary support to the infant and then successfully intubated an endotracheal tube with a 2.5 mm inner diameter before tracheostomy by otolaryngologists. Extracorporeal cardiopulmonary support is an alternative for maintenance of oxygenation in difficult airway management in infants.

  13. Management of Anesthesia under Extracorporeal Cardiopulmonary Support in an Infant with Severe Subglottic Stenosis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rie Soeda

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available A 4-month-old female infant who weighed 3.57 kg with severe subglottic stenosis underwent tracheostomy under extracorporeal cardiopulmonary support. First, we set up extracorporeal cardiopulmonary support to the infant and then successfully intubated an endotracheal tube with a 2.5 mm inner diameter before tracheostomy by otolaryngologists. Extracorporeal cardiopulmonary support is an alternative for maintenance of oxygenation in difficult airway management in infants.

  14. Novel blood sampling method of an artificial endocrine pancreas via the cardiopulmonary bypass circuit.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kawahito, Shinji; Higuchi, Seiichi; Mita, Naoji; Kitagawa, Tetsuya; Kitahata, Hiroshi

    2013-12-01

    We tried to perform continuous blood glucose monitoring during cardiovascular surgery involving cardiopulmonary bypass using an artificial endocrine pancreas (STG-22 or -55; Nikkiso, Tokyo, Japan); however, we often encountered problems during these procedures because insufficient blood was obtained for monitoring. Thus, we started performing the blood sampling via the venous side of the cardiopulmonary bypass circuit. As a result, continuous blood glucose monitoring using an artificial endocrine pancreas was proven to be stable and reliable during cardiovascular surgery involving cardiopulmonary bypass.

  15. Early Fluid Resuscitation and High Volume Hemofiltration Decrease Septic Shock Progression in Swine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhao, Ping; Zheng, Ruiqiang; Xue, Lu; Zhang, Min; Wu, Xiaoyan

    2015-01-01

    This study aimed to assess the effects of early fluid resuscitation (EFR) combined with high volume hemofiltration (HVHF) on the cardiopulmonary function and removal of inflammatory mediators in a septic shock swine model. Eighteen swine were randomized into three groups: control (n = 6) (extracorporeal circulating blood only), continuous renal replacement therapy (CRRT) (n = 6; ultrafiltration volume = 25 mL/Kg/h), and HVHF (n = 6; ultrafiltration volume = 85 mL/Kg/h). The septic shock model was established by intravenous infusion of lipopolysaccharides (50 µg/kg/h). Hemodynamic parameters (arterial pressure, heart rate, cardiac output, stroke volume variability, left ventricular contractility, systemic vascular resistance, and central venous pressure), vasoactive drug parameters (dose and time of norepinephrine and hourly fluid intake), pulmonary function (partial oxygen pressure and vascular permeability), and cytokines (interleukin-6 and interleukin-10) were observed. Treatment resulted in significant changes at 4-6 h. HVHF was beneficial, as shown by the dose of vasoactive drugs, fluid intake volume, left ventricular contractility index, and partial oxygen pressure. Both CRRT and HVHF groups showed improved removal of inflammatory mediators compared with controls. In conclusion, EFR combined with HVHF improved septic shock in this swine model. The combination decreased shock progression, reduced the need for vasoactive drugs, and alleviated the damage to cardiopulmonary functions.

  16. Impact of cerebral cardiopulmonary resuscitation maneuvers in a general hospital: prognostic factors and outcomes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bartholomay Eduardo

    2003-01-01

    Full Text Available OBJECTIVE: To assess survival of patients undergoing cerebral cardiopulmonary resuscitation maneuvers and to identify prognostic factors for short-term survival. METHODS: Prospective study with patients undergoing cardiopulmonary resuscitation maneuvers. RESULTS: The study included 150 patients. Spontaneous circulation was re-established in 88 (58% patients, and 42 (28% were discharged from the hospital. The necessary number of patients treated to save 1 life in 12 months was 3.4. The presence of ventricular fibrillation or tachycardia (VF/VT as the initial rhythm, shorter times of cardiopulmonary resuscitation maneuvers and cardiopulmonary arrest, and greater values of mean blood pressure (BP prior to cardiopulmonary arrest were independent variables for re-establishment of spontaneous circulation and hospital discharge. The odds ratios for hospital discharge were as follows: 6.1 (95% confidence interval [CI] = 2.7-13.6, when the initial rhythm was VF/VT; 9.4 (95% CI = 4.1-21.3, when the time of cerebral cardiopulmonary resuscitation was 70 mmHg. CONCLUSION: The presence of VF/VT as the initial rhythm, shorter times of cerebral cardiopulmonary resuscitation and of cardiopulmonary arrest, and a greater value of BP prior to cardiopulmonary arrest were independent variables of better prognosis.

  17. Recurrence of Ventricular Fibrillation after Successful Conversion, May be Associated with Immediate Post-Shock Chest Compressions: A Case Report

    OpenAIRE

    Shiyovich, Arthur; Gerovich, Alexander; Katz, Amos

    2013-01-01

    Aims: Since 2005, cardiopulmonary resuscitation (CPR) guidelines advise immediately resuming CPR after a defibrillation shock to minimize CPR interruption. During resuscitation, the incidence of ventricular fibrillation (VF) recurrence is as high as 79%. The aim of this report is to present a case of VF recurrence induced by chest compressions (CCs) following successful defibrillation of VF and to discuss the possible mechanisms that could be linked to this observation. Case Presentation: A 5...

  18. Cardiopulmonary resuscitation in the elderly: analysis of the events in the emergency department

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Augusto Tricerri

    2013-10-01

    Full Text Available With the increasing number of old people in all western countries and increasing life expectancy at birth, many seniors spend the last period of their life with various afflictions that may lead to cardiac arrest. Bystander cardiopulmonary resuscitation (CPR increases survival rates. Octogenarians are the fastest growing segment of the population and despite empirical evidence that CPR is of questionable effectiveness in seniors with comorbidities, it is still the only treatment among life-sustaining ones. Cardiopulmonary resuscitation is frequently unsuccessful, but if survival is achieved, a fairly good quality of life can be expected. Various papers analyzed the effect of CPR in hospitalized patients or in cardiac arrest occurring at home or in public places, while less is known about events occurring in the emergency room (ER. We performed a retrospective analysis of cardiac arrest events occurred in ER within 54 months: we analyzed 415,001 records of ER visits (from 01/01/1999 to 30/06/2003 in San Giovanni Addolorata Hospital. Data were analyzed in terms of age and outcome. We identified 475 records with the outcome of death in ER or death on arrival. Out of them, we selected 290 medical records which had sufficient data to be analyzed. Of the 290 patients evaluated, 225 died in ER, 18 were deemed to die on arrival, and 47 survived the cardiac arrest and were admitted to intensive care unit (ICU. The overall mortality was 0.11%, while the incidence of the selected events was 0.072%. The mean age of the analyzed population was 71.3 years. The only possible diagnosis was often cardiac arrest, though most of the times we could specify and group the diagnosis even better. The analysis of the procedures showed that cardiac arrest treated by direct current (DC shock was similarly distributed in different age groups, and no difference was detectable between the two groups. The mean age of the patients who underwent tracheal intubation (TI was

  19. European survey on laboratory preparedness, response and diagnostic capacity for crimean-congo haemorrhagic fever, 2012

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    M.D. Fernandez-Garcia (Maria Dolores); A. Negredo; A. Papa (Anna); O. Donoso-Mantke; M. Niedrig; H. Zeller; A. Tenorio; L. Franco (Leticia); S.W. Aberle (Stephan W.); M. van Esbroeck (M.); I. Christova; A. Markotic (Alemka); I.-C. Kurolt (Ivan-Christian); H. Zelena (Hana); I. Golovljova; D. Pannetier (Delphine); R. Charrel (Remi); J. Schmidt-Chanasit (Jonas); R. Wölfel (Roman); A. Papa (Anna); M.R. Capobianchi (Maria Rosaria); X. Jakupi (Xhevat); J. Storozenko (Jelena); A. Griskevicius (Algis); G. Bosevska (Golubinka); C. Muscat (Clive); M. Schutten (Martin); S.G. Dudman (Susanne Gjeruldsen); M.J. Alves (M. João); C.S. Ceianu; A. Platonov (Alexander); B. Bozovic (Bojana); B. Klempa; T. Avsic (Tatjana); A. Tenorio; Å. Lundkvist (Åke); P. Cherpillod (Pascal); G. Korukluoglu; D.W.G. Brown (D. W G); T. Brooks (Tim)

    2014-01-01

    textabstractCrimean-Congo haemorrhagic fever (CCHF) is an infectious viral disease that has (re-)emerged in the last decade in south-eastern Europe, and there is a risk for further geographical expansion to western Europe. Here we report the results of a survey covering 28 countries, conducted in 20

  20. CT perfusion on admission and cognitive functioning 3 months after aneurysmal subarachnoid haemorrhage

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Wajer, Irene M. C. Huenges; Cremers, Charlotte H. P.; van Zandvoort, Martine J. E.; Vergouwen, Mervyn D. I.; van der Schaaf, Irene C.; Velthuis, BK; Dankbaar, Jan Willem; Vos, Pieter C.; Visser-Meily, Johanna M. A.; Rinkel, Gabriel J. E.

    2015-01-01

    Many survivors of aneurysmal subarachnoid haemorrhage (aSAH) have persistent cognitive deficits. Underlying causes of these deficits have not been elucidated. We aimed to investigate if cerebral perfusion in the acute phase after aSAH measured with CT perfusion (CTP) is associated with cognitive out

  1. CT perfusion on admission and cognitive functioning 3 months after aneurysmal subarachnoid haemorrhage

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Huenges Wajer, Irene M C; Cremers, Charlotte H P; van Zandvoort, Martine J E; Vergouwen, Mervyn D I; van der Schaaf, Irene C.; Velthuis, Birgitta K.; Dankbaar, Jan Willem; Vos, Pieter C.; Visser-Meily, Johanna M A; Rinkel, Gabriel J E

    2015-01-01

    Many survivors of aneurysmal subarachnoid haemorrhage (aSAH) have persistent cognitive deficits. Underlying causes of these deficits have not been elucidated. We aimed to investigate if cerebral perfusion in the acute phase after aSAH measured with CT perfusion (CTP) is associated with cognitive

  2. Time-dependent test characteristics of neck stiffness in patients suspected of nontraumatic subarachnoid haemorrhage

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Backes, Daan; Rinkel, Gabriel J E; Sturkenboom, A. J Martijn; Vergouwen, Mervyn D I

    2015-01-01

    Background: Neck stiffness can be the only diagnostic clue for subarachnoid haemorrhage (SAH) at neurological examination in patients with a clinical suspicion of nontraumatic SAH who present with a normal level of consciousness and no focal neurologic deficits. Since the clinical impression is that

  3. Nosocomial infection of Crimean-Congo haemorrhagic fever in eastern Iran: case report.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chinikar, Sadegh; Shayesteh, Majid; Khakifirouz, Sahar; Jalali, Tahmineh; Rasi Varaie, Fereshteh Sadat; Rafigh, Mahboubeh; Mostafavi, Ehsan; Shah-Hosseini, Nariman

    2013-01-01

    An outbreak of Crimean-Congo haemorrhagic fever occurred in the county of Birjand in eastern Iran in November 2011. Four cases were involved in this outbreak. Two patients died after admission to hospital, one of whom was a nurse who acquired the infection nosocomially, and the others were treated successfully.

  4. The efficacy of fibrinogen concentrate compared with cryoprecipitate in major obstetric haemorrhage - an observational study.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Ahmed, S

    2012-10-01

    Fibrinogen replacement is critical in major obstetric haemorrhage (MOH). Purified, pasteurised fibrinogen concentrate appears to have benefit over cryoprecipitate in ease of administration and safety but is unlicensed in pregnancy. In July 2009, the Irish Blood Transfusion Service replaced cryoprecipitate with fibrinogen.

  5. Persistent postpartum haemorrhage after failed arterial ligation: value of pelvic embolisation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fargeaudou, Yann; Soyer, Philippe; Sirol, Marc; Boudiaf, Mourad; Dahan, Henri; Dref, Olivier le [Hopital Lariboisiere AP-HP et Universite Diderot-Paris 7, Department of Abdominal and Interventional Imaging, Paris (France); Morel, Olivier; Barranger, Emmanuel [Hopital Lariboisiere AP-HP, Department of Obstetrics and Gynecology, Paris (France); Gayat, Etienne; Mebazaa, Alexandre [Hopital Lariboisiere AP-HP, Department of Anesthesiology and Intensive Care Medicine, Paris (France)

    2010-07-15

    To evaluate the role and efficacy of pelvic embolisation in the treatment of persistent postpartum haemorrhage after failed arterial ligation and to identify the complications of this procedure in this specific population. The clinical files and angiographic examinations of 12 consecutive women (mean age 32 years) who were treated with pelvic embolisation because of persistent, severe postpartum haemorrhage after failed arterial ligation were reviewed. Angiography revealed that persistent bleeding was due to incomplete arterial ligation (n = 4) or the presence of newly developed anastomotic routes (n = 8). In 11 women, pelvic embolisation stopped the bleeding. Hysterectomy was needed in one woman with retained placenta. Two complications due to pelvic embolisation, including leg ischaemia and transient sciatic nerve ischaemia, were identified, both after internal iliac artery ligation. In women with persistent postpartum haemorrhage after failed arterial ligation, pelvic embolisation is an effective treatment in most cases. However, embolisation of the anastomotic routes that contribute to persistent bleeding may result in ischaemic complications. These potential complications reaffirm that arterial ligation should not be the favoured option for postpartum haemorrhage and that special care must be given during pelvic embolisation after failed arterial ligation. (orig.)

  6. The changing incidence of Dengue Haemorrhagic Fever in Indonesia : A 45-year registry-based analysis

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Karyanti, Mulya R.; Uiterwaal, Cuno S P M; Kusriastuti, Rita; Hadinegoro, Sri R.; Rovers, Maroeska M.; Heesterbeek, Hans; Hoes, Arno W.; Bruijning-Verhagen, Patricia

    2014-01-01

    Background: Increases in human population size, dengue vector-density and human mobility cause rapid spread of dengue virus in Indonesia. We investigated the changes in dengue haemorrhagic fever (DHF) incidence in Indonesia over a 45-year period and determined age-specific trends in annual DHF incid

  7. The changing incidence of Dengue Haemorrhagic Fever in Indonesia: a 45-year registry-based analysis

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Karyanti, M.R.; Uiterwaal, C.S.; Kusriastuti, R.; Hadinegoro, S.R.; Rovers, M.M.; Heesterbeek, H.; Hoes, A.W.; Bruijning-Verhagen, P.

    2014-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Increases in human population size, dengue vector-density and human mobility cause rapid spread of dengue virus in Indonesia. We investigated the changes in dengue haemorrhagic fever (DHF) incidence in Indonesia over a 45-year period and determined age-specific trends in annual DHF incid

  8. The changing incidence of Dengue Haemorrhagic Fever in Indonesia: a 45-year registry-based analysis

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Karyanti, M.R.; Uiterwaal, C.S.P.M.; Kusriastuti, R.; Hadinegoro, S.R.; Rovers, M.M.; Heesterbeek, J.A.P.; Hoes, A.W.; Bruijning-Verhagen, P.

    2014-01-01

    Background: Increases in human population size, dengue vector-density and human mobility cause rapid spread of dengue virus in Indonesia. We investigated the changes in dengue haemorrhagic fever (DHF) incidence in Indonesia over a 45-year period and determined age-specific trends in annual DHF incid

  9. Antigenic structure of the capsid protein of rabbit haemorrhagic disease virus

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Martinez-Torrecuadrada, Jorge L.; Cortes, Elena; Vela, Carmen;

    1998-01-01

    Rabbit haemorrhagic disease virus (RHDV) causes an important disease in rabbits. The virus capsid is composed of a single 60 kDa protein. The capsid protein gene was cloned in Escherichia coli using the pET3 system, and the antigenic structure of RHDV VP60 was dissected using 11 monoclonal...

  10. Influencing factors for high quality care on postpartum haemorrhage in the Netherlands: patient and professional perspectives

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Woiski, M.D.; Belfroid, E.; Liefers, J.; Grol, R.P.T.M.; Scheepers, H.C.; Hermens, R.P.M.G.

    2015-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Postpartum haemorrhage (PPH) remains a major contributor to maternal morbidity even in high resource settings, despite the development and dissemination of evidence-based guidelines and Advance-Trauma-Life-Support (ATLS) based courses for optimal management of PPH. We aimed to assess cur

  11. The effects of continuous prostacyclin infusion on regional blood flow and cerebral vasospasm following subarachnoid haemorrhage

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rasmussen, Rune; Wetterslev, Jørn; Stavngaard, Trine;

    2012-01-01

    One of the main causes of mortality and morbidity following subarachnoid haemorrhage (SAH) is the development of cerebral vasospasm, a frequent complication arising in the weeks after the initial bleeding. Despite extensive research, to date no effective treatment of vasospasm exists. Prostacycli...

  12. Necrosis and haemorrhage of the putamen in methanol poisoning shown on MRI

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kuteifan, K.; Gutbub, A.M.; Laplatte, G. [Service de Reanimation Medicale, Centre Hospitalier Louis Pasteur, Colmar (France); Oesterle, H.; Tajahmady, T. [Service de Neuroradiologie, Centre Hospitalier Louis Pasteur, Colmar (France)

    1998-03-01

    Methanol, a highly toxic substance, is used as an industrial solvent and in automobile antifreeze. Acute methanol poisoning produces severe metabolic acidosis and serious neurologic sequelae. We describe a 50-year-old woman with accidental methanol intoxication who was in a vegetative state. MRI showed haemorrhagic necrosis of the putamina and oedema in the deep white matter. (orig.) With 1 fig., 8 refs.

  13. Experimental respiratory Marburg virus haemorrhagic fever infection in the common marmoset (Callithrix jacchus).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smither, Sophie J; Nelson, Michelle; Eastaugh, Lin; Laws, Thomas R; Taylor, Christopher; Smith, Simon A; Salguero, Francisco J; Lever, Mark S

    2013-04-01

    Marburg virus causes a highly infectious and lethal haemorrhagic fever in primates and may be exploited as a potential biothreat pathogen. To combat the infection and threat of Marburg haemorrhagic fever, there is a need to develop and license appropriate medical countermeasures. To determine whether the common marmoset (Callithrix jacchus) would be an appropriate model to assess therapies against Marburg haemorrhagic fever, initial susceptibility, lethality and pathogenesis studies were performed. Low doses of virus, between 4 and 28 TCID50 , were sufficient to cause a lethal, reproducible infection. Animals became febrile between days 5 and 6, maintaining a high fever before succumbing to disease between 8 and 11 days postchallenge. Typical signs of Marburg virus infection were observed including haemorrhaging and a transient rash. In pathogenesis studies, virus was isolated from the animals' lungs from day 3 postchallenge and from the liver, spleen and blood from day 5 postchallenge. Early signs of histopathology were apparent in the kidney and liver from day 3. The most striking features were observed in animals exhibiting severe clinical signs, which included high viral titres in all organs, with the highest levels in the blood, increased levels in liver function enzymes and blood clotting times, decreased levels in platelets, multifocal moderate-to-severe hepatitis and perivascular oedema.

  14. Prediction of peripartum hysterectomy and end organ dysfunction in major obstetric haemorrhage.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    O'Brien, D

    2010-12-01

    The aims of this study are to determine the incidence and aetiology of major obstetric haemorrhage (MOH) in our population, to examine the success rates of medical and surgical interventions and to identify risk factors for peripartum hysterectomy and end organ dysfunction (EOD).

  15. Dose evaluation for long-term magnesium treatment in aneurysmal subarachnoid haemorrhage

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van Norden, A G W; van den Bergh, W M; Rinkel, G J E

    2005-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Magnesium is a neuroprotective agent that might prevent or reverse delayed cerebral ischaemia after aneurysmal subarachnoid haemorrhage (SAH). We are presently running a randomized, placebo-controlled, double blind trial with magnesium sulphate (64 mmol/day intravenously). We studied whe

  16. Magnesium therapy after aneurysmal subarachnoid haemorrhage a dose-finding study for long term treatment

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van den Bergh, W M; Albrecht, K W; Berkelbach van der Sprenkel, J W; Rinkel, G J E

    2003-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Magnesium is a neuroprotective agent which might prevent or reverse delayed cerebral ischemia (DCI) after aneurysmal subarachnoid haemorrhage (SAH). Although the dosage for short-term magnesium therapy is well established, there is lack of knowledge on the dosage for extended use of magn

  17. Recovery of an injured medial lemniscus pathway in a patient with intracerebral haemorrhage.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Seo, Jeong Pyo; Jang, Sung Ho

    2014-05-01

    We describe here a patient with intracerebral haemorrhage who showed recovery of an injured medial lemniscus and its related thalamocortical pathway on follow- up diffusion tensor tractography. A 48-year-old man presented with right hemiplegia following a spontaneous intracerebral haemorrhage in the left corona radiata and basal ganglia. He underwent conservative management for intracerebral haemorrhage and comprehensive rehabilitative therapy. The kinesthetic sensation score (maximum score 24 points) of the Nottingham Sensory Assessment improved from 6 points (at 2 weeks after injury) to 10 points (at 6 weeks) and to 18 points (at 12 weeks). For the left thalamocortical pathway, a discontinuation at the left midbrain below the haematoma was observed on the 2-week diffusion tensor tractography. The 6-week diffusion tensor tractography showed that the integrity of the left thalamocortical pathway had been restored to the left primary motor cortex, and the 12-week diffusion tensor tractography showed restoration to the left primary somatosensory cortex. The fibre number of the left thalamocortical pathway showed an increase (470 at 2 weeks after injury, 1,080 at 6 weeks, and 1,626 at 12 weeks). This patient underwent recovery of an injured thalamocortical pathway over a period of 10 weeks after the second week following intracerebral haemorrhage, in terms of restoration of discontinued integrity and increased fibre number in the thalamocortical pathway.

  18. Interindividual variation in platelets and the cardiovascular response to haemorrhage in the pig

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Zaar, Morten; Secher, Niels H; Gam, Christiane Marie Bourgin;

    2011-01-01

    The platelet count varies two-fold among healthy individuals. Considering the haemostatic role of platelets, this study evaluated the relation between cardiovascular and metabolic responses to uncontrolled haemorrhage and the pretrauma platelet count in pigs. A laceration liver injury was inflict...

  19. An increase in rates of obstetric haemorrhage in a setting of high HIV seroprevalence

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    E Shabalala

    2017-07-01

    Full Text Available Background. Obstetric haemorrhage (OH is the leading cause of maternal mortality worldwide, although, indirectly, HIV is also a leading cause of maternal mortality in some settings with a high HIV seroprevalence. Objective. To determine the possible association between increasing rates of OH and HIV or its treatment. Methods. We conducted a retrospective chart review of women with OH at King Edward VIII Hospital, Durban, South Africa, over a 3-year period (2009 - 2011, during which the drug regimen for the prevention of mother-to-child transmission was evolving from single-dose nevirapine to antenatal zidovudine combined with intrapartum nevirapine (also referred to as dual therapy, and finally to a combination or highly active antiretroviral therapy (cART or HAART. Cases of OH (including abruptio placentae, placenta praevia, unspecified antepartum haemorrhage (APH, and postpartum haemorrhage (PPH were identified from maternity delivery records, and the relevant data extracted. Results. We analysed the records of 448 women diagnosed with OH. Even though the incidence of OH was low, the study found an increasing number of cases during the 3-year period. PPH – not APH – was associated with HIV seropositivity (odds ratio 1.84, 95% confi­dence interval 1.14 - 2.95. cART was not associated with an increased risk of haemorrhage. Conclusion. HIV was associated with a high risk of PPH, and its possible association with HIV treatment needs further research.

  20. Treatment of Laryngeal Telangiectatic Lesions in a Patient Diagnosed with Hereditary Haemorrhagic Telangiectasia

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kjeldsen, Anette Drøhse; Printz, Trine; Slot Mehlum, Camilla;

    2015-01-01

    Abstract We here present a case concerning a 69 year old female patient with Hereditary Haemorrhagic Telangiectasia (HHT). She was suffering from hoarseness due to a telangiectatic lesion on the right vocal cord. The lesion was treated with laser and the voice improved markedly, which is document...

  1. The changing incidence of Dengue Haemorrhagic Fever in Indonesia : A 45-year registry-based analysis

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Karyanti, Mulya R.; Uiterwaal, Cuno S P M; Kusriastuti, Rita; Hadinegoro, Sri R.; Rovers, Maroeska M.; Heesterbeek, Hans; Hoes, Arno W.; Bruijning-Verhagen, Patricia

    2014-01-01

    Background: Increases in human population size, dengue vector-density and human mobility cause rapid spread of dengue virus in Indonesia. We investigated the changes in dengue haemorrhagic fever (DHF) incidence in Indonesia over a 45-year period and determined age-specific trends in annual DHF

  2. Computational Intelligence Method for Early Diagnosis Dengue Haemorrhagic Fever Using Fuzzy on Mobile Device

    Science.gov (United States)

    Salman, Afan; Lina, Yen; Simon, Christian

    2014-03-01

    Mortality from Dengue Haemorrhagic Fever (DHF) is still increasing in Indonesia particularly in Jakarta. Diagnosis of the dengue shall be made as early as possible so that first aid can be given in expectation of decreasing death risk. The Study will be conducted by developing expert system based on Computational Intelligence Method. On the first year, study will use the Fuzzy Inference System (FIS) Method to diagnose Dengue Haemorrhagic Fever particularly in Mobile Device consist of smart phone. Expert system application which particularly using fuzzy system can be applied in mobile device and it is useful to make early diagnosis of Dengue Haemorrhagic Fever that produce outcome faster than laboratory test. The evaluation of this application is conducted by performing accuracy test before and after validation using data of patient who has the Dengue Haemorrhagic Fever. This expert system application is easy, convenient, and practical to use, also capable of making the early diagnosis of Dengue Haemorraghic to avoid mortality in the first stage.

  3. Improvement after treatment of hydrocephalus in aneurysmal subarachnoid haemorrhage : implications for grading and prognosis

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    ter Laan, M; Mooij, JJA

    2006-01-01

    Two patients with aneurysmal subarachnoid haemorrhage and hydrocephalus are presented. On admission they scored E1M4V1 and E1M3Vtube on the Glasgow Coma Scale. The first patient recovered to E3M5Vtube after treatment of hydrocpehalus by extraventricular drainage. The second recovered to E2M5Vtube an

  4. Nd:YAG laser hyaloidotomy for valsalva pre-macular haemorrhage.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Kirwan, R P

    2012-02-01

    AIM: To report a case of successful drainage of a large pre-macular haemorrhage using laser photo-disruption of the posterior hyaloid membrane. MATERIALS AND METHODS: A case report. RESULTS: A 47-year-old man presented acutely to our emergency department complaining of a 24-h history of sudden onset, painless and persistent loss of vision in his left eye. Immediately before noticing this loss of vision, he had been vomiting violently from excessive alcohol intake. The left visual acuity was counting fingers. Dilated fundoscopy of the left eye revealed a large pre-macular haemorrhage which was 14 disc diametres in size. Clotting investigations were normal. A diagnosis of valsalva retinopathy was made and the patient elected to receive a prompt neodymium-doped yttrium aluminium garnet (Nd:YAG) laser posterior hyaloidotomy as an outpatient. At 1 week follow-up, the haemorrhage had drained completely into the vitreous space revealing a healthy macula and the visual acuity had improved to 6\\/12 unaided. At 6-month follow-up the left visual acuity stabilised at 6\\/9 unaided. CONCLUSION: Nd:YAG laser posterior hyaloidotomy is a useful outpatient procedure for successful clearance of large pre-macular haemorrhages that offers patients rapid recovery of visual acuity and the avoidance of more invasive intraocular surgery.

  5. Improvement after treatment of hydrocephalus in aneurysmal subarachnoid haemorrhage : implications for grading and prognosis

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    ter Laan, M; Mooij, JJA

    Two patients with aneurysmal subarachnoid haemorrhage and hydrocephalus are presented. On admission they scored E1M4V1 and E1M3Vtube on the Glasgow Coma Scale. The first patient recovered to E3M5Vtube after treatment of hydrocpehalus by extraventricular drainage. The second recovered to E2M5Vtube

  6. Haemorrhage after home birth: audit of decision making and referral : Part 2 : Results and discussion

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Smit, M.; Dijkman, A.; Rijnders, M.; Bustraan, J.; Dillen, J. van; Middeldorp, J.; Havenith, B.; Roosmalen, J. van

    2013-01-01

    In the Netherlands, 20 per cent of women give birth at home. In 0.7 per cent, referral to secondary care because of postpartum haemorrhage (PPH) is indicated. Midwives are regularly trained in managing obstetric emergencies. A postgraduate training programme developed for Dutch community-based midwi

  7. Epithelioid angiosarcoma: Use of angiographic embolisation and radiotherapy to control recurrent haemorrhage

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    WA Barber

    2010-07-01

    Full Text Available Epithelioid angiosarcoma is a rare, highly malignant tumour with a poor prognosis. We present the case of a 75 year old man who underwent an incision biopsy to diagnose the soft tissue tumour and suffered from surgically uncontrollable haemorrhage. The case report demonstrates the value of interventional radiology for acute bleeding and radiotherapy for more chronic tumour bleeding.

  8. Thymic cyst haemorrhages and transient cholestasis in a 4-week-old infant

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Koopman, LP; Plotz, FB; Meuzelaar, JJ; Knoester, H

    1998-01-01

    We report a 4-week-old boy with acute respiratory distress, due to massive haemorrhages in multiple thymic cysts. A right hemithymectomy was performed because of mechanical obstruction of the trachea by the cysts. The origin of the multilocular thymic cysts remained unclear. Most likely, these haemo

  9. Long-term mortality and vascular event risk after aneurysmal subarachnoid haemorrhage

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Wermer, M. J. H.; Greebe, P.; Algra, A.; Rinkel, G. J. E.

    2009-01-01

    Background: Patients with a history of subarachnoid haemorrhage (SAH) may be at risk for vascular events and excess mortality. Methods: We interviewed 752 patients ( mean age 50 years, 67% women, mean follow-up 8.1 years) clipped between 1985 and 2001 after SAH who had been discharged home or to a r

  10. Aneurysm occlusion in elderly patients with aneurysmal subarachnoid haemorrhage : a cost-utility analysis

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Koffijberg, H.; Buskens, E.; Rinkel, G. J. E.

    2011-01-01

    Background Aneurysm occlusion after subarachnoid haemorrhage (SAH) aims to improve outcome by reducing the rebleeding risk. With increasing age, overall prognosis decreases, and the complications of aneurysm occlusion increase. The balance of risks for aneurysm occlusion in elderly SAH patients in d

  11. Successful treatment of an acquired haemorrhagic diathesis due to factor X deficiency with chemotherapy

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    de Jager, E; Bieger, R; Castel, A; Kluin, PM

    2001-01-01

    A 70-yr-old woman presented with a severe haemorrhagic diathesis due to an acquired factor X deficiency. A plasma infusion study showed that exogenous factor X was eliminated very effectively from the patient's circulation. A bone marrow biopsy was consistent with plasma cell dyscrasia. Neither an a

  12. Mitral endocarditis due to Rothia aeria with cerebral haemorrhage and femoral mycotic aneurysms, first French description

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    R. Collarino

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available Rothia aeria is a Rothia species from the Micrococcaceae family. We report here the first French R. aeria endocarditis complicated by brain haemorrhage and femoral mycotic aneurysms. Altogether, severity and antimicrobial susceptibility should make us consider the management of R. aeria endocarditis as Staphylococcus aureus methicillin-susceptible endocarditis.

  13. Risk of haemorrhage from transurethral prostatectomy in acetylsalicylic acid and NSAID-treated patients

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Wierød, F S; Frandsen, N J; Jacobsen, J D

    1998-01-01

    Postoperative bleeding in patients who regularly ingest acetylsalicylic acid (ASA) has been reported after several types of surgery. However, data on the influence of ASA on the risk of haemorrhage from transurethral prostatectomy (TUR-P) have been conflicting. We have studied retrospectively...

  14. Toxic Shock Syndrome (For Parents)

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Feeding Your 1- to 2-Year-Old Toxic Shock Syndrome KidsHealth > For Parents > Toxic Shock Syndrome Print ... en español Síndrome de shock tóxico About Toxic Shock Syndrome Toxic shock syndrome (TSS) is a serious ...

  15. Streptococcal toxic shock syndrome

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gvozdenović Ljiljana

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available Introduction. Streptococcal toxic shock syndrome is now recognized as a toxin-mediated, multisystem illness. It is characterized by an early onset of shock with multiorgan failure and continues to be associated with high morbidity and mortality, caused by group A Streptococcus pyogenes. The symptoms for staphylococcal and streptococcal toxic shock syndrome are similar. Streptococcal toxic shock syndrome was not well described until 1993, when children who had suffered from varicella presented roughly 2-4 weeks later with a clinical syndrome highly suggestive of toxic shock syndrome. Characteristics, complications and therapy. It is characterized by a sudden onset of fever, chills, vomiting, diarrhea, muscle aches and rash. It can rapidly progress to severe and intractable hypotension and multisystem dysfunction. Almost every organ system can be involved. Complications of streptococcal toxic shock syndrome may include kidney failure, liver failure and even death. Crystalloids and inotropic agents are used to treat the hypovolemic shock aggressively, with close monitoring of the patient’s mean arterial pressure and central venous pressure. An immediate and aggressive management of hypovolemic shock is essential in streptococcal toxic shock syndrome. Targeted antibiotics are indicated; penicillin or a betalactam antibiotic is used for treating group A streptococci, and clindamycin has emerged as a key portion of the standard treatment.

  16. When Shock Waves Collide

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hartigan, P.; Foster, J.; Frank, A.; Hansen, E.; Yirak, K.; Liao, A. S.; Graham, P.; Wilde, B.; Blue, B.; Martinez, D.; Rosen, P.; Farley, D.; Paguio, R.

    2016-06-01

    Supersonic outflows from objects as varied as stellar jets, massive stars, and novae often exhibit multiple shock waves that overlap one another. When the intersection angle between two shock waves exceeds a critical value, the system reconfigures its geometry to create a normal shock known as a Mach stem where the shocks meet. Mach stems are important for interpreting emission-line images of shocked gas because a normal shock produces higher postshock temperatures, and therefore a higher-excitation spectrum than does an oblique shock. In this paper, we summarize the results of a series of numerical simulations and laboratory experiments designed to quantify how Mach stems behave in supersonic plasmas that are the norm in astrophysical flows. The experiments test analytical predictions for critical angles where Mach stems should form, and quantify how Mach stems grow and decay as intersection angles between the incident shock and a surface change. While small Mach stems are destroyed by surface irregularities and subcritical angles, larger ones persist in these situations and can regrow if the intersection angle changes to become more favorable. The experimental and numerical results show that although Mach stems occur only over a limited range of intersection angles and size scales, within these ranges they are relatively robust, and hence are a viable explanation for variable bright knots observed in Hubble Space Telescope images at the intersections of some bow shocks in stellar jets.

  17. Anti-Shock Garment

    Science.gov (United States)

    1996-01-01

    Ames Research Center developed a prototype pressure suit for hemophiliac children, based on research of astronauts' physiological responses in microgravity. Zoex Corporation picked up the design and patents and developed an anti-shock garment for paramedic use. Marketed by Dyna Med, the suit reverses the effect of shock on the body's blood distribution by applying counterpressure to the legs and abdomen, returning blood to vital organs and stabilizing body pressure until the patient reaches a hospital. The DMAST (Dyna Med Anti-Shock Trousers) employ lower pressure than other shock garments, and are non-inflatable.

  18. Chiral Shock Waves

    CERN Document Server

    Sen, Srimoyee

    2016-01-01

    We study shock waves in relativistic chiral matter. We argue that the conventional Rankine- Hugoinot relations are modified due to the presence of chiral transport phenomena. We show that the entropy discontinuity in a weak shock wave is linearly proportional to the pressure discontinuity when the effect of chiral transport becomes sufficiently large. We also show that rarefaction shock waves, which do not exist in usual nonchiral fluids, can appear in chiral matter. These features are exemplified by shock propagation in dense neutrino matter in the hydrodynamic regime.

  19. Reliability and Responsiveness of Cardiopulmonary Exercise Testing in Fatigued Persons with Multiple Sclerosis and Low to Mild Disability

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Heine, Martin; van den Akker, Lizanne Eva; Verschuren, Olaf; Visser-Meily, Anne; Kwakkel, Gert

    2015-01-01

    Background Peak oxygen uptake (VO(2)peak) via cardiopulmonary exercise testing is considered the gold standard for testing aerobic capacity in healthy participants and people with various medical conditions. The reliability and responsiveness of cardiopulmonary exercise testing outcomes in persons

  20. Soetomo score: score model in early identification of acute haemorrhagic stroke

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Moh Hasan Machfoed

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available Aim of the study: On financial or facility constraints of brain imaging, score model is used to predict the occurrence of acute haemorrhagic stroke. Accordingly, this study attempts to develop a new score model, called Soetomo score. Material and methods: The researchers performed a cross-sectional study of 176 acute stroke patients with onset of ≤24 hours who visited emergency unit of Dr. Soetomo Hospital from July 14th to December 14th, 2014. The diagnosis of haemorrhagic stroke was confirmed by head computed tomography scan. There were seven predictors of haemorrhagic stroke which were analysed by using bivariate and multivariate analyses. Furthermore, a multiple discriminant analysis resulted in an equation of Soetomo score model. The receiver operating characteristic procedure resulted in the values of area under curve and intersection point identifying haemorrhagic stroke. Afterward, the diagnostic test value was determined. Results: The equation of Soetomo score model was (3 × loss of consciousness + (3.5 × headache + (4 × vomiting − 4.5. Area under curve value of this score was 88.5% (95% confidence interval = 83.3–93.7%. In the Soetomo score model value of ≥−0.75, the score reached the sensitivity of 82.9%, specificity of 83%, positive predictive value of 78.8%, negative predictive value of 86.5%, positive likelihood ratio of 4.88, negative likelihood ratio of 0.21, false negative of 17.1%, false positive of 17%, and accuracy of 83%. Conclusions: The Soetomo score model value of ≥−0.75 can identify acute haemorrhagic stroke properly on the financial or facility constrains of brain imaging.

  1. Pericardial tamponade due to haemorrhagic pericardial effusion as a complication of prasugrel: a case report.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cader, Fathima Aaysha; Haq, M Maksumul; Nasrin, Sahela; Karim, Md Rezaul

    2016-08-30

    Striking an adequate balance between bleeding risks and prevention of stent thrombosis can be challenging in the setting of percutaneous coronary intervention (PCI) with drug eluting stents (DES) in acute myocardial infarction (MI). This is more pronounced in patients treated with both low molecular weight heparin (LMWH) and dual antiplatelet therapy (DAPT). Prasugrel, a second generation thienopyridine with more potent platelet inhibition capability, is associated with significant bleeding risks. This risk of bleeding is often underestimated when prescribing pharmacological agents such as DAPT and LMWH, designed to reduce ischaemic events following PCI in acute MI. Life-threatening haemorrhagic pericardial and pleural effusions not associated with access site bleeding are a rare example of such bleeding complications. We report a case of a Bangladeshi male who developed cardiac tamponade resulting from haemorrhagic pericardial effusion as well as bilateral pleural effusions, 9 days after PCI with a DES, while on prasugrel and aspirin. He had presented late with inferior ST elevation myocardial infarction (STEMI), and was therefore also given enoxaparin initially. Haemorrhagic pericardial and pleural fluid were drained, and the patient was discharged on DAPT comprising of aspirin and clopidogrel. Following PCI to obtuse marginal, which was done as a staged procedure 6 months later, he was commenced on ticagrelor instead of clopidogrel. He developed no further bleeding complications over 1 year of follow up. Non-access site bleeding such as this, leading to haemorrhagic pericardial and pleural effusions can be rare and life-threatening. Furthermore, patients with acute coronary syndromes (ACS) have marked variation in their risk of major bleeding. Since haemorrhagic complications are associated with mortality, maintaining a balance between the risk of recurrent ischemia and that of bleeding is of paramount importance. The use of validated bleeding risk scores

  2. Diffusive Shock Acceleration at Cosmological Shock Waves

    CERN Document Server

    Kang, Hyesung

    2012-01-01

    We reexamine nonlinear diffusive shock acceleration (DSA) at cosmological shocks in the large scale structure of the Universe, incorporating wave-particle interactions that are expected to operate in collisionless shocks. Adopting simple phenomenological models for magnetic field amplification (MFA) by cosmic-ray (CR) streaming instabilities and Alfv'enic drift, we perform kinetic DSA simulations for a wide range of sonic and Alfv'enic Mach numbers and evaluate the CR injection fraction and acceleration efficiency. In our DSA model the CR acceleration efficiency is determined mainly by the sonic Mach number Ms, while the MFA factor depends on the Alfv'enic Mach number and the degree of shock modification by CRs. We show that at strong CR modified shocks, if scattering centers drift with an effective Alfv'en speed in the amplified magnetic field, the CR energy spectrum is steepened and the acceleration efficiency is reduced significantly, compared to the cases without such effects. As a result, the postshock C...

  3. Gene expression profile after cardiopulmonary bypass and cardioplegic arrest.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ruel, Marc; Bianchi, Cesario; Khan, Tanveer A; Xu, Shu; Liddicoat, John R; Voisine, Pierre; Araujo, Eugenio; Lyon, Helen; Kohane, Isaac S; Libermann, Towia A; Sellke, Frank W

    2003-11-01

    This study examines the cardiac and peripheral gene expression responses to cardiopulmonary bypass and cardioplegic arrest. Atrial myocardium and skeletal muscle were harvested from 16 patients who underwent coronary artery bypass grafting before and after cardiopulmonary bypass and cardioplegic arrest. Ten sample pairs were selected for patient similarity, and oligonucleotide microarray analyses of 12,625 genes were performed using matched precardiopulmonary bypass tissues as controls. Array results were validated with Northern blotting, real-time polymerase chain reaction, in situ hybridization, and immunoblotting. Statistical analyses were nonparametric. Median durations of cardiopulmonary bypass and cardioplegic arrest were 74 and 60 minutes, respectively. Compared with precardiopulmonary bypass, postcardiopulmonary bypass myocardial tissues revealed 480 up-regulated and 626 down-regulated genes with a threshold P value of.025 or less (signal-to-noise ratio: 3.46); skeletal muscle tissues showed 560 and 348 such genes, respectively (signal-to-noise ratio: 3.04). Up-regulated genes in cardiac tissues included inflammatory and transcription activators FOS; jun B proto-oncogene; nuclear receptor subfamily 4, group A, member 3; MYC; transcription factor-8; endothelial leukocyte adhesion molecule-1; and cysteine-rich 61; apoptotic genes nuclear receptor subfamily 4, group A, member 1 and cyclin-dependent kinase inhibitor 1A; and stress genes dual-specificity phosphatase-1, dual-specificity phosphatase-5, and B-cell translocation gene 2. Up-regulated skeletal muscle genes included interleukin 6; interleukin 8; tumor necrosis factor receptor superfamily, member 11B; nuclear receptor subfamily 4, group A, member 3; transcription factor-8; interleukin 13; jun B proto-oncogene; interleukin 1B; glycoprotein Ib, platelet, alpha polypeptide; and Ras-associated protein RAB27A. Down-regulated genes included haptoglobin and numerous immunoglobulins in the heart, and factor H

  4. [CPR--guidelines 2000. New international guidelines for cardiopulmonary resuscitation].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gervais, H W

    2001-03-01

    The "Guidelines 2000 for Cardiopulmonary Resuscitation and Emergency Cardiovascular Care. An International Consensus an Science" are the first true international CPR guidelines in the history of resuscitation medicine. Experts from major international resuscitation organizations (International Liaison Committee on Resuscitation, ILCOR) achieved a consensus of recommendations which had to pass a rigorous review procedure applying the tools of evidence-based medicine: all proposed guidelines or guideline changes had to be based on critically appraised pieces of evidence which had to be integrated into a final class of recommendations. The most important changes compared to previous recommendations from either the European Resuscitation Council or the American Heart Association are presented and commented upon.

  5. A method of automatic control procedures cardiopulmonary resuscitation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bureev, A. Sh.; Zhdanov, D. S.; Kiseleva, E. Yu.; Kutsov, M. S.; Trifonov, A. Yu.

    2015-11-01

    The study is to present the results of works on creation of methods of automatic control procedures of cardiopulmonary resuscitation (CPR). A method of automatic control procedure of CPR by evaluating the acoustic data of the dynamics of blood flow in the bifurcation of carotid arteries and the dynamics of air flow in a trachea according to the current guidelines for CPR is presented. Evaluation of the patient is carried out by analyzing the respiratory noise and blood flow in the interspaces between the chest compressions and artificial pulmonary ventilation. The device operation algorithm of automatic control procedures of CPR and its block diagram has been developed.

  6. Popular Hybrid Congenital Heart Procedures without Cardiopulmonary Bypass

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gupta, Aamisha; Amin, Zahid

    2017-01-01

    As surgical and catheter interventions advance, patients with congenital heart disease are now offered alternative treatment options that cater to their individual needs. Furthermore, collaboration between interventional cardiologists and cardiac surgeons have led to the development of hybrid procedures, using the best techniques of each respective field to treat these complex cardiac entities from initial treatment in the pediatric patient to repeat intervention in the adult. We present a review of the increased popularity and trend in hybrid procedures in congenital heart disease without the use of cardiopulmonary bypass.

  7. [Serum immune complexes and cardiopulmonary bypass. A review of thirty-four cases (author's transl)].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Herreman, G; Poisson-Lespassailles, C; Puech, H; Vanetti, A; Delaunay, L; Yvart, J; Fermé, I

    1982-05-20

    The immunologic status of patients undergoing cardiopulmonary bypass as investigated. Rheumatoid factor, cryoglobulinemia and serum immune complexes were looked for. Studies were performed before the operation and eight or fifteen days later. From the results, it is concluded that the immunologic changes that occur in the immediate postoperative period cannot be interpreted because of the profound modifications resulting from cardiopulmonary bypass.

  8. Defibrillation delivered during the upstroke phase of manual chest compression improves shock success.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Yongqin; Wang, Hao; Cho, Jun Hwi; Quan, Weilun; Freeman, Gary; Bisera, Joe; Weil, Max Harry; Tang, Wanchun

    2010-03-01

    The current standard of manual chest compression during cardiopulmonary resuscitation requires pauses for rhythm analysis and shock delivery. However, interruptions of chest compression greatly decrease the likelihood of successful defibrillations, and significantly better outcomes are reported if this interruption is avoided. We therefore undertook a prospective randomized controlled animal study in an electrically induced ventricular fibrillation pig model to assess the effects of timing of defibrillation on the manual chest compression cycle on the defibrillation threshold. Prospective, randomized, controlled animal study. University-affiliated research laboratory. Yorkshire-X domestic pigs (Sus scrofa). In eight domestic male pigs weighing between 24 and 31 kg, ventricular fibrillation was electrically induced and untreated for 10 secs. Manual chest compression was then performed and continued for 25 secs with the protection of an isolation blanket. The depth and frequency of chest compressions were guided by a cardiopulmonary resuscitation prompter. Animals were randomized to receive a biphasic electrical shock in five different compression phases with a predetermined energy setting. A control phase was chosen at a constant 2 secs after discontinued chest compression. A grouped up-down defibrillation threshold testing protocol was used to compare the success rate at different coupling phases. After a recovery interval of 4 mins, the sequence was repeated for a total of 60 test shocks for each animal. No difference in coronary perfusion pressure before delivering of the shock was observed among the six study phases. The defibrillation success rate, however, was significantly higher when shocks were delivered in the upstroke phase of manual chest compression. Defibrillation efficacy is maximal when electrical shock is delivered during the upstroke phase of manual chest compression.

  9. Toxic Shock Syndrome (For Teens)

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Surgery? A Week of Healthy Breakfasts Shyness Toxic Shock Syndrome KidsHealth > For Teens > Toxic Shock Syndrome Print ... it, then take some precautions. What Is Toxic Shock Syndrome? If you're a girl who's had ...

  10. Climate shocks and conflict

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Papaioannou, Kostadis J.

    2016-01-01

    This paper offers a historical micro-level analysis of the impact of climate shocks on the incidence of civil conflict in colonial Nigeria (1912-1945). Primary historical sources on court cases, prisoners and homicides are used to capture conflict. To measure climate shocks we use the deviation f

  11. [Historical vision of shock].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dosne Pasqualini, C

    1998-01-01

    The concept of shock and its close relationship with that of stress dates back to the experiments of Hans Selye initiated in 1936 at McGill University in Montreal, with whom I collaborated between 1939 and 1942. It was demonstrated that the General Adaptation Syndrome begins with an Alarm Reaction, which consists of a Stage of Shock and one of Counter-Shock, followed by a Stage of Adaptation and finally a Stage of Exhaustion. My Ph.D. thesis concluded that shock was due to an adrenal insufficiency postulating that active metabolic processes drain the body of certain essential compounds the lack of which causes shock. My interest in the role of the glucose metabolism in shock led me to work with Bernardo Houssay in 1942 at the Institute of Physiology of the University of Buenos Aires and in 1944 with C.N.H. Long at Yale University. There I developed a method for the induction of hemorrhagic shock in the guinea pig with 94% lethality; curiously, the administration of 200 mg of ascorbic acid prevented death. Upon my return to Buenos Aires, these results were confirmed and moreover, it was demonstrated that the administration of cortisone led to 40% survival of the animals while desoxycorticosterone had no effect. At the time, no explanation was available but to-day, half a century later, this Symposium should be able to explain the mechanisms leading to death by hemorrhagic shock.

  12. [Shock waves in orthopedics].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Haupt, G

    1997-05-01

    Extracorporeal shock waves have revolutionized urological stone treatment. Nowadays shock waves are widely used in orthopedics, too. This article reviews the applications of extracorporeal shock waves on bone and adjacent soft tissue. The osteoneogenetic effect of extracorporeal shock waves has been proven and can be used to treat pseudarthrosis with a success rate of around 75%. Shock waves have a positive effect in tennis and golfer's elbow, calcaneal spur, and the complex called "periarthritis humero-scapularis." The mechanism for this is not yet known, and results from large prospective and randomized studies are still lacking. However, the treatment has been performed many thousands of times. In patients in whom conservative treatment has failed surgery used to be the only choice, but its success rate barely exceeds that of shock wave therapy and surgery can still be done if shock wave therapy fails. Extracorporeal shock waves will have an impact on orthopedics comparable to its effect in urology. Scientific evaluations, professional certifications, quality assurance and reimbursement issues present great challenges.

  13. The Shock Routine

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    van Hooren, Franca; Kaasch, Alexandra; Starke, Peter

    2014-01-01

    in Australia, Belgium, the Netherlands and Sweden over the course of four global economic shocks, we ask whether the notion of critical junctures is useful in understanding the nature of change triggered by crisis. The main empirical finding is that fundamental change in the aftermath of an exogenous shock...

  14. Our Favorite Film Shocks

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Willerslev, Rane; Suhr, Christian

    2014-01-01

    shocks? In this text we exchange personal experiences of cinematic shocks and ponder over these questions as related to wider theories on human trauma, emancipation, and enlightenment. In conclusion we argue for a revision of anthropological notions of validity in terms of the efficacy of the cinematic...

  15. Effects of Cardiopulmonary Bypass on Renal Perfusion, Filtration, and Oxygenation in Patients Undergoing Cardiac Surgery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lannemyr, Lukas; Bragadottir, Gudrun; Krumbholz, Vitus; Redfors, Bengt; Sellgren, Johan; Ricksten, Sven-Erik

    2017-02-01

    Acute kidney injury is a common complication after cardiac surgery with cardiopulmonary bypass. The authors evaluated the effects of normothermic cardiopulmonary bypass on renal blood flow, glomerular filtration rate, renal oxygen consumption, and renal oxygen supply/demand relationship, i.e., renal oxygenation (primary outcome) in patients undergoing cardiac surgery. Eighteen patients with a normal preoperative serum creatinine undergoing cardiac surgery procedures with normothermic cardiopulmonary bypass (2.5 l · min · m) were included after informed consent. Systemic and renal hemodynamic variables were measured by pulmonary artery and renal vein catheters before, during, and after cardiopulmonary bypass. Arterial and renal vein blood samples were taken for measurements of renal oxygen delivery and consumption. Renal oxygenation was estimated from the renal oxygen extraction. Urinary N-acetyl-β-D-glucosaminidase was measured before, during, and after cardiopulmonary bypass. Cardiopulmonary bypass induced a renal vasoconstriction and redistribution of blood flow away from the kidneys, which in combination with hemodilution decreased renal oxygen delivery by 20%, while glomerular filtration rate and renal oxygen consumption were unchanged. Thus, renal oxygen extraction increased by 39 to 45%, indicating a renal oxygen supply/demand mismatch during cardiopulmonary bypass. After weaning from cardiopulmonary bypass, renal oxygenation was further impaired due to hemodilution and an increase in renal oxygen consumption, accompanied by a seven-fold increase in the urinary N-acetyl-β-D-glucosaminidase/creatinine ratio. Cardiopulmonary bypass impairs renal oxygenation due to renal vasoconstriction and hemodilution during and after cardiopulmonary bypass, accompanied by increased release of a tubular injury marker.

  16. Cardiopulmonary exercise testing in the evaluation of high risk patients with lung cancer

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    MAO You-sheng; WANG Yong-gang; HUANG Jin-feng; HE Jie; YAN Shao-ping; Dong Jing-si; CHENG Gui-yu; SUN Ke-lin; LIU Xiang-yang; FANG De-kang; LI Jian

    2010-01-01

    Background It is still unclear whether pulmonary function tests (PFTs) are sufficient for predicting perioperative risk,and whether all patients or only a subset of them need a cardiopulmonary exercise test (CPET) for further assessment.Thus, this study was designed to evaluate the CPET and compare the results of CPET and conventional PFTs to identify which parameters are more reliable and valuable in predicting perioperative risks for high risk patients with lung cancer.Methods From January 2005 to August 2008, 297 consecutive lung cancer patients underwent conventional PFTs (spirometry + single-breath carbon monoxide diffusing capacity of the lungs (DLCOsb) for diffusion capacity) and CPET preoperatively. The correlation of postoperative cardiopulmonary complications with the parameters of PFT and CPET was retrospectively analyzed using the chi-square test, independent sample t test and binary Logistic regression analysis.Results Of the 297 patients, 78 did not receive operation due to advanced disease stage or poor cardiopulmonary function. The remaining 219 underwent different modes of operations. Twenty-one cases were excluded from this study due to exploration alone (15 cases) and operation-related complications (6 cases). Thus, 198 cases were eligible for evaluation. Fifty of the 198 patients (25.2%) had postoperative cardiopulmonary complications. Three patients (1.5%)died of complications within 30 postoperative days. The patients were stratified into groups based on VO2max/pred respectively. The rate of postoperative cardiopulmonary complications was significantly higher in the group with cardiopulmonary complications were significantly correlated with age, comorbidities, and poor PFT and CPET results.used to stratify the patients' cardiopulmonary function status and to predict the risk of postoperative cardiopulmonary predicting perioperative risk. If available, cardiopulmonary exercise testing is strongly suggested for high-risk lung cancer patients in

  17. Reflection of curved shock waves

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mölder, S.

    2017-03-01

    Shock curvatures are related to pressure gradients, streamline curvatures and vorticity in flows with planar and axial symmetry. Explicit expressions, in an influence coefficient format, are used to relate post-shock pressure gradient, streamline curvature and vorticity to pre-shock gradients and shock curvature in steady flow. Using higher order, von Neumann-type, compatibility conditions, curved shock theory is applied to calculate the flow near singly and doubly curved shocks on curved surfaces, in regular shock reflection and in Mach reflection. Theoretical curved shock shapes are in good agreement with computational fluid dynamics calculations and experiment.

  18. Reflection of curved shock waves

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mölder, S.

    2017-09-01

    Shock curvatures are related to pressure gradients, streamline curvatures and vorticity in flows with planar and axial symmetry. Explicit expressions, in an influence coefficient format, are used to relate post-shock pressure gradient, streamline curvature and vorticity to pre-shock gradients and shock curvature in steady flow. Using higher order, von Neumann-type, compatibility conditions, curved shock theory is applied to calculate the flow near singly and doubly curved shocks on curved surfaces, in regular shock reflection and in Mach reflection. Theoretical curved shock shapes are in good agreement with computational fluid dynamics calculations and experiment.

  19. Cardiopulmonary exercise testing (CPET) as preoperative test before lung resection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kallianos, Anastasios; Rapti, Aggeliki; Tsimpoukis, Sotirios; Charpidou, Andriani; Dannos, Ioannis; Kainis, Elias; Syrigos, Konstantinos

    2014-01-01

    Lung resection is still the only potentially curative therapy for patients with localized non-small lung cancer (NSCLC). However, the presence of cardiovascular comorbidities and underlying lung disease increases the risk of postoperative complications. Various studies have evaluated the use of different preoperative tests in order to identify patients with an increased risk for postoperative complications, associated with prolonged hospital stay and increased morbidity and mortality. In this topic review, we discuss the role of cardiopulmonary exercise testing (CPET) as one of the preoperative tests suggested for lung cancer patients scheduled for lung resection. We describe different types of exercise testing techniques and present algorithms of preoperative evaluation in lung cancer patients. Overall, patients with maximal oxygen consumption (VO2max) VO2max <15 mL/kg/min and both postoperative FEV1 and DLCO<40% predicted, are at high risk for perioperative death and postoperative cardiopulmonary complications, and thus should be offered an alternative medical treatment option. Copyright © 2014 International Institute of Anticancer Research (Dr. John G. Delinassios), All rights reserved.

  20. Gravity and the evolution of cardiopulmonary morphology in snakes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lillywhite, Harvey B; Albert, James S; Sheehy, Coleman M; Seymour, Roger S

    2012-02-01

    Physiological investigations of snakes have established the importance of heart position and pulmonary structure in contexts of gravity effects on blood circulation. Here we investigate morphological correlates of cardiopulmonary physiology in contexts related to ecology, behavior and evolution. We analyze data for heart position and length of vascular lung in 154 species of snakes that exhibit a broad range of characteristic behaviors and habitat associations. We construct a composite phylogeny for these species, and we codify gravitational stress according to species habitat and behavior. We use conventional regression and phylogenetically independent contrasts to evaluate whether trait diversity is correlated with gravitational habitat related to evolutionary transitions within the composite tree topology. We demonstrate that snake species living in arboreal habitats, or which express strongly climbing behaviors, possess relatively short blood columns between the heart and the head, as well as relatively short vascular lungs, compared to terrestrial species. Aquatic species, which experience little or no gravity stress in water, show the reverse - significantly longer heart-head distance and longer vascular lungs. These phylogenetic differences complement the results of physiological studies and are reflected in multiple habitat transitions during the evolutionary histories of these snake lineages, providing strong evidence that heart-to-head distance and length of vascular lung are co-adaptive cardiopulmonary features of snakes.

  1. Hypothermia and normothermia effects on mortality rate of cardiopulmonary bypass

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ali Rahdari

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: Cardiopulmonary bypass is associated with higher risk of mortality and morbidity, thus it should be investigated regarding the major risk factors. Temperature management have a significant role in postoperative cerebral and neurological complications; however the optimum temperature during cardiopulmonary surgery is not certainly detected. This systematic review has investigated the differences between hypothermia and normothermia regarding postoperative mortality. Method: PubMed was searched for the relevant articles. Only English language articles were included with no time limitation. Data regarding in-hospital patient deaths provided in each article mostly within 30 days after the surgery, were extracted and compared based on relative risk reduction (RRR, absolute risk reduction (ARR, and number needed to treat (NNT.Result: Totally, 28 articles were retrieved and extracted. The mortality rate was zero in hypothermic and normotehrmic groups of 8/28 included studies, thus the RRR, ARR, and NNT could not be calculated. There were no significant differences between investigated groups of each included studies regarding the patients’ age, gender, and preoperative conditions.Conclusions: No significant difference was obtained between two studied groups. Similar prevalence of death observed between hypothermic and normothermic groups might be due to the sample size of studies, or the subsequent cares performed in intensive care units that assist to reduce the postoperative mortality rate. According to the obtained results, both of these procedures might be similarly safe regarding mortality rate.

  2. Home-based mobile cardio-pulmonary rehabilitation consultant system.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Hsu-En; Wang, Wen-Chih; Lu, Shao-Wei; Wu, Bo-Yuan; Ko, Li-Wei

    2011-01-01

    Cardiovascular diseases are the most popular cause of death in the world recently. For postoperatives, cardiac rehabilitation is still asked to maintain at home (phase II) to improve cardiac function. However, only one third of outpatients do the exercise regularly, reflecting the difficulty for home-based healthcare: lacking of monitoring and motivation. Hence, a cardio-pulmonary rehabilitation system was proposed in this research to improve rehabilitation efficiency for better prognosis. The proposed system was built on mobile phone and receiving electrocardiograph (ECG) signal from a wireless ECG holter via Bluetooth connection. Apart from heart rate (HR) monitor, an ECG derived respiration (EDR) technique is also included to provide respiration rate (RR). Both HR and RR are the most important vital signs during exercise but only used one physiological signal recorder in this system. In clinical test, there were 15 subjects affording Bruce Task (treadmill) to simulate rehabilitation procedure. Correlation between this system and commercial product (Custo-Med) was up to 98% in HR and 81% in RR. Considering the prevention of sudden heart attack, an arrhythmia detection expert system and healthcare server at the backend were also integrated to this system for comprehensive cardio-pulmonary monitoring whenever and wherever doing the exercise.

  3. Effects of resistance exercise on cardiopulmonary factors in sedentary individuals.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Janyacharoen, Taweesak; Thayon, Methiya; Bushong, Wanwisa; Jaikla, Nussamol; Sawanyawisuth, Kittisak

    2016-01-01

    [Purpose] This study investigated the effects of resistance exercise on cardiopulmonary functions in young sedentary subjects. [Subjects] Forty-two young and healthy subjects with a sedentary lifestyle were included in this study. [Methods] The subjects were randomly divided into 2 groups: control and experimental. The control group (n=21) received health education and continued with normal activities of daily living. The experimental group (n=21) underwent resistance training, health education, and continued with normal activities of daily living. The resistance exercise program consisted of 3 postural exercises: chest press, dumbbell pullover, and flat-bench dumbbell fly. The subjects received this intervention 3 times/week for 8 weeks. [Results] The baseline characteristics were comparable between the 2 groups. The 6-minute-walk test score, peak expiratory flow, forced vital capacity, forced expiratory volume in 1 second, maximal voluntary ventilation, and chest expansions were significantly improved post-intervention in the experimental group and between the 2 groups. [Conclusion] Cardiopulmonary functions in young sedentary subjects were significantly improved with the 8-week resistance exercise program.

  4. Postgraduate Education for Physical Therapists at Cardiopulmonary Area in Colombia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Diana Durán Palomino

    2007-09-01

    Full Text Available This paper presents the supply of postdegreeprograms in the cardiopulmonary area in Colombiain orden to show its state and sufficiency.Plans of formation, objectives, curricular approach,methodology and profile of performanceare analyzed in terms of costs, duration,supply, location and research capabilities.Our results show problems in regard to supplyas well as unanimous criteria and strategic alliances.There are no Gremial associations thatfavor both discussion and analysis about epidemiologistaspects of respiratory and cardiovasculardiseases in Colombia there is necessityof professionals in this area with experience.Knowledge and appropiated skills in management,administration, laws, agreements andpublic policies that cover the affected population.Also, it is exposed that the Universities whitthis programs require support and pursuit forprofessionals positioning both in national andinternational context.MethodologyA descriptive study was carried out with a datacollection made in a period between April-Decemberof 2006. Cards were done and they allowedto review different aspects such as costs,occupational profile, duration, modality, methodology,practical component and evaluation inthe offering universities of programs of postdegreein the cardiopulmonary area for physiotherapists.Later an analysis was made oncurriculum, profiles, objectives, contents, professionalcompetitions the areas of research.

  5. Myocardial contractile function in survived neonatal piglets after cardiopulmonary bypass

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Popov Aron-Frederik

    2010-11-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Hemodynamic function may be depressed in the early postoperative stages after cardiac surgery. The aim of this study was the analysis of the myocardial contractility in neonates after cardiopulmonary bypass (CPB and mild hypothermia. Methods Three indices of left ventricular myocardial contractile function (dP/dt, (dP/dt/P, and wall thickening were studied up to 6 hours after CPB in neonatal piglets (CPB group; n = 4. The contractility data were analysed and then compared to the data of newborn piglets who also underwent median thoracotomy and instrumentation for the same time intervals but without CPB (non-CPB group; n = 3. Results Left ventricular dP/dtmax and (dP/dtmax/P remained stable in CPB group, while dP/dtmax decreased in non-CPB group 5 hours postoperatively (1761 ± 205 mmHg/s at baseline vs. 1170 ± 205 mmHg/s after 5 h; p max and (dP/dtmax/P there were no statistically significant differences between the two groups. Comparably, although myocardial thickening decreased in the non-CPB group the differences between the two groups were not statistically significant. Conclusions The myocardial contractile function in survived neonatal piglets remained stable 6 hours after cardiopulmonary bypass and mild hypothermia probably due to regional hypercontractility.

  6. Gravity and the Evolution of Cardiopulmonary Morphology in Snakes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lillywhite, Harvey B.; Albert, James S.; Sheehy, Coleman M.; Seymour, Roger S.

    2011-01-01

    Physiological investigations of snakes have established the importance of heart position and pulmonary structure in contexts of gravity effects on blood circulation. Here we investigate morphological correlates of cardiopulmonary physiology in contexts related to ecology, behavior and evolution. We analyze data for heart position and length of vascular lung in 154 species of snakes that exhibit a broad range of characteristic behaviors and habitat associations. We construct a composite phylogeny for these species, and we codify gravitational stress according to species habitat and behavior. We use conventional regression and phylogenetically independent contrasts to evaluate whether trait diversity is correlated with gravitational habitat related to evolutionary transitions within the composite tree topology. We demonstrate that snake species living in arboreal habitats, or which express strongly climbing behaviors, possess relatively short blood columns between the heart and the head, as well as relatively short vascular lungs, compared to terrestrial species. Aquatic species, which experience little or no gravity stress in water, show the reverse – significantly longer heart–head distance and longer vascular lungs. These phylogenetic differences complement the results of physiological studies and are reflected in multiple habitat transitions during the evolutionary histories of these snake lineages, providing strong evidence that heart–to–head distance and length of vascular lung are co–adaptive cardiopulmonary features of snakes. PMID:22079804

  7. Neurogenic Shock Immediately following Posterior Lumbar Interbody Fusion: Report of Two Cases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Matsumoto, Tomiya; Okuda, Shinya; Haku, Takamitsu; Maeda, Kazuya; Maeno, Takafumi; Yamashita, Tomoya; Yamasaki, Ryoji; Kuratsu, Shigeyuki; Iwasaki, Motoki

    2015-08-01

    Study Design Case report. Objective To present two cases of neurogenic shock that occurred immediately following posterior lumbar interbody fusion (PLIF) and that appeared to have been caused by the vasovagal reflex after dural injury and incarceration of the cauda equina. Case Report We present two cases of neurogenic shock that occurred immediately following PLIF. One patient had bradycardia, and the other developed cardiac arrest just after closing the surgical incision and opening the drainage tube. Cardiopulmonary resuscitation was performed immediately, and the patients recovered successfully, but they showed severe motor loss after awakening. The results of laboratory data, chest X-ray, electrocardiogram, computed tomography, and echocardiography ruled out pulmonary embolism, hemorrhagic shock, and cardiogenic shock. Although the reasons for the postoperative shock were obscure, reoperation was performed to explore the cause of paralysis. At reoperation, a cerebrospinal fluid collection and the incarceration of multiple cauda equina rootlets through a small dural tear were observed. The incarcerated cauda equina rootlets were reduced, and the dural defect was closed. In both cases, the reoperation was uneventful. From the intraoperative findings at reoperation, it was thought that the pathology was neurogenic shock via the vasovagal reflex. Conclusion Incarceration of multiple cauda equina rootlets following the accidental dural tear by suction drainage caused a sudden decrease of cerebrospinal fluid pressure and traction of the cauda equina, which may have led to the vasovagal reflex.

  8. Haemorrhagic bowel syndrome in dairy cattle: possible role of Clostridium perfringens type A in the disease complex.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ceci, L; Paradies, P; Sasanelli, M; de Caprariis, D; Guarda, F; Capucchio, M T; Carelli, G

    2006-12-01

    A survey based on clinical, pathological and microbiological investigations was performed on 11 Brown Swiss cattle affected with depression, anorexia, agalaxia, ruminal hypomotility, abdominal pain and melaena. In eight animals, macroscopical lesions consisted in haemorrhagic enteritis in the small intestine. Seven of eight isolates from tissue samples were identified as Clostridum perfringens type A, and four were identified as C. perfringens type A with the beta2 toxin gene. Based on these observations, animals were considered affected with haemorrhagic bowel syndrome.

  9. Vasogenic shock physiology

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sotiria Gkisioti

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Sotiria Gkisioti, Spyros D MentzelopoulosDepartment of Intensive Care Medicine, University of Athens Medical School, Evaggelismos General Hospital, Athens, GreeceAbstract: Shock means inadequate tissue perfusion by oxygen-carrying blood. In vasogenic shock, this circulatory failure results from vasodilation and/or vasoplegia. There is vascular hyporeactivity with reduced vascular smooth muscle contraction in response to α1 adrenergic agonists. Considering vasogenic shock, one can understand its utmost importance, not only because of its association with sepsis but also because it can be the common final pathway for long-lasting, severe shock of any cause, even postresuscitation states. The effective management of any patient in shock requires the understanding of its underlying physiology and pathophysiology. Recent studies have provided new insights into vascular physiology by revealing the interaction of rather complicated and multifactorial mechanisms, which have not been fully elucidated yet. Some of these mechanisms, such as the induction of nitric oxide synthases, the activation of adenosine triphosphate-sensitive potassium channels, and vasopressin deficiency, have gained general acceptance and are considered to play an important role in the pathogenesis of vasodilatory shock. The purpose of this review is to provide an update on the pathogenesis of vasogenic shock.Keywords: nitric oxide synthases, KATP channels, vasopressin, H2S, vasoplegic syndrome

  10. Acute primary haemorrhagic omental torsion mimicking perforated appendicitis: an unorthodox surgical paradox.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rehman, Abdul

    2014-08-01

    Acute primary haemorrhagic omental torsion is an atypical and deceptive cause of acute abdomen that could closely mimic a myriad of intra-abdominal catastrophes, especially perforated appendicitis. The author reports a 30 years man who had presented with gradually worsening right-sided abdominal pain of 2 days duration. Laboratory work-up and abdominal radiographs were inconclusive. Abdominal sonography detected presence of free fluid in the pelvic cul-de-sac. Based on clinical and sonographic findings, presumptive diagnosis of perforated appendicitis was made and the patient was explored through extended Rockey-Davis incision. About 500 - 700 ml of dark-coloured blood (haemoperitoneum) was present in the peritoneal cavity and the pelvis secondary to acute haemorrhagic omental torsion. The appendix was grossly normal. Omentectomy and prophylactic appendicectomy resulted in uneventful recovery of the patient. Acute primary omental torsion is an uncommon pathology that must be kept in mind during differential diagnosis of acute abdomen, especially acute or perforated appendicitis.

  11. CT Scan Features of Presumptive Haemorrhagic Stroke in a Dog with Cushing’s Disease

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. Liotta

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available A 9-year-old, intact male, Brie’s shepherd dog, with a 10-day history of depression and tachypnoea developed signs of central neurological dysfunction. 16 Multislice Computed Tomography (CT pre- and postcontrast studies of the brain revealed a single intra-axial homogeneous well-circumscribed hyperattenuating (+/− 62 HU and noncontrast-enhancing area, 5 mm in diameter, in the caudal part of the mesencephalon. This finding was highly suggestive of a haemorrhagic event. A pituitary-dependent hyperadrenocorticism (PDH was identified and is considered likely to be the underlying cause. A repeat CT scan examination, 2 months later, showed almost complete resolution of the brain lesion. The present case describes a solitary 5 mm diameter lesion: the result of intracranial haemorrhage in a dog with presumed PDH.

  12. Pregnancy complicated by haemorrhagic ascites in a woman with newly diagnosed HIV.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Morgan, Catrin; Nicholls, Kate; Gangat, Nusraat; Sansome, Stafford

    2016-07-29

    A young pregnant Zambian woman was referred from a district hospital in South Zambia to the university teaching hospital, Lusaka with severe anaemia and ascites. The ascites had developed over a month and the woman was currently 15 weeks pregnant. Further workup revealed that the patient was HIV-positive and the ascitic tap showed haemorrhagic fluid. After being reviewed by multiple doctors, the cause of the haemorrhagic ascites remained unclear; therefore, the decision was made to do a laparotomy. The laparotomy revealed haemoperitoneum and a large cyst attached to the liver containing 5 L of bloodstained fluid. The histopathology report revealed features consistent with a giant haemangioma. There were many barriers to accessing optimum healthcare in this case. These included limited access to blood, poor communication resulting in the patient being unaware of her HIV status and lack of patient education about HIV. 2016 BMJ Publishing Group Ltd.

  13. Efficacy of intra-arterial nimodipine in the treatment of cerebral vasospasm complicating subarachnoid haemorrhage

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hui, C. [Department of Diagnostic Imaging, Monash Medical Centre, Clayton, Vic. (Australia)]. E-mail: cathryn.hui@southernhealth.org.au; Lau, K.P. [Department of Diagnostic Imaging, Monash Medical Centre, Clayton, Vic. (Australia)

    2005-09-01

    AIM: To examine the efficacy and safety of nimodipine as an alternative to papaverine for the treatment of cerebral vasospasm following subarachnoid haemorrhage. METHODS: We retrospectively reviewed the procedure reports, anaesthetic records, clinical charts and CT and angiographic images of 9 patients who had received intra-arterial nimodipine; 1 of these patients received both nimodipine and papaverine. The difference in arterial luminal diameter before and after treatment was calculated as a percentage change. RESULTS: The average dose of nimodipine administered per vessel was 3.3 mg. The mean increase in arterial diameter was 66.6% in the vasospastic segment. There was no significant change in blood pressure of any of the subjects during endovascular treatment of vasospasm. CONCLUSION: Intra-arterial nimodipine is effective in improving angiographic vasospasm complicating subarachnoid haemorrhage. Further studies aimed at examining the clinical benefits of nimodipine are warranted, particularly in view of the low risk of adverse side effects of nimopidine when compared with papaverine.

  14. Severe acute haemorrhagic liver failure in a neonate with a favourable spontaneous outcome

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cavet, Madeleine; Balu, Marie; Garel, Catherine; Ducou le Pointe, Hubert [Universite Pierre et Marie Curie Paris VI, Service de Radiologie, Hopital d' enfants Armand-Trousseau, Paris (France); Mitanchez, Delphine; Alexandre, Marie [Universite Pierre et Marie Curie Paris VI, Service de Neonatologie, Hopital d' enfants Armand-Trousseau, Paris (France); Renolleau, Sylvain [Universite Pierre et Marie Curie Paris VI, Service de Reanimation, Hopital d' enfants Armand-Trousseau, Paris (France); Pariente, Daniele [Hopital de Bicetre, Service de Radiologie Pediatrique, Paris (France)

    2008-10-15

    Acute liver failure in neonates is rare and is frequently associated with an unfavourable outcome. There is no curative treatment other than liver transplantation. Screening for viral, metabolic, toxic or vascular disease is essential to assess the prognosis and to guide specific treatment. Hepatic haemorrhage in neonates is often associated with bacterial infection, trauma and coagulopathies. We present a unique case of neonatal acute liver failure and multifocal massive haemorrhagic intrahepatic lesions of traumatic origin, documented by US and MRI. The patient made a spontaneous recovery. Clinical, biological and imaging outcome was excellent despite the apparent severity of the initial features. The only possible aetiology was a difficult caesarean delivery for mild fetal macrosomia. (orig.)

  15. [The use of carboprost tromethamole for prevention and treatment of postpartal haemorrhage].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Milchev, N; Amaliev, G; Amaliev, I; Apiosian, Zh; Mladenova, M

    2011-01-01

    All around the world as well as in Bulgaria postpartal haemorrhage is a main reason of maternal death. The treatment of postpartal haemorrhage of which approximately 70% is caused by hypotony of the uterus is still a challenge for physician-obstetrician. In the following study we have used prostaglandin-Carboprost tromethamole (Prostin 15M) for treatment of this important obstetric pathology. One year investigation which includes 82 patients with hypotony during vaginal delivery or cesarian section. Results showed that the use of Carboprost tromethamole (Prostin 15M) in treatment of hypotony leads to fast and extended contraction of the uterus as well as significantly decreases blood loss and the necessity of haemotrasfusion.

  16. Bilateral adrenal haemorrhage associated with heparin-induced thrombocytopaenia during treatment of Fournier gangrene.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tattersall, Timothy Lee; Thangasamy, Isaac A; Reynolds, Jamie

    2014-10-14

    We present a case of bilateral adrenal haemorrhage (BAH) associated with heparin-induced thrombocytopaenia (HIT) in a 61-year-old man admitted to hospital for the treatment of Fournier's gangrene. He presented to hospital with scrotal swelling and fever, and developed spreading erythaema and a gangrenous scrotum. His scrotum was surgically debrided and intravenous broad-spectrum antibiotics were administered. Unfractionated heparin was given postoperatively for venous thromboembolism prophylaxis. The patient deteriorated clinically 8-11 days postoperatively with delirium, chest pain and severe hypertension followed by hypotension and thrombocytopaenia. Abdominal CT scan revealed bilateral adrenal haemorrhage. Antibodies to the heparin-platelet factor 4 complex were present. HIT-associated BAH was diagnosed and heparin was discontinued. Intravenous bivalirudin and hydrocortisone were started, with rapid improvement in clinical status. BAH is a rare complication of HIT and should be considered in the postoperative patient with unexplained clinical deterioration.

  17. Erythropoietin in patients with aneurysmal subarachnoid haemorrhage: a double blind randomised clinical trial

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Springborg, J B; Møller, C; Gideon, P;

    2007-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Erythropoietin (EPO) is neuroprotective in experimental models of stroke and subarachnoid haemorrhage (SAH) and possibly in patients with thromboembolic stroke. We studied the efficacy and safety of EPO in patients with SAH. METHODS: A larger scale clinical trial was planned but preli......BACKGROUND: Erythropoietin (EPO) is neuroprotective in experimental models of stroke and subarachnoid haemorrhage (SAH) and possibly in patients with thromboembolic stroke. We studied the efficacy and safety of EPO in patients with SAH. METHODS: A larger scale clinical trial was planned...... group but the difference was statistically insignificant. In the EPO-treated patients the CSF concentration of EPO increased 600-fold. Except for a higher extracelullar concentration of glycerol in the EPO group probably caused by the poorer clinical condition of these patients, there were...

  18. When and in which patients can anticoagulation be resumed after intracerebral haemorrhage?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marco Marietta

    2011-08-01

    Full Text Available Whether to resume the anticoagulant or the antiaggregant therapy after an episode of major haemorrhage is a difficult dilemma for the physician. The physician has to take into consideration two major questions: whether the benefits of restarting anticoagulation outweigh the risk, and if so, when and how should anticoagulation be restarted. Although some case reports suggest that anticoagulation can be withheld safely for short periods after ICH, even in patients with mechanical heart valves, it is still not clear if long-term anticoagulation can be safely reinstituted after haemorrhage, for example in patients with atrial fibrillation. In fact, no large and well-conducted randomised clinical trials are available, and there is lack of strong evidence on which guidelines recommendations can be based. The article summarise the available literature findings. Finally, a protocol is suggested which may represent a useful tool for assessing treatment options.

  19. A cylindrical converging shock tube for shock-interface studies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Luo, Xisheng; Si, Ting; Yang, Jiming; Zhai, Zhigang

    2014-01-01

    A shock tube facility for generating a cylindrical converging shock wave is developed in this work. Based on the shock dynamics theory, a specific wall profile is designed for the test section of the shock tube to transfer a planar shock into a cylindrical one. The shock front in the converging part obtained from experiment presents a perfect circular shape, which proves the feasibility and reliability of the method. The time variations of the shock strength obtained from numerical simulation, experiment, and theoretical estimation show the desired converging effect in the shock tube test section. Particular emphasis is then placed on the problem of shock-interface interaction induced by cylindrical converging shock waves. For this purpose, membrane-less gas cylinder is adopted to form the interface between two different fluids while the laser sheet technique to visualize the flow field. The result shows that it is convenient to perform such experiments in this facility.

  20. An epidemic of viral acute haemorrhagic conjunctivitis in Delhi in 1994

    OpenAIRE

    Satpathy Gita; Mohanty Sujata; Nayak Niranjan

    1996-01-01

    An epidemic of acute haemorrhagic conjunctivitis affecting persons of all ages and both sexes occurred in Delhi and surrounding areas during the monsoon season of 1994. The symptoms lasted on an average for 4-5 days. In some of the patients corneal involvement was observed. Conjunctival swabs from the affected patients were processed for viral antigen detection, virus isolation and bacterial culture and sensitivity. Viral antigen was detected in 62% (31/50) of the smears tested by indi...

  1. Pharmacological manipulation of gastric juice: thrombelastographic assessment and implications for treatment of gastrointestinal haemorrhage.

    OpenAIRE

    Patchett, S E; O'Donoghue, D P

    1995-01-01

    The impairment of formation and maintenance of a formed fibrin clot contributes to the prolonged bleeding and high incidence of rebleeding in upper gastrointestinal haemorrhage. To investigate the basis for the use of drug therapy in gastric bleeding, this study used thrombelastography to determine the effects of pharmacological manipulation of gastric juice on coagulation and fibrinolysis. The thrombelastograph is a mechanical device that provides a visual assessment of all stages of coagula...

  2. Pseudoaneurysm of uterine artery: as a cause of secondary post partum haemorrhage

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Prabha Devi Kodey

    2015-12-01

    Conclusions: Uterine artery embolization is an effective and reliable method for control of haemorrhage in pseudoaneurysm. One should have doubt about pseudoaneurysm in cases of secondary PPH where the bleeding is recurrent and cause not acertainable and to be referred in time where the facility of uterine artery embolization is available. [Int J Reprod Contracept Obstet Gynecol 2015; 4(6.000: 1821-1824

  3. Survival after profound hypocalcaemia with tetany complicating severe haemorrhagic acute pancreatitis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jones, P. A.

    1985-01-01

    A patient is reported who developed severe haemorrhagic pancreatitis, without hyperamylasemia, which was complicated by gross hypocalcaemia presenting as tetany. Tetany is very uncommon in acute pancreatitis and is a grave prognostic indicator, recovery being exceptionally rare. The mechanisms responsible for disordered calcium homeostasis associated with acute pancreatitis are reviewed. CT scanning was an important feature of this patient's management and its role in severe pancreatitis is discussed. Images Figure 1 PMID:3991403

  4. Neurosarcoidosis-related intracranial haemorrhage: three new cases and a systematic review of the literature.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    O'Dwyer, J P

    2012-06-09

    BACKGROUND AND PURPOSE: Intracranial haemorrhage in neurosarcoidosis (NS-ICH) is rare, poorly understood and the diagnosis of NS may not be immediately apparent. METHODS: The clinical features of three new NS-ICH cases are described including new neuropathological findings and collated with cases from a systematic literature review. RESULTS: Cases: (i) A 41-year-old man with headaches, hypoandrogenism and encephalopathy developed a cerebellar haemorrhage. He had neuropathological confirmation of NS with biopsy-proven angiocentric granulomata and venous disruption. He responded to immunosuppressive therapy. (ii) A 41-year-old man with no history of hypertension was found unconscious. A subsequently fatal pontine haemorrhage was diagnosed. Liver biopsy revealed sarcoid granulomas. (iii) A 36-year-old man with raised intracranial pressure headaches presented with a seizure and a frontal haemorrhage. Hilar lymph node biopsy confirmed sarcoidosis, and he was treated successfully. Systematic Review: Twelve other published cases were identified and collated with our cases. Average age was 36 years and M:F = 2.3:1; 46% presented with neurological symptoms and 31% had CNS-isolated disease. Immediate symptoms of ICH were acute\\/worsening headache or seizures (60%). ICH was supratentorial (62%), infratentorial (31%) or subarachnoid (7%). 40% had definite NS, 53% probable NS and 7% possible NS (Zajicek criteria). Antigranulomatous\\/immunosuppressive therapy regimens varied and 31% died. CONCLUSIONS: This series expands our knowledge of the pathology of NS-ICH, which may be of arterial or venous origin. One-third have isolated NS. Clinicians should consider NS in young-onset ICH because early aggressive antigranulomatous therapy may improve outcome.

  5. Management of ischemic proctitis with severe rectal haemorrhage: A case report

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Vincent SK Yip; Martin Downey; Nee Beng Teo; John R Anderson

    2006-01-01

    Acute ischemic proCTitis is a rare pathological condition.We report here a patient presented with massive rectal haemorrhage from a bleeding vessel superimposed on an underlying pathology of ischemic proctitis. This case report illustrates the difficulties in making the clinical distinction between ischemic proctitis and other pathological entities. We also discussed the beneficial role of arteriogram with embolotherapy as an effective therapeutic measure in the management of lower gastrointestinal bleeding. The literature on the subject is reviewed.

  6. Endoscopic resection of giant lipoma mimicking colonic neoplasm initially presenting with massive haemorrhage: a case report

    OpenAIRE

    Lazaraki, Georgia; Tragiannidis, Dimitrios; Xirou, Persefoni; Nakos, Andreas; Pilpilidis, Ioannis; Katsos, Ioannis

    2009-01-01

    Lipomas of the colon are benign tumors that rarely occur. Their size ranges from 2 mm to several cm. They are usually asymptomatic but occasionally they present with clinical manifestations depending on tumor size, localization and complications, which often lead to diagnostic difficulty. A 40-year-old man presented with massive rectal haemorrhage. During colonoscopy a giant polyp of over 50 mm in its bigger diameter, with a thick stalk of 2 cm, located in the transverse colon, was revealed. ...

  7. Neonatal cerebral oxygenation is not linked to foetal vasculitis and predicts intraventricular haemorrhage in preterm infants

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sorensen, Line C; Maroun, Lisa L; Borch, Klaus;

    2008-01-01

    Aim: The aim of the study was to compare the cerebral tissue oxygenation index (c-TOI) measured by near infrared spectroscopy (NIRS) in infants with and without foetal vasculitis. Methods: Twenty-four infants with placental signs of a foetal inflammatory response (FIR), foetal vasculitis, were.......002). Conclusion: Cerebral oxygenation was not affected in the first day of life in preterm infants born with foetal vasculitis, while cerebral oxygenation in infants that later developed intraventricular haemorrhage was impaired....

  8. Neonatal cerebral oxygenation is not linked to foetal vasculitis and predicts intraventricular haemorrhage in preterm infants

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sørensen, Line Carøe; Maroun, Lisa Leth; Borch, K.;

    2008-01-01

    AIM: The aim of the study was to compare the cerebral tissue oxygenation index (c-TOI) measured by near infrared spectroscopy (NIRS) in infants with and without foetal vasculitis. METHODS: Twenty-four infants with placental signs of a foetal inflammatory response (FIR), foetal vasculitis, were.......002). CONCLUSION: Cerebral oxygenation was not affected in the first day of life in preterm infants born with foetal vasculitis, while cerebral oxygenation in infants that later developed intraventricular haemorrhage was impaired Udgivelsesdato: 2008/11...

  9. Gastric Duplication: A Rare Cause of Massive Lower Gastrointestinal Haemorrhage, Chest Wall Mass, and Enterocutaneous Fistula

    OpenAIRE

    Emeka B. Kesieme; Dongo, Andrew E; Osime, Clement O.; Olomu, Sylvia C.; Awe, Oluwafemi O.; Gerald I Eze; Sylvester U. Eluehike

    2012-01-01

    Gastric duplications are uncommon developmental abnormality reported to present with different clinical scenarios. We present a 2-1/2-year-old Nigerian female who started having intermittent massive lower gastrointestinal haemorrhage at 5 months of age. She subsequently developed a lower chest wall mass and enterocutaneous fistula. She was found to have gastric duplication with fistulous communication with the descending colon, spleen, and lower chest wall. To the best of our knowledge, this...

  10. Left atrial appendage closure in patients with intracranial haemorrhage and atrial fibrillation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fayos-Vidal, F; Arzamendi-Aizpurua, D; Millán-Álvarez, X; Guisado-Alonso, D; Camps-Renom, P; Prats-Sánchez, L; Martínez-Domeño, A; Delgado-Mederos, R; Martí-Fàbregas, J

    2017-08-30

    The use of oral anticoagulants in patients with a history of atrial fibrillation (AF) and intracranial haemorrhage (ICH) is controversial on account of the risk of haemorrhagic stroke recurrence. This study presents our experience regarding the safety and efficacy of percutaneous left atrial appendage closure (LAAC), an alternative to anticoagulation in these patients. We conducted a retrospective, single-centre, observational study. LAAC was performed in patients with a history of ICH and non-valvular AF. Risk of ischaemic and haemorrhagic events was estimated using the CHA2DS2-VASc and HAS-BLED scales. We recorded periprocedural complications, IHC recurrence, cerebral/systemic embolism, mortality and use of antithrombotic drugs following the procedure. LAAC was performed in 9 patients (7 men, 2 women) using the AMPLATZER Amulet device in 7 cases and the AMPLATZER Cardiac Plug device in 2. Mean age was 72.7±8.2 years. Time between ICH and LAAC was less than one month in 5 patients and more than one month in 4 patients. Median CHA2DS2-VASc score was 4 (interquartile range of 2.5). Median HAS-BLED score was 3 (interquartile range of 0). No periprocedural complications were recorded. All patients received single anti-platelet therapy (clopidogrel in 5 patients, aspirin in 4) after the procedure; 5 patients received this treatment for 6 months and 4 received it indefinitely. No ischaemic or haemorrhagic events were recorded during follow-up (mean duration of 15 months). In our series, LAAC was found to be safe and effective in patients with a history of ICH who required anticoagulation due to AF. Copyright © 2017 Sociedad Española de Neurología. Publicado por Elsevier España, S.L.U. All rights reserved.

  11. Role of carotid body for neuronal protection in experimental subarachnoid haemorrhage

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mehmet Dumlu Aydın

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Objective: Carotid bodies are known as main arterialchemoregulatory units. Despite well known that carotidbodies have an important role in cerebral circulation andblood pH regulation, their roles has not been investigatedin subarachnoid haemorrhage. We investigated whetherthere is neuroprotective effect of neuron density of carotidbodies on the brain in subarachnoid haemorrhage.Methods: Twenty hybrid rabbits were studied. Four ofthem were used as reference group (n=4 and the remainingwas obliged to subarachnoid haemorrhage by injectingautologous blood into their cisterna magna (n=16and sacrificed after one month. All carotid bodies andbrains examined histopathologically using by stereologicmethods. The relationship between the neuronal densityof carotid body and degenerated neuron density of thehippocampus were compared statistically.Results: Five rabbits with subarachnoid haemorrhagedead during the follow-up time (n=5. The average neuronaldensity of carotid body was 4500±500 cells/mm3and of hippocampus 170.000±17.000 cell/mm3 in normalrabbit family. The degenerated neuron density ofthe hippocampus was 20.000±3.000 cells/mm3 in rabbitswith have high neuron density of carotid body and was65.000±8.000 cells/mm3 in rabbits with low neuron densityof carotid body. The differences between the neuronaldensity of carotid body and the degenerated neuron numbersof the hippocampus were significant.Conclusion: The neuron density of carotid body mayplay an important role on the protection of brain in subarachnoidhaemorrhage.Key words: Subarachnoid haemorrhage, carotid body,hippocampus, neurodegeneration, cerebral ischemia

  12. Internal iliac artery embolisation for intractable bladder haemorrhage in the peri-operative phase

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gujral, S.; Bell, R.; Kabala, J.; Persad, R.

    1999-01-01

    Intractable haemorrhage from the bladder wall during transurethral resection of bladder tumour is uncommon but potentially catastrophic. Internal iliac artery embolisation is a minimally invasive technique, which is now widely practised to stop bleeding from branches of these arteries in situations including pelvic malignancy, obstetric and gynaecological emergencies and trauma. We report its successful use peri-operatively, in an unfit, elderly patient with uncontrolled bleeding.


Keywords: embolisation; internal iliac artery; transurethral resection of bladder tumour PMID:10448498

  13. Superior cerebellar aneurysm causing subarachnoid haemorrhage in a 17-year-old with alagille syndrome.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    O'Connell, David

    2012-04-01

    Alagille syndrome is a rare autosomal dominant condition characterised by mutation in Jagged1 gene. Intracranial aneurysms may be seen in this condition and may present as subarachnoid hemorrhage. We describe the first case of superior cerebellar aneurysm rupture causing WFNS grade 1 subarachnoid haemorrhage in a 17-year-old girl. The clinical condition and management of this rare occurrence is discussed with a review of literature.

  14. Cardiopulmonary malformations in the inv/inv mouse.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McQuinn, T C; Miga, D E; Mjaatvedt, C H; Phelps, A L; Wessels, A

    2001-05-01

    The inv/inv mouse carries an insertional mutation in the inversin gene, (inv, for inversion of embryonic turning). Previously it had been reported that almost 100% of the homozygous offspring (inv/inv) were characterized by situs inversus totalis. In this report we identify the spectrum of cardiopulmonary anatomical abnormalities in inv/inv mice surviving to birth to determine whether the abnormalities seen are of the categories classically associated with human situs abnormalities. Stillborn mice, offspring that died unexpectedly (within 48 hr after birth), and neonates with phenotypic characteristics of situs inversus (right-sided stomachs, growth failure or jaundice) were processed for standard histological examination. Of 173 offspring, 34 (20%) neonates (11 stillborn, 9 unexpected deaths, and 14 mice with situs inversus phenotype) were examined, 27 of which were genotyped to be inv/inv. Interestingly, three inv/inv mice (11%) were found to have situs solitus. Twenty-four had situs inversus with normal, mirror-image cardiac anatomy (dextrocardia with atrioventricular concordance, ventriculoarterial concordance and a right aortic arch). The overall incidence of cardiovascular anomalies observed was 10 out of 27 (37%). The most frequent severe malformation, identified in 3 out of 27 animals, was a complex consisting of pulmonary infundibular stenosis/atresia with absence of pulmonary valve tissue and a ventricular septal defect. The pulmonary phenotype in inv/inv mice was situs inversus with occasional minor lobar abnormalities. We conclude that 1) cardiopulmonary malformations in inv/inv mice are not rare (37%), 2) the cardiopulmonary malformations observed in inv/inv specimens are not of the spectrum typically associated with human heterotaxia. In particular, inv/inv mice have a propensity for defects in the development of the right ventricular outflow tract and the interventricular septum, and 3) approximately one out of ten inv/inv mice is born with situs

  15. Duodenal Wedge Resection for Large Gastrointestinal Stromal Tumour Presenting with Life-Threatening Haemorrhage

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alexander Shaw

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Background. Duodenal gastrointestinal stromal tumours (GISTs are an uncommon malignancy of the gastrointestinal (GI tract. We present a case of life-threatening haemorrhage caused by a large ulcerating duodenal GIST arising from the third part of the duodenum managed by a limited duodenal wedge resection. Case Presentation. A 61-year-old patient presented with acute life-threatening gastrointestinal bleeding. After oesophagogastroduodenoscopy failed to demonstrate the source of bleeding, a 5 cm ulcerating exophytic mass originating from the third part of the duodenum was identified at laparotomy. A successful limited wedge resection of the tumour mass was performed. Histopathology subsequently confirmed a duodenal GIST. The patient remained well at 12-month followup with no evidence of local recurrence or metastatic spread. Conclusion. Duodenal GISTs can present with life-threatening upper GI haemorrhage. In the context of acute haemorrhage, even relatively large duodenal GISTs can be treated by limited wedge resection. This is a preferable alternative to duodenopancreatectomy with lower morbidity and mortality but comparable oncological outcome.

  16. Acute Headache at Emergency Department: Reversible Cerebral Vasoconstriction Syndrome Complicated by Subarachnoid Haemorrhage and Cerebral Infarction

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. Yger

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Introduction. Reversible cerebral vasoconstriction syndrome is becoming widely accepted as a rare cause of both ischemic and haemorrhagic stroke and should be evocated in case of thunderclap headaches associated with stroke. We present the case of a patient with ischemic stroke associated with cortical subarachnoid haemorrhage (cSAH and reversible diffuse arteries narrowing, leading to the diagnosis of reversible vasoconstriction syndrome. Case Report. A 48-year-old woman came to the emergency department because of an unusual thunderclap headache. The computed tomography of the brain completed by CT-angiography was unremarkable. Eleven days later, she was readmitted because of a left hemianopsia. One day after her admission, she developed a sudden left hemiparesis. The brain MRI showed ischemic lesions in the right frontal and occipital lobe and diffuse cSAH. The angiography showed vasoconstriction of the right anterior cerebral artery and stenosis of both middle cerebral arteries. Nimodipine treatment was initiated and vasoconstriction completely regressed on day 16 after the first headache. Conclusion. Our case shows a severe reversible cerebral vasoconstriction syndrome where both haemorrhagic and ischemic complications were present at the same time. The history we reported shows that reversible cerebral vasoconstriction syndrome is still underrecognized, in particular in general emergency departments.

  17. Serial CT and MRI of ischaemic cerebral infarcts: frequency and clinical impact of haemorrhagic transformation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mayer, T.E.; Brueckmann, H. [Muenchen Univ. (Germany). Abt. fuer Neuroradiologie; Schulte-Altedorneburg, G. [Dept. of Radiology/Neuroradiology, University Medical School of Luebeck (Germany); Droste, D.W. [Dept. of Neurology, University Medical School of Luebeck (Germany)

    2000-04-01

    The frequency, predisposing factors and clinical consequences of haemorrhagic infarcts and damaged blood-brain barrier as shown by contrast enhancement (CE) in ischaemic cerebral infarcts are controversial. We prospectively compared the sensitivity of CT and MRI to haemorrhagic transformation (HT) and CE. We also wished to investigate the clinical significance of HT and factors possibly associated with it. We studied 36 patients with acute ischaemic infarcts in the middle cerebral artery territory during the first 2 weeks after the ictus. After CT and rating of the neurological deficit on admission, serial examinations with clinical neuromonitoring, contrast-enhanced CT and MRI were done on the same day. The occurrence and severity of HT were correlated with CE, stroke mechanism, infarct size, development of neurological deficits and antithrombotic treatment. The frequency of HT detected by MRI was 80 %. CE usually preceded HT or was seen simultaneously. MRI had a higher sensitivity than CT to HT and CE. Severity of HT was positively correlated with infarct size (P < 0.01). HT had no influence on patient's neurological status. Neither the type of antithrombotic treatment nor the stroke mechanism was associated with the severity of HT. No parenchymal haemorrhage occurred. (orig.)

  18. Liver, meconium, haemorrhage: the value of T1-weighted images in fetal MRI

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zizka, Jan; Elias, Pavel; Belobradek, Zdenek; Klzo, Ludovit [Charles University Hospital, Department of Radiology, Hradec Kralove (Czech Republic); Hodik, Karel [Charles University Hospital, Department of Obstetrics and Gynaecology, Hradec Kralove (Czech Republic); Tintera, Jaroslav [Institute of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, MRI Unit, Prague (Czech Republic); Juttnerova, Vera [Charles University Hospital, Department of Medical Genetics, Hradec Kralove (Czech Republic)

    2006-08-15

    Ultrafast T2-weighted (T2-W) MRI sequences are currently considered a routine technique for fetal MR imaging. Limited experience exists with fetal T1-weighted (T1-W) imaging techniques. To determine MRI patterns of some fetal abdominal or haemorrhagic disorders with particular respect to the diagnostic value of T1-W images. In addition to standard T2-W single-shot sequences, T1-W single-shot and/or multislice sequences were employed in 25 MR examinations performed in 23 fetuses between 20 and 36 weeks of gestation for more detailed assessment of liver, meconium-filled digestive tract, haemorrhage, or further characterization of a fetal abdominal mass. Diagnostic value and presence of motion artefacts on T1-W images was recorded in each case. T1-W images enabled superior delineation of fetal liver and large intestine. They provided additional diagnostic information in 9 (39%) of 23 fetuses. One false-positive and one false-negative MRI diagnosis of malrotation anomaly were encountered. Use of single-shot T1-W sequences reduced the occurrence of motion artefacts in 64%. Our results suggest that the specific signal properties of methaemoglobin, meconium and liver are sufficiently important for T1-W sequences to become a routine part of fetal MRI protocols when dealing with digestive tract anomalies, diaphragmatic and abdominal wall defects, intraabdominal masses, and fetal haemorrhage. (orig.)

  19. Quantitative analysis of particles, genomes and infectious particles in supernatants of haemorrhagic fever virus cell cultures

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hedlund Kjell-Olof

    2011-02-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Information on the replication of viral haemorrhagic fever viruses is not readily available and has never been analysed in a comparative approach. Here, we compared the cell culture growth characteristics of haemorrhagic fever viruses (HFV, of the Arenaviridae, Filoviridae, Bunyaviridae, and Flavivridae virus families by performing quantitative analysis of cell culture supernatants by (i electron microscopy for the quantification of virus particles, (ii quantitative real time PCR for the quantification of genomes, and (iii determination of focus forming units by coating fluorescent antibodies to infected cell monolayers for the quantification of virus infectivity. The comparative analysis revealed that filovirus and RVFV replication results in a surplus of genomes but varying degrees of packaging efficiency and infectious particles. More efficient replication and packaging was observed for Lassa virus, and Dengue virus resulting in a better yield of infectious particles while, YFV turned out to be most efficient with only 4 particles inducing one FFU. For Crimean-Congo haemorrhagic fever virus (CCHFV a surplus of empty shells was observed with only one in 24 particles equipped with a genome. The complete particles turned out to be extraordinarily infectious.

  20. Motor dysfunction on the nonhemiplegic side in patients with intracerebral haemorrhage.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gupta P

    2000-01-01

    Full Text Available This study was undertaken to evaluate the motor dysfunction on the nonhemiplegic side in patients with acute intracerebral haemorrhage (ICH and correlate these with radiological and motor evoked potentials findings. 28 patients (23 males, 5 females, with CT proven ICH within 10 days of ictus were subjected to clinical evaluation and central motor conduction studies (CMCT of upper limbs. The patient′s age ranged between 28 and 84 years. Motor signs on the nonhemiplegic side were present in 17 patients in the form of increased tone (10, hyperreflexia (13 and extensor plantar response (10. Sixteen of these patients had severe weakness on the hemiplegic side. Most of the patients had putaminal haemorrhage (13 and thalamic and lobar haemorrhage was seen in 2 patients each. The motor dysfunction on the nonhemiplegic side correlated with midline shift but not with the size of haematoma. CMCT findings correlated with motor signs on the nonhemiplegic side in 6 patients. In the patients without any signs on the nonhemiplegic side, CMCT was normal. Out of 17 patients with motor dysfunction on the nonhemiplegic side 9 revealed improvement in CMCT at 1 month followup. The patients with CMCT abnormalities on the nonhemiplegic side either died (2 or had poor outcome (9. Motor dysfunction on the nonhemiplegic side may be due to tentorial herniation and suggests a poor outcome.

  1. Update on the Surgical Trial in Lobar Intracerebral Haemorrhage (STICH II: statistical analysis plan

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gregson Barbara A

    2012-11-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Previous studies had suggested that the outcome for patients with spontaneous lobar intracerebral haemorrhage (ICH and no intraventricular haemorrhage (IVH might be improved with early evacuation of the haematoma. The Surgical Trial in Lobar Intracerebral Haemorrhage (STICH II set out to establish whether a policy of earlier surgical evacuation of the haematoma in selected patients with spontaneous lobar ICH would improve outcome compared to a policy of initial conservative treatment. It is an international, multi-centre, prospective randomised parallel group trial of early surgery in patients with spontaneous lobar ICH. Outcome is measured at six months via a postal questionnaire. Results Recruitment to the study began on 27 November 2006 and closed on 15 August 2012 by which time 601 patients had been recruited. The protocol was published in Trials (http://www.trialsjournal.com/content/12/1/124/. This update presents the analysis plan for the study without reference to the unblinded data. The trial data will not be unblinded until after follow-up is completed in early 2013. The main trial results will be presented in spring 2013 with the aim to publish in a peer-reviewed journal at the same time. Conclusion The data from the trial will provide evidence on the benefits and risks of early surgery in patients with lobar ICH. Trial registration ISRCTN: ISRCTN22153967

  2. Contrast-enhanced magnetic resonance imaging for the detection of acute haemorrhagic necrotizing pancreatitis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Piironen, A. [Department of Radiology, Helsinki University Central Hospital, Helsinki (Finland); Kivisaari, R. [Department of Radiology, Helsinki University Central Hospital, Helsinki (Finland); Pitkaeranta, P. [Department of Radiology, Helsinki University Central Hospital, Helsinki (Finland); Poutanen, V.P. [Department of Radiology, Helsinki University Central Hospital, Helsinki (Finland); Laippala, P. [School of Public Health/Biometry Unit, Tampere University, Tampere (Finland); Laurila, P. [Department of Pathology, Helsinki Univ. (Finland); Kivisaari, L. [Department of Radiology, Helsinki University Central Hospital, Helsinki (Finland)

    1997-02-01

    Eleven piglets with haemorrhagic necrotizing pancreatitis and nine piglets with oedematous pancreatitis were imaged using a multi-breath-hold TurboFLASH (TR 6.5 ms, TE 3 ms, TI 300 ms, flip angle 8 , three slices) pre-excited T1-weighted sequence with an IV bolus injection of gadopentetate dimeglumine (Gd-DTPA, 0.3 mmol/kg) as a contrast agent to show dynamic contrast enhancement of the pancreas by MRI. All piglets were imaged according to the same protocol before inducing the disease. Following the IV Gd-DTPA bolus, time-enhancement curve of the pancreas during haemorrhagic necrotizing pancreatitis was significantly lower than during oedematous pancreatitis. The enhancement curves for the healthy piglets and piglets with oedematous pancreatitis did not differ significantly. Each piglet served as its own control. Because the results of this initial study are similar to those obtained with contrast-enhanced CT, we conclude that our results may encourage further clinical trials, and contrast-enhanced dynamic MRI may be an alternative to the established method of CT for diagnosing acute haemorrhagic necrotizing pancreatitis. (orig.). With 3 figs.

  3. Multi-detector CT: review of its use in acute GI haemorrhage

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Anthony, S.; Milburn, S. [Department of Radiology, John Radcliffe Hospital, Oxford (United Kingdom); Uberoi, R. [Department of Radiology, John Radcliffe Hospital, Oxford (United Kingdom)], E-mail: raman.uberoi@orh.nhs.uk

    2007-10-15

    The advent of multi-section computed tomography (CT) technology allows the non-invasive assessment of the arterial tree. Using current software, it is now possible to produce high-quality, angiographic-like images that can be used to plan and guide therapeutic procedures. One such clinical situation is the assessment of patients with acute gastrointestinal (GI) haemorrhage. Multi-section CT has a number of advantages over conventional angiography in this situation. The simplicity and non-invasive nature of the technique compared with conventional angiography make CT angiography possible in situations where conventional angiography is not available. Movement artefact from respiration and peristalsis is a common problem in the interpretation of conventional angiography; this is essentially abolished with rapid acquisition times and the use of multi-planar images to remove overlying bowel loops. Cross-sectional imaging with the ability for multi-planar reconstruction allows the accurate anatomical localization of the bleeding site, as well as an assessment of the underlying pathology: this can be used to plan therapy (embolization or surgery). The aim of this paper is to review the current use of CT in the investigation of patients with GI haemorrhage, illustrated with images from our Institution. For patients in whom GI endoscopy has failed to establish a diagnosis, we propose multi-section CT angiography as the initial imaging investigation in acute GI haemorrhage.

  4. Henoch-Schönlein purpura with intracerebral haemorrhage in an adult patient: a case report

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Karamadoukis Lazarus

    2008-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Introduction Henoch-Schönlein purpura is a small vessel vasculitis that affects mainly the skin, joints, gastrointestinal tract and kidneys. The central nervous system is also occasionally affected, although the majority of patients experience only mild symptoms such as headaches and behavioural changes. Intracerebral haemorrhage is a rare complication of Henoch-Schönlein purpura that so far has mainly been described in children and young adolescence. Case presentation We describe a 42-year-old man with Henoch-Schönlein purpura who developed an acute intracerebral haemorrhage that coincided with a reactivation of his vasculitis and the development of renal failure following discontinuation of steroids. In this patient, both the Henoch-Schönlein purpura and his neurological symptoms were successfully treated with intravenous cyclophosphamide and methylprednisolone, followed by a short course of oral cyclophosphamide and long-term oral prednisolone. His renal function also recovered sufficiently not to require renal replacement therapy. Conclusion The management of Henoch-Schönlein nephritis remains unclear, especially in the presence of severe complications such as intracerebral haemorrhage. We describe a successful outcome in such a patient.

  5. Hypovolemic shock after labial and lingual frenulectomy: A report of two cases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tracy, Lauren F; Gomez, Gabriel; Overton, Lewis J; McClain, Wade G

    2017-09-01

    Lingual and labial frenulectomy are commonly performed as an outpatient procedure, either in an office setting or under general anesthesia. Frenulectomy is generally regarded by both otolaryngologists and dentists as a straightforward and low-risk procedure with limited evidence-based indications and similarly few contraindications. We describe two cases of hypovolemic shock occurring after outpatient frenulectomy requiring emergent interventions of cardiopulmonary resuscitation and blood transfusion. These rare, but life-threatening outcomes warrant recognition as potential complications for the presumed benign labial and lingual frenulectomy. We additionally briefly review indications for upper labial and lingual frenulectomy. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  6. Collisionless parallel shocks

    Science.gov (United States)

    Khabibrakhmanov, I. KH.; Galeev, A. A.; Galinskii, V. L.

    1993-01-01

    Consideration is given to a collisionless parallel shock based on solitary-type solutions of the modified derivative nonlinear Schroedinger equation (MDNLS) for parallel Alfven waves. The standard derivative nonlinear Schroedinger equation is generalized in order to include the possible anisotropy of the plasma distribution and higher-order Korteweg-de Vies-type dispersion. Stationary solutions of MDNLS are discussed. The anisotropic nature of 'adiabatic' reflections leads to the asymmetric particle distribution in the upstream as well as in the downstream regions of the shock. As a result, nonzero heat flux appears near the front of the shock. It is shown that this causes the stochastic behavior of the nonlinear waves, which can significantly contribute to the shock thermalization.

  7. Shock structures of astrospheres

    CERN Document Server

    Scherer, Klaus; Kleimann, Jens; Wiengarten, Tobias; Bomans, Dominik J; Weis, Kerstin

    2015-01-01

    The interaction between a supersonic stellar wind and a (super-)sonic interstellar wind has recently been viewed with new interest. We here first give an overview of the modeling, which includes the heliosphere as an example of a special astrosphere. Then we concentrate on the shock structures of fluid models, especially of hydrodynamic (HD) models. More involved models taking into account radiation transfer and magnetic fields are briefly sketched. Even the relatively simple HD models show a rich shock structure, which might be observable in some objects. We employ a single fluid model to study these complex shock structures, and compare the results obtained including heating and cooling with results obtained without these effects. Furthermore, we show that in the hypersonic case valuable information of the shock structure can be obtained from the Rankine-Hugoniot equations. We solved the Euler equations for the single fluid case and also for a case including cooling and heating. We also discuss the analytic...

  8. Counseling For Future Shock

    Science.gov (United States)

    Morgan, Lewis B.

    1974-01-01

    In this article the author looks at some of the searing prophecies made by Alvin Toffler in his book Future Shock and relates them to the world of the professional counselor and the clientele the counselor attempts to serve. (Author)

  9. Cardiopulmonary resuscitation in the elderly: a clinical and ethical perspective

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2007-01-01

    The daily practice of cardiopulmonary resuscitation (CPR) in elderly patients has brought up the attention of outcome research and resource allocation. Determinants to predict survival have been well identified. There has been empirical evidence that CPR is of doubtful utility in the geriatric population, more studies have showed controversial data. Sometimes situations in which CPR needs to be given in the elderly, causes stress to healthcare providers, due to lack of communication of the patient's wishes and the belief that it will not be successful. It is of importance to state that we have the duty to identify on time the patients that will most likely benefit from CPR, and find out the preferences of the same. Whenever it is possible to institute these guidelines, we will avoid patient suffering.

  10. Certified Basic Life Support Instructors Assess Cardiopulmonary Resuscitation Skills Poorly

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hansen, Camilla; Rasmussen, Stinne E; Kristensen, Mette Amalie

    2016-01-01

    Introduction: High-quality cardiopulmonary resuscitation (CPR) improves survival from cardiac arrest. During basic life support (BLS) training, instructors assess CPR skills to enhance learning outcome. Emergency department staff and senior residents have been shown to assess chest compression...... quality poorly. Currently no studies have evaluated CPR assessment among certified BLS instructors. The aim of this study was to investigate certified BLS instructors’ assessment of chest compressions and rescue breathing.Methods: Data were collected at BLS courses for medical students at Aarhus...... University, Denmark. In pairs, BLS instructors, certified by the European Resuscitation Council, evaluated each learner in an end-of-course cardiac arrest test. Instructors’ assessments were compared with CPR quality data collected from the resuscitation manikin. Correct chest compressions were defined as ≥2...

  11. Vacuum-assisted drainage in cardiopulmonary bypass: advantages and disadvantages

    Science.gov (United States)

    de Carvalho Filho, Élio Barreto; Marson, Fernando Augusto de Lima; da Costa, Loredana Nilkenes Gomes; Antunes, Nilson

    2014-01-01

    Systematic review of vacuum assisted drainage in cardiopulmonary bypass, demonstrating its advantages and disadvantages, by case reports and evidence about its effects on microcirculation. We conducted a systematic search on the period 1997-2012, in the databases PubMed, Medline, Lilacs and SciELO. Of the 70 selected articles, 26 were included in the review. Although the vacuum assisted drainage has significant potential for complications and requires appropriate technology and professionalism, prevailed in literature reviewed the concept that vacuum assisted drainage contributed in reducing the rate of transfusions, hemodilutions, better operative field, no significant increase in hemolysis, reduced complications surgical, use of lower prime and of smaller diameter cannulas. PMID:25140478

  12. Voice advisory manikin versus instructor facilitated training in cardiopulmonary resuscitation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Isbye, Dan L; Høiby, Pernilla; Rasmussen, Maria B

    2008-01-01

    individual training. AIMS: To compare a VAM (ResusciAnne CPR skills station, Laerdal Medical A/S, Norway) with IF training in CPR using a bag-valve-mask (BVM) in terms of skills retention after 3 months. METHODS: Forty-three second year medical students were included and CPR performance (ERC Guidelines...... training (P=0.12). However, the IF group performed significantly better than the VAM group in the total score, both immediately after (P=0.0008) and 3 months after training (P=0.02). This difference was primarily related to the BVM skills. CONCLUSION: Skill retention in CPR using a bag-valve-mask......BACKGROUND: Training of healthcare staff in cardiopulmonary resuscitation (CPR) is time-consuming and costly. It has been suggested to replace instructor facilitated (IF) training with an automated voice advisory manikin (VAM), which increases skill level by continuous verbal feedback during...

  13. Ultrafiltration Technology and Its Application in Cardiopulmonary Bypass

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zhang Kun

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available The application of cardiopulmonary bypass (CPB technology makes it possible to safely conduct open-heart surgery. However, as an invasive adjuvant therapeutic measure, it cures and greatly injures a human body simultaneously. In CPB, hemodilution, the contact between blood and the surface of foreign matter and other various factors activate the stress response in the body and causes tissue edema, increase in total body water and systemic inflammatory response syndrome (SIRS; in severe cases, they may give rise to organ dysfunction. Ultrafiltration (UF not only can remove the redundant moisture effectively from the body after CPB, concentrate blood cells and recover body fluid equilibrium, but also can clear away part of inflammatory medium, improve postoperative organ function and enhance the clinical effect after an open-heart surgery.

  14. Electroencephalography during surgery with cardiopulmonary bypass and hypothermia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bashein, G; Nessly, M L; Bledsoe, S W; Townes, B D; Davis, K B; Coppel, D B; Hornbein, T F

    1992-06-01

    After more than 30 yr of use, electroencephalographic (EEG) monitoring during cardiopulmonary bypass has not gained wide clinical acceptance. To assess its utility to predict central nervous system injury, two-channel recordings were made from 78 patients undergoing cardiopulmonary bypass and anesthetized with fentanyl/diazepam/enflurane. The perfusion regimen included the use of high pump flow, a bubble oxygenator, and no arterial tubing filter. Target values were 28-32 degrees C for the minimum rectal temperature, 60-80 mmHg for mean arterial pressure, and 20-25% for hematocrit. Eight descriptors of the Fourier power spectra of the EEG were calculated off-line, and outcome comparisons were made with the results from neuropsychological tests. Among 58 patients yielding complete data of acceptable quality, a statistically significant reduction in total power was observed from prebypass to postbypass, accompanied by an increase in the fractional power in the theta and beta frequency bands and in the spectral edge frequency. The shifts in total and theta power were weakly associated with short-term but not with long-term changes in neuropsychological scores. Nearly 40% of the patients' EEGs were corrupted with electrical noise at some time during bypass. In 15 patients selected for having high-quality recordings and no neuropsychological deficit, an extensive statistical analysis failed to reveal any consistent variation in the EEG descriptors with hypothermia. Under the conditions studied, it appears that for other than gross signal dropout, the strong background variability in the EEG makes it have little value for detecting harbingers of brain injury.

  15. Sequestration of fentanyl by the cardiopulmonary bypass (CPBP).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Koren, G; Crean, P; Klein, J; Goresky, G; Villamater, J; MacLeod, S M

    1984-01-01

    Immediately following the connection of pediatric patients to cardiopulmonary bypass we have consistently observed a steep decrease in fentanyl plasma concentration (74 +/- 8.7%) (mean +/- SD), much greater than would have been expected from hemodilution alone (50.6% +/- 12.0%) (p less than 0.0001). Priming of the pump with 20 ng/ml of fentanyl before connection to the patients did not prevent this phenomenon. In order to study the possibility that fentanyl is sequestered by the bypass, levels of the primed drug in the bypass were assessed before connecting the pump to the children and a steep fall from 20 ng/ml to zero was shown before initiation of bypass. Pharmacokinetic assessment of fentanyl in a closed pump circuit showed that levels of 120 ng/ml fall to 2 ng/ml within 3 min and remain stable at the lower concentration for at least 30 min. Further studies have identified the membrane oxygenator as the major site of fentanyl sequestration. Concentrations across the membrane fall from 120 ng/ml to 10 ng/ml. The attached siliconized tubing is associated with a minor binding effect sufficient to reduce concentrations from 110 to 84 ng/ml. The pvc tubing, aluminium heat exchanger and plastic reservoir had no binding effect on fentanyl. The possibility that a decrease in fentanyl protein binding caused the fall in serum concentration was checked in 5 patients undergoing open heart surgery. After initiation of the cardiopulmonary bypass, there was a significant decrease in albumin serum concentrations from 32.0 +/- 2.3 mM to 15.0 +/- 1.6 mM (p less than 0.0001).(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS)

  16. Antioxidative effect of propofol during cardiopulmonary bypass in adults

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Shi-hai ZHANG; Shou-yong WANG; Shang-long YAO

    2004-01-01

    AIM: To investigate the antioxidative potential of propofol (an intravenous anesthetic with a chemical structure similar to phenol-based free radical scavengers such as vitamin E) during cardiopulmonary bypass (CPB). METHODS:Thirty adult patients referred for elective cardiac procedure with CPB were included and randomly allocated to a nously for anesthesia maintenance, whereas those allocated to the control group received fentanyl 10 μg/kg intravenously and inhaled enflurane (1%-1.5 %). Blood samples were collected at 7 time points: before the start of CPB,at 30 and 60 min of CPB, at the conclusion of CPB, 10 min after the administration of protamine, and 12 and 24 h after the cessation of CPB. Plasma levels of free F2-isoprostanes (sensitive markers of free radicals production)and complement C5a were determined by mass-spectrometric assay and enzyme immunoassay, respectively. Neutrophil adhesion to endothelial cells was observed at x200 magnification under a light microscope. RESULTS:Levels of F2-isoprostanes, complement C5a and neutrophil adhesion rate increased significantly during and after CPB in both groups. There were significantly higher levels of F2-isoprostanes, C5a, and more neutrophils adhering to endothelial cells in the control group than those in the propofol group, respectively. CONCLUSION: Cardiopulmonary bypass is associated with a great production of damaging free radicals. Propofol may be beneficial both as an anesthetic and as a potent free radical scavenger in patients presenting pathologies associated with free radical reactions during CPB.

  17. Coronary blood flow during cardiopulmonary resuscitation in swine

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bellamy, R.F.; DeGuzman, L.R.; Pedersen, D.C.

    1984-01-01

    Recent papers have raised doubt as to the magnitude of coronary blood flow during closed-chest cardiopulmonary resuscitation. We will describe experiments that concern the methods of coronary flow measurement during cardiopulmonary resuscitation. Nine anesthetized swine were instrumented to allow simultaneous measurements of coronary blood flow by both electromagnetic cuff flow probes and by the radiomicrosphere technique. Cardiac arrest was caused by electrical fibrillation and closed-chest massage was performed by a Thumper (Dixie Medical Inc., Houston). The chest was compressed transversely at a rate of 66 strokes/min. Compression occupied one-half of the massage cycle. Three different Thumper piston strokes were studied: 1.5, 2, and 2.5 inches. Mean aortic pressure and total systemic blood flow measured by the radiomicrosphere technique increased as Thumper piston stroke was lengthened (mean +/- SD): 1.5 inch stroke, 23 +/- 4 mm Hg, 525 +/- 195 ml/min; 2 inch stroke, 33 +/- 5 mm Hg, 692 +/- 202 ml/min; 2.5 inch stroke, 40 +/- 6 mm Hg, 817 +/- 321 ml/min. Both methods of coronary flow measurement (electromagnetic (EMF) and radiomicrosphere (RMS)) gave similar results in technically successful preparations (data expressed as percent prearrest flow mean +/- 1 SD): 1.5 inch stroke, EMF 12 +/- 5%, RMS 16 +/- 5%; 2 inch stroke, EMF 30 +/- 6%, RMS 26 +/- 11%; 2.5 inch stroke, EMF 50 +/- 12%, RMS 40 +/- 20%. The phasic coronary flow signal during closed-chest compression indicated that all perfusion occurred during the relaxation phase of the massage cycle. We concluded that coronary blood flow is demonstrable during closed-chest massage, but that the magnitude is unlikely to be more than a fraction of normal.

  18. Risk Factors for Intracranial Haemorrhage in Accidents Associated with the Shower or Bathtub.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Thomas C Sauter

    Full Text Available There has been little research on bathroom accidents. It is unknown whether the shower or bathtub are connected with special dangers in different age groups or whether there are specific risk factors for adverse outcomes.This cross-sectional analysis included all direct admissions to the Emergency Department at the Inselspital Bern, Switzerland from 1 January 2000 to 28 February 2014 after accidents associated with the bathtub or shower. Time, age, location, mechanism and diagnosis were assessed and special risk factors were examined. Patient groups with and without intracranial bleeding were compared with the Mann-Whitney U test.The association of risk factors with intracranial bleeding was investigated using univariate analysis with Fisher's exact test or logistic regression. The effects of different variables on cerebral bleeding were analysed by multivariate logistic regression.Two hundred and eighty (280 patients with accidents associated with the bathtub or shower were included in our study. Two hundred and thirty-five (235 patients suffered direct trauma by hitting an object (83.9% and traumatic brain injury (TBI was detected in 28 patients (10%. Eight (8 of the 27 patients with mild traumatic brain injuries (GCS 13-15, (29.6% exhibited intracranial haemorrhage. All patients with intracranial haemorrhage were older than 48 years and needed in-hospital treatment. Patients with intracranial haemorrhage were significantly older and had higher haemoglobin levels than the control group with TBI but without intracranial bleeding (p<0.05 for both.In univariate analysis, we found that intracranial haemorrhage in patients with TBI was associated with direct trauma in general and with age (both p<0.05, but not with the mechanism of the fall, its location (shower or bathtub or the gender of the patient. Multivariate logistic regression analysis identified only age as a risk factor for cerebral bleeding (p<0.05; OR 1.09 (CI 1.01;1.171.In patients

  19. Imported viral haemorrhagic fever with a potential for person-to-person transmission: review and recommendations for initial management of a suspected case in Belgium

    OpenAIRE

    Colebunders, R; Esbroeck, M.; Moreau, M; Borchert, M

    2002-01-01

    Viral haemorrhagic fevers are caused by a wide range of viruses. There are 4 types of viruses well known to spread from person to person and able to cause nosocomial outbreaks with a high case fatality rate: an arenavirus (Lassa fever and more exceptionally the Junin and Machupo virus), a bunyavirus (Crimean-Congo haemorrhagic fever) and the Filoviridae (Ebola and Marburg viruses). So far there have been only a limited number of imported cases of viral haemorrhagic fever in industrialized cou...

  20. Mass cardiopulmonary resuscitation 99--survey results of a multi-organisational effort in public education in cardiopulmonary resuscitation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fong, Y T; Anantharaman, V; Lim, S H; Leong, K F; Pokkan, G

    2001-05-01

    Mass cardiopulmonary resuscitation (CPR) 99 in Singapore was a large-scale multi-organisational effort to increase awareness and impart basic cardiac life support skills to the lay public. Mass CPR demonstrations followed by small group manikin practice with instructor guidance was conducted simultaneously in three centres, four times a day. The exercise enlisted 15 community organisations and received the support of 19 other organisations. Three hundred and ninety-eight manikins and 500 instructors ('I's) were mobilised to teach an audience of 6000 participants ('P's). Two surveys, for 'I's and 'P's were conducted with respondent rates of 65.8% and 50%, respectively. 73.6% of the P-respondents ('P-R's) indicated that they attended the event to increase their knowledge. 66.9% were willing to attend a more comprehensive CPR course. Concerns and perceptions in performing bystander CPR were assessed.

  1. Wireless System for Continuous Cardiopulmonary Monitoring in a Space Environment Project

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — We propose to develop the NJM Sense-It system based on small sensor tags, which include a cardiopulmonary MEMS sensor for measuring heartbeat and breath rates...

  2. Knowledge and preferences regarding cardiopulmonary resuscitation : A survey among older patients

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Zijlstra, Trudy J.; Leenman-Dekker, Sonja J.; Oldenhuis, Hilbrand K. E.; Bosveld, Henk E. P.; Berendsen, Annette J.

    Objective: Survival rates following cardiopulmonary resuscitation (CPR) are low for older people, and are associated with a high risk of neurological damage. This study investigated the relationship between the preferences, knowledge of survival chances, and characteristics among older people

  3. Increased neutrophil priming and sensitization before commencing cardiopulmonary bypass in cardiac surgical patients

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Gu, YJ; Schoen, P; Tigchelaar, [No Value; Loef, BG; Ebels, T; Rankin, AJ; van Oeveren, W

    2002-01-01

    Background. Neutrophil activation is implicated in postoperative complications in patients having cardiac surgery with cardiopulmonary bypass (CPB). This study was designed to determine the temporal fluctuations in the primability of neutrophils in the preoperative, intraoperative, and postoperative

  4. Utilising cardiopulmonary bypass for cancer surgery. Malignancy-induced protein C deficiency and thrombophilia.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Marshall, C

    2012-02-03

    Cardiopulmonary bypass has evolved over the last 30 years. It is an important tool for the cardiac surgeon today and also has applications in non-cardiac operations such as surgery to extract tumours. Such patients undergoing surgery for cancer may be at an increased risk of a thromboembolic event post surgery, due to disturbances in the normal clotting pathway leading to hypercoagulability. One such disturbance is malignancy-induced Protein C deficiency. A deficiency of Protein C can cause hypercoagulabitity. Recent studies have examined cardiopulmonary bypass and inherited Protein C deficiency. However, surgery for cancer patients with a malignancy-induced Protein C deficiency involving cardiopulmonary bypass has not been reported. Surgery using CPB in these patients may result in increased morbidity and mortality. The objective of this article is to review the literature in order to discuss the occurrence, the aetiology and possible management of cancer patients with malignancy-induced Protein C deficiencies that require cardiopulmonary bypass for their surgery.

  5. Impaired microcirculatory perfusion in a rat model of cardiopulmonary bypass : the role of hemodilution

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Koning, Nick J.; de lange, Fellery; Vonk, Alexander B. A.; Ahmed, Yunus; van den Brom, Charissa E.; Bogaards, Sylvia; van Meurs, Matijs; Jongman, Rianne M.; Schalkwijk, Casper G.; Begieneman, Mark P. V.; Niessen, Hans W.; Baufreton, Christophe; Boer, Christa

    2016-01-01

    Although hemodilution is attributed as the main cause of microcirculatory impairment during cardiopulmonary bypass (CPB), this relationship has never been investigated. We investigated the distinct effects of hemodilution with or without CPB on microvascular perfusion and subsequent renal tissue

  6. Changing attitudes to cardiopulmonary resuscitation in older people: a 15-year follow-up study.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Cotter, P E

    2009-03-01

    while it is well established that individual patient preferences regarding cardiopulmonary resuscitation (CPR) may change with time, the stability of population preferences, especially during periods of social and economic change, has received little attention.

  7. Wireless System for Continuous Cardiopulmonary Monitoring in a Space Environment Project

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — We propose to develop the NJM Sense-It system based on small sensor tags, which include a cardiopulmonary MEMS sensor for measuring heartbeat and breath rates...

  8. Cardiopulmonary exercise testing – Its application in cardiology and occupational medicine

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Małgorzata Kurpesa

    2014-10-01

    Full Text Available Cardiopulmonary exercise testing is a method used to assess the exercise capacity. It is used in cardiology to define the diagnostic and prognostic information, the treatment and its effectiveness. This method is also useful in sport medicine and in occupational medicine. The cardiopulmonary exercise test involves measuring of gas exchange during exercise testing. The article presents the main parameters assessed during the test and the indications and contraindications for conducting the test. It also reveals the results of recently published clinical trials on the use of cardiopulmonary exercise test in patients with cardiovascular disease and in the working population. The study included variability of respiratory parameters during the cardiopulmonary exercise test and after its completion, as well as their impact on the prognostic value. In addition, the results of a study involving an optimal choice of interval training on the basis of oxygen consumption at peak exercise are summarized. Med Pr 2014;65(5:665–674

  9. Reduced embolic load during clinical cardiopulmonary bypass using a 20 micron arterial filter.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jabur, G N S; Willcox, T W; Zahidani, S H; Sidhu, K; Mitchell, S J

    2014-05-01

    To compare the efficiency of 20 and 40 µm arterial line filters during cardiopulmonary bypass for the removal of emboli from the extracorporeal circuit. Twenty-four adult patients undergoing surgery were perfused using a cardiopulmonary bypass circuit containing either a 20 µm or 40 µm arterial filter (n = 12 in both groups). The Emboli Detection and Classification system was used to count emboli upstream and downstream of the filter throughout cardiopulmonary bypass. The mean proportion of emboli removed by the filter was compared between the groups. The 20 µm filter removed a significantly greater proportion of incoming emboli (0.621) than the 40 µm filter (0.334) (p=0.029). The superiority of the 20 µm filter persisted across all size groups of emboli larger than the pore size of the 40 µm filter. The 20 µm filter removed substantially more emboli than the 40 µm filter during cardiopulmonary bypass in this comparison.

  10. Impact of Intraoperative Events on Cerebral Tissue Oximetry in Patients Undergoing Cardiopulmonary Bypass

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Severdija, E.E.; Vranken, N.P.; Teerenstra, S.; Ganushchak, Y.M.; Weerwind, P.W.

    2015-01-01

    Previous studies showed that decreased cerebral saturation during cardiac surgery is related to adverse postoperative outcome. Therefore, we investigated the influence of intraoperative events on cerebral tissue saturation in patients undergoing cardiac surgery with cardiopulmonary bypass (CPB). A t

  11. Relationship Between Reverse Remodeling and Cardiopulmonary Exercise Capacity in Heart Failure Patients Undergoing Cardiac Resynchronization Therapy

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Mastenbroek, Mirjam H; van t Sant, Jetske; Versteeg, Henneke; Cramer, MJ; Doevendans, Pieter A; Pedersen, Susanne S; Meine, Mathias

    BACKGROUND: Studies on the relationship between left ventricular reverse remodeling and cardiopulmonary exercise capacity in heart failure patients undergoing cardiac resynchronization therapy (CRT) are scarce and inconclusive. METHODS AND RESULTS: Eighty-four patients with a 1st-time

  12. Relationship between reverse remodeling and cardiopulmonary exercise capacity in heart failure patients undergoing cardiac resynchronization therapy

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Mastenbroek, M.H.; Sant, Jetske Van't; Versteeg, H.; Cramer, Maarten J; Doevendans, Pieter A; Pedersen, Susanne S; Meine, Mathias

    2016-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Studies on the relationship between left ventricular reverse remodeling and cardiopulmonary exercise capacity in heart failure patients undergoing cardiac resynchronization therapy (CRT) are scarce and inconclusive. METHODS AND RESULTS: Eighty-four patients with a 1st-time

  13. Reduced complement activation during cardiopulmonary bypass does not affect the postoperative acute phase response

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van den Goor, J.; Nieuwland, R.; van den Brink, A.; van Oeveren, W.; Rutten, 27818; Tijssen, J.; Eijsman, L.; Rutten, P

    2004-01-01

    Objective: In the present study the relationship was evaluated between perioperative inflammation and the postoperative acute phase response in patients undergoing elective coronary artery bypass grafting (CABG) assisted by cardiopulmonary bypass (CPB). CPB circuits contained either non-coated-

  14. SUSCEPTIBILITY OF DENGUE HAEMORRHAGIC FEVER VECTOR (Aedes aegypti AGAINST ORGANOPHOSPHATE INSECTICIDES (MALATHION AND TEMEPHOS IN SOME DISTRICTS OF YOGYAKARTA AND CENTRAL JAVA PROVINCES

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Damar Tri Boewono

    2012-11-01

    Full Text Available SUSCEPTIBILITY OF DENGUE HAEMORRHAGIC FEVER VECTOR (Aedes aegypti AGAINST ORGANOPHOSPHATE INSECTICIDES (MALATHION AND TEMEPHOS IN SOME DISTRICTS OF YOGYAKARTA AND CENTRAL JAVA PROVINCES

  15. Síndrome pulmonar por hantavirus Andes en Chile CARDIOPULMONARY SYNDROME DUE TO ANDES VIRUS IN CHILE

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    CONSTANZA CASTILLO H.

    2002-01-01

    Full Text Available Desde 1993 han ocurrido 204 casos de Síndrome Cardiopulmonar por Hantavirus (SCPH en Chile. Los brotes epidémicos comenzaron en el sur y avanzan hacia el norte del país. Los más afectados son varones jóvenes, obreros agrícolas o forestales. En Chile, el SCPH es causado por el virus Andes, cuyo reservorio es el Oligorizomys longicaudatus (ratón de cola larga, que se distribuye desde la III Región al sur. El cuadro clínico es similar al descrito en EE.UU., caracterizado por una fase prodrómica que simula un estado gripal o cuadro gastrointestinal febril y que agrava por la aparición de edema pulmonar agudo e inestabilidad hemodinámica (fase cardiopulmonar. Sin embargo, cursa con mayores alteraciones hemorragí-paras y compromiso renal. La mortalidad inicial fue sobre 50% y actualmente es de alrededor del 33,3%. La presente revisión incluye: historia de la enfermedad, reservorio, modos de transmisión, patogenia, cuadro clínico, diagnóstico, tratamiento y medidas de prevenciónSince 1993, 204 cases of Hantavirus cardiopulmonary syndrome (HCPS occurred in Chile. Epidemic began in the south and moved thereafter to the northern regions. The disease affected predominantly young males, who worked in agricultural labours or as timber workers. The HCPS in Chile is caused by the Andes virus. The reservoir is the wild rat Oligoryzomis longicaudatus distributed from the III to the XII Region. The clinical features are similar to those described for Sin Nombre Virus. The disease has a prodromal stage characterised by fever, muscular pain, with or without gastrointestinal manifestations, followed by the rapid onset of respiratory insufficiency and haemodynamic unstability. Andes virus courses more often with haemorrhagic disorders and overt renal failure, than Sin Nombre Virus. The initial mortality was over 50% and declined to 33,3% in the last year. History of hantavirus-diseases, reservoir, and mode of contagion, pathogenesis, clinical

  16. Temporary bilateral sensorineural hearing loss following cardiopulmonary bypass -A case report-

    OpenAIRE

    Son, Hyo Jung; Joh, Jung Hwa; Kim, Wook Jong; Chin, Ji Hyun; Choi, Dae Kee; Lee, Eun Ho; Sim, Ji Yeon; Choi, In-Cheol

    2011-01-01

    Sudden sensorineural hearing loss has been reported to occur following anesthesia and various non-otologic surgeries, mostly after procedures involving cardiopulmonary bypass. Unilateral sensorineural hearing loss resulting from microembolism is an infrequent complication of cardiopulmonary bypass surgery that has long been acknowledged. Moreover, there are few reports on the occurrence of bilateral sensorineural hearing loss without other neurologic deficits and its etiology has also not bee...

  17. Relations between cardiopulmonary function during exercise and exercise tolerance in patients with COPD

    OpenAIRE

    Cuypers, Maarten; Vos, Tine

    2015-01-01

    Methods: In part 1, a cross-sectional study took place. Sixty COPD patients performed a spirometry and a cardiopulmonary exercise test (CPET). Predictors of exercise tolerance were examined. In part 2, a longitudinal observational study took place. Twelve COPD patients completed an exercise training intervention. A study on relations between changes in cardiopulmonary function and changes in exercise tolerance was performed. Results: Significant predictors of VO2peak are peak carbon d...

  18. Reversibility of cardiopulmonary impairment after laparoscopic repair of large hiatal hernia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Emanuele Asti

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Giant hiatus hernia with or without intrathoracic gastric volvulus often presents with symptoms suggestive of both cardiac and pulmonary compression. Cardiopulmonary impairment may be reversible in these patients by laparoscopic crural repair and fundoplication as shown in this case report. Cardiac magnetic resonance and the cardiopulmonary exercise test may help selecting patients for surgery. These preliminary findings led us to start a prospective study using this multimodality diagnostic approach.

  19. Is it necessary to stent renal artery stenosis patients before cardiopulmonary bypass procedures?

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    ZHENG Bin; YAN Hong-bing; LIU Rui-fang; CHENG Shu-juan; WANG Jian; ZHAO Han-jun; SONG Li

    2011-01-01

    Background Acute kidney injury (AKI) is associated with poor prognosis after cardiopulmonary bypass. The aim of this retrospective study was to investigate whether stent implantation before cardiopulmonary bypass has beneficial effect on development of AKI in renal artery stenosis (RAS) patients.Methods In this retrospective study, patients with abnormal baseline serum creatinine (SCr, >106 μmol/L) were not included. Included patients (n=69) were divided into two groups. Group 1 included 31 RAS patients receiving no stent implantation before cardiopulmonary bypass. Group 2 included 38 RAS patients having received stent implantation just before cardiopulmonary bypass. To assess AKI after cardiopulmonary bypass, serum urea nitrogen, SCr and creatinine clearance were recorded at baseline, at the end of operation, during the first and second postoperative 24 hours.Results Baseline characteristics were similar between groups. Serum urea nitrogen, SCr, creatinine clearance before and after cardiopulmonary bypass were also similar class groups. Incidence of AKI in group 1 was not significantly different from group 2. In group 1, AKI defined by RIFLE between occurred in 7 (22.6%) patients: 5 (16.1%) with RIFLE-R,2 (6.5%) with RIFLE-I, and no patients with RIFLE-F. In group 2, 10 patients (26.3%) had an episode of AKI during hospitalization: 6 (15.8%) had RIFLE-R, 4 (10.5%) had RIFLE-I, and no patients had RIFLE-F.Conclusions There are no data suggesting that it is necessary to stent RAS patients with normal SCr before cardiopulmonary bypass. However, it cannot be concluded that RAS is not associated with AKI after cardiopulmonary bypass.

  20. Transesophageal echocardiography-guided thrombectomy of intracardiac renal cell carcinoma without cardiopulmonary bypass

    Science.gov (United States)

    Souki, Fouad Ghazi; Demos, Michael; Fermin, Lilibeth; Ciancio, Gaetano

    2016-01-01

    Advanced renal cell carcinoma (RCC) resection has important anesthetic management implications, particularly when tumor extends, suprahepatic, into the right atrium. Use of transesophageal echocardiogram (TEE) is essential in identifying tumor extension and guiding resection. Latest surgical approach avoids venovenous and cardiopulmonary bypass yet requires special precautions and interventions on the anesthesiologist's part. We present a case of Level IV RCC resected without cardiopulmonary bypass and salvaged by TEE guidance and detection of residual intracardiac tumor. PMID:27716710