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Sample records for haemorrhagic shock cardiopulmonary

  1. Massive retroperitoneal haemorrhage after extracorporeal shock wave lithotripsy (ESWL).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Inoue, Hiromasa; Kamphausen, Thomas; Bajanowski, Thomas; Trübner, Kurt

    2011-01-01

    A 76-year-old male suffering from nephrolithiasis developed a shock syndrome 5 days after extracorporal shock wave lithotripsy (ESWL). CT scan of the abdomen showed massive haemorrhage around the right kidney. Although nephrectomy was performed immediately, the haemorrhage could not be controlled. Numerous units of erythrocytes were transfused, but the patient died. The autopsy revealed massive retroperitoneal haemorrhage around the right kidney. The kidney showed a subcapsular haematoma and a rupture of the capsule. The right renal artery was dissected. The inferior vena cava was lacerated. Accordingly, a hemorrhagic shock as the cause of death was determined, which might mainly have resulted from the laceration of the inferior vena cava due to ESWL. ESWL seems to be a relatively non-invasive modality, but one of its severe complications is perirenal hematoma. The injuries of the blood vessels might have been caused by excessive shock waves. Subsequently, anticoagulation therapy had been resumed 3 days after EWSL, which might have triggered the haemorrhage. Physicians should note that a haemorrhage after an ESWL can occur and they should pay attention to the postoperative management in aged individuals especially when they are under anticoagulation therapy.

  2. Comparison of the cardiovascular effects of meptazinol and naloxone following haemorrhagic shock in rats and cats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chance, E.; Paciorek, P. M.; Todd, M. H.; Waterfall, J. F.

    1985-01-01

    The cardiovascular effects of the opioid mixed agonist-antagonist, meptazinol, and the opioid antagonist, naloxone, have been evaluated in conscious rats, anaesthetized rats and anaesthetized cats following the induction of haemorrhagic shock. The mean arterial pressure of conscious rats decreased by 17-29 mmHg following a haemorrhage of 20% of blood volume. Meptazinol (17 mg kg-1, i.m.) administered after haemorrhage evoked a rapid and sustained increase in mean arterial pressure to pre-haemorrhage levels. Naloxone (10 mg kg-1, i.v.) also increased mean arterial pressure to a level significantly higher than post-haemorrhage values. Neither haemorrhage nor subsequent drug treatments evoked significant changes in the heart rates of conscious rats. In anaesthetized rats, 20% haemorrhage evoked decreases in mean arterial pressure, heart rate and cardiac output. Blood flow to the heart, skin, skeletal muscle, kidneys, spleen and liver (arterial) was decreased. Meptazinol and naloxone increased blood pressure and total peripheral resistance, but did not significantly alter heart rate or cardiac output. Hepatic arterial flow decreased further in both drug and vehicle treated groups. In addition meptazinol slightly reduced skeletal muscle flow. In anaesthetized cats 40% haemorrhage decreased mean arterial pressure by 46 +/- 3 mmHg. An intravenous infusion of either meptazinol or naloxone (cumulative 2 mg kg-1, i.v.) partially restored blood pressure. In experimental animal models of haemorrhagic shock, meptazinol has a similar cardiovascular profile to naloxone. The established analgesic activity of meptazinol may confer an advantage in some shock states. PMID:4052729

  3. Survival without sequelae after prolonged cardiopulmonary resuscitation after electric shock.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Motawea, Mohamad; Al-Kenany, Al-Sayed; Hosny, Mostafa; Aglan, Omar; Samy, Mohamad; Al-Abd, Mohamed

    2016-03-01

    "Electrical shock is the physiological reaction or injury caused by electric current passing through the human body. It occurs upon contact of a human body part with any source of electricity that causes a sufficient current through the skin, muscles, or hair causing undesirable effects ranging from simple burns to death." Ventricular fibrillation is believed to be the most common cause of death after electrical shock. "The ideal duration of cardiac resuscitation is unknown. Typically prolonged cardiopulmonary resuscitation is associated with poor neurologic outcomes and reduced long term survival. No consensus statement has been made and traditionally efforts are usually terminated after 15-30 minutes." The case under discussion seems worthy of the somewhat detailed description given. It is for a young man who survived after 65 minutes after electrical shock (ES) after prolonged high-quality cardiopulmonary resuscitation (CPR), multiple defibrillations, and artificial ventilation without any sequelae. Early start of adequate chest compressions and close adherence to advanced cardiac life support protocols played a vital role in successful CPR.

  4. Microvascular oxygen pressure in the pig intestine during haemorrhagic shock and resuscitation

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Sinaasappel, M.; van Iterson, M.; Ince, C.

    1999-01-01

    1. The aim of this study was to investigate the relation between microvascular and venous oxygen pressures during haemorrhagic shock and resuscitation in the pig intestine. To this end microvascular PO2 (microPO2) was measured by quenching of Pd-porphyrin phosphorescence by oxygen and validated for

  5. [Neonatal subgaleal haemorrhage; a potential life-threatening extracranial haemorrhage

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Fuijkschot, J.; Antonius, T.A.J.; Meijers, P.W.; Vrancken, S.L.A.G.

    2008-01-01

    A female neonate delivered at term developed hypovolemic shock due to a subgaleal haemorrhage, i.e. extracranial bleeding between the galea aponeurotica and the cranial periosteum. The subgaleal haemorrhage was most likely the result of a traumatic vacuum extraction. The patient was treated with

  6. The Stop-Only-While-Shocking algorithm reduces hands-off time by 17% during cardiopulmonary resuscitation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hansen, Lars Koch; Mohammed, Anna; Pedersen, Magnus

    2016-01-01

    INTRODUCTION: Reducing hands-off time during cardiopulmonary resuscitation (CPR) is believed to increase survival after cardiac arrests because of the sustaining of organ perfusion. The aim of our study was to investigate whether charging the defibrillator before rhythm analyses and shock delivery...... significantly reduced hands-off time compared with the European Resuscitation Council (ERC) 2010 CPR guideline algorithm in full-scale cardiac arrest scenarios. METHODS: The study was designed as a full-scale cardiac arrest simulation study including administration of drugs. Participants were randomized...... compressions. RESULTS: Sample size was calculated with an α of 0.05 and 80% power showed that we should test four scenarios with each algorithm. Twenty-nine physicians participated in 11 scenarios. Hands-off time was significantly reduced 17% using the SOWS algorithm compared with ERC2010 [22.1% (SD 2.3) hands...

  7. Ebola haemorrhagic fever

    Science.gov (United States)

    Feldmann, Heinz; Geisbert, Thomas W

    2012-01-01

    Ebola viruses are the causative agents of a severe form of viral haemorrhagic fever in man, designated Ebola haemorrhagic fever, and are endemic in regions of central Africa. The exception is the species Reston Ebola virus, which has not been associated with human disease and is found in the Philippines. Ebola virus constitutes an important local public health threat in Africa, with a worldwide effect through imported infections and through the fear of misuse for biological terrorism. Ebola virus is thought to also have a detrimental effect on the great ape population in Africa. Case-fatality rates of the African species in man are as high as 90%, with no prophylaxis or treatment available. Ebola virus infections are characterised by immune suppression and a systemic inflammatory response that causes impairment of the vascular, coagulation, and immune systems, leading to multiorgan failure and shock, and thus, in some ways, resembling septic shock. PMID:21084112

  8. Intracranial haemorrhage

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    of the brain the haemorrhage is referred to as an .... The bleed is in the left basal ganglia most often originating in the putamen. Fig. 3. This 26-year-old patient presented with sudden-onset headache, right-sided ..... Early surgery versus initial.

  9. Hepatitis C in haemorrhagic obstetrical emergencies

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Khaskheli, M.; Baloch, S.

    2014-01-01

    Objective: To determine the maternal health and fetal outcome in hepatitis C with obstetrical haemorrhagic emergencies. Study Design: An observational study. Place and Duration of Study: Department of Obstetrics and Gynaecology Unit-I, Liaquat University of Medical and Health Sciences Hospital, Hyderabad, Sindh, from January 2009 to December 2010. Methodology: All the women admitted during the study period with different obstetrical haemorrhagic emergencies were included. On virology screening, hepatitis C screening was done on all. The women with non-haemorrhagic obstetrical emergencies were excluded. Studied variables included demographic characteristics, the nature of obstetrical emergency, haemorrhagic conditions and maternal and fetal morbidity and mortality. The data was analyzed on SPSS version 20. Results: More frequent obstetrical haemorrhagic emergencies were observed with hepatitis C positive in comparison with hepatitis C negative cases including post-partum haemorrhage in 292 (80.88%) and ante-partum haemorrhage in 69 (19.11%) cases. Associated morbidities seen were disseminated intravascular coagulation in 43 (11.91%) and shock in 29 (8.03%) cases with hepatitis C positive. Fetal still birth rate was 37 (10.24%) in hepatitis C positive cases. Conclusion: Frequency of maternal morbidity and mortality and perinatal mortality was high in obstetrical haemorrhagic emergencies with hepatitis C positive cases. (author)

  10. Ebolavirus and Haemorrhagic Syndrome

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gerald A. Matua

    2015-05-01

    Full Text Available The Ebola virus is a highly virulent, single-stranded ribonucleic acid virus which affects both humans and apes and has fast become one of the world’s most feared pathogens. The virus induces acute fever and death, with haemorrhagic syndrome occurring in up to 90% of patients. The known species within the genus Ebolavirus are Bundibugyo, Sudan, Zaïre, Reston and Taï Forest. Although endemic in Africa, Ebola has caused worldwide anxiety due to media hype and concerns about its international spread, including through bioterrorism. The high fatality rate is attributed to unavailability of a standard treatment regimen or vaccine. The disease is frightening since it is characterised by rapid immune suppression and systemic inflammatory response, causing multi-organ and system failure, shock and often death. Currently, disease management is largely supportive, with containment efforts geared towards mitigating the spread of the virus. This review describes the classification, morphology, infective process, natural ecology, transmission, epidemic patterns, diagnosis, clinical features and immunology of Ebola, including management and epidemic containment strategies.

  11. Ebolavirus and Haemorrhagic Syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Matua, Gerald A; Van der Wal, Dirk M; Locsin, Rozzano C

    2015-05-01

    The Ebola virus is a highly virulent, single-stranded ribonucleic acid virus which affects both humans and apes and has fast become one of the world's most feared pathogens. The virus induces acute fever and death, with haemorrhagic syndrome occurring in up to 90% of patients. The known species within the genus Ebolavirus are Bundibugyo, Sudan, Zaïre, Reston and Taï Forest. Although endemic in Africa, Ebola has caused worldwide anxiety due to media hype and concerns about its international spread, including through bioterrorism. The high fatality rate is attributed to unavailability of a standard treatment regimen or vaccine. The disease is frightening since it is characterised by rapid immune suppression and systemic inflammatory response, causing multi-organ and system failure, shock and often death. Currently, disease management is largely supportive, with containment efforts geared towards mitigating the spread of the virus. This review describes the classification, morphology, infective process, natural ecology, transmission, epidemic patterns, diagnosis, clinical features and immunology of Ebola, including management and epidemic containment strategies.

  12. Viral Haemorrhagic Septicaemia Virus

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Olesen, Niels Jørgen; Skall, Helle Frank

    2013-01-01

    This chapter covers the genetics (genotypes and serotypes), clinical signs, host species, transmission, prevalence, diagnosis, control and prevention of viral haemorrhagic septicaemia virus.......This chapter covers the genetics (genotypes and serotypes), clinical signs, host species, transmission, prevalence, diagnosis, control and prevention of viral haemorrhagic septicaemia virus....

  13. Hereditary haemorrhagic telangiectasia

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kjeldsen, A D; Vase, P; Green, A

    1999-01-01

    Hereditary haemorrhagic telangiectasia (HHT) is a dominantly inherited disease characterized by telangiectatic lesions. The disease manifestations are variable and include epistaxis, gastrointestinal bleeding, pulmonary arteriovenous malformations and cerebral arteriovenous malformations. Early...

  14. Recombinant human brain natriuretic peptide attenuates trauma-/haemorrhagic shock-induced acute lung injury through inhibiting oxidative stress and the NF-κB-dependent inflammatory/MMP-9 pathway.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Song, Zhi; Zhao, Xiu; Liu, Martin; Jin, Hongxu; Wang, Ling; Hou, Mingxiao; Gao, Yan

    2015-12-01

    Acute lung injury (ALI) is one of the most serious complications in traumatic patients and is an important part of multiple organ dysfunction syndrome (MODS). Recombinant human brain natriuretic peptide (rhBNP) is a peptide with a wide range of biological activity. In this study, we investigated local changes in oxidative stress and the NF-κB-dependent matrix metalloproteinase-9 (MMP-9) pathway in rats with trauma/haemorrhagic shock (TH/S)-induced ALI and evaluated the effects of pretreatment with rhBNP. Forty-eight rats were randomly divided into four groups: sham operation group, model group, low-dosage rhBNP group and high-dosage rhBNP group (n = 12 for each group). Oxidative stress and MPO activity were measured by ELISA kits. MMP-9 activity was detected by zymography analysis. NF-κB activity was determined using Western blot assay. With rhBNP pretreatment, TH/S-induced protein leakage, increased MPO activity, lipid peroxidation and metalloproteinase (MMP)-9 activity were inhibited. Activation of antioxidative enzymes was reversed. The phosphorylation of NF-κB and the degradation of its inhibitor IκB were suppressed. The results suggested that the protection mechanism of rhBNP is possibly mediated through upregulation of anti-oxidative enzymes and inhibition of NF-κB activation. More studies are needed to further evaluate whether rhBNP is a suitable candidate as an effective inhaling drug to reduce the incidence of TH/S-induced ALI. © 2016 The Authors. International Journal of Experimental Pathology © 2016 International Journal of Experimental Pathology.

  15. Prophylactic ethamsylate for periventricular haemorrhage.

    OpenAIRE

    Cooke, R W; Morgan, M E

    1984-01-01

    Drug prophylaxis with ethamsylate for periventricular haemorrhage in very low birthweight infants significantly reduced the incidence of periventricular haemorrhage in survivors. A reduction in abnormalities at follow up and in insertion of ventriculoperitoneal shunts was also noted.

  16. Life threatening vaginal haemorrhage from coital laceration in a post ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Case report: A 55-year-old woman who presented as an emergency with haemorrhagic shock following vaginal bleeding from consensual coitus is presented. She was resuscitated with intravenous fluids and blood transfusions. The vaginal laceration of about 5 cm on the right side of the posterior fornix was sutured ...

  17. Emergency admissions for major haemorrhage associated with direct oral anticoagulants.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bouget, Jacques; Oger, Emmanuel

    2015-12-01

    To describe the population admitted in an emergency department of a teaching hospital for severe bleeding associated with direct oral anticoagulants (DOAC). During a three-year period (2012-2014) patients older than 16 years were prospectively identified by haemorrhagic symptoms from computerised requests. At least one of the following criteria defined major haemorrhage: haemorrhagic shock, unstable haemodynamic, need for transfusion or haemostatic procedure, or a life threatening location. Fifty four patients, 23 receiving dabigatran, 30 rivaroxaban and one apixaban were included, 2 in 2012, 35 in 2013 and 17 in 2014. Median age was 84 years (range 63-99) with a sex ratio of 1.16. Haemorrhagic complications were gastrointestinal (n=27), intracranial (n=12) or miscellaneous (n=15). Indication of DOAC was stroke prevention in atrial fibrillation in 49 cases and deep vein thrombosis in 5 cases. Hospitalization was required for 45 patients (83%) with a mean length of stay of 8.5 days. Sixteen patients needed intensive care. Reversal therapy was prescribed in 11 patients. At 1 month, overall mortality was 24%, reaching 41.7% for intracranial haemorrhage. Among surviving patients, DOAC was stopped in 10 cases, continued in 17 patients and switched for other antithrombotic in 17 patients. Our study contributes to the post marketing surveillance of major haemorrhagic complications associated with DOAC. It takes part to the knowledge about the course of this severe event in emergencies. Careful awareness in risk benefit assessment, especially in elderly, is needed. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  18. Drotrecogin alpha (activated) in two patients with the hantavirus cardiopulmonary syndrome

    OpenAIRE

    McDermid, Robert C; Gibney, RT Noel; Brisebois, Ronald J; Skjodt, Neil M

    2006-01-01

    Hantavirus cardiopulmonary syndrome (HCPS) is associated with rapid cardiopulmonary collapse from endothelial injury, resulting in massive capillary leak, shock and severe hypoxemic respiratory failure. To date, treatment remains supportive and includes mechanical ventilation, vasopressors and extracorporeal membrane oxygenation, with mortality approaching 50%. Two HCPS survivors initially given drotrecogin alpha (activated) (DAA) for presumed bacterial septic shock are described. Vasoactive ...

  19. Haemorrhagic pituitary tumours

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lazaro, C.M.; Philippine General Hospital, Manila; Guo, W.Y.; Sami, M.; Hindmarsch, T.; Ericson, K.; Hulting, A.L.; Wersaell, J.

    1994-01-01

    In a group of 69 patients with pituitary tumours, 12 were found to have evidence of intratumoral haemorrhage on MRI, characterized by high signal intensity on short TR/TE sequences. This was verified in all but 1 patient. The majority of the bleedings occurred in macroadenomas. Five (42%) were prolactinomas and 4 (33%) were non-functioning adenomas. There were 2 GH- and 1 ACTH-secreting tumours. All 5 patients with prolactinomas were on bromocriptine medication. Two of the patients had a clinical picture of pituitary apoplexy. The haemorrhage was not large enough to prompt surgery in any of the patients. However, surgical verification of the diagnosis was obtained in 5 cases, while 6 patients were examined with follow-up MRI. (orig.)

  20. Haemorrhage from Pancreatic Pseudocysts Presenting as Upper Gastrointestinal Haemorrhage

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Giuseppe Garcea

    2004-04-01

    Full Text Available Haemorrhage is a rare but frequently fatal complication of pancreatic pseudocysts. The high mortality associated with pancreatic haemorrhage makes prompt and aggressive management essential. Occasionally, haemorrhage may present atypically, leading to delay in its diagnosis and management. This report details a case of pancreatic haemorrhage presenting as an upper gastrointestinal bleed and discusses the subsequent management. When managing patients with pancreatic pseudocysts who present with the stigmata of upper gastrointestinal bleeding, the possibility that the bleeding originates from the pancreas must always be borne in mind.

  1. Cardiopulmonary bypass and hemostasis

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Eijsman, Leon

    1992-01-01

    In chapter 1, we recalled that intracardiac defects can only be corrected when cardiopulmonary circulation is maintained by extracorporeal criculation and ventilation. To prevent clot formation in this artificial circuit, the socalled cardiopulmonary bypass (CPB), we completely depend on the

  2. Postpartum haemorrhage: prevention

    OpenAIRE

    Chelmow, David

    2008-01-01

    Loss of more than 500 mL of blood is usually caused by failure of the uterus to contract fully after delivery of the placenta, and occurs in over 10% of deliveries with a 1% mortality rate worldwide. Other causes of postpartum haemorrhage include retained placental tissue, lacerations to the genital tract and coagulation disorders.Uterine atony is more likely in women who have had a general anaesthetic or oxytocin, an over-distended uterus, a prolonged or precipitous labour, or who are of ...

  3. Postpartum haemorrhage: prevention

    OpenAIRE

    Chelmow, David

    2011-01-01

    Loss of more than 500 mL of blood is usually caused by failure of the uterus to contract fully after delivery of the placenta, and occurs in over 10% of deliveries, with a 1% mortality worldwide. Other causes of postpartum haemorrhage include retained placental tissue, lacerations to the genital tract, and coagulation disorders.Uterine atony is more likely in women who have had a general anaesthetic or oxytocin, an over-distended uterus, a prolonged or precipitous labour, or who are of hig...

  4. Haemorrhage in intracranial tuber- culosis

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    CASE REPORT. 16. SA JOURNAL OF RADIOLOGY • July 2005. Haemorrhage in intracranial tuber- culosis. M Modi. FCRad (SA), MMed. Department of Radiation Sciences ... wall where granulomatous inflamma- tion (Fig. 2, arrow) was present in the adventitia. A specific site of origin for the subarachnoid haemorrhage was.

  5. Postpartum haemorrhage: prevention.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chelmow, David

    2011-04-04

    Loss of more than 500 mL of blood following childbirth is usually caused by failure of the uterus to contract fully after delivery of the placenta, and occurs in over 10% of deliveries, with a 1% mortality rate worldwide. Other causes of postpartum haemorrhage include retained placental tissue, lacerations to the genital tract, and coagulation disorders. Uterine atony is more likely in women who have had a general anaesthetic or oxytocin, an over-distended uterus, a prolonged or precipitous labour, or who are of high parity. We conducted a systematic review and aimed to answer the following clinical questions: What are the effects of non-drug interventions and of drug interventions to prevent primary postpartum haemorrhage? We searched: Medline, Embase, The Cochrane Library, and other important databases up to March 2010 (Clinical Evidence reviews are updated periodically; please check our website for the most up-to-date version of this review). We included harms alerts from relevant organisations such as the US Food and Drug Administration (FDA) and the UK Medicines and Healthcare products Regulatory Agency (MHRA). We found 40 systematic reviews, RCTs, or observational studies that met our inclusion criteria. We performed a GRADE evaluation of the quality of evidence for interventions. In this systematic review we present information relating to the effectiveness and safety of the following interventions: active management of the third stage of labour, carboprost injection, controlled cord traction, ergot compounds (ergometrine/methylergotamine), immediate breastfeeding, misoprostol (oral, rectal, sublingual, or vaginal), oxytocin, oxytocin plus ergometrine combinations, prostaglandin E2 compounds, and uterine massage.

  6. Traumatic primary brain stem haemorrhage

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Andrioli, G.C.; Zuccarello, M.; Trincia, G.; Fiore, D.L.; De Caro, R.

    1983-01-01

    We report 36 cases of post-traumatic 'primary brain stem haemorrhage' visualized by the CT scan and confirmed at autopsy. Clinical experience shows that many technical factors influence the inability to visualize brain stem haemorrhages. Experimental injection of fresh blood into the pons and midbrain of cadavers shows that lesions as small as 0.25 ml in volume may be visualized. The volume and the anatomical configuration of traumatic lesions of the brain stem extended over a rostro-caudal direction, and their proximity to bony structures at the base of the skull are obstacles to the visualization of brain stem haemorrhages. (Author)

  7. Intracerebral haemorrhage after carotid endarterectomy

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Schroeder, T; Sillesen, H; Boesen, J

    1987-01-01

    Among 662 consecutive carotid endarterectomies eight cases of postoperative ipsilateral intracerebral haemorrhage were identified, occurring into brain areas which, preoperatively were without infarction. As blood pressures across the stenosis were routinely measured during surgery, the internal...

  8. Subarachnoid Haemorrhage and Sports.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sousa Nanji, Liliana; Melo, Teresa P; Canhão, Patrícia; Fonseca, Ana Catarina; Ferro, José Manuel

    2015-01-01

    Some cases of subarachnoid haemorrhage (SAH) have been associated with vigorous physical activity, including sports. Our research aimed to describe the association between SAH and sports and to identify the types of sports that were more frequently found as precipitating factors in a tertiary single-centre SAH register. We retrieved information from a prospectively collected SAH registry and reviewed discharge notes of acute SAH patients admitted to the Stroke Unit of Hospital de Santa Maria, Lisbon, between 1995 and 2014. Out of 738 patients included in the analysis, 424 (57.5%) cases of SAH were preceded by physical activity. Nine cases (1.2%) were associated with sports, namely running (2 cases), aerobics (2 cases), cycling, body balance, dance, surf and windsurf. Patients with SAH while practicing sports were younger than controls (average age 43.1 vs. 57.0 years; p = 0.007). In 1 patient, there was a report of trauma to the neck. Patients in the sports group only had Hunt and Hess scale grades 1 (11.1%) or 2 (88.9%) at admission, while patients in the control group had a wider distribution in severity. Our findings indicate that SAH precipitated by sports is not very frequent and is uncommonly related to trauma. Patients who suffered SAH associated with sports were younger and apparently had a milder clinical presentation.

  9. Impact of beta-blockers on cardiopulmonary exercise testing in patients with advanced liver disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wallen, M P; Hall, A; Dias, K A; Ramos, J S; Keating, S E; Woodward, A J; Skinner, T L; Macdonald, G A; Arena, R; Coombes, J S

    2017-10-01

    Patients with advanced liver disease may develop portal hypertension that can result in variceal haemorrhage. Beta-blockers reduce portal pressure and minimise haemorrhage risk. These medications may attenuate measures of cardiopulmonary performance, such as the ventilatory threshold and peak oxygen uptake measured via cardiopulmonary exercise testing. To determine the effect of beta-blockers on cardiopulmonary exercise testing variables in patients with advanced liver disease. This was a cross-sectional analysis of 72 participants who completed a cardiopulmonary exercise test before liver transplantation. All participants remained on their usual beta-blocker dose and timing prior to the test. Variables measured during cardiopulmonary exercise testing included the ventilatory threshold, peak oxygen uptake, heart rate, oxygen pulse, the oxygen uptake efficiency slope and the ventilatory equivalents for carbon dioxide slope. Participants taking beta-blockers (n = 28) had a lower ventilatory threshold (P advanced liver disease taking beta-blockers compared to those not taking the medication. This may incorrectly risk stratify patients on beta-blockers and has implications for patient management before and after liver transplantation. The oxygen uptake efficiency slope was not influenced by beta-blockers and may therefore be a better measure of cardiopulmonary performance in this patient population. © 2017 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  10. Cardio-Pulmonary Response to Shock.

    Science.gov (United States)

    1981-02-01

    endothelium 4. Modes of serotonin transport by intimal and capillary endothelial cells 5. Loss of microvascular structural integrity with fluoxetine , a... synthesis and secretion. We have demon- strated that EC, intimal and microvessel, qualitatively share many character- istics such as the specific uptake... fluoxetine and imipramine), 40C and selected metabolic inhibitors and ana- logues. Analysis of transport kinetics at higher concentrations of S-HT

  11. THE PREVALENCE OF INTRAVENTRICULAR HAEMORRHAGE

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Esem

    haemorrhage in preterm infants with birth weight 1.5kg and less was 34.2% in ... case fatality rate was 85.7% for those with grade 4 in the first three days of life. ... with case fatality rates of more than 45% (2007 and 2008 NICU ward statistics).

  12. Neurology of cardiopulmonary resuscitation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mulder, M; Geocadin, R G

    2017-01-01

    This chapter aims to provide an up-to-date review of the science and clinical practice pertaining to neurologic injury after successful cardiopulmonary resuscitation. The past two decades have seen a major shift in the science and practice of cardiopulmonary resuscitation, with a major emphasis on postresuscitation neurologic care. This chapter provides a nuanced and thoughtful historic and bench-to-bedside overview of the neurologic aspects of cardiopulmonary resuscitation. A particular emphasis is made on the anatomy and pathophysiology of hypoxic-ischemic encephalopathy, up-to-date management of survivors of cardiopulmonary resuscitation, and a careful discussion on neurologic outcome prediction. Guidance to practice evidence-based clinical care when able and thoughtful, pragmatic suggestions for care where evidence is lacking are also provided. This chapter serves as both a useful clinical guide and an updated, thorough, and state-of-the-art reference on the topic for advanced students and experienced practitioners in the field. © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  13. Bilateral spontaneous adrenal haemorrhage complicating acute pancreatitis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pianta, M.; Varma, D. K.

    2007-01-01

    Bilateral adrenal haemorrhage is an event that mandates prompt diagnosis and treatment to prevent primary adrenocortical insufficiency and potential death. Presentation can be non-specific and incidentally diagnosed with imaging alone, primarily CT. We present a case of acute pancreatitis with spontaneous bilateral adrenal haemorrhage and briefly discuss imaging and treatment implications

  14. Ultrasonically detectable cerebellar haemorrhage in preterm infants.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    McCarthy, Lisa Kenyon

    2011-07-01

    To determine the frequency and pattern of cerebellar haemorrhage (CBH) on routine cranial ultrasound (cUS) imaging in infants of ≤32 weeks gestation, and to investigate how extremely preterm infants with CBH differ from those with severe intraventricular haemorrhage (IVH).

  15. Desmopressin Acetate in Intracranial Haemorrhage

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Thomas Kapapa

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Introduction. The secondary increase in the size of intracranial haematomas as a result of spontaneous haemorrhage or trauma is of particular relevance in the event of prior intake of platelet aggregation inhibitors. We describe the effect of desmopressin acetate as a means of temporarily stabilising the platelet function. Patients and Methods. The platelet function was analysed in 10 patients who had received single (N=4 or multiple (N=6 doses of acetylsalicylic acid and 3 patients (control group who had not taken acetylsalicylic acid. All subjects had suffered intracranial haemorrhage. Analysis was performed before, half an hour and three hours after administration of desmopressin acetate. Statistical analysis was performed by applying a level of significance of P≤0.05. Results. (1 Platelet function returned to normal 30 minutes after administration of desmopressin acetate. (2 The platelet function worsened again after three hours. (3 There were no complications related to electrolytes or fluid balance. Conclusion. Desmopressin acetate can stabilise the platelet function in neurosurgical patients who have received acetylsalicylic acid prior to surgery without causing transfusion-related side effects or a loss of time. The effect is, however, limited and influenced by the frequency of drug intake. Further controls are needed in neurosurgical patients.

  16. Cardiopulmonary Collapse during Labour

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vasilis Sitras

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available Cardiopulmonary collapse during labour is a catastrophic event caused by various medical, surgical and obstetrical conditions. It is an emergency that threatens the life of the mother and her unborn child. We present a case of a pregnant woman who suffered from preeclampsia and underwent induction of labour. Severe lung edema occurred early in labour that caused cardiopulmonary collapse. Advanced heart-lung resuscitation was established immediately and continued until an emergency cesarean section was performed few minutes later. The outcome was favourable for both mother and child. We further discuss some aspects of the pathophysiology and appropriate treatment of cardiorespiratory arrest during labour, which involves the coordinated action of the obstetric, pediatric and surgical ward personnel.

  17. Cardiopulmonary bypass in pregnancy

    OpenAIRE

    Mukul Chandra Kapoor

    2014-01-01

    Cardiac surgery carried out on cardiopulmonary bypass (CPB) in a pregnant woman is associated with poor neonatal outcomes although maternal outcomes are similar to cardiac surgery in non-pregnant women. Most adverse maternal and fetal outcomes from cardiac surgery during pregnancy are attributed to effects of CPB. The CPB is associated with utero-placental hypoperfusion due to a number of factors, which may translate into low fetal cardiac output, hypoxia and even death. Better maternal and f...

  18. Basics of cardiopulmonary bypass

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Manjula Sarkar

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Cardiopulmonary bypass (CPB provides a bloodless field for cardiac surgery. It incorporates an extracorporeal circuit to provide physiological support in which venous blood is drained to a reservoir, oxygenated and sent back to the body using a pump. Team effort between surgeon, perfusionist and anaesthesiologist is paramount for the successful use of CPB. However, it also has its share of complications and strategies to reduce these complications are the area of the current research.

  19. Embolization for non-variceal upper gastrointestinal tract haemorrhage: A systematic review

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mirsadraee, S.; Tirukonda, P.; Nicholson, A. [Department of Radiology, Leeds General Infirmary, Leeds (United Kingdom); Everett, S.M. [Department of Gastroenterology, Leeds General Infirmary, Leeds (United Kingdom); McPherson, S.J., E-mail: simon.mcpherson@leedsth.nhs.u [Department of Radiology, Leeds General Infirmary, Leeds (United Kingdom)

    2011-06-15

    Aim: To assess the published evidence on the endovascular treatment of non-variceal upper gastrointestinal haemorrhage. Materials and methods: An Ovid Medline search of published literature was performed (1966-2009). Non-English literature, experimental studies, variceal haemorrhage and case series with fewer than five patients were excluded. The search yielded 1888 abstracts. Thirty-five articles were selected for final analysis. Results: The total number of pooled patients was 927. The technical and clinical success of embolization ranged from 52-100% and 44-100%, respectively. The pooled mean technical/clinical success rate in primary upper gastrointestinal tract haemorrhage (PUGITH) only, trans-papillary haemorrhage (TPH) only, and mixed studies were 84%/67%, 93%/89%, and 93%/64%, respectively. Clinical outcome was adversely affected by multi-organ failure, shock, corticosteroids, transfusion, and coagulopathy. The anatomical source of haemorrhage and procedural variables did not affect the outcome. A successful embolization improved survival by 13.3 times. Retrospective comparison with surgery demonstrated equivalent mortality and clinical success, despite embolization being applied to a more elderly population with a higher prevalence of co-morbidities. Conclusions: Embolization is effective in this very difficult cohort of patients with outcomes similar to surgery.

  20. Comparison of cardiopulmonary resuscitation techniques using video camera recordings.

    OpenAIRE

    Mann, C J; Heyworth, J

    1996-01-01

    OBJECTIVE--To use video recordings to compare the performance of resuscitation teams in relation to their previous training in cardiac resuscitation. METHODS--Over a 10 month period all cardiopulmonary resuscitations carried out in an accident and emergency (A&E) resuscitation room were videotaped. The following variables were monitored: (1) time to perform three defibrillatory shocks; (2) time to give intravenous adrenaline (centrally or peripherally); (3) the numbers and grade of medical an...

  1. Postoperative abdominal complications after cardiopulmonary bypass

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dong Guohua

    2012-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background To summarize the diagnostic and therapeutic experiences on the patients who suffered abdominal complications after cardiovascular surgery with cardiopulmonary bypass(CPB. Methods A total of 2349 consecutive patients submitted to cardiovascular surgery with CPB in our hospital from Jan 2004 to Dec 2010 were involved. The clinical data of any abdominal complication, including its incidence, characters, relative risks, diagnostic measures, medical or surgical management and mortality, was retrospectively analyzed. Results Of all the patients, 33(1.4% developed abdominal complications postoperatively, including 11(33.3% cases of paralytic ileus, 9(27.3% of gastrointestinal haemorrhage, 2(6.1% of gastroduodenal ulcer perforation, 2(6.1% of acute calculus cholecystitis, 3(9.1% of acute acalculus cholecystitis, 4(12.1% of hepatic dysfunction and 2(6.1% of ischemia bowel diseases. Of the 33 patients, 26 (78.8% accepted medical treatment and 7 (21.2% underwent subsequent surgical intervention. There were 5(15.2% deaths in this series, which was significantly higher than the overall mortality (2.7%. Positive history of peptic ulcer, advanced ages, bad heart function, preoperative IABP support, prolonged CPB time, low cardiac output and prolonged mechanical ventilation are the risk factors of abdominal complications. Conclusions Abdominal complications after cardiovascular surgery with CPB have a low incidence but a higher mortality. Early detection and prompt appropriate intervention are essential for the outcome of the patients.

  2. Clinical practice guidelines in intracerebral haemorrhage.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rodríguez-Yáñez, M; Castellanos, M; Freijo, M M; López Fernández, J C; Martí-Fàbregas, J; Nombela, F; Simal, P; Castillo, J; Díez-Tejedor, E; Fuentes, B; Alonso de Leciñana, M; Alvarez-Sabin, J; Arenillas, J; Calleja, S; Casado, I; Dávalos, A; Díaz-Otero, F; Egido, J A; Gállego, J; García Pastor, A; Gil-Núñez, A; Gilo, F; Irimia, P; Lago, A; Maestre, J; Masjuan, J; Martínez-Sánchez, P; Martínez-Vila, E; Molina, C; Morales, A; Purroy, F; Ribó, M; Roquer, J; Rubio, F; Segura, T; Serena, J; Tejada, J; Vivancos, J

    2013-05-01

    Intracerebral haemorrhage accounts for 10%-15% of all strokes; however it has a poor prognosis with higher rates of morbidity and mortality. Neurological deterioration is often observed during the first hours after onset and determines poor prognosis. Intracerebral haemorrhage, therefore, is a neurological emergency which must be diagnosed and treated properly as soon as possible. In this guide we review the diagnostic procedures and factors that influence the prognosis of patients with intracerebral haemorrhage and we establish recommendations for the therapeutic strategy, systematic diagnosis, acute treatment and secondary prevention for this condition. Copyright © 2011 Sociedad Española de Neurología. Published by Elsevier Espana. All rights reserved.

  3. Nutritional management in Ebola haemorrhagic fever

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kamon Chaiyasit

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available Ebola haemorrhagic fever is a viral infection causing a major health problem worldwide. In this short article, the authors briefly review and discuss on the nutritional management (energy, protein, fat and micronutrient in management of Ebola infection.

  4. Aetiology and treatment of severe postpartum haemorrhage

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Edwards, Hellen

    2017-01-01

    This thesis is comprised of three studies focusing on severe postpartum haemorrhage (PPH). PPH is a major cause of maternal morbidity and mortality worldwide. Risk factors include retained placenta, prolonged duration of the third stage of labour, previous caesarean section, and operative vaginal...... delivery. Occurrence and development of PPH are, however, unpredictable and can sometimes give rise to massive haemorrhage or even hysterectomy and maternal death. Severe haemorrhage can lead to coagulopathy causing further haemorrhage and requiring substitution with blood transfusions. The aim...... had a cardiac arrest, and a total of 128 women (52%) required a hysterectomy. Hysterectomy was associated with increased blood loss, increased number of blood transfusions, a higher fresh frozen plasma to red blood cell ratio (p=0.010), and an increased number of red blood cells before first platelet...

  5. Clinical features of Hereditary Haemorrhagic Telangiectasia

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Hosman, A.E.

    2017-01-01

    Hereditary Haemorrhagic Telangiectasia (HHT), also known as Rendu-Osler-Weber disease (ROW), is an autosomal dominant disease with multi-systemic vascular dysplasia characterized by mucocutaneous telangiectasia, arteriovenous malformations and recurrent spontaneous epistaxis (nosebleeds). Most cases

  6. Calcium antagonists for aneurysmal subarachnoid haemorrhage

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Dorhout Mees, S. M.; Rinkel, G. J. E.; Feigin, V. L.; Algra, A.; van den Bergh, W. M.; Vermeulen, M.; van Gijn, J.

    2007-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Secondary ischaemia is a frequent cause of poor outcome in patients with subarachnoid haemorrhage (SAH). Its pathogenesis has been incompletely elucidated, but vasospasm probably is a contributing factor. Experimental studies have suggested that calcium antagonists can prevent or reverse

  7. Hypopituitarism is uncommon after aneurysmal subarachnoid haemorrhage

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Klose, Marianne; Brennum, Jannick; Poulsgaard, Lars

    2010-01-01

    Aneurysmal subarachnoid haemorrhage (SAH) has recently been reported as a common cause of chronic hypopituitarism, and introduction of routine neuroendocrine screening has been advocated. We aimed at estimating the risk of hypopituitarism after SAH using strict criteria including confirmatory...

  8. White-centred retinal haemorrhages (Roth spots).

    OpenAIRE

    Ling, R.; James, B.

    1998-01-01

    Roth spots (white-centred retinal haemorrhages) were classically described as septic emboli lodged in the retina of patients with subacute bacterial endocarditis. Indeed many have considered Roth spots pathognomonic for this condition. More recent histological evidence suggests, however, that they are not foci of bacterial abscess. Instead, they are nonspecific and may be found in many other diseases. A review of the histology and the pathogenesis of these white-centred haemorrhages will be p...

  9. European research priorities for intracerebral haemorrhage

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Steiner, Thorsten; Petersson, Jesper; Al-Shahi Salman, Rustam

    2011-01-01

    Over 2 million people are affected by intracerebral haemorrhage (ICH) worldwide every year, one third of them dying within 1 month, and many survivors being left with permanent disability. Unlike most other stroke types, the incidence, morbidity and mortality of ICH have not declined over time...... and disability. The European Research Network on Intracerebral Haemorrhage EURONICH is a multidisciplinary academic research collaboration that has been established to define current research priorities and to conduct large clinical studies on all aspects of ICH....

  10. Conservative management of primary postpartum haemorrhage

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Naqvi, S.; Makhdoom, T.

    2004-01-01

    Severe postpartum haemorrhage (PPH) is a serious obstetrical emergency. Two cases of severe PPH due to uterine atony are described which were managed by uterine packing with sterile ribbon gauze by vaginal route under general anesthesia. Along with supportive measures, it resulted in marked improvement in controlling haemorrhage and infectious morbidity. This is an effective treatment for severe PPH and should be practiced at tertiary care level in woman who wishes to preserve fertility. (author)

  11. Cardiopulmonary resuscitation: Advances

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    William Andrés Vargas-Garzón

    2011-06-01

    Full Text Available Reanimation’s guidelines dictated by the AHA (American Heart Association are the strategies to follow in the envi­ronment of any situation related to cardiac arrest. They are acquired after the analysis of the evidence available in reani­mation from higher to less quality, with the best neurological results. After years of observation, was achieved to establish that survival behind cardiac arrest is, in general, low (6%, except that any witness starts immediately cardiopulmonary resuscitation (CPR maneuvers; therefore, medical personal must know and practice these maneuvers. With these con­siderations, it’s necessary to emphasize in the theoretical training of CPR of all health professional and laity, which guarantee everybody be prepared to emergency system ac­tivation, brain’s preservation and defibrillate to recuperate heart and life. The actual approach that combines compres­sions and defibrillation to closed chest, rescue ventilation and cardio tonic drugs. The guidelines AHA 2010, focus on increase frequency and quality of CPR. The objective of this article is to recognize various changes in these guidelines in cardiopulmonary reanimation and promote the continued education’s importance in reanimation.

  12. Cardiopulmonary bypass in pregnancy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kapoor, Mukul Chandra

    2014-01-01

    Cardiac surgery carried out on cardiopulmonary bypass (CPB) in a pregnant woman is associated with poor neonatal outcomes although maternal outcomes are similar to cardiac surgery in non-pregnant women. Most adverse maternal and fetal outcomes from cardiac surgery during pregnancy are attributed to effects of CPB. The CPB is associated with utero-placental hypoperfusion due to a number of factors, which may translate into low fetal cardiac output, hypoxia and even death. Better maternal and fetal outcomes may be achieved by early pre-operative optimization of maternal cardiovascular status, use of perioperative fetal monitoring, optimization of CPB, delivery of a viable fetus before the operation and scheduling cardiac surgery on an elective basis during the second trimester.

  13. Cardiopulmonary bypass in pregnancy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mukul Chandra Kapoor

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Cardiac surgery carried out on cardiopulmonary bypass (CPB in a pregnant woman is associated with poor neonatal outcomes although maternal outcomes are similar to cardiac surgery in non-pregnant women. Most adverse maternal and fetal outcomes from cardiac surgery during pregnancy are attributed to effects of CPB. The CPB is associated with utero-placental hypoperfusion due to a number of factors, which may translate into low fetal cardiac output, hypoxia and even death. Better maternal and fetal outcomes may be achieved by early pre-operative optimization of maternal cardiovascular status, use of perioperative fetal monitoring, optimization of CPB, delivery of a viable fetus before the operation and scheduling cardiac surgery on an elective basis during the second trimester.

  14. Cardiopulmonary involvement in Fabry's disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Koskenvuo, Juha W; Kantola, Ilkka M; Nuutila, Pirjo; Knuuti, Juhani; Parkkola, Riitta; Mononen, Ilkka; Hurme, Saija; Kalliokoski, Riikka; Viikari, Jorma S; Wendelin-Saarenhovi, Maria; Kiviniemi, Tuomas O; Hartiala, Jaakko J

    2010-04-01

    Fabry's disease is an X-linked lysosomal storage disease caused by deficiency of alpha-galactosidase A enzyme activity. Decreased enzyme activity leads to accumulation of glycosphingolipid in different tissues, including endothelial and smooth-muscle cells and cardiomyocytes. There is controversial data on cardiopulmonary involvement in Fabry's disease, because many reports are based on small and selected populations with Fabry's disease. Furthermore, the aetiology of cardiopulmonary symptoms in Fabry's disease is poorly understood. We studied cardiopulmonary involvement in seventeen patients with Fabry's disease (20-65 years, 6 men) using ECG, bicycle stress, cardiac magnetic resonance imaging, spirometry, diffusing capacity and pulmonary high-resolution computed tomography (HRCT) tests. Cardiopulmonary symptoms were compared to observed parameters in cardiopulmonary tests. Left ventricular hypertrophy (LVH) and reduced exercise capacity are the most apparent cardiac changes in both genders with Fabry's disease. ECG parameters were normal when excluding changes related to LVH. Spirometry showed mild reduction in vital capacity and forced expiratory volume in one second (FEV I), and mean values in diffusing capacity tests were within normal limits. Generally, only slight morphological pulmonary changes were detected using pulmonary HRCT, and they were not associated with changes in pulmonary function. The self-reported amount of pulmonary symptoms associated only with lower ejection fraction (P routine cardiopulmonary evaluation in Fabry's disease using echocardiography is maybe enough when integrated to counselling for aerobic exercise training.

  15. THROMBOCYTOPENIA IN DENGUE HAEMORRHAGIC FEVER

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    I Wayan Putu Sutirta-Yasa

    2013-04-01

    Full Text Available The incidence and geographical distribution of dengue has gradually increased during the past decade. Today, dengue is considered one of the most important arthropod-borne viral diseasases in humans in term of morbidity and mortality. Dengue infection   a potential life-threatening dengue hemorrhagic fever (DHF / dengue shock syndrome(DSS, characterized by thrombocytopenia and increased vascular permiability. Thrombocytopenia causes bleeding, but in   DHF patients with thrombocytopenia do not always develop bleeding manifestation. The pathogenesis of thrombocytopenia are not cleared. Multiple factors  may be involved in the machanisms leading to thrombocytopenia in DHF/DSS patients.

  16. Emergency percutaneous transcatheter embolisation of acute arterial haemorrhage.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Keeling, A N

    2010-09-01

    The purpose of this study was to review indications, source of haemorrhage, method of embolisation and clinical outcome in patients referred to Interventional Radiology for the emergency management of acute arterial haemorrhage.

  17. White-centred retinal haemorrhages (Roth spots).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ling, R; James, B

    1998-10-01

    Roth spots (white-centred retinal haemorrhages) were classically described as septic emboli lodged in the retina of patients with subacute bacterial endocarditis. Indeed many have considered Roth spots pathognomonic for this condition. More recent histological evidence suggests, however, that they are not foci of bacterial abscess. Instead, they are nonspecific and may be found in many other diseases. A review of the histology and the pathogenesis of these white-centred haemorrhages will be provided, along with the work-up of the differential diagnosis.

  18. Intrapituitary fluid levels following haemorrhage: MRI appearances in 13 cases

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lenthall, R.K.; Dean, J.R.; Jeffree, M.A.; Bartlett, J.R.

    1999-01-01

    Demonstration of fluid levels on MRI is well recognised in cerebral haematomas, tumours and cysts. The occurrence of fluid levels within haemorrhagic pituitary tumours has not previously been described in detail. Evidence of haemorrhage was identified in 27 of 125 pituitary tumours. Fluid levels occurred in 13 of these haemorrhagic tumours. No association with histological type was identified. Recognised risk factors for haemorrhage were identified in half of the cases. (orig.) (orig.)

  19. Risk of subarachnoid haemorrhage in first degree relatives of patients with subarachnoid haemorrhage

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Gaist, D; Vaeth, M; Tsiropoulos, I

    2000-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: To estimate the risk of occurrence of subarachnoid haemorrhage in first degree relatives (parents, siblings, children) of patients with subarachnoid haemorrhage. DESIGN: Population based cohort study using data from the Danish National Discharge Registry and the Central Person Registry......, standardised for age, sex, and calendar period. This process was repeated for patients discharged from neurosurgery units, as diagnoses from these wards had high validity (93%). RESULTS: 18 patients had a total of 19 first degree relatives with subarachnoid haemorrhage during the study period, corresponding...... to a standardised incidence ratio of 2.9 (95% confidence interval 1.9 to 4.6). Patients discharged from neurosurgery wards had a higher standardised incidence ratio (4.5, 2.7 to 7.3). CONCLUSIONS: First degree relatives of patients with subarachnoid haemorrhage have a threefold to fivefold increased risk...

  20. Antithrombotic drugs and subarachnoid haemorrhage risk

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Pottegård, A; García Rodríguez, L A; Poulsen, F R

    2015-01-01

    The study objective was to investigate the relationship between use of antithrombotic drugs and subarachnoid haemorrhage (SAH). We identified patients discharged from Danish neurosurgery units with a first-ever SAH diagnosis in 2000 to 2012 (n=5,834). For each case, we selected 40 age-, sex...

  1. Total Body Opacification 'Technique Neonatal Adrenal Haemorrhage

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    1971-12-11

    Dec 11, 1971 ... A case is reported illustrating the possible usefulness of total body opacification in the diagnosis of neonatal adrenal haemorrhage. To derive maximum benefit from this principle, the routine use of an early film coupled with high dosage is urged whenever an intravenous pyelogram is performed for ...

  2. Cyclophosphamide induced Haemorrhagic Cystitis; a review of ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Cyclophosphamide is an akylating agent widely used in the management of both malignant and non neoplastic disorders. We undertook this review to assess the advancement in knowledge regarding the aetiopathogenesis and current management approaches of haemorrhagic cystitis resulting from the use of ...

  3. Sanitation of viral haemorrhagic septicaemia (VHS)

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Olesen, Niels Jørgen

    1998-01-01

    A sanitation programme for stamping-out viral haemorrhagic septicaemia (VHS) was implemented in Denmark in 1965. The programme has resulted in a dramatic reduction in the number of infected rainbow trout farms, from approximate to 400 to 26. The programme is carried out on a voluntary basis...

  4. The Prevalence of Intraventricular Haemorrhage and Associated ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    The Prevalence of Intraventricular Haemorrhage and Associated Risk Factors in Preterm Neonates in the Neonatal Intensive Care Unit at the University Teaching ... any-IVH generated at the time of analysis was used in determining the prevalence of IVH and also as the dependent variable in multivariate logistic regression.

  5. Drotrecogin Alpha (Activated in Two Patients with the Hantavirus Cardiopulmonary Syndrome

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Robert C McDermid

    2006-01-01

    Full Text Available Hantavirus cardiopulmonary syndrome (HCPS is associated with rapid cardiopulmonary collapse from endothelial injury, resulting in massive capillary leak, shock and severe hypoxemic respiratory failure. To date, treatment remains supportive and includes mechanical ventilation, vasopressors and extracorporeal membrane oxygenation, with mortality approaching 50%. Two HCPS survivors initially given drotrecogin alpha (activated (DAA for presumed bacterial septic shock are described. Vasoactive medications were required for a maximum of 52 h, whereas creatinine levels and platelet counts normalized within seven to nine days. Given the similar presentations of HCPS and bacterial septic shock, empirical DAA therapy will likely be initiated before a definitive diagnosis of HCPS is made. Further observations of DAA in HCPS seem warranted.

  6. A rare cause of fatal intracranial haemorrhage.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Neligan, A

    2012-01-31

    INTRODUCTION: We report the case of a 53-year-old farmer with a 5-day history of severe headache, photophobia and neck stiffness. Full blood count (platelets 173), coagulation screen were normal throughout. Liver function tests remained normal apart from an elevated gamma-GT (156). CT Brain was normal. CSF analysis showed a WCC of 454\\/mm(3) (60% lymphocytes), elevated CSF protein (1.42 g\\/l) and a normal CSF glucose. He was commenced on IV antibiotics and IV acyclivor and improved. On day 3 of admission, he complained of a sudden severe headache, became unresponsive (GCS 3\\/15). INVESTIGATIONS: CT Brain showed a massive left intraventricular haemorrhage. He died 4 days later. Subsequent serum serology for leptospirosis was positive. A repeat sample taken 4 days post-admission, showed a rising IgM indicating active leptospirosis. Detailed pathological examination confirmed intracerebral haemorrhage with normal cerebral vasculature. CONCLUSION: Leptospirosis is a rare cause of intracerebral haemorrhage even in the absence of coagulopathy.

  7. Retinal haemorrhage in infants with pertussis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Raoof, Naz; Pereira, Susana; Dai, Shuan; Neutze, Jocelyn; Grant, Cameron Charles; Kelly, Patrick

    2017-12-01

    It has been hypothesised that paroxysmal coughing in infantile pertussis (whooping cough) could produce retinal haemorrhages identical to those seen in abusive head trauma. We aimed to test this hypothesis. This is a prospective study of infants hospitalised with pertussis in Auckland, New Zealand, from 2009 to 2014. The clinical severity of pertussis was categorised. All infants recruited had retinal examination through dilated pupils by the paediatric ophthalmology service using an indirect ophthalmoscope. Forty-eight infants with pertussis, aged 3 weeks to 7 months, were examined after a mean of 18 days of coughing. Thirty-nine had severe pertussis and nine had mild pertussis. All had paroxysmal cough, and all were still coughing at the time of examination. No retinal haemorrhages were seen. We found no evidence to support the hypothesis that pertussis may cause the pattern of retinal haemorrhages seen in abusive head trauma in infants. © Article author(s) (or their employer(s) unless otherwise stated in the text of the article) 2017. All rights reserved. No commercial use is permitted unless otherwise expressly granted.

  8. Severe Crimean-Congo haemorrhagic fever presented with massive retroperitoneal haemorrhage that recovered without antiviral treatment

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Gharabaghi, Mehrnaz Asadi; Chinikar, Sadegh; Ghiasi, Seyyed Mojtaba

    2011-01-01

    Crimean-Congo haemorrhagic fever (CCHF) is a tickborne viral zoonosis with up to 50% mortality in humans caused by CCHF virus belonging to the genus Nairovirus, family Bunyaviridae. The geographical distribution of CCHF cases corresponds closely with the distribution of principle tick vectors...... that is species of Hyaloma. The disease presents with non-specific febrile symptoms, but progress to a serious haemorrhagic syndrome that, soon after, a full blown multi organ failure may develop with prominent features of liver damage and bleeding diathesis. The authors present a case of a 39-year-old man...

  9. Efficacy of b-lynch brace suture in postpartum haemorrhage

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tarique, S.; Wazir, S.; Moeen, G.

    2011-01-01

    Massive uncontrolled haemorrhage after childbirth is the leading cause of maternal death in developing countries. Postpartum haemorrhage is traditionally defined as blood loss of more than 500 ml after vaginal delivery and more than 1000 ml after caesarean section, but intraoperative estimation of blood loss is inaccurate. Uterine atony alone accounts for 75 - 90% of PPH. To estimate the effectiveness and safety of B-Lynch brace Suture in the management of primary postpartum haemorrhage (PPH). (author)

  10. Haemorrhage in pregnancy: information given to women in Chiradzulu (Malawi

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    H Kapyepye

    2006-09-01

    Full Text Available Advising women on , haemorrhage in pregnancy could, be viewed, as an integral aspect of maternal health care in M alawi. The WHO (1999 confirmed, that haemorrhage in pregnancy was not only a direct reason for maternal mortality but also a major cause of maternal death. The question on the nature of information that midwives and traditional birth attendants (referred to as TBA’s in the Chiradzulu district in Malawi gave with regard to haemorrhage in pregnancy, therefore arose. Research available focused on the women’s knowledge about the complications of pregnancy but not on the nature of information women received from midwives and TBA’s. This study explored and described the nature of information that was given to rural women in the Chiradzulu district by the midwives and TBA’s regarding haemorrhage in pregnancy. The findings revealed that although both the midwives and TBA’s included important information about haemorrhage in pregnancy, there were deficiencies in some critical areas. Examples of these deficiencies were the definition of haemorrhage in pregnancy; the predisposing factors for antepartum and postpartum haemorrhage and deficiencies in the nature of information on the management and referral of haemorrhaging patients. The findings provided insights into the nature of the information that was provided to the women regarding haemorrhage in pregnancy in the Chiradzulu district in Malawi. Thereafter guidelines were developed for the provision of this information. Finally a follow-up study was recommended after implementation of these guidelines in the district to evaluate the change in the nature of the information communicated to patients regarding haemorrhage by midwives and TBA’s. In this study, haemorrhage during pregnancy referred to the perinatal phase, including antepartum, intrapartum and postpartum haemorrhage.

  11. Adult adrenal haemorrhage: an unrecognised complication of renal vein thrombosis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Loke, T.K.L. E-mail: lokekl@ha.org.hk

    2001-07-01

    There are many predisposing factors for neonatal adrenal haemorrhage but the causative factors are different in adults. Several cases of neonatal adrenal haemorrhage have been reported in association with renal vein thrombosis. This complication has not been documented in the adults. The presence of an adrenal mass in the setting of renal vein thrombosis should raise the possibility of adrenal haemorrhage even though this is extremely uncommon in adults.

  12. Mitigating hyperventilation during cardiopulmonary resuscitation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nikolla, Dhimitri; Lewandowski, Tyler; Carlson, Jestin

    2016-03-01

    Although multiple airway management and ventilation strategies have been proposed during cardiac arrest, the ideal strategy is unknown. Current strategies call for advanced airways, such as endotracheal intubation and supraglottic airways. These may facilitate hyperventilation which is known to adversely affect cardiopulmonary physiology. We provide a summary of conceptual models linking hyperventilation to patient outcomes and identify methods for mitigating hyperventilation during cardiac arrest. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  13. Pharmacotherapy In Cardiopulmonary Resuscitation (CPR)

    OpenAIRE

    GÜNAYDIN, Berrin

    2014-01-01

    Cardiac arrest is defined as cessation of cardiac mechanical activity. Cardiopulmonary resuscitation (CPR) is an attempt to restore spontaneous circulation through several maneuvers and techniques. Although the two interventions, which are competent basic life support and prompt defibrillation, improve the survival rate, several adjuvant cardiac medication drugs are advocated to treat cardiac arrest during advanced cardiac life support. Since the introduction of modern CPR there have been man...

  14. Cardiopulmonary resuscitation in hospitalized infants.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hornik, Christoph P; Graham, Eric M; Hill, Kevin; Li, Jennifer S; Ofori-Amanfo, George; Clark, Reese H; Smith, P Brian

    2016-10-01

    Hospitalized infants requiring cardiopulmonary resuscitation (CPR) represent a high-risk group. Recent data on risk factors for mortality following CPR in this population are lacking. We hypothesized that infant demographic characteristics, diagnoses, and levels of cardiopulmonary support at the time of CPR requirement would be associated with survival to hospital discharge following CPR. Retrospective cohort study. All infants receiving CPR on day of life 2 to 120 admitted to 348 Pediatrix Medical Group neonatal intensive care units from 1997 to 2012. We collected data on demographics, interventions, center volume, and death prior to NICU discharge. We evaluated predictors of death after CPR using multivariable logistic regression with generalized estimating equations to account for clustering of the data by center. Our cohort consisted of 2231 infants receiving CPR. Of these, 1127 (51%) survived to hospital discharge. Lower gestational age, postnatal age, 5-min APGAR, congenital anomaly, and markers of severity of illness were associated with higher mortality. Mortality after CPR did not change significantly over time (Cochran-Armitage test for trend p=0.35). Mortality following CPR in infants is high, particularly for less mature, younger infants with congenital anomalies and those requiring cardiopulmonary support prior to CPR. Continued focus on at risk infants may identify targets for CPR prevention and improve outcomes. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  15. Pituitary apoplexy with optic tract oedema and haemorrhage in a patient with idiopathic thrombocytopenic purpura

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lenthall, R.; Jaspan, T.

    2001-01-01

    Bilateral optic tract oedema, left optic tract haemorrhage and subarachnoid haemorrhage occurred in a 70-year-old man with pituitary apoplexy associated with idiopathic thrombocytopenic purpura. Left optic tract haemorrhage was confirmed on MRI. (orig.)

  16. Simulated Cardiopulmonary Arrests in a Hospital Setting.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mishkin, Barbara H.; And Others

    1982-01-01

    Describes a simulated interdisciplinary role rehearsal for cardiopulmonary arrest to prepare nurses to function effectively. Includes needs analysis, program components, and responses of program participants. (Author)

  17. Dengue Haemorrhagic Fever presenting as Acute Abdomen

    OpenAIRE

    Al-Araimi, Hanaa; Al-Jabri, Amal; Mehmoud, Arshad; Al-Abri, Seif

    2011-01-01

    We describe a case of a 38 year-old Sri Lankan female who was referred to the surgeon on call with a picture of acute abdomen. She presented with a three-day history of fever, headache, abdominal pain and diarrhoea; however, the physical examination was not consistent with acute abdomen. Her platelet count was 22 ×109/L. A diagnosis of dengue haemorrhagic fever (DHF) was made and dengue serology was positive. Dengue epidemics have been associated with a variety of gastrointestinal symptoms an...

  18. Haemorrhagic SLE In A Young Male

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rajagopal R

    2002-01-01

    Full Text Available Systemic lupus erythematous (SLE is a systemic autoimmune disease that tends to occur in early adult life. The peak age of onset of the first symptom or sign in females is about 38 years and later in men, at about 44 years. Females outnumber men in this illness in a ratio of about 8 : 1. Cutaneous lesions in male have not been properly investigated and some studies in male with SLE have shown that the illness may present with atypical skin lesions. A case of SLE in a 20 year male who developed sudden onset of haemorrhagic vesiculobullous butterfly rash is described.

  19. Late onset retinoblastoma presenting with vitreous haemorrhage

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bagger, Mette; Prause, Jan Ulrik; Heegard, Steffen

    2012-01-01

    in the retina. A vascularized gelatinous mass was revealed after vitrectomy. Later the patient developed white cysts in the anterior chamber and histological findings were indicative of a retinoblastoma. The patient was enucleated and the diagnosis of retinoblastoma was confirmed. Intraocular surgery in young...... people with unknown retinoblastoma enhances the risk of metastasis development, orbital recurrence and death. Unexplained vitreous haemorrhage can obscure the view of a tumour but ultrasonic findings of a retinal mass calls for further imaging e.g. through MRI. The case illustrates the importance...

  20. Bipallidal haemorrhage after ethylene glycol intoxication

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Caparros-Lefebvre, D.; Policard, J.; Rigal, M. [CHU Pointe a Pitre, Service de Neurologie, Lille (France); Sengler, C. [CHU Pointe a Pitre, Laboratoire de Pharmaco-Toxicologie, Guadeloupe (France); Benabdallah, E. [CHU Pointe a Pitre, Service de Radiologie, Guadeloupe (France); Colombani, S. [Centre d' Imagerie medicale, Martinique (France)

    2005-02-01

    Acute or subacute bipallidal lesion, an uncommon radiological feature produced by metabolic disorders or poisoning, has never been attributed to ethylene glycol (EG) intoxication. This 50-year-old Afro-Caribbean alcoholic man had unexplained loss of consciousness. Blood tests showed osmolar gap. Drug screening was positive for EG at 6.06 mmol/l. Brain CT revealed bilateral pallidal haemorrhage. Pallidal haematoma, which could be related to deposition of oxalate crystals issued from EG metabolism, should lead to toxicological screening. (orig.)

  1. Bipallidal haemorrhage after ethylene glycol intoxication

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Caparros-Lefebvre, D.; Policard, J.; Rigal, M.; Sengler, C.; Benabdallah, E.; Colombani, S.

    2005-01-01

    Acute or subacute bipallidal lesion, an uncommon radiological feature produced by metabolic disorders or poisoning, has never been attributed to ethylene glycol (EG) intoxication. This 50-year-old Afro-Caribbean alcoholic man had unexplained loss of consciousness. Blood tests showed osmolar gap. Drug screening was positive for EG at 6.06 mmol/l. Brain CT revealed bilateral pallidal haemorrhage. Pallidal haematoma, which could be related to deposition of oxalate crystals issued from EG metabolism, should lead to toxicological screening. (orig.)

  2. European research priorities for intracerebral haemorrhage

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Steiner, Thorsten; Petersson, Jesper; Al-Shahi Salman, Rustam

    2011-01-01

    and disability. The European Research Network on Intracerebral Haemorrhage EURONICH is a multidisciplinary academic research collaboration that has been established to define current research priorities and to conduct large clinical studies on all aspects of ICH........ No standardised diagnostic workup for the detection of the various underlying causes of ICH currently exists, and the evidence for medical or surgical therapeutic interventions remains limited. A dedicated European research programme for ICH is needed to identify ways to reduce the burden of ICH-related death...

  3. Primary postpartum haemorrhage at the university of Port Harcourt ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Background: Postpartum haemorrhage (PPH) is a leading global cause of severe maternal morbidity and mortality. Approximately 14 million women suffer postpartum haemorrhage annually and at least 128,000 of these women bleed to death. Most of these deaths, which occur within four hours of delivery and are as a ...

  4. Molecular diagnosis of Haemorrhagic Septicaemia - A Review

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ranjan Rajeev

    2011-08-01

    Full Text Available Pasteurella multocida is associated with hemorrhagic septicaemia in cattle and buffaloes, pneumonic pasteurellosis in sheep and goats, fowl cholera in poultry, atrophic rhinitis in pigs and snuffles in rabbits. Haemorrhagic septicaemia is caused by Pasteurella multocida type B:2, B:2,5 and B:5 in Asian countries and type E:2 in African countries. Pasteurella multocida have five types of capsular serotype i.e. type A, B, D, E and F. Diagnosis of the disease is mainly based on the clinical sign and symptom, post mortem findings. Confirmatory diagnosis is done by isolation and identification of causative agent. A variety of laboratory diagnostic techniques have been developed over the years for pasteurellosis and used routinely in the laboratory. Among these techniques molecular techniques of diagnosis is most important. This technique not only gives diagnosis but it also provides information regarding capsular type of Pasteurella multocida. Techniques which are used for molecular diagnosis of haemorrhagic septicaemia are PCR based diagnosis, Restriction endonuclease analysis (REA, Ribotyping, Colony hybridization assay, Filled alternation gel electrophoresis (FAGE, Detection of Pasteurella multocida by Real Time PCR. Among these techniques real time PCR is most sensitive and specific. [Vet. World 2011; 4(4.000: 189-192

  5. Late haemorrhagic disease of the newborn.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zengin, Emine; Sarper, Nazan; Türker, Gülcan; Corapçioğlu, Funda; Etuş, Volkan

    2006-09-01

    Late haemorrhagic disease of the newborn (HDN) can occur owing to a lack of vitamin K prophylaxis, as a manifestation of an underlying disorder or idiopatically from the 8th day to 12 weeks after birth. Eight infants admitted to Kocaeli University Hospital with nine episodes of late HDN between January 2002 and April 2005 were evaluated retrospectively from hospital records. The median age at presentation was 46 (26-111) days. All the infants were born at full-term to healthy mothers and were exclusively breast-fed. All had an uneventful perinatal history, except one who had meconium aspiration. Four patients had received no vitamin K prophylaxis and another three had uncertain histories. At presentation, six had intracranial bleeding and the remainder had bleeding either from the venepuncture site or the gastro-intestinal tract. The presenting signs and symptoms were irritability, vomiting, bulging or full fontanelle, convulsions and diminished or absent neonatal reflexes. Galactosaemia was detected in a 2-month-old infant with prolonged jaundice. There was no surgery-related mortality or complications but one survived for only 2 days on ventilatory support following surgery. Only one of the six survivors had severe neurological sequelae. Late HDN frequently presents with intracranial haemorrhage, leading to high morbidity and mortality. HDN can be the manifestation of an underlying metabolic disorder. Vitamin K prophylaxis of the newborn should be routine in developing countries.

  6. Olivary degeneration after cerebellar or brain stem haemorrhage: MRI

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Uchino, A. (Dept. of Radiology, Kyushu Univ. Hospital, Fukuoka (Japan) Dept. of Radiology, Kyushu Rosai Hospital, Kitakyushu (Japan)); Hasuo, K. (Dept. of Radiology, Kyushu Univ. Hospital, Fukuoka (Japan)); Uchida, K. (Dept. of Radiology, Kyushu Rosai Hospital, Kitakyushu (Japan)); Matsumoto, S. (Dept. of Radiology, Kyushu Univ. Hospital, Fukuoka (Japan)); Tsukamoto, Y. (Dept. of Radiology, Kyushu Rosai Hospital, Kitakyushu (Japan)); Ohno, M. (Dept. of Radiology, Kyushu Rosai Hospital, Kitakyushu (Japan)); Masuda, K. (Dept. of Radiology, Kyushu Univ. Hospital, Fukuoka (Japan))

    1993-05-01

    Magnetic resonance (MR) images of seven patients with olivary degeneration caused by cerebellar or brain stem haemorrhages were reviewed. In four patients with cerebellar haemorrhage, old haematomas were identified as being located in the dentate nucleus; the contralateral inferior olivary nuclei were hyperintense on proton-density- and T2-weighted images. In two patients with pontine haemorrhages, the old haematomas were in the tegmentum and the ipsilateral inferior olivary nuclei, which were hyperintense. In one case of midbrain haemorrhage, the inferior olivary nuclei were hyperintense bilaterally. The briefest interval from the ictus to MRI was 2 months. Hypertrophic olivary nuclei were observed only at least 4 months after the ictus. Olivary degeneration after cerebellar or brain stem haemorrhage should not be confused with ischaemic, neoplastic, or other primary pathological conditions of the medulla. (orig.)

  7. Magnetic resonance imaging of central nervous system haemorrhage

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Silberstein, M.; Hennessy, O.

    1993-01-01

    The variable magnetic resonance imaging appearances of central nervous system haemorrhage, both intra- and extra-axial, are described. These will vary with the type of image contrast (T1 or T2 weighting), the nature of the imaging sequence (spin-echo or gradient-echo) and the time from onset of haemorrhage. Magnetic resonance imaging is a useful technique for imaging haemorrhage in the central nervous system as it yields temporal information about haematoma development, and it is the only non-invasive means of imaging intraspinal haemorrhage. However, in the imaging of haematomas within 24 h of onset and in subarachnoid haemorrhage computed tomography is the investigation of choice. 13 refs., 6 figs

  8. Clindamycin-induced Anaphylactic Shock During General Anesthesia

    OpenAIRE

    Chiuan-Shiou Chiou; Su-Man Lin; Shih-Pin Lin; Wen-Guei Chang; Kwok-Hon Chan; Chien-Kun Ting

    2006-01-01

    Clindamycin-related anaphylactic reaction is rarely reported. We report a male patient with buccal cancer who was undergoing radical neck dissection when life-threatening anaphylactic shock developed soon after intravenous infusion of clin-damycin. Immediate cardiopulmonary resuscitation was performed, and the patient recovered uneventfully. Perioperative anaphylactic shock is a serious problem due to the difficulty of judgment and potentially disastrous outcome. Immediate diagnosis and halti...

  9. Clindamycin-induced Anaphylactic Shock During General Anesthesia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chiuan-Shiou Chiou

    2006-11-01

    Full Text Available Clindamycin-related anaphylactic reaction is rarely reported. We report a male patient with buccal cancer who was undergoing radical neck dissection when life-threatening anaphylactic shock developed soon after intravenous infusion of clin-damycin. Immediate cardiopulmonary resuscitation was performed, and the patient recovered uneventfully. Perioperative anaphylactic shock is a serious problem due to the difficulty of judgment and potentially disastrous outcome. Immediate diagnosis and halting of drug infusion should be the first actions taken.

  10. Clindamycin-induced anaphylactic shock during general anesthesia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chiou, Chiuan-Shiou; Lin, Su-Man; Lin, Shih-Pin; Chang, Wen-Guei; Chan, Kwok-Hon; Ting, Chien-Kun

    2006-11-01

    Clindamycin-related anaphylactic reaction is rarely reported. We report a male patient with buccal cancer who was undergoing radical neck dissection when life-threatening anaphylactic shock developed soon after intravenous infusion of clindamycin. Immediate cardiopulmonary resuscitation was performed, and the patient recovered uneventfully. Perioperative anaphylactic shock is a serious problem due to the difficulty of judgment and potentially disastrous outcome. Immediate diagnosis and halting of drug infusion should be the first actions taken.

  11. Influencing the practice and outcome in acute upper gastrointestinal haemorrhage. Steering Committee of the National Audit of Acute Upper Gastrointestinal Haemorrhage.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rockall, T A; Logan, R F; Devlin, H B; Northfield, T C

    1997-11-01

    To assess changes in practice and outcome in acute upper gastrointestinal haemorrhage following the feedback of data, the reemphasis of national guidelines, and specific recommendations following an initial survey. A prospective, multicentre, audit cycle. Forty five hospitals from three health regions participated in two phases of the audit cycle. Phase I: 2332 patients with acute upper gastrointestinal haemorrhage; phase II: 1625 patients with upper gastrointestinal haemorrhage. Patients were evaluated with respect to management (with reference to the recommendations in the national guidelines), mortality, and length of hospital stay. Following the distribution of data from the first phase of the National Audit and the formulation of specific recommendations for improving practice, the proportion of hospitals with local guidelines or protocols for the management of upper gastrointestinal haemorrhage rose from 71% (32/45) to 91% (41/45); 12 of the 32 hospitals with guidelines during the first phase revised their guidelines following the initial survey. There was a small but significant increase in the proportion of all patients who underwent endoscopy (from 81% to 86%), the proportion who underwent endoscopy within 24 hours of admission (from 50% to 56%), and the use of central venous pressure monitoring in patients with organ failure requiring blood transfusion or those with profound shock (from 30% to 43%). There was, however, no change in the use of high dependency beds or joint medical/surgical management in high risk cases. There was no significant change in crude or risk standardised mortality (13.4% in the first phase and 14.4% in the second phase). Although many of the participating hospitals have made efforts to improve practice by producing or updating guidelines or protocols, there has been only a small demonstrable change in some areas of practice during the National Audit. The failure to detect any improvement in mortality may reflect this lack of

  12. Factors affecting the occurrence of symptomatic intracerebral haemorrhage after intravenous thrombolysis depending on the haemorrhage definition.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sledzińska-Dźwigał, M; Sobolewski, Piotr; Szczuchniak, W

    2013-01-01

    Symptomatic intracerebral haemorrhage (sICH) remains the most feared complication of systemic thrombolysis in patients with ischaemic stroke. The aim of the study was to analyze the impact of different factors on the occurrence of sICH, depending on definition used. We retrospectively evaluated the influence of several factors on the occurrence of sICH (according to definitions used in ECASS2, SITS-MOST and NINDS studies) in 200 patients treated with systemic thrombolysis from 2006 to 2011. Multivariate analysis of impact of individual variables on the occurrence of haemorrhagic transformation (HT) and parenchymal haemorrhage type 2 (PH2) were performed. Haemorrhagic transformation occurred in 35 cases (17.5%). SICH was found in 10 cases according to ECASS2, in 7 cases according to SITS and in 13 cases according to NINDS. Older age was related to higher risk of sICH, regardless which definition was used (ECASS2: p = 0.014, SITS-MOST: p = 0.048, NINDS: p = 0.008), and female sex was related to higher risk of sICH according to NINDS and ECASS2 definition (p = 0.002 and p = 0.04, respectively). Blood glucose level and high NIHSS score (> 14 pts) were found as risk factor of sICH in ECASS2 definition (p = 0.044 and p = 0.03, respectively). In multivariate logistic regression higher NIHSS scores were associated with HT independent of age, gender and glucose level (p = 0.012). Multivariate analysis showed no impact of age, gender, severity of stroke and glucose level on presence of PH2. Definition of sICH can determine variables that are related to a high risk of this complication. In our study most factors correlated with sICH using the ECASS2 definition.

  13. A Reliable Method for Rhythm Analysis during Cardiopulmonary Resuscitation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    U. Ayala

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Interruptions in cardiopulmonary resuscitation (CPR compromise defibrillation success. However, CPR must be interrupted to analyze the rhythm because although current methods for rhythm analysis during CPR have high sensitivity for shockable rhythms, the specificity for nonshockable rhythms is still too low. This paper introduces a new approach to rhythm analysis during CPR that combines two strategies: a state-of-the-art CPR artifact suppression filter and a shock advice algorithm (SAA designed to optimally classify the filtered signal. Emphasis is on designing an algorithm with high specificity. The SAA includes a detector for low electrical activity rhythms to increase the specificity, and a shock/no-shock decision algorithm based on a support vector machine classifier using slope and frequency features. For this study, 1185 shockable and 6482 nonshockable 9-s segments corrupted by CPR artifacts were obtained from 247 patients suffering out-of-hospital cardiac arrest. The segments were split into a training and a test set. For the test set, the sensitivity and specificity for rhythm analysis during CPR were 91.0% and 96.6%, respectively. This new approach shows an important increase in specificity without compromising the sensitivity when compared to previous studies.

  14. Viral haemorrhagic fever and vascular alterations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aleksandrowicz, P; Wolf, K; Falzarano, D; Feldmann, H; Seebach, J; Schnittler, H

    2008-02-01

    Pathogenesis of viral haemorrhagic fever (VHF) is closely associated with alterations of the vascular system. Among the virus families causing VHF, filoviruses (Marburg and Ebola) are the most fatal, and will be focused on here. After entering the body, Ebola primarily targets monocytes/macrophages and dendritic cells. Infected dendritic cells are largely impaired in their activation potency, likely contributing to the immune suppression that occurs during filovirus infection. Monocytes/macrophages, however, immediately activate after viral contact and release reasonable amounts of cytokines that target the vascular system, particularly the endothelial cells. Some underlying molecular mechanisms such as alteration of the vascular endothelial cadherin/catenin complex, tyrosine phosphorylation, expression of cell adhesion molecules, tissue factor and the effect of soluble viral proteins released from infected cells to the blood stream will be discussed.

  15. Filoviral haemorrhagic fevers: A threat to Zambia?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Katendi Changula

    2012-06-01

    Full Text Available Filoviral haemorrhagic fevers (FVHF are caused by agents belonging to Filoviridae family, Ebola and Marburg viruses. They are amongst the most lethal pathogens known to infect humans. Incidence of FVHF outbreaks are increasing, with affected number of patients on the rise. Whilst there has been no report yet of FVHF in Zambia, its proximity to Angola and Democratic Republic of Congo, which have recorded major outbreaks, as well as the open borders, increased trade and annual migration of bats between these countries, puts Zambia at present and increased risk. Previous studies have indicated bats as potential reservoir hosts for filoviruses. An increasing population with an increasing demand for resources has forced incursion into previously uninhabited land, potentially bringing them into contact with unknown pathogens, reservoir hosts and/or amplifying hosts. The recent discovery of a novel arenavirus, Lujo, highlights the potential that every region, including Zambia, has for being the epicentre or primary focus for emerging and re-emerging infections. It is therefore imperative that surveillance for potential emerging infections, such as viral haemorrhagic fevers be instituted. In order to accomplish this surveillance, rapid detection, identification and monitoring of agents in patients and potential reservoirs is needed. International co-operation is the strategy of choice for the surveillance and fight against emerging infections. Due to the extensive area in which filoviral infections can occur, a regional approach to surveillance activities is required, with regional referral centres. There is a need to adopt shared policies for the prevention and control of infectious diseases. There is also need for optimisation of currently available tests and development of new diagnostic tests, in order to have robust, highly sensitive and specific diagnostic tests that can be used even where there are inadequate laboratories and diagnostic services.

  16. Updates in small animal cardiopulmonary resuscitation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fletcher, Daniel J; Boller, Manuel

    2013-07-01

    For dogs and cats that experience cardiopulmonary arrest, rates of survival to discharge are 6% to 7%, as compared with survival rates of 20% for people. The introduction of standardized cardiopulmonary resuscitation guidelines and training in human medicine has led to substantial improvements in outcome. The Reassessment Campaign on Veterinary Resuscitation initiative recently completed an exhaustive literature review and generated a set of evidence-based, consensus cardiopulmonary resuscitation guidelines in 5 domains: preparedness and prevention, basic life support, advanced life support, monitoring, and postcardiac arrest care. This article reviews some of the most important of these new guidelines. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  17. Streptococcus sanguinis meningitis following endoscopic ligation for oesophageal variceal haemorrhage.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Yu-Ting; Lin, Chin-Fu; Lee, Ya-Ling

    2013-05-01

    We report a case of acute purulent meningitis caused by Streptococcus sanguinis after endoscopic ligation for oesophageal variceal haemorrhage in a cirrhotic patient without preceding symptoms of meningitis. Initial treatment with flomoxef failed. The patient was cured after 20 days of intravenous penicillin G. This uncommon infection due to S. sanguinis adds to the long list of infectious complications among patients with oesophageal variceal haemorrhage.

  18. An Unusual Case of Bilateral Vitreous Haemorrhage following Snake Bite

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vipul Bhandari

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available A-45-year-old man presented to us with diminution of vision in both eye following snake bite. On examination vision in the right eye (RE was 6/36 and vision in left eye (LE was hand movement positive and fundus examination revealed a subhyloid haemorrhage, left eye showed vitreous haemorrhage. Patient was advised bed rest, vitamin C tablets and oral steroids.

  19. [Hereditary haemorrhagic telangiectasia diagnosed in connection with a traffic accident].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sivapalan, Pradeesh; Demény, Ann Kathrin; Almind, Merete; Kjeldsen, Anette Drøhse

    2014-02-17

    Hereditary haemorrhagic telangiectasia (HHT) is an autosomal dominant disorder characterized by vascular dysplasia and haemorrhage. It is manifested by mucocutaneous telangiec-tases and arteriovenous malformations in organs such as lungs, liver and brain. We present a case of HHT. A 16-year-old patient with a history of recurrent epistaxis was admitted to the local hospital with chest pain and desaturation. A CT scan revealed pulmonary arteriovenous malformations.

  20. Teaching Cardiopulmonary Resuscitation in the Schools.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carveth, Stephen W.

    1979-01-01

    Cardiopulmonary resuscitation is a key part of emergency cardiac care. It is a basic life support procedure that can be taught in the schools with the assistance of the American Heart Association. (JMF)

  1. Dynamic Cerebral Autoregulation after Cardiopulmonary Bypass

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Christiansen, Claus Behrend; Berg, Ronan M G; Plovsing, Ronni R

    2016-01-01

    Background Cerebral hemodynamic disturbances in the peri- or postoperative period may contribute to postoperative cognitive dysfunction (POCD) in patients undergoing coronary artery bypass grafting (CABG) with cardiopulmonary bypass (CPB). We therefore examined dynamic cerebral autoregulation (d...

  2. Postpartum haemorrhage: a preventable cause of maternal mortality

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Shaheen, B.; Hassan, L.

    2007-01-01

    To assess the preventable predictors of severe postpartum haemorrhage and the adverse outcome associated with it. All the admitted patients who developed severe postpartum haemorrhage (>1500 ml) were included in the study. Clinical and sociodemographic data was obtained along with results of investigations to categorize the complications encountered. Odds ratio (OR) and 95% confidence intervals were determined. During the study period, 75 out of 4683 obstetrical admissions, developed severe postpartum haemorrhage (1.6 %). About 65% of the patients were admitted with some other complications including obstructed labour, antepartum haemorrhage and eclampsia. The risk factors were grand multiparity (OR=3.4), pre-eclampsia (OR=2.75), antepartum haemorrhage (OR=13.35), active labour of more than 10 hours (OR=46.92), twin delivery (OR=3.25), instrumental delivery (OR=8.62) and caesarean section (OR=9.74). Maternal mortality in these cases was 2.66% and residual morbidity being 40%. Birth attendant other than doctor and delivery outside the study unit were significantly associated with the adverse outcome in these patients. Maternal outcome associated with postpartum haemorrhage is a function of care given during labour and postnatal period with early diagnosis and management of the complication and its risk factors, being the key of good maternal outcome. (author)

  3. Evidence-based management of epistaxis in hereditary haemorrhagic telangiectasia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Syed, I; Sunkaraneni, V S

    2015-05-01

    There are currently no guidelines in the UK for the specific management of hereditary haemorrhagic telangiectasia related epistaxis. The authors aimed to review the literature and provide an algorithm for the management of hereditary haemorrhagic telangiectasia related epistaxis. The Medline and Embase databases were interrogated on 15 November 2013 using the search items 'hereditary haemorrhagic telangiectasia' (title), 'epistaxis' (title) and 'treatment' (title and abstract), and limiting the search to articles published in English. A total of 46 publications were identified, comprising 1 systematic review, 2 randomised, controlled trials, 27 case series, 9 case reports, 4 questionnaire studies and 3 in vitro studies. There is a lack of high-level evidence for the use of many of the available treatments for the specific management of epistaxis in hereditary haemorrhagic telangiectasia. Current management should be based on a multidisciplinary team approach involving both a hereditary haemorrhagic telangiectasia physician and an ENT surgeon, especially when systemic therapy is being considered. The suggested treatment algorithm considers that the severity of epistaxis merits intervention at different levels of the treatment ladder. The patient should be assessed using a reproducible validated assessment tool, for example an epistaxis severity score, to guide treatment. More research is required, particularly in the investigation of topical agents targeting the development and fragility of telangiectasiae in hereditary haemorrhagic telangiectasia.

  4. Fatal haemorrhage and neoplastic thrombosis in a captive African lion (Panthera leo) with metastatic testicular sex cord-stromal tumour.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gonzales-Viera, Omar Antonio; Sánchez-Sarmiento, Angélica María; Fernandes, Natália Coelho Couto de Azevedo; Guerra, Juliana Mariotti; Ressio, Rodrigo Albergaria; Catão-Dias, José Luiz

    2017-10-13

    The study of neoplasia in wildlife species contributes to the understanding of cancer biology, management practices, and comparative pathology. Higher frequencies of neoplasms among captive non-domestic felids have been reported most commonly in aging individuals. However, testicular tumours have rarely been reported. This report describes a metastatic testicular sex cord-stromal tumour leading to fatal haemorrhage and thrombosis in a captive African lion (Panthera leo). During necropsy of a 16-year-old male African lion, the left testicle and spermatic cord were found to be intra-abdominal (cryptorchid), semi-hard and grossly enlarged with multiple pale-yellow masses. Encapsulated haemorrhage was present in the retroperitoneum around the kidneys. Neoplastic thrombosis was found at the renal veins opening into the caudal vena cava. Metastases were observed in the lungs and mediastinal lymph nodes. Histology revealed a poorly differentiated pleomorphic neoplasm comprised of round to polygonal cells and scattered spindle cells with eosinophilic cytoplasm. An immunohistochemistry panel of inhibin-α, Ki-67, human placental alkaline phosphatase, cytokeratin AE1/AE3, cKit, vimentin and S100 was conducted. Positive cytoplasmic immunolabeling was obtained for vimentin and S100. The gross, microscopic and immunohistochemical findings of the neoplasm were compatible with a poorly differentiated pleomorphic sex cord-stromal tumour. Cause of death was hypovolemic shock from extensive retroperitoneal haemorrhage and neoplastic thrombosis may have contributed to the fatal outcome. To our knowledge, this is the first report of sex cord-stromal tumour in non-domestic felids.

  5. Amitriptyline Intoxication Responded to Cardiopulmonary Resuscitation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Güldem Turan

    2012-04-01

    Full Text Available The most severe effects in amitriptiline intoxications are related with central nervous system and cardiovascular system. Amitriptiline intoxication especially with high doses has severe cardiac effects and can result in cardiac arrest. Most favorable responses can be achieved with efficient and prolonged cardiopulmonary resuscitation. We wanted to present a case ingested high dose of amitriptiline for attempt to suicide and responded to prolonged cardiopulmonary resuscitation.

  6. Current diagnostic approaches to subarachnoid haemorrhage

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    U-King-Im, Jean Marie; Koo, Brendan; Trivedi, Rikin A.; Higgins, Nicholas J.; Tay, Keng Y.; Cross, Justin J.; Antoun, Nagui M.; Gillard, Jonathan H.

    2005-01-01

    Over the past decade, significant advances have been made in the field of subarachnoid haemorrhage (SAH). Prompt diagnosis with high-resolution CT and intensive critical care support remain key aspects of good patient management. Early identification and definitive treatment of underlying ruptured aneurysms is generally advocated to reduce the risk of re-bleeding, a complication with high mortality and morbidity. Although intra-arterial digital subtraction angiography (DSA) is still considered the gold standard for sourcing aneurysms, CT angiography, especially with the evolution of multi-slice technology, is slowly gaining acceptance as a rapid, accessible and minimally invasive method which appears likely to replace DSA as first-line modality in the future. Furthermore, the advent of Guglielmi detachable coils and the ISAT trial have revolutionised the treatment of ruptured aneurysms, with a significant trend towards endovascular coiling away from operative clipping. Improvements in clinical experience, coiling technology and assistive devices now allow interventionalists to potentially treat the majority of aneurysms, including wide-necked or complex lesions. The uncertain long-term results of coiling, however, still fuel strong debate and controversy. This review summarises current diagnostic approaches to SAH from a radiological perspective, with an emphasis on aneurysmal SAH and an evidence-based approach to the role of imaging and interventional radiology in diagnosis, treatment and follow-up. (orig.)

  7. Current diagnostic approaches to subarachnoid haemorrhage

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    U-King-Im, Jean Marie; Koo, Brendan; Trivedi, Rikin A.; Higgins, Nicholas J.; Tay, Keng Y.; Cross, Justin J.; Antoun, Nagui M.; Gillard, Jonathan H. [Addenbrooke' s Hospital, University Department of Radiology, Cambridge (United Kingdom)

    2005-06-01

    Over the past decade, significant advances have been made in the field of subarachnoid haemorrhage (SAH). Prompt diagnosis with high-resolution CT and intensive critical care support remain key aspects of good patient management. Early identification and definitive treatment of underlying ruptured aneurysms is generally advocated to reduce the risk of re-bleeding, a complication with high mortality and morbidity. Although intra-arterial digital subtraction angiography (DSA) is still considered the gold standard for sourcing aneurysms, CT angiography, especially with the evolution of multi-slice technology, is slowly gaining acceptance as a rapid, accessible and minimally invasive method which appears likely to replace DSA as first-line modality in the future. Furthermore, the advent of Guglielmi detachable coils and the ISAT trial have revolutionised the treatment of ruptured aneurysms, with a significant trend towards endovascular coiling away from operative clipping. Improvements in clinical experience, coiling technology and assistive devices now allow interventionalists to potentially treat the majority of aneurysms, including wide-necked or complex lesions. The uncertain long-term results of coiling, however, still fuel strong debate and controversy. This review summarises current diagnostic approaches to SAH from a radiological perspective, with an emphasis on aneurysmal SAH and an evidence-based approach to the role of imaging and interventional radiology in diagnosis, treatment and follow-up. (orig.)

  8. Cardiopulmonary measurements in dogs undergoing gastropexy without gastrectomy for correction of gastric dilatation-volvulus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wagner, A E; Dunlop, C I; Chapman, P L

    1999-08-15

    To measure cardiopulmonary variables, including cardiac index, in dogs with naturally acquired gastric dilatation-volvulus (GDV). Prospective clinical study. 6 dogs with GDV. In addition to typical medical and surgical management of GDV, the dorsal metatarsal and pulmonary arteries and right atrium of the dogs were catheterized to obtain cardiopulmonary measurements before and during anesthesia and surgery. All dogs underwent gastropexy but none required gastrectomy. Mean cardiac index and mean arterial blood pressure for this small population of dogs with GDV were not significantly different from those reported for clinically normal awake or anesthetized dogs. Dogs with naturally acquired GDV without gastric necrosis may not have the classic characteristics, including decreased cardiac index and hypotension, of hypovolemic circulatory shock.

  9. Shock absorber

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nemeth, J.D.

    1981-01-01

    A shock absorber for the support of piping and components in a nuclear power plant is described. It combines a high degree of stiffness under sudden shocks, e.g. seismic disturbances, with the ability to allow for thermal expansion without resistance when so required. (JIW)

  10. Circulatory Shock. Volume 34. Number 1. May 1991. International Conference on Shock (2nd), Meeting of European Shock Society (5th), Annual Meeting of the Shock Society (USA) (14th), Vienna Shock Form (3rd) Held in Vienna, Austria on 2-6 June 1991

    Science.gov (United States)

    1991-06-06

    OCTADECENOATE, AS A BURN TOXIN Takayuki Ozawa, Mika Hayakawa, Kazuhiro Kosaka, Satoru Sugiyama, Kazuhisa Yokoo, Hisashi Aoyama, and Yohei Izawa Department...shock. 41 CARDIOPULMONARY HEMODYNAMIC AND PERIPHERAL CIRCULATORY RESPONSES IN SHOCK T. Muteki, N. Kaku. T. Fukushige, I. Kohno and T. Hiraki Department...Tadashi, 242 Machleidt, Werner, 213 Ozawa, Takayuki , 11 Kawarada, Yoshifumi, 442 Mackie, D.P., 348 Ozawa, Kazue, 268 Keser, Claudia, 380 Maitra, Subir R

  11. The Inflammatory Sequelae of Aortic Balloon Occlusion in Hemorrhagic Shock

    Science.gov (United States)

    2014-04-13

    respectively. There was a trend toward greater vasopressor use (P ¼ 0.183) and increased incidence of acute respiratory distress syndrome (P ¼ 0.052) across the...Jansen JO. Intra operative correction of acidosis , coagulopathy and hypothermia in combat casualties with severe haemorrhagic shock. Anaesthesia...noncompressible torso hemorrhage. J Trauma 2011;71:S131. [19] Ranieri VM, Rubenfeld GD, Thompson BT, et al. Acute respiratory distress syndrome: the

  12. [Prehospital thrombolysis during cardiopulmonary resuscitation].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Spöhr, F; Böttiger, B W

    2005-02-01

    Although prehospital cardiac arrest has an incidence of 40-90/100,000 inhabitants per year, there has been a lack of therapeutic options to improve the outcome of these patients. Of all cardiac arrests, 50-70% are caused by acute myocardial infarction (AMI) or massive pulmonary embolism (PE). Thrombolysis has been shown to be a causal and effective therapy in patients with AMI or PE who do not suffer cardiac arrest. In contrast, experience with the use of thrombolysis during cardiac arrest has been limited. Thrombolysis during cardiopulmonary resuscitation (CPR) acts directly on thrombi or emboli causing AMI or PE. In addition, experimental studies suggest that thrombolysis causes an improvement in microcirculatory reperfusion after cardiac arrest. In-hospital and prehospital case series and clinical studies suggest that thrombolysis during CPR may cause a restoration of spontaneous circulation and survival even in patients that have been resuscitated conventionally without success. In addition, there is evidence for an improved neurological outcome in patients receiving a thrombolytic therapy during during CPR. A large randomized, double-blind multicenter trial that has started recently is expected to show if this new therapeutic option can generally improve the prognosis of patients with cardiac arrest.

  13. demystifying the shock of shocking

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    (with a pulse), atrial fibrillation and atrial flutter. The energy dose in cardioversion is less (0.5. - 2 J/kg) than in defibrillation (2 - 4 J/kg). In cardioversion the shock is discharged synchronously with the native R wave of the patient. Without synchronisation,. VF can be induced if a shock is delivered during the refractory period ...

  14. Fulminant intravascular lymphomatosis mimicking acute haemorrhagic leukoencephalopathy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marino, D; Sicurelli, F; Cerase, A; Tripodi, S; Cintorino, M; Lazzi, S; Federico, A

    2012-09-15

    Intravascular lymphomatosis (IVL) is a rare non-Hodgkin's lymphoma, usually of B cell lineage, characterized by massive angiotropic growth. The clinical presentation of IVL may include changes in mental status, non-localizing neurological deficits, seizures, fever of unknown origin and skin changes. Because of its rarity and the absence of specific diagnostic procedures except for cerebral biopsy, diagnosis is often postmortem. Brain MRI usually shows non-specific abnormalities. The purpose of this case report is to increase the knowledge of clinical and neuroimaging features of IVL by describing the findings observed in a 71-year-old patient. A 71-year-old male was admitted for right hemiparesis, acute cognitive impairment and febricula. A bone marrow biopsy resulted normal. He then developed a rapid progressive impairment of his mental status and left hemisoma motor seizures. Brain CT and MRI were interpreted as consistent with acute haemorrhagic leukoencephalopathy (AHLE), including multiple areas of restricted diffusion without gadolinium enhancement and a small focal area of gadolinium enhancement in the left temporal lobe white matter. The patient died within a few days and the autopsy led to the diagnosis of IVL. IVL may present with a variety of clinical signs and symptoms, including stroke and hemiparesis. IVL may mimic AHLE at brain MRI. However, the evidence of multiple areas of restricted diffusion without gadolinium enhancement and of a small area of gadolinium enhancement could have led to the correct diagnosis. IVL should be added to the differential diagnosis of AHLE at brain MRI. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  15. Successful cardiopulmonary resuscitation following cardiopulmonary arrest in a geriatric chinchilla.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fernandez, Christina M; Peyton, Jamie L; Miller, Mona; Johnson, Eric G; Kovacic, Jan P

    2013-01-01

    To describe the successful application of CPR in a geriatric chinchilla employing basic and advanced life support measures during cardiopulmonary arrest (CPA). A 13-year-old female intact chinchilla presented to a general and multispecialty referral hospital for a dental procedure. During recovery from anesthesia the patient suffered CPA and CPR was initiated. Noninvasive positive pressure mask ventilation was initiated and external chest compressions were performed. An 18-Ga needle was introduced into the medullary cavity of the right humerus as an intraosseous catheter and provided access for administration of drugs and fluids. After return of spontaneous circulation was noted mannitol was administered via the intraosseous catheter to alleviate suspected increased intracranial pressure. Clinical improvement was noted shortly after administration. Monitoring during the recovery period showed a normal sinus cardiac rhythm and a SpO₂ of 100% while on supplemental oxygen. Neurologic function continued to improve over the following hours. Oxygen therapy was provided via an oxygen cage, and administration of antimicirobials, gastrointestinal protectants, and nutritional supplementation were part of the post resuscitation care. Oxygen therapy was discontinued after 24 hours, during which time normal behaviors were observed and neurologic status was considered appropriate. The patient was discharged 48 hours after CPA. Published reports from clinical practice on the outcomes of CPR for exotic small mammals are limited. This report details the successful outcome of the use of combined basic and advanced life support measures for the provision of CPR in a chinchilla. This report also highlights the utility of an intraosseous catheter for administration of drugs and fluids novel to this species during resuscitation and recovery. To the authors' knowledge this is the first published report of successful CPR following CPA in a geriatric chinchilla. © Veterinary Emergency

  16. [Fatal alveolar haemorrhage following a "bang" of cannabis].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grassin, F; André, M; Rallec, B; Combes, E; Vinsonneau, U; Paleiron, N

    2011-09-01

    The new methods of cannabis consumption (home made water pipe or "bang") may be responsible for fatal respiratory complications. We present a case, with fatal outcome, of a man of 19 years with no previous history other than an addiction to cannabis using "bang". He was admitted to intensive care with acute dyspnoea. A CT scan showed bilateral, diffuse alveolar shadowing. He was anaemic with an Hb of 9.3g/l. Bronchoalveolar lavage revealed massive alveolar haemorrhage. Investigations for infection and immunological disorder were negative and toxicology was negative except for cannabis. Antibiotic treatment was given and favourable progress allowed early discharge. Death occurred 15 days later due to alveolar haemorrhage following a further "bang" of cannabis. Autopsy showed toxic alveolar haemorrhage. The probable mechanism is pulmonary damage due to acid anhydrides released by the incomplete combustion of cannabis in contact with plastic. These acids have a double effect on the lungs: a direct toxicity with severe inflammation of the mucosa leading to alveolar haemorrhage and subsequently the acid anhydrides may lead to the syndrome of intra-alveolar haemorrhage and anaemia described in occupational lung diseases by Herbert in Oxford in 1979. It manifests itself by haemoptysis and intravascular haemolysis. We draw attention to the extremely serious potential consequences of new methods of using cannabis, particularly the use of "bang" in homemade plastic materials. Copyright © 2011 SPLF. Published by Elsevier Masson SAS. All rights reserved.

  17. Are We Successful in Cardiopulmonary Resuscitation?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nalan Kozaci

    2013-08-01

    Full Text Available Purpose: In this study, we aimed to determine the success rate of cardiopulmonary resuscitation performed in the patients with diagnosis of cardiac arrest, and demographic characteristics of these patients. Material and Methods: The patients admitted to Adana Numune Education and Research Hospital, Department of Emergency Medicine between 01.01.2011 and 31.12.2012, and who underwent cardiopulmonary resuscitation were included to this study planned as retrospectively. The age, gender, status of judicial cases, causes and time of cardiac arrest, first observed arrest rhythm, the diseases prior to the arrest, means of arrival to emergency department, duration of cardiopulmonary resuscitation, results of cardiopulmonary resuscitation, the name of the hospitalised clinic, the existence of the operation, and outcome of the patients who underwent cardiopulmonary resuscitation in accordance with current advanced life support protocols were recorded in standard data entry form. Results: A total of 290 patients with completely accessible data were included to the study. Most of these patients were men (65.2%. The mean ages were 61 ± 19 years for men, 67 ± 14 years for women (p = 0.018. The most common diagnosis were ischemic heart disease and heart failure according to the analysis of the patient's medical history. 92 patients (31.7% were brought to the emergency department after death, and all of these patients were unsuccessful following to cardiopulmonary resuscitation. 198 patients (68.3% had cardiac arrest in the emergency department, and we determined that cardiopulmonary resuscitation application of 102 patients were successful. The most common causes of cardiac arrest were myocardial infarction and heart failure. Mostly first observed rhythm in the monitor was asystole. The response rate of cardiopulmonary resuscitation in patients with ventricular fibrillation and ventricular tachycardia was higher. Most patients were hospitalised to the

  18. Cardiopulmonary resuscitation in palliative care cancer patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kjørstad, Odd Jarle; Haugen, Dagny Faksvåg

    2013-02-19

    The criteria for refraining from cardiopulmonary resuscitation in palliative care cancer patients are based on patients' right to refuse treatment and the duty of the treating personnel not to exacerbate their suffering and not to administer futile treatment. When is cardiopulmonary resuscitation futile in these patients? Systematic literature searches were conducted in PubMed for the period 1989-2010 on the results of in-hospital cardiopulmonary resuscitation in advanced cancer patients and on factors that affected the results of CPR when special mention was made of cancer. The searches yielded 333 hits and 18 included articles: four meta-analyses, eight retrospective clinical studies, and six review articles. Cancer patients had a poorer post-CPR survival than non-cancer patients. Survival declined with increasing extent of the cancer disease. Widespread and therapy-resistant cancer disease coupled with a performance status lower than WHO 2 or a PAM score (Pre-Arrest Morbidity Index) of above 8 was regarded as inconsistent with survival after cardiopulmonary resuscitation. Cardiopulmonary resuscitation is futile for in-hospital cancer patients with widespread incurable disease and poor performance status.

  19. Wide variation in cardiopulmonary resuscitation interruption intervals among commercially available automated external defibrillators may affect survival despite high defibrillation efficacy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Snyder, David; Morgan, Carl

    2004-09-01

    Recent studies have associated interruptions of cardiopulmonary resuscitation imposed by automated external defibrillators (AEDs) with poor resuscitation outcome. In particular, the "hands-off" interval between precordial compressions and subsequent defibrillation shock has been implicated. We sought to determine the range of variation among current-generation AEDs with respect to this characteristic. Seven AEDs from six manufacturers were characterized via stopwatch and arrhythmia simulator with respect to the imposed hands-off interval. All AEDs were equipped with new batteries, and measurements were repeated five times for each AED. A wide variation in the hands-off interval between precordial compressions and shock delivery was observed, ranging from 5.2 to 28.4 secs, with only one AED achieving an interruption of <10 secs. Laboratory and clinical data suggest that this range of variation could be responsible for a more than two-fold variation in patient resuscitation success, an effect that far exceeds any defibrillation efficacy differences that may hypothetically exist. In addition to defibrillation waveform and dose, researchers should consider the hands-off cardiopulmonary resuscitation interruption interval between cardiopulmonary resuscitation and subsequent defibrillation shock to be an important covariate of outcome in resuscitation studies. Defibrillator design should minimize this interval to avoid potential adverse consequences on patient survival.

  20. Hypovolemic shock

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... the person's position unless they are in immediate danger. Do not give fluids by mouth. If person ... the patient with shock. In: Goldman L, Schafer AI, eds. Goldman-Cecil Medicine . 25th ed. Philadelphia, PA: ...

  1. Vesical Artery Embolization in Haemorrhagic Cystitis in Children

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    García-Gámez, Andrés, E-mail: agargamez@gmail.com; Bermúdez Bencerrey, Patricia, E-mail: PBERMUDE@clinic.ub.es [Hospital Clinic (Spain); Brio-Sanagustin, Sonia, E-mail: sbrio@santpau.cat [Hospital de la Santa Creu y Sant Pau (Spain); Guerrero Vara, Rubén, E-mail: rguerrerov@santpau.cat [Hospital Clinic (Spain); Sisinni, Luisa, E-mail: lsisinni@santpau.cat [Hospital de la Santa Creu y Sant Pau (Spain); Stuart, Sam, E-mail: sam.stuart@gosh.nhs.uk; Roebuck, Derek, E-mail: Derek.Roebuck@gosh.nhs.uk [Great Ormond Street Hospital for Children (United Kingdom); Gómez Muñoz, Fernando, E-mail: FEGOMEZ@clinic.ub.es [Hospital Clinic (Spain)

    2016-07-15

    Haemorrhagic cystitis is an uncommon and, in its severe form, potentially life-threatening complication of haematopoietic stem cell transplantation or cancer therapy in children. The severe form involves macroscopic haematuria with blood clots, urinary obstruction and/or renal impairment. There are many therapeutic options to treat acute haemorrhage, but only recombinant factor VII has a high level of clinical evidence in children. Supraselective vesical artery embolization (SVAE) is an increasingly used therapeutic procedure for controlling haemorrhage in adults, but is less commonly used in children. This might be due to several factors, such as the invasive nature of the procedure, lack of appropriate medical experience and possible long-term side effects. We present three cases of children successfully treated by means of effective SVAE.

  2. Neurosurgical management of L-asparaginase induced haemorrhagic stroke.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Ogbodo, Elisha

    2012-01-01

    The authors describe a case of L-asparaginase induced intracranial thrombosis and subsequent haemorrhage in a newly diagnosed 30-year-old man with acute lymphoblastic leukaemia who was successfully managed by surgical intervention. At presentation, he had a Glasgow Coma Score of 7\\/15, was aphasic and had dense right hemiplegia. Neuroimaging revealed an acute anterior left middle cerebral artery infarct with parenchymal haemorrhagic conversion, mass effect and subfalcine herniation. He subsequently underwent left frontal craniotomy and evacuation of large frontal haematoma and decompressive craniectomy for cerebral oedema. Six months postoperatively he underwent titanium cranioplasty. He had made good clinical recovery and is currently mobilising independently with mild occasional episodes of expressive dysphasia, difficulty with fine motor movement on the right side, and has remained seizure free. This is the first documented case of L-asparaginase induced haemorrhagic stroke managed by neurosurgical intervention. The authors emphasise the possible role of surgery in managing chemotherapy induced intracranial complications.

  3. The value of MRI in angiogram-negative intracranial haemorrhage

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Renowden, S.A. (Dept. of Neuroradiology, Radcliffe Infirmary, Oxford (United Kingdom)); Molyneux, A.J. (Dept. of Neuroradiology, Radcliffe Infirmary, Oxford (United Kingdom)); Anslow, P. (Dept. of Neuroradiology, Radcliffe Infirmary, Oxford (United Kingdom)); Byrne, J.V. (Dept. of Neuroradiology, Radcliffe Infirmary, Oxford (United Kingdom))

    1994-08-01

    In one year, cerebral angiograms were performed for intracranial haemorrhage (ICH) on 334 patients. No cause for haemorrhage could be identified in 41 (12 %), 30 of whom had predominantly subarachnoid (SAH) and 11 predominantly parenchymal haemorrhage (PH). These patients were prospectively examined by cranial MRI 1-6 weeks after the ictus. The MRI studies were positive in 7 patients (17 %). In the 30 patients examined after SAH, 2 studies were positive, showing an aneurysm in one case and a brain stem lesion of uncertain aetiology in the other. In those examined after PH, cavernous angiomas were shown in 2, a tumour in 1 and a vascular malformation in another; useful diagnostic information was thus obtained in 36 % of this group. (orig.)

  4. Trends in monitoring patients with aneurysmal subarachnoid haemorrhage

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Springborg, J B; Frederiksen, H-J; Eskesen, V

    2005-01-01

    After aneurysmal subarachnoid haemorrhage (SAH), the clinical outcome depends upon the primary haemorrhage and a number of secondary insults in the acute post-haemorrhagic period. Some secondary insults are potentially preventable but prevention requires prompt recognition of cerebral or systemic...... implemented monitoring system provides answers but it also raises valuable new questions challenging our current understanding of the brain injury after SAH....... complications. Currently, several neuro-monitoring techniques are available; this review describes the most frequently used techniques and discusses indications for their use, and their value in diagnosis and prognosis. None of the techniques, when considered in isolation, has proved sufficient after SAH...... with the conventional monitoring systems, for example intracranial pressure measurements, transcranial Doppler ultrasound and modern neuro-imaging, direct assessment of biochemical markers by intracerebral microdialysis is promising in the advancement of neurointensive care of patients with SAH. A successfully...

  5. Spontaneous haemorrhage and rupture of third ventricular colloid cyst.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Ogbodo, Elisha

    2012-01-01

    Acute bleeding within a colloid cyst of the third ventricle represents a rare event causing sudden increase in the cyst volume that may lead to acute hydrocephalus and rapid neurological deterioration. We report a case of spontaneous rupture of haemorrhagic third ventricular colloid cyst and its management. A 77-year-old ex-smoker presented with unsteady gait, incontinence and gradually worsening confusion over a 3-week period. Brain CT scan findings were highly suggestive of a third ventricular colloid cyst with intraventricular rupture. He underwent cyst excision and histopathology, which confirmed the radiological diagnosis with evidence of haemorrhage within the cyst. A ventriculo peritoneal shunt was performed for delayed hydrocephalus. Surgical management of these patients must include emergency ventriculostomy followed by prompt surgical removal of the haemorrhagic cyst.

  6. What are the current therapeutic options for haemorrhagic strokes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Khan, M.; Kamal, A.K.

    2010-01-01

    The Factor Seven for Acute Haemorrhagic Stroke Trial (FAST) and Intensive Blood Pressure Reduction in Acute Cerebral Haemorrhage trial (INTERACT). Intracerebral haemorrhage (ICH) is the most devastating form of stroke carrying a mortality of up to 40% at one month. In our part of the world the levels of uncontrolled hypertension pose a greater risk of ICH for our population where ICH is about 30% of all strokes compared to 14% in developed countries. There is evidence to suggest that haematoma expansion occurs in as many as 70% of patients. This expansion translates into increased disability and death. Most of this expansion is within the initial three hours. Also early elevation of blood pressure (BP) is very common after ICH and many studies have highlighted an association between elevated BP post ICH and poor outcomes. The reason for this is postulated to be an increase in both the size of the haematoma and perilesional oedema. (author)

  7. Shock absorber

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Housman, J.J.

    1978-01-01

    A shock absorber is described for use in a hostile environment at the end of a blind passage for absorbing impact loads. The shock absorber includes at least one element which occupies the passage and which is comprised of a porous brittle material which is substantially non-degradable in the hostile environment. A void volume is provided in the element to enable the element to absorb a predetermined level of energy upon being crushed due to impact loading

  8. 21 CFR 870.4320 - Cardiopulmonary bypass pulsatile flow generator.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Cardiopulmonary bypass pulsatile flow generator... Cardiopulmonary bypass pulsatile flow generator. (a) Identification. A cardiopulmonary bypass pulsatile flow generator is an electrically and pneumatically operated device used to create pulsatile blood flow. The...

  9. International prospective observational study of upper gastrointestinal haemorrhage: Does weekend admission affect outcome?

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Murray, Iain A.; Dalton, Harry R.; Stanley, Adrian J.

    2017-01-01

    Introduction Out of hours admissions have higher mortality for many conditions but upper gastrointestinal haemorrhage studies have produced variable outcomes. Methods Prospective study of 12 months consecutive admissions of upper gastrointestinal haemorrhage from four international high volume...

  10. Perforated ileal duplication cyst with haemorrhagic pseudocyst formation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hwang, Im Kyung; Kim, Bong Soo; Kim, Heung Chul; Lee, In Sun; Hwang, Woo Chul; Namkung, Sook

    2003-01-01

    Duplication cysts of the gastrointestinal tract are rare congenital abnormalities. Ectopic gastric mucosa, which can be found in duplications, may cause peptic ulceration, gastrointestinal bleeding or perforation. We report a 1-year-old boy with a perforated ileal duplication cyst with haemorrhagic pseudocyst formation caused by peptic ulceration of the duplication cyst. It presented a snowman-like appearance consisting of a small, thick-walled, true enteric cyst and a large, thin-walled haemorrhagic pseudocyst on US and CT. It is an unusual manifestation of a duplication cyst, which has not been reported in the English language literature. (orig.)

  11. Retroperitoneal Haematoma in a Patient with Dengue Haemorrhagic Fever: A Rare Case Report.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Singh, Jasminder; Singh, Harpreet; Sukhija, Gagandeep; Jagota, Ruchi; Bala, Saroj

    2016-11-01

    Dengue Haemorrhagic Fever (DHF) has diverse manifestations ranging from asymptomatic petechial skin haemorrhages to life threatening cerebral, pulmonary, gastrointestinal and genitourinary haemorrhages. However, the association of spontaneous retroperitoneal haematomas with DHF is not well documented in literature. We report a rare case of spontaneous retroperitoneal haematoma complicating DHF.

  12. Acute posthypoxic myoclonus after cardiopulmonary resuscitation

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bouwes, Aline; van Poppelen, Daniel; Koelman, Johannes H. T. M.; Kuiper, Michael A.; Zandstra, Durk F.; Weinstein, Henry C.; Tromp, Selma C.; Zandbergen, Eveline G. J.; Tijssen, Marina A. J.; Horn, Janneke

    2012-01-01

    Background: Acute posthypoxic myoclonus (PHM) can occur in patients admitted after cardiopulmonary resuscitation (CPR) and is considered to have a poor prognosis. The origin can be cortical and/or subcortical and this might be an important determinant for treatment options and prognosis. The aim of

  13. The Sunflower Cardiopulmonary Research Project of Children.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Greene, Leon

    A three year project designed to determine the value of a health program incorporating a cardiopulmonary fitness program is described. The instructional programs were in heart health, pulmonary health, nutrition, and physical fitness. A noncompetitive exercise and fitness period was employed in addition to the normal physical education time.…

  14. Cardiopulmonary resuscitation: update, controversies and new advances

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alexandre C. Zago

    1999-03-01

    Full Text Available Cardiopulmonary arrest is a medical emergency in which the lapse of time between event onset and the initiation of measures of basic and advanced support, as well as the correct care based on specific protocols for each clinical situation, constitute decisive factors for a successful therapy. Cardiopulmonary arrest care cannot be restricted to the hospital setting because of its fulminant nature. This necessitates the creation of new concepts, strategies and structures, such as the concept of life chain, cardio-pulmonary resuscitation courses for professionals who work in emergency medical services, the automated external defibrillator, the implantable cardioverter-defibrillator, and mobile intensive care units, among others. New concepts, strategies and structures motivated by new advances have also modified the treatment and improved the results of cardiopulmonary resuscitation in the hospital setting. Among them, we can cite the concept of cerebral resuscitation, the application of the life chain, the creation of the universal life support algorithm, the adjustment of drug doses, new techniques - measure of the end-tidal carbon dioxide levels and of the coronary perfusion pressure - and new drugs under research.

  15. [Cardiopulmonary resuscitation: the essential of 2015 guidelines].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maudet, Ludovic; Carron, Pierre-Nicolas; Trueb, Lionel

    2016-02-10

    Cardiopulmonary resuscitation (CPR) guidelines have been updated in October 2015. The 2010 guidelines are reaffirmed: immediate call for help via the local dispatch center, high quality CPR (frequency between 100 and 120/min, compression depth between 5 and 6 cm) and early defibrillation improve patient's survival chances. This article reviews the essential elements of resuscitation and recommended advanced measures.

  16. Anaesthetists' knowledge of cardiopulmonary resuscitation | Ogboli ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Background: Cardio-Pulmonary Resuscitation (CPR) is an integral part of an anaesthetist's knowledge and practice. In Nigeria, these skills are taught mainly during medical school and postgraduate training. Objectives: The study sought to assess the knowledge of anaesthetists about CPR. Methodology: A structured ...

  17. Physiological consequences : Cardiopulmonary, vestibular, and sensory aspects

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Welsch, H.; Albery, W.; Banks, R.D.; Bles, W.

    2000-01-01

    Discussing the physiological consequences of enhanced fighter manoeuvrability (EFM), aspects of cardiopulmonary reactions will be seen during high G manoeuvres, especially the combination of negative G-load followed by high G-onset manoeuvres ("push-pull"). The aircraft's capability to reach high

  18. Intra-arterial nimodipine for cerebral vasospasm after subarachnoid haemorrhage

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bashir, Asma; Andresen, Morten; Bartek, Jiri

    2016-01-01

    Intra-arterial nimodipine (IAN) has shown a promising effect on cerebral vasospasm (CV) after aneurysmal subarachnoid haemorrhage. At our institution, Rigshospitalet, IAN treatment has been used since 2009, but the short- and long-term clinical efficacy of IAN has not yet been assessed. The purpo...

  19. Review of Primary Postpartum Haemorrhage in Sagamu, Nigeria ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Out of these deliveries, 76 had primary postpartum haemorrhage (PPH), giving a prevalence of 3.1%. Uterine atony and genital tract trauma were the main causes of the primary PPH. Associated factors were prolonged second and third stages of labour, induction and augmentation of labour with oxytocin and instrumental ...

  20. New trends in the management of postpartum haemorrhage | Dyer ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    New trends in the management of postpartum haemorrhage. ... Africa is poor access to basic obstetric care, blood products and basic commodities, such as electricity, for the refrigeration of blood and drugs such as oxytocin.1 Nevertheless, there are many areas where management, and hence outcomes, could be improved.

  1. Expression of VP60 gene from rabbit haemorrhagic disease virus ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    The VP60 gene from rabbit haemorrhagic disease virus (RHDV) YL strain in Northeast of China, under control of the ats1A promoter from Rubisco small subunit genes of Arabidopsis thaliana, was introduced into the transfer deoxyribonucleic acid (T-DNA) region of plant transfer vector pCAMBIA1300 and transferred to ...

  2. Haemorrhagic Vaginal Discharge Following Ovariectomy in a Three ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Haemorrhagic Vaginal Discharge Following Ovariectomy in a Three Year Old Domestic Short-haired Cat. RA Ajadi, OO Adebayo, TA Ajadi. Abstract. Nigerian Veterinary Journal, VOL:33 (1) 403-406. Full Text: EMAIL FREE FULL TEXT EMAIL FREE FULL TEXT · DOWNLOAD FULL TEXT DOWNLOAD FULL TEXT.

  3. Risk of transmission of viral haemorrhagic fevers and the insecticide ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    ... of transmission of viral haemorrhagic fevers and the insecticide susceptibility status of Ae. aegypti in some sites in Accra, Ghana. Design: Larval surveys were carried to inspect containers within households and estimate larval indices and adult Aedes mosquitoes were collected using human landing collection technique.

  4. Prenatal MR imaging features of isolated cerebellar haemorrhagic lesions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Martino, Francesca; Malova, Mariya; Ramenghi, Luca A.; Cesaretti, Claudia; Parazzini, Cecilia; Doneda, Chiara; Righini, Andrea; Rossi, Andrea

    2016-01-01

    Prenatal features of isolated cerebellar haemorrhagic lesions have not been sufficiently characterised. We aimed to better define their MR imaging characteristics, documenting the location, extension, evolution stage and anatomic sequelae, and to better understand cerebellar haemorrhage pathophysiology. We screened our foetal MR imaging database (3200 cases) for reports of haemorrhagic lesions affecting only the cerebellum (without any supratentorial bleeding or other clastic lesions), defined as one of the following: T2-weighted hypointense or mixed hypo-/hyperintense signal; rim of T2-weighted hypointense signal covering the surface of volume-reduced parenchyma; T1-weighted hyperintense signal; increased DWI signal. Seventeen cases corresponded to the selection criteria. All lesions occurred before the 26th week of gestation, with prevalent origin from the peripheral-caudal portion of the hemispheres and equal frequency of unilateral/bilateral involvement. The caudal vermis appeared affected in 2/3 of cases, not in all cases confirmed postnatally. Lesions evolved towards malformed cerebellar foliation. The aetiology and pathophysiology were unknown, although in a subset of cases intra- and extracranial venous engorgement seemed to play a key role. Onset from the peripheral and caudal portion of the hemispheres seems characteristic of prenatal cerebellar haemorrhagic lesions. Elective involvement of the peripheral germinal matrix is hypothesised. (orig.)

  5. Relationship between lunar cycle and haemorrhagic complication rate in surgery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Raposio, Edoardo; Caruana, Giorgia; Santi, Pierluigi; Cafiero, Ferdinando

    2017-08-01

    The aim of this study was to evaluate a possible relationship between lunar cycles and haemorrhagic complication rate in surgery. The possible relationship between moon phases and surgical outcome was tested by evaluating the haemorrhagic complication rate for 18,760 patients who underwent surgery between January 2001 and December 2008 at the National Institute for Cancer Research in Genoa. A total of 103 lunar phases were considered using Chi-square (χ 2 ) test analysis, and patients were allocated a surgery date. One hundred and sixty-seven haemorrhagic complications were observed. Three hundred and nine new moon phase days were analysed and 12 incidences of complications detected, with a 3.9% complication rate per day. In the waxing moon phase, 1184.5 d were analysed with 68 incidences of complications at a daily rate of 5.7%. In the full moon phase there was a 4.9% complication rate per day (15 incidences in 309 d), whereas in the waning moon phase, the 6% percentage rate per day resulted from 72 incidences in 1184.5 d. No statistically significant correlations were found between moon cycles and postoperative haemorrhagic complications (p = .50).

  6. Periventricular-intraventricular haemorrhage in low-birth-weight ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    The prevalence of periventricular-intraventricular haemorrhage (PV-IVH) aInong very-low-birthweight infants at Baragwanath Hospital has not been well docwnented. In this prospective study, a total of 282 live-born infants with birth weights of 1 000 - 1 749 g were studied over a 41/2-month period. Every infant had at least ...

  7. Tranexamic acid for control of haemorrhage in acute promyelocytic leukaemia

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Avvisati, G.; ten Cate, J. W.; Büller, H. R.; Mandelli, F.

    1989-01-01

    In a double-blind study, 12 consecutive patients with acute promyelocytic leukaemia were randomised either to tranexamic acid (TA group) or to placebo (control group) for 6 days to see whether inhibition of fibrinolysis would reduce haemorrhage and transfusion requirements. The total study period

  8. Considerable delay in diagnosis and acute management of subarachnoid haemorrhage

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Larsen, Carl Christian; Eskesen, Vagn; Hauerberg, John

    2010-01-01

    Rebleeding from subarachnoid haemorrhage (SAH) usually occurs within the first six hours after the initial bleeding. Rebleeding can be prevented effectively with tranexamic acid (TXA). Although a broad consensus has evolved that SAH should be treated as an emergency, it is likely that delays do...

  9. CT and MRI of haemorrhage into intracranial neuromas

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Asari, S. (Dept. of Neurological Surgery, Okayama Univ. Medical School, Okayama City (Japan)); Katayama, S. (Dept. of Neurological Surgery, Okayama Univ. Medical School, Okayama City (Japan)); Itoh, T. (Dept. of Neurological Surgery, Okayama Univ. Medical School, Okayama City (Japan)); Tsuchida, S. (Dept. of Neurological Surgery, Okayama Univ. Medical School, Okayama City (Japan)); Ohmoto, T. (Dept. of Neurological Surgery, Okayama Univ. Medical School, Okayama City (Japan))

    1993-04-01

    Six patients with haemorrhage into intracranial neuromas were studied by computed tomography (CT) and magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) at 0.5 T with spin-echo pulse sequences. The nature of the tumour and the presence of a haematoma were confirmed by surgery and microscopic examination in all cases. Four neuromas arose from the acoustic nerves and two from the trigeminal. Four of the six patients suffered from sudden onset or rapid worsening of symptoms including headache, vertigo and/or hemifacial motor and sensory disturbances. CT in the acute stage revealed a hyperdense area or a fluid-fluid level (FFL). The hyperdense area disappeared on CT repeated in the chronic stage. On MRI in subacute and chronic stages the haemorrhage showed hyperintensity on both T1 and T2 weighting in five cases examined between 16 and 46 days after the onset, and isointensity on T1 weighting and an FFL on T2 weighting in one case examined 12 days after the onset of symptoms. A well-defined low intensity rim indicating prior haemorrhage was observed on T2-weighted images in three cases. MRI was more effectie than CT in detecting haemorrhage into the tumours and in staging it. (orig.)

  10. Marburg haemorrhagic fever: A rare but fatal disease

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    The causative virus is the Marburgvirus of the Filoviridae family. The disease is clinically indistinguishable from Ebola haemorrhagic fever though the latter's causative agent is unrelated. Transmission of the Marburgvirus is via close contact with blood or other body fluids (faeces, vomitus, urine and respiratory secretions) ...

  11. Uterine artery embolization: an effective treatment for intractable obstetric haemorrhage

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hong, T.-M.; Tseng, H.-S. E-mail: hstseng@vghtpe.gov.tw; Lee, R.-C.; Wang, J.-H.; Chang, C.-Y

    2004-01-01

    AIM: To present the findings of uterine artery embolization (UAE) in the management of obstetric haemorrhage. MATERIALS AND METHODS: From October 1999 to February 2003, 10 women with postpartum haemorrhage (n=7) and post-abortion haemorrhage with placenta accreta (n=3), were referred to our department for pelvic angiography and possible arterial embolization. RESULTS: Angiography revealed engorged and tortuous uterine arteries in all patients; and contrast medium extravasation in three patients. Eight patients (three with and five without detectable active bleeding) then underwent bilateral UAE. Medium-sized (250-355 {mu}m) polyvinyl alcohol particles were injected via a coaxial catheter into the uterine arteries, followed by gelatin sponge pieces via a 4 F Cobra catheter. Microcoil devascularization was also performed in the two patients with visible, active bleeding. The vaginal bleeding resolved in all patients, without any ischaemic complications. At follow-up, all patients who underwent UAE had normal menstruation; three of them subsequently gave birth to full-term healthy babies. CONCLUSION: Selective UAE by the coaxial method is safe and effective to control obstetric haemorrhage, with the potential to preserve fertility.

  12. Prospective study of sentinel headache in aneurysmal subarachnoid haemorrhage.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Linn, F.H.H.; Wijdicks, E.F.M.; Graaf, Y. van der; Weerdesteyn-van Vliet, F.A.C.; Bartelds, A.I.M.; Gijn, J. van

    1994-01-01

    Retrospective surveys of patients with subarachnoid haemorrhage suggest that minor episodes with sudden headache (warning leaks) may precede rupture of an aneurysm, and that early recognition and surgery might lead to improved outcome. We studied 148 patients with sudden and severe headache

  13. Post-tonsillectomy haemorrhage following traditional uvulectomy in ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    routinely performed in children due to the traditional belief that an elongated uvula is responsible for all throat problems, including suffocation during sleep in the neonatal period. Occasionally, it is done during ethnic identification ritual practices.2 The commonest complications following this procedure include haemorrhage,.

  14. Haemorrhage in the labyrinth caused by anticoagulant therapy: case report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Callonnec, F.; Gerardin, E.; Thiebot, J.; Marie, J.P.; Andrieu Guitrancourt, J.; Marsot-Dupuch, K.

    1999-01-01

    We report a patient who experienced a severe vertiginous episode with bilateral tinnitus and progressive right-sided hearing loss. She had Marfan's disease and was on anticoagulant treatment. The fluid in the labyrinth gave higher signal than cerebrospinal fluid on T1-weighted images, suggesting haemorrhage. The radiological follow-up is discussed. (orig.)

  15. Haemorrhage in the labyrinth caused by anticoagulant therapy: case report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Callonnec, F; Gerardin, E; Thiebot, J [Department of Radiology, Rouen University Hospital, 1 rue de Germont, F-76031 Rouen cedex (France); Marie, J P; Andrieu Guitrancourt, J [Department of Otolaryngology, Rouen University Hospital (France); Marsot-Dupuch, K [Department of Radiology, St. Antoine, Paris University Hospital (France)

    1999-06-01

    We report a patient who experienced a severe vertiginous episode with bilateral tinnitus and progressive right-sided hearing loss. She had Marfan`s disease and was on anticoagulant treatment. The fluid in the labyrinth gave higher signal than cerebrospinal fluid on T1-weighted images, suggesting haemorrhage. The radiological follow-up is discussed. (orig.) With 2 figs., 11 refs.

  16. Haemorrhagic pseudocyst of the pancreatic tail causing acute ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Haemorrhagic pseudocyst of the pancreatic tail causing acute abdominal pain in a 12-year-old girl. Rolf P. Dahmen a,c. , Gerhard Stuhldreier b. , Hartmut Bindewald c and Malte Weinrich a,c. Pancreatic disorders are a relatively uncommon event in children, particularly the development of pancreatic pseudocysts. The most ...

  17. Hypopituitarism after subarachnoid haemorrhage, do we know enough?

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    L. Khajeh (Ladbon); K. Blijdorp (Karin); S.J.C.M.M. Neggers (Bas); G.M. Ribbers (Gerard); D.W.J. Dippel (Diederik); F. van Kooten (Fop)

    2014-01-01

    textabstractBackground: Fatigue, slowness, apathy and decrease in level of activity are common long-term complaints after a subarachnoid haemorrhage (SAH). They resemble the symptoms frequently found in patients with endocrine dysfunction. Pituitary dysfunction may be the result of SAH or its

  18. Comparison of serum lipid profile in ischaemic and haemorrhagic stroke

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mehmood, A.; Sharif, M.A.

    2010-01-01

    To compare serum lipid profile between patients of ischaemic and haemorrhagic strokes. Study Design: Cross sectional, comparative study. Place and Duration of Study: Military Hospital, Rawalpindi, from August 2004 to February 2005. Methodology: Patients with diagnosis of stroke comprising 100 consecutive patients each of ischaemic and haemorrhagic strokes were included in the study while patients on lipid lowering therapy were excluded from study. To determine the subtype of stroke, clinical examination followed by CT scan of brain was done. A serum sample after 8 hours of overnight fasting was taken on the next day of admission for both groups of patients. Total serum cholesterol, triglycerides, LDL cholesterol, VLDL-cholesterol and HDL-cholesterol was determined, using enzymatic colorimetric method. Statistical analysis was done by comparison of lipid profile in two subgroups, using proportion test for any significant difference. Results: The mean age at presentation of patients with stroke was 64.2+-12 years with a male to female ratio of 3.6:1. In 100 ischaemic stroke patients, raised serum total cholesterol was seen in 42, triglyceride in 04, LDL-cholesterol in 05 and VLDL-cholesterol in 07 patients. Serum HDL-cholesterol was below the normal reference in 31 cases. On the other hand, serum total cholesterol and triglycerides was raised in 05 patients each, LDL-cholesterol in 09 and VLDL-cholesterol in 03 patients of haemorrhagic stroke. Serum HDL-cholesterol was below normal in 04 patients of haemorrhagic stroke. On comparison, there were significantly greater number of patients with raised serum cholesterol and low HDL-cholesterol in ischaemic stroke than haemorrhagic stroke (p < 0.05). No statistical significance was found on comparing serum values of ischaemic and haemorrhagic stroke for triglycerides, LDL-cholesterol and VLDL-cholesterol. Conclusion: Ischaemic stroke patients had high serum total cholesterol and lower HDL-cholesterol levels as compared to

  19. Brain microvascular function during cardiopulmonary bypass

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sorensen, H.R.; Husum, B.; Waaben, J.; Andersen, K.; Andersen, L.I.; Gefke, K.; Kaarsen, A.L.; Gjedde, A.

    1987-01-01

    Emboli in the brain microvasculature may inhibit brain activity during cardiopulmonary bypass. Such hypothetical blockade, if confirmed, may be responsible for the reduction of cerebral metabolic rate for glucose observed in animals subjected to cardiopulmonary bypass. In previous studies of cerebral blood flow during bypass, brain microcirculation was not evaluated. In the present study in animals (pigs), reduction of the number of perfused capillaries was estimated by measurements of the capillary diffusion capacity for hydrophilic tracers of low permeability. Capillary diffusion capacity, cerebral blood flow, and cerebral metabolic rate for glucose were measured simultaneously by the integral method, different tracers being used with different circulation times. In eight animals subjected to normothermic cardiopulmonary bypass, and seven subjected to hypothermic bypass, cerebral blood flow, cerebral metabolic rate for glucose, and capillary diffusion capacity decreased significantly: cerebral blood flow from 63 to 43 ml/100 gm/min in normothermia and to 34 ml/100 gm/min in hypothermia and cerebral metabolic rate for glucose from 43.0 to 23.0 mumol/100 gm/min in normothermia and to 14.1 mumol/100 gm/min in hypothermia. The capillary diffusion capacity declined markedly from 0.15 to 0.03 ml/100 gm/min in normothermia but only to 0.08 ml/100 gm/min in hypothermia. We conclude that the decrease of cerebral metabolic rate for glucose during normothermic cardiopulmonary bypass is caused by interruption of blood flow through a part of the capillary bed, possibly by microemboli, and that cerebral blood flow is an inadequate indicator of capillary blood flow. Further studies must clarify why normal microvascular function appears to be preserved during hypothermic cardiopulmonary bypass

  20. Toxic shock syndrome

    Science.gov (United States)

    Staphylococcal toxic shock syndrome; Toxic shock-like syndrome; TSLS ... Toxic shock syndrome is caused by a toxin produced by some types of staphylococcus bacteria. A similar problem, called toxic shock- ...

  1. Antifibrinolytic drugs for treating primary postpartum haemorrhage.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shakur, Haleema; Beaumont, Danielle; Pavord, Sue; Gayet-Ageron, Angele; Ker, Katharine; Mousa, Hatem A

    2018-02-20

    Postpartum haemorrhage (PPH) - heaving bleeding within the first 24 hours after giving birth - is one of the main causes of death of women after childbirth. Antifibrinolytics, primarily tranexamic acid (TXA), have been shown to reduce bleeding in surgery and safely reduces mortality in trauma patients with bleeding without increasing the risk of adverse events.An earlier Cochrane review on treatments for primary PPH covered all the various available treatments - that review has now been split by types of treatment. This new review concentrates only on the use of antifibrinolytic drugs for treating primary PPH. To determine the effectiveness and safety of antifibrinolytic drugs for treating primary PPH. We searched Cochrane Pregnancy and Childbirth's Trials Register, ClinicalTrials.gov, the WHO International Clinical Trials Registry Platform (ICTRP) (28 May 2017) and reference lists of retrieved studies. Randomised controlled trials (RCTs), including cluster-randomised trials of antifibrinolytic drugs (aprotinin, TXA, epsilon-aminocaproic acid (EACA) and aminomethylbenzoic acid, administered by whatever route) for primary PPH in women.Participants in the trials were women after birth following a pregnancy of at least 24 weeks' gestation with a diagnosis of PPH, regardless of mode of birth (vaginal or caesarean section) or other aspects of third stage management.We have not included quasi-randomised trials, or cross-over studies. Studies reported as abstracts have not been included if there was insufficient information to allow assessment of risk of bias.In this review we only identified studies looking at TXA. Two review authors independently extracted data from each study using an agreed form. We entered data into Review Manager software and checked for accuracy.For key review outcomes, we rated the quality of the evidence as 'high', 'moderate', 'low' or 'very low' according to the GRADE approach. Three trials (20,412 women) met our inclusion criteria. Two trials

  2. Uterine massage for preventing postpartum haemorrhage.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hofmeyr, G Justus; Abdel-Aleem, Hany; Abdel-Aleem, Mahmoud A

    2013-07-01

    Postpartum haemorrhage (PPH) (bleeding from the genital tract after childbirth) is a major cause of maternal mortality and disability, particularly in under-resourced areas. In these settings, uterotonics are often not accessible. There is a need for simple, inexpensive techniques which can be applied in low-resourced settings to prevent and treat PPH. Uterine massage is recommended as part of the routine active management of the third stage of labour. However, it is not known whether it is effective. If shown to be effective, uterine massage would represent a simple intervention with the potential to have a major effect on PPH and maternal mortality in under-resourced settings. To determine the effectiveness of uterine massage after birth and before or after delivery of the placenta, or both, to reduce postpartum blood loss and associated morbidity and mortality. We searched the Cochrane Pregnancy and Childbirth Group's Trials Register (30 April 2013). All published, unpublished and ongoing randomised controlled trials comparing uterine massage alone or in addition to uterotonics before or after delivery of the placenta, or both, with non-massage. Two researchers independently considered trials for eligibility, assessed risk of bias and extracted the data using the agreed form. Data were checked for accuracy. The effect of uterine massage commenced before or after placental delivery were first assessed separately, and then the combined for an overall result. This review included two randomised controlled trials. The first trial included 200 women who were randomised to receive uterine massage or no massage following delivery of the placenta, after active management of the third stage of labour including use of oxytocin. The numbers of women with blood loss more than 500 mL was small, with no statistically significant difference (risk ratio (RR) 0.52, 95% confidence interval (CI) 0.16 to 1.67). There were no cases of retained placenta in either group. The mean

  3. Basic cardiopulmonary life support (BCLS for cardiopulmonary resuscitation by trained paramedics and medics outside the hospital

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rakesh Garg

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available The cardiopulmonary resuscitation guideline of Basic Cardiopulmonary Life Support (BCLS for management of adult victims with cardiopulmonary arrest outside the hospital provides an algorithmic stepwise approach for optimal outcome of the victims by trained medics and paramedics. This guideline has been developed considering the need to have a universally acceptable practice guideline for India and keeping in mind the infrastructural limitations of some areas of the country. This guideline is based on evidence elicited in the international and national literature. In the absence of data from Indian population, the excerpts have been taken from international data, discussed with Indian experts and thereafter modified to make them practically applicable across India. The optimal outcome for a victim with cardiopulmonary arrest would depend on core links of early recognition and activation; early high-quality cardiopulmonary resuscitation, early defibrillation and early transfer to medical facility. These links are elaborated in a stepwise manner in the BCLS algorithm. The BCLS also emphasise on quality check for various steps of resuscitation.

  4. Emergent cardiopulmonary bypass during pectus excavatum repair

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ryan Craner

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Pectus excavatum is a chest wall deformity that produces significant cardiopulmonary disability and is typically seen in younger patients. Minimally invasive repair of pectus excavatum or Nuss procedure has become a widely accepted technique for adult and pediatric patients. Although it is carried out through a thoracoscopic approach, the procedure is associated with a number of potential intraoperative and post-operative complications. We present a case of cardiac perforation requiring emergent cardiopulmonary bypass in a 29-year-old male with Marfan syndrome and previous mitral valve repair undergoing a Nuss procedure for pectus excavatum. This case illustrates the importance of vigilance and preparation by the surgeons, anesthesia providers as well as the institution to be prepared with resources to handle the possible complications. This includes available cardiac surgical backup, perfusionist support and adequate blood product availability.

  5. Artificial neural network cardiopulmonary modeling and diagnosis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kangas, Lars J.; Keller, Paul E.

    1997-01-01

    The present invention is a method of diagnosing a cardiopulmonary condition in an individual by comparing data from a progressive multi-stage test for the individual to a non-linear multi-variate model, preferably a recurrent artificial neural network having sensor fusion. The present invention relies on a cardiovascular model developed from physiological measurements of an individual. Any differences between the modeled parameters and the parameters of an individual at a given time are used for diagnosis.

  6. Fluid distribution kinetics during cardiopulmonary bypass

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mattias Törnudd

    2014-08-01

    Full Text Available OBJECTIVE: The purpose of this study was to examine the isovolumetric distribution kinetics of crystalloid fluid during cardiopulmonary bypass. METHODS: Ten patients undergoing coronary artery bypass grafting participated in this prospective observational study. The blood hemoglobin and the serum albumin and sodium concentrations were measured repeatedly during the distribution of priming solution (Ringer's acetate 1470 ml and mannitol 15% 200 ml and initial cardioplegia. The rate of crystalloid fluid distribution was calculated based on 3-min Hb changes. The preoperative blood volume was extrapolated from the marked hemodilution occurring during the onset of cardiopulmonary bypass. Clinicaltrials.gov: NCT01115166. RESULTS: The distribution half-time of Ringer's acetate averaged 8 minutes, corresponding to a transcapillary escape rate of 0.38 ml/kg/min. The intravascular albumin mass increased by 5.4% according to mass balance calculations. The preoperative blood volume, as extrapolated from the drop in hemoglobin concentration by 32% (mean at the beginning of cardiopulmonary bypass, was 0.6-1.2 L less than that estimated by anthropometric methods (p<0.02. The mass balance of sodium indicated a translocation from the intracellular to the extracellular fluid space in 8 of the 10 patients, with a median volume of 236 ml. CONCLUSIONS: The distribution half-time of Ringer's solution during isovolumetric cardiopulmonary bypass was 8 minutes, which is the same as for crystalloid fluid infusions in healthy subjects. The intravascular albumin mass increased. Most patients were hypovolemic prior to the start of anesthesia. Intracellular edema did not occur.

  7. Characterizing amide proton transfer imaging in haemorrhage brain lesions using 3T MRI

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jeong, Ha-Kyu [Philips Korea, Seoul (Korea, Republic of); Korea Basic Science Institute, Chungcheongbuk-do (Korea, Republic of); Han, Kyunghwa [Yonsei University College of Medicine, Department of Radiology and Research Institute of Radiological Science, Seodaemun-gu, Seoul (Korea, Republic of); Yonsei University College of Medicine, Yonsei Biomedical Research Institute, Seoul (Korea, Republic of); Zhou, Jinyuan [Johns Hopkins University School of Medicine, Division of MRI Research, Department of Radiology, Baltimore, MD (United States); Zhao, Yansong [Philips Healthcare, MR Clinical Science, Cleveland, OH (United States); Choi, Yoon Seong; Lee, Seung-Koo; Ahn, Sung Soo [Yonsei University College of Medicine, Department of Radiology and Research Institute of Radiological Science, Seodaemun-gu, Seoul (Korea, Republic of)

    2017-04-15

    The aim of this study was to characterize amide proton transfer (APT)-weighted signals in acute and subacute haemorrhage brain lesions of various underlying aetiologies. Twenty-three patients with symptomatic haemorrhage brain lesions including tumorous (n = 16) and non-tumorous lesions (n = 7) were evaluated. APT imaging was performed and analyzed with magnetization transfer ratio asymmetry (MTR{sub asym}). Regions of interest were defined as the enhancing portion (when present), acute or subacute haemorrhage, and normal-appearing white matter based on anatomical MRI. MTR{sub asym} values were compared among groups and components using a linear mixed model. MTR{sub asym} values were 3.68 % in acute haemorrhage, 1.6 % in subacute haemorrhage, 2.65 % in the enhancing portion, and 0.38 % in normal white matter. According to the linear mixed model, the distribution of MTR{sub asym} values among components was not significantly different between tumour and non-tumour groups. MTR{sub asym} in acute haemorrhage was significantly higher than those in the other regions regardless of underlying pathology. Acute haemorrhages showed high MTR{sub asym} regardless of the underlying pathology, whereas subacute haemorrhages showed lower MTR{sub asym} than acute haemorrhages. These results can aid in the interpretation of APT imaging in haemorrhage brain lesions. (orig.)

  8. Shock Waves

    CERN Document Server

    Jiang, Z

    2005-01-01

    The International Symposium on Shock Waves (ISSW) is a well established series of conferences held every two years in a different location. A unique feature of the ISSW is the emphasis on bridging the gap between physicists and engineers working in fields as different as gas dynamics, fluid mechanics and materials sciences. The main results presented at these meetings constitute valuable proceedings that offer anyone working in this field an authoritative and comprehensive source of reference.

  9. FETOMATERNAL HAEMORRHAGE – DIFFERENTIAL DIAGNOSIS – CASE REPORT

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jadranka Domazet-Fink

    2002-07-01

    Full Text Available Background. There are several different causes for fetomaternal haemorrhage. Sinusoidal pattern, which is relatively characteristic for fetal anaemia, may in its final stages completely disappear. Differential diagnosis of silent trace of cardiotocogram with late decelerations is quite difficult to solve.Case report. A case of unusual injury of a pregnant woman is described. The injury led to fetomaternal haemorrhage. Typical sinusoidal pattern cardiotocogram was not seen and the differential diagnosis was hard to determine. Because of prompt intervention and efficient postnatal therapy the child and mother are both well. The dilemmas in regards to differential diagnosis are being discussed.Conclusions. It is important to be very careful in history taking even if the situation is urgent. If there is no explanation for pathological cardiotocogram, decision must be made according to pregnant woman’s wishes. Kleihauer-Betke test, which is easy to perform and gives much information, is described.

  10. Clinical presentation of late haemorrhagic disease of newborn

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Majeed, R.; Memon, Y.; Majeed, F.

    2008-01-01

    To observe the clinical presentation of late haemorrhagic disease of the newborn (LHDNB), and clinical improvement after the administration of vitamin K/sub 1/. This is a prospective descriptive study. All the children older than seven days who presented with bleeding were admitted in pediatrics ward of Isra University Hyderabad from April 2006 to April 2007 were included. Data collection was done by means of detailed proforma. Analysis was done on SPSS version 11. Thirty five cases were included. Commonest site of bleeding was subcutaneous followed by oral and injection site. Mean age of late haemorrhagic disease of newborn was 109 days and minimum age of presentation was 28 days. Common clinical presentations were irritability, convulsions, poor reflexes and poor feeding. Mostly recovery was within 24 hours after vit K. Late HDN results in severe hemorrhage especially hemorrhage in the central nervous system. Administration of Vitamin K (1mg, 1M) at birth can present these severe complications. (author)

  11. Therapeutic management of Crimean-Congo haemorrhagic fever.

    Science.gov (United States)

    de la Calle-Prieto, Fernando; Martín-Quirós, Alejandro; Trigo, Elena; Mora-Rillo, Marta; Arsuaga, Marta; Díaz-Menéndez, Marta; Arribas, José Ramón

    2017-06-29

    Crimean-Congo haemorrhagic fever has been reported in more than 30 countries in Africa, Asia, the Middle East and Eastern Europe, with an increasing incidence in recent years, especially in Europe. Because no specific treatments have demonstrated efficacy, supportive treatment is essential, as well as the provision of a centre with the appropriate means to guarantee the safety of its healthcare professionals. Laboratory monitoring of thrombocytopenia, severe coagulopathy or liver failure is of critical importance. Patients with Crimean-Congo haemorrhagic fever should be admitted to High Level Isolation Units where appropriate biocontainment procedures can prevent nosocomial transmission through infected fluids or accidents with contaminated material. In case of high-risk exposures, early administration of ribavirin should be considered. Copyright © 2017. Publicado por Elsevier España, S.L.U.

  12. The role of fibrinogen and haemostatic assessment in postpartum haemorrhage

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Wikkelsø, Anne Juul

    2015-01-01

    Pregnancy is a state of hypercoagulobility that might be an evolutionary way of protecting parturients from exsanguination following child birth. Observational studies suggest an association between a low level of fibrinogen (coagulation factor I) at the start of postpartum haemorrhage (PPH....... Paper III was based on two national Danish registries evaluating the predictability of postpartum blood transfusion. Prediction was found difficult. However, retained placental parts seemed to be the strongest predictor. Since this diagnosis is made very late and often in association with the onset...... describes the protocol for a RCT of early fibrinogen supplementation in women with severe postpartum haemorrhage. Several practical, ethical and trial management challenges need to be addressed when conducting independent clinical research involving parturients with severe bleeding, placebo...

  13. Dengue Haemorrhagic Encephalitis: Rare Case Report with Review of Literature.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kutiyal, Aditya Singh; Malik, Chetanya; Hyanki, Gitika

    2017-07-01

    Dengue is an endemic arboviral infection prevalent especially in tropical countries including Southern and Southeast Asia. Central Nervous System (CNS) involvement in dengue infection is uncommon. Haemorrhagic encephalitis is a rare presentation in dengue. This is a case of a 58-year-old male who presented with fever, petechial rash and altered sensorium. Dengue serology IgM was reactive and MRI brain was suggestive of haemorrhagic encephalitis. Patient was managed in Intensive Care Unit (ICU) but eventually succumbed to his illness. We report this fatal outcome of a common viral infection with unusual neurological presentation to propose an association between dengue and neurotropism and the need to look at dengue infection beyond its classical features.

  14. [Nursing process in advanced cardiopulmonary resuscitation].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lucio Peña, Gerardo; Fuentes Leonardo, Ana María

    2002-01-01

    The process male nurse is a systematic and organized method to offer effective and efficient cares guided to the achievement of solving real problems of health, reducing the incidence and the duration. It is organized and systematic for that consists of five sequential and interrelated steps: Valuation, diagnostic, planning, execution and evaluation, in which are carried out interrelated actions, thought to maximize the long term results. The nurse process is based on the notion that the success of the cares is measured by the degree of effectiveness and the degree of satisfaction and the patient's progress. Applying this method in the Advanced Cardiac Live Support (ACLS) the identification of a cardiovascular or cardiopulmonary urgency was achieved that implies advanced treatment of the air road, defibrillation and appropriate medications to the circumstances. The ACLS challenges the nurses in charge from the patient's attention to make decisions quick low pressure and in dramatic scenes. Reason why it develops the flowing process male nurse in the advanced cardiopulmonary reanimation due to the incidence of these events in the National Institute of Cardiology Ignacio Chávez, which should guarantee the benefit of services in basic and advanced cardiopulmonary reanimation for personal with a high formation level in all the units of intensive cares and services of hospitalization in integrated form and stratified this way to avoid that it progresses to situations that cause the death or leave irreversible sequels since in the central nervous system the time it is a factor critical for the treatment of this events.

  15. A Q fever case mimicking crimean-congo haemorrhagic fever

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    O Karabay

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Coxiella burnetii is the bacterium that causes Q fever. Human infection is mainly transmitted from cattle, goats and sheep. The disease is usually self-limited. Pneumonia and hepatitis are the most common clinical manifestations. In this study, we present a case of Q fever from the western part of Turkey mimicking Crimean-Congo haemorrhagic fever (CCHF in terms of clinical and laboratory findings.

  16. Ligation of internal iliac arteries for control of pelvic haemorrhage.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nandanwar Y

    1993-10-01

    Full Text Available This is a retrospective review of the internal iliac ligations (IAL done over a period of 3 years. Both gynaecological and obstetric cases were considered. A total of 46 ligations were performed. The additional treatment required was hysterectomy to control haemorrhage. Intra-and post-operative complications were noted. A comparative review of the effectiveness of IAL in different situations is done and alternative modalities of treatment are considered.

  17. Haemorrhagic enteritis seroconversion in turkey breeders: field observations

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Raffaella Ceruti

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available Seroconversion to viral haemorrhagic enteritis (HE was studied in seven flocks of turkey breeders (17.974 birds in total, after 20 weeks of the onset of egg production. They showed no clinical signs, and mortality rate was normal. However, the infection caused a drop in egg production lasting about five weeks (-2.32 eggs laid during this period, but had no effect on hatching parameters.

  18. Endovascular control of haemorrhagic urological emergencies: an observational study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Thorpe Peter

    2006-09-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Transarterial embolisation (TAE is an effective method in control of haemorrhage irrespective of the nature of urological emergency. As the technique and technology have evolved, it is now possible to perform highly selective embolisation. The aim of this study was to critically appraise feasibility and efficacy of therapeutic TAE in control of haemorrhagic urological emergencies using selective and non-selective embolisation. Specifically, we aimed to assess the impact of timing of embolisation on the requirement of blood transfusion and long-term morphological and functional follow-up of embolised organs. Methods This is a single institutional observational study carried out between March 1992 and March 2006. Records of all patients who underwent selective and non-selective angioembolisation to control bleeding in urological emergencies were reviewed. Data on success rate, periprocedural complications, timing of embolisation, requirement of blood transfusion and the long-term morphological and functional outcomes of embolised organs was recorded. Results Fourteen patients underwent endovascular control of bleeding as a result of trauma, iatrogenic injury and spontaneous perinephric haemorrhage during a period of 14 years. All these patients would have required emergency open surgery without the option of embolisation procedure. The mean time between the first presentation and embolisation was 22 hours (range 30 minutes to 60 hours. Mean pre-embolisation transfusion requirement was 6.8 units (range 0–22 units. None of the patients with successful embolisation required post-procedural blood transfusion. Permanent haemostasis was achieved in all but one patient, who required emergency nephrectomy. There were no serious procedure related post-embolisation complications. Conclusion Endovascular control using transarterial angioembolisation is an effective method for managing haematuria or haemorrhage in urological emergencies

  19. Surgical Trial in Lobar Intracerebral Haemorrhage (STICH II Protocol

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rowan Elise N

    2011-05-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Within the spectrum of spontaneous intracerebral haemorrhage there are some patients with large or space occupying haemorrhage who require surgery for neurological deterioration and others with small haematomas who should be managed conservatively. There is equipoise about the management of patients between these two extremes. In particular there is some evidence that patients with lobar haematomas and no intraventricular haemorrhage might benefit from haematoma evacuation. The STICH II study will establish whether a policy of earlier surgical evacuation of the haematoma in selected patients will improve outcome compared to a policy of initial conservative treatment. Methods/Design an international multicentre randomised parallel group trial. Only patients for whom the treating neurosurgeon is in equipoise about the benefits of early craniotomy compared to initial conservative treatment are eligible. All patients must have a CT scan confirming spontaneous lobar intracerebral haemorrhage (≤1 cm from the cortex surface of the brain and 10-100 ml in volume. Any clotting or coagulation problems must be corrected and randomisation must take place within 48 hours of ictus. With 600 patients, the study will be able to demonstrate a 12% benefit from surgery (2p Stratified randomisation is undertaken using a central 24 hour randomisation service accessed by telephone or web. Patients randomised to early surgery should have the operation within 12 hours. Information about the status (Glasgow Coma Score and focal signs of all patients through the first five days of their trial progress is also collected in addition to another CT scan at about five days (+/- 2 days. Outcome is measured at six months via a postal questionnaire to the patient. Primary outcome is death or severe disability defined using a prognosis based 8 point Glasgow Outcome Scale. Secondary outcomes include: Mortality, Rankin, Barthel, EuroQol, and Survival. Trial

  20. Acute haemorrhagic oedema of infancy with bullae and koebnerisation

    OpenAIRE

    Mohd Sazlly Lim, S; Shamsudin, N

    2014-01-01

    A 5-month-old Malay boy presented with purpuric papules and plaques on the face and extremities accompanied by fever, coryzal symptoms and bilateral lower limb oedema. There were also bullous linear purpuric lesions on the right upper limb. Blood and culture tests were normal. Histopathological tests showed leucocytoclastic vasculitis, confirming the diagnosis of acute haemorrhagic oedema of infancy. The patient achieved complete recovery after 2 weeks with no recurrence.

  1. Acute haemorrhagic oedema of infancy with bullae and koebnerisation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Norashikin Shamsudin

    2014-08-01

    Full Text Available A 5-month-old Malay boy presented with purpuric papules and plaques on the face and extremities accompanied by fever, coryzal symptoms and bilateral lower limb oedema. There were also bullous linear purpuric lesions on the right upper limb. Blood and culture tests were normal. Histopathological tests showed leucocytoclastic vasculitis, confirming the diagnosis of acute haemorrhagic oedema of infancy. The patient achieved complete recovery after 2 weeks with no recurrence.

  2. [Carbetocin versus Oxytocin during caesarean section for preventing postpartum haemorrhage].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pizzagalli, F; Agasse, J; Marpeau, L

    2015-05-01

    The aim of the study was to compare the effectiveness of Carbetocin versus Oxyotcin during caesarean section for preventing postpartum haemorrhage. Prospective observational study (before/after design). Five hundred and forty patients who received an injection of Oxytocin were compared to 262 patients with single injection of 100 micrograms of Carbetocin. The primary outcome was to compare the differential hematocrit level between pre- and postoperative blood samples. The secondary outcome was to compare differential hemoglobin level and the use of complementary therapies for postpartum haemorrhage. We did not find any difference between the Oxytocin and Carbetocin groups on differential hematocrit level. There was no difference between the groups regarding the use of additionnal therapies (Sulproston injections, blood transfusions and surgery methods). The rate of postpartum haemorrhage was similar in the two groups (18.7% vs 21.6%; P=0.33). We found a lower percentage of patients with differential of hemoglobin level between 2 g/dL and 4 g/dL in the Carbetocin group (6.5% vs 15.6%, Poxytocin. Carbetocin seems to reduce the need for postoperative intravenous iron injection. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Masson SAS. All rights reserved.

  3. Post eclamptic aneurysmal rupture subarachnoid haemorrhage diagnosed in the puerperium

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Coolen, Teresa

    2006-01-01

    The incidence of subarachnoid and/or intracerebral haemorrhage in women during pregnancy is rare. The risk depends on the stage of pregnancy, but seems to be highest during the late third trimester, during delivery and in the puerperium. Headache can be a symptom of both preeclampsia, subarachnoid haemorrhage and other pathologies or conditions. It is essential for pregnant women with a suspected ruptured aneurysm to be investigated and treated without delay, irrespective of fear of harm to the foetus, to avoid complications from aneurysm rupture. This case study presents a 39-year-old woman who was 35 weeks and 3 days pregnant with known preeclampsia. She endured a headache for the three days leading up to the delivery with associated diplopia on the third day, but these symptoms were thought to be related to her preeclampsia. Over the three hours following childbirth, her headache became more severe and she suffered from vomiting, loss of vision, torticollis and seizures. Computed tomography (CT) of her head revealed a subarachnoid haemorrhage while CT angiography of the Circle of Willis failed to reveal an aneurysm and 4-vessel angiography only demonstrated an area slightly suspicious for the presence of an aneurysm. 3D rotational angiography clearly demonstrated a 1-2 mm aneurysm superior to the left terminal internal carotid artery. In this case, 3D rotational angiography proved to be a valuable additional technique. This patient underwent surgery for her ruptured aneurysm and has made an excellent recovery

  4. Protective effect of dexmedetomidine combined with ulinastatin on cardiopulmonary function injury caused by cardiopulmonary bypass surgery

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zhu Zhu

    2016-11-01

    Full Text Available Objective: To analyze the protective effect of dexmedetomidine combined with ulinastatin on cardiopulmonary function impairment caused by cardiopulmonary bypass surgery. Methods: A total of 78 patients who received valve replacement under cardiopulmonary bypass were divided into observation group and control group (n=39 according to random number table. Control group received intraoperative ulinastatin intervention and observation group received intraoperative dexmedetomidine combined with ulinastatin intervention. Differences in the levels of cardiac function indexes, myocardial injury markers, pulmonary function parameters, inflammatory indexes and so on were compared between two groups of patients 24 hours after operation. Results: Cardiac function parameters LSV, RSV and RVEF values of observation group 24 hours after operation were higher than those of control group while PAP value was lower than that of control group; serum myocardial injury markers H-FABP, cTn-T, CKMB, cTnⅠ and NT-proBNP levels were lower than those of control group; lung function parameters Cs and Cd values were higher than those of control group while RI, R5-R20, X5 and Fres values were lower than those of control group; serum pro-inflammatory factors IL-6 and TNF-α levels were lower than those of control group while anti-inflammatory factors sTNF-RI, IL-4 and IL-10 levels were higher than those of control group. Conclusions: Dexmedetomidine combined with ulinastatin can protect the cardiopulmonary function in patients with cardiopulmonary bypass, and help to reduce the occurrence of postoperative cardiopulmonary dysfunction and other severe complications.

  5. Decompressive Abdominal Laparotomy for Abdominal Compartment Syndrome in an Unengrafted Bone Marrow Recipient with Septic Shock

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Derrick J. N. Dauplaise

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available Objective. To describe a profoundly immunocompromised (panleukopenia child with septic shock who developed abdominal compartment syndrome (ACS and was successfully treated with surgical decompression. Design. Individual case report. Setting. Pediatric intensive care unit of a tertiary children's hospital. Patient. A 32-month-old male with Fanconi anemia who underwent bone marrow transplantation (BMT 5 days prior to developing septic shock secondary to Streptococcus viridans and Escherichia coli ACS developed after massive fluid resuscitation, leading to cardiopulmonary instability. Interventions. Emergent surgical bedside laparotomy and silo placement. Measurements and Main Results. The patient's cardiopulmonary status stabilized after decompressive laparotomy. The abdomen was closed and the patient survived to hospital discharge without cardiac, respiratory, or renal dysfunction. Conclusions. The use of laparotomy and silo placement in an unengrafted BMT patient with ACS and septic shock did not result in additional complications. Surgical intervention for ACS is a reasonable option for high risk, profoundly immunocompromised patients.

  6. Bilateral adrenal cystic neuroblastoma with superior vena cava syndrome and massive intracystic haemorrhage

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pinarli, Faruk Guclu; Danaci, Murat; Diren, Baris; Tander, Burak; Rizalar, Riza; Dagdemir, Ayhan; Acar, Sabri

    2004-01-01

    Bilateral cystic adrenal tumours are a rare presentation of neuroblastoma. Intratumoural haemorrhage is a frequent finding in neuroblastoma, but is rarely symptomatic. We present an 11-month-old girl with predominantly cystic bilateral neuroblastomas and distant lymph-node metastasis. Massive intracystic haemorrhage and superior vena cava (SVC) syndrome were ominous prognostic factors, leading to death. Large tumours with intracystic haemorrhage might require a conservative approach. (orig.)

  7. Super selective transcatheter angiographic embolization: an effective and prophylactic treatment for massive obstetric haemorrhage

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zhou Yiming; Zhai Renyou; Qian Xiaojun; Wei Baojie; Gao Kun; Zhang Shilong; Liu Jinmei; Zhang Qiuhong; Jiang Lei

    2008-01-01

    Objective: To discuss the effect and safety of transcatheter angiographic embolization (TAE)for managing massive obstetric haemorrhage. Methods: 17 cases of obstetric massive haemorrhage or with haemorrhage tendency were treated with TAE. Among them 14 cases had haemorrhage already, including 10 cases after abortion, caesarean section or normal labor and other 4 of hydatidiform mole. 3 cases with obstetric haemorrhage tendency included 2 cases of placenta praevia and 1 case of cervical pregnancy. Selective catheterization into bilateral uterine arteries or internal iliac arteries for DSA, showed the cause and location of the haemorrhage and then embolized with gelfoam sponge chips (1-3 mm) or Polyvinyl Alcohol(PVA); and part of the cases with MTX through uterine arterial perfusion. Results: The successful rate of catheterization was 100%. The achievement in 14 cases showed no active haemorrhage immediately after the procedure and no vaginal bleeding after 1-5 days. In 3 prophylactic cases before abortion or uterine curettage, obstetric massive haemorrhage occurred in 1 case, but not so in other 2 cases. Conclusions: TAE is an effective treatment for obstetric massive haemorrhage, with the advantages of minimal trauma, fast and definite treating effect and less complications. Prophylactical application for high risk patients can reduce the bleeding and mortality. (authors)

  8. Shock Prevention

    Science.gov (United States)

    1978-01-01

    The electrician pictured is installing a General Electric Ground Fault Interrupter (GFI), a device which provides protection against electrical shock in the home or in industrial facilities. Shocks due to defective wiring in home appliances or other electrical equipment can cause severe burns, even death. As a result, the National Electrical Code now requires GFIs in all new homes constructed. This particular type of GFI employs a sensing element which derives from technology acquired in space projects by SCI Systems, Inc., Huntsville, Alabama, producer of sensors for GE and other manufacturers of GFI equipment. The sensor is based on the company's experience in developing miniaturized circuitry for space telemetry and other spacecraft electrical systems; this experience enabled SCI to package interruptor circuitry in the extremely limited space available and to produce sensory devices at practicable cost. The tiny sensor measures the strength of the electrical current and detects current differentials that indicate a fault in the functioning of an electrical system. The sensing element then triggers a signal to a disconnect mechanism in the GFI, which cuts off the current in the faulty circuit.

  9. 21 CFR 870.4280 - Cardiopulmonary prebypass filter.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Cardiopulmonary prebypass filter. 870.4280 Section... prebypass filter. (a) Identification. A cardiopulmonary prebypass filter is a device used during priming of... bypass. The device is not used to filter blood. (b) Classification. Class II (performance standards). ...

  10. 21 CFR 870.4200 - Cardiopulmonary bypass accessory equipment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... Cardiopulmonary bypass accessory equipment. (a) Identification. Cardiopulmonary bypass accessory equipment is a... mounting bracket or system-priming equipment. (b) Classification. (1) Class I. The device is classified as class I if it does not involve an electrical connection to the patient. The device is exempt from the...

  11. Normal values for cardiopulmonary exercise testing in children

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    ten Harkel, A.D.J.; Takken, T.; van Osch-Gevers, M.; Helbing, W.A.

    BACKGROUND: A reference set of data of normal values of newly developed cardiopulmonary parameters of exercise testing in an 8-18-year-old population is lacking. PATIENTS AND METHODS: Cardiopulmonary exercise testing was performed in 175 healthy school children (8-18 years old). Continuous

  12. 21 CFR 870.4390 - Cardiopulmonary bypass pump tubing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Cardiopulmonary bypass pump tubing. 870.4390 Section 870.4390 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES... bypass pump tubing. (a) Identification. A cardiopulmonary bypass pump tubing is polymeric tubing which is...

  13. 21 CFR 870.4240 - Cardiopulmonary bypass heat exchanger.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... bypass heat exchanger. (a) Identification. A cardiopulmonary bypass heat exchanger is a device, consisting of a heat exchange system used in extracorporeal circulation to warm or cool the blood or... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Cardiopulmonary bypass heat exchanger. 870.4240...

  14. 21 CFR 870.4300 - Cardiopulmonary bypass gas control unit.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Cardiopulmonary bypass gas control unit. 870.4300... bypass gas control unit. (a) Identification. A cardiopulmonary bypass gas control unit is a device used to control and measure the flow of gas into the oxygenator. The device is calibrated for a specific...

  15. Cardiopulmonary bypass: development of John Gibbon's heart-lung machine

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Andréia Cristina Passaroni

    2015-04-01

    Full Text Available AbstractObjective:To provide a brief review of the development of cardiopulmonary bypass.Methods:A review of the literature on the development of extracorporeal circulation techniques, their essential role in cardiovascular surgery, and the complications associated with their use, including hemolysis and inflammation.Results:The advancement of extracorporeal circulation techniques has played an essential role in minimizing the complications of cardiopulmonary bypass, which can range from various degrees of tissue injury to multiple organ dysfunction syndrome. Investigators have long researched the ways in which cardiopulmonary bypass may insult the human body. Potential solutions arose and laid the groundwork for development of safer postoperative care strategies.Conclusion:Steady progress has been made in cardiopulmonary bypass in the decades since it was first conceived of by Gibbon. Despite the constant evolution of cardiopulmonary bypass techniques and attempts to minimize their complications, it is still essential that clinicians respect the particularities of each patient's physiological function.

  16. New Therapeutic Possibilities of the Post-Irradiation Haemorrhagic Syndrome

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pospisil, J.; Dienstbier, Z. [Institute of Biophysics and Nuclear Medicine, Faculty of General Medicine, Charles University, Prague, Czechoslovak Socialist Republic (Czech Republic); Skala, E. [Central Military Hospital, Prague-Stresovice, Czechoslovak Socialist Republic (Czech Republic)

    1969-10-15

    Haemorrhagic diathesis is one of the dominant symptoms of acute post-irradiation lesion. Haemorrhagic syndrome is caused by the disturbance of haemocoagulation during simultaneous lesion of the vascular system. In our study we have tried to affect the post-irradiation haemocoagulation disturbance. Epsilon- amino-caproic acid (EACA) administered between the 8{sup th} and the 18{sup th} day (0.4 g/kg per day) to whole- body irradiated dogs (600 R) partially regulated the post-irradiation disturbance of haemocoagulation. The favourable effect of EACA was verified by in vitro experiments in which the blood of irradiated dogs was used. A repeated administration of EACA in the dose of 0.4 g/kg per day to whole-body irradiated rats (600 R) did not substantially affect the post-irradiation changes in the number of white blood elements; however, its administration to healthy animals caused lymphocytosis. In whole-body irradiated dogs (600 R) we have found lower levels of EACA in the blood up to the 8 day following irradiation as compared with healthy dogs after oral application of EACA. The whole-body irradiation of mice did not increase the acute toxicity of EACA. The daily administration of 0.4 g EACA/kg to whole-body irradiated mice (600 and 700 R) did not change the mortality induced by irradiation. The authors consider EACA to be a suitable compound for a complex therapy of radiation sickness. The administration of para-amino-methyl-benzoic acid (PAMBA), in spite of a certain improvement of postirradiation haemocoagulation disturbance, is less efficient. Our recent experiments with ellagic acid which significantly affects the post-traumatic haemorrhage in whole-body irradiated rats seem to be very promising. (author)

  17. Prevention of postpartum haemorrhage with the oxytocin analogue carbetocin.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rath, Werner

    2009-11-01

    Postpartum haemorrhage is the leading cause of maternal mortality worldwide: 67-80% of cases are caused by uterine atony. Preventive measures include prophylactic drug use to aid uterine contraction after delivery, thus avoiding severe blood loss and reducing maternal morbidity and mortality. Carbetocin is a synthetic analogue of oxytocin with a half-life approximately 4-10 times longer than that reported for oxytocin. It combines the safety and tolerability profile of oxytocin with the sustained uterotonic activity of injectable ergot alkaloids. Furthermore, carbetocin can be administered as a single dose injection either intravenously or intramuscularly rather than as an infusion over several hours as is the case with oxytocin. Carbetocin is currently indicated for prevention of uterine atony after delivery by caesarean section in spinal or epidural anaesthesia. Data from three randomised controlled trials in caesarean delivery and a meta-analysis indicate that carbetocin significantly reduces the need for additional uterotonic agents or uterine massage to prevent excessive bleeding compared with placebo or oxytocin. The risk of headache, tremor, hypotension, flushing, nausea, abdominal pain, pruritus and feeling of warmth was similar in women who received carbetocin or oxytocin. The findings from two more recent double-blind randomised trials and one retrospective study suggest that carbetocin may also represent a good alternative to conventional uterotonic agents for prevention of postpartum haemorrhage after vaginal deliveries. A reduced need for additional uterotonics was observed with carbetocin vs. oxytocin in high-risk women and carbetocin was at least as effective as syntometrine in low-risk women. In these studies of vaginal deliveries, carbetocin was associated with a low incidence of adverse effects and demonstrated a better tolerability profile than syntometrine. Carbetocin had a long duration of action compared with intravenous oxytocin alone and a

  18. Management of symptomatic thrombocytopenia associated with dengue haemorrhagic fever

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jameel, T.; Saleem, I.U.; Mehmood, K.; Tanvir, I.; Saadia, A.

    2010-01-01

    Introduction: Immune - mediated destruction of platelets is thought to be the mechanism of thrombocytopenia seen after the viraemic phase of dengue haemorrhagic fever (DHF). Immuno - suppressants such as steroids, immune globulin and Anti D immune globulin are effective in the treatment of this type of immune thrombocytopenic purpura. Objective: To evaluate the efficacy of oral Prednisolone in the rate of resolution of thrombocytopenia and monitoring of complications in patients recovering from Dengue haemorrhagic fever. Method: A controlled study was carried out on diagnosed cases Dengue haemorrhagic patients presenting with sever thrombocytopenia and symptoms like confluent ecchymosis, epistaxis and purpuric rashes. In study was conducted in Ittefaq hospital (trust) Lahore, during the period of October to December 2008. Treatment group received steroids in two forms i.e. first line therapy prednisolone (1 mg / kg) orally or as second line therapy of initial I/V high dose (prednisolone) in pulse doses i.e. 40 mg / bd for four days and later oral prednisolone as in first line therapy with omeprazole 20 mg / bd in addition to standard treatment. Control group received standard supportive care only. Results: A total of 341 suspected patients were admitted in hospital. Serological diagnosis was confirmed in 166 patients. CBC revealed platelet count . 100 x 109 / l in 106 patients. A group of symptomatic febrile patients have platelet count < 20 x 109 / l was selected for therapeutic intervention. first line therapy (oral prednisolone was stated in 43 patients. In Fourteen patients second line therapy (high dose dexamethasone pulse) therapy was instituted. Seven of them attained complete response whereas two patients achieved partial response. Four patients were shifted to Anti D therapy. Three deaths occurred during our study. Rest of all the patients improved and were discharged in due course of time. Conclusion: This small scale preliminary study shows promising

  19. The impact of post-resuscitation feedback for paramedics on the quality of cardiopulmonary resuscitation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bleijenberg, Eduard; Koster, Rudolph W; de Vries, Hendrik; Beesems, Stefanie G

    2017-01-01

    The Guidelines place emphasis on high-quality cardiopulmonary resuscitation (CPR). This study aims to measure the impact of post-resuscitation feedback on the quality of CPR as performed by ambulance personnel. Two ambulances are dispatched for suspected cardiac arrest. The crew (driver and paramedic) of the first arriving ambulance is responsible for the quality of CPR. The crew of the second ambulance establishes an intravenous access and supports the first crew. All resuscitation attempts led by the ambulance crew of the study region were reviewed by two research paramedics and structured feedback was given based on defibrillator recording with impedance signal. A 12-months period before introduction of post-resuscitation feedback was compared with a 19-months period after introduction of feedback, excluding a six months run-in interval. Quality parameters were chest compression fraction (CCF), chest compression rate, longest peri-shock pause and longest non-shock pause. In the pre-feedback period 55 cases were analyzed and 69 cases in the feedback period. Median CCF improved significantly in the feedback period (79% vs 86%, presuscitation feedback improves the quality of resuscitation, significantly increasing CCF and decreasing the duration of longest non-shock pauses. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  20. Haemorrhagic acoustic neuroma with features of a vascular malformation. A case report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Benhaiem-Sigaux, N. [Dept. of Pathology, Hopital Henri Mondor, Creteil (France); Ricolfi, F. [Dept. of Neuroradiology, Henri Mondor Hospital, Creteil (France); Torres-Diaz, A.; Keravel, Y. [Dept. of Neurosurgery, Henri Mondo Hospital, Creteil (France); Poirier, J. [Dept. of Histology, Pitie-Salpetriere Hospital, Paris (France)

    1999-10-01

    A 55-year-old man with hearing loss presented with vertigo and vomiting. CT tomography and MRI demonstrated a cerebellopontine angle mass with foci of haemorrhage. An angiomatous tumour, with large abnormal veins adhering to the capsule, was completely removed. Histologically, the tumour was an acoustic neuroma with abnormal vascularisation and limited intratumoral haemorrhage. (orig.)

  1. A composite neurobehavioral test to evaluate acute functional deficits after cerebellar haemorrhage in rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McBride, Devin W; Nowrangi, Derek; Kaur, Harpreet; Wu, Guangyong; Huang, Lei; Lekic, Tim; Tang, Jiping; Zhang, John H

    2018-03-01

    Cerebellar haemorrhage accounts for 5-10% of all intracerebral haemorrhages and leads to severe, long-lasting functional deficits. Currently, there is limited research on this stroke subtype, which may be due to the lack of a suitable composite neuroscoring system specific for cerebellar injury in rodents. The purpose of this study is to develop a comprehensive composite neuroscore test for cerebellar injury using a rat model of cerebellar haemorrhage. Sixty male Sprague-Dawley rats were subjected to either sham surgery or cerebellar haemorrhage. Twenty-four hours post-injury, neurological behaviour was evaluated using 17 cost-effective and easy-to-perform tests, and a composite neuroscore was developed. The composite neuroscore was then used to assess functional recovery over seven days after cerebellar haemorrhage. Differences in the composite neuroscore deficits for the mild and moderate cerebellar haemorrhage models were observed for up to five days post-ictus. Until now, a composite neuroscore for cerebellar injury was not available for rodent studies. Herein, using mild and moderate cerebellar haemorrhage rat models a composite neuroscore for cerebellar injury was developed and used to assess functional deficits after cerebellar haemorrhage. This composite neuroscore may also be useful for other cerebellar injury models.

  2. Three-dimensional reconstruction and volumetry of intracranial haemorrhage and its mass effect

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Strik, H.M.; Baehr, M.; Borchert, H.; Fels, C.; Knauth, M.; Rienhoff, O.; Verhey, J.F.

    2005-01-01

    Intracerebral haemorrhage still causes considerable disability and mortality. The studies on conservative and operative management are inconclusive, probably due to inexact volumetry of the haemorrhage. We investigated whether three-dimensional (3-D), voxel-based volumetry of the haemorrhage and its mass effect is feasible with routine computed tomography (CT) scans. The volumes of the haemorrhage, ventricles, midline shift, the intracranial volume and ventricular compression in CT scans of 12 patients with basal ganglia haemorrhage were determined with the 3-D slicer software. Indices of haemorrhage and intracranial or ventricular volume were calculated and correlated with the clinical data. The intended measures could be determined with an acceptable intra-individual variability. The 3-D volumetric data tended to correlate better with the clinical course than the conventionally assessed distance of midline shift and volume of haemorrhage. 3-D volumetry of intracranial haemorrhage and its mass effect is feasible with routine CT examination. Prospective studies should assess its value for clinical studies on intracranial space-occupying diseases. (orig.)

  3. Haemorrhagic acoustic neuroma with features of a vascular malformation. A case report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Benhaiem-Sigaux, N.; Ricolfi, F.; Torres-Diaz, A.; Keravel, Y.; Poirier, J.

    1999-01-01

    A 55-year-old man with hearing loss presented with vertigo and vomiting. CT tomography and MRI demonstrated a cerebellopontine angle mass with foci of haemorrhage. An angiomatous tumour, with large abnormal veins adhering to the capsule, was completely removed. Histologically, the tumour was an acoustic neuroma with abnormal vascularisation and limited intratumoral haemorrhage. (orig.)

  4. Efficacy of selective arterial embolisation for the treatment of life-threatening post-partum haemorrhage in a large population.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cyril Touboul

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: The objective of this study was to assess efficacy and determine the optimal indication of selective arterial embolisation (SAE in patients with life-threatening post-partum haemorrhage (PPH. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: One hundred and two patients with PPH underwent SAE and were included from January 1998 to January 2002 in our university care center. Embolisation was considered effective when no other surgical procedure was required. Univariate and multivariate statistical analysis were performed. SAE was effective for 73 patients (71.5%, while 29 required surgical procedures. SAE was effective in 88.6% of women with uterine atony that was associated with positive outcome (OR 4.13, 1.35-12.60, whereas caesarean deliveries (OR 0.16, 0.04-0.5 and haemodynamic shock (OR 0.21, 0.07-0.60 were associated with high failure rates, 47.6% and 39.1%, respectively. CONCLUSIONS/SIGNIFICANCE: Success rate for SAE observed in a large population is lower than previously reported. It is most likely to succeed for uterine atony but not recommended in case of haemodynamic shock or after caesarean section.

  5. Acute haemorrhagic diarrhoea syndrome in dogs: 108 cases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mortier, F; Strohmeyer, K; Hartmann, K; Unterer, S

    2015-06-13

    No prospective studies including large numbers of dogs with acute haemorrhagic diarrhoea syndrome (AHDS) are published so far. The aim of this case-control study was to describe signalment, history, clinical signs, laboratory values and course of disease in dogs with AHDS. Dogs (108) with idiopathic acute haemorrhagic diarrhoea (schnauzer and Maltese. The syndrome was more likely to occur during winter. Vomiting preceded the onset of bloody diarrhoea in 80 per cent of dogs and haematemesis was observed in half of those cases. Median AHDS index at presentation was 12 (range 3-17). Haematocrit was generally high (median 57.1 per cent; range 33-76 per cent), but exceeded 60 per cent only in 31.4 per cent of dogs. Haematocrit of 48.1 per cent of dogs was above reference range, as was monocyte (50.0 per cent), segmented (59.6 per cent) and band neutrophil count (45.2 per cent). A rapid clinical improvement occurred during the first 48 hours. British Veterinary Association.

  6. Genetic population structure of marine viral haemorrhagic septicaemia virus (VHSV)

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Snow, M.; Bain, N.; Black, J.

    2004-01-01

    The nucleotide sequences of a specific region of the nucleoprotein gene were compared in order to investigate the genetic population structure of marine viral haemorrhagic septicaemia virus (VHSV). Analysis of the sequence from 128 isolates of diverse geographic and host origin renders this the m......The nucleotide sequences of a specific region of the nucleoprotein gene were compared in order to investigate the genetic population structure of marine viral haemorrhagic septicaemia virus (VHSV). Analysis of the sequence from 128 isolates of diverse geographic and host origin renders...... this the most comprehensive molecular epidemiological study of marine VHSV conducted to date. Phylogenetic analysis of nucleoprotein gene sequences confirmed the existence of the 4 major genotypes previously identified based on N- and subsequent G-gene based analyses. The range of Genotype I included subgroups...... of isolates associated with rainbow trout aquaculture (Genotype la) and those from the Baltic marine environment (Genotype Ib) to emphasise the relatively close genetic relationship between these isolates. The existence of an additional genotype circulating within the Baltic Sea (Genotype II) was also...

  7. Role of canine circovirus in dogs with acute haemorrhagic diarrhoea.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Anderson, A; Hartmann, K; Leutenegger, C M; Proksch, A L; Mueller, R S; Unterer, S

    2017-06-03

    Canine circovirus (CanineCV) has been detected in some dogs with severe haemorrhagic diarrhoea, but its pathogenic role is unclear. This study evaluated a suspected association between the presence of CanineCV and acute haemorrhagic diarrhoea syndrome (AHDS) in dogs. The prevalence of CanineCV in dogs with AHDS was compared with that in healthy dogs and those infected with canine parvovirus (CPV). Additionally, time to recovery and mortality rate were compared between CanineCV-positive and CanineCV-negative dogs. Faecal samples of dogs with AHDS (n=55), healthy dogs (n=66) and dogs infected with CPV (n=54) were examined by two real-time TaqMan PCR assays targeting the replicase and capsid genes of CanineCV. CanineCV was detected in faecal samples of two dogs with AHDS, three healthy controls and seven dogs infected with CPV. Among the three groups, there was no significant difference in prevalence of CanineCV. CPV-infected animals that were coinfected with CanineCV had a significantly higher mortality rate compared with those negative for CanineCV. CanineCV does not appear to be the primary causative agent of AHDS in dogs, but might play a role as a negative co-factor in disease outcome in dogs with CPV infection. British Veterinary Association.

  8. Collisionless electrostatic shocks

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Andersen, H.K.; Andersen, S.A.; Jensen, Vagn Orla

    1970-01-01

    An attempt was made in the laboratory to observe the standing collisionless electrostatic shocks in connection with the bow shock of the earth......An attempt was made in the laboratory to observe the standing collisionless electrostatic shocks in connection with the bow shock of the earth...

  9. Condom Tamponade in the Management of Primary Postpartum Haemorrhage: A Report of three cases in Ghana.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maya, Ernest T; Buntugu, Kennedy A; Aki, Lovelace; Srofenyoh, Emmanuel K

    2015-09-01

    Postpartum haemorrhage is one of the major causes of maternal mortality worldwide. The leading cause of primary postpartum haemorrhage is uterine atony and active management of the third stage of labour with oxytocin is recommended for preventing primary postpartum haemorrhage. Parenteral oxytocin is also the drug of choice for medical management of postpartum haemorrhage secondary to uterine atony. Condom uterine balloon tamponade is .a low cost technique that can be used as a second-line option for treatment. We report retrospectively three cases of primary PPH secondary to uterine atony which were managed successfully with condom tamponade. Condom tamponade is effective in managing post partum haemorrhage secondary to uterine atony and we advocate for the training of all skilled attendants on how to insert the condom tamponade.

  10. Valved or valveless ventriculoperitoneal shunting in the treatment of post-haemorrhagic hydrocephalus

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Andreasen, Trine Hjorslev; Holst, Anders Vedel; Lilja, Alexander

    2016-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Implant infection and obstruction are major complications for ventriculoperitoneal shunts in patients with post-haemorrhagic hydrocephalus. In an effort to (1) reduce the incidence of these complications, (2) reduce the rate of shunt failure and (3) shorten the duration of neurosurgical...... hospitalisation, we have implemented valveless ventriculoperitoneal shunts at our department for adult patients with post-haemorrhagic hydrocephalus and haemorrhagic cerebrospinal fluid at the time of shunt insertion. METHODS: All adult patients (>18 years old) treated for post-haemorrhagic hydrocephalus.......3 %, p = 0.02), but a higher rate of overdrainage (10.3 % vs 2.6 %, p = 0.04). CONCLUSION: The use of a valveless shunting for patients with post-haemorrhagic hydrocephalus results in shorter duration of neurosurgical hospitalisation and lower rate of shunt infection, although these advantages should...

  11. Associates of Cardiopulmonary Arrest in the Perihemodialytic Period

    Science.gov (United States)

    Flythe, Jennifer E.; Li, Nien-Chen; Brunelli, Steven M.; Lacson, Eduardo

    2014-01-01

    Cardiopulmonary arrest during and proximate to hemodialysis is rare but highly fatal. Studies have examined peridialytic sudden cardiac event risk factors, but no study has considered associates of cardiopulmonary arrests (fatal and nonfatal events including cardiac and respiratory causes). This study was designed to elucidate patient and procedural factors associated with peridialytic cardiopulmonary arrest. Data for this case-control study were taken from the hemodialysis population at Fresenius Medical Care, North America. 924 in-center cardiopulmonary events (cases) and 75,538 controls were identified. Cases and controls were 1 : 5 matched on age, sex, race, and diabetes. Predictors of cardiopulmonary arrest were considered for logistic model inclusion. Missed treatments due to hospitalization, lower body mass, coronary artery disease, heart failure, lower albumin and hemoglobin, lower dialysate potassium, higher serum calcium, greater erythropoietin stimulating agent dose, and normalized protein catabolic rate (J-shaped) were associated with peridialytic cardiopulmonary arrest. Of these, lower albumin, hemoglobin, and body mass index; higher erythropoietin stimulating agent dose; and greater missed sessions had the strongest associations with outcome. Patient health markers and procedural factors are associated with peridialytic cardiopulmonary arrest. In addition to optimizing nutritional status, it may be prudent to limit exposure to low dialysate potassium (<2 K bath) and to use the lowest effective erythropoietin stimulating agent dose. PMID:25530881

  12. Associates of Cardiopulmonary Arrest in the Perihemodialytic Period

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jennifer E. Flythe

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Cardiopulmonary arrest during and proximate to hemodialysis is rare but highly fatal. Studies have examined peridialytic sudden cardiac event risk factors, but no study has considered associates of cardiopulmonary arrests (fatal and nonfatal events including cardiac and respiratory causes. This study was designed to elucidate patient and procedural factors associated with peridialytic cardiopulmonary arrest. Data for this case-control study were taken from the hemodialysis population at Fresenius Medical Care, North America. 924 in-center cardiopulmonary events (cases and 75,538 controls were identified. Cases and controls were 1 : 5 matched on age, sex, race, and diabetes. Predictors of cardiopulmonary arrest were considered for logistic model inclusion. Missed treatments due to hospitalization, lower body mass, coronary artery disease, heart failure, lower albumin and hemoglobin, lower dialysate potassium, higher serum calcium, greater erythropoietin stimulating agent dose, and normalized protein catabolic rate (J-shaped were associated with peridialytic cardiopulmonary arrest. Of these, lower albumin, hemoglobin, and body mass index; higher erythropoietin stimulating agent dose; and greater missed sessions had the strongest associations with outcome. Patient health markers and procedural factors are associated with peridialytic cardiopulmonary arrest. In addition to optimizing nutritional status, it may be prudent to limit exposure to low dialysate potassium (<2 K bath and to use the lowest effective erythropoietin stimulating agent dose.

  13. Some Medicolegal Aspects of the Russian Cardiopulmonary Resuscitation Protocol

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    V. A. Kuksinsky

    2006-01-01

    Full Text Available The purpose of the study was to analyze the Russian legislation to identify the medicolegal aspects of cardiopulmonary resuscitation, which are most significant for an intensive care anesthesiologist. Statutory acts concerning human health care, including those pertinent to cardiopulmonary resuscitation and those providing for the responsibility of medical workers in some cases were analyzed. A number of discrepancies in various legal acts concerning human death verification and resuscitative measures were identified. The analysis has revealed the aspects of cardiopulmonary resuscitation, which are, from the point of view of legislation, most important for the physician.

  14. Comprehensive cardiopulmonary life support (CCLS for cardiopulmonary resuscitation by trained paramedics and medics inside the hospital

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rakesh Garg

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available The cardiopulmonary resuscitation (CPR guideline of comprehensive cardiopulmonary life support (CCLS for management of the patient with cardiopulmonary arrest in adults provides an algorithmic step-wise approach for optimal outcome of the patient inside the hospital by trained medics and paramedics. This guideline has been developed considering the infrastructure of healthcare delivery system in India. This is based on evidence in the international and national literature. In the absence of data from the Indian population, the extrapolation has been made from international data, discussed with Indian experts and modified accordingly to ensure their applicability in India. The CCLS guideline emphasise the need to recognise patients at risk for cardiac arrest and their timely management before a cardiac arrest occurs. The basic components of CPR include chest compressions for blood circulation; airway maintenance to ensure airway patency; lung ventilation to enable oxygenation and defibrillation to convert a pathologic 'shockable' cardiac rhythm to one capable to maintaining effective blood circulation. CCLS emphasises incorporation of airway management, drugs, and identification of the cause of arrest and its correction, while chest compression and ventilation are ongoing. It also emphasises the value of organised team approach and optimal post-resuscitation care.

  15. Geometrical shock dynamics for magnetohydrodynamic fast shocks

    KAUST Repository

    Mostert, W.; Pullin, D. I.; Samtaney, Ravi; Wheatley, V.

    2016-01-01

    We describe a formulation of two-dimensional geometrical shock dynamics (GSD) suitable for ideal magnetohydrodynamic (MHD) fast shocks under magnetic fields of general strength and orientation. The resulting area–Mach-number–shock-angle relation is then incorporated into a numerical method using pseudospectral differentiation. The MHD-GSD model is verified by comparison with results from nonlinear finite-volume solution of the complete ideal MHD equations applied to a shock implosion flow in the presence of an oblique and spatially varying magnetic field ahead of the shock. Results from application of the MHD-GSD equations to the stability of fast MHD shocks in two dimensions are presented. It is shown that the time to formation of triple points for both perturbed MHD and gas-dynamic shocks increases as (Formula presented.), where (Formula presented.) is a measure of the initial Mach-number perturbation. Symmetry breaking in the MHD case is demonstrated. In cylindrical converging geometry, in the presence of an azimuthal field produced by a line current, the MHD shock behaves in the mean as in Pullin et al. (Phys. Fluids, vol. 26, 2014, 097103), but suffers a greater relative pressure fluctuation along the shock than the gas-dynamic shock. © 2016 Cambridge University Press

  16. Geometrical shock dynamics for magnetohydrodynamic fast shocks

    KAUST Repository

    Mostert, W.

    2016-12-12

    We describe a formulation of two-dimensional geometrical shock dynamics (GSD) suitable for ideal magnetohydrodynamic (MHD) fast shocks under magnetic fields of general strength and orientation. The resulting area–Mach-number–shock-angle relation is then incorporated into a numerical method using pseudospectral differentiation. The MHD-GSD model is verified by comparison with results from nonlinear finite-volume solution of the complete ideal MHD equations applied to a shock implosion flow in the presence of an oblique and spatially varying magnetic field ahead of the shock. Results from application of the MHD-GSD equations to the stability of fast MHD shocks in two dimensions are presented. It is shown that the time to formation of triple points for both perturbed MHD and gas-dynamic shocks increases as (Formula presented.), where (Formula presented.) is a measure of the initial Mach-number perturbation. Symmetry breaking in the MHD case is demonstrated. In cylindrical converging geometry, in the presence of an azimuthal field produced by a line current, the MHD shock behaves in the mean as in Pullin et al. (Phys. Fluids, vol. 26, 2014, 097103), but suffers a greater relative pressure fluctuation along the shock than the gas-dynamic shock. © 2016 Cambridge University Press

  17. Liver laceration related to cardiopulmonary resuscitation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Halil Beydilli

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available Cardiopulmonary resuscitation (CPR is recognized as a medical procedure performed to maintain vital functions of a person whose cardiac and respiratory functions have stopped. Chest compression is the most essential component of CPR and it is performed on the lower half of the sternum. During CPR, many complications may occur because of chest compressions, especially chest injuries including sternum and rib fractures. Rarely tracheal injury, rupture of the stomach, or liver or spleen injury may also occur as complications.In this study, we present two cases of liver injury caused by resuscitation. With this article, we want to emphasize the importance of making correct chest compressions. Keywords: Resuscitation complications, Emergency service, Liver laceration, Autopsy

  18. comparison of cardio-pulmonary responses to forward and ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    GOAL REALITY

    increase quadriceps power and strength (Mackie and. Dean, 1984 ... the metabolic cost of and cardiopulmonary response to this mode of ... power and at maximal exercise. ... wind resistance ) (Fohenbach, Mader and Holloman,. 1987; Heck ...

  19. Spatial variation in nitrogen dioxide concentrations and cardiopulmonary hospital admissions

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Dijkema, Marieke B A; van Strien, Robert T; van der Zee, Saskia C; Mallant, Sanne F; Fischer, Paul; Hoek, Gerard; Brunekreef, Bert; Gehring, Ulrike

    2016-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Air pollution episodes are associated with increased cardiopulmonary hospital admissions. Cohort studies showed associations of spatial variation in traffic-related air pollution with respiratory and cardiovascular mortality. Much less is known in particular about associations with

  20. 21 CFR 870.4350 - Cardiopulmonary bypass oxygenator.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... bypass oxygenator. (a) Identification. A cardiopulmonary bypass oxygenator is a device used to exchange gases between blood and a gaseous environment to satisfy the gas exchange needs of a patient during open...

  1. Bronchospasm and anaphylactic shock following lidocaine aerosol inhalation in a patient with butane inhalation lung injury.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Min-Young; Park, Kyong Ah; Yeo, So-Jeong; Kim, Shin-Hee; Goong, Hyeun-Jeong; Jang, An-Soo; Park, Choon-Sik

    2011-10-01

    Allergic reactions to local anesthetics are very rare and represent inhalation lung injury due to butane gas fuel. On the fifth day, he developed an asthmatic attack and anaphylactic shock immediately after lidocaine aerosol administration to prepare for bronchoscopy to confirm an acute inhalational lung injury diagnosis. Cardiopulmonary resuscitation was performed immediately after respiratory arrest, and the patient was admitted to the intensive care unit intubated and on a ventilator. He was extubated safely on the third post-cardiopulmonary resuscitation day. These observations suggest that aerosol lidocaine anesthesia may cause airway narrowing and anaphylactic shock. Practitioners should be aware of this potential complication. We report on this case with a brief review of the literature.

  2. Cardiopulmonary disease in the geriatric dog and cat

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Miller, M. S.; Tilley, L. P.; Smith, F.W.K. Jr.

    1989-01-15

    The incidence of cardiopulmonary disease increases with age. Degenerative valvular disease, chronic obstructive pulmonary disease, and arrhythmias are common in the geriatric dog. Chronic bronchial disease, pulmonary neoplasia, and arrhythmias occur in the geriatric cat. Systemic diseases in both species often show cardiopulmonary manifestations. Medical management to treat the underlying disease and to control clinical signs is complicated by altered absorption, metabolism, and elimination of drugs.

  3. The Level Of Knowlege Guidelines Cardiopulmonary Resuscitation For Nurses

    OpenAIRE

    Lukešová, Ludmila

    2012-01-01

    The goal of this thesis is to determine the level of theoretical knowledge of the procedures of cardiopulmonary resuscitation of selected non-medical staff members in VFN in Prague. The work is subdivided into a theoretical and a practical part. In the first part I comment on the history of cardiopulmonary resuscitation, the basic and widespread vital support to adults and children and the didactics of CPR. In the second- practical part I compare the theoretical knowledge of CPR of selected n...

  4. Cardiopulmonary disease in the geriatric dog and cat

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Miller, M.S.; Tilley, L.P.; Smith, F.W.K. Jr.

    1989-01-01

    The incidence of cardiopulmonary disease increases with age. Degenerative valvular disease, chronic obstructive pulmonary disease, and arrhythmias are common in the geriatric dog. Chronic bronchial disease, pulmonary neoplasia, and arrhythmias occur in the geriatric cat. Systemic diseases in both species often show cardiopulmonary manifestations. Medical management to treat the underlying disease and to control clinical signs is complicated by altered absorption, metabolism, and elimination of drugs

  5. Cardiopulmonary bypass: development of John Gibbon's heart-lung machine

    OpenAIRE

    Passaroni, Andréia Cristina; Silva, Marcos Augusto de Moraes; Yoshida, Winston Bonetti

    2015-01-01

    AbstractObjective:To provide a brief review of the development of cardiopulmonary bypass.Methods:A review of the literature on the development of extracorporeal circulation techniques, their essential role in cardiovascular surgery, and the complications associated with their use, including hemolysis and inflammation.Results:The advancement of extracorporeal circulation techniques has played an essential role in minimizing the complications of cardiopulmonary bypass, which can range from vari...

  6. Kinetics of carbon dioxide during cardiopulmonary resuscitation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Wiklund, L; Söderberg, D; Henneberg, S

    1986-01-01

    CO2 kinetics during CPR was investigated in 15 anesthetized piglets. BP, blood gases, and acid-base balance were monitored through catheters in the carotid artery and a central vein, as well as in cerebrospinal fluid. Cardiac arrest was induced by a transthoracic direct current shock. CPR was beg...

  7. A rare case of Weil's disease with alveolar haemorrhage

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Abhiram Chakrabarti

    2014-05-01

    Full Text Available Leptospirosis, a disease of protean manifestations occurs sporadically throughout the year with a peak seasonal incidence during the rainy season mimicking other febrile viral illness. In the rare case, the disease leads to renal and hepatic involvement with hemorrhage which may be associated with multisystem organ dysfunction in form of pulmonary, cardiac and central nervous system, when it is known as Weil's disease. Rarely haemorrhagic manifestations are assosciated. Early diagnosis is important as sometimes the disease may be life threatening. Proper antibiotics results in dramatic improvement. We hereby presented a case that had clinical features of Weil's disease with cough, dyspnoea and haemoptysis. Leptospirosis was detected on ELISA testing. Patient was cured rapidly with antibiotics.

  8. A rare case of Weil's disease with alveolar haemorrhage.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chakrabarti, Abhiram; Nandy, Manab; Pal, Dipankar; Mallik, Sudesna

    2014-05-01

    Leptospirosis, a disease of protean manifestations occurs sporadically throughout the year with a peak seasonal incidence during the rainy season mimicking other febrile viral illness. In the rare case, the disease leads to renal and hepatic involvement with hemorrhage which may be associated with multisystem organ dysfunction in form of pulmonary, cardiac and central nervous system, when it is known as Weil's disease. Rarely haemorrhagic manifestations are assosciated. Early diagnosis is important as sometimes the disease may be life threatening. Proper antibiotics results in dramatic improvement. We hereby presented a case that had clinical features of Weil's disease with cough, dyspnoea and haemoptysis. Leptospirosis was detected on ELISA testing. Patient was cured rapidly with antibiotics.

  9. Hereditary haemorrhagic telangiectasia: a cause of preventable morbidity and mortality.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Brady, A P

    2012-01-31

    Hereditary haemorrhagic telangiectasia (HHT) is an autosomal dominant condition whose effects are mediated through deficient blood vessel formation and regeneration, with multisystem involvement. Patients are usually aware of resulting skin telangiectasia and epistaxis, but are also exposed to dangers posed by occult vascular malformations in other organs. About 15-35% of HHT patients have pulmonary AVMs (PAVMs), 10% have cerebral AVMs (CAVMs), 25-33% suffer significant GI blood loss from GI tract telangiectasia, and an unknown but high percentage have liver involvement. In total, 10% of affected individuals die prematurely or suffer major disability from HHT, largely because of bleeding from CAVMs and PAVMs, or paradoxical embolization through PAVMs. Screening for and early intervention to treat occult PAVMs and CAVMs can largely eliminate these risks, and should be undertaken in a specialist centre. The National HHT Center in The Mercy University Hospital in Cork is the referral centre for HHT screening in Ireland.

  10. Pre-emptive treatment with fibrinogen concentrate for postpartum haemorrhage

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Wikkelsø, A J; Edwards, H M; Afshari, A

    2015-01-01

    BACKGROUND: In early postpartum haemorrhage (PPH), a low concentration of fibrinogen is associated with excessive subsequent bleeding and blood transfusion. We hypothesized that pre-emptive treatment with fibrinogen concentrate reduces the need for red blood cell (RBC) transfusion in patients...... and the fibrinogen concentration at inclusion. The primary outcome was RBC transfusion up to 6 weeks postpartum. Secondary outcomes were total blood loss, total amount of blood transfused, occurrence of rebleeding, haemoglobin ... concentrate, thereby significantly increasing fibrinogen concentration compared with placebo by 0.40 g litre(-1) (95% confidence interval, 0.15-0.65; P=0.002). Postpartum blood transfusion occurred in 25 (20%) of the fibrinogen group and 26 (22%) of the placebo group (relative risk, 0.95; 95% confidence...

  11. Eradication of viral haemorrhagic septicaemia in Danish aquaculture

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Olsen, N. J.; Skall, Helle Frank; Jensen, B. B.

    2013-01-01

    resources have been used to control and eradicate the disease. The control program included strict biosecurity and preventative measures, trade regulations, zoning and intensive inspections and laboratory testing. During the first decades of control and eradication programs the number of infected farms......Viral haemorrhagic septicaemia (VHS) virus was first isolated in Denmark in 1962, when more than half of the approximately 800 Danish fish farms were considered to be infected. Today, 50 years later, the country obtained status as EU approved VHS free zone. In the years in between very significant...... was significantly reduced while the curve flattened the last 20 years. It was only after a large and costly coordinated action in 2009-2013 including all affected areas that the country managed to free itself totally from VHS. Molecular tracing of the origin of VHSV isolates revealed that despite strict trade...

  12. Progress towards the treatment of Ebola haemorrhagic fever.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ströher, Ute; Feldmann, Heinz

    2006-12-01

    Being highly pathogenic for human and nonhuman primates and the subject of former weapon programmes makes Ebola virus one of the most feared pathogens worldwide today. Due to a lack of licensed pre- and postexposure intervention, the current response depends on rapid diagnostics, proper isolation procedures and supportive care of case patients. Consequently, the development of more specific countermeasures is of high priority for the preparedness of many nations. Over the past years, enhanced research efforts directed to better understand virus replication and pathogenesis have identified potential new targets for intervention strategies. The authors discuss the most promising therapeutic approaches for Ebola haemorrhagic fever as judged by their efficacy in animal models. The current development in this field encourages discussions on how to move some of the experimental approaches towards clinical application.

  13. Recanalisation of spontaneously occluded vertebral artery dissection after subarachnoid haemorrhage.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Akiyama, Takenori; Onozuka, Satoshi; Horiguchi, Takashi; Yoshida, Kazunari

    2012-10-01

    Spontaneous occlusion is a rare manifestation of ruptured vertebral artery dissection (VAD). Its natural history and treatment strategy have yet to be established due to its rarity. Here, we report five lesions involving spontaneous occlusion of VAD after subarachnoid haemorrhage, among which three lesions showed recanalisation. Based on our experience and previous reports, spontaneous occlusion of ruptured VAD can be classified into two groups-one group with occlusion in the acute stage with a high incidence of recanalisation and another group with occlusion in the chronic stage with a relatively low incidence of recanalisation. The underlying mechanism is likely different in each group, and treatment strategies should also be tailored depending on the pathophysiology.

  14. The need for repeat angiography in subarachnoid haemorrhage

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Urbach, H.; Solymosi, L.; Zentner, J.

    1998-01-01

    This study was designed to assess the necessity for a second angiogram study in patients in whom initial angiography after primary subarachnoid haemorrhage (SAH) was negative. During a 12-year period, 122 of 694 patients (17.5 %) had negative initial angiograms. CT, available for 98 patients, showed a preponderance of subarachnoid blood in the perimesencephalic cisterns in 50 of 73 patients (68.5 %) in whom blood was visible on CT. Angiography, repeated in 67 patients, revealed an aneurysm in 4 (6 %): 2 had an aneurysm of the anterior communicating artery, 1 of the posterior inferior cerebellar artery, and 1 of the P2 segment of the posterior cerebral artery. CT showed subarachnoid blood in the interpeduncular and ambient cisterns in this last case, and a preponderance of subarachnoid blood outside the perimesencephalic cisterns in the remaining 3 patients. (orig.)

  15. The need for repeat angiography in subarachnoid haemorrhage

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Urbach, H; Solymosi, L [Department of Neuroradiology, University of Bonn, Sigmund-Freud-Strasse 25, D-53127 Bonn (Germany); Zentner, J [Department of Neurosurgery, University of Bonn, Sigmund-Freud-Strasse 25, D-53127 Bonn (Germany)

    1998-01-01

    This study was designed to assess the necessity for a second angiogram study in patients in whom initial angiography after primary subarachnoid haemorrhage (SAH) was negative. During a 12-year period, 122 of 694 patients (17.5 %) had negative initial angiograms. CT, available for 98 patients, showed a preponderance of subarachnoid blood in the perimesencephalic cisterns in 50 of 73 patients (68.5 %) in whom blood was visible on CT. Angiography, repeated in 67 patients, revealed an aneurysm in 4 (6 %): 2 had an aneurysm of the anterior communicating artery, 1 of the posterior inferior cerebellar artery, and 1 of the P2 segment of the posterior cerebral artery. CT showed subarachnoid blood in the interpeduncular and ambient cisterns in this last case, and a preponderance of subarachnoid blood outside the perimesencephalic cisterns in the remaining 3 patients. (orig.) With 2 figs., 1 tab., 32 refs.

  16. The Significance of Variceal Haemorrhage in Ghana: A Retrospective Review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Archampong, T N A; Tachi, K; Agyei, A A; Nkrumah, K N

    2015-09-01

    This study describes the burden of bleeding oesophageal varices at the main tertiary referral centre in Accra. Retrospective design to describe the endoscopic spectrum and review mortality data following acute upper gastro-intestinal bleeding at the Korle-Bu Teaching Hospital. Endoscopic data was reviewed in the Endoscopy Unit between 2007 and 2010. Mortality data was collated from the Department of Medicine between 2010 and 2013. The study questionnaire compiled clinical and demographic characteristics, endoscopic diagnoses, length of hospital admission and treatment regimens. Aetiology and time-trend analysis of mortality rates following acute upper gastro-intestinal bleeding; variceal bleeding treatment modalities. On review of the endoscopic diagnoses, gastro-oesophageal varices were identified in 21.9% of cases followed by gastritis 21.7%, duodenal ulcer, 17.0%, and gastric ulcer, 13.2%. Gastro-oesophageal varices were the predominant cause of death from acute upper gastro-intestinal haemorrhage from 46% in 2010 to 76% in 2013. Outcomes following acute upper gastro-intestinal bleeding were dismal with some 38% of fatalities occurring within the first 24 hours. Injection sclerotherapy was the dominant endoscopic modality for secondary prevention of variceal bleeding in comparison with band ligation, mainly as a result of cost and availability. At the tertiary centre in Accra, variceal bleeding is an increasingly common cause of acute upper gastro-intestinal haemorrhage in comparison with previous reviews in Ghana. Its significantly high in-hospital mortality reflects inadequate facilities to deal with this medical emergency. A strategic approach to care with endoscopic services equipped with all the necessary therapeutic interventions will be vital in improving the outcomes of variceal bleeding in Ghana.

  17. ROLE OF HYSTEROSCOPY IN THE MANAGEMENT OF SECONDARY POSTPARTUM HAEMORRHAGE

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Krupa Patalay

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available INTRODUCTION Secondary postpartum haemorrhage [PPH] or puerperal haemorrhage, though rare can sometimes cause severe morbidity needing prolonged hospitalisation. Majority of the cases can be managed medically, a few of them requiring surgical interventions. With retained placental tissue being a common cause, emptying the uterus in the puerperium can be difficult and dangerous too as the wall is soft and perforation chances are high. Hysteroscopic evaluation of the puerperal uterus gives us a better picture of the retained bits of placental tissue, and helps in complete evacuation of the tissue without causing much trauma to the fragile uterine wall. It is also more specific than ultrasonogram [USG] to rule out the presence of retained tissue. MATERIAL AND METHODS 17 patients who had secondary PPH and did not respond to the initial medical management were included in the study. Hysteroscopy was done in these cases. Definitive pathology was found in 12 cases; 7 cases had polypoidal tissue [retained bits of placenta], 3 cases had placental tissue adherent to the caesarean scar [placenta accreta] and 2 cases had submucous fibroids. RESULTS In cases which had retained placental bits, the tissue could be visualised, its exact location noted and the entire tissue could be removed without inciting much trauma to the uterine wall. In cases with placenta accreta, gentle extraction of the adherent tissue could be done without traumatising the scar. In one case which had multiple fibroids with irregular uterine cavity, hysteroscopy helped in localising the retained tissue. CONCLUSION Hysteroscopy is a useful modality in managing cases of secondary PPH, who have persistent bleeding in the postpartum period.

  18. Miniature shock tube for laser driven shocks.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Busquet, Michel; Barroso, Patrice; Melse, Thierry; Bauduin, Daniel

    2010-02-01

    We describe in this paper the design of a miniature shock tube (smaller than 1 cm(3)) that can be placed in a vacuum vessel and allows transverse optical probing and longitudinal backside extreme ultraviolet emission spectroscopy in the 100-500 A range. Typical application is the study of laser launched radiative shocks, in the framework of what is called "laboratory astrophysics."

  19. Are Credit Shocks Supply or Demand Shocks?

    OpenAIRE

    Bijapur, Mohan

    2013-01-01

    This paper provides new insights into the relationship between the supply of credit and the macroeconomy. We present evidence that credit shocks constitute shocks to aggregate supply in that they have a permanent effect on output and cause inflation to rise in the short term. Our results also suggest that the effects on aggregate supply have grown stronger in recent decades.

  20. Shock absorbing structure

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kojima, Naoki; Matsushita, Kazuo.

    1992-01-01

    Small pieces of shock absorbers are filled in a space of a shock absorbing vessel which is divided into a plurality of sections by partitioning members. These sections function to prevent excess deformation or replacement of the fillers upon occurrence of falling accident. Since the shock absorbing small pieces in the shock absorbing vessel are filled irregularly, shock absorbing characteristics such as compression strength is not varied depending on the direction, but they exhibit excellent shock absorbing performance. They surely absorb shocks exerted on a transportation vessel upon falling or the like. If existing artificial fillers such as pole rings made of metal or ceramic and cut pieces such as alumium extrusion molding products are used as the shock absorbing pieces, they have excellent fire-proofness and cold resistance since the small pieces are inflammable and do not contain water. (T.M.)

  1. Melting under shock compression

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bennett, B.I.

    1980-10-01

    A simple model, using experimentally measured shock and particle velocities, is applied to the Lindemann melting formula to predict the density, temperature, and pressure at which a material will melt when shocked from room temperature and zero pressure initial conditions

  2. Prone Position Ventilation Used during a Transfer as a Bridge to Ecmo Therapy in Hantavirus-Induced Severe Cardiopulmonary Syndrome

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    R. Cornejo

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Background. Transport of critically ill patients is a complex issue. We present a case using prone positioning as a bridge to extracorporeal membrane oxygenation (ECMO, performed by a critical retrieval team from a university hospital. Case Report. A 28-year-old male developed fever, progressive respiratory failure, and shock. He was admitted to ICU from a public hospital, and mechanical ventilation was begun, but clinical response was not adequate. ECMO was deemed necessary due to severe respiratory failure and severe shock. A critical retrieval team of our center was assembled to attempt transfer. Prone positioning was employed to stabilize and transfer the patient, after risk-benefit assessment. Once in our hospital, ECMO was useful to resolve shock and pulmonary edema secondary to Hantavirus cardiopulmonary syndrome. Finally, he was discharged with normal functioning. Conclusion. This case exemplifies the relevance of a retrieval team and bridge therapy. Prone positioning improves oxygenation and is safe to perform as transport if performed by a trained team as in this case. Preparation and organization is necessary to improve outcomes, using teams and organized networks. Catastrophic respiratory failure and shock should not be contraindications to transferring patients, but it must be done with an experienced team.

  3. Outcome of cardiopulmonary resuscitation - predictors of survival

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ishtiaq, O.; Iqbal, M.; Zubair, M.; Qayyum, R.; Adil, M.

    2008-01-01

    To assess the outcomes of patients undergoing cardiopulmonary resuscitation (CPR). Data were collected retrospectively of all adult patients who underwent CPR. Clinical outcomes of interest were survival at the end of CPR and survival at discharge from hospital. Factors associated with survival were evaluated using logistic regression analysis. Of the 159 patients included, 55 (35%) were alive at the end of CPR and 17 (11%) were discharged alive from the hospital. At the end of CPR, univariate logistic regression analysis found the following factors associated with survival: cardiac arrest within hospital as compared to outside the hospital (odds ratio = 2.8, 95% CI = 1.27-6.20, p-value = 0.01), both cardiac and pulmonary arrest as compared to either cardiac or pulmonary arrest (odds ratio = 0.37, 95% CI = 0.19- 0.73, p-value = 0.004), asystole as cardiac rhythm at presentation (odds ratio = 0.47, 95% CI = 0.24-0.93, p-value = 0.03), and total atropine dose given during CPR (odds ratio = 0.78, 95% CI = 0.62-0.97, p-value = 0.02). In multivariate logistic regression, cardiac arrest within hospital (odds ratio = 2.52, 95% CI = 1.06-5.99, p-value = 0.04) and both cardiac and pulmonary arrest as compared to cardiac or pulmonary arrest (odds ratio = 0.44, 95% CI = 0.21-0.91, p-value = 0.03) were associated with survival at the end of CPR. At the time of discharge from hospital, univariate logistic regression analysis found following factors that were associated with survival: cardiac arrest within hospital (odds ratio = 8.4, 95% CI = 1.09-65.64, p-value = 0.04), duration of CPR (odds ratio = 0.91, 95% CI = 0.85-0.96, p-value = 0.001), and total atropine dose given during CPR (odds ratio = 0.68, 95% CI = 0.47-0.99, p-value = 0.05). In multivariate logistic regression analysis cardiac arrest within hospital (odds ratio 8.69, 95% CI = 1.01-74.6, p-value = 0.05) and duration of CPR (odds ratio 0.92, 95% CI = 0.87-0.98, p-value = 0.01) were associated with survival at

  4. Biomass shock pretreatment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Holtzapple, Mark T.; Madison, Maxine Jones; Ramirez, Rocio Sierra; Deimund, Mark A.; Falls, Matthew; Dunkelman, John J.

    2014-07-01

    Methods and apparatus for treating biomass that may include introducing a biomass to a chamber; exposing the biomass in the chamber to a shock event to produce a shocked biomass; and transferring the shocked biomass from the chamber. In some aspects, the method may include pretreating the biomass with a chemical before introducing the biomass to the chamber and/or after transferring shocked biomass from the chamber.

  5. Relativistic Shock Acceleration

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Duffy, P.; Downes, T.P.; Gallant, Y.A.; Kirk, J.G.

    1999-01-01

    In this paper we briefly review the basic theory of shock waves in relativistic hydrodynamics and magneto-hydrodynamics, emphasising some astrophysically interesting cases. We then present an overview of the theory of particle acceleration at such shocks describing the methods used to calculate the spectral indices of energetic particles. Recent results on acceleration at ultra-relativistic shocks are discussed. (author)

  6. Decompressive craniectomy in aneurysmal subarachnoid haemorrhage for hematoma or oedema versus secondary infarction

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Goedemans, Taco; Verbaan, Dagmar; Coert, Bert A.; Sprengers, Marieke E. S.; van den Berg, René; Vandertop, W. Peter; van den Munckhof, Pepijn

    2017-01-01

    Decompressive craniectomy (DC) has been proposed as lifesaving treatment in aneurysmal subarachnoid haemorrhage (aSAH) patients with elevated intracranial pressure (ICP). However, data is sparse and controversy exists whether the underlying cause of elevated ICP influences neurological outcome. The

  7. Development and validation of outcome prediction models for aneurysmal subarachnoid haemorrhage : The SAHIT multinational cohort study

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Jaja, Blessing N R; Saposnik, Gustavo; Lingsma, Hester F.; Macdonald, Erin; Thorpe, Kevin E.; Mamdani, Muhammed; Steyerberg, Ewout W.; Molyneux, Andrew; Manoel, Airton Leonardo De Oliveira; Schatlo, Bawarjan; Hanggi, Daniel; Hasan, David M.; Wong, George K C; Etminan, Nima; Fukuda, Hitoshi; Torner, James C.; Schaller, Karl L.; Suarez, Jose I.; Stienen, Martin N.; Vergouwen, Mervyn D.I.; Rinkel, Gabriel J.E.; Spears, Julian; Cusimano, Michael D.; Todd, Michael; Le Roux, Peter; Kirkpatrick, Peter J.; Pickard, John; Van Den Bergh, Walter M.; Murray, Gordon D; Johnston, S. Claiborne; Yamagata, Sen; Mayer, Stephan A.; Schweizer, Tom A.; Macdonald, R. Loch

    2018-01-01

    Objective To develop and validate a set of practical prediction tools that reliably estimate the outcome of subarachnoid haemorrhage from ruptured intracranial aneurysms (SAH). Design Cohort study with logistic regression analysis to combine predictors and treatment modality. Setting Subarachnoid

  8. Infrastructure and clinical practice for the detection and management of trauma-associated haemorrhage and coagulopathy

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Driessen, A.; Schäfer, N.; Albrecht, V.; Schenk, M.; Fröhlich, M.; Stürmer, E. K.; Maegele, M.; Johansson, Pär; Ostrowski, Sisse Rye; Tuovinen, Hannele; Stensballe, Jakob; Goslings, Johann Carel; Juffermans, Nicole; Balvers, Kirsten; Gaarder, Christine; Brohi, Karim; Eaglestone, Simon; Rourke, Claire; Campbell, Helen; Curry, Nicola; Stanworth, Simon; Maegele, Marc; Stürmer, Ewa K.; Schäfer, Nadine; Driessen, Arne; Orr, Adrian; Schubert, Axel

    2015-01-01

    Early detection and management of post-traumatic haemorrhage and coagulopathy have been associated with improved outcomes, but local infrastructures, logistics and clinical strategies may differ. To assess local differences in infrastructure, logistics and clinical management of trauma-associated

  9. Magnesium for aneurysmal subarachnoid haemorrhage (MASH-2): a randomised placebo-controlled trial

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Dorhout Mees, Sanne M.; Algra, Ale; Vandertop, W. Peter; van Kooten, Fop; Kuijsten, Hans A. J. M.; Boiten, Jelis; van Oostenbrugge, Robert J.; Al-Shahi Salman, Rustam; Lavados, Pablo M.; Rinkel, Gabriel J. E.; van den Bergh, Walter M.

    2012-01-01

    Background Magnesium sulphate is a neuroprotective agent that might improve outcome after aneurysmal subarachnoid haemorrhage by reducing the occurrence or improving the outcome of delayed cerebral ischaemia. We did a trial to test whether magnesium therapy improves outcome after aneurysmal

  10. Recognising haemorrhagic rash in children with fever: a survey of parents' knowledge.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aurel, M; Dubos, F; Motte, B; Pruvost, I; Leclerc, F; Martinot, A

    2011-07-01

    Early recognition and treatment of meningococcal disease improves its outcome. Haemorrhagic rash is one of the most specific signs that parents can learn to recognise. To determine the percentage of parents able to recognise a haemorrhagic rash and perform the tumbler test. 123 parents of children consulting for mild injuries were interviewed about the significance and recognition of haemorrhagic rash in febrile children. Although 88% of parents undressed their children when they were febrile, it was never to look specifically for a skin rash. Only 7% (95% CI 3% to 12%) were able to recognise a petechial rash and knew the tumbler test. Information campaigns about the significance of haemorrhagic rash and about the tumbler test are needed.

  11. Diagnostic accuracy of guys Hospital stroke score (allen score) in acute supratentorial thrombotic/haemorrhagic stroke

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zulfiqar, A.; Toori, K. U.; Khan, S. S.; Hamza, M. I. M.; Zaman, S. U.

    2006-01-01

    A consecutive series of 103 patients, 58% male with mean age of 62 year (range 40-75 years), admitted with supratentorial stroke in our teaching hospital were studied. All patients had Computer Tomography scan brain done after clinical evaluation and application of Allen stroke score. Computer Tomography Scan confirmed thrombotic stroke in 55 (53%) patients and haemorrhagic stroke in 48 (47%) patients. Out of the 55 patients with definitive thrombotic stroke on Computer Tomography Scan, Allen stroke score suggested infarction in 67%, haemorrhage in 6% and remained inconclusive in 27% of cases. In 48 patients with definitive haemorrhagic stroke on Computer Tomography Scan, Allen stroke score suggested haemorrhage in 60%, infarction in 11% and remained inconclusive in 29% of cases. The overall accuracy of Allen stroke score was 66%. (author)

  12. Obstacles to bystander cardiopulmonary resuscitation in Japan.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shibata, K; Taniguchi, T; Yoshida, M; Yamamoto, K

    2000-05-01

    bystander cardiopulmonary resuscitation (CPR) is performed infrequently in Japan. We conducted this study to identify Japanese attitudes toward the performance of bystander CPR. participants were asked about their willingness to perform CPR with varying scenarios and CPR techniques (mouth-to-mouth ventilation plus chest compression (MMV plus CC) versus chest compression alone (CC)). a total of 1302/1355 individuals completed the questionnaire, including high school students, teachers, emergency medical technicians, medical nurses, and medical students. About 2% of high school students, 3% of teachers, 26% of emergency medical technicians, 3% of medical nurses and 16% of medical students claimed they would 'definitely' perform MMV plus CC on a stranger. However, 21-72% claimed they would prefer the alternative of performing CC alone. Respondents claimed their unwillingness to perform MMV is not due to the fear of contracting a communicable disease, but the lack of confidence in their ability to perform CPR properly. in all categories of respondents, willingness to perform MMV plus CC for a stranger was disappointingly low. Better training in MMV together with teaching awareness that CC alone can be given should be instituted to maximize the number of potential providers of CPR in the community, even in communities where the incidence of HIV is very low.

  13. The importance of cardiopulmonary resuscitation quality.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abella, Benjamin S

    2013-06-01

    Cardiopulmonary resuscitation (CPR) is a fundamental component of initial care for the victim of cardiac arrest. In the past few years, increasing quantitative evidence has demonstrated that survival from cardiac arrest is dependent on the quality of delivered CPR. This review will focus on this body of evidence and on a range of practical approaches to improving CPR performance. A number of strategies to improve CPR quality have been evaluated recently, during both prehospital and in-hospital cardiac arrest care. These strategies have included the use of real-time CPR sensing and feedback, the employment of physiologic monitoring such as end-tidal CO(2) measurement and the use of metronome prompting. The use of mechanical CPR devices to avoid the challenges of manual CPR performance has also represented a topic of great current interest. Additional approaches have focused on both prearrest training (e.g. high-fidelity simulation education and CPR refreshers) and postarrest training (e.g. debriefing). A number of strategies have been evaluated to improve CPR performance. While many questions remain surrounding the relative value of each approach, it is likely that combinations of these methods may be useful in a variety of care settings to improve care for cardiac arrest victims.

  14. Cardiopulmonary resuscitation: what cost to cheat death?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, K H; Angus, D C; Abramson, N S

    1996-12-01

    To review the various outcomes from cardiopulmonary resuscitation (CPR), the factors that influence these outcomes, the costs associated with CPR, and the application of cost-analyses to CPR. Data used to prepare this article were drawn from published articles and work in progress. Articles were selected for their relevance to the subjects of CPR and cost-analysis by MEDLINE keyword search. The authors extracted all applicable data from the English literature. Cost-analysis studies of CPR programs are limited by the high variation in resources consumed and attribution of cost to these resources. Furthermore, cost projections have not been adjusted to reflect patient-dependent variation in outcome. Variation in the patient's underlying condition, presenting cardiac rhythm, time to provision of definitive CPR, and effective perfusion all influence final outcome and, consequently, influence the cost-effectiveness of CPR programs. Based on cost data from previous studies, preliminary estimates of the cost-effectiveness of CPR programs for all 6-month survivors of a large international multicenter collaborative trial are $406,605.00 per life saved (range $344,314.00 to $966,759.00), and $225,892.00 per quality-adjusted-life-year (range $191,286.00 to $537,088.00). Reported outcome from CPR has varied from reasonable rates of good recovery, including return to full employment to 100% mortality. Appropriate CPR is encouraged, but continued widespread application appears extremely expensive.

  15. Conflicting perspectives compromising discussions on cardiopulmonary resuscitation.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Groarke, J

    2010-09-01

    Healthcare professionals, patients and their relatives are expected to discuss resuscitation together. This study aims to identify the differences in the knowledge base and understanding of these parties. Questionnaires examining knowledge and opinion on resuscitation matters were completed during interviews of randomly selected doctors, nurses and the general public. 70% doctors, 24% nurses and 0% of a public group correctly estimated survival to discharge following in-hospital resuscitation attempts. Deficiencies were identified in doctor and nurse knowledge of ethics governing resuscitation decisions. Public opinion often conflicts with ethical guidelines. Public understanding of the nature of cardiopulmonary arrests and resuscitation attempts; and of the implications of a \\'Do Not Attempt Resuscitation (DNAR)\\' order is poor. Television medical dramas are the primary source of resuscitation knowledge. Deficiencies in healthcare professionals\\' knowledge of resuscitation ethics and outcomes may compromise resuscitation decisions. Educational initiatives to address deficiencies are necessary. Parties involved in discussion on resuscitation do not share the same knowledge base reducing the likelihood of meaningful discussion. Public misapprehensions surrounding resuscitation must be identified and corrected during discussion.

  16. Rescuer fatigue during simulated neonatal cardiopulmonary resuscitation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, E S; Cheung, P-Y; O'Reilly, M; Aziz, K; Schmölzer, G M

    2015-02-01

    To assess development of fatigue during chest compressions (CCs) in simulated neonatal cardiopulmonary resuscitation (CPR). Prospective randomized manikin crossover study. Thirty neonatal healthcare professionals who successfully completed the Neonatal Resuscitation Program performed CPR using (i) 3:1 compression:ventilation (C:V) ratio, (ii) continuous CC with asynchronous ventilation (CCaV) at a rate of 90 CC per min and (iii) CCaV at 120 CC per min for a duration of 10 min on a neonatal manikin. Changes in peak pressure (a surrogate of fatigue) and CC rate were continuously recorded and fatigue among groups was compared. Participants were blinded to pressure tracings and asked to rate their level of comfort and fatigue for each CPR trial. Compared with baseline, a significant decrease in peak pressure was observed after 72, 96 and 156 s in group CCaV-120, CCaV-90 and 3:1 C:V, respectively. CC depth decreased by 50% within the first 3 min during CCaV-120, 30% during CCaV-90 and 20% during 3:1 C:V. Moreover, 3:1 C:V and CCaV were similarly preferred by healthcare professionals. Similarly, 3:1 C:V and CCaV CPR were also fatiguing. We recommend that rescuers should switch after every second cycle of heart rate assessment during neonatal CPR.

  17. Bakri balloon as a uterus preserving treatment of uncontrollable haemorrhage one month post-partum

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bonnici, Mia; Markauskas, Algirdas; Munk, Torben

    2014-01-01

    In this case Bakri balloon was used to stop haemorrhage one month post-partum. The case introduces the use of this device outside usual indications. A 27-year-old woman was admitted several times with vaginal bleeding after caesarean section. She was treated pharmacologically and with curettage. ....... One month post-partum hysteroscopic removal of placental tissue was done. During this uncontrollable haemorrhage occurred and hysterectomy was considered. An attempt to save the uterus with Bakri balloon was made succesfully....

  18. Perimetric demonstration of spontaneous visual field recovery following occipital lobe haemorrhage.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lin, Siying; George, Badie Z; Wilson-Holt, Nicholas J

    2013-08-29

    A 45-year-old patient on lifelong warfarin therapy after a metal aortic valve replacement developed a homonymous visual field defect following an occipital lobe haemorrhage. The patient received only conservative management and yet described continued improvement in her visual field defect for up to 20 months following the initial cerebral insult. We present the first conclusive illustrative documentation of visual recovery in a patient with an occipital lobe haemorrhage with sequential automated perimetric assessments over an extended period of time.

  19. Risk factors for severe post partum haemorrhage in Mulago hospital, Kampala, Uganda.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wandabwa, J; Doyle, P; Todd, J; Ononge, S; Kiondo, P

    2008-02-01

    To determine the risk factors for severe postpartum haemorrhage. A case control study. Mulago hospital labour wards, Kampala, Uganda. One hundred and six mothers with severe postpartum haemorrhage were recruited between 15th November 2001 and 30th November 2002 and were compared with 500 women who had normal delivery. The predictors for postpartum haemorrhage were co-existing hypertension (O.R 9.3, 95% CI: 1.7-51.7), chronic anaemia (OR 17.3, 95% CI: 9.5-31.7), low socio economic background (OR 5.3, 95% CI: 3.0, 9.2), past history of postpartum haemorrhage (OR 3.6, 95% CI: 1.1-11.8), previous delivery by Caesarean section (OR 7.5, 95% CI: 3.5-14.3), long birth interval of more than sixty months (OR 5.2, 95% CI: 2.1-13.0), prolonged third stage (OR 49.1, 95% CI: 8.8-342.8) and non use of oxytocics (OR 4.3%, 95% CI: 1.2-15.3). Severe postpartum haemorrhage is common in our environment and is associated with a high maternal morbidity and mortality. The determinants of postpartum haemorrhage are useful in identifying mothers at risk and together with the services of a skilled birth attendant at delivery will prevent postpartum haemorrhage and reduce the maternal morbidity and mortality associated with this condition. In our study, the following risk factors were identified: pre-existing hypertension, chronic anaemia, low socio-economic background, history of postpartum haemorrhage, previous delivery by Caesarean section, longbirth interval of more than sixty months, prolonged third stage and non use of oxytocics were found to be significant.

  20. Patch: platelet transfusion in cerebral haemorrhage: study protocol for a multicentre, randomised, controlled trial

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dijkgraaf Marcel G

    2010-03-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Patients suffering from intracerebral haemorrhage have a poor prognosis, especially if they are using antiplatelet therapy. Currently, no effective acute treatment option for intracerebral haemorrhage exists. Limiting the early growth of intracerebral haemorrhage volume which continues the first hours after admission seems a promising strategy. Because intracerebral haemorrhage patients who are on antiplatelet therapy have been shown to be particularly at risk of early haematoma growth, platelet transfusion may have a beneficial effect. Methods/Design The primary objective is to investigate whether platelet transfusion improves outcome in intracerebral haemorrhage patients who are on antiplatelet treatment. The PATCH study is a prospective, randomised, multi-centre study with open treatment and blind endpoint evaluation. Patients will be randomised to receive platelet transfusion within six hours or standard care. The primary endpoint is functional health after three months. The main secondary endpoints are safety of platelet transfusion and the occurrence of haematoma growth. To detect an absolute poor outcome reduction of 20%, a total of 190 patients will be included. Discussion To our knowledge this is the first randomised controlled trial of platelet transfusion for an acute haemorrhagic disease. Trial registration The Netherlands National Trial Register (NTR1303

  1. MDCT diagnostic work-up of patients with subarachnoid haemorrhage

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Phanis, S.; Nikolopoulos, P.; Veliou, K.; Tsampoulas, C.; Efremidis, S.

    2006-01-01

    Full text: Our presentation is intended to analyze our experience over the last two years, in the expeditious work up of patients with subarachnoid haemorrhage, as well as patients whose clinical symptoms combined with radiological findings are highly suspicious of an aneurysm, acute arterial occlusion, cerebral vascular malformation, venous occlusion, dissection of the internal carotid artery or vertebral artery. 276 CT Angiographies of the brain have been performed and recorded over the last two years in our Department, on a 16 Detector Philips MX8000IDT Computed Tomograph. The patients are referred to our Department from the Emergency Department of our Hospital, as well as from Hospitals all over Northwestern Greece. The CT Angiographies are performed with examination protocols, which we will analyze thoroughly in our presentation. The primary data are then studied in workstations away from the main console of the Computed Tomograph. The study of the primary data consists in multiplanar reconstructions with the Maximum Intensity Algorithm, as well as Volume Rendering and three Dimensional Reconstruction. The stages we follow for these procedures will be presented as well as the procedures for the removal of bone structures, with the intention of the best possible angiographic results. Of the 276 patients 40 were diagnosed with an aneurysm,19 with a venous angioma, 2 with a vascular malformation, 3 with venous occlusion and 2 with dissection, a total of 66/276 with aneurysms and vascular malformations. These patients were subsequently referred to the Neurosurgery Clinic or to the Department of Interventional Radiology for further treatment. The remaining 210 patients, underwent in the following days of their hospitalization a Digital Subtraction Angiography, and in 16 (7.6%) of them a small aneurysm, 3-5 mm was diagnosed. The aneurysm was detected in a second reading of the CT Angiography in 8 patients (3.8%). The CT Angiography in patients with subarachnoid

  2. Alfven shock trains

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Malkov, M.A.; Kennel, C.F.; Wu, C.C.; Pellat, R.; Shapiro, V.D.

    1991-01-01

    The Cohen--Kulsrud--Burgers equation (CKB) is used to consider the nonlinear evolution of resistive, quasiparallel Alfven waves subject to a long-wavelength, plane-polarized, monochromatic instability. The instability saturates by nonlinear steepening, which proceeds until the periodic waveform develops an interior scale length comparable to the dissipation length; a fast or an intermediate shock then forms. The result is a periodic train of Alfven shocks of one or the other type. For propagation strictly parallel to the magnetic field, there will be two shocks per instability wavelength. Numerical integration of the time-dependent CKB equation shows that an initial, small-amplitude growing wave asymptotes to a stable, periodic stationary wave whose analytic solution specifies how the type of shock embedded in the shock train, and the amplitude and speed of the shock train, depend on the strength and phase of the instability. Waveforms observed upstream of the Earth's bowshock and cometary shocks resemble those calculated here

  3. delta-Opioid-induced pharmacologic myocardial hibernation during cardiopulmonary resuscitation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fang, Xiangshao; Tang, Wanchun; Sun, Shijie; Weil, Max Harry

    2006-12-01

    Cardiac arrest and cardiopulmonary resuscitation is an event of global myocardial ischemia and reperfusion, which is associated with severe postresuscitation myocardial dysfunction and fatal outcome. Evidence has demonstrated that mammalian hibernation is triggered by cyclic variation of a delta-opiate-like compound in endogenous serum, during which the myocardial metabolism is dramatically reduced and the myocardium tolerates the stress of ischemia and reperfusion without overt ischemic and reperfusion injury. Previous investigations also proved that the delta-opioid agonist elicited the cardioprotection in a model of regional ischemic intact heart or myocyte. Accordingly, we were prompted to search for an alternative intervention of pharmacologically induced myocardial hibernation that would result in rapid reductions of myocardial metabolism and therefore minimize the myocardial ischemic and reperfusion injury during cardiac arrest and cardiopulmonary resuscitation. Prospective, controlled laboratory study. University-affiliated research laboratory. In the series of studies performed in the established rat and pig model of cardiac arrest and cardiopulmonary resuscitation, the delta-opioid receptor agonist, pentazocine, was administered during ventricular fibrillation. : The myocardial metabolism reflected by the concentration of lactate, or myocardial tissue PCO2 and PO2, is dramatically reduced during cardiac arrest and cardiopulmonary resuscitation. These are associated with less severe postresuscitation myocardial dysfunction and longer duration of postresuscitation survival. delta-Opioid-induced pharmacologic myocardial hibernation is an option to minimize the myocardial ischemia and reperfusion injury during cardiac arrest and cardiopulmonary resuscitation.

  4. Dengue fever and dengue haemorrhagic fever in adolescents and adults.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tantawichien, Terapong

    2012-05-01

    Dengue fever (DF) is endemic in tropical and subtropical zones and the prevalence is increasing across South-east Asia, Africa, the Western Pacific and the Americas. In recent years, the spread of unplanned urbanisation, with associated substandard housing, overcrowding and deterioration in water, sewage and waste management systems, has created ideal conditions for increased transmission of the dengue virus in tropical urban centres. While dengue infection has traditionally been considered a paediatric disease, the age distribution of dengue has been rising and more cases have been observed in adolescents and adults. Furthermore, the development of tourism in the tropics has led to an increase in the number of tourists who become infected, most of whom are adults. Symptoms and risk factors for dengue haemorrhagic fever (DHF) and severe dengue differ between children and adults, with co-morbidities and incidence in more elderly patients associated with greater risk of mortality. Treatment options for DF and DHF in adults, as for children, centre round fluid replacement (either orally or intravenously, depending on severity) and antipyretics. Further data are needed on the optimal treatment of adult patients.

  5. Imaging cerebral haemorrhage with magnetic induction tomography: numerical modelling.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zolgharni, M; Ledger, P D; Armitage, D W; Holder, D S; Griffiths, H

    2009-06-01

    Magnetic induction tomography (MIT) is a new electromagnetic imaging modality which has the potential to image changes in the electrical conductivity of the brain due to different pathologies. In this study the feasibility of detecting haemorrhagic cerebral stroke with a 16-channel MIT system operating at 10 MHz was investigated. The finite-element method combined with a realistic, multi-layer, head model comprising 12 different tissues, was used for the simulations in the commercial FE package, Comsol Multiphysics. The eddy-current problem was solved and the MIT signals computed for strokes of different volumes occurring at different locations in the brain. The results revealed that a large, peripheral stroke (volume 49 cm(3)) produced phase changes that would be detectable with our currently achievable instrumentation phase noise level (17 m degrees ) in 70 (27%) of the 256 exciter/sensor channel combinations. However, reconstructed images showed that a lower noise level than this, of 1 m degrees , was necessary to obtain good visualization of the strokes. The simulated MIT measurements were compared with those from an independent transmission-line-matrix model in order to give confidence in the results.

  6. Endovascular management of delayed post-pancreatectomy haemorrhage

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pottier, Edwige [Beaujon Hospital, University Hospitals Paris Nord Val de Seine, Department of Radiology, Clichy, Hauts-de-Seine (France); Ronot, Maxime; Vilgrain, Valerie [Beaujon Hospital, University Hospitals Paris Nord Val de Seine, Department of Radiology, Clichy, Hauts-de-Seine (France); University Paris Diderot, Paris (France); INSERM U1149, centre de recherche biomedicale Bichat-Beaujon, CRB3, Paris (France); Gaujoux, Sebastien; Cesaretti, Manuela; Barbier, Louise [APHP, University Hospitals Paris Nord Val de Seine, Beaujon, Department of Surgery, Clichy, Hauts-de-Seine (France); Sauvanet, Alain [University Paris Diderot, Paris (France); APHP, University Hospitals Paris Nord Val de Seine, Beaujon, Department of Surgery, Clichy, Hauts-de-Seine (France)

    2016-10-15

    To assess the patient outcome after endovascular treatment of delayed post-pancreatectomy haemorrhage (PPH) as first-line treatment. Between January 2005 and November 2013, all consecutive patients referred for endovascular treatment of PPH were included. Active bleeding, pseudoaneurysms, collections and the involved artery were recorded on pretreatment CT. Endovascular procedures were classified as technical success (source of bleeding identified on angiogram and treated), technical failure (source of bleeding identified but incompletely treated) and abstention (no abnormality identified, no treatment performed). Factors associated with rebleeding were analysed. Sixty-nine patients (53 men) were included (mean 59 years old (32-75)). Pretreatment CT showed 27 (39 %) active bleeding. In 22 (32 %) cases, no involved artery was identified. Technical success, failure and abstention were observed in 48 (70 %), 9 (13 %) and 12 patients (17 %), respectively. Thirty patients (43 %) experienced rebleeding. Rebleeding rates were 29 %, 58 % and 100 % in case of success, abstention and failure (p < 0.001). Treatment failure/abstention was the only factor associated with rebleeding. Overall, 74 % of the patients were successfully treated by endovascular procedure(s) alone. After a first endovascular procedure for PPH, the rebleeding rate is high and depends upon the success of the procedure. Most patients are successfully treated by endovascular approach(es) alone. (orig.)

  7. Endovascular management of delayed post-pancreatectomy haemorrhage

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pottier, Edwige; Ronot, Maxime; Vilgrain, Valerie; Gaujoux, Sebastien; Cesaretti, Manuela; Barbier, Louise; Sauvanet, Alain

    2016-01-01

    To assess the patient outcome after endovascular treatment of delayed post-pancreatectomy haemorrhage (PPH) as first-line treatment. Between January 2005 and November 2013, all consecutive patients referred for endovascular treatment of PPH were included. Active bleeding, pseudoaneurysms, collections and the involved artery were recorded on pretreatment CT. Endovascular procedures were classified as technical success (source of bleeding identified on angiogram and treated), technical failure (source of bleeding identified but incompletely treated) and abstention (no abnormality identified, no treatment performed). Factors associated with rebleeding were analysed. Sixty-nine patients (53 men) were included (mean 59 years old (32-75)). Pretreatment CT showed 27 (39 %) active bleeding. In 22 (32 %) cases, no involved artery was identified. Technical success, failure and abstention were observed in 48 (70 %), 9 (13 %) and 12 patients (17 %), respectively. Thirty patients (43 %) experienced rebleeding. Rebleeding rates were 29 %, 58 % and 100 % in case of success, abstention and failure (p < 0.001). Treatment failure/abstention was the only factor associated with rebleeding. Overall, 74 % of the patients were successfully treated by endovascular procedure(s) alone. After a first endovascular procedure for PPH, the rebleeding rate is high and depends upon the success of the procedure. Most patients are successfully treated by endovascular approach(es) alone. (orig.)

  8. Brainstem Auditory Evoked Potentials in Patients with Subarachnoid Haemorrhage

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mikhail Matveev

    2009-10-01

    Full Text Available Objective. The aim of the present study is to typify BAEPs configurations of patients with different location of lesions caused by subarachnoid haemorrhage (SAH and the ensuing complications, in view of assessing the auditory-brainstem system disturbance.Methods. The typization was performed by comparing BAEPs with standard patterns from two sets of types of BAEPs by ipsilateral and binaural stimulation and by cross-stimulation.Results. 94 BAEPs were used for collection of normal referential values: for the absolute latencies and the absolute amplitudes of waves I, II, III, IV and V; for inter-peak latencies I-III, II-III, III-V, I-V and II-V; for amplitude ratios I/V and III/V. 146 BAEPs of patients with mild SAH and 55 from patients with severe SAH, were typified. In 5 types of BAEPs out of a total of 11, the percentage of the potentials in patients with mild SAH and severe SAH differed significantly (p<0.01.Conclusions. The use of sets of types of BAEPs by ipsilateral, binaural and cross-stimulation correctly classifies the potentials in patients with mild and severe SAH.

  9. Quality of care in the management of major obstetric haemorrhage.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Johnson, S N

    2012-02-01

    Substandard care is reported to occur in a large number of cases of major obstetric haemorrhage (MOH). A prospective audit was carried out by a multidisciplinary team at our hospital over a one year period to assess the quality of care (QOC) delivered to women experiencing MOH. MOH was defined according to criteria outlined in the Scottish Audit of Maternal Morbidity (SAMM). 31 cases were identified yielding an incidence of 3.5\\/1000 deliveries. The predominant causes were uterine atony 11 (35.4%), retained products of conception 6 (19.3%) and placenta praevia\\/accreta 6 (19.3%). Excellent initial resuscitation and monitoring was noted with a high level of senior staff input. Indicators of QOC compared favourably with the SAMM. Areas for improvement were identified. This pilot study demonstrates the feasibility of detailed prospective data collection in MOH in a busy Dublin obstetric unit with a view to developing a national audit. Standardization of definitions allows for international comparisons.

  10. Bevacizumab: an option for refractory epistaxis in hereditary haemorrhagic telangiectasia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Amann, Arno; Steiner, Normann; Gunsilius, Eberhard

    2015-08-01

    Recurrent epistaxis in hereditary haemorrhagic telangiectasia (HHT) patients significantly decreases their quality of life. Treatment in therapy refractory patients is limited although various options have been tested so far. Herein, one patient is described that was treated for HHT for over 20 years with only intermediate benefits. As epistaxis duration and frequency increased continuously, bevacizumab 5 mg/kg was administered every 2 weeks. During the time of treatment (six doses) and up to 3 month afterwards clinical symptoms, blood pressure, cardiac output, pulmonary arterial hypertension (PAH), bleeding duration and frequency were assessed as criteria for treatment benefit. Duration and frequency of epistaxis decreased immediately after the first application resulting in reduced need of blood transfusions. After completion of six cycles, a further decrease in frequency and duration of bleeding was noted. Cardiac output and PAH decreased or remained stable, respectively, during time and after treatment. No increase in blood pressure could be found but a significant increase in heart rate was experienced after completion of all six applications. Unfortunately, the patient died due to a cerebral abscess. Bevacizumab led to an improvement of HHT related epistaxis, refractory to other treatments.

  11. ELECTROCARDIOGRAPHIC CHANGES OBSERVED IN HAEMORRHAGIC AND ISCHAEMIC CEREBROVASCULAR DISEASES

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Channappa

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available INTRODUCTION Cardiac abnormalities are relatively common after acute neurologic injury. Disturbances can vary in severity from transient ECG abnormalities to profound myocardial injury and dysfunction. CNS is involved in the generation of cardiac arrhythmias and dysfunction even in an otherwise normal myocardium. AIM To find out proportion of ECG changes observed in ischaemic and haemorrhagic stroke. MATERIALS AND METHODS The Electrocardiographs of 100 patients with acute stroke were studied to find out the types of ECG abnormalities among different types of stroke. RESULTS In our study, the most common ECG abnormalities associated with stroke were prolonged QTc interval, ST-T segment abnormalities, prominent U wave and arrhythmias. Trop-I was positive in 12.8% patients with ECG changes. Statistical significance was found in association with Trop-I positivity and ST depression. CONCLUSION Usually patients with heart disease present with arrhythmias and Ischaemic like ECG changes. But these changes are also seen most often in the patients with presenting with stroke who didn’t have any past history of heart disease. This shows that arrhythmias and ischaemic ECG abnormalities are primarily evolved due to central nervous system disorders.

  12. Acute subarachnoid haemorrhage: Is a negative CT angiogram enough?

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    MacKinnon, A.D.; Clifton, A.G.; Rich, P.M.

    2013-01-01

    Aim: To determine the negative predictive value of 16 channel multisection computed tomography angiography (CTA) for detecting aneurysms in spontaneous subarachnoid haemorrhage (SAH), using digital subtraction angiography (DSA) as the reference standard. Materials and methods: The prospectively collected cerebral angiogram database of Department of Neuroradiology, Atkinson Morley Regional Neuroscience Centre was used to identify 200 consecutive patients who had undergone DSA for SAH. Of these, 176 had undergone CTA prior to DSA. Clinical details and radiology reports were correlated and images of positive investigations reviewed. Results: DSA showed one or more cerebral aneurysms in 105 (60%) patients. These were correctly reported on CTA in 100. CTA was reported negative for aneurysms in 74 patients. Of these five were false negative and had aneurysms detected on DSA. In the CTA/DSA negative group, 11 (16%) patients had classical perimesencephalic clinical syndrome and blood distribution. There were two false positives at CTA. For ruptured cerebral aneurysms, CTA had 95.2% sensitivity, 97.2% specificity, 98.1% positive predictive value, and 93.2% negative predictive value. Conclusion: The sensitivity and negative predictive value of CTA for ruptured aneurysms remains imperfect. Continued use of DSA is recommended in most patients with a negative CTA after acute SAH. Confirmation of a negative CTA result with DSA may not be routinely required in patients with perimesencephalic syndrome

  13. Obstructive sleep apnea, inflammation, and cardiopulmonary disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arter, Jim L; Chi, David S; M, Girish; Fitzgerald, S Matthew; Guha, Bhuvana; Krishnaswamy, Guha

    2004-09-01

    Obstructive sleep apnea (OSA) occurs commonly in the U.S. population and is seen in both obese as well as non-obese individuals. OSA is a disease characterized by periodic upper airway collapse during sleep, which then results in either apnea, hypopnea, or both. The disorder leads to a variety of medical complications. Neuropsychiatric complications include daytime somnolence, cognitive dysfunction, and depression. Increased incidence of motor vehicle accidents has been documented in these patients and probably reflects disordered reflex mechanisms or excessive somnolence. More importantly, vascular disorders such as hypertension, stroke, congestive cardiac failure, arrhythmias, and atherosclerosis occur frequently in these patients. The lungs may be affected by pulmonary hypertension and worsening of asthma. Recent data from several laboratories demonstrate that obstructive sleep apnea is characterized by an inflammatory response. Cytokines are elaborated during the hypoxemic episodes leading to inflammatory responses as marked clinically by elevated C-reactive protein (CRP). As elevated CRP levels are considered markers of the acute phase response and characterize progression of vascular injury in coronary artery disease, it is likely that obstructive sleep apnea could lead to worsening of vasculopathy. Moreover, as inflammatory mechanisms regulate bronchial asthma, it is also likely that cytokines and superoxide radicals generated during hypoxemic episodes could exacerbate reactive airway disease. Patients with Cough, Obstructive sleep apnea, Rhinosinusitis, and Esophageal reflux clustered together can be categorized by the acronym, "CORE", syndrome. The purpose of this manuscript is to review the inflammatory responses that occur in patients with obstructive sleep apnea and relate them to the occurrence of cardiopulmonary disease.

  14. Acute posthypoxic myoclonus after cardiopulmonary resuscitation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bouwes Aline

    2012-08-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Acute posthypoxic myoclonus (PHM can occur in patients admitted after cardiopulmonary resuscitation (CPR and is considered to have a poor prognosis. The origin can be cortical and/or subcortical and this might be an important determinant for treatment options and prognosis. The aim of the study was to investigate whether acute PHM originates from cortical or subcortical structures, using somatosensory evoked potential (SEP and electroencephalogram (EEG. Methods Patients with acute PHM (focal myoclonus or status myoclonus within 72 hours after CPR were retrospectively selected from a multicenter cohort study. All patients were treated with hypothermia. Criteria for cortical origin of the myoclonus were: giant SEP potentials; or epileptic activity, status epilepticus, or generalized periodic discharges on the EEG (no back-averaging was used. Good outcome was defined as good recovery or moderate disability after 6 months. Results Acute PHM was reported in 79/391 patients (20%. SEPs were available in 51/79 patients and in 27 of them (53% N20 potentials were present. Giant potentials were seen in 3 patients. EEGs were available in 36/79 patients with 23/36 (64% patients fulfilling criteria for a cortical origin. Nine patients (12% had a good outcome. A broad variety of drugs was used for treatment. Conclusions The results of this study show that acute PHM originates from subcortical, as well as cortical structures. Outcome of patients admitted after CPR who develop acute PHM in this cohort was better than previously reported in literature. The broad variety of drugs used for treatment shows the existing uncertainty about optimal treatment.

  15. Cardiopulmonary Resuscitation: Unusual Techniques for Unusual Situations

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vidhu Bhatnagar

    2018-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: The cardiopulmonary resuscitation (CPR in prone position has been dealt with in 2010 American Heart Association (AHA guidelines but have not been reviewed in 2015 guidelines. The guidelines for patients presenting with cardiac arrest under general anesthesia in lateral decubitus position and regarding resuscitation in confined spaces like airplanes are also not available in AHA guidelines. This article is an attempt to highlight the techniques adopted for resuscitation in these unusual situations. Aims: This study aims to find out the methodology and efficacy in nonconventional CPR approaches such as CPR in prone, CPR in lateral position, and CPR in confined spaces. Methods: We conducted a literature search using MeSH search strings such as CPR + Prone position, CPR + lateral Position, and CPR + confined spaces. Results: No randomized controlled trials are available. The literature search gives a handful of case reports, some simulation- and manikin-based studies but none can qualify for class I evidence. The successful outcome of CPR performed in prone position has shown compressions delivered on the thoracic spine with the same rate and force as they were delivered during supine position. A hard surface is required under the patient to provide uniform force and sternal counter pressure. Two rescuer technique for providing successful chest compression in lateral position has been documented in the few case reports published. Over the head CPR and straddle (STR, CPR has been utilized for CPR in confined spaces. Ventilation in operating rooms was taken care by an advanced airway in situ. Conclusion: A large number of studies of high quality are required to be conducted to determine the efficacy of CPR in such positions.

  16. Classification of non-aneurysmal subarachnoid haemorrhage: CT correlation to the clinical outcome

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nayak, S.; Kunz, A.B.; Kieslinger, K.; Ladurner, G.; Killer, M.

    2010-01-01

    Aim: To propose a new computed tomography (CT)-based classification system for non-aneurysmal subarachnoid haemorrhage (SAH), which predicts patients' discharge clinical outcome and helps to prioritize appropriate patient management. Methods and materials: A 5-year, retrospective, two-centre study was carried out involving 1486 patients presenting with SAH. One hundred and ninety patients with non-aneurysmal SAH were included in the study. Initial cranial CT findings at admission were correlated with the patients' discharge outcomes measured using the Modified Rankin Scale (MRS). A CT-based classification system (type 1-4) was devised based on the topography of the initial haemorrhage pattern. Results: Seventy-five percent of the patients had type 1 haemorrhage and all these patients had a good clinical outcome with a discharge MRS of ≤1. Eight percent of the patients presented with type 2 haemorrhage, 62% of which were discharged with MRS of ≤1 and 12% of patients had MRS 3 or 4. Type 3 haemorrhage was found in 10%, of which 16% had good clinical outcome, but 53% had moderate to severe disability (MRS 3 and 4) and 5% were discharged with severe disability (MRS 5). Six percent of patients presented with type 4 haemorrhage of which 42% of the patients had moderate to severe disability (MRS 3 and 4), 42% had severe disability and one-sixth of the patients died. Highly significant differences were found between type 1(1a and 1b) and type 2 (p = 0.003); type 2 and type 3 (p = 0.002); type 3 and type 4 (p = 0.001). Conclusion: Haemorrhages of the type 1 category are usually benign and do not warrant an extensive battery of clinical and radiological investigations. Type 2 haemorrhages have a varying prognosis and need to be investigated and managed along similar lines as that of an aneurysmal haemorrhage with emphasis towards radiological investigation. Type 3 and type 4 haemorrhages need to be extensively investigated to find an underlying cause.

  17. System Shock: The Archetype of Operational Shock

    Science.gov (United States)

    2017-05-25

    the battle space. They can also facilitate a much greater understanding of the variables involved in each party’s decision - making process. However...system shock nests within current US Army Unified Land Operations doctrine. In order to test the utility of system shock theory to Gray Zone...23 Neil E. Harrison, “Thinking about the World We Make ” in Chaos Theory in the Social Sciences: Foundations and Applications

  18. Postpartum Pyomyoma, a Rare Complication of Sepsis Associated with Chorioamnionitis and Massive Postpartum Haemorrhage Treated with an Intrauterine Balloon

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mandeep Kaler

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available We report the successful treatment of a postpartum pyomyoma, a rare but serious complication of uterine leiomyomata in a 28-year-old primigravida. The patient was treated for an Escherichia Coli (E. Coli urinary tract infection (UTI at 16 weeks of gestation. She had asymptomatic short cervical length on ultrasound scan at 20 weeks that was managed conservatively due to the presence of further UTI and received antibiotics. She was known to have a left sided intramural leiomyoma. She presented with abdominal pain and vaginal bleeding at 23+1 weeks of gestation and the next day she had spontaneous vaginal delivery and collapsed with E. Coli septic shock, massive postpartum haemorrhage, and disseminated intravascular coagulation and was successfully treated with oxytocic drugs, a Rusch intrauterine balloon, and intravenous antibiotics. Eleven days postnatally she re-presented with systemic sepsis and was treated for retained products of conception. Sepsis persisted and investigations showed a postpartum pyomyoma that was initially managed with intravenous antibiotics to avoid surgery. Ultimately she required laparotomy, drainage of pyomyoma, and myomectomy. Postoperative recovery was good and the patient had a successful pregnancy two years later.

  19. 21 CFR 870.4360 - Nonroller-type cardiopulmonary bypass blood pump.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Nonroller-type cardiopulmonary bypass blood pump... Nonroller-type cardiopulmonary bypass blood pump. (a) Identification. A nonroller-type cardiopulmonary bypass blood pump is a device that uses a method other than revolving rollers to pump the blood through...

  20. 21 CFR 870.4370 - Roller-type cardiopulmonary bypass blood pump.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Roller-type cardiopulmonary bypass blood pump. 870... Roller-type cardiopulmonary bypass blood pump. (a) Identification. A roller-type cardiopulmonary bypass blood pump is a device that uses a revolving roller mechanism to pump the blood through the...

  1. 21 CFR 870.4260 - Cardiopulmonary bypass arterial line blood filter.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Cardiopulmonary bypass arterial line blood filter... Cardiopulmonary bypass arterial line blood filter. (a) Identification. A cardiopulmonary bypass arterial line blood filter is a device used as part of a gas exchange (oxygenator) system to filter nonbiologic...

  2. 21 CFR 870.4410 - Cardiopulmonary bypass in-line blood gas sensor.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Cardiopulmonary bypass in-line blood gas sensor... Cardiopulmonary bypass in-line blood gas sensor. (a) Identification. A cardiopulmonary bypass in-line blood gas sensor is a transducer that measures the level of gases in the blood. (b) Classification. Class II...

  3. 21 CFR 870.4210 - Cardiopulmonary bypass vascular catheter, cannula, or tubing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ..., or tubing. 870.4210 Section 870.4210 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF... Devices § 870.4210 Cardiopulmonary bypass vascular catheter, cannula, or tubing. (a) Identification. A cardiopulmonary bypass vascular catheter, cannula, or tubing is a device used in cardiopulmonary surgery to...

  4. Intracranial haemorrhage: an incidental finding at magnetic resonance imaging in a cohort of late preterm and term infants

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sirgiovanni, Ida; Groppo, Michela; Bassi, Laura; Passera, Sofia; Schiavolin, Paola; Fumagalli, Monica; Mosca, Fabio [Universita degli Studi di Milano, Neonatal Intensive Care Unit, Department of Clinical Science and Community Health, Fondazione IRCCS Ca' Granda Ospedale Maggiore Policlinico, Milan (Italy); Avignone, Sabrina; Cinnante, Claudia; Triulzi, Fabio [Universita degli Studi di Milano, Department of Neuroradiology, Fondazione IRCCS Ca' Granda Ospedale Maggiore Policlinico, Milan (Italy); Lista, Gianluca [V. Buzzi Children' s Hospital, ICP, Neonatal Intensive Care Unit, Milan (Italy)

    2014-03-15

    Intracranial haemorrhage (ICH) in term newborns has been increasingly recognised but the occurrence in late preterm infants and the clinical presentation are still unclear. To investigate the appearance of intracranial haemorrhage at MRI in a cohort of infants born at 34 weeks' gestation or more and to correlate MRI findings with neonatal symptoms. We retrospectively reviewed neonatal brain MRI scans performed during a 3-year period. We included neonates ≥34 weeks' gestation with intracranial haemorrhage and compared findings with those in babies without intracranial haemorrhage. Babies were classified into three groups according to haemorrhage location: (1) infratentorial, (2) infra- and supratentorial, (3) infra- and supratentorial + parenchymal involvement. Intracranial haemorrhage was observed in 36/240 babies (15%). All of these 36 had subdural haemorrhage. Sixteen babies were included in group 1; 16 in group 2; 4 in group 3. All infants in groups 1 and 2 were asymptomatic except one who was affected by intraventricular haemorrhage grade 3. Among the infants in group 3, who had intracranial haemorrhage with parenchymal involvement, three of the four (75%) presented with acute neurological symptoms. Uncomplicated spontaneous vaginal delivery was reported in 20/36 neonates (56%), vacuum extraction in 4 (11%) and caesarean section in 12 (33%). Babies with intracranial haemorrhage had significantly higher gestational age (38 ± 2 weeks vs. 37 ± 2 weeks) and birth weight (3,097 ± 485 g vs. 2,803 ± 741 g) compared to babies without intracranial haemorrhage and were more likely to be delivered vaginally than by caesarian section. Mild intracranial haemorrhage (groups 1 and 2) is relatively common in late preterm and term infants, although it mostly represents an incidental finding in clinically asymptomatic babies; early neurological symptoms appear to be related to parenchymal involvement. (orig.)

  5. Intracranial haemorrhage: an incidental finding at magnetic resonance imaging in a cohort of late preterm and term infants

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sirgiovanni, Ida; Groppo, Michela; Bassi, Laura; Passera, Sofia; Schiavolin, Paola; Fumagalli, Monica; Mosca, Fabio; Avignone, Sabrina; Cinnante, Claudia; Triulzi, Fabio; Lista, Gianluca

    2014-01-01

    Intracranial haemorrhage (ICH) in term newborns has been increasingly recognised but the occurrence in late preterm infants and the clinical presentation are still unclear. To investigate the appearance of intracranial haemorrhage at MRI in a cohort of infants born at 34 weeks' gestation or more and to correlate MRI findings with neonatal symptoms. We retrospectively reviewed neonatal brain MRI scans performed during a 3-year period. We included neonates ≥34 weeks' gestation with intracranial haemorrhage and compared findings with those in babies without intracranial haemorrhage. Babies were classified into three groups according to haemorrhage location: (1) infratentorial, (2) infra- and supratentorial, (3) infra- and supratentorial + parenchymal involvement. Intracranial haemorrhage was observed in 36/240 babies (15%). All of these 36 had subdural haemorrhage. Sixteen babies were included in group 1; 16 in group 2; 4 in group 3. All infants in groups 1 and 2 were asymptomatic except one who was affected by intraventricular haemorrhage grade 3. Among the infants in group 3, who had intracranial haemorrhage with parenchymal involvement, three of the four (75%) presented with acute neurological symptoms. Uncomplicated spontaneous vaginal delivery was reported in 20/36 neonates (56%), vacuum extraction in 4 (11%) and caesarean section in 12 (33%). Babies with intracranial haemorrhage had significantly higher gestational age (38 ± 2 weeks vs. 37 ± 2 weeks) and birth weight (3,097 ± 485 g vs. 2,803 ± 741 g) compared to babies without intracranial haemorrhage and were more likely to be delivered vaginally than by caesarian section. Mild intracranial haemorrhage (groups 1 and 2) is relatively common in late preterm and term infants, although it mostly represents an incidental finding in clinically asymptomatic babies; early neurological symptoms appear to be related to parenchymal involvement. (orig.)

  6. Frequency of causes of primary postpartum haemorrhage in a tertiary care hospital

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Munir, S.I.

    2015-01-01

    Objective: To study the frequency of causes of primary postpartum hemorrhage (PPH) in women managed in a tertiary care Hospital. material and Methods: The study was conducted in the department of Obstetrics and Gynecology, Unit - 1, Lady Willingdon Hospital King Edward Medical University, Lahore from July 2013 to December 2013. All the women having postpartum haemorrhage after vaginal delivery in the labour room or referred with primary postpartum haemorrhage were included in the study and were evaluated to see the frequency of postpartum haemorrhage as well as the causes of PPH in women being treated in a tertiary care unit. Results: During the study period 1344 women delivered in unit I and 250 patients developed postpartum haemorrhage giving frequency of primary postpartum haemorrhage 18.60%. Majority of the women 29.6% (n = 74) were between 26 - 30 years of age, mean and SD was 28.43 ± 4.76 years. The gestation of 55.2% (n = 138) patients was between 37 - 40 weeks. The frequency of postpartum haemorrhage in booked women during antenatal period was recorded as 25.2% (n = 63) while 74.8% (n = 187) were not booked in any health facility. Among patients who developed PPH, uterine atony was the most common cause 57.6% (n = 144), followed by genital tract teats which was 29.2% (n = 73). The rest of the causes of PPH were retained placenta in 10% (n = 25), uterine rupture in 3.6% (n = 9) and uterine inversion in 1.6% (n = 4). Conclusions: Postpartum haemorrhage is still a leading but preventable cause of maternal morbidity and mortality in our country due to under utilization of health facilities, the major cause is uterine atony followed by perineal tears. (author)

  7. Haemorrhagic snake venom metalloproteases and human ADAMs cleave LRP5/6, which disrupts cell-cell adhesions in vitro and induces haemorrhage in vivo.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Seo, Tadahiko; Sakon, Taketo; Nakazawa, Shiori; Nishioka, Asuka; Watanabe, Kohei; Matsumoto, Kaori; Akasaka, Mari; Shioi, Narumi; Sawada, Hitoshi; Araki, Satohiko

    2017-06-01

    Snake venom metalloproteases (SVMPs) are members of the a disintegrin and metalloprotease (ADAM) family of proteins, as they possess similar domains. SVMPs are known to elicit snake venom-induced haemorrhage; however, the target proteins and cleavage sites are not known. In this work, we identified a target protein of vascular apoptosis-inducing protein 1 (VAP1), an SVMP, relevant to its ability to induce haemorrhage. VAP1 disrupted cell-cell adhesions by relocating VE-cadherin and γ-catenin from the cell-cell junction to the cytosol, without inducing proteolysis of VE-cadherin. The Wnt receptors low-density lipoprotein receptor-related proteins 5 and 6 (LRP5/6) are known to promote catenin relocation, and are rendered constitutively active in Wnt signalling by truncation. Thus, we examined whether VAP1 cleaves LRP5/6 to induce catenin relocation. Indeed, we found that VAP1 cleaved the extracellular region of LRP6 and LRP5. This cleavage removes four inhibitory β-propeller structures, resulting in activation of LRP5/6. Recombinant human ADAM8 and ADAM12 also cleaved LRP6 at the same site. An antibody against a peptide including the LRP6-cleavage site inhibited VAP1-induced VE-cadherin relocation and disruption of cell-cell adhesions in cultured cells, and blocked haemorrhage in mice in vivo. Intriguingly, animals resistant to the effects of haemorrhagic snake venom express variants of LRP5/6 that lack the VAP1-cleavage site, or low-density lipoprotein receptor domain class A domains involved in formation of the constitutively active form. The results validate LRP5/6 as physiological targets of ADAMs. Furthermore, they indicate that SVMP-induced cleavage of LRP5/6 causes disruption of cell-cell adhesion and haemorrhage, potentially opening new avenues for the treatment of snake bites. © 2017 Federation of European Biochemical Societies.

  8. Effectiveness of rectal misoprostol in cessation of Post Partum Haemorrhage

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nasreen, S.; Baqai, S.; Iftikhar, S.

    2018-01-01

    Objective: To determine the efficacy of rectal misoprostol in management of Post Partum Haemorrhage in third stage of labour. Study Design: Interventional study. Place and Duration of Study: Gynaecology and obstetrics department at PNS Shifa Hospital Karachi, from Sep 2012 to Mar 2013. Material and Methods: All singleton and multiple pregnancies of gestation 37-42 weeks, who presented in labour room to deliver and had prolonged second stage of labour (n=112) were enrolled in the study. Patients, who were having coagulopathy, abruption, placenta previa, and allergy to prostaglandins were excluded from the study. Third stage was managed actively according to hospital standard routine. Hemoglobin was measured at the time of admission and repeated after delivery in patients having PPH. Blood was estimated by weighing all gauzes and packs. If blood loss more than 500ml one hour after delivery and all traumatic causes and retained placenta were excluded, 600 mu g (3 tablets) of misoprostol were given per rectally, which were inserted up to a digit depth. After one hour total amount of blood loss was calculated. The data were then entered in a proforma and analyzed. Results: Majority (44.6%) of the women were 26-33 years of age, 8.9% had PPH with fall in hemoglobin by 1.5-2 gms/dl. Ninety percent of the patients responded to rectal misoprostol. Conclusion: Active management of third stage of labour has a definite role in the preventive of PPH. Rectal administration of misoprostol should be considered for control of PPH in low resource settings like ours as it was found effective in the study. (author)

  9. Acute intracerebral haemorrhage: grounds for optimism in management.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Delcourt, Candice; Anderson, Craig

    2012-12-01

    Spontaneous intracerebral haemorrhage (ICH) is one of the most devastating types of stroke, which has considerable disease burden in "non-white" ethnic groups where the population-attributable risks of elevated blood pressure are very high. Since the treatment of ICH remains largely supportive and expectant, nihilism and the early withdrawal of active therapy influence management decisions in clinical practice. However, approaches to management are now better defined on the basis of evidence that both survival and speed (and degree) of recovery are critically dependent on the location, size, and degree of expansion and extension into the intraventricular system of the haematoma of the ICH. Although no medical treatment has been shown to improve outcome in ICH, several promising avenues have emerged that include haemostatic therapy and intensive control of elevated blood pressure. Conversely, there is continued controversy over the role of evacuation of the haematoma of ICH via open craniotomy. Despite being an established practice for several decades, and having undergone evaluation in multiple randomised trials, there is uncertainty over which patients have the most to gain from an intervention with clear procedural risk. Minimally invasive surgery via local anaesthetic applied drill-puncture of the cranium and infusion of a thrombolytic agent is an attractive option for patients requiring critical management of the haematoma, not just in low resource settings but arguably also in specialist centres of western countries. With several ongoing clinical trials nearing completion, these treatments could enter routine practice within the next few years, further justifying the urgency of "time is brain" and that active management within well-organized, comprehensive acute stroke care units includes patients with ICH. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  10. Lifetime risks for aneurysmal subarachnoid haemorrhage: multivariable risk stratification.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vlak, Monique H M; Rinkel, Gabriel J E; Greebe, Paut; Greving, Jacoba P; Algra, Ale

    2013-06-01

    The overall incidence of aneurysmal subarachnoid haemorrhage (aSAH) in western populations is around 9 per 100 000 person-years, which confers to a lifetime risk of around half per cent. Risk factors for aSAH are usually expressed as relative risks and suggest that absolute risks vary considerably according to risk factor profiles, but such estimates are lacking. We aimed to estimate incidence and lifetime risks of aSAH according to risk factor profiles. We used data from 250 patients admitted with aSAH and 574 sex-matched and age-matched controls, who were randomly retrieved from general practitioners files. We determined independent prognostic factors with multivariable logistic regression analyses and assessed discriminatory performance using the area under the receiver operating characteristic curve. Based on the prognostic model we predicted incidences and lifetime risks of aSAH for different risk factor profiles. The four strongest independent predictors for aSAH, namely current smoking (OR 6.0; 95% CI 4.1 to 8.6), a positive family history for aSAH (4.0; 95% CI 2.3 to 7.0), hypertension (2.4; 95% CI 1.5 to 3.8) and hypercholesterolaemia (0.2; 95% CI 0.1 to 0.4), were used in the final prediction model. This model had an area under the receiver operating characteristic curve of 0.73 (95% CI 0.69 to 0.76). Depending on sex, age and the four predictors, the incidence of aSAH ranged from 0.4/100 000 to 298/100 000 person-years and lifetime risk between 0.02% and 7.2%. The incidence and lifetime risk of aSAH in the general population varies widely according to risk factor profiles. Whether persons with high risks benefit from screening should be assessed in cost-effectiveness studies.

  11. Chronic hypopituitarism is uncommon in survivors of aneurysmal subarachnoid haemorrhage.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hannon, M J; Behan, L A; O'Brien, M M; Tormey, W; Javadpour, M; Sherlock, M; Thompson, C J

    2015-01-01

    The incidence of hypopituitarism after aneurysmal subarachnoid haemorrhage (SAH) is unclear from the conflicting reports in the literature. As routine neuroendocrine screening for hypopituitarism for all patients would be costly and logistically difficult, there is a need for precise data on the frequency of hypopituitarism and on factors which might predict the later development of pituitary dysfunction. We aimed to: (i) Establish the incidence of long-term hypopituitarism in patients with aneurysmal SAH. (ii) Determine whether data from patients' acute admission with SAH could predict the occurrence of long-term hypopituitarism. One hundred patients were studied prospectively from the time of presentation with acute SAH. Plasma cortisol, plasma sodium and a variety of clinical and haemodynamic parameters were sequentially measured for the first 12 days of their acute admission. Forty-one patients then underwent dynamic pituitary testing at median 15 months following SAH (range 7-30 months), with insulin tolerance test (ITT) or, if contraindicated, a glucagon stimulation test (GST) plus short synacthen test (SST). If symptoms of cranial diabetes insipidus (CDI) were present, a water deprivation test was also performed. Forty-one patients attended for follow-up dynamic pituitary testing. Although 14 of 100 had acute glucocorticoid deficiency immediately following SAH, only two of 41 had long-term adrenocorticotrophic hormone (ACTH) deficiency and four of 41 had growth hormone (GH) deficiency. None were hypothyroid or gonadotrophin deficient. None had chronic CDI or hyponatraemia. There was no association between acute glucocorticoid deficiency, acute CDI or acute hyponatraemia and long-term pituitary dysfunction. Both anterior and posterior hypopituitarism are very uncommon following SAH and are not predicted by acute clinical, haemodynamic or endocrinological parameters. Routine neuroendocrine screening is not justified in SAH patients. © 2014 John Wiley & Sons

  12. Family presence during cardiopulmonary resuscitation and invasive procedures in children

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cristiana Araujo G. Ferreira

    2014-03-01

    Full Text Available Objective: To identify literature evidences related to actions to promote family's presence during cardiopulmonary resuscitation and invasive procedures in children hospitalized in pediatric and neonatal critical care units. Data sources : Integrative literature review in PubMed, SciELO and Lilacs databases, from 2002 to 2012, with the following inclusion criteria: research article in Medicine, or Nursing, published in Portuguese, English or Spanish, using the keywords "family", "invasive procedures", "cardiopulmonary resuscitation", "health staff", and "Pediatrics". Articles that did not refer to the presence of the family in cardiopulmonary resuscitation and invasive procedures were excluded. Therefore, 15 articles were analyzed. Data synthesis : Most articles were published in the United States (80%, in Medicine and Nursing (46%, and were surveys (72% with healthcare team members (67% as participants. From the critical analysis, four themes related to the actions to promote family's presence in invasive procedures and cardiopulmonary resuscitation were obtained: a to develop a sensitizing program for healthcare team; b to educate the healthcare team to include the family in these circumstances; c to develop a written institutional policy; d to ensure the attendance of family's needs. Conclusions: Researches on these issues must be encouraged in order to help healthcare team to modify their practice, implementing the principles of the Patient and Family Centered Care model, especially during critical episodes.

  13. Retention of Cardiopulmonary Resuscitation Skills in Nigerian Secondary School Students

    Science.gov (United States)

    Onyeaso, Adedamola Olutoyin

    2016-01-01

    Background/Objective: For effective bystander cardiopulmonary resuscitation (CPR), retention of CPR skills after the training is central. The objective of this study was to find out how much of the CPR skills a group of Nigerian secondary school students would retain six weeks after their first exposure to the conventional CPR training. Materials…

  14. Cardiopulmonary resuscitation: biomedical and biophysical analysis (Chapter XXX)

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Noordergraaf, G.J; Ottesen, Johnny T.; Scheffer, G.J.

    2004-01-01

    The evolution of the human in caring for others is reflected in the development of cardiopulmonary resuscitation (CPR). Superstition, divine intervention and finally science have contributed to the development of a technique which may allow any person to save another’s life. Fully 50% of the firs...

  15. Cardio-pulmonary manifestations of rheumatoid arthritis among ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Background: Rheumatoid arthritis is a chronic systemic inflammatory disease, characterized by polyarthritis and extraarticular manifestations. The cardiopulmonary manifestations of rheumatoid arthritis were studied retrospectively in a cohort of rheumatoid arthritis patients. Methods: This was a retrospective study of all ...

  16. Attitude of elderly patients towards cardiopulmonary resuscitation in Greece.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chliara, Daphne; Chalkias, Athanasios; Horopanitis, Evaggelos E; Papadimitriou, Lila; Xanthos, Theodoros

    2014-10-01

    Although researchers in several countries have investigated patients' points of view regarding cardiopulmonary resuscitation, there has been no research investigating this issue in Greece. The present study aimed at identifying the attitude of older Greek patients regarding cardiopulmonary resuscitation. One basic questionnaire consisting of 34 questions was used in order to identify patients' opinions regarding cardiopulmonary resuscitation in five different hospitals from June to November 2011. In total, 300 questionnaires were collected. Although patients' knowledge regarding cardiopulmonary resuscitation was poor, most of them would like to be resuscitated in case they suffered an in-hospital cardiac arrest. Also, they believe that they should have the right to accept or refuse treatment. However, the legal and sociocultural norms in Greece do not support patients' choice for the decision to refuse resuscitation. The influence of several factors, such as their general health status or the underlying pathology, could lead patients to give a "do not attempt resuscitation" order. The attitudes of older Greek patients regarding resuscitation are not different from others', whereas the legal and sociocultural norms in Greece do not support patient choice in end-of-life decisions, namely the decision to refuse resuscitation. We advocate the introduction of advanced directives, as well as the establishment and implementation of specific legislation regarding the ethics of resuscitation in Greece. © 2013 Japan Geriatrics Society.

  17. Myocardial injury and protection related to cardiopulmonary bypass

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    de Hert, Stefan; Moerman, Anneliese

    2015-01-01

    During cardiac surgery with cardiopulmonary bypass, the heart is isolated from the circulation. This inevitably induces myocardial ischemia. In addition to this ischemic insult, an additional hit will occur upon reperfusion, which may worsen the extent of tissue damage and organ dysfunction. Over

  18. Concomitant coronary artery revascularization and right pneumonectomy without cardiopulmonary bypass

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Hensens, AG; Zeebregts, C.J.A.M.; Liem, TH; Gehlmann, H; Lacquet, LK

    Combined coronary artery bypass grafting (CABG) and pneumonectomy has a high morbidity and mortality rate, especially when the right lung has to be removed. A patient is described who underwent a CABG operation through a midline sternotomy without the use of cardiopulmonary bypass (CPB), and a right

  19. Gastrointestinal motility during cardiopulmonary bypass : A sonomicrometric study

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Gu, YJ; de Kroon, TL; Elstrodt, JM; Rakhorst, G

    Cardiopulmonary bypass (CPB) is known to impair the integrity of the gastrointestinal tract. However, little is known about the movement behavior of the gastrointestinal tract during CPB. This study was aimed to assess the gastrointestinal motility with sonomicrometry, a distance measurement using

  20. PREVENTION OF BLOOD ACTIVATION DURING AND COMPLICATIONS AFTER CARDIOPULMONARY BYPASS

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    VANOEVEREN, W; WILDEVUUR, CRH

    1991-01-01

    The cardiopulmonary bypass (CPB) circuit for open heart surgery initiates a whole body inflammatory reaction (WBIR) resulting in impaired hemostasis and organ dysfunction. Impaired hemostasis appeared to be related to the activation of the contact system (factor XII), which can be inhibited by

  1. Welded tracheal stent removal in a child under cardiopulmonary bypass.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kao, S C; Chang, W K; Pong, M W; Cheng, K W; Chan, K H; Tsai, S K

    2003-08-01

    Metallic tracheal stents have been used in the treatment of paediatric tracheomalacia for more than a decade. We describe a case in which critical airway obstruction occurred during removal of a welded tracheal stent using a rigid bronchoscope under general anaesthesia. Life-saving cardiopulmonary bypass was instituted urgently, and the welded stent was then removed successfully by directly opening the trachea.

  2. Hydraulic shock absorbers

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Thatcher, G.; Davidson, D. F.

    1984-01-01

    A hydraulic shock absorber of the dash pot kind for use with electrically conducting liquid such as sodium, has magnet means for electro magnetically braking a stream of liquid discharged from the cylinder. The shock absorber finds use in a liquid metal cooled nuclear reactor for arresting control rods

  3. Our Favorite Film Shocks

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Willerslev, Rane; Suhr, Christian

    2014-01-01

    The modern medium of film has long been hailed for its capacity for producing shocks of an entertaining, thought-provoking, or even politically emancipative nature. But what is a shock, how and when does it occur, how long does it last, and are there particular techniques for producing cinematic...

  4. Climate shocks and conflict

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Papaioannou, Kostadis J.

    2016-01-01

    This paper offers a historical micro-level analysis of the impact of climate shocks on the incidence of civil conflict in colonial Nigeria (1912-1945). Primary historical sources on court cases, prisoners and homicides are used to capture conflict. To measure climate shocks we use the deviation

  5. Liquor circulation disturbance after subarachnoid haemorrhages - comparative pneumoencephalography and liquor scintigraphic investigations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Menzel, J.; Georgi, P.; Krastel, A.; Deutsches Krebsforschungszentrum, Heidelberg

    1976-01-01

    Haemorrhages into the subarachnoid space often lead to instant blocking of the liquor circulation pathways with an acute increase of the intracranial pressure and acute venticular enlargement. These liquor circulation disturbances may be diagnosed by liquor scintiscanning as well as by pneumoencephalography. 165 patients were examined by both methods. The following results were obtained: liquor circulation disturbances after subarachnoid bleeding are frequent, they should be expected in 33% of all cases after spontaneous subarachnoid haemorrhages and in 68% of the cases after traumatic subarachnoid haemorrhages. The most severe form of liquor circulation distrubance may also be diagnosed by liquor scintiscanning as well as by pneumoencephalography. Liquor scintiscanning is the more exact method in cases with transitory ventricular reflux, while lumbar pneumoencephalography, in this series, is the method of choice when it comes to documenting the extent of the hydrocephalus. (GSE) [de

  6. Sudden headache, third nerve palsy and visual deficit: thinking outside the subarachnoid haemorrhage box.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ní Chróinín, Danielle; Lambert, John

    2013-11-01

    A 75-year-old lady presented with sudden severe headache and vomiting. Examination was normal, and CT and lumbar puncture not convincing for subarachnoid haemorrhage. Shortly thereafter, she developed painless diplopia. Examination confirmed right third cranial nerve palsy plus homonymous left inferior quadrantanopia. Urgent cerebral MRI with angiography was requested to assess for a possible posterior communicating artery aneurysm, but revealed an unsuspected pituitary mass. Pituitary adenoma with pituitary apoplexy was diagnosed. Pituitary apopolexy is a syndrome comprising sudden headache, meningism, visual and/or oculomotor deficits, with an intrasellar mass. It is commonly due to haemorrhage or infarction within a pituitary adenoma. Treatment includes prompt steroid administration, and potentially surgical decompression. While subarachnoid haemorrhage is an important, well-recognised cause of sudden severe headache, other aetiologies, including pituitary apoplexy, should be considered and sought.

  7. Haemorrhage in intracerebral arteriovenous malformations: detection with MRI and comparison with clinical history

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Prayer, L. (Dept. of Radiology, and MR Inst., Univ. of Vienna (Austria)); Wimberger, D (Dept. of Radiology, and MR Inst., Univ. of Vienna (Austria) Dept. of Neurology, Univ. of Vienna (Austria)); Stiglbauer, R. (Dept. of Radiology, and MR Inst., Univ. of Vienna (Austria)); Kramer, J. (Dept. of Radiology, and MR Inst., Univ. of Vienna (Austria)); Richling, B. (Dept. of Neurosurgery, Univ. of Vienna (Austria)); Bavinzski, G. (Dept. of Neurosurgery, Univ. of Vienna (Austria)); Czech, T. (Dept. of Neurosurgery, Univ. of Vienna (Austria)); Imhof, H. (Dept. of Radiology, and MR Inst., Univ. of Vienna (Austria))

    1993-01-01

    Fifty-one patients with 59 angiographically proven cerebral arteriovenous malformations (AVMs) were examined by high-field MRI to detect blood breakdown products. Results were correlated with the history of intracranial bleeding. Evidence of previous episodes of haemorrhage was seen in 10 of 12 patients (83.3%) with verified bleeding, 4 of 9 patients (44.4%) with symptoms which could suggest bleeding and in 6 of 30 patients (20%) with negative histories. Because of the known rebleeding rate and the increased risk of associated complications, identification of the subgroup who had had haemorrhage and should therefore be considered for surgery may be beneficial. MRI can make a contribution to management by demonstrating prior haemorrhage in patients with an inadequate clinical history. (orig.)

  8. Preventing postpartum haemorrhage: active management of the third stage of labour.

    Science.gov (United States)

    de Castro Parreira, Maria V B; Gomes, Nádia C Ferreira

    2013-12-01

    To review scientific publications on health to identify the main practices used for the active management of the third stage of vaginal labour and to assess their effectiveness in preventing postpartum haemorrhage. According to the World Health Organization (WHO Recommendations for the Prevention of Postpartum Haemorrhage, 2007. WHO Document Production Services, Geneva), postpartum haemorrhage is considered to be the cause of a quarter of maternal morbidity and mortality rates worldwide. In an attempt to reduce the risk of haemorrhage, a group of interventions have been introduced into clinical practice that constitute active management conduct during the third stage of labour and are recommended by the international organisations. An integrative literature review of studies on the subject in question, indexed in databases of health between the years 2006-2012, was conducted. The analysis included 13 articles, six of which were original articles and seven of which were literature reviews. Based on our data analysis, we found that most studies supported the effectiveness of active management in reducing the risk of haemorrhage, in the immediate postpartum period. Despite the fact that active management practices for the third stage of labour differ in their specific elements, in the majority of the selected studies, the interventions followed those recommended by the international organisations. The results of this review of management practices supported active management of the third stage of labour to prevent postpartum haemorrhage, with five main forms of intervention: administration of oxytocin, delayed clamping of umbilical cord, draining of placental blood, controlled cord traction and uterine massage. There is a need to determine gaps in the clinical practices of midwives in regard to the active management of third stage of labour, to update knowledge and practices with the latest scientific evidence. © 2013 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  9. Intensive care management of patients with severe intracerebral haemorrhage after endovascular treatment of brain arteriovenous malformations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Keller, E.; Yonekawa, Y.; Imhof, H.G.; Tanaka, M.; Valavanis, Anton

    2002-01-01

    We studied the impact of emergency neurosurgery and intensive care on the outcome for patients with severe intracerebral haemorrhage after endovascular treatment of brain arteriovenous malformations (AVMs). We reviewed the case notes of 18 patients with severe haemorrhage after embolisation of a brain AVM between 1986 and 2001. During this period the treatment changed: before 1993, these patients were not surgically treated, and they died, while after 1994, all patients underwent emergency surgery. We established a standardised protocol for emergency treatment and intensive care in May 1998, and emergency surgery was performed as soon as possible after the onset of symptoms of haemorrhage. Postoperative intensive care was according to a standardised regime. During these 15 years, 24 out of 605 patients undergoing 1066 interventions had a haemorrhage during or after the procedure, of which 18 were severe (3% of patients, 1.7% of interventions). All patients had a severe clinical deficit (mean Glasgow coma scale 4.2); eight had uni- or bilateral mydriasis. From 1989 to April 1998 four (31%) of 13 patients died, one (7.5%) remained in a vegetative state and eight (61.5%) made a good recovery. All five patients treated between 1998 and 2001 had a favourable outcome. The mean time from onset of the symptoms of haemorrhage to reaching the operation room was 129 min between 1989 and 1998 and 24 min between 1998 and 2001. Standardised emergency treatment and intensive care with early resuscitation, minimal radiological exploration before rapid surgery improved the outcome. A short time between the onset of the symptoms of haemorrhage and evacuation of the haematoma may be the most important factor for a favourable outcome. (orig.)

  10. Mortality from trauma haemorrhage and opportunities for improvement in transfusion practice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stanworth, S J; Davenport, R; Curry, N; Seeney, F; Eaglestone, S; Edwards, A; Martin, K; Allard, S; Woodford, M; Lecky, F E; Brohi, K

    2016-03-01

    The aim of this study was to describe the prevalence, patterns of blood use and outcomes of major haemorrhage in trauma. This was a prospective observational study from 22 hospitals in the UK, including both major trauma centres and smaller trauma units. Eligible patients received at least 4 units of packed red blood cells (PRBCs) in the first 24 h of admission with activation of the massive haemorrhage protocol. Case notes, transfusion charts, blood bank records and copies of prescription/theatre charts were accessed and reviewed centrally. Study outcomes were: use of blood components, critical care during hospital stay, and mortality at 24 h, 30 days and 1 year. Data were used to estimate the national trauma haemorrhage incidence. A total of 442 patients were identified during a median enrolment interval of 20 (range 7-24) months. Based on this, the national incidence of trauma haemorrhage was estimated to be 83 per million. The median age of patients in the study cohort was 38 years and 73·8 per cent were men. The incidence of major haemorrhage increased markedly in patients aged over 65 years. Thirty-six deaths within 24 h of admission occurred within the first 3 h. At 24 h, 79 patients (17·9 per cent) had died, but mortality continued to rise even after discharge. Patients who received a cumulative ratio of fresh frozen plasma to PRBCs of at least 1 : 2 had lower rates of death than those who received a lower ratio. There were delays in administration of blood. Platelets and cryoprecipitate were either not given, or transfused well after initial resuscitation. There is a high burden of trauma haemorrhage that affects all age groups. Research is required to understand the reasons for death after the first 24 h and barriers to timely transfusion support. © 2016 BJS Society Ltd Published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  11. Inter-Species Transmission of Viral Haemorrhagic Septicaemia Virus Between Turbot (Scophthalmus Maximus) and Rainbow Trout (Onchorhynchus Mykiss)

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Schönherz, A. A.; Lorenzen, Niels; Einer-Jensen, Katja

    2012-01-01

    Viral haemorrhagic septicaemia is a serious viral disease of teleost fish with high economic impact on the aquaculture industry. The disease is caused by the viral haemorrhagic septicaemia virus (VHSV), an RNA virus belonging to the family Rhabdoviridae. Compared to other rhabdoviruses infecting...

  12. Epistaxis and other haemorrhagic events associated with the smoking cessation medicine varenicline : a case series from two national pharmacovigilance centres

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Harrison-Woolrych, Mira; Harmark, Linda; Tan, Ming; Maggo, Simran; van Grootheest, Kees

    Purpose To present a case series of haemorrhagic events associated with varenicline identified from the New Zealand (NZ) and Netherlands national pharmacovigilance centres and propose a possible mechanism for these adverse events. Methods Reports of epistaxis and other haemorrhagic events (in all

  13. Novel bivalent vectored vaccine for control of myxomatosis and rabbit haemorrhagic disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Spibey, N; McCabe, V J; Greenwood, N M; Jack, S C; Sutton, D; van der Waart, L

    2012-03-24

    A novel, recombinant myxoma virus-rabbit haemorrhagic disease virus (RHDV) vaccine has been developed for the prevention of myxomatosis and rabbit haemorrhagic disease (RHD). A number of laboratory studies are described illustrating the safety and efficacy of the vaccine following subcutaneous administration in laboratory rabbits from four weeks of age onwards. In these studies, both vaccinated and unvaccinated control rabbits were challenged using pathogenic strains of RHD and myxoma viruses, and 100 per cent of the vaccinated rabbits were protected against both myxomatosis and RHD.

  14. Calcific haemorrhagic bursitis anterior to the knee mimicking a soft tissue sarcoma: report of two cases

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Stahnke, M.; Davies, A.M. [Department of Radiology, Royal Orthopaedic Hospital, Woodlands, B31 2AP, Northfield, Birmingham (United Kingdom); Mangham, D.C. [Department of Pathology, Royal Orthopaedic Hospital, Woodlands, B31 2AP, Northfield, Birmingham (United Kingdom)

    2004-06-01

    We describe the radiological and pathological findings of two cases of calcific haemorrhagic bursitis, one involving the superficial infrapatellar bursa and the other the prepatellar bursa. It was the presence of dystrophic calcification within the lesion that suggested a mineralizing soft tissue sarcoma such as synovial sarcoma. As the radiographic and MR features of the two conditions can be similar but the appropriate management very different, rare calcifying haemorrhagic bursitis needs to be included in the differential diagnosis of masses adjacent to the knee joint showing calcification. (orig.)

  15. Calcific haemorrhagic bursitis anterior to the knee mimicking a soft tissue sarcoma: report of two cases

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Stahnke, M.; Davies, A.M.; Mangham, D.C.

    2004-01-01

    We describe the radiological and pathological findings of two cases of calcific haemorrhagic bursitis, one involving the superficial infrapatellar bursa and the other the prepatellar bursa. It was the presence of dystrophic calcification within the lesion that suggested a mineralizing soft tissue sarcoma such as synovial sarcoma. As the radiographic and MR features of the two conditions can be similar but the appropriate management very different, rare calcifying haemorrhagic bursitis needs to be included in the differential diagnosis of masses adjacent to the knee joint showing calcification. (orig.)

  16. Post-transfusion hypertension, convulsion and intracranial haemorrhage in beta-thalassemia major

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Masood, S.A.; Zaidi, A.

    2012-01-01

    The haematologic disorder b-thalassemia major is common in Pakistan. We describe a patient with undiagnosed thalassemia presenting with hypertension and convulsions and found to have cerebral haemorrhage on neuro-imaging. He had been transfused 2 weeks before this illness. Our experience is similar to a few case reports described in literature that were found to have cerebral haemorrhages post-mortem after a similar clinical presentation. All patients had a blood transfusion within 2 weeks prior to the presentation so association with transfusion has been proposed. We have reviewed the several mechanisms presented and discussed the findings. (author)

  17. Single-dose intravenous iron infusion or oral iron for treatment of fatigue after postpartum haemorrhage

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Holm, C; Thomsen, L L; Norgaard, A

    2017-01-01

    BACKGROUND AND OBJECTIVES: To evaluate the clinical efficacy of a single-dose intravenous infusion of iron isomaltoside compared with current treatment practice with oral iron measured by physical fatigue in women after postpartum haemorrhage. MATERIALS AND METHODS: Single-centre, open-label, ran......BACKGROUND AND OBJECTIVES: To evaluate the clinical efficacy of a single-dose intravenous infusion of iron isomaltoside compared with current treatment practice with oral iron measured by physical fatigue in women after postpartum haemorrhage. MATERIALS AND METHODS: Single-centre, open...

  18. Patient-centric Blood Pressure–targeted Cardiopulmonary Resuscitation Improves Survival from Cardiac Arrest

    Science.gov (United States)

    Friess, Stuart H.; Naim, Maryam Y.; Lampe, Joshua W.; Bratinov, George; Weiland, Theodore R.; Garuccio, Mia; Nadkarni, Vinay M.; Becker, Lance B.; Berg, Robert A.

    2014-01-01

    Rationale: Although current resuscitation guidelines are rescuer focused, the opportunity exists to develop patient-centered resuscitation strategies that optimize the hemodynamic response of the individual in the hopes to improve survival. Objectives: To determine if titrating cardiopulmonary resuscitation (CPR) to blood pressure would improve 24-hour survival compared with traditional CPR in a porcine model of asphyxia-associated ventricular fibrillation (VF). Methods: After 7 minutes of asphyxia, followed by VF, 20 female 3-month-old swine randomly received either blood pressure–targeted care consisting of titration of compression depth to a systolic blood pressure of 100 mm Hg and vasopressors to a coronary perfusion pressure greater than 20 mm Hg (BP care); or optimal American Heart Association Guideline care consisting of depth of 51 mm with standard advanced cardiac life support epinephrine dosing (Guideline care). All animals received manual CPR for 10 minutes before first shock. Primary outcome was 24-hour survival. Measurements and Main Results: The 24-hour survival was higher in the BP care group (8 of 10) compared with Guideline care (0 of 10); P = 0.001. Coronary perfusion pressure was higher in the BP care group (point estimate +8.5 mm Hg; 95% confidence interval, 3.9–13.0 mm Hg; P < 0.01); however, depth was higher in Guideline care (point estimate +9.3 mm; 95% confidence interval, 6.0–12.5 mm; P < 0.01). Number of vasopressor doses before first shock was higher in the BP care group versus Guideline care (median, 3 [range, 0–3] vs. 2 [range, 2–2]; P = 0.003). Conclusions: Blood pressure–targeted CPR improves 24-hour survival compared with optimal American Heart Association care in a porcine model of asphyxia-associated VF cardiac arrest. PMID:25321490

  19. Patient-centric blood pressure-targeted cardiopulmonary resuscitation improves survival from cardiac arrest.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sutton, Robert M; Friess, Stuart H; Naim, Maryam Y; Lampe, Joshua W; Bratinov, George; Weiland, Theodore R; Garuccio, Mia; Nadkarni, Vinay M; Becker, Lance B; Berg, Robert A

    2014-12-01

    Although current resuscitation guidelines are rescuer focused, the opportunity exists to develop patient-centered resuscitation strategies that optimize the hemodynamic response of the individual in the hopes to improve survival. To determine if titrating cardiopulmonary resuscitation (CPR) to blood pressure would improve 24-hour survival compared with traditional CPR in a porcine model of asphyxia-associated ventricular fibrillation (VF). After 7 minutes of asphyxia, followed by VF, 20 female 3-month-old swine randomly received either blood pressure-targeted care consisting of titration of compression depth to a systolic blood pressure of 100 mm Hg and vasopressors to a coronary perfusion pressure greater than 20 mm Hg (BP care); or optimal American Heart Association Guideline care consisting of depth of 51 mm with standard advanced cardiac life support epinephrine dosing (Guideline care). All animals received manual CPR for 10 minutes before first shock. Primary outcome was 24-hour survival. The 24-hour survival was higher in the BP care group (8 of 10) compared with Guideline care (0 of 10); P = 0.001. Coronary perfusion pressure was higher in the BP care group (point estimate +8.5 mm Hg; 95% confidence interval, 3.9-13.0 mm Hg; P < 0.01); however, depth was higher in Guideline care (point estimate +9.3 mm; 95% confidence interval, 6.0-12.5 mm; P < 0.01). Number of vasopressor doses before first shock was higher in the BP care group versus Guideline care (median, 3 [range, 0-3] vs. 2 [range, 2-2]; P = 0.003). Blood pressure-targeted CPR improves 24-hour survival compared with optimal American Heart Association care in a porcine model of asphyxia-associated VF cardiac arrest.

  20. Collisionless shock waves

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sagdeev, R.Z.; Kennel, C.F.

    1991-01-01

    Collisionless shocks cannot occur naturally on the earth, because nearly all matter here consists of electrically neutral atoms and molecules. In space, however, high temperatures and ultraviolet radiation from hot stars decompose atoms into their constituent nuclei and electrons, producing a soup of electrically charged particles known as a plasma. Plasma physicists proposed that the collective electrical and magnetic properties of plasmas could produce interactions that take the place of collisions and permit shocks to form. In 1964 the theoretical work found its first experimental confirmation. Norman F. Ness and his colleagues at the Goddard Space Flight Center, using data collected from the iMP-1 spacecraft, detected clear signs that a collisionless shock exists where the solar wind encounters the earth's magnetic field. More recent research has demonstrated that collisionless shocks appear in a dazzling array of astronomical settings. For example, shocks have been found in the solar wind upstream (sunward) of all the planet and comets that have been visited by spacecraft. Violent flares on the sun generate shocks that propagate to the far reaches of the solar system; tremendous galactic outbursts create disruptions in the intergalactic medium that are trillions of times larger. In addition, many astrophysicists think that shocks from supernova explosions in our galaxy accelerate cosmic rays, a class of extraordinarily energetic elementary particles and atomic nuclei that rain down on the earth from all directions

  1. Transthoracic impedance for the monitoring of quality of manual chest compression during cardiopulmonary resuscitation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Hehua; Yang, Zhengfei; Huang, Zitong; Chen, Bihua; Zhang, Lei; Li, Heng; Wu, Baoming; Yu, Tao; Li, Yongqin

    2012-10-01

    The quality of cardiopulmonary resuscitation (CPR), especially adequate compression depth, is associated with return of spontaneous circulation (ROSC) and is therefore recommended to be measured routinely. In the current study, we investigated the relationship between changes of transthoracic impedance (TTI) measured through the defibrillation electrodes, chest compression depth and coronary perfusion pressure (CPP) in a porcine model of cardiac arrest. In 14 male pigs weighing between 28 and 34 kg, ventricular fibrillation (VF) was electrically induced and untreated for 6 min. Animals were randomized to either optimal or suboptimal chest compression group. Optimal depth of manual compression in 7 pigs was defined as a decrease of 25% (50 mm) in anterior posterior diameter of the chest, while suboptimal compression was defined as 70% of the optimal depth (35 mm). After 2 min of chest compression, defibrillation was attempted with a 120-J rectilinear biphasic shock. There were no differences in baseline measurements between groups. All animals had ROSC after optimal compressions; this contrasted with suboptimal compressions, after which only 2 of the animals had ROSC (100% vs. 28.57%, p=0.021). The correlation coefficient was 0.89 between TTI amplitude and compression depth (pcompression depth and CPP in this porcine model of cardiac arrest. The TTI measured from defibrillator electrodes, therefore has the potential to serve as an indicator to monitor the quality of chest compression and estimate CPP during CPR. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  2. Changes in self-efficacy, collective efficacy and patient outcome following interprofessional simulation training on postpartum haemorrhage.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Egenberg, Signe; Øian, Pål; Eggebø, Torbjørn Moe; Arsenovic, Mirjana Grujic; Bru, Lars Edvin

    2017-10-01

    To examine whether interprofessional simulation training on management of postpartum haemorrhage enhances self-efficacy and collective efficacy and reduces the blood transfusion rate after birth. Postpartum haemorrhage is a leading cause of maternal morbidity and mortality worldwide, although it is preventable in most cases. Interprofessional simulation training might help improve the competence of health professionals dealing with postpartum haemorrhage, and more information is needed to determine its potential. Multimethod, quasi-experimental, pre-post intervention design. Interprofessional simulation training on postpartum haemorrhage was implemented for midwives, obstetricians and auxiliary nurses in a university hospital. Training included realistic scenarios and debriefing, and a measurement scale for perceived postpartum haemorrhage-specific self-efficacy, and collective efficacy was developed and implemented. Red blood cell transfusion was used as the dependent variable for improved patient outcome pre-post intervention. Self-efficacy and collective efficacy levels were significantly increased after training. The overall red blood cell transfusion rate did not change, but there was a significant reduction in the use of ≥5 units of blood products related to severe bleeding after birth. The study contributes to new knowledge on how simulation training through mastery and vicarious experiences, verbal persuasion and psychophysiological state might enhance postpartum haemorrhage-specific self-efficacy and collective efficacy levels and thereby predict team performance. The significant reduction in severe postpartum haemorrhage after training, indicated by reduction in ≥5 units of blood transfusions, corresponds well with the improvement in collective efficacy, and might reflect the emphasis on collective efforts to counteract severe cases of postpartum haemorrhage. Interprofessional simulation training in teams may contribute to enhanced prevention and

  3. Pediatric Toxic Shock Syndrome

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jennifer Yee

    2017-09-01

    Full Text Available Audience: This scenario was developed to educate emergency medicine residents on the diagnosis and management of a pediatric patient with toxic shock syndrome. The case is also appropriate for teaching of medical students and advanced practice providers, as well as a review of the principles of crisis resource management, teamwork, and communication. Introduction: Toxic shock syndrome is a low-frequency, high-acuity scenario requiring timely identification and aggressive management. If patients suffering from this condition are managed incorrectly, they may progress into multi-organ dysfunction and potentially death. Toxic shock syndrome has been associated with Streptococcus and Staphylococcus aureus (Staph. Approximately half of Staph cases are associated with menstruation, which was first described in the 1970s-1980s and was associated with the use of absorbent tampons.1 Group A Streptococcus may cause complications such as necrotizing fasciitis and gangrenous myositis.2 Pediatric patients may present critically ill from toxic shock syndrome. Providers need to perform a thorough history and physical exam to discern the source of infection. Management requires aggressive care with antibiotics and IV fluids. Objectives: By the end of this simulation session, the learner will be able to: 1 Recognize toxic shock syndrome. 2 Review the importance of a thorough physical exam. 3 Discuss management of toxic shock syndrome, including supportive care and the difference in antibiotic choices for streptococcal and staphylococcal toxic shock syndrome. 4 Appropriately disposition a patient suffering from toxic shock syndrome. 5 Communicate effectively with team members and nursing staff during a resuscitation of a critically ill patient. Method: This session was conducted using high-fidelity simulation, followed by a debriefing session and lecture on toxic shock syndrome.

  4. Shocks near Jamming

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gómez, Leopoldo R.; Turner, Ari M.; van Hecke, Martin; Vitelli, Vincenzo

    2012-02-01

    Nonlinear sound is an extreme phenomenon typically observed in solids after violent explosions. But granular media are different. Right when they jam, these fragile and disordered solids exhibit a vanishing rigidity and sound speed, so that even tiny mechanical perturbations form supersonic shocks. Here, we perform simulations in which two-dimensional jammed granular packings are dynamically compressed and demonstrate that the elementary excitations are strongly nonlinear shocks, rather than ordinary phonons. We capture the full dependence of the shock speed on pressure and impact intensity by a surprisingly simple analytical model.

  5. Mechanical shock absorber

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Vrillon, Bernard.

    1973-01-01

    The mechanical shock absorber described is made of a constant thickness plate pierced with circular holes regularly distributed in such a manner that for all the directions along which the strain is applied during the shock, the same section of the substance forming the plate is achieved. The shock absorber is made in a metal standing up to extensive deformation before breaking, selected from a group comprising mild steels and austenitic stainless steels. This apparatus is used for handling pots of fast neutron reactor fuel elements [fr

  6. Shock formation of HCO+

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Elitzur, M.

    1983-01-01

    It is shown that shocks propagating in dense molecular regions will lead to a decrease in HCO + relative abundance, in agreement with previous results by Iglesias and Silk. The shock enhancement of HCO + detected in the supernova remnant IC 443 by Dickenson et al. is due to enhanced ionization in the shocked material. This is the result of the material penetrating the remnant cavity where it becomes exposed to the trapped cosmic rays. A similar enhancement appears to have been detected by Wootten in W28 and is explained by the same model

  7. Changes in the level of cardiac troponine and disorders in pulmonary gas exchange as predictors of short- and long-term outcomes of patients with aneurysm subarachnoid haemorrhage.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Burzyńska, Małgorzata; Uryga, Agnieszka; Kasprowicz, Magdalena; Kędziora, Jarosław; Szewczyk, Ewa; Woźniak, Jowita; Jarmundowicz, Włodzimierz; Kübler, Andrzej

    2017-12-01

    Cardiopulmonary abnormalities are common after aneurysmal subarachnoid haemorrhage (aSAH). However, the relationship between short- and long-term outcome is poorly understood. In this paper, we present how cardiac troponine elevations (cTnI) and pulmonary disorders are associated with short- and long-term outcomes assessed by the Glasgow Outcome Scale (GOS) and Extended Glasgow Outcome Scale (GOSE). A total of 104 patients diagnosed with aSAH were analysed in the study. The non-parametric U Mann-Whitney test was used to evaluate the difference between good (GOS IV-V, GOSE V-VIII) and poor (GOS I-III, GOSE I-IV) outcomes in relation to cTnI elevation and pulmonary disorders. Outcome was assessed at discharge from the hospital, and then followed up 6 and 12 months later. Pulmonary disorders were determined by the PaO 2 /FiO 2 ratio and radiography. The areas under the ROC curves (AUCs) were used to determine the predictive power of these factors. In the group with good short-term outcomes cTnI elevation on the second day after aSAH was significantly lower (p = .00007) than in patients with poor short-term outcomes. The same trend was observed after 6 months, although there were different results 12 months from the onset (p = .024 and n.s., respectively). A higher peak of cTnI was observed in the group with a pathological X-ray (p = .008) and pathological PaO 2 /FiO 2 ratio (p ≪ .001). cTnI was an accurate predictor of short-term outcomes (AUC = 0.741, p ≪ .001) and the outcome after 6 months (AUC = 0.688, p = .015). The results showed that cardiopulmonary abnormalities perform well as predictive factors for short- and long-term outcomes after aSAH.

  8. Shock Isolation Elements Testing for High Input Loadings. Volume II. Foam Shock Isolation Elements.

    Science.gov (United States)

    SHOCK ABSORBERS ), (*GUIDED MISSILE SILOS, SHOCK ABSORBERS ), (*EXPANDED PLASTICS, (*SHOCK(MECHANICS), REDUCTION), TEST METHODS, SHOCK WAVES, STRAIN(MECHANICS), LOADS(FORCES), MATHEMATICAL MODELS, NUCLEAR EXPLOSIONS, HARDENING.

  9. Counseling For Future Shock

    Science.gov (United States)

    Morgan, Lewis B.

    1974-01-01

    In this article the author looks at some of the searing prophecies made by Alvin Toffler in his book Future Shock and relates them to the world of the professional counselor and the clientele the counselor attempts to serve. (Author)

  10. Life shocks and homelessness.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Curtis, Marah A; Corman, Hope; Noonan, Kelly; Reichman, Nancy E

    2013-12-01

    We exploited an exogenous health shock-namely, the birth of a child with a severe health condition-to investigate the effect of a life shock on homelessness in large cities in the United States as well as the interactive effects of the shock with housing market characteristics. We considered a traditional measure of homelessness, two measures of housing instability thought to be precursors to homelessness, and a combined measure that approximates the broadened conceptualization of homelessness under the 2009 Homeless Emergency Assistance and Rapid Transition to Housing Act (2010). We found that the shock substantially increases the likelihood of family homelessness, particularly in cities with high housing costs. The findings are consistent with the economic theory of homelessness, which posits that homelessness results from a conjunction of adverse circumstances in which housing markets and individual characteristics collide.

  11. Unlimited Relativistic Shock Surfing Acceleration

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ucer, D.; Shapiro, V. D.

    2001-01-01

    Nonrelativistic shock surfing acceleration at quasiperpendicular shocks is usually considered to be a preacceleration mechanism for slow pickup ions to initiate diffusive shock acceleration. In shock surfing, the particle accelerates along the shock front under the action of the convective electric field of the plasma flow. However, the particle also gains kinetic energy normal to the shock and eventually escapes downstream. We consider the case when ions are accelerated to relativistic velocities. In this case, the ions are likely to be trapped for infinitely long times, because the energy of bounce oscillations tends to decrease during acceleration. This suggests the possibility of unlimited acceleration by shock surfing

  12. Postpartum haemorrhage in midwifery care in the Netherlands: validation of quality indicators for midwifery guidelines

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Smit, M.; Chan, K.L.L.; Middeldorp, J.M.; van Roosmalen, J.

    2014-01-01

    Background: Postpartum haemorrhage (PPH) is still one of the major causes of severe maternal morbidity and mortality worldwide. Currently, no guideline for PPH occurring in primary midwifery care in the Netherlands is available. A set of 25 quality indicators for prevention and management of PPH in

  13. Antigenic structure of the capsid protein of rabbit haemorrhagic disease virus

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Martinez-Torrecuadrada, Jorge L.; Cortes, Elena; Vela, Carmen

    1998-01-01

    Rabbit haemorrhagic disease virus (RHDV) causes an important disease in rabbits. The virus capsid is composed of a single 60 kDa protein. The capsid protein gene was cloned in Escherichia coli using the pET3 system, and the antigenic structure of RHDV VP60 was dissected using 11 monoclonal...

  14. Nd:YAG laser hyaloidotomy for valsalva pre-macular haemorrhage.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Kirwan, R P

    2012-02-01

    AIM: To report a case of successful drainage of a large pre-macular haemorrhage using laser photo-disruption of the posterior hyaloid membrane. MATERIALS AND METHODS: A case report. RESULTS: A 47-year-old man presented acutely to our emergency department complaining of a 24-h history of sudden onset, painless and persistent loss of vision in his left eye. Immediately before noticing this loss of vision, he had been vomiting violently from excessive alcohol intake. The left visual acuity was counting fingers. Dilated fundoscopy of the left eye revealed a large pre-macular haemorrhage which was 14 disc diametres in size. Clotting investigations were normal. A diagnosis of valsalva retinopathy was made and the patient elected to receive a prompt neodymium-doped yttrium aluminium garnet (Nd:YAG) laser posterior hyaloidotomy as an outpatient. At 1 week follow-up, the haemorrhage had drained completely into the vitreous space revealing a healthy macula and the visual acuity had improved to 6\\/12 unaided. At 6-month follow-up the left visual acuity stabilised at 6\\/9 unaided. CONCLUSION: Nd:YAG laser posterior hyaloidotomy is a useful outpatient procedure for successful clearance of large pre-macular haemorrhages that offers patients rapid recovery of visual acuity and the avoidance of more invasive intraocular surgery.

  15. Prediction of peripartum hysterectomy and end organ dysfunction in major obstetric haemorrhage.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    O'Brien, D

    2010-12-01

    The aims of this study are to determine the incidence and aetiology of major obstetric haemorrhage (MOH) in our population, to examine the success rates of medical and surgical interventions and to identify risk factors for peripartum hysterectomy and end organ dysfunction (EOD).

  16. An increase in rates of obstetric haemorrhage in a setting of high HIV seroprevalence

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    E Shabalala

    2017-07-01

    Full Text Available Background. Obstetric haemorrhage (OH is the leading cause of maternal mortality worldwide, although, indirectly, HIV is also a leading cause of maternal mortality in some settings with a high HIV seroprevalence. Objective. To determine the possible association between increasing rates of OH and HIV or its treatment. Methods. We conducted a retrospective chart review of women with OH at King Edward VIII Hospital, Durban, South Africa, over a 3-year period (2009 - 2011, during which the drug regimen for the prevention of mother-to-child transmission was evolving from single-dose nevirapine to antenatal zidovudine combined with intrapartum nevirapine (also referred to as dual therapy, and finally to a combination or highly active antiretroviral therapy (cART or HAART. Cases of OH (including abruptio placentae, placenta praevia, unspecified antepartum haemorrhage (APH, and postpartum haemorrhage (PPH were identified from maternity delivery records, and the relevant data extracted. Results. We analysed the records of 448 women diagnosed with OH. Even though the incidence of OH was low, the study found an increasing number of cases during the 3-year period. PPH – not APH – was associated with HIV seropositivity (odds ratio 1.84, 95% confi­dence interval 1.14 - 2.95. cART was not associated with an increased risk of haemorrhage. Conclusion. HIV was associated with a high risk of PPH, and its possible association with HIV treatment needs further research.

  17. Addison's disease due to bilateral post-traumatic adrenal haemorrhage: CT and MR findings

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wilms, G.; Tits, J.; Vanstraelen, D.; Marchal, G.; Rigauts, H.; Baert, A.L.

    1991-01-01

    In a patient with Addison's disease, who gave a history of a severe car accident, CT showed bilateral enlargement of the adrenal glands. MRI, by demonstrating paramagnetic T1 shortening due to methaemoglobin and haemosiderin on T2-weighted images, confirmed the haemorrhagic nature of the lesions. (orig.)

  18. Use of thermography to monitor sole haemorrhages and temperature distribution over the claws of dairy cattle.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wilhelm, K; Wilhelm, J; Fürll, M

    2015-02-07

    Subclinical laminitis, an early pathological event in the development of many claw diseases, is an important factor in the welfare and economics of high-producing dairy cows. However, the aetiology and pathogenesis of this complex claw disease are not well understood. The present study investigated to what extent thermographic examination of claws is able to give information about corium inflammation, and whether the technique may be used as a diagnostic tool for early detection of subclinical laminitis. Moreover, the temperature distribution over the individual main claws was investigated to obtain further knowledge about pressure distribution on the claws. For this purpose the claws of 123 cows were evaluated in the first week after calving as well as after the second month of lactation for presence of sole haemorrhages (a sign of subclinical laminitis). Furthermore, the ground contact area was analysed by thermography. Sole haemorrhages were significantly increased by the second month of lactation. Thermography showed clear differences between the claws of the front limbs and hindlimbs, as well as between lateral and medial claws. Although the distribution of sole haemorrhages was consistent with the pattern of the temperature distribution over the main claws, no clear correlation was found between the claw temperature after calving and the visible laminitis-like changes (sole haemorrhages) eight weeks later. British Veterinary Association.

  19. Transcatheter embolization in a haemophiliac with post-traumatic renal haemorrhage

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Klamut, M; Szczerbo-Trojanowska, M; Kowalewski, J; Nowakowski, A [Akademia Medyczna, Lublin (Poland)

    1979-01-01

    Percutaneous transcatheter arterial embolization was performed in a case of severe haemophilia A to control haemorrhage secondary to renal trauma. The treatment proved to be life-saving. Eighteen months follow-up revealed no evidence of hypertension, renal failure or infection.

  20. Subarachnoid haemorrhage in Sweden 1987-2002 : regional incidence and case fatality rates

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Koffijberg, H.; Buskens, E.; Granath, F.; Adami, J.; Ekbom, A.; Rinkel, G. J. E.; Blomqvist, P.

    Background: Incidence estimates of subarachnoid haemorrhage (SAH) in Sweden vary, which may be caused by regional variations. Reliable estimates of age-specific case fatality rates are lacking. We analysed regional incidence rates and case fatality rates of SAH in Sweden. Methods: The Swedish

  1. Dose evaluation for long-term magnesium treatment in aneurysmal subarachnoid haemorrhage

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van Norden, A. G. W.; van den Bergh, W. M.; Rinkel, G. J. E.

    2005-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Magnesium is a neuroprotective agent that might prevent or reverse delayed cerebral ischaemia after aneurysmal subarachnoid haemorrhage (SAH). We are presently running a randomized, placebo-controlled, double blind trial with magnesium sulphate (64 mmol/day intravenously). We studied

  2. Is bacterial colonisation of the tonsillar fossa a factor in post-tonsillectomy haemorrhage?

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Stephens, J. C.; Georgalas, C.; Kyi, M.; Ghufoor, K.

    2008-01-01

    OBJECTIVES: To identify if there is a link between bacterial colonisation of the tonsillar fossa and post-tonsillectomy haemorrhage. STUDY DESIGN AND SETTING: Prospective non-interventional study of 105 patients who underwent tonsillectomy during a seven-month period. The study took place in a

  3. Uterine artery embolization for the management of secondary postpartum haemorrhage associated with placenta accreta

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Li, X.; Wang, Z.; Chen, J.; Shi, H.; Zhang, X.; Pan, J.; Liu, W.; Yang, N.; Jin, Z.; Lang, J.

    2012-01-01

    Aim: To evaluate the efficacy and safety of uterine artery embolization for the management of secondary postpartum haemorrhage associated with placenta accreta. Materials and methods: Between January 2005 and August 2011, 45 women with placenta accreta, which was discovered during delivery, were managed conservatively in Peking Union Medical College Hospital. They did not experience severe bleeding during delivery. Ten patients (mean age 31 ± 6.4 years) developed secondary postpartum haemorrhage and underwent uterine artery embolization. The complications, control of haemorrhage, and outcome of the placenta left inside the uterus were retrospectively reviewed. Results: All patients underwent transcatheter embolization of bilateral uterine arteries. The median time between delivery and uterine artery embolization was 11 days (range 3–76 days). The technical success rate of embolization was 100%. Bleeding was controlled in all patients during follow-up (11 ± 6.9 months; range 3–24 months), and no further bleeding occurred. One patient developed lower-extremity deep venous thrombosis after uterine artery embolization, and no other major complications occurred. The placentae that were left inside the uteri gradually decreased in size during follow-up, except in one case. Nine patients resumed normal menstruation. One patient subsequently became pregnant and had an uneventful intrauterine pregnancy carried to term. Conclusion: Uterine artery embolization is safe and effective for the management of secondary postpartum haemorrhage associated with placenta accreta.

  4. Persistent postpartum haemorrhage after failed arterial ligation: value of pelvic embolisation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fargeaudou, Yann; Soyer, Philippe; Sirol, Marc; Boudiaf, Mourad; Dahan, Henri; Dref, Olivier le [Hopital Lariboisiere AP-HP et Universite Diderot-Paris 7, Department of Abdominal and Interventional Imaging, Paris (France); Morel, Olivier; Barranger, Emmanuel [Hopital Lariboisiere AP-HP, Department of Obstetrics and Gynecology, Paris (France); Gayat, Etienne; Mebazaa, Alexandre [Hopital Lariboisiere AP-HP, Department of Anesthesiology and Intensive Care Medicine, Paris (France)

    2010-07-15

    To evaluate the role and efficacy of pelvic embolisation in the treatment of persistent postpartum haemorrhage after failed arterial ligation and to identify the complications of this procedure in this specific population. The clinical files and angiographic examinations of 12 consecutive women (mean age 32 years) who were treated with pelvic embolisation because of persistent, severe postpartum haemorrhage after failed arterial ligation were reviewed. Angiography revealed that persistent bleeding was due to incomplete arterial ligation (n = 4) or the presence of newly developed anastomotic routes (n = 8). In 11 women, pelvic embolisation stopped the bleeding. Hysterectomy was needed in one woman with retained placenta. Two complications due to pelvic embolisation, including leg ischaemia and transient sciatic nerve ischaemia, were identified, both after internal iliac artery ligation. In women with persistent postpartum haemorrhage after failed arterial ligation, pelvic embolisation is an effective treatment in most cases. However, embolisation of the anastomotic routes that contribute to persistent bleeding may result in ischaemic complications. These potential complications reaffirm that arterial ligation should not be the favoured option for postpartum haemorrhage and that special care must be given during pelvic embolisation after failed arterial ligation. (orig.)

  5. Severe postpartum haemorrhage from ruptured pseudoaneurysm: successful treatment with transcatheter arterial embolization

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Soyer, Philippe; Fargeaudou, Yann; Boudiaf, Mourad; Le Dref, Olivier; Rymer, Roland [Hopital Lariboisiere-AP-HP Universite Paris 7, Department of Abdominal Imaging, Paris cedex 10 (France); Morel, Olivier [Hopital Lariboisiere-AP-HP Universite Paris 7, Department of Obstetrics, Paris cedex 10 (France)

    2008-06-15

    The purpose of this retrospective study was to evaluate the role of transcatheter arterial embolization in the management of severe postpartum haemorrhage due to a ruptured pseudoaneurysm and to analyse the clinical symptoms that may suggest a pseudoaneurysm as a cause of postpartum haemorrhage. A retrospective search of our database disclosed seven women with severe postpartum haemorrhage in whom angiography revealed the presence of a uterine or vaginal artery pseudoaneurysm and who were treated using transcatheter arterial embolization. Clinical files were reviewed for possible clinical findings that could suggest pseudoaneurysm as a cause of bleeding. Angiography revealed extravasation of contrast material in five out of seven patients. Transcatheter arterial embolization allowed to control the bleeding in all patients and subsequently achieve vaginal suture in four patients with vaginal laceration. No complications related to transcatheter arterial embolization were noted. Only two patients had uterine atony, and inefficiency of sulprostone was observed in all patients. Transcatheter arterial embolization is an effective and secure technique for the treatment of severe postpartum haemorrhage due to uterine or vaginal artery pseudoaneurysm. Ineffectiveness of suprostone and absence of uterine atony should raise the possibility of a ruptured pseudoaneurysm. (orig.)

  6. Increased postpartum haemorrhage, the possible relation with serotonergic and other psychopharmacological drugs: a matched cohort study

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Heller, Hanna M.; Ravelli, Anita C. J.; Bruning, Andrea H. L.; de Groot, Christianne J. M.; Scheele, Fedde; van Pampus, Maria G.; Honig, Adriaan

    2017-01-01

    Postpartum haemorrhage is a major obstetric risk worldwide. Therefore risk factors need to be investigated to control for this serious complication. A recent systematic review and meta-analysis revealed that the use of both serotonergic and non-serotonergic antidepressants in pregnancy are

  7. Severe postpartum haemorrhage from ruptured pseudoaneurysm: successful treatment with transcatheter arterial embolization

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Soyer, Philippe; Fargeaudou, Yann; Boudiaf, Mourad; Le Dref, Olivier; Rymer, Roland; Morel, Olivier

    2008-01-01

    The purpose of this retrospective study was to evaluate the role of transcatheter arterial embolization in the management of severe postpartum haemorrhage due to a ruptured pseudoaneurysm and to analyse the clinical symptoms that may suggest a pseudoaneurysm as a cause of postpartum haemorrhage. A retrospective search of our database disclosed seven women with severe postpartum haemorrhage in whom angiography revealed the presence of a uterine or vaginal artery pseudoaneurysm and who were treated using transcatheter arterial embolization. Clinical files were reviewed for possible clinical findings that could suggest pseudoaneurysm as a cause of bleeding. Angiography revealed extravasation of contrast material in five out of seven patients. Transcatheter arterial embolization allowed to control the bleeding in all patients and subsequently achieve vaginal suture in four patients with vaginal laceration. No complications related to transcatheter arterial embolization were noted. Only two patients had uterine atony, and inefficiency of sulprostone was observed in all patients. Transcatheter arterial embolization is an effective and secure technique for the treatment of severe postpartum haemorrhage due to uterine or vaginal artery pseudoaneurysm. Ineffectiveness of suprostone and absence of uterine atony should raise the possibility of a ruptured pseudoaneurysm. (orig.)

  8. Spatio-temporal risk factors for viral haemorrhagic septicaemia (VHS) in Danish aquaculture

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jensen, Ann Britt Bang; Ersbøll, Annette Kjær; Korsholm, Henrik

    2014-01-01

    Viral haemorrhagic septicaemia (VHS) is an economically very important fish disease in the northern hemisphere. When the VHS virus was first isolated in Denmark 50 yr ago, more than 80% of the 800 Danish fish farms were considered to be infected, but vigilant surveillance and eradication programmes...

  9. Multicentre trial of ethamsylate for prevention of periventricular haemorrhage in very low birthweight infants.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Benson, J W; Drayton, M R; Hayward, C; Murphy, J F; Osborne, J P; Rennie, J M; Schulte, J F; Speidel, B D; Cooke, R W

    1986-12-06

    The effectiveness of ethamsylate in the prevention of periventricular haemorrhage (PVH) in very low birthweight infants was evaluated by means of a multicentre, placebo-controlled, double-blind trial. In 330 infants without evidence of PVH on initial cranial ultrasound examination there was little difference between ethamsylate and placebo groups with respect to subependymal haemorrhage, but intraventricular and parenchymal haemorrhages developed in 30/162 infants (18.5%) in the treated group, compared with 50/168 (29.8%) in the control group (p less than 0.02). The incidence of intraventricular and parenchymal haemorrhage in survivors was 20/137 (14.6%) in the ethamsylate group and 37/146 (25.3%) in the controls (p less than 0.05). In 30 infants with evidence of PVH on the initial scan, ethamsylate treatment seemed to limit parenchymal extension. Analysis of the total cohort of 360 infants showed that the proportion of infants in whom an increase of two or more grades of severity of PVH was recorded during the trial was lower in the treated than in the placebo group (p less than 0.01). No adverse effects were attributed to ethamsylate therapy. The reported incidence of patent ductus arterious was lower in the treated than in the placebo group (p less than 0.02). Mortality was similar in the two groups.

  10. Improvement after treatment of hydrocephalus in aneurysmal subarachnoid haemorrhage : implications for grading and prognosis

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    ter Laan, M; Mooij, JJA

    Two patients with aneurysmal subarachnoid haemorrhage and hydrocephalus are presented. On admission they scored E1M4V1 and E1M3Vtube on the Glasgow Coma Scale. The first patient recovered to E3M5Vtube after treatment of hydrocpehalus by extraventricular drainage. The second recovered to E2M5Vtube

  11. Bilateral Wyburn-Mason Syndrome presenting as acute subarachnoid haemorrhage - a very rare congenital neurocutaneuos disorder

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Cortnum, Søren Ole Stigaard; Sørensen, Preben; Andresen, J

    2008-01-01

    . Wyburn-Mason syndrome is a very rare congenital neurocutaneuos disorder comprising of vascular malformations of the retina, ipsilateral cerebral AVMs and occasionally lesions in the oronasopharyngeal area. Subarachnoid haemorrhage associated with Wyburn-Mason syndrome has been described in only 5...

  12. Treatment of Laryngeal Telangiectatic Lesions in a Patient Diagnosed with Hereditary Haemorrhagic Telangiectasia

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kjeldsen, Anette Drøhse; Printz, Trine; Slot Mehlum, Camilla

    2015-01-01

    Abstract We here present a case concerning a 69 year old female patient with Hereditary Haemorrhagic Telangiectasia (HHT). She was suffering from hoarseness due to a telangiectatic lesion on the right vocal cord. The lesion was treated with laser and the voice improved markedly, which is document...

  13. Mitral endocarditis due to Rothia aeria with cerebral haemorrhage and femoral mycotic aneurysms, first French description

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    R. Collarino

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available Rothia aeria is a Rothia species from the Micrococcaceae family. We report here the first French R. aeria endocarditis complicated by brain haemorrhage and femoral mycotic aneurysms. Altogether, severity and antimicrobial susceptibility should make us consider the management of R. aeria endocarditis as Staphylococcus aureus methicillin-susceptible endocarditis.

  14. The efficacy of fibrinogen concentrate compared with cryoprecipitate in major obstetric haemorrhage - an observational study.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Ahmed, S

    2012-10-01

    Fibrinogen replacement is critical in major obstetric haemorrhage (MOH). Purified, pasteurised fibrinogen concentrate appears to have benefit over cryoprecipitate in ease of administration and safety but is unlicensed in pregnancy. In July 2009, the Irish Blood Transfusion Service replaced cryoprecipitate with fibrinogen.

  15. The role of haemorrhage and exudate detection in automated grading of diabetic retinopathy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fleming, Alan D; Goatman, Keith A; Philip, Sam; Williams, Graeme J; Prescott, Gordon J; Scotland, Graham S; McNamee, Paul; Leese, Graham P; Wykes, William N; Sharp, Peter F; Olson, John A

    2010-06-01

    Automated grading has the potential to improve the efficiency of diabetic retinopathy screening services. While disease/no disease grading can be performed using only microaneurysm detection and image-quality assessment, automated recognition of other types of lesions may be advantageous. This study investigated whether inclusion of automated recognition of exudates and haemorrhages improves the detection of observable/referable diabetic retinopathy. Images from 1253 patients with observable/referable retinopathy and 6333 patients with non-referable retinopathy were obtained from three grading centres. All images were reference-graded, and automated disease/no disease assessments were made based on microaneurysm detection and combined microaneurysm, exudate and haemorrhage detection. Introduction of algorithms for exudates and haemorrhages resulted in a statistically significant increase in the sensitivity for detection of observable/referable retinopathy from 94.9% (95% CI 93.5 to 96.0) to 96.6% (95.4 to 97.4) without affecting manual grading workload. Automated detection of exudates and haemorrhages improved the detection of observable/referable retinopathy.

  16. Erythropoietin in the cerebrospinal fluid of patients with aneurysmal subarachnoid haemorrhage originates from the brain

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Springborg, Jacob Bertram; Sonne, Bjarne; Frederiksen, Hans Jørgen

    2003-01-01

    Recent years' research has revealed a specific, neuroprotective erythropoietin (EPO) system in the central nervous system (CNS) that is upregulated by hypoxia. The presence and dynamics of EPO in the cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) of patients with subarachnoid haemorrhage (SAH) has not been investigated...

  17. Magnesium therapy after aneurysmal subarachnoid haemorrhage a dose-finding study for long term treatment

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van den Bergh, W. M.; Albrecht, K. W.; Berkelbach van der Sprenkel, J. W.; Rinkel, G. J. E.

    2003-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Magnesium is a neuroprotective agent which might prevent or reverse delayed cerebral ischemia (DCI) after aneurysmal subarachnoid haemorrhage (SAH). Although the dosage for short-term magnesium therapy is well established, there is lack of knowledge on the dosage for extended use of

  18. Computational Intelligence Method for Early Diagnosis Dengue Haemorrhagic Fever Using Fuzzy on Mobile Device

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Salman Afan

    2014-03-01

    Full Text Available Mortality from Dengue Haemorrhagic Fever (DHF is still increasing in Indonesia particularly in Jakarta. Diagnosis of the dengue shall be made as early as possible so that first aid can be given in expectation of decreasing death risk. The Study will be conducted by developing expert system based on Computational Intelligence Method. On the first year, study will use the Fuzzy Inference System (FIS Method to diagnose Dengue Haemorrhagic Fever particularly in Mobile Device consist of smart phone. Expert system application which particularly using fuzzy system can be applied in mobile device and it is useful to make early diagnosis of Dengue Haemorrhagic Fever that produce outcome faster than laboratory test. The evaluation of this application is conducted by performing accuracy test before and after validation using data of patient who has the Dengue Haemorrhagic Fever. This expert system application is easy, convenient, and practical to use, also capable of making the early diagnosis of Dengue Haemorraghic to avoid mortality in the first stage.

  19. Aneurysm occlusion in elderly patients with aneurysmal subarachnoid haemorrhage : a cost-utility analysis

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Koffijberg, H.; Buskens, E.; Rinkel, G. J. E.

    Background Aneurysm occlusion after subarachnoid haemorrhage (SAH) aims to improve outcome by reducing the rebleeding risk. With increasing age, overall prognosis decreases, and the complications of aneurysm occlusion increase. The balance of risks for aneurysm occlusion in elderly SAH patients in

  20. The effects of continuous prostacyclin infusion on regional blood flow and cerebral vasospasm following subarachnoid haemorrhage

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rasmussen, Rune; Wetterslev, Jørn; Stavngaard, Trine

    2012-01-01

    One of the main causes of mortality and morbidity following subarachnoid haemorrhage (SAH) is the development of cerebral vasospasm, a frequent complication arising in the weeks after the initial bleeding. Despite extensive research, to date no effective treatment of vasospasm exists. Prostacycli...

  1. Necrosis and haemorrhage of the putamen in methanol poisoning shown on MRI

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kuteifan, K.; Gutbub, A.M.; Laplatte, G.; Oesterle, H.; Tajahmady, T.

    1998-01-01

    Methanol, a highly toxic substance, is used as an industrial solvent and in automobile antifreeze. Acute methanol poisoning produces severe metabolic acidosis and serious neurologic sequelae. We describe a 50-year-old woman with accidental methanol intoxication who was in a vegetative state. MRI showed haemorrhagic necrosis of the putamina and oedema in the deep white matter. (orig.)

  2. Spontaneous subarachnoid haemorrhage and outcome--results from Tan Tock Seng Hospital, Singapore.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wong, S H; Yeo, T T; Seow, W T; Tan, K K; Ong, P L

    1999-07-01

    To ascertain the number of cases of spontaneous (aneurysmal) subarachnoid haemorrhage presenting to Tan Tock Seng Hospital, Singapore, over a one year period, the demographics of the patients involved, their treatment and their eventual outcome. A retrospective study from June 1995 to June 1996. There were 62 patients admitted over this period with an average of 5 patients per month. Their ages ranged from 9 to 85 years with a mean of 54 years. All 62 patients underwent 4-vessel cerebral angiograms. Forty-three patients (69%) underwent clipping of their aneurysms. Twelve patients (19%) had negative angiograms. Four patients (6%) underwent coiling of their aneurysms via interventional neuroradiology techniques. Patients with subarachnoid haemorrhage of Grades 1 to 3 on the WFNS (World Federation of Neurological Surgeons) grading had a favourable outcome (Glasgow Outcome Score of 4 and 5) in 85% of the cases. The overall mortality rate for the operated group (all grades) was 11%. However for the group with good WFNS grading, namely the Grade 1 to 2 groups, there were no deaths. Twenty-four percent of patients developed clinically symptomatic vasospasm. Eighteen percent of patients required ventriculo-peritoneal shunting for hydrocephalus secondary to the subarachnoid haemorrhage. The overall management mortality (operated and non-operated cases) was 14% for proven aneurysmal and angiographically-negative spontaneous subarachnoid haemorrhage. These results are comparable to that of other reputable centers reported in the literature.

  3. Technology shocks matter

    OpenAIRE

    Jonas D. M. Fisher

    2002-01-01

    This paper uses the neoclassical growth model to identify the effects of technological change on the US business cycle. In the model there are two sources of technological change: neutral, which effects the production of all goods homogeneously, and investment-specific. Investment-specific shocks are the unique source of the secular trend in the real price of investment goods, while shocks to both kinds of technology are the only factors which affect labor productivity in the long run. Consis...

  4. Strategy analysis of cardiopulmonary resuscitation training in the community

    OpenAIRE

    Wang, Jin; Ma, Li; Lu, Yuan-Qiang

    2015-01-01

    Bystander cardiopulmonary resuscitation (CPR) is a crucial therapy for sudden cardiac arrest. This appreciation produced immense efforts by professional organizations to train laypeople for CPR skills. However, the rate of CPR training is low and varies widely across communities. Several strategies are used in order to improve the rate of CPR training and are performed in some advanced countries. The Chinese CPR training in communities could gain enlightenment from them.

  5. Traumatic Pancreatitis: A Rare Complication of Cardiopulmonary Resuscitation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aziz, Muhammad

    2017-08-17

    An elderly gentleman was successfully revived after undergoing cardiopulmonary resuscitation (CPR) for cardiac arrest. Post CPR, the patient developed acute pancreatitis which was likely complication of inappropriately delivered chest compressions which caused further complications and resulted in the death of the patient. This case underlines the importance of quality chest compressions that includes correct placement of hands by the operator giving chest compressions to avoid lethal injuries to the receiver.

  6. Transfusion requirements in elective cardiopulmonary bypass surgery patients

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sivapalan, Praleene; Bäck, Anne Caroline; Ostrowski, Sisse Rye

    2017-01-01

    Managing haemostasis in patients undergoing cardiopulmonary bypass (CPB) surgery remains a challenge. There is no established laboratory test to predict transfusion requirements in cardiac surgery. We investigated whether preoperative Thromboelastography (TEG) with Platelet Mapping Assay (PMA......) or Multiple Electrode Aggrometry (MEA) could predict transfusion requirements in patients undergoing elective coronary artery bypass grafting (CABG) or combined CABG with aortic or mitral valve replacement. We prospectively investigated 199 patients undergoing elective CABG or combined procedures. PMA and MEA...

  7. Disseminated intravascular and intracardiac thrombosis after cardiopulmonary bypass

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Deepak K Tempe

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Massive intracardiac and intravascular thrombosis is a rare complication following cardiopulmonary bypass (CPB. Most of the cases of the disseminated thrombosis have been reported in patients undergoing complex cardiac surgeries and those receiving antifibrinolytic agents during CPB. We report the occurrence of disseminated intravascular and intracardiac thrombosis after CPB in a patient undergoing mitral valve replacement in which no antifibrinolytic agent was used. The possible pathophysiology and management of the patient is discussed.

  8. Hantavirus cardiopulmonary syndrome: a report of two cases

    OpenAIRE

    Marcos Lazaro Moreli; Vivaldo Gomes da Costa; Daiane Pereira da Silva Novaes; Enia Cristina Flor; Juliana Freitas Silva; Keila Rejane Guimarães Vilela; Cácia Régia de Paula

    2013-01-01

    Infection with hantavirus, from the family Bunyaviridae, causes hantavirus cardiopulmonary syndrome (HCPS) in the Americas. This highly lethal anthropozoonosis afflicts preferentially individuals in rural areas and is transmitted by aerosol of excreta from infected wild rodents. The aim of this study is to report the almost simultaneous occurrence of two cases of HCPS in the municipality of Jataí, state of Goiás, Brazil.

  9. Hantavirus cardiopulmonary syndrome: a report of two cases

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marcos Lazaro Moreli

    2013-10-01

    Full Text Available Infection with hantavirus, from the family Bunyaviridae, causes hantavirus cardiopulmonary syndrome (HCPS in the Americas. This highly lethal anthropozoonosis afflicts preferentially individuals in rural areas and is transmitted by aerosol of excreta from infected wild rodents. The aim of this study is to report the almost simultaneous occurrence of two cases of HCPS in the municipality of Jataí, state of Goiás, Brazil.

  10. The Heliospheric Termination Shock

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jokipii, J. R.

    2013-06-01

    The heliospheric termination shock is a vast, spheroidal shock wave marking the transition from the supersonic solar wind to the slower flow in the heliosheath, in response to the pressure of the interstellar medium. It is one of the most-important boundaries in the outer heliosphere. It affects energetic particles strongly and for this reason is a significant factor in the effects of the Sun on Galactic cosmic rays. This paper summarizes the general properties and overall large-scale structure and motions of the termination shock. Observations over the past several years, both in situ and remote, have dramatically revised our understanding of the shock. The consensus now is that the shock is quite blunt, is with the front, blunt side canted at an angle to the flow direction of the local interstellar plasma relative to the Sun, and is dynamical and turbulent. Much of this new understanding has come from remote observations of energetic charged particles interacting with the shock, radio waves and radiation backscattered from interstellar neutral atoms. The observations and the implications are discussed.

  11. Cardiopulmonary resuscitation and contrast media reactions in a radiology department

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    O'Neill, John M.; McBride, Kieran D.

    2001-01-01

    AIM: To assess current knowledge and training in the management of contrast media reactions and cardiopulmonary resuscitation within a radiology department. MATERIALS AND METHODS: The standard of knowledge about the management of contrast media reactions and cardiopulmonary resuscitation among radiologists, radiographers and nurses were audited using a two-section questionnaire. Our results were compared against nationally accepted standards. Repeat audits were undertaken over a 28-month period. Three full audit cycles were completed. RESULTS: The initial audit confirmed that although a voluntary training programme was in place, knowledge of cardiopulmonary resuscitation techniques were below acceptable levels (set at 70%) for all staff members. The mean score for radiologists was 50%. Immediate changes instituted included retraining courses, the distribution of standard guidelines and the composition and distribution of two separate information handouts. Initial improvements were complemented by new wallcharts, which were distributed throughout the department, a series of lectures on management of contrast reactions and regular reviews with feedback to staff. In the third and final audit all staff groups had surpassed the required standard. CONCLUSION: Knowledge of contrast media reactions and resuscitation needs constant updating. Revision of skills requires a prescriptive programme; visual display of advice is a constant reminder. It is our contention all radiology departmental staff should consider it a personal duty to maintain their resuscitation skills at appropriate standards. O'Neill, J.M., McBride, K.D.(2001). Clinical Radiology 00, 000-000

  12. Cardiopulmonary resuscitation and contrast media reactions in a radiology department

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    O' Neill, John M.; McBride, Kieran D

    2001-04-01

    AIM: To assess current knowledge and training in the management of contrast media reactions and cardiopulmonary resuscitation within a radiology department. MATERIALS AND METHODS: The standard of knowledge about the management of contrast media reactions and cardiopulmonary resuscitation among radiologists, radiographers and nurses were audited using a two-section questionnaire. Our results were compared against nationally accepted standards. Repeat audits were undertaken over a 28-month period. Three full audit cycles were completed. RESULTS: The initial audit confirmed that although a voluntary training programme was in place, knowledge of cardiopulmonary resuscitation techniques were below acceptable levels (set at 70%) for all staff members. The mean score for radiologists was 50%. Immediate changes instituted included retraining courses, the distribution of standard guidelines and the composition and distribution of two separate information handouts. Initial improvements were complemented by new wallcharts, which were distributed throughout the department, a series of lectures on management of contrast reactions and regular reviews with feedback to staff. In the third and final audit all staff groups had surpassed the required standard. CONCLUSION: Knowledge of contrast media reactions and resuscitation needs constant updating. Revision of skills requires a prescriptive programme; visual display of advice is a constant reminder. It is our contention all radiology departmental staff should consider it a personal duty to maintain their resuscitation skills at appropriate standards. O'Neill, J.M., McBride, K.D.(2001). Clinical Radiology 00, 000-000.

  13. Cardiopulmonary metastrongyloidosis of dogs and cats contribution to diagnose

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ilić Tamara

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Background. In the last fifteen years on the European continent and also worldwide, the prevalence of cardiopulmonary metastrongyloidosis in dogs and cats has increased significantly, especially cases involving those parasites which are the most important for veterinary practice (Angiostrongylus vasorum, Aelurostrongylus abstrusus and Crenosoma vulpis. Scope and Approach. The aim of this study is to present a detailed clinical-parasitological approach to highlight the importance of these helminths, and to display the newest findings concerning the diagnostic possibilities in dogs and cats Key Findings and Conclusions. The effects of global warming, vector range shift, the frequent transportation and movement of animals to other epizootic areas, as well as the intensification of merchandise transportation and movement of people are just some of the potential factors which could impact the dynamics of incidence, upkeep and spread of cardiopulmonary nematodoses in carnivores. For the timely implementation of effective treatment of sick animals, it essential to accurately diagnose these parasitoses. Accurate, timely diagnosis can, in the end, significantly contribute to the prognostic course of disease in infected carnivores. Cardiopulmonary metastrongyloidoses in dogs and cats have great clinical-parasitological significance because of their high degree of pathogenicity, their spread outside endemic areas, the difficulties encountered in establishing their diagnosis, and the fact that they represent a potential danger to human health. [Project of the Serbian ministry of education, science and technological development

  14. Early cryoprecipitate for major haemorrhage in trauma: a randomised controlled feasibility trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Curry, N; Rourke, C; Davenport, R; Beer, S; Pankhurst, L; Deary, A; Thomas, H; Llewelyn, C; Green, L; Doughty, H; Nordmann, G; Brohi, K; Stanworth, S

    2015-07-01

    Low fibrinogen (Fg) concentrations in trauma haemorrhage are associated with poorer outcomes. Cryoprecipitate is the standard source for Fg administration in the UK and USA and is often given in the later stages of transfusion therapy. It is not known whether early cryoprecipitate therapy improves clinical outcomes. The primary aim of this feasibility study was to determine whether it was possible to administer cryoprecipitate, within 90 min of admission to hospital. Secondary aims were to evaluate laboratory measures of Fg and clinical outcomes including thrombotic events, organ failure, length of hospital stay and mortality. This was an unblinded RCT, conducted at two civilian UK major trauma centres of adult trauma patients (age ≥16 yrs), with active bleeding and requiring activation of the major haemorrhage protocol. Participants were randomised to standard major haemorrhage therapy (STANDARD) (n=22), or to standard haemorrhage therapy plus two early pools of cryoprecipitate (CRYO) (n=21). 85% (95% CI: 69-100%) CRYO participants received cryoprecipitate within 90 min, median time 60 min (IQR: 57-76) compared with 108 min (67-147), CRYO and STANDARD arms respectively (P=0.002). Fg concentrations were higher in the CRYO arm and were maintained above 1.8 g litre(-1) at all time-points during active haemorrhage. All-cause mortality at 28 days was not significantly different (P=0.14). Early Fg supplementation using cryoprecipitate is feasible in trauma patients. This study supports the need for a definitive RCT to determine the effect of early Fg supplementation on mortality and other clinical outcomes. ISRCTN55509212. © The Author 2015. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of the British Journal of Anaesthesia. All rights reserved. For Permissions, please email: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  15. Soetomo score: score model in early identification of acute haemorrhagic stroke

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Moh Hasan Machfoed

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available Aim of the study: On financial or facility constraints of brain imaging, score model is used to predict the occurrence of acute haemorrhagic stroke. Accordingly, this study attempts to develop a new score model, called Soetomo score. Material and methods: The researchers performed a cross-sectional study of 176 acute stroke patients with onset of ≤24 hours who visited emergency unit of Dr. Soetomo Hospital from July 14th to December 14th, 2014. The diagnosis of haemorrhagic stroke was confirmed by head computed tomography scan. There were seven predictors of haemorrhagic stroke which were analysed by using bivariate and multivariate analyses. Furthermore, a multiple discriminant analysis resulted in an equation of Soetomo score model. The receiver operating characteristic procedure resulted in the values of area under curve and intersection point identifying haemorrhagic stroke. Afterward, the diagnostic test value was determined. Results: The equation of Soetomo score model was (3 × loss of consciousness + (3.5 × headache + (4 × vomiting − 4.5. Area under curve value of this score was 88.5% (95% confidence interval = 83.3–93.7%. In the Soetomo score model value of ≥−0.75, the score reached the sensitivity of 82.9%, specificity of 83%, positive predictive value of 78.8%, negative predictive value of 86.5%, positive likelihood ratio of 4.88, negative likelihood ratio of 0.21, false negative of 17.1%, false positive of 17%, and accuracy of 83%. Conclusions: The Soetomo score model value of ≥−0.75 can identify acute haemorrhagic stroke properly on the financial or facility constrains of brain imaging.

  16. European cardiovascular nurses' and allied professionals' knowledge and practical skills regarding cardiopulmonary resuscitation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pettersen, Trond R; Mårtensson, Jan; Axelsson, Åsa; Jørgensen, Marianne; Strömberg, Anna; Thompson, David R; Norekvål, Tone M

    2018-04-01

    Cardiopulmonary resuscitation (CPR) remains a cornerstone in the treatment of cardiac arrest, and is directly linked to survival rates. Nurses are often first responders and need to be skilled in the performance of cardiopulmonary resuscitation. As cardiopulmonary resuscitation skills deteriorate rapidly, the purpose of this study was to investigate whether there was an association between participants' cardiopulmonary resuscitation training and their practical cardiopulmonary resuscitation test results. This comparative study was conducted at the 2014 EuroHeartCare meeting in Stavanger ( n=133) and the 2008 Spring Meeting on Cardiovascular Nursing in Malmö ( n=85). Participants performed cardiopulmonary resuscitation for three consecutive minutes CPR training manikins from Laerdal Medical®. Data were collected with a questionnaire on demographics and participants' level of cardiopulmonary resuscitation training. Most participants were female (78%) nurses (91%) from Nordic countries (77%), whose main role was in nursing practice (63%), and 71% had more than 11 years' experience ( n=218). Participants who conducted cardiopulmonary resuscitation training once a year or more ( n=154) performed better regarding ventilation volume than those who trained less (859 ml vs. 1111 ml, p=0.002). Those who had cardiopulmonary resuscitation training offered at their workplace ( n=161) also performed better regarding ventilation volume (889 ml vs. 1081 ml, p=0.003) and compression rate per minute (100 vs. 91, p=0.04) than those who had not. Our study indicates a positive association between participants' performance on the practical cardiopulmonary resuscitation test and the frequency of cardiopulmonary resuscitation training and whether cardiopulmonary resuscitation training was offered in the workplace. Large ventilation volumes were the most common error at both measuring points.

  17. Interhospital Transport of Children Undergoing Cardiopulmonary Resuscitation: A Practical and Ethical Dilemma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Noje, Corina; Fishe, Jennifer N; Costabile, Philomena M; Klein, Bruce L; Hunt, Elizabeth A; Pronovost, Peter J

    2017-10-01

    To discuss risks and benefits of interhospital transport of children in cardiac arrest undergoing cardiopulmonary resuscitation. Narrative review. Not applicable. Transporting children in cardiac arrest with ongoing cardiopulmonary resuscitation between hospitals is potentially lifesaving if it enables access to resources such as extracorporeal support, but may risk transport personnel safety. Research is needed to optimize outcomes of patients transported with ongoing cardiopulmonary resuscitation and reduce risks to the staff caring for them.

  18. Immediate post-partum haemorrhage: Epidemiological aspects and maternal prognosis at South N’djamena District Hospital (Chad

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gabkika Bray Madoue

    2015-05-01

    Full Text Available Background: Post-partum haemorrhage defined as blood loss after delivery over 500mls, affects all countries and is the commonest cause of maternal mortality. It is a frequent obstetric emergency in developing countries. Objective: To identify the causes of post-partum haemorrhage and identify adequate management of immediate post-partum haemorrhage and thus reduce maternal mortality. Patients and methods: This was a prospective and descriptive study of one year from 1st January 2014 to 31stDecember 2014 conducted at South N’Djamena district hospital. Before including a patient in our survey her consent was obtained after explaining to her the need for the survey. All consenting patients with post-partum haemorrhage were included. Data were analyzed using SPSS17.0. Results: We recorded 100 cases of post-partum haemorrhage among 6815 deliveries giving an incidence of 1.47%. The average age of the women was 25.0 years. The majority of deliveries (90% were vaginal. The main cause of immediate post-partum haemorrhage was a third stage of labour bleeding (66% followed by genital lesions (32%. The management was medical (uterotonic drug, fluid replacement and blood transfusion, obstetric (manual removal of placenta or clot, and surgical (suture of lesions, vascular ligature and hysterectomy. There were two maternal deaths (2%. Conclusion: Post-partum haemorrhage is often fatal in our region. Preventive measures and efficient management can help to improve maternal prognosis.

  19. The Effects of Normothermic and Hypothermic Cardiopulmonary Bypass Upon Defibrillation Energy Requirements and Transmyocardial Impedance

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Martin, David

    1993-01-01

    .... To evaluate these questions we studied the effect of controlled hypothermia upon defibrillation energy requirements and transcardiac impedance in a canine model of cardiopulmonary bypass in which 26...

  20. Cardiopulmonary resuscitation in the elderly: analysis of the events in the emergency department

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Augusto Tricerri

    2013-10-01

    Full Text Available With the increasing number of old people in all western countries and increasing life expectancy at birth, many seniors spend the last period of their life with various afflictions that may lead to cardiac arrest. Bystander cardiopulmonary resuscitation (CPR increases survival rates. Octogenarians are the fastest growing segment of the population and despite empirical evidence that CPR is of questionable effectiveness in seniors with comorbidities, it is still the only treatment among life-sustaining ones. Cardiopulmonary resuscitation is frequently unsuccessful, but if survival is achieved, a fairly good quality of life can be expected. Various papers analyzed the effect of CPR in hospitalized patients or in cardiac arrest occurring at home or in public places, while less is known about events occurring in the emergency room (ER. We performed a retrospective analysis of cardiac arrest events occurred in ER within 54 months: we analyzed 415,001 records of ER visits (from 01/01/1999 to 30/06/2003 in San Giovanni Addolorata Hospital. Data were analyzed in terms of age and outcome. We identified 475 records with the outcome of death in ER or death on arrival. Out of them, we selected 290 medical records which had sufficient data to be analyzed. Of the 290 patients evaluated, 225 died in ER, 18 were deemed to die on arrival, and 47 survived the cardiac arrest and were admitted to intensive care unit (ICU. The overall mortality was 0.11%, while the incidence of the selected events was 0.072%. The mean age of the analyzed population was 71.3 years. The only possible diagnosis was often cardiac arrest, though most of the times we could specify and group the diagnosis even better. The analysis of the procedures showed that cardiac arrest treated by direct current (DC shock was similarly distributed in different age groups, and no difference was detectable between the two groups. The mean age of the patients who underwent tracheal intubation (TI was

  1. Latin American Consensus for Pediatric Cardiopulmonary Resuscitation 2017: Latin American Pediatric Critical Care Society Pediatric Cardiopulmonary Resuscitation Committee.

    Science.gov (United States)

    López-Herce, Jesús; Almonte, Enma; Alvarado, Manuel; Bogado, Norma Beatriz; Cyunel, Mariana; Escalante, Raffo; Finardi, Christiane; Guzmán, Gustavo; Jaramillo-Bustamante, Juan C; Madrid, Claudia C; Matamoros, Martha; Moya, Luis Augusto; Obando, Grania; Reboredo, Gaspar; López, Lissette R; Scheu, Christian; Valenzuela, Alejandro; Yerovi, Rocío; Yock-Corrales, Adriana

    2018-03-01

    To develop a Latin American Consensus about Pediatric Cardiopulmonary Resuscitation. To clarify, reinforce, and adapt some specific recommendations for pediatric patients and to stimulate the implementation of these recommendations in clinical practice. Expert consensus recommendations with Delphi methodology. Latin American countries. Experts in pediatric cardiopulmonary resuscitation from 19 Latin American countries. Delphi methodology for expert consensus. The goal was to reach consensus with all the participating experts for every recommendation. An agreement of at least 80% of the participating experts had to exist in order to deliver a recommendation. Two Delphi voting rounds were sent out electronically. The experts were asked to score between 1 and 9 their level of agreement for each recommendation. The score was then classified into three groups: strong agreement (score 7-9), moderate agreement (score 4-6), and disagreement (score 1-3). Nineteen experts from 19 countries participated in both voting rounds and in the whole process of drafting the recommendations. Sixteen recommendations about organization of cardiopulmonary resuscitation, prevention, basic resuscitation, advanced resuscitation, and postresuscitation measures were approved. Ten of them had a consensus of 100%. Four of them were agreed by all the participants except one (94.7% consensus). One recommendation was agreed by all except two experts (89.4%), and finally, one was agreed by all except three experts (84.2%). All the recommendations reached a level of agreement. This consensus adapts 16 international recommendations to Latin America in order to improve the practice of cardiopulmonary resuscitation in children. Studies should be conducted to analyze the effectiveness of the implementation of these recommendations.

  2. Shocks in fragile matter

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vitelli, Vincenzo

    2012-02-01

    Non-linear sound is an extreme phenomenon typically observed in solids after violent explosions. But granular media are different. Right when they unjam, these fragile and disordered solids exhibit vanishing elastic moduli and sound speed, so that even tiny mechanical perturbations form supersonic shocks. Here, we perform simulations in which two-dimensional jammed granular packings are continuously compressed, and demonstrate that the resulting excitations are strongly nonlinear shocks, rather than linear waves. We capture the full dependence of the shock speed on pressure and compression speed by a surprisingly simple analytical model. We also treat shear shocks within a simplified viscoelastic model of nearly-isostatic random networks comprised of harmonic springs. In this case, anharmonicity does not originate locally from nonlinear interactions between particles, as in granular media; instead, it emerges from the global architecture of the network. As a result, the diverging width of the shear shocks bears a nonlinear signature of the diverging isostatic length associated with the loss of rigidity in these floppy networks.

  3. A survey on training in pediatric cardiopulmonary resuscitation in Latin America, Spain, and Portugal.

    Science.gov (United States)

    López-Herce, Jesús; Carrillo, Angel

    2011-09-01

    To determine how training in pediatric cardiopulmonary resuscitation is provided in the Iberoamerican countries. Survey. Latin America, Spain, and Portugal. Experts in pediatric cardiopulmonary resuscitation education. A questionnaire was sent to experts in pediatric cardiopulmonary resuscitation training in 21 countries in Latin America, Spain, and Portugal; we received 15 replies. Pediatric cardiopulmonary resuscitation training is not included in medical undergraduate or nursing training in any of these countries and pediatric residents receive systematic cardiopulmonary resuscitation training in only four countries. Basic pediatric life support courses, pediatric advanced life support courses, and pediatric cardiopulmonary resuscitation instructors courses are given in 13 of 15, 14 of 15, and 11 of 15 respondent countries, respectively. Course duration and the number of hours of practical training were variable: basic life support, 5 hrs (range, 4-8 hrs); practical training, 4 hrs (range, 2-5 hrs); advanced life support, 18 hrs (range, 10-30 hrs); and practical training, 14 hrs (range, 5-18 hrs). Only nine countries (60%) had a national group that organized pediatric cardiopulmonary resuscitation training. Thirteen countries (86.6%) had fewer than five centers offering pediatric cardiopulmonary resuscitation training. Respondents considered the main obstacles to the expansion of training in pediatric cardiopulmonary resuscitation to be the shortage of instructors (28.5%), students' lack of financial resources (21.4%), and deficiencies in educational organization (21.4%). Pediatric cardiopulmonary resuscitation training is not uniform across the majority of Iberoamerican countries, with poor organization and little institutional involvement. National groups should be created in each country to plan and coordinate pediatric cardiopulmonary resuscitation training and to coordinate with other Iberoamerican countries.

  4. Automation of CT-based haemorrhagic stroke assessment for improved clinical outcomes: study protocol and design.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chinda, Betty; Medvedev, George; Siu, William; Ester, Martin; Arab, Ali; Gu, Tao; Moreno, Sylvain; D'Arcy, Ryan C N; Song, Xiaowei

    2018-04-19

    Haemorrhagic stroke is of significant healthcare concern due to its association with high mortality and lasting impact on the survivors' quality of life. Treatment decisions and clinical outcomes depend strongly on the size, spread and location of the haematoma. Non-contrast CT (NCCT) is the primary neuroimaging modality for haematoma assessment in haemorrhagic stroke diagnosis. Current procedures do not allow convenient NCCT-based haemorrhage volume calculation in clinical settings, while research-based approaches are yet to be tested for clinical utility; there is a demonstrated need for developing effective solutions. The project under review investigates the development of an automatic NCCT-based haematoma computation tool in support of accurate quantification of haematoma volumes. Several existing research methods for haematoma volume estimation are studied. Selected methods are tested using NCCT images of patients diagnosed with acute haemorrhagic stroke. For inter-rater and intrarater reliability evaluation, different raters will analyse haemorrhage volumes independently. The efficiency with respect to time of haematoma volume assessments will be examined to compare with the results from routine clinical evaluations and planimetry assessment that are known to be more accurate. The project will target the development of an enhanced solution by adapting existing methods and integrating machine learning algorithms. NCCT-based information of brain haemorrhage (eg, size, volume, location) and other relevant information (eg, age, sex, risk factor, comorbidities) will be used in relation to clinical outcomes with future project development. Validity and reliability of the solution will be examined for potential clinical utility. The project including procedures for deidentification of NCCT data has been ethically approved. The study involves secondary use of existing data and does not require new consent of participation. The team consists of clinical neuroimaging

  5. Physics of Collisionless Shocks Space Plasma Shock Waves

    CERN Document Server

    Balogh, André

    2013-01-01

    The present book provides a contemporary systematic treatment of shock waves in high-temperature collisionless plasmas as are encountered in near Earth space and in Astrophysics. It consists of two parts. Part I develops the complete theory of shocks in dilute hot plasmas under the assumption of absence of collisions among the charged particles when the interaction is mediated solely by the self-consistent electromagnetic fields. Such shocks are naturally magnetised implying that the magnetic field plays an important role in their evolution and dynamics. This part treats both subcritical shocks, which dissipate flow energy by generating anomalous resistance or viscosity, and supercritical shocks. The main emphasis is, however, on super-critical shocks where the anomalous dissipation is insufficient to retard the upstream flow. These shocks, depending on the direction of the upstream magnetic field, are distinguished as quasi-perpendicular and quasi-parallel shocks which exhibit different behaviours, reflecti...

  6. Life Shocks and Homelessness

    Science.gov (United States)

    Corman, Hope; Noonan, Kelly; Reichman, Nancy E.

    2014-01-01

    We exploited an exogenous health shock—namely, the birth of a child with a severe health condition—to investigate the effect of a life shock on homelessness in large cities in the United States as well as the interactive effects of the shock with housing market characteristics. We considered a traditional measure of homelessness, two measures of housing instability thought to be precursors to homelessness, and a combined measure that approximates the broadened conceptualization of homelessness under the 2009 Homeless Emergency Assistance and Rapid Transition to Housing Act (2010). We found that the shock substantially increases the likelihood of family homelessness, particularly in cities with high housing costs. The findings are consistent with the economic theory of homelessness, which posits that homelessness results from a conjunction of adverse circumstances in which housing markets and individual characteristics collide. PMID:23868747

  7. Health Shocks and Retirement:

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Datta Gupta, Nabanita; Larsen, Mona

    We investigate the effect of an acute health shock on retirement among elderly male workers in Denmark, 1991-1999, and in particular whether various welfare state programs and institutions impinge on the retirement effect. The results show that an acute health event increases the retirement chances...... significant. For the most part, the retirement effect following a health shock seems to be immune to the availability of a multitude of government programs for older workers in Denmark....... benefits in Denmark nor by the promotion of corporate social responsibility initiatives since the mid-1990s. In the late 1990s, however, the retirement rate following a health shock is reduced to 3% with the introduction of the subsidized employment program (fleksjob) but this effect is not strongly...

  8. Achieved serum magnesium concentrations and occurrence of delayed cerebral ischaemia and poor outcome in aneurysmal subarachnoid haemorrhage

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Dorhout Mees, Sanne M.; van den Bergh, Walter M.; Algra, Ale; Rinkel, Gabriel J. E.

    2007-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Magnesium therapy probably reduces the frequency of delayed cerebral ischaemia (DCI) in subarachnoid haemorrhage (SAH) but uncertainty remains about the optimal serum magnesium concentration. We assessed the relationship between serum magnesium concentrations achieved with magnesium

  9. The Shock Routine

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    van Hooren, Franca; Kaasch, Alexandra; Starke, Peter

    2014-01-01

    in Australia, Belgium, the Netherlands and Sweden over the course of four global economic shocks, we ask whether the notion of critical junctures is useful in understanding the nature of change triggered by crisis. The main empirical finding is that fundamental change in the aftermath of an exogenous shock...... is the exception rather than the rule. Instead, incremental ‘crisis routines’ based on existing policy instruments are overwhelmingly used to deal with economic hardship. We discuss these findings in the light of the psychological ‘threat-rigidity’ effect and reflect on their consequences for theories...

  10. Initial presentation of a giant gastrointestinal stromal tumour of the stomach with recurrent spontaneous intra-peritoneal haemorrhage

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Margarida Vinagreiro

    2015-01-01

    Discussion and conclusion: GISTs are uncommon and rarely present with spontaneous intra-peritoneal haemorrhage, which may be life threatening. In our understanding, this is the first reported case of the reviewed literature presenting with a chronic hemoperitoneum, due to recurrent brisk episodes of tumour haemorrhage. Tumour rupture and large tumour size are two poor independent prognostic tumour factors for recurrence. Despite this, the patient remains free of disease after surgery and instituted adjuvant imatinib mesylate.

  11. Shock absorber in Ignalina NPP

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bulavas, A.; Muralis, J.

    1996-09-01

    Theoretical calculation and experimental analysis of models of shock absorber in Ignalina NPP is presented. The results obtained from the investigation with model of shock absorber coincide with the theoretical calculation. (author). 2 figs., 3 refs

  12. Shock Response of Boron Carbide

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Dandekar, D. P. (Dattatraya Purushottam)

    2001-01-01

    .... The present work was undertaken to determine tensile/spall strength of boron carbide under plane shock wave loading and to analyze all available shock compression data on boron carbide materials...

  13. Fascinating World of Shock Waves

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Srimath

    travelling at supersonic speeds (more than the sound speed at ... actual earth- quake, travel at supersonic speeds. .... The time scale of the shock wave is also important ..... real lithotripsy where a shock wave is used shatter the kidney stones!

  14. Does Cardiopulmonary Resuscitation Cause Rib Fractures in Children? A Systematic Review

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maguire, Sabine; Mann, Mala; John, Nia; Ellaway, Bev; Sibert, Jo R.; Kemp, Alison M.

    2006-01-01

    Background: There is a diagnostic dilemma when a child presents with rib fractures after cardiopulmonary resuscitation (CPR) where child abuse is suspected as the cause of collapse. We have performed a systematic review to establish the evidence base for the following questions: (i) Does cardiopulmonary resuscitation cause rib fractures in…

  15. 21 CFR 870.4270 - Cardiopulmonary bypass cardiotomy suction line blood filter.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... blood filter. 870.4270 Section 870.4270 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF... Devices § 870.4270 Cardiopulmonary bypass cardiotomy suction line blood filter. (a) Identification. A cardiopulmonary bypass cardiotomy suction line blood filter is a device used as part of a gas exchange (oxygenator...

  16. Ketamine has no effect on oxygenation indices following elective coronary artery bypass grafting under cardiopulmonary bypass

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Parthasarathi Gayatri

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Cardiopulmonary bypass is known to elicit systemic inflammatory response syndrome and organ dysfunction. This can result in pulmonary dysfunction and deterioration of oxygenation after cardiac surgery and cardiopulmonary bypass. Previous studies have reported varying results on anti-inflammatory strategies and oxygenation after cardiopulmonary bypass. Ketamine administered as a single dose at induction has been shown to reduce the pro-inflammatory serum markers in patients undergoing cardiopulmonary bypass. Therefore we investigated if ketamine can result in better oxygenation in these patients. This was a prospective randomized blinded study. Eighty consecutive adult patients undergoing elective coronary artery bypass grafting under cardiopulmonary bypass were included in the study. Patients were divided into two groups. Patients in ketamine group received 1mg/kg of ketamine intravenously at induction of anesthesia. Control group patients received an equal volume of saline. All patients received standard anesthesia, operative and postoperative care.Paired t test and independent sample t test were used to compare the inter-group and between group oxygenation indices respectively. Oxygenation index and duration of ventilation were analyzed. Deterioration of oxygenation index was noted in both the groups after cardiopulmonary bypass. However, there was no significant difference in the oxygenation index at various time points after cardiopulmonary bypass or the duration of ventilation between the two groups. This study shows that the administered as a single dose at induction does not result in better oxygenation after cardiopulmonary bypass.

  17. Video-assisted minimally invasive coronary operations without cardiopulmonary bypass : A multicenter study

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Benetti, F; Mariani, MA; Sani, G; Boonstra, PW; Grandjean, JG; Giomarelli, P; Toscano, M

    1996-01-01

    Objective: The need to avoid the risks associated with cardiopulmonary bypass has led to the interest in coronary operations without cardiopulmonary bypass, Patients and methods: From April 1994 to September 1995, 44 patients (mean age 63.3 +/- 10.0 years, range 43 to 83 years) were selected for

  18. Cardiopulmonary laboratory biomarkers in the evaluation of acute dyspnea

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Stokes NR

    2016-05-01

    Full Text Available Natalie R Stokes,1 Brett W Dietz,1 Jackson J Liang2 1Perelman School of Medicine, University of Pennsylvania, 2Cardiovascular Division, Hospital of the University of Pennsylvania, Philadelphia, PA, USAAbstract: Dyspnea is a common chief complaint in the emergency department, with over 4 million visits annually in the US. Establishing the correct diagnosis can be challenging, because the subjective sensation of dyspnea can result from a wide array of underlying pathology, including pulmonary, cardiac, neurologic, psychiatric, toxic, and metabolic disorders. Further, the presence of dyspnea is linked with increased mortality in a variety of conditions, and misdiagnosis of the cause of dyspnea leads to poor patient-level outcomes. In combination with the history and physical, efficient, and focused use of laboratory studies, the various cardiopulmonary biomarkers can be useful in establishing the correct diagnosis and guiding treatment decisions in a timely manner. Use and interpretation of such tests must be guided by the clinical context, as well as an understanding of the current evidence supporting their use. This review discusses current standards and research regarding the use of established and emerging cardiopulmonary laboratory markers in the evaluation of acute dyspnea, focusing on recent evidence assessing the diagnostic and prognostic utility of various tests. These markers include brain natriuretic peptide (BNP and N-terminal prohormone (NT-proBNP, mid-regional peptides proatrial NP and proadrenomedullin, cardiac troponins, D-dimer, soluble ST2, and galectin 3, and included is a discussion on the use of arterial and venous blood gases.Keywords: cardiopulmonary, emergency, heart failure, troponin, BNP, galectin 3, MR-proANP, MR-proADM

  19. Impaired cardiopulmonary exercise capacity in patients with hyperthyroidism.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kahaly, G; Hellermann, J; Mohr-Kahaly, S; Treese, N

    1996-01-01

    Hyperthyroidism (H) has been implicated as a primary cause of decreased exercise tolerance. To our knowledge, analysis of respiratory gas exchange, an efficient noninvasive method in evaluating cardiopulmonary capacity, has not been performed in patients with H. Using cardiopulmonary exercise testing, 12 consecutive women with Graves' H were examined and controlled in euthyroidism (E). Eighteen women with E, in whom cardiac catheterization had ruled out heart disease, served as control subjects (C). The ventilatory anaerobic threshold was determined by means of the V-slope method. Ergometry was performed with patients in a semisupine position using a continuous ramp protocol of 20 W/min. Echocardiography at rest was performed in all patients. In patients with H, heart rate at rest was higher than in patients with E (p lower increase between rest and anaerobic threshold compared with E patients (p = 0.007) and C (p = 0.009). Work rate was reduced (H, 50% vs E, 70%; p = 0.038). In H patients, the anaerobic threshold occurred at 59.6% of maximal oxygen uptake and 72% in E patients, respectively (p = 0.024). In H patients, the linear regression of the heart rate to oxygen uptake ratio showed a reduced slope in comparison with E patients (p = 0.001) and C (p = 0.004). In patients with H, a reduced tidal volume (p = 0.021) and an increased respiratory rate (p = 0.003) in comparison to patients with E were demonstrated. Echocardiographically, H patients had an increased ejection fraction (p = 0.008) and a higher cardiac index (p = 0.008) in comparison with E patients. Analysis of respiratory gas exchange showed marked alterations of cardiopulmonary exercise capacity in H patients, which are reversible in E patients. The impaired chronotropic response during exercise might be the primary limiting factor of reduced work capacity in patients with H.

  20. Severe acute haemorrhagic liver failure in a neonate with a favourable spontaneous outcome

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cavet, Madeleine; Balu, Marie; Garel, Catherine; Ducou le Pointe, Hubert; Mitanchez, Delphine; Alexandre, Marie; Renolleau, Sylvain; Pariente, Daniele

    2008-01-01

    Acute liver failure in neonates is rare and is frequently associated with an unfavourable outcome. There is no curative treatment other than liver transplantation. Screening for viral, metabolic, toxic or vascular disease is essential to assess the prognosis and to guide specific treatment. Hepatic haemorrhage in neonates is often associated with bacterial infection, trauma and coagulopathies. We present a unique case of neonatal acute liver failure and multifocal massive haemorrhagic intrahepatic lesions of traumatic origin, documented by US and MRI. The patient made a spontaneous recovery. Clinical, biological and imaging outcome was excellent despite the apparent severity of the initial features. The only possible aetiology was a difficult caesarean delivery for mild fetal macrosomia. (orig.)

  1. Infrastructure and clinical practice for the detection and management of trauma-associated haemorrhage and coagulopathy

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Driessen, Annemariek; Schäfer, N; Albrecht, V

    2015-01-01

    of trauma-associated haemorrhage and coagulopathy, we have conducted a web-based survey amongst the delegates to the 15th European Congress of Trauma and Emergency Surgery (ECTES) and the 2nd World Trauma (WT) Congress held in Frankfurt, Germany, 25-27 May 2014. RESULTS: 446/1,540 delegates completed...... frequently used strategies for early detection and monitoring of bleeding trauma patients with coagulopathy. Only 30% of the respondents declared to use extended coagulation assays to better characterise the bleeding and coagulopathy prompted by more individualised treatment concepts. Most trauma centres (69...... intake of anticoagulants including "new oral anticoagulants" and platelet inhibitors as an increasing threat to bleeding trauma patients. CONCLUSIONS: This study confirms differences in infrastructure, logistics and clinical practice for the detection and management of trauma-haemorrhage and trauma...

  2. CT Scan Features of Presumptive Haemorrhagic Stroke in a Dog with Cushing’s Disease

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. Liotta

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available A 9-year-old, intact male, Brie’s shepherd dog, with a 10-day history of depression and tachypnoea developed signs of central neurological dysfunction. 16 Multislice Computed Tomography (CT pre- and postcontrast studies of the brain revealed a single intra-axial homogeneous well-circumscribed hyperattenuating (+/− 62 HU and noncontrast-enhancing area, 5 mm in diameter, in the caudal part of the mesencephalon. This finding was highly suggestive of a haemorrhagic event. A pituitary-dependent hyperadrenocorticism (PDH was identified and is considered likely to be the underlying cause. A repeat CT scan examination, 2 months later, showed almost complete resolution of the brain lesion. The present case describes a solitary 5 mm diameter lesion: the result of intracranial haemorrhage in a dog with presumed PDH.

  3. Efficacy of intra-arterial nimodipine in the treatment of cerebral vasospasm complicating subarachnoid haemorrhage

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hui, C. [Department of Diagnostic Imaging, Monash Medical Centre, Clayton, Vic. (Australia)]. E-mail: cathryn.hui@southernhealth.org.au; Lau, K.P. [Department of Diagnostic Imaging, Monash Medical Centre, Clayton, Vic. (Australia)

    2005-09-01

    AIM: To examine the efficacy and safety of nimodipine as an alternative to papaverine for the treatment of cerebral vasospasm following subarachnoid haemorrhage. METHODS: We retrospectively reviewed the procedure reports, anaesthetic records, clinical charts and CT and angiographic images of 9 patients who had received intra-arterial nimodipine; 1 of these patients received both nimodipine and papaverine. The difference in arterial luminal diameter before and after treatment was calculated as a percentage change. RESULTS: The average dose of nimodipine administered per vessel was 3.3 mg. The mean increase in arterial diameter was 66.6% in the vasospastic segment. There was no significant change in blood pressure of any of the subjects during endovascular treatment of vasospasm. CONCLUSION: Intra-arterial nimodipine is effective in improving angiographic vasospasm complicating subarachnoid haemorrhage. Further studies aimed at examining the clinical benefits of nimodipine are warranted, particularly in view of the low risk of adverse side effects of nimopidine when compared with papaverine.

  4. Bilateral adrenal haemorrhage associated with heparin-induced thrombocytopaenia during treatment of Fournier gangrene.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tattersall, Timothy Lee; Thangasamy, Isaac A; Reynolds, Jamie

    2014-10-14

    We present a case of bilateral adrenal haemorrhage (BAH) associated with heparin-induced thrombocytopaenia (HIT) in a 61-year-old man admitted to hospital for the treatment of Fournier's gangrene. He presented to hospital with scrotal swelling and fever, and developed spreading erythaema and a gangrenous scrotum. His scrotum was surgically debrided and intravenous broad-spectrum antibiotics were administered. Unfractionated heparin was given postoperatively for venous thromboembolism prophylaxis. The patient deteriorated clinically 8-11 days postoperatively with delirium, chest pain and severe hypertension followed by hypotension and thrombocytopaenia. Abdominal CT scan revealed bilateral adrenal haemorrhage. Antibodies to the heparin-platelet factor 4 complex were present. HIT-associated BAH was diagnosed and heparin was discontinued. Intravenous bivalirudin and hydrocortisone were started, with rapid improvement in clinical status. BAH is a rare complication of HIT and should be considered in the postoperative patient with unexplained clinical deterioration. 2014 BMJ Publishing Group Ltd.

  5. Bilateral large subconjunctival haemorrhages unmasking immune thrombocytopenic purpura during retinopathy of prematurity screening.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chandra, Parijat; Kumawat, Devesh; Kumar, Vinod; Tewari, Ruchir

    2017-10-04

    Although thrombocytopenia is known to be associated with pathogenesis of retinopathy of prematurity (ROP), immune thrombocytopenic purpura (ITP) is rare in infancy and not reported to occur with ROP. A preterm infant with aggressive posterior ROP developed bilateral massive subconjunctival haemorrhage after scleral indentation during screening. On evaluation, the infant was found to have severe ITP. Following intravenous transfusion of platelets and immunoglobulin, platelet counts improved and subconjunctival haemorrhage resolved over time. This case highlights the unusual presentation of ITP and also discusses the association of thrombocytopenia with ROP. Ophthalmologists should get prompt haematological work-up of such occurrences. © BMJ Publishing Group Ltd (unless otherwise stated in the text of the article) 2017. All rights reserved. No commercial use is permitted unless otherwise expressly granted.

  6. Severe acute haemorrhagic liver failure in a neonate with a favourable spontaneous outcome

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cavet, Madeleine; Balu, Marie; Garel, Catherine; Ducou le Pointe, Hubert [Universite Pierre et Marie Curie Paris VI, Service de Radiologie, Hopital d' enfants Armand-Trousseau, Paris (France); Mitanchez, Delphine; Alexandre, Marie [Universite Pierre et Marie Curie Paris VI, Service de Neonatologie, Hopital d' enfants Armand-Trousseau, Paris (France); Renolleau, Sylvain [Universite Pierre et Marie Curie Paris VI, Service de Reanimation, Hopital d' enfants Armand-Trousseau, Paris (France); Pariente, Daniele [Hopital de Bicetre, Service de Radiologie Pediatrique, Paris (France)

    2008-10-15

    Acute liver failure in neonates is rare and is frequently associated with an unfavourable outcome. There is no curative treatment other than liver transplantation. Screening for viral, metabolic, toxic or vascular disease is essential to assess the prognosis and to guide specific treatment. Hepatic haemorrhage in neonates is often associated with bacterial infection, trauma and coagulopathies. We present a unique case of neonatal acute liver failure and multifocal massive haemorrhagic intrahepatic lesions of traumatic origin, documented by US and MRI. The patient made a spontaneous recovery. Clinical, biological and imaging outcome was excellent despite the apparent severity of the initial features. The only possible aetiology was a difficult caesarean delivery for mild fetal macrosomia. (orig.)

  7. Severe postpartum haemorrhage after vaginal delivery: a statistical process control chart to report seven years of continuous quality improvement.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dupont, Corinne; Occelli, Pauline; Deneux-Tharaux, Catherine; Touzet, Sandrine; Duclos, Antoine; Bouvier-Colle, Marie-Hélène; Rudigoz, René-Charles; Huissoud, Cyril

    2014-07-01

    Severe postpartum haemorrhage after vaginal delivery: a statistical process control chart to report seven years of continuous quality improvement To use statistical process control charts to describe trends in the prevalence of severe postpartum haemorrhage after vaginal delivery. This assessment was performed 7 years after we initiated a continuous quality improvement programme that began with regular criteria-based audits Observational descriptive study, in a French maternity unit in the Rhône-Alpes region. Quarterly clinical audit meetings to analyse all cases of severe postpartum haemorrhage after vaginal delivery and provide feedback on quality of care with statistical process control tools. The primary outcomes were the prevalence of severe PPH after vaginal delivery and its quarterly monitoring with a control chart. The secondary outcomes included the global quality of care for women with severe postpartum haemorrhage, including the performance rate of each recommended procedure. Differences in these variables between 2005 and 2012 were tested. From 2005 to 2012, the prevalence of severe postpartum haemorrhage declined significantly, from 1.2% to 0.6% of vaginal deliveries (pcontrol limits, that is, been out of statistical control. The proportion of cases that were managed consistently with the guidelines increased for all of their main components. Implementation of continuous quality improvement efforts began seven years ago and used, among other tools, statistical process control charts. During this period, the prevalence of severe postpartum haemorrhage after vaginal delivery has been reduced by 50%. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  8. INTERFERENCE OF UNIDIRECTIONAL SHOCK WAVES

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    P. V. Bulat

    2015-05-01

    Full Text Available Subject of study.We consider interference of unidirectional shock waves or, as they are called, catching up shock waves. The scope of work is to give a classification of the shock-wave structures that arise in this type of interaction of shock waves, and the area of their existence. Intersection of unidirectional shock waves results in arising of a shock-wave structure at the intersection point, which contains the main shock wave, tangential discontinuity and one more reflected gas-dynamic discontinuity of unknown beforehand type. The problem of determining the type of reflected discontinuity is the main problem that one has to solve in the study of catching shock waves interference. Main results.The paper presents the pictures of shock-wave structures arising at the interaction of catching up shock waves. The areas with a regular and irregular unidirectional interaction of shocks are described. Characteristic shock-wave structures are of greatest interest, where reflected gas-dynamic discontinuity degenerates into discontinuous characteristics. Such structures have a number of extreme properties. We have found the areas of existence for such shock-wave structures. There are also areas in which the steady-state solution is not available. The latter has determined revival of interest for the theoretical study of the problem, because the facts of sudden shock-wave structure destruction inside the air intake of supersonic aircrafts at high Mach numbers have been discovered. Practical significance.The theory of interference for unidirectional shock waves and design procedure are usable in the design of supersonic air intakes. It is also relevant for application possibility investigation of catching up oblique shock waves to create overcompressed detonation in perspective detonation air-jet and rocket engines.

  9. Vacuum-assisted drainage in cardiopulmonary bypass: advantages and disadvantages.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carvalho Filho, Elio Barreto de; Marson, Fernando Augusto de Lima; Costa, Loredana Nilkenes Gomes da; Antunes, Nilson

    2014-01-01

    Systematic review of vacuum assisted drainage in cardiopulmonary bypass, demonstrating its advantages and disadvantages, by case reports and evidence about its effects on microcirculation. We conducted a systematic search on the period 1997-2012, in the databases PubMed, Medline, Lilacs and SciELO. Of the 70 selected articles, 26 were included in the review. Although the vacuum assisted drainage has significant potential for complications and requires appropriate technology and professionalism, prevailed in literature reviewed the concept that vacuum assisted drainage contributed in reducing the rate of transfusions, hemodilutions, better operative field, no significant increase in hemolysis, reduced complications surgical, use of lower prime and of smaller diameter cannulas.

  10. [2018 National consensus on cardiopulmonary resuscitation training in China].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Lixiang; Meng, Qingyi; Yu, Tao

    2018-05-01

    To promote the technical training and scientific popularization of cardiopulmonary resuscitation (CPR) in China, the Cardiopulmonary Resuscitation Specialized Committee of Chinese Research Hospital Association combined with the Science Popularization Branch of the Chinese Medical Association wrote "2018 National consensus on cardiopulmonary resuscitation training in China". The formation was based on the general outline about "2016 National consensus on cardiopulmonary resuscitation in China", and to implement the important strategies included the "three pre" policy, prevention, precognition, and pre-warning, before the cardiac arrest (CA); the "three modernization" methods, standardized, diversified and individualized, during the CA; and the "three life" strategies, the rebirth, the extra and the extended, after the CA; and also combined with the concrete National conditions and clinical practice of China area. The document summarized the evidence of published science about CPR training till now, and recommend the establishment of "the CPR Training Triangle" according to the Chinese National conditions. The bases of the triangle were system, training and person, the core of which was CPR science. The main contents were: (1) The "three training" policy for CPR training: the cultivation of a sound system, which included professional credibility, extensive mobilization and continuous driving force, and the participation of the whole people and continuous improvement; the cultivation of scientific guidelines, which included scientific content, methods and thinking; and the cultivation of a healthy culture, which included the enhancement of civic quality, education of rescue scientifically, and advocate of healthy life. (2) The "three training" program of CPR training: training professional skills, which included standard, multiple, and individual skills; training multidimensional, which included time, space, and human; and training flexible, including problem, time

  11. Education Strategies Through Simulation For Training In Cardiopulmonary Resuscitation Treatment

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Regimar Carla Machado

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Theoretical and reflective study based on scientific literature and critical analysis of authors related to teaching strategies through simulation for training in cardiopulmonary resuscitation (CPR. Current teaching methodologies CPR involve realistic simulation strategies and simulations in virtual environments, but the first method provides the best results, allowing proactivity of individuals in their teaching-learning process and bringing them the experience of a life threatening situation. It is noteworthy that health professionals need to be able to assist a victim in cardiac arrest, but even  existing effective teaching methodologies to enable them in this subject, is not fully applicable in the Brazilian context of health education.

  12. Digital subtraction cardiopulmonary angiography using FCR (Fuji computed radiography)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tanimura, Shigeo; Tomoyasu, Hiroshi; Banba, Jiro; Masaki, Mikio; Kanno, Yukio; Abe, Kazuo

    1987-01-01

    Digital subtraction cardiopulmonary angiography using FCR was performed on 46 patients including lung cancer, mediastinal tumor, giant bullous formation and others. The images of digital subtraction for pulmonary artery, pulmonary vein and thoracic aorta were studied by comparing to the conventional pulmonary angiogram. Good images of pulmonary artery due to digital subtraction were obtained in 80 % of the 45 cases. This method needed only half volume of contrast media compared to the conventional for obtaining good images and thus reduced side effect. Therefore this method seems to be an usefull pre-operative examination in various chest diseases, especially in case of lung cancer. (author)

  13. Cardiopulmonary Exercise Testing in Patients with Idiopathic Scoliosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shen, Jianxiong; Lin, Youxi; Luo, Jinmei; Xiao, Yi

    2016-10-05

    Scoliosis causes impairment of the respiratory and cardiovascular systems. Traditional pulmonary function tests only examine patients under static conditions. The aim of our study was to investigate the correlation between radiographic parameters and dynamic cardiopulmonary capacity in patients with idiopathic scoliosis. Forty patients with idiopathic scoliosis were included in this prospective study from January 2014 to February 2016. The patients underwent full radiographic assessment of deformity, pulmonary function testing, and cardiopulmonary bicycle ergometer testing. The impact of the severity of thoracic curvature and kyphosis on pulmonary function and physical capacity was investigated. Thirty-three female patients with a mean age of 15.5 years (range, 11 to 35 years) and coronal thoracic curvature of 49.4° (range, 24° to 76°) and 7 male subjects with a mean age of 15.9 years (range, 13 to 18 years) and coronal thoracic curvature of 47.1°(range, 22° to 80°) were included. No correlation was found between coronal thoracic curvature and pulmonary function test results in the female patients. Female patients with a thoracic curve of ≥60° had lower blood oxygen saturation at maximal exercise in the cardiopulmonary exercise test (p = 0.032). Female patients with a thoracic curve of ≥50° had a higher respiratory rate (p = 0.041) and ventilation volume per minute (p = 0.046) and lower breathing reserve at maximal exercise (p = 0.038). Thoracic kyphosis in female patients was positively correlated with pulmonary function, as shown by the forced expiratory volume in 1 second (r = 0.456, p = 0.01), forced vital capacity (r = 0.366, p = 0.043), vital capacity (r = 0.525, p = 0.006), and total lung capacity (r = 0.388, p = 0.031), as well as with tidal volume (r = 0.401, p = 0.025) in cardiopulmonary exercise testing. Female patients who engaged in regular exercise had better peak oxygen intake normalized by body weight (p rate (p = 0.020), and heart rate

  14. Effectiveness of Per Rectal Misoprostol Versus Intramuscular Oxytocin for Prevention of Primary Postpartum Haemorrhage.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Asmat, Raheela; Ashraf, Tasneem; Asmat, Fazila; Asmat, Shakila; Asmat, Nagina

    2017-01-01

    To compare the effectiveness of per rectal misoprostol over oxytocin in primary postpartum haemorrhage (PPH). Randomised controlled trial study. Gynaecology and Obstetrics Department, Unit IV, Bolan Medical Complex Hospital, Quetta, from September 2013 to February 2014. Emergency obstetric patients receiving per rectal misoprostol (800 µgm) were named as group 'A' and those receiving 10 units oxytocin intramuscularly were labelled as group 'B'. The patients were followed within 24 hours of spontaneous vaginal deliveries. Pads soaked were used to assess the amount of blood loss. A total of 1,678 patients were included in the study. The mean age of patients in group-A was 29.11 years while the mean age of patients in group-B was 29.16 years. One hundred and twenty-three (14.66%) patients in group-A and 120 (14.31%) patients in group-B had PPH. Among the total 1,678 patients, 243 (14.49%) had postpartum haemorrhage among whom 24 (9.88%) had major haemorrhage with a blood loss ≥1000 mL. Among the sub-group (839 patients) administered misoprostol had 123 (14.66%) patients with blood loss greater than 500 mL and the rest 716 patients (85.34%) had blood loss less than 500 mL. The sub-group administered oxytocin have 120 (14.31%) out of 839 patients with postpartum haemorrhage while 719 (85.69%) had blood loss less than 500 mL. Active management of 3rd stage of labour with per rectal misoprostol administration was as effective as intramuscular oxytocin. Both were equally effective to reduce PPH and the subsequent need for surgical interventions.

  15. Neurosarcoidosis-related intracranial haemorrhage: three new cases and a systematic review of the literature.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    O'Dwyer, J P

    2012-06-09

    BACKGROUND AND PURPOSE: Intracranial haemorrhage in neurosarcoidosis (NS-ICH) is rare, poorly understood and the diagnosis of NS may not be immediately apparent. METHODS: The clinical features of three new NS-ICH cases are described including new neuropathological findings and collated with cases from a systematic literature review. RESULTS: Cases: (i) A 41-year-old man with headaches, hypoandrogenism and encephalopathy developed a cerebellar haemorrhage. He had neuropathological confirmation of NS with biopsy-proven angiocentric granulomata and venous disruption. He responded to immunosuppressive therapy. (ii) A 41-year-old man with no history of hypertension was found unconscious. A subsequently fatal pontine haemorrhage was diagnosed. Liver biopsy revealed sarcoid granulomas. (iii) A 36-year-old man with raised intracranial pressure headaches presented with a seizure and a frontal haemorrhage. Hilar lymph node biopsy confirmed sarcoidosis, and he was treated successfully. Systematic Review: Twelve other published cases were identified and collated with our cases. Average age was 36 years and M:F = 2.3:1; 46% presented with neurological symptoms and 31% had CNS-isolated disease. Immediate symptoms of ICH were acute\\/worsening headache or seizures (60%). ICH was supratentorial (62%), infratentorial (31%) or subarachnoid (7%). 40% had definite NS, 53% probable NS and 7% possible NS (Zajicek criteria). Antigranulomatous\\/immunosuppressive therapy regimens varied and 31% died. CONCLUSIONS: This series expands our knowledge of the pathology of NS-ICH, which may be of arterial or venous origin. One-third have isolated NS. Clinicians should consider NS in young-onset ICH because early aggressive antigranulomatous therapy may improve outcome.

  16. Neonatal cerebral oxygenation is not linked to foetal vasculitis and predicts intraventricular haemorrhage in preterm infants

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sørensen, Line Carøe; Maroun, Lisa Leth; Borch, K.

    2008-01-01

    AIM: The aim of the study was to compare the cerebral tissue oxygenation index (c-TOI) measured by near infrared spectroscopy (NIRS) in infants with and without foetal vasculitis. METHODS: Twenty-four infants with placental signs of a foetal inflammatory response (FIR), foetal vasculitis, were.......002). CONCLUSION: Cerebral oxygenation was not affected in the first day of life in preterm infants born with foetal vasculitis, while cerebral oxygenation in infants that later developed intraventricular haemorrhage was impaired Udgivelsesdato: 2008/11...

  17. Neonatal cerebral oxygenation is not linked to foetal vasculitis and predicts intraventricular haemorrhage in preterm infants

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sorensen, Line C; Maroun, Lisa L; Borch, Klaus

    2008-01-01

    Aim: The aim of the study was to compare the cerebral tissue oxygenation index (c-TOI) measured by near infrared spectroscopy (NIRS) in infants with and without foetal vasculitis. Methods: Twenty-four infants with placental signs of a foetal inflammatory response (FIR), foetal vasculitis, were.......002). Conclusion: Cerebral oxygenation was not affected in the first day of life in preterm infants born with foetal vasculitis, while cerebral oxygenation in infants that later developed intraventricular haemorrhage was impaired....

  18. Gastrointestinal haemorrhage due to lymphangiectasia caused by protein-losing enteropathy in the Fontan circulation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gras, Pauline; Gottrand, Frédéric; Godart, François

    2017-10-01

    We report the case of a 14-year-old boy with severe protein-losing enteropathy after Fontan surgery that led to lymphangiectasia, which caused gastrointestinal haemorrhage and required invasive treatment to stop the bleeding. Through this case and a review of the literature on protein-losing enteropathy after Fontan surgery, we highlight a rare and serious presentation of the disease and the difficulties of diagnosis and management.

  19. Emergence of a new lagovirus related to rabbit haemorrhagic disease virus

    OpenAIRE

    Le Gall-Recule, Ghislaine; Lavazza, Antonio; Marchandeau, Stephane; Bertagnoli, Stéphane; Zwingelstein, Francoise; Cavadini, Patrizia; Martinelli, Nicola; Lombardi, Guerino; Guérin, Jean-Luc; Lemaitre, Evelyne; Decors, Anouk; Boucher, Samuel; Le Normand, Bernadette; Capucci, Lorenzo

    2013-01-01

    Since summer 2010, numerous cases of Rabbit Haemorrhagic Disease (RHD) have been reported in north-western France both in rabbitries, affecting RHD-vaccinated rabbits, and in wild populations. We demonstrate that the aetiological agent was a lagovirus phylogenetically distinct from other lagoviruses and which presents a unique antigenic profile. Experimental results show that the disease differs from RHD in terms of disease duration, mortality rates, higher occurrence of subacute/chronic form...

  20. Crimean-Congo Haemorrhagic Fever in Kosova : a fatal case report

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Raka Lul

    2006-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Crimean-Congo haemorrhagic fever (CCHF is an often fatal viral infection described in about 30 countries around the world. The authors report a fatal case of Crimean-Congo hemorrhagic fever (CCHF observed in a patient from Kosova. The diagnosis of CCHF was confirmed by reverse transcription-PCR. Late diagnosis decreased the efficacy of treatment and patient died due to severe complications of infection.

  1. Biochemical and functional characterization of Bothropoidin: the first haemorrhagic metalloproteinase from Bothrops pauloensis snake venom.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gomes, Mário Sérgio R; Naves de Souza, Dayane L; Guimarães, Denise O; Lopes, Daiana S; Mamede, Carla C N; Gimenes, Sarah Natalie C; Achê, David C; Rodrigues, Renata S; Yoneyama, Kelly A G; Borges, Márcia H; de Oliveira, Fábio; Rodrigues, Veridiana M

    2015-03-01

    We present the biochemical and functional characterization of Bothropoidin, the first haemorrhagic metalloproteinase isolated from Bothrops pauloensis snake venom. This protein was purified after three chromatographic steps on cation exchange CM-Sepharose fast flow, size-exclusion column Sephacryl S-300 and anion exchange Capto Q. Bothropoidin was homogeneous by SDS-PAGE under reducing and non-reducing conditions, and comprised a single chain of 49,558 Da according to MALDI TOF analysis. The protein presented an isoelectric point of 3.76, and the sequence of six fragments obtained by MS (MALDI TOF\\TOF) showed a significant score when compared with other PIII Snake venom metalloproteinases (SVMPs). Bothropoidin showed proteolytic activity on azocasein, Aα-chain of fibrinogen, fibrin, collagen and fibronectin. The enzyme was stable at pH 6-9 and at lower temperatures when assayed on azocasein. Moreover, its activity was inhibited by EDTA, 1.10-phenanthroline and β-mercaptoethanol. Bothropoidin induced haemorrhage [minimum haemorrhagic dose (MHD) = 0.75 µg], inhibited platelet aggregation induced by collagen and ADP, and interfered with viability and cell adhesion when incubated with endothelial cells in a dose and time-dependent manner. Our results showed that Bothropoidin is a haemorrhagic metalloproteinase that can play an important role in the toxicity of B. pauloensis envenomation and might be used as a tool for studying the effects of SVMPs on haemostatic disorders and tumour metastasis. © The Authors 2014. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of the Japanese Biochemical Society. All rights reserved.

  2. Molecular epidemiology of Rabbit Haemorrhagic Disease Virus (RHDV) in Australia: when one became many

    OpenAIRE

    Kovaliski, John; Sinclair, Ron; Mutze, Greg; Peacock, David; Strive, Tanja; Abrantes, Joana; Esteves, Pedro J.; Holmes, Edward C.

    2013-01-01

    Rabbit Haemorrhagic Disease Virus (RHDV) was introduced into Australia in 1995 as a biological control agent against the wild European rabbit (Oryctolagus cuniculus). We evaluated its evolution over a 16 year period (1995–2011) by examining 50 isolates collected throughout Australia, as well as the original inoculum strains. Phylogenetic analysis of capsid protein VP60 sequences of the Australian isolates, compared to those sampled globally, revealed that they form a monophyletic group with t...

  3. Intracranial haemorrhage following lumbar myelography: case report and review of the literature

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Suess, O.; Stendel, R.; Baur, S.; Schilling, A.; Brock, M.

    2000-01-01

    We describe a subacute intracranial subdural haematoma following lumbar myelography. This rare but potentially life-threatening complication has been reported both after lumbar myelography and following lumbar puncture for spinal anaesthesia. We review 16 previously reported cases of intracranial haemorrhage following lumbar myelography, and discuss the pathogenesis. In all reported cases post-puncture headache was the leading symptom and should therefore be regarded as a warning sign. (orig.)

  4. Superior cerebellar aneurysm causing subarachnoid haemorrhage in a 17-year-old with alagille syndrome.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    O'Connell, David

    2012-04-01

    Alagille syndrome is a rare autosomal dominant condition characterised by mutation in Jagged1 gene. Intracranial aneurysms may be seen in this condition and may present as subarachnoid hemorrhage. We describe the first case of superior cerebellar aneurysm rupture causing WFNS grade 1 subarachnoid haemorrhage in a 17-year-old girl. The clinical condition and management of this rare occurrence is discussed with a review of literature.

  5. Clinical symptoms according to genotype amongst patients with hereditary haemorrhagic telangiectasia

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kjeldsen, A D; Møller, T R; Brusgaard, K

    2005-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Hereditary haemorrhagic telangiectasia (HHT) is a dominantly inherited disease, characterized by a wide variety of clinical manifestations, including epistaxis, gastrointestinal (GI) bleeding, pulmonary arteriovenous malformations (PAVMs) and neurological symptoms. HHT is a genetically...... patients had experienced more severe GI bleeding than HHT2 patients. There was no significant difference in severity of epistaxis or age at debut. Finally the mortality over a 90-month observation period was not significantly increased....

  6. Post-surgery lung torsion and haemorrhagic infarction - a case report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Noemayr, A.; Schmitt, R.; Wichert, C.; Bautz, W.; Rupprecht, H.

    1998-01-01

    Lung or lobe torsion may occur after thoracic surgery, chest trauma, pneumothorax, pneumonia, or even spontaneously. Lung infarction is a possible complication. The characteristic radiological signs on plain radiographs are opacification and/or displacement of lobes and hilus structures. CT-signs of haemorrhagic infarction are opacification and multiple punctate gas accumulations. The bronchus could be interrupted at the level of the torsion (''bronchus cutoff''). (orig.) [de

  7. Neurologic Manifestation as Initial Presentation in a Case of Hereditary Haemorrhagic Telangiectasia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yeow Kwan Teo

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available Hereditary Haemorrhagic Telangiectasia (HHT, or Osler-Weber-Rendu syndrome is an uncommon autosomal dominant multi-organ condition of vascular dysplasias. We describe a 19 year old Indian female who presented with cerebral abscess secondary to paradoxical emboli from pulmonary arteriovenous malformations (PAVMs associated with HHT. Cerebral, pulmonary, hepatic and gastrointestinal involvement can be life-threatening and it is important to have lifelong follow-ups on these patients.

  8. Shock tube Multiphase Experiments

    Science.gov (United States)

    Middlebrooks, John; Allen, Roy; Paudel, Manoj; Young, Calvin; Musick, Ben; McFarland, Jacob

    2017-11-01

    Shock driven multiphase instabilities (SDMI) are unique physical phenomena that have far-reaching practical applications in engineering and science. The instability is present in high energy explosions, scramjet combustors, and supernovae events. The SDMI arises when a multiphase interface is impulsively accelerated by the passage of a shockwave. It is similar in development to the Richtmyer-Meshkov (RM) instability however, particle-to-gas coupling is the driving mechanism of the SDMI. As particle effects such as lag and phase change become more prominent, the SDMI's development begins to significantly deviate from the RM instability. We have developed an experiment for studying the SDMI in our shock tube facility. In our experiments, a multiphase interface is created using a laminar jet and flowed into the shock tube where it is accelerated by the passage of a planar shockwave. The interface development is captured using CCD cameras synchronized with planar laser illumination. This talk will give an overview of new experiments conducted to examine the development of a shocked cylindrical multiphase interface. The effects of Atwood number, particle size, and a second acceleration (reshock) of the interface will be discussed.

  9. Teleconnected food supply shocks

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bren d'Amour, Christopher; Wenz, Leonie; Kalkuhl, Matthias; Steckel, Jan Christoph; Creutzig, Felix

    2016-03-01

    The 2008-2010 food crisis might have been a harbinger of fundamental climate-induced food crises with geopolitical implications. Heat-wave-induced yield losses in Russia and resulting export restrictions led to increases in market prices for wheat across the Middle East, likely contributing to the Arab Spring. With ongoing climate change, temperatures and temperature variability will rise, leading to higher uncertainty in yields for major nutritional crops. Here we investigate which countries are most vulnerable to teleconnected supply-shocks, i.e. where diets strongly rely on the import of wheat, maize, or rice, and where a large share of the population is living in poverty. We find that the Middle East is most sensitive to teleconnected supply shocks in wheat, Central America to supply shocks in maize, and Western Africa to supply shocks in rice. Weighing with poverty levels, Sub-Saharan Africa is most affected. Altogether, a simultaneous 10% reduction in exports of wheat, rice, and maize would reduce caloric intake of 55 million people living in poverty by about 5%. Export bans in major producing regions would put up to 200 million people below the poverty line at risk, 90% of which live in Sub-Saharan Africa. Our results suggest that a region-specific combination of national increases in agricultural productivity and diversification of trade partners and diets can effectively decrease future food security risks.

  10. STEREO interplanetary shocks and foreshocks

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Blanco-Cano, X.; Kajdič, P.; Aguilar-Rodríguez, E.; Russell, C. T.; Jian, L. K.; Luhmann, J. G.

    2013-01-01

    We use STEREO data to study shocks driven by stream interactions and the waves associated with them. During the years of the extended solar minimum 2007-2010, stream interaction shocks have Mach numbers between 1.1-3.8 and θ Bn ∼20-86°. We find a variety of waves, including whistlers and low frequency fluctuations. Upstream whistler waves may be generated at the shock and upstream ultra low frequency (ULF) waves can be driven locally by ion instabilities. The downstream wave spectra can be formed by both, locally generated perturbations, and shock transmitted waves. We find that many quasiperpendicular shocks can be accompanied by ULF wave and ion foreshocks, which is in contrast to Earth's bow shock. Fluctuations downstream of quasi-parallel shocks tend to have larger amplitudes than waves downstream of quasi-perpendicular shocks. Proton foreshocks of shocks driven by stream interactions have extensions dr ≤0.05 AU. This is smaller than foreshock extensions for ICME driven shocks. The difference in foreshock extensions is related to the fact that ICME driven shocks are formed closer to the Sun and therefore begin to accelerate particles very early in their existence, while stream interaction shocks form at ∼1 AU and have been producing suprathermal particles for a shorter time.

  11. STEREO interplanetary shocks and foreshocks

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Blanco-Cano, X. [Instituto de Geofisica, UNAM, CU, Coyoacan 04510 DF (Mexico); Kajdic, P. [IRAP-University of Toulouse, CNRS, Toulouse (France); Aguilar-Rodriguez, E. [Instituto de Geofisica, UNAM, Morelia (Mexico); Russell, C. T. [ESS and IGPP, University of California, Los Angeles, 603 Charles Young Drive, Los Angeles, CA 90095 (United States); Jian, L. K. [NASA Goddard Space Flight Center, Greenbelt, MD and University of Maryland, College Park, MD (United States); Luhmann, J. G. [SSL, University of California Berkeley (United States)

    2013-06-13

    We use STEREO data to study shocks driven by stream interactions and the waves associated with them. During the years of the extended solar minimum 2007-2010, stream interaction shocks have Mach numbers between 1.1-3.8 and {theta}{sub Bn}{approx}20-86 Degree-Sign . We find a variety of waves, including whistlers and low frequency fluctuations. Upstream whistler waves may be generated at the shock and upstream ultra low frequency (ULF) waves can be driven locally by ion instabilities. The downstream wave spectra can be formed by both, locally generated perturbations, and shock transmitted waves. We find that many quasiperpendicular shocks can be accompanied by ULF wave and ion foreshocks, which is in contrast to Earth's bow shock. Fluctuations downstream of quasi-parallel shocks tend to have larger amplitudes than waves downstream of quasi-perpendicular shocks. Proton foreshocks of shocks driven by stream interactions have extensions dr {<=}0.05 AU. This is smaller than foreshock extensions for ICME driven shocks. The difference in foreshock extensions is related to the fact that ICME driven shocks are formed closer to the Sun and therefore begin to accelerate particles very early in their existence, while stream interaction shocks form at {approx}1 AU and have been producing suprathermal particles for a shorter time.

  12. Ergometrine given during caesarean section and incidence of delayed postpartum haemorrhage due to uterine atony.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lourens, R; Paterson-Brown, S

    2007-11-01

    Delayed postpartum haemorrhage due to uterine atony after caesarean section was occurring in women in our recovery area despite many of them already having an oxytocin infusion running to prevent such a problem. We therefore decided to compare the incidence of such problems for a 2-month period before and after altering our uterotonic policy: in addition to the routine bolus dose of 5 units of oxytocin after delivery of the baby, we added 500 microg of intramuscular ergometrine during abdominal closure. We noticed a reduced number of massive postpartum haemorrhages due to an atonic uterus in the recovery room but an increased incidence of nausea and vomiting. No prophylactic anti-emetic was given during this pilot study. This small study suggests that 50 women would need to be given ergometrine at caesarean section to prevent one delayed massive haemorrhage from uterine atony and four extra women would suffer with vomiting. We feel this is reasonable and now use a prophylactic anti-emetic as well as delaying the ergometrine until closure of the rectus sheath which reduces the incidence of nausea and vomiting.

  13. In vitro contractile effects of agents used in the clinical management of postpartum haemorrhage.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Morrison, John J; Crosby, David A; Crankshaw, Denis J

    2016-10-15

    Uterine atony is a major cause of postpartum haemorrhage and maternal mortality. However, the comparative pharmacology of agents used to treat this condition is poorly understood. This study evaluates, using human pregnant myometrium in vitro, a range of contractile parameters for agents used in the clinical treatment of atonic postpartum haemorrhage. The effects of oxytocin, carbetocin, ergometrine, carboprost, syntometrine and misoprostol were investigated in 146 myometrial strips from 19 donors. The potency and maximal response values were obtained, and compared, using both maximal amplitude and mean contractile force as indices of contraction. Single, EC50 concentrations of the agents were administered and both force and contraction peak parameters were compared during a 15-min exposure. Differences were considered significant when Poxytocin and carbetocin being the most potent. The most important difference between the agents was in their ability to increase the mean contractile force, with oxytocin superior to all agents except syntometrine. In single dose experiments, mean contractile force was the parameter that separated the agents. In this respect, oxytocin was not statistically different from carboprost or syntometrine, but was superior to all other agents. These findings support a clear role for oxytocin as the first line agent for treatment of postpartum haemorrhage and raise doubts about the potential clinical usefulness of misoprostol. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  14. Transfusion of blood and blood component therapy for postpartum haemorrhage at a tertiary referral center

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hussain, N.; Shah, T.; Shah, N.; Khan, N.H.

    2011-01-01

    Objective: To determine the practice of transfusion of blood and blood products in cases of postpartum haemorrhage, at a tertiary referral center. Methods: A retrospective study was conducted where medical records were reviewed for women, who either delivered or were admitted in labour suite with diagnosis of postpartum haemorrhage. The study period extended from Jan 2008 to Oct 2009. During a period of 22 months, records were reviewed for transfusion of blood and blood products in above group of women. Data were analyzed for descriptive statistics. Results: During the study period, a total of 4744 patients were admitted in the labour suite. A total of 113 (2.36%) women were diagnosed with Post partum haemorrhage. Uterine atony was the commonest cause of PPH, followed by genital tract trauma. A total of 81(71%) women received transfusion of blood and blood components (1.6%). The mean blood loss was 1088 ml (+- 584ml). Transfusion of blood and blood component therapy was significantly more in women who underwent caesarean section, compared to those women who delivered vaginally. There was one case of acute tubular necrosis due to PPH, and seven maternal deaths. The mean hospital stay was of +- 3 days. Conclusion: In this hospital based study, the prevalence of PPH was 2.36 +- %, and the rate of transfusion of blood and blood products was 1.6%.

  15. Acute variceal haemorrhage in the United Kingdom: patient characteristics, management and outcomes in a nationwide audit.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jairath, Vipul; Rehal, Sunita; Logan, Richard; Kahan, Brennan; Hearnshaw, Sarah; Stanworth, Simon; Travis, Simon; Murphy, Michael; Palmer, Kelvin; Burroughs, Andrew

    2014-05-01

    Despite advances in treatment, acute variceal haemorrhage remains life-threatening. To describe contemporary characteristics, management and outcomes of patients with cirrhosis and acute variceal haemorrhage and risk factors for rebleeding and mortality. Multi-centre clinical audit conducted in 212 UK hospitals. In 526 cases of acute variceal haemorrhage, 66% underwent endoscopy within 24h with 64% (n=339) receiving endoscopic therapy. Prior to endoscopy, 57% (n=299) received proton pump inhibitors, 44% (n=232) vasopressors and 27% (n=144) antibiotics. 73% (n=386) received red cell transfusion, 35% (n=184) fresh frozen plasma and 14% (n=76) platelets, with widely varying transfusion thresholds. 26% (n=135) experienced further bleeding and 15% (n=80) died by day 30. The Model for End Stage Liver Disease score was the best predictor of mortality (area under the receiver operating curve=0.74, Prisk stratification tools are required to identify patients needing more intensive support. Copyright © 2013 Editrice Gastroenterologica Italiana S.r.l. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  16. Contrast-enhanced magnetic resonance imaging for the detection of acute haemorrhagic necrotizing pancreatitis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Piironen, A.; Kivisaari, R.; Pitkaeranta, P.; Poutanen, V.P.; Laippala, P.; Laurila, P.; Kivisaari, L.

    1997-01-01

    Eleven piglets with haemorrhagic necrotizing pancreatitis and nine piglets with oedematous pancreatitis were imaged using a multi-breath-hold TurboFLASH (TR 6.5 ms, TE 3 ms, TI 300 ms, flip angle 8 , three slices) pre-excited T1-weighted sequence with an IV bolus injection of gadopentetate dimeglumine (Gd-DTPA, 0.3 mmol/kg) as a contrast agent to show dynamic contrast enhancement of the pancreas by MRI. All piglets were imaged according to the same protocol before inducing the disease. Following the IV Gd-DTPA bolus, time-enhancement curve of the pancreas during haemorrhagic necrotizing pancreatitis was significantly lower than during oedematous pancreatitis. The enhancement curves for the healthy piglets and piglets with oedematous pancreatitis did not differ significantly. Each piglet served as its own control. Because the results of this initial study are similar to those obtained with contrast-enhanced CT, we conclude that our results may encourage further clinical trials, and contrast-enhanced dynamic MRI may be an alternative to the established method of CT for diagnosing acute haemorrhagic necrotizing pancreatitis. (orig.). With 3 figs

  17. Diagnostic efficacy of molecular assays for the viral haemorrhagic septicaemia virus isolates from the Czech Republic

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ľubomír Pojezdal

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available The diagnostic properties of the one-step real-time reverse-transcription polymerase chain reaction assay for viral haemorrhagic septicaemia virus detection were compared to methods currently in use in the Czech Republic, namely, virus isolation using the cell culture and conventional reverse-transcription polymerase chain reaction followed by the nested polymerase chain reaction. The assays were tested on a panel of 25 archived viral haemorrhagic septicaemia isolates and 8 archived infectious haematopoietic necrosis isolates obtained from monitoring and/or outbreaks of the diseases among farmed salmonids in the Czech Republic. The ability to detect the presence of the virus in the tissues of fish was tested on additional 32 field samples collected from the rainbow trout (Oncorhynchus mykiss, brown trout (Salmo trutta and brook trout (Salvelinus fontinalis. The real-time assay showed the highest analytic sensitivity by detecting the presence of viral nucleic acid in samples with 10-7 dilution, whereas the sensitivity of the conventional polymerase chain reaction peaked at 10-5. Diagnostic specificity of both molecular assays was confirmed by absence of cross-reactivity with the infectious haematopoietic necrosis virus isolates. This, along with consistent results in the detection of the virus in the fish tissues, confirms that the one-step real-time reverse-transcription polymerase chain reaction is currently an optimal stand-alone diagnostic method for the detection of the viral haemorrhagic septicaemia virus.

  18. Intracerebral haemorrhage associated with hourly concentration of ambient particulate matter: case-crossover analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yamazaki, S; Nitta, H; Ono, M; Green, J; Fukuhara, S

    2007-01-01

    To examine the association of hourly time lagged concentration of ambient particulate matter and death due to stroke. Mortality data for five years (January 1990 to December 1994) were obtained from the Ministry of Health, Labour, and Welfare of Japan. Data were used only if the deceased was 65 years old or older at the time of death, if death was attributed to intracerebral haemorrhage or ischaemic stroke, and if the deceased lived in one of 13 major urban areas. Hourly mean concentrations of PM7, NO2, and photochemical oxidants were measured at monitoring stations in the 13 areas. Time stratified case-crossover analysis was used to examine the data for evidence of triggering stroke mortality. The 1-hour mean concentration of PM7 measured about 2 hours before death was associated with the risk of death due to intracerebral haemorrhage from April to September (odds ratio = 2.40, 95% CI 1.48 to 3.89, for exposure to PM7 of more than 200 microg/m3 (threshold)). The higher risk was independent of the 24-hour mean concentration of PM7. PM7 was not associated with death due to ischaemic stroke. Transiently high concentrations of PM7 are associated with death due to intracerebral haemorrhage. Air quality standards or guidelines for particulate matter should be based not only on 24-hour mean concentrations, but also on hourly data.

  19. Intracerebral haemorrhage associated with hourly concentration of ambient particulate matter: case‐crossover analysis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yamazaki, S; Nitta, H; Ono, M; Green, J; Fukuhara, S

    2007-01-01

    Aims To examine the association of hourly time lagged concentration of ambient particulate matter and death due to stroke. Methods Mortality data for five years (January 1990 to December 1994) were obtained from the Ministry of Health, Labour, and Welfare of Japan. Data were used only if the deceased was 65 years old or older at the time of death, if death was attributed to intracerebral haemorrhage or ischaemic stroke, and if the deceased lived in one of 13 major urban areas. Hourly mean concentrations of PM7, NO2, and photochemical oxidants were measured at monitoring stations in the 13 areas. Time stratified case‐crossover analysis was used to examine the data for evidence of triggering stroke mortality. Results The 1‐hour mean concentration of PM7 measured about 2 hours before death was associated with the risk of death due to intracerebral haemorrhage from April to September (odds ratio = 2.40, 95% CI 1.48 to 3.89, for exposure to PM7 of more than 200 μg/m3 (threshold)). The higher risk was independent of the 24‐hour mean concentration of PM7. PM7 was not associated with death due to ischaemic stroke. Conclusions Transiently high concentrations of PM7 are associated with death due to intracerebral haemorrhage. Air quality standards or guidelines for particulate matter should be based not only on 24‐hour mean concentrations, but also on hourly data. PMID:16847037

  20. Intraventricular haemorrhage in preterm infants--can we improve outcome by addressing coagulation?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kuperman, Amir A; Brenner, Benjamin; Kenet, Gili

    2015-11-01

    During the last few decades, the survival of preterm infants has increased dramatically. Nevertheless, with the increasing number of very young and extremely low birth weight infants, morbidity is still a major problem. Intraventricular Haemorrhage (IVH) is a major complication of preterm birth, and large haemorrhages or haemorrhages associated with parenchymal brain lesions may yield a high rate of future disability. IVH is a complex, multi-factorial disorder. Prematurity and low birth weight remain as its most important risk factors, affecting vulnerability of the germinal matrix as well as the coagulation system. Approximately 80% of IVHs occur by 72 h after birth, but a considerable proportion of IVH is already visible on the first cranial ultrasound scan within a few hours of birth. The hypothesis that a severe coagulation deficiency in the premature newborn could be a major contributing factor to IVH has been suggested, and small open label interventional studies targeting the premature coagulation system have been conducted with ethamsylate, vitamin K, fresh frozen plasma, recombinant activated factor VII and prothrombin complex concentrate. The outcome of these studies will be reviewed.

  1. Risk factors associated with postpartum haemorrhage at Juba Teaching Hospital, South Sudan, 2011

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Thomas Tako Akim Ujjiga

    2014-08-01

    Full Text Available Objective: To study risk factors associated with post partum haemorrhage (PPH in Juba Teaching Hospital, South Sudan. Method: An unmatched case control study was conducted in which 44 cases and 88 Controls were involved, from September to December 2011. Data was collected using a structured questionnaire in face to face interviews, and analyzed using Epi-info 3.5.3 statistical programme to determine if there was a correlation. Results: Maternal demographic and obstetric characteristics were found to be associated with the risk of bleeding during Bivariate analysis. However, age was found to confound emergency admission, uterotonic use (Oxytocin and Misoprostol use and delivery type, the latter being modified, in the development of post partum haemorrhage. Conclusion: These results indicate that active management of the third stage of labour (AMTSL and prompt intervention reduced the risk of developing PPH. Understanding the factors that cause PPH will allow us to better strengthen and effect pre delivery and emergency obstetric care which may help us reduce maternal mortality due to post partum haemorrhage.

  2. Henoch-Schönlein purpura with intracerebral haemorrhage in an adult patient: a case report

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    Karamadoukis Lazarus

    2008-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Introduction Henoch-Schönlein purpura is a small vessel vasculitis that affects mainly the skin, joints, gastrointestinal tract and kidneys. The central nervous system is also occasionally affected, although the majority of patients experience only mild symptoms such as headaches and behavioural changes. Intracerebral haemorrhage is a rare complication of Henoch-Schönlein purpura that so far has mainly been described in children and young adolescence. Case presentation We describe a 42-year-old man with Henoch-Schönlein purpura who developed an acute intracerebral haemorrhage that coincided with a reactivation of his vasculitis and the development of renal failure following discontinuation of steroids. In this patient, both the Henoch-Schönlein purpura and his neurological symptoms were successfully treated with intravenous cyclophosphamide and methylprednisolone, followed by a short course of oral cyclophosphamide and long-term oral prednisolone. His renal function also recovered sufficiently not to require renal replacement therapy. Conclusion The management of Henoch-Schönlein nephritis remains unclear, especially in the presence of severe complications such as intracerebral haemorrhage. We describe a successful outcome in such a patient.

  3. Home therapy with continuous infusion of factor VIII after minor surgery or serious haemorrhage.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Varon, D; Schulman, S; Bashari, D; Martinowitz, U

    1996-10-01

    Administration of factor VIII (F VIII) concentrates by continuous infusion is now routinely used at several haemophilia centers but almost exclusively for hospitalized patients. We evaluated various aspects of home therapy with continuous infusion of an immunoaffinity purified F VIII concentrate (Monoclate P®, Armour) in patients who would normally have been treated with high doses in bolus injections or with continuous infusion as in-patients. Twenty haemophilia A patients, eight after minor surgery and 12 for serious haemorrhage, received continuous infusion with undiluted F VIII by a minipump for a mean of 0.9 days in the hospital, followed by 3.3 days at home. Infusion bags were exchanged every 2.5 days. No haemorrhagic complications occurred, and five haemorrhages that had been resistant to treatment with bolus injections responded promptly to the continuous infusion. There were no technical problems and patient compliance and acceptance was good. We find this mode of therapy safe, efficacious and convenient for the patients as well as for the staff.

  4. Serial CT and MRI of ischaemic cerebral infarcts: frequency and clinical impact of haemorrhagic transformation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mayer, T.E.; Brueckmann, H. [Muenchen Univ. (Germany). Abt. fuer Neuroradiologie; Schulte-Altedorneburg, G. [Dept. of Radiology/Neuroradiology, University Medical School of Luebeck (Germany); Droste, D.W. [Dept. of Neurology, University Medical School of Luebeck (Germany)

    2000-04-01

    The frequency, predisposing factors and clinical consequences of haemorrhagic infarcts and damaged blood-brain barrier as shown by contrast enhancement (CE) in ischaemic cerebral infarcts are controversial. We prospectively compared the sensitivity of CT and MRI to haemorrhagic transformation (HT) and CE. We also wished to investigate the clinical significance of HT and factors possibly associated with it. We studied 36 patients with acute ischaemic infarcts in the middle cerebral artery territory during the first 2 weeks after the ictus. After CT and rating of the neurological deficit on admission, serial examinations with clinical neuromonitoring, contrast-enhanced CT and MRI were done on the same day. The occurrence and severity of HT were correlated with CE, stroke mechanism, infarct size, development of neurological deficits and antithrombotic treatment. The frequency of HT detected by MRI was 80 %. CE usually preceded HT or was seen simultaneously. MRI had a higher sensitivity than CT to HT and CE. Severity of HT was positively correlated with infarct size (P < 0.01). HT had no influence on patient's neurological status. Neither the type of antithrombotic treatment nor the stroke mechanism was associated with the severity of HT. No parenchymal haemorrhage occurred. (orig.)

  5. Duodenal Wedge Resection for Large Gastrointestinal Stromal Tumour Presenting with Life-Threatening Haemorrhage

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    Alexander Shaw

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Background. Duodenal gastrointestinal stromal tumours (GISTs are an uncommon malignancy of the gastrointestinal (GI tract. We present a case of life-threatening haemorrhage caused by a large ulcerating duodenal GIST arising from the third part of the duodenum managed by a limited duodenal wedge resection. Case Presentation. A 61-year-old patient presented with acute life-threatening gastrointestinal bleeding. After oesophagogastroduodenoscopy failed to demonstrate the source of bleeding, a 5 cm ulcerating exophytic mass originating from the third part of the duodenum was identified at laparotomy. A successful limited wedge resection of the tumour mass was performed. Histopathology subsequently confirmed a duodenal GIST. The patient remained well at 12-month followup with no evidence of local recurrence or metastatic spread. Conclusion. Duodenal GISTs can present with life-threatening upper GI haemorrhage. In the context of acute haemorrhage, even relatively large duodenal GISTs can be treated by limited wedge resection. This is a preferable alternative to duodenopancreatectomy with lower morbidity and mortality but comparable oncological outcome.

  6. Follow-up of Thalidomide treatment in patients with Hereditary Haemorrhagic Telangiectasia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hosman, A; Westermann, C J J; Snijder, R; Disch, F; Mummery, C L; Mager, J J

    2015-12-01

    Patients with a hereditary vascular disorder called Rendu-Osler-Weber syndrome (Hereditary Haemorrhagic Telangiectasia, HHT) haemorrhage easily due to weak-walled vessels. Haemorrhage in lungs or brain can be fatal but patients suffer most from chronic and prolonged nosebleeds (epistaxis), the frequency and intensity of which increases with age. Several years ago, it was discovered serendipitously that the drug Thalidomide had beneficial effects on the disease symptoms in several of a small group of HHT patients: epistaxis and the incidence of anaemia were reduced and patients required fewer blood transfusions. In addition, they reported a better quality of life. However, Thalidomide has significant negative side effects, including neuropathy and fatigue. We followed up all HHT patients in the Netherlands who had been taking Thalidomide at the time the original study was completed to find out (i) how many had continued taking Thalidomide and for how long (ii) the nature and severity of any side-effects and (iii) whether side-effects had influenced their decision to continue taking Thalidomide. Only a minority of patients had continued taking the drug despite its beneficial effects on their symptoms and that the side effects were the primary reason to stop. Despite symptom reduction, alternative treatments are still necessary for epistaxis in HHT patients and a large-scale clinical trial is not justified although incidental use in the most severely affected patients can be considered.

  7. Basic and advanced paediatric cardiopulmonary resuscitation - guidelines of the Australian and New Zealand Resuscitation Councils 2010.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tibballs, James; Aickin, Richard; Nuthall, Gabrielle

    2012-07-01

    Guidelines for basic and advanced paediatric cardiopulmonary resuscitation (CPR) have been revised by Australian and New Zealand Resuscitation Councils. Changes encourage CPR out-of-hospital and aim to improve the quality of CPR in-hospital. Features of basic CPR include: omission of abdominal thrusts for foreign body airway obstruction; commencement with chest compression followed by ventilation in a ratio of 30:2 or compression-only CPR if the rescuer is unwilling/unable to give expired-air breathing when the victim is 'unresponsive and not breathing normally'. Use of automated external defibrillators is encouraged. Features of advanced CPR include: prevention of cardiac arrest by rapid response systems; restriction of pulse palpation to 10 s to diagnosis cardiac arrest; affirmation of 15:2 compression-ventilation ratio for children and for infants other than newly born; initial bag-mask ventilation before tracheal intubation; a single direct current shock of 4 J/kg for ventricular fibrillation (VF) and pulseless ventricular tachycardia followed by immediate resumption of CPR for 2 min without analysis of cardiac rhythm and avoidance of unnecessary interruption of continuous external cardiac compressions. Monitoring of exhaled carbon dioxide is recommended to detect non-tracheal intubation, assess quality of CPR, and to help match ventilation to reduced cardiac output. The intraosseous route is recommended if immediate intravenous access is impossible. Amiodarone is strongly favoured over lignocaine for refractory VF and adrenaline over atropine for severe bradycardia, asystole and pulseless electrical activity. Family presence at resuscitation is encouraged. Therapeutic hypothermia is acceptable after resuscitation to improve neurological outcome. Extracorporeal circulatory support for in-hospital cardiac arrest may be used in equipped centres. © 2011 The Authors. Journal of Paediatrics and Child Health © 2011 Paediatrics and Child Health Division (Royal

  8. Hemoadsorption treatment of patients with acute infective endocarditis during surgery with cardiopulmonary bypass - a case series.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Träger, Karl; Skrabal, Christian; Fischer, Guenther; Datzmann, Thomas; Schroeder, Janpeter; Fritzler, Daniel; Hartmann, Jan; Liebold, Andreas; Reinelt, Helmut

    2017-05-29

    Infective endocarditis is a serious disease condition. Depending on the causative microorganism and clinical symptoms, cardiac surgery and valve replacement may be needed, posing additional risks to patients who may simultaneously suffer from septic shock. The combination of surgery bacterial spreadout and artificial cardiopulmonary bypass (CPB) surfaces results in a release of key inflammatory mediators leading to an overshooting systemic hyperinflammatory state frequently associated with compromised hemodynamic and organ function. Hemoadsorption might represent a potential approach to control the hyperinflammatory systemic reaction associated with the procedure itself and subsequent clinical conditions by reducing a broad range of immuno-regulatory mediators. We describe 39 cardiac surgery patients with proven acute infective endocarditis obtaining valve replacement during CPB surgery in combination with intraoperative CytoSorb hemoadsorption. In comparison, we evaluated a historical group of 28 patients with infective endocarditis undergoing CPB surgery without intraoperative hemoadsorption. CytoSorb treatment was associated with a mitigated postoperative response of key cytokines and clinical metabolic parameters. Moreover, patients showed hemodynamic stability during and after the operation while the need for vasopressors was less pronounced within hours after completion of the procedure, which possibly could be attributed to the additional CytoSorb treatment. Intraoperative hemoperfusion treatment was well tolerated and safe without the occurrence of any CytoSorb device-related adverse event. Thus, this interventional approach may open up potentially promising therapeutic options for critically-ill patients with acute infective endocarditis during and after cardiac surgery, with cytokine reduction, improved hemodynamic stability and organ function as seen in our patients.

  9. "Please. Don't. Die.": A Grounded Theory Study of Bystander Cardiopulmonary Resuscitation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mausz, Justin; Snobelen, Paul; Tavares, Walter

    2018-02-01

    Bystander cardiopulmonary resuscitation (CPR) is an important determinant of survival from out-of-hospital cardiac arrest (OHCA), yet rates of bystander CPR are highly variable. In an effort to promote bystander CPR, the procedure has been streamlined, and ultrashort teaching modalities have been introduced. CPR has been increasingly reconceptualized as simple, safe, and easy to perform; however, current methods of CPR instruction may not adequately prepare lay rescuers for the various logistical, conceptual, and emotional challenges of resuscitating a victim of cardiac arrest. We adopted a constructivist grounded theory methodology to qualitatively explore bystander CPR and invited lay rescuers who had recently (ie, within 1 week) intervened in an OHCA to participate in semistructured interviews and focus groups. We used constant comparative analysis until theoretical saturation to derive a midrange explanatory theory of bystander CPR. We constructed a 3-stage theoretical model describing a common experiential process for lay rescuer intervention in OHCA: Being called to act is disturbing, causing panic, shock, and disbelief that must ultimately be overcome. Taking action to save the victim is complicated by several misconceptions about cardiac arrest, where victims are mistakenly believed to be choking, and agonal respirations are misinterpreted to mean the victim is alive. Making sense of the experience is challenging, at least in the short term, where lay rescuers have to contend with self-doubt, unanswered questions, and uncomfortable emotional reactions to a traumatic event. Our study suggests that current CPR training programs may not adequately prepare lay rescuers for the reality of an OHCA and identifies several key knowledge gaps that should be addressed. The long-term psychological consequences of bystander intervention in OHCA remain poorly understood and warrant further study. © 2018 American Heart Association, Inc.

  10. Shock Dynamics in Stellar Outbursts. I. Shock Formation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ro, Stephen; Matzner, Christopher D., E-mail: ro@astro.utoronto.ca [Department of Astronomy and Astrophysics, University of Toronto, 50 St. George Street, Toronto, ON M5S 3H4 (Canada)

    2017-05-20

    Wave-driven outflows and non-disruptive explosions have been implicated in pre-supernova outbursts, supernova impostors, luminous blue variable eruptions, and some narrow-line and superluminous supernovae. To model these events, we investigate the dynamics of stars set in motion by strong acoustic pulses and wave trains, focusing on nonlinear wave propagation, shock formation, and an early phase of the development of a weak shock. We identify the shock formation radius, showing that a heuristic estimate based on crossing characteristics matches an exact expansion around the wave front and verifying both with numerical experiments. Our general analytical condition for shock formation applies to one-dimensional motions within any static environment, including both eruptions and implosions. We also consider the early phase of shock energy dissipation. We find that waves of super-Eddington acoustic luminosity always create shocks, rather than damping by radiative diffusion. Therefore, shock formation is integral to super-Eddington outbursts.

  11. Grain destruction in interstellar shocks

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Seab, C.G.; Shull, J.M.

    1984-01-01

    One of the principal methods for removing grains from the Interstellar Medium is to destroy them in shock waves. Previous theoretical studies of shock destruction have generally assumed only a single size and type of grain; most do not account for the effect of the grain destruction on the structure of the shock. Earlier calculations have been improved in three ways: first, by using a ''complete'' grain model including a distribution of sizes and types of grains; second, by using a self-consistent shock structure that incorporates the changing elemental depletions as the grains are destroyed; and third, by calculating the shock-processed ultraviolet extinction curves for comparison with observations. (author)

  12. Where does ergometrine stand in prevention of postpartum haemorrhage in caesarean section

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mahmud, G.; Javaid, K.; Tasnim, N.; Tabassum, A.; Bangash, K. T. [Pakistan Inst. of Medical Sciences (PIMS), Islamabad (Pakistan). Maternal and Child Health Centre Unit-I

    2014-08-15

    Objective: To compare the safety and efficacy of 10 units of intravenous syntocinon alone with 10 units intravenous syntocinon and 0.25 mg intramuscular ergometrine in the prevention of atonic uterine haemorrhage during caesarean section. Method: The quasi-experimental study was conducted at the Maternal and Child Health Centre, Unit I, Pakistan Institute of Medical Sciences, Islamabad, from November 1, 2010 to February 28, 2011. All women undergoing caesarean section were included in the study. Patients were given intravenous 10 units syntocinon alone intra-operatively from November 1 to December 31, 2010, while 0.25 mg ergometrine intramuscular was added to 10 units intravenous syntocinon from January 1 to February 28, 2011. Frequency of postpartum haemorrhage, adverse effects of drugs and maternal morbidity and mortality were assessed by using chi square test. P <0.05 was taken as statistically significant. Results: Of the total number of 701 subjects, 378 (54%) women were given 10 units syntocinon and 323 (46%) were given 0.25 mg ergometrine in addition to 10 units syntocinon. The mean age in the syntocinon group was 28+-3.5 yrs with gestational age of 37.5+-2 weeks, while that in syntocinon-ergometrine group was 29+-3.4 years and 38+-2 weeks respectively. Postpartum haemorrhage in the syntocinon group was found in 38 (10%) women versus 05 (1.5%) women) in the other group (p<0.001). Adverse effects like nausea, vomiting and raised blood pressure were slightly more with syntocinon-ergometrine than syntocinon alone (n=56; 15.3% vs n=35; 9.2%), but it was not statistically significant. Post partum haemorrhage was responsible for 40% of maternal mortality during the study period and that was in the syntocinon group. Conclusion: Prophylactic ergometrine in addition to syntocinon is superior to syntocinon alone in decreasing frequency of postpartum haemorrhage in caesarean section and associated maternal morbidity and mortality. Regarding safety profile, the two

  13. Where does ergometrine stand in prevention of postpartum haemorrhage in caesarean section

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mahmud, G.; Javaid, K.; Tasnim, N.; Tabassum, A.; Bangash, K. T.

    2014-01-01

    Objective: To compare the safety and efficacy of 10 units of intravenous syntocinon alone with 10 units intravenous syntocinon and 0.25 mg intramuscular ergometrine in the prevention of atonic uterine haemorrhage during caesarean section. Method: The quasi-experimental study was conducted at the Maternal and Child Health Centre, Unit I, Pakistan Institute of Medical Sciences, Islamabad, from November 1, 2010 to February 28, 2011. All women undergoing caesarean section were included in the study. Patients were given intravenous 10 units syntocinon alone intra-operatively from November 1 to December 31, 2010, while 0.25 mg ergometrine intramuscular was added to 10 units intravenous syntocinon from January 1 to February 28, 2011. Frequency of postpartum haemorrhage, adverse effects of drugs and maternal morbidity and mortality were assessed by using chi square test. P <0.05 was taken as statistically significant. Results: Of the total number of 701 subjects, 378 (54%) women were given 10 units syntocinon and 323 (46%) were given 0.25 mg ergometrine in addition to 10 units syntocinon. The mean age in the syntocinon group was 28+-3.5 yrs with gestational age of 37.5+-2 weeks, while that in syntocinon-ergometrine group was 29+-3.4 years and 38+-2 weeks respectively. Postpartum haemorrhage in the syntocinon group was found in 38 (10%) women versus 05 (1.5%) women) in the other group (p<0.001). Adverse effects like nausea, vomiting and raised blood pressure were slightly more with syntocinon-ergometrine than syntocinon alone (n=56; 15.3% vs n=35; 9.2%), but it was not statistically significant. Post partum haemorrhage was responsible for 40% of maternal mortality during the study period and that was in the syntocinon group. Conclusion: Prophylactic ergometrine in addition to syntocinon is superior to syntocinon alone in decreasing frequency of postpartum haemorrhage in caesarean section and associated maternal morbidity and mortality. Regarding safety profile, the two

  14. Risk Factors for Intracranial Haemorrhage in Accidents Associated with the Shower or Bathtub.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Thomas C Sauter

    Full Text Available There has been little research on bathroom accidents. It is unknown whether the shower or bathtub are connected with special dangers in different age groups or whether there are specific risk factors for adverse outcomes.This cross-sectional analysis included all direct admissions to the Emergency Department at the Inselspital Bern, Switzerland from 1 January 2000 to 28 February 2014 after accidents associated with the bathtub or shower. Time, age, location, mechanism and diagnosis were assessed and special risk factors were examined. Patient groups with and without intracranial bleeding were compared with the Mann-Whitney U test.The association of risk factors with intracranial bleeding was investigated using univariate analysis with Fisher's exact test or logistic regression. The effects of different variables on cerebral bleeding were analysed by multivariate logistic regression.Two hundred and eighty (280 patients with accidents associated with the bathtub or shower were included in our study. Two hundred and thirty-five (235 patients suffered direct trauma by hitting an object (83.9% and traumatic brain injury (TBI was detected in 28 patients (10%. Eight (8 of the 27 patients with mild traumatic brain injuries (GCS 13-15, (29.6% exhibited intracranial haemorrhage. All patients with intracranial haemorrhage were older than 48 years and needed in-hospital treatment. Patients with intracranial haemorrhage were significantly older and had higher haemoglobin levels than the control group with TBI but without intracranial bleeding (p<0.05 for both.In univariate analysis, we found that intracranial haemorrhage in patients with TBI was associated with direct trauma in general and with age (both p<0.05, but not with the mechanism of the fall, its location (shower or bathtub or the gender of the patient. Multivariate logistic regression analysis identified only age as a risk factor for cerebral bleeding (p<0.05; OR 1.09 (CI 1.01;1.171.In patients

  15. Cardiopulmonary function and oxygen delivery during total liquid ventilation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tsagogiorgas, Charalambos; Alb, Markus; Herrmann, Peter; Quintel, Michael; Meinhardt, Juergen P

    2011-10-01

    Total liquid ventilation (TLV) with perfluorocarbons has shown to improve cardiopulmonary function in the injured and immature lung; however there remains controversy over the normal lung. Hemodynamic effects of TLV in the normal lung currently remain undetermined. This study compared changes in cardiopulmonary and circulatory function caused by either liquid or gas tidal volume ventilation. In a prospective, controlled study, 12 non-injured anesthetized, adult New Zealand rabbits were primarily conventionally gas-ventilated (CGV). After instrumentation for continuous recording of arterial (AP), central venous (CVP), left artrial (LAP), pulmonary arterial pressures (PAP), and cardiac output (CO) animals were randomized into (1) CGV group and (2) TLV group. In the TLV group partial liquid ventilation was initiated with instillation of perfluoroctylbromide (12 ml/kg). After 15 min, TLV was established for 3 hr applying a volume-controlled, pressure-limited, time-cycled ventilation mode using a double-piston configured TLV. Controls (CGV) remained gas-ventilated throughout the experiment. During TLV, heart rate, CO, PAP, MAP, CVP, and LAP as well as derived hemodynamic variables, arterial and mixed venous blood gases, oxygen delivery, PVR, and SVR did not differ significantly compared to CGV. Liquid tidal volumes suitable for long-term TLV in non-injured rabbits do not significantly impair CO, blood pressure, and oxygen dynamics when compared to CGV. Copyright © 2011 Wiley-Liss, Inc.

  16. Do Radiologists Want/Need Training in Cardiopulmonary Resuscitation?

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Schellhammer, F.

    2003-01-01

    Purpose: Prompt and effective cardiopulmonary resuscitation (CPR) decreases morbidity and mortality following cardiopulmonary arrest. Radiologists are frequently confronted with severely ill patients, who may deteriorate at any time. Furthermore, they have to be aware of life-threatening reactions towards contrast media. This study was designed to assess experience and self-estimation of German-speaking radiologists in CPR and cardiac defibrillation (CD). Material and Methods: 650 German-speaking radiologists were audited by a specially designed questionnaire, which was sent via e-mail. The answers were expected to be re-mailed within a 2-month period. Results: The response rate was 12.6%. 72.8% of the responders had performed at least 1 CPR (range 9.5 ± 13.1) and 37% at least 1 CD. 67.9% had had opportunities to attend training courses, which had been utilized by 41.8% of them. The last training of the responders was more than 2 years ago in 69.2% and more than 5 years ago in 37%. Of all responders 75.6% expressed the need for further education. Conclusion: The small response rate indicates the small importance of CPR in the subpopulation surveyed. The vast majority of the responders, however, showed interest in basic and advanced life support and advocated regular updates. It seems reasonable that radiological Dept. themselves should organize courses in order to cope with their specific situations

  17. Do Radiologists Want/Need Training in Cardiopulmonary Resuscitation?

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Schellhammer, F. [St. Katharinen Hospital, Frechen (Germany). Dept. of Radiology

    2003-03-01

    Purpose: Prompt and effective cardiopulmonary resuscitation (CPR) decreases morbidity and mortality following cardiopulmonary arrest. Radiologists are frequently confronted with severely ill patients, who may deteriorate at any time. Furthermore, they have to be aware of life-threatening reactions towards contrast media. This study was designed to assess experience and self-estimation of German-speaking radiologists in CPR and cardiac defibrillation (CD). Material and Methods: 650 German-speaking radiologists were audited by a specially designed questionnaire, which was sent via e-mail. The answers were expected to be re-mailed within a 2-month period. Results: The response rate was 12.6%. 72.8% of the responders had performed at least 1 CPR (range 9.5 {+-} 13.1) and 37% at least 1 CD. 67.9% had had opportunities to attend training courses, which had been utilized by 41.8% of them. The last training of the responders was more than 2 years ago in 69.2% and more than 5 years ago in 37%. Of all responders 75.6% expressed the need for further education. Conclusion: The small response rate indicates the small importance of CPR in the subpopulation surveyed. The vast majority of the responders, however, showed interest in basic and advanced life support and advocated regular updates. It seems reasonable that radiological Dept. themselves should organize courses in order to cope with their specific situations.

  18. Knowledge of Guidelines for Cardiopulmonary Resuscitation among Brazilian Medical Students

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Felipe Scipião Moura

    Full Text Available ABSTRACT Introduction Sudden death is a substantial public health problem, representing a major cause of mortality worldwide. Suitable initial care is essential for a good prognosis of these patients. Objectives To assess the knowledge of the 2010 guidelines for cardiopulmonary resuscitation (CPR among medical students in their final year of undergraduate training. Methods This was a cross-sectional study with a sample of 217 medical students enrolled in the sixth year of accredited medical schools in Brazil. A structured questionnaire with 27 items was used to record the sociodemographic characteristics of the participants and to assess their knowledge base of the 2010 ILCOR guidelines for CPR. Results Only fifty (23.04% out of 217 students achieved results considered as satisfactory in the written evaluation. The average score obtained was 56.74% correct answers. Seventeen percent of the students had never performed CPR maneuvers and 83.80% had never performed cardioversion or defibrillation. Conclusions The knowledge base of medical students regarding cardiopulmonary resuscitation is low. Considering these medical students are in their final year of medical school, this study reveals a worrisome scenario.

  19. Cardiopulmonary laboratory biomarkers in the evaluation of acute dyspnea.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stokes, Natalie R; Dietz, Brett W; Liang, Jackson J

    2016-01-01

    Dyspnea is a common chief complaint in the emergency department, with over 4 million visits annually in the US. Establishing the correct diagnosis can be challenging, because the subjective sensation of dyspnea can result from a wide array of underlying pathology, including pulmonary, cardiac, neurologic, psychiatric, toxic, and metabolic disorders. Further, the presence of dyspnea is linked with increased mortality in a variety of conditions, and misdiagnosis of the cause of dyspnea leads to poor patient-level outcomes. In combination with the history and physical, efficient, and focused use of laboratory studies, the various cardiopulmonary biomarkers can be useful in establishing the correct diagnosis and guiding treatment decisions in a timely manner. Use and interpretation of such tests must be guided by the clinical context, as well as an understanding of the current evidence supporting their use. This review discusses current standards and research regarding the use of established and emerging cardiopulmonary laboratory markers in the evaluation of acute dyspnea, focusing on recent evidence assessing the diagnostic and prognostic utility of various tests. These markers include brain natriuretic peptide (BNP) and N-terminal prohormone (NT-proBNP), mid-regional peptides proatrial NP and proadrenomedullin, cardiac troponins, D-dimer, soluble ST2, and galectin 3, and included is a discussion on the use of arterial and venous blood gases.

  20. Gravity and the Evolution of Cardiopulmonary Morphology in Snakes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lillywhite, Harvey B.; Albert, James S.; Sheehy, Coleman M.; Seymour, Roger S.

    2011-01-01

    Physiological investigations of snakes have established the importance of heart position and pulmonary structure in contexts of gravity effects on blood circulation. Here we investigate morphological correlates of cardiopulmonary physiology in contexts related to ecology, behavior and evolution. We analyze data for heart position and length of vascular lung in 154 species of snakes that exhibit a broad range of characteristic behaviors and habitat associations. We construct a composite phylogeny for these species, and we codify gravitational stress according to species habitat and behavior. We use conventional regression and phylogenetically independent contrasts to evaluate whether trait diversity is correlated with gravitational habitat related to evolutionary transitions within the composite tree topology. We demonstrate that snake species living in arboreal habitats, or which express strongly climbing behaviors, possess relatively short blood columns between the heart and the head, as well as relatively short vascular lungs, compared to terrestrial species. Aquatic species, which experience little or no gravity stress in water, show the reverse – significantly longer heart–head distance and longer vascular lungs. These phylogenetic differences complement the results of physiological studies and are reflected in multiple habitat transitions during the evolutionary histories of these snake lineages, providing strong evidence that heart–to–head distance and length of vascular lung are co–adaptive cardiopulmonary features of snakes. PMID:22079804

  1. Myocardial contractile function in survived neonatal piglets after cardiopulmonary bypass

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Popov Aron-Frederik

    2010-11-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Hemodynamic function may be depressed in the early postoperative stages after cardiac surgery. The aim of this study was the analysis of the myocardial contractility in neonates after cardiopulmonary bypass (CPB and mild hypothermia. Methods Three indices of left ventricular myocardial contractile function (dP/dt, (dP/dt/P, and wall thickening were studied up to 6 hours after CPB in neonatal piglets (CPB group; n = 4. The contractility data were analysed and then compared to the data of newborn piglets who also underwent median thoracotomy and instrumentation for the same time intervals but without CPB (non-CPB group; n = 3. Results Left ventricular dP/dtmax and (dP/dtmax/P remained stable in CPB group, while dP/dtmax decreased in non-CPB group 5 hours postoperatively (1761 ± 205 mmHg/s at baseline vs. 1170 ± 205 mmHg/s after 5 h; p max and (dP/dtmax/P there were no statistically significant differences between the two groups. Comparably, although myocardial thickening decreased in the non-CPB group the differences between the two groups were not statistically significant. Conclusions The myocardial contractile function in survived neonatal piglets remained stable 6 hours after cardiopulmonary bypass and mild hypothermia probably due to regional hypercontractility.

  2. Home-based mobile cardio-pulmonary rehabilitation consultant system.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Hsu-En; Wang, Wen-Chih; Lu, Shao-Wei; Wu, Bo-Yuan; Ko, Li-Wei

    2011-01-01

    Cardiovascular diseases are the most popular cause of death in the world recently. For postoperatives, cardiac rehabilitation is still asked to maintain at home (phase II) to improve cardiac function. However, only one third of outpatients do the exercise regularly, reflecting the difficulty for home-based healthcare: lacking of monitoring and motivation. Hence, a cardio-pulmonary rehabilitation system was proposed in this research to improve rehabilitation efficiency for better prognosis. The proposed system was built on mobile phone and receiving electrocardiograph (ECG) signal from a wireless ECG holter via Bluetooth connection. Apart from heart rate (HR) monitor, an ECG derived respiration (EDR) technique is also included to provide respiration rate (RR). Both HR and RR are the most important vital signs during exercise but only used one physiological signal recorder in this system. In clinical test, there were 15 subjects affording Bruce Task (treadmill) to simulate rehabilitation procedure. Correlation between this system and commercial product (Custo-Med) was up to 98% in HR and 81% in RR. Considering the prevention of sudden heart attack, an arrhythmia detection expert system and healthcare server at the backend were also integrated to this system for comprehensive cardio-pulmonary monitoring whenever and wherever doing the exercise.

  3. Cost-utility analysis of an adjunctive recombinant activated factor VIIa for on-demand treatment of bleeding episodes in dengue haemorrhagic fever.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Naing, Cho; Poovorawan, Yong; Mak, Joon Wah; Aung, Kyan; Kamolratankul, Pirom

    2015-06-01

    The present study aimed to assess the cost-utility analysis of using an adjunctive recombinant activated factor VIIa (rFVIIa) in children for controlling life-threatening bleeding in dengue haemorrhagic fever (DHF)/dengue shock syndrome (DSS). We constructed a decision-tree model, comparing a standard care and the use of an additional adjuvant rFVIIa for controlling life-threatening bleeding in children with DHF/DSS. Cost and utility benefit were estimated from the societal perspective. The outcome measure was cost per quality-adjusted life years (QALYs). Overall, treatment with adjuvant rFVIIa gained QALYs, but the total cost was higher. The incremental cost-utility ratio for the introduction of adjuvant rFVIIa was $4241.27 per additional QALY. Sensitivity analyses showed the utility value assigned for calculation of QALY was the most sensitive parameter. We concluded that despite high cost, there is a role for rFVIIa in the treatment of life-threatening bleeding in patients with DHF/DSS.

  4. The effects of changes to the ERC resuscitation guidelines on no flow time and cardiopulmonary resuscitation quality: a randomised controlled study on manikins.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jäntti, H; Kuisma, M; Uusaro, A

    2007-11-01

    The European Resuscitation Council (ERC) guidelines changed in 2005. We investigated the impact of these changes on no flow time and on the quality of cardiopulmonary resuscitation (CPR). Simulated cardiac arrest (CA) scenarios were managed randomly in manikins using ERC 2000 or 2005 guidelines. Pairs of paramedics/paramedic students treated 34 scenarios with 10min of continuous ventricular fibrillation. The rhythm was analysed and defibrillation shocks were delivered with a semi-automatic defibrillator, and breathing was assisted with a bag-valve-mask; no intravenous medication was given. Time factors related to human intervention and time factors related to device, rhythm analysis, charging and defibrillation were analysed for their contribution to no flow time (time without chest compression). Chest compression quality was also analysed. No flow time (mean+/-S.D.) was 66+/-3% of CA time with ERC 2000 and 32+/-4% with ERC 2005 guidelines (PERC 2000) versus 107+/-4s (ERC 2005) during 600-s scenarios (P=0.237). Device factor interventions took longer using ERC 2000 guidelines: 290+/-19s versus 92+/-15s (PERC 2005 guidelines (808+/-92s versus 458+/-90s, P<0.001), but the quality of CPR did not differ between the groups. The use of a single shock sequence with guidelines 2005 has decreased the no flow time during CPR when compared with guidelines 2000 with multiple shocks.

  5. Bubble Dynamics and Shock Waves

    CERN Document Server

    2013-01-01

    This volume of the Shock Wave Science and Technology Reference Library is concerned with the interplay between bubble dynamics and shock waves. It is divided into four parts containing twelve chapters written by eminent scientists. Topics discussed include shock wave emission by laser generated bubbles (W Lauterborn, A Vogel), pulsating bubbles near boundaries (DM Leppinen, QX Wang, JR Blake), interaction of shock waves with bubble clouds (CD Ohl, SW Ohl), shock propagation in polydispersed bubbly liquids by model equations (K Ando, T Colonius, CE Brennen. T Yano, T Kanagawa,  M Watanabe, S Fujikawa) and by DNS (G Tryggvason, S Dabiri), shocks in cavitating flows (NA Adams, SJ Schmidt, CF Delale, GH Schnerr, S Pasinlioglu) together with applications involving encapsulated bubble dynamics in imaging (AA Doinikov, A Novell, JM Escoffre, A Bouakaz),  shock wave lithotripsy (P Zhong), sterilization of ships’ ballast water (A Abe, H Mimura) and bubbly flow model of volcano eruptions ((VK Kedrinskii, K Takayama...

  6. Incidence, trends and severity of primary postpartum haemorrhage in Australia: A population-based study using Victorian Perinatal Data Collection data for 764 244 births.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Flood, Margaret; McDonald, Susan J; Pollock, Wendy; Cullinane, Fiona; Davey, Mary-Ann

    2018-05-22

    Increasing incidence and severity of postpartum haemorrhage, together with postpartum haemorrhage-associated morbidities, have been reported in many high-resource countries. In-depth analysis of such factors in Victorian births since 2002 was lacking. Our aim was to determine the incidence and trends for primary postpartum haemorrhage (World Health Organization and International Classification of Diseases 10th revision, Australian Modification definitions) for all confinements in Victoria, Australia, for the years 2003-2013 and the incidence and trends for severe postpartum haemorrhage (≥1500 mL) for 2009-2013. In this population-based cross-sectional study de-identified data from the Victorian Perinatal Data Collection were analysed for confinements (excluding terminations) from 2003 to 2013 (n = 764 244). Perinatal information for all births ≥20 weeks (or of at least 400 g birthweight if gestation was unknown) were prospectively collected. One in five women (21.8%) who gave birth between 2009 and 2013 experienced a primary postpartum haemorrhage and one in 71 women (1.4%) experienced a severe primary postpartum haemorrhage. The increasing trends in incidence of primary postpartum haemorrhage, severe primary postpartum haemorrhage, blood transfusion, admission to an intensive care or high dependency unit and peripartum hysterectomy were significant (P primary postpartum haemorrhage. The highest incidence was experienced by women who had an unplanned caesarean section birth. Women who had a forceps birth had the highest incidence of severe primary postpartum haemorrhage. The incidence of primary postpartum haemorrhage, severe primary postpartum haemorrhage and associated maternal morbidities have increased significantly over time in Victoria. © 2018 The Royal Australian and New Zealand College of Obstetricians and Gynaecologists.

  7. Heart Rate Variability Analysis in an Experimental Model of Hemorrhagic Shock and Resuscitation in Pigs.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Edgard Salomão

    Full Text Available The analysis of heart rate variability (HRV has been shown as a promising non-invasive technique for assessing the cardiac autonomic modulation in trauma. The aim of this study was to evaluate HRV during hemorrhagic shock and fluid resuscitation, comparing to traditional hemodynamic and metabolic parameters.Twenty anesthetized and mechanically ventilated pigs were submitted to hemorrhagic shock (60% of estimated blood volume and evaluated for 60 minutes without fluid replacement. Surviving animals were treated with Ringer solution and evaluated for an additional period of 180 minutes. HRV metrics (time and frequency domain as well as hemodynamic and metabolic parameters were evaluated in survivors and non-survivors animals.Seven of the 20 animals died during hemorrhage and initial fluid resuscitation. All animals presented an increase in time-domain HRV measures during haemorrhage and fluid resuscitation restored baseline values. Although not significantly, normalized low-frequency and LF/HF ratio decreased during early stages of haemorrhage, recovering baseline values later during hemorrhagic shock, and increased after fluid resuscitation. Non-surviving animals presented significantly lower mean arterial pressure (43±7 vs 57±9 mmHg, P<0.05 and cardiac index (1.7±0.2 vs 2.6±0.5 L/min/m2, P<0.05, and higher levels of plasma lactate (7.2±2.4 vs 3.7±1.4 mmol/L, P<0.05, base excess (-6.8±3.3 vs -2.3±2.8 mmol/L, P<0.05 and potassium (5.3±0.6 vs 4.2±0.3 mmol/L, P<0.05 at 30 minutes after hemorrhagic shock compared with surviving animals.The HRV increased early during hemorrhage but none of the evaluated HRV metrics was able to discriminate survivors from non-survivors during hemorrhagic shock. Moreover, metabolic and hemodynamic variables were more reliable to reflect hemorrhagic shock severity than HRV metrics.

  8. Adjustable Shock Absorbers

    OpenAIRE

    Adamiec, Radek

    2012-01-01

    Bakalářská práce obsahuje přehled používaných tlumičů osobních automobilů, závodních automobilů a motocyklů. Jsou zde popsány systémy t lumením, konstrukce tlumičů a vidlic používaných u motocyklů. Dále je zde přehled prvků používaných u podvozků automobilů. This bachelor´s thesis contains the survey of the shock absorbers of passenger cars, racing cars and motorcycles. Are described damping systems, the design used shock absorbers and forks for motorcycles. Then there is the list of the e...

  9. Radiative relativistic shock adiabate

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tsintsadze, L.N.; Nishikawa, K.

    1997-01-01

    The influences of thermal radiation on the state equation of shock waves, derived in the previous paper [L. N. Tsintsadze, Phys. Plasmas 2, 4462 (1995)], are studied and a series of relations of thermodynamic quantities that hold for shock waves are derived. It is shown that the presence of radiation can strongly change the compressibility of the plasma. It is well known that for polytropic gases the compressibility cannot change more than four times the initial value in the case of nonrelativistic temperatures. The numerical calculations show that there are no such restrictions, when the radiation energy exceeds the kinetic energy of the plasma. The ultrarelativistic temperature range is also covered in our numerical calculations. Also studied are the influences of the radiation on the PT and the TV diagrams. A significant modification due to radiation is found in every case studied. copyright 1997 American Institute of Physics

  10. POSTURAL SHOCK IN PREGNANCY

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wilkening, Ralph L.; Knauer, John; Larson, Roger K.

    1955-01-01

    Signs and symptoms of shock may be produced in some patients in late pregnancy by putting them in the dorsal recumbent posture. Change from this position will relieve the condition. The features of the supine hypotensive syndrome can be duplicated by applying pressure to the abdomen with the patient in a lateral position. The postural variations of venous pressure, blood pressure, and pulse appear to be due to obstruction of venous return from the lower portion of the body caused by the large uterus of late pregnancy compressing the vena cava. When shock is observed in a woman in late pregnancy, she should be turned to a lateral position before more active measures of treatment are begun. ImagesFigure 1. PMID:14351983

  11. Bow shock data analysis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zipf, Edward C.; Erdman, Peeter W.

    1994-08-01

    The University of Pittsburgh Space Physics Group in collaboration with the Army Research Office (ARO) modeling team has completed a systematic organization of the shock and plume spectral data and the electron temperature and density measurements obtained during the BowShock I and II rocket flights which have been submitted to the AEDC Data Center, has verified the presence of CO Cameron band emission during the Antares engine burn and for an extended period of time in the post-burn plume, and have adapted 3-D radiation entrapment codes developed by the University of Pittsburgh to study aurora and other atmospheric phenomena that involve significant spatial effects to investigate the vacuum ultraviolet (VUV) and extreme ultraviolet (EUV) envelope surrounding the re-entry that create an extensive plasma cloud by photoionization.

  12. Shock Isolation Elements Testing for High Input Loadings. Volume III. Mechanical Shock Isolation Elements.

    Science.gov (United States)

    SHOCK ABSORBERS ), (*GUIDED MISSILE SILOS, SHOCK ABSORBERS ), (*SPRINGS, (*SHOCK(MECHANICS), REDUCTION), TORSION BARS, ELASTOMERS, DAMPING, EQUATIONS OF MOTION, MODEL TESTS, TEST METHODS, NUCLEAR EXPLOSIONS, HARDENING.

  13. Shock resistance testing

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pouard, M.

    1984-03-01

    In the framework of mechanical tests and to answer the different requests for tests, the T.C.R (Transport Conditionnement et Retraitement) laboratory got test facilities. These installations allow to carry out tests of resistance to shocks, mainly at the safety level of components of nuclear power plants, mockups of transport casks for fuel elements and transport containers for radioactive materials. They include a tower and a catapult. This paper give a decription of the facilities and explain their operation way [fr

  14. On Modeling Risk Shocks

    OpenAIRE

    Dorofeenko, Victor; Lee, Gabriel; Salyer, Kevin; Strobel, Johannes

    2016-01-01

    Within the context of a financial accelerator model, we model time-varying uncertainty (i.e. risk shocks) through the use of a mixture Normal model with time variation in the weights applied to the underlying distributions characterizing entrepreneur productivity. Specifically, we model capital producers (i.e. the entrepreneurs) as either low-risk (relatively small second moment for productivity) and high-risk (relatively large second moment for productivity) and the fraction of both types is...

  15. The Shock Doctrine

    OpenAIRE

    Dionysios K. Solomos; Dimitrios N. Koumparoulis

    2011-01-01

    Naomi Klein attempts to redefine the economic history discovering the historical continuities and to reveal the neoliberal theory which functions via the utilization of specific “tools”. The state of shock is the key for the opponents of Chicago School and Milton Friedman in order for them to establish neoliberal policies and to promote the deregulated capitalism which includes less welfare state, less public sector, less regulation, weakened labor unions, privatizations and laissez-faire. Th...

  16. Characterization of shocked beryllium

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Papin P.A.

    2012-08-01

    Full Text Available While numerous studies have investigated the low-strain-rate constitutive response of beryllium, the combined influence of high strain rate and temperature on the mechanical behavior and microstructure of beryllium has received limited attention over the last 40 years. In the current work, high strain rate tests were conducted using both explosive drive and a gas gun to accelerate the material. Prior studies have focused on tensile loading behavior, or limited conditions of dynamic strain rate and/or temperature. Two constitutive strength (plasticity models, the Preston-Tonks-Wallace (PTW and Mechanical Threshold Stress (MTS models, were calibrated using common quasi-static and Hopkinson bar data. However, simulations with the two models give noticeably different results when compared with the measured experimental wave profiles. The experimental results indicate that, even if fractured by the initial shock loading, the Be remains sufficiently intact to support a shear stress following partial release and subsequent shock re-loading. Additional “arrested” drive shots were designed and tested to minimize the reflected tensile pulse in the sample. These tests were done to both validate the model and to put large shock induced compressive loads into the beryllium sample.

  17. Selfsimilar time dependent shock structures

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Beck, R.; Drury, L.O.

    1985-01-01

    Diffusive shock acceleration as an astrophysical mechanism for accelerating charged particles has the advantage of being highly efficient. This means however that the theory is of necessity nonlinear; the reaction of the accelerated particles on the shock structure and the acceleration process must be self-consistently included in any attempt to develop a complete theory of diffusive shock acceleration. Considerable effort has been invested in attempting, at least partially, to do this and it has become clear that in general either the maximum particle energy must be restricted by introducing additional loss processes into the problem or the acceleration must be treated as a time dependent problem (Drury, 1984). It is concluded that stationary modified shock structures can only exist for strong shocks if additional loss processes limit the maximum energy a particle can attain. This is certainly possible and if it occurs the energy loss from the shock will lead to much greater shock compressions. It is however equally possible that no such processes exist and we must then ask what sort of nonstationary shock structure develops. The same argument which excludes stationary structures also rules out periodic solutions and indeed any solution where the width of the shock remains bounded. It follows that the width of the shock must increase secularly with time and it is natural to examine the possibility of selfsimilar time dependent solutions

  18. Selfsimilar time dependent shock structures

    Science.gov (United States)

    Beck, R.; Drury, L. O.

    1985-01-01

    Diffusive shock acceleration as an astrophysical mechanism for accelerating charged particles has the advantage of being highly efficient. This means however that the theory is of necessity nonlinear; the reaction of the accelerated particles on the shock structure and the acceleration process must be self-consistently included in any attempt to develop a complete theory of diffusive shock acceleration. Considerable effort has been invested in attempting, at least partially, to do this and it has become clear that in general either the maximum particle energy must be restricted by introducing additional loss processes into the problem or the acceleration must be treated as a time dependent problem (Drury, 1984). It is concluded that stationary modified shock structures can only exist for strong shocks if additional loss processes limit the maximum energy a particle can attain. This is certainly possible and if it occurs the energy loss from the shock will lead to much greater shock compressions. It is however equally possible that no such processes exist and we must then ask what sort of nonstationary shock structure develops. The ame argument which excludes stationary structures also rules out periodic solutions and indeed any solution where the width of the shock remains bounded. It follows that the width of the shock must increase secularly with time and it is natural to examine the possibility of selfsimilar time dependent solutions.

  19. Regulatory T cells ameliorate tissue plasminogen activator-induced brain haemorrhage after stroke.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mao, Leilei; Li, Peiying; Zhu, Wen; Cai, Wei; Liu, Zongjian; Wang, Yanling; Luo, Wenli; Stetler, Ruth A; Leak, Rehana K; Yu, Weifeng; Gao, Yanqin; Chen, Jun; Chen, Gang; Hu, Xiaoming

    2017-07-01

    Delayed thrombolytic treatment with recombinant tissue plasminogen activator (tPA) may exacerbate blood-brain barrier breakdown after ischaemic stroke and lead to lethal haemorrhagic transformation. The immune system is a dynamic modulator of stroke response, and excessive immune cell accumulation in the cerebral vasculature is associated with compromised integrity of the blood-brain barrier. We previously reported that regulatory T cells, which function to suppress excessive immune responses, ameliorated blood-brain barrier damage after cerebral ischaemia. This study assessed the impact of regulatory T cells in the context of tPA-induced brain haemorrhage and investigated the underlying mechanisms of action. The number of circulating regulatory T cells in stroke patients was dramatically reduced soon after stroke onset (84 acute ischaemic stroke patients with or without intravenous tPA treatment, compared to 115 age and gender-matched healthy controls). Although stroke patients without tPA treatment gradually repopulated the numbers of circulating regulatory T cells within the first 7 days after stroke, post-ischaemic tPA treatment led to sustained suppression of regulatory T cells in the blood. We then used the murine suture and embolic middle cerebral artery occlusion models of stroke to investigate the therapeutic potential of adoptive regulatory T cell transfer against tPA-induced haemorrhagic transformation. Delayed administration of tPA (10 mg/kg) resulted in haemorrhagic transformation in the ischaemic territory 1 day after ischaemia. When regulatory T cells (2 × 106/mouse) were intravenously administered immediately after delayed tPA treatment in ischaemic mice, haemorrhagic transformation was significantly decreased, and this was associated with improved sensorimotor functions. Blood-brain barrier disruption and tight junction damages were observed in the presence of delayed tPA after stroke, but were mitigated by regulatory T cell transfer. Mechanistic

  20. Cardiopulmonary exercise testing after laryngectomy: A connection conundrum

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shana Overstreet

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available A patient presents with a new bronchogenic carcinoma 5 years after laryngectomy for recurrent laryngeal tumor and 13 years after chemoradiation for concurrent lung cancer with synchronous base-of-tongue tumor. Due to his complex history and perceived limited respiratory reserve, he was felt high risk for the completion pneumonectomy needed for resection of this new tumor. The attending surgeon requested a full cardiopulmonary exercise test for risk assessment prior to surgery. We found that there was no commercially available connector that would allow our CPET equipment to reliably collect respiratory gases from a patient with tracheostomy stoma or tube. We report here a simple coupling devised “in house” that allowed for the performance of an interpretable test leading to a significant change in medical care.

  1. Manual versus mechanical cardiopulmonary resuscitation. An experimental study in pigs

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wohlfart Björn

    2010-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Optimal manual closed chest compressions are difficult to give. A mechanical compression/decompression device, named LUCAS, is programmed to give compression according to the latest international guidelines (2005 for cardiopulmonary resuscitation (CPR. The aim of the present study was to compare manual CPR with LUCAS-CPR. Methods 30 kg pigs were anesthetized and intubated. After a base-line period and five minutes of ventricular fibrillation, manual CPR (n = 8 or LUCAS-CPR (n = 8 was started and run for 20 minutes. Professional paramedics gave manual chest compression's alternating in 2-minute periods. Ventilation, one breath for each 10 compressions, was given to all animals. Defibrillation and, if needed, adrenaline were given to obtain a return of spontaneous circulation (ROSC. Results The mean coronary perfusion pressure was significantly (p Conclusions LUCAS-CPR gave significantly higher coronary perfusion pressure and significantly fewer rib fractures than manual CPR in this porcine model.

  2. Cardiopulmonary resuscitation knowledge and skills of registered nurses in Botswana.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rajeswaran, Lakshmi; Ehlers, Valerie J

    2014-01-01

    In Botswana nurses provide most health care in the primary, secondary and tertiary level clinics and hospitals. Trauma and medical emergencies are on the increase, and nurses should have cardiopulmonary resuscitation (CPR) knowledge and skills in order to be able to implement effective interventions in cardiac arrest situations. The objective of this descriptive study was to assess registered nurses’ CPR knowledge and skills. A pre-test, intervention and re-test time-series research design was adopted, and data were collected from 102 nurses from the 2 referral hospitals in Botswana. A multiple-choice questionnaire and checklist were used to collect data. All nurses failed the pre-test. Their knowledge and skills improved after training, but deteriorated over the three months until the post-test was conducted. The significantly low levels of registered nurses’ CPR skills in Botswana should be addressed by instituting country-wide CPR training and regular refresher courses

  3. Certified Basic Life Support Instructors Assess Cardiopulmonary Resuscitation Skills Poorly

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hansen, Camilla; Rasmussen, Stinne E; Kristensen, Mette Amalie

    2016-01-01

    Introduction: High-quality cardiopulmonary resuscitation (CPR) improves survival from cardiac arrest. During basic life support (BLS) training, instructors assess CPR skills to enhance learning outcome. Emergency department staff and senior residents have been shown to assess chest compression...... quality poorly. Currently no studies have evaluated CPR assessment among certified BLS instructors. The aim of this study was to investigate certified BLS instructors’ assessment of chest compressions and rescue breathing.Methods: Data were collected at BLS courses for medical students at Aarhus...... of CPR skills may be beneficial to ensure high-quality learning outcome.Author Disclosures: C. Hansen: None. S.E. Rasmussen: None. M.A. Nebsbjerg: None. M. Stærk: None. B. Løfgren: None....

  4. [Basic cardiopulmonary resuscitation courses for parents of newborns and infants].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Enríquez, Diego; Castro, Adriana; Rabasa, Cecilia; Capelli, Carola; Cores Ponte, Florencia; Gutiérrez, Susana; Mariani, Gonzalo; Pacchioni, Sergio; Pardo, Amorina; Pérez, Gastón; Sorgetti, Mariana; Szyld, Edgardo

    2014-04-01

    Cardiopulmonary resuscitation (CPR) courses meet all the definitions of an educational activity for prevention of cardiac arrest death by risk patients' parents and/or the general population. The aim is to improve patients' home care and turn parents confident before their children are discharged from hospital, mainly from intensive care units. Currently these courses are part of discharge protocols in many neonatologist services although there are offers that exceed this target, and extend to other areas such as education and caregivers. Locally the experience of neonatal CPR at the Sociedad Argentina de Pediatría stands out in connection with delivering courses to high risk patients' parents as well as designing and spreading learning material.

  5. The key changes in pediatric and neonatal cardiopulmonary resuscitation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sung, Dyi-Shiang; Hsieh, Kai-Sheng

    2007-01-01

    The American Heart Association (AHA) guidelines for cardiopulmonary resuscitation (CPR) and emergency cardiovascular care (ECC) were changed in 2005. There were some key changes in the recommendations for pediatric basic and advanced life support, and neonatal resuscitation. The key changes included: emphasis on effective compressions (push hard, push fast, allow full chest recoil and minimize interruptions in compressions), a single compression-ventilation ratio (30:2) CPR for all groups of ages (except neonate), confirmation of effective ventilations, medication given and defibrillator charged without interruption of CPR, not recommended to routine tracheal suction the vigorous meconium-stained baby in newborn resuscitation, etc. We illustrate the major key changes and hope everyone is well trained to perform high quality CPR.

  6. [Problem-based learning in cardiopulmonary resuscitation: basic life support].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sardo, Pedro Miguel Garcez; Dal Sasso, Grace Terezinha Marcon

    2008-12-01

    Descriptive and exploratory study, aimed to develop an educational practice of Problem-Based Learning in CPR/BLS with 24 students in the third stage of the Nursing Undergraduate Course in a University in the Southern region of Brazil. The study used the PBL methodology, focused on problem situations of cardiopulmonary arrest, and was approved by the CONEP. The methodological strategies for data collection, such as participative observation and questionnaires to evaluate the learning, the educational practices and their methodology, allowed for grouping the results in: students' expectations; group activities; individual activities; practical activities; evaluation of the meetings and their methodology. The study showed that PBL allows the educator to evaluate the academic learning process in several dimensions, functioning as a motivating factor for both the educator and the student, because it allows the theoretical-practical integration in an integrated learning process.

  7. Central diabetes insipidus following cardiopulmonary arrest in a dog.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bellis, Tara; Daly, Meredith; Davidson, Benjamin

    2015-01-01

    To describe a clinical case of transient central diabetes insipidus (CDI) occurring post cardiopulmonary arrest (CPA) in a dog. An 8-week-old dog presented for intensive care after successful resuscitation following CPA. The patient exhibited neurologic deficits at initial presentation and over the following days developed marked polyuria, isosthenuria, and low urine osmolality. Treatment with synthetic vasopressin resulted in a reduction in urine output, increase in urine specific gravity (>50%), and increase in urine osmolality, suggesting a diagnosis of partial CDI. Clinical signs resolved over the following weeks and treatment was discontinued. CPA has been described as a cause of ischemic injury to the pituitary gland resulting in CDI in people. To the authors' knowledge, this is the first report of a dog developing transient partial CDI following CPA and successful resuscitation. © Veterinary Emergency and Critical Care Society 2015.

  8. Voice advisory manikin versus instructor facilitated training in cardiopulmonary resuscitation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Isbye, Dan L; Høiby, Pernilla; Rasmussen, Maria B

    2008-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Training of healthcare staff in cardiopulmonary resuscitation (CPR) is time-consuming and costly. It has been suggested to replace instructor facilitated (IF) training with an automated voice advisory manikin (VAM), which increases skill level by continuous verbal feedback during...... individual training. AIMS: To compare a VAM (ResusciAnne CPR skills station, Laerdal Medical A/S, Norway) with IF training in CPR using a bag-valve-mask (BVM) in terms of skills retention after 3 months. METHODS: Forty-three second year medical students were included and CPR performance (ERC Guidelines...... for Resuscitation 2005) was assessed in a 2 min test before randomisation to either IF training in groups of 8 or individual VAM training. Immediately after training and after 3 months, CPR performance was assessed in identical 2 min tests. Laerdal PC Skill Reporting System 2.0 was used to collect data. To quantify...

  9. Procedure-related haemorrhage in embolisation of intracranial aneurysms with Guglielmi detachable coils

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kwon, B.J.; Kim, K.H. [Department of Radiology, Seoul National University College of Medicine, 28 Yongon-Dong, Chongno-Ku, 110-744, Seoul (Korea); Han, M.H.; Chang, K.H. [Department of Radiology, Seoul National University College of Medicine, 28 Yongon-Dong, Chongno-Ku, 110-744, Seoul (Korea); Clinical Research Institute, Seoul National University Hospital, 28 Yongon-Dong, Chongno-Ku, 110-744, Seoul (Korea); Institute of Radiation Medicine, Seoul National University Medical Research Centre, 28 Yongon-Dong, Chongno-Ku, 110-744, Seoul (Korea); Seoul National University College of Medicine (Korea); Oh, C.W. [Department of Neurosurgery, Seoul National University College of Medicine, 28 Yongon-Dong, Chongno-Ku, 110-744, Seoul (Korea)

    2003-08-01

    We reviewed the haemorrhagic complications of the endovascular treatment of intracranial aneurysms, in terms of frequency, pre-embolisation clinical status, clinical and radiological manifestations, management and prognosis. In 275 patients treated for 303 aneurysms over 7 years we had seven (one man and six women - 2.3%) with haemorrhage during or immediately after endovascular treatment. All procedures were performed with a standardised protocol of heparinisation and anaesthesia. Four had ruptured aneurysms, two at the tip of the basilar artery, and one ach on the internal carotid and posterior cerebral artery, treated after 12, 5, 14, and 2 days, respectively, three were in Hunt and Hess grade 2 and one in grade 1. Bleeding occurred during coiling in three, after placement of at least four coils, and during manipulation of the guidewire to enter the aneurysm in the fourth. Haemorrhage was manifest as extravasation of contrast medium, with a sudden rise in systolic blood pressure in three patients. The other three patients had unruptured aneurysms; they had stable blood pressure and angiographic findings during the procedure, but one, under sedation, had seizures immediately after insertion of four coils, and the other two had seizures, headache and vomiting on the day following the procedure. Heparin reversal with protamine sulphate was started promptly started when bleeding was detected in four patients, and the embolisation was completed with additional coils in three. Emergency ventricular drainage was performed in the two patients with ruptured aneurysm and one with an unruptured aneurysm who had abnormal neurological responses or hydrocephalus. The bleeding caused a third nerve palsy in one patient, which might have been due to ischaemia and progressively improved. (orig.)

  10. Infrastructure and clinical practice for the detection and management of trauma-associated haemorrhage and coagulopathy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Driessen, A; Schäfer, N; Albrecht, V; Schenk, M; Fröhlich, M; Stürmer, E K; Maegele, M

    2015-08-01

    Early detection and management of post-traumatic haemorrhage and coagulopathy have been associated with improved outcomes, but local infrastructures, logistics and clinical strategies may differ. To assess local differences in infrastructure, logistics and clinical management of trauma-associated haemorrhage and coagulopathy, we have conducted a web-based survey amongst the delegates to the 15th European Congress of Trauma and Emergency Surgery (ECTES) and the 2nd World Trauma (WT) Congress held in Frankfurt, Germany, 25-27 May 2014. 446/1,540 delegates completed the questionnaire yielding a response rate of 29%. The majority specified to work as consultants/senior physicians (47.3%) in general (36.1%) or trauma/orthopaedic surgery (44.5%) of level I (70%) or level II (19%) trauma centres. Clinical assessment (>80%) and standard coagulation assays (74.6%) are the most frequently used strategies for early detection and monitoring of bleeding trauma patients with coagulopathy. Only 30% of the respondents declared to use extended coagulation assays to better characterise the bleeding and coagulopathy prompted by more individualised treatment concepts. Most trauma centres (69%) have implemented local protocols based on international and national guidelines using conventional blood products, e.g. packed red blood cell concentrates (93.3%), fresh frozen plasma concentrates (93.3%) and platelet concentrates (83%), and antifibrinolytics (100%). 89% considered the continuous intake of anticoagulants including "new oral anticoagulants" and platelet inhibitors as an increasing threat to bleeding trauma patients. This study confirms differences in infrastructure, logistics and clinical practice for the detection and management of trauma-haemorrhage and trauma-associated coagulopathy amongst international centres. Ongoing work will focus on geographical differences.

  11. MANIKIN DEMONSTRATION IN TEACHING CONSERVATIVE MANAGEMENT OF POSTPARTUM HAEMORRHAGE: A COMPARISON WITH CONVENTIONAL METHODS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sathi Mangalam Saraswathi

    2016-07-01

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND Even though there are many innovative methods to make classes more interesting and effective, in my department, topics are taught mainly by didactic lectures. This study attempts to compare the effectiveness of manikin demonstration and didactic lectures in teaching conservative management of post-partum haemorrhage. OBJECTIVE To compare the effectiveness of manikin demonstration and didactic lectures in teaching conservative management of postpartum haemorrhage. MATERIALS AND METHODS This is an observational study. Eighty four ninth-semester MBBS students posted in Department of Obstetrics and Gynaecology, Government Medical College, Kottayam were selected. They were divided into 2 groups by lottery method. Pre-test was conducted for both groups. Group A was taught by manikin demonstration. Group B was taught by didactic lecture. Feedback response from the students collected after demonstration class was analysed. Post-test was conducted for both the groups after one week. Gain in knowledge of both the groups were calculated from pre-test and post-test scores and compared by Independent sample t test. RESULTS The mean gain in knowledge in group A was 6.4 when compared to group B which is 4.3 and the difference was found to be statistically significant. All of the students in group A felt satisfied and more confident after the class and wanted more topics to be taken by demonstration. CONCLUSION Manikin demonstration class is more effective in teaching conservative management of post-partum haemorrhage and this method can be adopted to teach similar topics in clinical subjects.

  12. Emerging rabbit haemorrhagic disease virus 2 (RHDV2) at the gates of the African continent.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martin-Alonso, Aarón; Martin-Carrillo, Natalia; Garcia-Livia, Katherine; Valladares, Basilio; Foronda, Pilar

    2016-10-01

    Until the beginning of this decade, the genetic characterization of rabbit haemorrhagic disease virus (RHDV) from Iberian Peninsula had revealed the existence of two genogroups, G1 and sporadically G6. In 2010, the new emerging rabbit haemorrhagic disease variant, RHDV2 or RHDVb, was described in France, from where it has rapidly spread throughout Europe, including Iberian Peninsula countries. Nevertheless, although cases of rabbit haemorrhagic disease (RHD) have been reported in the Canary Islands, a Spanish archipelago located 100km off the coast of Morocco, no genetic characterization of RHDV had been carried out. Consequently, in order to identify the circulating RHDV strains in this archipelago, liver samples of six farm rabbits and fifteen wild rabbits were collected from several areas of the largest island, Tenerife, and analyzed for the presence of RHDV by antigen capture double antibody sandwich ELISA. In case of positive ELISA result, we amplified and sequenced two fragments of the vp60 gene, which were concatenated for phylogenetic purposes. The sequences analysis revealed the presence of RHDV2 in both farm and wild rabbits from several areas of Tenerife. This result constitutes the first finding of RHDV2 in the Canary Islands. These RHDV2 strains found in Tenerife shared two exclusive SNPs that have not been observed in the rest of RHDV2 strains. The identification of RHDV2 and the absence of classic RHDV strains in this study suggest that RHDV2 may be replacing classic strains in Tenerife, as has been also proposed in Iberian Peninsula, France and Azores. Given the proximity of the Canary Islands to the African continent, this result should raise awareness about a possible dispersal of RHDV2 from the Canary Islands to the North of Africa. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  13. Oral Triiodothyronine for Infants and Children Undergoing Cardiopulmonary Bypass.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marwali, Eva M; Boom, Cindy E; Budiwardhana, Novik; Fakhri, Dicky; Roebiono, Poppy S; Santoso, Anwar; Sastroasmoro, Sudigdo; Slee, April; Portman, Michael A

    2017-08-01

    This study evaluated the efficacy and safety of oral triiodothyronine (T3; Tetronine, Dalim BioTech, Korea) for infants and children undergoing cardiopulmonary bypass in an Indonesian population. We performed a single-center, randomized, double-blind, and placebo-controlled trial in children aged 3 years and younger undergoing congenital heart disease operations with cardiopulmonary bypass. We administered oral T3 (1 μg/kg per body weight/dose) or placebo (saccharum lactis) by nasogastric tube every 6 hours for 60 hours after induction of anesthesia. The primary end point, time to extubation, was compared with Cox regression. The modified intention-to-treat group included 101 placebo and 104 treated patients. The stratified log-rank test did not show a significant treatment difference (p = 0.061) for time to extubation, but after adjustment for age, the nutritional Z score, and Aristotle surgical complexity, the hazard ratio was 1.33 (95% confidence interval, 1.00 to 1.76; p = 0.049). The effect of T3 was stronger in the strata aged 5 months and younger (hazard ratio, 1.86; 95% confidence interval 1.02 to 3.39; p = 0.043). Median intubation time was 47.3 hours for the placebo and 32.1 hours for the T3 group in aged 5 months and younger. Adverse events rates, including arrhythmia, were similar between groups, although sepsis was more frequent with placebo. Oral T3 supplementation may shorten time to extubation in children undergoing congenital heart disease operations, particularly infants aged 5 months or younger. Administration is relatively safe, simple and inexpensive. Copyright © 2017 The Society of Thoracic Surgeons. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  14. Coronary blood flow during cardiopulmonary resuscitation in swine

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bellamy, R.F.; DeGuzman, L.R.; Pedersen, D.C.

    1984-01-01

    Recent papers have raised doubt as to the magnitude of coronary blood flow during closed-chest cardiopulmonary resuscitation. We will describe experiments that concern the methods of coronary flow measurement during cardiopulmonary resuscitation. Nine anesthetized swine were instrumented to allow simultaneous measurements of coronary blood flow by both electromagnetic cuff flow probes and by the radiomicrosphere technique. Cardiac arrest was caused by electrical fibrillation and closed-chest massage was performed by a Thumper (Dixie Medical Inc., Houston). The chest was compressed transversely at a rate of 66 strokes/min. Compression occupied one-half of the massage cycle. Three different Thumper piston strokes were studied: 1.5, 2, and 2.5 inches. Mean aortic pressure and total systemic blood flow measured by the radiomicrosphere technique increased as Thumper piston stroke was lengthened (mean +/- SD): 1.5 inch stroke, 23 +/- 4 mm Hg, 525 +/- 195 ml/min; 2 inch stroke, 33 +/- 5 mm Hg, 692 +/- 202 ml/min; 2.5 inch stroke, 40 +/- 6 mm Hg, 817 +/- 321 ml/min. Both methods of coronary flow measurement (electromagnetic [EMF] and radiomicrosphere [RMS]) gave similar results in technically successful preparations (data expressed as percent prearrest flow mean +/- 1 SD): 1.5 inch stroke, EMF 12 +/- 5%, RMS 16 +/- 5%; 2 inch stroke, EMF 30 +/- 6%, RMS 26 +/- 11%; 2.5 inch stroke, EMF 50 +/- 12%, RMS 40 +/- 20%. The phasic coronary flow signal during closed-chest compression indicated that all perfusion occurred during the relaxation phase of the massage cycle. We concluded that coronary blood flow is demonstrable during closed-chest massage, but that the magnitude is unlikely to be more than a fraction of normal

  15. Revolving back to the basics in cardiopulmonary resuscitation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roppolo, L P; Wigginton, J G; Pepe, P E

    2009-05-01

    Since the 1970s, most of the research and debate regarding interventions for cardiopulmonary arrest have focused on advanced life support (ALS) therapies and early defibrillation strategies. During the past decade, however, international guidelines for cardiopulmonary resuscitation (CPR) have not only emphasized the concept of uninterrupted chest compressions, but also improvements in the timing, rate and quality of those compressions. In essence, it has been a ''revolution'' in resuscitation medicine in terms of ''coming full circle'' to the 1960s when basic CPR was first developed. Recent data have indicated the need for minimally-interrupted chest compressions with an accompanying emphasis toward removing rescue ventilation altogether in sudden cardiac arrest, at least in the few minutes after a sudden unheralded collapse. In other studies, transient delays in defibrillation attempts and ALS interventions are even recommended so that basic CPR can be prioritized to first restore and maintain better coronary artery perfusion. New devices have now been developed to modify, in real-time, the performance of basic CPR, during both training and an actual resuscitative effort. Several new adjuncts have been created to augment chest compressions or enhance venous return and evolving technology may now be able to identify ventricular fibrillation (VF) without interrupting chest compressions. A renewed focus on widespread CPR training for the average person has also returned to center stage with ground-breaking training initiatives including validated video-based adult learning courses that can reliably teach and enable long term retention of basic CPR skills and automated external defibrillator (AED) use.

  16. Risk shocks and housing markets

    OpenAIRE

    Dorofeenko, Viktor; Lee, Gabriel S.; Salyer, Kevin D.

    2010-01-01

    Abstract: This paper analyzes the role of uncertainty in a multi-sector housing model with financial frictions. We include time varying uncertainty (i.e. risk shocks) in the technology shocks that affect housing production. The analysis demonstratesthat risk shocks to the housing production sector are a quantitatively important impulse mechanism for the business cycle. Also, we demonstrate that bankruptcy costs act as an endogenous markup factor in housing prices; as a consequence, the volati...

  17. Neisseria meningitidis: a neglected cause of infectious haemorrhagic fever in the amazon rainforest.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barroso, David E; Silva, Luciete A

    2007-12-01

    Neisseria meningitidis has not been seen as a significant cause of infectious haemorrhagic fever in the Amazon inlands; most reported cases are from the city of Manaus, the capital of the State of Amazonas. This picture is sustained by the lack of reliable microbiology laboratories, the perception of the health care workers, and the difficult to reach medical assistance; thus the number of confirmed cases is even lower with no reference of the strains phenotype. We report here the investigation of a case of suspected meningococcemia and his close contacts in a rural community in the Coari Lake, up the Amazon River.

  18. Progression of rabbit haemorrhagic disease virus 2 upon vaccination in an industrial rabbitry: a laboratorial approach

    OpenAIRE

    C.L. Carvalho; E.L. Duarte; J.M. Monteiro; C. Afonso; J. Pacheco; P. Carvalho; P. Mendonça; A. Botelho; T. Albuquerque; P. Themudo; M. Fevereiro; A.M. Henriques; S.S. Santos Barros; M. Dias Duarte

    2017-01-01

    Rabbit haemorrhagic disease virus 2 (RHDV2) emerged recently in several European countries, leading to extensive economic losses in the industry. In response to this new infection, specific inactivated vaccines were developed in Europe and full and rapid setup of protective immunity induced by vaccination was reported. However, data on the efficacy of these vaccines in an ongoing-infection scenario is unavailable. In this study we investigated an infected RHDV2 indoor industrial meat rabbitry...

  19. Neisseria meningitidis: a neglected cause of infectious haemorrhagic fever in the amazon rainforest

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    David E. Barroso

    Full Text Available Neisseria meningitidis has not been seen as a significant cause of infectious haemorrhagic fever in the Amazon inlands; most reported cases are from the city of Manaus, the capital of the State of Amazonas. This picture is sustained by the lack of reliable microbiology laboratories, the perception of the health care workers, and the difficult to reach medical assistance; thus the number of confirmed cases is even lower with no reference of the strains phenotype. We report here the investigation of a case of suspected meningococcemia and his close contacts in a rural community in the Coari Lake, up the Amazon River.

  20. A single subcutaneous bolus of erythropoietin normalizes cerebral blood flow autoregulation after subarachnoid haemorrhage in rats

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Springborg, Jacob Bertram; Ma, XiaoDong; Rochat, Per

    2002-01-01

    the intracarotid (133)Xe method. CBF autoregulation was preserved in both sham-operated groups (lower limits of mean arterial blood pressure: 91+/-3 and 98+/-3 mmHg in groups A and B, respectively). In the vehicle treated SAH-group, autoregulation was abolished and the relationship between CBF and blood pressure...... administered recombinant EPO on impaired cerebral blood flow (CBF) autoregulation after experimental subarachnoid haemorrhage (SAH). Four groups of male Sprague-Dawley rats were studied: group A, sham operation plus vehicle; group B, sham operation plus EPO; group C, SAH plus vehicle; group D, SAH plus EPO...